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Sample records for hopkins medical institutions

  1. Creating an institutional conflict-of-interest policy at Johns Hopkins: progress and lessons learned.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Edward D

    2007-03-01

    Unlike policies that address biomedical conflict of interest for individuals, conflict-of-interest policies for academic medical institutions are rare and lack consensus principles. Johns Hopkins Medicine is currently developing an institutional conflict-of-interest policy that emphasizes case-by-case review and disclosure of conflicts to research subjects and the public. Implementation of the policy will focus on transparency, consistent enforcement throughout the institution, thorough employee education about the policy, and ongoing policy review.

  2. Profiling medical school learning environments in Malaysia: a validation study of the Johns Hopkins Learning Environment Scale.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tackett, Sean; Bakar, Hamidah Abu; Shilkofski, Nicole A; Coady, Niamh; Rampal, Krishna; Wright, Scott

    2015-01-01

    While a strong learning environment is critical to medical student education, the assessment of medical school learning environments has confounded researchers. Our goal was to assess the validity and utility of the Johns Hopkins Learning Environment Scale (JHLES) for preclinical students at three Malaysian medical schools with distinct educational and institutional models. Two schools were new international partnerships, and the third was school leaver program established without international partnership. First- and second-year students responded anonymously to surveys at the end of the academic year. The surveys included the JHLES, a 28-item survey using five-point Likert scale response options, the Dundee Ready Educational Environment Measure (DREEM), the most widely used method to assess learning environments internationally, a personal growth scale, and single-item global learning environment assessment variables. The overall response rate was 369/429 (86%). After adjusting for the medical school year, gender, and ethnicity of the respondents, the JHLES detected differences across institutions in four out of seven domains (57%), with each school having a unique domain profile. The DREEM detected differences in one out of five categories (20%). The JHLES was more strongly correlated than the DREEM to two thirds of the single-item variables and the personal growth scale. The JHLES showed high internal reliability for the total score (α=0.92) and the seven domains (α, 0.56-0.85). The JHLES detected variation between learning environment domains across three educational settings, thereby creating unique learning environment profiles. Interpretation of these profiles may allow schools to understand how they are currently supporting trainees and identify areas needing attention.

  3. Profiling medical school learning environments in Malaysia: a validation study of the Johns Hopkins Learning Environment Scale

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sean Tackett

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: While a strong learning environment is critical to medical student education, the assessment of medical school learning environments has confounded researchers. Our goal was to assess the validity and utility of the Johns Hopkins Learning Environment Scale (JHLES for preclinical students at three Malaysian medical schools with distinct educational and institutional models. Two schools were new international partnerships, and the third was school leaver program established without international partnership. Methods: First- and second-year students responded anonymously to surveys at the end of the academic year. The surveys included the JHLES, a 28-item survey using five-point Likert scale response options, the Dundee Ready Educational Environment Measure (DREEM, the most widely used method to assess learning environments internationally, a personal growth scale, and single-item global learning environment assessment variables. Results: The overall response rate was 369/429 (86%. After adjusting for the medical school year, gender, and ethnicity of the respondents, the JHLES detected differences across institutions in four out of seven domains (57%, with each school having a unique domain profile. The DREEM detected differences in one out of five categories (20%. The JHLES was more strongly correlated than the DREEM to two thirds of the single-item variables and the personal growth scale. The JHLES showed high internal reliability for the total score (α=0.92 and the seven domains (α, 0.56-0.85. Conclusion: The JHLES detected variation between learning environment domains across three educational settings, thereby creating unique learning environment profiles. Interpretation of these profiles may allow schools to understand how they are currently supporting trainees and identify areas needing attention.

  4. URobotics—Urology Robotics at Johns Hopkins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stoianovici, D

    2011-01-01

    URobotics (Urology Robotics) is a program of the Urology Department at the Johns Hopkins Medical Institutions dedicated to the development of new technology for urologic surgery (http://urology.jhu.edu/urobotics). The program is unique in that it is the only academic engineering program exclusively applied to urology. The program combines efforts and expertise from the medical and engineering fields through a close partnership of clinical and technical personnel. Since its creation in 1996, the URobotics lab has created several devices, instruments, and robotic systems, several of which have been successfully used in the operating room. This article reviews the technology developed in our laboratory and its surgical applications, and highlights our future directions. PMID:11954067

  5. Medical student musculoskeletal education: an institutional survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skelley, Nathan W; Tanaka, Miho J; Skelley, Logan M; LaPorte, Dawn M

    2012-10-03

    Since the 1910 Flexner Report, medical education continues to undergo curriculum and graduation guideline reform to meet the needs of physicians and patients. Our aims were to (1) assess the quality of musculoskeletal education at our institution's School of Medicine by reporting the results of the Freedman and Bernstein examination among our medical students across all four years of training, and (2) stratify results according to medical school year, educational module, and intended career. We surveyed the 460 2009-2010 School of Medicine students via e-mail. The survey contained a validated orthopaedic examination of musculoskeletal competency (passing grade, 70%), demographic questions (e.g., year in training, clinical area of interest, and time dedicated to musculoskeletal topics in medical school education), and a 10-point tool for determining confidence in assessing musculoskeletal disorders. There were 354 responses (77.0%); six were excluded for incompleteness, leaving 348 for analysis. Linear regression analysis was used to determine the association between test scores and days spent studying musculoskeletal material. The unpaired Student t test was used to compare performance among areas of interest and training years, with p < 0.05 being considered significant. The mean score was 51.1%; only sixty-seven (19.3%) of the students passed. Fourth-year students scored significantly higher (59.0%) compared with first-year students (37.3%), but >65% of students in both groups failed. Only 34.2% of the graduating students had completed a musculoskeletal elective. Students who participated in elective musculoskeletal education had a higher pass rate (67.5%) than those who did not (43.9%, p < 0.001). A minimum of fifteen days dedicated to elective study of musculoskeletal medicine significantly increased the chance of passing this examination. First-year through fourth-year students ranked their level of confidence in dealing with musculoskeletal issues as 3.18, 3

  6. 76 FR 30373 - National Institute of General Medical Sciences; Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-05-25

    ... Institute of General Medical Sciences; Meeting Notice of Closed Meeting Pursuant to section 10(d) of the... General Medical Sciences Initial Review Group; Minority Programs Review Subcommittee A. Date: June 28..., Scientific Review Officer, Office of Scientific Review, National Institute of General Medical Sciences...

  7. 76 FR 30370 - National Institute of General Medical Sciences; Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-05-25

    ... Institute of General Medical Sciences; Meeting Notice of Closed Meeting Pursuant to section 10(d) of the... General Medical Sciences Initial Review Group; Biomedical Research and Research Training Review... General Medical Sciences, National Institutes of Health, Natcher Building, Room 3AN 18F, Bethesda, MD...

  8. Development of global health education at Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine: a student-driven initiative

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dane Moran

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Global health is increasingly present in the formal educational curricula of medical schools across North America. In 2008, students at Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine (JHUSOM perceived a lack of structured global health education in the existing curriculum and began working with the administration to enhance global health learning opportunities, particularly in resource-poor settings. Key events in the development of global health education have included the introduction of a global health intersession mandatory for all first-year students; required pre-departure ethics training for students before all international electives; and the development of a clinical global health elective (Global Health Leadership Program, GHLP. The main challenges to improving global health education for medical students have included securing funding, obtaining institutional support, and developing an interprofessional program that benefits from the resources of the Schools of Medicine, Public Health, and Nursing. Strategies used included objectively demonstrating the need for and barriers to more structured global health experiences; obtaining guidance and modifying existing resources from other institutions and relevant educational websites; and harnessing institution-specific strengths including the large Johns Hopkins global research footprint and existing interprofessional collaborations across the three schools. The Johns Hopkins experience demonstrates that with a supportive administration, students can play an important and effective role in improving global health educational opportunities. The strategies we used may be informative for other students and educators looking to implement global health programs at their own institutions.

  9. 78 FR 28600 - National Institute of General Medical Sciences; Notice of Closed Meetings

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-05-15

    ... HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health National Institute of General Medical Sciences; Notice of... of Committee: National Institute of General Medical Sciences Initial Review Group; Training and..., Office of Scientific Review, National Institute of General Medical Sciences, National Institutes of...

  10. 76 FR 10043 - National Institute of General Medical Sciences; Notice of Closed Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-02-23

    ... HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health National Institute of General Medical Sciences; Notice of... of Committee: National Institute of General Medical Sciences Initial Review Group, Minority Programs..., Office of Scientific Review, National Institute of General Medical Sciences, National Institutes of...

  11. 75 FR 7488 - National Institute of General Medical Sciences; Notice of Closed Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-02-19

    ... HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health National Institute of General Medical Sciences; Notice of... of Committee: National Institute of General Medical Sciences Initial Review Group, Biomedical... Review, National Institute of General Medical Sciences, National Institutes of Health, Natcher Building...

  12. 75 FR 63497 - National Institute of General Medical Sciences; Notice of Closed Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-15

    ... HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health National Institute of General Medical Sciences; Notice of... of Committee: National Institute of General Medical Sciences Special Emphasis Panel; Wound Healing..., Office of Scientific Review, National Institute of General Medical Sciences, National Institutes of...

  13. 78 FR 66372 - National Institute of General Medical Sciences; Notice of Closed Meetings

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-11-05

    ... HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health National Institute of General Medical Sciences; Notice of... of Committee: National Institute of General Medical Sciences Special Emphasis Panel; MIDAS..., Office of Scientific Review, National Institute of General Medical Sciences, National Institutes of...

  14. [Marketing as a tool in the medical institution management].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petrova, N G; Balokhina, S A

    2009-01-01

    The contemporary social economic conditions dictate the necessity to change tactics and strategy of functioning of medical institutions of different property forms. Marketing, alongside with management is to become a leading concept of administration of medical institutions. It should be a framework for systematic collection, registration and analysis of data relevant to the medical services market. The issues of the implementation of marketing concept in the practical everyday activities of commercial medical organization providing cosmetology services to population of metropolis.

  15. National Institute of General Medical Sciences

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Biology and Biophysics Genetics and Developmental Biology Pharmacology, Physiology, and Biological ... U.S. Department of Health and Human Services National Institutes of Health: NIH...Turning Discovery ...

  16. 78 FR 13362 - National Institute of General Medical Sciences; Notice of Closed Meetings

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-02-27

    ... HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health National Institute of General Medical Sciences; Notice of... of Committee: National Institute of General Medical Sciences Special Emphasis Panel Program Projects... Review Officer, Office of Scientific Review, National Institute of General Medical Sciences, National...

  17. 76 FR 10039 - National Institute of General Medical Sciences; Notice of Closed Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-02-23

    ... HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health National Institute of General Medical Sciences; Notice of... of Committee: National Institute of General Medical Sciences Special Emphasis Panel; Research Centers..., Scientific Review Officer, Office of Scientific Review, National Institute of General Medical Sciences...

  18. U.S. Army Medical Research Institute of Infectious Diseases

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... in the U.S. Army Medical Research Institute of Infectious Diseases (USAMRIID). The dedicated members of the USAMRIID staff ... military personnel and civilians from the threat of infectious diseases. We participate in support of emerging disease investigations, ...

  19. Perspectives from the historic African American medical institutions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Epps, C H

    1999-05-01

    The historically African American medical schools have been at the center of medical education for African American physicians in the United States since the Howard University College of Medicine opened in 1868. Although there were more than a dozen African American medical schools established during the next few decades, as propriety or church affiliated schools, only two survived the Flexner Report in 1910. Howard University (1868) and Meharry (1876) survived and trained generations of African Americans. These two schools educated approximately 85% of all African American physicians whereas the majority medical schools educated 15% for more than half of the twentieth century. As the result of a series of lawsuits filed by the National Association for the Advancement of Colored People, civil rights legislation and affirmative action programs, the numbers of the schools that now admitted African Americans increased and the total numbers of African American medical students increased when discrimination was prohibited in 1966. The percentage of African American medical students attending predominantly white institutions increased by 25% in 1948, by 47% in 1968, by 61% in 1983 and to 84% in 1990. Two additional predominantly African American medical schools were established: the Charles R. Drew Medical School, Los Angeles (affiliated with the University of California, Los Angeles) in 1966, and Morehouse Medical School, Atlanta, which admitted its first class in 1978. Recent court decisions prohibiting schools from considering race as factor in admission and the end of affirmative action programs have resulted in a drop in total minority enrollment. The historically African American medical schools, that admitted approximately 15% of the African American medical students during the era of affirmative action programs, will see this percentage decrease as the majority institutions admit fewer African American medical students and minority students. In the United States

  20. Time-bound promotions in Indian medical institutes: a mirage?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sukhlecha, Anupama

    2016-01-01

    Incentives, pay hikes and timely promotions enhance the job performance of an employee. In medical institutes, too, satisfied teachers would train students in a better way leading to better equipped doctors and ultimately, greater patient satisfaction. A study in Malaysia links high levels of satisfaction of employees with good salary, promotions, and incentives.

  1. [A Swiss medical-social institution and the Snoezelen concept].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dubois-Terrail, Caroline; Kemken, Lucie Marigo; Makamwe, Nicole

    2016-01-01

    In collaboration with six student nurses from the Geneva Haute École de Santé, the Les Franchises medical-social institution in Geneva has launched an innovative project: the integration of the Snoezelen concept into its care programme, which will benefit residents with moderate or advanced dementia. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  2. Institutional Oversight of the Graduate Medical Education Enterprise: Development of an Annual Institutional Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amedee, Ronald G; Piazza, Janice C

    2016-01-01

    The Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education (ACGME) fully implemented all aspects of the Next Accreditation System (NAS) on July 1, 2014. In lieu of periodic accreditation site visits of programs and institutions, the NAS requires active, ongoing oversight by the sponsoring institutions (SIs) to maintain accreditation readiness and program quality. The Ochsner Health System Graduate Medical Education Committee (GMEC) has instituted a process that provides a structured, process-driven improvement approach at the program level, using a Program Evaluation Committee to review key performance data and construct an annual program evaluation for each accredited residency. The Ochsner GMEC evaluates the aggregate program data and creates an Annual Institutional Review (AIR) document that provides direction and focus for ongoing program improvement. This descriptive article reviews the 2014 process and various metrics collected and analyzed to demonstrate the program review and institutional oversight provided by the Ochsner graduate medical education (GME) enterprise. The 2014 AIR provided an overview of performance and quality of the Ochsner GME program for the 2013-2014 academic year with particular attention to program outcomes; resident supervision, responsibilities, evaluation, and compliance with duty-hour standards; results of the ACGME survey of residents and core faculty; and resident participation in patient safety and quality activities and curriculum. The GMEC identified other relevant institutional performance indicators that are incorporated into the AIR and reflect SI engagement in and contribution to program performance at the individual program and institutional levels. The Ochsner GME office and its program directors are faced with the ever-increasing challenges of today's healthcare environment as well as escalating institutional and program accreditation requirements. The overall commitment of this SI to advancing our GME enterprise is

  3. [Ethic review on clinical experiments of medical devices in medical institutions].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shuai, Wanjun; Chao, Yong; Wang, Ning; Xu, Shining

    2011-07-01

    Clinical experiments are always used to evaluate the safety and validity of medical devices. The experiments have two types of clinical trying and testing. Ethic review must be done by the ethics committee of the medical department with the qualification of clinical research, and the approval must be made before the experiments. In order to ensure the safety and validity of clinical experiments of medical devices in medical institutions, the contents, process and approval criterions of the ethic review were analyzed and discussed.

  4. 75 FR 30408 - National Institute of General Medical Sciences; Notice of Closed Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-06-01

    ... HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health National Institute of General Medical Sciences; Notice of... Committee: National Institute of General Medical Sciences Special Emphasis Panel, Wound Healing and Biofilms... Scientific Review, National Institute of General Medical Sciences, National Institutes of Health, 45 Center...

  5. 78 FR 67374 - National Institute of General Medical Sciences; Notice of Closed Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-11-12

    ... HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health National Institute of General Medical Sciences; Notice of... of Committee: National Institute of General Medical Sciences Special Emphasis Panel; COBRE III... Institute of General Medical Sciences, National Institutes of Health, 45 Center Drive, Room 3As.19K...

  6. 78 FR 39741 - National Institute of General Medical Sciences; Notice of Closed Meetings

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-07-02

    ... HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health National Institute of General Medical Sciences; Notice of... of Committee: National Institute of General Medical Sciences Special Emphasis Panel; SCORE Grant... Institute of General Medical Sciences, National Institutes of Health, 45 Center Drive, Room 3An.12C...

  7. 76 FR 10038 - National Institute of General Medical Sciences; Notice of Closed Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-02-23

    ... HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health National Institute of General Medical Sciences; Notice of... of Committee: National Institute of General Medical Sciences Special Emphasis Panel, PSI Biology... Scientific Review, National Institute of General Medical Sciences, National Institutes of Health, 45 Center...

  8. 75 FR 42759 - National Institute of General Medical Sciences; Notice of Closed Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-22

    ... HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health National Institute of General Medical Sciences; Notice of... of Committee: National Institute of General Medical Sciences Special Emphasis Panel, R-13 Conference... Review, National Institute of General Medical Sciences, National Institutes of Health, Natcher Building...

  9. 78 FR 28601 - National Institute of General Medical Sciences; Notice of Closed Meetings

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-05-15

    ... HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health National Institute of General Medical Sciences; Notice of... of Committee: National Institute of General Medical Sciences; Initial Review Group, Training and..., National Institute of General Medical Sciences, National Institutes of Health, 45 Center Drive, Room 3An...

  10. 78 FR 66367 - National Institute of General Medical Sciences; Notice of Closed Meetings

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-11-05

    ... HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health National Institute of General Medical Sciences; Notice of... of Committee: National Institute of General Medical Sciences Initial Review Group; Training and... Review, National Institute of General Medical Sciences, National Institutes of Health, 45 Center Drive...

  11. 77 FR 64812 - National Institute of General Medical Sciences; Notice of Closed Meetings

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-10-23

    ... HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health National Institute of General Medical Sciences; Notice of... of Committee: National Institute of General Medical Sciences Special Emphasis Panel; Peer Review of... Review, National Institute of General Medical Sciences, National Institutes of Health, 45 Center Drive...

  12. 78 FR 37557 - National Institute of General Medical Sciences; Notice of Closed Meetings

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-06-21

    ... HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health National Institute of General Medical Sciences; Notice of... of Committee: National Institute of General Medical Sciences Special Emphasis Panel, R01 Grant... Officer, Office of Scientific Review, National Institute of General Medical Sciences, National Institutes...

  13. 75 FR 63493 - National Institute of General Medical Sciences; Notice of Closed Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-15

    ... HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health National Institute of General Medical Sciences; Notice of... of Committee: National Institute of General Medical Sciences Initial Review Group; Minority Programs... Institute of General Medical Sciences, National Institutes of Health, Natcher Building, Room 3AN18C...

  14. 78 FR 66369 - National Institute of General Medical Sciences; Notice of Closed Meetings

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-11-05

    ... HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health National Institute of General Medical Sciences; Notice of... of Committee: National Institute of General Medical Sciences Initial Review Group Training and..., National Institute of General Medical Sciences, National Institutes of Health, 45 Center Drive, Room 3An...

  15. 78 FR 35942 - National Institute of General Medical Sciences; Notice of Closed Meetings

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-06-14

    ... HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health National Institute of General Medical Sciences; Notice of... of Committee: National Institute of General Medical Sciences Special Emphasis Panel; R-13 Conference... Officer, Office of Scientific Review, National Institute of General Medical Sciences, National Institutes...

  16. 76 FR 35222 - National Institute of General Medical Sciences; Notice of Closed Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-06-16

    ... HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health National Institute of General Medical Sciences; Notice of... of Committee: National Institute of General Medical Sciences Initial Review Group, Minority Programs... Scientific Review, National Institute of General Medical Sciences, National Institutes of Health, 45 Center...

  17. 78 FR 66370 - National Institute of General Medical Sciences; Notice of Closed Meetings

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-11-05

    ... HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health National Institute of General Medical Sciences; Notice of... of Committee: National Institute of General Medical Sciences Special Emphasis Panel; Peer Review of... Institute of General Medical Sciences, National Institutes of Health, 45 Center Drive, Room 3An.22, Bethesda...

  18. NIH's National Institute of General Medical Sciences celebrates 45 years of Discovery for Health

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... By Alison Davis NIH's National Institute of General Medical Sciences celebrates 45 years of Discovery for Health The National Institute of General Medical Sciences (NIGMS) is the NIH institute that primarily supports ...

  19. Sustaining Reliability on Accountability Measures at The Johns Hopkins Hospital.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pronovost, Peter J; Holzmueller, Christine G; Callender, Tiffany; Demski, Renee; Winner, Laura; Day, Richard; Austin, J Matthew; Berenholtz, Sean M; Miller, Marlene R

    2016-02-01

    In 2012 Johns Hopkins Medicine leaders challenged their health system to reliably deliver best practice care linked to nationally vetted core measures and achieve The Joint Commission Top Performer on Key Quality Measures ®program recognition and the Delmarva Foundation award. Thus, the Armstrong Institute for Patient Safety and Quality implemented an initiative to ensure that ≥96% of patients received care linked to measures. Nine low-performing process measures were targeted for improvement-eight Joint Commission accountability measures and one Delmarva Foundation core measure. In the initial evaluation at The Johns Hopkins Hospital, all accountability measures for the Top Performer program reached the required ≥95% performance, gaining them recognition by The Joint Commission in 2013. Efforts were made to sustain performance of accountability measures at The Johns Hopkins Hospital. Improvements were sustained through 2014 using the following conceptual framework: declare and communicate goals, create an enabling infrastructure, engage clinicians and connect them in peer learning communities, report transparently, and create accountability systems. One part of the accountability system was for teams to create a sustainability plan, which they presented to senior leaders. To support sustained improvements, Armstrong Institute leaders added a project management office for all externally reported quality measures and concurrent reviewers to audit performance on care processes for certain measure sets. The Johns Hopkins Hospital sustained performance on all accountability measures, and now more than 96% of patients receive recommended care consistent with nationally vetted quality measures. The initiative methods enabled the transition of quality improvement from an isolated project to a way of leading an organization.

  20. Simmel's dynamic social medicine: new questions for studying medical institutions?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Menchik, Daniel A

    2014-04-01

    Over the last half century, changes in the structure of medicine have shifted the relationship between the profession of medicine and social institutions. In this paper, I uncover ideas for retheorizing this relationship by analyzing a review by Georg Simmel that has been previously overlooked. In an analytical overview and critical appraisal of Simmel's text, I argue that he considered preventative medical knowledge more influential when this knowledge is located outside the physician-patient relationship. Simmel suggests we need to identify how such knowledge is injected into medical and non-medical settings by the mixtures of professional-, market-, and state-based institutions governing medicine, and pay attention to how these institutions shift. His goals show continuity with a social medicine movement in Germany previously thought to be stalled, and are unique too in their focus on targeting institutions over individuals. Through a close analysis of Simmel's ideas, we can see the relationship of public health with social structural studies of medicine in theoretically innovative ways. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Johns Hopkins Particulate Matter Research Center

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The Johns Hopkins Particulate Matter Research Center will map health risks of PM across the US based on analyses of national databases on air pollution, mortality,...

  2. Genetics Home Reference: Pitt-Hopkins syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... that do not look in the same direction (strabismus), short stature, and minor brain abnormalities. Affected individuals ... responsible for Pitt-Hopkins syndrome, a severe epileptic encephalopathy associated with autonomic dysfunction. Am J Hum Genet. ...

  3. Factors affecting the depth of burns occurring in medical institutions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cho, Young Soon; Choi, Young Hwan; Yoon, Cheonjae; You, Je Sung

    2015-05-01

    Most cases of burns occurring in medical institutions are associated with activities involving heat. It is very difficult to detect these burns. To date, there are few reports on burns occurring in medical institutions. The purpose of this paper was to analyze the etiology of burns occurring in medical institutions and to elucidate the factors affecting burn depth. We conducted a retrospective analysis of the medical records of patients who visited our center from April 2008 to February 2013. This study enrolled all patients with burns occurring in the medical institution during or related to treatment. We excluded burn patients whose burns were not related to treatment (for example, we excluded patients with scalding burns that occurred in the hospital cafeteria and pediatric patients with hot water burns from the water purifier). However, patients with burns that occurred in the recovery room after general anesthesia were included. A total of 115 patients were enrolled in this study. The average patient age was 41.5 years, with more women than men (M:F=31:84). There were 29 cases (25.3%) of superficial burns (first-degree and superficial second-degree) and 86 cases (74.7%) of deep burns (deep second-degree and third-degree). Hot packs were the most common cause of burns (27 cases, 23.5%), followed by laser therapy, heating pads, and grounding pads, accounting for 15 cases each. There were 89 cases (77.4%) of contact burns and 26 cases (22.6%) of non-contact burns. The most common site of burns was the lower extremities (41 cases, 35.7%). The burn site and contact burns were both factors affecting burn depth. The rate of deep burns was higher in patients with contact burns than in those with non-contact burns (odds ratio 4.26) and was associated with lower body burns (odds ratio 2.85). In burns occurring in medical institutions, there is a high probability of a deep burn if it is a contact burn or occurs in the lower body. Therefore, safety guidelines are needed

  4. 78 FR 63231 - National Institute of General Medical Sciences; Notice of Closed Meetings

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-10-23

    ... HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health National Institute of General Medical Sciences; Notice of... of Committee: National Institute of General Medical Sciences Special Emphasis Panel P20 INBRE... of General Medical Sciences, National Institutes of Health, 45 Center Drive, Room 3An.22, Bethesda...

  5. 77 FR 71430 - National Institute of General Medical Sciences; Notice of Closed Meetings

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-11-30

    ... HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health National Institute of General Medical Sciences; Notice of... of Committee: National Institute of General Medical Sciences Special Emphasis Panel; Review of P01...., Scientific Review Officer, Office of Scientific Review, National Institute of General Medical Sciences...

  6. 75 FR 30410 - National Institute of General Medical Sciences; Notice of Closed Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-06-01

    ... HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health National Institute of General Medical Sciences; Notice of... of Committee: National Institute of General Medical Sciences Special Emphasis Panel, Dynamics of Host... Medical Sciences, National Institutes of Health, Natcher Building, Room 3AN-12, Bethesda, MD 20892. (301...

  7. 75 FR 7484 - National Institute of General Medical Sciences; Notice of Closed Meetings

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-02-19

    ... HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health National Institute of General Medical Sciences; Notice of... of Committee: National Institute of General Medical Sciences Initial Review Group, Minority Programs... General Medical Sciences, National Institutes of Health, Natcher Building, Room 3AN18C, Bethesda, MD 20892...

  8. 78 FR 70311 - National Institute of General Medical Sciences; Notice of Closed Meetings

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-11-25

    ... HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health National Institute of General Medical Sciences; Notice of... of Committee: National Institute of General Medical Sciences Special Emphasis Panel; Review of R-13...., Scientific Review Officer, Office of Scientific Review, National Institute of General Medical Sciences...

  9. The Armed Forces Research Institute of Medical Sciences: five decades of collaborative medical research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Arthur; Nitayaphan, Sorachai

    2011-05-01

    The Armed Forces Research Institute of Medical Sciences (AFRIMS) is a 50-year-old joint institute of the US and Royal Thai Army Medical Departments located in Bangkok, Thailand. Investigators from the Institute have carried out research in Thailand and the region, in collaboration with many partners, focused on a large number of tropical infectious diseases. In celebration of the 50th anniversary, this paper summarizes highlights of this research, focusing on malaria, Japanese encephalitis, dengue, diarrhea and HIV. In addition, research done in support of the medical problems of refugees and of the health of Thai peace-keeping forces are summarized. The research carried out by AFRIMS and added to the scientific literature has contributed significantly to advancement in multiple areas of tropical infectious disease.

  10. The Robert E. Hopkins Center for Optical Design and Engineering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zavislan, James M.; Brown, Thomas G.

    2008-08-01

    In 1929, a grant from Eastman Kodak and Bausch and Lomb established The Institute of Optics as the nation's first academic institution devoted to training optical scientists and engineers. The mission was 'to study light in all its phases', and the curriculum was designed to educate students in the fundamentals of optical science and build essential skills in applied optics and optical engineering. Indeed, our historic strength has been a balance between optical science and engineering--we have alumni who are carrying out prize-winning research in optical physics, alumni who are innovative optical engineers, and still other alumni who are leaders in the business community. Faculty who are top-notch optical engineers are an important resource to optical physics research groups -- likewise, teaching and modeling excellent optical science provides a strong underpinning for students on the applied/engineering end of the spectrum. This model -an undergraduate and graduate program that balances fundamental optics, applied optics, and optical engineering- has served us well. The impressive and diverse range of opportunities for our BS graduates has withstood economic cycles, and the students graduate with a healthy dose of practical experience. Undergraduate advisors, with considerable initiative from the program coordinator, are very aggressive in pointing students toward summer research and engineering opportunities. The vast majority of our undergraduate students graduate with at least one summer of experience in a company or a research laboratory. For example, 95% of the class of 2008 spent the summer of 2007 at companies and/or research laboratories: These include Zygo, NRL, Bausch and Lomb, The University of Rochester(The Institute of Optics, Medical Center, and Laboratory for Laser Energetics), QED, ARL Night Vision laboratories, JPL, Kollsman, OptiMax, Northrup Grumman, and at least two other companies. It is an impressive list, and bodes well for the career

  11. THE INFORMATION CONFIDENTIALITY AND CYBER SECURITY IN MEDICAL INSTITUTIONS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    SABAU-POPA CLAUDIA DIANA

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available The information confidentiality and cyber security risk affects the right to confidentiality and privacy of the patient, as regulated in Romania by the Law 46/2002. The manifestation of the cyber security risk event affects the reputation of the healthcare institution and is becoming more and more complex and often due to the: development of network technology, the medical equipment connected to wifi and the electronic databases. The databases containing medical records were implemented due to automation. Thus, transforming data into medical knowledge contribute to a better understanding of the disease. Due to these factors, the measures taken by the hospital management for this type of risk are adapted to the cyber changes. The hospital objectives aim: the implementation of a robust information system, the early threats identifications and the incident reporting. Neglecting this type of risk can generate financial loss, inability to continue providing health care services for a certain period of time, providing an erroneous diagnosis, medical equipment errors etc. Thus, in a digital age the appropriate risk management for the information security and cyber risk represent a necessity. The main concern of hospitals worldwide is to align with international requirements and obtain credentials in terms of data security from the International Organisation for Standardization, which regulates the management of this type of risk. Romania is at the beginning in terms of concerns regarding the management, avoidance and mitigation of information security, the health system being most highly exposed to its manifestation. The present paper examines the concerns of the health system to the confidentiality of information and cyber security risk and its management arrangements. Thus, a set of key risk indicators is implemented and monitored for 2011-2013, using a user interface, a Dashboard, which acts as an early warning system of the manifestation of the

  12. Medical wastes characterisation in healthcare institutions in Mauritius.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohee, R

    2005-01-01

    This study was initiated to characterize solid and liquid wastes generated in healthcare institutions and to provide a framework for the safe management of these wastes. The project was carried at three major medical institutions, namely, the Jeetoo Hospital, the Sir Seewoosagur Ramgoolam National (SSRN) Hospital and the Clinic Mauricienne. A waste audit carried out at these sites revealed that approximately 10% of solid wastes was hazardous in nature, consisting mainly of infectious, pathological and chemical wastes. The average amount of hazardous wastes per patient per day was found to be 0.072 kg at Jeetoo hospital, 0.091 kg at SSRN hospital and 0.179 kg at the clinic. The amount of hazardous wastes generated as a function of the number of occupied beds was found to follow a relationship of type y=0.0006x-0.19, where y was the amount of hazardous wastes generated per bed per day and x was the number of occupied beds. The waste quantifying process also revealed that at SSRN Hospital, 0.654 m(3) of water was being consumed per patient per day and the amount of wastewater produced was 500 m(3)/day. Further analysis revealed that the wastewater was polluting with chemical oxygen demand (COD), biological oxygen demand (BOD(5)), total suspended solids (TSS) and coliform content well above permissible limits.

  13. Instruction at the Hopkins Marine Station

    Science.gov (United States)

    1992-07-29

    in Frank Suprynowicz t.he Cell Cycle (Scripps Clinic). Week 4 July 4 ....................... S RESEARCH PROJECTS 6 g 7 3 . 8 a a Week 5 July 11 6 12...Presentations LASER G VIDEO MICROSCOPY Hopkins Marine Station and Dept. of Molecular 4 Cellular ?thyioloy Stanford University Sumer 1989 (Preliminary...sequenace, reie~mble those of the M-phase site% occur in othet nucleic acid-binding proteina wJ histonet kinalse, Is not Inhibited by SDINAP. and Sp his

  14. 76 FR 11801 - National Institute of General Medical Sciences; Notice of Closed Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-03-03

    ... of Committee: National Institute of General Medical Sciences Special Emphasis Panel, Systems Biology... HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health National Institute of General Medical Sciences; Notice of... Assistance Program Nos. 93.375, Minority Biomedical Research Support; 93.821, Cell Biology and Biophysics...

  15. Paul Scherrer Institut annual report 1995. Annex II: PSI life sciences and institute for medical radiobiology newsletter 1995

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Blaeuenstein, P.; Gschwend, B. [eds.

    1996-09-01

    The newsletter presents the 1995 progress report of PSI F2-Department and of the Institute for Medical Radiobiology in the fields of radiation medicine, radiopharmacy and radiation hygiene. figs., tabs., refs.

  16. Computerization medical institutions for the organization and optimization of clinical processes

    OpenAIRE

    ABDUMANONOV AKHRORJON ADXAMJONOVICH; KARABAEV MUHAMMADJON KARABAEV

    2016-01-01

    Article is devoted introduction of the medical is information communication technologies in emergency medical aid Uzbekistan. On the basis of practice introduction of complex medical information system is shown, that introduction of such systems in medical institutions, is a basis of effective gathering, storage, processing and use of the medical information.

  17. 77 FR 76059 - National Institute of General Medical Sciences; Notice of Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-12-26

    ... HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health National Institute of General Medical Sciences; Notice of....), notice is hereby given of a meeting of the National Advisory General Medical Sciences Council. The... clearly unwarranted invasion of personal privacy. Name of Committee: National Advisory General Medical...

  18. 75 FR 79386 - National Institute of General Medical Sciences; Notice of Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-12-20

    ... HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health National Institute of General Medical Sciences; Notice of....), notice is hereby given of a meeting of the National Advisory General Medical Sciences Council. The... clearly unwarranted invasion of personal privacy. Name of Committee: National Advisory General Medical...

  19. 75 FR 49499 - National Institute of General Medical Sciences; Notice of Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-08-13

    ... HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health National Institute of General Medical Sciences; Notice of....), notice is hereby given of a meeting of the National Advisory General Medical Sciences Council. The... clearly unwarranted invasion of personal privacy. Name of Committee: National Advisory General Medical...

  20. 78 FR 77472 - National Institute of General Medical Sciences; Notice of Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-12-23

    ... HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health National Institute of General Medical Sciences; Notice of....), notice is hereby given of a meeting of the National Advisory General Medical Sciences Council. The... clearly unwarranted invasion of personal privacy. Name of Committee: National Advisory General Medical...

  1. 76 FR 44597 - National Institute of General Medical Sciences; Notice of Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-07-26

    ... HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health National Institute of General Medical Sciences; Notice of....), notice is hereby given of a meeting of the National Advisory General Medical Sciences Council. The... clearly unwarranted invasion of personal privacy. Name of Committee: National Advisory General Medical...

  2. 77 FR 47857 - National Institute of General Medical Sciences; Notice of Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-08-10

    ... HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health National Institute of General Medical Sciences; Notice of....), notice is ] hereby given of a meeting of the National Advisory General Medical Sciences Council. The... clearly unwarranted invasion of personal privacy. Name of Committee: National Advisory General Medical...

  3. 78 FR 25281 - National Institute of General Medical Sciences; Notice of Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-04-30

    ... HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health National Institute of General Medical Sciences; Notice of....), notice is hereby given of a meeting of the National Advisory General Medical Sciences Council. The... clearly unwarranted invasion of personal privacy. Name of Committee: National Advisory General Medical...

  4. Electronic Medical Records, Medical Students, and Ambulatory Family Physicians: A Multi-Institution Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    White, Jordan; Anthony, David; WinklerPrins, Vince; Roskos, Steven

    2017-10-01

    Medical students commonly encounter electronic medical records (EMRs) in their ambulatory family medicine clerkships, but how students interact with this technology varies tremendously and presents challenges to students and preceptors. Little research to date has evaluated the impact of EMRs on medical student education in the ambulatory setting; this three-institution study aimed to identify behaviors of ambulatory family medicine preceptors as they relate to EMRs and medical students. In 2015, the authors sent e-mails to ambulatory preceptors who in the preceding year had hosted medical students during family medicine clerkships, inviting them to participate in the survey, which asked questions about each preceptor's methods of using the EMR with medical students. Of 801 ambulatory preceptors, 265 (33%) responded. The vast majority of respondents used an EMR and provided students with access to it in some way, but only 62.2% (147/236) allowed students to write electronic notes. Of those who allowed students electronic access, one-third did so by logging students in under their own (the preceptor's) credentials, either by telling the students their log-in information (22/202; 10.9%) or by logging in the student without revealing their passwords (43/202; 21.3%). Ambulatory medical student training in the use of EMRs not only varies but also requires many preceptors to break rules for students to learn important documentation skills. Without changes to the policies surrounding student access to and use of EMRs, future physicians will enter residency without the training they need to appropriately document patient care.

  5. Hopkins in the Age of Maxwell Hopkins à l’époque de Maxwell

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    René Gallet

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available Lorsque l’on veut situer l’œuvre de Hopkins dans son contexte scientifique, on a l’habitude de le faire uniquement par rapport au débat évolutionniste, ou même darwinien, comme dans l’ouvrage de référence de T. Zaniello, Hopkins in the Age of Darwin. Ceci présuppose une vision sélective de ce contexte où figure notamment une autre grande révolution scientifique, dans le domaine de la physique fondamentale. Le représentant le plus éminent en est J. C. Maxwell, chaînon essentiel entre Newton et Einstein. Dans ses textes, Hopkins lui-même s’est intéressé surtout à cette autre révolution scientifique, allant jusqu’à commencer un livre critique envers Light, ouvrage de Tait, physicien de renom et ami de Maxwell. Hopkins s’en prend plus à l’épistémologie idéaliste illustrée, selon le poète, par Tait, qu’à la pensée davantage matérialiste d’un Tyndall. La raison en est sans doute son attachement à un réalisme philosophique dont dépend la notion d’ « inscape ».

  6. Medical Student Perceptions of Global Surgery at an Academic Institution: Identifying Gaps in Global Health Education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mehta, Ambar; Xu, Tim; Murray, Matthew; Casey, Kathleen M

    2017-08-01

    Robust global health demands access to safe, affordable, timely surgical care for all. The long-term success of global surgery requires medical students to understand and engage with this emerging field. The authors characterized medical students' perceptions of surgical care relative to other fields within global health. An optional, anonymous survey was given to all Johns Hopkins medical students from February to March 2016 to assess perceptions of surgical care and its role in global health. Of 480 students, 365 (76%) completed the survey, with 150 (41%) reporting global health interests. One-third (34%) of responding students felt that surgical care is one of two fields with the greatest potential global health impact in the future, second to infectious disease (49%). A minority (28%) correctly identified that trauma results in more deaths worldwide than obstetric complications or HIV/AIDS, tuberculosis, and malaria combined. Relative to other examined fields, students perceived surgical care as the least preventive and cost-effective, and few students (3%) considered adequate surgical care the best indicator of a robust health care system. Students believed that practicing in a surgical field was least amenable to pursuing a global health career, citing several barriers. Medical students have several perceptions of global surgery that contradict current evidence and literature, which may have implications for their career choices. Opportunities to improve students' global health knowledge and awareness of global surgery career paths include updating curricula, fostering meaningful international academic opportunities, and creating centers of global surgery and global health consortia.

  7. 76 FR 49492 - National Institute of General Medical Sciences Amended Notice of Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-08-10

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health National Institute of General Medical Sciences Amended... Medical Sciences Special Emphasis Panel, August 11, 2011, 1 p.m. to August 11, 2011, 4 p.m., National...

  8. 76 FR 70155 - National Institute of General Medical Sciences; Amended Notice of Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-11-10

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health National Institute of General Medical Sciences; Amended... Medical Sciences Special Emphasis Panel, November 15, 2011, 12 p.m. to November 15, 2011, 5 p.m., National...

  9. 78 FR 13364 - National Institute of General Medical Sciences; Notice of Closed Meetings

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-02-27

    ... Medical Sciences Special Emphasis Panel; Systems Biology Grant Applications. Date: March 19, 2013. Time: 8... Research Support; 93.821, Cell Biology and Biophysics Research; 93.859, Pharmacology, Physiology, and... HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health National Institute of General Medical Sciences; Notice of...

  10. William Henry Welch (1850–1934): the road to Johns Hopkins

    OpenAIRE

    Silverman, Barry D.

    2011-01-01

    William Henry Welch's selection in 1884 as the first faculty member of the new medical school at Johns Hopkins created the invigorating atmosphere that generated the revolutionary changes in medical training and laboratory medicine that transformed medicine in America. Dr. Welch's family traditions, his New England upbringing, Yale education, and German university experience prepared a unique individual to lead American medicine into the 20th century.

  11. Medical Institutions and Twitter: A Novel Tool for Public Communication in Japan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sugawara, Yuya; Narimatsu, Hiroto; Tsuya, Atsushi; Tanaka, Atsushi; Fukao, Akira

    2016-01-01

    Twitter is a free social networking and microblogging service on the Internet. Medical professionals and patients have started to use Twitter in medicine. Twitter use by medical institutions can interactively and efficiently provide public health information and education for laypeople. This study examined Twitter usage by medical institutions. We reviewed all Japanese user accounts in which the names of medical institutions were described in the user's Twitter profile. We then classified medical institutions' tweets by content. We extracted 168 accounts for medical institutions with ≥500 followers. The medical specialties of those accounts were dentistry and oral surgery (n=73), dermatology (n=12), cosmetic surgery (n=10), internal medicine (n=10), ophthalmology (n=6), obstetrics and gynecology (n=5), plastic surgery (n=2), and others (n=50). Of these, 21 accounts tweeted medical knowledge and 45 accounts tweeted guidance about medical practice and consultation hours, including advertisements. In the dentistry and oral surgery accounts, individual behavior or thinking was the most frequent (22/71, 31%) content. On the other hand, consultation including advertisements was the most frequent (14/23, 61%) in cosmetic surgery, plastic surgery, and dermatology. Some medical specialties used Twitter for disseminating medical knowledge or guidance including advertisements. This indicates that Twitter potentially can be used for various purposes by different medical specialties.

  12. Differences in the use of outsourcing in public and private institutions providing medical services.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Czerw, Aleksandra I; Kowalska, Mariola; Religioni, Urszula

    2014-06-29

    The costs of health care in Poland are continuously increasing. Thus, almost every institution providing medical services aims at their limitation. One of the costs rationalisation methods in the health care sector is outsourcing. The study was conducted in 153 randomly selected institutions providing medical activities. The tool was a questionnaire, available via a web browser. Over 30% of public institutions identified the need for financial savings, as the main reason for outsourcing the cleaning function. Among private institutions, the dominant reason for this is too high maintenance cost of the cleaning staff (less than 40% of responses). The huge number of medical institutions use the services of an external company for laundering. Over 30% of public institutions identified as the most common reason for separation of functions laundering lack of resources to upgrade and modernize facilities. Less than 27% of public institutions indicate too high costs of kitchen staff as the main reason for ordering function of feeding. Another reason is the need for financial savings (22% response rate). Some institutions indicate a desire to focus on key areas (20% of responses) and lack of financial resources to upgrade and modernize the kitchen (20% response rate). Public and private institutions exercise control over the quality and method performed by an external service (71% of public institutions and 59% of private institutions). Private institutions often informally exercise external control (difference confirmed - Fisher's exact test). Less than 90% of public institutions indicated satisfaction with the services provided by external companies. The adaptation of outsourcing in medical facilities leads to financial efficiency improvement. Through the separation of some medical functions and entrusting their realisation to external companies, medical institutions can focus on their basic activity that is the provision of health services.

  13. The current situation and development of medical device testing institutes in China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Xiaofang; Mu, Ruihong; Fan, Yubo; Wang, Chunren; Li, Deyu

    2017-04-01

    This article analyses the current situation and development of Chinese medical device testing institutes from the perspectives of the two most important functions - testing functions and medical device standardization functions. Areas Covered: The objective of the Chinese government regulations for medical device industry is to ensure the safety and effectiveness of medical devices for Chinese patients. To support the regulation system, the Chinese government has established medical device testing institutes at different levels for example, the national, provincial, and municipal levels. These testing institutes also play an important role in technical support during medical device premarket registration and post market surveillance, they are also the vital practitioners of Chinese medical device standardization. Expert Commentary: Chinese medical device testing institutes are technical departments established by government, and serve the regulatory functions of government agency. In recent years, with the rapid development of medical device industry as well as constantly increasing international and domestic medical device market, the importance of medical device testing institute is more prominent, However, there are still some problems unsolved, such as their overall capacity remains to be improved, construction of standardization is to be strengthened, etc.

  14. Sexual behavior of medical students: A single institutional survey ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Objective: We investigated the sexual practices of medical students as they are positioned to serve as peer educators in the fight against HIV/AIDS. Methods: This was a cross sectional study, where self- administered questionnaires were distributed to consenting 4th to 6th year medical students in Jos, Nigeria with a view of ...

  15. Explaining medical practice variation: social organization and institutional mechanisms.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jong, J. de; Groenewegen, P.P.; Westert, G.P.

    2009-01-01

    Background: In general, patients expect that the medical treatment they receive is provided by physicians who adhere to professional norms which are based on evidence. The existence of variations in medical practice challenges that general belief. In the assumption that treatment by physicians is

  16. Medical student storytelling on an institutional blog: a case study analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Becker, Katherine A; Freberg, Karen

    2014-05-01

    Despite the proclivity and proliferation of blogs on the Internet, the use of blogs at medical institutions is not well documented. In examining the structured stories that medical students share with the digital community, we may better understand how students use institutional blogs to discuss their medical school experiences while maintaining their role as a medical student ambassador for the program. We conducted a case study to analyze the stories within 309 medical student blogs from one medical institution in the United States. In an attempt to communicate their experiences to different benefactors, student bloggers engaged in structured and personal storytelling. Structured stories offered medical school advice to prospective students, while personal stories embodied features of a personal diary where students recounted significant milestones, talked about personal relationships and engaged in emotional reflection and disclosure. Institutional blogs may provide social marketing for medical institutions, as students strategically framed their experiences to reflect a positive attitude about the medical institution and focused on providing advice to prospective students. Although these structured stories limit complete disclosure, students may still achieve benefits by engaging in emotional disclosure and personal reflection.

  17. Medical Institutions and Twitter: A Novel Tool for Public Communication in Japan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sugawara, Yuya; Tsuya, Atsushi; Tanaka, Atsushi; Fukao, Akira

    2016-01-01

    Background Twitter is a free social networking and microblogging service on the Internet. Medical professionals and patients have started to use Twitter in medicine. Twitter use by medical institutions can interactively and efficiently provide public health information and education for laypeople. Objective This study examined Twitter usage by medical institutions. Methods We reviewed all Japanese user accounts in which the names of medical institutions were described in the user’s Twitter profile. We then classified medical institutions’ tweets by content. Results We extracted 168 accounts for medical institutions with ≥500 followers. The medical specialties of those accounts were dentistry and oral surgery (n=73), dermatology (n=12), cosmetic surgery (n=10), internal medicine (n=10), ophthalmology (n=6), obstetrics and gynecology (n=5), plastic surgery (n=2), and others (n=50). Of these, 21 accounts tweeted medical knowledge and 45 accounts tweeted guidance about medical practice and consultation hours, including advertisements. In the dentistry and oral surgery accounts, individual behavior or thinking was the most frequent (22/71, 31%) content. On the other hand, consultation including advertisements was the most frequent (14/23, 61%) in cosmetic surgery, plastic surgery, and dermatology. Conclusions Some medical specialties used Twitter for disseminating medical knowledge or guidance including advertisements. This indicates that Twitter potentially can be used for various purposes by different medical specialties. PMID:27227154

  18. Monitoring the Veterinary Medical Student Experience: An Institutional Pilot Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, RoseAnn; Mavis, Brian E; Lloyd, James W; Grabill, Chandra M; Henry, Rebecca C; Patterson, Coretta C

    2015-01-01

    Veterinary medical school challenges students academically and personally, and some students report depression and anxiety at rates higher than the general population and other medical students. This study describes changes in veterinary medical student self-esteem (SE) over four years of professional education, attending to differences between high and low SE students and the characteristics specific to low SE veterinary medical students. The study population was students enrolled at the Michigan State University College of Veterinary Medicine from 2006 to 2012. We used data from the annual anonymous survey administered college-wide that is used to monitor the curriculum and learning environment. The survey asked respondents to rate their knowledge and skill development, learning environment, perceptions of stress, skill development, and SE. Participants also provided information on their academic performance and demographics. A contrasting groups design was used: high and low SE students were compared using logistic regression to identify factors associated with low SE. A total of 1,653 respondents met inclusion criteria: 789 low SE and 864 high SE students. The proportion of high and low SE students varied over time, with the greatest proportion of low SE students during the second-year of the program. Perceived stress was associated with low SE, whereas perceived supportive learning environment and skill development were associated with high SE. These data have provided impetus for curricular and learning environment changes to enhance student support. They also provide guidance for additional research to better understand various student academic trajectories and their implications for success.

  19. Patterns of use of medical cannabis among Israeli cancer patients: a single institution experience

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Waissengrin, Barliz; Urban, Damien; Leshem, Yasmin; Garty, Meital; Wolf, Ido

    2015-01-01

    .... Efficacy and patterns of use of cannabis were evaluated using physician-completed application forms, medical files, and a detailed questionnaire in adult cancer patients treated at a single institution...

  20. Gerard Manley Hopkins and Walter Pater : the labyrinths of transience

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mirko Starčević

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Transience forming life's very essence left an indelible mark on the creative explorations of Gerard Manley Hopkins and Walter Pater. The permanently indeterminable presence of mutability made both of them face the umbrous and unknowable aspect of death, thus revealing unto them the task of determining the role of art in life ruled by ceaseless corrosion. Pater accepts the flux of mutability as the primary particle in the revelatory act of the authentic creative experience. The power of that which is frolicsome in art augments the constitution of life's essence submerged in the unsettled condition of fate. Hopkins the priest particularly in his theoretic excursions recognizes in art itself only an approximate value to the timeless grandeur of God's ubiquity. His poetry, however, presents a dissimilar narrative. The poetic image that Hopkins forges corresponds to the mode of exposed individuality of the Romantic spirit, which Pater perceives as the harmony of strangeness and beauty. During Hopkins' student days at Oxford, Pater's relationship to the young poet was not confined to coaching only. Much of their time they spent in conversation, meditating upon the essential principles of artistic expression. Pater influenced Hopkins greatly and contributed impressively to the discipline of his poetic heart. Traces of this companionship do not find the path to Hopkins' religious ruminations; they announce their own existence, although very subtly, upon the individual levels of Hopkins' poetic yearnings.

  1. 77 FR 59936 - National Institute of General Medical Sciences Notice of Closed Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-10-01

    ... Research Support; 93.821, Cell Biology and Biophysics Research; 93.859, Pharmacology, Physiology, and Biological Chemistry Research; 93.862, Genetics and Developmental Biology Research; 93.88, Minority Access to... HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health National Institute of General Medical Sciences Notice of...

  2. 77 FR 5816 - National Institute of General Medical Sciences Notice of Closed Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-02-06

    ..., Cell Biology and Biophysics Research; 93.859, Pharmacology, Physiology, and Biological Chemistry Research; 93.862, Genetics and Developmental Biology Research; 93.88, Minority Access to Research Careers... HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health National Institute of General Medical Sciences Notice of...

  3. 76 FR 43334 - National Institute of General Medical Sciences Notice of Closed Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-07-20

    ... Biomedical Research Support; 93.821, Cell Biology and Biophysics Research; 93.859, Pharmacology, Physiology, and Biological Chemistry Research; 93.862, Genetics and Developmental Biology Research; 93.88... HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health National Institute of General Medical Sciences Notice of...

  4. 76 FR 41272 - National Institute of General Medical Sciences; Notice of Closed Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-07-13

    ... HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health National Institute of General Medical Sciences; Notice of... Domestic Assistance Program Nos. 93.375, Minority Biomedical Research Support; 93.821, Cell Biology and Biophysics Research; 93.859, Pharmacology, Physiology, and Biological Chemistry Research; 93.862, Genetics...

  5. 78 FR 11658 - National Institute of General Medical Sciences; Notice of Closed Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-02-19

    ... HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health National Institute of General Medical Sciences; Notice of... Program Nos. 93.375, Minority Biomedical Research Support; 93.821, Cell Biology and Biophysics Research; 93.859, Pharmacology, Physiology, and Biological Chemistry Research; 93.862, Genetics and...

  6. 77 FR 12857 - National Institute of General Medical Sciences; Notice of Closed Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-03-02

    ... Research Support; 93.821, Cell Biology and Biophysics Research; 93.859, Pharmacology, Physiology, and Biological Chemistry Research; 93.862, Genetics and Developmental Biology Research; 93.88, Minority Access to... HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health National Institute of General Medical Sciences; Notice of...

  7. 76 FR 37359 - National Institute of General Medical Sciences; Notice of Closed Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-06-27

    ... HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health National Institute of General Medical Sciences; Notice of... Nos. 93.375, Minority Biomedical Research Support; 93.821, Cell Biology and Biophysics Research; 93.859, Pharmacology, Physiology, and Biological Chemistry Research; 93.862, Genetics and Developmental...

  8. 76 FR 60059 - National Institute of General Medical Sciences; Notice of Closed Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-09-28

    ..., Cell Biology and Biophysics Research; 93.859, Pharmacology, Physiology, and Biological Chemistry Research; 93.862, Genetics and Developmental Biology Research; 93.88, Minority Access to Research Careers... HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health National Institute of General Medical Sciences; Notice of...

  9. 77 FR 33471 - National Institute of General Medical Sciences; Notice of Closed Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-06-06

    ... Research Support; 93.821, Cell Biology and Biophysics Research; 93.859, Pharmacology, Physiology, and Biological Chemistry Research; 93.862, Genetics and Developmental Biology Research; 93.88, Minority Access to... HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health National Institute of General Medical Sciences; Notice of...

  10. 77 FR 31862 - National Institute of General Medical Sciences; Notice of Closed Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-05-30

    ..., Cell Biology and Biophysics Research; 93.859, Pharmacology, Physiology, and Biological Chemistry Research; 93.862, Genetics and Developmental Biology Research; 93.88, Minority Access to Research Careers... HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health National Institute of General Medical Sciences; Notice of...

  11. 77 FR 35989 - National Institute of General Medical Sciences; Notice of Closed Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-06-15

    ..., Cell Biology and Biophysics Research; 93.859, Pharmacology, Physiology, and Biological Chemistry Research; 93.862, Genetics and Developmental Biology Research; 93.88, Minority Access to Research Careers... HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health National Institute of General Medical Sciences; Notice of...

  12. 77 FR 9677 - National Institute of General Medical Sciences; Notice of Closed Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-02-17

    ... HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health National Institute of General Medical Sciences; Notice of... Domestic Assistance Program Nos. 93.375, Minority Biomedical Research Support; 93.821, Cell Biology and Biophysics Research; 93.859, Pharmacology, Physiology, and Biological Chemistry Research; 93.862, Genetics...

  13. 76 FR 64957 - National Institute of General Medical Sciences Notice of Closed Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-10-19

    ..., Cell Biology and Biophysics Research; 93.859, Pharmacology, Physiology, and Biological Chemistry Research; 93.862, Genetics and Developmental Biology Research; 93.88, Minority Access to Research Careers... HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health National Institute of General Medical Sciences Notice of...

  14. 77 FR 6809 - National Institute of General Medical Sciences; Notice of Closed Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-02-09

    ... HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health National Institute of General Medical Sciences; Notice of... Domestic Assistance Program Nos. 93.375, Minority Biomedical Research Support; 93.821, Cell Biology and Biophysics Research; 93.859, Pharmacology, Physiology, and Biological Chemistry Research; 93.862, Genetics...

  15. 77 FR 61613 - National Institute of General Medical Sciences Notice of Closed Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-10-10

    ... HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health National Institute of General Medical Sciences Notice of... Domestic Assistance Program Nos. 93.375, Minority Biomedical Research Support; 93.821, Cell Biology and Biophysics Research; 93.859, Pharmacology, Physiology, and Biological Chemistry Research; 93.862, Genetics...

  16. 77 FR 64813 - National Institute of General Medical Sciences; Notice of Closed Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-10-23

    ..., Minority Biomedical Research Support; 93.821, Cell Biology and Biophysics Research; 93.859, Pharmacology, Physiology, and Biological Chemistry Research; 93.862, Genetics and Developmental Biology Research; 93.88... HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health National Institute of General Medical Sciences; Notice of...

  17. 78 FR 8157 - National Institute of General Medical Sciences; Notice of Closed Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-02-05

    ... HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health National Institute of General Medical Sciences; Notice of... Domestic Assistance Program Nos. 93.375, Minority Biomedical Research Support; 93.821, Cell Biology and Biophysics Research; 93.859, Pharmacology, Physiology, and Biological Chemistry Research; 93.862,Genetics and...

  18. 77 FR 30019 - National Institute of General Medical Sciences; Notice of Closed Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-05-21

    ... Biology and Biophysics Research; 93.859, Pharmacology, Physiology, and Biological Chemistry Research; 93.862, Genetics and Developmental Biology Research; 93.88, Minority Access to Research Careers; 93.96... HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health National Institute of General Medical Sciences; Notice of...

  19. 78 FR 72902 - National Institute of General Medical Sciences; Notice of Closed Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-12-04

    ... Biomedical Research Support; 93.821, Cell Biology and Biophysics Research; 93.859, Pharmacology, Physiology, and Biological Chemistry Research; 93.862, Genetics and Developmental Biology Research; 93.88... HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health National Institute of General Medical Sciences; Notice of...

  20. 78 FR 66947 - National Institute of General Medical Sciences; Notice of Closed Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-11-07

    ..., Cell Biology and Biophysics Research; 93.859, Pharmacology, Physiology, and Biological Chemistry Research; 93.862, Genetics and Developmental Biology Research; 93.88, Minority Access to Research Careers... HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health National Institute of General Medical Sciences; Notice of...

  1. 75 FR 69092 - National Institute of General Medical Sciences; Notice of Closed Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-11-10

    ... HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health National Institute of General Medical Sciences; Notice of... Domestic Assistance Program Nos. 93.375, Minority Biomedical Research Support; 93.821, Cell Biology and Biophysics Research; 93.859, Pharmacology, Physiology, and Biological Chemistry Research; 93.862, Genetics...

  2. 77 FR 61612 - National Institute of General Medical Sciences; Notice of Closed Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-10-10

    ..., Cell Biology and Biophysics Research; 93.859, Pharmacology, Physiology, and Biological Chemistry Research; 93.862, Genetics and Developmental Biology Research; 93.88, Minority Access to Research Careers... HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health National Institute of General Medical Sciences; Notice of...

  3. 75 FR 71713 - National Institute of General Medical Sciences; Notice of Closed Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-11-24

    ... HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health National Institute of General Medical Sciences; Notice of... Program Nos. 93.375, Minority Biomedical Research Support; 93.821, Cell Biology and Biophysics Research; 93.859, Pharmacology, Physiology, and Biological Chemistry Research; 93.862, Genetics and...

  4. 77 FR 31627 - National Institute of General Medical Sciences; Notice of Closed Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-05-29

    ... HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health National Institute of General Medical Sciences; Notice of... Domestic Assistance Program Nos. 93.375, Minority Biomedical Research Support; 93.821, CellBiology and Biophysics Research; 93.859, Pharmacology, Physiology, and Biological Chemistry Research; 93.862, Genetics...

  5. 76 FR 13196 - National Institute of General Medical Sciences; Notice of Closed Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-03-10

    ... Support; 93.821, Cell Biology and Biophysics Research; 93.859, Pharmacology, Physiology, and Biological Chemistry Research; 93.862, Genetics and Developmental Biology Research; 93.88, Minority Access to Research... HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health National Institute of General Medical Sciences; Notice of...

  6. 76 FR 36556 - National Institute of General Medical Sciences; Notice of Closed Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-06-22

    ... HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health National Institute of General Medical Sciences; Notice of... Nos. 93.375, Minority Biomedical Research Support; 93.821, Cell Biology and Biophysics Research; 93.859, Pharmacology, Physiology, and Biological Chemistry Research; 93.862, Genetics and Developmental...

  7. 77 FR 14406 - National Institute of General Medical Sciences; Notice of Closed Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-03-09

    ... HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health National Institute of General Medical Sciences; Notice of... Nos. 93.375, Minority Biomedical Research Support; 93.821, Cell Biology and Biophysics Research; 93.859, Pharmacology, Physiology, and Biological Chemistry Research; 93.862, Genetics and Developmental...

  8. 76 FR 62083 - National Institute of General Medical Sciences; Notice of Closed Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-10-06

    ..., Cell Biology and Biophysics Research; 93.859, Pharmacology, Physiology, and Biological Chemistry Research; 93.862, Genetics and Developmental Biology Research; 93.88, Minority Access to Research Careers... HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health National Institute of General Medical Sciences; Notice of...

  9. 77 FR 10541 - National Institute of General Medical Sciences; Notice of Closed Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-02-22

    ... HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health National Institute of General Medical Sciences; Notice of... Program Nos. 93.375, Minority Biomedical Research Support; 93.821, Cell Biology and Biophysics Research; 93.859, Pharmacology, Physiology, and Biological Chemistry Research; 93.862, Genetics and...

  10. 77 FR 14407 - National Institute of General Medical Sciences; Notice of Closed Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-03-09

    ... HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health National Institute of General Medical Sciences; Notice of... Program Nos. 93.375, Minority Biomedical Research Support; 93.821, Cell Biology and Biophysics Research; 93.859, Pharmacology, Physiology, and Biological Chemistry Research; 93.862, Genetics and...

  11. 77 FR 16248 - National Institute of General Medical Sciences; Notice of Closed Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-03-20

    ... HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health National Institute of General Medical Sciences; Notice of... Assistance Program Nos. 93.375, Minority Biomedical Research Support; 93.821, Cell Biology and Biophysics Research; 93.859, Pharmacology, Physiology, and Biological Chemistry Research; 93.862, Genetics and...

  12. 75 FR 9909 - National Institute of General Medical Sciences; Notice of Closed Meetings

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-03-04

    ..., Cell Biology and Biophysics Research; 93.859, Pharmacology, Physiology, and Biological Chemistry... HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health National Institute of General Medical Sciences; Notice of... High-Throughput- Enabled Structural Biology Partnerships (U01). Date: April 1-2, 2010. Time: 8:30 a.m...

  13. 77 FR 60448 - National Institute of General Medical Sciences Notice of Closed Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-10-03

    ..., Cell Biology and Biophysics Research; 93.859, Pharmacology, Physiology, and Biological Chemistry Research; 93.862, Genetics and Developmental Biology Research; 93.88, Minority Access to Research Careers... HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health National Institute of General Medical Sciences Notice of...

  14. 75 FR 70014 - National Institute of General Medical Sciences; Notice of Closed Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-11-16

    ..., Cell Biology and Biophysics Research; 93.859, Pharmacology, Physiology, and Biological Chemistry Research; 93.862, Genetics and Developmental Biology Research; 93.88, Minority Access to Research Careers... HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health National Institute of General Medical Sciences; Notice of...

  15. 75 FR 62548 - National Institute of General Medical Sciences; Notice of Closed Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-12

    ..., Cell Biology and Biophysics Research; 93.859, Pharmacology, Physiology, and Biological Chemistry Research; 93.862, Genetics and Developmental Biology Research; 93.88, Minority Access to Research Careers... HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health National Institute of General Medical Sciences; Notice of...

  16. 77 FR 35989 - National Institute of General Medical Sciences Notice of Closed Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-06-15

    ... HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health National Institute of General Medical Sciences Notice of... Domestic Assistance Program Nos. 93.375, Minority Biomedical Research Support; 93.821, Cell Biology and Biophysics Research; 93.859, Pharmacology, Physiology, and Biological Chemistry Research; 93.862, Genetics...

  17. 78 FR 10621 - National Institute of General Medical Sciences; Notice of Closed Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-02-14

    ... HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health National Institute of General Medical Sciences; Notice of... Domestic Assistance Program Nos. 93.375, Minority Biomedical Research Support; 93.821, Cell Biology and Biophysics Research; 93.859, Pharmacology, Physiology, and Biological Chemistry Research; 93.862, Genetics...

  18. 76 FR 13197 - National Institute of General Medical Sciences; Notice of Closed Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-03-10

    ... HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health National Institute of General Medical Sciences; Notice of... Domestic Assistance Program Nos. 93.375, Minority Biomedical Research Support; 93.821, Cell Biology and Biophysics Research; 93.859, Pharmacology, Physiology, and Biological Chemistry Research; 93.862, Genetics...

  19. 75 FR 76477 - National Institute of General Medical Sciences; Notice of Closed Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-12-08

    ... HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health National Institute of General Medical Sciences; Notice of... Domestic Assistance Program Nos. 93.375, Minority Biomedical Research Support; 93.821, Cell Biology and Biophysics Research; 93.859, Pharmacology, Physiology, and Biological Chemistry Research; 93.862, Genetics...

  20. 77 FR 33478 - National Institute of General Medical Sciences; Notice of Closed Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-06-06

    ..., Cell Biology and Biophysics Research; 93.859, Pharmacology, Physiology, and Biological Chemistry Research; 93.862, Genetics and Developmental Biology Research; 93.88, Minority Access to Research Careers... HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health National Institute of General Medical Sciences; Notice of...

  1. 77 FR 6129 - National Institute of General Medical Sciences Notice of Closed Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-02-07

    ... HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health National Institute of General Medical Sciences Notice of... Program Nos. 93.375, Minority Biomedical Research Support; 93.821, Cell Biology and Biophysics Research; 93.859, Pharmacology, Physiology, and Biological Chemistry Research; 93.862, Genetics and...

  2. 77 FR 11562 - National Institute of General Medical Sciences; Notice of Closed Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-02-27

    ... HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health National Institute of General Medical Sciences; Notice of... Nos. 93.375, Minority Biomedical Research Support; 93.821, Cell Biology and Biophysics Research; 93.859, Pharmacology, Physiology, and Biological Chemistry Research; 93.862, Genetics and Developmental...

  3. 77 FR 17489 - National Institute of General Medical Sciences; Notice of Closed Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-03-26

    ..., Minority Biomedical Research Support; 93.821, Cell Biology and Biophysics Research; 93.859, Pharmacology, Physiology, and Biological Chemistry Research; 93.862, Genetics and Developmental Biology Research; 93.88... HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health National Institute of General Medical Sciences; Notice of...

  4. 76 FR 6803 - National Institute of General Medical Sciences; Notice of Closed Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-02-08

    ... Biomedical Research Support; 93.821, Cell Biology and Biophysics Research; 93.859, Pharmacology, Physiology, and Biological Chemistry Research; 93.862, Genetics and Developmental Biology Research; 93.88... HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health National Institute of General Medical Sciences; Notice of...

  5. 75 FR 71712 - National Institute of General Medical Sciences; Notice of Closed Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-11-24

    ... Research Support; 93.821, Cell Biology and Biophysics Research; 93.859, Pharmacology, Physiology, and Biological Chemistry Research; 93.862, Genetics and Developmental Biology Research; 93.88, Minority Access to... HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health National Institute of General Medical Sciences; Notice of...

  6. 78 FR 59040 - National Institute of General Medical Sciences; Notice of Closed Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-09-25

    ... HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health National Institute of General Medical Sciences; Notice of... Assistance Program Nos. 93.375, Minority Biomedical Research Support; 93.821, Cell Biology and Biophysics Research; 93.859, Pharmacology, Physiology, and Biological Chemistry Research; 93.862, Genetics and...

  7. 78 FR 15020 - National Institute of General Medical Sciences; Notice of Closed Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-03-08

    ... HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health National Institute of General Medical Sciences; Notice of... Assistance Program Nos. 93.375, Minority Biomedical Research Support; 93.821, Cell Biology and Biophysics Research; 93.859, Pharmacology, Physiology, and Biological Chemistry Research; 93.862, Genetics and...

  8. 77 FR 69638 - National Institute of General Medical Sciences; Notice of Closed Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-11-20

    ..., Cell Biology and Biophysics Research; 93.859, Pharmacology, Physiology, and Biological Chemistry Research; 93.862, Genetics and Developmental Biology Research; 93.88, Minority Access to Research Careers... HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health National Institute of General Medical Sciences; Notice of...

  9. 77 FR 37424 - National Institute of General Medical Sciences; Notice of Closed Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-06-21

    ... HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health National Institute of General Medical Sciences; Notice of... Assistance Program Nos. 93.375, Minority Biomedical Research Support; 93.821, Cell Biology and Biophysics Research; 93.859, Pharmacology, Physiology, and Biological Chemistry Research; 93.862, Genetics and...

  10. 77 FR 15783 - National Institute of General Medical Sciences; Notice of Closed Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-03-16

    ... Support; 93.821, Cell Biology and Biophysics Research; 93.859, Pharmacology, Physiology, and Biological Chemistry Research; 93.862, Genetics and Developmental Biology Research; 93.88, Minority Access to Research... HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health National Institute of General Medical Sciences; Notice of...

  11. 77 FR 36563 - National Institute of General Medical Sciences; Notice of Closed Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-06-19

    ..., Cell Biology and Biophysics Research; 93.859, Pharmacology, Physiology, and Biological Chemistry Research; 93.862, Genetics and Developmental Biology Research; 93.88, Minority Access to Research Careers... HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health National Institute of General Medical Sciences; Notice of...

  12. 77 FR 33477 - National Institute of General Medical Sciences; Notice of Closed Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-06-06

    ... Support; 93.821, Cell Biology and Biophysics Research; 93.859, Pharmacology, Physiology, and Biological Chemistry Research; 93.862, Genetics and Developmental Biology Research; 93.88, Minority Access to Research... HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health National Institute of General Medical Sciences; Notice of...

  13. 76 FR 71350 - National Institute of General Medical Sciences; Notice of Closed Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-11-17

    ..., Minority Biomedical Research Support; 93.821, Cell Biology and Biophysics Research; 93.859, Pharmacology, Physiology, and Biological Chemistry Research; 93.862, Genetics and Developmental Biology Research; 93.88... HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health National Institute of General Medical Sciences; Notice of...

  14. 75 FR 9909 - National Institute of General Medical Sciences; Notice of Closed Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-03-04

    ..., Cell Biology and Biophysics Research; 93.859, Pharmacology, Physiology, and Biological Chemistry... HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health National Institute of General Medical Sciences; Notice of... Neuroscience & Physiology. Date: April 2, 2010. Time: 8:30 a.m. to 5 p.m. Agenda: To review and evaluate grant...

  15. 76 FR 7573 - National Institute of General Medical Sciences; Notice of Closed Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-02-10

    .... 93.375, Minority Biomedical Research Support; 93.821, Cell Biology and Biophysics Research; 93.859, Pharmacology, Physiology, and Biological Chemistry Research; 93.862, Genetics and Developmental Biology... HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health National Institute of General Medical Sciences; Notice of...

  16. 76 FR 64954 - National Institute of General Medical Sciences Notice of Closed Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-10-19

    ..., Cell Biology and Biophysics Research; 93.859, Pharmacology, Physiology, and Biological Chemistry Research; 93.862, Genetics and Developmental Biology Research; 93.88, Minority Access to Research Careers... HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health National Institute of General Medical Sciences Notice of...

  17. 78 FR 11896 - National Institute of General Medical Sciences; Notice of Closed Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-02-20

    ... HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health National Institute of General Medical Sciences; Notice of... Domestic Assistance Program Nos. 93.375, Minority Biomedical ] Research Support; 93.821, Cell Biology and Biophysics Research; 93.859, Pharmacology, Physiology, and Biological Chemistry Research; 93.862, Genetics...

  18. 77 FR 30020 - National Institute of General Medical Sciences; Notice of Closed Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-05-21

    ..., Cell Biology and Biophysics Research; 93.859, Pharmacology, Physiology, and Biological Chemistry Research; 93.862, Genetics and Developmental Biology Research; 93.88, Minority Access to Research Careers... HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health National Institute of General Medical Sciences; Notice of...

  19. 76 FR 64957 - National Institute of General Medical Sciences; Notice of Closed Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-10-19

    ... HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health National Institute of General Medical Sciences; Notice of... Nos. 93.375, Minority Biomedical Research Support; 93.821, Cell Biology and Biophysics Research; 93.859, Pharmacology, Physiology, and Biological Chemistry Research; 93.862, Genetics and Developmental...

  20. 77 FR 59936 - National Institute of General Medical Sciences; Notice of Closed Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-10-01

    ..., Cell Biology and Biophysics Research; 93.859, Pharmacology, Physiology, and Biological Chemistry Research; 93.862,Genetics and Developmental Biology Research; 93.88, Minority Access to Research Careers... HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health National Institute of General Medical Sciences; Notice of...

  1. 76 FR 71351 - National Institute of General Medical Sciences; Notice of Closed Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-11-17

    ..., Cell Biology and Biophysics Research; 93.859, Pharmacology, Physiology, and Biological Chemistry Research; 93.862, Genetics and Developmental Biology Research; 93.88, Minority Access to Research Careers... HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health National Institute of General Medical Sciences; Notice of...

  2. 77 FR 67385 - National Institute of General Medical Sciences; Notice of Closed Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-11-09

    ... HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health National Institute of General Medical Sciences; Notice of... Assistance Program Nos. 93.375, Minority Biomedical Research Support; 93.821, Cell Biology and Biophysics Research; 93.859, Pharmacology, Physiology, and Biological Chemistry Research; 93.862, Genetics and...

  3. 75 FR 69090 - National Institute of General Medical Sciences; Notice of Closed Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-11-10

    ... HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health National Institute of General Medical Sciences; Notice of... Assistance Program Nos. 93.375, Minority Biomedical Research Support; 93.821, Cell Biology and Biophysics Research; 93.859, Pharmacology, Physiology, and Biological Chemistry Research; 93.862, Genetics and...

  4. 76 FR 19104 - National Institute of General Medical Sciences; Notice of Closed Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-04-06

    ... HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health National Institute of General Medical Sciences; Notice of... Person: Vernon Anderson, PhD, Program Director, Division of Pharmacology, Physiology, and Biological... Domestic Assistance Program Nos. 93.375, Minority Biomedical Research Support; 93.821, Cell Biology and...

  5. 77 FR 38846 - National Institute of General Medical Sciences; Notice of Closed Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-06-29

    ... HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health National Institute of General Medical Sciences; Notice of... Assistance Program Nos. 93.375, Minority Biomedical Research Support; 93.821, Cell Biology and Biophysics Research; 93.859, Pharmacology, Physiology, and Biological Chemistry Research; 93.862, Genetics and...

  6. 78 FR 10623 - National Institute of General Medical Sciences; Notice of Closed Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-02-14

    .... 93.375, Minority Biomedical Research Support; 93.821, Cell Biology and Biophysics Research; 93.859, Pharmacology, Physiology, and Biological Chemistry Research; 93.862, Genetics and Developmental Biology... HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health National Institute of General Medical Sciences; Notice of...

  7. 77 FR 35413 - National Institute of General Medical Sciences; Notice of Closed Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-06-13

    ... Biomedical Research Support; 93.821, Cell Biology and Biophysics Research; 93.859, Pharmacology, Physiology, and Biological Chemistry Research; 93.862, Genetics and Developmental Biology Research; 93.88... HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health National Institute of General Medical Sciences; Notice of...

  8. 76 FR 62815 - National Institute of General Medical Sciences Notice of Closed Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-10-11

    ... HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health National Institute of General Medical Sciences Notice of... Nos. 93.375, Minority Biomedical Research Support; 93.821, Cell Biology and Biophysics Research; 93.859, Pharmacology, Physiology, and Biological Chemistry Research; 93.862, Genetics and Developmental...

  9. 76 FR 62815 - National Institute of General Medical Sciences; Notice of Closed Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-10-11

    ... HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health National Institute of General Medical Sciences; Notice of... Nos. 93.375, Minority Biomedical Research Support; 93.821, Cell Biology and Biophysics Research; 93.859, Pharmacology, Physiology, and Biological Chemistry Research; 93.862, Genetics and Developmental...

  10. 76 FR 68486 - National Institute of General Medical Sciences Notice of Closed Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-11-04

    ... HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health National Institute of General Medical Sciences Notice of... Program Nos. 93.375, Minority Biomedical Research Support; 93.821, Cell Biology and Biophysics Research; 93.859, Pharmacology, Physiology, and Biological Chemistry Research; 93.862, Genetics and...

  11. 76 FR 67467 - National Institute of General Medical Sciences; Notice of Closed Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-11-01

    ..., Minority Biomedical Research Support; 93.821, CellBiology and Biophysics Research; 93.859, Pharmacology, Physiology, and Biological Chemistry Research; 93.862,Genetics and Developmental Biology Research; 93.88... HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health National Institute of General Medical Sciences; Notice of...

  12. 76 FR 67199 - National Institute of General Medical Sciences; Notice of Closed Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-10-31

    ... Biology and Biophysics Research; 93.859, Pharmacology, Physiology, and Biological Chemistry Research; 93.862, Genetics and Developmental Biology Research; 93.88, Minority Access to Research Careers; 93.96... HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health National Institute of General Medical Sciences; Notice of...

  13. 76 FR 36932 - National Institute of General Medical Sciences; Notice of Closed Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-06-23

    ... HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health National Institute of General Medical Sciences; Notice of... Nos. 93.375, Minority Biomedical Research Support; 93.821, Cell Biology and Biophysics Research; 93.859, Pharmacology, Physiology, and Biological Chemistry Research; 93.862, Genetics and Developmental...

  14. 77 FR 15378 - National Institute of General Medical Sciences; Notice of Closed Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-03-15

    ... Systems Biology (P50) Grant. Applications Date: April 5, 2012. Time: 8 a.m. to 5 p.m. Agenda: To review... HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health National Institute of General Medical Sciences; Notice of... Program Nos. 93.375, Minority Biomedical Research Support; 93.821, Cell Biology and Biophysics Research...

  15. The Cold War and Academic Governance: The Lattimore Case at Johns Hopkins. SUNY Series, Frontiers in Education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lewis, Lionel S.

    During the Cold War era, when many institutions of higher learning sacrificed faculty in the face of political pressure, the Owen Lattimore case represents a situation where university administrators stood firm. This book explores what happened when pressure was put on Johns Hopkins University (Maryland) to punish a faculty member who expressed…

  16. Gauging events that influence students' perceptions of the medical school learning environment: findings from one institution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shochet, Robert B; Colbert-Getz, Jorie M; Levine, Rachel B; Wright, Scott M

    2013-02-01

    The medical school learning environment (LE), encompassing the physical, social, and psychological context for learning, holds significant influence on students' professional development. Among these myriad experiences, the authors sought to gauge what students judge as influencing their perceptions of the LE. Fourth-year medical students at Johns Hopkins University participated in this cohort survey study before their 2010 graduation. A list of 55 events was iteratively revised and pilot-tested before being administered online. Responses assessed whether students experienced each event and, if so, the degree of impact on perceptions of the LE. A calculated mean impact score (MIS) provided a means to compare the relative impact of events. Of 119 students, 84 (71%) completed the survey. Students rated the overall LE as exceptional (29/84; 35%), good (36/84; 43%), fair (17/84; 20%), or poor (2/84; 2%). Eighty percent of students experienced at least 41 of the 55 events. MIS values ranged from 2.00 to 3.76 (highest possible: 4.00). Students rated positive events as having the highest impact. Few significant differences were found across gender, age, or surgical/nonsurgical specialty choice. MIS distributions differed between those perceiving the LE as exceptional or fair to poor for 22 (40%) of 55 events. This study attempted to identify the discrete events that medical students perceive as most affecting their sense of the LE. Knowing the phenomena that most strongly influence student perceptions can inform how settings, relationships, and interactions can be shaped for meaningful learning and professional formation.

  17. Survey of Preventable Disaster Deaths at Medical Institutions in Areas Affected by the Great East Japan Earthquake: Retrospective Survey of Medical Institutions in Miyagi Prefecture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamanouchi, Satoshi; Sasaki, Hiroyuki; Kondo, Hisayoshi; Mase, Tomohiko; Otomo, Yasuhiro; Koido, Yuichi; Kushimoto, Shigeki

    2017-10-01

    Introduction In 2015, the authors reported the results of a preliminary investigation of preventable disaster deaths (PDDs) at medical institutions in areas affected by the Great East Japan Earthquake (2011). This initial survey considered only disaster base hospitals (DBHs) and hospitals that had experienced at least 20 patient deaths in Miyagi Prefecture (Japan); therefore, hospitals that experienced fewer than 20 patient deaths were not investigated. This was an additional study to the previous survey to better reflect PDD at hospitals across the entire prefecture. Of the 147 hospitals in Miyagi Prefecture, the 14 DBHs and 82 non-DBHs that agreed to participate were included in an on-site survey. A database was created based on the medical records of 1,243 patient deaths that occurred between March 11, 2011 and April 1, 2011, followed by determination of their status as PDDs. A total of 125 cases of PDD were identified among the patients surveyed. The rate of PDD was significantly higher at coastal hospitals than inland hospitals (17.3% versus 6.3%; PMase T , Otomo Y , Koido Y , Kushimoto S . Survey of preventable disaster deaths at medical institutions in areas affected by the Great East Japan Earthquake: retrospective survey of medical institutions in Miyagi Prefecture. Prehosp Disaster Med. 2017;32(5):515-522.

  18. The Hopkins Ultraviolet Telescope: The Final Archive

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dixon, William V.; Blair, William P.; Kruk, Jeffrey W.; Romelfanger, Mary L.

    2013-01-01

    The Hopkins Ultraviolet Telescope (HUT) was a 0.9 m telescope and moderate-resolution (Delta)lambda equals 3 A) far-ultraviolet (820-1850 Å) spectrograph that flew twice on the space shuttle, in 1990 December (Astro-1, STS-35) and 1995 March (Astro-2, STS-67). The resulting spectra were originally archived in a nonstandard format that lacked important descriptive metadata. To increase their utility, we have modified the original datareduction software to produce a new and more user-friendly data product, a time-tagged photon list similar in format to the Intermediate Data Files (IDFs) produced by the Far Ultraviolet Spectroscopic Explorer calibration pipeline. We have transferred all relevant pointing and instrument-status information from locally-archived science and engineering databases into new FITS header keywords for each data set. Using this new pipeline, we have reprocessed the entire HUT archive from both missions, producing a new set of calibrated spectral products in a modern FITS format that is fully compliant with Virtual Observatory requirements. For each exposure, we have generated quicklook plots of the fully-calibrated spectrum and associated pointing history information. Finally, we have retrieved from our archives HUT TV guider images, which provide information on aperture positioning relative to guide stars, and converted them into FITS-format image files. All of these new data products are available in the new HUT section of the Mikulski Archive for Space Telescopes (MAST), along with historical and reference documents from both missions. In this article, we document the improved data-processing steps applied to the data and show examples of the new data products.

  19. [The Mexican Institute of Social Security Institute (IMSS) in Numbers. Functional inventory of imaging medical equipment, 2003].

    Science.gov (United States)

    2005-01-01

    Medical technology is a fundamental instrument for the provision of health services in the Mexican Institute of Social Security (IMSS) and as a support for diagnostic and therapeutic interventions. The inventory of relevant medical equipment describes the needs for upgrading the technological infrastructure, organize its distribution and plan its renovation in order to guarantee the quality of health services. In this report we describe the type of equipment used in radiology and other imaging services, its geographical distribution, median age in operation and its productivity. The inventory reported 2091 pieces of equipment, ultrasonography and radiology were the most common types (31%) followed by fluoroscopic equipment (20%). Follow-up in the inventory should help in planning the acquisition and maintenance of sophisticated technology used for medical purposes.

  20. The Institute for Safe Medication Practices and Poison Control Centers: Collaborating to Prevent Medication Errors and Unintentional Poisonings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vaida, Allen J

    2015-06-01

    This article provides an overview on the Institute for Safe Medication Practices (ISMP), the only independent nonprofit organization in the USA devoted to the prevention of medication errors. ISMP developed the national Medication Errors Reporting Program (MERP) and investigates and analyzes errors in order to formulate recommendations to prevent further occurrences. ISMP works closely with the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA), drug manufacturers, professional organizations, and others to promote changes in package design, practice standards, and healthcare practitioner and consumer education. By collaborating with ISMP to share and disseminate information, Poison Control centers, emergency departments, and toxicologists can help decrease unintentional and accidental poisonings.

  1. Fellowship training at John Hopkins: programs leading to careers in librarianship and informatics as informaticians or informationists.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campbell, Jayne M; Roderer, Nancy K

    2005-01-01

    Preparing librarians to meet the information challenges faced in the current and future health care environments is critical. At Johns Hopkins University, three NLM-funded fellowship programs provide opportunities for librarians to utilize the rich environments of the Welch Medical Library and the Division of Health Sciences Informatics in support of life-long learning.

  2. Analysis of Forensic Autopsy in 120 Cases of Medical Disputes Among Different Levels of Institutional Settings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Lin-Sheng; Ye, Guang-Hua; Fan, Yan-Yan; Li, Xing-Biao; Feng, Xiang-Ping; Han, Jun-Ge; Lin, Ke-Zhi; Deng, Miao-Wu; Li, Feng

    2015-09-01

    Despite advances in medical science, the causes of death can sometimes only be determined by pathologists after a complete autopsy. Few studies have investigated the importance of forensic autopsy in medically disputed cases among different levels of institutional settings. Our study aimed to analyze forensic autopsy in 120 cases of medical disputes among five levels of institutional settings between 2001 and 2012 in Wenzhou, China. The results showed an overall concordance rate of 55%. Of the 39% of clinically missed diagnosis, cardiovascular pathology comprises 55.32%, while respiratory pathology accounts for the remaining 44. 68%. Factors that increase the likelihood of missed diagnoses were private clinics, community settings, and county hospitals. These results support that autopsy remains an important tool in establishing causes of death in medically disputed case, which may directly determine or exclude the fault of medical care and therefore in helping in resolving these cases. © 2015 American Academy of Forensic Sciences.

  3. An analysis of the awareness and performance of radiation workers' radiation/radioactivity protection in medical institutions : Focused on Busan regional medical institutions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, Cheol Koo [Dept. of Radiological Science, Graduate School of Catholic University of Pusan, Busan (Korea, Republic of); Hwang, Chul Hwan [Dept. of Radiation Oncology, Pusan National University Hospital, Busan (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Dong Hyun [Dept. of Radiological Science, College of Health Sciences, Catholic University of Pusan, Busan (Korea, Republic of)

    2017-03-15

    The purpose of this study was to investigate safety management awareness and behavioral investigation of radiation/radioactivity performance defenses of radiation workers' in medical institutions. Data collection consisted of 267 radiation workers working in medical institutions using structured questionnaires. As a result, it was analyzed that radiation safety management awareness and performance were high in 40s, 50s group and higher education group. The analysis according to the radiation safety management knowledge was analyzed that the 'Know very well' group had higher scores on awareness and performance scores. The analysis according to the degree of safety management effort showed the high awareness scale and the performance scale in the group 'Receiving various education or studying the safety management contents through book'. The correlations between the sub-factors showed the highest positive correlation between perceived practician and personal perspective and perceived by patient and patient's caretaker perspective. Therefore, radiation safety management for workers, patients, and patient's caretaker should be conducted through continuous education of radiation safety management through various routes of radiation workers working at medical institutions.

  4. Medical humanities and cultural studies: lessons learned from an NEH Institute.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Squier, Susan M; Hawkins, Anne Hunsaker

    2004-01-01

    In this essay, the directors of an NEH Institute on "Medicine, Literature, and Culture" consider the lessons they learned by bringing humanities scholars to a teaching hospital for a month-long institute that mingled seminar discussions, outside speakers and clinical observations. In an exchange of letters, they discuss the productive tensions inherent in approaching medicine from multiple perspectives, and they argue the case for a broader conception of medical humanities that incorporates the methodologies of cultural studies.

  5. [Complementary and alternative medical information on Israeli medical institutions' web sites in 2009: the desirable vs. the available].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keshet, Yael

    2010-12-01

    Although complementary and alternative medicine [CAM] is a term commonly used to denote practices that lie beyond the dominant medical orthodoxy, these practices are penetrating Israeli medical institutions. The purpose of the study was to evaluate CAM information on medical institutions' web sites in relation to the type of information considered to be significant by integrative physicians. The methods employed included evaluating CAM information on the websites of: all four health insurance agencies, the eleven largest hospitals in Israel, the Ministry of Health, and the Israeli Medical Association. This data was compared to the primary and most meaningful information stressed by integrative physicians at their conferences and work-meetings. The information on the insurance agencies' web sites is extensive and prominent, while on the other sites it is more concise and less prominent. A total of 31 diverse CAM methods are mentioned on all healthcare websites, while the Ministry of Health site mentions only four of them. Most sites list only advantages or drawbacks of these methods. Research findings on efficacy and safety, and information on the ethics and legality of CAM practitioners is virtually almost non-existent. While CAM is portrayed on some of the healthcare organizations' websites as an attractive commodity, on others it is presented as a separate area to be kept under biomedical scrutiny. One would expect healthcare institutions and the Ministry of Health to provide the public with balanced and sufficient information to enable patients to make informed choices and facilitate better integration of CAM with conventional treatments.

  6. Results of an Institutional LGBT Climate Survey at an Academic Medical Center.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chester, Sean D; Ehrenfeld, Jesse M; Eckstrand, Kristen L

    2014-12-01

    The purpose of this study was to characterize the climate and culture experienced by lesbian, gay, bisexual, and transgender (LGBT) employees and students at one large academic medical center. An anonymous, online institutional climate survey was used to assess the attitudes and experiences of LGBT employees and students. There were 42 LGBT and 14 non-LGBT survey participants. Results revealed that a surprisingly large percentage of LGBT individuals experienced pressure to remain "closeted" and were harassed despite medical center policies of non-discrimination. Continuing training, inclusive policies and practices, and the development of mechanisms to address LGBT-specific harassment are necessary for improving institutional climate.

  7. [Characteristics of work stimulation of the medical personnel in the treatment-and-prophylactic institutions].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shichanin, V V; Tregubov, V N; Serdiuk, B V

    2005-02-01

    Social and economic relations of the last years that were formed in our country have lead to the changes in approaches to administrative activity. Under conditions of administrative-and-command guidance the patriotism and requirements of production discipline ensured the highly effective work. Today the economic relations between employer and personnel are of the first priority. These principles can be attributed to the military medical collective activity. The algorithm developed during the investigation for stimulating the employees working in the in-patient military medical institutions suggests the following performance of measure complex directed to the improvement of professional training of managerial staff working in the military medical institutions work with subordinates, fulfilment of motivation activity, summing up the medical staff work.

  8. Behavioral Analysis of Visitors to a Medical Institution's Website Using Markov Chain Monte Carlo Methods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suzuki, Teppei; Tani, Yuji; Ogasawara, Katsuhiko

    2016-07-25

    Consistent with the "attention, interest, desire, memory, action" (AIDMA) model of consumer behavior, patients collect information about available medical institutions using the Internet to select information for their particular needs. Studies of consumer behavior may be found in areas other than medical institution websites. Such research uses Web access logs for visitor search behavior. At this time, research applying the patient searching behavior model to medical institution website visitors is lacking. We have developed a hospital website search behavior model using a Bayesian approach to clarify the behavior of medical institution website visitors and determine the probability of their visits, classified by search keyword. We used the website data access log of a clinic of internal medicine and gastroenterology in the Sapporo suburbs, collecting data from January 1 through June 31, 2011. The contents of the 6 website pages included the following: home, news, content introduction for medical examinations, mammography screening, holiday person-on-duty information, and other. The search keywords we identified as best expressing website visitor needs were listed as the top 4 headings from the access log: clinic name, clinic name + regional name, clinic name + medical examination, and mammography screening. Using the search keywords as the explaining variable, we built a binomial probit model that allows inspection of the contents of each purpose variable. Using this model, we determined a beta value and generated a posterior distribution. We performed the simulation using Markov Chain Monte Carlo methods with a noninformation prior distribution for this model and determined the visit probability classified by keyword for each category. In the case of the keyword "clinic name," the visit probability to the website, repeated visit to the website, and contents page for medical examination was positive. In the case of the keyword "clinic name and regional name," the

  9. Associations between medical student empathy and personality: a multi-institutional study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patrício Costa

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: More empathetic physicians are more likely to achieve higher patient satisfaction, adherence to treatments, and health outcomes. In the context of medical education, it is thus important to understand how personality might condition the empathetic development of medical students. Single institutional evidence shows associations between students' personality and empathy. This multi-institutional study aimed to assess such associations across institutions, looking for personality differences between students with high empathy and low empathy levels. METHODS: Participants were 472 students from three medical schools in Portugal. They completed validated adaptations to Portuguese of self-report measures of the NEO-Five Factor Inventory(NEO-FFI and the Jefferson Scale of Physician Empathy(JSPE-spv. Students were categorized into two groups: "Bottom" (low empathy, N = 165 and "Top" (high empathy, N = 169 according to their empathy JSPE-spv total score terciles. Correlation analysis, binary logistic regression analysis and ROC curve analysis were conducted. RESULTS: A regression model with gender, age and university had a predictive power (pseudo R2 for belonging to the top or bottom group of 6.4%. The addition of personality dimensions improved the predictive power to 16.8%. Openness to experience and Agreeableness were important to predict top or bottom empathy scores when gender, age and university were considered." Based on the considered predictors the model correctly classified 69.3% of all students. CONCLUSIONS: The present multi-institutional cross-sectional study in Portugal revealed across-school associations between the Big5 dimensions Agreeableness and Openness to experience and the empathy of medical students and that personality made a significant contribution to identify the more empathic students. Therefore, medical schools may need to pay attention to the personality of medical students to understand how to enhance

  10. THE CORRELATION BETWEEN LEARNING ACTIVITY MOTIVATION AND LIFE SENSE ORIENTATION OF MEDICAL INSTITUTE STUDENTS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Magazeva Elena Anatolevna

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available In the article the special features of academic motivation of medical institute students in field of “Medical Care” and “Medical preventive Care” are studied. This study is based on fundamental approaches to the motivation problems and, particularly, academic motivation which was a major precondition for examining its connection with life sense orientation of a personality. The research particularities consist in revealing of academic motivation characteristics of the students and determination of connection of these characteristics with life sense orientation characteristics. The correlations determined as a result of studies make possible to give a factful description and reveal the academic motivation particularities of the students.

  11. Patients of health care institutions towards the Problem of tobacco smoking by the medical staff

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lucyna Sochocka

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Background: Patients’ opinion on tobacco smoking amongst medical staff from health care institutions was a purpose of the paper. Materials and Methods: The studies were carried out in the health care institutions in the provinces of Opole, Silesia and Lower Silesia from July to September 2011. Results: The group under study consisted of 482 women and 322 men appropriately 60% and 40% of the examined ones. Patients of inpa-tient care (N4424 set 52.7%, of outpatient care (N4380 – 47.3% of the examined. Over half of the polled (N4436, 54.2% support a total ban on tobacco smoking which is in force in the health care institutions for over a year. 35.6% of the examined (N4286 came across the medical staff smoking cigarettes. The above phenomenon is dominating in the inpatient care institutions (p40.02704 *0.05. Notices on smoking ban in the health care institutions noted 70% of respondents. Conclusions: Intensifying the educational and promotional actions to appropriate health behavior problem in the medical field seems to be essential.

  12. 78 FR 38997 - National Institute of General Medical Sciences; Notice of Closed Meetings

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-06-28

    ... Assistance Program Nos. 93.375, Minority Biomedical Research Support; 93.821, Cell Biology and Biophysics Research; 93.859, Pharmacology, Physiology, and Biological Chemistry Research; 93.862, Genetics and... of Committee: National Institute of General Medical Sciences Special Emphasis Panel; Clinical Trials...

  13. 78 FR 13689 - National Institute of General Medical Sciences; Notice of Closed Meetings

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-02-28

    ... Program Nos. 93.375, Minority Biomedical Research Support; 93.821, Cell Biology and Biophysics Research; 93.859, Pharmacology, Physiology, and Biological Chemistry Research; 93.862, Genetics and... . Name of Committee: National Institute of General Medical Sciences Special Emphasis Panel; Clinical...

  14. 78 FR 8549 - National Institute of General Medical Sciences; Notice of Closed Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-02-06

    ... Program Nos. 93.375, Minority Biomedical Research Support; 93.821, Cell Biology and Biophysics Research; 93.859, Pharmacology, Physiology, and Biological Chemistry Research; 93.862, Genetics and... of Committee: National Institute of General Medical Sciences Special Emphasis Panel; Clinical Trial...

  15. On Management Problem of Energy Use at Medical Institutions in Morocco

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    М. Ait Bahajou

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper considers problems of rational energy use at  medical institutions inMoroccowithin the context of general energy policy and promotion of the ISO 50001:2011 “Energy management systems – Requirements with guidance for use” requirements in one of the largest hospitals of the country.

  16. On Management Problem of Energy Use at Medical Institutions in Morocco

    OpenAIRE

    М. Ait Bahajou; Т. G. Pospelova

    2012-01-01

    The paper considers problems of rational energy use at  medical institutions inMoroccowithin the context of general energy policy and promotion of the ISO 50001:2011 “Energy management systems – Requirements with guidance for use” requirements in one of the largest hospitals of the country.

  17. 78 FR 11658 - National Institute of General Medical Sciences; Notice of Closed Meetings

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-02-19

    ...; Biomedical Instrumentation 1. Date: March 12, 2013. Time: 8:30 a.m. to 5:00 p.m. Agenda: To review and...: National Institute of General Medical Sciences Special Emphasis Panel; Biomedical Instrumentation 2. Date... Biomedical Research Support; 93.821, Cell Biology and Biophysics Research; 93.859, Pharmacology, Physiology...

  18. Research monitoring by US medical institutions to protect human subjects: compliance or quality improvement?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Jong, Jean Philippe; van Zwieten, Myra C. B.; Willems, Dick L.

    2013-01-01

    In recent years, to protect the rights and welfare of human subjects, institutions in the USA have begun to set up programmes to monitor ongoing medical research. These programmes provide routine, onsite oversight, and thus go beyond existing oversight such as investigating suspected misconduct or

  19. Analysis of drug abuse data reported by medical institutions in Taiwan from 2002 to 2011

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jui Hsu

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Drug abuse has become a global issue of concern. It affects not only individual users, but also their families and communities. Data were retrieved from the database of the Taiwan Surveillance System of Drug Abuse and Addiction Treatment (SSDAAT from 2002 to 2011, and 147,660 cases reported by medical institutions in Taiwan were reviewed. This study showed that the top five reported abused drugs by medical institutions during the last decade were heroin, methamphetamine, benzodiazepines, ketamine, and zolpidem. Heroin and methamphetamine continued to be the first two abused drugs reported by medical institutions. Heroin abuse was significant, but has shown a downward trend. However, emerging abused drugs, such as ketamine and zolpidem, presented upward trends. 3,4-Methylenedioxy-N-methylamphetamine (MDMA abuse seems to have re-emerged and has increased gradually since 2010. Injection without needle sharing has become the most common route of administration of abused drugs since 2002. The majority of causes for these reported drug abuses were drug dependence, followed by peer influence and stress relief. Hepatitis C was the most commonly reported infectious disease, followed by hepatitis B and AIDS in the drug abusers reported by medical institutions. It should be noted that access to drugs via the Internet increased year by year, and this is clearly an area needing constant monitoring.

  20. [Investigation of non-ionizing radiation hazards from physiotherapy equipment in 16 medical institutions].

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Jia-xi; Zhou, Wei; Qiu, Hai-li; Yang, Guang-tao

    2013-12-01

    To investigate the non-ionizing radiation hazards from physiotherapy equipment in medical institutions and to explore feasible control measures for occupational diseases. On-site measurement and assessment of ultra-high-frequency radiation, high-frequency electromagnetic field, microwave radiation, and laser radiation were carried out in 16 medical institutions using the methods in the Measurement of Physical Agents in Workplace (GBZ/T189-2007). All the investigated medical institutions failed to take effective protective measures against non-ionizing radiation. Of the 17 ultra-short wave therapy apparatus, 70.6%, 47.1%, and 17.64% had a safe intensity of ultra-high-frequency radiation on the head, chest, and abdomen, respectively. Of the 4 external high-frequency thermotherapy apparatus, 100%, 75%, and 75%had a safe intensity of high-frequency electromagnetic field on the head, chest, and abdomen, respectively. In addition, the intensities of microwave radiation and laser radiation produced by the 18 microwave therapy apparatus and 12 laser therapeutic apparatus met national health standards. There are non-ionizing radiation hazards from physiotherapy equipment in medical institutions, and effective prevention and control measures are necessary.

  1. Development of a medical information system that minimizes staff workload and secures system safety at a small medical institution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haneda, Kiyofumi; Koyama, Tadashi

    2005-04-01

    We developed a secure system that minimizes staff workload and secures safety of a medical information system. In this study, we assess the legal security requirements and risks occurring from the use of digitized data. We then analyze the security measures for ways of reducing these risks. In the analysis, not only safety, but also costs of security measures and ease of operability are taken into consideration. Finally, we assess the effectiveness of security measures by employing our system in small-sized medical institution. As a result of the current study, we developed and implemented several security measures, such as authentications, cryptography, data back-up, and secure sockets layer protocol (SSL) in our system. In conclusion, the cost for the introduction and maintenance of a system is one of the primary difficulties with its employment by a small-sized institution. However, with recent reductions in the price of computers, and certain advantages of small-sized medical institutions, the development of an efficient system configuration has become possible.

  2. HOW MEDICAL UNDERGRADUATES PREPARE FOR UNIVERSITY EXAMINATION: LESSON FROM A TEACHING MEDICAL INSTITUTION IN SOUTH INDIA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shib Sekhar Datta

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Medical colleges in India conventionally follow a curriculum overfed with large volume of information expecting students will imbibe such curriculum unquestionably overlooking what and how they progress. There have been many attempts to improve the learning process of medical students, neglecting the process which students adopt towards such learning and prepare for their exams aiming better performance. Objective: To explore qualitatively the way medical undergraduates prepare for their university examination. Methods: Present qualitative research was undertaken among medical interns during Nov-2011 to March-2012. FGDs were conducted by trained moderator using semi-structured guidelines and note taker recorded each FGD. Content analysis of FGDs was primarily oriented towards behaviour of medical undergraduates during preparatory phase before their university examinations like study pattern, study material, eating behaviour, level of stress, addiction etc. Qualitative content analysis of textual level of data was undertaken using Atlas.ti.5.0 software package. Results: Students are serious about studies just before examinations and refer to notes prepared by seniors, small books with important topics, and self-made notes. Girls depend predominantly on self-made notes. Students primarily focus on important topics in each subject. Time-in-hand decides what they study and try to remember before exams. They become casual about their diet, clothing and self-care. Stress, fear and high academic expectation often drive them towards addictive substances. They often suffer from loneliness and seek empathy from opposite sex batch mates, seniors, teachers and family members and start believing in their fortune and examiners' will rather than actual preparation. Conclusion: Students' psychology and culture should be addressed in harmony with curriculum reform for better learning by medical undergraduates.

  3. Microbiological Assessment of Waste Bins Regarding Medical Waste Management in Health Care Institutions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cemil Örgev

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available The management of medical waste is of great importance due to its potential environmental hazards and public health risks because improper disposal of medical waste may pose a significant threat to human and environmental health. In this study, it was aimed to carry out bacteriologic analyses of disinfected medical waste bins used in health institutions. 571 samples taken from disinfected medical waste bins were grown in sheep blood agar, EMB agar and Chrome orientation medium and reproduction results were evaluated. Reproduction was observed in 502 samples out of 571 and the reproducing bacteria were E. faecalis, E. coli, K. pneumoniae, S. aureus, Proteus and S. Saprophyticus. Considering reproduction results of samples taken from medical waste bins, it becomes necessary to pay more attention to disinfection procedures and conform to standard infection prevention measures.

  4. What do Islamic institutional fatwas say about medical and research confidentiality and breach of confidentiality?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alahmad, Ghiath; Dierickx, Kris

    2012-08-01

    Protecting confidentiality is an essential value in all human relationships, no less in medical practice and research.(1) Doctor-patient and researcher-participant relationships are built on trust and on the understanding those patients' secrets will not be disclosed.(2) However, this confidentiality can be breached in some situations where it is necessary to meet a strong conflicting duty.(3) Confidentiality, in a general sense, has received much interest in Islamic resources including the Qur'an, Sunnah and juristic writings. However, medical and research confidentiality have not been explored deeply. There are few fatwas about the issue, despite an increased effort by both individuals and Islamic medical organizations to use these institutional fatwas in their research. Infringements on confidentiality make up a significant portion of institutional fatwas, yet they have never been thoroughly investigated. Moreover, the efforts of organizations and authors in this regard still require further exploration, especially on the issue of research confidentiality. In this article, we explore medical and research confidentiality and potential conflicts with this practice as a result of fatwas released by international, regional, and national Islamic Sunni juristic councils. We discuss how these fatwas affect research and publication by Muslim doctors, researchers, and Islamic medical organizations. We argue that more specialized fatwas are needed to clarify Islamic juristic views about medical and research confidentiality, especially the circumstances in which infringements on this confidentiality are justified. © 2012 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  5. Effectiveness of teaching methods in a medical institute: perceptions of medical students to teaching aids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naqvi, Suhaib Haider; Mobasher, Fizza; Afzal, Muhammad Abdul Rehman; Umair, Muhammad; Kohli, Arooj Naeem; Bukhari, Mulazim Hussain

    2013-07-01

    To discover the most effective mode of teaching from the perspective of medical students and to analyse their preferences for various pedagogical aids. The qualitative, descriptive survey designed as a cross-sectional study was conducted at the King Edward Medical University, Lahore, from April to June 2011. A 25-item questionnaire regarding perceptions towards teaching aids was handed out to 500 undergraduate medical students and the answers were analysed using SPSS 17. Of the 500 questionnaires, 8 (1.6%) were left out for being incomplete.The study sample size, as such, was 492 with a response rate of 98.4%. Out of the 492 students, 325 (66%) disagreed that the whole lecture should be delivered via PowerPoint slides.To understand complex concepts, 246 (50%) approved of animation based learning. For retaining and recalling facts, the combination of PowerPoint slides and animations was considered by 157 (32%) as most effective, while transparencies were considered to be the least effective (n=5; 1%). Regarding their attention span 357 (76%) students said they experienced the lowest attention span during Overhead Projector lectures. Irrespective of the method used, 225 (46%) students responded that visual aids of any sort increased their concentration 'a lot'. For small groups, 283 (58%) students considered blackboards optimal, while for a large group, 243 (49%) students considered animations to be optimal. As far as combinations went, 291 (59%) preferred blackboard plus animations, 148 (30%) preferred blackboard plus PowerPoint. The combination of animations alongside blackboard was preferred over other combinations. The subjects wanted animations to be incorporated frequently into medical pedagogy, while overhead projectors were clearly disliked by them.

  6. Development and Implementation of a School-Wide Institute for Excellence in Education to Enable Educational Scholarship by Medical School Faculty.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cofrancesco, Joseph; Barone, Michael A; Serwint, Janet R; Goldstein, Mitchell; Westman, Michael; Lipsett, Pamela A

    2018-01-01

    Educational scholarship is an important component for faculty at Academic Medical Centers, especially those with single-track promotion systems. Yet, faculty may lack the skills and mentorship needed to successfully complete projects. In addition, many educators feel undervalued. To reinvigorate our school's educational mission, the Institute for Excellence in Education (IEE) was created. Here we focus on one of the IEE's strategic goals, that of inspiring and supporting educational research, scholarship, and innovation. Using the 6-step curriculum development process as a framework, we describe the development and outcomes of IEE programs aimed at enabling educational scholarship at the Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine. Four significant programs that focused on educational scholarship were developed and implemented: (a) an annual conference, (b) a Faculty Education Scholars' Program, (c) "Shark Tank" small-grant program, and (d) Residency Redesign Challenge grants. A diverse group of primarily junior faculty engaged in these programs with strong mentorship, successfully completing and disseminating projects. Faculty members have been able to clarify their personal goals and develop a greater sense of self-efficacy for their desired paths in teaching and educational research. Faculty require programs and resources for educational scholarship and career development, focused on skills building in methodology, assessment, and statistical analysis. Mentoring and the time to work on projects are critical. Key to the IEE's success in maintaining and building programs has been ongoing needs assessment of faculty and learners and a strong partnership with our school's fund-raising staff. The IEE will next try to expand opportunities by adding additional mentoring capacity and further devilment of our small-grants programs.

  7. Phoretic symbionts of the mountain pine beetle (Dendroctonus ponderosae Hopkins)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Javier E. Mercado; Richard W. Hofstetter; Danielle M. Reboletti; Jose F. Negron

    2014-01-01

    During its life cycle, the tree-killing mountain pine beetle Dendroctonus ponderosae Hopkins interacts with phoretic organisms such as mites, nematodes, fungi, and bacteria. The types of associations these organisms establish with the mountain pine beetle (MPB) vary from mutualistic to antagonistic. The most studied of these interactions are those between beetle and...

  8. Development, cognition, and behaviour in Pitt-Hopkins syndrome

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Van Balkom, Ingrid D. C.; Vuijk, Pieter Jelle; Franssens, Marijke; Hoek, Hans W.; Hennekam, Raoul C. M.

    2012-01-01

    Aim The aim of the study was to collect detailed data on behavioural, adaptive, and psychological functioning in 10 individuals with PittHopkins syndrome (PTHS), with specific attention to manifestations of autism spectrum disorder (ASD). Method The participants (four females, six males), residing

  9. Development, cognition, and behaviour in Pitt-Hopkins

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Van Balkom, I.D.; Vuijk, P.J.; Franssens, M.; Hoek, H.W.; Hennekam, R.C.

    2012-01-01

    Aim The aim of the study was to collect detailed data on behavioural, adaptive, and psychological functioning in 10 individuals with Pitt-Hopkins syndrome (PTHS), with specific attention to manifestations of autism spectrum disorder (ASD). Method The participants (four females, six males), residing

  10. [Ways for optimization of treatment of patients with mesenterial thrombosis in municipal medical institutions of small towns and rural area].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alekseev, T V; Movchan, K N; Beznosov, A I; Lozovskiĭ, I F; Sidorenko, V A

    2010-01-01

    An analysis of 199 cases has shown that verification of mesenterial thrombosis in municipal medical institutions is 5.6% at the prehospital period, 23% in the admission rooms of hospitals, 30%--in surgical departments before operation. The index of postoperative lethality remains high reaching 91.3% in municipal hospitals of Leningrad oblast. In order to improve results of treatment of patients with mesenterial thrombosis in municipal medical institutions of small towns and rural area it is necessary to develop technology and organization of medical aid in municipal medical institutions.

  11. SATISFACTION LEVEL OF MEDICAL EDUCATORS WORKING IN TEACHING INSTITUTIONS : A QUESTIONNAIRE BASED CROSS-SECTIONAL STUDY

    OpenAIRE

    Sudeshna Chatterjee; Krishnangshu Ray; Anup Kumar Das; Arcojit Ghosh

    2016-01-01

    In a resource-limited and high-burden disease setting, satisfied health professional is an asset in terms of maximized productivity, efficiency and quality health care. Job Satisfaction Index is a validated measure to identify the components that influence those issues. A multi-faceted structured questionnaire study was conducted upon a cross-section of medical educators (n=160) serving two tertiary care teaching institutions under different management set-up. Multiple demographic...

  12. Chemohormonal therapy in metastatic hormone-sensitive prostate cancer. Sweeney CJ, Chen YH, Carducci M, Liu G, Jarrard DF, Eisenberger M, Wong YN, Hahn N, Kohli M, Cooney MM, Dreicer R, Vogelzang NJ, Picus J, Shevrin D, Hussain M, Garcia JA, DiPaola RS. Department of Medicine; Department of Biostatistics and Computational Biology; Dana-Farber Cancer Institute, Boston; Harvard Medical School, Boston; Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore; University of Wisconsin Carbone Cancer Center; School of Medicine and Public Health; Madison; Fox Chase Cancer Center, Temple University Health System, Philadelphia; Indiana University Melvin and Bren Simon Cancer Center, Indianapolis; Mayo Clinic, Rochester, MN; University Hospitals Case Medical Center, Seidman Cancer Center; Cleveland Clinic Taussig Cancer Institute; Both in Cleveland; University of Virginia Cancer Center, Charlottesville; Comprehensive Cancer Centers of Nevada, Las Vegas; Siteman Cancer Center, Washington University School of Medicine, St. Louis; NorthShore University Health System, Evanston, IL; University of Michigan Comprehensive Cancer Center, Ann Arbor; Rutgers Cancer Institute of New Jersey, New Brunswick.N Engl J Med. 2015 Aug 20;373(8):737-46. [Epub 2015 Aug 5]. doi: 10.1056/NEJMoa1503747.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scott, Eggener

    2017-03-01

    Androgen deprivation therapy (ADT) has been the backbone of treatment for metastatic prostate cancer since the 1940s. We assessed whether concomitant treatment with ADT plus docetaxel would result in longer overall survival than that with ADT alone. We assigned men with metastatic, hormone-sensitive prostate cancer to receive either ADT plus docetaxel (at a dose of 75mg per square meter of body-surface area every 3wk for 6 cycles) or ADT alone. The primary objective was to test the hypothesis that the median overall survival would be 33.3% longer among patients receiving docetaxel added to ADT early during therapy than among patients receiving ADT alone. A total of 790 patients (median age, 63y) underwent randomization. After a median follow-up of 28.9 months, the median overall survival was 13.6 months longer with ADT plus docetaxel (combination therapy) than with ADT alone (57.6 vs. 44.0mo; hazard ratio for death in the combination group, 0.61; 95% confidence interval [CI]: 0.47-0.80; P<0.001). The median time to biochemical, symptomatic, or radiographic progression was 20.2 months in the combination group, as compared with 11.7 months in the ADT-alone group (hazard ratio, 0.61; 95% CI: 0.51-0.72; P<0.001). The rate of a prostate-specific antigen level of less than 0.2ng/ml at 12 months was 27.7% in the combination group vs. 16.8% in the ADT-alone group (P<0.001). In the combination group, the rate of grade 3 or 4 febrile neutropenia was 6.2%, the rate of grade 3 or 4 infection with neutropenia was 2.3%, and the rate of grade 3 sensory neuropathy and of grade 3 motor neuropathy was 0.5%. Six cycles of docetaxel at the beginning of ADT for metastatic prostate cancer resulted in significantly longer overall survival than that with ADT alone. (Funded by the National Cancer Institute and others; ClinicalTrials.gov number, NCT00309985.). Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  13. Institutions and non-linear change in governance. Reforming the governance of medical performance in Europe.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burau, Viola; Vrangbaek, Karsten

    2008-01-01

    The paper aims to account for the substance of non-linear governance change by analysing the importance of sector-specific institutions and the pathways of governing they create. The analysis uses recent reforms of the governance of medical performance in four European countries as a case, adopting an inductively oriented approach to comparison. The governance of medical performance is a good case as it is both, closely related to redistributive policies, where the influence of institutions tends to be pertinent, and is subject to considerable policy pressures. The overall thrust of reforms is similar across countries, while there are important differences in relation to how individual forms of governance and the balance between different forms of governance are changing. More specifically, sector-specific institutions can account for the specific ways in which reforms redefine hierarchy and professional self-regulation and for the extent to which reforms strengthen hierarchy and affect the balance with other forms of governance. The recent literature on governance mainly focuses on mapping out the substance of non-linear change, whereas the development of explanations of the substance of governance change is less systematic. In the present paper, therefore, it is suggested coupling the notion of non-linear change with an analysis of sector specific institutions inspired by the historical institutionalist tradition to better account for the substance of non-linear governance change. Further, the analysis offers interesting insights into the complexity of redrawing boundaries between the public and the private in health care.

  14. The Invention of a Medical Institution? A Discussion of Hospitals Around 1800

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dross, Fritz

    2006-11-01

    Full Text Available The article considers the position of the hospital in the discussion on health care between self-help and formal poor relief. This is done for the late 18th and early 19th centuries when besides the famous hospital foundations e.g. in Vienna and Würzburg, a lot of hospital foundations failed. Although hospitals had been considered to be quite useful for the state by influential publicists, in the German territories neither public opinion nor doctors favoured central hospital care for the poor around 1800. A policinical model with an essential portion of curing the sick in their homes had been the modernist model of medical help in terms of late 18th / early 19th century discourse. The process of inventing the hospital as a new medical institution was based on the acceptance of family and kinship networks as requisite parts of medical help.

  15. THE CORRELATION BETWEEN LEARNING ACTIVITY MOTIVATION AND LIFE SENSE ORIENTATION OF MEDICAL INSTITUTE STUDENTS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Елена Анатольевна Магазева

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available In the article the special features of academic motivation of medical institute students in field of “Medical Care” and “Medical preventive Care” are studied.  This study is based on fundamental approaches to the motivation problems and, particularly, academic motivation which was a major precondition for examining its connection with life sense orientation of a personality. The research particularities consist in revealing of academic motivation characteristics of the students and determination of connection of these characteristics with life sense orientation characteristics. The correlations determined as a result of studies make possible to give a factful description and reveal the academic motivation particularities of the students. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.12731/2218-7405-2013-3-17

  16. The Johns Hopkins RTR Consortium: A Collaborative Approach to Advance Translational Science and Standardize Clinical Monitoring of Restorative Transplantation

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-10-01

    University Baltimore, MD 21205-1832 REPORT DATE: October 2016 TYPE OF REPORT: Annual PREPARED FOR: U.S. Army Medical Research and Materiel Command...October 2016 2. REPORT TYPE 3. DATES COVERED 09/15/2015 – 09/14/2016 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER The Johns Hopkins RTR Consortium: A...assessment and protocol skin biopsies . Alloreactivity against donor antigens was assessed using an optimized CFSE-based mixed lymphocyte reaction (MLR). All

  17. Interdisciplinary and inter-institutional differences in learning preferences among Malaysian medical and health sciences students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wong, Rebecca S Y; Siow, Heng Loke; Kumarasamy, Vinoth; Shaherah Fadhlullah Suhaimi, Nazrila

    2017-10-01

    The learner-centred approach in medical and health sciences education makes the study of learning preferences relevant and important. This study aimed to investigate the interdisciplinary, inter-institutional, gender and racial differences in the preferred learning styles among Malaysian medical and health sciences students in three Malaysian universities, namely SEGi University (SEGi), University of Malaya (UM) and Universiti Tunku Abdul Rahman (UTAR). It also investigated the differences in the preferred learning styles of these students between high achievers and non-high achievers. This cross-sectional study was carried out on medical and health sciences students from three Malaysian universities following the approval of the Research and Ethics Committee, SEGi University. Purposive sampling was used and the preferred learning styles were assessed using the VARK questionnaire. The questionnaire was validated prior to its use. Three disciplines (medicine, pharmacy and dentistry) were chosen based on their entry criteria and some similarities in their course structure. The three participating universities were Malaysian universities with a home-grown undergraduate entry medical program and students from a diverse cultural and socioeconomic background. The data were analysed using the Statistical Package for the Social Sciences (SPSS) software, version 22. VARK subscale scores were expressed as mean+standard deviation. Comparisons of the means were carried out using t-test or ANOVA. A p value of 0.05). This study gives an insight into the learner characteristics of more than one medical school in Malaysia. Such multi-institutional studies are lacking in the published literature and this study gives a better representation of the current situation in the learning preferences among medical students in Malaysia.

  18. Policies on medical decisions concerning the end of life in Dutch health care institutions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haverkate, I; van der Wal, G

    1996-02-14

    To describe the prevalence and some features of policies on medical decisions concerning the end of life (MDELs) in Dutch hospitals, nursing homes, and institutions for the mentally disabled. A cross-sectional descriptive postal survey of 558 Dutch health care institutions. All Dutch hospitals, nursing homes, and general institutions for the mentally disabled. Directors of patients care of the institutions. Respondents' reports on the existence of policies and guidelines on the following MDELs: euthanasia/assisted suicide (EAS), life-terminating acts without explicit request of the patient, refusal of treatment by patient, withholding or withdrawing treatment, symptom and pain control, and do-not-resuscitate (DNR) decisions. Of 558 health care institution managers, 86% responded. Most of the hospitals (69.2%) and nursing homes (73.9%) but only 16.3% of the institutions for the disabled had a written EAS policy. Nursing homes with a ban on EAS often had religious affiliations. In 37% of nursing homes, 15% of hospitals, and 15% of institutions for the disabled, the management had written policies on terminating life without request. Sixty percent of the hospitals, 35% of the nursing homes, and 17% of the institutions for the disabled had guidelines for one or more of four other distinct MDELs. Forty-five percent, 20%, and 8% of hospitals, nursing homes, and institutions of mentally disabled, respectively, had guidelines on DNR decisions. The management of 89% of the hospitals and 94% of the nursing homes communicated their policies on EAS to physicians and nurses in their institutions without being asked. Far fewer of these hospitals (3.9%) and nursing homes (30.5%) made their policies on EAS known to patients without being asked. This study indicates that an important step toward policy development on EAS has been made by Dutch hospitals and nursing homes. Particularly with respect to policies on such decisions as withholding or withdrawing treatment, symptom and

  19. Self-medication among health workers in a tertiary institution in South-West Nigeria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Babatunde, Oluwole Adeyemi; Fadare, Joseph Olusesan; Ojo, Olujide John; Durowade, Kabir Adekunle; Atoyebi, Oladele Ademola; Ajayi, Paul Oladapo; Olaniyan, Temitope

    2016-01-01

    Inappropriate self-medication results in wastage of resources, resistance to pathogen and generally entails serious health hazard. This study was undertaken to determine the knowledge, practice and reasons for practice of self-medication among health workers in a Nigerian tertiary institution. This was a cross-sectional descriptive study conducted among staff of Federal Medical Center Ido-Ekiti, Nigeria. Simple random sampling technique was used to select 305 respondents that were interviewed via a pretested semi-structured questionnaire. Analysis was done using SPSS version 15 and while chi-square test was used to test significance between variables, significant (p value setself-medication (94.8%), but only 47.2% had good knowledge of it. Reasons for practicing self-medication were financial problem (10.8%), mild sickness (10.8%), lack of time (13.4%), knowledge of diagnosis (5.6%), convenience (2.3%) and non-availability of doctors (3.0%). The drugs used by respondents without prescription included analgesics (38.2%), antibiotics (19.0%) anti-malaria drugs (13.3%), and others (29.4%). Conditions for which respondents self-medicated were body pains (14.9%), catarrh (14.9%), headache (14.3%), sore throat (11.5%), diarrhea (11.2%), fever (9.0%) and toothache (5.6%). The study demonstrates that the prevalence of self-medication is relatively high. There is need for health education on the implication and danger of self-medication. There is also need for government to pass and enforce law to restrict free access to drugs.

  20. Medical schools' attitudes and perceptions regarding the use of central institutional review boards.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loh, Evangeline D; Meyer, Roger E

    2004-07-01

    To investigate the current practices, attitudes, perceptions, and future plans of U.S. medical schools regarding the use of central institutional review boards (IRBs) to review research involving human participants. In 2003, a survey instrument was distributed via fax and e-mail to the deans of research at the 125 accredited U.S. medical schools. Each dean was asked to have the instrument completed by the official at that school who decided on the use of a central versus local IRB. The survey instrument consisted primarily of a variety of closed-ended questions. Eighty-eight medical schools (69.8%) completed the instrument; 76% of these indicated that they had never used a central IRB and 24% had used a central IRB. Most of the respondents expressed no interest in using a central IRB in the future because they believed that their local IRB was working efficiently, and they were concerned about issues of institutional liability and the loss of local representation in the review process. Of the medical schools that had used a central IRB, most were pleased with the performance of the central IRB and would continue to use a central IRB in the future. Of interest, most of these respondents did not agree that a central IRB had helped them to attract industry-sponsored research. In spite of much discussion about the advantages of central IRBs in expediting overview of human subjects research, especially in multicenter trials, the majority of medical schools surveyed had never used a central IRB and expressed no interest in doing so.

  1. Health research barriers in the faculties of two medical institutions in India

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alamdari A

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available A Alamdari,1 S Venkatesh,2 A Roozbehi,3 AT Kannan41Research Center of Factors Affecting Health, Faculty of Nursing and Midwifery, Yasouj University of Medical Sciences, Yasouj, Iran; 2National AIDS Control Organization, Janpath Road, Chandralok Building, New Delhi, India; 3Education Development Office, Yasouj University of Medical Sciences, Yasouj, Iran; 4Department of Community Medicine, University College of Medical Sciences and Guru Tegh Bahadur Hospital, Delhi, IndiaBackground: Health policy formation refers to the design of a conceptual framework to find possibilities, facilitate feasibilities, and identify strong and weak points, as well as insufficiencies, by research. Doing research should clarify qualities and standards for policy and decision-making to enable the success of development of health care in a country. Evaluation of the impact of health interventions is particularly poorly represented in public health research. This study attempted to identify barriers and facilitators of health research among faculty members in two major institutions in India, ie, the All India Institute of Medical Sciences (AIIMS and the University College of Medical Sciences (UCMS and Guru Tegh Bahadur (GTB Hospital in Delhi.Methods: The participants were asked to fill in a questionnaire that canvassed individual characteristics, ie, years of experience, place of work, academic rank, final educational qualification, work setting, educational group, primary activity, and number of publications in the previous 5 years. Barriers and facilitators were categorized into personal, resources, access, and administration groups. The data were processed using SPSS version 16, independent t-tests, Chi-square tests, and multivariate logistic regression.Results: The total number of faculty members at both institutions was 599, 456 (76% of whom participated in this study. The primary activities reported by faculty at UCMS (teaching and Faculty at AIIMS reported

  2. National Institutes of Health Research Plan on Rehabilitation: NIH Medical Rehabilitation Coordinating Committee.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Mara, Ann; Rowland, Julia H; Greenwell, Thomas N; Wiggs, Cheri L; Fleg, Jerome; Joseph, Lyndon; McGowan, Joan; Panagis, James S; Washabaugh, Charles; Peng, Grace C Y; Bray, Rosalina; Cernich, Alison N; Cruz, Theresa H; Marden, Sue; Michel, Mary Ellen; Nitkin, Ralph; Quatrano, Louis; Spong, Catherine Y; Shekim, Lana; Jones, Teresa L Z; Juliano-Bult, Denise; Panchinson, David M; Chen, Daofen; Jakeman, Lyn; Knebel, Ann; Tully, Lois A; Chan, Leighton; Damiano, Diane; Tian, Biao; McInnes, Pamela; Khalsa, Partap; Reider, Eve; Shurtleff, David; Elwood, William; Ballard, Rachel; Ershow, Abby G; Begg, Lisa

    2017-04-01

    One in five Americans experiences disability that affects their daily function because of impairments in mobility, cognitive function, sensory impairment, or communication impairment. The need for rehabilitation strategies to optimize function and reduce disability is a clear priority for research to address this public health challenge. The National Institutes of Health (NIH) recently published a Research Plan on Rehabilitation that provides a set of priorities to guide the field over the next 5 years. The plan was developed with input from multiple Institutes and Centers within the NIH, the National Advisory Board for Medical Rehabilitation Research, and the public. This article provides an overview of the need for this research plan, an outline of its development, and a listing of six priority areas for research. The NIH is committed to working with all stakeholder communities engaged in rehabilitation research to track progress made on these priorities and to work to advance the science of medical rehabilitation.This article is being published almost simultaneously in the following six journals: American Journal of Occupational Therapy, American Journal of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation, Archives of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation, Neurorehabilitation and Neural Repair, Physical Therapy, and Rehabilitation Psychology. Citation information is as follows: NIH Medical Rehabilitation Coordinating Committee. Am J Phys Med Rehabil. 2017;97(4):404-407. Copyright © Wolters Kluwer Health, Inc. 2017.

  3. Postgraduate pharmacology curriculum in medical institutions in India: time for need-based appraisal and modifications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Badyal, Dinesh K; Desai, Chetna; Tripathi, Santanu K; Dhaneria, S P; Chandy, Sujith J; Bezbaruah, B K

    2014-01-01

    The need to revise the curriculum for the postgraduate course (M.D.) in Pharmacology has been perceived by the academicians in India since quite some time. The changing professional requirements of the graduating students, the current scenario vis a vis animal experimentation and the emphasis of the Medical Council of India on a competency based curriculum has triggered this felt need. In spite of the fact that most medical institutions and universities in India offer postgraduate courses in pharmacology, the curriculum lacks uniformity with extreme variations observed at some places. This article attempts to analyze the existing curricula in pharmacology in India and suggest modifications that could be recommended to the suitable regulatory bodies for implementation. A revision of objectives in the three domains of learning, development of skills that help develop suitable competencies, adoption of teaching learning methods in addition to the conventional methods, and a rethink on the assessment methods have been recommended. Development and validation of alternatives skill-based modules in lieu of animal experiments are recommended. Additional skills like medical writing and communication skills, professionalism and ethics, multi and inter-disciplinary integration and collaboration and a wider exposure of students to the pharmaceutical, academic, regulatory and research institutions for onsite learning were also recommended to fulfill their future career requirements.

  4. Postgraduate pharmacology curriculum in medical institutions in India: Time for need-based appraisal and modifications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Badyal, Dinesh K.; Desai, Chetna; Tripathi, Santanu K.; Dhaneria, S. P.; Chandy, Sujith J.; Bezbaruah, B. K.

    2014-01-01

    The need to revise the curriculum for the postgraduate course (M.D.) in Pharmacology has been perceived by the academicians in India since quite some time. The changing professional requirements of the graduating students, the current scenario vis a vis animal experimentation and the emphasis of the Medical Council of India on a competency based curriculum has triggered this felt need. In spite of the fact that most medical institutions and universities in India offer postgraduate courses in pharmacology, the curriculum lacks uniformity with extreme variations observed at some places. This article attempts to analyze the existing curricula in pharmacology in India and suggest modifications that could be recommended to the suitable regulatory bodies for implementation. A revision of objectives in the three domains of learning, development of skills that help develop suitable competencies, adoption of teaching learning methods in addition to the conventional methods, and a rethink on the assessment methods have been recommended. Development and validation of alternatives skill-based modules in lieu of animal experiments are recommended. Additional skills like medical writing and communication skills, professionalism and ethics, multi and inter-disciplinary integration and collaboration and a wider exposure of students to the pharmaceutical, academic, regulatory and research institutions for onsite learning were also recommended to fulfill their future career requirements. PMID:25538327

  5. Implementation and evaluation of the Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine leadership program for women faculty.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levine, Rachel B; González-Fernández, Marlís; Bodurtha, Joann; Skarupski, Kimberly A; Fivush, Barbara

    2015-05-01

    Women continue to be underrepresented in top leadership roles in academic medicine. Leadership training programs for women are designed to enhance women's leadership skills and confidence and increase overall leadership diversity. The authors present a description and evaluation of a longitudinal, cohort-based, experiential leadership program for women faculty at the Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine. We compared pre- and post-program self-assessed ratings of 11 leadership skills and specific negotiation behaviors from 3 cohorts of leadership program participants (n=134) from 2010 to 2013. Women reported significant improvements in skills across 11 domains with the exceptions of 2 domains, Public Speaking and Working in Teams, both of which received high scores in the pre-program assessment. The greatest improvement in rankings occurred within the domain of negotiation skills. Although women reported an increase in their negotiation skills, we were not able to demonstrate an increase in the number of times that women negotiated for salary, space, or promotion following participation in the program. The Johns Hopkins School of Medicine Leadership Program for Women Faculty has demonstrable value for the professional development of participants and addresses institutional strategies to enhance leadership diversity and the advancement of women.

  6. Is There a Threat Towards Medical Institutions, and What to Do?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bemelman, Mike

    2017-01-01

    Unfortunately the reality of today is that a terrorist threat in Europe has become evident. With increasing frequency we are confronted with attacks all across Europe, at least this is the perception. So is there a Threat? If look at the paper of Wolf et al (1), this describes an increase of terrorist attacks from 1999- 2006, the amount of victims due to these attacks increased exponentially. This means the attacks are getting more effective. The perpetrators are getting better and are learning how to injure or kill more victims. The techniques are getting more sophisticated. For example if we look at the Bali Bombing in 2002, here a second hit technique is used. The terrorist placed first a small bomb in a tourist area, knowing that this eventually will attract many people who rush in to help the victims. Then a second hit was done with a much larger bomb killing and wounding even a larger group of people. This is the goal of the terrorist, introducing terror, shocking the world, introduce fear. If we look at the attack in Nice, South France. They used a truck driving through a large tourist crowd, knowing that there would be many children and young people. This is their ultimate goal, shock the world. With that mindset, just imagine how shocking would it be to primary attack a medical institution. Our weakness as medical people is that we want to help people, In fact we gave a Hippocratic oath that we will always help other people, that is our job. We find it hard to believe that medical relief institutions will be attacked. If we look at the London bombing in 2005, one of the terrorists detonated the bomb in a bus. By coincidence this happened right in front of the British Medical Association with many doctors in the building at that time. All of them immediately went to the exploded bus to provide medical relieve, did they even think for a second that there maybe would be a second hit? We are to nice, and the terrorists know this. Historyhas proven to us that

  7. Academic medical centers write their own rules.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freischlag, Julie Ann

    2011-09-01

    The interaction between pharmaceutical and device companies and hospitals and physicians has undergone significant transformation in the past few years due to the public's perception that bias may result when such relationships are not disclosed and monitored. Policies need to be written by medical centers and hospitals to preserve and retain the trust of the public. The policy written by Johns Hopkins Medical Institutions is outlined and its implications discussed in this article. The importance of such policies in guiding young faculty and staff as they begin their careers cannot be overemphasized. Copyright © 2011. Published by Mosby, Inc.

  8. Self-medication practices among female students of higher educational institutions in Selangor, Malaysia: A quantitative insight

    OpenAIRE

    Jamshed, Shazia Qasim; Wong, Pei Se; Yi, Heng Chin; Yun, Gan Siaw; Khan, Muhammad Umair; Ahmad, Akram

    2016-01-01

    Background: World Health Organization has defined self-medication as the selection and use of medications (including herbal and traditional product) by individuals to treat self-recognized illnesses or symptoms. The prevalence of self-medication is reported to be higher among female students. Objective: To investigate the awareness and self-medication practices among female students of higher education institutions in Malaysia. Method: A descriptive, cross-sectional study was conducted in fou...

  9. The professional stress of nurses employed in medical institutions in the Lublin Region

    OpenAIRE

    Michalik, Joanna; Zawadka, Magdalena; Wolski, Dariusz; Stanisławek, Andrzej; Węgorowski, Paweł

    2017-01-01

    Michalik Joanna, Zawadka Magdalena, Wolski Dariusz, Stanisławek Andrzej, Węgorowski Paweł. The professional stress of nurses employed in medical institutions in the Lublin Region. Journal of Education, Health and Sport. 2017;7(8):296-308. eISSN 2391-8306. DOI http://dx.doi.org/10.5281/zenodo.847992 http://ojs.ukw.edu.pl/index.php/johs/article/view/4732 The journal has had 7 points in Ministry of Science and Higher Education parametric evaluation. Part B item 12...

  10. Health research barriers in the faculties of two medical institutions in India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alamdari, A; Venkatesh, S; Roozbehi, A; Kannan, At

    2012-01-01

    Health policy formation refers to the design of a conceptual framework to find possibilities, facilitate feasibilities, and identify strong and weak points, as well as insufficiencies, by research. Doing research should clarify qualities and standards for policy and decision-making to enable the success of development of health care in a country. Evaluation of the impact of health interventions is particularly poorly represented in public health research. This study attempted to identify barriers and facilitators of health research among faculty members in two major institutions in India, ie, the All India Institute of Medical Sciences (AIIMS) and the University College of Medical Sciences (UCMS) and Guru Tegh Bahadur (GTB) Hospital in Delhi. The participants were asked to fill in a questionnaire that canvassed individual characteristics, ie, years of experience, place of work, academic rank, final educational qualification, work setting, educational group, primary activity, and number of publications in the previous 5 years. Barriers and facilitators were categorized into personal, resources, access, and administration groups. The data were processed using SPSS version 16, independent t-tests, Chi-square tests, and multivariate logistic regression. The total number of faculty members at both institutions was 599, 456 (76%) of whom participated in this study. The primary activities reported by faculty at UCMS (teaching) and Faculty at AIIMS reported (Research and Provision of health care services) as a major activity (P professors, whereas most of the faculty members at AIIMS were associate professors (P < 0.01). Of 47 barriers and facilitating factors, there were 26 barriers and 21 facilitating factors at AIIMS and 39 barriers and eight facilitating factors at UCMS. Faculty members at UCMS had 6.572 times more barriers to health research than those at AIIMS. Close proximity between AIIMS and the Indian Council of Medical Research and the National Medical Library

  11. Avicenna's doctrine and institutional review board in international bio-medical research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Radfar, Amir; Kazerouninia, Chekameh; Filip, Irina; Patriche, Diana; Ahmadi, Seyed Ahmad Asgharzadeh

    2012-12-01

    Avicenna, an outstanding Persian physician and philosopher (980 AD-1037 AD), established a clinical treaty, or doctrine, without which medical experimentation would not have progressed. This doctrine emphasizes the ultimate divine power of God or a higher being over healing and mandates the patients' well-being as the crucial aspect in all medical care and experiments. The Institutional Review Board, as the ethical body that oversees clinical research, is in line with this doctrine. However, the lack of a homogenous and internationally recognized code of ethics, the decentralized work of ethics oversight committees, the improper implementation of established ethical standards and a shortage of scientific auditing capacities have raised concerns over the possible exploitation of vulnerable populations.

  12. Improving oversight of the graduate medical education enterprise: one institution's strategies and tools.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Afrin, Lawrence B; Arana, George W; Medio, Franklin J; Ybarra, Angela F N; Clarke, Harry S

    2006-05-01

    Accreditation organizations, financial stakeholders, legal systems, and regulatory agencies have increased the need for accountability in educational processes and curricular outcomes of graduate medical education. This demand for greater programmatic monitoring has placed pressure on institutions with graduate medical education (GME) programs to develop greater oversight of these programs. Meeting these challenges requires development of new GME management strategies and tools for institutional GME administrators to scrutinize programs, while still allowing these programs the autonomy to develop and implement educational methods to meet their unique training needs. At the Medical University of South Carolina (MUSC), senior administrators in the college of medicine felt electronic information management was a critical strategy for success and thus proceeded to carefully select an electronic residency management system (ERMS) to provide functionality for both individual programs and the GME enterprise as a whole. Initial plans in 2002 for a phased deployment had to be changed to a much more rapid deployment due to regulatory issues. Extensive communication and cooperation among MUSC's GME leaders resulted in a successful deployment in 2003. Evaluation completion rates have substantially improved, duty hours are carefully monitored, patient safety has improved through more careful oversight of residents' procedural privileges, regulators have been pleased, and central GME administrative visibility of program performance has dramatically improved. The system is now being expanded to MUSC's medical school and other health professions colleges. The authors discuss lessons learned and opportunities and challenges ahead, which include improving tracking of development of procedural competency, establishing and monitoring program performance standards, and integrating the ERMS with GME reimbursement systems.

  13. Interdisciplinary and inter-institutional differences in learning preferences among Malaysian medical and health sciences students

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    REBECCA S.Y. WONG

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: The learner-centred approach in medical and health sciences education makes the study of learning preferences relevant and important. This study aimed to investigate the interdisciplinary, interinstitutional, gender and racial differences in the preferred learning styles among Malaysian medical and health sciences students in three Malaysian universities, namely SEGi University (SEGi, University of Malaya (UM and Universiti Tunku Abdul Rahman (UTAR. It also investigated the differences in the preferred learning styles of these students between high achievers and non-high achievers. Methods: This cross-sectional study was carried out on medical and health sciences students from three Malaysian universities following the approval of the Research and Ethics Committee, SEGi University. Purposive sampling was used and the preferred learning styles were assessed using the VARK questionnaire. The questionnaire was validated prior to its use. Three disciplines (medicine, pharmacy and dentistry were chosen based on their entry criteria and some similarities in their course structure. The three participating universities were Malaysian universities with a home-grown undergraduate entry medical program and students from a diverse cultural and socioeconomic background. The data were analysed using the Statistical Package for the Social Sciences (SPSS software, version 22. VARK subscale scores were expressed as mean±standard deviation. Comparisons of the means were carried out using t-test or ANOVA. A p value of 0.05. Conclusion: This study gives an insight into the learner characteristics of more than one medical school in Malaysia. Such multi-institutional studies are lacking in the published literature and this study gives a better representation of the current situation in the learning preferences among medical students in Malaysia.

  14. 77 FR 11562 - National Institute of General Medical Sciences; Notice of Closed Meeting Pursuant to Section 10(d...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-02-27

    ... Research Support; 93.821, Cell Biology and Biophysics Research; 93.859, Pharmacology, Physiology, and Biological Chemistry Research; 93.862, Genetics and Developmental Biology Research; 93.88, Minority Access to... HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health National Institute of General Medical Sciences; Notice of...

  15. [Software solution for work planning, monitoring and analysis in medical institutions and its appliance in information system of the medical center "Dom Zdravlja Nish"].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Becić, B; Pantić, D; Ristić, V

    1995-09-01

    Economic category of the given services in medical institutions is getting more important. The software solution explained in this paper offers efficient planning of services that could be given in medical institutions. The software module also covers plan realization monitorin. Large number of statistic reports enables detailed analysis of plan realization in required period, using hierarchical structure of institution organizacion and given services. Module offeres reports for monitoring every employee, as well as categories of insured persons, and kinds of medical protection, etc. Using number and price of services, economic side of work can be seen, for every employed person or whole institution. This software module is realized with ORACLE RDBMS in distributed UNIX ambient with LAN/WAN based on INTERNET TCP/IP.

  16. [Analysis of regulatory basis for organization of clinical nutrition in medical institutions of the Russian Federation].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tutel'ian, V A; Sharafetdinov, Kh Kh; Pogozheva, A V; Plotnikova, O A

    2013-01-01

    The article analyzes regulatory basis for organization of clinical nutrition in medical institutions of Russia. It is shown that the strategy of therapeutic measures in acute and chronic diseases a central place to take dietary therapy with adequate provision of energy and plastic body's needs, correction of metabolic disorders and risk factors for comorbidity. Prior to the confirmation of the order of Ministry of Health of Russia from 05.08.2003, No 330 "On measures to improve nutritional care in health care institutions in the Russian Federation" clinical nutrition in medical institutions was based on the nosological principle, in the form of daily diet--a diet designed for each concrete Diseases which are identified by a number from 1 to 15. According to the order of Ministry of Health of Russia from 05.08.2003, No 330 in the health care practice has introduced a new range of diets (system standard diets), which is based on the principle of adapting the chemical composition and energy value of the diet to the individual clinical and pathogenic features of the disease and combines previously used diet numbering system. It is shown that the organization of clinical nutrition should be based on common requirements imposed on the federal level and at the level of the subject of the Russian Federation. In order to optimize clinical nutrition is necessary to determine the methodological approaches to personalization through the introduction of diet in health care practice of modern innovative technologies health food, performing preventive and treatment of the problem (implementation of Article 39 of the Federal Law of 21.11.2011 No 323--FZ "On the basis of health protection in the Russian Federation", the Order of the Government of the Russian Federation of 25.10.2010 No 1873-r "On the basis of the state policy in the field of nutrition to 2020 year").

  17. Energy Programs at the Johns Hopkins University Applied Physics Laboratory, Quarterly Report, October-December 1980

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    1980-12-01

    The Johns Hopkins University Applied Physics Laboratory is engaged in developing energy resources, utilization concepts, and monitoring and storage methods. This Quarterly Report summarizes the work on the various tasks as of 31 December 1980. The Energy Quarterly Report is divided into five sections. The first, Geothermal Energy Development Planning and Technical Assistance, supported by the Department of Energy/Division of Geothermal Energy (DOE/DGE), contains reports on the progress of geothermal-related tasks on which effort was concentrated during the quarter. The second section, Operational Research, Hydroelectric Power Development, supported by the Department of Energy/Resource Applications (DOE/RA), contains a report on institutional problems for small-scale hydroelectric power development in the southeastern states and a list of documents published by APL in the hydroelectric program and in the geothermal program, above. The third section, Seismotectonic Investigations, contains an article on work on the geologic structure of the Danbury Quadrangle that is supported by the Reactor Safety Research Division of the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) and an in-house supported study on a new method for assessing earthquakes in intraplate regions. The fourth section, Energy Conversion and Storage Techniques, contains four articles. The first is an evaluation of the Einstein refrigerator, supported by independent IR and D funds. The second concerns fly-wheel technology development at APL supported by the Department of Energy, Division of Energy Storage (DOE/STOR). The third is a report on APL energy conservation efforts at its own buildings, and the fourth is an article on liquefied natural gas (LNG) safety evaluation, supported by the National Academy of Sciences. The fifth section explores the value of establishing an Energy Research Institute at The Johns Hopkins University.

  18. Impact of conflict on medical education: a cross-sectional survey of students and institutions in Iraq.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barnett-Vanes, Ashton; Hassounah, Sondus; Shawki, Marwan; Ismail, Omar Abdulkadir; Fung, Chi; Kedia, Tara; Rawaf, Salman; Majeed, Azeem

    2016-02-16

    This study surveyed all Iraqi medical schools and a cross-section of Iraqi medical students regarding their institutional and student experiences of medical education amidst ongoing conflict. The objective was to better understand the current resources and challenges facing medical schools, and the impacts of conflict on the training landscape and student experience, to provide evidence for further research and policy development. Deans of all Iraqi medical schools registered in the World Directory of Medical Schools were invited to participate in a survey electronically. Medical students from three Iraqi medical schools were invited to participate in a survey electronically. Primary: Student enrolment and graduation statistics; human resources of medical schools; dean perspectives on impact of conflict. Secondary: Medical student perspectives on quality of teaching, welfare and future career intentions. Of 24 medical schools listed in the World Directory of Medical Schools, 15 replied to an initial email sent to confirm their contact details, and 8 medical schools responded to our survey, giving a response rate from contactable medical schools of 53% and overall of 33%. Five (63%) medical schools reported medical student educational attainment being impaired or significantly impaired; 4 (50%) felt the quality of training medical schools could offer had been impaired or significantly impaired due to conflict. A total of 197 medical students responded, 62% of whom felt their safety had been threatened due to violent insecurity. The majority (56%) of medical students intended to leave Iraq after graduating. Medical schools are facing challenges in staff recruitment and adequate resource provision; the majority believe quality of training has suffered as a result. Medical students are experiencing added psychological stress and lower quality of teaching; the majority intend to leave Iraq after graduation. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission

  19. Exposure to plastic surgery during undergraduate medical training: A single-institution review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Austin, Ryan E; Wanzel, Kyle R

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Applications to surgical residency programs have declined over the past decade. Even highly competitive programs, such as plastic surgery, have begun to witness these effects. Studies have shown that early surgical exposure has a positive influence on career selection. OBJECTIVE: To review plastic surgery application trends across Canada, and to further investigate medical student exposure to plastic surgery. METHODS: To examine plastic surgery application trends, national data from the Canadian Resident Matching Service database were analyzed, comparing 2002 to 2007 with 2008 to 2013. To evaluate plastic surgery exposure, a survey of all undergraduate medical students at the University of Toronto (Toronto, Ontario) during the 2012/2013 academic year was conducted. RESULTS: Comparing 2002 to 2007 and 2008 to 2013, the average number of national plastic surgery training positions nearly doubled, while first-choice applicants decreased by 15.3%. The majority of Canadian academic institutions experienced a decrease in first-choice applicants; 84.7% of survey respondents indicated they had no exposure to plastic surgery during their medical education. Furthermore, 89.7% believed their education had not provided a basic understanding of issues commonly managed by plastic surgeons. The majority of students indicated they receive significantly less plastic surgery teaching than all other surgical subspecialties. More than 44% of students not considering plastic surgery as a career indicated they may be more likely to with increased exposure. CONCLUSION: If there is a desire to grow the specialty through future generations, recruiting tactics to foster greater interest in plastic surgery must be altered. The present study suggests increased and earlier exposure for medical students is a potential solution. PMID:25821773

  20. A Java-based multi-institutional medical information retrieval system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, K; van Wingerde, F J; Bradshaw, K; Szolovits, P; Kohane, I

    1997-01-01

    JAMI (Java-based Agglutination of Medical Information) is designed as a framework for integrating heterogeneous information systems used in healthcare related institutions. It is one of the implementations under the W3-EMRS project 1 aimed at using the World Wide Web (Web) to unify different hospital information systems. JAMI inherited several design decisions from the first W3-EMRS implementation described in, including using the Web as the communication infrastructure and HL7 as the communication protocol between the heterogeneous systems and the W3-EMRS systems. In addition, JAMI incorporates the growing Java technologies and has a more flexible and efficient architecture. This paper describes JAMI's architecture and implementation. It also present two instances of JAMI, one for the integration of different hospital information systems and another for the integration of two heterogeneous systems within a single hospital. Some important issues for the further development of JAMI, including security and confidentiality, data input and decision support are discussed.

  1. Confronting conflict: addressing institutional conflicts of interest in academic medical centers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liang, Bryan A; Mackey, Tim

    2010-01-01

    Individual conflicts of interest are rife in healthcare, and substantial attention has been given to address them. Yet a more substantive concern-institutional conflicts of interest ("ICOIs") in academic medical centers ("AMCs") engaged in research and clinical care-have yet to garner sufficient attention, despite their higher stakes for patient safety and welfare. ICOIs are standard in AMCs, are virtually unregulated, and have led to patient deaths. Upon review of ICOIs, we find a clear absence of substantive efforts to confront these conflicts. We also assess the Jesse Gelsinger case, which resulted in the death of a study participant exemplifying a deep-seated culture of institutional indifference and complicity in unmanaged conflicts. Federal policy, particularly the Bayh-Dole Act, also creates and promotes ICOIs. Efforts to address ICOIs are narrow or abstract, and do not provide for a systemic infrastructure with effective enforcement mechanisms. Hence, in this paper, we provide a comprehensive proposal to address ICOIs utilizing a "Centralized System" model that would proactively review, manage, approve, and conduct assessments of conflicts, and would have independent power to evaluate and enforce any violations via sanctions. It would also manage any industry funds and pharmaceutical samples and be a condition of participation in public healthcare reimbursement and federal grant funding. The ICOI policy itself would provide for disclosure requirements, separate management of commercial enterprise units from academic units, voluntary remediation of conflicts, and education on ICOIs. Finally, we propose a new model of medical education-academic detailing-in place of current marketing-focused "education." Using such a system, AMCs can wean themselves from industry reliance and promote a culture of accountability and independence from industry influence. By doing so, clinical research and treatment can return to a focus on patient care, not profits.

  2. Client satisfaction and quality of health care in a rural medical institute of central Uttar Pradesh

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sandip Kumar

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Background: Consumer satisfaction is recognized as an important parameter for assessing the quality of patient care services. Satisfaction regarding the attitude of providers toward these services is expected to affect treatment outcome and prognosis. Out Patient Departments (OPDs need to monitor the quality of care and patient satisfaction for continuous quality improvement. A major component of quality of health care is patient satisfaction. Present study has been conducted to assess consumer satisfaction with regard to clinical care in the Out Patient Department of Rural Medical Institute of Central Uttar Pradesh. Materials and Methods: The present study was an Outpatient- based cross sectional study conducted in Out Patient Department of UP Rural Institute of Medical Sciences & Research, Saifai, Etawah (UP between January- June, 2013. A total of 600 patients were selected at random for exit interviews during Out Patients Department hours. Results: The socio-demographic profile of study subjects showed that 57.17% respondents were male and mostly were Hindu (79.67%. A total of 65% were in the age group between 15-59 years. Respondents were patients themselves (86.17% and accompanying relatives for pediatric patients younger than 15 years old (13.83%. Forty percent of respondents were house wife by occupation. For most of the patients (58.83% waiting time for consultation was between 15-30 minutes, in 55.17% patients, doctor spent only 5-10 minutes for consultation. A total of 98.67% of the respondents were satisfied with the outpatient department timings.

  3. [Investigations on leishmaniases at the E.I. Martsinovsky Institute of Medical Parasitology and Tropical Medicine].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kellina, O I; Strelkova, M V

    2010-01-01

    The paper assesses the investigations on leishmaniases at the E.I. Martsinovsky Institute of Medical Parasitology and Tropical Medicine in 1920 to 2009. The analysis includes papers on biology, ecology, taxonomy, and experimental transmission of the agents of leishmaniases via the bites of sand flies, the principle in the control of zoonotic cutaneous leishmaniasis (ZCL) during the agricultural development of extensive territories in the Karshin steppe, on quantitative approaches in the epidemiology of ZCL, a search for Russian effective medicaments to treat patients with this disease and the development of criteria for selecting L. major strains for individual and mass vaccinations against ZCL, the revision of Leishmania circulating in great gerbil populations, and the description of the new species L. turanica, an important parasite for L. major persistence from one transmission season to the next. The first investigations on leishmaniasis were made by Prof. E.I. Martsinovsky, the founder and the first director of the Institute in the early 20th century.

  4. Clinical and translational research capacity building needs in minority medical and health science Hispanic institutions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Estapé-Garrastazu, Estela S; Noboa-Ramos, Carlamarie; De Jesús-Ojeda, Lizbelle; De Pedro-Serbiá, Zulmarie; Acosta-Pérez, Edna; Camacho-Feliciano, Delia M

    2014-10-01

    A preliminary needs assessment was conducted among faculty and students of three minority medical and health science institutions comprising the Puerto Rico Clinical and Translational Research Consortium (PRCTRC). The Web-based survey was focused on evaluating the training interests in the clinical and translational research core areas and competencies developed by the National Institutes of Health-Clinical and Translational Sciences Award. The survey was the result of a team effort of three PRCTRC key function's leaderships: Multidisciplinary Training and Career Development, Tracking and Evaluation and Community Research and Engagement. The questionnaire included 45 items distributed across five content areas including demographics, research training needs, training activities coordination and knowledge about the services offered by the PRCTRC. Analysis of research needs includes a sample distribution according to professor, assistant/associate professor and graduate students. The thematic area with highest response rate among the three groups was: "Identify major clinical/public health problems and relevant translational research questions," with the competency "Identify basic and preclinical studies that are potential testable clinical research hypothesis." These preliminary results will guide the training and professional development of the new generation of clinical and translational researchers needed to eliminate health disparities. © 2014 The Authors. Clinical and Translational Science Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  5. Relationship between National Institutes of Health research awards to US medical schools and managed care market penetration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moy, E; Mazzaschi, A J; Levin, R J; Blake, D A; Griner, P F

    1997-07-16

    Medical research conducted in academic medical centers is often dependent on support from clinical revenues generated in these institutions. Anecdotal evidence suggests that managed care has the potential to affect research conducted in academic medical centers by challenging these clinical revenues. To examine whether empirical evidence supports a relationship between managed care and the ability of US medical schools to sustain biomedical research. Data on annual extramural research grants awarded to US medical schools by the National Institutes of Health (NIH) from fiscal years 1986 to 1995 were obtained, and each medical school was matched to a market for which information about health maintenance organization (HMO) penetration in 1995 was available. Growth in total NIH awards, traditional research project (R01) awards, R01 awards to clinical and basic science departments, and changes in institutional ranking by NIH awards were compared among schools located in markets with low, medium, and high managed care penetration. Medical schools in all markets had comparable rates of growth in NIH awards from 1986 to 1990. Thereafter, medical schools in markets with high managed care penetration had slower growth in the dollar amounts and numbers of NIH awards compared with schools in markets with low or medium managed care penetration. This slower growth for schools in high managed care markets was associated with loss of share of NIH awards, equal to $98 million in 1995, and lower institutional ranking by NIH awards. Much of this revenue loss can be explained by the slower growth of R01 awards to clinical departments in medical schools in high managed care markets. These findings provide evidence of an inverse relationship between growth in NIH awards during the past decade and managed care penetration among US medical schools. Whether this association is causal remains to be determined.

  6. Self-medication practices among female students of higher educational institutions in Selangor, Malaysia: A quantitative insight

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jamshed, Shazia Qasim; Wong, Pei Se; Yi, Heng Chin; Yun, Gan Siaw; Khan, Muhammad Umair; Ahmad, Akram

    2016-01-01

    Background: World Health Organization has defined self-medication as the selection and use of medications (including herbal and traditional product) by individuals to treat self-recognized illnesses or symptoms. The prevalence of self-medication is reported to be higher among female students. Objective: To investigate the awareness and self-medication practices among female students of higher education institutions in Malaysia. Method: A descriptive, cross-sectional study was conducted in four higher education institutes of Selangor, Malaysia. Convenience sampling approach was used to collect data from a sample 475 students. A “pretested” questionnaire was used as a study instrument. Results: A total of 461 questionnaires were returned (response rate 97.05%). The prevalence of self-medication among female students in higher educational institutions was 57.2% (n = 262). The most common source of self-prescribed medicine was a pharmacy or clinics (n = 206; 45%). It was found that antipyretics were the most common medications used without doctor's consultation (n = 212; 89.1%). Analgesics and antipyretics (n = 79; 62.7%) were highly recommended by students to their family and friends. The common reason for self-medication was prior successful experience (n = 102, 81.0%). The majority of respondents (n = 280; 61.1%) reported that they believed over-the-counter medications were as effective as medications prescribed by a doctor. Conclusion: The prevalence of self-medication practice among female students in the sample of the four higher education institutions was moderate. More studies are required to generalize these findings across Malaysia. PMID:27413350

  7. Self-medication practices among female students of higher educational institutions in Selangor, Malaysia: A quantitative insight.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jamshed, Shazia Qasim; Wong, Pei Se; Yi, Heng Chin; Yun, Gan Siaw; Khan, Muhammad Umair; Ahmad, Akram

    2016-01-01

    World Health Organization has defined self-medication as the selection and use of medications (including herbal and traditional product) by individuals to treat self-recognized illnesses or symptoms. The prevalence of self-medication is reported to be higher among female students. To investigate the awareness and self-medication practices among female students of higher education institutions in Malaysia. A descriptive, cross-sectional study was conducted in four higher education institutes of Selangor, Malaysia. Convenience sampling approach was used to collect data from a sample 475 students. A "pretested" questionnaire was used as a study instrument. A total of 461 questionnaires were returned (response rate 97.05%). The prevalence of self-medication among female students in higher educational institutions was 57.2% (n = 262). The most common source of self-prescribed medicine was a pharmacy or clinics (n = 206; 45%). It was found that antipyretics were the most common medications used without doctor's consultation (n = 212; 89.1%). Analgesics and antipyretics (n = 79; 62.7%) were highly recommended by students to their family and friends. The common reason for self-medication was prior successful experience (n = 102, 81.0%). The majority of respondents (n = 280; 61.1%) reported that they believed over-the-counter medications were as effective as medications prescribed by a doctor. The prevalence of self-medication practice among female students in the sample of the four higher education institutions was moderate. More studies are required to generalize these findings across Malaysia.

  8. Radiation Oncology Medical Student Clerkship: Implementation and Evaluation of a Bi-institutional Pilot Curriculum

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Golden, Daniel W., E-mail: dgolden@radonc.uchicago.edu [Department of Radiation and Cellular Oncology, University of Chicago Pritzker School of Medicine, Chicago, Illinois (United States); Spektor, Alexander [Department of Radiation Oncology, Brigham and Women' s Hospital and Dana-Farber Cancer Institute, Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts (United States); Rudra, Sonali; Ranck, Mark C. [Department of Radiation and Cellular Oncology, University of Chicago Pritzker School of Medicine, Chicago, Illinois (United States); Krishnan, Monica S.; Jimenez, Rachel B.; Viswanathan, Akila N. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Brigham and Women' s Hospital and Dana-Farber Cancer Institute, Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts (United States); Koshy, Matthew; Howard, Andrew R.; Chmura, Steven J. [Department of Radiation and Cellular Oncology, University of Chicago Pritzker School of Medicine, Chicago, Illinois (United States)

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: To develop and evaluate a structured didactic curriculum to complement clinical experiences during radiation oncology clerkships at 2 academic medical centers. Methods and Materials: A structured didactic curriculum was developed to teach fundamentals of radiation oncology and improve confidence in clinical competence. Curriculum lectures included: (1) an overview of radiation oncology (history, types of treatments, and basic clinic flow); (2) fundamentals of radiation biology and physics; and (3) practical aspects of radiation treatment simulation and planning. In addition, a hands-on dosimetry session taught students fundamentals of treatment planning. The curriculum was implemented at 2 academic departments in 2012. Students completed anonymous evaluations using a Likert scale to rate the usefulness of curriculum components (1 = not at all, 5 = extremely). Likert scores are reported as (median [interquartile range]). Results: Eighteen students completed the curriculum during their 4-week rotation (University of Chicago n=13, Harvard Longwood Campus n=5). All curriculum components were rated as extremely useful: introduction to radiation oncology (5 [4-5]); radiation biology and physics (5 [5-5]); practical aspects of radiation oncology (5 [4-5]); and the treatment planning session (5 [5-5]). Students rated the curriculum as “quite useful” to “extremely useful” (1) to help students understand radiation oncology as a specialty; (2) to increase student comfort with their specialty decision; and (3) to help students with their future transition to a radiation oncology residency. Conclusions: A standardized curriculum for medical students completing a 4-week radiation oncology clerkship was successfully implemented at 2 institutions. The curriculum was favorably reviewed. As a result of completing the curriculum, medical students felt more comfortable with their specialty decision and better prepared to begin radiation oncology residency.

  9. Radiation oncology medical student clerkship: implementation and evaluation of a bi-institutional pilot curriculum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Golden, Daniel W; Spektor, Alexander; Rudra, Sonali; Ranck, Mark C; Krishnan, Monica S; Jimenez, Rachel B; Viswanathan, Akila N; Koshy, Matthew; Howard, Andrew R; Chmura, Steven J

    2014-01-01

    To develop and evaluate a structured didactic curriculum to complement clinical experiences during radiation oncology clerkships at 2 academic medical centers. A structured didactic curriculum was developed to teach fundamentals of radiation oncology and improve confidence in clinical competence. Curriculum lectures included: (1) an overview of radiation oncology (history, types of treatments, and basic clinic flow); (2) fundamentals of radiation biology and physics; and (3) practical aspects of radiation treatment simulation and planning. In addition, a hands-on dosimetry session taught students fundamentals of treatment planning. The curriculum was implemented at 2 academic departments in 2012. Students completed anonymous evaluations using a Likert scale to rate the usefulness of curriculum components (1=not at all, 5=extremely). Likert scores are reported as (median [interquartile range]). Eighteen students completed the curriculum during their 4-week rotation (University of Chicago n=13, Harvard Longwood Campus n=5). All curriculum components were rated as extremely useful: introduction to radiation oncology (5 [4-5]); radiation biology and physics (5 [5-5]); practical aspects of radiation oncology (5 [4-5]); and the treatment planning session (5 [5-5]). Students rated the curriculum as "quite useful" to "extremely useful" (1) to help students understand radiation oncology as a specialty; (2) to increase student comfort with their specialty decision; and (3) to help students with their future transition to a radiation oncology residency. A standardized curriculum for medical students completing a 4-week radiation oncology clerkship was successfully implemented at 2 institutions. The curriculum was favorably reviewed. As a result of completing the curriculum, medical students felt more comfortable with their specialty decision and better prepared to begin radiation oncology residency. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Plastination technology for anatomical studies in Nigeria: Opinion of teachers at medical institutions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Onyemaechi O. Azu

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Dr. Gunther von Hagens developed plastination as a technique of tissue preservation in 1977. He used a delicate method of forced impregnation with curable polymers like silicone, epoxy or polyester resins for preservation of anatomical specimens. With plastination, every part of a biological tissue is treated, preserving it for educational purposes. Hence, there are vast applications in the medical field. We set out to survey the knowledge and opinion of lecturers of anatomy about plastinated specimen use in medical schools through the administration of questionnaires to respondents who participated at the Society of Experimental and Clinical Anatomists of Nigeria (SECAN conference in 2011. It was found that 50.0%and 23.75%of respondents respectively, had their masters and doctorate degrees in Anatomy. Less than 8.0% utilised plastination as a tool for teaching as against 40%(plastic models, 36.25%(cadavers and 15.0%(pathology pots. Conventional methods such as fixation by immersion (15.0% and embalming (52.5% with formaldehyde were commonly used for long term preservation of tissues in their various institutions. These methods were found to be less costly (25.0%, easy to use (56.25% and the only method (12.25% available, even though they posed some health hazards (96.0%. Whilst only 6.25%of the respondents did not know anything about plastination, 93.75%were aware of it. The advocacy for preservation of tissues by plastination has been gradual in developed countries. We recommend the use of plastinates in medical schools in Nigeria.

  11. The benefits and challenges of research centers and institutes in academic medicine: findings from six universities and their medical schools.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mallon, William T

    2006-06-01

    To understand the benefits and challenges of using centers and institutes in the academic research enterprise, and to explore institutional strategies that capitalize on the strengths and ameliorate the weaknesses of the center/institute structure. Using a qualitative research design, the author and associates interviewed over 150 faculty members and administrators at six medical schools and their parent universities in 2004. Interview data were transcribed, coded, and analyzed using a grounded theory approach. This methodology generated rich descriptions and explanations of the six institutions, which can produce extrapolations to, but not necessarily findings that are generalizable to, other institutions and settings. Centers and institutes offer a number of benefits to academic institutions. Centers can aid in faculty recruitment and retention, facilitate collaboration in research, secure research resources, offer a sense of community and promote continued learning, afford organizational flexibility, and focus on societal problems and raise funds. Despite their many benefits, centers can also create tensions and present management challenges to institutional leaders. Centers can compete with departments over resources, complicate faculty recruitment, contribute to a fragmented mission, resist effective evaluation, pose governance problems, and impede junior faculty development. Institutional leaders might capitalize on the strengths of centers through three strategies: (1) reward leaders who embrace a collaborative point of view and develop a culture that frowns upon empire building; (2) distinguish among the many entities that share the "center" or "institute" labels; and (3) acknowledge that departments must maintain their place in the organizational milieu.

  12. Harvey Cushing and pediatric brain tumors at Johns Hopkins: the early stages of development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pendleton, Courtney; Ahn, Edward S; Quiñones-Hinojosa, Alfredo

    2011-06-01

    Harvey Cushing, credited with pioneering the field of neurosurgery as a distinct surgical subspecialty in the US, was at the forefront of neurooncology, publishing seminal papers on the diagnosis and treatment of pediatric brain tumors during the latter part of his career. However, his contributions to the surgical treatment of these lesions during the early stages of his tenure at the Johns Hopkins Hospital, from 1896 to 1912, remain largely unknown. After obtaining institutional review board approval, and through the courtesy of the Alan Mason Chesney Archives, the authors reviewed the Johns Hopkins Hospital surgical files from the years 1896 to 1912. Patients younger than 18 years of age, presenting with symptoms suspicious for an intracranial tumor, and undergoing surgical intervention by Cushing were selected for further analysis. Of the 40 pediatric patients undergoing surgery for suspected intracranial neoplasms, 26 were male. The mean age among the entire sample was 10.1 years. Cushing used three main operative approaches in the surgical treatment of pediatric intracranial neoplasms: infratentorial/suboccipital, subtemporal, and hemisphere flap. Twenty-three patients had negative findings following both the primary and subsequent surgical interventions conducted by Cushing. Postoperative conditions following the primary surgical intervention were improved in 24 patients. Twelve patients (30%) died during their inpatient stay for the primary intervention. The mean time to the last follow-up was 24.9 months; the mean time to death was 10.0 months. Cushing strove to maximize exposure while minimizing blood loss in an attempt to increase his ability to successfully treat pediatric brain tumors. His early contributions to the field of pediatric neurooncology demonstrate his commitment to advancing the field of neurosurgery.

  13. Pitt-Hopkins syndrome: report of a case with a TCF4 gene mutation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Orsini Alessandro

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Aims We will discuss the clinical and genetic diagnosis of a child with severe psychomotor delay, who at 3 years of age presented with paroxysms of hyperpnea-apnea and seizures unrelated to breathing anomalies. Methods The child underwent genetic (karyotype, FISH telomeres and neuroradiological (cranial CT and MRI tests, which proved to be normal. He came under our clinical observation at 3 years and 5 months of age. Due to severe psychomotor delay and facial dysmorphisms we completed the genetic investigations based on his clinical feature and analysis of the available literature. Results The presence of severe mental retardation associated with anomalous breathing pattern may suggest the Joubert and Rett syndrome, however these were excluded on the basis of clinical and genetic examination. Angelman syndrome, suspected for facial dysmorphisms and absent language, was also excluded because of the presence of a normal pattern of methylation at SNRPN locus. Another possible diagnosis was the Pitt-Hopkins Syndrome (PHS, characterized by severe mental retardation, breathing anomalies (paroxisms of hyperpnea-apnea, dysmorphisms and sometimes epilepsy. Haploinsufficiency of TCF4 gene located at 18q21.2 region has been recently identified as causative of this syndrome. In our patient the research of TCF4 mutation by the Institute of Human Genetics, University Hospital Erlangen (Germany, showed a de novo mutation. Conclusions The diagnosis of Pitt-Hopkins syndrome, an underdiagnosed cause of mental retardation, was based on clinical and genetic findings. Searching for TCF4 mutations is highly recommended when others overlapping syndromes was excluded. At our knowledge our patient is the first italian case of PHS diagnosed at molecular level.

  14. Paul Scherrer Institut annual report 1994. Annex II: PSI life sciences and institute for medical radiobiology newsletter 1994

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reist, H.W. [ed.] [Paul Scherrer Inst. (PSI), Villigen (Switzerland)

    1995-10-01

    This annex reports on the PSI life science division`s progress achieved during 1994 in the fields of radiation medicine, radiopharmacy, magnetic resonance imaging, radiation hygiene, positron emission tomography (PET) and medical radiology. A bibliography of the department`s publications is included. figs., tabs., refs.

  15. Bidirectional Exchanges of Medical Students Between Institutional Partners in Global Health Clinical Education Programs: Putting Ethical Principles into Practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rohrbaugh, Robert; Kellett, Anne; Peluso, Michael J

    One-third of US medical students participate in global health (GH) education, and approximately one-quarter of US medical schools have structured programs that offer special recognition in GH. GH clinical electives (GHCEs) are opportunities for students to experience a medical system and culture different from their own. GHCEs are administered through institutional affiliation agreements, often between an institution in a high-income country (HIC) and one in a low- or middle-income country (LMIC). Although these agreements suggest the exchange of students in both directions, GHCEs are traditionally characterized by students from HICs traveling to LMICs. The goal of this study was to investigate the availability of opportunities for students from LMICs participating in GHCEs at partner institutions in HICs and to describe the costs of these opportunities for students from LMICs. We conducted a web-based search of 30 US institutions previously identified as having structured programs in GH. We determined which of these schools have programs that accept medical students from international schools for GHCEs, as well as the administrative requirements, types of fees, and other costs to the international student based on information available on the web. Descriptive statistics were employed for the quantitative analysis of costs. We found that, although the majority of US institutions with structured GH programs sending students to sites abroad accept international students at their sites in the United States, nearly one-fifth of programs do not offer such opportunities for bidirectional exchange. We also characterized the substantial costs of such experiences, because this can represent a significant barrier for students from LMICs. Access to GHCEs in US partner institutions should be an important underlying ethical principle in the establishment of institutional partnerships. The opportunities available to and experiences of students from LMIC partner institutions are

  16. A short history of the William H. Welch Medical Library.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koehler, Barbara M; Roderer, Nancy K; Ruggere, Christine

    2004-02-01

    The William H. Welch Medical Library was founded in 1929 with the merger of three libraries, namely, the library of the School of Medicine, the library of the School of Hygiene and Public Health, and the library of the Johns Hopkins Hospital. Engendered by the dreams of Johns Hopkins University bibliophiles, such as founding Hopkins physicians William Osler, William Stewart Halsted, Howard Kelly, and William Henry Welch, the library flourished and expanded. At the same time as the founding of the central medical library, the Institute of the History of Medicine collection was established in the Welch Library building, with William H. Welch as its first director. Innovative leadership led to many exciting projects, such as the Welch Indexing Project, which was a prototype for the National Library of Medicine's medical subject headings, and the establishment of a laboratory for research into the application of information technologies to knowledge management. The Welch Library enters the 21st century as a dynamic library committed to the continuing delivery of information services, as well as ongoing research into the development of library services for the coming 100 years.

  17. Effect of medical institution change on gestational duration after the Great East Japan Earthquake: The Fukushima Health Management Survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suzuki, Kohta; Goto, Aya; Fujimori, Keiya

    2016-12-01

    The aim of this study was to examine the association between medical institution change for perinatal care and gestational duration after the Great East Japan Earthquake using data from the Fukushima Health Management Survey. The data of pregnant women who experienced the earthquake in Fukushima prefecture and participated in the Pregnancy and Birth Survey as part of the Fukushima Health Management Survey were analyzed. The primary and secondary outcomes of this study were gestational duration and preterm birth, respectively. The main study factor was prenatal checkup institution (only one institution, changed institution due to self-referral, changed institution due to medical indication, and went to parents' home for childbirth). Self-referral was considered as indicative of relocation after the disaster. Multiple linear and logistic regression analyses were conducted to examine the effect of earthquake on each outcome. A total of 5593 (60.2%) participants experienced the earthquake between the 4th and 37th weeks of their gestational period. After controlling for variables, pregnant women who changed their perinatal checkup institution due to medical indication were significantly associated with shorter gestational duration (β = -10.6, P Earthquake and the subsequent Fukushima Daiichi nuclear disaster was not significant. © 2016 Japan Society of Obstetrics and Gynecology.

  18. Workshop held at Johns Hopkins University, March 2013

    CERN Document Server

    2013-01-01

    Cyber-physical systems (CPS) involve deeply integrated, tightly coupled computational and physical components. These systems, spanning multiple scientific and technological domains, are highly complex and pose several fundamental challenges. They are also critically important to society’s advancement and security. The design and deployment of the adaptable, reliable CPS of tomorrow requires the development of a basic science foundation, synergistically drawing on various branches of engineering, mathematics, computer science, and domain specific knowledge.   This book brings together 19 invited papers presented at the Workshop on Control of Cyber-Physical Systems, hosted by the Department of Electrical & Computer Engineering at The Johns Hopkins University in March 2013. It highlights the central role of control theory and systems thinking in developing the theory of CPS, in addressing the challenges of cyber-trust and cyber-security, and in advancing emerging cyber-physical applications ranging from s...

  19. Epidemiology and Outcome of Self-Inflicted Burns at Pakistan Institute of Medical Sciences, Islamabad

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saaiq, Muhammad; Ashraf, Bushra

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND Self-inflicted burn injuries carry considerable mortality and morbidity among otherwise fit young individuals. This study assessed the epidemiologic pattern and outcome of these injuries in a burn care facility in Pakistan. METHODS The study was carried out at Pakistan Institute of Medical Sciences (PIMS) Burn Care Centre in Islamabad over a period of 2 years. It included all adult patients of either gender, aged over 14 years who presented as cases of burn suicides and attempted burn suicides during the study period. Convenience sampling technique was employed. The sociodemographic profile of the patients, motives underlying the act of self-immolation, any underlying psychiatric illness, alcohol abuse, total body surface area (TBSA) burnt, depth of burn injury, associated inhalation injury, duration of hospital stay, and mortality were all recorded. RESULTS Seventy five patients (80.64%) were female while 18 patients (19.35%) were male. The overall mean age was 26.89±6.1 years (range=15-52 years). The affected TBSA ranged from 15%-100% with an overall mean of 69.30±25.42%. The hospital stay ranged from 1-37 days with a mean of 7.16±6.60 days. Marital conflicts constituted the most frequent motive underlying the suicidal attempts (n=57; 61.29%) followed by failed love affairs (n=9; 9.67%). There was an overall mortality of 84.95%. The most common sufferers of self inflicted burn injuries were young, married, illiterate housewives who were resident of rural area. Getting marriage was the most common triggering cause for such injuries. CONCLUSION There is need to institute appropriate preventive measures to address the issue in a national perspective. PMID:25489533

  20. Academic and Post-Graduate Performance of African American Medical Students by Category of Premed Institution: Historically Black vs. Predominantly White Institutions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Capers, Quinn; Way, David P

    2015-08-01

    African American (AA) physicians are more likely to practice primary care and care for underserved populations than majority physicians, yet remain underrep-resented in medicine. Because Historically Black Colleges and Universities (HBCUs) have a legacy of matriculating students with lower standardized test scores, majority medical schools may be reluctant to form pipelines with HBCUs. We compared academic and postgraduate performance of two groups of AA students at The Ohio State University College of Medicine: HBCU versus Predominantly White Institutions (PWI) graduates. We identified 212 AA matriculants between 1992 and 2007. Group 1 (N=39) were HBCU graduates, Group 2 (N=173) were PWI graduates. We compared MCAT scores, medical school, and post-graduate performance. Despite lower average MCAT scores, groups did not differ significantly in terms of graduating, matching into residencies, selecting primary care, or achieving board certification. Majority medical schools should consider forming strong recruitment pipelines with HBCUs.

  1. 77 FR 36331 - Noise Exposure Maps; Cleveland Hopkins International Airport, Cleveland, OH

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-06-18

    ... Noise Exposure Maps; Cleveland Hopkins International Airport, Cleveland, OH AGENCY: Federal Aviation... determination that the noise exposure maps submitted by the City of Cleveland for Cleveland Hopkins... International Airport under Part 150 in conjunction with the noise exposure map, and that this program will be...

  2. SATISFACTION LEVEL OF MEDICAL EDUCATORS WORKING IN TEACHING INSTITUTIONS : A QUESTIONNAIRE BASED CROSS-SECTIONAL STUDY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sudeshna Chatterjee

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available In a resource-limited and high-burden disease setting, satisfied health professional is an asset in terms of maximized productivity, efficiency and quality health care. Job Satisfaction Index is a validated measure to identify the components that influence those issues. A multi-faceted structured questionnaire study was conducted upon a cross-section of medical educators (n=160 serving two tertiary care teaching institutions under different management set-up. Multiple demographic features were independent variables whereas three (3 critical areas of satisfaction index (SI were outcome variables. All participants were interviewed using 15 item Likert response-based, modified job satisfaction scale. It was observed that total SI scores among doctors representing the private group remained marginally higher (P<0.05 while compared to the other group. The comparative analysis of SI scores in critical areas like availability of academic supports and job security remained higher among the private doctors than that of the government ones though not significant. However the private doctors remained marginally satisfied in terms of working environment. The study outcome necessitates appropriate intervention measures at the organizational levels.

  3. Prediction of Osteopathic Medical School Performance on the basis of MCAT score, GPA, sex, undergraduate major, and undergraduate institution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dixon, Donna

    2012-04-01

    The relationships of students' preadmission academic variables, sex, undergraduate major, and undergraduate institution to academic performance in medical school have not been thoroughly examined. To determine the ability of students' preadmission academic variables to predict osteopathic medical school performance and whether students' sex, undergraduate major, or undergraduate institution influence osteopathic medical school performance. The study followed students who graduated from New York College of Osteopathic Medicine of New York Institute of Technology in Old Westbury between 2003 and 2006. Student preadmission data were Medical College Admission Test (MCAT) scores, undergraduate grade point averages (GPAs), sex, undergraduate major, and undergraduate institutional selectivity. Medical school performance variables were GPAs, clinical performance (ie, clinical subject examinations and clerkship evaluations), and scores on the Comprehensive Osteopathic Medical Licensing Examination-USA (COMLEX-USA) Level 1 and Level 2-Clinical Evaluation (CE). Data were analyzed with Pearson product moment correlation coefficients and multivariate linear regression analyses. Differences between student groups were compared with the independent-samples, 2-tailed t test. A total of 737 students were included. All preadmission academic variables, except nonscience undergraduate GPA, were statistically significant predictors of performance on COMLEX-USA Level 1, and all preadmission academic variables were statistically significant predictors of performance on COMLEX-USA Level 2-CE. The MCAT score for biological sciences had the highest correlation among all variables with COMLEX-USA Level 1 performance (Pearson r=0.304; Posteopathic medical school performance, including GPAs, clinical performance, and COMLEX-USA Level 1 and Level 2-CE results. Clinical performance was predictive of COMLEX-USA Level 2-CE performance.

  4. 77 FR 76457 - Howard Hughes Medical Institute, et al.; Notice of Consolidated Decision on Applications for Duty...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-12-28

    ... Chase, MD 20815. Instrument: Micro-litre and nanolite dispensing system. Manufacturer: TTP Labtech Ltd...: Howard Hughes Medical Institute, Chevy Chase, MD 20815. Instrument: Micro-litre and nanolitre dispensing... for applications presently occupied by conventional plastics. The core of this research will use...

  5. Applying the institutional review board data repository approach to manage ethical considerations in evaluating and studying medical education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thayer, Erin K; Rathkey, Daniel; Miller, Marissa Fuqua; Palmer, Ryan; Mejicano, George C; Pusic, Martin; Kalet, Adina; Gillespie, Colleen; Carney, Patricia A

    2016-01-01

    Medical educators and educational researchers continue to improve their processes for managing medical student and program evaluation data using sound ethical principles. This is becoming even more important as curricular innovations are occurring across undergraduate and graduate medical education. Dissemination of findings from this work is critical, and peer-reviewed journals often require an institutional review board (IRB) determination. IRB data repositories, originally designed for the longitudinal study of biological specimens, can be applied to medical education research. The benefits of such an approach include obtaining expedited review for multiple related studies within a single IRB application and allowing for more flexibility when conducting complex longitudinal studies involving large datasets from multiple data sources and/or institutions. In this paper, we inform educators and educational researchers on our analysis of the use of the IRB data repository approach to manage ethical considerations as part of best practices for amassing, pooling, and sharing data for educational research, evaluation, and improvement purposes. Fostering multi-institutional studies while following sound ethical principles in the study of medical education is needed, and the IRB data repository approach has many benefits, especially for longitudinal assessment of complex multi-site data.

  6. Burn Wound Infections and Antibiotic Susceptibility Patterns at Pakistan Institute of Medical Sciences, Islamabad, Pakistan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saaiq, Muhammad; Ahmad, Shehzad; Zaib, Muhammad Salman

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROND Burn wound infections carry considerable mortality and morbidity amongst burn injury victims who have been successfully rescued through the initial resuscitation. This study assessed the prevalent microrganisms causing burn wound infections among hospitalized patients; their susceptibility pattern to commonly used antibiotics; and the frequency of infections with respect to the duration of the burn wounds. METHODS This study was carried out at Burn Care Centre, Pakistan Institute of Medical Sciences (PIMS), Islamabad, Pakistan over a period of two years (i.e. from June 2010 to May 2012). The study included all wound-culture-positive patients of either gender and all ages, who had sustained deep burns and underwent definitive management with wound excisions and skin auto-grafting. Patients with negative cultures of the wounds were excluded. Tissue specimens for culture and sensitivity were collected from burn wounds using standard collection techniques and analyzed at microbiological laboratory. RESULTS Out of a total of 95 positive microbial growths, 36 were Pseudomonas aeruginosa (35.29%) as the most frequent isolate found, followed by 21 Klebsiella pneumoniae (20.58%), 19 Staphylococcus aureaus (18.62%), 10 Proteus (9.80%), 7 E. coli (6.86%), 7 Acinetobacter (6.86%), and 4 Candida (3.92%). A variable antibiotic susceptibility pattern was observed among the grown microbes. Positive cultures were significantly more frequent among patients with over two weeks duration of burn wounds. CONCLUSION P. aeruginosa, K. pneumoniae and S. aureus constituted the most common bacterial microbes of burn wounds in our in-patients cases. Positive cultures were more frequent among patients with over two weeks duration of burn wounds. Early excision and skin grafting of deep burns and adherence to infection control measures can help to effectively reduce the burden of these infections. PMID:25606471

  7. Case Study: Johns Hopkins Community Health Partnership: A model for transformation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berkowitz, Scott A; Brown, Patricia; Brotman, Daniel J; Deutschendorf, Amy; Dunbar, Linda; Everett, Anita; Hickman, Debra; Howell, Eric; Purnell, Leon; Sylvester, Carol; Zollinger, Ray; Bellantoni, Michele; Durso, Samuel C; Lyketsos, Constantine; Rothman, Paul

    2016-12-01

    To address the challenging health care needs of the population served by an urban academic medical center, we developed the Johns Hopkins Community Health Partnership (J-CHiP), a novel care coordination program that provides services in homes, community clinics, acute care hospitals, emergency departments, and skilled nursing facilities. This case study describes a comprehensive program that includes: a community-based intervention using multidisciplinary care teams that work closely with the patient's primary care provider; an acute care intervention bundle with collaborative team-based care; and a skilled nursing facility intervention emphasizing standardized transitions and targeted use of care pathways. The program seeks to improve clinical care within and across settings, to address the non-clinical determinants of health, and to ultimately improve healthcare utilization and costs. The case study introduces: a) main program features including rationale, goals, intervention design, and partnership development; b) illness burden and social barriers of the population contributing to care challenges and opportunities; and c) lessons learned with steps that have been taken to engage both patients and providers more actively in the care model. Urban health systems, including academic medical centers, must continue to innovate in care delivery through programs like J-CHiP to meet the needs of their patients and communities. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Transcultural adaptation of the Johns Hopkins Fall Risk Assessment Tool

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martinez, Maria Carmen; Iwamoto, Viviane Ernesto; Latorre, Maria do Rosário Dias de Oliveira; Noronha, Adriana Moreira; Oliveira, Ana Paula de Sousa; Cardoso, Carlos Eduardo Alves; Marques, Ifigenia Augusta Braga; Vendramim, Patrícia; Lopes, Paula Cristina; de Sant'Ana, Thais Helena Saes

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Objective: to perform the transcultural adaptation and content validity analysis of the Johns Hopkins Fall Risk Assessment Tool to assess both fall risk and fall-related injury risk for hospitalized elderly in Brazil. Method: the transcultural adaptation consisted of translating the scale to Portuguese (Brazil), back-translating it into its language of origin, establishing a consensus version, and having an expert committee verify its transcultural equivalence. Content assessment was conducted by a committee of judges, ending with the calculation of the items and scales' content validity index. Nurses tested the tool. Results: the scale's translated version went through two evaluation rounds by the judges, based on which, the items with unsatisfactory performance were changed. The content validity index for the items was ≥80.0% and the global index 97.1%. The experimental application showed the scale is user-friendly. Conclusion: the scale presents valid content for the assessment of fall risk and risk of fall-related injuries and is easy to use, with the potential to contribute to the proper identification of risks and the establishment of care actions. PMID:27579936

  9. [The medical social characteristic of patients with psychic disorders addressed to medical institutions with various forms of property].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petrov, D S; Konovalov, O E; Petrov, S S

    2009-01-01

    The article deals with the issues of enhancement of the psychiatric service. The analysis of the results of medical social study of the patients addressed for the medical care to public and commercial structures is given. The substantiation of necessity in enhancing the quality and effectiveness of out-patient psychiatric care service are presented and the various alternative models of its development as well.

  10. Clinical and economic efficacy of medical equipment at municipal health care institutions in megapolis

    OpenAIRE

    Gataullin M.R.; Mazitov M.R.; Shulaev А.V.

    2011-01-01

    Introduction of health insurance system provided modernization of medical facilities and equipment. High costs on medical equipment especially imported require economic analysis of its use. The aim of the study was to conduct clinical and economic analysis of efficacy of medical equipment use by municipal health care agencies in megapolis. Materials and methods: Annual reports on medical devices and anonymous questionnaires were included into the research. The study revealed the following res...

  11. Between two worlds: a multi-institutional qualitative analysis of students' reflections on joining the medical profession.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fischer, Melissa A; Harrell, Heather E; Haley, Heather-Lyn; Cifu, Adam S; Alper, Eric; Johnson, Krista M; Hatem, David

    2008-07-01

    Recent changes in healthcare system and training mandates have altered the clinical learning environment. We incorporated reflective writing into Internal Medicine clerkships (IMcs) in multiple institutions so students could consider the impact of clerkship experiences on their personal and professional development. We analyzed student reflections to inform curricula and support learning. We qualitatively analyzed the reflections of students at 3 US medical schools during IMcs (N = 292) to identify themes, tone, and reflective quality using an iterative approach. Chi-square tests assessed differences between these factors and across institutions. Students openly described powerful experiences. Major themes focused on 4 categories: personal issues (PI), professional development (PD), relational issues (RI), and medical care (MC). Each major theme was represented at each institution, although with significant variability between institutions in many of the subcategories including student role (PI), development-as-a-physician (PD), professionalism (PD) (p Students used positive tones to describe student role, development-as-a-physician and physician-patient relationship (PD) (p Students employed a "reporting" voice in writing about clinical problem-solving, healthcare systems, and quality/safety (MC). Reflection is considered important to professional development. Our analysis suggests that students at 3 institutions reflect on similar experiences. Theme variability across institutions implies curricula should be tailored to local culture. Reflective quality analysis suggests students are better equipped to reflect on certain experiences over others, which may impact learning. Student reflections can function as a mirror for our organizations, offer institutional feedback for support and improvement, and inform curricula for learners and faculty.

  12. The Wyss institute: A new model for medical technology innovation and translation across the academic-industrial interface.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tolikas, Mary; Antoniou, Ayis; Ingber, Donald E

    2017-09-01

    The Wyss Institute for Biologically Inspired Engineering at Harvard University was formed based on the recognition that breakthrough discoveries cannot change the world if they never leave the laboratory. The Institute's mission is to discover the biological principles that Nature uses to build living things, and to harness these insights to create biologically inspired engineering innovations to advance human health and create a more sustainable world. Since its launch in 2009, the Institute has developed a new model for innovation, collaboration, and technology translation within academia, breaking "silos" to enable collaborations that cross institutional and disciplinary barriers. Institute faculty and staff engage in high-risk research that leads to transformative breakthroughs. The biological principles uncovered are harnessed to develop new engineering solutions for medicine and healthcare, as well as nonmedical areas, such as energy, architecture, robotics, and manufacturing. These technologies are translated into commercial products and therapies through collaborations with clinical investigators, corporate alliances, and the formation of new start-ups that are driven by a unique internal business development team including entrepreneurs-in-residence with domain-specific expertise. Here, we describe this novel organizational model that the Institute has developed to change the paradigm of how fundamental discovery, medical technology innovation, and commercial translation are carried out at the academic-industrial interface.

  13. Harvey Cushing and early spinal dysraphism repair at Johns Hopkins Hospital.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pendleton, Courtney; Ahn, Edward S; Jallo, George I; Quiñones-Hinojosa, Alfredo

    2011-01-01

    As neurological surgery began developing into a surgical subspecialty in the US at the turn of the 20th century, with Harvey Cushing at the forefront, the operative treatment of spinal dysraphism was refined with attempts to minimize complications. Following institutional approval, and through the courtesy of the Alan Mason Chesney Archives, the authors reviewed the Johns Hopkins Hospital surgical files from 1896 to 1912. Patients presenting with spinal dysraphism who underwent surgical intervention by Dr. Harvey Cushing were selected for further analysis. Ten patients presented for surgical intervention for spinal dysraphism, and 7 of these had concurrent hydrocephalus. The mean age of these patients was 5.8 months (range 1-14 months). The mean length of stay was 20.4 days. There were 6 inpatient deaths. At the time of last follow-up, 2 patients were well, 1 patient remained unimproved, and 1 patient (for whom no discharge outcome was available) had died. The cases described in detail offer insight into the breadth of Cushing's practice and the varied approaches he employed. The use of Faradic stimulation to assess nerve root function, the use of complex multilayered closures, and the creation of operative tables for combined treatment of hydrocephalus and spinal dysraphism illustrate Cushing's contributions to developing the field of pediatric neurosurgery.

  14. Eluation of adjuvant chemoradiation therapy for ampullary adenocarcinoma: the Johns Hopkins Hospital - Mayo Clinic collaborative study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhou Jessica

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The role of adjuvant chemoradiation therapy for ampullary carcinoma is unknown. Previous literature suggests that certain populations with high risk factors for recurrence may benefit from adjuvant chemoradiation. We combined the experience of two institutions to better delineate which patients may benefit from adjuvant chemoradiation. Methods Patients who underwent curative surgery for ampullary carcinoma at the Johns Hopkins Hospital (n = 290; 1992-2007 and at the Mayo Clinic (n = 130; 1977-2005 were reviewed. Patients with Results Median overall-survival was 39.9 months with 2- and 5-year survival rates of 62.4% and 39.1%. On univariate analysis, adverse prognostic factors for overall survival included T3/T4 stage disease (RR = 1.86, p = 0.002, node positive status (RR = 3.18, p Conclusions Node-positive patients with resected ampullary adenocarcinoma may benefit from 5-FU based adjuvant chemoradiation. Since a significant proportion of patients develop metastatic disease, there is a need for more effective systemic treatment.

  15. Human rights from the Nuremberg Doctors Trial to the Geneva Declaration. Persons and institutions in medical ethics and history.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frewer, Andreas

    2010-08-01

    The "Universal Declaration of Human Rights" and the "Geneva Declaration" by the World Medical Association, both in 1948, were preceded by the foundation of the United Nations in New York (1945), the World Medical Association in London (1946) and the World Health Organization in Geneva (1948). After the end of World War II the community of nations strove to achieve and sustain their primary goals of peace and security, as well as their basic premise, namely the health of human beings. All these associations were well aware of the crimes by medicine, in particular by the accused Nazi physicians at the Nuremberg Doctors Trial (1946/47, sentence: August 1947). During the first conference of the World Medical Association (September 1947) issues of medical ethics played a major role: and a new document was drafted concerning the values of the medical profession. After the catastrophe of the War and the criminal activities of scientists, the late 1940s saw increased scrutiny paid to fundamental questions of human rights and medical ethics, which are still highly relevant for today's medicine and morality. The article focuses on the development of medical ethics and human rights reflected in the statement of important persons, codes and institutions in the field.

  16. Transcultural adaptation of the Johns Hopkins Fall Risk Assessment Tool.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martinez, Maria Carmen; Iwamoto, Viviane Ernesto; Latorre, Maria do Rosário Dias de Oliveira; Noronha, Adriana Moreira; Oliveira, Ana Paula de Sousa; Cardoso, Carlos Eduardo Alves; Marques, Ifigenia Augusta Braga; Vendramim, Patrícia; Lopes, Paula Cristina; Sant'Ana, Thais Helena Saes de

    2016-08-29

    to perform the transcultural adaptation and content validity analysis of the Johns Hopkins Fall Risk Assessment Tool to assess both fall risk and fall-related injury risk for hospitalized elderly in Brazil. the transcultural adaptation consisted of translating the scale to Portuguese (Brazil), back-translating it into its language of origin, establishing a consensus version, and having an expert committee verify its transcultural equivalence. Content assessment was conducted by a committee of judges, ending with the calculation of the items and scales' content validity index. Nurses tested the tool. the scale's translated version went through two evaluation rounds by the judges, based on which, the items with unsatisfactory performance were changed. The content validity index for the items was ≥80.0% and the global index 97.1%. The experimental application showed the scale is user-friendly. the scale presents valid content for the assessment of fall risk and risk of fall-related injuries and is easy to use, with the potential to contribute to the proper identification of risks and the establishment of care actions. realizar a adaptação transcultural para uso no Brasil e a avaliação da validade de conteúdo da Johns Hopkins Fall Risk Assessment Tool para avaliação de risco de quedas e de danos por quedas em pacientes adultos hospitalizados. adaptação transcultural consistiu na tradução da escala para a língua portuguesa (Brasil), retrotradução para a língua de origem, versão de consenso e análise da equivalência transcultural por um comitê de especialistas. A avaliação do conteúdo foi realizada por meio de um comitê de juízes, finalizando com o cálculo do índice de validade de conteúdo dos itens e da escala. Foi realizada a aplicação experimental do instrumento por enfermeiros. a versão traduzida da escala passou por duas rodadas de avaliação pelos juízes, a partir das quais os itens com desempenho insatisfatório foram modificados

  17. Malnutrition Diagnosis during Adult Inpatient Hospitalizations: Analysis of a Multi-Institutional Collaborative Database of Academic Medical Centers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tobert, Conrad M; Mott, Sarah L; Nepple, Kenneth G

    2018-01-01

    Malnutrition is a significant problem for hospitalized patients. However, the true prevalence of reported malnutrition diagnosis in real-world clinical practice is largely unknown. Using a large collaborative multi-institutional database, the rate of malnutrition diagnosis was assessed and used to assess institutional variables associated with higher rates of malnutrition diagnosis. The aim of this study was to define the prevalence of malnutrition diagnosis reported among inpatient hospitalizations. The University Health System Consortium (Vizient) database was retrospectively reviewed for reported rates of malnutrition diagnosis. All adult inpatient hospitalization at 105 member institutions during fiscal years 2014 and 2015 were evaluated. Malnutrition diagnosis based on the presence of an International Classification of Diseases-Ninth Revision diagnosis code. Hospital volume and publicly available hospital rankings and patient satisfaction scores were obtained. Multiple regression analysis was performed to assess the association between these variables and reported rates of malnutrition. A total of 5,896,792 hospitalizations were identified from 105 institutions during the 2-year period. It was found that 292,754 patients (5.0%) had a malnutrition diagnosis during their hospital stay. By institution, median rate of malnutrition diagnosis during hospitalization was 4.0%, whereas the rate of severe malnutrition diagnosis was 0.9%. There was a statistically significant increase in malnutrition diagnosis from 4.0% to 4.9% between 2014 and 2015 (P<0.01). Institutional factors associated with increased diagnosis of malnutrition were higher hospital volume, hospital ranking, and patient satisfaction scores (P<0.01). Missing a malnutrition diagnosis appears to be a universal issue because the rate of malnutrition diagnosis was consistently low across academic medical centers. Institutional variables were associated with the prevalence of malnutrition diagnosis, which

  18. Introducing the National Institute for Sports Medicine in Hungary: a complex sports medical healthcare and screening system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laki, Judit; Soós, Ágnes; Jákó, Péter; Tállay, András; Perjés, Ábel; Szabó, Anita Megyeriné

    2017-01-01

    The Hungarian National Institute for Sports Medicine (NISM) was founded in 1952 to provide medical coverage for national teams, screening and periodic health evaluation (PHE) for all Hungarian athletes. The system of 'all in one and ASAP' evolved by now to a specific state-funded healthcare provider with complex sports medical and sport-related services available for athletes. The NISM created a countrywide network to make health clearance available for all athletes close to their place of residency. This centralised system guarantees the uniformity and financial independence of the network, as it is directly financed by the government and free for every competitive athlete. Thus, it leaves no chance for conflict of interest in evaluating athletes' eligibility. In 2013, NISM established an online registry for preparticipation screening and PHE. This made the registry available for sports physicians and certain data for both sports physicians and athletes themselves. Furthermore, NISM created a nationwide, centrally coordinated, out of turn care with central coordination for elite athletes nationwide. Outpatient and inpatient clinics of NISM provide sports-specific care. Most of the minimally invasive techniques used at the Department of Sports Surgery are applied only here in the country. The medical staff of NISM has special experience in Sports Medicine and sport-related conditions. All tasks are managed within the same system, within institutional frames by professionals at Sports Medicine, which guarantees institutional expertise, competence and responsibility. Our aim is to introduce the complex system, the services and the recent achievements of the Hungarian NISM.

  19. Physicians' acceptance of electronic medical records exchange: an extension of the decomposed TPB model with institutional trust and perceived risk.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsieh, Pi-Jung

    2015-01-01

    Electronic medical records (EMRs) exchange improves clinical quality and reduces medical costs. However, few studies address the antecedent factors of physicians' intentions to use EMR exchange. Based on institutional trust and perceived risk integrated with the decomposed theory of planned behavior (TPB) model, we propose a theoretical model to explain the intention of physicians to use an EMR exchange system. We conducted a field survey in Taiwan to collect data from physicians who had experience using the EMR exchange systems. A valid sample of 191 responses was collected for data analysis. To test the proposed research model, we employed structural equation modeling using the partial least squares method. The study findings show that the following five factors have a significant influence on the physicians' intentions to use EMR exchange systems: (a) attitude; (b) subjective norm; (c) perceived behavior control; (d) institutional trust; and (e) perceived risk. These five factors are predictable by perceived usefulness, perceived ease of use, and compatibility, interpersonal and governmental influence, facilitating conditions and self-efficacy, situational normality and structural assurance, and institutional trust, respectively. The results also indicate that institutional trust and perceived risk integrated with the decomposed TPB model improve the prediction of physician's intentions to use EMR exchange. The results of this study indicate that our research model effectively predicts the intention of physicians to use EMR exchange, and provides valuable implications for academics and practitioners. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. ACTUALITY OF DIGITAL LIBRARIES CREATION IN THE HIGHER MEDICAL EDUCATIONAL INSTITUTIONS OF UKRAINE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kateryna O. Zhuravska

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available This article deals with an access to methodical materials from the sites of higher medical educational establishments of Ukraine. The tools that provide the process are analyzed. Particular attention is paid to the use of digital libraries in medical universities, the problem of open access to methodological information is considered. The prospects of the use of the latest information technologies in the medical education industry are highlighted. It is noted, that the use of digital libraries will allow medical students to acquire better knowledge and to be competitive specialists, as well as higher establishments will improve their rating.

  1. A case of Pitt-Hopkins syndrome with absence of hyperventilation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Inati, Adlette; Abbas, Hussein A; Korjian, Serge; Daaboul, Yazan; Harajeily, Mohamad; Saab, Raya

    2013-12-01

    Pitt-Hopkins syndrome is characterized by mental retardation, hyperventilation, and dysmorphic features due to TCF4 mutations. We report a case of Pitt-Hopkins syndrome in a 2½-year-old boy presenting with psychomotor retardation, recurrent respiratory tract infections, and dysmorphic features with absence of hyperventilation or other breathing abnormalities. Comparative genomic hybridization and quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction were used to confirm TCF4 haploinsufficiency. Pitt-Hopkins syndrome is a rare debilitating disease that should be in the differential diagnosis of other neurodevelopmental disorders characterized by mental retardation and hypotonicity despite the absence of hyperapnea and seizures. Quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction is another method to identify TCF4 and to confirm Pitt-Hopkins syndrome diagnosis.

  2. Graduate Management Project: An Evaluation of the Johns Hopkins Outpatient Surgery Center Patient Satisfaction Survey

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Evan, Barry

    1999-01-01

    .... Customer or patient satisfaction is a widely accepted measure of quality. Numerous organizations use satisfaction surveys as the foundation for organizational improvement and the Johns Hopkins Health System is no different...

  3. Radiation Protection in Medical Physics : Proceedings of the NATO Advanced Study Institute on Radiation Protection in Medical Physics Activities

    CERN Document Server

    Lemoigne, Yves

    2011-01-01

    This book introduces the fundamental aspects of Radiation Protection in Medical Physics and covers three main themes: General Radiation Protection Principles; Radiobiology Principles; Radiation Protection in Hospital Medical Physics. Each of these topics is developed by analysing the underlying physics principles and their implementation, quality and safety aspects, clinical performance and recent advances in the field. Some issues specific to the individual techniques are also treated, e.g. calculation of patient dose as well as that of workers in hospital, optimisation of equipment used, shielding design of radiation facilities, radiation in oncology such as use of brachytherapy in gynecology or interventional procedures. All topics are presented with didactical language and style, making this book an appropriate reference for students and professionals seeking a comprehensive introduction to the field as well as a reliable overview of the most recent developments.

  4. Development and validation of the Johns Hopkins Disruptive Clinician Behavior Survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dang, Deborah; Nyberg, Dorothy; Walrath, Jo M; Kim, Miyong T

    2015-01-01

    Although the negative impact of disruptive clinician behavior on quality health care delivery has gained attention recently, little systematic effort to address this issue has been reported. To facilitate empirical research to reduce disruptive clinician behaviors, an assessment tool (Johns Hopkins Disruptive Clinician Behavior Survey [JH-DCBS]) with 5 discrete subscales was developed using a 2-step design. First a pool of items was generated from focus group studies and the literature, and then a psychometric evaluation of the survey was conducted with a sample of clinicians (N = 1198) practicing in a large urban academic medical center. The results indicated that the tool was reliable (Cronbach α = .79-.91), showed high content validity (Content Validity Index = .97), and had significantly high correlations with theoretically selected variables. The study team concluded that the JH-DCBS provides a valid empirical assessment of disruptive behavior. Assessment results may be used to design strategies to improve the health and safety of practice environments. © The Author(s) 2014.

  5. The Impact of Early Clinical Training in Medical Education: A Multi-Institutional Assessment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carney, Patricia A.; Bar-on, Miriam E.; Grayson, Martha S.; Klein, Martin; Cochran, Nan; Eliassen, M. Scottie; Gambert, Steven R.; Gupta, Krishan L.; Labrecque, Mary C.; Munson, Paul J.; Nierenberg, David W.; O'Donnell, Joseph F.; Whitehurst-Cook, Michelle; Willett, Rita M.

    1999-01-01

    Funded by the Generalist Physician Initiative, Dartmouth Medical School (New Hampshire), Virginia Commonwealth University, and New York Medical College adopted early community-based training models for longitudinal clinical experiences. The three programs, the methods used to evaluate an aspect of the program, lessons learned about early clinical…

  6. STRATEGIES FOR ADVANCE IN DEVELOPMENT OF A HEALTH CARE INSTITUTION FOR SPECIALIZED PRE-HOSPITAL MEDICAL AID

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Desislava Todorova

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available which brings about a competitive environment for an increase of the quality of services offered. The aim of the study is making evident the recommendatory strategies of a health care institution for specialized pre-hospital medical aid in Sofia City for activity performed in the period from the year 2016 to 2018. The task assigned is an analysis of the opportunities for the widening of the activity, products, and markets of "DCC XXIVth-Sofia" EOOD. The chosen healthcare institution is active in a competitive environment in Sofia City, and in the district that it serves. Data from the health care institution, data from the institutions of National Statistics, and scientific literature on the topic were used in connection with the analysis. Some essential approaches of management were applied - analysis of the market share, and SWOT analysis, for determination of strategy. The conclusions of the analysis performed showed four possible strategies of advance in development and opportunities for activity in each of them. The administration of "DCC XXIVth-Sofia" EOOD had opportunities to all practical purposes for minimization of the negative effects, induced by the weaknesses and threats, and to successfully develop the activity - during the period from the year 2016 to 2018. Both the activity of the healthcare institution and the public health services of the population in the corresponding village/town/city depend on the choice of the administration and on its execution by the personnel.

  7. Knowledge, Attitude and Practices towards Medical Research amongst the Postgraduate Students of Pravara Institute of Medical Sciences University of Central India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giri, Purushottam A; Bangal, Vidyadhar B; Phalke, Deepak B

    2014-01-01

    Health research training is an essential component of medical education and a vital exercise to help develop physician research skills. This study was carried out to assess the knowledge, attitude, and practices towards health research amongst the postgraduate students of Pravara Institute of Medical Sciences University of central India. A cross-sectional study was carried out from August to October 2012. A total of 116 postgraduate students were interviewed. Knowledge, attitude, and practices related to health research were assessed using a predesigned, pretested and validated questionnaire. Results were analyzed in the form of percentage and proportions whenever appropriate. In present study, the concept of research hypothesis was known to only 18.9% of the postgraduate students, whereas 17.2 and 21.5% students knew the full form of MEDLARS and MEDLINE respectively. Majority (91.4%) students believed that patient outcome improves with continued medical research and 70.7% are willing to participate in workshop for research methodology. Lack of time due to vast curriculum of postgraduate subjects (59.5%), lack of research curriculum (25%), and inadequate facilities (25.8%) were stated as major obstacles for pursuing research. Postgraduate students have inadequate knowledge, but have positive attitudes towards health research. Postgraduate training and research facilities at the institution need to undergo major transformation in order to encourage meaningful research by postgraduate trainees.

  8. The temporal decline of idealism in two cohorts of medical students at one institution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mader, Emily M; Roseamelia, Carrie; Morley, Christopher P

    2014-03-24

    A number of studies have indicated that students lose idealistic motivations over the course of medical education, with some identifying the initiation of this decline as occurring as early as the second year of the traditional US curricula. This study builds on prior work testing the hypothesis that a decline in medical student idealism is detectable in the first two years of medical school. The original study sought to identify differences in survey responses between first-year (MS1) and second-year (MS2) medical students at the beginning and end of academic year 2010, on three proxies for idealism. The current study extends that work by administering the same survey items to the same student cohorts at the end of their third and fourth years (MS3 and MS4), respectively. Survey topics included questions on: (a) motivations for pursuing a medical career; (b) specialty choice; and (c) attitudes toward primary care. Principle component analysis was used to extract linear composite variables (LCVs) from responses to each group of questions. Linear regression was then used to test the effect of the six cohort/time-points on each composite variable, controlling for demographic characteristics. Idealism in medicine decreased (β = -.113, p idealism may occur as early as the second year of medical education. Additionally, as students make choices in their medical careers, such as specialty choice or consideration of primary care, the influences of job security, student debt and social status increasingly outweigh idealistic motivations.

  9. [French adaptation of the Hopkins Verbal Learning Test].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rieu, D; Bachoud-Lévi, A-C; Laurent, A; Jurion, E; Dalla Barba, G

    2006-06-01

    A number of tests are currently used in clinical and research settings for the assessment of patients with memory deficits. Among them, the Hopkins Verbal Learning Test (HVLT) is particularly appropriate for the longitudinal follow-up of patients with memory disorders because it exists in six parallel forms, and therefore avoids the risk of learning effect at retest. Since a test with these characteristics is not available in French, we decided to adapt a French version of the HVLT. 180 normal subjects participated in the study. Their mean age was 41 years (SD=11), and they had had on average 12 years of schooling (SD=3). The subjects were randomly divided into 6 groups of 30 subjects. One of the six forms of the French version of the HVLT was administered orally to each group of subjects. Each form consisted of a list of 12 words belonging to 3 different semantic categories. For the construction of the French version of the HVLT, we adopted the same procedure as used in the original version of the test taking into account the French lexical and semantic characteristics of the items. In the first part of the test, the list was administered three times to the subjects. Following each administration, subjects were asked for an immediate free recall. Twenty minutes later, used for intercurrent tasks, subjects were asked for a delayed free recall, which was immediately followed by a recognition memory task. In this task, subjects listened to a list of 24 words, 12 belonging to the studied list and 12 were distractors; the subjects were asked to recognize the 12 studied words. The subjects' performance was equivalent in the six forms of the test, except for the immediate recall of Form 3 (which was excluded from the test). No significant difference emerged in free recall, delayed free recall, and recognition across the five remaining forms of the test. Our study provides a useful tool for the longitudinal evaluation of patients with memory impairment and may become the

  10. SU-F-P-13: NRG Oncology Medical Physics Manpower Survey Quantifying Support Demands for Multi Institutional Clinical Trials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Monroe, J [St. Anthony’s Cancer Center, St. Louis, MO (United States); Case Western Reserve University (United States); Boparai, K [ACR, Reston, VA (United States); Xiao, Y [University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, PA (United States); Followill, D [UT MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX (United States); Galvin, J [Thomas Jefferson University Hospital, Newtown, PA (United States); Sohn, J [Case Western University, Cleveland, OH (United States)

    2016-06-15

    Purpose: A survey was taken by NRG Oncology to assess Full Time Equivalent (FTE) contributions to multi institutional clinical trials by medical physicists.No current quantification of physicists’ efforts in FTE units associated with clinical trials is available. The complexity of multi-institutional trials increases with new technologies and techniques. Proper staffing may directly impact the quality of trial data and outcomes. The demands on physics time supporting clinical trials needs to be assessed. Methods: The NRG Oncology Medical Physicist Subcommittee created a sixteen question survey to obtain this FTE data. IROC Houston distributed the survey to their list of 1802 contact physicists. Results: After three weeks, 363 responded (20.1% response). 187 (51.5%) institutions reporting external beam participation were processed. There was a wide range in number of protocols active and supported at each institution. Of the 187 clinics, 134 (71.7%) participate in 0 to 10 trials, 28 (15%) in 11 to 20 trials, 10 (5.3%) in 21 to 30 trials, 9 (4.8%) had 40 to 75 trials. On average, physicist spent 2.7 hours (SD: 6.0) per week supervising or interacting with clinical trial staff. 1.25 hours (SD: 3.37), 1.83 hours (SD: 4.13), and 0.64 hours(SD: 1.13) per week were spent on patient simulation, reviewing treatment plans, and maintaining a DICOM server, respectively. For all protocol credentialing activities, physicist spent an average of 37.05 hours (SD: 96.94) yearly. To support dosimetrists, clinicians, and therapists, physicist spend on average 2.07 hours (SD: 3.52) per week just reading protocols. Physicist attended clinical trial meetings for on average 1.13 hours (SD: 1.85) per month. Conclusion: Responding physicists spend a nontrivial amount of time: 8.8 hours per week (0.22 FTE) supporting, on average, 9 active multi-institutional clinical trials.

  11. Ethical dilemma of mandated contraception in pharmaceutical research at catholic medical institutions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Casey, Murray Joseph; O'Brien, Richard; Rendell, Marc; Salzman, Todd

    2012-01-01

    The Catholic Church proscribes methods of birth control other than sexual abstinence. Although the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) recognizes abstinence as an acceptable method of birth control in research studies, some pharmaceutical companies mandate the use of artificial contraceptive techniques to avoid pregnancy as a condition for participation in their studies. These requirements are unacceptable at Catholic health care institutions, leading to conflicts among institutional review boards, clinical investigators, and sponsors. Subjects may feel coerced by such mandates to adopt contraceptive techniques inconsistent with their personal situation and beliefs; women committed to celibacy or who engage exclusively in non-heterosexual activities are negatively impacted. We propose principles to insure informed consent to safeguard the rights of research subjects at Catholic institutions while mitigating this ethical conflict. At the same time, our proposal respects the interests of pharmaceutical research agencies and Catholic moral precepts, and fully abides by regulatory guidance.

  12. Institutional Oversight of Faculty-Industry Consulting Relationships in U.S. Medical Schools: A Delphi Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morain, Stephanie R; Joffe, Steven; Campbell, Eric G; Mello, Michelle M

    2015-01-01

    The conflicts of interest that may arise in relationships between academic researchers and industry continue to prompt controversy. The bulk of attention has focused on financial aspects of these relationships, but conflicts may also arise in the legal obligations that faculty acquire through consulting contracts. However, oversight of faculty members' consulting agreements is far less vigorous than for financial conflicts, creating the potential for faculty to knowingly or unwittingly contract away important rights and freedoms. Increased regulation could prevent this, but it is unclear what forms of oversight universities view as feasible and effective. In this article, we report on a Delphi study to evaluate several approaches for oversight of consulting agreements by medical schools. The panel was comprised of 11 senior administrators with responsibility for oversight of faculty consulting relationships. We found broad agreement among panelists regarding the importance of institutional oversight to protect universities' interests. There was strong support for two specific approaches: providing educational resources to faculty and submitting consulting agreements for institutional review. Notwithstanding the complexities of asserting authority to regulate private consulting agreements between faculty members and companies, medical school administrators reached consensus that several approaches to improving institutional oversight are feasible and useful. © 2015 American Society of Law, Medicine & Ethics, Inc.

  13. 77 FR 39714 - National Institute of General Medical Sciences; Notice of Closed Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-07-05

    ... Support; 93.821, Cell Biology and Biophysics Research; 93.859, Pharmacology, Physiology, and Biological Chemistry Research; 93.862, Genetics and Developmental Biology Research; 93.88, Minority Access to Research... No: 2012-16338] DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health National...

  14. 78 FR 70566 - National Institute of General Medical Sciences; Notice of Closed Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-11-26

    ... Biomedical Research Support; 93.821, Cell Biology and Biophysics Research; 93.859, Pharmacology, Physiology, and Biological Chemistry Research; 93.862, Genetics and Developmental Biology Research; 93.88...] [FR Doc No: 2013-28264] DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health National...

  15. Institutional constraints on strategic maneuvering in shared decision medical decision making

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Snoeck Henkemans, A.F.; Mohammed, D.

    2012-01-01

    In this paper it is first investigated to what extent the institutional goal and basic principles of shared decision making are compatible with the aim and rules for critical discussion. Next, some techniques that doctors may use to present their own treatment preferences strategically in a shared

  16. Seroprevalence of hepatitis B and C viruses among medical waste handlers at Gondar town Health institutions, Northwest Ethiopia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anagaw Belay

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Viral hepatitis is an inflammation of the liver due to viral infections and there are groups of viruses that affects the liver of which hepatitis B and C viruses are the causative agents of sever form of liver disease with high rate of mortality. Medical waste handlers who undergo collection, transportation, and disposal of medical wastes in the health institutions are at risk of exposure to acquire those infections which transmit mainly as a result of contaminated blood and other body fluids including injury with sharp instruments, splash to the eye or mucous membrane. This study aimed to determine the prevalence of hepatitis B and/or C viruses and associated risk factors among medical waste handlers. Results A cross-sectional study was conducted from April, 2011 to June, 2011 in government health institutions at Gondar town. Socio-demographic and possible risk factors data from medical waste handlers were collected using pre-tested and well structured questionnaires. Venous bloods were collected and the serums were tested for hepatitis B surface antigen and anti-hepatitis C antibody using rapid Immunochromatography assay. Data was entered and analyzed using SPSS software package (version16. Chi-square and Fisher exact tests were used to assess risk of association. A p-value of A total of 100 medical waste handlers and 100 non-clinical waste handlers were examined for HBV and HCV viruses. HBV was detected in 6 (6.0% and 1 (1.0% and HCV in 1 (1.0% and 0 (0.0% of medical waste handlers and non-clinical waste handlers, respectively. Significant differences were observed in the detection rates of HBV (OR = 6.3; X2 = 4.1; P = 0.04 and overall infection rate (HBV + HCV (OR = 7.5; X2 = 5.2; P: 0.02 in medical waste handlers when compared with non-clinical waste handlers. It was found that none of the observed risk factors significantly associated with rate of hepatitis infection compared to others. Conclusions Prevalence of HBV and

  17. Medical Student Perceptions of the Learning Environment: Learning Communities Are Associated With a More Positive Learning Environment in a Multi-Institutional Medical School Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Sunny D; Dunham, Lisette; Dekhtyar, Michael; Dinh, An; Lanken, Paul N; Moynahan, Kevin F; Stuber, Margaret L; Skochelak, Susan E

    2016-09-01

    Many medical schools have implemented learning communities (LCs) to improve the learning environment (LE) for students. The authors conducted this study to determine whether a relationship exists between medical student perceptions of the LE and presence of LCs during the preclerkship years. Students from 24 schools participating in the American Medical Association Learning Environment Study completed the 17-item Medical Student Learning Environment Survey (MSLES) at the end of their first and second years of medical school between 2011 and 2013. Mean total MSLES scores and individual item scores at the end of the first and second years in schools with and without LCs were compared with t tests, and effect sizes were calculated. Mixed-effects longitudinal models were used to control for student demographics and random school and student effects on the relationship between LC status and MSLES score. A total of 4,980 students (81% of 6,148 matriculants) from 18 schools with LCs and 6 without LCs participated. Mean [SD] MSLES scores were significantly higher in LC schools compared with non-LC schools at the end of year one (3.72 [0.44] versus 3.57 [0.43], P < .001) and year two (3.69 [0.49] versus 3.42 [0.54], P < .001). The effect size increased from 0.35 (small) at the end of year one to 0.53 (medium) at the end of year two. This large multi-institutional cohort study found that LCs at medical schools were associated with more positive perceptions of the LE by preclerkship students.

  18. Correlates of emotional intelligence: results from a multi-institutional study among undergraduate medical students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naeem, Naghma; van der Vleuten, Cees; Muijtjens, Arno M M; Violato, Claudio; Ali, Syed Moin; Al-Faris, Eiad Abdelmohsen; Hoogenboom, Ron; Naeem, Nadia

    2014-04-01

    Emotional Intelligence (EI) is the ability to deal with your own and others emotions. Medical students are inducted into medical schools on the basis of their academic achievement. Professionally, however, their success rate is variable and may depend on their interpersonal relationships. EI is thought to be significant in achieving good interpersonal relationships and success in life and career. Therefore, it is important to measure EI and understand its correlates in an undergraduate medical student population. The objective of study was to investigate the relationship between the EI of medical students and their academic achievement (based on cumulative grade point average [CGPA]), age, gender and year of study. A cross-sectional survey design was used. The SSREIS and demographic survey were administered in the three medical schools in Saudi Arabia from April to May 2012. The response rate was 30%. For the Optimism subscale, the mean score was M = 3.79, SD ± 0.54 (α = 0.82), for Awareness-of-emotion subscale M = 3.94, SD ± 0.57 (α = 0.72) and for Use-of-emotion subscale M = 3.92, SD ± 0.54 (α = 0.63). Multiple regression showed a significant positive correlation between CGPA and the EI of medical students (r = 0.246, p = 0.000) on the Optimism subscale. No correlation was seen between CGPA and Awareness of Emotions and Use of Emotions subscales. No relationship was seen for the other independent variables. The current study demonstrates that CGPA is the only significant predictor, indicating that Optimism tends to be higher for students with a higher CPGA. None of the other independent variables (age, year of study, gender) showed a significant relationship.

  19. Etiquette for medical students' email communication with faculty members: a single-institution study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Do-Hwan; Yoon, Hyun Bae; Yoo, Dong-Mi; Lee, Sang-Min; Jung, Hee-Yeon; Kim, Seog Ju; Shin, Jwa-Seop; Lee, Seunghee; Yim, Jae-Joon

    2016-04-27

    Email is widely used as a means of communication between faculty members and students in medical education because of its practical and educational advantages. However, because of the distinctive nature of medical education, students' inappropriate email etiquette may adversely affect their learning as well as faculty members' perception of them. Little data on medical students' competency in professional email writing is available; therefore, this study explored the strengths and weaknesses of medical students' email etiquette and factors that contribute to professional email writing. A total of 210 emails from four faculty members at Seoul National University College of Medicine were collected. An evaluation criteria and a scoring rubric were developed based on the various email-writing guidelines. The rubric comprised 10 items, including nine items for evaluation related to the email components and one item for the assessment of global impression of politeness. Three evaluators independently assessed all emails according to the criteria. Students were identified as being 61.0% male and 52.8% were in the undergraduate-entry program. The sum of each component score was 62.21 out of 100 and the mean value for global impression was 2.6 out of 4. The results demonstrated that students' email etiquettes remained low-to-mediocre for most criteria, except for readability and honorifics. Three criteria, salutation (r=0.668), closing (r=0.653), and sign-off (r=0.646), showed a strong positive correlation with the global impression of politeness. Whether a student entered a graduate-entry program or an undergraduate-entry program significantly contributed to professional email writing after other variables were controlled. Although students in the graduate-entry program demonstrated a relatively superior level of email etiquette, the majority of medical students did not write emails professionally. Educating all medical students in email etiquette may well contribute to

  20. Medical diplomacy and global mental health: from community and national institutions to regional centers of excellence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aggarwal, Neil Krishan; Kohrt, Brandon A

    2013-12-01

    We explore how regional medical diplomacy can increase funding for global mental health initiatives. Interventions for infectious diseases have dominated medical diplomacy by focusing on security concerns. The global mental health movement has adopted similar strategies, but unsuccessfully since mental illnesses do not cause international epidemics. Instead, realpolitik arguments may increase funding by prioritizing economic productivity and regional diplomacy based on cultural ties to advance mental health services and research at the community level. In South Asia, initiatives to train personnel and provide refugee services offer a foundation for regional centers of excellence. This model can be expanded elsewhere.

  1. Introducing the National Institute for Sports Medicine in Hungary: a complex sports medical healthcare and screening system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laki, Judit; Soós, Ágnes; Jákó, Péter; Tállay, András; Perjés, Ábel; Szabó, Anita Megyeriné

    2017-01-01

    The Hungarian National Institute for Sports Medicine (NISM) was founded in 1952 to provide medical coverage for national teams, screening and periodic health evaluation (PHE) for all Hungarian athletes. The system of ‘all in one and ASAP’ evolved by now to a specific state-funded healthcare provider with complex sports medical and sport-related services available for athletes. The NISM created a countrywide network to make health clearance available for all athletes close to their place of residency. This centralised system guarantees the uniformity and financial independence of the network, as it is directly financed by the government and free for every competitive athlete. Thus, it leaves no chance for conflict of interest in evaluating athletes’ eligibility. In 2013, NISM established an online registry for preparticipation screening and PHE. This made the registry available for sports physicians and certain data for both sports physicians and athletes themselves. Furthermore, NISM created a nationwide, centrally coordinated, out of turn care with central coordination for elite athletes nationwide. Outpatient and inpatient clinics of NISM provide sports-specific care. Most of the minimally invasive techniques used at the Department of Sports Surgery are applied only here in the country. The medical staff of NISM has special experience in Sports Medicine and sport-related conditions. All tasks are managed within the same system, within institutional frames by professionals at Sports Medicine, which guarantees institutional expertise, competence and responsibility. Our aim is to introduce the complex system, the services and the recent achievements of the Hungarian NISM. PMID:29071113

  2. Physicians' perceptions of institutional and leadership factors influencing their job satisfaction at one academic medical center.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Demmy, Todd L; Kivlahan, Coleen; Stone, Tamara T; Teague, Lynn; Sapienza, Pam

    2002-12-01

    Academic physicians' perceptions about their institution's function and leadership should provide insights toward improving faculty recruitment and retention. The authors surveyed 105 non-management and non-emeritus physicians who had been hired by (57%) or left (43%) the University of Missouri-Columbia School of Medicine (MUHC) in 1991-1998. The questionnaire measured both the importance and the availability of 14 institutional and leadership factors and the physicians' perceptions of satisfaction with their careers. Open-ended questions assessed additional concerns. In all, 56% of the overall satisfaction scores were unfavorable and, when grouped by faculty department, correlated inversely with departure rates (p =.04). Scores were surprisingly similar between those who left and those who remained at the institution. "Protected time for research or personal use" was the highest faculty priority regardless of level of overall satisfaction. "Equitable distribution of salary/resources" (p =.007) and "trust-communication with chair/division head" (p =.003) predicted good satisfaction independently. Openended responses for remaining at the university related to the pleasant local community (49%), intellectual issues (46%), and humanitarian issues (5%). Responses for considering opportunities elsewhere were administrative frustration (59%), income enhancement (18%), career advancement (9%), academic frustration (9%), and other (5%). Recommendations for enhancing recruitment and retention were fix administrative concerns (45%); improve research (20%), income (9%), physician support (9%), clinical programs (8%), and autonomy (5%); and other (4%). Surveying physicians who were recently hired or who have left an institution provides useful information to promote organizational changes that could improve physician retention.

  3. Quality of life of Pakistani medical students studying in a private institution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naseem, Sajida; Orooj, Fizza; Ghazanfar, Haider; Ghazanfar, Ali

    2016-05-01

    To find the quality of life of medical students using a World Health Organisation questionnaire. The cross-sectional study was conducted in February 2015 at Shifa College of Medicine, Islamabad, Pakistan, and comprised students studying in an integrated medical education system. The shortened version of World Health Organisation Quality of Life questionnaire comprising 26 items was used. Consecutive non-probability sampling was used to collect data which was analysed using SPSS 21. Out of 417 medical students, 185(44.4%) were male and 232(55.6%) were female. Of them, 165(39.6%) were in pre-clinical years, while 252(60.4%) were in clinical years. Overall, 347(83.2%) students rated their quality of life as "good" or "very good". Environmental domain had the highest mean score of 70.43±16.38 while Psychological Health domain had the lowest mean score of 66.48±15.64. Medical education affects students' health, thus their quality of life varies. Identification of this is very important, since long-term stress can induce some permanent personality changes in individuals.

  4. Developing outcomes assessments for collaborative, cross-institutional benchmarking: progress of the Australian Medical Assessment Collaboration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edwards, Daniel; Wilkinson, David; Canny, Benedict J; Pearce, Jacob; Coates, Hamish

    2014-02-01

    The Australian Medical Assessment Collaboration (AMAC) began in 2010. This article charts the development of the collaboration over its initial years. AMAC was instigated as a way of improving the quality of medical education through the recognition of the need for tools for comparison and evaluation of learning outcomes, acknowledgement of the need for high quality assessment, and to share expertise in these areas. In a climate of increasing regulation and accountability, this collaboration was formed as a means of increasing assessment practices by, with and for medical schools. This article provides an overview of the background issues stimulating the development of AMAC, discussion of the formation of the collaboration and reflection on the lessons learnt through these processes. In a relatively short space of time, AMAC has fostered substantial collaboration among schools; developed an Assessment Framework, items and an online assessment; and provided benchmarking reports to students and schools. The intention here is to provide guidance for others (within the medical education community and those in other disciplines) with similar intentions and aims, by outlining the developmental pathway of the project and the systematic lessons that the collaboration team has learnt in establishing AMAC.

  5. [What a surgeon needs to know of the work of a medical ethics committee/institutional review board].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beck, N

    2015-02-01

    Ethical committees or institutional review boards are interdisciplinary committees to assess the ethical, social, legal and medical aspects of research involving human subjects. The ethics commission is to protect both the patient as well as the investigators and other personnel involved in the implementation of scientific projects. According to the professional code (Berufsordnung) every physician is obliged to consult an ethics committee to get a an approval before carrying out a research project. Concerning the Declaration of Helsinki, the advice of physicians is an international standard before carrying out a research project. In addition to the advisory function the ethics committee has an authorisation function within the pharmaceutical and medical device law. In the present publication the advisory and authorisation functions of an German ethics committee are briefly explained. Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  6. Learning methods and strategies of anatomy among medical students in two different Institutions in Riyadh, Saudi Arabia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Mohrej, Omar A; Al-Ayedh, Noura K; Masuadi, Emad M; Al-Kenani, Nader S

    2017-04-01

    Anatomy instructors adopt individual teaching methods and strategies to convey anatomical information to medical students for learning. Students also exhibit their own individual learning preferences. Instructional methods preferences vary between both instructors and students across different institutions. In attempt to bridge the gap between teaching methods and the students' learning preferences, this study aimed to identify students' learning methods and different strategies of studying anatomy in two different Saudi medical schools in Riyadh. A cross-sectional study, conducted in Saudi Arabia in April 2015, utilized a three-section questionnaire, which was distributed to a consecutive sample of 883 medical students to explore their methods and strategies in learning and teaching anatomy in two separate institutions in Riyadh, Saudi Arabia. Medical students' learning styles and preferences were found to be predominantly affected by different cultural backgrounds, gender, and level of study. Many students found it easier to understand and remember anatomy components using study aids. In addition, almost half of the students felt confident to ask their teachers questions after class. The study also showed that more than half of the students found it easier to study by concentrating on a particular part of the body rather than systems. Students' methods of learning were distributed equally between memorizing facts and learning by hands-on dissection. In addition, the study showed that two thirds of the students felt satisfied with their learning method and believed it was well suited for anatomy. There is no single teaching method which proves beneficial; instructors should be flexible in their teaching in order to optimize students' academic achievements.

  7. Decline of medical student idealism in the first and second year of medical school: a survey of pre-clinical medical students at one institution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morley, Christopher P; Roseamelia, Carrie; Smith, Jordan A; Villarreal, Ana L

    2013-08-21

    Idealism declines in medical students over the course of training, with some studies identifying the beginning of the decline in year 3 of US curricula. This study tested the hypothesis that a decline in medical student idealism is detectable in the first two years of medical school. We sought to identify differences in survey responses between first-year (MS1) and second-year (MS2) medical students at the beginning (T1) and end (T2) of academic year 2010 on three proxies for idealism, including items asking about: (a) motivations for pursuing a medical career; (b) specialty choice; and (c) attitudes toward primary care. Principle component analysis was used to extract linear composite variables (LCVs) from responses to each group of questions; linear regression was then used to test the effect of on each LCV, controlling for race, ethnicity, rural or urban origins, gender, and marital status. MS2s placed more emphasis on status/income concerns (β=0.153, pidealism as a motivator (β=-0.081, p=0.054), in pursuing a medical career; more likely to consider lifestyle and family considerations (β=0.098, p=0.023), and less likely to consider idealistic motivations (β=-0.066, p=NS); and were more likely to endorse both negative/antagonistic (β=0.122, p=0.004) and negative/sympathetic (β=0.126, p=0.004) attitudes toward primary care. The results are suggestive that idealism decline begins earlier than noted in other studies, implying a need for curricular interventions in the first two years of medical school.

  8. Electronic Health Literacy Skills among Medical and Dental Interns at B P Koirala Institute of Health Sciences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pokharel, P K; Budhathoki, S S; Pokharel, H P

    2016-09-01

    Appropriate use of the available electronic resources is important for decision making in health. The use of electronic resources in health care is universal. The study measures the eHealth literacy skills among the medical and dental interns of the B P Koirala Institute of Health Sciences (BPKIHS), Nepal. Self administered electronic Health Literacy Scale (eHEALS) was used to collect data from 125 medical and dental interns at BPKIHS. The interns represent immediate past medical student and soon to be professional doctor. A quarter of interns are not sure about the usefulness of internet resources for health. The interns have limited knowledge about right resources in the internet. They are not equipped to tell useful resources from the not-useful ones in the internet. There is a need to pay attention to the eHealth Literacy needs of the interns. Further research may be needed to generate evidence on what interventions may be specific to meet the ehealth literacy needs of the medical and dental interns.

  9. Development of Geriatric Mental Health Learning Objectives for Medical Students: A Response to the Institute of Medicine 2012 Report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lehmann, Susan W; Brooks, William B; Popeo, Dennis; Wilkins, Kirsten M; Blazek, Mary C

    2017-10-01

    America is aging as the population of older adults increases. The shortage of geriatric mental health specialists means that most geriatric mental healthcare will be provided by physicians who do not have specialty training in geriatrics. The Institute of Medicine Report of 2012 highlighted the urgent need for development of national competencies and curricula in geriatric mental health for all clinicians. Virtually all physicians can expect to treat older patients with mental health symptoms, yet currently there are no widely accepted learning objectives in geriatric mental health specific for medical students. The authors describe the development of a set of such learning objectives that all medical students should achieve by graduation. The iterative process included initial drafting by content experts from five medical schools with input and feedback from a wider group of geriatric psychiatrists, geriatricians, internists, and medical educators. The final document builds upon previously published work and includes specific knowledge, attitudes and skills in six key domains: Normal Aging, Mental Health Assessment of the Geriatric Patient, Psychopharmacology, Delirium, Depression, and Dementia. These objectives address a pressing need, providing a framework for national standards and curriculum development. Copyright © 2017 American Association for Geriatric Psychiatry. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Exposure to plastic surgery during undergraduate medical training: A single-institution review

    OpenAIRE

    Austin, Ryan E; Wanzel, Kyle R

    2015-01-01

    Over the past decade, applications to surgical residency programs have witnessed a decline, with many of today’s medical students opting instead for specialties that would allow greater work-life balance. Although generational gaps, modifications to undergraduate curricula and increased enrollment to primary care training may have played a role in this decline, the authors of this study investigated whether limited exposure to plastic surgery during training may have also impacted application...

  11. Institution of a Rubella Screening and Immunization Program at Tripler Army Medical Center

    Science.gov (United States)

    1979-06-01

    to accomplish the same goal of protecting the best interest of mother , child and Tripler Army Medical Center. 59 HST-CPOH (26 Oct 78) SUBJECT: TAC...person who is infected doughs , sneezes or speaks. Symptoms of the disease are characterized by a mild upper respiratory illness with a low fever and a...children being born with congenital birth defects to mothers inadvertently exposed to rubella virus during pregnancy. 3. The health records of

  12. Factors associated to labour absenteeism due to medical cause in an university institution

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juan F. Saldarriaga

    2007-02-01

    Full Text Available Labor absenteeism due to medical cause has unfavorable implications for everybody. The employee suffers with the disease, the company loses productivity and society suffers delays in its economical and social growth. The study of this problem is obviously necessary in order to achieve an appropriate prevention and control of it. Objective: to explore the behavior of absenteeism by medical causes and its associated factors among the affiliates to the health program in the University of Antioquia, Colombia. Methods: frequency, duration, costs and causes of absenteeism are studied in relation to sex, age and physical activity as a regular behavior. Relative risk and its 95% confidence intervals are estimated. Results: respiratory diseases are the first cause of labor medical handicap. Absenteeism is higher in women. RR 1.65 (CI 95% 1.53-1.77. It has a close relationship to age RR 1.25 (CI 95% 1.12-1.38 and to sedentariness RR 2.17 (IC 95% 1.72-2.73.

  13. [Two research projects on infectious diseases conducted in Noguchi Memorial Institute for Medical Research, University of Ghana by Tokyo Medical and Dental University].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ido, Eiji; Yamaoka, Shoji

    2013-01-01

    Ghana-Tokyo Medical and Dental University Research Collaboration Center has been established since 2008 when our Program was chosen together with the Program in the Philippines proposed by Tohoku University as an additional small-scale research center of the Overseas Research Program on Emerging and Reemerging Diseases that is funded by the Ministry of Education, Culture, Sports, Science and Technology of the Japanese Government and started in 2005. This 5-year government-supported Program has changed its name to develop into a more active world-level program called Japan Initiative for Global Research Network on Infectious Diseases (J-GRID) and entered the second 5-year phase in 2010, and our Program is playing an important role among other research centers located in Asia and Africa. Currently, two research projects are carried out in parallel in Noguchi Memorial Institute for Medical Research by Tokyo Medical and Dental University: one is a J-GRID project and the other is the one of Science and Technology Research Partnership for Sustainable Development (SATREPS) which is a joint project between Japan International Cooperation Agency (JICA) and Japan Science and Technology Agency (JST). This special article is describing what these two projects are all about.

  14. [Institutional violence, medical authority, and power relations in maternity hospitals from the perspective of health workers].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aguiar, Janaina Marques de; d'Oliveira, Ana Flávia Pires Lucas; Schraiber, Lilia Blima

    2013-11-01

    The current article discusses institutional violence in maternity hospitals from the health workers' perspective, based on data from a study in the city of São Paulo, Brazil. Eighteen health workers from the public and private sectors were interviewed, including obstetricians, nurses, and nurse technicians. A semi-structured interview was used with questions on professional experience and the definition of violence. The analysis revealed that these health workers acknowledged the existence of discriminatory and disrespectful practices against women during prenatal care, childbirth, and the postpartum. Examples of such practices cited by interviewees included the use of pejorative slang as a form of "humor", threats, reprimands, and negligence in the management of pain. Such practices are not generally viewed by health workers as violent, but rather as the exercise of professional authority in what is considered a "difficult" context. The institutional violence is thus trivialized, disguised as purportedly good practice (i.e., "for the patient's own good"), and rendered invisible in the daily routine of care provided by maternity services.

  15. Infrastructure for teaching and learning in the community: Johns Hopkins University Student Outreach Resource Center (SOURCE).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levin, Mindi B; Rutkow, Lainie

    2011-01-01

    As health professional schools strive to offer students meaningful, structured community engagement activities, various support structures are needed. In 2005, Johns Hopkins University's Schools of Medicine, Nursing, and Public Health launched the interdisciplinary community service and service-learning center, Student Outreach Resource Center (SOURCE), which operates through reciprocal partnerships between the Hopkins schools and local community-based organizations. SOURCE is recognized on campus and in the Baltimore community for its ability to recruit and prepare students to collaborate with local partners on a wide range of practice initiatives, through both curricular and cocurricular offerings. This article describes SOURCE's history and formation, process for creating authentic partnerships, services and programs, governance, and lessons learned. In a short period of time and with a modest financial investment, the expertise and infrastructure provided by SOURCE have greatly benefited both the participating community-based organizations and the Johns Hopkins health professional schools.

  16. Formative exploration of students’ perception about Community Medicine teaching at Mahatma Gandhi Institute of Medical Sciences, Sewagram, India

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    AR Dongre

    2008-11-01

    Full Text Available Objective: The objectives of the present formative research were to explore the medical undergraduates’ study problems and their perceptions about various teaching approaches in currently practiced teaching curriculum of Community Medicine. Material and Methods: The present formative research was undertaken at Dr. Sushila Nayar School of Public Health incorporating Department of Community Medicine, Mahatma Gandhi Institute of Medical Sciences, Sewagram. The respondents were 17 (26.5% conveniently selected final year exam appearing medical undergraduates from 2004 regular batch of 64 students. A triangulation of qualitative research methods like free listing, pile sort exercise and a Focus Group Discussion (FGD were used. A two dimensional scaling and hierarchical cluster analysis was completed with the pile sort data. The data was analyzed by using software Anthropac 4.98.1/X software. Results: The medical undergraduates could understand the topics like Integrated Management of Neonatal and Childhood (IMNCI, Primary Health Care (PHC, cold chain system for vaccines, immunization and health education, dietary survey and cluster survey method taught in the community based camp approaches. Students found it difficult to comprehend the core of subject from the scattered lecture series over a long teaching period, especially using lengthy over head projector/liquid crystal display presentations. The major problems encountered in studying the subject of Community Medicine were difficulty in understanding the concepts of biostatistics, confusions due to apparently similar text in National Health Programs and difficulty to recall disease statistics due to vast syllabus. Conclusions: Students perceived the community based camp approach of teaching as a best method to understand the subject, which is an integration of task oriented assignments, integration of social sciences within medical domain and active community involvement. Hence, the community

  17. Cultivating Hygiene as a Science: The Welch-Rose Report's Influence at Johns Hopkins and Beyond.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas, Karen Kruse

    2016-03-01

    In 1915, William Henry Welch and Wickliffe Rose submitted a report to the Rockefeller Foundation that became the template for public health professional education in the United States and abroad. Based on the Welch-Rose Report's recommendations, the Foundation awarded a grant to Johns Hopkins University in 1916 to establish the first independent graduate school of public health, with Welch serving as the founding dean. The Welch-Rose Report and, by extension, the Johns Hopkins School of Hygiene and Public Health established and transmitted a new model of scientific training that wove the laboratory mindset together with the methods of public health administration and epidemiologic fieldwork. During the School's first quarter-century, faculty and alumni were remarkably active in frontline public health problem-solving, as well as launching public health agencies and schools of all types and sizes. The most lasting contribution of the Welch-Rose Report and the Johns Hopkins School of Hygiene and Public Health, now the Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health, has been to "cultivate the science of hygiene" to bring about exponential growth in the evidence base for public health. The schools that have adopted the Johns Hopkins model of public health education worldwide have produced professionals who have worked to achieve wide-ranging reforms dedicated to preserving life, protecting health, and preventing injury across populations and continents. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  18. Institutional and technological barriers to the use of open educational resources (OERs) in physiology and medical education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hassall, Christopher; Lewis, David I

    2017-03-01

    Open educational resources (OERs) are becoming increasingly common as a tool in education, particularly in medical and biomedical education. However, three key barriers have been identified to their use: 1) lack of awareness of OERs, 2) lack of motivation to use OERs, and 3) lack of training in the use of OERs. Here, we explore these three barriers with teachers of medical and biomedical science to establish how best to enhance the use of OERs to improve pedagogical outcomes. An online survey was completed by 209 educators, many of whom (68.4%) reported using OERs in their teaching and almost all (99.5%) showing awareness of at least one OER. The results suggest that key problems that prevent educators from adopting OERs in their teaching include suitability for particular classes, time, and copyright. Most (81.8%) educators were somewhat, very, or extremely comfortable with OERs so there is no innate motivational barrier to adoption. A lack of training was reported by 13.9% of respondents, and 40% of respondents stated that there was little or no support from their institutions. OER users were no more comfortable with technology or better supported by departments but tended to be aware of a greater number of sources of OERs. Our study illustrates key opportunities for the expansion of OER use in physiology and medical teaching: increased breadth of awareness, increased institutional support (including time, training, and copyright support), and greater sharing of diverse OERs to suit the range of teaching challenges faced by staff in different subdisciplines. Copyright © 2017 the American Physiological Society.

  19. Meharry-Johns Hopkins Center for Prostate Cancer Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-11-01

    SUPPLEMENTARY NOTES 14. ABSTRACT This project seeks to add to research knowledge that impacts racial disparities in prostate cancer by examining how...project seeks to add to available research on racial disparities in prostate cancer by examining health patterns among sons of fathers with the disease...Institute (NCI) state cancer profiles , the mortality rate is almost three times that of CA men (73.9 per 100,000 AA / 25.6 per 100,000 C). Genetic and

  20. The Effect of an Intervention Aimed at Reducing Errors when Administering Medication through Enteral Feeding Tubes in an Institution for Individuals with Intellectual Disability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Idzinga, J. C.; de Jong, A. L.; van den Bemt, P. M. L. A.

    2009-01-01

    Background: Previous studies, both in hospitals and in institutions for clients with an intellectual disability (ID), have shown that medication errors at the administration stage are frequent, especially when medication has to be administered through an enteral feeding tube. In hospitals a specially designed intervention programme has proven to…

  1. [The essence of doctor-patient relationship in creating image of a medical institution].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dworzański, Wojciech; Dworzańska, Anna; Burdan, Franciszek

    2012-01-01

    Irrespective of changing standards and continuous reforms in health service, the patient should always remain the principal focus. The patient is a person who should be treated not only as a customer or a recipient of medical services but also as a person being in a situation which is difficult and often unacceptable. Among the factors affecting patients' satisfaction and contentment in the course of the disease it is profoundly important that he cooperates with his doctor. For years it has been attempted to create an ideal model of doctor-patient relationship which would be mutually beneficial and not violating privacy or welfare of any of them. These attempts focused on various theoretical models, among others paternalistic, informative and interpretive. However, special attention should be paid to adherence to principles which is based on respect for patient autonomy, harmlessness, charity and fairness.

  2. Oak Ridge Institute for Science and Education, Medical Sciences Division report for 1994

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Snyder, F.; Poston, S.; Engle, J. [eds.

    1995-08-01

    The primary mission of the Medical Sciences Division is (1) to conduct basic and applied biomedical research on human health related to energy systems, (2) to provide technical assistance and training in occupational and environmental medicine, and (3) to make related biomedical applications available to others through technology transfer. As can be gleaned from this report, the strengths and capabilities of their staff in carrying out this mission are closely aligned with the four core competencies of ORISE: (1) occupational and environmental health, (2) environmental and safety evaluation and analysis, (3) education and training, and (4) enabling research. Brief descriptions of the various scientific and technical programs and their progress, as well as the staff responsible for the accomplishments made during 1994, are presented in this report. Research programs include the following: biochemistry; cytogenetics; Center for Epidemiologic Research; Center for Human Reliability Studies; occupational medicine; Radiation Emergency Assistance Center/Training Site; and Radiation Internal Dose Information Center.

  3. The quality of reports of medical and public health research from Palestinian institutions: a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Albarqouni, Loai; Abu-Rmeileh, Niveen Me; Elessi, Khamis; Obeidallah, Mohammad; Bjertness, Espen; Chalmers, Iain

    2017-06-09

    Over the past decade, there has been an increase in reports of health research from Palestine, but no assessment of their quality. We have assessed the quality of reports of Palestinian health research and factors associated with it. This is a systematic review. We searched Medline and Scopus for reports of original research relevant to human health or healthcare authored by researchers affiliated with Palestinian institutions and published between January 2000 and August 2015 inclusive. We used international guidelines to assess report quality, classifying as adequate those with ≥50% of items completely addressed. Of 2383 reports identified, 497 met our inclusion criteria. Just over half (264; 55%) of these were published after 2010. 354 (71%) of first authors were affiliated with Palestinian institutions; 261 (53%) reports had coauthors from outside Palestine. The majority of the reports in our study were inadequately reported (342; 69%), and none had adequately reported all items. Of 439 observational studies, 11 (2.5%) reports provided adequate descriptions of eligibility criteria and selection procedures; 35 (8%) reported efforts to address potential sources of bias; 50 (11.4%) reported the basis for the study sample size; and funding sources were mentioned in 74 reports (17%). Higher reporting quality was associated with international affiliation of the first author (prevalence ratio (PR) 1.6 (95% CI 1.2 to 2.1)), international collaboration (PR 2.9 (95% CI 1.7 to 5.0)), international funding (PR 1.9 (95% CI1.5 to 2.5)), publication after 2005 (PR 3.9 (95% CI 1.8 to 8.5)) and four or more coauthors (PR 1.5 (95% CI 1.1 to 2.1)). Although the quality of reports of Palestinian research has improved in recent years, it remains well below an acceptable standard. International reporting guidelines should be used to guide research design and improve the quality of reports of research. The systematic review protocol was registered in the International Prospective

  4. The quality of reports of medical and public health research from Palestinian institutions: a systematic review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abu-Rmeileh, Niveen ME; Elessi, Khamis; Obeidallah, Mohammad; Bjertness, Espen; Chalmers, Iain

    2017-01-01

    Objective Over the past decade, there has been an increase in reports of health research from Palestine, but no assessment of their quality. We have assessed the quality of reports of Palestinian health research and factors associated with it. Design This is a systematic review. Inclusion criteria We searched Medline and Scopus for reports of original research relevant to human health or healthcare authored by researchers affiliated with Palestinian institutions and published between January 2000 and August 2015 inclusive. Outcomes We used international guidelines to assess report quality, classifying as adequate those with ≥50% of items completely addressed. Results Of 2383 reports identified, 497 met our inclusion criteria. Just over half (264; 55%) of these were published after 2010. 354 (71%) of first authors were affiliated with Palestinian institutions; 261 (53%) reports had coauthors from outside Palestine. The majority of the reports in our study were inadequately reported (342; 69%), and none had adequately reported all items. Of 439 observational studies, 11 (2.5%) reports provided adequate descriptions of eligibility criteria and selection procedures; 35 (8%) reported efforts to address potential sources of bias; 50 (11.4%) reported the basis for the study sample size; and funding sources were mentioned in 74 reports (17%). Higher reporting quality was associated with international affiliation of the first author (prevalence ratio (PR) 1.6 (95% CI 1.2 to 2.1)), international collaboration (PR 2.9 (95% CI 1.7 to 5.0)), international funding (PR 1.9 (95% CI1.5 to 2.5)), publication after 2005 (PR 3.9 (95% CI 1.8 to 8.5)) and four or more coauthors (PR 1.5 (95% CI 1.1 to 2.1)). Conclusion Although the quality of reports of Palestinian research has improved in recent years, it remains well below an acceptable standard. International reporting guidelines should be used to guide research design and improve the quality of reports of research. Trial

  5. Medical Training and the Brain Death Exam: A Single Institution's Experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kashkoush, Ahmed; Weisgerber, Amy; Dharaneeswaran, Kiruba; Agarwal, Nitin; Shutter, Lori

    2017-12-01

    Clinicians may have limited opportunities to perform neurological determination of death (NDD, or brain death) certification during their training. This study aimed to evaluate the level of resident exposure to the brain death exam at a large-volume donor hospital. In March 2014, we adapted a dual-physician model for NDD certification at our institution to improve resident education regarding NDD. To evaluate the incidence of resident exposure, we collected examiner information from all brain death exams conducted between January 2014 and July 2015. Organ procurement, family authorization, and brain death intervals were also collected to evaluate the impact of NDD timeliness on organ donation. A total of 68 patients who met NDD criteria were included in this study. For these patients, 127 brain death exams were performed, 108 (85%) by a critical care attending physician or fellow, 9 (7%) by a neurology resident, and 7 (6%) by a neurosurgery resident. Exposure rates for neurology and neurosurgery residents were approximately 0.22 and 0.20 exams/resident/year, respectively. The median brain death interval between exams was 1.0 hours (interquartile range, 0.0-2.5) hours. Resident involvement, time between exams, and dual exams were all found to be nonsignificant correlates of organ authorization and family refusal. Neurology and neurosurgery residents may be limited in their exposure to the brain death exam during training. High-volume donor hospitals may be able to complete 2 exams for NDD certification in a timely manner without detrimentally influencing organ authorization or family refusal rates. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. A multi-institutional medical educational collaborative: advocacy training in California pediatric residency programs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chamberlain, Lisa J; Wu, Susan; Lewis, Gena; Graff, Nancy; Javier, Joyce R; Park, Joseph S R; Johnson, Christine L; Woods, Steven D; Patel, Mona; Wong, Daphne; Blaschke, Gregory S; Lerner, Marc; Kuo, Anda K

    2013-03-01

    Educational collaboratives offer a promising approach to disseminate educational resources and provide faculty development to advance residents' training, especially in areas of novel curricular content; however, their impact has not been clearly described. Advocacy training is a recently mandated requirement of the Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education that many programs struggle to meet.The authors describe the formation (in 2007) and impact (from 2008 to 2010) of 13 California pediatric residency programs working in an educational collaboration ("the Collaborative") to improve advocacy training. The Collaborative defined an overarching mission, assessed the needs of the programs, and mapped their strengths. The infrastructure required to build the collaboration among programs included a social networking site, frequent conference calls, and face-to-face semiannual meetings. An evaluation of the Collaborative's activities showed that programs demonstrated increased uptake of curricular components and an increase in advocacy activities. The themes extracted from semistructured interviews of lead faculty at each program revealed that the Collaborative (1) reduced faculty isolation, increased motivation, and strengthened faculty academic development, (2) enhanced identification of curricular areas of weakness and provided curricular development from new resources, (3) helped to address barriers of limited resident time and program resources, and (4) sustained the Collaborative's impact even after formal funding of the program had ceased through curricular enhancement, the need for further resources, and a shared desire to expand the collaborative network.

  7. Piloting the Mobile Medical Milestones Application (M3App©): A Multi-Institution Evaluation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Page, Cristen; Reid, Alfred; Coe, Catherine L; Beste, Janalynn; Fagan, Blake; Steinbacher, Erica; Newton, Warren P

    2017-01-01

    Competency-based evaluation of the Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education (ACGME) Milestones requires the development of new evaluation tools that can better capture learners' behavior. This study describes the implementation and initial assessment of an innovative point-of-care mobile application, the M3App,© linked to the Family Medicine Milestones. Seven family medicine residency programs in North Carolina implemented the M3App.© Program faculty and residents were surveyed prior to implementation regarding current evaluation methods and their quality and use and acceptability of electronic evaluation tools. Surveys were repeated after implementation for comparison. All seven programs successfully implemented the M3App. Most faculty members found the tool well designed, easy to use, beneficial to the quality and efficiency of feedback they provide, and to their knowledge of Milestones. Residents reported significant increases in the volume and quality of written feedback they receive. The M3App provides an efficient, convenient tool for assessing Milestones that can improve the quantity and quality of feedback residents receive from faculty. Improved faculty perception of knowledge of Milestones after M3App implementation suggests that the tool is also effective for faculty development.

  8. [Early-onset type 2 diabetes mellitus. The experience from a third level medical institution].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lerman-Garber, Israel; Aguilar-Salinas, Carlos; Tusié-Luna, Teresa; Velásquez, Daniel; Lobato-Valverde, Marlette; Osornio-Flores, Melannie; Gómez-Pérez, Francisco J; Granados-Arreola, Julio; Villa, Antonio R; Velascoa, María Luisa; Rull-Rodrigo, Juan A

    2010-01-01

    Describe the clinical, metabolic and psychosocial characteristics observed among patients with early onset type 2 diabetes (T2DM). We included 80 consecutive patients with early onset T2DM. All had a medical record, completed a battery of questionnaires and had blood and urine tests. Mean age was 49 +/- 12 years, 57.5% were women, 76.2% had a family history of diabetes and 68.8% a personal history of obesity. Diabetes was diagnosed at the mean age of 32 +/- 6 years with a mean duration of 17 +/- 11 years. Most patients (66.2%) were on poor glycemic control (Alc > 9.0%) and 30% were depressed. Insulin was commonly needed (80% of the patients) and started on average 9 years after diagnosis Significant diabetes related complications were common (71.3% of patients). A longer diabetes duration was the variable most significantly associated with developing complications (p diabetic patients attending our clinic; they are characterized by a stronger family history of diabetes, a personal history of obesity and co-morbidities associated with metabolic syndrome. Longer disease course and poor glycemic control contribute to a high prevalence of diabetes related complications and high rates of mortality.

  9. Cutting Close to the Bone: Student Trauma, Free Speech, and Institutional Responsibility in Medical Education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumagai, Arno K; Jackson, Brittani; Razack, Saleem

    2017-03-01

    Learning the societal roles and responsibilities of the physician may involve difficult, contentious conversations about topics such as race, gender, sexual orientation, and class, as well as violence, inequities, sexual assault, and child abuse. If not done well, these discussions may be deeply traumatizing to learners for whom these subjects "cut close to the bone." Equally traumatizing is exposure to injustice and mistreatment, as well as to the sights, sounds, and smells of suffering and pain in the clinical years. This potential for iatrogenic educational trauma remains unaddressed, and medical educators must take responsibility for attending to it. Possible solutions include trigger warnings or statements given to students before an educational activity that may cause personal discomfort. The authors of this Perspective assert, however, both that this concept does not distinguish between psychological trauma and discomfort and that well-intentioned trigger warnings target the wrong goal-the avoidance of distress. Exposure to discomfort not only is unavoidable in the practice of medicine but may be crucial to personal and professional moral development. The authors argue that a more appropriate solution is to create safe spaces for dialogues about difficult topics and jarring experiences. This approach places even the notion of free speech under a critical lens-it is not an end in itself but a means to create a professional ethic dedicated to treating all individuals with excellence and justice. Ultimately, this approach aspires to create an inclusive curriculum sensitive to the realities of teaching and learning in increasingly diverse societies.

  10. Simulation Training at a Medical Institute: An integral Part of the Educational Process

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. V. Ligatyuk

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: to master and practically execute cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR procedural techniques, to acquire skills to use state-of-art equipment, and to teach work in the team. Subjects and methods. Forty-six interns and residents took a simulation course of training in basic CPR and automatic external defibrillation. Three-four days before the course, its participants received the certified translation of the European Resuscitation Council (ERC information material and studied it. The course education program encompasses lectures, lessons on a medical care algorithm in sudden cardiac arrest, and practical works using models, including chest compression, ventilation, and automatic external defibrillator (AED training. The duration of the course is 6—7 hours. Results. All the interns and residents were motivated to learn: to acquire first aid skills to manage sudden cardiac arrest. The ERC algorithm and a 4-stepped model to have practical skills were used. The taken course met expectations in 100% of the participants; all the interns and residents adequately acquired practical CPR skills and successfully completed their training. A questionnaire survey at the end of the course showed the high efficiency of the course. The training enhanced motivation in 29 interns and residents; they obtained an ERC provider degree; 10 interns and residents continue to take a course of training as an ERC instructor. 

  11. Response of Dendroctonus mexicanus (Hopkins) to two optical isomers of verbenone

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vicente Diaz-Nunez; Guillermo Sanchez-Martinez; Nancy E. Gillette

    2006-01-01

    Given the need for diminishing the use of pesticides in natural environments, in this research we investigated the efficacy of two optical isomers of verbenone (4, 6, 6-trimethylbicyclo[3.1.1] hepto-3-en-e-1) as controls of the attack of Dendroctonus mexicanus (Hopkins) (Coleoptera: Curculionidae: Scolytinae).Two experiments were established in the...

  12. THE OCCUPATIONAL STRESS ON HEALTH’S PROFESSIONALS TO LEGAL MEDICAL INSTITUTE LEONIDIO RIBEIRO, FEDERAL DISTRICT - BRAZIL

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. C. Quaresma

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Occupational stress is defined as a psychological syndrome resulting in chronic interpersonal stressors at work and characterized by emotional exhaustion, depersonalization, and reduced personal accomplishment. It is observed that the pressures generated by continuous social and economic changes have made the individual more vulnerable to psychosomatic and organic pathologies. As a condition with high incidence rate you have, the stress has a negative impact on occupational life of the individual. This study was conducted on health-care workers of the LMI (Legal Medical Institute of the Federal District, Brazil; who work in the areas of anatomy, nursing, laboratory, radiology and medicine and is justified by the development of professional activities. The methodology used in this article was a descriptive study with a qualitative and quantitative approach as a tool for data collection was used a structured questionnaire with closed questions about the activities that will evoke stress on work activities. Fourty-nine per cent have more than 10 years of service time and 54.7 % (n = 53, rank among medium and high load stress suffering. The answers on the elements that are evocative of stress, 75 % think that 'deal with the pain of the family', with 51 % and 'removal of corpses in hard-to access/dangerous', with 24%, the most important stressors. We can consider that the occupational stress experienced by professionals in DF, Brazil, LMI should not be ignored by the institution , since its employees are subject to a great physical and mental load, which, if ignored even for short periods, may, at some point, lead to depletion of capacity for work, causing losses in the professional quality of life and, consequently, reduced the productivity of the institution as a result of increased absence professional.

  13. THE CURRENT PRACTICES FOR TESTING FOR HYPERGLYCAEMIA IN PREGNANCY (HIP IN THE MEDICAL COLLEGE INSTITUTIONS IN INDIA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hema Divakar

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND The aim of the study is to determine the current practices in the medical college institutions pan India for testing for Hyperglycaemia in Pregnancy (HIP to detect gestational diabetes and highlight areas that need additional attention in order to ensure adherence to current national guidelines. MATERIALS AND METHODS Questionnaires were used to obtain information regarding the testing strategy for hyperglycaemia in pregnancy. The questionnaires were filled out by the teaching faculty of the OB/GYN departments of 47 medical college institutions in India. The perceptions regarding the prevalence of diabetes in pregnancy in India and the needs for capacity building were assessed. RESULTS Forty seven respondents answered the questionnaires. The majority of respondents (95.83% reported that all pregnant women were offered (universal testing for hyperglycaemia in pregnancy and 37.5% reported that women were screened both in early and midtrimester of pregnancy. Most reported that testing for HIP took place once at booking, irrespective of the gestational age (39.58%. Thirty three (70.21% respondents reported using the single-step nonfasting method to diagnose hyperglycaemia. Furthermore, 21.28% of respondents reported using a glucometer to determine the concentration of blood glucose in plasma, while 68.08% reported using a lab analyser. The instructions for the testing were offered by consultants and postgraduates in a vast majority of cases (87.5%. The staff communicated with the women in a significantly less number of cases (12.5%. 65.96% of respondents felt that all women readily agreed to follow this advice. The majority of respondents (89.35% reported having noticed an increase in the number of women with hyperglycaemia. Furthermore, 91% of all the respondents felt there was a need to train medical personnel to test and manage hyperglycaemia. CONCLUSION Our study confirms the continued wide variability in testing for HIP in India with

  14. Does feedback matter? Practice-based learning for medical students after a multi-institutional clinical performance examination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Srinivasan, Malathi; Hauer, Karen E; Der-Martirosian, Claudia; Wilkes, Michael; Gesundheit, Neil

    2007-09-01

    Achieving competence in 'practice-based learning' implies that doctors can accurately self- assess their clinical skills to identify behaviours that need improvement. This study examines the impact of receiving feedback via performance benchmarks on medical students' self-assessment after a clinical performance examination (CPX). The authors developed a practice-based learning exercise at 3 institutions following a required 8-station CPX for medical students at the end of Year 3. Standardised patients (SPs) scored students after each station using checklists developed by experts. Students assessed their own performance immediately after the CPX (Phase 1). One month later, students watched their videotaped performance and reassessed (Phase 2). Some students received performance benchmarks (their scores, plus normative class data) before the video review. Pearson's correlations between self-ratings and SP ratings were calculated for overall performance and specific skill areas (history taking, physical examination, doctor-patient communication) for Phase 1 and Phase 2. The 2 correlations were then compared for each student group (i.e. those who received and those who did not receive feedback). A total of 280 students completed both study phases. Mean CPX scores ranged from 51% to 71% of items correct overall and for each skill area. Phase 1 self-assessment correlated weakly with SP ratings of student performance (r = 0.01-0.16). Without feedback, Phase 2 correlations remained weak (r = 0.13-0.18; n = 109). With feedback, Phase 2 correlations improved significantly (r = 0.26-0.47; n = 171). Low-performing students showed the greatest improvement after receiving feedback. The accuracy of student self-assessment was poor after a CPX, but improved significantly with performance feedback (scores and benchmarks). Videotape review alone (without feedback) did not improve self-assessment accuracy. Practice-based learning exercises that incorporate feedback to medical

  15. [A quantitative analysis of information-seeking behaviors regarding medical institutions with Spanish language support among South American Spanish-speaking migrants in Aichi Prefecture, Japan].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takaku, Michiko; Ichikawa, Seiichi; Kaneko, Noriyo

    2015-01-01

    This study aimed to explore the factors associated with information-seeking behaviors regarding medical institutions with Spanish language support among South American Spanish-speaking migrants living in Aichi Prefecture, Japan. The survey targeted South American Spanish-speaking migrants aged 18 years and older currently residing in Aichi Prefecture who had lived in Japan for at least three months and who had previously seen a doctor in Japan. The questionnaire was written in Spanish and the survey was conducted from April to July, 2010. Wilson's information behavior model was used to study information-seeking behavior regarding medical institutions with Spanish language support among 245 respondents who completed the questionnaires (response rate: 58.9%). Experience seeking medical institutions with Spanish language support in the Tokai area was set as the dependent variable and a chi-square test was conducted to examine relationships with language support needs, recognition of and access to medical institutions with Spanish language support, living situation in Japan, and Japanese language skills. Among the 245 respondents, 106 were male (43.3%) and 139 were female (56.7%). The average age was 39.6±11.2 years old and 84.5% were Peruvian. The average length of residency in Japan was 11.0±5.7 years, and 34.3% of respondents had lived in Aichi for 5-9 years. A total of 165 respondents (67.3%) had searched for medical institutions with Spanish language support, while 80 (32.7%) had not. Information-seeking behavior regarding medical institutions with Spanish language support was associated with having previously experienced a need for Spanish language support when seeing doctors in Japan, finding and attending medical institutions with Spanish language support in the Tokai area, length of residency in Japan, Japanese language skills, and the language used in daily life. Experience in requiring Spanish support when sick or injured in Japan motivated respondents to

  16. A national cohort study of MD-PhD graduates of medical schools with and without funding from the National Institute of General Medical Sciences' Medical Scientist Training Program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeffe, Donna B; Andriole, Dorothy A

    2011-08-01

    To determine whether prematriculation characteristics and career-setting preferences of MD-PhD graduates differ according to their schools' funding from the National Institute of General Medical Sciences' Medical Scientist Training Program (MSTP). The Association of American Medical Colleges provided deidentified records for the national cohort of all 1993-2000 U.S. medical school matriculants, 3,180 of whom graduated with dual MD-PhD degrees by March 2, 2009. The authors examined prematriculation characteristics, educational outcomes, and career-setting preferences at graduation in association with MD-PhD program graduation from schools with long-standing MSTP-funded, recent MSTP-funded, and non-MSTP-funded programs. Of 3,142 MD-PhD graduates with prematriculation data, 30% were women and 36% were nonwhite. Graduates from long-standing MSTP-funded schools (63% of 3,142 graduates) composed a more highly selective group academically (based on Medical College Admission Test scores) than did graduates from recent MSTP-funded (6%) and non-MSTP-funded schools (31%). Women and nonwhite graduates were more likely to have graduated from long-standing MSTP-funded schools. Controlling for MSTP funding and other variables, graduates with total debt of $100,000 or more were more likely to indicate non-research-related career-setting preferences (nonuniversity clinical practice: odds ratio [OR] 3.58, 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.86-6.87; undecided/other: OR 2.15, 95% CI 1.29-3.60). Neither gender nor race/ethnicity was independently associated with graduates' career-setting preferences. Women and nonwhite MD-PhD graduates more likely graduated from long-standing MSTP than non-MSTP-funded schools. Controlling for institutional MSTP funding, MD-PhD graduates with high debt were more likely to indicate non-research-related career-setting preferences.

  17. Understanding Bureaucracy in Health Science Ethics: Toward a Better Institutional Review Board

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bozeman, Barry; Hirsch, Paul

    2009-01-01

    Research involving human participants continues to grow dramatically, fueled by advances in medical technology, globalization of research, and financial and professional incentives. This creates increasing opportunities for ethical errors with devastating effects. The typical professional and policy response to calamities involving human participants in research is to layer on more ethical guidelines or strictures. We used a recent case—the Johns Hopkins University/Kennedy Kreiger Institute Lead Paint Study—to examine lessons learned since the Tuskegee Syphilis Study about the role of institutionalized science ethics in the protection of human participants in research. We address the role of the institutional review board as the focal point for policy attention. PMID:19608947

  18. Rural-to-Urban Migrants' Experiences with Primary Care under Different Types of Medical Institutions in Guangzhou, China.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jiazhi Zeng

    Full Text Available China is facing the unprecedented challenge of rapidly increasing rural-to-urban migration. Migrants are in a vulnerable state when they attempt to access to primary care services. This study was designed to explore rural-to-urban migrants' experiences in primary care, comparing their quality of primary care experiences under different types of medical institutions in Guangzhou, China.The study employed a cross-sectional survey of 736 rural-to-urban migrants in Guangzhou, China in 2014. A validated Chinese version of Primary Care Assessment Tool--Adult Short Version (PCAT-AS, representing 10 primary care domains was used to collect information on migrants' quality of primary care experiences. These domains include first contact (utilization, first contact (accessibility, ongoing care, coordination (referrals, coordination (information systems, comprehensiveness (services available, comprehensiveness (services provided, family-centeredness, community orientation and culturally competent. These measures were used to assess the quality of primary care performance as reported from patients' perspective. Analysis of covariance was conducted for comparison on PCAT scores among migrants accessing primary care in tertiary hospitals, municipal hospitals, community health centers/community health stations, and township health centers/rural health stations. Multiple linear regression models were used to explore factors associated with PCAT total scores.After adjustments were made, migrants accessing primary care in tertiary hospitals (25.49 reported the highest PCAT total scores, followed by municipal hospitals (25.02, community health centers/community health stations (24.24, and township health centers/rural health stations (24.18. Tertiary hospital users reported significantly better performance in first contact (utilization, first contact (accessibility, coordination (information system, comprehensiveness (service available, and cultural competence

  19. Hopkins and Victorian Responses to Suffering Hopkins et les réponses de l’époque victorienne à la souffrance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maureen Moran

    2009-05-01

    Full Text Available L’interprétation religieuse de la souffrance à l’époque victorienne insiste d’une manière qui lui est propre sur la prééminence de l’âme sur le corps, l’acte de bravoure qu’est le sacrifice de soi, et la souffrance comme moyen purgatif de repentance et de discipline. Les textes catholiques sur le corps souffrant, et notamment dans les sermons et les récits de martyre, mettent en avant tout particulièrement la valeur de l’immolation du moi physique faible et perfide comme première étape à la récompense céleste. Cet article explore la centralité de la souffrance dans la notion du moi telle que Hopkins la conçoit en examinant son adaptation des représentations victoriennes traditionnelles de ce thème. En combinant à la fois des inflexions protestantes et catholiques dans son discours sur la souffrance, Hopkins réécrit l’importance de la souffrance extrême pour parfaire et exprimer l’individu unique et uni.

  20. Response to the National Cancer Institute Alert. The effect of practice guidelines on two hospitals in the same medical community.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Studnicki, J; Schapira, D V; Bradham, D D; Clark, R A; Jarrett, A

    1993-11-15

    Despite the recent increase in medical practice guideline development and dissemination, physician compliance with the guidelines has often been low. Previous research has suggested that physicians at hospitals with low volumes of cases and weakened financial status were more likely to omit indicated diagnostic testing or appropriate treatment. The authors sought to determine whether differences in compliance to a widely disseminated set of guidelines would exist even among the most dominant hospital providers within the same medical community. Two hospitals, together providing nearly half of the cancer surgery within a metropolitan area, were studied for their compliance to the May 1988 National Cancer Institute (NCI) Clinical Alert regarding adjuvant therapy after primary treatment for node negative breast cancer. A case series consecutive collection of 549 women treated at the study hospitals for 2 years before and two years after the Alert determined those patients who had received any form or combination of adjuvant therapy after primary surgical treatment (lumpectomy or modified radical mastectomy). Following modified radical mastectomy, for women age 50 and older, the university hospital (U) provided adjuvant therapy to a higher percentage of patients than the community hospital (C) both before (25.6% versus 4.7%, P < 0.005) and after (58.9% versus 23.2%, P < 0.001) the Alert. For women younger than 50 years of age, the two hospitals were equally likely to provide adjuvant therapy both before and after the Alert. Following lumpectomy, hospital U increased the percentage of women receiving adjuvant therapy following the Alert in women younger than 50 years of age (25-75.8%, P < 0.001) and in women age 50 and older (33.3-56.5%, P < 0.025). Hospital C provided no adjuvant therapy before or after the Alert. Preferences for breast conserving surgical treatment were significantly (P < 0.001) different with hospital U performing a higher percentage of lumpectomies

  1. Student-centred learning in Community Medicine: An experience from Jawaharlal Institute of Postgraduate Medical Education and Research, Puducherry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kar, S S; Premarajan, K C; L, Subitha; Archana, R; Iswarya, S; A, Sujiv

    2014-01-01

    Student-centred learning (SCL) places the student at the centre of policies, practices and decision-making in the teaching-learning process. SCL methodology also advocates active involvement of students in the curriculum planning, selection of teaching-learning methods and assessment process. We planned an education innovation project to assess the perception of fifth semester undergraduate medical students towards implementation of an SCL methodology. The study was done among 87 fifth semester undergraduate medical students (batch of 2010-11) in the noncommunicable disease epidemiology section of Community Medicine at the Jawaharlal Institute of Postgraduate Medical Education and Research (JIPMER), Puducherry. The students divided themselves into seven groups and developed the learning objectives, selected teaching-learning methods and assessment process for each session. The facilitators had 3-5 rounds of interaction with each group before the session. Qualitative analysis of feedback collected from students and external faculty after each session was done. The effect of implementing the SCL methodology was assessed by the reaction level of Kirkpatrick's training evaluation model by using a rating scale Results. Of the 87 eligible students, 73 (83.9%) returned the forms for evaluation. All seven groups were able to formulate the learning objectives. Most of the groups had used PowerPoint slides and videos as a teaching-learning tool. Innovative assessment methods such as crosswords and 'chocopati' were used by some groups. In general, the perception of students was favourable towards SCL compared to conventional methods and they felt that this methodology should be adopted more often. Time management and organization of sessions were the main problems encountered by the students. The mean (SD) score for the items 'sessions were useful', 'sessions were enjoyable' and 'sessions improved my knowledge' were 6.2 (1.8), 7.1 (1.8) and 6.3 (1.9), respectively. The

  2. Developing Therapies for Brain Tumors: The Impact of the Johns Hopkins Hunterian Neurosurgical Research Laboratory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brem, Henry; Sankey, Eric W; Liu, Ann; Mangraviti, Antonella; Tyler, Betty M

    2017-01-01

    The Johns Hopkins Hunterian Neurosurgical Laboratory at the Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine was created in 1904 by Harvey Cushing and William Halsted and has had a long history of fostering surgical training, encouraging basis science research, and facilitating translational application. Over the past 30 years, the laboratory has addressed the paucity of brain tumor therapies. Pre-clinical work from the laboratory led to the development of carmustine wafers with initial US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) approval in 1996. Combining carmustine wafers, radiation, and temozolomide led to a significant increase in the median survival of patients with glioblastoma. The laboratory has also developed microchips and immunotherapy to further extend survival in this heretofore underserved population. These achievements were made possible by the dedication, commitment, and creativity of more than 300 trainees of the Hunterian Neurosurgical Laboratory. The laboratory demonstrates the beneficial influence of research experience as well its substantial impact on the field of biomedical research.

  3. Restoration of prehensile function for motor paralysis in Hopkins syndrome: case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Satbhai, Nilesh G; Doi, Kazuteru; Hattori, Yasunori; Sakamoto, Sotetsu

    2014-02-01

    Hopkins syndrome is a rare cause of poliomyelitis-like paralysis affecting 1 or more extremities after an acute attack of asthma. The exact etiology of Hopkins syndrome is not known. A 4-year-old girl developed acute asthma followed by complete flaccid paralysis of the left upper extremity. She underwent staged reconstruction using the double free muscle transfer technique. Rigorous postoperative physiotherapy was carried out to achieve a good functional outcome. At recent follow-up, 27 months after the first procedure, the patient was able to effectively use the reconstructed hand for most daily activities. She had good control and could perform 2-handed activities. The selection of a suitable operative treatment and suitable donor nerves is critical, and there are no clear guidelines in the literature. The double free muscle transfer can be effectively employed in similar cases to restore grasping function. Copyright © 2014 American Society for Surgery of the Hand. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Stakeholder Perspectives on the Optimizing Patient Transfers, Impacting Medical Quality, and Improving Symptoms: Transforming Institutional Care (OPTIMISTIC) Project.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ersek, Mary; Hickman, Susan E; Thomas, Anne C; Bernard, Brittany; Unroe, Kathleen T; Meeks, Suzanne

    2017-10-17

    The need to reduce burdensome and costly hospitalizations of frail nursing home residents is well documented. The Optimizing Patient Transfers, Impacting Medical Quality, and Improving Symptoms: Transforming Institutional Care (OPTIMISTIC) project achieved this reduction through a multicomponent collaborative care model. We conducted an implementation-focused project evaluation to describe stakeholders' perspectives on (a) the most and least effective components of the intervention; (b) barriers to implementation; and (c) program features that promoted its adoption. Nineteen nursing homes participated in OPTIMISTIC. We conducted semistructured, qualitative interviews with 63 stakeholders: 23 nursing home staff and leaders, 4 primary care providers, 10 family members, and 26 OPTIMISTIC clinical staff. We used directed content analysis to analyze the data. We found universal endorsement of the value of in-depth advance care planning (ACP) discussions in reducing hospitalizations and improving care. Similarly, all stakeholder groups emphasized that nursing home access to specially trained, project registered nurses (RNs) and nurse practitioners (NPs) with time to focus on ACP, comprehensive resident assessment, and staff education was particularly valuable in identifying residents' goals for care. Challenges to implementation included inadequately trained facility staff and resistance to changing practice. In addition, the program sometimes failed to communicate its goals and activities clearly, leaving facilities uncertain about the OPTIMISTIC clinical staff's roles in the facilities. These findings are important for dissemination efforts related to the OPTIMISTIC care model and may be applicable to other innovations in nursing homes.

  5. A study on teenage pregnant mothers attending primary health centers of Kempegowda Institute of Medical Sciences, Bangalore.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parasuramalu, B G; Shakila, N; Masthi, Ramesh N R

    2010-01-01

    Data were collected from 78 teenage pregnant mothers (15-19 years) out of 1446 pregnant mothers who attended the primary health centers situated in the field practice area of the rural health center, Kengeri of Kempegowda Institute of Medical Sciences, Bangalore, between May and July 2009 to study the factors associated with teenage pregnancies and awareness regarding family planning. This was a descriptive study. Out of 78 teenage pregnant mothers, 57 (73%) were Hindus and 45 (57.7%) belonged to joint families. 76 (97.4%) teenage pregnant mothers were housewives, i.e. 55 (70.5%) of the spouses of the teenage pregnant mothers were laborers, in majority, i.e. 40 (51.3%) teenage pregnant mothers' age at marriage and the age at first pregnancy were 18 years. The mean age at marriage increased significantly with an increase of the educational status of the teenage pregnant mothers (F value = 7.08%, Ppregnancy was also increased with an increase of the education status of both the teenage pregnant mothers and their spouse. The most common reason for early marriage and early pregnancy was traditional practices and family pressure among 50 (64%) and 45 (57.7%) teenage pregnant mothers, respectively. 49 (63%) teenage pregnant mothers were not aware of any family planning methods.

  6. Intersectoral collaboration between the medical and veterinary professions in low-resource societies: The role of research and training institutions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marcotty, Tanguy; Thys, Eric; Conrad, Patricia; Godfroid, Jacques; Craig, Philip; Zinsstag, Jakob; Meheus, Filip; Boukary, Abdou Razac; Badé, Mallam Abdou; Sahibi, Hamid; Filali, Hind; Hendrickx, Saskia; Pissang, Cyrille; Van Herp, Michel; van der Roost, Dirk; Thys, Séverine; Hendrickx, David; Claes, Marleen; Demeulenaere, Tine; van Mierlo, Joep; Dehoux, Jean-Paul; Boelaert, Marleen

    2013-05-01

    Neglected zoonoses continue to significantly affect human health in low-resource countries. A symposium was organised in Antwerp, Belgium, on 5 November 2010 to evaluate how intersectoral collaboration among educational and research institutions could improve the situation. Brucellosis and echinococcosis were presented as models for intersectoral collaboration. Low-resource societies face evident knowledge gaps on disease distribution, transmission within and across species and impact on human and animal health, precluding the development of integrated control strategies. While veterinarians have been the main driver of the One Health initiative, the medical profession does not seem to be fully aware of how veterinary science can contribute to human public health. It was postulated that transdisciplinarity could help fill knowledge gaps and that encouraging such transdisciplinarity should start with undergraduate students. Furthermore, intersectoral collaboration on zoonoses should not ignore the social sciences (e.g. assessment of indigenous knowledge and perception; participatory surveillance), which can contribute to a better understanding of the transmission of diseases and improve communities' participation in disease control activities. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Novel Approaches to Arabic Speech Recognition: Report from the 2002 Johns Hopkins Summer Workshop

    Science.gov (United States)

    2002-08-01

    standardized corpus of dialectal Arabic currently available, the LDC CallHome (CH) corpus of Egyptian Colloquial Arabic . This is a collection of phone... dialectal Arabic . This paper reports on our project at the 2002 Johns Hopkins Summer Workshop, which focused on the recognition of dialectal Arabic . Three...language modeling and the integration of out- of- corpus language model data, and report significant word error rate improvements on the LDC Arabic

  8. Osteopathic Manipulative Treatment Limits Chronic Constipation in a Child with Pitt-Hopkins Syndrome

    OpenAIRE

    Alessandro Aquino; Mattia Perini; Silvia Cosmai; Silvia Zanon; Viviana Pisa; Carmine Castagna; Stefano Uberti

    2017-01-01

    Pitt-Hopkins Syndrome (PTHS) is a rare genetic disorder caused by insufficient expression of the TCF4 gene. Children with PTHS typically present with gastrointestinal disorders and early severe chronic constipation is frequently found (75%). Here we describe the case of a PTHS male 10-year-old patient with chronic constipation in whom Osteopathic Manipulative Treatment (OMT) resulted in improved bowel functions, as assessed by the diary, the QPGS-Form A Section C questionnaire, and the Paedia...

  9. Policy statements and practice guidelines for medical end-of-life decisions in Dutch health care institutions: Developments in the past decade

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pasman, H.R.W.; Wolf, de JT; Hesselink, B.A.M.; Heide, van der A.; Wal, van der G.; Maas, van der P.J.; Philipsen, B.D.

    2009-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: To describe the existence of policy statements on euthanasia and physician-assisted suicide (EAS) and practice guidelines for all medical end-of-life decisions in Dutch health care institutions in 2005, whether the existence of practice guidelines is related to characteristics of

  10. Pprofessor P. S. Grigoriev's contribution in the development syphilology during his work in the 1st Moscow medical institute (1936-1940

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zavyalov A.l.

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available The scientific contribution of professor P. S. Grigoriev in the development of domestic venereology is presented, in the period of its activity at the Department of Skin and Venereal Diseases of the 1st Moscow Medical Institute (1936-1940.

  11. [Perinatal mortality at the Medical Care Units of the IMSS (Mexico Social Security Institute), National Medical Center of Torreón].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodríguez y Enríquez de Rivera, F C; Velázquez Trejo, M L; Roís Hernández, J

    1998-07-01

    To describe the situation of perinatal mortality during 1994 year in General Hospitals with Family Medicine number 16 and 18 of IMSS (Social Security Mexican Institut) National Medical Center in Torreón Coah. It was realized a retrospective study, were included 199 files of perinatal deaths occurred from January 1st to December 31 of 1994. The variables obtained were number of death for step, period, age, sex, weight and the cause of the cause of the death. Were eliminated the files without data of interest. For the analysis our utilized descriptive statistics. The rate of perinatal mortality was 20.17 per 1000 live birth, fetal death rate 9.58 by 1000 and the rate of neonatal death 12.97 per 1,000 live birth, fetal death rate 8.68 and neonatal death rate 12.30. The majority were in the perinatal period one with a rate of 16.71 by 1,000 live birth. Were most common in a male sex (53%) in pregnancies from 28 to 32 weeks (33.91%) and in babies with less of 1000 gr of weight (33.86%). The causes more frequents of deaths were the respiratory difficult syndrome (41.77%), the anomalies (19.62%) and hypoxia (9.49%). The perinatal mortality in our study was similar that in the rest of the country and is acorde with the literature. The perinatal mortality were in the perinatal period one. Is important to conduce a prospective studies.

  12. WORK EXPERIENCE OF THE OPERA TIVE INFORMATION SUPPORT SERVICE FOR SCIENTIFIC RESEARCH A T THE MEDICAL RADIOLOGICAL RESEARCH CENTER NAMED AFTER A.F . TSYB – BRANCH OF THE FEDERAL STATE BUDGET INSTITUTION "NATIONAL MEDICAL RESEARCH RADIOLOGICAL CENTER” OF T

    OpenAIRE

    N. P. Savina; V. A. Maznev; V. N. Galkin

    2015-01-01

    Abstract:The Operative Information Support Service for Scientific Research of the Medical Radiological Research Center named after A. F. Tsyb — Branch of the FSBI «National Medical Research Radiological Center” of the RF Health Ministry presented a report on providing off-budget support for scientific activities over the period from 1993 to 2014 using domestic and foreign information resources. The dynamics of employee activities in institutional sectors with aim to receive financial support ...

  13. [Conceptual foundations of creation of branch database of technology and intellectual property rights owned by scientific institutions, organizations, higher medical educational institutions and enterprises of healthcare sphere of Ukraine].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horban', A Ie

    2013-09-01

    The question of implementation of the state policy in the field of technology transfer in the medical branch to implement the law of Ukraine of 02.10.2012 No 5407-VI "On Amendments to the law of Ukraine" "On state regulation of activity in the field of technology transfers", namely to ensure the formation of branch database on technology and intellectual property rights owned by scientific institutions, organizations, higher medical education institutions and enterprises of healthcare sphere of Ukraine and established by budget are considered. Analysis of international and domestic experience in the processing of information about intellectual property rights and systems implementation support transfer of new technologies are made. The main conceptual principles of creation of this branch database of technology transfer and branch technology transfer network are defined.

  14. Rural-to-Urban Migrants' Experiences with Primary Care under Different Types of Medical Institutions in Guangzhou, China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeng, Jiazhi; Shi, Leiyu; Zou, Xia; Chen, Wen; Ling, Li

    2015-01-01

    China is facing the unprecedented challenge of rapidly increasing rural-to-urban migration. Migrants are in a vulnerable state when they attempt to access to primary care services. This study was designed to explore rural-to-urban migrants' experiences in primary care, comparing their quality of primary care experiences under different types of medical institutions in Guangzhou, China. The study employed a cross-sectional survey of 736 rural-to-urban migrants in Guangzhou, China in 2014. A validated Chinese version of Primary Care Assessment Tool--Adult Short Version (PCAT-AS), representing 10 primary care domains was used to collect information on migrants' quality of primary care experiences. These domains include first contact (utilization), first contact (accessibility), ongoing care, coordination (referrals), coordination (information systems), comprehensiveness (services available), comprehensiveness (services provided), family-centeredness, community orientation and culturally competent. These measures were used to assess the quality of primary care performance as reported from patients' perspective. Analysis of covariance was conducted for comparison on PCAT scores among migrants accessing primary care in tertiary hospitals, municipal hospitals, community health centers/community health stations, and township health centers/rural health stations. Multiple linear regression models were used to explore factors associated with PCAT total scores. After adjustments were made, migrants accessing primary care in tertiary hospitals (25.49) reported the highest PCAT total scores, followed by municipal hospitals (25.02), community health centers/community health stations (24.24), and township health centers/rural health stations (24.18). Tertiary hospital users reported significantly better performance in first contact (utilization), first contact (accessibility), coordination (information system), comprehensiveness (service available), and cultural competence

  15. Distribution of alpha thalassaemia gene variants in diverse ethnic populations in malaysia: data from the institute for medical research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmad, Rahimah; Saleem, Mohamed; Aloysious, Nisha Sabrina; Yelumalai, Punithawathy; Mohamed, Nurul; Hassan, Syahzuwan

    2013-09-10

    Alpha thalassaemia is highly prevalent in the plural society of Malaysia and is a public health problem. Haematological and molecular data from 5016 unrelated patients referred from various hospitals to the Institute for Medical Research for α thalassaemia screening from 2007 to 2010 were retrieved. The aims of this retrospective analysis were to describe the distribution of various alpha thalassaemia alleles in different ethnic groups, along with their genotypic interactions, and to illustrate the haematological changes associated with each phenotype. Amongst the patients, 51.2% (n = 2567) were diagnosed with α thalassaemia. Of the 13 α thalassaemia determinants screened, eight different deletions and mutations were demonstrated: three double gene deletions, --(SEA), --(THAI), --(FIL); two single-gene deletions, α-³·⁷ and -α⁴·²; and three non-deletion mutations, Cd59G > A (haemoglobin [Hb] Adana), Cd125T > C (Hb Quong Sze) and Cd142 (Hb Constant Spring). A high incidence of α-³·⁷ deletion was observed in Malays, Indians, Sabahans, Sarawakians and Orang Asli people. However, the --SEA deletion was the most common cause of alpha thalassaemia in Chinese, followed by the α-³·⁷ deletion. As many as 27 genotypic interactions showed 1023 α thalassaemia silent carriers, 196 homozygous α⁺ thalassaemia traits, 973 heterozygous α⁰ thalassaemia carriers and 375 patients with Hb H disease. Statistical analysis showed a significant difference in the distribution of α thalassaemia determinants amongst the various ethnic groups. Hence, the heterogeneous distribution of common determinants indicated that the introduction of an ethnicity-targeted hierarchical α thalassaemia screening approach in this multi-ethnic Malaysian population would be effective.

  16. ELEMENTAL COMPOSITION OF ROSEMARY SHOOTS (ROSMARINUS OFFICINALIS L., INTRODUCED IN THE BOTANICAL GARDEN OF PYATIGORSK MEDICAL-PHARMACEUTICAL INSTITUTE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. S. Nikitina

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Nowadays studying plant objects in the framework of environmental monitoring to improve the quality of herbal remedies is a very important area of research.The aim of the work is to determine the elemental composition and assessment of environmental cleanliness of rosemary shoots (Rosmarinus offi cinalis L., introduced in Botanical garden of Pyatigorsk medical-pharmaceutical Institute (PMPI, Pyatigorsk (Russia.Materials and methods. An experimental study was performed at the Central research laboratories spectral analysis (“Kavkazgeolsyemka” on diffraction spectrograph DFS-8-1 by evaporation from a crater of the carbon electrode. Photometric measurement of spectrograms was performed using the Atlas of spectral lines and spectra of standards with an accuracy of not more than 2% in terms of ash.Results and discussion. For the fi rst time there were 25 elements identifi ed in rosemary shoots introduced in the North Caucasus. The prevailing macro elements were K, Ca, Mg, Na, P and the trace elements were Al, Si and Fe. The toxic elements As, Cd, Hg, Bi, Sb were not detected in the rosemary shoots. Rosemary does not accumulate heavy metals or they are present in trace amounts.Conclusion. The absence of heavy metals or their low content in rosemary shoots can be explained prosperous environmental conditions of Pyatigorsk Botanical garden. The use of rosemary shoots as a source of natural compounds of primary and secondary synthesis and minerals, are involved in the regulation of life processes. This underlines the therapeutic importance of the raw materials and the possibility of creating drugs of combined action on the basis of rosemary for the treatment and prevention of pathologies associated with disorders of mineral metabolism.

  17. The hemorrhagic fevers of Southern Africa with special reference to studies in the South African Institute for Medical Research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gear, J H

    1982-01-01

    In this review of studies on the hemorrhagic fevers of Southern Africa carried out in the South African Institute for Medical Research, attention has been called to occurrence of meningococcal septicemia in recruits to the mining industry and South African Army, to cases of staphylococcal and streptococcal septicemia with hemorrhagic manifestations, and to the occurrence of plague which, in its septicemic form, may cause a hemorrhagic state. "Onyalai," a bleeding disease in tropical Africa, often fatal, was related to profound thrombocytopenia possibly following administration of toxic witch doctor medicine. Spirochetal diseases, and rickettsial diseases in their severe forms, are often manifested with hemorrhagic complications. Of enterovirus infections, Coxsackie B viruses occasionally caused severe hepatitis associated with bleeding, especially in newborn babies. Cases of hemorrhagic fever presenting in February-March, 1975 are described. The first outbreak was due to Marburg virus disease and the second, which included seven fatal cases, was caused by Rift Valley fever virus. In recent cases of hemorrhagic fever a variety of infective organisms have been incriminated including bacterial infections, rickettsial diseases, and virus diseases, including Herpesvirus hominis; in one patient, the hemorrhagic state was related to rubella. A boy who died in a hemorrhagic state was found to have Congo fever; another patient who died of severe bleeding from the lungs was infected with Leptospira canicola, and two patients who developed a hemorrhagic state after a safari trip in Northern Botswana were infected with Trypanosoma rhodesiense. An illness manifested by high fever and melena developed in a young man after a visit to Zimbabwe; the patient was found to have both malaria and Marburg virus disease.

  18. Distribution of Alpha Thalassaemia Gene Variants in Diverse Ethnic Populations in Malaysia: Data from the Institute for Medical Research

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Syahzuwan Hassan

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Alpha thalassaemia is highly prevalent in the plural society of Malaysia and is a public health problem. Haematological and molecular data from 5016 unrelated patients referred from various hospitals to the Institute for Medical Research for α thalassaemia screening from 2007 to 2010 were retrieved. The aims of this retrospective analysis were to describe the distribution of various alpha thalassaemia alleles in different ethnic groups, along with their genotypic interactions, and to illustrate the haematological changes associated with each phenotype. Amongst the patients, 51.2% (n = 2567 were diagnosed with α thalassaemia. Of the 13 α thalassaemia determinants screened, eight different deletions and mutations were demonstrated: three double gene deletions, ––SEA, ––THAI, ––FIL; two single-gene deletions, α–3.7 and –α4.2; and three non-deletion mutations, Cd59G > A (haemoglobin [Hb] Adana, Cd125T > C (Hb Quong Sze and Cd142 (Hb Constant Spring. A high incidence of α–3.7 deletion was observed in Malays, Indians, Sabahans, Sarawakians and Orang Asli people. However, the ––SEA deletion was the most common cause of alpha thalassaemia in Chinese, followed by the α–3.7 deletion. As many as 27 genotypic interactions showed 1023 α thalassaemia silent carriers, 196 homozygous α+ thalassaemia traits, 973 heterozygous α0 thalassaemia carriers and 375 patients with Hb H disease. Statistical analysis showed a significant difference in the distribution of α thalassaemia determinants amongst the various ethnic groups. Hence, the heterogeneous distribution of common determinants indicated that the introduction of an ethnicity-targeted hierarchical α thalassaemia screening approach in this multi-ethnic Malaysian population would be effective.

  19. MO-DE-BRA-03: The Ottawa Medical Physics Institute (OMPI): A Practical Model for Academic Program Collaboration in a Multi-Centre City

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McEwen, M [National Research Council Canada, Ottawa, ON (Canada); Rogers, D [Carleton University, Ottawa, ON (Canada); Johns, P

    2016-06-15

    Purpose: To build a world-class medical physics educational program that capitalizes on expertise distributed over several clinical, government, and academic centres. Few if any of these centres would have the critical mass to solely resource a program. Methods: In order to enable an academic program, stakeholders from five institutions made a proposal to Carleton University for a) a research network with defined membership requirements and a process for accepting new members, and b) a graduate specialization (MSc and PhD) in medical physics. Both proposals were accepted and the program has grown steadily. Our courses are taught by medical physicists from across the collaboration. Our students have access to physicists in: clinical radiotherapy (the Ottawa Cancer Centre treats 4500 new patients/y), radiology, cardiology and nuclear medicine, Canada’s primary standards dosimetry laboratory, radiobiology, and university-based medical physics research. Our graduate courses emphasize the foundational physics plus applied aspects of imaging, radiotherapy, and radiobiology. Active researchers in the city-wide volunteer-run network are appointed as adjunct professors by Physics, giving them access to national funding competitions and partial student funding through teaching assistantships while opening up facilities in their institutions for student thesis research. Results: The medical physics network has grown to ∼40 members from eight institutions and includes five full-time faculty in Physics and 17 adjunct research professors. The graduate student population is ∼20. Our graduates have proceeded to a spectrum of careers. Our alumni list includes a CCPM Past-President, the current COMP President, many clinical physicists, and the heads of at least three major clinical medical physics departments. Our PhD was Ontario’s first CAMPEP-accredited program. Conclusion: A self-governing volunteer network is the foundational element that enables an MSc/PhD medical

  20. [Hygiene and Infection Prevention in Medical Institutions, Kindergartens and Schools - Statutory Basis, Infection Control Practice and Experiences of the Public Health Services].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heudorf, U

    2015-07-01

    Infection prevention is one of the main tasks of the public health services. The "Protection against infection act" places all medical institutions and facilities for children (kindergartens and schools) under the obligation to assume responsibility and to cooperate. Duties of the institutions are described, and public health services are obliged to perform hygiene control visits.Regarding medical institutions, the guidelines of the German Commission on Hospital Hygiene and Infection Control have to be observed, and the counties were obliged to publish hygiene enactments. Subsequently, good improvements in hygiene management in medical institutions were achieved. In schools, however, severe hygienic problems (i.e. sanitary hygiene, indoor air hygiene) are detected, without any improvement - obviously due to a missing sense of responsibility in the school community. Causes for poor behaviour prevention (hand hygiene, ventilation) and missing situational prevention (i.e. cleaning) are discussed. Without reversion to the obviously needed but nearly forgotten subject school hygiene, obligatory guidelines and the assuming of responsibility, permanent improvements cannot be achieved. © Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  1. Characteristics and determinants of knowledge transfer policies at universities and public institutions in medical research--protocol for a systematic review of the qualitative research literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jahn, Rosa; Müller, Olaf; Bozorgmehr, Kayvan

    2015-08-19

    Universities, public institutions, and the transfer of knowledge to the private sector play a major role in the development of medical technologies. The decisions of universities and public institutions regarding the transfer of knowledge impact the accessibility of the final product, making it easier or more difficult for consumers to access these products. In the case of medical research, these products are pharmaceuticals, diagnostics, or medical procedures. The ethical dimension of access to these potentially lifesaving products is apparent and distinguishes the transfer of medical knowledge from the transfer of knowledge in other areas. While the general field of technology transfer from academic and public to private actors is attracting an increasing amount of scholarly attention, the specifications of knowledge transfer in the medical field are not as well explored. This review seeks to provide a systematic overview and analysis of the qualitative literature on the characteristics and determinants of knowledge transfer in medical research and development. The review systematically searches the literature for qualitative studies that focus on knowledge transfer characteristics and determinants at medical academic and public research institutions. It aims at identifying and analyzing the literature on the content and context of knowledge transfer policies, decision-making processes, and actors at academic and public institutions. The search strategy includes the databases PubMed, Web of Science, ProQuest, and DiVa. These databases will be searched based on pre-specified search terms. The studies selected for inclusion in the review will be critically assessed for their quality utilizing the Qualitative Research Checklist developed by the Clinical Appraisal Skills Programme. Data extraction and synthesis will be based on the meta-ethnographic approach. This review seeks to further the understanding of the kinds of transfer pathways that exist in medical

  2. [se-atlas - the health service information platform for people with rare diseases : Supporting research on medical care institutions and support groups].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haase, Johanna; Wagner, Thomas O F; Storf, Holger

    2017-05-01

    se-atlas - the health service information platform for rare diseases - is part of the German National Action Plan for People with Rare Diseases and is funded by the German Federal Ministry of Health. The objective of se-atlas as a web-based platform is to illustrate those medical care institutions that are linked to rare diseases, in a transparent and user-friendly way. The website provides an overview of medical care institutions and support groups focusing on rare diseases in Germany. The primary target groups of se-atlas are affected patients, their relatives and physicians but can also include non-medical professionals and the general public. In order to make it easier to look up medical care institutions or support groups and optimize the search results displayed, various strategies are being developed and evaluated. Hence, the allocation of diseases to appropriate medical care institutions and support groups is currently a main focus. Since its launch in 2015, se-atlas has grown continuously and now incorporates five times more entries than were included 20 months prior. Among this data are the current rare diseases centres in Germany, which play a major role in providing patient-centred healthcare by acting as primary contact points for people with rare diseases. Further expansion and maintenance of the data base raises several organisational and software-related challenges. For one, the data should be completed by adding more high-quality information, while not neglecting the existing entries and maintaining their high level of quality in the long term.

  3. Psychometric properties of the Experience of Work and Life Circumstances Questionnaire and the Hopkins Symptom Checklist

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rudolf M. Oosthuizen

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this research was to investigate the reliability and validity of the Experience of Work and Life Circumstances Questionnaire and the Hopkins Symptom Checklist when administered to a convenience sample of 241 fire-fighters from a metropolitan municipality. The results indicate that these two measuring instruments yielded acceptable internal-consistency reliability coefficients for most of the subscales of the questionnaires. Construct validity was investigated by means of exploratory factor analysis. It was concluded that the measuring instruments are fit to be used for diagnostic and developmental purposes and during counselling to enhance the psychological wellbeing of fire-fighters and their families.

  4. A case of Pitt-Hopkins syndrome presented with Angelman-like syndromic phenotypes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hong, Syuan-Yu; Chou, I-Ching; Lin, Wei-De; Tsai, Fuu-Jen

    2016-12-01

    Pitt-Hopkins syndrome (PTHS), caused by a TCF4 gene mutation, is a condition characterized by intellectual disability and developmental delay, breathing anomalies, epilepsy, and distinctive facial dysmorphism [1]. Its diverse clinical appearance causes pediatricians to confuse it with Angelman syndrome, which is considered one of the family members of Angelman-like syndrome. Herein, we report on a 4 y/o boy with PTHS and discuss its similarities and differences with Angelman syndrome. In doing so we hope to provide a feasible pathway to diagnose rare diseases, especially Angelman-like syndrome.

  5. Osteopathic Manipulative Treatment Limits Chronic Constipation in a Child with Pitt-Hopkins Syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alessandro Aquino

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Pitt-Hopkins Syndrome (PTHS is a rare genetic disorder caused by insufficient expression of the TCF4 gene. Children with PTHS typically present with gastrointestinal disorders and early severe chronic constipation is frequently found (75%. Here we describe the case of a PTHS male 10-year-old patient with chronic constipation in whom Osteopathic Manipulative Treatment (OMT resulted in improved bowel functions, as assessed by the diary, the QPGS-Form A Section C questionnaire, and the Paediatric Bristol Stool Form Scale. The authors suggested that OMT may be a valid tool to improve the defecation frequency and reduce enema administration in PTHS patients.

  6. Osteopathic Manipulative Treatment Limits Chronic Constipation in a Child with Pitt-Hopkins Syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aquino, Alessandro; Perini, Mattia; Cosmai, Silvia; Zanon, Silvia; Pisa, Viviana; Castagna, Carmine; Uberti, Stefano

    2017-01-01

    Pitt-Hopkins Syndrome (PTHS) is a rare genetic disorder caused by insufficient expression of the TCF4 gene. Children with PTHS typically present with gastrointestinal disorders and early severe chronic constipation is frequently found (75%). Here we describe the case of a PTHS male 10-year-old patient with chronic constipation in whom Osteopathic Manipulative Treatment (OMT) resulted in improved bowel functions, as assessed by the diary, the QPGS-Form A Section C questionnaire, and the Paediatric Bristol Stool Form Scale. The authors suggested that OMT may be a valid tool to improve the defecation frequency and reduce enema administration in PTHS patients.

  7. The Heffter Research Institute: past and hopeful future.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nichols, David E

    2014-01-01

    This essay describes the founding of the Heffter Research Institute in 1993 and its development up to the present. The Institute is the only scientific research organization dedicated to scientific research into the medical value of psychedelics, and it has particularly focused on the use of psilocybin. The first clinical treatment study was of the value of psilocybin in obsessive-compulsive disorder. Next was a UCLA study of psilocybin to treat end-of-life distress in end-stage cancer patients. While that study was ongoing, a trial was started at Johns Hopkins University (JHU) to study the efficacy of psilocybin in treating anxiety and depression resulting from a cancer diagnosis. Following the successful completion of the UCLA project, a larger study was started at New York University, which is near completion. A pilot study of the value of psilocybin in treating alcoholism at the University of New Mexico also is nearing completion, with a larger two-site study being planned. Other studies underway involve the use of psilocybin in a smoking cessation program and a study of the effects of psilocybin in long-term meditators, both at JHU. The institute is now planning for a Phase 3 clinical trial of psilocybin to treat distress in end-stage cancer patients.

  8. Practices of self-medication with antibiotics among nursing students of Institute of Nursing, Dow University of Health Sciences, Karachi, Pakistan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ali, Akbar Shoukat; Ahmed, Javed; Ali, Akbar Shoukat; Sonekhi, Gomand Beekho; Fayyaz, Nargis; Zainulabdin, Zeeshan; Jindani, Rahim

    2016-02-01

    Self-medication practice among nursing students is of growing concern. Access to drugs and handling them in their future practices make nursing students susceptible to self-prescription and self-medication. This cross-sectional study assesses the prevalence and pattern of self-medication with antibiotics among nursing students of Institute of Nursing, Dow University of Health Sciences, Karachi, Pakistan. A random sample of convenience of 160 nursing students underwent a predesigned questionnaire. More than half of nursing students 79 (52.7%) experienced self-medication with antibiotics. It was more prevalent among males 49 (62%) . Knowledge about the drug 59 (74.7%) and convenience 13 (16.5%) were the key reasons to self-medicate. Fever 37 (46.8%) and sore throat 27 (34.2%) were the common symptoms predisposing to self-medication. Beta-lactam group of antibiotics 35 (44.3%) was most frequent used. Only 26 (32.9%) respondents completed the entire antibiotic course. Efforts must be directed towards educating nursing students about responsible and informed self-medication practices.

  9. First Detection of G12 Rotaviruses in Newborns with Neonatal Rotavirus Infection at All India Institute of Medical Sciences, New Delhi, India▿

    OpenAIRE

    Ray, Pratima; Sharma, S.; Agarwal, R. K.; Longmei, K.; Gentsch, J. R.; Paul, V. K.; Glass, R. I.; Bhan, M. K.

    2007-01-01

    Rotavirus genotype G12 strains were detected for the first time among newborns with asymptomatic rotavirus infection (74% of 39 rotavirus strains isolated from the infected infants were genotype G12) in the nursery of the All India Institute of Medical Sciences during a period from 2005 to 2006. Sequence analysis of the VP7 genes from these neonatal strains indicated a high level of homology to other G12 strains reported worldwide, suggesting the recent emergence of these strains in humans. S...

  10. SCIENTIFIC EVENTS OF THE TURNER SCIENTIFIC AND RESEARCH INSTITUTE FOR CHILDREN’S ORTHOPEDICS AS A FORM OF CONTINUOUS MEDICAL EDUCATION FOR PEDIATRIC TRAUMATOLOGISTS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karina S. Solovyova

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available The experience of the Turner Scientific and Research Institute for Children's Orthopedics in educational activities for improvement of the professional knowledge of pediatric physicians was represented. The target audience of the continuous medical education include traumatologists, pediatric surgeons, and doctors of related specialties of Russia that are involved in diagnosis, treatment, and rehabilitation of children with injuries, congenital and acquired diseases of the musculoskeletal system. Since 1986, the Institute has organized 28 all-Russian scientific and practical conferences on topical issues of traumatology and orthopedics of pediatric age in 22 different cities across the country. In the interest of the institute, the school of pediatric orthopedists is constantly working for district orthopedists of children's polyclinics of St. Petersburg, and regular monothematic seminars are performed with the participation of leading Russian experts and visiting lecturers from abroad. These scientific and practical activities improve the professional skills of doctors and help them improve the provision of specialized care to children.

  11. Analysis of prescription pattern and guideline adherence in the management of asthma among medical institutions and physician specialties in Taiwan between 2000 and 2010.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chou, Chia-Lin; Perng, Diahn-Warng; Lin, Ting-Lun; Lin, Anya Maan-Yuh; Chen, Tzeng-Ji; Wu, Ming-Shan; Chou, Yueh-Ching

    2015-10-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate prescription patterns of antiasthmatic medications in ambulatory care, guideline adherence by physician specialties and medical institutions, and the rate of hospitalization and emergency department visits due to asthma exacerbation. The ambulatory visits between 2000 and 2010 from the Taiwan Longitudinal Health Insurance Database 2000 were analyzed for prescription trends. Seven classes of antiasthmatic medications were identified for prescription trend analysis. Prescription patterns of different medical institutions and physician specialties were further evaluated. We studied 4495 patients with newly diagnosed asthma in 2000. Estimates indicated an increased use in fixed-dose combination of inhaled corticosteroids and long-acting β2-agonists (3.6% in 2002 to 28.8% in 2010) with decreased use of inhaled corticosteroids (14.5% in 2001 to 7.3% in 2010). Xanthine was still the most frequently used medication for asthmatic patients (60.2% in 2001 and 45.2% in 2010). Another marked increase was the use of leukotriene receptor antagonists (2.6% in 2001 to 6.0% in 2010). In the studied population, the rate of hospital admission or emergency department visit moderately decreased from 1.42% to 0.59% during 10 years. Physicians in medical centers and regional hospitals, as well as asthma specialists, dominated the increased use of fixed-dose combinations of inhaled corticosteroids and long-acting β2-agonists and leukotriene receptor antagonists. Physicians in academic medical centers and asthma specialists achieved better adherence to the core recommendations of the international guidelines for asthma management. The reasons for guideline nonadherence among physicians in district hospitals and primary care clinics deserve health care professionals' attention and require further investigation. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier HS Journals, Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. The vicious circle of patient-physician mistrust in China: health professionals' perspectives, institutional conflict of interest, and building trust through medical professionalism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nie, Jing-Bao; Cheng, Yu; Zou, Xiang; Gong, Ni; Tucker, Joseph D; Wong, Bonnie; Kleinman, Arthur

    2017-09-18

    To investigate the phenomenon of patient-physician mistrust in China, a qualitative study involving 107 physicians, nurses and health officials in Guangdong Province, southern China, was conducted through semi-structured interviews and focus groups. In this paper we report the key findings of the empirical study and argue for the essential role of medical professionalism in rebuilding patient-physician trust. Health professionals are trapped in a vicious circle of mistrust. Mistrust (particularly physicians' distrust of patients and their relatives) leads to increased levels of fear and self-protection by doctors which exacerbate difficulties in communication; in turn, this increases physician workloads, adding to a strong sense of injustice and victimization. These factors produce poorer healthcare outcomes and increasingly discontented and angry patients, escalate conflicts and disputes, and result in negative media coverage, all these ultimately contributing to even greater levels of mistrust. The vicious circle indicates not only the crisis of patient-physician relationship but the crisis of medicine as a profession and institution. Underlying the circle is the inherent conflict of interest in the healthcare system by which health professionals and hospitals have become profit-driven. This institutional conflict of interest seriously compromises the fundamental principle of medical professionalism-the primacy of patient welfare-as well as the traditional Chinese ideal of "medicine as the art of humanity". Patient trust can be restored through rectifying this institutional conflict of interest and promoting medical professionalism via a series of recommended practical measures. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  13. Computational fluid dynamic modeling of the summit of Mt. Hopkins for the MMT Observatory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Callahan, S.

    2010-07-01

    Over the past three decades, the staff of the MMT observatory used a variety of techniques to predict the summit wind characteristics including wind tunnel modeling and the release of smoke bombs. With the planned addition of a new instrument repair facility to be constructed on the summit of Mt. Hopkins, new computational fluid dynamic (CFD) models were made to determine the building's influence on the thermal environment around the telescope. The models compared the wind profiles and density contours above the telescope enclosure with and without the new building. The results show the steeply-sided Mount Hopkins dominates the summit wind profiles. In typical winds, the height of the telescope remains above the ground layer and is sufficiently separated from the new facility to insure the heat from the new building does not interfere with the telescope. The results also confirmed the observatories waste heat exhaust duct location needs to be relocated to prevent heat from being trapped in the wind shadow of the new building and lofting above the telescope. These useful models provide many insights into understanding the thermal environment of the summit.

  14. The Creation of a Biocontainment Unit at a Tertiary Care Hospital. The Johns Hopkins Medicine Experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garibaldi, Brian T; Kelen, Gabor D; Brower, Roy G; Bova, Gregory; Ernst, Neysa; Reimers, Mallory; Langlotz, Ronald; Gimburg, Anatoly; Iati, Michael; Smith, Christopher; MacConnell, Sally; James, Hailey; Lewin, John J; Trexler, Polly; Black, Meredith A; Lynch, Chelsea; Clarke, William; Marzinke, Mark A; Sokoll, Lori J; Carroll, Karen C; Parish, Nicole M; Dionne, Kim; Biddison, Elizabeth L D; Gwon, Howard S; Sauer, Lauren; Hill, Peter; Newton, Scott M; Garrett, Margaret R; Miller, Redonda G; Perl, Trish M; Maragakis, Lisa L

    2016-05-01

    In response to the 2014-2015 Ebola virus disease outbreak in West Africa, Johns Hopkins Medicine created a biocontainment unit to care for patients infected with Ebola virus and other high-consequence pathogens. The unit team examined published literature and guidelines, visited two existing U.S. biocontainment units, and contacted national and international experts to inform the design of the physical structure and patient care activities of the unit. The resulting four-bed unit allows for unidirectional flow of providers and materials and has ample space for donning and doffing personal protective equipment. The air-handling system allows treatment of diseases spread by contact, droplet, or airborne routes of transmission. An onsite laboratory and an autoclave waste management system minimize the transport of infectious materials out of the unit. The unit is staffed by self-selected nurses, providers, and support staff with pediatric and adult capabilities. A telecommunications system allows other providers and family members to interact with patients and staff remotely. A full-time nurse educator is responsible for staff training, including quarterly exercises and competency assessment in the donning and doffing of personal protective equipment. The creation of the Johns Hopkins Biocontainment Unit required the highest level of multidisciplinary collaboration. When not used for clinical care and training, the unit will be a site for research and innovation in highly infectious diseases. The lessons learned from the design process can inform a new research agenda focused on the care of patients in a biocontainment environment.

  15. An economic analysis of inadequate prescription of antiulcer medications for in-hospital patients at a third level institution in Colombia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jorge Enrique Machado-Alba

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: The prescription and costs of antiulcer medications for in-hospital use have increased during recent years with reported inadequate use and underused. Aim: To determine the patterns of prescription-indication and also perform an economic analysis of the overcost caused by the non-justified use of antiulcer medications in a third level hospital in Colombia. Materials and methods: Cross-sectional study of prescription-indication of antiulcer medications for patients hospitalized in "Hospital Universitario San Jorge" of Pereira during July of 2012. Adequate or inadequate prescription of the first antiulcer medication prescribed was determined as well as for others prescribed during the hospital stay, supported by clinical practice guidelines from the Zaragoza I sector workgroup, clinical guidelines from the Australian Health Department, and finally the American College of Gastroenterology Criteria for stress ulcer prophylaxis. Daily defined dose per bed/day was used, as well as the cost for 100 beds/day and the cost of each bed/drug. A multivariate analysis was carried out using SPSS 21.0. Results: 778 patients were analyzed, 435 men (55.9% and 343 women, mean age 56.6 ± 20.1 years. The number of patients without justification for the prescription of the first antiulcer medication was 377 (48.5%, and during the whole in-hospital time it was 336 (43.2%. Ranitidine was the most used medication, in 438 patients (56.3%. The cost/month for poorly justified antiulcer medications was € 3,335.6. The annual estimated cost for inadequate prescriptions of antiulcer medications was € 16,770.0 per 100 beds. Conclusion: A lower inadequate prescription rate of antiulcer medications was identified compared with other studies; however it was still high and is troubling because of the major costs that these inadequate prescriptions generates for the institution.

  16. An economic analysis of inadequate prescription of antiulcer medications for in-hospital patients at a third level institution in Colombia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Machado-Alba, Jorge Enrique; Castrillón-Spitia, Juan Daniel; Londoño-Builes, Manuel José; Fernández-Cardona, Alejandra; Campo-Betancourth, Carlos Felipe; Ochoa-Orozco, Sergio Andrés; Echeverri-Cataño, Luis Felipe; Ruiz-Villa, Joaquín Octavio; Gaviria-Mendoza, Andrés

    2014-02-01

    The prescription and costs of antiulcer medications for in-hospital use have increased during recent years with reported inadequate use and underused. To determine the patterns of prescription-indication and also perform an economic analysis of the overcost caused by the non-justified use of antiulcer medications in a third level hospital in Colombia. Cross-sectional study of prescription-indication of antiulcer medications for patients hospitalized in "Hospital Universitario San Jorge" of Pereira during July of 2012. Adequate or inadequate prescription of the first antiulcer medication prescribed was determined as well as for others prescribed during the hospital stay, supported by clinical practice guidelines from the Zaragoza I sector workgroup, clinical guidelines from the Australian Health Department, and finally the American College of Gastroenterology Criteria for stress ulcer prophylaxis. Daily defined dose per bed/day was used, as well as the cost for 100 beds/day and the cost of each bed/drug. A multivariate analysis was carried out using SPSS 21.0. 778 patients were analyzed, 435 men (55.9 %) and 343 women, mean age 56.6 +/- 20.1 years. The number of patients without justification for the prescription of the first antiulcer medication was 377 (48.5 %), and during the whole in-hospital time it was 336 (43.2 %). Ranitidine was the most used medication, in 438 patients (56.3 %). The cost/month for poorly justified antiulcer medications was € 3,335.6. The annual estimated cost for inadequate prescriptions of antiulcer medications was € 16,770.0 per 100 beds. A lower inadequate prescription rate of antiulcer medications was identified compared with other studies; however it was still high and is troubling because of the major costs that these inadequate prescriptions generates for the institution.

  17. State Institution «National Research Center for Radiation Medicine of the National Academy of Medical Sciences of Ukraine» - research activities and scientific advance in 2015.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bazyka, D; Sushko, V; Chumak, A; Buzunov, V; Talko, V; Yanovych, L

    2016-12-01

    Research activities and scientific advance achieved in 2014 at the State Institution «National Research Center for Radiation Medicine of the National Academy of Medical Sciences of Ukraine» (NRCRM) concerning medical problems of the Chornobyl disaster, radiation medicine, radiobiology, radiation hygiene and epidemiology in collaboration with the WHO network of medical preparedness and assistance in radiation accidents are outlined in the annual report.The report presents the results of fundamental and applied research works of the study of radiation effects and health effects of the Chornobyl accident; fulfillment of tasks of «State social program for improving safety, occupational health and working environment in 2014-2018 years».The report also shows the results of scientific organizational and health care work, staff training.The NRCRM Annual Report was approved at the Scientific Council meeting of NAMS on March 17, 2016. D. Bazyka, V. Sushko, A. Chumak, V. Buzunov, V. Talko, L. Yanovych.

  18. ROLE OF SPIRITUALITY AS A WAY OF COPING FROM BURNOUT IN MEDICAL STUDENTS OF A TERTIARY CARE INSTITUTE IN INDIA

    OpenAIRE

    Sagar Shrikant; Deepika Abhainath

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND Medical students are exposed to various stressful conditions in their journey towards becoming a successful doctor leading to burnout. Adoption of faulty coping mechanisms increases the risk further. Spirituality as a way of coping can help to reduce burnout in these students. MATERIALS & METHODS We decided to conduct a study with aims to assess the prevalence of burnout in medical students, to study their socio-demographic profile and to understand the role of spiritualit...

  19. Knowledge and Attitude about Blood Donation Amongst Undergraduate Students of Pravara Institute of Medical Sciences Deemed University of Central India

    OpenAIRE

    Giri, Purushottam A; Phalke, Deepak B.

    2012-01-01

    Background: The major part of demand for blood in India is met through voluntary blood donations. Students consists a large and healthy group who are able to provide a large number of blood donation. However, there is a paucity of studies on knowledge and attitude among undergraduate students from medical and paramedical branches. Objectives: A present study was conducted to assess the knowledge and attitude about blood donation among undergraduate medical science university students. Materia...

  20. "A good career choice for women": female medical students' mentoring experiences: a multi-institutional qualitative study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levine, Rachel B; Mechaber, Hilit F; Reddy, Shalini T; Cayea, Danelle; Harrison, Rebecca A

    2013-04-01

    The career decisions, practice patterns, and approach to patient care of current female students, who make up close to 50% of medical school classes, will have a profound impact on the profession. This study explores the role gender plays in the mentoring experiences of female medical students. In 2011, the authors conducted focus groups with 48 third- and fourth-year female medical students at four U.S. medical schools. Using a template organizing style, they derived themes in an iterative process to explore female medical students' mentoring relationships and the impact of gender on those relationships. The authors identified four major themes: (1) Optimal mentoring relationships are highly relational. Students emphasized shared values, trust, and a personal connection in describing ideal mentoring relationships. (2) Relational mentoring is more important than gender concordance. Students identified a desire for access to female mentors but stated that when a mentor and mentee developed a personal connection, the gender of the mentor was less important. (3) Gender-based assumptions and stereotypes affect mentoring relationships. Students described gender-based assumptions and expectations for themselves and their mentors. (4) Gender-based power dynamics influence students' thinking about mentoring. Students stated that they were concerned about how their mentors might perceive their professional decisions because of their gender, which influenced what they disclosed to male mentors and mentors in positions of power. Gender appears to play a role in female medical students' expectations and experience with mentoring relationships and may influence their decision making around career planning.

  1. [Costs of medical care attributable to tobacco consumption at the Mexican Institute of Social Security (IMSS), Morelos].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reynales-Shigematsu, Luz Myriam; Juárez-Márquez, Sergio Arturo; Valdés-Salgado, Raydel

    2005-01-01

    To estimate the cost of medical care for the major diseases attributable to tobacco consumption at the IMSS, Morelos. A cost of illness (COI) analysis was carried out from the perspective of the health provider. An expert panel characterized medical care in primary and secondary care levels according to severity of disease. The smoking attributable fraction (SAF) by disease was used to derive costs attributable to tobacco consumption. The unitary cost was valuated in 2001 Mexican pesos (MP). The estimated annual average cost of medical care (diagnosis and first year of treatment) was 79,530 MP for acute myocardial infarction (AMI); 73,303 MP for chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD); and 102,215 MP for lung cancer (LC). The annual total cost of medical care for IMSS was 147,390 688 MP. The total annual cost of medical care attributable to tobacco consumption corresponds to dollars 124 million MP, which is equivalent to 7.3% of the annual budget of the Morelos Delegation. These results confirm the high medical costs associated with smoking. A repetition of this study at the national level is recommended in order to support decision-makers in strengthening public policies to control tobacco use in Mexico.

  2. 78 FR 66948 - National Institute on Drug Abuse; Amended Notice of Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-11-07

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health National Institute on Drug Abuse; Amended Notice of Meeting... Drug Abuse, NIH, Johns Hopkins Bayview Campus, Baltimore, MD, 21223 which was published in the Federal...

  3. WORK EXPERIENCE OF THE OPERA TIVE INFORMATION SUPPORT SERVICE FOR SCIENTIFIC RESEARCH A T THE MEDICAL RADIOLOGICAL RESEARCH CENTER NAMED AFTER A.F . TSYB – BRANCH OF THE FEDERAL STATE BUDGET INSTITUTION "NATIONAL MEDICAL RESEARCH RADIOLOGICAL CENTER” OF T

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. P. Savina

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract:The Operative Information Support Service for Scientific Research of the Medical Radiological Research Center named after A. F. Tsyb — Branch of the FSBI «National Medical Research Radiological Center” of the RF Health Ministry presented a report on providing off-budget support for scientific activities over the period from 1993 to 2014 using domestic and foreign information resources. The dynamics of employee activities in institutional sectors with aim to receive financial support for fundamental and applied scientific research on a competitive and non-competitive basis was given. The analysis of the obtained data indicated that a multi-channeling in off-budget funding was formed. It also showed to some extent a situation at the open market of grants in the field of medical radiology, radiobiology, and radiation epidemiology among leading investors in intellectual products.

  4. Modeling the economic impact of medication adherence in type 2 diabetes: a theoretical approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David S Cobden

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available David S Cobden1, Louis W Niessen2, Frans FH Rutten1, W Ken Redekop11Department of Health Policy and Management, Section of Health Economics – Medical Technology Assessment (HE-MTA, Erasmus MC, Erasmus University Rotterdam, The Netherlands; 2Department of International Health, Johns Hopkins University School of Public Health, Johns Hopkins Medical Institutions, Baltimore, MD, USAAims: While strong correlations exist between medication adherence and health economic outcomes in type 2 diabetes, current economic analyses do not adequately consider them. We propose a new approach to incorporate adherence in cost-effectiveness analysis.Methods: We describe a theoretical approach to incorporating the effect of adherence when estimating the long-term costs and effectiveness of an antidiabetic medication. This approach was applied in a Markov model which includes common diabetic health states. We compared two treatments using hypothetical patient cohorts: injectable insulin (IDM and oral (OAD medications. Two analyses were performed, one which ignored adherence (analysis 1 and one which incorporated it (analysis 2. Results from the two analyses were then compared to explore the extent to which adherence may impact incremental cost-effectiveness ratios.Results: In both analyses, IDM was more costly and more effective than OAD. When adherence was ignored, IDM generated an incremental cost-effectiveness of $12,097 per quality-adjusted life-year (QALY gained versus OAD. Incorporation of adherence resulted in a slightly higher ratio ($16,241/QALY. This increase was primarily due to better adherence with OAD than with IDM, and the higher direct medical costs for IDM.Conclusions: Incorporating medication adherence into economic analyses can meaningfully influence the estimated cost-effectiveness of type 2 diabetes treatments, and should therefore be ­considered in health care decision-making. Future work on the impact of adherence on health

  5. Medical student healthcare consulting groups: A novel way to train the next generation of physician-executives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsiang, Esther Y; Breithaupt, Andrew G; Su, Peiyi; Rogers, Andrew T; Milbar, Niv; Desai, Sanjay V

    2017-10-12

    Meeting the challenges of the evolving healthcare environment requires leadership of physicians well-trained in clinical medicine and healthcare management. However, many physicians lack training in business and leadership. While some residency programs have management tracks, training at the medical school level is currently lacking. We developed the Hopkins Health Management Advisory Group, an extracurricular program at Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine that exposes medical students to healthcare management and fosters development of leadership skills. Teams of students work directly with health system executives on 3-6 month-long projects using management consulting principles to address problems spanning health system domains, including strategy, operations, and quality improvement. Since the program's inception, 23 students have completed seven projects, with 13 additional students currently working on three more projects. Sponsors leading six out of seven completed projects have implemented recommendations. Qualitative survey respondents have found the program beneficial, with students frequently describing how the program has helped to develop professional skills and foster knowledge about healthcare management. These early assessments show positive impact for both students and the institution, and suggest that such programs can train students in management early and concurrently in their medication education by immersing them in team-based health system projects.

  6. Harvey Cushing and "birth hemorrhage": early pediatric neurosurgery at The Johns Hopkins Hospital.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mehta, Vivek A; Wijesekera, Olindi; Pendleton, Courtney; Quiñones-Hinojosa, Alfredo; Jallo, George I; Ahn, Edward S

    2011-12-01

    Of Harvey Cushing's many contributions to neurosurgery, one of the least documented is his early surgical intervention in children and his pioneering efforts to establish pediatric neurosurgery as a subspecialty. Between 1896 and 1912 Cushing conducted nearly 200 operations in children at The Johns Hopkins Hospital. A review of his records suggests that the advances he made in neurosurgery were significantly influenced by his experience with children. In this historical article, the authors describe Cushing's treatment of 6 children, in all of whom Cushing established a diagnosis of "birth hemorrhage." By reviewing Cushing's operative indications, techniques, and outcomes, the authors aim to understand the philosophy of his pediatric neurosurgical management and how this informed his development of neurosurgery as a new specialty.

  7. Recruitment of Young Medical Apprentices (RYOMA) project: a comprehensive surgical education program at a local academic institute in Japan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nanashima, Atsushi; Hidaka, Shigekazu; Nonaka, Takashi; Yamasaki, Naoya; Tsuchiya, Tomoshi; Matsumoto, Keitaro; Miyazaki, Takuro; Hatachi, Go; Sumida, Yorihisa; Sawai, Terumitsu; Yasutake, Toru; Nagayasu, Takeshi

    2014-01-01

    The number of young surgeons in Japan has significantly decreased in recent years, which may lead to future problems in the medical field. Therefore, comprehensive training programs for young surgeons are needed. Retrospective study We developed a specific education program called the "Recruitment of Young Medical Apprentices" (RYOMA) project. We performed this project between January 2008 and August 2013 on fourth- to sixth-year medical students and internship doctors. The RYOMA project included step-by-step surgical education programs on open and scopic procedures as dry, wet, and animal laboratory training. Our goal was to increase the number of young and specialist surgeons. Based on an interview questionnaire answered by 90 medical students, most young students were interested in surgical training and several chose to become surgeons in the future. The most positive opinions regarding the field of surgery were the impressive results achieved with surgery, whereas negative opinions included the difficulty of the surgical skill, physical concerns related to difficult work environments, and the severity of surgical procedures. The present program has begun to resolve negative opinions through adequate training or simulations. Of the 19 medical students and internship doctors who attended the RYOMA project in 2008, 17 trainees (90%) were satisfied with this special surgical program and 16 (88%) showed interest in becoming surgeons. The number of participants considering the field of surgery increased between 2008 and 2013. Of 23 participants, 19 (83%) had a positive opinion of the program after the training. Gaining experience in surgical training from an early stage in medical school and step-by-step authorized education by teaching staff are important for recruiting students and increasing the number of young surgeons. Copyright © 2014 Association of Program Directors in Surgery. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. [Family psychotherapy in medical institutions of the Instituto del Servicio de Seguridad Social de los Trabajadores del Estado].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Serrano, H

    1977-01-01

    The evolution of family therapy in Mexico is briefly reviewed. It is considered that the reach of this method is limited in institutions due to the lack of qualified psychotherapists with the different orientations of this speciality. The illness, as a sign of family imbalance within the humanistic concept, acquires an even if the treatment is given to the marital couple, the adolescent or the child. Family therapy helps in marital disagreements, behavior problems, anorexia, reactive depression, drug addictions, alcoholism and many other problems. The ISSSTE population has a stable location and is more or less homogeneous; in it family therapy is stimulating and possible; even though the institution imposes certain limitations to family therapy, the enthusiasm for this therapeutic method prevails.

  9. [Optimization of educational activity of departments of educational creativity in the Extension Course Institute for Medical Practitioners MUNKTs n. a. P.V.Mandryka].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balakhovskiĭ, A A; Koshelev, V P; Anufriev, A A; Vlasenko, T N

    2013-09-01

    Educational creativity is the key component of educational activity. The article is devoted to logical structure of educational creativity, difficulties and problems of formation and development of educational creativity in lecturers participating in educative process with participants of the Extension Course Institute for Medical Practitioners MUNKTs n. a. P.V. Mandryka. Heuristic activity and methods that are a huge part of educational creativity are emphasized. Specific features of heuristic activity are shown; classification of heuristic methods is presented. For the first time authors gave characteristic of qualitative levels of educational creativity.

  10. Impact of Institutional - and Individual - Level Discrimination on Medical Care & Quality of Life among Breast Cancer Survivors

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-07-01

    treatment? For example, did you use Chinese or Eastern medicine , vitamins or herbal supplements, massage, yoga, acupuncture , etc? (Circle one) 1. Yes 2...based on the global measure (PROMIS summary scores = 29.1 vs . 23.6, respectively). Lifetime discrimination did not appear to be associated with QOL...PROMIS summary scores = 23.0 vs . 24.8, respectively). To assess institutional-level discrimination, we included measurements for hospital mistrust and

  11. Risk of internet addiction among undergraduate medical, nursing, and lab technology students of a health institution from Delhi, India

    OpenAIRE

    Anika Sulania; Sandeep Sachdeva; Nidhi Dwivedi

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To assess prevalence, usage pattern, and risk of internet addiction (IA) among undergraduate students of a health institution from Delhi. Materials and Methods: A cross-sectional descriptive study was carried out during March-April 2015 using 20-item Young′s IA test, a Likert scale-based interview schedule with scores ranging from 0 to 100 points with a higher score indicating greater internet dependency. Background variables included sociodemographic details, general health practi...

  12. Henri de Toulouse-Lautrec Medical Examination, Rue des Moulins (1894): North wall fresco, lower panel 5.398 m × 13.716 m. Detroit Institute of Arts, Detroit, USA

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Mike Mckiernan

    2009-01-01

    ... . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Henri de Toulouse-LautrecMedical Examination, Rue des Moulins (1894) North wall fresco, lower panel 5.398 m 3 13.716 m. Detroit Institute of Arts, Detroit, USA...

  13. Stand characteristics and downed woody debris accumulations associated with a mountain pine beetle (Dendroctonus ponderosae Hopkins) outbreak in Colorado

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jennifer G. Klutsch; Jose F. Negron; Sheryl L. Costello; Charles C. Rhoades; Daniel R. West; John Popp; Rick Caissie

    2009-01-01

    Lodgepole pine (Pinus contorta Dougl. ex Loud.)-dominated ecosystems in north-central Colorado are undergoing rapid and drastic changes associated with overstory tree mortality from a currentmountain pine beetle (Dendroctonus ponderosae Hopkins) outbreak. To characterize stand characteristics and downed woody debris loads during...

  14. Flight periodicity of the Douglas-fir beetle, Dendroctonus pseudotsugae Hopkins (Coleoptera: Curculionidae: Scolytinae) in Colorado, U.S.A

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jose F. Negron; Willis C. Schaupp; Lee Pederson

    2011-01-01

    There are about 500 species of bark beetles (Coleoptera: Curculionidae: Scolytinae) in the United States (Wood 1982). A number of them are important disturbance agents in forested ecosystems, occasionally creating large tracts of dead trees. One eruptive species is the Douglas-fir beetle, Dendroctonus pseudotsugae Hopkins, which utilizes Douglas-fir, Pseudotsuga...

  15. Phenotype and natural history in 101 individuals with Pitt-Hopkins syndrome through an internet questionnaire system

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Winter, Channa F.; Baas, Melanie; Bijlsma, Emilia K.; van Heukelingen, John; Routledge, Sue; Hennekam, Raoul C. M.

    2016-01-01

    Pitt-Hopkins syndrome (PTHS; MIM# 610954) is a genetically determined entity mainly caused by mutations in TransCription Factor 4 (TCF4). We have developed a new way to collect information on (ultra-)rare disorders through a web-based database which we call 'waihonapedia' (waihona [meaning treasure

  16. A Study of the Distribution of Sample Coefficient Alpha with the Hopkins Symptom Checklist: Bootstrap versus Asymptotics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuan, Ke-Hai; Guarnaccia, Charles A.; Hayslip, Bert, Jr.

    2003-01-01

    Studied the sample coefficient alpha for each of the five subscales of the Hopkins Symptom Checklist (HSL; L. Derogaitis and others, 1974) in a sample of 419 adults. Findings show that the normal-theory-based distribution has a systematic bias in describing the behavior of the sample coefficient alpha. (SLD)

  17. On the shoulders of giants: Harvey Cushing's experience with acromegaly and gigantism at the Johns Hopkins Hospital, 1896-1912.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pendleton, C.; Adams, H.; Salvatori, R.; Wand, G.; Quinones-Hinojosa, A.

    2011-01-01

    A review of Dr. Cushing's surgical cases at Johns Hopkins Hospital revealed new information about his early operative experience with acromegaly. Although in 1912 Cushing published selective case studies regarding this work, a review of all his operations for acromegaly during his early years has

  18. REQUIREMENTS FOR STORAGE AND TRANSPORT OF BIOTECHNOLOGICAL MEDICAL PRODUCTS IN ACCORDANCE WITH THE REGULATORY FRAMEWORK OF MINISTRY OF PUBLIC HEALTH OF UKRAINE AND DETECTION OF VIOLATIONS IN THE MEDICAL AND PHARMACEUTICAL INSTITUTIONS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shukaeva O.

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. The rapid development of the pharmaceutical industry and the expansion of the range of biotech drugs require special conditions to ensure the quality, storage and transport through out the entire chain: manufacturer - distributor - pharmacy - hospital - the patient.We analyzed the current legislative frame work of Ministry of Public Health of Ukraine and conducted a study to identify and analyze of typical violations in the medical and pharmaceutical institutions. The aim of the investigation was to investigate and analyze inspection acts under storage and transport of biological medical products and identify major violations during the performance requirements for storage and transportation of drugs, level of awareness about medical products which are requiring special storage requirement. Methods: systemic, logistical, structural, marketing, regulatory. Results & discussion. According to the data presented in the report «Assessing biosimilar uptake and competition in European markets» of «IMS Health», sales of medical products with biological nature - biological medicinal products and biosymilyars is about 27% of total sales of drugs in the EU. This segment of the pharmaceutical market is characterized by faster growth compared to the pharmaceutical marketas a whole. Thus, in 2012-2013 years sales of biological medical products in the EU countries increased by 5.5% compared to 1.5% increase in total sales of drugs. It is important that in Europe, according to the 2013 preparations, the market share in value terms, with eight to prepare biological products, the term of patent protection that are either already expired or will expireby 2020, and therefore they can be competitors with biosymilars. In creasing the number of medications on the market requires a careful approach of storing and preserving the quality of distribution during throughout the life of the medical products in the chain: manufacturer - distributor

  19. [Business, politics, science, and visa versa: an institutional history of Brazilian medical journalism between 1827 and 1843].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferreira, Luiz Otávio

    2004-01-01

    This analysis of Brazil's first medical newspapers - Propagador das Ciências Médicas (1827-28); Semanário de Saúde Pública (1831-33); Diário de Saúde (1835-36); Revista Médica Fluminense (1835-41); Revista Médica Brasileira (1841-43) - shows how Rio de Janeiro's socio-cultural context made it possible for this type of publication to emerge within the city's dynamic, troubled environment of the 1820s and 30s. I argue that the distinguishing feature of Brazil's early medical journalism was a symbiosis between business (local publishing houses' commercial interests), politics (struggles for political hegemony during the consolidation of the Imperial State), and science (the movement to institutionalize medicine and affirm it as a science).

  20. [The medical, social and institutional challenges resulting from poliomyelitis: comprehensive rehabilitation in Argentina in the mid-twentieth century].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alvarez, Adriana

    2015-01-01

    Poliomyelitis on an epidemic scale gave rise to several challenges, one of which was the rehabilitation from the after-effects on many of the people who suffered from the disease. Paralysis and the ways it transformed the concept of physical rehabilitation (where the objective was only to restore the mobility of the affected muscles) and comprehensive rehabilitation that included social, educational and professional aspects in Argentina in the mid-twentieth century are the themes addressed in this article. It uses the methodology of institutional history that interacts in an ongoing manner with the history of health and disease.

  1. Central Nervous System Functional Condition In Interns With Different Progress Levels At Military Medical Institution Of Higher Education

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N.A. Bochkarjova

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available The characteristics of CNS functional condition and cognitive functions of interns with different progress levels at Military Medical School have been analyzed. According to the research results, the rate of excitement, noiseroof feature, functional mobility of nervous processes, development of verbal and logical thinking, verbal and operative memory as well as distribution and shifting of attention are the most important suppositions for successful military-professional training.

  2. ROLE OF SPIRITUALITY AS A WAY OF COPING FROM BURNOUT IN MEDICAL STUDENTS OF A TERTIARY CARE INSTITUTE IN INDIA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sagar Shrikant

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND Medical students are exposed to various stressful conditions in their journey towards becoming a successful doctor leading to burnout. Adoption of faulty coping mechanisms increases the risk further. Spirituality as a way of coping can help to reduce burnout in these students. MATERIALS & METHODS We decided to conduct a study with aims to assess the prevalence of burnout in medical students, to study their socio-demographic profile and to understand the role of spirituality as a way of coping from burnout. Ethics Committee approval was obtained. It was a cross-sectional study wherein random 100 medical students studying in MBBS were selected. A semi-structured questionnaire to obtain details about socio- demographic profile, Burnout Measure-Short Version Scale and Spiritual attitude inventory were administered. RESULTS The present study shows prevalence of burnout as 64%. According to socio-demographic profile, there was no association of burnout with age. Burnout was significantly more in females (n=48; 75%, hostellers (n=51; 79.69% and students studying in final year (n=22; 34.37% or in internship (n=28; 43.75%. There was no significant difference in burnout and non-burnout Group with respect to rural or urban background and socioeconomic class. On comparing spirituality, it was found that students without burnout were more spiritual when compared to students with burnout, also severity of burnout was negatively correlated with spirituality in all four domains i.e religious spiritual practice, negative religious coping, sense of purpose/connection and sense of hope/control. Thus spirituality as a way of coping acts as a buffer and prevents from burnout.

  3. [Psychosocial care in institutional neonatology in Germany: a quantitative-empirical inventory from the medical professionals' perspective].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kißgen, R; Carlitscheck, J; Rapp, C; Franke, S

    2012-12-01

    The available studies concerning the long-term development of preterm infants emphasise the protective significance of the parents. As a consequence, concomitant psychosocial support for parents during the neonatal period aiming at moderating the adverse effects of the critical incident "premature birth" is deemed to be imperative. The aim of this study is to assess the supply of psychosocial services in neonatal care units as viewed by medical professionals in Germany. A representative questionnaire-based survey in German neonatal care units was undertaken. A descriptive evaluation was made of frequency distributions, comparison of means between former West German and former East German states and levels of neonatal care (levels I-III). The time-budget available for parent consultation is considered insufficient by approximately one third (31.9%) of the medical personnel, 22.2% of the interviewees felt this task to be excessively demanding. As a standard, the option for cooperation with a qualified psychosocial consultant is available in 67.0% of the neonatal care units. 95.7% of the medical personnel consider this cooperation a desirable support; 97.9% consider interdisciplinary cooperation in neonatology a desirable option in general. Additional time for parent consultation is desirable and necessary. Psychosocial services should be extended and provided for in neonatal care units and appropriate financial and personnel resources should be made available. In many neonatal care units there is an awareness for the benefits of an appreciative, family-centred atmosphere as well as interdisciplinary cooperation. This is a favourable starting point for research efforts concerning further inquiries into implementation standards of family-centred, concomitant consultation. © Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  4. Report of the CIRRPC Executive Committee regarding EPA NESHAP regulations on radionuclides for medical research institutions and radiopharmaceutical manufacturers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1990-06-01

    There appears to be no compelling public health protection reason for EPA`s promulgation of NESHAP regulations to control air emissions of radioactive materials from NRC-licensed facilities engaged in activities associated with the practice and development of nuclear medicine. The NRC`s existing regulations provide the necessary controls for protection and EPA`s regulations would only add burdensome reporting requirements at substantial cost to medical treatment and diagnosis. Availability of nuclear medicine practice could be impacted and advancements through research delayed.

  5. Factors associated with the career choices of hematology and medical oncology fellows trained at academic institutions in the United States.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horn, Leora; Koehler, Elizabeth; Gilbert, Jill; Johnson, David H

    2011-10-10

    Factors that influence hematology-oncology fellows' choice of academic medicine as a career are not well defined. We undertook a survey of hematology-oncology fellows training at cancer centers designated by the National Cancer Institute (NCI) and the National Comprehensive Cancer Network (NCCN) to understand the factors fellows consider when making career decisions. Program directors at all NCI and NCCN cancer centers were invited to participate in the study. For the purpose of analysis, fellows were grouped into three groups on the basis of interest in an academic career. Demographic data were tested with the Kruskal-Wallis test and χ² test, and nondemographic data were tested by using the multiscale bootstrap method. Twenty-eight of 56 eligible fellowship programs participated, and 236 fellows at participating institutions responded (62% response rate). Approximately 60% of fellows graduating from academic programs in the last 5 years chose academic career paths. Forty-nine percent of current fellows ranked an academic career as extremely important. Fellows choosing an academic career were more likely to have presented and published their research. Additional factors associated with choosing an academic career included factors related to mentorship, intellect, and practice type. Fellows selecting nonacademic careers prioritized lifestyle in their career decision. Recruitment into academic medicine is essential for continued progress in the field. Our data suggest that fewer than half the current fellows training at academic centers believe a career in academic medicine is important. Efforts to improve retention in academics should include focusing on mentorship, research, and career development during fellowship training and improving the image of academic physicians.

  6. An online spaced-education game to teach and assess medical students: a multi-institutional prospective trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kerfoot, B Price; Baker, Harley; Pangaro, Louis; Agarwal, Kathryn; Taffet, George; Mechaber, Alex J; Armstrong, Elizabeth G

    2012-10-01

    To investigate whether a spaced-education (SE) game can be an effective means of teaching core content to medical students and a reliable and valid method of assessing their knowledge. This nine-month trial (2008-2009) enrolled students from three U.S. medical schools. The SE game consisted of 100 validated multiple-choice questions-explanations in preclinical/clinical domains. Students were e-mailed two questions daily. Adaptive game mechanics re-sent questions in three or six weeks if answered, respectively, incorrectly or correctly. Questions expired if not answered on time (appointment dynamic). Students retired questions by answering each correctly twice consecutively (progression dynamic). Posting of relative performance fostered competition. Main outcome measures were baseline and completion scores. Seven-hundred thirty-one students enrolled. Median baseline score was 53% (interquartile range [IQR] 16) and varied significantly by year (Pgames. An SE game is an effective and well-accepted means of teaching core content and a reliable and valid method to assess student knowledge. SE games may be valuable tools to identify and remediate students who could benefit from additional educational support.

  7. Clinical presentations as predictors of prolonged mechanical ventilation in Guillain-Barré syndrome in an institution with limited medical resources.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toamad, Umarudee; Kongkamol, Chanon; Setthawatcharawanich, Suwanna; Limapichat, Kitti; Phabphal, Kanitpong; Sathirapanya, Pornchai

    2015-10-01

    Severe Guillain-Barré syndrome (GBS) causes ventilatory insufficiency and the need for prolonged artificial ventilation. Under circumstances where medical care for patients with severe GBS is required in a resource-limited institution, identifying initial clinical presentations in GBS patients that can predict respiratory insufficiency and the need for prolonged mechanical ventilation (> 15 days) may be helpful for advanced care planning. The medical records of patients diagnosed with GBS in a tertiary care and medical teaching hospital from January 2001 to December 2010 were retrospectively reviewed. The demographic data and clinical presentations of the patients were summarised using descriptive statistics. Clinical predictors of respiratory insufficiency and the need for prolonged mechanical ventilation (> 15 days) were identified using univariate logistic regression analysis. A total of 55 patients with GBS were included in this study. Mechanical ventilation was needed in 28 (50.9%) patients. Significant clinical predictors for respiratory insufficiency were bulbar muscle weakness (odds ratio [OR] 5.08, 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.31-21.60, p = 0.007) and time to peak limb weakness ≤ 5 days (OR 0.75, 95% CI 0.62-0.91, p mechanical ventilation (> 15 days). Bulbar weakness and time to peak limb weakness ≤ 5 days were able to predict respiratory insufficiency and the need for prolonged mechanical ventilation in patients with GBS.

  8. Family history record and hereditary cancer risk perception according to National Cancer Institute criteria in a Spanish medical oncology service: a retrospective study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Márquez-Rodas, Iván; López-Trabada, Daniel; Rupérez Blanco, Ana Belén; Custodio Cabello, Sara; Peligros Gómez, María Isabel; Orera Clemente, María; Calvo, Felipe A; Martín, Miguel

    2012-01-01

    Identification of patients at risk of hereditary cancer is an essential component of oncology practice, since it enables clinicians to offer early detection and prevention programs. However, the large number of hereditary syndromes makes it difficult to take them all into account in daily practice. Consequently, the National Cancer Institute (NCI) has suggested a series of criteria to guide initial suspicion. It was the aim of this study to assess the perception of the risk of hereditary cancer according to the NCI criteria in our medical oncology service. We retrospectively analyzed the recordings of the family history in new cancer patients seen in our medical oncology service from January to November 2009, only 1 year before the implementation of our multidisciplinary hereditary cancer program. The family history was recorded in only 175/621 (28%) patients. A total of 119 (19%) patients met 1 or more NCI criteria (1 criterion, n = 91; 2 criteria, n = 23; 3 criteria, n = 4; and 4 criteria, n = 1), and only 14 (11.4%) patients were referred to genetic counseling. This study shows that few clinicians record the family history. The perception of the risk of hereditary cancer is low according to the NCI criteria in our medical oncology service. These findings can be explained by the lack of a multidisciplinary hereditary cancer program when the study was performed. Copyright © 2012 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  9. The knowledge and attitude of non-ophthalmic medical doctors towards glaucoma in two tertiary institutions in south eastern Nigeria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Achigbu, E O; Chuka-Okosa, C M

    2014-06-01

    This study is aimed at determining how much knowledge of glaucoma the non-ophthalmic medical doctors still possess and their personal attitudes toward glaucoma. Self- administered questionnaires were randomly distributed to the non-ophthalmic medical doctors in two specialist hospitals in south eastern Nigeria: The data obtained were the age, sex, professional and number of years of practice of the participants, their knowledge of the symptoms/ aetiology/risk factors, examination/investigation, treatment of glaucoma as well as their personal attitude towards glaucoma. There were two hundred respondents; one hundred and forty two males and fifty eight females (M:F=2.4:1); comprising 82.5% Resident doctors; 51% of whom had been in practice for less than 5 years.All the doctors had heard of glaucoma; approximately seventy two per cent (72.5%) had a good knowledge of glaucoma symptoms and 52.0% of these had been in practice for only 5 years or less. Similarly, of the 83% of the doctors who correctly answered the questions on the aetiology of glaucoma, majority (84.3%) had been in practice for 5 years or less. Only 24.5% and 38.5% respectively of the doctors had a good knowledge of the basic examination and treatment required for the management of glaucoma.There was no statistically significant relationship between most variables tested. Only the relationship between the knowledge of the symptoms of glaucoma and the duration of practice of the doctors was statistically significant (pdoctors have a basic knowledge of glaucoma and how to investigate it but showed a poor knowledge of examination and treatment modalities. They also acknowledged the importance of regular eye checks but only very few had had their eyes examined.

  10. Reliability of Multiple Mini-Interviews and traditional interviews within and between institutions: a study of five California medical schools

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anthony Jerant

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Many medical schools use admissions Multiple Mini-Interviews (MMIs rather than traditional interviews (TIs, partly because MMIs are thought to be more reliable. Yet prior studies examined single-school samples of candidates completing either an MMI or TI (not both. Using data from five California public medical schools, the authors examined the within- and between-school reliabilities of TIs and MMIs. Methods The analyses included applicants interviewing at ≥1 of the five schools during 2011–2013. Three schools employed TIs (TI1, TI2, TI3 and two employed MMIs (MMI1, MMI2. Mixed linear models accounting for nesting of observations within applicants examined standardized TI and MMI scores (mean = 0, SD = 1, adjusting for applicant socio-demographics, academic metrics, year, number of interviews, and interview date. Results A total of 4993 individuals (completing 7516 interviews [TI = 4137, MMI = 3379] interviewed at ≥1 school; 428 (14.5% interviewed at both MMI schools and 687 (20.2% at more than one TI school. Within schools, inter-interviewer consistency was generally qualitatively lower for TI1, TI2, and TI3 (Pearson’s r 0.07, 0.13, and 0.29, and Cronbach’s α, 0.40, 0.44, and 0.61, respectively than for MMI1 and MMI 2 (Cronbach’s α 0.68 and 0.60, respectively. Between schools, the adjusted intraclass correlation coefficient was 0.27 (95% CI 0.20–0.35 for TIs and 0.47 (95% CI 0.41–0.54 for MMIs. Conclusions Within and between-school reliability was qualitatively higher for MMIs than for TIs. Nonetheless, TI reliabilities were higher than anticipated from prior literature, suggesting TIs may not need to be abandoned on reliability grounds if other factors favor their use.

  11. Reliability of Multiple Mini-Interviews and traditional interviews within and between institutions: a study of five California medical schools.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jerant, Anthony; Henderson, Mark C; Griffin, Erin; Rainwater, Julie A; Hall, Theodore R; Kelly, Carolyn J; Peterson, Ellena M; Wofsy, David; Franks, Peter

    2017-11-06

    Many medical schools use admissions Multiple Mini-Interviews (MMIs) rather than traditional interviews (TIs), partly because MMIs are thought to be more reliable. Yet prior studies examined single-school samples of candidates completing either an MMI or TI (not both). Using data from five California public medical schools, the authors examined the within- and between-school reliabilities of TIs and MMIs. The analyses included applicants interviewing at ≥1 of the five schools during 2011-2013. Three schools employed TIs (TI1, TI2, TI3) and two employed MMIs (MMI1, MMI2). Mixed linear models accounting for nesting of observations within applicants examined standardized TI and MMI scores (mean = 0, SD = 1), adjusting for applicant socio-demographics, academic metrics, year, number of interviews, and interview date. A total of 4993 individuals (completing 7516 interviews [TI = 4137, MMI = 3379]) interviewed at ≥1 school; 428 (14.5%) interviewed at both MMI schools and 687 (20.2%) at more than one TI school. Within schools, inter-interviewer consistency was generally qualitatively lower for TI1, TI2, and TI3 (Pearson's r 0.07, 0.13, and 0.29, and Cronbach's α, 0.40, 0.44, and 0.61, respectively) than for MMI1 and MMI 2 (Cronbach's α 0.68 and 0.60, respectively). Between schools, the adjusted intraclass correlation coefficient was 0.27 (95% CI 0.20-0.35) for TIs and 0.47 (95% CI 0.41-0.54) for MMIs. Within and between-school reliability was qualitatively higher for MMIs than for TIs. Nonetheless, TI reliabilities were higher than anticipated from prior literature, suggesting TIs may not need to be abandoned on reliability grounds if other factors favor their use.

  12. Goal-oriented incentive payment in CUDAM institution and variation in medical visit indicators in children under one and pregnant women

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcelo Morales

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available ntroduction: The establishment of National Integrated Health System in Uruguay from 2007 led to changes in the financing of the Collective Health Care Institutions (IAMC. They charge the National Health Fund (FONASA for their partners from social security (SS a health fee consists of: a A risk-adjusted capita (94%b A component for compliance with performance (6%, depending on the fulfillment of three goals of care. Goal 1 is a component of the child under 1 year and a component of the pregnant woman. For both components were established institutional baseline (July 2007-September 2008 in the control patients in both age groups. This motif COMPLIANCE quarterly reports with a fee of $48/user FONASA/month for average baseline compliment. Las for children and pregnant women were monitored for IAMC CUDAM 64% and 59% respectively.This institution has 42,000 users, 95% derived from SS, featuring 45 births, 585 children <1 year and 405 pregnant women tested monthly.Objectives: Evaluate two years (July-September 2010:a The mean percentages of compliance for children and pregnant CUDAM with medical controlb Relationship between income through the FONASA insitucional for goal 1 and children and pregnant women in medical management during the quarter.Methods: a retrospective study of children and pregnant women with medical control CUDAM. In turn, each target has 6 indicators (N: children, F: females. Child: N1 and N2: derivation and acquisition of the newborn, N3: controls as a guideline, N4: current vaccination, N5: ultrasound hip and pregnant, N6: accreditation in good feeding practices for infants and young children and pregnant women. Pregnant woman: M1 controls as a guideline, M2: leaf perinatal information system, M3: HIV and VDRL performed, M4: uptake in 1 st quarter, M5 and M6: dental checkup during pregnancy and postpartum.Results: The mean percentages of compliance for children and pregnant women increased to 92% (164 additional children and 88

  13. The Johns Hopkins Hunterian Laboratory Philosophy: Mentoring Students in a Scientific Neurosurgical Research Laboratory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tyler, Betty M; Liu, Ann; Sankey, Eric W; Mangraviti, Antonella; Barone, Michael A; Brem, Henry

    2016-06-01

    After over 50 years of scientific contribution under the leadership of Harvey Cushing and later Walter Dandy, the Johns Hopkins Hunterian Laboratory entered a period of dormancy between the 1960s and early 1980s. In 1984, Henry Brem reinstituted the Hunterian Neurosurgical Laboratory, with a new focus on localized delivery of therapies for brain tumors, leading to several discoveries such as new antiangiogenic agents and Gliadel chemotherapy wafers for the treatment of malignant gliomas. Since that time, it has been the training ground for 310 trainees who have dedicated their time to scientific exploration in the lab, resulting in numerous discoveries in the area of neurosurgical research. The Hunterian Neurosurgical Laboratory has been a unique example of successful mentoring in a translational research environment. The laboratory's philosophy emphasizes mentorship, independence, self-directed learning, creativity, and people-centered collaboration, while maintaining productivity with a focus on improving clinical outcomes. This focus has been served by the diverse backgrounds of its trainees, both in regard to educational status as well as culturally. Through this philosophy and strong legacy of scientific contribution, the Hunterian Laboratory has maintained a positive and productive research environment that supports highly motivated students and trainees. In this article, the authors discuss the laboratory's training philosophy, linked to the principles of adult learning (andragogy), as well as the successes and the limitations of including a wide educational range of students in a neurosurgical translational laboratory and the phenomenon of combining clinical expertise with rigorous scientific training.

  14. Energy Programs at the Johns Hopkins University Applied Physics Laboratory, Quarterly Report, April-June 1980

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    1980-06-01

    The Johns Hopkins University Applied Physics Laboratory, under contracts with several agencies of the federal government and an agency of the State of Maryland, is engaged in developing energy resources, utilization concepts, and monitoring and storage methods. This Quarterly Report summarizes the work on the various tasks as of 30 June 1980. The Energy Quarterly Report is divided into three sections. The first, Geothermal Energy Development Planning and Technical Assistance, supported by the Department of Energy/Division of Geothermal Energy (DOE/DGE), contains reports on the progress of geothermal-related tasks on which effort was concentrated during the quarter. The second section, Operational Research, Hydroelectric Power Development, supported by the Department of Energy/Resource Applications (DOE/RA), contains reports on small-scale hydroelectric investigations in the southeastern states. The third section, Energy Conversion and Storage Techniques, contains three articles. The first is on data analysis of OTEC core unit condenser tests, and is supported by the Department of Energy/Division of Central Solar Technology (DOE/CST). The second is on the current status of the Community Annual Storage Energy System at the U.S. Naval Air Station, Norfolk, Va., and is supported by the Department of Energy and the Department of Defense, Naval Facilities Engineering Command/Atlantic Division. The third is on utilization of landfill methane and is supported by Argonne National Laboratory.

  15. Pitt-Hopkins syndrome: Mental retardation, psychomotor and developmental delays with facial dysmorphism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Avina Fierro, Jorge Arturo; Avina, Daniel Alejandro Hernández

    2014-01-01

    The Pitt-Hopkins syndrome is a very rare and severe genetic disease characterized by mental retardation, psychomotor and developmental delays with facial dysmorphism. It was first described in 1978 in patients with mental retardation and crisis of intermittent hyperventilation. The genetic cause is haploinsufficiency of the TCF4 (transcription factor 4) gene that affects the neurodevelopment in both sexes; the majority of patients have spontaneous molecular defects by point mutations or deletions in chromosome 18 at the region 18q21. The syndrome is characterized by neurological abnormalities that affect the motor coordination and balance, in patients with mental and developmental delays. The phenotype includes a peculiar face by specific craniofacial anomalies: prominent square forehead, deep-set eyes with ocular hypertelorism; prominent large nose beaked and broad flat nasal bridge; mouth wide and large, thick fleshy lips, tented bow-shaped upper lip and everted lower lip; cup-shaped ears with dysplastic broad overfolded helix. We review the literature and the photographs of 44 published patients from 2007 to 2012, to resume the principal features of craniofacial anomalies, attempting to delineate the syndrome phenotype and score the specific dysmorphism than help to achieve the early clinical diagnosis. PMID:27625870

  16. Hashimoto's Thyroiditis: Celebrating the Centennial Through the Lens of the Johns Hopkins Hospital Surgical Pathology Records

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Remigis, Alessandra; Chuang, Kelly; Dembele, Marieme; Iwama, Akiko; Iwama, Shintaro

    2013-01-01

    Hashimoto's thyroiditis is now considered the most prevalent autoimmune disease, as well as the most common endocrine disorder. It was initially described in 1912, but only rarely reported until the early 1950s. To celebrate this centennial, we reviewed the surgical pathology archives of the Johns Hopkins hospital for cases of Hashimoto's thyroiditis, spanning the period from May 1889 to October 2012. Approximately 15,000 thyroidectomies were performed at this hospital over 124 years. The first surgical case was reported in 1942, 30 years after the original description. Then, 867 cases of Hashimoto's thyroiditis were seen from 1942 to 2012, representing 6% of all thyroidectomies. Hashimoto's thyroiditis was the sole pathological finding in 462 cases; it accompanied other thyroid pathologies in the remaining 405 cases. The most commonly associated pathology was papillary thyroid cancer, an association that increased significantly during the last two decades. The most common indication for thyroidectomy was a thyroid nodule that was cytologically suspicious for malignancy. Hashimoto's thyroiditis remains a widespread, intriguing, and multifaceted disease of unknown etiology one century after its description. Advances in the understanding of its pathogenesis and preoperative diagnosis will improve recognition and treatment of this disorder, and may one day lead to its prevention. PMID:23151083

  17. The starlight night the sky in the writings of Shakespeare, Tennyson, and Hopkins

    CERN Document Server

    Levy, David H

    2016-01-01

    In this updated second edition renowned amateur comet-searcher David H. Levy expands on his work about the intricate relationship between the night sky and the works of English Literature. This revised and expanded text includes new sections on Alfred Lord Tennyson and Gerald Manley Hopkins (both amateur astronomers), extending the time period analyzed in the first edition from early modern literature to encompass the Victorian age. Although the sky enters into much of literature through the ages, British authors offer an especially fertile connection to the heavens, and Levy links the works of seminal authors from Shakespeare on to specific celestial events and scientific advances.  From the impact of comets and supernovae to eclipses, Levy’s ultimate goal in this book is to inspire his readers to do the same thing as their ancestors did so long ago—look up and appreciate the stars. His insights in this revised book spread farther and wider than ever before in this learned and enchanting tour of the ski...

  18. Background and applications of astrodynamics for space missions of the johns hopkins applied physics laboratory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dunham, David W; Farquhar, Robert W

    2004-05-01

    This paper describes astrodynamic techniques applied to develop special orbital designs for past and future space missions of the Applied Physics Laboratory (APL) of Johns Hopkins University, and background about those techniques. The paper does not describe the long history of low Earth-orbiting missions at APL, but rather concentrates on the astrodynamically more interesting high-altitude and interplanetary missions that APL has undertaken in recent years. The authors developed many of their techniques in preparation for, and during, the Third International Sun-Earth Explorer (ISEE-3) halo orbit mission while they worked for the Goddard Space Flight Center (GSFC) of NASA during the 1970s and 1980s. Later missions owed much to the ground breaking work of the trajectory designs for ISEE-3 (later known as the International Cometary Explorer, or ICE). This experience, and other new ideas, were applied to the APL near Earth asteroid rendezvous (NEAR) and comet nucleus tour (CONTOUR) discovery missions, as well as to APL's future MESSENGER, STEREO, and New Horizons missions. These will be described in the paper.

  19. Spectroscopy of a Balmer-dominated filament in the Cygnus Loop with the Hopkins Ultraviolet Telescope

    Science.gov (United States)

    Long, Knox S.; Blair, William P.; Vancura, Olaf; Bowers, Charles W.; Davidsen, Arthur F.; Raymond, John C.

    1992-01-01

    A fair UV spectrum of a nonradiative filament in the Cygnus Loop covering the wavelength range 830-1860 A at 3.5-A resolution was obtained using the Hopkins Ultraviolet Telescope (HUT) on the Astro-1 space shuttle mission. Nonradiative shock models which include a more sophisticated treatment of Lyman line transfer are calculated. It is found that the HUT spectrum can be explained in terms of a shock with velocity 175-185 km/s propagating into a low-density medium. This shock velocity can be reconciled with the 135-km/s width of the broad component of H-alpha in this filament if equilibration of the postshock electron and ion temperatures proceeds much more rapidly than Coulomb equilibration time scales. The time required for a 180-km/s shock to develop a partial recombination zone is short, about 200 yr if n is approximately equal to 2/cu cm. This suggests that the shock is decelerating as it encounters denser material. The current analysis patently favors rapid equilibration of electrons and ions behind the shock.

  20. Energy Programs at the Johns Hopkins University Applied Physics Laboratory. Quarterly report, October-December 1979

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    1979-12-01

    The Johns Hopkins University Applied Physics Laboratory, under contracts with several agencies of the federal government and an agency of the State of Maryland, is engaged in developing energy resources, utilization concepts, and storage methods. This Quarterly Report summarizes the work on the various tasks as of 31 December 1979. The Energy Quarterly Report is divided into five sections. The first, Geothermal Energy Development Planning and Technical Assistance, supported by the Department of Energy/Resource Applications (DOE/RA), contains reports on the progress of those geothermal-related tasks where effort was concentrated during the quarter. The second section, Operational Research, Hydroelectric Power Development, also supported by DOE/RA, contains reports on small-scale hydroelectric investigations in the southeastern states. The third section, Seismotectonic Studies, supported by the Reactor Safety Research Division of the Nuclear Regulatory Commission, reports on neotectonic investigations in Connecticut. The fourth section, Energy Conversion and Storage Techniques, contains two articles, the first on OTEC core unit testing supported by the Department of Energy, Division of Central Solar Technology (DOE/CST), and the second on recovery of landfill methane, supported by the Argonne National Laboratory. The fifth section, New Energy Technologies, reports on Laboratory studies of an unconventional gas source--Eastern Devonian shales.

  1. State Institution "National Research Center for Radiation Medicine of the National Academy of Medical Sciences of Ukraine" - research activities and scientific advance in 2014.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bazyka, D; Sushko, V; Chumak, A; Buzunov, V; Talko, V; Yanovich, L

    2015-12-01

    Research activities and scientific advance achieved in 2014 at the State Institution "National Research Center for Radiation Medicine of the National Academy of Medical Sciences of Ukraine" (NRCRM) concerning medical problems of the Chornobyl disaster, radiation medicine, radiobiology, radiation hygiene and epidemiology in collaboration with the WHO network of medical preparedness and assistance in radiation accidents are outlined in the annual report.Epidemiological cohort studies found increased incidence (1990-2012 gg.) of thyroid cancer in victims of Chernobyl accident (liquidators - in 4.6 times, evacuated - in 4.0 times, residents of contaminated areas - in 1.3 times) and increased incidence of breast cancer in female workers of 1986-1987. (in the 1994-2012 biennium. SIR = 160,0%, 95% CI: 142,4-177,6). Retrospective studies of thyroid cancer ("case control") in cohorts and 152 thousand of liquidators were continued together with the US National Cancer Institute. Radiation risks of multiple myeloma and chronic lymphocytic leukemia were found.Molecular effects of remote period after radiation exposure include changes in gene expression TERF1, TERF2, CCND1, telomere length, the protein expression of cyclin D1, histone gamma H2AX. An association of molecular changes with cognitive deficits were defined. Genetic polymorphisms of rs2981582 gene FGFR2, rs12443621 gene TNRC9, rs3817198 gene LSP1, rs3803662 gene TNRC9, rs889312 gene MAP3K1 and their association with breast can cer were studied; the expression by tumor cells of estrogen and progesterone receptor, antigens of c kit, cytoker atins 5/6, TP53 and ki67, amplification status of the gene Her2 / neu, mutation status of the genes BRCA1 (muta tions 185delAG and 5382insC) and BRCA2 (mutation 6174delT) were studied. The possibility of persistence of radi ation modified hidden chromosomal instability in consecutive generations of human somatic cells was proven.The status of reproductive function and peculiarities

  2. Medical education in cyberspace: critical considerations in the health system

    Science.gov (United States)

    YAZDANI, SHAHRAM; KHOSHGOFTAR, ZOHREH; AHMADY, SOLEIMAN; RASTEGARPOUR, HASSAN; FOROUTAN, SEYED ABBAS

    2017-01-01

    Introduction: Over the past few decades, two revolutionary approaches have emerged as a new form of medical education: Electronic Medical Education and Web-based Medical Education. A number of well-known medical institutions, such as Harvard and Johns Hopkins used a wide range of cyberspace capabilities to increase their competitiveness. Researchers have expressed that cyberspace will change health system’s main objective of training physicians and medical education. We conducted this study to identify the health system critical considerations on core issues, involving the development of medical education on cyberspace. Methods: In order to conduct this study, we observed the steps of a critical literature review, combined with the ‘Four-phase method’ adopted by Carnwell and Daly. We focused on particular literature on health and cyber system functions; it was associated with systemic approach. Results: We developed a six-level taxonomy, Cyber level, Governance level, Ministerial level, Organizational level, Program level and Performance level, as a key solution that can be applied for the success of medical education on cyberspace. The results were summarized and appraised in more details. Conclusion: Medical education on cyberspace is a complex interdisciplinary system. It is important that all aspects of the health systems be involved as integral to the development of cyber based medical education; without this convergence, we will be confused by the decisions made by others within the system. Health system should also communicate with those external sectors that are critical to achieving better learning on cyberspace. Integrated planning, governance and management of medical education in cyberspace are pivotal elements for the promotion. PMID:28124017

  3. THE MUTIFACTORIAL PATTERN OF OSTEOPOROSIS: A REVIEW OF THE RESEARCHES OF THE DEPARTMENT OF THERAPY, INSTITUTE OF POSTGRADUATE EDUCATION, YAROSLAVL STATE MEDICAL UNIVERSITY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    O. B. Ershova

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Osteoporosis (OP is one of the most common diseases and is characterized by serious clinical manifestations such as low-energy bone fractures that cause severe social consequences. In this connection, OP is now receiving much attention worldwide. In Yaroslavl, the Department of Therapy (Head, Professor N.I. Korshunov, MD, Institute of Postgraduate Education, Yaroslavl State Medical University (Chancellor, Prof. A.V. Pavlov, MD, has been intensively conducting researches into different aspects of OP for more than 20 years. The main areas of the investigations performed are the issues of the epidemiology and outcomes of osteoporotic fractures, the relationship of OP to different diseases (rheumatoid arthritis, cardiovascular diseases, as well as the specific features of the development of OP in fertile men and women and the problem of calcium and vitamin D deficiency in pregnant women. 

  4. The Medical Education Partnership Initiative (MEPI), a collaborative paradigm for institutional and human resources capacity building between high- and low- and middle-income countries: the Mozambique experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Virgínia Noormahomed, Emília; Carrilho, Carla; Ismail, Mamudo; Noormahomed, Sérgio; Nguenha, Alcido; Benson, Constance A; Mocumbi, Ana Olga; Schooley, Robert T

    2017-01-01

    Collaborations among researchers based in lower and middle income countries (LMICs) and high income countries (HICs) have made major discoveries related to diseases disproportionately affecting LMICs and have been vital to the development of research communities in LMICs. Such collaborations have generally been scientifically and structurally driven by HICs. In this report we outline a paradigm shift in collaboration, exemplified by the Medical Education Partnership Initiative (MEPI), in which the formulation of priorities and administrative infrastructure reside in the LMIC. This descriptive report outlines the critical features of the MEPI partnership. In the MEPI, LMIC program partners translate broad program goals and define metrics into priorities that are tailored to local conditions. Program funds flow to a LMIC-based leadership group that contracts with peers from HICs to provide technical and scientific advice and consultation in a 'reverse funds flow' model. Emphasis is also placed on strengthening administrative capacity within LMIC institutions. A rigorous monitoring and evaluation process modifies program priorities on the basis of evolving opportunities to maximize program impact. Vesting LMIC partners with the responsibility for program leadership, and building administrative and fiscal capacity in LMIC institutions substantially enhances program relevance, impact and sustainability.

  5. Singing Thy Sweet Radiance Encircling the Gem like World: A Comparative Study between Gerard Manley Hopkins and Rabindranath Tagore

    OpenAIRE

    Mohammad Kaosar Ahmed; Sultana Jahan

    2013-01-01

    Rabindranath Tagore, the first Nobel- Laureate in the Indian sub-continent journeyed all spheres of the domain of Bangla Literature in 19th century. His works are viewed in the West as spiritual and mercurial. On the other hand, Born in Victorian England and being influenced by the Oxford Movement, Hopkins decided to convert into restricted form of Catholicism, Jesuit life that made him culturally isolated. Despite having different religious and socio-cultural background their central philoso...

  6. Phenotype and natural history in 101 individuals with Pitt-Hopkins syndrome through an internet questionnaire system

    OpenAIRE

    de Winter, Channa F.; Baas, Melanie; Bijlsma, Emilia K.; van Heukelingen, John; Routledge, Sue; Hennekam, Raoul C M

    2016-01-01

    Background Pitt-Hopkins syndrome (PTHS; MIM# 610954) is a genetically determined entity mainly caused by mutations in TransCription Factor 4 (TCF4). We have developed a new way to collect information on (ultra-)rare disorders through a web-based database which we call ?waihonapedia? (waihona [meaning treasure in Hawaiian] encyclopaedia). Methods We have built a waihonapedia system in a collaboration between physicians, social scientists, and parent support groups. The system consists of an in...

  7. Archaeological Survey of Cooper Lake, Number 6, 1989. Cultural Resource Studies for Cooper Lake, Hopkins and Delta Counties, Texas

    Science.gov (United States)

    1989-01-01

    The disinterment was performed according comnposition cf the historic landscape consisted of to an explicit bioarchaeological and forensic a...consistM solely of One unique item, a Waco sinker formed on a surface collection. Whole (55.8%) and bri)en quartz cobble, was recovered. This artifact is...Hopkins County, Texas. Texian Society, Special Publication No. 1 and Texas Press, Waco , Texas. Memorial Museum Bulletin, No. 4, Austin. Saunders, Joe W

  8. The Johns Hopkins RTR Consortium: A Collaborative Approach to Advance Translational Science and Standardize Clinical Monitoring of Restorative Transplantation

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-10-01

    respiratory distress. Despite aggressive supportive therapy in conjunction with our veterinary staff, both animals had to be euthanized due to declining...presented at the International Hand and Composite Tissue Allotransplantation Society (IHCTAS) Annual Meeting on April 16th, 2015 and at the American...Brandacher, M.D. Org: Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine Award Amount: $1,297,034 Study/Product Aim(s) • Establish a belatacept-based protocol

  9. Instituciones de asistencia médica colectiva en el Uruguay: impacto de la regulación Collective medical care institutions in Uruguay: Impact of the regulation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Buglioli

    2002-02-01

    Full Text Available Con más de un siglo de historia en el país y brindando cobertura médica a más de la mitad de los uruguayos a través de una modalidad que integra las funciones de seguro y prestador de servicios, las instituciones de asistencia médica colectiva (IAMC han presentado en la última década un déficit persistente: el 52% de los beneficiarios están adscritos a instituciones con un déficit mayor al 4% sobre ingresos. Se trata de analizar cuál ha sido el impacto de la regulación en algunos aspectos relacionados con el comportamiento de la oferta ­concentración y cuotas del mercado, selección de riesgos, fijación de los precios­ y de la demanda ­selección adversa y el efecto de los copagos en la utilización de servicios­. El mensaje desde la regulación no parece haber promovido los incentivos adecuados para un comportamiento eficiente y de calidad por parte de las IAMC, siendo uno de los temas clave a abordar en un contexto de reforma sectorial.Collective medical care institutions have been in existence for more than a century and have provided medical care to more than half of Uruguayans through a modality that integrates insurance and provision of services. In the last decade, these institutions have presented a persistent deficit: 52% of the beneficiaries are members of institutions with a deficit of more than 4%. We analyze the impact of the regulation of certain aspects related to the behavior of supply (market concentration and quotas, risk selection, price fixing and demand (adverse selection and the effect of the co-payments in services utilization. The regulation seems not to have promoted the necessary incentives to efficiency and quality by the IAMC, one of the key aspects to be approached in the context of sectorial reform.

  10. "I Haven't Time to Write": Martha May Eliot and American Medical Education Reform.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levine, Deborah

    2016-11-15

    "We are up to our eyes in work. I have about 32 children tonight all with some contagious disease, if not two, and several very sick!" wrote Dr. Martha May Eliot to her parents in 1920, adding, "The hospital is full almost to overflowing and still they come." Eliot, who would go on to become an influential American pediatrician and public health authority, as well as the head of the Federal Children's Bureau, wrote her parents frequently during the course of her education at Radcliffe College (Cambridge, Massachusetts), Bryn Mawr College (Bryn Mawr, Pennsylvania), Johns Hopkins Medical School (Baltimore, Maryland), Peter Bent Brigham Hospital (Boston, Massachusetts), St. Louis Children's Hospital (St. Louis, Missouri), and Yale University Medical School (New Haven, Connecticut). Through these letters, she detailed her experience as a woman professional at elite institutions during a key transformative period in U.S. medicine. This article uses Eliot's collection of correspondence to shed light on physicians' experience of the increasingly rigorous training, testing, and licensing processes introduced in top medical schools and to offer insights into the history of women's medical education and experience in building careers as academic professionals during that time. Eliot's letters also illustrate how the newer, higher standards for medical graduates and postgraduates may have hastened-rather than hindered-the progress of some elite women in the medical profession. Today's physicians and medical educators, as well as those completing graduate training, will find much to draw on from the experience revealed by this rich epistolary archive.

  11. Unique challenges faced by pediatric neurosurgeon Harvey Cushing in 1909 at Johns Hopkins: a choroid plexus tumor of the lateral ventricle mimicking a cerebellar lesion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pendleton, Courtney; Olivi, Alessandro; Jallo, George I; Quiñones-Hinojosa, Alfredo

    2011-07-01

    At the turn of the twentieth century, diagnosis of pediatric intracranial lesions frequently relied exclusively on the subtle, nonspecific signs associated with these pathologies. In absence of detailed neuroimaging, erroneous diagnoses and misdirected operative explorations were common within pediatric populations. Following institutional review board approval, and through the courtesy of the Alan Mason Chesney Archives, we reviewed the surgical files from the Johns Hopkins Hospital for the years 1896-1912. Harvey Cushing's neurosurgical cases were collected and further analyzed. A 9-year-old boy presented with a year-long history of headaches and blindness. His neurological examination was remarkable for focal cranial nerve deficits and cerebellar signs. Cushing diagnosed a cerebellar tumor with hydrocephalus and performed two suboccipital explorations with negative results. The patient died prior to further operative intervention, and the postmortem examination revealed a large choroid plexus tumor within the left lateral ventricle. Early neurosurgical diagnosis and operative planning was fraught with difficulties, and surgeons relied solely on history and physical examination for localization of intracranial lesions. Here we report a case of a choroid plexus tumor of the lateral ventricle, which was misdiagnosed by Cushing. This case serves to emphasize the unique challenges faced by pediatric neurosurgeons at the turn of the twentieth century, who relied solely on history and examination to localize intracranial lesions.

  12. Introducing Pitt-Hopkins syndrome-associated mutations of TCF4 to Drosophila daughterless

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    Laura Tamberg

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Pitt-Hopkins syndrome (PTHS is caused by haploinsufficiency of Transcription factor 4 (TCF4, one of the three human class I basic helix-loop-helix transcription factors called E-proteins. Drosophila has a single E-protein, Daughterless (Da, homologous to all three mammalian counterparts. Here we show that human TCF4 can rescue Da deficiency during fruit fly nervous system development. Overexpression of Da or TCF4 specifically in adult flies significantly decreases their survival rates, indicating that these factors are crucial even after development has been completed. We generated da transgenic fruit fly strains with corresponding missense mutations R578H, R580W, R582P and A614V found in TCF4 of PTHS patients and studied the impact of these mutations in vivo. Overexpression of wild type Da as well as human TCF4 in progenitor tissues induced ectopic sensory bristles and the rough eye phenotype. By contrast, overexpression of DaR580W and DaR582P that disrupt DNA binding reduced the number of bristles and induced the rough eye phenotype with partial lack of pigmentation, indicating that these act dominant negatively. Compared to the wild type, DaR578H and DaA614V were less potent in induction of ectopic bristles and the rough eye phenotype, respectively, suggesting that these are hypomorphic. All studied PTHS-associated mutations that we introduced into Da led to similar effects in vivo as the same mutations in TCF4 in vitro. Consequently, our Drosophila models of PTHS are applicable for further studies aiming to unravel the molecular mechanisms of this disorder.

  13. Hindi translation and validation of Cambridge-Hopkins Diagnostic Questionnaire for RLS (CHRLSq

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    Ravi Gupta

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Restless legs syndrome also known as Willis-Ekbom′s Disease (RLS/WED is a common illness. Cambridge-Hopkins diagnostic questionnaire for RLS (CHRLSq is a good diagnostic tool and can be used in the epidemiological studies. However, its Hindi version is not available. Thus, this study was conducted to translate and validate it in the Hindi speaking population. Materials and Methods: After obtaining the permission from the author of the CHRLSq, it was translated into Hindi language by two independent translators. After a series of forward and back translations, the finalized Hindi version was administered to two groups by one of the authors, who were blinded to the clinical diagnosis. First group consisted of RLS/WED patients, where diagnosis was made upon face to face interview and the other group - the control group included subjects with somatic symptoms disorders or exertional myalgia or chronic insomnia. Each group had 30 subjects. Diagnosis made on CHRLSq was compared with the clinical diagnosis. Statistical Analysis: Analysis was done using Statistical Package for Social Sciences (SPSS v 21.0. Descriptive statistics was calculated. Proportions were compared using chi-square test; whereas, categorical variables were compared using independent sample t-test. Sensitivity, specificity, and positive predictive value of the translated version of questionnaire were calculated. Results: Average age was comparable between the cases and control group (RLS/WED = 39.1 ± 10.1 years vs 36.2 ± 11.4 years in controls; P = 0.29. Women outnumbered men in the RLS/WED group (87% in RLS/WED group vs 57% among controls; χ2 = 6.64; P = 0.01. Both the sensitivity and specificity of the translated version was 83.3%. It had the positive predictive value of 86.6%. Conclusion: Hindi version of CHRLSq has positive predictive value of 87% and it can be used to diagnose RLS in Hindi speaking population.

  14. Hindi translation and validation of Cambridge-Hopkins Diagnostic Questionnaire for RLS (CHRLSq).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gupta, Ravi; Allan, Richard P; Pundeer, Ashwini; Das, Sourav; Dhyani, Mohan; Goel, Deepak

    2015-01-01

    Restless legs syndrome also known as Willis-Ekbom's Disease (RLS/WED) is a common illness. Cambridge-Hopkins diagnostic questionnaire for RLS (CHRLSq) is a good diagnostic tool and can be used in the epidemiological studies. However, its Hindi version is not available. Thus, this study was conducted to translate and validate it in the Hindi speaking population. After obtaining the permission from the author of the CHRLSq, it was translated into Hindi language by two independent translators. After a series of forward and back translations, the finalized Hindi version was administered to two groups by one of the authors, who were blinded to the clinical diagnosis. First group consisted of RLS/WED patients, where diagnosis was made upon face to face interview and the other group - the control group included subjects with somatic symptoms disorders or exertional myalgia or chronic insomnia. Each group had 30 subjects. Diagnosis made on CHRLSq was compared with the clinical diagnosis. Analysis was done using Statistical Package for Social Sciences (SPSS) v 21.0. Descriptive statistics was calculated. Proportions were compared using chi-square test; whereas, categorical variables were compared using independent sample t-test. Sensitivity, specificity, and positive predictive value of the translated version of questionnaire were calculated. Average age was comparable between the cases and control group (RLS/WED = 39.1 ± 10.1 years vs 36.2 ± 11.4 years in controls; P = 0.29). Women outnumbered men in the RLS/WED group (87% in RLS/WED group vs 57% among controls; χ(2) = 6.64; P = 0.01). Both the sensitivity and specificity of the translated version was 83.3%. It had the positive predictive value of 86.6%. Hindi version of CHRLSq has positive predictive value of 87% and it can be used to diagnose RLS in Hindi speaking population.

  15. THE MOST COMMON REASONS FOR MEDICAL REFERRALS TO THE REHABILITATION OF THE MOTION ORGAN WITHIN THE PREVENTION OF DISABILITY PENSION OF SOCIAL INSURANCE INSTITUTION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Łukasz Polit

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: In the second half of the twentieth century, there was a significant increase in the incidence of civilisation diseases caused by the increasing pace of life, and a greater degree of industrialization and the ubiquitous stress. This phenomena was accompanied by the problem of unemployment and an aging of a population. An annual increasing number of people staying at long-term sick leave and people who completely lose their ability to work was the reason for the introduction by Social Insurance Institution a system of rehabilitation within the prevention of disability pension which mission is to help people to return to active work. Thanks to the rehabilitation system insured people gain not only the health improvement and functioning of the body but are given a chance to recover or improve ability to work which they lost as a result of the disease. Aim of the study : Finding the most common reasons for medical referrals to rehabilitation of the organ motion within the prevention of disability pension by Social Insurance Institution comparing gender, age, occupation, co-existing illnesses and disease entity which is the basis for referral to rehabilitation. Methodology: There was analysed information about finished rehabilitation among 1529 patients who were rehabilitated to be more efficient within the prevention of disability pension of Social Insurance Institution in Non-Public Health Establishment “Medicus” in Kielce. Results : In the period 2005–2011 there was a group of 1529 patients who were rehabilitated within the prevention of disability pension of Social Insurance Institution, including 549 women (37%, and 980 men (63%. In all age groups both among women and men the basic disease entity was the disorder of roots of the nerves (G54. Overcharging of the spinal structures occurred often within men whose main forms of activity were connected with physical effort and women whose occupation was mainly a clerical work

  16. Data Mining and Predictive Modeling in Institutional Advancement: How Ten Schools Found Success. Technical Report

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luperchio, Dan

    2009-01-01

    This technical report, produced in partnership by the Council for Advancement and Support of Education (CASE) and SPSS Inc., explores the promise of data mining alumni records at educational institutions. Working with individual alumni records from The Johns Hopkins Zanvyl Krieger School of Arts and Sciences, a predictive regression model is…

  17. Properties of the Hopkins Symptom Checklist-25 (HSCL-25) and the Self-Reporting Questionnaire (SRQ-20) as screening instruments used in primary care in Afghanistan

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ventevogel, Peter; de Vries, Gieljan; Scholte, Willem F.; Shinwari, Nasratullah Rasa; Faiz, Hafizullah; Nassery, Ruhullah; van den Brink, Wim; Olff, Miranda

    2007-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Recent epidemiological studies in Afghanistan using mental health questionnaires yielded high prevalence rates for anxiety and depression. OBJECTIVES: To explore the validity in the Afghan cultural context of two mental health questionnaires, the Hopkins Symptom Checklist-25 (HSCL-25)

  18. Product Failures in Respirators and Consumables: Analysis of Field Safety Notices of 2005-2013 Publicized by the Federal Institute for Drugs and Medical Devices in Germany.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hannig, Jürgen; Siekmeier, Rüdiger

    2015-01-01

    The current European system governed by the three EC directives 93/42/EEC (Medical Device Directive), 98/79/EC (In-Vitro Diagnostic Directive) and 90/385/EEC (Active Implantable Medical Device Directive) regulates marketing and post-market surveillance of medical devices in the European Economic Area (EEA). In cases of incidents raising the field safety corrective actions (FSCA), manufacturers have to inform the responsible Competent Authority (CA; in Germany this is the Federal Institute for Drugs and Medical Devices, BfArM) and the public by field safety notices (FSN). In this study we analyzed FSN of respirators and consumables directly required for their function, whereas devices for anesthesia and gas delivery were excluded. FSCA and FSN of 2005-2013 publicized by BfArM for the included products were analyzed with respect to the MEDDEV 2.12-1 rev. 8. In total, 60 FSCA were publicized. German and English FSN were found in 59/53 cases, respectively. FSN were clearly characterized as FSN in 44/38 cases and declaration of the type of action in 45/44 cases, respectively. Product names were provided in all cases. Lot numbers or other information for product characterization were available in 7/7 and 43/40 cases, respectively. Detailed information regarding FSCA and product malfunction was found in all cases. Information on product related risks with previous use of affected devices was provided in 42/38 cases. In 53/53 cases manufacturers provided information to mitigate product related risks. Requests to pass FSN to persons needing awareness in the organization were found in 27/24 cases. Contact data were provided in 53/48 cases, respectively. Confirmation that a CA was informed was found in 28/26 cases and in 19/15 cases a customer confirmation was included. The identified risks were: total loss of function (19/16), short circuit (1/1) and burn (3/3), and inhalation of foreign particles (1/1) which might cause severe risk to patients and users. The most frequent

  19. Measuring research impact in Australia's medical research institutes: a scoping literature review of the objectives for and an assessment of the capabilities of research impact assessment frameworks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deeming, Simon; Searles, Andrew; Reeves, Penny; Nilsson, Michael

    2017-03-21

    Realising the economic potential of research institutions, including medical research institutes, represents a policy imperative for many Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development nations. The assessment of research impact has consequently drawn increasing attention. Research impact assessment frameworks (RIAFs) provide a structure to assess research translation, but minimal research has examined whether alternative RIAFs realise the intended policy outcomes. This paper examines the objectives presented for RIAFs in light of economic imperatives to justify ongoing support for health and medical research investment, leverage productivity via commercialisation and outcome-efficiency gains in health systems, and ensure that translation and impact considerations are embedded into the research process. This paper sought to list the stated objectives for RIAFs, to identify existing frameworks and to evaluate whether the identified frameworks possessed the capabilities necessary to address the specified objectives. A scoping review of the literature to identify objectives specified for RIAFs, inform upon descriptive criteria for each objective and identify existing RIAFs. Criteria were derived for each objective. The capability for the existing RIAFs to realise the alternative objectives was evaluated based upon these criteria. The collated objectives for RIAFs included accountability (top-down), transparency/accountability (bottom-up), advocacy, steering, value for money, management/learning and feedback/allocation, prospective orientation, and speed of translation. Of the 25 RIAFs identified, most satisfied objectives such as accountability and advocacy, which are largely sufficient for the first economic imperative to justify research investment. The frameworks primarily designed to optimise the speed of translation or enable the prospective orientation of research possessed qualities most likely to optimise the productive outcomes from research. However

  20. Workplace interpersonal conflicts among the healthcare workers: Retrospective exploration from the institutional incident reporting system of a university-affiliated medical center.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jerng, Jih-Shuin; Huang, Szu-Fen; Liang, Huey-Wen; Chen, Li-Chin; Lin, Chia-Kuei; Huang, Hsiao-Fang; Hsieh, Ming-Yuan; Sun, Jui-Sheng

    2017-01-01

    There have been concerns about the workplace interpersonal conflict (WIC) among healthcare workers. As healthcare organizations have applied the incident reporting system (IRS) widely for safety-related incidents, we proposed that this system might provide a channel to explore the WICs. We retrospectively reviewed the reports to the IRS from July 2010 to June 2013 in a medical center. We identified the WICs and typed these conflicts according to the two foci (task content/process and interpersonal relationship) and the three properties (disagreement, interference, and negative emotion), and analyzed relevant data. Of the 147 incidents with WIC, the most common related processes were patient transfer (20%), laboratory tests (17%), surgery (16%) and medical imaging (16%). All of the 147 incidents with WIC focused on task content or task process, but 41 (27.9%) also focused on the interpersonal relationship. We found disagreement, interference, and negative emotion in 91.2%, 88.4%, and 55.8% of the cases, respectively. Nurses (57%) were most often the reporting workers, while the most common encounter was the nurse-doctor interaction (33%), and the majority (67%) of the conflicts were experienced concurrently with the incidents. There was a significant difference in the distribution of worker job types between cases focused on the interpersonal relationship and those without (p = 0.0064). The doctors were more frequently as the reporter when the conflicts focused on the interpersonal relationship (34.1%) than not on it (17.0%). The distributions of worker job types were similar between those with and without negative emotion (p = 0.125). The institutional IRS is a useful place to report the workplace interpersonal conflicts actively. The healthcare systems need to improve the channels to communicate, manage and resolve these conflicts.

  1. Clavien classification of complications after the initial series of robot-assisted radical prostatectomy: the Cancer Institute of New Jersey/Robert Wood Johnson Medical School experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeong, Jeongyun; Choi, Eun Yong; Kim, Isaac Yi

    2010-09-01

    To study the safety and feasibility of robot-assisted radical prostatectomy (RARP) for the surgical management of localized prostate cancer, we analyzed perioperative parameters and the pattern of complications in our patients who underwent RARP. After the performance of more than 600 RARP over a 4-year period by a single surgeon using the daVinci® robot system at the Cancer Institute of New Jersey/Robert Wood Johnson Medical School, we reviewed the medical records of the first 200 patients retrospectively. All patients were divided into four groups according to the order of case numbers to compare intergroup differences in preoperative characteristics and perioperative parameters. Perioperative complications were determined in all patients, and complications were classified according to the Clavien classification system. The mean operative time was 212 minutes, and the mean blood loss was 189 mL. The mean length of hospital stay was 1.13 days. Overall, 12% (24 men) experienced various perioperative complications among the 200 patients. Of the total 24 patients, 5 (20.8%) men experienced intraoperative complications, and 19 (79.2%) men showed postoperative complications. Rectal injury occurred in two (8.3%) men, and the injury was repaired primarily using two-layer suture techniques without any sequelae. Three (12.5%) patients had femoral neuropathy, and urinary retention developed in 7 (25.0%) patients. Among our 200 patients, no transfusion was needed intraoperatively and postoperatively. There were nine (4.5%) patients in the Clavien grade I complications category, and another 9 (4.5%) men were classified as grade II complications. Six (3.0%) men had grade IIIb complications, and there were no grade IV or V complications. In our initial series of RARP procedures, we experienced low morbidity, with the overall complication rate of 12%. After implementing minor modifications, most of the early complications were prevented. Rectal injuries, if recognized

  2. A framework for an institutional high level security policy for the processing of medical data and their transmission through the Internet.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ilioudis, C; Pangalos, G

    2001-01-01

    The Internet provides many advantages when used for interaction and data sharing among health care providers, patients, and researchers. However, the advantages provided by the Internet come with a significantly greater element of risk to the confidentiality, integrity, and availability of information. It is therefore essential that Health Care Establishments processing and exchanging medical data use an appropriate security policy. To develop a High Level Security Policy for the processing of medical data and their transmission through the Internet, which is a set of high-level statements intended to guide Health Care Establishment personnel who process and manage sensitive health care information. We developed the policy based on a detailed study of the existing framework in the EU countries, USA, and Canada, and on consultations with users in the context of the Intranet Health Clinic project. More specifically, this paper has taken into account the major directives, technical reports, law, and recommendations that are related to the protection of individuals with regard to the processing of personal data, and the protection of privacy and medical data on the Internet. We present a High Level Security Policy for Health Care Establishments, which includes a set of 7 principles and 45 guidelines detailed in this paper. The proposed principles and guidelines have been made as generic and open to specific implementations as possible, to provide for maximum flexibility and adaptability to local environments. The High Level Security Policy establishes the basic security requirements that must be addressed to use the Internet to safely transmit patient and other sensitive health care information. The High Level Security Policy is primarily intended for large Health Care Establishments in Europe, USA, and Canada. It is clear however that the general framework presented here can only serve as reference material for developing an appropriate High Level Security Policy in a

  3. A Framework for an Institutional High Level Security Policy for the Processing of Medical Data and their Transmission through the Internet

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pangalos, George

    2001-01-01

    Background The Internet provides many advantages when used for interaction and data sharing among health care providers, patients, and researchers. However, the advantages provided by the Internet come with a significantly greater element of risk to the confidentiality, integrity, and availability of information. It is therefore essential that Health Care Establishments processing and exchanging medical data use an appropriate security policy. Objective To develop a High Level Security Policy for the processing of medical data and their transmission through the Internet, which is a set of high-level statements intended to guide Health Care Establishment personnel who process and manage sensitive health care information. Methods We developed the policy based on a detailed study of the existing framework in the EU countries, USA, and Canada, and on consultations with users in the context of the Intranet Health Clinic project. More specifically, this paper has taken into account the major directives, technical reports, law, and recommendations that are related to the protection of individuals with regard to the processing of personal data, and the protection of privacy and medical data on the Internet. Results We present a High Level Security Policy for Health Care Establishments, which includes a set of 7 principles and 45 guidelines detailed in this paper. The proposed principles and guidelines have been made as generic and open to specific implementations as possible, to provide for maximum flexibility and adaptability to local environments. The High Level Security Policy establishes the basic security requirements that must be addressed to use the Internet to safely transmit patient and other sensitive health care information. Conclusions The High Level Security Policy is primarily intended for large Health Care Establishments in Europe, USA, and Canada. It is clear however that the general framework presented here can only serve as reference material for

  4. Gender Differences in Receipt of National Institutes of Health R01 Grants Among Junior Faculty at an Academic Medical Center: The Role of Connectivity, Rank, and Research Productivity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Warner, Erica T; Carapinha, René; Weber, Griffin M; Hill, Emorcia V; Reede, Joan Y

    2017-10-01

    To determine whether there were gender differences in likelihood of receiving a first National Institutes of Health (NIH) R01 award among 5445 instructors and assistant professors at Harvard Medical School (HMS). Data on R01 award principal investigators were obtained from NIH ExPORTER and linked with faculty data. Using Cox proportional hazard regression, we examined the association of gender with receipt of first R01 award between 2008 and 2015 accounting for demographics, research productivity metrics, and professional characteristics. Compared to males, females had fewer publications, lower h-index, smaller coauthor networks and were less likely to be assistant professors (p academic rank, previous K award, terminal degree, and HMS training were all significant predictors of receiving an R01 award. A relatively small proportion of HMS junior faculty obtained their first NIH R01 award during the study period. There was no significant gender difference in likelihood of award. However, we are unable to distinguish faculty that never applied from those who applied and were not successful.

  5. The P50 Research Center in Perioperative Sciences: How the investment by the National Institute of General Medical Sciences in team science has reduced postburn mortality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Finnerty, Celeste C; Capek, Karel D; Voigt, Charles; Hundeshagen, Gabriel; Cambiaso-Daniel, Janos; Porter, Craig; Sousse, Linda E; El Ayadi, Amina; Zapata-Sirvent, Ramon; Guillory, Ashley N; Suman, Oscar E; Herndon, David N

    2017-09-01

    Since the inception of the P50 Research Center in Injury and Peri-operative Sciences (RCIPS) funding mechanism, the National Institute of General Medical Sciences has supported a team approach to science. Many advances in critical care, particularly burns, have been driven by RCIPS teams. In fact, burns that were fatal in the early 1970s, prior to the inception of the P50 RCIPS program, are now routinely survived as a result of the P50-funded research. The advances in clinical care that led to the reduction in postburn death were made by optimizing resuscitation, incorporating early excision and grafting, bolstering acute care including support for inhalation injury, modulating the hypermetabolic response, augmenting the immune response, incorporating aerobic exercise, and developing antiscarring strategies. The work of the Burn RCIPS programs advanced our understanding of the pathophysiologic response to burn injury. As a result, the effects of a large burn on all organ systems have been studied, leading to the discovery of persistent dysfunction, elucidation of the underlying molecular mechanisms, and identification of potential therapeutic targets. Survival and subsequent patient satisfaction with quality of life have increased. In this review article, we describe the contributions of the Galveston P50 RCIPS that have changed postburn care and have considerably reduced postburn mortality.

  6. Phase II - Procurement of State of the Art Research Equipment to Support Faculty Members with the RNA Therapeutics Institute, a component of the Advanced Therapeutics Cluster at the University of Massachusetts Medical School

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moore, Melissa

    2011-10-14

    This project supported the continued development of the RNA Therapeutics Institute at the UMass Medical School. This funding allows for the purchase of critical equipment that will enable faculty members to develop RNA technology in order to better understand the complexity that separates genome sequence from biological function, as well as to reduce the hyperactivity of harmful genes.

  7. Risk Factors for Possible Dementia Using the Hopkins Verbal Learning Test and the Mini-Mental State Examination in Shanghai

    OpenAIRE

    Xin Xu; Shifu Xiao; Tri Budi Rahardjo; Eef Hogervorst

    2015-01-01

    Using a combination of the Hopkins Verbal Learning Test (HVLT) and the Mini-Mental State Examination (MMSE), we investigated the prevalence of possible dementia (DEM) in community-dwelling elderly in Shanghai. Subsequently, we investigated significant risk factors for DEM and generated a DEM self-checklist for early DEM detection and case management. We found that among a total of 521 participants using a HVLT cut-off score of <19 and a MMSE cut-off score of <24, a total of 69 DEM case...

  8. [Brief history of creation and activities of Research Institute of Hygiene and Health Protection of Children and Adolescents State Institution Research Centre of Children's Health Protection, Russian Academy of Medical Sciences].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baranov, A A; Kuchma, V R

    2009-01-01

    The Institute was founded to study effects of environmental factors on the health status and day-to-day activities of children and adolescents in organized groups and to use the data obtained for the elaboration of measures for the protection and promotion of their health. The Institute is up to now the sole research institution of this kind in the Russian Federation entitled to coordinate problem-solving efforts on a national scale. Since 2000, it has been functioning as the National Centre for support of the European network of health promoting schools. The Institute developed a concept of research designed to resolve topical problems facing hygienic science and practical health service; it implicates elaboration of hygienic norms and regulations taking into account age, sex, health status, and the level of mental and physical development of individual children. The main lines of research carried out at the Institute are listed with special reference to the theoretical aspects of such cardinal problems of child hygiene as adaptation, hygienic regulation and standardization, etc. The Institute participated in the development of a new basic curriculum and the state education standard law. The authors present results of multidisciplinary research and developments obtained at the Institute. Specialists of the Institute are involved in the work of international scientific societies.

  9. STUDY OF SERO-PREVALENCE OF DENGUE FEVER AND KNOWLEDGE ON DENGUE INFECTION IN CHALMEDA ANAND RAO INSTITUTE OF MEDICAL SCIENCES (CAIMS TEACHING HOSPITAL KARIMNAGAR, TELANGANA STATE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rajamouli

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND Dengue virus infection has emerged as a notable public health problem in recent decades in terms of the mortality and morbidity associated with it Dengue is endemic in many parts of India and epidemics are frequently reported from various parts of India and abroad. This study aimed for finding out the frequency and distribution of dengue fever and its case fatality based on the variables such as age and sex during a time period of monsoon. The present study report communicates us the Sero-prevalence of dengue fever and the knowledge on dengue infection in the study subjects of Chalmeda Anand Rao Institute of Medical Sciences (CAIMS teaching hospital Karimnagar, Telangana, India. AIMS AND OBJECTIVES 1. The present hospital study aims to describe the frequency, distribution and case fatality of dengue fever based on the variables such as age, sex and period of one month in CAIMS Teaching Hospital. 2. To assess the Sero-positive cases among all admitted fever cases. MATERIALS AND METHODS The total number 185 patients were admitted in medical ward and screened for Sero-positive dengue infection. It is across sectional study which is conducted by pre tested & structured questioner to assess knowledge and subjected for study to know the Sero-prevalence of dengue infection from 16th October 2015 to 15th November 2015 (period of 1 month. Blood samples were collected from 185 fever cases, Sera were separated and subjected for(Dengue check anti-dengue IgM and IgG antibody testing by the solid phase immune-chromatographic assay,( a commercial dengue virus rapid test kit manufactured by Standard Diagnostics, J. Mitra & Co. Pvt. ltd A 180 -181 Okla. Ind. in the Department of Microbiology CAIMS, Karimnagar. RESULTS Out of 185 admitted fever cases, 97(52.43% were found to be dengue positive for IgM or IgG or for both the antibodies. In 2015, the highest number of suspected dengue patients admitted was in the month of 16th October 2015 to 15th

  10. Penn medicine advances real-time medicine: The Ruth and Raymond Perelman Center for Advanced Medicine helps heal patients through innovative building design

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    2008-01-01

    Victor Almon McKusick, M.D., University Professor of Medical Genetics at the Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, one of the two distinguished Johns Hopkins geneticists for whom the McKusick-Nathans Institute of Genetic...

  11. "No clinical puzzles more interesting": Harvey Cushing and spinal trauma, the Johns Hopkins Hospital 1896-1912.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dasenbrock, Hormuzdiyar H; Pendleton, Courtney; Cohen-Gadol, Aaron A; Witham, Timothy F; Gokaslan, Ziya L; Quinones-Hinojosa, Alfredo; Bydon, Ali

    2011-02-01

    Although Harvey Cushing played a central role in the establishment of neurosurgery in the United States, his work on the spine remains largely unknown. This article is not only the first time that Cushing's spinal cases while he was at Johns Hopkins have been reported, but also the first time his management of spinal trauma has been described. We report on 12 patients that Cushing treated from 1898 to 1911 who have never been reported before, including blunt and penetrating injuries, complete and incomplete spinal cord lesions, and both immediate and delayed presentations. Cushing performed laminectomies within 24 hours on patients with immediate presentations-both complete and incomplete spinal cord lesions. Among those with delayed presentations, Cushing did laminectomies on patients with incomplete spinal cord injuries. By the end of his tenure at Hopkins, Cushing advocated nonoperative treatment for all patients with complete spinal cord lesions. Four patients died while an inpatient, with meningitis and cystitis leading to the death of 1 and 3 patients, respectively. Cystitis was treated with intravesicular irrigation; an indwelling catheter was placed by a suprapubic cystostomy in four. Cushing was one of the first to report the use of x-ray in a spine patient, in a case that may have been one factor leading to his interest in the nervous system; Cushing also routinely obtained radiographs in those with spinal trauma. These cases illustrate Cushing's dedication to and rapport with his patients, even in the face of a dismal prognosis.

  12. A Study on the Socio demographic Profile of the Attendees at the Integrated Counseling and Testing Centre of Institute of Medical Sciences BHU, Varanasi, Uttar Pradesh

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rashmi Kumari

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV counseling and testing services are a key entry point to the prevention of HIV infection and to the treatment and care of the people who are infected with HIV. The Integrated Counseling and Testing Centre (ICTC services are a cost effective intervention in the prevention of HIV/AIDS.Aims: To study the socio demographic characteristics of the attendees at the ICTC centre.Material and Methods: Setting – ICTC of Institutes of Medical Sciences BHU, Varanasi, Study Design: A cross-sectional, record based study, Study duration: The study population included 41159 clients who attended the ICTC centres from January 2009 to December 2011.Results: An overall 12.85% of the ICTC attendees were HIV Seropositive subjects. During 2009 to 2011. i.e. during past 3 years total males tested for HIV at the ICTC were 23326, out of which 3202 were HIV+ve showing positivity rate of 13.7%, while total females tested were 16671 out of which 2063 were HIV+ve showing positivity rate of about 12.4%. Consecutively in the last three years maximum load of patients was from the age groups 35-49 years (19.13% followed by 25-34 years (15.4%.Conclusion: People’s attitudes towards HIV are changing after the introduction of the ICTC, which plays a major role in the primary and secondary prevention of HIV. There is a more urgent need for the introduction of interventional measures like sex education and preventive education among the general population

  13. The past, present, and future of paediatric cardiology training at the Johns Hopkins Hospital, in the tradition of Dr Helen Taussig.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beasley, Gary S; Murphy, Anne M; Brenner, Joel I; Ravekes, William J

    2016-12-01

    Johns Hopkins has been a leader in paediatric cardiology for over 85 years. In the 1940s, Dr Helen Taussig began training fellows in paediatric cardiology at Johns Hopkins at a time when the diagnosis and treatment of CHD were in the earliest stage. Under her leadership, the fellowship developed a strong foundation that has continued to evolve to meet the current needs of learners and educators. In the current era, the Johns Hopkins programme implements the current theories of adult education and actively engages our fellows in learning as well as teaching. The programme uses techniques such as flipped classroom, structured case-based small-group learning, observed and structured clinical examination, simulations, and innovative educational technology. These strategies combined with our faculty and rich history give our fellows a unique educational experience.

  14. Investigation of the component processes involved in verbal declarative memory function in bipolar disorder: utility of the Hopkins Verbal Learning Test-Revised.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Rheenen, Tamsyn E; Rossell, Susan L

    2014-08-01

    Evidence suggests that standard learning and recall indexes are sensitive markers of verbal declarative memory ability in bipolar disorder (BD), but no study has examined performance across the full range of component process measures on the Hopkins Verbal Learning Test (HVLT-R) in a BD cohort. As the HVLT-R is part of a widely used battery of cognitive functioning backed by the U.S. Federal Drug Administration as the accepted battery for use in pro-cognitive trials assessing cognitive-enhancing drugs in the related disorder schizophrenia, estimating the utility of its measures in BD is important. Forty-nine BD patients and 51 healthy controls completed the HVLT-R, which was scored for 13 variables of interest, across 4 indices: recall and learning, recognition, strategic organization, and errors. BD patients had greater difficulty in learning the HVLT-R word list compared to controls. They also demonstrated impairment in delayed recall/recognition. There were no differences between the groups in terms of their slope of learning, retrieval index, retention percentage, semantic or serial clustering, errors, or level of retrieval. This pattern was consistent across symptomatic and euthymic patients. The HVLT-R has some utility in characterizing the component processes involved in memory function in BD, such that memory impairments appear to be attributable to deficient encoding processes during the acquisition phase of learning. In the case of planning pro-cognitive clinical trials, the encoding deficits in BD observed here may be sensitive enough to potentially respond to medications designed to enhance the verbal memory performance.

  15. Current and Future Management of Bilateral Loss of Vestibular Sensation – An update on the Johns Hopkins Multichannel Vestibular Prosthesis Project

    Science.gov (United States)

    Della Santina, Charles C.; Migliaccio, Americo A.; Hayden, Russell; Melvin, Thuy-Anh; Fridman, Gene Y.; Chiang, Bryce; Davidovics, Natan S.; Dai, Chenkai; Carey, John P.; Minor, Lloyd B.; Anderson, Iee-Ching; Park, HongJu; Lyford-Pike, Sofia; Tang, Shan

    2012-01-01

    Bilateral loss of vestibular sensation can disable individuals whose vestibular hair cells are injured by ototoxic medications, infection, Ménière’s disease or other insults to the labyrinth including surgical trauma during cochlear implantation. Without input to vestibulo-ocular and vestibulo-spinal reflexes that normally stabilize the eyes and body, affected patients suffer blurred vision during head movement, postural instability, and chronic disequilibrium. While individuals with some residual sensation often compensate for their loss through rehabilitation exercises, those who fail to do so are left with no adequate treatment options. An implantable neuroelectronic vestibular prosthesis that emulates the normal labyrinth by sensing head movement and modulating activity on appropriate branches of the vestibular nerve could significantly improve quality of life for these otherwise chronically dizzy patients. This brief review describes the impact and current management of bilateral loss of vestibular sensation, animal studies supporting the feasibility of prosthetic vestibular stimulation, and a vestibular prosthesis designed to restore sensation of head rotation in all directions. Similar to a cochlear implant in concept and size, the Johns Hopkins Multichannel Vestibular Prosthesis (MVP) includes miniature gyroscopes to sense head rotation, a microcontroller to process inputs and control stimulus timing, and current sources switched between pairs of electrodes implanted within the vestibular labyrinth. In rodents and rhesus monkeys rendered bilaterally vestibular-deficient via treatment with gentamicin and/or plugging of semicircular canals, the MVP partially restores the vestibulo-ocular reflex for head rotations about any axis of rotation in 3-dimensional space. Our efforts now focus on addressing issues prerequisite to human implantation, including refinement of electrode designs and surgical technique to enhance stimulus selectivity and preserve

  16. The Swedish radiation protection institute's regulations on general obligations in medical and dental practices using ionising radiation; issued on April 28, 2000

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2000-04-01

    These regulations are applicable to medical and dental practices with ionising radiation used for medical exposures. The regulations are also applicable to exposures of persons who knowingly and willingly, other than as part of their occupation, support and comfort patients undergoing medical exposure.

  17. Case Study: The Venous Thromboembolism Collaborative Team at the Johns Hopkins Hospital

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-05-21

    the use of evidence based medicine as well as a Collaborative of medical and administrative staff, the team developed a computer based decision...audits were conducted for some of the high-risk departments to validate adherence to compliance with evidence - based medicine supporting prevention

  18. The relationship between job satisfaction, burnout, and turnover intention among physicians from urban state-owned medical institutions in Hubei, China: a cross-sectional study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhang Yimin

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Throughout China, a growing number of physicians are leaving or intending to depart from their organizations owing to job dissatisfaction. Little information is available about the role of occupational burnout in this association. We set out to analyze the relationship between job satisfaction, burnout, and turnover intention, and further to determine whether occupational burnout can serve as a mediator among Chinese physicians from urban state-owned medical institutions. Methods A cross-sectional survey was carried out in March 2010 in Hubei Province, central China. The questionnaires assessed sociodemographic characteristics, job satisfaction, burnout, and turnover intention. The job satisfaction and occupational burnout instruments were obtained by modifying the Chinese Physicians' Job Satisfaction Questionnaire (CPJSQ and the Chinese Maslach Burnout Inventory (CMBI, respectively. Such statistical methods as one-way ANOVA, Pearson correlation, GLM-univariate and structural equation modeling were used. Results Of the 1600 physicians surveyed, 1451 provided valid responses. The respondents had medium scores (3.18 +/-0.73 on turnover intention, in which there was significant difference among the groups from three urban areas with different development levels. Turnover intention, which significantly and negatively related to all job-satisfaction subscales, positively related to each subscale of burnout syndrome. Work environment satisfaction (b = -0.074, p , job rewards satisfaction (b = -0.073, p , organizational management satisfaction (b = -0.146, p , and emotional exhaustion (b = 0.135, p were identified as significant direct predictors of the turnover intention of physicians, with 41.2% of the variance explained unitedly, under the control of sociodemographic variables, among which gender, age, and years of service were always significant. However, job-itself satisfaction no longer became significant, with the estimated

  19. The relationship between job satisfaction, burnout, and turnover intention among physicians from urban state-owned medical institutions in Hubei, China: a cross-sectional study

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-01

    Background Throughout China, a growing number of physicians are leaving or intending to depart from their organizations owing to job dissatisfaction. Little information is available about the role of occupational burnout in this association. We set out to analyze the relationship between job satisfaction, burnout, and turnover intention, and further to determine whether occupational burnout can serve as a mediator among Chinese physicians from urban state-owned medical institutions. Methods A cross-sectional survey was carried out in March 2010 in Hubei Province, central China. The questionnaires assessed sociodemographic characteristics, job satisfaction, burnout, and turnover intention. The job satisfaction and occupational burnout instruments were obtained by modifying the Chinese Physicians' Job Satisfaction Questionnaire (CPJSQ) and the Chinese Maslach Burnout Inventory (CMBI), respectively. Such statistical methods as one-way ANOVA, Pearson correlation, GLM-univariate and structural equation modeling were used. Results Of the 1600 physicians surveyed, 1451 provided valid responses. The respondents had medium scores (3.18 +/-0.73) on turnover intention, in which there was significant difference among the groups from three urban areas with different development levels. Turnover intention, which significantly and negatively related to all job-satisfaction subscales, positively related to each subscale of burnout syndrome. Work environment satisfaction (b = -0.074, p intention of physicians, with 41.2% of the variance explained unitedly, under the control of sociodemographic variables, among which gender, age, and years of service were always significant. However, job-itself satisfaction no longer became significant, with the estimated parameter on job rewards satisfaction smaller after burnout syndrome variables were included. As congregated latent concepts, job satisfaction had both significant direct effects (gamma21 = -0.32, p intention (47% explained

  20. Singing Thy Sweet Radiance Encircling the Gem like World: A Comparative Study between Gerard Manley Hopkins and Rabindranath Tagore

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad Kaosar Ahmed

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Rabindranath Tagore, the first Nobel- Laureate in the Indian sub-continent journeyed all spheres of the domain of Bangla Literature in 19th century. His works are viewed in the West as spiritual and mercurial. On the other hand, Born in Victorian England and being influenced by the Oxford Movement, Hopkins decided to convert into restricted form of Catholicism, Jesuit life that made him culturally isolated. Despite having different religious and socio-cultural background their central philosophical concern is in most cases similar. Shading   light on their views about nature, devotion to God, spiritual agony, this article goes deep into their values and beliefs and makes an analogy between them.

  1. Rob Hopkins, 2008, The Transition Handbook. From Oil Dependency to Local Resilience, Green books, 224 p.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luc Semal

    2008-07-01

    Full Text Available Le mouvement pour la Transition (ou Transition movement a été initié en 2005 à Totnes (Devon par Rob Hopkins, professeur de permaculture qui avait été sensibilisé au thème du pic du pétrole quelques mois auparavant : à l’époque, il s’agissait seulement d’élaborer une stratégie locale pour que Totnes puisse à l’avenir se passer de pétrole sans en souffrir. Mais d’autres groupes locaux ont rapidement suivi cet exemple, et en mai 2008, le « réseau de la Transition » comptait déjà 50 localités ...

  2. Risk Factors for Possible Dementia Using the Hopkins Verbal Learning Test and the Mini-Mental State Examination in Shanghai

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xin Xu

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Using a combination of the Hopkins Verbal Learning Test (HVLT and the Mini-Mental State Examination (MMSE, we investigated the prevalence of possible dementia (DEM in community-dwelling elderly in Shanghai. Subsequently, we investigated significant risk factors for DEM and generated a DEM self-checklist for early DEM detection and case management. We found that among a total of 521 participants using a HVLT cut-off score of <19 and a MMSE cut-off score of <24, a total of 69 DEM cases were identified. Risk factors, such as advanced age (≥68 years, low education (no or primary level, self-reported history of hypertension, and self-reported subjective memory complaints (SMC were significantly predictive of DEM. The presence of ≥3 out of four of the above mentioned risk factors can effectively discriminate DEM cases from non-DEM subjects.

  3. Hopkins' syndrome in the differential diagnosis of flaccid paralysis in children: clinical and neurophysiological features. Case report

    OpenAIRE

    Nora, Daniel B.; Gomes, Irenio; El Ammar, Gibran; Nunes, Magda L.

    2003-01-01

    INTRODUÇÃO: A síndrome de Hopkins (SH) é caracterizada por monoplegia ou diplegia, decorrente de lesão no corno anterior da medula, que se segue a um ataque agudo de asma, ocorre geralmente em crianças e sua etiologia ainda não está definida. Há 34 casos descritos no mundo, sendo este o primeiro relato na América do Sul e durante o primeiro ano de vida. CASO: Criança internada aos 4 meses de idade com quadro de sibilância e insuficiência respiratória. Cerca de 3 dias após melhora do quadro re...

  4. Seasonal shifts in accumulation of glycerol biosynthetic gene transcripts in mountain pine beetle, Dendroctonus ponderosae Hopkins (Coleoptera: Curculionidae, larvae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jordie D. Fraser

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Winter mortality is a major factor regulating population size of the mountain pine beetle, Dendroctonus ponderosae Hopkins (Coleoptera: Curculionidae. Glycerol is the major cryoprotectant in this freeze intolerant insect. We report findings from a gene expression study on an overwintering mountain pine beetle population over the course of 35 weeks. mRNA transcript levels suggest glycerol production in the mountain pine beetle occurs through glycogenolytic, gluconeogenic and potentially glyceroneogenic pathways, but not from metabolism of lipids. A two-week lag period between fall glycogen phosphorylase transcript and phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase transcript up-regulation suggests that gluconeogenesis serves as a secondary glycerol-production process, subsequent to exhaustion of the primary glycogenolytic source. These results provide a first look at the details of seasonal gene expression related to the production of glycerol in the mountain pine beetle.

  5. Seasonal shifts in accumulation of glycerol biosynthetic gene transcripts in mountain pine beetle, Dendroctonus ponderosae Hopkins (Coleoptera: Curculionidae), larvae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fraser, Jordie D; Bonnett, Tiffany R; Keeling, Christopher I; Huber, Dezene P W

    2017-01-01

    Winter mortality is a major factor regulating population size of the mountain pine beetle, Dendroctonus ponderosae Hopkins (Coleoptera: Curculionidae). Glycerol is the major cryoprotectant in this freeze intolerant insect. We report findings from a gene expression study on an overwintering mountain pine beetle population over the course of 35 weeks. mRNA transcript levels suggest glycerol production in the mountain pine beetle occurs through glycogenolytic, gluconeogenic and potentially glyceroneogenic pathways, but not from metabolism of lipids. A two-week lag period between fall glycogen phosphorylase transcript and phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase transcript up-regulation suggests that gluconeogenesis serves as a secondary glycerol-production process, subsequent to exhaustion of the primary glycogenolytic source. These results provide a first look at the details of seasonal gene expression related to the production of glycerol in the mountain pine beetle.

  6. Evaluating psychiatric symptoms in Parkinson's Disease by a clinimetric analysis of the Hopkins Symptom Checklist (SCL-90-R)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Carrozzino, Danilo; Morberg, Bo Mohr; Siri, Chiara

    2017-01-01

    Although psychiatric comorbidity in Parkinson's Disease (PD) has often been studied, the individual psychiatric symptoms have rarely been evaluated from a clinimetric point of view in an attempt to measure how much the symptoms have been bothering or distressing the PD patients. The current study...... is therefore aimed at evaluating from a clinimetric viewpoint the severity of psychiatric symptoms affecting PD patients by using the Hopkins Symptom Checklist (SCL-90-R) to show its measurement-driven construct validity (scalability). The conventional nine SCL-90-R subscales (somatization, obsessive...... are bothered with diverse somatic symptoms, but also with specific secondary psychiatric comorbidities which are clinically severe markers of impairment in the day-to-day function implying a negative cooping approach....

  7. An economic analysis of inadequate prescription of antiulcer medications for in-hospital patients at a third level institution in Colombia

    OpenAIRE

    Jorge Enrique Machado-Alba; Juan Daniel Castrillón-Spitia; Manuel José Londoño-Builes; Alejandra Fernández-Cardona; Carlos Felipe Campo-Betancourth; Sergio Andrés Ochoa-Orozco; Luis Felipe Echeverri-Cataño; Joaquín Octavio Ruiz-Villa; Andrés Gaviria-Mendoza

    2014-01-01

    Introduction: The prescription and costs of antiulcer medications for in-hospital use have increased during recent years with reported inadequate use and underused. Aim: To determine the patterns of prescription-indication and also perform an economic analysis of the overcost caused by the non-justified use of antiulcer medications in a third level hospital in Colombia. Materials and methods: Cross-sectional study of prescription-indication of antiulcer medications for patients hospitalized i...

  8. Portrayal of medical decision making around medical interventions life-saving encounters on three medical television shows

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwei, Rebecca J; Jacobs, Elizabeth A.; Wingert, Katherine; Montague, Enid

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Previous literature has shown that patients obtain information about the medical system from television shows. Additionally, shared decision making is regularly cited as the ideal way to make decisions during a medical encounter. Little information exists surrounding the characteristics of medical decision-making, such as who makes the decision, on medical television shows. We evaluate the characteristics of medical decisions in lifesaving encounters on medical television shows and evaluate if these characteristics were different on staged and reality television shows. Methods We coded type of medical intervention, patient’s ability to participate in decision, presence of patient advocate during decision, final decision maker, decision to use intervention, and controversy surrounding decision on three television shows. Frequencies by show were calculated and differences across the three television shows and between staged (ER) and reality (BostonMed and Hopkins) television shows were assessed with chi-square tests. Results The final data set included 37 episodes, 137 patients and 593 interventions. On ER, providers were significantly more likely to make the decision about the medical intervention without informing the patient when a patient was capable of making a decision compared to BostonMed or Hopkins (ptelevision shows we analyzed. It is possible that what patients see on television influences their expectations surrounding the decision making process and the use of medical interventions in everyday healthcare encounters. PMID:26478829

  9. [Spermiologic parameters in Czech men from 1950 to 1984 (analysis of data from the archives of the Sexology Institute of the First Medical School of Charles University and the General Medical School Hospital in Prague].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zvĕrina, J; Urbánek, V; Cirýn, J

    2002-01-01

    Reports maintaining that sperm concentration in male ejaculates had decreased markedly over the past decades captured mind-share all over the world. However, literary data diverge about such a lasting trend. Our objective has been to contribute to the ongoing debate by presenting results of our own research. We have studied semen analyses of 5,363 men who had been tested at an outpatient care unit of the Prague Institute of Sexology between 1950 and 1984. These semen analyses measured volume of the ejaculate, sperm concentration, sperm motility, and a share of sperms with morphological abnormalities. None of these values showed statistically significant deterioration among seven groups of patients, each spanning five years. Therefore, our data did not confirm the above-mentioned lasting trend in semen analysis values. Research teams from all over the world have recently attracted a lot of attention by reporting a no-table decrease over the past decades in sperm concentration in the male ejaculates. However, literary data diverge about such a lasting trend. Our objective has been to contribute to the ongoing debate by presenting results of our own research. We have analysed semen tests filed in the archives of the Institute of Sexology at the 1st Faculty of Medicine of Charles University. We have studied a set of 5,363 men who had undergone their first sperm analysis between 1950 and 1984. We have gathered our data from medical records, using a uniform pattern of investigation. The set was divided into seven five-year groups based on the year of the first analysis. Volume of the ejaculate: The groups showed the following average volume of the ejaculate: 3.9-3.8-3.8-3.8-3.8-3.7-3.7 (ml). Neither the distribution nor the mean value of this variable has changed much over time. Sperm concentration: The groups showed the following mean sperm concentration: 32.9-42.3-56.2-57.9-72.2-70.8-72.3 (million per ml). It is obvious from these results that the mean sperm

  10. Aspects of Reading Acquisition; Proceedings of the Annual Hyman Blumberg Symposium on Research in Early Childhood Education (5th, Johns Hopkins University, Nov. 13-14, 1974).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guthrie, John T., Ed.

    Papers collected in this volume were presented at the Fifth Annual Blumberg Symposium on Research in Early Childhood Education, held at Johns Hopkins University in 1974. Selections include "Alexia" (D. Frank Benson), "Young Children's Expectations for Reading" (Doris R. Entwisle), "Relations between Acquisition of…

  11. Harvey Cushing's case series of trigeminal neuralgia at the Johns Hopkins Hospital: a surgeon's quest to advance the treatment of the 'suicide disease'.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Adams, H.; Pendleton, C.; Latimer, K.; Cohen-Gadol, A.A.; Carson, B.S.; Quinones-Hinojosa, A.

    2011-01-01

    BACKGROUND: A review of Dr. Harvey Cushing's surgical cases at the Johns Hopkins Hospital provided insight into his early work on trigeminal neuralgia (TN). There was perhaps no other affliction that captured his attention in the way that TN did, and he built a remarkable legacy of successful

  12. The Use of Electronic Scholarly Journals: Models of Analysis and Data Drawn from the Project Muse Experience at Johns Hopkins University.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neal, James G.

    This paper outlines a series of quantitative and qualitative models for understanding and evaluating the use of electronic scholarly journals, and summarizes data based on the experience of Project Muse at Johns Hopkins University and early feedback received from subscribing libraries. Project Muse is a collaborative initiative between the Press…

  13. Cross-institutional knowledge-based planning (KBP) implementation and its performance comparison to Auto-Planning Engine (APE).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Binbin; Kusters, Martijn; Kunze-Busch, Martina; Dijkema, Tim; McNutt, Todd; Sanguineti, Giuseppe; Bzdusek, Karl; Dritschilo, Anatoly; Pang, Dalong

    2017-04-01

    To investigate (1) whether a plan library established at one institution can be applied for another institution's knowledge-based planning (KBP); (2) the performance of cross-institutional KBP compared to Auto-Planning Engine (APE). Radboud University Medical Center (RUMC) provided 35 oropharyngeal cancer patients (68Gy to PTV(68) and 50.3Gy to PTV(50.3)) with clinically-delivered and comparative APE plans. The Johns Hopkins University (JHU) contributed a three-dose-level plan library consisting of 179 clinically-delivered plans. MedStar Georgetown University Hospital (MGUH) contributed a KBP approach employing overlap-volume histogram (OVH-KBP), where the JHU library was used for guiding RUMC patients' KBP. Since clinical protocols adopted at RUMC and JHU are different and both approaches require protocol-specific planning parameters as initial input, 10 randomly selected patients from RUMC were set aside for deriving them. The finalized parameters were applied to the remaining 25 patients for OVH-KBP and APE plan generation. A Wilcoxon rank-sum test was used for statistical comparison. PTV(68) and PTV(50.3)'s V95 in OVH-KBP and APE were similar (p>0.36). Cord's D0.1 cc in OVH-KBP was reduced by 5.1Gy (p=0.0001); doses to other organs were similar (p>0.2). APE and OVH-KBP's plan quality is comparable. Institutional-protocol differences can be addressed to allow cross-institutional library sharing. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. A mile in their shoes: interdisciplinary education at the Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pathak, Sujay; Holzmueller, Christine G; Haller, Karen B; Pronovost, Peter J

    2010-01-01

    An elective course exposing medical students to nonphysician hospital providers and staff was conceived and implemented. Goals and objectives identified were to (1) increase students' understanding of the roles of nonphysician professionals in hospital care, (2) demonstrate how the services offered by these professionals complement those offered by physicians, (3) improve students' skill in communicating with nonphysician professionals, (4) develop students' comfort approaching these professionals about patient care issues, (5) show students "what it is like" to be each of these providers, and (6) demonstrate the common challenges they face. A 2-week elective rotation paired students with experienced preceptors in several nonphysician hospital care disciplines. Quantitative and qualitative data indicate that this experience empowered students to collaborate more actively with the nonphysician colleagues, whom they would encounter in their careers, to provide coordinated patient care.

  15. Evolutionary institutionalism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fürstenberg, Dr Kai

    Institutions are hard to define and hard to study. Long prominent in political science have been two theories: Rational Choice Institutionalism (RCI) and Historical Institutionalism (HI). Arising from the life sciences is now a third: Evolutionary Institutionalism (EI). Comparative strengths and weaknesses of these three theories warrant review, and the value-to-be-added by expanding the third beyond Darwinian evolutionary theory deserves consideration. Should evolutionary institutionalism expand to accommodate new understanding in ecology, such as might apply to the emergence of stability, and in genetics, such as might apply to political behavior? Core arguments are reviewed for each theory with more detailed exposition of the third, EI. Particular attention is paid to EI's gene-institution analogy; to variation, selection, and retention of institutional traits; to endogeneity and exogeneity; to agency and structure; and to ecosystem effects, institutional stability, and empirical limitations in behavioral genetics. RCI, HI, and EI are distinct but complementary. Institutional change, while amenable to rational-choice analysis and, retrospectively, to criticaljuncture and path-dependency analysis, is also, and importantly, ecological. Stability, like change, is an emergent property of institutions, which tend to stabilize after change in a manner analogous to allopatric speciation. EI is more than metaphorically biological in that institutional behaviors are driven by human behaviors whose evolution long preceded the appearance of institutions themselves.

  16. Institutional advantage

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Martin, Xavier

    Is there such a thing as institutional advantage—and what does it mean for the study of corporate competitive advantage? In this article, I develop the concept of institutional competitive advantage, as distinct from plain competitive advantage and from comparative institutional advantage. I first

  17. Clinical Communities at Johns Hopkins Medicine: An Emerging Approach to Quality Improvement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gould, Lois J; Wachter, Patricia A; Aboumatar, Hanan; Blanding, Renee J; Brotman, Daniel J; Bullard, Janine; Gilmore, Maureen M; Golden, Sherita Hill; Howell, Eric; Ishii, Lisa; Lee, K H Ken; Paul, Martin G; Rotello, Leo C; Satin, Andrew J; Wick, Elizabeth C; Winner, Laura; Zenilman, Michael E; Pronovost, Peter J

    2015-09-01

    Clinical communities are an emerging approach to quality improvement (QI) to which several large-scale projects have attributed some success. In 2011 the Armstrong Institute for Patient Safety and Quality established clinical communities as a core strategy to connect frontline providers from six different hospitals to improve quality of care, patient safety, and value across the health system. CLINICAL COMMUNITIES: Fourteen clinical communities that presented great opportunity for improvement were established. A community could focus on a clinical area, a patient population, a group, a process, a safety-related issue, or nearly any health care issue. The collaborative spirit of the communities embraced interdisciplinary membership and representation from each hospital in each community. Communities engaged in team-building activities and facilitated discussions, met monthly, and were encouraged to meet in person to develop relationships and build trust. After a community was established, patients and families were invited to join and share their perspectives and experiences. ENABLING STRUCTURES: The clinical community structure provided clinicians access to resources, such as technical experts and safety and QI researchers, that were not easily otherwise accessible or available. Communities convened clinicians from each hospital to consider safety problems and their resolution and share learning with workplace peers and local unit safety teams. The clinical communities engaged 195 clinicians from across the health system in QI projects and peer learning. Challenges included limited financial support and time for clinicians, timely access to data, limited resources from the health system, and not enough time with improvement experts.

  18. The Francis Crick Institute.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peters, Keith; Smith, Jim

    2017-04-01

    The Francis Crick Institute Laboratory, opened in 2016, is supported by the Medical Research Council, Cancer Research UK, the Wellcome Trust, and University College London, King's College London and Imperial College London. The emphasis on research training and early independence of gifted scientists in a multidisciplinary environment provides unique opportunities for UK medical science, including clinical and translational research. © Royal College of Physicians 2017. All rights reserved.

  19. Smartphone Use and the Perception of Professionalism Among Medical Students and Surgical Faculty.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patel, Silka; Lidor, Anne; Sanyal, Abanti; Goepfert, Alice R; Hueppchen, Nancy

    2017-08-03

    To understand the perception of professionalism surrounding smartphone use (wards/educational activities) among medical students and surgical faculty. A prospective cohort study was conducted using an electronic survey and distributed to third- and fourth-year medical students, obstetrics/gynecology, and surgery faculty members. Five cases were randomly presented; participants were asked to review and rate the clinician's behavior on a 5-point Likert scale. The study was completed at The Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, a tertiary care institution, in the departments of gyn/ob and surgery. A total of 123 medical students (51% response rate) from the class of 2015/2016 along with 73 surgical faculty in the departments of gyn/ob and surgery completed the study. Of the surgical faculty, 48% were ob/gyn (54% response rate) and 52% were surgery (21% response rate). Of note, when quarrying the department of surgery all surgical faculty were included, however, only those with direct student interaction were asked to complete the survey leading to the lower response rate. In 3 of 5 scenarios, students and faculty had significant differences in perception of professionalism (pperception of acceptable behavior in certain scenarios. Copyright © 2017 Association of Program Directors in Surgery. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Institutional entrepreneurship:

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gretzinger, Susanne

    2018-01-01

    of agents or organisations in the policy arena. The present chapter understands institutional entrepreneurship as the process of changing institutionalised practices. Based on a literature review, it describes the triggers, activities and potential effects of institutional entrepreneurs. The chapter......Institutional entrepreneurship pays specific attention to the process and outcomes of agents who are willing and capable of changing institutions. It has some common ground with the political entrepreneur, a concept that proposes change in norms and institutions because of commitment and activities...... concludes by tentatively arguing that political entrepreneurs can be institutional entrepreneurs, but institutional entrepreneurship can be considered as the broader concept that incorporates strategies and visions as well as interpretative-discursive power into the conceptual framework....

  1. [How the patients on sick leave assess the Medical Inspector: The Institut Català d'Avaluacions Mèdiques (ICAM) experience in Catalonia].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gálvez Hernando, G; Mira Solves, J J; Jardí Lliberia, J; Guilabert Mora, M; Manzanera López, R

    2012-01-01

    To analyse the patient perception of the medical inspector, and to examine whether this perception is related with the outcome of the medical report. A cross-sectional study based on telephone interviews with a random sample of patients visited in Catalonia in 2010 for temporary (TSL) or permanent (PSL) sick leave. The study was conducted in November 2011. A stratified sample considering the time from the consultation and province where patients were visited was used. The scale was assessed by Intraclass Correlation coefficient (0.93, 95% CI; 0.92-0.94) and testing with the Spearman-Brown split-half coefficient (0.93). A total of 609 patients were surveyed. A majority of them (400; 65.7%) had a positive opinion of the medical inspector. When PSL was denied, the assessment was worse (P=.002), this was different when TSL was cancelled. Patients who did not continue in PSL stated that doctor's decisions were determined by non-medical interests, and not oriented to the defence of the patient's rights (odds ratio 2.8, 95% CI; 1.7 to 4.8). When the perceptions were negative, patients focus their criticism on the role of medical inspector (Pindependence of the physician. This is not so in the case of TSL. Copyright © 2011 SECA. Published by Elsevier Espana. All rights reserved.

  2. Talbot-Lau X-ray Phase-Contrast Research at Johns Hopkins

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stutman, Dan [Johns Hopkins Univ., Baltimore, MD (United States); Valdivia, Maria Pia [Johns Hopkins Univ., Baltimore, MD (United States); Finkenthal, Michael [Johns Hopkins Univ., Baltimore, MD (United States)

    2014-05-12

    The Talbot-Lau (T-L) grating interferometer enables X-ray differential phase-contrast (DPC) imaging with low coherence conventional X-ray tubes, being thus attractive for medical and other applications. We studied several variations of the conventional T-L interferometer design. First, to extend the T-L method to high X-ray energy we developed a symmetric interferometer having gratings inclined at a glancing angle (GAI). This simple setup enables achieving high fringe contrast up to 80 kVp or more. The high GAI contrast in turn enabled demonstrating for the first time DPC-CT of soft tissues with clinically compatible X-ray dose and energy. Industrial and security applications of the GAI appear also possible. Further on, we studied high magnification T-L interferometry for electron density diagnostic in high energy density plasmas. High magnification refraction radiography with laser driven backlighters can help understand inertial confinement fusion experiments for instance. For plasma diagnostic using a single radiographic image we develop Moiré fringe deflectometry. We also extended the T-L method below 10 keV using membrane and free standing gratings. Lastly, we explored using grazing incidence micro-periodic mirrors instead of gratings in the T-L interferometers. These enable in principle achieving very small interferometer periods over a broad energy range, at the price of a narrow field of view in one dimension. The possibility of using these designs for DPC imaging of materials under extreme conditions will also be examined.

  3. Extreme ultraviolet observations of G191-B2B and the local interstellar medium with the Hopkins Ultraviolet Telescope

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kimble, Randy A.; Davidsen, Arthur F.; Blair, William P.; Bowers, Charles W.; Van Dyke Dixon, W.; Durrance, Samuel T.; Feldman, Paul D.; Ferguson, Henry C.; Henry, Richard C.; Kriss, Gerard A.

    1993-01-01

    During the Astro-l mission in 1990 December, the Hopkins Ultraviolet Telescope (HUT) was used to observe the extreme ultraviolet spectrum (415-912 A) of the hot DA white dwarf GI91-B2B. Absorption by neutral helium shortward of the 504 A He I absorption edge is clearly detected in the raw spectrum. Model fits to the observed spectrum require interstellar neutral helium and neutral hydrogen column densities of 1.45 +/- 0.065 x 10 exp 17/sq cm and 1.69 +/- 0.12 x 10 exp 18/sq cm, respectively. Comparison of the neutral columns yields a direct assessment of the ionization state of the local interstellar cloud surrounding the Sun. The neutral hydrogen to helium ratio of 11.6 +/- 1.0 observed by HUT strongly contradicts the widespread view that hydrogen is much more ionized than helium in the local interstellar medium, a view which has motivated some exotic theoretical explanations for the supposed high ionization.

  4. Embedded performance validity tests within the Hopkins Verbal Learning Test - Revised and the Brief Visuospatial Memory Test - Revised.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sawyer, R John; Testa, S Marc; Dux, Moira

    2017-01-01

    Various research studies and neuropsychology practice organizations have reiterated the importance of developing embedded performance validity tests (PVTs) to detect potentially invalid neurocognitive test data. This study investigated whether measures within the Hopkins Verbal Learning Test - Revised (HVLT-R) and the Brief Visuospatial Memory Test - Revised (BVMT-R) could accurately classify individuals who fail two or more PVTs during routine clinical assessment. The present sample of 109 United States military veterans (Mean age = 52.4, SD = 13.3), all consisted of clinically referred patients and received a battery of neuropsychological tests. Based on performance validity findings, veterans were assigned to valid (n = 86) or invalid (n = 23) groups. Of the 109 patients in the overall sample, 77 were administered the HLVT-R and 75 were administered the BVMT-R, which were examined for classification accuracy. The HVLT-R Recognition Discrimination Index and the BVMT-R Retention Percentage showed good to adequate discrimination with an area under the curve of .78 and .70, respectively. The HVLT-R Recognition Discrimination Index showed sensitivity of .53 with specificity of .93. The BVMT-R Retention Percentage demonstrated sensitivity of .31 with specificity of .92. When used in conjunction with other PVTs, these new embedded PVTs may be effective in the detection of invalid test data, although they are not intended for use in patients with dementia.

  5. How the Distinctive Cultures of Osteopathic and Allopathic Medical Schools Affect the Careers, Perceptions, and Institutional Efforts of Their Anatomy Faculties: A Qualitative Case Study of Two Schools

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brokaw, James J.; Byram, Jessica N.; Traser, Courtney J.; Arbor, Tafline C.

    2016-01-01

    Anatomy faculties are integral to basic science instruction in medical schools, particularly given the preponderance of anatomic instruction in the preclinical curriculum. Recent years have witnessed major curricular restructuring and other emerging national trends that pose significant challenges to anatomists. An examination of anatomy faculty…

  6. A History of Medicine and the Establishment of Medical Institutions in Middlesex County, New Jersey that Transformed Doctor and Patient Relationships during the Early Twentieth Century

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whitfield-Spinner, Linda

    2011-01-01

    The early twentieth century was a period of tremendous advancements in medicine and technology and as a result experienced a revolutionary change in the delivery of healthcare in America. Modern medicine which encompassed specialized knowledge, technical procedures, and rules of behavior, changed the way medical care was provided in the United…

  7. Medical Students' Exposure to the Humanities Correlates with Positive Personal Qualities and Reduced Burnout: A Multi-Institutional U.S. Survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mangione, Salvatore; Chakraborti, Chayan; Staltari, Giuseppe; Harrison, Rebecca; Tunkel, Allan R; Liou, Kevin T; Cerceo, Elizabeth; Voeller, Megan; Bedwell, Wendy L; Fletcher, Keaton; Kahn, Marc J

    2018-01-29

    Literature, music, theater, and visual arts play an uncertain and limited role in medical education. One of the arguments often advanced in favor of teaching the humanities refers to their capacity to foster traits that not only improve practice, but might also reduce physician burnout-an increasing scourge in today's medicine. Yet, research remains limited. To test the hypothesis that medical students with higher exposure to the humanities would report higher levels of positive physician qualities (e.g., wisdom, empathy, self-efficacy, emotional appraisal, spatial skills), while reporting lower levels of negative qualities that are detrimental to physician well-being (e.g., intolerance of ambiguity, physical fatigue, emotional exhaustion, and cognitive weariness). An online survey. All students enrolled at five U.S. medical schools during the 2014-2015 academic year were invited by email to take part in our online survey. Students reported their exposure to the humanities (e.g., music, literature, theater, visual arts) and completed rating scales measuring selected personal qualities. In all, 739/3107 medical students completed the survey (23.8%). Regression analyses revealed that exposure to the humanities was significantly correlated with positive personal qualities, including empathy (p burnout (p = 0.01). Thus, all hypotheses were statistically significant, with effect sizes ranging from 0.2 to 0.59. This study confirms the association between exposure to the humanities and both a higher level of students' positive qualities and a lower level of adverse traits. These findings may carry implications for medical school recruitment and curriculum design. "[Science and humanities are] twin berries on one stem, grievous damage has been done to both in regarding [them]... in any other light than complemental." (William Osler, Br Med J. 1919;2:1-7).

  8. Evaluation of Several Common Antimotion Sickness Medications and Recommendations Concerning Their Potential Usefulness During Special Operations

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-12-02

    aboard an aircraft carrier , the USS Kennedy (CV-67), a Senior Medical Officer (E. Hopkins III, personal communication, 2001) noted that motion-induced...stance), while wearing a set of noise dampening headphones . Subjects closed their eyes and tried to maintain balance as long as they could, for a

  9. Bioterror Preparedness-Educational Programming for Military, Public Health and Civilian Medical Personnel

    Science.gov (United States)

    2006-10-01

    from Rice University and his medical degree from Johns Hopkins University. He held a leadership role in developing concepts of pathogenesis and...of the U.S. Government. His professional interests include the pathology and epidemiology of viral diseases ( rabies , arboviruses, viral hemorrhagic

  10. Renal insufficiency, bleeding and prescription of discharge medication in patients undergoing percutaneous coronary intervention in the National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute (NHLBI) Dynamic Registry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maree, Andrew O; Margey, Ronan J; Selzer, Faith; Bajrangee, Amrit; Jneid, Hani; Marroquin, Oscar C; Mulukutla, Suresh R; Laskey, Warren K; Jacobs, Alice K

    2016-01-01

    To establish the relationship between renal insufficiency, bleeding and prescription of cardiovascular medication. This was a prospective, multi-center, cohort study of consecutive patients undergoing PCI during three NHLBI Dynamic Registry recruitment waves. Major and minor bleeding, access site bleeding and rates of prescription of cardiovascular medication at discharge were determined based on estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR). Renal insufficiency was an independent predictor of major adverse cardiovascular events (MACE). Bleeding events and access site bleeding requiring transfusion were significantly associated with degrees of renal insufficiency (pinsufficiency is associated with bleeding in patients undergoing PCI. Patients with renal insufficiency are less likely to receive recommended discharge pharmacotherapy. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. 78 FR 26055 - National Cancer Institute; Notice of Closed Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-05-03

    ... Committee: National Cancer Institute Special Emphasis Panel; Early-Stage Development of Informatics... of Extramural Activities, National Cancer Institute, NIH, 9609 Medical Center Drive, Room 7W-236...

  12. The Knowledge and Uptake of Travel Vaccine Among Medical Doctors in a Tertiary Health Institution in Plateau State, North Central Nigeria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hassan, Zuwaira Ibrahim; Afolaranmi, Tolulope O

    2015-01-01

    Travelers play a significant role in the spread of infectious diseases across international borders, through their travel patterns and behaviors. Travel maybe the only risk factor for infectious diseases that are well controlled in the travelers' country of residence, particularly vaccine-preventable diseases. The role of vaccination among travelers is an essential component of the control of travel-associated infectious diseases. This study was conducted to assess the knowledge and uptake of travel vaccine among medical doctors in Jos University Teaching Hospital (JUTH). This was a descriptive cross-sectional study conducted in 2013 using quantitative method of data collection among 189 medical doctors. Epi Info™ statistical software package version 3.5.4 was used for data analysis and a P ≤ 0.05 was considered statistically significant. The mean age of the respondents was 33.8 ± 4.5 years, majority of the respondents (96.3%) were aware of travel vaccines with 45 (71.4%) of the 63 respondents who had embarked on international travel prior to the study had taken travel vaccine in their last travel. Knowledge of travel vaccination was found to have statistically significant relationship with uptake of travel vaccine (P = 0.013). This study has revealed the need to improve the knowledge and uptake of travel vaccine among medical doctors.

  13. The knowledge and uptake of travel vaccine among medical doctors in a tertiary health institution in Plateau State, North Central Nigeria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zuwaira Ibrahim Hassan

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Travelers play a significant role in the spread of infectious diseases across international borders, through their travel patterns and behaviors. Travel maybe the only risk factor for infectious diseases that are well controlled in the travelers′ country of residence, particularly vaccine-preventable diseases. The role of vaccination among travelers is an essential component of the control of travel-associated infectious diseases. This study was conducted to assess the knowledge and uptake of travel vaccine among medical doctors in Jos University Teaching Hospital (JUTH. Materials and Methods: This was a descriptive cross-sectional study conducted in 2013 using quantitative method of data collection among 189 medical doctors. Epi Info™ statistical software package version 3.5.4 was used for data analysis and a P ͳ 0.05 was considered statistically significant. Result: The mean age of the respondents was 33.8 ± 4.5 years, majority of the respondents (96.3% were aware of travel vaccines with 45 (71.4% of the 63 respondents who had embarked on international travel prior to the study had taken travel vaccine in their last travel. Knowledge of travel vaccination was found to have statistically significant relationship with uptake of travel vaccine (P = 0.013. Conclusion: This study has revealed the need to improve the knowledge and uptake of travel vaccine among medical doctors.

  14. A multi-institutional study exploring the impact of positive mental health on medical students' professionalism in an era of high burnout.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dyrbye, Liselotte N; Harper, William; Moutier, Christine; Durning, Steven J; Power, David V; Massie, F Stanford; Eacker, Anne; Thomas, Matthew R; Satele, Daniel; Sloan, Jeff A; Shanafelt, Tait D

    2012-08-01

    Although burnout is associated with erosion of professionalism and serious personal consequences, whether positive mental health can enhance professionalism and how it shapes personal experience remain poorly understood. The study simultaneously explores the relationship between positive mental health and burnout with professionalism and personal experience. The authors surveyed 4,400 medical students at seven U.S. medical schools in 2009 to assess mental health (categorized as languishing, moderate, and flourishing) and burnout. Additional items explored professional behaviors, beliefs, suicidal ideation, and serious thoughts of dropping out. A total of 2,682/4,400 (61%) responded. Prevalence of suicidal ideation (55/114 [48.2%], 281/1,128 [24.9%], and 127/1,409 [9.1%]) and serious thoughts of dropping out (15/114 [13.2%], 30/1,128 [2.7%], and 14/1,409 [1.0%]) decreased as mental health improved from languishing, moderate, and flourishing, respectively (all P burnout (all P students' altruistic beliefs regarding physicians' responsibility toward society improved. For example, 33/113 (29.2%), 426/1,120 (38.0%), and 718/1,391 (51.6%) of students with languishing, moderate, and flourishing mental health endorsed all five altruistic professional beliefs (P students with burnout, whereas fewer relationships were found among students without burnout. Findings suggest that positive mental health attenuates some adverse consequences of burnout. Medical student wellness programs should aspire to prevent burnout and promote mental health.

  15. Forensic medical examinations conducted on complainants of sexual assault in the Forensic Medicine Institute, Collegium Medicum in Bydgoszcz, Nicolaus Copernicus University in Torun, between 2006 and 2013.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Engelgardt, P; Cychowska, M; Bloch-Bogusławska, E

    2014-01-01

    A total of 46 cases of alleged sexual assault were analysed from the years 2006-2013 where forensic medical examinations were conducted. The material was compared with data from literature. All the victims were female. In 9 cases (20%) a sexual assault by sexual touching was alleged, 67% of complainants (31 cases) had alleged non-consensual sexual intercourse, 6 complainants (13%) had no recollection of events. Genital area injuries were reported in 26% of sexual assault victims. Injuries of other parts of the body were found in 73% of victims. None of the subjects were positive for severe injuries such as fractures, wounds, and head trauma with loss of consciousness. The majority of complainants (29 cases, 63%) were examined within 24 hours after the incident and 6 examinees (13%) were assessed between 24 and 48 hours after the alleged sexual assault. Eleven forensic medical examinations (24%) were conducted after the lapse of more than 48 hours since the alleged incident. Twenty nine complainants admitted that they had washed their genital area after the sexual assault. Forensic swabs were taken during all forensic medical examinations.

  16. Using the Johns Hopkins' Aggregated Diagnosis Groups (ADGs) to predict 1-year mortality in population-based cohorts of patients with diabetes in Ontario, Canada.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Austin, P C; Shah, B R; Newman, A; Anderson, G M

    2012-09-01

    There are limited validated methods to ascertain comorbidities for risk adjustment in ambulatory populations of patients with diabetes using administrative health-care databases. The objective was to examine the ability of the Johns Hopkins' Aggregated Diagnosis Groups to predict mortality in population-based ambulatory samples of both incident and prevalent subjects with diabetes. Retrospective cohorts constructed using population-based administrative data. The incident cohort consisted of all 346,297 subjects diagnosed with diabetes between 1 April 2004 and 31 March 2008. The prevalent cohort consisted of all 879,849 subjects with pre-existing diabetes on 1 January, 2007. The outcome was death within 1 year of the subject's index date. A logistic regression model consisting of age, sex and indicator variables for 22 of the 32 Johns Hopkins' Aggregated Diagnosis Group categories had excellent discrimination for predicting mortality in incident diabetes patients: the c-statistic was 0.87 in an independent validation sample. A similar model had excellent discrimination for predicting mortality in prevalent diabetes patients: the c-statistic was 0.84 in an independent validation sample. Both models demonstrated very good calibration, denoting good agreement between observed and predicted mortality across the range of predicted mortality in which the large majority of subjects lay. For comparative purposes, regression models incorporating the Charlson comorbidity index, age and sex, age and sex, and age alone had poorer discrimination than the model that incorporated the Johns Hopkins' Aggregated Diagnosis Groups. Logistical regression models using age, sex and the John Hopkins' Aggregated Diagnosis Groups were able to accurately predict 1-year mortality in population-based samples of patients with diabetes. © 2011 The Authors. Diabetic Medicine © 2011 Diabetes UK.

  17. Donation of surplus frozen embryos for stem cell research or fertility treatment-should medical professionals and healthcare institutions be allowed to exercise undue influence on the informed decision of their former patients?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heng, Boon Chin

    2006-01-01

    The increasing availability of clinical assisted reproduction has led to an accumulated surplus of frozen embryos within fertility clinics worldwide. Couples that have attained success in clinical assisted reproduction, and have no further desire to reproduce; are often faced with an agonizing dilemma on what to do with their surplus frozen embryos-whether to simply discard them, or donate either for scientific research or to other infertile couples. There is a risk that persons or institutions directly involved in procuring donated embryos will prioritize their own interests over the informed choice of the patient to donate either for scientific research or to other infertile couples. Very often, formerly infertile couples who have attained reproductive success feel an overwhelming sense of gratitude to the fertility doctor handling their treatment. Hence, there is a risk of medical professionals exercising undue influence on their former patients, to sway the final decision to their preferred outcome. In the private practice setting, the preferred outcome would likely be donation for the treatment of other infertile couples; whilst in the case of medical professionals affiliated with research or academic institutions, the preferred outcome would likely be donation for stem cell research.

  18. Institutional actorhood

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Madsen, Christian Uhrenholdt

    In this paper I describe the changing role of intra-organizational experts in the face of institutional complexity of their field. I do this through a qualitative investigation of the institutional and organizational roles of actors in Danish organizations who are responsible for the efforts...... to comply with the Danish work environment regulation. And by doing so I also describe how institutional complexity and organizational responses to this complexity are particular important for the changing modes of governance that characterizes contemporary welfare states....

  19. Competence and confidence with basic procedural skills: the experience and opinions of fourth-year medical students at a single institution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dehmer, Jeffrey J; Amos, Keith D; Farrell, Timothy M; Meyer, Anthony A; Newton, Warren P; Meyers, Michael O

    2013-05-01

    Data indicate that students are unprepared to perform basic medical procedures on graduation. The authors' aim was to characterize graduating students' experience with and opinions about these skills. In 2011, an online survey queried 156 fourth-year medical students about their experience with, and actual and desired levels of competence for, nine procedural skills (Foley catheter insertion, nasogastric tube insertion, venipuncture, intravenous catheter insertion, arterial puncture, basic suturing, endotracheal intubation, lumbar puncture, and thoracentesis). Students self-reported competence on a four-point Likert scale (4=independently performs skill; 1=unable to perform skill). Data were analyzed by analysis of variance and Student t test. A five-point Likert scale was used to assess student confidence. One hundred thirty-four (86%) students responded. Two skills were performed more than two times by over 50% of students: Foley catheter insertion and suturing. Mean level of competence ranged from 3.13±0.75 (Foley catheter insertion) to 1.7±0.7 (thoracentesis). A gap in desired versus actual level of competence existed for all procedures (Pskills except arterial puncture and suturing. Participants had performed most skills infrequently and rated themselves as being unable to perform them without assistance. Strategies to improve student experience and competence of procedural skills must evolve to improve the technical competency of graduating students because their current competency varies widely.

  20. Associations between respiratory illnesses and secondhand smoke exposure in flight attendants: A cross-sectional analysis of the Flight Attendant Medical Research Institute Survey

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Redberg Rita F

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Secondhand tobacco smoke (SHS is associated with increased risk of respiratory illness, cancer, and cardiovascular disease. Prior to smoking bans on airlines in the late 1980s, flight attendants were exposed to a significant amount of SHS. In the present study, we examine associations between flight attendant SHS exposure and development of respiratory illnesses and cardiovascular disease. Methods Between December 2006 and October 2010, three hundred sixty-two flight attendants completed an online questionnaire with information regarding experience as a flight attendant, medical history, smoking history, and SHS exposure. Rates of illnesses in flight attendants were compared with an age and smoking history matched population sample from NHANES 2005-2006. Logistic regression analysis was used to examine the association of reported medical conditions and pre-ban years of exposure. Results Compared with the sample from NHANES 2005-2006, flight attendants had increased prevalence of chronic bronchitis (11.7% vs. 7.2%, p Conclusions Flight attendants experience increased rates of respiratory illnesses compared to a population sample. The frequency of symptoms of nasal congestion, throat or eye irritation is associated with occupational SHS exposure in the pre-smoking ban era.

  1. Changes in medical students' exposure to and attitudes about drug company interactions from 2003 to 2012: a multi-institutional follow-up survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sierles, Frederick S; Kessler, Kenneth H; Mintz, Matthew; Beck, Gary; Starr, Stephanie; Lynn, D Joanne; Chao, Jason; Cleary, Lynn M; Shore, William; Stengel, Terrie L; Brodkey, Amy C

    2015-08-01

    To ascertain whether changes occurred in medical student exposure to and attitudes about drug company interactions from 2003-2012, which factors influence exposure and attitudes, and whether exposure and attitudes influence future plans to interact with drug companies. In 2012, the authors surveyed 1,269 third-year students at eight U.S. medical schools. Items explored student exposure to, attitudes toward, and future plans regarding drug company interactions. The authors compared 2012 survey data with their 2003 survey data from third-year students at the same schools. The 2012 response rate was 68.2% (866/1,269). Compared with 2003, in 2012, students were significantly less frequently exposed to interactions (1.6/month versus 4.1/month, P students (65.0%) reported private outpatient offices were the main location of exposure to pharmaceutical representatives, despite spending only 18.4% of their clerkship-rotation time there. In 2012, 310/703 students (44.1%) were unaware their schools had rules restricting interactions, and 467/837 (55.8%) planned to interact with pharmaceutical representatives during residency. Students in 2012 had less exposure to drug company interactions and were more likely to have skeptical attitudes than students in 2003. These changes are consistent with national organizations' recommendations to limit and teach about these interactions. Continued efforts to study and influence students' and physician role models' exposures to and attitudes about drug companies are warranted.

  2. Institutional Controls

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — This dataset consists of institutional control data from multiple Superfund sites in U.S. EPA Region 8. These data were acquired from multiple sources at different...

  3. Institutional upbringing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gulløv, Eva

    2008-01-01

    current testing of Danish language fluency levels among pre-school minority children. Testing language skills marks and defines distinctions that reinforce images of deviance that, in turn, legitimize initiatives to enrol children, specifically minority children, in child care institutions....

  4. Institutional ethnography

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lund, Rebecca; Tienari, Janne

    2016-01-01

    of managerial respondents. This leads to another bias in the study of M&As: an managerial one. These critiques are an important step in pinpointing some of the problematic aspects in the field, which we suggest can be part remedied by institutional ethnography developed by Dorothy Smith and her colleagues....... In institutional ethnography the notion of objectification is applied to describe research processes like those that have been found to dominate in scholarly work on M&As. In this chapter, we offer an outline of Smiths critique of objectification, elucidate how institutional ethnography seeks to address it......, and point to some of the problems in M&A studies identified through this lens. Finally, we argue why institutional ethnography, in comparison with other methods of inquiry, is particularly fruitful in the study of mergers and acquisitions....

  5. Institutional Investors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Birkmose, Hanne Søndergaard; Strand, Therese

    Research Question/Issue: Institutional investors are facing increased pressure and threats of legislation from the European Union to abandon passive ownership strategies. This study investigates the prerequisites for – and potential dissimilarities in the practice of, active ownership among....../Policy Implications: Regulators should be aware of the impact by local governance mechanisms, and how shareholders react under different legal and practical prerequisites. The paper also highlights legal elements that differ between Denmark and Sweden, and which might affect institutional activism....

  6. Hopkins, Prof. Frederick Gowland

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Academy Public Lecture. Posted on 19 January 2018. Seasonal and Pandemic Influenza by Prof. Kanta Subbarao 25 January 2018 at 1600 hrs. Ground floor, Main auditorium, New Biological Sciences Building, IISc. Event Poster ...

  7. Nurses' role in medical error recovery: an integrative review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaffney, Theresa A; Hatcher, Barbara J; Milligan, Renee

    2016-04-01

    The aim of this study was to conduct an integrative review of the literature to fully understand nurses' role in medical error recovery. Despite focused efforts on error prevention, the prevalence of medical errors occurring in the health care system remains a concern. Patient harm can be reduced or prevented by adequate recovery processes that include identifying, interrupting and correcting medical errors in a timely fashion. Both medical error prevention and recovery are critical components in advancing patient safety, yet little is known about nurses' role in medical error recovery. An integrative review of the literature, guided by Whittmore and Knafl's (Journal of Advanced Nursing, 5, 2005, 546) five-step process, was conducted for the period between 2000-2015. A comprehensive search yielded twelve articles for this review. The level and quality of evidence of the included articles was rated using a five-level rating system and the Johns Hopkins Nursing Quality of Evidence Appraisal developed by ©The Johns Hopkins Hospital/The Johns Hopkins University. The medical error recovery rate varied across specialty nursing populations with nurses recovering, on average, as many as one error per shift to as few as one error per week. Nurses rely on knowing the patient, environment and plan of care to aid in medical error recovery. Nurses play a unique yet invisible role in identifying, interrupting and recovering medical errors. Individual and organisational factors influencing nurses' ability to recover medical errors remain unclear. Greater understanding of nurse characteristics and organisational factors that influence error recovery can foster the development of effective strategies to detect and correct medical errors and enable organisations to reduce negative outcomes. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  8. Research on Charging Price in Medical Institutions Providing Elderly Care in Chengdu%成都市医养结合型医疗机构的价格收费研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    田帆; 王阳; 范宁玥; 翟辛谊; 潘杰

    2017-01-01

    目的:探究成都市医养结合型医疗机构服务的具体项目和收费方式,为成都市针对医养结合型医疗机构制定相应价格收费政策提供建议.方法:通过文献复习、焦点访谈、问卷调查等方法,对成都市医养结合型医疗机构的价格收费展开研究.结果:目前成都市医养结合型医疗机构提供的服务项目可概括为五类:照护、护理、康复、评估和临终关怀服务.服务项目的价格收费包括医疗和养老两个方面,大多数新增服务项目尚缺乏收费标准和收费依据.相关机构负责人最为重视将康复服务纳入收费项目.结论:政府应完善相关收费标准,从政策和制度上提高医养结合型服务的供给和服务质量,切实解决目前医养结合型医疗机构面临的价格收费问题,满足老年人对医养结合型养老服务的需求.%Objective:To survey the price and service information of the medical institutions which provided elderly care services in Chengdu,in order to provide suggestions on designing corresponding charging policy for medical institutions providing elderly care services.Methods:Literature review,in-depth interview,and questionnaire survey were respectively conducted on implementing research of charging prices for medical institutions providing elderly care services.Results:At present,there were five types of services provided by the institutions integrating medical and elderly care:care services,nursing services,rehabilitation services,assessment services and hospice services.The charging for service items contained health care and services for the elderly,however,most new added service items still lacked charging regulation and evidence.The habitation services were ranked as the highest priority to be included in the charging list by the government.Conclusion:The local government should modify the related price regulation and promote the development of the integrating medical and elderly care.

  9. [Prevalence and characteristics of the "burnout syndrome" of the medical staff of cancer and TB institutions of Primorskiĭ Kraĭ].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bektasova, M V; Kaptsov, V A; Sheparev, A A

    2012-01-01

    As 50 doctors and 70 nurses in oncologic dispensaries as well 90 doctors and 110 nurses in tuberculosis dispensaries in Primorye have been studied on the basis of voluntary testing methods supposed by C. Maslach and V.V. Boiko. The aim of this study was to estimate the relative prevalence and psychological features of the "burnout syndrome" among doctors and nurses of oncologic and tuberculosis dispensaries in Primorye Territory. "Emotional burnout" in various stages of its development is much more common among nurses (75% of respondents), compared with physicians (less than 50% tested). In nursing professional burnout syndrome developed significantly more frequently in the more severe form, and with less seniority of professional activity. The dependence of burning on the age and professional experience is more common for physicians. There is an urgent need to study the epidemiology of the "burnout syndrome" and identify ways to prevent the formation of social syndrome in medical personnel.

  10. Extending professional education to health workers at grass root level: An experience from All India Institute of Medical Sciences, New Delhi

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K K Deepak

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: In India, the opportunities for professional education of the grass root level health workers are grossly inadequate. Capacity building of all categories of health workers is needed for enhancing health outcomes. Objectives: To plan and implement a professional development training program for all categories of allied health workers and to assess its outcomes in terms of knowledge and skills Materials and Method: We planned and organized a ′one week′(15 h training program for 10 categories of allied health workers (1260 working in our hospital. The program included nine generic skills/topics: the prestige of AIIMS, sterilization & infection control, universal precaution, biomedical waste management, public health, life style & healthy nutrition, fire safety, communication skills and office procedure besides subject specific skills. Trainers were drawn from 12 departments. Training methodology included interactive lectures, narratives, demonstrations, videos, PPT slides, and informal discussions with participants. The effectiveness of the program was judged on the basis of participants′ feedback, feedback from the supervisors, and our own observations post training. Results: Feedback from the participants and their supervisors after training was encouraging. The participants described training as a "life time experience". The supervisors reported improvement in confidence, communication skills, and awareness of workers. Conclusion: The success of the program was due to the use of interactive methods, involvement of multidisciplinary team, and commitment from leadership. We recommend that professional education should be linked with career advancement. Academic institutions can play a key role in taking such initiatives.

  11. The Effect of Mobile Tablet Computer (iPad) Implementation on Graduate Medical Education at a Multi-specialty Residency Institution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dupaix, John; Chen, John J; Chun, Maria Bj; Belcher, Gary F; Cheng, Yongjun; Atkinson, Robert

    2016-07-01

    Use of mobile tablet computers (MTCs) in residency education has grown. The objective of this study was to investigate the impact of MTCs on multiple specialties' residency training and identify MTC adoption impediments. To our knowledge, this current project is one of the first multispecialty studies of MTC implementation. A prospective cohort study was formulated. In June 2012 iPad2s were issued to all residents after completion of privacy/confidentiality agreements and a mandatory hard-copy pre-survey regarding four domains of usage (general, self-directed learning, clinical duties, and patient education). Residents who received iPads previously were excluded. A voluntary post-survey was conducted online in June 2013. One-hundred eighty-five subjects completed pre-survey and 107 completed post-survey (58% overall response rate). Eighty-six pre- and post-surveys were linked (response rate of 46%). There was a significant increase in residents accessing patient information/records and charting electronically (26.9% to 79.1%; Peducation, clinical practice, and patient education. The survey tool may be useful in collecting data on MTC use by other graduate medical education programs.

  12. Relationship between symptoms of anxiety and depression in a sample of Arab college students using the Hopkins Symptom Checklist 25.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Turkait, Fawziyah A; Ohaeri, Jude U; El-Abbasi, Abdul-Hamid M; Naguy, Ahmed

    2011-01-01

    The controversy over the relationship between symptoms of anxiety and depression is an enduring issue. Various models have been proposed to explain this relationship. We explored the following research questions. First, using exploratory factor analysis (EFA), will the symptoms that define anxiety and depression (as in the Hopkins Symptom Checklist 25, HSCL-25) appear together in 1 factor, or are they separable into the hypothesized dimensions of the disorders? Second, using confirmatory factor analysis, how will the structural integrity of the resulting factors compare with those of the various models that have been proposed to explain the relationship between the symptoms of anxiety and depression? This issue has not been investigated in an Arab setting. Participants (n = 624) were Kuwaiti national college students, who completed the HSCL-25 in class. EFA was done by principal axis factoring. Seven models were generated for comparison in confirmatory factor analysis, using 8 'fit' indices in Analysis of Moment Structures, version 16. The 5 factors from EFA were similar in construct to the subscales of the Mood and Anxiety Symptom Questionnaire, on which the tripartite model of anxiety and depression was validated ('core anxiety', 'core depression', 'general distress mixed', 'general distress anxiety', 'general distress depression'). The hierarchical bifactor model and the dimensional model characterized by the correlation of these factors were best at meeting the fit indices, followed by the correlated 2-factor anxiety/depression model. In line with theory, the correlation between the specific anxiety/depression factors was lower than that between each of them and the general distress mixed factor; and there was no significant gender difference in the summed score for core depression. The findings support the impression that, although the core symptoms of anxiety are separable from the core symptoms of depression, there is an overlapping set of symptoms which

  13. Institutional Awareness

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ahlvik, Carina; Boxenbaum, Eva

    Drawing on dual-process theory and mindfulness research this article sets out to shed light on the conditions that need to be met to create “a reflexive shift in consciousness” argued to be a key foundational mechanism for agency in institutional theory. Although past research has identified diff...... in consciousness to emerge and argue for how the varying levels of mindfulness in the form of internal and external awareness may manifest as distinct responses to the institutional environment the actor is embedded in....

  14. Dosimetry in occupational exposure workers of the medical institutes of the University San Francisco Xavier de Chuquisaca; Dosimetria en TOEs de los institutos medicos de la Universidad San Francisco Xavier de Chuquisaca

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zambrana Z, A. J.; Castro S, O.; Huanca S, E.; Torrez C, M. [Universidad Mayor, Real y Pontificia de San Francisco Xavier de Chuquisaca, Instituto de Medicina Nuclear de Sucre, Plaza Libertad No. 1, Sucre (Bolivia, Plurinational State of); Villca Q, I., E-mail: nuclear_sre@entelnet.bo [Universidad Mayor, Real y Pontificia de San Francisco Xavier de Chuquisaca, Instituto Nacional de Cancerologia Dr. Jose Cupertino Arteaga, Plaza Libertad No. 1, Sucre (Bolivia, Plurinational State of)

    2014-08-15

    In this work is made a retrospective analysis of the record, of the dosimetric control readings processed by the Dosimetry Laboratory of the Instituto Boliviano de Ciencia y Tecnologia Nuclear, as regulator entity at national level for Occupational Exposed Workers (OEWs) to ionizing radiations, of the Medical Institutes of the Universidad Mayor, Real y Pontificia de San Francisco Xavier de Chuquisaca, by a period of 10 and 15 years. The results showed that in the Nuclear Medicine Institute of Sucre, the Accumulated Occupational Exposure of a total of 393 readings of 15 OEWs was of 20.4 mSv, identifying as maximum value 10.2 mSv, in the official that develops the Radio-pharmacy activities (elution, fractionation, preparation and management). In the Instituto Nacional de Cancerologia Dr. Jose Cupertino Arteaga the dosimetric background registered an Accumulated Occupational Exposure of a total of 1319 readings of 50 OEWs of 309.69 mSv, with a maximum value of 62.30 mSv, corresponding to the worker of the technical area (maintenance, adjustment and calibration). Comparison that allows to infer that the difference is due mainly to the radio-active source type {sup 99m}Tc Vs {sup 60}Co utilized in these health centers. (Author)

  15. Institutional Assessment

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    Organizational incentives refer to the way an organization's system of rewards and punishments either encourages or discourages behaviours – in the case of research institutions, productivity and creativity. Incentives are important to individual research careers and to overall organizational success and can help ...

  16. European Institutions?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Meacham, Darian

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this article is to sketch a phenomenological theory of political institutions and to apply it to some objections and questions raised by Pierre Manent about the project of the European Union and more specifically the question of “European Construction”, i.e. what is the aim of the

  17. What inhibits working women with mental disorders from returning to their workplace?-A study of systematic re-employment support in a medical institution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hayashi, Karin; Taira, Yoichi; Maeda, Takamitsu; Matsuda, Yumie; Kato, Yuki; Hashi, Kozue; Kuroki, Nobuo; Katsuragawa, Shuichi

    2016-01-01

    It has been customary for working women in Japan to retire when they marry and to devote themselves to household work as well as having children. However, according to a report published by the Ministry of Internal Affairs and Communications in 2013, the number of working women has increased consistently. As more women are advancing into society, they have more options with respect to lifestyle but may encounter new psychological burdens. Therefore, we reviewed trends among participants in a re-work day care program (hereinafter referred to as "re-work program") to clarify various problems encountered by working women and the prevalence of mental disorders. A total of 454 participants (352 males, mean age 46.5 ± 9.4 years; 102 females, mean age 39.8 ± 9.4 years) who participated in our re-work program were included in this study. We reviewed their basic characteristics: life background, clinical diagnoses, outcomes after use of the re-work program, and reasons for failing to return to the workplace or start working where applicable. The number of female participants was small and accounted for less than one fourth of all participants. As many as 67.3 % of the males succeeded in returning to the workplace, but only 48.0 % of the females were successful. The most common reason for failing to return to the workplace in both sexes was the exacerbation of symptoms; among females, other reasons, such as pregnancy, marriage, and family circumstances, were observed occasionally, but these reasons were not reported by the males. We found that female-specific problems were not the only issue, but rather work-life balance, relationships in the workplace, and gender differences in work roles could also trigger psychiatric disorders. A deeper understanding of the problems encountered by women in the workforce is important for the treatment of their psychiatric disorders. Therefore, it is considered essential for family members, co-workers, medical staff, and

  18. A survey of the perspectives of patients who are seriously ill regarding end-of-life decisions in some medical institutions of Korea, China and Japan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ivo, Kwon; Younsuck, Koh; Ho, Yun Young; Sang-Yeon, Suh; Seog, Heo Dae; Hyunah, Bae; Kenji, Hattori; Xiaomei, Zhai

    2012-05-01

    The debate about the end-of-life care decision is becoming a serious ethical and legal concern in the Far-Eastern countries of Korea, China and Japan. However, the issues regarding end-of-life care will reflect the cultural background, current medical practices and socioeconomic conditions of the countries, which are different from Western countries and between each other. Understanding the genuine thoughts of patients who are critically ill is the first step in confronting the issues, and a comparative descriptive study of these perspectives was conducted by collaboration between researchers in all three countries. Surveys using self-reporting paper questionnaire forms were conducted from December 2008 to April 2009 in Korea (six hospitals in two regions), China (five hospitals in four regions) and Japan (nine hospitals in one region). The subjects were patients who were critically ill who had been diagnosed as having cancer. A total of 235 participants (Korea, 91; China, 62; Japan, 52) were eventually recruited and statistically analysed. Most respondents had sometimes or often thought of their own death, mostly fear of 'separation from loved ones'. They wanted to hear the news regarding their own condition directly and frankly from the physician. A quarter of them preferred making end-of-life care decisions by themselves, while many respondents favoured a 'joint decision' with their family members. The most favoured proxy decision maker was the spouse, followed by the children. Most admitted the necessity of 'advance directives' and agreed with artificial ventilation withdrawal in irreversible conditions. The most common reason was 'artificial prolongation of life is unnecessary'. Most respondents agreed with the concept of active euthanasia; however, significant differences were sometimes observed in the responses according to variables such as patient's country of origin, age, gender and education level. Patients in Far-Eastern countries gave various responses

  19. Clinical study of burn patients requiring admission: A single center experience at North Eastern Indira Gandhi Regional Institute of Health and Medical Sciences

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Donkupar Khongwar

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Although burns are a major problem in health care, a lot of the variation in risk factors exists from region to region which if uncovered correctly could help take effective prevention measures. Aims and Objectives: To assess the 3-year (January 2012 to January 2015 epidemiology of burn injuries admitted to our hospital (primary objective and to find areas of improvement in burn care (secondary objective. Materials and Methods: After obtaining ethical approval data were obtained from the medical record section regarding age, sex, residence, occupation, marital status, socioeconomic status, dates of admission and discharge, circumstances regarding the place, intent, cause, and source of heat. Clinical assessment was done using Wallace's “Rule of Nine” in adult and “Lund and Browder” chart in the pediatric age groups. The interrelationships between clinical and epidemiological variables with burn injury were studied. Results: An increasing trend in the admission rates of burn victims noted in last 3 years males (55.47% outnumbered females (44.52%. The most common age group affected is older children, adolescents, and young adults (between 11 and 30 years. Flame (38.3% and scald (25.3% burns contributed to most of the injuries. Females (52.30% are the major victim of flame burns. Electrical and chemical burns affected only the males suggesting work-related injuries. Trunk (30.8% is the most severely affected site in all cases. Depression (6.8% and power line workers (4.7% seem to be important risk factors in our study. Inability to complete treatment (26.7% was a major concern in our study. Conclusions: This study highlights the need for proper burn care that could be provided at the primary health-care level. The majority of burns were accidental in nature in school going children, young adults, and females. Flame and scald burns were the most common cause. Preventive measures directed toward burn safety and first aid measures

  20. Medical Management of Severe Alcoholic Hepatitis: Expert Review from the Clinical Practice Updates Committee of the AGA Institute.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitchell, Mack C; Friedman, Lawrence S; McClain, Craig J

    2017-01-01

    high mortality rate. Best Practice Advice 8: Nephrotoxic drugs, including diuretics, should be avoided or used sparingly in patients with AH, since AKI is an early manifestation of MOF. Best Practice Advice 9: Patients with MDF > 32 or MELD score > 20 without a contraindication to glucocorticoid, such as hepatitis B viral infection, tuberculosis, or other serious infectious diseases, may be treated with methylprednisolone 32 mg daily, but the appropriate duration of treatment remains a subject of controversy. Methylprednisolone does not improve survival beyond 28 days, and the benefits for 26 with good insight into their alcohol use disorder and good social support should be referred for evaluation for liver transplantation, as the 90-day mortality rate is very high. Best Practice Advice 12: Patients with mild to moderate AH defined by a MELD score < 20 and MDF < 32 should be referred for abstinence counseling and prescribed a high protein diet supplemented with B vitamins and folic acid. Copyright © 2017 AGA Institute. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.