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Sample records for hormone replacement therapies

  1. Hormone Replacement Therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... before and during menopause, the levels of female hormones can go up and down. This can cause ... hot flashes and vaginal dryness. Some women take hormone replacement therapy (HRT), also called menopausal hormone therapy, ...

  2. Controversies in hormone replacement therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Baziad

    2001-09-01

    Full Text Available Deficiency of estrogen hormone will result in either long-term or short-term health problems which may reduce the quality of life. There are numerous methods by which the quality of female life can be achieved. Since the problems occuring are due to the deficiency of estrogen hormone, the appropriate method to tackle the problem is by administration of estrogen hormone. The administration of hormone replacement therapy (HRT with estrogen may eliminate climacteric complaints, prevent osteoporosis, coronary heart disease, dementia, and colon cancer. Although HRT has a great deal of advantage, its use is still low and may result in controversies. These controversies are due to fact that both doctor and patient still hold on to the old, outmoded views which are not supported by numerous studies. Currently, the use of HRT is not only based on experience, or temporary observation, but more on evidence based medicine. (Med J Indones 2001; 10: 182-6Keywords: controversies, HRT

  3. Menopause and hormone replacement therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ali Baziad

    2001-12-01

    Full Text Available The global population in the 21st century has reached 6.2 billion people, by the year 2025 it is to be around 8.3-8.5 billion, and will increase further. Elderly people are expected to grow rapidly than other groups. The fastest increase in the elderly population will take place in Asia. Life expectancy is increasing steadily throughout developed and developing countries. For many  menopausal women, increased life expectancy will accompanied by many health problems. The consequences of estrogen deficiency are the menopausal symptoms. The treatment of menopause related complaints and diseases became an  important socioeconomic and medical issue. Long term symptoms, such as the increase in osteoporosis fractures, cardio and cerebrovascular disesses and dementia, created a large financial burden on individuals and society. All these health problems can be lreated or prevented by hormone replacement therapy (HRT. Natural HRT is usually prefened. Synthetic  estrogen in oral contraceptives (oc are not recommended for HRT. Many contra-indications for oc, but now it is widely usedfor HRT. The main reasons for discontinuing HRT are unwanted bleeding, fear of cancer, and negative side effects. Until now there are sill debates about the rebrtonship between HRT and the incidence of breast cancer. Many data showed that there were no clear relationship between the use of HRT and breast cancer. ThereÎore, nwny experts advocate the use of HRTfrom the first sign of climacteric complaints until death. (Med J Indones 2001;10: 242-51Keywords: estrogen deficiency, climacteric phases, tibolone.

  4. Postmenopausal hormone replacement therapy--clinical implications

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ravn, S H; Rosenberg, J; Bostofte, E

    1994-01-01

    in the urogenital tract. Women at risk of osteoporosis will benefit from hormone replacement therapy. The treatment should start as soon after menopause as possible and it is possible that it should be maintained for life. The treatment may be supplemented with extra calcium intake, vitamin D, and maybe calcitonin....... Physical activity should be promoted, and cigarette smoking reduced if possible. Women at risk of cardiovascular disease will also benefit from hormone replacement therapy. There is overwhelming evidence that hormone therapy will protect against both coronary heart disease and stroke...... suggest that every woman showing any signs of hormone deprivation should be treated with hormone replacement therapy. This includes women with subjective or objective vaso-motor symptoms, genito-urinary symptoms, women at risk of osteoporosis (fast bone losers), and women at risk of cardiovascular...

  5. [Hormone replacement therapy: curse or blessing?].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmidt, M; Fink, D; Lang, U; Kimmig, R

    2006-01-01

    There is a controversial discussion on the risks and benefits of hormonal replacement therapy (HRT), and many women and doctors have revised their opinions of HRT over the last few years. Complementary and alternative therapies can be considered an option to treat menopausal symptoms. The following issue summarizes the actual knowledge of treatment options of menopausal symptoms.

  6. Hormone replacement therapy and risk of glioma

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Lene; Friis, Søren; Hallas, Jesper;

    2013-01-01

    Aim: Several studies indicate that use of hormone replacement therapy (HRT) is associated with an increased risk of intracranial meningioma, while associations between HRT use and risk of other brain tumors have been less explored. We investigated the influence of HRT use on the risk of glioma...

  7. Effect of growth hormone replacement therapy on pituitary hormone secretion and hormone replacement therapies in GHD adults

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hubina, Erika; Mersebach, Henriette; Rasmussen, Ase Krogh;

    2004-01-01

    We tested the impact of commencement of GH replacement therapy in GH-deficient (GHD) adults on the circulating levels of other anterior pituitary and peripheral hormones and the need for re-evaluation of other hormone replacement therapies, especially the need for dose changes.......We tested the impact of commencement of GH replacement therapy in GH-deficient (GHD) adults on the circulating levels of other anterior pituitary and peripheral hormones and the need for re-evaluation of other hormone replacement therapies, especially the need for dose changes....

  8. Growth hormone replacement therapy in Costello syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Triantafyllou, Panagiota; Christoforidis, Athanasios; Vargiami, Euthymia; Zafeiriou, Dimitrios I

    2014-12-01

    Costello syndrome (CS) is considered an overgrowth disorder given the macrosomia that is present at birth .However, shortly after birth the weight drops dramatically and the patients are usually referred for failure to thrive. Subsequently, affected patients develop the distinctive coarse facial appearance and are at risk for cardiac anomalies and solid tumor malignancies. Various endocrine disorders, although not very often, have been reported in patients with CS, including growth hormone deficiency, hypoglycemia, ACTH deficiency, cryptorchidism and hypothyroidism. We report a case of Costello syndrome with hypothyroidism, cryptorchidism and growth hormone deficiency and we evaluate the long-term safety and efficacy of growth hormone replacement therapy. The index patient is a paradigm of successful and safe treatment with growth hormone for almost 7 years. Since patients with CS are at increased risk for cardiac myopathy and tumor development they deserve close monitoring during treatment.

  9. Hypoparathyroidism: Replacement Therapy with Parathyroid Hormone

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lars Rejnmark

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Hypoparathyroidism (HypoPT is characterized by low serum calcium levels caused by an insufficient secretion of parathyroid hormone (PTH. Despite normalization of serum calcium levels by treatment with activated vitamin D analogues and calcium supplementation, patients are suffering from impaired quality of life (QoL and are at increased risk of a number of comorbidities. Thus, despite normalization of calcium levels in response to conventional therapy, this should only be considered as an apparent normalization, as patients are suffering from a number of complications and calcium-phosphate homeostasis is not normalized in a physiological manner. In a number of recent studies, replacement therapy with recombinant human PTH (rhPTH(1-84 as well as therapy with the N-terminal PTH fragment (rhPTH(1-34 have been investigated. Both drugs have been shown to normalize serum calcium while reducing needs for activated vitamin D and calcium supplements. However, once a day injections cause large fluctuations in serum calcium. Twice a day injections diminish fluctuations, but don't restore the normal physiology of calcium homeostasis. Recent studies using pump-delivery have shown promising results on maintaining normocalcemia with minimal fluctuations in calcium levels. Further studies are needed to determine whether this may improve QoL and lower risk of complications. Such data are needed before replacement with the missing hormone can be recommended as standard therapy.

  10. Hormone Replacement Therapy: Can It Cause Vaginal Bleeding?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hormone replacement therapy: Can it cause vaginal bleeding? I'm taking hormone therapy for menopause symptoms, and my monthly menstrual periods have returned. Is this normal? Answers from Shannon K. Laughlin- ...

  11. Improving compliance with hormonal replacement therapy in primary osteoporosis prevention

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vestergaard, P; Hermann, A P; Gram, J

    1997-01-01

    To evaluate whether introduction of treatment alternatives would improve compliance with hormonal replacement therapy (HRT) as primary osteoporosis prevention in women not tolerating the first line osteoporosis prevention schedule.......To evaluate whether introduction of treatment alternatives would improve compliance with hormonal replacement therapy (HRT) as primary osteoporosis prevention in women not tolerating the first line osteoporosis prevention schedule....

  12. Hormone Replacement Therapy After Breast Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mueck AO

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available So far, patient samples in all studies investigating hormone replacement therapy (HRT after breast cancer have been small.Therefore, HRT should only be used if alternatives such as specifically not contraindicated phytopreparations or selective sero-tonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs are not effective. This is primarily due to forensic reasons since clinical data on the risk ofalternatives (based on present evidence are even more sparse. Regarding HRT, four prospective randomized studies and at least15 observational studies after breast cancer are available. Only the HABITS study shows an increased risk of relapse. The authorssuggest that this is probably associated with the relatively high number of patients with HRT treatment after ER-positive cancersas well as due to the preferred use of estrogen/progestin-combined preparations. Based on the results of the randomized pla-cebo-controlled study Women’s Health Initiative (WHI as well as of at least 12 observational studies, the progestin componentseems to be mainly responsible for the probability of increased diagnosis frequency of primary breast cancer. However, no dataare available on the impact of progestin on the use of combined HRT after breast cancer. However, also with estrogen only anincreased risk of relapse must be expected and patients should be informed about it. This has to be concluded due to biologicalplausibility and observational studies although the estrogen-only arm in WHI did not show any increased primary risk. Thus, anyform of HRT should only be performed in exceptional cases, and treatment duration should be as short as possible with thelowest effective dose.

  13. Spontaneous Coronary Artery Dissection following Topical Hormone Replacement Therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexander L. Pan

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Spontaneous coronary artery dissection is a rare condition, usually presenting as an acute coronary syndrome, and is often seen in states associated with high systemic estrogen levels such as pregnancy or oral contraceptive use. While topical hormonal replacement therapy may result in increased estrogen levels similar to those documented with oral contraceptive use, there are no reported cases of spontaneous coronary dissection with topical hormonal replacement therapy. We describe a 53-year-old female who developed two spontaneous coronary dissections while on topical hormonal replacement therapy. The patient had no other risk factors for coronary dissection. After withdrawal from topical hormonal therapy, our patient has done well and has not had recurrent coronary artery dissections over a one-year follow-up period. The potential contributory role of topical hormonal therapy as a cause of spontaneous coronary dissection should be recognized.

  14. Spontaneous Coronary Artery Dissection following Topical Hormone Replacement Therapy

    OpenAIRE

    2012-01-01

    Spontaneous coronary artery dissection is a rare condition, usually presenting as an acute coronary syndrome, and is often seen in states associated with high systemic estrogen levels such as pregnancy or oral contraceptive use. While topical hormonal replacement therapy may result in increased estrogen levels similar to those documented with oral contraceptive use, there are no reported cases of spontaneous coronary dissection with topical hormonal replacement therapy. We describe a 53-year...

  15. Hormone replacement therapy in Denmark, 1995-2004

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Løkkegaard, Ellen; Lidegaard, Ojvind; Møller, Lisbeth Nørgaard;

    2007-01-01

    Recently, the Danish National Register of Medicinal Product Statistics (NRM) was opened for research purposes, and therefore, on an individual basis, can merge with other national registers. The aim of this study was to analyse the use of hormones based on the individual data of the entire Danish...... female population, with the focus on a detailed evaluation of specific hormone regimens and factors associated with systemic hormone replacement therapy (HRT)....

  16. Menopausal depression:comparison of hormone replacement therapy and hormone replacement therapy plus fiuoxetine

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘平; 何方方; 白文佩; 郁琦; 史蔚; 吴宜勇; 贺丹军; 肖计划; 郑晔; 廖秦平

    2004-01-01

    Background To compare the efficacy and safety of hormone replacement therapy (HRT) combined with fluoxetine, with HRT alone, in post-menopausal women suffering from depression.Methods A randomized, open-label, parallel trial was applied. HRT was administered to all patients for 2 cycles, with ]4 days of estrogen therapy and 14 days of estrogen plus progesterone. Patients who were randomly assigned to the HRT plus fluoxetine group were given fluoxetine in combination with HRT. Hamilton Depression Rating Scale (HAMD), Kupperman Menopausal Index (KMI), and Clinical Global Impressions scale were used to measure the efficacy. Results One hundred and twenty-three post-menopausal patients with depression were enrolled in the study. Among them, 120 had at least one post-treatment visit and entered into the statistical analysis. The mean total HAMD scores were significantly lower, and the percentages of HAMD score reductions were higher in the HRT plus fluoxetine Group compared with the HRT Group, after at least 3 weeks of treatment, with an average difference of 5 points at the endpoint. The Clinical Global Impression-Severity and Clinical Global Impression-Improvement scores were significantly different in the 2 groups, in favor of the combination therapy. The mean total KMI was significantly lower in the Combination Group compared with the HRT Group, after at least 6 weeks of treatment, with an average 4. 5-point difference between the groups. No statistically significant differences were found in most of the adverse events reported in the Combination Group compared with the HRT group, with the exception of 3 symptoms, i. e., dry mouth, loss of appetite, and abdominal distention. They were mild to moderate in severity. Two patients in the HRT group, but none in the combination group, dropped out due to adverse events. Conclusion HRT plus fluoxetine therapy was effective in the treatment of menopausal depression with a satisfactory safety profile.

  17. Therapy of hypoparathyroidism by replacement with parathyroid hormone

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rejnmark, Lars; Underbjerg, Line; Sikjaer, Tanja

    2014-01-01

    Hypoparathyroidism (HypoPT) is a state of hypocalcemia due to inappropriate low levels of parathyroid hormone (PTH). HypoPT is normally treated by calcium supplements and activated vitamin D analogues. Although plasma calcium is normalized in response to conventional therapy, quality of life (Qo......L) seems impaired and patients are at increased risk of renal complications. A number of studies have suggested subcutaneous injections with PTH as an alternative therapy. By replacement with the missing hormone, urinary calcium may be lowered and QoL may improve. PTH replacement therapy (PTH-RT) possesses...

  18. Hormone replacement therapy and risk of non-fatal stroke

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, A T; Lidegaard, O; Kreiner, S;

    1997-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The effect of postmenopausal hormone replacement therapy (HRT) on the risk of subtypes of stroke is as yet unclear. To investigate the effect of oestrogen and combined oestrogen-progestagen therapy on the risk of non-fatal haemorrhagic and thromboembolic stroke, we carried out a case-...

  19. [Hormone replacement therapy--growth hormone, melatonin, DHEA and sex hormones].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fukai, Shiho; Akishita, Masahiro

    2009-07-01

    The ability to maintain active and independent living as long as possible is crucial for the healthy longevity. Hormones responsible for some of the manifestations associated with aging are growth hormone, insulin-like growth factor-1 (IGF-1), melatonin, dehydroepiandrosterone (DHEA), sex hormones and thyroid hormones. These hormonal changes are associated with changes in body composition, visceral obesity, muscle weakness, osteoporosis, urinary incontinence, loss of cognitive functioning, reduction in well being, depression, as well as sexual dysfunction. With the prolongation of life expectancy, both men and women today live the latter third life with endocrine deficiencies. Hormone replacement therapy may alleviate the debilitating conditions of secondary partial endocrine deficiencies by preventing or delaying some aspects of aging.

  20. Functional and molecular neuroimaging of menopause and hormone replacement therapy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Comasco, Erika; Frøkjær, Vibe; Sundström-Poromaa, Inger

    2014-01-01

    The level of gonadal hormones to which the female brain is exposed considerably changes across the menopausal transition, which in turn, is likely to be of great relevance for neurodegenerative diseases and psychiatric disorders. However, the neurobiological consequences of these hormone fluctuat......The level of gonadal hormones to which the female brain is exposed considerably changes across the menopausal transition, which in turn, is likely to be of great relevance for neurodegenerative diseases and psychiatric disorders. However, the neurobiological consequences of these hormone...... fluctuations and of hormone replacement therapy in the menopause have only begun to be understood. The present review summarizes the findings of thirty-five studies of human brain function, including functional magnetic resonance imaging, positron and single-photon computed emission tomography studies, in peri......-controlled multi-modal prospective neuroimaging studies as well as investigation on the related molecular mechanisms of effects of menopausal hormonal variations on the brain....

  1. Functional and molecular neuroimaging of menopause and hormone replacement therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Erika eComasco

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available The level of gonadal hormones to which the female brain is exposed considerably changes across the menopausal transition, which in turn, is likely to be of great relevance for neurodegenerative diseases and psychiatric disorders. However, the neurobiological consequences of these hormone fluctuations and of hormone replacement therapy in the menopause have only begun to be understood. This review summarizes the findings of thirty-four studies of human brain function, including functional magnetic resonance imaging, positron and single-photon computed emission tomography studies, in peri- and postmenopausal women treated with estrogen, or estrogen-progestagen replacement therapy. Seven studies using gonadotropin-releasing hormone agonist intervention as a model of hormonal withdrawal are also included. Cognitive paradigms are employed by the majority of studies evaluating the effect of unopposed estrogen or estrogen-progestagen treatment on peri- and postmenopausal women’s brain. In randomized-controlled trials, estrogen treatment enhances activation of fronto-cingulate regions during cognitive functioning, though in many cases no difference in cognitive performance was present. Progestagens seems to counteract the effects of estrogens. Findings on cognitive functioning during acute ovarian hormone withdrawal suggest a decrease in activation of the inferior frontal gyrus, thus essentially corroborating the findings in postmenopausal women. Studies of the cholinergic and serotonergic systems indicate these systems as biological mediators of hormonal influences on the brain. More, hormonal replacement appears to increase cerebral blood flow in cortical regions. On the other hand, studies on emotion processing in postmenopausal women are lacking. These results call for well-powered randomized-controlled multi-modal prospective neuroimaging studies as well as investigation on the related molecular mechanisms of effects of menopausal hormonal

  2. Hormone replacement therapy and the prevention of postmenopausal osteoporosis

    OpenAIRE

    Marco Gambacciani; Marco Levancini

    2014-01-01

    Fracture prevention is one of the public health priorities worldwide. Estrogen deficiency is the major factor in the pathogenesis of postmenopausal osteoporosis, the most common metabolic bone disease. Different effective treatments for osteoporosis are available. Hormone replacement therapy (HRT) at different doses rapidly normalizes turnover, preserves bone mineral density (BMD) at all skeletal sites, leading to a significant, reduction in vertebral and non-vertebral fractures. Tibolone, a ...

  3. Hormone replacement therapy and risk of non-fatal stroke

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, A T; Lidegaard, O; Kreiner, S

    1997-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The effect of postmenopausal hormone replacement therapy (HRT) on the risk of subtypes of stroke is as yet unclear. To investigate the effect of oestrogen and combined oestrogen-progestagen therapy on the risk of non-fatal haemorrhagic and thromboembolic stroke, we carried out a case......-control study. METHODS: From the Danish National Patient Register we identified all Danish women aged 45-64 years who had a non-fatal, first-ever cerebrovascular attack during 1990-92. Two age-matched controls were randomly selected for each case from the Danish National Person Register. Important correlates...... of hormone use and stroke, on which information was obtained from postal questionnaires, were controlled for by multivariate analyses based on log-linear graphical models. The analyses included data on 1422 cases classified in four subtypes of stroke (160 subarachnoid haemorrhage, 95 intracerebral...

  4. Alzheimer's disease, apolipoprotein E and hormone replacement therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Depypere, H; Vierin, A; Weyers, S; Sieben, A

    2016-12-01

    Alzheimer's disease is the most frequent cause of dementia in older patients. The prevalence is higher in women than in men. This may be the result of both the higher life expectancy of women and the loss of neuroprotective estrogen after menopause. Earlier age at menopause (spontaneous or surgical) is associated with an enhanced risk of developing Alzheimer's disease. Therefore, it is postulated that estrogen could be protective against it. If so, increasing exposure to estrogen through the use of postmenopausal hormone replacement could also be protective against Alzheimer's disease. The results of the clinical studies that have examined this hypothesis are inconclusive, however. One explanation for this is that estrogen treatment is protective only if it is initiated in the years immediately after menopause. Another possibility is that the neuroprotective effects of estrogen are negated by a particular genotype of apolipoprotein E. This protein plays an important role in cholesterol transport to the neurons. Studies that have examined the link between estrogen replacement therapy, Alzheimer's disease and the E4 allele of ApoE are inconclusive. This article reviews the literature on the influence of hormone replacement therapy on the incidence and progression of Alzheimer's disease.

  5. Primary prevention of cardiovascular disease with hormone replacement therapy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schierbeck, L

    2015-01-01

    Many peri- and postmenopausal women suffer from a reduced quality of life due to menopausal symptoms and preventable diseases. The importance of cardiovascular disease in women must be emphasized, as it is the leading cause of mortality and morbidity in women. It is well known that female hormones...... contribute to the later onset of cardiovascular disease in women. The effect of estrogens has for decades been understood from observational studies of postmenopausal women treated with hormone replacement therapy (HRT). Later, treatment with HRT was disregarded due to the fear of side......-effects and an ambiguity of the cardiovascular advantages. Accumulating knowledge from the large number of trials and studies has elucidated the cause for the disparity in results. In this paper, the beneficial effects of HRT, with emphasis on cardiovascular disease are explained, and the relative and absolute risks...

  6. Stroke in women - oral contraception, pregnancy, and hormone replacement therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rantanen, Kirsi; Tatlisumak, Turgut

    2013-01-01

    Stroke is a devastating disease affecting millions of people worldwide every year. Female stroke victims have higher mortality rates and they do not re-cover as well as men. Women's longevity and different vascular risk factor burden like a larger prevalence of atrial fibrillation play a role. Women also have unique risk factors such as oral contraception, pregnancy, estrogen decrease after the menopause and hormone replacement therapy, which should all be evaluated and taken into consideration in treatment decisions both in the acute phase of stroke and in secondary prevention. In this review, the evidence regarding these hormonal aspects and the risk of stroke in women are evaluated. The relevant guidelines are studied and research gaps identified. Future topics for research are recommended and current treatment possibilities and their risks discussed.

  7. A retrospective study: osteoporosis and hormone replacement therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H. June Kuczynski

    1989-09-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this stud y was to determine i f women who undergo hormone replacement therapy postmenopausally, will demonstrate less osteoporosis than women who do not undergo H R T. The osteoporosis subjects were 195 women who volunteered to participate in an NIHsponsored double-blind clinical trial entitled Safely and Efficacy of Fluoride Therapy in Osteoporosis. A convenience sample of 78 controls was obtained by inviting women seeking regular medical attention to join an epidemiological investigation of osteoporosis. The data were analyzed using Chisquare and Student’s t-ratio. The study concludes that future retrospective and prospective analyses appreciate the com plexity of the problem in terms of individual risk for osteoporosis.

  8. Advances in hormone replacement therapy: making the menopause manageable

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Palacios Santiago

    2008-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The importance of the results of some large, randomized controlled trials (RCTs on Hormone Replacement Therapy (HRT has modified the risk/benefit perception of HRT. Recent literature review supports a different management. The differences in age at initiation and the duration of HRT are key points. HRT appears to decrease coronary disease in younger women, near menopause; yet, in older women, HRT increases risk of a coronary event. Although HRT is a recognized method in the prevention and treatment of osteoporosis, it is not licensed for the prevention of osteoporosis as a first-line treatment. The effectiveness of low and ultra-low estrogen doses has been demonstrated for the treatment of vasomotor symptoms, genital atrophy and the prevention of bone loss, with fewer side-effects than the standard dose therapy. Further research, however, is needed to determine the effect both on fractures, as well as on cardiovascular and breast diseases. Newer progestins show effects that are remarkably different from those of other assays. The effectiveness of testosterone at improving both sexual desire and response in surgically and naturally postmenopausal women is shown by the testosterone patch. The intention, dose and regimen of HRT need to be individualized, based on the principle of choosing the lowest appropriate dose in relation to the severity of symptoms and the time and menopause age.

  9. Discontinuation of hormone replacement therapy after myocardial infarction and short term risk of adverse cardiovascular events

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bretler, Ditte-Marie; Hansen, Peter Riis; Sørensen, Rikke;

    2012-01-01

    To assess the risk of adverse cardiovascular events in women who discontinue hormone replacement therapy after myocardial infarction compared with those who continue.......To assess the risk of adverse cardiovascular events in women who discontinue hormone replacement therapy after myocardial infarction compared with those who continue....

  10. Relation between hormone replacement therapy and ischaemic heart disease in women

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Løkkegaard, E; Pedersen, A T; Heitmann, B L

    2003-01-01

    To investigate the risk of ischaemic heart disease and myocardial infarction among women using hormone replacement therapy, especially the potential modifying effect of cardiovascular risk factors.......To investigate the risk of ischaemic heart disease and myocardial infarction among women using hormone replacement therapy, especially the potential modifying effect of cardiovascular risk factors....

  11. Menopausal Women's Access Path to Bioidentical Hormone Replacement Therapy: An Exploratory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moro, Doris; Young, Wendy; Stein, Richard; Isaac, Winston; Goodman, Deborah

    2010-01-01

    The objective of this exploratory qualitative study was to describe (1) the key factors affecting women's initial decision to explore the use of bioidentical hormone, (2) where women gather their information on bioidentical hormones, (3) the enablers and barriers to obtaining bioidentical hormones, and (4) how to improve the bioidentical hormone replacement therapy access path. The study was conducted in a compounding pharmacy located in a large urban area in southern Ontario, Canada. The participants included four postmenopausal women between the ages of 46 and 72 who self-identified as users of bioidentical hormone replacement therapy and with comprehensive provincial healthcare coverage. Participants were recruited at a compounding pharmacy with the use of tri-fold brochures, tear-sheets, and posters. The women participated in an audio-taped mini focus group. Discussion was guided by six open-ended questions. Verbatim quotes were analyzed using an affinity diagram. Participants identified three key factors related to their initial decision: (1) symptoms unalleviated by synthetic hormone replacement therapy, (2) side effects from synthetic hormone replacement therapy, and (3) personal preference. They obtained information and support from many sources, including: family/friends, publications, and specialists in menopausal health. Once participants had made a decision, they obtained a prescription and accessed bioidentical hormone replacement therapy at a compounding pharmacy. Knowledgeable primary care physicians and compounding pharmacists were seen as enablers. Lack of support/Information and costs were identifies as barriers. Improvements to bioidentical hormone replacement therapy access path were suggested. The results of this study suggest that there may be value in implementing strategies to further encourage family physicians and other specialists in menopausal health to discuss options regarding hormone replacement therapy with patients. For example, the

  12. Plant derived alternatives for hormone replacement therapy (HRT).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seidlova-Wuttke, Dana; Jarry, Hubertus; Wuttke, Wolfgang

    2013-12-01

    Abstract Hormone replacement therapy (HRT) has undisputable positive effects on climacteric complaints, in the bone and on body weight but also several undesired side effects. Therefore, plant-derived alternatives are currently promoted. Phytoestrogens - primarily the isoflavones genistein, daidzein and coumestrol, stemming from soy (Glycine max) or red clover (Trifolium pratense) - were suggested to have the desired but not the undesired effects of estrogens. Most recently published placebo-controlled studies question the beneficial effects. When taken at the time of puberty however, phytoestrogens appear to protect against mammary cancer later in life. Extracts from the rhizome of Cimicifuga racemosa (black cohosh) have no estrogenic effects. In a narrow dose range they have beneficial effects on climacteric complaints, which are due to several compounds with dopaminergic, noradrenergic, serotoninergic and GABAergic actions that act together in the hypothalamus. Ecdysone is produced by several plants, including spinach (Spinacia oleracea) and was very early on shown to increase muscle mass. Later it became apparent that spinach extracts containing ecdysone decreased body fat load, thereby reducing secretion of proinflammatory cytokines by visceral adipocytes and oxidative stress. This had beneficial effects on body weight and serum lipids not only in obese postmenopausal but also in premenopausal women and in men. For the above-described plant extracts, solid placebo-controlled clinical trials are available. For other plant extracts claiming beneficial effects on climacteric complaints or postmenopausal diseases, no solid data are available.

  13. Hormone replacement therapy and the prevention of postmenopausal osteoporosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gambacciani, Marco; Levancini, Marco

    2014-09-01

    Fracture prevention is one of the public health priorities worldwide. Estrogen deficiency is the major factor in the pathogenesis of postmenopausal osteoporosis, the most common metabolic bone disease. Different effective treatments for osteoporosis are available. Hormone replacement therapy (HRT) at different doses rapidly normalizes turnover, preserves bone mineral density (BMD) at all skeletal sites, leading to a significant, reduction in vertebral and non-vertebral fractures. Tibolone, a selective tissue estrogenic activity regulator (STEAR), is effective in the treatment of vasomotor symptoms, vaginal atrophy and prevention/treatment of osteoporosis with a clinical efficacy similar to that of conventional HRT. Selective estrogen receptor modulators (SERMs) such as raloxifene and bazedoxifene reduce turnover and maintain or increase vertebral and femoral BMD and reduce the risk of osteoporotic fractures. The combination of bazedoxifene and conjugated estrogens, defined as tissue selective estrogen complex (TSEC), is able to reduce climacteric symptoms, reduce bone turnover and preserve BMD. In conclusion, osteoporosis prevention can actually be considered as a major additional benefit in climacteric women who use HRT for treatment of climacteric symptoms. The use of a standard dose of HRT for osteoporosis prevention is based on biology, epidemiology, animal and preclinical data, observational studies and randomized, clinical trials. The antifracture effect of a lower dose HRT or TSEC is supported by the data on BMD and turnover, with compelling scientific evidence.

  14. Hormone replacement therapy: real concerns and false alarms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bluming, Avrum Z; Tavris, Carol

    2009-01-01

    From 2002 to 2008, reports from the Women's Health Initiative (WHI) claimed that hormone replacement therapy (HRT) significantly increased the risks of breast cancer development, cardiac events, Alzheimer disease, and stroke. These claims alarmed the public and health professionals alike, causing an almost immediate and sharp decline in the numbers of women receiving HRT. However, the actual data in the published WHI articles reveal that the findings reported in press releases and interviews of the principal investigators were often distorted, oversimplified, or wrong. This review highlights the history of research on HRT, including a timeline of studies that have or have not found a link between HRT and breast cancer; discusses how to distinguish important, robust findings from those that are trivial; closely examines the WHI findings on HRT and breast cancer, most of which are weak or statistically insignificant; reviews the current thinking about possible links of HRT with cardiovascular disease and cognitive functioning; and reports research on the benefits of HRT, notably relief of menopausal symptoms, that affect a woman's quality of life. On these complicated matters, physicians and the public must be cautious about accepting "findings by press release" in determining whether to prescribe or take HRT.

  15. Hormone replacement therapy and the prevention of postmenopausal osteoporosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marco Gambacciani

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Fracture prevention is one of the public health priorities worldwide. Estrogen deficiency is the major factor in the pathogenesis of postmenopausal osteoporosis, the most common metabolic bone disease. Different effective treatments for osteoporosis are available. Hormone replacement therapy (HRT at different doses rapidly normalizes turnover, preserves bone mineral density (BMD at all skeletal sites, leading to a significant, reduction in vertebral and non-vertebral fractures. Tibolone, a selective tissue estrogenic activity regulator (STEAR, is effective in the treatment of vasomotor symptoms, vaginal atrophy and prevention/treatment of osteoporosis with a clinical efficacy similar to that of conventional HRT. Selective estrogen receptor modulators (SERMs such as raloxifene and bazedoxifene reduce turnover and maintain or increase vertebral and femoral BMD and reduce the risk of osteoporotic fractures. The combination of bazedoxifene and conjugated estrogens, defined as tissue selective estrogen complex (TSEC, is able to reduce climacteric symptoms, reduce bone turnover and preserve BMD. In conclusion, osteoporosis prevention can actually be considered as a major additional benefit in climacteric women who use HRT for treatment of climacteric symptoms. The use of a standard dose of HRT for osteoporosis prevention is based on biology, epidemiology, animal and preclinical data, observational studies and randomized, clinical trials. The antifracture effect of a lower dose HRT or TSEC is supported by the data on BMD and turnover, with compelling scientific evidence.

  16. Manufacturing heterosexuality: hormone replacement therapy and menopause in urban Oaxaca.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramirez, Michelle

    2006-01-01

    For several decades, hormone replacement therapies have been prescribed to women, not only to prevent disease but to improve the sexual functioning of menopausal women. The medical promotion of continued sexual activity in a woman's post-reproductive years is exported to locations outside of North America and Europe, which provides an opportunity to critically examine the cultural roots that have informed expert biomedical representations. This ethnographic study examined menopause and social class in Oaxaca de Juarez, Mexico using interviews, questionnaires, and textual analysis. The research found that biomedicine in conjunction with the pharmaceutical industry promoted culturally constructed gender hierarchies under the guise of optimal menopausal health. However, women's actual experience of gender and sexuality in mid-life diverged significantly from these expert representations. Themes that emerged in interviews and questionnaires included the importance of motherhood in old age, diminished sexual desire as not problematic, and greater sexual freedom at a post-reproductive age. Ultimately, biomedical discourse was not the sole arbiter of appropriate menopausal womanhood and femininity.

  17. Hormone replacement therapy diminishes hearing in peri-menopausal mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Price, Katharine; Zhu, Xiaoxia; Guimaraes, Patricia F; Vasilyeva, Olga N; Frisina, Robert D

    2009-06-01

    We recently discovered that progestin in hormone replacement therapy (HRT) for post-menopausal women has detrimental effects on the ear and central auditory system [Guimaraes, P., Frisina, S.T., Mapes, F., Tadros, S.F., Frisina, D.R., Frisina, R.D., 2006. Progestin negatively affects hearing in aged women. Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. - PNAS 103, 14246-14249]. To start determining the generality and neural bases of these human findings, the present study examined the effects of combination HRT (estrogen+progestin) and estrogen alone on hearing in peri-menopausal mice. Specifically, auditory brainstem responses (ABRs-sensitivity of the auditory system) and distortion-product otoacoustic emissions (DPOAEs-cochlear outer hair cell system) were employed. Middle age female CBA mice received either a time-release, subcutaneous implanted pellet of estrogen+progestin, estrogen alone, or placebo. Longitudinal comparisons of ABR threshold data obtained at 4 months of treatment revealed statistically significant declines in auditory sensitivity over time for the combined estrogen+progestin treatment group, with the estrogen only group revealing milder changes at 3, 6 and 32 kHz. DPOAE testing revealed statistically significant differences for the estrogen+progestin treatment group in the high and middle frequency ranges (15-29 and 30-45 kHz) after as early as 2 months of treatment (p<0.01 and p<0.001, respectively). Statistically significant changes were also seen at 4 months of treatment across all frequencies for the combined HRT group. These data suggest that estrogen+progestin HRT therapy of 4 months duration impairs outer hair cell functioning and overall auditory sensitivity. These findings indicate that estrogen+progestin HRT may actually accelerate age-related hearing loss, relative to estrogen monotherapy; findings that are consistent with the clinical hearing loss observed in aging women that have taken combination HRT.

  18. Hormone Replacement Therapy and Physical Function in Healthy Older Men. Time to Talk Hormones?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giannoulis, Manthos G.; Martin, Finbarr C.; Nair, K. Sreekumaran; Umpleby, A. Margot

    2012-01-01

    Improving physical function and mobility in a continuously expanding elderly population emerges as a high priority of medicine today. Muscle mass, strength/power, and maximal exercise capacity are major determinants of physical function, and all decline with aging. This contributes to the incidence of frailty and disability observed in older men. Furthermore, it facilitates the accumulation of body fat and development of insulin resistance. Muscle adaptation to exercise is strongly influenced by anabolic endocrine hormones and local load-sensitive autocrine/paracrine growth factors. GH, IGF-I, and testosterone (T) are directly involved in muscle adaptation to exercise because they promote muscle protein synthesis, whereas T and locally expressed IGF-I have been reported to activate muscle stem cells. Although exercise programs improve physical function, in the long-term most older men fail to comply. The GH/IGF-I axis and T levels decline markedly with aging, whereas accumulating evidence supports their indispensable role in maintaining physical function integrity. Several studies have reported that the administration of T improves lean body mass and maximal voluntary strength in healthy older men. On the other hand, most studies have shown that administration of GH alone failed to improve muscle strength despite amelioration of the detrimental somatic changes of aging. Both GH and T are anabolic agents that promote muscle protein synthesis and hypertrophy but work through separate mechanisms, and the combined administration of GH and T, albeit in only a few studies, has resulted in greater efficacy than either hormone alone. Although it is clear that this combined approach is effective, this review concludes that further studies are needed to assess the long-term efficacy and safety of combined hormone replacement therapy in older men before the medical rationale of prescribing hormone replacement therapy for combating the sarcopenia of aging can be established

  19. Hormone replacement therapy and physical function in healthy older men. Time to talk hormones?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giannoulis, Manthos G; Martin, Finbarr C; Nair, K Sreekumaran; Umpleby, A Margot; Sonksen, Peter

    2012-06-01

    Improving physical function and mobility in a continuously expanding elderly population emerges as a high priority of medicine today. Muscle mass, strength/power, and maximal exercise capacity are major determinants of physical function, and all decline with aging. This contributes to the incidence of frailty and disability observed in older men. Furthermore, it facilitates the accumulation of body fat and development of insulin resistance. Muscle adaptation to exercise is strongly influenced by anabolic endocrine hormones and local load-sensitive autocrine/paracrine growth factors. GH, IGF-I, and testosterone (T) are directly involved in muscle adaptation to exercise because they promote muscle protein synthesis, whereas T and locally expressed IGF-I have been reported to activate muscle stem cells. Although exercise programs improve physical function, in the long-term most older men fail to comply. The GH/IGF-I axis and T levels decline markedly with aging, whereas accumulating evidence supports their indispensable role in maintaining physical function integrity. Several studies have reported that the administration of T improves lean body mass and maximal voluntary strength in healthy older men. On the other hand, most studies have shown that administration of GH alone failed to improve muscle strength despite amelioration of the detrimental somatic changes of aging. Both GH and T are anabolic agents that promote muscle protein synthesis and hypertrophy but work through separate mechanisms, and the combined administration of GH and T, albeit in only a few studies, has resulted in greater efficacy than either hormone alone. Although it is clear that this combined approach is effective, this review concludes that further studies are needed to assess the long-term efficacy and safety of combined hormone replacement therapy in older men before the medical rationale of prescribing hormone replacement therapy for combating the sarcopenia of aging can be established.

  20. Quantitative liver functions in Turner syndrome with and without hormone replacement therapy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gravholt, Claus Højbjerg; Poulsen, Henrik Enghusen; Ott, Peter

    2007-01-01

    Studies have documented elevated levels of liver enzymes in many females with Turner syndrome (TS). Histology has shown a range of changes. Treatment with female hormone replacement therapy (HRT) reduces liver enzymes.......Studies have documented elevated levels of liver enzymes in many females with Turner syndrome (TS). Histology has shown a range of changes. Treatment with female hormone replacement therapy (HRT) reduces liver enzymes....

  1. Hormone replacement therapy and the risk of endometrial cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sjögren, Lea; Mørch, Lina S; Løkkegaard, Ellen

    2016-01-01

    progestin therapy according to the risk of endometrial cancer, while considering both regimen and type of progestin. METHODS: PubMed, EMBASE and the Cochrane Library were searched, resulting in the identification of 527 published articles on menopausal women with intact uteri treated with estrogen only......BACKGROUND: In 1975, estrogen only was found to be associated with an increased risk of endometrial cancer. In November 2015, NICE guidelines on hormone therapy were published that did not take this risk into account. AIM: This systematic literature review assesses the safety of estrogen plus......, estrogen plus progestin or tibolone for a minimum of one year. Risk of endometrial cancer was compared to placebo or never users and measured as relative risk, hazard or odds ratio. RESULTS: 28 studies were included. The observational literature found an increased risk among users of estrogen alone...

  2. Effects of Growth Hormone Replacement Therapy on Bone Mineral Density in Growth Hormone Deficient Adults: A Meta-Analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peng Xue

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Objectives. Growth hormone deficiency patients exhibited reduced bone mineral density compared with healthy controls, but previous researches demonstrated uncertainty about the effect of growth hormone replacement therapy on bone in growth hormone deficient adults. The aim of this study was to determine whether the growth hormone replacement therapy could elevate bone mineral density in growth hormone deficient adults. Methods. In this meta-analysis, searches of Medline, Embase, and The Cochrane Library were undertaken to identify studies in humans of the association between growth hormone treatment and bone mineral density in growth hormone deficient adults. Random effects model was used for this meta-analysis. Results. A total of 20 studies (including one outlier study with 936 subjects were included in our research. We detected significant overall association of growth hormone treatment with increased bone mineral density of spine, femoral neck, and total body, but some results of subgroup analyses were not consistent with the overall analyses. Conclusions. Our meta-analysis suggested that growth hormone replacement therapy could have beneficial influence on bone mineral density in growth hormone deficient adults, but, in some subject populations, the influence was not evident.

  3. Breast density changes associated with postmenopausal hormone replacement therapy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Mads; Pettersen, Paola; Alexandersen, P

    2010-01-01

    Objective: The aim of this study was to assess the impact of oral hormone therapy (HT) on breast density in postmenopausal women and to compare the use of computer-based automated approaches for the assessment of breast density with reference to traditional methods. Methods: Low-dose oral estrogen...... (1 mg) continuously combined with drospirenone (2 mg) was administered to postmenopausal women for up to 2 years (26 treatment cycles, 28 d/cycle) in a randomized, placebo-controlled trial. This post hoc analysis assessed the changes in breast density measured from digitized images by two radiologist.......01) but not in the placebo group. Conclusions: HT for 2 years in postmenopausal women significantly increased radiologist-assessed breast density compared with placebo, in addition to significant changes in estrogen levels, markers of bone metabolism, and bone mineral density. Computer-automated techniques may be comparable...

  4. An automatic framework for assessing breast cancer risk due to various hormone replacement therapies (HRT)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Karemore, Gopal; Brandt, Sami; Nielsen, Mads

    It is well known that menopausal hormone therapy increases mammographic density. Increase in breast density may relate to breast cancer risk. Several computer assisted automatic methods for assessing mammographic density have been suggested by J.W. Byng (1996), N. Karssemeijer (1998), J.M. Boone(...... features describing the local elongatedness or stripiness, especially trained to see the effect of HRT (Hormone Replacement Therapy ) thereby providing a non-subjective and reproducible measure and compare it to the BIRADS and percentage density measure....

  5. Postoperative pituitary hormonal disturbances and hormone replacement therapy time and dosage in children with craniopharyngiomas

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI Gui-mei; SUN Xiao-jun; SHAO Peng

    2008-01-01

    BackgroundThe proliferative activity and penetration into the hypothalamic structures in children craniopharyngiomas (CP) often make radical resection difficult. Therefore, complete resection of CP often results in permanent multiple pituitary hormone deficiency (MPHD). This study aimed to elucidate the postoperative pituitary hormonal disturbances, and hormone replacement therapy (HRT) time and dosage in children with CP.Methods Twenty patients with growth retardation and CP after resection, comprising 14 boys and 6 girls, with a mean age of (10.63 3.18) years (Group A) and 10 male patients of group A aged >10 years (Group B) were entailed. Thirty age-, sex- and Tanner stage-matched normal children (control Group A), and 44 male older children >10 years (control Group B) served as controls. The serum concentrations of insulin-like growth factor-1 (IGF-1), growth hormone (GH), free thyroxine (FT4), thyroid-stimulating hormone (TSH), adrenocorticortropic hormone (ACTH), cortisol (COR), follicle stimulating hormone (FSH), luteinizing hormone (LH), prolactin (PRL), testosterone (T) and estradiol (E2) were measured in the CP patients after resection and in controls. The appropriate time and dosage of HRT were investigated. Linear correlation analysis was made between levothyroxine (L-T4) dosage and primary FT4 in CP patients after resection. Results All cases had MPHD. The serum peak GH, IGF-1, FT4 and COR levels of Group A were significantly lower than that of the control Group A. The serum IGF-1 concentration increased to the normal level after 3 months of rhGH therapy; the serum FSH, LH, and T levels were significantly decreased (P <0.001); however, E2 and PRL were significantly increased (P <0.001) in Group B compared with the control Group B; 18 cases were found to have central diabetes insipidus (Dl) by water deprivation test and MRI. There was a significant negative linear regression (r= -0.8, P <0.001) between L-T4 and primary FT4 in Group A patients with CP

  6. Effects of hormone replacement therapy on depressive and anxiety symptoms after oophorectomy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Danijela D. Ðoković

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Aim To assess the effect of hormone replacement therapy on postoperative depression and anxiety symptoms. Methods In observational prospective study 80 women divided into two groups were evaluated: women who received estrogen and androgen replacement therapy after hysterectomy with bilateral oophorectomy before onset of menopause (35-45 years old and a control group that consisted of perimenipausal women (45-55 years old. Hormone replacement therapy began one week after surgery. The severity of depression and anxiety was evaluated through the use of Hamilton Depression Rating Scale and Hamilton Anxiety Rating Scale. Subjects from the study group were interviewed right after the surgical treatment, one, two and three months later. Subjects from the control group were interviewed only once. Results The women who underwent surgery had a statistically significantly higher score in Hamilton Depression Scale (p<0.001 and Hamilton Anxiety Scale (p=0.002 compared to the control perimenopausal women. There was a significant reduction of depressive and anxiety symptoms during hormone replacement therapy. Statistically significant difference in depressive score was found immediately after one month of hormone replacement therapy (first week/one month later: p=0.0057. Statistically significant difference in anxiety score appeared three months after the introduction of hormone therapy (first week/one month later: p=0.309; first week/two months later: p=0.046; first week/three months later: p<0.001. Level of serum luteinizing hormone was in correlation with depressive and anxiety score. Conclusion Estrogen-androgen replacement therapy may reduce the risk of psychiatric disorders developing in women with bilateral oophorectomy (indication for hysterectomy with oophorectomy was leiomyomata uteri.

  7. Effects of aerobic exercise on ectopic lipids in patients with growth hormone deficiency before and after growth hormone replacement therapy

    OpenAIRE

    2016-01-01

    Growth hormone replacement therapy (GHRT) increases exercise capacity and insulin resistance while it decreases fat mass in growth hormone-deficient patients (GHD). Ectopic lipids (intramyocellular (IMCL) and intrahepatocellular lipids (IHCL) are related to insulin resistance. The effect of GHRT on ectopic lipids is unknown. It is hypothesized that exercise-induced utilization of ectopic lipids is significantly decreased in GHD patients and normalized by GHRT. GHD (4 females, 6 males) and age...

  8. Ductal carcinoma In-Situ in turner syndrome patient undergoing hormone replacement therapy: A case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rashmi Bawa

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Turner’s syndrome is a rare congenital disease which affects about 1 in every 2500-3000 live-born females. This happens due to chromosomal abnormalities in a phenotypic female, causing increased gonadotropin concentrations and low concentrations of estrogens from infancy. As a result, hormone replacement therapy is started in most adolescent Turner syndrome patients to initiate and sustain sexual maturation. Accordingly, most Turner’s syndrome patients undergo several decades of estrogen replacement therapy, from puberty to post-menopausal age. The highly publicized findings of the Women’s Health Initiative have called into question the appropriateness of hormone replacement therapy in adolescents with Turner’s syndrome. Those concerns were mostly theoretical extrapolations, as few prospective studies of cancer occurrence in women with Turner syndrome have been reported. Consequently, several recent publications have challenged those extrapolations, based on the assertion that the levels of hormone replacement in Turner syndrome patients are well below the physiologic levels observed in normal menstruating women, as well as the fact that these women are significantly younger than those studied by the Women’s Health Initiative. In discord to those reports, we present a case of ductal carcinoma in-situ in a 40-year-old Turner patient, who had undergone over two decades of combined hormone replacement therapy. The patient underwent an elective excisional biopsy for a palpable mass, with histopathology revealing a complex fibroadenoma with a nidus of ductal carcinoma in-situ. The lesion was noted to be estrogen receptor positive and progesterone receptor negative, with heavy staining for HER-2/Neu receptor. The patient was treated with tamoxifen. While a rare case, it is imperative for the astute clinician to keep in mind the consequences of long-term hormone replacement therapy in Turner’s syndrome patients in order to avoid missed

  9. Raloxifene and hormone replacement therapy increase arachidonic acid and docosahexaenoic levels in postmenopausal women

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Giltay, E.J.; Duschek, E.J.J.; Katan, M.B.; Neele, S.J.; Netelenbos, J.C.; Zock, P.L.

    2004-01-01

    Estrogens may affect the essential n-6 and n-3 fatty acids arachidonic acid (AA; C20:4n-6) and docosahexaenoic acid (DHA; C22:6n-3). Therefore, we investigated the long-term effects of hormone replacement therapy and raloxifene, a selective estrogen-receptor modulator, in two randomized, double-blin

  10. Hormonal replacement therapy reduces forearm fracture incidence in recent postmenopausal women

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mosekilde, Leif; Beck-Nielsen, H.; Sørensen, O.H.

    2000-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: To study the fracture reducing potential of hormonal replacement therapy (HRT) in recent postmenopausal women in a primary preventive scenario. METHODS: Prospective controlled comprehensive cohort trial: 2016 healthy women aged 45-58 years, from three to 24 months past last menstrual...... and possibly the total number of fractures in recent postmenopausal women by use of HRT as primary prevention....

  11. Increased risk of breast cancer following different regimens of hormone replacement therapy frequently used in Europe

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stahlberg, Claudia; Pedersen, Anette Tønnes; Lynge, Elsebeth

    2004-01-01

    Epidemiologic studies have shown an increased risk of breast cancer following hormone replacement therapy (HRT). The aim of this study was to investigate whether different treatment regimens or the androgenecity of progestins influence the risk of breast cancer differently. The Danish Nurse Cohort...

  12. Use of postmenopausal hormone replacement therapy and risk of non-Hodgkin's lymphoma

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nørgaard, M; Poulsen, A H; Pedersen, L;

    2006-01-01

    Use of postmenopausal hormone replacement therapy (HRT) has been hypothesised to be associated with a reduced risk of non-Hodgkin's lymphoma (NHL), but the epidemiologic evidence is conflicting. To examine the risk of NHL in HRT users aged 40 and older, we conducted a cohort study in the County...

  13. The validity of self-reported use of hormone replacement therapy among Danish nurses

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Løkkegaard, Ellen Christine Leth; Johnsen, Søren Påske; Heitmann, Berit Lillienthal

    2004-01-01

    Recent findings from randomized clinical trials on the effects of hormone replacement therapy (HRT) among postmenopausal women contradict findings from observational studies indicating a protective effect on the development of cardiovascular disease. Most observational studies on HRT are based...... on self-reported data, although data on the validity of HRT in postmenopausal women are sparse....

  14. The Miracle Drug : Hormone Replacement Therapy and Labor Market Behavior of Middle-Aged Women

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Meltem Daysal, N.; Orsini, C.

    2012-01-01

    Abstract: In an aging society, determining which factors contribute to the employment of older individuals is increasingly important. This paper sheds light on the impact of medical innovation in the form of Hormone Replacement Therapy (HRT) on employment of middle-aged women. HRT are drugs taken by

  15. Raloxifene and hormone replacement therapy increase arachidonic acid and docosahexaenoic levels in postmenopausal women

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Giltay, E.J.; Duschek, E.J.J.; Katan, M.B.; Neele, S.J.; Netelenbos, J.C.; Zock, P.L.

    2004-01-01

    Estrogens may affect the essential n-6 and n-3 fatty acids arachidonic acid (AA; C20:4n-6) and docosahexaenoic acid (DHA; C22:6n-3). Therefore, we investigated the long-term effects of hormone replacement therapy and raloxifene, a selective estrogen-receptor modulator, in two randomized,

  16. Should we start and continue growth hormone (GH) replacement therapy in adults with GH deficiency?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    ter Maaten, JC

    2000-01-01

    During the last decade, growth hormone deficiency (GHD) in adults has been described as a clinical syndrome. Central features of this entity include increased fat mass, reduced muscle and bone mass, as well as impaired exercise capacity and quality of life. GH replacement therapy has been initiated

  17. Obesity and sarcopenia after menopause are reversed by sex hormone replacement therapy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, M B; Rosenfalck, A M; Højgaard, L

    2001-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: Menopause is linked to an increase in fat mass and a decrease in lean mass exceeding age-related changes, possibly related to reduced output of ovarian steroids. In this study we examined the effect of combined postmenopausal hormone replacement therapy (HRT) on the total and regional ......, which in turn, prevents disease in the elderly....

  18. Does hormone replacement therapy and use of oral contraceptives increase the risk of non-melanoma skin cancer?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Birch-Johansen, Fatima; Jensen, Allan; Olesen, Anne Braae

    2012-01-01

    We aimed to examine whether use of hormone replacement therapy (HRT) and oral contraceptives (OC) affect the risk of basal cell carcinoma (BCC) and squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) in women.......We aimed to examine whether use of hormone replacement therapy (HRT) and oral contraceptives (OC) affect the risk of basal cell carcinoma (BCC) and squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) in women....

  19. Nanostructured transdermal hormone replacement therapy for relieving menopausal symptoms: a confocal Raman spectroscopy study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marco Antonio Botelho

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: To determine the safety and efficacy of a transdermal nanostructured formulation of progesterone (10% combined with estriol (0.1% + estradiol (0.25% for relieving postmenopausal symptoms. METHODS: A total of 66 postmenopausal Brazilian women with climacteric symptoms of natural menopause received transdermal nanostructured formulations of progesterone and estrogens in the forearm daily for 60 months to mimic the normal ovarian secretory pattern. Confocal Raman spectroscopy of hormones in skin layers was performed. Clinical parameters, serum concentrations of estradiol and follicle-stimulating hormone, blood pressure, BI-RADS classification from bilateral mammography, and symptomatic relief were compared between baseline and 60 months post-treatment. Clinicaltrials.gov: NCT02033512. RESULTS: An improvement in climacteric symptoms was reported in 92.5% of women evaluated before and after 60 months of treatment. The serum concentrations of estradiol and follicle-stimulating hormone changed significantly (p<0.05 after treatment; the values of serum follicle-stimulating hormone decreased after 60 months from 82.04±4.9 to 57.12±4.1 IU/mL. A bilateral mammography assessment of the breasts revealed normal results in all women. No adverse health-related events were attributed to this hormone replacement therapy protocol. CONCLUSION: The nanostructured formulation is safe and effective in re-establishing optimal serum levels of estradiol and follicle-stimulating hormone and relieving the symptoms of menopause. This transdermal hormone replacement therapy may alleviate climacteric symptoms in postmenopausal women.

  20. Nanostructured transdermal hormone replacement therapy for relieving menopausal symptoms: a confocal Raman spectroscopy study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Botelho, Marco Antonio; Queiroz, Dinalva Brito; Barros, Gisele; Guerreiro, Stela; Umbelino, Sonia; Lyra, Arao; Borges, Boniek; Freitas, Allan, E-mail: marcobotelho@pq.cnpq.br [Universidade Potiguar, Natal, RN (Brazil). Lab. de Nanotecnologia; Fechine, Pierre [Universidade Federal do Ceara (GQMAT/UFCE), Fortaleza, CE (Brazil). Dept. de Quimica Analitica. Grupo Avancado de Biomateriais em Quimica; Queiroz, Danilo Caldas de [Instituto Federal de Ciencia e Tecnologia (IFCT), Fortaleza, CE (Brazil). Lab. de Biotecnologia; Ruela, Ronaldo [Instituto de Biotecnologia Aplicada (INBIOS), Fortaleza, CE (Brazil); Almeida, Jackson Guedes [Universidade Federal do Vale de Sao Francisco (UNIVALE), Petrolina, PE (Brazil). Fac. de Ciencias Farmaceuticas; Quintans Junior, Lucindo [Universidade Federal de Sergipe (UFSE), Sao Cristovao, SE (Brazil). Dept. de Fisiologia

    2014-06-01

    Objective:to determine the safety and efficacy of a transdermal nanostructured formulation of progesterone (10%) combined with estriol (0.1%) + estradiol (0.25%) for relieving postmenopausal symptoms. Methods: a total of 66 postmenopausal Brazilian women with climacteric symptoms of natural menopause received transdermal nanostructured formulations of progesterone and estrogens in the forearm daily for 60 months to mimic the normal ovarian secretory pattern. Confocal Raman spectroscopy of hormones in skin layers was performed. Clinical parameters, serum concentrations of estradiol and follicle-stimulating hormone, blood pressure, BI-RADS classification from bilateral mammography, and symptomatic relief were compared between baseline and 60 months post-treatment. Clinicaltrials.gov: NCT02033512. Results: an improvement in climacteric symptoms was reported in 92.5% of women evaluated before and after 60 months of treatment. The serum concentrations of estradiol and follicle-stimulating hormone changed significantly (p<0.05) after treatment; the values of serum follicle-stimulating hormone decreased after 60 months from 82.04 ± 4.9 to 57.12 ± 4.1 IU/mL. A bilateral mammography assessment of the breasts revealed normal results in all women. No adverse health-related events were attributed to this hormone replacement therapy protocol. Conclusion: the nanostructured formulation is safe and effective in re-establishing optimal serum levels of estradiol and follicle-stimulating hormone and relieving the symptoms of menopause. This transdermal hormone replacement therapy may alleviate climacteric symptoms in postmenopausal women. (author)

  1. Adiposity, hormone replacement therapy use and breast cancer risk by age and hormone receptor status : a large prospective cohort study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ritte, Rebecca; Lukanova, Annekatrin; Berrino, Franco; Dossus, Laure; Tjonneland, Anne; Olsen, Anja; Overvad, Thure Filskov; Overvad, Kim; Clavel-Chapelon, Francoise; Fournier, Agnes; Fagherazzi, Guy; Rohrmann, Sabine; Teucher, Birgit; Boeing, Heiner; Aleksandrova, Krasimira; Trichopoulou, Antonia; Lagiou, Pagona; Trichopoulos, Dimitrios; Palli, Domenico; Sieri, Sabina; Panico, Salvatore; Tumino, Rosario; Vineis, Paolo; Ramon Quiros, Jose; Buckland, Genevieve; Sanchez, Maria-Jose; Amiano, Pilar; Chirlaque, Maria-Dolores; Ardanaz, Eva; Sund, Malin; Lenner, Per; Bueno-de-Mesquita, Bas; van Gils, Carla H.; Peeters, Petra H. M.; Krum-Hansen, Sanda; Gram, Inger Torhild; Lund, Eiliv; Khaw, Kay-Tee; Wareham, Nick; Allen, Naomi E.; Key, Timothy J.; Romieu, Isabelle; Rinaldi, Sabina; Siddiq, Afshan; Cox, David; Riboli, Elio; Kaaks, Rudolf

    2012-01-01

    Introduction: Associations of hormone-receptor positive breast cancer with excess adiposity are reasonably well characterized; however, uncertainty remains regarding the association of body mass index (BMI) with hormone-receptor negative malignancies, and possible interactions by hormone replacement

  2. Oral contraceptive use, hormone replacement therapy, reproductive history and risk of colorectal cancer in women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kabat, Geoffrey C; Miller, Anthony B; Rohan, Thomas E

    2008-02-01

    Evidence from epidemiologic studies suggests a possible role of exogenous and endogenous hormones in colorectal carcinogenesis in women. However, with respect to exogenous hormones, in contrast to hormone replacement therapy, few cohort studies have examined oral contraceptive use in relation to colorectal cancer risk. We used data from a large cohort study of Canadian women enrolled in a randomized controlled trial of breast cancer screening to assess the association of oral contraceptive use, hormone replacement therapy and reproductive factors with risk of colorectal cancer, overall and by subsite within the colorectum. Cancer incidence and mortality were ascertained by linkage to national databases. Among 89,835 women aged 40-59 at enrollment and followed for an average of 16.4 years, we identified 1,142 incident colorectal cancer cases. Proportional hazards models were used to estimate the associations between the exposures of interest and risk of colorectal cancer. Ever use of oral contraceptives at baseline was associated with a modest reduction in the risk of colorectal cancer (hazard ratio 0.83, 95% confidence interval 0.73-0.94), with similar effects for different subsites within the colorectum. No trend was seen in the hazard ratios with increasing duration of oral contraceptive use. No associations were seen with use of hormone replacement therapy (ever use or duration of use) or reproductive factors. Our results are suggestive of an inverse association between oral contraceptive use and colorectal carcinogenesis. However, given the lack of a dose-response relationship and the potential for confounding, studies with more complete assessment of exogenous hormone use throughout the life course are needed to clarify this association. (c) 2007 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  3. Hepatic adenomatosis associated with hormone replacement therapy and hemosiderosis: A case report

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Satoshi Hagiwara; Hiroyuki Kuwano; Masatomo Mori; Hitoshi Takagi; Daisuke Kanda; Naondo Sohara; Satoru Kakizaki; Kenji Katakai; Teruo Yoshinaga; Tsugio Higuchi; Kenichi Nomoto

    2006-01-01

    We have reported a case of hepatic adenomatosis associated with hormone replacement therapy (estrogen and progesterone) and hemosiderosis caused by excessive blood transfusion for the treatment of chronic myeloid leukemia. A 34-year-old woman was found to have several hepatic tumors on a routine medical examination. The general condition was good.Laboratory studies showed iron overload. Abdominal computed tomography and selective hepatic angiography showed several hypervascular tumors in the right lobe of the liver (up to 20 mm in diameter). Since hepatocellular carcinoma could not be ruled out, subsegmental hepatectomy was performed. Histopathological examination of the surgical specimen showed hepatic adenomatosis with hemosiderosis. Both hormone replacement therapy and iron overload could be the cause of hepatic adenomatosis.

  4. Use and discontinuation of hormone replacement therapy in women with myocardial infarction: a nationwide study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bretler, Ditte-Marie; Hansen, P. R.; Abildstrom, S. Z.

    2011-01-01

    center dot General use of hormone replacement therapy (HRT) dropped drastically after 2002 when pivotal randomized trials showed increased risk of coronary artery disease and other complications with HRT. center dot HRT is not recommended for primary or secondary prevention of coronary heart...... disease and guidelines recommend discontinuation of HRT after myocardial infarction (MI). center dot It is unknown whether women actually discontinue HRT after MI. WHAT THIS STUDY ADDS center dot Women who use HRT when they experience their MI generally continue using HRT. center dot We found a remarkably...... low increase in discontinuation after 2002, in contrast to the general drop in use of HRT. AIM To characterize the pattern of use and discontinuation of postmenopausal hormone replacement therapy (HRT) in women with myocardial infarction (MI) before and after 2002, where the general use of HRT dropped...

  5. Breast cancer after hormone replacement therapy--does prognosis differ in perimenopausal and postmenopausal women?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baumgärtner, A K; Häusler, A; Seifert-Klauss, V; Schuster, T; Schwarz-Boeger, U; Kiechle, M

    2011-10-01

    Hormone replacement therapy (HRT) has been associated with higher incidence of breast cancer in postmenopausal women, but it is unclear if breast cancers developing after HRT use have different prognosis. 1053 women with hormone receptor positive non-metastasized breast cancer were analyzed in a retrospective trial, stratifying by HRT use before diagnosis. Postmenopausal HRT users had significantly more early tumor stages (pprognosis in perimenopausal women only (TTP: HR=1.16; OS: HR=1.31). In this retrospective analysis postmenopausal HRT users seemed to have a better breast cancer prognosis. For perimenopausal HRT users however, a trend towards worse prognosis was found.

  6. The Miracle Drug : Hormone Replacement Therapy and Labor Market Behavior of Middle-Aged Women

    OpenAIRE

    Meltem Daysal, N.; Orsini, C.

    2012-01-01

    Abstract: In an aging society, determining which factors contribute to the employment of older individuals is increasingly important. This paper sheds light on the impact of medical innovation in the form of Hormone Replacement Therapy (HRT) on employment of middle-aged women. HRT are drugs taken by middle-aged women to soften symptoms related to menopause. Before 2002, HRT products were among the most popular prescription drugs in America. We use the timing of the release of information of t...

  7. [Hormone replacement therapy among Norwegian women. Self-reported use and sales of estrogen preparations].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Søgaard, A J; Fønnebø, V; Magnus, J H; Tollan, A

    1998-02-10

    In order to analyse the use of hormone replacement therapy (HRT) and the predicting factors for its use, two random samples of Norwegian women (30-79 years) were interviewed by the Central Bureau of Statistics in 1994 (n = 565) and in 1996 (n = 470). The extent of use of HRT was compared with statistics for sales of oestrogen in Norway and the Nordic countries. In the age group 45-69 years the use of hormone replacement therapy increased from 16.3% in 1994 to 19.1% in 1996. The proportion of users did not increase with a higher level of education. In addition to information received, and after adjusting for other variables, attitudes towards oestrogen and knowledge about it were the most important contributing factors for using HRT. Sales figures show that the use of systemic oestrogen in Norway has increased more than 280% since 1990. None of the Nordic countries have had a corresponding increase, but the Norwegian figures are still low compared to most other Nordic countries. In 1996 14.5% of Norwegian women (50-79 years) used oestrogen for urogenital disorders. Norwegian women need to be better informed and more knowledgeable to enable them to make conscious choice regarding use of hormone replacement therapy.

  8. Managing the menopause - British Menopause Society Council consensus statement on hormone replacement therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pitkin, Joan; Rees, Margaret C P; Gray, Sarah; Lumsden, Mary Ann; Stevenson, John; Williamson, Jennifer

    2003-09-01

    The British Menopause Society Council aims to aid health professionals to inform and advise women about the menopause. The oestrogen plus progestogen arm of the Women's Health Initiative was stopped in July 2002. This guidance regarding hormone replacement therapy (HRT) use responds to the results and analysis that have been published since then. Because there are few effective alternatives to HRT for vasomotor and urogenital symptoms, oestrogen-based treatments still have a major role. HRT is also most effective for prevention of osteoporosis. Unopposed oestrogens are contraindicated in women with an intact uterus, and hence a range of oestrogen and progestogen combinations, with differing routes of delivery, now exists under the title of "HRT". Treatment choice should be based on up to date information and targeted to individual women's needs. Hormone replacement still offers the potential for benefit to outweigh harm, providing the appropriate regimen has been instigated in terms of dose, route and combination.

  9. Phytoestrogens as alternative hormone replacement therapy in menopause: What is real, what is unknown.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moreira, Ana C; Silva, Ana M; Santos, Maria S; Sardão, Vilma A

    2014-09-01

    Menopause is characterized by an altered hormonal status and by a decrease in life quality due to the appearance of uncomfortable symptoms. Nowadays, with increasing life span, women spend one-third of their lifetime under menopause. Understanding menopause-associated pathophysiology and developing new strategies to improve the treatment of menopausal-associated symptoms is an important topic in the clinic. This review describes physiological and hormone alterations observed during menopause and therapeutic strategies used during this period. We critically address the benefits and doubts associated with estrogen/progesterone-based hormone replacement therapy (HRT) and discuss the use of phytoestrogens (PEs) as a possible alternative. These relevant plant-derived compounds have structural similarities to estradiol, interacting with cell proteins and organelles, presenting several advantages and disadvantages versus traditional HRT in the context of menopause. However, a better assessment of PEs safety/efficacy would warrant a possible widespread clinical use.

  10. The impact of hormone replacement therapy on menopausal symptoms in younger high-risk women after prophylactic salpingo-oophorectomy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    J.B. Madalinska; M. van Beurden; E.M.A. Bleiker; H.B. Valdimarsdottir; J. Hollenstein; L.F. Massuger; K.N. Gaarenstroom; M.J.E. Mourits; R.H.M. Verheijen; E.B.L. van Dorst; H. van der Putten; K. van der Velden; H. Boonstra; N.K. Aaronson

    2006-01-01

    Purpose Preventive health strategies for women at increased hereditary risk of ovarian cancer include gynecologic screening (GS) and/or prophylactic oophorectomy (PBSO). Hormone replacement therapy (HRT) is often prescribed to compensate for postsurgical endocrine deficiencies. This study examined t

  11. The impact of hormone replacement therapy on menopausal symptoms in younger high-risk women after prophylactic salpingo-oophorectomy.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Madalinska, J.B.; Beurden, M. van; Bleiker, E.M.A.; Valdimarsdottir, H.B.; Hollenstein, J.; Massuger, L.F.A.G.; Gaarenstroom, K.N.; Mourits, M.J.E.; Verheijen, R.H.; Dorst, E.B.L. van; Putten, H. van der; Velden, K. van der; Boonstra, H.; Aaronson, N.K.

    2006-01-01

    PURPOSE: Preventive health strategies for women at increased hereditary risk of ovarian cancer include gynecologic screening (GS) and/or prophylactic oophorectomy (PBSO). Hormone replacement therapy (HRT) is often prescribed to compensate for postsurgical endocrine deficiencies. This study examined

  12. The impact of hormone replacement therapy on menopausal symptoms in younger high-risk women after prophylactic salpingo-oophorectomy.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Madalinska, J.B.; Beurden, M. van; Bleiker, E.M.A.; Valdimarsdottir, H.B.; Hollenstein, J.; Massuger, L.F.A.G.; Gaarenstroom, K.N.; Mourits, M.J.E.; Verheijen, R.H.; Dorst, E.B.L. van; Putten, H. van der; Velden, K. van der; Boonstra, H.; Aaronson, N.K.

    2006-01-01

    PURPOSE: Preventive health strategies for women at increased hereditary risk of ovarian cancer include gynecologic screening (GS) and/or prophylactic oophorectomy (PBSO). Hormone replacement therapy (HRT) is often prescribed to compensate for postsurgical endocrine deficiencies. This study examined

  13. Serum estrogen and SHBG levels and breast cancer incidence among users and never users of hormone replacement therapy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Würtz, Anne Mette Lund; Tjønneland, Anne; Christensen, Jane Hvarregaard;

    2012-01-01

    Levels of endogenous estrogen and SHBG are associated with risk of breast cancer among women who have never used hormone replacement therapy (HRT). We investigated these associations in both never and baseline users of HRT.......Levels of endogenous estrogen and SHBG are associated with risk of breast cancer among women who have never used hormone replacement therapy (HRT). We investigated these associations in both never and baseline users of HRT....

  14. The effectiveness of sublingual and topical compounded bioidentical hormone replacement therapy in postmenopausal women: an observational cohort study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruiz, Andres D; Daniels, Kelly R

    2014-01-01

    Prior studies demonstrated improved menopausal symptom relief following treatment with compounded bioidentical hormone replacement therapy; however, clinical effectiveness studies evaluating different routes of bioidentical hormone replacement therapy administration are lacking. The objective of this study was to determine the effectiveness of sublingual and topical compounded bioidentical hormone replacement therapy for the treatment of vasomotor, mood, and other quality-of-life symptoms in post-menopausal women. This was a prospective, observational cohort study of women > or = 18 years of age who received a compounded sublingual or topical bioidentical hormone replacement therapy preparation between January 1, 2003 and October 1, 2010 in a community pharmacy. Data collection included patient demographics, comorbidities, hormone regimens, and therapeutic outcomes. Patients rated their vasomotor, mood, and quality-of-life symptoms as absent, mild, moderate, or severe at baseline, at one to three months follow-up, and three to six months follow-up. Baseline characteristics were compared using the chi-square test for categorical variables and the Wilcoxon rank sum test for continuous variables. Symptom intensity between baseline and follow-up periods were compared using the Wilcoxon signed-rank test. A total of 200 patients met study criteria; 160 received topical bioidentical hormone replacement therapy, and 40 received sublingual bioidentical hormone replacement therapy. Most sublingually-treated patients (70%) received an estrogen combination and 100% received progesterone. Nearly half (43%) of the topically treated patients received an estrogen combination (43%) and 99% received progesterone. The percentage of sublingually treated patients reporting "moderate" or "severe" symptoms was significantly reduced at one to three months follow-up for the following target symptoms: hot flashes (31%, P = 0.04), night sweats (38%, P sublingual bioidentical hormone

  15. Hormone replacement therapy and risk of breast cancer: the role of progestins

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stahlberg, Claudia Irene; Pederson, Anette Tønnes; Lynge, Elsebeth;

    2003-01-01

    Epidemiological studies have shown an increased risk of breast cancer associated with the use of hormone replacement therapy (HRT). This notion is mostly based on studies from the USA. During the last decades unopposed estrogen treatment has been used to a lesser extent, whereas the combined...... estrogen-progestin treatment regime is now prescribed worldwide. In the USA the predominant compounds are conjugated estrogens and medroxyprogesterone-acetate, whereas oestradiol combined with testosterone-like progestins is commonly used in Europe. These differences are largely the result of traditions...

  16. Long-term hormone replacement therapy preserves bone mineral density in Turner syndrome

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cleemann, Line; Hjerrild, Britta E; Lauridsen, Anna L;

    2009-01-01

    at baseline and follow-up (5.9+/-0.7 years). SETTING: Tertiary hospital. PARTICIPANTS: Fifty-four women with TS (43.0+/-9.95 years). Interventions Hormone replacement therapy (HRT) and calcium and vitamin D supplementation. Main outcome measures BMD (g/cm(2)) measured at lumbar spine, hip, and the non.......010+/-0.144, PTestosterone, IGF1, and maximal oxygen uptake was significantly reduced in TS. CONCLUSION: Longitudinal changes in BMD in TS were slight. BMD can be maintained at most sites in well...

  17. Effects of hormone replacement therapy on endothelial function in menopausal women

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2009-01-01

    Objective To observe the effects of hormone replacement therapy (HRT) on endothelial function in menopausal women. Methods A total of 30 menopausal women were treated with 2.5 mg of Tibolone (Livial) daily. At the same time,30 women with natural menopause without any treatment served as the control group. Endothelium-dependent (EDD),endothelium-independent (NID) vasodilatation function,and estradiol (E2) were examined by the non-invasive high-resolution ultrasonography before the treatment and at 12th,24th,...

  18. Managing the menopause: British Menopause Society Council consensus statement on hormone replacement therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pitkin, Joan; Rees, Margaret C P; Gray, Sarah; Lumsden, Mary Ann; Marsden, Jo; Stevenson, John; Williamson, Jennifer

    2005-12-01

    The British Menopause Society Council aims to help health professionals inform and advise women about the menopause. This guidance regarding estrogen-based hormone replacement therapy (HRT), including tibolone, which is classified in the British National Formulary as HRT, responds to the results and analysis of the randomized Women's Health Initiative studies and the observational Million Women Study. Treatment choice should be based on up-to-date information and targeted to individual women's needs. HRT still offers the potential for benefit to outweigh harm, providing the appropriate regimen has been instigated in terms of dose, route and combination.

  19. Breast cancer with different prognostic characteristics developing in Danish women using hormone replacement therapy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stahlberg, Claudia; Pedersen, A T; Andersen, Zorana Jovanovic;

    2004-01-01

    The aim of this study is to investigate the risk of developing prognostic different types of breast cancer in women using hormone replacement therapy (HRT). A total of 10 874 postmenopausal Danish Nurses were followed since 1993. Incident breast cancer cases and histopathological information were...... retrieved through the National Danish registries. The follow-up ended on 31 December 1999. Breast cancer developed in 244 women, of whom 172 were invasive ductal carcinomas. Compared to never users, current users of HRT had an increased risk of a hormone receptor-positive breast cancer, but a neutral risk...... of receptor-negative breast cancer, relative risk (RR) 3.29 (95% confidence interval (CI): 2.27-4.77) and RR 0.99 (95% CI: 0.42-2.36), respectively (P for difference=0.013). The risk of being diagnosed with low histological malignancy grade was higher than high malignancy grade with RR 4.13 (95% CI: 2...

  20. The role of hormone replacement therapy in the intensive care management of deceased organ donors: a primer for nurses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smetana, Keaton S; Kimmons, Lauren A; Jones, G Morgan

    2015-01-01

    Donation after brain death remains the primary contributor to the supply of organs available for transplantation in the United States. After brain death, both a surge of catecholamines and a dysregulation of the neurohormonal axis may result in hypotension, decreased organ perfusion, and reduced viability of organs to be transplanted. Hormone replacement therapy is widely used to maintain organ perfusion and has been shown to increase the number of organs procured. This article reviews the literature and mechanisms supporting the use of hormone replacement therapy in brain-dead organ donors and provides clinicians with information regarding the administration, monitoring, and preparation of thyroid hormone, arginine vasopressin, and corticosteroids.

  1. Lipoproteína a, aterosclerosis y terapia hormonal de reemplazo Lipoprotein a, atherosclerosis and replacement hormone therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Miguel Lugones Botell

    2005-08-01

    Full Text Available Se realizó una revisión sobre la lipoproteína plasmática, Lp(a, cuyo papel fisiológico es poco conocido. Se ha descrito una asociación entre las concentraciones aumentadas de Lp(a y el proceso aterosclerótico. Además, su exceso podría inducir una disminución de la actividad fibrinolítica y, por tanto, favorecer la trombosis. También analizamos la terapia hormonal de reemplazo. En relación con los efectos positivos, mejora los síntomas climatéricos y previene la osteoporosis, aunque entre los efectos adversos en las mujeres que la siguen, se ha descrito un ligero aumento del riesgo del tromboembolismo venoso, y más recientemente, en estudios realizados en EE.UU. en los años 2002 y 2004, en el ya conocido estudio (Women´s Health Initiative Study, se reportó mayor incidencia de eventos cardiovasculares para la terapia combinada con estrógenos conjugados equinos y medroxiprogesterona, y de stroke para la terapia estrogénica. Estos estudios pusieron en su lugar los efectos de esta terapia, que no es totalmente inocua. Se precisan estudios más amplios para definir el papel de la terapia hormonal de reemplazo y otras medidas terapéuticas sobre el sistema hemostático, el metabolismo lipídico y la enfermedad cardiovascular.A review of plasmatic lipoprotein, Lp(a, whose physiological role is little known, was made. An association between the augmented concentrations of Lp(a and the atherosclerotic proccess has been described. Besides, its excess may lead to a reduction of the fibrinolytic activity and, therefore, favor thrombosis. The replacement hormone therapy was also analyzed. In relation to its positive effects, it improves the climacteric symptoms and prevents osteoporosis. Among its adverse effects, it has been observed a mild increase of the risk for venous thromboembolism and, more recently, in the aleady known Women's Health Initiative Study, it was reported a higher incidence of cardiovascular events for the combined

  2. Efficacy of Drospirenone-Containing Hormone Replacement Therapy to Reduce Vasomotor Symptoms of Menopause

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dana A. Brown

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Hormone replacement therapy has been proven efficacious for controlling vasomotor symptoms such as hot flushes associated with menopause. Drospirenone is a progestin with antiandrogenic and antimineralocorticoid activity that may be used in combination with estrogen to control hot flushes and offers the potential benefit of minimizing breast tenderness, blood pressure elevations and weight gain. Six clinical trials were reviewed. Of these, four trials explicitly listed hot flushes as a primary outcome. Efficacy with regards to hot flushes was found to range from modest to large (i.e., 37.5% to 94.6%, and four of the studies utilized diary cards to assess hot flushes. Results from these studies must be interpreted cautiously as quite a few limitations existed such as small population sizes involving specific ethnic groups, lack of p values with regards to baseline characteristics lending question to homogeneity, and inclusion of mostly healthy participants. Additionally, while the studies were long enough to see an effect, the long term effects of drospirenone-containing hormone replacement therapy (HRT is unknown. The available data supports the use of drospirenone-containing HRT for the treatment of hot flushes associated with menopause.

  3. Hormone replacement therapy and menopause%绝经期激素替代疗法

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2002-01-01

    SUMMARY Hormone replacement therapy (HRT) was initiated almost half a century ago to treat menopausal symptoms. Initially, its use remained limited even among symptomatic women and the move toward postmenopausal hormone use for disease prevention came later. Improved treatment schedules and delivery systems expanded the use of HRT worldwide. However, large trials of postmenopausal hormones with disease outcomes were even later in coming and today HRT has become a specialized, multidisciplinary area of research. As the population continues to grow older, there has been an increased focus on the effects of ageing. HRT may affect length and quality of life through disease prevention. It may have possible beneficial effects on cognition, on the incidence of hip fracture, myocardial infarction and stroke, and adverse effects on the incidence of breast cancer, endometrial cancer, and venous thromboembolism.Today's attitudes about the hormonal treatments for the menopausal transition have moved from expansive optimism to contracting disappointment amidst safety concerns and equivocal results and faces greater skepticism and scrutiny. The health and well being of large numbers of women are at stake, and researchers, clinicians and the general public are watching and weighing the options.

  4. Modification of blood pressure in postmenopausal women: role of hormone replacement therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cannoletta M

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Marianna Cannoletta, Angelo Cagnacci Institute of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Department of Medical and Surgical Sciences of the Mother, Child and Adult, University of Modena and Reggio Emilia, Modena and Reggio Emilia, Emilia-Romagna, Italy Abstract: The rate of hypertension increases after menopause. Whether estrogen and progesterone deficiency associated with menopause play a role in determining a worst blood pressure (BP control is still controversial. Also, studies dealing with the administration of estrogens or hormone therapy (HT have reported conflicting evidence. In general it seems that, despite some negative data on subgroups of later postmenopausal women obtained with oral estrogens, in particular conjugated equine estrogens (CEE, most of the data indicate neutral or beneficial effects of estrogen or HT administration on BP control of both normotensive and hypertensive women. Data obtained with ambulatory BP monitoring and with transdermal estrogens are more convincing and concordant in defining positive effect on BP control of both normotensive and hypertensive postmenopausal women. Overall progestin adjunct does not hamper the effect of estrogens. Among progestins, drospirenone, a spironolactone-derived molecule, appears to be the molecule with the best antihypertensive properties. Keywords: hormone replacement therapy, estrogen, progestin, blood pressure, menopause, hypertension 

  5. Parity, infertility, oral contraceptives, and hormone replacement therapy and the risk of ovarian serous borderline tumors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, Emma L Kaderly; Hannibal, Charlotte Gerd; Dehlendorff, Christian

    2017-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: Few studies have examined the risk of an ovarian serous borderline tumor (SBT) associated with parity, infertility, oral contraceptives (OCs), or hormone replacement therapy (HRT), which was the study aim. METHODS: This nationwide case-control study included all women with an SBT...... diagnosis in Denmark, 1978-2002. SBTs were confirmed by centralized expert pathology review. For each case, 15 age-matched female controls were randomly selected using risk-set sampling. Cases and controls with previous cancer (except for non-melanoma skin cancer) and controls with bilateral oophorectomy...... birth also decreased the SBT risk (p=0.03). An increased SBT risk was associated with infertility (OR=3.31; 95% CI: 2.44-4.49), which was present both among parous and nulliparous women. HRT use increased the SBT risk (OR=1.32; 95% CI: 1.02-1.72), whereas OC use decreased the risk (OR=0.40; 95% CI: 0...

  6. Hormone Replacement Therapy: An Increased Risk of Recurrence and Mortality for Breast Cancer Patients?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lupo, Molly; Dains, Joyce E.; Madsen, Lydia T.

    2015-01-01

    Historically, randomized controlled trials (RCTs) have shown an increased risk of recurrence and mortality among women who have used primarily oral HRT after breast cancer. However, many of these studies have had design flaws that may impact the findings. Numerous investigators have concluded that additional RCTs should be performed, but because of ethical issues and logistic challenges, large-scale RCTs are unlikely. Thus, the authors conducted an integrative review investigating recurrence and mortality data among breast cancer survivors who have used hormone replacement therapy (HRT). They recommend a stepwise algorithm for treating vaginal symptoms in breast cancer survivors: (1) start with nonhormonal treatments; (2) progress to a detailed discussion among patients and health-care professionals about the current known risks and benefits of vaginal estrogen; and (3) conclude with mutual decision-making between health-care providers and patients regarding the use of vaginal estrogen treatment. PMID:26705493

  7. Changing pattern of thyroid and adrenal function in postmenopausal women after hormone replacement therapy

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Lu Shu-lan; Yu Shan-shan; Cao Zuan-sun

    2005-01-01

    Objective:To investigate the changing pattern of thyroid and adrenal function in postmenopausal women; and the relationship between hormone replacement therapy (HRT) and thyroid and adrenal function. Methods:The levels of tT3, tT4, fT3, fT4, TSH and cortisol were measured in 60 postmenopausal women (30 cases in HRT group; 30 cases in control group) before and 12 months after HRT.Results:The serum levels of tT3, tT4, fT3, fT4, TSH and cortisol had no significant difference before and 12 months after HRT in postmenopausal women. The values of them were all in normal ranges.Conclusion:Changing pattern of thyroid and adrenal function was not as significant as that of gonads in postmenopausal women and the impact of HRT on it was not so significantly evident.

  8. Description of women's personality traits and psychological vulnerability prior to choosing hormone replacement therapy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Loekkegaard, E; Eplov, L F; Køster, A

    2002-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: Data suggest that women using hormone replacement therapy (HRT) represent a special subgroup of the general population regarding, for instance, cardiovascular risk factors and education. OBJECTIVE: To analyse if women who choose HRT are characterised a priori by high neuroticism score...... included Eysencks personality questionnaire concerning intro/extroversion and neuroticism. At the age of 45, the re-examination of the women included a test for psychological vulnerability. The participants reported whether or not they used HRT at the age of 40, 45, 51 and 60 years. The analyses comprised...... "never users" of HRT and "future users", defined as women who started HRT subsequent to baseline registration during the observation period. The groups were compared by multivariate statistical methods to adjust for confounding factors. RESULTS: Women with high neuroticism score at the age of 40 were...

  9. Hormone replacement therapy and age-related brain shrinkage: regional effects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raz, Naftali; Rodrigue, Karen M; Kennedy, Kristen M; Acker, James D

    2004-11-15

    Neuroprotective properties of estrogen have been established in animal models, but clinical trials of hormone replacement therapy (HRT) produced contradictory results. We examined the impact of HRT on age-related regional changes in human brain volume. Six brain regions were measured twice, five years apart, in 12 healthy women who took HRT and in matched controls who did not. The controls showed a typical pattern of differential brain shrinkage in the association cortices and the hippocampus with no change in the primary visual cortex. In contrast, women who took HRT showed comparable shrinkage of the hippocampus but no significant shrinkage of the neocortex. Future large scale studies may benefit from applying regional rather than global measures in assessment of brain integrity.

  10. Sources of information influencing the state-of-the-science gap in hormone replacement therapy usage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chew, Fiona; Wu, Xianwei

    2017-01-01

    Medical reviews and research comprise a key information source for news media stories on medical therapies and innovations as well as for physicians in updating their practice. The present study examined medical review journal articles, physician surveys and news media coverage of hormone replacement therapy (HT) to assess the relationship between the three information sources and whether/if they contributed to a state-of-the-science gap (a condition when the evaluation of a medical condition or therapy ascertained by the highest standards of investigation is incongruent with the science-in-practice such as physician recommendations and patient actions). We content-analyzed 177 randomly sampled HT medical reviews between 2002 and 2014, and HT news valence in three major TV networks, newspapers and magazines/internet sites in 2002-2003, 2008-2009 and 2012-14. The focus in both analyses was whether HT benefits outweighed risks, risks outweighed benefits or both risks and benefits were presented. We also qualitatively content-analyzed all 19 surveys of US physicians' HT recommendations from 2002 to 2009, and 2012 to 2014. Medical reviews yielded a mixed picture about HT (40.1% benefits, 26.0% risks, and 33.9% both benefits and risks). While a majority of physician surveys were pro-HT 10/19), eight showed varied attitudes and one was negative. Newspaper and television coverage reflected a pro and con balance while magazine stories were more positive in the later reporting period. Medical journal review articles, physicians, and media reports all provide varying view points towards hormone therapy use thus leading to limited knowledge about the actual risks and benefits of HT among peri- and menopausal women and a state-of-the-science gap.

  11. Sources of information influencing the state-of-the-science gap in hormone replacement therapy usage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Xianwei

    2017-01-01

    Objective Medical reviews and research comprise a key information source for news media stories on medical therapies and innovations as well as for physicians in updating their practice. The present study examined medical review journal articles, physician surveys and news media coverage of hormone replacement therapy (HT) to assess the relationship between the three information sources and whether/if they contributed to a state-of-the-science gap (a condition when the evaluation of a medical condition or therapy ascertained by the highest standards of investigation is incongruent with the science-in-practice such as physician recommendations and patient actions). Methods We content-analyzed 177 randomly sampled HT medical reviews between 2002 and 2014, and HT news valence in three major TV networks, newspapers and magazines/internet sites in 2002–2003, 2008–2009 and 2012–14. The focus in both analyses was whether HT benefits outweighed risks, risks outweighed benefits or both risks and benefits were presented. We also qualitatively content-analyzed all 19 surveys of US physicians’ HT recommendations from 2002 to 2009, and 2012 to 2014. Results Medical reviews yielded a mixed picture about HT (40.1% benefits, 26.0% risks, and 33.9% both benefits and risks). While a majority of physician surveys were pro-HT 10/19), eight showed varied attitudes and one was negative. Newspaper and television coverage reflected a pro and con balance while magazine stories were more positive in the later reporting period. Conclusion Medical journal review articles, physicians, and media reports all provide varying view points towards hormone therapy use thus leading to limited knowledge about the actual risks and benefits of HT among peri- and menopausal women and a state-of-the-science gap. PMID:28158240

  12. Effects of aerobic exercise on ectopic lipids in patients with growth hormone deficiency before and after growth hormone replacement therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christ, Emanuel R; Egger, Andrea; Allemann, Sabin; Buehler, Tania; Kreis, Roland; Boesch, Chris

    2016-01-21

    Growth hormone replacement therapy (GHRT) increases exercise capacity and insulin resistance while it decreases fat mass in growth hormone-deficient patients (GHD). Ectopic lipids (intramyocellular (IMCL) and intrahepatocellular lipids (IHCL) are related to insulin resistance. The effect of GHRT on ectopic lipids is unknown. It is hypothesized that exercise-induced utilization of ectopic lipids is significantly decreased in GHD patients and normalized by GHRT. GHD (4 females, 6 males) and age/gender/waist-matched control subjects (CS) were studied. VO2max was assessed on a treadmill and insulin sensitivity determined by a two-step hyperinsulinaemic-euglycaemic clamp. Visceral (VAT) and subcutaneous (SAT) fat were quantified by MR-imaging. IHCL and IMCL were measured before and after a 2 h exercise at 50-60% of VO2max using MR-spectroscopy (∆IMCL, ∆IHCL). Identical investigations were performed after 6 months of GHRT. VO2max was similar in GHD and CS and significantly increased after GHRT; GHRT significantly decreased SAT and VAT. 2 h-exercise resulted in a decrease in IMCL (significant in CS and GHRT) and a significant increase in IHCL in CS and GHD pre and post GHRT. GHRT didn't significantly impact on ∆IMCL and ∆IHCL. We conclude that aerobic exercise affects ectopic lipids in patients and controls. GHRT increases exercise capacity without influencing ectopic lipids.

  13. Pharmaceutical intervention in menopausal patients with hormone replacement therapy in a community pharmacy from Antofagasta

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alejandrina Alucema

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Context: Hormone replacement therapy (HRT is the most widely used treatment for controlling the effects of menopause. This type of therapy causes some drug-related problems (DRP, which requires monitoring to control the negative effects and ensure patient adherence to therapy. Aims: Perform a pharmacotherapeutic monitoring and educate to menopausal patients in HRT of a community pharmacy from the city of Antofagasta. Methods: A 98-menopausal patients underwent a pharmaceutical intervention to identify the PRM and its resolution. It was applied to them a survey before and after educational activities about this disease and HRT to determine the knowledge on the subject. Results: During the pharmacotherapeutic monitoring was determined that 55% of patients using combined HRT. 62 DRPs were detected, of which 43 were resolved (69%; the most were Patient-Pharmacist (73%. The better resolution DRP were DRP 4(b “frequency of inadequate administration” and DRP 2(a “no medical indication”. At baseline, 90% had an inadequate level of knowledge about the disease and THR, 8% intermediate, and only 2% adequate. After the implementation of the education strategy, the level of knowledge increased, achieving at the end of the study only intermediate (10% and adequate (90% levels. Conclusions: The results confirm the importance of pharmaceutical intervention for the identification and resolution of DRP and the requirement to establish educational strategies to increase the knowledge about menopause and HRT in menopausal patients.

  14. Hormone replacement therapy in morphine-induced hypogonadic male chronic pain patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ravaioli Laura

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In male patients suffering from chronic pain, opioid administration induces severe hypogonadism, leading to impaired physical and psychological conditions such as fatigue, anaemia and depression. Hormone replacement therapy is rarely considered for these hypogonadic patients, notwithstanding the various pharmacological solutions available. Methods To treat hypogonadism and to evaluate the consequent endocrine, physical and psychological changes in male chronic pain patients treated with morphine (epidural route, we tested the administration of testosterone via a gel formulation for one year. Hormonal (total testosterone, estradiol, free testosterone, DHT, cortisol, pain (VAS and other pain questionnaires, andrological (Ageing Males' Symptoms Scale - AMS and psychological (POMS, CES-D and SF-36 parameters were evaluated at baseline (T0 and after 3, 6 and 12 months (T3, T6, T12 respectively. Results The daily administration of testosterone increased total and free testosterone and DHT at T3, and the levels remained high until T12. Pain rating indexes (QUID progressively improved from T3 to T12 while the other pain parameters (VAS, Area% remained unchanged. The AMS sexual dimension and SF-36 Mental Index displayed a significant improvement over time. Conclusions In conclusion, our results suggest that a constant, long-term supply of testosterone can induce a general improvement of the male chronic pain patient's quality of life, an important clinical aspect of pain management.

  15. Effects of hormone replacement therapy on endothelial function in menopausal women

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jin-rn Yang; Fen Li

    2009-01-01

    Objective To observe the effects of hormone replacement therapy (HRT) on endothelial function in menopausal women. Methods A total of 30 menopausal women were treated with 2.5 mg of Tibolone (Livial) daily. At the same time, 30 women with natural menopause without any treatment served as the control group. Endothelium-dependent (EDD), endothelium-independent (NID) vasodilatation function, and estradiol (E2) were examined by the non-invasive high-resolution ultrasonography before the treatment and at 12th, 24th, 36th and 48th week of treatment, respectively. Results After hormone treatment, E2 increased significantly and EDD was improved significantly (P<0.05), and E2 was positively related with EDD (r=0.8092, P<0.001). No change of EDD was observed in the control group whereas a significant increase was observed in the treatment group. Conclusion Endothelium-dependent vasodilatation dysfunction is prominent in menopausal women. Tibolone can help improve the condition.

  16. Hormone replacement therapy: will it affect seizure control and AED levels?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harden, Cynthia L

    2008-03-01

    Interest in the years of reproductive changes for women with epilepsy (WWE), specifically perimenopause, menopause and postmenopause has been emerging in the epilepsy community. This article discusses evidence for changes in seizure frequency during perimenopause and postmenopause. Further, a catamenial epilepsy pattern during the reproductive years may be a hallmark for the observed seizure frequency change during these years; that is, an increase at perimenopause but a decrease at menopause. This finding implies that a subset of WWE are particularly susceptible to endogenous reproductive hormonal changes. An adverse effect on seizure frequency with the use of hormone replacement therapy (HRT) during postmenopause for WWE was reported in questionnaires, and was later borne out in a clinical trial. The laboratory counterpart of this human trial, HRT in ovariectomized rodent seizure models, shows that estrogen and progesterone are neuroprotective and do not uniformly increase seizure frequency. Possible reasons for the discrepancy between "the lab and the clinic" are presented. Strategies for managing HRT in symptomatic postmenopausal WWE using estrogenic and progestogenic compounds that may be less likely to promote seizures are discussed.

  17. Pulmonary thrombosis associated with antidiuretic hormone replacement therapy due to secondary diabetes insipidus after traumatic brain injury: A case report

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naito, Kiyohito; Watari, Taiji; Yasunari, Eisuke; Yamano, Miki; Mogami, Atsuhiko; Obayashi, Osamu; Kaneko, Kazuo

    2012-01-01

    INTRODUCTION Diabetes insipidus is a well-recognized complication of traumatic brain injury. The majority of patients with post-traumatic diabetes insipidus will require antidiuretic hormone (ADH) replacement therapy and tend to show dehydration. On the other hand, some negative effects of ADH on blood coagulation, such as increased platelet cohesion and the promotion of von Willebrand factor release, have also been reported. However, the incidence of thrombosis during antidiuretic hormone replacement therapy is disputed. PRESENTATION OF CASE A case of pulmonary thrombosis associated with ADH replacement therapy due to secondary diabetes insipidus after traumatic brain injury is presented here. DISCUSSION In our case, there were three factors that may have contributed to the observed thrombosis (dehydration, bed rest for a long period and ADH replacement therapy). CONCLUSION We believe that controlling urinary output and monitoring urinary and serum osmotic pressure are necessary for the management for diabetes insipidus patients after traumatic brain injury. In particular, we must carefully monitor the management of such patients during antidiuretic hormone replacement therapy. PMID:23131855

  18. Pulmonary thrombosis associated with antidiuretic hormone replacement therapy due to secondary diabetes insipidus after traumatic brain injury: A case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naito, Kiyohito; Watari, Taiji; Yasunari, Eisuke; Yamano, Miki; Mogami, Atsuhiko; Obayashi, Osamu; Kaneko, Kazuo

    2013-01-01

    Diabetes insipidus is a well-recognized complication of traumatic brain injury. The majority of patients with post-traumatic diabetes insipidus will require antidiuretic hormone (ADH) replacement therapy and tend to show dehydration. On the other hand, some negative effects of ADH on blood coagulation, such as increased platelet cohesion and the promotion of von Willebrand factor release, have also been reported. However, the incidence of thrombosis during antidiuretic hormone replacement therapy is disputed. A case of pulmonary thrombosis associated with ADH replacement therapy due to secondary diabetes insipidus after traumatic brain injury is presented here. In our case, there were three factors that may have contributed to the observed thrombosis (dehydration, bed rest for a long period and ADH replacement therapy). We believe that controlling urinary output and monitoring urinary and serum osmotic pressure are necessary for the management for diabetes insipidus patients after traumatic brain injury. In particular, we must carefully monitor the management of such patients during antidiuretic hormone replacement therapy. Copyright © 2012 Surgical Associates Ltd. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Hormonal replacement therapy reduces forearm fracture incidence in recent postmenopausal women - results of the Danish Osteoporosis Prevention Study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mosekilde, Leif; Beck-Nielsen, H; Sørensen, O H

    2000-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: To study the fracture reducing potential of hormonal replacement therapy (HRT) in recent postmenopausal women in a primary preventive scenario. METHODS: Prospective controlled comprehensive cohort trial: 2016 healthy women aged 45-58 years, from three to 24 months past last menstrual ...

  20. Risk of low-energy hip, wrist, and upper arm fractures among current and previous users of hormone replacement therapy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hundrup, Yrsa Andersen; Høidrup, Susanne; Ekholm, Ola

    2004-01-01

    To examine the effect of oestrogen alone and in combination with progestin on the risk of low-energy, hip, wrist, and upper arm fractures. Additionally, to examine to what extent previous use, duration of use as well as recency of discontinuation of hormone replacement therapy (HRT) influences th...

  1. Hormone replacement therapy: changes in frequency and type of prescription by Dutch GPs during the last decade of the millenium.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Donker, G.A.; Spreeuwenberg, P.; Bartelds, A.I.M.; Velden, K. van der; Foets, M.

    2000-01-01

    Objective: The present study was conducted in order to determine the change of frequency and type of hormone replacement therapy (HRT) regimen newly prescribed by Dutch GPs. Methods: A comparison was made of two data sets (multi-stage random samples) collected in 1987/88 and from 1995 to 1998 concer

  2. The growth hormone (GH)-insulin-like growth factor axis during testosterone replacement therapy in GH-treated hypopituitary males

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fisker, Sidse; Nørrelund, Helene; Juul, A

    2001-01-01

    -independent effect on IGF-I and related parameters. Eight adult hypopituitary men (39.9 +/- 5.7 years) receiving growth hormone (GH) and testosterone replacement therapy (250 mg testosterone enantate every fourth week) participated in this prospective study. Frequent blood samples were drawn over a 5 week period...

  3. Impacto da terapia hormonal sobre o peso corpóreo Impact of hormone replacement therapy on body weight

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joana Palmira Martins Almeida

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available OBJETIVO: avaliar o efeito da terapêutica hormonal (TH no peso de mulheres na peri-menopausa, assim como o efeito de diferentes regimes terapêuticos no referido parâmetro. MÉTODOS: estudo retrospectivo de 139 mulheres, com menopausa há menos de 2 anos, acompanhadas na consulta de climatério do nosso departamento. Obtiveram-se dois grupos: mulheres a quem se iniciou TH (n=89 e outro, grupo controle, sem terapia hormonal (n=50. Em cada grupo, foi avaliada a modificação ponderal no intervalo de 1 ano após a primeira consulta. Nas submetidas a TH, avaliou-se esse mesmo parâmetro em função de diferentes regimes terapêuticos preconizados: estrogênio isolado vs estroprogestagênio e dose standard vs baixa dosagem. A análise estatística foi realizada com recurso ao programa SPSS®, adotando-se como nível de significância valores pPURPOSE: to evaluate the effect of hormone replacement therapy (HT on the weight on perimenopausal women as well as the effect of different treatment regimens on this parameter. METHODS: a retrospective study of 139 women with menopause for less than 2 years, who were monitored with periodical visits in our department. We compared two groups: women who started HT (n=89 with women who had no hormonal treatment (n=50 and in the two groups, we evaluated the changes in body weight over a 1-year period. In the first group, we assessed the same parameter as a function of different treatment regimens: estrogen alone versus estrogen combined with progestin and standard dose versus low dose. The SPSS® program was used for statistical analysis, with the level of significance set at p<0.05. RESULTS: the groups were similar with respect to demographic and baseline characteristics; weight gain was higher in the untreated group (434 vs 76 g, but the difference observed was not significant (p = 0.406; among HT users, those taking estrogen alone had an increased weight gain compared to women taking estrogen with progestin

  4. Temporal changes in clinic and ambulatory blood pressure during cyclic post-menopausal hormone replacement therapy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, M B; Rasmussen, Verner; Jensen, Gorm Boje;

    2000-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: Post-menopausal hormone replacement (HRT) might protect against cardiovascular disease, possibly by arterial vasodilation and reduced blood pressure. Progestogens are needed to avoid endometrial disease but vascular effects are controversial. The objective was to assess temporal changes...... in blood pressure (BP) by two measurement techniques during a cyclic hormone replacement regimen. DESIGN AND METHODS: Sixteen healthy and normotensive post-menopausal women (age 55 +/- 3 years) were studied in a placebo-controlled, randomized crossover study, and were randomized to 17beta-oestradiol plus...

  5. Temporal changes in clinic and ambulatory blood pressure during cyclic post-menopausal hormone replacement therapy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, M B; Rasmussen, Verner; Jensen, Gorm Boje

    2000-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: Post-menopausal hormone replacement (HRT) might protect against cardiovascular disease, possibly by arterial vasodilation and reduced blood pressure. Progestogens are needed to avoid endometrial disease but vascular effects are controversial. The objective was to assess temporal changes...... in blood pressure (BP) by two measurement techniques during a cyclic hormone replacement regimen. DESIGN AND METHODS: Sixteen healthy and normotensive post-menopausal women (age 55 +/- 3 years) were studied in a placebo-controlled, randomized crossover study, and were randomized to 17beta-oestradiol plus...

  6. Risk of venous thromboembolic disease in postmenopausal women taking oral or transdermal hormone replacement therapy

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Barbara RUSZKOWSKA; Gra(z)yna GADOMSKA; Liliana BIELIS; Marzena GRUSZKA; Barbara G(O)RALCZYK; Danuta RO(S)(C); Gra(z)yna ODROW(A)(Z)-SYPNIEWSKA

    2011-01-01

    Objective: The influence of hormone replacement therapy(HRT)on hemostasis processes depends on the type of hormone,the combination of doses,the time of taking HRT,and the route of administration(oral,transdermal,implanted).The aim of the current study was to assess some parameters of coagulation,especially tissue factor pathway inhibitor(TFPI)and tissue factor(TF)in postmenopausal women using oral or transdermal HRT.Methods: The study was conducted on 76 healthy women,including 46 women aged 44-58 years who were taking oral(26)or transdermal(20)HRT,and 30 women aged 44-54 years who did not take HRT as the control group.Plasma concentrations of TF,TFPI,thrombin-antithrombin complex(TAT),and D-dimer were performed by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay(ELISA).Moreover,the concentration of fibrinogen and activity of protein C were measured by chromogenic and chronometric methods.Results: We observed a significantly higher concentration of TF and a significantly lower concentration of TFPI in women taking oral and transdermal HRT in comparison with the control group.We also found a significantly lower concentration of fibrinogen in women taking oral HRT vs.the control group.Moreover,no statistically significant changes in concentrations of TAT and D-dimer,or activity of protein C were noted.Conclusions: In this study,the occurrence of an increased TF concentration simultaneously with a decreased concentration of TFPI in women taking HRT indicates hypercoagulability.No significant modification of TAT or D-dimer occurred,and thus there may not be increased risk of thrombosis.

  7. Effects of hormone replacement therapy on magnetic resonance imaging of brain parenchyma hyperintensities in postmenopausal women

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yan-yong LIU; Qin-sheng GE; Ping-ping ZUO; Ling HU; Chao JI; Dong-wen CHEN; Xi SHEN; Nan YANG; Yun YUE; Jing-mei JIANG; Xia HONG

    2009-01-01

    Aim:To apply 3.0 magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) to study the effects of long-term,low dose hormone replacement therapy (HRT) on the brain parenchyma of postmenopausal women.Methods:A total of 155 postmenopausal healthy female medical staff members from Peking Union Medical College Hospital were enrolled.The HRT group was composed of 71 subjects who had been given a low dose of HRT for over 4 years,while 84 women who had never been given HRT were enrolled in the control group.The Mini-Mental State Examination (MMSE) was used to evaluate mental state,and an Enzyme-Linked ImmunoSorbent Assay (ELISA) was used to detect plasma levels of sex hormones.In addition,all participants were subjected to an MRI,including axial T2 weighted imaging (T2WI),fluid-attenuated inversion recovery (FLAIR),T1 weighted imaging (TIWI,oblique coronal,vertical to the hippocampus,slice thickness 3 mm without gaps),and a 3D image of the whole brain.Results:The ELISA showed that the plasma level of estradiol in the HRT group was significantly higher than that in the control group (P

  8. Hormone Replacement Therapy and Risk of Breast Cancer in Korean Women: A Quantitative Systematic Review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bae, Jong-Myon; Kim, Eun Hee

    2015-01-01

    Objectives: The epidemiological characteristics of breast cancer incidence by age group in Korean women are unique. This systematic review aimed to investigate the association between hormone replacement therapy (HRT) and breast cancer risk in Korean women. Methods: We searched electronic databases such as KoreaMed, KMbase, KISS, and RISS4U as well as PubMed for publications on Korean breast cancer patients. We also conducted manual searching based on references and citations in potential papers. All of the analytically epidemiologic studies that obtained individual data on HRT exposure and breast cancer occurrence in Korean women were selected. We restricted the inclusion of case-control studies to those that included age-matched controls. Estimates of summary odds ratio (SOR) with 95% confidence intervals (CIs) were calculated using random effect models. Results: One cohort and five case-control studies were finally selected. Based on the heterogeneity that existed among the six studies (I-squared=70.2%), a random effect model was applied. The summary effect size of HRT history from the six articles indicated no statistical significance in breast cancer risk (SOR, 0.983; 95% CI, 0.620 to 1.556). Conclusions: These facts support no significant effect of HRT history in the risk of breast cancer in Korean women. It is necessary to conduct a pooled analysis. PMID:26429288

  9. Prevalence of hormone replacement therapy in a sample of middle-aged women

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, S H; Jeune, B

    1988-01-01

    A survey based on a postal questionnaire sent to a random sample of Danish women aged 40-59 yr living on the island of Fünen (n = 401, response rate = 79%) revealed that the overall prevalence of the use of hormone replacement therapy (HRT) was 16%, the highest rate being in the 50-54 age group (21......%). Among post-menopausal women the rate was 21% and it was highest of all (37%) in those who had undergone an artificial menopause. The median age at the start of treatment was 44.3 yr among the artificial menopause and 48.9 yr among the natural menopause subjects. About half of the women were treated...... with natural oestrogen alone and over a third with cyclic natural oestrogen in combination with progestogens. Almost one-third of the women had consulted their doctor about climacteric complaints and two-thirds of these were current or past users of HRT. The women had ambiguous feelings towards HRT...

  10. Effects of hormone replacement therapy on platelet activation in postmenopausal women

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    古健; 杨冬梓; 王良岸; 尹松梅; 邝健全

    2003-01-01

    Objective To assess the effects of hormone replacement therapy (HRT) on platelet activation in postmenopausal women compared with premenopausal women. Methods The expressions of CD41 and CD62P in fifteen postmenopausal women before and after HRT were detected using flow cytometry (FCM), with fifteen premenopausal women with a mean age of 47 years as controls.Results The expressions of CD41 and CD62P in postmenopausal women were higher than those in the control group. CD62P(%), CD62P(I) and CD41 were reduced from 36.40±5.9, 37.75±5.8, and 470.11±74.0 to 27.97±5.6, 26.64±4.9, and 303.23±72.8 after six months of HRT (P<0.05). Conclusions Platelet activation in postmenopausal women was higher than in premenopausal women and was reduced significantly after six months of HRT. HRT may have a favorable effect on reduction of platelet activity.

  11. Analysis of the Influence of Hormone Replacement Therapy on Osteocalcin Gene Expression in Postmenopausal Women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rahnama, Mansur; Jastrzębska-Jamrogiewicz, Izabela; Jamrogiewicz, Rafał; Trybek, Grzegorz

    2015-01-01

    Osteocalcin (OC) contributes to the process of bone mineralization. Present study was designed to investigate the changes in OC gene expression of postmenopausal women treated with hormone replacement therapy (HRT). Study was also designed to evaluate OC gene expression in cells which are not part of connective tissue. Research was carried out on 30 postmenopausal women not treated and 30 treated with HRT. Examination of OC gene expression was conducted on peripheral blood lymphocytes (PBL) and buccal epithelial lining (BEL). Densitometry was conducted on femur and mandible. Tests revealed OC gene expression in BEL and PBL. BMD was higher in groups treated with HRT. Assessment of correlation between the OC gene expression in BEL and BMD of mandible revealed significant positive relation. OC gene expression can be stated BEL and PBL. Analysis of correlation between OC gene expression in oral cavity and mandible BMD showed significant correlation between local OC expression and local bone metabolism. The relation between OC gene expression and bone metabolism is complex and further research is needed to clear all of the uncertainties.

  12. Loyalties in clinical research on drugs: the case of hormone replacement therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palmlund, Ingar

    2006-07-01

    In this study, physicians' loyalties toward patients and pharmaceutical companies in clinical drug research are explored, using Bourdieu's conceptual tools. The utilization of estrogen supplements in so-called hormone replacement therapy (HRT) for healthy menopausal and postmenopausal women is used as a case. For over 60 years a multitude of reports in medical journals have praised the benefits of HRT, even though some studies indicated hazards. Clinical studies and promotional campaigns resulted in prescriptions of HRT for millions of women. A large randomized controlled clinical trial known as the Women's Health Initiative (WHI) in 2002 demonstrated that many of the claims of benefits of HRT had been misguiding; the risks of cancer and heart disease had been proven higher than most purported benefits. I draw on Bourdieu's theories to emphasize that a more distinct demarcation line between those who dispose their economic capital in the interests of producing and promoting products for profit, and those who exchange their cultural capital for economic benefits, is needed to ensure trust in physicians' loyalty to patients is not eroded.

  13. Is the oral contraceptive or hormone replacement therapy a risk factor for cholelithiasis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Siqi; Wang, Yuqiong; Xu, Jinming; Chen, Yuxin

    2017-01-01

    Abstract Background: Association between exogenous estrogen intake and cholelithiasis risk has been reported in several epidemiological studies, including oral contraceptive (OC) and hormone replacement therapy (HRT), while the results were controversial. This study aimed to perform a comprehensive meta-analysis of this issue. Methods: PUBMED, EMBASE, and Cochrane library database were searched up to October 2016. Two reviewers independently extracted data from eligible studies, relative risks (RRs), and/or odds ratios (ORs) with 95% confidence intervals (95% CIs) for the highest versus lowest categories of intake were adopted. Either a fixed- or a random-effects model was adopted to estimate overall RRs or ORs. Besides, subgroup and publication bias analyses were applied to explain the heterogeneity. An original study was also conducted to verify our conclusion. Results: A total of 19 studies with approximately 556,620 participants were included in this meta-analysis. The pooled RR of cholelithiasis for the highest versus the lowest categories was 1.59 (95% CI: 1.44–1.75), indicating that exogenous estrogen was positive associated with the intake of exogenous estrogen. However, the pooled RR of OC intake and cholelithiasis risk was 1.19 (95% CI: 0.97–1.45), and the RR for HRT was 1.79 (95% CI: 1.61–2.00). Conclusion: The HRT was positively associated with the cholelithiasis risk, and the OC will not increase the risk of cholelithiasis. PMID:28383429

  14. Are women who are taking Hormone Replacement Therapy doing so with informed consent?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mitchell, E.M

    2003-11-01

    Just over half the population in Britain today are women, and each is likely to spend over one-third of her life in the post menopausal state. The number of post-war 'Baby Boomers' is having a profound effect on interest in the menopause and increasing awareness of Hormone Replacement Therapy (HRT). Patients are no longer prepared to passively accept the advice of their doctor, and should make an informed decision over its use, after having been given up-to-date information. Some of the claimed benefits of taking HRT are not fully proven and the risks and disadvantages must be considered, notably the increased risk of breast cancer and the effect on the sensitivity and specificity of the mammographic image. The long-term benefits are still uncertain. Available information needs to be comprehensible, credible, and up to date. Whether to initiate the taking of HRT is one of the most important decisions a woman entering mid-life will make, so she needs to be given information she can understand in order to make an informed decision. HRT and informed consent are topics relevant to mammography, which was the rationale in writing this paper as part of a Post Graduate Certificate in Mammographic Studies.

  15. Risks and benefits of hormone replacement therapy in older men Riscos e benefícios da terapia de reposição hormonal em homens idosos

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fábio Firmbach Pasqualotto

    2004-02-01

    Full Text Available The use of testosterone in older men, known as male hormonal replacement therapy or androgen replacement therapy, has become of increasing interest to both the medical and lay communities over the past decade. Even though the knowledge of the potential benefits and risks of male Androgen Replacement Therapy has increased dramatically, there is still much that needs to be determined. Although there are a number of potential benefits of male Androgen Replacement Therapy and data concerning clinical effects of such replacement have accumulated, as yet there have not been any large multicenter randomized controlled trials of this therapy. It is the purpose of this article to review what is currently known about the possible risks and benefits of male Androgen Replacement Therapy by discussing the clinical trials to date.O uso da testosterona em homens idosos, conhecido como Terapia de Reposição Hormonal no homem ou Terapia de Reposição com Androgênios, têm aumentado o interesse para as comunidades médica e leiga na última década. Muito embora o conhecimento a respeito dos potenciais benefícios e riscos da Terapia de Reposição Hormonal nos homens tem aumentado dramaticamente, ainda existe muito que precisa ser determinado. Embora existam vários benefícios potenciais da Terapia de Reposição com Androgênios e dados clínicos relacionados com o uso de tal terapia, não existem ainda nenhum estudo controlado, randomizado e multicêntrico avaliando o uso de tal terapia. O objetivo deste artigo é revisar os aspectos atuais sobre os possíveis riscos e benefícios da Terapia de Reposição com Androgênios discutindo os estudos clínicos publicados sobre o assunto.

  16. Evolution of glycated haemoglobin in adults on growth hormone replacement therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andrea Parra R, Paola; Barquiel A, Beatriz; Fernández M, Alberto; Pérez F, Laura; Lecumberri S, Beatriz; Gaby Llaro C, Mary; Álvarez-Escolá, Cristina

    2015-05-01

    To evaluate the effects of GH replacement therapy (GHR) for 3 years on glycated haemoglobin (HbA1c) and on the presence of dysglycaemia at any time during follow-up in Spanish adult patients with growth hormone deficiency (GHD). A retrospective study of 41 patients with GHD was conducted using baseline and long-term data. Changes in HbA1c values during the first 3 years of GHR were studied in both the overall population and patients with or without dysglycaemia during follow-up. Dysglycaemia was defined as FPG ≥ 100 mg/dl and/or HbA1c ≥ 5.7%. Mean HbA1c value (5.4 ± 0.4% at baseline) increased during the first and second years of GHR (HbA1c 5.5 ± 0.4%, p=0.05, and 5.5 ± 0.4%, p=0.006 respectively). This increase was not maintained during the third year (HbA1c 5.4 ± 0.3%, p=0.107) of GHR. Twenty-eight patients (68.2%) had dysglycaemia during follow-up, 9 of them since baseline. In the 19 patients without baseline dysglycaemia, HbA1c increased during the first year and remained stable in the next 2 years (mean HbA1c 5.2 ± 0.4% at baseline; 5.5 ± 0.4% at 1 year, p<0.050; 5.4 ± 0.4% at 2 years, p=0.004, and 5.4 ± 0.4% at 3 years, p=0.016). In the 9 patients with baseline dysglycaemia, HbA1c did not significantly change during the 3 years of GHR therapy. HbA1c values increased during the first 2 years of GHR therapy. In patients with no dysglycaemia before treatment, HbA1c steadily increased over the 3 years. However, it did not change in patients with baseline dysglycaemia. Copyright © 2014 SEEN. Published by Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  17. Benign Phyllodes Tumor Mimicking a Malignancy in a Turner Syndrome Woman with Hormone Replacement Therapy: A Case Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Woong Jae; Chong, Se Min; Pang, Jae Choon; Seo, Jae Seung; Byun, Jun Soo; Seok, Ju Won [Chung-Ang University Medical Center, Chung-Ang University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Shin, Hee Jung; Gong, Gyung Yub [Asan Medical Center, University of Ulsan College of Mdeicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2010-12-15

    Phyllodes tumor of the breast is a relatively rare fibroepithelial tumor. Turner syndrome is a condition that affects approximately 50 per 100,000 females and includes total or partial absence of one X chromosome in all or part of the cells, reduced final height, absence of female sex hormone, and infertility. In this case report, we describe the first case of a benign phyllodes tumor mimicking a malignancy at breast US in a 26-year-old woman with Turner syndrome who had been undergoing hormone replacement therapy

  18. Dietary Boron and Hormone Replacement Therapy as Risk Factors for Lung Cancer in Women

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahabir, S.; Spitz, M. R.; Barrera, S. L.; Dong, Y. Q.; Eastham, C.; Forman, M. R.

    2012-01-01

    Hormone replacement therapy (HRT) may reduce lung cancer risk. Dietary boron may have actions similar to those of HRT; however, no previous study has reported the associations between dietary boron intake and lung cancer risk or the joint effects of boron intake and HRT use on lung cancer risk. The authors examined the associations between boron intake and the joint effects of boron intake and HRT on lung cancer risk in women. In an ongoing case-control study in Houston, Texas (July 1995 through April 2005, end date for this analysis), 763 women were diagnosed with lung cancer, and 838 were matched healthy controls with data on both diet and HRT. Multiple logistic regression analyses were conducted to assess the associations between dietary boron and HRT with lung cancer risk. After adjustment for potential confounders, the odds ratios for lung cancer with decreasing quartiles of dietary boron intake were 1.0, 1.39 (95% confidence interval (CI): 1.02, 1.90), 1.64 (95% CI: 1.20, 2.24), and 1.95 (95% CI: 1.42, 2.68) mg/day, respectively, for all women (ptrend boron intake who used HRT, the odds ratio for lung cancer for low dietary boron intake and no HRT use was 2.07 (95% CI: 1.53, 2.81). Boron intake was inversely associated with lung cancer in women, whereas women who consumed low boron and did not use HRT were at substantial increased odds. PMID:18343880

  19. Replacing hormone therapy-is the decline in prescribing sustained, and are nonhormonal drugs substituted?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vegter, Stefan; Kolling, Pieternel; Toben, Marjolijn; Visser, Sipke T.; de Jong-van den Berg, Lolkje T. W.

    2009-01-01

    Objectives: After two cautioning landmark studies in 2002 and 2003, a dramatic decrease in hormonal therapy (HT) prescribing for menopausal symptoms was seen. Our objectives were to (1) determine whether this decline in HT prescribing sustained until 2007 and (2) investigate nonhormonal drug prescri

  20. Genetic modifiers of menopausal hormone replacement therapy and breast cancer risk

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rudolph, Anja; Hein, Rebecca; Lindström, Sara

    2013-01-01

    Women using menopausal hormone therapy (MHT) are at increased risk of developing breast cancer (BC). To detect genetic modifiers of the association between current use of MHT and BC risk, we conducted a meta-analysis of four genome-wide case-only studies followed by replication in 11 case...

  1. Effects of different progestin regimens in hormone replacement therapy on blood coagulation factor VII and tissue factor pathway inhibitor

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bladbjerg, E-M; Skouby, S O.; Andersen, L F;

    2002-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Long-term hormone replacement therapy (HRT) reduces cardiovascular risk, but an early increased risk was reported in women with coronary heart disease. In such women the arterial intima can express tissue factor, and changes in coagulation factor VII (factor VII) and tissue factor...... after progestin intake. The integrated response, AUC, for TFPI was significantly lower in the HRT groups compared with the reference group. CONCLUSION: The observed changes may increase the early thrombotic risk associated with HRT use. Udgivelsesdato: 2002-Dec...

  2. Favorable Impacts of Growth Hormone (GH) Replacement Therapy on Atherogenic Risks in Japanese Children with GH Deficiency

    OpenAIRE

    Kohno, Hitoshi; Tanaka, Toshiaki; Fujieda, Kenji; Chihara, Kazuo; Seino, Yoshiki; Irie, Minoru; Takano, Kazue

    2012-01-01

    Growth hormone (GH) affects body composition and atherogenic risk factors. Severe hyperlipidemia may develop in GH-deficient adults as a consequence of continuous GH deficiency. We investigated changes in lipid profiles in 158 Japanese children (103 boys and 55 girls) with GH deficiency who had been enrolled in the Pfizer International Growth Database Japan during 3 yr of GH replacement therapy to evaluate whether GH treatment has beneficial effects on atherogenic risk factors. Total choleste...

  3. Menopausia, hipertensión arterial y terapia de reemplazo hormonal Menopause, blood hypertension and hormone replacement therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daysi Navarro Despaigne

    2003-04-01

    Full Text Available Para evaluar la influencia de la terapia de reemplazo hormonal (THR sobre el síndrome climatérico (SC y los niveles de tensión arterial en mujeres posmenopáusicas con hipertensión arterial (HTA, se realizó un ensayo terapéutico abierto, el cual incluyó 45 mujeres no obesas con HTA ligera/moderada. En cada mujer se evaluó la evolución de los síntomas climatéricos y de los niveles de tensión arterial, así como los efectos indeseables a la THR. Como medicamento las pacientes recibieron Estradiol 2mg + Levonorgestrel 1 mg por día durante 12 meses. Durante la THR disminuyeron los síntomas climatéricos, en particular los vasomotores (de 86,6 a 10 % y los genitourinarios (de 56,7 a 15 %. En la totalidad de las mujeres existió estabilidad en los niveles de tensión arterial. En 5 mujeres hubo necesidad de incrementar la dosis de medicamentos antihipertensivos. En el resto esta se mantuvo o disminuyó. Como efectos indeseables se reportó sangramiento vaginal, mastodinia, cefalea, vasculitis e isquemia del quinto dedo del pie. Las dos últimas pacientes debieron suspender el tratamiento y se presentaron al sexto mes de haber iniciado la THR. En conclusión, en mujeres de edad mediana con hipertensión arterial la THR mejora el síndrome climatérico sin empeorar los niveles de tensión arterial.To evaluate the influence of hormone replacement therapy on the climateric syndrome (CS and the blood pressure values in postmenopausal women with hypertension, an open therapeutic assay was carried out, which included 45 non-obese women with slight/moderate hypertension. The course of the climateric symptoms and the blood pressure levels as well as the adverse effects of HRT were evaluated in every woman. The patients took Estradiol 2mg plus Levonorgestrel 1 mg per day for 12 months as drug therapy. During the application of the HRT, the climateric symptoms, particularly vasomotor (from 86,6 to 10% and genitourinary (from 56,7 to 15% decreased

  4. Sindrom pomanjkanja rastnega hormona pri odraslem - učinki nadomestnega zdravljenja: Syndrome of growth hormone deficiency in adults - effects of growth hormone replacement therapy:

    OpenAIRE

    Pfeifer, Marija

    2001-01-01

    Background. After the cessation of longitudinal growth, growth hormone (GH) continues to subserve an important role in the regulation of body metabolism (stimulation of lipolysis and lipid oxidation, protein synthesis, insulin antagonism, and sodium and water retention) to optimise body composition and function. Most patients with hypopituitarism exhibit the syndrome of GH deficiency with a number of abnormal features which can be reversed with recombinant GH replacement therapy. Conclusions....

  5. The use of 17β Estradiol gel and progestogen tablet for hormone replacement therapy (HRT in menopause

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ali Baziad

    2003-09-01

    Full Text Available The treatment and prevention of disease in menopausal women due to deficiency of estrogen hormone are done through the administration of estrogen hormone, known as hormone replacement therapy (HRT. The administration of HRT is commonly done through the administration of tablets. However, the administration of tablet will result in metabolism in the colon and liver. Tablets are usually used on a daily basis such that it may lead to boredom and results in gastrointestinal disorder. The administration of gel, on the other hand, is done by applying the gel to the body and therefore metabolism in the colon and liver can be prevented. In women with uterus, estrogen must be combined with progestogen. The type of progestogen recommended is the one with natural derivative and which possesses antimineralocorticoid properties, such that fluid retention can be avoided. One of the types of progestogen which does not result in fluid retention is nomogestrol acetate. Nomogestrol acetate will also inhibit 17β hydrosisteroiddehydrogency enzyme type 1, such that estradiol (E2 is prevented from being transformed into estron (E1. As a result, E2 level in the breast tissue is kept at minimum, thereby reducing the risk of breast cancer. (Med J Indones 2003; 12: 194-8 Keywords: 17β estradiol gel, hormone replacement therapy, progestogen, nomogestrol acetate, enzyme

  6. The effect of Hormone Replacement Therapy (HRT in the psychological well-being of menopausal women

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eugenia Vlachou

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The factors affecting the psychological situation of menopausal women have often been examined in the past. Aim: The purpose of the present study was to examine the psychological disorders that arise in menopausal women receiving Hormone Replacement Therapy (HRT in comparison to those not receiving HRT. Material and Method: The sample of the study included 216 menopausal women, 40-60 years old, divided into two groups and examined twice in a six months period apart. The first group included 100 women receiving HRT for at least three months period, while the second group included116 women not receiving HRT. A demographic inventory, the Greene Climacteric Scale, the Hamilton Anxiety Scale and the CES-D Depression Scale were used. Results: 46.3% of women were taking HRT while 53.7% were not. In the first interview the mean values of the Greene Scale were for the first group 13.21±9.61 and for the second one 25.33±12.25, (p<0.001, while at the second interview the mean values were 9.17±6.93 and 28.65±13.25 respectively, (p<0.001. In the Hamilton scale at the first interview the mean values of the first group were 5.74±8.29 and for the second one 19.28±11.90 (p<0.001, while at the second interview the mean values were 4.43±7.75 and 19.47±11.75 respectively (p<0.001 and were above the threshold of a clinically anxiety syndrome. The mean values of the CES-D in the first interview were 10.33±7.58 in the first group and 11.20±11.22 in the second one (p<0.001, while at the second interview were 8.61±6.25 and 11.82±11.59 respectively (p<0.001. Multiple linear regression analysis demonstrated that the education level interprets 49.4%, 28.4% and 17.1% of the variable, for Greene, Hamilton and CES-D scales respectively (Β=-4.563, p<0.001, Β=-3.012, p=0.005 και Β=-4.175, p<0.001 respectively. Conclusions: HRT seem to provide significant improvement in menopausal psychological symptoms. Further studies are needed in order to clarify relative

  7. Influence of modified transdermal hormone replacement therapy on the concentrations of hormones, growth factors, and bone mineral density in women with osteopenia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stanosz, Staniaław; Zochowska, Ewa; Safranow, Krzysztof; Sieja, Krzysztof; Stanosz, Małgorzta

    2009-01-01

    The metabolic and therapeutic action of estrogens depends on their type, dosage, form, route of administration, and treatment-free interval during the therapeutic cycle. Hormone therapy is generally subclassified into 2 forms that differ in the type of hormones. In hormonal replacement therapy (HRT), estrogens and progesterone components do not differ in chemical structure and molecular mass from those naturally produced by the female organism. In hormonal supplementary therapy (HST), the estrogen and progestagen components do differ from the natural hormones in structure and mass. The aim of the study was to compare 2 kinds of hormonal therapy in early postmenopausal women with osteopenia. These forms of therapy are modified transdermal HRT and orally given HST. The objective of this study was the estimation of sex hormone, insulin-like growth factor I (IGF-I), prolactin (PRL), osteocalcin, and procollagen concentration in serum as well as the degree of mineralization of the lumbar spine in women in the early postmenopausal period with osteopenia under different kinds of hormonal therapy. The study was conducted in 75 women with an average age of 52.4 +/- 3.5 years and with primary osteopenia, in the early postmenopausal period, who were randomly assigned to 3 groups depending on the form and route of administration of therapy: Group I (n = 25, control) was receiving placebo in the form of patches. Group II (n = 25) was treated with modified transdermal HRT. This group obtained micronized 17beta-estradiol at increasing-decreasing doses and progesterone in the second phase of the therapeutic cycle. Group III (n = 25) was receiving orally given HST and obtained Cyclo-Menorette (Wyeth, Munster, Germany). The therapeutic cycle in each group lasted 21 days, followed by a 7-day medication-free interval. Estradiol concentration in serum was increased 5-fold and estrone (E(1)) was increased about 11-fold in the group of women receiving orally given HST (P hormone was

  8. Lifestyle influences on the association between pre-diagnostic hormone replacement therapy and breast cancer prognosis - results from The Danish 'Diet, Cancer and Health' prospective cohort

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Holm, Marianne; Olsen, Anja; Kroman, Niels

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: The association between pre-diagnostic hormone replacement therapy (HRT) and breast cancer specific mortality as well as potential influences from other lifestyle factors on the association was investigated. STUDY DESIGN: Female participants from the prospective cohort "Diet, Cancer...

  9. Analysis of the influence of hormone replacement therapy on TNF-alpha serum levels in menopausal women 

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mansur Rahnama

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Objective:The aim of the study was to investigate and compare levels of TNF-α in serum of menopausal women treated and not treated with hormone replacement therapy (HRT.Design:The study was designed to verify whether there is a correlation between the concentrations of this cytokine and bone mineral density (BMD.Material/Methods:The study was carried out on a group of 60 women during menopause – 30 untreated (control group and 30 treated with HRT (study group. Half of the patients were after natural menopause and the other half were after ovariectomy. Blood samples were collected. Densitometry was conducted on the vertebral column. To evaluate the results of densitometric examination the T-score index was calculated.Results:The T-score index of the control group reached values below –2. T-score results for the study group were significantly higher than in the control group. Hormone replacement therapy used by women from the study group caused a decrease in the TNF content in serum, compared with the control group.Conclusions:Beneficial effects of HRT on bone tissue may be exerted through decreased concentration of TNF-α in serum. The use of HRT allows constant bone mineral density to be maintained, which leads to prevention of osteoporotic changes. 

  10. EFFECT OF GROWTH HORMONE REPLACEMENT THERAPY ON THE QUALITY OF LIFE IN WOMEN WITH GROWTH HORMONE DEFICIENCY WHO HAVE A HISTORY OF ACROMEGALY VERSUS OTHER DISORDERS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valassi, Elena; Brick, Danielle J.; Johnson, Jessica C.; Biller, Beverly M. K.; Klibanski, Anne; Miller, Karen K.

    2013-01-01

    Objective To compare the response in quality of life (QoL) to growth hormone (GH) replacement in women with GH deficiency (GHD) and a history of acromegaly with that in women with GHD of other causes. Methods Fifty-five women with GHD were studied: 17 with prior acromegaly and 38 with other causes of GHD. We compared two 6-month, randomized, placebo-controlled studies of GH therapy in women with hypopituitarism conducted with use of the same design—one in women with a history of acromegaly and one in women with no prior acromegaly. QoL was assessed with the following questionnaires: the QoL-Assessment of Growth Hormone deficiency in Adults (AGHDA), the Symptom Questionnaire, and the 36-Item Short-Form Health Survey (SF-36). Results The 2 groups had comparable mean pretreatment age, body mass index, and QoL scores and comparable mean GH dose at 6 months (0.61 ± 0.30 versus 0.67 ± 0.27 mg daily). After 6 months of GH replacement therapy, women with GHD and prior acromegaly demonstrated a greater improvement in AGHDA score, four SF-36 subscales (Role Limitations due to Physical Health, Energy or Fatigue, Emotional Well-Being, and Social Functioning), and the Somatic Symptoms subscale of the Symptom Questionnaire than did women with GHD of other causes. Poorer pretreatment QoL was associated with a greater improvement in QoL after administration of GH. Conclusion In this study, GH replacement therapy improved QoL in women with GHD and a history of acromegaly but not in women with GHD due to other hypothalamic and pituitary disorders. Further studies are needed to determine the long-term risks versus benefits of GH replacement in patients who develop GHD after definitive treatment for acromegaly. PMID:22440981

  11. Effects of growth hormone and thyroxine replacement therapy on insulin signaling in Ames dwarf mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Louis, Audreen; Bartke, Andrzej; Masternak, Michal M

    2010-04-01

    Ames dwarf (Prop1(df), df/df) mice lack growth hormone (GH), prolactin, and thyrotropin and live remarkably longer than their normal siblings. Significance of reduced activity of the somatotropic and thyroid axes during development and adulthood on longevity are unknown. Because enhanced insulin sensitivity and reduced insulin levels are among likely mechanisms responsible for increased longevity in these mutants, we compared the effects of GH and thyroxine (T4) replacement on various parameters related to insulin signaling in young and old male df/df mice. The results suggest that altered plasma adiponectin and insulin-like growth factor-1 (IGF-1) and hepatic IGF-1, insulin receptor (IR), IR substrate-1, peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor (PPAR) gamma, and PPARgamma coactivator-1 alpha may contribute to increased insulin sensitivity in Ames dwarfs. The stimulatory effect of GH and T4 treatment on plasma insulin and inhibitory effect on expression of hepatic glucose transporter-2 were greater in old than in young dwarfs. These results indicate that GH and T4 treatment has differential impact on insulin signaling during development and adulthood.

  12. The presence and role of progesterone receptor in the ovaries of postmenopausal women who have not applied hormone replacement therapy.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Małgorzata Piasecka

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available At present, not much is known about progesterone receptor (PR expression and localization in postmenopausal women ovaries. In the ovaries of reproductive age women, PR is localized in internal theca and granulosa cells, corpus luteum, ovary surface epithelium (OSE and in stroma. PR expression depends on the serum concentration of progesterone, estrogen, gonadotropin and androgen. The goal of the conducted studies was to examine PR localization and expression in the ovaries of postmenopausal women who have not applied hormone replacement therapy so far. Also, the correlation was examined between PR expression and localization in the ovaries, steroid and gonadotropin hormone serum concentrations, and influence of the time from the last menstruation. The material came from 50 postmenopausal women who had their ovaries removed due to non-neoplastic diseases. The women were divided into 3 groups (A, B, C depending on the time from the last menstruation. The follitropin (FSH, luteotropin (LH, estradiol (E2, testosterone (T, androstendione (A and dehydroepiandrosterone sulphate (DHEAS concentrations in blood plasma were measured. Monoclonal mouse anti-human PR antibody was used for immunohistochemical detection (examination involved 50 postmenopausal ovaries. Between particular groups, E2 serum concentrations did not differ, but FSH, LH, T, A, DHEAS serum concentrations were significantly different. Immunohistochemical nuclear localization of PR in postmenopausal women ovaries was observed. PR expression was similar in all three groups (A, B, C. PR expression was observed in OSE nuclei and invaginations cysts deriving from the isolation of invaginated epithelium and metaplastic columnar epithelium and in stroma. In the ovaries of postmenopausal women who have not applied hormone replacement therapy so far, PR was detected in all three groups. Its expression did not depend on the time from menopause and was similar in all examined groups. FSH, LH, T, A

  13. Testosterone Replacement Therapy Prevents Alterations of Coronary Vascular Reactivity Caused by Hormone Deficiency Induced by Castration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rouver, Wender Nascimento; Delgado, Nathalie Tristão Banhos; Menezes, Jussara Bezerra; Santos, Roger Lyrio; Moyses, Margareth Ribeiro

    2015-01-01

    The present study aimed to determine the effects of chronic treatment with different doses of testosterone on endothelium-dependent coronary vascular reactivity in male rats. Adult male rats were divided into four experimental groups: control (SHAM), castrated (CAST), castrated and immediately treated subcutaneously with a physiological dose (0.5 mg/kg/day, PHYSIO group) or supraphysiological dose (2.5 mg/kg/day, SUPRA group) of testosterone for 15 days. Systolic blood pressure (SBP) was assessed at the end of treatment through tail plethysmography. After euthanasia, the heart was removed and coronary vascular reactivity was assessed using the Langendorff retrograde perfusion technique. A dose-response curve for bradykinin (BK) was constructed, followed by inhibition with 100 μM L-NAME, 2.8 μM indomethacin (INDO), L-NAME + INDO, or L-NAME + INDO + 0.75 μM clotrimazole (CLOT). We observed significant endothelium-dependent, BK-induced coronary vasodilation, which was abolished in the castrated group and restored in the PHYSIO and SUPRA groups. Furthermore, castration modulated the lipid and hormonal profiles and decreased body weight, and testosterone therapy restored all of these parameters. Our results revealed an increase in SBP in the SUPRA group. In addition, our data led us to conclude that physiological concentrations of testosterone may play a beneficial role in the cardiovascular system by maintaining an environment that is favourable for the activity of an endothelium-dependent vasodilator without increasing SBP.

  14. Body mass and endometrial cancer risk by hormone replacement therapy and cancer subtype.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCullough, Marjorie L; Patel, Alpa V; Patel, Roshni; Rodriguez, Carmen; Feigelson, Heather Spencer; Bandera, Elisa V; Gansler, Ted; Thun, Michael J; Calle, Eugenia E

    2008-01-01

    Epidemiologic studies unequivocally show that greater body mass increases the risk of endometrial cancer, but whether risk varies by use of postmenopausal hormone therapy (HT), location of fat deposition, or cancer subtype is still unclear. We examined these associations among 33,436 postmenopausal women in the Cancer Prevention Study II Nutrition Cohort, who completed questionnaires on diet, lifestyle, and medical history at baseline in 1992. A total of 318 cases were eligible through June 2003. Cox-proportional hazards analyses were used to estimate multivariate-adjusted rate ratios (RR). As expected, adult body mass index (BMI) was a strong predictor of risk [RR, 4.70; 95% confidence interval (CI), 3.12-7.07 for BMI 35+ versus 22.5-25.0, P trend or =35 versus 22.5-25.0, P trend or =30 versus <25.0) increased risk of both "type I" (classic estrogen pathway, RR, 4.22; 95% CI, 3.07-5.81) and "type II" (serous, clear cell, and all other high grade) cancers (RR, 2.87; 95% CI, 1.59-5.16). The increased risk of endometrial cancer across the range of BMI in women who never used postmenopausal HT stresses the need to prevent both overweight and obesity in women.

  15. Testosterone Replacement Therapy Prevents Alterations of Coronary Vascular Reactivity Caused by Hormone Deficiency Induced by Castration.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wender Nascimento Rouver

    Full Text Available The present study aimed to determine the effects of chronic treatment with different doses of testosterone on endothelium-dependent coronary vascular reactivity in male rats. Adult male rats were divided into four experimental groups: control (SHAM, castrated (CAST, castrated and immediately treated subcutaneously with a physiological dose (0.5 mg/kg/day, PHYSIO group or supraphysiological dose (2.5 mg/kg/day, SUPRA group of testosterone for 15 days. Systolic blood pressure (SBP was assessed at the end of treatment through tail plethysmography. After euthanasia, the heart was removed and coronary vascular reactivity was assessed using the Langendorff retrograde perfusion technique. A dose-response curve for bradykinin (BK was constructed, followed by inhibition with 100 μM L-NAME, 2.8 μM indomethacin (INDO, L-NAME + INDO, or L-NAME + INDO + 0.75 μM clotrimazole (CLOT. We observed significant endothelium-dependent, BK-induced coronary vasodilation, which was abolished in the castrated group and restored in the PHYSIO and SUPRA groups. Furthermore, castration modulated the lipid and hormonal profiles and decreased body weight, and testosterone therapy restored all of these parameters. Our results revealed an increase in SBP in the SUPRA group. In addition, our data led us to conclude that physiological concentrations of testosterone may play a beneficial role in the cardiovascular system by maintaining an environment that is favourable for the activity of an endothelium-dependent vasodilator without increasing SBP.

  16. Hormone replacement therapy increases levels of antibodies against heat shock protein 65 and certain species of oxidized low density lipoprotein

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Uint L.

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available Hormone replacement therapy (HRT reduces cardiovascular risks, although the initiation of therapy may be associated with transient adverse ischemic and thrombotic events. Antibodies against heat shock protein (Hsp and oxidized low density lipoprotein (LDL have been found in atherosclerotic lesions and plasma of patients with coronary artery disease and may play an important role in the pathogenesis of atherosclerosis. The aim of the present study was to assess the effects of HRT on the immune response by measuring plasma levels of antibodies against Hsp 65 and LDL with a low and high degree of copper-mediated oxidative modification of 20 postmenopausal women before and 90 days after receiving orally 0.625 mg equine conjugate estrogen plus 2.5 mg medroxyprogesterone acetate per day. HRT significantly increased antibodies against Hsp 65 (0.316 ± 0.03 vs 0.558 ± 0.11 and against LDL with a low degree of oxidative modification (0.100 ± 0.01 vs 0.217 ± 0.02 (P<0.05 and P<0.001, respectively, ANOVA. The hormone-mediated immune response may trigger an inflammatory response within the vessel wall and potentially increase plaque burden. Whether or not this immune response is temporary or sustained and deleterious requires further investigation.

  17. The effect of hormone replacement therapy on mood and everyday memory in younger mid-life women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stephens, Christine; Pachana, Nancy A; Bristow, Virginia

    2006-11-01

    Research on the effect of hormone replacement therapy (HRT) on both mood and memory indicates that oestrogen may enhance verbal memory in younger mid-aged women. This study examined the effect of HRT on everyday memory, while accounting for mood changes, in women between ages 40 and 60. A within-subjects comparison of 17 women, showed that mood, everyday memory, working memory, and delayed verbal memory improved after 3 months of HRT use. The improvement in memory was not mediated by mood, but changes in mood were moderated by exercise habits. The results suggest that verbal memory in particular may be enhanced by HRT in this age group, and everyday memory is an important construct to consider in future research.

  18. Effect of hormone replacement therapy on the bone mass and urinary excretion of pyridinium cross-links

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dolores Perovano Pardini

    2000-01-01

    Full Text Available CONTEXT: The menopause accelerates bone loss and is associated with an increased bone turnover. Bone formation may be evaluated by several biochemical markers. However, the establishment of an accurate marker for bone resorption has been more difficult to achieve. OBJECTIVE: To study the effect of hormone replacement therapy (HRT on bone mass and on the markers of bone resorption: urinary excretion of pyridinoline and deoxypyridinoline. DESIGN: Cohort correlational study. SETTING: Academic referral center. SAMPLE: 53 post-menopausal women, aged 48-58 years. MAIN MEASUREMENTS: Urinary pyr and d-pyr were measured in fasting urine samples by spectrofluorometry after high performance liquid chromatography and corrected for creatinine excretion measured before treatment and after 1, 2, 4 and 12 months. Bone mineral density (BMD was measured by dual energy X-ray absorptiometry (DEXA before treatment and after 12 months of HRT. RESULTS: The BMD after HRT was about 4.7% (P < 0.0004; 2% (P < 0.002; and 3% (P < 0.01 higher than the basal values in lumbar spine, neck and trochanter respectively. There were no significant correlations between pyridinium cross-links and age, weight, menopause duration and BMD. The decrease in pyr and d-pyr was progressive after HRT, reaching 28.9% (P < 0.0002, and 42% (P < 0.0002 respectively after 1 year. CONCLUSIONS: Urinary pyridinoline and deoxypyridinoline excretion decreases early in hormone replacement therapy, reflecting a decrease in the bone resorption rate, and no correlation was observed with the bone mass evaluated by densitometry.

  19. Impact of hormone replacement therapy on cardiac metabolic indicators in men with high cardiovascular risk and hypogonadism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. N. Mamedov

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available The paper evaluates the impact of hormone replacement therapy (HRT with androgens on cardiac metabolic indicators in men with high cardiovascular risk (CVR and androgen deficiency state. An open-label randomized clinical trial enrolled 52 men aged 30–64 years with high CVR and detected androgen-deficiency state. The men were randomized into 2 groups: a control group (CG (n = 26 continued to receive the pre-trial therapy; during the previous therapy, a study group (SG (n = 26 had daily applications of transdermal gel with testosterone (AndroGel in a daily dose of 50 mg of testosterone in 5 g of the gel. The trial lasted 180 days. The changes in the indicators under study were traced 90 days after treatment initiation at an intermediate visit and 180 days after the initiation of treatment – at the end of its treatment.At the end of the trial, HRT in men with androgen deficiency and high CVR led to normalization of testosterone levels in all the SG patients and to improvement in erectile function by 12 %. Androgen therapy caused a statistically significant reduction in blood pressure by 10 %; no changes were virtually observed in the CG. HRT promoted a slight, but significant weight loss (by an average of 2.8 kg and waist circumference (by an average of 1.7 cm. The therapy performed also lowered the concentration of total cholesterol by an average of 11 % and that of triglycerides by 22 %. During the therapy, there was a significant decrease in fasting insulin and glucose levels. Overall, the course therapy with transdermal gel in combination with testosterone resulted in a reduction in the expected total CVR by 30 %. Thus, HRT using testosterone preparations in men with hypogonadism and high CVR led to normalization of testosterone levels and major cardiac metabolic indicators and to improvement in erectile function.

  20. Impact of hormone replacement therapy on cardiac metabolic indicators in men with high cardiovascular risk and hypogonadism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. N. Mamedov

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper evaluates the impact of hormone replacement therapy (HRT with androgens on cardiac metabolic indicators in men with high cardiovascular risk (CVR and androgen deficiency state. An open-label randomized clinical trial enrolled 52 men aged 30–64 years with high CVR and detected androgen-deficiency state. The men were randomized into 2 groups: a control group (CG (n = 26 continued to receive the pre-trial therapy; during the previous therapy, a study group (SG (n = 26 had daily applications of transdermal gel with testosterone (AndroGel in a daily dose of 50 mg of testosterone in 5 g of the gel. The trial lasted 180 days. The changes in the indicators under study were traced 90 days after treatment initiation at an intermediate visit and 180 days after the initiation of treatment – at the end of its treatment.At the end of the trial, HRT in men with androgen deficiency and high CVR led to normalization of testosterone levels in all the SG patients and to improvement in erectile function by 12 %. Androgen therapy caused a statistically significant reduction in blood pressure by 10 %; no changes were virtually observed in the CG. HRT promoted a slight, but significant weight loss (by an average of 2.8 kg and waist circumference (by an average of 1.7 cm. The therapy performed also lowered the concentration of total cholesterol by an average of 11 % and that of triglycerides by 22 %. During the therapy, there was a significant decrease in fasting insulin and glucose levels. Overall, the course therapy with transdermal gel in combination with testosterone resulted in a reduction in the expected total CVR by 30 %. Thus, HRT using testosterone preparations in men with hypogonadism and high CVR led to normalization of testosterone levels and major cardiac metabolic indicators and to improvement in erectile function.

  1. Hormonal replacement therapy and aging: Asian practical recommendations on testosterone supplementation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YoungChanKim

    2003-01-01

    Profound and diffuse alterations in the production of gonadal and adrenal androgens as well as growth hormone are associated with aging. To convey this concept more appropriately, partial endocrine deficiency in the aging male (PEDAM) was introduced as a term for the phenomenon of hormonal alterations in the aging male.Hormones responsible for some of the manifestations associated with male aging are testosterone, growth hormone,dehydroepiansdrosterone (DHEA), melatonin, thyroid hormones and leptin. Of these, testosterone has been widely investigated and its beneficial and adverse effects on male bodily systems are relatively well established. However, a serious body of confusion and misunderstandings surrounding the diagnosis, treatment and monitoring of men suspected of having androgen deficiency has been raised. Therefore, it is timely to provide practical criteria for diagnosis and treatment to avoid misconception about the use of testosterone in the aging male. To provide an understanding and information of the issues, the following headings are summarized: (1) Important clinical consideration on testosterone supplementation in the aging male; (2) Asian practical recommendations on testosterone supplementation in the aging male.

  2. Comparison of Piascledine (Avocado and Soybean Oil) and Hormone Replacement Therapy in Menopausal-Induced Hot Flashing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Panahi, Yunes; Beiraghdar, Fatemeh; Kashani, Nafise; Baharie Javan, Nika; dadjo, yahya

    2011-01-01

    Different symptoms in Climacteric period, includes hot flash. Hormone replacement therapy (HRT) is common therapy for relief of menopausal symptoms but has possible contraindications and side effects. Recently Piascledine (combination of Avocado oil with Soybean oil) showed effects in reducing hot flash severity. Present study designed to compare the effects of HRT with Piascledine in treatment of hot flash. The cases of this study were sixty-six women at the age range of 40 to 70 years and complaints of menopause-induced hot flashing, whose last menstruation dated at least 6 months prior to the beginning of the study. The patients in this open label clinical trial, randomized to receive Piascledine capsule 1 mg or HRT (0.625 mg oral daily Conjugated Estrogen tablets, plus 2.5 mg continuous oral daily Medroxyprogesterone Acetate tablets) for 2 month. Hot flash property and severity was assessed via a daily check list and Visual analog scale. Climacteric symptom was measured before and after intervention using Greene Climacteric Scale (GCS) and Blatt-kupperman Menopausal Index (BKMI). Thirty-three eligible patients were allocated in each group. From the Piascledine group, one patient and from the HRT group, 16 patients weren›t willing to attend the study; therefore, 32 and 17 woman received treatment in Piascledine and HRT groups. 4 patients were withdrawn for vaginal bleeding and one for breast tenderness from HTR group. Hot flash severity in both groups decreased during the time similarly. With regard to GCS (p = 0.571) and BMKI (p = 0.891), the outcome was similar among the two groups. Due to low HRT compliance and its possible risks in long period of time and considering the same activity of soybean supplement and HRT in relieving the hot flash as menopausal symptoms in women, it seems that soybean supplements can be an alternative therapy to hormone. PMID:24250433

  3. Estrogen metabolism genotypes, use of long-term hormone replacement therapy and risk of postmenopausal breast cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cerne, Jasmina Ziva; Novakovic, Srdjan; Frkovic-Grazio, Snjezana; Pohar-Perme, Maja; Stegel, Vida; Gersak, Ksenija

    2011-08-01

    Association between long-term hormone replacement therapy (HRT) use and increased risk of breast cancer is still under debate. Functionally relevant genetic variants within the estrogen metabolic pathway may alter exposure to exogenous sex hormones and affect the risk of postmenopausal breast cancer. We investigated the associations of common polymorphisms in 4 genes encoding key proteins of the estrogen metabolic pathway, duration of HRT use and their interactions with breast cancer risk. We studied 530 breast cancer cases and 270 controls of the same age and ethnicity participating in a case-control study of postmenopausal women. Duration of HRT use was ascertained through a postal questionnaire. Genotyping was conducted for CYP1B1 (rs1056836), COMT (rs4680), GSTP1 (rs1695) and MnSOD (rs4880) polymorphisms by PCR-based RFLP and TaqMan® allelic discrimination method. Adjusted odds ratios and 95% confidence intervals were calculated using logistic regression analysis. HRT use was significantly associated with decreased breast cancer risk (pC and HRT use (pinteraction=0.036); the risk of breast cancer associated with long-term vs. short-term HRT use was decreased in women homozygous for the wild-type allele and increased in women with at least one variant allele of the MnSOD 47T>C polymorphism. Our results suggest that MnSOD 47T>C polymorphism in interaction with long-term HRT use may modify the risk of breast cancer.

  4. Investigation of awareness rate and current situation in hormone replacement therapy in medical care personnel in Shanghai

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Shao Hong-fang; Tao Min-fang; Sun Xun-yan; Jiang Li-zhen

    2012-01-01

    Objective: To survey the cognition and requirement of perimenopause health care in Shanghai women,and provide updated situation about hormone replacement therapy (HRT) for further improving the quality of perimenopause health care.Methods: A large survey among 480 medical care personnel at age of 40-60 years in 12 hospitals in Shanghai was launched.The designed questionnaires included the awareness rate,basic knowledge of HRT and request for the information of HRT etc.The data were analyzed.Results: Among the respondents,35.81% (169/472) believed that it is necessary to start HRT in perimenopause women; 16.10 % (76/472) knew about H RT at some extent; 43.22 % (204/472) requested for the training of HRT; and 14.19%(67/472)would like to recommend patients using the hormone to treat perimenopause syndrome.In addition,52.41% (76/145)of the medical care personnel who refused to use HRT were worried about the side effects.Conclusion: In Shanghai,the awareness rate of HRT among medical care personnel was relatively low.Only a few medical care personnel prefer to use HRT in perimenopause patients.The main reasons for that were lack of understanding in the treatment of HRT and concerned side effects.

  5. Hormonal Replacement Therapy and the Risk of Lung Cancer in Women: An Adaptive Meta-analysis of Cohort Studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bae, Jong-Myon; Kim, Eun Hee

    2015-11-01

    Approximately 10% to 15% of lung cancer cases occur in never-smokers. Hormonal factors have been suggested to lead to an elevated risk of lung cancer in women. This systematic review (SR) aimed to investigate the association between hormonal replacement therapy (HRT) and the risk of lung cancer in women using cohort studies. We first obtained previous SR articles on this topic. Based on these studies we made a list of refereed, cited, and related articles using the PubMed and Scopus databases. All cohort studies that evaluated the relative risk of HRT exposure on lung cancer occurrence in women were selected. Estimate of summary effect size (sES) with 95% confidence intervals (CIs) were calculated. A total of 14 cohort studies were finally selected. A random effect model was applied due to heterogeneity (I-squared, 64.3%). The sES of the 14 articles evaluating the impact of HRT exposure on lung cancer occurrence in women indicated no statistically significant increase in lung cancer risk (sES, 0.99; 95% CI, 0.90 to 1.09). These results showed that HRT history had no effect on the risk of lung cancer in women, even though the sES of case-control studies described in previous SR articles indicated that HRT had a protective effect against lung cancer. It is necessary to conduct a pooled analysis of cohort studies.

  6. Age at menopause and hormone replacement therapy as risk factors for head and neck and oesophageal cancer (Review).

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCarthy, Caroline E; Field, John K; Marcus, Michael W

    2017-10-01

    There were ~986,000 cases of head and neck cancer (HNC) and oesophageal cancer diagnosed worldwide in 2012. The incidence of these types of cancer is much higher in males than females, although this disparity decreases in the elderly population, suggesting a role for hormones as a risk factor. This systematic review investigates the potential role of female hormones [age at menopause and use of hormone replacement therapy (HRT)] as risk factors for HNC/oesophageal squamous cell carcinoma (SCC). The electronic databases MEDLINE, Web of Science, EMBASE and Cochrane were searched. Only studies with at least 50 cases of HNC/oesophageal SCC, with data on age at menopause, smoking, alcohol, age and socioeconomic status or educational attainment, were included. The Newcastle Ottawa Scale was used for assessing risk of bias. Eight studies met the inclusion criteria (5 oesophageal SCC, 2 HNC and 1 combined oesophageal SCC and HNC). HRT was shown to reduce the risk of HNC (HR, 0.78; 95% CI, 0.61-0.99) in one study. Our results showed that earlier age at menopause is a risk factor for oesophageal SCC, with women entering menopause at 50 years. Similar, but less striking, results were observed for HNC. HRT was found to reduce the risk of HNC/oesophageal SCC, but the evidence is inconclusive. We, therefore, recommend that consideration should be given to collecting data on reproductive factors and exposure to HRT, as routine practice, in future epidemiological and clinical studies of these cancers. The concept of oestrogen deficiency as a risk for HNC/oesophageal SCC deserves further exploration in future laboratory and clinical studies.

  7. Improved adipose tissue metabolism after 5-year growth hormone replacement therapy in growth hormone deficient adults: The role of zinc-α2-glycoprotein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balaž, Miroslav; Ukropcova, Barbara; Kurdiova, Timea; Vlcek, Miroslav; Surova, Martina; Krumpolec, Patrik; Vanuga, Peter; Gašperíková, Daniela; Klimeš, Iwar; Payer, Juraj; Wolfrum, Christian; Ukropec, Jozef

    2015-01-01

    Growth hormone (GH) supplementation therapy to adults with GH deficiency has beneficial effects on adipose tissue lipid metabolism, improving thus adipocyte functional morphology and insulin sensitivity. However, molecular nature of these effects remains unclear. We therefore tested the hypothesis that lipid-mobilizing adipokine zinc-α2-glycoprotein is causally linked to GH effects on adipose tissue lipid metabolism. Seventeen patients with severe GH deficiency examined before and after the 5-year GH replacement therapy were compared with age-, gender- and BMI-matched healthy controls. Euglycemic hyperinsulinemic clamp was used to assess whole-body and adipose tissue-specific insulin sensitivity. Glucose tolerance was determined by oGTT, visceral and subcutaneous abdominal adiposity by MRI, adipocyte size morphometrically after collagenase digestion, lipid accumulation and release was studied in differentiated human primary adipocytes in association with GH treatment and zinc-α2-glycoprotein gene silencing. Five-year GH replacement therapy improved glucose tolerance, adipose tissue insulin sensitivity and reduced adipocyte size without affecting adiposity and whole-body insulin sensitivity. Adipose tissue zinc-α2-glycoprotein expression was positively associated with whole-body and adipose tissue insulin sensitivity and negatively with adipocyte size. GH treatment to adipocytes in vitro increased zinc-α2-glycoprotein expression (>50%) and was paralleled by enhanced lipolysis and decreased triglyceride accumulation (>35%). Moreover, GH treatment improved antilipolytic action of insulin in cultured adipocytes. Most importantly, silencing zinc-α2-glycoprotein eliminated all of the GH effects on adipocyte lipid metabolism. Effects of 5-year GH supplementation therapy on adipose tissue lipid metabolism and insulin sensitivity are associated with zinc-α2-glycoprotein. Presence of this adipokine is required for the GH action on adipocyte lipid metabolism in vitro.

  8. The effects of GH and hormone replacement therapy on serum concentrations of mannan-binding lectin, surfactant protein D and vitamin D binding protein in Turner syndrome

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gravholt, Claus Højbjerg; Leth-Larsen, Rikke; Lauridsen, Anna Lis

    2004-01-01

    function. In the present study we examined whether GH or hormone replacement therapy (HRT) in Turner syndrome (TS) influence the serum concentrations of MBL and two other proteins partaking in the innate immune defence, surfactant protein D (SP-D) and vitamin D binding protein (DBP). DESIGN: Study 1...

  9. The influence of hormone replacement therapy on the aging-related change in cognitive performance. Analysis based on a Danish cohort study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Løkkegaard, E; Pedersen, A T; Laursen, P;

    2002-01-01

    A maintenance and/or improvement of cognitive performance with postmenopausal hormone replacement therapy (HRT) is biological plausible. The objectives of this study were to analyze the impact of HRT on aging-related changes in cognitive performances, and to assess whether women who choose HRT have...... better cognitive performance prior to HRT....

  10. Safety of hormonal replacement therapy and oral contraceptives in systemic lupus erythematosus: a systematic review and meta-analysis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adriana Rojas-Villarraga

    Full Text Available There is conflicting data regarding exogenous sex hormones [oral contraceptives (OC and hormonal replacement therapy (HRT] exposure and different outcomes on Systemic Lupus Erythematosus (SLE. The aim of this work is to determine, through a systematic review and meta-analysis the risks associated with estrogen use for women with SLE as well as the association of estrogen with developing SLE.MEDLINE, EMBASE, SciElo, BIREME and the Cochrane library (1982 to July 2012, were databases from which were selected and reviewed (PRISMA guidelines randomized controlled trials, cross-sectional, case-control and prospective or retrospective nonrandomized, comparative studies without language restrictions. Those were evaluated by two investigators who extracted information on study characteristics, outcomes of interest, risk of bias and summarized strength of evidence. A total of 6,879 articles were identified; 20 full-text articles were included. Thirty-two meta-analyses were developed. A significant association between HRT exposure (Random model and an increased risk of developing SLE was found (Rate Ratio: 1.96; 95%-CI: 1.51-2.56; P-value<0.001. One of eleven meta-analyses evaluating the risk for SLE associated with OC exposure had a marginally significant result. There were no associations between HRT or OC exposure and specific outcomes of SLE. It was not always possible to Meta-analyze all the available data. There was a wide heterogeneity of SLE outcome measurements and estrogen therapy administration.An association between HRT exposure and SLE causality was observed. No association was found when analyzing the risk for SLE among OC users, however since women with high disease activity/Thromboses or antiphospholipid-antibodies were excluded from most of the studies, caution should be exercised in interpreting the present results. To identify risk factors that predispose healthy individuals to the development of SLE who are planning to start HRT or OC

  11. Prevalence of right atrial non-pulmonary vein triggers in atrial fibrillation patients treated with thyroid hormone replacement therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Ki-Hun; Mohanty, Sanghamitra; Mohanty, Prasant; Trivedi, Chintan; Morris, Eli Hamilton; Santangeli, Pasquale; Bai, Rong; Al-Ahmad, Amin; Burkhardt, John David; Gallinghouse, Joseph G; Horton, Rodney; Sanchez, Javier E; Bailey, Shane; Hranitzky, Patrick M; Zagrodzky, Jason; Kim, Soo G; Di Biase, Luigi; Natale, Andrea

    2017-08-01

    Thyroid hormone (TH) is known to enhance arrhythmogenicity, and high-normal thyroid function is related with an increased recurrence of atrial fibrillation (AF) after catheter ablation. However, the impact of thyroid hormone replacement (THR) on AF ablation is not well known. This study evaluated 1163 consecutive paroxysmal AF patients [160 (14%) on THR and 1003 (86%) without THR] undergoing their first catheter ablation. A total of 146 patients on THR and 146 controls were generated by propensity matching, based on calculated risk factor scores, using a logistic model (age, sex, body mass index, and left atrium size). The presence of non-pulmonary vein (PV) triggers was disclosed by a high-dose isoproterenol challenge (up to 30 μg/min) after PV isolation. Clinical characteristics were not different between the groups. When compared to the control, non-PV triggers were significantly greater in the THR patients [112 (77%) vs. 47 (32%), P right atrium (95 vs. 56%, P sources of non-PV triggers were the interatrial septum (25 vs. 11%, P = 0.002), coronary sinus (70 vs. 52%, P = 0.01), left atrial appendage (47 vs. 34%, P = 0.03), crista terminalis/superior vena cava (11 vs. 8%, P = 0.43), and mitral valve annulus (7 vs. 5%, P = 0.45) (THR vs. control), respectively. After mean follow-up of 14.7 ± 5.2 months, success rate was lower in patients on THR therapy [94 (64.4%)] compared to patients not receiving THR therapy [110 (75.3%), log-rank test value = 0.04]. Right atrial non-PV triggers were more prevalent in AF patients treated with THR. Elimination of non-PV triggers provided better arrhythmia-free survival in the non-THR group.

  12. The Role of Sex Hormone Replacement Therapy on Self-Perceived Competence in Adolescents with Delayed Puberty.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwab, Jacqueline; Kulin, Howard E.; Susman, Elizabeth J.; Finkelstein, Jordan W.; Chinchilli, Vernon M.; Kunselman, Susan J.; Liben, Lyye S.; D'Arcangelo, M. Rose; Demers, Lawrence M.

    2001-01-01

    Examined role of sex steroids in development of self-perceived competence among adolescents receiving hormone therapy for delayed puberty. Found that hormone treatments had a significant positive effect for both males and females in perceived job competence. Significant positive effects were also obtained for perceptions of romantic appeal and…

  13. Hormone Therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... types of estrogen therapy relieve vaginal dryness. • Systemic estrogen protects against the bone loss that occurs early in menopause and helps prevent hip and spine fractures. • Combined estrogen and progestin therapy may reduce the risk of ...

  14. Primary hypothyroidism mimicking a pituitary macroadenoma: regression after thyroid hormone replacement therapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Eom, Ki Seong; Kim, Jong Moon; Kim, Tae Young [Wonkwang University School of Medicine, Department of Neurosurgery, Iksan (Korea); See-Sung, Choi [Wonkwang University School of Medicine, Department of Radiology, Iksan (Korea); Kim, Jong Duck [Wonkwang University School of Medicine, Department of Pediatrics, Iksan (Korea)

    2009-02-15

    We report a 9-year-old girl with pituitary hyperplasia due to primary hypothyroidism. She presented with growth arrest, abnormal thyroid function studies, and a pituitary mass on MRI. With thyroxine therapy, the pituitary mass regressed and her symptoms resolved. Primary hypothyroidism should be considered in the differential diagnosis of solid mass lesions of the pituitary gland. (orig.)

  15. Sex hormone replacement in Turner syndrome

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Trolle, Christian; Hjerrild, Britta; Cleemann, Line Hartvig

    2012-01-01

    osteoporosis seen in Turner syndrome. But sex hormone insufficiency is also involved in the increased cardiovascular risk, state of physical fitness, insulin resistance, body composition, and may play a role in the increased incidence of autoimmunity. Severe morbidity and mortality affects females with Turner...... syndrome. Recent research emphasizes the need for proper sex hormone replacement therapy (HRT) during the entire lifespan of females with TS and new hypotheses concerning estrogen receptors, genetics and the timing of HRT offers valuable new information. In this review, we will discuss the effects...

  16. Declining incidence of breast cancer after decreased use of hormone-replacement therapy: magnitude and time lags in different countries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zbuk, Kevin; Anand, Sonia S

    2012-01-01

    Throughout the latter half of the 20th century, hormone-replacement therapy (HRT) use steadily increased in the Western world. In 2002, the early termination of the Women's Health Initiative trial due to an excess of adverse events attributable to HRT, led to a precipitous decline in its use. Breast cancer incidence began to decline soon thereafter in the USA and several other countries. However, the magnitude of the decline in breast cancer incidence, and its timing with respect to HRT cessation, shows considerable variability between nations. The impact of HRT cessation appears most significant and immediate in countries with the largest absolute decline in HRT use. In countries in which peak prevalence of HRT use was high, several studies have convincingly excluded decreasing rates of mammographic screening as an explanation for the decline in breast cancer incidence. Conversely, in some countries, no decline in breast cancer incidence is apparent that can be readily attributed to declining trends in HRT use. In such cases, declines in breast cancer incidence may be related instead to saturation or decreased utilisation of mammographic screening programmes. In other cases, it is difficult to disentangle the respective influence of trends in HRT use, and the influence of changes relating to mammographic screening. However, irrespective of time lags and varying magnitudes of effect, the data convincingly support a direct association between decreasing HRT use and declining breast cancer incidence.

  17. Decline in breast cancer incidence in the Flemish region of Belgium after a decline in hormonal replacement therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Renard, F; Vankrunkelsven, P; Van Eycken, L; Henau, K; Boniol, M; Autier, P

    2010-12-01

    Breast cancer incidence rate in Belgian women was as high as 152.7 for 100 000 in 2003 (adjusted on European population). We made an estimation of the contribution of hormone replacement therapy (HRT) on breast cancer incidence from 1999 to 2005 in women aged 50-69 years in Flanders. Breast cancer data were extracted from the Belgium Cancer Registry. Drug consumption was computed from drug sales data. The fraction of breast cancers attributable to HRT was calculated by year, using the relative risks of the Million Women Study in the UK. The proportion of women aged 50-69 years using HRT in Flanders increased since 1992, peaked at 20% in 2001, then decreased to 8% in 2008. The incidence of breast cancer in 100 000 women aged 50-69 years in Flanders increased from 332.8 in 1999 to 407.9 in 2003, then decreased to 366.1 in 2005; the variations were mostly noticeable for tumors <20 mm in size. The fraction of breast cancers attributed to HRT peaked at 11% in 2001 and decreased afterward. The high level of breast cancer observed in the years 2001-2003 in Flanders can be partly attributed to the use of HRT. Since participation to mammography screening of Flemish women aged 50-69 years was still on the rise in 2003 and never exceeds 62%, the decrease in breast cancer incidence was likely to be due to the decrease in HRT use and not to screening saturation.

  18. [Phytoestrogens--whether can they be an alternative to hormone replacement therapy for women during menopause period?].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dittfeld, Anna; Koszowska, Aneta; Brończyk, Anna Puzoń; Nowak, Justyna; Gwizdek, Katarzyna; Zubelewicz-Szkodzińska, Barbara

    2015-01-01

    Menopause is a turning point in a woman's life. Decreasing of secretion of estrogens can cause appearing of many health problems, which make that life is becoming harder in each partof life. Hormonal ReplacementTherapy (HRT) is using for relieving the symptoms of menopause, however, because of the possibility of adverse reactions cannot be used by all women. Alternative for HTC are phytoestrogens--compounds naturally occurring in plants, structurally similar to endogenous estrogen, so that they have an affinity for estrogen receptors, and in this way they can modulate functions of endocrine system. Phytoestrogens can play an important role in symptoms of menopause, but their positive impacts are being described for cardiovascular system, especially for lipid metabolism, bone metabolism. Moreover consumption of phytoestrogens could relieve as symptoms as: fatigue, insomnia, problems with concentrations and depression symptoms. Phytoestrogens are acting as antioxidants against free radicals, and reactive oxygen forms which are known as carcinogenic factors. Article is a review of the most important information about phitoestrogens and their influence on women organism during menopausal period.

  19. Hormone-replacement therapy influences gene expression profiles and is associated with breast-cancer prognosis: a cohort study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Skoog Lambert

    2006-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Postmenopausal hormone-replacement therapy (HRT increases breast-cancer risk. The influence of HRT on the biology of the primary tumor, however, is not well understood. Methods We obtained breast-cancer gene expression profiles using Affymetrix human genome U133A arrays. We examined the relationship between HRT-regulated gene profiles, tumor characteristics, and recurrence-free survival in 72 postmenopausal women. Results HRT use in patients with estrogen receptor (ER protein positive tumors (n = 72 was associated with an altered regulation of 276 genes. Expression profiles based on these genes clustered ER-positive tumors into two molecular subclasses, one of which was associated with HRT use and had significantly better recurrence free survival despite lower ER levels. A comparison with external data suggested that gene regulation in tumors associated with HRT was negatively correlated with gene regulation induced by short-term estrogen exposure, but positively correlated with the effect of tamoxifen. Conclusion Our findings suggest that post-menopausal HRT use is associated with a distinct gene expression profile related to better recurrence-free survival and lower ER protein levels. Tentatively, HRT-associated gene expression in tumors resembles the effect of tamoxifen exposure on MCF-7 cells.

  20. Hormone replacement therapy and oral contraceptives and risk of oesophageal adenocarcinoma: a systematic review and meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lagergren, Katarina; Lagergren, Jesper; Brusselaers, Nele

    2014-11-01

    There is an unexplained strong male predominance in the aetiology of oesophageal adenocarcinoma (OAC). The hypothesis that oestrogens are protective, deserves attention. A potential protective influence of exogenous oestrogen exposure, that is, hormone replacement therapy (HRT) and oral contraceptives (OC) has been addressed only in studies of limited statistical power, and the individual studies have not provided conclusive results. We conducted a systematic literature search and meta-analysis on HRT and OC and the risk of OAC. We used the databases PubMed and the Web of Science. Odds ratios (ORs) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs) were estimated by the Mantel-Haenszel random-effect method. A total of five studies were included. Compared to never users, ever users of HRT had a statistically significantly decreased risk of OAC (pooled OR = 0.75; 95% CI: 0.58-0.98), and ever users of OC had a borderline significantly decreased risk of this cancer (pooled OR = 0.76; 95% CI: 0.57-1.00). In conclusion, HRT and OC use seems to be associated with a decreased risk of OAC. However, further research is warranted.

  1. Efecto de la terapia hormonal de reemplazo sobre la mamografía: nuestra experiencia Effect of replacement hormone therapy on mammography: our experience in this field

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daysi Navarro Despaigne

    2005-12-01

    Full Text Available Se realizó un estudio retrospectivo, cuyo objetivo fue describir el efecto de la terapia hormonal de reemplazo (THR sobre las mamografías de mujeres de edad mediana que asistieron a la Clínica de Climaterio y Osteoporosis (ClimOs entre enero de 1998 y diciembre de 2003. A cada mujer se le realizó mamografía (Mx inicial y durante el uso de la THR, las cuales fueron informadas como: 1 mamografías sin alteraciones, 2 con cambios menores [densidad irregular y microcalcificaciones] y 3 con cambios mayores [nódulos, quistes u otra alteración]. Como tratamiento recibieron estrógenos solos (E, estrógenos y progestagenos combinados continuos (EP y terapia no estrogénica (fitoestrógenos, tibolona. La muestra estuvo constituida por 112 mujeres, con edades entre 34 y 59 años. La Mx inicial mostró: no alteraciones en el 85,5 %, cambios menores en el 9,1 y cambios mayores en el 5,4. En la posTHR (tiempo promedio entre ambos estudios: 2,5 años, el 66 % continuó con mamografías normales, en el 29,0 hubo cambios menores (pA retrospective study was conducted, with the objective of describing the effect of hormone replacement therapy (HRT on mammography performed on middle-aged females, who had been seen at climacterics and osteoporosis clinics from January 1998 to December 2003. Mammography had been performed on each woman at the beginning and during the use of the HRT, being the results as follows: 1 mammography showing no changes; 2 mammography with slight changes irregular density and microcalcification and 3 mammography with major changes nodules, cysts or any other change . As a treatment, they received estrogen (E, continuos combined estrogen and progestagen (EP and nonestrogen therapy (phytoestrogen, tibolone. The sample was composed of 112 women aged 34 to 59 years. The initial Mx showed no changes in 85,5 %, slight changes in 9,1 and major changes in 5,4 of females. After the application of HRT (average time between both mammographic

  2. Inverse association of female hormone replacement therapy with age-related macular degeneration and interactions with ARMS2 polymorphisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edwards, Digna R Velez; Gallins, Paul; Polk, Monica; Ayala-Haedo, Juan; Schwartz, Stephen G; Kovach, Jaclyn L; Spencer, Kylee; Wang, Gaofeng; Agarwal, Anita; Postel, Eric A; Haines, Jonathan L; Pericak-Vance, Margaret; Scott, William K

    2010-04-01

    Purpose. To investigate whether female reproductive history and hormone replacement therapy (HRT) or birth control pills (BCPs) influence risk for age-related macular degeneration (AMD) and whether genetic factors interact with HRT to modulate AMD risk. Methods. Related and unrelated female participants (n = 799) were examined and data were analyzed with generalized estimating equations with adjustment for age and smoking. Individuals with AMD grades 1 to 2 were considered to be unaffected (n = 239) and those with grades 3 to 5 were considered affected (n = 560). Results. When comparing all cases with controls, significant inverse associations were observed for HRT (odds ratio [OR] = 0.65, 95% CI 0.48-0.90, P = 0.008) and BCPs (OR = 0.60, 95% CI 0.36-0.10, P = 0.048). When analyses were stratified by AMD severity (early versus geographic atrophy versus neovascular), the inverse association remained significant (HRT OR = 0.45, 95% CI 0.30-0.66, P control. All pair-wise HRT-genotype and BCP-genotype interactions were examined, to determine whether HRT or BCP modifies the effect of established genetic risk factors. The strongest interactions were observed for HRT x ARMS2 coding SNP (R73H) rs10490923 (P = 0.007) and HRT x ARMS2 intronic SNP rs17623531 (P = 0.019). Conclusions. These findings provide the first evidence suggesting that ARMS2 interacts with HRT to modulate AMD risk and are consistent with previous reports demonstrating a protective relationship between exogenous estrogen use and neovascular AMD. These results highlight the genetic and environmental complexity of the etiologic architecture of AMD; however, further replication is necessary to validate them.

  3. Attributable Causes of Breast Cancer and Ovarian Cancer in China: Reproductive Factors, Oral Contraceptives and Hormone Replacement Therapy

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Li Li; Jia Ji; Jian-bing Wang; Mayineur Niyazi; You-lin Qiao; Paolo Boffettas

    2012-01-01

    Objective:To provide an evidence-based,consistent assessment of the burden of breast cancer attributable to reproductive factors (RFs,including nulliparity,mean number of children,age at first birth and breastfeeding),use of oral contraceptives (OCs,restricted to the age group of 15-49 years),and hormone replacement therapy (HRT),as well as of the burden of ovarian cancer attributable to the mean number of children in China in 2005.Methods:We derived the prevalence of these risk factors and the relative risk of breast and ovarian cancer from national surveys or large-scale studies conducted in China.In the case of RFs,we compared the exposure distributions in 2001 and counterfactual exposure.Results:Exposure of RFs in 2001 was found to account for 6.74% of breast cancer,corresponding to 9,617 cases and 2,769 deaths,and for 2.78% of ovarian cancer (711 cases,294 deaths).The decrease in mean number of children alone was responsible for 1.47% of breast cancer and 2.78% of ovarian cancer.The prevalence of OC use was 1.74% and the population attributable fraction (PAF) of breast cancer was 0.71%,corresponding to 310 cases and 90 deaths.The PAF of breast cancer due to HRT was 0.31%,resulting in 297 cases and 85 deaths.Conclusion:RFs changes in China contributed to a sizable fraction of breast and ovarian cancer incidence and mortality,whereas HRT and OCs accounted for relatively low incidence of breast cancer in China.

  4. Progestagen component in combined hormone replacement therapy in postmenopausal women and breast cancer risk: a debated clinical issue.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gadducci, Angiolo; Biglia, Nicoletta; Cosio, Stefania; Sismondi, Piero; Genazzani, Andrea Riccardo

    2009-12-01

    The relevance of the progestagen component in combined hormone replacement therapy (HRT) for breast cancer risk has been long debated. In vitro studies have shown that progestins exert both genomic transcriptional and non-genomic effects that can enhance the proliferation, invasiveness and spread of breast cancer cells. According to a novel hypothesis, progestins can still activate cancer stem cells in patients with pre-existing, clinically undetected breast cancer. However, some experimental and clinical data suggest that different progestins may have a different impact on the pathophysiology of malignant breast cells. In vitro studies on estrogen receptor (ER)+ breast cancer cells have shown that the addition of medroxyprogesterone acetate (MPA) to estradiol (E(2)) produces a significantly higher increase of the mRNA levels and activities of estrogen-activating enzymes aromatase, 17beta hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase type-1 and sulfatase when compared with progesterone plus E(2). In randomised trial performed on ovariectomised adult female monkeys, oral E(2) plus MPA have resulted in a significantly greater proliferation of breast lobular and ductal epithelium when compared with placebo, whereas E(2) plus micronised progesterone have not. In the same experimental model, oral E(2) plus MPA have been found to induce the expression of genes encoding epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) ligands and downstream targets, whereas E(2) alone or E(2) plus micronised progesterone had no or modest effects on EGFR-related genes. In last years, some clinical studies on HRT users have shown that androgenic progestin- or MPA-based formulations are associated with an increased breast cancer incidence, whereas micronised progesterone- or dydrogesterone-based formulations are not. Further basic and clinical investigations on this topic are strongly warranted to elucidate whether the choice of the progestagen component in combined HRT could be of clinical relevance as for breast

  5. Volumetric quantification of the effect of aging and hormone replacement therapy on breast composition from digital mammograms

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hammann-Kloss, J.S., E-mail: sophie.hammann-kloss@egzb.de [Department of Radiology, Charité Universitätsmedizin Berlin, Charitéplatz 1, 10117 Berlin (Germany); Ärztlicher Dienst, Evangelisches Geriatriezentrum Berlin gGmbH, Reinickendorfer Straße 61, 13347 Berlin (Germany); Bick, U., E-mail: ulrich.bick@charite.de [Department of Radiology, Charité Universitätsmedizin Berlin, Charitéplatz 1, 10117 Berlin (Germany); Fallenberg, E., E-mail: eva.fallenberg@charite.de [Department of Radiology, Charité Universitätsmedizin Berlin, Charitéplatz 1, 10117 Berlin (Germany); Engelken, F., E-mail: florian.engelken@charite.de [Department of Radiology, Charité Universitätsmedizin Berlin, Charitéplatz 1, 10117 Berlin (Germany)

    2014-07-15

    Objective: To assess the physiological changes in breast composition with aging using volumetric breast composition measurement from digital mammograms and to assess the effect of hormone replacement therapy (HRT). Methods: A total of 764 consecutive mammograms of 208 non-HRT using women and 508 mammograms of 134 HRT-using women were analyzed using a volumetric breast composition assessment software (Quantra™, Hologic Inc.). Fibroglandular tissue volume (FTV), breast volume (BV), and percent density (PD) were measured. For statistical analysis, women were divided into a premenopausal (<46 years), a perimenopausal (46–55 years), and a postmenopausal (>55 years) age group. More detailed graphical analysis was performed using smaller age brackets. Women using HRT were compared to age-matched controls not using HRT. Results: Women in the postmenopausal age group had a significantly lower FTV and PD and a significantly higher BV than women in the premenopausal age group (FTV: 77 vs. 120 cm{sup 3}, respectively; PD: 16% vs. 28%, respectively; BV 478 vs. 406 cm{sup 3}, respectively; p < 0.01 for all). Median FTV was nearly stable in consecutive mammograms in the premenopausal and postmenopausal age groups, but declined at a rate of 3.9% per year in the perimenopausal period. Median PD was constant in the premenopausal and postmenopausal age groups and declined at a rate of 0.57% per year in the perimenopausal age group. BV continuously increased with age. Women using HRT throughout the study had a 5% higher PD than women not using HRT (22% vs. 17%, respectively; p < 0.001). Conclusions: Accurate knowledge of normal changes in breast composition are of particular interest nowadays due to the importance of breast density for breast cancer risk evaluation. FTV and PD change significantly during the perimenopausal period but remain relatively constant before and thereafter. Median total breast volume consistently increases with age and further contributes to changes in

  6. The incidence of breast cancer and changes in the use of hormone replacement therapy: a review of the evidence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verkooijen, Helena M; Bouchardy, Christine; Vinh-Hung, Vincent; Rapiti, Elisabetta; Hartman, Mikael

    2009-10-20

    Even though a link between hormone replacement therapy (HRT) and breast cancer has been well documented in the epidemiological literature since the 1980s, it was not until publication of the results of the Women's Health Initiative (WHI) study in 2002 and the Million Women Study in 2003 that women and doctors started reconsidering the use of HRT and sales of HRT started to drop. This paper evaluates the impact of the publication of these two landmark studies on the expected and observed changes in the incidence of breast cancer. Between 2001-2002 and 2005-2006, sharp and significant reductions in the incidence of breast cancer of up to 22% were reported in many US and European populations, temporally consistent with the drop in usage of HRT. Declines in the rates of breast cancer were strongest for 50-60-year-old women (those most likely to be current users of HRT), affected mainly ER+ and PR+ cancers (those most strongly associated with HRT use), and were largest among women with the highest pre-decline prevalence of HRT use and the sharpest decline in its use. A considerable amount of scientific evidence supports the hypothesis that the decline in the incidence of breast cancer is in large part attributable to the sudden drop in HRT use following publication of the WHI and Million Women studies. Nevertheless, the problem of how to advise women contemplating HRT use today remains. Medical relief will remain necessary for many women with menopausal complaints, and so new therapeutic options need to be explored.

  7. Influence of hormone replacement therapy in postmenopausal women with type 2 diabetes and hyperlipidemia on lipid and glucose metabolism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vuksanović Miljanka

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Hormone replacement therapy (HRT is less frequently prescribed to postmenopausal women with diabetes type 2 who have poor lipid status despite well known favorable effect of HRT on lipid levels. Objective. The aim of this study was to assess the effect of oral HRT in postmenopausal women with type 2 diabetes and hyperlipidemia. Method. Continuously combined HRT, estradiol 2mg + norethisterone acetate 1mg was given to 30 women with diabetes type 2 and hyperlipidemia and two control groups of postmenopausal women (30 with hyperlipidemia only and 30 healthy women over a 6-month period. Total cholesterol (t- HOL, triglycerides, LDL-cholesterol, HDL-cholesterol, glycosylated hemoglobin A1c (HbA1c were evaluated in 3-month intervals. Fasting and postprandial glucose levels were evaluated monthly. Results. HRT significantly decreased levels of t-HOL (χ2 Friedman=11.712; p<0.01 and LDL-c (χ2 Friedman=10.403; p<0.01 in postmenopausal women with type 2 diabetes. However, the effect was more pronounced in two control groups. Triglycerides (χ2 Friedman=5.400; p≥0.05 and HDL-c (χ2 Friedman=1.113; p>0.05 did not change in postmenopausal women with type 2 diabetes. Six month of oral HRT significantly decreased HbA1c (F=44.693; p<0.01. Fasting and postprandial glycemia was decreased but not significantly (χ2 Friedman=6.527; p>0.05. Conclusion. Six-month application of HRT is effective in lowering the lipid levels and HbA1c in postmenopausal women with type 2 diabetes. However, target lipid levels were not achieved.

  8. Hormone replacement therapy and risk for coronary heart disease. Data from the CORA-study--a case-control study on women with incident coronary heart disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Windler, Eberhard; Zyriax, Birgit-Christiane; Eidenmüller, Britta; Boeing, Heiner

    2007-07-20

    Hormone replacement therapy (HRT) has been suggested to prevent cardiovascular disease, while some intervention studies have shed doubt on this concept. Thus, uncertainty remains whether current HRT use is beneficial as to cardiovascular disease or may even be harmful. This research investigates the association of hormone replacement therapy, risk factors and lifestyle characteristics with the manifestation of coronary heart disease in current HRT users versus never users. The coronary risk factors for atherosclerosis in women study (CORA-study) provide clinical and biochemical parameters and data on lifestyle in 200 consecutive pre- and postmenopausal women with incident coronary heart disease compared to 255 age-matched population-based controls, of which 87.9% were postmenopausal. Significantly more controls than cases used currently HRT for a median of 9.5 years (32.9% versus 20.2%), while 50.0% of cases and 42.5% of controls had never used HRT (pCORA-study are not compatible with an adverse impact of hormone replacement therapy on cardiovascular disease, rather support the notion of beneficial effects of HRT on weight, central adiposity, insulin sensitivity and blood pressure. Yet, the data do not support the presumption of a general healthy user effect in women on HRT either. Rather, in some women adverse lifestyle habits, especially intense smoking, appear to counteract possible beneficial effects of HRT.

  9. An Epidemiologic Study of Genetic Variation in Hormonal Pathways in Relation to the Effect of Hormone Replacement Therapy on Breast Cancer Risk

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-10-01

    hormone therapy in breast cancer risk.” Kerryn W. Reding, Chu Chen, Christopher I. Li, Christopher S. Carlson, Jasmine Wilkerson, Frederico M...therapy in breast cancer risk.” Kerryn W. Reding, Chu Chen, Christopher I. Li, Christopher S. Carlson, Jasmine Wilkerson, Frederico M. Farin, Kenneth E...Chen, Christopher I. Li, Christopher S. Carlson, Jasmine Wilkerson, Frederico M. Farin, Kenneth E. Thummel, Janet R. Daling, and Kathleen E. Malone

  10. 性激素,激素替代疗法与心血管疾病%Sexual hormones, hormonal replacement therapy and cardiovascular disease

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YANG Xiao-ping; Jane F.Reckelhoff; 曲浥晨

    2012-01-01

    Premenopausal women have a lower risk and incidence of cardiovascular disease (CVD) compared to age-matched men and this gender advantage for women gradually disappears after menopause, suggesting that sexual hormones, most likely estrogen, play a cardioprotective role in women. Observational studies have shown that postmenopausal on hormone replacement therapy (HRT) have a lower rate of CVD. However, randomized prospective primary or secondary prevention trials failed to confirm the beneficial cardiac effects of HRT. Both the Women's Health Initiative (WHI) and the Heart and Estrogen/Progestin Replacement Study (HERS Ⅰ and Ⅱ ) shown that HRT increase the risk and events of CVD in postmenopausal women. The reasons for this paradoxical characterization of HRT as both beneficial and detrimental remain unclear. This review highlights the factors that may contribute to this divergent outcome and could reveal why young or premenopausal women are protected from CVD and yet postmenopausal women do not benefit from HRT. Moreover, dosage, duration, the type of estrogen and route of administration all merit consideration when determining the outcome of HRT. In summary, the fact that young or premenopausal women are protected from cardiovascular disease and yet postmenopausal women do not benefit from HRT has made HRT one of the most controversial topics related to women's health. Future studies are necessary if we are to understand the divergent published findings regarding HRT and develop new therapeutic strategies to improve the quality of life for women.%绝经前女性的心血管疾病(CVD)风险及其发生率与同龄男性相比均较低,女性的这种性别优势却在绝经后逐渐消失,这表明,性激素,尤其是雌激素,在女性中具有心血管保护的作用.观察性研究显示女性绝经后接受激素替代疗法(HRT)可降低CVD的发病率.但是,随机前瞻性一级或二级预防试验未能证实HRT对心脏有积极影响.女性健康

  11. Progestins used in hormonal replacement therapy display different effects in coronary arteries from New Zealand white rabbits

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Nina G; Pedersen, Susan H; Dalsgaard, Tórur;

    2004-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: The aim of this study was in an animal model to assess the vascular effects of different progestins commonly used in hormonal replacement treatment. METHODS: Fifty-six non-atherosclerotic, ovariectomized New Zealand white rabbits were randomized into seven groups: (1) medroxyprogester......OBJECTIVES: The aim of this study was in an animal model to assess the vascular effects of different progestins commonly used in hormonal replacement treatment. METHODS: Fifty-six non-atherosclerotic, ovariectomized New Zealand white rabbits were randomized into seven groups: (1...... part of the left anterior descending coronary artery were microdissected and mounted for isometric tension recordings in a myograph. The vasoconstrictory responses induced by potassium, endothelin-1, calcium and Nw-nitro-L-arginine methyl ester, and the vasodilatory response induced by acetylcholine......+/-S.E.M.). Treatment with MPA compared to placebo caused an endothelin-1 induced increase of Emax in the distal coronary artery (9.21+/-0.87 versus 6.51+/-0.65 Pcalcium induced increase of pD2 in both coronary arteries (2.98+/-0.19 versus 2.42+/-0.12 P

  12. Genetic variation in estrogen receptor, C-reactive protein and fibrinogen does not predict the plasma levels of inflammation markers after longterm hormone replacement therapy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    de Maat, Moniek P M; Madsen, Jonna Skov; Langdahl, Bente Lomholt;

    2007-01-01

    Markers of inflammation, such as C-reactive protein (CRP) and fibrinogen, are associated with the risk of atherothrombosis. Plasma levels of these markers of inflammation are affected by hormone replacement therapy (HRT) and modulated by smoking. We studied whether genetic variation in the estrogen...... receptor- 1 (ESR1), CRP and fibrinogen-beta genes influences the plasma levels of inflammation markers after HRT. Plasma CRP and fibrinogen were measured after five years follow-up in healthy postmenopausal women (per-protocol group) who were randomised to hormone therapy (n=187) or no treatment (n=249......). The effect of HRT, smoking and genetic variations in ESR1 (PvuII and XbaI), CRP (1444C/T) and fibrinogen-beta (FGB, -455G/A) were determined. The plasma concentration of CRP was higher in the HRT group than in the control group (2.03 mg/l and 1.41 mg/l, respectively; p

  13. The effect of the deterioration of insulin sensitivity on beta-cell function in growth-hormone-deficient adults following 4-month growth hormone replacement therapy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rosenfalck, A M; Fisker, S; Hilsted, J;

    1999-01-01

    .07). One patient developed impaired glucose tolerance. Short-term GH replacement therapy in a dose of about 2 IU/m2 daily in GHD adults induces a reduction in insulin sensitivity, despite favourable changes in body composition, and an inadequate enhancement of insulin secretion....

  14. Thyroid function in children with growth hormone (GH deficiency during the initial phase of GH replacement therapy - clinical implications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Smyczynska Joanna

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Normal thyroid hormone secretion or appropriate L-thyroxine (L-T4 substitution is necessary for the optimal effect of the growth hormone (GH administration on growth rate. The decrease of free thyroxine (FT4 levels at recombinant human GH (rhGH therapy onset has been reported in several studies. The aim of the present study was to evaluate the effect of rhGH administration on thyrotropin (TSH and FT4 serum concentrations in children with GH deficiency (GHD during the 1st year of therapy, as well as to assess potential indications to thyroid hormone supplementation in them. Patients and methods The analysis involved data of 75 children (59 boys, 16 girls with disorders of GH secretion (GHD, neurosecretory dysfunction - NSD and partial GH inactivity (inactGH, who were treated with rhGH for - at least - one year. In all the children, body height and height velocity (HV were assessed before and after 1 year of therapy, while TSH, FT4, IGF-I and IGFBP-3 before treatment and after 3-6 months and 1 year of treatment. In the patients, who revealed hypothyroidism (HypoT, an appropriate L-T4 substitution was introduced immediately. The incidence of HypoT, occurring during the initial phase of rhGH therapy, was assessed, as well as its influence on the therapy effectiveness. Results Before rhGH substitution, there were no significant differences in either auxological indices or TSH and FT4 secretion, or IGF-I concentration and its bioavailability among the groups of patients. During the initial 3-6 months of rhGH administration, a significant decrease of FT4 serum concentration, together with a significant increase of IGF-I SDS and IGF-I/IGFBP-3 molar ratio was observed in all the studied groups. In 17 children, HypoT was diagnosed and L-T4 substitution was administered. Despite similar IGF-I secretion increase, the improvement of HV presented significantly lower in children with HypoT than in those who remained euthyroid all the time

  15. Terapia hormonal de reemplazo en prevención cardiovascular: ¿Dónde estamos parados? Hormone replacement therapy and cardiovascular prevention: Where are we now?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jorge Lermna

    2008-06-01

    of physiological mechanisms suggesting that estrogens could be responsible for this cardiovascular protection, and retrospective analysis of clinical studies showed that post menopausal women who had used hormonal replacement therapy (HRT suffered less cardiovascular events. These observations stimulated the execution of several prospective, randomized clinical trials (some of them with a large number of patients and prolonged follow-up in post menopausal women, with the aim of proving the hypothesis that HRT could prevent major cardiovascular events. Such hypothesis could not be demonstrated in any of those studies because HRT was not beneficial, and in several cases it was even deleterious in some aspects. Criticism has arisen over some of the methodological aspects of those prospective trials, basically regarding the age of the included patients and the timing of the beginning of HRT. There are also biological reasons that can explain the contradiction. A new hypothesis, also based on experimental and clinical observations, suggests the possibility that beginning HRT in younger women and earlier after menopause could yield different results.

  16. A comparative analysis of the lipid tissue hormones concentration, lipid metabolism and insulin resistance in subclinical hypothyroidism depending on the presence/absence of the levothyroxin replacement therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N E Altshuler

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the present research was to study the influence of lipid tissue hormones on the mechanisms of insulin resistance development and rates of lipid metabolism in patients with subclinical hypothyroidism (SH aged over 50 years, depending on the body mass index (BMI, as well as the presence or absence of the levothyroxin (L-T4 replacement therapy. In patients with SH there were revealed disturbances of lipid metabolism which were manifested by low concentration of HDL-C, as well as the reduction in insulin sensitivity (an increase in the insulin level in normoglycemia and elevation of HOMA-IR rates. The analyses of lipid tissue hormones levels in studied groups showed an increase in adiponectin level within the reference values range, but they significantly differed from those of the controls. The values of leptin and resistin in the studied groups did not show significant difference from those of the healthy persons of the corresponding age, sex, and BMI. A correlation analysis of the values of lipid tissue hormones, TSH, lipid spectrum, insulin, glucose, and HOMA-IR was carried out. The results obtained were analyzed by two main points: the replacement therapy and BMI. The analyses of the results in accordance with BMI revealed that in patients with the normal body mass (BMI<24.9 kg/m2 the adiponectin rate was higher against the background of the lipid metabolism disturbance. In patients with the excessive body mass (BMI>25–29.9 kg/m2 the values of insulin and HOMA-IR increased, the disturbance of lipid metabolism aggravated, and adiponectin concentration decreased. The L-T4 replacement therapy was effective and resulted in the normalization of the rates of lipid and carbohydrate metabolism, adiponectin, and leptin. However the comparison of the results obtained in the groups with compensated and noncompensated SH shows that after 6 months significant differences were revealed only in the levels of adiponectin, resistin, and insulin.

  17. Breast Cancer Suspicion in a Transgender Male-to-Female Patient on Hormone Replacement Therapy Presenting with Right Breast Mass: Breast Cancer Risk Assessment and Presentation of a Rare Lesion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Krystina Tongson

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available There has been an increasing use of hormonal therapy among male-to-female (MtF transgender individuals. This long-term hormone replacement therapy (HRT renders MtF individuals a unique patient subgroup in terms of breast cancer risk. This case describes a MtF transgender who presented with a breast lesion concerning for malignancy following hormonal replacement therapy. The patient additionally had a strong family history of breast cancer. Final pathology revealed lobular hyperplasia in the setting of gynecomastia and pseudoangiomatous stromal hyperplasia (PASH. Both pathology findings are rare in biological females, let alone in the setting of hormone replacement therapy in a MtF individual. While the number of reported cases of suspicious breast lesions in this population remains scarce, it presents both a diagnostic and therapeutic challenge due to the nature of the treatment course and the lack of research in this recently growing subgroup of patients.

  18. The effect of a high-protein, high-sodium diet on calcium and bone metabolism in postmenopausal women stratified by hormone replacement therapy use

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Harrington, M.; Bennett, T.; Jakobsen, Jette;

    2004-01-01

    randomly assigned to a diet high in protein ( 90 g/day) and sodium (180 mmol/day) ( calciuric diet) or a diet moderate in protein ( 70 g/day) and low in sodium ( 65 mmol/day) for 4 weeks followed by crossover to alternative dietary regimen for a further 4 weeks. The calciuric diet significantly (P......The objective of this study was to investigate the influence of a high-sodium, high-protein diet on bone metabolism in postmenopausal women ( aged 49 - 60 y) stratified by hormone replacement therapy (HRT) use. In a crossover trial, 18 women (n = 8 HRT users (+HRT) and n = 10 nonusers (-HRT)) were...

  19. The effect of a high-protein, high-sodium diet on calcium and bone metabolism in postmenopausal women stratified by hormone replacement therapy use

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Harrington, M.; Bennett, T.; Jakobsen, Jette

    2004-01-01

    randomly assigned to a diet high in protein ( 90 g/day) and sodium (180 mmol/day) ( calciuric diet) or a diet moderate in protein ( 70 g/day) and low in sodium ( 65 mmol/day) for 4 weeks followed by crossover to alternative dietary regimen for a further 4 weeks. The calciuric diet significantly (P......The objective of this study was to investigate the influence of a high-sodium, high-protein diet on bone metabolism in postmenopausal women ( aged 49 - 60 y) stratified by hormone replacement therapy (HRT) use. In a crossover trial, 18 women (n = 8 HRT users (+HRT) and n = 10 nonusers (-HRT)) were...

  20. Cardiac function in growth hormone deficient patients before and after 1 year with replacement therapy: a magnetic resonance imaging study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andreassen, Mikkel; Faber, Jens Oscar; Petersen, Claus Leth;

    2011-01-01

    Assessed by conventional echocardiography the influence of growth hormone deficiency (GHD) and effects of replacement therapy on left ventricle (LV) function and mass (LVM) have shown inconsistent results. We aimed to evaluate cardiac function before and during replacement therapy employing...... the gold standard method cardiac magnetic resonance imaging (CMRI) and measurements of circulating levels of B-type natriuretic peptides. Sixteen patients (8 males and 8 females, mean age 49 years (range 18-75)) with severe GHD and 16 matched control subjects were included. CMRI was performed at baseline...... and after 1 year of GH replacement therapy. IGF-I, B-type natriuretic peptide (BNP) and N-terminal pro-BNP (NT-proBNP) were measured after 0, 1, 2, 3, 6 and 12 months of treatment. IGF-I Z-score increased from (median (IQR)) -2.3 (-3.8 to -1.4) to 0.5 (-0.3 to 1.7). LVM index (LVMI), ejection fraction...

  1. Is Hormone Replacement Therapy Safe in Women With a BRCA Mutation?: A Systematic Review of the Contemporary Literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Birrer, Nicole; Chinchilla, Carolina; Del Carmen, Marcela; Dizon, Don S

    2016-02-02

    Women with a BRCA1 or BRCA2 mutation are recommended to undergo prophylactic (or risk reducing) bilateral salpingo-oophorectomy (BSO) before age 40, resulting in surgical menopause. Given the concerns of estrogen deprivation on overall health, hormone therapy (HT) is often discussed, yet safety concerns persist. We performed a systematic literature review of the safety of HT in women with a BRCA mutation undergoing prophylactic BSO. Although there remains a paucity of data on this topic, as evidenced by this systematic review of the contemporary literature, these patients do benefit from treatment, especially as it relates to menopausal symptoms without an apparently increased risk of breast cancer. Decisions regarding the use of HT in women who undergo BSO after detection of a BRCA mutation must be individualized based on careful consideration of the risks and benefits. However, the risks of a subsequent cancer diagnosis appear small, particularly in regards to the benefits of treatment afforded by HT.

  2. Effect of Hormone Replacement Therapy (HRT and low-dose combined oral pill on skin thickness, lipid profile and blood chemistry of menopausal women

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ali Baziad

    2003-12-01

    Full Text Available This study to evaluate the effect of hormone replacement therapy ( HRT and low-dose combinated oral pill on skin thickness , lipid profile and blood chemistry on menopausal woman.This study was carried out in one year randomized prospective study. 36 women were divided into 18 women receiving HRT and the other 18 receiving low-dose oral pill. The result of this study showed an increase in skin thickness (collagen in both groups. But Those received low dose oral pill showed more . The increase of the skin thickness can prevent osteoporosis. The administration of HRT or low-dose oral pill could cause allteration in blood lipip profile and blood chemistry. But The changes were still within in normal limit. The administration of low-dose oral pill can be considered in postmeno-pausal women. (Med J Indones 2003; 12: 224-8Keywords: Hormone replacement therapy, low-dose oral pill, menopausal women, skin thickness, lipid profile, blood chemistry.

  3. Effect of Hormone Replacement Therapy on Serum Complement (C3,C4) and Immunoglobulin (IgG, IgM) Levels in Post-menopausal Women

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yi LIU; Liqun LV

    2008-01-01

    Serum C3, C4, IgG and IgM levels were evaluated in healthy post-menopausal women receiving short-term hormone replacement therapy (HRT) regimens and in untreated women. Serum C3, C4, IgM and IgG levels were assessed in 54 women receiving HRT therapy (CEE 0.625 mg+MPA 2.5 mg/day), and in 54 control women not receiving HRT. The results showed that the mean serum C3 and C4 levels were significantly higher in women receiving HRT than those untreated women (P<0.01). There was significant difference in lgG and IgM levels between two groups. It was con-cluded that HRT might be involved in the development of cardiovascular diseases through inflamma- tory mechanisms, as suggested by increased serum levels of C3 and C4.

  4. Positive impact of hormone replacement therapy on the fibrinolytic system: a long-term randomized controlled study in healthy postmenopausal women

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Madsen, J S; Kristensen, S R; Bladbjerg, E M;

    2003-01-01

    be of importance. OBJECTIVES: To investigate the prolonged effect of HRT on the fibrinolytic system and to determine whether two common polymorphisms in the plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 (PAI-1) and tissue-type plasminogen activator (t-PA) genes modulate this effect. Methods: Healthy postmenopausal women (n......BACKGROUND: The mechanisms by which postmenopausal hormone replacement therapy (HRT) may influence risk of cardiovascular disease are still unclear. Impaired fibrinolytic function is associated with an enhanced risk of cardiovascular disease and therefore the effect of HRT on fibrinolysis may...... of smoking and without influence from the two common polymorphisms PAI-1 -675(4G/5G) and t-PA intron8ins311. Furthermore, no difference between opposed estrogen (with norethisterone acetate as the gestagen component) and unopposed estrogen therapy was found. Both an intention-to-treat and a per...

  5. Papel de la terapia hormonal sustitutiva, en la prevención y tratamiento de la osteoporosis menopáusica Role of hormone replacement therapy in the prevention and treatment of menopausal osteoporosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. C. Landa

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available La terapia hormonal sustitutiva se ha venido utilizando como prevención y tratamiento de la osteoporosis postmenopáusica. En este trabajo se revisan los ensayos publicados recientemente, especialmente los estudios Heart and estrogen/progestin replacement study (HERS y Women´s Health Initiative (WHI, ensayos aleatorizados controlados de gran extensión. Se concluye que la terapia hormonal sustitutiva tiene un efecto de mejora de los síntomas vasomotores de la menopausia. Tiene un efecto positivo sobre la masa ósea con más intensidad sobre el hueso trabecular, pero este efecto sólo persiste durante el tratamiento hormonal y se recupera el balance negativo del recambio óseo al acabar el tratamiento. Se comprueba un efecto protector sobre las fracturas osteoporóticas (vértebra, fémur durante el tratamiento en mujeres mayores (60 años, pero no se comprueba esta acción a largo plazo por lo que su valor como terapia preventiva de la osteoporosis no es apoyada. Al finalizar se dan unas orientaciones que permitan ayudar en la práctica clínica.Hormone replacement therapy has been employed for the prevention and treatment of postmenopausal osteoporosis. This paper reviews recently published trials, especially the studies Heart and estrogen/progestin replacement study (HERS and Women´s Health Initiative (WHI, randomized controlled trials of wide scope. The conclusion reached is that hormone replacement therapy has the effect of improving the vasomotor symptoms of menopause. It has a positive effect on the bone mass with more intensity on the trabecular bone, but this effect only persists during the hormonal treatment and the negative balance of bone exchange is recovered when treatment stops. A protective effect is found on osteoporotic fractures (vertebra, femur during the treatment of older women (above 60 years, but this action is not found in the long term, which is why its value as a preventive therapy for osteoporosis is not supported

  6. Effect of estrogen receptor-alpha (ESR1 gene polymorphism on high density lipoprotein levels in response to hormone replacement therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N.C. Nogueira-de-Souza

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Studies have shown that estrogen replacement therapy and estrogen plus progestin replacement therapy alter serum levels of total, LDL and HDL cholesterol levels. However, HDL cholesterol levels in women vary considerably in response to hormone replacement therapy (HRT. A significant portion of the variability of these levels has been attributed to genetic factors. Therefore, we investigated the influence of estrogen receptor-alpha (ESR1 gene polymorphisms on HDL levels in response to postmenopausal HRT. We performed a prospective cohort study on 54 postmenopausal women who had not used HRT before the study and had no significant general medical illness. HRT consisted of conjugated equine estrogen and medroxyprogesterone acetate continuously for 1 year. The lipoprotein levels were measured from blood samples taken before the start of therapy and after 1 year of HRT. ESR1 polymorphism (MspI C>T, HaeIII C>T, PvuII C>T, and XbaI A>G frequencies were assayed by restriction fragment length polymorphism. A general linear model was used to describe the relationships between HDL levels and genotypes after adjusting for age. A significant increase in HDL levels was observed after HRT (P = 0.029. Women with the ESR1 PvuII TT genotype showed a statistically significant increase in HDL levels after HRT (P = 0.032. No association was found between other ESR1 polymorphisms and HDL levels. According to our results, the ESR1 PvuII TT genotype was associated with increased levels of HDL after 1 year of HRT.

  7. Effect of hormone replacement therapy on climacteric syndrome%激素替代治疗对更年期综合征的影响

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    仲海平

    2015-01-01

    Objective To explore the effect of hormone replacement therapy on menopausal syndrome. Methods Select 128 cases of menopausal syndrome in our hospital during November November to 2013,Hormone replacement therapy,E2, FSH and other indicators were observed before and after treatment, and the quality of life of patients were observed.Results Compared with before treatment,After treatment, patients with FSH, LH, E2 and other biochemical indicators have improved,The difference was statistically significant (P<0.05);Patients sweating, irritability, insomnia, depression and other symptoms scores were decreased after treatment,The difference was statistically significant (P<0.05);After treatment, the patients in the psychological field, social relations, the field score were improved,The difference was statistically significant (P<0.05). Conclusion The clinical symptoms and biochemical indexes of the patients can be significantly improved by hormone replacement therapy,To improve the quality of life of patients with important significance.%目的 探讨激素替代治疗对更年期综合征的影响.方法 选择2013年11月~2014年11月我院收治的更年期综合征患者128例为研究对象,对其进行激素替代治疗,观察患者治疗前后血清雌二醇(E2)、促卵泡成熟激素(FSH)等指标变化及患者生活质量评分.结果 治疗后患者E2、FSH、黄体生成激素(LH)等生化指标与治疗前相比,均有所改善,差异有统计学意义(P<0.05);治疗后患者潮热出汗、烦躁易怒、失眠、抑郁等临床症状评分均有所降低,差异有统计学意义(P<0.05);治疗后患者心理领域、社会关系领域评分均有所提高,差异有统计学意义(P<0.05).结论 更年期综合征应用激素替代治疗可显著改善患者生化指标及临床症状,对提高患者生活质量有重要意义.

  8. Effectiveness and safety of growth hormone replacement therapy in adults with growth hormone deficiency%生长激素替代治疗成人生长激素缺乏症的有效性与安全性

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    林晨红; 宋筱筱; 徐小红

    2015-01-01

    成人生长激素缺乏症可致机体组分改变、糖、脂代谢紊乱、骨代谢异常、心血管疾病风险增加及生活质量下降等,生长激素替代治疗可有效改善以上情况.但生长激素广泛的生理作用使其安全性备受争议,近几年大部分文献提示生长激素替代治疗不增加糖尿病的发生、肿瘤复发、新发恶性肿瘤及心血管事件等,但仍缺乏大量随机、对照研究,故在生长激素治疗时应严密监测血清胰岛素样生长因子-1水平、血脂、血压、血糖、骨密度、肿瘤标志物及生活质量等指标.%Adult growth hormone deficiency causes a series of abnormities including abnormal body composition,impaired glucose and lipid metabolism,abnormal bone metabolism,as well as increased cardiovascular risk and decreased living quality.Growth hormone replacement therapy can effectively improve those abnormalities.However,the safety of growth hormone is controversial since growth hormone has extensively physiological functions.In recent years,most of the studies revealed that the incidence of diabetes mellitus,tumor recurrence,second neoplasms and cardiovascular events in growth hormone replacement therapy did not increase,although large randomized controlled studies are needed to reach the conclusion.Serum insulin-like growth factor-1 level,serum lipids,blood pressure,plasma glucose,bone mineral density,cancer biomarkers and living quality should be closely monitored during the period of growth hormone replacement therapy.

  9. The effect of the deterioration of insulin sensitivity on beta-cell function in growth-hormone-deficient adults following 4-month growth hormone replacement therapy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rosenfalck, A M; Fisker, S; Hilsted, Jannik

    1999-01-01

    The purpose of the present study was to evaluate the combined effect of GH treatment on body composition and glucose metabolism, with special focus on beta-cell function in adult GHD patients. In a double-blind placebo-controlled design, 24 GHD adults (18M/6F), were randomized to 4 months treatment.......7 and after 14.6 +/- 16.1 pmol/l, Psensitivity index SI, estimated by Bergmans Minimal Model, decreased significantly [before GH 1.1 +/- 0.7 and after 0.4 +/- 0.2 10(-4)(min x pmol/l), P....07). One patient developed impaired glucose tolerance. Short-term GH replacement therapy in a dose of about 2 IU/m2 daily in GHD adults induces a reduction in insulin sensitivity, despite favourable changes in body composition, and an inadequate enhancement of insulin secretion....

  10. Genetic variation in estrogen receptor, C-reactive protein and fibrinogen does not predict the plasma levels of inflammation markers after longterm hormone replacement therapy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    de Maat, Moniek P M; Madsen, Jonna Skov; Langdahl, Bente

    2007-01-01

    Markers of inflammation, such as C-reactive protein (CRP) and fibrinogen, are associated with the risk of atherothrombosis. Plasma levels of these markers of inflammation are affected by hormone replacement therapy (HRT) and modulated by smoking. We studied whether genetic variation in the estrogen......). The effect of HRT, smoking and genetic variations in ESR1 (PvuII and XbaI), CRP (1444C/T) and fibrinogen-beta (FGB, -455G/A) were determined. The plasma concentration of CRP was higher in the HRT group than in the control group (2.03 mg/l and 1.41 mg/l, respectively; p ... concentration (n.s.). Genetic polymorphisms in ESR1, CRP and fibrinogen were not associated with an effect of HRT on the CRP and fibrinogen plasma levels, and no significant interaction with smoking was observed. In conclusion, higher plasma levels of CRP and lower plasma levels of fibrinogen were observed...

  11. Variação no Índice de Massa Corporal em Usuárias de Terapia de Reposição Hormonal Variations in the Body Mass Index in Users of Hormone Replacement Therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    José Alaércio de Toledo Lima-Junior

    2000-05-01

    Full Text Available Objetivo: avaliar os efeitos da terapia de reposição hormonal sobre o índice de massa corporal de mulheres na pós-menopausa. Casuística e Métodos: foram avaliadas retrospectivamente, por um período de três anos, 166 usuárias e 136 não-usuárias de reposição hormonal, acompanhadas no Ambulatório de Menopausa do Centro de Atenção Integral à Saúde da Mulher da Universidade Estadual de Campinas, avaliando-se a variação desse parâmetro ao final de cada ano em relação ao inicial. A análise dos dados foi realizada usando-se o testechi², o teste t de Student e o teste de Mann-Whitney para amostras independentes. Resultados: não foram observadas variações significativas no índice de massa corporal, quando se compararam as usuárias e não-usuárias durante os três anos de observação. Conclusão: a terapia de reposição hormonal não produziu alterações no índice de massa corporal em mulheres adequadamente acompanhadas durante o seu uso.Purpose: to evaluate the effects of hormone replacement therapy on the body mass index of postmenopausal women. Methods: for this purpose, 166 users and 136 non-users of hormone replacement were evaluated retrospectively during a period of three years. All women were assisted at the Menopause Outpatient Clinic of CAISM - UNICAMP, where the variations in this parameter were evaluated at the end of each year in relation to the initial parameters. The data analysis was performed through chi² test, Student's t test, and Mann-Whitney test. Results: we observed no significant variations in the body mass index, when comparing users and non-users during the three years of observation. Conclusion: hormone replacement therapy did not produce changes in this parameter in women properly assisted during its use.

  12. Iron replacement therapy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Ole Haagen; Coskun, Mehmet; Weiss, Günter

    2016-01-01

    PURPOSE OF REVIEW: Approximately, one-third of the world's population suffers from anemia, and at least half of these cases are because of iron deficiency. With the introduction of new intravenous iron preparations over the last decade, uncertainty has arisen when these compounds should be admini...... treatment, when to follow-up for relapse, which dosage and type of therapy should be recommended or not recommended, and if some patients should not be treated....... be administered and under which circumstances oral therapy is still an appropriate and effective treatment. RECENT FINDINGS: Numerous guidelines are available, but none go into detail about therapeutic start and end points or how iron-deficiency anemia should be best treated depending on the underlying cause...... of iron deficiency or in regard to concomitant underlying or additional diseases. SUMMARY: The study points to major issues to be considered in revisions of future guidelines for the true optimal iron replacement therapy, including how to assess the need for treatment, when to start and when to stop...

  13. Effects of growth hormone replacement on cortisol metabolism in hypopituitary patients treated with cortisone acetate

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Beentjes, JAM; Kerstens, MN; Dullaart, RPF

    2001-01-01

    Growth hormone (GH) replacement may inhibit 11 beta -hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase type 1 (11 beta HSD1) activity, resulting in diminished conversion of cortisone to cortisol. Moreover, GH replacement may lower bioavailability of hydrocortisone tablets. Therefore, substitution therapy with cortisone

  14. Sonographic assessment of carotid artery in postmenopausal women receiving long-term low-dose hormone replacement therapy

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Wang Hong-yan; Jiang Yu-xin; Meng Hua; Ge Qin-sheng

    2004-01-01

    Objective: The aim of this study was to determine the influence of long-term low-dose hor mone replacement therapy (HRT) on the intima-media wall of the carotid artery in postmenopa usal women by ultrasound.Methods: 146 postmenopausal women were divided into the HRT group(n= 68, HRT over 5years after menopause) and the control group(n= 78, no HRT). The intima-media thickness (IMT) of the carotid arteries was measured bilaterally, the characteristics of the atherosclerotic plaques were described, the peak systolic velocity (PSV) and resistance index (RI) were measured by ultrasound examination.Results: The IMT of HRT group was significantly smaller than that of the control group,(0. 089±0. 22) cm vs (0. 093±0.29) cm, (P<0. 01). The occurrence of plaques was reduced in HRT group than the control group (7.7% vs 12.7%, P<0. 05). The plaques were most frequently found at the bifurcation of the arteries. The soft and mixed plaques in HRT group were found significantly less than that of the control group (soft 1.7% vs 4. 5%, mixed 3.1% vs 6. 7%, both P<0.05), while the hard plaques in HRT group were more than those of the control group(2.6% vs 1.3%, P<0. 05). The maximum plaque thickness of HRT group was less than that of control group (0. 191±0. 057) cm vs (0. 226±0. 073) cm, (P<0.05). The internal carotid artery PSV and RI in the two groups were similar [PSV (65.61±26.55) cm/s vs (64.82±27. 22) cm/s, RI (0.67±0. 082) vs (0. 68±0. 075), both P>0.05].Conclusion: Our study indicated that HRT may has an effect to reduce the carotid IMT thickness, inhibit the plaque formation, and make the plaques harder and more stable. The long-term low-dose HRT may protect the postmenopausal women against the artherosclerosis of the carotid artery.

  15. Effect of Climacteric Syndrome Hormone Replacement Therapy Compliance Related Factors and Preventive Countermeasures%影响更年期综合征激素替代治疗依从性相关因素及预防对策

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    董小艳

    2015-01-01

    目的:探讨影响更年期综合征激素替代治疗依从性的相关因素及预防措施。方法:104例更年期综合征患者根据患者个体情况分别应用单纯雌激素补充、单纯孕激素补充和雌孕(雄)激素联系补充3种方式,分析104例更年期综合征临床资料,进行激素替代治疗依从性判断,比较两组不同依从性相关因素上的差异,并进行统计学分析。结果:104例患者激素替代治疗依从性好62例(59.62%),激素替代治疗依从性差42例(40.38%);单因素χ²检验文化程度、家庭支持、居住地、心理状态、经济收入、对激素替代治疗认知、激素替代治疗不良反应、医疗费用、就诊条件9个指标差异有统计学意义(P<0.05)。Logistic回归分析影响更年期综合征激素替代治疗依从性的相关因素,激素替代治疗认知偏差、激素替代治疗不良反应、不良心理状况、居住农村(OR=4.70、4.29、3.89、3.17)。结论:更年期综合征激素替代治疗过程中依从性较差,导致依从性差影响复杂,应实施针对性措施提高激素替代治疗依从性。%Objective: To investigate the effects of menopause syndrome hormone replacement therapy compliance related factors and preventive measures.Method: 104 patients with climacteric syndrome according to individual condition used only estrogen supplement, progesterone supplementation alone and female pregnancy (male) hormone ties complement in three ways, to analyze climacteric syndrome clinical data, hormone replacement therapy compliance judgment of 104 cases, differences of compliance related factors between the two groups.Result: 104 patients with hormone replacement therapy compliance in 62 cases (59.62%), hormone replacement therapy for treatment of 42 cases of poor compliance (40.38%); single factor χ² test culture degree, family support, place of residence, the psychological condition, economic income

  16. Progestins used in hormonal replacement therapy display different effects in coronary arteries from New Zealand white rabbits

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Nina G; Pedersen, Susan H; Dalsgaard, Tórur

    2004-01-01

    ) medroxyprogesterone acetate (MPA), (2) norethisterone acetate (NETA), (3) conjugated equine estrogens (CEE), (4) 17-beta-estradiol (E2), (5) MPA+CEE , (6) NETA+E2 , (7) or placebo (n=8) and given hormonal treatment through the diet for 4 weeks. Ring segments from the left proximal coronary artery and from the distal...

  17. Power output, isometric strength and steadiness in the leg muscles of pre- and postmenopausal women; the effects of hormone replacement therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carville, Serena F; Rutherford, Olga M; Newham, Di J

    2006-02-01

    There are conflicting reports of the effects of hormone replacement therapy (HRT) on strength preservation in postmenopausal women, while any effect on power output has received little attention. Decreased steadiness of force generation has been reported in older muscles and may be related to the hormonal changes associated with the menopause, but the effect of HRT has not been investigated. We have studied the effect of HRT on strength, power output and isometric force steadiness in healthy women. Sixteen young (aged 27.4 +/- 1.4 years, mean +/- SEM) and 29 postmenopausal women were studied. Fifteen of the latter were taking HRT (68.1 +/- 1.4 years, HRT+) and 14 (70.5 +/- 1.5 years, HRT-) had never done so. During isometric quadriceps contractions the force steadiness (coefficient of variation of force) was measured at 10, 25, 50 and 100% maximum voluntary contraction (MVC). The average power generated by an explosive leg extension was recorded. The HRT- group generated less power (110.2 +/- 7.2 W) than both the HRT+ (136.5 +/- 10.9 W, P = 0.027) and young (136.2 +/- 5.8 W, P = 0.027) subjects. Power output was similar in the HRT+ and younger subjects. The HRT- subjects were weaker than the younger ones (241.3 +/- 14.0 N vs. 297.6 +/- 13 N, P = 0.006). The strength of the HRT+ group (255.5 +/- 14 N) was not significantly different to the other two groups. There was no difference in steadiness between the three groups at any of the force levels. HRT appears to maintain power output to a greater extent than isometric strength in postmenopausal women. There was no evidence for an effect of either age or HRT on isometric steadiness in the quadriceps.

  18. Thickening of the epicardial adipose tissue can be alleviated by thyroid hormone replacement therapy in patients with subclinical hypothyroidism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sayin, Irmak; Erkan, Aycan Fahri; Ekici, Berkay; Kutuk, Utku; Corakci, Ahmet; Tore, Hasan Fehmi

    2016-01-01

    Subclinical hypothyroidism (SCH) is a common disorder which has adverse cardiovascular effects. Epicardial adipose tissue (EAT), a novel marker of cardiovascular risk, is increased in SCH. We aimed to investigate whether L-thyroxine treatment can reverse the thickening of EAT in SCH. Forty-four patients with SCH and 42 euthyroid control subjects were included. EAT thickness was measured using transthoracic echocardiography at baseline and after restoration of the euthyroid status with 3 months of L-thyroxine treatment. At baseline, mean EAT thickness was significantly greater in the SCH group when compared to the control group (6.3 ± 1.7 mm vs. 4.1 ± 0.9 mm, respectively, p hormone (TSH) level and EAT thickness in the SCH group. There was a significant reduction in mean EAT thickness in response to L-thyroxine treatment (6.3 ± 1.7 mm vs. 5.1 ± 1.4 mm, p adipose tissue thickness is increased in patients with SCH. This thickening was alleviated with restoration of the euthyroid status with L-thyroxine treatment in our study population of predominantly male, relatively old subjects with greater baseline EAT thickness.

  19. Effects of long-term hormone replacement therapy on QT and corrected QT dispersion during resting and peak exercise electrocardiography in post-menopausal women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Altunkeser, Bülent B; Ozdemir, Kurtulus; Içli, Abdullah; Celik, Cetin; Akyürek, Cemalettin; Gök, Hasan

    2002-01-01

    It is known that the QT interval is longer in women than men. Estrogen is reported to account for the QT interval prolongation in several studies conducted with hormone replacement therapy (HRT) in postmenopausal women. Along with this, there are conflicting data as regards the effects of HRT on QT interval and dispersion. Moreover, there is no evidence about the effect of HRT on exercise QT parameters. We compared QT parameters obtained from surface electrocardiograms during resting and peak exercise before and after 6 months of HRT consisting of estrogen plus progesterone in healthy postmenopausal women. Twenty-four healthy postmenopausal women were given 0.625 mg/day conjugated estrogens and 2.5 mg/day medroxyprogesterone acetate for 6 months. Exercise stress testing using the Bruce protocol was performed before and after HRT. QT maximum, minimum, dispersion and corrected QT maximum, minimum and dispersion were calculated during resting and peak exercise. HRT resulted in a significant increase in estradiol plasma levels from 24+/-10 pg/mL to 117+/-66 pg/mL (Pexercise (20+/-7 versus 25+/-10 ms; Pexercise QT parameters were unchanged. The resting QT parameters are not affected by long term HRT consisting of estrogen plus progesterone, which leads to an increase in QT dispersion and corrected QT dispersion during peak exercise.

  20. Progress of Hormone Replacement Therapy and Breast Cancer%激素替代疗法与乳腺癌关系的研究进展

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    孙芳芳; 史惠蓉

    2014-01-01

    Hormone replacement therapy (HRT) can alleviate postmenopausal women′menopausal symptoms,prevent osteoporosis and reduce fractures with a consensus,but its influence on breast cancer,cardiovascular disease and other chronic diseases is still controversial. Using estrogen alone may not increase the risk of breast cancer ,while combining estrogen with progesterone may increase breast cancer′s risk. Different breast disease patients may suffer different risks of breast cancer after HRT,the relationship between Chinese women HRT and breast cancer are uncertain. Benefits exceed risks when applying HRT on women who have indications close to post menopause ,different types and occupy pathways of HRT may result in different breast cancer risks. Summarize the relationship between HRT and breast cancer as well as HRT applications in patients with different breast disease.%激素替代疗法(hormone replacement therapy,HRT)在改善妇女绝经症状、预防骨质疏松、减少骨折发生等方面的作用已成共识,但其对乳腺癌、心脑血管疾病及其他慢性疾病的影响尚存在争议。单用雌激素可能不增加乳腺癌风险,雌孕激素联合应用可能增加乳腺癌风险。不同乳腺疾病患者应用HRT后乳腺癌发病风险不同,中国女性HRT与乳腺癌的关系尚未完全明确。在近绝经期有适应证的妇女中应用HRT的收益大于风险,且HRT的种类与使用途径对乳腺癌的发病风险可能不同。综述HRT与乳腺癌的关系以及HRT在不同乳腺疾病患者中的应用。

  1. EVALUATION OF NEUROPROTECTIVE EFFECTS OF LONG-TERM LOW DOSE HORMONE REPLACEMENT THERAPY ON POSTMENOPAUSAL WOMEN BRAIN HIPPOCAMPUS USING MAGNETIC RESONANCE SCANNER

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ling Hu; Yun Yue; Ping-ping Zuo; Zheng-yu Jin; Feng Feng; Hui You; Ming-li Li; Qin-sheng Ge

    2006-01-01

    Objective To investigate the effects of long-term low dose hormone replacement therapy (HRT) on postmenopausal women in hormone level,cognition score,hippocampus volume,and magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS) parameters.Methods A total of 182 postmenopausal women aged 50-87 years were chosen at Peking Union Medical College Hospital and assigned to HRT group and control group.The volunteers of HRT group had taken low dose hormone [estradiol (E2) 0.5-1.0 mg and progesterone 0.5-2.0 mg,once a day] for 4-33 years.The concentrations of E2,progesterone,and testosterone were measured using enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA).The gene types of apolipoprotein E (ApoE) were measured by polymerase chain reaction,and the subjects with susceptible genes (ApoE ε3/ε4) of Alzheimer's disease (AD) were screened.Their hippocampus volumes and MRS parameters were obtained through magnetic resonance imaging (MRI),and results in two groups were analyzed by statistical method.Results Compared with control group,the concentrations of E2 at each age stage in HRT group were significantly higher (P<0.05) except the 80-89 years old subgroup;yet,there were no statistical differences in the concentrations of progesterone and testosterone between the two groups.There was no obvious difference in ApoE subtypes distribution between the two groups.The results of hippocampus MRI for the subjects with susceptible genes ApoE ε3/ε4 (HRT group 14 cases,control group 11 cases) showed that the ratio of bilateral hippocampus volume to whole brain volume in HRT group (0.406±0.028) was significantly higher than control group (0.369±0.031,P<0.05).The results of 1H MRS for the subjects with susceptible genes ApoE ε3/ε4 (HRT group 12 cases,control group 11 cases) showed that the N-acetylaspartate/total creatine at the area of hippocampus in HRT group (1.54±0.08) were significantly higher than control group (1.45±0.13,P<0.05).Conclusions For postmenopausal women,long-term low dose HRT can

  2. The effects of long-term low-dose hormone replacement therapy on blood pressure and vasoactive factors in postmenopausal women

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Nie Min; Sun Mei-li; Song Ai-ling; Ge Qin-sheng

    2005-01-01

    Objective: To investigate the effects of long-term low-dose hormone replacement therapy (HRT) on blood pressure, the plasma renin activity (PRA), plasma angiotensin Ⅱ (Ang Ⅱ) level and serum nitric oxide (NO) concentration in postmenopausal women.Methods: A total of 140 postmenopausal women were selected from the medical staff of the Peking Union Medical College Hospital. Of these, 63 subjects who had been treated with low-dose sex hormone for over 5 (5-32) years were set up as HRT group, and 77 age-matched subjects who had never received HRT were designed as control group. The levels of serum estradiol (E2), follicle stimulating hormone (FSH) and nitric oxide (NO), the concentration of plasma angiotensin Ⅱ (Ang Ⅱ), plasma rennin activity (PRA) and the blood pressure were evaluated in these two groups.Results: The serum level of estradiol in HRT group was significantly higher than that in control group(median,interquartile range; 124.0 pmol/L,113.4 vs. 78.2 pmol/L,121.8)(P<0.05)and systolic blood pressure in HRT groups was significantly lower than that in control group [(126.7±14.4) mmHg vs. (132.4±19.8) mmHg] (P<0.05). Diastolic blood pressure [(79.7±7.9) mmHg vs. (79.6±10.4) mmHg], the serum level of FSH [(54.4±18.9) IU/L vs. (60.4±24.4) IU/L], the plasma level of PRA(median,interquartile range; 0.14 pg/L/hr,0.11 vs. 0.12 pg/L/hr,0.10), Ang Ⅱ(median,interquartile range; 46.0,31.1 pg/ml vs. 44.4,33.0 pg/ml)and serum level of NO(median,interquartile range;63.8 μmol/L,58.9 vs. 56.0 μmol/L,94.8)showed no significant difference between HRT and control groups (P>0.05).Conclusions: Long-term low-dose HRT decreased the systolic blood pressure, but showed no effects on the diastolic blood pressure, plasma level of Ang Ⅱ, PRA, and serum level of NO in postmenopausal women.

  3. Hormone replacement therapy for postmenopausal osteoporosis%激素替代治疗与绝经后骨质疏松症

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    宋志琴; 胡平

    2014-01-01

    绝经后骨质疏松症主要是由于卵巢功能的减退或衰竭、雌激素水平下降而导致破骨细胞的骨吸收大于成骨细胞的骨形成,以进行性骨丢失、骨小梁退行性病变、骨质疏松、骨脆性增加和骨折风险增加为临床特征的全身性疾病,具有发病率随绝经年限延长而增高的特点。临床中相当数量的绝经后女性并不重视骨质疏松的严重性,从而延误了预防和治疗的最佳时机,增加了骨质疏松症治疗的复杂性。激素替代治疗是预防和治疗绝经后女性骨质疏松的有效方法之一,尤其是对于预防过早绝经妇女的骨质丢失已成为一线的治疗手段,且具有成本低、安全性高的优点。激素替代治疗不仅可增加患者的骨密度、减缓骨丢失,而且还可使血清降钙素、碱性磷酸酶骨质破坏的标志物较基础水平明显下降,起到预防和治疗绝经后妇女骨质疏松和骨折的作用。本文就绝经后妇女骨质的改变进行综述。%Postmenopausal osteoporosis is mainly due to the loss of ovarian function or failure, decreased estrogen levels caused by broken bone resorption of bone cells than of osteoblasts in bone formation, with progressive bone loss, bone trabecular degenerative diseases, osteoporosis, increased osteopsathyrosis and increased risk of fracture for the clinical features of systemic disease.Numbers of clinical postmenopausal women do not attach importance to the severity of osteoporosis,which delay the best time of the prevention and treatment, increase the complexity of the osteoporosis treatment. Hormone replacement therapy for the prevention and treatment of osteoporosis in postmenopausal women is one of effective method,especially for prevention of early postmenopausal bone loss has be-come a first-line treatment,and has advantages of low cost and high security.Hormone replacement therapy can increase not only in patients with bone mineral density

  4. Association of the Joint Effect of Menopause and Hormone Replacement Therapy and Cancer in African American Women: The Jackson Heart Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel Sarpong

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Cancer is the second leading cause of death in the US and in Mississippi. Breast cancer (BC is the most common cancer among women, and the underlying pathophysiology remains unknown, especially among African American (AA women. The study purpose was to examine the joint effect of menopause status (MS and hormone replacement therapy (HRT on the association with cancers, particularly BC using data from the Jackson Heart Study. The analytic sample consisted of 3202 women between 35 and 84 years of which 73.7% and 22.6% were postmenopausal and on HRT, respectively. There were a total of 190 prevalent cancer cases (5.9% in the sample with 22.6% breast cancer cases. Menopause (p < 0.0001, but not HRT (p = 0.6402, was independently associated with cancer. Similar results were obtained for BC. BC, cancer, hypertension, type 2 diabetes, prevalent cardiovascular disease, physical activity and certain dietary practices were all significantly associated with the joint effect of menopause and HRT in the unadjusted analyses. The family history of cancer was the only covariate that was significantly associated with cancer in the age-adjusted models. In examining the association of cancer and the joint effect of menopause and HRT, AA women who were menopausal and were not on HRT had a 1.97 (95% CI: 1.15, 3.38 times odds of having cancer compared to pre-menopausal women after adjusting for age; which was attenuated after further adjusting for family history of cancer. Given that the cancer and BC cases were small and key significant associations were attenuated after adjusting for the above mentioned covariates, these findings warrant further investigation in studies with larger sample sizes of cancer (and BC cases.

  5. Media coverage of women's health issues: is there a bias in the reporting of an association between hormone replacement therapy and breast cancer?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whiteman, M K; Cui, Y; Flaws, J A; Langenberg, P; Bush, T L

    2001-01-01

    Media coverage of scientific research plays a major role in shaping public opinion and influencing medical practice. When an association is controversial, such as with hormone replacement therapy (HRT) and breast cancer, it is important that a balanced picture of the scientific literature be reported. The objective of this study was to assess whether scientific publications that do and do not support an HRT/breast cancer association were cited in the media in proportions similar to those with which they appear in the scientific literature. Scientific publications reporting on the HRT/breast cancer association published from January 1, 1995, to June 30, 2000, were identified through a systematic Medline search. Media reports from newspapers, magazines, television, and radio that reported on HRT and breast cancer were retrieved from an online database. Investigators independently recorded characteristics of the scientific publications and media reports. A total of 32 scientific publications were identified: 20 (62.5%) concluded there was an increased risk of breast cancer associated with HRT (positive publications), and 12 (37.5%) concluded there was no evidence for an association (null publications). Nearly half (47%) of the scientific publications were not cited by the media. There were 203 media citations of scientific publications: 82% were of positive publications and 18% were of null publications, representing a significant excess of citations of positive publications (p Media coverage of this controversial issue is based on a limited sample of the scientific publications. Moreover, the excess of media citations for positive scientific publications suggests a bias against null scientific publications.

  6. Effects of long-term, low-dose sex hormone replacement therapy on hippocampus and cognition of postmenopausal women of different apoE genotypes

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yun YUE; Ping-ping ZUO; Ling HU; Qin-jie TIAN; Jing-mei JIANG; Yi-long DONG; Zheng-yu JIN; Yu-hang CHENG; Xia HONG; Qin-sheng GE

    2007-01-01

    Aim: To study the effects of long-term, low-dose sex hormone replacement therapy (HRT) on the volume and biochemical changes of the hippocampus in postmeno-pausal women carrying apolipoprotein E (apoE) gene ε3 or ε4. Methods: Eighty-three postmenopausal women who had used a low dose of HRT for over 4 years were selected as the HRT group, and 99 postmenopausal women with matched age and education were enrolled as the control group. ApoE alleles were analyzed by PCR. Magnetic resonance imaging was performed to determine the volume of the brain hippocampus. Proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy was used to detect the biochemical changes in the anterior cingulate cortex and hippocampus in apoE ε4 and ε3 carriers. Six common cognitive tests were used to make an overall evaluation of cognitive function. Results: Analysis with the apoE ε4 carriers showed that the volume of the hippocampus of the control group were significantly lower than those of the HRT group. The biochemical analysis showed that there was an increase of N-acetylaspartate (NAA)/total creatine (tCr) and a decrease of myoinositol (mI)/tCr in the hippocampus of apoE ε4 carriers in the HRT group, compared with the control group. For the apoE ε3 carriers, the least squares means (LSMEAN) of the HRT group was higher than that of the control group. Conclusion: This study showed that long-term, low dose HRT might be beneficial for reducing the risk of AD development in vulnerable postmenopausal women. Meanwhile, HRT could increase the LSMEAN of apoE ε3 carriers.

  7. Parity, infertility, oral contraceptives, and hormone replacement therapy and the risk of ovarian serous borderline tumors: A nationwide case-control study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rasmussen, Emma L Kaderly; Hannibal, Charlotte Gerd; Dehlendorff, Christian; Baandrup, Louise; Junge, Jette; Vang, Russell; Kurman, Robert J; Kjaer, Susanne K

    2017-03-01

    Few studies have examined the risk of an ovarian serous borderline tumor (SBT) associated with parity, infertility, oral contraceptives (OCs), or hormone replacement therapy (HRT), which was the study aim. This nationwide case-control study included all women with an SBT diagnosis in Denmark, 1978-2002. SBTs were confirmed by centralized expert pathology review. For each case, 15 age-matched female controls were randomly selected using risk-set sampling. Cases and controls with previous cancer (except for non-melanoma skin cancer) and controls with bilateral oophorectomy or salpingo-oophorectomy were excluded. Conditional logistic regression was used to estimate adjusted odds ratios (ORs) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs). We found a strongly decreased risk of SBTs among parous women which decreased with increasing number of children (pinfertility (OR=3.31; 95% CI: 2.44-4.49), which was present both among parous and nulliparous women. HRT use increased the SBT risk (OR=1.32; 95% CI: 1.02-1.72), whereas OC use decreased the risk (OR=0.40; 95% CI: 0.26-0.62). Our nationwide study with expert histopathologic review of all SBTs showed that parity, infertility, use of HRT, and use of OCs, respectively, were strongly associated with the risk of SBTs. This is the first study to report a strong and significantly decreased SBT risk associated with OC use and a significantly increased risk with infertility, and HRT use. This supports that SBTs and serous ovarian cancer share similar risk factors. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. KRAS rs61764370 is associated with HER2-overexpressed and poorly-differentiated breast cancer in hormone replacement therapy users: a case control study

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    Cerne Jasmina-Ziva

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background A single nucleotide polymorphism located in the 3'-untranslated region of the KRAS oncogene (KRAS variant; rs61764370 disrupts a let-7 miRNA binding and was recently reported to act as a genetic marker for increased risk of developing human cancers. We aimed to investigate an association of the KRAS variant with sporadic and familial breast cancer and breast tumor characteristics. Methods Genotyping was accomplished in 530 sporadic postmenopausal breast cancer cases, 165 familial breast cancer cases (including N = 29, who test positive for BRCA1/2 mutations and 270 postmenopausal control women using the flurogenic 5' nuclease assay. Information on hormone replacement therapy (HRT use and tumor characteristics in sporadic breast cancer cases was ascertained from a postal questionnaire and pathology reports, respectively. Associations between the KRAS genotype and breast cancer or breast tumor characteristics were assessed using chi-square test and logistic regression models. Results No evidence of association was observed between the KRAS variant and risk of sporadic and familial breast cancer - either among BRCA carriers or non-BRCA carriers. The KRAS variant was statistically significantly more often associated with human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (HER2 - positive tumors and tumors of higher histopathologic grade. However, both associations were detected only in HRT users. Conclusion Our data do not support the hypothesis that the KRAS variant rs61764370 is implicated in the aetiology of sporadic or of familial breast cancer. In postmenopausal women using HRT, the KRAS variant might lead to HER2 overexpressed and poorly-differentiated breast tumors, both indicators of a worse prognosis.

  9. Renal replacement therapy in ICU

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    C Deepa

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Diagnosing and managing critically ill patients with renal dysfunction is a part of the daily routine of an intensivist. Acute kidney insufficiency substantially contributes to the morbidity and mortality of critically ill patients. Renal replacement therapy (RRT not only does play a significant role in the treatment of patients with renal failure, acute as well as chronic, but also has spread its domains to the treatment of many other disease conditions such as myaesthenia gravis, septic shock and acute on chronic liver failure. This article briefly outlines the role of renal replacement therapy in ICU.

  10. Relation of androgen receptor gene polymorphism to bone mineral density and fracture risk in early postmenopausal women during a 5-year randomized hormone replacement therapy trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salmén, Timo; Heikkinen, Anna-Mari; Mahonen, Anitta; Kröger, Heikki; Komulainen, Marja; Pallonen, Heli; Saarikoski, Seppo; Honkanen, Risto; Mäenpää, Pekka H

    2003-02-01

    In women, the influence of androgens on bone health is not clear. It has been suggested that the androgen receptor (AR) genotype is associated with bone mineral density and serum androgen levels in pre- and perimenopausal women, but the association between AR genotype, bone mineral density, and fracture risk has not been studied in postmenopausal women. Therefore, we studied whether AR polymorphism affects bone mineral density, bone mineral density change, or fracture risk in a 5-year randomized hormone replacement therapy (HRT) trial on 331 early postmenopausal women (mean baseline age, 52.7 +/- 2.3 years). The participants consisted of two treatment groups: the HRT group (n = 151) received a sequential combination of 2 mg estradiol valerate and 1 mg cyproterone acetate with or without vitamin D3, 100-300 IU + 93 mg calcium as lactate/day, and the non-HRT group (n = 180) received 93 mg calcium alone or in combination with vitamin D3, 100-300 IU/day for 5 years. Bone mineral density was measured from lumbar spine and proximal femur (DXA) before and after the 5-year trial. All new symptomatic, radiographically defined fractures were recorded during the follow-up. The length of CAG repeat in exon 1 of AR gene was evaluated after polymerase chain reaction (PCR) amplification. The subjects were divided into three repeat groups according to AR alleles. None of the baseline characteristics were associated with AR gene polymorphism and HRT treatment. The polymorphism did not influence the calculated annual changes of lumbar or femoral neck bone mineral density during the 5-year follow-up in the HRT (p = 0.926 and 0.146, respectively) or non-HRT (p = 0.818 and 0.917, respectively) groups. In all, 28 women sustained 33 fractures during the follow-up. Thus, the numbers of fractures were limited. The AR repeat length variation was not significantly associated with fracture risk in the HRT or non-HRT groups (p = 0.632 and 0.459, respectively; Cox proportional hazards model

  11. Effects of hormone replacement therapy and high-impact physical exercise on skeletal muscle in post-menopausal women: a randomized placebo-controlled study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sipilä, S; Taaffe, D R; Cheng, S; Puolakka, J; Toivanen, J; Suominen, H

    2001-08-01

    An age-related decline in muscle performance is a known risk factor for falling, fracture and disability. In women, a clear deterioration is observed from early menopause. The effect of hormone replacement therapy (HRT) in preserving muscle performance is, however, unclear. This trial examined the effects of a 12-month HRT and high-impact physical exercise regimen on skeletal muscle in women in early menopause. A total of 80 women aged 50-57 years were assigned randomly to one of four groups: exercise (Ex), HRT, exercise+HRT (ExHRT) and control (Co). The exercise groups participated in a high-impact training programme. The administration of HRT (oestradiol/noretisterone acetate) or placebo was carried out double-blind. Knee extension torque and vertical jumping height were evaluated. Lean tissue cross-sectional area (LCSA) and the relative proportion of fat within the muscle compartment were measured for the quadriceps and lower leg muscles. The ExHRT group showed significant increases in knee extension torque (8.3%) and vertical jumping height (17.2%) when compared with the Co group (-7.2%). Vertical jumping height also increased after HRT alone (6.8%). The LCSA of the quadriceps was increased significantly in the HRT (6.3%) and ExHRT (7.1%) groups when compared with the Ex (2.2%) and Co (0.7%) groups. Lower leg LCSA was also increased in the ExHRT group (9.1%) when compared with the Ex (3.0%) and Co (4.1%) groups. In addition, the increase in the relative proportion of fat in the quadriceps in the Co group (16.6%) was significant compared with those in the HRT (4.9%) and ExHRT (-0.6%) groups. Thus, in post-menopausal women, muscle performance, muscle mass and muscle composition are improved by HRT. The beneficial effects of HRT combined with high-impact physical training may exceed those of HRT alone.

  12. Hormone therapy for transgender patients

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-01-01

    Many transgender men and women seek hormone therapy as part of the transition process. Exogenous testosterone is used in transgender men to induce virilization and suppress feminizing characteristics. In transgender women, exogenous estrogen is used to help feminize patients, and anti-androgens are used as adjuncts to help suppress masculinizing features. Guidelines exist to help providers choose appropriate candidates for hormone therapy, and act as a framework for choosing treatment regimens and managing surveillance in these patients. Cross-sex hormone therapy has been shown to have positive physical and psychological effects on the transitioning individual and is considered a mainstay treatment for many patients. Bone and cardiovascular health are important considerations in transgender patients on long-term hormones, and care should be taken to monitor certain metabolic indices while patients are on cross-sex hormone therapy. PMID:28078219

  13. Long-term effects of growth hormone (GH) replacement therapy on hematopoiesis in a large cohort of children with GH deficiency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Esposito, Andrea; Capalbo, Donatella; De Martino, Lucia; Rezzuto, Martina; Di Mase, Raffaella; Pignata, Claudio; Salerno, Mariacarolina

    2016-07-01

    The aim of our prospective case-control study was to evaluate long-term effects of GH replacement therapy on erythrocytes parameters, leukocytes, and platelets numbers in a large cohort of children with isolated GH deficiency (GHD). Hemoglobin (Hb) concentration, hematocrit (Hct), mean corpuscular volume, mean corpuscular hemoglobin, red cell distribution width, number of erythrocytes, leukocytes, neutrophils, lymphocytes, monocytes and platelets, ferritin, and C-reactive protein were evaluated in 85 children with isolated GHD (10.20 ± 3.50 years) before and annually during the first 5 years of GH replacement therapy and in 85 healthy children age and sex comparable to patients during 5 years of follow-up. Compared with controls, GHD children at study entry showed lower Hb (-1.18 ± 0.87 vs. -0.40 ± 0.90 SDS, p GH therapy was associated with a significant increase in Hb, Hct, and red cells number which became all comparable to controls within the first 2 years of treatment. Moreover, hemoglobin levels normalized in all anemic GHD patients after 5 years of therapy. No difference between patients and controls was found in leukocytes and platelets numbers neither at baseline nor during the study. GHD in childhood is associated with an impairment of erythropoiesis which causes a normocytic anemia in a considerable percentage of patients. GH replacement therapy exerts a beneficial effect leading to a significant increase of erythrocytes parameters and recovery from anemia. Neither GHD nor GH replacement treatment exerts effects on leukocytes or platelets numbers.

  14. Efeitos da terapia de reposição hormonal na cicatrização de anastomoses de cólon Effects of hormonal replacement therapy on colon anastomosis healing in rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria de Lourdes Pessole Biondo-Simões

    2005-06-01

    Full Text Available OBJETIVO: Existe coincidência entre os sintomas do climatério e o aparecimento acentuado dos sinais de envelhecimento da pele. Estudos, em modelos animais, mostraram que o estrógeno é uma espécie de mediador crítico na cicatrização de feridas. Os autores apresentam um estudo da influência da terapia de reposição hormonal (TRH em anastomoses de cólon, feitas em ratas. MÉTODOS: Utilizam 3 grupos de ratas Wistar, um grupo de ooforectomizadas com TRH feita com 50mg de estrógeno e 2 mg de acetato de medroxiprogesterona, um de ooforectomizadas e sem TRH e um de ratas laparotomizadas e não ooforectomizadas. Realizaram a ooforectomia e a confirmação da condição hormonal após 28 dias. Em seguida instituíram a TRH ou de solução fisiológica, diariamente. Após 2 meses fizeram uma colotomia esquerda com anastomose término-terminal e estudaram a resistência e a densidade de colágeno com 7 e 14 dias. RESULTADOS: As anastomoses dos cólons das ratas sem TRH eram menos resistentes do que as do grupo controle tanto no 7.º dia (p=0,0488 como no 14.º dia (p=0,0115. A densidade de colágeno foi menor no 7.º dia (p=0,0210 com menor presença de colágeno I (p=0,0023 e de colágeno III (p=0,0470. No 14.º dia estas diferenças permaneceram significantes. Nas anastomoses dos cólons das ratas com TRH as diferenças, em relação ao grupo controle, não foram significantes. CONCLUSÃO: A falta dos hormônios ovarianos leva à menor resistência e atrasa a maturação de anastomoses do cólon, em ratas e estas deficiências são compensadas pela TRH.PURPOSE: The symptoms of the climacteric coincide with the marked appearance of signs of skin aging. Studies on animal models have shown that estrogen is a critical mediator in wound healing. The authors report a study of the influence of hormonal replacement therapy (HRT on colon anastomoses performed in female rats. METHODS: Three groups of Wistar rats were used: one submitted to oophorectomy

  15. Types of Cancer Treatment: Hormone Therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Describes how hormone therapy slows or stops the growth of breast and prostate cancers that use hormones to grow. Includes information about the types of hormone therapy and side effects that may happen.

  16. Relationship between hormone replacement therapy and cardiovascular diseases in postmenopausal women%激素替代治疗与绝经后妇女心血管疾病的关系

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王倩倩; 王建华

    2011-01-01

    Before menopause, women were in lower risk of cardiovascular diseases. However, with the coming of menopause, the incidence of cardiovascular diseases in women is significantly increaed, and hormone replacement therapy becomes a hot topic of preventing cardiovascular diseases in clinic. The results of researches are inconsistent in the prevention of cardiovascular diseases in postmenopausal women, some of which depend on the physical condition of individual. Therefore, medication time and individualized treatment should be noted in hormone replacement therapy. At the same time, only hormone replacement therapy combined with a healthy lifestyle can prevent cardiovascular diseases better.%在绝经前,女性发生心血管疾病的危险性较低,然而,伴随着更年期的到来,女性心血管疾病的发病率明显升高,激素替代治疗随之成为临床上预防心血管疾病的热点话题.激素替代治疗在预防绝经妇女心血管疾病方面的研究.结果 并不一致,其预防效果在一定程度上取决于接受治疗者个体情况的差异.因此,激素替代治疗应当注意用药的时间、用药的个体化.同时,只有激素替代治疗与健康的生活方式相结合才能更好地预防心血管疾病.

  17. Hormone therapy and ovarian borderline tumors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mørch, Lina Steinrud; Løkkegaard, Ellen; Andreasen, Anne Helms

    2012-01-01

    Little is known about the influence of postmenopausal hormone therapy on the risk of ovarian borderline tumors. We aimed at assessing the influence of different hormone therapies on this risk.......Little is known about the influence of postmenopausal hormone therapy on the risk of ovarian borderline tumors. We aimed at assessing the influence of different hormone therapies on this risk....

  18. Testosterone Replacement Therapy: The Emperor's New Clothes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sansone, Andrea; Sansone, Massimiliano; Lenzi, Andrea; Romanelli, Francesco

    2017-02-01

    The mean age of the world population has steadily increased in the last decades, as a result of increased life expectancy and reduced birth rate. Global aging has led to a greater worldwide cost for healthcare: hormonal alterations contribute to the pathogenesis of several conditions and might cause a significant reduction in the perceived sense of well-being. Menopause is archetypal of hormonal alterations occurring during aging: in males, sex hormones do not decrease abruptly, yet testosterone levels decrease steadily and continuously during aging, ultimately resulting in late-onset hypogonadism. Treatment of this condition might mitigate most symptoms; however, testosterone replacement therapy (TRT) should be prescribed only in selected patients and it should not be considered as an antiaging treatment. In recent years, different authors have questioned health risks associated with testosterone treatment; while position statements from many scientific societies seem to be reassuring, the Food and Drug Administration has issued a warning in regard to the possible side effects of this therapy. We aim to review recent controversies and discoveries in regard to TRT.

  19. Change in bone mass distribution induced by hormone replacement therapy and high-impact physical exercise in post-menopausal women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, S; Sipilä, S; Taaffe, D R; Puolakka, J; Suominen, H

    2002-07-01

    The purpose of this intervention trial was to determine whether changes in bone mass distribution could be observed in postmenopausal women following hormone replacement therapy (HRT) and/or high-impact physical exercise. Eighty healthy women, aged 50-57 years, at menopause and with no previous use of HRT, were randomly assigned to one of four groups: HRT; exercise (Ex); HRT + Ex (ExHRT); and control (Co). HRT administration was conducted in a double-blind manner for 1 year using estradiol plus noretisterone acetate (Kliogest). The exercise groups participated in a 1 year progressive training program consisting of jumping and bounding activities. Subjects participated in two supervised sessions per week and were asked to perform a series of exercises at home 4 days/week. Bone measurements using a quantitative computed tomography scanner (Somatom DR, Siemens) were obtained from the proximal femur, midfemur, proximal tibia, and tibial shaft. Data were analyzed with a software program (BONALYSE 1.3) calculating density (g/cm(3)), cross-sectional area (CSA; mm(2)), and moments of inertia (I(max), I(min), I(polar)). In addition, the bone mass spectrum was determined as a function of the angular distribution around the bone mass center (polar distribution) and the distance from the bone mass center through the diaphyseal wall (radial distribution). After the 1 year period, there was an overall interaction of group x time in bone mineral density (BMD) at the proximal femur (p = 0.05) and tibial shaft (p = 0.035). Women in the ExHRT and HRT groups had increased proximal femur and tibial shaft BMD when compared with the change observed in the Co group (p = 0.024-0.011). The change was more pronounced in the cortical tibia, wherein the ExHRT group also differed from the Ex group (p = 0.038). No significant changes were found in bone CSA at any of the measured sites. The radial distribution indicated an increase of BMD in the endocortical part of the measured sites in the HRT

  20. Hormone replacement therapy dissociates fat mass and bone mass, and tends to reduce weight gain in early postmenopausal women: a randomized controlled 5-year clinical trial of the Danish Osteoporosis Prevention Study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, L B; Vestergaard, P; Hermann, A P

    2003-01-01

    The aim of this study was to study the influence of hormone replacement therapy (HRT) on weight changes, body composition, and bone mass in early postmenopausal women in a partly randomized comprehensive cohort study design. A total of 2016 women ages 45-58 years from 3 months to 2 years past last...... of the weight gain was a decline in physical fitness. Women opting for HRT had a significantly lower body weight at inclusion than the other participants, but the results in the self-selected part of the study followed the pattern found in the randomized part. The change in fat mass was the strongest predictor...

  1. Deciding about hormone therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... your risk for endometrial cancer. Taking progestin with estrogen seems to protect against this cancer. So if you have a ... menopause without taking hormones. They can also help protect your bones, improve your heart health , and help you stay ...

  2. The replacement of serum by hormones in cell culture media.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sato, G; Hayashi, I

    1976-12-01

    The replacement of serum by hormones in cell culture media. (Reemplazo del suero por hormonas en el medio de cultivo de células). Arch. Biol. Med. Exper. 10: 120-121, 1976. The serum used in cell culture media can be replaced by a mixture of hormones and some accesory blood factors. The pituitary cell line GH3 can be grown in a medium in which serum is replaced by triiodothyronine, transferrin, parathormone, tyrotrophin releasing hormone and somatomedins. Hela and BHK cell strains can also be grown in serum free medium supplemented with hormones. Each cell type appears to have different hormonal requirements yet it may found that some hormones are required for most cell types.

  3. The optimal hormonal replacement modality selection for multiple organ procurement from brain-dead organ donors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mi Z

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Zhibao Mi,1 Dimitri Novitzky,2 Joseph F Collins,1 David KC Cooper3 1Cooperative Studies Program Coordinating Center, VA Maryland Health Care Systems, Perry Point, MD, USA; 2Department of Cardiothoracic Surgery, University of South Florida, Tampa, FL, USA; 3Thomas E Starzl Transplantation Institute, University of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, PA, USA Abstract: The management of brain-dead organ donors is complex. The use of inotropic agents and replacement of depleted hormones (hormonal replacement therapy is crucial for successful multiple organ procurement, yet the optimal hormonal replacement has not been identified, and the statistical adjustment to determine the best selection is not trivial. Traditional pair-wise comparisons between every pair of treatments, and multiple comparisons to all (MCA, are statistically conservative. Hsu’s multiple comparisons with the best (MCB – adapted from the Dunnett’s multiple comparisons with control (MCC – has been used for selecting the best treatment based on continuous variables. We selected the best hormonal replacement modality for successful multiple organ procurement using a two-step approach. First, we estimated the predicted margins by constructing generalized linear models (GLM or generalized linear mixed models (GLMM, and then we applied the multiple comparison methods to identify the best hormonal replacement modality given that the testing of hormonal replacement modalities is independent. Based on 10-year data from the United Network for Organ Sharing (UNOS, among 16 hormonal replacement modalities, and using the 95% simultaneous confidence intervals, we found that the combination of thyroid hormone, a corticosteroid, antidiuretic hormone, and insulin was the best modality for multiple organ procurement for transplantation. Keywords: best treatment selection, brain-dead organ donors, hormonal replacement, multiple binary endpoints, organ procurement, multiple comparisons

  4. Cambios en el uso de la terapia hormonal sustitutiva tras una intervención informativa dirigida a mujeres y prescriptores Changes in the use of hormone replacement therapy after an educational intervention aimed at women and prescribers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carmen Mosquera Tenreiro

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available Objetivos: Describir las acciones desarrolladas en Asturias en 2004 y 2005 a partir de las recomendaciones de la Agencia Española del Medicamento (AEM sobre el uso de la terapia hormonal sustitutiva (THS después de la publicación del Women's Health Initiative y del Million Women Study. Métodos: Estudio casi experimental sin grupo control. Los datos utilizados fueron las ventas de THS entre 1996 y 2003, previamente a la intervención. En 2004-2005 se analizaron las ventas anuales de THS y el porcentaje estimado de mujeres que usaban este tratamiento respecto a la población de 50-59 años de edad. Para el análisis de la evolución de los costes se tomaron los precios de cada especialidad en pesetas hasta el año 2001 y en euros a partir de entonces. Resultados: Hubo un incremento de las ventas hasta el año 2001. A partir de entonces cambió la tendencia, con un descenso hasta 2005 del 73,6%. El descenso observado en el período 2004-2005 (49,1% fue el doble del producido durante 2002-2003 (24,5%. El porcentaje estimado de mujeres usuarias de THS entre 50 y 59 años habría sido de un 17,2% en 2001 y de un 4,1% en 2005. El gasto total de la THS experimentó un descenso similar, aunque Boltin® (tibolona duplicó sus ventas. Conclusiones: Las acciones para proporcionar una información sistemática e independiente a los profesionales y la población general son necesarias y eficaces. Es preciso investigar en el ámbito nacional la «epidemia» de la THS y sus costes en la salud, así como el uso de tibolona y sus efectos adversos.Objective: To describe changes in prescription of hormone replacement therapy (HRT in Asturias (Spain after the publication of the results of the Women's Health Initiative and the Million Women Study and following the recommendations of the Spanish Drugs Agency to women and prescribers (2004-2005. Methods: We performed a quasiexperimental study with no control group. The data used consisted of sales of HRT products

  5. Hormone replacement for osteoporosis in women with primary biliary cirrhosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rudic, Jelena S; Poropat, Goran; Krstic, Miodrag N

    2011-01-01

    Women with primary biliary cirrhosis often suffer from postmenopausal osteoporosis due to their age, or osteoporosis secondary to their liver disease, or treatments provided for their liver disease. Hormone replacement increases bone mineral density and reduces fractures in postmenopausal women...

  6. 儿童颅咽管瘤手术前后激素替代治疗与随访%Preoperative and postoperative hormone replacement therapy for children with craniopharyngioma

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王超; 刘窗溪; 熊云彪; 杨恒; 廖昆; 韩国强

    2013-01-01

    目的 探讨儿童颅咽管瘤手术前后激素替代治疗与随访的临床意义.方法 应用电化学发光法,对40例颅咽管瘤儿童与正常同龄儿血皮质醇(PTC)、24 h尿游离皮质醇(UFC)、游离三碘甲状腺原氨酸(FT3)、游离甲状腺素(FT4)、促甲状腺素(TSH)、生长激素(GH)、性激素:卵泡生成激素(FSH)、黄体生成激素(LH)、雌二醇(E2)、睾酮(T)、催乳激素(PRL)进行定量分析,同时分析24例随访满2年患儿激素水平,必要时予激素替代治疗.结果 颅咽管瘤患儿术前皮质激素低下25例(65.50%),甲状腺激素低下13例(32.50%),男性患儿睾酮低下11例(61.11%);术后1周内发现6例患儿TSH(15.00%)、11例PTC(27.50%)、15例UFC(37.50%)较入院时有所下降,术后33例出现尿崩症(82.50%).随访满2年患儿24例,醋酸泼尼松替代治疗5例(20.83%);醋酸泼尼松联合左甲状腺素片治疗7例(29.17%);醋酸去氨加压素片替代治疗4例(16.67%);生长激素替代治疗6例(25.00%).男性患儿十一酸睾酮替代治疗8例(72.73%);女性患儿卵泡生成激素、黄体生成激素替代治疗4例(30.77%).结论 对激素低下的颅咽管瘤患儿手术前后激素替代治疗对康复起着至关重要的作用.长期内分泌水平随访及个体化治疗能明显改善预后,提高患儿生活质量.%Objective To explore the results of preoperative and postoperative hormone replacement therapy for children with craniopharyngioma.Methods Serum hormones including cortisol(PTC),24 hours urinary free cortisol (UFC),free triiodothyronine (FT3),free thyroxine (FT4),thyroid stimulating hormone (TSH),growth hormone (GH),and sex hormones including follicle stimulating hormone (FSH),luteinizing hormone (LH),estradiol (E2),testosterone (T),serum prolactin(PRL) in 40 children with craniopharyngioma and normal children were measured by electrochemical luminescence method.Hormone levels were monitored and analyzed in 24 cases by

  7. Renal replacement therapy in Europe

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Noordzij, Marlies; Kramer, Anneke; Abad Diez, José M

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: This article provides a summary of the 2011 ERA-EDTA Registry Annual Report (available at www.era-edta-reg.org). METHODS: Data on renal replacement therapy (RRT) for end-stage renal disease (ESRD) from national and regional renal registries in 30 countries in Europe and bordering the .......6-47.0], and on dialysis 39.3% (95% CI 39.2-39.4). The unadjusted 5-year patient survival after the first renal transplantation performed between 2002 and 2006 was 86.7% (95% CI 86.2-87.2) for kidneys from deceased donors and 94.3% (95% CI 93.6-95.0) for kidneys from living donors....

  8. Genetic variation in estrogen receptor, C-reactive protein and fibrinogen does not predict the plasma levels of inflammation markers after longterm hormone replacement therapy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    de Maat, Moniek P M; Madsen, Jonna Skov; Langdahl, Bente;

    2007-01-01

    ). The effect of HRT, smoking and genetic variations in ESR1 (PvuII and XbaI), CRP (1444C/T) and fibrinogen-beta (FGB, -455G/A) were determined. The plasma concentration of CRP was higher in the HRT group than in the control group (2.03 mg/l and 1.41 mg/l, respectively; p ... receptor- 1 (ESR1), CRP and fibrinogen-beta genes influences the plasma levels of inflammation markers after HRT. Plasma CRP and fibrinogen were measured after five years follow-up in healthy postmenopausal women (per-protocol group) who were randomised to hormone therapy (n=187) or no treatment (n=249...... concentration (n.s.). Genetic polymorphisms in ESR1, CRP and fibrinogen were not associated with an effect of HRT on the CRP and fibrinogen plasma levels, and no significant interaction with smoking was observed. In conclusion, higher plasma levels of CRP and lower plasma levels of fibrinogen were observed...

  9. Postmenopausal hormone replacement therapy and changes in skin connective tissue%绝经后激素治疗与皮肤结缔组织变化

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    杨欣; 陈华云

    2011-01-01

    绝经和衰老导致皮肤的改变如干燥,皱纹增加,伤口不易愈合及松弛等.雌激素通过雌激素受体调节皮肤的表皮角质化细胞、真皮成纤维细胞、黑色素细胞和毛囊等对皮肤产生影响.激素治疗能增加皮肤水合作用、皮肤厚度、皮肤弹性,减少皱纹,而且增加皮肤胶原含量和质量等,延缓衰老导致的皮肤改变.%Menopause and aging is associated with skin dryness, wrinkling, poor healing, and laxity.Estrogens modulate epidermal keratinocytes, dermalfi broblasts and melanocytes, and hair follicle by estrogen receptor. Skin aging can be signifi cantly delayed by the administration of estrogen. Hormone therapy (HT) has been shown to increase epidermal hydration, skin elasticity, skin thickness, and also reduces skin wrinkles. Furthermore, the content and quality of collagen is enhanced.

  10. 广东某高校中老年妇女对激素替代治疗的认知调查%Cognition of hormone replacement therapy survey of female quinquagenarian at a university in Guangdong Province

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    唐海英

    2016-01-01

    目的 了解广东某高校中老年妇女对女性绝经后生理变化及绝经后激素替代治疗(Hormone replacement therapy,HRT)的认知和接受度,为围绝经期及绝经期女性预防保健工作开展提供指导.方法 2016年4月18日至22日选择广东某高校40~60岁女性,进行有关绝经相关问题及绝经后激素替代治疗的认知及接受度的问卷调查,根据结果进行问卷结果分析.结果 调查对象对HRT方案和益处存在认知不足,对于卵巢功能衰减、激素水平降低造成神经精神症状、心脑血管疾病,特别是低骨量、骨质疏松、泌尿生殖道萎缩症状影响了解不够.73.13%妇女愿意了解HRT治疗,表明对HRT的健康教育有需求,55.22%妇女不能接受规范的HRT治疗.结论 需要提高围绝经期及绝经期女性自我保健意识,加强医学指导,有重点地开展科学、有效的健康教育和心理咨询,注重绝经后激素替代治疗效果的宣传,防范绝经综合征,使妇女顺利渡过绝经期.%Objectives To investigated the female adults' cognition of physiological changes and the acceptance of hormone replacement therapy (HRT) in menopause and to provide some suggestions for preventive health care of female adults in perimenopause and menopause.Methods This study adopted questionnaire survey.April 18th to 22nd,2016,40 to 60 years old female adults were selected from a university in Guandong Province;the questionnaire including the items about the cognition and acceptance of physiological changes and hormone replacement therapy (HRT) was carried out.Results The participants lacked knowledge of HRT and its benefits.Moreover,the participants had little knowledge of physiological changes,such as neuropsychological symptoms,cardiovascular disease,and so on,which resulted from decreased ovarian function and decreased hormone levels.Particularly,they had little knowledge of low bone mass,osteoporosis,and atrophy of urinary and reproductive

  11. 激素替代疗法在围绝经期综合征患者中的临床应用研究%Clinical Study of Hormone Replacement Therapy in Patients With Perimenopausal Syndrome

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    杜灵枝

    2015-01-01

    目的:评价激素替代疗法对围绝期综合征(PMS)患者中的治疗效果及安全性。方法选择焦作市第二人民医院门诊就诊的112例PMS患者,按照随机数字表法分为A、B两组,每组56例,A组患者予以谷维素片治疗,30 mg/次,3次/d。B组患者应用激素替代疗法进行治疗,临床疗效采用Kupperman评分进行评价。对两组患者的Kupperman评分、治疗前后的促卵泡激素、雌二醇、黄体生存素水平及子宫内膜厚度进行记录,并对两组患者治疗后不良反应进行观察。结果两组患者治疗后的Kupperman评分、促卵泡激素、黄体生存素水平显著低于治疗前(P均<0.05),而雌二醇水平及子宫内膜厚度显著高于治疗前(P均<0.05),而治疗后B组患者的Kupperman评分、促卵泡激素、黄体生存素水平显著低于A组(P均<0.05),雌二醇水平及子宫内膜厚度显著高于A组(P均<0.05)。且全部患者治疗后均  未见明显药物不良反应。结论激素替代疗法应用于PMS患者的治疗效果及安全性较满意,能够有效缓解患者的临床症状和改善其生活质量。%ObjectiveTo study the effect and safety of hormone replacement therapy in patients with perimenopausal syndrome (PMS).Methods112 patients with PMS from Jiaozuo Second People's Hospital were divided into group A and B randomly with 56 cases in each group, patients in group A were given oryzanol tablets treatment (30 mg a time, 3 times a day),patients in group were given hormone replacement therapy, clinical efifcacy were evaluated by Kupperman scores. Kupperman scores, follicle stimulating hormone, estradiol, corpus luteum surviving, endometrial thickness of the two groups before and after treatment were recorded, adverse reactions of the two groups were observed.Results Kupperman scores, follicle stimulating hormone and corpus luteum surviving in two groups after treatment were lower than before

  12. Delivering enhanced testosterone replacement therapy through nanochannels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferrati, Silvia; Nicolov, Eugenia; Bansal, Shyam; Zabre, Erika; Geninatti, Thomas; Ziemys, Arturas; Hudson, Lee; Ferrari, Mauro; Goodall, Randal; Khera, Mohit; Palapattu, Ganesh; Grattoni, Alessandro

    2015-02-18

    Primary or secondary hypogonadism results in a range of signs and symptoms that compromise quality of life and requires life-long testosterone replacement therapy. In this study, an implantable nanochannel system is investigated as an alternative delivery strategy for the long-term sustained and constant release of testosterone. In vitro release tests are performed using a dissolution set up, with testosterone and testosterone:2-hydroxypropyl-β-cyclodextrin (TES:HPCD) 1:1 and 1:2 molar ratio complexes release from the implantable nanochannel system and quantify by HPLC. 1:2 TES:HPCD complex stably achieve 10-15 times higher testosterone solubility with 25-30 times higher in vitro release. Bioactivity of delivered testosterone is verified by LNCaP/LUC cell luminescence. In vivo evaluation of testosterone, luteinizing hormone (LH), and follicle stimulating hormone (FSH) levels by liquid chromatography mass spectrometry (LC/MS) and multiplex assay is performed in castrated Sprague-Dawley rats over 30 d. Animals are treated with the nanochannel implants or degradable testosterone pellets. The 1:2 TES:HPCD nanochannel implant exhibits sustained and clinically relevant in vivo release kinetics and attains physiologically stable plasma levels of testosterone, LH, and FSH. In conclusion, it is demonstrated that by providing long-term steady release 1:2 TES:HPCD nanochannel implants may represent a major breakthrough for the treatment of male hypogonadism.

  13. Hypoparathyroidism: clinical features, skeletal microstructure and parathyroid hormone replacement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rubin, Mishaela R.; Bilezikian, John P.

    2013-01-01

    Objective Hypoparathyroidism is a disorder in which parathyroid hormone is deficient in the circulation due most often to immunological destruction of the parathyroids or to their surgical removal. The objective of this work was to define the abnormalities in skeletal microstructure as well as to establish the potential efficacy of PTH(1-84) replacement in this disorder. Subjects and methods Standard histomorphometric and μCT analyses were performed on iliac crest bone biopsies obtained from patients with hypoparathyroidism. Participants were treated with PTH(1-84) for two years. Results Bone density was increased and skeletal features reflected the low turnover state with greater BV/TV, Tb. Wi and Ct. Wi as well as suppressed MS and BFR/BS as compared to controls. With PTH(1-84), bone turnover and bone mineral density increased in the lumbar spine. Requirements for calcium and vitamin D fell while serum and urinary calcium concentrations did not change. Conclusion Abnormal microstructure of the skeleton in hypoparathyroidism reflects the absence of PTH. Replacement therapy with PTH has the potential to correct these abnormalities as well as to reduce the requirements for calcium and vitamin D. PMID:20485912

  14. Clinical Analysis of Fluoxetine and Hormone Replacement Therapy in Menopausal Depression%盐酸氟西汀及激素补充治疗用于绝经期抑郁症临床分析

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王建英

    2016-01-01

    Objective:To analyze the clinical effects of Fluoxetine combined with hormone replacement therapy in menopausal depression. Methods:124 patients with menopausal depression treated from December 2013 to December 2014 in our hospital were selected and randomly divided into research group and control group, 62 cases each group. The research group adopted Fluoxetine combined with hormone replacement therapy;the control group adopted hormone replacement therapy. After 12w of treatment, the clinical effects of two groups were compared;the menopausal symptoms based on SDL and depression scores based on HAMD of two groups before and after treatment were evaluated. Results:After treatment, the clinical effective rate of research group (75.8%) was signiifcantly higher than that of control group(56.5%) (P<0.05);after 4w, 8w and 12w of treatment, the score of menopausal symptoms based on SDL of research group was signiifcantly bet er than that of control group (P<0.05);after 4w, 8w and 12w of treatment, the score of HAMD of research group was signiifcantly bet er than that of control group (P<0.05).Conclusion:Fluoxetine combined with hormone replacement therapy has an obvious effect in menopausal depression, can signiifcantly improve the menopausal symptoms and depression. It is worthy of clinical promotion.%目的:探析绝经期抑郁症患者进行盐酸氟西汀与激素补充联合治疗的临床效果分析。方法选取我院2013年12月至2014年12月绝经期抑郁症患者124例,根据随机数字表法分为研究组、对照组,每组62例,研究组进行盐酸氟西汀与激素补充联合治疗,对照组进行激素补充疗法,两组均治疗12周,治疗后比较两组的临床效果;应用SDL自评量表评估两组治疗前后的更年期症状;进行汉密尔顿抑郁量表(HAMD)评估两组治疗前后的抑郁评分。结果研究组治疗后的临床有效率为75.8%显著高于对照组的56.5%,差异有统计学意义(P<0.05

  15. Hormone therapy and ovarian cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mørch, Lina Steinrud; Løkkegaard, Ellen; Andreasen, Anne Helms

    2009-01-01

    CONTEXT: Studies have suggested an increased risk of ovarian cancer among women taking postmenopausal hormone therapy. Data are sparse on the differential effects of formulations, regimens, and routes of administration. OBJECTIVE: To assess risk of ovarian cancer in perimenopausal...... of Medicinal Product Statistics provided individually updated exposure information. The National Cancer Register and Pathology Register provided ovarian cancer incidence data. Information on confounding factors and effect modifiers was from other national registers. Poisson regression analyses with 5-year age...... bands included hormone exposures as time-dependent covariates. PARTICIPANTS: A total of 909,946 women without hormone-sensitive cancer or bilateral oophorectomy. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURE: Ovarian cancer. RESULTS: In an average of 8.0 years of follow-up (7.3 million women-years), 3068 incident ovarian...

  16. Effects of growth hormone replacement therapy on IGF-related parameters and on the pituitary-gonadal axis in GH-deficient males. A double-blind, placebo-controlled crossover study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Juul, A; Andersson, A M; Pedersen, S A;

    1998-01-01

    It has been suggested that growth hormone (GH) may play a regulatory role in male reproductive function. To express full anabolic effect in immature boys testosterone apparently requires the presence of GH. In GH-deficient adults, GH replacement therapy exerts a variety of anabolic actions, some...... in hypogonadal patients substituted with androgens, but GH had no effect on inhibin-B levels. In conclusion, GH replacement therapy in 13 GH-deficient young adult males resulted in significant increases in total and free IGF-I as well as in ALS levels in all patients, but had no significant effect on: (1....../l and ALS levels from 9,182 (5,524) to 16,872 (6,278) microg/l (all p testosterone levels in the 13 patients between the GH and placebo treatment periods (21.9 (5.1) vs. 24.5 (8.1) nmol/l, nonsignificant). Furthermore, no effect of GH on the testicular response...

  17. Progestogens in menopausal hormone therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Małgorzata Bińkowska

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Progestogens share one common effect: the ability to convert proliferative endometrium to its secretory form. In contrast, their biological activity is varied, depending on the chemical structure, pharmacokinetics, receptor affinity and different potency of action. Progestogens are widely used in the treatment of menstrual cycle disturbances, various gynaecological conditions, contraception and menopausal hormone therapy. The administration of progestogen in menopausal hormone therapy is essential in women with an intact uterus to protect against endometrial hyperplasia and cancer. Progestogen selection should be based on the characteristics available for each progestogen type, relying on the assessment of relative potency of action in experimental models and animal models, and on the indirect knowledge brought by studies of the clinical use of different progestogen formulations. The choice of progestogen should involve the conscious use of knowledge of its benefits, with a focus on minimizing potential side effects. Unfortunately, there are no direct clinical studies comparing the metabolic effects of different progestogens.

  18. Temporal changes in cardiac function and cerebral blood flow during sequential postmenopausal hormone replacement

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, M B; Fritz-Hansen, T; Jensen, H H

    2001-01-01

    (maximum increase, 5.2%; P fluid retention. Both systolic (-5 mm Hg; P =.03) and diastolic (-3 mm Hg; P =.03) blood pressure were reduced during estradiol. Cerebral blood flow was reduced after 9 weeks of hormone replacement therapy (-37 mL/min; P =.01) but increased to baseline after...

  19. Adult growth hormone deficiency – benefits, side effects, and risks of growth hormone replacement

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mary Lim Reed

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Deficiency of growth hormone (GH in adults results in a syndrome characterized by decreased muscle mass and exercise capacity, increased visceral fat, impaired quality of life, unfavorable alterations in lipid profile and markers of cardiovascular risk, decrease in bone mass and integrity and increased mortality. When dosed appropriately, GH replacement therapy (GHRT is well tolerated, with a low incidence of side effects, and improves most of the alterations observed in GH deficiency (GHD; beneficial effects on mortality, cardiovascular events and fracture rates, however, remain to be conclusively demonstrated. The potential of GH to act as a mitogen has resulted in concern over the possibility of increased de novo tumors or recurrence of pre-existing malignancies in individuals treated with GH. Though studies of adults who received GHRT in childhood have produced conflicting reports in this regard, long term surveillance of adult GHRT has not demonstrated increased cancer risk or mortality.

  20. Concomitant therapies (glucocorticoids and sex hormones) in adult patients with growth hormone deficiency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scaroni, C; Ceccato, F; Rizzati, S; Mantero, F

    2008-09-01

    Adult-onset GH deficiency (GHD), mostly due to organic lesions of the pituitary-hypothalamic region, is frequently associated with multiple anterior pituitary deficiencies that need long-term substitutive treatment. The GH-IGF-I axis may play an important role in modulating peripheral metabolism of hormones (adrenal, thyroid, and sex hormones) and these interactions may have clinically significant implications on the phenotypes of adult GHD patients and on the effects of the combined replacement hormonal treatment of this condition. By accelerating the peripheral metabolism of cortisol, GH therapy may precipitate adrenal insufficiency in susceptible hypopituitary patients; estrogen replacement blunts the response to GH in women whereas in men with androgen substitution the responsivity increases over time. Endocrinologists should be mindful of these phenomena when starting patients with hypopituitarism on GH replacement therapy.

  1. Safety and efficacy of testosterone replacement therapy in adolescents with Klinefelter syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mehta, Akanksha; Clearman, Theresa; Paduch, Darius A

    2014-05-01

    We investigated the safety and tolerability of testosterone replacement therapy in adolescents with Klinefelter syndrome. We reviewed the medical records of all consecutive adolescents with Klinefelter syndrome evaluated between 2007 and 2012. Patients receiving testosterone replacement and aromatase inhibitor therapy were identified. Data on demographics, physical characteristics, medical history and serum hormone concentrations were collected for each patient. We evaluated longitudinal changes in serum testosterone, luteinizing hormone and follicle-stimulating hormone as well as changes in body mass index after the initiation of testosterone replacement therapy. We identified 151 adolescents with Klinefelter syndrome. Mean age at presentation was 11.6 years. Testosterone replacement therapy and aromatase inhibitors were initiated in 110 and 75 patients, respectively, at an average age of 13 to 14 years. Topical testosterone replacement therapy was used in 95% of patients with good clinical efficacy and compliance based on serial serum testosterone values. After the initiation of testosterone replacement therapy average serum testosterone improved from 240 to 650 ng/ml. Serum luteinizing hormone and follicle-stimulating hormone increased with the progression of puberty from 2.6 to 16.6 and 7 to 42 mIU/ml, respectively. No adverse outcomes related to testosterone replacement therapy were reported. Hormone supplementation with testosterone and aromatase inhibitors in adolescents with Klinefelter syndrome appears to be safe and effective for maintaining serum testosterone within the normal range. Compliance with topical formulations is high. Topical testosterone replacement therapy is not associated with the suppression of endogenous serum luteinizing hormone or follicle-stimulating hormone. Copyright © 2014 American Urological Association Education and Research, Inc. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Continuation of growth hormone therapy versus placebo in transition-phase patients with growth hormone deficiency

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jørgensen, Jens; Nørrelund, Helene; Vahl, Nina

    2002-01-01

    In a placebo-controlled, parallel study of 18 patients with a mean age of 20 years who had confirmed growth hormone (GH) deficiency, we evaluated body composition, insulin sensitivity, and glucose turnover at baseline (when all were receiving GH replacement); after 12 months of continued GH therapy...

  3. Renal replacement therapy for acute renal failure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Macedo, E; Bouchard, J; Mehta, R L

    2009-09-01

    Renal replacement therapy became a common clinical tool to treat patients with severe acute kidney injury (AKI) since the 1960s. During this time dialytic options have expanded considerably; biocompatible membranes, bicarbonate dialysate and dialysis machines with volumetric ultrafiltration control have improved the treatment for acute kidney injury. Along with advances in methods of intermittent hemodialysis, continuous renal replacement therapies have gained widespread acceptance in the treatment of dialysis-requiring AKI. However, many of the fundamental aspects of the renal replacement treatment such as indication, timing of dialytic intervention, and choice of dialysis modality are still controversial and may influence AKI patient's outcomes. This review outlines current concepts in the use of dialysis techniques for AKI and suggests an approach for selecting the optimal method of renal replacement therapy.

  4. Efectos de la terapia de reemplazo hormonal sobre la función autonómica en mujeres postmenopáusicas Effects of estrogen replacement therapy on autonomic function of post-menopausal women

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juan C Guzmán

    2007-02-01

    para mejorar los síntomas de la menopausia durante un tiempo corto, principalmente en mujeres postmenopáusicas jóvenes no hipertensas.Background: estrogen deficit during menopause may be related to cardiac autonomic function imbalance, reducing the cardiovagal reflex response that could potentially increase cardiovascular risk. The physiological mechanisms that lead to this alteration in postmenopausal women remain unclear. In this article, the effect of hormonal replacement therapy on autonomic function in women submitted to hysterectomy is discussed. Methods: Fifty women with a previous hysterectomy and amenorrhea for 1 year prior to surgery were enrolled in a prospective randomized crossover double-blind placebo controlled trial. Either oral estrogen replacement therapy (ERT conjugated estrogens 0.625 mg once a day or placebo, were randomly administered in a crossover design during 12 weeks with a 2 week washout period. Cardiovagal autonomic function was assessed by conventional techniques and through venous occlusion plethysmography in order to evaluate vascular autonomic function calculating forearm blood flow (FBF and peripheral vascular resistance (PVR at baseline, and during head-up tilt (HUT and a non-hypotensive stimuli (-10mmHg lower-body negative pressure (LBNP. Results: No differences were found in cardiovagal autonomic function comparing ERT vs. placebo at baseline resting conditions, nor during HUT and LBNP. A significant difference was identified in supine FBF [1.9(0.5 vs. 1.5(0.5, p=0.02] as well as in PVR [53.5(18.2 vs. 68.6(34, p=0.02] comparing ERT vs. placebo interventions. Conclusions: Short term ERT did not improve cardiovascular autonomic reflex responses in postmenopausal women, but increased vascular relaxation primarily by reducing peripheral vascular resistance. Hormone replacement therapy can be used under adequate supervision in order to improve menopausal symptoms during a short period of time, mainly in young non-hypertensive post

  5. Effect of estrogen and testosterone replacement therapy on cognitive fatigue.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Möller, Marika Christina; Rådestad, Angelique Flöter; von Schoultz, Bo; Bartfai, Aniko

    2013-02-01

    Both estrogen and testosterone insufficiency has been associated with reduced psychological well-being including fatigue. However, hormonal replacement studies on fatigue are rare. Therefore, we wanted to study the effect of testosterone and estrogen replacement therapy on cognitive fatigue and the relation between sex hormone levels and cognitive fatigue in oophorectomized women. Fifty women with surgically induced menopause (mean age: 54.0 ± 2.9 years) were randomly assigned to treatment with estradiol valerate in combination with testosterone undecanoate or placebo for 24 weeks in a double-blind cross-over study. Neuropsychological tests and questionnaires were used to assess cognitive fatigue and psychological well-being. Cognitive fatigue was significantly associated to poor self-rated health and higher body mass index but not to general psychological well-being or sex hormone levels. Treatment with testosterone + estrogen had no significant effect on cognitive fatigue but the results indicated a curvilinear relation for hormonal levels. The estrogen/testosterone ratio was more related to functions rather than high or low hormone levels per se. We found that cognitive fatigue is frequent in oophorectomized women and negatively associated to self-perceived health and positively associated to BMI. A well-balanced ratio between estrogen and testosterone levels may be important for cognitive fatigue.

  6. Postmenopausal hormone therapy and cognition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCarrey, Anna C; Resnick, Susan M

    2015-08-01

    This article is part of a Special Issue "Estradiol and cognition". Prior to the publication of findings from the Women's Health Initiative (WHI) in 2002, estrogen-containing hormone therapy (HT) was used to prevent age-related disease, especially cardiovascular disease, and to treat menopausal symptoms such as hot flushes and sleep disruptions. Some observational studies of HT in midlife and aging women suggested that HT might also benefit cognitive function, but randomized clinical trials have produced mixed findings in terms of health and cognitive outcomes. This review focuses on hormone effects on cognition and risk for dementia in naturally menopausal women as well as surgically induced menopause, and highlights findings from the large-scale WHI Memory Study (WHIMS) which, contrary to expectation, showed increased dementia risk and poorer cognitive outcomes in older postmenopausal women randomized to HT versus placebo. We consider the 'critical window hypothesis', which suggests that a window of opportunity may exist shortly after menopause during which estrogen treatments are most effective. In addition, we highlight emerging evidence that potential adverse effects of HT on cognition are most pronounced in women who have other health risks, such as lower global cognition or diabetes. Lastly, we point towards implications for future research and clinical treatments. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  7. Postmenopausal hormone therapy and cognition

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCarrey, Anna C.; Resnick, Susan M.

    2015-01-01

    Prior to the publication of findings from the Women’s Health Initiative (WHI) in 2002, estrogen-containing hormone therapy (HT) was used to prevent age-related disease, especially cardiovascular disease, and to treat menopausal symptoms such as hot flushes and sleep disruptions. Some observational studies of HT in midlife and aging women suggested that HT might also benefit cognitive function, but randomized clinical trials have produced mixed findings in terms of health and cognitive outcomes. This review focuses on hormone effects on cognition and risk for dementia in naturally menopausal women as well as surgically induced menopause, and highlights findings from the large-scale WHI Memory Study (WHIMS) which, contrary to expectation, showed increased dementia risk and poorer cognitive outcomes in older postmenopausal women randomized to HT versus placebo. We consider the ‘critical window hypothesis’, which suggests that a window of opportunity may exist shortly after menopause during which estrogen treatments are most effective. In addition, we highlight emerging evidence that potential adverse effects of HT on cognition are most pronounced in women who have other health risks, such as cerebrovascular disease or diabetes. Lastly, we point towards implications for future research and clinical treatments. PMID:25935728

  8. Continuation of growth hormone therapy versus placebo in transition-phase patients with growth hormone deficiency

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jørgensen, Jens; Nørrelund, Helene; Vahl, Nina

    2002-01-01

    In a placebo-controlled, parallel study of 18 patients with a mean age of 20 years who had confirmed growth hormone (GH) deficiency, we evaluated body composition, insulin sensitivity, and glucose turnover at baseline (when all were receiving GH replacement); after 12 months of continued GH therapy...... or placebo; and after a 12-month open phase of GH therapy. In the placebo group, insulin sensitivity and fat mass increased and lipid oxidation decreased, whereas glucose oxidation increased (p...

  9. Periodontal disease-associated micro-organisms in peri-menopausal and post-menopausal women using or not using hormone replacement therapy. A two-year follow-up study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Furuholm Jussi

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Despite conflicting results on the use of hormone replacement therapy (HRT there is no doubt that many women benefit from it. Women using HRT are known to be more health conscious in general with putative positive implications in the mouth. However, we observed recently in our cohort hardly any difference in oral health status between HRT-users and non-users. There are only a few studies about HRT and oral microbiota. We hypothesized that counts of periodontal micro-organisms are lower in health-conscious HRT-users than non-users. Methods Two-year open follow-up study was conducted on originally 200 HRT-users and 200 non-users from age cohorts of 50-58 years. After clinical examination pooled subgingival plaque samples were taken for polymerase chain reaction analyses. The results of finally 135 women meeting the inclusion criteria were analyzed with cross-tabulation and chi-square test. Explanatory factors were studied by step-wise logistic regression analysis. Results In HRT group, the numbers of positive samples for Porphyromonas gingivalis (P. gingivalis, p Prevotella intermedia (P. intermedia, p Tannerella forsythia (T. forsythia, p P. gingivalis (p T. forsythia (p Conclusion Although use of HRT did not correlate with periodontal health status, HRT led to decreasing numbers of positive samples of the periodontal pathogens P. gingivalis and T. forsythia. Further studies with longer observation time are needed to observe the clinical relevance of the results.

  10. Growth hormone therapy for people with thalassaemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ngim, Chin Fang; Lai, Nai Ming; Hong, Janet Yh; Tan, Shir Ley; Ramadas, Amutha; Muthukumarasamy, Premala; Thong, Meow-Keong

    2017-09-18

    Thalassaemia is a recessively-inherited blood disorder that leads to anaemia of varying severity. In those affected by the more severe forms, regular blood transfusions are required which may lead to iron overload. Accumulated iron from blood transfusions may be deposited in vital organs including the heart, liver and endocrine organs such as the pituitary glands which can affect growth hormone production. Growth hormone deficiency is one of the factors that can lead to short stature, a common complication in people with thalassaemia. Growth hormone replacement therapy has been used in children with thalassaemia who have short stature and growth hormone deficiency. To assess the benefits and safety of growth hormone therapy in people with thalassaemia. We searched the Cochrane Haemoglobinopathies Trials Register, compiled from electronic database searches and handsearching of journals and conference abstract books. We also searched the reference lists of relevant articles, reviews and clinical trial registries. Our database and trial registry searches are current to 10 August 2017 and 08 August 2017, respectively. Randomised and quasi-randomised controlled trials comparing the use of growth hormone therapy to placebo or standard care in people with thalassaemia of any type or severity. Two authors independently selected trials for inclusion. Data extraction and assessment of risk of bias were also conducted independently by two authors. The quality of the evidence was assessed using GRADE criteria. One parallel trial conducted in Turkey was included. The trial recruited 20 children with homozygous beta thalassaemia who had short stature; 10 children received growth hormone therapy administered subcutaneously on a daily basis at a dose of 0.7 IU/kg per week and 10 children received standard care. The overall risk of bias in this trial was low except for the selection criteria and attrition bias which were unclear. The quality of the evidence for all major outcomes

  11. [Effect of estradiol valerate and chlormadinone acetate in hormone replacement therapy in postmenopause on Kupperman index, body weight, blood pressure, lipids, enzymes and electrolytes].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Göretzlehner, G; Nikschick, S; Zimmermann, T

    1996-01-01

    Kupperman-index, weight, blood pressure, serum lipids, blood count, thrombocytes, fibrinogen, thrombine time, electrolytes, enzymes, serum proteins, bilirubine and other parameters were studied in 16 healthy post-menopausal women treated for 18 months with 2 mgs estradiol valerate continuously sequentially combined with the antiandrogenic progestogen chlormadinone acetate (CMA) 2 mgs from 1st to 12th every month of treatment. The women were examined after the 1st, 3rd, 6th, 12th, and 18th month during the last 3 days of the progestogen phase, where the CMA had been added to the estradiol valerate for at least 12 days. The combined estradiol-CMA therapy resulted in a significantly reduced Kupperman-index. The total serum cholesterol- and LDLC-levels were also reduced and the HDL-cholesterol and HDLC-cholesterol-quotient increased. Triglycerides, weight, blood pressure, enzymes, and other parameters were unchanged. The positively metabolic effects of estradiol valerate were not altered after the chlormadinone acetate in a sequential regime.

  12. Postmenopausal hormone therapy in clinical perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hodis, Howard N; Mack, Wendy J

    2007-01-01

    Although many of the risks and benefits of postmenopausal hormone therapy are known, only recently has the magnitude of these effects and their perspective to other therapies become more fully understood. Careful review of randomized controlled trials indicates that the risks of postmenopausal hormone therapy including breast cancer, stroke and venous thromboembolism are similar to other commonly used agents. Overall, these risks are rare (less than 1 event per 1,000 women) and even rarer when initiated in women less than 60 years of age or within 10 years of menopause. In addition, the literature indicates similar benefit of postmenopausal hormone therapy, in women who initiate hormone therapy in close proximity to menopause, to other medications used for the primary prevention of coronory heart disease in women.

  13. Testosterone replacement therapy and prostate health.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Polackwich, A Scott; Ostrowski, Kevin A; Hedges, Jason C

    2012-12-01

    There is an emerging evolution in the understanding of the relationship between the prostate and testosterone. It has long been generally believed that with testosterone replacement therapy (TRT), increasing serum testosterone levels led to prostatic growth and worsening of voiding dysfunction and associated complications. A new theory, the Saturation Model of Testosterone and its effect on the Prostate has gained attention. This theory suggests that the prostate's response to increasing levels of serum testosterone reaches a limit beyond which there is minimal effect. This model predicts that testosterone replacement therapy occurs above this saturation point, and replacing testosterone to eugonadal levels should not worsen prostate related benign disease. We evaluated the recent published data, with an emphasis on clinical studies done within the last 3 years, for the effects of testosterone supplementation on benign prostatic disease.

  14. [Acute renal replacement therapy in pediatrics].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaillot, T; Ozanne, B; Bétrémieux, P; Tirel, O; Ecoffey, C

    2013-12-01

    In pediatric intensive care unit, the available modalities of acute renal replacement therapy include intermittent hemodialysis, peritoneal dialysis and continuous renal replacement therapies. No prospective studies have evaluated to date the effect of dialysis modality on the outcomes of children. The decision about dialysis modality should therefore be based on local expertise, resources available, and the patient's clinical status. Poor hemodynamic tolerance of intermittent hemodialysis is a common problem in critically ill patients. Moreover, many pediatric intensive care units are not equipped with dedicated water circuit. Peritoneal dialysis, a simple and inexpensive alternative, is the most widely available form of acute renal replacement therapy. However, its efficacy may be limited in critically ill patients. The use of continuous renal replacement therapy permits usually to reach a greater estimated dialysis dose, a better control of fluid balance, and additionally, to provide adequate nutrition. Copyright © 2013 Société française d’anesthésie et de réanimation (Sfar). Published by Elsevier SAS. All rights reserved.

  15. Enzyme replacement therapy for alpha-mannosidosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Borgwardt, Line Gutte; Dali, Christine I.; Fogh, J

    2013-01-01

    Alpha-mannosidosis (OMIM 248500) is a rare lysosomal storage disease (LSD) caused by alpha-mannosidase deficiency. Manifestations include intellectual disabilities, facial characteristics and hearing impairment. A recombinant human alpha-mannosidase (rhLAMAN) has been developed for weekly intrave...... intravenous enzyme replacement therapy (ERT). We present the preliminary data after 12 months of treatment....

  16. Hormone Replacement Therapy and Your Heart

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... lifestyle choices. Counter the risks of developing heart disease by making heart-healthy lifestyle choices. Don't smoke or use tobacco products. ... ... for Disease Control and Prevention. http://www.cdc.gov/nchs/data/nvsr/nvsr61/ ...

  17. Estrogen and Progestin (Hormone Replacement Therapy)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... made by the body. Estrogen reduces feelings of warmth in the upper body and periods of sweating ... and the laboratory. You should have a complete physical exam, including blood pressure measurements, breast and pelvic ...

  18. osteoporosis - from hormonal replacement therapy to ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2007-11-11

    Nov 11, 2007 ... INTRODUCTION. Osteoporosis is a systemic skeletal disorder .... while the rest undergo apoptosis (12,13). Estrogen .... syndrome should be sent for spine radiographs ..... increases the incidence of hot flushes and leg clamps.

  19. Hormone Replacement Therapy, Iron, and Breast Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    2005-10-01

    pH ( TRIZMA ®, pH 8.1). Ferrous ions added to the serum bind specifically to transferrin at unsaturated iron-binding sites and then the remaining...mouse antibody (Cell Signaling, Beverly, MA), cell lysis M-Per buffer (Pierce, Rockford, IL), PrempoTM 0.625mg/2.5 mg tablet containing 0.625 mg...rubber policeman, lysed with M-Per lysis buffer (Pierce). Cell lysates (30 µg protein) were subjected to 12% SDS-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis and

  20. Hormone therapy and different ovarian cancers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mørch, Lina Steinrud; Løkkegaard, Ellen; Andreasen, Anne Helms;

    2012-01-01

    , including information about tumor histology. The authors performed Poisson regression analyses that included hormone exposures and confounders as time-dependent covariates. In an average of 8.0 years of follow up, 2,681 cases of epithelial ovarian cancer were detected. Compared with never users, women......Postmenopausal hormone therapy use increases the risk of ovarian cancer. In the present study, the authors examined the risks of different histologic types of ovarian cancer associated with hormone therapy. Using Danish national registers, the authors identified 909,946 women who were followed from...... 1995-2005. The women were 50-79 years of age and had no prior hormone-sensitive cancers or bilateral oophorectomy. Hormone therapy prescription data were obtained from the National Register of Medicinal Product Statistics. The National Cancer and Pathology Register provided data on ovarian cancers...

  1. Hormone therapy and different ovarian cancers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mørch, Lina Steinrud; Løkkegaard, Ellen; Andreasen, Anne Helms;

    2012-01-01

    Postmenopausal hormone therapy use increases the risk of ovarian cancer. In the present study, the authors examined the risks of different histologic types of ovarian cancer associated with hormone therapy. Using Danish national registers, the authors identified 909,946 women who were followed from...... 1995-2005. The women were 50-79 years of age and had no prior hormone-sensitive cancers or bilateral oophorectomy. Hormone therapy prescription data were obtained from the National Register of Medicinal Product Statistics. The National Cancer and Pathology Register provided data on ovarian cancers......, including information about tumor histology. The authors performed Poisson regression analyses that included hormone exposures and confounders as time-dependent covariates. In an average of 8.0 years of follow up, 2,681 cases of epithelial ovarian cancer were detected. Compared with never users, women...

  2. Immunoglobulin Replacement Therapy for Primary Immunodeficiency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sriaroon, Panida; Ballow, Mark

    2015-11-01

    Immunoglobulin replacement therapy has been standard treatment in patients with primary immunodeficiency diseases for the past 3 decades. The goal of therapy is to reduce serious bacterial infections in individuals with antibody function defects. Approximately one-third of patients receiving intravenous immunoglobulin treatment experience adverse reactions. Recent advances in manufacturing processes have resulted in products that are safer and better tolerated. Self-infusion by the subcutaneous route has become popular and resulted in better quality of life. This review summarizes the use of immunoglobulin therapy in primary immunodeficiency diseases including its properties, dosing, adverse effects, and different routes of administration.

  3. Therapy for obesity based on gastrointestinal hormones

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bagger, Jonatan I; Christensen, Mikkel; Knop, Filip K;

    2011-01-01

    It has long been known that peptide hormones from the gastrointestinal tract have significant impact on the regulation of nutrient metabolism. Among these hormones, incretins have been found to increase insulin secretion, and thus incretin-based therapies have emerged as new modalities...

  4. Estrogen replacement therapy among postmenopausal women and its effects on signs and symptoms of temporomandibular disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nekora-Azak, Aysen; Evlioglu, Gulumser; Ceyhan, Arzu; Keskin, Haluk; Berkman, Sinan; Issever, Halim

    2008-07-01

    The prevalence of temporomandibular disorders (TMD) is about two to five times higher in females than in males. Data for the higher prevalence of TMD in women and prevalence rates peak during the reproductive years and decrease after menopause. This indicated that female sex hormones may play a role in the etiology or maintenance of TMD. The aim of this study was to investigate the relationship between postmenopausal hormone use and TMD in Turkish postmenopausal women. One hundred-eighty (180), postmenopausal women, aged 42-72 years, were examined both clinically and by questionnaire with regard to the signs and symptoms of temporomandibular disorders, general health status and use of postmenopausal hormone replacement therapy in the preceding year. Ninety-one (91) postmenopausal women (50.6%) were on hormone replacement therapy (HRT). The remaining 89 (49.4%) postmenopausal women were not on hormone replacement therapy. There was no significant difference found in the signs and symptoms of TMD between postmenopausal women using hormone therapy and those not using postmenopausal hormones. There was no association between the use of postmenopausal hormones and the signs and symptoms of TMD in this study.

  5. Cognitive effects of hormonal therapy in older adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitsiades, Nicholas; Correa, Denise; Gross, Cary P; Hurria, Arti; Slovin, Susan F

    2008-12-01

    There is ample preclinical evidence that gonadal steroids (estrogens and androgens) play an important role in central nervous system development and function. The abrupt decline of estrogen levels in women after menopause, and the slower, subtler decline in total and bioavailable testosterone serum levels that occurs in aging men ("andropause," "male menopause," partial androgen deficiency in ageing males [PADAM]), have been implicated in the pathogenesis of cognitive dysfunction prevalent in elderly adults. However, the current clinical evidence supporting hormonal replacement as a neuroprotective therapy is at best inconclusive. Anti-estrogen and anti-androgen hormonal therapies are used in the treatment of breast and prostate carcinomas, respectively. Although generally considered less toxic than conventional cytotoxic chemotherapy, these hormonal manipulations have side effects that are not trivial. This review will summarize the available evidence regarding the impact of these hormonal therapies on cognitive function in older adults. Additional clinical research in this field is needed to confirm the existence and severity of such a possible cognitive impact, which may then need to be considered prior to initiating hormonal therapies in the elderly, as many patients may be in the prodromal phase or early stages of a neurodegenerative disorder, such as Alzheimer's disease, and this information may influence treatment decision-making and subsequent management.

  6. 利维爱激素替代疗法治疗绝经期失眠的效果%EFFECTS OF LIVIAL HORMONE REPLACEMENT THERAPY ON MENOPAUSAL INSOMNIA

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王华静; 宋丽红; 高春妮

    2011-01-01

    目的 探讨利维爱激素替代疗法(HRT)对绝经期失眠病人的治疗效果.方法 绝经期失眠病人120例,随机分为HRT组和对照组,各60例.研究分为两个阶段,即单盲导入期和双盲治疗期.单盲导入期为期1周,所有病人每天均给予1片安慰剂(淀粉片);双盲治疗期90 d,HRT组病人每天给予利维爱1片(2.5 mg),对照组给予安慰剂.病人每天记录睡眠日记,内容包括是否按时服药、主观入睡潜伏期(sSL)、主观总睡眠时间(sTST)和主观睡眠中觉醒时间(sWASO)等,并于单盲导入期第7天(治疗前)和双盲治疗期第90天(治疗后)分别进行匹兹堡睡眠质量指数(PSQI)评分.结果 HRT组中共52例病人完成研究,对照组中共47例病人完成研究.HRT组治疗后与治疗前相比较,sSL和sWASO缩短,sTST延长,主观睡眠效率(sSE)提高,PSQI评分减低,差异均有显著性(t=2.34~2.70,P<0.05).HRT组和对照组比较,治疗后与治疗前的sSL、sTST、sWASO、sSE和PSQI评分的差值绝对值差异均有显著性(t=2.19~2.38,P<0.05).结论 利维爱2.5 mg/d剂量替代疗法能够明显改善绝经期失眠病人的主观睡眠质量.%Objective To assess the effects of hormone replacement therapy (HRT) with Livial on menopausal insomnia. Methods This study consisted of 120 patients with menopausal insomnia who were evenly randomized to HRT-treatment group and placebo control group. The study was divided into two phases: single-blind transduced phase (SBTP) and double-blind treatment phase (DBTP). During SBTP, one tablet of placebo (starch) a day was offered to all patients in both groups for two weeks; during DBTP, to those in HRT group, Livial (2. 5 mg) was given, once a day, to those in the control group, placebo was offered, the course of therapy lasting for 90 days. The patients were asked to keep a sleep diary everyday, including if the drug was taken on time, subjective sleep latency (sSL), subjective total sleep time (sTST) and

  7. Nicotine replacement therapies: patient safety and persistence

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ferguson SG

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Stuart G Ferguson1,2, Saul Shiffman3,4, Joseph G Gitchell51School of Pharmacy, 2Menzies Research Institute Tasmania, University of Tasmania, Hobart, Australia; 3Pinney Associates, 4University of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, PA, USA; 5Pinney Associates, Bethesda, MD, USAAbstract: Nicotine replacement therapy (NRT has become a central part of the treatment of nicotine dependence. However, NRT’s potential efficacy is limited to some extent by patient adherence and persistence. Here we review the relationship between NRT compliance and adherence, and overall treatment outcome. We then examine the factors that likely impact on treatment compliance and persistence, with a special focus on users’ perceptions of treatment safety and efficacy as possible mediators. Potential clinical strategies for improving suboptimal medication use are also discussed.Keywords: nicotine replacement therapy, compliance, safety

  8. Menopausal Hormone Therapy and Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Kidney (Renal Cell) Cancer Leukemia Liver Cancer Lung Cancer Lymphoma Pancreatic Cancer Prostate Cancer Skin Cancer Thyroid Cancer Uterine Cancer ... Myths and Misconceptions Diet Hormones Immunosuppression Infectious Agents Obesity Radiation Sunlight Tobacco Genetics NCI Cancer Genetics Services ...

  9. Risks of testosterone replacement therapy in men

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E Charles Osterberg

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Testosterone replacement therapy (TRT is a widely used treatment for men with symptomatic hypogonadism. The benefits seen with TRT, such as increased libido and energy level, beneficial effects on bone density, strength and muscle as well as cardioprotective effects, have been well-documented. TRT is contraindicated in men with untreated prostate and breast cancer. Men on TRT should be monitored for side-effects such as polycythemia, peripheral edema, cardiac and hepatic dysfunction.

  10. Mitochondrial Replacement Therapy in Reproductive Medicine

    OpenAIRE

    Wolf, Don P; Mitalipov, Nargiz; Mitalipov, Shoukhrat

    2014-01-01

    Mitochondrial dysfunction is implicated in disease and in age-related infertility. Mitochondrial replacement therapies (MRT) in oocytes or zygotes such as pronuclear (PNT), spindle (ST) or polar body (PBT) transfer could prevent second generation transmission of mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) defects. PNT, associated with high levels of mtDNA carryover in mice but low levels in human embryos, carries ethical issues secondary to donor embryo destruction. ST, developed in primates, supports normal d...

  11. Drug Dosing During Continuous Renal Replacement Therapies

    OpenAIRE

    Thompson, A. Jill

    2008-01-01

    Continuous renal replacement therapies (CRRT) are used to manage fluid overload and/or renal failure. The continuous nature of the fluid and solute removal has less impact on hemodynamic variables in critically ill patients, making CRRT preferred over intermittent hemodialysis for some patients in the intensive care arena. The impact of CRRT on drug removal is variable depending on the CRRT modality, the ultrafiltrate and dialysate flow rates, the filter, and the patient's residual renal func...

  12. Transdermal testosterone replacement therapy in men

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ullah MI

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available M Iftekhar Ullah,1 Daniel M Riche,1,2 Christian A Koch1,31Department of Medicine, University of Mississippi Medical Center, 2Department of Pharmacy Practice, The University of Mississippi, 3GV (Sonny Montgomery VA Medical Center, Jackson, MS, USAAbstract: Androgen deficiency syndrome in men is a frequently diagnosed condition associated with clinical symptoms including fatigue, decreased libido, erectile dysfunction, and metabolic syndrome. Serum testosterone concentrations decline steadily with age. The prevalence of androgen deficiency syndrome in men varies depending on the age group, known and unknown comorbidities, and the respective study group. Reported prevalence rates may be underestimated, as not every man with symptoms of androgen deficiency seeks treatment. Additionally, men reporting symptoms of androgen deficiency may not be correctly diagnosed due to the vagueness of the symptom quality. The treatment of androgen deficiency syndrome or male hypogonadism may sometimes be difficult due to various reasons. There is no consensus as to when to start treating a respective man or with regards to the best treatment option for an individual patient. There is also lack of familiarity with treatment options among general practitioners. The formulations currently available on the market are generally expensive and dose adjustment protocols for each differ. All these factors add to the complexity of testosterone replacement therapy. In this article we will discuss the general indications of transdermal testosterone replacement therapy, available formulations, dosage, application sites, and recommended titration schedule.Keywords: hypogonadism, transdermal, testosterone, sexual function, testosterone replacement therapy, estradiol

  13. Physiologic growth hormone replacement improves fasting lipid kinetics in patients with HIV lipodystrophy syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    HIV lipodystrophy syndrome (HLS) is characterized by accelerated lipolysis, inadequate fat oxidation, increased hepatic reesterification, and a high frequency of growth hormone deficiency (GHD). The effect of growth hormone (GH) replacement on these lipid kinetic abnormalities is unknown. We aimed ...

  14. Hormones for therapy of climacteric afflictions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Greiner, Wolfgang

    2007-03-01

    Full Text Available Background: In Western countries hormone replacement therapy (HT is widely used in the treatment of climacteric women who are affected with hot flashes and night sweats. Besides, long-term HT was frequently used to manage the higher risks for osteoporosis and heart attack in postmenopause. Estrogens alone or combined with progestin feature most frequently in HT. Objectives: This HTA report addresses the questions on medical efficacy and cost-effectiveness of HT as a treatment of hot flashes and night sweats as well as in the primary prevention of osteoporosis and cardiovascular disease in postmenopause in general healthy women. Methods: The literature search for articles published after 1998 was conducted in March 2004 in standard medical and economic databases. The analysis included randomised controlled trials, systematic reviews, meta-analysis and economic evaluations considering relevant clinical endpoints in English or German language. The quality of the studies was assessed using checklists corresponding to the study type. Results: HT is highly effective in treating hot flashes in climacteric women. The question of economical efficiency cannot be answered due to the scarce database. As the positive effects (lower risk for fractures and endometrial cancer do not outweigh the negative effects (higher risk for breast cancer and general cardiovascular risk estrogen-progestin combination HT cannot be recommended for primary prevention of osteoporosis and cardiovascular disease in postmenopausal women. Discussion: The observation period of most of the studies regarding therapy of hot flashes and night sweats were too short to evaluate possible risks of long-term HT. The economic publications assessing HT for this indication varied vastly in terms of applied methods and were not carried out with respect to the German health care system. Conclusions: HT can be recommended in the short-term treatment of hot flashes and night sweats in climacteric

  15. Mitochondrial replacement therapy in reproductive medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wolf, Don P; Mitalipov, Nargiz; Mitalipov, Shoukhrat

    2015-02-01

    Mitochondrial dysfunction is implicated in disease and age-related infertility. Mitochondrial replacement therapies (MRT) in oocytes or zygotes, such as pronuclear (PNT), spindle (ST), or polar body (PBT) transfer, could prevent second-generation transmission of mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) defects. PNT, associated with high levels of mtDNA carryover in mice but low levels in human embryos, carries ethical issues secondary to donor embryo destruction. ST, developed in primates, supports normal development to adults and low mtDNA carryover. PBT in mice, coupled with PN or ST, may increase the yield of reconstructed embryos with low mtDNA carryover. MRT also offers replacement of the deficient cytoplasm in oocytes from older patients, with the expectation of high pregnancy rates following in vitro fertilization.

  16. Testosterone replacement therapy for older men

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stephen E Borst

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Stephen E Borst, Thomas MulliganGeriatrics Research, Education, and Clinical Center, North Florida/South Georgia Veterans Health System, Gainesville, FL, USAAbstract: Despite intensive research on testosterone therapy for older men, important questions remain unanswered. The evidence clearly indicates that many older men display a partial androgen deficiency. In older men, low circulating testosterone is correlated with low muscle strength, with high adiposity, with insulin resistance and with poor cognitive performance. Testosterone replacement in older men has produced benefits, but not consistently so. The inconsistency may arise from differences in the dose and duration of testosterone treatment, as well as selection of the target population. Generally, studies reporting anabolic responses to testosterone have employed higher doses of testosterone for longer treatment periods and have targeted older men whose baseline circulating bioavailable testosterone levels were low. Most studies of testosterone replacement have reported anabolic that are modest compared to what can be achieved with resistance exercise training. However, several strategies currently under evaluation have the potential to produce greater anabolic effects and to do so in a safe manner. At this time, testosterone therapy can not be recommended for the general population of older men. Older men who are hypogonadal are at greater risk for the catabolic effects associated with a number of acute and chronic medical conditions. Future research is likely to reveal benefits of testosterone therapy for some of these special populations. Testosterone therapy produces a number of adverse effects, including worsening of sleep apnea, gynecomastia, polycythemia and elevation of PSA. Efficacy and adverse effects should be assessed frequently throughout the course of therapy.Keywords: aging, testosterone, hypogonadism, physical function

  17. Growth hormone therapy in progeria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sadeghi-Nejad, Ab; Demmer, Laurie

    2007-05-01

    Catabolic processes seen in Hutchinson-Gilford progeria resemble those of normal aging and, in the affected children, usually result in death at an early age. In addition to its growth promoting effects, growth hormone (GH) has potent anabolic properties. Administration of GH ameliorates some of the catabolic effects of normal aging. We report the results of GH treatment in a young child with progeria.

  18. Experimental Benefits of Sex Hormones on Vascular Function and the Outcome of Hormone Therapy in Cardiovascular Disease

    OpenAIRE

    Ross, Reagan L.; Serock, Michelle R; Khalil, Raouf A.

    2008-01-01

    Cardiovascular disease (CVD) is more common in men and postmenopausal women than premenopausal women, suggesting vascular benefits of female sex hormones. Experimental data have shown beneficial vascular effects of estrogen including stimulation of endothelium-dependent nitric oxide, prostacyclin and hyperpolarizing factor-mediated vascular relaxation. However, the experimental evidence did not translate into vascular benefits of hormone replacement therapy (HRT) in postmenopausal women, and ...

  19. Testosterone Replacement Therapy and the Cardiovascular System.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naderi, Sahar

    2016-04-01

    As testosterone replacement therapy (TRT) has emerged as a commonly prescribed therapy for symptomatic low testosterone, conflicting data have been reported in terms of both its efficacy and potential adverse outcomes. One of the most controversial associations has been that of TRT and cardiovascular morbidity and mortality. This review briefly provides background on the history of TRT, the indications for TRT, and the data behind TRT for symptomatic low testosterone. It then specifically delves into the rather limited data for cardiovascular outcomes of those with low endogenous testosterone and those who receive TRT. The available body of literature strongly suggests that more work, by way of clinical trials, needs to be done to better understand the impact of testosterone and TRT on the cardiovascular system.

  20. Renal Replacement Therapy in Austere Environments

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    Christina M. Yuan

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Myoglobinuric renal failure is the classically described acute renal event occurring in disaster environments—commonly after an earthquake—which most tests the ingenuity and flexibility of local and regional nephrology resources. In recent decades, several nephrology organizations have developed response teams and planning protocols to address disaster events, largely focusing on patients at risk for, or with, acute kidney injury (AKI. In this paper we briefly review the epidemiology and outcomes of patients with dialysis-requiring AKI after such events, while providing greater focus on the management of the end-stage renal disease population after a disaster which incapacitates a pre-existing nephrologic infrastructure (if it existed at all. “Austere” dialysis, as such, is defined as the provision of renal replacement therapy in any setting in which traditional, first-world therapies and resources are limited, incapacitated, or nonexistent.

  1. Análise de correspondência para avaliação do perfil de mulheres na pós-menopausa e o uso da terapia de reposição hormonal Correspondence analysis for the evaluation of women's profile during post-menopause and hormone replacement therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Renata Nunes Aranha

    2004-02-01

    Full Text Available Neste estudo ilustra-se a utilização da técnica de análise de correspondência na caracterização do perfil das usuárias e das não-usuárias da Terapia de Reposição Hormonal (TRH. Analisou-se dados seccionais de 195 mulheres com relato de menopausa natural, entre 2.240 participantes do Estudo Pró-Saúde (Rio de Janeiro. As mulheres não-usuárias da TRH apresentaram perfil mais desfavorável em relação às usuárias dessa terapia, por exemplo, ganho ponderal mais acentuado na vida adulta, idade mais avançada, menopausa mais tardia e menor nível de escolaridade. O uso desta ferramenta analítica deveria ser estimulada na área da saúde, em análises exploratórias das inter-relações entre um grande número de variáveis em populações de interesse.This study illustrates the use of correspondence analysis to identify distinct profiles characterizing hormone replacement therapy (HRT users and non-users, allowing the visualization of concurrent characteristics associated with this self-selection process. We analyzed cross-sectional information provided by 195 women reporting natural menopause, among 2,240 participants in the Pro-Saude Study (Rio de Janeiro, Brazil. Non-users had an unfavorable profile, including greater weight gain during adult life, older age, later menopause, and less schooling. This analytic tool should be used more extensively in public health research, in exploratory analyses of the relations among a large number of variables in key populations.

  2. Transdermal testosterone replacement therapy in men.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ullah, M Iftekhar; Riche, Daniel M; Koch, Christian A

    2014-01-01

    Androgen deficiency syndrome in men is a frequently diagnosed condition associated with clinical symptoms including fatigue, decreased libido, erectile dysfunction, and metabolic syndrome. Serum testosterone concentrations decline steadily with age. The prevalence of androgen deficiency syndrome in men varies depending on the age group, known and unknown comorbidities, and the respective study group. Reported prevalence rates may be underestimated, as not every man with symptoms of androgen deficiency seeks treatment. Additionally, men reporting symptoms of androgen deficiency may not be correctly diagnosed due to the vagueness of the symptom quality. The treatment of androgen deficiency syndrome or male hypogonadism may sometimes be difficult due to various reasons. There is no consensus as to when to start treating a respective man or with regards to the best treatment option for an individual patient. There is also lack of familiarity with treatment options among general practitioners. The formulations currently available on the market are generally expensive and dose adjustment protocols for each differ. All these factors add to the complexity of testosterone replacement therapy. In this article we will discuss the general indications of transdermal testosterone replacement therapy, available formulations, dosage, application sites, and recommended titration schedule.

  3. Testosterone replacement therapy in obese males.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drewa, Tomasz; Olszewska-Słonina, Dorota; Chlosta, Piotr

    2011-01-01

    Controversy surrounds testosterone replacement therapy in obese ageing due to no generally accepted lower limits of normal testosterone level and high prevalence of hypogonadal symptoms in the ageing male population and the non-specific nature of these symptoms. Late onset hypogonadism is a clinical and biochemical syndrome associated with advancing age, often coexisting with obesity and metabolic syndrome. High fat and carbohydrates (fructose) consumption is responsible for development of obesity and metabolic syndrome which is one of risk factors for hypogonadism in older men. High fructose intake has been shown to cause dyslipidemia and to impair hepatic insulin sensitivity. Obesity and lack of physical activity negatively influence testosterone level. Low testosterone level should be regarded as an effect of obesity, but reverse relationship has not been proved yet. The management of late-onset hypogonadism symptoms has to be treated by a change of a life style and prevented with healthy nutrition and physical activity. The question related to rational indications for testosterone replacement therapy in obese males seems to be still actual.

  4. Two to three years of hormone replacement treatment in healthy women have long-term preventive effects on bone mass and osteoporotic fractures: the PERF study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bagger, Yu Z; Tankó, László B; Alexandersen, Peter

    2004-01-01

    Hormone replacement therapy (HRT) is often prescribed for a few years to suppress menopausal symptoms. Although its long-term use of HRT for the primary prevention of osteoporosis is not currently recommended, the long-term skeletal benefits of the limited therapy are of great interest. To determ......Hormone replacement therapy (HRT) is often prescribed for a few years to suppress menopausal symptoms. Although its long-term use of HRT for the primary prevention of osteoporosis is not currently recommended, the long-term skeletal benefits of the limited therapy are of great interest...

  5. Renal replacement therapy in Korea, 2012

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    Dong Chan Jin

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available The Korean Society of Nephrology (KSN launched the official end-stage renal disease (ESRD patient registry in 1985, and an Internet online registry program was opened in 2001 and revised in 2013. The ESRD Registry Committee of KSN has collected data on dialysis therapy in Korea through the online registry program in the KSN Internet website. The status of renal replacement therapy in Korea at the end of 2012 is described in the following. The total number of ESRD patients was 70,211 at the end of 2012, which included 48,531 hemodialysis (HD patients, 7,552 peritoneal dialysis (PD patients, and 14,128 functioning kidney transplant (KT patients. The prevalence of ESRD was 1,353.3 patients per million population (PMP, and the distribution of renal replacement therapy among ESRD patients was as follows: HD, 69.1%; PD, 10.8%; and KT, 20.2%. The number of new ESRD patients in 2012 was 11,742 (HD, 8,811; PD, 923; and KT, 1,738; the incidence rate was 221.1 PMP. The primary causes of ESRD were diabetic nephropathy (50.6%, hypertensive nephrosclerosis (18.5%, and chronic glomerulonephritis (18.1%. The mean urea reduction ratio was 67.9% in male and 74.1% in female HD patients. The mean Kt/V was 1.382 in male and 1.652 in female HD patients. The 5-year survival rates of male and female dialysis patients were 70.6% and 73.5%, respectively.

  6. Neonatal varicella pneumonia, surfactant replacement therapy

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    Mousa Ahmadpour-kacho

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Background: Chickenpox is a very contagious viral disease that caused by varicella-zoster virus, which appears in the first week of life secondary to transplacental transmission of infection from the affected mother. When mother catches the disease five days before and up to two days after the delivery, the chance of varicella in neonate in first week of life is 17%. A generalized papulovesicular lesion is the most common clinical feature. Respiratory involvement may lead to giant cell pneumonia and respiratory failure. The mortality rate is up to 30% in the case of no treatment, often due to pneumonia. Treatment includes hospitalization, isolation and administration of intravenous acyclovir. The aim of this case report is to introduce the exogenous surfactant replacement therapy after intubation and mechanical ventilation for respiratory failure in neonatal chickenpox pneumonia and respiratory distress. Case Presentation: A seven-day-old neonate boy was admitted to the Neonatal Intensive Care Unit at Amirkola Children’s Hospital, Babol, north of Iran, with generalized papulovesicular lesions and respiratory distress. His mother has had a history of Varicella 4 days before delivery. He was isolated and given supportive care, intravenous acyclovir and antibiotics. On the second day, he was intubated and connected to mechanical ventilator due to severe pneumonia and respiratory failure. Because of sever pulmonary involvement evidenced by Chest X-Ray and high ventilators set-up requirement, intratracheal surfactant was administered in two doses separated by 12 hours. He was discharged after 14 days without any complication with good general condition. Conclusion: Exogenous surfactant replacement therapy can be useful as an adjunctive therapy for the treatment of respiratory failure due to neonatal chickenpox.

  7. Testosterone replacement therapy following the diagnosis of prostate cancer: outcomes and utilization trends.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaplan, Alan L; Trinh, Quoc-Dien; Sun, Maxine; Carter, Stacey C; Nguyen, Paul L; Shih, Ya-Chen Tina; Marks, Leonard S; Hu, Jim C

    2014-04-01

    Late-onset hypogonadism may impair quality of life and contribute to metabolic and cardiovascular comorbidity in aging men. Testosterone replacement therapy is effective in treating hypogonadism. However, for the millions of men with a history of prostate cancer, exogenous testosterone has long been considered contraindicated, even though little data in such men are available. Clarification of this safety issue could allow treatment to be considered for a sizeable segment of the aging male population. The aim of this study is to examine population-based utilization and impact of testosterone replacement therapy in men with prostate cancer. Using linked Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results-Medicare data, we identified 149,354 men diagnosed with prostate cancer from 1992 to 2007. Of those, 1181 (0.79%) men received exogenous testosterone following their cancer diagnosis. We used propensity scoring analysis to examine the effect of testosterone replacement on the use of salvage hormone therapy and overall and prostate cancer-specific mortality. We assessed overall mortality, cancer-specific mortality, and the use of salvage hormone therapy. Following prostate cancer diagnosis, testosterone replacement was directly related to income and educational status and inversely related to age (all P testosterone (all P testosterone replacement therapy was not associated with overall or cancer-specific mortality or with the use of salvage hormone therapy. In this population-based observational study of testosterone replacement therapy in men with a history of prostate cancer, treatment was not associated with increased overall or cancer-specific mortality. These findings suggest testosterone replacement therapy may be considered in men with a history of prostate cancer, but confirmatory prospective studies are needed. © 2014 International Society for Sexual Medicine.

  8. Alternative hormone replacement regimens: is there a need for further clinical trials?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Welty, Francine K

    2003-12-01

    To review the randomized trials of hormone replacement therapy. Studies have shown that conjugated equine estrogen 0.625 mg a day plus medroxyprogesterone acetate 2.5 mg a day increased the risk of cardiovascular events during the first year of treatment in women both with and without coronary heart disease. Conjugated equine estrogen plus medroxyprogesterone acetate also increased the overall risk of myocardial infarction and stroke in women without coronary heart disease, and myocardial infarction or death in women with coronary heart disease, and also increased the risk of breast cancer, cognitive decline and dementia. Unopposed, oral 17B-estradiol increased the risk of stroke during the first 6 months of treatment in women with a previous stroke. Oral 17B-estradiol with or without cyclic progestin had no effect on the progression of atherosclerosis or reinfarction. Transdermal 17B-estradiol plus cyclic progestin was associated with a non-significant increase in coronary heart disease events in women with coronary heart disease. Compared with placebo, cardiovascular events increased in the ongoing estrogen-only arm of the Women's Health Initiative, indicating that unopposed conjugated equine estrogen is unlikely to be cardioprotective. However, oral 17B-estradiol retarded the progression of subclinical atherosclerosis in younger women without coronary heart disease. Hormone replacement therapy should not be initiated for the primary or secondary prevention of coronary heart disease in women. A trial of 17B-estradiol started at menopause in women without coronary heart disease should be considered.

  9. Caracterização das usuárias de terapia de reposição hormonal do Município de Campinas, São Paulo Characterization of hormone replacement therapy users in Campinas, São Paulo

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aarão Mendes Pinto Neto

    2002-02-01

    Full Text Available Realizou-se um estudo descritivo de corte transversal, de base populacional, com o objetivo de caracterizar as mulheres climatéricas do Município de Campinas, Estado de São Paulo, de acordo com o uso da terapia de reposição hormonal (TRH. Selecionaram-se, por processo de amostragem, 456 mulheres na faixa etária de 45-60 anos de idade, segundo informações obtidas da agência local da Fundação Instituto Brasileiro de Geografia e Estatística (IBGE. As mulheres foram selecionadas por conglomerados e a unidade de referência foi um setor censitário, conforme definido pelo IBGE. Os dados foram coletados por intermédio de entrevistas domiciliares, com questionários estruturados e pré-testados, fornecidos pela Fundação Internacional de Saúde, Sociedade Internacional de Menopausa e pela Sociedade Norte-Americana de Menopausa e adaptados pelos autores. Para caracterizar as mulheres segundo o uso atual ou passado de TRH, utilizou-se o modelo de regressão logística politômica, com processo de seleção backward de variáveis. Concluiu-se que no Município de Campinas as principais características das usuárias da terapia de reposição hormonal foram estar na perimenopausa, ter maior escolaridade e melhor classe social.This study employed a descriptive, cross-sectional, population-based design to characterize climacteric women from Campinas, São Paulo State, based on use of hormone replacement therapy (HRT. An area cluster sample was selected with 456 women 45 to 60 years of age, residing in Campinas, based on data from the Brazilian Institute of Statistics and Geography (IBGE. Women were selected by area cluster, and the reference unit was the census tract as defined by the IBGE. Data were collected through home interviews using a structured and pre-tested questionnaire provided by the International Health Foundation/International Menopause Society and by the North American Menopause Society and adapted by the authors. In order to

  10. Recombinant Enzyme Replacement Therapy in Hypophosphatasia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hofmann, Christine; Jakob, Franz; Seefried, Lothar; Mentrup, Birgit; Graser, Stephanie; Plotkin, Horacio; Girschick, Hermann J; Liese, Johannes

    2015-01-01

    Hypophosphatasia (HPP) is a rare monogenetic and multisystemic disease with involvement of different organs, including bone, muscle, kidney, lung, gastrointestinal tract and the nervous system. The exact metabolic mechanisms of the effects of TNAP deficiency in different tissues are not understood in detail. There is no approved specific treatment for HPP; therefore symptomatic treatment in order to improve the clinical features is of major interest. Enzyme replacement therapy (ERT) is a relatively new type of treatment based on the principle of administering a medical treatment replacing a defective or absent enzyme. Recently ERT with a bone targeted recombinant human TNAP molecule has been reported to be efficient in ten severely affected patients and improved survival of life threatening forms. These results are very promising especially with regard to the skeletal phenotype but it is unclear whether ERT also has beneficial effects for craniosynostosis and in other affected tissues in HPP such as brain and kidney. Long-term data are not yet available and further systematic clinical trials are needed. It is also necessary to establish therapeutic approaches to help patients who are affected by less severe forms of HPP but also suffer from a significant reduction in quality of life. Further basic research on TNAP function and role in different tissues and on its physiological substrates is critical to gain a better insight in the pathogenesis in HPP. This and further experiences in new therapeutic strategies may improve the prognosis and quality of life of patients with all forms of HPP.

  11. Effect of estrogen-progestin hormonal replacement therapy on blood coagulation and fibrinolysis in postmenopausal women Efeitos da terapia de reposição hormonal estroprogestativa sobre o sistema de coagulação e de fibrinólise em mulheres na pós-menopausa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Claudio E Bonduki

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: To evaluate antithrombin III (AT, thrombin (Fragment 1+2 [F1+2] and thrombin-antithrombin [TAT] generation markers, as well as other coagulation parameters, such as prothrombin time, partial activated thromboplastin time, thrombin time, fibrinogen, euglobulin lysis time, and platelet count, in postmenopausal women after hormonal therapy. STUDY DESIGN: Forty-five patients who received either 0.625 mg/day unopposed oral conjugated equine estrogen (CEE, 0.625 mg/day oral CEE plus medroxyprogesterone acetate (MP, or 50 µg/day transdermal 17beta-estradiol plus MP, were included. Tests were performed before (T0 and after 3 (T3, 6 (T6 and 12 (T12 months of treatment. AT was determined by an amidolytic method, whereas F1+2 and TAT complex were measured by ELISA. RESULTS: There was a significant reduction in the AT level of patients who received oral CEE plus MP at T3. There was no AT reduction in patients taking either oral CEE alone or transdermal 17beta-estradiol plus MP. F1+2 increased in all patients, but it reached statistical significance only in patients receiving transdermal 17beta-estradiol MP at T3. CONCLUSIONS: The CEE associated with MP treatment may reduce AT levels, whereas unopposed CEE or transdermal 17beta-estradiol plus MP does not change AT. These changes might not be clinically relevant in the general population; however, hormonal replacement therapy may increase the risk of thrombosis in women with congenital or acquired thrombophilia.OBJETIVO: Avaliar os marcadores antitrombina III (AT, fragmento 1 + 2 da trombina (F1+2 e complexo trombina-antitrombina (TAT, bem como outros parâmetros da coagulação, como tempo de pró-trombina, tempo parcial de tromboplastina ativado, tempo de trombina, fibrinogênio e tempo de lise da euglobulina em mulheres na pós-menopausa após terapia hormonal. DESENHO DO ESTUDO: Foram incluídas 45 voluntárias que receberam estrogênios conjugados eqüinos (ECE 0,625 mg/dia, isoladamente ou

  12. Avaliação tomográfica e tensiométrica de fêmures de ratas ooforectomizadas submetidas à terapia de reposição hormonal Tomografic and tensiometric assessment of femurs of oophorectomized rats submitted to hormone replacement therapy

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    Fábio Alexandre Martynetz

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available OBJETIVO: Analisar os efeitos da TRH na avaliação biomecânica e tomográfica dos fêmures de ratas submetidas à menopausa induzida. MÉTODOS: Foram divididas igualmente em três grupos 45 ratas Wistar adultas. O primeiro e o segundo constituíram-se de ratas ooforectomizadas e o terceiro, o grupo controle, de ratas não ooforectomizadas. Após a constatação da falência hormonal (citologia esfoliativa. somente o primeiro grupo recebeu TRH, durante dois meses. Após esse período, os fêmures foram desarticulados e submetidos a testes biomecânicos através de máquina universal de ensaios para avaliação da resistência e submetidos a tomografia para determinação da densidade óssea. RESULTADOS: A citologia esfoliativa demonstrou indução de falência hormonal em todos os animais ooforectomizados. Notou-se diferença significante (p = 0,030 entre os grupos ao se mensurar a força máxima de resistência, maior no grupo que recebeu TRH. Observou-se maior fragilidade óssea nos animais ooforectomizados sem TRH quando comparados com os com TRH (p = 0,010 em relação ao grupo controle (p = 0,0107. Houve aumento da resistência óssea nas ratas ooforectomizadas com TRH em relação às sem TRH e valores semelhantes aos do grupo controle (p = 0,179. Na avaliação tomográfica, não se encontraram diferenças significantes entre os grupos (p = 0,625. CONCLUSÃO: Observou-se aumento significativo da resistência óssea com a utilização de TRH. No entanto, o tratamento com TRH não apresentou alteração significante da densidade mineral óssea.OBJECTIVE: To analyze the effects of Hormone Replacement Therapy on the biomechanical and tomographic evaluation of femurs of rats submitted to induced menopause. METHODS: Forty-five adult Wistar rats were divided equally into three groups. The first and second groups consisted of rats submitted to oophorectomy, and the third was the control group, consisting of non-oophorectomized rates. After

  13. Protein Replacement Therapy Shows Promise in Treating Rare Skin Disorder

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... 1999 Spotlight on Research 2014 February 2014 (historical) Protein Replacement Therapy Shows Promise in Treating Rare Skin Disorder Replacing a protein that is crucial to ensuring that the skin’s ...

  14. Improved response of growth hormone to growth hormone-releasing hormone and reversible chronic thyroiditis after hydrocortisone replacement in isolated adrenocorticotropic hormone deficiency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Inagaki, Miho; Sato, Haruhiro; Miyamoto, Yoshiyasu; Hirukawa, Takashi; Sawaya, Asako; Miyakogawa, Takayo; Tatsumi, Ryoko; Kakuta, Takatoshi

    2009-07-20

    We report a 44-year-old Japanese man who showed a reversible blunted response of growth hormone (GH) to GH-releasing hormone (GRH) stimulation test and reversible chronic thyroiditis accompanied by isolated ACTH deficiency. He was admitted to our hospital because of severe general malaise, hypotension, and hypoglycemia. He showed repeated attacks of hypoglycemia, and his serum sodium level gradually decreased. Finally, he was referred to the endocrinology division, where his adrenocorticotropic hormone (ACTH) and cortisol values were found to be low, and his GH level was slightly elevated. An increased value of thyroid stimulating hormone (TSH) and decreased values of free triidothyronine and free thyroxine were observed along with anti-thyroglobulin antibody, suggesting chronic thyroiditis. Pituitary stimulation tests revealed a blunted response of ACTH and cortisol to corticotropin-releasing hormone, and a blunted response of GH to GRH. Hydrocortisone replacement was then started, and this improved the patient's general condition. His hypothyroid state gradually ameliorated and his titer of anti-thyroglobulin antibody decreased to the normal range. Pituitary function was re-evaluated with GRH stimulation test under a maintenance dose of 20 mg/day hydrocortisone and showed a normal response of GH to GRH. It is suggested that re-evaluation of pituitary and thyroid function is useful for diagnosing isolated ACTH deficiency after starting a maintenance dose of hydrocortisone in order to avoid unnecessary replacement of thyroid hormone.

  15. Acute Renal Replacement Therapy in Pediatrics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rajit K. Basu

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Acute kidney injury (AKI independently increases morbidity and mortality in children admitted to the hospital. Renal replacement therapy (RRT is an essential therapy in the setting of AKI and fluid overload. The decision to initiate RRT is complex and often complicated by concerns related to patient hemodynamic and thermodynamic instability. The choice of which RRT modality to use depends on numerous criteria that are both patient and treatment center specific. Surprisingly, despite decades of use, no randomized, controlled trial study involving RRT in pediatrics has been performed. Because of these factors, clear-cut consensus is lacking regarding key questions surrounding RRT delivery. In this paper, we will summarize existing data concerning RRT use in children. We discuss the major modalities and the data-driven specifics of each, followed by controversies in RRT. As no standard of care is in widespread use for RRT in AKI or in multiorgan disease, we conclude in this paper that prospective studies of RRT are needed to identify best practice guidelines.

  16. [Renal replacement therapy for refractory heart failure].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwenger, V; Remppis, A B

    2012-07-01

    After broad cardiological and nephrological evaluation and consideration of optimal conservative options according to national and international guidelines, renal replacement therapy might be helpful in patients with refractory heart failure even if they are not dialysis-dependent. This is even more important as renal failure is a strong predictor for mortality in patients with severe congestive heart failure (CHF) and CHF is one of the fastest growing morbidities in western countries. Although peritoneal dialysis (PD) is frequently used in patients with CHF its role remains unclear. Acute chronic volume overload in refractory CHF is still an unresolved clinical problem. In patients with acute heart and renal failure with need of management in an intensive care unit, extracorporeal ultrafiltration or a dialysis modality should be preferred. In patients with chronic refractory CHF, volume overload and renal failure, peritoneal dialysis should be the therapy of choice. Due to the limited data available, treatment and outcome parameters should be recorded in the registry of the German Society of Nephrology (http://www.herz-niere.de).

  17. Drug dosing during continuous renal replacement therapies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thompson, A Jill

    2008-04-01

    Continuous renal replacement therapies (CRRT) are used to manage fluid overload and/or renal failure. The continuous nature of the fluid and solute removal has less impact on hemodynamic variables in critically ill patients, making CRRT preferred over intermittent hemodialysis for some patients in the intensive care arena. The impact of CRRT on drug removal is variable depending on the CRRT modality, the ultrafiltrate and dialysate flow rates, the filter, and the patient's residual renal function; all of these may change from patient to patient or even in the same patient depending on the clinical status. However, CRRT modalities are generally more efficient than intermittent hemodialysis at drug removal, in some cases approximating or even exceeding normal renal function, resulting in a significant risk of subtherapeutic dosing if conventional hemodialysis dosing recommendations are followed. This annotated bibliography provides a summary of publications analyzing drug removal during CRRT, including CRRT settings and drug clearance values found in each study. Caution is warranted as findings from one study may not be generalizable to all patients due to the many factors that influence drug removal. Serum drug concentrations should be monitored when available, and patient clinical status is exceedingly important for following expected and unexpected responses to drug therapies. Reviews on general drug dosing calculations in CRRT are available elsewhere.

  18. Drug dosing during continuous renal replacement therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Churchwell, Mariann D; Mueller, Bruce A

    2009-01-01

    Continuous renal replacement therapy (CRRT) has given clinicians an important option in the care of critically ill patients. The slow and continuous dialysate and ultrafiltrate flow rates that are employed with CRRT can yield drug clearances similar to an analogous glomerular filtration rate of the native kidneys. Advantages such as superior volume control, excellent metabolic control, and hemodynamic tolerance by critically ill patients are well documented, but an understanding of drug dosing for CRRT is still a bit of a mystery. Although some pharmaceutical companies have dedicated postmarket research in this direction, many pharmaceutical companies have chosen not to pursue this information as it is not mandated and represents a relatively small part of their market. This lack of valuable information has created many challenges in the care of the critically ill patient as intermittent hemodialysis drug dosing recommendations cannot be extrapolated to CRRT. This drug dosing review will highlight factors that clinicians should consider when determining a pharmacotherapy regimen for a patient receiving CRRT.

  19. The effect of 30 months of low-dose replacement therapy with recombinant human growth hormone (rhGH) on insulin and C-peptide kinetics, insulin secretion, insulin sensitivity, glucose effectiveness, and body composition in GH-deficient adults

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rosenfalck, A M; Maghsoudi, S; Fisker, S;

    2000-01-01

    (frequently sampled iv glucose tolerance test) glucose tolerance test, and body composition was estimated by dual-energy x-ray absorptiometry. Treatment with rhGH induced persistent favorable changes in body composition, with a 10% increase in lean body mass (P ...The aim of the present study was to evaluate the long-term (30 months) metabolic effects of recombinant human GH (rhGH) given in a mean dose of 6.7 microg/kg x day (= 1.6 IU/day), in 11 patients with adult GH deficiency. Glucose metabolism was evaluated by an oral glucose tolerance test and an iv...... in glucose tolerance, beta-cell response was still inappropriate. Our conclusion is that long-term rhGH-replacement therapy in GH deficiency adults induced a significant deterioration in glucose tolerance, profound changes in kinetics of C-peptide, and insulin and prehepatic insulin secretion, despite...

  20. Surfactant replacement therapy--economic impact.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pejaver, R K; al Hifzi, I; Aldussari, S

    2001-06-01

    Surfactant replacement is an effective treatment for neonatal respiratory distress syndrome. (RDS). As widespread use of surfactant is becoming a reality, it is important to assess the economic implications of this new form of therapy. A comparison study was carried out at the Neonatal Intensive Care Unit (NICU) of Northwest Armed Forces Hospital, Saudi Arabia. Among 75 infants who received surfactant for RDS and similar number who were managed during time period just before the surfactant was available, but by set criteria would have made them eligible for surfactant. All other management modalities except surfactant were the same for all these babies. Based on the intensity of monitoring and nursing care required by the baby, the level of care was divided as: Level IIIA, IIIB, Level II, Level I. The cost per day per bed for each level was calculated, taking into account the use of hospital immovable equipment, personal salaries of nursing, medical, ancillary staff, overheads and maintenance, depreciation and replacement costs. Medications used, procedures done, TPN, oxygen, were all added to individual patient's total expenditure. 75 infants in the Surfactant group had 62 survivors. They spent a total of 4300 days in hospital. (av 69.35) Out of which 970 d (av 15.65 per patient) were ventilated days. There were 56 survivors in the non-surfactant group of 75. They had spent a total of 5023 days in the hospital (av 89.69/patient) out of which 1490 were ventilated days (av 26.60 d). Including the cost of surfactant (two doses), cost of hospital stay for each infant taking the average figures of stay would be SR 118, 009.75 per surfactant treated baby and SR 164, 070.70 per non-surfactant treated baby. The difference of 46,061 SR is 39.03% more in non-surfactant group. One Saudi rial = 8 Rs (approx at the time study was carried out.) Medical care cost varies from place to place. However, it is definitely cost-effective where surfactant is concerned. Quality adjusted

  1. Isolated growth hormone deficiency type 2: from gene to therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miletta, Maria Consolata; Lochmatter, Didier; Pektovic, Vibor; Mullis, Primus-E

    2012-01-01

    Isolated growth hormone deficiency type-2 (IGHD-2), the autosomal-dominant form of GH deficiency, is mainly caused by specific splicing mutations in the human growth hormone (hGH) gene (GH-1). These mutations, occurring in and around exon 3, cause complete exon 3 skipping and produce a dominant-negative 17.5 kD GH isoform that reduces the accumulation and secretion of wild type-GH (wt-GH). At present, patients suffering from IGHD-2 are treated with daily injections of recombinant human GH (rhGH) in order to reach normal height. However, this type of replacement therapy, although effective in terms of growth, does not prevent toxic effects of the 17.5-kD mutant on the pituitary gland, which can eventually lead to other hormonal deficiencies. Considering a well-known correlation between the clinical severity observed in IGHD-2 patients and the increased expression of the 17.5-kD isoform, therapies that specifically target this isoform may be useful in patients with GH-1 splicing defects. This chapter focuses on molecular strategies that could represent future directions for IGHD-2 treatment.

  2. Renal replacement therapy after cardiac surgery; renal function recovers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Steinthorsdottir, Kristin Julia; Kandler, Kristian; Agerlin Windeløv, Nis

    2013-01-01

    To assess renal outcome in patients discharged from hospital following cardiac surgery-associated acute kidney injury (CSA-AKI) with need for renal replacement therapy.......To assess renal outcome in patients discharged from hospital following cardiac surgery-associated acute kidney injury (CSA-AKI) with need for renal replacement therapy....

  3. Anti-ischemic effect of chronic oestrogen replacement therapy alone or in combination with medroxyprogesterone acetate in different replacement schemes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cerquetani, E; Leonardo, F; Pagnotta, P; Galetta, P; Onorati, D; Fini, M; Rosano, G M

    2001-09-28

    Oestrogen replacement therapy in postmenopausal women has a protective effect upon the cardiovascular system and improves exercise-induced myocardial ischemia. Although in hormone replacement schemes progestins are required to reduce the likelihood of uterine malignancies, little is known on the cardiovascular effect of progestins. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effect of oestrogen replacement alone and two different estrogen-progestin replacement therapy schemes upon exercise induced myocardial ischemia. The study population included 18 female menopausal patients with coronary artery disease. After a baseline exercise test patients received conjugated equine estrogens (CEE) 0.625 mg alone for 30 days when they underwent a second exercise test and were randomized to receive in a cross-over design medroxyprogesterone acetate (MPA) either in continuous combined therapy (2.5 mg/daily) for 28 days or in cyclical therapy (10 mg o.d. from day 16 to day 28). After CEE alone two patients with a previously positive exercise test showed a negative exercise test. CEE increased time to 1 mm ST compared to baseline (352+/-185 vs 265+/-133 s, Pexercise test was negative after CEE the test remained negative during continuous combined MPA therapy while become positive during cyclical MPA. CEE+continuous combined MPA increased both time to 1 mm ST and exercise time compared to baseline (386+/-165 vs 265+/-133 s, Pexercise time (268+/-164 vs 265+/-133 s, P=NS and 455+/-223 vs 465+/-186 s, P=NS, respectively). Continuous combined therapy with CEE+MPA improves exercise-induced myocardial ischemia in female patients with coronary artery disease while the beneficial effect of CEE is reduced by cyclical therapy.

  4. Enhanced Neuroactivation during Verbal Memory Processing in Postmenopausal Women Receiving Short Term Hormone Therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Persad, Carol C.; Zubieta, Jon-Kar; Love, Tiffany; Wang, Heng; Tkaczyk, Anne; Smith, Yolanda R.

    2012-01-01

    Capsule Using a randomized, double-blind placebo-controlled cross-over design, we showed that short-term hormone replacement therapy increases brain activation in parietal and prefrontal areas during verbal memory tasks in postmenopausal women. Objective To study the effects of hormone therapy on brain activation patterns during verbal memory in postmenopausal women. Design A randomized, double-blind placebo-controlled cross-over study was performed. Setting A tertiary care university medical center. Participants Ten healthy postmenopausal women (age range 50-60 years) were recruited from the local community. Interventions Women were randomized to the order they received combined hormone therapy, 5 ug ethinyl estradiol and 1 mg norethindrone acetate, and placebo. Volunteers received hormone therapy or placebo for 4 weeks, followed by a one month washout period, and then received the other treatment for 4 weeks. An fMRI was performed at the end of each 4 week treatment utilizing a verbal memory task. Main Outcome Measure Brain activation patterns were compared between hormone therapy and placebo. Results Hormone therapy was associated with increased activation in left middle/superior frontal cortex (BA 6,9), medial frontal cortex and dorsal anterior cingulate (BA 24,32), posterior cingulate (BA 6), and left inferior parietal (BA 40) during memory encoding. All regions were significant at p ≤ 0.05 with correction for multiple comparisons. Conclusions Hormone therapy increased neural activation in frontal and parietal areas in postmenopausal women during a verbal memory task. PMID:18692790

  5. Blood donation and testosterone replacement therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chin-Yee, Benjamin; Lazo-Langner, Alejandro; Butler-Foster, Terrie; Hsia, Cyrus; Chin-Yee, Ian

    2017-03-01

    Polycythemia is the most common adverse effect of testosterone replacement therapy (TRT) and may predispose patients to adverse vascular events. Current Canadian guidelines recommend regular laboratory monitoring and discontinuing TRT or reducing the dose if the hematocrit exceeds 54% (hemoglobin ≥180 g/L). This threshold has been interpreted by some physicians and patients to indicate the need for phlebotomy or blood donation while on TRT. We reviewed all male blood donors in Southwestern Ontario at Canadian Blood Services from December 2013 to March 2016 who self-identified or were found on donor screening to be on TRT. Hemoglobin concentration was measured at the time of donation or clinic visit and with each subsequent appointment in repeat donors. We identified 39 patients on TRT who presented for blood donation over a 2-year period. The mean hemoglobin level at all clinic visits was 173 g/L (range, 134-205 g/L; n = 108). Hemoglobin concentrations of 180 g/L or more (calculated hematocrit, ≥54%) were measured at 25% of appointments. Of the 27 repeat donors, 12 (44%) had persistently elevated hemoglobin levels (≥180 g/L) at subsequent donations. Hemoglobin concentrations were elevated in donors on TRT, and significant numbers had hemoglobin levels above those recommended by current guidelines. These data also suggest that repeat blood donation was insufficient to maintain a hematocrit below 54%. Our findings raise concerns about the persistent risk of vascular events in these donors, particularly when coupled with the misperception by patients and health care providers that donation has reduced or eliminated the risks of TRT-induced polycythemia. © 2017 AABB.

  6. Improved left ventricular function after growth hormone replacement in patients with hypopituitarism: assessment with radionuclide angiography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cuocolo, A. [Cattedra di Medicina Nucleare, Centro per la Medicina Nucleare del CNR, Universita Federico II, Napoli (Italy); Nicolai, E. [Cattedra di Medicina Nucleare, Centro per la Medicina Nucleare del CNR, Universita Federico II, Napoli (Italy); Colao, A. [Dipartimento di Endocrinologia ed Oncologia Molecolare e Clinica, Universita Federico II, Napoli (Italy); Longobardi, S. [Dipartimento di Endocrinologia ed Oncologia Molecolare e Clinica, Universita Federico II, Napoli (Italy); Cardei, S. [Cattedra di Medicina Nucleare, Centro per la Medicina Nucleare del CNR, Universita Federico II, Napoli (Italy); Fazio, S. [Medicina Interna, Universita Federico II, Napoli (Italy); Merola, B. [Dipartimento di Endocrinologia ed Oncologia Molecolare e Clinica, Universita Federico II, Napoli (Italy); Lombardi, G. [Dipartimento di Endocrinologia ed Oncologia Molecolare e Clinica, Universita Federico II, Napoli (Italy); Sacca, L. [Medicina Interna, Universita Federico II, Napoli (Italy); Salvatore, M. [Cattedra di Medicina Nucleare, Centro per la Medicina Nucleare del CNR, Universita Federico II, Napoli (Italy)

    1996-04-01

    Prolonged growth hormone deficiency (GHD) leads to marked cardiac dysfunction; however, whether reversal of this abnormality may be achieved after specific replacement therapy has not yet been completely clarified. Fourteen patients with childhood-onset GHD (nine men and five women, mean age 27{+-}4 years) and 12 normal control subjects underwent equilibrium radionuclide angiography under control conditions at rest. Patients with GHD were also studied 6 months after recombinant human (rh) GH treatment (0.05 IU/kg per day). Normal control subjects and patients with GHD did not differ with respect to age, gender and heart rate. In contrast, left ventricular ejection fraction (53%{+-}9% vs 66%{+-}6%, P <0.001), stroke volume index (41{+-}11 vs 51{+-}8 ml/m{sup 2}, P <0.01) and cardiac index (2.8{+-}0.6 vs 3.{+-}0.5 l/min/m{sup 2}, P <0.001) were significantly lower in GHD patients than in normal control subjects. None of the GHD patients showed adverse or side-effects during rhGH therapy; thus none required a reduction in GH dose during the treatment period. Heart rate and arterial blood pressure were not significantly modified by rhGH treatment. After 6 months of rhGH therapy a significant improvement in left ventricular ejection fraction (from 53%{+-}9% to 59%{+-}9%, P <0.01), stroke volume index (from 41{+-}11 to 47{+-}13 ml/m{sup 2}, P <0.05) and cardiac index (from 2.8{+-}0.6 to 3.3{+-}0.8 l/min/m{sup 2}, P <0.01) was observed in GHD patients. In conclusion, prolonged lack of GH leads to impaired left ventricular function at rest. Reversal of this abnormality may be observed after 6 months of specific replacement therapy in patients with childhood-onset GHD. (orig.). With 4 figs., 1 tab.

  7. Therapeutic effect of hormone replacement therapy on periodontitis combined with postmenopausal osteoporosis%雌激素替代疗法对绝经期骨质疏松伴牙周病患者系统治疗的影响

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    姚丽; 黄薇; 刘莹

    2015-01-01

    Objective To study the clinical effect of hormone replacement therapy on the treatment of periodontal system in postmenopausal osteoporotic women with periodontitis.Methods Estrogen level, BMD, BI, PD, and CAL of 30 periodontal patients were observed.Patients were randomly divided to 2 groups according to their physical status.Patients in control group received periodontal treatment.Patients in experiment group received periodontal treatment combined with hormone replacement therapy.Data were recorded and compared after 3-month and 6-month treatment.Results Estrogen level and BMD decreased to different extent in 38 postmenopausal osteoporotic women.Estrogen level recovered or closes to normal in 12 patients who had received hormone replacement therapy for 3 months.The difference was statistically significant ( P0.05).BI, PD, and CAL decreased compared to control group, with no significant difference ( P >0.05 ) .Conclusion Hormone replacement therapy can effectively improve estrogen level, BMD, and the efficacy of periodontal systemic therapy.%目的:研究雌激素替代疗法对绝经期雌激素降低伴骨质疏松女性牙周病患者进行牙周系统治疗的临床疗效。方法观察38名绝经期女性雌激素、骨密度测量水平及牙周各项指标,根据身体状况随机分为两组,对照组采取牙周系统治疗,实验组补充雌激素结合牙周系统治疗。术后3个月、6个月记录各项指标进行对比研究。结果38名绝经期女性患者雌激素水平及骨密度存在不同程度降低,实验组12例患者补充雌激素3个月后雌激素恢复或接近正常( P<0.05),统计学上有显著性差异;6个月骨密度测量出现不同程度改善(P>0.05),但统计学上无显著性差异;附着丧失水平较未补充雌激素组降低(P>0.05),但统计学上无显著性差异。结论雌激素替代疗法可以有效提高绝经期女性雌激素、骨密度水平及牙周病患

  8. Abnormal Bleeding During Menopause Hormone Therapy: Insights for Clinical Management

    OpenAIRE

    2013-01-01

    Objective Our objective was to review the involved mechanisms and propose actions for controlling/treating abnormal uterine bleeding during climacteric hormone therapy. Methods A systemic search of the databases SciELO, MEDLINE, and Pubmed was performed for identifying relevant publications on normal endometrial bleeding, abnormal uterine bleeding, and hormone therapy bleeding. Results Before starting hormone therapy, it is essential to exclude any abnormal organic condition, identify women a...

  9. GH-replacement therapy in adults

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christiansen, J S; Jørgensen, J O; Pedersen, S A

    1991-01-01

    Growth hormone (GH) deficiency in adults, whether GH deficient since childhood or patients rendered GH deficient in adult life, is associated with psychosocial maladjustment, reduced muscle strength and reduced exercise capacity. Body composition is significantly altered with increased fat and de...

  10. 雌孕激素替代疗法配合中药治疗卵巢早衰34例%Hormone Replacement Therapy Cooperating with Traditional Chinese Medicine in Women with Premature Ovarian Failure(with 34 cases reported)

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    陈蔚

    2003-01-01

    Premature ovarian failure (POF) is secondary amenorrhea with elevated gonadotrophins oc-curring under the age of 40,affects 1-3% women in the general population with myriad ramificationsfrom psychological devastation to multi-system implications of estrogen deprivation and its sequelae. Sev-eral therapeutic approaches have been tried.The Objective of the paper is to evaluate the clinical thera-peutic effectiveness to these patients.34 women with POF who were treated with traditional Chinesemedicine and hormone replacement therapy were included in the study.Some women experiencing theapproach obtained improvement, even pregnancy, and two newborn were gained. The treatment conceptsand pathogeny for women with POF are discussed in this paper.

  11. Implications of human evolution and admixture for mitochondrial replacement therapy

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Rishishwar, Lavanya; Jordan, I. King

    2017-01-01

    Mitochondrial replacement (MR) therapy is a new assisted reproductive technology that allows women with mitochondrial disorders to give birth to healthy children by combining their nuclei with mitochondria from unaffected egg donors...

  12. Nursing procedures during continuous renal replacement therapies: a national survey

    OpenAIRE

    Ricci, Zaccaria; Benelli, Sonia; Barbarigo, Fabio; Cocozza, Giulia; Pettinelli, Noemi; Di Luca, Emanuela; Mettifogo, Mariangela; Toniolo, Andrea; Ronco, Claudio

    2015-01-01

    Introduction The current role of nurses in the management of critically ill patients needing continuous renal replacement therapies is clearly fundamental. The care of these complex patients is typically shared by critical care and dialysis nurses: their precise duties may vary from country to country. Methods To clarify this issue we conducted a national-level survey at a recent Italian course on nursing practices during continuous renal replacement therapies. Results A total of 119 question...

  13. [Localized lipohypertrophy during growth hormone therapy].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mersebach, Henriette; Feldt-Rasmussen, Ulla F

    2002-04-01

    Accumulation of subcutaneous fat is described in a 51-year-old woman with panhypopituitarism treated on all insufficient pituitary axes, including growth hormone (GH). Malnutrition and alcoholic liver disease caused reduced synthesis of hepatic insulin-like growth factor I (IGF-I), and the function of IGF-I as biochemical marker of the GH effect was compromised. Peripheral levels of GH and IGF-I in tissues may have reached supra physiological levels and induced localised lipohypertrophy. Adjustment of GH treatment should not rest in all cases on IGF-I alone, but also depend on the clinical effect. Adjustment should follow suspected adverse events, such as lipohypertrophy, which is, however, an unusual complication of GH therapy.

  14. Immunoglobulin Replacement Therapy: When You Need It -- and When You Don't

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Videos Lists Search Patient Resources Immunoglobulin Replacement Therapy Immunoglobulin Replacement Therapy When you need it—and when ... enough germ-fighting antibodies. A treatment known as immunoglobulin replacement (IgG) therapy can be a lifesaver for ...

  15. Risk of Stroke With Various Types of Menopausal Hormone Therapies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Løkkegaard, Ellen; Nielsen, Lars Hougaard; Keiding, Niels

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE: Double-blind randomized studies on the effects of oral postmenopausal hormone therapies were stopped mainly because of increased risk of stroke. We aimed to assess the risk of all strokes and various subtypes associated with hormone therapy and explore the influence of reg...

  16. Continuous Renal Replacement Therapy for Severe Obstetric Sepsis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. L. Shukevich

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: to improve the results of treatment for severe obstetric sepsis by pathogenetically founded continuous renal replacement therapies as extracorporeal homeostatic correction. Subjects and methods. Forty-two women with severe abdominal sepsis were divided into 3 groups: 1 14 women with severe extragenital abdominal sepsis who received standard intensive care (a control group; 2 12 women with severe obstetric sepsis who had standard intensive care (a study group; 3 16 with severe obstetric sepsis who had the standard intensive care supplemented with continuous renal replacement therapy (an intervention group. Results. In Group 2, endogenous intoxication and multiple organ dysfunction were controlled later than in Group 1, mortality rates being 41.7 and 7.1%, respectively. Clinical laboratory differences were due to gestosis recorded in 100% of the patients with severe obstetric sepsis. When continuous renal replacement therapy was incorporated into the complex therapy of severe obstetric sepsis, there was a prompter regression of endogenous intoxication and multiple organ dysfunction, mortality was decreased by an average of 35% as compared with that during standard therapy. Conclusion. The inclusion of continuous renal replacement therapy into the complex treatment program for severe obstetric sepsis made it possible to reduce control time _ for endogenous intoxication and multiple organ dysfunction and to decrease mortality by an average of 35% as compared with that during standard intensive care. Key words: obstetric sepsis, abdominal sepsis, gestosis, endogenous intoxication, multiple organ dysfunction, renal replacement therapy.

  17. Growth Hormone Therapy in Adults with Prader-Willi Syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karen S. Vogt

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Prader-Willi syndrome (PWS is characterized by hyperphagia, obesity if food intake is not strictly controlled, abnormal body composition with decreased lean body mass and increased fat mass, decreased basal metabolic rate, short stature, low muscle tone, cognitive disability, and hypogonadism. In addition to improvements in linear growth, the benefits of growth hormone therapy on body composition and motor function in children with PWS are well established. Evidence is now emerging on the benefits of growth hormone therapy in adults with PWS. This review summarizes the current literature on growth hormone status and the use of growth hormone therapy in adults with PWS. The benefits of growth hormone therapy on body composition, muscle strength, exercise capacity, certain measures of sleep-disordered breathing, metabolic parameters, quality of life, and cognition are covered in detail along with potential adverse effects and guidelines for initiating and monitoring therapy.

  18. Predictors of Insulin Like Growth Factor-I responses to Growth Hormone replacement in young adults with Growth Hormone deficiency

    OpenAIRE

    Thankamony, Ajay; Capalbo, Donatella; Jonsson, Peter J.; Simpson, Helen L.; Dunger, David B.

    2016-01-01

    This is the author accepted manuscript. It is currently under an indefinite embargo pending publication by Karger Publishers. Background/Aims: Physiological growth hormone (GH) secretion and IGF-I levels are greater in young compared to older adults. We evaluated IGF-I levels and predictors of IGF-I responses in young adults on GH replacement. Design: From KIMS database, 310 young adults (age, 15 26 years) with the severe GH deficiency related to childhood-onset disease, and commenced ...

  19. Prospects for retinal gene replacement therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Alexander J; Bainbridge, James W; Ali, Robin R

    2009-04-01

    Inherited retinal degeneration, which includes conditions such as retinitis pigmentosa and Leber congenital amaurosis (LCA), affects approximately 1/3000 of the population in the Western world. It is characterized by loss of vision and results from mutations in any one of >100 different genes. There are currently no effective treatments, but many of the genes have now been identified and their functions elucidated, providing a major impetus to develop gene-based treatments. Preliminary results from three clinical trials indicate that the treatment of a form of LCA by gene therapy can be safe and effective. Here, we discuss the potential for treating other forms of retinal degeneration by gene therapy, focusing on the gene defects that are likely to be the most amenable to treatment.

  20. Testosterone replacement therapy for older men

    OpenAIRE

    Borst, S E

    2008-01-01

    Stephen E Borst, Thomas MulliganGeriatrics Research, Education, and Clinical Center, North Florida/South Georgia Veterans Health System, Gainesville, FL, USAAbstract: Despite intensive research on testosterone therapy for older men, important questions remain unanswered. The evidence clearly indicates that many older men display a partial androgen deficiency. In older men, low circulating testosterone is correlated with low muscle strength, with high adiposity, with insulin resistance and wit...

  1. Testosterone replacement therapy for older men

    OpenAIRE

    Borst, Stephen E.; Thomas Mulligan

    2007-01-01

    Stephen E Borst, Thomas MulliganGeriatrics Research, Education, and Clinical Center, North Florida/South Georgia Veterans Health System, Gainesville, FL, USAAbstract: Despite intensive research on testosterone therapy for older men, important questions remain unanswered. The evidence clearly indicates that many older men display a partial androgen deficiency. In older men, low circulating testosterone is correlated with low muscle strength, with high adiposity, with insulin resistance and wit...

  2. Testosterone replacement therapy for older men

    OpenAIRE

    Borst, S. E.

    2008-01-01

    Stephen E Borst, Thomas MulliganGeriatrics Research, Education, and Clinical Center, North Florida/South Georgia Veterans Health System, Gainesville, FL, USAAbstract: Despite intensive research on testosterone therapy for older men, important questions remain unanswered. The evidence clearly indicates that many older men display a partial androgen deficiency. In older men, low circulating testosterone is correlated with low muscle strength, with high adiposity, with insulin resistance and wit...

  3. Testosterone replacement therapy for older men

    OpenAIRE

    Stephen E Borst; Thomas Mulligan

    2007-01-01

    Stephen E Borst, Thomas MulliganGeriatrics Research, Education, and Clinical Center, North Florida/South Georgia Veterans Health System, Gainesville, FL, USAAbstract: Despite intensive research on testosterone therapy for older men, important questions remain unanswered. The evidence clearly indicates that many older men display a partial androgen deficiency. In older men, low circulating testosterone is correlated with low muscle strength, with high adiposity, with insulin resistance and wit...

  4. Testosterone Replacement Therapy and Prostate Cancer Incidence

    OpenAIRE

    Eisenberg, Michael Louis

    2015-01-01

    While early studies demonstrated a positive association between testosterone and prostate cancer, evidence on the nature of the relationship has evolved with time and newer data. Studies examining links between baseline testosterone levels as well as testosterone therapy and incident prostate cancer, reveal a more complex relationship. Moreover, investigators have reported their initial experiences with supplementing testosterone in men with a history of both treated and untreated prostate ca...

  5. Should dehydroepiandrosterone replacement therapy be provided with glucocorticoids?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robinzon, B; Cutolo, M

    1999-06-01

    Adrenocorticotrophic hormone (ACTH) induces the concomitant secretion of glucocorticoids (GC) and dehydroepiandrosterone (DHEA) from the adrenal cortex. Whereas GC are catabolic, DHEA is anabolic. Long-term GC administration may result in some deleterious side-effects, such as muscular weakness, atrophy and necrosis, diabetes, fattiness, osteopenia, osteoporosis and avascular necrosis and susceptibility to infections. DHEA ameliorates some deleterious effects of GC, such as diabetes, amino acid deamination, fattiness, hypertension and susceptibility to viraemia. By its anabolic effects in muscles, bones and endothelium, DHEA may diminish the severity of GC-induced myopathy, osteopenia, osteoporosis and avascular necrosis. The natural concomitant secretion of DHEA with GC probably enables the latter to protect the body from ill-effects of stress without exerting their deleterious potency. DHEA secretion diminishes during aging and severe or chronic diseases such as rheumatoid arthritis (RA) and systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE). Anti-inflammatory and immunosuppressive effects of GC and androgens, including DHEA, are now well established. On the other hand, administration of GC inhibits ACTH secretion, involutes the adrenal cortex and results in further DHEA deficiency, particularly harmful in chronic autoimmune diseases (i.e. RA, SLE). Therefore, the deleterious side-effects of chronic administration of GC emerges from both their direct catabolic activity and the suppression of DHEA production. Whereas, in males, most androgens come from the testes, in females, under GC supplementation, DHEA deficiency leads to nullification of the androgen-dependent anabolism, leaving them exposed to the GC-catabolic effects to a larger extent. The viewpoint presented here claims that under chronic GC supplementation, DHEA replacement therapy may reduce damage caused by GC administration.

  6. Beneficial Effects on Pregnancy Outcomes of Thyroid Hormone Replacement for Subclinical Hypothyroidism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Norman J. Blumenthal

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Hypothyroidism and raised thyroid antibody levels have been associated with adverse obstetrical outcomes. Several studies have investigated causal associations, but results have been inconsistent and few studies have reported the effects of thyroxine replacement therapy on pregnancy outcomes in hypothyroid patients. Objective. The primary study objective was to determine the outcome of pregnancies in women diagnosed with overt and subclinical hypothyroidism (SCH (serum TSH > 2.5 mIU/L and those with elevated circulating thyroid autoantibody levels in the first trimester of pregnancy and after the institution of appropriate thyroxine replacement therapy to maintain the serum TSH ≤ 2.5 mIU/L. Study Design. This prospective observational study was undertaken between 2013 and 2016. Blood samples were taken from 1025 women at presentation for thyroid stimulating hormone (TSH, anti-thyroglobulin antibodies (TGAb, and thyroid peroxidase antibodies (TPOAb. Those with a TSH > 2.5 mIU/L were treated with thyroxine and managed appropriately to ensure that the TSH was maintained ≤2.5 mIU/L. Outcomes in these patients were compared to those in euthyroid patients. Maternal antenatal complications and perinatal outcomes were recorded. Results. There were a total of 1025 patients of whom 382 (37.5% were nulliparous. 10.1% had a TSH level > 2.5 mIU/L and 18.2% had at least one raised thyroid antibody level. No differences in adverse outcomes of pregnancy were evident in women treated for SCH or overt hypothyroidism compared to the euthyroid group. There was also no association between raised thyroid antibodies and adverse pregnancy outcomes in either group. Conclusion. There were no adverse outcomes of pregnancy found in pregnant women who had been diagnosed and treated with thyroxine for SCH at the time of presentation when compared to euthyroid patients. There was also no relationship with thyroid antibodies and adverse pregnancy

  7. Beneficial Effects on Pregnancy Outcomes of Thyroid Hormone Replacement for Subclinical Hypothyroidism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eastman, Creswell J.

    2017-01-01

    Background. Hypothyroidism and raised thyroid antibody levels have been associated with adverse obstetrical outcomes. Several studies have investigated causal associations, but results have been inconsistent and few studies have reported the effects of thyroxine replacement therapy on pregnancy outcomes in hypothyroid patients. Objective. The primary study objective was to determine the outcome of pregnancies in women diagnosed with overt and subclinical hypothyroidism (SCH) (serum TSH > 2.5 mIU/L) and those with elevated circulating thyroid autoantibody levels in the first trimester of pregnancy and after the institution of appropriate thyroxine replacement therapy to maintain the serum TSH ≤ 2.5 mIU/L. Study Design. This prospective observational study was undertaken between 2013 and 2016. Blood samples were taken from 1025 women at presentation for thyroid stimulating hormone (TSH), anti-thyroglobulin antibodies (TGAb), and thyroid peroxidase antibodies (TPOAb). Those with a TSH > 2.5 mIU/L were treated with thyroxine and managed appropriately to ensure that the TSH was maintained ≤2.5 mIU/L. Outcomes in these patients were compared to those in euthyroid patients. Maternal antenatal complications and perinatal outcomes were recorded. Results. There were a total of 1025 patients of whom 382 (37.5%) were nulliparous. 10.1% had a TSH level > 2.5 mIU/L and 18.2% had at least one raised thyroid antibody level. No differences in adverse outcomes of pregnancy were evident in women treated for SCH or overt hypothyroidism compared to the euthyroid group. There was also no association between raised thyroid antibodies and adverse pregnancy outcomes in either group. Conclusion. There were no adverse outcomes of pregnancy found in pregnant women who had been diagnosed and treated with thyroxine for SCH at the time of presentation when compared to euthyroid patients. There was also no relationship with thyroid antibodies and adverse pregnancy outcomes in the

  8. The effects of growth hormone deficiency and replacement on glucocorticoid exposure in hypopituitary patients on cortisone acetate and hydrocortisone replacement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swords, F M; Carroll, P V; Kisalu, J; Wood, P J; Taylor, N F; Monson, J P

    2003-11-01

    11 beta-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase type 1 (11 beta HSD1) converts inactive cortisone to active cortisol. 11 beta HSD1 activity is increased in GH deficiency and inhibited by GH and IGF-I in acromegaly. However it is not known whether these changes in cortisol metabolism exert significant effects during hydrocortisone therapy, and the effect has not been studied in patients taking cortisone acetate. We have studied the effect of GH induced 11 beta HSD1 inhibition in hypopituitary adults with severe GH deficiency to determine whether this inhibition has a different magnitude of effect when patients are taking different forms of glucocorticoid replacement therapy. We have taken the ratio of 11-hydroxy/11-oxo cortisol metabolites (Fm/Em), an established measure of net 11 beta HSD activity to reflect the likely balance of cortisol to cortisone exposure in tissues expressing 11 beta HSD1, principally the liver and adipose tissue. We recruited 10 hypopituitary adults all on established glucocorticoid replacement therapy, but who were not receiving GH. Patients were treated with their standard hydrocortisone therapy for one week and an equivalent dose of cortisone acetate in its place for one week in random order. Serial serum cortisol assessments and urine steroid profiles were performed on each treatment. All patients were then established on GH therapy for at least three months before the two-week cycle was repeated. Fm/Em was also measured in a control population (20F, 20M). Prior to GH, the ratio Fm/Em was greater with hydrocortisone compared with cortisone acetate replacement (1.17 +/- 0.28 and 0.52 +/- 0.09 respectively, P cortisol/cortisone did not change indicating unchanged 11 beta HSD2 activity. Mean circulating cortisol also fell in all subjects after GH. This effect was greater during cortisone acetate treatment (-18.7%, P tissue exposure to glucocorticoid is supra-physiological in hypopituitary patients with untreated GH deficiency taking hydrocortisone

  9. Hypopituitarism due to sports related head trauma and the effects of growth hormone replacement in retired amateur boxers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanriverdi, F; Unluhizarci, K; Karaca, Z; Casanueva, F F; Kelestimur, F

    2010-06-01

    Traumatic brain injury (TBI) has been recently recognized as a leading cause of pituitary dysfunction. Current data clearly demonstrated that sports related head trauma due to boxing, kickboxing, and soccer might results in pituitary hormone deficiencies, isolated growth hormone (GH) deficiency in particular. In the present report physiologic dose GH replacement therapy (GHRT) was performed in two GH deficient retired amateur boxers for the first time. The boxers received recombinant GH for 6 months. After 6 months of GHRT there were substantial improvements, but not complete normalization, in the body composition parameters, lipid profiles and quality of life scores in both boxers. These preliminary results suggest that GHRT may have beneficial effects in retired boxers with severe isolated GH deficiency due to sports related head trauma. But more data with higher number of boxers and longer GHRT duration are warranted.

  10. [Gene replacement therapy in achromatopsia type 2].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mühlfriedel, R; Tanimoto, N; Seeliger, M W

    2014-03-01

    Achromatopsia is an autosomal recessive inherited retinal disease caused by a complete loss of cone photoreceptor function. About 80 % of achromatopsia patients show mutations in the alpha or beta subunit (A3 and B3) of the cGMP controlled cation channel CNG (cyclic nucleotide-gated channel) of cone photoreceptors. Homologous to the human disease, CNGA3 deficient mice reveal a loss of cone specific functionality leading to degeneration of affected cone photoreceptors. The Institute for Ophthalmic Research in Tübingen has now succeeded in curing achromatopsia ACHM2 in an animal model. In this article, we explain the recombinant adeno-associated virus-based approach in detail. Furthermore, applied non-invasive diagnostic techniques for quality and success control, ERG, SLO and OCT, are described. The success of the therapy is indicated by a restored cone photoreceptor function as well as the neuronal processing of retinal signals resulting in a specific, cone-mediated behaviour. The outstanding results derived from the animal model are the starting point for the first human translation of a gene therapy for achromatopsia in Germany. Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  11. Psychological functioning after growth hormone therapy in adult growth hormone deficient patients: endocrine and body composition correlates

    OpenAIRE

    Lašaitė, Lina; Bunevičius, Robertas; Lašienė, Danutė Teresė; Lašas, Liudvikas

    2004-01-01

    Growth hormone replacement in adult growth hormone deficient patients improves psychological well-being and the quality of life. The aim of this study was to investigate relationship between changes in mood, cognitive functioning, quality of life, changes in body composition and hormone concentration at baseline and six months after treatment with human recombinant growth hormone. Eighteen adult patients with growth hormone deficiency syndrome were recruited to the study. Growth hormone was a...

  12. [Hormone replacement and selective estrogen receptor modulators (SERMS) in the prevention and treatment of postmenopausal osteoporosis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pfeilschifter, J

    2001-07-01

    For many years, hormone replacement therapy (HRT) has been regarded as one of the most reliable means of prophylaxis and treatment for postmenopausal osteoporosis. As HRT ameliorates menopausal symptoms, it is widely prescribed among early postmenopausal women. A variety of different modes of replacement that suit each individual requirement are available in terms of schedule (cyclic or combined application of gestagens) and route of application (oral or transdermal). HRT effectively prevents spinal bone loss and delays bone loss at the hip up to a very old age. With continued use after menopause, HRT might theoretically halve the incidence of vertebral and hip fractures. However, long-term use or use of HRT in old age is rarely practiced, and the actual benefit of a transient use for future fracture prevention remains unclear. Raloxifene is the first member of the novel class of selective estrogen receptor modulators (SERMs) that has been approved for the prophylaxis and treatment of postmenopausal osteoporosis. It combines the positive effects of estrogen on the skeleton with estrogen-antagonistic effects on sex tissues. Thus, raloxifene maintains bone mass and decreases the incidence of vertebral fractures in osteoporotic women, but avoids many of the side effects that are responsible for the poor long-term compliance to HRT such as resumption or continuation of regular menses, breast tenderness, or breast cancer. It even markedly reduces the risk of breast cancer. Both estrogen and raloxifene are characterized by a large number of extraskeletal effects that have to be taken into account when counseling postmenopausal women on the use of these agents for the prevention or treatment of osteoporosis.

  13. Concomitant intramuscular human chorionic gonadotropin preserves spermatogenesis in men undergoing testosterone replacement therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsieh, Tung-Chin; Pastuszak, Alexander W; Hwang, Kathleen; Lipshultz, Larry I

    2013-02-01

    Testosterone replacement therapy results in decreased serum gonadotropins and intratesticular testosterone, and impairs spermatogenesis, leading to azoospermia in 40% of patients. However, intratesticular testosterone can be maintained during testosterone replacement therapy with co-administration of low dose human chorionic gonadotropin, which may support continued spermatogenesis in patients on testosterone replacement therapy. We retrospectively reviewed the records of hypogonadal men treated with testosterone replacement therapy and concomitant low dose human chorionic gonadotropin. Testosterone replacement consisted of daily topical gel or weekly intramuscular injection with intramuscular human chorionic gonadotropin (500 IU) every other day. Serum and free testosterone, estradiol, semen parameters and pregnancy rates were evaluated before and during therapy. A total of 26 men with a mean age of 35.9 years were included in the study. Mean followup was 6.2 months. Of the men 19 were treated with injectable testosterone and 7 were treated with transdermal gel. Mean serum hormone levels before vs during treatment were testosterone 207.2 vs 1,055.5 ng/dl (p testosterone 8.1 vs 20.4 pg/ml (p = 0.02) and estradiol 2.2 vs 3.7 pg/ml (p = 0.11). Pretreatment semen parameters were volume 2.9 ml, density 35.2 million per ml, motility 49.0% and forward progression 2.3. No differences in semen parameters were observed during greater than 1 year of followup. No impact on semen parameters was observed as a function of testosterone formulation. No patient became azoospermic during concomitant testosterone replacement and human chorionic gonadotropin therapy. Nine of 26 men contributed to pregnancy with the partner during followup. Low dose human chorionic gonadotropin appears to maintain semen parameters in hypogonadal men on testosterone replacement therapy. Concurrent testosterone replacement and human chorionic gonadotropin use may preserve fertility in hypogonadal males

  14. CYP2D6, GST-M1 and GST-T1 enzymes: expression in parathyroid gland and association with the parathyroid hormone concentration during early renal replacement therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Feng-Xiang; Langub, M Chris; Ihnen, Mark A; Hornung, Carlton; Juronen, Erkki; Rayens, Mary K; Cai, Wei-Min; Wedlund, Peter J; Fanti, Paolo

    2003-01-01

    Aims The purpose of this research was to characterize CYP2D6, GST-M1 and GST-T1 enzyme expression in human parathyroid tissue, and to determine whether or not there is any association between deficiencies in these enzymes and serum parathyroid hormone concentrations in patients with end-stage renal disease. Methods Surgical human parathyroid tissue was obtained and evaluated by immunohistochemistry for cellular localization of CYP2D6, GST-M1 and GST-T1 and colocalization of CYP2D6 with parathyroid hormone. Blood samples were collected from 328 Caucasian patients with end-stage renal disease for genetic testing of CYP2D6*3, *4, *5, *6, *7 and GST-M1*0 and GST-T1*0 alleles. Clinical chemistry data and serum intact parathyroid hormone (iPTH) concentrations were obtained from patient medical records. In 277 of the patients, the same laboratory performed all clinical tests. Results CYP2D6, GST-M1 and GST-T1 were present in human parathyroid tissue. CYP2D6 was colocalized with parathyroid hormone in parathyroid chief cells. Within the end-stage renal disease population, a nonfunctional CYP2D6 genotype was present in 18.2%[95% confidence interval (CI) 8.0, 28.4] of patients in the 1st iPTH concentration quintile (iPTH 347 pg mL−1) (P = 0.001). Out of 12 CYP2D6-deficient females, seven were in the 1st iPTH concentration quintile and the remaining five were in the 5th quintile. Patients deficient in the GST-M1 and GST-T1 enzymes displayed a far more uniform frequency distribution relative to serum iPTH concentrations. Conclusions The presence of CYP2D6, GST-M1 and GST-T1 in parathyroid cells was observed. An association is reported between a lack of CYP2D6 and iPTH concentrations in newly diagnosed end-stage renal disease patients. Gender and concomitant deficiency in GST-M1 and/or GST-T1 appear to define this association further. It remains to be established whether these associations reflect a cause-effect relationship between deficient expression of metabolizing

  15. Gene replacement therapy for retinal CNG channelopathies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schön, Christian; Biel, Martin; Michalakis, Stylianos

    2013-10-01

    Visual phototransduction relies on the function of cyclic nucleotide-gated channels in the rod and cone photoreceptor outer segment plasma membranes. The role of these ion channels is to translate light-triggered changes in the second messenger cyclic guanosine 3'-5'-monophosphate levels into an electrical signal that is further processed within the retinal network and then sent to higher visual centers. Rod and cone photoreceptors express distinct CNG channels. The rod photoreceptor CNG channel is composed of one CNGB1 and three CNGA1 subunits, whereas the cone channel is formed by one CNGB3 and three CNGA3 subunits. Mutations in any of these channel subunits result in severe and currently untreatable retinal degenerative diseases like retinitis pigmentosa or achromatopsia. In this review, we provide an overview of the human diseases and relevant animal models of CNG channelopathies. Furthermore, we summarize recent results from preclinical gene therapy studies using adeno-associated viral vectors and discuss the efficacy and translational potential of these gene therapeutic approaches.

  16. Starting Hormone Therapy at Menopause Increases Breast Cancer Risk

    Science.gov (United States)

    According to a January 28, 2011 article in the Journal of the National Cancer Institute, women who start taking menopausal hormone therapy around the time of menopause have a higher risk of breast cancer than women who begin taking hormones a few years later.

  17. Endocrine therapy use among elderly hormone receptor-pos...

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — Clinical guidelines recommend that women with hormone-receptor positive breast cancer receive endocrine therapy (selective estrogen receptor modulators or aromatase...

  18. Hormone Therapy Not Advised for Preventing Disease After Menopause

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Hormone Therapy Not Advised for Preventing Disease After Menopause Benefits of treatment don't outweigh the risks, ... attack, stroke and blood clots. Women typically enter menopause around the age of 50. Following menopause, women's ...

  19. Terapia hormonal y calidad del hueso Hormone therapy and bone quality

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    2005-08-01

    Full Text Available La osteoporosis se reconoce como uno de los problemas de salud de la población femenina posmenopáusica, y la terapia hormonal de reemplazo (THR como una de las medidas terapéuticas efectivas para evitar la fractura. Nos propusimos mostrar la experiencia acumulada en relación con el efecto de la terapia hormonal de reemplazo sobre la calidad del hueso. En un estudio retrospectivo realizado en 42 mujeres con edades entre 40 y 59 años que asistieron a la Clínica de Climaterio y Osteoporosis y a la consulta multidisciplinaria de climaterio del Hospital Ginecoobstétrico “Ramón González Coro” entre enero de 1997 y diciembre del año 2003, se determinó la calidad ósea mediante absorciometría dual de rayos X en región lumbar (L2-L4 o por ultrasonido del calcáneo (USCAL y recibieron tratamiento continuado con terapia estrogénica (E o con estrógenos progestagenos (EP durante no menos de un año (n = 30. Las mujeres que no pudieron recibir THR fueron agrupadas y evaluadas como grupo control (n =12. Durante el tiempo de observación promedio de 2 años, las mujeres que recibieron THR mejoraron su calidad ósea en el 16,8 %, mientras que las del grupo control empeoraron en el 8 % de los casos. Estos resultados iniciales, aunque son modestos, muestran la utilidad de la THR para mejorar la calidad del hueso y la necesidad de continuar estudios que permitan definir en nuestro medio la persistencia de la mejoría ósea, así como la magnitud de la osteoporosis posmenopáusica.Osteoporosis is recognized as one of the health problems of the female postmenopausic population and the replacement hormone therapy (RHT as one of the effective therapeutical measures to prevent fracture. We proposed ourselves to show the experience accumulated in relation to the effect of the replacement hormone therapy on the bone quality. In a retrospective study conducted among 42 women aged 30-59 that attended the Climacteric and Osteoporosis Clinic and the

  20. Effects of hormone therapy on brain structure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tosakulwong, Nirubol; Lesnick, Timothy G.; Zuk, Samantha M.; Gunter, Jeffrey L.; Gleason, Carey E.; Wharton, Whitney; Dowling, N. Maritza; Vemuri, Prashanthi; Senjem, Matthew L.; Shuster, Lynne T.; Bailey, Kent R.; Rocca, Walter A.; Jack, Clifford R.; Asthana, Sanjay; Miller, Virginia M.

    2016-01-01

    Objective: To investigate the effects of hormone therapy on brain structure in a randomized, double-blinded, placebo-controlled trial in recently postmenopausal women. Methods: Participants (aged 42–56 years, within 5–36 months past menopause) in the Kronos Early Estrogen Prevention Study were randomized to (1) 0.45 mg/d oral conjugated equine estrogens (CEE), (2) 50 μg/d transdermal 17β-estradiol, or (3) placebo pills and patch for 48 months. Oral progesterone (200 mg/d) was given to active treatment groups for 12 days each month. MRI and cognitive testing were performed in a subset of participants at baseline, and at 18, 36, and 48 months of randomization (n = 95). Changes in whole brain, ventricular, and white matter hyperintensity volumes, and in global cognitive function, were measured. Results: Higher rates of ventricular expansion were observed in both the CEE and the 17β-estradiol groups compared to placebo; however, the difference was significant only in the CEE group (p = 0.01). Rates of ventricular expansion correlated with rates of decrease in brain volume (r = −0.58; p ≤ 0.001) and with rates of increase in white matter hyperintensity volume (r = 0.27; p = 0.01) after adjusting for age. The changes were not different between the CEE and 17β-estradiol groups for any of the MRI measures. The change in global cognitive function was not different across the groups. Conclusions: Ventricular volumes increased to a greater extent in recently menopausal women who received CEE compared to placebo but without changes in cognitive performance. Because the sample size was small and the follow-up limited to 4 years, the findings should be interpreted with caution and need confirmation. Classification of evidence: This study provides Class I evidence that brain ventricular volume increased to a greater extent in recently menopausal women who received oral CEE compared to placebo. PMID:27473135

  1. Digestive Enzyme Replacement Therapy: Pancreatic Enzymes and Lactase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Felicilda-Reynaldo, Rhea Faye D; Kenneally, Maria

    2016-01-01

    Maldigestion occurs when digestive enzymes are lacking to help break complex food components into absorbable nutrients within the gastrointestinal tract. Education is needed to help patients manage the intricacies of digestive enzyme replacement therapies and ensure their effectiveness in reducing symptoms of maldigestion.

  2. Trends in Renal Replacement Therapy in Turkey, 1996-2008

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    G. Suleymanlar; K. Serdengecti; M.R. Altiparmak; K. Jager; N. Seyahi; E. Erek

    2011-01-01

    Background: National renal registry studies providing data for incidence, prevalence, and characteristics of end-stage renal disease and renal replacement therapy (RRT) serve as a basis to determine national strategies for the prevention and treatment of these diseases and identify new areas for spe

  3. Modeling Outcome of Patients on Renal Replacement Therapy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Y.S. Liem (Ylian Serina)

    2008-01-01

    textabstractThe incidence of end-stage renal disease is increasing and therefore, the number of patients requiring renal replacement therapy (RRT), renal dialysis or renal transplantation (RTx), has been rising. The various forms of RRT are associated with differences in survival and quality of life

  4. Sheehan's syndrome with pancytopenia--complete recovery after hormone replacement (case series with review).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laway, Bashir Ahmad; Bhat, Javid Rasool; Mir, Shahnaz Ahmad; Khan, Raja Sultan Zaman; Lone, Mohd Iqbal; Zargar, Abdul Hamid

    2010-03-01

    Reports of pancytopenia in patients with Sheehan's syndrome are rare, because the disorder is not commonly seen in western countries. A case series of pancytopenia in three patients of Sheehan's syndrome is presented. Three women aged 22, 30, and 34 years developed Sheehan's syndrome preceded by post partum hemorrhage. During investigations, they were found to have pancytopenia with hypocellular marrow. Treatment with thyroxine and glucocorticoids resulted in complete recovery after attaining euthyroid and eucortisolemic state. Review of literature revealed the rarity of the disorder, with only four cases reported so far. Multiple anterior pituitary hormone deficiencies in Sheehan's syndrome are responsible for pancytopenia; replacement of thyroid and cortisol hormones results in complete recovery.

  5. Increased survival in men with metastatic prostate cancer receiving chemo and hormone therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Men with hormone-sensitive metastatic prostate cancer who received the chemotherapy drug docetaxel given at the start of standard hormone therapy lived longer than patients who received hormone therapy alone, according to early results from a NIH-supporte

  6. Effect of testosterone replacement therapy on bone mineral density in patients with Klinefelter syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jo, Dae Gi; Lee, Hyo Serk; Joo, Young Min; Seo, Ju Tae

    2013-11-01

    Klinefelter syndrome (KS) is related to testicular insufficiency, which causes low testosterone levels in serum. Generally, sex hormone levels and bone mineral density (BMD) are lower in patients with KS than normal. We investigated the effects of testosterone replacement on serum testosterone levels and BMD in KS patients. From December 2005 to March 2008, 18 KS patients with a 47, XXY karyotype were treated with initial intramuscular injections of long-acting testosterone undecanoate (Nebido®, 1000 mg/4 mL) at baseline and second injections after six weeks. An additional four injections were administered at intervals of 12 weeks after the second injection. BMD was measured at the lumbar spine (L2-4), the left femoral neck and Ward's triangle, using dual energy X-ray absorptiometry. Medical histories, physical examinations and prostate specific antigen, hematology and serum chemistry were conducted for each patient. In addition, total testosterone and sex hormone-binding globulin levels were measured. Following testosterone replacement, mean serum total testosterone increased significantly from baseline (0.90 vs. 4.51 ng/mL, ptestosterone rose to normal levels after replacement in all patients. The mean BMD of the lumbar spine increased significantly (0.91 vs. 0.97 g/cm², ptestosterone replacement therapy may be effective in treating BMD deficiency in men with testosterone deficiency, especially those with Klinefelter syndrome.

  7. Sex hormone replacement in Turner syndrome%Turner综合征患者的性激素替代治疗

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    孙文慧

    2012-01-01

    特纳综合征的基本特征是矮身材、先天畸形、性腺发育不足.其性激素分泌不足导致无第二性征发育、不孕症,并与骨质疏松症频繁发生、心血管疾病风险增加、身体健康状态及身体结构改变、胰岛素抵抗、自身免疫病发病率增加等相关.最近的研究强调特纳综合征女性患者需要终身的性激素替代治疗,以改善其生活质量.该文对雌激素和雄激素不足及性激素替代治疗对于特纳综合征患者的全身影响做一综述.%The cardinal features of Turner syndrome(TS) are short stature,congenital abnormalities,gonadal dysgenesis.The sex hormone insufficiency lead to infertility and lack of proper development of secondary sex characteristics,it also involves in the frequent osteoporosis and increased cardiovascular risk,state of physical fitness,insulin resistance,body composition,and may play a role in the increased incidence of autoimmunity.Recent researches emphasize the TS patients need for proper sex hormone replacement therapy to improve their quality of life.This review summarizes the effects of estrogen and androgen insufficiency as well as the effects of sex hormone replacement therapy on the whole body of Turner syndrome.

  8. Optimization of growth hormone therapy in growth hormone deficient children

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    S.M.P.F. de Muinck Keizer-Schrama (Sabine)

    1991-01-01

    textabstractIt is obvious that the results published so far as well as the present preliminary data do not answer many questions regarding the optimal therapeutic regimen in GH deficiency. In particular, long-term follow-up must be organized to evaluate efficacy and safety of GH therapy not only in

  9. Hormone Therapy for Breast Cancer in Men

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... of testosterone and other androgens (male hormones). Most male breast cancers have androgen receptors that may cause the cells ... into estrogens in the body. Orchiectomy shrinks most male breast cancers, and may help make other treatments like tamoxifen ...

  10. Hormone therapy in hypospadias surgery: a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Netto, Jose Murillo B; Ferrarez, Carlos Eduardo P F; Schindler Leal, Anucha Andrade; Tucci, Silvio; Gomes, Carlos Augusto; Barroso, Ubirajara

    2013-12-01

    Surgical correction of hypospadias is proposed to improve the aesthetic and functional quality of the penis. Hormone therapy preceding surgical correction is indicated to obtain better surgical conditions. However, there is divergence in the literature regarding the hormone therapy of choice, time of its use before surgery, appropriate dose, and route of application. To try to elucidate this matter, an electronic survey of the databases PubMed and Cochrane Central Library was conducted, limited to articles in English published since 1980. Search strategy identified 14 clinical trials that matched the inclusion criteria. Analysis was made in terms of study design, classification of hypospadias, association with chordee and cryptorchidism, type of hormone, route of application, dose and duration of treatment, penile length before and after hormone therapy, glans circumference before and after hormone therapy, adverse effects, and surgical complications. From the trials evaluated it was not possible to determine the ideal neoadjuvant treatment. A preference for use of testosterone was observed. Intramuscular administration seems to have fewer adverse effects than topical treatment. Side effects were seldom described, and treated patients were not followed on a long-term basis. The scarcity of randomized and controlled clinical trials regarding the topic impairs the establishment of a protocol. In conclusion, although preoperative hormone therapy is currently used before hypospadias surgery, its real benefit in terms of improvement of the penis and surgical results has not been defined.

  11. 正常老年人使用重组人生长激素替代治疗对其生活质量的影响及可行性%Effect on quality of life and feasibility of using replacement therapy with recombinant human growth hormone on normal elderly

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    侯佳彤; 于萍; 潘慧; 陈适

    2014-01-01

    随着人口老龄化的加剧,衰老越来越受到人们的重视。衰老主要表现为行为能力、工作能力、肌肉质量以及生殖能力、性行为、性欲的降低,同时还会出现血脂水平增加,认知功能的损伤和睡眠障碍等。衰老相关的临床表现,降低了老年人的生活质量(QoL),其中有很多表现与生长激素缺乏患者的表现相似。近年来关于使用重组人生长激素(rhGH)替代治疗来延缓衰老的研究有很多。研究显示 rhGH 可以改善老年人的生活质量。本文将从生活质量的定义、测量,老年人身体各系统与生长激素(GH)的关系以及rhGH可能的作用机制来阐述rhGH替代治疗对正常老年人生活质量的影响和可行性。%With the increasing population of the aged, more and more people pay attention to aging, which may cause the behavior ability, work ability, muscle mass, the reproductive capacity, sexual behavior and libido to decrease, meanwhile, there will be increased blood lipid level, sleeping disorders, cognitive impairment etc. Aging-related clinical manifestations reduce the older's quality of life (QoL), which are similar to the performance of patients with growth hormone deficiency. There are many researches about using recombinant human growth hormone (rhGH) to slow down the aging progress. Studies have shown that rhGH can improve the QoL of old persons. This paper explained the definition and measurement of QoL, the relationship between the body systems of the old and growth hormone (GH), the possible mechanism of rhGH and the effects and feasibility of rhGH replacement therapy on QoL in normal aged ones.

  12. Endocrine studies in postmenopausal women during oral replacement therapy with unconjugated oestrogens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vasquez, J M; Samaras, C A; Nezhat, C

    1982-01-01

    Two groups of postmenopausal women were seen at monthly intervals during a three-month trial of continuous therapy with oral unconjugated oestrogens. Ten women in the first group were administered daily Hormonin No. 1 containing oestriol (E3) 0.135 mg, oestradiol (E2) 0.3 mg and oestrone (E1) 0.7 mg. Eight women in the second group received Hormonin No. 2 containing E3 0.27 mg, E2 0.6 mg and E1 1.4 mg. E1, E2, E3 and dehydroepiandrosterone (DHA) as well as follicle-stimulating hormone (FSH) and luteinizing hormone (LH) were measured by radioimmunoassay. Maturation index of vaginal smears and clinical effects were also evaluated. Oral replacement therapy with these unconjugated oestrogens produced a significant elevation of E1 (p less than 0.05) and E2 (p less than 0.05) to values corresponding well with the premenopausal range measured in our laboratory. Postmenopausal levels of FSH and LH showed only a moderate but significant decrease (p less than 0.05). There was consistent relief of vasomotor symptoms. One case of endometrial focal adenomatous hyperplasia uncovered during the period of treatment was transformed to functional secretory endometrium after an appropriate course with progestogens. Oral administration of unconjugated oestrogens and periodic withdrawal bleeding induced with a progestational agent seems to be an effective method of replacement therapy in postmenopausal women.

  13. Breast cancer and post-menopausal hormone therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kenemans, P; Bosman, A

    2003-03-01

    From the introduction of post-menopausal hormone replacement therapy (HRT) there has been great concern that HRT could possibly increase the risk of breast cancer. Prolonged exposure to endogenous oestrogens undeniably increases the risk of breast cancer. Questions that are important and until now only partly answered, are the following. Are oestrogens tumour promoters, as they induce mitosis, lead to proliferation and, therefore, accelerated growth of clinically occult pre-existing tumours? In addition to this, are they genotoxic mutagenic carcinogens, or could they initiate tumours by way of accumulation of incessant DNA-replication damage mechanism? Opinions vary as to the effect of the addition of a progestogen. There is a multitude of different progestogens which could bind with differing affinity to progesterone receptor PR-A or PR-B, and which have different physiological functions via differential gene regulation. The action of a progestogen on the oestrogen-induced cellular mitotic activity could be synergistic or antagonistic (by different pathways: oestrogen receptor downregulation, activating of metabolic pathways within the breast or stimulation of apoptosis)? Over 60 observational studies and two randomized trials provide evidence that the small but significant increase in risk appears with long-term current post-menopausal hormone use. The addition of a progestogen does not decrease the risk as seen with oestrogens alone and might increase the risk further. It is not clear whether there is a difference in risk with sequentially combined versus continuously combined HRT. Many questions nevertheless still remain. Is the risk increase limited to lean women only? What about risk-modifying factors such as alcohol use and a positive family history for breast cancer? Are tumours detected under HRT less aggressive, is there a better prognosis and is the mortality not increased while morbidity is? And is HRT contraindicated for women with a positive family

  14. RELATION OF PERIOPERATIVE SERUM THYROID HORMONE CHANGES TO HEART DYSFUNCTION IN PATIENTS UNDERGONE CARDIAC VALVE REPLACEMENT

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2000-01-01

    Objective To explore the relationship between perioperative serum thyroid hormone changes and heart dysfunction in patients undergone cardiac valve replacement. Methods The serum concentrations of free tri- iodothyronine (),free thyroxine (),total total reverse and thyroid-stimulating hor- mone (TSH) in 20 patients undergone routine rheumatic mitral valve replacement were determined by radioim- munoassay at preoperation, the end of myocardial ischemia, and 2,6,12,24 and 48h postoperation, respectively. The alteration hormones above mentioned were comparatively analysed of the normal heart function group (group I,n = 14) and heart dysfunction group (group I ,n=6) after surgery. Results In comparing group I with group I , the more severe the chronic congestive heart failure, the lower the thyroid hormone level before operation;and subse- quently both progressively lowered T3 level and acute heart dysfunction emerged after operation. The decreased extent of serum thyroid hormone was closely parallel to the severity of heart dysfunction. Gonclusion Perioperatively, de- creased serum FT3 and TT3 concentrations are at least an important humoral factor aggravating heart dysfunction, and the patients with preoperative low T3 should be considered as high-risk valvular surgical cases.

  15. Effect of Cross-Sex Hormonal Replacement on Antioxidant Enzymes in Rat Retroperitoneal Fat Adipocytes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Velázquez Espejel, Rodrigo; Cabrera-Orefice, Alfredo; Uribe-Carvajal, Salvador; Pavón, Natalia

    2016-01-01

    We report the effect of cross-sex hormonal replacement on antioxidant enzymes from rat retroperitoneal fat adipocytes. Eight rats of each gender were assigned to each of the following groups: control groups were intact female or male (F and M, resp.). Experimental groups were ovariectomized F (OvxF), castrated M (CasM), OvxF plus testosterone (OvxF + T), and CasM plus estradiol (CasM + E2) groups. After sacrifice, retroperitoneal fat was dissected and processed for histology. Adipocytes were isolated and the following enzymatic activities were determined: Cu-Zn superoxide dismutase (SOD), catalase (CAT), glutathione peroxidase (GPx), glutathione-S-transferase (GST), and glutathione reductase (GR). Also, glutathione (GSH) and lipid peroxidation (LPO) were measured. In OvxF, retroperitoneal fat increased and adipocytes were enlarged, while in CasM rats a decrease in retroperitoneal fat and small adipocytes are observed. The cross-sex hormonal replacement in F rats was associated with larger adipocytes and a further decreased activity of Cu-Zn SOD, CAT, GPx, GST, GR, and GSH, in addition to an increase in LPO. CasM + E2 exhibited the opposite effects showing further activation antioxidant enzymes and decreases in LPO. In conclusion, E2 deficiency favors an increase in retroperitoneal fat and large adipocytes. Cross-sex hormonal replacement in F rats aggravates the condition by inhibiting antioxidant enzymes. PMID:27630756

  16. 植物雌激素与激素替代疗法治疗围绝经期综合征的疗效比较%Comparison of effect of Phytoestrogens and Hormone Replacement Therapy in the treatment of Perimenopaus-al Syndrome

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张新容; 张晓颜; 赖坚

    2015-01-01

    目的:探讨植物雌激素治疗围绝经期综合征的临床疗效及其作用机制,比较植物雌激素与激素替代疗法治疗围绝经期综合征的临床疗效。方法:将180例围绝经期综合征患者按照就诊顺序随机分成 A、B 两组,分别运用大豆异黄酮和激素替代疗法进行治疗,应用 Kupper - man 症状评分标准判定临床疗效,并抽血检测治疗前后患者血清 E2、FSH、LH、P、AKP、TC、TG等各项指标,进行治疗前后对照观察。结果:经4个周期治疗后,患者的相关症状得到明显改善;与治疗前相比,Kupperman 评分显著下降,差异具有统计学意义(P ﹤0.01);与治疗前相比,治疗后两组患者的 E2、P 均明显升高,而 FSH、LH、AKP、TC、TG 均明显降低,且差异具有统计学意义(P ﹤0.05);两组间疗效差异无统计学意义(P ﹥0.05)。结论:植物雌激素能够有效改善围绝经期综合征的临床症状,调节围绝经期综合征患者体内激素水平,且疗效与激素替代疗法无显著性差异。植物雌激素还对绝经期及绝经后期妇女的心血管有保护作用,并可预防骨质疏松,防止骨量丢失。%Objective To investigate the phytoestrogen treatment of perimenopausal syndrome clinical efficacy and mechanism of ac-tion,compare phytoestrogens and hormone replacement therapy for perimenopausal syndrome clinical efficacy. Method 180 patients with perimenopausal syndrome were randomly divided into A and B groups according to treatment order,namely the use of soy isoflavones and hormone replacement therapy for treatment,application Kupper - man symptom score determines the clinical efficacy and treatment of blood testing the indicators before and after the patient serum E2、FSH、LH、P、AKP、TC、TG,were observed before and after treatment con-trol. Results After 4 cycles of therapy,the patient's symptoms improved significantly. Compared with before

  17. Subcutaneous pellet testosterone replacement therapy: the "first steps" in treating men with spinal cord injuries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gray, Kendra M; Derosa, Angela

    2013-12-01

    The authors describe the case of a 36-year-old man who presented with hormone level concerns 6 months after a rock climbing accident that resulted in paraplegia. Hypogonadism was diagnosed, and the patient received subcutaneous pellet testosterone replacement therapy. Within 6 months, the patient had substantial improvement in muscle function and was able to take several steps with the assistance of crutches or a walker. This case highlights the potential improvement in quality of life and overall prognosis resulting from the subcutaneous pellet form of testosterone when used as part of the overall treatment plan in such patients. Considering the overwhelming preponderance of hypogonadism in men with spinal cord injuries, the standard of care for such patients should include screening, laboratory hormone evaluation, and prompt treatment for testosterone deficiency.

  18. The nanochannel delivery system for constant testosterone replacement therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferrati, Silvia; Nicolov, Eugenia; Zabre, Erika; Geninatti, Thomas; Shirkey, Beverly A; Hudson, Lee; Hosali, Sharath; Crawley, Michael; Khera, Mohit; Palapattu, Ganesh; Grattoni, Alessandro

    2015-06-01

    The goal of testosterone replacement is to provide long-term physiological supplementation at sufficient levels to mitigate the symptoms of hypogonadism. The objective of this work is to determine if the implantable nanochannel delivery system (nDS) can present an alternative delivery strategy for the long-term sustained and constant release of testosterone. A formulation of common testosterone esters (F1) was developed to enable nanochannel delivery of the low water soluble hormone. In vivo evaluation of testosterone, luteinizing hormone (LH) and follicle stimulating hormone (FSH) levels by liquid chromatography/mass spectrometry and a multiplex assay, respectively, in castrated Sprague-Dawley rats implanted with nDS-F1 implants or polymeric pellets was performed over a 6-month period. The percent of testosterone concentrations observed that fell within the normal range of testosterone levels for each animal was calculated and used to compare the study groups. Sustain release of testosterone in vivo for over 6 months. The subcutaneous release of F1 from nDS implants exhibited sustained in vivo release kinetics and attained stable clinically relevant plasma testosterone levels. Plasma LH and FSH levels were significantly diminished in nDS-F1 implant-treated animals, confirming biological activity of the released testosterone. In conclusion, we demonstrate that nDS-F1 implants represents a novel approach for the treatment of male hypogonadism. Further studies will be performed in view of translating the technology to clinical use. © 2015 International Society for Sexual Medicine.

  19. [Extracorporeal renal replacement therapies in acute renal failure].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schaefer, R M; Barenbrock, M; Teschner, M; Bahner, U

    2000-05-15

    The most serious forms of acute renal failure (ARF) are nowadays encountered in the intensive care unit (ICU), where up to 25% of new patients are reported to develop ARF. Lethality rates may reach 50 to 90% when the ARF is part of a multiple organ dysfunction syndrome. A multitude of extracorporeal procedures have been introduced into intensive care medicine. Applied with adequate skills and experience, most of these techniques will suffice to replace excretory renal function. However, because of low efficacy arterio-venous procedures (CAVH and CAVHD) have been abandoned for the veno-venous, pump-driven techniques (CVVH and CVVHD). Up to now, there is no consensus whether continuous or intermittent renal replacement therapy is more advantageous. In many cases, oliguric patients with circulatory instability will be treated by CVVH, even though there is no prospective study to show that in terms of outcome continuous treatment is superior to intermittent hemodialysis. It is equally conceivable to treat such patients with daily, prolonged (intermittent) hemodialysis. Apparently, the dose of replacement therapy, be it continuous filtration (36 to 48 l/24 h) or intermittent hemodialysis (daily 3 to 4 h) with a target BUN of less than 50 mg/dl, is more important than the modality of treatment. Moreover, there is good evidence that the use of biocompatible membranes (no complement- or leukocyte activation) is preferable and that with high-volume hemofiltration bicarbonate-containing replacement fluids should be used. However, despite all the technical advances, we firmly believe that the skills and the experience of those physicians and nurses who actually perform renal replacement therapy in the ICU are more important than the modality of treatment applied.

  20. Myelin restoration: progress and prospects for human cell replacement therapies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Potter, Gregory B; Rowitch, David H; Petryniak, Magdalena A

    2011-06-01

    Oligodendrocytes are the primary source of myelin in the adult central nervous system (CNS), and their dysfunction or loss underlies several diseases of both children and adults. Dysmyelinating and demyelinating diseases are thus attractive targets for cell-based strategies since replacement of a single presumably homogeneous cell type has the potential to restore functional levels of myelin. To understand the obstacles that cell-replacement therapy might face, we review oligodendrocyte biology and emphasize aspects of oligodendrocyte development that will need to be recapitulated by exogenously transplanted cells, including migration from the site of transplantation, axon recognition, terminal differentiation, axon wrapping, and myelin production and maintenance. We summarize studies in which different types of myelin-forming cells have been transplanted into the CNS and highlight the continuing challenges regarding the use of cell-based therapies for human white matter disorders.

  1. Iodinated contrast media and the role of renal replacement therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weisbord, Steven D; Palevsky, Paul M

    2011-05-01

    Iodinated contrast media are among the most commonly used pharmacologic agents in medicine. Although generally highly safe, iodinated contrast media are associated with several adverse effects, most significantly the risk of acute kidney injury, particularly in patients with underlying renal dysfunction. By virtue of their pharmacokinetic characteristics, these contrast agents are efficiently cleared by hemodialysis and to a lesser extent, hemofiltration. This has led to research into the capacity for renal replacement therapies to prevent certain adverse effects of iodinated contrast. This review examines the molecular and pharmacokinetic characteristics of iodinated contrast media and critically analyzes data from past studies on the role of renal replacement therapy to prevent adverse effects of these diagnostic agents. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  2. Controversies in testosterone replacement therapy: testosterone and cardiovascular disease

    OpenAIRE

    Kathleen Hwang; Martin Miner

    2015-01-01

    The role of testosterone in the cardiovascular (CV) health of men is controversial. Data suggest that both the condition and treatment of clinical hypogonadism is associated with decreased CV mortality; however, two recent studies suggest that hypogonadal subjects treated with testosterone replacement therapy have a higher incidence of new CV events. There has been increased media attention concerning the risk of CV disease in men treated with testosterone. Until date, there are no long-term ...

  3. Controversies in testosterone replacement therapy: testosterone and cardiovascular disease

    OpenAIRE

    Kathleen Hwang; Martin Miner

    2015-01-01

    The role of testosterone in the cardiovascular (CV) health of men is controversial. Data suggest that both the condition and treatment of clinical hypogonadism is associated with decreased CV mortality; however, two recent studies suggest that hypogonadal subjects treated with testosterone replacement therapy have a higher incidence of new CV events. There has been increased media attention concerning the risk of CV disease in men treated with testosterone. Until date, there are no long-term ...

  4. 更年期女性激素补充治疗对T细胞及白细胞介素-2水平的影响%The change of T cells and interleukin-2 with hormone replacement therapy in menopausal women

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    肖春玉; 张维保; 王蕊; 秦学桂

    2016-01-01

    Objective To explore the changes of endocrine and immune function in menopausal women before and after the hormone replacement therapy.Mthods 70 menopausal women from Mar.2012 to Mar.2014 in maternal and child health hospital in Dangyang city were selected.They were given estrogen replacement therapy for 2 months.The levels of estradial (E2),follide stimulating hormone (FSH),luteining hormone (LH),interleukin(IL)-2 in serum were compared before and after the treatment.Besides,the changes of constituents ratios of CD3 +,CD4 + and CD8 + T cells were observed.Results The levels of E2,FSH,LH and IL-2 in serum were (445.21 ± 78.62) pmol/L,(41.09 ± 6.13) IU/L,(38.84 ± 7.27) IU/L and (3.14 ± 1.28)kU/L before treatment,and they were changed into (708.65 ± 82.76) pmol/L,(32.54 ± 5.69) IU/L,(29.52 ± 4.83) IU/L and (12.09 ± 5.92) kU/L after treatment;the differences were all statistically significant (P <0.05).In peripheral blood T lymphocyte subsets,the composition ratios of CD3 +,CD4 + and CD4 + / CD8 +were (41.76 ± 7.29) %,(27.88 ± 7.91) % and 0.91 ± 0.27 before treatment,and they were changed into (60.52 ±9.17)%,(39.16 ±8.28)% and (1.87 ±0.31)% after treatment;the differences were all statistically significant (P < 0.05).Concluions As for menopausal patients,hormone replacement therapy is helpful to improve the,menopause female endocrine function disorder and improve the immunity.It can avoid complications caused by menopause.%目的 探究更年期女性内分泌和免疫功能的变化以及激素治疗后的改善情况.方法 随机选取2012年3月至2014年3月当阳市妇幼保健院收治的更年期综合征女性患者70例,给予两个月的雌激素补充治疗,观察并比较患者治疗前后血清中雌二醇(E2)、卵泡刺激素(FSH)、黄体生成素(LH)的水平以及外周血中白细胞介素-2(IL-2)水平,T淋巴细胞中CD3+、CD4+、CD8+构成比和CD4+与CD8+的比值.结果 治疗前患者血清E2、FSH、LH和IL-2

  5. Hormone therapy for patients with advanced or recurrent endometrial cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Wen-Ling; Yen, Ming-Shyen; Chao, Kuan-Chong; Yuan, Chiou-Chung; Ng, Heung-Tat; Chao, Hsiang-Tai; Lee, Fa-Kung; Wang, Peng-Hui

    2014-05-01

    The "gold standard" treatment for endometrial cancer is completely staged surgery, followed by radiation or chemotherapy, based on the final pathological surgical stage and requirements. In the primary treatment of endometrial cancers, hormones are rarely taken into consideration after primary surgery. Primary treatment with hormones to preserve fertility in younger women with endometrial cancer is an attractive option, and many successful cases have been reported, although the majority of them finally received definite therapy, including total hysterectomy. The role of hormone therapy is often delayed in recurrent disease; response rates to progestins and tamoxifen or aromatase inhibitors in advanced/recurrent endometrial cancers are approximately 15-20% and nearly ≤ 10%, respectively. This review is focused on updated information and recent knowledge on the use of hormones in the management of women with advanced or recurrent endometrial cancers.

  6. AARC Clinical Practice Guideline. Surfactant replacement therapy: 2013.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walsh, Brian K; Daigle, Brandon; DiBlasi, Robert M; Restrepo, Ruben D

    2013-02-01

    We searched the MEDLINE, CINAHL, and Cochrane Library databases for English-language randomized controlled trials, systematic reviews, and articles investigating surfactant replacement therapy published between January 1990 and July 2012. By inspection of titles, references having no relevance to the clinical practice guideline were eliminated. The update of this clinical practice guideline is based on 253 clinical trials and systematic reviews, and 12 articles investigating surfactant replacement therapy. The following recommendations are made following the Grading of Recommendations Assessment, Development, and Evaluation scoring system: 1: Administration of surfactant replacement therapy is strongly recommended in a clinical setting where properly trained personnel and equipment for intubation and resuscitation are readily available. 2: Prophylactic surfactant administration is recommended for neonatal respiratory distress syndrome (RDS) in which surfactant deficiency is suspected. 3: Rescue or therapeutic administration of surfactant after the initiation of mechanical ventilation in infants with clinically confirmed RDS is strongly recommended. 4: A multiple surfactant dose strategy is recommended over a single dose strategy. 5: Natural exogenous surfactant preparations are recommended over laboratory derived synthetic suspensions at this time. 6: We suggest that aerosolized delivery of surfactant not be utilized at this time.

  7. High Phenobarbital Clearance During Continuous Renal Replacement Therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosenborg, Staffan; Saraste, Lars; Wide, Katarina

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Phenobarbital is an old antiepileptic drug used in severe epilepsy. Despite this, little is written about the need for dose adjustments in renal replacement therapy. Most sources recommend a moderately increased dose guided by therapeutic drug monitoring. A 14 year old boy with nonketotic hyperglycinemia, a rare inborn error of metabolism, characterized by high levels of glycine, epilepsy, spasticity, and cognitive impairment, was admitted to the emergency department with respiratory failure after a few days of fever and cough. The boy was unconscious at admittance and had acute renal and hepatic failure. Due to the acute respiratory infection, hypoxic hepatic and renal failure occurred and the patient had a status epilepticus. The patient was intubated and mechanically ventilated. Continuous renal replacement therapy was initiated. Despite increased phenobarbital doses, therapeutic levels were not reached until the dose was increased to 500 mg twice daily. Therapeutic drug monitoring was performed in plasma and dialysate. Calculations revealed that phenobarbital was almost freely dialyzed. Correct dosing of drugs in patients on renal replacement therapy may need a multidisciplinary approach and guidance by therapeutic drug monitoring. PMID:25101986

  8. Renal Replacement Therapy [version 1; referees: 4 approved

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zaccaria Ricci

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available During the last few years, due to medical and surgical evolution, patients with increasingly severe diseases causing multiorgan dysfunction are frequently admitted to intensive care units. Therapeutic options, when organ failure occurs, are frequently nonspecific and mostly directed towards supporting vital function. In these scenarios, the kidneys are almost always involved and, therefore, renal replacement therapies have become a common routine practice in critically ill patients with acute kidney injury. Recent technological improvement has led to the production of safe, versatile and efficient dialysis machines. In addition, emerging evidence may allow better individualization of treatment with tailored prescription depending on the patients’ clinical picture (e.g. sepsis, fluid overload, pediatric. The aim of the present review is to give a general overview of current practice in renal replacement therapies for critically ill patients. The main clinical aspects, including dose prescription, modality of dialysis delivery, anticoagulation strategies and timing will be addressed. In addition, some technical issues on physical principles governing blood purification, filters characteristics, and vascular access, will be covered. Finally, a section on current standard nomenclature of renal replacement therapy is devoted to clarify the “Tower of Babel” of critical care nephrology.

  9. A time-resolved fluorescence immunoassay for the measurement of testosterone in saliva: Monitoring of testosterone replacement therapy with testosterone buciclate

    OpenAIRE

    Tschöp, Matthias; Behre, Hermann M.; Nieschlag, Eberhard; Dressendorfer, Regina A.; Strasburger, Christian J.

    1998-01-01

    Monitoring of testosterone replacement therapy requires a reliable method for testosterone measurement. Determination of salivary testosterone, which reflects the hormone's biologically active plasma fraction, is a superior technique for this purpose. The aim of the present study was to establish a new sensitive time-resolved fluorescence immunoassay for the accurate measurement of testosterone levels in saliva and to validate it by monitoring testosterone replacement therapy in eight hypogon...

  10. Comments to guidelines for the treatment of hypothyroidism prepared by the American thyroid association task force on thyroid hormone replacement

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Valentin Viktorovich Fadeev

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available The article is dedicated to the discussion about to guidelines for the treatment of hypothyroidism prepared by the American thyroid association task force on thyroid hormone replacement.

  11. Benefits and risks of hormone replacement on the disturbance androgenic male ageing: A review of the literature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    José Simão Rodrigues Filho

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available The aging man is accompanied by a progressive decline in testosterone production. This slow decrease causes a series of signs and symptoms can often interfere with the quality of man life. The purpose of this article is to review the current issues about the possible risks and benefits of androgen replacement therapy, discussing the clinical studies published on the subject. This is a review of scientific articles, and the identification and analysis of the articles were made through a search in the PUBMED database and SCIELO the period July to October 2013 This set of changes from affecting the musculoskeletal system to damage the scope psycho-behavioral called Androgen Dysfunction Male Aging, which affects over 20% of men over 60 years worldwide. It was found in this work that replacement with androgens exerts beneficial effects on the musculoskeletal system and psycho-behavioral, reflecting improved quality of life. In the other hand, the potential risks refer to the cardiovascular effects of metabolism and worsening of prostate cancer. Although knowledge about the potential risks and benefits of hormone replacement in men has evolved, there is still much that needs to be determined.

  12. BENEFITS AND RISKS OF HORMONE REPLACEMENT ON THE DISTURBANCE ANDROGENIC MALE AGEING: A REVIEW OF THE LITERATURE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    José Simão Rodrigues Filho

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available The aging man is accompanied by a progressive decline in testosterone production. This slow decrease causes a series of signs and symptoms can often interfere with the quality of man life. The purpose of this article is to review the current issues about the possible risks and benefits of androgen replacement therapy, discussing the clinical studies published on the subject. This is a review of scientific articles, and the identification and analysis of the articles were made through a search in the PUBMED database and SCIELO the period July to October 2013 This set of changes from affecting the musculoskeletal system to damage the scope psychobehavioral called Androgen Dysfunction Male Aging, which affects over 20% of men over 60 years worldwide. It was found in this work that replacement with androgens exerts beneficial effects on the ystem and psycho-behavioral, reflecting improved quality of life. In the other hand, the potential risks refer to the cardiovascular effects of metabolism and worsening of prostate cancer. Although knowledge about the potential risks and benefits of hormone replacement in men has evolved, there is still much that needs to be determined.

  13. The influence of hormone therapies on colon and rectal cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mørch, Lina Steinrud; Lidegaard, Øjvind; Keiding, Niels;

    2016-01-01

    followed 1995-2009. Information on HT exposures was from the National Prescription Register and updated daily, while information on colon (n = 8377) and rectal cancers (n = 4742) were from the National Cancer Registry. Potential confounders were obtained from other national registers. Poisson regression...... analyses with 5-year age bands included hormone exposures as time-dependent covariates. Use of estrogen-only therapy and combined therapy were associated with decreased risks of colon cancer (adjusted incidence rate ratio 0.77, 95 % confidence interval 0.68-0.86 and 0.88, 0.80-0.96) and rectal cancer (0......Exogenous sex hormones seem to play a role in colorectal carcinogenesis. Little is known about the influence of different types or durations of postmenopausal hormone therapy (HT) on colorectal cancer risk. A nationwide cohort of women 50-79 years old without previous cancer (n = 1,006,219) were...

  14. Enzyme replacement therapy for pancreatic insufficiency: present and future

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fieker A

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Aaron Fieker1, Jessica Philpott1, Martine Armand21Division of Digestive Diseases, University of Oklahoma, OKC, OK, USA; 2INSERM, U476 "Nutrition Humaine et Lipides", Marseille, F-13385 France; Univ Méditerranée Aix-Marseille 2, Faculté de Médecine, IPHM-IFR 125, Marseille, F-13385 FranceAbstract: Pancreatic enzyme replacement therapy is currently the mainstay of treatment for nutrient malabsorption secondary to pancreatic insufficiency. This treatment is safe and has few side effects. Data demonstrate efficacy in reducing steatorrhea and fat malabsorption. Effective therapy has been limited by the ability to replicate the physiologic process of enzyme delivery to the appropriate site, in general the duodenum, at the appropriate time. The challenges include enzyme destruction in the stomach, lack of adequate mixing with the chyme in the duodenum, and failing to deliver and activate at the appropriate time. Treatment is begun when clinically significant malabsorption occurs resulting in steatorrhea and weight loss. Treatment failure is addressed in a sequential fashion. Current research is aimed at studying new enzymes and delivery systems to improve the efficiency of action in the duodenum along with developing better means to monitor therapy.Keywords: exocrine pancreatic insufficiency, chronic pancreatitis, cystic fibrosis, pancreatic enzyme replacement therapy, lipase, lipids

  15. GENETICS OF BREAST CANCER AND HORMONE REPLACEMENT THERAPY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ksenija Geršak

    2008-12-01

    The findings of pharmacogenomic studies about polymorphisms in oestrogen synthesizingand metabolizing genes could have an important clinical value: before prescribing HRT,we would offer women genetic counselling and define their genotype. Thus, we would beable to organize an individualized postmenopausal period for each woman accordingly

  16. Insomnia related to postmenopausal syndrome and hormone replacement therapy: sleep laboratory studies on baseline differences between patients and controls and double-blind, placebo-controlled investigations on the effects of a novel estrogen-progestogen combination (Climodien, Lafamme) versus estrogen alone.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saletu-Zyhlarz, Gerda; Anderer, Peter; Gruber, Georg; Mandl, Magdalena; Gruber, Doris; Metka, Markus; Huber, Johannes; Oettel, Michael; Gräser, Thomas; Abu-Bakr, Manal Hassan; Grätzhofer, Elisabeth; Saletu, Bernd

    2003-09-01

    Differences in sleep and awakening quality between 51 insomniac postmenopausal syndrome patients and normal controls were evaluated. In a subsequent double-blind, placebo-controlled, comparative, randomized, three-arm trial (Climodien 2/3 = estradiol valerate 2 mg + the progestogen dienogest 3 mg = regimen A, estradiol valerate 2 mg = regimen EV, and placebo = regimen P), the effects of 2 months of hormone replacement therapy were investigated, followed by a 2-month open-label phase in which all patients received Climodien 2/2 (EV 2 mg + dienogest 2 mg = regimen A*). Polysomnography at baseline demonstrated significantly deteriorated sleep initiation and maintenance, increased S1 and decreased S2 in patients. Subjective sleep and awakening quality, well-being, morning drive, wakefulness, memory and reaction time performance were deteriorated too. Treatment with both regimen A and regimen EV induced a moderate, although nonsignificant, improvement in the primary efficacy variable wakefulness during the total sleep period compared with baseline, while under placebo no changes occurred. Secondary efficacy variables concerning sleep initiation and maintenance, and sleep architecture showed similar findings. The apnea and apnea-hypopnea indices improved significantly under regimen A, compared with both baseline and placebo. Subjective sleep and awakening quality improved significantly after regimen A and EV compared with baseline, with the drug-induced changes being superior to those induced by placebo. In the open-label phase, subjective sleep quality improved further, significantly in the former regimen A group. Awakening quality, somatic complaints and morning thymopsyche did not yield any significant findings. Concerning morning noopsychic performance, memory improved significantly after regimen A compared with baseline, fine motor activity after regimen EV. Reaction time performance increased with all three compounds. In conclusion, Climodien significantly improved

  17. Renal replacement therapy in the intensive care unit

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chacko Jose

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Acute renal failure is a frequent complication in critically ill patients that carries with it considerable morbidity and mortality. The management of renal failure in patients with multi-organ failure is different from that of renal failure that presents as a single organ failure. Intermittent haemodialysis, done in the conventional manner may not be tolerated by most critically ill patients. Continuous renal replacement therapy is physiologically superior; however, there is lack of strong evidence to prove a clinical benefit. Hybrid therapies that combine the benefits of intermittent haemodialysis and continuous therapies have emerged in the past few years. These are simpler to carry out, provide more flexibility and may be cost effective and need to be studied in a systematic manner.

  18. The adverse effects of hormonal therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bush, T L

    1986-02-01

    Estrogen therapy must be cycled with progestin therapy in women with intact uteri in order to prevent uterine cancer. However, these women cannot be expected to benefit (with regard to cardiovascular disease) from any estrogen-induced changes in the lipoprotein profile, as progestins will either negate or overwhelm any estrogen effects. However, such women will definitely benefit from estrogen's effects with regard to menopausal symptoms and bone loss. These clearly beneficial effects of estrogen-progestin therapy are not outweighed by any known risks. However, in women without uteri (approximately 30 per cent of women), unopposed estrogen therapy in the menopause may protect against cardiovascular disease, as well as have beneficial effects on bone metabolism and menopausal symptoms. In this special case, the beneficial effects of unopposed estrogen therapy clearly outweigh any known risk.

  19. Abnormal Bleeding During Menopause Hormone Therapy: Insights for Clinical Management

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Medeiros, Sebastião Freitas; Yamamoto, Márcia Marly Winck; Barbosa, Jacklyne Silva

    2013-01-01

    Objective Our objective was to review the involved mechanisms and propose actions for controlling/treating abnormal uterine bleeding during climacteric hormone therapy. Methods A systemic search of the databases SciELO, MEDLINE, and Pubmed was performed for identifying relevant publications on normal endometrial bleeding, abnormal uterine bleeding, and hormone therapy bleeding. Results Before starting hormone therapy, it is essential to exclude any abnormal organic condition, identify women at higher risk for bleeding, and adapt the regimen to suit eachwoman’s characteristics. Abnormal bleeding with progesterone/progestogen only, combined sequential, or combined continuous regimens may be corrected by changing the progestogen, adjusting the progestogen or estrogen/progestogen doses, or even switching the initial regimen to other formulation. Conclusion To diminish the occurrence of abnormal bleeding during hormone therapy (HT), it is important to tailor the regimen to the needs of individual women and identify those with higher risk of bleeding. The use of new agents as adjuvant therapies for decreasing abnormal bleeding in women on HT awaits future studies. PMID:24665210

  20. Reversal learning in gonadectomized marmosets with and without hormone replacement: are males more sensitive to punishment?

    Science.gov (United States)

    LaClair, Matthew; Lacreuse, Agnès

    2016-05-01

    This study examined sex differences in executive function in middle-aged gonadectomized marmosets (Callithrix jacchus) with or without hormonal replacement. We tested ten castrated male (mean age 5.5 years) marmosets treated with testosterone cypionate (T, n = 5) or vehicle (n = 5) on Reversal Learning, which contributes to cognitive flexibility, and the Delayed Response task, measuring working memory. Their performance was compared to that of 11 ovariectomized females (mean age = 3.7 years) treated with Silastic capsules filled with 17-β estradiol (E2, n = 6) or empty capsules (n = 5), previously tested on the same tasks (Lacreuse et al. in J Neuroendocrinol 26:296-309, 2014. doi: 10.1111/jne.12147). Behavioral observations were conducted daily. Females exhibited more locomotor behaviors than males. Males and females did not differ in the number of trials taken to reach criterion on the reversals, but males had significantly longer response latencies, regardless of hormone replacement. They also had a greater number of refusals than females. Additionally, both control and T-treated males, but not females, had slower responses on incorrect trials, suggesting that males were making errors due to distraction, lack of motivation or uncertainty. Furthermore, although both males and females had slower responding following an incorrect compared to a correct trial, the sex difference in response latencies was disproportionally large following an incorrect trial. No sex difference was found in the Delayed Response task. Overall, slower response latencies in males than females during Reversal Learning, especially during and following an incorrect trial, may reflect greater sensitivity to punishment (omission of reward) and greater performance monitoring in males, compared to females. Because these differences occurred in gonadectomized animals and regardless of hormone replacement, they may be organized early in life.

  1. Testosterone replacement therapy and the risk of prostate cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Warburton, Daniel; Hobaugh, Christopher; Wang, Grace; Lin, Haocheng; Wang, Run

    2015-01-01

    Understanding the role of testosterone replacement therapy (TRT) in the development and progression of prostate cancer is an important concept in treating patients with symptoms of hypogonadism. This article revealed a small number of mostly retrospective, observational studies describing the use of TRT in the general population, in men with prostatic intraepithelial neoplasia (PIN), in men with a history of treated prostate cancer, and in men on active surveillance for prostate cancer. The current literature does not report a statistically significant increase in the development or progression of prostate cancer in men receiving testosterone replacement for symptomatic hypogonadism, and the prostate saturation theory provides a model explaining the basis for these results. The use of TRT in men with a history of prostate cancer is considered experimental, but future results from randomized controlled trials could lead to a change in our current treatment approach.

  2. Testosterone replacement therapy and the risk of prostate cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel Warburton

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Understanding the role of testosterone replacement therapy (TRT in the development and progression of prostate cancer is an important concept in treating patients with symptoms of hypogonadism. This article revealed a small number of mostly retrospective, observational studies describing the use of TRT in the general population, in men with prostatic intraepithelial neoplasia (PIN, in men with a history of treated prostate cancer, and in men on active surveillance for prostate cancer. The current literature does not report a statistically significant increase in the development or progression of prostate cancer in men receiving testosterone replacement for symptomatic hypogonadism, and the prostate saturation theory provides a model explaining the basis for these results. The use of TRT in men with a history of prostate cancer is considered experimental, but future results from randomized controlled trials could lead to a change in our current treatment approach.

  3. [Pharmacokinetics of antibiotics in continuous renal replacement therapies (CRRT)].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morabito, Santo; Pistolesi, Valentina; Maggiore, Umberto; Fiaccadori, Enrico; Pierucci, Alessandro

    2012-01-01

    In the critically ill patient, acute kidney injury (AKI) is frequently associated with infective complications requiring appropriate antimicrobial treatment. AKI and multiple organ dysfunction syndrome can affect the pharmacokinetic parameters of many drugs. Furthermore, the start of renal replacement therapy (RRT) is an additional variable to be taken into consideration to avoid inappropriate antimicrobial therapy. Continuous renal replacement therapies (CRRT) are widely adopted in the intensive care unit (ICU) and antibiotics that are significantly eliminated by the kidney are likely to be removed during RRT. Generally, drug-dosing adjustments are required if the extracorporeal clearance accounts for more than 25-30% of the total body clearance. The molecular weight cutoffs of the more widely used membranes are much higher than the molecular weight of most drugs. Therefore, molecular size will not be a limitation for the removal of the unbound fraction of the antibiotics most commonly used in ICU patients. However, CRRTs are still not standardized and the impact of RRT on plasma drug concentrations can be substantially different depending on the CRRT modality (diffusive, convective or both), membrane characteristics and delivered dialysis dose. In any case, drug-dosing adjustments should be based on the knowledge of the pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic properties of the different classes of antimicrobials, taking into account that high extracorporeal clearances could lead to drug underexposure in clinical conditions where appropriate antibiotic treatment is essential.

  4. The benefits and risks of testosterone replacement therapy: a review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nazem Bassil

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available Nazem Bassil1, Saad Alkaade2, John E Morley1,31Division of Geriatric Medicine; 2Internal Medicine, Saint Louis University Health Sciences Center, St. Louis, Missouri, USA; 3GRECC, VA Medical Center, St. Louis, Missouri, USAAbstract: Increased longevity and population aging will increase the number of men with late onset hypogonadism. It is a common condition, but often underdiagnosed and undertreated. The indication of testosterone-replacement therapy (TRT treatment requires the presence of low testosterone level, and symptoms and signs of hypogonadism. Although controversy remains regarding indications for testosterone supplementation in aging men due to lack of large-scale, long-term studies assessing the benefits and risks of testosterone-replacement therapy in men, reports indicate that TRT may produce a wide range of benefits for men with hypogonadism that include improvement in libido and sexual function, bone density, muscle mass, body composition, mood, erythropoiesis, cognition, quality of life and cardiovascular disease. Perhaps the most controversial area is the issue of risk, especially possible stimulation of prostate cancer by testosterone, even though no evidence to support this risk exists. Other possible risks include worsening symptoms of benign prostatic hypertrophy, liver toxicity, hyperviscosity, erythrocytosis, worsening untreated sleep apnea or severe heart failure. Despite this controversy, testosterone supplementation in the United States has increased substantially over the past several years. The physician should discuss with the patient the potential benefits and risks of TRT. The purpose of this review is to discuss what is known and not known regarding the benefits and risks of TRT.Keywords: hypogonadism, testosterone replacement therapy, erectile dysfunction, osteoporosis, cardiovascular disease

  5. [Hormonal therapy for prostatic cancer--state of the art].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miyakita, Hideshi

    2005-02-01

    Following the studies of Huggins and colleagues in 1941, the hormonal treatment of prostatic cancer has been aimed at neutralizing the influence of testicular androgens through surgical castration or the administration of high dose estrogen. Labrie et al introduced combined use of a LHRH agonist and an androgen antagonist for prostatic cancer. Various reports demonstrated a beneficial effect for combined androgen blockade using nonsteroidal antiandrogens for advanced prostatic cancer through meta-analysis of published randomized control trials. In Japanese status, a combined androgen blockade is popular for advanced prostatic cancer as well as local cancer by J-Cap survey. There is a lot of controversy about adjuvant hormonal therapy for prostatic cancer including intermittent hormonal therapy, but the results are not gotten yet.

  6. Update on Testosterone Replacement Therapy in Hypogonadal Men.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leung, Kevin Matthew Yen Bing; Alrabeeah, Khalid; Carrier, Serge

    2015-08-01

    Late-onset male hypogonadism has long been recognized as a treatable medical condition; however, misconceptions about the use of testosterone replacement therapy (TRT) have often led urologists away from its more mainstream use. This paper aims to bring the reader up-to-date on the current understanding of TRT, starting with when and who to treat. Various formulations of TRT, each with its own risks and benefits, are also detailed. Finally, a comprehensive analysis of the current literature's views into the various controversies of TRT including its impact on prostate health, sexual health, cardiovascular health, frailty, and mood is discussed.

  7. [Renal replacement therapy by hemodialysis in Constantine (Algeria)].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bouhabel, Abdelouahab; Laib, Zoheir; Hannache, Kamel; Aberkane, Abdelhamid

    2014-02-01

    End-stage renal failure is considered a public heath problem that constitutes a heavy cost on communities worldwide. To be able to plan the treatment of this pathology, we must have reliable and updated information through health network which represents the best mean for planning and reflexion locally and nationwide. The aim of our study was to answer to this need through a local registry of renal replacement therapy and nephrology network that we have for the first time an inventory of this pathology in an Algerian town (Constantine), and in this article we present the first results concerning patients under chronic hemodialysis.

  8. Demographics of paediatric renal replacement therapy in Europe

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chesnaye, Nicholas; Bonthuis, Marjolein; Schaefer, Franz;

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The ESPN/ERA-EDTA Registry collects data on European children with end-stage renal disease receiving renal replacement therapy (RRT) who are listed on national and regional renal registries in Europe. In this paper we report on the analysis of demographic data collected from 2009...... to 2011. METHODS: Data on primary renal disease, incidence, prevalence, 4-year survival, transplantation rate and causes of death in paediatric patients receiving RRT were extracted from the ESPN/ERA-EDTA Registry for 37 European countries. RESULTS: The incidence of RRT in paediatric patients in Europe...

  9. Vascular access for extracorporeal renal replacement therapy in veterinary patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chalhoub, Serge; Langston, Cathy E; Poeppel, Karen

    2011-01-01

    Vascular access is the first and most basic requirement for successful extracorporeal renal replacement therapy (ERRT). Dual-lumen catheters are the most commonly used method of vascular access for ERRT in veterinary patients. An adequately functioning dialysis catheter allows for smooth and efficient patient management, whereas a poorly functioning catheter frustrates the technician, doctor, and patient. These catheters are fairly quick to place but require meticulous care for optimal function. The most common complications are thrombosis and infection. Monitoring catheter performance should be a routine part of dialysis patient care.

  10. Promotional tone in reviews of menopausal hormone therapy after the Women's Health Initiative: an analysis of published articles.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adriane Fugh-Berman

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Even after the Women's Health Initiative (WHI found that the risks of menopausal hormone therapy (hormone therapy outweighed benefit for asymptomatic women, about half of gynecologists in the United States continued to believe that hormones benefited women's health. The pharmaceutical industry has supported publication of articles in medical journals for marketing purposes. It is unknown whether author relationships with industry affect promotional tone in articles on hormone therapy. The goal of this study was to determine whether promotional tone could be identified in narrative review articles regarding menopausal hormone therapy and whether articles identified as promotional were more likely to have been authored by those with conflicts of interest with manufacturers of menopausal hormone therapy. METHODS AND FINDINGS: We analyzed tone in opinion pieces on hormone therapy published in the four years after the estrogen-progestin arm of the WHI was stopped. First, we identified the ten authors with four or more MEDLINE-indexed reviews, editorials, comments, or letters on hormone replacement therapy or menopausal hormone therapy published between July 2002 and June 2006. Next, we conducted an additional search using the names of these authors to identify other relevant articles. Finally, after author names and affiliations were removed, 50 articles were evaluated by three readers for scientific accuracy and for tone. Scientific accuracy was assessed based on whether or not the findings of the WHI were accurately reported using two criteria: (1 Acknowledgment or lack of denial of the risk of breast cancer diagnosis associated with hormone therapy, and (2 acknowledgment that hormone therapy did not benefit cardiovascular disease endpoints. Determination of promotional tone was based on the assessment by each reader of whether the article appeared to promote hormone therapy. Analysis of inter-rater consistency found moderate agreement

  11. Therapy for obesity based on gastrointestinal hormones

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bagger, Jonatan I; Christensen, Mikkel; Knop, Filip K;

    2011-01-01

    for the treatment of type 2 diabetes. In contrast to other antidiabetic treatments, these agents have a positive outcome profile on body weight. Worldwide there are 500 million obese people, and 3 million are dying every year from obesity-related diseases. Recently, incretin-based therapy was proposed...... for the treatment of obesity. Currently two different incretin therapies are widely used in the treatment of type 2 diabetes: 1) the GLP-1 receptor agonists which cause significant and sustained weight loss in overweight patients, and 2) dipeptidyl peptidase 4 (DPP-4) inhibitors being weight neutral. These findings...... have led to a greater interest in the physiology of intestinal peptides with potential weight-reducing properties. This review discusses the effects of the incretin-based therapies in obesity, and provides an overview of intestinal peptides with promising effects as potential new treatments for obesity....

  12. Mid-luteal serum progesterone concentrations govern implantation rates for cryopreserved embryo transfers conducted under hormone replacement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yovich, John L; Conceicao, Jason L; Stanger, James D; Hinchliffe, Peter M; Keane, Kevin N

    2015-08-01

    This study explores the relevance of mid-luteal serum hormonal concentrations in cryopreserved embryo transfer cycles conducted under hormone replacement therapy (HRT) control and which involved single-embryo transfer (SET) of 529 vitrified blastocysts. Widely ranging mid-luteal oestradiol and progesterone concentrations ensued from the unique HRT regimen. Oestradiol had no influence on clinical pregnancy or live birth rates, but an optimal progesterone range between 70 and 99 nmol/l (P decreased implantation rates. There was no clear interaction between oestradiol and progesterone concentrations but embryo quality grading did show a significant influence on outcomes (P pregnancy and live birth rates, respectively). Multiple comparison analysis showed that the progesterone effect was influential regardless of embryo grading, body mass index or the woman's age, either at vitrification or at cryopreserved embryo transfer. The results support the argument that careful monitoring of serum progesterone concentrations in HRT-cryopreserved embryo transfer is warranted and that further studies should explore pessary adjustments to optimize concentrations for individual women to enhance implantation rates.

  13. Controversies in testosterone replacement therapy: testosterone and cardiovascular disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hwang, Kathleen; Miner, Martin

    2015-01-01

    The role of testosterone in the cardiovascular (CV) health of men is controversial. Data suggest that both the condition and treatment of clinical hypogonadism is associated with decreased CV mortality; however, two recent studies suggest that hypogonadal subjects treated with testosterone replacement therapy have a higher incidence of new CV events. There has been increased media attention concerning the risk of CV disease in men treated with testosterone. Until date, there are no long-term prospective studies to determine safety. Literature spanning over the past 30 years has suggested that not only is there a possible increased CV risk in men with low levels of testosterone, but the benefits from testosterone therapy may even lower this risk. We review here the recent studies that have garnered such intense scrutiny. This article is intended as a thorough review of testosterone levels and CV risk, providing the clinician with the facts needed to make informed clinical decisions in managing patients with clinical hypogonadism.

  14. Renal replacement therapy in sepsis-induced acute renal failure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rajapakse Senaka

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Acute renal failure (ARF is a common complication of sepsis and carries a high mortality. Renal replacement therapy (RRT during the acute stage is the mainstay of therapy. Va-rious modalities of RRT are available. Continuous RRT using convective methods are preferred in sepsis-induced ARF, especially in hemodynamically unstable patients, although clear evidence of benefit over intermittent hemodialysis is still not available. Peritoneal dialysis is clearly inferior, and is not recommended. Early initiation of RRT is probably advantageous, although the optimal timing of dialysis is yet unknown. Higher doses of RRT are more likely to be beneficial. Use of bio-compatible membranes and bicarbonate buffer in the dialysate are preferred. Anticoagulation during dialysis must be carefully adjusted and monitored.

  15. RENAL REPLACEMENT THERAPY IN ACUTE KIDNEY FAILURE - AN OVERVIEW

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Treesa P. Varghese

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Renal failure is the loss of renal function, either acute or chronic, that results in azotemia and syndrome of uremia. Acute renal failure, is also known as acute kidney injury (AKI, is defined as an abrupt (within 48 hours reduction in kidney function. The initial management of acute kidney failure involves treating the underlying cause, stopping nephrotoxic drugs and ensuring that the patient is euvolaemic with an adequate mean arterial blood pressure. However, no specific treatments have been shown to reverse the course AKF so Renal Replacement Therapy (RRT is the cornerstone of further management. RRT therapy can be administrated either intermittently or continuously. Multiple modalities of RRT are currently available. The purpose of this review is to familiarize different modalities of RRT for blood purification.

  16. Possible removal of topiramate by continuous renal replacement therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Browning, Linda; Parker, Dennis; Liu-DeRyke, Xi; Shah, Aashit; Coplin, William M; Rhoney, Denise H

    2010-01-15

    Topiramate is primarily renally eliminated and requires dosage adjustment based upon renal function. While there is data to suggest drug removal during intermittent hemodialysis (IHD), little is known regarding its clearance and dosing during continuous renal replacement therapy (CRRT). We describe a 59-year-old man with refractory status epilepticus who was started on continuous venovenous hemodiafiltration (CVVHDF) for acute renal failure while receiving topiramate with a series of serum concentrations to assess for removal during CVVHDF. Our data suggest clinically important amounts of topiramate are removed by CRRT, and higher topiramate dosage may be needed for these patients instead of the current recommended 50% of normal dosage. Unfortunately, there is no antiepileptic drug dosing recommendation when used during CRRT due to the paucity of data. This case highlights a need for research evaluating the effect of CRRT on AED elimination in order to optimize therapy for seizure control.

  17. Acute Kidney Injury and Renal Replacement Therapy in Burns

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Burak Canver

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Acute kidney injury (AKI is a common complication in patients with severe burn injury and one of the major causes of death. It has a negative prognostic value and almost always develops in the context of multiple organ dysfunction syndrome (MODS induced by sepsis. Over the last 20 years, according to data avaliable, the mortality rate has been reported to reach about 75%. Several definitions of AKI have been used , but nowadays the RIFLE classification is considered the gold standard, enabling a more objective comparison of populations. There are several ways to treat AKI in burn patients, including peritoneal dialysis (PD, intermittent hemodialysis, and continuous renal replacement therapy (CRRT. CRRT is generally used in patients in whom intermittent hemodialysis has failed to control hypovolemia, as well as in patients who cannot tolerate intermittent hemodialysis. Additionally, PD is not suitable for patients with burns within the abdominal area. For these reasons, most patients with unstable hemodynamic conditions receive CRRT. In burn patients with acute renal failure the dialytic treatment with continuous renal replacement therapies permitted us to achieve a survival and dialytic adequacy; however, mortality rate is high and related to septic shock and MODS. Despite the wide variation of the analysed burn populations and definitions of AKI, this review clearly showed that AKI remains prevalent and is associated with increased mortality in patients with severe burn injury. (Journal of the Turkish Society Intensive Care 2011; 9 Suppl: 46-50

  18. Type of hormone therapy and risk of misclassification at mammography screening

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Njor, Sisse H; Hallas, Jesper; Schwartz, Walter;

    2011-01-01

    Current users of hormone therapy (HT) are known to have a lower accuracy of mammography screening than do never users. We studied whether the risk of misclassification depends on type of hormone, administration, regimen, and dose of the therapy.......Current users of hormone therapy (HT) are known to have a lower accuracy of mammography screening than do never users. We studied whether the risk of misclassification depends on type of hormone, administration, regimen, and dose of the therapy....

  19. Development of a men's Preference for Testosterone Replacement Therapy (P-TRT instrument

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Szeinbach SL

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Sheryl L Szeinbach,1 Enrique Seoane-Vazquez,2 Kent H Summers31Ohio State University, College of Pharmacy, Columbus, OH, USA; 2International Center for Pharmaceutical Economics and Policy, Massachusetts College of Pharmacy and Health Sciences, Boston, MA, 3Endo Health Solutions, Chadds Ford, PA, USABackground: This study used a standard research approach to create a final conceptual model and the Preference for the Testosterone Replacement Therapy (P-TRT instrument.Methods: A discussion guide was developed from a literature review and expert opinion to direct one-on-one interviews with participants who used testosterone replacement therapy and consented to participate in the study. Data from telephone interviews were transcribed for theme analysis using NVivo 9 qualitative analysis software, analyzed descriptively from a saturation grid, and used to evaluate men's P-TRT. Data from cognitive debriefing for five participants were used to evaluate the final conceptual model and validate the initial P-TRT instrument.Results: Item saturation and theme exhaustion was achieved by 58 male participants of mean age 55.0 ± 10.0 (22–69 years who had used testosterone replacement therapy for a mean of 175.0 ± 299.2 days. The conceptual model was developed from items and themes obtained from the participant interviews and saturation grid. Items comprising eight dimensions were used for instrument development, ie, ease of use, effect on libido, product characteristics, physiological impact, psychological impact, side effects, treatment experience, and preference. Results from the testosterone replacement therapy preference evaluation provide a detailed insight into why most men preferred a topical gel product over an injection or patch.Conclusion: Items and themes relating to use of testosterone replacement therapy were in concordance with the final conceptual model and 29-item P-TRT instrument. The standard research approach used in this study produced the

  20. Growth hormone deficiency in adults--an indication for therapy?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Preece, M A; Round, J M; Jones, D A

    1987-01-01

    Case studies are presented for two patients, one with isolated hGH deficiency and one with multiple hormone deficiencies. The patients were studied 3 months before, and 3 and 9 months after discontinuing hGH therapy, at 19 and 18 years of age, respectively. Strength in the quadriceps femoris, cross-sectional area of the quadriceps muscles and cross-sectional muscle fibre area were measured. In the patient with multiple hormone deficiencies, clear decreases in all three parameters were evident after discontinuing hGH treatment. There were no significant changes in the other patient. Reasons for these differences are discussed.

  1. Long-term effects of growth hormone (GH) replacement in men with childhood-onset GH deficiency

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ter Maaten, JC; De Boer, H; Kamp, O; Stuurman, L; Van der Veen, EA

    1999-01-01

    Short term GH replacement therapy has been shown to improve body composition and exercise capacity. It is not yet known whether GH replacement remains beneficial over the long term. We assessed the effects of long term GH replacement on body composition, bone mineral density, and cardiac function. T

  2. Influence of hormone substitution therapy on postmenopausal uterus; Einfluss einer Hormonsubstitution auf den postmenopausalen Uterus

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Otte, A.; Ruedisueli, A.; Goetze, M.; Leibundgut, U.; Mueller-Brand, J. [Inst. fuer Nuklearmedizin, Kantonsspital, Universitaetskliniken, Basel (Switzerland); Nitzsche, E.U. [Abt. Nuklearmedizin, Radiologische Universitaetsklinik, Freiburg (Germany)

    1997-12-01

    In a 58-year-old postmenopausal woman blood flow and blood pool images of bone scintigraphy showed a focus of increased activity in the right pelvic region. Computed tomography and ultrasound exhibited no abnormalities in the abdomen; especially the uterus and ovaries were normal. Careful anamnestic evaluation revealed that the patient received a long-term peroral estrogen/gestagen replacement therapy for the prevention of osteoporosis, but did not have menstruation-like bleedings for the last twelve months of therapy. At time of admission, the patient was on day 25 of hormone replacement therapy, and the uterus wash, therefore, in a premenstrual stage. Hence, despite cessation of bleedings in postmenopausal women, one should think of hormone replacement therapy as an explanation for vascular pelvic tumors seen by the first two phases of bone scintigraphy, before further diagnostic steps are undertaken. (orig.) [Deutsch] Bei der Skelettszintigraphie einer 58jaehrigen postmenopausalen Frau erkannte man in der Perfusions- und Blood-pool-Phase einen unklaren Fokus erhoehter Aktivitaet im rechten Becken. Computertomographie und Sonographie des Abdomens, insbesondere des Uterus und der Ovarien, waren unauffaellig. Nach eingehender anamnestischer Befragung stellte sich heraus, dass die Patientin unter einer mehrjaehrigen peroralen Oestrogen-/Gestagen-Hormonsubstitutionstherapie zur Osteoporose-Prophylaxe stand, jedoch seit den letzten zwoelf Monaten der Therapie ueber keine menstruationsaehnlichen Abbruchblutungen mehr berichten konnte. Bei ihrer Zuweisung befand sich die Patientin am 25. Tag der Hormonsubstitutionstherapie und ihr Uterus somit in einem praemenstruellen Stadium. Trotz Ausbleibens der Blutung bei postmenopausalen Frauen sollte somit an die Moeglichkeit der Hormonsubstitution gedacht und danach gefragt werden, wenn in den ersten beiden Phasen der Skelettszintigraphie eine unklare, gut vaskularisierte Struktur im kleinen Becken gefunden wird, bevor weitere

  3. Parathyroid hormone and parathyroid hormone-related protein analogs as therapies for osteoporosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Augustine, Marilyn; Horwitz, Mara J

    2013-12-01

    Osteoporotic fractures result in significant morbidity and mortality. Anabolic agents reverse the negative skeletal balance that characterizes osteoporosis by stimulating osteoblast-dependent bone formation to a greater degree than osteoclast-dependent bone resorption. Parathyroid hormone (PTH) and parathyroid hormone- related protein (PTHrP) are peptide hormones, which have anabolic actions when administered intermittently. The only FDA-approved anabolic bone agent for the treatment of osteoporosis in the United States is PTH 1-34, or teriparatide, administered by daily subcutaneous injections. However, PTH 1-84 is also available in Europe. Synthetic human PTHrP 1-36 and a PTHrP 1-34 analog, BA058, have also been shown to increase lumbar spine bone density. These agents and several other PTH and PTHrP analogs, including some which are not administered as injections, continue to be investigated as potential anabolic therapies for osteoporosis.

  4. Enzyme replacement therapy in a mouse model of aspartylglycosaminuria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dunder, U; Kaartinen, V; Valtonen, P; Väänänen, E; Kosma, V M; Heisterkamp, N; Groffen, J; Mononen, I

    2000-02-01

    Aspartylglycosaminuria (AGU), the most common lysosomal disorder of glycoprotein degradation, is caused by deficient activity of glycosylasparaginase (AGA). AGA-deficient mice share most of the clinical, biochemical and histopathologic characteristics of human AGU disease. In the current study, recombinant human AGA administered i.v. to adult AGU mice disappeared from the systemic circulation of the animals in two phases predominantly into non-neuronal tissues, which were rapidly cleared from storage compound aspartylglucosamine. Even a single AGA injection reduced the amount of aspartylglucosamine in the liver and spleen of AGU mice by 90% and 80%, respectively. Quantitative biochemical analyses along with histological and immunohistochemical studies demonstrated that the pathophysiologic characteristics of AGU were effectively corrected in non-neuronal tissues of AGU mice during 2 wk of AGA therapy. At the same time, AGA activity increased to 10% of that in normal brain tissue and the accumulation of aspartylglucosamine was reduced by 20% in total brain of the treated animals. Immunohistochemical studies suggested that the corrective enzyme was widely distributed within the brain tissue. These findings suggest that AGU may be correctable by enzyme therapy.-Dunder, U., Kaartinen, V., Valtonen, P., Väänänen, E., Kosma, V.-M., Heisterkamp, N., Groffen, J., Mononen, I. Enzyme replacement therapy in a mouse model of aspartylglycosaminuria.

  5. The appropriateness and persistence of testosterone replacement therapy in Ontario.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martins, Diana; Yao, Zhan; Tadrous, Mina; Shah, Baiju R; Juurlink, David N; Mamdani, Muhammad M; Gomes, Tara

    2017-02-01

    To examine the concordance between testosterone replacement therapy (TRT) use and established reimbursement criteria, as well as compare the persistence of use among available formulations (injectable, oral, topical gel, transdermal patch) among elderly men in Ontario, Canada. We conducted a retrospective cohort study of men aged 66 years or older in Ontario newly treated with testosterone between 1 January 2009 and 31 December 2012 using linked health administrative data. Continuous use was defined on the basis of prescription refills issued within 180 days of the preceding prescription. We studied men who received at least two consecutive TRT prescriptions. We estimated the prevalence of hypogonadism, human immunodeficiency virus, specialist visits and lab tests for serum testosterone prior to initiation of TRT to investigate concordance with prescribing criteria. We also performed a Kaplan-Meier analysis to test for differences in the median time to discontinuation among formulations. Among the 4797 men who received at least two TRT prescriptions, only 38.7% met the reimbursement criteria for use prior to initiating therapy. The median time to discontinuation differed significantly among formulations and was longest among recipients of oral TRT products (383 days), and lower for recipients of topical gels (319 days), injectable (283 days) and transdermal patches (160 days; Log-rank test p therapy, and many discontinue TRT within a year of initiation. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  6. Hormonal therapy for acne: why not as first line therapy? facts and controversies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katsambas, Andreas D; Dessinioti, Clio

    2010-01-01

    Standard systemic therapeutic agents used in acne include oral antimicrobials, isotretinoin, and hormonal agents. Appropriate patient selection is the key to decide when to use hormonal agents as first-line therapy as well as to achieve optimal results. Indications of hormonal therapy in acne in girls and women include proven ovarian or adrenal hyperandrogenism, recalcitrant acne, acne not responding to repeated courses of oral isotretinoin, acne tarda, polycystic ovary syndrome, or the presence of clinical signs of hyperandrogenism such as androgenic alopecia or the presence of the seborrhea, acne, hirsutism, alopecia syndrome. We describe the hormonal agents currently available for acne treatment, discuss their indications and contraindications, and address the question of whether they may be used as a first-line therapy in acne.

  7. [Testosterone replacement therapy and prostate cancer: the downfall of a paradigm?].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castillo, Octavio A; López-Fontana, Gastón; Vidal-Mora, Ivar; López Laur, José Daniel

    2015-04-06

    For six decades, it has been a part of the conventional medical wisdom that higher levels of testosterone increase the risk of prostate cancer. This belief is mostly derived from the well-documented regression of prostate cancer after surgical or pharmacological castration. However, there is an absence of scientific data supporting the concept that higher testosterone levels are associated with an increased risk of prostate cancer. Moreover, men with hypogonadism have substantial rates of prostate cancer in prostatic biopsies, suggesting that low testosterone has no protective effect against the development of prostate cancer. Moreover, prostate cancer rate is higher in elderly patients when hormonal levels are low. These results argue against an increased risk of prostate cancer with testosterone replacement therapy.

  8. Replacing SUs with incretin-based therapies for type 2 diabetes mellitus: challenges and feasibility

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Knop, Filip K; Holst, Jens Juul; Vilsbøll, Tina

    2008-01-01

    Type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) is a progressive disease characterized by insulin resistance, a steady decline in glucose-induced insulin secretion (most likely caused by a progressive decrease in functional beta-cell mass), and inappropriately regulated glucagon secretion; in combination...... with increased beta-cell apoptosis, suggesting that SU may actually accelerate the progressive decrease in beta-cell mass, thereby promoting the need for insulin replacement. In contrast, the newly developed incretin-based therapies for T2DM employ the beta-cell-preserving properties of incretin hormones......, these effects result in hyperglycemia. In 1958, sulfonylurea (SU) was introduced to the market as one of the first oral treatments for T2DM. Since then, the ability of SU to stimulate the release of insulin from pancreatic beta-cells by the closure of ATP-sensitive K+-channels has been employed as one...

  9. Being a long-term user of nicotine replacement therapy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Borup, Gitte; Nørgaard, Lotte Stig; Tønnesen, Philip

    Background During recent years a gradual shift in the application of nicotine replacement therapy (NRT) has taken place from NRT-products only being recommended to achieve smoking cessation, to now including smoking reduction, and long-term substitution of tobacco with NRT has taken place. This has...... been promoted as a way of achieving harm-reduction in highly nicotine dependent smokers who are unwilling or incapable of quitting all nicotine products, as continued use of NRT is widely accepted as being far less hazardous than continued smoking. To our knowledge no previous research has been done...... of feeling addicted, cost of NRT products and fear of adverse health consequences. Aim of study • To get a thorough understanding of the lived experiences of nicotine dependent long-term NRT users. • To investigate what motivates or discourages quitting NRT. Method Semi-structured interviews with long...

  10. Predictors of Renal Replacement Therapy in Acute Kidney Injury

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael J. Koziolek

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Backgrounds: Criteria that may guide early renal replacement therapy (RRT initiation in patients with acute kidney injury (AKI currently do not exist. Methods: In 120 consecutive patients with AKI, clinical and laboratory data were analyzed on admittance. The prognostic power of those parameters which were significantly different between the two groups was analyzed by receiver operator characteristic curves and by leave-1-out cross validation. Results: Six parameters (urine albumin, plasma creatinine, blood urea nitrogen, daily urine output, fluid balance and plasma sodium were combined in a logistic regression model that estimates the probability that a particular patient will need RRT. Additionally, a second model without daily urine output was established. Both models yielded a higher accuracy (89 and 88% correct classification rate, respectively than the best single parameter, cystatin C (correct classification rate 74%. Conclusions: The combined models may help to better predict the necessity of RRT using clinical and routine laboratory data in patients with AKI.

  11. Being a long-term user of nicotine replacement therapy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Borup, Gitte; Nørgaard, Lotte Stig; Tønnesen, Philip;

    Background During recent years a gradual shift in the application of nicotine replacement therapy (NRT) has taken place from NRT-products only being recommended to achieve smoking cessation, to now including smoking reduction, and long-term substitution of tobacco with NRT has taken place. This has...... been promoted as a way of achieving harm-reduction in highly nicotine dependent smokers who are unwilling or incapable of quitting all nicotine products, as continued use of NRT is widely accepted as being far less hazardous than continued smoking. To our knowledge no previous research has been done......, regarding long-term NRT users’ experiences with continuing the use of NRT. Results from a survey study among long-term NRT-users, who had used NRT for 12 months or more, found that out of 92 former smokers 88 % wished to quit using NRT. The primary causes stated for wishing to quit were being tired...

  12. Continuous renal replacement therapy circuit failure after antidote administration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeong, Jinwoo

    2014-12-01

    A 73-year-old man was transferred to the emergency department (ED). He was found unconscious in his house along with an empty 200-mL bottle of Basta(™), a herbicide containing 18% glufosinate. He was comatose with a Glasgow Coma Scale score of 3. As his blood pressure dropped to 60/30 mmHg despite fluids and norepinephrine, 20% intravenous fat emulsion product was injected. He experienced repeated cardiopulmonary arrests during his first 4 h in the ED. When the arrests occurred, standard cardiopulmonary resuscitation was performed, and boluses of fat emulsion were given. He was given a total of 1500 mL of 20% fat emulsion. In an attempt to correct the acidosis, continuous renal replacement therapy (CRRT) was started. Within 5 min of starting CRRT, the transmembrane pressure increased sharply and the machine stopped.

  13. A Cost Analysis of Kidney Replacement Therapy Options in Palestine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mustafa Younis Ph.D.

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available This study provides a cost analysis of kidney replacement therapy options in Palestine. It informs evidence-based resource allocation decisions for government-funded kidney disease services where transplant donors are limited, and some of the common modalities, i.e., peritoneal dialysis (PD and home hemodialysis (HD, are not widely available due to shortages of qualified staff, specialists, and centers to follow the patient cases, provide training, make home visits, or provide educational programs for patients. The average cost of kidney transplant was US$16 277 for the first year; the estimated cost of HD per patient averaged US$16 085 per year—nearly as much as a transplant. Consistent with prior literature and experience, while live, related kidney donors are scarce, we found that kidney transplant was more adequate and less expensive than HD. These results have direct resource allocation implications for government-funded kidney disease services under Palestinian Ministry of Health. Our findings strongly suggest that investing in sufficient qualified staff, equipment, and clinical infrastructure to replace HD services with transplantation whenever medically indicated and suitable kidney donors are available, as well as deploying PD programs and Home HD programs, will result in major overall cost savings. Our results provide a better understanding of the costs of kidney disease and will help to inform Ministry of Health and related policy makers as they develop short- and long-term strategies for the population, in terms of both cost savings and enhanced quality of life.

  14. [The transrectal ultrasonography of prostate in men with congenital hypogonadism treated by long term testosterone replacement therapy].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heráček, Jiří; El Balouly, Karim; Sobotka, Vladimír; Šnajderová, Marta; Kalvachová, Božena; Urban, Michael

    2012-01-01

    The aim of the study was to evaluate prostate transrectal ultrasonography findings in men with congenital hypogonadism treated by long term testosterone replacement therapy. We have gradually included 31 men with congenital hypogonadism in period of 2001-2011. The average follow-up was 7.3 years (2 months - 10.8 years). We have used Sustanon® 250 i.m. every 3 weeks or Nebido® i.m. every 3 months for continual testosterone replacement therapy. We performed to all patients the transrectal ultrasonography of prostate and seminal vesicles by biplanar rectal probe every 6 months. During the transrectal ultrasonography we observed in 22 (71.0 %) patients changes in prostatic tissue. In case of 12 patients were diagnosed asymptomatic prostatic cysts, in 9 patients prostatolithiasis and in 5 patients changes in echogenity of prostatic tissue. In 2 patients was found simultaneous occurrence of prostatic cyst and prostolithiasis, in further 2 patients simultaneous occurrence of hyperechogenic prostatic lesion and prostatolithiasis. The above described findings were diagnosed in 5 patients in the treatment lasting from 3 to 5 years, for the other 17 men with hormone replacement therapy longer than 5 years. The study presents long term results of complex treatment in patients with disorders of sexual development, onset and progress of puberty. The long term treatment of these patients in interdisciplinary cooperation of endocrinologist and andrologist may significantly contribute to clarify an impact of testosterone replacement therapy on prostate development.

  15. Neurological, psychological, and cognitive disorders in patients with chronic kidney disease on conservative and replacement therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lai, Silvia; Mecarelli, Oriano; Pulitano, Patrizia; Romanello, Roberto; Davi, Leonardo; Zarabla, Alessia; Mariotti, Amalia; Carta, Maria; Tasso, Giorgia; Poli, Luca; Mitterhofer, Anna Paola; Testorio, Massimo; Frassetti, Nicla; Aceto, Paola; Galani, Alessandro; Lai, Carlo

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Chronic kidney disease (CKD) is a highly prevalent condition in the world. Neurological, psychological, and cognitive disorders, related to CKD, could contribute to the morbidity, mortality, and poor quality of life of these patients. The aim of this study was to assess the neurological, psychological, and cognitive imbalance in patients with CKD on conservative and replacement therapy. Seventy-four clinically stable patients affected by CKD on conservative therapy, replacement therapy (hemodialysis (HD), peritoneal dialysis (PD)), or with kidney transplantation (KT) and 25 healthy controls (HC), matched for age and sex were enrolled. Clinical, laboratory, and instrumental examinations, as renal function, inflammation and mineral metabolism indexes, electroencephalogram (EEG), psychological (MMPI-2, Sat P), and cognitive tests (neuropsychological tests, NPZ5) were carried out. The results showed a significant differences in the absolute and relative power of delta band and relative power of theta band of EEG (P = 0.008, P 2D3) (P 2D3, intact parathyroid hormone (iPTH), phosphorus, and cynical and hysterical personality, are correlated with higher relative power of delta (P = 0.016) and theta band (P = 0.016). Moreover, all NPZ5 scores showed a significant difference between the means of nephropathic patients and the means of the HC, and a positive correlation with eGFR, serum nitrogen, CRP, iPTH, and vitamin D. In CKD patients, simple and noninvasive instruments, as EEG, and cognitive-psychological tests, should be performed and careful and constant monitoring of renal risk factors, probably involved in neuropsychological complications (inflammation, disorders of mineral metabolism, electrolyte disorders, etc.), should be carried out. Early identification and adequate therapy of neuropsychological, and cognitive disorders, might enable a better quality of life and a major compliance with a probable reduction in the healthcare costs. PMID

  16. Controversies in testosterone replacement therapy: testosterone and cardiovascular disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kathleen Hwang

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available The role of testosterone in the cardiovascular (CV health of men is controversial. Data suggest that both the condition and treatment of clinical hypogonadism is associated with decreased CV mortality; however, two recent studies suggest that hypogonadal subjects treated with testosterone replacement therapy have a higher incidence of new CV events. There has been increased media attention concerning the risk of CV disease in men treated with testosterone. Until date, there are no long-term prospective studies to determine safety. Literature spanning over the past 30 years has suggested that not only is there a possible increased CV risk in men with low levels of testosterone, but the benefits from testosterone therapy may even lower this risk. We review here the recent studies that have garnered such intense scrutiny. This article is intended as a thorough review of testosterone levels and CV risk, providing the clinician with the facts needed to make informed clinical decisions in managing patients with clinical hypogonadism.

  17. Estrogen replacement therapy and cardioprotection: mechanisms and controversies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M.T.R. Subbiah

    2002-03-01

    Full Text Available Epidemiological and case-controlled studies suggest that estrogen replacement therapy might be beneficial in terms of primary prevention of coronary heart disease (CHD. This beneficial effect of estrogens was initially considered to be due to the reduction of low density lipoproteins (LDL and to increases in high density lipoproteins (HDL. Recent studies have shown that estrogens protect against oxidative stress and decrease LDL oxidation. Estrogens have direct effects on the arterial tissue and modulate vascular reactivity through nitric oxide and prostaglandin synthesis. While many of the effects of estrogen on vascular tissue are believed to be mediated by estrogen receptors alpha and ß, there is evidence for `immediate non-genomic' effects. The role of HDL in interacting with 17ß-estradiol including its esterification and transfer of esterified estrogens to LDL is beginning to be elucidated. Despite the suggested positive effects of estrogens, two recent placebo-controlled clinical trials in women with CHD did not detect any beneficial effects on overall coronary events with estrogen therapy. In fact, there was an increase in CHD events in some women. Mutations in thrombogenic genes (factor V Leiden, prothrombin mutation, etc. in a subset of women may play a role in this unexpected finding. Thus, the cardioprotective effect of estrogens appears to be more complicated than originally thought and requires more research.

  18. Adherence to hormone therapy among women with breast cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brito, Claudia; Portela, Margareth Crisóstomo; de Vasconcellos, Mauricio Teixeira Leite

    2014-06-03

    Despite the excellent results obtained with hormone therapy, the long treatment period and the side effects associated with its use make patient adherence difficult. Moreover, certain aspects of health care can mitigate or exacerbate non-adherence. This study aimed to identify the factors associated with adherence to hormone therapy for breast cancer, with the goal of contributing to the reformulation of the care process and to improvements in outcomes. This was a retrospective longitudinal study based on secondary data. The study integrated and analyzed data from a cohort of 5,861 women with breast cancer who were identified in the databases of the Brazilian National Cancer Institute [Instituto Nacional de Câncer - INCA] and the Unified Health System [Sistema Único de Saúde - SUS]. All of the patients were treated at INCA, which dispenses free medication, and the follow-up period lasted from 01/01/2004 to 10/29/2010. The outcome of interest was hormone treatment adherence, which was defined as the possession of medication, and a logistic regression model was employed to identify the socio-demographic, behavioral, clinical, and health care variables that were independently associated with the variations in this outcome. The proportion of women who adhered to hormone therapy was 76.3%. The likelihood of adherence to hormone therapy increased with each additional year of age, as well as among women with a secondary or higher level education, those with a partner, those who underwent surgery, those who had more consultations with a breast specialist and clinical oncologist, and those who underwent psychotherapy; the effect for the latter increased with each additional consultation. Conversely, the likelihood of adherence was lower among patients at a non-curable stage, those who were alcohol drinkers, those who received chemotherapy, those who had undergone more tests and had more hospitalizations, and those who used tamoxifen and combined aromatase inhibitors

  19. Adherence and discontinuation of oral hormonal therapy in patients with hormone receptor positive breast cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ayres, Lorena Rocha; Baldoni, André de Oliveira; Borges, Anna Paula de Sá; Pereira, Leonardo Régis Leira

    2014-02-01

    Oral treatment in women with breast cancer has been increasingly used. However, a potentially negative side of oral medication is poor patient adherence and/or discontinuation, which reduces the treatment effectiveness, accelerating progression of the disease and reducing the patient survival rate. To compare the rates of adherence and/or discontinuation and the methodologies used to assess these outcomes. It was conducted an integrative review of original articles published from 2000 to 2012, in which their primary outcome was to quantify medication adherence and/or discontinuation of oral hormonal therapy in patients with hormone receptor positive breast cancer. Original studies were searched in the PubMed/MEDLINE, Scopus, Embase and SciELO databases. The Medical Subject Heading was used to define descriptors. The descriptor "breast neoplasms" was used in all combinations. Each of the descriptors "medication adherence" and "patient compliance" were combined with each of the following descriptors "tamoxifen", "aromatase inhibitors", "selective estrogen receptor modulators", or the terms "letrozole", "anastrozole", and "exemestane". Twenty-four original articles were included. Our study showed a wide range of adherence and discontinuation rates, ranging from 45-95.7 and 12-73 %, respectively. Regarding the methodological development of the selected articles, a high prevalence (87.5 %) of prospective and/or retrospective longitudinal studies was found. In addition, there was a high prevalence of studies using a database (70.8 %). Among some of the studies, it was shown that patient adherence to hormonal therapy gradually reduces, while discontinuation increases during the treatment. It was observed a great diversity among rates of adherence and/or discontinuation of hormonal therapy for breast cancer, which may be due to a lack of methodology standardization. Therefore, adequate and validated methods to ensure reliability of the results and allow comparison in the

  20. Hormone therapy in transgender adults is safe with provider supervision; A review of hormone therapy sequelae for transgender individuals

    OpenAIRE

    Jamie D. Weinand, BS, BA; Joshua D. Safer, MD

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: Some providers report concern for the safety of transgender hormone therapy (HT). Methods: This is a systematic literature review of HT safety for transgender adults. Results: Current literature suggests HT is safe when followed carefully for certain risks. The greatest health concern for HT in transgender women is venous thromboembolism. HT among transgender men appears to cause polycythemia. Both groups experienced elevated fasting glucose. There is no increase in cancer...

  1. The relationship between breast density and bone mineral density in never users of postmenopausal hormone therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seckin, Berna; Pekcan, Meryem Kuru; Inal, Hasan Ali; Gulerman, Cavidan

    2017-06-01

    Estrogen is known to affect both mammographic breast density and bone mineral density (BMD), but there are inconsistent results about the association of these density measurements in postmenopausal women. Furthermore, there are scarce data on the relationship between breast density and BMD in never users of postmenopausal hormone therapy. In this study, we examined the relationship between mammographic breast density and BMD in postmenopausal women who were never hormone replacement therapy users. A total of 293 postmenopausal women were enrolled in this cross-sectional study. Mammograms and BMD measurements for screening purposes were obtained. Assessment of mammographic breast density was performed by using breast imaging reporting and data system classification. The BMD was measured using dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry of the lumbar spine and femoral neck. Grade 1 breast density was observed in 64 women (21.8 %), grade 2 in 113 women (38.6 %) and grades 3 and 4 in 116 (39.6 %) women. Breast density decreased with increasing age and body mass index (BMI). Meanwhile, no significant differences were detected in BMD measures of the hip (p = 0.14) and lumbar spine (p = 0.29) among the breast density categories. After adjusting for age and BMI, the differences in the mean BMD at the hip and lumbar spine across the breast density categories remained insignificant (p = 0.26 and 0.11, respectively). There is no evidence of a relationship between mammographic breast density and BMD in postmenopausal women who had never used hormone replacement therapy.

  2. Mitochondrial Replacement Therapy: Halachic Considerations for Enrolling in an Experimental Clinical Trial

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Tendler, Rabbi Moshe D; Loike, John D

    2015-01-01

    .... In this paper we analyze the Jewish halachic perspectives of volunteering for clinical trials by focusing on an innovative technology in reproductive medicine, mitochondrial replacement therapy...

  3. Estrogen, vascular estrogen receptor and hormone therapy in postmenopausal vascular disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khalil, Raouf A

    2013-12-15

    Cardiovascular disease (CVD) is less common in premenopausal women than men of the same age or postmenopausal women, suggesting vascular benefits of estrogen. Estrogen activates estrogen receptors ERα, ERβ and GPR30 in endothelium and vascular smooth muscle (VSM), which trigger downstream signaling pathways and lead to genomic and non-genomic vascular effects such as vasodilation, decreased VSM contraction and growth and reduced vascular remodeling. However, randomized clinical trials (RCTs), such as the Women's Health Initiative (WHI) and Heart and Estrogen/progestin Replacement Study (HERS), have shown little vascular benefits and even adverse events with menopausal hormone therapy (MHT), likely due to factors related to the MHT used, ER profile, and RCT design. Some MHT forms, dose, combinations or route of administration may have inadequate vascular effects. Age-related changes in ER amount, distribution, integrity and post-ER signaling could alter the vascular response to MHT. The subject's age, preexisting CVD, and hormone environment could also reduce the effects of MHT. Further evaluation of natural and synthetic estrogens, phytoestrogens, and selective estrogen-receptor modulators (SERMs), and the design of appropriate MHT combinations, dose, route and 'timing' could improve the effectiveness of conventional MHT and provide alternative therapies in the peri-menopausal period. Targeting ER using specific ER agonists, localized MHT delivery, and activation of specific post-ER signaling pathways could counter age-related changes in ER. Examination of the hormone environment and conditions associated with hormone imbalance such as polycystic ovary syndrome may reveal the causes of abnormal hormone-receptor interactions. Consideration of these factors in new RCTs such as the Kronos Early Estrogen Prevention Study (KEEPS) could enhance the vascular benefits of estrogen in postmenopausal CVD. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Breast Cancer Risk After Radiation Therapy for Hodgkin Lymphoma: Influence of Gonadal Hormone Exposure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krul, Inge M; Opstal-van Winden, Annemieke W J; Aleman, Berthe M P; Janus, Cécile P M; van Eggermond, Anna M; De Bruin, Marie L; Hauptmann, Michael; Krol, Augustinus D G; Schaapveld, Michael; Broeks, Annegien; Kooijman, Karen R; Fase, Sandra; Lybeert, Marnix L; Zijlstra, Josée M; van der Maazen, Richard W M; Kesminiene, Ausrele; Diallo, Ibrahima; de Vathaire, Florent; Russell, Nicola S; van Leeuwen, Flora E

    2017-07-18

    Young women treated with chest radiation therapy (RT) for Hodgkin lymphoma (HL) experience a strongly increased risk of breast cancer (BC). It is unknown whether endogenous and exogenous gonadal hormones affect RT-associated BC risk. We conducted a nested case-control study among female 5-year HL survivors treated before age 41. Hormone exposure and HL treatment data were collected through medical records and questionnaires for 174 BC case patients and 466 control patients. Radiation dose to breast tumor location was estimated based on RT charts, simulation films, and mammography reports. We observed a linear radiation dose-response curve with an adjusted excess odds ratio (EOR) of 6.1%/Gy (95% confidence interval [CI]: 2.1%-15.4%). Women with menopause <30 years (caused by high-dose procarbazine or pelvic RT) had a lower BC risk (OR, 0.13; 95% CI, 0.03-0.51) than did women with menopause ≥50 years. BC risk increased by 6.4% per additional year of post-RT intact ovarian function (P<.001). Among women with early menopause (<45 years), hormone replacement therapy (HRT) use for ≥2 years did not increase BC risk (OR, 0.86; 95% CI, 0.32-2.32), whereas this risk was nonsignificantly increased among women without early menopause (OR, 3.69; 95% CI, 0.97-14.0; P for interaction: .06). Stratification by duration of post-RT intact ovarian function or HRT use did not statistically significantly modify the radiation dose-response curve. BC risk in female HL survivors increases linearly with radiation dose. HRT does not appear to increase BC risk for HL survivors with therapy-induced early menopause. There are no indications that endogenous and exogenous gonadal hormones affect the radiation dose-response relationship. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Prostate volume and growth during testosterone replacement therapy is related to visceral obesity in Klinefelter syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Selice, R; Caretta, N; Di Mambro, A; Torino, M; Palego, P; Ferlin, A; Foresta, C

    2013-12-01

    Klinefelter syndrome (KS) is a chromosomal alteration characterized by increased risk of metabolic syndrome, mainly caused by visceral obesity. In the last years, obesity has been studied as a potential risk factor for prostate disease and recently a link has been demonstrated between visceral adiposity with prostate volume. The aim of this study was to analyze the relationship between obesity and prostate volume and growth during testosterone therapy in KS subjects. We evaluated reproductive hormones, metabolic parameters, anthropometric measures, PSA, and prostate volume in 121 naïve non-mosaic KS patients and 60 age-matched healthy male controls. Fifty-six KS hypogonadic subjects were treated with testosterone-gel 2% and reevaluated after 18 months of treatment. Prostate volume in KS was positively related to waist circumference (WC). The KS group with WC ≥94 cm had significantly higher prostate volume, BMI, insulin plasma levels, homeostasis model assessment index, total cholesterol, triglycerides, and glycemia with respect to the KS group with WC testosterone replacement therapy, only hypogonadic KS men with WC ≥94 cm had a statistically significant increase in prostate volume. Furthermore, in untreated KS subjects, prostate volume showed a statistically significant increase after 18 months of follow-up only in subjects with WC ≥94 cm. This study showed that visceral obesity, insulin resistance, and lipid and glucose metabolism alterations are associated with prostate volume and growth during testosterone replacement therapy in KS, independently from androgen or estrogen levels. These latter findings might provide the basis for a better management and follow-up of KS subjects.

  6. Warning sign of postmenopausal hormone replacement treatment%绝经后激素治疗慎用证

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    孙爱军

    2011-01-01

    Patients with menopausal symptoms, especially those who are also complicated with any disease of uterine fibroids, endometriosis, diabetes, hypertension, thrombophilia, gallbladder diseases, asthma, and hyperprolactinemia, or also with a family history of breast cancer, should be individually and carefully assessed when hormone replacement therapy is applied to them, so as to provide better medical service to them.%有更年期症状的患者如同时合并子宫肌瘤、子宫内膜异位症、糖尿病、高血压、血栓形成倾向、胆囊疾病、哮喘、高泌乳素血症或有乳腺癌家族史应用激素治疗时应仔细评估,个体化分析每个患者的慎用情况,以期为患者提供更好的医疗服务.

  7. Status of renal replacement therapy and peritoneal dialysis in Mexico.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cueto-Manzano, Alfonso M; Rojas-Campos, Enrique

    2007-01-01

    Mexico is struggling to gain a place among developed countries; however, there are many socioeconomic and health problems still waiting for resolution. While Mexico has the twelfth largest economy in the world, a large portion of its population is impoverished. Treatment for end-stage renal disease (377 patients per million population) is determined by the individual's access to resources such as private medical care (approximately 3%) and public sources (Social Security System: approximately 40%; Health Secretariat: approximately 57%). With only 6% of the gross national product spent on healthcare and most treatment providers being public health institutions that are often under economic restrictions, it is not surprising that many Mexican patients do not receive renal replacement therapy. Mexico is still the country with the largest utilization of peritoneal dialysis (PD) in the world, with 18% on automated PD, 56% on continuous ambulatory PD (CAPD), and 26% on hemodialysis. Results of PD (patient morbi-mortality, peritonitis rate, and technique survival) in Mexico are comparable to other countries. However, malnutrition and diabetes mellitus are highly prevalent in Mexican patients on CAPD programs, and these conditions are among the most important risk factors for a poor outcome in our setting.

  8. Technological advances in renal replacement therapy: five years and beyond.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rastogi, Anjay; Nissenson, Allen R

    2009-12-01

    The worldwide epidemic of chronic kidney disease shows no signs of abating in the near future. Current dialysis forms of renal replacement therapy (RRT), even though successful in sustaining life and improving quality of life somewhat for patients with ESRD, have many limitations that result in still unacceptably high morbidity and mortality. Transplantation is an excellent option but is limited by the scarcity of organs. An ideal form of RRT would mimic the functions of natural kidneys and be transparent to the patient, as well as affordable to society. Recent advances in technology, although generally in early stages of development, might achieve these goals. The application of nanotechnology, microfluidics, bioreactors with kidney cells, and miniaturized sorbent systems to regenerate dialysate makes clinical reality seem closer than ever before. Finally, stem cells hold much promise, both for kidney disease and as a source of tissues and organs. In summary, nephrology is at an exciting crossroad with the application of innovative and novel technologies to RRT that hold considerable promise for the near future.

  9. EMAS position statement: Testosterone replacement therapy in the aging male‏.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dimopoulou, Christina; Ceausu, Iuliana; Depypere, Herman; Lambrinoudaki, Irene; Mueck, Alfred; Pérez-López, Faustino R; Rees, Margaret; van der Schouw, Yvonne T; Senturk, Levent M; Simonsini, Tommaso; Stevenson, John C; Stute, Petra; Goulis, Dimitrios G

    2016-02-01

    Late-onset hypogonadism (LOH) represents a common clinical entity in aging males, characterized by the presence of symptoms (most usually of a sexual nature, such as decreased libido, decreased spontaneous erections and erectile dysfunction) and signs, in combination with low serum testosterone concentrations. Whether testosterone replacement therapy (TRT) should be offered to those individuals is still under extensive debate. The aim of this position statement is to provide and critically appraise evidence on TRT in the aging male, focusing on pathophysiology and characteristics of LOH, indications for TRT, available therapeutic agents, monitoring and treatment-associated risks. Literature review and consensus of expert opinion. Diagnosis and treatment of LOH is justified, if a combination of symptoms of testosterone deficiency and low testosterone is present. Patients receiving TRT could profit with regard to obesity, metabolic syndrome, type 2 diabetes mellitus, sexual function and osteoporosis and should undergo scheduled testing for adverse events regularly. Potential adverse effects of TRT on cardiovascular disease, prostate cancer and sleep apnea are as yet unclear and remain to be investigated in large-scale prospective studies. Management of aging men with LOH should include individual evaluation of co-morbidities and careful risk versus benefit assessment. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Study on hormone replacement therapy for patients with poor endometrial growth to freezing-thawing embryo transfer%激素替代方案应用于子宫内膜生长不良患者冻胚移植内膜准备

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    朱鹏云; 林妍; 刘芸

    2012-01-01

    Objective To investigate the effects of hormone replacement therapy on endometrial thickness of different dosages and different duration of the patients with poor endometrial growth receiving oral estrogen in frozen-thawed embryo transfer cycles. Methods Retrospective analysis was performed on 97 frozen-thawed embryo transfer cycles of patients with poor endometrial growth treated with estrogen. Patients were divided into implantation group and non-implantation group based on clinical outcome to analyze the relation between embryo implantation outcome and endometrial thickness. Furthermore, the duration and dosage of estrogen were analyzed to detect the effects of different durations and dosages of estrogen on endometrial thickness. Results ( 1 )lt was observed that there was no statistical difference of the endometrial thickness in the estrogen application time and the day of deciding embryo transfer between the embryo implantation group and non-implantation group. However, the endometrial thickening value( thickness value of the day of deciding embryo transfer minus the value of the 12th day of estrogen treatment )of implantation group was significantly higher than that of non-implantation group( P 0. 05 ). ( 3 )There was no significant different on the endometrial thickness and endometrial thickening value between the groups of taking 6 mg estrogen and 9 mg estrogen on the day of deciding embryo transfer( P > 0. 05 ). Conclusions For patients with poor endometrial growth treated with estrogen for preparing endometria in freezing-thawing embryo transfer, the endometrial thickening value was one of the important factors for outcome of frozen-thawed embryo transfer. Taking the estrogen within 19-21 days was favorable for endometrial growth and embryo implantation, but increasing the dosage had no effect on endometrial growth.%目的 探讨子宫内膜生长不良患者行激素替代方案冻融胚胎移植周期中口服雌激素的不同时间及剂量

  11. Sexual dysfunctions in men affected by autoimmune Addison's disease before and after short-term gluco- and mineralocorticoid replacement therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Granata, Antonio; Tirabassi, Giacomo; Pugni, Valeria; Arnaldi, Giorgio; Boscaro, Marco; Carani, Cesare; Balercia, Giancarlo

    2013-08-01

    There is evidence suggesting that autoimmune Addison's disease (AD) could be associated with sexual dysfunctions probably caused by gluco- and mineralocorticoid deficiency; however, no study has yet treated this subject in males. To evaluate male sexuality and psychological correlates in autoimmune AD before and after gluco- and mineralocorticoid replacement therapy. Twelve subjects with a first diagnosis of autoimmune AD were studied before (baseline) and 2 months after (recovery phase) initiating hormone replacement therapy. Erectile function (EF), orgasmic function (OF), sexual desire (SD), intercourse satisfaction (IS), overall satisfaction (OS), depression, and anxiety were studied using a number of questionnaires (International Index of Erectile Function, Beck Depression Inventory, and Spielberger State-Trait Anxiety Inventory); clinical, biochemical, and hormone data were included in the analysis. At baseline, low values were found for EF, OF, SD, IS, and OS and high values for depression and anxiety; all of these parameters improved significantly in the recovery phase compared with baseline. EF variation between the two phases correlated significantly and positively with the variation of serum cortisol, urinary free cortisol, systolic blood pressure, and diastolic blood pressure and inversely with that of upright plasma renin activity. Multiple linear regression analysis using EF variation as dependent variable confirmed the relationship of the latter with variation of serum cortisol, urinary free cortisol, and upright plasma renin activity but not with variation of systolic and diastolic blood pressure. Our study showed that onset of autoimmune AD in males is associated with a number of sexual dysfunctions, all reversible after initiating replacement hormone therapy; cortisol and aldosterone deficiency seems to play an important role in the genesis of erectile dysfunction although the mechanism of their activity is not clear. © 2012 International Society

  12. β-lactam antibiotic concentrations during continuous renal replacement therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-01-01

    Introduction The use of standard doses of β-lactam antibiotics during continuous renal replacement therapy (CRRT) may result in inadequate serum concentrations. The aim of this study was to evaluate the adequacy of unadjusted drug regimens (i.e., similar to those used in patients with normal renal function) in patients treated with CRRT and the influence of CRRT intensity on drug clearance. Methods We reviewed data from 50 consecutive adult patients admitted to our Department of Intensive Care in whom routine therapeutic drug monitoring (TDM) of broad-spectrum β-lactam antibiotics (ceftazidime or cefepime, CEF; piperacillin/tazobactam; TZP; meropenem, MEM) was performed using unadjusted β-lactam antibiotics regimens (CEF = 2 g q8h; TZP = 4 g q6h; MEM = 1 g q8h). Serum drug concentrations were measured twice during the elimination phase by high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC-UV). We considered therapy was adequate when serum drug concentrations were between 4 and 8 times the minimal inhibitory concentration (MIC) of Pseudomonas aeruginosa during optimal periods of time for each drug (≥70% for CEF; ≥ 50% for TZP; ≥ 40% for MEM). Therapy was considered as early (ET) or late (LT) phase if TDM was performed within 48 hours of antibiotic initiation or later on, respectively. Results We collected 73 serum samples from 50 patients (age 58 ± 13 years; Acute Physiology and Chronic Health Evaluation II (APACHE II) score on admission 21 (17–25)), 35 during ET and 38 during LT. Drug concentrations were above 4 times the MIC in 63 (90%), but above 8 times the MIC in 39 (53%) samples. The proportions of patients with adequate drug concentrations during ET and LT were quite similar. We found a weak but significant correlation between β-lactam antibiotics clearance and CRRT intensity. Conclusions In septic patients undergoing CRRT, doses of β-lactam antibiotics similar to those given to patients with normal renal function achieved drug

  13. Postmenopausal hormone therapy and the risk of breast cancer: a contrary thought.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Speroff, Leon

    2008-01-01

    The most important unanswered question regarding postmenopausal hormone therapy and the risk of breast cancer is whether hormone therapy initiates the growth of new breast cancers or whether the epidemiologic data reflect a hormonal impact on preexisting tumors. In this perspective I review the evidence favoring hormonal effects on preexisting tumors and suggest that exposure to combined estrogen and progestin is beneficial, causing greater differentiation and earlier detection of breast cancers.

  14. Effectiveness and adverse effects of hormonal therapy for prostate cancer: Japanese experience and perspective

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Mikio Namiki; Satoru Ueno; Yasuhide Kitagawa; Takashi Fukagai; Hideyuki Akaza

    2012-01-01

    Recently,novel anti-androgens and inhibitors of androgen biosynthesis have been developed through the elucidation of mechanisms of castration resistance of prostate cancer.We believe that these new developments will improve hormonal therapy.On the other hand,there has been an increase in criticism of hormonal therapy,because hormonal therapy is supposed to induce adverse effects such as cardiovascular disease.In this review,we have introduced the Japanese experience of hormonal therapy,because we believe that there may be ethnic differences between Caucasians and Asian people in the efficacy and adverse effects of hormonal therapy.First,we showed that primary hormonal therapy can achieve long-term control of localized prostate cancer in some cases and that quality of life of patients receiving hormonal therapy is rather better than previously thought.Neoadjuvant and adjuvant hormonal therapy in cases undergoing radical prostatectomy or radiotherapy are very useful for high-risk or locally advanced prostate cancer.Further clinical trials are required to confirm the efficacy of neoadjuvant or adjuvant hormonal therapy.We showed that the death from cardiovascular diseases in Japanese patients receiving hormonal therapy was not higher than that in the general population.However,efforts should be made to decrease the adverse effects of hormonal therapy,because life-style change may increase the susceptibility to adverse effects by hormonal therapy even in Japan.Managements of endocrine and metabolic dysfunction,such as diabetes mellitus,are essential.New hormonal compounds such as selective androgen receptor modulators capable of specifically targeting prostate cancer are expected to be developed.

  15. Growth hormone therapy and craniofacial bones: a comprehensive review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Litsas, G

    2013-09-01

    Growth hormone (GH) has significant effects on linear bone growth, bone mass and bone metabolism. The primary role of GH supplementation in children with GH deficiency, those born small for gestational age or with other types of disorders in somatic development is to increase linear growth. However, GH therapy seems to elicit varying responses in the craniofacial region. Whereas the effects of GH administration on somatic development are well documented, comparatively little is known of its effects on the craniofacial region. The purpose of this review was to search the literature and compile results from both animal and human studies related to the impact of GH on craniofacial growth.

  16. Analgesic Nephropathy and Renal Replacement Therapy in Australia: Trends, Comorbidities and Outcomes

    OpenAIRE

    Chang, Sean Haw; Mathew, Timothy Hamish; McDonald, Stephen Peter

    2008-01-01

    Background and objectives: This study examined age-specific incidence and prevalence of renal replacement therapy attributed to analgesic nephropathy from 1971 through 2005 and adjusted comorbidity prevalence and survival of patients who had analgesic nephropathy and were on renal replacement therapy (compared with control subjects without diabetes).

  17. Magnetic resonance imaging in infantile spasms: effects of hormonal therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Konishi, Y; Yasujima, M; Kuriyama, M; Konishi, K; Hayakawa, K; Fujii, Y; Ishii, Y; Sudo, M

    1992-01-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) was performed on five patients with infantile spasms who were treated with relatively low doses of adrenocorticotrophic hormone (ACTH) to study the extent of brain shrinkage induced by ACTH therapy. MRI prior to ACTH therapy revealed periventricular hyperintensity (PVH) areas and poor myelination in four patients. In one case, MRI performed 2 days after initiation of ACTH therapy also showed PVH and poor myelination. Brain shrinkage was observed 2 weeks after initiation of ACTH therapy. The most impressive follow-up finding upon MRI was the decrease in PVH found in four patients. The differentiation between myelinated white matter and surrounding cortex became poorer in three cases. Cortical atrophy progressed in all patients but ventricular dilation progressed in only one patient. At the end of ACTH therapy, ventricular dilation progressed in all cases. These findings suggest that loss of water not only from periventricular white matter but also from cortex is the main etiological factor of brain shrinkage induced by ACTH.

  18. Testosterone Replacement Therapy and Mortality in Older Men.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hackett, G I

    2016-02-01

    While US testosterone prescriptions have tripled in the last decade with lower trends in Europe, debate continues over the risks, benefits and appropriate use of testosterone replacement therapy (TRT). Several authors blame advertising and the availability of more convenient formulations, whilst others have pointed out that the routine testing of men with erectile dysfunction (ED) (a significant marker of cardiovascular risk) and those with diabetes would inevitably increase the diagnosis of hypogonadism and lead to an increase in totally appropriate prescribing. They commented that this was merely an appropriate correction of previous under-diagnosis and under-treatment in line with evidence based guidelines. It is unlikely that persuasive advertising or convenient formulations could grow a market over such a sustained period if the treatment was not effective. Urologists and primary care physicians are the most frequent initiators of TRT usually for ED. Benefits are clearly established for sexual function, increase in lean muscle mass and strength, mood and cognitive function, with a possible reduction in frailty and osteoporosis. There remains no evidence that TRT is associated with increased risk of prostate cancer or symptomatic benign prostatic hyperplasia, yet the decision to initiate and continue therapy is often decided by urologists. The cardiovascular issues associated with TRT have been clarified by recent studies showing that therapy associated with clear increases in serum testosterone levels to the normal range is associated with reduced all-cause mortality. Studies reporting to show increased risk have been subject to flawed designs with inadequate baseline diagnosis and follow-up testing. Effectively, they have compared non-treated patients with under-treated or non-compliant subjects involving a range of different therapy regimes. Recent evidence suggests long-acting injections may be associated with decreased cardiovascular risk, but the

  19. Cost analysis of the Spanish renal replacement therapy programme.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Villa, Guillermo; Rodríguez-Carmona, Ana; Fernández-Ortiz, Lucía; Cuervo, Jesús; Rebollo, Pablo; Otero, Alfonso; Arrieta, Javier

    2011-11-01

    A cost analysis of the Spanish Renal Replacement Therapy (RRT) programme in the year 2010, for end-stage renal disease (ESRD) patients, was performed from the perspective of the Public Administration. The costs associated with each RRT modality [hemodialysis (HD), peritoneal dialysis (PD) and kidney transplantation (Tx)] were analysed. The Spanish ESRD incidence and prevalence figures in the year 2010 were forecasted in order to enable the calculation of an aggregate cost for each modality. Costs were mainly computed based on a review of the existing literature and of the Official Bulletins of the Spanish Autonomous Communities. Data from Oblikue Consulting eSalud health care costs database and from several Spanish public sources were also employed. In the year 2010, the forecasted incidence figures for HD, PD and Tx were 5409, 822 and 2317 patients, respectively. The forecasted prevalence figures were 22,582, 2420 and 24,761 patients, respectively. The average annual per-patient costs (incidence and prevalence) were €2651 and €37,968 (HD), €1808 and €25,826 (PD) and €38,313 and €6283 (Tx). Indirect costs amounted to €8929 (HD), €7429 (PD) and €5483 (Tx). The economic impact of the Spanish RRT programme on the Public Administration budget was estimated at ~€1829 million (indirect costs included): €1327 (HD), €109 (PD) and €393 (Tx) million. HD accounted for >70% of the aggregate costs of the Spanish RRT programme in 2010. From a costs minimization perspective, it would be preferable if the number of incident and prevalent patients in PD were increased.

  20. Principles of antibacterial dosing in continuous renal replacement therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Gordon; Gomersall, Charles D; Tian, Qi; Joynt, Gavin M; Freebairn, Ross; Lipman, Jeffrey

    2009-07-01

    To outline the concepts involved in optimizing antibacterial dosing in critically ill patients with acute renal failure undergoing continuous renal replacement therapy (CRRT), provide a strategy for optimizing dosing, and summarize the data required to implement the strategy. MEDLINE search from February 1986 to 2008. Optimal dosing of antibacterials is dependent on achieving pharmacokinetic targets associated with maximal killing of bacteria and improved outcomes. The initial dose is dependent on the volume of distribution. Maintenance doses are dependent on clearance. Both should be adjusted according to the pharmacokinetic target associated with optimal bacterial killing, when known. The volume of distribution of some antibacterials is altered by critical illness or acute renal failure or both. Clearance by CRRT is dependent on the dose and mode of CRRT and the sieving or saturation coefficient of the drug. Both sieving and saturation coefficient are related to the plasma protein binding and thus may be altered in renal failure. Appropriate dose calculation requires knowledge of the pharmacokinetic target and the usual minimum inhibitory concentration of the suspected organism in the patient's locality (or if unavailable, the break point for the organism), published pharmacokinetic data (volume of distribution, non-CRRT clearance) on critically ill patients receiving CRRT (which may differ substantially from noncritically ill patients or those without renal failure), the sieving or saturation coefficient of the relevant drug in critically ill patients, the dose and mode of CRRT being used, and the actual dose of CRRT that is delivered. This large number of variables results in considerable inter- and intrapatient heterogeneity in dose requirements. This article provides basic principles and relevant data to guide the clinician in prescribing individualized dosing regimes.

  1. Fibromyalgic syndromes: could growth hormone therapy be beneficial?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cuatrecasas, Guillem

    2009-06-01

    Fibromyalgia is a chronic, idiopathic condition in which patients experience pain, asthenia and fatigue. The pathogenesis of the condition is unknown, and numerous mechanisms have been postulated, including neural hypersensitivity and autoimmunity. Symptoms of fibromyalgia are broadly similar to those of growth hormone deficiency (GHD), and there is evidence of decreased GH secretion and functional GHD in a subset of patients with fibromyalgia. Use of GH therapy in this patient population therefore represents a rational treatment strategy. Preliminary placebo-controlled trials have shown that GH therapy can significantly improve signs and symptoms of fibromyalgia and quality of life in patients receiving the current standard of care. Despite the use of relatively high doses of GH in these patients, treatment is well tolerated. Several mechanisms of action for GH in fibromyalgia have been suggested, including both central and peripheral effects.

  2. Cardiovascular Disease Among Transgender Adults Receiving Hormone Therapy: A Narrative Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Streed, Carl G; Harfouch, Omar; Marvel, Francoise; Blumenthal, Roger S; Martin, Seth S; Mukherjee, Monica

    2017-08-15

    Recent reports estimate that 0.6% of adults in the United States, or approximately 1.4 million persons, identify as transgender. Despite gains in rights and media attention, the reality is that transgender persons experience health disparities, and a dearth of research and evidence-based guidelines remains regarding their specific health needs. The lack of research to characterize cardiovascular disease (CVD) and CVD risk factors in transgender populations receiving cross-sex hormone therapy (CSHT) limits appropriate primary and specialty care. As with hormone therapy in cisgender persons (that is, those whose sex assigned at birth aligns with their gender identity), existing research in transgender populations suggests that CVD risk factors are altered by CSHT. Currently, systemic hormone replacement for cisgender adults requires a nuanced discussion based on baseline risk factors and age of administration of exogenous hormones because of concern regarding an increased risk for myocardial infarction and stroke. For transgender adults, CSHT has been associated with the potential for worsening CVD risk factors (such as blood pressure elevation, insulin resistance, and lipid derangements), although these changes have not been associated with increases in morbidity or mortality in transgender men receiving CSHT. For transgender women, CSHT has known thromboembolic risk, and lower-dose transdermal estrogen formulations are preferred over high-dose oral formulations. In addition, many studies of transgender adults focus predominantly on younger persons, limiting the generalizability of CSHT in older transgender adults. The lack of randomized controlled trials comparing various routes and formulations of CSHT, as well as the paucity of prospective cohort studies, limits knowledge of any associations between CSHT and CVD.

  3. Neurological, psychological, and cognitive disorders in patients with chronic kidney disease on conservative and replacement therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lai, Silvia; Mecarelli, Oriano; Pulitano, Patrizia; Romanello, Roberto; Davi, Leonardo; Zarabla, Alessia; Mariotti, Amalia; Carta, Maria; Tasso, Giorgia; Poli, Luca; Mitterhofer, Anna Paola; Testorio, Massimo; Frassetti, Nicla; Aceto, Paola; Galani, Alessandro; Lai, Carlo

    2016-11-01

    Chronic kidney disease (CKD) is a highly prevalent condition in the world. Neurological, psychological, and cognitive disorders, related to CKD, could contribute to the morbidity, mortality, and poor quality of life of these patients. The aim of this study was to assess the neurological, psychological, and cognitive imbalance in patients with CKD on conservative and replacement therapy.Seventy-four clinically stable patients affected by CKD on conservative therapy, replacement therapy (hemodialysis (HD), peritoneal dialysis (PD)), or with kidney transplantation (KT) and 25 healthy controls (HC), matched for age and sex were enrolled. Clinical, laboratory, and instrumental examinations, as renal function, inflammation and mineral metabolism indexes, electroencephalogram (EEG), psychological (MMPI-2, Sat P), and cognitive tests (neuropsychological tests, NPZ5) were carried out.The results showed a significant differences in the absolute and relative power of delta band and relative power of theta band of EEG (P = 0.008, P therapy, and Grade 2-3 in KT patients. The scales of MMPI-2 hysteria and paranoia, are significantly correlated with creatinine, eGFR, serum nitrogen, CRP, 1,25-(OH)2D3, intact parathyroid hormone (iPTH), phosphorus, and cynical and hysterical personality, are correlated with higher relative power of delta (P = 0.016) and theta band (P = 0.016). Moreover, all NPZ5 scores showed a significant difference between the means of nephropathic patients and the means of the HC, and a positive correlation with eGFR, serum nitrogen, CRP, iPTH, and vitamin D.In CKD patients, simple and noninvasive instruments, as EEG, and cognitive-psychological tests, should be performed and careful and constant monitoring of renal risk factors, probably involved in neuropsychological complications (inflammation, disorders of mineral metabolism, electrolyte disorders, etc.), should be carried out. Early identification and adequate therapy of neuropsychological

  4. Risk of Breast Cancer in Relation to Combined Effects of Hormone Therapy, Body Mass Index, and Alcohol Use, by Hormone-receptor Status

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hvidtfeldt, Ulla Arthur; Tjonneland, Anne; Keiding, Niels;

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Alcohol consumption, increased body mass index (BMI), and hormone therapy are risk factors for postmenopausal breast cancer, but their combined effects are not well understood. Because hormone therapy is effective for the relief of menopausal symptoms, the identification of "high...... therapy users across all BMI strata (P for interaction = 0.003). A markedly higher risk of breast cancer was also observed for alcohol combined with hormone therapy use compared with abstinent nonusers (P for interaction = 0.02). These effects were primarily restricted to ER-positive cases. Combined...... effects of hormone therapy/high BMI and hormone therapy/alcohol on serum estradiol and testosterone supported the hypothesis of a hormonal pathway linking these exposures to breast cancer. CONCLUSION: These analyses suggest an increased risk of breast cancer associated with hormone therapy use-a risk...

  5. Physiological growth hormone replacement and rate of recurrence of craniopharyngioma: the Genentech National Cooperative Growth Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Timothy R; Cote, David J; Jane, John A; Laws, Edward R

    2016-10-01

    OBJECTIVE The object of this study was to establish recurrence rates in patients with craniopharyngioma postoperatively treated with recombinant human growth hormone (rhGH) as a basis for determining the risk of rhGH therapy in the development of recurrent tumor. METHODS The study included 739 pediatric patients with craniopharyngioma who were naïve to GH upon entering the Genentech National Cooperative Growth Study (NCGS) for treatment. Reoperation for tumor recurrence was documented as an adverse event. Cox proportional-hazards regression models were developed for time to recurrence, using age as the outcome and enrollment date as the predictor. Patients without recurrence were treated as censored. Multivariate logistic regression was used to examine the incidence of recurrence with adjustment for the amount of time at risk. RESULTS Fifty recurrences in these 739 surgically treated patients were recorded. The overall craniopharyngioma recurrence rate in the NCGS was 6.8%, with a median follow-up time of 4.3 years (range 0.7-6.4 years.). Age at the time of study enrollment was statistically significant according to both Cox (p = 0.0032) and logistic (p treatment era.

  6. Tetrac can replace thyroid hormone during brain development in mouse mutants deficient in the thyroid hormone transporter Mct8

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    S. Horn (Sigrun); S. Kersseboom (Simone); S. Mayerl (Steffen); J. Müller (Julia); C. Groba (Claudia); M. Trajkovic-Arsic (Marija); T. Ackermann (Tobias); T.J. Visser (Theo); H. Heuer (Heike)

    2013-01-01

    textabstractThe monocarboxylate transporter 8 (MCT8) plays a critical role in mediating the uptake of thyroid hormones (THs) into the brain. In patients, inactivating mutations in the MCT8 gene are associated with a severe form of psychomotor retardation and abnormal serum TH levels. Here, we evalua

  7. Testosterone replacement therapy outcomes among opioid users: the Testim Registry in the United States (TRiUS).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blick, Gary; Khera, Mohit; Bhattacharya, Rajib K; Nguyen, Dat; Kushner, Harvey; Miner, Martin M

    2012-05-01

    Among patients with hypogonadism-associated comorbidities, opioid users have the highest incidence of hypogonadism. Data from the Testim Registry in the United States were analyzed to determine the efficacy of testosterone replacement therapy in opioid users vs nonusers. Prospective, 12-month observational cohort registry. Hypogonadal men (N = 849) prescribed Testim (but not necessarily testosterone replacement) for the first time. Testim 1% testosterone gel (5-10 g/day). Total and free testosterone, sex hormone-binding globulin, prostate-specific antigen, sexual function, mood/depression, and anthropometric data were assessed. Changes from baseline were analyzed using repeated measures mixed-effects analysis of variance; multiple linear regressions of changes in testosterone levels with sexual function, mood, and opioid use were computed. 90/849 patients (10.6%) reported opioid use at baseline; 75/90 (83%) used opioids for ≥ 30 days prior to baseline. Baseline total testosterone and prostate-specific antigen were not statistically different between opioid users and nonusers; there was a trend for higher sex hormone-binding globulin (P = 0.08) and lower free testosterone (P = 0.05) in opioid users. After 1 month, both opioid users and nonusers had significant (P testosterone, which continued through 12 months. Sexual function and mood improved significantly in both opioid users and nonusers over 12 months, and significantly correlated with change in total testosterone. Testosterone replacement therapy increased serum testosterone in hypogonadal opioid users and nonusers alike. The data suggest that with testosterone replacement, hypogonadal opioid users might be expected to have similar improvements in sexual function and mood as opioid nonusers. Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  8. Replacement

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Radhakrishnan

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available The fishmeal replaced with Spirulina platensis, Chlorella vulgaris and Azolla pinnata and the formulated diet fed to Macrobrachium rosenbergii postlarvae to assess the enhancement ability of non-enzymatic antioxidants (vitamin C and E, enzymatic antioxidants (superoxide dismutase (SOD and catalase (CAT and lipid peroxidation (LPx were analysed. In the present study, the S. platensis, C. vulgaris and A. pinnata inclusion diet fed groups had significant (P < 0.05 improvement in the levels of vitamins C and E in the hepatopancreas and muscle tissue. Among all the diets, the replacement materials in 50% incorporated feed fed groups showed better performance when compared with the control group in non-enzymatic antioxidant activity. The 50% fishmeal replacement (best performance diet fed groups taken for enzymatic antioxidant study, in SOD, CAT and LPx showed no significant increases when compared with the control group. Hence, the present results revealed that the formulated feed enhanced the vitamins C and E, the result of decreased level of enzymatic antioxidants (SOD, CAT and LPx revealed that these feeds are non-toxic and do not produce any stress to postlarvae. These ingredients can be used as an alternative protein source for sustainable Macrobrachium culture.

  9. Renal Replacement Therapy in Support of Combat Operations

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-07-01

    was used to create viable sets; pediatric chest tubes were used as PD catheters and dialysate was made using either intravenous saline solution with...important logistic factor in performing RRT is the volume of fluid required for dialysate (for hemodi- alysis and peritoneal dialysis) or replace- ment...treatment may range on the order of 100 to 1000 L per day per patient. Both the dialysate and replacement fluid must be sterile, and no approach for

  10. Testosterone replacement therapy in patients with prostate cancer after radical prostatectomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pastuszak, Alexander W; Pearlman, Amy M; Lai, Win Shun; Godoy, Guilherme; Sathyamoorthy, Kumaran; Liu, Joceline S; Miles, Brian J; Lipshultz, Larry I; Khera, Mohit

    2013-08-01

    Testosterone replacement therapy in men with prostate cancer is controversial, with concern that testosterone can stimulate cancer growth. We evaluated the safety and efficacy of testosterone in hypogonadal men with prostate cancer treated with radical prostatectomy. We performed a review of 103 hypogonadal men with prostate cancer treated with testosterone after prostatectomy (treatment group) and 49 nonhypogonadal men with cancer treated with prostatectomy (reference group). There were 77 men with low/intermediate (nonhigh) risk cancer and 26 with high risk cancer included in the analysis. All men were treated with transdermal testosterone, and serum hormone, hemoglobin, hematocrit and prostate specific antigen were evaluated for more than 36 months. Median (IQR) patient age in the treatment group was 61.0 years (55.0-67.0), and initial laboratory results included testosterone 261.0 ng/dl (213.0-302.0), prostate specific antigen 0.004 ng/ml (0.002-0.007), hemoglobin 14.7 gm/dl (13.3-15.5) and hematocrit 45.2% (40.4-46.1). Median followup was 27.5 months, at which time a significant increase in testosterone was observed in the treatment group. A significant increase in prostate specific antigen was observed in the high risk and nonhigh risk treatment groups with no increase in the reference group. Overall 4 and 8 cases of cancer recurrence were observed in treatment and reference groups, respectively. Thus, testosterone therapy is effective and, while followed by an increase in prostate specific antigen, does not appear to increase cancer recurrence rates, even in men with high risk prostate cancer. However, given the retrospective nature of this and prior studies, testosterone therapy in men with history of prostate cancer should be performed with a vigorous surveillance protocol. Copyright © 2013 American Urological Association Education and Research, Inc. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Hormone therapy for postmenopausal women—An unanswered issue

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wen-Ling Lee

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Menopause is a biological and natural process that occurs as part of aging in women and is secondary to ovarian failure with resultant estrogen deficiency; therefore, menopause should not be considered as a disease. However, there is no doubt that estrogen deficiency induces general psychological and physical changes, and that postmenopausal women will experience many health-related issues and problems, including osteoporotic fractures, coronary heart disease (CHD, and most importantly for the quality of life (QOL and vasomotor symptoms (VMS such as hot flashes and night sweats. Hormone therapy (HT is very effective in the management of postmenopausal women with symptoms. With the large number of patients being treated with HT, especially the combination of estrogen and progestin therapy (EPT in the Women's Health Initiative (WHI study, clinicians now recognize the potential adverse effects of EPT. Although this concept is much clearer now, some women might still benefit from short-term HT, especially for young postmenopausal women. In this review, some health issues of postmenopausal women, especially alternative therapies are discussed.

  12. A randomized double-blind study of testosterone replacement therapy or placebo in testicular cancer survivors with mild Leydig cell insufficiency (Einstein-intervention)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bandak, Mikkel; Jorgensen, Niels; Juul, Anders

    2017-01-01

    -controlled study, designed to evaluate the effect of testosterone replacement therapy in TC survivors with mild Leydig cell insufficiency. Seventy subjects will be randomized to receive either testosterone replacement therapy or placebo. The subjects will be invited for an information meeting where informed......Background: Elevated serum levels of luteinizing hormone and slightly decreased serum levels of testosterone (mild Leydig cell insufficiency) is a common hormonal disturbance in testicular cancer (TC) survivors. A number of studies have shown that low serum levels of testosterone is associated...... with low grade inflammation and increased risk of metabolic syndrome. However, so far, no studies have evaluated whether testosterone substitution improves metabolic dysfunction in TC survivors with mild Leydig cell insufficiency. Methods/design: This is a single-center, randomized, double-blind, placebo...

  13. RENAL REPLACEMENT THERAPY FOR END-STAGE RENAL DISEASE PATIENTS IN RUSSIAN FEDERATION, 1998–2011 (Report of the Russian Registry of Renal Replacement Therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. A. Tomilina

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The report of the Russian Renal Replacement Therapy Registry covers the period from the year 1998 to 2011 and represents data on the national, regional, and individual patient levels. We summarize information about epidemiology of treated end-stage renal disease in Russia, and describe in details incidence and prevalence for all modalities of renal replacement therapy. The article contains broad spectrum of data on quality of treatment indicators, waiting list, pharmacological treatment, mortality, and survival patterns in patients on hemodialysis, peritoneal dialysis and with functioning renal graft. 

  14. Bioidentical hormone therapy: An assessment of provider knowledge.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Files, Julia A; Kransdorf, Lisa N; Ko, Marcia; Kling, Juliana M; David, Paru S; Pruthi, Sandhya; Sood, Richa; Creedon, Douglas; Chang, Yu-Hui H; Mayer, Anita P

    2016-12-01

    Bioidentical hormone therapy (BHT) is available in the United States in formulations that have been approved by the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) but also in formulations that have not been so approved. The aim of this study was to evaluate the knowledge, beliefs, and prescribing practices of BHT among healthcare providers. A cross-sectional self-selected responder survey was conducted of health care providers attending primary care Continuing Medical Education (CME) conferences in the United States from May 2012 to April 2013. The questionnaire consisted of 26 items assessing knowledge, beliefs, and current practice around BHT. A total of 366 survey responses were analyzed. Though 69.8% of respondents accurately identified the definition of BHT, only 45.3% were aware that BHT is available in FDA-approved products and 34.2% of respondents incorrectly identified that BHT is available only in custom-compounded formulations. Of those who had prescribed CC-BHT, less than half agreed with the statement "I am comfortable prescribing BHT" (45.4%). Our study showed that many practitioners are unaware that bioidentical hormones are available in FDA-approved products. Knowledge gaps identified by this survey highlight the need for and importance of education to further dispel misinformation surrounding the topic. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. [Molecular-targeted therapy for hormone-refractory prostate cancer].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nishimura, Kazuo; Takayama, Hitoshi; Nakayama, Masashi; Nonomura, Norio; Okuyama, Akihiko

    2006-06-01

    Molecular-targeted therapy is to treat pathologic pathways specifically in tumor cell or tumor microenvironment. Specific molecular-targeted therapeutic agents for hormone-refractory prostate cancer (HRPC) include endothelin-A receptor antagonist, EGF receptor (EGFR) inhibitor, platelet derived growth factor receptor (PDGFR) inhibitor, nuclear factor of kappaB (NF-kappaB) inhibitor, cyclooxygenase-2 (COX2) inhibitor, and active form of Vitamin D. These agents have been investigated in clinical trials. So far, none of the above-mentioned agent has shown a sufficient clinical efficacy alone. However, docetaxel-based combinations with thalidomide or calcitriol have promising clinical activities. Further investigations are needed to optimize the molecular-targeted agents in the combinations with chemotherapeutic agents for the treatment of HRPC.

  16. Safety and efficacy of growth hormone therapy in childhood.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bowlby, Deborah A; Rapaport, Robert

    2004-11-01

    Growth hormone (GH) has been used for more than 40 years. GH improves height velocity in many conditions associated with impaired growth and corrects metabolic deficits attributable to GH deficiency (GHD). Many studies and surveillance programs exist to collect efficacy and safety data. GH has been demonstrated to have a relatively wide safety margin. Reported side effects, including pseudotumor cerebri, edema, slipped capital femoral epiphysis (SCFE), worsening of scoliosis, gynecomastia, and hyperglycemia require careful monitoring. Currently, there are no data suggesting that GH therapy increases the risk of developing de novo, recurrent, or secondary malignancies. Patients who have a high intrinsic risk factor for the development of an adverse event need more vigilant surveillance.

  17. European Code against Cancer 4th Edition: Medical exposures, including hormone therapy, and cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Friis, Søren; Kesminiene, Ausrele; Espina, Carolina; Auvinen, Anssi; Straif, Kurt; Schüz, Joachim

    2015-12-01

    The 4th edition of the European Code against Cancer recommends limiting - or avoiding when possible - the use of hormone replacement therapy (HRT) because of the increased risk of cancer, nevertheless acknowledging that prescription of HRT may be indicated under certain medical conditions. Current evidence shows that HRT, generally prescribed as menopausal hormone therapy, is associated with an increased risk of cancers of the breast, endometrium, and ovary, with the risk pattern depending on factors such as the type of therapy (oestrogen-only or combined oestrogen-progestogen), duration of treatment, and initiation according to the time of menopause. Carcinogenicity has also been established for anti-neoplastic agents used in cancer therapy, immunosuppressants, oestrogen-progestogen contraceptives, and tamoxifen. Medical use of ionising radiation, an established carcinogen, can provide major health benefits; however, prudent practices need to be in place, with procedures and techniques providing the needed diagnostic information or therapeutic gain with the lowest possible radiation exposure. For pharmaceutical drugs and medical radiation exposure with convincing evidence on their carcinogenicity, health benefits have to be balanced against the risks; potential increases in long-term cancer risk should be considered in the context of the often substantial and immediate health benefits from diagnosis and/or treatment. Thus, apart from HRT, no general recommendations on reducing cancer risk were given for carcinogenic drugs and medical radiation in the 4th edition of European Code against Cancer. It is crucial that the application of these measures relies on medical expertise and thorough benefit-risk evaluation. This also pertains to cancer-preventive drugs, and self-medication with aspirin or other potential chemopreventive drugs is strongly discouraged because of the possibility of serious, potentially lethal, adverse events.

  18. AN ULTRASTRUTURAL STUDY OF HUMAN LUMINAL ENDOMETRIAL CELLS FOLLOWING DIFFERENT DOSES OF OESTROGEN REPLACEMENT THERAPY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    SARANI SH.A

    2001-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: The effects of different doses of oestrogen on the endometrium of women with premature ovarian failure have been examined in this study. Materials and Methods: Four groups of women of reproductive age were studied; 1 normal fertile controls 2. patients given a standard, variable hormone replacement therapy (HRT 3. a group given a fixed daily dose of 1 mg of oestrogen and 4. a group given a fixed daily dose of 4 mg of oestrogen. Endrometrial diposises were taken at a bout 5-6 days after ovulation and tissue was prepared for light and electron microscopy. Morphometry was used to evaluate quantitatively various features of endometrial luminal epithelial cells. The volume fraction (Vv of nucleus to cell in the standard group was significantly larger than the 4 mg group. Results: The Vv of euchromatin to nucleus was larger in the controls and 4 mg group than the 1 mg subjects. The Vv of mitochondria to cell was largest in the control group. The ratio of desmosomes to surface membrane was increased (P<0.05 in the 1 mg subjects. Conclusion: These results suggest that, while standard HRT is generally a good mimic of controls, the 1 mg fixed dose delayed some membrane features and the fixed 4 mg group showed advancement in some organelle growth.

  19. Effects of Long-term Growth Hormone Replacement in Adults With Growth Hormone Deficiency Following Cure of Acromegaly

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tritos, Nicholas A; Johannsson, Gudmundur; Korbonits, Márta

    2014-01-01

    CONTEXT: GH deficiency (GHD) may occur in adults with cured acromegaly (acroGHD). OBJECTIVE: Our objective was to examine the effectiveness and safety of GH replacement in acroGHD. DESIGN: This study was a retrospective analysis of data from KIMS (Pfizer International Metabolic Database). SETTING...

  20. Drug dosing during intermittent hemodialysis and continuous renal replacement therapy : special considerations in pediatric patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Veltri, Michael A; Neu, Alicia M; Fivush, Barbara A; Parekh, Rulan S; Furth, Susan L

    2004-01-01

    Chronic renal failure is, fortunately, an unusual occurrence in children; however, many children with various underlying illnesses develop acute renal failure, and transiently require renal replacement therapy - peritoneal dialysis, intermittent hemodialysis (IHD), or continuous renal replacement therapy (CRRT). As children with acute and chronic renal failure often have multiple comorbid conditions requiring drug therapy, generalists, intensivists, nephrologists, and pharmacists need to be aware of the issues surrounding the management of drug therapy in pediatric patients undergoing renal replacement therapy. This article summarizes the pharmacokinetics and dosing of many drugs commonly prescribed for pediatric patients, and focuses on the management of drug therapy in pediatric patients undergoing IHD and CRRT in the intensive care unit setting. Peritoneal dialysis is not considered in this review. Finally, a summary table with recommended initial dosages for drugs commonly encountered in pediatric patients requiring IHD or CRRT is presented.

  1. Effects of menopausal hormonal therapy on occult breast tumors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santen, Richard J; Song, Yan; Yue, Wei; Wang, Ji-Ping; Heitjan, Daniel F

    2013-09-01

    An estimated 7% of 40-80 year old women dying of unrelated causes harbor occult breast tumors at autopsy. These lesions are too small to be detected by mammography, a method which requires tumors to be approximately 1cm in diameter to be diagnosed. Tumor growth rates, as assessed by "effective doubling times" on serial mammography range from 10 to >700 days with a median of approximately 200 days. We previously reported two models, based on iterative analysis of these parameters, to describe the biologic behavior of undiagnosed, occult breast tumors. One of our models is biologically based and includes parameters of a 200 day effective doubling time, 7% prevalence of occult tumors in the 40-80 aged female population and a detection threshold of 1.16 cm and the other involves computer based projections based on age related breast cancer incidence. Our models facilitate interpretation of the Women's Health Initiative (WHI) and anti-estrogen prevention studies. The biologically based model suggests that menopausal hormone therapy with conjugated equine estrogens plus medroxyprogesterone acetate (MPA) in the WHI trial primarily promoted the growth of pre-existing, occult lesions and minimally initiated de novo tumors. The paradoxical reduction of breast cancer incidence in women receiving estrogen alone is consistent with a model that this hormone causes apoptosis in women deprived of estrogen long term as a result of the cessation of estrogen production after the menopause. Understanding of the kinetics of occult tumors suggests that breast cancer "prevention" with anti-estrogens or aromatase inhibitors represents early treatment rather than a reduction in de novo tumor formation. Our in vivo data suggest that the combination of a SERM, bazedoxifene (BZA), with conjugated equine estrogen (CEE) acts to block maturation of the mammary gland in oophorectomized, immature mice. This hormonal combination is defined by the generic term, tissue selective estrogen complex or

  2. Study protocol; Thyroid hormone Replacement for Untreated older adults with Subclinical hypothyroidism

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stott, David J.; Gussekloo, Jacobijn; Kearney, Patricia M.

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Subclinical hypothyroidism (SCH) is a common condition in elderly people, defined as elevated serum thyroid-stimulating hormone (TSH) with normal circulating free thyroxine (fT4). Evidence is lacking about the effect of thyroid hormone treatment. We describe the protocol of a large ra...

  3. Prescribing menopausal hormone therapy: an evidence-based approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sood R

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Richa Sood, Stephanie S Faubion, Carol S Kuhle, Jacqueline M Thielen, Lynne T Shuster Division of General Internal Medicine, Women's Health Clinic, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, MN, USA Abstract: The constantly changing landscape regarding menopausal hormone therapy (MHT has been challenging for providers caring for menopausal women. After a decade of fear and uncertainty regarding MHT, reanalysis of the Women's Health Initiative data and the results of recent studies have provided some clarity regarding the balance of risks and benefits of systemic MHT. Age and years since menopause are now known to be important variables affecting the benefit-risk profile. For symptomatic menopausal women who are under 60 years of age or within 10 years of menopause, the benefits of MHT generally outweigh the risks. Systemic MHT initiated early in menopause appears to slow the progression of atherosclerotic disease, thereby reducing the risk of cardiovascular disease and mortality. During this window of opportunity, MHT might also provide protection against cognitive decline. In older women and women more than 10 years past menopause, the risk-benefit balance of MHT is less favorable, particularly with regard to cardiovascular risk and cognitive impairment. For women entering menopause prematurely (<40 years, MHT ameliorates the risk of cardiovascular disease, osteoporosis, and cognitive decline. Nonoral administration of estrogen offers advantages due to the lack of first-pass hepatic metabolism, which in turn avoids the increased hepatic synthesis of clotting proteins, C-reactive protein, triglycerides, and sex hormone-binding globulin. The duration of combined MHT use is ideally limited to less than 5 years because of the known increase in breast cancer risk after 3–5 years of use. Limitations to use of estrogen only MHT are less clear, since breast cancer risk does not appear to increase with use of estrogen alone. For women under the age of 60 years, or

  4. Growth hormone therapy in heart failure: a novel therapy worthy of further consideration?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Demers, Catherine; McKelvie, Robert S

    2005-08-01

    Despite the improvements in survival with angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors and beta-blockers, the clinical events for patients with heart failure remain elevated. New therapies for heart failure are required to improve the functional capacity, quality of life and prognosis. Growth hormone exerts both direct and indirect effects on cardiac structure and function. Experimental models of heart failure and small studies have demonstrated significant improvements in cardiac function, haemodynamical parameters, functional capacity and quality of life. The results from randomised controlled studies have been mixed with others showing benefit and some that do not. The randomised studies showing benefit consistently used growth hormone every other day. Further studies are needed to assess the potential role of this adjuvant therapy in patients with heart failure.

  5. Development of nanoparticle-bound arylsulfatase B for enzyme replacement therapy of mucopolysaccharidosis VI

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Mühlstein, A; Gelperina, S; Kreuter, J

    2013-01-01

    .... Even though an enzyme replacement therapy (ERT) of recombinant arylsulfatase B (ASB) is available for MPS VI, the administration cannot positively affect the neurologic manifestations such as spinal cord compression...

  6. Salivary cortisol day curves in assessing glucocorticoid replacement therapy in Addison's disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Smans, L.; Lentjes, E.G.W.M.; Hermus, A.R.; Zelissen, P.

    2013-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: Patients with Addison's disease require lifelong treatment with glucocorticoids. At present, no glucocorticoid replacement therapy (GRT) can exactly mimic normal physiology. As a consequence, under- and especially overtreatment can occur. Suboptimal GRT may lead to various side effects.

  7. Prevalence of patients receiving renal replacement therapy in El Salvador in 2014.

    Science.gov (United States)

    García-Trabanino, Ramón; Trujillo, Zulma; Colorado, Ana Verónica; Magaña Mercado, Salvador; Henríquez, Carlos Atilio

    El Salvador has the highest renal failure mortality rate in the Americas. Five healthcare providers offer renal replacement therapy (RRT) in the country. The national RRT prevalence has never been reported.

  8. Salivary cortisol day curves in assessing glucocorticoid replacement therapy in Addison's disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Smans, L.; Lentjes, E.G.W.M.; Hermus, A.R.; Zelissen, P.

    2013-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: Patients with Addison's disease require lifelong treatment with glucocorticoids. At present, no glucocorticoid replacement therapy (GRT) can exactly mimic normal physiology. As a consequence, under- and especially overtreatment can occur. Suboptimal GRT may lead to various side effects. T

  9. Serum free insulin-like growth factor-I in growth hormone-deficient adults before and after growth hormone replacement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skjaerbaek, C; Vahl, N; Frystyk, J; Hansen, T B; Jørgensen, J O; Hagen, C; Christiansen, J S; Orskov, H

    1997-08-01

    The objective of the present study was to compare fasting levels of free IGF-I in serum from patients with adult onset growth hormone deficiency (GHD) and from healthy volunteers, and to examine the effect of GH replacement therapy in GHD on serum free IGF-I. Free IGF-I was measured using separation of free IGF-I by ultrafiltration in serum samples from 42 healthy volunteers and 27 patients with GHD, in the latter before and after 1 year of treatment with GH (2 IU/m2) (n = 13) or placebo (n = 14). Free IGF-I was significantly decreased in patients with GHD (700 +/- 100 ng/l (mean +/- S.E.M.), range 55-2618 ng/l) compared with controls (1010 +/- 70 ng/l, range 231-2431 ng/l; P = 0.0016). Total IGF-I was 85 +/- 10 micrograms/l (GHD) and 160 +/- 10 micrograms/l (controls) (P < 0.0001). The ratio of free over total IGF-I was increased in GHD to 0.85 +/- 0.08% compared with 0.66 +/- 0.05% in controls (P = 0.04). In both GHD and controls, free IGF-I correlated significantly (P < 0.05) with total IGF-I (GHD r = 0.78; controls r = 0.42), IGFBP-1 (GHD r = -0.67; controls r = -0.46) and the molar ratio of total IGF-I over IGFBP-3 (GHD r = 0.58; controls r = 0.62). After 1 year of GH treatment, free IGF-I was increased to 2780 +/- 320 ng/l (P = 0.003) and total IGF-I was increased to 270 +/- 30 micrograms/l (P = 0.006) both of which values were greater than those in healthy volunteers. There were no changes in free or total IGF-I in the placebo-treated group. In conclusion, levels of free IGF-I are decreased in GHD, but measurements of free IGF-I in a single, fasting serum sample do not offer a better separation of patients with GHD from individuals with normal GH status than can be achieved by measurement of total IGF-I. One year of treatment with 2IU/m2 GH caused an increase of serum free IGF-I to supraphysiological levels.

  10. Terapia de reposição hormonal no hipopituitarismo

    OpenAIRE

    Abucham, Julio; Vieira, Teresa C. Alfinito [UNIFESP; BARBOSA, Erika Ribeiro; Ribeiro, Rogério Silicani [UNIFESP; Martins, Manoel R. Alves [UNIFESP

    2003-01-01

    This article brings an updated review of hypopituitarism with emphasis in hormone replacement therapy. The physiological basis of hormone replacement therapy and practical aspects of treating hypopituitary patients were both taken into account to provide a rational strategy for treatment. The review is organized by individual pituitary hormone deficiency and covers epidemiology, etiology, clinical presentation, and diagnosis of hypopituitarism, as well as the most relevant hormone preparation...

  11. Cell replacement therapy for central nervous system diseases

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Danju Tso; Randall D. McKinnon

    2015-01-01

    The brain and spinal cord can not replace neurons or supporting glia that are lost through trau-matic injury or disease. In pre-clinical studies, however, neural stem and progenitor cell transplants can promote functional recovery. Thus the central nervous system is repair competent but lacks endogenous stem cell resources. To make transplants clinically feasible, this ifeld needs a source of histocompatible, ethically acceptable and non-tumorgenic cells. One strategy to generate pa-tient-speciifc replacement cells is to reprogram autologous cells such as ifbroblasts into pluripotent stem cells which can then be differentiated into the required cell grafts. However, the utility of pluripotent cell derived grafts is limited since they can retain founder cells with intrinsic neoplastic potential. A recent extension of this technology directly reprograms ifbroblasts into the ifnal graft-able cells without an induced pluripotent stem cell intermediate, avoiding the pluripotent caveat. For both types of reprogramming the conversion efficiency is very low resulting in the need to amplify the cells in culture which can lead to chromosomal instability and neoplasia. Thus to make reprogramming biology clinically feasible, we must improve the efifciency. The ultimate source of replacement cells may reside in directly reprogramming accessible cells within the brain.

  12. Polymorphisms of the GR and HSD11B1 genes influence body mass index and weight gain during hormone replacement treatment in patients with Addison's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Molnár, Ágnes; Kövesdi, Annamária; Szücs, Nikolette; Tóth, Miklós; Igaz, Péter; Rácz, Károly; Patócs, Attila

    2016-08-01

    Glucocorticoid substitution is essential in patients with chronic primary adrenocortical insufficiency (Addison's disease) and both over-treatment and inadequate dosage have deleterious effects. Individual sensitivity to glucocorticoids is partly genetically determined. To test the hypothesis whether the well-characterized SNPs of the GR and HSD11B1 genes may modulate the individual sensitivity to exogenous glucocorticoids and may influence clinical and/or laboratory parameters and the glucocorticoid substitution dosage in patients with Addison's disease. 68 patients with primary adrenocortical insufficiency were involved. Clinical and laboratory data, as well as the dosage of the hormone replacement therapy were collected. Peripheral blood DNA was isolated, and the GR and HSD11B1 SNPs were examined using allele-specific PCR or Taqman assay on Real Time PCR. The allele frequency of the GR N363S polymorphism was higher in patients compared to the control group and the disease appeared significantly earlier in patients harbouring the GR A3669G compared to noncarriers. These patients had higher ACTH level measured at the time of diagnosis. Homozygous BclI carriers had higher body mass index (BMI) and lower total hydrocortisone equivalent supplementation dose needed than heterozygous or noncarriers. The BMI and weight gain during hormone replacement therapy were also higher in carriers of the HSD11B1 rs4844880 treated with glucocorticoids other than dexamethasone. The BclI polymorphism of the GR gene and the rs4844880 of the HSD11B1 gene may contribute to weight gain and may affect the individual need of glucocorticoid substitution dose in these patients. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  13. Primary hypothyroidism in the community: Lower daily dosages of levothyroxine replacement therapy for Asian patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, Ngiap Chuan; Chew, Rong Quan; Koh, Yi Ling Eileen; Subramanian, Reena Chandini; Sankari, Usha; Meyappan, Meykkumar; Cho, Li Wei

    2017-02-01

    The goal of treatment in patients with primary hypothyroidism is to attain euthyroidism guided by the stipulated thyroid-stimulating hormone (TSH) levels range so as to minimize any potential long-term adverse effects. However, various factors may result in their Levothyroxine (T4) under and over-replacement.Our study aimed to evaluate the mean daily dose of L-T4 replacement for Asian patients with primary hypothyroidism. The secondary aims were to determine the proportion of those who were either over or under-replaced, and the factors associated with their thyroid function status and replacement adherence.Data collected using questionnaire survey from targeted patients managed in a typical public primary care center in Singapore: socio-demographic characteristics, clinical parameters, laboratory investigations, mean daily L-T4-replacement doses, and replacement regimens. The thyroid status of patients was classified based on thyroid function investigations.Complete data of 229 patients were analyzed. A total of 59.8% of patients had TSH within the normal range, 27.5% and 12.7% were under and over-replaced, respectively. About 60% of Asian patients with primary hypothyroidism achieved normal TSH status requiring average of 1.1 μg of daily L-T4/kgBW (kg body weight). Subjects who were over-replaced had a higher daily L-T4 dose/kgBW when compared to the euthyroid and the under replaced groups. Those with L-T4 over-replacement were largely due to excessive dosage. Patients who were younger, from lower socioeconomic strata, and higher BMI were more likely to be over or under-replaced.Majority of Asian patients with hypothyroidism required replacement of 1.1 μg of daily L-T4/kgBW. Their thyroid status was influenced by demographic and dosing factors.

  14. Continuous Renal Replacement Therapy and Extracorporeal Membrane Oxygenation in Cardias Surgery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. V. Kolesnikov

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: to analyze the combined use of extracorporeal membrane oxygenation (ECMO and continuous renal replacement therapy with switching into the ECMO circuit in cardiac surgical patients over 18 years of age and to reveal predictors of a fatal outcome in this combination of auxiliary organ support techniques. Materials and methods. The retrospective cohort study postoperatively used a combination of ECMO and continuous renal replacement therapy in 27 cardiac surgical patients aged over 18 years with severe cardiopulmonary insufficiency concurrent with acute kidney lesion. In all cases, the continuous renal replacement therapy circuit was switched into the line after an ECMO pump. The end points of the study were the duration of dialysis-dependent acute renal failure, the frequency of complications, and hospital mortality. Results. In all cases with a favorable outcome, the duration of continuous renal replacement therapy was 3 days longer than that of ECMO. There were no cases of recovery if the duration of continuous renal replacement therapy was shorter than that of ECMO and the duration of the latter was more than 10 days. The duration of sympathomimetic support (>3.5 days was shown to be an independent and significant predictor of death (AUC 0.99; CI 99.9%, 0.96—1.0 in the patients receiving continuous renal replacement therapy and ECMO. It was established that the number of inotrophic drugs (>2 and the highest lactate level (>1.99 mmol/l could be used to predict hospital mortality in patients with acute kidney injury and severe cardiopulmonary insufficiency (AUC 0.85 and 0.86; sensitivity/specificity 0.83/0.67 and 0.86/0.67, respectively.Conclusion. The concurrent use of ECMO and continuous renal replacement therapy in severe cardiac surgical patients with potentially reversible cardiopulmonary insufficiency and acute kidney injury is a sound and complementary combination of auxiliary organ support techniques.  

  15. Sexual healing in patients with prostate cancer on hormone therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schover, Leslie R

    2015-01-01

    Since prostate cancer becomes more common with age, at least one-third of men have sexual problems at diagnosis. All localized treatments for prostate cancer greatly increase the prevalence of sexual dysfunction, which include loss of desire, erectile dysfunction, and changes in orgasm. Even men on active surveillance have a higher rate of problems than matched peers without prostate cancer. However, men given androgen deprivation therapy (ADT) have the worst rates of sexual dysfunction. Even after 3 to 4 months of ADT, men's desire for sex is decreased and irreversible damage may occur to the erectile tissue in the penis. Erections do not recover in about one-half of men, even if ADT is discontinued. Although intermittent ADT allows some recovery of sexual function, serum testosterone requires 9 to 12 months off ADT to recover. Again, one-half of men have permanent erectile dysfunction. If ADT causes atrophy of the erectile tissue, blood leaks out of the venous system during erection. This syndrome is difficult to treat except with surgery to implant a penile prosthesis. Despite the high rate of sexual problems in men on ADT, a small group stays sexually active and is able to have reliable erections. To improve men's sexual satisfaction on ADT, it may be important to educate them about getting extra mental and physical sexual stimulation, as well as using penile rehabilitation during hormone therapy. Information on reaching orgasm and coping with problems such as dry orgasm, pain with orgasm, and urinary incontinence during sex also should be provided.

  16. Complete adrenocorticotropin deficiency after radiation therapy for brain tumor with a normal growth hormone reserve

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sakai, Haruna; Yoshioka, Katsunobu; Yamagami, Keiko [Osaka City General Hospital (Japan)] (and others)

    2002-06-01

    A 34-year-old man with neurofibromatosis type 1, who had received radiation therapy after the excision of a brain tumor 5 years earlier, was admitted to our hospital with vomiting and weight loss. Cortisol and adrenocorticotropin (ACTH) were undetectable before and after administration of 100 {mu}g corticotropin releasing hormone. The level of growth hormone without stimulation was 24.7 ng/ml. We diagnosed him to have complete ACTH deficiency attributable to radiation therapy. This is the first known case of a patient with complete ACTH deficiency after radiation therapy and a growth hormone reserve that remained normal. (author)

  17. Low-dose hormone therapy in postmenopausal women in China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zang, H; Shi, H; Speroff, L

    2010-12-01

    To review the experience of menopausal symptoms and low-dose hormone therapy (HT) in postmenopausal women in China. Literature review and critical summaries of available prospective, clinical trials (randomized, controlled trials, RCTs). Chinese women experience menopausal symptoms less frequently compared with women in developed countries, and the prevalence of menopausal symptoms is less in women of southern China than in women of northern China. The majority of postmenopausal Chinese women lack knowledge about HT, and the usage rate of HT is low in these women compared to that in women of developed countries. Some RCTs investigated the efficacy and safety of low- or ultra-low-dose HT, including conjugated equine estrogen, estradiol valerate, transdermal estradiol, nylestriol alone or in combination with progesterone, and tibolone in postmenopausal Chinese women. These RCTs reported that low- or ultra-low-dose HT relieved menopausal symptoms and prevented bone loss as well as standard-dose HT and was less likely to induce side-effects, including irregular vaginal bleeding and breast tenderness; there may be dose-dependent effects of HT. No study evaluated the effects of low-dose HT on cardiovascular events or breast mammographic density/risk of breast cancer. More RCTs are required to confirm efficacy and to assess the safety of low- or ultra-low-dose HT for a long-term period in a large group of postmenopausal women.

  18. Successful Growth Hormone Therapy in Cornelia de Lange Syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Graaf, Michael; Kant, Sarina G; Wit, Jan Maarten; Willem Redeker, Egbert Johan; Eduard Santen, Gijs Willem; Henriëtta Verkerk, Annemieke Johanna Maria; Uitterlinden, André Gerardus; Losekoot, Monique; Oostdijk, Wilma

    2017-06-07

    Cornelia de Lange Syndrome (CdLS) is a heterogeneous syndrome, both clinically and genetically, in its classical form characterised by distinctive facial features, intra-uterine growth retardation, short stature, developmental delay and anomalies in multiple organ systems. NIPBL, SMC1A, SMC3, RAD21 and HDAC8, all involved in the Cohesin pathway, have been identified to cause CdLS. Growth hormone (GH) secretion has been reported as normal, and to our knowledge there are no reports on the effect of recombinant human GH (r-hGH) treatment in CdLS patients. We present a patient born small for gestational age (SGA) with persistent severe growth retardation (height -3.4 SDS) and mild dysmorphic features, who was treated with GH from 4.3 years of age onward, and diagnosed 6 years later with CdLS using whole exome sequencing. Treatment led to a height gain of 1.6 standard deviation score (SDS) over 8 years. Treatment was interrupted shortly due to high serum IGF-1 serum values. We conclude that GH therapy appears effective and safe for short children with CdLS.

  19. Parathyroid Hormone-Related Protein Analogs as Osteoporosis Therapies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Esbrit, Pedro; Herrera, Sabina; Portal-Núñez, Sergio; Nogués, Xavier; Díez-Pérez, Adolfo

    2016-04-01

    The only bone anabolic agent currently available for osteoporosis treatment is parathyroid hormone (PTH)-either its N-terminal 1-34 fragment or the whole molecule of 1-84 aminoacids-whose intermittent administration stimulates new bone formation by targeting osteoblastogenesis and osteoblast survival. PTH-related protein (PTHrP) is an abundant factor in bone which shows N-terminal homology with PTH and thus exhibits high affinity for the same PTH type 1 receptor in osteoblasts. Therefore, it is not surprising that intermittently administered N-terminal PTHrP peptides induce bone anabolism in animals and humans. Furthermore, the C-terminal region of PTHrP also elicits osteogenic features in vitro in osteoblastic cells and in various animal models of osteoporosis. In this review, we discuss the current concepts about the cellular and molecular mechanisms whereby PTHrP may induce anabolic actions in bone. Pre-clinical studies and clinical data using N-terminal PTHrP analogs are also summarized, pointing to PTHrP as a promising alternative to current bone anabolic therapies.

  20. Effects of hormone therapy on cognition and mood.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fischer, Barbara; Gleason, Carey; Asthana, Sanjay

    2014-04-01

    Results of the Women's Health Initiative (WHI) and Women's Health Initiative Memory Study (WHIMS) suggested that hormone therapy (HT) may be detrimental to cognitive health. This article reviews clinical studies that address issues relevant to those results. Literature review. A search of Pubmed and Web of Science was conducted using the search terms HT and cognition, HT and mood. Clinical and observational studies were selected if they were published after the year 2000. Theories of HT mechanisms of action, pharmacology, biology, and observational and clinical trials are discussed. Although observational and clinical trials show conflicting findings, methodologic considerations must be acknowledged. HT formulation and dose, route of administration, timing of initiation, length of treatment, and health of participants all contribute to inconsistencies in results. Transdermal estradiol and micronized progesterone administered at time of menopause are generally associated with cognitive and affective benefit. At the present time, results from existing studies are equivocal regarding the benefits of HT on cognition and affect. Future studies, such as the Kronos Early Estrogen Prevention Study (KEEPS), should address methodologic inconsistencies to provide clearer answers to this important question. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  1. Interstitial cystitis/bladder pain syndrome and glycosaminoglycans replacement therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-01-01

    Interstitial cystitis/bladder pain syndrome (IC/BPS) is a debilitating chronic disease characterized by discomfort or recurrent abdominal and pelvic pains in the absence of urinary tract infections. Its symptomatology includes discomfort, increased bladder pressure, sensitivity and intense pain in the bladder and pelvic areas, increased voiding frequency and urgency, or a combination of these symptoms. For these reasons, this pathology has a very negative impact on quality of life. The etiology of IC/BPS is still not well understood and different hypotheses have been formulated, including autoimmune processes, allergic reactions, chronic bacterial infections, exposure to toxins or dietary elements, and psychosomatic factors. The finding of an effective and specific therapy for IC/BPS remains a challenge for the scientific community because of the lack of a consensus regarding the causes and the inherent difficulties in the diagnosis. The last recent hypothesis is that IC/BPS could be pathophysiologically related to a disruption of the bladder mucosa surface layer with consequent loss of glycosaminoglycans (GAGs). This class of mucopolysaccharides has hydrorepellent properties and their alteration expose the urothelium to many urinary toxic agents. It has been hypothesized that when these substances penetrate the bladder wall a chain is triggered in the submucosa. In order to improve the integrity and function of the bladder lining, GAG layer replenishment therapy is widely accepted as therapy for patients with IC/BPS who have poor or inadequate response to conventional therapy. Currently, Chondroitin sulfate (CS), heparin, hyaluronic acid (HA), and pentosan polysulphate (PPS), and combinations of two GAGs (CS and HA) are the available substances with different effectiveness rates in patients with IC/BPS. There are four different commercially available products for GAG replenishment including CS, heparin, HA and PPS. Each product has different concentrations and

  2. Current status of myelin replacement therapies in multiple sclerosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Jeffrey K; Franklin, Robin J M

    2012-01-01

    Multiple sclerosis is an autoimmune disease of the human central nervous system characterized by immune-mediated myelin and axonal damage, and chronic axonal loss attributable to the absence of myelin sheaths. There are two aspects to the treatment of MS-first, the prevention of damage by suppressing the maladaptive immune system, and second, the long-term preservation of axons by the promotion of remyelination, a regenerative process in which new axons are restored to demyelinated axons. Medicine has made significant progress in the first of these in recent years-there is an increasing number of ever more effective disease-modifying immunomodulatory interventions. However, there are currently no widely used regenerative therapies in MS. Conceptually, there are two approaches to remyelination therapy-transplantation of myelinogenic cells and promotion of endogenous remyelination mediated by myelinogenic cells present within the diseased tissue. In this chapter, in addition to describing why remyelination therapies are important, we review both these approaches, outlining their current status and future developments.

  3. The physician's role in selecting a factor replacement therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pipe, S W

    2006-03-01

    Over the past 20 years, transmissions of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV), hepatitis B virus or hepatitis C virus have been virtually eliminated from plasma-derived or recombinant therapy in the USA, a record that can be largely attributed to the use of effective screening and inactivation technologies for known pathogens. The next significant threat will likely come from the emergence of a new, blood-borne infectious disease, perhaps one transmitted by a non-lipid-enveloped virus or prion, for which current inactivation methods are ineffective. Following the HIV crisis of the 1980s, government, patient advocacy groups, medical and scientific communities and the manufacturers of clotting therapies can learn from the past and approach potential threats from emerging pathogens in a proactive and productive manner. For clinicians, this includes actively engaging patients in a dialogue about all the factors that may influence their choice of clotting factor therapies, including emerging pathogens, patient convenience, consistency and reliability of supply, relative cost/benefit ratios, reimbursement issues (where applicable), patient preference and brand loyalty. It is our obligation as healthcare providers to understand potential risks and help make proactive decisions with our patients, decisions that often must be made in an environment of scientific uncertainty. Threats from infectious agents that were once deemed theoretical can, and often do, ultimately become real, with serious implications for morbidity and mortality.

  4. Relationships between selenium, lipids, iron status and hormonal therapy in women of the SU.VI.M.AX cohort.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arnaud, Josiane; Arnault, Nathalie; Roussel, Anne-Marie; Bertrais, Sandrine; Ruffieux, Daniel; Galan, Pilar; Favier, Alain; Hercberg, Serge

    2007-01-01

    Significant differences in serum selenium concentration according to contraceptive treatment and age have been evidenced in women of the SU.VI.M.AX cohort. This study aimed at verifying the physiopathological hypothesis that the observed increase in serum selenium concentration could be related to serum lipid increase and/or bleeding decrease. Women were divided into six groups: menopausal with or without hormonal replacement therapy; non-menopausal using contraceptive pills; intrauterine device; other contraceptive treatment or no contraceptive treatment. Adjusted linear regression indicated positive associations between selenium and apolipoprotein A1 (r(2) from 0.038 to 0.074, p<0.07 depending on groups) or ferritin in serum (r(2) from 0.032 to 0.075, p<0.07 depending on groups). These relationships could explain the differences observed according to hormonal treatment and age in the SU.VI.MAX study.

  5. Standard and Low-dose Hormone Therapy for Postmenopausal Women—Focus on the Breast

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peng-Hui Wang

    2007-06-01

    Full Text Available Menopause occurs naturally when the ovary ceases folliculogenesis, or artificially by surgical and/or medical ablation of the ovarian function. Menopause is a hypoestrogenic state, which may adversely affect estrogen target tissues, such as the brain, skeleton and skin, as well as the cardiovascular and genitourinary systems, with resultant frequency and severity of climacteric symptoms. The climacteric symptoms, however, vary significantly among women. For decades, hormone therapy (HT has been the mainstay and is considered the most effective for managing menopausal symptoms. The prolonged use of either single estrogen therapy or a combination therapy of estrogen and progestogen (EPT might be associated with a slightly increased risk of breast cancer and many resultant adverse events, such as coronary heart disease, stroke and venous thromboembolism. Perhaps because the clear benefits are limited to these end points of HT in treating menopausal women, the relatively significant adverse event profiles of these women may not be enough to trigger primary care physicians to be more aggressive than they have been to date in treating climacteric symptoms of postmenopausal women. However, severe climacteric symptoms really disturb the woman's life. Some epidemiologic studies have shown that the increased risk for breast cancer after 5 years of combined EPT is similar in magnitude to other lifestyle variables, such as 10-year delayed menopause, fewer pregnancies and reduced breastfeeding, postmenopausal obesity, excessive alcohol or cigarette use, and lack of regular exercise. Furthermore, elevated serum concentrations of either endogenous or exogenous (replaced by HT sex hormone in either pre- or postmenopausal women are associated with an increased risk of breast cancer. Finally, the increased breast cancer risk diminishes soon after discontinuing hormones, and largely disappears by 5 years after cessation. Taken together, low-dose conventional HT

  6. Renal replacement therapies after abdominal aortic aneurysm repair--a review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hudorović, Narcis; Lovricević, Ivo; Brkić, Petar; Ahel, Zaky; Vicić-Hudorović, Visnja

    2011-09-01

    The objective of this review is to assess the incidence of postoperative acute renal failure that necessitates the application of hemofiltration and to determine the factors that influence the outcome in patients undergoing surgical repair of abdominal aortic aneurysm. In addition, the review aims to assess the outcomes of postoperative early hemofiltration as compared to late intensive hemofiltration. Different forms of renal replacement therapies for use in abdominal aortic aneurysm surgery patients are discussed. Electronic literature searches were performed using Pubmed, Medline, Embase, Sumsearch, Cinahil, The Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials and Excerpta Medica. The search identified 419 potentially eligible studies, of which 119 were excluded based on the title and abstract. Of the remaining 300 studies, full articles were collected and re-evaluated. Forty-five articles satisfied our inclusion criteria, of which only 12 were of the IA Level of evidence. The search results indicated that the underlying disease, its severity and stage, the etiology of acute renal failure, clinical and hemodynamic status of the patient, the resources available, and different costs of therapy might all influence the choice of the renal replacement therapy strategy. However, clear guidelines on renal replacement therapy duration are still lacking. Moreover, it is not known whether in acute renal failure patients undergoing abdominal aortic aneurysm surgery, renal replacement therapy modalities can eliminate significant amounts of clinically relevant inflammatory mediators. This review gives current information available in the literature on the possible mechanisms underlying acute renal failure and recent developments in continuous renal replacement treatment modalities.

  7. Effect of different hormonal therapies on thyroid function in surgical menopause: short-term results.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erel, C Tamer; Gezer, Altay; Sentürk, Levent M; Somunkiran, Asli; Kaleli, Semih; Seyisoglu, Hakan

    2007-12-01

    To determine the effects of different hormone replacement therapy (HRT) regimens on thyroid function in surgical menopause. In a randomized, controlled study, 59 euthyroid women with surgical menopause were randomized to an estrogen-only (n=20), tibolone (n=20) or calcium-only (n=19) group. On the 5th postoperative day and 4th and 12th weeks, serum E2, TSH, free T3 and free T4 levels were determined. Although the initial and week 4 serum E2, TSH, free T3 and free T4 levels were comparable, the week 12 serum E2 and TSH levels were different between the subjects on estrogen therapy and those receiving tibolone or calcium only (p=0.008 and 0.000, respectively). Serum E2 levels were higher and TSH levels lower in subjects receiving estrogen. Moreover, serum TSH levels correlated negatively with serum E2 levels in the 12th week of estrogen use (r=-0.354, p=0.006). TSH increased in the tibolone group as compared to the estrogen group but was still lower than in the calcium-only group; however, the differences were not statistically significant. Irrespective of different regimens, HRT does not have an important short-term effect on thyroid function in women with surgical menopause.

  8. Difference in signalling between various hormone therapies in endometrium, myometrium and upper part of the vagina

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    P. Hanifi-Moghaddam (Payman); B. Boers-Sijmons (Bianca); A.H.A. Klaassens (Anet); F.H. van Wijk (Heidy); W.F.J. van IJcken (Wilfred); P.J. van der Spek (Peter); H.A.M. Verheul (Herman); H.J. Kloosterboer (Helenius); C.W. Burger (Curt); L.J. Blok (Leen)

    2008-01-01

    textabstractBACKGROUND: Combined hormone treatments in post-menopausal women have different clinical responses on uterus and vagina; therefore, we investigated differences in steroid signalling between various hormone therapies in these tissues. METHODS: A total of 30 post-menopausal women scheduled

  9. Levodopa therapy: consequences of the nonphysiologic replacement of dopamine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chase, T N

    1998-05-01

    Normal motor function is dependent on the highly regulated synthesis and release of the transmitter dopamine by neurons projecting from the substantia nigra to the corpus striatum. Parkinson's disease involves the progressive degeneration of these neurons. Its core symptoms are a direct consequence of a striatal insufficiency of intrasynaptic dopamine. Levodopa, the standard of care for the treatment of PD, acts after its conversion to dopamine by restoring striatal dopaminergic transmission. However, there are significant differences between the normally functioning dopamine system and the restoration of function provided by standard levodopa treatment. Increasing clinical and preclinical evidence suggests that the intermittent stimulation of dopamine receptors resulting from current therapeutic regimens contributes to the response complications that ultimately affect most parkinsonian patients. It now appears that chronic nonphysiologic stimulation of dopaminergic receptors on striatal GABAergic neurons activates characteristic signaling pathways, leading to a potentiation of the synaptic efficacy of adjacent glutamatergic receptors of the N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) subtype. As a result, function of these GABAergic efferent neurons changes in ways that favor the appearance of motor complications. Conceivably, use of dopaminomimetic replacement strategies that provide more continuous dopamine receptor stimulation will act to prevent or alleviate these disabling complications. A number of promising approaches to achieving this goal are now under development.

  10. Hormones

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hormones are your body's chemical messengers. They travel in your bloodstream to tissues or organs. They work ... glands, which are special groups of cells, make hormones. The major endocrine glands are the pituitary, pineal, ...

  11. Thyroid hormone therapy and procurement of livers from brain-dead donors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Novitzky, Dimitri; Mi, Zhibao; Videla, Luis A; Collins, Joseph F; Cooper, David K C

    2016-08-01

    Hormonal therapy to brain-dead potential organ donors remains controversial. A retrospective study was carried out of hormonal therapy on procurement of organs in 63,593 donors in whom information on T3/T4 therapy was available. In 40,124 donors, T3/T4 and all other hormonal therapy was recorded. The percentages of all organs procured, except livers, were greater in T3/T4-treated donors. Nevertheless, if T3/T4 therapy had been administered to the donor, liver transplantation was associated with significantly increased graft and recipient survival at 1 month and 12 months. The potential reasons for the lack of effect of T3/T4 therapy on the number of livers procured are discussed.

  12. New Product Marketing Blurs the Line Between Nicotine Replacement Therapy and Smokeless Tobacco Products.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kostygina, Ganna; England, Lucinda; Ling, Pamela

    2016-07-01

    Tobacco companies have begun to acquire pharmaceutical subsidiaries and recently started to market nicotine replacement therapies, such as Zonnic nicotine gum, in convenience stores. Conversely, tobacco companies are producing tobacco products such as tobacco chewing gum and lozenges that resemble pharmaceutical nicotine replacement products, including a nicotine pouch product that resembles snus pouches. This convergence of nicotine and tobacco product marketing has implications for regulation and tobacco cessation.

  13. Risk of fracture in adults on renal replacement therapy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Ditte; Olesen, Jonas B; Gislason, Gunnar H;

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Patients on dialysis treatment or living with a transplanted kidney have several risk factors for bone fracture, especially disturbances in mineral metabolism and immunosuppressive therapy. We describe the incidence of fracture in this retrospective national Danish cohort study...... and explore the influence of age, gender, comorbidity and prescribed medication. METHODS: By individual-level linkage between nationwide administrative registries, the risk of fracture was compared between the group of patients receiving chronic dialysis treatment and patients receiving their first renal...... transplanted group: 1.82 (95% CI: 1.62-2.06)]. Prescribed diuretics, lipid-modifying agents and proton pump inhibitors also modulated the fracture risk. CONCLUSIONS: Patients on dialysis or living with a transplanted kidney have a significantly higher risk of fracture than the Danish background population...

  14. Cognitive Development in Infantile-Onset Pompe Disease Under Very Early Enzyme Replacement Therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lai, Chih-Jou; Hsu, Ting-Rong; Yang, Chia-Feng; Chen, Shyi-Jou; Chuang, Ya-Chin; Niu, Dau-Ming

    2016-12-01

    Most patients with infantile-onset Pompe disease die in early infancy before beginning enzyme replacement therapy, which has made it difficult to evaluate the impact of Pompe disease on cognitive development. Patients with infantile-onset Pompe disease can survive with enzyme replacement therapy, and physicians can evaluate cognitive development in these patients. We established an effective newborn screening program with quick clinical diagnostic criteria. Cognitive and motor development were evaluated using the Bayley Scales of Infant and Toddler Development-Third Edition at 6, 12, and 24 months of age. The patients who were treated very early demonstrate normal cognitive development with no significant change in cognition during this period (P = .18 > .05). The cognitive development was positively correlated with motor development (r = 0.533, P = .011). The results indicated that very early enzyme replacement therapy could protect cognitive development in patients with infantile-onset Pompe disease up to 24 months of age.

  15. Current attitudes on self-use and prescription of hormone therapy among New York City gynaecologists

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Devi, Gayatri; Sugiguchi, Fumitaka; Pedersen, Anette Tønnes

    2013-01-01

    The results of the Women's Health Initiative studies dramatically altered hormone therapy use around the world. In countries outside the United States, self-use in physicians remained unaltered while prescription use declined, implying that physicians may not concur with the findings. We wished t...... to explore prevailing attitudes among American physicians by examining New York City obstetrician-gynaecologists' self-use and prescription use of hormone therapy....

  16. Prescription drug coverage: implications for hormonal therapy adherence in women diagnosed with breast cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bradley, Cathy J; Dahman, Bassam; Jagsi, Reshma; Katz, Steven; Hawley, Sarah

    2015-11-01

    In spite of its demonstrated benefits, many women do not initiate hormonal therapy, and among those who do, many discontinue it prematurely. We examined whether differences in hormonal therapy adherence may be at least partially explained by the availability of prescription drug coverage. Women aged 20-79 years diagnosed with stage I-III breast cancer between June 2005 and Februa