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Sample records for horizontal vestibuloocular reflex

  1. Studies of the horizontal vestibulo-ocular reflex in spaceflight

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thornton, William E.; Uri, John J.; Moore, Tom; Pool, Sam

    1989-01-01

    Changes in the vestibulo-ocular reflex (VOR) during space flight have been suspected of contributing to space motion sickness. The horizontal VOR was studied in nine subjects on two space shuttle missions. Active unpaced head oscillation at 0.3 Hz was used as the stimulus to examine the gain and phase of the VOR with and without visual input, as well as the visual suppression of the reflex. No statistically significant changes were noted inflight in the gains or phase shifts of the VOR during any test condition, or between space motion sickness susceptible and nonsusceptible populations. Although VOR suppression was unaffected by spaceflight, the space motion sickness-susceptible group tended to exhibit greater error in the suppression than the nonsusceptible group. It is concluded that at this stimulus frequency, VOR gain is unaffected by space-flight, and any minor individual changes do not seem to contribute to space motion sickness.

  2. Behavior of human horizontal vestibulo-ocular reflex in response to high-acceleration stimuli

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maas, E. F.; Huebner, W. P.; Seidman, S. H.; Leigh, R. J.

    1989-01-01

    The horizontal vestibulo-ocular reflex (VOR) during transient, high-acceleration (1900-7100 deg/sec-squared) head rotations was studied in four human subjects. Such stimuli perturbed the angle of gaze and caused illusory movement of a viewed target (oscillopsia). The disturbance of gaze could be attributed to the latency of the VOR (which ranged from 6-15 ms) and inadequate compensatory eye rotations (median VOR gain ranged from 0.61-0.83).

  3. The horizontal angular vestibulo-ocular reflex: a non-linear mechanism for context-dependent responses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ranjbaran, Mina; Galiana, Henrietta L

    2012-01-01

    A bilateral model for the horizontal angular vestibulo-ocular reflex (AVOR) is presented in this paper. It is shown that by assigning proper non-linear neural computations at the premotor level, the model is capable of replicating target-distance dependent VOR responses. Moreover, the model behavior in case of sensory plugging is also consistent with reported experimental observations.

  4. The horizontal angular vestibulo-ocular reflex: a nonlinear mechanism for context-dependent responses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ranjbaran, Mina; Galiana, Henrietta L

    2013-11-01

    Studies of the vestibulo-ocular reflex (VOR) have revealed that this type of involuntary eye movement is influenced by viewing distance. This paper presents a bilateral model for the horizontal angular VOR in the dark based on realistic physiological mechanisms. It is shown that by assigning proper nonlinear neural computations at the premotor level, the model is capable of replicating target-distance-dependent VOR responses that are in agreement with geometrical requirements. Central premotor responses in the model are also shown to be consistent with experimental observations. Moreover, the model performance after simulated unilateral canal plugging also reproduces experimental observations, an emerging property. Such local nonlinear computations could similarly generate context-dependent behaviors in other more complex motor systems.

  5. Studies of the horizontal vestibulo-ocular reflex on STS 7 and 8

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thornton, William E.; Uri, John J.; Moore, Thomas P.; Pool, Sam L.

    1988-01-01

    Unpaced voluntary horizontal head oscillation was used to study the Vestibulo-Ocular Reflex (VOR) on Shuttle flights STS 7 and 8. Ten subjects performed head oscillations at 0.33 Hz + or - 30 deg amplitude under the followng conditions: VVOR (visual VOR), eyes open and fixed on a stationary target; VOR-EC, with eyes closed and fixed on the same target in imagination; and VOR-S (VOR suppression), with eyes open and fixed on a head-synchronized target. Effects of weightlessness, flight phase, and Space Motion Sickness (SMS) on head oscillation characteristics were examined. A significant increase in head oscillation frequency was noted inflight in subjects free from SMS. In subjects susceptible to SMS, frequency was reduced during their Symptomatic period. The data also suggest that the amplitude and peak velocity of head oscillation were reduced early inflight. No significant changes were noted in reflex gain or phase in any of the test conditions; however, there was a suggestion of an increase in VVOR and VOR-ES gain early inflight in asymptomatic subjects. A significant difference in VOR-S was found between SMS susceptible and non-susceptible subjects. There is no evidence that any changes in VOR characteristics contributed to SMS.

  6. Horizontal vestibuloocular reflex evoked by high-acceleration rotations in the squirrel monkey. I. Normal responses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Minor, L. B.; Lasker, D. M.; Backous, D. D.; Hullar, T. E.; Shelhamer, M. J. (Principal Investigator)

    1999-01-01

    The horizontal angular vestibuloocular reflex (VOR) evoked by high-frequency, high-acceleration rotations was studied in five squirrel monkeys with intact vestibular function. The VOR evoked by steps of acceleration in darkness (3,000 degrees /s(2) reaching a velocity of 150 degrees /s) began after a latency of 7.3 +/- 1.5 ms (mean +/- SD). Gain of the reflex during the acceleration was 14.2 +/- 5.2% greater than that measured once the plateau head velocity had been reached. A polynomial regression was used to analyze the trajectory of the responses to steps of acceleration. A better representation of the data was obtained from a polynomial that included a cubic term in contrast to an exclusively linear fit. For sinusoidal rotations of 0.5-15 Hz with a peak velocity of 20 degrees /s, the VOR gain measured 0.83 +/- 0.06 and did not vary across frequencies or animals. The phase of these responses was close to compensatory except at 15 Hz where a lag of 5.0 +/- 0.9 degrees was noted. The VOR gain did not vary with head velocity at 0.5 Hz but increased with velocity for rotations at frequencies of >/=4 Hz (0. 85 +/- 0.04 at 4 Hz, 20 degrees /s; 1.01 +/- 0.05 at 100 degrees /s, P < 0.0001). No responses to these rotations were noted in two animals that had undergone bilateral labyrinthectomy indicating that inertia of the eye had a negligible effect for these stimuli. We developed a mathematical model of VOR dynamics to account for these findings. The inputs to the reflex come from linear and nonlinear pathways. The linear pathway is responsible for the constant gain across frequencies at peak head velocity of 20 degrees /s and also for the phase lag at higher frequencies being less than that expected based on the reflex delay. The frequency- and velocity-dependent nonlinearity in VOR gain is accounted for by the dynamics of the nonlinear pathway. A transfer function that increases the gain of this pathway with frequency and a term related to the third power of head

  7. Differential adaptation of the linear and nonlinear components of the horizontal vestibuloocular reflex in squirrel monkeys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clendaniel, Richard A.; Lasker, David M.; Minor, Lloyd B.; Shelhamer, M. J. (Principal Investigator)

    2002-01-01

    Previous work in squirrel monkeys has demonstrated the presence of linear and nonlinear components to the horizontal vestibuloocular reflex (VOR) evoked by high-acceleration rotations. The nonlinear component is seen as a rise in gain with increasing velocity of rotation at frequencies more than 2 Hz (a velocity-dependent gain enhancement). We have shown that there are greater changes in the nonlinear than linear component of the response after spectacle-induced adaptation. The present study was conducted to determine if the two components of the response share a common adaptive process. The gain of the VOR, in the dark, to sinusoidal stimuli at 4 Hz (peak velocities: 20-150 degrees /s) and 10 Hz (peak velocities: 20 and 100 degrees /s) was measured pre- and postadaptation. Adaptation was induced over 4 h with x0.45 minimizing spectacles. Sum-of-sines stimuli were used to induce adaptation, and the parameters of the stimuli were adjusted to invoke only the linear or both linear and nonlinear components of the response. Preadaptation, there was a velocity-dependent gain enhancement at 4 and 10 Hz. In postadaptation with the paradigms that only recruited the linear component, there was a decrease in gain and a persistent velocity-dependent gain enhancement (indicating adaptation of only the linear component). After adaptation with the paradigm designed to recruit both the linear and nonlinear components, there was a decrease in gain and no velocity-dependent gain enhancement (indicating adaptation of both components). There were comparable changes in the response to steps of acceleration. We interpret these results to indicate that separate processes drive the adaptation of the linear and nonlinear components of the response.

  8. Velocity-selective adaptation of the horizontal and cross-axis vestibulo-ocular reflex in the mouse.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hübner, Patrick P; Khan, Serajul I; Migliaccio, Americo A

    2014-10-01

    One commonly observed phenomenon of vestibulo-ocular reflex (VOR) adaptation is a frequency-selective change in gain (eye velocity/head velocity) and phase (relative timing between the vestibular stimulus and response) based on the frequency content of the adaptation training stimulus. The neural mechanism behind this type of adaptation is not clear. Our aim was to determine whether there were other parameter-selective effects on VOR adaptation, specifically velocity-selective and acceleration-selective changes in the horizontal VOR gain and phase. We also wanted to determine whether parameter selectivity was also in place for cross-axis adaptation training (a visual-vestibular training stimulus that elicits a vestibular-evoked torsional eye movement during horizontal head rotations). We measured VOR gain and phase in 17 C57BL/6 mice during baseline (no adaptation training) and after gain-increase, gain-decrease and cross-axis adaptation training using a sinusoidal visual-vestibular (mismatch) stimulus with whole-body rotations (vestibular stimulus) with peak velocity 20 and 50°/s both with a fixed frequency of 0.5 Hz. Our results show pronounced velocity selectivity of VOR adaptation. The difference in horizontal VOR gain after gain-increase versus gain-decrease adaptation was maximal when the sinusoidal testing stimulus matched the adaptation training stimulus peak velocity. We also observed similar velocity selectivity after cross-axis adaptation training. Our data suggest that frequency selectivity could be a manifestation of both velocity and acceleration selectivity because when one of these is absent, e.g. acceleration selectivity in the mouse, frequency selectivity is also reduced.

  9. The Chinchilla's vestibulo-ocular reflex

    Science.gov (United States)

    Merwin, W. H., Jr.; Wall, Conrad, III; Tomko, D. L.

    1989-01-01

    The horizontal vestibulo-ocular reflex (VOR) was measured and characterized in seven adult chinchillas using 0.01 to 1.0 Hz angular velocity sinusoids. Gains were less than compensatory, and were variable from day to day, but phases were highly repeatable both within and between animals. The best fitting transfer function to the average data of all animals had a dominant time constant of 7.5 sec, and an adaptation operator with a time constant of 24.0 sec. There were certain nonlinearities in the horizontal VOR of this animal, and it was difficult to elicit a robust optokinetic response. Results are discussed in relation to similar measurements in other species.

  10. Hybrid nonlinear model of the angular vestibulo-ocular reflex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ranjbaran, Mina; Galiana, Henrietta L

    2013-01-01

    A hybrid nonlinear bilateral model for the horizontal angular vestibulo-ocular reflex (AVOR) is presented in this paper. The model relies on known interconnections between saccadic burst circuits in the brainstem and ocular premotor areas in the vestibular nuclei during slow and fast phase intervals. A viable switching strategy for the timing of nystagmus events is proposed. Simulations show that this hybrid model replicates AVOR nystagmus patterns that are observed in experimentally recorded data.

  11. Effects of reversible pharmacological shutdown of cerebellar flocculus on the memory of long-term horizontal vestibulo-ocular reflex adaptation in monkeys.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anzai, Mari; Kitazawa, Hiromasa; Nagao, Soichi

    2010-11-01

    The adaptation of the horizontal vestibulo-ocular reflex (HVOR) provides an experimental model for motor learning. Two studies, using cats and mice, respectively, have recently suggested pharmacologically that the memory of adaptation is located multiply in the cerebellum and brainstem. Here, we examined the effects of acute cerebellar flocculus shutdown on the adaptation in four monkeys. Two hours of 0.11Hz-10° turntable oscillation while viewing a stationary checked-patterned screen through the left-right reversing prism decreased the HVOR gains by 0.16, and 3 days of prism wearing combined with 2h of daily turntable oscillation decreased the HVOR gains by 0.27. Injections of lidocaine into bilateral flocculi did not affect the nonadapted HVOR gains, but depressed the visual suppression of the HVOR. They recovered the HVOR gains decreased by 2h of training, but very little affected the HVOR gains decreased by previous 2 days of training. Injections of control Ringer's solution did not affect the gains adapted by 2h or 3 days of training. These results are consistent with the previous studies, and suggest that the memory trace of adaptation of the HVOR initially resides in the flocculus but later resides, presumably, in the vestibular nuclei in the monkey.

  12. Glycine receptor deficiency and its effect on the horizontal vestibulo-ocular reflex: a study on the SPD1J mouse.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hübner, Patrick P; Lim, Rebecca; Brichta, Alan M; Migliaccio, Americo A

    2013-04-01

    Inhibition is critical in the pathways controlling the vestibulo-ocular reflex (VOR) and plays a central role in the precision, accuracy and speed of this important vestibular-mediated compensatory eye movement. While γ-aminobutyric acid is the common fast inhibitory neurotransmitter in most of the VOR microcircuits, glycine is also found in key elements. For example, the omnidirectional pause neurons (OPNs) and inhibitory burst neurons in the horizontal VOR both use glycine as their preferred inhibitory neurotransmitter. Determining the precise contribution of glycine to the VOR pathway has been difficult due to the lack of selective tools; however, we used spasmodic mice that have a naturally occurring defect in the glycine receptor (GlyR) that reduces glycinergic transmission. Using this animal model, we compared the horizontal VOR in affected animals with unaffected controls. Our data showed that initial latency and initial peak velocity as well as slow-phase eye movements were unaffected by reduced glycinergic transmission. Importantly however, there were significant effects on quick-phase activity, substantially reducing their number (30-70 %), amplitude (~55 %) and peak velocity (~38 %). We suggest that the OPNs were primarily responsible for the reduced quick-phase properties, since they are part of an unmodifiable, or more 'hard-wired', microcircuit. In contrast, the effects of reduced glycinergic transmission on slow-phases were likely ameliorated by the intrinsically modifiable nature of this pathway. Our results also suggested there is a 'threshold' in GlyR-affected animals, below which the effects of reduced glycinergic transmission were undetected.

  13. The human vestibulo-ocular reflex during linear locomotion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moore, S. T.; Hirasaki, E.; Raphan, T.; Cohen, B.

    2001-01-01

    During locomotion, there is a translation and compensatory rotation of the head in both the vertical and horizontal planes. During moderate to fast walking (100 m/min), vertical head translation occurs at the frequency of stepping (2 Hz) and generates peak linear acceleration of 0.37 g. Lateral head translation occurs at the stride frequency (1 Hz) and generates peak linear acceleration of 0.1 g. Peak head pitch and yaw angular velocities are approximately 17 degrees/s. The frequency and magnitude of these head movements are within the operational range of both the linear and angular vestibulo-ocular reflex (IVOR and aVOR). Vertical eye movements undergo a phase reversal from near to far targets. When viewing a far (>1 m) target, vertical eye velocity is typical of an aVOR response; that is, it is compensatory for head pitch. At close viewing distances (head pitch and is compensatory for vertical head translation, suggesting that the IVOR predominantly generates the eye movement response. Horizontal head movements during locomotion occur at the stride frequency of 1 Hz, where the IVOR gain is low. Horizontal eye movements are compensatory for head yaw at all viewing distances and are likely generated by the aVOR.

  14. The human vestibulo-ocular reflex during linear locomotion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moore, S. T.; Hirasaki, E.; Raphan, T.; Cohen, B.

    2001-01-01

    During locomotion, there is a translation and compensatory rotation of the head in both the vertical and horizontal planes. During moderate to fast walking (100 m/min), vertical head translation occurs at the frequency of stepping (2 Hz) and generates peak linear acceleration of 0.37 g. Lateral head translation occurs at the stride frequency (1 Hz) and generates peak linear acceleration of 0.1 g. Peak head pitch and yaw angular velocities are approximately 17 degrees/s. The frequency and magnitude of these head movements are within the operational range of both the linear and angular vestibulo-ocular reflex (IVOR and aVOR). Vertical eye movements undergo a phase reversal from near to far targets. When viewing a far (>1 m) target, vertical eye velocity is typical of an aVOR response; that is, it is compensatory for head pitch. At close viewing distances (<1 m), vertical eye velocity is in phase with head pitch and is compensatory for vertical head translation, suggesting that the IVOR predominantly generates the eye movement response. Horizontal head movements during locomotion occur at the stride frequency of 1 Hz, where the IVOR gain is low. Horizontal eye movements are compensatory for head yaw at all viewing distances and are likely generated by the aVOR.

  15. Vestibulo-ocular reflex and the head impulse test

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eliana T. Maranhão

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available The authors highlights the importance of the vestibulo-ocular reflex examination through the head impulse test as a diagnostic method for vestibular dysfunction as well as, and primarily, a bedside semiotic resource capable of differentiating between acute peripheral vestibulopathy and a cerebellar or brainstem infarction in emergency rooms.

  16. Vestibulo-ocular reflex and the head impulse test.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maranhão, Eliana T; Maranhão-Filho, Péricles

    2012-12-01

    The authors highlights the importance of the vestibulo-ocular reflex examination through the head impulse test as a diagnostic method for vestibular dysfunction as well as, and primarily, a bedside semiotic resource capable of differentiating between acute peripheral vestibulopathy and a cerebellar or brainstem infarction in emergency rooms.

  17. Studies of the vestibulo-ocular reflex on STS 4, 5 and 6

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thornton, William E.; Pool, Sam L.; Moore, Thomas P.; Uri, John J.

    1988-01-01

    The vestibulo-ocular reflex (VOR) may be altered by weightlessness. Since this reflex plays a large role in visual stabilization, it was important to document any changes caused by space flight. This is a report on findings on STS-4 through 6 and is part of a larger study of neurosensory adaptation done on STS-4 through 8. Voluntary horizontal head oscillations at 1/3 Hz with amplitude of 30 deg right and left of center were recorded by a potentiometer and compared to eye position recorded by electroculography under the following conditions: eyes open, head fixed, tracking horizontal targets switched 0, 15, and 30 degrees right and left (optokinetic reflex - OKR - and calibration); eyes open and fixed on static external target with oscillation, (vestibulo ocular reflex, eyes closed - VOR EC); eyes open and wearing opaque goggles with target fixed in imagination (vestibulo-ocular reflex, eyes shaded - VOR ES); and eyes open and fixed on a head synchronized target with head oscillation (VOR suppression). No significant changes were found in voluntary head oscillation frequency or amplitude in those with (n=5), and without (n=3), space motion sickness (SMS), with phase of flight or test condition. Variations in head oscillation were too small to have produced detectable changes in test results.

  18. Directional sensitivity of anterior, posterior, and horizontal canal vestibulo-ocular neurons in the cat.

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    Brettler, S C; Baker, J F

    2001-10-01

    Neurons subserving the vestibulo-ocular reflex transform the directionality and timing of input from semicircular canals into commands that are appropriate to rotate the eyes in a compensatory fashion. In order to assess the degree to which this transformation is evident in vestibular nucleus neurons of alert cats, we recorded the extracellular discharge properties of 138 second-order vestibular neurons in the superior and medial vestibular nucleus, including 64 neurons identified as second-order vestibulo-ocular neurons by antidromic responses to oculomotor nucleus stimulation and short-latency orthodromic responses to labyrinth stimulation (1.3 ms or less). Neuronal response gains and phases were recorded during 0.5-Hz sinusoidal oscillations about many different horizontal axes and during vertical axis rotations to define neuronal response directionality more precisely than in past studies. Neurons with spatial responses similar to anterior semicircular canal afferents were found to have more diverse maximal activation direction vectors than neurons with responses resembling those of posterior or horizontal canal afferents. The mean angle from neuron response vector to the axis of the nearest canal or canal pair was 19 degrees for anterior canal second-order neurons (n=28) and 20 degrees for anterior canal second-order vestibulo-ocular neurons (n=18), compared with 11 degrees for posterior canal second-order neurons (n=43) and 11 degrees for posterior canal second-order vestibulo-ocular neurons (n=25). Only two second-order vestibulo-ocular neurons (3%) showed a marked dependence of response phase on rotation direction, which is indicative of convergent inputs that differ in both dynamics and directionality. This suggests that spatiotemporal convergence is uncommon in the three-neuron vestibulo-ocular reflex arc of the cat. Neuron vectors included many that were closely aligned with canal axes and several that were better aligned with oblique or superior rectus

  19. Identification of the vestibulo-ocular reflex dynamics.

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    Ranjbaran, Mina; Galiana, Henrietta L

    2014-01-01

    The vestibulo-ocular reflex (VOR) plays an important role in our daily activities by enabling us to fixate on objects during head movements. Modeling and identification of the VOR improves our insight into the system behavior and helps in diagnosing various disorders. However, the switching nature of eye movements, including the VOR, makes the dynamic analysis challenging. In this work we are using integration of subspace and prediction error methods to analyze VOR dynamics. The performance of the method is evaluated using simulation studies and experimental data.

  20. Optokinetic and vestibulo-ocular reflex responses to an unpredictable stimulus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peterka, Robert J.; Black, F. Owen; Schoenhoff, Monika B.

    1987-01-01

    Horizontal plane optokinetic (OKR) and vestibuloocular reflex eye movements were obtained from normal subjects in response to pseudorandom rotational stimulation. Results showed large intersubject variability in OKR responses. Typical OKR responses had approximately constant gain over 0.02-1.5 Hz. Response phase was near zero below 0.1 Hz with increasing phase lags as frequency increased consistent with time delays of 180 ms. Results suggested that visual motion information could be significant in the control of eye movements up to 6.1 Hz. Pseudorandom optokinetic stimulation induced motion sickness symptoms in approximately 20 percent of the 213 subjects tested.

  1. Age-related changes in human vestibulo-ocular and optokinetic reflexes: Pseudorandom rotation tests

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peterka, R. J.; Black, F. O.; Schoenhoff, M. B.

    1989-01-01

    The dynamic response properties of horizontal vestibulo-ocular reflex (VOR) and optokinetic reflex (OKR) were characterized in 216 human subjects ranging in age from 7 to 81 years. The object of this cross-sectional study was to determine the effects of aging on VOR and OKR reflex dynamics, and to identify the distributions of parameters which describe VOR and OKR responses to pseudorandom stimuli in a putatively normal population. In general, VOR and OKR response parameters changed in a manner consistent with declining function with increasing age. For the VOR this was reflected in declining response amplitudes, although the magnitude of the decline was small relative to the variability of the data. For the OKR the lag time of the response, probably associated with the time required for visual information processing, increased linearly with age at a rate of about 1 ms per year.

  2. Unilateral adaptation of the human angular vestibulo-ocular reflex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Migliaccio, Americo A; Schubert, Michael C

    2013-02-01

    A recent study showed that the angular vestibulo-ocular reflex (VOR) can be better adaptively increased using an incremental retinal image velocity error signal compared with a conventional constant large velocity-gain demand (×2). This finding has important implications for vestibular rehabilitation that seeks to improve the VOR response after injury. However, a large portion of vestibular patients have unilateral vestibular hypofunction, and training that raises their VOR response during rotations to both the ipsilesional and contralesional side is not usually ideal. We sought to determine if the vestibular response to one side could selectively be increased without affecting the contralateral response. We tested nine subjects with normal vestibular function. Using the scleral search coil and head impulse techniques, we measured the active and passive VOR gain (eye velocity / head velocity) before and after unilateral incremental VOR adaptation training, consisting of self-generated (active) head impulses, which lasted ≈ 15 min. The head impulses consisted of rapid, horizontal head rotations with peak-amplitude 15°, peak-velocity 150°/s and peak-acceleration 3,000°/s(2). The VOR gain towards the adapting side increased after training from 0.92 ± 0.18 to 1.11 ± 0.22 (+22.7 ± 20.2 %) during active head impulses and from 0.91 ± 0.15 to 1.01 ± 0.17 (+11.3 ± 7.5 %) during passive head impulses. During active impulses, the VOR gain towards the non-adapting side also increased by ≈ 8 %, though this increase was ≈ 70 % less than to the adapting side. A similar increase did not occur during passive impulses. This study shows that unilateral vestibular adaptation is possible in humans with a normal VOR; unilateral incremental VOR adaptation may have a role in vestibular rehabilitation. The increase in passive VOR gain after active head impulse adaptation suggests that the training effect is robust.

  3. Peaks and Troughs of Three-Dimensional Vestibulo-ocular Reflex in Humans

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    J. Goumans (Janine); M. Houben (Mark); J. Dits (Joyce); J. van der Steen (Hans)

    2010-01-01

    textabstractThe three-dimensional vestibulo-ocular reflex (3D VOR) ideally generates compensatory ocular rotations not only with a magnitude equal and opposite to the head rotation but also about an axis that is collinear with the head rotation axis. Vestibulo-ocular responses only partially fulfill

  4. Peaks and troughs of three-dimensional vestibulo-ocular reflex in humans

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Goumans, J.; Houben, M.M.J.; Dits, J.; Steen, J. van der

    2010-01-01

    The three-dimensional vestibulo-ocular reflex (3D VOR) ideally generates compensatory ocular rotations not only with a magnitude equal and opposite to the head rotation but also about an axis that is collinear with the head rotation axis. Vestibulo-ocular responses only partially fulfill this ideal

  5. Peaks and troughs of three-dimensional vestibulo-ocular reflex in humans

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    J. Goumans (Janine); M. Houben (Mark); J. Dits (Joyce); J. van der Steen (Johannes)

    2010-01-01

    textabstractThe three-dimensional vestibulo-ocular reflex (3D VOR) ideally generates compensatory ocular rotations not only with a magnitude equal and opposite to the head rotation but also about an axis that is collinear with the head rotation axis. Vestibulo-ocular responses only partially fulfill

  6. Rapid motor learning in the translational vestibulo-ocular reflex

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    Zhou, Wu; Weldon, Patrick; Tang, Bingfeng; King, W. M.; Shelhamer, M. J. (Principal Investigator)

    2003-01-01

    Motor learning was induced in the translational vestibulo-ocular reflex (TVOR) when monkeys were repeatedly subjected to a brief (0.5 sec) head translation while they tried to maintain binocular fixation on a visual target for juice rewards. If the target was world-fixed, the initial eye speed of the TVOR gradually increased; if the target was head-fixed, the initial eye speed of the TVOR gradually decreased. The rate of learning acquisition was very rapid, with a time constant of approximately 100 trials, which was equivalent to or=1 d without any reinforcement, indicating induction of long-term synaptic plasticity. Although the learning generalized to targets with different viewing distances and to head translations with different accelerations, it was highly specific for the particular combination of head motion and evoked eye movement associated with the training. For example, it was specific to the modality of the stimulus (translation vs rotation) and the direction of the evoked eye movement in the training. Furthermore, when one eye was aligned with the heading direction so that it remained motionless during training, learning was not expressed in this eye, but only in the other nonaligned eye. These specificities show that the learning sites are neither in the sensory nor the motor limb of the reflex but in the sensory-motor transformation stage of the reflex. The dependence of the learning on both head motion and evoked eye movement suggests that Hebbian learning may be one of the underlying cellular mechanisms.

  7. The human vestibulo-ocular reflex (VOR) evaluated with a reactive torque helmet

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    S. Tabak (Sylvia)

    1997-01-01

    textabstractThe vestibulo-ocular reflex (YOR) generates eye rotations that compensate for head movements. Head movements include rotations and translations (linear displacements). Linear acceleration during translational movement, as well as the gravitational acceleration, signalling head orientatio

  8. Effects of adaptation of vestibulo-ocular reflex function on manual target localization

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    Bloomberg, J. J.; Merkle, L. A.; Barry, S. R.; Huebner, W. P.; Cohen, H. S.; Mueller, S. A.; Fordice, J.

    2000-01-01

    The goal of the present study was to determine if adaptive modulation of vestibulo-ocular reflex (VOR) function is associated with commensurate alterations in manual target localization. To measure the effects of adapted VOR on manual responses we developed the Vestibular-Contingent Pointing Test (VCP). In the VCP test, subjects pointed to a remembered target following passive whole body rotation in the dark. In the first experiment, subjects performed VCP before and after wearing 0.5X minifying lenses that adaptively attenuate horizontal VOR gain. Results showed that adaptive reduction in horizontal VOR gain was accompanied by a commensurate change in VCP performance. In the second experiment, bilaterally labyrinthine deficient (LD) subjects were tested to confirm that vestibular cues were central to the spatial coding of both eye and hand movements during VCP. LD subjects performed significantly worse than normal subjects. These results demonstrate that adaptive change in VOR can lead to alterations in manual target localization.

  9. Hybrid Model of the Context Dependent Vestibulo-Ocular Reflex: Implications for Vergence-Version Interactions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mina eRanjbaran

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available The vestibulo-ocular reflex (VOR is an involuntary eye movement evoked by head movements. It is also influenced by viewing distance. This paper presents a hybrid nonlinear bilateral model for the horizontal angular vestibulo-ocular reflex (AVOR in the dark. The model is based on known interconnections between saccadic burst circuits in the brainstem and ocular premotor areas in the vestibular nuclei during fast and slow phase intervals of nystagmus. We implemented a viable switching strategy for the timing of nystagmus events to allow emulation of real nystagmus data. The performance of the hybrid model is evaluated with simulations, and results are consistent with experimental observations. The hybrid model replicates realistic AVOR nystagmus patterns during sinusoidal or step head rotations in the dark and during interactions with vergence, e.g. fixation distance. By simply assigning proper nonlinear neural computations at the premotor level, the model replicates all reported experimental observations. This work sheds light on potential underlying neural mechanisms driving the context dependent AVOR and explains contradictory results in the literature. Moreover, context-dependent behaviors in more complex motor systems could also rely on local nonlinear neural computations.

  10. Hybrid model of the context dependent vestibulo-ocular reflex: implications for vergence-version interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ranjbaran, Mina; Galiana, Henrietta L

    2015-01-01

    The vestibulo-ocular reflex (VOR) is an involuntary eye movement evoked by head movements. It is also influenced by viewing distance. This paper presents a hybrid nonlinear bilateral model for the horizontal angular vestibulo-ocular reflex (AVOR) in the dark. The model is based on known interconnections between saccadic burst circuits in the brainstem and ocular premotor areas in the vestibular nuclei during fast and slow phase intervals of nystagmus. We implemented a viable switching strategy for the timing of nystagmus events to allow emulation of real nystagmus data. The performance of the hybrid model is evaluated with simulations, and results are consistent with experimental observations. The hybrid model replicates realistic AVOR nystagmus patterns during sinusoidal or step head rotations in the dark and during interactions with vergence, e.g., fixation distance. By simply assigning proper nonlinear neural computations at the premotor level, the model replicates all reported experimental observations. This work sheds light on potential underlying neural mechanisms driving the context dependent AVOR and explains contradictory results in the literature. Moreover, context-dependent behaviors in more complex motor systems could also rely on local nonlinear neural computations.

  11. Influence of gravity on cat vertical vestibulo-ocular reflex

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tomko, D. L.; Wall, C., III; Robinson, F. R.; Staab, J. P.

    1988-01-01

    The vertical vestibulo-ocular reflex (VOR) was recorded in cats using electro-oculography during sinusoidal angular pitch. Peak stimulus velocity was 50 deg/s over a frequency range from 0.01 to 4.0 Hz. To test the effect of gravity on the vertical VOR, the animal was pitched while sitting upright or lying on its side. Upright pitch changed the cat's orientation relative to gravity, while on-side pitch did not. The cumulative slow component position of the eye during on-side pitch was less symmetric than during upright pitch. Over the mid-frequency range (0.1 to 1.0 Hz), the average gain of the vertical VOR was 14.5 percent higher during upright pitch than during on-side pitch. At low frequencies (less than 0.05 Hz) changing head position relative to gravity raised the vertical VOR gain and kept the reflex in phase with stimulus velocity. These results indicate that gravity-sensitive mechanisms make the vertical VOR more compensatory.

  12. The relationship between disordered pursuit and vestibulo-ocular reflex suppression

    OpenAIRE

    Chambers, Br; Gresty, MA

    1983-01-01

    The performance of the smooth pursuit reflex and the ability to suppress the vestibulo-ocular reflex were assessed in 10 normal subjects and in patients with a variety of diseases of the central nervous system. Pursuit was measured as the maximum velocity of slow phase eye movement in response to a laser target moving sinusoidally at various frequencies up to 1 Hz and with amplitudes stepped up to 35° peak. Suppression of the vestibulo-ocular reflex was assessed with subjects seated in a Bara...

  13. Vergence-dependent adaptation of the vestibulo-ocular reflex

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lewis, Richard F.; Clendaniel, Richard A.; Zee, David S.; Shelhamer, M. J. (Principal Investigator)

    2003-01-01

    The gain of the vestibulo-ocular reflex (VOR) normally depends on the distance between the subject and the visual target, but it remains uncertain whether vergence angle can be linked to changes in VOR gain through a process of context-dependent adaptation. In this study, we examined this question with an adaptation paradigm that modified the normal relationship between vergence angle and retinal image motion. Subjects were rotated sinusoidally while they viewed an optokinetic (OKN) stimulus through either diverging or converging prisms. In three subjects the diverging prisms were worn while the OKN stimulus moved out of phase with the head, and the converging prisms were worn when the OKN stimulus moved in-phase with the head. The relationship between the vergence angle and OKN stimulus was reversed in the fourth subject. After 2 h of training, the VOR gain at the two vergence angles changed significantly in all of the subjects, evidenced by the two different VOR gains that could be immediately accessed by switching between the diverged and converged conditions. The results demonstrate that subjects can learn to use vergence angle as the contextual cue that retrieves adaptive changes in the angular VOR.

  14. Role of the flocculus of the cerebellum in motor learning of the vestibulo-ocular reflex

    Science.gov (United States)

    Highstein, S. M.

    1998-01-01

    Structure-function studies at the systems level are an effective method for understanding the relationship of the central nervous system to behavior. Motor learning or adaptation of the vestibulo-ocular reflex is a clear example wherein this approach has been productive. During a vestibulo-ocular reflex the brain converts a head velocity signal, transduced through the vestibular semicircular canals, into an eye movement command delivered to the extraocular muscles. If the viewed target remains on the fovea of the retina, the reflex is compensatory, and its gain, eye velocity/head velocity, is one. When the image of the viewed object slips across the retina, visual acuity decreases, and the gain of the reflex, which is no longer one, is plastically adapted or adjusted until retinal stability is restored. The anatomic substrate for this plasticity thus involves brain structures in which visual-vestibular interaction can potentially occur, as well as vestibular and visual sensory and oculomotor motor structures. Further, it has been known for many years that removal of the flocculus of the cerebellum permanently precludes further vestibulo-ocular reflex adaptation, demonstrating the involvement of the cerebellum in this behavior. Maekawa and Simpson (J Neurophysiol 1973;36: 649-66) discovered that one visual input to the flocculus involved the accessory optic system and the inferior olive. Ensuing work has demonstrated that the visual signals used to adapt the vestibulo-ocular reflex are transmitted by this accessory optic system to the flocculus and subsequently to brain stem structures involved in vestibulo-ocular reflex plasticity. Presently the inclusive list of anatomic sites involved in vestibulo-ocular reflex circuitry and its adaptive plasticity is small. Our laboratory continues to believe that this behavior should be caused by interactions within this small class of neurons. By studying each class of identified neuron and its interactions with others within

  15. Ontogeny of mouse vestibulo-ocular reflex following genetic or environmental alteration of gravity sensing.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mathieu Beraneck

    Full Text Available The vestibular organs consist of complementary sensors: the semicircular canals detect rotations while the otoliths detect linear accelerations, including the constant pull of gravity. Several fundamental questions remain on how the vestibular system would develop and/or adapt to prolonged changes in gravity such as during long-term space journey. How do vestibular reflexes develop if the appropriate assembly of otoliths and semi-circular canals is perturbed? The aim of present work was to evaluate the role of gravity sensing during ontogeny of the vestibular system. In otoconia-deficient mice (ied, gravity cannot be sensed and therefore maculo-ocular reflexes (MOR were absent. While canals-related reflexes were present, the ied deficit also led to the abnormal spatial tuning of the horizontal angular canal-related VOR. To identify putative otolith-related critical periods, normal C57Bl/6J mice were subjected to 2G hypergravity by chronic centrifugation during different periods of development or adulthood (Adult-HG and compared to non-centrifuged (control C57Bl/6J mice. Mice exposed to hypergravity during development had completely normal vestibulo-ocular reflexes 6 months after end of centrifugation. Adult-HG mice all displayed major abnormalities in maculo-ocular reflexe one month after return to normal gravity. During the next 5 months, adaptation to normal gravity occurred in half of the individuals. In summary, genetic suppression of gravity sensing indicated that otolith-related signals might be necessary to ensure proper functioning of canal-related vestibular reflexes. On the other hand, exposure to hypergravity during development was not sufficient to modify durably motor behaviour. Hence, 2G centrifugation during development revealed no otolith-specific critical period.

  16. Peaks and troughs of three-dimensional vestibulo-ocular reflex in humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goumans, Janine; Houben, Mark M J; Dits, Joyce; van der Steen, Johannes

    2010-09-01

    The three-dimensional vestibulo-ocular reflex (3D VOR) ideally generates compensatory ocular rotations not only with a magnitude equal and opposite to the head rotation but also about an axis that is collinear with the head rotation axis. Vestibulo-ocular responses only partially fulfill this ideal behavior. Because animal studies have shown that vestibular stimulation about particular axes may lead to suboptimal compensatory responses, we investigated in healthy subjects the peaks and troughs in 3D VOR stabilization in terms of gain and alignment of the 3D vestibulo-ocular response. Six healthy upright sitting subjects underwent whole body small amplitude sinusoidal and constant acceleration transients delivered by a six-degree-of-freedom motion platform. Subjects were oscillated about the vertical axis and about axes in the horizontal plane varying between roll and pitch at increments of 22.5 degrees in azimuth. Transients were delivered in yaw, roll, and pitch and in the vertical canal planes. Eye movements were recorded in with 3D search coils. Eye coil signals were converted to rotation vectors, from which we calculated gain and misalignment. During horizontal axis stimulation, systematic deviations were found. In the light, misalignment of the 3D VOR had a maximum misalignment at about 45 degrees . These deviations in misalignment can be explained by vector summation of the eye rotation components with a low gain for torsion and high gain for vertical. In the dark and in response to transients, gain of all components had lower values. Misalignment in darkness and for transients had different peaks and troughs than in the light: its minimum was during pitch axis stimulation and its maximum during roll axis stimulation. We show that the relatively large misalignment for roll in darkness is due to a horizontal eye movement component that is only present in darkness. In combination with the relatively low torsion gain, this horizontal component has a relative

  17. A signal analysis technique of vestibulo-ocular reflex stimulated with impulsive head movements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Juhola, Martti; Aalto, Heikki; Hirvonen, Timo

    2006-07-01

    Eye movements have been investigated in several areas of medicine and also elsewhere, such as in psychology or even in the development of human-computer interfaces. In the last few years we have designed a technique to stimulate, measure and analyze vestibulo-ocular reflex eye movements. In the otoneurological literature these are seen as a novel and promising means of revealing certain disorders and diseases associated with vertigo. Vestibulo-ocular reflex is stimulated by impulsive head movements. We developed the present pattern recognition technique to detect the stimulus (impulsive head movements) and the vestibulo-ocular reflex (response eye movements) generated from signals and to compute the latency and the gain values between them. Using our technique to calculate these attributes, we obtained clearly different results for a group of 22 dizzy patients than for a group of 30 healthy subjects.

  18. Binocular Coordination of the Human Vestibulo-Ocular Reflex during Off-axis Pitch Rotation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wood, S. J.; Reschke, M. F.; Kaufman, G. D.; Black, F. O.; Paloski, W. H.

    2006-01-01

    Head movements in the sagittal pitch plane typically involve off-axis rotation requiring both vertical and horizontal vergence ocular reflexes to compensate for angular and translational motion relative to visual targets of interest. The purpose of this study was to compare passive pitch VOR responses during rotation about an Earth-vertical axis (canal only cues) with off-axis rotation (canal and otolith cues). Methods. Eleven human subjects were oscillated sinusoidally at 0.13, 0.3 and 0.56 Hz while lying left-side down with the interaural axis either aligned with the axis of rotation or offset by 50 cm. In a second set of measurements, twelve subjects were also tested during sinusoidally varying centrifugation over the same frequency range. The modulation of vertical and horizontal vergence ocular responses was measured with a binocular videography system. Results. Off-axis pitch rotation enhanced the vertical VOR at lower frequencies and enhanced the vergence VOR at higher frequencies. During sinusoidally varying centrifugation, the opposite trend was observed for vergence, with both vertical and vergence vestibulo-ocular reflexes being suppressed at the highest frequency. Discussion. These differential effects of off-axis rotation over the 0.13 to 0.56 Hz range are consistent with the hypothesis that otolith-ocular reflexes are segregated in part on the basis of stimulus frequency. At the lower frequencies, tilt otolith-ocular responses compensate for declining canal input. At higher frequencies, translational otolith-ocular reflexes compensate for declining visual contributions to the kinematic demands required for fixating near targets.

  19. Translational Vestibulo-Ocular Reflexes During Off-Vertical Axis Rotation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wood, Scott J.; Clement, Gilles

    2009-01-01

    The translational vestibulo-ocular reflex (tVOR) is an otolith-mediated response that stabilizes near vision during linear acceleration at higher frequencies where visually mediated reflexes are not adequate. The modulation of horizontal and vergence eye movements during Off-Vertical Axis Rotation (OVAR) are presumed to reflect the tVOR in response to the continuously varying linear acceleration in the interaural and nasooccipital axes, respectively. The purpose of this study was to examine the effect of frequency and fixation distance on the modulation of slow phase eye velocity (SPV) as further evidence that the tVOR is elicited during OVAR. Eighteen subjects were rotated about their longitudinal axis tilted by 30 deg off-vertical. Rotational velocities varied between 18 and 288 deg/sec corresponding to a frequency range of 0.05 to 0.8 Hz. Fixation distance was altered by asking subjects to imagine stationary targets that were briefly presented at 0.5, 1 and 2 m during some rotation cycles. The target flash was 40 msec in the nose-up position at eye level. Oculomotor responses were recorded in the dark using infrared binocular videography. Sinusoidal curve fits were used to derive amplitude, phase and bias velocity of the eye movements across multiple rotation cycles. Consistent with previous studies, the modulation of both horizontal and vergence SPV increased with stimulus frequency. The effect of fixation distance was negligible at lower frequencies. The modulation of horizontal and vergence SPV was; however, proportional to fixation distance during OVAR at 0.8 Hz. This increasing sensitivity and dependence on fixation distance of horizontal and vergence SPV during OVAR is consistent with tVOR characteristics measured during other types of linear motion. We conclude that the modulation of horizontal and vergence SPV will be diagnostically more useful at higher stimulus frequencies where the tVOR is more robust.

  20. Translational Vestibulo-Ocular Reflexes During Off-Vertical Axis Rotation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wood, Scott J.; Clement, Gilles

    2009-01-01

    The translational vestibulo-ocular reflex (tVOR) is an otolith-mediated response that stabilizes near vision during linear acceleration at higher frequencies where visually mediated reflexes are not adequate. The modulation of horizontal and vergence eye movements during Off-Vertical Axis Rotation (OVAR) are presumed to reflect the tVOR in response to the continuously varying linear acceleration in the interaural and nasooccipital axes, respectively. The purpose of this study was to examine the effect of frequency and fixation distance on the modulation of slow phase eye velocity (SPV) as further evidence that the tVOR is elicited during OVAR. Eighteen subjects were rotated about their longitudinal axis tilted by 30 deg off-vertical. Rotational velocities varied between 18 and 288 deg/sec corresponding to a frequency range of 0.05 to 0.8 Hz. Fixation distance was altered by asking subjects to imagine stationary targets that were briefly presented at 0.5, 1 and 2 m during some rotation cycles. The target flash was 40 msec in the nose-up position at eye level. Oculomotor responses were recorded in the dark using infrared binocular videography. Sinusoidal curve fits were used to derive amplitude, phase and bias velocity of the eye movements across multiple rotation cycles. Consistent with previous studies, the modulation of both horizontal and vergence SPV increased with stimulus frequency. The effect of fixation distance was negligible at lower frequencies. The modulation of horizontal and vergence SPV was; however, proportional to fixation distance during OVAR at 0.8 Hz. This increasing sensitivity and dependence on fixation distance of horizontal and vergence SPV during OVAR is consistent with tVOR characteristics measured during other types of linear motion. We conclude that the modulation of horizontal and vergence SPV will be diagnostically more useful at higher stimulus frequencies where the tVOR is more robust.

  1. Neural learning rules for the vestibulo-ocular reflex

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raymond, J. L.; Lisberger, S. G.

    1998-01-01

    Mechanisms for the induction of motor learning in the vestibulo-ocular reflex (VOR) were evaluated by recording the patterns of neural activity elicited in the cerebellum by a range of stimuli that induce learning. Patterns of climbing-fiber, vestibular, and Purkinje cell simple-spike signals were examined during sinusoidal head movement paired with visual image movement at stimulus frequencies from 0.5 to 10 Hz. A comparison of simple-spike and vestibular signals contained the information required to guide learning only at low stimulus frequencies, and a comparison of climbing-fiber and simple-spike signals contained the information required to guide learning only at high stimulus frequencies. Learning could be guided by comparison of climbing-fiber and vestibular signals at all stimulus frequencies tested, but only if climbing fiber responses were compared with the vestibular signals present 100 msec earlier. Computational analysis demonstrated that this conclusion is valid even if there is a broad range of vestibular signals at the site of plasticity. Simulations also indicated that the comparison of vestibular and climbing-fiber signals across the 100 msec delay must be implemented by a subcellular "eligibility" trace rather than by neural circuits that delay the vestibular inputs to the site of plasticity. The results suggest two alternative accounts of learning in the VOR. Either there are multiple mechanisms of learning that use different combinations of neural signals to drive plasticity, or there is a single mechanism tuned to climbing-fiber activity that follows activity in vestibular pathways by approximately 100 msec.

  2. Visual suppression of the vestibulo-ocular reflex during space flight

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uri, John J.; Thornton, William E.; Moore, Thomas P.; Pool, Sam L.

    1989-01-01

    Visual suppression of the vestibulo-ocular reflex was studied in 16 subjects on 4 Space Shuttle missions. Eye movements were recorded by electro-oculography while subjects fixated a head mounted target during active sinusoidal head oscillation at 0.3 Hz. Adequacy of suppression was evaluated by the number of nystagmus beats, the mean amplitude of each beat, and the cumulative amplitude of nystagmus during two head oscillation cycles. Vestibulo-ocular reflex suppression was unaffected by space flight. Subjects with space motion sickness during flight had significantly more nystagmus beats than unaffected individuals. These susceptible subjects also tended to have more nystagmus beats before flight.

  3. The dynamic characteristics of the mouse horizontal vestibulo-ocular and optokinetic response

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    A.M. van Alphen (Arjan); J.S. Stahl (J.); C.I. de Zeeuw (Chris)

    2001-01-01

    textabstractIn the present study the optokinetic reflex, vestibulo-ocular reflex and their interaction were investigated in the mouse, using a modified subconjunctival search coil technique. Gain of the ocular response to sinusoidal optokinetic stimulation was relatively constant for peak velocities

  4. The dynamic characteristics of the mouse horizontal vestibulo-ocular and optokinetic response

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    A.M. van Alphen (Arjan); J.S. Stahl (J.); C.I. de Zeeuw (Chris)

    2001-01-01

    textabstractIn the present study the optokinetic reflex, vestibulo-ocular reflex and their interaction were investigated in the mouse, using a modified subconjunctival search coil technique. Gain of the ocular response to sinusoidal optokinetic stimulation was relatively constant for peak velocities

  5. Modulation of high-frequency vestibuloocular reflex during visual tracking in humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Das, V E; Leigh, R J; Thomas, C W; Averbuch-Heller, L; Zivotofsky, A Z; Discenna, A O; Dell'Osso, L F

    1995-08-01

    1. Humans may visually track a moving object either when they are stationary or in motion. To investigate visual-vestibular interaction during both conditions, we compared horizontal smooth pursuit (SP) and active combined eye-head tracking (CEHT) of a target moving sinusoidally at 0.4 Hz in four normal subjects while the subjects were either stationary or vibrated in yaw at 2.8 Hz. We also measured the visually enhanced vestibuloocular reflex (VVOR) during vibration in yaw at 2.8 Hz over a peak head velocity range of 5-40 degrees/s. 2. We found that the gain of the VVOR at 2.8 Hz increased in all four subjects as peak head velocity increased (P control condition when subjects were rotated in darkness. 3. During both horizontal SP and CEHT, tracking gains were similar, and the mean slip speed of the target's image on the retina was held below 5.5 degrees/s whether subjects were stationary or being vibrated at 2.8 Hz. During both horizontal SP and CEHT of target motion at 0.4 Hz, while subjects were vibrated in yaw, VVOR gain for the 2.8-Hz head rotations was similar to or higher than that achieved during fixation of a stationary target. This is in contrast to the decrease of VVOR gain that is reported while stationary subjects perform CEHT.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  6. Dynamic properties of the human vestibulo-ocular reflex during head rotations in roll

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seidman, S. H.; Leigh, R. J.; Tomsak, R. L.; Grant, M. P.; Dell'Osso, L. F.

    1995-01-01

    We investigated the dynamic properties of the human vestibulo-ocular reflex (VOR) during roll head rotations in three human subjects using the magnetic search coil technique. In the first of two experiments, we quantify the behavior of the ocular motor plant in the torsional plane. The subject's eye was mechanically displaced into intorsion, extorsion or abduction, and the dynamic course of return of the eye to its resting position was measured. The mean predominant time constants of return were 210 msec from intorsion, 83 msec from extorsion, and 217 msec from abduction, although there was considerable variability of results from different trials and subjects. In the second experiment, we quantify the efficacy of velocity-to-position integration of the vestibular signal. Position-step stimuli were used to test the torsional or horizontal VOR, being applied with subjects heads erect or supine. After a torsional position-step, the eye drifted back to its resting position, but after a horizontal position-step the eye held its new horizontal position. To interpret these responses we used a simple model of the VOR with parameters of the ocular motor plant set to values determined during Exp 1. The time constant of the velocity-to-position neural integrator was smaller (typically 2 sec) in the torsional plane than in the horizontal plane (> 20 sec). No disconjugacy of torsional eye movements was observed. Thus, the dynamic properties of the VOR in roll differ significantly from those of the VOR in yaw, reflecting different visual demands placed on this reflex in these two planes.

  7. Yaw sensory rearrangement alters pitch vestibulo-ocular reflex responses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petropoulos, A. E.; Wall, C. 3rd; Oman, C. M.

    1997-01-01

    Ten male subjects underwent two types of adaptation paradigm designed either to enhance or to attenuate the gain of the canal-ocular reflex (COR), before undergoing otolith-ocular reflex (OOR) testing with constant velocity, earth horizontal axis and pitch rotation. The adaptation paradigm paired a 0.2 Hz sinusoidal rotation about an earth vertical axis with a 0.2 Hz optokinetic stimulus that was deliberately mismatched in peak velocity or phase and was designed to produce short-term changes in the COR. Preadaptation and postadaptation OOR tests occurred at a constant velocity of 60 degrees/sec in the dark and produced a modulation component of the slow phase velocity with a frequency of 0.16 Hz due to otolithic stimulation by the sinusoidally changing gravity vector. Of the seven subjects who showed enhancement of the COR gain, six also showed enhancement of the OOR modulation component. Of the seven subjects who showed attenuation of the COR gain, five also showed attenuation of the OOR modulation component. The probability that these two cross-axis adaptation effects would occur by chance is less than 0.02. This suggests that visual-vestibular conditioning of the yaw axis COR also induced changes in the pitch axis OOR. We thus postulate that the central nervous system pathways that process horizontal canal yaw stimuli have elements in common with those processing otolithic stimuli about the pitch axis.

  8. Multiple types of cerebellar target neurons and their circuitry in the vestibulo-ocular reflex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shin, Minyoung; Moghadam, Setareh H; Sekirnjak, Chris; Bagnall, Martha W; Kolkman, Kristine E; Jacobs, Richard; Faulstich, Michael; du Lac, Sascha

    2011-07-27

    The cerebellum influences behavior and cognition exclusively via Purkinje cell synapses onto neurons in the deep cerebellar and vestibular nuclei. In contrast with the rich information available about the organization of the cerebellar cortex and its synaptic inputs, relatively little is known about microcircuitry postsynaptic to Purkinje cells. Here we examined the cell types and microcircuits through which Purkinje cells influence an oculomotor behavior controlled by the cerebellum, the horizontal vestibulo-ocular reflex, which involves only two eye muscles. Using a combination of anatomical tracing and electrophysiological recordings in transgenic mouse lines, we identified several classes of neurons in the medial vestibular nucleus that receive Purkinje cell synapses from the cerebellar flocculus. Glycinergic and glutamatergic flocculus target neurons (FTNs) with somata densely surrounded by Purkinje cell terminals projected axons to the ipsilateral abducens and oculomotor nuclei, respectively. Of three additional types of FTNs that were sparsely innervated by Purkinje cells, glutamatergic and glycinergic neurons projected to the contralateral and ipsilateral abducens, respectively, and GABAergic neurons projected to contralateral vestibular nuclei. Densely innervated FTNs had high spontaneous firing rates and pronounced postinhibitory rebound firing, and were physiologically homogeneous, whereas the intrinsic excitability of sparsely innervated FTNs varied widely. Heterogeneity in the molecular expression, physiological properties, and postsynaptic targets of FTNs implies that Purkinje cell activity influences the neural control of eye movements in several distinct ways. These results indicate that the cerebellum regulates a simple reflex behavior via at least five different cell types that are postsynaptic to Purkinje cells.

  9. Context compensation in the vestibulo-ocular reflex during active head rotations

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Medendorp, W.P.; Gisbergen, J.A.M. van; Pelt, S. van; Gielen, C.C.A.M.

    2000-01-01

    The vestibuloocular reflex (VOR) needs to modulate its gain depending on target distance to prevent retinal slip during head movements. We investigated gain modulation (context compensation) for binocular gaze stabilization in human subjects during voluntary yaw and pitch head rotations. Movements o

  10. Reversal of Motor Learning in the Vestibulo-Ocular Reflex in the Absence of Visual Input

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cohen, Marlene R.; Meissner, Geoffrey W.; Schafer, Robert J.; Raymond, Jennifer L.

    2004-01-01

    Motor learning in the vestibulo-ocular reflex (VOR) and eyeblink conditioning use similar neural circuitry, and they may use similar cellular plasticity mechanisms. Classically conditioned eyeblink responses undergo extinction after prolonged exposure to the conditioned stimulus in the absence of the unconditioned stimulus. We investigated the…

  11. The bedside examination of the vestibulo-ocular reflex (VOR): an update.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kheradmand, A; Zee, D S

    2012-10-01

    Diagnosing dizzy patients remains a daunting challenge to the clinician in spite of modern imaging and increasingly sophisticated electrophysiological testing. Here we review the major bedside tests of the vestibulo-ocular reflex and how, when combined with a proper examination of the other eye movement systems, one can arrive at an accurate vestibular diagnosis.

  12. Disorders of gaze related to vertigo: physiological mechanisms of vestibuloocular and optokinetic reflex

    OpenAIRE

    Saborío Morales, Lachiner; Monge Rodríguez, Silvia Leticia; Ramírez Rojas, Ana Carolina; Tencio Araya, José Alfredo; Brenes García, Oscar

    2016-01-01

    Vestibulo-ocular and optokinetic reflex are evoked by changes in head position or movement of the visual field, the result is a nystagmus, defined by a slow phase and subsequently a rapid phase. The objective of this work is to explain the physiological mechanism involved in these reflexes. The pathways explaining the generation of these responses include a complex integration system of the motor vestibular system, ocular system, many nucleus in the brainstem, cerebellum, somatosensory cortex...

  13. DVA as a Diagnostic Test for Vestibulo-Ocular Reflex Function

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wood, Scott J.; Appelbaum, Meghan

    2010-01-01

    The vestibulo-ocular reflex (VOR) stabilizes vision on earth-fixed targets by eliciting eyes movements in response to changes in head position. How well the eyes perform this task can be functionally measured by the dynamic visual acuity (DVA) test. We designed a passive, horizontal DVA test to specifically study the acuity and reaction time when looking in different target locations. Visual acuity was compared among 12 subjects using a standard Landolt C wall chart, a computerized static (no rotation) acuity test and dynamic acuity test while oscillating at 0.8 Hz (+/-60 deg/s). In addition, five trials with yaw oscillation randomly presented a visual target in one of nine different locations with the size and presentation duration of the visual target varying across trials. The results showed a significant difference between the static and dynamic threshold acuities as well as a significant difference between the visual targets presented in the horizontal plane versus those in the vertical plane when comparing accuracy of vision and reaction time of the response. Visual acuity increased proportional to the size of the visual target and increased between 150 and 300 msec duration. We conclude that dynamic visual acuity varies with target location, with acuity optimized for targets in the plane of rotation. This DVA test could be used as a functional diagnostic test for visual-vestibular and neuro-cognitive impairments by assessing both accuracy and reaction time to acquire visual targets.

  14. Modulation of high-frequency vestibuloocular reflex during visual tracking in humans

    Science.gov (United States)

    Das, V. E.; Leigh, R. J.; Thomas, C. W.; Averbuch-Heller, L.; Zivotofsky, A. Z.; Discenna, A. O.; Dell'Osso, L. F.

    1995-01-01

    1. Humans may visually track a moving object either when they are stationary or in motion. To investigate visual-vestibular interaction during both conditions, we compared horizontal smooth pursuit (SP) and active combined eye-head tracking (CEHT) of a target moving sinusoidally at 0.4 Hz in four normal subjects while the subjects were either stationary or vibrated in yaw at 2.8 Hz. We also measured the visually enhanced vestibuloocular reflex (VVOR) during vibration in yaw at 2.8 Hz over a peak head velocity range of 5-40 degrees/s. 2. We found that the gain of the VVOR at 2.8 Hz increased in all four subjects as peak head velocity increased (P tracking gains were similar, and the mean slip speed of the target's image on the retina was held below 5.5 degrees/s whether subjects were stationary or being vibrated at 2.8 Hz. During both horizontal SP and CEHT of target motion at 0.4 Hz, while subjects were vibrated in yaw, VVOR gain for the 2.8-Hz head rotations was similar to or higher than that achieved during fixation of a stationary target. This is in contrast to the decrease of VVOR gain that is reported while stationary subjects perform CEHT.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS).

  15. Adaptation of the vertical vestibulo-ocular reflex in cats during low-frequency vertical rotation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fushiki, Hiroaki; Maruyama, Motoyoshi; Shojaku, Hideo

    2017-04-27

    We examined plastic changes in the vestibulo-ocular reflex (VOR) during low-frequency vertical head rotation, a condition under which otolith inputs from the vestibular system are essential for VOR generation. For adaptive conditioning of the vertical VOR, 0.02Hz sinusoidal pitch rotation for one hour about the earth's horizontal axis was synchronized with out-of-phase vertical visual stimulation from a random dot pattern. A vertical VOR was well evoked when the upright animal rotated around the earth-horizontal axis (EHA) at low frequency due to the changing gravity stimulus and dynamic stimulation of the otoliths. After adaptive conditioning, the amplitude of the vertical VOR increased by an average of 32.1%. Our observations showing plasticity in the otolithic contribution to the VOR may provide a new strategy for visual-vestibular mismatch training in patients with otolithic disorders. This low-frequency vertical head rotation protocol also provides a model for investigating the mechanisms underlying the adaptation of VORs mediated by otolith activation. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. Cross-axis adaptation of torsional components in the yaw-axis vestibulo-ocular reflex

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trillenberg, P.; Shelhamer, M.; Roberts, D. C.; Zee, D. S.

    2003-01-01

    The three pairs of semicircular canals within the labyrinth are not perfectly aligned with the pulling directions of the six extraocular muscles. Therefore, for a given head movement, the vestibulo-ocular reflex (VOR) depends upon central neural mechanisms that couple the canals to the muscles with the appropriate functional gains in order to generate a response that rotates the eye the correct amount and around the correct axis. A consequence of these neural connections is a cross-axis adaptive capability, which can be stimulated experimentally when head rotation is around one axis and visual motion about another. From this visual-vestibular conflict the brain infers that the slow-phase eye movement is rotating around the wrong axis. We explored the capability of human cross-axis adaptation, using a short-term training paradigm, to determine if torsional eye movements could be elicited by yaw (horizontal) head rotation (where torsion is normally inappropriate). We applied yaw sinusoidal head rotation (+/-10 degrees, 0.33 Hz) and measured eye movement responses in the dark, and before and after adaptation. The adaptation paradigm lasted 45-60 min, and consisted of the identical head motion, coupled with a moving visual scene that required one of several types of eye movements: (1) torsion alone (-Roll); (2) horizontal/torsional, head right/CW torsion (Yaw-Roll); (3) horizontal/torsional, head right/CCW torsion (Yaw+Roll); (4) horizontal, vertical, torsional combined (Yaw+Pitch-Roll); and (5) horizontal and vertical together (Yaw+Pitch). The largest and most significant changes in torsional amplitude occurred in the Yaw-Roll and Yaw+Roll conditions. We conclude that short-term, cross-axis adaptation of torsion is possible but constrained by the complexity of the adaptation task: smaller torsional components are produced if more than one cross-coupling component is required. In contrast, vertical cross-axis components can be easily trained to occur with yaw head

  17. Velocity storage in the human vertical rotational vestibulo-ocular reflex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bertolini, G; Ramat, S

    2011-03-01

    Human horizontal rotational vestibulo-ocular reflex (rVOR) has been extensively investigated: the horizontal semicircular canals sense yaw rotations with high-pass filter dynamics and a time constant (TC) around 5 s, yet the rVOR response shows a longer TC due to a central processing stage, known as velocity storage mechanism (VSM). It is generally assumed that the vertical rVOR behaves similarly to the horizontal one; however, VSM processing of the human vertical rVOR is still to be proven. We investigated the vertical rVOR in eight healthy human subjects using three experimental paradigms: (1) per- and post-rotatory around an earth-vertical axis (ear down rotations, EDR), (2) post-rotatory around an earth-horizontal axis with different stopping positions (static otolith stimulation), (3) per-rotatory around an earth-horizontal axis (dynamic otolith stimulation). We found that the TC of vertical rVOR responses ranged 3-10 s, depending both on gravity and on the direction of rotation. The shortest TC were found in response to post-rotatory earth-horizontal stimulation averaging 3.6 s, while they were prolonged in EDR stimulation, i.e. when the head angular velocity vector is aligned with gravity, with a mean value of about 6.0 s. Overall, the longest TC were observed in per-rotatory earth-horizontal stimulation, averaging 7.8 s. The finding of longer TC in EDR than in post-rotatory earth-horizontal stimulation indicates a role for the VSM in the vertical rVOR, although its contribution appears to be weaker than on the horizontal rVOR and may be directionally asymmetric. The results from per-rotatory earth-horizontal stimulation, instead, imply a role for the otoliths in controlling the duration of the vertical rVOR response. We found no reorientation of the response toward earth horizontal, indicating a difference between human and monkey rVOR.

  18. System identification of the human vestibulo-ocular reflex during head-free tracking.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tangorra, James L; Jones, Lynette A; Hunter, Ian W

    2004-01-01

    A method was developed to identify the linear, system level dynamics of the horizontal, angular vestibulo-ocular reflex (VOR) as it stabilized vision during head-free tracking of a visual target. Small amplitude, broad spectrum, stochastic torque perturbations were applied to the head while the subject tracked an unpredictable, moving target with active head and eye motions. Stochastic system identification techniques were used to design the torque and target inputs and to conduct the analysis such that the linear dynamics of the VOR, independently of the visual system's influence on eye motions, were determined. The linear analysis was limited to evaluating VOR dynamics from approximately 0.5 to 4.5 Hz. Nonlinearities in the head-neck system affected the low frequency response of the head to the torque perturbations, and the eye velocity sequence was affected by nonlinearities and degraded by noise at high frequencies. The VOR's gain was near 1.0 between about 0.5 and 2.5 Hz, and then decreased steadily to 0.85 as the frequency increased towards 4.0 Hz. The VOR phase angle was also frequency dependent and corresponded to VOR eye motions lagging the head's disturbance motion by less than 10 ms at frequencies greater than 1.0 Hz.

  19. The vestibular implant: Frequency-dependency of the electrically evoked Vestibulo-Ocular Reflex in humans

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raymond eVan De Berg

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The Vestibulo-Ocular Reflex (VOR shows frequency-dependent behavior. This study investigated whether the characteristics of the electrically evoked VOR (eVOR elicited by a vestibular implant, showed the same frequency-dependency.Twelve vestibular electrodes implanted in 7 patients with bilateral vestibular hypofunction were tested. Stimuli consisted of amplitude-modulated electrical stimulation with a sinusoidal profile at frequencies of 0.5Hz, 1Hz, and 2Hz. The main characteristics of the eVOR were evaluated and compared to the natural VOR characteristics measured in a group of age-matched healthy volunteers who were subjected to horizontal whole body rotations with equivalent sinusoidal velocity profiles at the same frequencies.A strong and significant effect of frequency was observed in the total peak eye velocity of the eVOR. This effect was similar to that observed in the natural VOR. Other characteristics of the (eVOR (angle, habituation-index, and asymmetry showed no significant frequency-dependent effect. In conclusion, this study demonstrates that, at least at the specific (limited frequency range tested, responses elicited by a vestibular implant closely mimic the frequency-dependency of the normal vestibular system.

  20. The vestibular implant: frequency-dependency of the electrically evoked vestibulo-ocular reflex in humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van de Berg, Raymond; Guinand, Nils; Nguyen, T A Khoa; Ranieri, Maurizio; Cavuscens, Samuel; Guyot, Jean-Philippe; Stokroos, Robert; Kingma, Herman; Perez-Fornos, Angelica

    2014-01-01

    The vestibulo-ocular reflex (VOR) shows frequency-dependent behavior. This study investigated whether the characteristics of the electrically evoked VOR (eVOR) elicited by a vestibular implant, showed the same frequency-dependency. Twelve vestibular electrodes implanted in seven patients with bilateral vestibular hypofunction (BVH) were tested. Stimuli consisted of amplitude-modulated electrical stimulation with a sinusoidal profile at frequencies of 0.5, 1, and 2 Hz. The main characteristics of the eVOR were evaluated and compared to the "natural" VOR characteristics measured in a group of age-matched healthy volunteers who were subjected to horizontal whole body rotations with equivalent sinusoidal velocity profiles at the same frequencies. A strong and significant effect of frequency was observed in the total peak eye velocity of the eVOR. This effect was similar to that observed in the "natural" VOR. Other characteristics of the (e)VOR (angle, habituation-index, and asymmetry) showed no significant frequency-dependent effect. In conclusion, this study demonstrates that, at least at the specific (limited) frequency range tested, responses elicited by a vestibular implant closely mimic the frequency-dependency of the "normal" vestibular system.

  1. The human translational vestibulo-ocular reflex in response to complex motion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walker, Mark; Liao, Ke

    2011-09-01

    We studied the translational vestibulo-ocular reflex (tVOR) in four healthy human subjects during complex, unpredictable sum-of-sines head motion (combination of 0.73, 1.33, 1.93, and 2.93 Hz), while subjects viewed a target 15 cm away. Ideal eye velocity was calculated from recorded head motion; actual eye velocity was measured with scleral coils. The gain and phase for each frequency component was determined by least-squares optimization. Gain averaged approximately 40% and did not change with frequency; phase lag increased with frequency to a maximum of 66°. Fitting actual to ideal eye velocity predicted a tVOR latency of 48 m/s for vertical and 38 m/s for horizontal translation. These findings provide further evidence that the normal tVOR is considerably undercompensatory, even at low frequencies if the stimulus is not predictable. The similarity of this behavior to that of pursuit suggests that these two eye movements may share some aspects of neural processing.

  2. Kinematic principles of primate rotational vestibulo-ocular reflex. I. Spatial organization of fast phase velocity axes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hess, B. J.; Angelaki, D. E.

    1997-01-01

    The spatial organization of fast phase velocity vectors of the vestibulo-ocular reflex (VOR) was studied in rhesus monkeys during yaw rotations about an earth-horizontal axis that changed continuously the orientation of the head relative to gravity ("barbecue spit" rotation). In addition to a velocity component parallel to the rotation axis, fast phases also exhibited a velocity component that invariably was oriented along the momentary direction of gravity. As the head rotated through supine and prone positions, torsional components of fast phase velocity axes became prominent. Similarly, as the head rotated through left and right ear-down positions, fast phase velocity axes exhibited prominent vertical components. The larger the speed of head rotation the greater the magnitude of this fast phase component, which was collinear with gravity. The main sequence properties of VOR fast phases were independent of head position. However, peak amplitude as well as peak velocity of fast phases were both modulated as a function of head orientation, exhibiting a minimum in prone position. The results suggest that the fast phases of vestibulo-ocular reflexes not only redirect gaze and reposition the eye in the direction of head motion but also reorient the eye with respect to earth-vertical when the head moves relative to gravity. As further elaborated in the companion paper, the underlying mechanism could be described as a dynamic, gravity-dependent modulation of the coordinates of ocular rotations relative to the head.

  3. Kinematic principles of primate rotational vestibulo-ocular reflex. II. Gravity-dependent modulation of primary eye position

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hess, B. J.; Angelaki, D. E.

    1997-01-01

    The kinematic constraints of three-dimensional eye positions were investigated in rhesus monkeys during passive head and body rotations relative to gravity. We studied fast and slow phase components of the vestibulo-ocular reflex (VOR) elicited by constant-velocity yaw rotations and sinusoidal oscillations about an earth-horizontal axis. We found that the spatial orientation of both fast and slow phase eye positions could be described locally by a planar surface with torsional variation of 10-15 degrees ) of fast phase positions when expressed relative to Listing's plane. We conclude that primary eye position depends dynamically on head orientation relative to space rather than being fixed to the head. It defines a gravity-dependent coordinate system relative to which the torsional variability of eye positions is minimized even when the head is moved passively and vestibulo-ocular reflexes are evoked. In this general sense, Listing's law is preserved with respect to an otolith-controlled reference system that is defined dynamically by gravity.

  4. Effects of 4-aminopyridine on nystagmus and vestibulo-ocular reflex in ataxia-telangiectasia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shaikh, Aasef G; Marti, Sarah; Tarnutzer, Alexander A; Palla, Antonella; Crawford, Thomas O; Zee, David S; Straumann, Dominik

    2013-11-01

    Ataxia-telangiectasia (A-T) is a progressive neurodegenerative disorder with prominent eye movement deficits localizing to the cerebellum. We sought to determine if 4-aminopyridine (4-AP), which putatively enhances the precision of Purkinje neurons, could improve the disorders of eye movements and vestibular function in A-T. The influence of 4-AP on disorders of eye movements and vestibular function was studied in four A-T patients. The effects on the cerebellar control of vestibulo-ocular reflex (VOR) was quantitatively assessed by the decay time constant of per- and post-rotational nystagmus during constant velocity en bloc rotations. The length of the VOR time constant determines the fidelity of the vestibular velocity storage, a neural mechanism that increases the bandwidth of VOR under cerebellar control. The VOR time constant was not increased in A-T patients. The latter is explained by the extent of cerebellar lesion as previously described in A-T and other cerebellar disorders. Nevertheless, 4-AP shortened the VOR time constant during horizontal rotations. Severe disinhibition of velocity storage in subjects with putatively profound cerebellar degeneration manifest periodic alternating nystagmus (PAN). Among two A-T subjects who manifested PAN, 4-AP reduced the peak slow phase velocity of the more severely affected individual and abrogated the PAN in the other. Two A-T subjects manifested horizontal and vertical spontaneous nystagmus (SN) in primary gaze, 4-AP reduced its slow phase velocity. We conclude that in subjects with A-T 4-AP has a prominent effect on the ocular motor and vestibular deficits that are ascribed to the loss of cerebellar Purkinje neurons.

  5. Modification of the Passive Vestibulo-Ocular Reflex During and After Short-Duration Spaceflight

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wood, S. J.; Reschke, M. F.

    2011-01-01

    The vestibulo-ocular reflex (VOR) is mediated by integration of canal and otolith inputs to generate compensatory eye movements during head movements. We hypothesized that adaptive change in vestibular processing of gravitoinertial cues would be reflected by plane specific modification of the VOR during passive whole-body rotation during and after spaceflight. Using a repeated measures design, the VOR was assessed in four payload crewmembers in yaw, pitch and roll planes during multiple sessions before, during and after an 8 day orbital mission (STS-42). Rotation was about an earth-vertical axis during ground tests, with the head located off-axis by up to 45cm during pitch and roll rotation (peak acceleration less than 0.2g). The motion profiles included sum-of-sinusoids between 0.02 - 1.39 Hz (yaw), single sinusoids between 0.05-1.25 Hz (yaw and pitch) and velocity steps (yaw, pitch and roll). Eye movements were recorded with both video and electro-oculographic techniques. As expected, VOR gain changes were greater in pitch than in yaw. During pitch rotation, there was a progressive shift in the axis of eye movements during the flight, which was also present during the early post-flight period. This increased horizontal component during pitch, most prevalent at 0.2 Hz, was interpreted as an increase in a translational vergence response elicited during eccentric rotation as subjects imagined a wall fixed target. There was also an increased horizontal component during the eccentric roll step runs performed on flight day 7. These results are consistent with a frequency-dependent increase in otolith-mediated translational VOR responses following adaptation to microgravity. We conclude that the adaptive changes in the VOR are likely to be greatest in the frequency range where there is a cross-over of otolith-mediated tilt and translation responses.

  6. Correlation between vestibulo-ocular reflex and optokinetic afternystagmus in normal subjects and in patients with vestibular system disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dellepiane, M; Medicina, M C; Barettini, L; Mura, A C

    2006-02-01

    Optokinetic afternystagmus follows optokinetic nystagmus as an expression of the central velocity storage integrator discharge and its fast phase is beating in the same direction as the previous optokinetic nystagmus. We investigated the correlation between vestibulo-ocular reflex and optokinetic afternystagmus in normal subjects and in patients with bilateral vestibular disorders. The aim of this study was to determine the possible role of optokinetic afternystagmus as a diagnostic test for identifying functional vestibular disorders. The subjects were examined by electronystagmography and vestibulo-ocular reflex, optokinetic nystagmus stare type as well as optokinetic afternystagmus were recorded. They were restrained in a rotatory drum chair, both the chair and the drum could be rotated, independently or coupled. For vestibulo-ocular reflex analysis, we studied post-rotatory-nystagmus from a velocity of 90 degrees s. Optokinetic nystagmus was recorded at a drum velocity of 30 degrees s and the registration continued in total darkness, after the illumination was switched off, to study optokinetic afternystagmus. We considered vestibulo-ocular reflex and optokinetic nystagmus gain, vestibulo-ocular reflex and optokinetic afternystagmus constant of time (tc) defined as the time necessary for the slow phase eye velocity to be reduced to 37% of its initial value. Results demonstrated that vestibulo-ocular reflex gain and ct showed a significant difference only in patients with reduced vestibular reflexia, while optokinetic nystagmus gain was greater only in patients with increased reflexia; optokinetic afternystagmus ct was different from the control group only in patients with hyporeflexia. In conclusion, our results suggest that vestibulo-ocular reflex and optokinetic afternystagmus ct are clinically more useful than the gain alone in testing vestibular disorders with hyporeflexia. On the other hand, we propose a new mathematical and statistical approach to study

  7. Chronic symptoms after vestibular neuritis and the high velocity vestibulo-ocular reflex

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patel, Mitesh; Arshad, Qadeer; Roberts, R Edward; Ahmad, Hena; Bronstein, Adolfo M.

    2015-01-01

    Hypothesis As the anterior and posterior semicircular canals are vital to the regulation of gaze stability, particularly during locomotion or vehicular travel, we tested whether the high velocity vestibulo-ocular reflex (VOR) of the three ipsilesional semicircular canals elicited by the modified Head Impulse Test would correlate with subjective dizziness or vertigo scores after vestibular neuritis (VN). Background Recovery following acute VN varies with around half reporting persistent symptoms long after the acute episode. However, an unanswered question is whether chronic symptoms are associated with impairment of the high velocity VOR of the anterior or posterior canals. Methods Twenty patients who had experienced an acute episode of VN at least three months earlier were included in this study. Participants were assessed with the video head impulse test (vHIT) of all six canals, bithermal caloric irrigation, the Dizziness Handicap Inventory (DHI) and the Vertigo Symptoms Scale short-form (VSS). Results Of these 20 patients, 12 felt that they had recovered from the initial episode whereas 8 did not and reported elevated DHI and VSS scores. However, we found no correlation between DHI or VSS scores and the ipsilesional single or combined vHIT gain, vHIT gain asymmetry or caloric paresis. The high velocity VOR was not different between patients who felt they had recovered and patients who felt they had not. Conclusions Our findings suggest that chronic symptoms of dizziness following VN are not associated with the high velocity VOR of the single or combined ipsilesional horizontal, anterior or posterior semicircular canals. PMID:26719963

  8. Prolonged vestibular stimulation induces homeostatic plasticity of the vestibulo-ocular reflex in larval Xenopus laevis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dietrich, Haike; Straka, Hans

    2016-07-01

    Vestibulo-ocular reflexes (VOR) stabilise retinal images during head/body motion in vertebrates by generating spatio-temporally precise extraocular motor commands for corrective eye movements. While VOR performance is generally robust with a relatively stable gain, cerebellar circuits are capable of adapting the underlying sensory-motor transformation. Here, we studied cerebellum-dependent VOR plasticity by recording head motion-induced lateral rectus and superior oblique extraocular motor discharge in semi-intact preparations of Xenopus laevis tadpoles. In the absence of visual feedback, prolonged sinusoidal rotation caused either an increase or decrease of the VOR gain depending on the motion stimulus amplitude. The observed changes in extraocular motor discharge gradually saturated after 20 min of constant rotation and returned to baseline in the absence of motion stimulation. Furthermore, plastic changes in lateral rectus and superior oblique motor commands were plane-specific for horizontal and vertical rotations, respectively, suggesting that alterations are restricted to principal VOR connections. Comparison of multi- and single-unit activity indicated that plasticity occurs in all recorded units of a given extraocular motor nucleus. Ablation of the cerebellum abolished motoneuronal gain changes and prevented the induction of plasticity, thus demonstrating that both acquisition and retention of this type of plasticity require an intact cerebellar circuitry. In conclusion, the plane-specific and stimulus intensity-dependent modification of the VOR gain through the feed-forward cerebellar circuitry represents a homeostatic plasticity that likely maintains an optimal working range for the underlying sensory-motor transformation.

  9. The effect of retinal image error update rate on human vestibulo-ocular reflex gain adaptation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fadaee, Shannon B; Migliaccio, Americo A

    2016-04-01

    The primary function of the angular vestibulo-ocular reflex (VOR) is to stabilise images on the retina during head movements. Retinal image movement is the likely feedback signal that drives VOR modification/adaptation for different viewing contexts. However, it is not clear whether a retinal image position or velocity error is used primarily as the feedback signal. Recent studies examining this signal are limited because they used near viewing to modify the VOR. However, it is not known whether near viewing drives VOR adaptation or is a pre-programmed contextual cue that modifies the VOR. Our study is based on analysis of the VOR evoked by horizontal head impulses during an established adaptation task. Fourteen human subjects underwent incremental unilateral VOR adaptation training and were tested using the scleral search coil technique over three separate sessions. The update rate of the laser target position (source of the retinal image error signal) used to drive VOR adaptation was different for each session [50 (once every 20 ms), 20 and 15/35 Hz]. Our results show unilateral VOR adaptation occurred at 50 and 20 Hz for both the active (23.0 ± 9.6 and 11.9 ± 9.1% increase on adapting side, respectively) and passive VOR (13.5 ± 14.9, 10.4 ± 12.2%). At 15 Hz, unilateral adaptation no longer occurred in the subject group for both the active and passive VOR, whereas individually, 4/9 subjects tested at 15 Hz had significant adaptation. Our findings suggest that 1-2 retinal image position error signals every 100 ms (i.e. target position update rate 15-20 Hz) are sufficient to drive VOR adaptation.

  10. Modeling the vestibulo-ocular reflex of the squirrel monkey during eccentric rotation and roll tilt

    Science.gov (United States)

    Merfeld, D. M.; Paloski, W. H. (Principal Investigator)

    1995-01-01

    Model simulations of the squirrel monkey vestibulo-ocular reflex (VOR) are presented for two motion paradigms: constant velocity eccentric rotation and roll tilt about a naso-occipital axis. The model represents the implementation of three hypotheses: the "internal model" hypothesis, the "gravito-inertial force (GIF) resolution" hypothesis, and the "compensatory VOR" hypothesis. The internal model hypothesis is based on the idea that the nervous system knows the dynamics of the sensory systems and implements this knowledge as an internal dynamic model. The GIF resolution hypothesis is based on the idea that the nervous system knows that gravity minus linear acceleration equals GIF and implements this knowledge by resolving the otolith measurement of GIF into central estimates of gravity and linear acceleration, such that the central estimate of gravity minus the central estimate of acceleration equals the otolith measurement of GIF. The compensatory VOR hypothesis is based on the idea that the VOR compensates for the central estimates of angular velocity and linear velocity, which sum in a near-linear manner. During constant velocity eccentric rotation, the model correctly predicts that: (1) the peak horizontal response is greater while "facing-motion" than with "back-to-motion"; (2) the axis of eye rotation shifts toward alignment with GIF; and (3) a continuous vertical response, slow phase downward, exists prior to deceleration. The model also correctly predicts that a torsional response during the roll rotation is the only velocity response observed during roll rotations about a naso-occipital axis. The success of this model in predicting the observed experimental responses suggests that the model captures the essence of the complex sensory interactions engendered by eccentric rotation and roll tilt.

  11. Abnormal Vestibulo-Ocular Reflexes in Autism: A Potential Endophenotype

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-06-01

    Vertical and horizontal smooth pursuit eye movements in children: A neuro-developmental study. European Journal of Paediatric Neurology 13, 362-366...Buttner, U. (2007) Neuro- Ophthalmology : Neuronal Control of Eye Movements. Karger, Basel, Switzerland.

  12. Visual contribution to the high-frequency human angular vestibulo-ocular reflex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chim, Daniel; Lasker, David M; Migliaccio, Americo A

    2013-09-01

    The vestibulo-ocular reflex (VOR) acts to maintain images stable on the retina by rotating the eyes in exactly the opposite direction, but with equal magnitude, to head velocity. When viewing a near target, this reflex has an increased response to compensate for the translation of the eyes relative to the target that acts to reduce retinal image slip. Previous studies have shown that retinal velocity error provides an important visual feedback signal to increase the low-frequency (<1 Hz) VOR response during near viewing. We sought to determine whether initial eye position and retinal image position error could provide enough information to substantially increase the high-frequency VOR gain (eye velocity/head velocity) during near viewing. Ten human subjects were tested using the scleral search coil technique during horizontal head impulses under different lighting conditions (constant dark, strobe light at 0.5, 1, 2, 4, 10, 15 Hz, constant light) while viewing near (9.5 ± 1.3 cm) and far (104 cm) targets. Our results showed that the VOR gain increased during near viewing compared to far viewing, even during constant dark. For the near target, there was an increase in VOR gain with increasing strobe frequency from 1.17 ± 0.17 in constant dark to 1.36 ± 0.27 in constant light, a 21 ± 9 % increase. For the far target, strobe frequency had no effect. Presentation order of strobe frequency (i.e. 0.5-15 vs. 15-0.5 Hz) did not affect the gain, but it did affect the vergence angle (angle between the two eye's lines of sight). The VOR gain and vergence angles were constant during each trial. Our findings show that a retinal position error signal helps increase the vergence angle and could be invoking vestibular adaptation mechanisms to increase the high-frequency VOR response during near viewing. This is in contrast to the low-frequency VOR that depends more on retinal velocity error and predictive adaptation mechanisms.

  13. Vestibulo-Ocular Reflex Suppression during Head-Fixed Saccades Reveals Gaze Feedback Control

    OpenAIRE

    Daye, Pierre M.; Dale C Roberts; David S Zee; Optican, Lance M.

    2015-01-01

    Previous experiments have shown that the vestibulo-ocular reflex (VOR) is partially suppressed during large head-free gaze (gaze = eye-in-head + head-in-space) shifts when both the eyes and head are moving actively, on a fixed body, or when the eyes are moving actively and the head passively on a fixed body. We tested, in human subjects, the hypothesis that the VOR is also suppressed during gaze saccades made with en bloc, head and body together, rotations. Subjects made saccades by following...

  14. The vestibulo-ocular reflex and its possible roles in space motion sickness

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watt, Douglas G. D.

    1987-01-01

    Prolonged exposure to an inappropriate vestibulo-ocular reflex (VOR) will usually lead to motion sickness, and it has been predicted on theoretical grounds that VOR gain may be decreased in weightlessness. While experiments during parabolic flight in aircraft tend to confirm this prediction, experiments during orbital spaceflight have led to apparently contradictory results. It is suggested that VOR gain is reduced initially, but that rapid compensatory mechanisms restore it to normal within minutes of reaching weightlessness. However, even though this process may lead to the rapid return of functionally normal gaze stability, it may not protect against the development of motion sickness.

  15. A linear canal-otolith interaction model to describe the human vestibulo-ocular reflex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crane, B T; Demer, J L

    1999-08-01

    A control systems model of the vestibulo-ocular reflex (VOR) originally derived for yaw rotation about an eccentric axis (Crane et al. 1997) was applied to data collected during ambulation and dynamic posturography. The model incorporates a linear summation of an otolith response due to head translation scaled by target distance, adding to a semi-circular canal response that depends only on angular head rotation. The results of the model were compared with human experimental data by supplying head angular velocity as determined by magnetic search coil recording as the input for the canal branch of the model and supplying linear acceleration as determined by flux gate magnetometer measurements of otolith position. The model was fit to data by determining otolith weighting that enabled the model to best fit the data. We fit to the model experimental data from normal subjects who were: standing quietly, walking, running, or making active sinusoidal head movements. We also fit data obtained during dynamic posturography tasks of: standing on a platform sliding in a horizontal plane at 0.2 Hz, standing directly on a platform tilting at 0.1 Hz, and standing on the tilting platform buffered by a 5-cm thick foam rubber cushion. Each task was done with the subject attending a target approximately 500, 100, or 50 cm distant, both in light and darkness. The model accurately predicted the observed VOR response during each test. Greater otolith weighting was required for near targets for nearly all activities, consistent with weights for the otolith component found in previous studies employing imposed rotations. The only exceptions were for vertical axis motion during standing, sliding, and tilting when the platform was buffered with foam rubber. In the horizontal axis, the model always fit near target data better with a higher otolith component. Otolith weights were similar with the target visible and in darkness. The model predicts eye movement during both passive whole

  16. The vestibulo-ocular reflex of the squirrel monkey during eccentric rotation and roll tilt

    Science.gov (United States)

    Merfeld, D. M.; Young, L. R.

    1995-01-01

    The vestibulo-ocular reflexes (VOR) are determined not only by angular acceleration, but also by the presence of gravity and linear acceleration. This phenomenon was studied by measuring three-dimensional nystagmic eye movements, with implanted search coils, in six male squirrel monkeys during eccentric rotation. Monkeys were rotated in the dark at a constant velocity of 200 degrees/s (centrally or 79 cm off axis) with the axis of rotation always aligned with gravity and the spinal axis of the upright monkeys. The monkey's orientation (facing-motion or back-to-motion) had a dramatic influence on the VOR. These experiments show that: (a) the axis of eye rotation always shifted toward alignment with gravito-inertial force; (b) the peak value of horizontal slow phase eye velocity was greater with the monkey facing-motion than with back-to-motion; and (c) the time constant of horizontal eye movement decay was smaller with the monkey facing-motion than with back-to-motion. All of these findings were statistically significant and consistent across monkeys. In another set of tests, the same monkeys were rapidly tilted about their naso-occipital (roll) axis. Tilted orientations of 45 degrees and 90 degrees were maintained for 1 min. Other than a compensatory angular VOR during the angular rotation, no consistent eye velocity response was observed during or following the tilt for any of the six monkeys. The absence of any eye movement response following tilt weighs against the possibility that translational linear VOR responses are due to simple high-pass filtering of the otolith signals. The VOR response during eccentric rotation was divided into the more familiar angular VOR and linear VOR components. The angular component is known to depend upon semicircular canal dynamics and central influences. The linear component of the response decays rapidly with a mean duration of only 6.6 s, while the axis of eye rotation rapidly aligns (< 10 s) with gravito-inertial force. These

  17. Enhanced vestibulo-ocular reflex to electrical vestibular stimulation in Meniere's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aw, Swee T; Aw, Grace E; Todd, Michael J; Halmagyi, G Michael

    2013-02-01

    Meniere's disease is characterized by sporadic episodes of vertigo, nystagmus, fluctuating sensorineural hearing loss, tinnitus and aural pressure. Since Meniere's disease can affect different regions of the vestibular labyrinth, we investigated if electrical vestibular stimulation (EVS) which excites the entire vestibular labyrinth may be useful to reveal patchy endorgan pathology. We recorded three-dimensional electrically evoked vestibulo-ocular reflex (eVOR) to transient EVS using bilateral, bipolar 100-ms current steps at intensities of 0.9, 2.5, 5.0, 7.5 and 10.0 mA with dual-search coils in 12 unilateral Meniere's patients. Their results were compared to 17 normal subjects. Normal eVOR had tonic and phasic spatiotemporal properties best described by the torsional component, which was four times larger than horizontal and vertical components. At EVS onset and offset of 8.9 ms latency, there were phasic eVOR initiation (M = 1,267 °/s(2)) and cessation (M = -1,675 °/s(2)) acceleration pulses, whereas during the constant portion of the EVS, there was a maintained tonic eVOR (M = 9.1 °/s) at 10 mA. However in Meniere's disease, whilst latency of EVS onset and offset was normal at 9.0 ms, phasic eVOR initiation (M = 1,720 °/s(2)) and cessation (M = -2,523 °/s(2)) were enlarged at 10 mA. The initiation profile was a bimodal response, whilst the cessation profile frequently did not return to baseline. The tonic eVOR (M = 20.5 °/s) exhibited a ramped enhancement of about twice normal at 10 mA. Tonic eVOR enhancement was present for EVS >0.9 mA and disproportionately enhanced the torsional, vertical and horizontal components. These eVOR abnormalities may be a diagnostic indicator of Meniere's disease and may explain the vertigo attacks in the presence of declining mechanically evoked vestibular responses.

  18. The human vertical translational vestibulo-ocular reflex. Normal and abnormal responses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liao, Ke; Walker, Mark F; Joshi, Anand; Reschke, Millard; Strupp, Michael; Leigh, R John

    2009-05-01

    Geometric considerations indicate that the human translational vestibulo-ocular reflex (tVOR) should have substantially different properties than the angular vestibulo-ocular reflex (aVOR). Specifically, tVOR cannot simultaneously stabilize images of distant and near objects on the retina. Most studies make the tacit assumption that tVOR acts to stabilize foveal images even though, in humans, tVOR is reported to compensate for less than 60% of foveal image motion. We have determined that the compensation gain (eye rotational velocity/required eye rotational velocity to maintain foveal target fixation) of tVOR is held steady at approximately 0.6 during viewing of either near or distant targets during vertical (bob) translations in ambient illumination. We postulate that tVOR evolved not to stabilize the image of the target on the fovea, but rather to minimize retinal image motion between objects lying in different depth planes, in order to optimize motion parallax information. Such behavior is optimized when binocular visual cues of both near and distant targets are available in ambient light. Patients with progressive supranuclear palsy or cerebellar ataxia show impaired ability to increase tVOR responses appropriately when they view near targets. In cerebellar patients, impaired ability to adjust tVOR responses to viewing conditions occurs despite intact ability to converge at near. Loss of the ability to adjust tVOR according to viewing conditions appears to represent a distinct disorder of vestibular function.

  19. Healthy and pathological cerebellar Spiking Neural Networks in Vestibulo-Ocular Reflex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Antonietti, Alberto; Casellato, Claudia; Geminiani, Alice; D'Angelo, Egidio; Pedrocchi, Alessandra

    2015-01-01

    Since the Marr-Albus model, computational neuroscientists have been developing a variety of models of the cerebellum, with different approaches and features. In this work, we developed and tested realistic artificial Spiking Neural Networks inspired to this brain region. We tested in computational simulations of the Vestibulo-Ocular Reflex protocol three different models: a network equipped with a single plasticity site, at the cortical level; a network equipped with a distributed plasticity, at both cortical and nuclear levels; a network with a pathological plasticity mechanism at the cortical level. We analyzed the learning performance of the three different models, highlighting the behavioral differences among them. We proved that the model with a distributed plasticity produces a faster and more accurate cerebellar response, especially during a second session of acquisition, compared with the single plasticity model. Furthermore, the pathological model shows an impaired learning capability in Vestibulo-Ocular Reflex acquisition, as found in neurophysiological studies. The effect of the different plasticity conditions, which change fast and slow dynamics, memory consolidation and, in general, learning capabilities of the cerebellar network, explains differences in the behavioral outcome.

  20. Habituation and adaptation of the vestibuloocular reflex: a model of differential control by the vestibulocerebellum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cohen, H.; Cohen, B.; Raphan, T.; Waespe, W.

    1992-01-01

    We habituated the dominant time constant of the horizontal vestibuloocular reflex (VOR) of rhesus and cynomolgus monkeys by repeated testing with steps of velocity about a vertical axis and adapted the gain of the VOR by altering visual input with magnifying and reducing lenses. After baseline values were established, the nodulus and ventral uvula of the vestibulocerebellum were ablated in two monkeys, and the effects of nodulouvulectomy and flocculectomy on VOR gain adaptation and habituation were compared. The VOR time constant decreased with repeated testing, rapidly at first and more slowly thereafter. The gain of the VOR was unaffected. Massed trials were more effective than distributed trials in producing habituation. Regardless of the schedule of testing, the VOR time constant never fell below the time constant of the semicircular canals (approximately 5 s). This finding indicates that only the slow component of the vestibular response, the component produced by velocity storage, was habituated. In agreement with this, the time constant of optokinetic after-nystagmus (OKAN) was habituated concurrently with the VOR. Average values for VOR habituation were obtained on a per session basis for six animals. The VOR gain was adapted by natural head movements in partially habituated monkeys while they wore x 2.2 magnifying or x 0.5 reducing lenses. Adaptation occurred rapidly and reached about +/- 30%, similar to values obtained using forced rotation. VOR gain adaptation did not cause additional habituation of the time constant. When the VOR gain was reduced in animals with a long VOR time constant, there were overshoots in eye velocity that peaked at about 6-8 s after the onset or end of constant-velocity rotation. These overshoots occurred at times when the velocity storage integrator would have been maximally activated by semicircular canal input. Since the activity generated in the canals is not altered by visual adaptation, this finding indicates that the gain

  1. Altered gravitational forces affect the development of the static vestibuloocular reflex in fish (Oreochromis mossambicus).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sebastian, C; Esseling, K; Horn, E

    2001-01-01

    Young fish (Oreochromis mossambicus) were exposed to microgravity (micro g) for 9 to 10 days during space missions STS-55 and STS-84, or to hypergravity (hg) for 9 days. Young animals (stages 11-12), which had not yet developed the roll-induced static vestibuloocular reflex (rVOR) at micro g- and hg-onset, and older ones (stages 14-16), which had already developed the rVOR, were used. For several weeks afterwards, the rVOR was recorded after termination of mug and hg. Here are the main results: (1) In the stage 11-12 fish, the rVOR gain (response angle/roll angle) measured for roll angles 15 degrees, 30 degrees, and 45 degrees was not affected by microgravity if animals were rolled from the horizontal to the inclined posture, but was increased significantly if animals were rolled in the opposite manner. The rVOR amplitude (maximal eye movement during a complete 360 degrees roll) of micro g animals increased significantly by 25% compared to 1g controls during the first postflight week, but decreased to the control level during the second postflight week. Microgravity had no effect in stage 14-16 fish on either rVOR gain or amplitude. (2) After 3g exposure, both rVOR gain and amplitude were significantly reduced for both stage 11-12 and stage 15 fish. One g readaptation was completed during the second post-3g week. Hypergravity at 2 or 2.5 g had no effect. (3) Hypergravity at all three levels tested (2g, 2.5g, and 3g) accelerated the morphological development as assessed by external morphological markers. Exposure to micro g- or 3g-periods during an early developmental period modifies the physiological properties of the neuronal network underlying the static rVOR; in susceptible developmental stages, these modifications include sensitization by microgravity and desensitization by hypergravity. Copyright 2000 John Wiley & Sons, Inc.

  2. Impaired vestibulo-ocular reflex (VOR) in spinocerebellar ataxia type 3 (SCA3): bedside and search coil evaluation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gordon, Carlos R; Zivotofsky, Ari Z; Caspi, Avi

    2014-01-01

    Vestibulo-Ocular Reflex (VOR) abnormalities in cerebellar ataxias are a matter of renewed interest. We have previously reported vestibular areflexia in a group of Yemenite-Jews with Spinocerebellar Ataxia Type 3 (SCA3) who had clear bilateral pathological horizontal Head Impulse Test (HIT). The objective of this study was to evaluate the VOR of ten SCA3 patients who have variable bedside HIT responses by recording their eye movements using magnetic search coils and to correlate these results with their clinical and genetic data. Eight out of the ten patients have abnormal horizontal HIT detected by both clinical bedside examination and laboratory tests. Results of bedside HIT testing were significantly correlated with the VOR gain recorded using magnetic search coils. No significant correlations were found between VOR gain and other clinical or genetic data. Our study confirms the presence of defective VOR in SCA3 patients and corroborates the useful of the HIT as a reliable bedside test for diagnosis of VOR deficits.

  3. Light conditions affect the roll-induced vestibuloocular reflex in Xenopus laevis tadpoles

    Science.gov (United States)

    El-Yamany, Nabil A.

    2008-12-01

    In Xenopus laevis tadpoles, effects of asymmetrical light conditions on the roll-induced vestibuloocular reflex (rVOR) were tested for the developmental period between stage 47 and 49. For comparison, the rVOR was tested in dim- and high-symmetrical light environments. Test parameters were the rVOR gain and rVOR amplitude. Under all light conditions, the rVOR increased from tadpole stage 47 to 49. For all stages, the asymmetrical light field induced the strongest response, the dim light field the weakest one. The response for the left and right eye was identical, even if the tadpoles were tested under asymmetrical light conditions. The experiments can be considered as hints (1) for an age-dependent light sensitivity of vestibular neurons, and (2) for the existence of control systems for coordinated eye movements that has its origin in the proprioceptors of the extraocular eye muscles.

  4. An adaptive gaze stabilization controller inspired by the vestibulo-ocular reflex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lenz, A; Balakrishnan, T; Pipe, A G; Melhuish, C

    2008-09-01

    The vestibulo-ocular reflex stabilizes vision in many vertebrates. It integrates inertial and visual information to drive the eyes in the opposite direction to head movement and thereby stabilizes the image on the retina. Its adaptive nature guarantees stable vision even when the biological system undergoes dynamic changes (due to disease, growth or fatigue etc), a characteristic especially desirable in autonomous robotic systems. Based on novel, biologically plausible neurological models, we have developed a robotic testbed to qualitatively evaluate the performance of these algorithms. We show how the adaptive controller can adapt to a time varying plant and elaborate how this biologically inspired control architecture can be employed in general engineering applications where sensory feedback is very noisy and/or delayed.

  5. Quantifying the vestibulo-ocular reflex with video-oculography: nature and frequency of artifacts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mantokoudis, Georgios; Saber Tehrani, Ali S; Kattah, Jorge C; Eibenberger, Karin; Guede, Cynthia I; Zee, David S; Newman-Toker, David E

    2015-01-01

    Video-oculography devices are now used to quantify the vestibulo-ocular reflex (VOR) at the bedside using the head impulse test (HIT). Little is known about the impact of disruptive phenomena (e.g. corrective saccades, nystagmus, fixation losses, eye-blink artifacts) on quantitative VOR assessment in acute vertigo. This study systematically characterized the frequency, nature, and impact of artifacts on HIT VOR measures. From a prospective study of 26 patients with acute vestibular syndrome (16 vestibular neuritis, 10 stroke), we classified findings using a structured coding manual. Of 1,358 individual HIT traces, 72% had abnormal disruptive saccades, 44% had at least one artifact, and 42% were uninterpretable. Physicians using quantitative recording devices to measure head impulse VOR responses for clinical diagnosis should be aware of the potential impact of disruptive eye movements and measurement artifacts.

  6. Frequency response of the vestibulo-ocular reflex /VOR/ in the monkey

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buettner, U. W.; Henn, V.; Young, L. R.

    1981-01-01

    The frequency response of the vestibulo-ocular reflex has been investigated in the alert monkey during sinusoidal rotation about a vertical axis in a frequency range of 0.001-0.5 Hz. Phase and gain of nystagmus slow phase velocity was determined. In the frequency range above 0.1 Hz, nystagmus slow phase velocity was in phase with (compensated for) head velocity. At lower frequencies, an increasing phase lead was present which could reach more than 90 deg. Gain fell off correspondingly at low frequencies. Calculated time constants were 10-40 s in different monkeys. Animals which had been exposed to numerous previous rotary stimuli in the laboratory showed much shorter time constants than did 'native' monkeys.

  7. Three-dimensional vibration-induced vestibulo-ocular reflex identifies vertical semicircular canal dehiscence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aw, Swee Tin; Aw, Grace Elizabeth; Todd, Michael John; Bradshaw, Andrew Philip; Halmagyi, Gabor Michael

    2011-10-01

    Vertical semicircular canal dehiscence (VSCD) due to superior canal dehiscence (SCD) or posterior canal dehiscence (PCD) of the temporal bone causes vestibular and cochlear hypersensitivity to sound. This study aimed to characterize the vibration-induced vestibulo-ocular reflex (ViVOR) in VSCD. ViVORs in one PCD and 17 SCD patients, confirmed by CT imaging reformatted in semicircular canal planes, were measured with dual-search coils as binocular three-dimensional eye rotations induced by skull vibrations from a bone oscillator (B71-10 ohms) at 7 ms, 500 Hz, 135-dB peak-force level (re: 1 μN). The ViVOR eye rotation axes were computed by vector analysis and referenced to known semicircular canal planes. Onset latency of the ViVOR was 11 ms. ViVOR from VSCD was up to nine times greater than normal. The ViVOR's torsional rotation was always contraversive-torsional (the eye's upper pole rotated away from the stimulated ear), i.e. its direction was clockwise from a left and counterclockwise from a right VSCD, thereby lateralizing the side of the VSCD. The ViVORs vertical component distinguishes PCD from SCD, being downwards in PCD and upwards in SCD. In unilateral VSCD, the ViVOR eye rotation axis aligned closest to the dehiscent vertical semicircular canal axis from either ipsilateral or contralateral mastoid vibrations. However, in bilateral VSCDs, the ViVOR eye rotation axis lateralized to the ipsilateral dehiscent vertical semicircular canal axis. ViVOR was evoked in ossicular chain dysfunction, even when air-conducted click vestibulo-ocular reflex (VOR) was absent or markedly reduced. Hence, ViVOR could be a useful measurement to identify unilateral or bilateral VSCD even in the presence of ossicular chain dysfunction.

  8. Do agility and skull architecture influence the geometry of the mammalian vestibulo-ocular reflex?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeffery, Nathan; Cox, Philip G

    2010-04-01

    The spatial arrangement of the semicircular canals and extraocular muscles of the eye has been of considerable interest, particularly to researchers working on adaptations of the vestibulo-ocular reflex. Here we offer the first, extensive comparative analysis of the spatial relationships between each extraocular muscle and the canal providing its primary excitatory stimulus. The sample consisted of 113 specimens, representing 51 extant mammalian species. Hypotheses tested included that variations in the spatial alignments are linked with differences of skull morphology and with differences of agility during locomotion. Internal morphologies were visualized with magnetic resonance imaging and were measured with landmark-based vectors and planes. Values for body mass and agility were taken from the existing literature. Data were investigated for trends and associations with standard bivariate and multivariate statistical methods as well as with phylogenetically adjusted bivariate methods. The findings clearly show that species differences in the alignment of each extraocular muscle relative to the canal providing its primary excitatory stimulus are closely associated with changes of orbit morphology. The results also indicate that the actions of the oblique muscles interchange with those of the superior and inferior recti muscles when comparing lateral-eyed (rabbit) with frontal-eyed species (cat). There was only weak evidence to support the notion that canal-muscle alignments differ significantly among species according to how agile they are. The results suggest that semicircular canal morphology is arranged primarily for detecting head movements and then secondarily, if at all, for diminishing the burden of transforming vestibulo-ocular reflex signals in the most agile species.

  9. Bone conducted vibration activates the vestibulo-ocular reflex in the guinea pig.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vulovic, Vedran; Curthoys, Ian S

    2011-08-10

    The aim of the study was: (a) to test whether short duration (6 ms) 500 Hz bone-conducted vibration (BCV) of the skull in alert head free guinea pigs would elicit eye movements; (b) to test whether these eye movements were vestibular in origin; and (c) to determine whether they corresponded to human eye movements to such stimuli. In this way we sought to establish the guinea pig as an acceptable model for testing the mechanism of the effect BCV on the vestibulo-ocular reflex. Consistent short-latency stimulus-locked responses to BCV were observed. The magnitude of eye displacement was directly related to stimulus intensity as recorded by accelerometers cemented onto the animal's skull. The strongest and most consistent response component was intorsion of both eyes. In lateral-eyed animals intorsion is produced by the combined contraction of the inferior rectus and superior oblique muscles. In humans the same pair of muscles acts to cause depression of the eye. To test whether the movements were vestibular we selectively ablated the vestibular endorgans: 3 of the 8 animals underwent a bilateral intratympanic injection of gentamicin, an ototoxic aminoglycoside antibiotic, to ablate their vestibular receptors. After ablation there was an overall reduction in the magnitude of eye displacement, as well as a reduction in the effectiveness of the BCV stimulus to elicit eye movements. The animals' hearing, as measured by the threshold for auditory brainstem responses, remained unchanged after gentamicin, confirming that the cochlea was not affected. The reduced magnitude of responses after vestibular receptor ablation demonstrates that the eye-movement responses to BCV are probably caused by the stimulation of vestibular receptors, which in turn activate the vestibulo-ocular reflex.

  10. Variations in gravitoinertial force level affect the gain of the vestibulo-ocular reflex - Implications of the etiology of space motion sickness

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lackner, J. R.; Graybiel, A.

    1981-01-01

    Recordings of horizontal nystagmus were obtained on 16 male subjects exposed to repeated patterns of horizontal angular acceleration, constant velocity rotation, and sudden-stop deceleration in the laboratory and in the free-fall and high-force periods of parabolic flight. Nystagmus intensity was a clear function of gravitoinertial force level: slow phase velocity and beat frequency increased during exposure to high force levels and decreased in free-fall compared to values obtained at 1 G. These findings indicate that the gain of the vestibulo-ocular reflex decreases in free-fall. This fact likely accounts for the disorientation and dizziness sometimes experienced by astronauts when moving their heads in the early phases of orbital flight and again after splashdown. The implications of the present findings, both for the etiology and for the treatment of space motion sickness, are discussed.

  11. Automatic classification and robust identification of vestibulo-ocular reflex responses: from theory to practice: introducing GNL-HybELS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghoreyshi, Atiyeh; Galiana, Henrietta

    2011-10-01

    The Vestibulo-Ocular Reflex (VOR) stabilizes images of the world on our retinae when our head moves. Basic daily activities are thus impaired if this reflex malfunctions. During the past few decades, scientists have modeled and identified this system mathematically to diagnose and treat VOR deficits. However, traditional methods do not analyze VOR data comprehensively because they disregard the switching nature of nystagmus; this can bias estimates of VOR dynamics. Here we propose, for the first time, an automated tool to analyze entire VOR responses (slow and fast phases), without a priori classification of nystagmus segments. We have developed GNL-HybELS (Generalized NonLinear Hybrid Extended Least Squares), an algorithmic tool to simultaneously classify and identify the responses of a multi-mode nonlinear system with delay, such as the horizontal VOR and its alternating slow and fast phases. This algorithm combines the procedures of Generalized Principle Component Analysis (GPCA) for classification, and Hybrid Extended Least Squares (HybELS) for identification, by minimizing a cost function in an optimization framework. It is validated here on clean and noisy VOR simulations and then applied to clinical VOR tests on controls and patients. Prediction errors were less than 1 deg for simulations and ranged from .69 deg to 2.1 deg for the clinical data. Nonlinearities, asymmetries, and dynamic parameters were detected in normal and patient data, in both fast and slow phases of the response. This objective approach to VOR analysis now allows the design of more complex protocols for the testing of oculomotor and other hybrid systems.

  12. Relation between perception of vertical axis rotation and vestibulo-ocular reflex symmetry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peterka, Robert J.; Benolken, Martha S.

    1992-01-01

    Subjects seated in a vertical axis rotation chair controlled their rotational velocity by adjusting a potentiometer. Their goal was to null out pseudorandom rotational perturbations in order to remain perceptually stationary. Most subjects showed a slow linear drift of velocity (a constant acceleration) to one side when they were deprived of an earth-fixed visual reference. The amplitude and direction of this drift can be considered a measure of a static bias in the subject's perception of rotation. The presence of a perceptual bias is consistent with a small, constant imbalance of vestibular function which could be of either central or peripheral origin. Deviations from perfect vestibulo-ocular reflex (VOR) symmetry are also assumed to be related to imbalances in either peripheral or central vestibular function. Researchers looked for correlations between perceptual bias and various measures of vestibular reflex symmetry that might suggest a common source for both reflective and perceptual imbalances. No correlations were found. Measurement errors could not account for these results since repeated tests on the same subjects of both perceptual bias and VOR symmetry were well correlated.

  13. Suppression of the vertical vestibulo-ocular reflex in older persons at risk of falling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Di Fabio, R P; Emasithi, A; Greany, J F; Paul, S

    2001-09-01

    A case-control design was used to assess eye-head-trunk coordination for community-dwelling elders performing a stand-walk task. Eighteen elders with a high risk of falling were matched to 18 subjects with low risk on the basis of age, living status (living alone or with someone) and category of residence (independent living or assisted living facility). Standard electro-oculography was used in conjunction with an electromagnetic tracking device to measure eye and head-trunk motion, respectively. For the low-risk group, the mean slope of gaze-head and gaze-trunk relationships was significantly greater than zero (0.91 and 0.64, respectively), whereas high-risk elders did not demonstrate slope magnitudes significantly different from zero (0.52 and 0.16, respectively) due to large inter-subject variations. While the majority of subjects showed some counter-rotation of the eyes with head pitch, a greater percentage of subjects in the high-risk group did not suppress this response and consequently gaze and gaze velocity overcompensated for head pitch. These findings suggest that the vertical vestibulo-ocular reflex is not adequately suppressed during the stand-walk task in elders who are at a high risk of falling. Possible mechanisms contributing to these findings are discussed.

  14. Automatic Classification of the Vestibulo-Ocular Reflex Nystagmus: Integration of Data Clustering and System Identification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ranjbaran, Mina; Smith, Heather L H; Galiana, Henrietta L

    2016-04-01

    The vestibulo-ocular reflex (VOR) plays an important role in our daily activities by enabling us to fixate on objects during head movements. Modeling and identification of the VOR improves our insight into the system behavior and improves diagnosis of various disorders. However, the switching nature of eye movements (nystagmus), including the VOR, makes dynamic analysis challenging. The first step in such analysis is to segment data into its subsystem responses (here slow and fast segment intervals). Misclassification of segments results in biased analysis of the system of interest. Here, we develop a novel three-step algorithm to classify the VOR data into slow and fast intervals automatically. The proposed algorithm is initialized using a K-means clustering method. The initial classification is then refined using system identification approaches and prediction error statistics. The performance of the algorithm is evaluated on simulated and experimental data. It is shown that the new algorithm performance is much improved over the previous methods, in terms of higher specificity.

  15. Primate translational vestibuloocular reflexes. III. Effects of bilateral labyrinthine electrical stimulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Angelaki, D. E.; McHenry, M. Q.; Dickman, J. D.; Perachio, A. A.

    2000-01-01

    The effects of functional, reversible ablation and potential recruitment of the most irregular otolith afferents on the dynamics and sensitivity of the translational vestibuloocular reflexes (trVORs) were investigated in rhesus monkeys trained to fixate near and far targets. Translational motion stimuli consisted of either steady-state lateral and fore-aft sinusoidal oscillations or short-lasting transient lateral head displacements. Short-duration (usually stimulation, trVOR sensitivity and its dependence on viewing distance were significantly decreased. In addition, anodal currents significantly increased phase lags. During transient motion, anodal stimulation resulted in significantly lower initial eye acceleration and more sluggish responses. Cathodal currents tended to have opposite effects. The main characteristics of these results were simulated by a simple model where both regularly and irregularly discharging afferents contribute to the trVORs. Anodal labyrinthine currents also were found to decrease eye velocity during long-duration, constant velocity rotations, although results were generally more variable compared with those during translational motion.

  16. Visual and vestibular determinants of the translational vestibulo-ocular reflex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liao, Ke; Schneider, Rosalyn M; Yaniglos, Stacia S; Bertolini, Giovanni; Glendinning, Paul; Sawyer, Robert N; Reschke, Millard; Leigh, R John

    2011-09-01

    Prior studies indicate that the human translational vestibulo-ocular reflex (tVOR) generates eye rotations approximately half the magnitude required to keep the line of sight pointed at a stationary object--a compensation ratio (CR) of ∼0.5. We asked whether changes of visual or vestibular stimuli could increase the CR of tVOR. First, subjects viewed their environment through an optical device that required eye movements to increase by ∼50% to maintain fixation of a stationary visual target. During vertical translation, eye movements did increase, but tVOR CR remained at ∼0.5. Second, subjects viewed through LCD goggles providing 4 Hz strobe vision that minimized retinal image motion; this reduced tVOR CR. Finally, subjects were rotated in roll while they translated vertically; no increase in tVOR occurred. Taken with prior studies, we conclude that tVOR is optimally set to generate eye rotations that are about 50% of those required to stabilize the line of sight.

  17. Vestibulo-ocular reflex suppression during head-fixed saccades reveals gaze feedback control.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daye, Pierre M; Roberts, Dale C; Zee, David S; Optican, Lance M

    2015-01-21

    Previous experiments have shown that the vestibulo-ocular reflex (VOR) is partially suppressed during large head-free gaze (gaze = eye-in-head + head-in-space) shifts when both the eyes and head are moving actively, on a fixed body, or when the eyes are moving actively and the head passively on a fixed body. We tested, in human subjects, the hypothesis that the VOR is also suppressed during gaze saccades made with en bloc, head and body together, rotations. Subjects made saccades by following a target light. During some trials, the chair rotated so as to move the entire body passively before, during, or after a saccade. The modulation of the VOR was a function of both saccade amplitude and the time of the head perturbation relative to saccade onset. Despite the perturbation, gaze remained accurate. Thus, VOR modulation is similar when gaze changes are programmed for the eyes alone or for the eyes and head moving together. We propose that the brain always programs a change in gaze using feedback based on gaze and head signals, rather than on separate eye and head trajectories.

  18. Dual adaptation and adaptive generalization of the human vestibulo-ocular reflex

    Science.gov (United States)

    Welch, R. B.; Bridgeman, B.; Williams, J. A.; Semmler, R.

    1998-01-01

    In two experiments, we examined the possibility that the human vestibulo-ocular reflex (VOR) is subject to dual adaptation (the ability to adapt to a sensory rearrangement more rapidly and/or more completely after repeated experience with it) and adaptive generalization (the ability to adapt more readily to a novel sensory rearrangement as a result of prior dual adaptation training). In Experiment 1, the subjects actively turned the head during alternating exposure to a visual-vestibular rearrangement (target/head gain = 0.5) and the normal situation (target/head gain = 0.0). These conditions produced both adaptation and dual adaptation of the VOR but no evidence of adaptive generalization when tested with a target/head gain of 1.0. Experiment 2, in which exposure to the 0.5 gain entailed externally controlled (i.e., passive) whole body rotation, resulted in VOR adaptation but no dual adaptation. As in Experiment 1, no evidence of adaptive generalization was found.

  19. Effect of vergence on the gain of the linear vestibulo-ocular reflex

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shelhamer, M.; Merfeld, D. M.; Mendoza, J. C.; Paloski, W. H. (Principal Investigator)

    1995-01-01

    We measured the linear vestibulo-ocular reflex (LVOR) and vergence, using binocular search coils, in 3 humans. The subjects were accelerated sinusoidally at 0.5 Hz and 0.2 g peak acceleration, in complete darkness, while performing three different tasks: i) mental arithmetic; ii) tracking a remembered target at either 0.34 m or 0.14 m distance; and iii) maintaining vergence at either of these distances by means of audio biofeedback based on vergence. Subjects could control vergence using the audio feedback; there was greater convergence with the near audio target. However, there was no significant difference in vergence between the near and far remembered target conditions. With audio feedback, the amplitude of smooth tracking was not consistently different for the near and the far conditions. However, the amplitude of tracking (saccades and smooth component) in the remembered target conditions was greater for near than for far targets. These results suggest that linear VOR amplitude is not determined by vergence alone.

  20. Artificial balance: restoration of the vestibulo-ocular reflex in humans with a prototype vestibular neuroprosthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perez Fornos, Angelica; Guinand, Nils; van de Berg, Raymond; Stokroos, Robert; Micera, Silvestro; Kingma, Herman; Pelizzone, Marco; Guyot, Jean-Philippe

    2014-01-01

    The vestibular system plays a crucial role in the multisensory control of balance. When vestibular function is lost, essential tasks such as postural control, gaze stabilization, and spatial orientation are limited and the quality of life of patients is significantly impaired. Currently, there is no effective treatment for bilateral vestibular deficits. Research efforts both in animals and humans during the last decade set a solid background to the concept of using electrical stimulation to restore vestibular function. Still, the potential clinical benefit of a vestibular neuroprosthesis has to be demonstrated to pave the way for a translation into clinical trials. An important parameter for the assessment of vestibular function is the vestibulo-ocular reflex (VOR), the primary mechanism responsible for maintaining the perception of a stable visual environment while moving. Here we show that the VOR can be artificially restored in humans using motion-controlled, amplitude modulated electrical stimulation of the ampullary branches of the vestibular nerve. Three patients received a vestibular neuroprosthesis prototype, consisting of a modified cochlear implant providing vestibular electrodes. Significantly higher VOR responses were observed when the prototype was turned ON. Furthermore, VOR responses increased significantly as the intensity of the stimulation increased, reaching on average 79% of those measured in healthy volunteers in the same experimental conditions. These results constitute a fundamental milestone and allow us to envision for the first time clinically useful rehabilitation of patients with bilateral vestibular loss.

  1. Amplitude and frequency prediction in the translational vestibulo-ocular reflex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schneider, Rosalyn; Walker, Mark F

    2014-01-01

    The goal of this study was to assess the effect of amplitude and frequency predictability on the performance of the translational vestibulo-ocular reflex (tVOR). Eye movements were recorded in 5 subjects during continuous vertical translation that consisted of a series of segments with: 1) 3 amplitudes at constant frequency (2 Hz) or 2) 3 different frequencies (1.6, 2, 2.5 Hz). Stimulus changes were presented in a pseudo-random order. We found that there was little change in the tVOR immediately after an unexpected stimulus change, as if eye velocity were being driven more by an expectation based on previous steady-state motion than by current head translation. For amplitude transitions, only about 30% of the eventual response change was seen in the first half cycle. Similarly, a sudden change in translation frequency did not appear in eye velocity for 70 ms, compared to a 8 ms lag during similar yaw rotation. Finally, after a sudden large decrease in frequency, the eyes continued to track at the original higher frequency, resulting initially in an anti-compensatory tVOR acceleration. Our results elucidate further the complexity of the tVOR and show that motion prediction based on prior experience plays an important role in its response.

  2. Effect of the slow transient phenomenon of a synaptic modification on vestibulo-ocular reflex adaptation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsusaka, K.

    1998-05-01

    According to the experimental studies, the duration of the transient phenomenon of the synaptic modification involved in vestibulo-ocular reflex (VOR) adaptation lasts considerably long after the synaptic inputs. In the present article, effect of the transient phenomenon on VOR adaptation is studied by incorporating the transient phenomenon into the cerebellar model proposed by Fujita. In the present extended model, it is assumed that the synaptic modification is a modification of the concentrations of reactants and products for a certain reaction. The synaptic efficacy is given by the concentration of products. The model of reaction includes the supply of reactants and flux of reactants and products out of the reaction system. The supply of reactants is induced by correlation between two different types of input signals, which has been considered to be proportional to the amount of the synaptic modification at the moment. The flux produces natural recovery of the synaptic modification, which was observed in experiments. The simulation results suggest that VOR adaptation takes two types of courses according to the efficiency of the reactant supply to the synaptic inputs under the slow transient phenomenon of the synaptic modification. The present extended model gives approaches to control mechanisms of VOR adaptation.

  3. Coordination of Lower Limb Joints During Locomotion: The Effects of Vestibulo-Ocular Reflex Adaptation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Chris; Mulavara, Ajitkumar; Richards, Jason; Peters, Brian; Houser, Jeremy; Marshburn, Ann; Bloomberg, Jacob

    2003-01-01

    Controlling locomotion while maintaining a stable gaze requires precise coordination between several, interdependent full-body sensorimotor subsystems (Bloomberg and Mulavara, 2003; McDonald, et al., 1997). The overall goal of this study is to determine how this full-body gaze stabilization system responds to adaptive changes in vestibuloocular reflex (VOR) function. Locomotion involves cyclical physical interactions (impacts) with the environment. Hence, focusing on a target and maintaining visual acuity during this activity may require mechanisms to manage the energy flow, so it does not disrupt the visual and vestibular sensory information processing that stabilizes gaze. It has been shown that increasing the difficulty of a gaze task (reading numbers on a screen as opposed to simply focusing on a central dot pattern) resulted in an increase in the amount of knee flexion movement during the critical phase immediately following the heel strike event (Mulavara and Bloomberg, 2003). The increase in knee flexion during the stance phase of the gait cycle has been suggested to function as a shock absorbing mechanism associated with the rapid weight transfer from the trailing to the leading leg during walking. To understand this full-body coordination, the relative contributions of each component and the resulting effects should be assessed. In this study, we hypothesized that VOR adaptation would result in a reorganization of the lower limb joint coordination during treadmill walking in a manner to facilitate the gaze stabilization task and preserve locomotor function.

  4. Single motor unit activity in human extraocular muscles during the vestibulo-ocular reflex.

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    Weber, Konrad P; Rosengren, Sally M; Michels, Rike; Sturm, Veit; Straumann, Dominik; Landau, Klara

    2012-07-01

    Motor unit activity in human eye muscles during the vestibulo-ocular reflex (VOR) is not well understood, since the associated head and eye movements normally preclude single unit recordings. Therefore we recorded single motor unit activity following bursts of skull vibration and sound, two vestibular otolith stimuli that elicit only small head and eye movements. Inferior oblique (IO) and inferior rectus (IR) muscle activity was measured in healthy humans with concentric needle electrodes. Vibration elicited highly synchronous, short-latency bursts of motor unit activity in the IO (latency: 10.5 ms) and IR (14.5 ms) muscles. The activation patterns of the two muscles were similar, but reciprocal, with delayed activation of the IR muscle. Sound produced short-latency excitation of the IO muscle (13.3 ms) in the eye contralateral to the stimulus. Simultaneous needle and surface recordings identified the IO as the muscle of origin of the vestibular evoked myogenic potential (oVEMP) thus validating the physiological basis of this recently developed clinical test of otolith function. Single extraocular motor unit recordings provide a window into neural activity in humans that can normally only be examined using animal models and help identify the pathways of the translational VOR from otoliths to individual eye muscles.

  5. Artificial balance: restoration of the vestibulo-ocular reflex in humans with a prototype vestibular neuroprosthesis

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    Angelica ePerez Fornos

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available The vestibular system plays a crucial role in the multisensory control of balance. When vestibular function is lost, essential tasks such as postural control, gaze stabilization, and spatial orientation are limited and the quality of life of patients is significantly impaired. Currently there is no effective treatment for bilateral vestibular deficits. Research efforts both in animals and humans during the last decade set a solid background to the concept of using electrical stimulation to restore vestibular function. Still, the potential clinical benefit of a vestibular neuroprosthesis has to be demonstrated to pave the way for a translation into clinical trials. An important parameter for the assessment of vestibular function is the Vestibulo-Ocular Reflex (VOR, the primary mechanism responsible for maintaining the perception of a stable visual environment while moving. Here we show that the VOR can be artificially restored in humans using motion-controlled, amplitude modulated electrical stimulation of the ampullary branches of the vestibular nerve. Three patients received a vestibular neuroprosthesis prototype, consisting of a modified cochlear implant providing vestibular electrodes. Significantly higher VOR responses were observed when the prototype was turned ON. Furthermore, VOR responses increased significantly as the intensity of the stimulation increased, reaching on average 79% of those measured in healthy volunteers in the same experimental conditions. These results constitute a fundamental milestone and allow us to envision for the first time clinically useful rehabilitation of patients with bilateral vestibular loss.

  6. The cerebellar nodulus/uvula integrates otolith signals for the translational vestibulo-ocular reflex.

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    Mark F Walker

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The otolith-driven translational vestibulo-ocular reflex (tVOR generates compensatory eye movements to linear head accelerations. Studies in humans indicate that the cerebellum plays a critical role in the neural control of the tVOR, but little is known about mechanisms of this control or the functions of specific cerebellar structures. Here, we chose to investigate the contribution of the nodulus and uvula, which have been shown by prior studies to be involved in the processing of otolith signals in other contexts. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We recorded eye movements in two rhesus monkeys during steps of linear motion along the interaural axis before and after surgical lesions of the cerebellar uvula and nodulus. The lesions strikingly reduced eye velocity during constant-velocity motion but had only a small effect on the response to initial head acceleration. We fit eye velocity to a linear combination of head acceleration and velocity and to a dynamic mathematical model of the tVOR that incorporated a specific integrator of head acceleration. Based on parameter optimization, the lesion decreased the gain of the pathway containing this new integrator by 62%. The component of eye velocity that depended directly on head acceleration changed little (gain decrease of 13%. In a final set of simulations, we compared our data to the predictions of previous models of the tVOR, none of which could account for our experimental findings. CONCLUSIONS/ SIGNIFICANCE: Our results provide new and important information regarding the neural control of the tVOR. Specifically, they point to a key role for the cerebellar nodulus and uvula in the mathematical integration of afferent linear head acceleration signals. This function is likely to be critical not only for the tVOR but also for the otolith-mediated reflexes that control posture and balance.

  7. Dependence of the roll angular vestibuloocular reflex (aVOR) on gravity.

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    Yakushin, Sergei B; Xiang, Yongqing; Cohen, Bernard; Raphan, Theodore

    2009-11-01

    Little is known about the dependence of the roll angular vestibuloocular reflex (aVOR) on gravity or its gravity-dependent adaptive properties. To study gravity-dependent characteristics of the roll aVOR, monkeys were oscillated about a naso-occipital axis in darkness while upright or tilted. Roll aVOR gains were largest in the upright position and decreased by 7-15% as animals were tilted from the upright. Thus the unadapted roll aVOR gain has substantial gravitational dependence. Roll gains were also decreased or increased by 0.25 Hz, in- or out-of-phase rotation of the head and the visual surround while animals were prone, supine, upright, or in side-down positions. Gain changes, determined as a function of head tilt, were fit with a sinusoid; the amplitudes represented the amount of the gravity-dependent gain change, and the bias, the gravity-independent gain change. Gravity-dependent gain changes were absent or substantially smaller in roll (approximately 5%) than in yaw (25%) or pitch (17%), whereas gravity-independent gain changes were similar for roll, pitch, and yaw (approximately 20%). Thus the high-frequency roll aVOR gain has an inherent dependence on head orientation re gravity in the unadapted state, which is different from the yaw/pitch aVORs. This inherent gravitational dependence may explain why the adaptive circuits are not active when the head is tilted re gravity during roll aVOR adaptation. These behavioral differences support the idea that there is a fundamental difference in the central organization of canal-otolith convergence of the roll and yaw/pitch aVORs.

  8. The conjugacy of the vestibulo-ocular reflex evoked by single labyrinth stimulation in awake monkeys.

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    Tang, Xuehui; Xu, Youguo; Simpson, Ivra; Jeffcoat, Ben; Mustain, William; Zhou, Wu

    2010-10-01

    It is well known that the vestibulo-ocular reflex (VOR) is conjugate when measured in the dark with minimal vergence. But the neural basis of the VOR conjugacy remains to be identified. In the present study, we measured the VOR conjugacy during single labyrinth stimulation to examine whether the VOR conjugacy depends on reciprocal stimulation of the two labyrinths. There are conflicting views on this issue. First, since the vestibular signals carried by the ascending tract of Deiters' are distributed exclusively to the motoneurons of the ipsilateral eye, the neural innervations after single labyrinth stimulation are not symmetrical for the two eyes. Thus, single labyrinth stimulation may generate disjunctive VOR responses. Second, the only published study on this issue was an electrooculography (EOG) study that reported disjunctive VOR responses during unilateral caloric irrigation (Wolfe in Ann Otol 88:79-85, 1979). Third, the VOR during unilateral caloric stimulation performed in clinical vestibular tests is routinely perceived to be conjugate. To resolve these conflicting views, the present study examined the VOR conjugacy during single labyrinth stimulation by recording binocular eye position signals in awake monkeys with a search coil technique. In contradiction to the previous EOG study and the prediction based on the asymmetry of the unilateral brainstem VOR circuits, we found that the VOR during unilateral caloric irrigation was conjugate over a wide range of conditions. We conclude that the net neural innervations received by the two eyes are symmetrical after single labyrinth stimulation, despite the apparent asymmetry in the unilateral VOR pathways. A novel role for the ascending tract of Deiters' in the VOR conjugacy is proposed.

  9. Getting ahead of oneself: anticipation and the vestibulo-ocular reflex.

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    King, W M

    2013-04-16

    Compensatory counter-rotations of the eyes provoked by head turns are commonly attributed to the vestibulo-ocular reflex (VOR). A recent study in guinea pigs demonstrates, however, that this assumption is not always valid. During voluntary head turns, guinea pigs make highly accurate compensatory eye movements that occur with zero or even negative latencies with respect to the onset of the provoking head movements. Furthermore, the anticipatory eye movements occur in animals with bilateral peripheral vestibular lesions, thus confirming that they have an extra vestibular origin. This discovery suggests the possibility that anticipatory responses might also occur in other species including humans and non-human primates, but have been overlooked and mistakenly identified as being produced by the VOR. This review will compare primate and guinea pig vestibular physiology in light of these new findings. A unified model of vestibular and cerebellar pathways will be presented that is consistent with current data in primates and guinea pigs. The model is capable of accurately simulating compensatory eye movements to active head turns (anticipatory responses) and to passive head perturbations (VOR induced eye movements) in guinea pigs and in human subjects who use coordinated eye and head movements to shift gaze direction in space. Anticipatory responses provide new evidence and opportunities to study the role of extra vestibular signals in motor control and sensory-motor transformations. Exercises that employ voluntary head turns are frequently used to improve visual stability in patients with vestibular hypofunction. Thus, a deeper understanding of the origin and physiology of anticipatory responses could suggest new translational approaches to rehabilitative training of patients with bilateral vestibular loss.

  10. Readaptation of the Vestibulo-Ocular Reflex Relieves the Mal de Debarquement Syndrome

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    Mingjia eDai

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available The Mal de Debarquement Syndrome (MdDS, a continuous feeling of swaying, rocking and/or bobbing, generally follows travel on the sea. The associated symptoms cause considerable distress. The underlying neural mechanisms are unknown, and to date there have been no effective treatments for this condition. Results in monkeys and humans suggested that MdDS was caused by maladaptation of the vestibulo-ocular reflex (VOR to roll of the head during rotation. We studied twenty-four subjects with persistent MdDS (3 males, 21 females; 19.1 ± 33 months. Physical findings included body oscillation at 0.2Hz, oscillating vertical nystagmus when the head was rolled from side-to-side in darkness, and unilateral rotation during the Fukuda stepping test. We posited that the maladapted rocking and the physical symptoms could be diminished or extinguished by readapting the VOR. Subjects were treated by rolling the head from side-to-side while watching a rotating full-field visual stimulus. Seventeen of the twenty-four subjects had a complete or substantial recovery on average for approximately one year. Six were initially better, but the symptoms recurred. One subject did not respond to treatment. Thus, readaptation of the VOR has led to a cure or substantial improvement in 70% of the subjects with MdDS. We conclude that the adaptive processes associated with roll-while-rotating are responsible for producing MdDS, and that the symptoms can be reduced or resolved by readapting the VOR.

  11. An assessment of the vestibulo-ocular reflex (VOR) in persons with Down syndrome.

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    Costa, Alberto C S

    2011-10-01

    Down syndrome (DS), the most common genetically defined cause of intellectual disability, is the phenotypic consequence of a supernumerary chromosome 21. Persons with DS commonly display deficits in visuomotor integration, motor coordination, and balance. Despite the key roles of the optokinetic and vestibular systems in these submodalities of motor function, a systematic investigation into the optokinetic nystagmus (OKN) and vestibulo-ocular reflex (VOR) in persons with DS was lacking in the literature. Accordingly, this study generated quantitative data on oculomotor function in persons with DS under vestibular stimulation (an accompanying work describes results on the analysis of optokinetic function in the same cohort of participants). Experiments involved 32 participants with DS (14-36 years old, equally divided by gender) and 32 chronological age- and gender-matched typically developing controls. Eye movements were recorded by binocular video-oculography, and a servo-controlled rotary chair produced vestibular stimulation. Participants were assessed for VOR during step, ramp, and sinusoidal stimulations; inhibition of the VOR by visual target fixation; and VOR adaptation to conflicting visual input. Individuals with DS displayed small alterations in the VOR gain and dynamics compared to controls. In contrast, the number of VOR nystagmus beats and the ability to inhibit the VOR by visual target fixation were markedly and robustly smaller in persons with DS. Significantly increased VOR adaptation was observed in men with DS. These findings may have implications to the understanding of the neurological basis of the motor dysfunction that affects performance in many practical tasks persons with DS encounter in their everyday lives.

  12. Readaptation of the vestibulo-ocular reflex relieves the mal de debarquement syndrome.

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    Dai, Mingjia; Cohen, Bernard; Smouha, Eric; Cho, Catherine

    2014-01-01

    The mal de debarquement syndrome (MdDS), a continuous feeling of swaying, rocking, and/or bobbing, generally follows travel on the sea. The associated symptoms cause considerable distress. The underlying neural mechanisms are unknown, and to date there have been no effective treatments for this condition. Results in monkeys and humans suggested that MdDS was caused by maladaptation of the vestibulo-ocular reflex (VOR) to roll of the head during rotation. We studied 24 subjects with persistent MdDS (3 males, 21 females; 19.1 ± 33 months). Physical findings included body oscillation at 0.2 Hz, oscillating vertical nystagmus when the head was rolled from side-to-side in darkness, and unilateral rotation during the Fukuda stepping test. We posited that the maladapted rocking and the physical symptoms could be diminished or extinguished by readapting the VOR. Subjects were treated by rolling the head from side-to-side while watching a rotating full-field visual stimulus. Seventeen of the 24 subjects had a complete or substantial recovery on average for approximately 1 year. Six were initially better, but the symptoms recurred. One subject did not respond to treatment. Thus, readaptation of the VOR has led to a cure or substantial improvement in 70% of the subjects with MdDS. We conclude that the adaptive processes associated with roll-while-rotating are responsible for producing MdDS, and that the symptoms can be reduced or resolved by readapting the VOR.

  13. Role of cerebellum in motion perception and vestibulo-ocular reflex-similarities and disparities.

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    Shaikh, Aasef G; Palla, Antonella; Marti, Sarah; Olasagasti, Itsaso; Optican, Lance M; Zee, David S; Straumann, Dominik

    2013-02-01

    Vestibular velocity storage enhances the efficacy of the angular vestibulo-ocular reflex (VOR) during relatively low-frequency head rotations. This function is modulated by GABA-mediated inhibitory cerebellar projections. Velocity storage also exists in perceptual pathway and has similar functional principles as VOR. However, it is not known whether the neural substrate for perception and VOR overlap. We propose two possibilities. First, there is the same velocity storage for both VOR and perception; second, there are nonoverlapping neural networks: one might be involved in perception and the other for the VOR. We investigated these possibilities by measuring VOR and perceptual responses in healthy human subjects during whole-body, constant-velocity rotation steps about all three dimensions (yaw, pitch, and roll) before and after 10 mg of 4-aminopyridine (4-AP). 4-AP, a selective blocker of inward rectifier potassium conductance, can lead to increased synchronization and precision of Purkinje neuron discharge and possibly enhance the GABAergic action. Hence 4-AP could reduce the decay time constant of the perceived angular velocity and VOR. We found that 4-AP reduced the decay time constant, but the amount of reduction in the two processes, perception and VOR, was not the same, suggesting the possibility of nonoverlapping or partially overlapping neural substrates for VOR and perception. We also noted that, unlike the VOR, the perceived angular velocity gradually built up and plateau prior to decay. Hence, the perception pathway may have additional mechanism that changes the dynamics of perceived angular velocity beyond the velocity storage. 4-AP had no effects on the duration of build-up of perceived angular velocity, suggesting that the higher order processing of perception, beyond the velocity storage, might not occur under the influence of mechanism that could be influenced by 4-AP.

  14. Restoring the 3D vestibulo-ocular reflex via electrical stimulation: the Johns Hopkins multichannel vestibular prosthesis project.

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    Rahman, Mehdi A; Dai, Chenkai; Fridman, Gene Y; Davidovics, Natan S; Chiang, Bryce; Ahn, JoongHo; Hayden, Russell; Melvin, Thuy-Anh N; Sun, Daniel Q; Hedjoudje, Abderrahmane; Della Santina, Charles C

    2011-01-01

    Bilateral loss of vestibular sensation causes difficulty maintaining stable vision, posture and gait. An implantable prosthesis that partly restores normal activity on branches of the vestibular nerve should improve quality of life for individuals disabled by this disorder. We have developed a head-mounted multichannel vestibular prosthesis that restores sufficient semicircular canal function to partially recreate a normal 3-dimensional angular vestibulo-ocular reflex in animals. Here we describe several parallel lines of investigation directed toward refinement of this approach toward eventual clinical application.

  15. A reevaluation of the vestibulo-ocular reflex: new ideas of its purpose, properties, neural substrate, and disorders

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    Leigh, R. J.; Brandt, T.

    1993-01-01

    Conventional views of the vestibulo-ocular reflex (VOR) have emphasized testing with caloric stimuli and by passively rotating patients at low frequencies in a chair. The properties of the VOR tested under these conditions differ from the performance of this reflex during the natural function for which it evolved--locomotion. Only the VOR (and not visually mediated eye movements) can cope with the high-frequency angular and linear perturbations of the head that occur during locomotion; this is achieved by generating eye movements at short latency (disorders that disrupt the VOR cause not just only nystagmus, but also instability of posture (eg, increased fore-aft sway in patients with downbeat nystagmus) and disturbance of spatial orientation (eg, tilt of the subjective visual vertical in Wallenberg's syndrome).

  16. Vestibulo-ocular reflex responses to a multichannel vestibular prosthesis incorporating a 3D coordinate transformation for correction of misalignment.

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    Fridman, Gene Y; Davidovics, Natan S; Dai, Chenkai; Migliaccio, Americo A; Della Santina, Charles C

    2010-09-01

    There is no effective treatment available for individuals unable to compensate for bilateral profound loss of vestibular sensation, which causes chronic disequilibrium and blurs vision by disrupting vestibulo-ocular reflexes that normally stabilize the eyes during head movement. Previous work suggests that a multichannel vestibular prosthesis can emulate normal semicircular canals by electrically stimulating vestibular nerve branches to encode head movements detected by mutually orthogonal gyroscopes affixed to the skull. Until now, that approach has been limited by current spread resulting in distortion of the vestibular nerve activation pattern and consequent inability to accurately encode head movements throughout the full 3-dimensional (3D) range normally transduced by the labyrinths. We report that the electrically evoked 3D angular vestibulo-ocular reflex exhibits vector superposition and linearity to a sufficient degree that a multichannel vestibular prosthesis incorporating a precompensatory 3D coordinate transformation to correct misalignment can accurately emulate semicircular canals for head rotations throughout the range of 3D axes normally transduced by a healthy labyrinth.

  17. Adaptation of the vestibulo-ocular reflex for forward-eyed foveate vision.

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    Migliaccio, Americo A; Minor, Lloyd B; Della Santina, Charles C

    2010-10-15

    To maintain visual fixation on a distant target during head rotation, the angular vestibulo-ocular reflex (aVOR) should rotate the eyes at the same speed as the head and in exactly the opposite direction. However, in primates for which the 3-dimensional (3D) aVOR has been extensively characterised (humans and squirrel monkeys (Saimiri sciureus)), the aVOR response to roll head rotation about the naso-occipital axis is lower than that elicited by yaw and pitch, causing errors in aVOR magnitude and direction that vary with the axis of head rotation. In other words, primates keep the central part of the retinal image on the fovea (where photoreceptor density and visual acuity are greatest) but fail to keep that image from twisting about the eyes' resting optic axes. We tested the hypothesis that aVOR direction dependence is an adaptation related to primates' frontal-eyed, foveate status through comparison with the aVOR of a lateral-eyed, afoveate mammal (Chinchilla lanigera). As chinchillas' eyes are afoveate and never align with each other, we predicted that the chinchilla aVOR would be relatively low in gain and isotropic (equal in gain for every head rotation axis). In 11 normal chinchillas, we recorded binocular 3D eye movements in darkness during static tilts, 20-100 deg s(1) whole-body sinusoidal rotations (0.5-15 Hz), and 3000 deg s(2) acceleration steps. Although the chinchilla 3D aVOR gain changed with both frequency and peak velocity over the range we examined, we consistently found that it was more nearly isotropic than the primate aVOR. Our results suggest that primates' anisotropic aVOR represents an adaptation to their forward-eyed, foveate status. In primates, yaw and pitch aVOR must be compensatory to stabilise images on both foveae, whereas roll aVOR can be under-compensatory because the brain tolerates torsion of binocular images that remain on the foveae. In contrast, the lateral-eyed chinchilla faces different adaptive demands and thus enlists a

  18. Directional plasticity rapidly improves 3D vestibulo-ocular reflex alignment in monkeys using a multichannel vestibular prosthesis.

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    Dai, Chenkai; Fridman, Gene Y; Chiang, Bryce; Rahman, Mehdi A; Ahn, Joong Ho; Davidovics, Natan S; Della Santina, Charles C

    2013-12-01

    Bilateral loss of vestibular sensation can be disabling. We have shown that a multichannel vestibular prosthesis (MVP) can partly restore vestibular sensation as evidenced by improvements in the 3-dimensional angular vestibulo-ocular reflex (3D VOR). However, a key challenge is to minimize misalignment between the axes of eye and head rotation, which is apparently caused by current spread beyond each electrode's targeted nerve branch. We recently reported that rodents wearing a MVP markedly improve 3D VOR alignment during the first week after MVP activation, probably through the same central nervous system adaptive mechanisms that mediate cross-axis adaptation over time in normal individuals wearing prisms that cause visual scene movement about an axis different than the axis of head rotation. We hypothesized that rhesus monkeys would exhibit similar improvements with continuous prosthetic stimulation over time. We created bilateral vestibular deficiency in four rhesus monkeys via intratympanic injection of gentamicin. A MVP was mounted to the cranium, and eye movements in response to whole-body passive rotation in darkness were measured repeatedly over 1 week of continuous head motion-modulated prosthetic electrical stimulation. 3D VOR responses to whole-body rotations about each semicircular canal axis were measured on days 1, 3, and 7 of chronic stimulation. Horizontal VOR gain during 1 Hz, 50 °/s peak whole-body rotations before the prosthesis was turned on was <0.1, which is profoundly below normal (0.94 ± 0.12). On stimulation day 1, VOR gain was 0.4-0.8, but the axis of observed eye movements aligned poorly with head rotation (misalignment range ∼30-40 °). Substantial improvement of axis misalignment was observed after 7 days of continuous motion-modulated prosthetic stimulation under normal diurnal lighting. Similar improvements were noted for all animals, all three axes of rotation tested, for all sinusoidal frequencies tested (0.05-5 Hz), and for

  19. Motor learning in common marmosets: vestibulo-ocular reflex adaptation and its sensitivity to inhibitors of Purkinje cell long-term depression.

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    Anzai, Mari; Nagao, Soich

    2014-06-01

    Adaptation of the horizontal vestibulo-ocular reflex (HVOR) provides an experimental model for cerebellum-dependent motor learning. We developed an eye movement measuring system and a paradigm for induction of HVOR adaptation for the common marmoset. The HVOR gain in dark measured by 10° (peak-to-peak amplitude) and 0.11-0.5Hz turntable oscillation was around unity. The gain-up and gain-down HVOR adaptation was induced by 1h of sustained out-of-phase and in-phase 10°-0.33Hz combined turntable-screen oscillation in the light, respectively. To examine the role of long-term depression (LTD) of parallel fiber-Purkinje cell synapses, we intraperitonially applied T-588 or nimesulide, which block the induction of LTD in vitro or in vivo preparations, 1h before the test of HVOR adaptation. T-588 (3 and 5mg/kg body weight) did not affect nonadapted HVOR gains, and impaired both gain-up and gain-down HVOR adaptation. Nimesulide (3 and 6mg/kg) did not affect nonadapted HVOR gains, and impaired gain-up HVOR adaptation dose-dependently; however, it very little affected gain-down HVOR adaptation. These findings are consistent with the results of our study of nimesulide on the adaptation of horizontal optokinetic response in mice (Le et al., 2010), and support the view that LTD underlies HVOR adaptation.

  20. Long-term potentiation of inhibitory synaptic transmission onto cerebellar Purkinje neurons contributes to adaptation of vestibulo-ocular reflex.

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    Tanaka, Shinsuke; Kawaguchi, Shin-Ya; Shioi, Go; Hirano, Tomoo

    2013-10-23

    Synaptic plasticity in the cerebellum is thought to contribute to motor learning. In particular, long-term depression (LTD) at parallel fiber (PF) to Purkinje neuron (PN) excitatory synapses has attracted much attention of neuroscientists as a primary cellular mechanism for motor learning. In contrast, roles of plasticity at cerebellar inhibitory synapses in vivo remain unknown. Here, we have investigated the roles of long-lasting enhancement of transmission at GABAergic synapses on a PN that is known as rebound potentiation (RP). Previous studies demonstrated that binding of GABAA receptor with GABAA receptor-associated protein (GABARAP) is required for RP, and that a peptide that blocks this binding suppresses RP induction. To address the functional roles of RP, we generated transgenic mice that express this peptide fused to a fluorescent protein selectively in PNs using the PN-specific L7 promoter. These mice failed to show RP, although they showed no changes in the basal amplitude or frequency of miniature IPSCs. The transgenic mice also showed no abnormality in gross cerebellar morphology, LTD, or other excitatory synaptic properties, or intrinsic excitability of PNs. Next, we attempted to evaluate their motor control and learning ability by examining reflex eye movements. The basal dynamic properties of the vestibulo-ocular reflex and optokinetic response, and adaptation of the latter, were normal in the transgenic mice. In contrast, the transgenic mice showed defects in the adaptation of vestibulo-ocular reflex, a model paradigm of cerebellum-dependent motor learning. These results together suggest that RP contributes to a certain type of motor learning.

  1. Characterization of the 3D angular vestibulo-ocular reflex in C57BL6 mice.

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    Migliaccio, Americo A; Meierhofer, Robert; Della Santina, Charles C

    2011-05-01

    We characterized the three-dimensional angular vestibulo-ocular reflex (3D aVOR) of adult C57BL6 mice during static tilt testing, sinusoidal, and high-acceleration rotations and compared it with that of another lateral-eyed mammal with afoveate retinae (chinchilla) and two primate species with forward eye orientation and retinal foveae (human and squirrel monkey). Noting that visual acuity in mice is poor compared to chinchillas and even worse compared to primates, we hypothesized that the mouse 3D aVOR would be relatively low in gain (eye-velocity/head-velocity) compared to other species and would fall off for combinations of head rotation velocity and frequency for which peak-to-peak position changes fall below the minimum visual angle resolvable by mice. We also predicted that as in chinchilla, the mouse 3D aVOR would be more isotropic (eye/head velocity gain independent of head rotation axis) and better aligned with the axis of head rotation than the 3D aVOR of primates. In 12 adult C57BL6 mice, binocular 3D eye movements were measured in darkness during whole-body static tilts, 20-100°/s whole-body sinusoidal rotations (0.02-10 Hz) and acceleration steps of 3,000°/s² to a 150°/s plateau (dominant spectral content 8-12 Hz). Our results show that the mouse has a robust static tilt counter-roll response gain of ~0.35 (eye-position Δ/head-position Δ) and mid-frequency aVOR gain (~0.6-0.8), but relatively low aVOR gain for high-frequency sinusoidal head rotations and for steps of head rotation acceleration (~0.5). Due to comparatively poor static visual acuity in the mouse, a perfectly compensatory 3D aVOR would confer relatively little benefit during high-frequency, low-amplitude movements. Therefore, our data suggest that the adaptive drive for maintaining a compensatory 3D aVOR depends on the static visual acuity in different species. Like chinchillas, mice have a much more nearly isotropic 3D aVOR than do the primates for which comparable data are

  2. An Indirect System Identification Technique for Stable Estimation of Continuous-Time Parameters of the Vestibulo-Ocular Reflex (VOR)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kukreja, Sunil L.; Wallin, Ragnar; Boyle, Richard D.

    2013-01-01

    The vestibulo-ocular reflex (VOR) is a well-known dual mode bifurcating system that consists of slow and fast modes associated with nystagmus and saccade, respectively. Estimation of continuous-time parameters of nystagmus and saccade models are known to be sensitive to estimation methodology, noise and sampling rate. The stable and accurate estimation of these parameters are critical for accurate disease modelling, clinical diagnosis, robotic control strategies, mission planning for space exploration and pilot safety, etc. This paper presents a novel indirect system identification method for the estimation of continuous-time parameters of VOR employing standardised least-squares with dual sampling rates in a sparse structure. This approach permits the stable and simultaneous estimation of both nystagmus and saccade data. The efficacy of this approach is demonstrated via simulation of a continuous-time model of VOR with typical parameters found in clinical studies and in the presence of output additive noise.

  3. Torsional vestibulo-ocular reflex measurements for identifying otolith asymmetries possibly related to space motion sickness susceptibility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peterka, Robert J.

    Recent studies by Diamond and Markham 1,2 have identified significant correlations between space motion sickness susceptibility and measures of disconjugate torsional eye movements recorded during parabolic flights. These results support an earlier proposal by von Baumgarten and Thümler 3 which hypothesized that an asymmetry of otolith function between the two ears is the cause of space motion sickness. It may be possible to devise experiments that can be performed in the 1 g environment on earth that could identify and quantify the presence of asymmetric otolith function. This paper summarizes the known physiological and anatomical properties of the otolith organs and the properties of the torsional vestibulo-ocular reflex which are relevant to the design of a stimulus to identify otolith asymmetries. A specific stimulus which takes advantage of these properties is proposed.

  4. Signal processing related to the vestibulo-ocular reflex during combined angular rotation and linear translation of the head

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    McCrea, R. A.; Chen-Huang, C.; Peterson, B. W. (Principal Investigator)

    1999-01-01

    The contributions of vestibular nerve afferents and central vestibular pathways to the angular (AVOR) and linear (LVOR) vestibulo-ocular reflex were studied in squirrel monkeys during fixation of near and far targets. Irregular vestibular afferents did not appear to be necessary for the LVOR, since when they were selectively silenced with galvanic currents the LVOR was essentially unaffected during both far- and near-target viewing. The linear translation signals generated by secondary AVOR neurons in the vestibular nuclei were, on average, in phase with head velocity, inversely related to viewing distance, and were nearly as strong as AVOR-related signals. We suggest that spatial-temporal transformation of linear head translation signals to angular eye velocity commands is accomplished primarily by the addition of viewing distance multiplied, centrally integrated, otolith regular afferent signals to angular VOR pathways.

  5. Behavioral analysis of signals that guide learned changes in the amplitude and dynamics of the vestibulo-ocular reflex

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raymond, J. L.; Lisberger, S. G.

    1996-01-01

    We characterized the dependence of motor learning in the monkey vestibulo-ocular reflex (VOR) on the duration, frequency, and relative timing of the visual and vestibular stimuli used to induce learning. The amplitude of the VOR was decreased or increased through training with paired head and visual stimulus motion in the same or opposite directions, respectively. For training stimuli that consisted of simultaneous pulses of head and target velocity 80-1000 msec in duration, brief stimuli caused small changes in the amplitude of the VOR, whereas long stimuli caused larger changes in amplitude as well as changes in the dynamics of the reflex. When the relative timing of the visual and vestibular stimuli was varied, brief image motion paired with the beginning of a longer vestibular stimulus caused changes in the amplitude of the reflex alone, but the same image motion paired with a later time in the vestibular stimulus caused changes in the dynamics as well as the amplitude of the VOR. For training stimuli that consisted of sinusoidal head and visual stimulus motion, low-frequency training stimuli induced frequency-selective changes in the VOR, as reported previously, whereas high-frequency training stimuli induced changes in the amplitude of the VOR that were more similar across test frequency. The results suggest that there are at least two distinguishable components of motor learning in the VOR. One component is induced by short-duration or high-frequency stimuli and involves changes in only the amplitude of the reflex. A second component is induced by long-duration or low-frequency stimuli and involves changes in the amplitude and dynamics of the VOR.

  6. Behavioral analysis of signals that guide learned changes in the amplitude and dynamics of the vestibulo-ocular reflex

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raymond, J. L.; Lisberger, S. G.

    1996-01-01

    We characterized the dependence of motor learning in the monkey vestibulo-ocular reflex (VOR) on the duration, frequency, and relative timing of the visual and vestibular stimuli used to induce learning. The amplitude of the VOR was decreased or increased through training with paired head and visual stimulus motion in the same or opposite directions, respectively. For training stimuli that consisted of simultaneous pulses of head and target velocity 80-1000 msec in duration, brief stimuli caused small changes in the amplitude of the VOR, whereas long stimuli caused larger changes in amplitude as well as changes in the dynamics of the reflex. When the relative timing of the visual and vestibular stimuli was varied, brief image motion paired with the beginning of a longer vestibular stimulus caused changes in the amplitude of the reflex alone, but the same image motion paired with a later time in the vestibular stimulus caused changes in the dynamics as well as the amplitude of the VOR. For training stimuli that consisted of sinusoidal head and visual stimulus motion, low-frequency training stimuli induced frequency-selective changes in the VOR, as reported previously, whereas high-frequency training stimuli induced changes in the amplitude of the VOR that were more similar across test frequency. The results suggest that there are at least two distinguishable components of motor learning in the VOR. One component is induced by short-duration or high-frequency stimuli and involves changes in only the amplitude of the reflex. A second component is induced by long-duration or low-frequency stimuli and involves changes in the amplitude and dynamics of the VOR.

  7. Chromatic contrast sensitivity during optokinetic nystagmus, visually enhanced vestibulo-ocular reflex, and smooth pursuit eye movements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schütz, Alexander C; Braun, Doris I; Gegenfurtner, Karl R

    2009-05-01

    Recently we showed that sensitivity for chromatic- and high-spatial frequency luminance stimuli is enhanced during smooth-pursuit eye movements (SPEMs). Here we investigated whether this enhancement is a general property of slow eye movements. Besides SPEM there are two other classes of eye movements that operate in a similar range of eye velocities: the optokinetic nystagmus (OKN) is a reflexive pattern of alternating fast and slow eye movements elicited by wide-field visual motion and the vestibulo-ocular reflex (VOR) stabilizes the gaze during head movements. In a natural environment all three classes of eye movements act synergistically to allow clear central vision during self- and object motion. To test whether the same improvement of chromatic sensitivity occurs during all of these eye movements, we measured human detection performance of chromatic and luminance line stimuli during OKN and contrast sensitivity during VOR and SPEM at comparable velocities. For comparison, performance in the same tasks was tested during fixation. During the slow phase of OKN we found a similar enhancement of chromatic detection rate like that during SPEM, whereas no enhancement was observable during VOR. This result indicates similarities between slow-phase OKN and SPEM, which are distinct from VOR.

  8. Use of a genetic algorithm for the analysis of eye movements from the linear vestibulo-ocular reflex

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shelhamer, M.

    2001-01-01

    It is common in vestibular and oculomotor testing to use a single-frequency (sine) or combination of frequencies [sum-of-sines (SOS)] stimulus for head or target motion. The resulting eye movements typically contain a smooth tracking component, which follows the stimulus, in which are interspersed rapid eye movements (saccades or fast phases). The parameters of the smooth tracking--the amplitude and phase of each component frequency--are of interest; many methods have been devised that attempt to identify and remove the fast eye movements from the smooth. We describe a new approach to this problem, tailored to both single-frequency and sum-of-sines stimulation of the human linear vestibulo-ocular reflex. An approximate derivative is used to identify fast movements, which are then omitted from further analysis. The remaining points form a series of smooth tracking segments. A genetic algorithm is used to fit these segments together to form a smooth (but disconnected) wave form, by iteratively removing biases due to the missing fast phases. A genetic algorithm is an iterative optimization procedure; it provides a basis for extending this approach to more complex stimulus-response situations. In the SOS case, the genetic algorithm estimates the amplitude and phase values of the component frequencies as well as removing biases.

  9. Ethanol consumption impairs vestibulo-ocular reflex function measured by the video head impulse test and dynamic visual acuity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roth, Thomas N; Weber, Konrad P; Wettstein, Vincent G; Marks, Guy B; Rosengren, Sally M; Hegemann, Stefan C A

    2014-01-01

    Ethanol affects many parts of the nervous system, from the periphery to higher cognitive functions. Due to the established effects of ethanol on vestibular and oculomotor function, we wished to examine its effect on two new tests of the vestibulo-ocular reflex (VOR): the video head impulse test (vHIT) and dynamic visual acuity (DVA). We tested eight healthy subjects with no history of vestibular disease after consumption of standardized drinks of 40% ethanol. We used a repeated measures design to track vestibular function over multiple rounds of ethanol consumption up to a maximum breath alcohol concentration (BrAC) of 1.38 per mil. All tests were normal at baseline. VOR gain measured by vHIT decreased by 25% at the highest BrAC level tested in each subject. Catch-up saccades were negligible at baseline and increased in number and size with increasing ethanol consumption (from 0.13° to 1.43° cumulative amplitude per trial). DVA scores increased by 86% indicating a deterioration of acuity, while static visual acuity (SVA) remained unchanged. Ethanol consumption systematically impaired the VOR evoked by high-acceleration head impulses and led to a functional loss of visual acuity during head movement.

  10. Influence of stimulus interval on the habituation of vestibulo-ocular reflex and sensation of rotation in humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clément, Gilles; Tilikete, Caroline; Courjon, Jean-Hubert

    2013-08-01

    Previous studies in cats revealed that vestibular habituation of the vestibulo-ocular reflex (VOR) only occurs when velocity steps are delivered during the secondary phase nystagmus, suggesting that the presence of anti-compensatory slow phases may trigger the habituation process. We verified this property in humans by comparing vestibular habituation of VOR and sensation of rotation when steps were delivered either immediately after the perception of self-rotation had stopped, which is shortly before the nystagmus reverses direction; or when steps were delivered 60s later, i.e. during the secondary phase. Vestibular habituation of the VOR occurred in both instances. However, the decrease in VOR peak slow phase velocity and time constant was larger when steps were delivered after nystagmus reversal compared to before nystagmus reversal. The duration of the perception of self-rotation habituated equally for both conditions. These results confirm that VOR habituation fully develops only when velocity steps are delivered after the primary phase nystagmus. This finding may be helpful for minimizing the impact of repetitive vestibular stimuli in protocols using crossover design for drug studies, testing recovery in vestibular patients, or training people for different gravitoinertial environments.

  11. A reevaluation of the vestibulo-ocular reflex: new ideas of its purpose, properties, neural substrate, and disorders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leigh, R. J.; Brandt, T.

    1993-01-01

    Conventional views of the vestibulo-ocular reflex (VOR) have emphasized testing with caloric stimuli and by passively rotating patients at low frequencies in a chair. The properties of the VOR tested under these conditions differ from the performance of this reflex during the natural function for which it evolved--locomotion. Only the VOR (and not visually mediated eye movements) can cope with the high-frequency angular and linear perturbations of the head that occur during locomotion; this is achieved by generating eye movements at short latency (< 16 msec). Interpretation of vestibular testing is enhanced by the realization that, although the di- and trisynaptic components of the VOR are essential for this short-latency response, the overall accuracy and plasticity of the VOR depend upon a distributed, parallel network of neurons involving the vestibular nuclei. Neurons in this network variously upon a distributed, parallel network of neurons involving the vestibular nuclei. Neurons in this network variously encode inputs from the labyrinthine semicircular canals and otoliths, as well as from the visual and somatosensory systems. The central vestibular pathways branch to contact vestibular cortex (for perception) and the spinal cord (for control of posture). Thus, the vestibular nuclei basically coordinate the stabilization of gaze and posture, and contribute to the perception of verticality and self-motion. Consequently, brainstem disorders that disrupt the VOR cause not just only nystagmus, but also instability of posture (eg, increased fore-aft sway in patients with downbeat nystagmus) and disturbance of spatial orientation (eg, tilt of the subjective visual vertical in Wallenberg's syndrome).

  12. [Visual tracking with/without passive whole-body rotation in Parkinson's disease (PD): Dissociation of smooth-pursuit and cancellation of vestibulo-ocular reflex (VOR)].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ito, Norie; Takei, Hidetoshi; Chiba, Susumu; Inoue, Kiyoharu; Fukushima, Kikuro

    2016-01-01

    Although impaired smooth-pursuit in Parkinson's disease (PD) is well known, reports are conflicting on the ability to cancel vestibulo-ocular reflex (VOR) when the target moves with head, requiring gaze-pursuit. To compare visual tracking performance with or without passive whole-body rotation, we examined eye movements of 10 PD patients and 6 age-matched controls during sinusoidal horizontal smooth-pursuit and passive whole-body rotation (0.3 Hz, ± 10°). Three tasks were tested: smooth-pursuit, VOR cancellation, and VORx1 while subjects fixated an earth-stationary spot during whole-body rotation. Mean ± SD eye velocity gains (eye velocities/stimulus velocities) of PD patients during the 3 tasks were 0.32 ± 0.24 0.25 ± 0.22, 0.85 ± 0.20, whereas those of controls were 0.91 ± 0.06, 0.14 ± 0.07, 0.94 ± 0.05, respectively. Difference was significant between the two subject groups only during smooth-pursuit. Plotting eye-velocity gains of individual subjects during VOR cancellation against those during smooth-pursuit revealed significant negative linear correlation between the two parameters in the controls, but no correlation was found in PD patients. Based on the regression equation of the controls, we estimated expected eye velocity gains of individual subjects during VOR cancellation from their smooth-pursuit gains. Estimated gains of PD patients during VOR cancellation were significantly different from their actual gains, suggesting that different neural mechanisms operate during VOR cancellation in the controls and PD.

  13. Cross-axis adaptation improves 3D vestibulo-ocular reflex alignment during chronic stimulation via a head-mounted multichannel vestibular prosthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dai, Chenkai; Fridman, Gene Y; Chiang, Bryce; Davidovics, Natan S; Melvin, Thuy-Anh; Cullen, Kathleen E; Della Santina, Charles C

    2011-05-01

    By sensing three-dimensional (3D) head rotation and electrically stimulating the three ampullary branches of a vestibular nerve to encode head angular velocity, a multichannel vestibular prosthesis (MVP) can restore vestibular sensation to individuals disabled by loss of vestibular hair cell function. However, current spread to afferent fibers innervating non-targeted canals and otolith end organs can distort the vestibular nerve activation pattern, causing misalignment between the perceived and actual axis of head rotation. We hypothesized that over time, central neural mechanisms can adapt to correct this misalignment. To test this, we rendered five chinchillas vestibular deficient via bilateral gentamicin treatment and unilaterally implanted them with a head-mounted MVP. Comparison of 3D angular vestibulo-ocular reflex (aVOR) responses during 2 Hz, 50°/s peak horizontal sinusoidal head rotations in darkness on the first, third, and seventh days of continual MVP use revealed that eye responses about the intended axis remained stable (at about 70% of the normal gain) while misalignment improved significantly by the end of 1 week of prosthetic stimulation. A comparable time course of improvement was also observed for head rotations about the other two semicircular canal axes and at every stimulus frequency examined (0.2-5 Hz). In addition, the extent of disconjugacy between the two eyes progressively improved during the same time window. These results indicate that the central nervous system rapidly adapts to multichannel prosthetic vestibular stimulation to markedly improve 3D aVOR alignment within the first week after activation. Similar adaptive improvements are likely to occur in other species, including humans.

  14. A cerebellar learning model of vestibulo-ocular reflex adaptation in wild-type and mutant mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clopath, Claudia; Badura, Aleksandra; De Zeeuw, Chris I; Brunel, Nicolas

    2014-05-21

    Mechanisms of cerebellar motor learning are still poorly understood. The standard Marr-Albus-Ito theory posits that learning involves plasticity at the parallel fiber to Purkinje cell synapses under control of the climbing fiber input, which provides an error signal as in classical supervised learning paradigms. However, a growing body of evidence challenges this theory, in that additional sites of plasticity appear to contribute to motor adaptation. Here, we consider phase-reversal training of the vestibulo-ocular reflex (VOR), a simple form of motor learning for which a large body of experimental data is available in wild-type and mutant mice, in which the excitability of granule cells or inhibition of Purkinje cells was affected in a cell-specific fashion. We present novel electrophysiological recordings of Purkinje cell activity measured in naive wild-type mice subjected to this VOR adaptation task. We then introduce a minimal model that consists of learning at the parallel fibers to Purkinje cells with the help of the climbing fibers. Although the minimal model reproduces the behavior of the wild-type animals and is analytically tractable, it fails at reproducing the behavior of mutant mice and the electrophysiology data. Therefore, we build a detailed model involving plasticity at the parallel fibers to Purkinje cells' synapse guided by climbing fibers, feedforward inhibition of Purkinje cells, and plasticity at the mossy fiber to vestibular nuclei neuron synapse. The detailed model reproduces both the behavioral and electrophysiological data of both the wild-type and mutant mice and allows for experimentally testable predictions.

  15. Vestibulo-ocular reflex of the squirrel monkey during eccentric rotation with centripetal acceleration along the naso-occipital axis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Merfeld, D. M.; Paloski, W. H. (Principal Investigator)

    1996-01-01

    The vestibulo-ocular reflexes (VOR) are determined not only by angular acceleration, but also by the presence of gravity and linear acceleration. This phenomenon was studied by measuring three-dimensional nystagmic eye movements, with implanted search coils, in four male squirrel monkeys. Monkeys were rotated in the dark at 200 degrees/s, centrally or 79 cm off-axis, with the axis of rotation always aligned with gravity and the spinal axis of the upright monkeys. The monkey's position relative to the centripetal acceleration (facing center or back to center) had a dramatic influence on the VOR. These studies show that a torsional response was always elicited that acted to shift the axis of eye rotation toward alignment with gravito-inertial force. On the other hand, a slow phase downward vertical response usually existed, which shifted the axis of eye rotation away from the gravito-inertial force. These findings were consistent across all monkeys. In another set of tests, the same monkeys were rapidly tilted about their interaural (pitch) axis. Tilt orientations of 45 degrees and 90 degrees were maintained for 1 min. Other than a compensatory angular VOR during the rotation, no consistent eye velocity response was ever observed during or following the tilt. The absence of any response following tilt proves that the observed torsional and vertical responses were not a positional nystagmus. Model simulations qualitatively predict all components of these eccentric rotation and tilt responses. These simulations support the conclusion that the VOR during eccentric rotation may consist of two components: a linear VOR and a rotational VOR. The model predicts a slow phase downward, vertical, linear VOR during eccentric rotation even though there was never a change in the force aligned with monkey's spinal (Z) axis. The model also predicts the torsional components of the response that shift the rotation axis of the angular VOR toward alignment with gravito-inertial force.

  16. Chronic stimulation of the semicircular canals using a multichannel vestibular prosthesis: effects on locomotion and angular vestibulo-ocular reflex in chinchillas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Daniel Q; Rahman, Mehdi A; Fridman, Gene; Dai, Chenkai; Chiang, Bryce; Della Santina, Charles C

    2011-01-01

    Bilateral loss of vestibular sensation causes difficulty maintaining stable vision, posture and gait. An implantable prosthesis that partly restores vestibular sensation could significantly improve quality of life for individuals disabled by this disorder. We have developed a head-mounted multichannel vestibular prosthesis (MVP) that restores sufficient semicircular canal function to recreate a 3D angular vestibulo-ocular reflex (aVOR). In this study, we evaluated effects of chronic MVP stimulation on locomotion in chinchillas. Two of three animals examined exhibited significant improvements in both locomotion and aVOR.

  17. Contribution of the otholiths to the human torsional vestibulo-ocular reflex

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Groen, E.L.; Bos, J.E.; Graaf, J.E. de

    1999-01-01

    The dynamic contribution of the otoliths to the human ocular torsion response was examined during passive sinusoidal body roll about an earth-horizontal axis (varying otolith input) and about an earth-vertical axis (unvarying otolith input). At a fixed amplitude of 25°, the stimulus frequency was va

  18. Sound-evoked vestibulo-ocular reflexes (VOR) in trained monkeys.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Wu; Mustain, W; Simpson, I

    2004-05-01

    Acoustic stimulation of the vestibular system has been well documented in humans and has been accepted as a useful tool to diagnose vestibular disorders. The goal of this study was to establish an awake and behaving primate model that might be useful for investigating the neural mechanisms underlying acoustic activation of the vestibular system. We recorded sound-evoked eye movements in monkeys while they performed ocular motor tasks. In the first part of the study, an acoustic click (1 ms, 99 to approximately 125 db peak SPL) was delivered to one of the monkeys' ears while they fixated on visual targets of varying eccentricities and viewing distances. Acoustic clicks were found to evoke well-defined biphasic eye velocity responses. For the movement in the horizontal direction, the first eye velocity peaks were always away from the stimulated ear. For the movement in the vertical direction, however, the directions of the first eye velocity peaks varied from monkey to monkey. This variability was difficult to interpret in the absence of torsional measurement. Thus, our analysis in this report was focused on horizontal eye movements. We found that click-evoked eye movements were disjunctive, with larger first horizontal eye velocity peaks from the eye ipsilateral to the stimulated ear (the amplitude ratio was 1.8 +/- 0.3, n=4). The amplitudes of the first horizontal peaks were also linearly correlated with gaze eccentricity and viewing distance. In the second part of the study, we found that a brief tone-pulse (100 ms, 125 db peak SPL) evoked eye movements that exhibited a well-defined frequency tuning with the most effective stimulating frequencies ranging from 1 K to 1.5 KHz. These data demonstrate that the sound-evoked eye movements in behaving monkeys are well defined and reproducible. This paradigm may be useful for studying the neural mechanisms underlying acoustic activation of the vestibular system.

  19. The effect of vestibulo-ocular reflex deficits and covert saccades on dynamic vision in opioid-induced vestibular dysfunction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramaioli, Cecilia; Colagiorgio, Paolo; Sağlam, Murat; Heuser, Fabian; Schneider, Erich; Ramat, Stefano; Lehnen, Nadine

    2014-01-01

    Patients with bilateral vestibular dysfunction cannot fully compensate passive head rotations with eye movements, and experience disturbing oscillopsia. To compensate for the deficient vestibulo-ocular reflex (VOR), they have to rely on re-fixation saccades. Some can trigger "covert" saccades while the head still moves; others only initiate saccades afterwards. Due to their shorter latency, it has been hypothesized that covert saccades are particularly beneficial to improve dynamic visual acuity, reducing oscillopsia. Here, we investigate the combined effect of covert saccades and the VOR on clear vision, using the Head Impulse Testing Device-Functional Test (HITD-FT), which quantifies reading ability during passive high-acceleration head movements. To reversibly decrease VOR function, fourteen healthy men (median age 26 years, range 21-31) were continuously administrated the opioid remifentanil intravenously (0.15 µg/kg/min). VOR gain was assessed with the video head-impulse test, functional performance (i.e. reading) with the HITD-FT. Before opioid application, VOR and dynamic reading were intact (head-impulse gain: 0.87±0.08, mean±SD; HITD-FT rate of correct answers: 90±9%). Remifentanil induced impairment in dynamic reading (HITD-FT 26±15%) in 12/14 subjects, with transient bilateral vestibular dysfunction (head-impulse gain 0.63±0.19). HITD-FT score correlated with head-impulse gain (R = 0.63, p = 0.03) and with gain difference (before/with remifentanil, R = -0.64, p = 0.02). One subject had a non-pathological head-impulse gain (0.82±0.03) and a high HITD-FT score (92%). One subject triggered covert saccades in 60% of the head movements and could read during passive head movements (HITD-FT 93%) despite a pathological head-impulse gain (0.59±0.03) whereas none of the 12 subjects without covert saccades reached such high performance. In summary, early catch-up saccades may improve dynamic visual function. HITD-FT is an appropriate method

  20. The effect of vestibulo-ocular reflex deficits and covert saccades on dynamic vision in opioid-induced vestibular dysfunction.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cecilia Ramaioli

    Full Text Available Patients with bilateral vestibular dysfunction cannot fully compensate passive head rotations with eye movements, and experience disturbing oscillopsia. To compensate for the deficient vestibulo-ocular reflex (VOR, they have to rely on re-fixation saccades. Some can trigger "covert" saccades while the head still moves; others only initiate saccades afterwards. Due to their shorter latency, it has been hypothesized that covert saccades are particularly beneficial to improve dynamic visual acuity, reducing oscillopsia. Here, we investigate the combined effect of covert saccades and the VOR on clear vision, using the Head Impulse Testing Device-Functional Test (HITD-FT, which quantifies reading ability during passive high-acceleration head movements. To reversibly decrease VOR function, fourteen healthy men (median age 26 years, range 21-31 were continuously administrated the opioid remifentanil intravenously (0.15 µg/kg/min. VOR gain was assessed with the video head-impulse test, functional performance (i.e. reading with the HITD-FT. Before opioid application, VOR and dynamic reading were intact (head-impulse gain: 0.87±0.08, mean±SD; HITD-FT rate of correct answers: 90±9%. Remifentanil induced impairment in dynamic reading (HITD-FT 26±15% in 12/14 subjects, with transient bilateral vestibular dysfunction (head-impulse gain 0.63±0.19. HITD-FT score correlated with head-impulse gain (R = 0.63, p = 0.03 and with gain difference (before/with remifentanil, R = -0.64, p = 0.02. One subject had a non-pathological head-impulse gain (0.82±0.03 and a high HITD-FT score (92%. One subject triggered covert saccades in 60% of the head movements and could read during passive head movements (HITD-FT 93% despite a pathological head-impulse gain (0.59±0.03 whereas none of the 12 subjects without covert saccades reached such high performance. In summary, early catch-up saccades may improve dynamic visual function. HITD-FT is an appropriate

  1. Characterizing high-velocity angular vestibulo-ocular reflex function in service members post-blast exposure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scherer, Matthew R; Shelhamer, Mark J; Schubert, Michael C

    2011-02-01

    Blasts (explosions) are the most common mechanism of injury in modern warfare. Traumatic brain injury (TBI) and dizziness are common sequelae associated with blasts, and many service members (SMs) report symptoms worsen with activity. The purpose of this study was to measure angular vestibulo-ocular reflex gain (aVOR) of blast-exposed SMs with TBI during head impulse testing. We also assessed their symptoms during exertion. Twenty-four SMs recovering from TBI were prospectively assigned to one of two groups based on the presence or absence of dizziness. Wireless monocular scleral search coil and rate sensor were used to characterize active and passive yaw and pitch head and eye rotations. Visual analog scale (VAS) was used to monitor symptoms during fast walking/running. For active yaw head impulses, aVOR gains were significantly lower in the symptomatic group (0.79 ± 0.15) versus asymptomatic (0.87 ± 0.18), but not for passive head rotation. For pitch head rotation, the symptomatic group had both active (0.915 ± 0.24) and passive (0.878 ± 0.22) aVOR gains lower than the asymptomatic group (active 1.03 ± 0.27, passive 0.97 ± 0.23). Some SMs had elevated aVOR gain. VAS scores for all symptoms were highest during exertion. Our data suggest symptomatic SMs with TBI as a result of blast have varied aVOR gain during high-velocity head impulses and provide compelling evidence of pathology affecting the vestibular system. Potential loci of injury in this population include the following: disruption of pathways relaying vestibular efference signals, differential destruction of type I vestibular hair cells, or selective damage to irregular afferent pathways-any of which may explain the common discrepancy between reports of vestibular-like symptoms and laboratory testing results. Significantly reduced pitch aVOR in symptomatic SMs and peak symptom severity during exertional testing support earlier findings in the chronic blast-exposed active duty SMs.

  2. Note: High frequency vibration rejection using a linear shaft actuator-based image stabilizing device via vestibulo-ocular reflex adaptation control method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koh, Doo-Yeol; Kim, Young-Kook; Kim, Kyung-Soo; Kim, Soohyun

    2013-08-01

    In mobile robotics, obtaining stable image of a mounted camera is crucial for operating a mobile system to complete given tasks. This note presents the development of a high-speed image stabilizing device using linear shaft actuator, and a new image stabilization method inspired by human gaze stabilization process known as vestibulo-ocular reflex (VOR). In the proposed control, the reference is adaptively adjusted by the VOR adaptation control to reject residual vibration of a camera as the VOR gain converges to optimal state. Through experiments on a pneumatic vibrator, it will be shown that the proposed system is capable of stabilizing 10 Hz platform vibration, which shows potential applicability of the device to a high-speed mobile robot.

  3. Multiple subclasses of Purkinje cells in the primate floccular complex provide similar signals to guide learning in the vestibulo-ocular reflex

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raymond, J. L.; Lisberger, S. G.

    1997-01-01

    The neural "learning rules" governing the induction of plasticity in the cerebellum were analyzed by recording the patterns of neural activity in awake, behaving animals during stimuli that induce a form of cerebellum-dependent learning. We recorded the simple- and complex-spike responses of a broad sample of Purkinje cells in the floccular complex during a number of stimulus conditions that induce motor learning in the vestibulo-ocular reflex (VOR). Each subclass of Purkinje cells carried essentially the same information about required changes in the gain of the VOR. The correlation of simple-spike activity in Purkinje cells with activity in vestibular pathways could guide learning during low-frequency but not high-frequency stimuli. Climbing fiber activity could guide learning during all stimuli tested but only if compared with the activity present approximately 100 msec earlier in either vestibular pathways or Purkinje cells.

  4. Clinical interest of postural and vestibulo-ocular reflex changes induced by cervical muscles and skull vibration in compensated unilateral vestibular lesion patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dumas, Georges; Lion, Alexis; Gauchard, Gérome C; Herpin, Guillaume; Magnusson, Måns; Perrin, Philippe P

    2013-01-01

    Skull vibration induces nystagmus in unilateral vestibular lesion (UVL) patients. Vibration of skull, posterior cervical muscles or inferior limb muscles alters posture in recent UVL patients. This study aimed to investigate the postural effect of vibration in chronic compensated UVL patients. Vibration was applied successively to vertex, each mastoid, each side of posterior cervical muscles and of triceps surae in 12 UVL patients and 9 healthy subjects. Eye movements were recorded with videonystagmography. Postural control was evaluated in eyes open (EO) and eyes closed (EC) conditions. Sway area, sway path, anteroposterior and medio-lateral sways were recorded.A vibration induced nystagmus (VIN) beating toward the healthy side was obtained for each UVL patient during mastoid vibration. In EO, only sway path was higher in UVL group during vibration of mastoids and posterior cervical muscles.The EO postural impairments of UVL patients could be related to the eye movements or VIN, leading to visual perturbations, or to a proprioceptive error signal, providing an erroneous representation of head position. The vibration-induced sway was too small to be clinically useful. Vestibulo-ocular reflex observed with videonystagmography during mastoid vibration seems more relevant to reveal chronic UVL than vestibulo-spinal reflex observed with posturography.

  5. Self-motion perception and vestibulo-ocular reflex during whole body yaw rotation in standing subjects: the role of head position and neck proprioception.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Panichi, Roberto; Botti, Fabio Massimo; Ferraresi, Aldo; Faralli, Mario; Kyriakareli, Artemis; Schieppati, Marco; Pettorossi, Vito Enrico

    2011-04-01

    Self-motion perception and vestibulo-ocular reflex (VOR) were studied during whole body yaw rotation in the dark at different static head positions. Rotations consisted of four cycles of symmetric sinusoidal and asymmetric oscillations. Self-motion perception was evaluated by measuring the ability of subjects to manually track a static remembered target. VOR was recorded separately and the slow phase eye position (SPEP) was computed. Three different head static yaw deviations (active and passive) relative to the trunk (0°, 45° to right and 45° to left) were examined. Active head deviations had a significant effect during asymmetric oscillation: the movement perception was enhanced when the head was kept turned toward the side of body rotation and decreased in the opposite direction. Conversely, passive head deviations had no effect on movement perception. Further, vibration (100 Hz) of the neck muscles splenius capitis and sternocleidomastoideus remarkably influenced perceived rotation during asymmetric oscillation. On the other hand, SPEP of VOR was modulated by active head deviation, but was not influenced by neck muscle vibration. Through its effects on motion perception and reflex gain, head position improved gaze stability and enhanced self-motion perception in the direction of the head deviation.

  6. Vestibulo-ocular reflex gain as a measure of vestibular function in guinea pigs while in a recompression chamber: apparatus design and effects of nitrogen narcosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stevens, D M; Dutka, A J; Snyder, J E

    1995-05-01

    There are several mechanisms whereby alteration of barometric pressure can produce vertigo in divers or aviators. Development of a reliable measure of vestibular function in an animal model is the first requirement for further study of these mechanisms. This report presents the development of a rotatory table device capable of evoking the vestibulo-ocular reflex (VOR) of a guinea pig while in a hyperbaric chamber. To assess the reproducibility of this response, eight animals were monitored by electronystagmography during rotations at three table velocities (62.4, 83.3, and 100 degrees/s). Two test sessions were performed on each animal with a 6-hour interval between sessions. The VOR gain was calculated by dividing the average peak velocity of the slow phase component of the nystagmus by the peak stimulus velocity. At least eight observations per test speed were averaged; calibration of eye movement was performed prior to each session by forced ocular abduction. Multifactorial analysis of variance revealed no significant differences (p > .05) between the differing rotation speeds nor between test sessions for individual animals. However, there was a significant difference in VOR gain between animals (p nitrogen narcosis. Pre- and post-dive VOR gains were significantly greater than those measured at depth (p nitrogen narcosis and the controversial theory that central nervous system depressants decrease the VOR gain. The results also demonstrate the ability of this inexpensive apparatus to provide a sensitive measure of pressure-induced changes of vestibular function in guinea pigs.

  7. Effect of short-duration sleep deprivation on the vestibulo-ocular reflex system evaluated by ocular vestibular-evoked myogenic potential test.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Bing-Yi; Young, Yi-Ho

    2014-07-01

    The ocular vestibular-evoked myogenic potential (oVEMP) test yields the same information as the rotational test in sleep-deprived subjects as evidenced by increased vestibulo-ocular reflex (VOR) asymmetry. However, the duration of sleep deprivation (12 h) and testing time required for the oVEMP test are shorter than for the rotational test. This study utilized the oVEMP test in sleep-deprived subjects to investigate the effect of short-duration sleep deprivation on the VOR system. Twenty healthy resident physicians underwent oVEMP and cervical VEMP (cVEMP) tests twice in a randomized order; one test battery was performed after a normal sleep, and the other was performed after a night duty at the emergency service, which meant a state of 12 h sleep deprivation. All 20 subjects had clear oVEMPs regardless of whether testing was performed after a normal sleep or 12 h sleep deprivation condition. Significant differences were not identified between the two sleep conditions in terms of characteristic parameters, i.e. latencies and amplitude of oVEMPs. However, the mean asymmetry ratio after sleep deprivation (20 ± 13%) was significantly larger than that after normal sleep (8 ± 12%). Conversely, the cVEMP parameters did not differ significantly between the two sleep conditions.

  8. The bidirectionality of motor learning in the vestibulo-ocular reflex is a function of cerebellar mGluR1 receptors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Titley, Heather K; Heskin-Sweezie, Raquel; Broussard, Dianne M

    2010-12-01

    Bidirectional changes in synaptic transmission have the potential to optimize the control of movement. However, it can be difficult to establish a causal relationship between the bidirectionality of synaptic plasticity and bidirectional changes in the speed of actual movements. We asked whether metabotropic glutamate receptor 1 (mGluR1) receptors, which participate in cerebellar long-term depression (LTD), are necessary for bidirectional motor learning in the vestibulo-ocular reflex (VOR). Cerebellar LTD and long-term potentiation (LTP) are thought to cause increases and decreases, respectively, in the gain of the VOR; the direction of learning depends on the behavioral protocol. We injected either the mGluR1 agonist (S)-DHPG or the antagonist YM 298198 bilaterally into the flocculus of alert cats, and then induced motor learning. In the presence of YM 298198, the VOR gain decreased in gain-up, as well as in gain-down protocols. (S)-DHPG augmented gain-up learning. Gain-down learning was not significantly affected by either drug. These results supported the hypothesis that gain-up learning relies on cerebellar LTD, but gain-down learning relies on a different mechanism. In the absence of mGluR1 activity, cerebellar LTD may be replaced with LTP, permitting learning in only one direction.

  9. Reaching the limit of the oculomotor plant: 3D kinematics after abducens nerve stimulation during the torsional vestibulo-ocular reflex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klier, Eliana M; Meng, Hui; Angelaki, Dora E

    2012-09-19

    Accumulating evidence shows that the oculomotor plant is capable of implementing aspects of three-dimensional kinematics such as Listing's law and the half-angle rule. But these studies have only examined the eye under static conditions or with movements that normally obey these rules (e.g., saccades and pursuit). Here we test the capability of the oculomotor plant to rearrange itself as necessary for non-half-angle behavior. Three monkeys (Macaca mulatta) fixated five vertically displaced targets along the midsagittal plane while sitting on a motion platform that rotated sinusoidally about the naso-occipital axis. This activated the torsional, rotational vestibulo-ocular reflex, which exhibits a zero-angle or negative-angle rule (depending on the visual stimulus). On random sinusoidal cycles, we stimulated the abducens nerve and observed the resultant eye movements. If the plant has rearranged itself to implement this non-half-angle behavior, then stimulation should reveal this behavior. On the other hand, if the plant is only capable of half-angle behavior, then stimulation should reveal a half-angle rule. We find the latter to be true and therefore additional neural signals are likely necessary to implement non-half-angle behavior.

  10. Loss of α-calcitonin gene-related peptide (αCGRP) reduces the efficacy of the Vestibulo-ocular Reflex (VOR).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luebke, Anne E; Holt, Joseph C; Jordan, Paivi M; Wong, Yi Shan; Caldwell, Jillian S; Cullen, Kathleen E

    2014-07-30

    The neuroactive peptide calcitonin-gene related peptide (CGRP) is known to act at efferent synapses and their targets in hair cell organs, including the cochlea and lateral line. CGRP is also expressed in vestibular efferent neurons as well as a number of central vestibular neurons. Although CGRP-null (-/-) mice demonstrate a significant reduction in cochlear nerve sound-evoked activity compared with wild-type mice, it is unknown whether and how the loss of CGRP influence vestibular system function. Vestibular function was assessed by quantifying the vestibulo-ocular reflex (VOR) in alert mice. The loss of CGRP in (-/-) mice was associated with a reduction of the VOR gain of ≈50% without a concomitant change in phase. Using immunohistochemistry, we confirmed that, although CGRP staining was absent in the vestibular end-organs of null (-/-) mice, cholinergic staining appeared normal, suggesting that the overall gross development of vestibular efferent innervation was unaltered. We further confirmed that the observed deficit in vestibular function of null (-/-) mice was not the result of nontargeted effects at the level of the extraocular motor neurons and/or their innervation of extraocular muscles. Analysis of the relationship between vestibular quick phase amplitude and peak velocity revealed that extraocular motor function was unchanged, and immunohistochemistry revealed no abnormalities in motor endplates. Together, our findings show that the neurotransmitter CGRP plays a key role in ensuring VOR efficacy.

  11. Neural correlates of motor learning in the vestibulo-ocular reflex: dynamic regulation of multimodal integration in the macaque vestibular system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sadeghi, Soroush G; Minor, Lloyd B; Cullen, Kathleen E

    2010-07-28

    Motor learning is required for the reacquisition of skills that have been compromised as a result of brain lesion or disease, as well as for the acquisition of new skills. Behaviors with well characterized anatomy and physiology are required to yield significant insight into changes that occur in the brain during motor learning. The vestibulo-ocular reflex (VOR) is well suited to establish connections between neurons, neural circuits, and motor performance during learning. Here, we examined the linkage between neuronal and behavioral VOR responses in alert behaving monkeys (Macaca mulatta) during the impressive recovery that occurs after unilateral vestibular loss. We show, for the first time, that motor learning is characterized by the dynamic reweighting of inputs from different modalities (i.e., vestibular vs extravestibular) at the level of the single neurons that constitute the first central stage of vestibular processing. Specifically, two types of information, which did not influence neuronal responses before the lesion, had an important role during compensation. First, unmasked neck proprioceptive inputs played a critical role in the early stages of this process demonstrated by faster and more substantial recovery of vestibular responses in proprioceptive sensitive neurons. Second, neuronal and VOR responses were significantly enhanced during active relative to passive head motion later in the compensation process (>3 weeks). Together, our findings provide evidence linking the dynamic regulation of multimodal integration at the level of single neurons and behavioral recovery, suggesting a role for homeostatic mechanisms in VOR motor learning.

  12. Readaptation of the vestibuloocular reflex to 1g-Condition in immature lower vertebrates ( Xenopus laevis) after micro- or hypergravity exposure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sebastian, C.; Horn, E.; Eβeling, K.; Neubert, J.

    The effects of altered gravitational conditions (AGC) on the development of the static vestibulo-ocular reflex (VOR) and readaptation to 1g were investigated in the amphibian Xenopus laevis. Tadpoles were exposed to microgravity (μg) during the German Space Mission D-2 for 10 days, using the STATEX closed survival system, or to 3g for 9 days during earth-bound experiments. At the beginning of AGC, the tadpoles had not yet developed the static VOR. The main results were: (i) Tadpoles with ug- or 3g-experience had a lower gain of the static VOR than the 1g-controls during the 2nd and 5th post-AGC days, (ii) Readaptation to response levels of 1g-reared controls usually occurred during the following weeks, except in slowly developing tadpoles with 3g-experience. Readaptation was less pronounced if, during the acute VOR test, tadpoles were rolled from the inclined to the normal posture than in the opposite test situation. It is postulated that (i) gravity is necessarily involved in the development of the static VOR, but only during a period including the time before onset of the first behavioural response; and (ii) readaptation which is superimposed by the processes of VOR development depends on many factors including the velocity of development, the actual excitation level of the vestibular systems and the neuroplastic properties of its specific pathways.

  13. Mechanisms of vestibulo-ocular reflex (VOR) cancellation in spinocerebellar ataxia type 3 (SCA-3) and episodic ataxia type 2 (EA-2).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gordon, Carlos R; Caspi, Avi; Levite, Ronen; Zivotofsky, Ari Z

    2008-01-01

    The vestibulo-ocular reflex (VOR) mechanism triggers eye movements as a result of head motion in order to keep gaze stationary relative to the world. However, in order to shift the direction of the gaze along with head motion, the VOR mechanism must be overridden ("cancelled"). Two mechanisms have been proposed to explain this cancellation: a reduction of the VOR gain or activation of smooth pursuit (SP) eye movements in the opposite direction. We studied VOR cancellation using the magnetic search coil in six spinocerebellar ataxia type 3 (SCA-3) and four episodic ataxia type 2 (EA-2) patients, conditions that are known to have degraded SP but different degrees of VOR impairment. Abnormal VOR was found in two of the four EA-2 patients and all of the SCA-3 patients. All subjects possessed residual VOR, although when tested using head thrusts it was almost negligible in the SCA-3 patients. The EA-2 patients showed essentially no SP and the SCA-3 patients had poor SP. However, for all patients, the gain during VOR cancellation was comparable to normals. These results provide additional evidence that SP cancellation of the VOR cannot be the sole mechanism utilized in overriding the VOR in these patients.

  14. Translational Vestibulo-Ocular Reflex and Motion Perception During Interaural Linear Acceleration: Comparison of Different Motion Paradigms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beaton, K. H.; Holly, J. E.; Clement, G. R.; Wood, S. J.

    2011-01-01

    The neural mechanisms to resolve ambiguous tilt-translation motion have been hypothesized to be different for motion perception and eye movements. Previous studies have demonstrated differences in ocular and perceptual responses using a variety of motion paradigms, including Off-Vertical Axis Rotation (OVAR), Variable Radius Centrifugation (VRC), translation along a linear track, and tilt about an Earth-horizontal axis. While the linear acceleration across these motion paradigms is presumably equivalent, there are important differences in semicircular canal cues. The purpose of this study was to compare translation motion perception and horizontal slow phase velocity to quantify consistencies, or lack thereof, across four different motion paradigms. Twelve healthy subjects were exposed to sinusoidal interaural linear acceleration between 0.01 and 0.6 Hz at 1.7 m/s/s (equivalent to 10 tilt) using OVAR, VRC, roll tilt, and lateral translation. During each trial, subjects verbally reported the amount of perceived peak-to-peak lateral translation and indicated the direction of motion with a joystick. Binocular eye movements were recorded using video-oculography. In general, the gain of translation perception (ratio of reported linear displacement to equivalent linear stimulus displacement) increased with stimulus frequency, while the phase did not significantly vary. However, translation perception was more pronounced during both VRC and lateral translation involving actual translation, whereas perceptions were less consistent and more variable during OVAR and roll tilt which did not involve actual translation. For each motion paradigm, horizontal eye movements were negligible at low frequencies and showed phase lead relative to the linear stimulus. At higher frequencies, the gain of the eye movements increased and became more inphase with the acceleration stimulus. While these results are consistent with the hypothesis that the neural computational strategies for

  15. An age-dependent sensitivity of the roll-induced vestibuloocular reflex to hypergravity exposure of several days in an amphibian ( Xenopus laevis)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sebastian, C. E.; Pfau, K.; Horn, E. R.

    In tadpoles of the Southern Clawed Toad ( Xenopus laevis), the effects of an exposure to hypergravity of several days duration on the development of the roll-induced static vestibuloocular reflex (rVOR) were investigated. Special attention was given to the onset of the 9 or 12 days lasting 3G-period during early life. First recordings of the rVOR characteristics for complete 360 ° rolls of the tadpoles were performed 24 hrs after the end of the 3G-period. The rVOR peak-to-peak amplitudes as well as the VOR-gain for a roll angle of 15 ° from 3G-and 1G-samples recorded at the 2nd and 3rd day after 3G-termination agreed for the youngest group, but were reduced by approx. 30% in the older tadpoles. Long-term observations lasting up to 8 weeks after termination of the 3G-period, demonstrated (i) an early retardation of the development, and (ii) a developmental acceleration in all groups so that after 2 weeks in the stage 6/9- and 33/36-samples and after 8 weeks in the stage 45-tadpoles, the rVOR-amplitude as well as the rVOR-gain for a 15 ° roll were at the same level in both the 3G- and the 1G-samples. The results support the existence of a sensitive period for the rVOR development, and additionally demonstrate the importance of the period of the first appearance of the rVOR for the development of adaptive properties of the underlying neuronal network. They also demonstrate the dominant efficiency of genetic programs in the functional development of the vestibular system. Methodological approaches are discussed which will be useful in the further description of the critical period. They include studies on the neuronogenesis and synaptic maturation within the vestibular pathways as well as on the fundamentals of buoyancy control during swimming. A modular but closed mini-system for experimental use is described which allows survival periods lasting many weeks and multiple types of treatments of developing aquatic animals in orbit, controlled automatically.

  16. Active Compensation Method of Robot Visual Error Based on Vestibulo-ocular Reflex%基于眼球前庭动眼反射的机器人视觉误差主动补偿方法

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李恒宇; 罗均; 李超; 李磊; 谢少荣

    2011-01-01

    针对机器人在颠簸环境下作业过程中产生姿态变化从而导致的视觉不稳定性问题,基于眼球前庭动眼反射的机理,提出一种主动补偿视觉误差的方法.在生理学和解剖学的基础上,根据眼球运动的神经回路,建立了一个具有自适应性的前庭动眼反射控制模型.为了验证模型的性能,在不同的环境中进行了仿真实验,仿真结果表明该模型可以主动补偿机器人姿态变化所引起的视觉误差,并且具有良好的自适应性.最后,通过实体机器人实验验证了该控制模型的有效性与准确性.%To solve the problem of vision instability caused by attitude variation of the robot working under bumpy environment, a method of active compensation for robot visual error is proposed based on the principle of vestibulo-ocular reflex(VOR).According to oculomotor neural circuits, an adaptive control model of vestibulo-ocular reflex is established on the basis of physiology and anatomy.In order to verify the model's performance, some simulation experiments are performed in different environments.Simulation results show that the model can actively compensate the visual error caused by robot attitude variation and has better adaptability.Finally, physical robot experiments demonstrate the validity and accuracy of the control model.

  17. Plasticity of the human otolith-ocular reflex

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wall, C. 3rd; Smith, T. R.; Furman, J. M.

    1992-01-01

    The eye movement response to earth vertical axis rotation in the dark, a semicircular canal stimulus, can be altered by prior exposure to combined visual-vestibular stimuli. Such plasticity of the vestibulo-ocular reflex has not been described for earth horizontal axis rotation, a dynamic otolith stimulus. Twenty normal human subjects underwent one of two types of adaptation paradigms designed either to attenuate or enhance the gain of the semicircular canal-ocular reflex prior to undergoing otolith-ocular reflex testing with horizontal axis rotation. The adaptation paradigm paired a 0.2 Hz sinusoidal rotation about a vertical axis with a 0.2 Hz optokinetic stripe pattern that was deliberately mismatched in peak velocity. Pre- and post-adaptation horizontal axis rotations were at 60 degrees/s in the dark and produced a modulation in the slow component velocity of nystagmus having a frequency of 0.17 Hz due to putative stimulation of the otolith organs. Results showed that the magnitude of this modulation component response was altered in a manner similar to the alteration in semicircular canal-ocular responses. These results suggest that physiologic alteration of the vestibulo-ocular reflex using deliberately mismatched visual and semicircular canal stimuli induces changes in both canal-ocular and otolith-ocular responses. We postulate, therefore, that central nervous system pathways responsible for controlling the gains of canal-ocular and otolith-ocular reflexes are shared.

  18. H-reflex excitability is inhibited in soleus, but not gastrocnemius, at the short-latency response of a horizontal jump-landing task.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thompson, Cassandra S; Schabrun, Siobhan; Marshall, Paul W

    2016-06-01

    Impaired spinal-level neuromuscular control is suggested to contribute to instability and injury during dynamic landing tasks. Despite this suggestion, spinal-level neuromuscular control is yet to be examined during a horizontal jump-landing task. The aim of the current study was to assess changes in H-reflexes and its reliability at the short-latency response of landings from short and long distances. Eight healthy individuals (five male, three female; age, 22±1.2yrs; height, 178±8.1cm; weight, 72±15.7kg) participated in the study. H-reflexes were evoked at the SLR in the soleus and medial gastrocnemius muscles, during two landing conditions: 25% and 50% of maximal broad jump distance. H-reflexes were expressed relative to the background electromyography (EMG) and maximal M-wave responses (M-max). Soleus H-reflexes were inhibited when landing from shorter distance (25%, 13.9±7.6%; 50%, 8.3±6.5%; pH-reflex excitability was observed in medial gastrocnemius. Background EMG was unaltered across landing conditions. Inhibition of soleus H-reflex excitability from 25% to 50% landing condition indicates a reduced contribution of Ia-afferent feedback to the alpha-motor neuron during landings from greater distances, which may contribute to stiffness regulation at the ankle joint. Unaltered H-reflex excitability of medial gastrocnemius is most likely attributed to its functional role during the landing task.

  19. Plasticity of the cervico-ocular reflex in health and Disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    W.P.A. Kelders (Willem)

    2006-01-01

    textabstractThe cervico-ocular reflex (COR) is an ocular stabilization reflex that is elicited by rotation of the neck. It works in conjunction with the vestibulo-ocular reflex (VOR) and the optokinetic reflex (OKR) in order to prevent visual slip over the retina due to self motion. The VOR

  20. Horizontal

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHONG; Chunping

    2005-01-01

    [1]Wu, H., Bochner technique in differential geometry, Advance in Math. (in Chinese), 1981, 10(1): 57-76.[2]Morrow, J., Kodaira, K., Complex Manifolds, New York: Holt, Rinehart & Winston, 1971.[3]Abate, M., Aikou, T., Patrizio, G., Preface for Complex Finsler Geometry, Cont. Math., Vol. 196, Providence,RI: Amer. Math. Soc., 1996, 97-100.[4]Abate, M., Patrizio, G., Finsler Metrics-A global approach with applications to geometric function theory,Lecture Notes in Mathematics, Vol. 1591, Bedin: Springer-Verlag, 1994.[5]Antonelli, P. L., Lackey, B.(eds.), The Theory of Finslerian Laplacians and Applications, MAIA 459, Dordrecht:Kluwer Academic Publishers, 1998.[6]Bao, D., Lackey, B., A Hodge decomposition theorem for Finsler spaces, C. R. Acad. Sci. Paris, t. 323, Serie 1,1996, 51-56.[7]Munteanu, O., Weitzenbock formulas for horizontal and vertical Laplacians, Houston Journal of Mathematics,2003, 29(4): 889-900.[8]Faran, J. J., The equivalence problem for complex Finsler Hamiltonians, Cont. Math.,Vol. 196, Providence, RI:Amer. Math. Soc., 1996, 133-144.[9]Kobayashi, S., Complex Finsler vector bundles, Cont. Math., Vol. 196, Providence, RI: Amer. Math. Soc.,1996,145-153.[10]Aikou, T., On complex Finsler manifolds, Rep. Fac. Sci. Kagoshima Univ. (Math. Phys. & Chem.), 1991, 24:9-25.

  1. Adaptive plasticity in the otolith-ocular reflex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koizuka, Izumi

    2003-02-01

    This review focuses on the plasticity in the vestibulo-ocular reflex (VOR), especially in the otolith-ocular reflex (OOR). The VOR is a mechanism for the production of rapid compensatory eye movements during head movements. The VOR is under adaptive control which corrects VOR performance when visual-vestibular mismatch arises during head movements. It has been demonstrated that chronic exposure to certain visual environments, those generated by magnifying lenses and reversing prisms, alter the gain and phase of VOR in the dark in numerous species. Most experiments concerning such modification of the VOR have used semicircular canal stimulation. The VOR consists of the semicircular-ocular reflex (ScOR) and the OOR. There are few results regarding the relationship between the gain of the ScOR and the OOR. This review summarizes the studies on plasticity in the OOR. In addition, the difficulty in evaluating the OOR using current conventional methods including earth horizontal axis (EHA) rotation, off-vertical axis rotation (OVAR) and linear sled, is discussed. We believe that the ScOR and the OOR share common neural pathways in such a way that a change in the synaptic efficacy of one pathway is accompanied by a change in the other.

  2. The human vestibulo-ocular reflex : effects of adaptation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    L.J.J.M. Boumans (Leon)

    1982-01-01

    textabstractThis thesis systematically investigates the influence of adaptation on the human VOR-response. Various types of angular acceleration around the vertical axis are used to determine the time constants of the VOR-system. Care is taken as far as possible to avoid fatigue, habituation and the

  3. Abnormal Vestibulo-Ocular Reflexes in Autism: A Potential Endophenotype

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-08-01

    appropriate motor output via brainstem, cerebellum, and parietal lobe circuitry and may be deficient in individuals with ASD. Recent imaging...2009), thalamus and parietal lobes (Baron-Cohen et. al., 2009; Teitelbaum, Teitelbaum, Nye, Fryman, Maurer, 1998).Third, the anatomy and...sensorimotor behavior that involves several spatially distant brain regions such as the frontal eye fields, lateral intra- parietal area, medial superior

  4. Abnormal Vestibulo-Ocular Reflexes in Autism: A Potential Endophenotype

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-06-01

    planetary gear reduction winch with a 12 volt DC powered motor and a drum that has been modified to accept a belt. This facilitates the ability to...vary the ratio to the main shaft by selection of different sized pulleys . The control circuit of the motor uses a series of resistors and relays to

  5. Horizontal plane head stabilization during locomotor tasks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cromwell, R L; Newton, R A; Carlton, L G

    2001-03-01

    Frequency characteristics of head stabilization were examined during locomotor tasks in healthy young adults(N = 8) who performed normal walking and 3 walking tasks designed to produce perturbations primarily in the horizontal plane. In the 3 walking tasks, the arms moved in phase with leg movement, with abnormally large amplitude, and at twice the frequency of leg movement. Head-in-space angular velocity was examined at the predominant frequencies of trunk motion. Head movements in space occurred at low frequencies ( 4.0 Hz) when the arms moved at twice the frequency of the legs. Head stabilization strategies were determined from head-on-trunk with respect to trunk frequency profiles derived from angular velocity data. During natural walking at low frequencies (head-on-trunk movement was less than trunk movement. At frequencies 3.0 Hz or greater, equal and opposite compensatory movement ensured head stability. When arm swing was altered, compensatory movement guaranteed head stability at all frequencies. Head stabilization was successful for frequencies up to 10.0 Hz during locomotor tasks. Maintaining head stability at high frequencies during voluntary tasks suggests that participants used feedforward mechanisms to coordinate head and trunk movements. Maintenance of head stability during dynamic tasks allows optimal conditions for vestibulo-ocular reflex function.

  6. Specificity of reflex adaptation for task-relevant variability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Franklin, David W; Wolpert, Daniel M

    2008-12-24

    The motor system responds to perturbations with reflexes, such as the vestibulo-ocular reflex or stretch reflex, whose gains adapt in response to novel and fixed changes in the environment, such as magnifying spectacles or standing on a tilting platform. Here we demonstrate a reflex response to shifts in the hand's visual location during reaching, which occurs before the onset of voluntary reaction time, and investigate how its magnitude depends on statistical properties of the environment. We examine the change in reflex response to two different distributions of visuomotor discrepancies, both of which have zero mean and equal variance across trials. Critically one distribution is task relevant and the other task irrelevant. The task-relevant discrepancies are maintained to the end of the movement, whereas the task-irrelevant discrepancies are transient such that no discrepancy exists at the end of the movement. The reflex magnitude was assessed using identical probe trials under both distributions. We find opposite directions of adaptation of the reflex response under these two distributions, with increased reflex magnitudes for task-relevant variability and decreased reflex magnitudes for task-irrelevant variability. This demonstrates modulation of reflex magnitudes in the absence of a fixed change in the environment, and shows that reflexes are sensitive to the statistics of tasks with modulation depending on whether the variability is task relevant or task irrelevant.

  7. Eye movements to yaw, pitch, and roll about vertical and horizontal axes : Adaptation, and motion sickness

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bos, J.E.; Bles, W.; Graaf, B. de

    2002-01-01

    Background: In the search for parameters to predict motion sickness that can be measured in the laboratory, we performed a longitudinal investigation in aviators. Since the vestibular system is involved in the generation of motion sickness as well as eye movements, vestibulo-ocular reflex (VOR) para

  8. Coligações: reflexão da aliança “informal” entre PSDB e PT em Belo Horizonte

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sander Neves

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Os partidos políticos brasileiros, às vésperas das eleições de 2008, buscam alternativas que lhes permitam ampliar o número de votos destinados aos candidatos indicados nas convenções para concorrer ao cargo de prefeito. Neste contexto, as coligações partidárias ganham cada vez mais importância no cenário da política nacional. Em Belo Horizonte, nove partidos lançaram candidatos próprios. Os demais participarão via coligações. E é exatamente uma das coligações o alvo deste artigo. A capital mineira é palco de uma coligação “informal” entre o atual governador do estado, Aécio Neves (PSDB, e o atual prefeito de Belo Horizonte, Fernando Pimentel (PT, que se uniram, contra a vontade dos seus respectivos partidos, para apoiar a candidatura do empresário Márcio Lacerda (PSB. PT e PSDB juntos? O que estaria por trás desta parceria? Este artigo tenta refletir sobre estas questões.

  9. Transient Positive Horizontal Head Impulse Test in Pregabalin Intoxication

    OpenAIRE

    Jeong, Seong-Hae; Kim, Yong Soo; Lee, Ju-Hoen; Jo, Hyunjin; Lee, Ae Young; Kim, Jae-Moon

    2015-01-01

    Head impulse test (HIT) is helpful to understanding high-frequency vestibulo-ocular reflex in patients with dizziness and imbalance. There are some reports on abnormal HITs in cerebellar disorder. To our knowledge, there was no report of transient bilateral positive head impulse related to antiepileptic drugs. A 65-year-old woman developed dizziness and imbalance after treatment with pregabalin for pain control of radiation cystitis. Neurological examination exhibited positive bilateral HIT r...

  10. Physiology of Developing Gravity Receptors and Otolith-Ocular Reflexes in Rat

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blanks, Robert H.

    1997-01-01

    This proposal had the long-term objective of examining the effects of microgravity on the physiology of the adult and developing mammalian gravity receptors. The grant outlined three-years of ground-based studies to examine. 1) the physiologic responses or otolith afferents in the adult rat and during postnatal development, and 2) the otolith organ contributions to the vertical vestibulo-ocular (VOR) and postural reflexes.

  11. Effect of Target Location on Dynamic Visual Acuity During Passive Horizontal Rotation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Appelbaum, Meghan; DeDios, Yiri; Kulecz, Walter; Peters, Brian; Wood, Scott

    2010-01-01

    The vestibulo-ocular reflex (VOR) generates eye rotation to compensate for potential retinal slip in the specific plane of head movement. Dynamic visual acuity (DVA) has been utilized as a functional measure of the VOR. The purpose of this study was to examine changes in accuracy and reaction time when performing a DVA task with targets offset from the plane of rotation, e.g. offset vertically during horizontal rotation. Visual acuity was measured in 12 healthy subjects as they moved a hand-held joystick to indicate the orientation of a computer-generated Landolt C "as quickly and accurately as possible." Acuity thresholds were established with optotypes presented centrally on a wall-mounted LCD screen at 1.3 m distance, first without motion (static condition) and then while oscillating at 0.8 Hz (DVA, peak velocity 60 deg/s). The effect of target location was then measured during horizontal rotation with the optotypes randomly presented in one of nine different locations on the screen (offset up to 10 deg). The optotype size (logMar 0, 0.2 or 0.4, corresponding to Snellen range 20/20 to 20/50) and presentation duration (150, 300 and 450 ms) were counter-balanced across five trials, each utilizing horizontal rotation at 0.8 Hz. Dynamic acuity was reduced relative to static acuity in 7 of 12 subjects by one step size. During the random target trials, both accuracy and reaction time improved proportional to optotype size. Accuracy and reaction time also improved between 150 ms and 300 ms presentation durations. The main finding was that both accuracy and reaction time varied as a function of target location, with greater performance decrements when acquiring vertical targets. We conclude that dynamic visual acuity varies with target location, with acuity optimized for targets in the plane of motion. Both reaction time and accuracy are functionally relevant DVA parameters of VOR function.

  12. Shoulder reflexes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Diederichsen, Louise; Krogsgaard, Michael; Voigt, Michael

    2002-01-01

    Dynamic shoulder stability is dependent on muscular coordination and sensory inputs. In the shoulder, mechanoreceptors are found in the coracoacromial ligament, the rotator cuff tendons, the musculotendinous junctions of the rotator cuff and in the capsule. The number of receptors in the capsule...... is small compared to the number in the other shoulder structures. Proprioceptive information from numerous receptors in muscles and tendons is mediated via fast conducting nervefibers and probably contribute more to kinaestethic sensation than information from capsule and ligaments. Therefore it seems...... likely that the joint receptors have a more distinct role for the kinaestethic sense than muscle receptors. In cats a direct reflex from the afferents innervating the shoulder to the muscles around the shoulder has been presented. The reflex had an extremely short latency (2.7-3.1 ms). In man, a very...

  13. Clinical predictors of vestibulo-ocular dysfunction in pediatric sports-related concussion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ellis, Michael J; Cordingley, Dean M; Vis, Sara; Reimer, Karen M; Leiter, Jeff; Russell, Kelly

    2017-01-01

    OBJECTIVE There were 2 objectives of this study. The first objective was to identify clinical variables associated with vestibulo-ocular dysfunction (VOD) detected at initial consultation among pediatric patients with acute sports-related concussion (SRC) and postconcussion syndrome (PCS). The second objective was to reexamine the prevalence of VOD in this clinical cohort and evaluate the effect of VOD on length of recovery and the development of PCS. METHODS A retrospective review was conducted for all patients with acute SRC and PCS who were evaluated at a pediatric multidisciplinary concussion program from September 2013 to May 2015. Acute SRS was defined as presenting vision, etc.) and more than 1 objective physical examination finding (abnormal near point of convergence, smooth pursuits, saccades, or vestibulo-ocular reflex testing). Poisson regression analysis was used to identify factors that increased the risk of VOD at initial presentation and the development of PCS. RESULTS Three hundred ninety-nine children, including 306 patients with acute SRC and 93 with PCS, were included. Of these patients, 30.1% of those with acute SRC (65.0% male, mean age 13.9 years) and 43.0% of those with PCS (41.9% male, mean age 15.4 years) met the criteria for VOD at initial consultation. Independent predictors of VOD at initial consultation included female sex, preinjury history of depression, posttraumatic amnesia, and presence of dizziness, blurred vision, or difficulty focusing at the time of injury. Independent predictors of PCS among patients with acute SRC included the presence of VOD at initial consultation, preinjury history of depression, and posttraumatic amnesia at the time of injury. CONCLUSIONS This study identified important potential risk factors for the development of VOD following pediatric SRC. These results provide confirmatory evidence that VOD at initial consultation is associated with prolonged recovery and is an independent predictor for the

  14. WEAKLY ALGEBRAIC REFLEXIVITY AND STRONGLY ALGEBRAIC REFLEXIVITY

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    TaoChangli; LuShijie; ChenPeixin

    2002-01-01

    Algebraic reflexivity introduced by Hadwin is related to linear interpolation. In this paper, the concepts of weakly algebraic reflexivity and strongly algebraic reflexivity which are also related to linear interpolation are introduced. Some properties of them are obtained and some relations between them revealed.

  15. Recovery of the horizontal vestibulo-ocular reflex in motorized head impulse test is common after vestibular loss%前庭功能损失后普遍存在电动头脉冲试验中水平前庭眼反射的恢复

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    TOPI JUTILA; HEIKKI AALTO; TIMO P.HIRVONEN; 张甦琳

    2014-01-01

    目的:对急性单侧外周前庭功能损失的患者使用电动头脉冲试验量化前庭功能的恢复,并把这些结果与其他体征和症状相比较.方法:使用电动头脉冲旋转仪记录30例突发单侧前庭功能障碍的患者平均在发生后3 d(前期)的潜在的水平前庭眼反射(VOR),20例患者平均3个月后(后期)继续测量.计算VOR增益和不对称((x)±s).结果:从前期的患侧增益0.49±0.21到后期的0.79±0.23 (P=0.0000)有高度显著改善.各自的不对称从(32±18)%到(12±14)%(P=0.0002)也有高度显著改善.至少80%的患者增益或不对称恢复.后期的高症状评分与低增益(P=0.043)和高不对称(P=0.018)有相关性.结论:用电动头脉冲旋转仪来测量减少的水平VOR增益,突发单侧前庭功能损失后至少部分恢复.除了眼震的传统评价,头脉冲试验的反应为前庭损失的严重程度和恢复提供了有价值的信息.

  16. The Adaptive Effects Of Virtual Interfaces: Vestibulo-Ocular Reflex and Simulator Sickness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2007-11-02

    of several smaller time delays within the system ( Silverton , 1994). The components of overall system time delay include tracker delay (sensing...display response time and display decay time). Silverton (1994) provides a detailed analysis of each component of overall system time delay within...CRT displays have fast response time and short persistence ( Silverton , 1994). However, even the refresh rate can effect system time delay (see

  17. An Investigation and Analysis of the Vestibulo-Ocular Reflex (VOR) in a Vibration Environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-03-01

    Savior, Jesus Christ , for without Him none of what I do would be possible. I would also like to express my sincere appreciation to my faculty advisor...remove it from the original glasses, and to add 20 foot VGA and USB cables to connect the laptop during the test sessions. The extension cables permitted...towards their original position, although there is a settling period as the eye will often go below the original starting position. As seen in the

  18. Modeling the spatiotemporal organization of velocity storage in the vestibuloocular reflex by optokinetic studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raphan, T.; Sturm, D.; Cohen, B. (Principal Investigator)

    1991-01-01

    1. A generalized three-dimensional state space model of visual vestibular interaction was developed. Matrix and dynamical system operators associated with inputs from the semicircular canals, otolith velocity estimator, and the visual system have been incorporated into the model, which focus on their relationship to the velocity storage integrator. 2. A relationship was postulated between the eigenvalues and the direction of the eigenvectors of the system matrix and the orientation of the spatial vertical. It was assumed that the system matrix for a tilted position was a composition of two linear transformations of the system matrix for the upright position. One transformation modifies the eigenvalues of the system matrix, whereas another rotates the eigenvectors of the system matrix. The pitch and roll eigenvectors rotate with the head, whereas the yaw axis eigenvector remains approximately spatially invariant. 3. Based on the three-dimensional model, a computational procedure was formulated to identify the eigenvalues and eigenvectors of the system matrix with the use of a modification of the marquardt algorithm. With the use of data obtained from a monkey, it was shown that the three-dimensional behavior of velocity storage cannot be predicted solely in terms of its time constants, i.e., the inverse of its eigenvalues. With the use of the same eigenvalues the data could either be fit or not fit, depending on the eigenvector directions. Therefore, it is necessary to specify eigenvector directions when characterizing velocity storage in three dimensions. 4. Parameters found with the use of the Marquardt algorithm were incorporated into the model. Diagonal matrices in a head coordinate frame were introduced for coupling the visual system to the integrator and to the direct optokinetic pathway. Simulations of optokinetic nystagmus (OKN) and optokinetic after-nystagmus (OKAN) were run. The model predicted the behavior of yaw and pitch OKN and OKAN when the animal is upright. It also predicted the cross-coupling in the side down position. The trajectories in velocity space were also accurately simulated. 5. One of the predictions of the model is that when the stimulus direction is along an eigenvector, the trajectory in velocity space is a straight line. Using the "spectral width" of the residuals from a straight line sequence during OKAN, we developed a methodology to estimate how close the OKAN decay was to an eigenvector trajectory. 6. Thus we have developed a model-based approach for studying and interpreting the response characteristics of velocity storage in three dimensions.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 400 WORDS).

  19. Three-Dimensional Vestibulo-Ocular Reflex in Humans: a Matter of Balance

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    J. Goumans (Janine)

    2010-01-01

    textabstractThe objective of this thesis was to quantify three-dimensional ocular stability in response to head movements in healthy human subjects and in patients with various types of peripheral vestibular disorders. Despite a large increase in our knowledge from animal and human studies about the

  20. Lightweight device to stimulate and monitor human vestibulo-ocular reflex

    Science.gov (United States)

    McStravick, M. Catherine (Inventor); Proctor, David R. (Inventor); Wood, Scott J. (Inventor)

    1989-01-01

    A helmet formed of a rigid shell is disclosed. The shell is lined with several air filled bladders to contact firmly the head of a user. The shell has a rigid chin bar supporting a bite bar connected fixedly to a mouthpiece bearing against the teeth and hard palate to firmly anchor the helmet without movement. The outer shell surface supports various air pumping bulbs and accelerometers. Separate left and right visor pivot on the side guided in a central tongue and groove track to move optical lens mounts into the user's field of vision. The chin bar is connected to the shell by a pair of releasable clasps. A safety lanyard connects to the clasps to quickly pull pins from the clasps to enable quick release in case of motion sickness.

  1. Reflexes in Psychiatry

    OpenAIRE

    Sanders, Richard D.; Gillig, Paulette Marie

    2011-01-01

    Psychiatric patients often do not cooperate fully with the neurologic examination. Reflexes virtually bypass patient effort and are difficult to consciously determine. This article reviews muscle stretch (deep tendon) reflexes, and pathological reflexes including the extensor plantar (Babinski) and primitive release reflexes. Topics include findings in common psychiatric and neurologic conditions and methods for eliciting these signs.

  2. Reflexive cacti: a survey

    OpenAIRE

    Bojana Mihailović; Marija Rašajski; Zoran Stanić

    2016-01-01

    A graph is called reflexive if its second largest eigenvalue does not exceed 2. We survey the results on reflexive cacti obtained in the last two decades. We also discuss various patterns of appearing of Smith graphs as subgraphs of reflexive cacti. In the Appendix, we survey the recent results concerning reflexive bipartite regular graphs.

  3. The nasocardiac reflex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baxandall, M L; Thorn, J L

    1988-06-01

    The oculocardiac reflex is well described and recognised in anaesthesia. The nasocardiac reflex is less well-known. We describe a clinical manifestation of this reflex and describe the relevant anatomy. This reflex may be obtunded during general anaesthesia. during general anaesthesia.

  4. Reflexives in Veracruz Huastec.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Constable, Peter G.

    A study examines various Huastec clause types that are reflexive in some sense, including ordinary reflexives, which involve co-reference. Two mutually exclusive morphosyntactic devices are used in Huastec: reflexive pronouns and verbal morphology. In this way, Huastec is like various European languages. Clauses involving reflexive pronouns and…

  5. Traumatic brain injury and vestibulo-ocular function: current challenges and future prospects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wallace B

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Bridgett Wallace,1–4 Jonathan Lifshitz4–8 1360 Balance and Hearing, Department of Physical Therapy, Austin, TX, 2Concussion Health, Department of Clinical Education, Austin, TX, 3Conquering Concussions, Scottsdale, AZ, 4Barrow Neurological Institute at Phoenix Children’s Hospital, Phoenix, AZ, 5Department of Child Health, University of Arizona College of Medicine-Phoenix, Phoenix, AZ, 6The CACTIS Foundation, Scottsdale, 7Phoenix VA Healthcare System, Phoenix, AZ, 8Department of Psychology, Arizona State University, Tempe, AZ, USA Abstract: Normal function of the vestibulo-ocular reflex (VOR coordinates eye movement with head movement, in order to provide clear vision during motion and maintain balance. VOR is generated within the semicircular canals of the inner ear to elicit compensatory eye movements, which maintain stability of images on the fovea during brief, rapid head motion, otherwise known as gaze stability. Normal VOR function is necessary in carrying out activities of daily living (eg, walking and riding in a car and is of particular importance in higher demand activities (eg, sports-related activities. Disruption or damage in the VOR can result in symptoms such as movement-related dizziness, blurry vision, difficulty maintaining balance with head movements, and even nausea. Dizziness is one of the most common symptoms following traumatic brain injury (TBI and is considered a risk factor for a prolonged recovery. Assessment of the vestibular system is of particular importance following TBI, in conjunction with oculomotor control, due to the intrinsic neural circuitry that exists between the ocular and vestibular systems. The purpose of this article is to review the physiology of the VOR and the visual-vestibular symptoms associated with TBI and to discuss assessment and treatment guidelines for TBI. Current challenges and future prospects will also be addressed. Keywords: traumatic brain injury, concussion, vestibular, ocular

  6. Embodied Self-Reflexivity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pagis, Michal

    2009-01-01

    Drawing on G. H. Mead and Merleau-Ponty, this paper aims to extend our understanding of self-reflexivity beyond the notion of a discursive, abstract, and symbolic process. It offers a framework for embodied self-reflexivity, which anchors the self in the reflexive capacity of bodily sensations. The data consist of two years of ethnographic…

  7. Horizontal Accelerator

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The Horizontal Accelerator (HA) Facility is a versatile research tool available for use on projects requiring simulation of the crash environment. The HA Facility is...

  8. Vestibulo-Ocular Responses to Vertical Translation using a Hand-Operated Chair as a Field Measure of Otolith Function

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wood, S. J.; Campbell, D. J.; Reschke, M. F.; Prather, L.; Clement, G.

    2016-01-01

    The translational Vestibulo-Ocular Reflex (tVOR) is an important otolith-mediated response to stabilize gaze during natural locomotion. One goal of this study was to develop a measure of the tVOR using a simple hand-operated chair that provided passive vertical motion. Binocular eye movements were recorded with a tight-fitting video mask in ten healthy subjects. Vertical motion was provided by a modified spring-powered chair (swopper.com) at approximately 2 Hz (+/- 2 cm displacement) to approximate the head motion during walking. Linear acceleration was measured with wireless inertial sensors (Xsens) mounted on the head and torso. Eye movements were recorded while subjects viewed near (0.5m) and far (approximately 4m) targets, and then imagined these targets in darkness. Subjects also provided perceptual estimates of target distances. Consistent with the kinematic properties shown in previous studies, the tVOR gain was greater with near targets, and greater with vision than in darkness. We conclude that this portable chair system can provide a field measure of otolith-ocular function at frequencies sufficient to elicit a robust tVOR.

  9. Reflexives and reflexive constructions in Afrikaans

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Kate H

    coreferential relationship between the pronoun and some other expression in the sentence. Keywords: reflexives ...... object argument, functions as the complement of a noun. Consider the ...... A minimalist approach to the syntax of. Dutch.

  10. Emotionally Colorful Reflexive Games

    CERN Document Server

    Tarasenko, Sergey

    2011-01-01

    This study addresses the matter of reflexive control of the emotional states by means of Reflexive Game Theory (RGT). It is shown how to build a bridge between RGT and emotions. For this purpose the Pleasure-Arousal-Dominance (PAD) model is adopted. The major advantages of RGT are its ability to predict human behavior and unfold the entire spectra of reflexion in the human mind. On the other hand, PAD provides ultimate approach to model emotions. It is illustrated that emotions are reflexive processes and, consequently, RGT fused with PAD model is natural solution to model emotional interactions between people. The fusion of RGT and PAD, called Emotional Reflexive Games (ERG), inherits the key features of both components. Using ERG, we show how reflexive control can be successfully applied to model human emotional states. Up to date, EGR is a unique methodology capable of modeling human reflexive processes and emotional aspects simultaneously.

  11. Reflex excitability regulates prepulse inhibition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schicatano, E J; Peshori, K R; Gopalaswamy, R; Sahay, E; Evinger, C

    2000-06-01

    Presentation of a weak stimulus, a prepulse, before a reflex-evoking stimulus decreases the amplitude of the reflex response relative to reflex amplitude evoked without a preceding prepulse. For example, presenting a brief tone before a trigeminal blink-eliciting stimulus significantly reduces reflex blink amplitude. A common explanation of such data are that sensory processing of the prepulse modifies reflex circuit behavior. The current study investigates the converse hypothesis that the intrinsic characteristics of the reflex circuit rather than prepulse processing determine prepulse modification of trigeminal and acoustic reflex blinks. Unilateral lesions of substantia nigra pars compacta neurons created rats with hyperexcitable trigeminal reflex blinks but normally excitable acoustic reflex blinks. In control rats, presentation of a prepulse reduced the amplitude of both trigeminal and acoustic reflex blinks. In 6-OHDA-lesioned rats, however, the same acoustic prepulse facilitated trigeminal reflex blinks but inhibited acoustic reflex blinks. The magnitude of prepulse modification correlated with reflex excitability. Humans exhibited the same pattern of prepulse modification. An acoustic prepulse facilitated the trigeminal reflex blinks of subjects with hyperexcitable trigeminal reflex blinks caused by Parkinson's disease. The same prepulse inhibited trigeminal reflex blinks of age-matched control subjects. Prepulse modification also correlated with trigeminal reflex blink excitability. These data show that reflex modification by a prepulse reflects the intrinsic characteristics of the reflex circuit rather than an external adjustment of the reflex circuit by the prepulse.

  12. The Fontana paradoxical reflex?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lavorini, Federico; Fontana, Giovanni; Chellini, Elisa; Magni, Chiara; Pistolesi, Massimo; Widdicombe, John

    2011-09-01

    This commentary describes the "deflation cough" caused by deep lung deflations. Deflation cough is a paradoxical reflex similar to that described by Henry Head in 1889 for lung inflations that probably is mediated by the same sensors and afferent fibers in the lungs and activated by gastroesophageal reflux. We discuss how this reflex must be self-limiting, the general role of paradoxical reflexes in the body, and the possible clinical significance of deflation cough.

  13. Off-vertical axis rotation: a test of the otolith-ocular reflex

    Science.gov (United States)

    Furman, J. M.; Schor, R. H.; Schumann, T. L.

    1992-01-01

    The vestibulo-ocular reflex was studied via off-vertical axis rotation (OVAR) in the dark. The axis of the turntable could be tilted from vertical by up to 30 degrees. Eye movements were measured with electro-oculography. Results from healthy asymptomatic subjects indicated that 1) a reliable otolith-induced response could be obtained during constant velocity OVAR using a velocity of 60 degrees/s with a tilt of 30 degrees; 2) constant velocity OVAR rotation was nausea-producing and, especially if subjects were rotated in the dark about an earth-vertical axis prior to being tilted, disorienting; and 3) sinusoidal OVAR produced minimal nausea; the eye movement response appeared to be the result of a combination of semicircular canal and otolith components. We conclude that OVAR has the potential of becoming a useful method for clinically assessing both the otolith-ocular reflex and semicircular canal-otolith interaction.

  14. Cruciate ligament reflexes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Krogsgaard, Michael R; Dyhre-Poulsen, Poul; Fischer-Rasmussen, Torsten

    2002-01-01

    The idea of muscular reflexes elicited from sensory nerves of the cruciate ligaments is more than 100 years old, but the existence of such reflexes has not been proven until the recent two decades. First in animal experiments, a muscular excitation could be elicited in the hamstrings when the ant...

  15. Reflexivity in qualitative research

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Evans, Adam Brian; Nistrup, Anne; Henderson, Hannah

    2017-01-01

    There has been something of a “reflexive shift” in sociological research. Sociological researchers are increasingly encouraged to be “present” within their work, and to recognize their own role in structuring the entire research process. One way to achieve this is through engagement in reflexive...... practice, that is, to reflect on our own values, beliefs, and biographies. It can be difficult to know exactly how a researcher should engage in these practices, however. Here, we discuss our reflexive practice in two case studies, both which utilized the same figurational theoretical framework...... Kingdom. Reflexive practice in both studies was affected by researcher biographies and by study design. In Study 1, both researchers were reasonably detached from the study context, the theoretical framework was in place from the very beginning, and reflexive practice was embedded in the study design...

  16. Etnography and Reflexivity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mario Cardano

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available This essay deals with a relevant and controversial topic – objectivity in ethnographic research. More specifically, I would like to examine how reflexive procedures, more precisely “reflexive account”, can increase the robustness of results gained through an ethnographic research. The essay is organized in five parts. I will start by giving a preliminary definition of the two key concepts which are at the center of the analysis – objectivity and reflexivity. I will then give a brief description of the epistemological framework in which the proposed conceptions of objectivity and reflexivity are located. Thirdly, I move on to consider the epistemic status of ethnographic research, and will emphasize that ethnographies are not just “theory-laden”, as many writers have stated, but also “praxis” or “procedure laden”. In other words, I will stress that it is not only theories which are inevitably embedded in research, influencing how observations can be made; much the same can also be said of the concrete research practices which contribute to determine the experience of the ethnographer and its representation in a text. Fourthly, I will discuss why it is useful to employ reflexive practices, and then immediately afterwards will illustrate the ways in which reflexive descriptions can contribute to greater objectivity of ethnographic accounts. In conclusion, I will discuss a number of objections which have been raised against this use of reflexivity.

  17. On Reflexive Data Models

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Petrov, S.

    2000-08-20

    An information system is reflexive if it stores a description of its current structure in the body of stored information and is acting on the base of this information. A data model is reflexive, if its language is meta-closed and can be used to build such a system. The need for reflexive data models in new areas of information technology applications is argued. An attempt to express basic notions related to information systems is made in the case when the system supports and uses meta-closed representation of the data.

  18. Modification of cutaneous reflexes during visually guided walking.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruff, Casey R; Miller, Andreas B; Delva, Mona L; Lajoie, Kim; Marigold, Daniel S

    2014-01-01

    Although it has become apparent that cutaneous reflexes can be adjusted based on the phase and context of the locomotor task, it is not clear to what extent these reflexes are regulated when locomotion is modified under visual guidance. To address this, we compared the amplitude of cutaneous reflexes while subjects performed walking tasks that required precise foot placement. In one experiment, subjects walked overground and across a horizontal ladder with narrow raised rungs. In another experiment, subjects walked and stepped onto a series of flat targets, which required different levels of precision (large vs. narrow targets). The superficial peroneal or tibial nerve was electrically stimulated in multiple phases of the gait cycle in each condition and experiment. Reflexes between 50 and 120 ms poststimulation were sorted into 10 equal phase bins, and the amplitudes were then averaged. In each experiment, differences in cutaneous reflexes between conditions occurred predominantly during swing phase when preparation for precise foot placement was necessary. For instance, large excitatory cutaneous reflexes in ipsilateral tibialis anterior were present in the ladder condition and when stepping on narrow targets compared with inhibitory responses in the other conditions, regardless of the nerve stimulated. In the ladder experiments, additional effects of walking condition were evident during stance phase when subjects had to balance on the narrow ladder rungs and may be related to threat and/or the unstable foot-surface interaction. Taken together, these results suggest that cutaneous reflexes are modified when visual feedback regarding the terrain is critical for successful walking.

  19. Corneomandibular reflex: Anatomical basis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michele Pistacchi

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Corneomandibular reflex is a pathological phenomenon evident in cases of severe brainstem damage. It is considered to be a pathological exteroceptive reflex, associated with precentro bulbar tract lesions. The sign is useful in distinguishing central neurological injuries to metabolic disorders in acutely comatose patients, localizing lesions to the upper brainstem area, determining the depth of coma and its evolution, providing evidence of uncal or transtentorial herniation in acute cerebral hemisphere lesions, and it is a marker of supraspinal level impairment in amyotrophic lateral sclerosis and multiple sclerosis. This sign was evident in a patient with severe brain damage. We discuss the literature findings and its relevance in prognosis establishment.

  20. Adaptation of the phase of the human linear vestibulo-ocular reflex (LVOR) and effects on the oculomotor neural integrator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hegemann, S.; Shelhamer, M.; Kramer, P. D.; Zee, D. S.

    2000-01-01

    The phase of the translational linear VOR (LVOR) can be adaptively modified by exposure to a visual-vestibular mismatch. We extend here our earlier work on LVOR phase adaptation, and discuss the role of the oculomotor neural integrator. Ten subjects were oscillated laterally at 0.5 Hz, 0.3 g peak acceleration, while sitting upright on a linear sled. LVOR was assessed before and after adaptation with subjects tracking the remembered location of a target at 1 m in the dark. Phase and gain were measured by fitting sine waves to the desaccaded eye movements, and comparing sled and eye position. To adapt LVOR phase, the subject viewed a computer-generated stereoscopic visual display, at a virtual distance of 1 m, that moved so as to require either a phase lead or a phase lag of 53 deg. Adaptation lasted 20 min, during which subjects were oscillated at 0.5 Hz/0.3 g. Four of five subjects produced an adaptive change in the lag condition (range 4-45 deg), and each of five produced a change in the lead condition (range 19-56 deg), as requested. Changes in drift on eccentric gaze suggest that the oculomotor velocity-to-position integrator may be involved in the phase changes.

  1. Dynamics of the human linear vestibulo-ocular reflex at medium frequency and modification by short-term training

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shelhamer, M.; Roberts, D. C.; Zee, D. S.

    2000-01-01

    We study here the effect of a short-term training paradigm on the gain and phase of the human translational VOR (the linear VOR: LVOR). Subjects were exposed to lateral sinusoidal translations on a sled, at 0.5 Hz, 0.3 g peak acceleration. With subjects tracking a remembered target at 1.2 m, the LVOR (slow-phase) under these conditions typically has a phase lead or lag, and a gain that falls short of compensatory. To induce short-term adaptation (training), we presented an earth-fixed visual scene at 1.2 m during sinusoidal translation (x 1 viewing) for 20 minutes, so as to drive the LVOR toward compensatory phase and gain. We examined both the slow-phase and the saccadic responses to these stimuli. Testing after training showed changes in slow-component gain and phase which were mostly but not always in the compensatory direction. These changes were more consistent in naive subjects than in subjects who had previous LVOR experience. Changes in gain were seen with step as well as sinusoidal test stimuli; gain changes were not correlated with vergence changes. There was a strong correlation between gain changes and phase changes across subjects. Fast phases (catch-up saccades) formed a large component of the LVOR under our testing conditions (approximately 30% of the changes in gain but not in phase due to training.

  2. A cerebellar learning model of vestibulo-ocular reflex adaptation in wild-type and mutant mice

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Clopath, Claudia; Badura, Aleksandra; De Zeeuw, Chris I; Brunel, Nicolas

    2014-01-01

    Mechanisms of cerebellar motor learning are still poorly understood. The standard Marr-Albus-Ito theory posits that learning involves plasticity at the parallel fiber to Purkinje cell synapses under control of the climbing fiber input, which provides an error signal as in classical supervised learni

  3. [The influence of otolithic afferentation on the vestibulo-ocular interaction in the patients presenting with an unilateral lesion in a peripheral vestibular neuron].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Likhac, S A; Pleshko, I V

    2013-01-01

    The objective of the present work was to study the influence of otolithic afferentation on the vestibulo-ocular interaction in 20 patients with vestibular neuronitis (at the stages of decompensation and subcompensation) and in 30 healthy subjects by the electronystagmographic technique. The sinusoidal (program 1) and eccentric (program 2) rotation was applied with the angular velocity of 10 degrees/s (stimulus 1, rotation rate 0.04 Hz), 30 degrees/s (stimulus II, rotation rate 0.12 Hz), 60 degrees/s (stimulus III) and oscillation periods of 18, 6, and 3 s respectively. No significant changes in the parameters of the vesicular reflex were observed in the patients with vestibular neuronitis and control subjects studied in the phase of decompensation under programs 1 and 2 . The study of the patients presenting with vestibular neuronitis in the subcompensation phase (program 2) revealed a significant increase of nystagmus intensity on the affected side compared with the respective parameters estimated in the framework of program 1 (pvestibular labyrinth dysfunction in the patients presenting with vestibular neuronitis at the stage of decompensation.

  4. The Babinski reflex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Gijn, J

    1995-11-01

    The plantar response is a reflex that involves not only the toes, but all muscles that shorten the leg. In the newborn the synergy is brisk, involving all flexor muscles of the leg; these include the toe 'extensors', which also shorten the leg on contraction and therefore are flexors in a physiological sense. As the nervous system matures and the pyramidal tract gains more control over spinal motoneurones the flexion synergy becomes less brisk, and the toe 'extensors' are no longer part of it. The toes then often go down instead of up, as a result of a segmental reflex involving the small foot muscles and the overlying skin, comparable to the abdominal reflexes. With lesions of the pyramidal system, structural or functional, this segmental, downward response of the toes disappears, the flexion synergy may become disinhibited and the extensor hallucis longus muscle is again recruited into the flexion reflex of the leg: the sign of Babinski. A true Babinski sign denotes dysfunction of the pyramidal tract, and should be clearly distinguished from upgoing toes that do not belong to the flexion synergy of the leg. Correct interpretation of the plantar response depends only to a minor degree on the method or site of stimulation of the foot. It is therefore most important to assess the response in the entire leg.

  5. Reflexivity and social justice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Maksimovic, Tijana; Jakobsen, Helle Nordentoft

    2017-01-01

    Career practitioners’ reflexive understanding of their professional role as change agents in career guidance and counselling practices has a major impact on how social justice can be achieved. This entitles an awareness of the way in which guidance and counselling practices are embedded in the co...

  6. Identification of Spinal Reflexes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    De Vlugt, E.

    2004-01-01

    Visco-elasticity of joints is important for the maintenance of the human body posture and can in two manners be regulated. By means of cocontraction of antagonistic muscle groups and by neural reflexive feedback of muscle length and muscle strength, measured both by means of sensors in the muscles.

  7. Spinal reflexes in brain death.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beckmann, Yesim; Çiftçi, Yeliz; Incesu, Tülay Kurt; Seçil, Yaprak; Akhan, Galip

    2014-12-01

    Spontaneous and reflex movements have been described in brain death and these unusual movements might cause uncertainties in diagnosis. In this study we evaluated the presence of spinal reflexes in patients who fulfilled the criteria for brain death. Thirty-two (22 %) of 144 patients presented unexpected motor movements spontaneously or during examinations. These patients exhibited the following signs: undulating toe, increased deep tendon reflexes, plantar responses, Lazarus sign, flexion-withdrawal reflex, facial myokymia, neck-arm flexion, finger jerks and fasciculations. In comparison, there were no significant differences in age, sex, etiology of brain death and hemodynamic laboratory findings in patients with and without reflex motor movement. Spinal reflexes should be well recognized by physicians and it should be born in mind that brain death can be determined in the presence of spinal reflexes.

  8. Mentalis muscle related reflexes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gündüz, Ayşegül; Uyanık, Özlem; Ertürk, Özdem; Sohtaoğlu, Melis; Kızıltan, Meral Erdemir

    2016-05-01

    The mentalis muscle (MM) arises from the incisive fossa of the mandible, raises and protrudes the lower lip. Here, we aim to characterize responses obtained from MM by supraorbital and median electrical as well as auditory stimuli in a group of 16 healthy volunteers who did not have clinical palmomental reflex. Reflex activities were recorded from the MM and orbicularis oculi (O.oc) after supraorbital and median electrical as well as auditory stimuli. Response rates over MM were consistent after each stimulus, however, mean latencies of MM response were longer than O.oc responses by all stimulation modalities. Shapes and amplitudes of responses from O.oc and MM were similar. Based on our findings, we may say that MM motoneurons have connections with trigeminal, vestibulocochlear and lemniscal pathways similar to other facial muscles and electrophysiological recording of MM responses after electrical and auditory stimulation is possible in healthy subjects.

  9. Reflex epilepsy: a review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karim Nikkhah

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Interesting phenomena of reflex epileptic syndromes are characterized by epileptic seizures each one induced by specific stimulus with a variety of types. Simple triggers, which lead to seizures within seconds, are of sensory type (most commonly visual, most rarely tactile or proprioceptive stimuli. Complex triggers, which are mostly of cognitive type such as praxis, reading, talking, and music, usually induce the epileptic event within minutes. It should differ from what most epileptic patients report as provocative precipitants for seizures (such as emotional stress, fatigue, fever, sleep deprivation, alcohol, and menstrual cycle. The identification of a specific trigger is not only important for patients or their parents to avoid seizures, but also it might help neurologists to choose the most effective antiepileptic drug for each case. In addition, research in this area may possibly reveal some underlying pathophysiology of epileptic phenomena in the brain.In this review, we briefly introduce reported reflex epileptic seizures, their clinical features and management.

  10. Neurophysiological methods for the assessment of spasticity: the Hoffmann reflex, the tendon reflex, and the stretch reflex

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Voerman, Gerlienke; Gregoric, M.; Hermens, Hermanus J.

    PURPOSE: To review the literature concerning neurophysiological methods to assess spasticity with respect to mechanisms and methodology, and to describe the three most commonly used methods: the Hoffmann reflex (H-reflex), the Tendon reflex (T-reflex), and the Stretch Reflex (SR). METHOD: A

  11. Adductor T reflex abnormalities in patients with decreased patellar reflexes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tataroglu, Cengiz; Deneri, Ersin; Ozkul, Ayca; Sair, Ahmet; Yaycioglu, Soner

    2009-08-01

    The adductor reflex (AR) is a tendon reflex that has various features that differ from other tendon reflexes. This reflex was tested in different disorders presenting with diminished patellar reflexes such as diabetic lumbosacral radiculoplexus neuropathy (DLRPN), L2-L4 radiculopathy, and distal symmetric diabetic neuropathy (diabetic PNP). The AR and crossed-AR (elicited by tapping the contralateral patellar tendon) were recorded using concentric needle electrodes. Additionally, the patellar T reflex (vm-TR) and vastus medialis H reflex (vm-HR) were recorded using surface electrodes. AR was recorded in only one out of eight patients with DLRPN, but it was recorded in 21 out of 22 patients with L2-L4 radiculopathy (95.5%). Of these reflexes, only AR showed prolonged latency in the L2-L4 radiculopathy group. The latencies of AR, vm-TR, and vm-HR were prolonged in patients with diabetic PNP. We conclude that AR can be useful in the differential diagnosis of some lower motor neuron disorders that present with patellar reflex disturbance. Muscle Nerve 40: 264-270, 2009.

  12. Too Busy for Reflexivity?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ratner, Helene

    highlighted non-symmetric relationships between observer and observed and accused the academic text of enacting a realist genre, concealing the relativism entailed in textual production (Clifford and Marcus 1986, Woolgar 1988, Ashmore 1989). On the other hand, the reflexivity program produced fears...... of a “corrosive relativism in which everything is but a more or less clever expression of opinion” (Geertz 1988:2, 3) and it has suffered the little flattering accusations of piling "layer upon layer of self-consciousness to no avail" (Latour 1988:170) with little “interest [for] … theoretically ambitious...

  13. [Laryngeal and larynx-associated reflexes].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ptok, M; Kühn, D; Miller, S; Jungheim, M; Schroeter, S

    2016-06-01

    The laryngeal adductor reflex and the pharyngoglottal closure reflex protect the trachea and lower respiratory tract against the entrance of foreign material. The laryngeal expiration reflex and the cough reflex serve to propel foreign material, which has penetrated in the cranial direction. The inspiration reflex, the sniff reflex, and the swallowing reflex are further larynx-associated reflexes. In patients with dysphagia the laryngeal adductor reflex can be clinically tested with air pulses. The water swallow test serves to show the integrity of the cough reflex. The sniff reflex is useful to test the abduction function of the vocal folds. Future studies should address laryngeal reflexes more specifically, both for a better understanding of these life-supporting mechanisms and to improve diagnostic procedures in patients with impaired laryngeal function.

  14. Patterning of somatosympathetic reflexes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kerman, I. A.; Yates, B. J.

    1999-01-01

    In a previous study, we reported that vestibular nerve stimulation in the cat elicits a specific pattern of sympathetic nerve activation, such that responses are particularly large in the renal nerve. This patterning of vestibulosympathetic reflexes was the same in anesthetized and decerebrate preparations. In the present study, we report that inputs from skin and muscle also elicit a specific patterning of sympathetic outflow, which is distinct from that produced by vestibular stimulation. Renal, superior mesenteric, and lumbar colonic nerves respond most strongly to forelimb and hindlimb nerve stimulation (approximately 60% of maximal nerve activation), whereas external carotid and hypogastric nerves were least sensitive to these inputs (approximately 20% of maximal nerve activation). In contrast to vestibulosympathetic reflexes, the expression of responses to skin and muscle afferent activation differs in decerebrate and anesthetized animals. In baroreceptor-intact animals, somatosympathetic responses were strongly attenuated (to 150 mmHg. These findings demonstrate that different types of somatic inputs elicit specific patterns of sympathetic nerve activation, presumably generated through distinct neural circuits.

  15. Proprioceptive reflexes and neurological disorders

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schouten, A.C.

    2004-01-01

    Proprioceptive reflexes play an important role during the control of movement and posture. Disturbed modulation of proprioceptive reflexes is often suggested as the cause for the motoric features present in neurological disorders. In this thesis methods are developed and evaluated to quantify propri

  16. AMPUTATION AND REFLEX SYMPATHETIC DYSTROPHY

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    GEERTZEN, JHB; EISMA, WH

    Reflex sympathetic dystrophy is a chronic pain syndrome characterized by chronic burning pain, restricted range of motion, oedema and vasolability. Patients are difficult to treat and the prognosis is very often poor. This report emphasizes that an amputation in case of a reflex sympathetic

  17. Reflexive Aero Structures for Enhanced Survivability Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Cornerstone Research Group Inc. (CRG) proposes to develop an advanced reflexive structure system to increase the survivability of aerostructures. This reflexive...

  18. Acoustic reflex and general anaesthesia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farkas, Z

    1983-01-01

    Infant and small children are not always able to cooperate in impedance measurements. For this reason it was decided, -in special cases, -to perform acoustic reflex examination under general anaesthesia. The first report on stapedius reflex and general anaesthesia was published by Mink et al. in 1981. Under the effect of Tiobutabarbital, Propanidid and Diazepam there is no reflex response. Acoustic reflex can be elicited with Ketamin-hydrochlorid and Alphaxalone-alphadolone acetate narcosis. The reflex threshold remains unchanged and the amplitude of muscle contraction is somewhat increased. The method was used: 1. to assess the type and degree of hearing loss in children with cleft palate and/or lip prior to surgery. 2. to exclude neuromuscular disorders with indication of pharyngoplasties. 3. to quantify hearing level in children--mostly multiply handicapped--with retarded speech development. The results of Behavioral Observation and Impedance Audiometry are discussed and evaluated.

  19. [Reflex seizures, cinema and television].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olivares-Romero, Jesús

    2015-12-16

    In movies and television series are few references to seizures or reflex epilepsy even though in real life are an important subgroup of total epileptic syndromes. It has performed a search on the topic, identified 25 films in which they appear reflex seizures. Most seizures observed are tonic-clonic and visual stimuli are the most numerous, corresponding all with flashing lights. The emotions are the main stimuli in higher level processes. In most cases it is not possible to know if a character suffers a reflex epilepsy or suffer reflex seizures in the context of another epileptic syndrome. The main conclusion is that, in the movies, the reflex seizures are merely a visual reinforcing and anecdotal element without significant influence on the plot.

  20. The vestibulosympathetic reflex in humans: neural interactions between cardiovascular reflexes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ray, Chester A.; Monahan, Kevin D.

    2002-01-01

    1. Over the past 5 years, there has been emerging evidence that the vestibular system regulates sympathetic nerve activity in humans. We have studied this issue in humans by using head-down rotation (HDR) in the prone position. 2. These studies have clearly demonstrated increases in muscle sympathetic nerve activity (MSNA) and calf vascular resistance during HDR. These responses are mediated by engagement of the otolith organs and not the semicircular canals. 3. However, differential activation of sympathetic nerve activity has been observed during HDR. Unlike MSNA, skin sympathetic nerve activity does not increase with HDR. 4. Examination of the vestibulosympathetic reflex with other cardiovascular reflexes (i.e. barorereflexes and skeletal muscle reflexes) has shown an additive interaction for MSNA. 5. The additive interaction between the baroreflexes and vestibulosympathetic reflex suggests that the vestibular system may assist in defending against orthostatic challenges in humans by elevating MSNA beyond that of the baroreflexes. 6. In addition, the further increase in MSNA via otolith stimulation during isometric handgrip, when arterial pressure is elevated markedly, indicates that the vestibulosympathetic reflex is a powerful activator of MSNA and may contribute to blood pressure and flow regulation during dynamic exercise. 7. Future studies will help evaluate the importance of the vestibulosympathetic reflex in clinical conditions associated with orthostatic hypotension.

  1. Oculocardiac reflex during strabismus surgery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mehryar Taghavi Gilani

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available The activation of oculucardiac reflex (OCR is common during the strabismus surgeries. OCR is known as a trigemino-vagal reflex, which leads to the various side effects including bradycardia, tachycardia, arrhythmia, or in some cases cardiac arrest. This reflex could be activated during intraorbital injections, hematomas, and mechanical stimulation of eyeball and extraocular muscles surgeries. The incidence of OCR varies in a wide range, from 14% to 90%, that depends on anesthetic strategy and drug used for the surgery. The efficacy of various anticholinergic and anesthetic agents on declining the OCR reflex has been evaluated in different studies, especially in children. Although the detection of OCR goes back to 1908, its exact effect is not well recognized during strabismus surgery. In this review, we aimed to summarize the studies investigated the efficacy and potential of various anesthetic medications on inhibiting the OCR in children undergoing strabismus surgery.

  2. Management of Reflex Anoxic Seizures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J Gordon Millichap

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Investigators at the Roald Dahl EEG Unit, Alder Hey Children’s NHS Foundation, Liverpool, UK, review the definition, pathophysiology, clinical presentation, and management of reflex anoxic seizures (RAS in children.

  3. SYSTEM REFLEXIVE STRATEGIC MARKETING MANAGEMENT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Dligach

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available This article reviews the System Reflexive paradigm of strategic marketing management, being based on the alignment of strategic economic interests of stakeholders, specifically, enterprise owners and hired managers, and consumers. The essence of marketing concept of management comes under review, along with the strategic management approaches to business, buildup and alignment of economic interests of business stakeholders. A roadmap for resolving the problems of modern marketing is proposed through the adoption of System Reflexive marketing theory.

  4. SYSTEM REFLEXIVE STRATEGIC MARKETING MANAGEMENT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrii A. DLIGACH

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available This article reviews the System Reflexive paradigm of strategic marketing management, being based on the alignment of strategic economic interests of stakeholders, specifically, enterprise owners and hired managers, and consumers. The essence of marketing concept of management comes under review, along with the strategic management approaches to business, buildup and alignment of economic interests of business stakeholders. A roadmap for resolving the problems of modern marketing is proposed through the adoption of System Reflexive marketing theory.

  5. Emergent Identity Matching after Successive Matching Training, I: Reflexivity or Generalized Identity?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Urcuioli, Peter J.

    2011-01-01

    This research investigated the source of an ostensible reflexivity effect in pigeons reported by Sweeney and Urcuioli (2010). In Experiment 1, pigeons learned two symmetrically reinforced symbolic successive matching tasks (hue-form and form-hue) using red-green and triangle-horizontal line stimuli. They differed in their third concurrently…

  6. Horizontal drilling in Ontario

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sidey, P.; Precul, L. [Sproule Associates Ltd., Calgary, AB (Canada)

    2002-07-01

    A review of oil and gas production in Ontario was presented with particular reference to drilling activity between 1987 to mid 2002 when 1450 vertical wells were drilled, of which 1100 were for petroleum production and the remainder were for gas storage, observation wells, private gas wells and stratigraphic tests. Of the 1100 vertical wells drilled for petroleum production, 40 per cent became gas wells, 16 per cent became oil wells, 4 per cent became oil and gas wells, and 40 per cent were dry. During the same time period, 133 horizontal wells were also drilled, mostly for petroleum. The most active operator was Talisman Energy, which drilled 101 of the 133 horizontal wells. The remainder were drilled by 12 other companies. Of the horizontal wells, 64 per cent became oil wells, 19 per cent became gas wells, and 17 per cent were dry. This presentation included graphs depicting which oil and gas pools saw vertical or horizontal drilling during the designated time period, and explained how the wells were classified. Both horizontal and vertical well targets were illustrated. Particular reference was made to Talisman Energy's Lake Erie Drilling program which revealed that horizontal wells have an initial production rate that is 5 times that expected from vertical wells. The Hillman Pool case study revealed that the initial rate of the average horizontal well is less than half that of the average vertical well. Horizontal drilling in the Lake Erie Morpeth Gas pool has also been a commercial success. This paper demonstrates that operators have maintained Ontario's oil and gas production at high levels. In 1997 widespread horizontal drilling began taking place in Ontario, and since then, approximately 30 per cent of the wells drilled in the province have been horizontal. 16 figs.

  7. Estudio del horizonte local

    OpenAIRE

    Ros Ferré, Rosa Maria

    2009-01-01

    El estudio del horizonte es fundamental para poder facilitar las primeras observaciones de los alumnos en un centro educativo. Un simple modelo, que debe realizarse para cada centro, nos permite facilitar el estudio y la comprensión de los primeros rudimentos astronómicos. El modelo construido se presenta a su vez como un sencillo modelo de reloj ecuatorial y a partir de él se pueden construir otros modelos (horizontal y vertical).

  8. Coligações: reflexão da aliança “informal” entre PSDB e PT em Belo Horizonte http://dx.doi.org/10.15601/1983-7631/rt.v3n4p61-74

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sander Neves

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Os partidos políticos brasileiros, às vésperas das eleições de 2008, buscam alternativas que lhes permitam ampliar o número de votos destinados aos candidatos indicados nas convenções para concorrer ao cargo de prefeito. Neste contexto, as coligações partidárias ganham cada vez mais importância no cenário da política nacional. Em Belo Horizonte, nove partidos lançaram candidatos próprios. Os demais participarão via coligações. E é exatamente uma das coligações o alvo deste artigo. A capital mineira é palco de uma coligação “informal” entre o atual governador do estado, Aécio Neves (PSDB, e o atual prefeito de Belo Horizonte, Fernando Pimentel (PT, que se uniram, contra a vontade dos seus respectivos partidos, para apoiar a candidatura do empresário Márcio Lacerda (PSB. PT e PSDB juntos? O que estaria por trás desta parceria? Este artigo tenta refletir sobre estas questões.Palavras-chave: Eleição; coligações; Belo Horizonte

  9. Outside home. Notes on reflexivity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mara Clemente

    2017-01-01

    The paper proffers the idea in which a “reflexive process” on subjectivity can involve and/or hopefully involve the entire experience of the researcher, going beyond the borders of a single research. In the process, unexpected elements of subjectivity can come into play; in other cases the meaning attributed to them can change in time or can have a role different from what had been expected. Some elements, objects of epistemological analyses, as imposed by a reflexive approach, can become objects of attention also on the phenomenological level.

  10. The history of examination of reflexes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boes, Christopher J

    2014-12-01

    In the late 1800s, Wilhelm Erb, Joseph Babinski, William Gowers, and others helped develop the neurologic examination as we know it today. Erb was one of the first to emphasize a detailed and systematic neurologic exam and was co-discoverer of the muscle stretch reflex, Gowers began studying the knee jerk shortly after it was described, and Babinski focused on finding reliable signs that could differentiate organic from hysterical paralysis. These physicians and others emphasized the bedside examination of reflexes, which have been an important part of the neurologic examination ever since. This review will focus on the history of the examination of the following muscle stretch and superficial/cutaneous reflexes: knee jerk, jaw jerk, deep abdominal reflexes, superficial abdominal reflexes, plantar reflex/Babinski sign, and palmomental reflex. The history of reflex grading will also be discussed.

  11. Educating the Reflexive Practitioner

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marc J. Neveu

    2012-09-01

    wearing any clothes.Notwithstanding such issues, I do believe the studio holds the potentialto be an empowering learning experience. The intention of this article is to question the mode of instruction in an architectural studio. I’ve structured the paper in three parts. First, I will briefly describe the findingsof the study made by the Carnegie Foundation for the Advancementof Teaching known as the Boyer Report.2 To develop and support the findings of the Boyer Report, I introduce the work of the educator Donald Schön. Though I see much merit in the Boyer Report, and Schön’sproposals, I argue that a more nuanced approach is required. I will recommend, therefore, in the second section of this paper that a meansof architectural education as based on the Socratic method may be amore productive approach. My reading of the Socratic method is basedprimarily on early Socratic dialogues and I will specifically use Charmidesto illustrate the issues that I believe are relevant to studio pedagogy.3 From my analysis of Charmides I will, in the third section of the essay,describe how the Socratic method is beneficial to studio pedagogy threeways: reflexive, non-propositional, and finally how Socrates’ approachmay indeed be practical. This last section will be illustrated with a studentproject. It is my conjecture that the Socratic method offers insight intocurrent discussions of educational theory, namely student-centered,project-based learning.

  12. The reflexive case study method

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rittenhofer, Iris

    2015-01-01

    This paper extends the international business research on small to medium-sized enterprises (SME) at the nexus of globalization. Based on a conceptual synthesis across disciplines and theoretical perspectives, it offers management research a reflexive method for case study research of postnational...

  13. Soleus stretch reflex during cycling

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Grey, Michael James; Pierce, C. W.; Milner, T. E.

    2001-01-01

    The modulation and strength of the human soleus short latency stretch reflex was investigated by mechanically perturbing the ankle during an unconstrained pedaling task. Eight subjects pedaled at 60 rpm against a preload of 10 Nm. A torque pulse was applied to the crank at various positions durin...

  14. Sliding Downhill Horizontally

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zurcher, Ulrich

    2005-04-01

    We study the motion of object sliding on a rough incline plane. The coefficient of kinetic friction between the surface and the object is such that the magnitude of the gravitational force along the incline F is equal to the magnitude of the kinetic friction S. If the initial velocity of the object is along the incline, the object slides down the incline with constant velocity. We study the case when the object in launched in horizontal direction. We derive exact expressions for the terminal speed of the object and the maximum horizontal displacement of the object.

  15. Model simulation studies to clarify the effect on saccadic eye movements of initial condition velocities set by the Vestibular Ocular Reflex (VOR)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nam, M. H.; Winters, J. M.; Stark, L.

    1981-01-01

    Voluntary active head rotations produced vestibulo-ocular reflex eye movements (VOR) with the subject viewing a fixation target. When this target jumped, the size of the refixation saccades were a function of the ongoing initial velocity of the eye. Saccades made against the VOR were larger in magnitude. Simulation of a reciprocally innervated model eye movement provided results comparable to the experimental data. Most of the experimental effect appeared to be due to linear summation for saccades of 5 and 10 degree magnitude. For small saccades of 2.5 degrees, peripheral nonlinear interaction of state variables in the neuromuscular plant also played a role as proven by comparable behavior in the simulated model with known controller signals.

  16. Horizontal Connection and Horizontal Mean Curvature in Carnot Groups

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Kang Hai TAN; Xiao Ping YANG

    2006-01-01

    In this paper we give a geometric interpretation of the notion of the horizontal mean curvature which is introduced by Danielli-Garofalo-Nhieu and Pauls who recently introduced sub-Riemannian minimal surfaces in Carnot groups. This will be done by introducing a natural nonholonomic connection which is the restriction (projection) of the natural Riemannian connection on the horizontal bundle. For this nonholonomic connection and (intrinsic) regular hypersurfaces we introduce the notions of the horizontal second fundamental form and the horizontal shape operator. It turns out that the horizontal mean curvature is the trace of the horizontal shape operator.

  17. Reflexivity in Narratives on Practice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jakobsen, Helle Nordentoft; Olesen, Lektor Birgitte Ravn

    Previous research has shown how reflexivity is a precondition for knowledge co-production through productive dialogue in organisational contexts because it entails a re-ordering, re-arranging and re-designing of what one knows and therefore creates new angles of vision. In this paper, we draw...... on Bakhtinian dialogic communication theory and discursive psychology to investigate the written practice narratives of 23 students on a Masters Degree Programme in Educational Studies, focusing on how the process of writing narratives accentuates reflexivity. Our findings indicate that the narratives invite...... a dialogic conception of practice as they entail a conceptual reframing of key elements in practice. In addition, the narratives expose a situational and relational, rather than normative, focus which allows for reflections on emotional and bodily experiences. In conclusion, we argue that practice narratives...

  18. Integrating Reflexivity in Livelihoods Research

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Prowse, Martin

    2010-01-01

    Much poverty and development research is not explicit about its methodology or philosophical foundations. Based on the extended case method of Burawoy and the epistemological standpoint of critical realism, this paper discusses a methodological approach for reflexive inductive livelihoods researc...... that overcomes the unproductive social science dualism of positivism and social constructivism. The approach is linked to a conceptual framework and a menu of research methods that can be sequenced and iterated in light of research questions.......Much poverty and development research is not explicit about its methodology or philosophical foundations. Based on the extended case method of Burawoy and the epistemological standpoint of critical realism, this paper discusses a methodological approach for reflexive inductive livelihoods research...

  19. Reflexive fatherhood in everyday life

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Westerling, Allan

    2015-01-01

    This article looks at fathering practices in Denmark, using the findings from a research project on everyday family life in Denmark. It takes a social psychological perspective and employs discursive psychology and theories about reflexive modernisation. It shows how fathers orient towards intimacy...... this analysis and discussion, the article offers a way to understand the complexities of fathering in everyday life from the perspective of fathers....

  20. Integrating Reflexivity in Livelihoods Research

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Prowse, Martin

    2010-01-01

    Much poverty and development research is not explicit about its methodology or philosophical foundations. Based on the extended case method of Burawoy and the epistemological standpoint of critical realism, this paper discusses a methodological approach for reflexive inductive livelihoods researc...... that overcomes the unproductive social science dualism of positivism and social constructivism. The approach is linked to a conceptual framework and a menu of research methods that can be sequenced and iterated in light of research questions....

  1. Horizontally mounted solar collector

    Science.gov (United States)

    Black, D. H. (Inventor)

    1979-01-01

    Solar energy is collected by using a vertical deflector assembly, a stationary reflector and a horizontally mounted solar collector. The deflector assembly contains a plurality of vanes which change the direction of the solar energy to the vertical, while constantly keeping the same side of the deflector facing the sun. The vertical rays are then reflected off the stationary reflector and are then absorbed by the collector.

  2. Horizontal drilling activity in Manitoba

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fox, J.

    1997-04-01

    An update of horizontal well drilling in Manitoba was provided. Manitoba`s productive formations are: (1) the Bakken Formation, (2) the Lodgepole Formation, (3) the Mission Canyon Formation, (4) the Amaranth Formation, and (5) the Melita Formation. A total of 28 exploratory wells and 29 development wells, including 11 horizontal wells were drilled in 1996. The 11 horizontal wells accounted for 30 per cent of the drilling meterage. The leading drillers for horizontal wells in Manitoba are Tundra Oil and Gas, Chevron, Anderson and HCO. Production from horizontal wells in 1996 totaled 310 cubic meter per day. To date, no horizontal wells have been drilled in the Bakken Formation. The least successful horizontal well application has been in the Lodgepole Formation. A summary of horizontal well production was provided for each Formation. 4 tabs., 10 figs.

  3. [Clinical relevance of cardiopulmonary reflexes in anesthesiology].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guerri-Guttenberg, R A; Siaba-Serrate, F; Cacheiro, F J

    2013-10-01

    The baroreflex, chemoreflex, pulmonary reflexes, Bezold-Jarisch and Bainbridge reflexes and their interaction with local mechanisms, are a demonstration of the richness of cardiovascular responses that occur in human beings. As well as these, the anesthesiologist must contend with other variables that interact by attenuating or accentuating cardiopulmonary reflexes such as, anesthetic drugs, surgical manipulation, and patient positioning. In the present article we review these reflexes and their clinical relevance in anesthesiology. Copyright © 2012 Sociedad Española de Anestesiología, Reanimación y Terapéutica del Dolor. Published by Elsevier España. All rights reserved.

  4. Neural reflexes in inflammation and immunity

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Andersson, Ulf; Tracey, Kevin J

    2012-01-01

    .... Development of advanced neurophysiological and immunological techniques recently enabled the study of reflex neural circuits that maintain immunological homeostasis, and are essential for health in mammals...

  5. Reflexive Aero Structures for Enhanced Survivability Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Cornerstone Research Group Inc. (CRG) will develop an advanced reflexive structure technology system to increase the survivability of future systems constructed of...

  6. Reflexivity in Narratives on Practice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jakobsen, Helle Nordentoft; Olesen, Lektor Birgitte Ravn

    on Bakhtinian dialogic communication theory and discursive psychology to investigate the written practice narratives of 23 students on a Masters Degree Programme in Educational Studies, focusing on how the process of writing narratives accentuates reflexivity. Our findings indicate that the narratives invite...... a dialogic conception of practice as they entail a conceptual reframing of key elements in practice. In addition, the narratives expose a situational and relational, rather than normative, focus which allows for reflections on emotional and bodily experiences. In conclusion, we argue that practice narratives...

  7. Two ways to support reflexivity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Adriansen, Hanne Kirstine; Knudsen, Hanne

    2013-01-01

    Management (MEM). MEM provides the participating managers with a new language that can give them a critical distance to the overload of expectations they meet at work and MEM teaches the participants to translate this new language into practice. The pedagogy used for this is labelled ‘experimental management......’. This requires participants to conduct experiments in their own organization, to reflect on and analyse their experiences with concepts from the curriculum. While the new language and the experimental teaching format are difficult, the participants learn a reflexive practice that can enable them to life up...

  8. Structural cure for reflex syncope?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sulke, Neil; Eysenck, William; Badiani, Sveeta; Furniss, Stephen

    2016-01-20

    The ROX Coupler is a device that allows creation of a central arteriovenous anastomosis at the iliac level. The device has been shown to improve exercise capacity in patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease and is CE marked for the treatment of resistant and uncontrolled hypertension. Reflex syncope is a challenging clinical condition with limited proven therapeutic options. We describe the resolution of symptoms and tilt table response of a patient who underwent insertion of a ROX Coupler to treat hypertension, and also incidentally had pre-existing vasodepressor syncope.

  9. The Dynamics of the Stapedial Acoustic Reflex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moss, Sherrin Mary

    Available from UMI in association with The British Library. This thesis aims to separate the neural and muscular components of the stapedial acoustic reflex, both anatomically and physiologically. It aims to present an hypothesis to account for the differences between ipsilateral and contralateral reflex characteristics which have so far been unexplained, and achieve a greater understanding of the mechanisms underlying the reflex dynamics. A technique enabling faithful reproduction of the time course of the reflex is used throughout the experimental work. The technique measures tympanic membrane displacement as a result of reflex stapedius muscle contraction. The recorded response can be directly related to the mechanics of the middle ear and stapedius muscle contraction. Some development of the technique is undertaken by the author. A model of the reflex neural arc and stapedius muscle dynamics is evolved that is based upon a second order system. The model is unique in that it includes a latency in the ipsilateral negative feedback loop. Oscillations commonly observed on reflex responses are seen to be produced because of the inclusion of a latency in the feedback loop. The model demonstrates and explains the complex relationships between neural and muscle dynamic parameters observed in the experimental work. This more comprehensive understanding of the interaction between the stapedius dynamics and the neural arc of the reflex would not usually have been possible using human subjects, coupled with a non-invasive measurement technique. Evidence from the experimental work revealed the ipsilateral reflex to have, on average, a 5 dB lower threshold than the contralateral reflex. The oscillatory charcteristics, and the steady state response, of the contralateral reflex are also seen to be significantly different from those of the ipsilateral reflex. An hypothesis to account for the experimental observations is proposed. It is propounded that chemical neurotransmitters

  10. Vestibulo-Ocular Response and Balance Control in Children and Young Adults with Mild-to-Moderate Intellectual and Developmental Disability: A Pilot Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zur, Oz; Ronen, Ayelet; Melzer, Itshak; Carmeli, Eli

    2013-01-01

    The vestibulo-ocular response (VOR) may not be fully developed in children with an intellectual and developmental disability (IDD). This study aimed to identify the presence of VOR deficit in children and young adults with unspecified mild-to-moderate intellectual and developmental disability and its effect on balance control. Twenty-one children…

  11. Effects of α-noradrenergic substances on the optokinetic and vestibulo-ocular responses in the rabbit: A study with systemic and intrafloccular injections

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    H.S. Tan (H.); J. van Neerven (J.); H. Collewijn (Han); O. Pompeiano (O.)

    1991-01-01

    markdownabstract__Abstract__ The effects of microinjection of α-noradrenergic agonists and antagonists in the flocculus on the basic gain and adaptability of vestibulo-ocular and optokinetic responses were investigated. A complementary, previous investigation46 had shown that the adaptation, but no

  12. [Non-reflex activity of the CNS].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brozek, G

    1995-06-01

    Recent studies of biological rhythms have modified Sherrington's concept of nervous system as exclusively reflexive to include the fact that some neural activity is also endogenously rhythmic. Reflexes are undoubtedly the most important components of animal's and human behavior. But are reflexes the basic units of all complex movements and acts? Rhythmical movements such as respiration, walking and running and other forms of locomotion, as well as rhythmical alimentary processes such as respiration, walking and running and other forms of locomotion, as well as rhythmical alimentary processes such as licking, mastication, and the peristaltic propulsion of nutrients and waste are examples of acts controlled by intrinsic oscillators, so called central pattern generators. Information from the periphery is, however, essential for controlling the extent and rate of movements. Between reflex and non-reflex activity it is possible to place complex species-specific responses called by ethologists fixed-action patterns. Recent investigators have shown that many complex sequences of behavior like speech or piano playing are determined by an internal plan, rather than being generated by a "chain" of reflexes. Non-reflexive activity appears earlier in ontogeny, and is probably phylogenetically older than reflexes.

  13. Reflexive choice in Dutch and German

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hendriks, Petra; Hoeks, John C. J.; Spenader, Jennifer

    2014-01-01

    Standard Dutch and German have two reflexive forms: a weak form ('zich' in Dutch and 'sich' in German) and a strong form ('zichzelf' in Dutch and 'sich selbst' in German). The choice between the two reflexive forms in Dutch has been explained by the selectional restrictions of the verb, distinguishi

  14. Reflexivity in Teams: A Measure and Correlates

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    M.C. Schippers (Michaéla); D.N. den Hartog (Deanne); P.L. Koopman (Paul)

    2005-01-01

    textabstractReflexivity -the extent to which teams reflect upon and modify their functioning- has been identified as a possible key factor in the effectiveness of work teams. The aim of the present study was to develop a questionnaire to measure (aspects of) reflexivity, with a focus on team reflect

  15. Axon reflexes in human cold exposed fingers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Daanen, H.A.M.; Ducharme, M.B.

    2000-01-01

    Exposure of fingers to severe cold induces cold induced vasodilation (CIVD). The mechanism of CIVD is still debated. The original theory states that an axon reflex causes CIVD. To test this hypothesis, axon reflexes were evoked by electrical stimulation of the middle fingers of hands immersed in

  16. Axon reflexes in human cold exposed fingers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Daanen, H.A.M.; Ducharme, M.B.

    2000-01-01

    Exposure of fingers to severe cold induces cold induced vasodilation (CIVD). The mechanism of CIVD is still debated. The original theory states that an axon reflex causes CIVD. To test this hypothesis, axon reflexes were evoked by electrical stimulation of the middle fingers of hands immersed in wat

  17. [Cutaneo-muscular reflexes of the human hand. II. Neurophysiologic aspects of reflex organization and coordination].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meinck, H M; Berkefeld, J; Conrad, B

    1987-09-01

    The organization and coordination of cutaneo-muscular reflexes of human finger and arm muscles to electrical stimulation of the digital nerves were investigated in 14 healthy volunteers. Thumb and finger muscles, although antagonists, showed homonymous reflex effects whereas the wrist and elbow muscles exhibited an reciprocally alternating reflex pattern in pairs of antagonists (Fig. 1). The mechanographical correlate of the homonymous reflex activity in distal muscles was a short release (Fig. 6). The receptive field for evoking such reflex effects covered both the palmar and dorsal surfaces of the fingers (Fig. 2). However, with stimulation of the thumb, the muscles of the fingers and of the wrist showed reflex reversal (Figs 3, 5). If the stimulus was moved from the second to the fifth fingers, a successive attenuation of the transcortical reflex component was seen (Fig. 4). It is concluded that the reflexes investigated are complex flexor reflexes comprising both a distal release and a proximal flexion synergy. According to opposition of the thumb in grasping, the receptive field terminates between thumb and index finger. These reflexes are supposed to have no assisting function during corticalized manipulatory movements--in contrast to the long-loop reflexes evoked by epicritic sensibility. The transcortical servo is blocked if the eliciting stimulus is contaminated by nociceptive signals; its receptive field is confined to those fingers used in the precision grip.

  18. Well Spacing for Horizontal Wells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C.D.S. Keuengoua

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available In the developing phase of a hydrocarbon reservoir and planning for drilling the production wells, it is necessary to drill the wells in an appropriate spacing to achieve maximum economic revenues during the reservoir life span. Well spacing which is the real location and interrelationship between producing oil or gas wells in an oil field is an important parameter. It is determined for the maximum ultimate production of a given reservoir and should be taken in consideration during well planning to avoid drilling of unnecessary wells. This study presents the concept of drainage area on horizontal well and horizontal productivity indices with different equations and their applications. A user friendly Excel Spreadsheet program was developed to calculate the productivity values of horizontal wells using three major available productivity equations. Also, the developed spreadsheet program was used to evaluate the effect of well spacing on the productivities of horizontal wells using productivity index approach and drainage area concept. It also helps to review the comparison between vertical and horizontal wells spacing based on drainage area concept. This program was validated, and then was used to study the effect of horizontal well length on the ratio of horizontal well productivity to vertical well productivity. The results show that higher ratio of horizontal well productivity to vertical well productivity values are obtained with increase length of the horizontal well. It is a very useful tool for making decision about the application of well spacing for horizontal wells.

  19. Reliability of the NINDS Myotatic Reflex Scale.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Litvan, I; Mangone, C A; Werden, W; Bueri, J A; Estol, C J; Garcea, D O; Rey, R C; Sica, R E; Hallett, M; Bartko, J J

    1996-10-01

    The assessment of deep tendon reflexes is useful for localization and diagnosis of neurologic disorders, but only a few studies have evaluated their reliability. We assessed the reliability of four neurologists, instructed in two different countries, in using the National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke (NINDS) Myotatic Reflex Scale. To evaluate the role of training in using the scale, the neurologists randomly and blindly evaluated a total of 80 patients, 40 before and 40 after a training session. Inter- and intraobserver reliability were measured with kappa statistics. Our results showed substantial to near-perfect intraobserver reliability, and moderate-to-substantial interobserver reliability of the NINDS Myotatic Reflex Scale. The reproducibility was better for reflexes in the lower than in the upper extremities. Neither educational background nor the training session influenced the reliability of our results. The NINDS Myotatic Reflex Scale has sufficient reliability to be adopted as a universal scale.

  20. PRODUCTIVITY OF FRACTURED HORIZONTAL WELLS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stjepan Antolović

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available The interest and performance of horizontal drilling and completions has increased during the last two decades. Horizontal wells are advantageous compared to vertical wells in thin reservoirs, reservoirs with favorable vertical permeability and reservoirs with water and gas coning problems. In many reservoirs, the ratio of horizontal permeability to the vertical permeability is substantially larger than one and often is close to 10. Thus, these reservoirs are very good candidates for hydraulic fracturing. By hydraulic fracturing one or more fractures are created, which can be longitudinal or orthogonal. By that, flow is altered and it mostly conducts horizontally through reservoir toward horizontal wellbore. With this altered flow, fluid is produced faster, with less pressure loss by fluid unit of produced fluid. Some of the existing mathematical models to determine the productivity of multifractured horizontal wells are presented in this work (the paper is published in Croatian.

  1. [Urinary urgency and reflex incontinence].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Madersbacher, H

    1991-07-01

    Urge and reflex incontinence are caused by detrusor dysfunction:urgency may be due to hyperactivity or hypersensitivity of the bladder. Neurogenic hyperactivity of the detrusor is called detrusor hyperreflexia: the neurogenic uninhibited bladder is caused by incomplete, and the so-called reflex bladder by complete, suprasacral lesions. The pathophysiology of symptomatic and idiopathic detrusor hyperactivity and the therapeutic armentarium are described. Bladder drill together with biofeedback and pharmacotherapy with spasmolytic drugs - several potent spasmolytic drugs with different modes of action are available - are the basis of treatment for hyperactivity and hypersensitivity of the detrusor. An alternative is electrostimulation: stimulation of the afferents of the pudendal nerve, via the pelvic floor (anal, vaginal), percutaneously (dorsal nerve of the penis, clitoric nerve) or by the implantation of electrodes results in inhibition of the detrusor. Most (80-90%) patients can be treated successfully by conservative means. Operative measurements comprise bladder denervation and bladder augmentation. The results of bladder denervation by transtrigonal phenolization of the pelvic plexus are highly controversial. In patients with uncontrollable hyperactivity of the detrusor, augmentation of the bladder (e.g. clam ileocystoplasty) is the method of choice, while for those with uncontrollable hypersensitivity of the detrusor, cystectomy followed by bladder substitution should be performed as a last resort. Treatment for urinary incontinence due to detrusor hyperreflexia must be selected bearing in mind that bladder emptying is inadequate, in most cases because of dyssynergia between detrusor and external sphincter. Therapy is basically aimed at transforming hyperreflexia of the detrusor into hyporeflexia, primarily by potent spasmolytic drugs.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  2. Cutaneous reflex modulation and self-induced reflex attenuation in cerebellar patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoogkamer, Wouter; Van Calenbergh, Frank; Swinnen, Stephan P; Duysens, Jacques

    2015-02-01

    Modulation of cutaneous reflexes is important in the neural control of walking, yet knowledge about underlying neural pathways is still incomplete. Recent studies have suggested that the cerebellum is involved. Here we evaluated the possible roles of the cerebellum in cutaneous reflex modulation and in attenuation of self-induced reflexes. First we checked whether leg muscle activity during walking was similar in patients with focal cerebellar lesions and in healthy control subjects. We then recorded cutaneous reflex activity in leg muscles during walking. Additionally, we compared reflexes after standard (computer triggered) stimuli with reflexes after self-induced stimuli for both groups. Biceps femoris and gastrocnemius medialis muscle activity was increased in the patient group compared with the control subjects, suggesting a coactivation strategy to reduce instability of gait. Cutaneous reflex modulation was similar between healthy control subjects and cerebellar patients, but the latter appeared less able to attenuate reflexes to self-induced stimuli. This suggests that the cerebellum is not primarily involved in cutaneous reflex modulation but that it could act in attenuation of self-induced reflex responses. The latter role in locomotion would be consistent with the common view that the cerebellum predicts sensory consequences of movement. Copyright © 2015 the American Physiological Society.

  3. Brainstem reflexes in patients with familial dysautonomia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gutiérrez, Joel V; Norcliffe-Kaufmann, Lucy; Kaufmann, Horacio

    2015-03-01

    Several distinctive clinical features of patients with familial dysautonomia (FD) including dysarthria and dysphagia suggest a developmental defect in brainstem reflexes. Our aim was to characterize the neurophysiological profile of brainstem reflexes in these patients. We studied the function of sensory and motor trigeminal tracts in 28 patients with FD. All were homozygous for the common mutation in the IKAP gene. Each underwent a battery of electrophysiological tests including; blink reflexes, jaw jerk reflex, masseter silent periods and direct stimulation of the facial nerve. Responses were compared with 25 age-matched healthy controls. All patients had significantly prolonged latencies and decreased amplitudes of all examined brainstem reflexes. Similar abnormalities were seen in the early and late components. In contrast, direct stimulation of the facial nerve revealed relative preservation of motor responses. The brainstem reflex abnormalities in FD are best explained by impairment of the afferent and central pathways. A reduction in the number and/or excitability of trigeminal sensory axons is likely the main problem. These findings add further evidence to the concept that congenital mutations of the elongator-1 protein (or IKAP) affect the development of afferent neurons including those carrying information for the brainstem reflex pathways. Copyright © 2014 International Federation of Clinical Neurophysiology. Published by Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Reflexivity and technology in adult learning

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Neil Selwyn

    2005-03-01

    Full Text Available It is argued by influential commentators such as Ulrich Beck and Scott Lash that we now live in a ‘reflexively modern' age. People are seen to now be free of the structures of modern society and driven instead by individualised opportunities to reflexively engage with their fast-changing social worlds and identities. Taking the notion of reflexive modernisation as its starting point, this paper explores the roles that information technologies (ITs may play in supporting adults' reflexive judgements about, and reflexive engagements with, education and learning. Through an analysis of interview data with 100 adults in the UK the paper finds that whilst a minority of interviewees were using ITs to support and inform reflexive engagementwith learning, the majority of individuals relayed little sign of technology-supported reflexivity when it came to their (nonengagement with education. For most people ITs were found, at best, to reinforce pre-established tendencies to ‘drift' through the formal education system. The paper concludes by considering the implications of these findings for ongoing efforts in developed countries to establish technology-supported ‘learning societies'.

  5. The Multiple Faces of Reflexive Research Designs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karl H. Müller

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Reflexive research can be grouped into five clusters with circular relations between two elements x ↔ x, namely circular relations between observers, between scientific building blocks like concepts, theories or models, between systemic levels, between rules and rule systems or as circular relations or x ↔ y between these four components. By far the most important cluster is the second cluster which becomes reflexive through a re-entry operation RE into a scientific element x and which establishes its circular formation as x(x. Many of the research problems in these five clusters in reflexivity research are still unexplored and pose grand challenges for future research.

  6. Ranges of bimodule projections and reflexivity

    CERN Document Server

    Eleftherakis, G K

    2011-01-01

    We develop a general framework for reflexivity in dual Banach spaces, motivated by the question of when the weak* closed linear span of two reflexive masa-bimodules is automatically reflexive. We establish an affirmative answer to this question in a number of cases by examining two new classes of masa-bimodules, defined in terms of ranges of masa-bimodule projections. We give a number of corollaries of our results concerning operator and spectral synthesis, and show that the classes of masa-bimodules we study are operator synthetic if and only if they are strong operator Ditkin.

  7. A computational study of synaptic mechanisms of partial memory transfer in cerebellar vestibulo-ocular-reflex learning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Masuda, Naoki; Amari, Shun-ichi

    2008-04-01

    There is a debate regarding whether motor memory is stored in the cerebellar cortex, or the cerebellar nuclei, or both. Memory may be acquired in the cortex and then be transferred to the cerebellar nuclei. Based on a dynamical system modeling with a minimal set of variables, we theoretically investigated possible mechanisms of memory transfer and consolidation in the context of vestibulo-ocular reflex learning. We tested different plasticity rules for synapses in the cerebellar nuclei and took robustness of behavior against parameter variation as the criterion of plausibility of a model variant. In the most plausible scenarios, mossy-fiber nucleus-neuron synapses or Purkinje-cell nucleus-neuron synapses are plastic on a slow time scale and store permanent memory, whose content is passed from the cerebellar cortex storing transient memory. In these scenarios, synaptic strengths are potentiated when the mossy-fiber afferents to the nuclei are active during a pause in Purkinje-cell activities. Furthermore, assuming that mossy fibers create a limited variety of signals compared to parallel fibers, our model shows partial memory transfer from the cortex to the nuclei.

  8. △'-Reflexive Modules and Cogen(P)-Linear Compactness

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Lin Xin

    2005-01-01

    In this paper, we introduce the notion of △'-reflexive modules. We investigate the reflexive modules with respect to a partial cotilting (bi)module and obtain a connection between △'-reflexive modules and Cogen(P)-linearly compact modules. The main results generalize the results on reflexive modules with respect to a cotilting bimodule.

  9. Entrepreneurship Teaching Conducted as Strategic Reflexive Conversation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kristiansson, Michael

    The paper intends exploring and ascertaining whether the concept of strategic reflexive conversation can profitably be applied to entrepreneurship. As a start, a process of conceptualisation is undertaken, which is instrumental in placing the notion of strategic reflexive conversation...... into a knowledge management perspective. Strategic reflexive conversation is presented in an enhanced and updated version, which is contrasted to entrepreneurship through reflection. The findings indicate and it can be concluded that, with some important reservations, strategic reflexive conversation can...... and empirical studies. No doubt the reported study can be enhanced and refined in a theoretical sense and be empirically supported. The paper addresses a potentially significant theme and aims to stimulate discussion, which can provide input and ideas for enhancing practice-oriented entrepreneurship...

  10. Portraying Reflexivity in Health Services Research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rae, John; Green, Bill

    2016-09-01

    A model is proposed for supporting reflexivity in qualitative health research, informed by arguments from Bourdieu and Finlay. Bourdieu refers to mastering the subjective relation to the object at three levels-the overall social space, the field of specialists, and the scholastic universe. The model overlays Bourdieu's levels of objectivation with Finlay's three stages of research (pre-research, data collection, and data analysis). The intersections of these two ways of considering reflexivity, displayed as cells of a matrix, pose questions and offer prompts to productively challenge health researchers' reflexivity. Portraiture is used to show how these challenges and prompts can facilitate such reflexivity, as illustrated in a research project. © The Author(s) 2016.

  11. On the Second Language Acquisition of Spanish Reflexive Passives and Reflexive Impersonals by French- and English-Speaking Adults

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tremblay, Annie

    2006-01-01

    This study, a partial replication of Bruhn de Garavito (1999a; 1999b), investigates the second language (L2) acquisition of Spanish reflexive passives and reflexive impersonals by French- and English-speaking adults at an advanced level of proficiency. The L2 acquisition of Spanish reflexive passives and reflexive impersonals by native French and…

  12. Reflexive convention: civil partnership, marriage and family.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heaphy, Brian

    2017-09-14

    Drawing on an analysis of qualitative interview data from a study of formalized same-sex relationships (civil partnerships) this paper examines the enduring significance of marriage and family as social institutions. In doing so, it intervenes in current debates in the sociology of family and personal life about how such institutions are undermined by reflexivity or bolstered by convention. Against the backdrop of dominating sociological frames for understanding the links between the changing nature of marriage and family and same-sex relationship recognition, the paper analyses the diverse and overlapping ways (including the simple, relational, strategic, ambivalent and critical ways) in which same-sex partners reflexively constructed and engaged with marriage and family conventions. My analysis suggests that instead of viewing reflexivity and convention as mutually undermining, as some sociologists of family and personal life do, it is insightful to explore how diverse forms of reflexivity and convention interact in everyday life to reconfigure the social institutions of marriage and family, but do not undermine them as such. I argue the case for recognizing the ways in which 'reflexive convention', or reflexive investment in convention, contributes to the continuing significance of marriage and family as social institutions. © London School of Economics and Political Science 2017.

  13. The passive of reflexive verbs in Icelandic

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hlíf Árnadóttir

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available The Reflexive Passive in Icelandic is reminiscent of the so-called New Passive (or New Impersonal in that the oblique case of a passivized object NP is preserved. As is shown by recent surveys, however, speakers who accept the Reflexive Passive do not necessarily accept the New Passive, whereas conversely, speakers who accept the New Passive do also accept the Reflexive Passive. Based on these results we suggest that there is a hierarchy in the acceptance of passive sentences in Icelandic, termed the Passive Acceptability Hierarchy. The validity of this hierarchy is confirmed by our diachronic corpus study of open access digital library texts from Icelandic journals and newspapers dating from the 19th and 20th centuries (tímarit.is. Finally, we sketch an analysis of the Reflexive Passive, proposing that the different acceptability rates of the Reflexive and New Passives lie in the argument status of the object. Simplex reflexive pronouns are semantically dependent on the verbs which select them, and should therefore be analyzed as syntactic arguments only, and not as semantic arguments of these verbs.

  14. Torso flexion modulates stiffness and reflex response.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Granata, K P; Rogers, E

    2007-08-01

    Neuromuscular factors that contribute to spinal stability include trunk stiffness from passive and active tissues as well as active feedback from reflex response in the paraspinal muscles. Trunk flexion postures are a recognized risk factor for occupational low-back pain and may influence these stabilizing control factors. Sixteen healthy adult subjects participated in an experiment to record trunk stiffness and paraspinal muscle reflex gain during voluntary isometric trunk extension exertions. The protocol was designed to achieve trunk flexion without concomitant influences of external gravitational moment, i.e., decouple the effects of trunk flexion posture from trunk moment. Systems identification analyses identified reflex gain by quantifying the relation between applied force disturbances and time-dependent EMG response in the lumbar paraspinal muscles. Trunk stiffness was characterized from a second order model describing the dynamic relation between the force disturbances versus the kinematic response of the torso. Trunk stiffness increased significantly with flexion angle and exertion level. This was attributed to passive tissue contributions to stiffness. Reflex gain declined significantly with trunk flexion angle but increased with exertion level. These trends were attributed to correlated changes in baseline EMG recruitment in the lumbar paraspinal muscles. Female subjects demonstrated greater reflex gain than males and the decline in reflex gain with flexion angle was greater in females than in males. Results reveal that torso flexion influences neuromuscular factors that control spinal stability and suggest that posture may contribute to the risk of instability injury.

  15. Constitucionalization´S Reflex in Private Relations: The Horizontal Effectiveness of Fundamental Rights

    OpenAIRE

    Gadelha Campos, Cristina Paiva Serafim; Queiroz, José Rodolpho Régis

    2015-01-01

    Irradiation of the effects of the values and principles of the Constitution of a State by the law to her respective translates into the constitutional process, which is consolidated space in contemporary legal systems. Thus, this research paper seeks to show that one of the main aspects of this process it comes to the application of fundamental rights in private affairs. To this end, use the literature and the inductive method to verify the influence of constitutional principles on social rel...

  16. Horizontal and Vertical Line Designs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johns, Pat

    2003-01-01

    Presents an art lesson in which students learn about the artist Piet Mondrian and create their own abstract artworks. Focuses on geometric shapes using horizontal and vertical lines. Includes background information about the artist. (CMK)

  17. Soleus H-Reflex Operant Conditioning Changes The H-Reflex Recruitment Curve

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thompson, Aiko K.; Chen, Xiang Yang; Wolpaw, Jonathan R.

    2012-01-01

    Introduction Operant conditioning can gradually change the human soleus H-reflex. The protocol conditions the reflex near M-wave threshold. This study examined its impact on the reflexes at other stimulus strengths. Methods H-reflex recruitment curves were obtained before and after a 24-session exposure to an up-conditioning (HRup) or down-conditioning (HRdown) protocol and were compared. Results In both HRup and HRdown subjects, conditioning affected the entire H-reflex recruitment curve. In 5 of 6 HRup and 3 of 6 HRdown subjects, conditioning elevated (HRup) or depressed (HRdown), respectively, the entire curve. In the other HRup subject or the other 3 HRdown subjects, the curve was shifted to the left or to the right, respectively. Discussion H-reflex conditioning does not simply change the H-reflex to a stimulus of particular strength; it also changes the H-reflexes to stimuli of different strengths. Thus, it is likely to affect many actions in which this pathway participates. PMID:23281107

  18. Loading and reflexes : the influence of body weight and active movements on reflex responses in humans

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bastiaanse, Catharina Maria

    2003-01-01

    This thesis describes six studies on the influence of active movements and body loading on reflex responses. To measure those influences healthy subjects were asked to walk with different loadings (e.g. a backpack) or with different active movements (e.g. arm swing) while different reflex responses

  19. Ocular Reflex Phase During Off-Vertical Axis Rotation In Humans Is Modified By Head-On-Trunk Position

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wood, Scott; Clement, Gilles; Denise, Pierre; Reschke, Millard

    2005-01-01

    Constant velocity Off-Vertical Axis Rotation (OVAR) imposes a continuously varying orientation of the head and body relative to gravity. The ensuing ocular reflexes include modulation of both horizontal and torsional eye velocity as a function of the varying linear acceleration along the lateral plane. The purpose of this study was to examine whether the modulation of these ocular reflexes would be modified by different head-on-trunk positions. Ten human subjects were rotated in darkness about their longitudinal axis 20 deg off-vertical at constant rates of 45 and 180 deg/s, corresponding to 0.125 and 0.5 Hz. Binocular responses were obtained with video-oculography with the head and trunk aligned, and then with the head turned relative to the trunk 40 deg to the right or left of center. Sinusoidal curve fits were used to derive amplitude, phase and bias velocity of the eye movements across multiple cycles for each head-on-trunk position. Consistent with previous studies, the modulation of torsional eye movements was greater at 0.125 Hz while the modulation of horizontal eye movements was greater at 0.5 Hz. Neither amplitude nor bias velocities were significantly altered by head-on-trunk position. The phases of both torsional and horizontal ocular reflexes, on the other hand, shifted towards alignment with the head. These results are consistent with the modulation of torsional and horizontal ocular reflexes during OVAR being primarily mediated by the otoliths in response to the sinusoidally varying linear acceleration along the interaural head axis.

  20. Experimental investigation of horizontal convection

    OpenAIRE

    Muñoz Córdoba, Lucía

    2015-01-01

    Fluid circulation driven by buoyancy forces due to a thermal gradient on a horizontal boundary, known as horizontal convection, is experimentally studied. For that purpose, a methacrylate box with inner dimensions 300x150x150 mm3 (LxWxH) whose bottom is composed by a heat exchanger and a printed circuit board is lled with water. The heat exchanger provides a uniform temperature boundary condition while the printed circuit board provides a boundary condition of uniform heat ...

  1. The trigemino-cervical reflex in normal subjects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Milanov, I; Bogdanova, D; Ishpekova, B

    2001-01-01

    There are only few reports on the trigemino-cervical reflex in humans and there is debate over the best method of reflex examination. The aim of this study was, comparing different methods, to provide a reproducible method for evaluating the trigemino-cervical reflex. The trigemino-cervical reflex was studied in 32 healthy volunteers. The stimulation was applied to the supraorbital, infraorbital or mental nerve. Recordings were performed bilaterally from the sternocleidomastoid and trapezius muscles at rest. The reflex was also examined during maximal voluntary contraction of the sternocleidomastoid muscle after supraorbital nerve stimulation. It presented as a two-component reflex if recorded from a tonically active muscle and as a one-component reflex if recorded from a relaxed muscle. The most reproducible reflex responses were obtained from the resting sternocleidomastoid muscle after stimulation of the supraorbital nerve. In conclusion, the trigemino-cervical reflex may be most easily obtained from the relaxed sternocleidomastoid muscle after supraorbital nerve stimulation.

  2. Using ESO Reflex with Web Services

    Science.gov (United States)

    Järveläinen, P.; Savolainen, V.; Oittinen, T.; Maisala, S.; Ullgrén, M. Hook, R.

    2008-08-01

    ESO Reflex is a prototype graphical workflow system, based on Taverna, and primarily intended to be a flexible way of running ESO data reduction recipes along with other legacy applications and user-written tools. ESO Reflex can also readily use the Taverna Web Services features that are based on the Apache Axis SOAP implementation. Taverna is a general purpose Web Service client, and requires no programming to use such services. However, Taverna also has some restrictions: for example, no numerical types such integers. In addition the preferred binding style is document/literal wrapped, but most astronomical services publish the Axis default WSDL using RPC/encoded style. Despite these minor limitations we have created simple but very promising test VO workflow using the Sesame name resolver service at CDS Strasbourg, the Hubble SIAP server at the Multi-Mission Archive at Space Telescope (MAST) and the WESIX image cataloging and catalogue cross-referencing service at the University of Pittsburgh. ESO Reflex can also pass files and URIs via the PLASTIC protocol to visualisation tools and has its own viewer for VOTables. We picked these three Web Services to try to set up a realistic and useful ESO Reflex workflow. They also demonstrate ESO Reflex abilities to use many kind of Web Services because each of them requires a different interface. We describe each of these services in turn and comment on how it was used

  3. Horizontal fiscal imbalance in Germany

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paweł Kowalik

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Regional inequalities are currently a challenge for the majority of the countries, in particular the large ones. The problem of public income redistribution emerges due to possible differentiation of the economic development level of territorial units. The most often considered problem is the vertical distribution. The horizontal division of income is far less frequently considered. Horizontal fiscal imbalance or regional tax inequalities seem to be graver than the vertical imbalance, particularly in developing countries. The public finance system, in particular in federations, is often very complex. Public finance of federations and federated states are not often based on the same assumptions. This leads to differences among regions, both vertical and horizontal. The use of the presented measures helps identify those differences and permits developing mechanisms equalising those inequalities. It should be remembered that those measures may have certain drawbacks, and they mainly focus on certain specific values of income redistribution. Thereby several measures should be applied in measurements and the obtained results should be compared. There are no up-to-date measurements and comparisons of horizontal fiscal imbalance among countries.. The aim of this paper is to measure horizontal fiscal imbalance in Germany, especially after reunification, which represents one of two models of federalism. At the beginning it shows the static and dynamic measurements presented in the literature that can be used to measure the horizontal fiscal imbalance. And then it is followed by the results of calculations for Germany in the period 1970-2013. As expected, horizontal imbalance was much lower before than after the reunification of Germany. After the reunification there were large disparities between "old" and "new" länder. This imbalance is gradually reduced. In comparison with the results obtained for the USA [Kowalik 2014, pp. 144-148] it can be said

  4. The stretch reflex and the contributions of C David Marsden

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kalyan B Bhattacharyya

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The stretch reflex or myotatic reflex refers to the contraction of a muscle in response to its passive stretching by increasing its contractility as long as the stretch is within physiological limits. For ages, it was thought that the stretch reflex was of short latency and it was synonymous with the tendon reflex, subserving the same spinal reflex arc. However, disparities in the status of the two reflexes in certain clinical situations led Marsden and his collaborators to carry out a series of experiments that helped to establish that the two reflexes had different pathways. That the two reflexes are dissociated has been proved by the fact that the stretch reflex and the tendon reflex, elicited by stimulation of the same muscle, have different latencies, that of the stretch reflex being considerably longer. They hypothesized that the stretch reflex had a transcortical course before it reached the spinal motor neurons for final firing. Additionally, the phenomenon of stimulus-sensitive cortical myoclonus lent further evidence to the presence of the transcortical loop where the EEG correlate preceded the EMG discharge. This concept has been worked out by later neurologists in great detail , and the general consensus is that indeed, the stretch reflex is endowed with a conspicuous transcortical component.

  5. The effect of elbow position on biceps tendon reflex

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Keles Isik

    2004-07-01

    Full Text Available Background: Testing of tendon (T reflex is the basic method used in the diagnostic procedure of clinical neurology. Measurement of T reflexes precisely can be a valuable adjunct to clinical examination. Quantification of T reflexes may provide more accurate results. Aims: To analyze the effect of elbow position on biceps T reflex. Settings and Design: A self-controlled clinical trial of biceps T reflex testing at the Electrophysiology Unit of the Department of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation. Methods and Materials: Biceps T reflex was obtained utilizing a hand-held electronic reflex hammer in 50 extremities of 25 healthy volunteers and the effect of elbow position (at 90°, 120° and 150° on reflex response was evaluated. Statistical Analysis: Repeated-measures analysis of variance by the General Linear Model and Pearson correlation test procedures. Results: Onset latency was significantly shorter at 120° of elbow position. The maximum amplitude value of biceps T reflex was obtained at 90° of elbow position. Onset latency of the reflex correlated significantly with the height and arm length but not with age. Conclusions: The electrophysiological measurement of T reflexes is an easy and useful method in the quantification of reflexes, supplying more objective data. However, when performing T reflex studies, the position of the extremity should be taken into consideration to achieve more reliable results.

  6. Reflexive Planning as Design and Work

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lissandrello, Enza; Grin, John

    2011-01-01

    In recent years, planning theorists have advanced various interpretations of the notion of reflexivity, inspired by American pragmatism, complexity theory, hermeneutics, discursive and collaborative planning. Scholars agree that “reflexivity” has a strong temporal dimension: it not only aims...... to solve present planning problems, but to imagine and understand alternative trajectories for future action. This article explores the practical utility of reflexivity for planners, through a case study that focuses on a project to promote sustainable development in the Port of Amsterdam. Reflexivity...... in planning emerges as a new tool for generating critical knowledge and dialogue that can synthesise the perspectives of multiple actors in a common understanding, existing structural constraints and a collective imagination of alternative future possibilities. Such research highlights the potential...

  7. Human investigations into the exercise pressor reflex

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Secher, Niels H; Amann, Markus

    2012-01-01

    During exercise, neural input from skeletal muscles reflexly maintains or elevates blood pressure (BP) despite a maybe fivefold increase in vascular conductance. This exercise pressor reflex is illustrated by similar heart rate (HR) and BP responses to electrically induced and voluntary exercise....... The importance of the exercise pressor reflex for tight cardiovascular regulation during dynamic exercise is supported by studies using pharmacological blockade of lower limb muscle afferent nerves. These experiments show attenuation of the increase in BP and cardiac output when exercise is performed...... of an increase in BP during exercise with paralysed legs manifests, although electrical stimulation of muscles enhances lactate release and reduces muscle glycogen. Thus, the exercise pressor reflex enhances sympathetic activity and maintains perfusion pressure by restraining abdominal blood flow, while brain...

  8. Reflexive Planning as Design and Work

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lissandrello, Enza; Grin, John

    2011-01-01

    In recent years, planning theorists have advanced various interpretations of the notion of reflexivity, inspired by American pragmatism, complexity theory, hermeneutics, discursive and collaborative planning. Scholars agree that “reflexivity” has a strong temporal dimension: it not only aims...... to solve present planning problems, but to imagine and understand alternative trajectories for future action. This article explores the practical utility of reflexivity for planners, through a case study that focuses on a project to promote sustainable development in the Port of Amsterdam. Reflexivity...... in planning emerges as a new tool for generating critical knowledge and dialogue that can synthesise the perspectives of multiple actors in a common understanding, existing structural constraints and a collective imagination of alternative future possibilities. Such research highlights the potential...

  9. Reflexive structures an introduction to computability theory

    CERN Document Server

    Sanchis, Luis E

    1988-01-01

    Reflexive Structures: An Introduction to Computability Theory is concerned with the foundations of the theory of recursive functions. The approach taken presents the fundamental structures in a fairly general setting, but avoiding the introduction of abstract axiomatic domains. Natural numbers and numerical functions are considered exclusively, which results in a concrete theory conceptually organized around Church's thesis. The book develops the important structures in recursive function theory: closure properties, reflexivity, enumeration, and hyperenumeration. Of particular interest is the treatment of recursion, which is considered from two different points of view: via the minimal fixed point theory of continuous transformations, and via the well known stack algorithm. Reflexive Structures is intended as an introduction to the general theory of computability. It can be used as a text or reference in senior undergraduate and first year graduate level classes in computer science or mathematics.

  10. Orthodoxy and reflexivity in international comparative analysis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lind, Jens; Valkenburg, Ben

    2002-01-01

    project, in which we have tried to deal with these consequences. Fourth, and hopefully as a result of the first three aims, we want to argue that a reflexive approach of international, comparative research is not only desirable, but attainable as well. In order to do so, we begin with a short discussion...... upon the consequences on the level of empirical research. We want to avoid that, so our second and third subject will be the practical implications of reflexivity for empirical research as well as for social policy. Our discussion on these subjects is based on the practical experiences in the INPART...... on the main issues in the so-called ?reflexive approach? and consider the main consequences of this approach for both social science and social policy. Against this background we will discuss the implications for comparative research and the experiences of the INPART project end up with a few central issues...

  11. New molecular knowledge towards the trigemino-cardiac reflex as a cerebral oxygen-conserving reflex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sandu, N; Spiriev, T; Lemaitre, F; Filis, A; Schaller, B

    2010-05-04

    The trigemino-cardiac reflex (TCR) represents the most powerful of the autonomous reflexes and is a subphenomenon in the group of the so-called "oxygen-conserving reflexes". Within seconds after the initiation of such a reflex, there is a powerful and differentiated activation of the sympathetic system with subsequent elevation in regional cerebral blood flow (CBF), with no changes in the cerebral metabolic rate of oxygen (CMRO2) or in the cerebral metabolic rate of glucose (CMRglc). Such an increase in regional CBF without a change of CMRO2 or CMRglc provides the brain with oxygen rapidly and efficiently. Features of the reflex have been discovered during skull base surgery, mediating reflex protection projects via currently undefined pathways from the rostral ventrolateral medulla oblongata to the upper brainstem and/or thalamus, which finally engage a small population of neurons in the cortex. This cortical center appears to be dedicated to transduce a neuronal signal reflexively into cerebral vasodilatation and synchronization of electrocortical activity; a fact that seems to be unique among autonomous reflexes. Sympathetic excitation is mediated by cortical-spinal projection to spinal preganglionic sympathetic neurons, whereas bradycardia is mediated via projections to cardiovagal motor medullary neurons. The integrated reflex response serves to redistribute blood from viscera to the brain in response to a challenge to cerebral metabolism, but seems also to initiate a preconditioning mechanism. Previous studies showed a great variability in the human TCR response, in special to external stimuli and individual factors. The TCR gives, therefore, not only new insights into novel therapeutic options for a range of disorders characterized by neuronal death, but also into the cortical and molecular organization of the brain.

  12. Stuttering or reflex seizure? A case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Michel, Véronique; Burbaud, Pierre; Taillard, Jacques; Gaida, Tsouria; Joseph, Pierre Alain; Duché, Bernard; Bioulac, Bernard

    2004-09-01

    Stuttering is characterized by involuntary syllabic repetitions and interruption in the smooth flow of speech. The exact cause of primary stuttering remains a matter of debate but a frontal dysfunction has been evoked. On the other hand, acquired stuttering is uncommon. We report a case of reflex epilepsy in which seizures were triggered by reading aloud or stressful conversation. Each paroxysmal event in left frontal region was associated clinically with a language disorder mimicking stuttering. Our observation suggests that reflex frontal focal epilepsy could be a putative etiology for acquired stuttering.

  13. [The vegetative component of a conditioned reflex].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ordzhonikadze, Ts A; Pkhakadze, L D

    1975-01-01

    Defensive and alimentary conditioned reflexes were studied on normal cats and cats with neural isolation of the neocortex. The cardiac component of the conditioned reflexes is elaborated in decorticated animals at a similar rate and is as steady as in normal cats. Motor conditioned reactions in decorticated cats are difficult to elaborate. Both in normal and decorticated cats unconditioned pain stimulation evokes tachycardia, while a conditioned signal, paired with this unconditioned stimulus, produces bradicardia. Ban assumption has been made that the primary conditioned reaction consists in the appearance of a certain emotional state which changes the cardiac rhythm in a typical way.

  14. DRILL BITS FOR HORIZONTAL WELLS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paolo Macini

    1996-12-01

    Full Text Available This paper underlines the importance of the correct drill bit application in horizontal wells. Afler the analysis of the peculiarities of horizontal wells and drainholes drilling techniques, advantages and disadvantages of the application of both roller cone and fixed cutters drill bits have been discussed. Also, a review of the potential specific featuries useful for a correct drill bit selection in horizontal small diameter holes has been highlighted. Drill bits for these special applications, whose importance is quickly increasing nowadays, should be characterised by a design capable to deliver a good penetration rate low WOB, and, at the same time, be able to withstand high RPM without premature cutting structure failure and undergauge. Formation properties will also determine the cutting structure type and the eventual specific features for additional gauge and shoulder protection.

  15. Charitable giving and reflexive individuals: How personal reflexivity mediates between structure and agency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanghera, Balihar

    2017-03-01

    This article examines how individuals are reflexive beings who interpret the world in relation to things that matter to them, and how charitable acts are evaluated and embedded in their lives with different degrees of meaning and importance. Rather than framing the discussion of charitable practices in terms of an altruism/egoism binary or imputing motivations and values to social structures, the article explains how reflexivity is an important and neglected dimension of social practices, and how it interacts with sympathy, sentiments and discourses to shape giving. The study also shows that there are different modes of reflexivity, which have varied effects on charity and volunteering.

  16. How many theta roles in a reflexive verb?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dimitriadis, Alexis; Everaert, Martin

    2014-01-01

    While purely syntactic approaches to reflexivization have characterized reflexive verbs in terms of detransitivization, we show that there is a discrepancy between syntactic and semantic arity. Reflexive verbs are syntactically intransitive, but semantically they are two-place predicates: both

  17. Team Reflexivity and Innovation: The Moderating Role of Team Context

    OpenAIRE

    Dawson, J.; Schippers, M; M. West

    2012-01-01

    Team reflexivity, the extent to which teams collectively reflect upon and adapt their working methods and functioning, has been shown to be an important predictor of team outcomes, notably innovation. As described in the current article, the authors developed and tested a team-level contingency model of team reflexivity, work demands, and innovation. They argue that highly reflexive teams will be more innovative than teams low in reflexivity when facing a demanding work environment. A field s...

  18. Horizontal Diplopia Following Upper Blepharoplasty

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tomás Ortiz-Basso

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Diplopia is an infrequent complication after blepharoplasty. Most of the cases are in its vertical form due to trauma of the extraocular muscles. In this article, we present a case of horizontal diplopia following cosmetic upper blepharoplasty; we review the literature on this unexpected complication and offer some recommendations to avoid it.

  19. Control of reflexive saccades following hemispherectomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reuter-Lorenz, Patricia A; Herter, Troy M; Guitton, Daniel

    2011-06-01

    Individuals who have undergone hemispherectomy for treatment of intractable epilepsy offer a rare and valuable opportunity to examine the ability of a single cortical hemisphere to control oculomotor performance. We used peripheral auditory events to trigger saccades, thereby circumventing dense postsurgical hemianopia. In an antisaccade task, patients generated numerous unintended short-latency saccades toward contralesional auditory events, indicating pronounced limitations in the ability of a single hemicortex to exert normal inhibitory control over ipsilateral (i.e., contralesional) reflexive saccade generation. Despite reflexive errors, patients retained an ability to generate correct antisaccades in both directions. The prosaccade task revealed numerous contralesional express saccades, a robust contralesional gap effect, but the absence of both effects for ipsilesional saccades. These results indicate limits to the saccadic control capabilities following hemispherectomy: A single hemicortex can mediate antisaccades in both directions, but plasticity does not extend fully to the bilateral inhibition of reflexive saccades. We posit that these effects are due to altered control dynamics that reduce the responsivity of the superior colliculus on the intact side and facilitate the release of an auditory-evoked ocular grasp reflex into the blind hemifield that the intact hemicortex has difficulty suppressing.

  20. Dilemmas and Deliberations in Reflexive Ethnographic Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robinson, Janean Valerie

    2014-01-01

    This paper traces insights into the challenges and dilemmas experienced whilst researching students' interpretations and understandings of the Behaviour Management in Schools policy in Western Australia. Journal records, supported by student transcripts, are woven together in a reflexive ethnographic journey--from the beginning phase of…

  1. The Reflexive Modernization of Australian Universities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pick, David

    2004-01-01

    The profound changes occurring in Australian higher education are viewed here in the context of the social, cultural, political and economic effects of globalization. Particular attention is paid to providing a theoretical foundation for understanding these effects using the reflexive modernization perspective. Highlighted are some of the…

  2. A reflexive perspective in problem solving

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chio, José Angel

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this paper is to favour the methodological process of reflexive analysis in problem solving in the general teaching methods that concentrates in strengthening the dimensional analysis, to gain a greater preparation of the students for the solution of mathematical problems.

  3. Taking Control of Reflexive Social Attention

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ristic, Jelena; Kingstone, Alan

    2005-01-01

    Attention is shifted reflexively to where other people are looking. It has been argued by a number of investigators that this social attention effect reflects the obligatory bottom-up activation of domain-specific modules within the inferior temporal (IT) cortex that are specialized for processing face and gaze information. However, it is also the…

  4. The reflexive self and culture: a critique.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adams, Matthew

    2003-06-01

    This article attempts to engage with a tendency in the theorization of social change and self-identity, evident in the work of a number of contemporary social theorists, to place an extended process of reflexivity at the heart of modern identity. As symptomatic of 'neo-modern' accounts of selfhood, critical readings of Giddens, Beck, Castells and some aspects of social theory more generally, and their account of modern reflexivity's relationship to culture, are assessed. In light of these criticisms, ways in which culture might still play an important part in the shaping of identity are considered. The relationship between language, culture and reflexivity, drawing from philosophy, sociology and G. H. Mead's own brand of social psychology, are all utilized in establishing a critique of the role Giddens and others designate for culture in the constitution of the contemporary self. By potentially repositioning self-identity in its connection to culture, the overall bearing of reflexivity upon the processes of self-identity is thus questioned. It is argued that a culturally-situated, yet fluid and multifarious account of self-identity is a necessary analytical and normative alternative.

  5. A Testbed for Autonomous Reflexive Grasping

    Science.gov (United States)

    1993-03-01

    written in C. The tactile sensor is neural network causes the reflex layer of the a 10 x 10 Tekscan sensor with an active area subsumption architecture to...Doctoral Thesis, March 1990. [9] J. G. Webster, Tactile Sensors for Robotics and Medicine, John Wiley & Sons, 1988 [10] Tekscan Inc., " Tekscan Corporate

  6. Biological Motion Cues Trigger Reflexive Attentional Orienting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Jinfu; Weng, Xuchu; He, Sheng; Jiang, Yi

    2010-01-01

    The human visual system is extremely sensitive to biological signals around us. In the current study, we demonstrate that biological motion walking direction can induce robust reflexive attentional orienting. Following a brief presentation of a central point-light walker walking towards either the left or right direction, observers' performance…

  7. A Reflexive Model for Teaching Instructional Design.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shambaugh, Neal; Magliaro, Susan

    2001-01-01

    Documents a five-year study of two instructors who collaborated on formally studying their teaching of a master's level instructional design course. Outlines their views on learning, teaching, and instructional design (ID), describes the ID course, and explains the reflexive instructional model used, in which the teachers examined their teaching…

  8. New Molecular Knowledge Towards the Trigemino-Cardiac Reflex as a Cerebral Oxygen-Conserving Reflex

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. Sandu

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available The trigemino-cardiac reflex (TCR represents the most powerful of the autonomous reflexes and is a subphenomenon in the group of the so-called “oxygen-conserving reflexes”. Within seconds after the initiation of such a reflex, there is a powerful and differentiated activation of the sympathetic system with subsequent elevation in regional cerebral blood flow (CBF, with no changes in the cerebral metabolic rate of oxygen (CMRO2 or in the cerebral metabolic rate of glucose (CMRglc. Such an increase in regional CBF without a change of CMRO2 or CMRglc provides the brain with oxygen rapidly and efficiently. Features of the reflex have been discovered during skull base surgery, mediating reflex protection projects via currently undefined pathways from the rostral ventrolateral medulla oblongata to the upper brainstem and/or thalamus, which finally engage a small population of neurons in the cortex. This cortical center appears to be dedicated to transduce a neuronal signal reflexively into cerebral vasodilatation and synchronization of electrocortical activity; a fact that seems to be unique among autonomous reflexes. Sympathetic excitation is mediated by cortical-spinal projection to spinal preganglionic sympathetic neurons, whereas bradycardia is mediated via projections to cardiovagal motor medullary neurons. The integrated reflex response serves to redistribute blood from viscera to the brain in response to a challenge to cerebral metabolism, but seems also to initiate a preconditioning mechanism. Previous studies showed a great variability in the human TCR response, in special to external stimuli and individual factors. The TCR gives, therefore, not only new insights into novel therapeutic options for a range of disorders characterized by neuronal death, but also into the cortical and molecular organization of the brain.

  9. The Interrater Reliability of Subjective Assessments of the Babinski Reflex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dafkin, Chloe; Green, Andrew; Kerr, Samantha; Veliotes, Demetri; Olivier, Benita; McKinon, Warrick

    2016-01-01

    The Babinski reflex is a clinical diagnostic tool; however, the interrater reliability of this tool is currently greatly contested. A comparison between rater groups with objective measurements of the Babinski reflex was therefore conducted. Fifteen recorded Babinski reflexes were assessed by 12 neurologists and 12 medical students as being either pathological or nonpathological. Kinematic and electromyographic variables were collected and used to assess which aspects of the Babinski reflex predict classification. Substantial interrater agreement within the neurologist and student groups (κ = .72 and .67, respectively) was shown; however, there were some differing aspects between what neurologists and students used to assess the reflex as determined by objective kinematic measurements.

  10. Modulation of the initial light reflex during affective picture viewing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henderson, Robert R; Bradley, Margaret M; Lang, Peter J

    2014-09-01

    An initial reflexive constriction of the pupil to stimulation-the light reflex-is primarily modulated by brightness, but is attenuated when participants are under threat of shock (i.e., fear-inhibited light reflex). The present study assessed whether the light reflex is similarly attenuated when viewing emotional pictures. Pupil diameter was recorded while participants viewed erotic, violent, and neutral scenes that were matched in brightness; scrambled versions identical in brightness were also presented as an additional control. Compared to viewing neutral scenes, the light reflex was reliably modulated by hedonic content, with significant attenuation both when viewing unpleasant as well as pleasant pictures. No differences in the light reflex were found among scrambled versions. Thus, emotional modulation of the initial light reflex is not confined to a context of fear and is not indicative of brightness differences when viewing pictures of natural scenes. Copyright © 2014 Society for Psychophysiological Research.

  11. Horizontally oriented plates in clouds

    CERN Document Server

    Bréon, François-Marie

    2011-01-01

    Horizontally oriented plates in clouds generate a sharp specular reflectance signal in the glint direction, often referred to as "subsun". This signal (amplitude and width) may be used to analyze the relative area fraction of oriented plates in the cloud top layer and their characteristic tilt angle to the horizontal. We make use of spaceborne measurements from the POLDER instrument to provide a statistical analysis of these parameters. More than half of the clouds show a detectable maximum reflectance in the glint direction, although this maximum may be rather faint. The typical effective fraction (area weighted) of oriented plates in clouds lies between 10-3 and 10-2. For those oriented plates, the characteristic tilt angle is less than 1 degree in most cases. These low fractions imply that the impact of oriented plates on the cloud albedo is insignificant. The largest proportion of clouds with horizontally oriented plates is found in the range 500-700 hPa, in agreement with typical in situ observation of p...

  12. Partial Horizontal Laryngectomy and Epiglottiplasty

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2006-01-01

    In order to evaluate the availability of the lateral horizontal laryngectomy and anaplasty of epiglottis to treat somepatients with specific supraglottic carcinomas and hypopharyngeal carcinomas, 17 cases of laryngeal and hypopharyngeal carcinomas were retrospectively analyzed, whose tumors were located at the lateral margin of epiglottis, aryepiglottic fold, medial wall of piriformfossa and were treated by the lateral horizontal laryngectomy and anaplasty of epiglottis. The results showed that all cases took food by mouth in postoperative 9-14 days and subjected to decannulation in postoperative 9-15 days. Three cases had postoperative hoarse voice. The free-disease survival rate of 3 years was 71.4 % in 14 cases followed up after the first surgical therapy, and the overall free-disease survival rate of 3 years was 85.7 % after the second surgical therapy. It was concluded that the manipulations of the lateral horizontal laryngectomy and epiglottiplasty were simple. It could alleviate the postoperative symptoms of aspiration and bucking remarkably and shorten their postoperative recovery time, yet does not lower the survival rate of patients if laryngocarcinoma or hypopharyngeal carcinoma cases were properly selected.

  13. Reflexive regulation of CSR to promote sustainablility

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Buhmann, Karin

    climate change and environmental sustainability, and social, economic and other human rights lend human rights as part of CSR a potential for meeting some environmental and climate concerns and handling adverse side-effects. The article analyses two EU initiatives: The EU Multi-Stakeholder (MSF) on CSR...... in promoting companies’ responsibility with regard to aspects of sustainable development, such as climate impact. Keywords: Sustainable development, sustainable companies, reflexive regulation, climate change, CSR, EU law, public-private regulation, companies' self-regulation...... and the EU CSR Alliance. Focusing on human rights based in international law, it analyses the patterns of negotiation in the MSF and the background for the launch of the CSR Alliance. It shows that analysing public-private regulation of CSR from the perspective of reflexive law theory assists us...

  14. Reflexive cartography a new perspective in mapping

    CERN Document Server

    Casti, Emanuela

    2015-01-01

    Reflexive Cartography addresses the adaptation of cartography, including its digital forms (GIS, WebGIS, PPGIS), to the changing needs of society, and outlines the experimental context aimed at mapping a topological space. Using rigorous scientific analysis based on statement consistency, relevance of the proposals, and model accessibility, it charts the transition from topographical maps created by state agencies to open mapping produced by citizens. Adopting semiotic theory to uncover the complex communicative mechanisms of maps and to investigate their ability to produce their own messages and new perspectives, Reflexive Cartography outlines a shift in our way of conceptualizing maps: from a plastic metaphor of reality, as they are generally considered, to solid tools that play the role of agents, assisting citizens as they think and plan their own living place and make sense of the current world. Applies a range of technologies to theoretical perspectives on mapping to innovatively map the world's geogr...

  15. The Reflexive Principle of Sociological Theorization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R T Ubaidullayeva

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available The article attempts to describe the reflexive principle in theory-making, which integrates the basic modern methodological paradigms and lays the foundation for the development of sociology. On the basis of the theoretical ideas of P. Bourdieu, A. Giddens and P. Ricoeur the author defines the concept of social reflexion and reveals its peculiarities in sociology as compared to reflexion in philosophy. According to the author, the fulfillment of reflexive functions in sociology is connected with the task of analyzing the complex structure of the polysemantic object, considering the specific quality of the subjects and their various trends of development. The presence of the poles — objectivity-subjectivity, rationality-irrationality, consciousness-unconsciousness etc, requires a reproduction of the dichotomies engendering them in social life and development of cognitive methods for their study in sociology.

  16. Tactile Sensing Reflexes for Advanced Prosthetic Hands

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-10-01

    Quad Chart 37 1. INTRODUCTION: The purpose of this research is to equip a myoelectric prosthetic hand with contact detecting sensors and a...controller to perform contact detection reflex (11-13 mos.) 80% • Program controller to perform software functions for clinical studies (12-13 mos.) 60...candidates have been ordered, and are having pressure relief holes laser drilled . A custom flexible component board that holds the pressure sensor

  17. The spinal reflex cannot be perceptually separated from voluntary movements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghosh, Arko; Haggard, Patrick

    2014-01-01

    Both voluntary and involuntary movements activate sensors in the muscles, skin, tendon and joints. As limb movement can result from a mixture of spinal reflexes and voluntary motor commands, the cortical centres underlying conscious proprioception might either aggregate or separate the sensory inputs generated by voluntary movements from those generated by involuntary movements such as spinal reflexes. We addressed whether healthy volunteers could perceive the contribution of a spinal reflex during movements that combined both reflexive and voluntary contributions. Volunteers reported the reflexive contribution in leg movements that were partly driven by the knee-jerk reflex induced by a patellar tendon tap and partly by voluntary motor control. In one condition, participants were instructed to kick back in response to a tendon tap. The results were compared to reflexes in a resting baseline condition without voluntary movement. In a further condition, participants were instructed to kick forwards after a tap. Volunteers reported the perceived reflex contribution by repositioning the leg to the perceived maximum displacement to which the reflex moved the leg after each tendon tap. In the resting baseline condition, the reflex was accurately perceived. We found a near-unity slope of linear regressions of perceived on actual reflexive displacement. Both the slope value and the quality of regression fit in individual volunteers were significantly reduced when volunteers were instructed to generate voluntary backward kicks as soon as they detected the tap. In the kick forward condition, kinematic analysis showed continuity of reflex and voluntary movements, but the reflex contribution could be estimated from electromyography (EMG) recording on each trial. Again, participants' judgements of reflexes showed a poor relation to reflex EMG, in contrast to the baseline condition. In sum, we show that reflexes can be accurately perceived from afferent information. However

  18. The effect of distraction strategies on pain perception and the nociceptive flexor reflex (RIII reflex).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruscheweyh, Ruth; Kreusch, Annette; Albers, Christoph; Sommer, Jens; Marziniak, Martin

    2011-11-01

    Distraction from pain reduces pain perception, and imaging studies have suggested that this may at least partially be mediated by activation of descending pain inhibitory systems. Here, we used the nociceptive flexor reflex (RIII reflex) to directly quantify the effects of different distraction strategies on basal spinal nociception and its temporal summation. Twenty-seven healthy subjects participated in 3 distraction tasks (mental imagery, listening to preferred music, spatial discrimination of brush stimuli) and, in a fourth task, concentrated on the painful stimulus. Results show that all 3 distraction tasks reduced pain perception, but only the brush task also reduced the RIII reflex. The concentration-on-pain task increased both pain perception and the RIII reflex. The extent of temporal summation of pain perception and the extent of temporal summation of the RIII reflex were not affected by any of the tasks. These results suggest that some, but not all, forms of pain reduction by distraction rely on descending pain inhibition. In addition, pain reduction by distraction seems to preferentially affect mechanisms of basal nociceptive transmission, not of temporal summation. Copyright © 2011 International Association for the Study of Pain. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. Basic Gravitational Reflexes in the Larval Frog

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cochran, Stephen L.

    1996-01-01

    This investigation was designed to determine how a primitive vertebrate, the bullfrog tadpole, is able to sense and process gravitational stimuli. Because of the phylogenetic similarities of the vestibular systems in all vertebrates, the understanding of the gravitational reflexes in this relatively simple vertebrate should elucidate a skeletal framework on a elementary level, upon which the more elaborate reflexes of higher vertebrates may be constructed. The purpose of this study was to understand how the nervous system of the larval amphibian processes gravitational information. This study involved predominantly electrophysiological investigations of the isolated, alert (forebrain removed) bullfrog tadpole head. The focus of these experiments is threefold: (1) to understand from whole extraocular nerve recordings the signals sent to the eye following static gravitational tilt of the head; (2) to localize neuronal centers responsible for generating these signals through reversible pharmacological ablation of these centers; and (3) to record intracellularly from neurons within these centers in order to determine the single neuron's role in the overall processing of the center. This study has provided information on the mechanisms by which a primitive vertebrate processes gravitational reflexes.

  20. Acoustic reflex patterns in amyotrophic lateral sclerosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Canale, Andrea; Albera, Roberto; Lacilla, Michelangelo; Canosa, Antonio; Albera, Andrea; Sacco, Francesca; Chiò, Adriano; Calvo, Andrea

    2017-02-01

    The aim of the study is to investigate acoustic reflex testing in amyotrophic lateral sclerosis patients. Amplitude, latency, and rise time of stapedial reflex were recorded for 500 and 1000 Hz contralateral stimulus. Statistical analysis was performed by the Wilcoxon test and the level of significance was set at 5 %. Fifty-one amyotrophic lateral sclerosis patients and ten sex- and age-matched control subjects were studied. Patients were further divided in two groups: amyotrophic lateral sclerosis-bulbar (38 cases, with bulbar signs at evaluation) and amyotrophic lateral sclerosis-spinal (13 cases, without bulbar signs at evaluation). Stapedial reflex was present in all patients. There was a statistically significant difference in the mean amplitude, latency, and rise time between the amyotrophic lateral sclerosis patients as compared with the controls. Amplitude was lower in both the amyotrophic lateral sclerosis-bulbar and the amyotrophic lateral sclerosis-spinal patients than in the controls (p amyotrophic lateral sclerosis cases with bulbar signs and, moreover, suggesting a possible subclinical involvement of the stapedial motor neuron even in amyotrophic lateral sclerosis-spinal patients. Amplitude and rise time seem to be good sensitive parameters for investigating subclinical bulbar involvement.

  1. Social orienting: reflexive versus voluntary control.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hill, Julia L; Patel, Saumil; Gu, Xue; Seyedali, Nassim S; Bachevalier, Jocelyne; Sereno, Anne B

    2010-09-24

    Many studies have shown that the direction of gaze of a face covertly facilitates the response to a target presented in the matching direction. In this study we seek to determine whether there exist separate reflexive and voluntary forms of such covert social orienting and how they interact with each other. We measured the effect of the predictive value of a gaze cue on manual choice reaction times. When the predictive value of the gaze cue was zero, a facilitatory cueing effect was still observed which peaked at a cue onset to target onset delay (CTD) of 150ms and largely diminished beyond a CTD of 500ms. When the gaze cue was 100% predictive of the future location of the target, at CTDs greater than 200, the predictive cue resulted in a significantly greater facilitation of response than occurred with a non-predictive cue. These results suggest that given enough time (about 200ms), the social cue is interpreted and a willful or voluntary spatially-specific social cueing effect occurs. In addition, we found that a predictive cue resulted in a significant slowing of the observer's responses up to a CTD of 200ms. These findings show that, similar to non-social spatial orienting, there appear to be two forms of social orienting including a reflexive component and voluntary component. We suggest a model of social orienting in which the voluntary social orienting system modulates tonic inhibition of the reflexive social orienting system. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  2. Clinical correlation of cervical myelopathy and the hyperactive pectoralis reflex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paholpak, Permsak; Jirarattanaphochai, Kitti; Sae-Jung, Surachai; Wittayapairoj, Kriangkrai

    2013-12-01

    A diagnostic study. To validate the correlation between hyperactive pectoralis reflex and the level of cervical myelopathy. The hyperactive pectoralis reflex was proposed to be present in patients with spinal cord compression at the C2-3 and/or C3-4 level. Nevertheless, in a validation study on the correlation of various hyperactive reflexes and the cervical myelopathic level, this particular reflex was not evaluated. All patients presenting with cervical myelopathy between August 2009 and June 2012 were included in this study. Each patient underwent neurological examination for cervical myelopathy focusing on the examination of pathologic reflexes, including the hyperactive pectoralis reflex. We recorded the presence or absence of these reflexes and the level of cervical myelopathy as detected on magnetic resonance imaging. We used the level of spinal cord compression-cranial to C4 of the vertebral body-as the reference level to validate a hyperactive pectoralis reflex. The study included 95 cervical myelopathy patients: 33 patients had most of their compressed cervical cord somewhere above the C4 vertebral body. The hyperactive pectoralis reflex for cervical myelopathy at this level had a respective sensitivity, specificity, positive likelihood ratio, and negative likelihood ratio of 84.8%, 96.7%, 26.67, and 0.16. The high sensitivity and specificity of the hyperactive pectoralis reflex is very useful for screening and diagnosis of the cervical myelopathic level when it is above the C4 vertebral body.

  3. The swallowing reflex and its significance as an airway defensive reflex

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Takashi eNishino

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Swallowing function, in humans, is very complex. Swallowing plays, not only an important role in food digestion, but also a major role in preventing the entrance of food and/or other materials into the lower respiratory tract. To achieve this, precise coordination is necessary between breathing and swallowing since the pharynx serves as a common pathway for both respiration and digestion. The swallowing reflex consists of afferent pathways, central integration, and efferent pathways. Any defect or disorder along reflex arc can cause a potential delay or impairment in swallow function. The swallowing reflex can be modulated not only by pathological factors but also by physiological factors. Among these, timing of swallows in relation to the phase of respiration may be the most important factor that determines the occurrence of pulmonary aspiration, since phases of inspiration and the expiration-inspiration transition are the most vulnerable for pulmonary aspiration.

  4. Panspermia and horizontal gene transfer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klyce, Brig

    2009-08-01

    Evidence that extremophiles are hardy and ubiquitous is helping to make panspermia a respectable theory. But even if life on Earth originally came from space, biologists assume that the subsequent evolution of life is still governed by the darwinian paradigm. In this review we show how panspermia could amend darwinism and point to a cosmic source for, not only extremophiles but, all of life. This version of panspermia can be called "strong panspermia." To support this theory we will discuss recent evidence pertaining to horizontal gene transfer, viruses, genes apparently older than the Earthly evolution of the features they encode, and primate-specific genes without identifiable precursors.

  5. An experimental study of artificial murine bladder reflex arc established by abdominal reflex

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG Jin-wu; ZHAO Yu-wu; HOU Chun-lin; NI Wei-feng; RUI Bi-yu; GUO Shang-chun; ZHENG Xian-you; DAI Ke-rong

    2011-01-01

    Background The neurogenic bladder dysfunction caused by spinal cord injury is difficult to treat clinically. The aim of this research was to establish an artificial bladder reflex arc in rats through abdominal reflex pathway above the level of spinal cord injury, reinnervate the neurogenic bladder and restore bladder micturition.Methods The outcome was achieved by intradural microanastomosis of the right T13 ventral root to S2 ventral root with autogenous nerve grafting, leaving the right T13 dorsal root intact. Long-term function of the reflex arc was assessed from nerve electrophysiological data and intravesical pressure tests during 8 months postoperation. Horseradish peroxidase (HRP) tracing was performed to observe the effectiveness of the artificial reflex.Results Single stimulus (3 mA, 0.3 ms pulses, 20 Hz, 5-second duration) on the right T13 dorsal root resulted in evoked action potentials, raised intravesical pressures and bladder smooth muscle, compound action potential recorded from the right vesical plexus before and after the spinal cord transaction injury between L5 and S4 segmental in 12 Sprague-Dawley rats. There were HRP labelled cells in T13 ventral horn on the experimental side and in the intermediolateral nucleus on both sides of the L6-S4 segments after HRP injection. There was no HRP labelled cell in T13 ventral horn on the control side.Conclusion Using the surviving somatic reflex above the level of spinal cord injury to reconstruct the bladder autonomous reflex arc by intradural microanastomosis of ventral root with a segment of autologous nerve grafting is practical in rats and may have clinical applications for humans.

  6. Reflex receptive fields for human withdrawal reflexes elicited by non-painful and painful electrical stimulation of the foot sole.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andersen, O K; Sonnenborg, F A; Arendt-Nielsen, L

    2001-04-01

    Human withdrawal reflex receptive fields (RRFs) were assessed for 4 different electrical stimulus intensities, ranging from below the pain threshold (PTh) to up to two times the PTh intensity (0.8x, 1.2x, 1.6x, and 2.0xPTh). Thirteen subjects participated, and the reflexes were recorded in a sitting position. The stimuli were delivered in random order to 12 positions distributed over the foot sole. Tibialis anterior (TA), gastrocnemius medialis (GM), vastus lateralis (VL), and biceps femoris (BF) reflexes were recorded. Further, knee and ankle joint angle changes were recorded. The strongest reflexes were seen in the TA compared with the other 3 muscles. Dorsi-flexion dominated distal to the talocrural joint corresponding to the TA receptive field area. An expansion of the RRF for the TA and GM was seen when increasing the stimulus intensity from 0.8xPTh to 1.2xPTh and from 1.2xPTh to 1.6xPTh, indicating a gradually increasing reflex threshold towards the border, where TA contraction is inappropriate in a withdrawal reaction. For the BF and VL, the borders of the RRF areas were not detected. By integrating the reflex size within the RRF (i.e. the reflex volume), gradually increasing reflexes for increasing stimulus intensity were seen in all 4 muscles tested, most clearly in the TA and GM. The subjective pain intensity correlated to the reflex volume for the TA, GM, and BF. In conclusion, the highest reflex sensitivity was seen in the centre of the RRF, while the stimulus intensity needed for eliciting a reflex increased towards the receptive field border. Within the RRF, stronger reflexes were evoked for increasing stimulus intensity. The limit in the size of the receptive field size for the TA and GM supports a modular withdrawal reflex organisation.

  7. Assessment of Hyperactive Reflexes in Patients with Spinal Cord Injury

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Chung-Yong

    2015-01-01

    Hyperactive reflexes are commonly observed in patients with spinal cord injury (SCI) but there is a lack of convenient and quantitative characterizations. Patellar tendon reflexes were examined in nine SCI patients and ten healthy control subjects by tapping the tendon using a hand-held instrumented hammer at various knee flexion angles, and the tapping force, quadriceps EMG, and knee extension torque were measured to characterize patellar tendon reflexes quantitatively in terms of the tendon reflex gain (G tr), contraction rate (R c), and reflex loop time delay (t d). It was found that there are significant increases in G tr and R c and decrease in t d in patients with spinal cord injury as compared to the controls (P reflex excitability and muscle contraction dynamics. With proper simplifications, it can potentially be used for quantitative diagnosis and outcome evaluations of hyperreflexia in clinical settings. PMID:25654084

  8. The parallel programming of voluntary and reflexive saccades.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walker, Robin; McSorley, Eugene

    2006-06-01

    A novel two-step paradigm was used to investigate the parallel programming of consecutive, stimulus-elicited ('reflexive') and endogenous ('voluntary') saccades. The mean latency of voluntary saccades, made following the first reflexive saccades in two-step conditions, was significantly reduced compared to that of voluntary saccades made in the single-step control trials. The latency of the first reflexive saccades was modulated by the requirement to make a second saccade: first saccade latency increased when a second voluntary saccade was required in the opposite direction to the first saccade, and decreased when a second saccade was required in the same direction as the first reflexive saccade. A second experiment confirmed the basic effect and also showed that a second reflexive saccade may be programmed in parallel with a first voluntary saccade. The results support the view that voluntary and reflexive saccades can be programmed in parallel on a common motor map.

  9. Horizontal gene transfer in chromalveolates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bhattacharya Debashish

    2007-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Horizontal gene transfer (HGT, the non-genealogical transfer of genetic material between different organisms, is considered a potentially important mechanism of genome evolution in eukaryotes. Using phylogenomic analyses of expressed sequence tag (EST data generated from a clonal cell line of a free living dinoflagellate alga Karenia brevis, we investigated the impact of HGT on genome evolution in unicellular chromalveolate protists. Results We identified 16 proteins that have originated in chromalveolates through ancient HGTs before the divergence of the genera Karenia and Karlodinium and one protein that was derived through a more recent HGT. Detailed analysis of the phylogeny and distribution of identified proteins demonstrates that eight have resulted from independent HGTs in several eukaryotic lineages. Conclusion Recurring intra- and interdomain gene exchange provides an important source of genetic novelty not only in parasitic taxa as previously demonstrated but as we show here, also in free-living protists. Investigating the tempo and mode of evolution of horizontally transferred genes in protists will therefore advance our understanding of mechanisms of adaptation in eukaryotes.

  10. Horizontal versus vertical plate motions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Cuffaro

    2006-07-01

    Full Text Available We review both present and past motions at major plate boundaries, which have the horizontal component in average 10 to 100 times faster (10–100 mm/yr than the vertical component (0.01–1 mm/yr in all geodynamic settings. The steady faster horizontal velocity of the lithosphere with respect to the upward or downward velocities at plate boundaries supports dominating tangential forces acting on plates. This suggests a passive role of plate boundaries with respect to far field forces determining the velocity of plates. The forces acting on the lithosphere can be subdivided in coupled and uncoupled, as a function of the shear at the lithosphere base. Higher the asthenosphere viscosity, more significant should be the coupled forces, i.e., the mantle drag and the trench suction. Lower the asthenosphere viscosity, more the effects of uncoupled forces might result determinant, i.e., the ridge push, the slab pull and the tidal drag. Although a combination of all forces acting on the lithosphere is likely, the decoupling between lithosphere and mantle suggests that a torque acts on the lithosphere independently of the mantle drag. Slab pull and ridge push are candidates for generating this torque, but, unlike these boundary forces, the advantage of the tidal drag is to be a volume force, acting simultaneously on the whole plates, and being the decoupling at the lithosphere base controlled by lateral variations in viscosity of the low-velocity layer.

  11. Sympathetic reflex control of blood flow in human peripheral tissues

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Henriksen, O

    1991-01-01

    Sympathetic vasoconstrictor reflexes are essential for the maintenance of arterial blood pressure in upright position. It has been generally believed that supraspinal sympathetic vasoconstrictor reflexes elicited by changes in baroreceptor activity play an important role. Recent studies on human ...... to collision of normodromically and antidromically conducted impulses in efferent sympathetic vasoconstrictor fibers. The evidence obtained suggests that sympathetic vasoconstrictor reflexes to postural changes are complex and highly differentiated....

  12. A syntactic and lexical approach to French reflexive verbs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Corina Petersilka

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available This Construction grammar approach to French refl exive verbs describes the formal and semantic constraints at work in the different refl exive constructions, points out at their different branches of inheritance and shows cases of fusion with other argument structures. The article suggests a family tree of French reflexive constructions which appear to be derived from different transitive constructions. It also deals with how the reflexive argument structure modifies the semantics of the transitive verb used in reflexive construction.

  13. Sympathetic reflex control of blood flow in human peripheral tissues

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Henriksen, O

    1991-01-01

    Sympathetic vasoconstrictor reflexes are essential for the maintenance of arterial blood pressure in upright position. It has been generally believed that supraspinal sympathetic vasoconstrictor reflexes elicited by changes in baroreceptor activity play an important role. Recent studies on human...... sympathetic vasoconstrictor reflexes are blocked. Blood flow has been measure by the local 133Xe-technique. The results indicate the presence of spinal as well as supraspinal sympathetic vasoconstrictor reflexes to human peripheral tissues. Especially is emphasized the presence of a local sympathetic veno...

  14. The legacy of care as reflexive learning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    García, Marta Rodríguez; Moya, Jose Luis Medina

    2016-06-14

    to analyze whether the tutor's use of reflexive strategies encourages the students to reflect. The goal is to discover what type of strategies can help to achieve this and how tutors and students behave in the practical context. a qualitative and ethnographic focus was adopted. Twenty-seven students and 15 tutors from three health centers participated. The latter had received specific training on reflexive clinical tutoring. The analysis was developed through constant comparisons of the categories. the results demonstrate that the tutors' use of reflexive strategies such as didactic questioning, didactic empathy and pedagogical silence contributes to encourage the students' reflection and significant learning. reflexive practice is key to tutors' training and students' learning. analisar se o uso de estratégias reflexivas por parte da tutora de estágio clínico estimula a reflexão nos estudantes. A intenção é descobrir qual tipo de estratégias podem ajudar a fazê-lo e como as tutoras e os estudantes se comportam no contexto prático. foi adotado um enfoque qualitativo de cunho etnográfico em que participaram 27 estudantes e 15 tutores de três centros de saúde que haviam recebido formação específica sobre tutoria clínica reflexiva. A análise foi realizada por meio de comparações constantes das categorias. os resultados demonstram que o uso de estratégias reflexivas como a interrogação didática, a empatia didática e o silêncio pedagógico por parte das tutoras, contribui para fomentar a reflexão do estudante e sua aprendizagem significativa. a prática reflexiva é a chave para a formação dos tutores e para a aprendizagem dos estudantes. analizar si el uso de estrategias reflexivas por parte de la tutora de prácticas clínicas fomenta la reflexión en los estudiantes. Se trata de conocer qué tipo de estrategias pueden ayudar a hacerlo y cómo se comportan tutoras y estudiantes en el contexto práctico. se ha utilizado un enfoque

  15. Lower esophageal sphincter relaxation reflex kinetics: effects of peristaltic reflexes and maturation in human premature neonates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pena, Eneysis M; Parks, Vanessa N; Peng, Juan; Fernandez, Soledad A; Di Lorenzo, Carlo; Shaker, Reza; Jadcherla, Sudarshan R

    2010-12-01

    We defined the sensory-motor characteristics of the lower esophageal sphincter relaxation (LESR) (stimulus threshold volume, response onset, and relaxation period, relaxation magnitude, nadir) during maturation in human neonates. We hypothesized that LESR kinetics differs during maturation and with peristaltic reflex type. Basal and adaptive esophageal motility testing was performed (N = 20 premature neonates) at 34.7 and 39.1 wk (time 1 and time 2). Effects of midesophageal provocation with graded stimuli (N = 1,267 stimuli, air and liquids) on LESR kinetics during esophagodeglutition response (EDR) and secondary peristalsis (SP) were analyzed by mixed models. Frequency of LESR with basal primary peristalsis were different during maturation (P = 0.03). During adaptive responses with maturation, 1) the frequencies of peristaltic reflexes and LESR were similar; 2) liquid stimuli resulted in a shorter LESR response latency and LESR nadir and greater LESR magnitude (all P reflexes at both times (vs. none, P reflex, and postnatal maturation. Maturation modulates an increased recruitment of inhibitory pathways that favor LESR.

  16. An Enabling Framework for Reflexive Learning: Experiential Learning and Reflexivity in Contemporary Modernity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dyke, Martin

    2009-01-01

    The paper presents an enabling framework for experiential learning that connects with reflexive modernity. This framework places an emphasis on learning with others and on the role of theory, practice and reflection. A sociological argument is constructed for an alternative framework for experiential learning that derives from social theory. It is…

  17. Methodological Reflexivity: Towards Evolving Methodological Frameworks through Critical and Reflexive Deliberations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raven, Glenda

    2006-01-01

    In this article, the author argues for a central and critical role for "reflexivity in research" with the aim of developing and strengthening not only everyone's understanding of what everyone does in environmental education research, but also how, and why everyone does it. In a narrative account of methodological issues that occurred…

  18. The neuronal organization of horizontal semicircular canalactivated inhibitory vestibulocollic neurons in the cat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Isu, N; Sakuma, A; Hiranuma, K; Uchino, H; Sasaki, S; Imagawa, M; Uchino, Y

    1991-01-01

    1. The somatic location and axonal projections of inhibitory vestibular nucleus neurons activated by the horizontal semicircular canal nerve (HCN) were studied in anesthetized cats. Cats were anesthetized with ketamine hydrochloride and pentobarbital sodium. 2. Intracellular recordings were obtained from 11 neck extensor motoneurons which were identified by antidromic activation from the dosal rami (DR) in the C1 segment. Stimulation of the ipsilateral (i-) HCN and the ipsilateral abducens (AB) nucleus evoked IPSPs in the motoneurons. These IPSPs were fully or partially occluded when they were evoked simultaneously. 3. Intracellular recordings were obtained from 8 AB motoneurons. Stimulation of the i-HCN and the i-C1DR motoneuron pool evoked IPSPs in the AB motoneurons. These IPSPs were also partially occluded when they were evoked simultaneously, which implied that some HCN-activated neurons inhibit both i-AB motoneurons and ipsilateral neck motoneurons. 4. Unit activity was extracellularly recorded from 30 vestibular neurons that were activated monosynaptically by i-HCN stimulation. Their axonal projections were determined by stimulating the i-AB nucleus and the i-C1DR motoneuron pool. Eight neurons were activated by both stimuli, and were termed vestibulooculo-collic (VOC) neurons. Their axonal branching was examined by means of local stimulation in and around the i-AB nucleus and the i-C1DR motoneuron pool. Eighteen neurons were antidromically activated from the i-C1DR motoneuron pool but not from the i-AB nucleus. These were termed vestibulo-collic (VC) neurons. Four neurons were activated from the i-AB nucleus but not from the ventral funiculus in the C1 segment, and were termed vestibulo-ocular (VO) neurons.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  19. Reflexivity and vulnerability in collaborative knowledge production

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jakobsen, Helle Nordentoft; Olesen, Birgitte Ravn

    in the interaction between the peers. This can, for instance be observed in the participants’ tone of voice and body-language. In other words, these moments can be seen as naturally occurring ‘breaching incidents’ in an apparently fruitful learning environment (Have, 2004). As such, they have potential to expose...... the normativity,, of the ways in which roles and relationships between the peers and researchers unfold. In both instances, the ambition was to create a reflexive learning environment in which peers co-produce new knowledge on how to communicate with patients and relatives; however, we conclude that the opposite...

  20. Explorando nuevos horizontes en NASA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Villanueva, G. L.

    A pesar de la incesante expansión del Universo iniciada con el Big Bang 14 mil millones de años atrás, nuestro Universo se siente cada día más cercano. La inquebrantable vocación de la humanidad por descubrir nuevos horizontes ha permitido el acercamiento de civilizaciones en nuestro planeta y nos ha permitido conocer nuestro lugar en el Universo como nunca antes. En este artículo presento una breve sinopsis de nuestro trabajo que se relaciona con diversas investigaciones con implicaciones astrobiológicas, desde el origen de los ingredientes de la "sopa de la vida", hasta la evolución y composición de la atmósfera de Marte.

  1. Optimization of horizontal well staggered patterns

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhao Chunsen; Li Peijing; Guan Dan; Liu Qingjuan

    2008-01-01

    Staggered line-drive patterns are widely used in oilfields. In this paper, to optimize a staggered pattern of horizontal wells, a 3D problem was divided into two 2D (x-y plane and y-z plane) problems with the pseudo-3D method, conformal transformation and superposition principle. A productivity equation for a horizontal well was deduced, which can be used to optimize the well pattern. A relationship between the length of horizontal wells and the shape factor of well patterns was established. The result shows that optimized well patterns can improve oil production from horizontal wells. This provides a theoretical basis for horizontal well applications to the development of oilfieids, especially for overall development of oilfields by horizontal wells.

  2. Reflexivity and adjustment strategies at the interfaces

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ismael Teomiro

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available I argue in this work that Reinhart & Reuland’s (1993 conditions A and B hold for Spanish. I provide evidence supporting the hypothesis that this language makes use of both SE and SELF-anaphors. Inherent reflexive verbs undergo an internal argument reduction operation in the lexicon. However, the syntax always requires two arguments. Therefore certain clitics, which are SE-anaphors, are inserted in these derivations. This is a last-resort mechanism that makes an adjustment between the valence of the lexical entry of the verb and the requirements of the syntax in order for the derivation to converge at the C-I interface. These clitics are syntactic arguments. Nevertheless, they are not interpreted as semantic arguments since they violate the double chain condition, which forces nominal elements to share both a tense and thematic features with the verb and the tense heads. Non- inherent reflexive verbs require the presence of a SELF-anaphor, which is formed out of a SE-anaphor along with a protector SELF element. Therefore, both syntactic elements are interpreted as two distinguishable semantic elements at C-I despite the fact that there is binding between them both. The interpretation of both syntactic elements as just one semantic element is a pragmatic epiphenomenon.

  3. The Self-Reflexivity of Social Action

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bogdan POPOVENIUC

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available The most puzzling and striking feature of Social Theory lies in the impossibility to control its leaning toward self-fulfilling statements. In Sociology, the epistemic explanation become part of explained world and the Theory is at risk to become either futile or subjective along with the dialectic evolution of social understanding. As major mature sciences, it has solid instruments and methods for acquiring useful knowledge, self-regulatory rules for assuring the accuracy of its affirmations and errors refutation. More than any other sciences, it achieved the level of meta-theoretical thinking about its own practice and sets up its limits and expertise. However this is not enough. The understanding brought by sociological the most evolved concept of reflexivity is overwhelmed complexity of social reality, because it fails to cover the self-reference supposed by itself. The Scientific discourse of third person should be transcended toward the level of dialectical co-constructed consciousness-reality awareness, that the subjective “I”, is the condition of possibility for objective knowledge (of Science, which, in turn, represents the categorical conditions of possibility for (self-understanding. A self-reflexive level of understanding instead, would illuminate many concealed suppositions, conundrums and inconsistencies of social discourse and reasoning. This enhancement is also required to put the present uncontrolled collective intelligent development of Mankind on a safety and desirable path.

  4. Effect of guaifenesin on cough reflex sensitivity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dicpinigaitis, Peter V; Gayle, Yvonne E

    2003-12-01

    Guaifenesin, a commonly used agent for the treatment of cough, is termed an expectorant since it is believed to alleviate cough discomfort by increasing sputum volume and decreasing its viscosity, thereby promoting effective cough. Despite its common usage, relatively few studies, yielding contrasting results, have been performed to investigate the action and efficacy of guaifenesin. To evaluate the effect of guaifenesin on cough reflex sensitivity. Randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial. Academic medical center. Fourteen subjects with acute viral upper respiratory tract infection (URI) and 14 healthy volunteers. On 2 separate days, subjects underwent capsaicin cough challenge 1 to 2 h after receiving a single, 400-mg dose (capsules) of guaifenesin or matched placebo. The concentration of capsaicin inducing five or more coughs (C(5)) was determined. Among subjects with URI, mean (+/- SEM) log C(5) after guaifenesin and placebo were 0.92 +/- 0.17 and 0.66 +/- 0.14, respectively (p = 0.028). No effect on cough sensitivity was observed in healthy volunteers. Our results demonstrate that guaifenesin inhibits cough reflex sensitivity in subjects with URI, whose cough receptors are transiently hypersensitive, but not in healthy volunteers. Possible mechanisms include a central antitussive effect, or a peripheral effect by increased sputum volume serving as a barrier shielding cough receptors within the respiratory epithelium from the tussive stimulus.

  5. Cough reflex sensitization from esophagus and nose.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hennel, Michal; Brozmanova, Mariana; Kollarik, Marian

    2015-12-01

    The diseases of the esophagus and nose are among the major factors contributing to chronic cough although their role in different patient populations is debated. Studies in animal models and in humans show that afferent C-fiber activators applied on esophageal or nasal mucosa do not initiate cough, but enhance cough induced by inhaled irritants. These results are consistent with the hypothesis that activation of esophageal and nasal C-fibers contribute to cough reflex hypersensitivity observed in chronic cough patients with gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) and chronic rhinitis, respectively. The afferent nerves mediating cough sensitization from the esophagus are probably the neural crest-derived vagal jugular C-fibers. In addition to their responsiveness to high concentration of acid typical for gastroesophageal reflux (pH cough sensitization are less understood. Increased cough reflex sensitivity was also reported in many patients with GERD or rhinitis who do not complain of cough indicating that additional endogenous or exogenous factors may be required to develop chronic coughing in these diseases.

  6. Somatoautonomic reflexes in acupuncture therapy: A review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uchida, Sae; Kagitani, Fusako; Sato-Suzuki, Ikuko

    2017-03-01

    Oriental therapies such as acupuncture, moxibustion, or Anma, have been used to treat visceral disorders since ancient times. In each of these therapies, stimulation of the skin or underlying muscles leads to excitation of afferent nerves. The sensory information is carried to the central nervous system, where it is transferred to autonomic efferents, thus affecting visceral functions. This neuronal pathway, known as the "somatoautonomic reflex", has been systematically studied by Sato and his colleagues for over a half century. Nearly all their studies were conducted in anesthetized animals, whereas human patients are conscious. Responses in patients or the events following therapeutic somatic stimulation may differ from those observed in anesthetized animals. In fact, it is increasingly apparent that the responses in patients and animals are not always coincident, and the differences have been difficult for clinicians to reconcile. We review the mechanism of the "somatoautonomic reflex" as described in anesthetized animals and then discuss how it can be applied clinically. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. Metabolic syndrome and the hepatorenal reflex

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael D Wider

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Insufficient hepatic O 2 in animal and human studies has been shown to elicit a hepatorenal reflex in response to increased hepatic adenosine, resulting in stimulation of renal as well as muscle sympathetic nerve activity and activating the renin angiotensin system. Low hepatic ATP, hyperuricemia, and hepatic lipid accumulation reported in metabolic syndrome (MetS patients may reflect insufficient hepatic O 2 delivery, potentially accounting for the sympathetic overdrive associated with MetS. This theoretical concept is supported by experimental results in animals fed a high fructose diet to induce MetS. Hepatic fructose metabolism rapidly consumes ATP resulting in increased adenosine production and hyperuricemia as well as elevated renin release and sympathetic activity. This review makes the case for the hepatorenal reflex causing sympathetic overdrive and metabolic syndrome in response to exaggerated splanchnic oxygen consumption from excessive eating. This is strongly reinforced by the fact that MetS is cured in a matter of days in a significant percentage of patients by diet, bariatric surgery, or endoluminal sleeve, all of which would decrease splanchnic oxygen demand by limiting nutrient contact with the mucosa and reducing the nutrient load due to the loss of appetite or dietary restriction.

  8. The Role of Transformational Leadership in Enhancing Team Reflexivity

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    M.C. Schippers (Michaéla); D.N. den Hartog (Deanne); P.L. Koopman (Paul); D.L. van Knippenberg (Daan)

    2007-01-01

    textabstractTeam reflexivity, or the extent to which teams reflect upon and modify their functioning, has been identified as a key factor in the effectiveness of work teams. As yet, however, little is known about the factors that play a role in enhancing team reflexivity, and it is thus important to

  9. Bourdieu and Science Studies: Toward a Reflexive Sociology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hess, David J.

    2011-01-01

    Two of Bourdieu's fundamental contributions to science studies--the reflexive analysis of the social and human sciences and the concept of an intellectual field--are used to frame a reflexive study of the history and social studies of science and technology as an intellectual field in the United States. The universe of large, Ph.D.-granting…

  10. The role of transformational leadership in enhancing team reflexivity

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schippers, M.C.; den Hartog, D.N.; Koopman, P.L.; van Knippenberg, D.

    2008-01-01

    Team reflexivity, or the extent to which teams reflect upon and modify their functioning, has been identified as a key factor in the effectiveness of work teams. As yet, however, little is known about the factors that play a role in enhancing team reflexivity, and it is thus important to develop the

  11. [Value of blink reflex studies in neurosurgical problems].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jamjoom, Z; Nahser, H C; Nau, H E

    1983-09-01

    Blinking reflex studies were done in neurosurgical patients with processes in the posterior fossa and idiopathic trigeminal neuralgia. Alterations were found in space occupying, ischemic, and traumatic lesions of the trigemino-facial system. The analysis of the components of the blinking reflex can give hints to the site of the lesion and also to the prognosis of the underlying process.

  12. (Re)constructing Reflexivity: A Relational Constructionist Approach

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hosking, D.M.; Pluut, B.

    2010-01-01

    This article distinguishes three discourses of reflexivity in relation to human inquiry. One of these arises from a post-modern, relational constructionist perspective which radically re-conceptualizes reflexivity: (a) as a local and co-constructed process oriented towards the question (b) how are w

  13. Reflexivity in Teams: A Review and New Perspectives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Konradt, Udo; Otte, Kai-Philip; Schippers, Michaéla C; Steenfatt, Corinna

    2016-01-01

    Team reflexivity posits that the extent to which teams reflect upon and adapt their functioning is positively related to team performance. While remarkable progress has been made to provide evidence of this relationship, the underlying framework is missing elements of current theoretical streams for analyzing and describing teamwork, leaving the diversity of effects of team reflexivity often untouched. In this article, we present an update for this framework, by reviewing previous research on reflexivity, addressing gaps in the literature, and revising the original model by integrating feedback and dynamic team effectiveness frameworks for describing temporal developments of reflexivity. We furthermore propose a new dimensional structure for reflexivity, relying on prior work conceptualizing teams as information-processing systems that learn and advance through social-cognitive elements. Our model is therefore not only suitable for explaining the diverse set of relationships between team reflexivity on outcomes, but also provides valuable directions for viewing reflexivity as process that takes place during both transition and action phases of teamwork. We conclude with implications for managers, identify limitations, and propose an agenda for further research into this area. This article contributes an extended perspective relevant for further theory development and for effectively managing reflexivity in teams.

  14. Iris Pigmentation and Fractionated Reaction and Reflex Time.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hale, Bruce D.; And Others

    Behavioral measures, fractionated reaction and reflex times by means of electromyography, were used to determine if the eye color differences are found in the central or peripheral regions of the nervous system. The purpose of this research was to determine the truth of the hypothesis that dark-eyed individuals have faster reflex and reaction time…

  15. [The development of I. P. Pavlov's conditioned reflex theory].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, O J

    1992-01-01

    This paper deals with the theory of Ivan Petrovich Pavlov (1849-1936), a Russian physiologist who presented for the first time the systematic theory of the function of the brain that controls the whole behavior of animals, i.e. higher nervous activity through experimental studies. This paper, principally based on Lectures on Conditioned Reflexes (1928), investigates the development of conditioned reflex theory from its beginning by dividing it into three periods. First, during the period from 1898 to 1906, the fundamental concept of conditioned reflex was established and the study of conditioned reflex became an independent discipline. From 1907 to 1916, the second period, Pavlov theorized on higher nervous activity on the basis of extensive data from his laboratory experiments of conditioned reflex. And Pavlov complemented conditioned reflex theory, during the third period from 1916 to 1928, and extended the boundaries of it through applications of conditioned reflex theory to psychopathology and typology. The study contributes to the understanding that conditioned reflex theory was historically developed, and not presented as a complete form from the beginning, and that Pavlov intended to study the higher nervous activity through the method of neurophysiology.

  16. (Re)constructing Reflexivity: A Relational Constructionist Approach

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hosking, D.M.; Pluut, B.

    2010-01-01

    This article distinguishes three discourses of reflexivity in relation to human inquiry. One of these arises from a post-modern, relational constructionist perspective which radically re-conceptualizes reflexivity: (a) as a local and co-constructed process oriented towards the question (b) how are

  17. Ultimate concerns in late modernity: Archer, Bourdieu and reflexivity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farrugia, David; Woodman, Dan

    2015-12-01

    Through a critique of Margaret Archer's theory of reflexivity, this paper explores the theoretical contribution of a Bourdieusian sociology of the subject for understanding social change. Archer's theory of reflexivity holds that conscious 'internal conversations' are the motor of society, central both to human subjectivity and to the 'reflexive imperative' of late modernity. This is established through critiques of Bourdieu, who is held to erase creativity and meaningful personal investments from subjectivity, and late modernity is depicted as a time when a 'situational logic of opportunity' renders embodied dispositions and the reproduction of symbolic advantages obsolete. Maintaining Archer's focus on 'ultimate concerns' in a context of social change, this paper argues that her theory of reflexivity is established through a narrow misreading and rejection of Bourdieu's work, which ultimately creates problems for her own approach. Archer's rejection of any pre-reflexive dimensions to subjectivity and social action leaves her unable to sociologically explain the genesis of 'ultimate concerns', and creates an empirically dubious narrative of the consequences of social change. Through a focus on Archer's concept of 'fractured reflexivity', the paper explores the theoretical necessity of habitus and illusio for understanding the social changes that Archer is grappling with. In late modernity, reflexivity is valorized just as the conditions for its successful operation are increasingly foreclosed, creating 'fractured reflexivity' emblematic of the complex contemporary interaction between habitus, illusio, and accelerating social change. © London School of Economics and Political Science 2015.

  18. The role of transformational leadership in enhancing team reflexivity

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schippers, M.C.; den Hartog, D.N.; Koopman, P.L.; van Knippenberg, D.

    2008-01-01

    Team reflexivity, or the extent to which teams reflect upon and modify their functioning, has been identified as a key factor in the effectiveness of work teams. As yet, however, little is known about the factors that play a role in enhancing team reflexivity, and it is thus important to develop

  19. Reflex sympathetic dystrophy: Early treatment and psychological aspects

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Geertzen, J.H.B.; De Bruijn, H.; De Bruijn-Kofman, A.T.; Arendzen, J.H.

    1994-01-01

    We report the results of two prospective studies of early treatment and psychological aspects in a series of 26 patients with sympathetic reflex dystrophy of the hand in which treatment was started within 3 months after diagnosis. Ismelin blocks is an often used therapy in sympathetic reflex dystrop

  20. The feasibility of reflexive control in transfemoral prostheses

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wentink, E.C.; Rietman, J.S.; Veltink, P.H.

    2009-01-01

    The feasibility of reflexive control in transfemoral prosthesis is assessed using a model of the lower extremity. The artificial triggering of reflexes, the processing of the central nervous system, the EMG detection and the control input to the prosthetic knee all take time. A model was used to ass

  1. Human intersegmental reflexes from intercostal afferents to scalene muscles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McBain, Rachel A; Taylor, Janet L; Gorman, Robert B; Gandevia, Simon C; Butler, Jane E

    2016-10-01

    What is the central question of this study? The aim was to determine whether specific reflex connections operate between intercostal afferents and the scalene muscles in humans, and whether these connections operate after a clinically complete cervical spinal cord injury. What is the main finding and its importance? This is the first description of a short-latency inhibitory reflex connection between intercostal afferents from intercostal spaces to the scalene muscles in able-bodied participants. We suggest that this reflex is mediated by large-diameter afferents. This intercostal-to-scalene inhibitory reflex is absent after cervical spinal cord injury and may provide a way to monitor the progress of the injury. Short-latency intersegmental reflexes have been described for various respiratory muscles in animals. In humans, however, only short-latency reflex responses to phrenic nerve stimulation have been described. Here, we examined the reflex connections between intercostal afferents and scalene muscles in humans. Surface EMG recordings were made from scalene muscles bilaterally, in seven able-bodied participants and seven participants with motor- and sensory-complete cervical spinal cord injury (median 32 years postinjury, range 5 months to 44 years). We recorded the reflex responses produced by stimulation of the eighth or tenth left intercostal nerve. A short-latency (∼38 ms) inhibitory reflex was evident in able-bodied participants, in ipsilateral and contralateral scalene muscles. This bilateral intersegmental inhibitory reflex occurred in 46% of recordings at low stimulus intensities (at three times motor threshold). It was more frequent (in 75-85% of recordings) at higher stimulus intensities (six and nine times motor threshold), but onset latency (38 ± 9 ms, mean ± SD) and the size of inhibition (23 ± 10%) did not change with stimulus intensity. The reflex was absent in all participants with spinal cord injury. As the intercostal

  2. Vestibulo-Oculomotor Reflex Recording Using the Scleral Search Coil Technique. Review of Peripheral Vestibular Disorders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boleas-Aguirre, Marisol; Migliaccio, Amerio A.; Carey, John P.

    2010-01-01

    Our goal is to review vestibulo-oculomotor reflex (VOR) studies on several peripheral vestibular disorders (Ménière’s disease, vestibular neuritis, benign paroxysmal positional vertigo, superior canal dehiscence syndrome, and vestibular neuroma), using the scleral search coil (SSC) technique. Head movements are detected by vestibular receptors and the elicited VOR is responsible for compensatory 3 dimensional eye movements. Therefore, to study the VOR it is necessary to assess the direction and velocity of 3 dimensional head, and eye movements. This can be achieved using the SSC technique. Interaction between a scleral search coil and an alternating magnetic field generates an electrical signal that is proportional to eye position. Ideally, eye rotation axis is aligned with head rotation axis and VOR gain (eye velocity/head velocity) for horizontal and vertical head rotations is almost 1. The VOR gain, however, for torsional head rotations is smaller and about 0.7. PMID:17683700

  3. Soleus H-reflex excitability during pedaling post-stroke

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schindler-Ivens, Sheila; Brown, David A.; Lewis, Gwyn N.

    2008-01-01

    A major contributor to impaired locomotion post-stroke is abnormal phasing of paretic muscle activity, but the mechanisms remain unclear. Previous studies have shown that, in the paretic limb of people post-stroke, Group Ia reflexes are abnormally elevated and fail to decrease in amplitude during...... the pedaling cycle. H-reflexes were large during extension and small during flexion. Reduced H-reflex modulation post-stroke was associated with the level of neuromuscular impairment as indicated by Fugl-Meyer score. However, regardless of impairment level, stroke subjects displayed H-reflex suppression during...... the flexion phase of pedaling. After correcting for the level of background muscle activity, H-reflexes were found to be larger in paretic as compared to NI individuals, regardless of the phase of the pedaling cycle. We conclude that Group Ia afferent transmission is enhanced in the paretic SO of people post-stroke...

  4. Voluntary Control of the Near Reflex: A Case Report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Serpil Akar

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Spasm of the near reflex is a rare disorder that involves intermittent and variable episodes of esotropia, pseudomyopia, and pupillary myosis. It is usually functional in origin and is seen mainly in young patients. Treatment options for spasm of the near reflex have had variable success. In instances where the etiology of spasm of the near reflex was suspected to be hysteria, psychotherapy has proven beneficial. We report the case of an 11-year-old girl who had functional spasm of the near reflex. The symptoms persisted for two years. Symptomatic relief was achieved by cycloplegia and spectacle correction (added plus lenses at near. The patient also underwent psychological counseling. In our case, the functional spasm of the near reflex spontaneously resolved after 2 years. (Turk J Ophthalmol 2014; 44: 161-3

  5. Widespread horizontal transfer of retrotransposons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walsh, Ali Morton; Kortschak, R Daniel; Gardner, Michael G; Bertozzi, Terry; Adelson, David L

    2013-01-15

    In higher organisms such as vertebrates, it is generally believed that lateral transfer of genetic information does not readily occur, with the exception of retroviral infection. However, horizontal transfer (HT) of protein coding repetitive elements is the simplest way to explain the patchy distribution of BovB, a long interspersed element (LINE) about 3.2 kb long, that has been found in ruminants, marsupials, squamates, monotremes, and African mammals. BovB sequences are a major component of some of these genomes. Here we show that HT of BovB is significantly more widespread than believed, and we demonstrate the existence of two plausible arthropod vectors, specifically reptile ticks. A phylogenetic tree built from BovB sequences from species in all of these groups does not conform to expected evolutionary relationships of the species, and our analysis indicates that at least nine HT events are required to explain the observed topology. Our results provide compelling evidence for HT of genetic material that has transformed vertebrate genomes.

  6. On the Hydraulics of Flowing Horizontal Wells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bian, A.; Zhan, H.

    2003-12-01

    A flowing horizontal well is a special type of horizontal well that does not have pumping/injecting facility. The discharge rate of a flowing horizontal well is controlled by the hydraulic gradient between the aquifer and the well and it generally varies with time if the hydraulic head of the aquifer is transient. This type of well has been used in landslide control, mining dewatering, water table control, underground water transportation through a horizontal tunnel, agricultural water drainage, and other applications. Flowing horizontal wells have quite different hydrodynamic characteristics from horizontal wells with fixed pumping or injecting rates because their discharge rates are functions of the aquifer hydraulic heads (Zhan et al, 2001; Zhan and Zlotnik, 2002). Hydraulics of flowing horizontal wells have rarely been studied although the hydraulics of flowing vertical wells have been extensively investigated before. The purpose of this paper is to obtain analytical solutions of groundwater flow to a flowing horizontal-well in a confined aquifer, in a water table aquifer without precipitation, and in a water table aquifer with precipitation. The functions of the flowing horizontal well discharge rates versus time will be obtained under above mentioned different aquifer conditions. The relationships of the aquifer hydraulic heads versus the discharge rates of the well will be investigated. The rate of water table decline due to the dewatering of the well will also be computed, and this solution is particularly useful for landslide control and mining dewatering. The theoretical solutions will be compared with results of experiments that will be conducted in the hydrological laboratory at Texas A&M University. Reference: Zhan, H., Wang, L.V., and Park, E, On the horizontal well pumping tests in the anisotropic confined aquifers, J. hydrol., 252, 37-50, 2001. Zhan, H., and Zlotnik, V. A., Groundwater flow to a horizontal or slanted well in an unconfined aquifer

  7. Reflex control of human jaw muscles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Türker, Kemal S

    2002-01-01

    The aim of this review is to discuss what is known about the reflex control of the human masticatory system and to propose a method for standardized investigation. Literature regarding the current knowledge of activation of jaw muscles, receptors involved in the feedback control, and reflex pathways is discussed. The reflexes are discussed under the headings of the stimulation conditions. This was deliberately done to remind the reader that under each stimulation condition, several receptor systems are activated, and that it is not yet possible to stimulate only one afferent system in isolation in human mastication experiments. To achieve a method for uniform investigation, we need to set a method for stimulation of the afferent pathway under study with minimal simultaneous activation of other receptor systems. This stimulation should also be done in an efficient and reproducible way. To substantiate our conviction to standardize the stimulus type and parameters, we discuss the advantages and disadvantages of mechanical and electrical stimuli. For mechanical stimulus to be delivered in a reproducible way, the following precautions are suggested: The stimulus delivery system (often a probe attached to a vibrator) should be brought into secure contact with the area of stimulation. To minimize the slack between the probe, the area to be stimulated should be taken up by the application of pre-load, and the delivered force should be recorded in series. Electrical stimulus has advantages in that it can be delivered in a reproducible way, though its physiological relevance can be questioned. It is also necessary to standardize the method for recording and analyzing the responses of the motoneurons to the stimulation. For that, a new technique is introduced, and its advantages over the currently used methods are discussed. The new method can illustrate the synaptic potential that is induced in the motoneurons without the errors that are unavoidable in the current

  8. Academic strangeness as uncomfortable reflexivity and academic reflexivity as uncomfortable strangeness in higher education

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fristrup, Tine; Tulinius, Charlotte; Hølge-Hazelton, Bibi

    2015-01-01

    strangeness among several of the students, but also among ourselves as teachers and facilitators. We have been inspired by the work done by Ruth Behar (1996) on becoming a vulnerable observer and the work done by Pranee Liamputtong (2006) on researching the vulnerable. Both approaches involve a critique....... The paper briefly describes the strategies used to plan, deliver and evaluate the course, but the main emphasis is on the learning taking place as a consequence of working within this area and using these strategies in the educational setting. Having participated in and studied academic and peer supervision...... for the course, as teachers, was to create ‘an academic zone of comfort’ at the course, something we had been deprived of ourselves as young researchers. Our insistence on continuous reflexivity regarding the uncomfortable in order to develop academic reflexivity among the students created uncomfortable academic...

  9. Horizontal Directional Drilling (HDD) Technology and Applications

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    J. G. Cai; X. N. Wang

    2004-01-01

    @@ 1 What is Horizontal Directional Drilling? Horizontal Directional Drilling, accurately steered drilling, has become state -of- the -art drilling technique in the world. Specially- designed directionsteerable corebarrel and accurate direction measurement tool are available for the use together with wire line core drilling machine. That makes it feasible to extract cores and to measure the drill travel line &length while drilling in a curve.

  10. Reflexive regulation of CSR to promote sustainability

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Buhmann, Karin

    2011-01-01

    climate change and environmental sustainability, and social, economic and other human rights lend human rights as part of CSR a potential for meeting some environmental and climate concerns and handling adverse side-effects. The article analyses two EU initiatives: The EU Multi-Stakeholder (MSF) on CSR......This article discusses Corporate Social Responsibility (CSR) from the perspective of governmental regulation as a measure to promote public policy interests through public-private regulation intended to influence firms’ self-regulation. Presenting a ‘government case’ for CSR, the connection between...... and the EU CSR Alliance. Focusing on human rights based in international law, it analyses the patterns of negotiation in the MSF and the background for the launch of the CSR Alliance. It shows that analysing public-private regulation of CSR from the perspective of reflexive law theory assists us...

  11. Reflexive regulation of CSR to promote sustainablility

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Buhmann, Karin

    climate change and environmental sustainability, and social, economic and other human rights lend human rights as part of CSR a potential for meeting some environmental and climate concerns and handling adverse side-effects. The article analyses two EU initiatives: The EU Multi-Stakeholder (MSF) on CSR...... in promoting companies’ responsibility with regard to aspects of sustainable development, such as climate impact. Keywords: Sustainable development, sustainable companies, reflexive regulation, climate change, CSR, EU law, public-private regulation, companies' self-regulation......This article discusses Corporate Social Responsibility (CSR) from the perspective of governmental regulation as a measure to promote public policy interests through public-private regulation intended to influence firms’ self-regulation. Presenting a ‘government case’ for CSR, the connection between...

  12. Cultural reflexivity in health research and practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aronowitz, Robert; Deener, Andrew; Keene, Danya; Schnittker, Jason; Tach, Laura

    2015-07-01

    Recent public health movements have invoked cultural change to improve health and reduce health disparities. We argue that these cultural discourses have sometimes justified and maintained health inequalities when those with power and authority designated their own social practices as legitimate and healthy while labeling the practices of marginalized groups as illegitimate or unhealthy. This "misrecognition," which creates seemingly objective knowledge without understanding historical and social conditions, sustains unequal power dynamics and obscures the fact that what is deemed legitimate and healthy can be temporally, geographically, and socially relative. We use examples from research across multiple disciplines to illustrate the potential consequences of cultural misrecognition, highlight instances in which culture was invoked in ways that overcame misrecognition, and discuss how cultural reflexivity can be used to improve health research and practice.

  13. Is there a hierarchy of survival reflexes?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Macphail, Kieran

    2013-10-01

    A hierarchy of survival reflexes for prioritising assessment and treatment in patients with pain of insidious onset is hypothesised. The hierarchy asserts that some systems are more vital than others and that the central nervous system (CNS) prioritises systems based on their significance to survival. The hypothesis suggests that dysfunction in more important systems will cause compensation in less important systems. This paper presents studies examining these effects for each system, arguing that each section of the hierarchy may have effects on other systems within the hierarchy. This concept is untested empirically, highly speculative and substantial research is required to validate the suggested hierarchical prioritisation by the CNS. Nonetheless, the hierarchy does provide a theoretical framework to use to exclude contributing systems in patients with pain of insidious onset. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. The Disappearing Audience and Reflexive Visibility

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katerina Girginova

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Contrary to popular opinion and some academic writing that celebrates the renewed visibility of new media audiences, this essay argues that they are increasingly going into retreat. To understand how new media audiences “disappear” from view of one another, I borrow from Brighenti’s typology of visibility and develop the idea of “reflexive visibility.” The latter describes the ability to socially orient ourselves in a digital environment through the textual and contextual cues of others—an activity that is of utmost importance not only to researchers wishing to “see” various audiences but also for audiences writ large, wishing to know themselves.

  15. Conditioning the middle ear reflex at sensation levels below reflex threshold: air jet and electrical stimulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McDaniel-Bacon, L; Fulton, R T; Laskowski, R P

    1980-01-01

    An ABAB functional analysis, conditioning and generalization, design was used in 3 experiments (2 were formal studies and 1 was empirical in nature) to investigate the conditionability of the middle ear reflex. The conditioned stimuli were subreflex threshold pure tones of various frequencies and intensities. The unconditioned stimulus (UCS) was an auricular air jet to the contralateral ear in the first experiment and cutaneous electrical stimulation to the ipsolateral, probe ear in the last 2 experiments. Reflexes were monitored by an otoadmittance meter, storage oscilloscope, and strip chart recorder. In the first experiment (air jet UCS), no subjects met the conditioning criterion within the maximum presentation of 400 paired trials, despite pilot evidence which indicated conditioning was feasible. In the second experiment (electrical stimulation UCS), 2 subjects met conditioning criterion; however, only one subject reconditioned and demonstrated partial generalization to other conditioned stimuli. In the third experiment (electrical stimulation UCS), one of 3 subjects who had previously been unconditionable with the air jet UCS met conditioning and reconditioning criterion and demonstrated partial generalization. Results indicate that the middle ear reflex can be conditioned to be elicited by subreflex threshold pure tones, however, results are limited.

  16. Somatosensory imprinting in spinal reflex modules.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schouenborg, Jens

    2003-05-01

    Understanding how sensory information is used by motor systems for motor commands requires detailed knowledge about how the body shape and biomechanics are represented in the motor circuits. We have used the withdrawal reflex system as a model for studies of sensorimotor transformation. This system has a modular organisation in the adult. Each module performs a detailed and functionally adapted sensorimotor transformation related to the withdrawal efficacy of its output muscle(s). The weight distribution of the cutaneous input to a module is determined by the pattern of withdrawal efficacy of the muscle. Recently, we found that the somatotopic organisation and weight of the cutaneous input to the dorsal horn of the lower lumbar cord is related to this modular organisation. The dorsal horn in the lower lumbar cord thus appears to be organised in a column-like fashion, where each column performs a basic sensorimotor transformation related to the movement caused by a single muscle and the body shape. Since the withdrawal reflex system encodes error signals to the cerebellum through some of the spino-olivo cerebellar pathways, the modular concept is, in fact, a key to understanding sensory processing in higher order motor systems as well. Developmental studies indicate that each module is a self-organising circuitry that uses sensory feedback on muscle contractions to adjust its synaptic organisation. Furthermore, these studies suggest that the spontaneous movements during development, by providing structured sensory information related to movement pattern of single muscles and body shape, are instrumental in shaping the sensorimotor transformation in the spinal cord. These findings and their implications for the understanding of higher motor functions and their clinical aspects will be discussed.

  17. Intra-firm Horizontal Knowledge Transfer Management

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG Yaowu; WANG Yanhang

    2009-01-01

    Knowledge transfer is widely emphasized as a strategic issue for firm competition. A model for intra-firm horizontal knowledge transfer is proposed to model horizontal knowledge transfer to solve some demerits in current knowledge transfer researches. The concept model of intra-firm horizontal knowledge transfer was described and a framework was provided to define the main components of thetransfer process. Horizontal knowledge transfer is that knowledge is transferred from the source to the same hierarchical level recipients as the target. Horizontal knowledge transfer constitutes a strategic area of knowledge management research. However, little is known about the circumstances under which one particular mechanism is the most appropriate. To address these issues, some significant conclusions are drawn concerning knowledge transfer mechanisms in a real-world setting.

  18. Horizontal Canal Benign Positional Vertigo

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohtaram Najafi

    1998-03-01

    Full Text Available Benign paroxysmal positional vertigo (BPPV is a syndrome characterized by transient episodes of vertigo in association with rapid changes in head position in Dix-Halpike Maneuver. This kind of vertigo is thought to be caused by migration of otoconial debris into canals other than the posterior canal, such as the anterior or lateral canals. It is also theoretically possible for many aberrant patterns of BPPV to occur from an interaction of debris in several canals, location of debris within the canal, and central adaptation patterns to lesions. The symptoms of BPPV are much more consistent with free-moving densities (canaliths in the posterior SCC rather than fixed densities attached to the cupula. While the head is upright, the particles sit in the PSC at the most gravity-dependent position. The best method to induce and see vertigo and nystagmus in BPPV of the lateral semicircular canal is to rotate head 90°while patient is in the supine position, nystagmus would appear in the unaffected side weaker but longer than the affected side. canal paresis has been described in one third of the patients with BPPV. Adaptation which is one of the remarkable features of BPPV in PSC is rarely seen in LSC. Rotations of 270° or 360° around the yaw axis (the so-called barbecue maneuver toward the unaffected ear are popular methods for the treatment of geotropic HC-BPPV. These maneuvers consist of sequential head turning of 90° toward the healthy side while supine. With these maneuvers, the free-floating otoconial debris migrates in the ampullofugal direction, finally entering the utricle through the nonampullated end of the horizontal canal. This kind of vertigo recovers spontaneously more rapidly and suddenly.

  19. Avian reflex and electroencephalogram responses in different states of consciousness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sandercock, Dale A; Auckburally, Adam; Flaherty, Derek; Sandilands, Victoria; McKeegan, Dorothy E F

    2014-06-22

    Defining states of clinical consciousness in animals is important in veterinary anaesthesia and in studies of euthanasia and welfare assessment at slaughter. The aim of this study was to validate readily observable reflex responses in relation to different conscious states, as confirmed by EEG analysis, in two species of birds under laboratory conditions (35-week-old layer hens (n=12) and 11-week-old turkeys (n=10)). We evaluated clinical reflexes and characterised electroencephalograph (EEG) activity (as a measure of brain function) using spectral analyses in four different clinical states of consciousness: conscious (fully awake), semi-conscious (sedated), unconscious-optimal (general anaesthesia), unconscious-sub optimal (deep hypnotic state), as well as assessment immediately following euthanasia. Jaw or neck muscle tone was the most reliable reflex measure distinguishing between conscious and unconscious states. Pupillary reflex was consistently observed until respiratory arrest. Nictitating membrane reflex persisted for a short time (reflex is a conservative measure of death in poultry. Using spectral analyses of the EEG waveforms it was possible to readily distinguish between the different states of clinical consciousness. In all cases, when birds progressed from a conscious to unconscious state; total spectral power (PTOT) significantly increased, whereas median (F50) and spectral edge (F95) frequencies significantly decreased. This study demonstrates that EEG analysis can differentiate between clinical states (and loss of brain function at death) in birds and provides a unique integration of reflex responses and EEG activity. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Analysing responses to climate change through the lens of reflexivity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davidson, Debra

    2012-12-01

    Sociologists are increasingly directing attention toward social responses to climate change. As is true of any new field of inquiry, theoretical frameworks guiding the research to date have room for improvement. One advance could be achieved through closer engagement with Reflexivity Theory, particularly the work of Margaret Archer, who asks just how individuals come to give attention to certain problems, and formulate responses to them. Individuals vary significantly in regard to their understanding of and concern for anthropogenic climate change, and these standpoints in turn influence commitment to mitigation and adaptation. The emergent social interactions among all such agents in turn influence the morphogenetic trajectories through which social structures will evolve, but the role of 'meta-reflexives' is particularly crucial. Identifying pathways of individual climate change reflexivity can make a valuable contribution to our understanding of the potential for and nature of collective responses. In this paper, I explore climate change reflexivity, with particular attention to climate change meta-reflexives, through a qualitative analysis of personal interviews with residents of two small communities in Alberta, Canada. Applying Reflexivity Theory to this context articulates dimensions of reflexive processing not elaborated in current theoretical treatments, including future outlook and comfort with uncertainty, among others.

  1. Reflexes from the lungs and airways: historical perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Widdicombe, John

    2006-08-01

    Historical aspects of respiratory reflexes from the lungs and airways are reviewed, up until about 10 yr ago. For most of the 19th century, the possible reflex inputs into the "respiratory center," the position of which had been identified, were very speculative. There was little concept of reflex control of the pattern of breathing. Then, in 1868, Breuer published his paper on "The self-steering of respiration via the Nervus Vagus." For the first time this established the role of vagal inflation and deflation reflexes in determining the pattern of breathing. Head later extended Breuer's work, and Kratschmer laid a similar basis for reflexes from the nose and larynx. Then, 50-60 yr later, the development of the thermionic valve and the oscilloscope allowed recording action potentials from single nerve fibers in the vagus. In 1933, Adrian showed that slowly adapting pulmonary stretch receptors were responsible for the inflation reflex. Later, Knowlton and Larrabee described rapidly adapting receptors and showed that they mediated deep augmented breaths and the deflation reflex. Still later, it was established that rapidly adapting receptors were, at least in part, responsible for cough. In 1954, Paintal began his study of C-fiber receptors (J receptors), work greatly extended by the Coleridges. Since approximately 10 yr ago, when the field of this review stops, there has been an explosion of research on lung and airway receptors, many aspects of which are dealt with in other papers in this series.

  2. Perceptual rivalry: reflexes reveal the gradual nature of visual awareness.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marnix Naber

    Full Text Available Rivalry is a common tool to probe visual awareness: a constant physical stimulus evokes multiple, distinct perceptual interpretations ("percepts" that alternate over time. Percepts are typically described as mutually exclusive, suggesting that a discrete (all-or-none process underlies changes in visual awareness. Here we follow two strategies to address whether rivalry is an all-or-none process: first, we introduce two reflexes as objective measures of rivalry, pupil dilation and optokinetic nystagmus (OKN; second, we use a continuous input device (analog joystick to allow observers a gradual subjective report. We find that the "reflexes" reflect the percept rather than the physical stimulus. Both reflexes show a gradual dependence on the time relative to perceptual transitions. Similarly, observers' joystick deflections, which are highly correlated with the reflex measures, indicate gradual transitions. Physically simulating wave-like transitions between percepts suggest piece-meal rivalry (i.e., different regions of space belonging to distinct percepts as one possible explanation for the gradual transitions. Furthermore, the reflexes show that dominance durations depend on whether or not the percept is actively reported. In addition, reflexes respond to transitions with shorter latencies than the subjective report and show an abundance of short dominance durations. This failure to report fast changes in dominance may result from limited access of introspection to rivalry dynamics. In sum, reflexes reveal that rivalry is a gradual process, rivalry's dynamics is modulated by the required action (response mode, and that rapid transitions in perceptual dominance can slip away from awareness.

  3. Exercise-induced neuromuscular dysfunction under reflex conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaufman, T; Burke, J R; Davis, J M; Durstine, J L

    2001-06-01

    The purpose of this research was to describe further the effects of exercise-induced muscle damage on reflex sensitivity. The subjects were eight physically active, but untrained males, between the ages of 18 and 29 years. The effects of eccentric and concentric exercise on patellar tendon reflex responses were determined. The 8 week experiment consisted of two, 5 day, test protocols with a 6 week wash-out period between test protocols. Each 5 day test protocol consisted of the following six test sessions: (1) day 1--baseline, (2) day 2 baseline, (3) day 2--immediate post-exercise, and (4-6) days 3-5: 24, 48, and 72 h post-exercise. On day 2, the subjects made either 100 fatiguing concentric or eccentric isotonic contractions using the right leg at 75% of the corresponding repetition maximum values. During each test session, the electromyogram (EMG) and force-time characteristics of basic and conditioned patellar tendon reflex responses were measured. The reflex amplitudes of basic and conditioned patellar tendon reflex responses were decreased following fatiguing concentric exercise. There were no immediate effects of fatiguing eccentric exercise on the basic and conditioned patellar tendon reflex responses, but the EMG amplitudes of these reflex responses were reduced on the days following eccentric exercise. The amount of conditioned patellar tendon reflex facilitation was decreased following the concentric exercise protocol and at 48 h post-eccentric exercise. Our conditioned reflex data suggest that post-exercise changes to the physiological mechanisms that modulate the recruitment gain of the alpha-motoneuron pool may depend upon the type of fatiguing exercise.

  4. Interindividual differences in H reflex modulation during normal walking.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simonsen, Erik B; Dyhre-Poulsen, Poul; Alkjaer, Tine; Aagaard, Per; Magnusson, S Peter

    2002-01-01

    Based on previous studies, at least two different types of soleus Hoffmann (H) reflex modulation were likely to be found during normal human walking. Accordingly, the aim of the present study was to identify different patterns of modulation of the soleus H reflex and to examine whether or not subjects with different H reflex modulation would exhibit different walking mechanics and different EMG activity. Fifteen subjects walked across two force platforms at 4.5 km/h (+/-10%) while the movements were recorded on video. The soleus H reflex and EMG activity were recorded separately during treadmill walking at 4.5 km/h. Using a two-dimensional analysis joint angles, angular velocities, accelerations, linear velocities and accelerations were calculated, and net joint moments about the ankle, knee and hip joint were computed by inverse dynamics from the video and force plate data. Six subjects (group S) showed a suppressed H reflex during the swing phase, and 9 subjects (group LS) showed increasing reflex excitability during the swing phase. The plantar flexor dominated moment about the ankle joint was greater for group LS. In contrast, the extensor dominated moment about the knee joint was greater for the S group. The hip joint moment was similar for the groups. The EMG activity in the vastus lateralis and anterior tibial muscles was greater prior to heel strike for the S group. These data indicate that human walking exhibits at least two different motor patterns as evaluated by gating of afferent input to the spinal cord, by EMG activity and by walking mechanics. Increasing H reflex excitability during the swing phase appears to protect the subject against unexpected perturbations around heel strike by a facilitated stretch reflex in the triceps surae muscle. Alternatively, in subjects with a suppressed H reflex in the swing phase the knee joint extensors seem to form the primary protection around heel strike.

  5. Atypical Pupillary Light Reflex in Individuals with Autism

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-09-01

    AWARD NUMBER: W81XWH-10-1-0474 TITLE: Atypical Pupillary Light Reflex in Individuals with Autism ...30th/2014 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER W81XWH-10-1-0474 Atypical Pupillary  Light  Reflex in Individuals with  Autism 5b. GRANT NUMBER...20,  p< .00005 in all instances].  15. SUBJECT TERMS Pupillary light reflex, autism , functional MRI 16. SECURITY CLASSIFICATION OF: 17

  6. [Human physiology: images and practices of the reflex].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wübben, Yvonne

    2010-01-01

    The essay examines the function of visualizations and practices in the formation of the reflex concept from Thomas Willis to Marshall Hall. It focuses on the specific form of reflex knowledge that images and practices can contain. In addition, the essay argues that it is through visual representations and experimental practices that technical knowledge is transferred to the field of human reflex physiology. When using technical metaphors in human physiology authors often seem to feel obliged to draw distinctions between humans, machines and animals. On closer scrutiny, these distinctions sometimes fail to establish firm borders between the human and the technical.

  7. Development of sensory motor reflexes in 2 G exposed rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wubbels, Réne; Bouët, Valentine; de Jong, Herman; Gramsbergen, Albert

    2004-07-01

    During gestation and early postnatal development, the animal's size and weight rapidly increase. Within that period, gravity affects sensory and motor development. We studied age-dependent modifications of several types of motor reflexes in 5 groups of rats conceived, born and reared in hypergravity (HG; 2 g). These rats were transferred to normal gravity (NG; 1 g) at various postnatal days, and their behavioral reflexes were compared with a control group which was constantly kept under NG. HG induced a retarded development of vestibular dependent reflexes. Other types of motor behavior were not delayed.

  8. Primitive Reflexes and Attention-Deficit/Hyperactivity Disorder: Developmental Origins of Classroom Dysfunction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taylor, Myra; Houghton, Stephen; Chapman, Elaine

    2004-01-01

    The present research studied the symptomatologic overlap of AD/HD behaviours and retention of four primitive reflexes (Moro, Tonic Labyrinthine Reflex [TLR], Asymmetrical Tonic Neck Reflex [ATNR], Symmetrical Tonic Neck Reflex [STNR]) in 109 boys aged 7-10 years. Of these, 54 were diagnosed with AD/HD, 34 manifested sub-syndromal coordination,…

  9. Optimizing of Culture Conditionin Horizontal Rotating Bioreactor

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2005-01-01

    1 IntroductionBioreactor is the most important equipment in tissue engineering. It can mimic the micro-environment of cell growth in vitro. At present, horizontal rotating bioreactor is the most advanced equipment for cell culture in the world. 2 Rotating bioreactors2.1 Working principleThere are two kinds of horizontal rotating bioreactor: HARV(high aspect ratio vessel) and RCCS (rotary cell culture system). It is drived by step motor with horizontal rotation, the culture medium and cell is filled between ...

  10. Horizontal gene transfer and bacterial diversity

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Chitra Dutta; Archana Pan

    2002-02-01

    Bacterial genomes are extremely dynamic and mosaic in nature. A substantial amount of genetic information is inserted into or deleted from such genomes through the process of horizontal transfer. Through the introduction of novel physiological traits from distantly related organisms, horizontal gene transfer often causes drastic changes in the ecological and pathogenic character of bacterial species and thereby promotes microbial diversification and speciation. This review discusses how the recent influx of complete chromosomal sequences of various microorganisms has allowed for a quantitative assessment of the scope, rate and impact of horizontally transmitted information on microbial evolution.

  11. EXPERIMENTAL STUDY OF ELECTROACUPUNCTURE IMPROVING THE OBSTRUCTION OF VESTIBULAR MICROCIRCULATION IN VERTEBROBASILAR INSUFFICIENCY AND THE EFFECT ON VESTIBULO-OCULAR REFLEX%电针改善VBI所致内耳微循环障碍及对VOR的影响

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    郑重; 宋开源; 胡晓梅; 余芳; 邓晓筑; 张泉; 温国伟; 曹雪明

    2006-01-01

    目的:对照电针和西比灵(盐酸氟桂利嗪)的效应,探讨电针改善椎-基底动脉供血不足(VBI)所致内耳微循环障碍的机理及电针对前庭-眼反射(VOR)的影响.方法:组织硬化剂-775注射液注射致家兔左侧颈椎横突软组织建立椎动脉型颈椎病(VCS)模型,采用直线加速度(LA)和水平旋转(HR)诱发眼震电图(ENG)、经颅多谱勒(TCD)、激光多谱勒血流计(LDF)和血液流变学,检测VBI家兔NEG频率、基底动脉(BA)血流速度、内耳血流量(IEBF)、血液粘度和细胞流变性变化.结果:模型组ENG频率、BA血流速度和IEBF显著降低,全血中、低切变率粘度和红细胞聚集指数(EDI)显著增高.西比灵可显著降低全血粘度和EDI,加快BA收缩期血流速度(Vs),但对舒张期血流速度(Vd)和平均血流速度(Vm)无明显作用.电针不能降低血液粘度和EDI无明显作用,但改善IEBF和LA诱发的ENG作用较西比灵显著,并有增快Vs、Vd和Vm的趋势,电针和西比灵对HR诱发的ENG均无改善作用.结论:VBI所致内耳微循环障碍可引起前庭和水平半规管功能障碍,电针可能通过神经-体液调节改善VBI,并可能主要通过增强内耳微循环局部调节改善内耳血供,恢复前庭囊斑对LA的敏感性.电针效应优于西比灵.VBI模型前庭器官内血流分配及前庭信号转导可能存在复杂的机制,有待深入研究.

  12. Cortical control of vertical and horizontal saccades in progressive supranuclear palsy: An exploratory fMRI study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lemos, J; Pereira, D; Almendra, L; Rebelo, D; Patrício, M; Castelhano, J; Cunha, G; Januário, C; Cunha, L; Freire, A; Castelo-Branco, M

    2017-02-15

    Progressive supranuclear palsy (PSP) is a neurodegenerative disorder showing predominant brainstem involvement, characterized by marked slowing of rapid eye movements (saccades), particularly along the vertical plane. While the contribution of the brainstem damage for the saccadic disturbance in PSP has been extensively studied, much less is known about its cortical and subcortical pathomechanisms. We measured reflexive (prosaccades) and voluntary (antisaccades) saccades in the vertical and horizontal plane in PSP patients (n=8) and controls (n=10) in an eye tracking study, followed by the measurement of blood oxygenation-level dependent (BOLD) activation (PSP, n=6; controls, n=10) during similar saccade paradigms. Behaviorally, PSP patients evidenced slower and lower amplitude prosaccades (horizontal and vertical) and lower amplitude antisaccades (vertical) than controls. Functionally, patients showed decreased frontostriatal BOLD activation during prosaccades (horizontal and vertical) and antisaccades (vertical), relative to controls. Additionally, PSP patients showed less default mode network (DMN) deactivation than controls for all types of saccades. Within groups, controls showed no BOLD differences between horizontal and vertical prosaccades while PSP patients demonstrated greater DMN deactivation during vertical prosaccades. Both groups evidenced greater DMN deactivation during vertical antisaccades when compared to their horizontal counterpart and patients further showed relative frontostriatal BOLD hypoactivity during vertical antisaccades. We found fMRI evidence of frontostriatal hypoactivity in PSP patients relative to controls, especially during vertical saccades. These new findings highlight the impact of cortical impairment in saccadic disturbance of PSP. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. Quantified reflex strategy using an iPod as a wireless accelerometer application.

    Science.gov (United States)

    LeMoyne, Robert; Mastroianni, Timothy; Grundfest, Warren

    2012-01-01

    A primary aspect of a neurological evaluation is the deep tendon reflex, frequently observed through the patellar tendon reflex. The reflex response provides preliminary insight as to the status of the nervous system. A quantified reflex strategy has been developed, tested, and evaluated though the use of an iPod as a wireless accelerometer application integrated with a potential energy device to evoke the patellar tendon reflex. The iPod functions as a wireless accelerometer equipped with robust software, data storage, and the capacity to transmit the recorded accelerometer waveform of the reflex response wirelessly through email for post-processing. The primary feature of the reflex response acceleration waveform is the maximum acceleration achieved subsequent to evoking the patellar tendon reflex. The quantified reflex strategy using an iPod as a wireless accelerometer application yields accurate and consistent quantification of the reflex response.

  14. Sensory and circuit mechanisms mediating lower urinary tract reflexes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Danziger, Zachary C; Grill, Warren M

    2016-10-01

    Neural control of continence and micturition is distributed over a network of interconnected reflexes. These reflexes integrate sensory information from the bladder and urethra and are modulated by descending influences to produce different physiological outcomes based on the information arriving from peripheral afferents. Therefore, the mode of activation of primary afferents is essential in understanding the action of spinal reflex pathways in the lower urinary tract. We present an overview of sensory mechanisms in the bladder and urethra focusing on their spinal integration, identify the cardinal spinal reflexes responsible for continence and micturition, and describe how their functional role is controlled via peripheral afferent activity. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. Trigemino-cervical reflex in patients with headache.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Milanov, I; Bogdanova, D

    2003-02-01

    Neurophysiological studies have shown abnormal activity of some brainstem nuclei in headache patients. The trigemino-cervical reflex is an anti-nociceptive reflex that gives an opportunity for evaluation of the brainstem interneurone activity. It has not been previously examined in headache patients. We studied 15 patients with predominantly unilateral chronic tension-type headache, 15 patients with migraine without aura and 32 healthy subjects. The trigemino-cervical reflex was recorded bilaterally from the resting sternocleidomastoid muscle using surface electromyographic recordings. In all headache patients the trigemino-cervical reflex on the painful side was with shortened latency compared with the non-painful side and with healthy persons. The results suggest decreased activity of the brainstem inhibitory interneurones. We suggest that although the pathophysiological mechanisms of tension-type headache and migraine are different, they share common mechanisms of abnormal pain control.

  16. Interindividual differences in H reflex modulation during normal walking

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Simonsen, Erik B; Dyhre-Poulsen, Poul; Alkjaer, T

    2002-01-01

    Based on previous studies, at least two different types of soleus Hoffmann (H) reflex modulation were likely to be found during normal human walking. Accordingly, the aim of the present study was to identify different patterns of modulation of the soleus H reflex and to examine whether...... or not subjects with different H reflex modulation would exhibit different walking mechanics and different EMG activity. Fifteen subjects walked across two force platforms at 4.5 km/h (+/-10%) while the movements were recorded on video. The soleus H reflex and EMG activity were recorded separately during...... treadmill walking at 4.5 km/h. Using a two-dimensional analysis joint angles, angular velocities, accelerations, linear velocities and accelerations were calculated, and net joint moments about the ankle, knee and hip joint were computed by inverse dynamics from the video and force plate data. Six subjects...

  17. On the gastrocecal inhibitory reflex in the rat.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lee,Zai-Liu

    1981-11-01

    Full Text Available In rats anesthetized with urethane, the effects of distention of the stomach upon cecal motility and neural mechanisms which generate this effect were studied. Cecal motility was inhibited which generate this effect were studied. Cecal motility was inhibited when the pars glandularis of the stomach was distended by pressure ranging from 25 to 30 cm H2O. This inhibitory reflex was not affected by bilateral cervical vagotomy, but completely abolished following bilateral severance of the greater splanchnic nerves or after intravenous administration of guanethidine. After transection of the spinal cord at the level of the 5th thoracic segment the inhibitory reflex remained intact, but was abolished following pithing of the 6th thoracic segment and below. It may be concluded that the afferent and efferent path of the gastrocecal inhibitory reflex mainly pass through the greater splanchnic nerves and the reflex center is located in thoracic segments caudal to the 6th thoracic segment.

  18. Reflexive Pronouns in Dagbani Samuel Alhassan Issah1 Abstract ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ... this paper. 1 Samuel Alhassan Issah teaches at the University of Education, Winneba. ..... This seems to suggest that the reflexive pronouns of Mandarian Chinese ... pronouns of Russian which are also argued to be non-local as argued by.

  19. Neuroanatomical basis of Sandifer's syndrome: a new vagal reflex?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cerimagic, Denis; Ivkic, Goran; Bilic, Ervina

    2008-01-01

    Sandifer's syndrome is a gastrointestinal disorder with neurological features. It is characterized by reflex torticollis following deglutition in patients with gastroesophageal reflux and/or hiatal hernia. The authors believe that neurological manifestations of the syndrome are the consequence of vagal reflex with the reflex center in nucleus tractus solitarii (NTS). Three models for the neuroanatomical basis of the hypothetic reflex arc are presented. In the first one the hypothetic reflex arc is based on the classic hypothesis of two components nervus accessorius (n.XI) - radix cranialis (RC) and radix spinalis (RS) The nervous impulses are transmitted by nervus vagus (n.X) general visceral afferent (GVA) fibers to NTS situated in medulla oblongata, then by interneuronal connections on nucleus ambiguus (NA) and nucleus dorsalis nervi vagi (NDX). Special visceral efferent fibers (SVE) impulses from NA are in part transferred to n.XI ramus externus (RE) (carrying the majority of general somatic efferent (GSE) fibers) via hypothetic anastomoses in the region of foramen jugulare. This leads to contraction of trapezius and sternocleidomastoideus muscles, and the occurrence of intermittent torticollis. In the second suggested neuroanatomical model the hypothetic reflex arc is organized in the absence of n.XI RC, the efferent part of the reflex arc continues as NA, which is motor nucleus of nervus glossopharyngeus (n.IX) and n.X in this case while distal roots of n.XI that appear at the level of the olivary nucleus lower edge represent n.X roots. In the third presented model the hypothetic reflex arc includes no jugular transfer and could be realized via interneuronal connections directly from NTS to the spinal motoneurons within nucleus radicis spinalis nervi accessorii (NRS n.XI) or from NA to NRS n.XI. The afferent segment of the postulated reflex arc in all three models is mediated via n.X. We conclude that Sandifer's syndrome is a clinical manifestation of another

  20. Estrogen attenuates the exercise pressor reflex in female cats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmitt, Petra M; Kaufman, M P

    2003-10-01

    In humans, the pressor and muscle sympathetic nerve responses to static exercise are less in women than in men. The difference has been attributed to the effect of estrogen on the exercise pressor reflex. Estrogen receptors are abundant in areas of the dorsal horn receiving input from group III and IV muscle afferents, which comprise the sensory limb of the exercise pressor reflex arc. These findings prompted us to investigate the effect of estrogen on the spinal pathway of the exercise pressor reflex arc. Previously, we found that the threshold concentration of 17beta-estradiol needed to attenuate the exercise pressor reflex in male decerebrate cats was 10 microg/ml (Schmitt PM and Kaufman MP. J Appl Physiol 94: 1431-1436, 2003). The threshold concentration for female cats, however, is not known. Consequently, we applied 17beta-estradiol to a well covering the L6-S1 spinal cord in decerebrate female cats. The exercise pressor reflex was evoked by electrical stimulation of the L7 or S1 ventral root, a maneuver that caused the hindlimb muscles to contract statically. We found that the pressor response to contraction averaged 38 +/- 7 mmHg before the application of 17beta-estradiol (0.01 microg/ml) to the spinal cord, whereas it averaged only 23 +/- 4 mmHg 30 min after application (P effect on the exercise pressor reflex (n = 5). We conclude that the concentration of 17beta-estradiol required to attenuate the exercise pressor reflex is 1,000 times more dilute in female cats than that needed to attenuate this reflex in male cats.

  1. Impaired control of the oculomotor reflexes in Parkinson's disease

    OpenAIRE

    van Koningsbruggen, Martijn G.; Pender, Tom; Machado, Liana; Rafal, Robert D.

    2009-01-01

    To investigate the role of the basal ganglia in integrating voluntary and reflexive behaviour, the current study examined the ability of patients with Parkinson's disease to voluntarily control oculomotor reflexes. We measured the size of the fixation offset effect (the reduction in saccadic reaction time when a fixation point is removed) during a block of pro- and a block of anti-saccades. Healthy controls showed the expected reduction of the FOE during the anti-saccades, which results from ...

  2. An electronic device to record consensual reflex in human pupil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pinheiro, H M; Costa, R M; Camilo, E N R; Gang, Hua

    2015-01-01

    Examination of the pupil offers an objective evaluation of visual function as well as the vegetative pathways to the eye. This work proposes the development of an effective method and a portable device to test the consensual pupillary reflex. The first results demonstrate the success of a new device construction and methodology to record the consensual reflex with different stimulus, in a situation of complete blockage of light.

  3. Mechanical Characteristics of Reflex Durign Upright Posture in Paralyzed Subjects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Yongchul; Youm, Youngil; Lee, Bumsuk; Kim, Youngho; Choi, Hyeonki

    The characteristics of flexor reflexes have been investigated in the previous studies with human subjects who were seated or supine position. However, researchers did not describe how the spinal circuits are used in different hip angles for paralyzed subjects, such as the standing position with walker or cane. In upright posture the compatibility between a flexor reflex of leg and body balance is a special problem for lower limb injured subjects. Therefore, the purpose of this study was to investigate the effects of hip angle change on the flexor reflex evoked in standing paralyzed subjects supported by walker. In this study, six spinal cord injured and four stroke subjects were recruited through the inpatient physical therapy clinics of Korea national rehabilitation hospital. A single axis electronic goniometer was mounted on the lateral side of the hip joint of the impaired limb to record movements in the sagittal plane at this joint. The electronic goniometer was connected to a data acquisition system, through amplifiers to a computer. Since subject' posture influenced characteristics of the flexion reflex response, the subjects were supported in an upright posture by the help of parallelogram walder. Two series of tests were performed on each leg. The first series of the tests investigated the influence of hip angle during stationary standing posture on flexion reflex response. The hip angle was adjusted by the foot plate. The second examined the effect of the voluntary action of subject on swing motion during the gait. The electrically induced flexion reflex simultaneously produced the flexion of the hip, knee and dorsiflexion of the ankle enabling the swing phase of walking. Form the experimental results we observed that the reflex response of hip joint was largerwith the hip in the extended position than in the flexed position during standing posture. Under voluntary movement on flexion reflex during gaint, the peak hip angle induced by stimulation was

  4. An experimental psychophysiological approach to human bradycardiac reflexes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Furedy, J J

    1985-01-01

    Bradycardic reflexes in man are both of scientific and clinical interest. Using the methods of experimental psychophysiology, control over relevant independent variables permits the study of fine-grained temporal physiologic response topographies, and of psychological factors that may modify the reflex. In addition, information can also be sought through interdisciplinary collaborations with experimental physiologists in order to shed light on the mechanism of the reflexes. These general features of the approach are illustrated by presenting data on two bradycardic reflex preparations: the laboratory dive analog, and the 90-degree negative tilt. The dive-analog studies have shown that a) the dive-reflex proper is a late-occurring bradycardia accompanied by a late-occurring vasoconstriction; and b) for the elicitation of this reflex, both breath-holding and face immersion are necessary. In addition, the physiologic manipulation of temperature affects the reflex in an inverse way over the range of 10 degrees to 40 degrees C, while the sense of control (a psychological variable) attenuates the reflex. The negative-tilt preparation produces a bradycardic response that is ideal as a Pavlovian unconditional response. Some Pavlovian conditioning arrangements, especially an "imaginational" form, do produce significant conditional bradycardic responding, and this has both potential clinical (e.g., biofeedback-related) and theoretical (e.g., S-R vs. S-S accounts of Pavlovian conditioning) applications. The paper ends with a comment on the cognitive paradigm shift in psychology. Although this shift is of importance, it is suggested that it is also important to "remember the response."

  5. Inhibitory reflex responses of masseter muscle in anterior open bite

    OpenAIRE

    Priyada, SANTILAKANAWONG; Hiroaki, KIRIMOTO; Yoichiro, SEKI; Kunimichi, SOMA; Orthodontic Science, Department of Orofacial Development and Function, Division of Oral Health Sciences, Graduate School, Tokyo Medical and Dental University

    2003-01-01

    Animal studies indicated that loss of occlusal contact between maxillary and mandibular teeth causes altered functional activity of periodontal mechanoreceptors. The alteration of periodontal mechanoreceptors may influence jawmuscle reflex and masticatory muscle activity. In this study, the inhibitory reflex response of masseter muscle in subjects with anterior open bite was investigated. The study population included 10 subjects with anterior open bite with no muscle pain or craniomandibular...

  6. Stretch reflex instability compared in three different human muscles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Durbaba, R; Taylor, A; Manu, C A; Buonajuti, M

    2005-06-01

    The possibility of causing instability in the stretch reflex has been examined in three different human muscles: biceps, first dorsal interosseous (FDI) of the hand and digastric. Tremor recorded as fluctuation of isometric force was compared with that occurring during contraction against a spring load. The spring compliance was selected to make the natural frequency of the part in each case appropriate for oscillations in the short latency stretch reflex. A computer model of the whole system was used to predict the frequency at which oscillations should be expected and to estimate the reflex gain required in each case to cause sustained oscillations. Estimates were computed of the autospectra of the force records and of the rectified surface EMG signals and of the coherence functions. Normal subjects showed no evidence of a distinct spectral peak during isometric recording from any of the three muscles. However, in anisometric conditions regular oscillations in force occurred in biceps, but not in FDI or digastric. The oscillations in biceps at 8-9 Hz were accompanied by similar oscillations in the EMG which were highly coherent with the force signal. The results are consistent with the presence of a strong segmental stretch reflex effect in biceps and weak or absent reflex in FDI. Digastric is known to contain no muscle spindles and therefore to lack a stretch reflex. In two subjects who volunteered that they had more tremor than normal, but had no known neurological abnormality, there was a distinct peak in the force spectrum at 8-9 Hz in biceps and FDI in isometric conditions with coherent EMG activity. The peak increased in size in anisometric conditions in biceps but not in FDI. This component appears to be of central rather than of reflex origin. No equivalent component was found in digastric records. The results are discussed in relation to the possible role of the short latency stretch reflex in the genesis of physiological tremor in different muscles.

  7. Nasocardiac reflex during aspiration and injection through a nasogastric tube: An infrequent occurrence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haldar, Rudrashish; Kaur, Jasleen; Bajwa, Sukhminder Jit Singh

    2015-04-01

    Nasocardiac reflex is a relatively less discussed variant of trigeminovagal reflex where the afferent arc of the reflex is represented by any of the branches of the trigeminal nerves, and the efferent arc is via the vagus nerve. Elicitation of this reflex is commonly seen during surgical manipulation and is manifested as bradycardia or even asystole. We report a case where nasocardiac reflex was unusually observed in a patient when aspiration and injection were done through a nasogastric tube.

  8. Horizontal cooperation in transport and logistics

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Cruijssen, F.C.A.M.

    2006-01-01

    This thesis deals with horizontal cooperation in transport and logistics. It contains a comprehensive discussion of the available academic literature on this topic, many practical examples, and an empirical investigation of opportunities and impediments. Furthermore, three enabling concepts for

  9. Modulation of trigeminal reflex excitability in migraine: effects of attention and habituation on the blink reflex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Tommaso, Marina; Murasecco, Donatella; Libro, Giuseppe; Guido, Marco; Sciruicchio, Vittorio; Specchio, Luigi Maria; Gallai, Virgilio; Puca, Francomichele

    2002-06-01

    The modulation of trigeminal reflex excitability in migraine patients was evaluated during the asymptomatic phase by studying the effects of attention, habituation and preconditioning stimulus on the R2 and R3 components of the blink reflex (BR). Fifty patients suffering from migraine without aura, 20 affected by migraine with aura and 35 sex- and age-matched controls were selected. In subgroups of migraine with-aura and without-aura patients, and normal controls, the blink reflex was elicited during different cognitive situations: (a) spontaneous mental activity; (b) stimulus anticipation; (c) recognition of target numbers. In the remaining subjects, R2 and R3 habituation was evaluated by repetitive stimulation at 1, 5, 10, 15, 20, 25 and 30 s intervals. The R2 and R3 recovery curves were also computed. A reduced R3 threshold with a normal pain threshold was found in migraine with-aura and without-aura patients; the R3 component was not significantly correlated with the pain thresholds in patients and controls. The R2 and R3 components were less influenced by the warning of the stimulus in migraine without-aura and migraine with-aura patients, in comparison with the control group. A slight increase of both R2 and R3 recovery after preconditioning stimulus was also observed in migraine patients, probably caused by a phenomenon of trigeminal hyperexcitability persisting after the last attack. The abnormal BR modulation by alerting expresses in migraine a dysfunction of adaptation capacity to environmental conditions, probably predisposing to migraine.

  10. Vestibulocollic reflexes in the absence of head postural control.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Forbes, Patrick A; Siegmund, Gunter P; Happee, Riender; Schouten, Alfred C; Blouin, Jean-Sébastien

    2014-10-01

    Percutaneous electrical vestibular stimulation evokes reflexive responses in appendicular muscles that are suppressed during tasks in which the muscles are not contributing to balance control. In neck muscles, which stabilize the head on the torso and in space, it is unclear whether similar postural task dependence shapes vestibular reflexes. We investigated whether vestibulocollic reflexes are modulated during tasks in which vestibular information is not directly relevant to maintaining the head balanced on the torso. We hypothesized that vestibulocollic reflexes would be 1) evoked when neck muscles are not involved in balancing the head on the torso and 2) invariant across synergistic neck muscle contraction tasks. Muscle activity was recorded bilaterally in sternocleidomastoid and splenius capitis muscles during head-free and head-fixed conditions while subjects were exposed to stochastic electrical vestibular stimulation (± 5 mA, 0-75 Hz). Significant vestibular reflex responses (P reflex coupling, which we suggest functions through its closed-loop influence on head posture to ensure cervical spine stabilization. Copyright © 2014 the American Physiological Society.

  11. Reflex anuria affecting both kidneys following hysterectomy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gholyaf Mahmoud

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available In situations when there is unilateral ureteral obstruction, the contralateral kidney retains its normal function. In rare instances however, it has been reported that unilateral ureteral obstruction can lead to reflex anuria (RA and acute renal failure (ARF. Even more unusually, RA with ARF can occur without organic obstruction due to ureteric manipulation during pelvic surgery. We report a 78- year-old woman, who underwent hysterectomy because of endometrial carcinoma. She developed ARF evidenced by anuria of 120-hours duration, and gradual rise of serum creatinine levels to 11.8 mg/dL on the fifth day after hysterectomy. Ultrasound study of the urinary tract revealed bilateral moderate hydronephrosis. Detailed evaluation did not reveal any organic obstruc-tion. She was managed with hemodialysis, control of hypertension and correction of fluid and elec-trolyte imbalances. By the sixth day, diuresis was established, and the blood urea and serum crea-tinine levels decreased to normal by the sixteenth day. The patient was finally discharged on the eighteenth day. Our case suggests that urologists and nephrologists should consider RA as one of the causes of anuria and ARF.

  12. Minimum Cost Homomorphisms to Reflexive Digraphs

    CERN Document Server

    Gupta, Arvind; Karimi, Mehdi; Rafiey, Arash

    2007-01-01

    For digraphs $G$ and $H$, a homomorphism of $G$ to $H$ is a mapping $f:\\ V(G)\\dom V(H)$ such that $uv\\in A(G)$ implies $f(u)f(v)\\in A(H)$. If moreover each vertex $u \\in V(G)$ is associated with costs $c_i(u), i \\in V(H)$, then the cost of a homomorphism $f$ is $\\sum_{u\\in V(G)}c_{f(u)}(u)$. For each fixed digraph $H$, the {\\em minimum cost homomorphism problem} for $H$, denoted MinHOM($H$), is the following problem. Given an input digraph $G$, together with costs $c_i(u)$, $u\\in V(G)$, $i\\in V(H)$, and an integer $k$, decide if $G$ admits a homomorphism to $H$ of cost not exceeding $k$. We focus on the minimum cost homomorphism problem for {\\em reflexive} digraphs $H$ (every vertex of $H$ has a loop). It is known that the problem MinHOM($H$) is polynomial time solvable if the digraph $H$ has a {\\em Min-Max ordering}, i.e., if its vertices can be linearly ordered by $<$ so that $i

  13. [Dissociated near reflex and accommodative convergence excess].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gräf, M; Becker, R; Kloss, S

    2004-10-01

    We report on an 8-year-old boy whose near reflex could be elicited exclusively when the left eye was fixing (LF) but not when the right eye was fixing (RF). With RE +1.25/-1.25/169 degrees and LE +1.0/-0.75/24 degrees, the visual acuity was 1.0 OU at 5 m and RE 0.5, LE 1.0 at 0.3 m improving to 1.0 OU by a near addition of 3.0 D. Stereopsis was 100 degrees (Titmus test). The prism and cover test revealed an esophoria of 4 degrees at 5 m. At 3 m there was an esophoria of 6 degrees (RF) and an esotropia of 28 degrees (LF), compensating to an esophoria of 3 degrees (RF/LF) with a near addition of 3.0 D. Accommodation and the pupillary near reaction (OU) were hardly elicitable during RF. During LF, retinoscopy revealed an accommodation of 8 D (OU) and the pupils constricted normally. Correction by bifocal glasses yielded orthotropia with random dot stereopsis at near.

  14. Evaluation of extremely small horizontal emittance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. Okugi

    1999-02-01

    Full Text Available The KEK Accelerator Test Facility (KEK-ATF was constructed to develop technologies for producing a low-emittance beam which will be required by future linear colliders. The KEK-ATF consists of an injector linac, a damping ring, and a beam extraction line. The basic optical structure of the damping ring is a FOBO lattice, which reduces the horizontal dispersion at the center of the bending magnets and, as a consequence, can produce an extremely small emittance beam. To verify the performance of such a unique, low-emittance lattice, it is crucial to measure the horizontal emittance. The horizontal emittance was measured using wire scanners in the beam extraction line. Since the horizontal beam position was not stable, we established a method to correct the measured beam size for position fluctuation (“jitter” and we succeeded in the observation of the so far smallest horizontal emittance in any accelerator. The measured horizontal emittance was 1.37±0.03nm at a beam energy of 1.285 GeV and a bunch population of \\(3–5\\×10^{9}, in agreement with the design value of 1.27–1.34 nm at the beam energy and the bunch population.

  15. Vibration-induced finger flexion reflex and inhibitory effect of acupuncture on this reflex in cervical spinal cord injury patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takakura, N; Iijima, S; Kanamaru, A; Shibuya, M; Homma, I; Ohashi, M

    1996-12-01

    The vibration-induced finger flexion reflex (VFR) and the inhibitory effect of acupuncture on this reflex were studied in five cervical spinal cord injury patients (C-SCIs). VFR, which is a tonic finger flexion reflex induced by vibratory stimulation on the finger tip, was induced before and after acupuncture was carried out on the same hand. A stainless steel needle was inserted to the Hoku point. As in healthy subjects, VFR was performed and it was significantly inhibited by acupuncture in the C-SCIs; mean maximum VFR was 204.2 +/- S.E. 68.6 g before and 119.8 +/- S.E. 42.2 g after acupuncture. The present results suggest that at least part of the reflex center for VFR is located in the spinal cord and that part of VFR inhibition by acupuncture may be mediated via the spinal cord.

  16. A reflective account on becoming reflexive: the 7 Cs of caring conversations as a framework for reflexive questioning

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Edel Roddy

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Context: Some uncertainty surrounds both the definition and the application of reflexivity in participatory research and practice development. There is scope for further exploration of what reflexivity might look like in practice, and how the researcher/practice developer and participants might be involved. This paper does this in the context of a study that is using appreciative inquiry to explore the experience of inspection in care homes. Aims: I will explore my personal journey into the use of a relational constructionist approach to reflexivity and suggest that the 7 Cs of caring conversations provide a useful framework to inform reflexive practice. The 7 Cs will be used as a framework for the telling of this story. Implications for practice: Relational reflexivity has the potential to create the space for all those involved in research/practice development initiatives to voice their thoughts and feelings about the initiative and their involvement in it The 7 Cs of caring conversations can provide a framework for developing questions that may serve as a starting point for cultivating reflexive practice

  17. WEAKLY ALGEBRAIC REFLEXIVITY AND STRONGLY ALGEBRAIC REFLEXIVITY%弱代数性自反与强代数性自反

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    陶常利; 鲁世杰; 陈培鑫

    2002-01-01

    Algebraic reflexivity introduced by Hadwin is related to linear interpolation. In this paper, the concepts of weakly algebraic reflexivity and strongly algebraic reflexivity which are also related to linear interpolation are introduced. Some properties of them are obtained and some relations between them revealed.

  18. Inputs from regularly and irregularly discharging vestibular nerve afferents to secondary neurons in squirrel monkey vestibular nuclei. III. Correlation with vestibulospinal and vestibuloocular output pathways

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boyle, R.; Goldberg, J. M.; Highstein, S. M.

    1992-01-01

    1. A previous study measured the relative contributions made by regularly and irregularly discharging afferents to the monosynaptic vestibular nerve (Vi) input of individual secondary neurons located in and around the superior vestibular nucleus of barbiturate-anesthetized squirrel monkeys. Here, the analysis is extended to more caudal regions of the vestibular nuclei, which are a major source of both vestibuloocular and vestibulospinal pathways. As in the previous study, antidromic stimulation techniques are used to classify secondary neurons as oculomotor or spinal projecting. In addition, spinal-projecting neurons are distinguished by their descending pathways, their termination levels in the spinal cord, and their collateral projections to the IIIrd nucleus. 2. Monosynaptic excitatory postsynaptic potentials (EPSPs) were recorded intracellularly from secondary neurons as shocks of increasing strength were applied to Vi. Shocks were normalized in terms of the threshold (T) required to evoke field potentials in the vestibular nuclei. As shown previously, the relative contribution of irregular afferents to the total monosynaptic Vi input of each secondary neuron can be expressed as a %I index, the ratio (x100) of the relative sizes of the EPSPs evoked by shocks of 4 x T and 16 x T. 3. Antidromic stimulation was used to type secondary neurons as 1) medial vestibulospinal tract (MVST) cells projecting to spinal segments C1 or C6; 2) lateral vestibulospinal tract (LVST) cells projecting to C1, C6; or L1; 3) vestibulooculo-collic (VOC) cells projecting both to the IIIrd nucleus and by way of the MVST to C1 or C6; and 4) vestibuloocular (VOR) neurons projecting to the IIIrd nucleus but not to the spinal cord. Most of the neurons were located in the lateral vestibular nucleus (LV), including its dorsal (dLV) and ventral (vLV) divisions, and adjacent parts of the medial (MV) and descending nuclei (DV). Cells receiving quite different proportions of their direct inputs

  19. A method of reflexive balancing in a pragmatic, interdisciplinary and reflexive bioethics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ives, Jonathan

    2014-07-01

    In recent years there has been a wealth of literature arguing the need for empirical and interdisciplinary approaches to bioethics, based on the premise that an empirically informed ethical analysis is more grounded, contextually sensitive and therefore more relevant to clinical practice than an 'abstract' philosophical analysis. Bioethics has (arguably) always been an interdisciplinary field, and the rise of 'empirical' (bio)ethics need not be seen as an attempt to give a new name to the longstanding practice of interdisciplinary collaboration, but can perhaps best be understood as a substantive attempt to engage with the nature of that interdisciplinarity and to articulate the relationship between the many different disciplines (some of them empirical) that contribute to the field. It can also be described as an endeavour to explain how different disciplinary approaches can be integrated to effectively answer normative questions in bioethics, and fundamental to that endeavour is the need to think about how a robust methodology can be articulated that successfully marries apparently divergent epistemological and metaethical perspectives with method. This paper proposes 'Reflexive Bioethics' (RB) as a methodology for interdisciplinary and empirical bioethics, which utilizes a method of 'Reflexive Balancing' (RBL). RBL has been developed in response to criticisms of various forms of reflective equilibrium, and is built upon a pragmatic characterization of Bioethics and a 'quasi-moral foundationalism', which allows RBL to avoid some of the difficulties associated with RE and yet retain the flexible egalitarianism that makes it intuitively appealing to many.

  20. Horizontal roof gap of backfill hydraulic support

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张强; 张吉雄; 邰阳; 方坤; 殷伟

    2015-01-01

    For the backfill hydraulic support as the key equipment for achieving integration of backfilling and coal mining simultaneously in the practical process, its characteristics will directly influence the backfill body’s compression ratio. Horizontal roof gap, as a key parameter of backfilling characteristics, may impact the backfilling effect from the aspects of control of roof subsidence in advance, support stress, backfilling process and the support design. Firstly, the reason why horizontal roof gap exists was analyzed and its definition, causes and connotation were introduced, then adopting the Pro/E 3D simulation software, three typical 3D entity models of backfill hydraulic supports were built, based on the influence of horizontal roof gap on backfilling effect, and influence rules of four factors, i.e. support height, suspension height, suspension angle and tamping angle, were emphatically analyzed on horizontal roof gap. The results indicate that, the four factors all have significant impacts on horizontal roof gap, but show differences in influence trend and degree, showing negative linear correlation, positive linear correlation, positive semi-parabolic correlation and negative semi-parabolic correlation, respectively. Four legs type is the most adaptive to the four factors, while six legs (II) type has the poorest adaptability, and the horizontal roof gap is small under large support height, small suspension height, small suspension angle and large tamping angle situation. By means of optimizing structure components and their positional relation and suspension height of backfill scrape conveyor in the process of support design and through controlling working face deployment, roof subsidence in advance, mining height and backfilling during engineering application, the horizontal roof gap is optimized. The research results can be served as theoretical basis for support design and guidance for backfill support to have better performance in backfilling.

  1. Bilateral Reflex Fluctuations during Rhythmic Movement of Remote Limb Pairs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mezzarane, Rinaldo A.; Nakajima, Tsuyoshi; Zehr, E. Paul

    2017-01-01

    The modulation of spinal cord excitability during rhythmic limb movement reflects the neuronal coordination underlying actions of the arms and legs. Integration of network activity in the spinal cord can be assessed by reflex variability between the limbs, an approach so far very little studied. The present work addresses this question by eliciting Hoffmann (H-) reflexes in both limbs to assess if common drive onto bilateral pools of motoneurons influence spinal cord excitability simultaneously or with a delay between sides. A cross-covariance (CCV) sequence between reflexes in both arms or legs was evaluated under conditions providing common drive bilaterally through voluntary muscle contraction and/or rhythmic movement of the remote limbs. For H-reflexes in the flexor carpi radialis (FCR) muscle, either contraction of the FCR or leg cycling induced significant reduction in the amplitude of the peak at the zero lag in the CCV sequence, indicating independent variations in spinal excitability between both sides. In contrast, for H-reflexes in the soleus (SO) muscle, arm cycling revealed no reduction in the amplitude of the peak in the CCV sequence at the zero lag. This suggests a more independent control of the arms compared with the legs. These results provide new insights into the organization of human limb control in rhythmic activity and the behavior of bilateral reflex fluctuations under different motor tasks. From a functional standpoint, changes in the co-variability might reflect dynamic adjustments in reflex excitability that are subsumed under more global control features during locomotion. PMID:28725191

  2. The role of the superior laryngeal nerve in esophageal reflexes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lang, I M; Medda, B K; Jadcherla, S; Shaker, R

    2012-06-15

    The aim of this study was to determine the role of the superior laryngeal nerve (SLN) in the following esophageal reflexes: esophago-upper esophageal sphincter (UES) contractile reflex (EUCR), esophago-lower esophageal sphincter (LES) relaxation reflex (ELIR), secondary peristalsis, pharyngeal swallowing, and belch. Cats (N = 43) were decerebrated and instrumented to record EMG of the cricopharyngeus, thyrohyoideus, geniohyoideus, and cricothyroideus; esophageal pressure; and motility of LES. Reflexes were activated by stimulation of the esophagus via slow balloon or rapid air distension at 1 to 16 cm distal to the UES. Slow balloon distension consistently activated EUCR and ELIR from all areas of the esophagus, but the distal esophagus was more sensitive than the proximal esophagus. Transection of SLN or proximal recurrent laryngeal nerves (RLN) blocked EUCR and ELIR generated from the cervical esophagus. Distal RLN transection blocked EUCR from the distal cervical esophagus. Slow distension of all areas of the esophagus except the most proximal few centimeters activated secondary peristalsis, and SLN transection had no effect on secondary peristalsis. Slow distension of all areas of the esophagus inconsistently activated pharyngeal swallows, and SLN transection blocked generation of pharyngeal swallows from all levels of the esophagus. Slow distension of the esophagus inconsistently activated belching, but rapid air distension consistently activated belching from all areas of the esophagus. SLN transection did not block initiation of belch but blocked one aspect of belch, i.e., inhibition of cricopharyngeus EMG. Vagotomy blocked all aspects of belch generated from all areas of esophagus and blocked all responses of all reflexes not blocked by SLN or RLN transection. In conclusion, the SLN mediates all aspects of the pharyngeal swallow, no portion of the secondary peristalsis, and the EUCR and ELIR generated from the proximal esophagus. Considering that SLN is not

  3. Trigeminal Cardiac Reflex and Cerebral Blood Flow Regulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lapi, Dominga; Scuri, Rossana; Colantuoni, Antonio

    2016-01-01

    The stimulation of some facial regions is known to trigger the trigemino-cardiac reflex: the main stimulus is represented by the contact of the face with water. This phenomenon called diving reflex induces a set of reactions in the cardiovascular and respiratory systems occurring in all mammals, especially marine (whales, seals). During the immersion of the face in the water, the main responses are aimed at reducing the oxygen consumption of the organism. Accordingly reduction in heart rate, peripheral vasoconstriction, blood pooling in certain organs, especially the heart, and brain and an increase in blood pressure have been reported. Moreover, the speed and intensity of the reflex is inversely proportional to the temperature of the water: more cold the water, more reactions as described are strong. In the case of deep diving an additional effect, such as blood deviation, has been reported: the blood is sequestered within the lungs, to compensate for the increase in the external pressure, preventing them from collapsing. The trigeminal-cardiac reflex is not just confined to the diving reflex; recently it has been shown that a brief proprioceptive stimulation (10 min) by jaw extension in rats produces interesting effects both at systemic and cerebral levels, reducing the arterial blood pressure, and vasodilating the pial arterioles. The arteriolar dilation is associated with rhythmic diameter changes characterized by an increase in the endothelial activity. Fascinating the stimulation of trigeminal nerve is able to activate the nitric oxide release by vascular endothelial cells. Therefore, the aim of this review was to highlight the effects due to trigeminal cardiac reflex induced by a simple mandibular extension. Opposite effects, such as hypotension, and modulation of cerebral arteriolar tone, were observed, when these responses were compared to those elicited by the diving reflex. PMID:27812317

  4. Can Treadmill Perturbations Evoke Stretch Reflexes in the Calf Muscles?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lizeth H Sloot

    Full Text Available Disinhibition of reflexes is a problem amongst spastic patients, for it limits a smooth and efficient execution of motor functions during gait. Treadmill belt accelerations may potentially be used to measure reflexes during walking, i.e. by dorsal flexing the ankle and stretching the calf muscles, while decelerations show the modulation of reflexes during a reduction of sensory feedback. The aim of the current study was to examine if belt accelerations and decelerations of different intensities applied during the stance phase of treadmill walking can evoke reflexes in the gastrocnemius, soleus and tibialis anterior in healthy subjects. Muscle electromyography and joint kinematics were measured in 10 subjects. To determine whether stretch reflexes occurred, we assessed modelled musculo-tendon length and stretch velocity, the amount of muscle activity, as well as the incidence of bursts or depressions in muscle activity with their time delays, and co-contraction between agonist and antagonist muscle. Although the effect on the ankle angle was small with 2.8±1.0°, the perturbations caused clear changes in muscle length and stretch velocity relative to unperturbed walking. Stretched muscles showed an increasing incidence of bursts in muscle activity, which occurred after a reasonable electrophysiological time delay (163-191 ms. Their amplitude was related to the muscle stretch velocity and not related to co-contraction of the antagonist muscle. These effects increased with perturbation intensity. Shortened muscles showed opposite effects, with a depression in muscle activity of the calf muscles. The perturbations only slightly affected the spatio-temporal parameters, indicating that normal walking was retained. Thus, our findings showed that treadmill perturbations can evoke reflexes in the calf muscles and tibialis anterior. This comprehensive study could form the basis for clinical implementation of treadmill perturbations to functionally

  5. Trigeminal cardiac reflex and cerebral blood flow regulation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dominga Lapi

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available The stimulation of some facial regions is known to trigger the trigemino-cardiac reflex: the main stimulus is represented by the contact of the face with water. This phenomenon called diving reflex induces a set of reactions in the cardiovascular and respiratory systems occurring in all mammals, especially marine (whales, seals. During the immersion of the face in the water, the main responses are aimed at reducing the oxygen consumption of the organism. Accordingly reduction in heart rate, peripheral vasoconstriction, blood pooling in certain organs, especially the heart and brain, and an increase in blood pressure have been reported. Moreover, the speed and intensity of the reflex is inversely proportional to the temperature of the water: more cold the water, more reactions as described are strong. In the case of deep diving an additional effect, such as blood deviation, has been reported: the blood is requested within the lungs, to compensate for the increase in the external pressure, preventing them from collapsing.The trigeminal-cardiac reflex is not just confined to the diving reflex; recently it has been shown that a brief proprioceptive stimulation (10 min by jaw extension in rats produces interesting effects both at systemic and cerebral level, reducing the arterial blood pressure and vasodilating the pial arterioles. The arteriolar dilation is associated with rhythmic diameter changes characterized by an increase in the endothelial activity. Fascinating the stimulation of trigeminal nerve is able to activated the nitric oxide release by vascular endothelial. Therefore the aim of this review was to highlight the effects due to trigeminal cardiac reflex induced by a simple mandibular extension, because produced opposite effects compared to those elicited by the diving reflex as it induces hypotension and modulation of cerebral arteriolar tone.

  6. Gravity and Development of Cardiopulmonary Reflex

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagaoka, Shunji; Eno, Yuko; Ohira, Yoshinobu

    Cardio-pulmonary reflex, which our cardiac activity is synchronized to the respiration by autonomic nervous system regulation, is called as "respiratory sinus arrhythmia" and commonly found in adult. The physiological function of the espiratory sinus arrhythmia is considered to maximize the gas exchange during respiration cycle. This respiration induced heart rate variability (RHRV) is only found in mammals and avian showing a remarkable postnatal development, whereas no RHRV in aquatic species such as fish or amphibian. To elucidate our hypothesis that gravity exposure may plays a key role in the postnatal development of RHRV as well as its evolutional origin in these ground animals, we have studied effects of hypergravity (2G) on the postnatal development of RHRV using rat. Pregnant Wister rats were kept in centrifugal cages system for 38 days from 6th days of pregnant mother to have neonates until 23 days old. Electrocardiograph was recorded from the neonates in 2 to 23 days old in 2G group with simultaneous control (1G) group. The RHRV analysis was performed by calculating a component of Fourier power spectral coincide with the respiration frequency. In both groups, averaged resting heart rate gradually increase from 2 to 23 days old. When comparing the heart rate between the two groups, the 2G group indicated significantly lower (240± 8 bpm) than 1G control (326±21 bpm, p¡0.001) in 2 days old, where as no significance in 23 days old. The RHRV of 2 days old neonates in both groups indicated very small magnitude but significantly lower in 2G group than 1G control (p¡0.01). The RHRV gradually increase during the first 2 weeks and then rapid increased to reached 45 fold of magnitude in 1G control, whereas 69 fold in 2G group. The results strongly suggested that the postnatal innervation from respiration to cardiovascular centers was gravity dependent.

  7. Horizontal alveolar bone loss: A periodontal orphan

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jayakumar A

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Attempts to successfully regenerate lost alveolar bone have always been a clinician′s dream. Angular defects, at least, have a fairer chance, but the same cannot be said about horizontal bone loss. The purpose of the present study was to evaluate the prevalence of horizontal alveolar bone loss and vertical bone defects in periodontal patients; and later, to correlate it with the treatment modalities available in the literature for horizontal and vertical bone defects. Materials and Methods: The study was conducted in two parts. Part I was the radiographic evaluation of 150 orthopantomographs (OPGs (of patients diagnosed with chronic periodontitis and seeking periodontal care, which were digitized and read using the AutoCAD 2006 software. All the periodontitis-affected teeth were categorized as teeth with vertical defects (if the defect angle was ≤45° and defect depth was ≥3 mm or as having horizontal bone loss. Part II of the study comprised search of the literature on treatment modalities for horizontal and vertical bone loss in four selected periodontal journals. Results: Out of the 150 OPGs studied, 54 (36% OPGs showed one or more vertical defects. Totally, 3,371 teeth were studied, out of which horizontal bone loss was found in 3,107 (92.2% teeth, and vertical defects were found only in 264 (7.8% of the teeth, which was statistically significant (P<.001. Search of the selected journals revealed 477 papers have addressed the treatment modalities for vertical and horizontal types of bone loss specifically. Out of the 477 papers, 461 (96.3% have addressed vertical bone loss, and 18 (3.7% have addressed treatment options for horizontal bone loss. Two papers have addressed both types of bone loss and are included in both categories. Conclusion: Horizontal bone loss is more prevalent than vertical bone loss but has been sidelined by researchers as very few papers have been published on the subject of regenerative treatment

  8. Pelviureteral inhibitory reflex and ureteropelvic excitatory reflex: role of the two reflexes in regulation of urine flow from the renal pelvis to the ureter.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shafik, A

    1997-01-01

    The mechanism by which the ureteropelvic junction (UPJ) regulates the passage of urine from the renal pelvis to the ureter, and prevents urinary backflow from the the ureter to the renal pelvis, is not completely understood. The current communication studies this mechanism in 18 dogs. With the dogs under anesthesia, nephrostomy was done through which two catheters (one pressure and one balloon-tipped) were introduced into the UPJ and the renal pelvis, respectively. Renal pelvis distension with a balloon filled with 1 ml of saline effected a rise of renal pelvic pressure from a mean basal pressure of 4.8 +/- 1.2 cm H2O to 6.9 +/- 2.3 cm H2O (P pelvic balloon (P > 0.05). Renal pelvic distension with 2, 3, and 4 ml caused a significant rise of renal pelvic pressure to 8.4 +/- 2.7 (P 0.05). In contrast, the UPJ showed no significant pressure change upon distension of the locally anesthetized renal pelvis or ureter, respectively. Likewise, the locally anesthetized UPJ exhibited no significant pressure response to renal pelvic or ureteric distension. The study demonstrates that urine might have to accumulate in the renal pelvis up to a certain volume and pressure so as to effect UPJ opening, which occurs at its maximum irrespective of the distending volume. UPJ opening upon renal pelvic distension postulates a reflex relationship which we call "pelviureteral inhibitory reflex." This reflex is believed to regulate the passage of urine from the renal pelvis to the ureter. Ureteric distension closes the UPJ; we call this reflex action the "ureteropelvic excitatory reflex" as it seems to prevent reflux of urine through the UPJ and thus protects the kidney. The concept that the UPJ acts as a physiologic sphincter is put forward.

  9. Trigemino-cervical-spinal reflexes after traumatic spinal cord injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nardone, Raffaele; Höller, Yvonne; Orioli, Andrea; Brigo, Francesco; Christova, Monica; Tezzon, Frediano; Golaszewski, Stefan; Trinka, Eugen

    2015-05-01

    After spinal cord injury (SCI) reorganization of spinal cord circuits occur both above and below the spinal lesion. These functional changes can be determined by assessing electrophysiological recording. We aimed at investigating the trigemino-cervical reflex (TCR) and trigemino-spinal reflex (TSR) responses after traumatic SCI. TCR and TSR were registered after stimulation of the infraorbital nerve from the sternocleidomastoid, splenius, deltoid, biceps and first dorsal interosseous muscles in 10 healthy subjects and 10 subjects with incomplete cervical SCI. In the control subjects reflex responses were registered from the sternocleidomastoid, and splenium muscles, while no responses were obtained from upper limb muscles. In contrast, smaller but clear short latency EMG potentials were recorded from deltoid and biceps muscles in about half of the SCI patients. Moreover, the amplitudes of the EMG responses in the neck muscles were significantly higher in patients than in control subjects. The reflex responses are likely to propagate up the brainstem and down the spinal cord along the reticulospinal tracts and the propriospinal system. Despite the loss of corticospinal axons, synaptic plasticity in pre-existing pathways and/or formation of new circuits through sprouting processes above the injury site may contribute to the findings of this preliminary study and may be involved in the functional recovery. Trigemino-cervical-spinal reflexes can be used to demonstrate and quantify plastic changes at brainstem and cervical level following SCI. Copyright © 2014 International Federation of Clinical Neurophysiology. Published by Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Reflexivity: a methodological tool in the knowledge translation process?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alley, Sarah; Jackson, Suzanne F; Shakya, Yogendra B

    2015-05-01

    Knowledge translation is a dynamic and iterative process that includes the synthesis, dissemination, exchange, and application of knowledge. It is considered the bridge that closes the gap between research and practice. Yet it appears that in all areas of practice, a significant gap remains in translating research knowledge into practical application. Recently, researchers and practitioners in the field of health care have begun to recognize reflection and reflexive exercises as a fundamental component to the knowledge translation process. As a practical tool, reflexivity can go beyond simply looking at what practitioners are doing; when approached in a systematic manner, it has the potential to enable practitioners from a wide variety of backgrounds to identify, understand, and act in relation to the personal, professional, and political challenges they face in practice. This article focuses on how reflexive practice as a methodological tool can provide researchers and practitioners with new insights and increased self-awareness, as they are able to critically examine the nature of their work and acknowledge biases, which may affect the knowledge translation process. Through the use of structured journal entries, the nature of the relationship between reflexivity and knowledge translation was examined, specifically exploring if reflexivity can improve the knowledge translation process, leading to increased utilization and application of research findings into everyday practice.

  11. Reflexivity, critical qualitative research and emancipation: a Foucauldian perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCabe, Janet L; Holmes, Dave

    2009-07-01

    In this paper, we consider reflexivity, not only as a concept of qualitative validity, but also as a tool used during the research process to achieve the goals of emancipation that are intrinsic to qualitative research conducted within a critical paradigm. Research conducted from a critical perspective poses two challenges to researchers: validity of the research must be ensured and the emancipatory aims of the research need to be realized and communicated. The traditional view of reflexivity as a means of ensuring validity in qualitative research limits its potential to inform the research process. The Medline and CINAHL data bases were searched (1998-2008 inclusive) using keywords such as reflexivity, validity, subjectivity, bias, emancipation, empowerment and disability. In addition, the work of Michel Foucault was examined. Using the work of the late French philosopher Michel Foucault, we explore how Foucault's 'technologies of the self' can be employed during critical qualitative research to achieve emancipatory changes. Using research conducted with marginalized populations as an example (specifically, individuals with disabilities), we demonstrate the potential for using reflexivity, in a Foucauldian sense, during the research process. Shifting the traditional view of reflexivity allows researchers to focus on the subtle changes that comprise emancipation (in a Foucauldian sense). As a result, researchers are better able to see, understand and analyse this process in both the participants and themselves.

  12. Reflex conditioning: A new strategy for improving motor function after spinal cord injury

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Xiang Yang; Chen, Yi; Wang, Yu; Thompson, Aiko; Carp, Jonathan S.; Segal, Richard L.; Wolpaw, Jonathan R.

    2010-01-01

    Spinal reflex conditioning changes reflex size, induces spinal cord plasticity, and modifies locomotion. Appropriate reflex conditioning can improve walking in rats after spinal cord injury (SCI). Reflex conditioning offers a new therapeutic strategy for restoring function in people with SCI. This approach can address the specific deficits of individuals with SCI by targeting specific reflex pathways for increased or decreased responsiveness. In addition, once clinically significant regeneration can be achieved, reflex conditioning could provide a means of re-educating the newly (and probably imperfectly) reconnected spinal cord. PMID:20590534

  13. Simultaneous characterizations of reflex and nonreflex dynamic and static changes in spastic hemiparesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chung, Sun G.; Ren, Yupeng; Liu, Lin; Roth, Elliot J.; Rymer, W. Zev

    2013-01-01

    This study characterizes tonic and phasic stretch reflex and stiffness and viscosity changes associated with spastic hemiparesis. Perturbations were applied to the ankle of 27 hemiparetic and 36 healthy subjects under relaxed or active contracting conditions. A nonlinear delay differential equation model characterized phasic and tonic stretch reflex gains, elastic stiffness, and viscous damping. Tendon reflex was characterized with reflex gain and threshold. Reflexively, tonic reflex gain was increased in spastic ankles at rest (P hemiparesis may help to evaluate and treat them more effectively. PMID:23636726

  14. Diffuser Augmented Horizontal Axis Tidal Current Turbines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nasir Mehmood

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available The renewal energy technologies are increasingly popular to ensure future energy sustenance and address environmental issues. The tides are enormous and consistent untapped resource of renewable energy. The growing interest in exploring tidal energy has compelling reasons such as security and diversity of supply, intermittent but predictable and limited social and environmental impacts. The tidal energy industry is undergoing an increasing shift towards diffuser augmented turbines. The reason is the higher power output of diffuser augmented turbines compared to conventional open turbines. The purpose of this study is to present a comprehensive review of diffuser augmented horizontal axis tidal current turbines. The components, relative advantages, limitations and design parameters of diffuser augmented horizontal axis tidal current turbines are presented in detail. CFD simulation of NACA 0016 airfoil is carried out to explore its potential for designing a diffuser. The core issues associated with diffuser augmented horizontal axis tidal current turbines are also discussed.

  15. HORIZONTAL WELL DRILL-IN FLUIDS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nediljka Gaurina-Međimurec

    1998-12-01

    Full Text Available Main objective of horizontal driling is to place a drain-hole for a long distance within the pay zone to enhance productivity or injectivity. In drilling horizontal wells, more serious problems appear than in drilling vertical wells. These problems are: poor hole cleaning, excessive torque and drag, hole filling, pipe stucking, wellbore instability, loss of circulation, formation damage, poor cement job, and difficulties at logging jobs. From that reason, successful drilling and production of horizontal well depends largely on the fluid used during drilling and completion phases. Several new fluids, that fulfill some or all of required properties (hole cleaning, cutting suspension, good lubrication, and relative low formation damage, are presented in this paper.

  16. Horizontal stirring in the global ocean

    CERN Document Server

    Hernández-Carrasco, I; Hernández-García, E; Turiel, A

    2011-01-01

    Horizontal mixing and the distribution of coherent structures in the global ocean are analyzed using Finite-Size Lyapunov Exponents (FSLE), computed for the surface velocity field derived from the Ocean general circulation model For the Earth Simulator (OFES). FSLEs measure horizontal stirring and dispersion; additionally, the transport barriers which organize the oceanic flow can roughly be identified with the ridges of the FSLE field. We have performed a detailed statistical study, particularizing for the behaviour of the two hemispheres and different ocean basins. The computed Probability Distributions Functions (PDFs) of FSLE are broad and asymmetric. Horizontal mixing is generally more active in the northern hemisphere than in the southern one. Nevertheless the Southern Ocean is the most active ocean, and the Pacific the less active one. A striking result is that the main currents can be classified in two 'activity classes': Western Boundary Currents, which have broad PDFs with large FSLE values, and Eas...

  17. The blink reflex and the corneal reflex are followed by cortical activity resembling the nociceptive potentials induced by trigeminal laser stimulation in man.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Tommaso, M; Libro, G; Guido, M; Sciruicchio, V; Puca, F

    2001-09-07

    Laser stimulation of the supraorbital regions evokes brain potentials (LEPs) related to trigeminal nociception. The aim of this study was to record the R2 component of the blink reflex and the corneal reflex in 20 normal subjects, comparing the scalp activity following these reflexes with the nociceptive potentials evoked by CO2 laser stimulation of supraorbital regions. Cortical and muscular reflexes evoked by stimulation of the first trigeminal branch were recorded simultaneously. The R2 component of the blink reflex and the corneal reflex were followed by two cortical peaks, which resembled morphologically N-P waves of LEPs. The two peaks demonstrated a difference in latency of approximately 40 ms, which is consistent with activation time of nociception. This finding suggests that these reflexes are induced by activation of small pain-related fibers.

  18. El horizonte estético

    OpenAIRE

    Perniola, Mario

    2004-01-01

    La existencia de un horizonte estético depende de la coexistencia de múltiples factores de distinta naturaleza que interactúan entre ellos. No bastan las reflexiones en torno a lo bello y al arte para crear un horizonte estético. La palabra “estética” es introducida en el Settecento por la filosofía para indicar una articulación disciplinar propia que pudiera ubicarse cerca de la lógica; esta circunstancia histórica, sin embargo, no debe hacernos olvidar que la filosofía es desde su nacimient...

  19. Fourth international seminar on horizontal steam generators

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tuomisto, H. [ed.] [IVO Group, Vantaa (Finland); Purhonen, H. [ed.] [VTT, Espoo (Finland); Kouhia, V. [ed.] [Lappeenranta Univ. of Technology (Finland)

    1997-12-31

    The general objective of the International Seminars of Horizontal Steam Generator Modelling has been the improvement in understanding of realistic thermal hydraulic behaviour of the generators when performing safety analyses for VVER reactors. The main topics presented in the fourth seminar were: thermal hydraulic experiments and analyses, primary collector integrity, feedwater distributor replacement, management of primary-to-secondary leakage accidents and new developments in the VVER safety technology. The number of participants, representing designers and manufacturers of the horizontal steam generators, plant operators, engineering companies, research organizations, universities and regulatory authorities, was 70 from 10 countries.

  20. Horizontal Roll Vortices and Crown Fires.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haines, Donald A.

    1982-06-01

    Observational evidence from nine crown fires suggests that horizontal roll vortices are a major mechanism in crown-fire spread. Post-burn aerial photography indicates that unburned tree-crown streets are common with crown fire. Investigation of the understory of these crown streets after two fires showed uncharred tree trunks along a center line. This evidence supports a hypothesis of vortex action causing strong downward motion of air along the streets. Additionally, photographs of two ongoing crown fires show apparent horizontal roll vortices. Discussion also includes laboratory and numerical studies in fluid dynamics that may apply to crown fires.

  1. Faroese long-distance reflexives face off against Icelandic long-distance reflexives

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tania E. Strahan

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Long-distance reflexives (LDRs in Faroese are often compared to those in Icelandic, and are even considered to have the same distribution (Thráinsson et al., 2004. In this paper I evaluate the extent to which this is true. The results from recent fieldwork show that there are clear differences between the LDR in the two closely related languages, in particular that Faroese speakers often reject LDR sentences that contain a non-third person, and that Faroese LDR is often completely acceptable out of a non-complement clause. In addition, initial findings suggest that there may be dialectal variation with respect to at least these two aspects of LDR in Faroese.

  2. Academic strangeness as uncomfortable reflexivity and academic reflexivity as uncomfortable strangeness in higher education

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fristrup, Tine; Tulinius, Charlotte; Hølge-Hazelton, Bibi

    2015-01-01

    to develop a five-day course, focusing on vulnerable research subjects, research participants and researchers. All five teachers and facilitators knew each other, the three authors through research collaborations and because they had been part of the same academic supervision groups for a decade. Our aim...... of conventional objectivity, looking for alternatives to the distanced, impersonal mode of presentation in order to produce texts with more passionate individual voices. In order to develop a reflexive framework for academic learning processes when researching vulnerable subjects in qualitative research, we....... The paper briefly describes the strategies used to plan, deliver and evaluate the course, but the main emphasis is on the learning taking place as a consequence of working within this area and using these strategies in the educational setting. Having participated in and studied academic and peer supervision...

  3. Pedaling alters the excitability and modulation of vastus medialis H-reflexes after stroke.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fuchs, Dana P; Sanghvi, Namita; Wieser, Jon; Schindler-Ivens, Sheila

    2011-10-01

    Individuals post-stroke display abnormal Group Ia reflex excitability. Pedaling has been shown to reduce Group Ia reflexes and to normalize the relationship between EMG and reflex amplitude in the paretic soleus (SO). The purpose of this study was to determine whether these changes extend to the paretic quadriceps. H-reflexes were used to examine Group Ia reflex excitability of the vastus medialis (VM). H-reflexes were elicited in paretic (n=13) and neurologically intact (n=13) individuals at 11 positions in the pedaling cycle and during static knee extension at comparable limb positions and levels of VM EMG. VM H-reflexes were abnormally elevated in the paretic limb of stroke survivors. During static muscle activation, H-reflex amplitude did not change with the level of background VM activity. Pedaling reduced the amplitude of paretic VM H-reflexes and restored the normal relationship between VM EMG and H-reflex amplitude. Pedaling-induced changes in Group Ia reflex excitability that have been reported for the paretic SO are evident in the paretic VM. Pedaling may have a generalized effect on lower extremity Group Ia reflexes post-stroke. Pedaling may be therapeutic for reducing Group Ia reflexes after stroke. Copyright © 2011 International Federation of Clinical Neurophysiology. Published by Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. The trigemino-cervical reflex in tension-type headache.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nardone, R; Tezzon, F

    2003-05-01

    To investigate the pathophysiology of tension-type headache (TTH) with special reference to central mechanisms and to the involvement of the trigeminal system. Short latency responses can be recorded in tonically active sternocleidomastoid muscle after stimulation of the infraorbital branch of the trigeminal nerve (the trigemino-cervical reflex). This brainstem reflex was studied in 15 healthy subjects, in 15 patients with episodic tension-type headache (ETTH) and in 15 patients with chronic tension-type headache (CTTH) outside of the pain attacks. The trigemino-cervical response was abnormal, in the size or latency, in 13 patients with CTTH and in only one patient with ETTH. This finding strongly suggests that only in the CTTH the underlying pathophysiology involves the trigeminal system. The trigemino-cervical reflex is a sensitive method to evaluate the involvement of the trigeminal brainstem neurones in TTH and their assessment may provide useful diagnostic and prognostic information.

  5. The frequency of buccopalpebral reflex in Parkinson disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eser, Hülya; Ünal, Yasemin; Kutlu, Gülnihal; Öcal, Ruhsen; İnan, Levent Ertuğrul

    2016-11-17

    This study aimed to define the frequency of a primitive reflex, the buccopalpebral reflex (BPR), and its association with the clinical situation in patients with Parkinson disease. Between May 2010 and May 2011, 222 patients, 115 with Parkinson disease and 107 patients without any sign of neurodegenerative disease, were included in the study. All included patients were examined for BPR and snout reflex and were also evaluated with the Mini Mental State Examination. All patients with Parkinson disease were classified with the Unified Parkinson's Disease Rating Scale (UPDRS) and the Hoehn and Yahr Score to determine their clinical severity. Sixteen patients with Parkinson disease (13.9%) had a BPR (+) and 4 patients in the control group (3.7%) (P Parkinson disease than in patients without a neurodegenerative disease.

  6. Acoustic Reflex Thresholds in Normal, Cochlear, and Retrocochlear Lesions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Navid Shahnaz

    1993-03-01

    Full Text Available The cut off points of 90th percentile of acoustic reflex thresholds were determined in the normal and sensory hearing loss.All subjects had measurable hearing(ANSI-1969≤110 dBHL in three frequencies of 500,1000 and 2000Hz.While hearing loss was more than 55dB, The cut off point was higher in studies that NR responses was included.In cases that hearing loss was less than 75dB 90th percentile can be used in diganosis of retrochochlear lesions.Since Acoustic reflexes are absent in both mentioned pathologies in greater amount of hearing loss,It would be less efficient in diffrential diganisis of cochlear and retrochochlear lesions to use acoustic reflex thresholds under the mentioned circumstances.

  7. Startle and blink reflex in high functioning autism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erturk, Ozdem; Korkmaz, Baris; Alev, Gulce; Demirbilek, Veysi; Kiziltan, Meral

    2016-06-01

    An important clinical feature of autism is the presence of atypical responses to sensory stimuli. In this study, we investigated if high functioning autistic patients had abnormalities in the blink reflex and the startle reaction to auditory or somatosensory stimuli. Fourteen patients aged between 7 and 16 years were included in the study. We found a longer latency of the blink reflex, an increased duration and amplitude of the auditory startle reaction and a lower presence rate of the somatosensorial startle reaction in autistic patients. To better define the sensorial characteristics of the disease could improve the therapeutic management of children with autism spectrum disorder.

  8. A Case Study of Horizontal Teacher Evaluation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Trav D.

    Horizontal teacher evaluation increases understanding of teaching through the critical examination of educational goals and classroom practices. This examination includes teachers' classroom observations of one another coupled with in-depth teacher conversations or dialogue about teaching aims and practices. A qualitative case study of a…

  9. Third international seminar on horizontal steam generators

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1995-12-31

    The Third International Seminar on Horizontal Steam Generators held on October 18-20, 1994 in Lappeenranta, consisted of six sessions dealing with the topics: thermal hydraulic experiments and analyses, primary collector integrity, management of primary-to-secondary leakage accidents, feedwater collector replacement and discussion of VVER-440 steam generator safety issues.

  10. Parametric study for horizontal steam generator modelling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ovtcharova, I. [Energoproekt, Sofia (Bulgaria)

    1995-12-31

    In the presentation some of the calculated results of horizontal steam generator PGV - 440 modelling with RELAP5/Mod3 are described. Two nodalization schemes have been used with different components in the steam dome. A study of parameters variation on the steam generator work and calculated results is made in cases with separator and branch.

  11. Evaluation of horizontal magnification on panoramic images

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maryam Raoof

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Aims: This study evaluated the horizontal magnification of images taken from adults and pediatrics with PM 2002 CC Planmeca analogue machine. Materials and Methods: A series of 120 panoramic radiographs were obtained of 60 adults and 60 pediatrics. For all patients, negative impressions were used to make positive casts of the teeth. A caliper was used to measure the maximum mesiodistal length of the buccal surface of all teeth except canines on both casts and radiographs. The horizontal magnification factor was calculated for incisor, premolar, and molar regions by dividing the values obtained from the casts by the values obtained from the radiographs. Statistical Analysis: Independent t-test and one-way analysis of variance (ANOVA were used. Results: The results indicated that with regard to adults, maxillary and mandibular incisor regions, unlike the other two sessions, didn′t show significant difference of the mean magnification of horizontal dimension (P = 0.5. In pediatrics, the comparison between mean magnification factors of all subgroups showed significant difference (P < 0.0001. Despite the adults′ radiographs, the results of pediatrics′ radiographs showed significantly higher magnification than the index listed by the manufacturer of the radiographic machine used. Conclusion: The present study results point to the fact that PM 2002 CC Proline panoramic machine makes possible precise measurements on radiographs of adults′ jaws in the horizontal dimension.

  12. Fermion mass hierarchy and global horizontal symmetries

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gelmini, G.B.; Gerard, J.M.; Yanagida, T.; Zoupanos, G. (European Organization for Nuclear Research, Geneva (Switzerland))

    1984-02-02

    We present a mechanism for quark mass generation in zeroth order using induced representations rather than the minimization of the horizontal potential. Using a simplicity criterion, we derive a realistic mass matrix. We also discuss a possible application of the mechanism to various models.

  13. Horizontal gene transfer in the phytosphere

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Elsas, van J.D.; Turner, S.; Bailey, M.J.

    2003-01-01

    Here, the ecological aspects of gene transfer processes between bacteria in the phytosphere are examined in the context of emerging evidence for the dominant role that horizontal gene transfer (HGT) has played in the evolutionary shaping of bacterial communities. Moreover, the impact of the putative

  14. Flow mapping for ESS horizontal target

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Takeda, Y.; Kikura, H.; Taishi, T. [Paul Scherrer Inst. (PSI), Villigen (Switzerland)

    1997-09-01

    Flow behaviour for ESS horizontal target is studied experimentally using two dimensional water model. A velocity field of stationary flow in reaction zone has been obtained. Three dimensional effect was also studied as a spanwise flow structure. (author) 3 figs., 3 refs.

  15. Buoyancy Driven Natural Ventilation through Horizontal Openings

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Heiselberg, Per

    2009-01-01

    An experimental study of the phenomenon of buoyancy driven natural ventilation through single-sided horizontal openings was performed in a full-scale laboratory test rig. The measurements were made for opening ratios L/D ranging from 0.027 to 4.455, where L and D are the length of the opening...

  16. Teaching Activities on Horizontal Nuclear Proliferation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zola, John

    1990-01-01

    Provides learning activities concerning the horizontal proliferation of nuclear weapons. Includes step-by-step directions for four activities: (1) the life cycle of nuclear weapons; (2) nuclear nonproliferation: pros and cons; (3) the nuclear power/nuclear weapons connection; and (4) managing nuclear proliferation. (NL)

  17. Mud and cement for horizontal wells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zurdo, C.; Georges, C.; Martin, M.

    1986-01-01

    High-angle and horizontal well bores raise many questions concerning the characteristics of mud and cement. This paper is a summary of the authors' knowledge and work on these two subjects. For all research carried out, large or full-scale laboratory test plants were used. Cutting transport is not only a problem in horizontal conditions but hole angles of 25 to 65/sup 0/ can be even more critical when parameters such as mud rheological properties and velocities are not optimized. Drilling a long horizontal drain creates a dynamic annulus pressure unbalance. This can lead to a loss and kick situation. Two test benches were thus used to obtain a good understanding of the inefficiency of conventional plugging methods and of the difficulties of gas migration control in subhorizontal well bores. High concentrations of LCM, high rheological properties of fluids and low flow rates increase the changes of solving the first problem. The results of the second bench demonstrate the difficulties of annulus gas evacution for angles varying from 90 to 100 degrees, or from over-gauged sections in horizontal holes.

  18. Characteristics of the spino-bulbo-spinal reflex with evoked EMGs in human subjects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ishikawa, T; Miyazawa, T; Fujiwara, T

    1984-08-01

    Training in sports medicine and rehabilitation medicine requires the establishment of conditioned reflexes. Reinforcement of a conditioned reflex is more effective when it is part of a set of two or three reflexes. The late spinal reflexes appearing after conditioning were resolved into a stretch reflex and a spino-bulbo-spinal (SBS) reflex. H and M waves on the tibialis anterior muscle induced by tibial nerve stimulation were determined from the escape potential of the triceps sural muscle contraction. The tibial nerve and peroneal nerve were stimulated bilaterally, and H and M waves from the triceps sural muscle and tibialis anterior muscle were recorded bilaterally. The complete separation method of the late response and the time course of the stretch reflex and SBS reflex that composed the late response are described in this paper.

  19. The inhibitory effect of a chewing task on a human jaw reflex

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Maillou, P.; Cadden, S.W.; Lobbezoo, F.

    2010-01-01

    This study was undertaken to investigate whether an inhibitory jaw reflex could be modulated by experimentally controlled conditions that mimicked symptoms of temporomandibular disorders. Reflecting on previous work, we anticipated that these conditions might suppress the reflex. Electromyographic r

  20. Effects of the reappearance of primitive reflexes on eating function and prognosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hobo, Kimiko; Kawase, Junko; Tamura, Fumiyo; Groher, Michael; Kikutani, Takeshi; Sunakawa, Hajime

    2014-01-01

    Primitive reflexes can reappear with diseases of the brain, particularly those affecting the frontal lobes. Most studies on primitive reflexes have reported an association between such reflexes and brain damage, and the clinical symptoms of dementia. These reflexes can also be present during eating; however, their effects on eating function are difficult to evaluate. The purpose of the present study was to identify the frequency at which primitive reflexes reappear in elderly people, and to determine the effects that such reflexes have on eating function, nutritional status and prognosis. We followed 121 nursing home residents for 6 months. All patients required long-term care and were examined for the presence of a sucking reflex, snout reflex and phasic bite reflex for baseline measures. Demographic characteristics, physical and cognitive function, and nutritional status were obtained from chart reviews, interviews with nurses, and a brief physical examination at baseline and incidence of aspiration pneumonia during the study period. The sucking reflex was confirmed in 31 patients (25.6%), snout reflex in 15 patients (12.3%) and phasic bite reflex in 28 patients (23.1%). One or more of these reflexes was identified in 38 patients (31.4%). A relationship between the presence of a primitive reflex and nutritional status was shown. An association with the presence of these reflexes and the development of aspiration pneumonia during 6 months was also confirmed. The appearance of primitive reflexes appears to be associated with the risk of malnutrition and developing aspiration pneumonia. © 2013 Japan Geriatrics Society.

  1. Hip proprioceptors preferentially modulate reflexes of the leg in human spinal cord injury

    OpenAIRE

    Onushko, Tanya; Hyngstrom, Allison; Brian D Schmit

    2013-01-01

    Stretch-sensitive afferent feedback from hip muscles has been shown to trigger long-lasting, multijoint reflex responses in people with chronic spinal cord injury (SCI). These reflexes could have important implications for control of leg movements during functional activities, such as walking. Because the control of leg movement relies on reflex regulation at all joints of the limb, we sought to determine whether stretch of hip muscles modulates reflex activity at the knee and ankle and, conv...

  2. Reflexivity: The Creation of Liminal Spaces--Researchers, Participants, and Research Encounters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Enosh, Guy; Ben-Ari, Adital

    2016-03-01

    Reflexivity is defined as the constant movement between being in the phenomenon and stepping outside of it. In this article, we specify three foci of reflexivity--the researcher, the participant, and the encounter--for exploring the interview process as a dialogic liminal space of mutual reflection between researcher and participant. Whereas researchers' reflexivity has been discussed extensively in the professional discourse, participants' reflexivity has not received adequate scholarly attention, nor has the promise inherent in reflective processes occurring within the encounter.

  3. Algebraic Reflexivity of the set of n-Isometries on C(X,E)

    CERN Document Server

    Abubaker, A B

    2012-01-01

    We prove that if the group of isometries of C(X,E) is algebraically reflexive, then the group of n-isometries is also algebraically reflexive. Here, X is a compact Hausdorff space and E is a uniformly convex Banach space such that the group of isometries of E is algebraically reflexive. As a corollary to this, we establish the algebraic reflexivity of the set of generalized bi-circular projections on C(X,E).

  4. [Regression analysis of an instrumental conditioned tentacular reflex in the edible snail].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stepanov, I I; Kuntsevich, S V; Lokhov, M I

    1989-01-01

    Regression analysis revealed the opportunity of approximation with exponential mathematical model of the learning curves of conditioned tentacle reflex. Retention of the reflex persisted for more than three weeks. There were some quantitative differences between conditioning of the right and the left tentacle. There was formation of the reflex in every session during spring period, but there was no retention between sessions. The conditioned tentacle reflex may be employed in neuropharmacological studies.

  5. Correlation between subjective visual horizontal test and ocular vestibular-evoked myogenic potential test.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Kuei-You; Young, Yi-Ho

    2011-02-01

    The static subjective visual horizontal (SVH) test correlates with the dynamic ocular vestibular-evoked myogenic potential (oVEMP) test in healthy and pathological ears, and further confirms that both tests may, at least in part, share the same utricular reflex pathway. This study correlated the SVH test results with those of the oVEMP and cervical VEMP (cVEMP) tests to investigate their relationships. Twenty healthy subjects underwent the SVH test at a view pattern angle of 30° or 70° horizontal tilt under various background distractions to establish the optimal stimulation mode for SVH test. Thereafter, 20 patients with unilateral Meniere's disease underwent the SVH test using the optimal mode. In addition, oVEMP and cVEMP tests were performed in all subjects. The preliminary study in 20 healthy subjects at a view pattern angle of 70° under counterclockwise square background distraction revealed that the mean deviation degree of the SVH test was -0.61 ± 1.17°. Based on the criteria, abnormal percentages of SVH in 20 Meniere's patients were 40%. All healthy subjects had normal oVEMPs and cVEMPs. In contrast, eight patients (40%) showed abnormal oVEMPs and nine (45%) revealed abnormal cVEMPs. The SVH test results correlated significantly with oVEMP results, but not with cVEMP results.

  6. Viscero-somatic and viscero-visceral reflexes in brain death.

    OpenAIRE

    Conci, F.; Procaccio, F; Arosio, M; Boselli, L.

    1986-01-01

    Little is known about spinal visceral reflexes in brain-dead man, although they have been described in experimental animals. In 1983, 25 brain-dead individuals were observed during donor nephrectomy. It was confirmed that some of these donors, without higher centre modulation and not under significant pharmacological influence, had viscero-somatic motor reflexes and viscero-visceral cardiovascular reflexes.

  7. Postnatal temporal, spatial and modality tuning of nociceptive cutaneous flexion reflexes in human infants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cornelissen, Laura; Fabrizi, Lorenzo; Patten, Deborah; Worley, Alan; Meek, Judith; Boyd, Stewart; Slater, Rebeccah; Fitzgerald, Maria

    2013-01-01

    Cutaneous flexion reflexes are amongst the first behavioural responses to develop and are essential for the protection and survival of the newborn organism. Despite this, there has been no detailed, quantitative study of their maturation in human neonates. Here we use surface electromyographic (EMG) recording of biceps femoris activity in preterm (reflex (>4 seconds) to a single noxious skin lance which decreases significantly with gestational age. This reflex is not restricted to the stimulated limb: heel lance evokes equal ipsilateral and contralateral reflexes in preterm and term infants. We further show that infant flexion withdrawal reflexes are not always nociceptive specific: in 29% of preterm infants, tactile stimulation evokes EMG activity that is indistinguishable from noxious stimulation. In 40% of term infants, tactile responses are also present but significantly smaller than nociceptive reflexes. Infant flexion reflexes are also evoked by application of calibrated punctate von Frey hairs (vFh), 0.8-17.2 g, to the heel. Von Frey hair thresholds increase significantly with gestational age and the magnitude of vFh evoked reflexes are significantly greater in preterm than term infants. Furthermore flexion reflexes in both groups are sensitized by repeated vFh stimulation. Thus human infant flexion reflexes differ in temporal, modality and spatial characteristics from those in adults. Reflex magnitude and tactile sensitivity decreases and nociceptive specificity and spatial organisation increases with gestational age. Strong, relatively non-specific, reflex sensitivity in early life may be important for driving postnatal activity dependent maturation of targeted spinal cord sensory circuits.

  8. Affective Modulation of the Startle Eyeblink and Postauricular Reflexes in Autism Spectrum Disorder

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dichter, Gabriel S.; Benning, Stephen D.; Holtzclaw, Tia N.; Bodfish, James W.

    2010-01-01

    Eyeblink and postauricular reflexes to standardized affective images were examined in individuals without (n = 37) and with (n = 20) autism spectrum disorders (ASDs). Affective reflex modulation in control participants replicated previous findings. The ASD group, however, showed anomalous reflex modulation patterns, despite similar self-report…

  9. On Being a Nice Country Girl and an Academic Feminist: Using Reflexivity in Rural Social Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pini, Barbara

    2004-01-01

    This paper uses a study of women's participation in the Australian sugar industry to illustrate and critique the process and usefulness of reflexivity in rural research. I begin by situating the use of reflexivity within the feminist literature. Following this, I describe the way in which I used reflexivity to examine different identities I…

  10. Temporal development of anticipatory reflex modulation to dynamical interactions during arm movement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kimura, Toshitaka; Gomi, Hiroaki

    2009-10-01

    It is known that somatosensory reflex during voluntary arm movement is modulated anticipatorily according to given tasks or environments. However, when and how reflex amplitude is set remains controversial. Is the reflex modulation completed preparatorily before movement execution or does it vary with the movement? Is the reflex amplitude coded in a temporal manner or in a spatial (or state-dependent) manner? Here we studied these issues while subjects performed planar reaching movements with upcoming opposite (rightward/leftward) directions of force fields. Somatosensory reflex responses of shoulder muscles induced by a small force perturbation were evaluated at several points before the arm encountered predictable force fields after movement start. We found that the shoulder flexor reflex responses were generally higher for the rightward than for the leftward upcoming force fields, whereas the extensor reflex responses were higher for the leftward force field. This reflex amplitude depending on the upcoming force field direction became prominent as the reflex was evoked closer to the force fields, indicating continuous changes in reflex modulation during movement. An additional experiment further showed that the reflex modulation developed as a function of the temporal distance to the force fields rather than the spatial distance. Taken together, the results suggest that, in the force field interaction task, somatosensory reflex amplitude during the course of movement is set anticipatorily on the basis of an estimate of the time-to-contact rather than the state-to-contact, to upcoming dynamical interaction during voluntary movement.

  11. The effects of neural synchronization and peripheral compression on the acoustic-reflex threshold

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Müller-Wehlau, Matthias; Mauermann, Manfred; Dau, Torsten;

    2005-01-01

    This study investigates the acoustic reflex threshold (ART) dependency on stimulus phase utilizing low-level reflex audiometry [Neumann et al., Audiol. Neuro-Otol. 1, 359–369 (1996)]. The goal is to obtain optimal broadband stimuli for elicitation of the acoustic reflex and to obtain objective...

  12. A task dependent change in the medium latency component of the soleus stretch reflex

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Grey, Michael James; Larsen, Birgit; Sinkjær, Thomas

    2002-01-01

    In comparison to the H-reflex, the task dependency of the human stretch reflex during locomotive and postural tasks has not received a great deal of attention in the literature. The few studies on reflex task dependency that have been performed to date have concentrated on either the group Ia...

  13. Evaluation of relationship between feeding reflexes and articulation in spastic cerebral palsy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M.R. Hadian

    2006-07-01

    Full Text Available Background: Cerebral palsy is the term used to describe a movement disorder though to be the result of nonprogressive brain damage. Due to damage to CNS, it is associated with articulation disorder and abnormal feeding reflex. Lack of oral function control and coordination following feeding reflex disorders. Articulation disorders are seen in most of the cerebral palsied patients.This research aimed to determine the relationship between feeding reflexes and articulation in cerebral palsy (spasticchildren. Methods: This study was cross sectionally carried out on 52 children with cerebral palsy, 5 to 10 yrs old, in rehabilitation centers and private clinics. The information related to feeding reflexes was collected through direct observation of patient and evaluation of sound articulation through phonetic information test. Results: Statistical analysis carried out by SPSS and chi-square and fisher exact tests. Abnomal chewing and tongue reflex are more prevalent than other feeding reflexes.The relationship between lip reflex and articulation of p/m/r/y/f/č and chewing reflex with articulation of/z/š/ is meaningful. The relationship between biting reflex with articulation of /z/j/l/š/ is meaningful. The relationship between tongue reflex and rooting reflex with articulation of sound is not meaningful. Conclusion: With regard to the result of this research, it can be suggested that in children with cerebral palsy following feeding reflex disorders, abnormal posture during speech occurs that could have effect on articulation.

  14. Experimental Study of a Triode Reflex Geometry Vircator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baryshevsky, Vladimir; Gurinovich, Alexandra; Gurnevich, Evgeny; Molchanov, Pavel

    2017-04-01

    Triode reflex geometry vircator operating within 3.0 - 4.2 GHz range with efficiency up to 6% is developed and experimentally investigated. Shiftable reflectors are shown to enable frequency tuning and output power control. Radiation frequency and power are analyzed for different cathode-anode gap values and varied reflector positions.

  15. Experimental Study of a Triode Reflex Geometry Vircator

    CERN Document Server

    Baryshevsky, Vladimir; Gurnevich, Evgeny; Molchanov, Pavel

    2016-01-01

    Triode reflex geometry vircator operating within 3.0 - 4.2 GHz range with efficiency up to 6% is developed and experimentally investigated. Shiftable reflectors are shown to enable frequency tuning and output power control. Radiation frequency and power are analyzed for different cathode-anode gap values and varied reflector positions.

  16. Design method of coaxial reflex hollow beam generator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Jiake; Xu, Jia; Fu, Yuegang; He, Wenjun; Zhu, Qifan

    2016-10-01

    In view of the light energy loss in central obscuration of coaxial reflex optical system, the design method of a kind of hollow beam generator is introduced. First of all, according to the geometrical parameter and obscuration ratio of front-end coaxial reflex optical system, calculate the required physical dimension of hollow beam, and get the beam expanding rate of the hollow beam generator according to the parameters of the light source. Choose the better enlargement ratio of initial expanding system using the relational expression of beam expanding rate and beam expanding rate of initial system; the traditional design method of the reflex optical system is used to design the initial optical system, and then the position of rotation axis of the hollow beam generator can be obtained through the rotation axis translation formula. Intercept the initial system bus bar using the rotation axis after the translation, and rotate the bus bar around the rotation axis for 360°, so that two working faces of the hollow beam generator can be got. The hollow beam generator designed by this method can get the hollow beam that matches the front-end coaxial reflex optical system, improving the energy utilization ratio of beam and effectively reducing the back scattering of transmission system.

  17. Reconceptualising Learning as a Form of Relational Reflexivity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dyke, Martin

    2015-01-01

    The paper makes a connection between transmission modes and constructivism in sociology and education, respectively. There are parallels between Archer's criticism of upward and downward conflation in social theory, and approaches to learning in education. In her 2012 book, Archer seeks to reconceptualise socialisation as relational reflexivity.…

  18. Design of Perturbation Signals for the Estimation of Proprioceptive Reflexes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schouten, A.C.; De Vlugt, E.; Van der Helm, F.C.T.

    2008-01-01

    This study aimed to identify the functional contribution of reflexes to human motor control during posture maintenance. Continuous random force disturbances were applied at the hand while the subjects were instructed to minimize the deviation resulting from the force disturbances. The results were a

  19. Power from Switching across Netdoms through Reflexive and Indexical Language.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fontdevila, Jorge

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available In differentiated societies with far-reaching yet fragmented social networks, the ability to manage pervasive ambiguity is crucial to navigate domination orders. In this paper we contend that identities, to enhance their control through switchings across networks and domains (netdoms, manage growing ambiguity via language’s reflexive and indexical features. We elaborate on several features—metapragmatics, heteroglossia, and poetics—and assert that they are seldom innocent performances to build consensus in the reproduction of social orders. On the contrary, language is inherently implicated in relations of domination. We then argue that metapragmatic control of stories acquired in countless netdom switchings leads to strong footings that secure resources and opportunity; that rhetorics that include rich heteroglossic voicing via structural holes generate stories that can be reflexively transposed to other institutional arenas; and that poetic control of speech styles may transform identities into power-law constellations with robust footing that decouple into prisms to preserve quality. Our goal is to twofold: First, to show that the reflexivity and indexicality of language emerges from myriad switchings across netdoms; and second, to demonstrate that reflexive and indexical language is critical to identities’ struggles for control—of footing and domination—via their switchings across rapidly polymerizing netdoms.

  20. How to test for the red reflex in a child

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adapted from the poster: ‘See RED’ produced by JR Ainsworth, UK National Retinoblastoma Service, Birmingham, UK and the Childhood Eye Cancer Trust. www.chect.org.uk.

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Examination of pupil reflections, also known as the red reflex text, can reveal problems in the cornea, lens and sometimes the vitreous, and is particularly useful in young children. These photographs show what can occur in the case of certain major eye conditions, the most serious of which is retinoblastoma.

  1. The plantar reflex : a historical, clinical and electromyographic study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    J. van Gijn (Jan)

    1977-01-01

    textabstractThe plantar reflex is one of the most important physical signs in medicine. Few patients undergoing a full medical examination can avoid having their soles stroked, because an upgoing great toe is regarded as a reliable sign of dysfunction of corticospinal nerve fibres. So far, there is

  2. Increased Auditory Startle Reflex in Children with Functional Abdominal Pain

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bakker, Mirte J.; Boer, Frits; Benninga, Marc A.; Koelman, Johannes H. T. M.; Tijssen, Marina A. J.

    2010-01-01

    Objective To test the hypothesis that children with abdominal pain-related functional gastrointestinal disorders have a general hypersensitivity for sensory stimuli. Study design Auditory startle reflexes were assessed in 20 children classified according to Rome III classifications of abdominal pain

  3. Circulatory reflexes in tetraplegics during artifical ventilation and general anaesthesia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Welply, N C; Mathias, C J; Frankel, H L

    1975-11-01

    The arterial blood pressure, heart rate and electrocardiograph were recorded, and plasma electrolytes, arterial blood gases and pH, and plasma catecholamines were estimated in seven patients with physiologically complete cervical spinal cord transections who needed intermittent possitive pressure ventilation (I.P.P.V.) or were undergoing urological surgery under general anaesthesia. In the tetraplegics on I.P.P.V., bradycardia, and in two patients even cardiac arrest, occurred during tracheal suction, especially in the presence of hypoxia. In one tetraplegic being anaesthetised, cardiac arrest occurred during endotracheal intubation. This reflex bradycardia and cardiac arrest appeared to be due to a vago-vagal reflex, unopposed by sympathetic activity or by the pulmonary (inflation) vagal reflex. Atropine was effective in preventing this reflex. In the tetraplegics undergoing urological surgery, severe hypertension resulting from visceral stimulation was effectively reduced by halothane. In these patients, control of arterial blood pressure with lower concentrations of halothane may also be achieved with I.P.P.V.

  4. Identifying intrinsic and reflexive contributions to low-back stabilization

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Van Drunen, P.; Maaswinkel, E.; Van der Helm, F.C.T.; Van Dieën, J.H.; Happee, R.

    2013-01-01

    Motor control deficits have been suggested as potential cause and/or effect of a-specific chronic low-back pain and its recurrent behavior. Therefore, the goal of this study is to identify motor control in low-back stabilization by simultaneously quantifying the intrinsic and reflexive contributions

  5. Trait dominance promotes reflexive staring at masked angry body postures

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hortensius, R.; van Honk, J.; De Gelder, B.; Terburg, D.

    2014-01-01

    It has been shown that dominant individuals sustain eye-contact when non-consciously confronted with angry faces, suggesting reflexive mechanisms underlying dominance behaviors. However, dominance and submission can be conveyed and provoked by means of not only facial but also bodily features. So fa

  6. Knowledge generation and utilisation in occupational therapy: towards epistemic reflexivity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kinsella, Elizabeth Anne; Whiteford, Gail Elizabeth

    2009-08-01

    The purpose of this article is to consider the ways in which theory generation, and hence knowledge generation, in occupational therapy is a complex social process, and therefore carries (often hidden) responsibilities for those who are part of our epistemic community. An epistemic community is a knowledge-producing community, who apply their standards of credibility, and epistemic values, to theory choice. In occupational therapy this community is comprised of a worldwide group of scholars and practitioners. We propose that epistemic reflexivity can be used to critique and contribute to our disciplinary knowledge and to critically consider 'who' makes epistemological choices in our profession, and the consequent implications for the theories we adopt. The purpose of this article is to make these relations explicit so that scholars and therapists can become increasingly conscious and empowered with respect to their contributions to occupational therapy's epistemic community. To demonstrate an application of epistemic reflexivity, we critically consider a theoretical construction that has been widely adopted by the international occupational therapy community: evidence-based practice. As authors, we engage in epistemic reflexivity to critically consider the challenge posed by evidence-based practice. We propose a conception of practice knowledge that is informed by evidence yet based on a conception of wise practice. Our intention is to stimulate discussion and debate in occupational therapy's epistemic community, a number of approaches for fostering epistemic reflexivity in occupational therapy are suggested.

  7. Reconceptualising Learning as a Form of Relational Reflexivity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dyke, Martin

    2015-01-01

    The paper makes a connection between transmission modes and constructivism in sociology and education, respectively. There are parallels between Archer's criticism of upward and downward conflation in social theory, and approaches to learning in education. In her 2012 book, Archer seeks to reconceptualise socialisation as relational reflexivity.…

  8. Strict Feasibility of Variational Inequalities in Reflexive Banach Spaces

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yi Ran HE; Xiu Zhen MAO; Mi ZHOU

    2007-01-01

    Strict feasibility is proved to be an equivalent characterization of (dual) variational in-equalities having a nonempty bounded solution set, provided the mappings involved are stably properly quasimonotone. This generalizes an earlier result from finite-dimensional Euclidean spaces to infinite-dimensional reflexive Banach spaces. Moreover, the monotonicity-type assumptions are also mildly relaxed.

  9. Home and Away: Self-Reflexive Auto-/Ethnography

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Christiane Kraft Alsop

    2002-01-01

    ..., cultural psychology, psychoanalysis and anthropology I will provide a description of those two states to open up various dimensions of their meanings. [1] In the wake of colonialism anthropologists came up with the term self-reflexivity to understand ethnographic limitations and potentials. The concept and method called auto-ethnography is ...

  10. Spasm of the near reflex associated with head injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knapp, Christopher; Sachdev, Arun; Gottlob, Irene

    2002-03-01

    Spasm of the near reflex is characterized by intermittent miosis, convergence spasm and pseudomyopia with blurred vision at distance. Usually, it is a functional disorder in young patients with underlying emotional problems. Only rarely is it caused by organic disorder. We report a patient who developed convergent spasm associated with miosis after head trauma at the age of 84 years.

  11. Reflexive Water Management in Arid Regions: The Case of Iran

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Balali, M.R.; Keulartz, F.W.J.; Korthals, M.

    2009-01-01

    To illuminate the problems and perspectives of water management in Iran and comparable (semi-) arid Middle East and North Africa (MENA) countries, three paradigms can be distinguished: the traditional, the industrial and the reflexive paradigm. Each paradigm is characterised by its key technical sys

  12. Gastric sensitivity and reflexes: basic mechanisms underlying clinical problems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Azpiroz, Fernando; Feinle-Bisset, Christine; Grundy, David; Tack, Jan

    2014-02-01

    Both reflex and sensory mechanisms control the function of the stomach, and disturbances in these mechanisms may explain the pathophysiology of disorders of gastric function. The objective of this report is to perform a literature-based critical analysis of new, relevant or conflicting information on gastric sensitivity and reflexes, with particular emphasis on the comprehensive integration of basic and clinical research data. The stomach exerts both phasic and tonic muscular (contractile and relaxatory) activity. Gastric tone determines the capacity of the stomach and mediates both gastric accommodation to a meal as well as gastric emptying, by partial relaxation or progressive recontraction, respectively. Perception and reflex afferent pathways from the stomach are activated independently by specific stimuli, suggesting that the terminal nerve endings operate as specialized receptors. Particularly, perception appears to be related to stimulation of tension receptors, while the existence of volume receptors in the stomach is uncertain. Reliable techniques have been developed to measure gastric perception and reflexes both in experimental and clinical conditions, and have facilitated the identification of abnormal responses in patients with gastric disorders. Gastroparesis is characterised by impaired gastric tone and contractility, whereas patients with functional dyspepsia have impaired accommodation, associated with antral distention and increased gastric sensitivity. An integrated view of fragmented knowledge allows the design of pathophysiological models in an attempt to explain disorders of gastric function, and may facilitate the development of mechanistically orientated treatments.

  13. Characteristics of Buoyancy Driven Natural Ventilation through Horizontal Openings

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Li, Zhigang

    and smoke. Air flow through vertical openings has been widely investigated but little is known about the flow in the horizontal openings, especially when they are driven by buoyancy. A literature survey shows that the brine-water system and the scale model are normally used forthe research work of air flow...... through horizontal openings. Two cases of full-scale measurements of buoyancy driven natural ventilation through horizontal openings are performed: one horizontal opening and one horizontal opening combined with one vertical opening. For the case of one horizontal opening, the measurements are made...

  14. The horizontal plane appearances of scoliosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Illés, Tamás S.; Burkus, Máté; Somoskeőy, Szabolcs

    2017-01-01

    Purpose: A posterior-anterior vertebral vector is proposed to facilitate visualization and understanding of scoliosis. The aim of this study was to highlight the interest of using vertebral vectors, especially in the horizontal plane, in clinical practice. Methods: We used an EOS two-/three-dimen......Purpose: A posterior-anterior vertebral vector is proposed to facilitate visualization and understanding of scoliosis. The aim of this study was to highlight the interest of using vertebral vectors, especially in the horizontal plane, in clinical practice. Methods: We used an EOS two...... of scoliosis. The approach used is simple. These results are sufficient for a first visual analysis furnishing significant clinical information in all three anatomical planes. This visualization represents a reasonable compromise between mathematical purity and practical use....

  15. Kinematics of horizontal and vertical caterpillar crawling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Griethuijsen, Linnea I; Trimmer, Barry A

    2009-05-01

    Unlike horizontal crawling, vertical crawling involves two counteracting forces: torque rotating the body around its center of mass and gravity resisting forward movement. The influence of these forces on kinematics has been examined in the soft-bodied larval stage of Manduca sexta. We found that crawling and climbing are accomplished using the same movements, with both segment timing and proleg lift indistinguishable in horizontal and vertical locomotion. Minor differences were detected in stride length and in the delay between crawls, which led to a lower crawling speed in the vertical orientation. Although these differences were statistically significant, they were much smaller than the variation in kinematic parameters between animals. The ability of Manduca to crawl and climb using the same movements is best explained by Manduca's relatively small size, slow speed and strong, controlled, passive grip made possible by its proleg/crochets.

  16. Detecting series periodicity with horizontal visibility graphs

    CERN Document Server

    Núñez, Angel M; Valero, Eusebio; Gómez, Jose Patricio; Luque, Bartolo

    2011-01-01

    The horizontal visibility algorithm has been recently introduced as a mapping between time series and networks. The challenge lies in characterizing the structure of time series (and the processes that generated those series) using the powerful tools of graph theory. Recent works have shown that the visibility graphs inherit several degrees of correlations from their associated series, and therefore such graph theoretical characterization is in principle possible. However, both the mathematical grounding of this promising theory and its applications are on its infancy. Following this line, here we address the question of detecting hidden periodicity in series polluted with a certain amount of noise. We first put forward some generic properties of horizontal visibility graphs which allow us to define a (graph theoretical) noise reduction filter. Accordingly, we evaluate its performance for the task of calculating the period of noisy periodic signals, and compare our results with standard time domain (autocorre...

  17. Buoyancy Driven Natural Ventilation through Horizontal Openings

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Heiselberg, Per; Li, Zhigang

    2009-01-01

    An experimental study of the phenomenon of buoyancy driven natural ventilation through single-sided horizontal openings was performed in a full-scale laboratory test rig. The measurements were made for opening ratios L/D ranging from 0.027 to 4.455, where L and D are the length of the opening...... and the diameter of the opening, respectively. The basic nature of airflow through single-sided openings, including airflow rate, air velocity, temperature difference between the rooms and the dimensions of the horizontal openings, were measured. A bi-directional airflow rate was measured using the constant...... injection tracer gas technique. Smoke visualizations showed that the airflow patterns are highly transient and unstable, and that the airflow rate oscillates with time. Correlations between the Froude (Archimedes) number Fr (Ar) and the L/D ratio are presented. In some cases the measured airflow rates fit...

  18. Horizontal Bilayer for Electrical and Optical Recordings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alf Honigmann

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Artificial bilayer containing reconstituted ion channels, transporters and pumps serve as a well-defined model system for electrophysiological investigations of membrane protein structure–function relationship. Appropriately constructed microchips containing horizontally oriented bilayers with easy solution access to both sides provide, in addition, the possibility to investigate these model bilayer membranes and the membrane proteins therein with high resolution fluorescence techniques up to the single-molecule level. Here, we describe a bilayer microchip system in which long-term stable horizontal free-standing and hydrogel-supported bilayers can be formed and demonstrate its prospects particularly for single-molecule fluorescence spectroscopy and high resolution fluorescence microscopy in probing the physicochemical properties like phase behavior of the bilayer-forming lipids, as well as in functional studies of membrane proteins.

  19. Distinct functional properties of the vertical and horizontal saccadic network in Health and Parkinson's disease: An eye-tracking and fMRI study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lemos, J; Pereira, D; Almendra, L; Rebelo, D; Patrício, M; Castelhano, J; Cunha, G; Januário, C; Cunha, L; Freire, A; Castelo-Branco, M

    2016-10-01

    Saccadic behaviour ranges from reflexive (e.g., prosaccade) to goal oriented voluntary movements (e.g., antisaccade). Behavioural asymmetries between vertical and horizontal saccades have been described both in normal individuals (greater delay of vertical prosaccades) and in disease states such as Parkinson's disease (PD) (prosaccades are short and antisaccades are delayed, especially in the vertical plane, possibly due to a frontostriatal deficit). Importantly, the cortical mechanisms for the generation of vertical saccades are largely unknown, both in health and disease, when compared with their horizontal counterpart. Moreover, studies exploring saccadic neural correlates and putative compensatory mechanisms at a functional level in PD are scarce. We investigated horizontal and vertical prosaccades and antisaccades in an eye tracking paradigm in 19 PD patients off medication and 22 healthy controls, followed by a block-design functional Magnetic Resonance Imaging (fMRI) study, consisting of two runs (prosaccade, antisaccade) of 6 blocks each (3 vertical, 3 horizontal). While saccade metrics were not significantly different between groups, PD showed left frontal underactivation during horizontal prosaccades and right parietal overactivation during horizontal and vertical prosaccades and horizontal antisaccades. Moreover, controls showed greater deactivation of the default-mode network (DMN) during antisaccades. Vertical prosaccades were associated with greater right frontal and cerebellar activity in controls, and cuneus hypoactivity in PD. Vertical antisaccades were associated with greater DMN deactivation in both groups and left frontal hypoactivity in PD. Putative functional compensatory changes in the right parietal cortex in PD patients may help to keep saccadic behaviour at the same level as the healthy controls. We provide first time evidence showing that functional cortical asymmetries between vertical and horizontal saccades occur distinctively in PD

  20. Evaluation of cranial tibial and extensor carpi radialis reflexes before and after anesthetic block in cats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tudury, Eduardo Alberto; de Figueiredo, Marcella Luiz; Fernandes, Thaiza Helena Tavares; Araújo, Bruno Martins; Bonelli, Marília de Albuquerque; Diogo, Camila Cardoso; Silva, Amanda Camilo; Santos, Cássia Regina Oliveira; Rocha, Nadyne Lorrayne Farias Cardoso

    2017-02-01

    Objectives This study aimed to test the extensor carpi radialis and cranial tibial reflexes in cats before and after anesthetic block of the brachial and lumbosacral plexus, respectively, to determine whether they depend on a myotatic reflex arc. Methods Fifty-five cats with a normal neurologic examination that were referred for elective gonadectomy were divided into group 1 (29 cats) for testing the extensor carpi radialis reflex, and group 2 (26 cats) for testing the cranial tibial reflex. In group 1, the extensor carpi radialis reflex was tested after anesthetic induction and 15 mins after brachial plexus block with lidocaine. In group 2, the cranial tibial, withdrawal and patellar reflexes were elicited in 52 hindlimbs and retested 15 mins after epidural anesthesia. Results In group 1, before the anesthetic block, 55.17% of the cats had a decreased and 44.83% had a normal extensor carpi radialis reflex. After the block, 68.96% showed a decreased and 27.59% a normal reflex. No cat had an increased or absent reflex before anesthetic block. In group 2, prior to the anesthetic block, 15.38% of the cats had a decreased cranial tibial reflex and 84.62% had a normal response, whereas after the block it was decreased in 26.92% and normal in 73.08% of the cats. None of the cats had an increased or absent reflex. Regarding the presence of both reflexes before and after anesthetic block, there was no significant difference at 1% ( P = 0.013). Conclusions and relevance The extensor carpi radialis and cranial tibial reflexes in cats are not strictly myotatic reflexes, as they are independent of the reflex arc, and may be idiomuscular responses. Therefore, they are not reliable for neurologic examination in this species.