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Sample records for hormone mimic zr-512

  1. Regioselective deiodination of iodothyronamines, endogenous thyroid hormone derivatives, by deiodinase mimics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mondal, Santanu; Mugesh, Govindasamy

    2014-08-25

    Iodothyronine deiodinases (IDs) are mammalian selenoenzymes that play an important role in the activation and inactivation£ of thyroid hormones. It is known that iodothyronamines (TnAMs), produced by the decarboxylation of thyroid hormones, act as substrates for deiodinases. To understand whether decarboxylation alters the rate and/or regioselectivity of deiodination by using synthetic deiodinase mimics, we studied the deiodination of different iodothyronamines. The triiodo derivative 3,3',5-triiodothyronamine (T3 AM) is deiodinated at the inner ring by naphthyl-based deiodinase mimics, which is similar to the deiodination of 3,3',5-triiodothyronine (T3). However, T3 AM undergoes much slower deiodination than T3. Detailed experimental and theoretical investigations suggest that T3 AM forms a weaker halogen bond with selenium donors than T3. Kinetic studies and single-crystal X-ray structures of T3 and T3 AM reveal that intermolecular I⋅⋅⋅I interactions may play an important role in deiodination. The formation of hydrogen- and halogen-bonding assemblies, which leads to the formation of a dimeric species of T3 in solution, facilitates the interactions between the selenium and iodine atoms. In contrast, T3 AM, which does not have I⋅⋅⋅I interactions, undergoes much slower deiodination. © 2014 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  2. Development and Characterization of a Novel Anti-idiotypic Monoclonal Antibody to Growth Hormone, Which Can Mimic Physiological Functions of Growth Hormone in Primary Porcine Hepatocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lan, Hai-Nan; Jiang, Hai-Long; Li, Wei; Wu, Tian-Cheng; Hong, Pan; Li, Yu Meng; Zhang, Hui; Cui, Huan-Zhong; Zheng, Xin

    2015-04-01

    B-32 is one of a panel of monoclonal anti-idiotypic antibodies to growth hormone (GH) that we developed. To characterize and identify its potential role as a novel growth hormone receptor (GHR) agonist, we determined that B-32 behaved as a typical Ab2β based on a series of enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay assays. The results of fluorescence-activated cell sorting, indirect immunofluorescence and competitive receptor binding assays demonstrated that B-32 specifically binds to the GHR expressed on target cells. Next, we examined the resulting signal transduction pathways triggered by this antibody in primary porcine hepatocytes. We found that B-32 can activate the GHR and Janus kinase (2)/signal transducers and activators of transcription (JAK2/STAT5) signalling pathways. The phosphorylation kinetics of JAK2/STAT5 induced by either GH or B-32 were analysed in dose-response and time course experiments. In addition, B32 could also stimulate porcine hepatocytes to secrete insulin-like growth factors-1. Our work indicates that a monoclonal anti-idiotypic antibody to GH (B-32) can serve as a GHR agonist or GH mimic and has application potential in domestic animal (pig) production.

  3. Biological activities of recombinant equine luteinizing hormone/chorionic gonadotropin (eLH/CG) expressed in Sf9 and Mimic insect cell lines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Legardinier, Sébastien; Duonor-Cérutti, Martine; Devauchelle, Gérard; Combarnous, Yves; Cahoreau, Claire

    2005-02-01

    Equine luteinizing hormone (eLH) and chorionic gonadotropin (eCG) are composed of identical alpha and beta polypeptide chains, but eCG subunits are much more heavily glycosylated and sialylated. Consequently, eCG exhibits a much longer half-life than eLH in blood. Recombinant eLH/CG, expressed in Sf9 and Mimic insect cells, were compared with one another and to the natural hormones eCG and eLH. Mimic cells are stably-transformed Sf9 cells, expressing five mammalian genes encoding glycosyltransferases involved in the synthesis of complex N-carbohydrate chains. Recombinant eLH/CG expressed in Mimic cells exhibited a higher apparent molecular weight (MW) than that expressed in Sf9 cells, suggesting that its N-glycosylation was, as expected, more complete. Nevertheless, the two recombinant eLH/CG exhibited lower MW than natural eCG from pregnant mare plasma. The two eLH/CG produced in Sf9 and Mimic cells were found to be active in in vitro LH and FSH bioassays, with potencies similar to those of eCG. By contrast, they exhibited no significant in vivo bioactivity, neither in the specific follicle-stimulating hormone (FSH) assay nor in the specific eCG assay. Although recombinant eLH/CG produced in Mimic cells bears more elaborate carbohydrate chains than recombinant eLH/CG from Sf9 cells, it exhibits no significant in vivo bioactivity, probably because of insufficient terminal sialylation of its carbohydrate chains, leading to its rapid removal from blood.

  4. Deiodination of thyroid hormones by iodothyronine deiodinase mimics: does an increase in the reactivity alter the regioselectivity?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manna, Debasish; Mugesh, Govindasamy

    2011-07-06

    Organoselenium compounds as functional mimics of iodothyronine deiodinase are described. The naphthyl-based compounds having two selenol groups are remarkably efficient in the inner-ring deiodination of thyroxine. The introduction of a basic amino group in close proximity to one of the selenol moieties enhances the deiodination. This study suggests that an increase in the nucleophilic reactivity of the conserved Cys residue at the active site of deiodinases is very important for effective deiodination.

  5. Scleroderma mimics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nashel, Jennifer; Steen, Virginia

    2012-02-01

    Scleroderma is a rare systemic autoimmune disease with multiple organ manifestations, including skin fibrosis. The groups of disorders classified as scleroderma mimics share the common thread of skin thickening but are otherwise quite incongruous in terms of underlying disease process and other organ involvement. This article reviews the clinical presentation, etiology, and treatment options available for scleroderma mimics, including morphea, scleredema, diabetic cheiroarthropathy, scleromyxedema, nephrogenic systemic fibrosis, and eosinophilic fasciitis. Through greater understanding of these diseases and the associated extradermal implications, we hope to facilitate recognition of scleroderma and its mimics.

  6. Hormones

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hormones are your body's chemical messengers. They travel in your bloodstream to tissues or organs. They work ... glands, which are special groups of cells, make hormones. The major endocrine glands are the pituitary, pineal, ...

  7. A peptide mimic of an antigenic loop of alpha-human chorionic gonadotropin hormone: solution structure and interaction with a llama V-HH domain

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ferrat, G.; Renisio, J.G.; Morelli, X.; Slootstra, J.W.; Meloen, R.; Cambillau, C.; Darbon, H.

    2002-01-01

    The X-ray structure of a ternary complex between human chorionic gonadotropin hormone (hCG) and two Fvs recognizing its alpha and beta subunits has been recently determined. The Fvs recognize the elongated hCG molecule by its two ends, one being the Leu-12-Cys-29 loop of the alpha subunit. We have d

  8. Hormone impostors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Colborn, T.; Dumanoski, D.; Myers, J.P.

    1997-01-01

    This article discusses the accumulating evidence that some synthetic chemicals disrupt hormones in one way or another. Some mimic estrogen and others interfere with other parts of the body`s control or endocrine system such as testosterone and thyroid metabolism. Included are PCBs, dioxins, furans, atrazine, DDT. Several short sidebars highlight areas where there are or have been particular problems.

  9. MIMIC en Robin Hood

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    R.A. de Mooij (Ruud); A.L. Bovenberg (Lans); F. van der Ploeg (Ploeg)

    1994-01-01

    textabstractVerlaging van het belastingtarief in de eerste schijf, gefinancierd met verhoging van het tarief in de andere schijven, is in het MIMIC-model van het Centraal Planbureau goed voor de werkgelegenheid. Onlangs werd .in E5B betwijfeld of het CPB de gevolgen van zo'n 'Robin Hood'- beleid

  10. MIMIC en Robin Hood

    OpenAIRE

    Mooij, Ruud; Bovenberg, Lans; Ploeg, Ploeg

    1994-01-01

    textabstractVerlaging van het belastingtarief in de eerste schijf, gefinancierd met verhoging van het tarief in de andere schijven, is in het MIMIC-model van het Centraal Planbureau goed voor de werkgelegenheid. Onlangs werd .in E5B betwijfeld of het CPB de gevolgen van zo'n 'Robin Hood'- beleid goed weergeeft. Het is echter de vraag of de niet-kwantificeerbare effecten wel van zo 'n groot belang zijn.

  11. Antimicrobial activities of squalamine mimics.

    OpenAIRE

    1997-01-01

    We investigated the antimicrobial properties of compounds with structural features that were designed to mimic those of squalamine, an antibiotic isolated from the stomach of the dogfish shark. The mimics, like squalamine, are sterol-polyamine conjugates. Unlike squalamine, the mimics were simple to prepare, at high yield, from readily available starting materials. Several squalamine mimics showed activity against gram-negative rods, gram-positive cocci including methicillin-resistant Staphyl...

  12. Parasomnias and their mimics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malhotra, Raman K; Avidan, Alon Y

    2012-11-01

    Parasomnias are classified into nonrapid eye movement and rapid eye movement sleep parasomnias. It is important for the clinician to consider other parasomnia mimics that present to the sleep disorders clinic. These conditions can be differentiated by taking a detailed sleep history and conducting nocturnal polysomnograms to evaluate for potential comorbidities and better characterize the disorder. Mainstays of treatment include treating any underlying primary sleep disorders that induce sleep fragmentation and could trigger the parasomnia, as well as implementing safety precautions to protect patients and their household. Pharmacologic treatment of many parasomnias is also available if needed and clinically indicated.

  13. Antimicrobial activities of squalamine mimics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kikuchi, K; Bernard, E M; Sadownik, A; Regen, S L; Armstrong, D

    1997-07-01

    We investigated the antimicrobial properties of compounds with structural features that were designed to mimic those of squalamine, an antibiotic isolated from the stomach of the dogfish shark. The mimics, like squalamine, are sterol-polyamine conjugates. Unlike squalamine, the mimics were simple to prepare, at high yield, from readily available starting materials. Several squalamine mimics showed activity against gram-negative rods, gram-positive cocci including methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus, vancomycin-resistant Enterococcus faecium, and fungi. Some had little or no hemolytic activity. The hydrophobicity of the sterol backbone and the length and the cationic charge of the side chains appeared to be critical determinants of activity. One of the squalamine mimics, SM-7, was bactericidal against Escherichia coli, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, and S. aureus; its activity was decreased by divalent or monovalent cations and by bovine serum albumin. Subinhibitory concentrations of SM-7 markedly enhanced the antimicrobial activity of rifampin against gram-negative rods. These results suggest that the compounds may disrupt an outer membrane of gram-negative rods. Squalamine mimics are a new class of broad-spectrum antimicrobial agents. The antagonism of their activity by serum and albumin and their hemolytic properties may limit their use as systemic agents. The squalamine mimics, because of their potencies, broad spectra of antimicrobial activity, and potential for systemic toxicity, appear to be good candidates for development as topical antimicrobial agents.

  14. A nonpeptidyl growth hormone secretagogue.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, R G; Cheng, K; Schoen, W R; Pong, S S; Hickey, G; Jacks, T; Butler, B; Chan, W W; Chaung, L Y; Judith, F

    1993-06-11

    A nonpeptidyl secretagogue for growth hormone of the structure 3-amino-3-methyl-N-(2,3,4,5-tetrahydro-2-oxo-1-([2'-(1H-tetrazol-5 -yl) (1,1'-biphenyl)-4-yl]methyl)-1H-1-benzazepin-3(R)-yl)-butanamid e (L-692,429) has been identified. L-692,429 synergizes with the natural growth hormone secretagogue growth hormone-releasing hormone and acts through an alternative signal transduction pathway. The mechanism of action of L-692,429 and studies with peptidyl and nonpeptidyl antagonists suggest that this molecule is a mimic of the growth hormone-releasing hexapeptide His-D-Trp-Ala-Trp-D-Phe-Lys-NH2 (GHRP-6). L-692,429 is an example of a nonpeptidyl specific secretagogue for growth hormone.

  15. Growth Hormone

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... AACC products and services. Advertising & Sponsorship: Policy | Opportunities Growth Hormone Share this page: Was this page helpful? Also known as: GH; Human Growth Hormone; HGH; Somatotropin; Growth Hormone Stimulation Test; Growth ...

  16. Carbocyclic Carbohydrate Mimics as Potential Glycosidase Inhibitors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fanefjord, Mette; Lundt, Inge

    It has been proven that aminocyclopentanols having the aminogroup adjacent to a carbon sidechain could be potential anomer-selective glycosidase inhibitors [1]. A successful pathway for synthesising mimics to L-carbohydrates 2, by introducing nitrogen to the C6 position in compound 1, has been...... developed in our group. A similar strategy has been used for synthesising mimics of D-carbohydrates. The α,β-unsaturated lactone 3 was cyclised to compound 4 which was further transformed into 5. The nitrogen functionality in compound 7 is introduced by an Overman rearrangement of 6 and the hydroxyl...

  17. Carbocyclic Carbohydrate Mimics as Potential Glycosidase Inhibitors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fanefjord, Mette; Lundt, Inge

    functionalities was introduced by either epoxidation or dihydroxylation of 7. Finally, reduction of the lactone ring led to the sugar mimics 8. The synthesis of several isomers of 8 will be presented. [1] a) Kleban, M. ; Hilgers, P. ; Greul, J.N. ; Kugler, R.D. ; Li, J. ; Picasso, S. ; Vogel, P. ; Jäger, V. Chem...

  18. A chemical system that mimics decoding operations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giansante, Carlo; Ceroni, Paola; Venturi, Margherita; Sakamoto, Junji; Schlüter, A Dieter

    2009-02-23

    The chemical information stored in equilibrium mixtures of molecular species is larger than the sum of information carried by the individual molecules. Protonation equilibria in dilute dichloromethane solution of a shape-persistent macrocycle bearing two 2,2'-bipyridine units and two Coumarin 2 moieties (see figure) can be exploited to mimic decoding operations.

  19. Permanent female mimics in a lekking shorebird

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jukema, Joop; Piersma, Theunis

    2006-01-01

    Female mimics are known from many species, but permanent, non-conditional, alternative mating strategies are only known from an isopod, a fish, a lizard and a bird. The single bird example refers to lek-breeding ruffs Philomachus pugnax, a shorebird for which two strategies (independent and satellit

  20. Mimics and chameleons in motor neurone disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turner, Martin R; Talbot, Kevin

    2013-06-01

    The progression of motor neurone disease (MND) is currently irreversible, and the grave implications of diagnosis naturally fuels concern among neurologists over missing a potential mimic disorder. There is no diagnostic test for MND but in reality there are few plausible mimics in routine clinical practice. In the presence of a progressive pure motor disorder, signs such as florid fasciculations, bilateral tongue wasting, the 'split hand', head drop, emotionality, and cognitive or behavioural impairment carry high positive predictive value. MND is clinically heterogeneous, however, with some important chameleon-like presentations and considerable variation in clinical course. Lack of confidence about the scope of such variation, or an approach to diagnosis emphasising investigations over clinical common sense, has the potential to exacerbate diagnostic delay in MND and impede timely planning of the care which is essential to maximising quality of life.

  1. Engineering hydrogels as extracellular matrix mimics

    OpenAIRE

    Geckil, Hikmet; Xu, Feng; Zhang, Xiaohui; Moon, SangJun; Demirci, Utkan

    2010-01-01

    Extracellular matrix (ECM) is a complex cellular environment consisting of proteins, proteoglycans, and other soluble molecules. ECM provides structural support to mammalian cells and a regulatory milieu with a variety of important cell functions, including assembling cells into various tissues and organs, regulating growth and cell–cell communication. Developing a tailored in vitro cell culture environment that mimics the intricate and organized nanoscale meshwork of native ECM is desirable....

  2. Stereocontrolled Synthesis of Methyl Silanediol Peptide Mimics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Lone; Lindsay, Karl; Faber, Jesper;

    2007-01-01

    with methanolic HCl and the resulting amine extended into peptide chains accordingly. The diphenylsilyl moiety is a resilient protecting group for the corresponding silanediol, which can be unmasked via treatment with TfOH, followed by aqueous hydrolysis. The crude silanediol may be isolated and purified as its...... corresponding bis-TMS siloxane via protection with TMSCl, and converted back to the desired silanediol via hydrolysis with aqueous KOH. Efforts to apply this approach to biologically relevant silanediol peptide mimics, with a view to protease inhibition, are described....

  3. Can strange stars mimic dark energy stars?

    CERN Document Server

    Deb, Debabrata; Guha, B K; Ray, Saibal

    2016-01-01

    The possibility of strange stars mixed with dark energy to be one of candidates for dark energy stars is the main issue of the present study. Our investigation shows that quark matter is acting as dark energy after certain yet unknown critical condition inside the quark stars. Our proposed model reveals that strange stars mixed with dark energy feature not only a physically acceptable stable model but also mimic characteristics of dark energy stars. The plausible connections are shown through the mass-radius relation as well as the entropy and temperature. We particulary note that two-fluid distribution is the major reason for anisotropic nature of the spherical stellar system.

  4. Oxidoreductase mimic activity of natural pyrrhotite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ibáñez de Aldecoa, A. L.; Velasco, F.; Menor-Salván, C.

    2012-09-01

    The theory of the chemo-autotrophic origin of life, also called the "iron-sulfur world hypothesis", proposes that the system FeS/FeS2 present in the primitive Earth crust gave the reductive power necessary to conduct the first protometabolic redox reactions. Some experimental studies demonstrated the redox activity of the FeS/SH2 system, but none of them used natural FeS. Here, we show that the iron sulfide mineral pyrrhotite is able to mimic the redox activity of the enzyme lactate dehydrogenase, which reversibly reduces the pyruvate in lactate, under prebiotic conditions with pyrite formation.

  5. Meningeal fibroma: a rare meningioma mimic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kakkar, Aanchal; Sharma, Mehar C; Goyal, Nishant; Sarkar, Chitra; Suri, Vaishali; Garg, Ajay; Kale, Shashank S; Suri, Ashish

    2014-08-01

    Meningeal fibromas are rare intracranial tumors that mimic meningiomas radiologically as well as histologically. The authors report 2 cases of meningeal fibroma with detailed clinical, radiological, histopathological, and immunohistochemical features, and discuss the differential diagnosis of this entity. Knowledge of this rare tumor is essential for pathologists to be able distinguish it from more common meningeal tumors, especially in younger patients. This knowledge is also essential for neurosurgeons, as incomplete resection may lead to tumor recurrence, and such patients require close follow-up.

  6. Do benzodiazepines mimic reverse-turn structures?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hata, Masayuki; Marshall, Garland R.

    2006-05-01

    The role of benzodiazepine derivatives (BZD) as a privileged scaffold that mimics β-turn structures (Ripka et al. (1993) Tetrahedron 49:3593-3608) in peptide/protein recognition was reexamined in detail. Stable BZD ring conformers were determined with MM3, and experimental reverse-turn structures were extracted from the basis set of protein crystal structures previously defined by Ripka et al. Ideal β-turns were also modeled and similarly compared with BZD conformers. Huge numbers of conformers were generated by systematically scanning the torsional degrees of freedom for BZDs, as well as those of ideal β-turns for comparison. Using these structures, conformers of BZDs were fit to experimental structures as suggested by Ripka et al., or modeled classical β-turn conformers, and the root-mean-square deviation (RMSD) values were calculated for each pairwise comparison. Pairs of conformers with the smallest RMSD values for overlap of the four α-β side-chain orientations were selected. All overlaps of BZD conformers with experimental β-turns yielded one or more comparisons where the least RMSD was significantly small, 0.48-0.86 Å, as previously suggested. Utilizing a different methodology, the overall conclusion that benzodiazepines could serve as reverse-turn mimetics of Ripka et al. is justified. The least RMSD values for the overlap of BZDs and modeled classical β-turns were also less than 1 Å. When comparing BZDs with experimental or classical β-turns, the set of experimental β-turns selected by Ripka et al. fit the BZD scaffolds better than modeled classical β-turns; however, all the experimental β-turns did not fit a particular BZD scaffold better. A single BZD ring conformation, and/or chiral orientation, can mimic some, but not all, of the experimental β-turn structures. BZD has two central ring conformations and one chiral center that explains why the four variations of the BZD scaffold can mimic all types of β-turn structure examined. It was

  7. Right-sided diverticulitis mimics appendicitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gilmore, Thomas; Jordan, Charlton; Edelstein, Elisabeth

    2013-01-01

    Right-sided diverticulitis is a rare source of right lower quadrant pain in Western society; however, it is quite common in Asian societies. Right-sided diverticulitis presents very similarly to appendicitis, with right lower quadrant pain, fever, nausea, and laboratory abnormalities, and is often seen in young patients. In this report, we present a case of right-sided diverticulitis. We review right-sided diverticulitis' diagnosis and management. It is important to diagnose right-sided diverticulitis because it is a good mimic of appendicitis and ideally should be diagnosed before a patient has unnecessary surgery. A 26-year-old Asian woman presented for evaluation of right lower quadrant pain and fever. She was initially thought to have appendicitis clinically, but had right-sided diverticulitis diagnosed by computed tomography (CT) scan. She was admitted and received intravenous antibiotics and bowel rest. Her right-sided diverticulitis resolved in 3 days. Severe right lower quadrant pain in young patients of Asian descent can be right-sided diverticulitis. Right-sided diverticulitis is a benign condition managed medically that mimics appendicitis. CT imaging seems to be the best way to avoid unnecessary surgery. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Engineering hydrogels as extracellular matrix mimics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geckil, Hikmet; Xu, Feng; Zhang, Xiaohui; Moon, SangJun; Demirci, Utkan

    2010-04-01

    Extracellular matrix (ECM) is a complex cellular environment consisting of proteins, proteoglycans, and other soluble molecules. ECM provides structural support to mammalian cells and a regulatory milieu with a variety of important cell functions, including assembling cells into various tissues and organs, regulating growth and cell-cell communication. Developing a tailored in vitro cell culture environment that mimics the intricate and organized nanoscale meshwork of native ECM is desirable. Recent studies have shown the potential of hydrogels to mimic native ECM. Such an engineered native-like ECM is more likely to provide cells with rational cues for diagnostic and therapeutic studies. The research for novel biomaterials has led to an extension of the scope and techniques used to fabricate biomimetic hydrogel scaffolds for tissue engineering and regenerative medicine applications. In this article, we detail the progress of the current state-of-the-art engineering methods to create cell-encapsulating hydrogel tissue constructs as well as their applications in in vitro models in biomedicine.

  9. Hormone Data

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Hormones quantified from marine mammal and sea turtle tissue provide information about the status of each animal sampled, including its sex, reproductive status and...

  10. Preparation of highly efficient manganese catalase mimics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Triller, Michael U; Hsieh, Wen-Yuan; Pecoraro, Vincent L; Rompel, Annette; Krebs, Bernt

    2002-10-21

    The series of compounds [Mn(bpia)(mu-OAc)](2)(ClO(4))(2) (1), [Mn(2)(bpia)(2)(muO)(mu-OAc)](ClO(4))(3).CH(3)CN (2), [Mn(bpia)(mu-O)](2)(ClO(4))(2)(PF(6)).2CH(3)CN (3), [Mn(bpia)(Cl)(2)](ClO)(4) (4), and [(Mn(bpia)(Cl))(2)(mu-O)](ClO(4))(2).2CH(3)CN (5) (bpia = bis(picolyl)(N-methylimidazol-2-yl)amine) represents a structural, spectroscopic, and functional model system for manganese catalases. Compounds 3 and 5 have been synthesized from 2 via bulk electrolysis and ligand exchange, respectively. All complexes have been structurally characterized by X-ray crystallography and by UV-vis and EPR spectroscopies. The different bridging ligands including the rare mono-mu-oxo and mono-mu-oxo-mono-mu-carboxylato motifs lead to a variation of the Mn-Mn separation across the four binuclear compounds of 1.50 A (Mn(2)(II,II) = 4.128 A, Mn(2)(III,III) = 3.5326 and 3.2533 A, Mn(2)(III,IV) = 2.624 A). Complexes 1, 2, and 3 are mimics for the Mn(2)(II,II), the Mn(2)(III,III), and the Mn(2)(III,IV) oxidation states of the native enzyme. UV-vis spectra of these compounds show similarities to those of the corresponding oxidation states of manganese catalase from Thermus thermophilus and Lactobacillus plantarum. Compound 2 exhibits a rare example of a Jahn-Teller compression. While complexes 1 and 3 are efficient catalysts for the disproportionation of hydrogen peroxide and contain an N(4)O(2) donor set, 4 and 5 show no catalase activity. These complexes have an N(4)Cl(2) and N(4)OCl donor set, respectively, and serve as mimics for halide inhibited manganese catalases. Cyclovoltammetric data show that the substitution of oxygen donor atoms with chloride causes a shift of redox potentials to more positive values. To our knowledge, complex 1 is the most efficient binuclear functional manganese catalase mimic exhibiting saturation kinetics to date.

  11. Recognizing asthma mimics and asthma complications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amundson, Dennis; Seda, Gilbert; Daheshia, Massoud

    2011-10-01

    Asthma is a chronic inflammatory disorder of the airways characterized by airflow obstruction, bronchial hyperreactivity, and underlying inflammation. Two common reasons asthmatics fail standard therapy are incorrect diagnosis and failure to recognize underlying contributing factors. A correct diagnosis of asthma is of great importance to military practitioners since misdiagnosis or uncontrolled asthma affects an individual's operational readiness or determines whether one can receive a medical waiver to enlist in military service. This article presents four cases of patients with dyspnea that have conditions which mimic asthma or complicate asthma management: vocal cord dysfunction misdiagnosed as asthma, respiratory bronchiolitis interstitial lung disease mistaken as asthma, difficult-to-control asthma because of bronchiectasis and allergic bronchopulmonary aspergillosis, and difficult and fatal asthma. Asthma is contrasted to other respiratory disorders, and an outlined approach to asthma diagnosis and management is presented using the Global Initiative for Asthma guidelines.

  12. Renewable polyethylene mimics derived from castor oil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Türünç, Oĝuz; Montero de Espinosa, Lucas; Meier, Michael A R

    2011-09-01

    An increasing number of reports on the syntheses of carbohydrate- and plant oil-based polymers has been published in ongoing efforts to produce plastic materials from renewable resources. Although many of these polymers are biodegradable and this is a desirable property for certain applications, in some cases non-degradable polymers are needed for long-term use purposes. Polyolefins are one of the most important classes of materials that have already taken their places in our daily life. On the other hand, their production relies on fossil resources. Therefore, within this contribution, we discuss synthetic routes toward a number of polyethylene mimics derived from fatty acids via thiol-ene and ADMET polymerization reactions in order to establish more sustainable routes toward this important class of polymers. Two different diene monomers were thus prepared from castor oil derived platform chemicals, their polymerization via the two mentioned routes was optimized and compared to each other, and their thermal properties were investigated.

  13. New strigolactone mimics: structure-activity relationship and mode of action as germinating stimulants for parasitic weeds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zwanenburg, Binne; Nayak, Sandip K; Charnikhova, Tatsiana V; Bouwmeester, Harro J

    2013-09-15

    Strigolactones (SLs) are new plant hormones with varies important bio-functions. This Letter deals with germination of seeds of parasitic weeds. Natural SLs have a too complex structure for synthesis. Therefore, there is an active search for SL analogues and mimics with a simpler structure with retention of activity. SL analogues all contain the D-ring connected with an enone moiety through an enol ether unit. A new mechanism for the hydrolysis SL analogues involving bidentate bound water and an α,β-hydrolase with a Ser-His-Asp catalytic triad has been proposed. Newly discovered SL mimics only have the D-ring with an appropriate leaving group at C-5. A mode of action for SL mimics was proposed for which now supporting evidence is provided. As predicted an extra methyl group at C-4 of the D-ring blocks the germination of seeds of parasitic weeds. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Designing mimics of membrane active proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sgolastra, Federica; Deronde, Brittany M; Sarapas, Joel M; Som, Abhigyan; Tew, Gregory N

    2013-12-17

    As a semipermeable barrier that controls the flux of biomolecules in and out the cell, the plasma membrane is critical in cell function and survival. Many proteins interact with the plasma membrane and modulate its physiology. Within this large landscape of membrane-active molecules, researchers have focused significant attention on two specific classes of peptides, antimicrobial peptides (AMPs) and cell penetrating peptides (CPPs), because of their unique properties. In this Account, we describe our efforts over the last decade to build and understand synthetic mimics of antimicrobial peptides (SMAMPs). These endeavors represent one specific example of a much larger effort to understand how synthetic molecules interact with and manipulate the plasma membrane. Using both defined molecular weight oligomers and easier to produce, but heterogeneous, polymers, we have generated scaffolds with biological potency exceeding that of the natural analogues. One of these compounds has progressed through a phase II clinical trial for pan-staph infections. Modern biophysical assays have highlighted the interplay between the synthetic scaffold and lipid composition: a negative Gaussian curvature is required both for pore formation and for the initiation of endosome creation. Although work remains to better resolve the complexity of this interplay between lipids, other bilayer components, and the scaffolds, significant new insights have been discovered. These results point to the importance of considering the various aspects of permeation and how these are related to "pore formation". More recently, our efforts have expanded toward protein transduction domains, or mimics of cell penetrating peptides. Using a combination of unique molecular scaffolds and guanidinium-rich side chains, we have produced an array of polymers with robust membrane (and delivery) activity. In this new area, researchers are just beginning to understand the fundamental interactions between these new

  15. Retropharyngeal Calcific Tendonitis Mimics a Retropharyngeal Abscess

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Natasha Pollak

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Retropharyngeal calcific tendonitis (RCT is an uncommon, self-limiting condition that is often omitted in the differential diagnosis of a retropharyngeal fluid collection. This condition mimics a retropharyngeal abscess and should be considered when evaluating a fluid collection in the retropharyngeal space. Although calcific tendonitis at other sites has been well described in the medical literature, it appears that this entity has been underreported in the otolaryngology literature where only a few case reports have been identified. Presumably, the actual incidence is higher than the reported incidence, due to lack of familiarity with this disorder. As an otolaryngologist’s scope of practice includes the managements of retropharyngeal lesions, it is important for the otolaryngologist to recognize the presentation of acute RCT and be familiar with appropriate treatment strategies. Retropharyngeal calcific tendonitis presents with neck pain, limitation of neck range of motion and includes inflammation, calcifications, and a sterile effusion within the longus colli muscle. Treatment is medical with nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory medications. RCT does not require surgical treatment, and an accurate diagnosis can prevent unnecessary attempts at operative drainage. In this study, we discuss two cases of RCT, summarize the salient features in diagnosis, including key radiologic features, discuss treatment options, and review the literature.

  16. Mycosis Fungoides mimic chronic eczema? Observation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jacek Andruszkiewicz

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Mycosis fungoides (MF is the most common type of cutaneous T-cell lymphoma [1]. Because of its great variety of clinical features and nonspecific histological findings (especially in early stages has been named the "great imitator "and can induce many wrong diagnosis [2,3]. Mycosis fungoides (MF, is an epidermotropic lymphoma included as an indolent form in the recent WHO/EORTC classification. From a clinical point of view, the classic disease progression usually is slow and takes over years or even decades, and characterized by the evolution from patches to more infiltrated plaques and eventually to tumours or erythroderma. However, the analysis of the MF disease course has been greatly impaired by the rarity of the disease, thus data about the time course of disease progression and pattern of relapse during time are not well known [4,5]. Therefore very often Mycosis fungoides is misdiagnosed as chronic eczema [6]. MF can also mimic: vitiligo [6], alopecia-Areata [7], ecchymosis [8].

  17. Gibberellic and kaurenoic hybrid strigolactone mimics for seed germination of parasitic weeds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pereira, Rondinelle G; Cala, Antonio; Fernández-Aparicio, Mónica; Molinillo, José Mg; Boaventura, Maria Ad; Macías, Francisco A

    2017-06-23

    Parasitic weeds are widespread and cause significant losses in important crops. Their germination requires the detection of crop-derived molecules such as strigolactones. Strigolactone mimics are germination-inducing molecules with the potential to apply a suicidal germination strategy for seed bank control of parasitic weeds. The D-ring, which is instrumental in the germination process of seeds of parasitic weeds, was attached to gibberellin (GA3 ) and kaurenoic acid as the scaffold. It was shown that indeed strigolactone mimics prepared from GA3 and kaurenoic acid are active as stimulants when a D-ring is present; some of the mimics are as active as GR24. The starting molecules were plant hormones that had previous growth-regulating activity in other organisms and the products showed enhanced activity towards parasitic weeds. The information generated may contribute to a better understanding of the germination biochemistry of the weed species used. Further research is required in this area but it is clear that the results are promising. © 2017 Society of Chemical Industry. © 2017 Society of Chemical Industry.

  18. Glutathione transferase mimics : Micellar catalysis of an enzymic reaction

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lindkvist, Björn; Weinander, Rolf; Engman, Lars; Koetse, Marc; Engberts, Jan B.F.N.; Morgenstern, Ralf

    1997-01-01

    Substances that mimic the enzyme action of glutathione transferases (which serve in detoxification) are described. These micellar catalysts enhance the reaction rate between thiols and activated halogenated nitroarenes as well as alpha,beta-unsaturated carbonyls. The nucleophilic aromatic substituti

  19. Parry-Romberg syndrome with hemimasticatory spasm in pregnancy; A dystonia mimic

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Akhila Kumar Panda

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Parry-Romberg syndrome (PRS with hemimasticatory spasm (HMS is quite an uncommon overlapping phenomenon which very often mimics jaw closing dystonia. A previously healthy 35-year-old female, during her 5 th month of pregnancy started developing intermittent unilateral painful spasms of jaw while conversation, clinching of teeth, or eating, which led to frequent tongue bites. The spasms were worsened during pregnancy. She used to do certain manoeuvre like sensory tricks in form of touching involved side of the face to relieve the symptoms. Apart from this, she developed progressive hemifacial and hemitongue atrophy. Other medical and neurological examinations were normal. Laboratory investigations as well as neuroimaging were noncontributory. The spasm responded to carbamazepine but hemifacial atrophy persists. To our best knowledge, onset and worsening of this syndrome in pregnancy has not been described earlier which might be correlated either with some hormonal imbalance or some unknown mechanisms.

  20. Growth hormone suppression test

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/003376.htm Growth hormone suppression test To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. The growth hormone suppression test determines whether growth hormone production ...

  1. Growth hormone test

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/003706.htm Growth hormone test To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. The growth hormone test measures the amount of growth hormone ...

  2. Hormone Replacement Therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... before and during menopause, the levels of female hormones can go up and down. This can cause ... hot flashes and vaginal dryness. Some women take hormone replacement therapy (HRT), also called menopausal hormone therapy, ...

  3. A Batesian mimic and its model share color production mechanisms

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    David W.KIKUCHI; David W.PFENNIG

    2012-01-01

    Batesian mimics are harmless prey species that resemble dangerous ones (models),and thus receive protection from predators.How such adaptive resemblances evolve is a classical problem in evolutionary biology.Mimicry is typically thought to be difficult to evolve,especially if the model and mimic produce the convergent phenotype through different proximate mechanisms.However,mimicry may evolve more readily if mimic and model share similar pathways for producing the convergent phenotype.In such cases,these pathways can be co-opted in ancestral mimic populations to produce high-fidelity mimicry without the need for major evolutionary innovations.Here,we show that a Batesian mimic,the scarlet kingsnake Lampropettis elapsoides,produces its coloration using the same physiological mechanisms as does its model,the eastern coral snake Micrurus fulvius.Therefore,precise color mimicry may have been able to evolve easily in this system.Generally,we know relatively little about the proximate mechanisms underlying mimicry.

  4. Molecular mimics of the tumour antigen MUC1.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tharappel C James

    Full Text Available A key requirement for the development of cancer immunotherapy is the identification of tumour-associated antigens that are differentially or exclusively expressed on the tumour and recognized by the host immune system. However, immune responses to such antigens are often muted or lacking due to the antigens being recognized as "self", and further complicated by the tumour environment and regulation of immune cells within. In an effort to circumvent the lack of immune responses to tumour antigens, we have devised a strategy to develop potential synthetic immunogens. The strategy, termed mirror image phage display, is based on the concept of molecular mimicry as demonstrated by the idiotype/anti-idiotype paradigm in the immune system. Here as 'proof of principle' we have selected molecular mimics of the well-characterised tumour associated antigen, the human mucin1 protein (MUC1 from two different peptide phage display libraries. The putative mimics were compared in structure and function to that of the native antigen. Our results demonstrate that several of the mimic peptides display T-cell stimulation activity in vitro when presented by matured dendritic cells. The mimic peptides and the native MUC1 antigenic epitopes can cross-stimulate T-cells. The data also indicate that sequence homology and/or chemical properties to the original epitope are not the sole determining factors for the observed immunostimulatory activity of the mimic peptides.

  5. SuperMimic – Fitting peptide mimetics into protein structures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Schmidt Ulrike

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Various experimental techniques yield peptides that are biologically active but have unfavourable pharmacological properties. The design of structurally similar organic compounds, i.e. peptide mimetics, is a challenging field in medicinal chemistry. Results SuperMimic identifies compounds that mimic parts of a protein, or positions in proteins that are suitable for inserting mimetics. The application provides libraries that contain peptidomimetic building blocks on the one hand and protein structures on the other. The search for promising peptidomimetic linkers for a given peptide is based on the superposition of the peptide with several conformers of the mimetic. New synthetic elements or proteins can be imported and used for searching. Conclusion We present a graphical user interface for finding peptide mimetics that can be inserted into a protein or for fitting small molecules into a protein. Using SuperMimic, promising locations in proteins for the insertion of mimetics can be found quickly and conveniently.

  6. SuperMimic – Fitting peptide mimetics into protein structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goede, Andrean; Michalsky, Elke; Schmidt, Ulrike; Preissner, Robert

    2006-01-01

    Background Various experimental techniques yield peptides that are biologically active but have unfavourable pharmacological properties. The design of structurally similar organic compounds, i.e. peptide mimetics, is a challenging field in medicinal chemistry. Results SuperMimic identifies compounds that mimic parts of a protein, or positions in proteins that are suitable for inserting mimetics. The application provides libraries that contain peptidomimetic building blocks on the one hand and protein structures on the other. The search for promising peptidomimetic linkers for a given peptide is based on the superposition of the peptide with several conformers of the mimetic. New synthetic elements or proteins can be imported and used for searching. Conclusion We present a graphical user interface for finding peptide mimetics that can be inserted into a protein or for fitting small molecules into a protein. Using SuperMimic, promising locations in proteins for the insertion of mimetics can be found quickly and conveniently. PMID:16403211

  7. Hormones and absence epilepsy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Luijtelaar, E.L.J.M. van; Tolmacheva, E.A.; Budziszewska, B.

    2017-01-01

    Hormones have an extremely large impact on seizures and epilepsy. Stress and stress hormones are known to reinforce seizure expression, and gonadal hormones affect the number of seizures and even the seizure type. Moreover, hormonal concentrations change drastically over an individual's lifetime, es

  8. Hormones and absence epilepsy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Luijtelaar, E.L.J.M. van; Budziszewska, B.; Tolmacheva, E.A.

    2009-01-01

    Hormones have an extremely large impact on seizures and epilepsy. Stress and stress hormones are known to reinforce seizure expression, and gonadal hormones affect the number of seizures and even the seizure type. Moreover, hormonal concentrations change drastically over an individual's lifetime, es

  9. Synthesis of aminocyclopentanols: a-D-galacto configured sugar mimics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bøjstrup, Marie; Lundt, Inge

    2005-01-01

    Four aminocyclopentanols, as mimics of putative intermediates in hydrolysis of a-D-galactosides, have been synthesized through a number of stereoselective transformations, using the cis-fused cyclopentane-1,4-lactone (1R, 5S, 7R, 8R)-7,8-dihydroxy-2-oxabicyclo[3.3.0]oct-3-one 1 as a chiral building...

  10. Synthesis of aminocyclopentanols: a-D-galacto configured sugar mimics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bøjstrup, Marie; Lundt, Inge

    2005-01-01

    Four aminocyclopentanols, as mimics of putative intermediates in hydrolysis of a-D-galactosides, have been synthesized through a number of stereoselective transformations, using the cis-fused cyclopentane-1,4-lactone (1R, 5S, 7R, 8R)-7,8-dihydroxy-2-oxabicyclo[3.3.0]oct-3-one 1 as a chiral buildi...

  11. Selective Mimics of Strigolactone Actions and Their Potential Use for Controlling Damage Caused by Root Parasitic Weeds

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Kosuke Fukui; Shinsaku Ito; Tadao Asami

    2013-01-01

    Strigolactones (SLs) are a novel class of plant hormones and rhizosphere communication signals,although the molecular mechanisms underlying their activities have not yet been fully determined.Nor is their application in agriculture well developed.The importance of plant hormone agonists has been demonstrated in both basic and applied research,and chemicals that mimic strigolactone functions should greatly facilitate strigolactone research.Here,we report our discovery of a new phenoxyfuranone compound,4-Br debranone (4BD),that shows similar activity to that of the major strigolactone (SL) analog GR24 in many aspects of a biological assay on plants.4BD strongly inhibited tiller bud outgrowth in the SL-deficient rice mutant d10 at the same concentration as GR24,with no adverse effects,even during prolonged cultivation.This result was also observed in the Arabidopsis thaliana SL-deficient mutants max1,max3,and max4.However,the application of 4BD to the Arabidopsis SL-insensitive mutant max2 induced no morphological changes in it.The expression of SL biosynthetic genes was also reduced by 4BD treatment,probably via negative feedback regulation.However,in a seed germination assay on Striga hermonthica,a root parasitic plant,4BD showed far less activity than GR24.These results suggest that 4BD is the first plant-specific strigolactone mimic.

  12. Selective mimics of strigolactone actions and their potential use for controlling damage caused by root parasitic weeds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fukui, Kosuke; Ito, Shinsaku; Asami, Tadao

    2013-01-01

    Strigolactones (SLs) are a novel class of plant hormones and rhizosphere communication signals, although the molecular mechanisms underlying their activities have not yet been fully determined. Nor is their application in agriculture well developed. The importance of plant hormone agonists has been demonstrated in both basic and applied research, and chemicals that mimic strigolactone functions should greatly facilitate strigolactone research. Here, we report our discovery of a new phenoxyfuranone compound, 4-Br debranone (4BD), that shows similar activity to that of the major strigolactone (SL) analog GR24 in many aspects of a biological assay on plants. 4BD strongly inhibited tiller bud outgrowth in the SL-deficient rice mutant d10 at the same concentration as GR24, with no adverse effects, even during prolonged cultivation. This result was also observed in the Arabidopsis thaliana SL-deficient mutants max1, max3, and max4. However, the application of 4BD to the Arabidopsis SL-insensitive mutant max2 induced no morphological changes in it. The expression of SL biosynthetic genes was also reduced by 4BD treatment, probably via negative feedback regulation. However, in a seed germination assay on Striga hermonthica, a root parasitic plant, 4BD showed far less activity than GR24. These results suggest that 4BD is the first plant-specific strigolactone mimic.

  13. Standardization of hormone determinations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stenman, Ulf-Håkan

    2013-12-01

    Standardization of hormone determinations is important because it simplifies interpretation of results and facilitates the use of common reference values for different assays. Progress in standardization has been achieved through the introduction of more homogeneous hormone standards for peptide and protein hormones. However, many automated methods for determinations of steroid hormones do not provide satisfactory result. Isotope dilution-mass spectrometry (ID-MS) has been used to establish reference methods for steroid hormone determinations and is now increasingly used for routine determinations of steroids and other low molecular weight compounds. Reference methods for protein hormones based on MS are being developed and these promise to improve standardization.

  14. A Taylor-Made Design of Phenoxyfuranone-Type Strigolactone Mimic

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kosuke Fukui

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Strigolactones are a class of plant hormones that inhibit axillary bud outgrowth and are released from plant roots to act as a rhizosphere communication signal. The Orobanchaceae parasitic plant Striga hermonthica perceives strigolactone as its germination signal, indicating host presence. After germination, the Striga plant parasitises the host plant and suppresses host growth by draining photosynthetic products, water and other essential nutrients. Because of this way of life, this parasite threatens crop production in sub-Saharan Africa with infestation in crop fields and crop devastation. Crop protection in such areas is among the most concerning problems to be dealt with as immediately as possible. With respect to crop protection from Striga, many strigolactone agonists have been developed and used in research to reveal Striga biology, and have contributed to development of crop protection methods. However, an effective method has yet to be found. In a previous study, we reported debranones as a group of strigolactone mimics that inhibit axillary buds outgrowth with moderate stimulation activity for Striga germination. Debranones would be accessible because they are simply synthesized from commercially available phenols and bromo butenolide. Taking this advantage of debranones for Striga research, we tried to find the debranones stimulating Striga seed germination. To modulate functional selectivity and to enhance germination inducing activity of debranones, we studied structure–activity relationships. We investigated effects of substituent position and functional group on debranone activity and selectivity as a strigolactone mimic. As a result, we improved stimulation activity of debranones for Striga seed germination by chemical modification, and demonstrated the pharmacophore of debranones for selective modulation of distinct strigolactone responses.

  15. Bioidentical Hormones and Menopause

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Hormones and Menopause Fact Sheet Bioidentical Hormones and Menopause January, 2012 Download PDFs English Espanol Editors Howard ... JoAnn Pinkerton, MD Richard Santen, MD What is menopause? Menopause is the time of life when monthly ...

  16. Growth hormone deficiency

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... dosage of the medicine. Serious side effects of growth hormone treatment are rare. Common side effects include: Headache Fluid ... years. The rate of growth then slowly decreases. Growth hormone therapy does not work for all children. Left untreated, ...

  17. Hormones and Obesity

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Balance › Hormones and Obesity Fact Sheet Hormones and Obesity March, 2010 Download PDFs English Espanol Editors Caroline Apovian, MD Judith Korner, MD, PhD What is obesity? Obesity is a chronic (long-term) medical problem ...

  18. Data on the catalytic mechanism of thiol peroxidase mimics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B. Zadehvakili

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available We have recently reported SAR data describing the pharmacological activity of a series of phenyl alkyl selenides and tellurides which catalyse the oxidation of thiols by hydrogen peroxide (H2O2, “The design of redox active thiol peroxidase mimics: dihydrolipoic acid recognition correlates with cytotoxicity and prooxidant action” B. Zadehvakili, S.M. McNeill, J.P. Fawcett, G.I. Giles (2016 [1]. This thiol peroxidase (TPx activity is potentially useful for a number of therapeutic applications, as it can alter the outcome of oxidative stress related pathologies and modify redox signalling. This article presents data describing the molecular changes that occur to a TPx mimic upon exposure to H2O2, and then the thiol mercaptoethanol, as characterised by UV–vis spectroscopy and HPLC retention time.

  19. Varroa destructor changes its cuticular hydrocarbons to mimic new hosts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Le Conte, Y; Huang, Z Y; Roux, M; Zeng, Z J; Christidès, J-P; Bagnères, A-G

    2015-06-01

    Varroa destructor (Vd) is a honeybee ectoparasite. Its original host is the Asian honeybee, Apis cerana, but it has also become a severe, global threat to the European honeybee, Apis mellifera. Previous studies have shown that Varroa can mimic a host's cuticular hydrocarbons (HC), enabling the parasite to escape the hygienic behaviour of the host honeybees. By transferring mites between the two honeybee species, we further demonstrate that Vd is able to mimic the cuticular HC of a novel host species when artificially transferred to this new host. Mites originally from A. cerana are more efficient than mites from A. mellifera in mimicking HC of both A. cerana and A. mellifera. This remarkable adaptability may explain their relatively recent host-shift from A. cerana to A. mellifera.

  20. Wolff-Parkinson-White Syndrome Mimics a Conduction Disease

    OpenAIRE

    Marrakchi, S.; I. Kammoun; S. Kachboura

    2014-01-01

    Background. It is important to recognise Wolff-Parkinson-White (WPW) syndrome in electrocardiograms (ECG), as it may mimic ischaemic heart disease, ventricular hypertrophy, and bundle branch block. Recognising WPW syndrome allows for risk stratification, the identification of associated conditions, and the institution of appropriate management. Objective. The present case showed that electrophysiological study is indicated in patients with abnormal ECG and syncope. Case Report. A 40-year-old ...

  1. The menace of endocrine disruptors on thyroid hormone physiology and their impact on intrauterine development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mastorakos, George; Karoutsou, Eftychia I; Mizamtsidi, Maria; Creatsas, George

    2007-06-01

    The delivery of the appropriate thyroid hormones quantity to target tissues in euthyroidism is the result of unopposed synthesis, transport, metabolism, and excretion of these hormones. Thyroid hormones homeostasis depends on the maintenance of the circulating 'free' thyroid hormone reserves and on the development of a dynamic balance between the 'free' hormones reserves and those of the 'bound' hormones with the transport proteins. Disturbance of this hormone system, which is in constant interaction with other hormone systems, leads to an adaptational counter-response targeting to re-establish a new homeostatic equilibrium. An excessive disturbance is likely to result, however, in hypo- or hyper- thyroid clinical states. Endocrine disruptors are chemical substances forming part of 'natural' contaminating agents found in most ecosystems. There is abundant evidence that several key components of the thyroid hormones homeostasis are susceptible to the action of endocrine disruptors. These chemicals include some chlorinated organic compounds, polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons, herbicides, and pharmaceutical agents. Intrauterine exposure to endocrine disruptors that either mimic or antagonize thyroid hormones can produce permanent developmental disorders in the structure and functioning of the brain, leading to behavioral changes. Steroid receptors are important determinants of the consequences of endocrine disruptors. Their interaction with thyroid hormones complicates the effect of endocrine disruptors. The aim of this review is to present the effect of endocrine disruptors on thyroid hormones physiology and their potential impact on intrauterine development.

  2. CRADA Final Report: Mucin Mimic and Glycopeptide Synthesis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bertozzi, Carolyn R.

    2002-10-22

    Mucus has several constituents but the most important are the mucins, heavily O-glycosylated proteins characterized by long stretches of tandem repeat sequences rich in glycosylated serine and threonine residues, with N- and C-terminal domains that have determined to a large extent by the viscous and viscoelastic properties of mucin glycoproteins. Indeed, these properties are evident in reconstituted purified mucin glycoproteins. Oligomeric mucin can be deconstructed into its monomeric components and then further into the domains that comprise each mucin molecule. There are two major domain types. "Glycodomains" are defined by stretches of the tandemly repeated Thr/Ser-rich segments that bear the characteristic O-linked glycans of the mucin molecule. The goal of this project is to synthesize polymeric materials that mimic mucin glycodomains. In order to mimic the central features of mucin, these materials should have dense clusters of glycans that bear a similar structure to those found in native mucins, and a fairly rigid polymer backbone. Four different polymers bearing ketone groups for the attachment of sugars were synthesized. GalNAc{alpha}-ONH{sub 2} and Sia{alpha}2,6GaINAc{alpha}·ONH{sub 2} both of which could be ligated to the polymer scaffolds were synthesized. Mucin glycodomain mimics were successfully synthesized by ligation of glycans to polymers.

  3. Molecular mechanical properties of short-sequence peptide enzyme mimics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takahashi, Tsukasa; Vo Ngo, Bao C; Xiao, Leyang; Arya, Gaurav; Heller, Michael J

    2016-01-01

    While considerable attempts have been made to recreate the high turnover rates of enzymes using synthetic enzyme mimics, most have failed and only a few have produced minimal reaction rates that can barely be considered catalytic. One particular approach we have focused on is the use of short-sequence peptides that contain key catalytic groups in close proximity. In this study, we designed six different peptides and tested their ability to mimic the catalytic mechanism of the cysteine proteases. Acetylation and deacylation by Ellman's Reagent trapping experiments showed the importance of having phenylalanine groups surrounding the catalytic sites in order to provide greater proximity between the cysteine, histidine, and aspartate amino acid R-groups. We have also carried out all-atom molecular dynamics simulations to determine the distance between these catalytic groups and the overall mechanical flexibility of the peptides. We found strong correlations between the magnitude of fluctuations in the Cys-His distance, which determines the flexibility and interactions between the cysteine thiol and histidine imidazole groups, and the deacylation rate. We found that, in general, shorter Cys-His distance fluctuations led to a higher deacylation rate constant, implying that greater confinement of the two residues will allow a higher frequency of the acetyl exchange between the cysteine thiol and histidine imidazole R-groups. This may be the key to future design of peptide structures with molecular mechanical properties that lead to viable enzyme mimics.

  4. Pattern Differences of Small Hand Muscle Atrophy in Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis and Mimic Disorders

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jia Fang

    2016-01-01

    Conclusions: The different patterns of small hand muscle atrophy between the ALS patients and the patients with mimic disorders presumably reflect distinct pathophysiological mechanisms underlying different disorders, and may aid in distinguishing between ALS and mimic disorders.

  5. Hormonal regulation of energy partitioning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rohner-Jeanrenaud, F

    2000-06-01

    A loop system exists between hypothalamic neuropeptide Y (NPY) and peripheral adipose tissue leptin to maintain normal body homeostasis. When hypothalamic NPY levels are increased by fasting or by intracerebroventricular (i.c.v.) infusion, food intake and body weight increase. NPY has genuine hormono-metabolic effects. It increases insulin and corticosterone secretion relative to controls. These hormonal changes, acting singly or combined, favor adipose tissue lipogenic activity, while producing muscle insulin resistance. They also promote leptin release from adipose tissue. When infused i.c.v. to normal rats to mimic its central effects, leptin decreases NPY levels, thus food intake and body weight. Leptin i.c.v. has also genuine hormono-metabolic effects. It decreases insulinemia and adipose tissue storage ability, enhancing glucose disposal. Leptin increases the expression of uncoupling proteins (UCP-1, -2, -3) and thus energy dissipation. Leptin-induced changes favor oxidation at the expense of storage. Circadian fluctuations of NPY and leptin levels maintain normal body homeostasis. In animal obesity, defective hypothalamic leptin receptor activation prevent leptin from acting, with resulting obesity, insulin and leptin resistance.

  6. The Mediated MIMIC Model for Understanding the Underlying Mechanism of DIF

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Ying; Shao, Can; Lathrop, Quinn N.

    2016-01-01

    Due to its flexibility, the multiple-indicator, multiple-causes (MIMIC) model has become an increasingly popular method for the detection of differential item functioning (DIF). In this article, we propose the mediated MIMIC model method to uncover the underlying mechanism of DIF. This method extends the usual MIMIC model by including one variable…

  7. Bicelles and Other Membrane Mimics: Comparison of Structure, Properties, and Dynamics from MD Simulations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vestergaard, Mikkel; Kraft, Johan Frederik; Vosegaard, Thomas

    2015-01-01

    The increased interest in studying membrane proteins has led to the development of new membrane mimics such as bicelles and nanodiscs. However, only limited knowledge is available of how these membrane mimics are affected by embedded proteins and how well they mimic a lipid bilayer. Herein, we pr...

  8. Fine-Needle Aspiration Cytology of Parathyroid Carcinoma Mimic Hürthle Cell Thyroid Neoplasm

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chutintorn Sriphrapradang

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Fine-needle aspiration (FNA can cause misdiagnosis of cytomorphological findings between parathyroid and thyroid lesions. Case Presentation. A 31-year-old man presented with a palpable neck mass on the right thyroid lobe. FNA cytology was reported as intrathyroidal lymphoid hyperplasia. After 5 years, repeated FNA was done on the enlarged nodule with result of Hürthle cell lesion. Prior to right lobectomy, laboratories revealed elevated serum calcium and parathyroid hormone (PTH. Careful history taking revealed chronic knee pain and ossifying fibroma at the maxilla. Ultrasonography showed a 2.8 cm mass inferior to right thyroid lobe. Pathology from en bloc resection was parathyroid carcinoma and immunohistochemical study revealed positivity for PTH. Genetic analysis found somatic mutation of CDC73 gene in exon1 (c.70delG which caused premature stop codon in amino acid 26 (p.Glu24Lysfs2*. The final diagnosis was hyperparathyroidism-jaw tumor syndrome. Conclusions. FNA cytology of parathyroid can mimic thyroid lesion. It is important to consider and correlate the entire information from clinical history, laboratory, imaging, and FNA.

  9. Low-dose effects of hormones and endocrine disruptors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vandenberg, Laura N

    2014-01-01

    Endogenous hormones have effects on tissue morphology, cell physiology, and behaviors at low doses. In fact, hormones are known to circulate in the part-per-trillion and part-per-billion concentrations, making them highly effective and potent signaling molecules. Many endocrine-disrupting chemicals (EDCs) mimic hormones, yet there is strong debate over whether these chemicals can also have effects at low doses. In the 1990s, scientists proposed the "low-dose hypothesis," which postulated that EDCs affect humans and animals at environmentally relevant doses. This chapter focuses on data that support and refute the low-dose hypothesis. A case study examining the highly controversial example of bisphenol A and its low-dose effects on the prostate is examined through the lens of endocrinology. Finally, the chapter concludes with a discussion of factors that can influence the ability of a study to detect and interpret low-dose effects appropriately.

  10. De novo design of protein mimics of B-DNA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yüksel, Deniz; Bianco, Piero R; Kumar, Krishna

    2016-01-01

    Structural mimicry of DNA is utilized in nature as a strategy to evade molecular defences mounted by host organisms. One such example is the protein Ocr - the first translation product to be expressed as the bacteriophage T7 infects E. coli. The structure of Ocr reveals an intricate and deliberate arrangement of negative charges that endows it with the ability to mimic ∼24 base pair stretches of B-DNA. This uncanny resemblance to DNA enables Ocr to compete in binding the type I restriction modification (R/M) system, and neutralizes the threat of hydrolytic cleavage of viral genomic material. Here, we report the de novo design and biophysical characterization of DNA mimicking peptides, and describe the inhibitory action of the designed helical bundles on a type I R/M enzyme, EcoR124I. This work validates the use of charge patterning as a design principle for creation of protein mimics of DNA, and serves as a starting point for development of therapeutic peptide inhibitors against human pathogens that employ molecular camouflage as part of their invasion stratagem.

  11. Wolff-Parkinson-White Syndrome Mimics a Conduction Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Marrakchi

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. It is important to recognise Wolff-Parkinson-White (WPW syndrome in electrocardiograms (ECG, as it may mimic ischaemic heart disease, ventricular hypertrophy, and bundle branch block. Recognising WPW syndrome allows for risk stratification, the identification of associated conditions, and the institution of appropriate management. Objective. The present case showed that electrophysiological study is indicated in patients with abnormal ECG and syncope. Case Report. A 40-year-old man with Wolff-Parkinson-White syndrome was presented to emergency with syncope. A baseline ECG was a complete right branch block and posterior left hemiblock. He was admitted to the cardiac care unit for pacemaker implantation. The atypical figure of complete right branch block and posterior left hemiblock was thought to be a “false positive” of conduction abnormality. But the long anterograde refractory period of the both accessory pathway and atrioventricular conduction may cause difficulty in diagnosing Wolff-Parkinson-White syndrome, Conclusion. A Wolff-Parkinson-White Syndrome may mimic a conduction disease. No reliable algorithm exists for making an ECG diagnosis of a preexcitation syndrome with conduction disorders. This can lead to diagnostic and therapeutic dilemmas in the context of syncope.

  12. Growth Hormone Deficiency

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ömer Tarım

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Growth hormone deficiency is the most promising entity in terms of response to therapy among the treatable causes of growth retardation. It may be due to genetic or acquired causes. It may be isolated or a part of multiple hormone deficiencies. Diagnostic criteria and therefore treatment indications are still disputed. (Journal of Current Pediatrics 2010; 8: 36-8

  13. Genomic responses in mouse models poorly mimic human inflammatory diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seok, Junhee; Warren, H Shaw; Cuenca, Alex G; Mindrinos, Michael N; Baker, Henry V; Xu, Weihong; Richards, Daniel R; McDonald-Smith, Grace P; Gao, Hong; Hennessy, Laura; Finnerty, Celeste C; López, Cecilia M; Honari, Shari; Moore, Ernest E; Minei, Joseph P; Cuschieri, Joseph; Bankey, Paul E; Johnson, Jeffrey L; Sperry, Jason; Nathens, Avery B; Billiar, Timothy R; West, Michael A; Jeschke, Marc G; Klein, Matthew B; Gamelli, Richard L; Gibran, Nicole S; Brownstein, Bernard H; Miller-Graziano, Carol; Calvano, Steve E; Mason, Philip H; Cobb, J Perren; Rahme, Laurence G; Lowry, Stephen F; Maier, Ronald V; Moldawer, Lyle L; Herndon, David N; Davis, Ronald W; Xiao, Wenzhong; Tompkins, Ronald G

    2013-02-26

    A cornerstone of modern biomedical research is the use of mouse models to explore basic pathophysiological mechanisms, evaluate new therapeutic approaches, and make go or no-go decisions to carry new drug candidates forward into clinical trials. Systematic studies evaluating how well murine models mimic human inflammatory diseases are nonexistent. Here, we show that, although acute inflammatory stresses from different etiologies result in highly similar genomic responses in humans, the responses in corresponding mouse models correlate poorly with the human conditions and also, one another. Among genes changed significantly in humans, the murine orthologs are close to random in matching their human counterparts (e.g., R(2) between 0.0 and 0.1). In addition to improvements in the current animal model systems, our study supports higher priority for translational medical research to focus on the more complex human conditions rather than relying on mouse models to study human inflammatory diseases.

  14. Synthesis of substituted benzimidazolyl curcumin mimics and their anticancer activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woo, Ho Bum; Eom, Young Woo; Park, Kyu-Sang; Ham, Jungyeob; Ahn, Chan Mug; Lee, Seokjoon

    2012-01-15

    A novel curcumin mimic library (14a-14h and 15a-15h) possessing variously substituted benzimidazole groups was synthesized through the aldol reaction of (E)-4-(4-hydroxy-3-methoxyphenyl)but-3-en-2-one (7) or (E)-4-(3-hydroxy-4-methoxyphenyl)but-3-en-2-one (13) with diversely substituted benzimidazolyl-2-carbaldehyde (12a-12h). The MTT assay of the cancer cells MCF-7, SH-SY5Y, HEP-G2, and H460 showed that compound 14c with IC(50) of 1.0 and 1.9μM has a strong inhibitory effect on the growth of SH-SY5Y and Hep-G2 cells, respectively, and that compound 15h with IC(50) of 1.9μM has a strong inhibitory effect on the growth of MCF-7 cancer cells.

  15. A Photoisomerizing Rhodopsin Mimic Observed at Atomic Resolution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nosrati, Meisam; Berbasova, Tetyana; Vasileiou, Chrysoula; Borhan, Babak; Geiger, James H

    2016-07-20

    The members of the rhodopsin family of proteins are involved in many essential light-dependent processes in biology. Specific photoisomerization of the protein-bound retinylidene PSB at a specified wavelength range of light is at the heart of all of these systems. Nonetheless, it has been difficult to reproduce in an engineered system. We have developed rhodopsin mimics, using intracellular lipid binding protein family members as scaffolds, to study fundamental aspects of protein/chromophore interactions. Herein we describe a system that specifically isomerizes the retinylidene protonated Schiff base both thermally and photochemically. This isomerization has been characterized at atomic resolution by quantitatively interconverting the isomers in the crystal both thermally and photochemically. This event is accompanied by a large pKa change of the imine similar to the pKa changes observed in bacteriorhodopsin and visual opsins during isomerization.

  16. Constraining cyclic peptides to mimic protein structure motifs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hill, Timothy A.; Shepherd, Nicholas E.; Diness, Frederik;

    2014-01-01

    Many proteins exert their biological activities through small exposed surface regions called epitopes that are folded peptides of well-defined three-dimensional structures. Short synthetic peptide sequences corresponding to these bioactive protein surfaces do not form thermodynamically stable...... protein-like structures in water. However, short peptides can be induced to fold into protein-like bioactive conformations (strands, helices, turns) by cyclization, in conjunction with the use of other molecular constraints, that helps to fine-tune three-dimensional structure. Such constrained cyclic...... peptides can have protein-like biological activities and potencies, enabling their uses as biological probes and leads to therapeutics, diagnostics and vaccines. This Review highlights examples of cyclic peptides that mimic three-dimensional structures of strand, turn or helical segments of peptides...

  17. Amyloid protein unfolding and insertion kinetics on neuronal membrane mimics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qiu, Liming; Buie, Creighton; Vaughn, Mark; Cheng, Kwan

    2010-03-01

    Atomistic details of beta-amyloid (Aβ ) protein unfolding and lipid interaction kinetics mediated by the neuronal membrane surface are important for developing new therapeutic strategies to prevent and cure Alzheimer's disease. Using all-atom MD simulations, we explored the early unfolding and insertion kinetics of 40 and 42 residue long Aβ in binary lipid mixtures with and without cholesterol that mimic the cholesterol-depleted and cholesterol-enriched lipid nanodomains of neurons. The protein conformational transition kinetics was evaluated from the secondary structure profile versus simulation time plot. The extent of membrane disruption was examined by the calculated order parameters of lipid acyl chains and cholesterol fused rings as well as the density profiles of water and lipid headgroups at defined regions across the lipid bilayer from our simulations. Our results revealed that both the cholesterol content and the length of the protein affect the protein-insertion and membrane stability in our model lipid bilayer systems.

  18. Spinal dural arteriovenous fistula: Imaging features and its mimics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jeog, Ying; Ting, David Yen; Hsu, Hui Ling; Huang, Yen Lin; Chen, Chi Jen; Tseng, Ting Chi [Dept. of Radiology, aipei Medical University-Shuang Ho Hospital, New Taipei City, Taiwan (China)

    2015-10-15

    Spinal dural arteriovenous fistula (SDAVF) is the most common spinal vascular malformation, however it is still rare and underdiagnosed. Magnetic resonance imaging findings such as spinal cord edema and dilated and tortuous perimedullary veins play a pivotal role in the confirmation of the diagnosis. However, spinal angiography remains the gold standard in the diagnosis of SDAVF. Classic angiographic findings of SDAVF are early filling of radicular veins, delayed venous return, and an extensive network of dilated perimedullary venous plexus. A series of angiograms of SDAVF at different locations along the spinal column, and mimics of serpentine perimedullary venous plexus on MR images, are demonstrated. Thorough knowledge of SDAVF aids correct diagnosis and prevents irreversible complications.

  19. Genomic responses in mouse models poorly mimic human inflammatory diseases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seok, Junhee; Warren, H. Shaw; Cuenca, Alex G.; Mindrinos, Michael N.; Baker, Henry V.; Xu, Weihong; Richards, Daniel R.; McDonald-Smith, Grace P.; Gao, Hong; Hennessy, Laura; Finnerty, Celeste C.; López, Cecilia M.; Honari, Shari; Moore, Ernest E.; Minei, Joseph P.; Cuschieri, Joseph; Bankey, Paul E.; Johnson, Jeffrey L.; Sperry, Jason; Nathens, Avery B.; Billiar, Timothy R.; West, Michael A.; Jeschke, Marc G.; Klein, Matthew B.; Gamelli, Richard L.; Gibran, Nicole S.; Brownstein, Bernard H.; Miller-Graziano, Carol; Calvano, Steve E.; Mason, Philip H.; Cobb, J. Perren; Rahme, Laurence G.; Lowry, Stephen F.; Maier, Ronald V.; Moldawer, Lyle L.; Herndon, David N.; Davis, Ronald W.; Xiao, Wenzhong; Tompkins, Ronald G.; Abouhamze, Amer; Balis, Ulysses G. J.; Camp, David G.; De, Asit K.; Harbrecht, Brian G.; Hayden, Douglas L.; Kaushal, Amit; O’Keefe, Grant E.; Kotz, Kenneth T.; Qian, Weijun; Schoenfeld, David A.; Shapiro, Michael B.; Silver, Geoffrey M.; Smith, Richard D.; Storey, John D.; Tibshirani, Robert; Toner, Mehmet; Wilhelmy, Julie; Wispelwey, Bram; Wong, Wing H

    2013-01-01

    A cornerstone of modern biomedical research is the use of mouse models to explore basic pathophysiological mechanisms, evaluate new therapeutic approaches, and make go or no-go decisions to carry new drug candidates forward into clinical trials. Systematic studies evaluating how well murine models mimic human inflammatory diseases are nonexistent. Here, we show that, although acute inflammatory stresses from different etiologies result in highly similar genomic responses in humans, the responses in corresponding mouse models correlate poorly with the human conditions and also, one another. Among genes changed significantly in humans, the murine orthologs are close to random in matching their human counterparts (e.g., R2 between 0.0 and 0.1). In addition to improvements in the current animal model systems, our study supports higher priority for translational medical research to focus on the more complex human conditions rather than relying on mouse models to study human inflammatory diseases. PMID:23401516

  20. Piezoelectric materials mimic the function of the cochlear sensory epithelium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Inaoka, Takatoshi; Shintaku, Hirofumi; Nakagawa, Takayuki; Kawano, Satoyuki; Ogita, Hideaki; Sakamoto, Tatsunori; Hamanishi, Shinji; Wada, Hiroshi; Ito, Juichi

    2011-01-01

    Cochlear hair cells convert sound vibration into electrical potential, and loss of these cells diminishes auditory function. In response to mechanical stimuli, piezoelectric materials generate electricity, suggesting that they could be used in place of hair cells to create an artificial cochlear epithelium. Here, we report that a piezoelectric membrane generated electrical potentials in response to sound stimuli that were able to induce auditory brainstem responses in deafened guinea pigs, indicating its capacity to mimic basilar membrane function. In addition, sound stimuli were transmitted through the external auditory canal to a piezoelectric membrane implanted in the cochlea, inducing it to vibrate. The application of sound to the middle ear ossicle induced voltage output from the implanted piezoelectric membrane. These findings establish the fundamental principles for the development of hearing devices using piezoelectric materials, although there are many problems to be overcome before practical application. PMID:22025702

  1. Biofilm streamer formation in a microfluidic porous media mimic

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Aloke; Valiei, Amin; Mukherjee, Partha; Liu, Yang; Thundat, Thomas

    2013-03-01

    Biofilm formation in porous media is of significant importance in many environmental and industrial processes such as bioremediation, oil recovery, and wastewater treatment. Among different biological and environmental factors, hydrodynamics is considered an important determinant of the dynamics of biofilm formation. In the present study, we fabricated a microfluidic porous media mimic and investigated how fluid flow influences the formation of filamentous structures, known as streamers, between porous media structures. Streamers are viscoelastic materials composed of extracellular polymeric substances (EPS) and bacterial cells, and these filamentous structures are typically tethered at either one of both ends to surfaces. We studied evolution of streamers in different flow rates and identified a tangible link between hydrodynamic conditions and development of these filamentous structures. Our results show that hydrodynamic conditions not only determine the limit of the streamers formation, but also influence both temporal evolution and spatial organization of biofilm streamers.

  2. Malakoplakia mimics urinary bladder cancer: A case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ristić-Petrović Ana

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Malakoplakia is an unusual and very rare chronic inflammatory disease. In bladder especially it can mimic malignancy and lead to serious misdiagnosis. Case report. We presented a case of a middle-aged woman with persistent macrohematuria and cystoscopically polypoid bladder mass that resembled a neoplastic process. The final diagnosis was based on cystoscopic biopsy and microscopic findings of acidophilic, foamy histiocytes with the presence of Michaelis-Gutmann inclusions which are characteristic for diagnosis of malakoplakia. Immunohistochemistry confirmed diagnosis by demonstrating CD68-positive macrophages. Conclusion. Urinary bladder malakoplakia should be considered in patients with persistent urinary tract infections and tumor mass at cystoscopy. Early identification with prompt antibiotic treatment can be helpful in avoiding unnecessary surgical interventions and in preventing development of possible complications. [Projekat Ministarstva nauke Republike Srbije, br. 175092

  3. Restless legs syndrome in Wilson's disease: frequency, characteristics, and mimics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trindade, M C; Bittencourt, T; Lorenzi-Filho, G; Alves, R C; de Andrade, D C; Fonoff, E T; Bor-Seng-Shu, E; Machado, A A; Teixeira, M J; Barbosa, E R; Tribl, G G

    2017-02-01

    To determine characteristics, clinical significance, frequency, and mimics of restless legs syndrome (RLS) in a cohort of Wilson's disease (WD, n = 42/f = 18), compared to healthy, matched controls. Structured clinical interviews (patients and caregiving family members), repeated neurological examinations (afternoon and presleep), comprehensive laboratory tests, WD-, RLS-, and sleep-specific rating scales, and video-polysomnography. Thirteen patients with WD (13/42 = 31.0%) clearly fulfilled the five diagnostic criteria of RLS; in eight patients (19.1%), the burden of RLS was clinically significant. The RLS was of moderate severity, equally distributed among sexes, manifested mainly in the evening and before falling asleep, and had developed mostly after clinical manifestation of WD (time elapsed 10.2 ± 14.5 years), still at a young mean age (27.5 ± 11.5 years). The known RLS-associated features were absent (normal iron and kidney parameters) or rare (positive family history, polyneuropathy). Compared to WD patients without RLS, patients with RLS were significantly elder and had suffered longer from WD. WD-specific RLS mimics as well as RLS confounding motor comorbidities (dystonia, tremor, chorea) were frequent and a diagnostic challenge; in difficult cases, the differentiation was reached by clinical observation of the motor behavior in the evening or at nighttime. RLS was frequent in this cohort of WD and might be causally related to WD. RLS should be included in the diagnostic work-up of WD. In complex motor disorders, differential diagnosis of RLS might require evening/nighttime examination and video-polysomnography. In WD patients with a clinically significant RLS, treatment with dopaminergic substances may be considered. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  4. Hormonal Regulators of Appetite

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juliana Austin

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Obesity is a significant cause of morbidity and mortality worldwide. There has been a significant worsening of the obesity epidemic mainly due to alterations in dietary intake and energy expenditure. Alternatively, cachexia, or pathologic weight loss, is a significant problem for individuals with chronic disease. Despite their obvious differences, both processes involve hormones that regulate appetite. These hormones act on specific centers in the brain that affect the sensations of hunger and satiety. Mutations in these hormones or their receptors can cause substantial pathology leading to obesity or anorexia. Identification of individuals with specific genetic mutations may ultimately lead to more appropriate therapies targeted at the underlying disease process. Thus far, these hormones have mainly been studied in adults and animal models. This article is aimed at reviewing the hormones involved in hunger and satiety, with a focus on pediatrics.

  5. Hormonal Regulators of Appetite

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Austin Juliana

    2008-11-01

    Full Text Available Obesity is a significant cause of morbidity and mortality worldwide. There has been a significant worsening of the obesity epidemic mainly due to alterations in dietary intake and energy expenditure. Alternatively, cachexia, or pathologic weight loss, is a significant problem for individuals with chronic disease. Despite their obvious differences, both processes involve hormones that regulate appetite. These hormones act on specific centers in the brain that affect the sensations of hunger and satiety. Mutations in these hormones or their receptors can cause substantial pathology leading to obesity or anorexia. Identification of individuals with specific genetic mutations may ultimately lead to more appropriate therapies targeted at the underlying disease process. Thus far, these hormones have mainly been studied in adults and animal models. This article is aimed at reviewing the hormones involved in hunger and satiety, with a focus on pediatrics.

  6. Heart, lipids and hormones

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peter Wolf

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Cardiovascular disease is the leading cause of death in general population. Besides well-known risk factors such as hypertension, impaired glucose tolerance and dyslipidemia, growing evidence suggests that hormonal changes in various endocrine diseases also impact the cardiac morphology and function. Recent studies highlight the importance of ectopic intracellular myocardial and pericardial lipid deposition, since even slight changes of these fat depots are associated with alterations in cardiac performance. In this review, we overview the effects of hormones, including insulin, thyroid hormones, growth hormone and cortisol, on heart function, focusing on their impact on myocardial lipid metabolism, cardiac substrate utilization and ectopic lipid deposition, in order to highlight the important role of even subtle hormonal changes for heart function in various endocrine and metabolic diseases.

  7. SIKs control osteocyte responses to parathyroid hormone

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wein, Marc N.; Liang, Yanke; Goransson, Olga; Sundberg, Thomas B.; Wang, Jinhua; Williams, Elizabeth A.; O'Meara, Maureen J.; Govea, Nicolas; Beqo, Belinda; Nishimori, Shigeki; Nagano, Kenichi; Brooks, Daniel J.; Martins, Janaina S.; Corbin, Braden; Anselmo, Anthony; Sadreyev, Ruslan; Wu, Joy Y.; Sakamoto, Kei; Foretz, Marc; Xavier, Ramnik J.; Baron, Roland; Bouxsein, Mary L.; Gardella, Thomas J.; Divieti-Pajevic, Paola; Gray, Nathanael S.; Kronenberg, Henry M.

    2016-01-01

    Parathyroid hormone (PTH) activates receptors on osteocytes to orchestrate bone formation and resorption. Here we show that PTH inhibition of SOST (sclerostin), a WNT antagonist, requires HDAC4 and HDAC5, whereas PTH stimulation of RANKL, a stimulator of bone resorption, requires CRTC2. Salt inducible kinases (SIKs) control subcellular localization of HDAC4/5 and CRTC2. PTH regulates both HDAC4/5 and CRTC2 localization via phosphorylation and inhibition of SIK2. Like PTH, new small molecule SIK inhibitors cause decreased phosphorylation and increased nuclear translocation of HDAC4/5 and CRTC2. SIK inhibition mimics many of the effects of PTH in osteocytes as assessed by RNA-seq in cultured osteocytes and following in vivo administration. Once daily treatment with the small molecule SIK inhibitor YKL-05-099 increases bone formation and bone mass. Therefore, a major arm of PTH signalling in osteocytes involves SIK inhibition, and small molecule SIK inhibitors may be applied therapeutically to mimic skeletal effects of PTH. PMID:27759007

  8. SIKs control osteocyte responses to parathyroid hormone.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wein, Marc N; Liang, Yanke; Goransson, Olga; Sundberg, Thomas B; Wang, Jinhua; Williams, Elizabeth A; O'Meara, Maureen J; Govea, Nicolas; Beqo, Belinda; Nishimori, Shigeki; Nagano, Kenichi; Brooks, Daniel J; Martins, Janaina S; Corbin, Braden; Anselmo, Anthony; Sadreyev, Ruslan; Wu, Joy Y; Sakamoto, Kei; Foretz, Marc; Xavier, Ramnik J; Baron, Roland; Bouxsein, Mary L; Gardella, Thomas J; Divieti-Pajevic, Paola; Gray, Nathanael S; Kronenberg, Henry M

    2016-10-19

    Parathyroid hormone (PTH) activates receptors on osteocytes to orchestrate bone formation and resorption. Here we show that PTH inhibition of SOST (sclerostin), a WNT antagonist, requires HDAC4 and HDAC5, whereas PTH stimulation of RANKL, a stimulator of bone resorption, requires CRTC2. Salt inducible kinases (SIKs) control subcellular localization of HDAC4/5 and CRTC2. PTH regulates both HDAC4/5 and CRTC2 localization via phosphorylation and inhibition of SIK2. Like PTH, new small molecule SIK inhibitors cause decreased phosphorylation and increased nuclear translocation of HDAC4/5 and CRTC2. SIK inhibition mimics many of the effects of PTH in osteocytes as assessed by RNA-seq in cultured osteocytes and following in vivo administration. Once daily treatment with the small molecule SIK inhibitor YKL-05-099 increases bone formation and bone mass. Therefore, a major arm of PTH signalling in osteocytes involves SIK inhibition, and small molecule SIK inhibitors may be applied therapeutically to mimic skeletal effects of PTH.

  9. Aging changes in hormone production

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/004000.htm Aging changes in hormone production To use the sharing ... that produce hormones are controlled by other hormones. Aging also changes this process. For example, an endocrine ...

  10. Hormones and female sexuality

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bjelica Artur L.

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction In contrast to animal species in which linear relationships exist between hormonal status and sexual behaviour sexuality in human population is not determined so simply by the level of sexual steroids. The article analyses female sexuality in the light of hormonal status. Administration of sexual steroids during pregnancy and sexual differentiation High doses of gestagens, especially those with high androgen activity, widely used against miscarriages may lead to tomboys, but without differences in sexual orientation. However, it has been observed that the frequency of bisexual and lesbian women is higher in women with congenital adrenogenital syndrome. Hormones sexual desire and sexuality during menstrual cycle It has been established that sexual desire, autoeroticism and sexual fantasies in women depend on androgen levels. There are a lot of reports claiming that sexual desire varies during the menstrual cycle. Hormonal contraception and sexuality Most patients using birth control pills present with decreased libido. But, there are reports that progestagens with antiandrogenic effect in contraceptive pills do not affect sexual desire. Hormonal changes in peri- and postmenopausal period and sexuality Decreased levels of estrogen and testosterone in older women are associated with decreased libido, sensitivity and erotic stimuli. Sexuality and hormone replacement therapy Hormonal therapy with estrogen is efficient in reference to genital atrophy, but not to sexual desire. Really increased libido is achieved using androgens. Also, therapy with dehydroepiandrosterone (DHEA and tibolone have positive effects on female libido. Conclusion Effect of sexual steroids on sexual sphere of women is very complex. The association between hormones and sexuality is multidimensional, as several hormones are important in regulation of sexual behaviour. Still, it should be pointed out that sexuality is in the domain of hormonal, emotional

  11. Genetic models for the study of luteinizing hormone receptor function

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Prema eNarayan

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available The luteinizing hormone/chorionic gonadotropin receptor, LHCGR, is essential for fertility in men and women. LHCGR binds luteinizing hormone (LH as well as the highly homologous chorionic gonadotropin (CG. Signaling from LHCGR is required for steroidogenesis and gametogenesis in males and females and for sexual differentiation in the male. The importance of LHCGR in reproductive physiology is underscored by the large number of naturally occurring inactivating and activating mutations in the receptor that result in reproductive disorders. Consequently, several genetically modified mouse models have been developed for the study of LHCGR function. They include targeted deletion of LH and LHCGR that mimic inactivating mutations in hormone and receptor, expression of a constitutively active mutant in LHCGR that mimics activating mutations associated with familial male-limited precocious puberty and transgenic models of LH and hCG overexpression. This review summarizes the salient findings from these models and their utility in understanding the physiological and pathological consequences of loss and gain of function in LHCGR signaling.

  12. Migraine and Hormones.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pakalnis, Ann

    2016-02-01

    This article discusses the role that hormones play in adolescent girls and young women with headaches, which are very common in adolescent girls, in particular, migraine. In many cases, migraine onset may occur shortly around the time of menarche, prevalence of recurrent migraine in this population approaches 15%, and typically the symptoms continue through adulthood. Hormonal changes associated with puberty and the menstrual cycle may significantly influence migraine in young women. This article reviews the following topics: management of menstrually related headaches, changes in ovarian hormones and their relationship to migraine, and oral contraceptives and pregnancy effects on migraine.

  13. All-metal clusters that mimic the chemistry of halogens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Tianshan; Li, Yawei; Wang, Qian; Jena, Puru

    2013-10-07

    Owing to their s(2)p(5) electronic configuration, halogen atoms are highly electronegative and constitute the anionic components of salts. Whereas clusters that contain no halogen atoms, such as AlH(4), mimic the chemistry of halogens and readily form salts (e.g., Na(+)(AlH(4))(-)), clusters that are solely composed of metal atoms and yet behave in the same manner as a halogen are rare. Because coinage-metal atoms (Cu, Ag, and Au) only have one valence electron in their outermost electronic shell, as in H, we examined the possibility that, on interacting with Al, in particular as AlX(4) (X=Cu, Ag, Au), these metal atoms may exhibit halogen-like properties. By using density functional theory, we show that AlAu(4) not only mimics the chemistry of halogens, but also, with a vertical detachment energy (VDE) of 3.98 eV in its anionic form, is a superhalogen. Similarly, analogous to XHX superhalogens (X=F, Cl, Br), XAuX species with VDEs of 4.65, 4.50, and 4.34 eV in their anionic form, respectively, also form superhalogens. In addition, Au can also form hyperhalogens, a recently discovered species that show electron affinities (EAs) that are even higher than those of their corresponding superhalogen building blocks. For example, the VDEs of M(AlAu(4))(2)(-) (M=Na and K) and anionic (FAuF)Au(FAuF) range from 4.06 to 5.70 eV. Au-based superhalogen anions, such as AlAu(4)(-) and AuF(2)(-), have the additional advantage that they exhibit wider optical absorption ranges than their H-based analogues, AlH(4)(-) and HF(2)(-). Because of the catalytic properties and the biocompatibility of Au, Au-based superhalogens may be multifunctional. However, similar studies that were carried out for Cu and Ag atoms have shown that, unlike AlAu(4), AlX(4) (X=Cu, Ag) clusters are not superhalogens, a property that can be attributed to the large EA of the Au atom. Copyright © 2013 WILEY‐VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  14. LH (Luteinizing Hormone) Test

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... develop gonads (gonadal agenesis) Chromosomal abnormality, such as Klinefelter syndrome Testicular failure: Viral infection ( mumps ) Trauma Exposure to ... the ovaries or testicles Hormone deficiency Turner syndrome Klinefelter syndrome Chronic infections Cancer Eating disorder (anorexia nervosa) ^ Back ...

  15. Thyroid Hormone Treatment

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... need a different dose of thyroid hormone include birth control pills, estrogen, testosterone, some anti-seizure medications (for ... is no evidence that desiccated thyroid has any advantage over synthetic T4. WHAT ABOUT T3? While most ...

  16. Deciding about hormone therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... your risk for endometrial cancer. Taking progestin with estrogen seems to protect against this cancer. So if you have a ... menopause without taking hormones. They can also help protect your bones, improve your heart health , and help you stay ...

  17. Menopause and Hormones

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... the participating organizations that have assisted in its reproduction and distribution. Learn More about Menopause and Hormones ... Medical Devices Radiation-Emitting Products Vaccines, Blood & Biologics Animal & Veterinary Cosmetics Tobacco Products

  18. A Case Report of Neurosarcoidosis Presenting as a Lymphoma Mimic

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cameron, Lauren; Syritsyna, Olga

    2016-01-01

    Objective. To describe a unique presentation of neurosarcoidosis. Background. Central nervous system involvement is rare in sarcoidosis. Sarcoidosis can be severe and can be mistaken for systemic lymphoma. Case Description. A 55-year-old right-handed white male with past medical history of obstructive sleep apnea, Raynaud's disease, and Hashimoto's thyroiditis was noted to have cognitive decline over a duration of few weeks and 20 lb weight loss. His neurologic exam (including cranial nerves) was normal except for five-minute recall. Head CT revealed a lacrimal gland mass, confirmed on brain MRI, which was suspicious for lymphoma on brain PET/MRI. Subsequent whole-body FDG PET/CT scan showed multiple enlarged lymph nodes. Bone marrow biopsy was negative. Serum and CSF ACE levels were within normal limits. Supraclavicular lymph node biopsy before steroids therapy was initiated and revealed multiple noncaseating granulomas, diagnostic of “sarcoidosis.” He was treated with daily prednisone for two months, followed by weekly infliximab. Brain MRI two months after treatment with prednisone showed decrease in size of lacrimal lesion, and brain PET/MRI showed normal brain metabolism pattern after five months. Neurocognitive evaluation three months after diagnosis demonstrated improvements in memory abilities. Discussion. Both clinically and radiographically, neurosarcoidosis can mimic systemic lymphoma. Biopsy in these types of cases is necessary to establish the diagnosis. PMID:27800198

  19. Berberine inhibits PTP1B activity and mimics insulin action.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Chunhua; Zhang, Yuebo; Huang, Cheng

    2010-07-02

    Type 2 diabetes patients show defects in insulin signal transduction that include lack of insulin receptor, decrease in insulin stimulated receptor tyrosine kinase activity and receptor-mediated phosphorylation of insulin receptor substrates (IRSs). A small molecule that could target insulin signaling would be of significant advantage in the treatment of diabetes. Berberine (BBR) has recently been shown to lower blood glucose levels and to improve insulin resistance in db/db mice partly through the activation of AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) signaling and induction of phosphorylation of insulin receptor (IR). However, the underlying mechanism remains largely unknown. Here we report that BBR mimics insulin action by increasing glucose uptake ability by 3T3-L1 adipocytes and L6 myocytes in an insulin-independent manner, inhibiting phosphatase activity of protein tyrosine phosphatase 1B (PTP1B), and increasing phosphorylation of IR, IRS1 and Akt in 3T3-L1 adipocytes. In diabetic mice, BBR lowers hyperglycemia and improves impaired glucose tolerance, but does not increase insulin release and synthesis. The results suggest that BBR represents a different class of anti-hyperglycemic agents.

  20. Chimpanzees and humans mimic pupil-size of conspecifics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kret, Mariska E; Tomonaga, Masaki; Matsuzawa, Tetsuro

    2014-01-01

    Group-living typically provides benefits to individual group members but also confers costs. To avoid incredulity and betrayal and allow trust and cooperation, individuals must understand the intentions and emotions of their group members. Humans attend to other's eyes and from gaze and pupil-size cues, infer information about the state of mind of the observed. In humans, pupil-size tends to mimic that of the observed. Here we tested whether pupil-mimicry exists in our closest relative, the chimpanzee (P. troglodytes). We conjectured that if pupil-mimicry has adaptive value, e.g. to promote swift communication of inner states and facilitate shared understanding and coordination, pupil-mimicry should emerge within but not across species. Pupillometry data was collected from human and chimpanzee subjects while they observed images of the eyes of both species with dilating/constricting pupils. Both species showed enhanced pupil-mimicry with members of their own species, with effects being strongest in humans and chimpanzee mothers. Pupil-mimicry may be deeply-rooted, but probably gained importance from the point in human evolution where the morphology of our eyes became more prominent. Humans' white sclera surrounding the iris, and the fine muscles around their eyes facilitate non-verbal communication via eye signals.

  1. Young diabetics' compliance in the framework of the MIMIC model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kyngäs, H; Hentinen, M; Koivukangas, P; Ohinmaa, A

    1996-11-01

    The compliance of 346 young diabetics aged 13-17 years with health regimens is analysed in the framework of a MIMIC (multiple indicators, multiple causes) model. The data were compiled by means of a questionnaire on compliance, conditions for compliance, the meaning attached to treatment and the impact of the disease, and the model constructed using the LISREL VII programme, treating compliance as an unobserved variable formulated in terms of observed causes (x-variables) and observed indicators (y-variables). The resulting solutions are entirely satisfactory. The goodness-of-fit index is 0.983, the root mean square residual 0.058 and the chi-squared statistic 43.35 (P compliance to be indicated by self-care behaviour, responsibility for treatment, intention to pursue the treatment and collaboration with the physician, and to be greatly determined by motivation, experience of the results of treatment and having the energy and will-power to pursue the treatment and, to a lesser extent, by a sense of normality and fear.

  2. Approaches to mimic the metallic sheen in beetles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lenau, Torben A.; Aggerbeck, Martin; Nielsen, Steffen

    2009-08-01

    A range of different beetles exhibits brilliant colours and metallic sheen. One of the most spectacular species is the Plusiotis resplendens from Central America with gold metal appearance. The beetle shells are made from chitin and have a number of unique properties that apart from spectacular aesthetic effects include metal sheen from non-metal surfaces combined with electric and thermal insulation. The reflection mechanism has been studied by a number of authors and is well understood. Basically there are 2 different reflection principles. One is the multilayer reflector where alternating layers have high and low refractive index. The other is the Bouligand structure where birefringent chiral nanofibres are organised in spiral structures. The paper describes work done to explore different approaches to mimic these structures using polymer based materials and production methods that are suitable for more complex double curved geometry. One approach is to use alternating layers of 2 different polymers applied by dipping and another is applying cholesteric liquid crystals in paint. However, none of them can yet make the desired metal-looking free-form surfaces.

  3. Reproducing Natural Spider Silks’ Copolymer Behavior in Synthetic Silk Mimics

    Science.gov (United States)

    An, Bo; Jenkins, Janelle E.; Sampath, Sujatha; Holland, Gregory P.; Hinman, Mike; Yarger, Jeffery L.; Lewis, Randolph

    2012-01-01

    Dragline silk from orb-weaving spiders is a copolymer of two large proteins, major ampullate spidroin 1 (MaSp1) and 2 (MaSp2). The ratio of these proteins is known to have a large variation across different species of orb-weaving spiders. NMR results from gland material of two different species of spiders, N. clavipes and A. aurantia, indicates that MaSp1 proteins are more easily formed into β-sheet nanostructures, while MaSp2 proteins form random coil and helical structures. To test if this behavior of natural silk proteins could be reproduced by recombinantly produced spider silk mimic protein, recombinant MaSp1/MaSp2 mixed fibers as well as chimeric silk fibers from MaSp1 and MaSp2 sequences in a single protein were produced based on the variable ratio and conserved motifs of MaSp1 and MaSp2 in native silk fiber. Mechanical properties, solid-state NMR, and XRD results of tested synthetic fibers indicate the differing roles of MaSp1 and MaSp2 in the fiber and verify the importance of postspin stretching treatment in helping the fiber to form the proper spatial structure. PMID:23110450

  4. Reproducing natural spider silks' copolymer behavior in synthetic silk mimics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    An, Bo; Jenkins, Janelle E; Sampath, Sujatha; Holland, Gregory P; Hinman, Mike; Yarger, Jeffery L; Lewis, Randolph

    2012-12-10

    Dragline silk from orb-weaving spiders is a copolymer of two large proteins, major ampullate spidroin 1 (MaSp1) and 2 (MaSp2). The ratio of these proteins is known to have a large variation across different species of orb-weaving spiders. NMR results from gland material of two different species of spiders, N. clavipes and A. aurantia , indicates that MaSp1 proteins are more easily formed into β-sheet nanostructures, while MaSp2 proteins form random coil and helical structures. To test if this behavior of natural silk proteins could be reproduced by recombinantly produced spider silk mimic protein, recombinant MaSp1/MaSp2 mixed fibers as well as chimeric silk fibers from MaSp1 and MaSp2 sequences in a single protein were produced based on the variable ratio and conserved motifs of MaSp1 and MaSp2 in native silk fiber. Mechanical properties, solid-state NMR, and XRD results of tested synthetic fibers indicate the differing roles of MaSp1 and MaSp2 in the fiber and verify the importance of postspin stretching treatment in helping the fiber to form the proper spatial structure.

  5. Antimicrobial polymers as synthetic mimics of host-defense peptides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuroda, Kenichi; Caputo, Gregory A

    2013-01-01

    Antibiotic-resistant bacteria 'superbugs' are an emerging threat to public health due to the decrease in effective antibiotics as well as the slowed pace of development of new antibiotics to replace those that become ineffective. The need for new antimicrobial agents is a well-documented issue relating to world health. Tremendous efforts have been given to developing compounds that not only show high efficacy, but also those that are less susceptible to resistance development in the bacteria. However, the development of newer, stronger antibiotics which can overcome these acquired resistances is still a scientific challenge because a new mode of antimicrobial action is likely required. To that end, amphiphilic, cationic polymers have emerged as a promising candidate for further development as an antimicrobial agent with decreased potential for resistance development. These polymers are designed to mimic naturally occurring host-defense antimicrobial peptides which act on bacterial cell walls or membranes. Antimicrobial-peptide mimetic polymers display antibacterial activity against a broad spectrum of bacteria including drug-resistant strains and are less susceptible to resistance development in bacteria. These polymers also showed selective activity to bacteria over mammalian cells. Antimicrobial polymers provide a new molecular framework for chemical modification and adaptation to tune their biological functions. The peptide-mimetic design of antimicrobial polymers will be versatile, generating a new generation of antibiotics toward implementation of polymers in biomedical applications. Copyright © 2012 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  6. Chimpanzees and humans mimic pupil-size of conspecifics.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mariska E Kret

    Full Text Available Group-living typically provides benefits to individual group members but also confers costs. To avoid incredulity and betrayal and allow trust and cooperation, individuals must understand the intentions and emotions of their group members. Humans attend to other's eyes and from gaze and pupil-size cues, infer information about the state of mind of the observed. In humans, pupil-size tends to mimic that of the observed. Here we tested whether pupil-mimicry exists in our closest relative, the chimpanzee (P. troglodytes. We conjectured that if pupil-mimicry has adaptive value, e.g. to promote swift communication of inner states and facilitate shared understanding and coordination, pupil-mimicry should emerge within but not across species. Pupillometry data was collected from human and chimpanzee subjects while they observed images of the eyes of both species with dilating/constricting pupils. Both species showed enhanced pupil-mimicry with members of their own species, with effects being strongest in humans and chimpanzee mothers. Pupil-mimicry may be deeply-rooted, but probably gained importance from the point in human evolution where the morphology of our eyes became more prominent. Humans' white sclera surrounding the iris, and the fine muscles around their eyes facilitate non-verbal communication via eye signals.

  7. Decorin mimic inhibits vascular smooth muscle proliferation and migration.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rebecca A Scott

    Full Text Available Over the past 10 years, the number of percutaneous coronary intervention procedures performed in the United States increased by 33%; however, restenosis, which inhibits complete functional recovery of the vessel wall, complicates this procedure. A wide range of anti-restenotic therapeutics have been developed, although many elicit non-specific effects that compromise vessel healing. Drawing inspiration from biologically-relevant molecules, our lab developed a mimic of the natural proteoglycan decorin, termed DS-SILY, which can mask exposed collagen and thereby effectively decrease platelet activation, thus contributing to suppression of vascular intimal hyperplasia. Here, we characterize the effects of DS-SILY on both proliferative and quiescent human SMCs to evaluate the potential impact of DS-SILY-SMC interaction on restenosis, and further characterize in vivo platelet interactions. DS-SILY decreased proliferative SMC proliferation and pro-inflammatory cytokine secretion in vitro in a concentration dependent manner as compared to untreated controls. The addition of DS-SILY to in vitro SMC cultures decreased SMC migration and protein synthesis by 95% and 37%, respectively. Furthermore, DS-SILY decreased platelet activation, as well as reduced neointimal hyperplasia by 60%, in vivo using Ossabaw swine. These results indicate that DS-SILY demonstrates multiple biological activities that may all synergistically contribute to an improved treatment paradigm for balloon angioplasty.

  8. Small Undifferentiated Pancreatic Adenocarcinoma which Mimics IPMN at Imaging

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mirko D’Onofrio

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available Context To present the case of an unusual presentation at imaging of a very small solid undifferentiated pancreatic adenocarcinoma which mimics a side-branch intraductal papillary mucinous neoplasm. Case report The patient came to our hospital for a revaluation of a cystic pancreatic lesion. Ultrasound (US and contrast-enhanced ultrasound (CEUS examinations were carried out. A small cystic lesion of about 1.5 cm in diameter was seen in the posterior aspect of the pancreatic uncinate process A very small, solid, vascularized nodule was detected at CEUS within the lesion. Consequently, the patient underwent CT and MRI. MRI confirmed the presence of an intralesional nodule and communication with the main pancreatic duct was demonstrated, suggesting the diagnosis of intraductal papillary mucinous neoplasm with solid intralesional tissue. A pylorus preserving pancreaticoduodenectomy was carried out. An undifferentiated adenocarcinoma having a notable peripheral inflammatory reaction and dilated branch duct was finally diagnosed. Conclusion To our knowledge, we present for the first time, the case of a very small solid undifferentiated pancreatic adenocarcinoma of the uncinate process which mimicked a side-branch intraductal papillary mucinous neoplasm at imaging. The cystic appearance may be an epiphenomenon of a solid lesion and this possibility has to be considered when one encounters incidental cystic lesions at imaging.

  9. A Case Report of Neurosarcoidosis Presenting as a Lymphoma Mimic

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gurcharanjeet Kaur

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective. To describe a unique presentation of neurosarcoidosis. Background. Central nervous system involvement is rare in sarcoidosis. Sarcoidosis can be severe and can be mistaken for systemic lymphoma. Case Description. A 55-year-old right-handed white male with past medical history of obstructive sleep apnea, Raynaud’s disease, and Hashimoto’s thyroiditis was noted to have cognitive decline over a duration of few weeks and 20 lb weight loss. His neurologic exam (including cranial nerves was normal except for five-minute recall. Head CT revealed a lacrimal gland mass, confirmed on brain MRI, which was suspicious for lymphoma on brain PET/MRI. Subsequent whole-body FDG PET/CT scan showed multiple enlarged lymph nodes. Bone marrow biopsy was negative. Serum and CSF ACE levels were within normal limits. Supraclavicular lymph node biopsy before steroids therapy was initiated and revealed multiple noncaseating granulomas, diagnostic of “sarcoidosis.” He was treated with daily prednisone for two months, followed by weekly infliximab. Brain MRI two months after treatment with prednisone showed decrease in size of lacrimal lesion, and brain PET/MRI showed normal brain metabolism pattern after five months. Neurocognitive evaluation three months after diagnosis demonstrated improvements in memory abilities. Discussion. Both clinically and radiographically, neurosarcoidosis can mimic systemic lymphoma. Biopsy in these types of cases is necessary to establish the diagnosis.

  10. Hormones and female sexuality

    OpenAIRE

    2003-01-01

    Introduction In contrast to animal species in which linear relationships exist between hormonal status and sexual behaviour sexuality in human population is not determined so simply by the level of sexual steroids. The article analyses female sexuality in the light of hormonal status. Administration of sexual steroids during pregnancy and sexual differentiation High doses of gestagens, especially those with high androgen activity, widely used against miscarriages may lead to tomboys, but with...

  11. Hormonal Regulators of Appetite

    OpenAIRE

    Austin Juliana; Marks Daniel

    2008-01-01

    Obesity is a significant cause of morbidity and mortality worldwide. There has been a significant worsening of the obesity epidemic mainly due to alterations in dietary intake and energy expenditure. Alternatively, cachexia, or pathologic weight loss, is a significant problem for individuals with chronic disease. Despite their obvious differences, both processes involve hormones that regulate appetite. These hormones act on specific centers in the brain that affect the sensations of hunger a...

  12. Protein Hormones and Immunity‡

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelley, Keith W.; Weigent, Douglas A.; Kooijman, Ron

    2007-01-01

    A number of observations and discoveries over the past 20 years support the concept of important physiological interactions between the endocrine and immune systems. The best known pathway for transmission of information from the immune system to the neuroendocrine system is humoral in the form of cytokines, although neural transmission via the afferent vagus is well documented also. In the other direction, efferent signals from the nervous system to the immune system are conveyed by both the neuroendocrine and autonomic nervous systems. Communication is possible because the nervous and immune systems share a common biochemical language involving shared ligands and receptors, including neurotransmitters, neuropeptides, growth factors, neuroendocrine hormones and cytokines. This means that the brain functions as an immune-regulating organ participating in immune responses. A great deal of evidence has accumulated and confirmed that hormones secreted by the neuroendocrine system play an important role in communication and regulation of the cells of the immune system. Among protein hormones, this has been most clearly documented for prolactin (PRL), growth hormone (GH), and insulin-like growth factor-1 (IGF-I), but significant influences on immunity by thyroid stimulating hormone (TSH) have also been demonstrated. Here we review evidence obtained during the past 20 years to clearly demonstrate that neuroendocrine protein hormones influence immunity and that immune processes affect the neuroendocrine system. New findings highlight a previously undiscovered route of communication between the immune and endocrine systems that is now known to occur at the cellular level. This communication system is activated when inflammatory processes induced by proinflammatory cytokines antagonize the function of a variety of hormones, which then causes endocrine resistance in both the periphery and brain. Homeostasis during inflammation is achieved by a balance between cytokines and

  13. Body segments and growth hormone.

    OpenAIRE

    Bundak, R; Hindmarsh, P C; Brook, C. G.

    1988-01-01

    The effects of human growth hormone treatment for five years on sitting height and subischial leg length of 35 prepubertal children with isolated growth hormone deficiency were investigated. Body segments reacted equally to treatment with human growth hormone; this is important when comparing the effect of growth hormone on the growth of children with skeletal dysplasias or after spinal irradiation.

  14. Treatment with thyroid hormone.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biondi, Bernadette; Wartofsky, Leonard

    2014-06-01

    Thyroid hormone deficiency can have important repercussions. Treatment with thyroid hormone in replacement doses is essential in patients with hypothyroidism. In this review, we critically discuss the thyroid hormone formulations that are available and approaches to correct replacement therapy with thyroid hormone in primary and central hypothyroidism in different periods of life such as pregnancy, birth, infancy, childhood, and adolescence as well as in adult patients, the elderly, and in patients with comorbidities. Despite the frequent and long term use of l-T4, several studies have documented frequent under- and overtreatment during replacement therapy in hypothyroid patients. We assess the factors determining l-T4 requirements (sex, age, gender, menstrual status, body weight, and lean body mass), the major causes of failure to achieve optimal serum TSH levels in undertreated patients (poor patient compliance, timing of l-T4 administration, interferences with absorption, gastrointestinal diseases, and drugs), and the adverse consequences of unintentional TSH suppression in overtreated patients. Opinions differ regarding the treatment of mild thyroid hormone deficiency, and we examine the recent evidence favoring treatment of this condition. New data suggesting that combined therapy with T3 and T4 could be indicated in some patients with hypothyroidism are assessed, and the indications for TSH suppression with l-T4 in patients with euthyroid multinodular goiter and in those with differentiated thyroid cancer are reviewed. Lastly, we address the potential use of thyroid hormones or their analogs in obese patients and in severe cardiac diseases, dyslipidemia, and nonthyroidal illnesses.

  15. Inhibition of duck hepatitis B virus replication by mimic peptides in vitro

    Science.gov (United States)

    JIA, HONGYU; LIU, CHANGHONG; YANG, YING; ZHU, HAIHONG; CHEN, FENG; LIU, JIHONG; ZHOU, LINFU

    2015-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to investigate the inhibitory effect of specific mimic peptides targeting duck hepatitis B virus polymerase (DHBVP) on duck hepatitis B virus (DHBV) replication in primary duck hepatocytes. Phage display technology (PDT) was used to screen for mimic peptides specifically targeting DHBVP and the associated coding sequences were determined using DNA sequencing. The selected mimic peptides were then used to treat primary duck hepatocytes infected with DHBV in vitro. Infected hepatocytes expressing the mimic peptides intracellularly were also prepared. The cells were divided into mimic peptide groups (EXP groups), an entecavir-treated group (positive control) and a negative control group. The medium was changed every 48 h. Following a 10-day incubation, the cell supernatants were collected. DHBV-DNA in the cellular nucleus, cytoplasm and culture supernatant was analyzed by quantitative polymerase chain reaction (qPCR). Eight mimic peptides were selected following three PDT screening rounds for investigation in the DHBV-infected primary duck hepatocytes. The qPCR results showed that following direct treatment with mimic peptide 2 or 7, intracellular expression of mimic peptide 2 or 7, or treatment with entecavir, the DHBV-DNA levels in the culture supernatant and cytoplasm of duck hepatocytes were significantly lower than those in the negative control (P<0.05). The cytoplasmic DHBV-DNA content of the cells treated with mimic peptide 7 was lower than that in the other groups (P<0.05). In addition, the DHBV-DNA content of the nuclear fractions following the intracellular expression of mimic peptide 7 was significantly lower than that in the other groups (P<0.05). Mimic peptides specifically targeting DHBVP, administered directly or expressed intracellularly, can significantly inhibit DHBV replication in vitro. PMID:26640539

  16. Bovine Serum Albumin Metal Complexes for Mimic of SOD

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    GUIFANG YAN; YUFENG HE; GANG LI; YUBING XIONG; PENGFEI SONG; RONG-MIN WANG

    2016-11-01

    Superoxide anion radical (O•−₂ ) is a noxious reactive oxygen species (ROS). Transition metal ion complexes have been generally used as antioxidants to eliminate ROS. In this work, a neoteric watersoluble biopolymer metal complex (BSA-M) was prepared by conjugating the soluble biopolymer bovineserum albumin (BSA) with three transition metal ions (M, M=Cu, Co, Mn). The binding mode and ratio of metal ions bound to albumin were investigated. The BSA-M complexes were characterized by UV-Vis, circular dichroism (CD) spectra and polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (PAGE). BSA served as polymerscaffold and the metal complex functioned as the catalytic active center. The results demonstrated that the structure of BSA remained unchanged when the binding ratio of transition metal ion complex to BSA was 5:1. Furthermore, the scavenging superoxide anion free radical (O•−₂ ) activity of biopolymer-metal complexes were determined by nitroblue tetrazolium light reduction assay method. The antioxidant capacity of BSA-M has markedly increased. The conjugated BSA-M (M=Cu, Mn) showed preeminent scavenging activity for O•−₂ , and the EC₅₀ value of the BSA-Cu was 0.038±0.0013μmol·L⁻¹, which is comparable to EC₅₀ value (0.041±0.001μmol·L⁻¹) of the natural superoxide dismutase (SOD), the analog quantity reached 107%. As a consequence, it can be considered as a bio-functional mimic of enzyme SOD and has a promising application prospect in antioxidant drug field.

  17. Batesian mimics influence the evolution of conspicuousness in an aposematic salamander.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kraemer, A C; Serb, J M; Adams, D C

    2015-05-01

    Conspicuousness, or having high contrast relative to the surrounding background, is a common feature of unpalatable species. Several hypotheses have been proposed to explain the occurrence of conspicuousness, and while most involve the role of conspicuousness as a direct signal of unpalatability to potential predators, one hypothesis suggests that exaggerated conspicuousness may evolve in unpalatable species to reduce predator confusion with palatable species (potential Batesian mimics). This hypothesis of antagonistic coevolution between palatable and unpalatable species hinges on the 'cost of conspicuousness', in which conspicuousness increases the likelihood of predation more in palatable species than in unpalatable species. Under this mimicry scenario, four patterns are expected: (i) mimics will more closely resemble local models than models from other localities, (ii) there will be a positive relationship between mimic and model conspicuousness, (iii) models will be more conspicuous in the presence of mimics, and (iv) when models and mimics differ in conspicuousness, mimics will be less conspicuous than models. We tested these predictions in the salamander mimicry system involving Notophthalmus viridescens (model) and one colour morph of Plethodon cinereus (mimic). All predictions were supported, indicating that selection for Batesian mimicry not only influences the evolution of mimics, but also the evolution of the models they resemble. These findings indicate that mimicry plays a large role in the evolution of model warning signals, particularly influencing the evolution of conspicuousness. © 2015 European Society For Evolutionary Biology. Journal of Evolutionary Biology © 2015 European Society For Evolutionary Biology.

  18. [Denervation of mimic muscles during endoscopic lifting of the upper part of face].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pinchuk, V D; Tkach, O S

    2013-08-01

    Endoscopic lifting of the upper part of face carry out in 28 patients Chemical or surgical denervation had been done for decreasing of mimic muscles activity. Medical glue with folic acid had been used for tissues fixation. Use of medical glue in conjunction with preliminary chemical denervation of mimic muscles with botulin toxin application decreases surgery duration, prevents complications and increases satisfaction of patients.

  19. Double-stranded Let-7 mimics, potential candidates for cancer gene therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Qi-zhao; Lv, Ying-hui; Gong, Yu-hua; Li, Zhao-fa; Xu, William; Diao, Yong; Xu, Ruian

    2012-03-01

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs), a class of small, single-stranded endogenous RNAs, act as post-transcriptional regulators of gene expression. The ability of one single miRNA regulating multiple functionally related mRNAs makes it a new potential candidate for cancer gene therapy. Let-7s miRNAs have been demonstrated as tumor-suppressor genes in various types of cancers, providing one choice of gene therapy by replenishing this miRNA. In the present studies, we demonstrate that the chemically synthesized, double-stranded Let-7 mimics can inhibit the growth and migration and induce the cell cycle arrest of lung cancer cell lines in vitro. Let-7 mimics silence gene expression by binding to the 3' UTR of targeting mRNAs. Mutation of seed sequence significantly depresses the gene silencing activity of Let-7 mimics. Our results also demonstrate that it is possible to increase the activity of Let-7s through mutating the sequence within the 3'end of the antisense strand. Directly, co-transfection Let-7 mimics with active siRNAs impairs the anti-cancer activities of Let-7 mimics. However, a 3-h interval between the introduction of Let-7 mimics and a kind of siRNA avoids the competition and enhances the anti-cancer activities of Let-7 mimics. Taken together, these results have revealed that Let-7s mimics are potential candidates for cancer gene therapy.

  20. Discovery & development of small molecule allosteric modulators of glycoprotein hormone receptors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Selvaraj G Nataraja

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Glycoprotein hormones, follicle-stimulating hormone (FSH, luteinizing hormone (LH, and thyroid stimulating hormone (TSH are heterodimeric proteins with a common subunit and hormone-specific subunit. These hormones are dominant regulators of reproduction and metabolic processes. Receptors for the glycoprotein hormones belong to the family of G-protein coupled receptors (GPCR. FSH receptor (FSHR and LH receptor (LHR are primarily expressed in somatic cells in ovary and testis to promote egg and sperm production in women & men respectively. TSH receptor (TSHR is expressed in thyroid cells and regulates the secretion of T3 & T4. Glycoprotein hormones bind to the large extracellular domain of the receptor and cause a conformational change in the receptor that leads to activation of more than one intracellular signaling pathway. Several small molecules have been described to activate/inhibit glycoprotein hormone receptors through allosteric sites of the receptor. Small molecule allosteric modulators have the potential to be administered orally to patients thus improving the convenience of treatment. It has been a challenge to develop a small molecule allosteric agonist for glycoprotein hormones that can mimic the agonistic effects of the large natural ligand to activate similar signaling pathways. However, in the past few years, there have been several promising reports describing distinct chemical series with improved potency in preclinical models. In parallel, proposal of new structural model for FSH receptor and in silico docking studies of small molecule ligands to glycoprotein hormone receptors provide a giant leap on the understanding of the mechanism of action of the natural ligands and new chemical entities on the receptors. This review will focus on the current status of small molecule allosteric modulators of glycoprotein hormone receptors, their effects on common signaling pathways in cells, their utility for clinical

  1. Growth hormone response to growth hormone-releasing peptide-2 in growth hormone-deficient Little mice

    OpenAIRE

    PERONI, CIBELE N.; Cesar Y. Hayashida; Nancy Nascimento; LONGUINI, VIVIANE C.; Toledo, Rodrigo A.; Paolo Bartolini; Bowers, Cyril Y.; Toledo,Sergio P. A.

    2012-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To investigate a possible direct, growth hormone-releasing, hormone-independent action of a growth hormone secretagogue, GHRP-2, in pituitary somatotroph cells in the presence of inactive growth hormone-releasing hormone receptors. MATERIALS AND METHODS: The responses of serum growth hormone to acutely injected growth hormone-releasing P-2 in lit/litmice, which represent a model of GH deficiency arising frommutated growth hormone-releasing hormone-receptors, were compared to those ...

  2. Optimized FPGA Implementation of the Thyroid Hormone Secretion Mechanism Using CAD Tools.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alghazo, Jaafar M

    2017-02-01

    The goal of this paper is to implement the secretion mechanism of the Thyroid Hormone (TH) based on bio-mathematical differential eqs. (DE) on an FPGA chip. Hardware Descriptive Language (HDL) is used to develop a behavioral model of the mechanism derived from the DE. The Thyroid Hormone secretion mechanism is simulated with the interaction of the related stimulating and inhibiting hormones. Synthesis of the simulation is done with the aid of CAD tools and downloaded on a Field Programmable Gate Arrays (FPGAs) Chip. The chip output shows identical behavior to that of the designed algorithm through simulation. It is concluded that the chip mimics the Thyroid Hormone secretion mechanism. The chip, operating in real-time, is computer-independent stand-alone system.

  3. Effect of rice fat mimics on texture and microstructure of low-fat yoghurt

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    XU Dan; KONG Baohua; LIU Huaiwei

    2007-01-01

    This paper made a research on a new kind of rice fat mimics, which was obtained from rice powder hydrolyzed by a -amylase. Through the comparison between the yoghurt added with diverse proportions of above mentioned rice fat mimics and the reduced-fat yoghurt without any fat mimics as well as full-fat ones, the effect of the rice fat mimics in different proportions was examined upon the composition, the microstructure, the texture and the sensory evaluation of reduced-fat yoghurt. The results showed that the yoghurts added with rice fat mimics exhibited similar organoleptic attribute, textual characteristics and acceptability compared to those of full-fat controls(P>0.05), but with lower fat content and looser microstructures.

  4. Headache And Hormones

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shukla Rakesh

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available There are many reasons to suggest a link between headache and hormones. Migraine is three times common in women as compared to men after puberty, cyclic as well as non-cyclic fluctuations in sex hormone levels during the entire reproductive life span of a women are associated with changes in frequency or severity of migraine attack, abnormalities in the hypothalamus and pineal gland have been observed in cluster headache, oestrogens are useful in the treatment of menstrual migraine and the use of melatonin has been reported in various types of primary headaches. Headache associated with various endocrinological disorders may help us in a better understanding of the nociceptive mechanisms involved in headache disorders. Prospective studies using headache diaries to record the attacks of headache and menstrual cycle have clarified some of the myths associated with menstrual migraine. Although no change in the absolute levels of sex hormones have been reported, oestrogen withdrawal is the most likely trigger of the attacks. Prostaglandins, melatonin, opioid and serotonergic mechanisms may also have a role in the pathogenesis of menstrual migraine. Guidelines have been published by the IHS recently regarding the use of oral contraceptives by women with migraine and the risk of ischaemic strokes in migraineurs on hormone replacement therapy. The present review includes menstrual migraine, pregnancy and migraine, oral contraceptives and migraine, menopause and migraine as well as the hormonal changes in chronic migraine.

  5. Hormonal control of euryhalinity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takei, Yoshio; McCormick, Stephen D.; McCormick, Stephen D.; Farrell, Anthony Peter; Brauner, Colin J.

    2013-01-01

    Hormones play a critical role in maintaining body fluid balance in euryhaline fishes during changes in environmental salinity. The neuroendocrine axis senses osmotic and ionic changes, then signals and coordinates tissue-specific responses to regulate water and ion fluxes. Rapid-acting hormones, e.g. angiotensins, cope with immediate challenges by controlling drinking rate and the activity of ion transporters in the gill, gut, and kidney. Slow-acting hormones, e.g. prolactin and growth hormone/insulin-like growth factor-1, reorganize the body for long-term acclimation by altering the abundance of ion transporters and through cell proliferation and differentiation of ionocytes and other osmoregulatory cells. Euryhaline species exist in all groups of fish, including cyclostomes, and cartilaginous and teleost fishes. The diverse strategies for responding to changes in salinity have led to differential regulation and tissue-specific effects of hormones. Combining traditional physiological approaches with genomic, transcriptomic, and proteomic analyses will elucidate the patterns and diversity of the endocrine control of euryhalinity.

  6. Association of the thyroid stimulating hormone receptor gene (TSHR) with Graves' disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brand, Oliver J; Barrett, Jeffrey C; Simmonds, Matthew J;

    2009-01-01

    Graves' disease (GD) is a common autoimmune disease (AID) that shares many of its susceptibility loci with other AIDs. The thyroid stimulating hormone receptor (TSHR) represents the primary autoantigen in GD, in which autoantibodies bind to the receptor and mimic its ligand, thyroid stimulating...... hormone, causing the characteristic clinical phenotype. Although early studies investigating the TSHR and GD proved inconclusive, more recently we provided convincing evidence for association of the TSHR region with disease. In the current study, we investigated a combined panel of 98 SNPs, including 70...

  7. Stroke mimics under the drip-and-ship paradigm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mehta, Sonal; Vora, Nirav; Edgell, Randall C; Allam, Hesham; Alawi, Aws; Koehne, Jennifer; Kumar, Abhay; Feen, Eliahu; Cruz-Flores, Salvador; Alshekhlee, Amer

    2014-01-01

    Recent reports suggested better outcomes associated with the drip-and-ship paradigm for acute ischemic stroke (AIS) treated with thrombolysis. We hypothesized that a higher rate of stroke mimics (SM) among AIS treated in nonspecialized stroke centers that are transferred to comprehensive centers is responsible for such outcomes. Consecutive patients treated with thrombolysis according to the admission criteria were reviewed in a single comprehensive stroke center over 1 academic year (July 1, 2011 to June 30, 2012). Information on the basic demographic, hospital complications, psychiatric diagnoses, and discharge disposition was collected. We identified those patients who were treated at a facility and then transferred to the tertiary center (ie, drip-and-ship paradigm). In addition to comparative and adjusted analysis to identify predictors for SM, a stratified analysis by the drip-and-ship status was performed. One hundred twenty patients were treated with thrombolysis for AIS included in this analysis; 20 (16.7%) were discharged with the final diagnosis of SM; 14 of those had conversion syndrome and 6 patients had other syndromes (seizures, migraine, and hypoglycemia). Patients with SM were younger (55.6 ± 15.0 versus 69.4 ± 14.9, P = .0003) and more likely to harbor psychiatric diagnoses (45% versus 9%; P ≤ .0001). Eighteen of 20 SM patients (90%) had the drip-and-ship treatment paradigm compared with 65% of those with AIS (P = .02). None of the SM had hemorrhagic complications, and all were discharged to home. Predictors of SM on adjusted analysis included the drip-and-ship paradigm (odds ratio [OR] 12.8, 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.78, 92.1) and history of any psychiatric illness (OR 12.08; 95% CI 3.14, 46.4). Eighteen of 83 drip-and-ship patients (21.7%) were diagnosed with SM compared with 2 of 37 patients (5.4%) presented directly to the hub hospital (P = .02). The drip-and-ship paradigm and any psychiatric history predict the diagnosis of

  8. Ovarian hormones and obesity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leeners, Brigitte; Geary, Nori; Tobler, Philippe N; Asarian, Lori

    2017-05-01

    Obesity is caused by an imbalance between energy intake, i.e. eating and energy expenditure (EE). Severe obesity is more prevalent in women than men worldwide, and obesity pathophysiology and the resultant obesity-related disease risks differ in women and men. The underlying mechanisms are largely unknown. Pre-clinical and clinical research indicate that ovarian hormones may play a major role. We systematically reviewed the clinical and pre-clinical literature on the effects of ovarian hormones on the physiology of adipose tissue (AT) and the regulation of AT mass by energy intake and EE. Articles in English indexed in PubMed through January 2016 were searched using keywords related to: (i) reproductive hormones, (ii) weight regulation and (iii) central nervous system. We sought to identify emerging research foci with clinical translational potential rather than to provide a comprehensive review. We find that estrogens play a leading role in the causes and consequences of female obesity. With respect to adiposity, estrogens synergize with AT genes to increase gluteofemoral subcutaneous AT mass and decrease central AT mass in reproductive-age women, which leads to protective cardiometabolic effects. Loss of estrogens after menopause, independent of aging, increases total AT mass and decreases lean body mass, so that there is little net effect on body weight. Menopause also partially reverses women's protective AT distribution. These effects can be counteracted by estrogen treatment. With respect to eating, increasing estrogen levels progressively decrease eating during the follicular and peri-ovulatory phases of the menstrual cycle. Progestin levels are associated with eating during the luteal phase, but there does not appear to be a causal relationship. Progestins may increase binge eating and eating stimulated by negative emotional states during the luteal phase. Pre-clinical research indicates that one mechanism for the pre-ovulatory decrease in eating is a

  9. Hormones and postpartum cardiomyopathy.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Clapp, C.; Thebault, S.C.; Martinez de la Escalera, G.M.

    2007-01-01

    Prolactin, a hormone fundamental for lactation, was recently shown to mediate postpartum cardiomyopathy, a life-threatening disease in late-term and lactating mothers. The detrimental effect of prolactin results from myocardial upregulation of cathepsin-D, which in turn cleaves prolactin to a 16 kDa

  10. Hormonal influences on osteoporosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McKenna, M J; Frame, B

    1987-01-26

    Osteoporosis has recently received increased attention in both the medical and lay literature. It is estimated that there are more than one million osteoporosis-related fractures yearly in the United States, which are responsible for between three and four billion dollars in health care expenditures. A discussion of osteoporosis requires consideration of both the physiology and pathophysiology of bone tissue. In a structural sense, bone exists in two forms, the outer compact cortex accounting for 80 percent of total bone volume, and the more porous inner trabecular bone. Bone-forming osteoblasts and bone-resorbing osteoclasts are responsible for the ongoing, life-long process of formation and resorption of bone. Sex hormone deficiency, as well as chronic illness, malnutrition, and childhood immobilization, has deleterious effects on growth and modeling, ultimately reducing peak bone mass and setting the stage for osteoporosis in later life. Estrogen is known to have a protective effect on the female skeleton. The mechanisms of this effect are unknown, although estrogen may protect against parathyroid hormone-mediated bone loss. There may be a particular subset of postmenopausal women who are particularly susceptible to estrogen deficiency. Calcitonin levels, which decrease postmenopausally, return to normal with estrogen; other hormones may also play important roles. Osteoporosis is not the result of a single hormonal deficiency or excess; it must be considered in relation to other pathogenetic and risk factors.

  11. [Adipose tissue hormones].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haluzík, M; Trachta, P; Haluzíková, D

    2010-10-01

    Adipose tissue had been traditionally considered a passive energy storage site without direct influence on energy homeostasis regulation. This view has been principally changed during early nineties by the discovery of hormonal production of adipose tissue. At present, the list of hormonally active substances of adipose tissue includes more than one hundred factors with paracrine or endocrine activity that play an important role in metabolic, food intake a inflammatory regulations and many other processes. Only minority of adipose tissue-derived hormones is produced exclusively in fat. Most of these factors is primarily put out by other tissues and organs. Adipose tissue-derived hormones are produced not only by adipocytes but also by preadipocytes, immunocompetent and endothelial cells and other cell types residing in fat. This paper summarizes current knowledge about endocrine function of adipose tissue with special respect to its changes in obesity. It also describes its possible role in the ethiopathogenesis of insulin resistance, atherosclerosis and other obesity-related pathologies.

  12. Thyroid hormone deiodination

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    T.J. Visser (Theo)

    1980-01-01

    textabstractThe enzymatic deiodination of thyroid hormone is an important process since it concerns- among other things- the regulation of thyromimetic activity at the site of the target organ. To understand the mechanism of this regulation it is necessary to have a detailed knowledge of the mode of

  13. Thyroid hormone deiodination

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    T.J. Visser (Theo)

    1980-01-01

    textabstractThe enzymatic deiodination of thyroid hormone is an important process since it concerns- among other things- the regulation of thyromimetic activity at the site of the target organ. To understand the mechanism of this regulation it is necessary to have a detailed knowledge of the mode of

  14. SHBG (Sex Hormone Binding Globulin)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... as: Testosterone-estrogen Binding Globulin; TeBG Formal name: Sex Hormone Binding Globulin Related tests: Testosterone , Free Testosterone, ... I should know? How is it used? The sex hormone binding globulin (SHBG) test may be used ...

  15. Hormonal contraception and venous thromboembolism

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lidegaard, Øjvind; Milsom, Ian; Geirsson, Reynir Tomas;

    2012-01-01

    New studies about the influence of hormonal contraception on the risk of venous thromboembolism (VTE) have been published.......New studies about the influence of hormonal contraception on the risk of venous thromboembolism (VTE) have been published....

  16. Growth Hormone Deficiency in Adults

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... mass and strength Mild bone loss Thinning skin Sleep problems Decreased exercise performance Decreased energy Decreased well-being, mild depression, or moodiness What are the benefits of growth hormone therapy? Growth hormone treatment involves injections (shots) ...

  17. Luteinizing hormone (LH) blood test

    Science.gov (United States)

    ICSH - blood test; Luteinizing hormone - blood test; Interstitial cell stimulating hormone - blood test ... to temporarily stop medicines that may affect the test results. Be sure to tell your provider about ...

  18. Analysis of Paired Primary-Metastatic Hormone-Receptor Positive Breast Tumors (HRPBC Uncovers Potential Novel Drivers of Hormonal Resistance.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luis Manso

    Full Text Available We sought to identify genetic variants associated with disease relapse and failure to hormonal treatment in hormone-receptor positive breast cancer (HRPBC. We analyzed a series of HRPBC with distant relapse, by sequencing pairs (n = 11 of tumors (primary and metastases at >800X. Comparative genomic hybridization was performed as well. Top hits, based on the frequency of alteration and severity of the changes, were tested in the TCGA series. Genes determining the most parsimonious prognostic signature were studied for their functional role in vitro, by performing cell growth assays in hormonal-deprivation conditions, a setting that mimics treatment with aromatase inhibitors. Severe alterations were recurrently found in 18 genes in the pairs. However, only MYC, DNAH5, CSFR1, EPHA7, ARID1B, and KMT2C preserved an independent prognosis impact and/or showed a significantly different incidence of alterations between relapsed and non-relapsed cases in the TCGA series. The signature composed of MYC, KMT2C, and EPHA7 best discriminated the clinical course, (overall survival 90,7 vs. 144,5 months; p = 0.0001. Having an alteration in any of the genes of the signature implied a hazard ratio of death of 3.25 (p<0.0001, and early relapse during the adjuvant hormonal treatment. The presence of the D348N mutation in KMT2C and/or the T666I mutation in the kinase domain of EPHA7 conferred hormonal resistance in vitro. Novel inactivating mutations in KMT2C and EPHA7, which confer hormonal resistance, are linked to adverse clinical course in HRPBC.

  19. Growth Hormone Deficiency in Children

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fact Sheet Growth Defici H e o n r c m y one in Children What is growth hormone deficiency? Growth hormone deficiency (GHD) is a rare condition in which the body does not make enough growth hormone (GH). GH is made by the pituitary ...

  20. Hormonal Control of Fetal Growth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cooke, Paul S.; Nicoll, Charles S.

    1983-01-01

    Summarizes recent research on hormonal control of fetal growth, presenting data obtained using a new method for studying the area. Effects of endocrine ablations and congenital deficiencies, studies of hormone/receptor levels, in-vitro techniques, hormones implicated in promoting fetal growth, problems with existing methodologies, and growth of…

  1. Nanostructured transdermal hormone replacement therapy for relieving menopausal symptoms: a confocal Raman spectroscopy study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marco Antonio Botelho

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: To determine the safety and efficacy of a transdermal nanostructured formulation of progesterone (10% combined with estriol (0.1% + estradiol (0.25% for relieving postmenopausal symptoms. METHODS: A total of 66 postmenopausal Brazilian women with climacteric symptoms of natural menopause received transdermal nanostructured formulations of progesterone and estrogens in the forearm daily for 60 months to mimic the normal ovarian secretory pattern. Confocal Raman spectroscopy of hormones in skin layers was performed. Clinical parameters, serum concentrations of estradiol and follicle-stimulating hormone, blood pressure, BI-RADS classification from bilateral mammography, and symptomatic relief were compared between baseline and 60 months post-treatment. Clinicaltrials.gov: NCT02033512. RESULTS: An improvement in climacteric symptoms was reported in 92.5% of women evaluated before and after 60 months of treatment. The serum concentrations of estradiol and follicle-stimulating hormone changed significantly (p<0.05 after treatment; the values of serum follicle-stimulating hormone decreased after 60 months from 82.04±4.9 to 57.12±4.1 IU/mL. A bilateral mammography assessment of the breasts revealed normal results in all women. No adverse health-related events were attributed to this hormone replacement therapy protocol. CONCLUSION: The nanostructured formulation is safe and effective in re-establishing optimal serum levels of estradiol and follicle-stimulating hormone and relieving the symptoms of menopause. This transdermal hormone replacement therapy may alleviate climacteric symptoms in postmenopausal women.

  2. Nanostructured transdermal hormone replacement therapy for relieving menopausal symptoms: a confocal Raman spectroscopy study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Botelho, Marco Antonio; Queiroz, Dinalva Brito; Barros, Gisele; Guerreiro, Stela; Umbelino, Sonia; Lyra, Arao; Borges, Boniek; Freitas, Allan, E-mail: marcobotelho@pq.cnpq.br [Universidade Potiguar, Natal, RN (Brazil). Lab. de Nanotecnologia; Fechine, Pierre [Universidade Federal do Ceara (GQMAT/UFCE), Fortaleza, CE (Brazil). Dept. de Quimica Analitica. Grupo Avancado de Biomateriais em Quimica; Queiroz, Danilo Caldas de [Instituto Federal de Ciencia e Tecnologia (IFCT), Fortaleza, CE (Brazil). Lab. de Biotecnologia; Ruela, Ronaldo [Instituto de Biotecnologia Aplicada (INBIOS), Fortaleza, CE (Brazil); Almeida, Jackson Guedes [Universidade Federal do Vale de Sao Francisco (UNIVALE), Petrolina, PE (Brazil). Fac. de Ciencias Farmaceuticas; Quintans Junior, Lucindo [Universidade Federal de Sergipe (UFSE), Sao Cristovao, SE (Brazil). Dept. de Fisiologia

    2014-06-01

    Objective:to determine the safety and efficacy of a transdermal nanostructured formulation of progesterone (10%) combined with estriol (0.1%) + estradiol (0.25%) for relieving postmenopausal symptoms. Methods: a total of 66 postmenopausal Brazilian women with climacteric symptoms of natural menopause received transdermal nanostructured formulations of progesterone and estrogens in the forearm daily for 60 months to mimic the normal ovarian secretory pattern. Confocal Raman spectroscopy of hormones in skin layers was performed. Clinical parameters, serum concentrations of estradiol and follicle-stimulating hormone, blood pressure, BI-RADS classification from bilateral mammography, and symptomatic relief were compared between baseline and 60 months post-treatment. Clinicaltrials.gov: NCT02033512. Results: an improvement in climacteric symptoms was reported in 92.5% of women evaluated before and after 60 months of treatment. The serum concentrations of estradiol and follicle-stimulating hormone changed significantly (p<0.05) after treatment; the values of serum follicle-stimulating hormone decreased after 60 months from 82.04 ± 4.9 to 57.12 ± 4.1 IU/mL. A bilateral mammography assessment of the breasts revealed normal results in all women. No adverse health-related events were attributed to this hormone replacement therapy protocol. Conclusion: the nanostructured formulation is safe and effective in re-establishing optimal serum levels of estradiol and follicle-stimulating hormone and relieving the symptoms of menopause. This transdermal hormone replacement therapy may alleviate climacteric symptoms in postmenopausal women. (author)

  3. Transformation optics that mimics the system outside a Schwarzschild black hole

    OpenAIRE

    Chen, Huanyang; Miao, Rong-Xin; Li, Miao

    2009-01-01

    We applied the transformation optics to mimic a black hole of Schwarzschild form. Similar properties of photon sphere were also found numerically for the metamaterial black hole. Several reduced versions of the black hole systems were proposed for easier implementations.

  4. Assembly of a Library of Trisaccharides as Mimics of Sialyl Lewis X via Random Combination Strategy

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xiang Bao MENG; Hui LI; Qing LI; Tie Ming CHENG; Zhong Jun LI

    2004-01-01

    A small library containing six positional isomers of fucosyl on the modified lactoside backbone as mimics of the Sialyl Lewis X was synthesized via random combinatorial glycosylation,which was charactered by ESI-MS and HPLC.

  5. Selective chromo-fluorogenic detection of DFP (a Sarin and Soman mimic) and DCNP (a Tabun mimic) with a unique probe based on a boron dipyrromethene (BODIPY) dye.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barba-Bon, Andrea; Costero, Ana M; Gil, Salvador; Martínez-Máñez, Ramón; Sancenón, Félix

    2014-11-21

    A novel colorimetric probe (P4) for the selective differential detection of DFP (a Sarin and Soman mimic) and DCNP (a Tabun mimic) was prepared. Probe P4 contains three reactive sites; i.e. (i) a nucleophilic phenol group able to undergo phosphorylation with nerve gases, (ii) a carbonyl group as a reactive site for cyanide; and (iii) a triisopropylsilyl (TIPS) protecting group that is known to react with fluoride. The reaction of P4 with DCNP in acetonitrile resulted in both the phosphorylation of the phenoxy group and the release of cyanide, which was able to react with the carbonyl group of P4 to produce a colour modulation from pink to orange. In contrast, phosphorylation of P4 with DFP in acetonitrile released fluoride that hydrolysed the TIPS group in P4 to yield a colour change from pink to blue. Probe P4 was able to discriminate between DFP and DCNP with remarkable sensitivity; limits of detection of 0.36 and 0.40 ppm for DCNP and DFP, respectively, were calculated. Besides, no interference from other organophosphorous derivatives or with presence of acid was observed. The sensing behaviour of P4 was also retained when incorporated into silica gel plates or onto polyethylene oxide membranes, which allowed the development of simple test strips for the colorimetric detection of DCNP and DFP in the vapour phase. P4 is the first probe capable of colorimetrically differentiating between a Tabun mimic (DCNP) and a Sarin and Soman mimic (DFP).

  6. Membrane type-1 matrix metalloproteinases and tissue inhibitor of metalloproteinases-2 RNA levels mimic each other during Xenopus laevis metamorphosis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Logan A Walsh

    Full Text Available Matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs and their endogenous inhibitors TIMPs (tissue inhibitors of MMPs, are two protein families that work together to remodel the extracellular matrix (ECM. TIMPs serve not only to inhibit MMP activity, but also aid in the activation of MMPs that are secreted as inactive zymogens. Xenopus laevis metamorphosis is an ideal model for studying MMP and TIMP expression levels because all tissues are remodeled under the control of one molecule, thyroid hormone. Here, using RT-PCR analysis, we examine the metamorphic RNA levels of two membrane-type MMPs (MT1-MMP, MT3-MMP, two TIMPs (TIMP-2, TIMP-3 and a potent gelatinase (Gel-A that can be activated by the combinatory activity of a MT-MMP and a TIMP. In the metamorphic tail and intestine the RNA levels of TIMP-2 and MT1-MMP mirror each other, and closely resemble that of Gel-A as all three are elevated during periods of cell death and proliferation. Conversely, MT3-MMP and TIMP-3 do not have similar RNA level patterns nor do they mimic the RNA levels of the other genes examined. Intriguingly, TIMP-3, which has been shown to have anti-apoptotic activity, is found at low levels in tissues during periods of apoptosis.

  7. INFLUENCE OF MIMIC CARDIAC RATE ON HYDRODYNAMICS OF DIFFERENT MECHANICAL PROSTHETIC CARDIAC VALVES IN VITRO

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yin-ping Chu; Jin-lian Cheng; Ru-kun Chen; Yu-bo Fan; Fang Pu

    2005-01-01

    Objective To assess the influence of mimic cardiac rate on hydrodynamics of different mechanical prosthetic cardiac valves.Methods US-made CarboMedics bileaflet valve, China-made Jiuling bileaflet valve and C-L tilting disc valve were tested via a pulsatile flow simulator in the aortic position. Testing conditions were set at mimic cardiac rates of 55 bpm, 75 bpm, 100bpm with a constant mimic cardiac output of 4 L/min. The mean pressure differences (△P), leakage volumes (LEV) and closing volumes (CLV) across each valve, and effective orifice areas (EOA) were analyzed.Results Within physiological range, △p, LEV, and CLV decreased as mimic cardiac rate increased, with a large extent of variance. EOA increased along with an increase in mimic cardiac rate. It was a different response in terms of cardiac rate alteration for different types of mechanical prosthetic cardiac valves.Conclusion Mimic cardiac rate change affects hydrodynamics of mechanical prosthetic cardiac valves. Within physiological range, the hydrodynamic of prosthetic bileaflet valve is better than that of tilting disc valve.

  8. Sex Hormones and Tendon

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Mette; Kjaer, Michael

    2016-01-01

    The risk of overuse and traumatic tendon and ligament injuries differ between women and men. Part of this gender difference in injury risk is probably explained by sex hormonal differences which are specifically distinct during the sexual maturation in the teenage years and during young adulthood....... The effects of the separate sex hormones are not fully elucidated. However, in women, the presence of estrogen in contrast to very low estrogen levels may be beneficial during regular loading of the tissue or during recovering after an injury, as estrogen can enhance tendon collagen synthesis rate. Yet...... has also been linked to a reduced responsiveness to relaxin. The present chapter will focus on sex difference in tendon injury risk, tendon morphology and tendon collagen turnover, but also on the specific effects of estrogen and androgens....

  9. Hormones in pregnancy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pratap Kumar

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The endocrinology of human pregnancy involves endocrine and metabolic changes that result from physiological alterations at the boundary between mother and fetus. Progesterone and oestrogen have a great role along with other hormones. The controversies of use of progestogen and others are discussed in this chapter. Progesterone has been shown to stimulate the secretion of Th2 and reduces the secretion of Th1 cytokines which maintains pregnancy. Supportive care in early pregnancy is associated with a significant beneficial effect on pregnancy outcome. Prophylactic hormonal supplementation can be recommended for all assisted reproduction techniques cycles. Preterm labor can be prevented by the use of progestogen. The route of administration plays an important role in the drug′s safety and efficacy profile in different trimesters of pregnancy. Thyroid disorders have a great impact on pregnancy outcome and needs to be monitored and treated accordingly. Method of locating review: Pubmed, scopus

  10. Biosimilar growth hormone.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saenger, Paul

    2012-01-01

    As the first wave of biopharmaceuticals is expiring, biosimilars or follow-on -protein products (FOPP's) have emerged. Biosimilar drugs are cheaper than the originator/comparator drug. The regulatory foundation for these products is more advanced and better codified in Europe than in the US. Biosimilar soamtropin has been approved in both the US and Europe. The scientific viability of biosimilar drugs and especially growth hormone has been proven by several rigorously conducted clinical trials. Efficacy and safety data (growth rates, IGF-1 generation) for up to 7 y for pediatric indications measure up favorably to previously approved growth hormones which served as reference comparators. The Obama Administration appears to be committed to establish innovative pathways for the approval of biologics and biosimilars in the US. The cost savings in health care expenditures will be substantial as the global sales of biologics have reached $ 93 billion in 2009.

  11. Gastrointestinal hormones and their targets

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rehfeld, Jens F.

    2014-01-01

    Gastrointestinal hormones are peptides released from endocrine cells and neurons in the digestive tract. More than 30 hormone genes are currently known to be expressed in the gastrointestinal tract, which makes the gut the largest hormone producing organ in the body. Modern biology makes......, paracrine, spermiocrine secretion etc.), so the same peptide may act as a blood-borne hormone, a neurotransmitter, a local growth factor, or a fertility factor. The molecular targets of each bioactive peptide are specific G-protein coupled receptors expressed in the cell membranes of different target cells...... it feasible to conceive the hormones under five headings: The structural homology groups a majority of the hormones into nine families, each of which is assumed to originate from one ancestral gene. The individual hormone gene often has multiple phenotypes due to alternative splicing, tandem organization...

  12. The wound hormone jasmonate

    OpenAIRE

    Koo, Abraham J. K.; Howe, Gregg A.

    2009-01-01

    Plant tissues are highly vulnerable to injury by herbivores, pathogens, mechanical stress, and other environmental insults. Optimal plant fitness in the face of these threats relies on complex signal transduction networks that link damage-associated signals to appropriate changes in metabolism, growth, and development. Many of these wound-induced adaptive responses are triggered by de novo synthesis of the plant hormone jasmonate (JA). Recent studies provide evidence that JA mediates systemic...

  13. Growth Hormone and Aging

    Science.gov (United States)

    2000-08-01

    thru ADP010582 UNCLASSIFIED 23-1 GROWTH HORMONE AND AGING J.A.F. Tresguerres , Perez Romero, N. de las Heras, S. Vazquez, C. Ariznavarreta Complutense... Tresguerres 1996). GHRH is were treated as children with GH, a significant secreted in peaks as well as somatostatin, both number of problems were detected...of GH ( Tresguerres 1996) reduction in muscular and bone mass together IGFI is a peptide of 70 aminoacids that shows with an increase in body fat

  14. [Acne and hormones].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faure, Michel

    2002-04-15

    Androgens stimulate sebum production which is necessary for the development of acne. Acne in women may thus be considered as a manifestation of cutaneous androgenization. Most of acnes may be related to an idiopathic skin hyperandrogenism due to in situ enzyme activity and androgen receptor hypersensitivity, as also noted in idiopathic hirsutism. Some acne may correspond to elevated ovarian or adrenal androgen secretion. The presence of acne in women may lead to a diagnosis of functional hyperandrogenism, either polycysticovary syndrome or nonclassical 21-hydroxylase deficiency. Plasma level assays for testosterone, delta 4 androstenedione and 17-OH progesterone and ovarian echography are necessary to determine the possibility for an ovarian or adrenal hyperandrogenism, but not to better treat acne. The goal of hormonal therapy in acne is to oppose the effects of androgens on the sebaceous gland. Hormones may be used in female acne in the absence of endocrine abnormalities. Antiandrogens (cyproterone acetate or aldactone) may be useful in severe acne, hormonal contraceptives with cyproterone acetate or non androgenic progestins in mild or common acne often in association with other anti-acneic drugs. Glucocorticoids have to be administered in acne fulminans and other forms of acute, severe, inflammatory acne, for their anti-inflammatory properties.

  15. [Hormones and the cardiovascular system].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lacka, Katarzyna; Czyzyk, Adam

    2008-01-01

    Hormones have an influence on many tissues and organs, including the cardio-vascular system (CVS). Depending on their activity on CVS, they can be divided into 4 groups: having hypertensive or hypotensive influence and chronotropic positive or negative action. Endocrine regulation in CVS may occur in many ways. Apart from hormones usually connected with CVS regulation, other more recently, discovered ones can act on it. A few of these act directly through specific receptors in heart or vessel wall cells, whereas some act indirectly - stimulating other neuroendocrine factors. Additionally, novel mechanisms of signal transduction have been discovered for steroid and thyroid hormones, which are independent of gene transcription regulation and are - known as "nongenomic". Hormones which increase blood pressure include: urotensin II, endothelins, angiotensin II, catecholamines, aldosterone, antidiuretic hormone, glucocorticosteroids, thyroid hormones, growth hormone and leptin. On the other hand, blood pressure can be decreased by: natriuretic peptides, the calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP) family, angiotensin 1-7, substance P, neurokinin A, ghrelin, Parathyroid hormone-related protein (PTHrP), oxytocin, and, sex hormones. Hormones which when appearing in excess increase the heart rate are: catecholamines, endothelins, glucocorticosteroids, thyroid hormones, leptin and PTHrP. Those which decrease the heart rate include: natriuretic peptides, substance P, neurokinin A, oxytocin, angiotensin 1-7. This paper describes the contemporary view of the functions of hormones which act on the vessel tree and heart. The particular effect of mediator depends on many circumstances i.e.: hormone concentration, receptor type. It may also undergo contraregulation. The majority of those hormones play an important role in the pathogenesis of CVS diseases', which can result in the development of new medicines.

  16. Biomimetic deiodination of thyroid hormones and iodothyronamines - a structure-activity relationship study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mondal, Santanu; Mugesh, Govindasamy

    2016-10-12

    Mammalian selenoenzymes, iodothyronine deiodinases (DIOs), catalyze the tyrosyl and phenolic ring deiodination of thyroid hormones (THs) and play an important role in maintaining the TH concentration throughout the body. These enzymes also accept the decarboxylated thyroid hormone metabolites, iodothyronamines (TAMs), as substrates for deiodination. Naphthalene-based selenium and/or sulphur-containing small molecules have been shown to mediate the regioselective tyrosyl ring deiodination of thyroid hormones and their metabolites. Herein, we report on the structure-activity relationship studies of a series of peri-substituted selenium-containing naphthalene derivatives for the deiodination of thyroid hormones and iodothyronamines. Single crystal X-ray crystallographic and (77)Se NMR spectroscopic studies indicated that the intramolecular SeX (X = N, O and S) interactions play an important role in the deiodinase activity of the synthetic mimics. Furthermore, the decarboxylated metabolites, TAMs, have been observed to undergo slower tyrosyl ring deiodination than THs by naphthyl-based selenium and/or sulphur-containing synthetic deiodinase mimics and this has been explained on the basis of the strength of SeI halogen bonding formed by THs and TAMs.

  17. [Thyroid hormones and their precursors. II. Species-specific properties].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tóth, Gergo; Noszál, Béla

    2014-01-01

    This paper surveys the species-specific physico-chemical parameters (basicity and lipophilicity) and related biological functions of thyroid hormones (thyroxine, liothyronine and reverse liothyronine) and their biological precursors (tyrosine, monoiodotyrosine and diiodotyrosine). The protonation macroconstants were determined by 1H NMR-pH titrations while the microconstants were determined by a multimodal spectroscopic-deductive methodology using auxiliary derivatives of reduced complexity. Our results show that the different number and/or position of iodine are the key factors to influence the phenolate basicity. The ionization state of the phenolate site is crucial in the biosynthesis and protein binding of thyroid hormones. The role of the protonation state in the receptor binding was investigated by an in silico docking method. Microspecies of thyroid hormones were docked to the thyroid hormone receptor isoforms. Our results quantitate at the molecular level how the ionization stage and the charge distribution influence the protein binding. The anionic form of the carboxyl group is essential for the protein binding, whereas the protonated form of the amino group loosens it. The protonation state of the phenolate plays a role of secondary importance in the receptor binding. The combined results of docking and microspeciation studies show that microspecies of the highest concentration at the pH of blood are not the strongest binding ones. The site-specific lipophilicity of our investigated molecules was determined with the measurement of distribution coefficients at different pH using carboxymethyl- and O-methyl-derivatives to mimic the partition of some of the individual microspecies. Correction factors were determined and introduced. Our data show that the iodinated aromatic ring system is the definitive structural element that fundamentally determines the lipophilicity of thyroid hormones, whereas the protonation state of the aliphatic part is essential in

  18. Effects of hormone agonists on Sf9 cells, proliferation and cell cycle arrest.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giraudo, Maeva; Califano, Jérôme; Hilliou, Frédérique; Tran, Trang; Taquet, Nathalie; Feyereisen, René; Le Goff, Gaëlle

    2011-01-01

    Methoxyfenozide and methoprene are two insecticides that mimic the action of the main hormones involved in the control of insect growth and development, 20-hydroxyecdysone and juvenile hormone. We investigated their effect on the Spodoptera frugiperda Sf9 cell line. Methoxyfenozide was more toxic than methoprene in cell viability tests and more potent in the inhibition of cellular proliferation. Cell growth arrest occurred in the G2/M phase after a methoprene treatment and more modestly in G1 after methoxyfenozide treatment. Microarray experiments and real-time quantitative PCR to follow the expression of nuclear receptors ultraspiracle and ecdysone receptor were performed to understand the molecular action of these hormone agonists. Twenty-six genes were differentially expressed after methoxyfenozide treatment and 55 genes after methoprene treatment with no gene in common between the two treatments. Our results suggest two different signalling pathways in Sf9 cells.

  19. Effects of hormone agonists on Sf9 cells, proliferation and cell cycle arrest.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maeva Giraudo

    Full Text Available Methoxyfenozide and methoprene are two insecticides that mimic the action of the main hormones involved in the control of insect growth and development, 20-hydroxyecdysone and juvenile hormone. We investigated their effect on the Spodoptera frugiperda Sf9 cell line. Methoxyfenozide was more toxic than methoprene in cell viability tests and more potent in the inhibition of cellular proliferation. Cell growth arrest occurred in the G2/M phase after a methoprene treatment and more modestly in G1 after methoxyfenozide treatment. Microarray experiments and real-time quantitative PCR to follow the expression of nuclear receptors ultraspiracle and ecdysone receptor were performed to understand the molecular action of these hormone agonists. Twenty-six genes were differentially expressed after methoxyfenozide treatment and 55 genes after methoprene treatment with no gene in common between the two treatments. Our results suggest two different signalling pathways in Sf9 cells.

  20. Growth hormone and aging

    OpenAIRE

    Bartke, Andrzej; Brown-Borg, Holly; Kinney, Beth; Mattison, Julie; Wright, Chris; Hauck, Steven; Coschigano, Karen; Kopchick, John

    2000-01-01

    The potential usefulness of growth hormone (GH) as an anti-aging therapy is of considerable current interest. Secretion of GH normally declines during aging and administration of GH can reverse age-related changes in body composition. However, mutant dwarf mice with congenital GH deficiency and GH resistant GH-R-KO mice live much longer than their normal siblings, while a pathological elevation of GH levels reduces life expectancy in both mice and men. We propose that the actions of GH on gro...

  1. Rationally designed squaryldiamides - a novel class of sugar-nucleotide mimics?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niewiadomski, Sven; Beebeejaun, Zeenat; Denton, Helen; Smith, Terry K; Morris, Richard J; Wagner, Gerd K

    2010-08-07

    Sugar-nucleotides such as GDP-mannose, GDP-fucose and UDP-glucose are important biomolecules with a central role in carbohydrate and glycoconjugate biosynthesis, metabolism and cell signalling. Analogues and mimics of naturally occurring sugar-nucleotides are sought after as chemical tools and inhibitor candidates for sugar-nucleotide-dependent enzymes including glycosyltransferases. Many sugar-nucleotides bind to their target glycosyltransferases via coordination of the diphosphate group to a divalent metal cofactor in the active site. The identification of uncharged, chemically stable surrogates for the diphosphate group, with the ability to coordinate to a divalent metal, is therefore an important design criteria for the development of sugar-nucleotide mimics. Here, we describe the rational design and synthesis of a novel class of sugar-nucleotide mimics based on a squaryldiamide scaffold, an uncharged phosphate isostere. We demonstrate by comprehensive NMR titration experiments that the new sugar-nucleotide mimics coordinate efficiently to Mg(2+), and provide results from biological studies with a therapeutically relevant mannosyltransferase from Trypanosoma brucei. Our findings suggest that squaryldiamides are a promising template for the development of sugar-nucleotide mimics, and illustrate the considerable potential of the squarylamide group as a fragment for inhibitor design.

  2. Antimicrobial Effects of Novel Triple Antibiotic Paste–Mimic Scaffolds on Actinomyces naeslundii Biofilm

    Science.gov (United States)

    Albuquerque, Maria T.P.; Ryan, Stuart J.; Münchow, Eliseu A.; Kamocka, Maria M.; Gregory, Richard L.; Valera, Marcia C.; Bottino, Marco C.

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Actinomyces naeslundii has been recovered from traumatized permanent teeth diagnosed with necrotic pulps. In this work, a triple antibiotic paste (TAP)–mimic scaffold is proposed as a drug-delivery strategy to eliminate A. naeslundii dentin biofilm. Methods Metronidazole, ciprofloxacin, and minocycline were added to a polydioxanone (PDS) polymer solution and spun into fibrous scaffolds. Fiber morphology, mechanical properties, and drug release were investigated by using scanning electron microscopy, microtensile testing, and high-performance liquid chromatography, respectively. Human dentin specimens (4 × 4 × 1 mm3, n = 4/group) were inoculated with A. naeslundii (ATCC 43146) for 7 days for biofilm formation. The infected dentin specimens were exposed to TAP-mimic scaffolds, TAP solution (positive control), and pure PDS (drug-free scaffold). Dentin infected (7-day biofilm) specimens were used for comparison (negative control). Confocal laser scanning microscopy was done to determine bacterial viability. Results Scaffolds displayed a submicron mean fiber diameter (PDS = 689 ± 312 nm and TAP-mimic = 718 ± 125 nm). Overall, TAP-mimic scaffolds showed significantly (P ≤ .040) lower mechanical properties than PDS. Within the first 24 hours, a burst release for all drugs was seen. A sustained maintenance of metronidazole and ciprofloxacin was observed over 4 weeks, but not for minocycline. Confocal laser scanning microscopy demonstrated complete elimination of all viable bacteria exposed to the TAP solution. Meanwhile, TAP-mimic scaffolds led to a significant (P regenerative endodontics. PMID:25917945

  3. A bioconjugate approach toward squalamine mimics: Insight into the mechanism of biological action.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Wen-Hua; Shao, Xue-Bin; Moellering, Robert; Wennersten, Christine; Regen, Steven L

    2006-01-01

    A short and efficient synthesis has been devised for a family of squalamine mimics, based on the use of cholic acid, deoxycholic acid, lithocholic acid, putrescine, and spermine as starting materials. Those mimics that contain two facially amphiphilic sterol-spermidine conjugates show strong antibacterial activity against a broad spectrum of Gram-positive bacteria; their corresponding activities against a broad spectrum of Gram-negative bacteria are relatively moderate. Larger mimics, containing four such sterol-spermidine conjugates, exhibit very weak activities. Reversal of the pendent spermidine moiety and a putrescine linkage on the A- and D-rings had little consequence on the antibacterial activity for the most active of the squalamine mimics, which contained two sterol-polyamine units; similar results were obtained with squalamine mimics made from only one sterol unit. Detailed structure-activity measurements, in combination with kinetic studies carried out using liposomes as model membranes, support a mechanism of action involving noncovalent dimers as ion transporting species, most probably via the formation of pores or channels.

  4. A Host-Produced Autoinducer-2 Mimic Activates Bacterial Quorum Sensing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ismail, Anisa S; Valastyan, Julie S; Bassler, Bonnie L

    2016-04-13

    Host-microbial symbioses are vital to health; nonetheless, little is known about the role crosskingdom signaling plays in these relationships. In a process called quorum sensing, bacteria communicate with one another using extracellular signal molecules called autoinducers. One autoinducer, AI-2, is proposed to promote interspecies bacterial communication, including in the mammalian gut. We show that mammalian epithelia produce an AI-2 mimic activity in response to bacteria or tight-junction disruption. This AI-2 mimic is detected by the bacterial AI-2 receptor, LuxP/LsrB, and can activate quorum-sensing-controlled gene expression, including in the enteric pathogen Salmonella typhimurium. AI-2 mimic activity is induced when epithelia are directly or indirectly exposed to bacteria, suggesting that a secreted bacterial component(s) stimulates its production. Mutagenesis revealed genes required for bacteria to both detect and stimulate production of the AI-2 mimic. These findings uncover a potential role for the mammalian AI-2 mimic in fostering crosskingdom signaling and host-bacterial symbioses.

  5. [Hormone replacement therapy--growth hormone, melatonin, DHEA and sex hormones].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fukai, Shiho; Akishita, Masahiro

    2009-07-01

    The ability to maintain active and independent living as long as possible is crucial for the healthy longevity. Hormones responsible for some of the manifestations associated with aging are growth hormone, insulin-like growth factor-1 (IGF-1), melatonin, dehydroepiandrosterone (DHEA), sex hormones and thyroid hormones. These hormonal changes are associated with changes in body composition, visceral obesity, muscle weakness, osteoporosis, urinary incontinence, loss of cognitive functioning, reduction in well being, depression, as well as sexual dysfunction. With the prolongation of life expectancy, both men and women today live the latter third life with endocrine deficiencies. Hormone replacement therapy may alleviate the debilitating conditions of secondary partial endocrine deficiencies by preventing or delaying some aspects of aging.

  6. Halogen bonding controls the regioselectivity of the deiodination of thyroid hormones and their sulfate analogues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manna, Debasish; Mondal, Santanu; Mugesh, Govindasamy

    2015-02-02

    The type 1 iodothyronine deiodinase (1D-1) in liver and kidney converts the L-thyroxine (T4), a prohormone, by outer-ring (5') deiodination to biologically active 3,3',5-triiodothyronine (T3) or by inner-ring (5) deiodination to inactive 3,3',5'-triiodothronine (rT3). Sulfate conjugation is an important step in the irreversible inactivation of thyroid hormones. While sulfate conjugation of the phenolic hydroxyl group stimulates the 5-deiodination of T4 and T3, it blocks the 5'-deiodination of T4. We show that thyroxine sulfate (T4S) undergoes faster deiodination as compared to the parent thyroid hormone T4 by synthetic selenium compounds. It is also shown that ID-3 mimics, which are remarkably selective to the inner-ring deiodination of T4 and T3, changes the selectivity completely when T4S is used as a substrate. From the theoretical investigations, it is observed that the strength of halogen bonding increases upon sulfate conjugation, which leads to a change in the regioselectivity of ID-3 mimics towards the deiodination of T4S. It has been shown that these mimics perform both the 5'- and 5-ring deiodinations by an identical mechanism. © 2015 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  7. Estimating the size of non-observed economy in Croatia using the MIMIC approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vjekoslav Klarić

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available This paper gives a quick overview of the approaches that have been used in the research of shadow economy, starting with the definitions of the terms “shadow economy” and “non-observed economy”, with the accent on the ISTAT/Eurostat framework. Several methods for estimating the size of the shadow economy and the non-observed economy are then presented. The emphasis is placed on the MIMIC approach, one of the methods used to estimate the size of the nonobserved economy. After a glance at the theory behind it, the MIMIC model is then applied to the Croatian economy. Considering the described characteristics of different methods, a previous estimate of the size of the non-observed economy in Croatia is chosen to provide benchmark values for the MIMIC model. Using those, the estimates of the size of non-observed economy in Croatia during the period 1998-2009 are obtained.

  8. Catalytic hyperbranched polymers as enzyme mimics; exploiting the principles of encapsulation and supramolecular chemistry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirkorian, Katerina; Ellis, Adam; Twyman, Lance J

    2012-09-21

    Nature uses the principles of encapsulation and supramolecular chemistry to bind and orientate substrates within active catalytic sites. Over the years, synthetic chemistry has generated a number of small molecule active site mimics capable of catalysing reactions involving bound substrates. Another approach uses larger molecules that better represent an enzymes globular structure. These molecules mimic an enzymes structure by incorporating binding/catalytic sites within the globular structure of the polymer. As such, the electronic and steric properties around the binding/catalytic site(s) can be controlled and fine-tuned. One class of polymer that is particularly adept at mimicking the globular structure of enzymes are dendritic polymers. This review will concentrate on the use of hyperbranched polymers as synthetic enzyme mimics.

  9. Design and characterization of ebolavirus GP prehairpin intermediate mimics as drug targets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clinton, Tracy R; Weinstock, Matthew T; Jacobsen, Michael T; Szabo-Fresnais, Nicolas; Pandya, Maya J; Whitby, Frank G; Herbert, Andrew S; Prugar, Laura I; McKinnon, Rena; Hill, Christopher P; Welch, Brett D; Dye, John M; Eckert, Debra M; Kay, Michael S

    2015-01-01

    Ebolaviruses are highly lethal filoviruses that cause hemorrhagic fever in humans and nonhuman primates. With no approved treatments or preventatives, the development of an anti-ebolavirus therapy to protect against natural infections and potential weaponization is an urgent global health need. Here, we describe the design, biophysical characterization, and validation of peptide mimics of the ebolavirus N-trimer, a highly conserved region of the GP2 fusion protein, to be used as targets to develop broad-spectrum inhibitors of ebolavirus entry. The N-trimer region of GP2 is 90% identical across all ebolavirus species and forms a critical part of the prehairpin intermediate that is exposed during viral entry. Specifically, we fused designed coiled coils to the N-trimer to present it as a soluble trimeric coiled coil as it appears during membrane fusion. Circular dichroism, sedimentation equilibrium, and X-ray crystallography analyses reveal the helical, trimeric structure of the designed N-trimer mimic targets. Surface plasmon resonance studies validate that the N-trimer mimic binds its native ligand, the C-peptide region of GP2. The longest N-trimer mimic also inhibits virus entry, thereby confirming binding of the C-peptide region during viral entry and the presence of a vulnerable prehairpin intermediate. Using phage display as a model system, we validate the suitability of the N-trimer mimics as drug screening targets. Finally, we describe the foundational work to use the N-trimer mimics as targets in mirror-image phage display, which will be used to identify d-peptide inhibitors of ebolavirus entry. PMID:25287718

  10. Carbonic anhydrase mimics for enhanced CO2 absorption in an amine-based capture solvent.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelsey, Rachael A; Miller, David A; Parkin, Sean R; Liu, Kun; Remias, Joe E; Yang, Yue; Lightstone, Felice C; Liu, Kunlei; Lippert, Cameron A; Odom, Susan A

    2016-01-07

    Two new small-molecule enzyme mimics of carbonic anhydrase were prepared and characterized. These complexes contain the salen-like ligand bis(hydroxyphenyl)phenanthroline. This ligand is similar to the salen-type ligands previously incorporated into carbonic anhydrase mimics but contains no hydrolyzable imine groups and therefore serves as a promising ligand scaffold for the synthesis of a more robust CO2 hydration catalyst. These homogeneous catalysts were investigated for CO2 hydration in concentrated primary amine solutions through which a dilute CO2 (14%) fluid stream was flowed and showed exceptional activity for increased CO2 absorption rates.

  11. Construction of Large-Volume Tissue Mimics with 3D Functional Vascular Networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, Tae-Yun; Hong, Jung Min; Jung, Jin Woo; Kang, Hyun-Wook; Cho, Dong-Woo

    2016-01-01

    We used indirect stereolithography (SL) to form inner-layered fluidic networks in a porous scaffold by introducing a hydrogel barrier on the luminal surface, then seeded the networks separately with human umbilical vein endothelial cells and human lung fibroblasts to form a tissue mimic containing vascular networks. The artificial vascular networks provided channels for oxygen transport, thus reducing the hypoxic volume and preventing cell death. The endothelium of the vascular networks significantly retarded the occlusion of channels during whole-blood circulation. The tissue mimics have the potential to be used as an in vitro platform to examine the physiologic and pathologic phenomena through vascular architecture. PMID:27228079

  12. Construction of Large-Volume Tissue Mimics with 3D Functional Vascular Networks.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tae-Yun Kang

    Full Text Available We used indirect stereolithography (SL to form inner-layered fluidic networks in a porous scaffold by introducing a hydrogel barrier on the luminal surface, then seeded the networks separately with human umbilical vein endothelial cells and human lung fibroblasts to form a tissue mimic containing vascular networks. The artificial vascular networks provided channels for oxygen transport, thus reducing the hypoxic volume and preventing cell death. The endothelium of the vascular networks significantly retarded the occlusion of channels during whole-blood circulation. The tissue mimics have the potential to be used as an in vitro platform to examine the physiologic and pathologic phenomena through vascular architecture.

  13. Inhibition of hepatitis C virus replication by single-stranded RNA structural mimics

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Robert; Smolic; Martina; Smolic; John; H; Andorfer; Catherine; H; Wu; Robert; M; Smith; George; Y; Wu

    2010-01-01

    AIM: To examine the effect of hepatitis C virus (HCV) structural mimics of regulatory regions of the genome on HCV replication.METHODS: HCV RNA structural mimics were constructed and tested in a HCV genotype 1b aBB7 replicon,and a Japanese fulminant hepatitis-1 (JFH-1) HCV genotype 2a infection model.All sequences were computer-predicted to adopt stem-loop structures identical to the corresponding elements in full-length viral RNA.Huh7.5 cells bearing the BB7 replicon or infected with JFH-1 virus were trans...

  14. Sex Hormones and Ischemic Stroke

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Holmegard, Haya N; Nordestgaard, Børge G; Jensen, Gorm B

    2016-01-01

    CONTEXT AND OBJECTIVE: Whether endogenous sex hormones are associated with ischemic stroke (IS) is unclear. We tested the hypothesis that extreme concentrations of endogenous sex hormones are associated with risk of IS in the general population. DESIGN, SETTING, AND PARTICIPANTS: Adult men (n...

  15. Thyroid hormone and the heart.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moolman, J A

    2002-01-01

    Thyroid hormone has important cardiovascular effects, and abnormalities of its production cause cardiovascular morbidity. The role of both excessive and insufficient thyroid hormone production in the pathogenesis of clinical cardiac diseases can be deduced from thyroid hormone-induced molecular changes. Thyroid hormone regulates the expression of myocardial genes regulating the handling of calcium, which affects both systolic and diastolic myocardial function. Thyroid hormone also has indirect and direct effects on peripheral vascular smooth muscle tone, and alters the coupling of the left ventricle and arterial system. Excessive production of thyroid hormone results in an increased cardiac output as well as increased cardiac work efficiency, but reduced cardiac reserve. Amiodarone therapy for cardiac rhythm can cause both hyper- and hypothyroidism. Amiodarone-induced thyrotoxicosis (AIT) can be due to either excessive thyroid hormone production (type I AIT) or thyroid hormone release due to an inflammatory condition (type II AIT). Classification of AIT is helpful in guiding therapy. Amiodarone causes changes in the thyroid function tests of euthyroid patients on therapy--it inhibits the conversion of T(4) and T(3), which results in decreased T(3) and slightly increased T(4) serum levels in euthyroid patients. Baseline thyroid functions should therefore be determined before starting amiodarone therapy, and at 6-monthly intervals thereafter.

  16. Hormonal Programming Across the Lifespan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tobet, Stuart A; Lara, Hernan E; Lucion, Aldo B; Wilson, Melinda E; Recabarren, Sergio E; Paredes, Alfonso H

    2013-01-01

    Hormones influence countless biological processes across the lifespan, and during developmental sensitive periods hormones have the potential to cause permanent tissue-specific alterations in anatomy and physiology. There are numerous critical periods in development wherein different targets are affected. This review outlines the proceedings of the Hormonal Programming in Development session at the US-South American Workshop in Neuroendocrinology in August 2011. Here we discuss how gonadal hormones impact various biological processes within the brain and gonads during early development and describe the changes that take place in the aging female ovary. At the cellular level, hormonal targets in the brain include neurons, glia, or vasculature. On a genomic/epigenomic level, transcription factor signaling and epigenetic changes alter the expression of hormone receptor genes across development and following ischemic brain insult. In addition, organizational hormone exposure alters epigenetic processes in specific brain nuclei and may be a mediator of sexual differentiation of the neonatal brain. During development of the ovary, exposure to excess gonadal hormones leads to polycystic ovarian syndrome (PCOS). Exposure to excess androgens during fetal development also has a profound effect on the development of the male reproductive system. In addition, increased sympathetic nerve activity and stress during early life have been linked to PCOS symptomology in adulthood. Finally, we describe how age-related decreases in fertility are linked to high levels of nerve growth factor (NGF), which enhances sympathetic nerve activity and alters ovarian function. PMID:22700441

  17. Hormones and β-Agonists

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ginkel, van L.A.; Bovee, T.F.H.; Blokland, M.H.; Sterk, S.S.; Smits, N.G.E.; Pleadin, Jelka; Vulić, Ana

    2016-01-01

    This chapter provides some updated information on contemporary methods for hormone and β-agonist analyses. It deals with the classical approaches for the effective detection and identification of exogenous hormones. The chapter examines specific problems related to control strategies for natural

  18. Hormone therapy for transgender patients

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-01-01

    Many transgender men and women seek hormone therapy as part of the transition process. Exogenous testosterone is used in transgender men to induce virilization and suppress feminizing characteristics. In transgender women, exogenous estrogen is used to help feminize patients, and anti-androgens are used as adjuncts to help suppress masculinizing features. Guidelines exist to help providers choose appropriate candidates for hormone therapy, and act as a framework for choosing treatment regimens and managing surveillance in these patients. Cross-sex hormone therapy has been shown to have positive physical and psychological effects on the transitioning individual and is considered a mainstay treatment for many patients. Bone and cardiovascular health are important considerations in transgender patients on long-term hormones, and care should be taken to monitor certain metabolic indices while patients are on cross-sex hormone therapy. PMID:28078219

  19. Leptin: a multifunctional hormone

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2000-01-01

    Leptin is the protein product encoded by the obese (ob)gene. It is a circulating hormone produced primarily by the adipose tissue. ob/ob mice with mutations of the gene encoding leptin become morbidly obese, infertile, hyperphagic, hypothermic,and diabetic. Since the cloning of leptin in 1994, our knowledge in body weight regulation and the role played by leptin has increased substantially. We now know that leptin signals through its receptor, OB-R, which is a member of the cytokine receptor superfamily. Leptin serves as an adiposity signal to inform the brain the adipose tissue mass in a negative feedback loop regulating food intake and energy expenditure. Leptin also plays important roles in angiogenesis, immune function, fertility, and bone formation. Humans with mutations in the gene encoding leptin are also morbidly obese and respond to leptin treatment,demonstrating that enhancing or inhibiting leptin's activities in vivo may have potential therapeutic benefits.

  20. Types of Cancer Treatment: Hormone Therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Describes how hormone therapy slows or stops the growth of breast and prostate cancers that use hormones to grow. Includes information about the types of hormone therapy and side effects that may happen.

  1. Hormonal programming across the lifespan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nugent, B M; Tobet, S A; Lara, H E; Lucion, A B; Wilson, M E; Recabarren, S E; Paredes, A H

    2012-07-01

    Hormones influence countless biological processes across an animal's lifespan. Many hormone-mediated events occur within developmental sensitive periods, during which hormones have the potential to cause permanent tissue-specific alterations in anatomy and physiology. There are numerous selective critical periods in development with different targets being affected during different periods. This review outlines the proceedings of the Hormonal Programming in Development session at the US-South American Workshop in Neuroendocrinology in August 2011. Here we discuss how gonadal steroid hormones impact various biological processes within the brain and gonads during early development and describe the changes that take place in the aging female ovary. At the cellular level, hormonal targets in the brain include neurons, glia, or vasculature. On a genomic/epigenomic level, transcription factor signaling and epigenetic changes alter the expression of critical hormone receptor genes across development and following ischemic brain insult. In addition, organizational hormone exposure alters epigenetic processes in specific brain nuclei and may be an important mediator of sexual differentiation of the neonatal brain. Brain targets of hormonal programming, such as the paraventricular nucleus of the hypothalamus, may be critical in influencing the development of peripheral targets, such as the ovary. Exposure to excess hormones can cause abnormalities in the ovary during development leading to polycystic ovarian syndrome (PCOS). Exposure to excess androgens during fetal development also has a profound effect on the development of the male reproductive system. In addition, increased activity of the sympathetic nerve and stress during early life have been linked to PCOS symptomology in adulthood. Finally, we describe how age-related decreases in fertility are linked to high levels of nerve growth factor (NGF), which enhances sympathetic nerve activity and alters ovarian function.

  2. Storage of Electromagnetic Waves in a Metamaterial that Mimics Electromagnetically Induced Transparency

    CERN Document Server

    Nakanishi, Toshihiro; Tamayama, Yasuhiro; Kitano, Masao

    2013-01-01

    We propose a method for dynamically controlling the properties of a metamaterial that mimics electromagnetically induced transparency (EIT) by introducing varactor diodes to manipulate the structural symmetry of the metamaterial. Dynamic modulation of the EIT property enables the storage and retrieval of electromagnetic waves. We confirmed that the electromagnetic waves were stored and released, while maintaining the phase distribution in the propagating direction.

  3. Synthesis of oxime-linked mucin mimics containing thetumor-related TN and sialyl TN antigens

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marcaurelle, Lisa A.; Shin, Youngsook; Goon, Scarlett; Bertozzi,Carolyn R.

    2001-08-21

    The synthesis of oxime-linked mucin mimics was accomplished via the incorporation of multiple ketone residues into a peptide followed by reaction with aminooxy sugars corresponding to the tumor-related T{sub N} and sialyl T{sub N} (ST{sub N}) antigens.

  4. A Molecular Mechanics Analysis of Molecular Recognition by Cyclodextrin Mimics of Alpha-Chymotrypsin

    Science.gov (United States)

    1989-05-26

    Clasification ) A Molecular Mechanics Analysis of Molecular Recognition By Cyclodextrin Mimics of Alpha-Chymotrypsin. 12. PERSONAL AUTHOR(S) C.A. Venanzil...Field Parameters The AMBER force field was developed by Kollmann and coworkers tc 28293 treat proteins and nucleic acids , as well as small molecules2 9

  5. Isolation and characterization of rice lesion mimic mutants from a T-DNA tagged population

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI Shutian; PEI Zhongyou; LUO Lijuan; TIAN Yingchuan; HE Chaozu

    2005-01-01

    A rice ( Oryza sativa L. ssp. japonica cv. Nipponbare) T-DNA tagged population consisting of about 7000 individual lines was generated and screened for rice lesion mimic mutants in the T1 generation. Ten lines were found to develop spontaneous lesions in the absence of pathogen infection and displayed distinct lesion phenotypes. These mutants were tentatively designated as lm1 -lm10 (for lesion mimic), respectively. Lesion formation of lm mutants was developmentally regulated, and all the mutants showed stunted growth and reduced fertility. Genetic analysis demonstrated that all the mutations were recessive, and five partially fertile mutants (lm4-lm8) were derived from different loci. Mimic lesions occurring on the leaves of lm mutants resulted from cell death as revealed by trypan blue staining. Six of them ( lm3 -lm8 ) exhibited enhanced resistance to five bacterial blight isolates, indicating their wide-spectrum resistance to this pathogen. These results imply that some lesion mimic mutations of rice might be involved in disease resistance signaling pathways,and that isolation of these mutated genes may be useful for elucidating molecular mechanisms of plant disease resistance. Among the mutants, only one mutant, lm6, was preliminarily shown to cosegregate with the inserted T-DNA in its T1 generation, making it feasible to isolate the gene responsible for the phenotype of this mutant.

  6. Molecularly-imprinted polymers as synythetic mimics of bioreceptors. 2. Applications in modern biotechnology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sergeyeva T. A.

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available The review is devoted to the analysis of publications on the synthesis of artificial mimics of biological receptors as well as their application in biotechnology. The special attention is paid to such areas of biotechnology: sensor technology, solid-phase extraction, pseudoimmunoassay, and chromatography.

  7. A Lesion-Mimic Syntaxin Double Mutant in Arabidopsis Reveals Novel Complexity of Pathogen Defense Signaling

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ziguo Zhang; Hans Thordal-Christensen; Andrea Lenk; Mats X. Andersson; Torben Gjetting; Carsten Pedersen; Mads E. Nielsen; Marl-Anne Newman; Bi-Huei Hou; Shauna C. Somerville

    2008-01-01

    The lesion-mimicArabidopsis mutant, syp121 syp122, constitutively expresses the salicylic acid (SA) signaling pathway and has low penetration resistance to powdery mildew fungi. Genetic analyses of the lesion-mimic phenotype have expanded our understanding of programmed cell death (PCD) in plants. Inactivation of SA signaling genes in syp121 syp 122 only partially rescues the lesion-mimic phenotype, indicating that additional defenses contribute to the PCD. Whole genome transcriptome analysis confirmed that SA-induced transcripts, as well as numerous other known pathogenresponse transcripts, are up-regulated after inactivation of the syntaxin genes. A suppressor mutant analysis of syp121 syp122 revealed that FMO1, ALD1, and PAD4 are important for lesion development. Mutant alleles of EDS1, NDR1, RAR1, and SGT1b also partially rescued the lesion-mimic phenotype, suggesting that mutating syntaxin genes stimulates TIR-NB-LRR and CC-NB-LRR-type resistances. The syntaxin double knockout potentiated a powdery mildewinduced HR-like response. This required functional PAD4 but not functional SA signaling. However, SA signaling potentiated the PAD4-dependent HR-like response. Analyses of quadruple mutants suggest that EDS5 and SID2 confer separate SA-independent signaling functions, and that FMO1 and ALD1 mediate SA-independent signals that are NPRl-dependent.These studies highlight the contribution of multiple pathways to defense and point to the complexity of their interactions.

  8. Synergistic Effect of MiR-146a Mimic and Cetuximab on Hepatocellular Carcinoma Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Suning Huang

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Previously, we found that the expression of microRNA-146a (miR-146a was downregulated in hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded (FFPE tissues compared to the adjacent noncancerous hepatic tissues. In the current study, we have explored the in vitro effect of miR-146a on the malignant phenotypes of HCC cells. MiR-146a mimic could suppress cell growth and increase cellular apoptosis in HCC cell lines HepG2, HepB3, and SNU449, as assessed by spectrophotometry, fluorimetry, and fluorescence microscopy, respectively. Furthermore, western blot showed that miR-146a mimic downregulated EGFR, ERK1/2, and stat5 signalings. These effects were less potent compared to that of a siRNA targeting EGFR, a known target gene of miR-146a. Moreover, miR-146a mimic could enhance the cell growth inhibition and apoptosis induction impact of various EGFR targeting agents. The most potent combination was miR-146a mimic with cetuximab, presenting a synergistic effect. In conclusion, miR-146a plays a vital role in the cell growth and apoptosis of HCC cells and inducing miR-146a level might be a critical targeted molecular therapy strategy for HCC.

  9. Effect of the search image on the lizard ability to reveal a Batesian mimic

    OpenAIRE

    Beneš, Josef

    2016-01-01

    The effect of the search image on the ability of hand reared skinks (Chalcides sexlineatus) to reveal a "fake" Batesian mimic was tested with respect to their previous experience with palatable experimental prey (Guyana spotted cockroach Blaptica dubia) which served as a motivational prey as well as midsized mealworm beetle larvae (Tenebrio molitor). The red firebug (Pyrrhocoris apterus) was used as an aposematic model.

  10. Identification and Genetic Mapping of a Lesion Mimic Mutant in Rice

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    MA Jian-yang; CHEN Sun-lu; ZHANG Jian-hui; DONG Yan-jun; TENG Sheng

    2012-01-01

    A lesion mimic stripe mutant,designated as Ims1 (lesion mimic stripe 1),was obtained from the M2 progeny of a 60Co Y-radiation treated japonica rice variety Jiahua 1.The Ims1 mutant displayed propagation type lesions across the whole growth and developmental stages.Physiology and histochemistry analysis showed that the mutant exhibited a phenotype of white stripe when grown under high temperature (30 ℃),and the lesion mimic caused by programmed cell death under low temperature (20 ℃).The genetic analysis indicated that this lesion-mimic phenotype is controlled by a single locus recessive nuclear gene.Furthermore,by using simple sequence repeat markers and an F2 segregating population derived from two crosses of Ims1 × 93-11 and Ims1 × Pei'ai 64S,the Ims1 gene was mapped between markers Indel1 and MM0112-4 with a physical distance of 400 kb on chromosome 6 in rice.

  11. Pattern Differences of Small Hand Muscle Atrophy in Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis and Mimic Disorders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fang, Jia; Liu, Ming-Sheng; Guan, Yu-Zhou; Du, Hua; Li, Ben-Hong; Cui, Bo; Ding, Qing-Yun; Cui, Li-Ying

    2016-01-01

    Background: Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) and some mimic disorders, such as distal-type cervical spondylotic amyotrophy (CSA), Hirayama disease (HD), and spinobulbar muscular atrophy (SBMA) may present with intrinsic hand muscle atrophy. This study aimed to investigate different patterns of small hand muscle involvement in ALS and some mimic disorders. Methods: We compared the abductor digiti minimi/abductor pollicis brevis (ADM/APB) compound muscle action potential (CMAP) ratios between 200 ALS patients, 95 patients with distal-type CSA, 88 HD patients, 43 SBMA patients, and 150 normal controls. Results: The ADM/APB CMAP amplitude ratio was significantly higher in the ALS patients (P SBMA patients was similar to that of the normal controls (P = 0.862). An absent APB CMAP and an abnormally high ADM/APB CMAP amplitude ratio (≥4.5) were observed exclusively in the ALS patients. Conclusions: The different patterns of small hand muscle atrophy between the ALS patients and the patients with mimic disorders presumably reflect distinct pathophysiological mechanisms underlying different disorders, and may aid in distinguishing between ALS and mimic disorders. PMID:26996473

  12. Efficient Nuclear DNA Cleavage in Human Cancer Cells by Synthetic Bleomycin Mimics

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Li, Qian; van der Wijst, Monique G. P.; Kazemier, Hinke G.; Rots, Marianne G.; Roelfes, Gerard

    2014-01-01

    Iron complexes of N,N-bis(2-Pyridylmethyl)-N-bis(2-pyridyl)-methylamine (N4Py) have proven to be excellent synthetic mimics of the Bleomycins (BLMs), which are a family of natural antibiotics used clinically in the treatment of certain cancers. However, most investigations of DNA cleavage activity o

  13. The role of the hipermobile mimic muscules of midle face on the postrhinoplastic results

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hayk D. Yenokyan

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available In article questions of influence of mimic muscles on the remote results ринопластических operations are considered. Use Botox (botulotoxin type A for improvement of results rhinoplasties.

  14. Recent advances in compartmentalized synthetic architectures as drug carriers, cell mimics and artificial organelles

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    York-Durán, María José; Gallardo, Maria Godoy; Labay, Cédric Pierre

    2017-01-01

    significant research attention and these assemblies are proposed as candidate materials for a range of biomedical applications. In this Review article, the recent successes of multicompartment architectures as carriers for the delivery of therapeutic cargo or the creation of micro- and nanoreactors that mimic...

  15. Thyroid hormones and cardiovascular disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jabbar, Avais; Pingitore, Alessandro; Pearce, Simon H S; Zaman, Azfar; Iervasi, Giorgio; Razvi, Salman

    2017-01-01

    Myocardial and vascular endothelial tissues have receptors for thyroid hormones and are sensitive to changes in the concentrations of circulating thyroid hormones. The importance of thyroid hormones in maintaining cardiovascular homeostasis can be deduced from clinical and experimental data showing that even subtle changes in thyroid hormone concentrations - such as those observed in subclinical hypothyroidism or hyperthyroidism, and low triiodothyronine syndrome - adversely influence the cardiovascular system. Some potential mechanisms linking the two conditions are dyslipidaemia, endothelial dysfunction, blood pressure changes, and direct effects of thyroid hormones on the myocardium. Several interventional trials showed that treatment of subclinical thyroid diseases improves cardiovascular risk factors, which implies potential benefits for reducing cardiovascular events. Over the past 2 decades, accumulating evidence supports the association between abnormal thyroid function at the time of an acute myocardial infarction (MI) and subsequent adverse cardiovascular outcomes. Furthermore, experimental studies showed that thyroid hormones can have an important therapeutic role in reducing infarct size and improving myocardial function after acute MI. In this Review, we summarize the literature on thyroid function in cardiovascular diseases, both as a risk factor as well as in the setting of cardiovascular diseases such as heart failure or acute MI, and outline the effect of thyroid hormone replacement therapy for reducing the risk of cardiovascular disease.

  16. Biological effects of thyroid hormones

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. S. Saatov

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available The article presents the findings from the study on multifunctional effects of thyroid hormones in relation to normal and malignantly transformed tissues and cells. Both “rapid” and «slow» effects of thyroid hormones including calorigenic effects and effects over adenylate cyclase – cAMP system have been described. Thyroxin (Т4 has been established capable to inhibit proliferation and to induce apoptosis of cells carrying Т4 receptors on their membranes as well as to change course of metabolic processes under its effect. Spectrum of Т4 targets is quite broad to include not only cells of hormone-producing organs, to name those of the breast and the colon, but also other types of cells to name melanin-containing ones; Т4 effects resulting in reconstruction of presentation of regulatory proteins on the cell membrane surface to ultimately activate the process of cell apoptosis. Our findings help determine alternative paths for hormonal regulation of cell proliferation and apoptosis of cells of hormone-dependent tumors, breast cancer, in particular, upon impossibility to regulate the processes by conventional methods. This facilitates understanding mechanisms for activation of signal system of the breast cancer’s cells by hormones upon changes in expression of receptors on the cells’ surface, making possible development of novel strategy for replacement therapy of hormone-dependent tumors upon low efficacy of drug therapy.

  17. Selection of peptide mimics of HIV-1 epitope recognized by neutralizing antibody VRC01.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anton N Chikaev

    Full Text Available The ability to induce anti-HIV-1 antibodies that can neutralize a broad spectrum of viral isolates from different subtypes seems to be a key requirement for development of an effective HIV-1 vaccine. The epitopes recognized by the most potent broadly neutralizing antibodies that have been characterized are largely discontinuous. Mimetics of such conformational epitopes could be potentially used as components of a synthetic immunogen that can elicit neutralizing antibodies. Here we used phage display technology to identify peptide motifs that mimic the epitope recognized by monoclonal antibody VRC01, which is able to neutralize up to 91% of circulating primary isolates. Three rounds of biopanning were performed against 2 different phage peptide libraries for this purpose. The binding specificity of selected phage clones to monoclonal antibody VRC01 was estimated using dot blot analysis. The putative peptide mimics exposed on the surface of selected phages were analyzed for conformational and linear homology to the surface of HIV-1 gp120 fragment using computational analysis. Corresponding peptides were synthesized and checked for their ability to interfere with neutralization activity of VRC01 in a competitive inhibition assay. One of the most common peptides selected from 12-mer phage library was found to partially mimic a CD4-binding loop fragment, whereas none of the circular C7C-mer peptides was able to mimic any HIV-1 domains. However, peptides identified from both the 12-mer and C7C-mer peptide libraries showed rescue of HIV-1 infectivity in the competitive inhibition assay. The identification of epitope mimics may lead to novel immunogens capable of inducing broadly reactive neutralizing antibodies.

  18. Genotoxic potential of nonsteroidal hormones

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Topalović Dijana

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Hormones are cellular products involved in the regulation of a large number of processes in living systems, and which by their actions affect the growth, function and metabolism of cells. Considering that hormones are compounds normally present in the organism, it is important to determine if they can, under certain circumstances, lead to genetic changes in the hereditary material. Numerous experimental studies in vitro and in vivo in different systems, from bacteria to mammals, dealt with the mutagenic and genotoxic effects of hormones. This work presents an overview of the research on genotoxic effects of non­steroidal hormones, although possible changes of genetic material under their influence have not still been known enough, and moreover, investigations on their genotoxic influence have given conflicting results. The study results show that mechanisms of genotoxic effect of nonsteroidal hormones are manifested through the increase of oxidative stress by arising reactive oxygen species. A common mechanism of ROS occurence in thyroid hormones and catecholamines is through metabolic oxidation of their phenolic groups. Manifestation of insulin genotoxic effect is based on production of ROS by activation of NADPH isophorms, while testing oxytocin showed absence of genotoxic effect. Considering that the investigations on genotoxicity of nonsteroidal hormones demonstrated both positive and negative results, the explanation of this discordance involve limitations of test systems themselves, different cell types or biological species used in the experiments, different level of reactivity in vitro and in vivo, as well as possible variations in a tissue-specific expression. Integrated, the provided data contribute to better understanding of genotoxic effect of nonsteroidal hormones and point out to the role and mode of action of these hormones in the process of occurring of effects caused by oxidative stress. [Projekat Ministarstva nauke Republike

  19. contribution of growth hormone-releasing hormone and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    hormone (GHRH) and increased somatostatin secretion to this phenomenon. ... negative feedback effects of IGF-1 or combinations of these factors. Studies to ..... increase in lean body mass and reduction in adipose tissue.6. Reduced GH ...

  20. Neural and hormonal control of food hoarding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bartness, Timothy J; Keen-Rhinehart, E; Dailey, M J; Teubner, B J

    2011-09-01

    Many animals hoard food, including humans, but despite its pervasiveness, little is known about the physiological mechanisms underlying this appetitive behavior. We summarize studies of food hoarding in humans and rodents with an emphasis on mechanistic laboratory studies of species where this behavior importantly impacts their energy balance (hamsters), but include laboratory rat studies although their wild counterparts do not hoard food. The photoperiod and cold can affect food hoarding, but food availability is the most significant environmental factor affecting food hoarding. Food-deprived/restricted hamsters and humans exhibit large increases in food hoarding compared with their fed counterparts, both doing so without overeating. Some of the peripheral and central peptides involved in food intake also affect food hoarding, although many have not been tested. Ad libitum-fed hamsters given systemic injections of ghrelin, the peripheral orexigenic hormone that increases with fasting, mimics food deprivation-induced increases in food hoarding. Neuropeptide Y or agouti-related protein, brain peptides stimulated by ghrelin, given centrally to ad libitum-fed hamsters, duplicates the early and prolonged postfood deprivation increases in food hoarding, whereas central melanocortin receptor agonism tends to inhibit food deprivation and ghrelin stimulation of hoarding. Central or peripheral leptin injection or peripheral cholecystokinin-33, known satiety peptides, inhibit food hoarding. Food hoarding markedly increases with pregnancy and lactation. Because fasted and/or obese humans hoard more food in general, and more high-density/high-fat foods specifically, than nonfasted and/or nonobese humans, understanding the mechanisms underlying food hoarding could provide another target for behavioral/pharmacological approaches to curb obesity.

  1. Hormonal signaling in the gut.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Côté, Clémence D; Zadeh-Tahmasebi, Melika; Rasmussen, Brittany A; Duca, Frank A; Lam, Tony K T

    2014-04-25

    The gut is anatomically positioned to play a critical role in the regulation of metabolic homeostasis, providing negative feedback via nutrient sensing and local hormonal signaling. Gut hormones, such as cholecystokinin (CCK) and glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1), are released following a meal and act on local receptors to regulate glycemia via a neuronal gut-brain axis. Additionally, jejunal nutrient sensing and leptin action are demonstrated to suppress glucose production, and both are required for the rapid antidiabetic effect of duodenal jejunal bypass surgery. Strategies aimed at targeting local gut hormonal signaling pathways may prove to be efficacious therapeutic options to improve glucose control in diabetes.

  2. Hormonal Signaling in the Gut*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Côté, Clémence D.; Zadeh-Tahmasebi, Melika; Rasmussen, Brittany A.; Duca, Frank A.; Lam, Tony K. T.

    2014-01-01

    The gut is anatomically positioned to play a critical role in the regulation of metabolic homeostasis, providing negative feedback via nutrient sensing and local hormonal signaling. Gut hormones, such as cholecystokinin (CCK) and glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1), are released following a meal and act on local receptors to regulate glycemia via a neuronal gut-brain axis. Additionally, jejunal nutrient sensing and leptin action are demonstrated to suppress glucose production, and both are required for the rapid antidiabetic effect of duodenal jejunal bypass surgery. Strategies aimed at targeting local gut hormonal signaling pathways may prove to be efficacious therapeutic options to improve glucose control in diabetes. PMID:24577102

  3. Gut hormones and gastric bypass

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Holst, Jens J.

    2016-01-01

    , oxyntomodulin, neurotensin and peptide YY (PYY). However, some proximal hormones also show changes probably reflecting that the distribution of these hormones is not restricted to the bypassed segments of the gut. Thus, cholecystokinin responses are increased, whereas gastric inhibitory polypeptide responses......%. The increased insulin responses after the operation, one of the important mechanisms whereby these operations cause diabetes remission, is clearly due to a combination of the increased glucose absorption rates and the exaggerated GLP-1 secretion. The hormonal changes are therefore very important...

  4. Specific involvement of gonadal hormones in the functional maturation of growth hormone releasing hormone (GHRH) neurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gouty-Colomer, Laurie-Anne; Méry, Pierre-François; Storme, Emilie; Gavois, Elodie; Robinson, Iain C; Guérineau, Nathalie C; Mollard, Patrice; Desarménien, Michel G

    2010-12-01

    Growth hormone (GH) is the key hormone involved in the regulation of growth and metabolism, two functions that are highly modulated during infancy. GH secretion, controlled mainly by GH releasing hormone (GHRH), has a characteristic pattern during postnatal development that results in peaks of blood concentration at birth and puberty. A detailed knowledge of the electrophysiology of the GHRH neurons is necessary to understand the mechanisms regulating postnatal GH secretion. Here, we describe the unique postnatal development of the electrophysiological properties of GHRH neurons and their regulation by gonadal hormones. Using GHRH-eGFP mice, we demonstrate that already at birth, GHRH neurons receive numerous synaptic inputs and fire large and fast action potentials (APs), consistent with effective GH secretion. Concomitant with the GH secretion peak occurring at puberty, these neurons display modifications of synaptic input properties, decrease in AP duration, and increase in a transient voltage-dependant potassium current. Furthermore, the modulation of both the AP duration and voltage-dependent potassium current are specifically controlled by gonadal hormones because gonadectomy prevented the maturation of these active properties and hormonal treatment restored it. Thus, GHRH neurons undergo specific developmental modulations of their electrical properties over the first six postnatal weeks, in accordance with hormonal demand. Our results highlight the importance of the interaction between the somatotrope and gonadotrope axes during the establishment of adapted neuroendocrine functions.

  5. Network identification of hormonal regulation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel J Vis

    Full Text Available Relations among hormone serum concentrations are complex and depend on various factors, including gender, age, body mass index, diurnal rhythms and secretion stochastics. Therefore, endocrine deviations from healthy homeostasis are not easily detected or understood. A generic method is presented for detecting regulatory relations between hormones. This is demonstrated with a cohort of obese women, who underwent blood sampling at 10 minute intervals for 24-hours. The cohort was treated with bromocriptine in an attempt to clarify how hormone relations change by treatment. The detected regulatory relations are summarized in a network graph and treatment-induced changes in the relations are determined. The proposed method identifies many relations, including well-known ones. Ultimately, the method provides ways to improve the description and understanding of normal hormonal relations and deviations caused by disease or treatment.

  6. Controversies in hormone replacement therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Baziad

    2001-09-01

    Full Text Available Deficiency of estrogen hormone will result in either long-term or short-term health problems which may reduce the quality of life. There are numerous methods by which the quality of female life can be achieved. Since the problems occuring are due to the deficiency of estrogen hormone, the appropriate method to tackle the problem is by administration of estrogen hormone. The administration of hormone replacement therapy (HRT with estrogen may eliminate climacteric complaints, prevent osteoporosis, coronary heart disease, dementia, and colon cancer. Although HRT has a great deal of advantage, its use is still low and may result in controversies. These controversies are due to fact that both doctor and patient still hold on to the old, outmoded views which are not supported by numerous studies. Currently, the use of HRT is not only based on experience, or temporary observation, but more on evidence based medicine. (Med J Indones 2001; 10: 182-6Keywords: controversies, HRT

  7. Menopausal Hormone Therapy and Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Kidney (Renal Cell) Cancer Leukemia Liver Cancer Lung Cancer Lymphoma Pancreatic Cancer Prostate Cancer Skin Cancer Thyroid Cancer Uterine Cancer ... Myths and Misconceptions Diet Hormones Immunosuppression Infectious Agents Obesity Radiation Sunlight Tobacco Genetics NCI Cancer Genetics Services ...

  8. Measurement of the incretin hormones

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kuhre, Rune Ehrenreich; Wewer Albrechtsen, Nicolai Jacob; Hartmann, Bolette;

    2015-01-01

    The two incretin hormones, glucagon-like peptide 1 (GLP-1) and glucose-dependent insulinotropic peptide (GIP), are secreted from the gastrointestinal tract in response to meals and contribute to the regulation of glucose homeostasis by increasing insulin secretion. Assessment of plasma concentrat......The two incretin hormones, glucagon-like peptide 1 (GLP-1) and glucose-dependent insulinotropic peptide (GIP), are secreted from the gastrointestinal tract in response to meals and contribute to the regulation of glucose homeostasis by increasing insulin secretion. Assessment of plasma...... concentrations of GLP-1 and GIP is often an important endpoint in both clinical and preclinical studies and, therefore, accurate measurement of these hormones is important. Here, we provide an overview of current approaches for the measurement of the incretin hormones, with particular focus on immunological...

  9. Triazacyclophane (TAC)-scaffolded histidine and aspartic acid residues as mimics of non-heme metalloenzyme active sites

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Albada, H.B.; Soulimani, F.; Jacobs, H.J.F.; Versluis, C.; Weckhuysen, B.M.; Liskamp, R.M.J.

    2012-01-01

    We describe the synthesis and coordination behaviour to copper(II) of two close structural triazacyclophane-based mimics of two often encountered aspartic acid and histidine containing metalloenzyme active sites. Coordination of these mimics to copper(I) and their reaction with molecular oxygen lead

  10. Fe-TAML encapsulated inside mesoporous silica nanoparticles as peroxidase mimic: femtomolar protein detection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumari, Sushma; Dhar, Basab B; Panda, Chakadola; Meena, Abhishek; Sen Gupta, Sayam

    2014-08-27

    Peroxidase, such as horseradish peroxidase (HRP), conjugated to antibodies are routinely used for the detection of proteins via an ELISA type assay in which a critical step is the catalytic signal amplification by the enzyme to generate a detectable signal. Synthesis of functional mimics of peroxidase enzyme that display catalytic activity which far exceeds the native enzyme is extremely important for the precise and accurate determination of very low quantities of proteins (fM and lower) that is necessary for early clinical diagnosis. Despite great advancements, analyzing proteins of very low abundance colorimetrically, a method that is most sought after since it requires no equipment for the analysis, still faces great challenges. Most reported HRP mimics that show catalytic activity greater than native enzyme (∼10-fold) are based on metal/metal-oxide nanoparticles such as Fe3O4. In this paper, we describe a second generation hybrid material developed by us in which approximately 25,000 alkyne tagged biuret modified Fe-tetraamido macrocyclic ligand (Fe-TAML), a very powerful small molecule synthetic HRP mimic, was covalently attached inside a 40 nm mesoporous silica nanoparticle (MSN). Biuret-modified Fe-TAMLs represent one of the best small molecule functional mimics of the enzyme HRP with reaction rates in water close to the native enzyme and operational stability (pH, ionic strength) far exceeding the natural enzyme. The catalytic activity of this hybrid material is around 1000-fold higher than that of natural HRP and 100-fold higher than that of most metal/metal oxide nanoparticle based HRP mimics reported to date. We also show that using antibody conjugates of this hybrid material it is possible to detect and, most importantly, quantify femtomolar quantities of proteins colorimetrically in an ELISA type assay. This represents at least 10-fold higher sensitivity than other colorimetric protein assays that have been reported using metal/metal oxide

  11. Organizational Actions of Metabolic Hormones

    OpenAIRE

    Bouret, Sebastien G.

    2013-01-01

    Brain development is a complex and dynamic process, and many environmental factors have been found to influence the normal development of neural pathways. Cumulative evidence suggests that metabolic hormones that regulate the hypothalamic circuits that control energy homeostasis function in much the same way that sex steroids act on sexually dimorphic circuits. For example, although the effects of the adipocyte-derived hormone leptin were originally thought to be limited to the neural control...

  12. Does growth hormone cause cancer?

    OpenAIRE

    Jenkins, P.J.; Mukherjee, A.; Shalet, S. M.

    2006-01-01

    KEYWORDS - CLASSIFICATION: adverse effects;Acromegaly;Adult;Animals;cancer epidemiology;complications;Child;Child Development;Colorectal Neoplasms;deficiency;epidemiology;etiology;Evaluation;Growth Hormone;Human Growth Hormone;Humans;Insulin-Like Growth Factor I;mechanisms of carcinogenesis;Neoplasm Recurrence,Local;Neoplasms;Neoplasms,Multiple Primary;physiology;physiopathology;Risk Factors;secretion;therapy. The ability of GH, via its mediator peptide IGF-1, to influence regulation of ce...

  13. Simple hormones but complex signalling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vogler, Hannes; Kuhlemeier, Cris

    2003-02-01

    It has not been easy to make sense of the pleiotropic effects of plant hormones, especially of auxins; but now, it has become possible to study these effects within the framework of what we know about signal transduction in general. Changes in local auxin concentrations, perhaps even actively maintained auxin gradients, signal to networks of transcription factors, which in turn signal to downstream effectors. Transcription factors can also signal back to hormone biosynthetic pathways.

  14. Hormone therapy and ovarian borderline tumors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mørch, Lina Steinrud; Løkkegaard, Ellen; Andreasen, Anne Helms

    2012-01-01

    Little is known about the influence of postmenopausal hormone therapy on the risk of ovarian borderline tumors. We aimed at assessing the influence of different hormone therapies on this risk.......Little is known about the influence of postmenopausal hormone therapy on the risk of ovarian borderline tumors. We aimed at assessing the influence of different hormone therapies on this risk....

  15. Ghrelin: much more than a hunger hormone

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghrelin is a multifaceted gut hormone that activates its receptor, growth hormone secretagogue receptor (GHS-R). Ghrelin's hallmark functions are its stimulatory effects on growth hormone release, food intake and fat deposition. Ghrelin is famously known as the 'hunger hormone'. However, ample recen...

  16. The evolution of peptide hormones.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niall, H D

    1982-01-01

    Despite limitations in our present knowledge it is already possible to discern the main features of peptide hormone evolution, since the same mechanisms (and indeed the same hormone molecules) function in many different ways. This underlying unity of organization has its basis in the tendency of biochemical networks, once established, to survive and diversify. The most surprising recent findings in endocrinology have been the discovery of vertebrate peptide hormones in multiple sites within the same organism, and the reports, persuasive but requiring confirmation, of vertebrate hormones in primitive unicellular organisms (20, 20a). Perhaps the major challenge for the future is to define the roles and interactions of the many peptide hormones identified in brain (18). The most primitive bacteria and the human brain, though an enormous evolutionary distance apart, may have more in common than we have recognized until now. As Axelrod & Hamilton have pointed out in a recent provocative article, "The Evolution of Cooperation" (1), bacteria, though lacking a brain, are capable of adaptive behavior that can be analysed in terms of game theory. It is clear that we can learn a great deal about the whole evolutionary process from a study of the versatile and durable peptide hormones molecules.

  17. Steroid hormones and sleep regulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Terán-Pérez, G; Arana-Lechuga, Y; Esqueda-León, E; Santana-Miranda, R; Rojas-Zamorano, J Á; Velázquez Moctezuma, J

    2012-10-01

    In the search of the sleep substance, many studies have been addressed for different hormones, responsible for sleep-wake cycle regulation. In this article we mentioned the participation of steroid hormones, besides its role regulating sexual behavior, they influence importantly in the sleep process. One of the clearest relationships are that estrogen and progesterone have, that causing changes in sleep patterns associated with the hormonal cycles of women throughout life, from puberty to menopause and specific periods such as pregnancy and the menstrual cycle, including being responsible for some sleep disorders such as hypersomnia and insomnia. Another studied hormone is cortisol, a hormone released in stressful situations, when an individual must react to an extraordinary demand that threatens their survival, but also known as the hormone of awakening because the release peak occurs in the morning, although this may be altered in some sleep disorders like insomnia and mood disorders. Furthermore neurosteroids such as pregnanolone, allopregnanolone and pregnenolone are involved in the generation of slow wave sleep, the effect has been demonstrated in experimental animal studies. Thus we see that the sleep and the endocrine system saved a bidirectional relationship in which depends on each other to regulate different physiological processes including sleep.

  18. Natriuretic hormones in brain function

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David eLichtstein

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Natriuretic hormones include three groups of compounds: the natriuretic peptides (ANP, BNP and CNP, the gastrointestinal peptides (guanylin and uroguanylin, and endogenous cardiac steroids. These substances induce the kidney to excrete sodium and therefore participate in the regulation of sodium and water homeostasis, blood volume and blood pressure. In addition to their peripheral functions, these hormones act as neurotransmitters or neuromodulators in the brain. In this review, the established information on the biosynthesis, release and function of natriuretic hormones is discussed, with particular focus on their role in brain function. The available literature on the expression patterns of each of the natriuretic hormones and their receptors in the brain will be summarized, followed by the evidence for their roles in modulating brain function. Although numerous open questions exist regarding this issue, the available data support the notion that natriuretic hormones participate in the central regulation of blood pressure, neuroprotection, satiety, and various psychiatric conditions, including: anxiety, addiction and depressive disorders. In addition, the interactions between the different natriuretic hormones in the periphery and the brain are discussed.

  19. Growth Hormone and Endocrinopathies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, K. W.; Choe, K. O.; Park, C. Y.; Lee, H.; Son, H. Y.; Huh, K. B.; Ryu, K. J. [Yonsei University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    1979-03-15

    This is an analysis of 39 patients studied at the Yonsei Medical Center from January, 1976 to March 1979. Of these 35 patient were suspected of having hypothalamic insufficiency and subjected to the L-Dopa stimulation test to observe growth hormone secretary function while four acromegaly patient received the glucose loading test and L-Dopa stimulation test. The results are as follows: 1) The basal level of GH in the various disease was as follows: a) The basal level was lower than the control level but was not statistically significant b) In diabetes the mean value tended to higher than the control level but was not significant statistically c) In all four acromegaly patients the GH level was significantly higher than the control level 2) Of 13 patients with diabetes, nine had diabetic retinopathy, and of those nine, six showed increased L-Dopa response. However, of the four non retinopathic DM patients, only one showed increased response to L-Dopa. 3) Two patients out of ten with Sheehan's syndrome responded to L-Dopa stimulation. 4) One Patient of eight with pituitary chromophobe adenoma responded to L-Dopa stimulation. 5) Four acromegaly patients revealed 3 acidophilic adenoma and one chromophobe adenoma histologically. Of patients receiving the L-Dopa stimulation test. Two showed a paradoxical response. Two patients who received the glucose loading test showed suppressed response. 6) Of two craniopharyngioma patients, one showed increased GH response after L-Dopa stimulation. Increased response of GH after L-Dopa stimulation was seen in one two craniopharyngioma patients and also in one of two patients with short structure.

  20. A plant tendril mimic soft actuator with phototunable bending and chiral twisting motion modes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Meng; Lin, Bao-Ping; Yang, Hong

    2016-12-01

    In nature, plant tendrils can produce two fundamental motion modes, bending and chiral twisting (helical curling) distortions, under the stimuli of sunlight, humidity, wetting or other atmospheric conditions. To date, many artificial plant-like mechanical machines have been developed. Although some previously reported materials could realize bending or chiral twisting through tailoring the samples into various ribbons along different orientations, each single ribbon could execute only one deformation mode. The challenging task is how to endow one individual plant tendril mimic material with two different, fully tunable and reversible motion modes (bending and chiral twisting). Here we show a dual-layer, dual-composition polysiloxane-based liquid crystal soft actuator strategy to synthesize a plant tendril mimic material capable of performing two different three-dimensional reversible transformations (bending versus chiral twisting) through modulation of the wavelength band of light stimuli (ultraviolet versus near-infrared). This material has broad application prospects in biomimetic control devices.

  1. Idiopathic Hypertrophic Pyloric Stenosis in an Adult, a Potential Mimic of Gastric Carcinoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alireza Zarineh

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Primary or idiopathic hypertrophy of the pyloric muscle (IHPM is a rare entity with uncertain pathogenesis which both clinically and pathologically mimics gastric cancer. We present a rare late-occurring case of IHPM in a 71-year-old Caucasian man with no apparent predisposing factor. Imaging studies demonstrated gastric distension with air fluid levels and no evidence of extrinsic compression. At upper endoscopy, massive gastric distension and no evidence of any ulcer or other mucosal defects were observed. Microscopically, marked hypertrophy of muscularis mucosa with smooth muscle cells arranged in whorls and fascicles was present which gradually transitioned to normal areas. The muscle fibers stained with smooth muscle actin and trichrome stain highlighted fibrosis between the muscle fibers. Although uncommon, IHPM can clinically and histologically mimic other proliferations in the gastric wall, such as gastrointestinal stromal tumor or a spindle cell neoplasm. The recent advances in understanding the pathogenesis of IHPM are discussed.

  2. How well does cholesteryl hemisuccinate mimic cholesterol in saturated phospholipid bilayers?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kulig, W.; Tynkkynen, J.; Javanainen, M.

    2014-01-01

    Cholesteryl hemisuccinate is a detergent that is often used to replace cholesterol in crystallization of membrane proteins. Here we employ atomistic molecular dynamics simulations to characterize how well the properties of cholesteryl hemisuccinate actually match those of cholesterol in saturated...... protein-free lipid membranes. We show that the protonated form of cholesteryl hemisuccinate mimics many of the membrane properties of cholesterol quite well, while the deprotonated form of cholesteryl hemisuccinate is less convincing in this respect. Based on the results, we suggest that cholesteryl...... hemisuccinate in its protonated form is a quite faithful mimic of cholesterol for membrane protein crystallization, if specific cholesterol-protein interactions (not investigated here) are not playing a crucial role....

  3. Recognition of extended linear and cyclised polyketide mimics by a Type II acyl carrier protein

    OpenAIRE

    Dong, Xu; Bailey, Christopher; Williams, Christopher; Crosby, John; Simpson, Tom; Willis, Chris; Crump, Matthew

    2016-01-01

    Polyketides are secondary metabolites which display both valuable pharmaceutical and agrochemical properties. Biosynthesis is performed by polyketide synthases (PKSs), and the acyl carrier protein (ACP), a small acidic protein, that transports the growing polyketide chain and is essential for activity. Here we report the synthesis of two aromatic probes and a linear octaketide mimic that have been tethered to actinorhodin ACP. These experiments were aimed at probing the ACP’s capacity to sequ...

  4. Chemical UV Filters Mimic the Effect of Progesterone on Ca(2+) Signaling in Human Sperm Cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rehfeld, A; Dissing, S; Skakkebæk, N E

    2016-01-01

    Progesterone released by cumulus cells surrounding the egg induces a Ca(2+) influx into human sperm cells via the cationic channel of sperm (CatSper) Ca(2+) channel and controls multiple Ca(2+)-dependent responses essential for fertilization. We hypothesized that chemical UV filters may mimic...... competitively inhibited progesterone-induced Ca(2+) signals. In vivo exposure studies are needed to investigate whether UV filter exposure affects human fertility....

  5. Artificial cell mimics as simplified models for the study of cell biology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salehi-Reyhani, Ali; Ces, Oscar; Elani, Yuval

    2017-07-01

    Living cells are hugely complex chemical systems composed of a milieu of distinct chemical species (including DNA, proteins, lipids, and metabolites) interconnected with one another through a vast web of interactions: this complexity renders the study of cell biology in a quantitative and systematic manner a difficult task. There has been an increasing drive towards the utilization of artificial cells as cell mimics to alleviate this, a development that has been aided by recent advances in artificial cell construction. Cell mimics are simplified cell-like structures, composed from the bottom-up with precisely defined and tunable compositions. They allow specific facets of cell biology to be studied in isolation, in a simplified environment where control of variables can be achieved without interference from a living and responsive cell. This mini-review outlines the core principles of this approach and surveys recent key investigations that use cell mimics to address a wide range of biological questions. It will also place the field in the context of emerging trends, discuss the associated limitations, and outline future directions of the field. Impact statement Recent years have seen an increasing drive to construct cell mimics and use them as simplified experimental models to replicate and understand biological phenomena in a well-defined and controlled system. By summarizing the advances in this burgeoning field, and using case studies as a basis for discussion on the limitations and future directions of this approach, it is hoped that this minireview will spur others in the experimental biology community to use artificial cells as simplified models with which to probe biological systems.

  6. Molecularly imprinted polymers as synthetic mimics of bioreceptors. 1. General principles of molecular imprinting

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sergeyeva T. A.

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available The review is devoted to analysis of the publications in the area of synthesis of artificial mimics of biological receptors using the method of molecular imprinting. General principles of molecular imprinting as well as main types of polymers being used in molecular imprinting are described. The special attention is paid to the polymers-biomimics synthesized using the method of non-covalent molecular imprinting.

  7. Biomolecular Programming of Discrete Nanomaterials for Sensors, Templates and Mimics of Natural Nanoscale Assemblies

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-10-17

    AFRL-AFOSR-VA-TR-2016-0343 BIOMOLECULAR PROGRAMMING OF DISCRETE NANOMATERIALS FOR SENSORS, TEMPLATES AND MIMICS OF NATURAL NANOSCALE ASSEMBLIES...Performance 3. DATES COVERED (From - To) 01 Jun 2011 to 31 May 2016 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE BIOMOLECULAR PROGRAMMING OF DISCRETE NANOMATERIALS FOR SENSORS...responsive elements for assembly of complex morphology switchable nanomaterials , and have combined this with an effort in nature-inspired materials

  8. An electronic nose for the detection of Sarin, Soman and Tabun mimics and interfering agents

    OpenAIRE

    2014-01-01

    An electronic nose system (E-nose) with metal oxide semiconductor sensors (MOS) has been designed to discriminate and quantify different chemical warfare agents (CWA) mimics. The E-nose consists of an array of commercial MOS for different gases, two sensors for temperature sensing, a sample handling system, a data acquisition system and a laptop with the data acquisition system control. With this device, discrimination studies have been carried out to detect specific CWA simulants...

  9. Contact hypersensitivity to mercury in amalgam restorations may mimic oral lichen planus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Camisa, C; Taylor, J S; Bernat, J R; Helm, T N

    1999-03-01

    Oral lichenoid lesions caused by hypersensitivity to mercury in amalgam fillings may mimic oral lichen planus on clinical and histologic examination. A positive patch test reaction to more than one mercurial allergen increases confidence in the diagnosis and justifies the removal and replacement of all amalgam fillings with those made of other materials. A complete remission may be expected about 3 months after the last amalgam filling is removed.

  10. Evidence that Cerambycid Beetles Mimic Vespid Wasps in Odor as well as Appearance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitchell, Robert F; Curkovic, Tomislav; Mongold-Diers, Judith A; Neuteboom, Lara; Galbrecht, Hans-Martin; Tröger, Armin; Bergmann, Jan; Francke, Wittko; Hanks, Lawrence M

    2017-01-01

    We present evidence that cerambycid species that are supposed mimics of vespid wasps also mimic their model's odor by producing spiroacetals, common constituents of vespid alarm pheromones. Adults of the North American cerambycids Megacyllene caryae (Gahan) and Megacyllene robiniae (Forster) are conspicuously patterned yellow and black, and are believed to be mimics of aculeate Hymenoptera, such as species of Vespula and Polistes. Adult males of M. caryae produce an aggregation-sex pheromone, but both sexes produce a pungent odor when handled, which has been assumed to be a defensive response. Headspace aerations of agitated females of M. caryae contained 16 compounds with mass spectra characteristic of spiroacetals of eight distinct chemical structures, with the dominant compound being (7E,2E)-7-ethyl-2-methyl-1,6-dioxaspiro[4.5]decane. Headspace samples of agitated males of M. caryae contained five of the same components, with the same dominant compound. Females of M. robiniae produced six different spiroacetals, one of which was not produced by M. caryae, (2E,7E)-2-ethyl-7-methyl-1,6-dioxaspiro[4.5]decane, and five that were shared with M. caryae, including the dominant (2E,8E)-2,8-dimethyl-1,7-dioxaspiro[5.5]undecane. The latter compound is the sole spiroacetal produced by both males and females of a South American cerambycid species, Callisphyris apicicornis (Fairmaire & Germain), which is also thought to be a wasp mimic. Preliminary work also identified spiroacetals of similar or identical structure released by vespid wasps that co-occur with the Megacyllene species.

  11. Representing life in the Earth system with soil microbial functional traits in the MIMICS model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wieder, W. R.; Grandy, A. S.; Kallenbach, C. M.; Taylor, P. G.; Bonan, G. B.

    2015-06-01

    Projecting biogeochemical responses to global environmental change requires multi-scaled perspectives that consider organismal diversity, ecosystem processes, and global fluxes. However, microbes, the drivers of soil organic matter decomposition and stabilization, remain notably absent from models used to project carbon (C) cycle-climate feedbacks. We used a microbial trait-based soil C model with two physiologically distinct microbial communities, and evaluate how this model represents soil C storage and response to perturbations. Drawing from the application of functional traits used to model other ecosystems, we incorporate copiotrophic and oligotrophic microbial functional groups in the MIcrobial-MIneral Carbon Stabilization (MIMICS) model; these functional groups are akin to "gleaner" vs. "opportunist" plankton in the ocean, or r- vs. K-strategists in plant and animal communities. Here we compare MIMICS to a conventional soil C model, DAYCENT (the daily time-step version of the CENTURY model), in cross-site comparisons of nitrogen (N) enrichment effects on soil C dynamics. MIMICS more accurately simulates C responses to N enrichment; moreover, it raises important hypotheses involving the roles of substrate availability, community-level enzyme induction, and microbial physiological responses in explaining various soil biogeochemical responses to N enrichment. In global-scale analyses, we show that MIMICS projects much slower rates of soil C accumulation than a conventional soil biogeochemistry in response to increasing C inputs with elevated carbon dioxide (CO2) - a finding that would reduce the size of the land C sink estimated by the Earth system. Our findings illustrate that tradeoffs between theory and utility can be overcome to develop soil biogeochemistry models that evaluate and advance our theoretical understanding of microbial dynamics and soil biogeochemical responses to environmental change.

  12. Molecularly imprinted polymers as synthetic mimics of bioreceptors. 1. General principles of molecular imprinting

    OpenAIRE

    Sergeyeva T. A.

    2009-01-01

    The review is devoted to analysis of the publications in the area of synthesis of artificial mimics of biological receptors using the method of molecular imprinting. General principles of molecular imprinting as well as main types of polymers being used in molecular imprinting are described. The special attention is paid to the polymers-biomimics synthesized using the method of non-covalent molecular imprinting.

  13. Some tropical viral diseases that can mimic swine flu in pediatrics

    OpenAIRE

    Wiwanitkit, Viroj

    2009-01-01

    Abstract Swine flu is an important emerging infection that is presently pandemic around the world. The pediatric population is an important group that can be infected with swine flu. Generally, common presentations of swine flu include fever and respiratory presentations. However, there are several infections that can have similar presentations to swine flu. In this specific article, the author will briefly discuss on some tropical viral diseases that can mimic swine flu in pediatrics. ...

  14. Some tropical viral diseases that can mimic swine flu in pediatrics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Viroj WIWANITKIT

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available Swine flu is an important emerging infection that is presently pandemic around the world. The pediatric population is an important group that can be infected with swine flu. Generally, common presentations of swine flu include fever and respiratory presentations. However, there are several infections that can have similar presentations to swine flu. In this specific article, the author will briefly discuss on some tropical viral diseases that can mimic swine flu in pediatrics.

  15. Pattern Differences of Small Hand Muscle Atrophy in Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis and Mimic Disorders

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jia Fang; Ming-Sheng Liu; Yu-Zhou Guan; Hua Du; Ben-Hong Li; Bo Cui; Qing-Yun Ding

    2016-01-01

    Background:Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) and some mimic disorders,such as distal-type cervical spondylotic amyotrophy (CSA),Hirayama disease (HD),and spinobulbar muscular atrophy (SBMA) may present with intrinsic hand muscle atrophy.This study aimed to investigate different patterns of small hand muscle involvement in ALS and some mimic disorders.Methods:We compared the abductor digiti minimi/abductor pollicis brevis (ADM/APB) compound muscle action potential (CMAP) ratios between 200 ALS patients,95 patients with distal-type CSA,88 HD patients,43 SBMA patients,and 150 normal controls.Results:The ADM/APB CMAP amplitude ratio was significantly higher in the ALS patients (P < 0.001) than that in the normal controls.The ADM/APB CMAP amplitude ratio was significantly reduced in the patients with distal-type CSA (P < 0.001) and the HD patients (P < 0.001) compared with that in the normal controls.The patients with distal-type CSA had significantly lower APB CMAP amplitude than the HD patients (P =0.004).The ADM/APB CMAP amplitude ratio was significantly lower in the HD patients (P < 0.001) than that in the patients with distal-type CSA.The ADM/APB CMAP amplitude ratio of the SBMA patients was similar to that of the normal controls (P =0.862).An absent APB CMAP and an abnormally high ADM/APB CMAP amplitude ratio (>4.5) were observed exclusively in the ALS patients.Conclusions:The different patterns of small hand muscle atrophy between the ALS patients and the patients with mimic disorders presumably reflect distinct pathophysiological mechanisms underlying different disorders,and may aid in distinguishing between ALS and mimic disorders.

  16. The theory of modulated hormone therapy for the treatment of breast cancer in pre- and post-menopausal women

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Teresa S. Wiley

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available We present a theory that questions the standard of care for pre- and post-menopausal women with breast cancer. Through the use of modulated hormones to mimic the natural multiphasic fluctuations of estrogen and progesterone cycles of healthy young women, it can be expected that patients will not only exhibit increased quality of life such as better sleep, well-being, and libido, but also memory improvement and less joint pain. Additionally, this regimen may engage genetic pathways that protect women in youth from breast cancers. We present a mathematical basis for the coupling of the hormone cycles through the use of Gaussian curves that provides the foundation of a new format of hormone replacement in women.

  17. Recognition of extended linear and cyclised polyketide mimics by a type II acyl carrier protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dong, Xu; Bailey, Christopher D; Williams, Christopher; Crosby, John; Simpson, Thomas J; Willis, Christine L; Crump, Matthew P

    2016-03-01

    Polyketides are secondary metabolites which display both valuable pharmaceutical and agrochemical properties. Biosynthesis is performed by polyketide synthases (PKSs), and the acyl carrier protein (ACP), a small acidic protein, that transports the growing polyketide chain and is essential for activity. Here we report the synthesis of two aromatic probes and a linear octaketide mimic that have been tethered to actinorhodin ACP. These experiments were aimed at probing the ACP's capacity to sequester a non-polar versus a phenolic aromatic ring (that more closely mimics a polyketide intermediate) as well as investigations with extended polyketide chain surrogates. The binding of these mimics has been assessed using high-resolution solution NMR studies and high-resolution structure determination. These results reveal that surprisingly a PKS ACP is able to bind and sequester a bulky non-polar substrate containing an aromatic ring in a fatty acid type binding mode, but the introduction of even a small degree of polarity favours a markedly different association at a surface site that is distinct from that employed by fatty acid ACPs.

  18. Settlement pattern of Posidonia oceanica epibionts along a gradient of ocean acidification: an approach with mimics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. DONNARUMMA

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Effects of ocean acidification (OA on the colonization/settlement pattern of the epibiont community of the leaves and rhizomesof the Mediterranean seagrass,Posidoniaoceanica, have been studied at volcanic CO2vents off Ischia (Italy, using “mimics”as artificial substrates. The experiments were conducted in shallowPosidoniastands (2-3 m depth, in three stations on the northand three on the south sides of the study area, distributed along a pH gradient. At each station, 4 rhizome mimics and 6 artificialleaves were collected every three months (Sept 2009-Sept 2010. The epibionts on both leaf and rhizome mimics showed clearchanges along the pH gradient; coralline algae and calcareous invertebrates (bryozoans, serpulid polychaetes and barnacles weredominant at control stations but progressively disappeared at the most acidified stations. In these extremely low pH sites theassemblage was dominated by filamentous algae and non calcareous taxa such as hydroids and tunicates. Settlement pattern onthe artificial leaves and rhizome mimics over time showed a consistent distribution pattern along the pH gradient and highlightedthe peak of recruitment of the various organisms in different periods according to their life history.Posidoniamimics at theacidified station showed a poor and very simplified assemblage where calcifying epibionts seemed less competitive for space. Thisprofound difference in epiphyte communities in low pH conditions suggests cascading effects on the food web of the meadow and,consequently, on the functioning of the system

  19. Settlement pattern of Posidonia oceanica epibionts along a gradient of ocean acidification: an approach with mimics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. DONNARUMMA

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Effects of ocean acidification (OA on the colonization/settlement pattern of the epibiont community of the leaves and rhizomesof the Mediterranean seagrass,Posidoniaoceanica, have been studied at volcanic CO2vents off Ischia (Italy, using “mimics”as artificial substrates. The experiments were conducted in shallowPosidoniastands (2-3 m depth, in three stations on the northand three on the south sides of the study area, distributed along a pH gradient. At each station, 4 rhizome mimics and 6 artificialleaves were collected every three months (Sept 2009-Sept 2010. The epibionts on both leaf and rhizome mimics showed clearchanges along the pH gradient; coralline algae and calcareous invertebrates (bryozoans, serpulid polychaetes and barnacles weredominant at control stations but progressively disappeared at the most acidified stations. In these extremely low pH sites theassemblage was dominated by filamentous algae and non calcareous taxa such as hydroids and tunicates. Settlement pattern onthe artificial leaves and rhizome mimics over time showed a consistent distribution pattern along the pH gradient and highlightedthe peak of recruitment of the various organisms in different periods according to their life history.Posidoniamimics at theacidified station showed a poor and very simplified assemblage where calcifying epibionts seemed less competitive for space. Thisprofound difference in epiphyte communities in low pH conditions suggests cascading effects on the food web of the meadow and,consequently, on the functioning of the system

  20. Pd-Ir Core-Shell Nanocubes: A Type of Highly Efficient and Versatile Peroxidase Mimic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xia, Xiaohu; Zhang, Jingtuo; Lu, Ning; Kim, Moon J; Ghale, Kushal; Xu, Ye; McKenzie, Erin; Liu, Jiabin; Ye, Haihang

    2015-10-27

    Peroxidase mimics with dimensions on the nanoscale have received great interest as emerging artificial enzymes for biomedicine and environmental protection. While a variety of peroxidase mimics have been actively developed recently, limited progress has been made toward improving their catalytic efficiency. In this study, we report a type of highly efficient peroxidase mimic that was engineered by depositing Ir atoms as ultrathin skins (a few atomic layers) on Pd nanocubes (i.e., Pd-Ir cubes). The Pd-Ir cubes exhibited significantly enhanced efficiency, with catalytic constants more than 20- and 400-fold higher than those of the initial Pd cubes and horseradish peroxidase (HRP), respectively. As a proof-of-concept demonstration, the Pd-Ir cubes were applied to the colorimetric enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) of human prostate surface antigen (PSA) with a detection limit of 0.67 pg/mL, which is ∼110-fold lower than that of the conventional HRP-based ELISA using the same set of antibodies and the same procedure.

  1. Tunable Molecular MoS2 Edge-Site Mimics for Catalytic Hydrogen Production.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garrett, Benjamin R; Polen, Shane M; Click, Kevin A; He, Mingfu; Huang, Zhongjie; Hadad, Christopher M; Wu, Yiying

    2016-04-18

    Molybdenum sulfides represent state-of-the-art, non-platinum electrocatalysts for the hydrogen evolution reaction (HER). According to the Sabatier principle, the hydrogen binding strength to the edge active sites should be neither too strong nor too weak. Therefore, it is of interest to develop a molecular motif that mimics the catalytic sites structurally and possesses tunable electronic properties that influence the hydrogen binding strength. Furthermore, molecular mimics will be important for providing mechanistic insight toward the HER with molybdenum sulfide catalysts. In this work, a modular method to tune the catalytic properties of the S-S bond in MoO(S2)2L2 complexes is described. We studied the homogeneous electrocatalytic hydrogen production performance metrics of three catalysts with different bipyridine substitutions. By varying the electron-donating abilities, we present the first demonstration of using the ligand to tune the catalytic properties of the S-S bond in molecular MoS2 edge-site mimics. This work can shed light on the relationship between the structure and electrocatalytic activity of molecular MoS2 catalysts and thus is of broad importance from catalytic hydrogen production to biological enzyme functions.

  2. Antibacterial TAP-mimic Electrospun Polymer Scaffold – Effects on P. gingivalis-Infected Dentin Biofilm

    Science.gov (United States)

    Albuquerque, Maria Tereza P.; Evans, Joshua D.; Gregory, Richard L.; Valera, Marcia C.; Bottino, Marco C.

    2016-01-01

    Objectives This study sought to investigate, in-vitro, the effects of a recently developed triple antibiotic paste (TAP)-mimic polymer nanofibrous scaffold against Porphyromonas gingivalis (Pg)-infected dentin biofilm. Materials and Methods Dentin specimens (4×4×1mm3) were prepared from human canines. The specimens were sterilized, inoculated with Pg (ATCC 33277), and incubated for one week to allow for biofilm formation. Infected dentin specimens were exposed for 3 days to the following treatments: antibiotic-free polydioxanone scaffold (PDS, control), PDS+25wt.%TAP (25 mg of each antibiotic [metronidazole, ciprofloxacin, and minocycline] per mL of the PDS polymer solution), or a saturated TAP-based solution (50 mg of each antibiotic per mL of saline solution). In order to serve as the negative control, infected dentin specimens were left untreated (bacteria only). To determine the antimicrobial efficacy of the TAP-mimic scaffold, a colony-forming unit (CFU/mL) (n=10/group) measurement was performed. Furthermore, additional specimens (n=2/group) were prepared to qualitatively study biofilm inhibition via scanning electron microscopy (SEM). Statistics were performed and significance was set at the 5% level. Results Both the TAP-mimic scaffold and the positive control (TAP solution) led to complete bacterial elimination, differing statistically (pregenerative endodontics. PMID:26319981

  3. MiRNA mimic screen for improved expression of functional neurotensin receptor from HEK293 cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiao, Su; Chen, Yu-Chi; Betenbaugh, Michael J; Martin, Scott E; Shiloach, Joseph

    2015-08-01

    Obtaining adequate quantities of functional mammalian membrane proteins has been a bottleneck in their structural and functional studies because the expression of these proteins from mammalian cells is relatively low. To explore the possibility of enhancing expression of these proteins using miRNA, a stable T-REx-293 cell line expressing the neurotensin receptor type 1 (NTSR1), a hard-to-express G protein-coupled receptor (GPCR), was constructed. The cell line was then subjected to human miRNA mimic library screening. In parallel, an HEK293 cell line expressing luciferase was also screened with the same human miRNA mimic library. Five microRNA mimics: hsa-miR-22-5p, hsa-miR-18a-5p, hsa-miR-22-3p, hsa-miR-429, and hsa-miR-2110were identified from both screens. They led to 48% increase in the expression of functional NTSR1 and to 239% increase of luciferase expression. These miRNAs were also effective in enhancing the expression of secretedglypican-3 hFc-fusion protein from HEK293 cells.The results indicate that these molecules may have a wide role in enhancing the production of proteins with biomedical interest.

  4. A collection of target mimics for comprehensive analysis of microRNA function in Arabidopsis thaliana.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marco Todesco

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available Many targets of plant microRNAs (miRNAs are thought to play important roles in plant physiology and development. However, because plant miRNAs are typically encoded by medium-size gene families, it has often been difficult to assess their precise function. We report the generation of a large-scale collection of knockdowns for Arabidopsis thaliana miRNA families; this has been achieved using artificial miRNA target mimics, a recently developed technique fashioned on an endogenous mechanism of miRNA regulation. Morphological defects in the aerial part were observed for approximately 20% of analyzed families, all of which are deeply conserved in land plants. In addition, we find that non-cleavable mimic sites can confer translational regulation in cis. Phenotypes of plants expressing target mimics directed against miRNAs involved in development were in several cases consistent with previous reports on plants expressing miRNA-resistant forms of individual target genes, indicating that a limited number of targets mediates most effects of these miRNAs. That less conserved miRNAs rarely had obvious effects on plant morphology suggests that most of them do not affect fundamental aspects of development. In addition to insight into modes of miRNA action, this study provides an important resource for the study of miRNA function in plants.

  5. Virulent Burkholderia species mimic host actin polymerases to drive actin-based motility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benanti, Erin L.; Nguyen, Catherine M.; Welch, Matthew D.

    2015-01-01

    Summary Burkholderia pseudomallei and B. mallei are bacterial pathogens that cause melioidosis and glanders, while their close relative B. thailandensis is nonpathogenic. All use the trimeric autotransporter BimA to facilitate actin-based motility, host cell fusion and dissemination. Here, we show that BimA orthologs mimic different host actin-polymerizing proteins. B. thailandensis BimA activates the host Arp2/3 complex. In contrast, B. pseudomallei and B. mallei BimA mimic host Ena/VASP actin polymerases in their ability to nucleate, elongate and bundle filaments by associating with barbed ends, as well as in their use of WH2 motifs and oligomerization for activity. Mechanistic differences among BimA orthologs resulted in distinct actin filament organization and motility parameters, which affected the efficiency of cell fusion during infection. Our results identify bacterial Ena/VASP mimics and reveal that pathogens imitate the full spectrum of host actin-polymerizing pathways, suggesting that mimicry of different polymerization mechanisms influences key parameters of infection. PMID:25860613

  6. A search for symbiotic behaviour amongst OH/IR colour mimics

    CERN Document Server

    Seaquist, E R

    1994-01-01

    Recent maser surveys have shown that many potential OH/IR stars have no OH masers in their circumstellar envelopes, despite the modest requirements which should be implicitly met by IRAS colour-selected candidates. It has been suggested that these OH/IR colour mimics must have a degenerate companion which dissociates OH molecules and disrupts the masing action, ie. that they are related to symbiotic Miras. Coincidentally, there is a paucity of long-period symbiotic Miras and symbiotic OH/IR stars. Phenomonologically, those that are known seem to cluster in the zone where field Miras transform into OH/IR stars. If it could be proven that OH/IR colour mimics contain a degenerate star, that observable evidence of this star is hidden from view by CS dust whilst it slowly accretes from the wind of its Mira companion, then we have an excellent explanation for not only the existence of OH/IR colour mimics, but also for the low observed frequency of symbiotic OH/IR stars and the common occurrence of very slow novae i...

  7. Acetylation Mimics Within a Single Nucleosome Alter Local DNA Accessibility In Compacted Nucleosome Arrays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mishra, Laxmi N.; Pepenella, Sharon; Rogge, Ryan; Hansen, Jeffrey C.; Hayes, Jeffrey J.

    2016-01-01

    The activation of a silent gene locus is thought to involve pioneering transcription factors that initiate changes in the local chromatin structure to increase promoter accessibility and binding of downstream effectors. To better understand the molecular requirements for the first steps of locus activation, we investigated whether acetylation of a single nucleosome is sufficient to alter DNA accessibility within a condensed 25-nucleosome array. We found that acetylation mimics within the histone H4 tail domain increased accessibility of the surrounding linker DNA, with the increased accessibility localized to the immediate vicinity of the modified nucleosome. In contrast, acetylation mimics within the H3 tail had little effect, but were able to synergize with H4 tail acetylation mimics to further increase accessibility. Moreover, replacement of the central nucleosome with a nucleosome free region also resulted in increased local, but not global DNA accessibility. Our results indicate that modification or disruption of only a single target nucleosome results in significant changes in local chromatin architecture and suggest that very localized chromatin modifications imparted by pioneer transcription factors are sufficient to initiate a cascade of events leading to promoter activation. PMID:27708426

  8. MIMIC: An Innovative Methodology for Determining Mobile Laser Scanning System Point Density

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Conor Cahalane

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Understanding how various Mobile Mapping System (MMS laser hardware configurations and operating parameters exercise different influence on point density is important for assessing system performance, which in turn facilitates system design and MMS benchmarking. Point density also influences data processing, as objects that can be recognised using automated algorithms generally require a minimum point density. Although obtaining the necessary point density impacts on hardware costs, survey time and data storage requirements, a method for accurately and rapidly assessing MMS performance is lacking for generic MMSs. We have developed a method for quantifying point clouds collected by an MMS with respect to known objects at specified distances using 3D surface normals, 2D geometric formulae and line drawing algorithms. These algorithms were combined in a system called the Mobile Mapping Point Density Calculator (MIMIC and were validated using point clouds captured by both a single scanner and a dual scanner MMS. Results from MIMIC were promising: when considering the number of scan profiles striking the target, the average error equated to less than 1 point per scan profile. These tests highlight that MIMIC is capable of accurately calculating point density for both single and dual scanner MMSs.

  9. Bisphenol A and Hormone-Associated Cancers: Current Progress and Perspectives

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Hui; Yang, Bao-Jun; Li, Nan; Feng, Li-Min; Shi, Xiao-Yu; Zhao, Wei-Hong; Liu, Si-Jin

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Bisphenol A (BPA), a carbon-based synthetic compound, exhibits hormone-like properties and is present ubiquitously in the environment and in human tissues due to its widespread use and biological accumulation. BPA can mimic estrogen to interact with estrogen receptors α and β, leading to changes in cell proliferation, apoptosis, or migration and thereby, contributing to cancer development and progression. At the genetic level, BPA has been shown to be involved in multiple oncogenic signaling pathways, such as the STAT3, MAPK, and PI3K/AKT pathways. Moreover, BPA may also interact with other steroid receptors (such as androgen receptor) and plays a role in prostate cancer development. This review summarizes the current literature regarding human exposure to BPA, the endocrine-disrupting effects of BPA, and the role of BPA in hormone-associated cancers of the breast, ovary, and prostate. PMID:25569640

  10. Hormonal changes during 17 days of head-down bed-rest

    Science.gov (United States)

    Custaud, Marc-Antoine; Arnaud, Sara B.; Monk, Timothy H.; Claustrat, Bruno; Gharib, Claude; Gauquelin-Koch, Guillemette

    2003-01-01

    We investigated in six men the impact of 17 days of head-down bed rest (HDBR) on the daily rhythms of the hormones involved in hydroelectrolytic regulation. This HDBR study was designed to mimic a real space flight. Urine samples were collected at each voiding before, during and after HDBR. Urinary excretion of Growth Hormone (GH), Cortisol, 6 Sulfatoxymelatonin, Normetadrenaline (NMN) and Metadrenaline (NM) was determined. A decrease in urinary cortisol excretion during the night of HDBR was noted. For GH, a rhythm was found before and during HDBR. The rhythm of melatonin, evaluated with the urine excretion of 6 Sulfatoxymelatonin (aMT6S), the main hepatic metabolite, persisted throughout the experiment without any modification to the level of phase. A decrease during the night was noted for normetadrenaline urinary derivates, but only during the HDBR.

  11. Laboratory assessment of indigenous plant extracts for anti-juvenile hormone activity in Culex quinquefasciatus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saxena, R C; Dixit, O P; Sukumaran, P

    1992-07-01

    Of 15 plants tested, five plant extracts showed anti-juvenile hormone-like activity against laboratory colonised late fourth instar larvae and adult female mosquitoes. Petroleum ether extract of Eichhornia crassipes and acetone extracts of Ageratum conyzoides, Cleome icosandra, Tagetes erectes and Tridax procumbens showed growth inhibitory (P less than 0.001) and juvenile hormone mimicing activity to the treated larvae of C. quinquefasciatus.. Larval pupal intermediates, demalanised pupae, defective egg rafts and adult with deformed flight muscles were few noticeable changes. Biting behaviour was observed to be affected only in Ageratum, Cleome and Tridax extracts (P less than 0.001). Loss of fecundity was observed in the treated mosquitoes but no sterilant effects could be seen. Adults, obtained from larvae exposed to the plant extracts produced significantly shorter egg-rafts (P less than 0.005) than in control.

  12. Non-hormonal male contraception: A review and development of an Eppin based contraceptive.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Rand, Michael G; Silva, Erick J R; Hamil, Katherine G

    2016-01-01

    Developing a non-hormonal male contraceptive requires identifying and characterizing an appropriate target and demonstrating its essential role in reproduction. Here we review the development of male contraceptive targets and the current therapeutic agents under consideration. In addition, the development of EPPIN as a target for contraception is reviewed. EPPIN is a well characterized surface protein on human spermatozoa that has an essential function in primate reproduction. EPPIN is discussed as an example of target development, testing in non-human primates, and the search for small organic compounds that mimic contraceptive antibodies; binding EPPIN and blocking sperm motility. Although many hurdles remain before the success of a non-hormonal male contraceptive, continued persistence should yield a marketable product.

  13. Thyroid Hormone Deiodinases and Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Antonio eBianco

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Deiodinases constitute a group of thioredoxin-containing selenoenzymes that play an important function in thyroid hormone homeostasis and control of thyroid hormone action. There are three known deiodinases: D1 and D2 activate the pro-hormone thyroxine (T4 to T3, the most active form of thyroid hormone, while D3 inactivates thyroid hormone and terminates T3 action. A number of studies indicate that deiodinase expression is altered in several types of cancers, suggesting that (i they may represent a useful cancer marker and/or (ii could play a role in modulating cell proliferation - in different settings thyroid hormone modulates cell proliferation. For example, although D2 is minimally expressed in human and rodent skeletal muscle, its expression level in rhabdomyosarcoma (RMS-13 cells is 3-4 fold higher. In basal cell carcinoma (BCC cells, sonic hedgehog (Shh-induced cell proliferation is accompanied by induction of D3 and inactivation of D2. Interestingly a 5-fold reduction in the growth of BCC in nude mice was observed if D3 expression was knocked down. A decrease in D1 activity has been described in renal clear cell carcinoma, primary liver cancer, lung cancer, and some pituitary tumors, while in breast cancer cells and tissue there is an increase in D1 activity. Furthermore D1 mRNA and activity were found to be decreased in papillary thyroid cancer while D1 and D2 activities were significantly higher in follicular thyroid cancer tissue, in follicular adenoma and in anaplastic thyroid cancer. It is conceivable that understanding how deiodinase dysregulation in tumor cells affect thyroid hormone signaling and possibly interfere with tumor progression could lead to new antineoplastic approaches.

  14. The Effect of Small Sample Size on Measurement Equivalence of Psychometric Questionnaires in MIMIC Model: A Simulation Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jamshid Jamali

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Evaluating measurement equivalence (also known as differential item functioning (DIF is an important part of the process of validating psychometric questionnaires. This study aimed at evaluating the multiple indicators multiple causes (MIMIC model for DIF detection when latent construct distribution is nonnormal and the focal group sample size is small. In this simulation-based study, Type I error rates and power of MIMIC model for detecting uniform-DIF were investigated under different combinations of reference to focal group sample size ratio, magnitude of the uniform-DIF effect, scale length, the number of response categories, and latent trait distribution. Moderate and high skewness in the latent trait distribution led to a decrease of 0.33% and 0.47% power of MIMIC model for detecting uniform-DIF, respectively. The findings indicated that, by increasing the scale length, the number of response categories and magnitude DIF improved the power of MIMIC model, by 3.47%, 4.83%, and 20.35%, respectively; it also decreased Type I error of MIMIC approach by 2.81%, 5.66%, and 0.04%, respectively. This study revealed that power of MIMIC model was at an acceptable level when latent trait distributions were skewed. However, empirical Type I error rate was slightly greater than nominal significance level. Consequently, the MIMIC was recommended for detection of uniform-DIF when latent construct distribution is nonnormal and the focal group sample size is small.

  15. Gastrointestinal hormone research - with a Scandinavian annotation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rehfeld, Jens F

    2015-01-01

    Gastrointestinal hormones are peptides released from neuroendocrine cells in the digestive tract. More than 30 hormone genes are currently known to be expressed in the gut, which makes it the largest hormone-producing organ in the body. Modern biology makes it feasible to conceive the hormones...... as a blood-borne hormone, a neurotransmitter, a local growth factor or a fertility factor. The targets of gastrointestinal hormones are specific G-protein-coupled receptors that are expressed in the cell membranes also outside the digestive tract. Thus, gut hormones not only regulate digestive functions...... under five headings: The structural homology groups a majority of the hormones into nine families, each of which is assumed to originate from one ancestral gene. The individual hormone gene often has multiple phenotypes due to alternative splicing, tandem organization or differentiated posttranslational...

  16. Hormone therapy and ovarian cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mørch, Lina Steinrud; Løkkegaard, Ellen; Andreasen, Anne Helms

    2009-01-01

    CONTEXT: Studies have suggested an increased risk of ovarian cancer among women taking postmenopausal hormone therapy. Data are sparse on the differential effects of formulations, regimens, and routes of administration. OBJECTIVE: To assess risk of ovarian cancer in perimenopausal...... of Medicinal Product Statistics provided individually updated exposure information. The National Cancer Register and Pathology Register provided ovarian cancer incidence data. Information on confounding factors and effect modifiers was from other national registers. Poisson regression analyses with 5-year age...... bands included hormone exposures as time-dependent covariates. PARTICIPANTS: A total of 909,946 women without hormone-sensitive cancer or bilateral oophorectomy. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURE: Ovarian cancer. RESULTS: In an average of 8.0 years of follow-up (7.3 million women-years), 3068 incident ovarian...

  17. Electrochemical biosensors for hormone analyses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bahadır, Elif Burcu; Sezgintürk, Mustafa Kemal

    2015-06-15

    Electrochemical biosensors have a unique place in determination of hormones due to simplicity, sensitivity, portability and ease of operation. Unlike chromatographic techniques, electrochemical techniques used do not require pre-treatment. Electrochemical biosensors are based on amperometric, potentiometric, impedimetric, and conductometric principle. Amperometric technique is a commonly used one. Although electrochemical biosensors offer a great selectivity and sensitivity for early clinical analysis, the poor reproducible results, difficult regeneration steps remain primary challenges to the commercialization of these biosensors. This review summarizes electrochemical (amperometric, potentiometric, impedimetric and conductometric) biosensors for hormone detection for the first time in the literature. After a brief description of the hormones, the immobilization steps and analytical performance of these biosensors are summarized. Linear ranges, LODs, reproducibilities, regenerations of developed biosensors are compared. Future outlooks in this area are also discussed.

  18. [Women, immunity and sexual hormones].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Denenberg, R

    1995-01-01

    How a weakened immune system affects the female's reproductive system is explained. The female's endocrine system controls the menstrual and reproductive systems, and the immune system attacks harmful substances and organisms. The hypothalamus stimulates the pituitary gland to produce the hormones FSH and LH, which in turn signal the ovaries to produce estrogen and progesterone. These hormones cause a mature egg to be released. If fertilized, the egg remains within the uterus; if not, menstruation occurs. HIV-positive females often complain of menstrual cycle changes, such as irregular periods, depression, or pain. The virus, other complications, or medications, such as AZT, may cause these symptoms. Estrogen therapy may help those with suppressed immune systems who have premature menopause. Oral contraceptives offer protection against pregnancy, but not HIV. It is not known if the pill reacts adversely with AIDS treatment drugs. Lists are provided showing the pros and cons of oral contraceptives and hormone therapy.

  19. Hormones and prostate cancer: what's next?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsing, A W

    2001-01-01

    In summary, the hormonal hypothesis remains one of the most important hypotheses in prostate cancer etiology. Although epidemiologic data regarding the role of hormones are still inconclusive, there are many intriguing leads. Armed with more complete methodological data, state-of-the-art hormone assays, sound epidemiologic design, and a more thorough analytical approach, a new generation of studies should yield critical data and insights to help clarify further the role of hormones in prostate cancer. These new studies may determine ultimately whether racial/ethnic differences in hormonal levels and in genetic susceptibility to hormone-metabolizing genes can help explain the very large racial/ethnic differences in prostate cancer risk.

  20. Advances in male hormonal contraception

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Costantino Antonietta

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Contraception is a basic human right for its role on health, quality of life and wellbeing of the woman and of the society as a whole. Since the introduction of female hormonal contraception the responsibility of family planning has always been with women. Currently there are only a few contraceptive methods available for men, but recently, men have become more interested in supporting their partners actively. Over the last few decades different trials have been performed providing important advances in the development of a safe and effective hormonal contraceptive for men. This paper summarizes some of the most recent trials.

  1. Differential Juvenile Hormone Variations in Scale Insect Extreme Sexual Dimorphism.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Isabelle Mifom Vea

    Full Text Available Scale insects have evolved extreme sexual dimorphism, as demonstrated by sedentary juvenile-like females and ephemeral winged males. This dimorphism is established during the post-embryonic development; however, the underlying regulatory mechanisms have not yet been examined. We herein assessed the role of juvenile hormone (JH on the diverging developmental pathways occurring in the male and female Japanese mealybug Planococcus kraunhiae (Kuwana. We provide, for the first time, detailed gene expression profiles related to JH signaling in scale insects. Prior to adult emergence, the transcript levels of JH acid O-methyltransferase, encoding a rate-limiting enzyme in JH biosynthesis, were higher in males than in females, suggesting that JH levels are higher in males. Furthermore, male quiescent pupal-like stages were associated with higher transcript levels of the JH receptor gene, Methoprene-tolerant and its co-activator taiman, as well as the JH early-response genes, Krüppel homolog 1 and broad. The exposure of male juveniles to an ectopic JH mimic prolonged the expression of Krüppel homolog 1 and broad, and delayed adult emergence by producing a supernumeral pupal stage. We propose that male wing development is first induced by up-regulated JH signaling compared to female expression pattern, but a decrease at the end of the prepupal stage is necessary for adult emergence, as evidenced by the JH mimic treatments. Furthermore, wing development seems linked to JH titers as JHM treatments on the pupal stage led to wing deformation. The female pedomorphic appearance was not reflected by the maintenance of high levels of JH. The results in this study suggest that differential variations in JH signaling may be responsible for sex-specific and radically different modes of metamorphosis.

  2. Differential Juvenile Hormone Variations in Scale Insect Extreme Sexual Dimorphism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vea, Isabelle Mifom; Tanaka, Sayumi; Shiotsuki, Takahiro; Jouraku, Akiya; Tanaka, Toshiharu; Minakuchi, Chieka

    2016-01-01

    Scale insects have evolved extreme sexual dimorphism, as demonstrated by sedentary juvenile-like females and ephemeral winged males. This dimorphism is established during the post-embryonic development; however, the underlying regulatory mechanisms have not yet been examined. We herein assessed the role of juvenile hormone (JH) on the diverging developmental pathways occurring in the male and female Japanese mealybug Planococcus kraunhiae (Kuwana). We provide, for the first time, detailed gene expression profiles related to JH signaling in scale insects. Prior to adult emergence, the transcript levels of JH acid O-methyltransferase, encoding a rate-limiting enzyme in JH biosynthesis, were higher in males than in females, suggesting that JH levels are higher in males. Furthermore, male quiescent pupal-like stages were associated with higher transcript levels of the JH receptor gene, Methoprene-tolerant and its co-activator taiman, as well as the JH early-response genes, Krüppel homolog 1 and broad. The exposure of male juveniles to an ectopic JH mimic prolonged the expression of Krüppel homolog 1 and broad, and delayed adult emergence by producing a supernumeral pupal stage. We propose that male wing development is first induced by up-regulated JH signaling compared to female expression pattern, but a decrease at the end of the prepupal stage is necessary for adult emergence, as evidenced by the JH mimic treatments. Furthermore, wing development seems linked to JH titers as JHM treatments on the pupal stage led to wing deformation. The female pedomorphic appearance was not reflected by the maintenance of high levels of JH. The results in this study suggest that differential variations in JH signaling may be responsible for sex-specific and radically different modes of metamorphosis.

  3. Plasma hormones facilitated the hypermotility of the colon in a chronic stress rat model.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chengbai Liang

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: To study the relationship between brain-gut peptides, gastrointestinal hormones and altered motility in a rat model of repetitive water avoidance stress (WAS, which mimics the irritable bowel syndrome (IBS. METHODS: Male Wistar rats were submitted daily to 1-h of water avoidance stress (WAS or sham WAS (SWAS for 10 consecutive days. Plasma hormones were determined using Enzyme Immunoassay Kits. Proximal colonic smooth muscle (PCSM contractions were studied in an organ bath system. PCSM cells were isolated by enzymatic digestion and IKv and IBKca were recorded by the patch-clamp technique. RESULTS: The number of fecal pellets during 1 h of acute restraint stress and the plasma hormones levels of substance P (SP, thyrotropin-releasing hormone (TRH, motilin (MTL, and cholecystokinin (CCK in WAS rats were significantly increased compared with SWAS rats, whereas vasoactive intestinal peptide (VIP, calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP and corticotropin releasing hormone (CRH in WAS rats were not significantly changed and peptide YY (PYY in WAS rats was significantly decreased. Likewise, the amplitudes of spontaneous contractions of PCSM in WAS rats were significantly increased comparing with SWAS rats. The plasma of WAS rats (100 µl decreased the amplitude of spontaneous contractions of controls. The IKv and IBKCa of PCSMs were significantly decreased in WAS rats compared with SWAS rats and the plasma of WAS rats (100 µl increased the amplitude of IKv and IBKCa in normal rats. CONCLUSION: These results suggest that WAS leads to changes of plasma hormones levels and to disordered myogenic colonic motility in the short term, but that the colon rapidly establishes a new equilibrium to maintain the normal baseline functioning.

  4. Model for biological communication in a nanofabricated cell-mimic driven by stochastic resonance

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Karig, David K [ORNL; Siuti, Piro [ORNL; Dar, Roy D. [University of Tennessee, Knoxville (UTK); Retterer, Scott T [ORNL; Doktycz, Mitchel John [ORNL; Simpson, Michael L [ORNL

    2011-01-01

    Cells offer natural examples of highly efficient networks of nanomachines. Accordingly, both intracellular and intercellular communication mechanisms in nature are looked to as a source of inspiration and instruction for engineered nanocommunication. Harnessing biological functionality in this manner requires an interdisciplinary approach that integrates systems biology, synthetic biology, and nanofabrication. Recent years have seen the amassing of a tremendous wealth of data from the sequencing of new organisms and from high throughput expression experiments. At the same time, a deeper fundamental understanding of individual cell function has been developed, as exemplified by the growth of fields such as noise biology, which seeks to characterize the role of noise in gene expression. The availability of well characterized biological components coupled with a deeper understanding of cell function has led to efforts to engineer both living cells and to create bio-like functionality in non-living substrates in the field of synthetic biology. Here, we present a model system that exemplifies the synergism between these realms of research. We propose a synthetic gene network for operation in a nanofabricated cell mimic array that propagates a biomolecular signal over long distances using the phenomenon of stochastic resonance. Our system consists of a bacterial quorum sensing signal molecule, a bistable genetic switch triggered by this signal, and an array of nanofabricated cell mimic wells that contain the genetic system. An optimal level of noise in the system helps to propagate a time-varying AHL signal over long distances through the array of mimics. This noise level is determined both by the system volume and by the parameters of the genetic network. Our proposed genetically driven stochastic resonance system serves as a testbed for exploring the potential harnessing of gene expression noise to aid in the transmission of a time-varying molecular signal.

  5. Language barriers between physicians and patients are not associated with thrombolysis of stroke mimics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rostanski, Sara K; Williams, Olajide; Stillman, Joshua I; Marshall, Randolph S; Willey, Joshua Z

    2016-10-01

    Acute stroke is a time-sensitive condition in which rapid diagnosis must be made in order for thrombolytic treatment to be administered. A certain proportion of patients who receive thrombolysis will be found on further evaluation to have a diagnosis other than stroke, so-called "stroke mimics." Little is known about the role of language discordance in the emergency department diagnosis of acute ischemic stroke. This is a retrospective analysis of all acute ischemic stroke patients who received IV tissue plasminogen activator (tPA) in our emergency department between July 2011 and December 2015. Baseline characteristics, patient language, and final diagnosis were compared between encounters in which the treating neurologist and patient spoke the same language (concordant cases) and encounters in which they did not (discordant cases). A total of 350 patients received IV tPA during the study period. English was the primary language for 52.6%, Spanish for 44.9%, and other languages for 2.6%; 60.3% of cases were classified as language concordant and 39.7% as discordant. We found no significant difference in the proportion of stroke mimics in the language concordant compared to discordant groups (16.6% vs 9.4%, p = 0.06). Similarly, the proportion of stroke mimics did not differ between English- and Spanish-speaking patients (15.8% vs 11.5%, p = 0.27). Language discordance was not associated with acute stroke misdiagnosis among patients treated with IV tPA. Prospective evaluation of communication during acute stroke encounters is needed to gain clarity on the role of language discordance in acute stroke misdiagnosis.

  6. Representing life in the Earth system with soil microbial functional traits in the MIMICS model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    W. R. Wieder

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Projecting biogeochemical responses to global environmental change requires multi-scaled perspectives that consider organismal diversity, ecosystem processes and global fluxes. However, microbes, the drivers of soil organic matter decomposition and stabilization, remain notably absent from models used to project carbon cycle–climate feedbacks. We used a microbial trait-based soil carbon (C model, with two physiologically distinct microbial communities to improve current estimates of soil C storage and their likely response to perturbations. Drawing from the application of functional traits used to model other ecosystems, we incorporate copiotrophic and oligotrophic microbial functional groups in the MIcrobial-MIneral Carbon Stabilization (MIMICS model, which incorporates oligotrophic and copiotrophic functional groups, akin to "gleaner" vs. "opportunist" plankton in the ocean, or r vs. K strategists in plant and animals communities. Here we compare MIMICS to a conventional soil C model, DAYCENT, in cross-site comparisons of nitrogen (N enrichment effects on soil C dynamics. MIMICS more accurately simulates C responses to N enrichment; moreover, it raises important hypotheses involving the roles of substrate availability, community-level enzyme induction, and microbial physiological responses in explaining various soil biogeochemical responses to N enrichment. In global-scale analyses, we show that current projections from Earth system models likely overestimate the strength of the land C sink in response to increasing C inputs with elevated carbon dioxide (CO2. Our findings illustrate that tradeoffs between theory and utility can be overcome to develop soil biogeochemistry models that evaluate and advance our theoretical understanding of microbial dynamics and soil biogeochemical responses to environmental change.

  7. Macrocyclic beta-sheet peptides that mimic protein quaternary structure through intermolecular beta-sheet interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khakshoor, Omid; Demeler, Borries; Nowick, James S

    2007-05-02

    This paper reports the design, synthesis, and characterization of a family of cyclic peptides that mimic protein quaternary structure through beta-sheet interactions. These peptides are 54-membered-ring macrocycles comprising an extended heptapeptide beta-strand, two Hao beta-strand mimics [JACS 2000, 122, 7654] joined by one additional alpha-amino acid, and two delta-linked ornithine beta-turn mimics [JACS 2003, 125, 876]. Peptide 3a, as the representative of these cyclic peptides, contains a heptapeptide sequence (TSFTYTS) adapted from the dimerization interface of protein NuG2 [PDB ID: 1mio]. 1H NMR studies of aqueous solutions of peptide 3a show a partially folded monomer in slow exchange with a strongly folded oligomer. NOE studies clearly show that the peptide self-associates through edge-to-edge beta-sheet dimerization. Pulsed-field gradient (PFG) NMR diffusion coefficient measurements and analytical ultracentrifugation (AUC) studies establish that the oligomer is a tetramer. Collectively, these experiments suggest a model in which cyclic peptide 3a oligomerizes to form a dimer of beta-sheet dimers. In this tetrameric beta-sheet sandwich, the macrocyclic peptide 3a is folded to form a beta-sheet, the beta-sheet is dimerized through edge-to-edge interactions, and this dimer is further dimerized through hydrophobic face-to-face interactions involving the Phe and Tyr groups. Further studies of peptides 3b-3n, which are homologues of peptide 3a with 1-6 variations in the heptapeptide sequence, elucidate the importance of the heptapeptide sequence in the folding and oligomerization of this family of cyclic peptides. Studies of peptides 3b-3g show that aromatic residues across from Hao improve folding of the peptide, while studies of peptides 3h-3n indicate that hydrophobic residues at positions R3 and R5 of the heptapeptide sequence are important in oligomerization.

  8. Synthetic mimic of antimicrobial peptide with nonmembrane-disrupting antibacterial properties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gabriel, Gregory J; Madkour, Ahmad E; Dabkowski, Jeffrey M; Nelson, Christopher F; Nüsslein, Klaus; Tew, Gregory N

    2008-11-01

    Polyguanidinium oxanorbornene ( PGON) was synthesized from norbornene monomers via ring-opening metathesis polymerization. This polymer was observed to be strongly antibacterial against Gram-negative and Gram-positive bacteria as well as nonhemolytic against human red blood cells. Time-kill studies indicated that this polymer is lethal and not just bacteriostatic. In sharp contrast to previously reported SMAMPs (synthetic mimics of antimicrobial peptides), PGON did not disrupt membranes in vesicle-dye leakage assays and microscopy experiments. The unique biological properties of PGON, in same ways similar to cell-penetrating peptides, strongly encourage the examination of other novel guanidino containing macromolecules as powerful and selective antimicrobial agents.

  9. [Often an orthopedic problem can manifest as chest pain. Cervical vertebrae syndrome mimics myocardial infarct].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fromm, B

    2002-04-25

    Up to 20% of all patients with pectoral symptoms have an underlying orthopedic problem. The most common orthopedic conditions that may mimic chest pain radiating into the left arm include slipped disc, cervicothoracic tension syndrome, blockage of intervertebral or rib joints, and intercostal neuralgia. Less common causes of such pain are arthrosis of the shoulder, spondylocystitis, osteoporotic fractures or tumors of the bone. Management is oriented to the underlying cause, and treatment extends from physiotherapeutic measures (rest, heat treatment) via medication (non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, myotonolytic agents) to operative interventions.

  10. Cholesterol atheroembolism of the colon can mimic the endoscopic features of pseudomembranous colitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lim, Geok-Hoon; Roslani, April Camilla; Pang, Brendan; Bih-Shiou, Charles Tsang

    2008-12-01

    The endoscopic features of cholesterol atheroembolism affecting the colon have not been extensively described in the literature, owing to the rarity of this entity. We report a middle-aged man who presented with hematochezia after recent coronary artery bypass graft surgery. Colonoscopy revealed ulcerative skip lesions with overlying slough resembling pseudomembranes distal to the transverse colon, inconsistent with the initial clinical impression of ischemic colitis. As a consequence of continued bleeding with hemodynamic instability, the patient underwent an extended low anterior resection with end transverse colostomy. Histology revealed cholesterol atheroembolism resulting in patchy ischemic ulceration of the colon. Colonic cholesterol atheroembolism can mimic the endoscopic features of pseudomembranous colitis.

  11. Chondromyxoid fibroma of the rib mimics a chondrosarcoma on 18F-FDG PET/CT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Makis, William (Dept. of Nuclear Medicine, Brandon Regional Health Centre, Brandon (Canada)), email: makisw79@yahoo.com; Ciarallo, Anthony; Lisbona, Robert (Dept. of Nuclear Medicine, Royal Victoria Hospital, McGill Univ. Health Centre, Montreal (Canada))

    2011-06-15

    Chondromyxoid fibroma (CMF) is a rare benign bone tumor of chondroid origin that occurs mostly in the metaphyses of long bones. CMF can occasionally mimic a chondrosarcoma on CT, and the literature on the 18F-FDG PET/CT imaging characteristics of CMF tumors is limited. In the presented case, a large histologically proven CMF chest wall mass was initially misinterpreted as a chondrosarcoma. This case highlights a potential pitfall in the PET/CT evaluation of these rare benign bone tumors

  12. Tsukamurella: an unrecognized mimic of atypical mycobacterial keratitis? The first case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tam, Patrick M K; Young, Alvin L; Cheng, Lulu; Congdon, Nathan; Lam, Philip T H

    2010-03-01

    The purpose of this study was to report on Tsukamurella as a mimic of atypical mycobacterial infection. We report a patient who had received repeated corneal grafts with culture-proven Tsukamurella keratitis. A slow-progressing corneal abscess that initially developed adjacent to a corneal stitch responded poorly to empiric antibiotic treatment. A preliminary culture report revealed fast-growing mycobacterial species. Treatment adjustments successfully controlled the disease. A final diagnosis of Tsukamurella was subsequently made on the basis of cultures. Tsukamurella exhibits laboratory similarities to mycobacteria and should be considered in the differential of atypical infection of the ocular surface.

  13. Synthesis and Evaluation of Heterocyclic Catechol Mimics as Inhibitors of Catechol-O-methyltransferase (COMT)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-01-01

    3-Hydroxy-4-pyridinones and 5-hydroxy-4-pyrimidinones were identified as inhibitors of catechol-O-methyltransferase (COMT) in a high-throughput screen. These heterocyclic catechol mimics exhibit potent inhibition of the enzyme and an improved toxicity profile versus the marketed nitrocatechol inhibitors tolcapone and entacapone. Optimization of the series was aided by X-ray cocrystal structures of the novel inhibitors in complex with COMT and cofactors SAM and Mg2+. The crystal structures suggest a mechanism of inhibition for these heterocyclic inhibitors distinct from previously disclosed COMT inhibitors. PMID:25815153

  14. Race-related cognitive test bias in the active study: a mimic model approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aiken Morgan, Adrienne T; Marsiske, Michael; Dzierzewski, Joseph M; Jones, Richard N; Whitfield, Keith E; Johnson, Kathy E; Cresci, Mary K

    2010-10-01

    The present study investigated evidence for race-related test bias in cognitive measures used in the baseline assessment of the ACTIVE clinical trial. Test bias against African Americans has been documented in both cognitive aging and early life span studies. Despite significant mean performance differences, Multiple Indicators Multiple Causes (MIMIC) models suggested most differences were at the construct level. There was little evidence that specific measures put either group at particular advantage or disadvantage and little evidence of cognitive test bias in this sample. Small group differences in education, cognitive status, and health suggest positive selection may have attenuated possible biases.

  15. Multiple Myeloma Presenting as Massive Amyloid Deposition in a Parathyroid Gland Associated with Amyloid Goiter: A Medullary Thyroid Carcinoma Mimic on Intra-operative Frozen Section.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hill, Kirk; Diaz, Jason; Hagemann, Ian S; Chernock, Rebecca D

    2017-09-06

    Clinical examples of amyloid deposition in parathyroid glands are exceedingly rare and usually present as an incidental finding in a patient with amyloid goiter. Here, we present the first histologically documented case of parathyroid amyloid deposition that presented as a mass. The patient did not have hyperparathyroidism. The parathyroid gland was submitted for intra-operative frozen section and concern for medullary thyroid carcinoma was raised. An important histologic clue arguing against medullary thyroid carcinoma was the evenly dispersed nature of the amyloid. Histologic perinuclear clearing and parathyroid hormone immunohistochemistry confirmed parathyroid origin on permanent sections. The patient was also found to have associated amyloid goiter. Mass spectrometry of the amyloid showed it to be composed of kappa light chains. On further work-up, the patient was diagnosed with multiple myeloma. Awareness of parathyroid amyloid deposition is important as it is a histologic mimic of medullary thyroid carcinoma, especially on frozen section. Amyloid typing with evaluation for multiple myeloma in any patient with kappa or lambda light chain restriction is also important.

  16. Parathyroid Hormone Levels and Cognition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burnett, J.; Smith, S.M.; Aung, K.; Dyer, C.

    2009-01-01

    Hyperparathyroidism is a well-recognized cause of impaired cognition due to hypercalcemia. However, recent studies have suggested that perhaps parathyroid hormone itself plays a role in cognition, especially executive dysfunction. The purpose of this study was to explore the relationship of parathyroid hormone levels in a study cohort of elders with impaied cognition. Methods: Sixty community-living adults, 65 years of age and older, reported to Adult Protective Services for self-neglect and 55 controls matched (on age, ethnicity, gender and socio-economic status) consented and participated in this study. The research team conducted in-home comprehensive geriatric assessments which included the Mini-mental state exam (MMSE), the 15-item geriatric depression scale (GDS) , the Wolf-Klein clock test and a comprehensive nutritional panel, which included parathyroid hormone and ionized calcium. Students t tests and linear regression analyses were performed to assess for bivariate associations. Results: Self-neglecters (M = 73.73, sd=48.4) had significantly higher PTH levels compared to controls (M =47.59, sd=28.7; t=3.59, df=98.94, pParathyroid hormone may be associated with cognitive performance.

  17. Hormonal contraceptives and venous thrombosis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Stegeman, Berendina Hendrika (Bernardine)

    2013-01-01

    Oral contraceptive use is associated with venous thrombosis. However, the mechanism behind this remains unclear. The aim of this thesis was to evaluate genetic variation in the first-pass metabolism of contraceptives, to identify the clinical implications of hormonal contraceptive use after a

  18. Parathyroid Hormone Levels and Cognition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burnett, J.; Smith, S.M.; Aung, K.; Dyer, C.

    2009-01-01

    Hyperparathyroidism is a well-recognized cause of impaired cognition due to hypercalcemia. However, recent studies have suggested that perhaps parathyroid hormone itself plays a role in cognition, especially executive dysfunction. The purpose of this study was to explore the relationship of parathyroid hormone levels in a study cohort of elders with impaied cognition. Methods: Sixty community-living adults, 65 years of age and older, reported to Adult Protective Services for self-neglect and 55 controls matched (on age, ethnicity, gender and socio-economic status) consented and participated in this study. The research team conducted in-home comprehensive geriatric assessments which included the Mini-mental state exam (MMSE), the 15-item geriatric depression scale (GDS) , the Wolf-Klein clock test and a comprehensive nutritional panel, which included parathyroid hormone and ionized calcium. Students t tests and linear regression analyses were performed to assess for bivariate associations. Results: Self-neglecters (M = 73.73, sd=48.4) had significantly higher PTH levels compared to controls (M =47.59, sd=28.7; t=3.59, df=98.94, pcognitive measures. Conclusion: Parathyroid hormone may be associated with cognitive performance.

  19. Parathyroid Hormone in Osteoporosis Treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    İ. Özkul

    2002-03-01

    Full Text Available Parathyroid hormone stimulates bone formation, prevents or reverses bone loss, increases bone mass, bone strength and provides protection against fractures. PTH treatment for postmenopausal, male and glucocorticoid- induced osteoporosis proved to be effective in a number of RCTs.

  20. Anabolic steroids and growth hormone.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haupt, H A

    1993-01-01

    Athletes are generally well educated regarding substances that they may use as ergogenic aids. This includes anabolic steroids and growth hormone. Fortunately, the abuse of growth hormone is limited by its cost and the fact that anabolic steroids are simply more enticing to the athlete. There are, however, significant potential adverse effects regarding its use that can be best understood by studying known growth hormone excess, as demonstrated in the acromegalic syndrome. Many athletes are unfamiliar with this syndrome and education of the potential consequences of growth hormone excess is important in counseling athletes considering its use. While athletes contemplating the use of anabolic steroids may correctly perceive their risks for significant physiologic effects to be small if they use the steroids for brief periods of time, many of these same athletes are unaware of the potential for habituation to the use of anabolic steroids. The result may be incessant use of steroids by an athlete who previously considered only short-term use. As we see athletes taking anabolic steroids for more prolonged periods, we are likely to see more severe medical consequences. Those who eventually do discontinue the steroids are dismayed to find that the improvements made with the steroids generally disappear and they have little to show for hours or even years of intense training beyond the psychological scars inherent with steroid use. Counseling of these athletes should focus on the potential adverse psychological consequences of anabolic steroid use and the significant risk for habituation.

  1. Hormone receptors in breast cancer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Suijkerbuijk, K. P M; van der Wall, E.; van Diest, P. J.

    2016-01-01

    Steroid hormone receptors are critical for the growth and development of breast tissue as well as of breast cancer. The importance of the role estrogens in breast cancer has been delineated for more than 100 years. The analysis of its expression has been used not only to classify breast cancers but

  2. Hypothalamic effects of thyroid hormone

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zhang, Z.; Boelen, Anita; Bisschop, Peter H; Kalsbeek, A.; Fliers, Eric

    Thyroid hormone (TH) is a key driver of metabolism in mammals. Plasma concentrations of TH are kept within a narrow range by negative feedback regulation in the hypothalamus-pituitary-thyroid (HPT) axis. Plasma TH concentrations are an important determinant of metabolic processes in liver and brown

  3. Hormonal contraceptives and venous thrombosis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Stegeman, Berendina Hendrika (Bernardine)

    2013-01-01

    Oral contraceptive use is associated with venous thrombosis. However, the mechanism behind this remains unclear. The aim of this thesis was to evaluate genetic variation in the first-pass metabolism of contraceptives, to identify the clinical implications of hormonal contraceptive use after a thromb

  4. Parathyroid Hormone Levels and Cognition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burnett, J.; Smith, S.M.; Aung, K.; Dyer, C.

    2009-01-01

    Hyperparathyroidism is a well-recognized cause of impaired cognition due to hypercalcemia. However, recent studies have suggested that perhaps parathyroid hormone itself plays a role in cognition, especially executive dysfunction. The purpose of this study was to explore the relationship of parathyroid hormone levels in a study cohort of elders with impaied cognition. Methods: Sixty community-living adults, 65 years of age and older, reported to Adult Protective Services for self-neglect and 55 controls matched (on age, ethnicity, gender and socio-economic status) consented and participated in this study. The research team conducted in-home comprehensive geriatric assessments which included the Mini-mental state exam (MMSE), the 15-item geriatric depression scale (GDS) , the Wolf-Klein clock test and a comprehensive nutritional panel, which included parathyroid hormone and ionized calcium. Students t tests and linear regression analyses were performed to assess for bivariate associations. Results: Self-neglecters (M = 73.73, sd=48.4) had significantly higher PTH levels compared to controls (M =47.59, sd=28.7; t=3.59, df=98.94, pself-neglect group (r=-.298, p=.024) and this remained significant after controlling for ionized calcium levels in the regression. No significant associations were revealed in the control group or among any of the other cognitive measures. Conclusion: Parathyroid hormone may be associated with cognitive performance.

  5. Hormonal determinants of pubertal growth.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Delamarre-van Waal, H.A.; Coeverden, S.C. van; Rotteveel, J.J.

    2001-01-01

    Pubertal growth results from increased sex steroid and growth hormone (GH) secretion. Estrogens appear to play an important role in the regulation of pubertal growth in both girls and boys. In girls, however, estrogens cannot be the only sex steroids responsible for pubertal growth, as exogenous est

  6. Hormonal crosstalk in plant immunity

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Does, A.

    2012-01-01

    The plant hormones salicylic acid (SA), also known as plant aspirin, and jasmonic acid (JA) play major roles in the regulation of the plant immune system. In general, SA is important for defense against pathogens with a biotrophic lifestyle, whereas JA is essential for defense against insect herbivo

  7. Growth Hormone: Use and Abuse

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... GH helps children grow taller (also called linear growth), increases muscle mass, and decreases body fat. In both children ... syndrome In adults, GH is used to treat • Growth hormone deficiency • Muscle wasting (loss of muscle tissue) from HIV • Short ...

  8. Parathyroid hormone-related protein blood test

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/003691.htm Parathyroid hormone-related protein blood test To use the ... features on this page, please enable JavaScript. The parathyroid hormone-related protein (PTH-RP) test measures the ...

  9. Growth hormone stimulation test - series (image)

    Science.gov (United States)

    The growth hormone (GH) is a protein hormone released from the anterior pituitary gland under the control of the hypothalamus. In children, GH has growth-promoting effects on the body. It stimulates the ...

  10. The 'Love Hormone' May Quiet Tinnitus

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... medlineplus.gov/news/fullstory_161110.html The 'Love Hormone' May Quiet Tinnitus Small, preliminary study suggests oxytocin ... tinnitus -- may find some relief by spraying the hormone oxytocin in their nose, a small initial study ...

  11. Genetics Home Reference: isolated growth hormone deficiency

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Genetic Testing (4 links) Genetic Testing Registry: Ateleiotic dwarfism Genetic Testing Registry: Autosomal dominant isolated somatotropin deficiency ... in my area? Other Names for This Condition dwarfism, growth hormone deficiency dwarfism, pituitary growth hormone deficiency ...

  12. In Vitro Study of Influence of Mimic Cardiac Rate on Hydrodynamics of the Different Mechanical Cardiac Valve Prostheses

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CHU Yin-ping; CHENG Jin-lian; CHEN Ru-kun; FAN Yu-bo; PU Fang

    2005-01-01

    Objective:To assess the influence of mimic cardiac rate on hydrodynamics of the different mechanical prosthetic cardiac valves. Methods: US-made CarboMedics bileaflet valve and China-made Jiuling bileaflet valve and C-L tilting disc valve have been tested in a pulsatile flow simulator in the aortic position. The testing condition was set at the mimic cardiac rate of 55 beats/min,75 beats/min,100beats/min and a constant mimic cardiac output of 4L/min. The mean pressure differences (△P) ,leakage volumes (LEV) and closing volumes (CLV) across each valve,and the effective orifice areas(EOA) have been analyzed. Results:Within the range of physiology,the △P,LEV and CLV were falling as the increasing of mimic cardiac rate,and the extent of variance was larger. The EOA was increasing with the increase of the mimic cardiac rate. It is a different response as the altering of the cardiac rate for the different type of the mechanical prosthetic cardiac valves.Conclusions:The change of the mimic cardiac rate can affect the hydrodynamics of the mechanical prosthetic cardiac valves. The hydrodynamics of the bileaflet valve prosthesis is better than the tilting disc valve.

  13. Knockin mouse with mutant Gα11 mimics human inherited hypocalcemia and is rescued by pharmacologic inhibitors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Roszko, Kelly L; Bi, Ruiye; Gorvin, Caroline M

    2017-01-01

    in patients with autosomal-dominant hypocalcemia type 2 (ADH2), an inherited disorder of hypocalcemia, low parathyroid hormone (PTH), and hyperphosphatemia. We have generated knockin mice harboring the point mutation GNA11 c.C178T (p.Arg60Cys) identified in ADH2 patients. The mutant mice faithfully replicated...

  14. Response of luteinizing hormone and follicle stimulating hormone to luteinizing hormone-releasing hormone in prepubertal and pubertal chidren, as measured by a highly sensitive immunradiometric assay

    OpenAIRE

    樋口,譲二

    1992-01-01

    To investigate the age-related changes in the pituitary responsiveness to luteinizing hormone-releasing hormone (LH-RH), the consentrations of serum luteinizing hormone (LH) and follicle stimulating hormone (FSH) were measured before and after LH-RH administra-tion using the highly sensitive immunoradiometric assay (IRMA) in 283 normal children (161 males and 77 females) between 4 and 14 years old and in 22 patients (18 males and 4 females) with pituitary dwarfism. Then, the area of response ...

  15. Novel mechanisms of growth hormone regulation: growth hormone-releasing peptides and ghrelin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A.-M.J. Lengyel

    2006-08-01

    Full Text Available Growth hormone secretion is classically modulated by two hypothalamic hormones, growth hormone-releasing hormone and somatostatin. A third pathway was proposed in the last decade, which involves the growth hormone secretagogues. Ghrelin is a novel acylated peptide which is produced mainly by the stomach. It is also synthesized in the hypothalamus and is present in several other tissues. This endogenous growth hormone secretagogue was discovered by reverse pharmacology when a group of synthetic growth hormone-releasing compounds was initially produced, leading to the isolation of an orphan receptor and, finally, to its endogenous ligand. Ghrelin binds to an active receptor to increase growth hormone release and food intake. It is still not known how hypothalamic and circulating ghrelin is involved in the control of growth hormone release. Endogenous ghrelin might act to amplify the basic pattern of growth hormone secretion, optimizing somatotroph responsiveness to growth hormone-releasing hormone. It may activate multiple interdependent intracellular pathways at the somatotroph, involving protein kinase C, protein kinase A and extracellular calcium systems. However, since ghrelin has a greater ability to release growth hormone in vivo, its main site of action is the hypothalamus. In the current review we summarize the available data on the: a discovery of this peptide, b mechanisms of action of growth hormone secretagogues and ghrelin and possible physiological role on growth hormone modulation, and c regulation of growth hormone release in man after intravenous administration of these peptides.

  16. Peptide Hormones in the Gastrointestinal Tract

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rehfeld, Jens F.

    2015-01-01

    Gastrointestinal hormones are peptides released from endocrine cells and neurons in the digestive tract. More than 30 hormone genes are currently known to be expressed in the gastrointestinal tract, which makes the gut the largest hormone-producing organ in the body. Modern biology makes it feasi...

  17. "Sex Hormones" in Secondary School Biology Textbooks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nehm, Ross H.; Young, Rebecca

    2008-01-01

    This study explores the extent to which the term "sex hormone" is used in science textbooks, and whether the use of the term "sex hormone" is associated with pre-empirical concepts of sex dualism, in particular the misconceptions that these so-called "sex hormones" are sex specific and restricted to sex-related physiological functioning. We found…

  18. Hormonal regulation of spermatogenesis in zebrafish

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Waal, P.P.

    2009-01-01

    Across vertebrates, spermatogenesis is under the endocrine control of two hormones, follicle-stimulating hormone (FSH) and androgens; the testicular production and secretion of the latter are controlled by luteinizing hormone. In fish, also the strong steroidogenic potency of Fsh should be taken int

  19. Identification and Characterization of Peptide Mimics of Blood Group A Antigen

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhaoming TANG; Lin WANG; Lihua HU; Yirong LI; Tianpen CUI; Juan XIONG; Lifang DOU

    2008-01-01

    In order to investigate peptide mimics of carbohydrate blood group A antigen, a phage display 12-met peptide library was screened with a monoclonal antibody against blood group A antigen, NaM87-1F6. The antibody-binding properties of the selected phage peptides were evaluated by phage ELISA and phage capture assay. The peptides were co-expressed as glutathione S-transferase (GST) fusion proteins. RBC agglutination inhibition assay was performed to assess the natural blood group A antigen-mimicking ability of the fusion proteins. The results showed that seven phage clones selected bound to NaM87-1F6 specifically, among which, 6 clones bore the same peptide sequence, EYWYCGMNRTGC and another harbored a different one QIWYERTLPFrF. The two peptides were successfully expressed at the N terminal of GST protein. Both of the fusion proteins inhibited the RBC agglutination mediated by anti-A serum in a concentration-dependent manner. These results suggested that the fusion proteins based on the selected peptides could mimic the blood group A an- tigen and might be used as anti-A antibody-adsorbing materials when immunoabsorption was applied in ABO incompatible transplantation.

  20. Comprehending body language and mimics: an ERP and neuroimaging study on Italian actors and viewers.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alice Mado Proverbio

    Full Text Available In this study, the neural mechanism subserving the ability to understand people's emotional and mental states by observing their body language (facial expression, body posture and mimics was investigated in healthy volunteers. ERPs were recorded in 30 Italian University students while they evaluated 280 pictures of highly ecological displays of emotional body language that were acted out by 8 male and female Italian actors. Pictures were briefly flashed and preceded by short verbal descriptions (e.g., "What a bore!" that were incongruent half of the time (e.g., a picture of a very attentive and concentrated person shown after the previous example verbal description. ERP data and source reconstruction indicated that the first recognition of incongruent body language occurred 300 ms post-stimulus. swLORETA performed on the N400 identified the strongest generators of this effect in the right rectal gyrus (BA11 of the ventromedial orbitofrontal cortex, the bilateral uncus (limbic system and the cingulate cortex, the cortical areas devoted to face and body processing (STS, FFA EBA and the premotor cortex (BA6, which is involved in action understanding. These results indicate that face and body mimics undergo a prioritized processing that is mostly represented in the affective brain and is rapidly compared with verbal information. This process is likely able to regulate social interactions by providing on-line information about the sincerity and trustfulness of others.

  1. cNMP-AMs mimic and dissect bacterial nucleotidyl cyclase toxin effects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beckert, Ulrike; Grundmann, Manuel; Wolter, Sabine; Schwede, Frank; Rehmann, Holger; Kaever, Volkhard; Kostenis, Evi; Seifert, Roland

    2014-09-05

    In addition to the well-known second messengers cAMP and cGMP, mammalian cells contain the cyclic pyrimidine nucleotides cCMP and cUMP. The Pseudomonas aeruginosa toxin ExoY massively increases cGMP and cUMP in cells, whereas the Bordetella pertussis toxin CyaA increases cAMP and, to a lesser extent, cCMP. To mimic and dissect toxin effects, we synthesized cNMP-acetoxymethylesters as prodrugs. cNMP-AMs rapidly and effectively released the corresponding cNMP in cells. The combination of cGMP-AM plus cUMP-AM mimicked cytotoxicity of ExoY. cUMP-AM and cGMP-AM differentially activated gene expression. Certain cCMP and cUMP effects were independent of the known cNMP effectors protein kinases A and G and guanine nucleotide exchange factor Epac. In conclusion, cNMP-AMs are useful tools to mimic and dissect bacterial nucleotidyl cyclase toxin effects.

  2. BSA-templated MnO2 nanoparticles as both peroxidase and oxidase mimics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Xing; Wang, Qi; Zhao, Huihui; Zhang, Lichun; Su, Yingying; Lv, Yi

    2012-10-01

    Inorganic nanomaterials that mimic enzymes are fascinating as they potentially have improved properties relative to native enzymes, such as greater resistance to extremes of pH and temperature and lower sensitivity to proteases. Although many artificial enzymes have been investigated, searching for highly-efficient and stable catalysts is still of great interest. In this paper, we first demonstrated that bovine serum albumin (BSA)-stabilized MnO(2) nanoparticles (NPs) exhibited highly peroxidase-, oxidase-, and catalase-like activities. The activities of the BSA-MnO(2) NPs were evaluated using the typical horseradish peroxidase (HRP) substrates o-phenylenediamine (OPD) and 3,3',5,5'-tetramethylbenzidine (TMB) in the presence of either hydrogen peroxide or dissolved oxygen. These small-sized BSA-MnO(2) NPs with good dispersion, solubility and biocompatibility exhibited typical Michaelis-Menten kinetics and high affinity for H(2)O(2), OPD and TMB, indicating that BSA-MnO(2) NPs can be used as satisfactory enzyme mimics. Based on these findings, BSA-MnO(2) NPs were used as colorimetric immunoassay tags for the detection of goat anti-human IgG in place of HRP. The colorimetric immunoassay using BSA-MnO(2) NPs has the advantages of being fast, robust, inexpensive, easily prepared and with no HRP and H(2)O(2) being needed. These water-soluble BSA-MnO(2) NPs may have promising potential applications in biotechnology, bioassays, and biomedicine.

  3. Development of a Functional Glomerulus at the Organ Level on a Chip to Mimic Hypertensive Nephropathy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Mengying; Zhang, Xulang; Wen, Xinyu; Wu, Taihua; Wang, Weidong; Yang, Mingzhou; Wang, Jing; Fang, Ming; Lin, Bingcheng; Lin, Hongli

    2016-01-01

    Glomerular hypertension is an important factor exacerbating glomerular diseases to end-stage renal diseases because, ultimately, it results in glomerular sclerosis (especially in hypertensive and diabetic nephropathy). The precise mechanism of glomerular sclerosis caused by glomerular hypertension is unclear, due partly to the absence of suitable in vitro or in vivo models capable of mimicking and regulating the complex mechanical forces and/or organ-level disease processes. We developed a “glomerulus-on-a-chip” (GC) microfluidic device. This device reconstitutes the glomerulus with organ-level glomerular functions to create a disease model-on-a chip that mimics hypertensive nephropathy in humans. It comprises two channels lined by closely opposed layers of glomerular endothelial cells and podocytes that experience fluid flow of physiological conditions to mimic the glomerular microenvironment in vivo. Our results revealed that glomerular mechanical forces have a crucial role in cellular cytoskeletal rearrangement as well as the damage to cells and their junctions that leads to increased glomerular leakage observed in hypertensive nephropathy. Results also showed that the GC could readily and flexibly meet the demands of a renal-disease model. The GC could provide drug screening and toxicology testing, and create potential new personalized and accurate therapeutic platforms for glomerular disease. PMID:27558173

  4. Smells like aphids: orchid flowers mimic aphid alarm pheromones to attract hoverflies for pollination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stökl, Johannes; Brodmann, Jennifer; Dafni, Amots; Ayasse, Manfred; Hansson, Bill S

    2011-04-22

    Most insects are dependent on chemical communication for activities such as mate finding or host location. Several plants, and especially orchids, mimic insect semiochemicals to attract insects for unrewarded pollination. Here, we present a new case of pheromone mimicry found in the terrestrial orchid Epipactis veratrifolia. Flowers are visited and pollinated by several species of aphidophagous hoverflies, the females of which also often lay eggs in the flowers. The oviposition behaviour of these hoverflies is mainly guided by aphid-derived kairomones. We show that the flowers produce α- and β-pinene, β-myrcene and β-phellandrene, and that these compounds attract and induce oviposition behaviour in female hoverflies. This floral odour profile is remarkably similar to the alarm pheromone released by several aphid species, such as Megoura viciae. We therefore suggest that E. veratrifolia mimics aphid alarm pheromones to attract hoverflies for pollination; this is the first time, to our knowledge, that such a case of mimicry has been demonstrated.

  5. Generation 9 polyamidoamine dendrimer encapsulated platinum nanoparticle mimics catalase size, shape, and catalytic activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xinyu; Zhang, Yincong; Li, Tianfu; Tian, Wende; Zhang, Qiang; Cheng, Yiyun

    2013-04-30

    Poly(amidoamine) (PAMAM) encapsulated platinum nanoparticles were synthesized and used as catalase mimics. Acetylated generation 9 (Ac-G9) PAMAM dendrimer with a molecular size around 10 nm was used as a template to synthesize platinum nanoparticles. The feeding molar ratio of Pt(4+) and Ac-G9 is 2048, and the synthesized platinum nanoparticle (Ac-G9/Pt NP) has an average size of 3.3 nm. Ac-G9/Pt NP has a similar molecular size and globular shape with catalase (~11 nm). The catalytic activity of Ac-G9/Pt NP on the decomposition of H2O2 is approaching that of catalase at 37 °C. Ac-G9/Pt NP shows differential response to the changes of pH and temperature compared with catalase, which can be explained by different catalytic mechanisms of Ac-G9/Pt NP and catalase. Ac-G9/Pt NP also shows horseradish peroxidase activity and is able to scavenge free radicals such as di(phenyl)-(2,4,6-trinitrophenyl)iminoazanium (DPPH). Furthermore, Ac-G9/Pt NP shows excellent biocompatibility on different cell lines and can down-regulate H2O2-induced intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS) in these cells. These results suggest that dendrimers are promising mimics of proteins with different sizes and Ac-G9/Pt NP can be used as an alternative candidate of catalase to decrease oxidation stress in cells.

  6. Compartmentalization Approaches in Soft Matter Science: From Nanoreactor Development to Organelle Mimics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schoonen, Lise; van Hest, Jan C M

    2016-02-10

    Compartmentalization is an essential feature found in living cells to ensure that biological processes occur without being affected by undesired external influences. Over the years many scientists have designed self-assembled soft matter structures that mimic these natural catalytic compartments. The rationale behind this research is threefold. First of all, compartmentalization leads to the creation of a secluded environment for the catalytic species, which solves compatibility issues and which can improve catalyst efficiency and selectivity. Secondly, nano- and micro-compartments are constructed with the aim to obtain microenvironments that more closely mimic the cellular architecture. These biomimetic platforms are used to attain a better understanding of how cellular processes are executed. Thirdly, natural design rules are applied to create biomolecular assemblies with unusual functionality, which for example are used as artificial organelles. Here, recent developments will be discussed regarding these compartmentalized catalytic systems, with a selected number of illustrative examples to demonstrate which strategies have been followed, and to show to what extent the ambitious goals of this field of science have been reached. The focus here is on the field of soft matter science, covering the wide spectrum from polymeric assemblies to protein nanocages.

  7. Synthesis of Oxylipin Mimics and Their Antifungal Activity against the Citrus Postharvest Pathogens

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jimei Ma

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Nine oxylipin mimics were designed and synthesized starting from d-mannose. Their antifungal activity against three citrus postharvest pathogens was evaluated by spore germination assay. The results indicated that all the compounds significantly inhibited the growth of Penicillium digitatum, Penicillium italicum and Aspergillus niger. The compound (3Z,6Z,8S,9R,10R-octadeca-3,6-diene-8,9,10-triol (3 exhibited excellent inhibitory effect on both Penicillium digitatum (IC50 = 34 ppm and Penicillium italicum (IC50 = 94 ppm. Their in vivo antifungal activities against citrus postharvest blue mold were tested with fruit inoculated with the pathogen Penicillium italicum. The compound (3R,4S-methyl 3,4-dihydroxy-5-octyltetrahydrofuran-2-carboxylate (9 demonstrated significant efficacy by reducing the disease severity to 60%. The antifungal mechanism of these oxylipin mimics was postulated in which both inhibition of pathogenic mycelium and stimuli of the host oxylipin-mediated defense response played important roles.

  8. Comprehending body language and mimics: an ERP and neuroimaging study on Italian actors and viewers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Proverbio, Alice Mado; Calbi, Marta; Manfredi, Mirella; Zani, Alberto

    2014-01-01

    In this study, the neural mechanism subserving the ability to understand people's emotional and mental states by observing their body language (facial expression, body posture and mimics) was investigated in healthy volunteers. ERPs were recorded in 30 Italian University students while they evaluated 280 pictures of highly ecological displays of emotional body language that were acted out by 8 male and female Italian actors. Pictures were briefly flashed and preceded by short verbal descriptions (e.g., "What a bore!") that were incongruent half of the time (e.g., a picture of a very attentive and concentrated person shown after the previous example verbal description). ERP data and source reconstruction indicated that the first recognition of incongruent body language occurred 300 ms post-stimulus. swLORETA performed on the N400 identified the strongest generators of this effect in the right rectal gyrus (BA11) of the ventromedial orbitofrontal cortex, the bilateral uncus (limbic system) and the cingulate cortex, the cortical areas devoted to face and body processing (STS, FFA EBA) and the premotor cortex (BA6), which is involved in action understanding. These results indicate that face and body mimics undergo a prioritized processing that is mostly represented in the affective brain and is rapidly compared with verbal information. This process is likely able to regulate social interactions by providing on-line information about the sincerity and trustfulness of others.

  9. Lanolin-derived lipid mixtures mimic closely the lipid composition and organization of vernix caseosa lipids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rissmann, Robert; Oudshoorn, Marion H M; Kocks, Elise; Hennink, Wim E; Ponec, Maria; Bouwstra, Joke A

    2008-10-01

    The aim of the present study was to use semi-synthetic lipid mixtures to mimic the complex lipid composition, organization and thermotropic behaviour of vernix caseosa (VC) lipids. As VC shows multiple protecting and barrier supporting properties before and after birth, it is suggested that a VC substitute could be an innovative barrier cream for barrier deficient skin. Lanolin was selected as the source of the branched chain sterol esters and wax esters--the main lipid classes of VC. Different lipid fractions were isolated from lanolin and subsequently mixed with squalene, triglycerides, cholesterol, ceramides and fatty acids to generate semi-synthetic lipid mixtures that mimic the lipid composition of VC, as established by high-performance thin-layer chromatography. Differential scanning calorimetry and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy investigations revealed that triglycerides play an important role in the (lateral) lipid organization and thermotropic behaviour of the synthetic lipid mixtures. Excellent resemblance of VC lipids was obtained when adding unsaturated triglycerides. Moreover, these lipid mixtures showed similar long range ordering as VC. The optimal lipid mixture was evaluated on tape-stripped hairless mouse skin in vivo. The rate of barrier recovery was increased and comparable to VC lipid treatment.

  10. A low dose of dietary resveratrol partially mimics caloric restriction and retards aging parameters in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barger, Jamie L; Kayo, Tsuyoshi; Vann, James M; Arias, Edward B; Wang, Jelai; Hacker, Timothy A; Wang, Ying; Raederstorff, Daniel; Morrow, Jason D; Leeuwenburgh, Christiaan; Allison, David B; Saupe, Kurt W; Cartee, Gregory D; Weindruch, Richard; Prolla, Tomas A

    2008-06-04

    Resveratrol in high doses has been shown to extend lifespan in some studies in invertebrates and to prevent early mortality in mice fed a high-fat diet. We fed mice from middle age (14-months) to old age (30-months) either a control diet, a low dose of resveratrol (4.9 mg kg(-1) day(-1)), or a calorie restricted (CR) diet and examined genome-wide transcriptional profiles. We report a striking transcriptional overlap of CR and resveratrol in heart, skeletal muscle and brain. Both dietary interventions inhibit gene expression profiles associated with cardiac and skeletal muscle aging, and prevent age-related cardiac dysfunction. Dietary resveratrol also mimics the effects of CR in insulin mediated glucose uptake in muscle. Gene expression profiling suggests that both CR and resveratrol may retard some aspects of aging through alterations in chromatin structure and transcription. Resveratrol, at doses that can be readily achieved in humans, fulfills the definition of a dietary compound that mimics some aspects of CR.

  11. Possibilities and limitations of current technologies for quantification of biological extracellular vesicles and synthetic mimics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maas, Sybren L.N.; de Vrij, Jeroen; van der Vlist, Els J.; Geragousian, Biaina; van Bloois, Louis; Mastrobattista, Enrico; Schiffelers, Raymond M.; Wauben, Marca H.M.; Broekman, Marike L.D.; Nolte-'t Hoen, Esther N.M.

    2015-01-01

    Nano-sized extracelullar vesicles (EVs) released by various cell types play important roles in a plethora of (patho)physiological processes and are increasingly recognized as biomarkers for disease. In addition, engineered EV and EV-inspired liposomes hold great potential as drug delivery systems. Major technologies developed for high-throughput analysis of individual EV include nanoparticle tracking analysis (NTA), tunable resistive pulse sensing (tRPS) and high-resolution flow cytometry (hFC). Currently, there is a need for comparative studies on the available technologies to improve standardization of vesicle analysis in diagnostic or therapeutic settings. We investigated the possibilities, limitations and comparability of NTA, tRPS and hFC for analysis of tumor cell-derived EVs and synthetic mimics (i.e. differently sized liposomes). NTA and tRPS instrument settings were identified that significantly affected the quantification of these particles. Furthermore, we detailed the differences in absolute quantification of EVs and liposomes using the three technologies. This study increases our understanding of possibilities and pitfalls of NTA, tRPS and hFC, which will benefit standardized and large-scale clinical application of (engineered) EVs and EV-mimics in the future. PMID:25555362

  12. Smells like aphids: orchid flowers mimic aphid alarm pheromones to attract hoverflies for pollination

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stökl, Johannes; Brodmann, Jennifer; Dafni, Amots; Ayasse, Manfred; Hansson, Bill S.

    2011-01-01

    Most insects are dependent on chemical communication for activities such as mate finding or host location. Several plants, and especially orchids, mimic insect semiochemicals to attract insects for unrewarded pollination. Here, we present a new case of pheromone mimicry found in the terrestrial orchid Epipactis veratrifolia. Flowers are visited and pollinated by several species of aphidophagous hoverflies, the females of which also often lay eggs in the flowers. The oviposition behaviour of these hoverflies is mainly guided by aphid-derived kairomones. We show that the flowers produce α- and β-pinene, β-myrcene and β-phellandrene, and that these compounds attract and induce oviposition behaviour in female hoverflies. This floral odour profile is remarkably similar to the alarm pheromone released by several aphid species, such as Megoura viciae. We therefore suggest that E. veratrifolia mimics aphid alarm pheromones to attract hoverflies for pollination; this is the first time, to our knowledge, that such a case of mimicry has been demonstrated. PMID:20943694

  13. Molybdate partly mimics insulin-promoted metabolic effects in Drosophila melanogaster.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rovenko, Bohdana M; Perkhulyn, Natalia V; Lushchak, Oleh V; Storey, Janet M; Storey, Kenneth B; Lushchak, Volodymyr I

    2014-09-01

    Molybdenum-containing salts have been found to attenuate diabetes complications in mammals by affecting processes normally regulated by insulin and thus were believed to mimic insulin activity. In this study, we used a fruit fly model to test sodium molybdate, Na2MoO4, action in relation to insulin-promoted processes and toxicity. We studied how larval food supplementation with sodium molybdate affected levels of body carbohydrates and lipids in two-day old adult Drosophila melanogaster. Molybdate salt, in the concentrations used (0.025, 0.05, 0.5, 5, and 10mM), showed low toxicity to fly larvae and slightly influenced development and the percentage of pupated animals. Additionally, sodium molybdate decreased the level of hemolymph glucose in males by 30%, and increased the level of hemolymph trehalose in flies of both sexes. These changes were accompanied by an increase in whole body trehalose and glycogen of about 30-90%. Although total lipid levels in flies of both sexes were depleted by 25%, an increased amount of triacylglycerides among total lipids was observed. These effects were not related to changes in food intake. Taken together, the present data let us suggest that sodium molybdate may at least partly mimic insulin-related effects in Drosophila.

  14. Polymer Brushes that Mimic Repulsive Properties of the Boundary Lubricant Glycoprotein Lubricin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torres, Jahn; Jay, Gregory; Ni, Qian; Bello, David; Bothun, Geoffrey; Kim, Kyung-Suk

    2011-03-01

    This is a report on the design of tailored functional groups which mimic the repulsive forces at work in the natural-joint boundary lubricant known as lubricin. Lubricin, an amphiphilic polyelectrolyte biomolecule, decreases friction and cellular adhesion by exhibiting surface force fields based on steric hindrance, Debye electrostatic double layer repulsion and hydration repulsive forces. We have identified a physically and chemically stable candidate polymers for anti-fouling coatings that will mimic lubricin's repulsive properties. Synthetic polymer brushes mimicking lubricin have been produced using these polymers grafted onto a glass surfaces. The average adhesive forces for the polymer brushes measured through atomic force microscopy are as low (56.796 +/- 0.796 mN/m), similar to those exhibited by lubricin coated surfaces and on the same order of magnitude as superhydrophobic surfaces. This work was supported by the Coatings/Biofouling Program and the Maritime Sensing Program of the Office of Naval Research as well as the ILIR Program of the Naval Undersea Warfare Center DIVNPT.

  15. Asteroid Hyalosis: A Mimic of Vitreous Hemorrhage on Point of Care Ultrasound.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stringer, Charles E A; Ahn, Justin S; Kim, Daniel J

    2017-07-01

    Point of care ultrasound in the emergency department (ED) is increasingly being used to diagnose time-sensitive, vision-threatening conditions. We present a case of a 64-year-old female who presented to the ED with a three-day history of worsening left eye floaters. Point of care ocular ultrasound demonstrated a posterior chamber containing many echogenic opacities of varying size without acoustic shadowing. Movement of the eye resulted in significant after-movement of these opacities, giving the classic "washing machine" appearance seen with vitreous hemorrhage (VH). Based on these ultrasound findings, the patient was diagnosed with a VH and was referred to ophthalmology. The consulting ophthalmologist ultimately diagnosed the patient with asteroid hyalosis without VH. Asteroid hyalosis is a benign condition of the vitreous resulting in calcium phosphate and lipid deposits that can mimic more serious VH on point of care ultrasound. Knowledge of this mimic is helpful for communication with specialists and for awareness of the potential for misdiagnosis with ocular ultrasound.

  16. MicroRNA-125b-5p mimic inhibits acute liver failure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Dakai; Yuan, Qinggong; Balakrishnan, Asha; Bantel, Heike; Klusmann, Jan-Henning; Manns, Michael P.; Ott, Michael; Cantz, Tobias; Sharma, Amar Deep

    2016-01-01

    The lack of broad-spectrum anti-acute liver failure (ALF) therapeutic agents contributes to ALF-related mortality. MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are suggested to be potent serum biomarkers for ALF, but their functional and therapeutic relevance in ALF are unclear. Here we show an unbiased approach, using two complementary miRNA screens, to identify miRNAs that can attenuate ALF. We identify miR-125b-5p as a regulator of cell death that attenuates paracetamol-induced and FAS-induced toxicity in mouse and human hepatocytes. Importantly, administration of miR-125b-5p mimic in mouse liver prevents injury and improves survival in models of ALF. Functional studies show that miR-125b-5p ameliorates ALF by directly regulating kelch-like ECH-associated protein 1, in turn elevating expression of nuclear factor-E2-related factor 2, a known regulator in ALF. Collectively, our findings establish miR-125b-5p as an important regulator of paracetamol-induced and FAS-induced cell death. Thus, miR-125b-5p mimic may serve as a broad-spectrum therapeutic attenuator of cell death during ALF. PMID:27336362

  17. Construction and Expression of a Single Chain Antibody Mimicing Human Ovarian Cancer Antigen CA125

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Aidong Li; Zheng Li; Yinghong Wang; Yongming Zhang; Jie Ma

    2006-01-01

    One concept for immune therapy of cancer involves induction of antigen mimic antibodies to trigger the immune response against tumor cells. Anti-idiotypic antibodies directed against the antigen-binding site of antibodies specific for tumor antigen may functionally and even structurally mimic antigen and induce anti-anti-idiotypic immune response. Monoclonal antibody WJ02 is one of such anti-idiotypic antibodies, which contains internal image of CA125. In order to improve the immunospecificity of mAb WJ02, we constructed a single chain of mAb WJ02 in Vl-linker-Vh orientation. The scFv-WJ02 could be expressed and secreted in the recombinant Pichia pastoris system. The secreted scFv protein with a molecular weight of 30 kD retained the biological activity of mAb WJ02, which was proved by a direct binding assay and inhibition experiment. Our results indicated that the scFv-WJ02 could be used as a possible tool for idiotypic therapy against ovarian cancer, which might enhance the possibility of eliminating nonspecific responses induced by mAb WJ02.

  18. De novo designed protein transduction domain mimics from simple synthetic polymers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tezgel, A Özgül; Telfer, Janice C; Tew, Gregory N

    2011-08-08

    Protein transduction domains (PTDs) that readily transverse cellular membranes are of great interest and are attractive tools for the intracellular delivery of bioactive molecules. Learning to program synthetic polymers and oligomers with the appropriate chemical information to capture adequately the biological activity of proteins is critical to our improved understanding of how these natural molecules work. In addition, the versatility of these synthetic mimics provides the opportunity to discover analogs with superior properties compared with their native sequences. Here we report the first detailed structure-activity relationship of a new PTD family of polymers based on a completely abiotic backbone. The synthetic approach easily allows doubling the density of guanidine functional groups, which increases the transduction efficiency of the sequences. Cellular uptake studies on three different cell lines (HEK 293T, CHO, and Jurkat T cells) confirm that these synthetic analogs are highly efficient novel protein transduction domain mimics (PTDMs), which are more effective than TAT(49-57) and nonaarginine (R9) and also highlight the usefulness of polymer chemistry at the chemistry-biology interface.

  19. Decidualized endometrioma during pregnancy: recognizing an imaging mimic of ovarian malignancy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poder, Liina; Coakley, Fergus V; Rabban, Joseph T; Goldstein, Ruth B; Aziz, Seerat; Chen, Lee-may

    2008-01-01

    To present the ultrasound and magnetic resonance imaging findings that may allow for a prospective diagnosis and expectant management of decidualized endometriomas because the rare occurrence of decidualization in the ectopic endometrial stroma of an endometrioma during pregnancy can mimic ovarian cancer at imaging. Smooth lobulated mural nodules with prominent internal vascularity were noted in an apparent right ovarian endometrioma on serial ultrasound studies in a 34-year-old woman at 12, 21, 27, and 30 weeks of gestation. Magnetic resonance imaging demonstrated the nodules to be strikingly similar in intensity and texture to the decidualized endometrium in the uterus on T2-weighted sequences. A provisional diagnosis of decidualized endometrioma allowed for expectant management with immediate postpartum resection and confirmation of the diagnosis. Decidualized endometrioma can mimic ovarian malignancy during pregnancy, but a prospective diagnosis may be possible when solid smoothly lobulated nodules with prominent internal vascularity within an endometrioma are seen from early in pregnancy, and the nodules demonstrate marked similarity in signal intensity and texture with the decidualized endometrium in the uterus at magnetic resonance imaging.

  20. Micro-fabricated shunt to mimic arachnoid granulations for the treatment of communicating hydrocephalus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kralick, Francis; Oh, Jonghyun; Medina, Tim; Noh, Hongseok Moses

    2012-01-01

    Hydrocephalus is the abnormal accumulation of cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) within the confines of the skull that if left untreated results in significant morbidity and mortality. The treatment for hydrocephalus has remained essentially unchanged for over 50 years. It was a technological advance in materials that allowed John Holter, in conjunction with neurosurgeons Spitzer and Nulsen, to devise a valve and shunt system that diverted excess CSF from the ventricular space to the peritoneum. This ventriculo-peritoneal (VP) shunt is far from ideal, with problems associated with under/over shunting, mechanical mismatch, infection, high failure rates, disconnection and erosion. With the advances in the field of micro-fabrication and micro-machines we propose an innovative shunt system that would mimic the function of arachnoid granulations. This micro-fabricated shunting device, or micro-mechanical arachnoid granulation (MAG), consists of a multiplicity of micro-valves each 210 μm in diameter that each adhere to individual micro-needles. This work demonstrates the design and initial test results of the micro-valve with parameters for low cracking pressure, optimal flow rate, and reflux that would mimic the function of the native arachnoid granulations.

  1. A low dose of dietary resveratrol partially mimics caloric restriction and retards aging parameters in mice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jamie L Barger

    Full Text Available Resveratrol in high doses has been shown to extend lifespan in some studies in invertebrates and to prevent early mortality in mice fed a high-fat diet. We fed mice from middle age (14-months to old age (30-months either a control diet, a low dose of resveratrol (4.9 mg kg(-1 day(-1, or a calorie restricted (CR diet and examined genome-wide transcriptional profiles. We report a striking transcriptional overlap of CR and resveratrol in heart, skeletal muscle and brain. Both dietary interventions inhibit gene expression profiles associated with cardiac and skeletal muscle aging, and prevent age-related cardiac dysfunction. Dietary resveratrol also mimics the effects of CR in insulin mediated glucose uptake in muscle. Gene expression profiling suggests that both CR and resveratrol may retard some aspects of aging through alterations in chromatin structure and transcription. Resveratrol, at doses that can be readily achieved in humans, fulfills the definition of a dietary compound that mimics some aspects of CR.

  2. Synthesis and biological activity of conformationally restricted gypsy moth pheromone mimics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Hao; Gong, Yongmei; Gries, Regine M; Plettner, Erika

    2010-04-15

    The design and synthesis of a series of conformationally constrained mimics of gypsy moth sex pheromone, (+)-disparlure (7R,8S)-2-methyl-7,8-epoxyoctadecane, are described. The core structure of the mimics is derived from 5-(2'-hydroxyethyl)cyclopent-2-en-1-ol. Substituent optimization of the analogs was accomplished through the synthesis of mini-libraries and pure individual compounds, followed by electrophysiological experiments with male gypsy moth antennae. The electroantennogram results show that the analogs elicited weak to no antennal responses themselves. There was a clear structure-activity pattern for odorant activity, with ethyl substituents being best. Further, when puffed simultaneously with the pheromone, some of the compounds gave a significant enhancement of the antennal depolarization, indicating an additive or synergistic effect. A pure pheromone stimulus following a mixed compound/pheromone stimulus was generally not affected, with two exceptions: one compound enhanced and another inhibited a subsequent stimulus. The compounds also prolonged the stimulation of the antenna, which manifested itself in widened electroantennogram peaks. We tested the hypothesis that this prolonged stimulation may be due to the stabilization of a particular conformer of the pheromone-binding protein (PBP). Compounds that caused PBP2 to adopt a similar conformation than in the presence of pheromone also caused peak widening. This was not the case with PBP1.

  3. Can medical therapy mimic the clinical efficacy or physiological effects of bariatric surgery?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miras, A D; le Roux, C W

    2014-03-01

    The number of bariatric surgical procedures performed has increased dramatically. This review discusses the clinical and physiological changes, and in particular, the mechanisms behind weight loss and glycaemic improvements, observed following the gastric bypass, sleeve gastrectomy and gastric banding bariatric procedures. The review then examines how close we are to mimicking the clinical or physiological effects of surgery through less invasive and safer modern interventions that are currently available for clinical use. These include dietary interventions, orlistat, lorcaserin, phentermine/topiramate, glucagon-like peptide-1 receptor agonists, dipeptidyl peptidase-4 inhibitors, pramlintide, dapagliflozin, the duodenal-jejunal bypass liner, gastric pacemakers and gastric balloons. We conclude that, based on the most recent trials, we cannot fully mimic the clinical or physiological effects of surgery; however, we are getting closer. A 'medical bypass' may not be as far in the future as we previously thought, as the physician's armamentarium against obesity and type 2 diabetes has recently got stronger through the use of specific dietary modifications, novel medical devices and pharmacotherapy. Novel therapeutic targets include not only appetite but also taste/food preferences, energy expenditure, gut microbiota, bile acid signalling, inflammation, preservation of β-cell function and hepatic glucose output, among others. Although there are no magic bullets, an integrated multimodal approach may yield success. Non-surgical interventions that mimic the metabolic benefits of bariatric surgery, with a reduced morbidity and mortality burden, remain tenable alternatives for patients and health-care professionals.

  4. Short exposure of albumin to high concentrations of malondialdehyde does not mimic physiological conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Millanta, Susanna; Furfaro, Anna Lisa; Carlier, Paolo; Tasso, Bruno; Nitti, Mariapaola; Domenicotti, Cinzia; Odetti, Patrizio; Pronzato, Maria Adelaide; Traverso, Nicola

    2013-02-01

    Malondialdehyde (MDA), a major lipid peroxidation product, spontaneously binds to, and modifies proteins. In vivo, proteins are physiologically exposed to micromolar MDA concentrations for long periods. In order to mimic this process in vitro, protein modification is often performed by short exposure to millimolar MDA concentrations, also in order to generate antigenic structures for antibody production. However, in our study, spectrophotometric and fluorimetric characteristics, electrophoretic migration, susceptibility to trypsin digestion and reactivity to antibodies indicated substantial differences between albumin incubated with millimolar MDA concentrations for a short period of time and albumin incubated with micromolar MDA concentrations for a long period of time. Therefore, our study showed that short incubation of albumin with millimolar MDA concentrations does not mimic the consequences of albumin exposure to long incubation with micromolar MDA concentrations. This casts doubts on the real possibility that antibodies, elicited with proteins modified with millimolar MDA concentrations for a short period, could detect all MDA-modified proteins in vivo. Moreover, natural antibodies against albumin, modified with micromolar MDA concentrations, have been detected in the serum of healthy blood donors, which appears to justify the existence of these kinds of modified proteins in vivo.

  5. Pancreatic and peri-pancreatic lesions mimic pancreatic islet cell tumor in multidetector computed tomography

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    XUE Hua-dan; LIU Wei; XIAO Yu; SUN Hao; WANG Xuan; LEI Jing; JIN Zheng-yu

    2011-01-01

    Objective This pictorial review aimed to summarize the most possible differential diagnosis of pancreatic islet cell tumor (PICT).Data sources Data used in this review were mainly from Medline and Pubmed in English. And all clinical images in this review were from Department of Radiology, Peking Union Medical College Hospital, Beijing, China.Study selection Cases of pancreatic cystadenoma, solid pseudo-papillary tumor of the pancreas, pancreatic metastasis, pancreatic adenocarcinoma, para-pancreatic neuroendocrine tumors, Castleman disease, gastrointestinal stromal tumor, splenic artery aneurysm and accessory spleen were selected in this pictorial review for differential diagnosis of PICT.Results Careful analysis of imaging features and correlation with the clinical manifestations may allow a more specific diagnosis. It is also important that the radiologist is familiar with the anatomic variants and disease entities which mimic pancreatic islet cell tumor in order to avoid an improper treatment protocol.Conclusions Many congenital anatomic variants or other pancreatic and peri-pancreatic diseases may mimic MDCT appearance of pancreatic islet cell tumor. Radiological, clinical and pathological characteristics should be considered for the final diagnosis.

  6. Highly potent metallopeptide analogues of luteinizing hormone-releasing hormone

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bajusz, S.; Janaky, T.; Csernus, V.J.; Bokser, L.; Fekete, M.; Srkalovic, G.; Redding, T.W.; Schally, A.V. (Tulane Univ. School of Medicine, New Orleans, LA (USA))

    1989-08-01

    Metal complexes related to the cytotoxic complexes cisplatin (cis-diamminedichloroplatinum(II)) and transbis(salicylaldoximato)copper(II) were incorporated into suitably modified luteinizing hormone-releasing hormone (LH-RH) analogues containing D-lysine at position 6. Some of the metallopeptides thus obtained proved to be highly active LH-RH agonists or antagonists. Most metallopeptide analogues of LH-RH showed high affinities for the membrane receptors of rat pituitary and human breast cancer cells. Some of these metallopeptides had cytotoxic activity against human breast cancer and prostate cancer and prostate cancer cell lines in vitro. Such cytostatic metallopeptides could be envisioned as targeted chemotherapeutic agents in cancers that contain receptors for LH-RH-like peptides.

  7. Reproductive Hormones and Mood Disorders

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sermin Kesebir

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available During the menstrual cycle, pregnancy and breast-feeding periods, as well as in menopausal and post-menopausal periods, the physiological and psychological processes that change according to the hormonal fluctuations influence every women similarly and each one differently. These physiological processes are controlled by neuroendocrine sequences, of which the hypothalamo-pituitary-adrenal axis and the hypothalamo-pituitary-gonadal axis are the most important ones. The hypothalamo-pituitary-gonadal axis affects mood, anxiety, cognition and pain. The interaction of these hormones with mood and behavior is bidirectional. The differences in phenomenology and epidemiology of mood disorders with regards to gender can be explained with the effects of hormones. All of the periods mentioned above are related with mood disorders at terms of risk factors, disease symptoms, progress of disease and response to treatment. Epidemiologic data supports the relationship between the mood disorders and reproductive processes. The prevalence of major depression increases in women with the menarche and ceases in post- menopausal period. Similarly, the initial symptoms of bipolar disorder begins around the menarche period in 50% of the cases. Despite proper treatment, some female patients with major depression experience recurrence during the premenstrual period of their menstrual cycles. The conformity and change in a woman’s brain during pregnancy is controlled dominantly by the neuroendocrine systems, while it is controlled by the external stimuli actively related to the baby during nursing period. The changes that occur are closely related to postpartum mood disorders. Again, all the changes and suspension of medication during this procedure are risk factors for early depressive and dysphoric situations. Variables of a wide range, from follicle stimulating hormone, melatonin, and sleep to body mass index interact with mood disorders in menopausal and post

  8. Hormonal treatment of acne vulgaris: an update

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elsaie, Mohamed L

    2016-01-01

    Acne vulgaris is a common skin condition associated with multiple factors. Although mostly presenting alone, it can likewise present with features of hyperandrogenism and hormonal discrepancies. Of note, hormonal therapies are indicated in severe, resistant-to-treatment cases and in those with monthly flare-ups and when standard therapeutic options are inappropriate. This article serves as an update to hormonal pathogenesis of acne, discusses the basics of endocrinal evaluation for patients with suspected hormonal acne, and provides an overview of the current hormonal treatment options in women. PMID:27621661

  9. Progestogens in menopausal hormone therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Małgorzata Bińkowska

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Progestogens share one common effect: the ability to convert proliferative endometrium to its secretory form. In contrast, their biological activity is varied, depending on the chemical structure, pharmacokinetics, receptor affinity and different potency of action. Progestogens are widely used in the treatment of menstrual cycle disturbances, various gynaecological conditions, contraception and menopausal hormone therapy. The administration of progestogen in menopausal hormone therapy is essential in women with an intact uterus to protect against endometrial hyperplasia and cancer. Progestogen selection should be based on the characteristics available for each progestogen type, relying on the assessment of relative potency of action in experimental models and animal models, and on the indirect knowledge brought by studies of the clinical use of different progestogen formulations. The choice of progestogen should involve the conscious use of knowledge of its benefits, with a focus on minimizing potential side effects. Unfortunately, there are no direct clinical studies comparing the metabolic effects of different progestogens.

  10. Modelling hormonal response and development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Voß, Ute; Bishopp, Anthony; Farcot, Etienne; Bennett, Malcolm J

    2014-05-01

    As our knowledge of the complexity of hormone homeostasis, transport, perception, and response increases, and their outputs become less intuitive, modelling is set to become more important. Initial modelling efforts have focused on hormone transport and response pathways. However, we now need to move beyond the network scales and use multicellular and multiscale modelling approaches to predict emergent properties at different scales. Here we review some examples where such approaches have been successful, for example, auxin-cytokinin crosstalk regulating root vascular development or a study of lateral root emergence where an iterative cycle of modelling and experiments lead to the identification of an overlooked role for PIN3. Finally, we discuss some of the remaining biological and technical challenges. Copyright © 2014 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  11. [Dehydroepiandrosterone (DHEA)--youth hormone?].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zdrojewicz, Z; Kesik, S

    2001-01-01

    Dehydroepiandrosterone (DHEA) and its sulphated metabolite (DHEA-S) are endogenous steroid hormones, synthesized by the adrenal cortex, gonads and CNS. The secretion profile changes with age and depends on the sex. Human DHEA and DHEA-S levels decline linearly and systematically with age and suggest the potential importance of that parameter as a biomarker of ageing. The counteraction of DHEA against atherosclerotic disease, cancer growth, diabetes mellitus, insulin resistance, obesity and the influence on immunological functions are observed in researches. DHEA influences the condition of mind, cognition functions, memory and well-being. DHEA hormonal replacement therapy is expected to lengthen human life by the stoppage of physiological degeneration changes and prevention of age-related clinical disorders.

  12. Thyroid hormone disorders and sepsis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, Bin; Yu, Zhui; Li, Yinping

    2017-01-01

    Sepsis is a systemic inflammatory response syndrome with high mortality, which results from severe infection and can lead to secondary organ dysfunction. It is one of the most common cause of death in intensive care unit. Clinical reports have shown that sepsis was often accompanied by thyroid dysfunction, which is called "low triiodothyronine (T3)" syndrome and characterized by decreased blood total T3 and free T3, and by normal or decreased thyroxine (T4) and thyroid stimulating hormone (TSH). This syndrome may greatly affect the prognosis of patients with sepsis. The main purpose of this review is to illustrate the role of thyroid hormone disorder in the development and prognosis of sepsis.

  13. Luteinizing hormone in testicular descent

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Toppari, Jorma; Kaleva, Marko M; Virtanen, Helena E

    2007-01-01

    . Insulin-like hormone-3 (INSL3) is suggested to be the main regulator of gubernacular development and therefore an apparent regulator of testicular descent. INSL3 production is also related to LH, and reduced INSL3 action is a possible cause for cryptorchidism. Cryptorchid boys have normal testosterone......A proper hypothalamus-pituitary-testis axis with normal androgen synthesis and action is a prerequisite for normal testicular descent. Various defects in this axis may result in cryptorchidism but endocrine abnormalities are rarely detected. Androgens regulate testicular descent but androgen action...... alone is not sufficient for normal testicular descent. The regulation of androgen production is influenced both by placental human chorionic gonadotropin (hCG) and pituitary luteinizing hormone (LH). There is evidence that the longer pregnancy continues, the more important role pituitary LH may have...

  14. Obesity and hormonal contraceptive efficacy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robinson, Jennifer A; Burke, Anne E

    2013-09-01

    Obesity is a major public health concern affecting an increasing proportion of reproductive-aged women. Avoiding unintended pregnancy is of major importance, given the increased risks associated with pregnancy, but obesity may affect the efficacy of hormonal contraceptives by altering how these drugs are absorbed, distributed, metabolized or eliminated. Limited data suggest that long-acting, reversible contraceptives maintain excellent efficacy in obese women. Some studies demonstrating altered pharmacokinetic parameters and increased failure rates with combined oral contraceptives, the contraceptive patch and emergency contraceptive pills suggest decreased efficacy of these methods. It is unclear whether bariatric surgery affects hormonal contraceptive efficacy. Obese women should be offered the full range of contraceptive options, with counseling that balances the risks and benefits of each method, including the risk of unintended pregnancy.

  15. Growth hormone therapy in progeria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sadeghi-Nejad, Ab; Demmer, Laurie

    2007-05-01

    Catabolic processes seen in Hutchinson-Gilford progeria resemble those of normal aging and, in the affected children, usually result in death at an early age. In addition to its growth promoting effects, growth hormone (GH) has potent anabolic properties. Administration of GH ameliorates some of the catabolic effects of normal aging. We report the results of GH treatment in a young child with progeria.

  16. Parathyroid Hormone Levels and Cognition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burnett, J.; Smith, S.M.; Aung, K.; Dyer, C.

    2009-01-01

    Hyperparathyroidism is a well-recognized cause of impaired cognition due to hypercalcemia. However, recent studies have suggested that perhaps parathyroid hormone itself plays a role in cognition, especially executive dysfunction. The purpose of this study was to explore the relationship of parathyroid hormone levels in a study cohort of elders with impaied cognition. Methods: Sixty community-living adults, 65 years of age and older, reported to Adult Protective Services for self-neglect and 55 controls matched (on age, ethnicity, gender and socio-economic status) consented and participated in this study. The research team conducted in-home comprehensive geriatric assessments which included the Mini-mental state exam (MMSE), the 15-item geriatric depression scale (GDS) , the Wolf-Klein clock test and a comprehensive nutritional panel, which included parathyroid hormone and ionized calcium. Students t tests and linear regression analyses were performed to assess for bivariate associations. Results: Self-neglecters (M = 73.73, sd=48.4) had significantly higher PTH levels compared to controls (M =47.59, sd=28.7; t=3.59, df=98.94, p<.01). There was no significant group difference in ionized calcium levels. Overall, PTH was correlated with the MMSE (r=-.323, p=.001). Individual regression analyses revealed a statistically significant correlation between PTH and MMSE in the self-neglect group (r=-.298, p=.024) and this remained significant after controlling for ionized calcium levels in the regression. No significant associations were revealed in the control group or among any of the other cognitive measures. Conclusion: Parathyroid hormone may be associated with cognitive performance.

  17. Thyroid Hormone Regulation of Metabolism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mullur, Rashmi; Liu, Yan-Yun

    2014-01-01

    Thyroid hormone (TH) is required for normal development as well as regulating metabolism in the adult. The thyroid hormone receptor (TR) isoforms, α and β, are differentially expressed in tissues and have distinct roles in TH signaling. Local activation of thyroxine (T4), to the active form, triiodothyronine (T3), by 5′-deiodinase type 2 (D2) is a key mechanism of TH regulation of metabolism. D2 is expressed in the hypothalamus, white fat, brown adipose tissue (BAT), and skeletal muscle and is required for adaptive thermogenesis. The thyroid gland is regulated by thyrotropin releasing hormone (TRH) and thyroid stimulating hormone (TSH). In addition to TRH/TSH regulation by TH feedback, there is central modulation by nutritional signals, such as leptin, as well as peptides regulating appetite. The nutrient status of the cell provides feedback on TH signaling pathways through epigentic modification of histones. Integration of TH signaling with the adrenergic nervous system occurs peripherally, in liver, white fat, and BAT, but also centrally, in the hypothalamus. TR regulates cholesterol and carbohydrate metabolism through direct actions on gene expression as well as cross-talk with other nuclear receptors, including peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor (PPAR), liver X receptor (LXR), and bile acid signaling pathways. TH modulates hepatic insulin sensitivity, especially important for the suppression of hepatic gluconeogenesis. The role of TH in regulating metabolic pathways has led to several new therapeutic targets for metabolic disorders. Understanding the mechanisms and interactions of the various TH signaling pathways in metabolism will improve our likelihood of identifying effective and selective targets. PMID:24692351

  18. Parathyroid Hormone Levels and Cognition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burnett, J.; Smith, S.M.; Aung, K.; Dyer, C.

    2009-01-01

    Hyperparathyroidism is a well-recognized cause of impaired cognition due to hypercalcemia. However, recent studies have suggested that perhaps parathyroid hormone itself plays a role in cognition, especially executive dysfunction. The purpose of this study was to explore the relationship of parathyroid hormone levels in a study cohort of elders with impaied cognition. Methods: Sixty community-living adults, 65 years of age and older, reported to Adult Protective Services for self-neglect and 55 controls matched (on age, ethnicity, gender and socio-economic status) consented and participated in this study. The research team conducted in-home comprehensive geriatric assessments which included the Mini-mental state exam (MMSE), the 15-item geriatric depression scale (GDS) , the Wolf-Klein clock test and a comprehensive nutritional panel, which included parathyroid hormone and ionized calcium. Students t tests and linear regression analyses were performed to assess for bivariate associations. Results: Self-neglecters (M = 73.73, sd=48.4) had significantly higher PTH levels compared to controls (M =47.59, sd=28.7; t=3.59, df=98.94, p<.01). There was no significant group difference in ionized calcium levels. Overall, PTH was correlated with the MMSE (r=-.323, p=.001). Individual regression analyses revealed a statistically significant correlation between PTH and MMSE in the self-neglect group (r=-.298, p=.024) and this remained significant after controlling for ionized calcium levels in the regression. No significant associations were revealed in the control group or among any of the other cognitive measures. Conclusion: Parathyroid hormone may be associated with cognitive performance.

  19. Growth hormone, inflammation and aging

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michal M. Masternak

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Mutant animals characterized by extended longevity provide valuable tools to study the mechanisms of aging. Growth hormone and insulin-like growth factor-1 (IGF-1 constitute one of the well-established pathways involved in the regulation of aging and lifespan. Ames and Snell dwarf mice characterized by GH deficiency as well as growth hormone receptor/growth hormone binding protein knockout (GHRKO mice characterized by GH resistance live significantly longer than genetically normal animals. During normal aging of rodents and humans there is increased insulin resistance, disruption of metabolic activities and decline of the function of the immune system. All of these age related processes promote inflammatory activity, causing long term tissue damage and systemic chronic inflammation. However, studies of long living mutants and calorie restricted animals show decreased pro-inflammatory activity with increased levels of anti-inflammatory adipokines such as adiponectin. At the same time, these animals have improved insulin signaling and carbohydrate homeostasis that relate to alterations in the secretory profile of adipose tissue including increased production and release of anti-inflammatory adipokines. This suggests that reduced inflammation promoting healthy metabolism may represent one of the major mechanisms of extended longevity in long-lived mutant mice and likely also in the human.

  20. Thyroid hormone and seasonal rhythmicity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hugues eDardente

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Living organisms show seasonality in a wide array of functions such as reproduction, fattening, hibernation and migration. At temperate latitudes, changes in photoperiod maintain the alignment of annual rhythms with predictable changes in the environment. The appropriate physiological response to changing photoperiod in mammals requires retinal detection of light and pineal secretion of melatonin, but extraretinal detection of light occurs in birds. A common mechanism across all vertebrates is that these photoperiod-regulated systems alter hypothalamic thyroid hormone conversion. Here we review the evidence that a circadian clock within the pars tuberalis of the adenohypophysis links photoperiod decoding to local changes of thyroid hormone signalling within the medio-basal hypothalamus through a conserved thyrotropin/deiodinase axis. We also focus on recent findings which indicate that, beyond the photoperiodic control of its conversion, thyroid hormone might also be involved in longer term timing processes of seasonal programs. Finally, we examine the potential implication of kisspeptin and RFRP3, two RF-amide peptides expressed within the medio-basal hypothalamus, in seasonal rhythmicity.

  1. Thyroid hormone deiodination in birds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Darras, Veerle M; Verhoelst, Carla H J; Reyns, Geert E; Kühn, Eduard R; Van der Geyten, Serge

    2006-01-01

    Because the avian thyroid gland secretes almost exclusively thyroxine (T4), the availability of receptor-active 3,3',5-triiodothyronine (T3) has to be regulated in the extrathyroidal tissues, essentially by deiodination. Like mammals and most other vertebrates, birds possess three types of iodothyronine deiodinases (D1, D2, and D3) that closely resemble their mammalian counterparts, as shown by biochemical characterization studies in several avian species and by cDNA cloning of the three enzymes in chicken. The tissue distribution of these deiodinases has been studied in detail in chicken at the level of activity and mRNA expression. More recently specific antibodies were used to study cellular localization at the protein level. The abundance and distribution of the different deiodinases shows substantial variation during embryonic development and postnatal life. Deiodination in birds is subject to regulation by hormones from several endocrine axes, including thyroid hormones, growth hormone and glucocorticoids. In addition, deiodination is also influenced by external parameters, such as nutrition, temperature, light and also a number of environmental pollutants. The balance between the outer and inner ring deiodination resulting from the impact of all these factors ultimately controls T3 availability.

  2. Variables That Best Differentiate In-Patient Acute Stroke from Stroke-Mimics with Acute Neurological Deficits

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. Natteru

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Strokes and stroke-mimics have been extensively studied in the emergency department setting. Although in-hospital strokes are less studied in comparison to strokes in the emergency department, they are a source of significant direct and indirect costs. Differentiating in-hospital strokes from stroke-mimics is important. Thus, our study aimed to identify variables that can differentiate in-hospital strokes from stroke-mimics. Methods. We present here a retrospective analysis of 93 patients over a one-year period (2009 to 2010, who were evaluated for a concern of in-hospital strokes. Results. About two-thirds (57 of these patients were determined to have a stroke, and the remaining (36 were stroke-mimics. Patients with in-hospital strokes were more likely to be obese (p=0.03, have been admitted to the cardiology service (p=0.01, have atrial fibrillation (p=0.03, have a weak hand or hemiparesis (p=0.03, and have a prior history of stroke (p=0.05, whereas, when the consults were called for “altered mental status” but no other deficits (p<0.0001, it is likely a stroke-mimic. Conclusion. This study demonstrates that in-hospital strokes are a common occurrence, and knowing the variables can aid in their timely diagnosis and treatment.

  3. Review of Breast Cancers That Can Mimic a Cystic Component: Ultrasonographic and Pathologic Correlations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chang, Yun Woo; Kwon, Kui Hyang; Choi, Deuk Lin; Lee, Dong Wha [Dept. of Radiology, (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Kyung Whan [Dept. of Radiology, Soonchunhyang Cheonan Hospital, Cheonan (Korea, Republic of); Yang, Seung Bo [Dept. of Radiology, Soonchunhyang Gumi Hospital, Gumi (Korea, Republic of)

    2011-05-15

    We illustrate the sonographic findings of malignant breast masses that can mimic a cystic component with pathologic correlations. The disease entities presented in this study include infiltrating ductal carcinoma, ductal carcinoma in situ (DCIS), papillary carcinoma, mucinous carcinoma, medullary carcinoma, metaplastic carcinoma, and a malignant phyllodes tumor. Malignant masses with a cystic component are often characterized by well-circumscribed round, oval, or lobular masses, thereby appearing benign on ultrasonography. On pathology, the cystic component of a malignant mass is identified by cystic degeneration, hemorrhage, necrosis, or ductal dilatation. If the mass is well-circumscribed with a cystic component, a biopsy should be considered in the analysis of the solid component within a mass.

  4. Identification of chemicals that mimic transcriptional changes associated with autism, brain aging and neurodegeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pearson, Brandon L; Simon, Jeremy M; McCoy, Eric S; Salazar, Gabriela; Fragola, Giulia; Zylka, Mark J

    2016-03-31

    Environmental factors, including pesticides, have been linked to autism and neurodegeneration risk using retrospective epidemiological studies. Here we sought to prospectively identify chemicals that share transcriptomic signatures with neurological disorders, by exposing mouse cortical neuron-enriched cultures to hundreds of chemicals commonly found in the environment and on food. We find that rotenone, a pesticide associated with Parkinson's disease risk, and certain fungicides, including pyraclostrobin, trifloxystrobin, famoxadone and fenamidone, produce transcriptional changes in vitro that are similar to those seen in brain samples from humans with autism, advanced age and neurodegeneration (Alzheimer's disease and Huntington's disease). These chemicals stimulate free radical production and disrupt microtubules in neurons, effects that can be reduced by pretreating with a microtubule stabilizer, an antioxidant, or with sulforaphane. Our study provides an approach to prospectively identify environmental chemicals that transcriptionally mimic autism and other brain disorders.

  5. Differential Diagnoses of Restless Legs Syndrome/Willis-Ekbom Disease: Mimics and Comorbidities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chokroverty, Sudhansu

    2015-09-01

    Restless legs syndrome (RLS) mimics cannot always be differentiated from RLS/Willis-Ekbom disease (WED) based on 4 essential criteria; hence, a fifth criterion has recently been established. RLS comorbidities may provide us important clues for understanding the neurobiology of RLS/WED. Iron-dopamine connection, hypoxia pathway activation, and dopamine-opioid interaction are important pathophysiological mechanisms in RLS; this knowledge is derived from our understanding of RLS associations with a variety of medical, neurologic, and other conditions. Clinicians must formulate an RLS differential diagnosis based on history and physical examination, but laboratory tests may sometimes be needed to arrive at a correct diagnosis. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. FIESTA: an MR arthrography celebration of shoulder joint anatomy, variants, and their mimics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, D; Turmezei, T D; Kerslake, R W

    2013-03-01

    Magnetic resonance (MR) arthrography is currently the gold standard radiological investigation for shoulder joint instability. Not only does this investigation allow for identification of important disease processes, but the reduced slice thickness and increased in-plane resolution allowed by the latest imaging sequences also gives excellent demonstration of shoulder joint internal anatomy. This article describes the technique of MR arthrography of the shoulder practiced at our institution, briefly outlining features of the FIESTA (fast imaging employing steady state acquisition) MR sequence employed, including its advantages and limitations. A pictorial review of shoulder MR arthrography performed with this technique is presented, concentrating on normal shoulder joint internal anatomy and anatomical variants that may mimic pathology. Copyright © 2012 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  7. Giant Polymersome Protocells Dock with Virus Particle Mimics via Multivalent Glycan-Lectin Interactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kubilis, Artur; Abdulkarim, Ali; Eissa, Ahmed M.; Cameron, Neil R.

    2016-08-01

    Despite the low complexity of their components, several simple physical systems, including microspheres, coacervate droplets and phospholipid membrane structures (liposomes), have been suggested as protocell models. These, however, lack key cellular characteristics, such as the ability to replicate or to dock with extracellular species. Here, we report a simple method for the de novo creation of synthetic cell mimics in the form of giant polymeric vesicles (polymersomes), which are capable of behavior approaching that of living cells. These polymersomes form by self-assembly, under electroformation conditions, of amphiphilic, glycosylated block copolymers in aqueous solution. The glycosylated exterior of the resulting polymeric giant unilamellar vesicles (GUVs) allows their selective interaction with carbohydrate-binding receptor-functionalized particles, in a manner reminiscent of the cell-surface docking of virus particles. We believe that this is the first example of a simple protocell model displaying cell-like behavior through a native receptor-ligand interaction.

  8. Structural mimics of viruses through peptide/DNA co-assembly.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ni, Rong; Chau, Ying

    2014-12-31

    A synthetic mimic of viral structure has been constructed by the synergistic co-assembly of a 16-amino acid peptide and plasmid DNA. The rational design of this short peptide, including segments for binding DNA and forming β-sheet, is inspired by viral capsid protein. The resulting nanostructures, which we term nanococoons, appear as ellipsoids of virus-like dimension (65 × 47 nm) and display repeating stripes of ∼4 nm wide. We propose that the co-assembly process involves DNA as a template to assist the organization of peptide strands by electrostatic interaction, while the bilayer β-sheets and their lateral association stabilize the peptide "capsid" and organize the DNA within. The hierarchy affords an extremely stable structure, protecting peptide and DNA against enzymatic digestion. It opens a new and facile avenue to fabricate viral alternatives with diverse functions.

  9. Extruded highly proliferative benign mucous neck cells: a peculiar histologic mimic of poorly cohesive gastric carcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arnason, Thomas; Lauwers, Gregory Y

    2014-10-01

    Histologic mimics of poorly cohesive gastric carcinoma are uncommon but are important for pathologists to recognize. Here we report 2 cases of a novel histologic pattern mimicking poorly cohesive gastric carcinoma. In both cases, light microscopy revealed sheets of discohesive epithelial cells with prominent mitoses that have high proliferative activity, with a Ki67 proliferation index greater than 70%. One case was diagnosed as poorly cohesive carcinoma at an outside hospital and the other was referred in consultation as atypia of undetermined significance. Reexamination of the hematoxylin-eosin slides revealed morphologic clues that these sheets of discohesive cells represent artifactual extrusion of the highly proliferative neck zone from the surrounding benign mucosa. In contrast to poorly cohesive cancer, this artifact lacks all of the following diagnostic features: nuclear atypia, signet ring cell morphology, and intercellular stroma with infiltrating single cells between glands. Eight and 14 months later, both patients remain cancer free. © The Author(s) 2013.

  10. Effects of disc asymmetries on astrometric measurements - Can they mimic planets?

    CERN Document Server

    Kral, Quentin; Kennedy, Grant; Souami, Damya

    2016-01-01

    Astrometry covers a parameter space that cannot be reached by RV or transit methods to detect terrestrial planets on wide orbits. In addition, high accuracy astrometric measurements are necessary to measure the inclination of the planet's orbits. Here we investigate the principles of an artefact of the astrometric approach. Namely, the displacement of the photo-centre due to inhomogeneities in a dust disc around the parent star. Indeed, theory and observations show that circumstellar discs can present strong asymmetries. We model the pseudo-astrometric signal caused by these inhomogeneities, asking whether a dust clump in a disc can mimic the astrometric signal of an Earth-like planet. We show that these inhomogeneities cannot be neglected when using astrometry to find terrestrial planets. We provide the parameter space for which these inhomogeneities can affect the astrometric signals but still not be detected by mid-IR observations. We find that a small cross section of dust corresponding to a cometary mass...

  11. Insights from the structure of a smallpox virus topoisomerase-DNA transition state mimic

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perry, Kay; Hwang, Young; Bushman, Frederic D.; Van Duyne, Gregory D.

    2010-01-01

    Summary Poxviruses encode their own type IB topoisomerases (TopIBs) which release superhelical tension generated by replication and transcription of their genomes. To investigate the reaction catalyzed viral TopIBs, we have determined the structure of a variola virus topoisomerase-DNA complex trapped as a vanadate transition state mimic. The structure reveals how the viral TopIB enzymes are likely to position the DNA duplex for ligation following relaxation of supercoils and identifies the sources of friction observed in single molecule experiments that argue against free rotation. The structure also identifies a conformational change in the leaving group sugar that must occur prior to cleavage and reveals a mechanism for promoting ligation following relaxation of supercoils that involves a novel Asp-minor groove interaction. Overall, the new structural data support a common catalytic mechanism for the TopIB superfamily but indicate distinct methods for controlling duplex rotation in the small vs. large enzyme subfamilies. PMID:20152159

  12. Systemic lupus erythematosis with antiphospholipid antibody syndrome: A mimic of Buerger′s disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vasugi Zoya

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available This case report is about a past smoker who presented with history of recurrent ulcers and digital gangrene with claudication pain of the left foot for the past fifteen years. Clinical examination and angiogram showed disease involving the peripheral vessels of lowervlimb. This patient had been labeled as Buerger′s disease 15 years ago based on clinical and demographic profile of the illness. We felt that the progression of the disease despite the patient having stopped smoking 15 years ago along with the presence of elevated inflammatory markers in the blood with proteinuria was not in keeping with the nature of the disease. Furthur evaluation revealed that the patient had systemic lupus erythematosus with antiphospholipid antibody syndrome. This case highlights the need for a careful search for diseases, which can mimic Buerger′s disease in young smokers who present with peripheral vascular disease and who have an atypical clinical presentation or progression.

  13. Nonlinear mechanics of hybrid polymer networks that mimic the complex mechanical environment of cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jaspers, Maarten; Vaessen, Sarah L.; van Schayik, Pim; Voerman, Dion; Rowan, Alan E.; Kouwer, Paul H. J.

    2017-05-01

    The mechanical properties of cells and the extracellular environment they reside in are governed by a complex interplay of biopolymers. These biopolymers, which possess a wide range of stiffnesses, self-assemble into fibrous composite networks such as the cytoskeleton and extracellular matrix. They interact with each other both physically and chemically to create a highly responsive and adaptive mechanical environment that stiffens when stressed or strained. Here we show that hybrid networks of a synthetic mimic of biological networks and either stiff, flexible and semi-flexible components, even very low concentrations of these added components, strongly affect the network stiffness and/or its strain-responsive character. The stiffness (persistence length) of the second network, its concentration and the interaction between the components are all parameters that can be used to tune the mechanics of the hybrids. The equivalence of these hybrids with biological composites is striking.

  14. Brief optogenetic inhibition of dopamine neurons mimics endogenous negative reward prediction errors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Chun Yun; Esber, Guillem R; Marrero-Garcia, Yasmin; Yau, Hau-Jie; Bonci, Antonello; Schoenbaum, Geoffrey

    2016-01-01

    Correlative studies have strongly linked phasic changes in dopamine activity with reward prediction error signaling. But causal evidence that these brief changes in firing actually serve as error signals to drive associative learning is more tenuous. Although there is direct evidence that brief increases can substitute for positive prediction errors, there is no comparable evidence that similarly brief pauses can substitute for negative prediction errors. In the absence of such evidence, the effect of increases in firing could reflect novelty or salience, variables also correlated with dopamine activity. Here we provide evidence in support of the proposed linkage, showing in a modified Pavlovian over-expectation task that brief pauses in the firing of dopamine neurons in rat ventral tegmental area at the time of reward are sufficient to mimic the effects of endogenous negative prediction errors. These results support the proposal that brief changes in the firing of dopamine neurons serve as full-fledged bidirectional prediction error signals.

  15. Giant Polymersome Protocells Dock with Virus Particle Mimics via Multivalent Glycan-Lectin Interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kubilis, Artur; Abdulkarim, Ali; Eissa, Ahmed M; Cameron, Neil R

    2016-08-31

    Despite the low complexity of their components, several simple physical systems, including microspheres, coacervate droplets and phospholipid membrane structures (liposomes), have been suggested as protocell models. These, however, lack key cellular characteristics, such as the ability to replicate or to dock with extracellular species. Here, we report a simple method for the de novo creation of synthetic cell mimics in the form of giant polymeric vesicles (polymersomes), which are capable of behavior approaching that of living cells. These polymersomes form by self-assembly, under electroformation conditions, of amphiphilic, glycosylated block copolymers in aqueous solution. The glycosylated exterior of the resulting polymeric giant unilamellar vesicles (GUVs) allows their selective interaction with carbohydrate-binding receptor-functionalized particles, in a manner reminiscent of the cell-surface docking of virus particles. We believe that this is the first example of a simple protocell model displaying cell-like behavior through a native receptor-ligand interaction.

  16. Thyroid hormone receptors bind to defined regions of the growth hormone and placental lactogen genes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barlow, J W; Voz, M L; Eliard, P H; Mathy-Harter, M; De Nayer, P; Economidis, I V; Belayew, A; Martial, J A; Rousseau, G G

    1986-12-01

    The intracellular receptor for thyroid hormone is a protein found in chromatin. Since thyroid hormone stimulates transcription of the growth hormone gene through an unknown mechanism, the hypothesis that the thyroid hormone-receptor complex interacts with defined regions of this gene has been investigated in a cell-free system. Nuclear extracts from human lymphoblastoid IM-9 cells containing thyroid hormone receptors were incubated with L-3,5,3'-tri[125I]iodothyronine and calf thymus DNA-cellulose. Restriction fragments of the human growth hormone gene were added to determine their ability to inhibit labeled receptor binding to DNA-cellulose. These fragments encompassed nucleotide sequences from about three kilobase pairs upstream to about four kilobase pairs downstream from the transcription initiation site. The thyroid hormone-receptor complex bound preferentially to the 5'-flanking sequences of the growth hormone gene in a region between nucleotide coordinates -290 and -129. The receptor also bound to an analogous promoter region in the human placental lactogen gene, which has 92% nucleotide sequence homology with the growth hormone gene. These binding regions appear to be distinct from those that are recognized by the receptor for glucocorticoids, which stimulate growth hormone gene expression synergistically with thyroid hormone. The presence of thyroid hormone was required for binding of its receptor to the growth hormone gene promoter, suggesting that thyroid hormone renders the receptor capable of recognizing specific gene regions.

  17. Dynamic processes in biological membrane mimics revealed by quasielastic neutron scattering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lautner, Lisa; Pluhackova, Kristyna; Barth, Nicolai K H; Seydel, Tilo; Lohstroh, Wiebke; Böckmann, Rainer A; Unruh, Tobias

    2017-08-01

    Neutron scattering is a powerful tool to study relaxation processes in biological membrane mimics in space and time. Combining different inelastic and quasielastic neutron scattering techniques, a large dynamic range can be covered: from atomic to mesoscopic lengths and from femto- to some hundreds of nanoseconds in time. This allows studies on e.g. the diffusion of lipids, the membrane undulation motions, the dispersion of sound waves in membranes as well as the mutual interactions of membrane constituents such as lipids, proteins, and additives. In particular, neutron scattering provides a quite direct experimental approach to the inter-atomic and inter-molecular potentials on length and time scales which are perfectly accessible by molecular dynamics (MD) simulations. Neutron scattering experiments may thus substantially support the further refinement of biomolecular force fields for MD simulations by supplying structural and dynamical information with high spatial and temporal resolution. In turn, MD simulations support the interpretation of neutron scattering data. The combination of both, neutron scattering experiments and MD simulations, yields an unprecedented insight into the molecular interactions governing the structure and dynamics of biological membranes. This review provides an overview of the molecular dynamics in biological membrane mimics as revealed by neutron scattering. It focuses on the latest findings such as the fundamental molecular mechanism of lateral lipid diffusion as well as the influence of additives and proteins on the short-time dynamics of lipids. Special emphasis is placed on the comparison of recent neutron scattering and MD simulation data with respect to molecular membrane dynamics on the pico- to nanosecond time scale. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. Seminal epithelium in prostate biopsy can mimic malignant and premalignant prostatic lesions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arista-Nasr, J; Trolle-Silva, A; Aguilar-Ayala, E; Martínez-Benítez, B

    2016-01-01

    In most prostate biopsies, the seminal epithelium is easily recognised because it meets characteristic histological criteria. However, some biopsies can mimic malignant or premalignant prostatic lesions. The aims of this study were to analyse the histological appearance of the biopsies that mimic adenocarcinomas or preneoplastic prostatic lesions, discuss the differential diagnosis and determine the frequency of seminal epithelia in prostate biopsies. We consecutively reviewed 500 prostate puncture biopsies obtained using the sextant method and selected those cases in which we observed seminal vesicle or ejaculatory duct epithelium. In the biopsies in which the seminal epithelium resembled malignant or premalignant lesions, immunohistochemical studies were conducted that included prostate-specific antigen and MUC6. The most important clinical data were recorded. Thirty-six (7.2%) biopsies showed seminal epithelium, and 7 of them (1.4%) resembled various prostate lesions, including high-grade prostatic intraepithelial neoplasia, atypical acinar proliferations, adenocarcinomas with papillary patterns and poorly differentiated carcinoma. The seminal epithelium resembled prostate lesions when the lipofuscin deposit, the perinuclear vacuoles or the nuclear pseudoinclusions were inconspicuous or missing. Five of the 7 biopsies showed mild to moderate cellular atypia with small and hyperchromatic nuclei, and only 2 showed cellular pleomorphism. The patients were alive and asymptomatic after an average of 6 years of progression. The seminal epithelium resembles prostatic intraepithelial neoplasia, atypical acinar proliferations and various types of prostatic adenocarcinomas in approximately 1.4% of prostate biopsies. Copyright © 2015 AEU. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  19. Coexposure to phytoestrogens and bisphenol a mimics estrogenic effects in an additive manner.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katchy, Anne; Pinto, Caroline; Jonsson, Philip; Nguyen-Vu, Trang; Pandelova, Marchela; Riu, Anne; Schramm, Karl-Werner; Samarov, Daniel; Gustafsson, Jan-Åke; Bondesson, Maria; Williams, Cecilia

    2014-03-01

    Endocrine-disrupting chemicals (EDC) are abundant in our environment. A number of EDCs, including bisphenol A (BPA) can bind to the estrogen receptors (ER), ERα and ERβ, and may contribute to estrogen-linked diseases such as breast cancer. Early exposure is of particular concern; many EDCs cross the placenta and infants have measurable levels of, eg, BPA. In addition, infants are frequently fed soy-based formula (SF) that contains phytoestrogens. Effects of combined exposure to xeno- and phytoestrogens are poorly studied. Here, we extensively compared to what extent BPA, genistein, and an extract of infant SF mimic estrogen-induced gene transcription and cell proliferation. We investigated ligand-specific effects on ER activation in HeLa-ERα and ERβ reporter cells; on proliferation, genome-wide gene regulation and non-ER-mediated effects in MCF7 breast cancer cells; and how coexposure influenced these effects. The biological relevance was explored using enrichment analyses of differentially regulated genes and clustering with clinical breast cancer profiles. We demonstrate that coexposure to BPA and genistein, or SF, results in increased functional and transcriptional estrogenic effects. Using statistical modeling, we determine that BPA and phytoestrogens act in an additive manner. The proliferative and transcriptional effects of the tested compounds mimic those of 17β-estradiol, and are abolished by cotreatment with an ER antagonist. Gene expression profiles induced by each compound clustered with poor prognosis breast cancer, indicating that exposure may adversely affect breast cancer prognosis. This study accentuates that coexposure to BPA and soy-based phytoestrogens results in additive estrogenic effects, and may contribute to estrogen-linked diseases, including breast cancer.

  20. Plants altering hormonal milieu: A review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Prashant Tiwari

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the present review article is to investigate the herbs which can alter the levels of hormones like Follicle stimulating hormone, Prolactin, Growth hormone, Insulin, Thyroxine, Estrogen, Progesterone, Testosterone, and Relaxin etc. Hormones are chemical signal agents produced by different endocrine glands for regulating our biological functions. The glands like pituitary, thyroid, adrenal, ovaries in women and testes in men all secrete a number of hormones with different actions. However, when these hormones are perfectly balanced then people become healthy and fit. But several factors like pathophysiological as well as biochemical changes, disease conditions, changes in the atmosphere, changes in the body, diet changes etc. may result in imbalance of various hormones that produce undesirable symptoms and disorders. As medicinal plants have their importance since ancient time, people have been using it in various ways as a source of medicine for regulation of hormonal imbalance. Moreover, it is observed that certain herbs have a balancing effect on hormones and have great impact on well-being of the people. So, considering these facts we expect that the article provides an overview on medicinal plants with potential of altering hormone level.

  1. Hormone symphony during root growth and development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garay-Arroyo, Adriana; De La Paz Sánchez, María; García-Ponce, Berenice; Azpeitia, Eugenio; Alvarez-Buylla, Elena R

    2012-12-01

    Hormones regulate plant growth and development in response to external environmental stimuli via complex signal transduction pathways, which in turn form complex networks of interaction. Several classes of hormones have been reported, and their activity depends on their biosynthesis, transport, conjugation, accumulation in the vacuole, and degradation. However, the activity of a given hormone is also dependent on its interaction with other hormones. Indeed, there is a complex crosstalk between hormones that regulates their biosynthesis, transport, and/or signaling functionality, although some hormones have overlapping or opposite functions. The plant root is a particularly useful system in which to study the complex role of plant hormones in the plastic control of plant development. Physiological, cellular, and molecular genetic approaches have been used to study the role of plant hormones in root meristem homeostasis. In this review, we discuss recent findings on the synthesis, signaling, transport of hormones and role during root development and examine the role of hormone crosstalk in maintaining homeostasis in the apical root meristem.

  2. The Enzyme-mimic Activity of Ferric Nano-Core Residing in Ferritin and Its Biosensing Applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tang, Zhiwen; Wu, Hong J.; Zhang, Youyu; Li, Zhaohui; Lin, Yuehe

    2011-11-15

    Ferritins are nano-scale globular protein cages encapsulating a ferric core. They widely exist in animals, plants, and microbes, playing indispensable roles in iron homeostasis. Interestingly, our study clearly demonstrates that ferritin has an enzyme-mimic activity derived from its ferric nano-core, but not the protein cage. Further study revealed that the mimic-enzyme activity of ferritin is more thermally stable and pH-tolerant compared with horseradish peroxidase. Considering the abundance of ferritin in numerous organisms, this finding may indicate a new role of ferritin in antioxidant and detoxification metabolisms. In addition, as a natural protein-caged nanoparticle with an enzyme-mimic activity, ferritin is readily conjugated with biomolecules to construct nano-biosensors, thus holds promising potential for facile and biocompatible labeling for sensitive and robust bioassays in biomedical applications.

  3. Dimeric Arrangement of the Parathyroid Hormone Receptor and a Structural Mechanism for Ligand-induced Dissociation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pioszak, Augen A.; Harikumar, Kaleeckal G.; Parker, Naomi R.; Miller, Laurence J.; Xu, H. Eric (Van Andel); (Mayo)

    2010-06-25

    The parathyroid hormone receptor (PTH1R) is a class B G protein-coupled receptor that is activated by parathyroid hormone (PTH) and PTH-related protein (PTHrP). Little is known about the oligomeric state of the receptor and its regulation by hormone. The crystal structure of the ligand-free PTH1R extracellular domain (ECD) reveals an unexpected dimer in which the C-terminal segment of both ECD protomers forms an {alpha}-helix that mimics PTH/PTHrP by occupying the peptide binding groove of the opposing protomer. ECD-mediated oligomerization of intact PTH1R was confirmed in living cells by bioluminescence and fluorescence resonance energy transfer experiments. As predicted by the structure, PTH binding disrupted receptor oligomerization. A receptor rendered monomeric by mutations in the ECD retained wild-type PTH binding and cAMP signaling ability. Our results are consistent with the hypothesis that PTH1R forms constitutive dimers that are dissociated by ligand binding and that monomeric PTH1R is capable of activating G protein.

  4. Twenty-five Years of PTHrP Progress from Cancer Hormone to Multifunctional Cytokine

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCauley, Laurie K.; Martin, T. John

    2016-01-01

    Twenty-five years ago a ‘new’ protein was identified from cancers that caused hypercalcemia. It was credited for its ability to mimic parathyroid hormone, and hence was termed parathyroid hormone-related protein (PTHrP). Today it is recognized for its widespread distribution, its endocrine, paracrine, and intracrine modes of action driving numerous physiologic and pathologic conditions with a central role in organogenesis. The multiple biological activities within a complex molecule with paracrine modulation of adjacent target cells present boundless possibilities. The protein structure of PTHrP has been traced, dissected and deleted comprehensively and conditionally, yet numerous questions lurk in its past that will carry into the future. Issues of the variable segments of the protein including the enigmatic nuclear localization sequence are only recently being clarified. Aspects of PTHrP production and action in the menacing condition of cancer are emerging as dichotomies that may represent intended temporal actions of PTHrP. Relative to PTH, the hormone regulating calcium homeostasis, PTHrP ‘controls the show’ locally at the PTH/PTHrP receptor throughout the body. Great strides have been made in our understanding of PTHrP actions, yet years of exciting investigation and discovery are imminent. PMID:22549910

  5. Effect of growth hormone replacement therapy on pituitary hormone secretion and hormone replacement therapies in GHD adults

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hubina, Erika; Mersebach, Henriette; Rasmussen, Ase Krogh;

    2004-01-01

    We tested the impact of commencement of GH replacement therapy in GH-deficient (GHD) adults on the circulating levels of other anterior pituitary and peripheral hormones and the need for re-evaluation of other hormone replacement therapies, especially the need for dose changes.......We tested the impact of commencement of GH replacement therapy in GH-deficient (GHD) adults on the circulating levels of other anterior pituitary and peripheral hormones and the need for re-evaluation of other hormone replacement therapies, especially the need for dose changes....

  6. Expression of growth hormone and growth hormone receptor in fibroadenomas of the breast.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lenicek, Tanja; Kasumović, Dino; Stajduhar, Emil; Dzombeta, Tihana; Jukić, Zoran; Kruslin, Bozo

    2013-06-01

    Fibroadenoma is the most prevalent benign breast tumor. It consists of epithelial and stromal components. In general, breast tumors are highly hormonally dependent and growth hormone by its physiology may have a possible oncogenic potential. Therefore, the aim of this study was to determine the expression of growth hormone and growth hormone receptor in epithelial and stromal components of fibroadenomas. Study group included 30 randomly chosen fibroadenomas from female patients aged between 18 and 69 years. The expression of growth hormone and growth hormone receptor was defined in both histologic components of fibroadenomas. Growth hormone was expressed in 96.7% of both epithelial and stromal components of fibroadenomas, with stronger expression in the stromal component. The same percentage of positive reaction (96.7%) was obtained in the epithelial component of fibroadenomas for growth hormone receptor expression. Only 6.7% of stromal components tested for growth hormone receptor were positive. The high expression of growth hormone and growth hormone receptor in fibroadenoma tissue indicates their possible role in the pathogenesis of this tumor. Follow up of patients with high expression of growth hormone and growth hormone receptor may be suggested.

  7. The thyroid hormone, parathyroid hormone and vitamin D associated hypertension

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sandeep Chopra

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Thyroid disorders and primary hyperparathyroidism have been known to be associated with increases in blood pressure. The hypertension related to hypothyroidism is a result of increased peripheral resistance, changes in renal hemodynamics, hormonal changes and obesity. Treatment of hypothyroidism with levo-thyroxine replacement causes a decrease in blood pressure and an overall decline in cardiovascular risk. High blood pressure has also been noted in patients with subclinical hypothyroidism. Hyperthyroidism, on the other hand, is associated with systolic hypertension resulting from an expansion of the circulating blood volume and increase in stroke volume. Increased serum calcium levels associated with a primary increase in parathyroid hormone levels have been also associated with high blood pressure recordings. The mechanism for this is not clear but the theories include an increase in the activity of the renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system and vasoconstriction. Treatment of primary hyperparathyroidism by surgery results in a decline in blood pressure and a decrease in the plasma renin activity. Finally, this review also looks at more recent evidence linking hypovitaminosis D with cardiovascular risk factors, particularly hypertension, and the postulated mechanisms linking the two.

  8. Evaluating the function of putative hormone transporters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frommer, Wolf B; Schulz, Burkhard; Murphy, Angus S

    2009-02-01

    Hormones typically serve as long distance signaling molecules. To reach their site of action, hormones need to be transported from the sites of synthesis. Many plant hormones are mobile, thus requiring specific transport systems for the export from their source cells as well as subsequent import into target cells. Hormone transport in general is still poorly understood. Auxin is probably the most intensively studied plant hormone concerning transport in the moment. To advance our understanding of hormone transport we need two principal data sets: information on the properties of the transport systems including substrate specificity and kinetics, and we need to identify candidate genes for the respective transporters. Physiological transport data can provide an important basis for identifying and characterizing candidate transporters and to define their in vivo role. A recent publication in Plant Physiology highlights how kinetic and specificity studies may help to identify cytokinin transporters.

  9. Physical Activity and Obesity Related Hormones

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mehdi Hedayati

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Probably, obesity can be considered as the most common metabolic disorder. In other words, the control of metabolism is disrupted in this condition. The most important metabolic control is performed by hormones. Today, adipose tissue is considered as an active tissue in secretion of hormones. In obesity, in addition to adipose tissue hormones, effective neuropeptides on appetite are interfered. There are 4 main approaches in the management and treatment of obesity including nutrition and diet therapy, physical activity, medical and surgical approaches. The specialists and obese patients prefer the first and second approaches. Physical activity helps to control and treat this disorder by influencing on obesity-related hormones. The main obesity-related hormones are ghrelin, agouti, obestatin, leptin, adiponectin, nesfatin, visfatin, tumor necrosis factor, interleukin-6, and resistin. In this review, the effect of physical activity on 10 major obesity-related hormones has been discussed.

  10. Do hormones influence melanoma? Facts and controversies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gupta, Amie; Driscoll, Marcia S

    2010-01-01

    The issue of whether hormones influence malignant melanoma (MM) has been controversial for many years. Although early case reports demonstrated a negative effect of hormones, recent evidence has not supported a potential role for hormones in MM. We address whether exogenous and endogenous hormones influence a woman's risk for MM or affect her prognosis if diagnosed with MM. Multiple epidemiologic studies show the use of oral contraceptives or hormone replacement therapy does not appear to increase a woman's risk for MM. Pregnancy does not appear to influence a woman's risk of MM, nor does pregnancy appear to affect prognosis in the woman diagnosed with MM. When counseling the woman who is diagnosed with MM during pregnancy or during the childbearing years, future use of oral contraceptives or hormone replacement therapy is not contraindicated; counseling concerning future pregnancies should be done on a case-by-case basis, with emphasis placed on established prognostic factors for MM.

  11. Aluminum, parathyroid hormone, and osteomalacia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Burnatowska-Hledin, M.A.; Kaiser, L.; Mayor, G.H.

    1983-01-01

    Aluminum exposure in man is unavoidable. The occurrence of dialysis dementia, vitamin D-resistant osteomalacia, and hypochromic microcytic anemia in dialysis patients underscores the potential for aluminum toxicity. Although exposure via dialysate and hyperalimentation leads to significant tissue aluminum accumulation, the ubiquitous occurrence of aluminum and the severe pathology associated with large aluminum burdens suggest that smaller exposures via the gastrointestinal tract and lungs could represent an important, though largely unrecognized, public health problem. It is clear that some aluminum absorption occurs with the ingestion of small amounts of aluminum in the diet and medicines, and even greater aluminum absorption is seen in individuals consuming large amounts of aluminum present in antacids. Aluminum absorption is enhanced in the presence of elevated circulating parathyroid hormone. In addition, elevated PTH leads to the preferential deposition of aluminum in brain and bone. Consequently, PTH is likely to be involved in the pathogenesis of toxicities in those organs. PTH excess also seems to lead to the deposition of aluminum in the parathyroid gland. The in vitro demonstration that aluminum inhibits parathyroid hormone release is consistent with the findings of a euparathyroid state in dialysis patients with aluminum related vitamin D-resistant osteomalacia. Nevertheless, it seems likely that hyperparathyroidism is at least initially involved in the pathogenesis of aluminum neurotoxicity and osteomalacia; the increases in tissue aluminum stores are followed by suppression of parathyroid hormone release, which is required for the evolution of osteomalacia. Impaired renal function is not a prerequisite for increased tissue aluminum burdens, nor for aluminum-related organ toxicity. Consequently, it is likely that these diseases will be observed in populations other than those with chronic renal disease.

  12. Thyroid hormone metabolism in poultry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Darras V.M.

    2000-01-01

    Full Text Available Thyroid hormone (TH receptors preferentially bind 3.5,3'-triiodothyronine (T3. Therefore the metabolism of thyroxine (T4 secreted by the thyroid gland in peripheral tissues, resulting in the production and degradation of receptor-active T3, plays a major role in thyroid function. The most important metabolic pathway for THs is deiodination. Another important pathway is sulfation, which is a reversible pathway that has been shown to interact with TH deiodination efficiency. The enzymes catalysing TH deiodination consist of three types. Type 1 deiodinase (D1 catalyses both outer ring (ORD and inner ring deiodinalion (IRD. Type II deiodinase (D2 only catalyses ORD while type III (D3 only catalyses IRD. The three chicken deiodinase cDNAs have been cloned recently. These enzymes all belong to the family of selenoproteins. Ontogenetic studies show that the availability of deiodinases is regulated in a tissue specific and developmental stage dependent way. Characteristic for the chicken is the presence of very high levels off, inactivating D3 enzyme in the embryonic liver. Hepatic D3 is subject to acute regulation in a number of situations. Both growth hormone and glucocorticoid injection rapidly decrease hepatic D3 levels, hereby increasing plasma T3 without affecting hepatic D1 levels. The inhibition of D3 seems to be regulated mainly at the level of D3 gene transcription. The effect of growth hormone on D3 expression persists throughout life, while glucocorticoids start to inhibit hepatic D1 expression in posthatch chickens. Food restriction in growing chickens increases hepatic D3 levels. This contributes to the decrease in plasma T3 necessary to reduce energy loss. Refeeding restores hepatic D3 and plasma T3 to control levels within a few hours. It can be concluded that the tissue and time dependent regulation of the balance between TH activating and inactivating enzymes plays an essential role in the control of local T3 availability and hence in

  13. Anticoncepción hormonal

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Miguel Lugones Botell

    1997-02-01

    Full Text Available Se realizó una revisión de los anticonceptivos hormonales con énfasis en aspectos que van desde su descubrimiento, el mecanismo de acción, los diferentes tipos y formas de utilización, así como el esquema de administración terapéutica en algunas entidades, sus indicaciones, ventajas y contraindicaciones: A review of the hormonal contraceptives was carried out, emphasizing on features from their discovery, trigger mechanism, different kinds, and ways to use them, as well as the scheme of the therapeutical administration in some entities, its indications, advantages, and contraindications.

  14. Parathyroid hormone and bone healing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ellegaard, M; Jørgensen, N R; Schwarz, P

    2010-01-01

    , no pharmacological treatments are available. There is therefore an unmet need for medications that can stimulate bone healing. Parathyroid hormone (PTH) is the first bone anabolic drug approved for the treatment of osteoporosis, and intriguingly a number of animal studies suggest that PTH could be beneficial...... in the treatment of fractures and could thus be a potentially new treatment option for induction of fracture healing in humans. Furthermore, fractures in animals with experimental conditions of impaired healing such as aging, estrogen withdrawal, and malnutrition can heal in an expedited manner after PTH treatment...

  15. Plant Hormones: Metabolism, Signaling and Crosstalk

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Li-Jia Qu; Yunde Zhao

    2011-01-01

    @@ Plants synthesize various hormones in response to environmental cues and developmental signals to ensure their proper growth and development.Elucidation of the molecular mechanisms by which plant hormones control growth and development contributes to our understanding of fundamental plant biology and provides tools to improve crops.Because of their critical roles in plant growth and development, plant hormones have been studied extensively since the early days of plant biology.

  16. Growth hormone insensitivity syndrome: A sensitive approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Soumik Goswami

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Patients with Growth Hormone Insensitivity have characteristic phenotypic features and severe short stature. The underlying basis are mutations in the growth hormone receptor gene which gives rise to a characteristic hormonal profile. Although a scoring system has been devised for the diagnosis of this disorder, it has not been indisputably validated. The massive expense incurred in the diagnosis and treatment of this condition with suboptimal therapeutic response necessitates a judicious approach in this regard in our country.

  17. Obesity, growth hormone and weight loss

    OpenAIRE

    Rasmussen, Michael Højby

    2009-01-01

    Abstract Growth hormone (GH) is the most important hormonal regulator of postnatal longitudinal growth in man. In adults GH is no longer needed for longitudinal growth. Adults with growth hormone deficiency (GHD) are characterised by perturbations in body composition, lipid metabolism, cardiovascular risk profile and bone mineral density. It is well established that adult GHD usually is accompanied by an increase in fat accumulation and GH replacement in adult patients with GHD res...

  18. Pharmacologic development of male hormonal contraceptive agents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roth, M Y; Amory, J K

    2011-01-01

    The world population continues to increase dramatically despite the existence of contraceptive technology. The use of male hormonal contraception may help in preventing un intended pregnancies and managing future population growth. Male hormonal contraception relies on the administration of exogenous hormones to suppress spermatogenesis. Clinical trials have tested several regimens using testosterone, alone or in combination with a progestin. These regimens were shown to be >90% effective in preventing conception and were not associated with serious adverse events.

  19. Thyroid hormone function in the rat testis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ying eGao

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Thyroid hormones are emerging regulators of testicular function since Sertoli, germ and Leydig cells are found to express thyroid hormone receptors. These testicular cells also express deiodinases which are capable of converting the pro-hormone T4 to the active thyroid hormone T3, or inactivating T3 or T4 to a non-biologically active form. Furthermore, thyroid hormone transporters are also found in the testis. Thus, the testis is equipped with the transporters and the enzymes necessary to maintain the optimal level of thyroid hormone in the seminiferous epithelium, as well as the specific thyroid hormone receptors to execute thyroid hormone action in response to different stages of the epithelial cycle of spermatogenesis. Studies using genetic models and/or goitrogens (e.g., PTU (propylthiouracil have illustrated a tight physiological relationship between thyroid hormone and testicular function, in particular Sertoli cell differentiation status, mitotic activity, gap junction function and blood-testis barrier (BTB assembly. These findings are briefly summarized and discussed herein.

  20. Thyroid hormone and the cardiovascular system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Danzi, Sara; Klein, Irwin

    2012-03-01

    Thyroid hormone has profound effects on the heart and cardiovascular system. This article describes the cellular mechanisms by which thyroid hormone acts at the level of the cardiac myocyte and the vascular smooth muscle cell to alter phenotype and physiology. Because it is well established that thyroid hormone, specifically T(3), acts on almost every cell and organ in the body, studies on the regulation of thyroid hormone transport into cardiac and vascular tissue have added clinical significance. The characteristic changes in cardiovascular hemodynamics and metabolism that accompany thyroid disease states can then be best understood at the cellular level. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Effects of hormones on platelet aggregation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farré, Antonio López; Modrego, Javier; Zamorano-León, José J

    2014-04-01

    Platelets and their activation/inhibition mechanisms play a central role in haemostasis. It is well known agonists and antagonists of platelet activation; however, during the last years novel evidences of hormone effects on platelet activation have been reported. Platelet functionality may be modulated by the interaction between different hormones and their platelet receptors, contributing to sex differences in platelet function and even in platelet-mediated vascular damage. It has suggested aspects that apparently are well established should be reviewed. Hormones effects on platelet activity are included among them. This article tries to review knowledge about the involvement of hormones in platelet biology and activity.

  2. Hormones and the blood-brain barrier.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hampl, Richard; Bičíková, Marie; Sosvorová, Lucie

    2015-03-01

    Hormones exert many actions in the brain, and brain cells are also hormonally active. To reach their targets in brain structures, hormones must overcome the blood-brain barrier (BBB). The BBB is a unique device selecting desired/undesired molecules to reach or leave the brain, and it is composed of endothelial cells forming the brain vasculature. These cells differ from other endothelial cells in their almost impermeable tight junctions and in possessing several membrane structures such as receptors, transporters, and metabolically active molecules, ensuring their selection function. The main ways how compounds pass through the BBB are briefly outlined in this review. The main part concerns the transport of major classes of hormones: steroids, including neurosteroids, thyroid hormones, insulin, and other peptide hormones regulating energy homeostasis, growth hormone, and also various cytokines. Peptide transporters mediating the saturable transport of individual classes of hormones are reviewed. The last paragraph provides examples of how hormones affect the permeability and function of the BBB either at the level of tight junctions or by various transporters.

  3. Endogenous target mimics down-regulate miR160 mediation of ARF10, -16 and -17 cleavage during somatic embryogenesis in Dimocarpus longan Lour.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    yuling elin

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available MicroRNA160 plays a critical role in plant development by negatively regulating the auxin response factors ARF10, -16 and -17. However, the ways in which miR160 expression is regulated at the transcriptional level, and how miR160 interacts with its targets during plant embryo development, remain unknown. Here, we studied the regulatory relationships among endogenous target mimics (eTMs, and miR160 and its targets, and their involvement in hormone signaling and somatic embryogenesis (SE in Dimocarpus longan. We identified miR160 family members and isolated the miR160 precursor, primary transcript, and promoter. The promoter contained cis-acting elements responsive to stimuli such as light, abscisic acid, salicylic acid and heat stress. The pri-miR160 was down-regulated in response to salicylic acid but up-regulated by gibberellic acid, ethylene, and methyl jasmonate treatment, suggesting that pri-miR160 was associated with hormone transduction. Dlo-miR160a, -a* and -d* reached expression peaks in torpedo-shaped embryos, globular embryos and cotyledonary embryos, respectively, but were barely detectable in embryogenic callus. This suggests that they have expression-related and functional diversity, especially during the middle and later developmental stages of SE. Four potential eTMs for miR160 were identified. Two of them, glucan endo-1,3-beta- glucosidase-like protein 2-like and calpain-type cysteine protease DEK1, were confirmed to control the corresponding dlo-miR160a* expression level. This suggests that they may function to abolish the binding between dlo-miR160a* and its targets. These two eTMs also participated in auxin and ABA signal transduction. DlARF10, -16, and -17 targeting by dlo-miR160a was confirmed; their expression levels were higher in friable-embryogenic callus and incomplete compact pro-embryogenic cultures and responded to 2,4-D, suggesting they may play a major role in the early stages of longan SE dependent on 2,4-D. The e

  4. Antimüllerian hormone in gonadotropin releasing-hormone antagonist cycles

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Arce, Joan-Carles; La Marca, Antonio; Mirner Klein, Bjarke

    2013-01-01

    To assess the relationships between serum antimüllerian hormone (AMH) and ovarian response and treatment outcomes in good-prognosis patients undergoing controlled ovarian stimulation using a gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH) antagonist protocol.......To assess the relationships between serum antimüllerian hormone (AMH) and ovarian response and treatment outcomes in good-prognosis patients undergoing controlled ovarian stimulation using a gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH) antagonist protocol....

  5. The ghrelin receptor agonist HM01 mimics the neuronal effects of ghrelin in the arcuate nucleus and attenuates anorexia-cachexia syndrome in tumor-bearing rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borner, Tito; Loi, Laura; Pietra, Claudio; Giuliano, Claudio; Lutz, Thomas A; Riediger, Thomas

    2016-07-01

    The gastric hormone ghrelin positively affects energy balance by increasing food intake and reducing energy expenditure. Ghrelin mimetics are a possible treatment against cancer anorexia-cachexia syndrome (CACS). This study aimed to characterize the action of the nonpeptidergic ghrelin receptor agonist HM01 on neuronal function, energy homeostasis and muscle mass in healthy rats and to evaluate its possible usefulness for the treatment of CACS in a rat tumor model. Using extracellular single-unit recordings, we tested whether HM01 mimics the effects of ghrelin on neuronal activity in the arcuate nucleus (Arc). Furthermore, we assessed the effect of chronic HM01 treatment on food intake (FI), body weight (BW), lean and fat volumes, and muscle mass in healthy rats. Using a hepatoma model, we investigated the possible beneficial effects of HM01 on tumor-induced anorexia, BW loss, muscle wasting, and metabolic rate. HM01 (10(-7)-10(-6) M) mimicked the effect of ghrelin (10(-8) M) by increasing the firing rate in 76% of Arc neurons. HM01 delivered chronically for 12 days via osmotic minipumps (50 μg/h) increased FI in healthy rats by 24%, paralleled by increased BW, higher fat and lean volumes, and higher muscle mass. Tumor-bearing rats treated with HM01 had 30% higher FI than tumor-bearing controls and were protected against BW loss. HM01 treatment resulted in higher muscle mass and fat mass. Moreover, tumor-bearing rats reduced their metabolic rate following HM01 treatment. Our studies substantiate the possible therapeutic usefulness of ghrelin receptor agonists like HM01 for the treatment of CACS and possibly other forms of disease-related anorexia and cachexia.

  6. Investigation of the effect of phytohormone on the expression of microRNA-159a in Arabidopsis thaliana seedlings based on mimic enzyme catalysis systematic electrochemical biosensor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Yunlei; Wang, Mo; Xu, Zhenning; Ni, Cailing; Yin, Huanshun; Ai, Shiyun

    2014-04-15

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) play very important roles in plant growth and development as well as phytohormones. More importantly, microRNAs were recently found to be a new growth regulator involved in plant hormone signaling. Therefore, for investigating the expression change of microRNAs in plants exposed to phytohormones and understanding the effect of phytohormones on microRNAs expression, we developed a simple, sensitive, and label-free method for microRNAs biosensing based on mimic enzyme catalysis signal amplification, where carboxylic graphene-hemin hybrid nanosheets was synthesized and used to catalyze the oxidation reaction of hydroquinone in the presence of H2O2 due to the intrinsic peroxidase-like activity of hemin on the carboxylic graphene surface. The electrochemical reduction current of the oxidative product of benzoquinone was depended on the hybridization amount of microRNAs and used to monitor the microRNAs hybridization event. Under optimal detection conditions, the current response was proportional to the logarithm concentration of microRNA-159a from 0.5 pM to 1.0 nM with the detection limit of 0.17 pM (S/N=3). The fabricated biosensor showed highly reproducible (Relative standard deviation (RSD) was 3.53% for 10 biosensors fabricated independently) and detection selectivity (Even discriminating single-base mismatched microRNA sequence). We also found that abscisic acid, a kind of phytohormone, had greatly influence on microRNA-159a expression in Arabidopsis thaliana seedlings. With increasing abscisic acid concentration and prolonging incubation time, both the expression level of microRNA-159a increased. This graphene-hemin-based approach provides a novel avenue to detect microRNA with high sensitivity and selectivity while avoiding laborious label, disadvantages of bio-enzymes and complex operations for microRNAs separation and enrichment, which might be attractive for genetic analysis and clinic biomedical application.

  7. Assessing the potential of surrogate EPS to mimic natural biofilm mechanical properties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thom, Moritz; Schimmels, Stefan

    2017-04-01

    Biofilms growing on benthic sediments may increase the resistance towards erosion considerably by the sticky nature of extracellular polymeric substances (EPS). The EPS is a biopolymer which is secreted by the microorganisms inhabiting the biofilm matrix and may be regarded as natural glue. However, laboratory studies on the biostabilization effect mediated by biofilms are often hampered by the unavailability of "environmental" flumes in which light intensities, water temperature and nutrient content can be controlled. To allow investigations on biostabilization in "traditional" flume settings the use of surrogate materials is studied. Another advantage of using appropriate surrogates is the potential to reduce the experimental time, as compared to cultivating natural biofilms, the surrogates can readily be designed to mimic biofilms at different growth stages. Furthermore, the use of surrogates which are expected to have more homogeneous mechanical properties could facilitate fundamental studies to improve our knowledge on biostabilization. Even though a number of studies have already utilized EPS surrogates it is not clear how to mix them to correctly mimic natural EPS mechanical properties. In this study the adhesiveness (a measure of stickiness) on the surface of several EPS surrogates (e.g. Xanthan Gum, sodium alginate) is measured. These surrogates which are originally used in the food industry as rheology modifiers are mixed by adding water to a powder at a desired concentration (C). The measured surface adhesion of different surrogates at different concentrations ranged from 0.5 to 6.7 N/m2, which is well in line with values found for laboratory cultured biofilms. We found that the surrogate characteristics differed largely especially in regard to a) the response of the adhesiveness to increased concentrations (powder to water) and b) in their rheological characteristics. A seemingly promising surrogate for the use in biostabilization studies is Xanthan Gum

  8. Postmenopausal hormone therapy and cognition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCarrey, Anna C; Resnick, Susan M

    2015-08-01

    This article is part of a Special Issue "Estradiol and cognition". Prior to the publication of findings from the Women's Health Initiative (WHI) in 2002, estrogen-containing hormone therapy (HT) was used to prevent age-related disease, especially cardiovascular disease, and to treat menopausal symptoms such as hot flushes and sleep disruptions. Some observational studies of HT in midlife and aging women suggested that HT might also benefit cognitive function, but randomized clinical trials have produced mixed findings in terms of health and cognitive outcomes. This review focuses on hormone effects on cognition and risk for dementia in naturally menopausal women as well as surgically induced menopause, and highlights findings from the large-scale WHI Memory Study (WHIMS) which, contrary to expectation, showed increased dementia risk and poorer cognitive outcomes in older postmenopausal women randomized to HT versus placebo. We consider the 'critical window hypothesis', which suggests that a window of opportunity may exist shortly after menopause during which estrogen treatments are most effective. In addition, we highlight emerging evidence that potential adverse effects of HT on cognition are most pronounced in women who have other health risks, such as lower global cognition or diabetes. Lastly, we point towards implications for future research and clinical treatments. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  9. Thyroid hormone deiodination in fish.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orozco, Aurea; Valverde-R, Carlos

    2005-08-01

    We review the experimental evidence accumulated within the past decade regarding the physiologic, biochemical, and molecular characterization of iodothyronine deiodinases (IDs) in piscine species. Agnathans, chondrichthyes, and teleosts express the three isotypes of IDs: ID1, ID2, and ID3, which are responsible for the peripheral fine-tuning of thyroid hormone (TH) bioactivity. At the molecular and operational level, fish IDs share properties with their corresponding vertebrate counterparts. However, fish IDs also exhibit discrete features that seem to be distinctive for piscine species. Indeed, teleostean ID1 is conspicuously resistant to propylthiouracil (PTU) inhibition, and its response to thyroidal status differs from that exhibited by other ID1s. Moreover, both the high level of ID2 activity and its expression in the liver of teleosts are unique among vertebrates. The physiologic role of iodothyronine deiodination in functions regulated by TH in fish is not entirely clear. Nevertheless, current experimental evidence suggests that IDs may coordinate and facilitate, in a tissue-specific fashion, the action of iodothyronines and other hormones involved in such processes.

  10. Postmenopausal hormone therapy and cognition

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCarrey, Anna C.; Resnick, Susan M.

    2015-01-01

    Prior to the publication of findings from the Women’s Health Initiative (WHI) in 2002, estrogen-containing hormone therapy (HT) was used to prevent age-related disease, especially cardiovascular disease, and to treat menopausal symptoms such as hot flushes and sleep disruptions. Some observational studies of HT in midlife and aging women suggested that HT might also benefit cognitive function, but randomized clinical trials have produced mixed findings in terms of health and cognitive outcomes. This review focuses on hormone effects on cognition and risk for dementia in naturally menopausal women as well as surgically induced menopause, and highlights findings from the large-scale WHI Memory Study (WHIMS) which, contrary to expectation, showed increased dementia risk and poorer cognitive outcomes in older postmenopausal women randomized to HT versus placebo. We consider the ‘critical window hypothesis’, which suggests that a window of opportunity may exist shortly after menopause during which estrogen treatments are most effective. In addition, we highlight emerging evidence that potential adverse effects of HT on cognition are most pronounced in women who have other health risks, such as cerebrovascular disease or diabetes. Lastly, we point towards implications for future research and clinical treatments. PMID:25935728

  11. Hormonal mechanisms of cooperative behaviour

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soares, Marta C.; Bshary, Redouan; Fusani, Leonida; Goymann, Wolfgang; Hau, Michaela; Hirschenhauser, Katharina; Oliveira, Rui F.

    2010-01-01

    Research on the diversity, evolution and stability of cooperative behaviour has generated a considerable body of work. As concepts simplify the real world, theoretical solutions are typically also simple. Real behaviour, in contrast, is often much more diverse. Such diversity, which is increasingly acknowledged to help in stabilizing cooperative outcomes, warrants detailed research about the proximate mechanisms underlying decision-making. Our aim here is to focus on the potential role of neuroendocrine mechanisms on the regulation of the expression of cooperative behaviour in vertebrates. We first provide a brief introduction into the neuroendocrine basis of social behaviour. We then evaluate how hormones may influence known cognitive modules that are involved in decision-making processes that may lead to cooperative behaviour. Based on this evaluation, we will discuss specific examples of how hormones may contribute to the variability of cooperative behaviour at three different levels: (i) within an individual; (ii) between individuals and (iii) between species. We hope that these ideas spur increased research on the behavioural endocrinology of cooperation. PMID:20679116

  12. Hormones as doping in sports.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duntas, Leonidas H; Popovic, Vera

    2013-04-01

    Though we may still sing today, as did Pindar in his eighth Olympian Victory Ode, "… of no contest greater than Olympia, Mother of Games, gold-wreathed Olympia…", we must sadly admit that today, besides blatant over-commercialization, there is no more ominous threat to the Olympic games than doping. Drug-use methods are steadily becoming more sophisticated and ever harder to detect, increasingly demanding the use of complex analytical procedures of biotechnology and molecular medicine. Special emphasis is thus given to anabolic androgenic steroids, recombinant growth hormone and erythropoietin as well as to gene doping, the newly developed mode of hormones abuse which, for its detection, necessitates high-tech methodology but also multidisciplinary individual measures incorporating educational and psychological methods. In this Olympic year, the present review offers an update on the current technologically advanced endocrine methods of doping while outlining the latest procedures applied-including both the successes and pitfalls of proteomics and metabolomics-to detect doping while contributing to combating this scourge.

  13. Hormone-Sensitive Lipase Knockouts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shen Wen-Jun

    2006-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract All treatments for obesity, including dietary restriction of carbohydrates, have a goal of reducing the storage of fat in adipocytes. The chief enzyme responsible for the mobilization of FFA from adipose tissue, i.e., lipolysis, is thought to be hormone-sensitive lipase (HSL. Studies of HSL knockouts have provided important insights into the functional significance of HSL and into adipose metabolism in general. Studies have provided evidence that HSL, though possessing triacylglycerol lipase activity, appears to be the rate-limiting enzyme for cholesteryl ester and diacylglycerol hydrolysis in adipose tissue and is essential for complete hormone stimulated lipolysis, but other triacylglycerol lipases are important in mediating triacylglycerol hydrolysis in lipolysis. HSL knockouts are resistant to both high fat diet-induced and genetic obesity, displaying reduced quantities of white with increased amounts of brown adipose tissue, increased numbers of adipose macrophages, and have multiple alterations in the expression of genes involved in adipose differentiation, including transcription factors, markers of adipocyte differentiation, and enzymes of fatty acid and triglyceride synthesis. With disruption of lipolysis by removal of HSL, there is a drastic reduction in lipogenesis and alteration in adipose metabolism.

  14. Action of luteinizing hormone-releasing hormone in rat ovarian cells: Hormone production and signal transduction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Jian.

    1989-01-01

    The present study was conducted to investigate the hypothesis that the breakdown of membrane phosphoinositides may participate in the actions of luteinizing hormone-releasing hormone (LHRH) on hormone production in rat granulosa cells. In cells prelabeled with ({sup 3}H)inositol or ({sup 3}H)arachidonic acid (AA), treatment with LHRH increased the formation of radiolabeled inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate (IP{sub 3}) and diacylglycerol (DG), and the release of radiolabeled AA. Since IP{sub 3} induces intracellular Ca{sup 2+} mobilization, changes in the cytosolic free calcium ion concentrations ((Ca{sup 2+})i) induced by LHRH were studied in individual cells using fura-2 microspectrofluorimetry. Alterations in (Ca{sup 2+})i induced by LHRH were rapid and transient, and could be completely blocked by a LHRH antagonist. Sustained perifusion of LHRH resulted in a desensitization of the (Ca{sup 2+})i response to LHRH. LHRH treatment accelerated (Ca{sup 2+})i depletion in the cells perifused with Ca{sup 2+} free medium, indicating the involvement of intracellular Ca{sup 2+} pool(s) in (Ca{sup 2+})i changes. The actions of LHRH on the regulation of progesterone (P{sub 4}) and prostaglandin E{sub 2} (PGE{sub 2}) production were also examined. LHRH increased basal P{sub 4} production and attenuated FSH induced P{sub 4} production. Both basal and FSH stimulated PGE{sub 2} formation were increased by LHRH. Since LHRH also increased the formation of DG that stimulates the activity of protein kinase C, an activator of protein kinase C (12-0-tetradecanolyphorbol-13-acetate: TPA) was used with the Ca{sup 2+} ionophore A23187 and melittin (an activator of phospholipase A{sub 2}) to examine the roles of protein kinase C, Ca{sup 2+} and free AA, respectively, in LHRH action.

  15. Luteinizing hormone-releasing hormone receptor antagonist may reduce postmenopausal flushing

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gastel, P. van; Zanden, M. van der; Telting, D.; Filius, M.; Bancsi, L.; Boer, H. de

    2012-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: Hormone therapy (HT) is the most effective treatment of postmenopausal (PMP) flushing; however, its use is often contraindicated. As an alternative option, we explored the efficacy of the luteinizing hormone-releasing hormone (LHRH) receptor antagonist cetrorelix in women with severe PMP

  16. Thyroid Hormone Receptor beta Mediates Acute Illness-Induced Alterations in Central Thyroid Hormone Metabolism

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    A. Boelen; J. Kwakkel; O. Chassande; E. Fliers

    2009-01-01

    Acute illness in mice profoundly affects thyroid hormone metabolism in the hypothalamus and pituitary gland. It remains unknown whether the thyroid hormone receptor (TR)-beta is involved in these changes. In the present study, we investigated central thyroid hormone metabolism during lipopolysacchar

  17. Growth Hormone Response after Administration of L-dopa, Clonidine, and Growth Hormone Releasing Hormone in Children with Down Syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pueschel, Seigfried M.

    1993-01-01

    This study of eight growth-retarded children with Down's syndrome (aged 1 to 6.5 years) found that administration of growth hormone was more effective than either L-dopa or clonidine. Results suggest that children with Down's syndrome have both anatomical and biochemical hypothalamic derangements resulting in decreased growth hormone secretion and…

  18. Synthesis of Pyridinic-Rich N, S Co-doped Carbon Quantum Dots as Effective Enzyme Mimics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Teng; Cui, Zhi-wei; Zhou, Jun; Wang, Ying; Zou, Zhi-gang

    2017-05-01

    N and S co-doped carbon quantum dots (N, S-CQDs) with high N- and S-doping level were synthesized by microwave solid-phase pyrolysis within 50 s. Owing to the dominant pyridinic N injection into the conjugated framework, both high enzyme mimics catalytic activity and photoluminescence quantum yield are achieved simultaneously.

  19. Enzyme active site mimics based on TriAzaCyclophane (TAC)-scaffolded peptides and amino acid residues

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Albada, H.B.

    2009-01-01

    This thesis describes the scope and limitations of the application of TriAzaCyclophane (TAC)-scaffolded peptides or amino acid residues as enzyme active site mimics, as ligands in asymmetric catalysis and as hydrolysis catalysts attached to vancomycin. For the mimicry of functional group enzymes, of

  20. Fluorometric, water-based sensors for the detection of nerve gas G mimics DMMP, DCP and DCNP.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wild, Andreas; Winter, Andreas; Hager, Martin D; Schubert, Ulrich S

    2012-01-25

    Water-based Zn(II) bisterpyridine systems were used as fluorometric sensors for the detection of the nerve gas G mimics DMMP, DCP and DCNP. Analyte concentrations in the range of 10(-7) to 10(-6) M are detectable in solution. The utilization of a test stripe additionally allows the detection of organophosphonates from the gas phase.

  1. A strategy for depositing different types of cells in three dimensions to mimic tubular structures in tissues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuan, Bo; Jin, Yu; Sun, Yi; Wang, Dong; Sun, Jiashu; Wang, Zhuo; Zhang, Wei; Jiang, Xingyu

    2012-02-14

    The fabrication of tubular structures, with multiple cell types forming different layers of the tube walls, is described using a stress-induced rolling membrane (SIRM). Cell orientation inside the tubes can also be controlled by topographical contact guidance. These layered tubes precisely mimic blood vessels and many other tubular structures, suggesting that they may be of great use in tissue engineering.

  2. The pattern recognition molecule deleted in malignant brain tumors 1 (DMBT1) and synthetic mimics inhibit liposomal nucleic acid delivery

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lund Hansen, Pernille; Blaich, Stephanie; End, Caroline;

    2011-01-01

    Liposomal nucleic acid delivery is a preferred option for therapeutic settings. The cellular pattern recognition molecule DMBT1, secreted at high levels in various diseases, and synthetic mimics efficiently inhibit liposomal nucleic acid delivery to human cells. These findings may have relevance...

  3. Triggering a false alarm: wounding mimics prey capture in the carnivorous Venus flytrap (Dionaea muscipula).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pavlovič, Andrej; Jakšová, Jana; Novák, Ondřej

    2017-08-29

    In the carnivorous plant Venus flytrap (Dionaea muscipula), the sequence of events after prey capture resembles the well-known plant defence signalling pathway in response to pathogen or herbivore attack. Here, we used wounding to mimic prey capture to show the similarities and differences between botanical carnivory and plant defence mechanisms. We monitored movement, electrical signalling, jasmonate accumulation and digestive enzyme secretion in local and distal (systemic) traps in response to prey capture, the mechanical stimulation of trigger hairs and wounding. The Venus flytrap cannot discriminate between wounding and mechanical trigger hair stimulation. Both induced the same action potentials, rapid trap closure, hermetic trap sealing, the accumulation of jasmonic acid (JA) and its isoleucine conjugate (JA-Ile), and the secretion of proteases (aspartic and cysteine proteases), phosphatases and type I chitinase. The jasmonate accumulation and enzyme secretion were confined to the local traps, to which the stimulus was applied, which correlates with the propagation of electrical signals and the absence of a systemic response in the Venus flytrap. In contrast to plant defence mechanisms, the absence of a systemic response in carnivorous plant may represent a resource-saving strategy. During prey capture, it could be quite expensive to produce digestive enzymes in the traps on the plant without prey. © 2017 The Authors. New Phytologist © 2017 New Phytologist Trust.

  4. Ring-down gravity waves: How far wormhole observables can mimic those of a black hole?

    CERN Document Server

    Nandi, Kamal K; Yanbekov, Almir A; Shayakhmetov, Azat A

    2016-01-01

    It has been argued that the recently detected ring-down gravity waveforms could be indicative only of the presence of light rings in a horizonless object, such as a surgical Schwarzschild wormhole, with the frequencies differing drastically from those of the horizon quasinormal mode frequencies $\\omega _{\\text{QNM}}$. While the possibility of such a horizonless alternative is novel by itself, we show by an appropriate example that the difference in frequencies need not be drastic. We shall consider here an analytic (as opposed to surgical) stable traversable Ellis-Bronnikov wormhole and show that observables such as the $\\omega _{\\text{QNM}}$, strong field Bozza lensing parameters and the accretion disk signatures of the Ellis-Bronnikov wormhole could actually be very close to those of a black hole (say, SgrA$^{\\ast }$ hosted by our galaxy) of the same mass. This situation indicates that the wormhole observables could remarkably mimic those of a black hole unless highly precise measurements distinguishing the...

  5. Secretory carcinoma of the breast and its histopathological mimics: value of markers for differential diagnosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Osako, Tomo; Takeuchi, Kengo; Horii, Rie; Iwase, Takuji; Akiyama, Futoshi

    2013-10-01

    Secretory carcinoma (SC) is a rare histological type of breast cancer, and ETV6-NTRK3 gene fusion is highly specific to it. The differential diagnoses of SC include acinic cell carcinoma (ACCA) and cystic hypersecretory carcinoma (CHC), as well as invasive ductal carcinoma (IDC). For patients with these rare but distinctive histological subtypes, SC and its histopathological mimics should be differentiated from each other. However, differential markers have not yet been assessed systematically, and we aimed to identify and evaluate novel and existing markers. We reviewed 19 cases diagnosed initially as SC using integrated diagnostic techniques, including morphology, immunohistochemistry and molecular pathology, and validated promising markers in 445 breast cancers. We reclassified 19 formerly diagnosed 'SCs' into nine SCs, three ACCAs, three CHCs, three IDCs and one microglandular adenosis. We confirmed that ETV6-NTRK3 gene rearrangement and amylase positivity are good diagnostic markers for SC and ACCA, respectively. Vacuolar staining for adipophilin, positivity for α-lactalbumin and negativity for ETV6 rearrangement are diagnostic markers for CHC. In this study, we propose a panel of four markers (ETV6 rearrangement, amylase, α-lactalbumin and adipophilin) for distinguishing SC, ACCA, CHC and IDC. This simple but robust panel will serve pathologists well as a practical guide for reaching an appropriate diagnosis. © 2013 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  6. Design of aromatic-containing cell-penetrating peptide mimics with structurally modified π electronics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    deRonde, Brittany M; Birke, Alexander; Tew, Gregory N

    2015-02-09

    Cell-penetrating peptides (CPPs) and their synthetic mimics (CPPMs) represent a class of molecules that facilitate the intracellular delivery of various cargo. Previous studies indicated that the presence of aromatic functionalities improved CPPM activity. Given that aromatic functionalities play prominent roles in membrane biology and participate in various π interactions, we explored whether these interactions could be optimized for improved CPPM activity. CPPMs were synthesized by ring-opening metathesis polymerization by using monomers that contained aromatic rings substituted with electron-donating and electron-withdrawing groups and covered an electrostatic potential range from -29.69 to +15.57 kcal mol(-1) . These groups altered the quadrupole moments of the aromatic systems and were used to test if such structural modifications changed CPPM activity. CPPMs were added to dye-loaded vesicles and the release of carboxyfluorescein was monitored as a function of polymer concentration. Changes in the effective polymer concentration to release 50% of the dye (effective concentration, EC50 ) were monitored. Results from this assay showed that the strength of the electron-donating and electron-withdrawing groups incorporated in the CPPMs did not alter polymer EC50 values or activity. This suggests that other design parameters may have a stronger impact on CPPM activity. In addition, these results indicate that a wide range of aromatic groups can be incorporated without negatively impacting polymer activity.

  7. Cultivation of Human Microvascular Endothelial Cells on Topographical Substrates to Mimic the Human Corneal Endothelium

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jie Shi Chua

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Human corneal endothelial cells have a limited ability to replicate in vivo and in vitro. Allograft transplantation becomes necessary when an accident or trauma results in excessive cell loss. The reconstruction of the cornea endothelium using autologous cell sources is a promising alternative option for therapeutic or in vitro drug testing applications. The native corneal endothelium rests on the Descemet’s membrane, which has nanotopographies of fibers and pores. The use of synthetic topographies mimics the native environment, and it is hypothesized that this can direct the behavior and growth of human microvascular endothelial cells (HMVECs to resemble the corneal endothelium. In this study, HMVECs are cultivated on substrates with micron and nano-scaled pillar and well topographies. Closely packed HMVEC monolayers with polygonal cells and well-developed tight junctions were formed on the topographical substrates. Sodium/potassium (Na+/K+ adenine triphosphatase (ATPase expression was enhanced on the microwells substrate, which also promotes microvilli formation, while more hexagonal-like cells are found on the micropillars samples. The data obtained suggests that the use of optimized surface patterning, in particular, the microtopographies, can induce HMVECs to adopt a more corneal endothelium-like morphology with similar barrier and pump functions. The mechanism involved in cell contact guidance by the specific topographical features will be of interest for future studies.

  8. Benign Conditions That Mimic Prostate Carcinoma: MR Imaging Features with Histopathologic Correlation1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kitzing, Yu Xuan; Prando, Adilson; Varol, Celi; Karczmar, Gregory S.; Maclean, Fiona; Oto, Aytekin

    2017-01-01

    Multiparametric magnetic resonance (MR) imaging combines anatomic and functional imaging techniques for evaluating the prostate and is increasingly being used in diagnosis and management of prostate cancer. A wide spectrum of anatomic and pathologic processes in the prostate may masquerade as prostate cancer, complicating the imaging interpretation. The histopathologic and imaging findings of these potential mimics are reviewed. These entities include the anterior fibromuscular stroma, surgical capsule, central zone, periprostatic vein, periprostatic lymph nodes, benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH), atrophy, necrosis, calcification, hemorrhage, and prostatitis. An understanding of the prostate zonal anatomy is helpful in distinguishing the anatomic entities from prostate cancer. The anterior fibromuscular stroma, surgical capsule, and central zone are characteristic anatomic features of the prostate with associated low T2 signal intensity due to dense fibromuscular tissue or complex crowded glandular tissue. BPH, atrophy, necrosis, calcification, and hemorrhage all have characteristic features with one or more individual multiparametric MR imaging modalities. Prostatitis constitutes a heterogeneous group of infective and inflammatory conditions including acute and chronic bacterial prostatitis, infective and noninfective granulomatous prostatitis, and malacoplakia. These entities are associated with variable clinical manifestations and are characterized by the histologic hallmark of marked inflammatory cellular infiltration. In some cases, these entities are indistinguishable from prostate cancer at multiparametric MR imaging and may even exhibit extraprostatic extension and lymphadenopathy, mimicking locally advanced prostate cancer. It is important for the radiologists interpreting prostate MR images to be aware of these pitfalls for accurate interpretation. PMID:26587887

  9. [Video Instruction for Synchronous Video Recording of Mimic Movement of Patients with Facial Palsy].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schaede, Rebecca Anna; Volk, Gerd Fabian; Modersohn, Luise; Barth, Jodi Maron; Denzler, Joachim; Guntinas-Lichius, Orlando

    2017-05-03

    Photografy and video are necessary to record the severity of a facial palsy or to allow offline grading with a grading system. There is no international standard for the video recording urgently needed to allow a standardized comparison of different patient cohorts. A video instruction was developed. The instruction was shown to the patient and presents several mimic movements. At the same time the patient is recorded while repeating the presented movement using commercial hardware. Facial movements were selected in such a way that it was afterwards possible to evaluate the recordings with standard grading systems (House-Brackmann, Sunnybrook, Stennert, Yanagihara) or even with (semi)automatic software. For quality control, the patients evaluated the instruction using a questionnaire. The video instruction takes 11 min and 05 and is divided in 3 parts: 1) Explanation of the procedure; 2) Foreplay and recreating of the facial movements; 3) Repeating of sentences to analyze the communication skills. So far 13 healthy subjects and 10 patients with acute or chronic facial palsy were recorded. All recordings could be assessed by the above mentioned grading systems. The instruction was rated as well explaining and easy to follow by healthy persons and patients. There is now a video instruction available for standardized recording of facial movement. This instruction is recommended for use in clinical routine and in clinical trials. This will allow a standardized comparison of patients within Germany and international patient cohorts. © Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  10. To die or not to die? Lessons from lesion mimic mutants

    KAUST Repository

    Bruggeman, Quentin

    2015-01-30

    Programmed cell death (PCD) is a ubiquitous genetically regulated process consisting in an activation of finely controlled signaling pathways that lead to cellular suicide. Although some aspects of PCD control appear evolutionary conserved between plants, animals and fungi, the extent of conservation remains controversial. Over the last decades, identification and characterization of several lesion mimic mutants (LMM) has been a powerful tool in the quest to unravel PCD pathways in plants. Thanks to progress in molecular genetics, mutations causing the phenotype of a large number of LMM and their related suppressors were mapped, and the identification of the mutated genes shed light on major pathways in the onset of plant PCD such as (i) the involvements of chloroplasts and light energy, (ii) the roles of sphingolipids and fatty acids, (iii) a signal perception at the plasma membrane that requires efficient membrane trafficking, (iv) secondary messengers such as ion fluxes and ROS and (v) the control of gene expression as the last integrator of the signaling pathways.

  11. Can f(T) gravity theories mimic ΛCDM cosmic history

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Setare, M.R.; Mohammadipour, N., E-mail: rezakord@ipm.ir, E-mail: N.Mohammadipour@uok.ac.ir [Department of Science, University of Kurdistan, Sanandaj (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2013-01-01

    Recently the teleparallel Lagrangian density described by the torsion scalar T has been extended to a function of T. The f(T) modified teleparallel gravity has been proposed as the natural gravitational alternative for dark energy to explain the late time acceleration of the universe. In order to reconstruct the function f(T) by demanding a background ΛCDM cosmology we assume that, (i) the background cosmic history provided by the flat ΛCDM (the radiation ere with ω{sub eff} = (1/3), matter and de Sitter eras with ω{sub eff} = 0 and ω{sub eff} = −1, respectively) (ii) the radiation dominate in the radiation era with Ω{sub 0r} = 1 and the matter dominate during the matter phases when Ω{sub 0m} = 1. We find the cosmological dynamical system which can obey the ΛCDM cosmic history. In each era, we find a critical lines that, the radiation dominated and the matter dominated are one points of them in the radiation and matter phases, respectively. Also, we drive the cosmologically viability condition for these models. We investigate the stability condition with respect to the homogeneous scalar perturbations in each era and we obtain the stability conditions for the fixed points in each eras. Finally, we reconstruct the function f(T) which mimics cosmic expansion history.

  12. [Search of Neurotrophin-mimic Natural Products for Prevention and Treatment of Neurodegenerative Disease].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kubo, Miwa

    2015-01-01

    As part of our continuing studies on neurotrophin-mimic active compounds in natural products, we investigated the chemical constituents of the pericarps of Illicium jiadifengpi and the roots of Indonesian ginger Zingiber purpureum, resulting in the isolation of new seco-prezizaane-type sesquiterpenoid 1 and phenylbutenoid dimer 3-4 and two new curcuminoids 5-6. The MeOH extract of I. jiadifengpi was fractionated, leading to the isolation of compound 1. Compound 1 significantly enhanced neurite outgrowth in primary cell cultures of fetal rat cortical neurons. It is noteworthy that compound 1 has potential significantly to promote differentiation of multipotent neural stem cell line (MEB5 cells) into neurons. Additionally, we investigated the MeOH extract of the root of Bangle (Z. purpureum) that exhibited neuritogenesis activity in PC12 cells at 25 μg/mL, resulting in the isolation of neurotrophic phenylbutenoid dimers 3-4 and new compounds 5-6. Compounds 3 and 4 were found not only significantly to induce neurite sprouting of PC12 cells but also to increase the neurite length and number of neurites in primary cultured rat cortical neurons, and also showed protective activity against cell death caused by deprivation of serum. Furthermore, chronic treatment with these compounds enhanced hippocampal neurogenesis in dementia model olfactory bulbectomized (OBX) mice. Compounds 5 and 6 had significant NGF-potentiating effects on PC12 cells whereas compound 5 enhanced prevention of amyloid β (Aβ) 42 aggregation.

  13. System of elastic hard spheres which mimics the transport properties of a granular gas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santos, Andrés; Astillero, Antonio

    2005-09-01

    The prototype model of a fluidized granular system is a gas of inelastic hard spheres (IHS) with a constant coefficient of normal restitution alpha. Using a kinetic theory description we investigate the two basic ingredients that a model of elastic hard spheres (EHS) must have in order to mimic the most relevant transport properties of the underlying IHS gas. First, the EHS gas is assumed to be subject to the action of an effective drag force with a friction constant equal to half the cooling rate of the IHS gas, the latter being evaluated in the local equilibrium approximation for simplicity. Second, the collision rate of the EHS gas is reduced by a factor (1/2)(1+alpha), relative to that of the IHS gas. Comparison between the respective Navier-Stokes transport coefficients shows that the EHS model reproduces almost perfectly the self-diffusion coefficient and reasonably well the two transport coefficients defining the heat flux, the shear viscosity being reproduced within a deviation less than 14% (for alpha > or = 0.5). Moreover, the EHS model is seen to agree with the fundamental collision integrals of inelastic mixtures and dense gases. The approximate equivalence between IHS and EHS is used to propose kinetic models for inelastic collisions as simple extensions of known kinetic models for elastic collisions.

  14. Inhibiting oral intoxication of botulinum neurotoxin A complex by carbohydrate receptor mimics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Kwangkook; Lam, Kwok-Ho; Kruel, Anna-Magdalena; Mahrhold, Stefan; Perry, Kay; Cheng, Luisa W; Rummel, Andreas; Jin, Rongsheng

    2015-12-01

    Botulinum neurotoxins (BoNTs) cause the disease botulism manifested by flaccid paralysis that could be fatal to humans and animals. Oral ingestion of the toxin with contaminated food is one of the most common routes for botulism. BoNT assembles with several auxiliary proteins to survive in the gastrointestinal tract and is subsequently transported through the intestinal epithelium into the general circulation. Several hemagglutinin proteins form a multi-protein complex (HA complex) that recognizes host glycans on the intestinal epithelial cell surface to facilitate BoNT absorption. Blocking carbohydrate binding to the HA complex could significantly inhibit the oral toxicity of BoNT. Here, we identify lactulose, a galactose-containing non-digestible sugar commonly used to treat constipation, as a prototype inhibitor against oral BoNT/A intoxication. As revealed by a crystal structure, lactulose binds to the HA complex at the same site where the host galactose-containing carbohydrate receptors bind. In vitro assays using intestinal Caco-2 cells demonstrated that lactulose inhibits HA from compromising the integrity of the epithelial cell monolayers and blocks the internalization of HA. Furthermore, co-administration of lactulose significantly protected mice against BoNT/A oral intoxication in vivo. Taken together, these data encourage the development of carbohydrate receptor mimics as a therapeutic intervention to prevent BoNT oral intoxication.

  15. Unofficial Economy Estimation by the MIMIC Model: the Case of Kenya, Namibia, Ghana and Nigeria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dennis Nchor

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available This study investigates the size and trend of the underground economies in selected African countries. Underground economies are present in all countries, but they are endemic in developing economies. Their presence is not necessarily bad for the economies, in which they prevail. It could however cause huge losses to government revenue and could also constitute serious violation of Labor regulations. The study uses the Multiple Indicators and Multiple Causes model (MIMIC, a variant of Simultaneous Equations Model (SEM. It involves two sets of variables: the observed variables and the indicator variables. The former include size of government, indirect tax rates, total tax rates, business regulation, interest rate on deposits, unemployment rate, quality of public services, and GDP per capita. The indicator variables were Labor participation rate in the official economy, the amount of cash held outside the banking system and growth in GDP per capita. This study found the average level of underground economies in Kenya, Namibia, Ghana and Nigeria as 33.7%, 29.1%, 36% and 47%, respectively. The estimated results show that the causes of shadow economic activities vary among the countries. The data was obtained from the World Bank country indicators and the International Financial Statistics.

  16. To die or not to die? Lessons from lesion mimic mutants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Quentin eBruggeman

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Programmed cell death (PCD is a ubiquitous genetically regulated process consisting in an activation of finely controlled signaling pathways that lead to cellular suicide. Although some aspects of PCD control appear evolutionary conserved between plants, animals and fungi, the extent of conservation remains controversial. Over the last decades, identification and characterization of several lesion mimic mutants (LMM has been a powerful tool in the quest to unravel PCD pathways in plants. Thanks to progress in molecular genetics, mutations causing the phenotype of a large number of LMM and their related suppressors were mapped, and the identification of the mutated genes shed light on major pathways in the onset of plant PCD such as (i the involvements of chloroplasts and light energy, (ii the roles of sphingolipids and fatty acids, (iii a signal perception at the plasma membrane that requires efficient membrane trafficking, (iv secondary messengers such as ion fluxes and ROS and (v the control of gene expression as the last integrator of the signaling pathways.

  17. The interplay between neuronal activity and actin dynamics mimic the setting of an LTD synaptic tag.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szabó, Eszter C; Manguinhas, Rita; Fonseca, Rosalina

    2016-09-21

    Persistent forms of plasticity, such as long-term depression (LTD), are dependent on the interplay between activity-dependent synaptic tags and the capture of plasticity-related proteins. We propose that the synaptic tag represents a structural alteration that turns synapses permissive to change. We found that modulation of actin dynamics has different roles in the induction and maintenance of LTD. Inhibition of either actin depolymerisation or polymerization blocks LTD induction whereas only the inhibition of actin depolymerisation blocks LTD maintenance. Interestingly, we found that actin depolymerisation and CaMKII activation are involved in LTD synaptic-tagging and capture. Moreover, inhibition of actin polymerisation mimics the setting of a synaptic tag, in an activity-dependent manner, allowing the expression of LTD in non-stimulated synapses. Suspending synaptic activation also restricts the time window of synaptic capture, which can be restored by inhibiting actin polymerization. Our results support our hypothesis that modulation of the actin cytoskeleton provides an input-specific signal for synaptic protein capture.

  18. Benign Conditions That Mimic Prostate Carcinoma: MR Imaging Features with Histopathologic Correlation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kitzing, Yu Xuan; Prando, Adilson; Varol, Celi; Karczmar, Gregory S; Maclean, Fiona; Oto, Aytekin

    2016-01-01

    Multiparametric magnetic resonance (MR) imaging combines anatomic and functional imaging techniques for evaluating the prostate and is increasingly being used in diagnosis and management of prostate cancer. A wide spectrum of anatomic and pathologic processes in the prostate may masquerade as prostate cancer, complicating the imaging interpretation. The histopathologic and imaging findings of these potential mimics are reviewed. These entities include the anterior fibromuscular stroma, surgical capsule, central zone, periprostatic vein, periprostatic lymph nodes, benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH), atrophy, necrosis, calcification, hemorrhage, and prostatitis. An understanding of the prostate zonal anatomy is helpful in distinguishing the anatomic entities from prostate cancer. The anterior fibromuscular stroma, surgical capsule, and central zone are characteristic anatomic features of the prostate with associated low T2 signal intensity due to dense fibromuscular tissue or complex crowded glandular tissue. BPH, atrophy, necrosis, calcification, and hemorrhage all have characteristic features with one or more individual multiparametric MR imaging modalities. Prostatitis constitutes a heterogeneous group of infective and inflammatory conditions including acute and chronic bacterial prostatitis, infective and noninfective granulomatous prostatitis, and malacoplakia. These entities are associated with variable clinical manifestations and are characterized by the histologic hallmark of marked inflammatory cellular infiltration. In some cases, these entities are indistinguishable from prostate cancer at multiparametric MR imaging and may even exhibit extraprostatic extension and lymphadenopathy, mimicking locally advanced prostate cancer. It is important for the radiologists interpreting prostate MR images to be aware of these pitfalls for accurate interpretation. Online supplemental material is available for this article.

  19. Ouabain mimics low temperature rescue of F508del-CFTR in cystic fibrosis epithelial cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Donglei eZhang

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT Most cases of cystic fibrosis (CF are caused by the deletion of a single phenylalanine residue at position 508 of the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR. The mutant F508del-CFTR is retained in the endoplasmic reticulum and degraded, but can be induced by low temperature incubation (29°C to traffic to the plasma membrane where it functions as a chloride channel. Here we show that, cardiac glycosides, at nanomolar concentrations, can partially correct the trafficking of F508del-CFTR in human CF bronchial epithelial cells (CFBE41o- and in an F508del-CFTR mouse model. Comparison of the transcriptional profiles obtained with polarized CFBE41o- cells after treatment with ouabain and by low temperature has revealed a striking similarity between the two corrector treatments that is not shared with other correctors. In summary, our study shows a novel function of ouabain and its analogues in the regulation of F508del-CFTR trafficking and suggests that compounds that mimic this low temperature correction of trafficking will provide new avenues for the development of therapeutics for CF.

  20. Amyloid β-sheet mimics that antagonize protein aggregation and reduce amyloid toxicity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Pin-Nan; Liu, Cong; Zhao, Minglei; Eisenberg, David; Nowick, James S.

    2012-11-01

    The amyloid protein aggregation associated with diseases such as Alzheimer's, Parkinson's and type II diabetes (among many others) features a bewildering variety of β-sheet-rich structures in transition from native proteins to ordered oligomers and fibres. The variation in the amino-acid sequences of the β-structures presents a challenge to developing a model system of β-sheets for the study of various amyloid aggregates. Here, we introduce a family of robust β-sheet macrocycles that can serve as a platform to display a variety of heptapeptide sequences from different amyloid proteins. We have tailored these amyloid β-sheet mimics (ABSMs) to antagonize the aggregation of various amyloid proteins, thereby reducing the toxicity of amyloid aggregates. We describe the structures and inhibitory properties of ABSMs containing amyloidogenic peptides from the amyloid-β peptide associated with Alzheimer's disease, β2-microglobulin associated with dialysis-related amyloidosis, α-synuclein associated with Parkinson's disease, islet amyloid polypeptide associated with type II diabetes, human and yeast prion proteins, and Tau, which forms neurofibrillary tangles.

  1. Macroscopic Properties of Restacked, Redox-Liquid Exfoliated Graphite and Graphite Mimics Produced in Bulk Quantities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Srivastava, Vikram K [ORNL; Quinlan, Ronald [ORNL; Agapov, Alexander L [ORNL; Dunlap, John R [ORNL; Nelson, Kimberly M [ORNL; Duranty, Edward R [ORNL; Sokolov, Alexei P [ORNL; Bhat, Gajanan [ORNL; Mays, Jimmy [ORNL

    2014-01-01

    The excellent properties exhibited by monolayer graphene have spurred the development of exfoliation techniques using bulk graphite to produce large quantities of pristine monolayer sheets. Development of simple chemistry to exfoliate and intercalate graphite and graphite mimics in large quantities is required for numerous applications. To determine the macroscopic behavior of restacked, exfoliated bulk materials, a systematic approach is presented using a simple, redox-liquid sonication process along to obtain large quantities of 2D and 3D hexagonally layered graphite, molybdenum disulfi de, and boron nitride, which are subsequently characterized to observe chemical and structural changes. For MoS 2 sonicated with the antioxidant sodium bisulfi te, results from Raman spectroscopy, X-ray diffraction, and electron microscopy indicate the presence of distorted phases from different polymorphs, and apparent nanotube structures in the bulk, restacked powder. Furthermore, using thermograviemtric analysis, the antioxidant enhances the resistance to oxidative degradation of MoS 2 , upon thermal treatment up to 900 C. The addition of the ionic antioxidant decreased dispersion stability in non-polar solvent, suggesting decreased compatibility with non-polar systems. Using simple chemical methods, the ability to generate tailored multidimensional layered materials with unique macroscopic properties is critical for numerous applications, including electrical devices, reinforced polymer composites, lithium ion capacitors, and chemical sensing.

  2. Functionalized hybrid nanofibers to mimic native ECM for tissue engineering applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karuppuswamy, Priyadharsini; Venugopal, Jayarama Reddy; Navaneethan, Balchandar; Laiva, Ashang Luwang; Sridhar, Sreepathy; Ramakrishna, Seeram

    2014-12-01

    Nanotechnology being one of the most promising technologies today shows an extremely huge potential in the field of tissue engineering to mimic the porous topography of natural extracellular matrix (ECM). Natural polymers are incorporated into the synthetic polymers to fabricate functionalized hybrid nanofibrous scaffolds, which improve cell and tissue compatibility. The present study identified the biopolymers - aloe vera, silk fibroin and curcumin incorporated into polycaprolactone (PCL) as suitable substrates for tissue engineering. Different combinations of PCL with natural polymers - PCL/aloe vera, PCL/silk fibroin, PCL/aloe vera/silk fibroin, PCL/aloe vera/silk fibroin/curcumin were electrospun into nanofibrous scaffolds. The fabricated two dimensional nanofibrous scaffolds showed high surface area, appropriate mechanical properties, hydrophilicity and porosity, required for the regeneration of diseased tissues. The nanofibrous scaffolds were characterized by Scanning electron microscope (SEM), porometry, Instron tensile tester, VCA optima contact angle measurement and FTIR to analyze the fiber diameter and morphology, porosity and pore size distribution, mechanical strength, wettability, chemical bonds and functional groups, respectively. The average fiber diameter of obtained fibers ranged from 250 nm to 350 nm and the tensile strength of PCL scaffolds at 4.49 MPa increased upto 8.3 MPa for PCL/silk fibroin scaffolds. Hydrophobicity of PCL decreased with the incorporation of natural polymers, especially for PCL/aloe vera scaffolds. The properties of as-spun nanofiber scaffolds showed their potential as promising scaffold materials in tissue engineering applications.

  3. Reproducing Natural Spider Silks' Copolymer Behavior in Synthetic Silk Mimics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    An, Bo; Jenkins, Janelle E; Sampath, Sujatha; Holland, Gregory P; Hinman, Mike; Yarger, Jeffery L; Lewis, Randolph [Wyoming; (Sandia); (Utah SU); (AZU)

    2012-10-30

    Dragline silk from orb-weaving spiders is a copolymer of two large proteins, major ampullate spidroin 1 (MaSp1) and 2 (MaSp2). The ratio of these proteins is known to have a large variation across different species of orb-weaving spiders. NMR results from gland material of two different species of spiders, N. clavipes and A. aurantia, indicates that MaSp1 proteins are more easily formed into β-sheet nanostructures, while MaSp2 proteins form random coil and helical structures. To test if this behavior of natural silk proteins could be reproduced by recombinantly produced spider silk mimic protein, recombinant MaSp1/MaSp2 mixed fibers as well as chimeric silk fibers from MaSp1 and MaSp2 sequences in a single protein were produced based on the variable ratio and conserved motifs of MaSp1 and MaSp2 in native silk fiber. Mechanical properties, solid-state NMR, and XRD results of tested synthetic fibers indicate the differing roles of MaSp1 and MaSp2 in the fiber and verify the importance of postspin stretching treatment in helping the fiber to form the proper spatial structure.

  4. BioMimic fabrication of electrospun nanofibers with high-throughput

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    He Jihuan [Key Laboratory of Science and Technology of Eco-Textile, Donghua University, Ministry of Education (China); Modern Textile Institute, Donghua University, 1882 Yan' an Xilu Road, Shanghai 200051 (China)], E-mail: jhhe@dhu.edu.cn; Liu Yong; Xu Lan; Yu Jianyong; Sun Gang [Key Laboratory of Science and Technology of Eco-Textile, Donghua University, Ministry of Education (China); Modern Textile Institute, Donghua University, 1882 Yan' an Xilu Road, Shanghai 200051 (China)

    2008-08-15

    Spider-spun fiber is of extraordinary strength and toughness comparable to those of electrospun fiber, the later needs a very high voltage (from several thousands voltage to several ten thousands voltages) applied to water-soluble protein 'soup' that was produced by a spider, furthermore, its mechanical strength dramatically decreases comparable to spider silk. A possible mechanism in spider-spinning process is given, the distinct character in spider-spinning is that its spinneret consists of millions of nano scale tubes, and a bubble can be produced at the apex of each nano-tube. The surface tension of each bubble is extremely small such that it can be spun into nanofibers with an awfully small force, either by the spider's body weight or tension created by the rear legs. We mimic the spider-spinning in electrospinning using an aerated solution, which leads to various small bubbles on surface with very small surface tension, as a result the bubble can be easily electrospun into nanofibers with low applied voltage. This fabrication process possesses features of high productivity, versatility, in addition, the minimum diameter of nanofibers produced by this process can reach as small as 50 nm.

  5. SIRT1 Gain of Function Does Not Mimic or Enhance the Adaptations to Intermittent Fasting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boutant, Marie; Kulkarni, Sameer S; Joffraud, Magali; Raymond, Frédéric; Métairon, Sylviane; Descombes, Patrick; Cantó, Carles

    2016-03-08

    Caloric restriction (CR) has been shown to prevent the onset of insulin resistance and to delay age-related physiological decline in mammalian organisms. SIRT1, a NAD(+)-dependent deacetylase enzyme, has been suggested to mediate the adaptive responses to CR, leading to the speculation that SIRT1 activation could be therapeutically used as a CR-mimetic strategy. Here, we used a mouse model of moderate SIRT1 overexpression to test whether SIRT1 gain of function could mimic or boost the metabolic benefits induced by every-other-day feeding (EODF). Our results indicate that SIRT1 transgenesis does not affect the ability of EODF to decrease adiposity and improve insulin sensitivity. Transcriptomic analyses revealed that SIRT1 transgenesis and EODF promote very distinct adaptations in individual tissues, some of which can be even be metabolically opposite, as in brown adipose tissue. Therefore, whereas SIRT1 overexpression and CR both improve glucose metabolism and insulin sensitivity, the etiologies of these benefits are largely different.

  6. MD-simulations of Beta-Amyloid Protein Insertion Efficiency and Kinetics into Neuronal Membrane Mimics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qiu, Liming; Buie, Creighton; Vaughn, Mark; Cheng, Kwan

    2011-03-01

    Early interaction events of beta-amyloid (A β) peptides with the neuronal membranes play a key role in the pathogenesis of Alzheimer's disease. We have used all-atom MD simulations to study the protein insertion efficiency and kinetics of monomeric A β40 and A β42 into phosphatidylcholine lipid bilayers (PC) with and without 40 mole% cholesterol (CHOL) that mimic the cholesterol-enriched and depleted lipid nanodomains of the neuronal plasma membranes. Independent replicates of 200-ns simulations of each protein pre-inserted in the upper lipid layer were generated. In PC bilayers, only 25% of A β40 and 50% of A β42 in the replicates showed complete insertion into the lower lipid layer, whereas the percentages increased to 50% and 100%, respectively, in PC/CHOL bilayers, providing evidence that cholesterol improves the protein insertion efficiency into the bilayers. The rate of protein insertion was proportional to the hydrophobic, transmembrane helix length of the inserted peptide and depended on the cholesterol content. We propose that the lysine snorkeling and C-terminus anchoring of A β to the PC headgroups at the upper and lower lipid/water interfaces represent the dual-transmembrane stabilization mechanisms of A β in the neuronal membrane domains.

  7. Cell adaptation to a physiologically relevant ECM mimic with different viscoelastic properties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghosh, Kaustabh; Pan, Zhi; Guan, E; Ge, Shouren; Liu, Yajie; Nakamura, Toshio; Ren, Xiang-Dong; Rafailovich, Miriam; Clark, Richard A.F.

    2009-01-01

    To successfully induce tissue repair or regeneration in vivo, bioengineered constructs must possess both optimal bioactivity and mechanical strength. This is because cell interaction with the extracellular matrix (ECM) produces two different but concurrent signaling mechanisms: ligation-induced signaling, which depends on ECM biological stimuli, and traction-induced signaling, which depends on ECM mechanical stimuli. In this report, we provide a fundamental understanding of how alterations in mechanical stimuli alone, produced by varying the viscoelastic properties of our bioengineered construct, modulate phenotypic behavior at the whole-cell level. Using a physiologically-relevant ECM mimic composed of hyaluronan and fibronectin, we found that adult human dermal fibroblasts modify their mechanical response in order to match substrate stiffness. More specifically, the cells on stiffer substrates had higher modulus and a more stretched and organized actin cytoskeleton (and vice versa), which translated into larger traction forces exerted on the substrate. This modulation of cellular mechanics had contrasting effects on migration and proliferation, where cells migrated faster on softer substrates while proliferating preferentially on the stiffer ones. These findings implicate substrate rigidity as a critical design parameter in the development of bioengineered constructs aimed at eliciting maximal cell and tissue function. PMID:17049594

  8. Intratemporal facial nerve neuromas and their mimics: CT and MR findings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Han, Moon Hee; Chang, Kee Hyun; Lee, Kyung Hwan; Cha, Sang Hoon; Kim, Chong Sun [Seoul National University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Sang Joon [Chungang Gil General Hospital, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    1992-05-15

    CT and MR findings of nine cases with intra temporal facial nerve neuromas were described and compared with CT findings of 3 cases with facial nerve palsy and facial nerve canal erosion which may mimic facial nerve neuroma. The tympanic segment of the facial nerve was involved in 8 cases, mastoid segment in 7 cases and labyrinthine segment in 5 cases. The lesions were easily diagnosed with high resolution CT with bone algorithms by showing the expansion of bony structures along the course of the facial nerves. In 4 cases with large vertical segment tumors, extensive destruction of mastoid air cells and external auditory canals posed difficulty in making a diagnosis. Two out of 5 cases with labyrinthine segment involvement were presented as middle cranial fossa masses. MRI with enhancement was performed in 4 cases and was useful in characterizing the lesion as a tumor with its superior sensitivity to enhancement. Three cases of facial neuroma-mimicking lesion including post-inflammatory peri neural thickening, peri neural extension from parotid adenoid cystic carcinoma, and congenita; cholesteatoma showed irregular erosion or mild expansion of the facial nerve canal which may be helpful for differential diagnosis from neuromas.

  9. Phage-displayed peptides that mimic epitopes of hepatitis E virus capsid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larralde, Osmany; Petrik, Juraj

    2017-08-01

    Hepatitis E is an emerging zoonotic infection of increasing public health threat for the UK, especially for immunosuppressed individuals. A human recombinant vaccine has been licensed only in China and is not clear whether it protects against hepatitis E virus (HEV) genotype 3, the most prevalent in Europe. The aim of this study was to use phage display technology as a tool to identify peptides that mimic epitopes of HEV capsid (mimotopes). We identified putative linear and conformational mimotopes using sera from Scottish blood donors that have the immunological imprint of past HEV infection. Four mimotopes did not have homology with the primary sequence of HEV ORF2 capsid but competed effectively with a commercial HEV antigen for binding to anti-HEV reference serum. When the reactivity profile of each mimotope was compared with Wantai HEV-IgG ELISA, the most sensitive HEV immunoassay, mimotopes showed 95.2-100% sensitivity while the specificity ranged from 81.5 to 95.8%. PepSurf algorithm was used to map affinity-selected peptides onto the ORF2 crystal structure of HEV genotype 3, which predicted that these four mimototopes are clustered in the P domain of ORF2 capsid, near conformational epitopes of anti-HEV neutralising monoclonal antibodies. These HEV mimotopes may have potential applications in the design of structural vaccines and the development of new diagnostic tests.

  10. A mimic study on effects of fluoride on tooth enamel structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Guobin; Wang, Mu; Liu, Xiang Yang

    2010-03-01

    Tooth enamel is the hardest tissue in human body, and this superior mechanical property is contributed by its unique microstructures, i.e., oriented growth of rod-like apatite crystals into basic structural units called the prisms Fluoride (F^-) has been recognized to have significant effects on the physical and chemical properties of tooth enamel. However, the role of F^- on microstructures of apatite crystals is not well understood yet. Here we report a detailed investigation on the topic. Mimic in vitro growth of tooth enamel structures is performed at the biophysical conditions in simulated body fluids, using belt-like hydroxyapatite crystals as substrates It shows that F^- on the order of 0.1 mM will dramatically change the morphology of the grown crystals from irregular slabs to nano-needles, and the needles are aligned along the substrate with an average misorientation of ˜12 . Branched growth of bundles of nano-needles occurs with further increase of F^-, and finally, growth of highly porous structures as well as microspheres takes place when the F^- concentration exceeds 5 mM. In comparison with real tooth enamel structures, the relationship between enamel microstructures and tooth caries as well as fluorosis is discussed.

  11. Synthetic Random Copolymers as a Molecular Platform To Mimic Host-Defense Antimicrobial Peptides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takahashi, Haruko; Caputo, Gregory A; Vemparala, Satyavani; Kuroda, Kenichi

    2017-05-17

    Synthetic polymers have been used as a molecular platform to develop host-defense antimicrobial peptide (AMP) mimetics which are effective in killing drug-resistant bacteria. In this topical review, we will discuss the AMP-mimetic design and chemical optimization strategies as well as the biological and biophysical implications of AMP mimicry by synthetic polymers. Traditionally, synthetic polymers have been used as a chemical means to replicate the chemical functionalities and physicochemical properties of AMPs (e.g., cationic charge, hydrophobicity) to recapitulate their mode of action. However, we propose a new perception that AMP-mimetic polymers are an inherently bioactive platform as whole molecules, which mimic more than the side chain functionalities of AMPs. The tunable nature and chemical simplicity of synthetic random polymers facilitate the development of potent, cost-effective, broad-spectrum antimicrobials. The polymer-based approach offers the potential for many antimicrobial applications to be used directly in solution or attached to surfaces to fight against drug-resistant bacteria.

  12. Tumour-derived microvesicles (TMV) mimic the effect of tumour cells on monocyte subpopulations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baj-Krzyworzeka, Monika; Baran, Jaroslaw; Weglarczyk, Kazimierz; Szatanek, Rafal; Szaflarska, Anna; Siedlar, Maciej; Zembala, Marek

    2010-09-01

    Monocytes/macrophages may be affected by tumour cells via cell-to-cell contact, soluble factors and by tumour-derived microvesicles (TMV). Previous observations indicate that TMV interact with monocytes and alter their immunophenotype and activity. This study was designed to determine interactions of TMV with subpopulations (CD14(++)CD16(-) and CD14(+)CD16(++)) of human monocytes. Engulfment of TMV by subsets of monocytes was analysed by flow cytometry. Moreover cytokine release and production of reactive oxygen intermediates (ROI) and reactive nitrogen intermediates (RNI) by CD14(++)CD16(-) and CD14(+)CD16(++) cells after TMV stimulation was determined. It was found that TMV are engulfed more efficiently by CD14(++)CD16(-) than CD14(+)CD16(++) cells. TMV-activated CD14(++)CD16(-) cells produce more ROI and interleukin -10 (IL-10) than CD14(++)CD16(+). CD14(+)CD16(++) cells following TMV stimulation showed an increased release of tumour necrosis factor alpha, IL-12p40 and RNI. TMV significantly modulate biological activity of monocyte subsets with a pattern similar to tumour cells. Therefore, TMV mimic the activating effect of tumour cells on monocytes as assessed by release of cytokines, ROI and RNI.

  13. ROMP- and RAFT-Based Guanidinium-Containing Polymers as Scaffolds for Protein Mimic Synthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarapas, Joel M; Backlund, Coralie M; deRonde, Brittany M; Minter, Lisa M; Tew, Gregory N

    2017-05-17

    Cell-penetrating peptides are an important class of molecules with promising applications in bioactive cargo delivery. A diverse series of guanidinium-containing polymeric cell-penetrating peptide mimics (CPPMs) with varying backbone chemistries was synthesized and assessed for delivery of both GFP and fluorescently tagged siRNA. Specifically, we examined CPPMs based on norbornene, methacrylate, and styrene backbones to determine how backbone structure impacted internalization of these two cargoes. Either charge content or degree of polymerization was held constant at 20, with diguanidinium norbornene molecules being polymerized to both 10 and 20 repeat units. Generally, homopolymer CPPMs delivered low amounts of siRNA into Jurkat T cells, with no apparent backbone dependence; however, by adding a short hydrophobic methyl methacrylate block to the guanidinium-rich methacrylate polymer, siRNA delivery to nearly the entire cell population was achieved. Protein internalization yielded similar results for most of the CPPMs, though the block polymer was unable to deliver proteins. In contrast, the styrene-based CPPM yielded the highest internalization for GFP (≈40 % of cells affected), showing that indeed backbone chemistry impacts protein delivery, specifically through the incorporation of an aromatic group. These results demonstrate that an understanding of how polymer structure affects cargo-dependent internalization is critical to designing new, more effective CPPMs. © 2017 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  14. Cardiac cell culture model as a left ventricle mimic for cardiac tissue generation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, Mai-Dung; Tinney, Joseph P; Yuan, Fangping; Roussel, Thomas J; El-Baz, Ayman; Giridharan, Guruprasad; Keller, Bradley B; Sethu, Palaniappan

    2013-09-17

    A major challenge in cardiac tissue engineering is the delivery of hemodynamic mechanical cues that play a critical role in the early development and maturation of cardiomyocytes. Generation of functional cardiac tissue capable of replacing or augmenting cardiac function therefore requires physiologically relevant environments that can deliver complex mechanical cues for cardiomyocyte functional maturation. The goal of this work is the development and validation of a cardiac cell culture model (CCCM) microenvironment that accurately mimics pressure-volume changes seen in the left ventricle and to use this system to achieve cardiac cell maturation under conditions where mechanical loads such as pressure and stretch are gradually increased from the unloaded state to conditions seen in vivo. The CCCM platform, consisting of a cell culture chamber integrated within a flow loop was created to accomplish culture of 10 day chick embryonic ventricular cardiomyocytes subject to 4 days of stimulation (10 mmHg, ∼13% stretch at a frequency of 2 Hz). Results clearly show that CCCM conditioned cardiomyocytes accelerate cardiomyocyte structural and functional maturation in comparison to static unloaded controls as evidenced by increased proliferation, alignment of actin cytoskeleton, bundle-like sarcomeric α-actinin expression, higher pacing beat rate at lower threshold voltages, and increased shortening. These results confirm the CCCM microenvironment can accelerate immature cardiac cell structural and functional maturation for potential cardiac regenerative applications.

  15. Designed ankyrin repeat proteins: a new approach to mimic complex antigens for diagnostic purposes?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stefanie Hausammann

    Full Text Available Inhibitory antibodies directed against coagulation factor VIII (FVIII can be found in patients with acquired and congenital hemophilia A. Such FVIII-inhibiting antibodies are routinely detected by the functional Bethesda Assay. However, this assay has a low sensitivity and shows a high inter-laboratory variability. Another method to detect antibodies recognizing FVIII is ELISA, but this test does not allow the distinction between inhibitory and non-inhibitory antibodies. Therefore, we aimed at replacing the intricate antigen FVIII by Designed Ankyrin Repeat Proteins (DARPins mimicking the epitopes of FVIII inhibitors. As a model we used the well-described inhibitory human monoclonal anti-FVIII antibody, Bo2C11, for the selection on DARPin libraries. Two DARPins were selected binding to the antigen-binding site of Bo2C11, which mimic thus a functional epitope on FVIII. These DARPins inhibited the binding of the antibody to its antigen and restored FVIII activity as determined in the Bethesda assay. Furthermore, the specific DARPins were able to recognize the target antibody in human plasma and could therefore be used to test for the presence of Bo2C11-like antibodies in a large set of hemophilia A patients. These data suggest, that our approach might be used to isolate epitopes from different sets of anti-FVIII antibodies in order to develop an ELISA-based screening assay allowing the distinction of inhibitory and non-inhibitory anti-FVIII antibodies according to their antibody signatures.

  16. A periodic diet that mimics fasting promotes multi-system regeneration, enhanced cognitive performance and healthspan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brandhorst, Sebastian; Choi, In Young; Wei, Min; Cheng, Chia Wei; Sedrakyan, Sargis; Navarrete, Gerardo; Dubeau, Louis; Yap, Li Peng; Park, Ryan; Vinciguerra, Manlio; Di Biase, Stefano; Mirzaei, Hamed; Mirisola, Mario G.; Childress, Patra; Ji, Lingyun; Groshen, Susan; Penna, Fabio; Odetti, Patrizio; Perin, Laura; Conti, Peter S.; Ikeno, Yuji; Kennedy, Brian K.; Cohen, Pinchas; Morgan, Todd E.; Dorff, Tanya B.; Longo, Valter D.

    2015-01-01

    Summary Prolonged fasting (PF) promotes stress resistance but its effects on longevity are poorly understood. We show that alternating PF and nutrient-rich medium extended yeast lifespan independently of established pro-longevity genes. In mice, four days of a diet that mimics fasting (FMD), developed to minimize the burden of PF, decreased the size of multiple organs/systems; an effect followed upon re-feeding by an elevated number of progenitor and stem cells and regeneration. Bi-monthly FMD cycles started at middle age extended longevity, lowered visceral fat, reduced cancer incidence and skin lesions, rejuvenated the immune system, and retarded bone mineral density loss. In old mice, FMD cycles promoted hippocampal neurogenesis, lowered IGF-1 levels and PKA activity, elevated NeuroD1, and improved cognitive performance. In a pilot clinical trial, three FMD cycles decreased risk factors/biomarkers for aging, diabetes, cardiovascular disease and cancer without major adverse effects, providing support for the use of FMDs to promote healthspan. PMID:26094889

  17. Medical Textiles as Vascular Implants and Their Success to Mimic Natural Arteries

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Charanpreet Singh

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Vascular implants belong to a specialised class of medical textiles. The basic purpose of a vascular implant (graft and stent is to act as an artificial conduit or substitute for a diseased artery. However, the long-term healing function depends on its ability to mimic the mechanical and biological behaviour of the artery. This requires a thorough understanding of the structure and function of an artery, which can then be translated into a synthetic structure based on the capabilities of the manufacturing method utilised. Common textile manufacturing techniques, such as weaving, knitting, braiding, and electrospinning, are frequently used to design vascular implants for research and commercial purposes for the past decades. However, the ability to match attributes of a vascular substitute to those of a native artery still remains a challenge. The synthetic implants have been found to cause disturbance in biological, biomechanical, and hemodynamic parameters at the implant site, which has been widely attributed to their structural design. In this work, we reviewed the design aspect of textile vascular implants and compared them to the structure of a natural artery as a basis for assessing the level of success as an implant. The outcome of this work is expected to encourage future design strategies for developing improved long lasting vascular implants.

  18. Mimics: a symbolic conflict/cooperation simulation program, with embedded protocol recording and automatic psychometric assessment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aidman, Eugene V; Shmelyov, Alexander G

    2002-02-01

    This paper describes an interactive software environment designed as a social interaction simulator with embedded comprehensive recording and flexible assessment facilities. Using schematized visual sketches similar to cross-cultural facial universals (Ekman, 1999), Mimics (Shmelyov & Aidman, 1997) employs a computer-game-like scenario that requires the subject to identify with an avatar and navigate it through a playing field inhabited by hosts who display a range of facial expressions. From these expressions (which are highly consequential), the player has to anticipate the hosts' reactions to the avatar (which may vary from friendly to obstructing or aggressive) and choose between negotiating with a host (by altering the avatar's facial expression), attacking it, or searching for an escape route. Comprehensive recording of player moves and interactions has enabled computation of several finegrained indices of interactive behavior, such as aggressive response styles, efficiency, and motivation in conflict/cooperation contexts. Initial validation data and potential applications of the method in the assessment of personality and social behavior are discussed.

  19. Hereditary and inflammatory neuropathies: a review of reported associations, mimics and misdiagnoses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rajabally, Yusuf A; Adams, David; Latour, Philippe; Attarian, Shahram

    2016-10-01

    Distinguishing between hereditary and inflammatory neuropathy is usually straightforward on clinical grounds with the help of a family history. There are nevertheless cases where the distinction is less clear. The advent of molecular genetics has in the past several years aided confirmatory diagnosis for an increasing proportion of patients with genetic neuropathy. Various reports have described associations of Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease with a suspected or confirmed inflammatory neuropathy occasionally responding to immunotherapy. Possible predisposition to an inflammatory component was suggested in a subset of patients. Such reports have, however, been relatively few in number, suggesting the rarity of such associations and of such a predisposition if it exists. There have been a number of publications detailing clinical presentations suggestive of inflammatory neuropathy in patients with a known or later proven genetic aetiology, and subsequently felt to be part of the phenotype rather than representing an association. A number of genetically mediated multisystemic diseases with neuropathy have otherwise been reported as mimicking chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyneuropathy (CIDP). The most common example is that of familial amyloid polyneuropathy, of particular concern for the clinician when misdiagnosed as CIDP, in view of the therapeutic implications. We review the literature on reported associations, mimics and misdiagnoses of hereditary and inflammatory neuropathy and attempt to determine a practical approach to the problem in clinical practice using clinical features, electrophysiology, histopathology and targeted early genetic testing. The issue of attempting immunomodulatory therapy is discussed in view of the published literature.

  20. Metal-based superoxide dismutase and catalase mimics reduce oxidative stress biomarkers and extend life span of Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ribeiro, Thales de P; Fonseca, Fernanda L; de Carvalho, Mariana D C; Godinho, Rodrigo M da C; de Almeida, Fernando Pereira; Saint'Pierre, Tatiana D; Rey, Nicolás A; Fernandes, Christiane; Horn, Adolfo; Pereira, Marcos D

    2017-01-15

    Aging is a natural process characterized by several biological changes. In this context, oxidative stress appears as a key factor that leads cells and organisms to severe dysfunctions and diseases. To cope with reactive oxygen species and oxidative-related damage, there has been increased use of superoxide dismutase (SOD)/catalase (CAT) biomimetic compounds. Recently, we have shown that three metal-based compounds {[Fe(HPClNOL)Cl2]NO3, [Cu(HPClNOL)(CH3CN)](ClO4)2 and Mn(HPClNOL)(Cl)2}, harboring in vitro SOD and/or CAT activities, were critical for protection of yeast cells against oxidative stress. In this work, treating Saccharomyces cerevisiae with these SOD/CAT mimics (25.0 µM/1 h), we highlight the pivotal role of these compounds to extend the life span of yeast during chronological aging. Evaluating lipid and protein oxidation of aged cells, it becomes evident that these mimics extend the life expectancy of yeast mainly due to the reduction in oxidative stress biomarkers. In addition, the treatment of yeast cells with these mimics regulated the amounts of lipid droplet occurrence, consistent with the requirement and protection of lipids for cell integrity during aging. Concerning SOD/CAT mimics uptake, using inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry, we add new evidence that these complexes, besides being bioabsorbed by S. cerevisiae cells, can also affect metal homeostasis. Finally, our work presents a new application for these SOD/CAT mimics, which demonstrate a great potential to be employed as antiaging agents. Taken together, these promising results prompt future studies concerning the relevance of administration of these molecules against the emerging aging-related diseases such as Parkinson's, Alzheimer's and Huntington's.

  1. Lipid profiling and transcriptomic analysis reveals a functional interplay between estradiol and growth hormone in liver

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fernández-Pérez, Leandro; Santana-Farré, Ruymán; Mirecki-Garrido, Mercedes de

    2014-01-01

    fatty acid oxidation. Both E2 and GH replacements reduced hepatic CHO levels and increased the formation of cholesterol esters and triacylglycerols. Notably, the hepatic lipid profiles were endowed with singular fingerprints that may be used to segregate the effects of different hormonal replacements......, through its interaction with the estrogen receptor, exerts direct effects on liver. Hypothyroidism also affects endocrine and metabolic functions of the liver, rendering a metabolic phenotype with features that mimic deficiencies in E2 or GH. In this work, we combined the lipid and transcriptomic analysis......-differentiated functions. E2 influenced genes involved in metabolism of lipids and endo-xenobiotics, and the GH-regulated endocrine, metabolic, immune, and male-specific responses. E2 induced a female-pattern of gene expression and inhibited GH-regulated STAT5b targeted genes. E2 did not prevent the inhibitory effects...

  2. Measuring Steroid Hormones in Avian Eggs

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Engelhardt, Nikolaus von; Groothuis, Ton G.G.

    2005-01-01

    Avian eggs contain substantial levels of various hormones of maternal origin and have recently received a lot of interest, mainly from behavioral ecologists. These studies strongly depend on the measurement of egg hormone levels, but the method of measuring these levels has received little attention

  3. Incretin hormone secretion over the day

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ahren, B; Carr, RD; Deacon, Carolyn F.

    2010-01-01

    . Regulation of incretin hormone secretion is less well characterized. The main stimulus for incretin hormone secretion is presence of nutrients in the intestinal lumen, and carbohydrate, fat as well as protein all have the capacity to stimulate GIP and GLP-1 secretion. More recently, it has been established...

  4. Incretin hormones and the satiation signal

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Holst, Jens Juul

    2013-01-01

    Recent research has indicated that appetite-regulating hormones from the gut may have therapeutic potential. The incretin hormone, glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1), appears to be involved in both peripheral and central pathways mediating satiation. Several studies have also indicated that GLP-1...

  5. Measuring steroid hormones in avian eggs

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Von Engelhardt, N; Groothuis, TGG; Bauchinger, U; Goymann, W; JenniEiermann, S

    2005-01-01

    Avian eggs contain substantial levels of various hormones of maternal origin and have recently received a lot of interest, mainly from behavioral ecologists. These studies strongly depend on the measurement of egg hormone levels, but the method of measuring these levels has received little attention

  6. Recombinant Bovine Growth Hormone Criticism Grows.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaard, Greta

    1995-01-01

    Discusses concerns related to the use of recombinant bovine growth hormone in the United States and other countries. Analyses the issue from the perspectives of animal rights, human health, world hunger, concerns of small and organic farmers, costs to the taxpayer, and environmental questions. A sidebar discusses Canadian review of the hormone.…

  7. Hormones and absence epilepsy in genetic models

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tolmacheva, E.A.; Luijtelaar, E.L.J.M. van

    2010-01-01

    Steroid hormones are known to have a tremendous impact on seizures and might play a prominent role in epileptogenesis. However, little is known about the role of steroid hormones in absence epilepsy. Here we review recently combined electrophysiological, pharmacological and behavioural studies in a

  8. The barrier within: endothelial transport of hormones.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kolka, Cathryn M; Bergman, Richard N

    2012-08-01

    Hormones are involved in a plethora of processes including development and growth, metabolism, mood, and immune responses. These essential functions are dependent on the ability of the hormone to access its target tissue. In the case of endocrine hormones that are transported through the blood, this often means that the endothelium must be crossed. Many studies have shown that the concentrations of hormones and nutrients in blood can be very different from those surrounding the cells on the tissue side of the blood vessel endothelium, suggesting that transport across this barrier can be rate limiting for hormone action. This transport can be regulated by altering the surface area of the blood vessel available for diffusion through to the underlying tissue or by the permeability of the endothelium. Many hormones are known to directly or indirectly affect the endothelial barrier, thus affecting their own distribution to their target tissues. Dysfunction of the endothelial barrier is found in many diseases, particularly those associated with the metabolic syndrome. The interrelatedness of hormones may help to explain why the cluster of diseases in the metabolic syndrome occur together so frequently and suggests that treating the endothelium may ameliorate defects in more than one disease. Here, we review the structure and function of the endothelium, its contribution to the function of hormones, and its involvement in disease.

  9. Therapy for obesity based on gastrointestinal hormones

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bagger, Jonatan I; Christensen, Mikkel; Knop, Filip K;

    2011-01-01

    It has long been known that peptide hormones from the gastrointestinal tract have significant impact on the regulation of nutrient metabolism. Among these hormones, incretins have been found to increase insulin secretion, and thus incretin-based therapies have emerged as new modalities...

  10. Sweat secretion rates in growth hormone disorders

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sneppen, S B; Main, K M; Juul, A

    2000-01-01

    While increased sweating is a prominent symptom in patients with active acromegaly, reduced sweating is gaining status as part of the growth hormone deficiency (GHD) syndrome.......While increased sweating is a prominent symptom in patients with active acromegaly, reduced sweating is gaining status as part of the growth hormone deficiency (GHD) syndrome....

  11. Sex hormones and skeletal muscle weakness

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sipilä, Sarianna; Narici, Marco; Kjaer, Michael

    2013-01-01

    Human ageing is accompanied with deterioration in endocrine functions the most notable and well characterized of which being the decrease in the production of sex hormones. Current research literature suggests that low sex hormone concentration may be among the key mechanism for sarcopenia and mu...

  12. Sweat secretion rates in growth hormone disorders

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sneppen, S B; Main, K M; Juul, A

    2000-01-01

    While increased sweating is a prominent symptom in patients with active acromegaly, reduced sweating is gaining status as part of the growth hormone deficiency (GHD) syndrome.......While increased sweating is a prominent symptom in patients with active acromegaly, reduced sweating is gaining status as part of the growth hormone deficiency (GHD) syndrome....

  13. Characterization of thyroid hormone uptake in heart

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Putten, Haidy Hendrica Antonia Gerarda Maria van der

    2002-01-01

    Transport of T3 and T4 across the plasma membrane is the first step in the sequence of intracellular thyroid hormone action. It is generally accepted that this is mediated by specific carrier proteins. The knowledge about these proteins in liver is abundant, but information about thyroid hormone upt

  14. Menstrual cycle hormones, food intake, and cravings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Objective: Food craving and intake are affected by steroid hormones during the menstrual cycle, especially in the luteal phase, when craving for certain foods has been reported to increase. However, satiety hormones such as leptin have also been shown to affect taste sensitivity, and therefore food ...

  15. Menopausal hormone use and ovarian cancer risk

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Beral, V; Gaitskell, K; Hermon, C

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Half the epidemiological studies with information about menopausal hormone therapy and ovarian cancer risk remain unpublished, and some retrospective studies could have been biased by selective participation or recall. We aimed to assess with minimal bias the effects of hormone therapy...

  16. The association between nonylphenols and sexual hormones levels among pregnant women: a cohort study in Taiwan.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chia-Huang Chang

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Nonylphenol (NP has been proven as an endocrine disrupter and had the ability to interfere with the endocrine system. Though the health effects of NP on pregnant women and their fetuses are sustained, these negative associations related to the mechanisms of regulation for estrogen during pregnancy need to be further clarified. The objective of this study is to explore the association between maternal NP and hormonal levels, such as estradiol, testosterone, luteinizing hormone (LH and follicle stimulating hormone (FSH, and progesterone. METHODS: A pregnant women cohort was established in North Taiwan between March and December 2010. Maternal urine and blood samples from the first, second, and third trimesters of gestation were collected. Urinary NP concentration was measured by high-performance liquid chromatography coupled with fluorescent detection. A mixed-effects model using a generalised estimating equation (GEE was applied to assess the associations between maternal NP concentration and plasma hormones throughout the three trimesters. RESULTS: In total, 162 singleton pregnant women completed this study through delivery. The geometric mean of creatinine-adjusted urinary NP concentrations were 4.27, 4.21, and 4.10 µg/g cre. in the first, second, and third trimesters respectively. A natural log-transformation of urinary NP concentrations were significantly associated with LH in the GEE model (β = -0.23 mIU/ml, p<0.01. CONCLUSION: This perspective cohort study demonstrates that negative association occurs between maternal NP exposure and plasma LH levels. The estrogen-mimic effect of NP might influence the negative feedback on LH during pregnancy.

  17. Biomonitoring and hormone-disrupting effect biomarkers of persistent organic pollutants in vitro and ex vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonefeld-Jørgensen, Eva C; Ghisari, Mandana; Wielsøe, Maria; Bjerregaard-Olesen, Christian; Kjeldsen, Lisbeth S; Long, Manhai

    2014-07-01

    Persistent organic pollutants (POPs) include lipophilic legacy POPs and the amphiphilic perfluorinated alkyl acids (PFAAs). They have long half-lives and bioaccumulate in the environment, animals and human beings. POPs possess toxic, carcinogenic and endocrine-disrupting potentials. Endocrine-disrupting chemicals (EDCs) are compounds that either mimic or block endogenous hormones and thus disrupt the normal hormone homeostasis. Biomonitoring assesses the internal doses of a person to provide information about chemical exposures. Effect biomarkers assess chemicals potential to affect cellular functions in vivo/ex vivo. Human beings are exposed to complex mixtures of chemicals, having individually very different biological potentials and effects. Therefore, the assessment of the combined, integrated biological effect of the actual chemical mixture in human blood is important. In vitro and ex vivo cell systems have been introduced for the assessment of the integrated level of xenobiotic cellular effects in human beings. Ex vivo studies have shown geographical differences in bioaccumulated POP serum levels, being reflected by the combined biomarker effects of the complex mixture extracted from human serum. Xenohormone receptor transactivities can be used as an ex vivo integrated biomarker of POP exposure and effects. Epidemiological and in vitro/ex vivo studies have supported the potential impact of the combined effect of serum POPs on the activity of hormone and/or dioxin receptors as a risk factor for human health. With focus on hormone disruption, this MiniReview will give an update on recent POP-related endocrine-disrupting effects in vitro/ex vivo/in vivo and some related genetic data.

  18. Hormonal contraception for human males: prospects

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    P.R.K.Reddy

    2000-01-01

    Development of an ideal hormonal contraceptive for man has been the goal of several research workers during the past few decades. Suppression of pituitary gonadotropic hormones, which in turn would inhibit spermatogenesis while maintaining normal libido and potentia has been the approach for a contraceptive agent. Intramuscularly administered and orally active testosterone or testosterone in combination with progesterone have been shown to cause inhibition of spermatogenesis resulting in azoospermia in normal men. Similarly testosterone has been used in combination with gonadotropin releasing hormone antagonists and agonists to inhibit pituitary gonadotropic hormone release. Immunological approach to neutralize the circulating levels of follicle stimulating hormone has also been shown to cause inhibition of spermatogenesis. The available literature shows that testosterone causes reversible azoospermia without any significant side effects in Asian population effectively and appears to be a promising chemical for control of fertility in man.( Asian J Androl 2000 ; 2 : 46 - 50 )

  19. Postmenopausal hormone replacement therapy--clinical implications

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ravn, S H; Rosenberg, J; Bostofte, E

    1994-01-01

    in the urogenital tract. Women at risk of osteoporosis will benefit from hormone replacement therapy. The treatment should start as soon after menopause as possible and it is possible that it should be maintained for life. The treatment may be supplemented with extra calcium intake, vitamin D, and maybe calcitonin....... Physical activity should be promoted, and cigarette smoking reduced if possible. Women at risk of cardiovascular disease will also benefit from hormone replacement therapy. There is overwhelming evidence that hormone therapy will protect against both coronary heart disease and stroke...... suggest that every woman showing any signs of hormone deprivation should be treated with hormone replacement therapy. This includes women with subjective or objective vaso-motor symptoms, genito-urinary symptoms, women at risk of osteoporosis (fast bone losers), and women at risk of cardiovascular...

  20. Hormone therapy and different ovarian cancers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mørch, Lina Steinrud; Løkkegaard, Ellen; Andreasen, Anne Helms;

    2012-01-01

    , including information about tumor histology. The authors performed Poisson regression analyses that included hormone exposures and confounders as time-dependent covariates. In an average of 8.0 years of follow up, 2,681 cases of epithelial ovarian cancer were detected. Compared with never users, women......Postmenopausal hormone therapy use increases the risk of ovarian cancer. In the present study, the authors examined the risks of different histologic types of ovarian cancer associated with hormone therapy. Using Danish national registers, the authors identified 909,946 women who were followed from...... 1995-2005. The women were 50-79 years of age and had no prior hormone-sensitive cancers or bilateral oophorectomy. Hormone therapy prescription data were obtained from the National Register of Medicinal Product Statistics. The National Cancer and Pathology Register provided data on ovarian cancers...

  1. Hormone therapy and different ovarian cancers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mørch, Lina Steinrud; Løkkegaard, Ellen; Andreasen, Anne Helms;

    2012-01-01

    Postmenopausal hormone therapy use increases the risk of ovarian cancer. In the present study, the authors examined the risks of different histologic types of ovarian cancer associated with hormone therapy. Using Danish national registers, the authors identified 909,946 women who were followed from...... 1995-2005. The women were 50-79 years of age and had no prior hormone-sensitive cancers or bilateral oophorectomy. Hormone therapy prescription data were obtained from the National Register of Medicinal Product Statistics. The National Cancer and Pathology Register provided data on ovarian cancers......, including information about tumor histology. The authors performed Poisson regression analyses that included hormone exposures and confounders as time-dependent covariates. In an average of 8.0 years of follow up, 2,681 cases of epithelial ovarian cancer were detected. Compared with never users, women...

  2. Current Status of Biosimilar Growth Hormone

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saenger Paul

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available As the first wave of biopharmaceuticals is set to expire, biosimilars or follow-on protein products (FOPPs have emerged. The regulatory foundation for these products is more advanced and better codified in Europe than in the US. Recent approval of biosimilar Somatropin (growth hormone in Europe and the US prompted this paper. The scientific viability of biosimilar growth hormone is reviewed. Efficacy and safety data (growth rates, IGF-1 generation for up to 7 years for pediatric indications measure up favorably to previously approved growth hormones as reference comparators. While the approval in the US is currently only for treatment of growth hormone deficiency (GHD in children and adults, the commercial use of approved biosimilar growth hormones will allow in the future for in-depth estimation of their efficacy and safety in non-GH deficient states as well.

  3. Current Status of Biosimilar Growth Hormone

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paul Saenger

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available As the first wave of biopharmaceuticals is set to expire, biosimilars or follow-on protein products (FOPPs have emerged. The regulatory foundation for these products is more advanced and better codified in Europe than in the US. Recent approval of biosimilar Somatropin (growth hormone in Europe and the US prompted this paper. The scientific viability of biosimilar growth hormone is reviewed. Efficacy and safety data (growth rates, IGF-1 generation for up to 7 years for pediatric indications measure up favorably to previously approved growth hormones as reference comparators. While the approval in the US is currently only for treatment of growth hormone deficiency (GHD in children and adults, the commercial use of approved biosimilar growth hormones will allow in the future for in-depth estimation of their efficacy and safety in non-GH deficient states as well.

  4. Sex hormone binding globulin phenotypes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cornelisse, M M; Bennett, Patrick; Christiansen, M

    1994-01-01

    Human sex hormone binding globulin (SHBG) is encoded by a normal and a variant allele. The resulting SHBG phenotypes (the homozygous normal SHBG, the heterozygous SHBG and the homozygous variant SHBG phenotype) can be distinguished by their electrophoretic patterns. We developed a novel detection....... This method of detection was used to determine the distribution of SHBG phenotypes in healthy controls of both sexes and in five different pathological conditions characterized by changes in the SHBG level or endocrine disturbances (malignant and benign ovarian neoplasms, hirsutism, liver cirrhosis...... on the experimental values. Differences in SHBG phenotypes do not appear to have any clinical significance and no sex difference was found in the SHBG phenotype distribution....

  5. [Plant hormones, plant growth regulators].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Végvári, György; Vidéki, Edina

    2014-06-29

    Plants seem to be rather defenceless, they are unable to do motion, have no nervous system or immune system unlike animals. Besides this, plants do have hormones, though these substances are produced not in glands. In view of their complexity they lagged behind animals, however, plant organisms show large scale integration in their structure and function. In higher plants, such as in animals, the intercellular communication is fulfilled through chemical messengers. These specific compounds in plants are called phytohormones, or in a wide sense, bioregulators. Even a small quantity of these endogenous organic compounds are able to regulate the operation, growth and development of higher plants, and keep the connection between cells, tissues and synergy between organs. Since they do not have nervous and immume systems, phytohormones play essential role in plants' life.

  6. Neuroendocrine hormone amylin in diabetes

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xiao-Xi; Zhang; Yan-Hong; Pan; Yan-Mei; Huang; Hai-Lu; Zhao

    2016-01-01

    The neuroendocrine hormone amylin, also known as islet amyloid polypeptide, is co-localized, co-packaged and cosecreted with insulin from adult pancreatic islet β cells to maintain glucose homeostasis. Specifically, amylin reduces secretion of nutrient-stimulated glucagon, regulates blood pressure with an effect on renin-angiotensin system, and delays gastric emptying. The physiological actions of human amylin attribute to the conformational α-helix monomers whereas the misfolding instable oligomers may be detrimental to the islet β cells and further transform to β-sheet fibrils as amyloid deposits. No direct evidence proves that the amylin fibrils in amyloid deposits cause diabetes. Here we also have performed a systematic review of human amylin gene changes and reported the S20 G mutation is minor in the development of diabetes. In addition to the metabolic effects, human amylin may modulate autoimmunity and innate inflammation through regulatory T cells to impact on both human type 1 and type 2 diabetes.

  7. Hormonal status can modify radiosensitivity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ricoul, M.; Sabatier, L.; Dutrillaux, B. [CEA Fontenay-aux-Roses, 92 (France). Dept. de Radiobiologie et de Radiopathologie

    1997-03-01

    In preliminary experiments, we have demonstrated that pregnancy increases chromosome radiosensitivity in the mouse at the end of gestation. Blood obtained from women at various times of pregnancy was then exposed to ionizing radiations in vitro. By comparison to non pregnant women, an increase in chromosome breakages was observed in metaphases from lymphocytes. Immediately after delivery, this increase of radiosensitivity disappeared. In a prospective study, serial analyses showed a very strong correlation between the amount of pregnancy hormones, progesterone in particular, and the increase of radiosensitivity. Thus, pregnant women may have an increased sensitivity to ionizing radiation during the second half of their pregnancy and the risks of radiation exposure of pregnant women have to be considered not only n relation to the child, but also to their own hypersensitivity. (authors)

  8. Phosphorylation of chicken growth hormone

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aramburo, C.; Montiel, J.L. (Universidad Nacional Autonoma de Mexico (Mexico)); Donoghue, D.; Scanes, C.G. (Rutgers Univ., New Brunswick, NJ (USA)); Berghman, L.R. (Laboratory for Neuroendocrinology and Immunological Biotechnology, Louvain (Belgium))

    1990-01-01

    The possibility that chicken growth hormone (cGH) can be phosphorylated has been examined. Both native and biosynthetic cGH were phosphorylated by cAMP-dependent protein kinase (and {gamma}-{sup 32}P-ATP). The extent of phosphorylation was however less than that observed with ovine prolactin. Under the conditions employed, glycosylated cGH was not phosphorylated. Chicken anterior pituitary cells in primary culture were incubated in the presence of {sup 32}P-phosphate. Radioactive phosphate was incorporated in vitro into the fraction immunoprecipitable with antisera against cGH. Incorporation was increased with cell number and time of incubation. The presence of GH releasing factor (GRF) increased the release of {sup 32}P-phosphate labeled immunoprecipitable GH into the incubation media but not content of immunoprecipitable GH in the cells. The molecular weight of the phosphorylated immunoreactive cGH in the cells corresponded to cGH dimer.

  9. Hormones and pheromones in regulation of insect behavior

    Science.gov (United States)

    Both pheromones and hormones are well recognized regulators of insect biology. However, the interactions between hormones and pheromones in coordinating insect biology are less well understood. We have studied the interactions between juvenile hormone, its precursor methyl farnesoate, and pheromon...

  10. Combined Hormonal Birth Control: Pill, Patch, and Ring

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... AQ FREQUENTLY ASKED QUESTIONS FAQ185 CONTRACEPTION Combined Hormonal Birth Control: Pill, Patch, and Ring • What are combined hormonal birth control methods? • How do combined hormonal methods prevent pregnancy? • ...

  11. Information for People Treated with Human Growth Hormone (Summary)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... NHPP): Information for People Treated with Pituitary Human Growth Hormone (Summary) How did Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease (CJD) occur in people treated with pituitary human growth hormone (hGH)? From 1963 to 1985, the National Hormone ...

  12. [Thyroid hormones and cardiovascular system].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Límanová, Zdeňka; Jiskra, Jan

    Cardiovascular system is essentially affected by thyroid hormones by way of their genomic and non-genomic effects. Untreated overt thyroid dysfunction is associated with higher cardiovascular risk. Although it has been studied more than 3 decades, in subclinical thyroid dysfunction the negative effect on cardiovascular system is much more controversial. Large meta-analyses within last 10 years have shown that subclinical hyperthyroidism is associated with higher cardiovascular risk than subclinical hypothyroidism. Conversely, in patients of age > 85 years subclinical hypothyroidism was linked with lower mortality. Therefore, subclinical hyperthyroidism should be rather treated in the elderly while subclinical hypothyroidism in the younger patients and the older may be just followed. An important problem on the border of endocrinology and cardiology is amiodarone thyroid dysfunction. Effective and safe treatment is preconditioned by distinguishing of type 1 and type 2 amiodarone induced hyperthyroidism. The type 1 should be treated with methimazol, therapeutic response is prolonged, according to recent knowledge immediate discontinuation of amiodarone is not routinely recommended and patient should be usually prepared to total thyroidectomy, or rather rarely 131I radioiodine ablation may be used if there is appropriate accumulation. In the type 2 there is a promt therapeutic response on glucocorticoids (within 1-2 weeks) with permanent remission or development of hypothyroidism. If it is not used for life-threatening arrhytmias, amiodarone may be discontinuated earlier (after several weeks). Amiodarone induced hypothyroidism is treated with levothyroxine without amiodarone interruption.Key words: amiodarone induced thyroid dysfunction - atrial fibrillation - cardiovascular risk - heart failure - hyperthyroidism - hypothyroidism - thyroid stimulating hormone.

  13. Sexual Desire and Hormonal Contraception

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boozalis, Amanda; Tutlam, Nhial T.; Robbins, Camaryn Chrisman; Peipert, Jeffrey F.

    2015-01-01

    Objective To examine the effect of hormonal contraception on sexual desire. Materials and Methods We performed a cross-sectional analysis of 1,938 of the 9,256 participants enrolled in the Contraceptive CHOICE Project. This subset included participants enrolled between April and September 2011 who completed a baseline and six-month telephone survey. Multivariable logistic regression was used to assess the association between contraceptive method and report of lacking interest in sex, controlling for potential confounding variables. Results More than one in five participants (23.9%) reported lacking interest in sex at 6 months after initiating a new contraceptive method. Of 262 copper IUD users (referent group), 18.3% reported lacking interest in sex. Our primary outcome was more prevalent in women who are young (copper IUD users, participants using depot medroxyprogesterone (ORadj=2.61, 95% confidence interval (CI)=1.47-4.61), the vaginal ring (ORadj=2.53, 95% CI=1.37-4.69), and the implant (ORadj=1.60, 95% CI=1.03-2.49) more commonly reported lack of interest in sex. We found no association between use of the hormonal IUD, oral contraceptive pill, and patch and lack of interest in sex. Conclusion CHOICE participants using depot medroxyprogesterone acetate, the contraceptive ring, and implant were more likely to report a lack of interest in sex compared to copper IUD users. Future research should confirm these findings and their possible physiological basis. Clinicians should be reassured that most women do not experience reduced sex drive with the use of most contraceptive methods. PMID:26855094

  14. Adipose tissues and thyroid hormones

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria-Jesus eObregon

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available The maintenance of energy balance is regulated by complex homeostatic mechanisms, including those emanating from adipose tissue. The main function of the adipose tissue is to store the excess of metabolic energy in the form of fat. The energy stored as fat can be mobilized during periods of energy deprivation (hunger, fasting, diseases. The adipose tissue has also a homeostatic role regulating energy balance and functioning as endocrine organ that secretes substances that control body homeostasis. Two adipose tissues have been identified: white and brown adipose tissues (WAT and BAT with different phenotype, function and regulation. WAT stores energy, while BAT dissipates energy as heat. Brown and white adipocytes have different ontogenetic origin and lineage and specific markers of WAT and BAT have been identified. Brite or beige adipose tissue has been identified in WAT with some properties of BAT. Thyroid hormones exert pleiotropic actions, regulating the differentiation process in many tissues including the adipose tissue. Adipogenesis gives raise to mature adipocytes and is regulated by several transcription factors (c/EBPs, PPARs that coordinately activate specific genes, resulting in the adipocyte phenotype. T3 regulates several genes involved in lipid mobilization and storage and in thermogenesis. Both WAT and BAT are targets of thyroid hormones, which regulate genes crucial for their proper function: lipogenesis, lipolysis, thermogenesis, mitochondrial function, transcription factors, the availability of nutrients. T3 acts directly through specific TREs in the gene promoters, regulating transcription factors. The deiodinases D3, D2 and D1 regulate the availability of T3. D3 is activated during proliferation, while D2 is linked to the adipocyte differentiation program, providing T3 needed for lipogenesis and thermogenesis. We examine the differences between BAT, WAT and brite/beige adipocytes and the process that activate UCP1 in WAT and

  15. Adipose tissues and thyroid hormones.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Obregon, Maria-Jesus

    2014-01-01

    The maintenance of energy balance is regulated by complex homeostatic mechanisms, including those emanating from adipose tissue. The main function of the adipose tissue is to store the excess of metabolic energy in the form of fat. The energy stored as fat can be mobilized during periods of energy deprivation (hunger, fasting, diseases). The adipose tissue has also a homeostatic role regulating energy balance and functioning as endocrine organ that secretes substances that control body homeostasis. Two adipose tissues have been identified: white and brown adipose tissues (WAT and BAT) with different phenotype, function and regulation. WAT stores energy, while BAT dissipates energy as heat. Brown and white adipocytes have different ontogenetic origin and lineage and specific markers of WAT and BAT have been identified. "Brite" or beige adipose tissue has been identified in WAT with some properties of BAT. Thyroid hormones exert pleiotropic actions, regulating the differentiation process in many tissues including the adipose tissue. Adipogenesis gives raise to mature adipocytes and is regulated by several transcription factors (c/EBPs, PPARs) that coordinately activate specific genes, resulting in the adipocyte phenotype. T3 regulates several genes involved in lipid mobilization and storage and in thermogenesis. Both WAT and BAT are targets of thyroid hormones, which regulate genes crucial for their proper function: lipogenesis, lipolysis, thermogenesis, mitochondrial function, transcription factors, the availability of nutrients. T3 acts directly through specific TREs in the gene promoters, regulating transcription factors. The deiodinases D3, D2, and D1 regulate the availability of T3. D3 is activated during proliferation, while D2 is linked to the adipocyte differentiation program, providing T3 needed for lipogenesis and thermogenesis. We examine the differences between BAT, WAT and brite/beige adipocytes and the process that lead to activation of UCP1 in WAT and

  16. Genetic Evidence for Function of the bHLH-PAS Protein Gce/Met As a Juvenile Hormone Receptor.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marek Jindra

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Juvenile hormones (JHs play a major role in controlling development and reproduction in insects and other arthropods. Synthetic JH-mimicking compounds such as methoprene are employed as potent insecticides against significant agricultural, household and disease vector pests. However, a receptor mediating effects of JH and its insecticidal mimics has long been the subject of controversy. The bHLH-PAS protein Methoprene-tolerant (Met, along with its Drosophila melanogaster paralog germ cell-expressed (Gce, has emerged as a prime JH receptor candidate, but critical evidence that this protein must bind JH to fulfill its role in normal insect development has been missing. Here, we show that Gce binds a native D. melanogaster JH, its precursor methyl farnesoate, and some synthetic JH mimics. Conditional on this ligand binding, Gce mediates JH-dependent gene expression and the hormone's vital role during development of the fly. Any one of three different single amino acid mutations in the ligand-binding pocket that prevent binding of JH to the protein block these functions. Only transgenic Gce capable of binding JH can restore sensitivity to JH mimics in D. melanogaster Met-null mutants and rescue viability in flies lacking both Gce and Met that would otherwise die at pupation. Similarly, the absence of Gce and Met can be compensated by expression of wild-type but not mutated transgenic D. melanogaster Met protein. This genetic evidence definitively establishes Gce/Met in a JH receptor role, thus resolving a long-standing question in arthropod biology.

  17. Receptors for thyrotropin-releasing hormone, thyroid-stimulating hormone, and thyroid hormones in the macaque uterus: effects of long-term sex hormone treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hulchiy, Mariana; Zhang, Hua; Cline, J Mark; Hirschberg, Angelica Lindén; Sahlin, Lena

    2012-11-01

    Thyroid gland dysfunction is associated with menstrual cycle disturbances, infertility, and increased risk of miscarriage, but the mechanisms are poorly understood. However, little is known about the regulation of these receptors in the uterus. The aim of this study was to determine the effects of long-term treatment with steroid hormones on the expression, distribution, and regulation of the receptors for thyrotropin-releasing hormone (TRHR) and thyroid-stimulating hormone (TSHR), thyroid hormone receptor α1/α2 (THRα1/α2), and THRβ1 in the uterus of surgically menopausal monkeys. Eighty-eight cynomolgus macaques were ovariectomized and treated orally with conjugated equine estrogens (CEE; n = 20), a combination of CEE and medroxyprogesterone acetate (MPA; n = 20), or tibolone (n = 28) for 2 years. The control group (OvxC; n = 20) received no treatment. Immunohistochemistry was used to evaluate the protein expression and distribution of the receptors in luminal epithelium, glands, stroma, and myometrium of the uterus. Immunostaining of TRHR, TSHR, and THRs was detected in all uterine compartments. Epithelial immunostaining of TRHR was down-regulated in the CEE + MPA group, whereas in stroma, both TRHR and TSHR were increased by CEE + MPA treatment as compared with OvxC. TRHR immunoreactivity was up-regulated, but THRα and THRβ were down-regulated, in the myometrium of the CEE and CEE + MPA groups. The thyroid-stimulating hormone level was higher in the CEE and tibolone groups as compared with OvxC, but the level of free thyroxin did not differ between groups. All receptors involved in thyroid hormone function are expressed in monkey uterus, and they are all regulated by long-term steroid hormone treatment. These findings suggest that there is a possibility of direct actions of thyroid hormones, thyroid-stimulating hormone and thyrotropin-releasing hormone on uterine function.

  18. Hormone abuse in sports: the antidoping perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barroso, Osquel; Mazzoni, Irene; Rabin, Olivier

    2008-05-01

    Since ancient times, unethical athletes have attempted to gain an unfair competitive advantage through the use of doping substances. A list of doping substances and methods banned in sports is published yearly by the World Anti-Doping Agency (WADA). A substance or method might be included in the List if it fulfills at least two of the following criteria: enhances sports performance; represents a risk to the athlete's health; or violates the spirit of sports. This list, constantly updated to reflect new developments in the pharmaceutical industry as well as doping trends, enumerates the drug types and methods prohibited in and out of competition. Among the substances included are steroidal and peptide hormones and their modulators, stimulants, glucocorticosteroids, beta2-agonists, diuretics and masking agents, narcotics, and cannabinoids. Blood doping, tampering, infusions, and gene doping are examples of prohibited methods indicated on the List. From all these, hormones constitute by far the highest number of adverse analytical findings reported by antidoping laboratories. Although to date most are due to anabolic steroids, the advent of molecular biology techniques has made recombinant peptide hormones readily available. These substances are gradually changing the landscape of doping trends. Peptide hormones like erythropoietin (EPO), human growth hormone (hGH), insulin, and insulin-like growth factor I (IGF-I) are presumed to be widely abused for performance enhancement. Furthermore, as there is a paucity of techniques suitable for their detection, peptide hormones are all the more attractive to dishonest athletes. This article will overview the use of hormones as doping substances in sports, focusing mainly on peptide hormones as they represent a pressing challenge to the current fight against doping. Hormones and hormones modulators being developed by the pharmaceutical industry, which could emerge as new doping substances, are also discussed.

  19. Inhibition of progesterone metabolism mimics the effect of progesterone withdrawal on forced swim test immobility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beckley, Ethan H; Finn, Deborah A

    2007-10-01

    Withdrawal from high levels of progesterone in rodents has been proposed as a model for premenstrual syndrome or postpartum depression. Forced swim test (FST) immobility, used to model depression, was assessed in intact female DBA/2J mice following progesterone withdrawal (PWD) or treatment with the 5alpha-reductase inhibitor finasteride. Following 5 daily progesterone injections (5 mg/kg IP) FST immobility increased only in mice withdrawn for 3 days (pimmobility. PWD and finasteride treatment, both of which reduce allopregnanolone levels, were associated with increased FST immobility in female DBA/2J mice. These findings suggest that decreased levels of the GABAergic neurosteroid allopregnanolone contribute to symptoms of PWD. Future studies of PWD may provide information about human conditions that are associated with hormone changes such as premenstrual syndrome or postpartum depression.

  20. 3,5-Diiodothyronine in vivo maintains euthyroidal expression of type 2 iodothyronine deiodinase, growth hormone, and thyroid hormone receptor beta1 in the killifish.

    Science.gov (United States)

    García-G, C; López-Bojorquez, L; Nuñez, J; Valverde-R, C; Orozco, A

    2007-08-01

    Until recently, 3,5-diiodothyronine (3,5-T(2)) has been considered an inactive by-product of triiodothyronine (T(3)) deiodination. However, studies from several laboratories have shown that 3,5-T(2) has specific, nongenomic effects on mitochondrial oxidative capacity and respiration rate that are distinct from those due to T(3). Nevertheless, little is known about the putative genomic effects of 3,5-T(2). We have previously shown that hyperthyroidism induced by supraphysiological doses of 3,5-T(2) inhibits hepatic iodothyronine deiodinase type 2 (D2) activity and lowers mRNA levels in the killifish in the same manner as T(3) and T(4), suggesting a pretranslational effect of 3,5-T(2) (Garcia-G C, Jeziorski MC, Valverde-R C, Orozco A. Gen Comp Endocrinol 135: 201-209, 2004). The question remains as to whether 3,5-T(2) would have effects under conditions similar to those that are physiological for T(3). To this end, intact killifish were rendered hypothyroid by administering methimazole. Groups of hypothyroid animals simultaneously received 30 nM of either T(3), reverse T(3), or 3,5-T(2). Under these conditions, we expected that, if it were bioactive, 3,5-T(2) would mimic T(3) and thus reverse the compensatory upregulation of D2 and tyroid receptor beta1 and downregulation of growth hormone that characterize hypothyroidism. Our results demonstrate that 3,5-T(2) is indeed bioactive, reversing both hepatic D2 and growth hormone responses during a hypothyroidal state. Furthermore, we observed that 3,5-T(2) and T(3) recruit two distinct populations of transcription factors to typical palindromic and DR4 thyroid hormone response elements. Taken together, these results add further evidence to support the notion that 3,5-T(2) is a bioactive iodothyronine.

  1. Get the most out of blow hormones: validation of sampling materials, field storage and extraction techniques for whale respiratory vapour samples.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burgess, Elizabeth A; Hunt, Kathleen E; Kraus, Scott D; Rolland, Rosalind M

    2016-01-01

    Studies are progressively showing that vital physiological data may be contained in the respiratory vapour (blow) of cetaceans. Nonetheless, fundamental methodological issues need to be addressed before hormone analysis of blow can become a reliable technique. In this study, we performed controlled experiments in a laboratory setting, using known doses of pure parent hormones, to validate several technical factors that may play a crucial role in hormone analyses. We evaluated the following factors: (i) practical field storage of samples on small boats during daylong trips; (ii) efficiency of hormone extraction methods; and (iii) assay interference of different sampler types (i.e. veil nylon, nitex nylon mesh and polystyrene dish). Sampling materials were dosed with mock blow samples of known mixed hormone concentrations (progesterone, 17β-estradiol, testosterone, cortisol, aldosterone and triiodothyronine), designed to mimic endocrine profiles characteristic of pregnant females, adult males, an adrenal glucocorticoid response or a zero-hormone control (distilled H2O). Results showed that storage of samples in a cooler on ice preserved hormone integrity for at least 6 h (P = 0.18). All sampling materials and extraction methods yielded the correct relative patterns for all six hormones. However, veil and nitex mesh produced detectable assay interference (mean 0.22 ± 0.04 and 0.18 ± 0.03 ng/ml, respectively), possibly caused by some nylon-based component affecting antibody binding. Polystyrene dishes were the most efficacious sampler for accuracy and precision (P samples obtained from field collections of whale blow.

  2. Adiposity, hormone replacement therapy use and breast cancer risk by age and hormone receptor status : a large prospective cohort study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ritte, Rebecca; Lukanova, Annekatrin; Berrino, Franco; Dossus, Laure; Tjonneland, Anne; Olsen, Anja; Overvad, Thure Filskov; Overvad, Kim; Clavel-Chapelon, Francoise; Fournier, Agnes; Fagherazzi, Guy; Rohrmann, Sabine; Teucher, Birgit; Boeing, Heiner; Aleksandrova, Krasimira; Trichopoulou, Antonia; Lagiou, Pagona; Trichopoulos, Dimitrios; Palli, Domenico; Sieri, Sabina; Panico, Salvatore; Tumino, Rosario; Vineis, Paolo; Ramon Quiros, Jose; Buckland, Genevieve; Sanchez, Maria-Jose; Amiano, Pilar; Chirlaque, Maria-Dolores; Ardanaz, Eva; Sund, Malin; Lenner, Per; Bueno-de-Mesquita, Bas; van Gils, Carla H.; Peeters, Petra H. M.; Krum-Hansen, Sanda; Gram, Inger Torhild; Lund, Eiliv; Khaw, Kay-Tee; Wareham, Nick; Allen, Naomi E.; Key, Timothy J.; Romieu, Isabelle; Rinaldi, Sabina; Siddiq, Afshan; Cox, David; Riboli, Elio; Kaaks, Rudolf

    2012-01-01

    Introduction: Associations of hormone-receptor positive breast cancer with excess adiposity are reasonably well characterized; however, uncertainty remains regarding the association of body mass index (BMI) with hormone-receptor negative malignancies, and possible interactions by hormone replacement

  3. L30A Mutation of Phospholemman Mimics Effects of Cardiac Glycosides in Isolated Cardiomyocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Himes, Ryan D; Smolin, Nikolai; Kukol, Andreas; Bossuyt, Julie; Bers, Donald M; Robia, Seth L

    2016-11-08

    To determine if mutations introduced into phospholemman (PLM) could increase the level of PLM-Na,K-ATPase (NKA) binding, we performed scanning mutagenesis of the transmembrane domain of PLM and measured Förster resonance energy transfer (FRET) between each mutant and NKA. We observed an increased level of binding to NKA for several PLM mutants compared to that of the wild type (WT), including L27A, L30A, and I32A. In isolated cardiomyocytes, overexpression of WT PLM increased the amplitude of the Ca(2+) transient compared to the GFP control. The Ca(2+) transient amplitude was further increased by L30A PLM overexpression. The L30A mutation also delayed Ca(2+) extrusion and increased the duration of cardiomyocyte contraction. This mimics aspects of the effect of cardiac glycosides, which are known to increase contractility through inhibition of NKA. No significant differences between WT and L30A PLM-expressing myocytes were observed after treatment with isoproterenol, suggesting that the superinhibitory effects of L30A are reversible with β-adrenergic stimulation. We also observed a decrease in the extent of PLM tetramerization with L30A compared to WT using FRET, suggesting that L30 is an important residue for mediating PLM-PLM binding. Molecular dynamics simulations revealed that the potential energy of the L30A tetramer is greater than that of the WT, and that the transmembrane α helix is distorted by the mutation. The results identify PLM residue L30 as an important determinant of PLM tetramerization and of functional inhibition of NKA by PLM.

  4. Somatostatin receptor 1 and 5 double knockout mice mimic neurochemical changes of Huntington's disease transgenic mice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Padmesh S Rajput

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Selective degeneration of medium spiny neurons and preservation of medium sized aspiny interneurons in striatum has been implicated in excitotoxicity and pathophysiology of Huntington's disease (HD. However, the molecular mechanism for the selective sparing of medium sized aspiny neurons and vulnerability of projection neurons is still elusive. The pathological characteristic of HD is an extensive reduction of the striatal mass, affecting caudate putamen. Somatostatin (SST positive neurons are selectively spared in HD and Quinolinic acid/N-methyl-D-aspartic acid induced excitotoxicity, mimic the model of HD. SST plays neuroprotective role in excitotoxicity and the biological effects of SST are mediated by five somatostatin receptor subtypes (SSTR1-5. METHODS AND FINDINGS: To delineate subtype selective biological responses we have here investigated changes in SSTR1 and 5 double knockout mice brain and compared with HD transgenic mouse model (R6/2. Our study revealed significant loss of dopamine and cAMP regulated phosphoprotein of 32 kDa (DARPP-32 and comparable changes in SST, N-methyl-D-aspartic acid receptors subtypes, calbindin and brain nitric oxide synthase expression as well as in key signaling proteins including calpain, phospho-extracellular-signal-regulated kinases1/2, synapsin-IIa, protein kinase C-α and calcineurin in SSTR1/5(-/- and R6/2 mice. Conversely, the expression of somatostatin receptor subtypes, enkephalin and phosphatidylinositol 3-kinases were strain specific. SSTR1/5 appears to be important in regulating NMDARs, DARPP-32 and signaling molecules in similar fashion as seen in HD transgenic mice. CONCLUSIONS: This is the first comprehensive description of disease related changes upon ablation of G- protein coupled receptor gene. Our results indicate that SST and SSTRs might play an important role in regulation of neurodegeneration and targeting this pathway can provide a novel insight in understanding the

  5. Peptide mimics of a major lupus epitope of SmB/B'.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaufman, Kenneth M; Kirby, Monica Y; Harley, John B; James, Judith A

    2003-04-01

    One of the most distinguishing features of systemic lupus erythematosus is the presence of high concentrations of autoantibodies that recognize a limited number of self-antigens. Even though many lupus autoantigens have been identified, the inciting triggers of these abnormal immune responses are not fully understood. One mechanism that could generate these autoantibodies is a normal immune response toward a foreign epitope that mimics a common antigenic target of an autoantigen. Antibody generated toward the foreign epitope could also bind the autoantigen. This "cross-reactivity" would result in the presentation of the autoantigen to the immune system. Under autoimmune-prone conditions, tolerance toward the native protein is broken and an autoimmune response is initiated. Previously, it was suggested that Epstein-Barr virus might use such a mechanism to initiate an autoimmune response. Cross-reactive epitopes may have a similar amino acid sequence or a similar tertiary structure that is independent of amino acid sequence. A major, and likely initial, target of the lupus anti-SmB' response is a repeated, proline-rich sequence, PPPGMRPP. To identify potential cross-reactive targets, we used affinity-purified autoantibodies specific for PPPGMRPP to screen a random heptapeptide phage display library. Eighty-five clones were isolated and sequenced with eleven distinct sequence motifs being identified. Two of these motifs were homologous to the SmB' epitope, while the other nine were not. Interestingly, one of the peptide motifs that mimicked the SmB' epitope is identical to a peptide sequence found in the Epstein-Barr virus major DNA binding protein.

  6. Irregular-shaped platinum nanoparticles as peroxidase mimics for highly efficient colorimetric immunoassay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Zhuangqiang; Xu, Mingdi; Hou, Li; Chen, Guonan; Tang, Dianping

    2013-05-01

    Enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) methods based on natural enzyme-labeled probes have been applied in the immunoassays, but most have some inevitable limitations (e.g. harsh preparation, purification and storage) and are unsuitable for routine use. Herein we synthesized a new class of irregular-shaped platinum nanoparticles (ISPtNP) with a mean length of 7.0 nm and a narrowing width from 2.0 to 5.0 nm along the longitudinal axes, which were utilized as peroxidase-like mimics for the development of colorimetric immunoassays. Compared with bioactive horseradish peroxidase (HRP), the synthesized ISPtNP exhibited a low Km value (~0.12 mM) and a high Kcat value (~2.27×10(4)s(-1)) for 3,3',5,5'-tetramethylbenzidine (TMB) with strong thermal stability and pH tolerance. The catalytic mechanism of the ISPtNP toward TMB/H2O2 was for the first time discussed and deliberated in this work. Based on a sandwich-type assay format, two types of colorimetric immunoassay protocols were designed and developed for the detection of rabbit IgG (RIgG, as a model) by using the synthesized ISPtNP and conventional HRP as the labeling of detection antibodies, respectively. Similar detection limits (LODs) of 2.5 ng mL(-1) vs. 1.0 ng mL(-1) were obtained toward RIgG with the ISPtNP labeling compared to HRP format. Intra- and inter-assay coefficients of variation were less than 13%. Importantly, the ISPtNP-based assay system could be suitable for use in a mass production of miniaturized lab-on-a-chip devices and open new opportunities for protein diagnostics and biosecurity.

  7. An athymic mouse model to mimic cobalt-60 cutaneous radiation injury

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mosca, Rodrigo Crespo; Ferreira, Danilo Cardenuto; Napolitano, Celia Marina; Santin, Stefany Plumeri; Dornelles, Leonardo Dalla Porta; Alvarenga, Eluara Ortigoso; Mathor, Monica Beatriz, E-mail: rcmosca@usp.br [Instituto de Pesquisas Energeticas e Nucleares (IPEN/CNEN-SP), Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil)

    2013-07-01

    Propose: Cutaneous wound from irradiation is the most common complication in radiotherapy treatment, and can be lead to mortality. We describe an athymic mouse model to mimic cutaneous radiation injury by Cobalt-60. Methods: A protocol was including dosimetry with silicon diodes,10x10x5 cm arrangement made by four lead bricks and PVC pipe designed to immobilize the athymic mouse in order to irradiate one clamped back skin point that was subdivided in four parts. To get the measurements of dose rates on the arrangement in Panoramic Irradiator, it was used a silicon diode encased in an opaque protection for ambient light and connected to an electric cable, forming a dosing probe. The currents generated in diode sensitive volume as a function of time of exposure to gamma radiation coming from the radiator, with dose rate of 0,015 Gy/min in positions 1, 0,021 Gy/min in position 2, 0,55 Gy/min in position 3 and 1,45 Gy/min in position four. After the dosimetry, each athymic mouse was anesthetized using Xylazine and Ketamine dilution and entered into a PVC pipe and a small portion of skin (1 cm{sup 3}) was clamped. This tube was then fixed to arrangement and the athymic mouse was irradiate for 60 min, than it was being returned to its cage. Results: The wound was visualized in all animals and photographed after 5 days of irradiation, with the emergence of ulceration after 9 days. No systemic or lethal sequelae occurred or visualized in any animals. Late clinical signs included a wound healing after 22 days. Conclusion: While still being a baseline study, we created a new functional preclinical animal model that can be used for new therapies and may improve radiotherapy management. (author)

  8. A peptide mimic blocks the cross-reaction of anti-DNA antibodies with glomerular antigens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xia, Y; Eryilmaz, E; Der, E; Pawar, R D; Guo, X; Cowburn, D; Putterman, C

    2016-03-01

    Anti-DNA antibodies play a pivotal role in the pathogenesis of lupus nephritis by cross-reacting with renal antigens. Previously, we demonstrated that the binding affinity of anti-DNA antibodies to self-antigens is isotype-dependent. Furthermore, significant variability in renal pathogenicity was seen among a panel of anti-DNA isotypes [derived from a single murine immunoglobulin (Ig)G3 monoclonal antibody, PL9-11] that share identical variable regions. In this study, we sought to select peptide mimics that effectively inhibit the binding of all murine and human anti-DNA IgG isotypes to glomerular antigens. The PL9-11 panel of IgG anti-DNA antibodies (IgG1, IgG2a, IgG2b and IgG3) was used for screening a 12-mer phage display library. Binding affinity was determined by surface plasmon resonance. Enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA), flow cytometry and glomerular binding assays were used for the assessment of peptide inhibition of antibody binding to nuclear and kidney antigens. We identified a 12 amino acid peptide (ALWPPNLHAWVP, or 'ALW') which binds to all PL9-11 IgG isotypes. Preincubation with the ALW peptide reduced the binding of the PL9-11 anti-DNA antibodies to DNA, laminin, mesangial cells and isolated glomeruli significantly. Furthermore, we confirmed the specificity of the amino acid sequence in the binding of ALW to anti-DNA antibodies by alanine scanning. Finally, ALW inhibited the binding of murine and human lupus sera to dsDNA and glomeruli significantly. In conclusion, by inhibiting the binding of polyclonal anti-DNA antibodies to autoantigens in vivo, the ALW peptide (or its derivatives) may potentially be a useful approach to block anti-DNA antibody binding to renal tissue.

  9. Fluorescent competitive assay for melamine using dummy molecularly imprinted polymers as antibody mimics

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    DU Xin-wei; JIN Mao-jun; ZHENG Lu-fei; ZHANG Yan-xin; SHE Yong-xin; LIU Guang-yang; ZHAO Feng-nian; WANG Jing; WANG Shan-shan; JIN Fen; SHAO Hua

    2016-01-01

    A lfuorescent competitive assay for melamine was ifrst developed utilizing dummy molecularly imprinted polymers (DMIPs) as artiifcial antibodies. This method is based on the competition between lfuorescent substances and the unlabeled analyte for binding sites in synthesized DMIPs and the decreased binding of lfuorescent substances to DMIPs due to increased concentrations of melamine in the solutions. DMIPs for melamine were synthesized under a hot water bath in the pres-ence of the initiator azobisisobutyronitrile (AIBN) using 2,4-diamino-6-methyl-1,3,5-triazine (DAMT) as a dummy template, methacrylic acid (MAA) as a functional monomer, and ethylene glycol dimethacrylate (EGDMA) as a crosslinking agent. The adsorption capacity and selectivity of DMIPs for melamine were evaluated by the isothermal adsorption curve and Scatchard analysis. The evaluation results showed that the synthesized DMIPs had speciifc recognition sites for melamine and the maximum adsorption amount was 1066.33 μg g–1. Later, 5-(4,6-dichlorotriazinyl) amino lfuorescein (DTAF) with a triazine ring, which slightly resembles melamine, was selected as the lfuorescent substance. The lfuorescent competitive assay using DMIPs as the antibody mimics was ifnaly established by selecting and optimizing the reaction solvents, DMIPs amount, DTAF concentration, and incubation time. The optimal detection system showed a linear response within range of 0.05–40 mg L–1 and the limit of detection (LOD) was 1.23 μg L–1. It was successfuly applied to the detection of melamine in spiked milk samples with satisfactory recoveries (71.9 to 86.3%). According to the comparative analysis, the result of optimized lfuorescent competitive assay revealed excelent agreement with the HPLC-MS/MS result for melamine.

  10. Child Abuse Mimic: Avulsion Injury in a Child With Penoscrotal Webbing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deutsch, Stephanie Anne; Long, Christopher J; Srinivasan, Arun K; Wood, Joanne N

    2017-04-01

    Sexual abuse of children is prevalent in today's society. In 2012, approximately 686,000 children (9.2 per 1000) in the United States were determined to be victims of substantiated child abuse and neglect, according to national data compiled by child protective service agencies; victimization rates were highest for children younger than 1 year. Nearly 9.3% of maltreated children were victims of sexual abuse, this finding was reported by US Department of Health and Human Services (http://www.acf.hhs.gov/programs/cb/research-data-technology/statistics-research/child-maltreatment). Previous research has shown that as many as 1 in 3 girls and 1 in 7 boys will be sexually abused during childhood (Child Abuse Negl. 2003;27:1205-1222). Although sexual abuse seems to be less common in boys than girls, this may be partly due to underdiagnosis and underreporting of sexual abuse in boys (Arch Dis Child. 2007;92:328-331). Clinicians should therefore consider the possibility of sexual abuse when boys present with genital injuries, because failing to recognize and diagnose sexual abuse can pose an ongoing safety risk to a child. However, an erroneous diagnosis of sexual abuse can have equally hazardous repercussions, including removal of a child from their caregivers or prosecution of an innocent individual. A number of medical conditions can mimic child sexual abuse injuries, including anal fissures, failure of midline fusion, perianal streptococcal dermatitis, and straddle injury (J Pediatr Health Care. 2009;23:283-288 and Acta Paediatr. 2011;100:590-593). The following case involves a 5-week-old male infant who presented to the pediatric emergency department with an avulsion injury to his penis concerning for sexual abuse. He was ultimately diagnosed with a relatively rare anatomic variant of the genitalia and determined to have sustained an accidental injury whose appearance mimicked abuse.

  11. Phosphatase-inert glucosamine 6-phosphate mimics serve as actuators of the glmS riboswitch.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fei, Xiang; Holmes, Thomas; Diddle, Julianna; Hintz, Lauren; Delaney, Dan; Stock, Alex; Renner, Danielle; McDevitt, Molly; Berkowitz, David B; Soukup, Juliane K

    2014-12-19

    The glmS riboswitch is unique among gene-regulating riboswitches and catalytic RNAs. This is because its own metabolite, glucosamine-6-phosphate (GlcN6P), binds to the riboswitch and catalytically participates in the RNA self-cleavage reaction, thereby providing a novel negative feedback mechanism. Given that a number of pathogens harbor the glmS riboswitch, artificial actuators of this potential RNA target are of great interest. Structural/kinetic studies point to the 2-amino and 6-phosphate ester functionalities in GlcN6P as being crucial for this actuation. As a first step toward developing artificial actuators, we have synthesized a series of nine GlcN6P analogs bearing phosphatase-inert surrogates in place of the natural phosphate ester. Self-cleavage assays with the Bacillus cereus glmS riboswitch give a broad SAR. Two analogs display significant activity, namely, the 6-deoxy-6-phosphonomethyl analog (5) and the 6-O-malonyl ether (13). Kinetic profiles show a 22-fold and a 27-fold higher catalytic efficiency, respectively, for these analogs vs glucosamine (GlcN). Given their nonhydrolyzable phosphate surrogate functionalities, these analogs are arguably the most robust artificial glmS riboswitch actuators yet reported. Interestingly, the malonyl ether (13, extra O atom) is much more effective than the simple malonate (17), and the "sterically true" phosphonate (5) is far superior to the chain-truncated (7) or chain-extended (11) analogs, suggesting that positioning via Mg coordination is important for activity. Docking results are consistent with this view. Indeed, the viability of the phosphonate and 6-O-malonyl ether mimics of GlcN6P points to a potential new strategy for artificial actuation of the glmS riboswitch in a biological setting, wherein phosphatase-resistance is paramount.

  12. AICAR stimulation metabolome widely mimics electrical contraction in isolated rat epitrochlearis muscle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miyamoto, Licht; Egawa, Tatsuro; Oshima, Rieko; Kurogi, Eriko; Tomida, Yosuke; Tsuchiya, Koichiro; Hayashi, Tatsuya

    2013-12-15

    Physical exercise has potent therapeutic and preventive effects against metabolic disorders. A number of studies have suggested that 5'-AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) plays a pivotal role in regulating carbohydrate and lipid metabolism in contracting skeletal muscles, while several genetically manipulated animal models revealed the significance of AMPK-independent pathways. To elucidate significance of AMPK and AMPK-independent signals in contracting skeletal muscles, we conducted a metabolomic analysis that compared the metabolic effects of 5-aminoimidazole-4-carboxamide-1-β-D-ribonucleoside (AICAR) stimulation with the electrical contraction ex vivo in isolated rat epitrochlearis muscles, in which both α1- and α2-isoforms of AMPK and glucose uptake were equally activated. The metabolomic analysis using capillary electrophoresis time-of-flight mass spectrometry detected 184 peaks and successfully annotated 132 small molecules. AICAR stimulation exhibited high similarity to the electrical contraction in overall metabolites. Principal component analysis (PCA) demonstrated that the major principal component characterized common effects whereas the minor principal component distinguished the difference. PCA and a factor analysis suggested a substantial change in redox status as a result of AMPK activation. We also found a decrease in reduced glutathione levels in both AICAR-stimulated and contracting muscles. The muscle contraction-evoked influences related to the metabolism of amino acids, in particular, aspartate, alanine, or lysine, are supposed to be independent of AMPK activation. Our results substantiate the significance of AMPK activation in contracting skeletal muscles and provide novel evidence that AICAR stimulation closely mimics the metabolomic changes in the contracting skeletal muscles.

  13. Sulfinylated azadecalins act as functional mimics of a pollen germination stimulant in Arabidopsis pistils.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qin, Yuan; Wysocki, Ronald J; Somogyi, Arpad; Feinstein, Yelena; Franco, Jessica Y; Tsukamoto, Tatsuya; Dunatunga, Damayanthi; Levy, Clara; Smith, Steven; Simpson, Robert; Gang, David; Johnson, Mark A; Palanivelu, Ravishankar

    2011-12-01

    Polarized cell elongation is triggered by small molecule cues during development of diverse organisms. During plant reproduction, pollen interactions with the stigma result in the polar outgrowth of a pollen tube, which delivers sperm cells to the female gametophyte to effect double fertilization. In many plants, pistils stimulate pollen germination. However, in Arabidopsis, the effect of pistils on pollen germination and the pistil factors that stimulate pollen germination remain poorly characterized. Here, we demonstrate that stigma, style, and ovules in Arabidopsis pistils stimulate pollen germination. We isolated an Arabidopsis pistil extract fraction that stimulates Arabidopsis pollen germination, and employed ultra-high resolution electrospray ionization (ESI), Fourier-transform ion cyclotron resonance (FT-ICR) and MS/MS techniques to accurately determine the mass (202.126 Da) of a compound that is specifically present in this pistil extract fraction. Using the molecular formula (C10H19NOS) and tandem mass spectral fragmentation patterns of the m/z (mass to charge ratio) 202.126 ion, we postulated chemical structures, devised protocols, synthesized N-methanesulfinyl 1- and 2-azadecalins that are close structural mimics of the m/z 202.126 ion, and showed that they are sufficient to stimulate Arabidopsis pollen germination in vitro (30 μm stimulated approximately 50% germination) and elicit accession-specific response. Although N-methanesulfinyl 2-azadecalin stimulated pollen germination in three species of Lineage I of Brassicaceae, it did not induce a germination response in Sisymbrium irio (Lineage II of Brassicaceae) and tobacco, indicating that activity of the compound is not random. Our results show that Arabidopsis pistils promote germination by producing azadecalin-like molecules to ensure rapid fertilization by the appropriate pollen.

  14. Caloric restriction in C57BL/6J mice mimics therapeutic fasting in humans

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Denny Christine A

    2006-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Caloric restriction (CR has long been recognized as a dietary therapy that improves health and increases longevity. Little is known about the persistent effects of CR on plasma biomarkers (glucose, ketone bodies, and lipids following re-feeding in mice. It is also unclear how these biomarker changes in calorically restricted mice relate to those observed previously in calorically restricted humans. Results Three groups of individually housed adult female C57BL/6J (B6 mice (n = 4/group were fed a standard rodent chow diet either: (1 unrestricted (UR; (2 restricted for three weeks to reduce body weight by approximately 15–20% (R; or (3 restricted for three weeks and then re-fed unrestricted (ad libitum for an additional three weeks (R-RF. Body weight and food intake were measured throughout the study, while plasma lipids and levels of glucose and ketone bodies (β-hydroxybutyrate were measured at the termination of the study. Plasma glucose, phosphatidylcholine, cholesterol, and triglycerides were significantly lower in the R mice than in the UR mice. In contrast, plasma fatty acids and β-hydroxybutyrate were significantly higher in the R mice than in the UR mice. CR had no effect on plasma phosphatidylinositol levels. While body weight and plasma lipids of the R-RF mice returned to unrestricted levels upon re-feeding, food intake and glucose levels remained significantly lower than those prior to the initiation of CR. Conclusion CR establishes a new homeostatic state in B6 mice that persists for at least three weeks following ad libitum re-feeding. Moreover, the plasma biomarker changes observed in B6 mice during CR mimic those reported in humans on very low calorie diets or during therapeutic fasting.

  15. Space science applications for conducting polymer particles: synthetic mimics for cosmic dust and micrometeorites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fielding, Lee A; Hillier, Jon K; Burchell, Mark J; Armes, Steven P

    2015-12-11

    Over the last decade or so, a range of polypyrrole-based particles have been designed and evaluated for space science applications. This electrically conductive polymer enables such particles to efficiently acquire surface charge, which in turn allows their acceleration up to the hypervelocity regime (>1 km s(-1)) using a Van de Graaff accelerator. Either organic latex (e.g. polystyrene or poly(methyl methacrylate)) or various inorganic materials (such as silica, olivine or pyrrhotite) can be coated with polypyrrole; these core-shell particles are useful mimics for understanding the hypervelocity impact ionisation behaviour of micro-meteorites (a.k.a. cosmic dust). Impacts on metal targets at relatively low hypervelocities (10 km s(-1)) generate predominately atomic species, since many more chemical bonds are cleaved if the particles impinge with higher kinetic energy. Such fundamental studies are relevant to the calibration of the cosmic dust analyser (CDA) onboard the Cassini spacecraft, which was designed to determine the chemical composition of Saturn's dust rings. Inspired by volcanism observed for one of the Jupiter's moons (Io), polypyrrole-coated sulfur-rich latexes have also been designed to help space scientists understand ionisation spectra originating from sulfur-rich dust particles. Finally, relatively large (20 μm diameter) polypyrrole-coated polystyrene latexes have proven to be useful for understanding the extent of thermal ablation of organic projectiles when fired at ultralow density aerogel targets at up to 6.1 km s(-1) using a Light Gas Gun. In this case, the sacrificial polypyrrole overlayer simply provides a sensitive spectroscopic signature (rather than a conductive overlayer), and the scientific findings have important implications for the detection of organic dust grains during the Stardust space mission.

  16. Functionalized hybrid nanofibers to mimic native ECM for tissue engineering applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Karuppuswamy, Priyadharsini [Center for Nanofibers and Nanotechnology, Nanoscience and Nanotechnology Initiative, Faculty of Engineering, National University of Singapore, Singapore (Singapore); Department Physics and Nanotechnology, SRM University, Kattankulathur, Chennai (India); Department of Engineering and System Science, National Tsing Hua University, Hsinchu 30013, Taiwan (China); Venugopal, Jayarama Reddy, E-mail: nnijrv@nus.edu.sg [Center for Nanofibers and Nanotechnology, Nanoscience and Nanotechnology Initiative, Faculty of Engineering, National University of Singapore, Singapore (Singapore); Navaneethan, Balchandar [Center for Nanofibers and Nanotechnology, Nanoscience and Nanotechnology Initiative, Faculty of Engineering, National University of Singapore, Singapore (Singapore); Department Physics and Nanotechnology, SRM University, Kattankulathur, Chennai (India); Laiva, Ashang Luwang; Sridhar, Sreepathy; Ramakrishna, Seeram [Center for Nanofibers and Nanotechnology, Nanoscience and Nanotechnology Initiative, Faculty of Engineering, National University of Singapore, Singapore (Singapore)

    2014-12-15

    Highlights: • Functionalized hybrid polymer mats fabricated for tissue engineering. • Hybrid polymer mats showed high surface area, high porosity and good wettability. • Incorporation of natural polymers modified the properties of nanofiber mats more biologically favorable for biomedical applications. - Abstract: Nanotechnology being one of the most promising technologies today shows an extremely huge potential in the field of tissue engineering to mimic the porous topography of natural extracellular matrix (ECM). Natural polymers are incorporated into the synthetic polymers to fabricate functionalized hybrid nanofibrous scaffolds, which improve cell and tissue compatibility. The present study identified the biopolymers – aloe vera, silk fibroin and curcumin incorporated into polycaprolactone (PCL) as suitable substrates for tissue engineering. Different combinations of PCL with natural polymers – PCL/aloe vera, PCL/silk fibroin, PCL/aloe vera/silk fibroin, PCL/aloe vera/silk fibroin/curcumin were electrospun into nanofibrous scaffolds. The fabricated two dimensional nanofibrous scaffolds showed high surface area, appropriate mechanical properties, hydrophilicity and porosity, required for the regeneration of diseased tissues. The nanofibrous scaffolds were characterized by Scanning electron microscope (SEM), porometry, Instron tensile tester, VCA optima contact angle measurement and FTIR to analyze the fiber diameter and morphology, porosity and pore size distribution, mechanical strength, wettability, chemical bonds and functional groups, respectively. The average fiber diameter of obtained fibers ranged from 250 nm to 350 nm and the tensile strength of PCL scaffolds at 4.49 MPa increased upto 8.3 MPa for PCL/silk fibroin scaffolds. Hydrophobicity of PCL decreased with the incorporation of natural polymers, especially for PCL/aloe vera scaffolds. The properties of as-spun nanofiber scaffolds showed their potential as promising scaffold materials in

  17. The role of soil layers in preventing ground water pollution with 17ß-estradiol hormone (E 2

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A’zam Golzari

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Background: Estrogens include estoril (E3, estradiol and estrone (E1. These chemicals are produced in human and animal bodies as well as in synthetic chemicals (drugs. Estrogens can enter water sources in different ways. When these chemicals enter the human body through water and wastewater, they have the ability to mimic or disrupt the normal estrogen activities in humans and animals. Estrogens in wastewater are able to pass soil layers and contaminate groundwater. Therefore, in this study, the removal of the hormone 17ß-estradiol (E2 as a representative of estrogens in three types of soils was studied. The selection was chosen in respect to the importance of entering the hormone into groundwater through the soil. Methods: This study was an experimental study in which the removal of the hormone E2 from different depths of three types of soils was experimented. The soils were consisted of two different textures, the silty sandy clay and the silty sand with gravel. The hormone E2 was diluted and injected into the drilled holes. Soils were characterized in the soil mechanics laboratory. Hormone extraction from the soils was performed using a centrifuge and analyzed with the Elecsys device. The results were analyzed using the IBM SPSS version 22 software. Results: The results showed that the removal rates of hormone E2 in the three types of soils were higher than 99.5%, and the removal rate in the silty sand was more than the others. In all three soil samples, the removal rates in the first layer were high. The average injected hormone in the soil decreased from 3500 to 3112 ng/l. The results showed that the adhesion and plasticity of the soil had also affected the removal rates. Conclusion: Results showed that the soil plays a significant role in the removal of E2 hormone and this hormone was reduced or eliminated in the first layers of the soils. Thus, the risk of groundwater contamination is low.

  18. Psychological functioning after growth hormone therapy in adult growth hormone deficient patients: endocrine and body composition correlates

    OpenAIRE

    Lašaitė, Lina; Bunevičius, Robertas; Lašienė, Danutė Teresė; Lašas, Liudvikas

    2004-01-01

    Growth hormone replacement in adult growth hormone deficient patients improves psychological well-being and the quality of life. The aim of this study was to investigate relationship between changes in mood, cognitive functioning, quality of life, changes in body composition and hormone concentration at baseline and six months after treatment with human recombinant growth hormone. Eighteen adult patients with growth hormone deficiency syndrome were recruited to the study. Growth hormone was a...

  19. Hormonal modulation of endothelial NO production.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duckles, Sue P; Miller, Virginia M

    2010-05-01

    Since the discovery of endothelium-derived relaxing factor and the subsequent identification of nitric oxide (NO) as the primary mediator of endothelium-dependent relaxations, research has focused on chemical and physical stimuli that modulate NO levels. Hormones represent a class of soluble, widely circulating chemical factors that impact production of NO both by rapid effects on the activity of endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS) through phosphorylation of the enzyme and longer term modulation through changes in amount of eNOS protein. Hormones that increase NO production including estrogen, progesterone, insulin, and growth hormone do so through both of these common mechanisms. In contrast, some hormones, including glucocorticoids, progesterone, and prolactin, decrease NO bioavailability. Mechanisms involved include binding to repressor response elements on the eNOS gene, competing for co-regulators common to hormones with positive genomic actions, regulating eNOS co-factors, decreasing substrate for eNOS, and increasing production of oxygen-derived free radicals. Feedback regulation by the hormones themselves as well as the ability of NO to regulate hormonal release provides a second level of complexity that can also contribute to changes in NO levels. These effects on eNOS and changes in NO production may contribute to variability in risk factors, presentation of and treatment for cardiovascular disease associated with aging, pregnancy, stress, and metabolic disorders in men and women.

  20. Hormonal Factors and Disturbances in Eating Disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Culbert, Kristen M; Racine, Sarah E; Klump, Kelly L

    2016-07-01

    This review summarizes the current state of the literature regarding hormonal correlates of, and etiologic influences on, eating pathology. Several hormones (e.g., ghrelin, CCK, GLP-1, PYY, leptin, oxytocin, cortisol) are disrupted during the ill state of eating disorders and likely contribute to the maintenance of core symptoms (e.g., dietary restriction, binge eating) and/or co-occurring features (e.g., mood symptoms, attentional biases). Some of these hormones (e.g., ghrelin, cortisol) may also be related to eating pathology via links with psychological stress. Despite these effects, the role of hormonal factors in the etiology of eating disorders remains unknown. The strongest evidence for etiologic effects has emerged for ovarian hormones, as changes in ovarian hormones predict changes in phenotypic and genetic influences on disordered eating. Future studies would benefit from utilizing etiologically informative designs (e.g., high risk, behavioral genetic) and continuing to explore factors (e.g., psychological, neural responsivity) that may impact hormonal influences on eating pathology.