WorldWideScience

Sample records for hormone gh messenger

  1. Growth hormone (GH)-releasing activity of chicken GH-releasing hormone (GHRH) in chickens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harvey, S; Gineste, C; Gaylinn, B D

    2014-08-01

    Two peptides with sequence similarities to growth hormone releasing hormone (GHRH) have been identified by analysis of the chicken genome. One of these peptides, chicken (c) GHRH-LP (like peptide) was previously found to poorly bind to chicken pituitary membranes or to cloned and expressed chicken GHRH receptors and had little, if any, growth hormone (GH)-releasing activity in vivo or in vitro. In contrast, a second more recently discovered peptide, cGHRH, does bind to cloned and expressed cGHRH receptors and increases cAMP activity in transfected cells. The possibility that this peptide may have in vivo GH-releasing activity was therefore assessed. The intravenous (i.v.) administration of cGHRH to immature chickens, at doses of 3-100 μg/kg, significantly increased circulating GH concentrations within 10 min of injection and the plasma GH levels remained elevated for at least 30 min after the injection of maximally effective doses. The plasma GH responses to cGHRH were comparable with those induced by human (h) or porcine (p) GHRH preparations and to that induced by thyrotropin releasing hormone (TRH). In marked contrast, the i.v. injection of cGHRH-LP had no significant effect on circulating GH concentrations in immature chicks. GH release was also increased from slaughterhouse chicken pituitary glands perifused for 5 min with cGHRH at doses of 0.1 μg/ml or 1.0 μg/ml, comparable with GH responses to hGHRH1-44. In contrast, the perifusion of chicken pituitary glands with cGHRH-LP had no significant effect on GH release. In summary, these results demonstrate that cGHRH has GH-releasing activity in chickens and support the possibility that it is the endogenous ligand of the cGHRH receptor. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Growth hormone (GH) activity is associated with increased serum oestradiol and reduced Anti-Müllerian Hormone in healthy male volunteers treated with GH and a GH antagonist

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andreassen, M; Frystyk, Jan; Faber, J

    2013-01-01

    Growth hormone (GH) and insulin-like growth factor I (IGF-I) receptors are present on pituitary gonadotrophs and on testicular Leydig and Sertoli cells. Thus, the GH/IGF-I system may modulate the pituitary-gonadal axis in males. This is a randomized cross-over study. Eight healthy male volunteers...... of luteinizing hormone (LH), follicle-stimulating hormone, testosterone, oestradiol, sex hormone-binding globulin, inhibin B and Anti-Müllerian Hormone (AMH) were measured. During GH treatment, IGF-I increased [(median (IQR)] 166 (162-235) vs. 702 (572-875) μg/L, p .../IGF-I stimulates aromatase activity in vivo. As a novel observation, we found that high GH activity was associated with reduced levels of the Sertoli cell marker AMH. Further studies are needed to evaluate possible effects of GH on Sertoli cell function and/or spermatogenesis....

  3. Growth hormone (GH) and GH-releasing hormone (GHRH): Co-localization and action in the chicken testis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martínez-Moreno, Carlos G; López-Marín, Luz M; Carranza, Martha; Giterman, Daniel; Harvey, Steve; Arámburo, Carlos; Luna, Maricela

    2014-04-01

    Growth hormone (GH) gene expression is not confined to the pituitary gland and occurs in many extrapituitary tissues, including the chicken testis. The regulation and function of GH in extrapituitary tissues is, however, largely unknown. The possibility that chicken testicular GH might be regulated by GH-releasing hormone (GHRH), as in the avian pituitary gland, was investigated in the present study. GHRH co-localized with GH in the germinal epithelium and in interstitial zones within the chicken testes, particularly in the spermatogonia and spermatocytes. In testicular cell cultures, exogenous human GHRH1-44 induced (at 1, 10 and 100nM) a dose-related increase in GH release. Western blot analysis showed a heterogeneous pattern in the GH moieties released during GHRH stimulation. 26kDa monomer GH was the most abundant moiety under basal conditions, but 15 and 17kDa isoforms were more abundant after GHRH stimulation. GHRH treatment also increased the abundance of PCNA (proliferating cell nuclear antigen) immunoreactivity in the testes. This may have been GH-mediated, since exogenous GH similarly increased the incorporation of ((3)H)-thymidine into cultured testicular cells and increased their metabolic activity, as determined by increased MTT reduction. Furthermore, GH and GHRH immunoneutralization blocked GHRH-stimulated proliferative activity. In summary, these results indicate that GHRH stimulates testicular GH secretion in an autocrine or paracrine manner. Data also demonstrate proliferative actions of GHRH on testicular cell number and suggest that this action is mediated by local GH production. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Regulation of the growth hormone (GH) receptor and GH-binding protein mRNA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kaji, Hidesuke; Ohashi, Shin-Ichirou; Abe, Hiromi; Chihara, Kazuo [Kobe Univ. School of Medicine, Kobe (Japan)

    1994-12-31

    In fasting rats, a transient increase in growth hormone-binding protein (GHBP) mRNA levels was observed after 1 day, in muscle, heart, and liver, but not in fat tissues. The liver GH receptor (GHR) mRNA level was significantly increased after 1 day (but not after 5 days) of bovine GH (bGH) treatment in fed rats. Both the liver GHR mRNA level and the net increment of plasma IGF-I markedly decreased after 5 days of bGH administration in fasting rats. These findings suggest that GHR and GHBP mRNAs in the liver are expressed in a different way and that the expression of GHBP mRNA is regulated differently between tissues, at least in rats. The results also suggest that refractoriness to GH in a sustained fasting state might be beneficial in preventing anabolic effects of GH. In humans, GHR mRNA in lymphocytes, from subjects with either GH-deficiency or acromegaly, could be detected by the reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction method. In one patient with partial GH insensitivity, a heterozygous missense mutation (P561T) was identified in the cytoplasmic domain of GHR. 15 refs., 4 figs.

  5. Congenital Growth Hormone (GH) Deficiency and Atherosclerosis: Effects of GH Replacement in GH-Naive Adults

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Oliveira, Joselina L. M; Aguiar-Oliveira, Manuel H; D’Oliveira, Argemiro; Pereira, Rossana M. C; Oliveira, Carla R. P; Farias, Catarine T; Barreto-Filho, José A; Anjos-Andrade, Fernando D; Marques-Santos, Celi; Nascimento-Junior, Adão C; Alves, Érica O; Oliveira, Francielle T; Campos, Viviane C; Ximenes, Roberto; Blackford, Amanda; Parmigiani, Giovanni; Salvatori, Roberto

    2007-01-01

    Background: GH deficiency (GHD) in adults is associated with increased abdominal adiposity and systolic blood pressure, total and low-density lipoprotein cholesterol, and C-reactive protein. Methods...

  6. Should we start and continue growth hormone (GH) replacement therapy in adults with GH deficiency?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    ter Maaten, JC

    2000-01-01

    During the last decade, growth hormone deficiency (GHD) in adults has been described as a clinical syndrome. Central features of this entity include increased fat mass, reduced muscle and bone mass, as well as impaired exercise capacity and quality of life. GH replacement therapy has been initiated

  7. Growth hormone (GH) and atherosclerosis: changes in morphology and function of major arteries during GH treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pfeifer, M; Verhovec, R; Zizek, B

    1999-04-01

    Patients with hypopituitarism have increased carotid artery intima-media thickness and reduced arterial distensibility. The effect of 2 years of growth hormone (GH) replacement therapy on these parameters was studied in 11 GH-deficient men (age range, 24-49 years) with hypopituitarism and compared with 12 healthy, age-matched men with no evidence of pituitary or vascular disease. Before treatment the intima-media of the common carotid arteries and the carotid bifurcations were significantly thicker in patients (P < 0.001) than in the control group. Treatment with GH normalized the intima-media thickness of the common carotid artery within 6 months and of the carotid bifurcation within 3 months. The changes in intima-media thickness of the carotid artery were negatively correlated with changes in serum levels of insulin-like growth factor I during treatment. There was a significant improvement in flow-mediated, endothelium-dependent dilation of the brachial artery at 3 months, which was sustained at 6, 18 and 24 months of GH treatment (P < 0.05). Thus, GH replacement therapy in GH-deficient men reverses early morphological and functional atherosclerotic changes in major arteries, and may reduce rates of vascular morbidity and mortality.

  8. Evaluation of growth hormone (GH) action in mice: discovery of GH receptor antagonists and clinical indications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kopchick, John J.; List, Edward O.; Kelder, Bruce; Gosney, Elahu S.; Berryman, Darlene E.

    2013-01-01

    The discovery of a growth hormone receptor antagonist (GHA) was initially established via expression of mutated GH genes in transgenic mice. Following this discovery, development of the compound resulted in a drug termed pegvisomant, which has been approved for use in patients with acromegaly. Pegvisomant treatment in a dose dependent manner results in normalization of IGF-1 levels in most patients. Thus, it is a very efficacious and safe drug. Since the GH/IGF-1 axis has been implicated in the progression of several types of cancers, many have suggested the use of pegvisomant as an anti-cancer therapeutic. In this manuscript, we will review the use of mouse strains that possess elevated or depressed levels of GH action for unraveling many of GH actions. Additionally, we will describe experiments in which the GHA was discovered, review results of pegvisomant’s preclinical and clinical trials, and provide data suggesting pegvisomant’s therapeutic value in selected types of cancer. PMID:24035867

  9. Thyroid function in children with growth hormone (GH deficiency during the initial phase of GH replacement therapy - clinical implications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Smyczynska Joanna

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Normal thyroid hormone secretion or appropriate L-thyroxine (L-T4 substitution is necessary for the optimal effect of the growth hormone (GH administration on growth rate. The decrease of free thyroxine (FT4 levels at recombinant human GH (rhGH therapy onset has been reported in several studies. The aim of the present study was to evaluate the effect of rhGH administration on thyrotropin (TSH and FT4 serum concentrations in children with GH deficiency (GHD during the 1st year of therapy, as well as to assess potential indications to thyroid hormone supplementation in them. Patients and methods The analysis involved data of 75 children (59 boys, 16 girls with disorders of GH secretion (GHD, neurosecretory dysfunction - NSD and partial GH inactivity (inactGH, who were treated with rhGH for - at least - one year. In all the children, body height and height velocity (HV were assessed before and after 1 year of therapy, while TSH, FT4, IGF-I and IGFBP-3 before treatment and after 3-6 months and 1 year of treatment. In the patients, who revealed hypothyroidism (HypoT, an appropriate L-T4 substitution was introduced immediately. The incidence of HypoT, occurring during the initial phase of rhGH therapy, was assessed, as well as its influence on the therapy effectiveness. Results Before rhGH substitution, there were no significant differences in either auxological indices or TSH and FT4 secretion, or IGF-I concentration and its bioavailability among the groups of patients. During the initial 3-6 months of rhGH administration, a significant decrease of FT4 serum concentration, together with a significant increase of IGF-I SDS and IGF-I/IGFBP-3 molar ratio was observed in all the studied groups. In 17 children, HypoT was diagnosed and L-T4 substitution was administered. Despite similar IGF-I secretion increase, the improvement of HV presented significantly lower in children with HypoT than in those who remained euthyroid all the time

  10. Sequence polymorphisms at the growth hormone GH1/GH2-N and GH2-Z gene copies and their relationship with dairy traits in domestic sheep (Ovis aries).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vacca, G M; Dettori, M L; Balia, F; Luridiana, S; Mura, M C; Carcangiu, V; Pazzola, M

    2013-09-01

    The purpose was to analyze the growth hormone GH1/GH2-N and GH2-Z gene copies and to assess their possible association with milk traits in Sarda sheep. Two hundred multiparous lactating ewes were monitored. The two gene copies were amplified separately and each was used as template for a nested PCR, to investigate single strand conformation polymorphism (SSCP) of the 5'UTR, exon-1, exon-5 and 3'UTR DNA regions. SSCP analysis revealed marked differences in the number of polymorphic patterns between the two genes. Sequencing revealed five nucleotide changes at the GH1/GH2-N gene. Five nucleotide changes occurred at the GH2-Z gene: one was located in exon-5 (c.556G > A) and resulted in a putative amino acid substitution G186S. All the nucleotide changes were copy-specific, except c.*30delT, which was common to both GH1/GH2-N and GH2-Z. Variability in the promoter regions of each gene might have consequences on the expression level, due to the involvement in potential transcription factor binding sites. Both gene copies influenced milk yield. A correlation with milk protein and casein content was also evidenced. These results may have implications that make them useful for future breeding strategies in dairy sheep breeding.

  11. GH and Pituitary Hormone Alterations After Traumatic Brain Injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karaca, Züleyha; Tanrıverdi, Fatih; Ünlühızarcı, Kürşad; Kelestimur, Fahrettin

    2016-01-01

    Traumatic brain injury (TBI) is a crucially important public health problem around the world, which gives rise to increased mortality and is the leading cause of physical and psychological disability in young adults, in particular. Pituitary dysfunction due to TBI was first described 95 years ago. However, until recently, only a few papers have been published in the literature and for this reason, TBI-induced hypopituitarism has been neglected for a long time. Recent studies have revealed that TBI is one of the leading causes of hypopituitarism. TBI which causes hypopituitarism may be characterized by a single head injury such as from a traffic accident or by chronic repetitive head trauma as seen in combative sports including boxing, kickboxing, and football. Vascular damage, hypoxic insult, direct trauma, genetic predisposition, autoimmunity, and neuroinflammatory changes may have a role in the development of hypopituitarism after TBI. Because of the exceptional structure of the hypothalamo-pituitary vasculature and the special anatomic location of anterior pituitary cells, GH is the most commonly lost hormone after TBI, and the frequency of isolated GHD is considerably high. TBI-induced pituitary dysfunction remains undiagnosed and therefore untreated in most patients because of the nonspecific and subtle clinical manifestations of hypopituitarism. Treatment of TBI-induced hypopituitarism depends on the deficient anterior pituitary hormones. GH replacement therapy has some beneficial effects on metabolic parameters and neurocognitive dysfunction. Patients with TBI without neuroendocrine changes and those with TBI-induced hypopituitarism share the same clinical manifestations, such as attention deficits, impulsion impairment, depression, sleep abnormalities, and cognitive disorders. For this reason, TBI-induced hypopituitarism may be neglected in TBI victims and it would be expected that underlying hypopituitarism would aggravate the clinical picture of TBI

  12. Growth hormone (GH)/STAT5 signaling during the growth period in liver of mice overexpressing GH

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martinez, Carolina S; Piazza, Verónica G; Díaz, María E; Boparai, Ravneet K; Arum, Oge; Ramírez, María C; González, Lorena; Becú-Villalobos, Damasia; Bartke, Andrzej; Turyn, Daniel; Miquet, Johanna G; Sotelo, Ana I

    2016-01-01

    Growth hormone (GH)/STAT5 signaling is desensitized in liver of adult transgenic mice overexpressing GH; however, these animals present greater body size. To assess if the STAT5 pathway is active during the growth period in liver of these animals, and how signaling modulators participate in this process, growing transgenic mice and normal siblings were evaluated. STAT5 does not respond to an acute GH-stimulus but presents higher basal phosphorylation in liver of growing GH-overexpressing mice. GH receptor and positive modulators GR and HNF1 display greater abundance in transgenic animals, supporting STAT5 activity. Negative modulators CIS and PTP1B are increased in GH-overexpressing mice. Suppressors SOCS2 and SOCS3 exhibit higher mRNA levels in transgenic mice but lower protein content, suggesting they are being actively degraded. Therefore, STAT5 signaling is increased in liver of GH-transgenic mice during the growth period, with a balance between positive and negative effectors resulting in an accelerated but controlled growth. PMID:25691498

  13. Continuation of growth hormone (GH) therapy in GH-deficient patients during transition from childhood to adulthood

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nørrelund, Helene; Vahl, N; Juul, A

    2000-01-01

    is the impact of GH substitution on insulin sensitivity, which normally declines during puberty. We, therefore, evaluated insulin sensitivity (euglycemic glucose clamp) and substrate metabolism in 18 GH-deficient patients (6 females and 12 males; age, 20 +/- 1 yr; body mass index, 25 +/- 1 kg/m2) in a placebo...... fat and increased fat-free mass [M-value (mg/kg x min), 5.1 +/- 0.7 (placebo) vs. 3.4 +/- 1.0 (open), P = 0.09]. In the group randomized to continued GH treatment almost all hormonal and metabolic parameters remained unchanged during the study. In conclusion, 1) discontinuation of GH therapy for 1 yr...

  14. Crosstalk between secondary messengers, hormones and MAPK modules during abiotic stress signalling in plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smékalová, Veronika; Doskočilová, Anna; Komis, George; Samaj, Jozef

    2014-01-01

    The crosstalk between second messengers, hormones and mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPKs) in plant signalling systems facilitates adaptation and survival in the face of diverse environmental stresses. This review focuses on the transduction of second messenger and hormone signals by MAPK modules in plant abiotic stress responses. We discuss how this crosstalk regulates gene expression (e.g. by controlling transcription factor activity) and other cellular and physiological responses to enable adaptation and/or resistance to abiotic stresses. © 2013.

  15. Long-term in-vitro treatment of human growth hormone (GH)-secreting pituitary adenoma cells with octreotide causes accumulation of intracellular GH and GH mRNA levels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hofland, L J; Velkeniers, B; vd Lely, A J; van Koetsveld, P M; Kazemzadeh, M; Waaijers, M; Hooghe-Peters, E L; Lamberts, S W

    1992-09-01

    We studied the effects of long-term in-vitro exposure of human GH secreting pituitary adenoma cells to octreotide on GH release, intracellular GH concentrations and GH messenger ribonucleic acid (mRNA) levels. Human GH-secreting pituitary adenoma cells were cultured for periods from 4 days up to 3 weeks without or with octreotide (10 nM) and/or bromocriptine (10 nM). The effects of these drugs were measured on GH release, intracellular GH concentrations and intracellular GH mRNA levels. Thirteen patients with GH-secreting pituitary adenomas were studied. Twelve patients were untreated, one had been pretreated with octreotide (12 weeks, 3 x 100 micrograms daily). GH, PRL, alpha-subunit and IGF-I concentrations in plasma, media and cell extracts were determined by immunoradiometric or radioimmuno-assays. GH mRNA levels were determined by automatic quantification of grain numbers in individual adenoma cells. Incubation of the adenoma cells for 4 days with 10 nM octreotide induced a dose-dependent inhibition of GH release and a parallel increase (increase varying between 124 and 617% of control) in the intracellular GH levels was observed in six of seven adenomas. In addition, bromocriptine, when effective in inhibiting GH release by the adenomas, also induced an increase in intracellular GH levels. Even after 3 weeks of exposure to 10 nM octreotide in vitro there was a statistically significant increase in intracellular GH levels (between 191 and 923% of control). Withdrawal of octreotide after 6 days of incubation resulted in a lowering of intracellular GH levels to control values, showing that the octreotide-induced increase in intracellular GH is reversible. In a 96-hour incubation with 10 nM octreotide, GH mRNA levels were increased in two, and slightly decreased in one of the three adenomas tested. This effect was time dependent in that there was no significant effect of 10 nM octreotide on GH mRNA levels in a 24-hour incubation. (1) Long-term in-vitro exposure

  16. Growth hormone (GH) treatment reverses early atherosclerotic changes in GH-deficient adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pfeifer, M; Verhovec, R; Zizek, B; Prezelj, J; Poredos, P; Clayton, R N

    1999-02-01

    Hypopituitary patients have increased mortality from vascular disease, and in these patients, early markers of atherosclerosis [increased carotid artery intima-media thickness (IMT) and reduced distensibility] are more prevalent. As GH replacement can reverse some risk factors of atherosclerosis, the present study examined the effect of GH treatment on morphological and functional changes in the carotid and brachial arteries of GH-deficient (GHD) adults. Eleven GHD hypopituitary men (24-49 yr old) were treated with recombinant human GH (0.018 U/kg BW x day) for 18 months. IMT of the common carotid artery (CCA) and the carotid bifurcation (CB), and flow-mediated endothelium-dependent dilation (EDD) of the brachial artery were measured by B mode ultrasound before and at 3, 6, 12, and 18 months of treatment, and values were compared with those in 12 age-matched control men. Serum concentrations of lipids, lipoprotein(a), insulin-like growth factor I (IGF-I), and IGF-binding protein-3 (IGFBP-3) were also measured. In GHD men before treatment the IMTs of the CCA [mean(SD), 0.67(0.05) mm] and CB [0.75(0.04) mm] were significantly greater (P < 0.001) than those in control men [0.52(0.07) and 0.65(0.07) mm, respectively]. GH treatment normalized the IMT of the CCA by 6 months [0.53(0.04) mm] and that of the CB by 3 months [0.68(0.05) mm]. The IMT of the carotid artery (CCA and CB) was negatively correlated with serum IGF-I (r = -0.53; P < 0.0001). There was a significant improvement in flow-mediated EDD of the brachial artery at 3 months, which was sustained at 6 and 18 months of GH treatment (P < 0.05). GH treatment increased high density lipoprotein cholesterol at 3 and 6 months, but did not reduce total or low density lipoprotein cholesterol and was without effect on lipoprotein(a). There was no correlation between plasma lipids and changes in IMT or EDD of the arteries examined. In conclusion, GH treatment of hypopituitary GHD men reverses early morphological and

  17. Pioglitazone treatment increases spontaneous growth hormone (GH) secretion and stimulated GH levels in polycystic ovary syndrome

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Glintborg, Dorte; Støving, René Klinkby; Hagen, Claus

    2005-01-01

    treatment. Before and after intervention, levels of fasting insulin, GH, total IGF-I, free IGF-I, IGF binding protein-1, IGF-II, free fatty acids, testosterone, and SHBG were measured. Patients underwent whole-body dual x-ray absorptiometry scans, pyridostigmine-GHRH tests, and 24-h 20-min integrated blood...

  18. Structural Basis for Prereceptor Modulation of Plant Hormones by GH3 Proteins

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Westfall, Corey S.; Zubieta, Chloe; Herrmann, Jonathan; Kapp, Ulrike; Nanao, Max H.; Jez, Joseph M. (WU); (EMBL); (ESRF)

    2013-04-08

    Acyl acid amido synthetases of the GH3 family act as critical prereceptor modulators of plant hormone action; however, the molecular basis for their hormone selectivity is unclear. Here, we report the crystal structures of benzoate-specific Arabidopsis thaliana AtGH3.12/PBS3 and jasmonic acid-specific AtGH3.11/JAR1. These structures, combined with biochemical analysis, define features for the conjugation of amino acids to diverse acyl acid substrates and highlight the importance of conformational changes in the carboxyl-terminal domain for catalysis. We also identify residues forming the acyl acid binding site across the GH3 family and residues critical for amino acid recognition. Our results demonstrate how a highly adaptable three-dimensional scaffold is used for the evolution of promiscuous activity across an enzyme family for modulation of plant signaling molecules.

  19. Effects of growth hormone (GH therapy withdrawal on glucose metabolism in not confirmed GH deficient adolescents at final height.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Flavia Prodam

    Full Text Available CONTEXT OBJECTIVE: Growth hormone deficiency (GHD is associated with insulin resistance and diabetes, in particular after treatment in children and adults with pre-existing metabolic risk factors. Our aims were. i to evaluate the effect on glucose metabolism of rhGH treatment and withdrawal in not confirmed GHD adolescents at the achievement of adult height; ii to investigate the impact of GH receptor gene genomic deletion of exon 3 (d3GHR. DESIGN SETTING: We performed a longitudinal study (1 year in a tertiary care center. METHODS: 23 GHD adolescent were followed in the last year of rhGH treatment (T0, 6 (T6 and 12 (T12 months after rhGH withdrawal with fasting and post-OGTT evaluations. 40 healthy adolescents were used as controls. HOMA-IR, HOMA%β, insulinogenic (INS and disposition (DI indexes were calculated. GHR genotypes were determined by multiplex PCR. RESULTS: In the group as a whole, fasting insulin (p<0.05, HOMA-IR (p<0.05, insulin and glucose levels during OGTT (p<0.01 progressively decreased from T0 to T12 becoming similar to controls. During rhGH, a compensatory insulin secretion with a stable DI was recorded, and, then, HOMAβ and INS decreased at T6 and T12 (p<0.05. By evaluating the GHR genotype, nDel GHD showed a decrease from T0 to T12 in HOMA-IR, HOMAβ, INS (p<0.05 and DI. Del GHD showed a gradual increase in DI (p<0.05 and INS with a stable HOMA-IR and higher HDL-cholesterol (p<0.01. CONCLUSIONS: In not confirmed GHD adolescents the fasting deterioration in glucose homeostasis during rhGH is efficaciously coupled with a compensatory insulin secretion and activity at OGTT. The presence of at least one d3GHR allele is associated with lower glucose levels and higher HOMA-β and DI after rhGH withdrawal. Screening for the d3GHR in the pediatric age may help physicians to follow and phenotype GHD patients also by a metabolic point of view.

  20. The effect of growth hormone (GH) replacement on muscle strength in patients with GH-deficiency: a meta-analysis.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Widdowson, W Matthew

    2012-02-01

    CONTEXT\\/OBJECTIVES: GH replacement increases muscle mass and reduces body fat in growth hormone deficiency (GHD) adults. A recent meta-analysis has demonstrated that this improvement in body composition is associated with improved exercise performance. The current meta-analysis was carried out to determine whether high-quality evidence exists to support a beneficial effect of GH replacement on strength. DESIGN\\/METHODS: An extensive Medline search\\/literature review identified eight studies with utilizable, robust data, involving 231 patients in nine cohorts. Previously unpublished data were sought from authors and obtained in two cases. All studies included were randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled, of parallel or cross-over design and of an average 6.7 months duration. Information was retrieved in uniform format, with data pertaining to patient numbers, study-design, GH-dose, mean age, IGF-I levels and muscle strength measurements (isometric or isokinetic quadriceps strength) recorded. Data were analysed using a fixed-effects model, utilizing continuous data measured on different scales. A summary effect measure (d(s)) was derived for individual strength variables, whereas an overall summary effect was derived from the sum of all studies incorporating different variables; 95% CIs were calculated from the weighted variances of individual study effects. RESULTS: Analysis revealed no significant improvement, neither when all studies were combined (d(s) = +0.01 +\\/- 0.26) nor when measured individually (isometric quadriceps strength, d(s) = +0.02 +\\/- 0.32 and isokinetic quadriceps strength, d(s) = 0.00 +\\/- 0.45). CONCLUSIONS: Evidence from short-term controlled studies fails to support a benefit on muscle strength of GH replacement in GHD patients, which is likely to occur over a longer time-course, as seen in open-label studies.

  1. Body mass index (BMI) in Turner Syndrome before and during growth hormone (GH) therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blackett, P R; Rundle, A C; Frane, J; Blethen, S L

    2000-02-01

    To study whether body mass index (BMI) is different in girls with Turner syndrome (TS) compared to normal girls, and whether BMI in TS is affected by growth hormone (GH) treatment. A retrospective cross-sectional study. 2468 girls with TS enrolled in the National Cooperative Group Study (NCGS), a collaborative surveillance study for assessing GH-treated children. BMI and BMI standard deviation score (BMI SDS) at baseline and during GH treatment were computed from height and weight data. BMI in TS patients increases with age as expected. However, BMI SDS increased starting at about age 9 y. A similar pattern of increase in BMI SDS was observed after each year of GH treatment for up to 4 y, but GH treatment did not change the magnitude of increase. BMI and BMI SDS curves before and during GH treatment were essentially superimposable. These findings suggest that mechanisms specific for TS are responsible for the age-related increase in BMI SDS. This increase was unaffected by GH treatment.

  2. Impact of recombinant human growth hormone (rh-GH treatment on psychiatric, neuropsychological and clinical profiles of GH deficient adults: a placebo - controlled trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    SOARES CLÁUDIO DE NOVAES

    1999-01-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Untreated GH-deficient adults have a diversity of dysfunctions (e.g. reduced muscle strength, emotional instability during stress, depressive symptoms that may cause deleterious effects on quality of life, and may be positively influenced by recombinant human growth hormone (rh-GH therapy. AIM: To evaluate the impact of a clinical intervention with rh-GH therapy on GH - deficient adults. METHOD: The physical, psychiatric and neuropsychological status of 9 GH-deficient adults was determined before and after the administration of rh-GH (0.250 IU/Kg/week in a double blind placebo-controlled trial for six months. Patients then received rh-GH for a further period of 6 months and their status was re-evaluated. RESULTS: Rh-GH was significant better than placebo at 6th month (p<0.05, producing increased serum Insulin like growth factor-I (IGF-1 levels, reduced body mass index (BMI and body fat, increased lean body mass and water, reduced waist/hip ratio and increased energy expenditure. The rh-GH therapy was also significantly better than placebo on depressive features as measured by the Hamilton Depression Scale (17-items (p= 0.0431 and the Beck Depression Inventory (p= 0.0431. Neuropsychological evaluations showed significant improvements in measures of Attention: Digit Backward (p= 0.035,Verbal Fluency (FAS (p= 0.02 and Cognitive Efficiency (WAIS-R tests: Vocabulary (p= 0.027 , Picture Arrangements (p= 0.017, and Comprehension (p= 0.01 following rh-GH therapy. CONCLUSION: The clinical, psychiatric, and neuropsychological impairments of untreated GH-deficient adults can be decreased by rh-GH therapy.

  3. A phase 2 trial of long-acting TransCon growth hormone in adult GH deficiency

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Charlotte Höybye

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available TransCon growth hormone is a sustained-release human growth hormone prodrug under development in which unmodified growth hormone is transiently linked to a carrier molecule. It is intended as an alternative to daily growth hormone in the treatment of growth hormone deficiency. This was a multi-center, randomized, open-label, active-controlled trial designed to compare the safety (including tolerability and immunogenicity, pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics of three doses of weekly TransCon GH to daily growth hormone (Omnitrope. Thirty-seven adult males and females diagnosed with adult growth hormone deficiency and stable on growth hormone replacement therapy for at least 3 months were, following a wash-out period, randomized (regardless of their pre-study dose to one of three TransCon GH doses (0.02, 0.04 and 0.08 mg GH/kg/week or Omnitrope 0.04 mg GH/kg/week (divided into 7 equal daily doses for 4 weeks. Main outcomes evaluated were adverse events, immunogenicity and growth hormone and insulin-like growth factor 1 levels. TransCon GH was well tolerated; fatigue and headache were the most frequent drug-related adverse events and reported in all groups. No lipoatrophy or nodule formation was reported. No anti-growth hormone-binding antibodies were detected. TransCon GH demonstrated a linear, dose-dependent increase in growth hormone exposure without accumulation. Growth hormone maximum serum concentration and insulin-like growth factor 1 exposure were similar after TransCon GH or Omnitrope administered at comparable doses. The results suggest that long-acting TransCon GH has a profile similar to daily growth hormone but with a more convenient dosing regimen. These findings support further TransCon GH development.

  4. Hypophysectomy eliminates and growth hormone (GH) maintains the midpregnancy elevation in GH receptor and serum binding protein in the mouse

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sanchez-Jimenez, F.; Fielder, P.J.; Martinez, R.R.; Smith, W.C.; Talamantes, F. (Univ. of California, Santa Cruz (USA))

    1990-02-01

    ({sup 125}I)Iodomouse GH (({sup 125}I)iodo-mGH) binding to samples of serum and hepatic microsomal membranes was measured in hypophysectomized pregnant, sham-operated pregnant, intact pregnant, and intact adult virgin mice. Surgeries were carried out on day 11 of pregnancy, and the animals were killed on day 14. The binding of mGH to both serum and hepatic microsomal membranes of intact virgin mice was much lower than to those of intact pregnant mice. In hypophysectomized mice, the mGH-binding capacity of both serum and hepatic microsomes decreased to values similar to those of nonpregnant mice. No significant differences were observed between intact and sham-operated pregnant animals in the maternal serum mGH concentration, the serum GH-binding protein concentration, or the hepatic GH receptor concentration. GH receptor and binding protein-encoding mRNAs were also higher in intact and sham-operated pregnant mice than in virgin and hypophysectomized mice. Hypophysectomized mice were treated with 200 micrograms/day bovine GH, administered by osmotic minipump; after 3 days of treatment, a significant elevation of hepatic GH receptor and serum GH-binding protein levels was observed. These results demonstrate an up-regulation of hepatic GH receptors and serum GH-binding protein by GH during pregnancy in the mouse.

  5. Growth hormone (GH) treatment increases serum insulin-like growth factor binding protein-3, bone isoenzyme alkaline phosphatase and forearm bone mineral content in young adults with GH deficiency of childhood onset

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Juul, A; Pedersen, S A; Sørensen, S

    1994-01-01

    the effect of GH treatment on a marker of bone formation (bone alkaline phosphatase), hepatic excretory function and distal forearm bone mineral content in GH-deficient adults. Growth hormone was administered subcutaneously in 21 adults (13 males and 8 females) with GH deficiency of childhood onset for 4...... months of GH treatment (p molar ratio between IGF-I and IGFBP-3 increased significantly from 0.22 to 0.33 after GH treatment (p

  6. Long-term effects of growth hormone (GH) replacement in men with childhood-onset GH deficiency

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    ter Maaten, JC; De Boer, H; Kamp, O; Stuurman, L; Van der Veen, EA

    Short term GH replacement therapy has been shown to improve body composition and exercise capacity. It is not yet known whether GH replacement remains beneficial over the long term. We assessed the effects of long term GH replacement on body composition, bone mineral density, and cardiac function.

  7. Brain Recovery after a Plane Crash: Treatment with Growth Hormone (GH and Neurorehabilitation: A Case Report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jesús Devesa

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study is to describe the results obtained after growth hormone (GH treatment and neurorehabilitation in a young man that suffered a very grave traumatic brain injury (TBI after a plane crash. Methods: Fifteen months after the accident, the patient was treated with GH, 1 mg/day, at three-month intervals, followed by one-month resting, together with daily neurorehabilitation. Blood analysis at admission showed that no pituitary deficits existed. At admission, the patient presented: spastic tetraplegia, dysarthria, dysphagia, very severe cognitive deficits and joint deformities. Computerized tomography scanners (CT-Scans revealed the practical loss of the right brain hemisphere and important injuries in the left one. Clinical and blood analysis assessments were performed every three months for three years. Feet surgery was needed because of irreducible equinovarus. Results: Clinical and kinesitherapy assessments revealed a prompt improvement in cognitive functions, dysarthria and dysphagia disappeared and three years later the patient was able to live a practically normal life, walking alone and coming back to his studies. No adverse effects were observed during and after GH administration. Conclusions: These results, together with previous results from our group, indicate that GH treatment is safe and effective for helping neurorehabilitation in TBI patients, once the acute phase is resolved, regardless of whether or not they have GH-deficiency (GHD.

  8. Effects of recombinant growth hormone (GH) replacement and psychomotor and cognitive stimulation in the neurodevelopment of GH-deficient (GHD) children with cerebral palsy: a pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Devesa, Jesús; Alonso, Begoña; Casteleiro, Nerea; Couto, Paula; Castañón, Beatriz; Zas, Eva; Reimunde, Pedro

    2011-01-01

    Cerebral palsy (CP) is the main cause of physical disability in childhood and is an important health issue that has a strong socioeconomic impact. There is no effective treatment for CP and therapeutic approaches report only partial benefits for affected people. In this study we assessed the effects of growth hormone (GH) treatment combined with psychomotor and cognitive stimulation in the neurodevelopment of children with CP and GH deficiency (GHD). The study was carried out in 11 patients (7 boys and 4 girls; 4.12 ± 1.31 years) with GHD and CP who were treated with recombinant GH (rGH) and psychomotor and cognitive stimulation during 2 months. Battelle Developmental Inventory Screening Test (BDIST) was performed 2 months before commencing GH treatment, just before commencing GH administration, and after 2 months of combined treatment involving GH and cognitive stimulation. Psychomotor and cognitive status did not change during the period in which only cognitive stimulation was performed; however, significant improvements in personal and social skills, adaptive behavior, gross motor skills and total psychomotor abilities, receptive and total communication, cognitive skills and in the total score of the test (P motor skills and expressive communication (P stimulation seem to be useful for the appropriate neurodevelopment of children with GHD and CP.

  9. A phase 2 trial of long-acting TransCon growth hormone in adult GH deficiency

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Höybye, Charlotte; Pfeiffer, Andreas F H; Ferone, Diego

    2017-01-01

    was reported. No treatment-emergent anti-growth hormone binding antibodies were detected. TransCon GH demonstrated a linear, dose-dependent increase in growth hormone exposure without substantial accumulation. Growth hormone maximum serum concentration and insulin-like growth factor 1 exposure were similar......TransCon growth hormone is a sustained release human growth hormone prodrug in development in which unmodified growth hormone is transiently linked to a carrier molecule. It is intended as an alternative to daily growth hormone in the treatment of growth hormone deficiency. This was a multi......-center, randomized, open-label, active-controlled trial designed to compare the safety (including tolerability and immunogenicity), pharmacokinetics, and pharmacodynamics of three doses of weekly TransCon GH to daily growth hormone (Omnitrope). Thirty-seven adult males or females diagnosed with adult growth hormone...

  10. Effects of recombinant growth hormone (GH replacement and psychomotor and cognitive stimulation in the neurodevelopment of GH-deficient (GHD children with cerebral palsy: a pilot study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Devesa J

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Jesús Devesa1,2, Begoña Alonso1, Nerea Casteleiro1, Paula Couto1, Beatriz Castañón1, Eva Zas1, Pedro Reimunde1,21Medical Center “Proyecto Foltra”, Cacheiras (Teo, A Coruña, Spain; 2Department of Physiology, School of Medicine, University of Santiago de Compostela, SpainAbstract: Cerebral palsy (CP is the main cause of physical disability in childhood and is an important health issue that has a strong socioeconomic impact. There is no effective treatment for CP and therapeutic approaches report only partial benefits for affected people. In this study we assessed the effects of growth hormone (GH treatment combined with psychomotor and cognitive stimulation in the neurodevelopment of children with CP and GH deficiency (GHD. The study was carried out in 11 patients (7 boys and 4 girls; 4.12 ± 1.31 years with GHD and CP who were treated with recombinant GH (rGH and psychomotor and cognitive stimulation during 2 months. Battelle Developmental Inventory Screening Test (BDIST was performed 2 months before commencing GH treatment, just before commencing GH administration, and after 2 months of combined treatment involving GH and cognitive stimulation. Psychomotor and cognitive status did not change during the period in which only cognitive stimulation was performed; however, significant improvements in personal and social skills, adaptive behavior, gross motor skills and total psychomotor abilities, receptive and total communication, cognitive skills and in the total score of the test (P < 0.01, and in fine motor skills and expressive communication (P < 0.02 were observed after the combined treatment period. Therefore, GH replacement together with psychomotor and cognitive stimulation seem to be useful for the appropriate neurodevelopment of children with GHD and CP.Keywords: growth hormone, cerebral palsy, cognitive functions, Battelle’s test, neurodevelopment

  11. Ultrasensitive determination of human growth hormone (hGH) with a disposable electrochemical magneto-immunosensor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Serafín, V; Úbeda, N; Agüí, L; Yáñez-Sedeño, P; Pingarrón, J M

    2012-05-01

    In this paper, an electrochemical magneto-immunosensor for the detection of human growth hormone (hGH) is described for the first time. The immunosensor involves the use of tosyl-activated magnetic microparticles (TsMBs) to covalently immobilize a monoclonal mAbhHG antibody. A sandwich-type immunoassay with a secondary pAbhGH antibody and anti-IgG labelled with alkaline phosphatase (anti-IgG-AP) was employed. TsMBs–mAbhGH–hGH–pAbhGH–anti-IgG-AP conjugates were deposited onto the surface of a screen-printed gold electrode using a small neodymium magnet, and electrochemical detection was performed by square-wave voltammetry upon the addition of 4-aminophenyl phosphate as the AP substrate. All the variables involved in the preparation of immunoconjugates and in the immunoassay protocol were optimized. A calibration curve for hGH was constructed with a linear range between 0.01 and 100 ng/mL (r = 0.998) and a limit of detection of 0.005 ng/mL. This value is nearly three orders of magnitude lower than that obtained using surface plasmon resonance (Treviño et al., Talanta 78:1011-1016, 2009). Furthermore, good repeatability, with RSD = 3% (n = 10) at the 1-ng/mL hGH level, was obtained. Cross-reactivity studies with other hormones demonstrated good selectivity. The magneto-immunosensor was applied to the analysis of human serum spiked with hGH at the 4- and 0.1-ng/mL levels. Mean recoveries of 96 ± 6% and 99 ± 2%, respectively, were obtained.

  12. Attenuation of epidermal growth factor (EGF) signaling by growth hormone (GH).

    Science.gov (United States)

    González, Lorena; Miquet, Johanna G; Irene, Pablo E; Díaz, M Eugenia; Rossi, Soledad P; Sotelo, Ana I; Frungieri, Mónica B; Hill, Cristal M; Bartke, Andrzej; Turyn, Daniel

    2017-05-01

    Transgenic mice overexpressing growth hormone (GH) show increased hepatic protein content of the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR), which is broadly associated with cell proliferation and oncogenesis. However, chronically elevated levels of GH result in desensitization of STAT-mediated EGF signal and similar response of ERK1/2 and AKT signaling to EGF compared to normal mice. To ascertain the mechanisms involved in GH attenuation of EGF signaling and the consequences on cell cycle promotion, phosphorylation of signaling mediators was studied at different time points after EGF stimulation, and induction of proteins involved in cell cycle progression was assessed in normal and GH-overexpressing transgenic mice. Results from kinetic studies confirmed the absence of STAT3 and 5 activation and comparable levels of ERK1/2 phosphorylation upon EGF stimulation, which was associated with diminished or similar induction of c-MYC, c-FOS, c-JUN, CYCLIN D1 and CYCLIN E in transgenic compared to normal mice. Accordingly, kinetics of EGF-induced c-SRC and EGFR phosphorylation at activating residues demonstrated that activation of these proteins was lower in the transgenic mice with respect to normal animals. In turn, EGFR phosphorylation at serine 1046/1047, which is implicated in the negative regulation of the receptor, was increased in the liver of GH-overexpressing transgenic mice both in basal conditions and upon EGF stimulus. Increased basal phosphorylation and activation of the p38-mitogen-activated protein kinase might account for increased Ser 1046/1047 EGFR. Hyperphosphorylation of EGFR at serine residues would represent a compensatory mechanism triggered by chronically elevated levels of GH to mitigate the proliferative response induced by EGF. © 2017 Society for Endocrinology.

  13. Growth hormone (GH) treatment increases serum insulin-like growth factor binding protein-3, bone isoenzyme alkaline phosphatase and forearm bone mineral content in young adults with GH deficiency of childhood onset

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Juul, A; Pedersen, S A; Sørensen, S

    1994-01-01

    Recent studies have demonstrated that growth hormone (GH)-deficient adults have a markedly decreased bone mineral content compared to healthy adults. However, there are conflicting results regarding the effects of GH treatment on bone mineral content in GH-deficient adults. Therefore, we evaluated...... the effect of GH treatment on a marker of bone formation (bone alkaline phosphatase), hepatic excretory function and distal forearm bone mineral content in GH-deficient adults. Growth hormone was administered subcutaneously in 21 adults (13 males and 8 females) with GH deficiency of childhood onset for 4...... months in a double-blind, placebo-controlled GH trial, while 13 of the patients then received further GH for an additional 14 months. Serum insulin-like growth factor I (IGF-I) increased significantly from 100 to 279 micrograms/l and IGF binding protein-3 (IGFBP-3) from 1930 to 3355 micrograms/l after 4...

  14. Editorial Foreword: Comments on "Growth hormone (GH-releasing hormone and GH secretagogues in normal aging" || FREE PAPER ||

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Richard F Walker

    2008-03-01

    Full Text Available Richard F WalkerInternational Society for Applied Research in Aging (SARAThis issue of Clinical Interventions in Aging contains a quite interesting and informative article about a topic that is popular and also controversial among practitioners of age-management medicine. Appropriate to that controversy, Drs Hersch and Merriam (2008 have asked the question in the title of their paper, does the use of growth hormone secretagogues in age management medicine hold the promise of a fountain of youth, or that of a pool of Tantalus? While there is universal understanding of the fountain imagery, the meaning of the pool is perhaps less obvious. It derives, of course, from the Greek myth of Tantalus, who had both a hidden, divine sire and a mortal one. As the son of Zeus, he was uniquely favored among mortals and was invited to share the food of the gods. However, driven by pride, he shared the divine ambrosia with other mortals, and thus aroused the ire of the gods. As punishment, he was made to stand chin-deep in water with a variety of sweet-smelling and delicious fruit dangling just over his head. However, whenever he tried to drink or eat, the water would magically recede or the fruit would miraculously be lifted just out of his reach. Thus, it is that torment, through which something seems to be offered only to be withdrawn again, that has been called “tantalizing” in memory of its best known victim.

  15. Blockade of the growth hormone (GH) receptor unmasks rapid GH-releasing peptide-6-mediated tissue-specific insulin resistance

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    A.F. Muller (Alex); L.J. Hofland (Leo); S.W.J. Lamberts (Steven); M. Bidlingmaier (Martin); C.J. Strasburger; J.A.M.J.L. Janssen (Joseph); A-J. van der Lely (Aart-Jan)

    2001-01-01

    textabstractThe roles of GH and its receptor (GHR) in metabolic control are not yet fully understood. We studied the roles of GH and the GHR using the GHR antagonist pegvisomant for metabolic control of healthy nonobese men in fasting and nonfasting conditions. Ten

  16. Continuation of growth hormone (GH) therapy in GH-deficient patients during transition from childhood to adulthood

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nørrelund, Helene; Vahl, N; Juul, A

    2000-01-01

    The appropriate management of GH-deficient patients during transition from childhood to adulthood has not been reported in controlled trials, even though there is evidence to suggest that this phase is associated with specific problems in relation to GH sensitivity. An issue of particular interest...

  17. Growth hormone (GH)-independent dimerization of GH receptor by a leucine zipper results in constitutive activation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Behncken, S N; Billestrup, Nils; Brown, R

    2000-01-01

    and cytoplasmic domains of the GHR in the absence of the extracellular domain can lead to the constitutive activation of known GH signaling end points, supporting the view that proximity of Janus kinase 2 (JAK2) kinases is the essential element in signaling. Such constitutively active GH receptors may have...

  18. Continuous infusion versus daily injections of growth hormone (GH) for 4 weeks in GH-deficient patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Laursen, Torben; Jørgensen, Jens Otto Lunde; Jakobsen, Grethe

    1995-01-01

    infusion by means of a portable pump for 1 month and as daily sc injections (at 1900 h) for another month. An average daily GH dosage (+/- SEM) of 3.15 +/- 0.27 IU was administered during both periods. Steady state 24-h profiles of GH, IGF-I, IGF-binding proteins (IGFBPs), insulin, glucose, lipid......Abstract Endogenous GH secretion is pulsatile. Animal studies indicate that GH administered in a pulsatile manner induces growth and insulin-like growth factor I (IGF-I) generation more effectively than continuous administration. Short term human studies, however, have reported similar metabolic.......5 +/- 50.2 (injection) and 334.6 +/- 46.6 (infusion)]. Similarly, constant GH delivery induced higher IGFBP-3 levels (P insulin levels (P

  19. Adult growth hormone (GH)-deficient patients demonstrate heterogeneity between childhood onset and adult onset before and during human GH treatment. Adult Growth Hormone Deficiency Study Group

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Attanasio, A F; Lamberts, S W; Matranga, A M

    1997-01-01

    -deficient adult patients have been compared. The first 6 months comprised randomized, double-blind treatment with GH or placebo, then all patients were GH-treated for a further 12 months. At baseline the height, body weight, body mass index, lean body mass, and waist/hip ratio of AO patients were significantly (P......The onset of adult GH deficiency may be during either adulthood (AO) or childhood (CO), but potential differences have not previously been examined. In this study the baseline and GH therapy (12.5 micrograms/kg per day) data from CO (n = 74; mean age 29 yr) and AO (n = 99; mean age 44 yr) GH...

  20. Ocular findings in adult subjects with an inactivating mutation in GH releasing hormone receptor gene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faro, Augusto C N; Pereira-Gurgel, Virginia M; Salvatori, Roberto; Campos, Viviane C; Melo, Gustavo B; Oliveira, Francielle T; Oliveira-Santos, Alecia A; Oliveira, Carla R P; Pereira, Francisco A; Hellström, Ann; Oliveira-Neto, Luís A; Valença, Eugenia H O; Aguiar-Oliveira, Manuel H

    2017-06-01

    Ocular function is fundamental for environmental adaptation and survival capacity. Growth factors are necessary for a mature eyeball, needed for adequate vision. However, the consequences of the deficiency of circulating growth hormone (GH) and its effector insulin-like growth factor I (IGF-I) on the physical aspects of the human eye are still debated. A model of untreated isolated GH deficiency (IGHD), with low but measurable serum GH, may clarify this issue. The aim of this study was to assess the ocular aspects of adult IGHD individuals who have never received GH therapy. Cross sectional study. Setting: University Hospital, Federal University of Sergipe, Brazil. Twenty-five adult (13 males, mean age 50.1years, range 26 to 70years old) IGHD subjects homozygous for a null mutation (c.57+1G>A) in the GHRH receptor gene, and 28 (15 males, mean age 51.1years, range 26 to 67years old) controls were submitted to an endocrine and ophthalmological assessment. Forty-six IGHD and 50 control eyes were studied. Visual acuity, intraocular pressure, refraction (spherical equivalent), ocular axial length (AL), anterior chamber depth (ACD), lens thickness (LT), vitreous depth (VD), mean corneal curvature (CC) and central corneal thickness (CCT). IGHD subjects exhibited unmeasurable serum IGF-I levels, similar visual acuity, intraocular pressure and LT, higher values of spherical equivalent and CC, and lower measures of AL, ACD, VD and CCT in comparison to controls, but within their respective normal ranges. While mean stature in IGHD group was 78% of the control group, mean head circumference was 92% and axial AL was 96%. These observations suggest mild ocular effects in adult subjects with severe IGF-I deficiency due to non-treated IGHD. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Time mode of growth hormone (GH) entry into the bloodstream and steady-state plasma GH concentrations, rather than sex, estradiol, or menstrual cycle stage, primarily determine the GH elimination rate in healthy young women and men.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shah, N; Aloi, J; Evans, W S; Veldhuis, J D

    1999-08-01

    the same volunteers, stopping the constant iv infusions revealed t 1/2 values of GH decay from equilibrium of 26+/-5 and 23+/-2.3 min for the two higher GH infusion rates. In a fourth paradigm, endogenous GH t 1/2 values, as assessed in the same individuals by deconvolution analysis of overnight (10-min sampled) serum GH concentration profiles, averaged 18+/-1.3 min. This value was intermediate between that of poststeady state decay and iv bolus elimination of GH. In summary, the foregoing clinical experiments in healthy men and women indicate that 1) the nonequilibrium GH t 1/2, (body surface area-normalized) Vo, and MCR are independent of GH dose, sex, menstrual cycle stage, and serum estradiol concentrations; 2) the GH t 1/2 calculated after iv bolus injection is significantly (50%) shorter than that assessed during or after steady-state GH infusions or endogenously (overnight) by deconvolution analysis; and 3) the descending rank order of GH t 1/2 values in healthy volunteers is approximately: decay from steady state (23+/-2.3 min) > endogenously secreted GH (18+/-1.3 min) > during equilibrium infusion (15+/-1 min) > after bolus infusion (9.8+/-0.8 min). We thus conclude that for any given body surface area, the elimination properties of GH in men and women reflect predominantly the time mode of hormone entry into the circulation, rather than gender, menstrual cycle stage, or prevailing serum estradiol concentration. Accordingly, differences in serum GH concentrations in premenopausal women compared to those in young men and across the normal menstrual cycle reflect commensurate differences in pituitary GH secretion rates.

  2. Urinary growth hormone (U-GH) excretion and serum insulin-like growth factor 1 (IGF-1) in patients with alcoholic cirrhosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Møller, S; Grønbaek, M; Main, K

    1993-01-01

    Basal serum growth hormone (GH) levels are elevated and insulin-like growth factor 1 (IGF-1) concentrations in serum are suppressed in patients with chronic liver disease. The aim of this study was to measure the urinary GH (U-GH) excretion and IGF-1 concentrations in patients with cirrhosis...... was significantly higher in patients than in the healthy controls (p encephalopathy (p

  3. The 20kDa and 22kDa forms of human growth hormone (hGH) exhibit different intracellular signalling profiles and properties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yao-Xia, Liu; Jing-Yan, Chen; Xia-Lian, Tang; Ping, Chen; Min, Zhang

    2017-07-01

    Human Growth Hormone (hGH) includes two main variants. The first is 22kDa GH (22K-GH), which is predominant in the blood circulation. The second most abundant variant is 20K-GH, which makes up 5-10% of the blood circulation. Both bind and activate the same receptor, called the human growth hormone receptor (GHR). However, the reason why 22K-GH and 20K-GH exhibit similar, but not identical physiological activities remains poorly understood. In this article, the intracellular signalling profiles between these two hormones were examined. Western blot analyses were performed in 3T3-F442A and CHO cells transfected with GHR (CHO-GHR). The results revealed that both 22K-GH and 20K-GH can activate Janus kinase 2 (JAK2) and signal transducers and activators of transcription 1, 3 and 5 (STATs 1/3/5). Both induced tyrosine phosphorylation of JAK2 and STAT/1/3/5 in a time-dependent and dose-dependent manner. However, there were significant differences in the intracellular signalling properties between 22K-GH and 20K-GH. In particular, the kinetics of signalling shown by 22K-GH and 20K-GH is different. In addition, we found that the 20K-GH-induced tyrosine phosphorylation of signalling proteins was weaker than that of 22K-GH. Together, these observations indicate that the levels and kinetics of phosphorylation mediated by the main signalling proteins triggered by 22K-GH or 20K-GH were not exactly the same. This may provide a possible explanation for the different biological activities exhibited by 22K-GH and 20K-GH. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Short-term changes in bone formation markers following growth hormone (GH) treatment in short prepubertal children with a broad range of GH secretion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andersson, Björn; Swolin-Eide, Diana; Magnusson, Per; Albertsson-Wikland, Kerstin

    2015-01-01

    Growth hormone (GH) promotes longitudinal growth and bone modelling/remodelling. This study investigated the relationship between levels of bone formation markers and growth during GH treatment in prepubertal children with widely ranging GH secretion levels. The study group comprised 113 short prepubertal children (mean age ± SD, 9·37 ± 2·13 years; 99 boys) on GH treatment (33·0 ± 0·06 μg/kg/day) for 1 year. Blood samples were taken at baseline and 1 and 2 weeks, 1 and 3 months, and 1 year after treatment start. Intact amino-terminal propeptide of type I procollagen (PINP), bone-specific alkaline phosphatase (BALP) and osteocalcin were measured using an automated IDS-iSYS immunoassay system. Intact amino-terminal propeptide of type I procollagen (PINP), BALP and osteocalcin, increased in the short-term during GH treatment. PINP after 1 week (P = 0·00077), and BALP and osteocalcin after 1 month (P growth response. No significant correlations were found between BALP and first year growth. Multiple regression analysis showed that bone marker levels together with auxological data and insulin-like growth factor binding protein-3 explained the variation in first year growth response to 36% at start, 32% after 2 weeks and 48% at 3 months. Short-term increases in levels of the bone formation markers PINP, BALP and osteocalcin showed different temporal patterns, but all correlated with first year growth response during GH treatment. These markers may be a useful addition to existing prediction models for growth response. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  5. Is the growth outcome of children with idiopathic short stature and isolated growth hormone deficiency following treatment with growth hormone and a luteinizing hormone-releasing hormone agonist superior to that obtained by GH alone?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colmenares, Ana; González, Laura; Gunczler, Peter; Lanes, Roberto

    2012-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of combined therapy with growth hormone (GH) and luteinizing hormone-releasing hormone agonist (LHRHa) on the near-final height (NFH) of children with idiopathic short stature (ISS) and growth hormone deficiency (GHD) in early puberty. A retrospective analysis of 20 patients with ISS and 9 patients with GHD treated with combined therapy was undertaken. Twelve children with ISS and ten with GHD, treated with GH alone, served as controls. Patients were matched at baseline for chronological age, bone age, height standard deviation score (SDS), and pubertal development. Patients with ISS or GHD treated with combined therapy improved both their predicted adult height (PAH) at 2 years of therapy (ISS, p children, an increase of 7.9 +/- 4.9 cm with combined therapy vs. 7.3 +/- 6.0 cm with GH; GHD children, an increase of 6.8 +/- 7.8 cm with combined therapy vs. 5 +/- 5.9 cm with GH). The total height gain SDS was higher in patients treated with GH alone compared with those with combined therapy, but the difference was not significant (ISS children, a gain of 2.4 SDS with GH vs. 0.8 SDS with combined therapy; GHD children, a gain of 1.8 SDS with GH vs. 0.6 SDS with combined therapy). Although 2 years of combined treatment with GH and LHRHa improved the PAH and the NFH of ISS and GHD patients in early puberty, this improvement was not significant compared with that observed in similar subjects treated with GH alone.

  6. Changes in bone mineral density, body composition, and lipid metabolism during growth hormone (GH) treatment in children with GH deficiency

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    A.M. Boot (Annemieke); M.A. Engels (Melanie); G.J.M. Boerma (Geert); E.P. Krenning (Eric); S.M.P.F. de Muinck Keizer-Schrama (Sabine)

    1997-01-01

    textabstractAdults with childhood onset GH deficiency (GHD) have reduced bone mass, increased fat mass, and disorders of lipid metabolism. The aim of the present study was to evaluate bone mineral density (BMD), bone metabolism, body composition, and lipid metabolism in

  7. Growth hormone (GH) treatment increases serum insulin-like growth factor binding protein-3, bone isoenzyme alkaline phosphatase and forearm bone mineral content in young adults with GH deficiency of childhood onset

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Juul, A; Pedersen, S A; Sørensen, S

    1994-01-01

    months of GH treatment (p alkaline phosphatase increased significantly from 38.6 to 92.9 U/l during GH therapy in male patients (p liver...... the effect of GH treatment on a marker of bone formation (bone alkaline phosphatase), hepatic excretory function and distal forearm bone mineral content in GH-deficient adults. Growth hormone was administered subcutaneously in 21 adults (13 males and 8 females) with GH deficiency of childhood onset for 4......-derived alkaline phosphatase was unaltered by GH. In the females, the increase in bone alkaline phosphatase did not reach statistical significance (19.1 vs 40.0 U/l, p = 0.06). The GH-induced increase in bone alkaline phosphatase correlated significantly with the increase in serum IGFBP-3 (r = 0.46, p = 0...

  8. Different short-term effect of protein and carbohydrate intake on TSH, growth hormone (GH), insulin, C-peptide, and glucagon in humans

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Matzen, L E; Andersen, B B; Jensen, B G

    1990-01-01

    hormone (GH) and thyroid stimulating hormone (TSH) to protein and carbohydrate was identical, with a reduction in both GH and TSH, and nadir occurring after 45-60 min and 120 min, respectively. During the next 120 min TSH returned to starting level after carbohydrate intake but was still reduced after...

  9. The growth hormone (GH)-insulin-like growth factor axis during testosterone replacement therapy in GH-treated hypopituitary males

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fisker, Sidse; Nørrelund, Helene; Juul, A

    2001-01-01

    in relation to two testosterone injections. Mean baseline IGF-I levels were 352 +/- 135 microg/L, and they remained unaltered during the study period (analysis of variance (ANOVA), P = 0.88). Free IGF-I levels did not change either (ANOVA, P = 0.35). Serum IGF binding protein-3 (IGFBP-3) and acid...... (ANOVA, P = 0.08). Prostate-specific antigen tended slightly to increase after each testosterone injection (ANOVA, P = 0.08, post hoc, NS). We conclude that major changes in total IGF-I are not induced during conventional intramuscular testosterone replacement in GH-treated hypopituitary males......, suggesting that testosterone effects on IGF-I are likely to be secondary to a stimulation of endogenous GH release....

  10. Mutation of the SHP-2 binding site in growth hormone (GH) receptor prolongs GH-promoted tyrosyl phosphorylation of GH receptor, JAK2, and STAT5B

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stofega, M R; Herrington, J; Billestrup, Nils

    2000-01-01

    association of the SH2 domains of SHP-2 with GHR. Mutation of tyrosine 595 dramatically prolongs the duration of tyrosyl phosphorylation of the signal transducer and activator of transcription STAT5B in response to GH, while mutation of tyrosine 487 moderately prolongs the duration of STAT5B tyrosyl...... phosphorylation. Consistent with the effects on STAT5B phosphorylation, tyrosine-to-phenylalanine mutation of tyrosine 595 prolongs the duration of tyrosyl phosphorylation of GHR and JAK2. These data suggest that tyrosine 595 is a major site of interaction of GHR with SHP-2, and that GHR-bound SHP-2 negatively...

  11. Autosomal-dominant isolated growth hormone deficiency (IGHD type II) with normal GH-1 gene.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Fintini, D.; Salvatori, R.; Salemi, S.; Otten, B.J.; Ubertini, G.; Cambiaso, P.; Mullis, P.E.

    2006-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Autosomal-dominant isolated GH deficiency (IGHD) is a rare disorder that is commonly believed to be due to heterozygous mutations in the GH-1 gene (GH-1). These mutations cause the production of a protein that affects the release of the product of the normal allele. Rarely, heterozygous

  12. Mitogenic signaling pathways in the liver of growth hormone (GH)-overexpressing mice during the growth period.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martinez, Carolina S; Piazza, Verónica G; González, Lorena; Fang, Yimin; Bartke, Andrzej; Turynl, Danie; Miquet, Johanna G; Sotelo, Ana I

    2016-01-01

    Growth hormone (GH) is a pleiotropic hormone that triggers STATs, ERK1/2 and Akt signaling, related to cell growth and proliferation. Transgenic mice overexpressing GH present increased body size, with a disproportionate liver enlargement due to hypertrophy and hyperplasia of the hepatocytes. We had described enhanced mitogenic signaling in liver of young adult transgenic mice. We now evaluate the activation of these signaling cascades during the growth period and relate them to the morphological alterations found. Signaling mediators, cell cycle regulators and transcription factors involved in cellular growth in the liver of GH-overexpressing growing mice were assessed by immunoblotting, RT-qPCR and immunohistochemistry. Hepatocyte enlargement can be seen as early as 2-weeks of age in GH-overexpressing animals, although it is more pronounced in young adults. Levels of cell cycle mediators PCNA and cyclin D1, and transcription factor c-Jun increase with age in transgenic mice with no changes in normal mice, whereas c-Myc levels are higher in 2-week-old transgenic animals and cyclin E levels decline with age for both genotypes. STAT3, Akt and GSK3 present higher activation in the adult transgenic mice than in the growing animals, while for c-Src and mTOR, phosphorylation in GH-overexpressing mice is higher than in control siblings at 4 and 9 weeks of age. No significant changes are observed for ERK1/2, neither by age or genotype. Thus, the majority of the mitogenic signaling pathways are gradually up-regulated in the liver of GH-transgenic mice, giving rise to the hepatic morphological changes these mice exhibit.

  13. A peptide hormone gene, GhPSK promotes fibre elongation and contributes to longer and finer cotton fibre.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Jie; Tan, Jiafu; Tu, Lili; Zhang, Xianlong

    2014-09-01

    Cotton fibres, the single-celled trichomes derived from the ovule epidermis, provide the most important natural material for the global textile industry. A number of studies have demonstrated that regulating endogenous hormone levels through transgenic approaches can improve cotton fibre qualities. Phytosulfokine-α (PSK-α) is a novel peptide hormone in plants that is involved in regulating cell proliferation and elongation. However, its potential applications in crop genetic improvement have not been evaluated. In this study, we describe how exogenous PSK-α application promotes cotton fibre cell elongation in vitro. Chlorate, an effective inhibitor of peptide sulfation, suppressed fibre elongation in ovule culture. Exogenously applied PSK-α partly restored the chlorate-induced suppression. A putative PSK gene (GhPSK) was cloned from Gossypium hirsutum. Expression pattern analysis revealed that GhPSK is preferentially expressed in rapidly elongating fibre cells (5-20 days postanthesis). Overexpression of GhPSK in cotton increased the endogenous PSK-α level and promoted cotton fibre cell elongation, resulting in longer and finer fibres. Further results from electrophysiological and physiological analyses suggest that GhPSK affects fibre development through regulation of K(+) efflux. Digital gene expression (DGE) profile analysis of GhPSK overexpression lines indicates that PSK signalling may regulate the respiratory electron-transport chain and reactive oxygen species to affect cotton fibre development. These results imply that peptide hormones are involved in cotton fibre growth and suggest a new strategy for the biotechnological improvement of cotton fibre quality. © 2014 Society for Experimental Biology, Association of Applied Biologists and John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  14. The dwarf phenotype in GH240B mice, haploinsufficient for the autism candidate gene Neurobeachin, is caused by ectopic expression of recombinant human growth hormone.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kim Nuytens

    Full Text Available Two knockout mouse models for the autism candidate gene Neurobeachin (Nbea have been generated independently. Although both models have similar phenotypes, one striking difference is the dwarf phenotype observed in the heterozygous configuration of the GH240B model that is generated by the serendipitous insertion of a promoterless human growth hormone (hGH genomic fragment in the Nbea gene. In order to elucidate this discrepancy, the dwarfism present in this Nbea mouse model was investigated in detail. The growth deficiency in Nbea+/- mice coincided with an increased percentage of fat mass and a decrease in bone mineral density. Low but detectable levels of hGH were detected in the pituitary and hypothalamus of Nbea+/- mice but not in liver, hippocampus nor in serum. As a consequence, several members of the mouse growth hormone (mGH signaling cascade showed altered mRNA levels, including a reduction in growth hormone-releasing hormone mRNA in the hypothalamus. Moreover, somatotrope cells were less numerous in the pituitary of Nbea+/- mice and both contained and secreted significantly less mGH resulting in reduced levels of circulating insulin-like growth factor 1. These findings demonstrate that the random integration of the hGH transgene in this mouse model has not only inactivated Nbea but has also resulted in the tissue-specific expression of hGH causing a negative feedback loop, mGH hyposecretion and dwarfism.

  15. Effects of growth hormone (GH) treatment on body fluid distribution in patients undergoing elective abdominal surgery

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Møller, Jacob; Jensen, Martin Bach; Frandsen, E.

    1998-01-01

    weight was constant (P balance in the GH-treated patients compared to the placebo group (GH: 3.6 +/- 0.7 l; plc: -0.7 +/- 1.2 l, P ... at day -2 and at day 7, and body composition was estimated by dual X-ray absorptiometry and bioimpedance. Changes in body weight and fluid balance were recorded and hence intracellular volume was assessed. RESULTS: During placebo treatment body weight decreased 4.3 +/- 0.6 kg; during GH treatment body.......39 +/- 0.08 l during placebo administration (P = 0.03). Intracellular volume (ICV) decreased less during GH than during placebo (GH: -1.42 +/- 0.45; plc: -3.70 +/- 0.76; P = 0.02). Bioimpedance remained constant during GH administration and increased 60 +/- 9 ohm in the placebo-treated group (P

  16. Human metastatic melanoma cell lines express high levels of growth hormone receptor and respond to GH treatment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sustarsic, Elahu G; Junnila, Riia K; Kopchick, John J.

    2013-01-01

    Cancer Institute's NCI60 panel includes 60 cancer cell lines from nine types of human cancer: breast, CNS, colon, leukemia, melanoma, non-small cell lung, ovarian, prostate and renal. We utilized this panel to quantify expression of GHR, GH, prolactin receptor (PRLR) and prolactin (PRL) mRNA with real......Accumulating evidence implicates the growth hormone receptor (GHR) in carcinogenesis. While multiple studies show evidence for expression of growth hormone (GH) and GHR mRNA in human cancer tissue, there is a lack of quantification and only a few cancer types have been investigated. The National......-time RT qPCR. Both GHR and PRLR show a broad range of expression within and among most cancer types. Strikingly, GHR expression is nearly 50-fold higher in melanoma than in the panel as a whole. Analysis of human metastatic melanoma biopsies confirmed GHR gene expression in melanoma tissue. In these human...

  17. Human metastatic melanoma cell lines express high levels of growth hormone receptor and respond to GH treatment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sustarsic, Elahu G. [Edison Biotechnology Institute, 1 Watertower Drive, Athens, OH (United States); Department of Biological Sciences, Ohio University, Athens, OH (United States); Junnila, Riia K. [Edison Biotechnology Institute, 1 Watertower Drive, Athens, OH (United States); Kopchick, John J., E-mail: kopchick@ohio.edu [Edison Biotechnology Institute, 1 Watertower Drive, Athens, OH (United States); Department of Biological Sciences, Ohio University, Athens, OH (United States); Department of Biomedical Sciences, Heritage College of Osteopathic Medicine, Ohio University, Athens, OH (United States)

    2013-11-08

    Highlights: •Most cancer types of the NCI60 have sub-sets of cell lines with high GHR expression. •GHR is highly expressed in melanoma cell lines. •GHR is elevated in advanced stage IV metastatic tumors vs. stage III. •GH treatment of metastatic melanoma cell lines alters growth and cell signaling. -- Abstract: Accumulating evidence implicates the growth hormone receptor (GHR) in carcinogenesis. While multiple studies show evidence for expression of growth hormone (GH) and GHR mRNA in human cancer tissue, there is a lack of quantification and only a few cancer types have been investigated. The National Cancer Institute’s NCI60 panel includes 60 cancer cell lines from nine types of human cancer: breast, CNS, colon, leukemia, melanoma, non-small cell lung, ovarian, prostate and renal. We utilized this panel to quantify expression of GHR, GH, prolactin receptor (PRLR) and prolactin (PRL) mRNA with real-time RT qPCR. Both GHR and PRLR show a broad range of expression within and among most cancer types. Strikingly, GHR expression is nearly 50-fold higher in melanoma than in the panel as a whole. Analysis of human metastatic melanoma biopsies confirmed GHR gene expression in melanoma tissue. In these human biopsies, the level of GHR mRNA is elevated in advanced stage IV tumor samples compared to stage III. Due to the novel finding of high GHR in melanoma, we examined the effect of GH treatment on three NCI60 melanoma lines (MDA-MB-435, UACC-62 and SK-MEL-5). GH increased proliferation in two out of three cell lines tested. Further analysis revealed GH-induced activation of STAT5 and mTOR in a cell line dependent manner. In conclusion, we have identified cell lines and cancer types that are ideal to study the role of GH and PRL in cancer, yet have been largely overlooked. Furthermore, we found that human metastatic melanoma tumors express GHR and cell lines possess active GHRs that can modulate multiple signaling pathways and alter cell proliferation. Based on

  18. Hormones

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hormones are your body's chemical messengers. They travel in your bloodstream to tissues or organs. They work ... glands, which are special groups of cells, make hormones. The major endocrine glands are the pituitary, pineal, ...

  19. A novel oral preparation of human growth hormone (hGH) is absorbed and increases serum IGF-I levels after 7 days administration to GH-deficient adults

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Laursen, Torben; Mindeholm, Linda; Haemmerle, Sibylle

    2007-01-01

    Growth hormone deficient (GHD) patients are currently effectively treated with daily subcutaneous (sc) injections of hGH in the evening, but alternative routes would be attractive. An oral formulationulation of hGH, using an amino-caprilic acid derivative (5-CNAC, Emisphere's eligen® technology...... to the end of washout. Further studies should determine optimal formulation, dose and impact of meals, but the possibility of oral delivery of peptides opens new therapeutic perspectives....

  20. Developmental programming of growth: genetic variant in GH2 gene encoding placental growth hormone contributes to adult height determination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Timasheva, Y; Putku, M; Kivi, R; Kožich, V; Männik, J; Laan, M

    2013-11-01

    Given the physiological role of placental growth hormone (PGH) during intrauterine development and growth, genetic variation in the coding Growth hormone 2 (GH2) gene may modulate developmental programming of adult stature. Two major GH2 variants were described worldwide, determined by single polymorphism (rs2006123; c.171 + 50C > A). We sought to study whether GH2 variants may contribute to adult anthropometric measurements. Genotyping of GH2 SNP rs2006123 by RFLP, testing its genetic association with adult height and Body Mass Index (BMI) by linear regression analysis, and combining the results of three individual study samples in meta-analysis. HYPEST (Estonia), n = 1464 (506 men/958 women), CADCZ (Czech), n = 871 (518/353); UFA (Bashkortostan), n = 954 (655/299); meta-analysis, n = 3289 (1679/1610). Meta-analysis across HYPEST, CADCZ and UFA samples (n = 3289) resulted in significant association of GH2 rs2006123 with height (recessive model: AA-homozygote effect: beta (SE) = 1.26 (0.46), P = 5.90 × 10⁻³; additive model: A-allele effect: beta (SE) = 0.45 (0.18), P = 1.40 × 10⁻²). Among men (n = 1679), the association of the A-allele with taller stature remained significant after multiple-testing correction (additive effect: beta = 0.86 (0.28), P = 1.83 × 10⁻³). No association was detected with BMI. Notably, rs2006123 was in strong LD (r² ≥ 0.87) with SNPs significantly associated with height (rs2665838, rs7209435, rs11658329) and mapped near GH2 in three independent meta-analyses of GWA studies. This is the first study demonstrating a link between a placental gene variant and programming of growth potential in adulthood. The detected association between PGH encoding GH2 and adult height promotes further research on the role of placental genes in prenatal programming of human metabolism. Copyright © 2013 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  1. Growth hormone (GH) dose-dependent IGF-I response relates to pubertal height gain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lundberg, Elena; Kriström, Berit; Jonsson, Bjorn; Albertsson-Wikland, Kerstin

    2015-12-18

    Responsiveness to GH treatment can be estimated by both growth and ∆IGF-I. The primary aim of the present study was to investigate if mimicking the physiological increase during puberty in GH secretion, by using a higher GH dose could lead to pubertal IGFs in short children with low GH secretion. The secondary aim was to explore the relationship between IGF-I, IGFBP-3 and the IGF-I/IGFBP-3 ratio and gain in height. A multicentre, randomized, clinical trial (TRN88-177) in 104 children (90 boys), who had received GH 33 μg/kg/day during at least 1 prepubertal year. They were followed from GH start to adult height (mean, 7.5 years; range, 4.6-10.7). At onset of puberty, children were randomized into three groups, to receive 67 μg/kg/day (GH(67)) given once (GH(67x1); n = 30) or divided into two daily injection (GH(33x2); n = 36), or to remain on a single 33 μg/kg/day dose (GH(33x1); n = 38). The outcome measures were change and obtained mean on-treatment IGF-I(SDS), IGFBP3(SDS) and IGF-I/IGFBP3 ratio(SDS) during prepuberty and puberty. These variables were assessed in relation to prepubertal, pubertal and total gain in heightSDS. Mean prepubertal increases 1 year after GH start were: 2.1 IGF-I(SDS), 0.6 IGFBP3(SDS) and 1.5 IGF-I/IGFBP3ratio(SDS). A significant positive correlation was found between prepubertal ∆IGFs and both prepubertal and total gain in height(SDS). During puberty changes in IGFs were GH dose-dependent: mean pubertal level of IGF-I(SDS) was higher in GH(67) vs GH(33) (p = 0.031). First year pubertal ∆IGF-I(SDS) was significantly higher in the GH(67)vs GH(33) group (0.5 vs -0.1, respectively, p = 0.007), as well as ∆IGF-I(SDS) to the pubertal mean level (0.2 vs -0.2, p = 0.028). In multivariate analyses, the prepubertal increase in '∆IGF-I(SDS) from GH start' and the 'GH dose-dependent pubertal ∆IGF-I(SDS)' were the most important variables for explaining variation in prepubertal (21 %), pubertal (26 %) and total

  2. From isolated GH deficiency to multiple pituitary hormone deficiency: an evolving continuum - a KIMS analysis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Klose, M.; Jonsson, B.; Abs, R.

    2009-01-01

    with available data on concomitant medication (165 IGHD, 3006 MPHD). RESULTS: IGHD and MPHD patients had similar baseline clinical presentation, and both groups responded similarly to 2 years of GH therapy, with favourable changes in lipid profile and improved quality of life. New deficiencies were observed...... in 35% of IGHD patients, which was similar to MPHD patients with one additional deficit other than GH. New deficiencies most often presented within the first year but were observed up to 6 years after GH commencement. Conversion of IGHD into MPHD was not predicted by aetiology, baseline characteristics...

  3. Effects of growth hormone replacement therapy on IGF-related parameters and on the pituitary-gonadal axis in GH-deficient males. A double-blind, placebo-controlled crossover study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Juul, A; Andersson, A M; Pedersen, S A

    1998-01-01

    It has been suggested that growth hormone (GH) may play a regulatory role in male reproductive function. To express full anabolic effect in immature boys testosterone apparently requires the presence of GH. In GH-deficient adults, GH replacement therapy exerts a variety of anabolic actions, some...... of which are similar to the effects of gonadal steroids. However, little is known about the potential effects of GH on gonadal steroids and on dynamic tests of pituitary-gonadal function in adults with GH deficiency. We evaluated the pituitary-gonadal axis in a 4-month double-blind, placebo-controlled GH...

  4. Do IGF-I concentrations better reflect growth hormone (GH action in children with short stature than the results of GH stimulating tests? Evidence from the simultaneous assessment of thyroid function

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Smyczyńska Joanna

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The diagnosis of growth hormone (GH deficiency (GHD in short children seems unquestionable when both GH peak in stimulating tests (GHST and IGF-I concentration are decreased. However, the discrepancies between the results of GHST and IGF-I secretion are observed. It seems purposeful to determine the significance of GHST and IGF-I assessment in diagnosing GHD. The relationship between GH secretion and thyroid function, as well as GH influence on the peripheral thyroxine (T4 to triiodothyronine (T3 deiodination, mediated by IGF-I, were identified. Thus, clear differences in thyroid function between GH-deficient and non-GH-deficient subjects should exist. Methods Analysis comprised 800 children (541 boys, age 11.6 ± 3.1 years (mean ± SD, with short stature, in whom two (2 standard GHST (with clonidine and with glucagon were performed and IGF-I, free T4 (FT4, free T3 (FT3 and TSH serum concentrations were assessed. The patients were qualified to the following groups: GHD - decreased GH peak in GHST and IGF-I SDS (n = 81, ISS - normal GH peak and IGF-I SDS (n = 347, low GH - normal IGF-I SDS, and decreased GH peak (n = 212, low IGF - decreased IGF-I SDS, and normal GH peak (n = 160. The relationships among the results of particular tests were evaluated. Results In the groups with decreased IGF-I concentrations (GHD Group and low IGF Group, the more severe deficit of height was observed, together with higher TSH and FT4 but lower FT3 levels than in groups with normal IGF-I concentrations (ISS Group and low GH Group, independently of the results of GHST. TSH, FT4 and FT3 concentrations were - respectively - similar in two groups with decreased IGF-I secretion, as well as in two groups with normal IGF-I levels. Significant correlations were found between patients' height SDS and IGF-I SDS, between FT3 and IGF-I SDS (positive, and between FT4 and IGF-I SDS (negative, with no correlation between GH peak and any of the parameters

  5. Preference of Arabidopsis thaliana GH3.5 acyl amido synthetase for growth versus defense hormone acyl substrates is dictated by concentration of amino acid substrate aspartate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mackelprang, Rebecca; Okrent, Rachel A; Wildermuth, Mary C

    2017-11-01

    The GH3 family of adenylating enzymes conjugate acyl substrates such as the growth hormone indole-3-acetic acid (IAA) to amino acids via a two-step reaction of acyl substrate adenylation followed by amino acid conjugation. Arabidopsis thaliana GH3.5 was previously shown to be unusual in that it could adenylate both IAA and the defense hormone salicylic acid (SA, 2-hydroxybenzoate). Our detailed studies of the kinetics of GH3.5 on a variety of auxin and benzoate substrates provides insight into the acyl preference and reaction mechanism of GH3.5. For example, we found GH3.5 activity on substituted benzoates is not defined by the substitution position as it is for GH3.12/PBS3. Most importantly, we show that GH3.5 strongly prefers Asp as the amino acid conjugate and that the concentration of Asp dictates the functional activity of GH3.5 on IAA vs. SA. Not only is Asp used in amino acid biosynthesis, but it also plays an important role in nitrogen mobilization and in the production of downstream metabolites, including pipecolic acid which propagates defense systemically. During active growth, [IAA] and [Asp] are high and the catalytic efficiency (k cat /K m ) of GH3.5 for IAA is 360-fold higher than with SA. GH3.5 is expressed under these conditions and conversion of IAA to inactive IAA-Asp would provide fine spatial and temporal control over local auxin developmental responses. By contrast, [SA] is dramatically elevated in response to (hemi)-biotrophic pathogens which also induce GH3.5 expression. Under these conditions, [Asp] is low and GH3.5 has equal affinity (K m ) for SA and IAA with similar catalytic efficiencies. However, the concentration of IAA tends to be very low, well below the K m for IAA. Therefore, GH3.5 catalyzed formation of SA-Asp would occur, fine-tuning localized defensive responses through conversion of active free SA to SA-Asp. Taken together, we show how GH3.5, with dual activity on IAA and SA, can integrate cellular metabolic status via Asp to

  6. Bioavailability and bioactivity of intravenous vs subcutaneous infusion of growth hormone in GH-deficient patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Laursen, Torben; Møller, Jens; Ørskov, Hans

    1996-01-01

    of the present study was to evaluate the short-term metabolic effects of GH following i.v. and s.c. delivery. DESIGN AND MEASUREMENTS: In a cross-over design 10 GH-deficient patients were randomized to receive GH (0.03 microgram (0.1 mU/kg/min) as a continuous i.v. or s.c. infusion for 39 hours on two different...... by RIA following both s.c. (P infusion (P infusion (P infusion [159.5 +/- 21.8 (s.c.), 185.2 +/- 27.7 (i.v.), P = 0.......001), and a higher ratio was obtained following i.v. infusion (P infusion resulted in significantly lower mean levels of serum NEFA (P

  7. Effect of 12 months of recombinant human growth hormone replacement therapy on insulin sensitivity in GH-deficient adults as determined by different methods.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Micic D

    2002-10-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Controversial results have been obtained in measuring insulin sensitivity (S(I during recombinant human growth hormone (rhGH treatment in adult growth hormone deficient (GH-deficient patients. AIMS: The aim of our study was to estimate S(I before and during treatment using three different methods for quantifying insulin sensitivity in GH-deficient adults treated with rhGH. SETTINGS AND DESIGN: Twenty-one GH-deficient adults were treated with rhGH during 12 months. S(I was estimated using Minimal model analysis, Homeostatic Model of Assessment (HOMA and Quantitative Insulin Sensitivity Check Index (QUICKI before and after 3, 6, 9 and 12 months of rhGH therapy. MATERIAL AND METHODS: Oral Glucose Tolerance Test (OGTT and Frequently Sampled Intravenous Glucose Tolerance Test (FSIGT were performed in each patient at respective time intervals. QUICKI and HOMA were calculated using basal values of glucose and insulin from FSIGT. Minimal model computer analysis was calculated from glucose and insulin data obtained during FSIGT. STATISTICAL ANALYSIS: Area under the curve for glucose, insulin and C-peptide were calculated using trapezoidal rule from OGTT data. Differences and correlations were tested using ANOVA for repeated measures, Wilcoxon′s matched-paired test, paired t-test, Pearson′s correlation and Bland Altman plot. RESULTS: There were no significant changes in S(I using Minimal model analysis and QUICKI during rhGH treatment. On the contrary, HOMA analysis indicated significant deterioration in S(I after 12 months of therapy. CONCLUSION: Our study did not demonstrate any changes in S(I using Minimal model and QUICKI analysis, while there was significant increase in insulin resistance using HOMA model. We suggest that the choice of method for the determination of S(I may influence the interpretation of results concerning the effect of rhGH therapy on S(I in GH-deficient adults.

  8. The Long Intron 1 of Growth Hormone Gene from Reeves’ Turtle (Chinemys reevesii Correlates with Negatively Regulated GH Expression in Four Cell Lines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wen-Sheng Liu

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Turtles grow slowly and have a long lifespan. Ultrastructural studies of the pituitary gland in Reeves’ turtle (Chinemys reevesii have revealed that the species possesses a higher nucleoplasmic ratio and fewer secretory granules in growth hormone (GH cells than other animal species in summer and winter. C. reevesii GH gene was cloned and species-specific similarities and differences were investigated. The full GH gene sequence in C. reevesii contains 8517 base pairs (bp, comprising five exons and four introns. Intron 1 was found to be much longer in C. reevesii than in other species. The coding sequence (CDS of the turtle’s GH gene, with and without the inclusion of intron 1, was transfected into four cell lines, including DF-1 chicken embryo fibroblasts, Chinese hamster ovary (CHO cells, human embryonic kidney 293FT cells, and GH4C1 rat pituitary cells; the turtle growth hormone (tGH gene mRNA and protein expression levels decreased significantly in the intron-containing CDS in these cell lines, compared with that of the corresponding intronless CDS. Thus, the long intron 1 of GH gene in Reeves’ turtle might correlate with downregulated gene expression.

  9. Cortical bone density is normal in prepubertal children with growth hormone (GH) deficiency, but initially decreases during GH replacement due to early bone remodeling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schweizer, R; Martin, D D; Schwarze, C P; Binder, G; Georgiadou, A; Ihle, J; Ranke, M B

    2003-11-01

    Dual energy x-ray absorptiometry (DEXA) has revealed that GH- deficient adults gain in bone mineral density during GH therapy. Measurements of volumetric bone density (grams per cubic centimeter vs. grams per square centimeter) and structure, however, are achieved through peripheral quantitative computed tomography (pQCT). In 45 prepubertal GH-deficient children, we studied pQCT measurements before the start and for 12 months of GH treatment. Serum alkaline phosphatase (AP), procollagen I carboxyl-terminal propeptide (PICP), and deoxypyridinoline reflected bone metabolism status. Findings at the start of GH treatment were (mean SD score): bone area, -0.44; cortical density, -0.03; cortical area, -1.32; cortical thickness, -1.41; and marrow area, +0.66. At 12 months, cortical density had fallen to -0.73 (P < 0.001), whereas cortical area and thickness, and marrow area did not change. AP, PICP, and deoxypyridinoline increased significantly within the first 3 months (increase: AP, 66.5 U/liter; PICP, 72 microg/liter; DPD, 11.4 nmol/mmol creatinine). The pQCT showed that cortical density is not reduced in GH-deficient patients. Higher bone metabolism explains the lower cortical density after GH therapy commenced. Thus, the manifestation of GH deficiency is evidently similar in children and adults, and pQCT provides important information in addition to DEXA measurements, as DEXA does not take bone structure into account.

  10. Effects of a 7-day continuous infusion of octreotide on circulating levels of growth factors and binding proteins in growth hormone (GH)-treated GH-deficient patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Laursen, Torben; Møller, Jens; Fisker, Sanne

    1999-01-01

    were studied for 24 h after each of the following treatment regimens (each of 1 weeks duration): (a) daily s.c. GH injection (2 IU/m(2)); (b) as (a) + continuous s.c. infusion of OCT (200 microg/24 h) by means of a portable pump (Nordic Infuser); (c) no treatment. Serum GH binding protein (GHBP) levels......-II, IGFBP-3, and ALS were recorded (Pinsulin levels (pmol/l) were significantly higher after GH alone as compared with no GH (P...' administration of OCT to GH-treated GHD patients slightly attenuated serum IGF-I generation, and tended to decrease levels of the other components of the 150 kDa ternary complex. Whether these effects are mediated directly by OCT or indirectly via the accompanying changes in insulin levels remains...

  11. The role of SOCS2 in recombinant human growth hormone (rhGH) regulating lipid metabolism in high-fat-diet-induced obesity mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Hai Li; Feng, Min; Tan, Xiao; Yan, Guo Yong; Sun, Chao

    2013-03-01

    In addition to regulate body growth and development process, growth hormone (GH) also involved in lipid metabolism, decreasing fat mass and improving lipolysis. To normal mice, GH could reduce their fat content, but events turned uncertain coming to the pattern of feeding high-fat-diet. In order to investigate the role of GH in adipogenesis of mice with high-fat-diet, the high-fat-diet feeding mice were randomly assigned into three groups and treated with recombinant human growth hormone (rhGH) and the somatostatin analogue octreotide respectively. Results demonstrated that both rhGH and octreotide could reduce the body weight but the trends diminished in the end. HDL-C level was increased in octreotide treated groups but the activity of lipase was increased significantly in both two groups. RhGH remarkable increased the expression of SOCS2, FAS (P < 0.01) and SREBP-1c (P < 0.05), decreased the expression of SOCS1, SOCS3 (P < 0.05) and HSL (P < 0.01) in subcutaneous fat mass. In visceral fat tissue, all genes were increased except SOCS2 (P < 0.01), at the same time the visceral fat mass was decreased. The protein phosphorylation of JAK2 and STAT5 which were treated with octreotide were increased in subcutaneous fat, visceral fat and liver (P < 0.01) and were increased significant in visceral fat by rhGH treated (P < 0.01). In liver, only JAK2 protein phosphorylation was raised (P < 0.01). In conclusion, rhGH and octreotide could decrease the whole body mass before 6 days; the trend was weaken in later period with high-fat-diet. RhGH could increase the subcutaneous fat mass and reduce the visceral fat mass, and SOCS2 might be involved in regulation of the mechanism through JAK2/STAT5 signaling pathway.

  12. Impact of the underlying etiology of growth hormone deficiency on serum IGF-I SDS levels during GH treatment in children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Léger, Juliane; Mohamed, Damir; Dos Santos, Sophie; Ben Azoun, Myriam; Zénaty, Delphine; Simon, Dominique; Paulsen, Anne; Martinerie, Laetitia; Chevenne, Didier; Alberti, Corinne; Carel, Jean-Claude; Guilmin-Crepon, Sophie

    2017-09-01

    Regular monitoring of serum IGF-I levels during growth hormone (GH) therapy has been recommended, for assessing treatment compliance and safety. To investigate serum IGF-I SDS levels during GH treatment in children with GH deficiency, and to identify potential determinants of these levels. This observational cohort study included all patients ( n  = 308) with childhood-onset non-acquired or acquired GH deficiency (GHD) included in the database of a single academic pediatric care center over a period of 10 years for whom at least one serum IGF-I SDS determination during GH treatment was available. These determinations had to have been carried out centrally, with the same immunoradiometric assay. Serum IGF-I SDS levels were determined as a function of sex, age and pubertal stage, according to our published normative data. Over a median of 4.0 (2-5.8) years of GH treatment per patient, 995 serum IGF-I SDS determinations were recorded. In addition to BMI SDS, height SDS and GH dose ( P  SDS levels, with patients suffering from acquired GHD having higher serum IGF-I SDS levels than those with non-acquired GHD, whereas sex, age, pubertal stage, treatment duration, hormonal status (isolated GHD (IGHD) vs multiple pituitary hormone deficiency (MPHD)) and initial severity of GHD, had no effect. These original findings have important clinical implications for long-term management and highlight the need for careful and appropriate monitoring of serum IGF-I SDS and GH dose, particularly in patients with acquired GHD, to prevent the unnecessary impact of potential comorbid conditions. © 2017 European Society of Endocrinology.

  13. Pulsatile characteristics of spontaneous growth hormone (GH) concentration profiles in boys evaluated by an ultrasensitive immunoradiometric assay: Evidence for ultradian periodicity of GH secretion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Goji, Katsumi (Kobe Children' s Hospital (Japan))

    1993-03-01

    To investigate underlying ultradian periodicities in spontaneous circulating GH concentrations, blood samples were drawn from 15 normal short boys every 20 min over a 24-h period, and plasma GH concentrations were measured using an ultrasensitive immunoradiometric assay. The limit of detection for the GH assay was 0.01 [mu]g/L. The GH time series were analyzed using the Cluster program, Ultra program, cosinor analysis, and autocorrelation analysis. Plasma GH concentrations in 1,095 samples derived from 15 normal short boys were all within the detectable range of the assay and ranged from 0.07-52.2 [mu]g/L. Thirty-six percent of the GH values in the 1,095 samples from 15 normal short boys were below 1 [mu]g/L, and 82% of them occurred during the diurnal awakening period. Cluster analysis disclosed a total of 176 peaks in 15 normal short boys, with a mean [+-] SEM number of significant GH peaks of 12.1 [+-] 0.5/24 h. Twelve percent of the 176 peaks were below 1 [mu]g/L, and 95% of them occurred during the diurnal awakening period. In addition, Cluster analysis disclosed 161 interpulse intervals in total, with a mean [+-] SEM interval of 116.5 [+-] 4.3 min. The GH interpulse interval did not show a significant 24-h rhythm, whereas the GH peak height increased significantly at night. An independent discrete peak detection in program, Ultra, identified 12.6 [+-] 0.5 GH peaks/24 h. This result was in good agreement with that from analysis by the Cluster program (P = NS). Autocorrelation analysis revealed that GH time series were significantly autocorrelated in 9 of the 15 boys, with maximal autocorrelation coefficients at 115.5 min, on the average. The mean autocorrelation coefficient for a group of 15 normal short boys was significantly positive at a 100-min lag. These findings suggest that there could be a regularly occurring periodicity of approximately 100-120 min in the human GH time series. 18 refs., 4 figs., 1 tab.

  14. Expanding the spectrum of mutations in GH1 and GHRHR: genetic screening in a large cohort of patients with congenital isolated growth hormone deficiency

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Alatzoglou, Kyriaki S; Turton, James P; Kelberman, Daniel

    2009-01-01

    CONTEXT: It is estimated that 3-30% of cases with isolated GH deficiency (IGHD) have a genetic etiology, with a number of mutations being reported in GH1 and GHRHR. The aim of our study was to genetically characterize a cohort of patients with congenital IGHD and analyze their characteristics....... CONCLUSIONS: IGHD patients with severe growth failure and a positive family history should be screened for genetic mutations; the evolving endocrinopathy observed in some of these patients suggests the need for long-term follow-up........ PATIENTS AND METHODS: A total of 224 patients (190 pedigrees) with IGHD and a eutopic posterior pituitary were screened for mutations in GH1 and GHRHR. To explore the possibility of an association of GH1 abnormalities with multiple pituitary hormone deficiencies, we have screened 62 patients with either...

  15. Keragaman Genetik Gen Hormon Pertumbuhan (GH|MboII pada Itik Sikumbang Janti Menggunakan Penciri PCR-RFLP

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T.D. Nova

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Penelitian ini bertujuan untuk mengetahui keragaman gen hormon pertumbuhan (GH dengan enzim MboII pada itik Sikumbang Janti dengan menggunakan penciri PCR-RFLP (polymerase chain reaction-restriction fragment length polymorphism. Penelitian ini menggunakan sebanyak 50 sampel darah itik Sikumbang Janti. Sampel darah itik Sikumbang Janti diambil melalui vena achilaris sebanyak ± 1 ml. DNA sampel darah diisolasi menggunakan protocol Genomik DNA Purification Kit (Promega. DNA total diamplifikasi menggunakan sepasang primer F : 5’-CTG GAG CAG GCA GGA AAA TT-3’ dan R: 5’-TCC AGG GAC AGT GAC TCA AC-3’ yang menghasilkan fragmen exon 1 gen GH dengan panjang 801 bp. Produk amplifikasi direstriksi dengan menggunakan MboII yang mengenali situs pemotongan GAAGA (N/8↓ . Dari 46 sampel hasil restriksi diperoleh dua posisi. Pada posisi 618 bp dengan genotip yaitu genotip heterozigot (+/- yang terdiri dari 3 pita (266 bp, 535 bp dan 801 bp, genotip homozigot (+/+ yang terdiri dari 3 pita (109 bp, 266 bp, 426 bp dan genotip homozigot (-/- yang terdiri dari 1 pita ( 801 dan terdapat dua tipe alel, yaitu alel (+ dan all (-, all (+ sebesar 0,79 dan alel (- sebesar 0,21. Sedangkan pada posisi 727 bp memiliki genotip yaitu genotip heterozigot (+/- yang terdiri dari 3 pita (109 bp, 266 bp, 426 bp, dan genotip homozigot (-/- yang terdiri dari 3 pita dan terdapat dua tipe alel, yaitu frekuensi alel (+ sebesar 0,61 dan frekuensi alel (- sebesar 0,39. Dari hasil penelitian ini dapat disimpulkan bahwa gen GH-MboII memiliki keragamanan yang tinggi serta menunjukkan adanya keseimbangan atau tidak menyimpang dari keseimbangan Hardy Weinberg pada posisi keragaman 618 bp dan pada posisi 727 dalam ketidakseimbangan Hardy Weinberg.

  16. Jointly Amplified Basal and Pulsatile Growth Hormone (GH) Secretion and Increased Process Irregularity in Women with Anorexia Nervosa

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Støving, R K; Veldhuis, J D; Flyvbjerg, A

    1999-01-01

    positively correlated to GH secretion rates. Leptin levels were significantly inversely correlated to the pulsatile, but not the basal, GH secretion rate. The present data demonstrate augmented basal as well as pulsatile GH secretion with disruption of the orderliness of the GH release process in AN....... Accordingly, GH secretion in AN probably reflects altered neuroendocrine feedback regulation, e.g. associated with increased hypothalamic GHRH discharge superimposed on reduced hypothalamic somatostatinergic tone....

  17. GH3 expression and IAA-amide synthetase activity in pea (Pisum sativum L.) seedlings are regulated by light, plant hormones and auxinic herbicides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ostrowski, Maciej; Jakubowska, Anna

    2013-03-01

    The formation of auxin conjugates is one of the important regulatory mechanisms for modulating IAA action. Several auxin-responsive GH3 genes encode IAA-amide synthetases that are involved in the maintenance of hormonal homeostasis by conjugating excess IAA to amino acids. Recently, the data have revealed novel regulatory functions of several GH3 proteins in plant growth, organ development, fruit ripening, light signaling, abiotic stress tolerance and plant defense responses. Indole-3-acetyl-aspartate (IAA-Asp) synthetase catalyzing IAA conjugation to aspartic acid in immature seeds of pea (Pisum sativum L.) was purified and characterized during our previous investigations. In this study, we examined the effect of auxin and other plant hormones (ABA, GA, kinetin, JA, MeJA, SA), different light conditions (red, far-red, blue, white light), and auxinic herbicides (2,4-D, Dicamba, Picloram) on the expression of a putative GH3 gene and IAA-amide synthesizing activity in 10-d-old pea seedlings. Quantitative RT-PCR analysis indicated that the PsGH3-5 gene, weakly expressed in control sample, was visibly induced in response to all plant hormones, different light wavelengths and the auxinic herbicides tested. Protein A immunoprecipitation/gel blot analysis using anti-AtGH3.5 antibodies revealed a similar pattern of changes on the protein levels in response to all treatments. IAA-amide synthetase activity determined with aspartate as a substrate, not detectable in control seedlings, was positively affected by a majority of treatments. Based on these results, we suggest that PsGH3-5 may control the growth and development of pea plants in a way similar to the known GH3 genes from other plant species. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  18. The effects of GH and hormone replacement therapy on serum concentrations of mannan-binding lectin, surfactant protein D and vitamin D binding protein in Turner syndrome

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gravholt, Claus Højbjerg; Leth-Larsen, Rikke; Lauridsen, Anna Lis

    2004-01-01

    function. In the present study we examined whether GH or hormone replacement therapy (HRT) in Turner syndrome (TS) influence the serum concentrations of MBL and two other proteins partaking in the innate immune defence, surfactant protein D (SP-D) and vitamin D binding protein (DBP). DESIGN: Study 1...

  19. Limited usefulness of the test of spontaneous growth hormone (GH nocturnal secretion as a screening procedure in diagnosing GH deficiency in children with short stature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joanna Smyczyńska

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available [b]introduction and objective[/b]. In Poland, the assessment of nocturnal GH secretion has gained the status of screening test; however, this procedure is not included in international recommendations. The aim of the study was to assess the accuracy and predictive value of the test of nocturnal GH secretion as a screening procedure in diagnosing GHD, and to check the adequacy of the cut-off value for GH peak in this test on the level of 10 ng/ml. [b]materials and methods. [/b]The analysis comprised the data of 1,000 children with short stature. In all the patients, GH secretion was assessed in a screening test (after falling asleep and in 2 stimulating tests (reference tests, with simultaneous assessment of IGF-I secretion before stimulating tests. The indices of screening test accuracy, likelihood ratios and predictive values were assessed. The cut-off level of GH peak after falling asleep, ensuring its 95% sensitivity, was calculated in ROC curve analysis. [b]results[/b]. Sensitivity of the screening test was 70.4%, while the specificity – 61.2%, positive likelihood ratio – 1.842, negative likelihood ratio – 0.482, positive predictive value – 0.462, negative predictive value – 0.812. The sensitivity of the test of GH secretion after falling asleep is too low with respect to the requirements for screening test. The ROC curve analysis showed 95% sensitivity for the screening test on the level of 19.0 ng/ml; however, with a very low specificity – below 25%, thus making this test completely useless as a screening procedure. [b]conclusions.[/b] The obtained results strongly contradict the opinion that the assessment of GH secretion after falling asleep should be a screening test in diagnosing GHD in children with short stature.

  20. Long-term skeletal effects of recombinant human growth hormone (rhGH) alone and rhGH combined with alendronate in GH-deficient adults: a seven-year follow-up study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biermasz, Nienke R; Hamdy, Neveen A T; Pereira, Alberto M; Romijn, Johannes A; Roelfsema, Ferdinand

    2004-05-01

    GH-deficient patients respond to recombinant human GH (rhGH) replacement therapy by increasing bone mineral density (BMD) at a rate of about 1% a year for at least 4 years. Predictive factors for a beneficial effect on bone are a low bone mass at baseline and gender. Whether the beneficial skeletal effects of GH are sustained in the long term remains to be established. It is also not known whether osteoporotic GH-deficient patients may require additional antiresorptive drugs and whether this treatment would be effective concomitantly with GH replacement. We performed a long-term, controlled study in 30 GH-deficient adults: 15 with osteoporosis and 15 control subjects with low bone mass. All patients were treated with rhGH for at least 4 years; thereafter, 3 years of additional alendronate treatment was given to patients with osteoporosis, while controls continued on GH therapy alone. The GH dose was individualized to maintain an IGF-I within the normal reference range for the duration of the study, and was equal between genders. At the end of 4 years of rhGH replacement therapy, a significant increase in mean lumbar spine BMD was observed in both the osteoporosis group (3.6%) and the control group (7.0%), with no significant difference between groups. Males had a larger increase in BMD than females (P = 0.032). After 4 or 5 years of GH treatment patients with persisting osteoporosis received additional alendronate (10 mg/day) for 3 years. Lumbar spine BMD increased by 8.7% after 3 years (P = 0.001) vs 1.5% (P = NS) in the control group continuing on rhGH replacement alone. The alendronate effect was gender independent (P = 0.59). Mean bone area of the lumbar spine did not change in both groups for the duration of the study. Femoral neck BMD increased significantly in the osteoporosis group (3.5%) and was unchanged in the control group. Five osteoporotic GH-deficient patients had a total of 12 vertebral fractures before start of alendronate. Only one of these

  1. Gene expression of a truncated and the full-length growth hormone (GH) receptor in subcutaneous fat and skeletal muscle in GH-deficient adults

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fisker, Sidse; Kristensen, K; Rosenfalck, A M

    2001-01-01

    the relationship of circulating GHBP and body composition to GHR and GHRtr gene expression. Eleven adult GH-deficient patients were studied before and after 4 months of GH substitution therapy. Abdominal fat obtained by liposuction and femoral muscle biopsies were taken at baseline and after 4 months. Gene...... expression of GHR and GHRtr in adipose tissue and skeletal muscle was determined and expressed relative to the expression of beta-actin. Gene expression of GHR in abdominal sc adipose tissue was not altered, whereas the expression of GHRtr increased significantly. In skeletal muscle inverse changes were seen...

  2. Histamine-induced paradoxical GH response to TRH/GnRH in men and women: dependence on gonadal steroid hormones

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Knigge, U; Thuesen, B; Dejgaard, A

    1990-01-01

    A stimulatory GH response to TRH and GnRH occurs frequently in patients with various pathological conditions, but is absent in normal subjects. We have previously shown that histamine induced a paradoxical GH response to TRH in normal men. Since gonadal steroids influence GH secretion, we...

  3. Impact of environmental chemicals on the thyroid hormone function in pituitary rat GH3 cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ghisari, Mandana; Bonefeld-Jørgensen, Eva

    2005-01-01

    Endocrine disrupting chemicals (EDCs) are widespread in the environment and suspected to interfere with the function of thyroid hormones (THs). We investigated the TH disrupting activity of different classes of EDCs including plasticizers (bisphenol A, bisphenol A dimethacrylate), alkylphenols (4-n...

  4. The effect of growth hormone (GH) and insulin-like growth factor-I (IGF-I) on in vitro maturation of equine oocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pereira, Gabriel Ribas; Lorenzo, Pedro Luis; Carneiro, Gustavo Ferrer; Ball, Barry Allen; Gonçalves, Paulo Bayard Dias; Pegoraro, Lígia Maria Cantarelli; Bilodeau-Goeseels, Sylvie; Kastelic, John P; Casey, Patrick J; Liu, Irwin K M

    2012-11-01

    The objective of this study was to test the hypothesis that equine growth hormone (eGH), in combination with insulin growth factor-I (IGF-I), influences positively in vitro nuclear and cytoplasmic maturation of equine oocytes. Cumulus-oocyte complexes were recovered from follicles that were Lens culinaris agglutinin-fluorescein complex (FITC-LCA) to assess cortical granule migration by confocal microscopy. The proportion of immature oocytes that developed to the metaphase II (MII) stage in the eGH + IGF-I group (15 of 45) was greater than in the groups that were treated only with IGF-I (7 of 36, p = 0.03). Oocytes that reached MII in the control group (20 of 56; 35.7%) showed a tendency to be different when compared with eGH + IGF-I group (15 of 45; 33.3%, p = 0.08). The treated group that contained anti-IGF-I (15 of 33; 45.4%) decreased the number of oocytes reaching any stage of development when compared with eGH (47 of 72; 65.3%) and eGH + IGF-I (33 of 45; 73.3%) groups (p = 0.05) when data from MI and MII were combined. We concluded that the addition of eGH to in vitro maturation (IVM) medium influenced the in vitro nuclear and cytoplasmic maturation of equine oocytes. The use of GH and IGF-I in vitro may represent a potential alternative for IVM of equine oocytes.

  5. Metabolic consequences of 5-year growth hormone (GH) therapy in children treated with GH for idiopathic short stature. Genentech Collaborative Study Group.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saenger, P; Attie, K M; DiMartino-Nardi, J; Hintz, R; Frahm, L; Frane, J W

    1998-09-01

    In a multicenter study the metabolic effects of 5 yr of GH therapy in children with idiopathic short stature were evaluated. Patients received 0.3 mg/kg.week recombinant human GH. Of the 121 patients who entered the study, data for 62 were analyzed at the final 5 yr point. Routine laboratory determinations were available for all 62 subjects at the 5 yr point. Special laboratory determinations, such as postprandial glucose and insulin, were available for only a subset of patients. Mean insulin-like growth factor I levels rose to 283 +/- 101 micrograms/L, within the normal range using age-appropriate reference standards. T4, cholesterol, triglycerides, blood chemistries, and blood pressure showed no significant changes during the 5-yr period. Mean baseline and 2-h postprandial glucose levels remained unchanged. Both fasting and postprandial insulin levels rose substantively from low normal levels to the normal range (median, 4.9-43 mU/L). Mean hemoglobin A1c levels remained within the normal range throughout the study. In summary, careful monitoring has not revealed any currently discernible metabolic side-effects of clinical significance after GH therapy in this 5-yr study of children with idiopathic short stature.

  6. The role of the growth hormone (GH) receptor and JAK1 and JAK2 kinases in the activation of Stats 1, 3, and 5 by GH

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Smit, L S; Meyer, D J; Billestrup, Nils

    1996-01-01

    of JAK2 to a substantially greater extent than, and JAK1 to a similar extent as, leukemia inhibitory factor (LIF) and/or interferon gamma (IFN gamma), ligands whose receptors contains Stat3- and Stat1-binding sites and activate Stat3 and Stat1, respectively, better than GH. These findings suggest that: 1...... tyrosyl phosphorylation of JAK1 in addition to JAK2 with JAK2 having a much greater response; 5) some Stat3 and Stat5 (and possibly Stat1) may bind to nonphosphorylated amino acids in GHR or to phosphorylated tyrosines in proteins that bind to GHR (e.g. JAK22) to be maximally activated; and 6) if JAK2......, which contains Stat3-binding motifs, does serve as a docking site for some Stat proteins, Stat-JAK2 binding is likely to be more important for GH than LIF or IFN gamma in 3T3-F442A cells since GH induces 15 times more tyrosyl-phosphorylated JAK2 than LIF or IFN gamma....

  7. A brief review of the use and utility of growth hormone stimulation testing in the NCGS: do we need to do provocative GH testing?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, Darrell M; Frane, James

    2005-07-01

    True growth hormone deficiency (GHD) in childhood, while rare, has major clinical consequences. GHD is often associated with other pituitary hormone deficiencies, so these children may require multiple hormonal replacement and close clinical follow-up to optimize their outcome. Growth hormone stimulation testing (GHST), as currently conducted, is not a reliable diagnostic tool. Both changes in growth hormone assay methodologies and increases in the diagnostic threshold contribute to the incorrect labeling of a substantial proportion of normal children as having idiopathic GHD. Fortunately, newer imaging technologies and laboratory tests form a more rational basis to diagnose true GHD. The use of GHST among GH-naive subjects (<20 years of age) enrolled in the National Cooperative Growth Study has declined over the past two decades, from a high of 89% between 1987 and 1989 to only 52% in 2002. Given that GH stimulation testing does not meaningfully aid in distinguishing those few children with true growth hormone deficiency from the much more common short normal child and that alternatives are now available, it is time to discontinue the routine use of GHST in children.

  8. Growth and Growth hormone - Insulin Like Growth Factor -I (GH-IGF-I) Axis in Chronic Anemias.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soliman, Ashraf T; De Sanctis, Vincenzo; Yassin, Mohamed; Adel, Ashraf

    2017-04-28

    Anaemia is a global public health problem affecting both developing and developed countries with major consequences for human health as well as social and economic development. It occurs at all stages of the life cycle, but is more prevalent in pregnant women and young children. Iron deficiency anaemia (IDA) was considered to be among the most important contributing factors to the global burden of disease. Prolonged and/or chronic anemia has a negative effect on linear growth especially during the rapid phases (infancy and puberty). Additionally infants with chronic IDA have delayed cognitive, motor, and affective development that may be long-lasting. In view of the significant impact of chronic anemias on growth, pediatricians endocrinologists and hematologists should advocate primary prevention and screening for growth disturbance in these forms of anemias. The extent of the negative effect of different forms of chronic anemias on linear growth and its possible reversibilty is addressed in this review. The possible mechanisms that may impair growth in the different forms of anemias are addressed with special attention to their effect on the growth hormone (GH) - insulin like growth factor -I (IGF-I).

  9. Chronic alcohol consumption, type 2 diabetes mellitus, insulin-like growth factor-I (IGF-I), and growth hormone (GH) in ethanol-treated diabetic rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Soo-Jeong; Ju, Anes; Lim, Seul-Gi; Kim, Dai-Jin

    2013-11-13

    Alcohol has deleterious influences on glucose metabolism which may contribute to the development of type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM). Insulin-like growth factor I (IGF-I) and growth hormone (GH), which interact with insulin to modulate metabolic control, have been shown to be related to impaired glucose tolerance. This study was conducted to assess the possibility that altered circulating IGF-I and GH levels contribute to the exacerbation of T2DM by alcohol use in type 2 diabetic Otsuka Long-Evans Tokushima Fatty (OLETF) rats and non-diabetic Long-Evans Tokushima Otsuka (LETO) rats. OLETF rats were pair-fed a Lieber-DeCarli Regular Ethanol diet and LETO rats were pair-fed a control diet for 6 weeks. At 6 weeks, an Intraperitoneal Glucose Tolerance Test (IP-GTT) was performed and IGF-I and GH levels were evaluated. Prior to an IP-GTT, OLETF-Ethanol (O-E) group had significantly a decrease in the mean glucose levels compared to OLETF-Control (O-C) group. At 120 min post IP-GTT, the O-E group had significantly an increase in the mean glucose levels compared to O-C group. The serum IGF-I levels were significantly lower and the serum GH levels were significantly higher in the O-E group than in L-C group. These results suggest that IGF-I and GH are prominent in defining the risk and development of T2DM, and may be adversely affected by heavy alcohol use, possibly mediating its diabetogenic effects. Thus, the overall glucose intolerance in the setting of alcoholism may be attributable to inappropriate alteration of IGF-I and GH levels. © 2013. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Reversible albumin-binding GH possesses a potential once-weekly treatment profile in adult growth hormone deficiency

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, Michael Højby; Janukonyté, Jurgita; Klose, Marianne

    2016-01-01

    CONTEXT: NNC0195-0092 is a reversible, albumin-binding GH derivative, developed for once-weekly administration. OBJECTIVES: The objective of the study was to evaluate safety, local tolerability, pharmacodynamics, and pharmacokinetics of multiple, once-weekly doses of NNC0195-0092, compared...... with daily GH. DESIGN AND SETTING: This was a phase 1, randomized, open-label, active-controlled, multiple-dose, dose-escalation trial. PATIENTS: Thirty-four GH-treated adult subjects (male, n = 25) with GH deficiency participated in the study. INTERVENTIONS AND MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: Subjects were...... for the active control group. CONCLUSION: Four once-weekly doses of NNC0195-0092 (dose range 0.02-0.12 mg/kg) administered to adult patients with GH deficiency were well tolerated, and IGF-1 profiles were consistent with a once-weekly treatment profile. No clinically significant safety and tolerability signals...

  11. Up-regulation of hepatic receptor for growth hormone in the flounder ( Paralichthys olivaceus) after oral administration with exogenous GH

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Zong-Zhu; Wang, Jin-Bao; Xu, Yong-Li; Wang, Yong; Zhang, Pei-Jun

    2001-06-01

    The iodination efficiency of salmon GH(sGH) was 38.82%, using a modification of the chloramine-T method. The specific activity of the125I-sGH was about 40 μCi/μg protein. The results of binding assay showed a single class of high affinity and low-capacity binding site in flounder liver. Long-term administration with exogenous GH can induce the up-regulation of hepatic GH receptor in total binding capacity though there was no significant difference in capacity of free binding sites of livers from control and experimental fish, this result also indicated that the liver from experimental fish, compared to that from control fish, had more occupied binding sites.

  12. Growth hormone-like factor produced by the tapeworm, Spirometra mansonoides, displaces human growth hormone (hGH) from its receptors on cultured human lymphocytes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Watts, D.J.; Phares, C.K.

    1986-03-01

    An analogue of hGH isolated from plerocercoids of the tapeworm Spirometra mansonoides displaces (/sup 125/I)hGH from its receptors in rabbit, rat, and hamster liver membranes. Biologically, plerocercoid growth factor (PGF) is more similar to hGH than to other mammalian GH's but has not been shown to bond human cells. Receptors specific for hGH have been described on cultured human lymphocytes (IM-9). In this study, the authors compared the binding of PGF and hGH in IM-9 cells and in rabbit hepatic membranes. IM-9 lymphocytes (12 x 10/sup 6/ cells/tube) were incubated with (/sup 125/I)hGH and increasing concentrations of hGH (ng/ml) or PGF (serial dilutions) for 90 min at 30/sup 0/ C. Specific binding (B/sub 0/ - NSB) was determined for each dose of hGH or PGF and the binding curves were analyzed by logit-log regression. The results show that PGF displaced (/sup 125/I)hGH from human cells in a dose dependent manner (r = 0.98). Based on the IM-9 assay, 1 ml of the PGF had an activity equivalent to 625 ng of the hGH standard (ngE). However, the binding activity of the PGF in the rabbit liver RRA was 1653 ngE/ml, indicating that the binding potency of PGF in IM-9 cells was only 38% of that in the rabbit liver. These results clearly demonstrate that PGF binds hGH receptors in cells of human origin, suggesting that PGF will be effective in humans.

  13. Manipulation of the Growth Hormone-Insulin-Like Growth Factor (GH-IGF) Axis: A Treatment Strategy to Reverse the Effects of Early Life Developmental Programming.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reynolds, Clare M; Perry, Jo K; Vickers, Mark H

    2017-08-08

    Evidence from human clinical, epidemiological, and experimental animal models has clearly highlighted a link between the early life environment and an increased risk for a range of cardiometabolic disorders in later life. In particular, altered maternal nutrition, including both undernutrition and overnutrition, spanning exposure windows that cover the period from preconception through to early infancy, clearly highlight an increased risk for a range of disorders in offspring in later life. This process, preferentially termed "developmental programming" as part of the developmental origins of health and disease (DOHaD) framework, leads to phenotypic outcomes in offspring that closely resemble those of individuals with untreated growth hormone (GH) deficiency, including increased adiposity and cardiovascular disorders. As such, the use of GH as a potential intervention strategy to mitigate the effects of developmental malprogramming has received some attention in the DOHaD field. In particular, experimental animal models have shown that early GH treatment in the setting of poor maternal nutrition can partially rescue the programmed phenotype, albeit in a sex-specific manner. Although the mechanisms remain poorly defined, they include changes to endothelial function, an altered inflammasome, changes in adipogenesis and cardiovascular function, neuroendocrine effects, and changes in the epigenetic regulation of gene expression. Similarly, GH treatment to adult offspring, where an adverse metabolic phenotype is already manifest, has shown efficacy in reversing some of the metabolic disorders arising from a poor early life environment. Components of the GH-insulin-like growth factor (IGF)-IGF binding protein (GH-IGF-IGFBP) system, including insulin-like growth factor 1 (IGF-1), have also shown promise in ameliorating programmed metabolic disorders, potentially acting via epigenetic processes including changes in miRNA profiles and altered DNA methylation. However, as

  14. Adult height in short children born SGA treated with growth hormone and gonadotropin releasing hormone analog: results of a randomized, dose-response GH trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lem, Annemieke J; van der Kaay, Danielle C M; de Ridder, Maria A J; Bakker-van Waarde, Willie M; van der Hulst, Flip J P C M; Mulder, Jaap C; Noordam, Cees; Odink, Roel J; Oostdijk, Wilma; Schroor, Eelco J; Sulkers, Eric J; Westerlaken, Ciska; Hokken-Koelega, Anita C S

    2012-11-01

    GH treatment is effective in improving height in short children born small for gestational age (SGA). GH is thought to have limited effect when started during adolescence. The aim of this study was to investigate GH treatment efficacy in short SGA children when treatment was started during adolescence; to assess whether GH 2 mg/m(2) · d during puberty improves adult height (AH) compared with 1 mg/m(2) · d; and to assess whether an additional 2-yr postponement of puberty by GnRH analog (GnRHa) improves AH in children who are short at the start of puberty (SGA children (60 boys) at least 8 yr of age. We performed intention-to-treat analyses on all children and uncensored case analyses on 84 children who reached AH. Besides, we evaluated growth during 2 yr of combined GH/GnRHa and subsequent GH treatment until AH in a subgroup of 40 pubertal children with a height of less than 140 cm at the start. Short SGA children started treatment at a median age of 11.2 yr, when 46% had already started puberty. Median height increased from -2.9 at start to -1.7 sd score (SDS) at AH (P SGA children, particularly with GH 2 mg/m(2) · d during puberty. When SGA children are short at the start of puberty, they can benefit from combined GH/GnRHa treatment.

  15. Ghrelin drives GH secretion during fasting in man

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    A.F. Muller (Alex); S.W.J. Lamberts (Steven); L.J. Hofland (Leo); M. Bidlingmaier (Martin); C.J. Strasburger; E. Ghigo (Ezio); A-J. van der Lely (Aart-Jan); J.A.M.J.L. Janssen (Joseph); P.M. van Koetsveld (Peter)

    2002-01-01

    textabstractOBJECTIVES: In humans, fasting leads to elevated serum GH concentrations. Traditionally, changes in hypothalamic GH-releasing hormone and somatostatin release are considered as the main mechanisms that induce this elevated GH secretion during fasting. Ghrelin is an

  16. The interaction of lithium with thyrotropin-releasing hormone-stimulated lipid metabolism in GH3 pituitary tumour cells. Enhancement of stimulated 1,2-diacylglycerol formation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drummond, A H; Raeburn, C A

    1984-11-15

    Treatment of GH3 cells with thyrotropin-releasing hormone (TRH) for periods up to 60 min resulted in a prolonged reduction in the cellular content of phosphatidylinositol (PtdIns) with no lasting change in the levels of the other inositol-containing phospholipids. Accompanying this was a maintained increase in the GH3 cell 1,2-diacylglycerol content and a slower decline in the level of cellular triacylglycerol. When the cells were suspended in lithium-containing balanced salt solution for 30 min (in the absence of exogenous myo-inositol), there was a 15% decrease in GH3 cell inositol levels. This was associated with a small, but significant, increase in the cellular content of phosphatidylinositol 4,5-bisphosphate (PtdIns4,5P2) and 1,2-diacylglycerol. Addition of TRH to cells suspended in lithium-containing medium depleted cellular inositol levels by around 65% within 30 min. By this time, there was also a 50% reduction in the cellular content of PtdIns and a 20% reduction in phosphatidylinositol 4-phosphate (PtdIns4P). Control levels of PtdIns4,5P2 were maintained in the combined presence of TRH and lithium. Under those conditions, TRH no longer depleted cellular triacylglycerol and there was a marked increase in the ability of TRH to elevate the GH3 cell content of 1,2-diacylglycerol. The effect of TRH on the cellular content of phosphatidic acid was not altered by the presence of lithium. The results show, firstly, that when PtdIns resynthesis is inhibited by lithium-induced inositol depletion, its glycerol backbone accumulates, at least in part, in 1,2-diacylglycerol and, secondly, that GH3 cells preserve their cellular levels of PtdIns4,5P2 in the face of a considerable reduction in the cellular content of PtdIns.

  17. A phase 2 trial of long-acting TransCon growth hormone in adult GH deficiency

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Höybye, Charlotte; Pfeiffer, Andreas F H; Ferone, Diego

    2017-01-01

    TransCon growth hormone is a sustained release human growth hormone prodrug in development in which unmodified growth hormone is transiently linked to a carrier molecule. It is intended as an alternative to daily growth hormone in the treatment of growth hormone deficiency. This was a multi-cente...

  18. Effects of two oral contraceptives on plasma levels of insulin-like growth factor I (IGF-I) and growth hormone (hGH).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balogh, A; Kauf, E; Vollanth, R; Gräser, G; Klinger, G; Oettel, M

    2000-11-01

    In 18 healthy women, the effect of two oral contraceptives (OCs) on insulin-like growth factor (IGF-I) and its binding protein-3 (IGFBP-3) and growth hormone (hGH) plasma level were studied before and after intake of either of two OC formulations over 21 days, one containing 2 mg dienogest and 0.03 mg ethinylestradiol (group A) and the other 0.125 mg levonorgestrel and 0.03 mg ethinylestradiol (group B). There was a reduction of the mean IGF-I concentration of 30% (p = 0.008) in the women receiving dienogest-containing pills and 12% (p = 0.006) in women taking the levonogestrel-containing preparation. This difference between drug groups was statistically significant (p = 0.002). A correlation between the control values and the basal-treatment difference (r = 0.945; p = 0.000) was observed only in women of group A. Between basal and treatment cycles the mean plasma levels of hGH remained unchanged in both groups tested, but the 23.5-h integrated mean hGH plasma concentrations (AUC(0-23.5h)) were significantly elevated by 36% (p = 0.016) in comparison to basal values before treatment only in women receiving the levonorgestrel-containing pills. Also, in the women who received the dienogest-containing preparation, the changes of integrated mean plasma level were inversely associated with the control values (r = -0.723; p = 0.025). Neither in group A nor in group B was the mean plasma level of IGFB-3 changed. the results of the present analysis indicate that hormonal contraceptives can modulate the GH and IGF-I-axis in the reproductive age. Probably the androgenic progestogen levonorgestrel (0.125 mg/day) opposes the estrogen-induced action. In the women who took the dienogest-containing formulations (anti-androgenic progestogen-group A), the extent of individual changes (hGh and IGF-I) depends on the basal level prior to pill intake. Further studies, especially of long-term intake of OCs, are necessary to confirm these results and to assess the practical relevance for

  19. Reversible Albumin-Binding GH Possesses a Potential Once-Weekly Treatment Profile in Adult Growth Hormone Deficiency

    Science.gov (United States)

    Janukonyté, Jurgita; Klose, Marianne; Marina, Djordje; Tanvig, Mette; Nielsen, Lene F.; Höybye, Charlotte; Andersen, Marianne; Feldt-Rasmussen, Ulla; Christiansen, Jens Sandahl

    2016-01-01

    Context: NNC0195-0092 is a reversible, albumin-binding GH derivative, developed for once-weekly administration. Objectives: The objective of the study was to evaluate safety, local tolerability, pharmacodynamics, and pharmacokinetics of multiple, once-weekly doses of NNC0195-0092, compared with daily GH. Design and Setting: This was a phase 1, randomized, open-label, active-controlled, multiple-dose, dose-escalation trial. Patients: Thirty-four GH-treated adult subjects (male, n = 25) with GH deficiency participated in the study. Interventions and Main Outcome Measures: Subjects were sequentially assigned into four cohorts of eight subjects, randomized within each cohort (3:1) to once-weekly NNC0195-0092 (n = 6) for 4 weeks (0.02, 0.04, 0.08, and 0.12 mg/kg) or daily injections of Norditropin NordiFlex (n = 2) for 4 weeks with a dose replicating the pretrial dose of somatropin. A safety assessment was performed prior to initiating treatment at the next dose level of NNC0195-0092. Daily GH treatment was discontinued 14 days before the trial start. Blood samples were drawn for assessment of safety, pharmacokinetics, pharmacodynamics (IGF-1 and IGF-binding protein-3) profiles, and immunogenicity studies. Results: Numbers of adverse events were similar at the dose levels of 0.02, 0.04, and 0.08 mg/kg NNC0195-0092 vs daily injections of Norditropin NordiFlex, whereas the number of adverse events was greater at the highest dose level of NNC0195-0092 (0.12 mg/kg). NNC0195-0092 (area under the curve[0–168h]) and peak plasma concentration) increased in a dose-dependent manner, and a dose-dependent increase in IGF-1 levels was observed. IGF-1 profiles were elevated for at least 1 week, and for the 0.02-mg/kg and 0.04-mg/kg NNC0195-0092 doses, the observed IGF-1 levels were similar to the levels for the active control group. Conclusion: Four once-weekly doses of NNC0195-0092 (dose range 0.02–0.12 mg/kg) administered to adult patients with GH deficiency were well tolerated

  20. Homologous and heterologous in vitro regulation of pituitary receptors for somatostatin, growth hormone (GH)-releasing hormone, and ghrelin in a nonhuman primate (Papio anubis).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Córdoba-Chacón, Jose; Gahete, Manuel D; Castaño, Justo P; Kineman, Rhonda D; Luque, Raul M

    2012-01-01

    Secretion of GH by pituitary somatotrophs is primarily stimulated by GHRH and ghrelin and inhibited by somatostatin through the activation of specific receptors [GHRH receptor (GHRH-R), GH secretagogue receptor (GHS-R) and somatostatin receptors (sst1-5), respectively]. However, we have shown that somatostatin, at low doses, can also stimulate GH release, directly and specifically, in primary pituitary cultures from a nonhuman primate (baboons, Papio anubis) and pigs. To determine whether somatostatin, GHRH, and ghrelin can also regulate the expression of their receptors in primates, pituitary cultures from baboons were treated for 4 h with GHRH or ghrelin (10(-8) m) or with high (10(-7) m) and low (10(-15) m) doses of somatostatin, and GH release and expression levels of all receptors were measured. GHRH/ghrelin decreased the expression of their respective receptors (GHRH-R and GHS-R). Both peptides increased sst1, only GHRH decreased sst5 expression, whereas sst2 expression remained unchanged. The effects of GHRH/ghrelin were completely mimicked by forskolin (adenylate cyclase activator) and phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate (protein kinase C activator), respectively, indicating the regulation of receptor subtype levels by GHRH and ghrelin involved distinct signaling pathways. In contrast, high-dose somatostatin did not alter GH release but increased sst1, sst2, and sst5 expression, whereas GHRH-R and GHS-R expression were unaffected. Interestingly, low-dose somatostatin increased GH release and sst1 mRNA but decreased sst5 and GHRH-R expression, similar to that observed for GHRH. Altogether, our data show for the first time in a primate model that the primary regulators of somatotroph function (GHRH/ghrelin/somatostatin) exert both homologous and heterologous regulation of receptor synthesis which is dose and subtype dependent and involves distinct signaling pathways.

  1. A longitudinal study of intrauterine growth and the placental growth hormone (GH)-insulin-like growth factor I axis in maternal circulation: association between placental GH and fetal growth

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chellakooty, Marla; Vangsgaard, K; Larsen, T

    2004-01-01

    The aim of the study was 1) to evaluate the association of maternal serum levels of placental GH and IGF-I with fetal growth, and 2) to establish reference data for placental GH, IGF-I, and IGF-binding protein-3 (IGFBP-3) in normal pregnancies based on longitudinal measurements. A prospective lon....... We found a significant association between placental GH and fetal growth. In addition, we found a highly significant association between the increase in placental GH and the increase in IGF-I. The gestational age at peak placental GH levels was associated with pregnancy length....

  2. The GH/IGF axis in the mouse kidney

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    V. Cingel-Ristic

    2004-01-01

    textabstractGrowth hormone (GH) is a protein hormone synthesized and secreted by somatotroph cells within the anterior pituitary predominantly under regulation of hypothalamic peptides, GH releasing hormone (GHRH) and somatostatin (SS) (1-3) (Figure 1). Further, production of GH is modulated by

  3. Gh Jeelani

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Journal of Earth System Science. Gh Jeelani. Articles written in Journal of Earth System Science. Volume 120 Issue 3 June 2011 pp 399-411. Assessing variability of water quality in a groundwater-fed perennial lake of Kashmir Himalayas using linear geostatics · S Sarah Gh Jeelani Shakeel Ahmed.

  4. Long-term effects of continuous subcutaneous infusion versus daily subcutaneous injections of growth hormone (GH) on the insulin-like growth factor system, insulin sensitivity, body composition, and bone and lipoprotein metabolism in GH-deficient adults

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Laursen, Torben; Gravholt, Claus Højbjerg; Heickendorff, Lene

    2001-01-01

    injections (inj) in the evening as usual, and 7 received a continuous infusion (inf) of GH by means of a portable pump. The GH dose was kept unchanged before and during the study. Serum levels of insulin-like growth factor I (IGF-I) tended to increase in the patients switched to constant infusion (from 175...... not influence insulin sensitivity (P = 0.71) or glucose effectiveness (P = 0.15) derived from Bergman's minimal model. Similarly, the two treatment regimens had no differential impact on lipoprotein levels, bone metabolism, or body composition. In conclusion, continuous and intermittent administrations of GH...... for 6 months are comparable with respect to the IGF-IGFBP axis, whereas intermittent exposure may be of importance for the lipolytic effect of GH. The data on insulin sensitivity and lipoproteins suggest that constant GH exposure is as safe as intermittent GH administration....

  5. Use of recombinant human growth hormone (rhGH) in pubertal patients with CRI/dialysis/post-transplant: Dutch data. Dutch Study Group on Growth in Children with Chronic Renal Disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hokken-Koelega, A. C.; de Jong, R. C.; Donckerwolcke, R. A.; Groothoff, J. W.; Wolff, E. D.

    1996-01-01

    In the intermediate term, recombinant human growth hormone (rhGH) therapy in a dose of 28-30 i.u./m2/week accelerates growth significantly in most pubertal patients with growth retardation secondary to chronic renal insufficiency (CRI), dialysis and after renal transplantation (RTx), without

  6. Adult height after long-term, continuous growth hormone (GH) treatment in short children born small for gestational age: results of a randomized, double-blind, dose-response GH trial

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Y. van Pareren; M. Houdijk; M. Jansen (Maarten); M. Reeser; P.G.H. Mulder (Paul); A.C.S. Hokken-Koelega (Anita)

    2003-01-01

    textabstractThe GH dose-response effect of long-term continuous GH treatment on adult height (AH) was evaluated in 54 short children born small for gestational age (SGA) who were participating in a randomized, double-blind, dose-response trial. Patients were randomly and blindly

  7. Children and young adults born small for gestational age (SGA) : GH-IGF-IGFBP axis, insulin sensitivity, adipocytokines and body composition during and after growth hormone treatment

    OpenAIRE

    Dijk, Marije

    2007-01-01

    textabstractThis doctoral thesis gives a detailed account of various studies, performed in short children born small for gestational age (SGA) participating in the third Dutch GH trial (IUGR-3 study), and in young SGA adults previously treated with GH in the first Dutch GH trial (SGA follow-up study). This chapter describes defi nitions of SGA, prevalence and etiology of SGA, and clinical and endocrinological aspects associated with SGA. Also the effects of GH treatment in short SGA subjects ...

  8. Children and young adults born small for gestational age (SGA) : GH-IGF-IGFBP axis, insulin sensitivity, adipocytokines and body composition during and after growth hormone treatment

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    M. van Dijk (Marije)

    2007-01-01

    textabstractThis doctoral thesis gives a detailed account of various studies, performed in short children born small for gestational age (SGA) participating in the third Dutch GH trial (IUGR-3 study), and in young SGA adults previously treated with GH in the first Dutch GH trial (SGA follow-up

  9. A longitudinal study of intrauterine growth and the placental growth hormone (GH)-insulin-like growth factor I axis in maternal circulation: association between placental GH and fetal growth

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chellakooty, Marla; Vangsgaard, K; Larsen, T

    2004-01-01

    above -2 SD. Placental GH levels were detectable in all samples from as early as 5 wk gestation and increased significantly throughout pregnancy to approximately 37 wk when peak levels of 22 ng/ml (range, 4.64-69.22 ng/ml) were reached. Subsequently, placental GH levels decreased until birth. The change...... in placental GH during 24.5-37.5 wk gestation was positively associated with fetal growth rate (P = 0.027) and birth weight (P = 0.027). Gestational age at peak placental GH values (P = 0.007) was associated with pregnancy length. A positive association between the change in placental GH and the change in IGF......The aim of the study was 1) to evaluate the association of maternal serum levels of placental GH and IGF-I with fetal growth, and 2) to establish reference data for placental GH, IGF-I, and IGF-binding protein-3 (IGFBP-3) in normal pregnancies based on longitudinal measurements. A prospective...

  10. Growth hormone (GH) provocative retesting of 108 young adults with childhood-onset GH deficiency and the diagnostic value of insulin-like growth factor I (IGF-I) and IGF-binding protein-3

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Juul, A; Kastrup, K W; Pedersen, S A

    1997-01-01

    SD in 60 of 79 GHD patients and above -2 SD in 21 of 29 patients with a normal GH response. IGFBP-3 levels were below -2 SD in 54 of 79 GHD patients and above -2 SD in 23 of 29 patients with a normal GH response. Multiple linear regression analysis demonstrated that IGF-I and IGFBP-3 were.......e. 45% of patients treated with GH during childhood because of isolated GHD had a normal GH response when retested in adulthood. Multiple regression analysis revealed that peak GH levels were dependent on the degree of hypopituitarism, body mass index, and duration of disease. IGF-I levels were below -2...... controversy still exists. In adults, the diagnostic value of IGF-I and IGFBP-3 suspected of GHD has been reported in only a few studies. We performed a GH provocative test, using oral clonidine, in 108 patients who had previously been treated with GH during childhood (73 men and 35 women). Basal IGF...

  11. Photoperiod-dependent regulation of gonadotropin-releasing hormone 1 messenger ribonucleic acid levels in the songbird brain

    OpenAIRE

    Stevenson, Authors: Tyler J; Bernard, Daniel J; McCarthy, Margaret M; Ball, Gregory F

    2013-01-01

    Annual changes in day length induce marked changes in reproductive function in temperate zone vertebrates. In many avian species, in contrast to other seasonally breeding animals, plasticity in hypothalamic gonadotropin-releasing hormone – 1 (GnRH1) expression rather than (or in addition to) release governs changes in pituitary-gonadal activity. Investigations of the cellular and molecular mechanisms that govern GnRH1 plasticity were previously hindered by a collective inability of scientists...

  12. Growth Hormone Deficiency in Children

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... c m y one in Children What is growth hormone deficiency? Growth hormone deficiency (GHD) is a rare condition in which the body does not make enough growth hormone (GH). GH is made by the pituitary gland, ...

  13. Evaluation of cognitive performance by using P300 auditory event related potentials (ERPs) in patients with growth hormone (GH) deficiency and acromegaly.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanriverdi, F; Yapislar, H; Karaca, Z; Unluhizarci, K; Suer, C; Kelestimur, F

    2009-02-01

    Impaired cognitive performance has been demonstrated in adults with GH deficiency and acromegaly by using different neuropsychological tests. P300 event related potential (ERP) application is a well established neurophysiological approach in the assessment of cognitive performance. Evaluation of cognitive performance by using P300 ERPs has not been reported in acromegaly, and the comparisons of the P300 ERPs between the patients with GH deficiency and GH excess have not been done yet. Therefore present study was designed to investigate the effects of GH deficiency and GH excess on cognitive performance by using P300 ERPs. The study comprised 19 patients with severe GH deficiency, 18 acromegalic patients and 16 age, education and sex matched healthy controls. Baseline auditory ERPs were obtained at Fz (frontal), Cz (central), Pz (parietal) and Oz (occipital) electrode sites in GH deficient group, GH excess group and control group. There was a significant difference between mean serum IGF-I levels in the GH deficient and acromegalic patients (48+/-38 ng/ml and 742+/-272 ng/ml, respectively) (P=0.01). The mean P300 latency of the patients with GH deficiency was significantly (P=0.0001) prolonged when compared with that of normal controls and acromegalic patients at all electrode sites. The mean P300 amplitude of the patients with acromegaly was significantly (P=0.005) lower when compared with that of normal controls and GH deficient patients at all electrode sites. Using ERPs recordings, the present study indicates the prolongation of P300 latencies in patients with severe GH deficiency and reduction of P300 amplitudes in patients with acromegaly. This study provides the electrophysiological evidence for the presence of cognitive dysfunction in both GH deficiency and GH excess, and different components of the cognitive performance are impaired in these conditions.

  14. Growth hormone (GH) provocative retesting of 108 young adults with childhood-onset GH deficiency and the diagnostic value of insulin-like growth factor I (IGF-I) and IGF-binding protein-3

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Juul, A; Kastrup, K W; Pedersen, S A

    1997-01-01

    SD in 60 of 79 GHD patients and above -2 SD in 21 of 29 patients with a normal GH response. IGFBP-3 levels were below -2 SD in 54 of 79 GHD patients and above -2 SD in 23 of 29 patients with a normal GH response. Multiple linear regression analysis demonstrated that IGF-I and IGFBP-3 were.......e. 45% of patients treated with GH during childhood because of isolated GHD had a normal GH response when retested in adulthood. Multiple regression analysis revealed that peak GH levels were dependent on the degree of hypopituitarism, body mass index, and duration of disease. IGF-I levels were below -2...... significantly dependent on peak GH levels and the number of other pituitary axes affected. In this analysis, duration of disease was significantly associated with both IGF-I and IGFBP-3, whereas body mass index was significantly associated with IGFBP-3, but not with IGF-I. We conclude that IGF-I and IGFBP-3...

  15. [Low sensitivity of IGF-I, IGFBP-3 and urinary GH in the diagnosis of growth hormone insufficiency in slowly-growing short-statured boys. Grupo Español de Estudio de la Talla Baja].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Audí, L; Antonia Llopis, M; Luisa Granada, M; Hermoso, F; del Valle, J; Dolores Rodríguez-Arnao, M; Bel, J; Luzuriaga, C; Gallego, E; Marín, F

    2001-01-13

    The usefulness of IGF-I, IGFBP-3, and the urinary GH excretion in the diagnostic evaluation of growth retardation in boys with short stature was studied. Serum samples from two GH-stimulation tests and two 24-h urine samples were sent to a Central Laboratory to measure serum and urinary GH, serum IGF-I, IGFBP-3 and GHBP, both in absolute and standardized values (Z-score). Short children were classified as growth hormone deficient (GHD) (n = 25), and idiopathic short statured (ISS) (n = 54), on the basis of the peak stimulated GH concentration of or = 7.5 microg/l respectively. A group of 15 normally growing children and adolescents was also included. Height-velocity standard deviation score (HV)-SDS was lower and body mass index higher in GHD than ISS. Standardized IGF-I differed significantly by ANOVA among the three groups (p = 0.001). Multiple stepwise linear regression analysis with HV-SDS as dependent variable showed IGF-I SDS as the best predictor followed by peak GH clonidine response and uGH excretion. ROC curves showed optimum cut-off level for IGF-I SDS as 2.05 (sensitivity: 32%, specificity: 90%) and 1.14 for IGFBP-3 SDS sensitivity: 28%, specificity: 94%). Standardized IGF-I and IGFBP-3 measurements were highly efficient only in diagnosis of severe GHD, but they show low sensitivity for the diagnosis of isolated idiopathic GHD as defined according to the low GH response to stimulation tests.

  16. Follistatin, induced by thyrotropin-releasing hormone (TRH), plays no role in prolactin expression but affects gonadotropin FSHbeta expression as a paracrine factor in pituitary somatolactotroph GH3 cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oride, Aki; Kanasaki, Haruhiko; Purwana, Indri N; Mutiara, Sandra; Miyazaki, Kohji

    2009-08-07

    Follistatin regulates FSHbeta gene expression by binding to and bioneutralizing activin effects. In this study, we found that thyrotropin-releasing hormone (TRH) increased follistatin gene expression in pituitary somatolactotroph GH3 cells. Treatment of GH3 with 100 nM TRH significantly increased follistatin mRNA expression as determined by real time PCR. TRH-induced follistatin expression was significantly abrogated in the presence of MEK inhibitor, U0126. Overexpression of constitutive active MEKK in GH3 cells dramatically increased follistatin expressions. Transfection of GH3 cells with follistatin siRNA reduced endogenous follistatin mRNA expression, but failed to modulate prolactin promoter activity. Prolactin mRNA levels were not affected by increasing the dose of follistatin, and TRH-induced prolactin promoter activity was not modulated in the presence of follistatin. In other experiments using pituitary gonadotroph LbetaT2 cells, activin increased FSHbeta promoter activity and mRNA expression, and follistatin completely inhibited this activin-increased FSHbeta gene expression. Treatment of GH3 cells with activin reduced the basal activity of prolactin promoter and follistatin prevented this effect. GH3 cells were co-cultured with LbetaT2 cells, which had been transfected with FSHbeta promoter-linked luciferase vectors and treated with activin in the presence of TRH. Activin-induced FSHbeta promoter activity was completely inhibited in the presence of TRH. In addition to that, FSHbeta mRNA was not detected from LbetaT2 cells which were co-cultured with GH3 cells. Our current results suggest the possibility that TRH increases follistatin gene expression in prolactin-producing cells in association with ERK pathways. Somatolactotroph-derived follistatin affects gonadotrophs by countering activin-induced FSHbeta gene expression in a paracrine fashion.

  17. Involvement of second messengers in the signaling pathway of vitellogenesis-inhibiting hormone and their effects on vitellogenin mRNA expression in the whiteleg shrimp, Litopenaeus vannamei.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bae, Sun-Hye; Okutsu, Tomoyuki; Tsutsui, Naoaki; Kang, Bong Jung; Chen, Hsiang-Yin; Wilder, Marcy N

    2017-05-15

    We incubated fragments of Litopenaeus vannamei ovary to investigate second messengers involved in the regulation of vitellogenin (vg) mRNA levels. The use of 100nM recombinant vitellogenesis-inhibiting hormone (VIH) (corresponding to recombinant L. vannamei sinus gland peptide-G: rLiv-SGP-G) significantly reduced vg mRNA expression in sub-adults after 8h incubation to less than 20% of the control. The concentration of intracellular cyclic guanosine monophosphate (cGMP) increased 3.2-fold relative to the control after 2h incubation with rLiv-SGP-G. However, it reached levels 18-fold relative to the control after 0.5h incubation with rLiv-SGP-G where 3-isobutyl-1-methylxanthine (a phosphodiesterase inhibitor) was also added. Moreover, vg mRNA expression was significantly reduced to less than 50% of the control after 24h incubation with 1μM A23187 (a calcium ionophore). Thus, rLiv-SGP-G and calcium ionophore reduced vg mRNA expression in in vitro-cultured ovary, and cGMP may be involved in the signaling pathway of VIH. Overall, the above results suggest that vg mRNA expression might be inhibited in vitro by increasing intracellular cGMP and Ca2+ in L. vannamei ovary. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Photoperiod-dependent regulation of gonadotropin-releasing hormone 1 messenger ribonucleic acid levels in the songbird brain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stevenson, Tyler J; Bernard, Daniel J; McCarthy, Margaret M; Ball, Gregory F

    2013-09-01

    Annual changes in day length induce marked changes in reproductive function in temperate zone vertebrates. In many avian species, in contrast to other seasonally breeding animals, plasticity in hypothalamic gonadotropin-releasing hormone - 1 (GnRH1) expression rather than (or in addition to) release governs changes in pituitary-gonadal activity. Investigations of the cellular and molecular mechanisms that govern GnRH1 plasticity were previously hindered by a collective inability of scientists in the field to characterize the gnrh1 cDNA in songbirds. We finally overcame this roadblock after data from the zebra finch (Taeniopygia guttata) genome project enabled us to rapidly clone the gnrh1 cDNA from hypothalamic RNA of zebra finches and European starlings (Sturnus vulgaris). Here, we review the original data that identified GnRH1 protein plasticity in the songbird brain and discuss earlier failed attempts to clone gnrh1 in these animals. Then, we present recent efforts, including our own, that successfully characterized gnrh1 in zebra finch and starling, and demonstrated dynamic regulation of gnrh1 mRNA expression, particularly in sub-populations of preoptic area neurons, in the latter. Overall, this paper highlights GnRH1 plasticity in the avian brain, and weaves into the narrative the previously untold story of the challenges to sequencing gnrh1 in songbirds. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Alterations in serum growth hormone (GH)/GH dependent ternary complex components (IGF-I, IGFBP-3, ALS, IGF-I/IGFBP-3 molar ratio) and the influence of these alterations on growth pattern in female rhythmic gymnasts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adiyaman, P; Ocal, G; Berberoğlu, M; Evliyaoğlu, O; Aycan, Z; Cetinkaya, E; Bulca, Y; Ersöz, G; Akar, N

    2004-06-01

    Normal growth in children is regulated to a great extent through the actions of the GH/IGF-I axis, a system consisting of GH and its mediators (ternary complex) that modulate growth in many tissues. The ternary complex (IGF-I/IGFBP-3/ALS) provides an acute regulatory mechanism in which IGF-I may be mobilized from the circulating reservoir of 150 kDa complexes to the tissues. Acute exercise is known to be a stimulus for GH secretion. The beneficial effects of scheduled exercise on body composition are also well established. However, the impact of strenuous exercise on the pubertal development of child athletes is still not well understood. The first goal of this study was to assess the acute effects of high intensity exercise training on GH-dependent ternary complex components in female rhythmic gymnasts compared to age-matched healthy female controls with normal physical activity. The second goal was to explore the influence of these exercise-induced changes on skeletal and pubertal growth in the same group prospectively over a period of 4 years. Seventeen female rhythmic gymnasts, aged 11.4 +/- 0.9 years, who had 10 h per week intense exercise for at least 4 months volunteered to participate in this study. Anthropometric measurement of height (Height SDS for chronological age [HtSDS(CA)], parentally adjusted height, predicted adult height), bone age and weight (BMI) were made using standard techniques in gymnasts and controls (aged 12.5 +/- 3.0 years, n = 12). Gymnasts were followed up to 4 years to observe growth velocity and pubertal progression. In order to determine the acute impact of exercise on levels of GH and GH-dependent ternary complex component (IGF-I, IGFBP-3, ALS, IGF-I/IGFBP-3 molar ratio), blood samples were obtained from gymnasts after a routine 2-h high-intensity training program and then after a 2-day rest period. These results were compared with age-matched controls with no scheduled sports activity. Despite the significant increment in serum

  20. Similar effects of long-term exogenous growth hormone (GH) on bone and muscle parameters: a pQCT study of GH-deficient and small-for-gestational-age (SGA) children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schweizer, Roland; Martin, David D; Haase, Martin; Roth, Johannes; Trebar, Branko; Binder, Gerhard; Schwarze, C Philipp; Ranke, Michael B

    2007-11-01

    Treatment with GH in short children has focused on height development. Little is known about the concomitant changes in muscle mass, bone structure and bone strength. Muscle area as well as parameters of bone architecture (bone mineral content, BMC; volumetric cortical density, total bone area, TBA; cortical area, cortical thickness, CT; and marrow area) were measured by means of pQCT (Stratec) at 65% of the proximal length of the forearm. The strength-strain index (SSI) was calculated as an indicator of bone strength. Prepubertal children with GHD (mean values: age; 7.2 years; height SDS=-2.9 SDS; GH dose: 30 microg/kg/d) were followed at 0, 6, 12 (n=74) and 24 (n=55) months. Prepubertal children with SGA (mean values: age: 7.1 years; height SDS=-3.4 SDS; GH dose: 55 mug/kg/d) were followed at 0, 6, 12 (n=47) and 24 (n=35) months. Both groups showed a similar increase in height. At GH start, muscle mass and bone characteristics were lower than normal but similar in SGA vs. GHD. Muscle area (mean values, SDS) increased from -3.0 to -1.5 in SGA and from -2.4 to -1.0 in GHD. Bone geometry changed in a biphasic mode, with an increase in total bone area and lowering of bone mineral content (BMC) during the first 12 months, followed by an increase of BMC and CT thereafter. SSI (mean values, mm(3)) improved from 78 to 114 in GHD and from 62 to 101 in SGA after 24 months on GH. The increment in terms of SDS did not reach significance in SGA. SSI correlated positively with muscle area before and during GH treatment. Bone strength and muscle mass are impaired in prepubertal children with GHD and SGA. Exogenous GH can indirectly improve bone structure and strength by inducing an increase in muscle mass. Our findings support the assumption that, in SGA, there is impaired tissue responsiveness to GH.

  1. EXPRESSION OF GROWTH HORMONE (PhGH GENE AND ANALYSIS OF INSULINE-LIKE GROWTH FACTOR I (IGF-I PRODUCTION IN AFRICAN CATFISH (Clarias gariepinus TRANSGENIC F-1

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Huria Marnis

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available We have previously produced F-1 transgenic of African catfish from crosses between founder transgenic female and non transgenic male. The aim of this study was to evaluate distribution and expression PhGH growth hormone gene transgenic African catfish organs and to measure the concentration of IGF-I in plasma. Transgene was detected using the PCR method in various organs, namely pituitary, brain, liver, heart, spleen, kidney, intestine, stomach, muscle, gill, and eye. Transgene expression levels were analyzed using the method of quantitative Reverse Transcriptase-Polymerase Chain Reaction (qRT-PCR. Plasma samples were analyzed for Insuline-like Growth Factor (IGF-I using Enzyme Linked Immunosorbent Assay (ELISA method. The results showed that the PhGH was detected and expressed in all organs of the transgenic African catfish (F-1. Liver exhibited the highest level of PhGH mRNA (23 x 106 copies. The plasma IGF-I levels in transgenic individuals were not significant than non transgenic. The higher level of exogenous PhGH gene expression may not represent the production of IGF-1.

  2. GH and IGF1: roles in energy metabolism of long-living GH mutant mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown-Borg, Holly M; Bartke, Andrzej

    2012-06-01

    Of the multiple theories to explain exceptional longevity, the most robust of these has centered on the reduction of three anabolic protein hormones, growth hormone (GH), insulin-like growth factor, and insulin. GH mutant mice live 50% longer and exhibit significant differences in several aspects of energy metabolism as compared with wild-type mice. Mitochondrial metabolism is upregulated in the absence of GH, whereas in GH transgenic mice and dwarf mice treated with GH, multiple aspects of these pathways are suppressed. Core body temperature is markedly lower in dwarf mice, yet whole-body metabolism, as measured by indirect calorimetry, is surprisingly higher in Ames dwarf and Ghr-/- mice compared with normal controls. Elevated adiponectin, a key antiinflammatory cytokine, is also very likely to contribute to longevity in these mice. Thus, several important components related to energy metabolism are altered in GH mutant mice, and these differences are likely critical in aging processes and life-span extension.

  3. Models of GH deficiency in animal studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gahete, Manuel D; Luque, Raul M; Castaño, Justo P

    2016-12-01

    Growth hormone (GH) is a peptide hormone released from pituitary somatotrope cells that promotes growth, cell division and regeneration by acting directly through the GH receptor (GHR), or indirectly via hepatic insulin-like growth factor 1 (IGF1) production. GH deficiency (GHD) can cause severe consequences, such as growth failure, changes in body composition and altered insulin sensitivity, depending of the origin, time of onset (childhood or adulthood) or duration of GHD. The highly variable clinical phenotypes of GHD can now be better understood through research on transgenic and naturally-occurring animal models, which are widely employed to investigate the origin, phenotype, and consequences of GHD, and particularly the underlying mechanisms of metabolic disorders associated to GHD. Here, we reviewed the most salient aspects of GH biology, from somatotrope development to GH actions, linked to certain GHD types, as well as the animal models employed to reproduce these GHD-associated alterations. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. GH-replacement therapy in adults

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christiansen, J S; Jørgensen, J O; Pedersen, S A

    1991-01-01

    Growth hormone (GH) deficiency in adults, whether GH deficient since childhood or patients rendered GH deficient in adult life, is associated with psychosocial maladjustment, reduced muscle strength and reduced exercise capacity. Body composition is significantly altered with increased fat...... and decreased muscle volume as compared to healthy subjects. Kidney function is subnormal, and so is sweat secretion. Epidemiological data suggest premature mortality due to cardiovascular disease in hypopituitary patients. Short-term GH treatment trials have shown improved psychosocial performance......, normalization of body composition, increased muscle strength, improved exercise capacity, increased cardiac performance and increase in bone mineral mass as well as in serum markers of bone turnover, and normalization of kidney function. Thus GH replacement therapy in GH-deficient adults exhibits potential long...

  5. GH safety workshop position paper: A critical appraisal of recombinant human GH therapy in children and adults

    Science.gov (United States)

    Recombinant human Growth Hormone (rhGH) has been in use for 30 years, and over that time its safety and efficacy in children and adults has been subject to considerable scrutiny. In 2001, a statement from the GH Research Society (GRS) concluded that 'for approved indications, GH is safe'; however, t...

  6. Growth hormone stimulation test - series (image)

    Science.gov (United States)

    The growth hormone (GH) is a protein hormone released from the anterior pituitary gland under the control of the hypothalamus. ... performed on infants and children to identify human growth hormone (hGH) deficiency as a cause of growth retardation. ...

  7. Effects of hypophysectomy and GH administration on bovine and human GH binding to rat liver membranes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Messina, J L; Edén, S; Kostyo, J L

    1985-07-01

    Experiments were conducted to investigate the specific binding of highly purified bovine and human growth hormones (bGH and hGH) to purified liver plasma membranes of male rats at various times after hypophysectomy and after the acute intravenous administration of bGH. Liver membranes prepared from hypophysectomized male rats showed a two- to threefold increase in the specific binding of either [125I]iodo-bGH or [125I]iodo-hGH, when compared with membranes prepared from the livers of age-matched normal male rats. The increase in GH binding was apparent within 3 days after hypophysectomy and persisted for a number of weeks after the operation. The increase in GH binding produced by hypophysectomy appeared to be due to an increase in the number of binding sites present on the membranes. The intravenous injection of 200 micrograms of bGH into hypophysectomized male rats 5-60 min before they were killed markedly reduced the ability of liver membranes prepared from these animals to bind [125I]iodo-bGH specifically. This decrease in GH binding seen after the injection of bGH may have been due to the development of a slowly dissociating hormone-binding site complex, which thereby reduced the number of available binding sites. This conclusion is supported by the finding that bGH, which is bound in vitro to isolated liver membranes, dissociates slowly and incompletely in the presence of an excess of unlabeled hormone. Moreover, the degree to which the bound hormone can dissociate appears to depend on the length of time that association is allowed to occur.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  8. In Silico characterization of growth hormone from freshwater ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    dimensional (3D) structure prediction and evolutionary profile of growth hormone (GH) from 14 ornamental freshwater fishes. The analyses were performed using the sequence data of growth hormone gene (gh) and its encoded GH protein.

  9. Family-specific differences in growth rate and hepatic gene expression in juvenile triploid growth hormone (GH) transgenic Atlantic salmon (Salmo salar).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Qingheng; Feng, Charles Y; Hori, Tiago S; Plouffe, Debbie A; Buchanan, John T; Rise, Matthew L

    2013-12-01

    Growth hormone transgenic (GHTg) Atlantic salmon (Salmo salar) have enhanced growth when compared to their non-transgenic counterparts, and this trait can be beneficial for aquaculture production. Biological confinement of GHTg Atlantic salmon may be achieved through the induction of triploidy (3N). The growth rates of triploid GH transgenic (3NGHTg) Atlantic salmon juveniles were found to significantly vary between families in the AquaBounty breeding program. In order to characterize gene expression associated with enhanced growth in juvenile 3NGHTg Atlantic salmon, a functional genomics approach (32K cDNA microarray hybridizations followed by QPCR) was used to identify and validate liver transcripts that were differentially expressed between two fast-growing 3NGHTg Atlantic salmon families (AS11, AS26) and a slow-growing 3NGHTg Atlantic salmon family (AS25); juvenile growth rate was evaluated over a 45-day period. Of 687 microarray-identified differentially expressed features, 143 (116 more highly expressed in fast-growing and 27 more highly expressed in slow-growing juveniles) were identified in the AS11 vs. AS25 microarray study, while 544 (442 more highly expressed in fast-growing and 102 more highly expressed in slow-growing juveniles) were identified in the AS26 vs. AS25 microarray study. Forty microarray features (39 putatively associated with fast growth and 1 putatively associated with slow growth) were present in both microarray experiment gene lists. The expression levels of 15 microarray-identified transcripts were studied using QPCR with individual RNA samples to validate microarray results and to study biological variability of transcript expression. The QPCR results agreed with the microarray results for 12 of 13 putative fast-growth associated transcripts, but QPCR did not validate the microarray results for 2 putative slow-growth associated transcripts. Many of the 39 microarray-identified genes putatively associated at the transcript expression

  10. Justified and unjustified use of growth hormone.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    A-J. van der Lely (Aart-Jan)

    2004-01-01

    textabstractGrowth hormone (GH) replacement therapy for children and adults with proven GH deficiency due to a pituitary disorder has become an accepted therapy with proven efficacy. GH is increasingly suggested, however, as a potential treatment for frailty, osteoporosis,

  11. Subchronic toxicity study of GH transgenic carp.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yong, Ling; Liu, Yu-Mei; Jia, Xu-Dong; Li, Ning; Zhang, Wen-Zhong

    2012-11-01

    A subchronic toxicity study of GH (growth hormone) transgenic carp was carried out with 60 SD rats aged 4 weeks, weight 115∼125 g. Ten male and 10 female rats were allotted into each group. Animals of the three groups (transgenic carp group (GH-TC), parental carp group (PC) and control group) were fed soy- and alfalfa-free diet (SAFD) with 10% GH transgenic carp powder, 10% parental carp powder or 10% common carp powder for 90 consecutive days, respectively. In the end of study, animals were killed by exsanguination via the carotid artery under diethyl ether anesthesia, then weights of heart, liver, kidneys, spleen, thymus, brain, ovaries and uterus/testis were measured. Pathological examination of organs was determined. Endocrine hormones of triiodothyronine (T3), thyroid hormone (T4), follicle-stimulating hormone (FSH), 17β-estradiol (E2), progesterone (P) and testosterone (T) levels were detected by specific ELISA kit. Parameters of blood routine and blood biochemical were measured. The weights of the body and organs of the rats, food intake, blood routine, blood biochemical test and serum hormones showed no significant differences among the GH transgenic carp-treated, parental carp-treated and control groups (P>0.05). Thus, it was concluded that at the dose level of this study, GH transgenic carp showed no subchronic toxicity and endocrine disruption to SD rats. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Solubilization of receptors for thyrotropin-releasing hormone from GH4C1 rat pituitary cells: Demonstration of guanyl nucleotide sensitivity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sullivan, N.J.; Lautens, L.L.; Tashjian, A.H. Jr. (Harvard School of Public Health, Boston, MA (USA))

    1987-12-01

    TRH receptors have been solubilized from GH4C1 cells using the plant glycoside digitonin. Solubilized receptors retain the principal binding characteristics exhibited by the TRH receptor in intact pituitary cells and their membranes. The binding of the methylhistidyl derivative of TRH (( 3H)MeTRH) attained equilibrium within 2-3 h at 4 C, and it was reversible, dissociating with a t1/2 of 7 h. Analysis of (3H)MeTRH binding to soluble receptors at 4 C yielded a dissociation constant (Kd) of 3.8 nM and a total binding capacity (Bmax) of 3.9 pmol/mg protein. Peptides known to interact with non-TRH receptors on GH cells failed to interfere with the binding of (3H)MeTRH, indicating that the TRH binding was specific. Chlordiazepoxide, a competitive antagonist for TRH action in GH cells, inhibited TRH binding to soluble receptors with an IC50 of 11 microM. When (3H)MeTRH was bound to membranes and the membrane proteins were then solubilized, we found enhanced dissociation of the prebound (3H)MeTRH from its solubilized receptor by guanyl nucleotides. Maximal enhancement of (3H)MeTRH dissociation by 10 microM GTP gamma S occurred within about 45 min at 22 C. GTP gamma S, GTP, GDP beta S, and GDP were all effectors of (3H)MeTRH dissociation, exhibiting EC50s in the range of 14-450 nM. The rank order of potency of the tested nucleotides was GTP gamma S greater than GTP congruent to GDP beta S greater than GDP much greater than ATP gamma S greater than GMP. We conclude that TRH receptors have been solubilized from GH cells with digitonin and retain the binding characteristics of TRH receptors in intact pituitary cells. Furthermore, prebinding (3H)MeTRH to GH4C1 cell membranes results in the solubilization of a complex in which the TRH receptor is linked functionally to a GTP binding protein.

  13. Interaction of Mechanical Load with Growth Hormone (GH) and Insulin-Like Growth Factor I (IGF-I) on Slow-Twitch Skeletal Muscle and Bone

    Science.gov (United States)

    Linderman, Jon K.; Gosselink, Kristin L.; Wang, Tommy J.; Mukku, Venkat R.; Grindeland, Richard E.

    1994-01-01

    Exogenous humoral growth factors, combined with increased mechanical loading, reportedly induce hypertrophy of fast-, but not slow-twitch skeletal muscles, and have little effect in attenuating atrophy of slow-twitch muscle associated with exposure to microgravity in animals with intact neuroendocrine systems. These observations suggest that anabolic adjuvants and muscle tension do not interact to stimulate growth or maintenance of slow-twitch skeletal muscle. The purpose of the present study was to determine whether a chronic increase in mechanical loading (synergistic ablation) or hindlimb unweighting (hindlimb suspension) interact with exogenous GH and IGF-I (Genentech, So San Francisco, CA) in the slow-twitch soleus muscles of female rats (approx. 250 g). Bilateral ablation of the plantaris and gastrocnemius muscles induced 38% and 40% increases in the absolute (mg/pair) and relative (mg/100 g body weight) weights of the soleus, respectively (p less than or = 0.05), in ambulatory rats. GH and IGF-I interacted with chronic loading to increase absolute soleus mass an additional 20% (p less than or = 0.05), and mixed and myofibrillar protein contents an additional 12% and 7%, respectively (NS). In contrast, hindlimb suspension (HLS) resulted in 20% and 18% decreases in the absolute and relative weights of the soleus, respectively (p less than or = 0.05); GH and IGF-I did not spare loss of soleus mass or protein content in HLS rats. HLS decreased tibial plate thickness approx. 11% (p less than or = 0.05), but not weights of the tibia or femus. GH and IGF-I increased tibial plate thickness approx. 30% (p less than or = 0.05), in ambulatory and HLS rats, and increased femur and tibial weights 12% (p less than or = 0.05) and 8% (NS), respectively, in ambulatory rats, but had no effect in HLS rats. Results of the present investigation suggest that GH and IGF-I can stimulate hypertrophy of slow-twitch skeletal muscle when chronically overloaded, but can also stimulate

  14. Rising maternal circulating GH during murine pregnancy suggests placental regulation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kathryn L Gatford

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Placenta-derived hormones including growth hormone (GH in humans contribute to maternal adaptation to pregnancy, and intermittent maternal GH administration increases foetal growth in several species. Both patterns and abundance of circulating GH are important for its activity, but their changes during pregnancy have only been reported in humans and rats. The aim of the present study was to characterise circulating profiles and secretory characteristics of GH in non-pregnant female mice and throughout murine pregnancy. Circulating GH concentrations were measured in whole blood (2 μL collected every 10 min for 6 h in non-pregnant diestrus female C57Bl/6J mice (n = 9, and pregnant females at day 8.5–9.5 (early pregnancy, n = 8, day 12.5–13.5 (mid-pregnancy, n = 7 and day 17.5 after mating (late pregnancy, n = 7. Kinetics and secretory patterns of GH secretion were determined by deconvolution analysis, while orderliness and regularity of serial GH concentrations were calculated by approximate entropy analysis. Circulating GH was pulsatile in all groups. Mean circulating GH and total and basal GH secretion rates increased markedly from early to mid-pregnancy, and then remained elevated. Pulse frequency and pulsatile GH secretion rate were similar between groups. The irregularity of GH pulses was higher in all pregnant groups than that in non-pregnant mice. Increased circulating GH in murine pregnancy is consistent with an important role for this hormone in maternal adaptation to pregnancy and placental development. The timing of increased basal secretion from mid-pregnancy, concurrent with the formation of the chorioallantoic placenta and initiation of maternal blood flow through it, suggests regulation of pituitary secretion by placenta-derived factors.

  15. GH administration patterns differently regulate epidermal growth factor signaling

    OpenAIRE

    Díaz, Maria E.; Miquet, Johanna Gabriela; Rossi, Soledad Paola; Irene, Pablo E.; Sotelo, Ana Isabel; Frungieri, Monica Beatriz; Turyn, Daniel; Gonzalez, Lorena

    2016-01-01

    Current GH administration protocols imply frequent s.c. injections, resulting in suboptimal compliance. Therefore, there is interest in developing delivery systems for sustained release of the hormone. However, GH has different actions depending on its continuous or pulsatile plasma concentration pattern. GH levels and circulating concentration patterns could be involved in the regulation of epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) expression in liver. Aberrant expression of this receptor and/...

  16. Effect of cessation of GH treatment on cognition during transition phase in Prader-Willi syndrome: Results of a 2-year crossover GH trial

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    R.J. Kuppens (Renske); Mahabier, E.F.; N.E. Bakker (Nienke); E.P.C. Siemensma (Elbrich); S.H. Donze; A.C.S. Hokken-Koelega (Anita)

    2016-01-01

    textabstractBackground: Patients with Prader-Willi syndrome (PWS) have a cognitive impairment. Growth hormone (GH) treatment during childhood improves cognitive functioning, while cognition deteriorates in GH-untreated children with PWS. Cessation of GH treatment at attainment of adult height (AH)

  17. Regulation of corticotropin releasing hormone receptor type 1 messenger RNA level in Y-79 retinoblastoma cells: potential implications for human stress response and immune/inflammatory reaction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. C. Vamvakopoulos

    1996-01-01

    Full Text Available We report the regulation of type 1 receptor mRNA in Y-79 human retinoblastoma cells, grown in the absence or presence of pharmacological levels of phorbol esters, forskolin, glucocorticoids and their combinations. To control for inducibility and for assessing the sensitivity of the Y-79 system to glucocorticoids, corticotropin releasing hormone mRNA levels were measured in parallel. All treatments stimulated corticotropin releasing hormone receptor type 1 gene expression relative to baseline. A weak suppression of corticotropin releasing hormone mRNA level was observed during dexamethasone treatment. The cell line expressed ten-fold excess of receptor to ligand mRNA under basal conditions. The findings predict the presence of functional phorbol ester, cyclic AMP and glucocorticoid response elements in the promoter region of corticotropin releasing hormone receptor type 1 gene and support a potential role for its product during chronic stress and immune/inflammatory reaction.

  18. The GH/IGF-1 axis in chronic heart failure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arcopinto, Michele; Bobbio, Emanuele; Bossone, Eduardo; Perrone-Filardi, Pasquale; Napoli, Raffaele; Sacca, Luigi; Cittadini, Antonio

    2013-03-01

    The classic model of Chronic Heart Failure (CHF) is rooted in the overexpression of neurohormonal molecules. To complement this paradigm, increasing evidence indicates that a variety of hormones may be down-regulated in CHF patients. The list includes growth hormone (GH) and its tissue effector insulin-like growth factor-1 (IGF-1). The GH/IGF-1 axis regulates cardiac growth, stimulates myocardial contractility, and influences the vascular system. The relationship between the GH/IGF-1 axis and the cardiovascular system has been extensively demonstrated in numerous studies in animals models and confirmed by the cardiac derangements secondary to both GH excess and deficiency in humans. Impaired activity of the GH/IGF-1 axis in CHF has been described by several independent groups and includes a wide array of abnormalities, including low IGF-1 levels, GH deficiency (GHD), and GH resistance that may be related to the severity of heart disease. According to several observations, these derangements are associated with poor clinical status and outcome. Since the first study of GH therapy in CHF in 1996, several placebo-controlled trials have been conducted with conflicting results. These discordant findings are likely explained by the degree of CHF-associated GH/IGF-1 impairment that may impact on individual responsiveness to GH administration. Biological actions of GH and IGF-1, cardiovascular implication of GH deficiency and GH excess, relation between somatotrophic axis and CHF are discussed. Results from trials of GH therapy, emerging therapeutic strategies, safety issues, and lack in evidence are also reported.

  19. Plerocercoid growth factor (PGF), a human growth hormone (hGH) analogue produced by the tapeworm Spirometra mansonoides, has direct insulin-like action in adipose tissue of normal rats in vitro

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Salem, M.A.M.; Phares, C.K.

    1986-03-01

    The metabolic actions of GH can be divided into acute (insulin-like) and chronic (lipolytic/anti-insulin). The insulin-like actions of GH are most readily elicited in GH-deficient animals as GH induces resistance to its own insulin-like action. Like GH, PGF stimulates growth and cross-reacts with anti-hGH antibodies. Independent experiments were conducted comparing the direct actions of PGF to insulin or hGH in vitro. Insulin-like effects were determined by the ability of PGF, insulin or hGH to stimulate (U-/sup 14/C)glucose metabolism in epidydimal fat pads from normal rats and by inhibition of epinephrine-stimulated lipolysis. Direct stimulation of lipolysis was used as anti-insulin activity. To determine if PGF competes for insulin or GH receptors, adipocytes (3 x 10/sup 5/ cells/ml) were incubated with either (/sup 125/I)insulin or (/sup 125/I)hGH +/- PGF, +/- insulin or +/- hGH. PGF stimulated glucose oxidation and /sup 14/C-incorporation into lipids. Insulin, hGH and PGF inhibited lipolysis (33%, 29% and 34%, respectively). Adipose tissue was very sensitive to the lipolytic effect of hGH but PGF was neither lipolytic nor did it confer refractoriness to its insulin-like action. PGF bound to GH but not to insulin receptors. Therefore, PGF had direct insulin-like effects but did not stimulate lipolysis in tissue from normal rats in vitro.

  20. Primary empty sella and GH deficiency: prevalence and clinical implications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maurizio Poggi

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Primary empty sella (PES is a particular anatomical condition characterized by the herniation of liquor within the sella turcica. The pathogenesis of this alteration, frequently observed in general population, is not yet completely understood. Recently reports demonstrated, in these patients, that hormonal pituitary dysfunctions, specially growth hormone (GH/insulin-like growth factor (IGF-I axis ones, could be relevant. The aim of this paper is to evaluate GH/IGF-I axis in a group of adult patients affected by PES and to verify its clinical relevance. We studied a population of 28 patients with a diagnosis of PES. In each patient we performed a basal study of thyroid, adrenal and gonadal - pituitary axis and a dynamic evaluation of GH/IGF-I after GH-releasing hormone (GHRH plus arginine stimulation test. To evaluate the clinical significance of GH/IGF-I axis dysfunction we performed a metabolic and bone status evaluation in every patients. We found the presence of GH deficit in 11 patients (39.2 %. The group that displayed a GH/IGF-I axis dysfunction showed an impairment in metabolic profile and bone densitometry. This study confirms the necessity to screen the pituitary function in patients affected by PES and above all GH/IGF-I axis. Moreover the presence of GH deficiency could be clinically significant.

  1. Emerging roles in plant biotechnology for the second messenger ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Second messengers are small transient molecules that transmit and/or modulate environmental or hormonal signals linking them to complex and often systemic physiological responses. Recent reports have renewed interest in the second messenger guanosine 3', 5'-cyclic monophosphate (cGMP) since it has been shown ...

  2. Production and characterisation of glycoside hydrolases from GH3, GH5, GH10, GH11 and GH61 for chemo-enzymatic synthesis of xylo- and mannooligosaccharides

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dilokpimol, Adiphol

    Produktion og karakterisering af glykosid hydrolaser fro GH3, GH5, GH10, GH11 og GH61 til chemo-enzymatisk syntese af xylo- og mannooligosakkarider Biprodukter fra hydrolyse af plantecellevægge er kilder til oligosakkarider, som potentielt kan fungere som prebiotika ved at stimulere væksten af...... omfatter karakterisering af de producerede enzymer samt cDNA kloning af formodet GH61 endo Produktion og karakterisering af glykosid hydrolaser fro GH3, GH5, GH10, GH11 og GH61 til chemo-enzymatisk syntese af xylo- og mannooligosakkarider Biprodukter fra hydrolyse af plantecellevægge er kilder til...

  3. Growth hormone administration stimulates energy expenditure and extrathyroidal conversion of thyroxine to triiodothyronine in a dose-dependent manner and suppresses circadian thyrotrophin levels: studies in GH-deficient adults

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Laursen, Torben; Jørgensen, Jens Otto Lunde; Møller, Jens

    1994-01-01

    Abstract OBJECTIVE: The impact of exogenous GH on thyroid function remains controversial although most data add support to a stimulation of peripheral T4 to T3 conversion. For further elucidation we evaluated iodothyronine and circadian TSH levels in GH-deficient patients as part of a GH dose......-response study. PATIENTS: Eight GH-deficient adults, who received stable T4 substitution due to central hypothyroidism; two patients, who were euthyroid without T4 supplementation were studied separately. DESIGN: All patients were initially studied after at least 4 weeks without GH followed by 3 consecutive 4...

  4. Transmembrane Signalling: Membrane messengers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cockroft, Scott L.

    2017-05-01

    Life has evolved elaborate means of communicating essential chemical information across cell membranes. Inspired by biology, two new artificial mechanisms have now been developed that use synthetic messenger molecules to relay chemical signals into or across lipid membranes.

  5. A new specific reference gene based on growth hormone gene (GH1) used for detection and relative quantification of Aquadvantage® GM salmon (Salmo salar L.) in food products.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hafsa, Ahmed Ben; Nabi, Nesrine; Zellama, Mohamed Salem; Said, Khaled; Chaouachi, Maher

    2016-01-01

    Genetic transformation of fish is mainly oriented towards the improvement of growth for the benefit of the aquaculture. Actually, Atlantic salmon (Salmo salar) is the species most transformed to achieve growth rates quite large compared to the wild. To anticipate the presence of contaminations with GM salmon in fish markets and the lack of labeling regulations with a mandatory threshold, the proper methods are needed to test the authenticity of the ingredients. A quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction (QRT-PCR) method was used in this study. Ct values were obtained and validated using 15 processed food containing salmon. The relative and absolute limits of detection were 0.01% and 0.01 ng/μl of genomic DNA, respectively. Results demonstrate that the developed QRT-PCR method is suitable specifically for identification of S. salar in food ingredients based on the salmon growth hormone gene 1 (GH1). The processes used to develop the specific salmon reference gene case study are intended to serve as a model for performing quantification of Aquadvantage® GM salmon on future genetically modified (GM) fish to be commercialized. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Influence of gender on the correlation between plasma growth hormone profiles and urinary growth hormone excretion

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Main, K M; Jansson, C; Skakkebak, N

    1997-01-01

    A lot of interest has been directed towards the measurement of urinary growth hormone (GH) excretion instead of plasma GH profiles or provocation tests. We investigated the factors influencing the relationship between 24- and 3-hour plasma GH profiles and urinary GH excretion in a cohort of 113...

  7. Association between GH receptor polymorphism (exon 3 deletion), serum IGF1, semen quality, and reproductive hormone levels in 838 healthy young men

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andreassen, M; Jensen, Rikke Bodin; Jørgensen, Niels

    2014-01-01

    -binding globulin, and IGF1 were not associated with GHRd3 genotype. A twofold increase in serum IGF1 was associated with a 13% (4-23) increase in calculated free testosterone (P=0.004). By contrast IGF1 was inversely associated with serum inhibin-B (P=0.027), but showed no associations to semen quality. GHR......=467) GHRd3/d3 homozygous individuals (n=69) tended to have larger semen volume (3.2 (2.4-4.3) vs 3.6 (2.6-4.7) ml, P=0.053) and higher serum inhibin-B levels (208 pg/ml (158-257) vs 227 pg/ml (185-264), P=0.050). Semen quality, levels of gonadotropins, testosterone, estradiol, sex hormone...

  8. Growth hormone and selective attention : A review

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Quik, Elise H.; van Dam, P. Sytze; Kenemans, J. Leon

    Introduction: The relation between growth hormone (GH) secretion and general cognitive function has been established. General cognitive functioning depends on core functions including selective attention, which have not been addressed specifically in relation to GH. The present review addresses

  9. Association between GH encoding gene polymorphism and semen ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The objective of this present study was to investigate relationships between the growth hormone gene restriction fragment length polymorphism (RFLP) and bull sperm characteristics. A total of 89 bulls from two semen evaluation stations were genotyped for the bovine growth hormone (bGH)-AluI polymorphism by ...

  10. Plasma lactate, GH and GH-binding protein levels in exercise following BCAA supplementation in athletes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Palo, E F; Gatti, R; Cappellin, E; Schiraldi, C; De Palo, C B; Spinella, P

    2001-01-01

    Branched chain amino acids (BCAA) stimulate protein synthesis, and growth hormone (GH) is a mediator in this process. A pre-exercise BCAA ingestion increases muscle BCAA uptake and use. Therefore after one month of chronic BCAA treatment (0.2 gkg(-1) of body weight), the effects of a pre-exercise oral supplementation of BCAA (9.64 g) on the plasma lactate (La) were examined in triathletes, before and after 60 min of physical exercise (75% of VO2 max). The plasma levels of GH (pGH) and of growth hormone binding protein (pGHBP) were also studied. The end-exercise La of each athlete was higher than basal. Furthermore, after the chronic BCAA treatment, these end-exercise levels were lower than before this treatment (8.6+/-0.8 mmol L(-1) after vs 12.8+/-1.0 mmol L(-1) before treatment; p BCAA chronic treatment, this end-exercise pGHBP was 738+/-85 pmol L(-1) before vs 1691+/-555 pmol L(-1) after. pGH/pGHBP ratio was unchanged in each athlete and between the groups, but a tendency to increase was observed at end-exercise. The lower La at the end of an intense muscular exercise may reflect an improvement of BCAA use, due to the BCAA chronic treatment. The chronic BCAA effects on pGH and pGHBP might suggest an improvement of muscle activity through protein synthesis.

  11. Growth hormone treatment during pregnancy in a growth hormone-deficient woman

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Müller, J; Starup, J; Christiansen, J S

    1995-01-01

    Information on the course and outcome of pregnancies in growth hormone (GH)-deficient patients is sparse, and GH treatment during pregnancy in such women has not been described previously. We have studied fetal growth and serum levels of GH, insulin-like growth factor I (IGF-I) and IGF binding...... protein 3 (IGFBP-3) during pregnancy, as well as birth weight and hormone levels after delivery in a 25-year-old woman with idiopathic, isolated GH deficiency diagnosed at the age of 7 years. As part of a clinical trial, the patient was treated with 2 IU/M2 GH for a period of 5 years. At this time she...... became pregnant after donor insemination. The GH treatment was continued until variant GH production from the placenta was evident. Serum levels of GH, IGF-I and IGFBP-3 were measured monthly during pregnancy after 3 days off GH therapy. Abdominal ultrasound was performed five times. Hormonal levels were...

  12. Molt-inhibiting hormone stimulates vitellogenesis at advanced ovarian developmental stages in the female blue crab, Callinectes sapidus 2: novel specific binding sites in hepatopancreas and cAMP as a second messenger

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zmora, Nilli; Sagi, Amir; Zohar, Yonathan; Chung, J Sook

    2009-01-01

    The finding that molt-inhibiting hormone (MIH) regulates vitellogenesis in the hepatopancreas of mature Callinectes sapidus females, raised the need for the characterization of its mode of action. Using classical radioligand binding assays, we located specific, saturable, and non-cooperative binding sites for MIH in the Y-organs of juveniles (J-YO) and in the hepatopancreas of vitellogenic adult females. MIH binding to the hepatopancreas membranes had an affinity 77 times lower than that of juvenile YO membranes (KD values: 3.22 × 10-8 and 4.19 × 10-10 M/mg protein, respectively). The number of maximum binding sites (BMAX) was approximately two times higher in the hepatopancreas than in the YO (BMAX values: 9.24 × 10-9 and 4.8 × 10-9 M/mg protein, respectively). Furthermore, MIH binding site number in the hepatopancreas was dependent on ovarian stage and was twice as high at stage 3 than at stages 2 and 1. SDS-PAGE separation of [125I] MIH or [125I] crustacean hyperglycemic hormone (CHH) crosslinked to the specific binding sites in the membranes of the J-YO and hepatopancreas suggests a molecular weight of ~51 kDa for a MIH receptor in both tissues and a molecular weight of ~61 kDa for a CHH receptor in the hepatopancreas. The use of an in vitro incubation of hepatopancreas fragments suggests that MIH probably utilizes cAMP as a second messenger in this tissue, as cAMP levels increased in response to MIH. Additionally, 8-Bromo-cAMP mimicked the effects of MIH on vitellogenin (VtG) mRNA and heterogeneous nuclear (hn) VtG RNA levels. The results imply that the functions of MIH in the regulation of molt and vitellogenesis are mediated through tissue specific receptors with different kinetics and signal transduction. MIH ability to regulate vitellogenesis is associated with the appearance of MIH specific membrane binding sites in the hepatopancreas upon pubertal/final molt. PMID:19583849

  13. Activation of extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) and induction of mitogen-activated protein kinase phosphatase 1 (MKP-1) by perifused thyrotropin-releasing hormone (TRH) stimulation in rat pituitary GH3 cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oride, Aki; Kanasaki, Haruhiko; Mutiara, Sandra; Purwana, Indri Nuryani; Miyazaki, Kohji

    2008-12-16

    We investigated the pattern of extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) phosphorylation and the induction of mitogen-activated protein kinase phosphatase 1 (MKP-1) by thyrotropin-releasing hormone (TRH) under various stimulation conditions in pituitary GH3 cells. In static culture, ERK activation by continuous TRH was maximal at 10 min and persisted for up to 60 min, with a return to the basal level by 2h. Stimulation with continuous TRH in perifused cells resulted in a similar level of ERK phosphorylation. MKP-1 was expressed 60 min following either static or perifused, continuous TRH stimulation. When cells were stimulated with pulsatile TRH every 30 min, ERK activation was maximal at 10 min and returned to its baseline level by 30 min. ERK was phosphorylated again with each subsequent pulse. Pulsatile TRH did not induce MKP-1. Prolactin promoter activity following continuous, static TRH stimulation was higher than that following perifused TRH stimulation. TRH at a frequency of one pulse every 30 min increased prolactin promoter activity similar to that of perifused, continuous TRH stimulation. Additionally, changes in pulse frequency resulted in alterations in the level of prolactin promoter. Following static stimulation, a 10 min exposure to TRH was sufficient to obtain full activation of the prolactin promoter. Additionally, a 5-10 min exposure of TRH was sufficient to maintain ERK activation. A single 5-min pulse of TRH stimulation resulted in low activation of the prolactin promoter. ERK activation was necessary for prolactin gene transcription; however, prolactin gene transcription is not entirely determined by the strength or duration of TRH-induced ERK activation.

  14. Response to GH treatment in adult GH deficiency is predicted by gender, age, and IGF1 SDS but not by stimulated GH-peak.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feldt-Rasmussen, Ulla; Brabant, Georg; Maiter, Dominique; Jonsson, Björn; Toogood, Andy; Koltowska-Haggstrom, Maria; Rasmussen, Aase Krogh; Buchfelder, Michael; Saller, Bernhard; Biller, Beverly M K

    2013-05-01

    We studied whether the severity of GH deficiency (GHD) defined as i) GH-peak on stimulation tests (insulin tolerance test (ITT), arginine, and glucagon), ii) number of additional pituitary deficits, or iii) baseline IGF1 SDS could impact the response to GH treatment. We further explored whether iv) IGF1 SDS after 24 months of GH replacement or v) ΔIGF1 SDS from baseline to 24 months was related to the phenotypic response to GH treatment. DESIGN, PATIENTS, AND MEASUREMENTS: The patient cohort (n=1752; 50% women) was obtained from KIMS (Pfizer International Metabolic Database). The patients were divided into three groups of approximately equal size (tertiles) according to the stimulated GH-peak values and baseline IGF1 SDS and were studied at baseline, 12, and 24 months of GH therapy. Lower baseline IGF1 SDS predicted better response in weight, BMI, total cholesterol, and triglycerides, while IGF1 SDS after 24 months was associated with reduction in waist/hip ratio, total cholesterol, and improved quality of life (QoL). Age-correlated negatively with the response in body weight, BMI, waist, IGF1 SDS, and total and LDL-cholesterol. Response in weight and BMI was greater in men than in women, whereas women showed greater improvement in QoL than men. Patients with more severe GHD as assessed by lower GH-peaks and more pituitary hormone deficiencies had a greater increase in IGF1 SDS. The increase in IGF1 SDS was associated with a reduction in waist/hip ratio and an increase in weight, BMI, and triglycerides. There was no correlation with other lipids, blood pressure, or glucose. Our findings indicate that baseline and 24 months, IGF1 and its degree of increase during GH replacement were more important than stimulated peak GH to predict the phenotypic response.

  15. Effect of GH/IGF-1 on Bone Metabolism and Osteoporsosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vittorio Locatelli

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Growth hormone (GH and insulin-like growth factor (IGF-1 are fundamental in skeletal growth during puberty and bone health throughout life. GH increases tissue formation by acting directly and indirectly on target cells; IGF-1 is a critical mediator of bone growth. Clinical studies reporting the use of GH and IGF-1 in osteoporosis and fracture healing are outlined. Methods. A Pubmed search revealed 39 clinical studies reporting the effects of GH and IGF-1 administration on bone metabolism in osteopenic and osteoporotic human subjects and on bone healing in operated patients with normal GH secretion. Eighteen clinical studies considered the effect with GH treatment, fourteen studies reported the clinical effects with IGF-1 administration, and seven related to the GH/IGF-1 effect on bone healing. Results. Both GH and IGF-1 administration significantly increased bone resorption and bone formation in the most studies. GH/IGF-1 administration in patients with hip or tibial fractures resulted in increased bone healing, rapid clinical improvements. Some conflicting results were evidenced. Conclusions. GH and IGF-1 therapy has a significant anabolic effect. GH administration for the treatment of osteoporosis and bone fractures may greatly improve clinical outcome. GH interacts with sex steroids in the anabolic process. GH resistance process is considered.

  16. Hormone Therapy for Breast Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... hormones? Hormones are substances that function as chemical messengers in the body. They affect the actions of ... at the National Institutes of Health FOLLOW US Facebook Twitter Instagram YouTube Google+ LinkedIn GovDelivery RSS CONTACT ...

  17. Messenger RNA transcripts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dan Cullen

    2004-01-01

    In contrast to DNA, messenger RNA (mRNA) in complex substrata is rarely analyzed, in large part because labile RNA molecules are difficult to purify. Nucleic acid extractions from fungi that colonize soil are particularly difficult and plagued by humic substances that interfere with Taq polymerase (Tebbe and Vahjen 1993 and references therein). Magnetic capture...

  18. Gender influences short-term growth hormone treatment response in children

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sävendahl, Lars; Blankenstein, Oliver; Oliver, Isabelle

    2012-01-01

    Gender may affect growth hormone (GH) treatment outcome. This study assessed gender-related differences in change from baseline height standard deviation scores (ΔHSDS) after 2 years' GH treatment.......Gender may affect growth hormone (GH) treatment outcome. This study assessed gender-related differences in change from baseline height standard deviation scores (ΔHSDS) after 2 years' GH treatment....

  19. Binding properties of beetal recombinant caprine growth hormone to ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    SAM

    2014-07-23

    Jul 23, 2014 ... The aim of the study was to illustrate the radio-receptor assay of beetal recombinant caprine growth hormone (rcGH). Tracer (125I-rcGH) was prepared by iodinating beetal rcGH with iodine-125 and its biological activity was analyzed by rabbit anti-rcGH antibodies. Liver microsomal membranes of the.

  20. Binding properties of beetal recombinant caprine growth hormone to ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The aim of the study was to illustrate the radio-receptor assay of beetal recombinant caprine growth hormone (rcGH). Tracer (125I-rcGH) was prepared by iodinating beetal rcGH with iodine-125 and its biological activity was analyzed by rabbit anti-rcGH antibodies. Liver microsomal membranes of the Bovidae species ...

  1. Interrelationship of growth hormone, glucose and lipid metabolism ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    On the contrary, negative correlations were shown between GH vs the fasting levels of glucose,GH vs lipid and GH vs HSL. Conclusion: GH caused the reduction of the blood levels of glucose and, lipid using HSL as mediator, by inhibiting gluconeogenesis and stimulating lipolysis, respectively. Keywords: Growth hormone ...

  2. GH62 arabinofuranosidases: Structure, function and applications

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wilkens, Casper; Andersen, Susan; Dumon, Claire

    2017-01-01

    provides novel insights into structure/function relationships of GH62. Overall GH62 α-l-arabinofuranosidases are believed to play important roles in nature by acting in synergy with several cell wall degrading enzymes and members of GH62 represent promising candidates for biotechnological improvements...... hydrolytic release of α-l-arabinofuranosyl residues, which decorate xylan or arabinan backbones in lignocellulosic and pectin constituents of plant cell walls. The CAZy database classifies α-l-arabinofuranosidases in Glycoside Hydrolase (GH) families GH2, GH3, GH43, GH51, GH54 and GH62. Only GH62 contains...

  3. The robustness of diagnostic tests for GH deficiency in adults

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Marianne

    2015-01-01

    , including conventional substitution therapy, influences the GH-responses. Recently, the role of IGF-I measurements in the clinical decision making has been discussed. The aim of this review is to discuss the available GH-stimulation tests. In this author's opinion, tests which include growth......-hormone-releasing hormone (GHRH) tend to be more potent and robust, especially the GHRH+arginine test which has been proven to be of clinical use. In contrast, the insulin tolerance test (ITT) and the glucagon test appear to have too many drawbacks....

  4. Nutrient Sensing Overrides Somatostatin and Growth Hormone-Releasing Hormone to Control Pulsatile Growth Hormone Release.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steyn, F J

    2015-07-01

    Pharmacological studies reveal that interactions between hypothalamic inhibitory somatostatin and stimulatory growth hormone-releasing hormone (GHRH) govern pulsatile GH release. However, in vivo analysis of somatostatin and GHRH release into the pituitary portal vasculature and peripheral GH output demonstrates that the withdrawal of somatostatin or the appearance of GHRH into pituitary portal blood does not reliably dictate GH release. Consequently, additional intermediates acting at the level of the hypothalamus and within the anterior pituitary gland are likely to contribute to the release of GH, entraining GH secretory patterns to meet physiological demand. The identification and validation of the actions of such intermediates is particularly important, given that the pattern of GH release defines several of the physiological actions of GH. This review highlights the actions of neuropeptide Y in regulating GH release. It is acknowledged that pulsatile GH release may not occur selectively in response to hypothalamic control of pituitary function. As such, interactions between somatotroph networks, the median eminence and pituitary microvasculature and blood flow, and the emerging role of tanycytes and pericytes as critical regulators of pulsatility are considered. It is argued that collective interactions between the hypothalamus, the median eminence and pituitary vasculature, and structural components within the pituitary gland dictate somatotroph function and thereby pulsatile GH release. These interactions may override hypothalamic somatostatin and GHRH-mediated GH release, and modify pulsatile GH release relative to the peripheral glucose supply, and thereby physiological demand. © 2015 British Society for Neuroendocrinology.

  5. Control of cotton fibre elongation by a homeodomain transcription factor GhHOX3.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shan, Chun-Min; Shangguan, Xiao-Xia; Zhao, Bo; Zhang, Xiu-Fang; Chao, Lu-Men; Yang, Chang-Qing; Wang, Ling-Jian; Zhu, Hua-Yu; Zeng, Yan-Da; Guo, Wang-Zhen; Zhou, Bao-Liang; Hu, Guan-Jing; Guan, Xue-Ying; Chen, Z Jeffrey; Wendel, Jonathan F; Zhang, Tian-Zhen; Chen, Xiao-Ya

    2014-11-21

    Cotton fibres are unusually long, single-celled epidermal seed trichomes and a model for plant cell growth, but little is known about the regulation of fibre cell elongation. Here we report that a homeodomain-leucine zipper (HD-ZIP) transcription factor, GhHOX3, controls cotton fibre elongation. GhHOX3 genes are localized to the 12th homoeologous chromosome set of allotetraploid cotton cultivars, associated with quantitative trait loci (QTLs) for fibre length. Silencing of GhHOX3 greatly reduces (>80%) fibre length, whereas its overexpression leads to longer fibre. Combined transcriptomic and biochemical analyses identify target genes of GhHOX3 that also contain the L1-box cis-element, including two cell wall loosening protein genes GhRDL1 and GhEXPA1. GhHOX3 interacts with GhHD1, another homeodomain protein, resulting in enhanced transcriptional activity, and with cotton DELLA, GhSLR1, repressor of the growth hormone gibberellin (GA). GhSLR1 interferes with the GhHOX3-GhHD1 interaction and represses target gene transcription. Our results uncover a novel mechanism whereby a homeodomain protein transduces GA signal to promote fibre cell elongation.

  6. Diphosphoinositol Polyphosphates: Metabolic Messengers?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shears, Stephen B.

    2009-01-01

    The diphosphoinositol polyphosphates (“inositol pyrophosphates”) are a specialized subgroup of the inositol phosphate signaling family. This review proposes that many of the current data concerning the metabolic turnover and biological effects of the diphosphoinositol polyphosphates are linked by a common theme: these polyphosphates act as metabolic messengers. This review will also discuss the latest proposals concerning possible molecular mechanisms of action of this intriguing class of molecules. PMID:19439500

  7. The kidneys play a central role in the clearance of rhGH in rats

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vestergaard, Bill; Thygesen, Peter; Kreilgaard, Mads

    2016-01-01

    The kidneys are thought to play an important role in the clearance of recombinant human growth hormone (rhGH), but the relative importance is not clear. Obtaining knowledge of clearance pathway is an important prerequisite for the development of new long acting growth hormone analogues targeted...... at treatment of patients with growth hormone disorders. The purpose of this study was to investigate the relative importance of the kidneys in the clearance of rhGH. The study employed a newly validated nephrectomy rat model and a population based pharmacokinetic approach to assess renal clearance of rh...... that renal clearance plays a pivotal role in the elimination of rhGH in rats....

  8. Introduction of exogenous growth hormone receptors augments growth hormone-responsive insulin biosynthesis in rat insulinoma cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Billestrup, N; Møldrup, A; Serup, P

    1990-01-01

    The stimulation of insulin biosynthesis in the pancreatic insulinoma cell line RIN5-AH by growth hormone (GH) is initiated by GH binding to specific receptors. To determine whether the recently cloned rat hepatic GH receptor is able to mediate the insulinotropic effect of GH, we have transfected...... of GH receptors in one clone (1.24) selected for detailed analysis was increased 2.6-fold compared to untransfected cells. The increased GH receptor expression was accompanied by an increased responsiveness to GH. Thus, the maximal GH-stimulated increase of insulin biosynthesis was 4.1-fold in 1...... magnitude of GH-stimulated insulin biosynthesis. A close stoichiometric relationship between the level of receptor expression and the level of GH-stimulated insulin biosynthesis was observed. We conclude from these results that the hepatic GH receptor is able to mediate the effect of GH on insulin...

  9. Developmental and hormonally regulated messenger ribonucleic acid expression of KiSS-1 and its putative receptor, GPR54, in rat hypothalamus and potent luteinizing hormone-releasing activity of KiSS-1 peptide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Navarro, V M; Castellano, J M; Fernández-Fernández, R; Barreiro, M L; Roa, J; Sanchez-Criado, J E; Aguilar, E; Dieguez, C; Pinilla, L; Tena-Sempere, M

    2004-10-01

    The gonadotropic axis is centrally controlled by a complex regulatory network of excitatory and inhibitory signals that is activated at puberty. Recently, loss of function mutations of the gene encoding G protein-coupled receptor 54 (GPR54), the putative receptor for the KiSS-1-derived peptide metastin, have been associated with lack of puberty onset and hypogonadotropic hypogonadism. Yet the pattern of expression and functional role of the KiSS-1/GPR54 system in the rat hypothalamus remain unexplored to date. In the present work, expression analyses of KiSS-1 and GPR54 genes were conducted in different physiological and experimental settings, and the effects of central administration of KiSS-1 peptide on LH release were assessed in vivo. Persistent expression of KiSS-1 and GPR54 mRNAs was detected in rat hypothalamus throughout postnatal development, with maximum expression levels at puberty in both male and female rats. Hypothalamic expression of KiSS-1 and GPR54 genes changed throughout the estrous cycle and was significantly increased after gonadectomy, a rise that was prevented by sex steroid replacement both in males and females. Moreover, hypothalamic expression of the KiSS-1 gene was sensitive to neonatal imprinting by estrogen. From a functional standpoint, intracerebroventricular administration of KiSS-1 peptide induced a dramatic increase in serum LH levels in prepubertal male and female rats as well as in adult animals. In conclusion, we provide novel evidence of the developmental and hormonally regulated expression of KiSS-1 and GPR54 mRNAs in rat hypothalamus and the ability of KiSS-1 peptide to potently stimulate LH secretion in vivo. Our current data support the contention that the hypothalamic KiSS-1/GPR54 system is a pivotal factor in central regulation of the gonadotropic axis at puberty and in adulthood.

  10. Growth hormone: health considerations beyond height gain

    Science.gov (United States)

    The therapeutic benefit of growth hormone (GH) therapy in improving height in short children is widely recognized; however, GH therapy is associated with other metabolic actions that may be of benefit in these children. Beneficial effects of GH on body composition have been documented in several dif...

  11. Endurance training and GH administration in elderly women

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lange, K H; Lorentsen, J; Isaksson, F

    2001-01-01

    In the present study, the effect of endurance training alone and endurance training combined with recombinant human growth hormone (rhGH) administration on subcutaneous abdominal adipose tissue lipolysis was investigated. Sixteen healthy women [age 75 +/- 2 yr (mean +/- SE)] underwent a 12-wk...... and after completion of the training program. Similarly, no effect on subcutaneous abdominal adipose tissue lipolysis was observed when combining endurance training with rhGH administration. However, in both the placebo and the GH groups, fat oxidation was significantly increased during exercise performed...... at the same absolute workload after completion of the training program. We conclude that the changed lipid metabolism during exercise observed after endurance training alone or after endurance training combined with rhGH administration is not due to alterations in subcutaneous abdominal adipose tissue...

  12. Differential impact of selective GH deficiency and endogenous GH excess on insulin-mediated actions in muscle and liver of male mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cordoba-Chacon, Jose; Gahete, Manuel D; McGuinness, Owen P; Kineman, Rhonda D

    2014-11-15

    A reciprocal relationship between insulin sensitivity and glucose tolerance has been reported in some mouse models and humans with isolated changes in growth hormone (GH) production and signaling. To determine if this could be explained in part by tissue-specific changes in insulin sensitivity, hyperinsulinemic-euglycemic clamps were performed in mice with adult-onset, isolated GH deficiency and in mice with elevated endogenous GH levels due to somatotrope-specific loss of IGF-I and insulin receptors. Our results demonstrate that circulating GH levels are negatively correlated with insulin-mediated glucose uptake in muscle but positively correlated with insulin-mediated suppression of hepatic glucose production. A positive relationship was also observed between GH levels and endpoints of hepatic lipid metabolism known to be regulated by insulin. These results suggest hepatic insulin resistance could represent an early metabolic defect in GH deficiency.

  13. Different growth hormone sensitivity of target tissues and growth hormone response to glucose in HIV-infected patients with and without lipodystrophy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Ove; Haugaard, Steen B; Hansen, Birgitte R

    2004-01-01

    Growth hormone (GH)-secretion in HIV-lipodystrophy is impaired; however, GH-sensitivity of GH-target tissues remains to be evaluated. We measured overnight fasting concentrations of GH-sensitive insulin-like growth-factor-I (IGF-I) and IGF binding protein-3 (IGFBP-3) including GH binding protein ...... glucose in LIPO compared with NONLIPO and NAIVE (p inversely correlated with AUC-GH (p

  14. Extrapituitary growth hormone in the chicken reproductive system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luna, Maricela; Martínez-Moreno, Carlos G; Ahumada-Solórzano, Marisela S; Harvey, Steve; Carranza, Martha; Arámburo, Carlos

    2014-07-01

    Increasing evidence shows that growth hormone (GH) expression is not limited to the pituitary, as it can be produced in many other tissues. It is known that growth hormone (GH) plays a role in the control of reproductive tract development. Acting as an endocrine, paracrine and/or autocrine regulator, GH influences proliferation, differentiation and function of reproductive tissues. In this review we substantiate the local expression of GH mRNA and GH protein, as well as the GH receptor (GHR) in both male and female reproductive tract, mainly in the chicken. Locally expressed GH was found to be heterogeneous, with a 17 kDa variant being predominant. GH secretagogues, such as GHRH and TRH co-localize with GH expression in the chicken testis and induce GH release. In the ovarian follicular granulosa cells, GH and GHR are co-expressed and stimulate progesterone production, which was neutralized by a specific GH antibody. Both testicular and follicular cells in primary cultures were able to synthesize and release GH to the culture medium. We also characterized GH and GH mRNA expression in the hen's oviduct and showed that it had 99.6% sequence identity with pituitary GH. Data suggest local reproductive GH may have important autocrine/paracrine effects. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Optimizing Patient Management and Adherence for Children Receiving Growth Hormone

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Bang, Peter; Acerini, Carlo L; Lehwalder, Dagmar; Wac, Katarzyna

    2017-01-01

    Poor adherence with growth hormone (GH) therapy has been associated with worse clinical outcomes, which in children relates specifically to their linear growth and loss of quality of life. The “360° GH in Europe...

  16. Dynamical Messengers for Gauge Mediation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hook, Anson; Torroba, Gonzalo; /SLAC /Stanford U., Phys. Dept.

    2011-08-17

    We construct models of indirect gauge mediation where the dynamics responsible for breaking supersymmetry simultaneously generates a weakly coupled subsector of messengers. This provides a microscopic realization of messenger gauge mediation where the messenger and hidden sector fields are unified into a single sector. The UV theory is SQCD with massless and massive quarks plus singlets, and at low energies it flows to a weakly coupled quiver gauge theory. One node provides the primary source of supersymmetry breaking, which is then transmitted to the node giving rise to the messenger fields. These models break R-symmetry spontaneously, produce realistic gaugino and sfermion masses, and give a heavy gravitino.

  17. Effects of growth hormone replacement therapy on IGF-related parameters and on the pituitary-gonadal axis in GH-deficient males. A double-blind, placebo-controlled crossover study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Juul, A; Andersson, A M; Pedersen, S A

    1998-01-01

    to hCG after 72 h was seen compared to placebo (36.2 (6.4) vs. 38.8 (10.3) nmol/l). In addition, no differences existed in basal SHBG, DHT, free testosterone, delta4-adion and DHEA-S levels. There were no statistically significant differences in maximal FSH and LH response to a GnRH challenge between...... the GH and the placebo periods (15.7 (5.3) vs. 18.0 (8.8) U/l and 47.0 (26.4) vs. 40.4 (26.5) U/l, respectively). Furthermore, there was no effect on cortisol responses after ACTH between the GH and the placebo periods. However, significantly higher estradiol levels were seen after GH treatment (110 (50......) pmol/l) compared to after placebo (89 (34) pmol/l, p = 0.03). Prostate-specific antigen levels decreased after GH treatment compared to after placebo (0.42 (0.54) vs. 0.47 (0.48) microg/l) and this difference almost reached statistical significance (p = 0.059). Inhibin-B levels were significantly lower...

  18. Effect of cessation of GH treatment on cognition during transition phase in Prader-Willi syndrome: results of a 2-year crossover GH trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. J. Kuppens

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Patients with Prader-Willi syndrome (PWS have a cognitive impairment. Growth hormone (GH treatment during childhood improves cognitive functioning, while cognition deteriorates in GH-untreated children with PWS. Cessation of GH treatment at attainment of adult height (AH might deteriorate their GH-induced improved cognition, while continuation might benefit them. We, therefore, investigated the effects of placebo versus GH administration on cognition in young adults with PWS who were GH-treated for many years during childhood and had attained AH. Method Two-year, randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled cross-over study in 25 young adults with PWS. Cross-over intervention with placebo and GH (0.67 mg/m2/day, both during 1 year. Results Total (TIQ, verbal (VIQ and performance IQ (PIQ did not deteriorate during 1 year of placebo, compared to GH treatment (p > 0.322. Young adults with a lower TIQ had significantly more loss of TIQ points during placebo versus GH, in particular VIQ decreased more in those with a lower VIQ. The effect of placebo versus GH on TIQ, VIQ and PIQ was not different for gender or genotype. Conclusions Compared to GH treatment, 1 year of placebo did not deteriorate cognitive functioning of GH-treated young adults with PWS who have attained AH. However, patients with a lower cognitive functioning had more loss in IQ points during placebo versus GH treatment. The reassuring finding that 1 year of placebo does not deteriorate cognitive functioning does, however, not exclude a gradual deterioration of cognitive functioning on the long term. Trial registration ISRCTN24648386 , NTR1038 , Dutch Trial Register, www.trialregister.nl . Registered 16 August 2007.

  19. Effect of cessation of GH treatment on cognition during transition phase in Prader-Willi syndrome: results of a 2-year crossover GH trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuppens, R J; Mahabier, E F; Bakker, N E; Siemensma, E P C; Donze, S H; Hokken-Koelega, A C S

    2016-11-16

    Patients with Prader-Willi syndrome (PWS) have a cognitive impairment. Growth hormone (GH) treatment during childhood improves cognitive functioning, while cognition deteriorates in GH-untreated children with PWS. Cessation of GH treatment at attainment of adult height (AH) might deteriorate their GH-induced improved cognition, while continuation might benefit them. We, therefore, investigated the effects of placebo versus GH administration on cognition in young adults with PWS who were GH-treated for many years during childhood and had attained AH. Two-year, randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled cross-over study in 25 young adults with PWS. Cross-over intervention with placebo and GH (0.67 mg/m2/day), both during 1 year. Total (TIQ), verbal (VIQ) and performance IQ (PIQ) did not deteriorate during 1 year of placebo, compared to GH treatment (p > 0.322). Young adults with a lower TIQ had significantly more loss of TIQ points during placebo versus GH, in particular VIQ decreased more in those with a lower VIQ. The effect of placebo versus GH on TIQ, VIQ and PIQ was not different for gender or genotype. Compared to GH treatment, 1 year of placebo did not deteriorate cognitive functioning of GH-treated young adults with PWS who have attained AH. However, patients with a lower cognitive functioning had more loss in IQ points during placebo versus GH treatment. The reassuring finding that 1 year of placebo does not deteriorate cognitive functioning does, however, not exclude a gradual deterioration of cognitive functioning on the long term. ISRCTN24648386 , NTR1038 , Dutch Trial Register, www.trialregister.nl . Registered 16 August 2007.

  20. Growth hormone treatment during pregnancy in a growth hormone-deficient woman

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Müller, J; Starup, J; Christiansen, J S

    1995-01-01

    Information on the course and outcome of pregnancies in growth hormone (GH)-deficient patients is sparse, and GH treatment during pregnancy in such women has not been described previously. We have studied fetal growth and serum levels of GH, insulin-like growth factor I (IGF-I) and IGF binding...

  1. Continuation of growth hormone therapy versus placebo in transition-phase patients with growth hormone deficiency

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jørgensen, Jens; Nørrelund, Helene; Vahl, Nina

    2002-01-01

    In a placebo-controlled, parallel study of 18 patients with a mean age of 20 years who had confirmed growth hormone (GH) deficiency, we evaluated body composition, insulin sensitivity, and glucose turnover at baseline (when all were receiving GH replacement); after 12 months of continued GH therapy...

  2. Growth hormone action in rat insulinoma cells expressing truncated growth hormone receptors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Møldrup, Annette; Allevato, G; Dyrberg, Thomas

    1991-01-01

    Transfection of the insulin-producing rat islet tumor cell line RIN-5AH with a full length cDNA of the rat hepatic growth hormone (GH) receptor (GH-R1-638) augments the GH-responsive insulin synthesis in these cells. Using this functional system we analyzed the effect of COOH-terminal truncation...

  3. GH receptor blocker administration and muscle-tendon collagen synthesis in humans

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Rie Harboe; Doessing, Simon; Goto, Kazushige

    2011-01-01

    The growth hormone (GH)/insulin-like growth factor-I (IGF-I) axis stimulates collagen synthesis in tendon and skeletal muscle, but no studies have investigated the effect of reducing IGF-I on collagen synthesis in healthy humans.......The growth hormone (GH)/insulin-like growth factor-I (IGF-I) axis stimulates collagen synthesis in tendon and skeletal muscle, but no studies have investigated the effect of reducing IGF-I on collagen synthesis in healthy humans....

  4. Effect of growth hormone replacement therapy on pituitary hormone secretion and hormone replacement therapies in GHD adults

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hubina, Erika; Mersebach, Henriette; Rasmussen, Ase Krogh

    2004-01-01

    We tested the impact of commencement of GH replacement therapy in GH-deficient (GHD) adults on the circulating levels of other anterior pituitary and peripheral hormones and the need for re-evaluation of other hormone replacement therapies, especially the need for dose changes....

  5. Translational Influence on Messenger Stability

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Eriksen, Mette

    RNA messenger stability is in uenced by how well it is protected from ribonuclase degradation. The level and distribution of translating ribosomes on the messenger has an effect on messenger stability, which is tuned partly by the nature of the ribosome binding site and partly by the codon...... composition of the coding sequence of a gene. This thesis focussed on illuminating the impact of ribosome binding sites on the functional messenger half-life using a range of ribosome binding sites with altered binding strength. Furthermore, the additive in uence of the transcription terminator, Rho......, on messenger stability was examined. Depending on the translation initiation frequency, the chance of an initial ribosome trailing the RNA polymerase get better for better initiation sites, thus protecting transcription from termination by Rho. A polarity assay in which the activity of the downstream lac...

  6. Different growth hormone sensitivity of target tissues and growth hormone response to glucose in HIV-infected patients with and without lipodystrophy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Ove; Haugaard, Steen B; Hansen, Birgitte R

    2004-01-01

    Growth hormone (GH)-secretion in HIV-lipodystrophy is impaired; however, GH-sensitivity of GH-target tissues remains to be evaluated. We measured overnight fasting concentrations of GH-sensitive insulin-like growth-factor-I (IGF-I) and IGF binding protein-3 (IGFBP-3) including GH binding protein...... (GHBP), a marker of GH-receptor sensitivity, in antiretroviral treated HIV-infected patients with (LIPO) and without lipodystrophy (NONLIPO) and antiretroviral naive HIV-infected patients (NAIVE). Three h GH-suppression tests using oral glucose were undertaken to determine dynamics of GH-secretion. IGF...... glucose in LIPO compared with NONLIPO and NAIVE (p lipodystrophy....

  7. Continuation of growth hormone therapy versus placebo in transition-phase patients with growth hormone deficiency

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jørgensen, Jens; Nørrelund, Helene; Vahl, Nina

    2002-01-01

    In a placebo-controlled, parallel study of 18 patients with a mean age of 20 years who had confirmed growth hormone (GH) deficiency, we evaluated body composition, insulin sensitivity, and glucose turnover at baseline (when all were receiving GH replacement); after 12 months of continued GH therapy...... or placebo; and after a 12-month open phase of GH therapy. In the placebo group, insulin sensitivity and fat mass increased and lipid oxidation decreased, whereas glucose oxidation increased (p...

  8. Local feedback loop of ghrelin-GH in the pig ovary: action on estradiol secretion, aromatase activity and cell apoptosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rak, Agnieszka; Gregoraszczuk, Ewa Łucja

    2008-06-01

    Ghrelin is recognized as an important regulator of growth hormone (GH) secretion, food intake and a factor which controls reproduction. In the present studies, the effect of GH and insulin-like growth factor (IGF-I) on ghrelin synthesis and secretion and the effects of ghrelin on GH synthesis and secretion in cultured whole porcine follicles were studied. Ghrelin and GH levels were measured in the follicular wall and in the culture medium. Moreover, the action of combined treatment with ghrelin and GH on estradiol secretion, aromatase activity and cell apoptosis were examined. We demonstrated that ghrelin increased GH secretion but not GH synthesis by ovarian follicles. GH stimulated both ghrelin synthesis and secretion in the ovarian follicles. The increase in estradiol secretion, aromatase activity and the decrease in caspase-3 activity were noted in ghrelin alone- and ghrelin in combination with GH-treated cells. In culture treated with combination of both these hormones, all investigated parameters were similar to those noted in ghrelin alone-treated cells. In conclusion, our study provides novel evidence for the gonadal feedback loop between GH and ghrelin secretion in the ovary. However, results of the presented research suggest independent action of GH and ghrelin in the ovary.

  9. Mortality and GH deficiency

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stochholm, Kirstine; Gravholt, Claus Højbjerg; Laursen, Torben

    2007-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To estimate the mortality in Denmark in patients suffering from GH deficiency (GHD). DESIGN: Mortality was analyzed in 1794 GHD patients and 8014 controls matched on age and gender. All records in GHD patients were studied and additional morbidity noted. Patients were divided...... into childhood onset (CO) and adult onset (AO), discriminated by an age cutoff below or above 18 years at onset of GHD. METHOD: Data on death were identified in national registries. Sex- and cause-specific mortalities were identified in CO and AO GHD when compared with controls. RESULTS: Mortality was increased...... versus AO males, both compared with controls (P mortality was increased due to cancer in all subgroups, due to circulatory diseases in all age groups for females and for males in the oldest age group. For CO, the increased mortality was due to cancer. CONCLUSIONS: We found...

  10. Human growth hormone alters carbohydrate storage in blood and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Growth hormone (GH) is a peptide hormone that plays vital roles in cell growth and metabolism. Aim: The study investigates the effect of GH on carbohydrate metabolism using Indian bird, Acridotheres tristis. Methods: Three different doses (0.4, 0.6, and 0.8mg/100g body weight) of human growth hormone ...

  11. Evidences for involvement of growth hormone and insulin-like growth factor in ovarian development of starry flounder (Platichthys stellatus).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Yongjiang; Wang, Bin; Liu, Xuezhou; Shi, Bao; Zang, Kun

    2017-04-01

    Although gonadotrophins are major regulators of ovarian function in teleosts and other vertebrates, accumulating evidence indicates that the growth hormone (GH)-insulin-like growth factor (IGF) axis also plays an important role in fish reproduction. As a first step to understand the physiological role of the GH-IGF system in the ovarian development of starry flounder (Platichthys stellatus), the expression profiles of GH and IGF messenger RNAs (mRNAs) and plasma GH, IGF-I, estradiol-17β (E2), and testosterone (T) levels during the ovarian development were investigated. The developmental stages of ovaries were divided into five stages (II, III, IV, V, and VI) by histological analysis. The hepatosomatic index (HSI) and gonadosomatic index (GSI) values increased and peaked at stage IV and stage V, respectively, and then declined at stage VI. Pituitary GH mRNA levels decreased sharply at stage III and raised to top level at stage VI. The hepatic IGF-I mRNA levels ascended to maximum value at stage V and then declined significantly at stage VI. However, the hepatic IGF-II mRNA levels remained stable and increased significantly at stage VI. In contrast, the ovarian IGF-I mRNA levels increased gradually and peaked at stage VI. The ovarian IGF-II mRNA levels were initially stable and increased significantly at stage V until the top level at stage VI. Consistent with the pituitary GH mRNA levels, plasma GH levels reduced sharply at stage III and remained depressed until stage V and then raised remarkably at stage VI. Plasma IGF-I level peaked at stage V and then declined to initial level. Plasma E2 level peaked at stage IV and then dramatically descended to the basal level. Plasma T level peaked at stage V and then declined significantly back to the basal level. Based on statistical analysis, significant positive correlations between hepatic IGF-I mRNA and GSI, ovarian IGF-II mRNA and hepatic IGF-II mRNA, ovarian IGF-I mRNA and ovarian IGF-II mRNA, and plasma IGF-I and

  12. The rationale and design of TransCon Growth Hormone for the treatment of growth hormone deficiency

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kennett Sprogøe

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available The fundamental challenge of developing a long-acting growth hormone (LAGH is to create a more convenient growth hormone (GH dosing profile while retaining the excellent safety, efficacy and tolerability of daily GH. With GH receptors on virtually all cells, replacement therapy should achieve the same tissue distribution and effects of daily (and endogenous GH while maintaining levels of GH and resulting IGF-1 within the physiologic range. To date, only two LAGHs have gained the approval of either the Food and Drug Administration (FDA or the European Medicines Agency (EMA; both released unmodified GH, thus presumably replicating distribution and pharmacological actions of daily GH. Other technologies have been applied to create LAGHs, including modifying GH (for example, protein enlargement or albumin binding such that the resulting analogues possess a longer half-life. Based on these approaches, nearly 20 LAGHs have reached various stages of clinical development. Although most have failed, lessons learned have guided the development of a novel LAGH. TransCon GH is a LAGH prodrug in which GH is transiently bound to an inert methoxy polyethylene glycol (mPEG carrier. It was designed to achieve the same safety, efficacy and tolerability as daily GH but with more convenient weekly dosing. In phase 2 trials of children and adults with growth hormone deficiency (GHD, similar safety, efficacy and tolerability to daily GH was shown as well as GH and IGF-1 levels within the physiologic range. These promising results support further development of TransCon GH.

  13. 60 YEARS OF NEUROENDOCRINOLOGY: The hypothalamo-GH axis: the past 60 years.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murray, P G; Higham, C E; Clayton, P E

    2015-08-01

    At the time of the publication of Geoffrey Harris's monograph on 'Neural control of the pituitary gland' 60 years ago, the pituitary was recognised to produce a growth factor, and extracts administered to children with hypopituitarism could accelerate growth. Since then our understanding of the neuroendocrinology of the GH axis has included identification of the key central components of the GH axis: GH-releasing hormone and somatostatin (SST) in the 1970s and 1980s and ghrelin in the 1990s. Characterisation of the physiological control of the axis was significantly advanced by frequent blood sampling studies in the 1980s and 1990s; the pulsatile pattern of GH secretion and the factors that influenced the frequency and amplitude of the pulses have been defined. Over the same time, spontaneously occurring and targeted mutations in the GH axis in rodents combined with the recognition of genetic causes of familial hypopituitarism demonstrated the key factors controlling pituitary development. As the understanding of the control of GH secretion advanced, developments of treatments for GH axis disorders have evolved. Administration of pituitary-derived human GH was followed by the introduction of recombinant human GH in the 1980s, and, more recently, by long-acting GH preparations. For GH excess disorders, dopamine agonists were used first followed by SST analogues, and in 2005 the GH receptor blocker pegvisomant was introduced. This review will cover the evolution of these discoveries and build a picture of our current understanding of the hypothalamo-GH axis. © 2015 Society for Endocrinology.

  14. Nuclear translocation and retention of growth hormone

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mertani, Hichem C; Raccurt, Mireille; Abbate, Aude

    2003-01-01

    We have previously demonstrated that GH is subject to rapid receptor-dependent nuclear translocation. Here, we examine the importance of ligand activation of the GH-receptor (GHR)-associated Janus kinase (JAK) 2 and receptor dimerization for hormone internalization and nuclear translocation by use...... of cells stably transfected with cDNA for the GHR. Staurosporine and herbimycin A treatment of cells did not affect the ability of GH to internalize but resulted in increased nuclear accumulation of hormone. Similarly, receptor mutations, which prevent the association and activation of JAK2, did not affect...... the ability of the hormone to internalize or translocate to the nucleus but resulted in increased nuclear accumulation of GH. These results were observed both by nuclear isolation and confocal laser scanning microscopy. Staurosporine treatment of cells in which human GH (hGH) was targeted to the cytoplasm...

  15. Immune function during GH treatment in GH-deficient adults

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sneppen, S B; Mersebach, H; Ullum, H

    2002-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: The aim of the present study was to investigate natural killer (NK) cell function and lymphocyte subsets in GH-deficient (GHD) adults, before and during long-term GH treatment. STUDY DESIGN: We investigated immune function in 19 adults with severe GHD, before and during 18 months...... of randomized treatment with GH or placebo. Measurement of lymphocyte subsets and NK cell activity was performed. Data obtained from 110 healthy adults served as reference values. RESULTS: NK cell activity, both unstimulated and stimulated by interferon-a or interleukin-2, was significantly impaired in GHD...... may serve as an autocrine/paracrine factor in immunomodulation and explain the clinical normal immune function in adult GH-deficient patients....

  16. Single dose and pulsatile treatment with human growth hormone in growth hormone deficiency.

    OpenAIRE

    Smith, P J; Pringle, P J; Brook, C G

    1987-01-01

    The growth and growth hormone profiles in four children receiving three different regimens of treatment with human growth hormone (hGH) were compared. There was no significant difference in the rate of growth between the regimens; the rate of growth fell dramatically after treatment. Pulsatile administration of hGH was no better than conventional treatment.

  17. Growth Hormone Research Society perspective on the development of long-acting growth hormone preparations

    Science.gov (United States)

    The Growth Hormone (GH) Research Society (GRS) convened a workshop to address important issues regarding trial design, efficacy, and safety of long-acting growth hormone preparations (LAGH). A closed meeting of 55 international scientists with expertise in GH, including pediatric and adult endocrino...

  18. The characterization of six auxin-induced tomato GH3 genes uncovers a member, SlGH3.4, strongly responsive to arbuscular mycorrhizal symbiosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liao, Dehua; Chen, Xiao; Chen, Aiqun; Wang, Huimin; Liu, Jianjian; Liu, Junli; Gu, Mian; Sun, Shubin; Xu, Guohua

    2015-04-01

    In plants, the GH3 gene family is widely considered to be involved in a broad range of plant physiological processes, through modulation of hormonal homeostasis. Multiple GH3 genes have been functionally characterized in several plant species; however, to date, limited works to study the GH3 genes in tomato have been reported. Here, we characterize the expression and regulatory profiles of six tomato GH3 genes, SlGH3.2, SlGH3.3, SlGH3.4, SlGH3.7, SlGH3.9 and SlGH3.15, in response to different phytohormone applications and arbuscular mycorrhizal (AM) fungal colonization. All six GH3 genes showed inducible responses to external IAA, and three members were significantly up-regulated in response to AM symbiosis. In particular, SlGH3.4, the transcripts of which were barely detectable under normal growth conditions, was strongly activated in the IAA-treated and AM fungal-colonized roots. A comparison of the SlGH3.4 expression in wild-type plants and M161, a mutant with a defect in AM symbiosis, confirmed that SlGH3.4 expression is highly correlated to mycorrhizal colonization. Histochemical staining demonstrated that a 2,258 bp SlGH3.4 promoter fragment could drive β-glucuronidase (GUS) expression strongly in root tips, steles and cortical cells of IAA-treated roots, but predominantly in the fungal-colonized cells of mycorrhizal roots. A truncated 654 bp promoter failed to direct GUS expression in IAA-treated roots, but maintained the symbiosis-induced activity in mycorrhizal roots. In summary, our results suggest that a mycorrhizal signaling pathway that is at least partially independent of the auxin signaling pathway has evolved for the co-regulation of the auxin- and mycorrhiza-activated GH3 genes in plants. © The Author 2014. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Japanese Society of Plant Physiologists. All rights reserved. For permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  19. Elevated GH/IGF-I promotes mammary tumors in high-fat, but not low-fat, fed mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gahete, Manuel D; Córdoba-Chacón, José; Lantvit, Daniel D; Ortega-Salas, Rosa; Sanchez-Sanchez, Rafael; Pérez-Jiménez, Francisco; López-Miranda, José; Swanson, Steven M; Castaño, Justo P; Luque, Raúl M; Kineman, Rhonda D

    2014-11-01

    Growth hormone (GH) and/or insulin-like growth factor I (IGF-I) are thought to promote breast cancer based on reports showing circulating IGF-I levels correlate, in epidemiological studies, with breast cancer risk. Also, mouse models with developmental GH/IGF-I deficiency/resistance are less susceptible to genetic- or chemical-induced mammary tumorigenesis. However, given the metabolic properties of GH, medical strategies have been considered to raise GH to improve body composition and metabolic function in elderly and obese patients. Since hyperlipidemia, inflammation, insulin resistance and obesity increase breast cancer risk, elevating GH may serve to exacerbate cancer progression. To better understand the role GH/IGF-I plays in tumor formation, this study used unique mouse models to determine if reducing GH/IGF-I in adults protects against 7,12-dimethylbenz[α]anthracene (DMBA)-induced mammary tumor development, and if moderate elevations in endogenous GH/IGF-I alter DMBA-induced tumorigenesis in mice fed a standard-chow diet or in mice with altered metabolic function due to high-fat feeding. We observed that adult-onset isolated GH-deficient mice, which also have reduced IGF-I levels, were less susceptible to DMBA-treatment. Specifically, fewer adult-onset isolated GH-deficient mice developed mammary tumors compared with GH-replete controls. In contrast, chow-fed mice with elevated endogenous GH/IGF-I (HiGH mice) were not more susceptible to DMBA-treatment. However, high-fat-fed, HiGH mice showed reduced tumor latency and increased tumor incidence compared with diet-matched controls. These results further support a role of GH/IGF-I in regulating mammary tumorigenesis but suggest the ultimate consequences of GH/IGF-I on breast tumor development are dependent on the diet and/or metabolic status. Published by Oxford University Press 2014.

  20. The Messenger Mission to Mercury

    CERN Document Server

    Domingue, D. L

    2007-01-01

    NASA’s MESSENGER mission, launched on 3 August, 2004 is the seventh mission in the Discovery series. MESSENGER encounters the planet Mercury four times, culminating with an insertion into orbit on 18 March 2011. It carries a comprehensive package of geophysical, geological, geochemical, and space environment experiments to complete the complex investigations of this solar-system end member, which begun with Mariner 10. The articles in this book, written by the experts in each area of the MESSENGER mission, describe the mission, spacecraft, scientific objectives, and payload. The book is of interest to all potential users of the data returned by the MESSENGER mission, to those studying the nature of the planet Mercury, and by all those interested in the design and implementation of planetary exploration missions.

  1. Substrate Metabolism and Insulin Sensitivity During Fasting in Obese Human Subjects: Impact of GH Blockade.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pedersen, Morten Høgild; Svart, Mads Vandsted; Lebeck, Janne; Bidlingmaier, Martin; Stødkilde-Jørgensen, Hans; Pedersen, Steen Bønløkke; Møller, Niels; Jessen, Niels; Jørgensen, Jens O L

    2017-04-01

    Insulin resistance and metabolic inflexibility are features of obesity and are amplified by fasting. Growth hormone (GH) secretion increases during fasting and GH causes insulin resistance. To study the metabolic effects of GH blockade during fasting in obese subjects. Nine obese males were studied thrice in a randomized design: (1) after an overnight fast (control), (2) after 72 hour fasting (fasting), and (3) after 72 hour fasting with GH blockade (pegvisomant) [fasting plus GH antagonist (GHA)]. Each study day consisted of a 4-hour basal period followed by a 2-hour hyperinsulinemic, euglycemic clamp combined with indirect calorimetry, assessment of glucose and palmitate turnover, and muscle and fat biopsies. GH levels increased with fasting (P fasting-induced reduction of serum insulin-like growth factor I was enhanced by GHA (P Fasting increased lipolysis and lipid oxidation independent of GHA, but fasting plus GHA caused a more pronounced suppression of lipid intermediates in response to hyperinsulinemic, euglycemic clamp. Fasting-induced insulin resistance was abrogated by GHA (P Fasting plus GHA also caused elevated glycerol levels and reduced levels of counterregulatory hormones. Fasting significantly reduced the expression of antilipolytic signals in adipose tissue independent of GHA. Suppression of GH activity during fasting in obese subjects reverses insulin resistance and amplifies insulin-stimulated suppression of lipid intermediates, indicating that GH is an important regulator of substrate metabolism, insulin sensitivity, and metabolic flexibility also in obese subjects.

  2. Morbidity and GH deficiency

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stochholm, Kirstine; Laursen, Torben; Green, Anders

    2008-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To estimate morbidity in Denmark in all patients with GH deficiency (GHD). DESIGN: Morbidity was analyzed in 1794 GHD patients and 8014 controls matched on age and gender. All records in the GHD patients were studied and additional morbidity noted. Diagnoses and dates of admissions were...... identified in the National Patient Registry. Lag time until first admission was used as a measure of morbidity. Patients were divided into childhood onset (CO) and adult onset (AO), discriminated by an age cut-off of 18 years at onset of GHD. METHOD: Sex- and cause-specific hazard ratios (HRs) in CO and AO...... GHD compared with controls. RESULTS: Total morbidity was significantly increased in the GHD patients. HR for CO males: 3.1 (95% confidence interval (CI): 2.7-3.7), CO females: 3.2 (95% CI: 2.6-3.9), AO males: 2.9 (95% CI: 2.6-3.2), and AO females: 3.2 (95% CI: 2.8-3.6). In 18 out of 20 chapters from...

  3. GH Travel & Mission Support System

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Agency for International Development — HTRAMS is a travel data collection system for GH that collects information on both the basic details of an employee's trips (destination, length, purpose, etc.) and...

  4. The GH/IGF-1 axis in obesity: pathophysiology and therapeutic considerations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berryman, Darlene E; Glad, Camilla A M; List, Edward O; Johannsson, Gudmundur

    2013-06-01

    Obesity has become one of the most common medical problems in developed countries, and this disorder is associated with high incidences of hypertension, dyslipidaemia, cardiovascular disease, type 2 diabetes mellitus and specific cancers. Growth hormone (GH) stimulates the production of insulin-like growth factor 1 in most tissues, and together GH and insulin-like growth factor 1 exert powerful collective actions on fat, protein and glucose metabolism. Clinical trials assessing the effects of GH treatment in patients with obesity have shown consistent reductions in total adipose tissue mass, in particular abdominal and visceral adipose tissue depots. Moreover, studies in patients with abdominal obesity demonstrate a marked effect of GH therapy on body composition and on lipid and glucose homeostasis. Therefore, administration of recombinant human GH or activation of endogenous GH production has great potential to influence the onset and metabolic consequences of obesity. However, the clinical use of GH is not without controversy, given conflicting results regarding its effects on glucose metabolism. This Review provides an introduction to the role of GH in obesity and summarizes clinical and preclinical data that describe how GH can influence the obese state.

  5. Effects of growth hormone therapeutic supplementation on hematopoietic stem/progenitor cells in children with growth hormone deficiency: focus on proliferation and differentiation capabilities

    OpenAIRE

    Kawa, M. P.; Stecewicz, I.; Piecyk, K.; Pius-Sadowska, E.; E Paczkowska; Rogi?ska, D.; Sobu?, A.; ?uczkowska, K.; Gawrych, E.; Petriczko, E.; Walczak, M.; Machali?ski, B.

    2015-01-01

    We investigated the direct effects of growth hormone (GH) replacement therapy (GH-RT) on hematopoiesis in children with GH deficiency (GHD) with the special emphasis on proliferation and cell cycle regulation. Peripheral blood (PB) was collected from sixty control individuals and forty GHD children before GH-RT and in 3rd and 6th month of GH-RT to measure hematological parameters and isolate CD34+-enriched hematopoietic progenitor cells (HPCs). Selected parameters of PB were analyzed by hemat...

  6. Characterization of Growth Hormone Resistance in Experimental and Ulcerative Colitis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Soendergaard, Christoffer; Kvist, Peter Helding; Thygesen, Peter

    2017-01-01

    Growth hormone (GH) resistance may develop as a consequence of inflammation during conditions such as inflammatory bowel disease, encompassing ulcerative colitis (UC). However, the specific role of the GH-insulin growth factor (IGF)-1-axis and/or the functional consequences of GH resistance in th...

  7. GH response to intravenous clonidine challenge correlates with history of childhood trauma in personality disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Royce J; Fanning, Jennifer R; Coccaro, Emil F

    2016-05-01

    Childhood trauma is a risk factor for personality disorder. We have previously shown that childhood trauma is associated with increased central corticotrophin-releasing hormone concentration in adults with personality disorder. In the brain, the release of corticotrophin-releasing hormone can be stimulated by noradrenergic neuronal activity, raising the possibility that childhood trauma may affect the hypothalamic-pituitary adrenal (HPA) axis by altering brain noradrenergic function. In this study, we sought to test the hypothesis that childhood trauma is associated with blunted growth hormone response to the α-2 adrenergic autoreceptor agonist clonidine. All subjects provided written informed consent. Twenty personality disordered and twenty healthy controls (without personality disorder or Axis I psychopathology) underwent challenge with clonidine, while plasma Growth Hormone (GH) concentration was monitored by intravenous catheter. On a different study session, subjects completed the Childhood Trauma Questionnaire and underwent diagnostic interviews. Contrary to our a priori hypothesis, childhood trauma was associated with enhanced GH response to clonidine. This positive relationship was present in the group of 40 subjects and in the subgroup 20 personality disordered subjects, but was not detected in the healthy control subjects when analyzed separately. The presence of personality disorder was unrelated to the magnitude of GH response. Childhood trauma is positively correlated with GH response to clonidine challenge in adults with personality disorder. Enhanced rather that blunted GH response differentiates childhood trauma from previously identified negative predictors of GH response, such as anxiety or mood disorder. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Adult height in children with growth hormone deficiency: a randomized, controlled, growth hormone dose-response trial.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sas, T.C.J.; Ridder, M.A. de; Wit, J.M.; Rotteveel, J.J.; Oostdijk, W.; Reeser, H.M.; Otten, B.J.; Muinck Keizer-Schrama, S.M.P.F. de

    2010-01-01

    AIM: To investigate the effect of 2 growth hormone (GH) doses on adult height (AH) in GH deficiency (GHD). METHODS: A multicenter, randomized, controlled dose-response trial compared attained AH minus target height (TH) between children receiving 0.7 mg/m(2)/day biosynthetic GH (approx. 0.025

  9. GH does not modulate the early fasting-induced release of free fatty acids in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steyn, F J; Leong, J W; Huang, L; Tan, H Y; Xie, T Y; Nelson, C; Waters, M J; Veldhuis, J D; Epelbaum, J; Chen, C

    2012-01-01

    Fasting results in the mobilization of adipose stores and the elevation of levels of free fatty acids (FFA). In humans, this process is driven by a release in GH. Little is known regarding the role of GH in modulating this process during early stages of fasting in the mouse. Confirmation of the role of GH in modulating FFA release in the fasting mouse is of particular importance given the frequent use of mouse models to study metabolic mechanisms. Here, we correlate the initial release of FFA throughout fasting in mice with pulsatile GH secretion. Observations illustrate the rapid release of FFA in response to food withdrawal. This does not correlate with a rise in GH secretion. Rather, we observed a striking loss in pulsatile secretion of GH throughout the first 6 h of fasting, suggesting that GH does not modulate the initial release of FFA in the mouse in response to fasting. This was confirmed in GH receptor knockout mice, in which we observed a robust fasting-induced rise in FFA. We further illustrate the dynamic relationship between the orexigenic and anorexigenic hormones ghrelin and leptin during fasting in the mouse. Our findings show an initial suppression of leptin and the eventual rise in circulating levels of acyl-ghrelin with fasting. However, altered acyl-ghrelin and leptin secretion occurs well after the rise in FFA and the suppression of GH secretion. Consequently, we conclude that although acyl-ghrelin and leptin may modulate the physiological response to drive food intake, these changes do not contribute to the initial loss of pulsatile GH secretion. Rather, it appears that the suppression of GH secretion in fasting may occur in response to an elevation in fasting levels of FFA or physiological stress. Observations highlight a divergent role for GH in modulating FFA release between man and mouse.

  10. Evidence for association of the cloned liver growth hormone receptor with a tyrosine kinase

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wang, X; Uhler, M D; Billestrup, N

    1992-01-01

    in a variety of cell types. The finding that the level of phosphorylation of GH receptor appears to vary with cell type is consistent with the cloned liver GH receptor being a substrate for an associated tyrosine kinase and with the amount of such a GH receptor-associated tyrosine kinase being cell type-specific.......The ability of the cloned liver growth hormone (GH) receptor, when expressed in mammalian cell lines, to copurify with tyrosine kinase activity and be tyrosyl phosphorylated was examined. 125I-human growth hormone-GH receptor complexes isolated from COS-7 cells transiently expressing high levels...... of the cloned liver GH receptor bound to anti-phosphotyrosine antibody, suggesting that the cloned GH receptor is tyrosyl phosphorylated in vivo. GH-GH receptor complexes purified from transfected COS-7 cells using anti-GH antibody incorporated 32P when incubated with [gamma-32P]ATP, indicating association...

  11. Molecular mechanisms of regulation of growth hormone gene expression in cultured rat pituitary cells by thyroid and glucocorticoid hormones

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yaffe, B.M.

    1989-01-01

    In cultured GC cells, a rat pituitary tumor cell line, growth hormone (GH) is induced in a synergistic fashion by physiologic concentrations of thyroid and glucocorticoid hormones. Abundant evidence indicates that these hormones mediate this response via their specific receptors. The purpose of this thesis is to explore the mechanisms by which these hormones affect GH production. When poly (A){sup +} RNA was isolated from cells grown both with and without hormones and translated in a cell-free wheat germ system, the preGH translation products were shown to be proportional to immunoassayable GH production under all combinations of hormonal milieux, indicating that changes in GH production is modulated at a pretranslational level. A cDNA library was constructed from poly (A){sup +}RNA and one clone containing GH cDNA sequences was isolated. This was used to confirm the above results by Northern dot blot analysis. This probe was also used to assess hormonal effects on GH mRNA half-life and synthetic rates as well as GH gene transcription rates in isolated nuclei. Using a pulse-chase protocol in which cellular RNA was labeled in vivo with ({sup 3}H)uridine, and quantitating ({sup 3}H)GHmRNA directly by hybridization to GH cDNA bound to nitrocellulose filters, GHmRNA was found to have a half-life of approximately 50 hours, and was not significantly altered by the presence of inducing hormones.

  12. Does the pituitary somatotrope play a primary role in regulating GH output in metabolic extremes?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luque, Raul M; Gahete, Manuel D; Cordoba-Chacon, Jose; Childs, Gwen V; Kineman, Rhonda D

    2011-03-01

    Circulating growth hormone (GH) levels rise in response to nutrient deprivation and fall in states of nutrient excess. Because GH regulates carbohydrate, lipid, and protein metabolism, defining the mechanisms by which changes in metabolism alter GH secretion will aid in our understanding of the cause, progression, and treatment of metabolic diseases. This review will summarize what is currently known regarding the impact of systemic metabolic signals on GH-axis function. In addition, ongoing studies using the Cre/loxP system to generate mouse models with selective somatotrope resistance to metabolic signals will be discussed, where these models will serve to enhance our understanding of the specific role the somatotrope plays in sensing the metabolic environment and adjusting GH output in metabolic extremes. © 2011 New York Academy of Sciences.

  13. Growth hormone effects on cortical bone dimensions in young adults with childhood-onset growth hormone deficiency

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hyldstrup, L; Conway, G S; Racz, K

    2012-01-01

    Growth hormone (GH) treatment in young adults with childhood-onset GH deficiency has beneficial effects on bone mass. The present study shows that cortical bone dimensions also benefit from GH treatment, with endosteal expansion and increased cortical thickness leading to improved bone strength....... INTRODUCTION: In young adults with childhood-onset growth hormone deficiency (CO GHD), GH treatment after final height is reached has been shown to have beneficial effects on spine and hip bone mineral density. The objective of the study was to evaluate the influence of GH on cortical bone dimensions. METHODS...

  14. Different effects of continuous and intermittent patterns of growth hormone administration on lipoprotein levels in growth hormone-deficient patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Laursen, Torben; Lemming, Lone; Jørgensen, Jens Otto Lunde

    1998-01-01

    Abstract BACKGROUND: Lipoprotein (a) (Lp(a)) is a risk marker for the development of atherosclerotic coronary heart disease. Growth hormone (GH) administration to GH-deficient (GHD) adults increases serum Lp(a) concentrations, and the levels of Lp(a) and GH are correlated in patients...... to the impact of the pattern of GH administration on, e.g., the risk of developing coronary heart disease can be drawn....... continuous (p administration to GH-deprived GHD patients, whereas the increase after GH bolus injections alone was not significant (p = 0.14). In study B significantly higher (p

  15. Anthropometry, CT, and DXA as predictors of GH deficiency in premenopausal women: ROC curve analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bredella, Miriam A; Utz, Andrea L; Torriani, Martin; Thomas, Bijoy; Schoenfeld, David A; Miller, Karen K

    2009-02-01

    Visceral adiposity is a strong determinant of growth hormone (GH) secretion, and states of GH deficiency are associated with increased visceral adiposity and decreased lean body mass. The purpose of our study was to determine the sensitivity and specificity of different methods of assessing body composition [anthropometry, dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry (DXA), and computed tomography (CT)] to predict GH deficiency in premenopausal women and threshold values for each technique to predict GH deficiency, using receiver operator characteristic (ROC) curve analysis. We studied a group of 45 healthy lean, overweight, and obese premenopausal women who underwent anthropometric measurements (body mass index, waist and hip circumferences, skin fold thickness), DXA, CT, and a GH-releasing hormone-arginine stimulation test. ROC curve analysis was used to determine cutoff values for each method to identify GH deficiency. Visceral adiposity measured by CT showed the highest sensitivity and specificity for identifying subjects with GH deficiency with a cutoff of >9,962 mm(2) [area under the curve (AUC), 0.95; sensitivity, 100%; specificity, 77.8%; P = 0.0001]. Largest waist circumference showed high sensitivity and specificity with a cutoff of >101.7 cm (AUC, 0.89; sensitivity, 88.9%; specificity, 75%; P = 0.0001). When the ROC curves of visceral fat measured by CT and largest waist circumference were compared, the difference between the two methods was not statistically significant (P = 0.36). Our study showed that the largest waist circumference predicts the presence of GH deficiency in healthy premenopausal women with high sensitivity and specificity and nearly as well as CT measurement of visceral adiposity. It can be used to identify women in whom GH deficiency is likely and therefore in whom formal GH stimulation testing might be indicated.

  16. Growth hormone replacement therapy in adults with growth hormone deficiency; thrice weekly low dose administration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chung, Y. S.; Lee, H. C.; Hwang, S. K.; Paik, I. K.; Lee, J. H.; Huh, K. B.

    1994-01-01

    Recent reports on growth hormone (GH) therapy have shown that GH has various beneficial effects in GH deficient adults. In most of these studies, GH was administered daily. Because GH is still expensive and has to be delivered by subcutaneous injection, we studied the 6-month therapeutic effects of thrice weekly GH injection therapy and compared it with daily therapy. Twenty eight adult patients with GH deficiency were randomly assigned into group 1 (ten cases, thrice weekly injections of GH), group 2 (nine cases, daily injections), and group 3 (nine cases, placebo injections). Lean body mass, serum basal GH levels, and insulin-like growth factor 1 levels significantly increased after six months of GH therapy in both groups 1 and 2. According to computed tomography, the mean mid-thigh muscle mass significantly increased in group 1, while the visceral fat mass significantly decreased in group 2. GH levels significantly increased exercise rate-pressure product and hand grip strength only in group 1. These results suggest that thrice weekly injections of GH are as effective as daily injections in GH deficient adults. PMID:7986392

  17. Genome-wide analysis of the GH3 family in apple (Malus × domestica).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuan, Huazhao; Zhao, Kai; Lei, Hengjiu; Shen, Xinjie; Liu, Yun; Liao, Xiong; Li, Tianhong

    2013-05-02

    Auxin plays important roles in hormone crosstalk and the plant's stress response. The auxin-responsive Gretchen Hagen3 (GH3) gene family maintains hormonal homeostasis by conjugating excess indole-3-acetic acid (IAA), salicylic acid (SA), and jasmonic acids (JAs) to amino acids during hormone- and stress-related signaling pathways. With the sequencing of the apple (Malus × domestica) genome completed, it is possible to carry out genomic studies on GH3 genes to indentify candidates with roles in abiotic/biotic stress responses. Malus sieversii Roem., an apple rootstock with strong drought tolerance and the ancestral species of cultivated apple species, was used as the experimental material. Following genome-wide computational and experimental identification of MdGH3 genes, we showed that MdGH3s were differentially expressed in the leaves and roots of M. sieversii and that some of these genes were significantly induced after various phytohormone and abiotic stress treatments. Given the role of GH3 in the negative feedback regulation of free IAA concentration, we examined whether phytohormones and abiotic stresses could alter the endogenous auxin level. By analyzing the GUS activity of DR5::GUS-transformed Arabidopsis seedlings, we showed that ABA, SA, salt, and cold treatments suppressed the auxin response. These findings suggest that other phytohormones and abiotic stress factors might alter endogenous auxin levels. Previous studies showed that GH3 genes regulate hormonal homeostasis. Our study indicated that some GH3 genes were significantly induced in M. sieversii after various phytohormone and abiotic stress treatments, and that ABA, SA, salt, and cold treatments reduce the endogenous level of axuin. Taken together, this study provides evidence that GH3 genes play important roles in the crosstalk between auxin, other phytohormones, and the abiotic stress response by maintaining auxin homeostasis.

  18. Effect of gender on the GH-IGF-I response to anaerobic exercise in young adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eliakim, Alon; Nemet, Dan; Most, Guy; Rakover, Noa; Pantanowitz, Michal; Meckel, Yoav

    2014-12-01

    Exercise-associated effects on the growth hormone-insulin-like growth factor-I (GH-IGF-I) axis were studied, mainly after aerobic exercise. We determined the gender effect on the GH-IGF-I axis response to a standard all-out Wingate anaerobic test (WAnT) in healthy active young adult men and women (men = 12 and women = 16; age range: 24-34 years). Blood samples for GH and IGF-I, key elements of the GH-IGF-I axis, were collected before and 20, 30, 40, and 60 minutes after the beginning of exercise. In addition, we collected postexercise blood lactate levels. Postexercise lactate levels were higher among men; however, this difference did not reach statistical significance (13.8 ± 1.3 vs. 11.1 ± 1.0 mmol·L, respectively; p = 0.1). The WAnT was associated with a significant increase in GH in both genders. However, GH peak was greater among women (10.8 ± 1.8 vs. 5.6 ± 1.4 ng·ml, in women and men, respectively; p Exercise was associated with a significant increase in IGF only among men (from 166.8 ± 8.4 to 186.9 ± 9.3; p anaerobic exercise was associated with a greater and earlier postexercise GH peak in women compared with men. All together, the results suggest anaerobic exercise-related anabolic-type hormonal response.

  19. Luteinizing hormone (LH)-responsive Cushing's syndrome: the demonstration of LH receptor messenger ribonucleic acid in hyperplastic adrenal cells, which respond to chorionic gonadotropin and serotonin agonists in vitro

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    R.A. Feelders (Richard); W.W. de Herder (Wouter); S.W.J. Lamberts (Steven); L.J. Hofland (Leo); P.M. van Koetsveld (Peter); M. Verhoef-Post (Miriam); A.P.N. Themmen (Axel); F.H. de Jong (Frank); H.J. Bonjer (Jaap); A.J. Clark (Adrian); A-J. van der Lely (Aart-Jan)

    2003-01-01

    textabstractIn a substantial part of adrenal adenomas and hyperplasias from patients with Cushing's syndrome, cortisol production is controlled by the expression of aberrant hormone receptors on adrenocortical cells. We present in vivo and in vitro data of two patients with a

  20. Growth hormone and the cardiovascular system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palmeiro, Christopher R; Anand, Rishi; Dardi, Inderpreet Kaur; Balasubramaniyam, Nivas; Schwarcz, Monica D; Weiss, Irene A

    2012-01-01

    Growth hormone (GH) exerts its effects through insulin-like growth factor-1, and although ubiquitous in human tissues, it has a significant role in cardiovascular function. In recent years, there has been a great deal of interest in GH as an etiologic factor in many cardiovascular disease states. Acromegaly, a state of endogenous GH excess, results in myocardial hypertrophy and decreased cardiac performance with increased cardiovascular mortality. Additional insight into the role of excess GH on the cardiovascular system has been gained from data collected in athletes doping with GH. Likewise, GH deficiency is associated with increased mortality, possibly from the associated increase in atherosclerosis, lipid abnormalities, and endothelial dysfunction. However, further research is required to clarify the benefit of GH treatment in both deficient states and in heart failure patients.

  1. Skeletal muscle afferent regulation of bioassayable growth hormone in the rat pituitary

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gosselink, K. L.; Grindeland, R. E.; Roy, R. R.; Zhong, H.; Bigbee, A. J.; Grossman, E. J.; Edgerton, V. R.

    1998-01-01

    There are forms of growth hormone (GH) in the plasma and pituitary of the rat and in the plasma of humans that are undetected by presently available immunoassays (iGH) but can be measured by bioassay (bGH). Although the regulation of iGH release is well documented, the mechanism(s) of bGH release is unclear. On the basis of changes in bGH and iGH secretion in rats that had been exposed to microgravity conditions, we hypothesized that neural afferents play a role in regulating the release of these hormones. To examine whether bGH secretion can be modulated by afferent input from skeletal muscle, the proximal or distal ends of severed hindlimb fast muscle nerves were stimulated ( approximately 2 times threshold) in anesthetized rats. Plasma bGH increased approximately 250%, and pituitary bGH decreased approximately 60% after proximal nerve trunk stimulation. The bGH response was independent of muscle mass or whether the muscles were flexors or extensors. Distal nerve stimulation had little or no effect on plasma or pituitary bGH. Plasma iGH concentrations were unchanged after proximal nerve stimulation. Although there may be multiple regulatory mechanisms of bGH, the present results demonstrate that the activation of low-threshold afferents from fast skeletal muscles can play a regulatory role in the release of bGH, but not iGH, from the pituitary in anesthetized rats.

  2. Lipoprotein metabolism in hypothyroidism : the contribution of growth hormone

    OpenAIRE

    Hoogerbrugge, Nicoline

    1992-01-01

    textabstractCurrent data suggest a role for GH in the regulation of lipoprotein metabolism. In hypothyroidism not only the secretion of thyroid hormone, but also of GH is decreased. Generally the effects on plasma lipids seen in hypothyroid individuals are considered to be a consequence of decreased thyroid hormone levels. More then twenty years ago evidence was found that treatment of hypothyroid rats with GH in supraphysiologic doses affects plasma lipid concentrations, but whether a lack o...

  3. EFFECTS OF GROWTH HORMONE REPLACEMENT THERAPY ON THYROID FUNCTION TESTS IN GROWTH HORMONE DEFICIENT CHILDREN

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H Moayeri

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available "nThere are numerous, often contradictory reports on the effect of growth hormone (GH therapy on thyroid function. These reports prompted us to evaluate the impact of GH therapy on thyroid function in previously euthyroid children with GH deficiency. Twenty five clinically and biochemically euthyroid children with GH deficiency were studied. A thyroid profile (T4, Free T4, T3 and TSH was performed at baseline and 3, 6 and 12 months after GH therapy in 21 children with idiopathic growth hormone deficiency (group A and 4 children with organic GH deficiency (group B. We observed a significant reduction in serum T4 and free T4 concentrations during GH therapy in both groups (P < 0.01. No patient in group A had free T4 levels fell into the hypothyroid range, while in one of four patients in group B, free T4 value fell into the hypothyroid range during GH therapy. In both groups, no significant variation in serum TSH and T3 was recorded at any time. Our data suggest that GH therapy can introduce changes in thyroid function and so confirm the need of a careful monitoring of thyroid function in particular in children with organic GH deficiency during long-term GH therapy.

  4. GH/IGF-I Transgene Expression on Muscle Homeostasis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwartz, Robert J.

    1999-01-01

    We propose to test the hypothesis that the growth hormone/ insulin like growth factor-I axis through autocrine/paracrine mechanisms may provide long term muscle homeostasis under conditions of prolonged weightlessness. As a key alternative to hormone replacement therapy, ectopic production of hGH, growth hormone releasing hormone (GHRH), and IGF-I will be studied for its potential on muscle mass impact in transgenic mice under simulated microgravity. Expression of either hGH or IGF-I would provide a chronic source of a growth-promoting protein whose biosynthesis or secretion is shut down in space. Muscle expression of the IGF-I transgene has demonstrated about a 20% increase in hind limb muscle mass over control nontransgenic litter mates. These recent experiments, also establish the utility of hind-limb suspension in mice as a workable model to study atrophy in weight bearing muscles. Thus, transgenic mice will be used in hind-limb suspension models to determine the role of GH/IGF-I on maintenance of muscle mass and whether concentric exercises might act in synergy with hormone treatment. As a means to engineer and ensure long-term protein production that would be workable in humans, gene therapy technology will be used by to monitor muscle mass preservation during hind-limb suspension, after direct intramuscular injection of a genetically engineered muscle-specific vector expressing GHRH. Effects of this gene-based therapy will be assessed in both fast twitch (medial gastrocnemius) and slow twitch muscle (soleus). End-points include muscle size, ultrastructure, fiber type, and contractile function, in normal animals, hind limb suspension, and reambutation.

  5. Pituitary and mammary growth hormone in dogs

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bhatti, Sofie Fatima Mareyam

    2006-01-01

    Several pathological (e.g. obesity and chronic hypercortisolism) and non-pathological (e.g. ageing) states in humans are characterized by a reduction in pituitary growth hormone (GH) secretion. Chronic hypercortisolism in humans is also associated with an impaired GH response to various stimuli.

  6. Human Growth Hormone: The Latest Ergogenic Aid?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cowart, Virginia S.

    1988-01-01

    Believing that synthetic human growth hormone (hGH) will lead to athletic prowess and fortune, some parents and young athletes wish to use the drug to enhance sports performance. Should hGH become widely available, its abuse could present many problems, from potential health risks to the ethics of drug-enhanced athletic performance. (JL)

  7. Mercury after three MESSENGER flybys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Solomon, Sean C.; Bedini, Peter D.; Anderson, Brian J.; Prockter, Louise M.; Blewett, David T.; Evans, Larry G.; Gold, Robert E.; Murchie, Scott L.; Nittler, Larry R.; Phillips, Roger J.; Zuber, Maria T.

    The MErcury Surface, Space ENvironment, GEochemistry, and Ranging (MESSENGER) space-craft, developed under NASA's Discovery Program, is the first space probe to visit the planet Mercury in more than 30 years. MESSENGER flew by the innermost planet twice in 2008 and once last fall. The flybys confirmed that Mercury's internal magnetic field is dominantly dipolar, with a vector moment closely aligned with the spin axis. MESSENGER detected mag-nesium in Mercury's exosphere, demonstrated that Mercury's anti-sunward neutral tail contains multiple species, and revealed that the distributions of sodium, calcium, and magnesium in the exosphere and tail vary differently with latitude, time of day, and Mercury's position in or-bit, signatures of multiple source processes. MESSENGER's laser altimeter showed that the equatorial topographic relief of Mercury exceeds 5 km, revealed an equatorial ellipticity aligned with the ellipticity in Mercury's gravitational potential, and documented the form of numer-ous impact craters and fault scarps. MESSENGER images provided evidence for widespread volcanism, and candidate sites for volcanic centers were identified. In addition, newly imaged lobate scarps and other tectonic landforms support the hypothesis that Mercury contracted globally in response to interior cooling. The ˜1500-km-diameter Caloris basin, viewed in its entirety for the first time by MESSENGER, was the focus for concentrations of volcanic cen-ters, some with evidence of pyroclastic deposits, and widespread contractional and extensional deformation; smooth plains interior and exterior to the basin are demonstrably younger than the basin-forming event. The ˜700-km-diameter Rembrandt basin, less volcanically infilled than Caloris, was likewise a focus for concentrated magmatic and deformational activity. A ˜290-km-diameter basin contains interior plains that are among the youngest volcanic material on the planet. The nearly global observations of Mercury surface units

  8. Thyroid hormones affect plasma ghrelin and obestatin levels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kosowicz, J; Baumann-Antczak, A; Ruchała, M; Gryczyñska, M; Gurgul, E; Sowiñski, J

    2011-02-01

    Using radioimmunoassay, the effects of thyroid hormones on plasma total ghrelin (Gh) and obestatin (Ob) concentrations were evaluated in thyrotoxic patients with an excess of thyroid hormones and in hypothyroid patients lacking endogenous thyroid hormones. 24 patients with thyrotoxicosis, 25 hypothyroid patents after total thyreoidectomy performed due to thyroid cancer, and 17 control subjects were examined. Compared with the controls, the ghrelin and obestatin were elevated in hypothyroidism, while they were decreased in thyrotoxicosis. The plasma Gh and Ob levels differ depending on the thyroid function. In thyroid hormones deficiency, plasma Gh and Ob are increased, while in patients with excess of thyroid hormones, the levels of both Gh and Ob are definitely lower. Gh/Ob ratio is higher in hypothyroidism than in control subjects and thyrotoxic patients. © Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  9. Extrapituitary growth hormone synthesis in humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pérez-Ibave, Diana Cristina; Rodríguez-Sánchez, Iram Pablo; Garza-Rodríguez, María de Lourdes; Barrera-Saldaña, Hugo Alberto

    2014-01-01

    The gene for pituitary growth hormone (GH-N) in man belongs to a multigene locus located at chromosome 17q24.2, which also harbors four additional genes: one for a placental variant of GH-N (named GH-V) and three of chorionic somatommamotropin (CSH) type. Their tandem arrangement from 5' to 3' is: GH-N, CSH-L, CSH-1, GH-V and CSH-2. GH-N is mainly expressed in the pituitary from birth throughout life, while the remaining genes are expressed in the placenta of pregnant women. Pituitary somatotrophs secrete GH into the bloodstream to act at receptor sites in most tissues. GH participates in the regulation of several complex physiological processes, including growth and metabolism. Recently, the presence of GH has been described in several extrapituitary sites, such as neural, ocular, reproductive, immune, cardiovascular, muscular, dermal and skeletal tissues. It has been proposed that GH has an autocrine action in these tissues. While the body of evidence for its presence is constantly growing, research of its possible function and implications lag behind. In this review we highlight the evidence of extrapituitary synthesis of GH in humans. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Genome-wide identification, expression analysis of auxin-responsive GH3 family genes in maize (Zea mays L.) under abiotic stresses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feng, Shangguo; Yue, Runqing; Tao, Sun; Yang, Yanjun; Zhang, Lei; Xu, Mingfeng; Wang, Huizhong; Shen, Chenjia

    2015-09-01

    Auxin is involved in different aspects of plant growth and development by regulating the expression of auxin-responsive family genes. As one of the three major auxin-responsive families, GH3 (Gretchen Hagen3) genes participate in auxin homeostasis by catalyzing auxin conjugation and bounding free indole-3-acetic acid (IAA) to amino acids. However, how GH3 genes function in responses to abiotic stresses and various hormones in maize is largely unknown. Here, the latest updated maize (Zea mays L.) reference genome sequence was used to characterize and analyze the ZmGH3 family genes from maize. The results showed that 13 ZmGH3 genes were mapped on five maize chromosomes (total 10 chromosomes). Highly diversified gene structures and tissue-specific expression patterns suggested the possibility of function diversification for these genes in response to environmental stresses and hormone stimuli. The expression patterns of ZmGH3 genes are responsive to several abiotic stresses (salt, drought and cadmium) and major stress-related hormones (abscisic acid, salicylic acid and jasmonic acid). Various environmental factors suppress auxin free IAA contents in maize roots suggesting that these abiotic stresses and hormones might alter GH3-mediated auxin levels. The responsiveness of ZmGH3 genes to a wide range of abiotic stresses and stress-related hormones suggested that ZmGH3s are involved in maize tolerance to environmental stresses. © 2014 Institute of Botany, Chinese Academy of Sciences.

  11. [Effects of growth hormone replacement therapy on bone metabolism].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamamoto, Masahiro; Sugimoto, Toshitsugu

    2014-06-01

    Growth hormone (GH) as well as insulin like growth factor-1 (IGF-1) are essential hormones to maintain homeostasis of bone turnover by activating osteoblastogenesis and osteoclastogenesis. Results from GH replacement therapy for primary osteoporosis and adult-onset GH deficiency (AGHD) suggest that one year or more treatment period by this agent is required to gain bone mineral density (BMD) over the basal level after compensating BMD loss caused by dominant increase in bone resorption which was observed at early phase of GH treatment. A recent meta-analysis demonstrates the efficacy of GH replacement therapy on increases in BMD in male patients with AGHD. Additional analyses are needed to draw firm conclusions in female patients with AGHD, because insufficient amounts of GH might be administrated to them without considerations of influence of estrogen replacement therapy on IGF-1 production. Further observational studies are needed to clarify whether GH replacement therapy prevent fracture risk in these patients.

  12. Bone Mineral Density After Cessation of GH Treatment in Young Adults Born SGA: A 5-Year Longitudinal Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smeets, Carolina C J; van der Steen, Manouk; Renes, Judith S; Hokken-Koelega, Anita C S

    2017-09-01

    Short children born small for gestational age (SGA) have below-average bone mineral density (BMD). Growth hormone (GH) treatment improves height and BMD in short SGA children. Longitudinal data on BMD in adults born SGA, after GH cessation (GH-stop), are lacking. To determine BMD in young adults born SGA during 5 years after GH-stop. In 173 GH-treated adults born SGA (SGA-GH), BMD of total body (BMDTB) and bone mineral apparent density of lumbar spine (BMADLS) were measured longitudinally at adult height (AH) and 6 months, 2 years, and 5 years thereafter. At 5 years after GH-stop (age 21 years), data were compared with 45 untreated short SGA adults (SGA-S), 59 SGA adults with spontaneous catch-up (SGA-CU), and 81 adults born appropriate for gestational age (AGA). At GH-stop (mean age 16.4 years), estimated mean (standard error) BMDTB standard deviation score (SDS) was -0.40 (0.1) in males and -0.51 (0.1) in females, followed by a trend toward a decrease of BMDTB in males to -0.59 (0.1) at 5 years after GH-stop (P = 0.06), whereas it remained stable in females [-0.57 (0.1); P = 0.33]. At GH-stop, BMADLS SDS was -0.01 (0.1) in males and -0.29 (0.1) in females, followed by a decrease in males and females to -0.38 and -0.55, respectively, at 5 years after GH-stop (P SGA-GH were similar compared with SGA-S, SGA-CU, and AGA. After GH-stop, there is a gradual decline of BMADLS, but at the age of 21 years, BMDTB and BMADLS are similar as in untreated short SGA adults.

  13. Dual regulation role of GH3.5 in salicylic acid and auxin signaling during Arabidopsis-Pseudomonas syringae interaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Zhongqin; Li, Qun; Li, Zhimiao; Staswick, Paul E; Wang, Muyang; Zhu, Ying; He, Zuhua

    2007-10-01

    Salicylic acid (SA) plays a central role in plant disease resistance, and emerging evidence indicates that auxin, an essential plant hormone in regulating plant growth and development, is involved in plant disease susceptibility. GH3.5, a member of the GH3 family of early auxin-responsive genes in Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana), encodes a protein possessing in vitro adenylation activity on both indole-3-acetic acid (IAA) and SA. Here, we show that GH3.5 acts as a bifunctional modulator in both SA and auxin signaling during pathogen infection. Overexpression of the GH3.5 gene in an activation-tagged mutant gh3.5-1D led to elevated accumulation of SA and increased expression of PR-1 in local and systemic tissues in response to avirulent pathogens. In contrast, two T-DNA insertional mutations of GH3.5 partially compromised the systemic acquired resistance associated with diminished PR-1 expression in systemic tissues. The gh3.5-1D mutant also accumulated high levels of free IAA after pathogen infection and impaired different resistance-gene-mediated resistance, which was also observed in the GH3.6 activation-tagged mutant dfl1-D that impacted the auxin pathway, indicating an important role of GH3.5/GH3.6 in disease susceptibility. Furthermore, microarray analysis showed that the SA and auxin pathways were simultaneously augmented in gh3.5-1D after infection with an avirulent pathogen. The SA pathway was amplified by GH3.5 through inducing SA-responsive genes and basal defense components, whereas the auxin pathway was derepressed through up-regulating IAA biosynthesis and down-regulating auxin repressor genes. Taken together, our data reveal novel regulatory functions of GH3.5 in the plant-pathogen interaction.

  14. Growth hormone receptor C-terminal domains required for growth hormone-induced intracellular free Ca2+ oscillations and gene transcription

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Billestrup, N; Bouchelouche, P; Allevato, G

    1995-01-01

    The biological effects of growth hormone (GH) are initiated by its binding to the GH receptor (GHR) followed by association and activation of the tyrosine kinase JAK2. Here we report that GH can stimulate an increase in intracellular free Ca2+ concentration ([Ca2+]i) in cells expressing wild-type...

  15. Endurance training and GH administration in elderly women

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lange, K H; Lorentsen, J; Isaksson, F

    2001-01-01

    In the present study, the effect of endurance training alone and endurance training combined with recombinant human growth hormone (rhGH) administration on subcutaneous abdominal adipose tissue lipolysis was investigated. Sixteen healthy women [age 75 +/- 2 yr (mean +/- SE)] underwent a 12-wk...... endurance training program on a cycle ergometer. rhGH was administered in a randomized, double-blinded, placebo-controlled design in addition to the training program. Subcutaneous abdominal adipose tissue lipolysis was estimated by means of microdialysis combined with measurements of subcutaneous abdominal......% of pretraining peak oxygen uptake. Endurance training alone did not affect subcutaneous abdominal adipose tissue lipolysis either at rest or during exercise, as reflected by identical levels of interstitial adipose tissue glycerol, subcutaneous abdominal ATBF, and plasma nonesterified fatty acids before...

  16. Augmented Growth Hormone Secretion and Stat3 Phosphorylation in an Aryl Hydrocarbon Receptor Interacting Protein (AIP-Disrupted Somatotroph Cell Line.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Takashi Fukuda

    Full Text Available Aryl hydrocarbon receptor interacting protein (AIP is thought to be a tumor suppressor gene, as indicated by a mutational analysis of pituitary somatotroph adenomas. However, the physiological significance of AIP inactivation in somatotroph cells remains unclear. Using CRISPR/Cas9, we identified a GH3 cell clone (termed GH3-FTY in which Aip was genetically disrupted, and subsequently investigated its character with respect to growth hormone (Gh synthesis and proliferation. Compared with GH3, GH3-FTY cells showed remarkably increased Gh production and a slight increase in cell proliferation. Gh-induced Stat3 phosphorylation is known to be a mechanism of Gh oversecretion in GH3. Interestingly, phosphorylated-Stat3 expression in GH3-FTY cells was increased more compared with GH3 cells, suggesting a stronger drive for this mechanism in GH3-FTY. The phenotypes of GH3-FTY concerning Gh overproduction, cell proliferation, and increased Stat3 phosphorylation were significantly reversed by the exogenous expression of Aip. GH3-FTY cells were less sensitive to somatostatin than GH3 cells in the suppression of cell proliferation, which might be associated with the reduced expression of somatostatin receptor type 2. GH3-FTY xenografts in BALB/c nude mice (GH3-FTY mice formed more mitotic somatotroph tumors than GH3 xenografts (GH3 mice, as also evidenced by increased Ki67 scores. GH3-FTY mice were also much larger and had significantly higher plasma Gh levels than GH3 mice. Furthermore, GH3-FTY mice showed relative insulin resistance compared with GH3 mice. In conclusion, we established a somatotroph cell line, GH3-FTY, which possessed prominent Gh secretion and mitotic features associated with the disruption of Aip.

  17. Increased neck soft tissue mass and worsening of obstructive sleep apnea after growth hormone treatment in men with abdominal obesity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Karimi, Mahssa; Koranyi, Josef; Franco, Celina

    2010-01-01

    Risk factors for obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) are male gender, obesity and abnormalities in neck soft tissue mass. OSA is associated with both growth hormone (GH) excess and severe GH deficiency in adults. Adults with abdominal obesity have markedly suppressed GH secretion.......Risk factors for obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) are male gender, obesity and abnormalities in neck soft tissue mass. OSA is associated with both growth hormone (GH) excess and severe GH deficiency in adults. Adults with abdominal obesity have markedly suppressed GH secretion....

  18. Geodesy at Mercury with MESSENGER

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, David E.; Zuber, Maria t.; Peale, Stanley J.; Phillips, Roger J.; Solomon, Sean C.

    2006-01-01

    In 2011 the MESSENGER (MErcury Surface, Space ENvironment, GEochemistry, and Ranging) spacecraft will enter Mercury orbit and begin the mapping phase of the mission. As part of its science objectives the MESSENGER mission will determine the shape and gravity field of Mercury. These observations will enable the topography and the crustal thickness to be derived for the planet and will determine the small libration of the planet about its axis, the latter critical to constraining the state of the core. These measurements require very precise positioning of the MESSENGER spacecraft in its eccentric orbit, which has a periapsis altitude as low as 200 km, an apoapsis altitude near 15,000 km, and a closest approach to the surface varying from latitude 60 to about 70 N. The X-band tracking of MESSENGER and the laser altimetry are the primary data that will be used to measure the planetary shape and gravity field. The laser altimeter, which has an expected range of 1000 to 1200 km, is expected to provide significant data only over the northern hemisphere because of MESSENGER's eccentric orbit. For the southern hemisphere, radio occultation measurements obtained as the spacecraft passes behind the planet as seen from Earth and images obtained with the imaging system will be used to provide the long-wavelength shape of the planet. Gravity, derived from the tracking data, will also have greater resolution in the northern hemisphere, but full global models for both topography and gravity will be obtained at low harmonic order and degree. The limiting factor for both gravity and topography is expected to be knowledge of the spacecraft location. Present estimations are that in a combined tracking, altimetry, and occultation solution the spacecraft position uncertainty is likely to be of order 10 m. This accuracy should be adequate for establishing an initial geodetic coordinate system for Mercury that will enable positioning of imaged features on the surface, determination of

  19. Thyroid Hormone and Estrogen Regulate Exercise-Induced Growth Hormone Release

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ignacio, Daniele Leão; da S. Silvestre, Diego H.; Cavalcanti-de-Albuquerque, João Paulo Albuquerque; Louzada, Ruy Andrade

    2015-01-01

    Growth hormone (GH) regulates whole body metabolism, and physical exercise is the most potent stimulus to induce its secretion in humans. The mechanisms underlying GH secretion after exercise remain to be defined. The aim of this study was to elucidate the role of estrogen and pituitary type 1 deiodinase (D1) activation on exercise-induced GH secretion. Ten days after bilateral ovariectomy, animals were submitted to 20 min of treadmill exercise at 75% of maximum aerobic capacity and tissues were harvested immediately or 30 min after exercise. Non-exercised animals were used as controls. A significant increase in D1 activity occurred immediately after exercise (~60%) in sham-operated animals and GH was higher (~6-fold) 30 min after exercise. Estrogen deficient rats exhibited basal levels of GH and D1 activity comparable to those found in control rats. However, after exercise both D1 activity and serum GH levels were blunted compared to sedentary rats. To understand the potential cause-effect of D1 activation in exercise-induced GH release, we pharmacologically blocked D1 activity by propylthiouracil (PTU) injection into intact rats and submitted them to the acute exercise session. D1 inhibition blocked exercise-induced GH secretion, although basal levels were unaltered. In conclusion, estrogen deficiency impairs the induction of thyroid hormone activating enzyme D1 in the pituitary, and GH release by acute exercise. Also, acute D1 activation is essential for exercise-induced GH response. PMID:25874614

  20. IDENTIFICATION OF GH|ALUI AND GHR|ALUI GENES POLYMORPHISMS IN INDONESIAN BUFFALO

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. Andreas

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Growth hormone (GH is an anabolic hormone which sintesized and secreted by somatrotop cell inpituitary anterior lobe. GH exert its effect on growth and metabolism by interacting with a specificreceptor on the surface of the target cells. Growth hormone receptor (GHR has been suggested ascandidate gene for traits related to meat production in Bovidae. The objectives of this study were toidentify polymorphism of GH and GHR genes in buffalo. The 452 DNA samples buffalo were collectedfrom five populations in Indonesia (Siborong-Borong-Medan (65, Lebak-Banten (29, Pandeglang-Banten (180, Semarang-Central Java, and Mataram-West Nusa Tenggara (103. A gene fragment of theGH|AluI gene at 432 bp located on exon 3 and GHR|AluI gene at 298 bp on exon 10 were successfullyamplified by using the techniques of a PCR (polymerase chain reaction and genotyped by PCR-RFLP(restriction fragment length polymorphism then -SSCP (single strand conformation polymorphism. Theresults showed no polymorphisms were detected in these genes. All buffaloes tested had LL genotype forlocus GH|AluI and AA genotype for locus GHR|AluI.

  1. Pituitary adenomas in mice transgenic for growth hormone-releasing hormone

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Asa, S L; Kovacs, K; Stefaneanu, L

    1992-01-01

    It has been shown that mice transgenic for human GH-releasing hormone (GRH) develop hyperplasia of pituitary somatotrophs, lactotrophs, and mammosomatotrophs, cells capable of producing both GH and PRL, by 8 months of age. We now report that GRH transgenic mice 10-24 months of age develop pituitary...

  2. A remote but significant sequence homology between glycoside hydrolase clan GH-H and glycoside hydrolase family GH 31

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Janecek, S.; Svensson, Birte; MacGregor, E.A.

    2007-01-01

    Although both the α-amylase super-family, i.e. the glycoside hydrolase (GH) clan GH-H (the GH families 13, 70 and 77), and family GH31 share some characteristics, their different catalytic machinery prevents classification of GH31 in clan GH-H. A significant but remote evolutionary relatedness is......7 and β8 of the GH-H and GH31 (β/α)8-barrels. Structure comparison of GH13 α-amylase and GH31 α-xylosidase guided alignment of GH-H and GH31 members for construction of evolutionary trees. The closest sequence relationship displayed by GH31 is to GH77 of clan GH-H....

  3. The physiology of growth hormone and sport.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Widdowson, W Matthew

    2012-02-01

    The growth hormone (GH)\\/ insulin-like growth factor-I (IGF-I) axis exerts short-and long-term metabolic effects that are potentially important during exercise. Exercise is a potent stimulus to GH release and there is some evidence that the acute increase in GH is important in regulating substrate metabolism post-exercise. Regular exercise also increases 24-hour GH secretion rates, which potentially contributes to the physiologic changes induced by training. The effects of GH replacement in GH-deficient adults provide a useful model with which to study the effects of the more long-term effects of the GH\\/ IGF-I axis. There is convincing evidence that GH replacement increases exercise capacity. Measures of exercise performance including maximal oxygen uptake (VO2max) and ventilatory threshold (VeT) are impaired in GH deficiency and improved by GH replacement, probably through some combination of increased oxygen delivery to exercising muscle, increased fatty acid availability with glycogen sparing, increased muscle strength, improved body composition and improved thermoregulation. Administration of supraphysiologic doses of GH to athletes increases fatty acid availability and reduces oxidative protein loss particularly during exercise, and increases lean body mass. It is not known whether these effects translate to improved athletic performance, although recombinant human GH is known to be widely abused in sport. The model of acromegaly provides evidence that long-term GH excess does not result in improved performance but it is possible that a "window" exists in which the protein anabolic effects of supraphysiologic GH might be advantageous.

  4. Effects of Growth Hormone on Bone.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tritos, Nicholas A; Klibanski, Anne

    2016-01-01

    Describe the effects of growth hormone (GH) and insulin-like growth factor 1 (IGF-1) on the skeleton. The GH and IGF-1 axis has pleiotropic effects on the skeleton throughout the lifespan by influencing bone formation and resorption. GH deficiency leads to decreased bone turnover, delayed statural growth in children, low bone mass, and increased fracture risk in adults. GH replacement improves adult stature in GH deficient children, increases bone mineral density (BMD) in adults, and helps to optimize peak bone acquisition in patients, during the transition from adolescence to adulthood, who have persistent GH deficiency. Observational studies suggest that GH replacement may mitigate the excessive fracture risk associated with GH deficiency. Acromegaly, a state of GH and IGF-1 excess, is associated with increased bone turnover and decreased BMD in the lumbar spine observed in some studies, particularly in patients with hypogonadism. In addition, patients with acromegaly appear to be at an increased risk of morphometric-vertebral fractures, especially in the presence of active disease or concurrent hypogonadism. GH therapy also has beneficial effects on statural growth in several conditions characterized by GH insensitivity, including chronic renal failure, Turner syndrome, Prader-Willi syndrome, postnatal growth delay in patients with intrauterine growth retardation who do not demonstrate catchup growth, idiopathic short stature, short stature homeobox-containing (SHOX) gene mutations, and Noonan syndrome. GH and IGF-1 have important roles in skeletal physiology, and GH has an important therapeutic role in both GH deficiency and insensitivity states. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Growth Hormone and Aging

    Science.gov (United States)

    2000-08-01

    34Retrasos de crecimiento " 2a Ed., Diaz de al 1999), together with an increase in physical Santos. Madrid. pp 365-376 (1996). capacity (Jorgensen et al 1991...A, Marrama P, Agnati LF, Moiller EE. "Retrasos de crecimiento " 2’ Ed., Diaz de Reduced growth hormone releasing factor Santos. Madrid. pp 377-396...P, Skakkeback, Christiansen JS. variantes en (Moreno y Tresguerres dir). Three years of GH treatment in GH deficient "Retrasos de crecimiento " 2a Ed

  6. Postreceptor signaling mechanisms for Growth Hormone.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roupas, P; Herington, A C

    1994-01-01

    Recent data have shed significant new light on the mechanisms involved in the transmission of a biologic signal by GH. Following ligand-induced dimerization of the GH receptor, multiple cascades are involved in GH signaling. These include activation of nonreceptor tyrosine kinases, in particular JAK2, which is a mechanism shared by the newly described cytokine receptor superfamily. Furthermore, several classic pathways (for example, guanine-nucleotide-binding proteins and protein kinase C), shared by numerous hormones, growth factors, and neurotransmitters, are also involved in many of the actions of GH. The interrelationships between the various signaling pathways for GH have not yet been fully defined. This review briefly summarizes the current state of knowledge with respect to the processes involved in the effects of GH in target cells.

  7. Processing of growth hormone by rat adipocytes in primary culture: differentiation between release of intact hormone and degradative processing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roupas, P; Herington, A C

    1987-10-01

    Rat adipocytes in primary culture have been used to study the intracellular processing of GH. These classic target cells for GH have been shown to process GH through two pathways: a nondegradative pathway which resulted in the rapid release of intact GH, and a slower, degradative pathway which involved the degradation of GH and release of degraded ligand. Differentiation between the two pathways was on the basis of differences in their kinetics and temperature dependence. The present study has investigated the relative characteristics of the two pathways further. Incubation of [125I]human GH ([125I]hGH)-preloaded adipocytes with extracellular unlabeled hGH (400 ng/ml) resulted in an increase in the absolute amount of [125I]hGH released. The increased amount of [125I]hGH released was all intact. Extracellular, unlabeled hGH had no effect on the rate or amount of degraded [125I]hGH released. This suggests that the nondegradative pathway is sensitive to the number of internalized hormone-receptor complexes and that GH which is not immediately degraded or stored in the degradative pathway, is redirected and processed via the faster non-degradative pathway. Ammonium chloride (known to inhibit the lysosomal degradation of many polypeptide hormones) markedly inhibited the absolute amount of [125I]hGH released from preloaded adipocytes. This inhibition was due to an effect on the release of degraded [125I]hGH. NH4Cl had no effect on the rate or amount of intact [125I]hGH released. Finally, it was found that dinitrophenol and sodium fluoride (agents known to deplete cellular energy) inhibited the release of degraded GH but not intact GH suggesting that the degradative pathway involves an energy-dependent step, most likely the fusion of hormone-containing vesicles with the lysosomal membrane. The mechanism of release of intact hormone by energy-independent means is not yet known. These data indicate that the processing of GH by cultured rat adipocytes is complex and involves

  8. Carotid intima-media thickness in children treated with growth hormone.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knop, Caroline; Wolters, Barbara; Lass, Nina; Wunsch, Rainer; Reinehr, Thomas

    2015-09-01

    There is an ongoing discussion whether high doses of growth hormone (GH) may lead to cardiovascular diseases. Therefore, we studied the relationships between GH treatment and carotid intima-media thickness (cIMT), which is predictive of the development of atherosclerosis. We measured cIMT in 38 children with supraphysiological doses of GH (mean age 10.9 ± 2.2 years; 47% male; GH indication: small for gestational age, n = 31; Turner syndrome, n = 5; SHOX deficiency, n = 2) and in 38 age- and gender-matched healthy children without GH treatment. Furthermore, we examined cIMT in 61 children with physiological doses of GH (mean age 12.0 ± 3.1 years; 64% male; GH indication: GH deficiency) and in 61 age- and gender-matched healthy children without GH treatment. Moreover, we analyzed blood pressure, lipids, HbA1c, IGF-1, and IGFBP-3 in children treated with GH. The cIMT levels did not differ significantly between children with and without GH treatment either in high-dose GH treatment or in physiological GH doses. In backwards linear regression analyses, cIMT was significantly related to HbA1c, but not to age, gender, BMI, pubertal stage, indication of GH treatment, duration or doses of GH treatment, IGF-1, IGFBP-3, or to any cardiovascular risk factor. We found no evidence that GH treatment is associated with changes in cIMT.

  9. Arginine induces GH gene expression by activating NOS/NO signaling in rat isolated hemi-pituitaries

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Olinto, S.C.F. [Faculdade de Ciências Integradas do Pontal, Universidade Federal de Uberlândia, Ituiutaba, MG (Brazil); Adrião, M.G. [Departamento de Morfologia e Fisiologia, Universidade Federal Rural de Pernambuco, Recife, PE (Brazil); Castro-Barbosa, T.; Goulart-Silva, F.; Nunes, M.T. [Departamento de Fisiologia e Biofísica, Instituto de Ciências Biomédicas, Universidade de São Paulo, São Paulo, SP (Brazil)

    2012-06-01

    The amino acid arginine (Arg) is a recognized secretagogue of growth hormone (GH), and has been shown to induce GH gene expression. Arg is the natural precursor of nitric oxide (NO), which is known to mediate many of the effects of Arg, such as GH secretion. Arg was also shown to increase calcium influx in pituitary cells, which might contribute to its effects on GH secretion. Although the mechanisms involved in the effects of Arg on GH secretion are well established, little is known about them regarding the control of GH gene expression. We investigated whether the NO pathway and/or calcium are involved in the effects of Arg on GH gene expression in rat isolated pituitaries. To this end, pituitaries from approximately 170 male Wistar rats (∼250 g) were removed, divided into two halves, pooled (three hemi-pituitaries) and incubated or not with Arg, as well as with different pharmacological agents. Arg (71 mM), the NO donor sodium nitroprusside (SNP, 1 and 0.1 mM) and a cyclic guanosine monophosphate (cGMP) analogue (8-Br-cGMP, 1 mM) increased GH mRNA expression 60 min later. The NO acceptor hemoglobin (0.3 µM) blunted the effect of SNP, and the combined treatment with Arg and L-NAME (an NO synthase (NOS) inhibitor, 55 mM) abolished the stimulatory effect of Arg on GH gene expression. The calcium channel inhibitor nifedipine (3 µM) also abolished Arg-induced GH gene expression. The present study shows that Arg directly induces GH gene expression in hemi-pituitaries isolated from rats, excluding interference from somatostatinergic neurons, which are supposed to be inhibited by Arg. Moreover, the data demonstrate that the NOS/NO signaling pathway and calcium mediate the Arg effects on GH gene expression.

  10. Effects of growth hormone on glucose and fat metabolism in human subjects

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jørgensen, Jens O L; Møller, Louise; Krag, Morten Brøgger

    2007-01-01

    This article focuses on in vivo data from tests performed in normal subjects and in patients who had abnormal growth hormone (GH) status. Experimental data in human subjects demonstrate that GH acutely inhibits glucose disposal in skeletal muscle. At the same time GH stimulates the turnover and o......, but it is recommended that overdosing be avoided and glycemic control be monitored....

  11. Hypothalamic growth hormone deficiency in a patient with ring chromosome 18.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meloni, A; Boccone, L; Angius, L; Loche, S; Falchi, A M; Cao, A

    1994-02-01

    We report on a boy with a ring 18 chromosome associated with hypothalamic growth hormone (GH) deficiency. A 12-month trial of GH replacement therapy (0.5 U/kg/week) resulted in a marked growth acceleration. Our findings emphasise the need of evaluating GH secretion in patients with abnormalities of the 18 chromosome.

  12. Domains of the growth hormone receptor required for association and activation of JAK2 tyrosine kinase

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    VanderKuur, J A; Wang, X; Zhang, L

    1994-01-01

    Growth hormone (GH) has recently been shown to activate the GH receptor (GHR)-associated tyrosine kinase JAK2. In the present study, regions of the GHR required for JAK2 association with GHR were identified. GH-dependent JAK2 association with GHR was detected in Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cells...

  13. Acute GH and IGF-I responses to short vs. long rest period between ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    In order to examine the effects of different rest intervals between the sets on acute growth hormone (GH) and insulin-like growth factor-1 (IGF-I) responses, ten recreationally resistance trained men served as subjects (Mean ± SD, age=22 ± 2 years, body mass= 84 ± 8 kg). Subjects performed two heavy-resistance training ...

  14. Déficit aislado de GH tipo familiar: informe sobre el primer paciente en Cuba Familial isolated GH deficiency: report of the first case in Cuba

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tania Espinosa Reyes

    2006-04-01

    Full Text Available El déficit de hormona de crecimiento (GH aislado es una afección de naturaleza congénita o adquirida que se caracteriza por la ausencia parcial o total de hormona de crecimiento detectable en plasma o suero. Se presenta un paciente de 11 años, blanco, masculino, quien asiste a consulta por retraso marcado del crecimiento y desarrollo, con talla/edad correspondiente a 4,4 años y cifras de GH en pruebas farmacológicas que no superan los 10 ng/mL. El resto del estudio hormonal está dentro de los parámetros normales. Se comprueba en la madre baja talla y el estudio hormonal muestra similares resultados. La búsqueda de individuos de baja talla en la familia muestra iguales características en abuela y bisabuela maternas. Se diagnostica como un déficit aislado de GH de tipo familiar, tipo II, con patrón de herencia autosómica dominante. Se indica tratamiento con hormona de crecimiento biosintética con resultados satisfactorios. Se concluye que el estudio de la genealogía de un caso índice permite dilucidar la presencia de otros sujetos afectos y establecer los patrones de transmisión de la enfermedad genética.The isolated GH deficiency is an affection of congenital or acquired nature characterised by the partial or total absence of GH detectable in plasma or serum. It is reported the case of an 11-year-old white male patient that received medical attention due to a marked delay of growth and development with height/age corresponding to 4.4 years old and GH figures that were not over 10 ng/mL in pharmacological tests. The rest of the hormonal study was within the normal parameters. Low height was observed in the mother and the hormonal study had similar results. The search for low height individuals in the family showed the same characteristics in the maternal grandmother and great-grandmother. A familial isolated GH deficiency type II with pattern of autosomal dominant inheritance was diagnosed. Treatment with biosynthetic growth

  15. Nuclear Export of Messenger RNA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jun Katahira

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Transport of messenger RNA (mRNA from the nucleus to the cytoplasm is an essential step of eukaryotic gene expression. In the cell nucleus, a precursor mRNA undergoes a series of processing steps, including capping at the 5' ends, splicing and cleavage/polyadenylation at the 3' ends. During this process, the mRNA associates with a wide variety of proteins, forming a messenger ribonucleoprotein (mRNP particle. Association with factors involved in nuclear export also occurs during transcription and processing, and thus nuclear export is fully integrated into mRNA maturation. The coupling between mRNA maturation and nuclear export is an important mechanism for providing only fully functional and competent mRNA to the cytoplasmic translational machinery, thereby ensuring accuracy and swiftness of gene expression. This review describes the molecular mechanism of nuclear mRNA export mediated by the principal transport factors, including Tap-p15 and the TREX complex.

  16. Pituitary gonadotropins, prolactin and growth hormone differentially regulate AQP1 expression in the porcine ovarian follicular cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Skowronski, Mariusz T.; Mlotkowska, Patrycja; Tanski, Damian

    2018-01-01

    -stimulating hormone (FSH), luteinizing hormone (LH), prolactin (PRL) and growth hormone (GH) for 24 h in separated cells and co-cultures of these cells. Real-time PCR, Western blotting, immunofluorescence and volumetric analysis were then performed. Gonadotropins, PRL and GH had a stimulatory impact on AQP1 m...

  17. Boxing as a sport activity associated with isolated GH deficiency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelestimur, F; Tanriverdi, F; Atmaca, H; Unluhizarci, K; Selcuklu, A; Casanueva, F F

    2004-12-01

    Traumatic brain injury (TBI) has long been known as a cause of hypopituitarism, and it is characterized by a high prevalence of neuroendocrine abnormalities. Boxing, one of the most common combative sports, may also result in TBI. As far as we know, pituitary functions including GH status have not been investigated in boxers. Therefore, in this preliminary study, we have assessed the pituitary functions in boxers. Eleven actively competing or retired male boxers with a mean age of 38.0 +/- 3.6 yr and 7 age-, sex- and BMI-matched healthy non-boxing controls were included in the study. Biochemical and basal hormonal parameters including IGF-I levels were measured. To assess GH secretory status in boxers and healthy controls, GHRH (1 microg/kg)+GHRP-6 (1 microg/kg) test was performed. After GHRH+GHRP-6 test, mean peak GH level in boxers and in controls were 10.9 +/- 1.7 and 41.4 +/- 6.7 microg/l, respectively (p amateur, are needed to clarify pituitary dysfunction in boxers.

  18. Kinetic Basis for the Conjugation of Auxin by a GH3 Family Indole-acetic Acid-Amido Synthetase*

    OpenAIRE

    Chen, Qingfeng; Westfall, Corey S.; Hicks, Leslie M.; Wang, Shiping; Jez, Joseph M.

    2010-01-01

    The GH3 family of acyl-acid-amido synthetases catalyze the ATP-dependent formation of amino acid conjugates to modulate levels of active plant hormones, including auxins and jasmonates. Initial biochemical studies of various GH3s show that these enzymes group into three families based on sequence relationships and acyl-acid substrate preference (I, jasmonate-conjugating; II, auxin- and salicylic acid-conjugating; III, benzoate-conjugating); however, little is known about the kinetic and chemi...

  19. GH/STAT5 signaling during the growth period in livers of mice overexpressing GH

    OpenAIRE

    Martinez, Carolina Soledad; Piazza, Verónica Gabriela; Díaz, María Eugenia; Boparal, Raavnet K.; Arum, Oge; Ramirez, Maria Cecilia; Gonzalez, Lorena; Becu, Damasia; Bartke, Andrzej; Turyn, Daniel; Miquet, Johanna Gabriela; Sotelo, Ana Isabel

    2016-01-01

    GH/STAT5 signaling is desensitized in the liver in adult transgenic mice overexpressing GH; however, these animals present greater body size. To assess whether the STAT5 pathway is active during the growth period in the liver in these animals, and how signaling modulators participate in this process, growing transgenic mice and normal siblings were evaluated. STAT5 does not respond to an acute GH-stimulus, but displays higher basal phosphorylation in the livers of growing GH-overexpressing m...

  20. Growth hormone treatment in non-growth hormone-deficient children

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sandro Loche

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Until 1985 growth hormone (GH was obtained from pituitary extracts, and was available in limited amounts only to treat severe growth hormone deficiency (GHD. With the availability of unlimited quantities of GH obtained from recombinant DNA technology, researchers started to explore new modalities to treat GHD children, as well as to treat a number of other non-GHD conditions. Although with some differences between different countries, GH treatment is indicated in children with Turner syndrome, chronic renal insufficiency, Prader-Willi syndrome, deletions/mutations of the SHOX gene, as well as in short children born small for gestational age and with idiopathic short stature. Available data from controlled trials indicate that GH treatment increases adult height in patients with Turner syndrome, in patients with chronic renal insufficiency, and in short children born small for gestational age. Patients with SHOX deficiency seem to respond to treatment similarly to Turner syndrome. GH treatment in children with idiopathic short stature produces a modest mean increase in adult height but the response in the individual patient is unpredictable. Uncontrolled studies indicate that GH treatment may be beneficial also in children with Noonan syndrome. In patients with Prader-Willi syndrome GH treatment normalizes growth and improves body composition and cognitive function. In any indication the response to GH seems correlated to the dose and the duration of treatment. GH treatment is generally safe with no major adverse effects being recorded in any condition.

  1. The Challenge of Growth Hormone Deficiency Diagnosis and Treatment during the Transition from Puberty into Adulthood

    OpenAIRE

    Inzaghi, Elena; Cianfarani, Stefano

    2013-01-01

    In children with childhood-onset growth hormone deficiency, replacement GH therapy is effective in normalizing height during childhood and achieving adult height within the genetic target range. GH has further beneficial effects on body composition and metabolism through adult life. The transition phase, defined as the period from mid to late teens until 6–7 years after the achievement of final height, represents a crucial time for reassessing children’s GH secretion and deciding whether GH t...

  2. Inhibition of somatotroph growth and growth hormone biosynthesis by activin in vitro

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Billestrup, Nils; González-Manchón, C; Potter, E

    1990-01-01

    ]methionine-labeled cells, could be observed after 24 h of activin treatment, and maximal (70%) inhibition of GH biosynthesis was observed after 3 days. Activin inhibited basal as well as GH-releasing factor (GRF)-, glucocorticoid-, and thyroid hormone-stimulated GH biosynthesis. Inhibin, which is known to reverse...... was observed. These data demonstrate that activin, in addition to its stimulatory effect on FSH secretion, is able to inhibit both expression of GH and growth of somatotropic cells....

  3. Deletion of amino acid residues 33-46 in growth hormone alters the ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Growth hormone (GH) variants have been studied for the structure-function relationship of the molecule. The presence of a potential alternate splicing point in mRNA in bGH gene at exon 3, similar to hGH has been reported by workers. Early investigation on the characteristics of the chemistry of 20k oGH showed that the ...

  4. Rat insulinoma cells express both a 115-kDa growth hormone receptor and a 95-kDa prolactin receptor structurally related to the hepatic receptors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Møldrup, Annette; Billestrup, N; Nielsen, Jens Høiriis

    1990-01-01

    Insulin-producing rat islet RIN-5AH tumor cells express multiple binding sites for human growth hormone (hGH). The effect of rat growth hormone (rGH), rat prolactin (rPRL), and human placental lactogen (hPL) on the binding of 125I-labeled hGH (125I-hGH) to RIN-5AH cells revealed the presence...

  5. Similar clinical features among patients with severe adult growth hormone deficiency diagnosed with insulin tolerance test or arginine or glucagon stimulation tests

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Toogood, Andrew; Brabant, Georg; Maiter, Dominique

    2012-01-01

    To determine whether insulin tolerance tests (ITTs), arginine stimulation tests (ASTs), and glucagon stimulation tests (GST) identify patients who have similar clinical features of growth hormone (GH) deficiency when a diagnostic GH threshold of 3 μg/L is used.......To determine whether insulin tolerance tests (ITTs), arginine stimulation tests (ASTs), and glucagon stimulation tests (GST) identify patients who have similar clinical features of growth hormone (GH) deficiency when a diagnostic GH threshold of 3 μg/L is used....

  6. Nocturnal ghrelin, ACTH, GH and cortisol secretion after sleep deprivation in humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schüssler, P; Uhr, M; Ising, M; Weikel, J C; Schmid, D A; Held, K; Mathias, S; Steiger, A

    2006-09-01

    Ghrelin is an endogenous ligand of the growth hormone (GH) secretagogue (GHS) receptor. It is hypothesised to play a key role in energy balance stimulating food intake and body weight. Besides GH-releasing hormone (GHRH) and somatostatin, it is thought to be a regulating factor of GH release. Ghrelin also appears to be involved in sleep regulation. We showed recently that ghrelin promotes slow-wave sleep and the nocturnal release of GH, cortisol and prolactin in humans. Similarly, promotion of non-rapid-eye-movement (NREM) sleep was reported in mice after systemic ghrelin. If ghrelin is a factor that induces and/or maintains sleep, it should be enhanced after a period of sleep deprivation (SD). To clarify this issue, nocturnal ghrelin, GH, ACTH and cortisol plasma concentrations were determined and simultaneously sleep electroencephalogram (EEG) was recorded (2300-0700 h) during sleep before and after 1 night of total SD in 8 healthy subjects. Compared to baseline, ghrelin levels increased earlier by a non-significant trend, already before the beginning of recovery sleep. Further a non-significant trend occurred, suggesting higher ghrelin secretion in the first half of the night. The ghrelin maximum was found significantly earlier after SD than at baseline. GH secretion during the first half of the night and total night after SD were elevated. ACTH and cortisol were also elevated, which was most pronounced during the second half of the night. No effects of SD on the time of the maximum were found for GH, ACTH and cortisol. The increase in ACTH after SD is a novel finding. Whereas the effects of SD on ghrelin levels were relatively weak, our findings are in line with the hypothesis that ghrelin is a sleep-promoting factor in humans. Ghrelin may be involved in sleep promotion after SD.

  7. Growth hormone: a newly identified developmental organizer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Das, Rajat K; Banerjee, Sarmistha; Shapiro, Bernard H

    2017-03-01

    The sexually dimorphic expression of cytochromes P450 (CYP) drug-metabolizing enzymes has been reported in all species examined. These sex differences are only expressed during adulthood and are solely regulated by sex differences in circulating growth hormone (GH) profiles. Once established, however, the different male- and female-dependent CYP isoform profiles are permanent and immutable, suggesting that adult CYP expression requires imprinting. As the hormone that regulates an adult function is likely the same hormone that imprints the function, we selectively blocked GH secretion in some newborn male rats, whereas others received concurrent physiologic replacement of rat GH. The results demonstrate that adult male GH activation of the signal transduction pathway regulating expression of the principal CYP2C11 isoform is obligatorily dependent on perinatal GH imprinting, without which CYP2C11 and drug metabolism would be permanently and profoundly suppressed. As there are other adult metabolic functions also regulated by GH, pediatric drug therapy known to disrupt GH secretion could unintentionally impair adult health. © 2017 Society for Endocrinology.

  8. MESSENGER Spacecraft and Payload Performance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gold, R. E.; Solomon, S. C.; McNutt, J. R., Jr.; Leary, J. C.; MESSENGER Team

    The Mercury, Surface, Space ENvironment, GEochemistry, and Ranging (MESSENGER) mission, launched in May of this year, will be the first spacecraft to orbit the planet Mercury. The >14 kWm-2 solar thermal input and the large velocity change required to reach Mercury orbit make this a very challenging mission from thermal and mass perspectives. MESSENGER overcomes these challenges with innovative applications of existing technologies and materials. The spacecraft uses ordinary space electronics, has minimal moving parts, and has extensive redundancy and cross strapping to enhance its robustness. The major innovations are a ceramic-cloth thermal shade, an integrated lightweight structure, a high-performance propulsion system, and a solar array incorporating optical solar reflectors to prevent overheating. Seven miniaturized instruments, along with the spacecraft telecommunications system, satisfy all scientific objectives of the mission. The payload includes a dual imaging system with wide-angle and narrow-angle cameras; an integrated ultraviolet, visible, and infrared spectrometer that is sensitive enough to detect atmospheric emissions and robust enough to map mineralogical absorption features on the sun-lit surface; gamma-ray, X-ray, and neutron spectrometers for remote geochemical mapping; a vector magnetometer; a laser altimeter to determine the topography of surface features and determine whether Mercury has a fluid core; and an energetic particle and plasma spectrometer to characterize ionized species in the magnetosphere. The payload was fully calibrated before launch, and an additional series of calibration measurements are planned during the 5-year cruise to Mercury. The first of the three Venus flybys and two Mercury flybys during the cruise phase of the mission will occur in November 2004

  9. Ghrelin- and GH-induced insulin resistance

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vestergaard, Esben Thyssen; Krag, Morten B; Poulsen, Morten M

    2013-01-01

    Supraphysiological levels of ghrelin and GH induce insulin resistance. Serum levels of retinol-binding protein-4 (RBP4) correlate inversely with insulin sensitivity in patients with type 2 diabetes. We aimed to determine whether ghrelin and GH affect RBP4 levels in human subjects....

  10. Identification of tyrosine residues in the intracellular domain of the growth hormone receptor required for transcriptional signaling and Stat5 activation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, L. H.; Wang, X.; Kopchick, J J

    1996-01-01

    The binding of growth hormone (GH) to its receptor results in its dimerization followed by activation of Jak2 kinase and tyrosine phosphorylation of the GH receptor itself, as well as Jak2 and the transcription factors Stat1, -3, and -5. In order to study the role of GH receptor tyrosine.......1 promoter. Any of these three tyrosines is able to independently mediate GH-induced transcription, indicating redundancy in this part of the GH receptor. Tyrosine phosphorylation was not required for GH stimulation of mitogen-activated protein (MAP) kinase activity or for GH-stimulated Ca2+ channel...

  11. Transcriptome analysis of the mammary gland from GH transgenic goats during involution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Jian; Bao, Ze Kun; Zhang, Qiang; Hu, Wei Wei; Yu, Qing Hua; Yang, Qian

    2015-07-10

    Mammary glands are organs for milk production in female mammals. Growth hormone (GH) is known to affect the growth and development of the mammary gland, as well as to increase milk production in dairy goats. This study performed a comprehensive expression profiling of genes expressed in the mammary gland of early involution GH transgenic (n=4) and non-transgenic goats (n=4) by RNA sequencing. RNA was extracted from mammary gland tissues collected at day 3 of involution. Gene expression analysis was conducted by Illumina RNA sequencing and sequence reads were assembled and analyzed using TopHat. FPKM (fragments per kilobase of exon per million) values were analyzed for differentially expressed genes using the Cufflinks package. Gene ontology analysis of differentially expressed genes was categorized using agriGO, while KEGG pathway analysis was performed with the online KEGG automatic annotation server. Our results revealed that 75% of NCBI goat annotated genes were expressed during early involution. A total of 18,323 genes were expressed during early involution in GH transgenic goats, compared with 18,196 expressed genes during early involution of non-transgenic goats. In these expressed genes, the majority (17,589) were ubiquitously expressed in GH transgenic and non-transgenic goats. However, there were 745 differentially expressed genes, 421 of which were upregulated and 324 were downregulated in GH transgenic goats. GO and KEGG pathway analysis showed that these genes were involved in mammary gland physiology, including cell adhesion molecules, ECM-receptor interaction, Jak-STAT signaling pathway, and fat metabolism. Our results demonstrated that the GH receptor was strongly affected in GH transgenic goats, which may activate the IGF-1/Stat3 signaling pathway. Overall, our study provided a global view of the transcriptome during involution of GH transgenic and non-transgenic goats, which increases our understanding of the biology of involution in the goat

  12. GH, IGF-I and GH receptors mRNA expression in response to growth impairment following a food deprivation period in individually housed cichlid fish Cichlasoma dimerus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delgadin, Tomás Horacio; Pérez Sirkin, Daniela Irina; Di Yorio, María Paula; Arranz, Silvia Eda; Vissio, Paula Gabriela

    2015-02-01

    Cichlasoma dimerus is a social cichlid fish capable of growing at high rates under laboratory conditions, but knowledge on somatic growth regulation is still unclear. Growth hormone (GH)/insulin-like growth factor I (IGF-I) axis is the key regulator of somatic growth in vertebrates. Two types of growth hormone receptors have been described in teleost fish, named GH receptor type 1 (GHR1) and type 2 (GHR2). In addition, isoforms of these receptors lacking part of the intracellular region have been described. The aim of this study was to evaluate the somatic growth, liver histology and changes in the GH/IGF-I axis after 4 weeks of food deprivation in C. dimerus. Four-week fasted fish showed reductions in specific growth rates in body weight (p fish, while no changes in glucose levels were detected in plasma. The starvation protocol failed to induce changes in GH mRNA levels in the pituitary and IGF-I mRNA levels in liver. In contrast, IGF-I mRNA levels in muscle decreased in fasted fish (p = 0.002). On the other hand, GHR2 (detected with primer sets designed over the extracellular and intracellular region) was upregulated by starvation both in liver and muscle (p growth both in length and body weight concomitantly with alterations on liver and muscle GHR2 and muscle IGF-I mRNA expression.

  13. Purification and Cultivation of Human Pituitary Growth Hormones Secreting Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hymer, W. C.; Todd, P.; Grindeland, R.; Lanham, W.; Morrison, D.

    1985-01-01

    The rat and human pituitary gland contains a mixture of hormone producing cell types. The separation of cells which make growth hormone (GH) is attempted for the purpose of understanding how the hormone molecule is made within the pituitary cell; what form(s) it takes within the cell; and what form(s) GH assumes as it leaves the cell. Since GH has a number of biological targets (e.g., muscle, liver, bone), the assessment of the activities of the intracellular/extracellular GH by new and sensitive bioassays. GH cells contained in the mixture was separated by free flow electrophoresis. These experiments show that GH cells have different electrophoretic mobilities. This is relevant to NASA since a lack of GH could be a prime causative factor in muscle atrophy. Further, GH has recently been implicated in the etiology of motion sickness in space. Continous flow electrophoresis experiment on STS-8 showed that GH cells could be partially separated in microgravity. However, definitive cell culture studies could not be done due to insufficient cell recoveries.

  14. A comparison of different definitions of growth response in short prepubertal children treated with growth hormone

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bang, P; Bjerknes, R; Dahlgren, J

    2011-01-01

    How to define poor growth response in the management of short growth hormone (GH)-treated children is controversial. Aim: Assess various criteria of poor response.......How to define poor growth response in the management of short growth hormone (GH)-treated children is controversial. Aim: Assess various criteria of poor response....

  15. Detection of thyroid hormone receptor disruptors by a novel stable in vitro reporter gene assay

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Freitas, de J.; Cano, P.; Craig-Veit, C.; Goodson, M.L.; Furlow, J.D.; Murk, A.J.

    2011-01-01

    A stable luciferase reporter gene assay was developed based on the thyroid hormone responsive rat pituitary tumor GH3 cell line that constitutively expresses both thyroid hormone receptor isoforms. Stable transfection of the pGL4CP-SV40-2xtaDR4 construct into the GH3 cells resulted in a highly

  16. Growth hormone-releasing factor stimulates proliferation of somatotrophs in vitro

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Billestrup, Nils; Swanson, L W; Vale, W

    1986-01-01

    The mitogenic effect of the hypothalamic peptides growth hormone-releasing factor (GRF) and somatostatin on cultured growth hormone (GH)-producing cells (somatotrophs) was studied. Using autoradiographic detection of [3H]thymidine uptake and immunocytochemical identification of GH-producing cells...

  17. Multiple Effects of Growth Hormone in the Body: Is it Really the Hormone for Growth?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Devesa, Jesús; Almengló, Cristina; Devesa, Pablo

    2016-01-01

    In this review, we analyze the effects of growth hormone on a number of tissues and organs and its putative role in the longitudinal growth of an organism. We conclude that the hormone plays a very important role in maintaining the homogeneity of tissues and organs during the normal development of the human body or after an injury. Its effects on growth do not seem to take place during the fetal period or during the early infancy and are mediated by insulin-like growth factor I (IGF-I) during childhood and puberty. In turn, IGF-I transcription is dependent on an adequate GH secretion, and in many tissues, it occurs independent of GH. We propose that GH may be a prohormone, rather than a hormone, since in many tissues and organs, it is proteolytically cleaved in a tissue-specific manner giving origin to shorter GH forms whose activity is still unknown. PMID:27773998

  18. Increased neck soft tissue mass and worsening of obstructive sleep apnea after growth hormone treatment in men with abdominal obesity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Karimi, Mahssa; Koranyi, Josef; Franco, Celina

    2010-01-01

    Risk factors for obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) are male gender, obesity and abnormalities in neck soft tissue mass. OSA is associated with both growth hormone (GH) excess and severe GH deficiency in adults. Adults with abdominal obesity have markedly suppressed GH secretion....

  19. MESSENGER: Exploring the Innermost Planet

    Science.gov (United States)

    Solomon, S. C.

    2011-12-01

    One of Earth's closest planetary neighbors, Mercury remained comparatively unexplored for the more than three decades that followed the three flybys of the innermost planet by the Mariner 10 spacecraft in 1974-75. Mariner 10 imaged 45% of Mercury's surface at about 1 km/pixel average resolution, confirmed Mercury's anomalously high bulk density and implied large fractional core size, discovered Mercury's internal magnetic field, documented that H and He are present in the planet's tenuous exosphere, and made the first exploration of Mercury's magnetosphere and solar wind environment. Ground-based astronomers later reported Na, K, and Ca in Mercury's exosphere; the presence of deposits in the floors of polar craters having radar characteristics best matched by water ice; and strong evidence from the planet's forced libration amplitude that Mercury has a fluid outer core. Spacecraft exploration of Mercury resumed with the selection for flight, under NASA's Discovery Program, of the MErcury Surface, Space ENvironment, GEochemistry, and Ranging (MESSENGER) mission. Launched in 2004, MESSENGER flew by the innermost planet three times in 2008-2009 en route to becoming the first spacecraft to orbit Mercury in March of this year. MESSENGER's first chemical remote sensing measurements of Mercury's surface indicate that the planet's bulk silicate fraction differs from those of the other inner planets, with a low-Fe surface composition intermediate between basalts and ultramafic rocks and best matched among terrestrial rocks by komatiites. Moreover, surface materials are richer in the volatile constituents S and K than predicted by most planetary formation models. Global image mosaics and targeted high-resolution images (to resolutions of 10 m/pixel) reveal that Mercury experienced globally extensive volcanism, including large expanses of plains emplaced as flood lavas and widespread examples of pyroclastic deposits likely emplaced during explosive eruptions of volatile

  20. The Impact of Growth Hormone Therapy on the Apoptosis Assessment in CD34+ Hematopoietic Cells from Children with Growth Hormone Deficiency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kawa, Miłosz Piotr; Stecewicz, Iwona; Piecyk, Katarzyna; Paczkowska, Edyta; Rogińska, Dorota; Sobuś, Anna; Łuczkowska, Karolina; Pius-Sadowska, Ewa; Gawrych, Elżbieta; Petriczko, Elżbieta; Walczak, Mieczysław; Machaliński, Bogusław

    2017-01-07

    Growth hormone (GH) modulates hematopoietic cell homeostasis and is associated with apoptosis control, but with limited mechanistic insights. Aim of the study was to determine whether GH therapeutic supplementation (GH-TS) could affect apoptosis of CD34+ cells enriched in hematopoietic progenitor cells of GH deficient (GHD) children. CD34+ cells from peripheral blood of 40 GHD children were collected before and in 3rd and 6th month of GH-TS and compared to 60 controls adjusted for bone age, sex, and pubertal development. Next, apoptosis assessment via different molecular techniques was performed. Finally, to comprehensively characterize apoptosis process, global gene expression profile was determined using genome-wide RNA microarray technology. Results showed that GH-TS significantly reduced spontaneous apoptosis in CD34+ cells (p human GH has a direct anti-apoptotic activity in hematopoietic CD34+ cells derived from GHD subjects in course of GH-TS.

  1. Lipoprotein metabolism in hypothyroidism : the contribution of growth hormone

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    N. Hoogerbrugge (Nicoline)

    1992-01-01

    textabstractCurrent data suggest a role for GH in the regulation of lipoprotein metabolism. In hypothyroidism not only the secretion of thyroid hormone, but also of GH is decreased. Generally the effects on plasma lipids seen in hypothyroid individuals are considered to be a consequence of

  2. Hormonal determinants of pubertal growth.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Delamarre-van Waal, H.A.; Coeverden, S.C. van; Rotteveel, J.J.

    2001-01-01

    Pubertal growth results from increased sex steroid and growth hormone (GH) secretion. Estrogens appear to play an important role in the regulation of pubertal growth in both girls and boys. In girls, however, estrogens cannot be the only sex steroids responsible for pubertal growth, as exogenous

  3. Adult Height in Children with Growth Hormone Deficiency: A Randomized, Controlled, Growth Hormone Dose-Response Trial

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sas, T.C.J.; de Ridder, M.A.J.; Wit, J.M.; Rotteveel, J.; Oostdijk, W.; Reeser, H.M.; Otten, B.J.; Keizer-Schrama, S.M.P.F.

    2010-01-01

    Aim: To investigate the effect of 2 growth hormone (GH) doses on adult height (AH) in GH deficiency (GHD). Methods: A multicenter, randomized, controlled dose-response trial compared attained AH minus target height (TH) between children receiving 0.7 mg/m

  4. One year growth hormone replacement therapy does not alter colonic epithelial cell proliferation in growth hormone deficient adults

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Beentjes, JAM; van Gorkom, BAP; Sluiter, WJ; de Vries, Emma; Kleibeuker, JH; Dullaart, RPF

    OBJECTIVE Increased colonic epithelial cell proliferation has been found in various conditions associated with increased risk of colorectal cancer including acromegaly. In a placebo-controlled study we determined the effect of growth hormone (GH) replacement therapy in GH deficient adults on the

  5. Cholecystokinin-From Local Gut Hormone to Ubiquitous Messenger

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rehfeld, Jens F

    2017-01-01

    pancreatic enzyme secretion and growth, gallbladder contraction, and gut motility, satiety and inhibit acid secretion from the stomach. Moreover, they are major neurotransmitters in the brain and the periphery. CCK peptides also stimulate calcitonin, insulin, and glucagon secretion, and they may act...

  6. PCR-RFLP analyses for studying the diversity of GH and Pit-1 genes in Slovak Simmental cattle

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anna Trakovická

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was evaluation of growth hormone (GH and specific pituitary transcription factor (Pit-1 genes diversity in population of 353 Slovak Simmental cows. The analyses were based on single nucleotide polymorphisms GH/AluI and Pit-1/HinfI detections. A polymorphic site of GH gene (AluI has been linked to differences in circulating metabolites, metabolic hormones and milk yield. Bovine Pit-1 is responsible for pituitary development and hormone secreting gene expression, including GH gene. The Pit-1/HinfI locus was associated with growth, milk production and reproduction performance in cattle. Samples of genomic DNA were analyzed by PCR-RFLP method. Digestion of GH gene PCR products with restriction enzyme AluI revealed allele L and V with frequency 0.695 and 0.305, respectively. The digested Pit-1 gene PCR products with enzyme HinfI revealed alleles A (0.249 and B (0.751. Dominant genotypes were for GH gene heterozygous LV (0.47 and for Pit-1 gene homozygous BB (0.56 animals. The observed heterozygosity, effective allele numbers and polymorphism information content of GH/AluI and Pit-1/HinfI bovine loci population were 0.42/0.37, 1.73/1.59 and 0.33/0.30, respectively. The median polymorphic information content of loci was also transferred to the higher observed homozygosity in population (0.58/0.63. Keywords: cattle, growth hormone, leptin, PCR, Pit-1, polymorphism.

  7. The Impact of Growth Hormone Therapy on the Apoptosis Assessment in CD34+ Hematopoietic Cells from Children with Growth Hormone Deficiency

    OpenAIRE

    Miłosz Piotr Kawa; Iwona Stecewicz; Katarzyna Piecyk; Edyta Paczkowska; Dorota Rogińska; Anna Sobuś; Karolina Łuczkowska; Ewa Pius-Sadowska; Elżbieta Gawrych; Elżbieta Petriczko; Mieczysław Walczak; Bogusław Machaliński

    2017-01-01

    Growth hormone (GH) modulates hematopoietic cell homeostasis and is associated with apoptosis control, but with limited mechanistic insights. Aim of the study was to determine whether GH therapeutic supplementation (GH-TS) could affect apoptosis of CD34+ cells enriched in hematopoietic progenitor cells of GH deficient (GHD) children. CD34+ cells from peripheral blood of 40 GHD children were collected before and in 3rd and 6th month of GH-TS and compared to 60 controls adjusted for bone age, s...

  8. Cognitive impairments and mood disturbances in growth hormone deficient men

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Deijen, J.B.; de Boer, H.; Blok, G.J.; van der Veen, E.A.

    1996-01-01

    In order to establish whether reported psychological complaints in hypopituitary adults are related to growth hormone (GH) deficiency or other pituitary hormone deficiencies, emotional well-being and cognitive performance were evaluated in 31 men with multiple pituitary hormone deficiencies (MPHD)

  9. Growing up with short stature : Psychosocial consequences of hormone treatment

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Visser-van Balen, J.

    2007-01-01

    Growing up with short stature. Psychosocial consequences of hormone treatment To enhance height in children with short stature, growth hormone (GH) can be used. In short children without a detectable pathology underlying their short stature, there is no medical rationale for growth hormone

  10. Quality of Life of SGA Children with Short Stature Receiving GH Treatment in Japan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takahashi, Ryo; Ogawa, Madoka; Osada, Hisao

    2017-03-01

    The objective of this study was to compare the quality of life (QOL) of small for gestational age (SGA) children with short stature with that of children with normal height, and examine the effects of growth hormone (GH) treatment on the QOL of the SGA children using questionnaires administered to their parents or guardians. The results showed that QOL in daily living of SGA children with short stature was lower than that of normal children based on the perceptions of their parents or guardians. In addition, GH treatment improved the physical domain of QOL of SGA children with short stature. This study suggests that GH treatment can improve QOL and reduce psychosocial problems related to short stature. Copyright© of YS Medical Media ltd.

  11. cDNA cloning and sequencing of ostrich Growth hormone

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Doosti Abbas

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available In recent years, industrial breeding of ostrich (Struthio camelus has been widely developed in Iran. Growth hormone (GH is a peptide hormone that stimulates growth and cell reproduction in different animals. The aim of this study was to clone and sequence the ostrich growth hormone gene in E. coli, done for the first time in Iran. The cDNA that encodes ostrich growth hormone was isolated from total mRNA of the pituitary gland and amplified by RT-PCR using GH specific PCR primers. Then GH cDNA was cloned by T/A cloning technique and the construct was transformed into E. coli. Finally, GH cDNA sequence was submitted to the GenBank (Accession number: JN559394. The results of present study showed that GH cDNA was successfully cloned in E. coli. Sequencing confirmed that GH cDNA was cloned and that the length of ostrich GH cDNA was 672 bp; BLAST search showed that the sequence of growth hormone cDNA of the ostrich from Iran has 100% homology with other records existing in GenBank.

  12. Skin morphological changes in growth hormone deficiency and acromegaly

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lange, Merete Wolder; Thulesen, J; Feldt-Rasmussen, U

    2001-01-01

    To evaluate the histomorphology of skin and its appendages, especially eccrine sweat glands, in patients with GH disorders, because reduced sweating ability in patients with growth hormone deficiency (GHD) is associated with increased risk of hyperthermia under stressed conditions....

  13. Sleep Characteristics in Children with Growth Hormone Deficiency

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Verrillo, Elisabetta; Bizzarri, Carla; Cappa, Marco; Bruni, Oliviero; Pavone, Martino; Ferri, Raffaele; Cutrera, Renato

    2011-01-01

    Background/Aims: Growth hormone (GH) is preferentially secreted during slow wave sleep and the interactions between human sleep and the somatotropic system are well documented, although only few studies have investigated the sleep EEG...

  14. The challenge of growth hormone deficiency (GHD) diagnosis and treatment during the transition from puberty into adulthood

    OpenAIRE

    Stefano eCianfarani; Elena eInzaghi

    2013-01-01

    In children with childhood-onset growth hormone deficiency, replacement GH therapy is effective in normalising height during childhood and achieving adult height within the genetic target range. GH has further beneficial effects on body composition and metabolism through adult life. The transition phase, defined as the period from mid to late teens until 6–7 years after the achievement of final height, represents a crucial time for reassessing children’s GH secretion and deciding whether GH t...

  15. MESSENGER SPICE KERNELS V1.0

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — This data set includes the complete set of MESSENGER SPICE data files (''kernel files''), which can be accessed using SPICE software. The SPICE data contains...

  16. Arterial pulse wave velocity, inflammatory markers, pathological GH and IGF states, cardiovascular and cerebrovascular disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael R Graham

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available Michael R Graham1, Peter Evans2, Bruce Davies1, Julien S Baker11Health and Exercise Science Research Unit, Faculty of Health Sport and Science, University of Glamorgan, Pontypridd, Wales, United Kingdom; 2Royal Gwent Hospital, Newport, Gwent, United KingdomAbstract: Blood pressure (BP measurements provide information regarding risk factors associated with cardiovascular disease, but only in a specific artery. Arterial stiffness (AS can be determined by measurement of arterial pulse wave velocity (APWV. Separate from any role as a surrogate marker, AS is an important determinant of pulse pressure, left ventricular function and coronary artery perfusion pressure. Proximal elastic arteries and peripheral muscular arteries respond differently to aging and to medication. Endogenous human growth hormone (hGH, secreted by the anterior pituitary, peaks during early adulthood, declining at 14% per decade. Levels of insulin-like growth factor-I (IGF-I are at their peak during late adolescence and decline throughout adulthood, mirror imaging GH. Arterial endothelial dysfunction, an accepted cause of increased APWV in GH deficiency (GHD is reversed by recombinant human (rh GH therapy, favorably influencing the risk for atherogenesis. APWV is a noninvasive method for measuring atherosclerotic and hypertensive vascular changes increases with age and atherosclerosis leading to increased systolic blood pressure and increased left ventricular hypertrophy. Aerobic exercise training increases arterial compliance and reduces systolic blood pressure. Whole body arterial compliance is lowered in strength-trained individuals. Homocysteine and C-reactive protein are two infl ammatory markers directly linked with arterial endothelial dysfunction. Reviews of GH in the somatopause have not been favorable and side effects of treatment have marred its use except in classical GHD. Is it possible that we should be assessing the combined effects of therapy with rhGH and rh

  17. Growth Hormone as Biomarker in Heart Failure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marra, Alberto M; Bobbio, Emanuele; D'Assante, Roberta; Salzano, Andrea; Arcopinto, Michele; Bossone, Eduardo; Cittadini, Antonio

    2018-01-01

    The impairment of growth hormone (GH)/insulin growth factor-1(IGF-1) plays a crucial role in chronic heart failure (CHF). Several studies have shown that patients affected by this condition display a more aggressive disease, with impaired functional capacity and poor outcomes. Interestingly, GH replacement therapy represents a possible future therapeutic option in CHF. In this review, the authors focus on the assessment of the main abnormalities in GH/IGF-1 axis in CHF, the underlying molecular background, and their impact on disease progression and outcomes. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Interpretation of growth hormone provocative tests

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersson, A M; Orskov, H; Ranke, M B

    1995-01-01

    To compare interpretations of growth hormone (GH) provocative tests in laboratories using six different GH immunoassays (one enzymeimmunometric assay (EIMA, assay 1), one immunoradiometric assay (IRMA, assay 5), one time-resolved fluorimmunometric assay (TRFIA, assay 3) and three radioimmunoassays...... (RIAs, assays 2, 4 and 6)), aliquots of peak samples from GH provocative tests were distributed between the four participating laboratories, quantified in the respective immunoassays and interpreted according to the cut-off values for provocative tests defined for each assay method. There was a high...

  19. Growth hormone insensitivity: Mexican case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I Castilla-Cortazar

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Herein, we present a 14-year-old patient with short stature (134 cm referred from Paediatrics to our department for complementary evaluation since growth hormone (GH treatment failed to show any improvement. He was born premature and small for gestational age. Genital examination classified the patient as Tanner I–II with small penis and testicular size for his age. Biochemical analyses revealed normal GH levels with low serum insulin-like growth factor-1 (IGF-1. Molecular diagnosis confirmed several mutations in IGF1R and IGFALS, and so he was diagnosed with Laron Syndrome or GH insensibility and treated with IGF-1 substitutive therapy.

  20. Sweet spot supersymmetry and composite messengers

    OpenAIRE

    Ibe, Masahiro; Kitano, Ryuichiro

    2008-01-01

    Sweet spot supersymmetry is a phenomenologically and cosmologically perfect framework to realize a supersymmetric world at short distance. We discuss a class of dynamical models of supersymmetry breaking and its mediation whose low-energy effective description falls into this framework. Hadron fields in the dynamical models play a role of the messengers of the supersymmetry breaking. As is always true in the models of the sweet spot supersymmetry, the messenger scale is predicted to be 10^5 G...

  1. A novel GH secretagogue, A233, exhibits enhanced growth activity and innate immune system stimulation in teleosts fish.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martinez, Rebeca; Ubieta, Kenia; Herrera, Fidel; Forellat, Alina; Morales, Reynold; de la Nuez, Ania; Rodriguez, Rolando; Reyes, Osvaldo; Oliva, Ayme; Estrada, Mario P

    2012-09-01

    In teleosts fish, secretion of GH is regulated by several hypothalamic factors that are influenced by the physiological state of the animal. There is an interaction between immune and endocrine systems through hormones and cytokines. GH in fish is involved in many physiological processes that are not overtly growth related, such as saltwater osmoregulation, antifreeze synthesis, and the regulation of sexual maturation and immune functions. This study was conducted to characterize a decapeptide compound A233 (GKFDLSPEHQ) designed by molecular modeling to evaluate its function as a GH secretagogue (GHS). In pituitary cell culture, the peptide A233 induces GH secretion and it is also able to increase superoxide production in tilapia head-kidney leukocyte cultures. This effect is blocked by preincubation with the GHS receptor antagonist [d-Lys(3)]-GHRP6. Immunoneutralization of GH by addition of anti-tilapia GH monoclonal antibody blocked the stimulatory effect of A233 on superoxide production. These experiments propose a GH-mediated mechanism for the action of A233. The in vivo biological action of the decapeptide was also demonstrated for growth stimulation in goldfish and tilapia larvae (P<0.001). Superoxide dismutase levels, antiprotease activity, and lectin titer were enhanced in tilapia larvae treated with this novel molecule. The decapeptide A233 designed by molecular modeling is able to function as a GHS in teleosts and enhance parameters of the innate immune system in the fish larvae.

  2. Slipped Capital Femoral Epiphysis as a Complication of Growth Hormone Therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shuo-Yu Wang

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Slipped capital femoral epiphysis (SCFE is a rare complication of growth hormone (GH therapy. Here, we report three patients who developed SCFE during GH therapy. The first two patients had hypopituitarism and had started GH therapy at the age of 15 years 6 months and 13 years 9 months, respectively. SCFE developed 4 years and 1 year after GH therapy, respectively. The third patient had Prader-Willi syndrome with obesity and hypogonadism and began GH therapy at the age of 12 years and 11 months. SCFE developed 2 months after starting GH therapy. Pain over the hip joints or over the knees is an early sign of SCFE. Despite recommendation, none of the three patients continued GH therapy. A high index of suspicion during GH therapy in patients at high risk of SCFE is important for early diagnosis and appropriate management. [J Formos Med Assoc 2007;106(2 Suppl:S46-S50

  3. Lipoatrophy in GH deficient patients treated with a long-acting pegylated GH.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Touraine, Philippe; D'Souza, Gwyn A; Kourides, Ione; Abs, Roger; Barclay, Paul; Xie, Rujia; Pico, Antonio; Torres-Vela, Elena; Ekman, Bertil

    2009-10-01

    Changes observed during adult GH deficiency (GHD) are most often reversed with the administration of recombinant human GH (rhGH). To avoid daily injections, a long-acting GH molecule has been obtained by covalent binding of polyethylene glycol (PEG) with rhGH (PEG-GH), allowing weekly s.c. injections. This study was designed to assess its efficacy and safety, in adult GHD subjects. This was a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled, multiple-dose, parallel group study. Subjects were recruited from 34 centers. A total of 105 subjects with GHD were assigned a treatment. They received 6 weekly injections of either PEG-GH or placebo. Subjects were randomized into one out of four treatment groups (Groups A-D) or placebo (Group E). Groups A, B, and C received 1, 3, and 4 mg PEG-GH respectively, for the first 3 weeks followed by 2, 6, and 8 mg PEG-GH respectively, for the remaining 3 weeks. Group D received 4 mg PEG-GH for 6 weeks. Group E received placebo. The study was suspended because of the development of lipoatrophy in certain subjects and restarted with an injection rotation plan, before being terminated due to further subjects developing lipoatrophy. A total of 13 cases of injection-site lipoatrophy were reported, of which ten were in females and three occurred after the first injection; all cases were independent of PEG-GH dose or IGF1 levels, either basal or under treatment. The unpredictable occurrence of injection-site lipoatrophy with weekly long-acting pegylated GH molecules may be a limiting factor for their development.

  4. Effects of hypothalamic dopamine on growth hormone-releasing hormone-induced growth hormone secretion and thyrotropin-releasing hormone-induced prolactin secretion in goats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jin, Jin; Hashizume, Tsutomu

    2015-06-01

    The aim of the present study was to clarify the effects of hypothalamic dopamine (DA) on the secretion of growth hormone (GH) in goats. The GH-releasing response to an intravenous (i.v.) injection of GH-releasing hormone (GHRH, 0.25 μg/kg body weight (BW)) was examined after treatments to augment central DA using carbidopa (carbi, 1 mg/kg BW) and L-dopa (1 mg/kg BW) in male and female goats under a 16-h photoperiod (16 h light, 8 h dark) condition. GHRH significantly and rapidly stimulated the release of GH after its i.v. administration to goats (P < 0.05). The carbi and L-dopa treatments completely suppressed GH-releasing responses to GHRH in both male and female goats (P < 0.05). The prolactin (PRL)-releasing response to an i.v. injection of thyrotropin-releasing hormone (TRH, 1 μg/kg BW) was additionally examined in male goats in this study to confirm modifications to central DA concentrations. The treatments with carbi and L-dopa significantly reduced TRH-induced PRL release in goats (P < 0.05). These results demonstrated that hypothalamic DA was involved in the regulatory mechanisms of GH, as well as PRL secretion in goats. © 2014 Japanese Society of Animal Science.

  5. Effects of High Intensity Interval Training on Plasma Levels of GH and IGF-I

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Seyyed Mahmoud Hejazi

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: It is well-recognized that exercise has a significant impact on the GH/IGF system but less is known about the effects of HIIT on this axis. Aim of the present study was to evaluate the effect of ten weeks of HIIT on plasma levels of GH and IGF-I in healthy men. Methods: Twenty young men (age 23.34 ± 2.56 weight 72.47 ± 12.01 height 174.10 ± 5.75 recruited and randomly assigned into control (n=10 and HIIT (n=12 groups. HIIT protocol was started with 4 cycles. Then, every two weeks one cycle was added to the previous ones. Finally, it was to 8 cycles/ session in tenth weeks that lasted 16 minutes. Blood samples were collected prior to and after HIIT program for all subjects and IGF-I and GH levels were measured. Result: HIIT subjects showed a significant increase in IGF-I (P=0.002, F=12.38. However, no significant change was shown in GH levels (P=0.716, F=0.62. Discussion and conclusion: Our findings indicate that the HIIT caused increase in circulating levels of IGF-I independently from GH levels. Both hormones may contribute to positive effects of anabolic conditions.

  6. Distribution of growth hormone-responsive cells in the mouse brain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Furigo, Isadora C; Metzger, Martin; Teixeira, Pryscila D S; Soares, Carlos R J; Donato, Jose

    2017-01-01

    Growth hormone (GH) exerts important biological effects primarily related to growth and metabolism. However, the role of GH signaling in the brain is still elusive. To better understand GH functions in the brain, we mapped the distribution of GH-responsive cells and identified the receptors involved in GH central effects. For this purpose, mice received an acute intraperitoneal challenge with specific ligands of the GH receptor (mouse GH), prolactin receptor (prolactin) or both receptors (human GH), and their brains were subsequently processed immunohistochemically to detect the phosphorylated form of STAT5 (pSTAT5). GH induced pSTAT5 immunoreactivity in neurons, but not in astroglial cells of numerous brain regions, including the cerebral cortex, nucleus accumbens, hippocampus, septum and amygdala. The most prominent populations of GH-responsive neurons were located in hypothalamic areas, including several preoptic divisions, and the supraoptic, paraventricular, suprachiasmatic, periventricular, arcuate, ventromedial, dorsomedial, tuberal, posterior and ventral premammillary nuclei. Interestingly, many brainstem structures also exhibited GH-responsive cells. Experiments combining immunohistochemistry for pSTAT5 and in situ hybridization for GH and prolactin receptors revealed that human GH induced pSTAT5 in most, but not all, brain regions through both prolactin and GH receptors. Additionally, males and females exhibited a similar number of GH-responsive cells in forebrain structures known to be sexually dimorphic. In summary, we found GH-responsive cells primarily distributed in brain regions implicated in neurovegetative, emotional/motivational and cognitive functions. Our findings deepen the understanding of GH signaling in the brain and suggest that central GH signaling is likely more ample and complex than formerly recognized.

  7. Kisspeptin stimulates growth hormone release by utilizing Neuropeptide Y pathways and is dependent on the presence of ghrelin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Although kisspeptin is the primary stimulator of gonadotropin releasing hormone secretion and therefore the hypothalamic-pituitary gonadal axis, new findings suggest kisspeptin can also regulate additional neuroendocrine processes including release of growth hormone (GH). Central delivery of kisspep...

  8. GH safety workshop position paper: A critical appraisal of recombinant human GH therapy in children and adults

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    D.B. Allen (David); P. Backeljauw; M. Bidlingmaier (Martin); B.M.K. Biller; M. Boguszewski; P. Burman (Pia); G. Butler; K. Chihara; J. Christiansen; S. Cianfarani (S.); P.E. Clayton (P.); D.R. Clemmons (David); P. Cohen (Pinchas); F. Darendeliler (Feyza); C. Deal; D.B. Dunger (David B.); E.M. Erfurth (Eva Marie); J.S. Fuqua; A. Grimberg; M. Haymond; C. Higham; K. Ho; A.R. Hoffman; A.C.S. Hokken-Koelega (Anita); G. Johannsson; A. Juul (Anders); J.J. Kopchick (John ); P. Lee; M. Pollak; S. Radovick (Sally); L. Robison; R.G. Rosenfeld (Ron); R.J. Ross (Richard); L. Sävendahl (Lars); P. Saenger (Paul); H. Toft Sorensen; K. Stochholm; C.J. Strasburger; A.J. Swerdlow (Anthony ); M. Thorner

    2016-01-01

    textabstractRecombinant human GH (rhGH) has been in use for 30 years, and over that time its safety and efficacy in children and adults has been subject to considerable scrutiny. In 2001, a statement from the GH Research Society (GRS) concluded that 'for approved indications, GH is safe'; however,

  9. Anti-competitiveness of Instant Messenger Tying by Microsoft

    OpenAIRE

    Kim, Jaehong; Bang, Se Hoon; Hwang, Sunjoo

    2011-01-01

    In this paper, we theoretically analyze Microsoft's tying practice in the instant messenger market. Using a model that highlights distinct features of the instant messenger, which are different from the cases of the web browser and the media player, we show that Microsoft can leverage its monopoly power in the operating system (OS) market to the instant messenger market through tying strategy. Microsoft's messenger tying hurts consumers because it enables Microsoft to monopolize messenger mar...

  10. Adult growth hormone deficiency – benefits, side effects, and risks of growth hormone replacement

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mary Lim Reed

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Deficiency of growth hormone (GH in adults results in a syndrome characterized by decreased muscle mass and exercise capacity, increased visceral fat, impaired quality of life, unfavorable alterations in lipid profile and markers of cardiovascular risk, decrease in bone mass and integrity and increased mortality. When dosed appropriately, GH replacement therapy (GHRT is well tolerated, with a low incidence of side effects, and improves most of the alterations observed in GH deficiency (GHD; beneficial effects on mortality, cardiovascular events and fracture rates, however, remain to be conclusively demonstrated. The potential of GH to act as a mitogen has resulted in concern over the possibility of increased de novo tumors or recurrence of pre-existing malignancies in individuals treated with GH. Though studies of adults who received GHRT in childhood have produced conflicting reports in this regard, long term surveillance of adult GHRT has not demonstrated increased cancer risk or mortality.

  11. Estrogens regulate the hepatic effects of growth hormone, a hormonal interplay with multiple fates

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fernández-Pérez, Leandro; Guerra, Borja; Díaz-Chico, Juan C

    2013-01-01

    The liver responds to estrogens and growth hormone (GH) which are critical regulators of body growth, gender-related hepatic functions, and intermediate metabolism. The effects of estrogens on liver can be direct, through the direct actions of hepatic ER, or indirect, which include the crosstalk...... with endocrine, metabolic, and sex-differentiated functions of GH. Most previous studies have been focused on the influence of estrogens on pituitary GH secretion, which has a great impact on hepatic transcriptional regulation. However, there is strong evidence that estrogens can influence the GH......-regulated endocrine and metabolic functions in the human liver by acting at the level of GHR-STAT5 signaling pathway. This crosstalk is relevant because the widespread exposition of estrogen or estrogen-related compounds in human. Therefore, GH or estrogen signaling deficiency as well as the influence of estrogens...

  12. Changes in growth hormone-binding protein in girls with central precocious puberty treated with a depot preparation of luteinizing hormone-releasing hormone analogue.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oliveira, S B; Donnadieu, M; Chaussain, J L

    1993-01-01

    Growth hormone-binding protein (GHBP) was studied in 11 girls with true precocious puberty, aged 7.3 +/- 0.2 years (mean +/- SE), before and after the first 6 months of treatment with luteinizing hormone-releasing hormone analogue D-Trp6-LHRH. The 125I-human GH was incubated with 150 microliters of serum, bound and free GH were separated by gel filtration. The levels of GHBP increased significantly from 24.2 +/- 1.3 to 28.1 +/- 1.9% (p pubertal spurt is mediated by a sex-steroid-induced rise in GH concentration, and they suggest that the levels of GHBP may be related to the GH secretion and its variation with treatment.

  13. Growth hormone receptor expression and function in pituitary adenomas

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Clausen, Lene R; Kristiansen, Mikkel T; Rasmussen, Lars M

    2004-01-01

    OBJECTIVE AND DESIGN: Hypopituitarism, in particular GH deficiency, is prevalent in patients with clinically nonfunctioning pituitary adenomas (NFPAs) both before and after surgery. The factors regulating the growth of pituitary adenomas in general and residual tumour tissue in particular....... CONCLUSION: GH receptors are expressed in human pituitary adenoma cells but their functional role is uncertain. GH and IGF-I do not consistently influence the proliferation of cultured pituitary adenoma cells....... are not fully characterized, and the effect of GH and IGF-I on human pituitary cell proliferation has not previously been reported. In NFPA tissue from 14 patients we evaluated GH receptor (GHR) expression and signal transduction, and the effect of GH and IGF-I exposure on cell proliferation and hormone...

  14. Growth hormone therapy and craniofacial bones: a comprehensive review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Litsas, G

    2013-09-01

    Growth hormone (GH) has significant effects on linear bone growth, bone mass and bone metabolism. The primary role of GH supplementation in children with GH deficiency, those born small for gestational age or with other types of disorders in somatic development is to increase linear growth. However, GH therapy seems to elicit varying responses in the craniofacial region. Whereas the effects of GH administration on somatic development are well documented, comparatively little is known of its effects on the craniofacial region. The purpose of this review was to search the literature and compile results from both animal and human studies related to the impact of GH on craniofacial growth. © 2012 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  15. Antagonists of growth hormone-releasing hormone inhibit the proliferation of experimental non-small cell lung carcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szereday, Zoltan; Schally, Andrew V; Varga, Jozsef L; Kanashiro, Celia A; Hebert, Francine; Armatis, Patricia; Groot, Kate; Szepeshazi, Karoly; Halmos, Gabor; Busto, Rebeca

    2003-11-15

    Recent studies show that antagonists of growth hormone-releasing hormone (GH-RH) inhibit proliferation of various cancers indirectly through blockage of the endocrine GH-insulin-like growth factor (IGF) I axis and directly by an action on tumor cells involving the suppression of autocrine/paracrine IGF-I, IGF-II, or GH-RH. The effectiveness of therapy with GH-RH antagonist JV-1-38 and its mechanisms of action were investigated in NCI-H838 non-small cell lung carcinoma (NSCLC) xenografted s.c. into nude mice and in vitro. Treatment with GH-RH antagonist JV-1-38 significantly (P < 0.05-0.001) inhibited tumor growth as demonstrated by a 58% decrease in final tumor volume, 54% reduction in tumor weight, and the extension of tumor-doubling time from 8.5 +/- 1.38 to 12 +/- 1.07 days as compared with controls. Using ligand competition assays with (125)I-labeled GH-RH antagonist JV-1-42, specific high-affinity binding sites for GH-RH were found on tumor membranes. Reverse transcription-PCR revealed the expression of mRNA for GH-RH and splice variant 1 (SV(1)) of GH-RH receptor in H838 tumors. Reverse transcription-PCR analysis also demonstrated that H838 tumors express IGF-I and IGF-I receptors. Tumoral concentration of IGF-I and its mRNA expression were significantly decreased by 25% (P = 0.05) and 65% (P < 0.001), respectively, in animals receiving JV-1-38, whereas serum IGF-I levels remained unchanged. In vitro studies showed that H838 cells secreted GH-RH and IGF-I into the medium. The growth of tumor cells in vitro was stimulated by IGF-I and inhibited by GH-RH antagonist JV-1-38 and a GH-RH antiserum. Our results extend the findings on the involvement of IGF-I in NSCLC and suggest that GH-RH may be an autocrine growth factor for H838 NSCLC. The antitumorigenic action of GH-RH antagonists could be partly direct and mediated by SV(1) of tumoral GH-RH receptors. The finding of GH-RH and SV(1) of GH-RH receptors in NSCLC provides a new approach to the treatment of this

  16. Effects of 2 wk of GH administration on 24-h indirect calorimetry in young, healthy, lean men

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Mette; Morthorst, Rikke; Larsson, Benny

    2005-01-01

    The present study was designed as a randomized, double-blind placebo (Plc)-controlled study to determine the effect of 2 wk of growth hormone administration (GH-adm.) on energy expenditure (EE) and substrate oxidation in healthy humans. Sixteen young healthy men were divided into two groups....... The study consisted of two 24-h measurements (indirect calorimetry), separated by 2 wk of either Plc or GH injections (6 IU/day). At baseline, no significant differences were observed between the two groups in any of the measured anthropometric, hormonal, or metabolic parameters, neither did the parameters...... change over time in the Plc group. GH-adm. resulted in a 4.4% increase in 24-h EE (P

  17. The effect of long-term prednisone treatment on growth hormone and insulin-like growth factor-1

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Prummel, M. F.; Wiersinga, W. M.; Oosting, H.; Endert, E.

    1996-01-01

    Due to a lack of longitudinal data the precise effect of long-term corticosteroid treatment on serum levels of the anabolic hormones Growth Hormone (GH) and Insulin-like Growth Factor-1 (IGF-1) is unknown. Therefore, we prospectively followed GH and IGF-1 levels over a six month period in 18

  18. The Effects of GH Transgenic Goats on the Microflora of the Intestine, Feces and Surrounding Soil.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zekun Bao

    Full Text Available The development of genetically engineered animals has brought with it increasing concerns about biosafety issues. We therefore evaluated the risks of growth hormone from transgenic goats, including the probability of horizontal gene transfer and the impact on the microbial community of the goats' gastrointestinal tracts, feces and the surrounding soil. The results showed that neither the GH nor the neoR gene could be detected in the samples. Moreover, there was no significant change in the microbial community of the gastrointestinal tracts, feces and soil, as tested with PCR-denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis and 16S rDNA sequencing. Finally, phylogenetic analysis showed that the intestinal content, feces and soil samples all contained the same dominant group of bacteria. These results demonstrated that expression of goat growth hormone in the mammary of GH transgenic goat does not influence the microflora of the intestine, feces and surrounding soil.

  19. Structural characterization of iodinated bovine growth hormone.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mattera, R; Turyn, D; Fernandez, H N; Dellacha, J M

    1982-02-01

    Bovine growth hormone (bGH) was submitted to iodination using limited amounts of oxidizing reagent, yielding a derivative with no more than 1-g-atom of iodine per mole of hormone. Analysis of the hydrolysis products indicated that monoiodotyrosine was almost the only product of substitution. Isolation and identification of the tryptic fragments showed that half of the 125I-labeled bGH molecules were iodinated in Tyr 174, followed by Tyr 158 (16%) and Tyr 42 (14%). Frontal gel chromatography indicated that the preparation did not contain significant amounts of unreacted bGH. Circular dichroism evidenced structural similarity between the native and the iodinated bGH. The iodinated hormone, like the native protein, undergoes self-association. The dissociation constant of the iodo-labeled bGH self-association equilibrium showed a two-fold increase when compared to that corresponding to the unlabeled hormone. At pH 8.5, where the equilibrium constant was estimated, one tenth of the molecules bear a charged iodotyrosyl residue (average pKapp = 9.3), which could account for part, if not all, of the observed difference regarding self-association. By this criterion, the presence of the iodine atom does not disturb the area engaged in dimer formation.

  20. Physiological role of somatostatin on growth hormone regulation in humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thorner, M O; Vance, M L; Hartman, M L; Holl, R W; Evans, W S; Veldhuis, J D; Van Cauter, E; Copinschi, G; Bowers, C Y

    1990-09-01

    Growth hormone (GH) secretion in man is pulsatile and this pattern is regulated by both GH-releasing hormone (GHRH) and somatostatin. A large body of experimental evidence in both man and animals supports the model that bursts of GH secretion are mediated by a reduction of tonic hypothalamic somatostatin secretion. Our studies have been performed in normal subjects with frequent blood sampling for GH measurements (from 20-minute to 30-second intervals); the data have been analyzed by computer algorithms to objectively determine pulse characteristics and, in some studies, to estimate both pituitary secretion and clearance rates using deconvolution analysis. The studies include profiles of GH secretion in normal men and women in fed and fasted states; analysis of GH secretion during sleep; and administration of GHRH during different stages of sleep and after sleep deprivation. The variable GH response to exogenous GHRH and the attenuated response after 6 hours of GHRH infusion to GHRH, while not to hypoglycemia, as well as the pulsatile profile of GH secretion in response to continuous GHRH infusions (24 hours to 14 days), all support the thesis that it is hypothalamic somatostatin that determines the timing of bursts of GH secretion. This is further confirmed by the profile of GH secretion in a patient with ectopic GHRH secretion. Recently, we have initiated studies with the novel synthetic GH releasing hexapeptide, HisDTrpAlaTrpDPheLysNH2 (GHRP). Our studies show that it acts synergistically with GHRH. Several lines of evidence suggest that GHRP stimulates GH secretion independently of GHRH receptors and acts at both the hypothalamic and pituitary levels. It may act to functionally antagonize somatostatin.

  1. Higgs mass from neutrino-messenger mixing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Byakti, Pritibhajan [Center for High Energy Physics, Indian Institute of Science,C.V. Raman Ave, Bangalore 560012 (India); Department of Theoretical Physics, Indian Association for the Cultivation of Science,2A & 2B Raja S.C. Mullick Road, Kolkata 700 032 (India); Khosa, Charanjit K. [Center for High Energy Physics, Indian Institute of Science,C.V. Raman Ave, Bangalore 560012 (India); Mummidi, V.S. [Harish-Chandra Research Institute,Chhatnag Road, Jhusi, Allahabad 211019 (India); Vempati, Sudhir K. [Center for High Energy Physics, Indian Institute of Science,C.V. Raman Ave, Bangalore 560012 (India)

    2017-03-06

    The discovery of the Higgs particle at 125 GeV has put strong constraints on minimal messenger models of gauge mediation, pushing the stop masses into the multi-TeV regime. Extensions of these models with matter-messenger mixing terms have been proposed to generate a large trilinear parameter, A{sub t}, relaxing these constraints. The detailed survey of these models (DOI: 10.1007/JHEP05(2013)055; 10.1007/JHEP08(2013)093 ) so far considered messenger mixings with only MSSM superfields. In the present work, we extend the survey to MSSM with inverse-seesaw mechanism. The neutrino-sneutrino corrections to the Higgs mass in the inverse seesaw model are not significant in the minimal gauge mediation model, unless one considers messenger-matter interaction terms. We classify all possible models with messenger-matter interactions and perform thorough numerical analysis to find out the promising models. We found that out of the 17 possible models 9 of them can lead to Higgs mass within the observed value without raising the sfermion masses significantly. The successful models have stop masses ∼1.5 TeV with small or negligible mixing and yet a light CP even Higgs at 125 GeV.

  2. Milk insulin, GH and TSH: relationship to changes in milk lactose, glucose and protein during lactogenesis in women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kulski, J K; Hartmann, P E

    1983-10-01

    Changes in concentration of insulin, growth hormone (GH) and thyroid stimulating hormone (TSH) in the whey fraction of mammary secretion of women during late pregnancy and lactogenesis were determined by radioimmunoassay. The milk hormone changes were compared to changes in the concentration of milk lactose, glucose and proteins which reflect the transition from colostrum to milk production during lactogenesis. During late pregnancy the average concentrations of insulin, GH and TSH in the colostrum of 2 women were 114.6 microU ml-1, 21.7 microU ml-1 and 14.1 microU ml-1, respectively. The concentrations of these hormones fell from high to low levels between day 1 and day 2 post partum concomitantly with the changes in the concentration of milk lactose, glucose and protein. On day 5 post partum the average milk concentrations of insulin, GH and TSH were 21.0 microU ml-1, 4.0 microU ml-1, and 5.0 microU ml-1, respectively. Similar milk hormone changes occurred in non breast feeding women during the first 11 days post partum. During 2 to 13 months of lactation one woman, the average concentration of milk insulin was 12 microU ml-1. In another woman, from 0 to 22 days after termination of breast feeding, the concentration of insulin increased from 19 to 56 microU ml-1. There were significant positive correlations between hormones and total protein and negative correlations between hormones and lactose, and hormones and glucose in women during lactogenesis and involution. The results showed that the changes in insulin, GH and TSH in milk were closely related to changes in secretory activity and permeability of the breast.

  3. Real-life GH dosing patterns in children with GHD, TS or born SGA: a report from the NordiNet® International Outcome Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blankenstein, Oliver; Snajderova, Marta; Blair, Jo; Pournara, Effie; Pedersen, Birgitte Tønnes; Petit, Isabelle Oliver

    2017-08-01

    To describe real-life dosing patterns in children with growth hormone deficiency (GHD), born small for gestational age (SGA) or with Turner syndrome (TS) receiving growth hormone (GH) and enrolled in the NordiNet International Outcome Study (IOS; Nbib960128) between 2006 and 2016. This non-interventional, multicentre study included paediatric patients diagnosed with GHD (isolated (IGHD) or multiple pituitary hormone deficiency (MPHD)), born SGA or with TS and treated according to everyday clinical practice from the Czech Republic (IGHD/MPHD/SGA/TS: n  = 425/61/316/119), France ( n  = 1404/188/970/206), Germany ( n  = 2603/351/1387/411) and the UK ( n  = 259/60/87/35). GH dosing was compared descriptively across countries and indications. Proportions of patients by GH dose group (low/medium/high) or GH dose change (decrease/increase/no change) during years 1 and 2 were also evaluated across countries and indications. In the Czech Republic, GH dosing was generally within recommended levels. In France, average GH doses were higher for patients with IGHD, MPHD and SGA than in other countries. GH doses in TS tended to be at the lower end of the recommended label range, especially in Germany and the UK; the majority of patients were in the low-dose group. A significant inverse association between baseline height standard deviation score and GH dose was shown ( P  TS received GH doses below practice guidelines and label recommendations. © 2017 The authors.

  4. DNase I-hypersensitive sites in the chromatin of rat growth hormone gene locus and enhancer activity of regions with these sites.

    OpenAIRE

    Aizawa, A; Yoneyama, T.; Kazahari, K; Ono, M.

    1995-01-01

    In this study, a determination was made of the chromatin structure of the rat growth hormone (GH) gene locus by DNase I sensitivity analysis using GC [GH+, prolactin (PRL)-], 235 (GH-, PRL+), GH3 (GH+, PRL+) and liver (GH-, PRL-) cells. From 7 kb upstream from the transcription start site to 19 kb downstream from the polyadenylation site, two major DNase I-hypersensitive sites (M-DHS; UIA, UIIA) and three M-DHS (DIA, DII, DIII) were found within 2 kb upstream and 7 kb downstream regions, resp...

  5. Growth hormone-binding proteins in high-speed cytosols of multiple tissues of the rabbit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herington, A C; Ymer, S; Roupas, P; Stevenson, J

    1986-04-11

    Soluble, specific binding protein(s) for growth hormone (GH) have been identified and partially characterized in high-speed cytosolic preparations from a number of rabbit tissues. The binding of 125I-labelled human GH to proteins in liver, heart, adipose tissue, skeletal muscle and kidney cytosols was dependent on time and cytosolic protein concentration. By Scatchard analysis, the binding affinities (KA: (2-7) X 10(9) M-1) were somewhat higher than those generally reported for membrane GH receptors. The binding proteins had a greater specificity for somatotrophic hormones than lactogenic hormones, although the kidney appeared to have, in addition, a lactogen-binding protein. By gel filtration, the Mr of the cytosolic GH-binding protein was approximately 100 000 in all tissues. None of the binding proteins was detectable by the poly(ethylene glycol) precipitation method used widely for soluble hormone receptors. The cytosolic GH-binding proteins also cross-reacted with a monoclonal antibody to the rabbit liver membrane GH receptor. These results indicate the ubiquitous presence of apparently naturally soluble GH-binding proteins in the cytosolic fractions of several tissues in the rabbit. Of great interest is their presence in muscle, where GH receptors or binding proteins have not previously been detected, despite muscle being recognized as a classical GH target tissue.

  6. Sweet spot supersymmetry and composite messengers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ibe, Masahiro; Kitano, Ryuichiro

    2008-05-01

    Sweet spot supersymmetry is a phenomenological effective Lagrangian of weak scale supersymmetry with a certain set of natural assumptions. This framework is designed to avoid problems in low-energy phenomenology and cosmology of supersymmetric models. We discuss a class of dynamical models of supersymmetry breaking and its mediation, whose low-energy effective description falls into this framework. Hadron fields in the dynamical models play a role of the messengers of the supersymmetry breaking. As is always true in the models of the sweet spot supersymmetry, the messenger scale is predicted to be 105 GeV ≲Mmess ≲1010 GeV. Various values of the effective number of messenger fields Nmess are possible depending on the choice of the gauge group.

  7. Hormone Profiling in Plant Tissues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Müller, Maren; Munné-Bosch, Sergi

    2017-01-01

    Plant hormones are for a long time known to act as chemical messengers in the regulation of physiological processes during a plant's life cycle, from germination to senescence. Furthermore, plant hormones simultaneously coordinate physiological responses to biotic and abiotic stresses. To study the hormonal regulation of physiological processes, three main approaches have been used (1) exogenous application of hormones, (2) correlative studies through measurements of endogenous hormone levels, and (3) use of transgenic and/or mutant plants altered in hormone metabolism or signaling. A plant hormone profiling method is useful to unravel cross talk between hormones and help unravel the hormonal regulation of physiological processes in studies using any of the aforementioned approaches. However, hormone profiling is still particularly challenging due to their very low abundance in plant tissues. In this chapter, a sensitive, rapid, and accurate method to quantify all the five "classic" classes of plant hormones plus other plant growth regulators, such as jasmonates, salicylic acid, melatonin, and brassinosteroids is described. The method includes a fast and simple extraction procedure without time consuming steps as purification or derivatization, followed by optimized ultrahigh-performance liquid chromatography coupled to electrospray ionization-tandem mass spectrometry (UHPLC-MS/MS) analysis. This protocol facilitates the high-throughput analysis of hormone profiling and is applicable to different plant tissues.

  8. Gigantism caused by growth hormone secreting pituitary adenoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Noorisaem Rhee

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Gigantism indicates excessive secretion of growth hormones (GH during childhood when open epiphyseal growth plates allow for excessive linear growth. Case one involved a 14.7-year-old boy presented with extreme tall stature. His random serum GH level was 38.4 ng/mL, and failure of GH suppression was noted during an oral glucose tolerance test (OGTT; nadir serum GH, 22.7 ng/mL. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI of the brain revealed a 12-mm-sized pituitary adenoma. Transsphenoidal surgery was performed and a pituitary adenoma displaying positive immunohistochemical staining for GH was reported. Pituitary MRI scan was performed 4 months after surgery and showed recurrence/residual tumor. Medical treatment with a long-acting somatostatin analogue for six months was unsuccessful. As a result, secondary surgery was performed. Three months after reoperation, the GH level was 0.2 ng/mL and insulin-like growth factor 1 was 205 ng/mL. Case two involved a 14.9-year-old boy, who was referred to our department for his tall stature. His basal GH level was 9.3 ng/mL, and failure of GH suppression was reported during OGTT (nadir GH, 9.0 ng/mL. Pituitary MRI showed a 6-mm-sized pituitary adenoma. Surgery was done and histopathological examination demonstrated a pituitary adenoma with positive staining for GH. Three months after surgery, the GH level was 0.2 ng/mL and nadir GH during OGTT was less than 0.1 ng/mL. Pituitary MRI scans showed no residual tumor. We present two cases of gigantism caused by a GH-secreting pituitary adenoma with clinical and microscopic findings.

  9. Variability in adherence to rhGH treatment: Socioeconomic causes and effect on children's growth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Pedro, Silvina; Murillo, Marta; Salinas, Isabel; Granada, Maria-Luisa; Martinez, María; Puig-Domingo, Manel; Andreu, Angels; Bel, Joan

    2016-02-01

    In children with growth disorders, mean final height is associated to poor adherence to Growth Hormone therapy. The primary goal of this study is to identify patients who do not adhere to GH therapy and determine the influence of adherence in response to the treatment. The role of serum IGF-I and influence of socio-economic factors on the therapeutic adherence will also be evaluated. 158 children under treatment with rhGH were included in the study. Age, gender, etiology, Tanner stage, duration of treatment, growth rate, IGF-I serum values, daily dose, and annual rhGH dose data were collected. Adherence to therapy was defined as moderate-to-poor when the patient had taken less than 92% of the prescribed medication. A subgroup of 106 patients completed a questionnaire to assess social and environmental effects. Moderate-to-poor adherence to rhGH treatment was determined in 33.5% of study patients. A decrease in adherence was associated to treatment duration (p=0.001). A significant correlation was determined between adherence and height velocity (p=0.002) and IGF-I (p<0.0001) levels. Adherence rates were associated to the mother's educational level (p=0.007). Poor adherence to GH therapy was observed in one-third of study patients, resulting in suboptimal growth. IGF-I levels can be helpful to identify patients with poor adherence to GH medication. Physicians should pay special attention to certain characteristics of the patient and their environment, and encourage desirable therapeutic compliance. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Differential neonatal testosterone imprinting of GH-dependent liver proteins and genes in female mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramirez, María Cecilia; Luque, Guillermina María; Ornstein, Ana María; Becu-Villalobos, Damasia

    2010-12-01

    Abnormal exposure to steroid hormones within a critical developmental period elicits permanent alterations in female reproductive physiology in rodents, but the impact on the female GH axis and the underlying sexual differences in hepatic enzymes have not been described in detail. We have investigated the effect of neonatal androgenization of female mice (achieved by s.c. injection of 100 μg testosterone propionate (TP) on the day of birth: TP females) on the GHRH-somatostatin-GH axis and downstream GH targets, which included female and male predominant liver enzymes and secreted proteins. At 4 months of age, an organizational effect of neonatal testosterone was evidenced on hypothalamic Ghrh mRNA level but not on somatostatin (stt) mRNA level. Ghrh mRNA levels were higher in males than in females, but not in TP females. Increased expression in TP females correlated with increased pituitary GH content and somatotrope population, increased serum and liver IGF-I concentration, and ultimately higher body weight. Murine urinary proteins (MUPs) that were excreted at higher levels in male urine, and whose expression requires pulsatile occupancy of liver GH receptors, were not modified in TP females and neither was liver Mup 1/2/6/8 mRNA expression. Furthermore, a male predominant liver gene (Cyp2d9) was not masculinized in TP females either, whereas two female predominant genes (Cyp2b9 and Cyp2a4) were defeminized. These data support the hypothesis that neonatal steroid exposure contributes to the remodeling of the GH axis and defeminization of hepatic steroid-metabolizing enzymes, which may compromise liver physiology.

  11. Pituitary immediate release pools of growth hormone and prolactin are preferentially refilled by new rather than stored hormone.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stachura, M E; Tyler, J M; Kent, P G

    1989-07-01

    Pituitary stores of rat GH (rGH) and PRL (rPRL) are divisible into immediately releasable and more stable compartments representing either compartmentalized hormone within individual cells of a homogeneous population or responses of specialized cell subsets in a functionally heterogeneous population. In addition, newly synthesized rGH and rPRL can be processed either into intracellular storage or toward direct release. Fractional assignment of new hormone to these two paths can be influenced in the somatotroph by GHRH and may also represent either intracellular processes or functional heterogeneity of cells. We investigated the source, newly synthesized or stored, of hormone refilling the somatotroph and lactotroph immediately releasable pools (IRP) after their discharge by 21 mM potassium ion, 1 mM (Bu)2cAMP, 3 nM human GHRH-44, or 3 microM prostaglandin E1. Experiments were performed using perifused pituitary fragments exposed sequentially to [14C]- and [3H]leucine in association with stimulation by two 30-min pulses of the same secretagogue. Therefore, only [14C]hormone was available for release by the first stimulus, whereas both [14C]- and [3H]hormone were available for release by the second stimulus. Analysis was by specific immunoprecipitation. The first episode of stored [14C]rGH release exceeded the second episode of stored [14C]rGH release in response to each secretagogue. However, release of newly synthesized [3H]rGH in response to the second episode of stimulation exceeded the simultaneous release of stored [14C]rGH while matching or exceeding the [14C]rGH release that had occurred in the same experiment in response to the first episode of stimulation. Refilling both GH and PRL IRP stores drew primarily upon newly synthesized hormone, but with different secretagogue-specific patterns. These data confirm differential handling of new and stored rGH and rPRL within the pituitary. They are consistent with either (1) the enhanced shunting of newly

  12. GH replacement therapy and second neoplasms in adult survivors of childhood cancer: a retrospective study from a single institution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brignardello, E; Felicetti, F; Castiglione, A; Fortunati, N; Matarazzo, P; Biasin, E; Sacerdote, C; Ricardi, U; Fagioli, F; Corrias, A; Arvat, E

    2015-02-01

    Growth hormone deficiency (GHD) is the most common endocrine late effect observed in childhood cancer survivors (CCS) previously submitted to cranial irradiation. Radiation therapy can also increase the risk of second neoplasms (SNs). Since in previous studies GH replacement therapy was associated with increased incidence of neoplasia, we explored the association between SNs and GH replacement therapy in a cohort of CCS with GHD. Within the clinical cohort of CCS referred to the Transition Unit for Childhood Cancer Survivors of Turin between November 2001 and December 2012, we considered all patients who developed GHD as a consequence of cancer therapies. GHD was always diagnosed in childhood. To evaluate the quality of data, our cohort was linked to the Childhood Cancer Registry of Piedmont. GHD was diagnosed in 49 out of 310 CCS included in our clinical cohort. At least one SN was diagnosed in 14 patients, meningioma and basal cell carcinoma being the most common SNs. The cumulative incidence of SNs was similar in GH-treated and -untreated patients (8 SNs out of 26 GH-treated and 6 out of 23 GH-untreated patients; p = 0.331). Age, sex and paediatric cancer type had no impact on SNs development. In our CCS, GH replacement therapy does not seem to increase the risk of SNs. Anyway, independently from replacement therapy, in these patients we observed an elevated risk of SNs, possibly related to previous radiation therapy, which suggests the need of a close long-term follow-up.

  13. First-year response to rhGH therapy in children with CKD: a National Cooperative Growth Study Report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahan, John D; Warady, Bradley A; Frane, James; Rosenfeld, Ron G; Swinford, Rita D; Lippe, Barbara; Davis, D Aaron

    2010-06-01

    A clear definition of the appropriate growth response during recombinant human growth hormone (rhGH) treatment has never been established in the pediatric chronic kidney disease (CKD) population. We present here data from Genentech's National Cooperative Growth Study (NCGS) on the first-year growth response in prepubertal children with CKD. Using NCGS data, we constructed response curves for the first year of rhGH therapy in 270 (186 males, 84 females) naïve-to-treatment, prepubertal children with CKD prior to transplant or dialysis. Data from both genders were combined because gender was not significantly related to height velocity (p = 0.51). Response to rhGH was expressed as height velocity (HV) in cm/year. Mean, mean + or - 1SD, and mean - 2SD for HV during the first year of rhGH treatment as well as pretreatment HV were plotted versus age. Age-specific HV plots for rhGH-treated children with CKD are presented. At all ages, the first-year mean HV was greater than the mean pretreatment HV. The mean - 2SD for HV in children on rhGH treatment was similar to the mean pretreatment HV. These growth plots will be useful to clinicians for assessing a patient's first-year growth response. We propose that a HV below the mean - 1SD is an inadequate response. These curves may help identify patients with a suboptimal growth response due to confounding medical factors and/or non-compliance.

  14. Growth and maturational changes in dense fibrous connective tissue following 14 days of rhGH supplementation in the dwarf rat

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kyparos, Antonios; Orth, Michael W.; Vailas, Arthur C.; Martinez, Daniel A.

    2002-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the impact of recombinant human growth hormone (rhGH) on patella tendon (PT), medial collateral ligament (MCL), and lateral collateral ligament (LCL) on collagen growth and maturational changes in dwarf GH-deficient rats. Twenty male Lewis mutant dwarf rats, 37 days of age, were randomly assigned to Dwarf + rhGH (n = 10) and Dwarf + vehicle (n = 10) groups. The GH group received 1.25 mg rhGH/kg body wt twice daily for 14 days. rhGH administration stimulated dense fibrous connective tissue growth, as demonstrated by significant increases in hydroxyproline specific activity and significant decreases in the non-reducible hydroxylysylpyridinoline (HP) collagen cross-link contents. The increase in the accumulation of newly accreted collagen was 114, 67, and 117% for PT, MCL, and LCL, respectively, in 72 h. These findings suggest that a short course rhGH treatment can affect the rate of new collagen production. However, the maturation of the tendon and ligament tissues decreased 18-25% during the rapid accumulation of de novo collagen. We conclude that acute rhGH administration in a dwarf rat can up-regulate new collagen accretion in dense fibrous connective tissues, while causing a reduction in collagen maturation. Copyright 2002 Elsevier Science Ltd.

  15. GH/STAT5 signaling during the growth period in livers of mice overexpressing GH.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martinez, Carolina S; Piazza, Verónica G; Díaz, María E; Boparai, Ravneet K; Arum, Oge; Ramírez, María C; González, Lorena; Becú-Villalobos, Damasia; Bartke, Andrzej; Turyn, Daniel; Miquet, Johanna G; Sotelo, Ana I

    2015-04-01

    GH/STAT5 signaling is desensitized in the liver in adult transgenic mice overexpressing GH; however, these animals present greater body size. To assess whether the STAT5 pathway is active during the growth period in the liver in these animals, and how signaling modulators participate in this process, growing transgenic mice and normal siblings were evaluated. STAT5 does not respond to an acute GH-stimulus, but displays higher basal phosphorylation in the livers of growing GH-overexpressing mice. GH receptor and the positive modulators glucocorticoid receptor and HNF1 display greater abundance in transgenic animals, supporting the activity of STAT5. The negative modulators cytokine-induced suppressor and PTP1B are increased in GH-overexpressing mice. The suppressors SOCS2 and SOCS3 exhibit higher mRNA levels in transgenic mice but lower protein content, indicating that they are being actively degraded. Therefore, STAT5 signaling is increased in the liver in GH-transgenic mice during the growth period, with a balance between positive and negative effectors resulting in accelerated but controlled growth. © 2015 Society for Endocrinology.

  16. Evaluation of the increase in GH and IGF-1 and effectiveness in the treatment on Zacatecas population; Evaluacion del aumento en GH e IGF-1 y eficacia en el tratamiento en poblacion zacatecana

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gallegos F, P. I.; Badillo A, V., E-mail: perla_gf17@hotmail.com [Universidad Autonoma de Zacatecas, Unidad Academica de Estudios Nucleares, Laboratorio de Radioinmunoanalisis y Quimioluminiscencia, Cipres No. 10, Fracc. La Penuela, 98060 Zacatecas (Mexico)

    2013-10-15

    The acromegaly and gigantism are dysfunctions that are caused by hyper-secretion of growth hormone (GH) and of production in liver of growth factor similar to the insulin type 1 (IGF-1) mediated by the GH secretion. The secretor pituitary adenomas of GH are the main cause of the hyper-secretion. The acromegaly and gigantism are manifested respectively by acral alterations and extremities increase, and an excessive growth of the bones. Although a world prevalence of 40-60 cases by inhabitants million is registered, very few formal studies exist that confirm this number. According to the program Epiacro in Mexico is considered a prevalence of 13 cases by inhabitants million. In the Zacatecas State official statistical numbers are not had for these pathologies. Due to the few registrations that exist, or to the cases reported in Mexico, is necessary to evaluate patients with suspicion and with hyper-secretion diagnostic of GH, to contribute and/or to reinforce the health state and national statistics. In this work the GH and IGF-1 concentrations were measured on Zacatecas population to estimate the age range and sex with more probability of suffering this illness, and to evaluate the patients that have received some treatment to check their effectiveness verifying the GH and IGF-1 decrease and being able to obtain normal values. We register 26 patient cases with suspicion of GH hyper-secretion, of these 9 were affected by the illness. The hyper-secretion cases were presented with more frequency in half age adults, being affected in a same way as much men as women. To the end of the study only an affected patient concludes with the pharmacological treatment for the GH hyper-secretion control of a group of 5. (Author)

  17. Cirugía transesfenoidal: primera opción de tratamiento para adenomas hipofisarios secretores de GH Transsphenoidal surgery: first treatment option for GH secreting hypophyseal adenomas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Omar López Arbolay

    2004-12-01

    Full Text Available La elevación de los niveles de hormona del crecimiento (GH promueve el crecimiento grotesco de partes acras (acromegalia o incremento de la talla (gigantismo según la edad, así como trastornos metabólicos de relevancia biológica. La adenomectomía selectiva clasifica entre las modalidades de tratamiento. El objetivo del presente trabajo fue evaluar los resultados del tratamiento microquirúrgico por vía transeptoesfenoidal de los adenomas productores de GH en nuestro medio. Presentamos un estudio retrospectivo de pacientes intervenidos por vía transeptoesfenoidal, por esta variedad de adenomas, en el servicio de neurocirugía del Hospital "Hermanos Ameijeiras" desde 1996 al 2003. Se analizaron edad, sexo, síntomas cardinales, imaginología, niveles hormonales, complicaciones y evolución posoperatoria. Resultó que las complicaciones relacionadas con el proceder quirúrgico no fueron relevantes y ninguna persistió más allá del mes. La diabetes insípida fue la más frecuente. Los síntomas mejoraron y los títulos de GH descendieron por debajo de los niveles de curación en el 58,06 % de los operados. Se concluye que la adenomectomía transeptoesfenoidal es un proceder seguro y recomendable como tratamiento de elección en estos pacientes.The elevation of the growth hormone (GH levels enhances the grotesque growth of acral parts (acromegaly or the increase of height (gigantism according to age, as well as metabolic disorders of biological relevance. The selective adenotomy is among the treatment modalities. The objective of the present paper was to evaluate the results of the microsurgical transseptosphenoidal treatment of the GH producing adenomas in our setting. A retrospective study of patients that underwent transseptosphenoidal surgery for presenting this variety of adenomas at the neurosurgery service of "Hermanos Ameijeiras" Hospital from 1996 to 2003, was conducted. Age, cardinal symptoms, imaging, hormonal levels

  18. Growth hormone doping: a review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Erotokritou-Mulligan I

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Ioulietta Erotokritou-Mulligan, Richard IG Holt, Peter H SönksenDevelopmental Origins of Health and Disease Division, University of Southampton School of Medicine, The Institute of Developmental Science, Southampton General Hospital, Southampton, UKAbstract: The use of growth hormone (GH as a performance enhancing substance was first promoted in lay publications, long before scientists fully acknowledged its benefits. It is thought athletes currently use GH to enhance their athletic performance and to accelerate the healing of sporting injuries. Over recent years, a number of high profile athletes have admitted to using GH. To date, there is only limited and weak evidence for its beneficial effects on performance. Nevertheless the “hype” around its effectiveness and the lack of a foolproof detection methodology that will detect its abuse longer than 24 hours after the last injection has encouraged its widespread use. This article reviews the current evidence of the ergogenic effects of GH along with the risks associated with its use. The review also examines methodologies, both currently available and in development for detecting its abuse.Keywords: performance enhancing substance, GH, doping in sport, detection methods

  19. Identification and characterization of HolGH15: the holin of Staphylococcus aureus bacteriophage GH15.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Jun; Xia, Feifei; Jiang, Haiyan; Li, Xinwei; Hu, Liyuan; Gong, Pengjuan; Lei, Liancheng; Feng, Xin; Sun, Changjiang; Gu, Jingmin; Han, Wenyu

    2016-05-01

    Holins are phage-encoded hydrophobic membrane proteins that spontaneously and non-specifically accumulate and form lesions in the cytoplasmic membrane. The ORF72 gene (also designated HolGH15) derived from the genome of the Staphylococcus aureus phage GH15 was predicted to encode a membrane protein. An analysis indicated that the protein encoded by HolGH15 potentially consisted of two hydrophobic transmembrane helices. This protein exhibited the structural characteristics of class II holins and belonged to the phage_holin_1 superfamily. Expression of HolGH15 in Escherichia coli BL21 cells resulted in growth retardation of the host cells, which was triggered prematurely by the addition of 2,4-dinitrophenol. The expression of HolGH15 caused morphological alterations in engineered E. coli cells, including loss of the cell wall and cytoplasmic membrane integrity and release of intracellular components, which were visualized by transmission electron microscopy. HolGH15 exerted efficient antibacterial activity at 37 °C and pH 5.2. Mutation analysis indicated that the two transmembrane domains of HolGH15 were indispensable for the activity of the full-length protein. HolGH15 showed a broad antibacterial range: it not only inhibited Staphylococcus aureus, but also demonstrated antibacterial activity against other species, including Listeria monocytogenes, Bacillus subtilis, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Klebsiella pneumoniae and E. coli. At the minimal inhibitory concentration, HolGH15 evoked the release of cellular contents and resulted in the shrinkage and death of Staphylococcus aureus and Listeria monocytogenes cells. To the best of our knowledge, this study is the first report of a Staphylococcus aureus phage holin that exerts antibacterial activity against heterogeneous pathogens.

  20. Response to GH treatment in adult GH deficiency is predicted by gender, age, and IGF1 SDS but not by stimulated GH-peak

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Feldt-Rasmussen, Ulla; Brabant, Georg; Maiter, Dominique

    2013-01-01

    We studied whether the severity of GH deficiency (GHD) defined as i) GH-peak on stimulation tests (insulin tolerance test (ITT), arginine, and glucagon), ii) number of additional pituitary deficits, or iii) baseline IGF1 SDS could impact the response to GH treatment. We further explored whether iv......) IGF1 SDS after 24 months of GH replacement or v) ΔIGF1 SDS from baseline to 24 months was related to the phenotypic response to GH treatment. DESIGN, PATIENTS, AND MEASUREMENTS: The patient cohort (n=1752; 50% women) was obtained from KIMS (Pfizer International Metabolic Database). The patients were...... divided into three groups of approximately equal size (tertiles) according to the stimulated GH-peak values and baseline IGF1 SDS and were studied at baseline, 12, and 24 months of GH therapy....

  1. Intercultural Learning via Instant Messenger Interaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jin, Li; Erben, Tony

    2007-01-01

    This paper reports on a qualitative study investigating the viability of instant messenger (IM) interaction to facilitate intercultural learning in a foreign language class. Eight students in a Chinese as a foreign language (CFL) class participated in the study. Each student was paired with a native speaker (NS) of Chinese, and each pair…

  2. Messenger RNA surveillance: neutralizing natural nonsense

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Weischelfeldt, Joachim Lütken; Lykke-Andersen, Jens; Porse, Bo

    2005-01-01

    Messenger RNA transcripts that contain premature stop codons are degraded by a process termed nonsense-mediated mRNA decay (NMD). Although previously thought of as a pathway that rids the cell of non-functional mRNAs arising from mutations and processing errors, new research suggests a more general...

  3. 12 CFR 7.1012 - Messenger service.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... section and appropriate to assure compliance with safe and sound banking practices. (c) Pick-up and... section and appropriate to assure compliance with safe and sound banking practices. (2) The OCC reviews...) The messenger service maintains ultimate responsibility for scheduling, movement, and routing; (iv...

  4. Multi-Messenger Astronomy with Gravitational Waves

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Sound + images show Bailey was out in the India-Australia match on 12 Jan 2016. Image credit: Rediff / Fox news / Twitter. Page 10. Electromagnetic follow up: the Indian context. Page 11. Multi-Messenger Astronomy with Gravitational Waves | LIGO-G1601377-v2. Varun Bhalerao (IUCAA) | 1 July 2016. 11. 20 – 60 keV:.

  5. A first-in-man phase 1 trial for long-acting TransCon Growth Hormone.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gilfoyle, David; Mortensen, Eva; Christoffersen, Eva Dam; Leff, Jonathan A; Beckert, Michael

    2017-12-05

    TransCon growth hormone (GH) is a sustained-release inactive prodrug consisting of unmodified GH transiently bound to an inert carrier molecule designed to release fully active GH over a one-week period. This was a first-in-man phase 1 randomized trial was to evaluate the safety, tolerability, immunogenicity, pharmacokinetics (PK), and pharmacodynamics (PD) of a single dose of TransCon GH as compared to equivalent doses of daily GH (Omnitrope) or placebo in healthy adults. Forty-four healthy male adults were randomized to 4 cohorts of 11 subjects, distributed in a 7:2:2 ratio (TransCon GH: Omnitrope: placebo). A single injection of 4 possible TransCon GH doses (i.e., 0.04, 0.08, 0.16, or 0.24mg GH/kg/wk) or two different Omnitrope doses (i.e., 0.08 or 0.16mg GH/kg/wk divided into 7 equal daily doses) were administered with subjects evaluated for adverse events, immunogenicity, and GH and insulin-like growth factor-1 (IGF-1) levels. TransCon GH was well tolerated; no serious adverse events occurred, no injection site reaction differences between TransCon GH, Omnitrope, or placebo were identified, no nodules or lipoatrophy were reported, and no anti-GH binding antibodies or ECG changes were detected. Overall, the exposure of GH (Cmax) and IGF-1 (AUC0-168h) following administration of equivalent doses of TransCon GH and Omnitrope were similar. GH and IGF-1 kinetics showed a dose-proportional increase following a single SC administration of TransCon GH and indicated that the prodrug is suitable for weekly administration. These results support advancement of TransCon GH to pediatric and adult GHD trials. Clinical trial registration numbers: NCT01010425 (clinicaltrials.gov). Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Current indications for growth hormone therapy for children and adolescents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richmond, Erick; Rogol, Alan D

    2010-01-01

    Growth hormone (GH) therapy has been appropriate for severely GH-deficient children and adolescents since the 1960s. Use for other conditions for which short stature was a component could not be seriously considered because of the small supply of human pituitary-derived hormone. That state changed remarkably in the mid-1980s because of Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease associated with human pituitary tissue-derived hGH and the development of a (nearly) unlimited supply of recombinant, 22 kDa (r)hGH. The latter permitted all GH-deficient children to have access to treatment and one could design trials using rhGH to increase adult height in infants, children and adolescents with causes of short stature other than GH deficiency, as well as trials in adult GH-deficient men and women. Approved indications (US Food and Drug Administration) include: GH deficiency, chronic kidney disease, Turner syndrome, small-for-gestational age with failure to catch up to the normal height percentiles, Prader-Willi syndrome, idiopathic short stature, SHOX gene haploinsufficiency and Noonan syndrome (current to October 2008). The most common efficacy outcome in children is an increase in height velocity, although rhGH may prevent hypoglycemia in some infants with congenital hypopituitarism and increase the lean/fat ratio in most children - especially those with severe GH deficiency or Prader-Willi syndrome. Doses for adults, which affect body composition and health-related quality of life, are much lower than those for children, per kilogram of lean body mass. The safety profile is quite favorable with a small, but significant, incidence of raised intracranial pressure, scoliosis, muscle and joint discomfort, including slipped capital femoral epiphysis. The approval of rhGH therapy for short, non-GH-deficient children has validated the notion of GH sensitivity, which gives the opportunity to some children with significant short stature, but with normal stimulated GH test results, to benefit from

  7. The effect of short-term cortisol changes on growth hormone responses to the pyridostigmine-growth-hormone-releasing-hormone test in healthy adults and patients with suspected growth hormone deficiency

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, M; Støving, R K; Hangaard, J

    1998-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND AIMS: The interaction between cortisol and growth hormone (GH)-levels may significantly influence GH-responses to a stimulation test. In order to systematically analyse the interaction in a paired design, it is necessary to use a test, which has been proven safe and reliable such a...... nor by conventional HC therapy itself. However, our results also demonstrated that a GH-stimulation test should not be performed on patients, suffering from acute stress....... such as the pyridostigmine-growth-hormone-releasing-hormone (PD-GHRH) test. Three groups of subjects with a different GH-secretory capacity were included. STUDY A: Eight healthy adults were tested seven times, once with placebo throughout the examination and six times with the PD-GHRH test following no glucocorticoid......-responses to a PD-GHRH test were reduced in all individuals during acute stress-appropriate cortisol levels and the percentage reduction in GH-levels was independent of the GH-secretory capacity. Clinically, we found that peak GH-responses were not significantly affected by a short break in conventional HC therapy...

  8. Characterization of the inhibitory effect of growth hormone on primary preadipocyte differentiation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, L. H.; Madsen, B; Teisner, Børge

    1998-01-01

    GH exerts adipogenic activity in several preadipocyte cell lines, whereas in primary rat preadipocytes, GH has an antiadipogenic activity. To better understand the molecular mechanism involved in adipocyte differentiation, the expression of adipocyte-specific genes was analyzed in differentiating......% in response to GH. GH inhibited the expression of late markers of adipocyte differentiation, fatty acid synthase, aP2, and hormone-sensitive lipase by 70-80%. The antiadipogenic effect of GH was not affected by the mitogen-activated protein (MAP) kinase/ extracellular-regulated protein (ERK) kinase inhibitor...... PD 98059, indicating that the mitogen-activated protein kinase pathway was not involved in GH inhibition of preadipocyte differentiation. The expression of preadipocyte factor-1/fetal antigen 1 was decreased during differentiation, and GH treatment prevented this down-regulation of Pref1/FA1...

  9. Growth hormone-specific induction of the nuclear localization of porcine growth hormone receptor in porcine hepatocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lan, H N; Hong, P; Li, R N; Shan, A S; Zheng, X

    2017-10-01

    The phenomenon of nuclear translocation of growth hormone receptor (GHR) in human, rat, and fish has been reported. To date, this phenomenon has not been described in a domestic animal (such as pig). In addition, the molecular mechanisms of GHR nuclear translocation have not been thoroughly elucidated. To this end, porcine hepatocytes were isolated and used as a cell model. We observed that porcine growth hormone (pGH) can induce porcine GHR's nuclear localization in porcine hepatocytes. Subsequently, the dynamics of pGH-induced pGHR's nuclear localization were analyzed and demonstrated that pGHR's nuclear localization occurs in a time-dependent manner. Next, we explored the mechanism of pGHR nuclear localization using different pGHR ligands, and we demonstrated that pGHR's nuclear translocation is GH(s)-dependent. We also observed that pGHR translocates into cell nuclei in a pGH dimerization-dependent fashion, whereas further experiments indicated that IMPα/β is involved in the nuclear translocation of the pGH-pGHR dimer. The pGH-pGHR dimer may form a pGH-GHR-JAK2 multiple complex in cell nuclei, which would suggest that similar to its function in the cell membrane, the nuclear-localized pGH-pGHR dimer might still have the ability to signal. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. The production of nitric oxide in EL4 lymphoma cells overexpressing growth hormone.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arnold, Robyn E; Weigent, Douglas A

    2003-01-01

    Growth hormone (GH) is produced by immunocompetent cells and has been implicated in the regulation of a multiplicity of functions in the immune system involved in growth and activation. However, the actions of endogenous or lymphocyte GH and its contribution to immune reactivity when compared with those of serum or exogenous GH are still unclear. In the present study, we overexpressed lymphocyte GH in EL4 lymphoma cells, which lack the GH receptor (GHR), to determine the role of endogenous GH in nitric oxide (NO) production and response to genotoxic stress. Western blot analysis demonstrated that the levels of GH increased approximately 40% in cells overexpressing GH (GHo) when compared with cells with vector alone. The results also show a substantial increase in NO production in cells overexpressing GH that could be blocked by N(G)-monomethyl-L-arginine (L-NMMA), an L-arginine analogue that competitively inhibits all three isoforms of nitric oxide synthase (NOS). No evidence was obtained to support an increase in peroxynitrite in cells overexpressing GH. Overexpression of GH increased NOS activity, inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) promoter activity, and iNOS protein expression, whereas endothelial nitric oxide synthase and neuronal nitric oxide synthase protein levels were essentially unchanged. In addition, cells overexpressing GH showed increased arginine transport ability and intracellular arginase activity when compared with control cells. GH overexpression appeared to protect cells from the toxic effects of the DNA alkylating agent methyl methanesulfonate. This possibility was suggested by maintenance of the mitochondrial transmembrane potential in cells overexpressing GH when compared with control cells that could be blocked by L-NMMA. Taken together, the data support the notion that lymphocyte GH, independently of the GH receptor, may play a key role in the survival of lymphocytes exposed to stressful stimuli via the production of NO.

  11. Ten years of clinical experience with biosimilar human growth hormone: a review of safety data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borrás Pérez, Maria Victoria; Kriström, Berit; Romer, Tomasz; Walczak, Mieczyslaw; Höbel, Nadja; Zabransky, Markus

    2017-01-01

    Safety concerns for recombinant human growth hormone (rhGH) treatments include impact on cancer risk, impact on glucose homeostasis, and the formation of antibodies to endogenous/exogenous GH. Omnitrope(®) (biosimilar rhGH) was approved by the European Medicines Agency in 2006, with approval granted on the basis of comparable quality, safety, and efficacy to the reference medicine (Genotropin(®)). Additional concerns that may exist in relation to biosimilar rhGH include safety in indications granted on the basis of extrapolation and the impact of changing to biosimilar rhGH from other rhGH treatments. A substantial data set is available to fully understand the safety profile of biosimilar rhGH, which includes data from its clinical development studies and 10 years of post-approval experience. As of June 2016, 106,941,419 patient days (292,790 patient-years) experience has been gathered for biosimilar rhGH. Based on the available data, there have been no unexpected or unique adverse events related to biosimilar rhGH treatment. There is no increased risk of cancer, adverse glucose homeostasis, or immunogenic response with biosimilar rhGH compared with the reference medicine and other rhGH products. The immunogenicity of biosimilar rhGH is also similar to that of the reference and other rhGH products. Physicians should be reassured that rhGH products have a good safety record when used for approved indications and at recommended doses, and that the safety profile of biosimilar rhGH is in keeping with that of other rhGH products.

  12. Growth hormone enhances effects of endurance training on oxidative muscle metabolism in elderly women

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lange, K H; Isaksson, F; Juul, A

    2000-01-01

    The present study investigated whether recombinant human (rh) growth hormone (GH) combined with endurance training would have a larger effect on oxidative capacity, metabolism, and body fat than endurance training alone. Sixteen healthy, elderly women, aged 75 yr, performed closely monitored...... in the two subjects receiving rhGH. In conclusion, rhGH adds to the effects of endurance training on muscle oxidative enzymes and causes a reduction in body fat in elderly women....

  13. Identification of intracellular domains in the growth hormone receptor involved in signal transduction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Billestrup, N; Allevato, G; Norstedt, G

    1994-01-01

    The growth hormone (GH) receptor belongs to the GH/prolactin/cytokine super-family of receptors. The signal transduction mechanism utilized by this class of receptors remains largely unknown. In order to identify functional domains in the intracellular region of the GH receptor we generated......) for metabolic effects, a domain located in or near the proline-rich region is of importance; and (iii) for internalization, phenylalanine 346 is necessary....

  14. Treatment of short stature and growth hormone deficiency in children with somatotropin (rDNA origin)

    OpenAIRE

    Hardin, Dana S

    2008-01-01

    Dana S HardinOhio State University and Columbus Children’s Hospital, Columbus, Ohio, USAAbstract: Somatotropin (growth hormone, GH) of recombinant DNA origin has provided a readily available and safe drug that has greatly improved management of children and adolescents with GH deficiency (GHD) and other disorders of growth. In the US and Europe, regulatory agencies have given approval for the use of GH in children and adults who meet specific criteria. However, clinical and ethical ...

  15. Growth Hormone Mediates Its Protective Effect in Hepatic Apoptosis through Hnf6

    OpenAIRE

    Wang, Kewei; Wang, Minhua; Gannon, Maureen; Holterman, AiXuan

    2016-01-01

    Background and Aims Growth hormone (GH) not only supports hepatic metabolism but also protects against hepatocyte cell death. Hnf6 (or Oc1) belonging to the Onecut family of hepatocyte transcription factors known to regulate differentiated hepatic function, is a GH-responsive gene. We evaluate if GH mediates Hnf6 activity to attenuate hepatic apoptotic injury. Methods We used an animal model of hepatic apoptosis by bile duct ligation (BDL) with Hnf6 -/- (KO) mice in which hepatic Hnf6 was con...

  16. Growth hormone secretion is diminished and tightly controlled in humans enriched for familial longevity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    van der Spoel, Evie; Jansen, Steffy W; Akintola, Abimbola A

    2016-01-01

    Reduced growth hormone (GH) signaling has been consistently associated with increased health and lifespan in various mouse models. Here, we assessed GH secretion and its control in relation with human familial longevity. We frequently sampled blood over 24 h in 19 middle-aged offspring of long...... and more tight control. These data imply that the highly conserved GH signaling pathway, which has been linked to longevity in animal models, is also associated with human longevity....

  17. GHRH plus arginine and arginine administration evokes the same ratio of GH isoforms levels in young patients with Prader-Willi syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rigamonti, Antonello E; Crinò, Antonino; Bocchini, Sarah; Convertino, Alessio; Bidlingmaier, Martin; Haenelt, Michael; Tamini, Sofia; Cella, Silvano G; Grugni, Graziano; Sartorio, Alessandro

    2017-11-27

    Human GH is present in pituitary and circulation as several isoforms, the prevalent being 22kDa- and 20kDa-GH. Recently, we have demonstrated the preservation of a normal balance in GH isoforms after GH releasing hormone (GHRH) plus arginine (ARG) administration in adult patients with Prader-Willi syndrome (PWS), one of the most common causes of syndromic obesity, often associated with GH deficiency (GHD). Aim of the present study was to measure circulating levels of 22kDa- and 20kDa-GH in young PWS patients (n=24; F/M: 10/14; genotype UPD/DEL/met+: 11/11/2; age: 10.8±5.3years; BMI SDS: 2.0±2.0; GHD: 16/24; obesity: 12/24) after combined GHRH+ARG or ARG administration. The results were analysed subdividing the GHRH+ARG and ARG groups on the basis of PWS genotype, GHD status and obesity. Circulating levels of 22kDa- and 20kDa-GH were measured by a chemiluminescent or fluorescent method based on specific pairs of monoclonal antibodies. GHRH+ARG or ARG significantly stimulated the secretion of 22kDa-GH but not that of 20kDa-GH in all PWS patients. No significant GHRH+ARG- vs. ARG-induced changes in the ratios of 22kDa- to 20kDa-GH peaks were observed in all PWS patients, although 22kDa- or 20kDa-GH peaks were significantly higher in the GHRH+ARG than ARG group. When subdividing PWS patients in UPD vs. DEL, obese vs. non obese and GHD vs. non GHD subgroups, GH peaks were significantly higher in nonobese than obese patients and in non GHD than GHD patients administered with either GHRH+ARG or ARG test, apart from the comparisons in the DEL/UPD subgroups. Anyway, the ratios of peak levels of 22kDa- to 20kDa-GH were similar after GHRH+ARG vs. ARG in all subgroups investigated. In conclusion, this study shows that administration of two different pharmacological tests, i.e. ARG, capable of reducing hypothalamic somatostatinergic tone, and GHRH (+ARG), that directly acts at pituitary level on the somatotropic cell, evokes the same ratios of GH isoforms in young PWS

  18. Uptake of /sup 35/S sulphate by Xenopus cartilage. The influence of growth hormone and prolactin

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ishii, Takehisa; Kikuyama, Sakae (Waseda Univ., Tokyo (Japan))

    1984-08-01

    Hypohysectomized juvenile Xenopus were injected with growth hormone (GH) or prolactin (PRL) of either ovine or bullfrog origin. The growth promoting activity of these hormones was measured by monitoring the uptake of /sup 35/S sulphate by the xiphisternal cartilage in vitro. Analysis of the labelled cartilage revealed that the acid mucopolysaccharide fraction contained about 60-80 % of the label most of which was incorporated into chondroitin sulphates. All of the hormones tested enhaced the /sup 35/S sulphate uptake dose-dependently. Among them bullfrog GH was most effective, then followed ovine GH and ovine PRL. Bullfrog PRL was far less effective than other three. The sensitive assay for frog GH developed in the present experiment may be applicable to the assay for somatomedin-like activity and contribute to the analysis of the mode of action of GH in amphibians.

  19. Growth Hormone Inhibits Hepatic De Novo Lipogenesis in Adult Mice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cordoba-Chacon, Jose; Majumdar, Neena; List, Edward O.; Diaz-Ruiz, Alberto; Frank, Stuart J.; Manzano, Anna; Bartrons, Ramon; Puchowicz, Michelle; Kopchick, John J.

    2015-01-01

    Patients with nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) are reported to have low growth hormone (GH) production and/or hepatic GH resistance. GH replacement can resolve the fatty liver condition in diet-induced obese rodents and in GH-deficient patients. However, it remains to be determined whether this inhibitory action of GH is due to direct regulation of hepatic lipid metabolism. Therefore, an adult-onset, hepatocyte-specific, GH receptor (GHR) knockdown (aLivGHRkd) mouse was developed to model hepatic GH resistance in humans that may occur after sexual maturation. Just 7 days after aLivGHRkd, hepatic de novo lipogenesis (DNL) was increased in male and female chow-fed mice, compared with GHR-intact littermate controls. However, hepatosteatosis developed only in male and ovariectomized female aLivGHRkd mice. The increase in DNL observed in aLivGHRkd mice was not associated with hyperactivation of the pathway by which insulin is classically considered to regulate DNL. However, glucokinase mRNA and protein levels as well as fructose-2,6-bisphosphate levels were increased in aLivGHRkd mice, suggesting that enhanced glycolysis drives DNL in the GH-resistant liver. These results demonstrate that hepatic GH actions normally serve to inhibit DNL, where loss of this inhibitory signal may explain, in part, the inappropriate increase in hepatic DNL observed in NAFLD patients. PMID:26015548

  20. ISOLASI FRAGMEN TERTENTU GEN HORMON PERTUMBUHAN IKAN MAS MAJALAYA DAN NILA GIFT DENGAN METODE CTAB–PCR

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ibnu Dwi Buwono

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Hormon pertumbuhan (Growth Hormone/GH pada ikan berperan untuk memacu pertumbuhan, di samping terlibat juga dalam fungsi osmoregulasi, pengaturan keseimbangan cairan elektrolit, dan proses-proses metabolisme. Metode CTAB (Cetyl Trymethyl Ammonium Bromide digunakan untuk mengisolasi DNA sel ikan (DNA genomik dari sirip ekor ikan mas Majalaya dan nila GIFT. Isolasi gen hormon pertumbuhan dari DNA genomik kedua jenis ikan dapat disintesis dengan primer cGH (carp Growth Hormone dan TiGH (Tilapia Growth Hormone menggunakan metode PCR (Polymerase Chain Reaction. Hasil elektroforegram produk amplifikasi PCR untuk sebagian gen hormon pertumbuhan ikan mas Majalaya dapat dideteksi dengan ukuran fragmen DNA sebesar 615 bp dan 349 bp. Fragmen DNA hormon pertumbuhan ikan nila GIFT dapat dideteksi dengan ukuran 597 bp. The roles of growth hormones in fish are for growth promotion. They are also involved in osmoregulation function, balance regulation of liquid electrolite, and correlated with metabolism processes. CTAB (Cetyl Trymethyl Ammonium Bromide methods was used to isolate fish cell DNA (genomic DNA from caudal fin of Majalaya carp and GIFT nile. Growth hormone gene isolates from two kinds of genomic DNA can be synthesized with primers cGH (carp Growth Hormone and TiGH (Tilapia Growth Hormone using PCR (Polymerase Chain Reaction method. Electroforegram product of the PCR amplification for partial growth hormone gene of Majalaya carp fish can be detected with DNA fragment size of 615 bp and 349 bp. DNA fragment of growth hormone of GIFT nile tilapia can be detected with size of 597 bp.

  1. Growth hormone response to growth hormone-releasing peptide-2 in growth hormone-deficient Little mice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peroni, Cibele N.; Hayashida, Cesar Y.; Nascimento, Nancy; Longuini, Viviane C.; Toledo, Rodrigo A.; Bartolini, Paolo; Bowers, Cyril Y.; Toledo, Sergio P.A.

    2012-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To investigate a possible direct, growth hormone-releasing, hormone-independent action of a growth hormone secretagogue, GHRP-2, in pituitary somatotroph cells in the presence of inactive growth hormone-releasing hormone receptors. MATERIALS AND METHODS: The responses of serum growth hormone to acutely injected growth hormone-releasing P-2 in lit/lit mice, which represent a model of GH deficiency arising from mutated growth hormone-releasing hormone-receptors, were compared to those observed in the heterozygous (lit/+) littermates and wild-type (+/+) C57BL/6J mice. RESULTS: After the administration of 10 mcg of growth hormone-releasing P-2 to lit/lit mice, a growth hormone release of 9.3±1.5 ng/ml was observed compared with 1.04±1.15 ng/ml in controls (pgrowth hormone release of 34.5±9.7 ng/ml and a higher growth hormone release of 163±46 ng/ml were induced in the lit/+ mice and wild-type mice, respectively. Thus, GHRP-2 stimulated growth hormone in the lit/lit mice, and the release of growth hormone in vivo may be only partially dependent on growth hormone-releasing hormone. Additionally, the plasma leptin and ghrelin levels were evaluated in the lit/lit mice under basal and stimulated conditions. CONCLUSIONS: Here, we have demonstrated that lit/lit mice, which harbor a germline mutation in the Growth hormone-releasing hormone gene, maintain a limited but statistically significant growth hormone elevation after exogenous stimulation with GHRP-2. The present data probably reflect a direct, growth hormone-independent effect on Growth hormone S (ghrelin) stimulation in the remaining pituitary somatotrophs of little mice that is mediated by growth hormone S-R 1a. PMID:22473409

  2. GH administration and discontinuation in healthy elderly men

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lange, K H; Isaksson, F; Rasmussen, M H

    2001-01-01

    GH administration results in increased lean body mass (LBM), decreased fat mass (FM) and increased energy expenditure (EE). GH therapy may therefore have potential benefits, especially in the elderly, who are known to have decreased function of the GH/IGF-I axis. Several studies have focused on e...... discontinuation on body composition, resting oxygen uptake (VO2), resting heart rate (HR) and GH related serum markers in healthy elderly men....

  3. Final height in girls with Turner's syndrome treated with once or twice daily growth hormone injections. Dutch Advisory Group on Growth Hormone

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    T.C.J. Sas (Theo); T. Vulsma (Thomas); W.J. Gerver; S.L.S. Drop (Stenvert); H.M. Reeser (Maarten); M. Jansen (Maarten); S.M.P.F. de Muinck Keizer-Schrama (Sabine); Th. Stijnen (Theo); A. van Teunenbroek (Arne); A.C.S. Hokken-Koelega (Anita); J.J.J. Waelkens (Johan); G.G. Massa; H.A. Delemarre-van de Waal (Henriette)

    1999-01-01

    textabstractOBJECTIVES: To study final height in girls with Turner's syndrome treated with once or twice daily injections of growth hormone (GH) in combination with low dose ethinyl oestradiol. DESIGN: Until final height was reached, the effect of fractionated

  4. Overall and cause-specific mortality in GH-deficient adults on GH replacement

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gaillard, Rolf C; Mattsson, Anders F; Akerblad, Ann-Charlotte

    2012-01-01

    Hypopituitarism is associated with an increased mortality rate but the reasons underlying this have not been fully elucidated. The purpose of this study was to evaluate mortality and associated factors within a large GH-replaced population of hypopituitary patients.......Hypopituitarism is associated with an increased mortality rate but the reasons underlying this have not been fully elucidated. The purpose of this study was to evaluate mortality and associated factors within a large GH-replaced population of hypopituitary patients....

  5. Ets-1 is a target of MAPK signaling in the embryonic anterior pituitary gland during glucocorticoid initiation of pituitary growth hormone expression

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glucocorticoids play a critical role in functional differentiation of somatotrophs, the growth hormone (GH)-producing cells within the anterior pituitary gland. In chicken embryonic day 11 (e11) pituitary cells, premature induction of growth hormone (GH) resulting from corticosterone (CORT) treatmen...

  6. Effect of testosterone and growth hormone injection before puberty ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Egg shell quality and egg internal quality are of major importance to the egg industry worldwide. This experiment was conducted to evaluate the effect of testosterone and growth hormone (hGH) on egg production and characteristics. The aim of this trial is to test this hypothesis that one injection of these two hormones ...

  7. Nitric Oxide: The Coming of the Second Messenger

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ferid Murad

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available (Excerpt The concept of communications between cells or cell signaling dates back over 100 years to Pavlov. He discovered that neuronal signals, first generated by the smell of food and later by the ringing of a bell, enhanced gastric secretion. The neurons communicated with cells in the stomach. Today it is well established that cell signaling is a universal phenomenon, occurring throughout the body and even between unicellular organisms such as yeast, fungi, and bacteria. The molecules that are used for the purpose of communicating between cells are diverse and comprise amino acids, peptides, proteins, and other organic molecules. These molecules, which number in the hundreds, were initially called “first messengers” and are now called hormones, cytokines, growth factors, paracrine substances, neurotransmitters, and a variety of other names. These molecules find their target cell by identifying and binding to a receptor that is mostly located on the surface of the target cell. This binding ensures the specificity of the interaction, since only cells with specific receptors will bind to specific ligands. The binding of the ligand to the receptor initiates a biochemical cascade, resulting in the accumulation of an intracellular second messenger, which then goes on to trigger the desired effect on the cell. The first second messenger, which was discovered in 1957, was cyclic adenosine monophosphate, or cAMP. Others came along in the ensuing 10–15 years. Today, we know there are many such molecules, including cyclic guanosine monophosphate (cGMP, nitric oxide (NO, calcium, diacylglycerol, phosphatidylinositols, and more, some surely yet to be discovered. Many of these discoveries eventually led to a Nobel Prize.

  8. Ramadan fasting and the GH/IGF-1 axis of trained men during submaximal exercise.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bouhlel, Ezzedine; Zaouali, Monia; Miled, Abdelhedi; Tabka, Zouhair; Bigard, Xavier; Shephard, Roy

    2008-01-01

    The aim of this study was to explore possible changes in body composition, blood glucose regulation, plasma growth hormone (GH), insulin-like growth factor 1 (IGF-1), insulin-like growth factor-binding protein-3 (IGFBP-3), and insulin concentrations of trained athletes in response to the intermittent fasting and dehydration of Ramadan observance. Nine trained male rugby players (age 19 +/- 2 years, height 1.78 +/- 0.74 m) were tested 3 times: before Ramadan (C), at the end of the first week (R1), and during the fourth week (R2). They performed a progressive cycle ergometer test at each visit. The work rate was increased in 6-min stages corresponding to 20, 30, 40, 50 and 60% of W max. Substrate oxidation was evaluated by indirect calorimetry. On each occasion, substrate and plasma hormone concentrations were measured at rest and at the end of the exercise. Ramadan fasting induced a significant decrease in body mass and body fat (R2 vs. C, p < 0.001). Plasma concentrations of glucose, insulin, GH, IGF-1 and IGFBP-3 did not change significantly between C and R2, either at rest or following exercise. Ramadan fasting induces positive changes in body composition without disturbing glucose regulation or activity of the GH/IGF-1 system. 2008 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  9. Changes in GH/IGF-1 axis in intrauterine growth retardation: consequences of fetal programming?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Setia, S; Sridhar, M G

    2009-11-01

    Fetal growth is a complex process that depends on the genotype and epigenotype of the fetus, maternal nutrition, the availability of nutrients and oxygen to the fetus, intrauterine insults, and a variety of growth factors and proteins of maternal and fetal/placental origin. In the fetus, growth hormone (GH) plays little or no role in regulating fetal growth, and insulin-like growth factors (IGFs) control growth directly independent of fetal GH secretion. Placental growth hormone (PGH) is the prime regulator of maternal serum IGF-1 during pregnancy. Total as well as free PGH and IGFs are significantly lower in pregnancies with intrauterine growth retardation (IUGR). The GH/IGF axis is significantly affected by intrauterine growth retardation and some of these alterations may lead to permanent pathological programming of the IGF axis. Alterations in the IGF axis may play a role in the future occurrence of insulin resistance and hypertension. In this review we focus on the regulation of fetal growth and the role of fetal programming in the late consequences of a poor fetal environment reflected in IUGR.

  10. Gene study within the 5' flanking regions of growth hormone gene of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    user

    2011-01-17

    Jan 17, 2011 ... Growth hormone (GH) is a main regulatory protein secreted by pituitary gland and placenta, involved in most anabolic processes in mammals. Expression of more than one gene for GH has been reported, indicating polymorphism at gene and protein level; apart from this, silent mutations has also been.

  11. Fractures in pituitary adenoma patients from the Dutch National Registry of Growth Hormone Treatment in Adults

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Varsseveld, N.C.; van Bunderen, Christa C; Franken, A.A.M.; Koppeschaar, H.P.F.; van der Lely, A.J.; Drent, M L

    PURPOSE: The effects of growth hormone (GH) replacement therapy on fracture risk in adult GH deficient (GHD) patients with different etiologies of pituitary GHD are not well known, due to limited data. The aim of this study was to investigate characteristics and fracture occurrence at start of

  12. Gene study within the 5' flanking regions of growth hormone gene of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Growth hormone (GH) is a main regulatory protein secreted by pituitary gland and placenta, involved in most anabolic processes in mammals. Expression of more than one gene for GH has been reported, indicating polymorphism at gene and protein level; apart from this, silent mutations has also been reported, relating to ...

  13. The effect of oxandrolone on voice frequency in growth hormone-treated girls with Turner syndrome

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Menke, L.A.; Sas, T.C.J.; Koningsbrugge, S.H. van; Ridder, M.A. de; Zandwijken, G.R.; Boersma, B.; Dejonckere, P.H.; Muinck Keizer-Schrama, S.M.P.F. de; Otten, B.J.; Wit, J.M.

    2011-01-01

    OBJECTIVES/HYPOTHESIS: Oxandrolone (Ox) increases height gain but may also cause voice deepening in growth hormone (GH)-treated girls with Turner syndrome (TS). We assessed the effect of Ox on objective and subjective speaking voice frequency in GH-treated girls with TS. STUDY DESIGN: A multicenter,

  14. Peptide YY Levels across Pubertal Stages and Associations with Growth Hormone

    OpenAIRE

    Lloyd, Benjamin; Ravi, Praful; Mendes, Nara; Klibanski, Anne; Misra, Madhusmita

    2010-01-01

    Context: Changes in appetite-regulating peptides may impact food intake during puberty and facilitate the pubertal growth spurt. Peptide YY (PYY) is an anorexigenic hormone that is high in anorexia nervosa and low in obesity, inhibits GnRH secretion, and is suppressed by GH administration. The relationship between PYY and GH has not been examined across puberty.

  15. Growth hormone and reproduction in the female rat: a central role for somatostatin

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vugt, van H.H.

    2004-01-01

    It is well known that the somatotropic and gonadotropic axes are closely related: Both underproduction and overproduction of growth hormone (GH) affect reproduction. During aging, the decline in GH release and reproductive function appear to occur concurrently. Data from the literature suggest that

  16. Growth Hormone Receptor Signaling Pathways and its Negative Regulation by SOCS2

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fernández Pérez, Leandro; Flores-Morales, Amilcar; Guerra, Borja

    2016-01-01

    Growth hormone (GH) is a critical regulator of linear body growth during childhood but continues to have important metabolic actions throughout life. The GH receptor (GHR) is ubiquitously expressed, and deficiency of GHR signaling causes a dramatic impact on normal physiology during somatic devel...

  17. Fractures in pituitary adenoma patients from the Dutch National Registry of Growth Hormone Treatment in Adults

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    N.C. Van Varsseveld; C.C. van Bunderen (Christa); A.A.M. Franken (Anton); H.P.F. Koppeschaar (Hans); A-J. van der Lely (Aart-Jan); M.L. Drent (Madeleine)

    2016-01-01

    textabstractPurpose: The effects of growth hormone (GH) replacement therapy on fracture risk in adult GH deficient (GHD) patients with different etiologies of pituitary GHD are not well known, due to limited data. The aim of this study was to investigate characteristics and fracture occurrence at

  18. Five-year response to growth hormone in children with Noonan syndrome and growth hormone deficiency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zavras, Niki; Meazza, Cristina; Pilotta, Alba; Gertosio, Chiara; Pagani, Sara; Tinelli, Carmine; Bozzola, Mauro

    2015-10-06

    Noonan syndrome (NS) is an autosomal dominant disorder characterized by specific features including short stature, distinctive facial dysmorphic features, congenital heart defects, hypertrophic cardiomyopathy, skeletal anomalies and webbing of the neck. Molecular screening has shown that the majority of individuals with NS have a mutation in the PTPN11 gene. Noonan syndrome children may show an impaired growth hormone (GH)/insulin-like growth factor axis. Moreover, recombinant human GH (rhGH) has been shown to improve growth rate in patients with NS, although data are still limited. In the present study, we assessed growth response following GH therapy (0.25 mg/Kg/week) in 5 (2 M and 3 F) GH-deficient NS patients (NSGHD, mean age 8.5 years) and in 5 (2 M and 3 F) idiopathic GH deficient (IGHD, mean age 8.6 years) patients. We also evaluated the safety of rhGH therapy in NS patients with GHD. At the beginning of GH treatment, height and growth rate were statistically lower in NSGHD children than in IGHD ones. During the first three years of rhGH therapy, NSGHD patients showed a slight improvement in height (from -2.71 SDS to -2.44 SDS) and growth rate (from -2.42 SDS to -0.23 SDS), although the values were always significantly lower than in IGHD children. After five years of rhGH treatment, height gain was higher in IGHD children (mean 28.3 cm) than in NSGHD patients (mean 23.6 cm). During the first five years of rhGH therapy, regular cardiological and haematological check-ups were performed, leading to the conclusion that rhGH therapy was safe. In conclusion, pre-pubertal NS children with GHD slightly increased their height and growth rate during the first years of GH therapy, although the response to rhGH treatment was significantly lower than IGHD children. Furthermore, the therapy appeared to be safe since no severe adverse effects were reported, at least during the first five years. However, a close follow-up of these patients is mandatory, especially to

  19. Growth without growth hormone in combined pituitary hormone deficiency caused by pituitary stalk interruption syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sang Soo Lee

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Growth hormone (GH is an essential element for normal growth. However, reports of normal growth without GH have been made in patients who have undergone brain surgery for craniopharyngioma. Normal growth without GH can be explained by hyperinsulinemia, hyperprolactinemia, elevated leptin levels, and GH variants; however, its exact mechanism has not been elucidated yet. We diagnosed a female patient aged 13 with combined pituitary hormone deficiency (CPHD caused by pituitary stalk interruption syndrome (PSIS. The patient has experienced recurrent hypoglycemic seizures since birth, but reached the height of 160 cm at the age of 13, showing normal growth. She grew another 8 cm for 3 years after the diagnosis, and she reached her final adult height of 168 cm which was greater than the midparental height, at the age of 16. The patient's blood GH and insulin-like growth factor-I levels were consistently subnormal, although her insulin levels were normal. Her physical examination conducted at the age of 15 showed truncal obesity, dyslipidemia, and osteoporosis, which are metabolic features of GH deficiency (GHD. Herein, we report a case in which a PSIS-induced CPHD patient attained her final height above mid parental height despite a severe GHD.

  20. Impact of Growth Hormone on Cystatin C

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lisa Sze

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Background: Cystatin C (CysC is an alternative marker to creatinine for estimation of the glomerular filtration rate (GFR. Hormones such as thyroid hormones and glucocorticoids are known to have an impact on CysC. In this study, we examined the effect of growth hormone (GH on CysC in patients with acromegaly undergoing transsphenoidal surgery. Methods: Creatinine, CysC, GH and insulin-like growth factor-1 (IGF-1 were determined in 24 patients with acromegaly before and following transsphenoidal surgery. Estimated GFR was calculated using the Chronic Kidney Disease Epidemiology Collaboration formula. Results: In all patients, surgical debulking resulted in decreased clinical disease activity and declining GH/IGF-1 levels. Postoperatively, biochemical cure was documented in 20 out of 24 patients. Creatinine levels (mean ± SEM increased from 72 ± 3 to 80 ± 3 µmol/l (p = 0.0004 and concurrently, estimated GFR decreased from 99 ± 3 to 91 ± 3 ml/min (p = 0.0008. In contrast to creatinine, CysC levels decreased from 0.72 ± 0.02 to 0.68 ± 0.02 mg/l (p = 0.0008. Conclusions: Our study provides strong evidence for discordant effects of GH on creatinine and CysC in patients with acromegaly undergoing transsphenoidal surgery, thus identifying another hormone that influences CysC independent of renal function.

  1. Urinary growth hormone excretion in acromegaly

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Main, K M; Lindholm, J; Vandeweghe, M

    1993-01-01

    The biochemical assessment of disease activity in acromegaly still presents a problem, especially in treated patients with mild clinical symptoms. We therefore examined the diagnostic value of the measurement of urinary growth hormone (GH) excretion in seventy unselected patients with acromegaly...

  2. Daily or intermittent calcitriol administration during growth hormone therapy in rats with renal failure and advanced secondary hyperparathyroidism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanchez, Cheryl P; He, Yu-Zhu

    2005-04-01

    Growth hormone (GH) improves growth in children with chronic renal failure. The response to GH may be affected by the degree of secondary hyperparathyroidism and concurrent treatment with vitamin D. Forty-six rats underwent 5/6 nephrectomy (Nx) and were given a high-phosphorus diet (Nx-Phos) to induce advanced secondary hyperparathyroidism and divided into the following groups: (1) Nx-Phos (n = 10) received saline, (2) GH at 10 IU/kg per d (Nx-Phos+GH; n = 9), (3) GH and daily calcitriol (D) at 50 ng/kg per d (Nx-Phos+GH+daily D; n = 8), (4) GH and intermittent D (three times weekly) at 350 ng/kg per wk (Nx-Phos+GH+int D; n = 9), and (5) intact-control (n = 10). Serum parathyroid hormone (PTH) levels were elevated in Nx-Phos, but IGF-I levels did not change with growth hormone. Body length, tibial length, and growth plate width did not increase with either GH or calcitriol. Proliferating cell nuclear antigen staining, PTH/PTHrP receptor, bone morphogenetic protein-7, and fibroblast growth factor receptor-3 expression increased with GH alone or with intermittent calcitriol but were slightly diminished during daily calcitriol administration. GH enhanced IGF-I, IGF binding receptor-3, and GH receptor but declined with daily and intermittent calcitriol. Overall, there was no improvement in body length, tibial length, and growth plate width at the end of GH therapy, but selected markers of chondrocyte proliferation and chondrocyte differentiation increased, although these changes were attenuated by calcitriol. The combination of GH and calcitriol that is frequently used in children with renal failure and secondary hyperparathyroidism require further studies to evaluate the optimal dose and frequency of administration to increase linear growth and prevent bone disease.

  3. Multi-messenger aspects of cosmic neutrinos*

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ahlers Markus

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The recent observation of TeV-PeV neutrinos by IceCube has opened a new window to the high-energy Universe. I will discuss this signal in the context of multi-messenger astronomy. For extragalactic source scenarios the corresponding gamma-rays are not directly observable due to interactions with the cosmic radiation backgrounds. Nevertheless, the isotropic sub-TeV gamma ray background observed by Fermi-LAT contains indirect information from secondary emission produced in electromagnetic cascades. On the other hand, observation of PeV gamma rays would provide a smoking-gun signal for Galactic emission. Interestingly, the overall energy density of the observed neutrino flux is close to a theoretical limit for neutrino production in ultra-high energy cosmic ray sources and might indicate a common origin of these phenomena. I will highlight various multi-messenger relations and their implications for neutrino source scenarios.

  4. Growth hormone, interferon-gamma, and leukemia inhibitory factor promoted tyrosyl phosphorylation of insulin receptor substrate-1

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Argetsinger, L S; Hsu, G W; Myers, M G

    1995-01-01

    The identification of JAK2 as a growth hormone (GH) receptor-associated, GH-activated tyrosine kinase has established tyrosyl phosphorylation as a signaling mechanism for GH. In the present study, GH is shown to stimulate tyrosyl phosphorylation of insulin receptor substrate 1 (IRS-1), the princi......The identification of JAK2 as a growth hormone (GH) receptor-associated, GH-activated tyrosine kinase has established tyrosyl phosphorylation as a signaling mechanism for GH. In the present study, GH is shown to stimulate tyrosyl phosphorylation of insulin receptor substrate 1 (IRS-1......), the principle substrate of the insulin receptor. Tyrosyl phosphorylation of IRS-1 is a critical step in insulin signaling and provides binding sites for proteins with the appropriate Src homology 2 domains, including the 85-kDa regulatory subunit of phosphatidylinositol (PI) 3'-kinase. In 3T3-F442A fibroblasts......, GH-dependent tyrosyl phosphorylation of IRS-1 was detected by 1 min and at GH concentrations as low as 5 ng/ml (0.23 nM). Tyrosyl phosphorylation of IRS-1 was transient, with maximal stimulation detected at 30 min and diminished signal detected at 60 min. The ability of GH receptor (GHR) to transduce...

  5. Insulin and insulin-like growth factor-1 modulate the lipolytic action of growth hormone by altering signal pathway linkages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bergan-Roller, Heather E; Ickstadt, Alicia T; Kittilson, Jeffrey D; Sheridan, Mark A

    2017-07-01

    Growth hormone (GH) has many actions in vertebrates, including the regulation of two disparate metabolic processes: growth promotion (anabolic) and the mobilization of stored lipids (catabolic). Our previous studies showed that GH stimulated IGF-1 production in hepatocytes from fed rainbow trout, but in cells from fasted fish GH stimulated lipolysis. In this study, we used rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss) to elucidate regulation of the mechanisms that enable cells to alter their lipolytic responsiveness to GH. In the first experiment, cells were removed from either fed or fasted fish, conditioned in medium containing serum (10%) from either fed or fasted fish, then challenged with GH. GH stimulated the expression of hormone sensitive lipase (HSL), the primary lipolytic enzyme, in cells from fasted fish conditioned with "fasted serum" but not in cells from fasted fish conditioned in "fed serum." Pretreatment of cells from fed fish with "fasted serum" resulted in GH-stimulated HSL expression, whereas GH-stimulated HSL expression in cells from fasted fish was blocked by conditioning in "fed serum." The nature of the conditioning serum governed the signaling pathways activated by GH irrespective of the nutritional state of the animals from which the cells were removed. When hepatocytes were pretreated with "fed serum," GH activated JAK2, STAT5, Akt, and ERK pathways; when cells were pretreated with "fasted serum," GH activated PKC and ERK. In the second study, we examined the direct effects of insulin (INS) and insulin-like growth factor (IGF-1), two nutritionally-regulated hormones, on GH-stimulated lipolysis and signal transduction in isolated hepatocytes. GH only stimulated HSL mRNA expression in cells from fasted fish. Pretreatment with INS and/or IGF-1 abolished this lipolytic response to GH. INS and/or IGF-1 augmented GH activation of JAK2 and STAT5 in cells from fed and fasted fish. However, INS and/or IGF-1 eliminated the ability of GH to activate PKC and

  6. [Benefits and risks of growth hormone in adults with growth hormone deficiency].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Díez, Juan J; Cordido, Fernando

    2014-10-21

    Adult growth hormone (GH) deficiency is a well-recognized clinical syndrome with adverse health consequences. Many of these may improve after replacement therapy with recombinant GH. This treatment induces an increase in lean body mass and a decrease in fat mass. In long-term studies, bone mineral density increases and muscle strength improves. Health-related quality of life tends to increase after treatment with GH. Lipid profile and markers of cardiovascular risk also improve with therapy. Nevertheless, GH replacement therapy is not without risk. According to some studies, GH increases blood glucose, body mass index and waist circumference and may promote long-term development of diabetes and metabolic syndrome. Risk of neoplasia does not appear to be increased in adults treated with GH, but there are some high-risk subgroups. Methodological shortcomings and difficulties inherent to long-term studies prevent definitive conclusions about the relationship between GH and survival. Therefore, research in this field should remain active. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  7. The Energy Messenger, Number 1, Volume 4

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stancil, J. [ed.

    1995-01-01

    `The Energy Messenger` is a Department of Energy publication on energy activities of interest to American Indians. The first issue of 1995 (in a magazine format) includes articles on: tribes winning grants to develop energy resources, recruiting of internships for DOE, information about Title XXVI-Indian Energy Resources, American Indian Heritage Month, tribal perspective on DOE actions, joint ventures between tribes and the DOE, and brief description of recent DOE activities.

  8. Adenomas produtores de GH: Análise de 20 casos

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tella Jr Oswaldo Inácio de

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available Os adenomas produtores de GH podem ser mono, bi ou pluri-hormonais. A associação mais frequente do GH é com a sub unidade alfa ou com a prolactina. Apresentam-se com as alterações clássicas de acromegalia, mas quando produzem mais que um hormônio podem apresentar sintomas visuais. Os mono-hormonais são geralmente microadenomas e os outros dois grupos tendem a ser macroadenomas. Analisamos nossa experiência com 20 casos deste tipo de adenomas e mostramos o resultado cirúrgico, que foi bastante satisfatório para o grupo mono-hormonal. A radioterapia deve ser considerada quando a ressecção não foi total.

  9. Muscular dystrophy-related quantitative and chemical changes in adenohypophysis GH-cells in golden retrievers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    de Lima, A R; Nyengaard, Jens Randel; Jorge, A A L

    2007-01-01

    Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) is a recessive X-linked lethal condition which affects a boy in every 3300 births. It is caused by the absence of dystrophin, a protein occurring especially within the musculoskeletal system and in neurons in specific regions of the central nervous system (CNS......). Growth hormone (GH) inhibition is believed to decrease the severity of DMD and could perhaps be used in its treatment. However, the underlying pathological mechanism is not known. The golden retriever muscular dystrophy dog (GRMD) represents an animal model in the study of DMD. In this paper we...... difficulties in the GH secretion that might possibly be associated to dystrophin absence. In contrast to earlier reports, our data suggest that a lower IGF-1 concentration may be more related to a severe, as opposed to a benign, clinical form of muscular dystrophy. Udgivelsesdato: 2007-Dec...

  10. Estudo do comportamento cortisol, gh e insulina apos uma sessao de exercicio resistido agudo

    OpenAIRE

    Autran Jose Silva Jr.; Markus Vinicius Campos Souza; Luciane Magri Tomaz; Danilo Rodrigues Bertucci; Gabriela Soares de Souza; Gustavo Henrique Rigo Vanevazzi; Julio Conceicao Filho; Jose Campanholi Neto; Leandro Dias Ruffoni; Nuno Manuel Frade de Sousa; Vivian Maria Arakelian; Adriana Pelegrino Pinho Ramos; Cassiano Meirussi Neiva; Vilmar Baldissera

    2014-01-01

    INTRODUÇÃO:Muitos trabalhos têm estudado o comportamento hormonal nos exercício resistido, entretanto poucos relacionam os hormônios cortisol, GH e insulina.OBJETIVO:Estudar os ajustes das concentrações plasmáticas dos hormônios cortisol, GH e insulina em exercícios resistidos de mesma intensidade com relação à massas musculares distintas.MÉTODOS:Dez voluntários, com 20,3 ± 4,2 anos, 74,1 ± 10,2 kg de peso, 177,2 ± 4,6 cm de estatura e 23,8 ± 3,2 kg/m2 de IMC, realizaram uma sessão de leg pre...

  11. Isolation, characterization and comparison of Atlantic and Chinook salmon growth hormone 1 and 2

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Davidson William S

    2008-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Growth hormone (GH is an important regulator of skeletal growth, as well as other adapted processes in salmonids. The GH gene (gh in salmonids is represented by duplicated, non-allelic isoforms designated as gh1 and gh2. We have isolated and characterized gh-containing bacterial artificial chromosomes (BACs of both Atlantic and Chinook salmon (Salmo salar and Oncorhynchus tshawytscha in order to further elucidate our understanding of the conservation and regulation of these loci. Results BACs containing gh1 and gh2 from both Atlantic and Chinook salmon were assembled, annotated, and compared to each other in their coding, intronic, regulatory, and flanking regions. These BACs also contain the genes for skeletal muscle sodium channel oriented in the same direction. The sequences of the genes for interferon alpha-1, myosin alkali light chain and microtubule associated protein Tau were also identified, and found in opposite orientations relative to gh1 and gh2. Viability of each of these genes was examined by PCR. We show that transposon insertions have occurred differently in the promoters of gh, within and between each species. Other differences within the promoters and intronic and 3'-flanking regions of the four gh genes provide evidence that they have distinct regulatory modes and possibly act to function differently and/or during different times of salmonid development. Conclusion A core proximal promoter for transcription of both gh1 and gh2 is conserved between the two species of salmon. Nevertheless, transposon integration and regulatory element differences do exist between the promoters of gh1 and gh2. Additionally, organization of transposon families into the BACs containing gh1 and for the BACs containing gh2, are very similar within orthologous regions, but much less clear conservation is apparent in comparisons between the gh1- and gh2-containing paralogous BACs for the two fish species. This is consistent with the

  12. The effect of growth hormone replacement on the thyroid axis in patients with hypopituitarism: in vivo and ex vivo studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glynn, Nigel; Kenny, Helena; Quisenberry, Leah; Halsall, David J; Cook, Paul; Kyaw Tun, Tommy; McDermott, John H; Smith, Diarmuid; Thompson, Christopher J; O'Gorman, Donal J; Boelen, Anita; Lado-Abeal, Joaquin; Agha, Amar

    2017-05-01

    Alterations in the hypothalamic-pituitary-thyroid axis have been reported following growth hormone (GH) replacement. The aim was to examine the relationship between changes in serum concentration of thyroid hormones and deiodinase activity in subcutaneous adipose tissue, before and after GH replacement. A prospective, observational study of patients receiving GH replacement as part of routine clinical care. Twenty adult hypopituitary men. Serum TSH, thyroid hormones - free and total thyroxine (T4) and triiodothyronine (T3) and reverse T3, thyroglobulin and thyroid-binding globulin (TBG) levels were measured before and after GH substitution. Changes in serum hormone levels were compared to the activity of deiodinase isoenzymes (DIO1, DIO2 and DIO3) in subcutaneous adipose tissue. The mean daily dose of growth hormone (GH) was 0·34 ± 0·11 mg (range 0·15-0·5 mg). Following GH replacement, mean free T4 levels declined (-1·09 ± 1·99 pmol/l, P = 0·02). Reverse T3 levels also fell (-3·44 ± 1·42 ng/dl, P = 0·03) and free T3 levels increased significantly (+0·34 ± 0·15 pmol/l, P = 0·03). In subcutaneous fat, DIO2 enzyme activity declined; DIO1 and DIO3 activities remained unchanged following GH substitution. Serum TSH, thyroglobulin and TBG levels were unaltered by GH therapy. In vitro analysis of subcutaneous adipose tissue from hypopituitary human subjects demonstrates that GH replacement is associated with significant changes in deiodinase isoenzyme activity. However, the observed variation in enzyme activity does not explain the changes in the circulating concentration of thyroid hormones induced by GH replacement. It is possible that deiodinase isoenzymes are differentially regulated by GH in other tissues including liver and muscle. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  13. Response of Indian growth hormone deficient children to growth hormone therapy: association with pituitary size.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khadilkar, Vaman V; Prasad, Hemchand Krishna; Ekbote, Veena H; Rustagi, Vaishakhi T; Singh, Joshita; Chiplonkar, Shashi A; Khadilkar, Anuradha V

    2015-05-01

    To ascertain the impact of pituitary size as judged by Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI), on response to Growth Hormone (GH) therapy in GH deficient children. Thirty nine children (9.1 ± 2.7 y, 22 boys) with non-acquired GH deficiency (21 Isolated GH deficiency and 18 Combined pituitary hormone deficiency) were consecutively recruited and followed up for one year. Clinical, radiological (bone age and MRI) and biochemical parameters were studied. Children with hypoplastic pituitary (pituitary height children with normal pituitary heights (p children with hypoplastic pituitaries (13.8 ± 3.6 and 28.7 % vs. 11.2 ± 4.1 and 21.4 %). Significant co-relation was observed between pituitary height and height for age Z-scores at baseline (r = 0.39, p children with hypoplastic pituitary when compared to an increase from 145.8 to 153.5 cm observed in children with normal pituitary height (p growth hormone deficient children with hypoplastic pituitary respond better to therapy with GH in short term.

  14. Growth hormone therapy influences endothelial function in children with renal failure.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lilien, M.R.; Schröder, C.H.; Levtchenko, E.N.; Koomans, H.A.

    2004-01-01

    Endothelial dysfunction, an early step in atherogenesis, is prevalent in children with renal insufficiency. Endothelial dysfunction in growth hormone deficiency is reversed by growth hormone (rhGH) therapy. Renal failure induces growth hormone resistance at the receptor and post-receptor level,

  15. Resting hormone level response to a 16-week dynamic and static ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The aim of the study was to evaluate hormonal responses of serum cortisol, growth hormone (GH), testesterone and insulin-like growth factor-1 (IGF-1) levels during dynamic and static stress exercises in 20 male volunteer student athletes. The serum fasting hormonal levels of the participants were measured after six weeks ...

  16. Kinetic basis for the conjugation of auxin by a GH3 family indole-acetic acid-amido synthetase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Qingfeng; Westfall, Corey S; Hicks, Leslie M; Wang, Shiping; Jez, Joseph M

    2010-09-24

    The GH3 family of acyl-acid-amido synthetases catalyze the ATP-dependent formation of amino acid conjugates to modulate levels of active plant hormones, including auxins and jasmonates. Initial biochemical studies of various GH3s show that these enzymes group into three families based on sequence relationships and acyl-acid substrate preference (I, jasmonate-conjugating; II, auxin- and salicylic acid-conjugating; III, benzoate-conjugating); however, little is known about the kinetic and chemical mechanisms of these enzymes. Here we use GH3-8 from Oryza sativa (rice; OsGH3-8), which functions as an indole-acetic acid (IAA)-amido synthetase, for detailed mechanistic studies. Steady-state kinetic analysis shows that the OsGH3-8 requires either Mg(2+) or Mn(2+) for maximal activity and is specific for aspartate but accepts asparagine as a substrate with a 45-fold decrease in catalytic efficiency and accepts other auxin analogs, including phenyl-acetic acid, indole butyric acid, and naphthalene-acetic acid, as acyl-acid substrates with 1.4-9-fold reductions in k(cat)/K(m) relative to IAA. Initial velocity and product inhibition studies indicate that the enzyme uses a Bi Uni Uni Bi Ping Pong reaction sequence. In the first half-reaction, ATP binds first followed by IAA. Next, formation of an adenylated IAA intermediate results in release of pyrophosphate. The second half-reaction begins with binding of aspartate, which reacts with the adenylated intermediate to release IAA-Asp and AMP. Formation of a catalytically competent adenylated-IAA reaction intermediate was confirmed by mass spectrometry. These mechanistic studies provide insight on the reaction catalyzed by the GH3 family of enzymes to modulate plant hormone action.

  17. Gladiolus hybridus ABSCISIC ACID INSENSITIVE 5 (GhABI5) is an important transcription factor in ABA signaling that can enhance Gladiolus corm dormancy and Arabidopsis seed dormancy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Jian; Seng, Shanshan; Sui, Juanjuan; Vonapartis, Eliana; Luo, Xian; Gong, Benhe; Liu, Chen; Wu, Chenyu; Liu, Chao; Zhang, Fengqin; He, Junna; Yi, Mingfang

    2015-01-01

    The phytohormone abscisic acid (ABA) regulates plant development and is crucial for abiotic stress response. In this study, cold storage contributes to reducing endogenous ABA content, resulting in dormancy breaking of Gladiolus. The ABA inhibitor fluridone also promotes germination, suggesting that ABA is an important hormone that regulates corm dormancy. Here, we report the identification and functional characterization of the Gladiolus ABI5 homolog (GhABI5), which is a basic leucine zipper motif transcriptional factor (TF). GhABI5 is expressed in dormant vegetative organs (corm, cormel, and stolon) as well as in reproductive organs (stamen), and it is up-regulated by ABA or drought. Complementation analysis reveals that GhABI5 rescues the ABA insensitivity of abi5-3 during seed germination and induces the expression of downstream ABA response genes in Arabidopsis thaliana (EM1, EM6, and RD29B). Down-regulation of GhABI5 in dormant cormels via virus induced gene silence promotes sprouting and reduces the expression of downstream genes (GhLEA and GhRD29B). The results of this study reveal that GhABI5 regulates bud dormancy (vegetative organ) in Gladiolus in addition to its well-studied function in Arabidopsis seeds (reproductive organ).

  18. Effect of sodium oxybate on growth hormone secretion in narcolepsy patients and healthy controls

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Donjacour, C.E.; Aziz, N.A.; Roelfsema, F.; Frolich, M.; Overeem, S.; Lammers, G.J.; Pijl, H.

    2011-01-01

    Hypocretin deficiency causes narcolepsy and may affect neuroendocrine systems and body composition. Additionally, growth hormone (GH) alterations my influence weight in narcolepsy. Symptoms can be treated effectively with sodium oxybate (SXB; gamma-hydroxybutyrate) in many patients. This study

  19. Protein Hormones and Immunity‡

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelley, Keith W.; Weigent, Douglas A.; Kooijman, Ron

    2007-01-01

    A number of observations and discoveries over the past 20 years support the concept of important physiological interactions between the endocrine and immune systems. The best known pathway for transmission of information from the immune system to the neuroendocrine system is humoral in the form of cytokines, although neural transmission via the afferent vagus is well documented also. In the other direction, efferent signals from the nervous system to the immune system are conveyed by both the neuroendocrine and autonomic nervous systems. Communication is possible because the nervous and immune systems share a common biochemical language involving shared ligands and receptors, including neurotransmitters, neuropeptides, growth factors, neuroendocrine hormones and cytokines. This means that the brain functions as an immune-regulating organ participating in immune responses. A great deal of evidence has accumulated and confirmed that hormones secreted by the neuroendocrine system play an important role in communication and regulation of the cells of the immune system. Among protein hormones, this has been most clearly documented for prolactin (PRL), growth hormone (GH), and insulin-like growth factor-1 (IGF-I), but significant influences on immunity by thyroid stimulating hormone (TSH) have also been demonstrated. Here we review evidence obtained during the past 20 years to clearly demonstrate that neuroendocrine protein hormones influence immunity and that immune processes affect the neuroendocrine system. New findings highlight a previously undiscovered route of communication between the immune and endocrine systems that is now known to occur at the cellular level. This communication system is activated when inflammatory processes induced by proinflammatory cytokines antagonize the function of a variety of hormones, which then causes endocrine resistance in both the periphery and brain. Homeostasis during inflammation is achieved by a balance between cytokines and

  20. TRANSMISI GEN PhGH DAN PERFORMA PERTUMBUHAN IKAN LELE AFRIKA (Clarias gariepinus TRANSGENIK GENERASI KETIGA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Huria Marnis

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Penelitian ini bertujuan untuk mengevaluasi transmisi transgen PhGH dan performa ikan lele Afrika transgenik generasi ketiga (F3 yang meliputi pertumbuhan, rasio efisiensi konversi pakan, konsentrasi hormon pertumbuhan dan hormon IGF-I. Ikan lele transgenik F3 telah diproduksi dengan meyilangkan ikan lele transgenik F2 dengan non-transgenik. Deteksi transgen (PhGH dilakukan menggunakan metode PCR. Analisis hormon pertumbuhan dan hormon insuline-like growth factor (IGF-I menggunakan sampel serum darah dan metode enzyme linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA. Hasil penelitian menunjukkan bahwa ikan lele transgenik F3 yang digunakan pada pengujian ini terdeteksi positif membawa transgen dengan ukuran fragmen gen sebesar 1.500 bp. Transmisi transgen dari induk F2 ke F3 berkisar 0-75%. Pertumbuhan bobot populasi ikan lele transgenik F3 lebih tinggi 51,26% dibandingkan dengan ikan lele non-transgenik (P<0,05. Pertumbuhan bobot populasi ikan transgenik mencapai 484±60,3 g, sedangkan pertumbuhan bobot ikan non-transgenik 319,98±65,3 g. Nilai rasio konversi pakan ikan lele transgenik F3 sebesar 0,89 sedangkan non-transgenik 1,30. Hal ini menunjukkan bahwa efisiensi pakan ikan lele transgenik F3 lebih tinggi dibandingkan dengan ikan non-transgenik (P<0,05. Ikan lele transgenik mempunyai konsentrasi hormon pertumbuhan (5,67±2,65 ng/mL yang lebih tinggi (P<0,05 jika dibandingkan dengan ikan lele non-transgenik (3,00±1,41 ng/mL. Ikan lele transgenik juga memiliki kandungan hormon IGF-I (6,63±0,11 ng/mL lebih tinggi (P<0,05 dibandingkan dengan ikan lele non-transgenik (5,38±0,63 ng/mL. Tingginya konsentrasi hormon pertumbuhan dan hormon IGF-I dapat mewakili performa pertumbuhan dan efisiensi penggunaan pakan pada ikan lele transgenik. The aim of this study was to determine the transmission of a transgene (PhGH and to evaluate the performance of F3 transgenic African catfish, such as body weight, feed conversion ratio (FCR, growth hormone and IGF-I hormone

  1. Is growth hormone treatment in children associated with weight gain?--longitudinal analysis of KIGS data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reinehr, Thomas; Lindberg, Anders; Koltowska-Häggström, Maria; Ranke, Michael

    2014-11-01

    Growth hormone (GH) increases lean body mass and reduces fat mass. However, the long-term changes in weight status during growth hormone treatment, according to age and weight status at onset of treatment, have not previously been reported in large data sets. Changes in BMI-SDS between starting GH treatment and attaining near adult height (NAH) were analysed in 2643 children with idiopathic GH deficiency (IGHD), 281 children small for gestational age (SGA), 1661 girls with Turner syndrome (TS), and 142 children with Prader-Willi syndrome (PWS) in the KIGS database. BMI-SDS increased significantly between onset of GH treatment and NAH (IGHD:+0·29, SGA:+0·69, TS:+0·48) except in PWS (-0·02). These increases were greater in children with younger age at onset of GH treatment (significant in all indications) and with lower doses of GH treatment (significant in IGHD & TS) in multiple linear regression analyses also including gender, duration of GH treatment, BMI-SDS and height-SDS at onset of treatment, and birth weight-SDS. Obese children at onset of GH treatment decreased their BMI-SDS, while underweight and normal weight children at onset of GH treatment increased their BMI-SDS independently of GH treatment indication. Long-term GH treatment was associated with changes in weight status, which were beneficial for underweight and obese children independent of the indication for GH. However, the increase in BMI-SDS in normal weight children treated with GH needs to be investigated in future prospective longitudinal studies to analyse whether this represents an increase of fat mass, lean body mass or both. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  2. Growth Hormone Treatment in Turner's Syndrome: A Real World Experience

    OpenAIRE

    Vijay Sheker Reddy Danda; Sreedevi, P.; Arun, G.; P Srinivas Rao

    2017-01-01

    Objective: Short stature is a universal clinical feature of Turner's syndrome (TS). Growth failure begins in fetal life, and adults with TS are on an average 20 cm shorter than the normal female population. Since there is a paucity of data from India regarding the effect of growth hormone (GH) on TS patients, we retrospectively analyzed the data of TS patients who are on GH treatment. Methods: This hospital-based observational retrospective study was conducted in a tertiary care hospital of H...

  3. MRI of growth hormone-secreting pituitary adenomas: factors determining pretreatment hormone levels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Saeki, N.; Iuchi, T.; Eda, M.; Yamaura, A. [Dept. of Neurological Surgery, Chiba University School of Medicine (Japan); Isono, S. [Dept. of Neurological Surgery, Anesthesiology, Chiba University School of Medicine, Chiba (Japan)

    1999-10-01

    Preoperative serum growth hormone (GH) level is one of the most important determinants of outcome. Our aim was to assess MRI findings which may correlate with pretreatment GH levels in GH-secreting adenomas. We retrospectively studied 29 patients with acromegaly caused by a pituitary adenoma. Tumor size (height, width, thickness and volume), suprasellar extension, sphenoid or cavernous sinus invasion, signal intensity and contrast enhancement were studied. Linear regression analysis or Fisher's exact probability test was used for statistical analysis. Factors related to high GH levels were the maximum dimension of the tumour (r = 0.496, P < 0.01), its volume (r = 0.439, P < 0.05), spenoid sinus invasion (P < 0.01) and intracavernous carotid artery encasement (P < 0.01). The other items were not related to serum GH levels. Since we believe surgery is the first choice of treatment and the cavernous sinus is difficult of access with a conventional surgical approach, preoperative assessment of invasion into the cavernous sinus is critical for predicting the surgical outcome. Low GH levels (5-50 ng/ml) were found with tumours medial to the intercarotid line and high levels (more than 101 ng/ml) with invasive tumours with carotid artery encasement. Variable GH levels were noted with tumours extending beyond the intercarotid line. Because functioning adenomas invading the cavernous sinus tend to have markedly high hormone levels, and only patients with carotid artery encasement showed markedly elevated GH levels, we believe carotid artery encasement a reliable MRI indicator of cavernous sinus invasion. (orig.)

  4. Food intake and appetite control in a GH-transgenic zebrafish.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dalmolin, Camila; Almeida, Daniela Volcan; Figueiredo, Marcio Azevedo; Marins, Luis Fernando

    2015-10-01

    The biological actions of growth hormone (GH) are pleiotropic, including growth promotion, energy mobilization, gonadal development, appetite, and social behavior. The regulatory network for GH is complex and includes many central and peripheral endocrine factors as well as that from the environment. It is known that GH transgenesis results in increased growth, food intake, and consequent metabolic rates in fishes. However, the manner in which GH transgenesis alters the energetic metabolism in fishes has not been well explored. In order to elucidate these consequences, we examined the effect of GH overexpression on appetite control mechanisms in a transgenic zebrafish (Danio rerio) model. To this, we analyzed feeding behavior and the expression of the main appetite-related genes in two different feeding periods (fed and fasting) in non-transgenic (NT) and transgenic (T) zebrafish as well as glycaemic parameters of them. Our initial results have shown that NT males and females present the same feeding behavior and expression of main appetite-controlling genes; therefore, the data of both sexes were properly grouped. Following grouped data analyses, we compared the same parameters in NT and T animals. Feeding behavior results have shown that T animals eat significantly more and faster than NT siblings. Gene expression results pointed out that gastrointestinal (GT) cholecystokinin has a substantial contribution to the communication between peripheral and central control of food intake. Brain genes expression analyses revealed that T animals have a down-regulation of two strong and opposite peptides related to food intake: the anorexigenic proopiomelanocortin (pomc) and the orexigenic neuropeptide Y (npy). The down-regulation of pomc in T when compared with NT is an expected result, since the decrease in an anorexigenic factor might keep the transgenic fish hungry. The down-regulation of npy seemed to be contradictory at first, but if we consider the GH's capacity to

  5. Exploiting Nanobodies in the Detection and Quantification of Human Growth Hormone via Phage-Sandwich Enzyme-Linked Immunosorbent Assay

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hossam Murad

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available BackgroundMonitoring blood levels of human growth hormone (hGH in most children with short stature deficiencies is crucial for taking a decision of treatment with extended course of daily and expensive doses of recombinant hGH (rhGH or Somatropin®. Besides, misusing of rhGH by sportsmen is banned by the World Anti-Doping Agency and thus sensitive GH-detecting methods are highly welcome in this field. Nanobodies are the tiniest antigen-binding entity derived from camel heavy chain antibodies. They were successfully generated against numerous antigens including hormones.MethodsA fully nanobody-based sandwich ELISA method was developed in this work for direct measurement of GH in biological samples.ResultsTwo major characteristics of nanobody were exploited for this goal: the robust and stable structure of the nanobody (NbGH04 used to capture hGH from tested samples, and the great ability of tailoring, enabling the display of the anti-GH detector nanobody (NbGH07 on the tip of M13-phage. Such huge, stable, and easy-to-prepare phage-Nb was used in ELISA to provide an amplified signal. Previously, NbGH04 was retrieved on immobilized hGH by phage display from a wide “immune” cDNA library prepared from a hGH-immunized camel. Here, and in order to assure epitope heterogeneity, NbGH07 was isolated from the same library using NbGH04-captured hGH as bait. Interaction of both nanobodies with hGH was characterized and compared with different anti-GH nanobodies and antibodies. The sensitivity (~0.5 ng/ml and stability of the nanobody-base sandwich ELISA were assessed using rhGH before testing in the quantification of hGH in blood sera and cell culture supernatants.ConclusionIn regard to all advantages of nanobodies; stability, solubility, production affordability in Escherichia coli, and gene tailoring, nanobody-based phage sandwich ELISA developed here would provide a valuable method for hGH detection and quantification.

  6. Human Growth Hormone Delivery with a Microneedle Transdermal System: Preclinical Formulation, Stability, Delivery and PK of Therapeutically Relevant Doses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mahmoud Ameri

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available This study evaluated the feasibility of coating formulated recombinant human growth hormone (rhGH on a titanium microneedle transdermal delivery system, Zosano Pharma (ZP-hGH, and assessed preclinical patch delivery performance. Formulation rheology and surface activity were assessed by viscometry and contact angle measurement. rhGH liquid formulation was coated onto titanium microneedles by dip-coating and drying. The stability of coated rhGH was determined by size exclusion chromatography-high performance liquid chromatography (SEC-HPLC. Preclinical delivery and pharmacokinetic studies were conducted in female hairless guinea pigs (HGP using rhGH coated microneedle patches at 0.5 and 1 mg doses and compared to Norditropin® a commercially approved rhGH subcutaneous injection. Studies demonstrated successful rhGH formulation development and coating on microneedle arrays. The ZP-hGH patches remained stable at 40 °C for six months with no significant change in % aggregates. Pharmacokinetic studies showed that the rhGH-coated microneedle patches, delivered with high efficiency and the doses delivered indicated linearity with average Tmax of 30 min. The absolute bioavailability of the microneedle rhGH patches was similar to subcutaneous Norditropin® injections. These results suggest that ZP-transdermal microneedle patch delivery of rhGH is feasible and may offer an effective and patient-friendly alternative to currently marketed rhGH injectables.

  7. Does growth hormone treatment influence pubertal development in short children?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Albin, Anna-Karin; Ankarberg-Lindgren, Carina; Tuvemo, Torsten; Jonsson, Björn; Albertsson-Wikland, Kerstin; Ritzén, E Martin

    2011-01-01

    To study the influence of growth hormone (GH) treatment on the initiation and progression of puberty in short children. This prospective, randomized, controlled study included 124 short children (33 girls) who received GH treatment (Genotropin®; Pfizer Inc.) from a mean age of 11 years until near adult height [intent-to-treat (ITT) population]. Children were randomized into three groups: controls (n = 33), GH 33 μg/kg/day (n = 34) or GH 67 μg/kg/day (n = 57). Prepubertal children at study start constituted the per-protocol (PP) population (n = 101). Auxological measurements were made and puberty was staged every 3 months. Serum sex-steroid concentrations were assessed every 6 months. No significant differences were found between the groups, of both PP and ITT populations, in time elapsed from start of treatment until either onset of puberty, age at start of puberty or age at final pubertal maturation in either sex. In the ITT population, pubertal duration was significantly longer in GH-treated girls, and maximum mean testicular volume was significantly greater in GH-treated boys than controls, but there were no differences in testosterone levels between the groups. GH treatment did not influence age at onset of puberty and did not accelerate pubertal development. In boys, GH treatment appeared to increase testicular volume. Copyright © 2011 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  8. Urinary growth hormone excretion in 657 healthy children and adults

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Main, K; Philips, M; Jørgensen, M

    1991-01-01

    .0001) with maximum values in Tanner stage 3 for girls and 4 for boys. This corresponded to a peak in u-GH excretion between 11.5-14.5 years in girls and 12.5-16 years in boys. Additionally, u-GH excretion in adults was significantly higher than in prepubertal children (p less than 0.001). The day/night ratio of u......-GH excretion (pg/h) was significantly higher in females than in males (p less than 0.01). In Tanner stages 1-4, u-GH excretion during the day was lower than that at night, whereas the opposite was true in late puberty and in adult women. The interindividual variation of u-GH excretion within the same Tanner......Urinary growth hormone (u-GH) excretion was measured in 547 healthy children and 110 adults by ELISA with a detection limit of 1.1 ng/l u-GH after prior concentration of the urine samples (20- to 30-fold). u-GH excretion values were significantly dependent on the pubertal stage (p less than 0...

  9. Resolution of non-alcoholic steatohepatitis after growth hormone replacement in a pediatric liver transplant patient with panhypopituitarism

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gilliland, Thomas; Dufour, Sylvie; Shulman, Gerald I.

    2016-01-01

    . Pediatric patients with NASH cirrhosis secondary to panhypopituitarism can be good candidates for liver transplantation, but hormone deficiencies predispose to recurrence after transplant. High-dose GH replacement should be considered in pediatric patients with GH deficiency and recurrent disease...... in the pediatric population often results from craniopharyngioma or pituitary adenoma and the sequelae of treatment, causing hypothyroidism, adrenal insufficiency, hypogonadotropic hypogonadism, and GH deficiency. Refractory NAFLD in panhypopituitarism may be amenable to GH replacement. Here, we report a pediatric...... case of NASH secondary to panhypopituitarism from craniopharyngioma, which recurred by 11 months after LDLT. Despite low-dose GH replacement, the patient remained GH deficient. Pubertal dosed GH therapy led to rapid and complete resolution of hepatic steatosis, which we tracked using serial (1) H MRS...

  10. Understanding the multifactorial control of growth hormone release by somatotropes: lessons from comparative endocrinology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gahete, Manuel D; Durán-Prado, Mario; Luque, Raúl M; Martínez-Fuentes, Antonio J; Quintero, Ana; Gutiérrez-Pascual, Ester; Córdoba-Chacón, José; Malagón, María M; Gracia-Navarro, Francisco; Castaño, Justo P

    2009-04-01

    Control of postnatal growth is the main, but not the only, role for growth hormone (GH) as this hormone also contributes to regulating metabolism, reproduction, immunity, development, and osmoregulation in different species. Likely owing to this variety of group-specific functions, GH production is differentially regulated across vertebrates, with an apparent evolutionary trend to simplification, especially in the number of stimulatory factors governing substantially GH release. Thus, teleosts exhibit a multifactorial regulation of GH secretion, with a number of factors, from the newly discovered fish GH-releasing hormone (GHRH) to pituitary adenylate cyclase-activating peptide (PACAP) but also gonadotropin-releasing hormone, dopamine, corticotropin-releasing hormone, and somatostatin(s) directly controlling somatotropes. In amphibians and reptiles, GH secretion is primarily stimulated by the major hypothalamic peptides GHRH and PACAP and inhibited by somatostatin(s), while other factors (ghrelin, thyrotropin-releasing hormone) also influence GH release. Finally, in birds and mammals, primary control of GH secretion is exerted by a dual interplay between GHRH and somatostatin. In addition, somatotrope function is modulated by additional hypothalamic and peripheral factors (e.g., ghrelin, leptin, insulin-like growth factor-I), which together enable a balanced integration of feedback signals related to processes in which GH plays a relevant regulatory role, such as metabolic and energy status, reproductive, and immune function. Interestingly, in contrast to the high number of stimulatory factors impinging upon somatotropes, somatostatin(s) stand(s) as the main primary inhibitory regulator(s) for this cell type.

  11. Ten years' clinical experience with biosimilar human growth hormone: a review of efficacy data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    López-Siguero, Juan Pedro; Pfäffle, Roland; Chanson, Philippe; Szalecki, Mieczyslaw; Höbel, Nadja; Zabransky, Markus

    2017-01-01

    In 2006, the European Medicines Agency (EMA) approved Omnitrope(®) as a biosimilar recombinant human growth hormone (rhGH), on the basis of comparable quality, safety, and efficacy to the reference medicine (Genotropin(®), Pfizer). Data continue to be collected on the long-term efficacy of biosimilar rhGH from several on-going postapproval studies. Particular topics of interest include efficacy in indications granted on the basis of extrapolation, and whether efficacy of growth hormone treatment is affected when patients are changed to biosimilar rhGH from other rhGH products. Data from clinical development studies and 10 years of postapproval experience affirm the clinical efficacy and effectiveness of biosimilar rhGH across all approved indications. In addition, the decade of experience with biosimilar rhGH since it was approved in Europe confirms the scientific validity of the biosimilar pathway and the approval process. Concerns about clinical effect in extrapolated indications, and also about the impact of changing from other rhGH preparations, have been alleviated. Biosimilar rhGH is an effective treatment option for children who require therapy with rhGH.

  12. The Role of GH/IGF-I Axis in Muscle Homeostasis During Weightlessness

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwartz, Robert J.

    1997-01-01

    Exposure to reduced gravity during space travel profoundly alters the loads placed on bone and muscle. Astronauts suffer significant losses of muscle and bone strength during weightlessness. Exercise as a countermeasure is only partially effective in remedying severe muscle atrophy and bone demineralization. Similar wasting of muscles and bones affects people on Earth during prolonged bed rest or immobilization due to injury. In the absence of weight bearing activity, atrophy occurs primarily in the muscles that act in low power, routine movements and in maintaining posture. Hormonal disfunction could contribute in part to the loss of muscle and bone during spaceflight. Reduced levels of human Growth Hormone (hGH) were found in astronauts during space flight, as well as reduced GH secretory activity was observed from the anterior pituitary in 7-day space flight rats. Growth hormone has been shown to be required for maintenance of muscle mass and bone mineralization, in part by mediating the biosynthesis IGF-I, a small polypeptide growth factor. IGF biosynthesis and secretion plays an important role in potentiating muscle cell differentiation and has been shown to drive the expression of myogenin, a myogenic specific basic helix-loop-helix factor. IGF-I has also been shown to have an important role in potentiating muscle regeneration, repair and adult muscle hypertrophy.

  13. Obesity alters gene expression for GH/IGF-I axis in mouse mammary fat pads: differential role of cortistatin and somatostatin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Villa-Osaba, Alicia; Gahete, Manuel D; Córdoba-Chacón, José; de Lecea, Luis; Pozo-Salas, Ana I; Delgado-Lista, Francisco Javier; Álvarez-Benito, Marina; López-Miranda, José; Luque, Raúl M; Castaño, Justo P

    2015-01-01

    Locally produced growth hormone (GH) and IGF-I are key factors in the regulation of mammary gland (MG) development and may be important in breast cancer development/progression. Somatostatin (SST) and cortistatin (CORT) regulate GH/IGF-I axis at various levels, but their role in regulating GH/IGF-I in MGs remains unknown. Since obesity alters the expression of these systems in different tissues and is associated to MG (patho) physiology, we sought to investigate the role of SST/CORT in regulating GH/IGF-I system in the MGs of lean and obese mice. Therefore, we analyzed GH/IGF-I as well as SST/CORT and ghrelin systems expression in the mammary fat pads (MFPs) of SST- or CORT-knockout (KO) mice and their respective littermate-controls fed a low-fat (LF) or a high-fat (HF) diet for 16 wks. Our results demonstrate that the majority of the components of GH/IGF-I, SST/CORT and ghrelin systems are locally expressed in mouse MFP. Expression of elements of the GH/IGF-I axis was significantly increased in MFPs of HF-fed control mice while lack of endogenous SST partially suppressed, and lack of CORT completely blunted, the up-regulation observed in obese WT-controls. Since SST/CORT are known to exert an inhibitory role on the GH/IGFI axis, the increase in SST/CORT-receptor sst2 expression in MFPs of HF-fed CORT- and SST-KOs together with an elevation on circulating SST in CORT-KOs could explain the differences observed. These results offer new information on the factors (GH/IGF-I axis) involved in the endocrine/metabolic dysregulation of MFPs in obesity, and suggest that CORT is not a mere SST sibling in regulating MG physiology.

  14. Obesity alters gene expression for GH/IGF-I axis in mouse mammary fat pads: differential role of cortistatin and somatostatin.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alicia Villa-Osaba

    Full Text Available Locally produced growth hormone (GH and IGF-I are key factors in the regulation of mammary gland (MG development and may be important in breast cancer development/progression. Somatostatin (SST and cortistatin (CORT regulate GH/IGF-I axis at various levels, but their role in regulating GH/IGF-I in MGs remains unknown. Since obesity alters the expression of these systems in different tissues and is associated to MG (patho physiology, we sought to investigate the role of SST/CORT in regulating GH/IGF-I system in the MGs of lean and obese mice. Therefore, we analyzed GH/IGF-I as well as SST/CORT and ghrelin systems expression in the mammary fat pads (MFPs of SST- or CORT-knockout (KO mice and their respective littermate-controls fed a low-fat (LF or a high-fat (HF diet for 16 wks. Our results demonstrate that the majority of the components of GH/IGF-I, SST/CORT and ghrelin systems are locally expressed in mouse MFP. Expression of elements of the GH/IGF-I axis was significantly increased in MFPs of HF-fed control mice while lack of endogenous SST partially suppressed, and lack of CORT completely blunted, the up-regulation observed in obese WT-controls. Since SST/CORT are known to exert an inhibitory role on the GH/IGFI axis, the increase in SST/CORT-receptor sst2 expression in MFPs of HF-fed CORT- and SST-KOs together with an elevation on circulating SST in CORT-KOs could explain the differences observed. These results offer new information on the factors (GH/IGF-I axis involved in the endocrine/metabolic dysregulation of MFPs in obesity, and suggest that CORT is not a mere SST sibling in regulating MG physiology.

  15. Probing the Conformational and Functional Consequences of Disulfide Bond Engineering in Growth Hormone by Hydrogen-Deuterium Exchange Mass Spectrometry Coupled to Electron Transfer Dissociation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Seger, Signe T; Breinholt, Jens; Faber, Johan H

    2015-01-01

    Human growth hormone (hGH), and its receptor interaction, is essential for cell growth. To stabilize a flexible loop between helices 3 and 4, while retaining affinity for the hGH receptor, we have engineered a new hGH variant (Q84C/Y143C). Here, we employ hydrogen-deuterium exchange mass...... spectrometry (HDX-MS) to map the impact of the new disulfide bond on the conformational dynamics of this new hGH variant. Compared to wild type hGH, the variant exhibits reduced loop dynamics, indicating a stabilizing effect of the introduced disulfide bond. Furthermore, the disulfide bond exhibits longer...

  16. Mercury's Na Exosphere from MESSENGER Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Killen, Rosemary M.; Burger, M. H.; Cassidy, T. A.; Sarantos, M.; Vervack, R. J.; McClintock, W. El; Merkel, A. W.; Sprague, A. L.; Solomon, S. C.

    2012-01-01

    MESSENGER entered orbit about Mercury on March 18, 2011. Since then, the Ultraviolet and Visible Spectrometer (UWS) channel of MESSENGER's Mercury Atmospheric and Surface Composition Spectrometer (MASCS) has been observing Mercury's exosphere nearly continuously. Daily measurements of Na brightness were fitted with non-uniform exospheric models. With Monte Carlo sampling we traced the trajectories of a representative number of test particles, generally one million per run per source process, until photoionization, escape from the gravitational well, or permanent sticking at the surface removed the atom from the simulation. Atoms were assumed to partially thermally accommodate on each encounter with the surface with accommodation coefficient 0.25. Runs for different assumed source processes are run separately, scaled and co-added. Once these model results were saved onto a 3D grid, we ran lines of sight from the MESSENGER spacecraft :0 infinity using the SPICE kernels and we computed brightness integrals. Note that only particles that contribute to the measurement can be constrained with our method. Atoms and molecules produced on the nightside must escape the shadow in order to scatter light if the excitation process is resonant-light scattering, as assumed here. The aggregate distribution of Na atoms fits a 1200 K gas, with a PSD distribution, along with a hotter component. Our models constrain the hot component, assumed to be impact vaporization, to be emitted with a 2500 K Maxwellian. Most orbits show a dawnside enhancement in the hot component broadly spread over the leading hemisphere. However, on some dates there is no dawn/dusk asymmetry. The portion of the hot/cold source appears to be highly variable.

  17. Unsupervised Classification of MESSENGER MASC Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Sanctis, M. Cristina; Capaccioni, Fabrizio; Filacchione, Gianrico; Ammannito, Eleonora

    2010-05-01

    The MESSENGER spacecraft flew by Mercury as part of its journey to Mercury orbit insertion. The Mercury At-mospheric and Surface Composition Spectrometer (MASCS) observed Mercury during the first two flybys, includ-ing high-spatial-and spectral-resolution visible to near-infrared (IR) spectra of the Mercury surface. The Visible and InfraRed Spectrograph (VIRS) component of MASCS consists of two linear photodiode arrays covering a spectral range 320-1450 nm. We applied classification method to MASCS data in order to extract information on the mineralogy of Mercury. The classification of the Messenger data will permit to obtain maps of Mercury surface, giving us indication of the different mineralogy and maturity present on the Hermean surface. The data were pre-processed applying photometric correction and the VIS and NIR data were collected in a single spectrum. The data set show very similar featureless spectra. The main differences are in the reflectance levels and in the spectral slopes. To emphasize the spectral differences we have normalized the spectra to an average reflectance spectrum for each flyby. This allows to point out variation of different regions with respect to the aver-age spectral behaviour. Two different approaches have been used to analyze MASCS data of the two Messenger flybys: ISODATA unsupervised classification and a classification based on three different spectral slopes (in the wavelengths' ranges 0.3-0.55, 0.55-0.8 and 0.95-1.49 µm). The identified classes shows differences linked with slopes and reflectance's level: the proposed methods allows to correlate the most important classes with different morphological features on Mercury's surface which differ for weathering, maturity and composition. Our analysis is done in order to test and verify these classification methods that shall be necessary to analyze similar data harvested by SIMBIO-SYS/VIHI (Visible and Infrared Hyper-spectral Imager) aboard the future ESA's BepiColombo mission

  18. Adipokine zinc-α2-glycoprotein regulated by growth hormone and linked to insulin sensitivity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balaz, Miroslav; Ukropcova, Barbara; Kurdiova, Timea; Gajdosechova, Lucia; Vlcek, Miroslav; Janakova, Zuzana; Fedeles, Jozef; Pura, Mikulas; Gasperikova, Daniela; Smith, Steven R; Tkacova, Ruzena; Klimes, Iwar; Payer, Juraj; Wolfrum, Christian; Ukropec, Jozef

    2015-02-01

    Hypertrophic obesity is associated with impaired insulin sensitivity and lipid-mobilizing activity of zinc-α2-glycoprotein. Adipose tissue (AT) of growth hormone (GH) -deficient patients is characterized by extreme adipocyte hypertrophy due to defects in AT lipid metabolism. It was hypothesized that zinc-α2-glycoprotein is regulated by GH and mediates some of its beneficial effects in AT. AT from patients with GH deficiency and individuals with obesity-related GH deficit was obtained before and after 5-year and 24-month GH supplementation therapy. GH action was tested in primary human adipocytes. Relationships of GH and zinc-α2-glycoprotein with adipocyte size and insulin sensitivity were evaluated in nondiabetic patients with noncancerous cachexia and hypertrophic obesity. AT in GH-deficient adults displayed a substantial reduction of zinc-α2-glycoprotein. GH therapy normalized AT zinc-α2-glycoprotein. Obesity-related relative GH deficit was associated with almost 80% reduction of zinc-α2-glycoprotein mRNA in AT. GH increased zinc-α2-glycoprotein mRNA in both AT of obese men and primary human adipocytes. Interdependence of GH and zinc-α2-glycoprotein in regulating AT morphology and metabolic phenotype was evident from their relationship with adipocyte size and AT-specific and whole-body insulin sensitivity. The results demonstrate that GH is involved in regulation of AT zinc-α2-glycoprotein; however, the molecular mechanism linking GH and zinc-α2-glycoprotein in AT is yet unknown. © 2014 The Obesity Society.

  19. Growth hormone is a cellular senescence target in pituitary and nonpituitary cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chesnokova, Vera; Zhou, Cuiqi; Ben-Shlomo, Anat; Zonis, Svetlana; Tani, Yuji; Ren, Song-Guang; Melmed, Shlomo

    2013-01-01

    Premature proliferative arrest in benign or early-stage tumors induced by oncoproteins, chromosomal instability, or DNA damage is associated with p53/p21 activation, culminating in either senescence or apoptosis, depending on cell context. Growth hormone (GH) elicits direct peripheral metabolic actions as well as growth effects mediated by insulin-like growth factor 1 (IGF1). Locally produced peripheral tissue GH, in contrast to circulating pituitary-derived endocrine GH, has been proposed to be both proapoptotic and prooncogenic. Pituitary adenomas expressing and secreting GH are invariably benign and exhibit DNA damage and a senescent phenotype. We therefore tested effects of nutlin-induced p53-mediated senescence in rat and human pituitary cells. We show that DNA damage senescence induced by nutlin triggers the p53/p21 senescent pathway, with subsequent marked induction of intracellular pituitary GH in vitro. In contrast, GH is not induced in cells devoid of p53. Furthermore we show that p53 binds specific GH promoter motifs and enhances GH transcription and secretion in senescent pituitary adenoma cells and also in nonpituitary (human breast and colon) cells. In vivo, treatment with nutlin results in up-regulation of both p53 and GH in the pituitary gland, as well as increased GH expression in nonpituitary tissues (lung and liver). Intracrine GH acts in pituitary cells as an apoptosis switch for p53-mediated senescence, likely protecting the pituitary adenoma from progression to malignancy. Unlike in the pituitary, in nonpituitary cells GH exerts antiapoptotic properties. Thus, the results show that GH is a direct p53 transcriptional target and fulfills criteria as a p53 target gene. Induced GH is a readily measurable cell marker for p53-mediated cellular senescence. PMID:23940366

  20. Gravitational Waves and Multi-Messenger Astronomy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Centrella, Joan M.

    2010-01-01

    Gravitational waves are produced by a wide variety of sources throughout the cosmos, including the mergers of black hole and neutron star binaries/compact objects spiraling into central black holes in galactic nuclei, close compact binaries/and phase transitions and quantum fluctuations in the early universe. Observing these signals can bring new, and often very precise, information about their sources across vast stretches of cosmic time. In this talk we will focus on thee opening of this gravitational-wave window on the universe, highlighting new opportunities for discovery and multi-messenger astronomy.

  1. Identification of recombinant equine growth hormone in horse plasma by LC-MS/MS: a confirmatory analysis in doping control.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bailly-Chouriberry, Ludovic; Pinel, Gaud; Garcia, Patrice; Popot, Marie-Agnès; Le Bizec, Bruno; Bonnaire, Yves

    2008-11-01

    Equine growth hormone (eGH) has been available since 1998 as an approved drug (EquiGen-5, Bresagen) containing recombinant eGH (reGH). It is suspected of being illegally administered to racehorses in order to improve physical performance and to speed-up wound healing. Thus it may be considered a doping agent which would require a sensitive and reliable method of identification and confirmation in order to regulate its use in racehorses. reGH differs from the native eGH by an additional methionine at the N-terminal (met-eGH) and has never been unambiguously detected in any type of biological matrix at trace concentrations (1-10 microg/L). A plasma sample (4 mL) was treated with ammonium sulfate at the reGH isoelectric point and the pellet was purified by solid-phase extraction. Specific peptides were generated by trypsin digestion and analyzed by LC-MS/MS. The detection limit was 1 microg/L. The method was validated according to European Union regulation (DEC/2002/657/EC) and the Association of Official Racing Chemists (AORC) requirements. Furthermore, it was successfully applied to determining the plasma concentrations of reGH with time using linear ion trap mass analyzer. The presence of this prohibited hormone (reGH) was also successfully detected by triple quadrupole mass spectrometry up to 48 h postadministration of reGH to a horse. The present LC-MS/MS method is the first with adequate sensitivity and specificity for detection of reGH, rbGH, and endogenous eGH. Hence, an efficient analytical tool is proposed as a means to fulfilling the regulation of reGH abuse in the horse racing industry.

  2. Subcutaneous absorption kinetics of two highly concentrated preparations of recombinant human growth hormone

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Laursen, Torben; Jørgensen, Jens Otto Lunde; Susgaard, Søren

    1993-01-01

    hours. Samples were taken every 30 minutes for 6 hours and then hourly. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: Bioavailability (F) and absorption dynamics of human GH were measured. The relative absorption fractions estimated from the areas under the individual serum concentration curves from 0 to 24 hours......Abstract OBJECTIVE: The relative bioavailability of two highly concentrated (12 IU/ml) formulations of biosynthetic human growth hormone (GH) administered subcutaneously was compared. DESIGN: A randomized, crossover study. Conventional GH therapy was withdrawn 72 hours before each study period...... of signs of endogenous GH secretion. INTERVENTIONS: At the start of each study period, GH 3 IU/m2 was injected subcutaneously. The two formulations, PenFill and PenSet, differ in the buffers used and in the relative content of mannitol and glycine. Serum profiles of GH were monitored frequently for 24...

  3. Growth factors, glucose and insulin kinetics after low dose growth hormone in HIV - lipodystrophy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Haugaard, Steen B; Andersen, Ove; Flyvbjerg, Allan

    2006-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: Low-dose growth hormone (GH) administration has been suggested as a treatment for HIV-lipodystrophy. METHODS: Postglucose GH-secretion, kinetics of insulin-like growth factors (IGFs), insulin, and glucose metabolism were examined in six male HIV-infected lipodystrophic patients (two...... during a 5h oral glucose-tolerance test. Near lower normal limits in all patients before GH-therapy, total and free IGF-I increased between 87 and 152% during the GH-therapy (P... on circulating IGF-I, glucose metabolism, and insulin kinetics, 0.7 mg/day of GH may be expedient for treatment of HIV-infected males with lipodystrophy. Whether the patients' glucose metabolic status matters for the IGF-response to low-dose GH-therapy awaits further investigation....

  4. Effects of Recombinant Human Growth Hormone for Osteoporosis: Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Atkinson, Hayden F; Moyer, Rebecca F; Yacoub, Daniel; Coughlin, Dexter; Birmingham, Trevor B

    2017-03-01

    Our objective was to evaluate the efficacy of recombinant human growth hormone (GH) on bone mineral density (BMD) in persons age 50 and older, with normal pituitary function, with or at risk for developing osteoporosis. We systematically reviewed randomized clinical trials (RCTs), searching six databases, and conducted meta-analyses to examine GH effects on BMD of the lumbar spine and femoral neck. Data for fracture incidence, bone metabolism biomarkers, and adverse events were also extracted and analysed. Thirteen RCTs met the eligibility criteria. Pooled effect sizes suggested no significant GH effect on BMD. Pooled effect sizes were largest, but nonsignificant, when compared to placebo. GH had a significant effect on several bone metabolism biomarkers. A significantly higher rate of adverse events was observed in the GH groups. Meta-analysis of RCTs suggests that GH treatment for persons with or at risk for developing osteoporosis results in very small, nonsignificant increases in BMD.

  5. Growth factors, glucose and insulin kinetics after low dose growth hormone in HIV - lipodystrophy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Haugaard, Steen B; Andersen, Ove; Flyvbjerg, Allan

    2006-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: Low-dose growth hormone (GH) administration has been suggested as a treatment for HIV-lipodystrophy. METHODS: Postglucose GH-secretion, kinetics of insulin-like growth factors (IGFs), insulin, and glucose metabolism were examined in six male HIV-infected lipodystrophic patients (two...... and temporary reduction in insulin sensitivity was caused by a reduction in non-oxidative glucose metabolism (n=5). GH-administration reduced hepatic extraction of insulin alleviating the demand for insulin secretion (n=5). No adverse effects of GH were detected. CONCLUSIONS: As judged from effects...... on circulating IGF-I, glucose metabolism, and insulin kinetics, 0.7 mg/day of GH may be expedient for treatment of HIV-infected males with lipodystrophy. Whether the patients' glucose metabolic status matters for the IGF-response to low-dose GH-therapy awaits further investigation....

  6. Growth hormone responsiveness: peak stimulated growth hormone levels and other variables in idiopathic short stature (ISS): data from the National Cooperative Growth Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moore, Wayne V; Dana, Ken; Frane, James; Lippe, Barbara

    2008-09-01

    In children with idiopathic short stature (ISS), growth hormone (GH) response to a provocative test will be inversely related to the first year response to hGH and be a variable accounting for a degree of responsiveness. Because high levels of GH are a characteristic of GH insensitivity, such as in Laron syndrome, it is possible that a high stimulated GH is associated with a lower first year height velocity among children diagnosed as having ISS. We examined the relationship between the peak stimulated GH levels in 3 ISS groups; GH >10 -40 ng/mL and the first year growth response to rhGH therapy. We also looked at 8 other predictor variables (age, sex, height SDS, height age, body mass index (BMI), bone age, dose, and SDS deficit from target parental height. Multiple regression analysis with the first year height as the dependent variable and peak stimulated GH was the primary endpoint. The predictive value of adding each of the other variables was then assessed. Mean change in height velocity was similar among the three groups, with a maximum difference among the groups of 0.6 cm/yr. There was a small but statistically significant correlation (r=-0.12) between the stimulated GH and first year height velocity. The small correlation between first year growth response and peak GH is not clinically relevant in defining GH resistance. No cut off level by peak GH could be determined to enhance the usefulness of this measure to predict response. Baseline age was the only clinically significant predictor, R-squared, 6.4%. All other variables contributed less than an additional 2% to the R-squared.

  7. Taguchi Experimental Design for Optimization of Recombinant Human Growth Hormone Production in CHO Cell Lines and Comparing its Biological Activity with Prokaryotic Growth Hormone.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aghili, Zahra Sadat; Zarkesh-Esfahani, Sayyed Hamid

    2018-02-01

    Growth hormone deficiency results in growth retardation in children and the GH deficiency syndrome in adults and they need to receive recombinant-GH in order to rectify the GH deficiency symptoms. Mammalian cells have become the favorite system for production of recombinant proteins for clinical application compared to prokaryotic systems because of their capability for appropriate protein folding, assembly, post-translational modification and proper signal. However, production level in mammalian cells is generally low compared to prokaryotic hosts. Taguchi has established orthogonal arrays to describe a large number of experimental situations mainly to reduce experimental errors and to enhance the efficiency and reproducibility of laboratory experiments.In the present study, rhGH was produced in CHO cells and production of rhGH was assessed using Dot blotting, western blotting and Elisa assay. For optimization of rhGH production in CHO cells using Taguchi method An M16 orthogonal experimental design was used to investigate four different culture components. The biological activity of rhGH was assessed using LHRE-TK-Luciferase reporter gene system in HEK-293 and compared to the biological activity of prokaryotic rhGH.A maximal productivity of rhGH was reached in the conditions of 1%DMSO, 1%glycerol, 25 µM ZnSO 4 and 0 mM NaBu. Our findings indicate that control of culture conditions such as the addition of chemical components helps to develop an efficient large-scale and industrial process for the production of rhGH in CHO cells. Results of bioassay indicated that rhGH produced by CHO cells is able to induce GH-mediated intracellular cell signaling and showed higher bioactivity when compared to prokaryotic GH at the same concentrations. © Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  8. The Associations of GH and GHR Genes with Carcass Components in Indonesian Kampung and Broiler Chicken Cross

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I. Khaerunnisa

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available The chicken growth hormone (GH and its receptor (growth hormone receptor, GHR play important roles in chicken performances due to their crucial functions in growth. The variations of GH and GHR genes were then thought to be associated with the variations of the performances. This experiment was designed to identify the g.2248G>A GH and the g.565G>A GHR loci polymorphisms and to evaluate their associations with carcass components in Kampung and broiler chicken cross. A total of 215 chickens including 4 chicken populations (Kampung, Cobb broiler, F1, and F2 Kampung x broiler chicken cross were screened to identify polymorphism using PCR-RFLP technique with EcoRV and Eco72I restriction enzyme for GH and GHR loci, respectively. The carcass components were recorded at 26 weeks of age on F2 Kampung and broiler chicken cross (42 chickens for association study. Both the g.2248G>A GH and the g.565G>A GHR loci were polymorphic with two alleles (G and A and three genotypes (GG, AG, and AA. The GG genotype and the G allele of GH locus were predominant in all chicken populations. While in GHR locus, the AA genotype and the A allele were found to be higher in all chicken populations. The association study showed that the g.565G>A GHR locus polymorphism had significant effect on carcass components, including live weight, carcass weight, breast weight, thighs weight, breast muscle weight, and thighs muscle weight. There was no significant association was found between the g.2248G>A GH genotype and carcass components. It could be concluded that the g.2248G>A GH and the g.565G>A GHR loci were polymorphic in Kampung and broiler chicken cross and the g.565G>A GHR locus was accosiated with carcass components. This g.565G>A GHR SNP might be an important candidate marker for chicken growth and muscle mass improvement.

  9. Intracellular processing of growth hormone receptors by adipocytes in primary culture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roupas, P; Herington, A C

    1988-05-01

    Rat adipocytes in primary culture have been used to study the intracellular processing of growth hormone (GH) receptors. Pretreatment of adipocytes with 20 micrograms/ml cycloheximide resulted in a rapid decline (t1/2 approximately 45 min) of the 125I-human growth hormone (hGH) binding capacity of the cells. This decline occurred at a faster rate in the presence of extracellular unlabeled hGH (400 ng/ml) and was not due to receptor occupancy. These data suggest that GH receptors turn over rapidly and constitutively on the plasma membrane and in the absence of protein synthesis are not replaced. Dissociation of GH-receptor complexes was shown not to occur at pH 5.5, the pH encountered in the acidic pre-lysosomal compartments (endosomes) where intracellular dissociation of many hormone-receptor complexes takes place. These data, together, suggest that the majority of GH receptors are not recycled but instead suffer the same fate as the majority of GH, i.e. degradation. To determine the rate of appearance of GH receptors at the cell surface, adipocytes were first treated with trypsin and then incubated at 37 degrees C to permit incorporation of any available GH receptors into the plasma membrane. Binding of 125I-hGH recovered to pre-trypsin levels by 2 h. This recovery was completely blocked by concomitant treatment with monensin, cytochalasin B, colchicine and 2,4-dinitrophenol. NH4Cl had no effect on receptor recovery. These data suggest that once GH receptors are synthesized in the rough endoplasmic reticulum, they travel via the Golgi apparatus to the plasma membrane (by processes involving both microfilaments and microtubules) and are then inserted into the plasma membrane in an energy-dependent step.

  10. Effect of growth hormone administration to mature miniature Brahman cattle treated with or without insulin on circulating concentrations of insulin-like growth factor-I and other metabolic hormones and metabolites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Previously, we determined that a primary cause of proportional stunted growth in a line of Brahman cattle was related to an apparent refractoriness in metabolic response to growth hormone (GH) in young animals. The objective of this study was to determine the effect of administration of GH, insulin...

  11. Growth hormone treatment in the United States: demographic and diagnostic features of 2331 children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    August, G P; Lippe, B M; Blethen, S L; Rosenfeld, R G; Seelig, S A; Johanson, A J; Compton, P G; Frane, J W; McClellan, B H; Sherman, B M

    1990-06-01

    Demographic, diagnostic, and baseline clinical data were collected for a large cohort (N = 2331) of children who started treatment with biosynthetic human growth hormone (GH) between October 1985 and October 1987. Eighty-one percent met classic criteria for GH deficiency and were classified as having idiopathic GH deficiency (59%), organic GH deficiency (18%), or septo-optic dysplasia (4%). The remaining 19.8% had short stature of varied causes. Height standard deviation score at diagnosis, maximum GH response to stimulation, and heights of parents were examined according to gender, race, age at diagnosis, and previous treatment history. The predominance of boys in all subgroups except septooptic dysplasia, and the observation that girls with idiopathic GH deficiency were comparatively shorter than boys at diagnosis, suggest ascertainment bias. Black children with idiopathic GH deficiency were shorter than white children at diagnosis, and their low overall representation (6.0%) compared with their percentage in the at-risk population (12.9%) also suggest ascertainment bias among races. These data provide a profile of GH deficiency as it is currently defined and expose possible inherent biases in the diagnostic process. Now that GH supply is no longer limited, criteria for its use should be formulated to avoid apparent underascertainment or late diagnosis of GH deficiency in girls and black children.

  12. What is the value of growth hormone therapy in Prader Willi syndrome?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bridges, Nicola

    2014-02-01

    Prader Willi syndrome (PWS) is a genetic condition caused by loss of the paternal copy of a region of imprinted genes on chromosome 15. There is severe muscular hypotonia in the neonatal period, with the onset of hyperphagia and food-seeking behaviour in childhood. All individuals with PWS have developmental delay. Without careful control of food intake and the food environment, individuals with PWS become morbidly obese and are likely to die as young adults from the complications of obesity. The aims of growth hormone (GH) treatment in PWS are distinct from the use of GH in other conditions-although GH does increase final height in PWS, the main benefits of treatment are improved body composition and better exercise capacity, which can help with the aim of preventing obesity. GH trials in PWS have demonstrated improved muscle bulk, reduced fat mass and increased levels of physical activity. GH has also been demonstrated to improve attainment of developmental and cognitive milestones in children with PWS. GH treatment appears to change respiratory status in PWS, possibly because of growth of lymphoid tissue at the start of treatment. Respiratory assessment is recommended prior to, and just after starting GH treatment. Ideal age for starting GH is not clear, although there has been a trend towards starting at younger ages. It may be that GH treatment in childhood confers benefits into adult life. There are less data to support continuing GH treatment into adult life.

  13. Clinical and molecuar characterization of Brazilian patients with growth hormone gene deletions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I.J.P. Arnhold

    1998-04-01

    Full Text Available Genomic DNA from 23 patients with isolated growth hormone (GH deficiency (12 males and 11 females: heights -4.9 ± 1.4 SDS was screened for GH gene deletions by restriction endonuclease analysis of polymerase chain reaction amplification products. Three unrelated patients had typical features of severe GH deficiency and deletions (6.7 kb in two and 7.6 kb in one of the GH gene. The two patients with 6.7-kb deletions developed growth-attenuating anti-GH antibodies whereas the patient with the 7.6-kb deletion continued to grow with GH replacement therapy. Our finding that 3/23 (~13% Brazilian subjects had GH gene deletions agrees with previous studies of severe isolated GH deficiency subjects in other populations. Two of three subjects (67% with deletions developed blocking antibodies despite administration of exogenous GH at low doses. Interestingly, only 1/10 of cases with affected relatives or parental consanguinity had GH-1 gene deletions

  14. G.H. Mead's social behaviorism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cook, G A

    1977-10-01

    This paper seeks to clarify those conceptual foundations of G.H. Mead's social behaviorism which are assumed, but not made explicit, in that writer's well-known volume Mind, Self and Society. These foundations are shown to be an outgrowth of Mead's early commitment to the organic conception of conduct underlying the psychological functionalism of the Chicago School. Further light is shed upon Mead's position by pointing out the fundamental differences between his model of conduct and that characteristic of the behaviorist tradition in American psychology.

  15. Metabolic Health of Children Born SGA: Influence of parental health, prematurity, genetic polymorphisms and growth hormone treatment

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    S.W.K. de Kort (Sandra)

    2009-01-01

    textabstractSince 1991 our research group and others have investigated children with short stature who were born small for gestational age (SGA), both before and during treatment with biosynthetic growth hormone (GH). Because of these efforts and the positive results, GH treatment was licensed for

  16. Growth hormone, interferon-gamma, and leukemia inhibitory factor utilize insulin receptor substrate-2 in intracellular signaling

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Argetsinger, L S; Norstedt, G; Billestrup, Nils

    1996-01-01

    In this report, we demonstrate that insulin receptor substrate-2 (IRS-2) is tyrosyl-phosphorylated following stimulation of 3T3-F442A fibroblasts with growth hormone (GH), leukemia inhibitory factor and interferon-gamma. In response to GH and leukemia inhibitory factor, IRS-2 is immediately phosp...

  17. Chronic alterations in growth hormone/insulin-like growth factor-I signaling lead to changes in mouse tendon structure

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, R H; Clausen, N M; Schjerling, P

    2014-01-01

    The growth hormone/insulin-like growth factor-I (GH/IGF-I) axis is an important stimulator of collagen synthesis in connective tissue, but the effect of chronically altered GH/IGF-I levels on connective tissue of the muscle-tendon unit is not known. We studied three groups of mice; 1) giant...

  18. The impact of idiopathic childhood-onset growth hormone deficiency (GHD) on bone mass in subjects without adult GHD

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lange, Martin; Müller, Jørn; Svendsen, Ole Lander

    2005-01-01

    Despite seemingly adequate growth hormone (GH) treatment during childhood, children with GH deficiency (GHD) have reduced bone mineral density (BMD) at final height. The aim was to evaluate BMD and bone mineral content (BMC) in adults treated for idiopathic childhood-onset (CO) GHD, 18 years after...

  19. Growth hormone treatment for Turner syndrome in Australia reveals that younger age and increased dose interact to improve response

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hughes, Ian P.; Choong, Catherine S.; Harris, Mark; Ambler, Geoffrey R.; Cutfield, Wayne S.; Hofman, Paul L.; Cowell, Chris T.; Werther, George; Cotterill, Andrew; Davies, Peter S. W.

    P>Objective To investigate response to growth hormone (GH) in the first, second and third years of treatment in the total clinical cohort of Turner syndrome (TS) patients in Australia. Context Short stature is the most common clinical manifestation of TS. GH treatment improves growth. Design

  20. Combination of external load and whole body vibration potentiates the GH-releasing effect of squatting in healthy females.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giunta, M; Rigamonti, A E; Agosti, F; Patrizi, A; Compri, E; Cardinale, M; Sartorio, A

    2013-08-01

    In recent years, whole body vibration (WBV) has become an efficient complement or alternative to resistance training. Very limited data on the effects of different WBV protocols on anabolic hormones are available. In this study, we compared the growth hormone (GH), blood lactate (LA), and cortisol responses to different protocols involving WBV. Six healthy women recreationally active performed 10 sets of 12 dynamic squats in the following conditions: squatting alone (S), squatting+vibration (SV), squatting+external load (SE), and squatting+external load+vibration (SEV). All responses at the different stimuli determined acute increases in GH, cortisol, and LA. In particular, GH secretion significantly increased in all 4 conditions immediately after the exercise session compared to other time points. Furthermore, a significantly larger increase was identified following SEV as compared to the other conditions. Cortisol concentrations significantly decreased after S, SV and SE whereas they increased significantly following SEV. LA peaks occurred immediately at the end of each condition. However it reached statistical significance only following SEV. The results of our study demonstrate that the combination of squatting+external load+vibration (SEV) could represent the most suitable modality to potentiate the somatotropic function and, indirectly, to obtain an increase in muscle strength and positive changes in the body composition. Further studies are necessary in order to determine the chronic effects of this exercise modality on the hormonal profile. © Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  1. Endurance training-induced changes in the GH-IGF-I axis influence maximal muscle strength in previously untrained men.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grandys, Marcin; Majerczak, Joanna; Kuczek, Piotr; Sztefko, Krystyna; Duda, Krzysztof; Zoladz, Jerzy A

    2017-02-01

    In this study we have determined the effects of 20weeks of endurance running training on the GH-IGF-I axis changes in the context of the skeletal muscle performance and physical capacity level. Before and after the endurance training program a maximal incremental exercise tests, a 1500m race and a muscle strength measurements were performed and the blood samples were taken to determine both resting as well as end-exercise serum growth hormone (GH), insulin-like growth hormone-I (IGF-I), insulin-like growth hormone binding protein-3 (IGFBP-3) and plasma interleukin-6 (IL-6) concentrations. 20weeks of endurance running training improved power output generated at the end of the maximal incremental test by 24% (Ptraining (Ptraining (Ptraining. These changes were accompanied by a significantly higher (30%) end-exercise IL-6 concentration (Ptraining. Moreover, there were strong positive correlations between changes in resting serum IGF-I concentration (ΔIGF-Ires) and IGF-I/IGFBP-3 ratio (ΔIGF-I/IGFBP-3res) and changes in muscle strength (ΔMVC) (r=0.95, P=0.0003 and r=0.90, P=0.002, respectively). The training-induced changes in the components of the GH-IGF-I axis may have additive effects on skeletal muscle performance and physical capacity improvement. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. An application of CART algorithm in genetics: IGFs and cGH polymorphisms in Japanese quail

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaplan, Selçuk

    2017-04-01

    The avian insulin-like growth factor-1 (IGFs) and avian growth hormone (cGH) genes are the most important genes that can affect bird performance traits because of its important function in growth and metabolism. Understanding the molecular genetic basis of variation in growth-related traits is of importance for continued improvement and increased rates of genetic gain. The objective of the present study was to identify polymorphisms of cGH and IGFs genes in Japanese quail using conventional least square method (LSM) and CART algorithm. Therefore, this study was aimed to demonstrate at determining the polymorphisms of two genes related growth characteristics via CART algorithm. A simulated data set was generated to analyze by adhering the results of some poultry genetic studies which it includes live weights at 5 weeks of age, 3 alleles and 6 genotypes of cGH and 2 alleles and 3 genotypes of IGFs. As a result, it has been determined that the CART algorithm has some advantages as for that LSM.

  3. The association between growth response to growth hormone and baseline body composition of children with growth hormone deficiency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Esen, Ihsan; Demirel, Fatma; Tepe, Derya; Kara, Ozlem; Koc, Nevra

    2013-10-01

    We wanted to examine the relationship between initial growth response to recombinant human Growth Hormone (rhGH) treatment and body composition in children with growth hormone deficiency (GHD). Forty-two patients (21 boys and 21 girls) aged between 5.7-15.5 years (mean age: 10.8 ± 2.6 years) with isolated GHD. The auxological and laboratory data (GH and IGF-I levels) and results of bioelectrical impedance analyses were evaluated. Children with GHD were followed up for 12 months and categorized according to growth response to rhGH into good and poor responders (change in height of > 0.7 SDS or growth response to rhGH therapy. At study entry, mean age, height SDS, weight SDS, serum IGF-1 SDS, IGFBP-3 SDS, growth velocity prior to rhGH therapy, GH after clonidine and l-dopa were similar in the two groups. At baseline, BMI SDS and waist-hip ratio were significantly higher in good responders (p = 0.02 and p = 0.006, respectively). Good responders had lower percentages of FFM (73.4 ± 8.9 vs. 83.1 ± 5.9) and total body water (TBW) (56.5 ± 5.3 vs. 63.1 ± 4.4), compared to poor responders (p children with GHD on rhGH treatment (r = -0.617 for percentage of FFM, r = -0.629 for percentage of TBW, p growth response was observed only in prepubertal subjects. Baseline body composition data in children with GHD can be used to predict the growth response to rhGH treatment. A management strategy that involves titrating rhGH dose according to FFM as a means of optimizing the growth response to intervention requires further study. Crown Copyright © 2013. All rights reserved.

  4. Effect of summer daylight exposure and genetic background on growth in growth hormone-deficient children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Leonibus, C; Chatelain, P; Knight, C; Clayton, P; Stevens, A

    2016-11-01

    The response to growth hormone in humans is dependent on phenotypic, genetic and environmental factors. The present study in children with growth hormone deficiency (GHD) collected worldwide characterised gene-environment interactions on growth response to recombinant human growth hormone (r-hGH). Growth responses in children are linked to latitude, and we found that a correlate of latitude, summer daylight exposure (SDE), was a key environmental factor related to growth response to r-hGH. In turn growth response was determined by an interaction between both SDE and genes known to affect growth response to r-hGH. In addition, analysis of associated networks of gene expression implicated a role for circadian clock pathways and specifically the developmental transcription factor NANOG. This work provides the first observation of gene-environment interactions in children treated with r-hGH.

  5. 3D Volumetric Measurements of GH Secreting Adenomas Correlate with Baseline Pituitary Function, Initial Surgery Success Rate, and Disease Control.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tirosh, Amit; Papadakis, Georgios Z; Chittiboina, Prashant; Lyssikatos, Charalampos; Belyavskaya, Elena; Keil, Meg; Lodish, Maya B; Stratakis, Constantine A

    2017-06-01

    There is scarce data on the clinical utility of volume measurement for growth hormone (GH)-secreting pituitary adenomas. The current study objective was to assess the association between pituitary adenoma volumes and baseline endocrine evaluation, initial surgical success rate, and disease control among patients with acromegaly. A retrospective cohort study was conducted at a clinical research center including patients with acromegaly due to GH-secreting pituitary adenomas. Baseline hormonal evaluation and adenoma characteristics according to MRI were collected. Volumetric measurements of pituitary adenomas were performed using a semi-automated lesion segmentation and tumor-volume assessment tools. Rates of post-operative medical treatment, radiation therapy, and re-operation were gathered from the patients' medical records. Twenty seven patients (11 females) were included, median age 21.0 years (interquartile range 29 years, range 3-61 years). Patients harboring adenomas with a volume <2 000 mm 3 had higher chance to achieve disease remission [94.1% (n=16) vs. 50.0% (n=4), p<0.05]. Adenoma volumes positively correlated with baseline plasma GH levels before and after oral glucose administration, and with plasma IGF-I and PRL levels. Adenoma volume had negative correlation with morning plasma cortisol levels. Finally, patients harboring larger adenomas required 2nd surgery and/or medical treatment more often compared with subjects with smaller adenomas. Accurate 3D volume measurement of GH-secreting pituitary adenomas may be used for the prediction of initial surgery success and for disease control rates among patients with a GH-secreting pituitary adenomas and performs better than standard size assessments. © Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  6. Neurocognitive function in acromegaly after surgical resection of GH-secreting adenoma versus naïve acromegaly.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juan Francisco Martín-Rodríguez

    Full Text Available Patients with active untreated acromegaly show mild to moderate neurocognitive disorders that are associated to chronic exposure to growth hormone (GH and insulin-like growth factor (IGF-I hypersecretion. However, it is unknown whether these disorders improve after controlling GH/IGF-I hypersecretion. The aim of this study was to compare neurocognitive functions of patients who successfully underwent GH-secreting adenoma transsphenoidal surgery (cured patients with patients with naive acromegaly. In addition, we wanted to determine the impact of different clinical and biochemical variables on neurocognitive status in patients with active disease and after long-term cure. A battery of six standardized neuropsychological tests assessed attention, memory and executive functioning. In addition, a quantitative electroencephalography with Low-Resolution Electromagnetic Tomography (LORETA solution was performed to obtain information about the neurophysiological state of the patients. Neurocognitive data was compared to that of a healthy control group. Multiple linear regression analysis was also conducted using clinical and hormonal parameters to obtain a set of independent predictors of neurocognitive state before and after cure. Both groups of patients scored significantly poorer than the healthy controls on memory tests, especially those assessing visual and verbal recall. Patients with cured acromegaly did not obtain better cognitive measures than naïve patients. Furthermore memory deficits were associated with decreased beta activity in left medial temporal cortex in both groups of patients. Regression analysis showed longer duration of untreated acromegaly was associated with more severe neurocognitive complications, regardless of the diagnostic group, whereas GH levels at the time of assessment was related to neurocognitive outcome only in naïve patients. Longer duration of post-operative biochemical remission of acromegaly was associated with

  7. Optimizing Patient Management and Adherence for Children Receiving Growth Hormone

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carlo L. Acerini

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Poor adherence with growth hormone (GH therapy has been associated with worse clinical outcomes, which in children relates specifically to their linear growth and loss of quality of life. The “360° GH in Europe” meeting, held in Lisbon, Portugal, in June 2016 and funded by Merck KGaA (Germany, examined many aspects of GH diseases. The three sessions, entitled “Short Stature Diagnosis and Referral,” “Optimizing Patient Management,” and “Managing Transition,” each benefited from three guest speaker presentations, followed by an open discussion and are reported as a manuscript, authored by the speakers. Reported here is a summary of the proceedings of the second session, which reviewed the determinants of GH therapy response, factors affecting GH therapy adherence and the development of innovative technologies to improve GH treatment in children. Response to GH therapy varies widely, particularly in regard to the underlying diagnosis, although there is little consensus on the definition of a poor response. If the growth response is seen to be less than expected, the possible reasons should be discussed with patients and their parents, including compliance with the therapy regimen. Understanding and addressing the multiple factors that influence adherence, in order to optimize GH therapy, requires a multi-disciplinary approach. Because therapy continues over many years, various healthcare professionals will be involved at different periods of the patient’s journey. The role of the injection device for GH therapy, frequent monitoring of response, and patient support are all important for maintaining adherence. New injection devices are incorporating electronic technologies for automated monitoring and recording of clinically relevant information on injections. Study results are indicating that such devices can at least maintain GH adherence; however, acceptance of novel devices needs to be assessed and there remains an on

  8. GH/IGF-1 Signaling and Current Knowledge of Epigenetics; a Review and Considerations on Possible Therapeutic Options

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francisco Álvarez-Nava

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Epigenetic mechanisms play an important role in the regulation of the Growth Hormone- Insulin-like Growth Factor 1 (GH-IGF1 axis and in processes for controlling long bone growth, and carbohydrate and lipid metabolism. Improvement of methodologies that allow for the assessment of epigenetic regulation have contributed enormously to the understanding of GH action, but many questions still remain to be clarified. The reversible nature of epigenetic factors and, particularly, their role as mediators between the genome and the environment, make them viable therapeutic target candidates. Rather than reviewing the molecular and epigenetic pathways regulated by GH action, in this review we have focused on the use of epigenetic modulators as potential drugs to improve the GH response. We first discuss recent progress in the understanding of intracellular molecular mechanisms controlling GH and IGF-I action. We then emphasize current advances in genetic and epigenetic mechanisms that control gene expression, and which support a key role for epigenetic regulation in the cascade of intracellular events that trigger GH action when coupled to its receptor. Thirdly, we focus on fetal programming and epigenetic regulation at the IGF1 locus. We then discuss epigenetic alterations in intrauterine growth retardation, and the possibility for a potential epigenetic pharmaceutical approach in short stature associated with this fetal condition. Lastly, we review an example of epigenetic therapeutics in the context of growth-related epigenetic deregulation disorders. The advance of our understanding of epigenetic changes and the impact they are having on new forms of therapy creates exciting prospects for the future.

  9. PEMBUATAN SYSTEM CORPORATE MESSENGER PADA JARINGAN LAN

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lily Puspa Dewi

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Corporate messenger is the one of the application that can be used for communication in a local area network. The backgrounds of this topic are needs of sending message process in the LAN. The messages which want to be presented are not only in a text format, but also can be in audio visual format. Computer client will connect to the server. When the connection has been established, the client continued the authentication and started sending message between client and server. Audio and video message sending can be done with peer to peer connection with entering the IP address first from remote user that we want to communicate with. The evaluation of this application was done by using 3 computers and as the result, we found that authentication process can work properly, sending text message was done properly and communication using audio can be heard clearly. In addition to video sending message, we could see directly in remote client. The average time to show the video on remote client is 3.771 seconds. Abstract in Bahasa Indonesia: Corporate messenger merupakan suatu aplikasi yang dapat digunakan untuk berkomunikasi dalam sebuah Local Area Network. Hal ini dilatarbelakangi oleh perlu adanya proses pengiriman pesan secara bersama-sama dalam sebuah Local Area Network. Pesan yang ingin dikomunikasikan tidak hanya berupa teks, tetapi dapat juga menggunakan video maupun audio Komputer client akan melakukan koneksi dengan server. Jika sudah terjadi koneksi dengan server, maka client tersebut akan melanjutkan dengan autentikasi dan kemudian dapat melakukan pengiriman pesan dengan client yang telah terdaftar dalam database server. Pengiriman pesan audio dan video terjadi dengan koneksi peer to peer dengan terlebih dahulu memasukkan IP address dari remote user yang ingin diajak berkomunikasi. Pengujian dilakukan dengan menggunakan tiga buah komputer dan diperoleh bahwa proses autentikasi dapat berjalan dengan baik, pengiriman pesan teks dapat dilakukan

  10. Mercury after the Third MESSENGER Flyby

    Science.gov (United States)

    Solomon, S. C.; McNutt, R. L.; Bedini, P. D.; Anderson, B. J.; Evans, L. G.; Gold, R. E.; Head, J. W.; Krimigis, S. M.; Murchie, S. L.; Nittler, L.; Phillips, R. J.; Slavin, J. A.; Zuber, M. T.

    2009-12-01

    MESSENGER is the first spacecraft to visit the planet Mercury in more than 30 years. Images from MESSENGER’s first Mercury flyby, in January 2008, provided evidence for widespread volcanism, and candidate sites for volcanic centers were identified. Newly imaged lobate scarps and other tectonic landforms confirmed that Mercury contracted globally in response to interior cooling. The ~1500-km-diameter Caloris basin, viewed in its entirety for the first time by MESSENGER, was the focus for concentrations of volcanic centers, some with evidence of pyroclastic deposits, and widespread contractional and extensional deformation. Smooth plains interior and exterior to the basin are demonstrably younger than the basin-forming event. Reflectance spectra of Mercury’s surface showed no evidence for FeO in surface silicates. Reflectance and color imaging observations provided fresh support for earlier inferences that Mercury’s surface material consists dominantly of iron-poor, calcium-magnesium silicates with an admixture of spectrally neutral opaque minerals. MESSENGER’s second flyby, in October 2008, revealed the presence of neutral Mg and Ca in Mercury’s anti-sunward tail and documented strongly differing distributions of Mg, Ca, and Na in the nightside exosphere, the result of different combinations of time-variable source, transfer, and loss processes. A southward interplanetary magnetic field (IMF) was accompanied by multiple indications of magnetic reconnection at rates ~10 times typical at Earth; in combination with the more quiescent conditions under northward IMF seen during the first flyby, the results indicate that Mercury’s magnetosphere is more responsive to IMF direction than those of other planets. The internal magnetic field is dominantly dipolar with a vector moment closely aligned with the spin axis. The nearly global observations of Mercury surface units distinguishable by color and composition enforce the importance of the largely volcanic

  11. Pancreatic Beta Cell G-Protein Coupled Receptors and Second Messenger Interactions: A Systems Biology Computational Analysis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leonid E Fridlyand

    Full Text Available Insulin secretory in pancreatic beta-cells responses to nutrient stimuli and hormonal modulators include multiple messengers and signaling pathways with complex interdependencies. Here we present a computational model that incorporates recent data on glucose metabolism, plasma membrane potential, G-protein-coupled-receptors (GPCR, cytoplasmic and endoplasmic reticulum calcium dynamics, cAMP and phospholipase C pathways that regulate interactions between second messengers in pancreatic beta-cells. The values of key model parameters were inferred from published experimental data. The model gives a reasonable fit to important aspects of experimentally measured metabolic and second messenger concentrations and provides a framework for analyzing the role of metabolic, hormones and neurotransmitters changes on insulin secretion. Our analysis of the dynamic data provides support for the hypothesis that activation of Ca2+-dependent adenylyl cyclases play a critical role in modulating the effects of glucagon-like peptide 1 (GLP-1, glucose-dependent insulinotropic polypeptide (GIP and catecholamines. The regulatory properties of adenylyl cyclase isoforms determine fluctuations in cytoplasmic cAMP concentration and reveal a synergistic action of glucose, GLP-1 and GIP on insulin secretion. On the other hand, the regulatory properties of phospholipase C isoforms determine the interaction of glucose, acetylcholine and free fatty acids (FFA (that act through the FFA receptors on insulin secretion. We found that a combination of GPCR agonists activating different messenger pathways can stimulate insulin secretion more effectively than a combination of GPCR agonists for a single pathway. This analysis also suggests that the activators of GLP-1, GIP and FFA receptors may have a relatively low risk of hypoglycemia in fasting conditions whereas an activator of muscarinic receptors can increase this risk. This computational analysis demonstrates that study of

  12. Comparison of response to 2-years' growth hormone treatment in children with isolated growth hormone deficiency, born small for gestational age, idiopathic short stature, or multiple pituitary hormone deficiency

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lee, Peter A; Sävendahl, Lars; Oliver, Isabelle

    2012-01-01

    Few studies have compared the response to growth hormone (GH) treatment between indications such as isolated growth hormone deficiency (IGHD), born small for gestational age (SGA), idiopathic short stature (ISS), and multiple pituitary hormone deficiency (MPHD). The aim of this analysis of data......, collected from two large ongoing observational outcome studies, was to evaluate growth and insulin-like growth factor-I (IGF-I) response data for children of short stature with IGHD, MPHD, SGA, or ISS following two years of treatment with the recombinant GH product Norditropin® (Novo Nordisk A/S, Bagsværd...

  13. The Impact of Growth Hormone Therapy on the Apoptosis Assessment in CD34+ Hematopoietic Cells from Children with Growth Hormone Deficiency

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Miłosz Piotr Kawa

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Growth hormone (GH modulates hematopoietic cell homeostasis and is associated with apoptosis control, but with limited mechanistic insights. Aim of the study was to determine whether GH therapeutic supplementation (GH-TS could affect apoptosis of CD34+ cells enriched in hematopoietic progenitor cells of GH deficient (GHD children. CD34+ cells from peripheral blood of 40 GHD children were collected before and in 3rd and 6th month of GH-TS and compared to 60 controls adjusted for bone age, sex, and pubertal development. Next, apoptosis assessment via different molecular techniques was performed. Finally, to comprehensively characterize apoptosis process, global gene expression profile was determined using genome-wide RNA microarray technology. Results showed that GH-TS significantly reduced spontaneous apoptosis in CD34+ cells (p < 0.01 and results obtained using different methods to detect early and late apoptosis in analyzed cells population were consistent. GH-TS was also associated with significant downregulation of several members of TNF-alpha superfamily and other genes associated with apoptosis and stress response. Moreover, the significant overexpression of cyto-protective and cell cycle-associated genes was detected. These findings suggest that recombinant human GH has a direct anti-apoptotic activity in hematopoietic CD34+ cells derived from GHD subjects in course of GH-TS.

  14. The Impact of Growth Hormone Therapy on the Apoptosis Assessment in CD34+ Hematopoietic Cells from Children with Growth Hormone Deficiency

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kawa, Miłosz Piotr; Stecewicz, Iwona; Piecyk, Katarzyna; Paczkowska, Edyta; Rogińska, Dorota; Sobuś, Anna; Łuczkowska, Karolina; Pius-Sadowska, Ewa; Gawrych, Elżbieta; Petriczko, Elżbieta; Walczak, Mieczysław; Machaliński, Bogusław

    2017-01-01

    Growth hormone (GH) modulates hematopoietic cell homeostasis and is associated with apoptosis control, but with limited mechanistic insights. Aim of the study was to determine whether GH therapeutic supplementation (GH-TS) could affect apoptosis of CD34+ cells enriched in hematopoietic progenitor cells of GH deficient (GHD) children. CD34+ cells from peripheral blood of 40 GHD children were collected before and in 3rd and 6th month of GH-TS and compared to 60 controls adjusted for bone age, sex, and pubertal development. Next, apoptosis assessment via different molecular techniques was performed. Finally, to comprehensively characterize apoptosis process, global gene expression profile was determined using genome-wide RNA microarray technology. Results showed that GH-TS significantly reduced spontaneous apoptosis in CD34+ cells (p < 0.01) and results obtained using different methods to detect early and late apoptosis in analyzed cells population were consistent. GH-TS was also associated with significant downregulation of several members of TNF-alpha superfamily and other genes associated with apoptosis and stress response. Moreover, the significant overexpression of cyto-protective and cell cycle-associated genes was detected. These findings suggest that recombinant human GH has a direct anti-apoptotic activity in hematopoietic CD34+ cells derived from GHD subjects in course of GH-TS. PMID:28067847

  15. Fasting modulates GH/IGF-I axis and its regulatory systems in the mammary gland of female mice: Influence of endogenous cortistatin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Villa-Osaba, Alicia; Gahete, Manuel D; Cordoba-Chacon, José; de Lecea, Luis; Castaño, Justo P; Luque, Raúl M

    2016-10-15

    Growth hormone (GH) and insulin-like growth factor-I (IGF-I) are essential factors in mammary-gland (MG) development and are altered during fasting. However, no studies have investigated the alterations in the expression of GH/IGF-I and its regulatory systems (somatostatin/cortistatin and ghrelin) in MG during fasting. Therefore, this study was aimed at characterizing the regulation of GH/IGF-I/somatostatin/cortistatin/ghrelin-systems expression in MG of fasted female-mice (compared to fed-controls) and the influence of endogenous-cortistatin (using cortistatin-knockouts). Fasting decreased IGF-I while increased IGF-I/Insulin-receptors expression in MGs. Fasting provoked an increase in GH expression that might be associated to enhanced ghrelin-variants/ghrelin-O-acyl-transferase enzyme expression, while an upregulation of somatostatin-receptors was observed. However, cortistatin-knockouts mice showed a decrease in GH and somatostatin receptor-subtypes expression. Altogether, we demonstrate that GH/IGF-I, somatostatin/cortistatin and ghrelin systems expression is altered in MG during fasting, suggesting a relevant role in coordinating its response to metabolic stress, wherein endogenous cortistatin might be essential for an appropriate response. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. GhWRKY40, a multiple stress-responsive cotton WRKY gene, plays an important role in the wounding response and enhances susceptibility to ralstonia solanacearum infection in transgenic Nicotiana benthamiana.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiuling Wang

    Full Text Available WRKY transcription factors form one of the largest transcription factor families and function as important components in the complex signaling processes that occur during plant stress responses. However, relative to the research progress in model plants, far less information is available on the function of WRKY proteins in cotton. In the present study, we identified the GhWRKY40 gene in cotton (Gossypium hirsutum and determined that the GhWRKY40 protein is targeted to the nucleus and is a stress-inducible transcription factor. The GhWRKY40 transcript level was increased upon wounding and infection with the bacterial pathogen Ralstonia solanacearum. The overexpression of GhWRKY40 down-regulated most of the defense-related genes, enhanced the wounding tolerance and increased the susceptibility to R. solanacearum. Consistent with a role in multiple stress responses, we found that the GhWRKY40 transcript level was increased by the stress hormones salicylic acid (SA, methyl jasmonate (MeJA and ethylene (ET. Moreover, GhWRKY40 interacted with the MAPK kinase GhMPK20, as shown using yeast two-hybrid and bimolecular fluorescence complementation systems. Collectively, these results suggest that GhWRKY40 is regulated by SA, MeJA and ET signaling and coordinates responses to wounding and R. solanacearum attack. These findings highlight the importance of WRKYs in regulating wounding- and pathogen-induced responses.

  17. The chicken pituitary-specific transcription factor Pit-1 is involved in the hypothalamic regulation of pituitary hormones

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    As, van P.; Janssens, K.; Pals, K.; Groef, De B.; Onagbesan, O.M.; Bruggeman, V.; Darras, V.M.; Denef, C.; Decuypere, E.

    2006-01-01

    Pit-1 is a pituitary-specific POU-domain DNA binding factor, which binds to and trans-activates promoters of growth hormone- (GH), prolactin- (PRL) and thyroid stimulating hormone-beta- (TSHbeta) encoding genes. Thyrotropin-releasing hormone (TRH) is located in the hypothalamus and stimulates TSH,

  18. Growth hormone treatment for short stature in children born small for gestational age.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jung, Heike; Rosilio, Myriam; Blum, Werner F; Drop, Stenvert L S

    2008-10-01

    Children born small for gestational age (SGA) who do not show catch-up in the first 2 years generally remain short for life. Although the majority of children born SGA are not growth hormone (GH) deficient, GH treatment is known to improve average growth in these children.Early studies using GH in children born SGA demonstrated increased height velocity, but these effects tended to be short-term with effects decreasing when GH treatment stopped. With refined GH regimens, significant effects on height have been shown, with gains of approximately 1 standard deviation score after 2 years. Studies have also shown that long-term continuous GH therapy can significantly increase final height to within the normal range. GH treatment of children born SGA does not appear to unduly affect bone age or pubertal development. Growth prediction models have been used to identify various factors involved in the response to GH therapy with age at start, treatment duration, and GH dose showing strong effects. Genetic factors such as the exon 3 deletion of the GH receptor may contribute to short stature of children born SGA and may also be involved in the responsiveness to GH treatment, but there remain other unknown genetic and/or environmental factors. No unexpected safety concerns have arisen in GH therapy trials. In particular, no long-term adverse effects have been seen for glucose metabolism, and positive effects have been shown for lipid profiles and blood pressure.GH treatment in short children born SGA has shown a beneficial, growth-promoting effect in both the short-and long-term, and has become a recognized indication in both the US and Europe. Further studies on individualized treatment regimens and long-term safety are ongoing.

  19. Growth hormone secretion decreases with age in paediatric Prader-Willi syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cohen, M; Harrington, J; Narang, I; Hamilton, J

    2015-08-01

    Growth hormone deficiency is a common feature of Prader-Willi syndrome; however, biochemical deficiency is not uniformly demonstrated. Criteria for GH treatment in paediatric PWS vary with some countries requiring documentation of biochemical GH deficiency. Data regarding the significance of age in the interpretation of GH stimulation test results, particularly in infants, are lacking. We aimed to assess age-related trends in the prevalence of biochemical GH deficiency in infants and children with PWS. A retrospective chart review was conducted. Data from children with Prader-Willi syndrome that had GH stimulation tests performed at the Hospital for Sick Children in Toronto between the years 2000 and 2012 were collected. Charts of 47 children 0·4-15·5 years of age with PWS that had GH stimulation tests were reviewed. Biochemical GH status in relation to age and body mass index. Thirty-two of 47 patients (68%) were biochemically GH deficient. GH deficiency was significantly associated with older age (r = 0·45, P = 0·02) and higher body-mass-index z-score (r = 0·45, P = 0·02). Biochemical GH deficiency was less prevalent up to 18 months of age (3/11 27%) compared with older children (29/36 [81%]; P = 0·001). A higher prevalence of GH deficiency was also detected in obese patients (14/16 [88%]) compared with nonobese patients (18/31 [58%]; P = 0·04). The utility of performing GH stimulation tests as an indication of GH status under 18 months of age in Prader-Willi syndrome is questionable. If performed, results should be carefully interpreted in the context of age. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  20. [Irisin: a messenger from the gods?].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moreno, María; Moreno-Navarrete, José María; Fernández-Real, José Manuel

    2014-01-01

    Due to the need to understand the basis of the metabolic benefits of exercise, irisin was discovered a few years ago. This cytokine, secreted by skeletal muscle due to exercise, should have positive effects on energetic metabolism. In particular, it could act as a messenger on white adipose tissue, modifying its phenotype into the beige adipocyte, and increasing its thermogenic capacity. Since it was described, there have been numerous studies led to depict its function, with the aim of determining if irisin could become a therapeutic target in the context of diseases associated with a caloric excess, such as obesity and diabetes. In this review, the irisin discovery is summarized, along with its in vitro and in vivo effects described up until now. Copyright © 2013 Sociedad Española de Arteriosclerosis. Published by Elsevier España. All rights reserved.

  1. Increased serum and bone matrix levels of transforming growth factor {beta}1 in patients with GH deficiency in response to GH treatment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ueland, Thor; Lekva, Tove; Otterdal, Kari

    2011-01-01

    Patients with adult onset GH deficiency (aoGHD) have secondary osteoporosis, which is reversed by long-term GH substitution. Transforming growth factor β1 (TGFβ1 or TGFB1) is abundant in bone tissue and could mediate some effects of GH/IGFs on bone. We investigated its regulation by GH/IGF1 in vivo...

  2. Effects of growth hormone therapeutic supplementation on hematopoietic stem/progenitor cells in children with growth hormone deficiency: focus on proliferation and differentiation capabilities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kawa, M P; Stecewicz, I; Piecyk, K; Pius-Sadowska, E; Paczkowska, E; Rogińska, D; Sobuś, A; Łuczkowska, K; Gawrych, E; Petriczko, E; Walczak, M; Machaliński, B

    2015-09-01

    We investigated the direct effects of growth hormone (GH) replacement therapy (GH-RT) on hematopoiesis in children with GH deficiency (GHD) with the special emphasis on proliferation and cell cycle regulation. Peripheral blood (PB) was collected from sixty control individuals and forty GHD children before GH-RT and in 3rd and 6th month of GH-RT to measure hematological parameters and isolate CD34(+)-enriched hematopoietic progenitor cells (HPCs). Selected parameters of PB were analyzed by hematological analyzer. Moreover, collected HPCs were used to analyze GH receptor (GHR) and IGF1 expression, clonogenicity, and cell cycle activity. Finally, global gene expression profile of collected HPCs was analyzed using genome-wide RNA microarrays. GHD resulted in a decrease in several hematological parameters related to RBCs and significantly diminished clonogenicity of erythroid progenies. In contrast, GH-RT stimulated increases in clonogenic growth of erythroid lineage and RBC counts as well as significant up-regulation of cell cycle-propagating genes, including MAP2K1, cyclins D1/E1, PCNA, and IGF1. Likewise, GH-RT significantly modified GHR expression in isolated HPCs and augmented systemic IGF1 levels. Global gene expression analysis revealed significantly higher expression of genes associated with cell cycle, proliferation, and differentiation in HPCs from GH-treated subjects. (i) GH-RT significantly augments cell cycle progression in HPCs and increases clonogenicity of erythroid progenitors; (ii) GHR expression in HPCs is modulated by GH status; (iii) molecular mechanisms by which GH influences hematopoiesis might provide a basis for designing therapeutic interventions for hematological complications related to GHD.

  3. Ghrelin stimulation of growth hormone-releasing hormone neurons is direct in the arcuate nucleus.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guillaume Osterstock

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available Ghrelin targets the arcuate nucleus, from where growth hormone releasing hormone (GHRH neurones trigger GH secretion. This hypothalamic nucleus also contains neuropeptide Y (NPY neurons which play a master role in the effect of ghrelin on feeding. Interestingly, connections between NPY and GHRH neurons have been reported, leading to the hypothesis that the GH axis and the feeding circuits might be co-regulated by ghrelin.Here, we show that ghrelin stimulates the firing rate of identified GHRH neurons, in transgenic GHRH-GFP mice. This stimulation is prevented by growth hormone secretagogue receptor-1 antagonism as well as by U-73122, a phospholipase C inhibitor and by calcium channels blockers. The effect of ghrelin does not require synaptic transmission, as it is not antagonized by gamma-aminobutyric acid, glutamate and NPY receptor antagonists. In addition, this hypothalamic effect of ghrelin is independent of somatostatin, the inhibitor of the GH axis, since it is also found in somatostatin knockout mice. Indeed, ghrelin does not modify synaptic currents of GHRH neurons. However, ghrelin exerts a strong and direct depolarizing effect on GHRH neurons, which supports their increased firing rate.Thus, GHRH neurons are a specific target for ghrelin within the brain, and not activated secondary to altered activity in feeding circuits. These results support the view that ghrelin related therapeutic approaches could be directed separately towards GH deficiency or feeding disorders.

  4. Pathophysiological implications of the chemical messengers; Implicaciones fisiopatologicas de los mensajeros quimicos

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Blazquez Fernandez, E.

    2009-07-01

    To maintain a physical organization and a different composition of its surroundings environment, living beings use a great part of the energy that they produce. Vital processes require an elevated number of reactions which are regulated and integrated by chemical messengers. They use autocrine, paracrine, endocrine and synaptic signals through receptors of cell surface, nuclear or associated with ionic channels, enzymes, trim eric G proteins and to intracellular kinases. Through these mechanisms pheromones play an important role in the relationships between different individuals, and hormones are able to regulate the integrative functions of our organism. In the nervous system, neurotransmitters, neuromodulators, sensors and receptors between other messengers, play functions of great relevance, while growth factors stimulate cell proliferation and cytokines have many effects but the most important is the ones related with the control of the immflamatory process. Alterations of these messengers permit us a better understanding of the diseases and possibly of its treatments in a near future. Modifications of the expression of genes from the nuclear and mitochondrial genomes are responsible of monogenic, polygenic and mitochondrial diseases, while alterations in the activities of dopamine and serotonin neurotransmitters are related with schizophrenia, Parkinson disease and depression, respectively. Other example is the hyperthyroidism of the Graves-Bassedow disease due to the competitive interference of the LATS immunoglobulin with TSH at the level of the follicular cells producing thyroid hormones Twenty five years ago in the reviews on the mechanisms of insulin action, there was presentations in which the insulin receptor was located in the plasma membrane of the target cells while in the cytoplasm only a big interrogative was observed, that at present is replaced by chemical mediators cascades responsible of the multiple effects of insulin. This finding is similar

  5. Growth hormone treatment in Turner's syndrome: A real world experience

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vijay Sheker Reddy Danda

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: Short stature is a universal clinical feature of Turner's syndrome (TS. Growth failure begins in fetal life, and adults with TS are on an average 20 cm shorter than the normal female population. Since there is a paucity of data from India regarding the effect of growth hormone (GH on TS patients, we retrospectively analyzed the data of TS patients who are on GH treatment. Methods: This hospital-based observational retrospective study was conducted in a tertiary care hospital of Hyderabad. The data such as height, weight, and bone age of 16 patients who are diagnosed with TS on GH therapy for at least 6 months were included in the study. All the patients were treated with human recombinant GH at the dose of 0.3 mg/kg/week administered as daily subcutaneous injections. Results: The mean age at diagnosis was 12.7 years. The mean height at the start of GH therapy was 1.26 m, and mean height standard deviation score (HSDS was-0.61 when compared to Turner's specific reference data. With a mean duration of GH therapy of 25 months, the mean height at the end of therapy was 1.37 m and the mean height as per HSDS was + 0.37 resulting in a mean height gain of + 0.99 HSDS. Conclusion: Our observation shows that girls with TS benefit from early diagnosis and initiation of treatment with GH.

  6. Growth Hormone Treatment in Turner's Syndrome: A Real World Experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reddy Danda, Vijay Sheker; Sreedevi, P; Arun, G; Rao, P Srinivas

    2017-01-01

    Short stature is a universal clinical feature of Turner's syndrome (TS). Growth failure begins in fetal life, and adults with TS are on an average 20 cm shorter than the normal female population. Since there is a paucity of data from India regarding the effect of growth hormone (GH) on TS patients, we retrospectively analyzed the data of TS patients who are on GH treatment. This hospital-based observational retrospective study was conducted in a tertiary care hospital of Hyderabad. The data such as height, weight, and bone age of 16 patients who are diagnosed with TS on GH therapy for at least 6 months were included in the study. All the patients were treated with human recombinant GH at the dose of 0.3 mg/kg/week administered as daily subcutaneous injections. The mean age at diagnosis was 12.7 years. The mean height at the start of GH therapy was 1.26 m, and mean height standard deviation score (HSDS) was-0.61 when compared to Turner's specific reference data. With a mean duration of GH therapy of 25 months, the mean height at the end of therapy was 1.37 m and the mean height as per HSDS was + 0.37 resulting in a mean height gain of + 0.99 HSDS. Our observation shows that girls with TS benefit from early diagnosis and initiation of treatment with GH.

  7. Urinary GH and IGF-I excretion in nine year-old children: relation to sex, current size and size at birth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fall, C H; Clark, P M; Hindmarsh, P C; Clayton, P E; Shiell, A W; Law, C M

    2000-07-01

    To study the relationship of 24-hour urinary growth hormone (GH) and IGF-I excretion in childhood to sex and body size. To test the hypothesis that small size at birth followed by postnatal catch-up growth is associated with elevated IGF-I production. Follow-up study of a cohort of 183 healthy children born in Salisbury, UK. Weight and height, 24-h urinary growth hormone (uGH) and IGF-I (uIGF-I) excretion, and systolic and diastolic blood pressures. At 9 years of age, 24-h uIGF-I excretion, but not uGH excretion, was strongly related to current weight (P < 0.001) and height (P < 0. 001). Urinary GH and IGF-I excretion were positively correlated (r = 0.15, P = 0.05). Boys excreted more uIGF-I per unit uGH than girls (uIGF-I/uGH molar ratio 32.1 compared to 21.0; P for difference = 0. 002). There were no significant relationships of uGH, uIGF-I or uIGF-I/uGH molar ratio with birthweight, birthlength or head circumference at birth, nor with blood pressure at 9 years. 'Catch-up' growth, indicated by an increase in height SD scores between birth and 9 years, was associated with higher IGF-I excretion (P = 0.01) and occurred in children with taller parents (P < 0.001). Boys appear to be more sensitive to GH than girls, generating more uIGF-I in relation to uGH. Urinary IGF-I excretion at 9 years is related to both absolute height and to the degree of catch-up in height from birth. Our results suggest that IGF-I production is strongly influenced by genetic factors, but also by either the degree to which intrauterine growth falls short of genetic growth potential, or the process of postnatal catch-up growth that follows.

  8. MECHANISMS IN ENDOCRINOLOGY: The multiple facets of GHRH/GH/IGF-I axis: lessons from lifetime, untreated, isolated GH deficiency due to a GHRH receptor gene mutation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aguiar-Oliveira, Manuel H; Souza, Anita H O; Oliveira, Carla R P; Campos, Viviane C; Oliveira-Neto, Luíz A; Salvatori, Roberto

    2017-08-01

    Twenty years ago, we described kindred of 105 individuals with isolated GH deficiency (IGHD) in Itabaianinha County, in northeast Brazil, carrying a homozygous mutation in the GH-releasing hormone receptor gene. These subjects exhibit markedly reduced GH responsiveness to stimulatory tests, and anterior pituitary hypoplasia. Serum concentrations of IGF-I, IGF binding protein type 3 and the acid-labile subunit are markedly reduced, with a lesser reduction of IGF-II. The most striking physical findings of these IGHD individuals are the proportionate short stature, doll facies, high-pitched voice and visceral obesity with reduced fat-free mass. There is neither microphallus, nor neonatal hypoglycemia. Puberty is delayed, menopause anticipated, but fertility is preserved in both genders. The reduction in bone sizes is not even, with mean standard deviation scores for height of -7.2, total maxillary length of -6.5, total facial height of -4.3 and cephalic perimeter of -2.7. In addition, the non-osseous growth is not uniform, preserving some organs, like pancreas, liver, kidney, brain and eyes, and compromising others such as thyroid, heart, uterus and spleen. These subjects present higher prevalence of dizziness, mild high-tones sensorineural hearing loss, reduction of vascular retinal branching points, increase of optic disk, genu valgum and increased systolic blood pressure. Biochemically, they have high low density lipoprotein cholesterol and C-reactive protein levels, but maintain increased insulin sensitivity, and do not show premature atherosclerosis. Finally, they have normal immune function, and normal longevity. This review details the findings and summarizes 20 years of clinical research carried out in this unique population. © 2017 European Society of Endocrinology.

  9. Effect of Deletion of Ghrelin-O-Acyltransferase on the Pulsatile Release of Growth Hormone in Mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, T Y; Ngo, S T; Veldhuis, J D; Jeffery, P L; Chopin, L K; Tschöp, M; Waters, M J; Tolle, V; Epelbaum, J; Chen, C; Steyn, F J

    2015-12-01

    Ghrelin, a gut hormone originating from the post-translational cleavage of preproghrelin, is the endogenous ligand of growth hormone secretagogue receptor 1a (GHS-R1a). Within the growth hormone (GH) axis, the biological activity of ghrelin requires octanoylation by ghrelin-O-acyltransferase (GOAT), conferring selective binding to the GHS-R1a receptor via acylated ghrelin. Complete loss of preproghrelin-derived signalling (through deletion of the Ghrl gene) contributes to a decline in peak GH release; however, the selective contribution of endogenous acyl-ghrelin to pulsatile GH release remains to be established. We assessed the pulsatile release of GH in ad lib. fed male germline goat(-/-) mice, extending measures to include mRNA for key hypothalamic regulators of GH release, and peripheral factors that are modulated relative to GH release. The amount of GH released was reduced in young goat(-/-) mice compared to age-matched wild-type mice, whereas pulse frequency and irregularity increased. Altered GH release did not coincide with alterations in hypothalamic Ghrh, Srif, Npy or Ghsr mRNA expression, or pituitary GH content, suggesting that loss of Goat does not compromise canonical mechanisms that contribute to pituitary GH production and release. Although loss of Goat resulted in an irregular pattern of GH release (characterised by an increase in the number of GH pulses observed during extended secretory events), this did not contribute to a change in the expression of sexually dimorphic GH-dependent liver genes. Of interest, circulating levels of insulin-like growth factor (IGF)-1 were elevated in goat(-/-) mice. This rise in circulating levels of IGF-1 was correlated with an increase in GH pulse frequency, suggesting that sustained or increased IGF-1 release in goat(-/-) mice may occur in response to altered GH release patterning. Our observations demonstrate that germline loss of Goat alters GH release and patterning. Although the biological relevance of

  10. Longitudinal study of serum placental GH in 455 normal pregnancies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chellakooty, Marla; Skibsted, Lillian; Skouby, Sven Olaf

    2002-01-01

    Placental GH is thought to be responsible for the rise in maternal IGF-I during pregnancy and is considered to be important for fetal growth. In this prospective longitudinal study of healthy pregnant women, we investigated determinants of placental GH in maternal serum. Serum was obtained from 455...... women with normal singleton pregnancies at approximately 19 and 28 wk gestation. Serum placental GH concentrations were measured by a highly specific immunoradiometric assay, and fetal size was measured by ultrasound. Data on birth weight, gender, prepregnancy body mass index (BMI), parity, and smoking.......002). Placental GH at second examination was positively correlated with gestational age (P = 0.002) and negatively correlated with prepregnancy BMI (P = 0.039). Placental GH correlated with fetal weight at approximately 28 wk gestation (P = 0.002) but did not predict birth weight at term. Our study supports...

  11. The GH/IGF-1 axis in a critical period early in life determines cellular DNA repair capacity by altering transcriptional regulation of DNA repair-related genes: implications for the developmental origins of cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Podlutsky, Andrej; Valcarcel-Ares, Marta Noa; Yancey, Krysta; Podlutskaya, Viktorija; Nagykaldi, Eszter; Gautam, Tripti; Miller, Richard A; Sonntag, William E; Csiszar, Anna; Ungvari, Zoltan

    2017-04-01

    Experimental, clinical, and epidemiological findings support the concept of developmental origins of health and disease (DOHAD), suggesting that early-life hormonal influences during a sensitive period around adolescence have a powerful impact on cancer morbidity later in life. The endocrine changes that occur during puberty are highly conserved across mammalian species and include dramatic increases in circulating GH and IGF-1 levels. Importantly, patients with developmental IGF-1 deficiency due to GH insensitivity (Laron syndrome) do not develop cancer during aging. Rodents with developmental GH/IGF-1 deficiency also exhibit significantly decreased cancer incidence at old age, marked resistance to chemically induced carcinogenesis, and cellular resistance to genotoxic stressors. Early-life treatment of GH/IGF-1-deficient mice and rats with GH reverses the cancer resistance phenotype; however, the underlying molecular mechanisms remain elusive. The present study was designed to test the hypothesis that developmental GH/IGF-1 status impacts cellular DNA repair mechanisms. To achieve that goal, we assessed repair of γ-irradiation-induced DNA damage (single-cell gel electrophoresis/comet assay) and basal and post-irradiation expression of DNA repair-related genes (qPCR) in primary fibroblasts derived from control rats, Lewis dwarf rats (a model of developmental GH/IGF-1 deficiency), and GH-replete dwarf rats (GH administered beginning at 5 weeks of age, for 30 days). We found that developmental GH/IGF-1 deficiency resulted in persisting increases in cellular DNA repair capacity and upregulation of several DNA repair-related genes (e.g., Gadd45a, Bbc3). Peripubertal GH treatment reversed the radiation resistance phenotype. Fibroblasts of GH/IGF-1-deficient Snell dwarf mice also exhibited improved DNA repair capacity, showing that the persisting influence of peripubertal GH/IGF-1 status is not species-dependent. Collectively, GH/IGF-1 levels during a critical period

  12. Can growth hormone counteract the catabolic effects of steroids?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mauras, Nelly

    2009-11-01

    Chronic administration of glucocorticosteroids (GCs) can have significant catabolic effects in vivo in a host of metabolic systems, including amino acid metabolism, skeletal muscle, bone and linear growth. GCs inhibit protein synthesis and increase protein breakdown at the skeletal muscle and whole-body level and impair growth hormone (GH) secretion and action. Conversely, GH and insulin-like growth factor I (IGF-I) are potent protein-anabolic and growth-promoting agents in vitro and in vivo. This review summarizes both the catabolic effects of GCs and the anabolic and metabolic effects of GH and IGF-I. Both GH and IGF-I may decrease the catabolic effects of chronic steroid use in humans, particularly by enhancing lean body mass accrual and, in children, by increasing linear growth. Copyright 2009 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  13. Genomic growth hormone, growth hormone receptor and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    African Journal of Biotechnology ... The PCR products from GH, GHR and TGF-b3 loci were digested with SacI, HindIII and BslI restriction endonuclease, respectively. In GH and ... bp fragment not only reduced the expected size of the PCR product, but also, introduced a new restriction site for SacI enzyme at GH marker site.

  14. Allergic and non-allergic skin reactions associated with growth hormone therapy: elucidation of causative agents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mehta, Shilpa; Oza, Vikash; Potashner, Renee; Zamora, Patricia; Raisingani, Manish; Shah, Bina

    2018-01-26

    Allergic and non-allergic skin reactions to recombinant human growth hormone (rhGH) are uncommon and infrequently reported. However, physicians should be aware of these potential side effects to determine whether the reactions constitute true allergies and how to proceed with growth hormone therapy. To review allergic and non-allergic skin reactions caused by rhGH and subsequent diagnostic workup and management options. We report the case of a 12-year-old healthy male presenting with idiopathic short stature. He developed an itchy skin rash over the chest and abdomen, 15 min after administration of the first dose of rhGH, leading us to review allergic and non-allergic skin reactions to rhGH. In our patient, an immediate skin reaction after administration of rhGH prompted a concern about a type I hypersensitivity reaction (HS) and the discontinuation of rhGH. However, after a dermatologic evaluation and observed administration of rhGH without subsequent rash, the initial eruption was likely an exacerbation of his underlying atopic dermatitis and a type I HS was felt to be unlikely. The rhGH was resumed and he has been on rhGH for the past 1 year with no recurrence of rash and with improvement in growth velocity. Though rare, allergic and non-allergic skin reactions are known to occur with rhGH. It is important to know if the allergic reaction was due to the growth hormone molecule or one of the preservatives. It is also important to consider a non-allergic reaction due to flare up of underlying skin disorders as in our patient.

  15. Recombinant human growth hormone improves cognitive capacity in a pain patient exposed to chronic opioids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rhodin, A; von Ehren, M; Skottheim, B; Grönbladh, A; Ortiz-Nieto, F; Raininko, R; Gordh, T; Nyberg, F

    2014-07-01

    During recent decades, the increasing use of opioids for chronic non-cancer pain has raised concerns regarding tolerance, addiction, and importantly cognitive dysfunction. Current research suggests that the somatotrophic axis could play an important role in cognitive function. Administration of growth hormone (GH) to GH-deficient humans and experimental animals has been shown to result in significant improvements in cognitive capacity. In this report, a patient with cognitive disabilities resulting from chronic treatment with opioids for neuropathic pain received recombinant human growth hormone (rhGH) replacement therapy. A 61-year-old man presented with severe cognitive dysfunction after long-term methadone treatment for intercostal neuralgia and was diagnosed with GH insufficiency by GH releasing hormone-arginine testing. The effect of rhGH replacement therapy on his cognitive capacity and quality of life was investigated. The hippocampal volume was measured using magnetic resonance imaging, and the ratios of the major metabolites were calculated using proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy. Cognitive testing revealed significant improvements in visuospatial cognitive function after rhGH. The hippocampal volume remained unchanged. In the right hippocampus, the N-acetylaspartate/creatine ratio (reflecting nerve cell function) was initially low but increased significantly during rhGH treatment, as did subjective cognitive, physical and emotional functioning. This case report indicates that rhGH replacement therapy could improve cognitive behaviour and well-being, as well as hippocampal metabolism and functioning in opioid-treated patients with chronic pain. The idea that GH could affect brain function and repair disabilities induced by long-term exposure to opioid analgesia is supported. © 2014 The Authors. The Acta Anaesthesiologica Scandinavica Foundation. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  16. Pseudotumor Cerebri in a Child with Idiopathic Growth Hormone Insufficiency Two Months after Initiation of Recombinant Human Growth Hormone Treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eleni Loukianou

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose. To report a rare case of pseudotumor cerebri (PTC in a child two months after receiving treatment with recombinant human growth hormone (rhGH and to emphasize the need of close collaboration between ophthalmologists and pediatric endocrinologists in monitoring children receiving rhGH. Methods. A 12-year-old boy with congenital hypothyroidism started treatment with rhGH on a dose of 1,5 mg/daily IM (4.5 IU daily. Eight weeks later, he was complaining of severe headache without any other accompanying symptoms. The child was further investigated with computed tomography scan and lumbar puncture. Results. Computed tomography scan showed normal ventricular size and lumbar puncture revealed an elevated opening pressure of 360 mm H2O. RhGH was discontinued and acetazolamide 250 mg per os twice daily was initiated. Eight weeks later, the papilledema was resolved. Conclusions. There appears to be a causal relationship between the initiation of treatment with rhGH and the development of PTC. All children receiving rhGH should have a complete ophthalmological examination if they report headache or visual disturbances shortly after the treatment. Discontinuation of rhGH and initiation of treatment with acetazolamide may be needed and regular follow-up examinations by an ophthalmologist should be recommended.

  17. The Influence of Estrogens on the Biological and Therapeutic Actions of Growth Hormone in the Liver

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leandro Fernández-Pérez

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available GH is main regulator of body growth and composition, somatic development, intermediate metabolism and gender-dependent dimorphism in mammals. The liver is a direct target of estrogens because it expresses estrogen receptors which are connected with development, lipid metabolism and insulin sensitivity, hepatic carcinogenesis, protection from drug-induced toxicity and fertility. In addition, estrogens can modulate GH actions in liver by acting centrally, regulating pituitary GH secretion, and, peripherally, by modulating GHR-JAK2-STAT5 signalling pathway. Therefore, the interactions of estrogens with GH actions in liver are biologically and clinically relevant because disruption of GH signaling may cause alterations of its endocrine, metabolic, and gender differentiated functions and it could be linked to dramatic impact in liver physiology during development as well as in adulthood. Finally, the interplay of estrogens with GH is relevant because physiological roles these hormones have in human, and the widespread exposition of estrogen or estrogen-related compounds in human. This review highlights the importance of these hormones in liver physiology as well as how estrogens modulate GH actions in liver which will help to improve the clinical use of these hormones.

  18. Growth hormone, inflammation and aging

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michal M. Masternak

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Mutant animals characterized by extended longevity provide valuable tools to study the mechanisms of aging. Growth hormone and insulin-like growth factor-1 (IGF-1 constitute one of the well-established pathways involved in the regulation of aging and lifespan. Ames and Snell dwarf mice characterized by GH deficiency as well as growth hormone receptor/growth hormone binding protein knockout (GHRKO mice characterized by GH resistance live significantly longer than genetically normal animals. During normal aging of rodents and humans there is increased insulin resistance, disruption of metabolic activities and decline of the function of the immune system. All of these age related processes promote inflammatory activity, causing long term tissue damage and systemic chronic inflammation. However, studies of long living mutants and calorie restricted animals show decreased pro-inflammatory activity with increased levels of anti-inflammatory adipokines such as adiponectin. At the same time, these animals have improved insulin signaling and carbohydrate homeostasis that relate to alterations in the secretory profile of adipose tissue including increased production and release of anti-inflammatory adipokines. This suggests that reduced inflammation promoting healthy metabolism may represent one of the major mechanisms of extended longevity in long-lived mutant mice and likely also in the human.

  19. The aging suppressor klotho: a potential regulator of growth hormone secretion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shahmoon, Shiri; Rubinfeld, Hadara; Wolf, Ido; Cohen, Zvi R; Hadani, Moshe; Shimon, Ilan; Rubinek, Tami

    2014-08-01

    Klotho is a transmembranal protein highly expressed in the kidneys, choroid plexus, and anterior pituitary. Klotho can also be cleaved and shed and acts as a circulating hormone. Klotho-deficient mice (kl/kl mice) develop a phenotype resembling early aging. Several lines of evidence suggest a role for klotho in the regulation of growth hormone (GH) secretion. The kl/kl mice are smaller compared with their wild-type counterparts, and their somatotropes show reduced numbers of secretory granules. Moreover, klotho is a potent inhibitor of the IGF-I pathway, a negative regulator of GH secretion. Therefore, we hypothesized that klotho may enhance GH secretion. The effect of klotho on GH secretion was examined in GH3 rat somatotrophs, cultured rat pituitaries, and cultured human GH-secreting adenomas. In all three models, klotho treatment increased GH secretion. Prolonged treatment of mice with intraperitoneal klotho injections increased mRNA levels of IGF-I and IGF-I-binding protein-3 mRNA in the liver, reflecting increased serum GH levels. In accord with its ability to inhibit the IGF-I pathway, klotho partially restored the inhibitory effect of IGF-I on GH secretion. Klotho is known to be a positive regulator of basic bFGF signaling. We studied rat pituitaries and human adenoma cultures and noted that bFGF increased GH secretion and stimulated ERK1/2 phosphorylation. Both effects were augmented following treatment with klotho. Taken together, our data indicate for the first time that klotho is a positive regulator of GH secretion and suggest the IGF-I and bFGF pathways as potential mediators of this effect. Copyright © 2014 the American Physiological Society.

  20. Clinical features of GH deficiency and effects of 3 years of GH replacement in adults with controlled Cushing's disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Höybye, Charlotte; Ragnarsson, Oskar; Jönsson, Peter J

    2010-01-01

    Patients in remission from Cushing's disease (CD) have many clinical features that are difficult to distinguish from those of concomitant GH deficiency (GHD). In this study, we evaluated the features of GHD in a large cohort of controlled CD patients, and assessed the effect of GH treatment....

  1. Digestive enzymes activities in Oreochromis niloticus fed diet supplemented with recombinant growth hormone

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Apriana Vinasyiam

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT The specific activity of the digestive enzymes, namely: pepsin, amylase, lipase, trypsin, and chymotrypsin were studied in Nile tilapia Oreochromis niloticus fed diet supplemented with recombinant Ephinephelus lanceolatus growth hormone (rElGH. The results showed that fish treated with rE1GH showed lower lipase and chymotrypsin specific activities (P>0.05, while the trypsin/chymotrypsin specific activity (T/C ratio was found higher compared to control fish. Moreover, higher protein digestibility, higher protein retention and a lower ammonia excretion rate were measured for rE1GH treated fish. Oral rElGH administration enhanced Nile tilapia growth up to 20.04%, without affecting survival. This study suggested that rapid growth performance induced by rElGH was linked with T/C ratio rather than the specific activity of other digestive enzymes. Keywords: recombinant growth hormone, digestive enzyme, digestibility, Oreochromis niloticus  ABSTRAK Aktivitas spesifik enzim pencernaan pepsin, amilase, lipase, tripsin, dan kemotripsin diamati pada ikan nila Oreochromis niloticus yang diberi pakan mengandung hormon pertumbuhan rekombinan ikan kerapu kertang Ephinephelus lanceolatus (rElGH. Hasil menunjukkan bahwa ikan uji pada perlakuan rElGH memiliki aktivitas spesifik enzim lipase dan kemotripsin yang lebih rendah, sedangkan rasio tripsin/kemotripsin (rasio T/C yang lebih tinggi dibandingan ikan kontrol. Kecernaan protein dan retensi protein bernilai lebih tinggi sementara laju ekskresi amonia bernilai lebih rendah pada ikan perlakuan. Pemberian rElGH secara oral mampu mempercepat laju pertumbuhan ikan nila hingga 20,04% tanpa memengaruhi kelangsungan hidup. Berdasarkan penelitian ini, dapat disimpulkan bahwa laju pertumbuhan cepat yang diinduksi oleh rElGH berhubungan dengan rasio T/C dibandingkan dengan aktivitas spesifik enzim pencernaan lain. Kata kunci: hormon pertumbuhan rekombinan, enzim pencernaan, kecernaan, Oreochromis niloticus 

  2. Dexamethasone and BCAA Failed to Modulate Muscle Mass and mTOR Signaling in GH-Deficient Rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nishida, Hikaru; Ikegami, Ayaka; Kaneko, Chiaki; Kakuma, Hitomi; Nishi, Hisano; Tanaka, Noriko; Aoyama, Michiko; Usami, Makoto; Okimura, Yasuhiko

    2015-01-01

    Branched-chain amino acids (BCAAs) and IGF-I, the secretion of which is stimulated by growth hormone (GH), prevent muscle atrophy. mTOR plays a pivotal role in the protective actions of BCAA and IGF-1. The pathway by which BCAA activates mTOR is different from that of IGF-1, which suggests that BCAA and GH work independently. We tried to examine whether BCAA exerts a protective effect against dexamethasone (Dex)-induced muscle atrophy independently of GH using GH-deficient spontaneous dwarf rats (SDRs). Unexpectedly, Dex did not induce muscle atrophy assessed by the measurement of cross-sectional area (CSA) of the muscle fibers and did not increase atrogin-1, MuRF1 and REDD1 expressions, which are activated during protein degradation. Glucocorticoid (GR) mRNA levels were higher in SDRs compared to GH-treated SDRs, indicating that the low expression of GR is not the reason of the defect of Dex's action in SDRs. BCAA did not stimulate the phosphorylation of p70S6K or 4E-BP1, which stimulate protein synthesis. BCAA did not decrease the mRNA level of atrogin-1 or MuRF1. These findings suggested that Dex failed to modulate muscle mass and that BCAA was unable to activate mTOR in SDRs because these phosphorylations of p70S6K and 4E-BP1 and the reductions of these mRNAs are regulated by mTOR. In contrast, after GH supplementation, these responses to Dex were normalized and muscle fiber CSA was decreased by Dex. BCAA prevented the Dex-induced decrease in CSA. BCAA increased the phosphorylation of p70S6K and decreased the Dex-induced elevations of atrogin-1 and Bnip3 mRNAs. However, the amount of mTORC1 components including mTOR was not decreased in the SDRs compared to the normal rats. These findings suggest that GH increases mTORC1 activity but not its content to recover the action of BCAA in SDRs and that GH is required for actions of Dex and BCAA in muscles.

  3. Dexamethasone and BCAA Failed to Modulate Muscle Mass and mTOR Signaling in GH-Deficient Rats.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hikaru Nishida

    Full Text Available Branched-chain amino acids (BCAAs and IGF-I, the secretion of which is stimulated by growth hormone (GH, prevent muscle atrophy. mTOR plays a pivotal role in the protective actions of BCAA and IGF-1. The pathway by which BCAA activates mTOR is different from that of IGF-1, which suggests that BCAA and GH work independently. We tried to examine whether BCAA exerts a protective effect against dexamethasone (Dex-induced muscle atrophy independently of GH using GH-deficient spontaneous dwarf rats (SDRs. Unexpectedly, Dex did not induce muscle atrophy assessed by the measurement of cross-sectional area (CSA of the muscle fibers and did not increase atrogin-1, MuRF1 and REDD1 expressions, which are activated during protein degradation. Glucocorticoid (GR mRNA levels were higher in SDRs compared to GH-treated SDRs, indicating that the low expression of GR is not the reason of the defect of Dex's action in SDRs. BCAA did not stimulate the phosphorylation of p70S6K or 4E-BP1, which stimulate protein synthesis. BCAA did not decrease the mRNA level of atrogin-1 or MuRF1. These findings suggested that Dex failed to modulate muscle mass and that BCAA was unable to activate mTOR in SDRs because these phosphorylations of p70S6K and 4E-BP1 and the reductions of these mRNAs are regulated by mTOR. In contrast, after GH supplementation, these responses to Dex were normalized and muscle fiber CSA was decreased by Dex. BCAA prevented the Dex-induced decrease in CSA. BCAA increased the phosphorylation of p70S6K and decreased the Dex-induced elevations of atrogin-1 and Bnip3 mRNAs. However, the amount of mTORC1 components including mTOR was not decreased in the SDRs compared to the normal rats. These findings suggest that GH increases mTORC1 activity but not its content to recover the action of BCAA in SDRs and that GH is required for actions of Dex and BCAA in muscles.

  4. Equivalent potency and pharmacokinetics of recombinant human growth hormones with or without an N-terminal methionine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moore, J A; Rudman, C G; MacLachlan, N J; Fuller, G B; Burnett, B; Frane, J W

    1988-06-01

    Two forms of human GH (hGH) have been produced by recombinant DNA technology. One form has an amino acid sequence identical to that of the natural pituitary hormone (rhGH) and the other form has an additional N-terminal methionine (Met-hGH). The biological potencies of these 2 polypeptides have been compared in hypophysectomized rats in a multidose study measuring body weights and several long bone growth parameters. The pharmacokinetic profiles after iv and sc injection were determined in cynomolgus monkeys in a 4-period cross-over study. All of the measured parameters in all the studies indicated that there was no difference in the two forms of hGH. Measurements taken after 27 daily injections of rhGH or Met-hGH (30-500 micrograms/kg.day) indicated that femur length and width of the proliferative zone in the tibial epiphysis showed dose-related effects for both forms of hGH but no difference between them. The relative potency, based on body weight gain, was calculated using a parallel line bioassay. Weight gain after 8 daily injections in the 5-dose long bone growth study indicated a rhGH potency of 0.80 (95% confidence interval, 0.5-1.23) relative to Met-hGH. It was concluded that the presence of an N-terminal methionine on hGH has no effect on potency in this model. The pharmacokinetic parameters after iv administration were estimated by fitting serum concentration-time data to a 2-compartment model. Parameters after sc injection were computed by compartment-independent methods. Met-hGH and rhGH had very similar pharmacokinetic profiles after both routes of administration. Comparison of the pharmacokinetic parameters indicated that the clearance after iv administration (rhGH, 15 ml/min; Met-hGH, 13 ml/min) and the sc bioavailability (rhGH, 0.72 +/- 0.21; Met-hGH, 0.59 +/- 0.21) were not significantly different for the 2 forms of hGH. It was concluded that rhGH and Met-hGH have equivalent bioavailability and pharmacokinetics in cynomolgus monkeys.

  5. Klotho and the Growth Hormone/Insulin-Like Growth Factor 1 Axis: Novel Insights into Complex Interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rubinek, T; Modan-Moses, D

    2016-01-01

    The growth hormone (GH)/insulin-like growth factor (IGF)-1 axis is pivotal for many metabolic functions, including proper development and growth of bones, skeletal muscles, and adipose tissue. Defects in the axis' activity during childhood result in growth abnormalities, while increased secretion of GH from the pituitary results in acromegaly. In order to keep narrow physiologic concentration, GH and IGF-1 secretion and activity are tightly regulated by hypothalamic, pituitary, endocrine, paracrine, and autocrine factors. Klotho was first discovered as an aging-suppressor gene. Mice that do not express klotho die prematurely with multiple symptoms of aging, several of them are also characteristic of decreased GH/IGF-1 axis activity. Klotho is highly expressed in the brain, the kidney, and parathyroid and pituitary glands, but can also serve as a circulating hormone by its shedding, forming soluble klotho that can be detected in blood, cerebrospinal fluid, and urine. Several lines of evidence suggest an association between klotho levels and activity of the GH/IGF-1 axis: the GH-secreting cells in the anterior pituitary of klotho-deficient mice are hypotrophic; klotho levels are altered in subjects with pathologies of the GH/IGF-1 axis; and accumulating data indicate that klotho is a direct regulator of GH secretion. Thus, klotho seems to be a new player in the intricate regulation of the GH/IGF-1 axis. © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Luteinizing hormone responses to luteinizing hormone releasing hormone, and growth hormone and cortisol responses to insulin induced hypoglycaemia in functional secondary amenorrhoea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hirvonen, E; Seppälä, M; Karonen, S L; Adlercreutz, H

    1977-02-01

    Luteinizing hormone (LH) responses to luteinizing hormone releasing hormone (LHRH), and growth hormone (GH) and cortisol responses to insulin induced hypoglycaemia were studied in 56 women classified into 4 distinct groups of functional secondary amenorrhoea. The groups were: I, self-induced weight reduction (20 patients); II, post pill amenorrhoea (14 patients); III, anorexia nervosa (10 patients); and IV, idiopathic secondary amenorrhoea (12 patients). Only patients with no overlapping anamnestic factors were included. Group I patients had the most heavily impaired LHRH-LH responses, and the GH response to hypoglycaemia was smaller than in other groups. Cortisol responses were normal. Group II patients showed blunted LH responses and normal GH and cortisol responses. Group III patients showed normal or exaggerated LH responses in the recovery phase of anorexia nervosa, while those two patients who were in the static phase of the illness had impaired responses. GH responses varied greatly. Group IV patients had normal basal levels of LH and normal LH, GH and cortisol responses. The restoration of LH response is not solely correlated to body mass, since patients recovering from anorexia nervosa showed greater LHRH-LH responses with nutritional rehabilitation at 76% of ideal body weight than patients with self-induced weight reduction at 87% of ideal body weight. In idiopathic amenorrhoea the hypothalamic pituitary axis seems to be practically intact. The function of hypothalamic-pituitary axis may be impaired selectively in functional amenorrhoea. Corticotrophin releasing hormone function remains intact, and GH-response may be impaired or normal independently of the LH-response to LHRH. In self-induced weight reduction both functions were impaired. These tests are easily carried out with out-patients, and they give more information about the functional state of hypothalamic-pituitary axis than basal analyses of hypothalamic-pituitary axis than basal analyses of

  7. IDENTIFICATION OF GROWTH HORMONE GENE OF Pangasionodon hypophthalmus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raden Roro Sri Pudji Sinarni Dewi

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available Identification of growth hormone (GH gene in a target fish is the first step in the construction of “all fish genes transfer vector” to generate transgenic fish. The research was done to identify and characterize the GH gene of Pangasionodon hypophthalmus. There were several activities performed in identifying the GH gene: RNA extraction, cDNA synthesis, PCR amplification, and DNA fragment isolation. The characterizations were done using the nucleotide sequencing engine ABIPRISM 3100. The results were then analyzed using BLASTN/P and GENETYX version 7 program. The full-length GH gene of P. hypophthalmus was 1151 bp in length, coding for an open reading frame (ORF of 603 bp. The 5’ and 3’ untranslated regions of the GH gene were 22 bp and 526 bp long, respectively. The GH gene of P. hypophthalmus had some common characteristics that are owned by GH genes, such as single tryptophan residue (W on the 104th amino acid, 5 cysteine residues (C on the amino acid 71, 135, 173, 190, and 198 and a motif of Asn-Xaa-Thr on C terminus which is the potential location for N-linked glycosilation. Polyadenylation signal (aataaa was on the 14 bp at the upstream of polyadenylation location. Growth hormone of P. hypophthalmus consisted of over 200 amino acids from GH cDNA deduction. The highest proportion of amino acid composition was leusin (14% while the lowest was tryptophan (0.5%.

  8. Placental expression of pituitary hormones is an ancestral feature of therian mammals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Menzies Brandon R

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The placenta is essential for supplying nutrients and gases to the developing mammalian young before birth. While all mammals have a functional placenta, only in therian mammals (marsupials and eutherians does the placenta closely appose or invade the uterine endometrium. The eutherian placenta secretes hormones that are structurally and functionally similar to pituitary growth hormone (GH, prolactin (PRL and luteinizing hormone (LH. Marsupial and eutherian mammals diverged from a common ancestor approximately 125 to 148 million years ago and developed distinct reproductive strategies. As in eutherians, marsupials rely on a short-lived but functional placenta for embryogenesis. Results We characterized pituitary GH, GH-R, IGF-2, PRL and LHβ in a macropodid marsupial, the tammar wallaby, Macropus eugenii. These genes were expressed in the tammar placenta during the last third of gestation when most fetal growth occurs and active organogenesis is initiated. The mRNA of key growth genes GH, GH-R, IGF-2 and PRL were expressed during late pregnancy. We found significant up-regulation of GH, GH-R and IGF-2 after the start of the rapid growth phase of organogenesis which suggests that the placental growth hormones regulate the rapid phase of fetal growth. Conclusions This is the first demonstration of the existence of pituitary hormones in the marsupial placenta. Placental expression of these pituitary hormones has clearly been conserved in marsupials as in eutherian mammals, suggesting an ancestral origin of the evolution of placental expression and a critical function of these hormones in growth and development of all therian mammals.

  9. Two Lysin-Motif Receptor Kinases, Gh-LYK1 and Gh-LYK2, Contribute to Resistance against Verticillium wilt in Upland Cotton

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhouhang Gu

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Lysin-motif (LysM receptor kinases (LYKs play essential roles in recognition of chitin and activation of defense responses against pathogenic fungi in the model plants Arabidopsis and rice. The function of LYKs in non-model plants, however, remains elusive. In the present work, we found that the transcription of two LYK-encoding genes from cotton, Gh-LYK1 and Gh-LYK2, was induced after Verticillium dahliae infection. Virus-induced gene silencing (VIGS of Gh-LYK1 and Gh-LYK2 in cotton plants compromises resistance to V. dahliae. As putative pattern recognition receptors (PRRs, both Gh-LYK1 and Gh-LYK2 are membrane-localized, and all three LysM domains of Gh-LYK1 and Gh-LYK2 are required for their chitin-binding ability. However, since Gh-LYK2, but not Gh-LYK1, is a pseudo-kinase and, on the other hand, the ectodomain (ED of Gh-LYK2 can induce reactive oxygen species (ROS burst in planta, Gh-LYK2 and Gh-LYK1 may contribute differently to cotton defense. Taken together, our results establish that both Gh-LYK1 and Gh-LYK12 are required for defense against V. dahliae in cotton, possibly through different mechanisms.

  10. Preventive effects of chronic exogenous growth hormone levels on diet-induced hepatic steatosis in rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tian Ya-ping

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD, which is characterized by hepatic steatosis, can be reversed by early treatment. Several case reports have indicated that the administration of recombinant growth hormone (GH could improve fatty liver in GH-deficient patients. Here, we investigated whether chronic exogenous GH levels could improve hepatic steatosis induced by a high-fat diet in rats, and explored the underlying mechanisms. Results High-fat diet-fed rats developed abdominal obesity, fatty liver and insulin resistance. Chronic exogenous GH improved fatty liver, by reversing dyslipidaemia, fat accumulation and insulin resistance. Exogenous GH also reduced serum tumour necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-alpha levels, and ameliorated hepatic lipid peroxidation and oxidative stress. Hepatic fat deposition was also reduced by exogenous GH levels, as was the expression of adipocyte-derived adipokines (adiponectin, leptin and resistin, which might improve lipid metabolism and hepatic steatosis. Exogenous GH seems to improve fatty liver by reducing fat weight, improving insulin sensitivity and correcting oxidative stress, which may be achieved through phosphorylation or dephosphorylation of a group of signal transducers and activators of hepatic signal transduction pathways. Conclusions Chronic exogenous GH has positive effects on fatty liver and may be a potential clinical application in the prevention or reversal of fatty liver. However, chronic secretion of exogenous GH, even at a low level, may increase serum glucose and insulin levels in rats fed a standard diet, and thus increase the risk of insulin resistance.

  11. The role of hormones in muscle hypertrophy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fink, Julius; Schoenfeld, Brad Jon; Nakazato, Koichi

    2018-02-01

    Anabolic-androgenic steroids (AAS) and other hormones such as growth hormone (GH) and insulin-like growth factor-1 (IGF-1) have been shown to increase muscle mass in patients suffering from various diseases related to muscle atrophy. Despite known side-effects associated with supraphysiologic doses of such drugs, their anabolic effects have led to their widespread use and abuse by bodybuilders and athletes such as strength athletes seeking to improve performance and muscle mass. On the other hand, resistance training (RT) has also been shown to induce significant endogenous hormonal (testosterone (T), GH, IGF-1) elevations. Therefore, some bodybuilders employ RT protocols designed to elevate hormonal levels in order to maximize anabolic responses. In this article, we reviewed current RT protocol outcomes with and without performance enhancing drug usage. Acute RT-induced hormonal elevations seem not to be directly correlated with muscle growth. On the other hand, supplementation with AAS and other hormones might lead to supraphysiological muscle hypertrophy, especially when different compounds are combined.

  12. MESSENGER MERCURY RSS/MLA LEVEL 5 DERIVED DATA V1.0

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — This data set contains archival results from radio science investigations conducted during the MESSENGER mission. Radio measurements were made using the MESSENGER...

  13. [The use of growth hormone to treat endocrine-metabolic disturbances in acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS) patients].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spinola-Castro, Angela Maria; Siviero-Miachon, Adriana A; da Silva, Marcos Tadeu Nolasco; Guerra-Junior, Gil

    2008-07-01

    Acquired Immunodeficiency Syndrome (Aids) was initially related to HIV-associated wasting syndrome, and its metabolic disturbances to altered body composition. After Highly Active Antiretroviral Therapy (HAART) was started, malnutrition has declined and HIV-associated lipodystrophy syndrome has emerged as an important metabolic disorder. Aids is also characterized by hormonal disturbances, principally in growth hormone/insulin-like growth factor 1 (GH/IGF-1) axis. The use of recombinant human GH (hrGH) was formerly indicated to treat wasting syndrome, in order to increase lean body mass. Even though the use of hrGH in lipodystrophy syndrome has been considered, the decrease in insulin sensitivity is a limitation for its use, which has not been officially approved yet. Diversity in therapeutic regimen is another limitation to its use in Aids patients. The present study has reviewed the main HIV-related endocrine-metabolic disorders as well as the use of hrGH in such conditions.

  14. Molecular cloning and sequence analysis of growth hormone cDNA of Neotropical freshwater fish Pacu (Piaractus mesopotamicus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Janeth Silva Pinheiro

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available RT-PCR was used for amplifying Piaractus mesopotamicus growth hormone (GH cDNA obtained from mRNA extracted from pituitary cells. The amplified fragment was cloned and the complete cDNA sequence was determined. The cloned cDNA encompassed a sequence of 543 nucleotides that encoded a polypeptide of 178 amino acids corresponding to mature P. mesopotamicus GH. Comparison with other GH sequences showed a gap of 10 amino acids localized in the N terminus of the putative polypeptide of P. mesopotamicus. This same gap was also observed in other members of the family. Neighbor-joining tree analysis with GH sequences from fishes belonging to different taxonomic groups placed the P. mesopotamicus GH within the Otophysi group. To our knowledge, this is the first GH sequence of a Neotropical characiform fish deposited in GenBank.

  15. Calcium in Mercury's Exosphere: Modeling MESSENGER Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burger, M. H.; Killen, R. M.; McClintock, W. E.; Merkel, A. W.; Vervack, R. J.; Sarantos, M.; Sprague, A. L.

    2011-12-01

    Mercury is surrounded by a surface-bounded exosphere known to contain hydrogen, sodium, potassium, calcium, and magnesium. Because the exosphere is collisionless, its composition represents a balance of active source and loss processes. The Mercury Atmospheric and Surface Composition Spectrometer (MASCS) on the MErcury Surface, Space ENvironment, GEochemistry, and Ranging (MESSENGER) spacecraft has made high-spatial-resolution observations of sodium, calcium, and magnesium near Mercury's surface and in the extended, anti-sunward direction. The most striking feature of these data is the substantial differences among species, which was detected during three close flybys of the planet and has been persistantly present during MESSENGER's orbital phase. Our modeling demonstrates that these differences are not because of post-ejection dynamics such as differences in photo-ionization rate and radiation pressure, but rather result from differences in the source mechanisms and regions on the surface from which each species is ejected. The observations of calcium have revealed a strong dawn/dusk asymmetry, with the abundance over the dawn hemisphere substantially greater than that on the dusk side. To understand this asymmetry, we use a Monte Carlo model of Mercury's exosphere that we developed to track the motions of exospheric neutrals under the influence of gravity and radiation pressure. In this model, Ca atoms can be ejected directly from the surface or produced by ejection of CaO followed by dissociation to produce Ca and O. Particles are removed from the system if they stick to the surface or escape from the model region of interest (within 15 Mercury radii). Photoionization reduces the final weighting given to each particle when simulating the Ca radiance. Data from the flybys are consistent with a high temperature (~1-2 x 104 K) source of atomic Ca concentrated over the dawn hemisphere. Such a high temperature resutls from dissociation of CaO in a near

  16. Growth Hormone Is Secreted by Normal Breast Epithelium upon Progesterone Stimulation and Increases Proliferation of Stem/Progenitor Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sara Lombardi

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Using in vitro and in vivo experimental systems and in situ analysis, we show that growth hormone (GH is secreted locally by normal human mammary epithelial cells upon progesterone stimulation. GH increases proliferation of a subset of cells that express growth hormone receptor (GHR and have functional properties of stem and early progenitor cells. In 72% of ductal carcinoma in situ lesions, an expansion of the cell population that expresses GHR was observed, suggesting that GH signaling may contribute to breast cancer development.

  17. Effect of feeding allowance level on embryonic survival, IGF-1, insulin, GH, leptin and progesterone secretion in early pregnancy gilts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De, W; Ai-rong, Z; Yan, L; Sheng-yu, X; Hai-yan, G; Yong, Z

    2009-10-01

    The present experiment was conducted to evaluate the effects of feeding allowance level on embryonic survival, uterine development and reproductive hormone secretion in early gestation gilts. A total of 54 F1 crosses of Landrace x Large white gilts were randomly allocated to three treatment groups of high (H, 2 x maintenance), medium (M, 1.2 x maintenance) and low (L, 0.6 x maintenance) feeding level after mating. Blood samples and uterine flushings were collected on day 12, 25 and 35 of pregnancy, and embryonic survival rate was estimated. Concentrations of insulin-like growth factor I (IGF)-1, insulin, growth harmone (GH), leptin and progesterone in serum and uterine flushings were determined by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. Embryonic survival was affected by dietary treatment; total number of viable embryos and embryo survival of group M were higher than other groups in the early pregnancy (p allowance level. In serum, concentrations of IGF-1, leptin and insulin tended to be greater in H than in M and L during the early gestation, while concentrations of GH were greater in M and progesterone were the lowest in H. At the same time, feed allowance level affected the concentration of IGF-1, insulin, GH, leptin and progesterone in uterine flushings. These data demonstrated that feed allowance level after mating has important consequence on embryo survival, embryo development and uterine development, possibly mediated by nutrition level inducing changes in concentrations of reproductive hormones and/or intermediary metabolites in early pregnancy.

  18. The interaction between growth hormone and the thyroid axis in hypopituitary patients.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Behan, Lucy Ann

    2011-03-01

    Alterations in the hypothalamo-pituitary-thyroid axis have been reported following growth hormone (GH) administration in both adults and children with and without growth hormone deficiency. Reductions in serum free thyroxine (T4), increased tri-iodothyronine (T3) with or without a reduction in serum thyroid-stimulating hormone secretion have been reported following GH replacement, but there are wide inconsistencies in the literature about these perturbations. The clinical significance of these changes in thyroid function remains uncertain. Some authors report the changes are transient and revert to normal after a few months or longer. However, in adult hypopituitary patients, GH replacement has been reported to unmask central hypothyroidism biochemically in 36-47% of apparently euthyroid patients, necessitating thyroxine replacement and resulting in an attenuation of the benefit of GH replacement on quality of life in those who became biochemically hypothyroid after GH replacement. The group at highest risk are those with organic pituitary disease or multiple pituitary hormone deficiencies. It is therefore prudent to monitor thyroid function in hypopituitary patients starting GH therapy to identify those who will develop clinical and biochemical features of central hypothyroidism, thus facilitating optimal and timely replacement.

  19. The interaction between growth hormone and the thyroid axis in hypopituitary patients.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Behan, Lucy Ann

    2012-02-01

    Alterations in the hypothalamo-pituitary-thyroid axis have been reported following growth hormone (GH) administration in both adults and children with and without growth hormone deficiency. Reductions in serum free thyroxine (T4), increased tri-iodothyronine (T3) with or without a reduction in serum thyroid-stimulating hormone secretion have been reported following GH replacement, but there are wide inconsistencies in the literature about these perturbations. The clinical significance of these changes in thyroid function remains uncertain. Some authors report the changes are transient and revert to normal after a few months or longer. However, in adult hypopituitary patients, GH replacement has been reported to unmask central hypothyroidism biochemically in 36-47% of apparently euthyroid patients, necessitating thyroxine replacement and resulting in an attenuation of the benefit of GH replacement on quality of life in those who became biochemically hypothyroid after GH replacement. The group at highest risk are those with organic pituitary disease or multiple pituitary hormone deficiencies. It is therefore prudent to monitor thyroid function in hypopituitary patients starting GH therapy to identify those who will develop clinical and biochemical features of central hypothyroidism, thus facilitating optimal and timely replacement.

  20. GhJAZ2 negatively regulates cotton fiber initiation by interacting with the R2R3-MYB transcription factor GhMYB25-like.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Haiyan; He, Xin; Tu, Lili; Zhu, Longfu; Zhu, Sitao; Ge, Zonghe; Zhang, Xianlong

    2016-12-01

    Jasmonic acid (JA) signaling has been well studied in Arabidopsis. Most reports focus on the role of JA in biological pathways, such as stress resistance, trichome initiation and anthocyanin accumulation. The JASMONATE ZIM-DOMAIN (JAZ) protein is one of the important repressors in the JA signaling pathway. Previous studies showed that JA functions in fiber initiation and elongation, but little is known about how JAZ genes function in fiber development. In this study, a cotton JAZ protein (GhJAZ2) containing a highly conserved TIFY motif and a C-terminal Jas domain was identified, and its function during cotton fiber development was analysed. Gene expression analysis showed that GhJAZ2 was preferentially expressed in the root, hypocotyl, flower and ovule 1 day before anthesis. Overexpression of GhJAZ2 inhibited both lint and fuzz fiber initiation, and reduced the fiber length. Yeast two-hybrid assays showed that GhJAZ2 interacted with the R2R3-MYB transcription factors GhMYB25-like and GhGL1, the bHLH transcription factor GhMYC2, the WD repeat protein GhWD40 and the unknown protein GhJI1. Among these transcription factors, previous studies showed that downregulation of