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Sample records for homozygous inactivating mutations

  1. Homozygous Inactivating Mutation in NANOS3 in Two Sisters with Primary Ovarian Insufficiency

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    Mariza G. Santos

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Despite the increasing understanding of female reproduction, the molecular diagnosis of primary ovarian insufficiency (POI is seldom obtained. The RNA-binding protein NANOS3 poses as an interesting candidate gene for POI since members of the Nanos family have an evolutionarily conserved function in germ cell development and maintenance by repressing apoptosis. We performed mutational analysis of NANOS3 in a cohort of 85 Brazilian women with familial or isolated POI, presenting with primary or secondary amenorrhea, and in ethnically-matched control women. A homozygous p.Glu120Lys mutation in NANOS3 was identified in two sisters with primary amenorrhea. The substituted amino acid is located within the second C2HC motif in the conserved zinc finger domain of NANOS3 and in silico molecular modelling suggests destabilization of protein-RNA interaction. In vitro analyses of apoptosis through flow cytometry and confocal microscopy show that NANOS3 capacity to prevent apoptosis was impaired by this mutation. The identification of an inactivating missense mutation in NANOS3 suggests a mechanism for POI involving increased primordial germ cells (PGCs apoptosis during embryonic cell migration and highlights the importance of NANOS proteins in human ovarian biology.

  2. Diploid yeast cells yield homozygous spontaneous mutations

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    Esposito, M. S.; Bruschi, C. V.; Brushi, C. V. (Principal Investigator)

    1993-01-01

    A leucine-requiring hybrid of Saccharomyces cerevisiae, homoallelic at the LEU1 locus (leu1-12/leu1-12) and heterozygous for three chromosome-VII genetic markers distal to the LEU1 locus, was employed to inquire: (1) whether spontaneous gene mutation and mitotic segregation of heterozygous markers occur in positive nonrandom association and (2) whether homozygous LEU1/LEU1 mutant diploids are generated. The results demonstrate that gene mutation of leu1-12 to LEU1 and mitotic segregation of heterozygous chromosome-VII markers occur in strong positive nonrandom association, suggesting that the stimulatory DNA lesion is both mutagenic and recombinogenic. In addition, genetic analysis of diploid Leu+ revertants revealed that approximately 3% of mutations of leu1-12 to LEU1 result in LEU1/LEU1 homozygotes. Red-white sectored Leu+ colonies exhibit genotypes that implicate post-replicational chromatid breakage and exchange near the site of leu1-12 reversion, chromosome loss, and subsequent restitution of diploidy, in the sequence of events leading to mutational homozygosis. By analogy, diploid cell populations can yield variants homozygous for novel recessive gene mutations at biologically significant rates. Mutational homozygosis may be relevant to both carcinogenesis and the evolution of asexual diploid organisms.

  3. Homozygous mutation in the NPHP3 gene causing foetal nephronophthisis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Abdullah, Uzma; Farooq, Muhammad; Fatima, Ambrin

    2017-01-01

    We present a case of a foetal sonographic finding of hyper-echogenic kidneys, which led to a strategic series of genetic tests and identified a homozygous mutation (c.424C > T, p. R142*) in the NPHP3 gene. Our study provides a rare presentation of NPHP3-related ciliopathy and adds to the mutation...

  4. Homozygous STIL mutation causes holoprosencephaly and microcephaly in two siblings.

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    Charlotte Mouden

    Full Text Available Holoprosencephaly (HPE is a frequent congenital malformation of the brain characterized by impaired forebrain cleavage and midline facial anomalies. Heterozygous mutations in 14 genes have been identified in HPE patients that account for only 30% of HPE cases, suggesting the existence of other HPE genes. Data from homozygosity mapping and whole-exome sequencing in a consanguineous Turkish family were combined to identify a homozygous missense mutation (c.2150G>A; p.Gly717Glu in STIL, common to the two affected children. STIL has a role in centriole formation and has previously been described in rare cases of microcephaly. Rescue experiments in U2OS cells showed that the STIL p.Gly717Glu mutation was not able to fully restore the centriole duplication failure following depletion of endogenous STIL protein indicating the deleterious role of the mutation. In situ hybridization experiments using chick embryos demonstrated that expression of Stil was in accordance with a function during early patterning of the forebrain. It is only the second time that a STIL homozygous mutation causing a recessive form of HPE was reported. This result also supports the genetic heterogeneity of HPE and increases the panel of genes to be tested for HPE diagnosis.

  5. Spectrum of mutations in homozygous familial hypercholesterolemia in India, with four novel mutations.

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    Setia, Nitika; Saxena, Renu; Arora, Anjali; Verma, Ishwar C

    2016-12-01

    Homozygous familial hypercholesterolemia (FH) is a rare but serious, inherited disorder of lipid metabolism characterized by very high total and LDL cholesterol levels from birth. It presents as cutaneous and tendon xanthomas since childhood, with or without cardiac involvement. FH is commonly caused by mutations in three genes, i.e. LDL receptor (LDLR), apolipoprotein B (ApoB) and PCSK9. We aimed to determine the spectrum of mutations in cases of homozygous FH in Asian Indians and evaluate if there was any similarity to the mutations observed in Caucasians. Sixteen homozygous FH subjects from eleven families were analyzed for mutations by Sanger sequencing. Large rearrangements in LDLR gene were evaluated by multiplex ligation probe dependent amplification (MLPA) technique. Ten mutations were observed in LDLR gene, of which four mutations were novel. No mutation was detected in ApoB gene and common PCSK9 mutation (p.D374Y). Fourteen cases had homozygous mutations; one had compound heterozygous mutation, while no mutation was detected in one clinically homozygous case. We report an interesting "Triple hit" case with features of homozygous FH. The spectrum of mutations in the Asian Indian population is quite heterogeneous. Of the mutations identified, 40% were novel. No mutation was observed in exons 3, 9 and 14 of LDLR gene, which are considered to be hot spots in studies done on Asian Indians in South Africa. Early detection followed by aggressive therapy, and cascade screening of extended families has been initiated to reduce the morbidity and mortality in these patients. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. GNE Myopathy in Turkish Sisters with a Novel Homozygous Mutation

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    Diniz, Gulden; Secil, Yaprak; Ceylaner, Serdar; Tokucoglu, Figen; Türe, Sabiha; Celebisoy, Mehmet; İncesu, Tülay Kurt; Akhan, Galip

    2016-01-01

    Background. Hereditary inclusion body myopathy is caused by biallelic defects in the GNE gene located on chromosome 9p13. It generally affects adults older than 20 years of age. Methods and Results. In this study, we present two Turkish sisters with progressive myopathy and describe a novel mutation in the GNE gene. Both sisters had slightly higher levels of creatine kinase (CK) and muscle weakness. The older sister presented at 38 years of age with an inability to climb steps, weakness, and a steppage gait. Her younger sister was 36 years old and had similar symptoms. The first symptoms of the disorder were seen when the sisters were 30 and 34 years old, respectively. The muscle biopsy showed primary myopathic features and presence of rimmed vacuoles. DNA analysis demonstrated the presence of previously unknown homozygous mutations [c.2152 G>A (p.A718T)] in the GNE genes. Conclusion. Based on our literature survey, we believe that ours is the first confirmed case of primary GNE myopathy with a novel missense mutation in Turkey. These patients illustrate that the muscle biopsy is still an important method for the differential diagnosis of vacuolar myopathies in that the detection of inclusions is required for the definitive diagnosis. PMID:27298745

  7. A homozygous missense mutation in human KLOTHO causes severe tumoral calcinosis

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    Ichikawa, Shoji; Imel, Erik A.; Kreiter, Mary L.; Yu, Xijie; Mackenzie, Donald S.; Sorenson, Andrea H.; Goetz, Regina; Mohammadi, Moosa; White, Kenneth E.; Econs, Michael J.

    2007-01-01

    Familial tumoral calcinosis is characterized by ectopic calcifications and hyperphosphatemia due to inactivating mutations in FGF23 or UDP-N-acetyl-α-D-galactosamine:polypeptide N-acetylgalactosaminyltransferase 3 (GALNT3). Herein we report a homozygous missense mutation (H193R) in the KLOTHO (KL) gene of a 13-year-old girl who presented with severe tumoral calcinosis with dural and carotid artery calcifications. This patient exhibited defects in mineral ion homeostasis with marked hyperphosphatemia and hypercalcemia as well as elevated serum levels of parathyroid hormone and FGF23. Mapping of H193R mutation onto the crystal structure of myrosinase, a plant homolog of KL, revealed that this histidine residue was at the base of the deep catalytic cleft and mutation of this histidine to arginine should destabilize the putative glycosidase domain (KL1) of KL, thereby attenuating production of membrane-bound and secreted KL. Indeed, compared with wild-type KL, expression and secretion of H193R KL were markedly reduced in vitro, resulting in diminished ability of FGF23 to signal via its cognate FGF receptors. Taken together, our findings provide what we believe to be the first evidence that loss-of-function mutations in human KL impair FGF23 bioactivity, underscoring the essential role of KL in FGF23-mediated phosphate and vitamin D homeostasis in humans. PMID:17710231

  8. Novel homozygous nonsense mutations in the luteinizing hormone receptor (LHCGR) gene associated with 46,XY primary amenorrhea.

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    Ben Hadj Hmida, Imen; Mougou-Zerelli, Soumaya; Hadded, Anis; Dimassi, Sarra; Kammoun, Molka; Bignon-Topalovic, Joelle; Bibi, Mohamed; Saad, Ali; Bashamboo, Anu; McElreavey, Ken

    2016-07-01

    To determine the genetic cause of 46,XY primary amenorrhea in three 46,XY girls. Whole exome sequencing. University cytogenetics center. Three patients with unexplained 46,XY primary amenorrhea were included in the study. Potentially pathogenic variants were confirmed by Sanger sequencing, and familial segregation was determined where parents' DNA was available. Exome sequencing was performed in the three patients, and the data were analyzed for potentially pathogenic mutations. The functional consequences of mutations were predicted. Three novel homozygous nonsense mutations in the luteinizing hormone receptor (LHCGR) gene were identified:c.1573 C→T, p.Gln525Ter, c.1435 C→T p.Arg479Ter, and c.508 C→T, p.Gln170Ter. Inactivating mutations of the LHCGR gene may be a more common cause of 46,XY primary amenorrhea than previously considered. Copyright © 2016 American Society for Reproductive Medicine. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Novel homozygous missense mutation in ALDH7A1 causes neonatal pyridoxine dependent epilepsy.

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    Coci, Emanuele G; Codutti, Luca; Fink, Christian; Bartsch, Sophie; Grüning, Gunnar; Lücke, Thomas; Kurth, Ingo; Riedel, Joachim

    2017-04-01

    Pyridoxine dependent epilepsy (PDE) (OMIM#266100) is a neonatal form of epilepsy, caused by dysfunction of the enzyme α-aminoadipic semialdehyde dehydrogenase (ALDH7A1 or Antiquitin). This enzyme converts α-aminoadipic semialdehyde (α-AASA) into α-aminoadipate (AAA), a critical step in the lysine metabolism of the brain. ALDH7A1 dysfunction causes an accumulation of α-AASA and δ 1 -piperideine-6-carboxylic acid (P6C), which are in equilibrium with each other. P6C binds and inactivates pyridoxal 5'-phosphate (PLP), the active form of pyridoxine. Individuals affected by ALDH7A1 deficiency show pre-natal and post-natal seizures, which respond to oral pyridoxine but not to other pediatric anti-epileptic drugs. We discovered a novel missense mutation (c.566G > A, p.Gly189Glu) in homozygous state residing in the NAD+ binding domain coding region of exon 6 and affecting an highly conserved amino acid residue. The seizures stopped under post-natal pyridoxine therapy, nevertheless a longer follow-up is needed to evaluate the intellectual development of the child, who is additionally treated with oral l-arginine since the 13th month of life. Developmental delay with or without structural cortex abnormalities were reported in several patients. A brain MRI scan revealed hyperintense white matter in the right cerebellum compatible with cerebellar gliosis. Taken together, our studies enlarge the group of missense pathogenic mutations of ALDH7A1 gene and reveal a novel cerebellar finding within the PDE patients cohort. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. A Novel Homozygous MYO7A Mutation: Case Report

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    Mahsa Ahmadi

    2018-05-01

    Full Text Available MYO7A is an unconventional myosin that is essential for ordinary hearing and vision; mutations in the MYO7A gene result in Usher syndrome type 1B and other disorders. In this manuscript, we reported a mutation (c.4705delA in exon 35, causing the alteration of a Ser amino acid to Ala at codon 1569 (p.H2027del located within the first FERMdomain of the human protein myosin VIIA. This mutation involved in the pathogenesis of hearing loss, congenital night blindness, muscular weakness, skin problem, and difficulty in keeping balance in the 13-year-old female. After checkup the patient’s DNA was extracted from peripheral blood and amplification was performed by PCR. Sequencing method was performed for identification of the mutation. The c.4705delA mutation in exon 35 was found in the patient in heterozygosis form; this means that her mother and father were carriers. This mutation is located on the tail of the myosinVIIA protein and is associated with several disorders.

  11. A homozygous mutation in the NDUFS1 gene presents with a mild cavitating leukoencephalopathy

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    Kashani, A.; Thiffault, I.; Dilenge, M.E.; Saint-Martin, C.; Guerrero, K.; Tran, L.T.; Shoubridge, E.; van der Knaap, M.S.; Braverman, N.; Bernard, G.

    2014-01-01

    We report a case of mild cavitating leukoencephalopathy associated with a homozygous c.755A > G (p.Asp252Gly) NDUFS1 mutation in a 7-year old boy. Biochemical analysis confirmed an isolated reduction in complex I activity. Magnetic resonance imaging of the brain showed a diffuse cystic

  12. Homozygous mutations in the Fhit gene results in resistance to ionizing radiation and inhibition of apoptosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Turner, B.C.; Potoczek, M.B.; Ottey, M.; Croce, C.M.; Huebner, K.

    2001-01-01

    Purpose: The Fhit gene was identified because it represents the most active constitutive chromosome fragile site and has functions often associated with a tumor suppressor gene. Mutations in the Fhit locus have been identified in many cancer-derived cell lines, primary human tumors including lung, head and neck, colon, breast, and esophagus, and are associated with tobacco-induced lung cancers. In this study, we examined the cellular response of mouse epithelial cells with complete loss of Fhit to therapeutic doses of ionizing radiation and the prognostic importance of Fhit protein in early stage breast cancer patients treated with breast conserving therapy. Materials and Methods: Mouse epithelial cell lines containing either homozygous mutant Fhit -/- or wild-type Fhit +/+ were derived from mice (C57BL/6J X 129/SvJ) with either wild-type or inactivated Fhit gene. Clonogenic cell survival assays were carried out on subconfluent cells in logarithmic growth using a 137 Cs irradiator and survival curves were plotted as the log of the surviving cells versus dose and corrected for cloning efficiency. Apoptosis following ionizing radiation was determined by flow cytometry using the Annexin-V FITC kit and DAPI staining. Paraffin-embedded breast tumor blocks were obtained from 42 women with local breast tumor recurrence and 42 matched breast cancer patients without local cancer relapse treated with breast conserving therapy and stained with a 1:4000 dilution of polyclonal antibody to the Fhit protein and scored based on both intensity and distribution of Fhit staining within the invasive breast cancer component. Results: Treatment of Fhit -/- mouse epithelial cells with single fraction doses of ionizing radiation including 2, 4, 6, and 10 Gy result in 4-6 fold increase in cellular survival compared with isogenic parental cells from Fhit +/+ mice. Fhit -/- epithelial cells displayed 3-5 fold lower levels of apoptosis in response to both low and high doses of ionizing

  13. Spinal motor neuron involvement in a patient with homozygous PRUNE mutation.

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    Iacomino, Michele; Fiorillo, Chiara; Torella, Annalaura; Severino, Mariasavina; Broda, Paolo; Romano, Catia; Falsaperla, Raffaele; Pozzolini, Giulia; Minetti, Carlo; Striano, Pasquale; Nigro, Vincenzo; Zara, Federico

    2018-05-01

    In the last few years, whole exome sequencing (WES) allowed the identification of PRUNE mutations in patients featuring a complex neurological phenotype characterized by severe neurodevelopmental delay, microcephaly, epilepsy, optic atrophy, and brain or cerebellar atrophy. We describe an additional patient with homozygous PRUNE mutation who presented with spinal muscular atrophy phenotype, in addition to the already known brain developmental disorder. This novel feature expands the clinical consequences of PRUNE mutations and allow to converge PRUNE syndrome with previous descriptions of neurodevelopmental/neurodegenerative disorders linked to altered microtubule dynamics. Copyright © 2017 European Paediatric Neurology Society. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Efficient introduction of specific homozygous and heterozygous mutations using CRISPR/Cas9.

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    Paquet, Dominik; Kwart, Dylan; Chen, Antonia; Sproul, Andrew; Jacob, Samson; Teo, Shaun; Olsen, Kimberly Moore; Gregg, Andrew; Noggle, Scott; Tessier-Lavigne, Marc

    2016-05-05

    The bacterial CRISPR/Cas9 system allows sequence-specific gene editing in many organisms and holds promise as a tool to generate models of human diseases, for example, in human pluripotent stem cells. CRISPR/Cas9 introduces targeted double-stranded breaks (DSBs) with high efficiency, which are typically repaired by non-homologous end-joining (NHEJ) resulting in nonspecific insertions, deletions or other mutations (indels). DSBs may also be repaired by homology-directed repair (HDR) using a DNA repair template, such as an introduced single-stranded oligo DNA nucleotide (ssODN), allowing knock-in of specific mutations. Although CRISPR/Cas9 is used extensively to engineer gene knockouts through NHEJ, editing by HDR remains inefficient and can be corrupted by additional indels, preventing its widespread use for modelling genetic disorders through introducing disease-associated mutations. Furthermore, targeted mutational knock-in at single alleles to model diseases caused by heterozygous mutations has not been reported. Here we describe a CRISPR/Cas9-based genome-editing framework that allows selective introduction of mono- and bi-allelic sequence changes with high efficiency and accuracy. We show that HDR accuracy is increased dramatically by incorporating silent CRISPR/Cas-blocking mutations along with pathogenic mutations, and establish a method termed 'CORRECT' for scarless genome editing. By characterizing and exploiting a stereotyped inverse relationship between a mutation's incorporation rate and its distance to the DSB, we achieve predictable control of zygosity. Homozygous introduction requires a guide RNA targeting close to the intended mutation, whereas heterozygous introduction can be accomplished by distance-dependent suboptimal mutation incorporation or by use of mixed repair templates. Using this approach, we generated human induced pluripotent stem cells with heterozygous and homozygous dominant early onset Alzheimer's disease-causing mutations in

  15. Homozygous LIPE mutation in siblings with multiple symmetric lipomatosis, partial lipodystrophy, and myopathy.

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    Zolotov, Sagit; Xing, Chao; Mahamid, Riad; Shalata, Adel; Sheikh-Ahmad, Mohammed; Garg, Abhimanyu

    2017-01-01

    Despite considerable progress in identifying causal genes for lipodystrophy syndromes, the molecular basis of some peculiar adipose tissue disorders remains obscure. In an Israeli-Arab pedigree with a novel autosomal recessive, multiple symmetric lipomatosis (MSL), partial lipodystrophy and myopathy, we conducted exome sequencing of two affected siblings to identify the disease-causing mutation. The 41-year-old female proband and her 36-year-old brother reported marked accumulation of subcutaneous fat in the face, neck, axillae, and trunk but loss of subcutaneous fat from the lower extremities and progressive distal symmetric myopathy during adulthood. They had increased serum creatine kinase levels, hypertriglyceridemia and low levels of high-density lipoprotein cholesterol. Exome sequencing identified a novel homozygous NC_000019.9:g.42906092C>A variant on chromosome 19, leading to a NM_005357.3:c.3103G>T nucleotide change in coding DNA and corresponding p.(Glu1035*) protein change in hormone sensitive lipase (LIPE) gene as the disease-causing variant. Sanger sequencing further confirmed the segregation of the mutation in the family. Hormone sensitive lipase is the predominant regulator of lipolysis from adipocytes, releasing free fatty acids from stored triglycerides. The homozygous null LIPE mutation could result in marked inhibition of lipolysis from some adipose tissue depots and thus may induce an extremely rare phenotype of MSL and partial lipodystrophy in adulthood associated with complications of insulin resistance, such as diabetes, hypertriglyceridemia and hepatic steatosis. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  16. A novel homozygous truncating GNAT1 mutation implicated in retinal degeneration.

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    Carrigan, Matthew; Duignan, Emma; Humphries, Pete; Palfi, Arpad; Kenna, Paul F; Farrar, G Jane

    2016-04-01

    The GNAT1 gene encodes the α subunit of the rod transducin protein, a key element in the rod phototransduction cascade. Variants in GNAT1 have been implicated in stationary night-blindness in the past, but unlike other proteins in the same pathway, it has not previously been implicated in retinitis pigmentosa. A panel of 182 retinopathy-associated genes was sequenced to locate disease-causing mutations in patients with inherited retinopathies. Sequencing revealed a novel homozygous truncating mutation in the GNAT1 gene in a patient with significant pigmentary disturbance and constriction of visual fields, a presentation consistent with retinitis pigmentosa. This is the first report of a patient homozygous for a complete loss-of-function GNAT1 mutation. The clinical data from this patient provide definitive evidence of retinitis pigmentosa with late onset in addition to the lifelong night-blindness that would be expected from a lack of transducin function. These data suggest that some truncating GNAT1 variants can indeed cause a recessive, mild, late-onset retinal degeneration in human beings rather than just stationary night-blindness as reported previously, with notable similarities to the phenotype of the Gnat1 knockout mouse. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://www.bmj.com/company/products-services/rights-and-licensing/

  17. Homozygous YME1L1 mutation causes mitochondriopathy with optic atrophy and mitochondrial network fragmentation.

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    Hartmann, Bianca; Wai, Timothy; Hu, Hao; MacVicar, Thomas; Musante, Luciana; Fischer-Zirnsak, Björn; Stenzel, Werner; Gräf, Ralph; van den Heuvel, Lambert; Ropers, Hans-Hilger; Wienker, Thomas F; Hübner, Christoph; Langer, Thomas; Kaindl, Angela M

    2016-08-06

    Mitochondriopathies often present clinically as multisystemic disorders of primarily high-energy consuming organs. Assembly, turnover, and surveillance of mitochondrial proteins are essential for mitochondrial function and a key task of AAA family members of metalloproteases. We identified a homozygous mutation in the nuclear encoded mitochondrial escape 1-like 1 gene YME1L1, member of the AAA protease family, as a cause of a novel mitochondriopathy in a consanguineous pedigree of Saudi Arabian descent. The homozygous missense mutation, located in a highly conserved region in the mitochondrial pre-sequence, inhibits cleavage of YME1L1 by the mitochondrial processing peptidase, which culminates in the rapid degradation of YME1L1 precursor protein. Impaired YME1L1 function causes a proliferation defect and mitochondrial network fragmentation due to abnormal processing of OPA1. Our results identify mutations in YME1L1 as a cause of a mitochondriopathy with optic nerve atrophy highlighting the importance of YME1L1 for mitochondrial functionality in humans.

  18. Homozygous YME1L1 mutation causes mitochondriopathy with optic atrophy and mitochondrial network fragmentation

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    Hartmann, Bianca; Wai, Timothy; Hu, Hao; MacVicar, Thomas; Musante, Luciana; Fischer-Zirnsak, Björn; Stenzel, Werner; Gräf, Ralph; van den Heuvel, Lambert; Ropers, Hans-Hilger; Wienker, Thomas F; Hübner, Christoph; Langer, Thomas; Kaindl, Angela M

    2016-01-01

    Mitochondriopathies often present clinically as multisystemic disorders of primarily high-energy consuming organs. Assembly, turnover, and surveillance of mitochondrial proteins are essential for mitochondrial function and a key task of AAA family members of metalloproteases. We identified a homozygous mutation in the nuclear encoded mitochondrial escape 1-like 1 gene YME1L1, member of the AAA protease family, as a cause of a novel mitochondriopathy in a consanguineous pedigree of Saudi Arabian descent. The homozygous missense mutation, located in a highly conserved region in the mitochondrial pre-sequence, inhibits cleavage of YME1L1 by the mitochondrial processing peptidase, which culminates in the rapid degradation of YME1L1 precursor protein. Impaired YME1L1 function causes a proliferation defect and mitochondrial network fragmentation due to abnormal processing of OPA1. Our results identify mutations in YME1L1 as a cause of a mitochondriopathy with optic nerve atrophy highlighting the importance of YME1L1 for mitochondrial functionality in humans. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.16078.001 PMID:27495975

  19. Identification of a novel WFS1 homozygous nonsense mutation in Jordanian children with Wolfram syndrome.

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    Bodoor, Khaldon; Batiha, Osama; Abu-Awad, Ayman; Al-Sarihin, Khaldon; Ziad, Haya; Jarun, Yousef; Abu-Sheikha, Aya; Abu Jalboush, Sara; Alibrahim, Khoulod S

    2016-09-01

    Wolfram syndrome (WS) is a rare autosomal recessive neurodegenerative disorder characterized by the presentation of early onset type I diabetes mellitus and optic atrophy with later onset diabetes insipidus and deafness. WFS1 gene was identified on chromosome 4p16.1 as the gene responsible for WS disease given that most of the WS patients were found to carry mutations in this gene. This study was carried out to investigate the molecular spectrum of WFS1 gene in Jordanian families. Molecular and clinical characterization was performed on five WS patients from two unrelated Jordanian families. Our data indicated that WS patients of the first family harbored two deletion mutations (V415del and F247fs) located in exon 8 and exon 7 respectively, with a compound heterozygous pattern of inheritance; while in the second family, we identified a novel nonsense mutation (W185X) located in exon 5 in the N-terminal cytoplasmic domain with a homozygous pattern of inheritance. This mutation can be considered as loss of function mutation since the resulting truncated protein lost both the transmembrane domain and the C-terminal domain. Additionally, the W185X mutation lies within the CaM binding domain in wolframin protein which is thought to have a role in the regulation of wolframin function in response to calcium levels.

  20. ABCD syndrome is caused by a homozygous mutation in the EDNRB gene.

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    Verheij, Joke B G M; Kunze, Jürgen; Osinga, Jan; van Essen, Anthonie J; Hofstra, Robert M W

    2002-03-15

    ABCD syndrome is an autosomal recessive syndrome characterized by albinism, black lock, cell migration disorder of the neurocytes of the gut (Hirschsprung disease [HSCR]), and deafness. This phenotype clearly overlaps with the features of the Shah-Waardenburg syndrome, comprising sensorineural deafness; hypopigmentation of skin, hair, and irides; and HSCR. Therefore, we screened DNA of the index patient of the ABCD syndrome family for mutations in the endothelin B receptor (EDNRB) gene, a gene known to be involved in Shah-Waardenburg syndrome. A homozygous nonsense mutation in exon 3 (R201X) of the EDNRB gene was found. We therefore suggest that ABCD syndrome is not a separate entity, but an expression of Shah-Waardenburg syndrome.

  1. Homozygous TREM2 mutation in a family with atypical frontotemporal dementia.

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    Le Ber, Isabelle; De Septenville, Anne; Guerreiro, Rita; Bras, José; Camuzat, Agnès; Caroppo, Paola; Lattante, Serena; Couarch, Philippe; Kabashi, Edor; Bouya-Ahmed, Kawtar; Dubois, Bruno; Brice, Alexis

    2014-10-01

    TREM2 mutations were first identified in Nasu-Hakola disease, a rare autosomal recessive disease characterized by recurrent fractures because of bone cysts and presenile dementia. Recently, homozygous and compound heterozygous TREM2 mutations were identified in rare families with frontotemporal lobar degeneration (FTLD) but without bone involvement. We identified a p.Thr66Met heterozygous mutation in a new consanguineous Italian family. Two sibs had early onset autosomal recessive FTLD without severe bone disorders. Atypical signs were present in this family: early parietal and hippocampus involvement, parkinsonism, epilepsy, and corpus callosum thickness on brain magnetic resonance imaging. This study further demonstrates the implication of TREM2 mutations in FTLD phenotypes. It illustrates the variability of bone phenotype and underlines the frequency of atypical signs in TREM2 carriers. This and previous studies evidence that TREM2 mutation screening should be limited to autosomal recessive FTLD with atypical phenotypes characterized by: (1) a very young age at onset (20-50 years); (2) early parietal and hippocampal deficits; (3) the presence of seizures and parkinsonism; (4) suggestive extensive white matter lesions and corpus callosum thickness on brain magnetic resonance imaging. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Early presentation of cystic kidneys in a family with a homozygous INVS mutation.

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    Oud, Machteld M; van Bon, Bregje W; Bongers, Ernie M H F; Hoischen, Alexander; Marcelis, Carlo L; de Leeuw, Nicole; Mol, Suzanne J J; Mortier, Geert; Knoers, Nine V A M; Brunner, Han G; Roepman, Ronald; Arts, Heleen H

    2014-07-01

    Nephronophthisis (NPHP) is an autosomal recessive cystic kidney disease that is the most frequent monogenic cause of end-stage renal disease in children. Infantile NPHP, often in combination with other features like situs inversus, are commonly caused by mutations in the INVS gene. INVS encodes the ciliary protein inversin, and mutations induce dysfunction of the primary cilia. In this article, we present a family with two severely affected fetuses that were aborted after discovery of grossly enlarged cystic kidneys by ultrasonography before 22 weeks gestation. Exome sequencing showed that the fetuses were homozygous for a previously unreported nonsense mutation, resulting in a truncation in the IQ1 domain of inversin. This mutation induces nonsense-mediated RNA decay, as suggested by a reduced RNA level in fibroblasts derived from the fetus. However, a significant amount of mutant INVS RNA was present in these fibroblasts, yielding mutant inversin protein that was mislocalized. In control fibroblasts, inversin was present in the ciliary axoneme as well as at the basal body, whereas in the fibroblasts from the fetus, inversin could only be detected at the basal body. The phenotype of both fetuses is partly characteristic of infantile NPHP and Potter sequence. We also identified that the fetuses had mild skeletal abnormalities, including shortening and bowing of long bones, which may expand the phenotypic spectrum associated with INVS mutations. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  3. Novel homozygous VHL mutation in exon 2 is associated with congenital polycythemia but not with cancer.

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    Lanikova, Lucie; Lorenzo, Felipe; Yang, Chunzhang; Vankayalapati, Hari; Drachtman, Richard; Divoky, Vladimir; Prchal, Josef T

    2013-05-09

    Germline von Hippel-Lindau (VHL) gene mutations underlie dominantly inherited familial VHL tumor syndrome comprising a predisposition for renal cell carcinoma, pheochromocytoma/paraganglioma, cerebral hemangioblastoma, and endolymphatic sac tumors. However, recessively inherited congenital polycythemia, exemplified by Chuvash polycythemia, has been associated with 2 separate 3' VHL gene mutations in exon 3. It was proposed that different positions of loss-of-function VHL mutations are associated with VHL syndrome cancer predisposition and only C-terminal domain-encoding VHL mutations would cause polycythemia. However, now we describe a new homozygous VHL exon 2 mutation of the VHL gene:(c.413C>T):P138L, which is associated in the affected homozygote with congenital polycythemia but not in her, or her-heterozygous relatives, with cancer or other VHL syndrome tumors. We show that VHL(P138L) has perturbed interaction with hypoxia-inducible transcription factor (HIF)1α. Further, VHL(P138L) protein has decreased stability in vitro. Similarly to what was reported in Chuvash polycythemia and some other instances of HIFs upregulation, VHL(P138L) erythroid progenitors are hypersensitive to erythropoietin. Interestingly, the level of RUNX1/AML1 and NF-E2 transcripts that are specifically upregulated in acquired polycythemia vera were also upregulated in VHL(P138L) granulocytes.

  4. A homozygous CARD9 mutation in a family with susceptibility to fungal infections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glocker, Erik-Oliver; Hennigs, Andre; Nabavi, Mohammad; Schäffer, Alejandro A; Woellner, Cristina; Salzer, Ulrich; Pfeifer, Dietmar; Veelken, Hendrik; Warnatz, Klaus; Tahami, Fariba; Jamal, Sarah; Manguiat, Annabelle; Rezaei, Nima; Amirzargar, Ali Akbar; Plebani, Alessandro; Hannesschläger, Nicole; Gross, Olaf; Ruland, Jürgen; Grimbacher, Bodo

    2009-10-29

    Chronic mucocutaneous candidiasis may be manifested as a primary immunodeficiency characterized by persistent or recurrent infections of the mucosa or the skin with candida species. Most cases are sporadic, but both autosomal dominant inheritance and autosomal recessive inheritance have been described. We performed genetic studies in 36 members of a large, consanguineous five-generation family, in which 4 members had recurrent fungal infections and an additional 3 members died during adolescence, 2 after invasive infection of the brain with candida species. All 36 family members were enrolled in the study, and 22 had blood samples taken for DNA analysis. Homozygosity mapping was used to locate the mutated gene. In the 4 affected family members (patients) and the 18 unaffected members we sequenced CARD9, the gene encoding the caspase recruitment domain-containing protein 9, carried out T-cell phenotyping, and performed functional studies, with the use of either leukocytes from the patients or a reconstituted murine model of the genetic defect. We found linkage (lod score, 3.6) to a genomic interval on chromosome 9q, including CARD9. All four patients had a homozygous point mutation in CARD9, resulting in a premature termination codon (Q295X). Healthy family members had wild-type expression of the CARD9 protein; the four patients lacked wild-type expression, which was associated with low numbers of Th17 cells (helper T cells producing interleukin-17). Functional studies based on genetic reconstitution of myeloid cells from Card9(-/-) mice showed that the Q295X mutation impairs innate signaling from the antifungal pattern-recognition receptor dectin-1. An autosomal recessive form of susceptibility to chronic mucocutaneous candidiasis is associated with homozygous mutations in CARD9. 2009 Massachusetts Medical Society

  5. Homozygous EDNRB mutation in a patient with Waardenburg syndrome type 1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morimoto, Noriko; Mutai, Hideki; Namba, Kazunori; Kaneko, Hiroki; Kosaki, Rika; Matsunaga, Tatsuo

    2018-04-01

    To examine and expand the genetic spectrum of Waardenburg syndrome type 1 (WS1). Clinical features related to Waardenburg syndrome (WS) were examined in a five-year old patient. Mutation analysis of genes related to WS was performed in the proband and her parents. Molecular modeling of EDNRB and the p.R319W mutant was conducted to predict the pathogenicity of the mutation. The proband showed sensorineural hearing loss, heterochromia iridis, and dystopia canthorum, fulfilling the clinical criteria of WS1. Genetic analyses revealed that the proband had no mutation in PAX3 which has been known as the cause of WS1, but had a homozygous missense mutation (p.R319W) in endothelin receptor type B (EDNRB) gene. The asymptomatic parents had the mutation in a heterozygote state. This mutation has been previously reported in a heterozygous state in a patient with Hirschsprung's disease unaccompanied by WS, but the patient and her parents did not show any symptoms in gastrointestinal tract. Molecular modeling of EDNRB with the p.R319W mutation demonstrated reduction of the positively charged surface area in this region, which might reduce binding ability of EDNRB to G protein and lead to abnormal signal transduction underlying the WS phenotype. Our findings suggested that autosomal recessive mutation in EDNRB may underlie a part of WS1 with the current diagnostic criteria, and supported that Hirschsprung's disease is a multifactorial genetic disease which requires additional factors. Further molecular analysis is necessary to elucidate the gene interaction and to reappraise the current WS classification. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. Mutation inactivation of Nijmegen breakage syndrome gene (NBS1 in hepatocellular carcinoma and intrahepatic cholangiocarcinoma.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yan Wang

    Full Text Available Nijmegen breakage syndrome (NBS with NBS1 germ-line mutation is a human autosomal recessive disease characterized by genomic instability and enhanced cancer predisposition. The NBS1 gene codes for a protein, Nbs1(p95/Nibrin, involved in the processing/repair of DNA double-strand breaks. Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC is a complex and heterogeneous tumor with several genomic alterations. Recent studies have shown that heterozygous NBS1 mice exhibited a higher incidence of HCC than did wild-type mice. The objective of the present study is to assess whether NBS1 mutations play a role in the pathogenesis of human primary liver cancer, including HBV-associated HCC and intrahepatic cholangiocarcinoma (ICC. Eight missense NBS1 mutations were identified in six of 64 (9.4% HCCs and two of 18 (11.1% ICCs, whereas only one synonymous mutation was found in 89 control cases of cirrhosis and chronic hepatitis B. Analysis of the functional consequences of the identified NBS1 mutations in Mre11-binding domain showed loss of nuclear localization of Nbs1 partner Mre11, one of the hallmarks for Nbs1 deficiency, in one HCC and two ICCs with NBS1 mutations. Moreover, seven of the eight tumors with NBS1 mutations had at least one genetic alteration in the TP53 pathway, including TP53 mutation, MDM2 amplification, p14ARF homozygous deletion and promoter methylation, implying a synergistic effect of Nbs1 disruption and p53 inactivation. Our findings provide novel insight on the molecular pathogenesis of primary liver cancer characterized by mutation inactivation of NBS1, a DNA repair associated gene.

  7. Novel homozygous FANCL mutation and somatic heterozygous SETBP1 mutation in a Chinese girl with Fanconi Anemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Weiqing; Liu, Yang; Zhou, Qinghua; Wang, Qin; Luo, Fuwei; Xu, Zhiyong; Geng, Qian; Li, Peining; Zhang, Hui Z; Xie, Jiansheng

    2017-07-01

    Fanconi Anemia (FA) is a rare genetically heterogeneous disorder with 17 known complement groups caused by mutations in different genes. FA complementation group L (FA-L, OMIM #608111) occurred in 0.2% of all FA and only eight mutant variants in the FANCL gene were documented. Phenotype and genotype correlation in FANCL associated FA is still obscure. Here we describe a Chinese girl with FA-L caused by a novel homozygous mutation c.822_823insCTTTCAGG (p.Asp275LeufsX13) in the FANCL gene. The patient's clinical course was typical for FA with progression to bone marrow failure, and death from acute myelomonocytic leukemia (AML-M4) at 9 years of age. Mutation analysis also detected a likely somatic c.2608G > A (p.Gly870Ser) in the SETBP1 gene. Consistent copy number losses of 7q and 18p and gains of 3q and 21q and accumulated non-clonal single cell chromosomal abnormalities were detected in blood leukocytes as her FA progressed. This is the first Chinese FA-L case caused by a novel FANCL mutation. The somatic gene mutation and copy number aberrations could be used to monitor disease progression and the clinical findings provide further information for genotype-phenotype correlation for FA-L. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  8. A homozygous MYO7A mutation associated to Usher syndrome and unilateral auditory neuropathy spectrum disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xia, Hong; Hu, Pengzhi; Yuan, Lamei; Xiong, Wei; Xu, Hongbo; Yi, Junhui; Yang, Zhijian; Deng, Xiong; Guo, Yi; Deng, Hao

    2017-10-01

    Usher syndrome (USH) is an autosomal recessive disorder characterized by sensorineural hearing loss, progressive visual loss and night blindness due to retinitis pigmentosa (RP), with or without vestibular dysfunction. The purpose of this study was to detect the causative gene in a consanguineous Chinese family with USH. A c.3696_3706del (p.R1232Sfs*72) variant in the myosin VIIa gene (MYO7A) was identified in the homozygous state by exome sequencing. The co‑segregation of the MYO7A c.3696_3706del variant with the phenotype of deafness and progressive visual loss in the USH family was confirmed by Sanger sequencing. The variant was absent in 200 healthy controls. Therefore, the c.3696_3706del variant may disrupt the interaction between myosin VIIa and other USH1 proteins, and impair melanosome transport in retinal pigment epithelial cells. Notably, bilateral auditory brainstem responses were absent in two patients of the USH family, while distortion product otoacoustic emissions were elicited in the right ears of the two patients, consistent with clinical diagnosis of unilateral auditory neuropathy spectrum disorder. These data suggested that the homozygous c.3696_3706del variant in the MYO7A gene may be the disease‑causing mutation for the disorder in this family. These findings broaden the phenotype spectrum of the MYO7A gene, and may facilitate understanding of the molecular pathogenesis of the disease, and genetic counseling for the family.

  9. Inactivation and inducible oncogenic mutation of p53 in gene targeted pigs.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Simon Leuchs

    Full Text Available Mutation of the tumor suppressor p53 plays a major role in human carcinogenesis. Here we describe gene-targeted porcine mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs and live pigs carrying a latent TP53(R167H mutant allele, orthologous to oncogenic human mutant TP53(R175H and mouse Trp53(R172H, that can be activated by Cre recombination. MSCs carrying the latent TP53(R167H mutant allele were analyzed in vitro. Homozygous cells were p53 deficient, and on continued culture exhibited more rapid proliferation, anchorage independent growth, and resistance to the apoptosis-inducing chemotherapeutic drug doxorubicin, all characteristic of cellular transformation. Cre mediated recombination activated the latent TP53(R167H allele as predicted, and in homozygous cells expressed mutant p53-R167H protein at a level ten-fold greater than wild-type MSCs, consistent with the elevated levels found in human cancer cells. Gene targeted MSCs were used for nuclear transfer and fifteen viable piglets were produced carrying the latent TP53(R167H mutant allele in heterozygous form. These animals will allow study of p53 deficiency and expression of mutant p53-R167H to model human germline, or spontaneous somatic p53 mutation. This work represents the first inactivation and mutation of the gatekeeper tumor suppressor gene TP53 in a non-rodent mammal.

  10. Homozygous ARHGEF2 mutation causes intellectual disability and midbrain-hindbrain malformation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ethiraj Ravindran

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Mid-hindbrain malformations can occur during embryogenesis through a disturbance of transient and localized gene expression patterns within these distinct brain structures. Rho guanine nucleotide exchange factor (ARHGEF family members are key for controlling the spatiotemporal activation of Rho GTPase, to modulate cytoskeleton dynamics, cell division, and cell migration. We identified, by means of whole exome sequencing, a homozygous frameshift mutation in the ARHGEF2 as a cause of intellectual disability, a midbrain-hindbrain malformation, and mild microcephaly in a consanguineous pedigree of Kurdish-Turkish descent. We show that loss of ARHGEF2 perturbs progenitor cell differentiation and that this is associated with a shift of mitotic spindle plane orientation, putatively favoring more symmetric divisions. The ARHGEF2 mutation leads to reduction in the activation of the RhoA/ROCK/MLC pathway crucial for cell migration. We demonstrate that the human brain malformation is recapitulated in Arhgef2 mutant mice and identify an aberrant migration of distinct components of the precerebellar system as a pathomechanism underlying the midbrain-hindbrain phenotype. Our results highlight the crucial function of ARHGEF2 in human brain development and identify a mutation in ARHGEF2 as novel cause of a neurodevelopmental disorder.

  11. Homozygous ARHGEF2 mutation causes intellectual disability and midbrain-hindbrain malformation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ravindran, Ethiraj; Hu, Hao; Yuzwa, Scott A; Hernandez-Miranda, Luis R; Kraemer, Nadine; Ninnemann, Olaf; Musante, Luciana; Boltshauser, Eugen; Schindler, Detlev; Hübner, Angela; Reinecker, Hans-Christian; Ropers, Hans-Hilger; Birchmeier, Carmen; Miller, Freda D; Wienker, Thomas F; Hübner, Christoph; Kaindl, Angela M

    2017-04-01

    Mid-hindbrain malformations can occur during embryogenesis through a disturbance of transient and localized gene expression patterns within these distinct brain structures. Rho guanine nucleotide exchange factor (ARHGEF) family members are key for controlling the spatiotemporal activation of Rho GTPase, to modulate cytoskeleton dynamics, cell division, and cell migration. We identified, by means of whole exome sequencing, a homozygous frameshift mutation in the ARHGEF2 as a cause of intellectual disability, a midbrain-hindbrain malformation, and mild microcephaly in a consanguineous pedigree of Kurdish-Turkish descent. We show that loss of ARHGEF2 perturbs progenitor cell differentiation and that this is associated with a shift of mitotic spindle plane orientation, putatively favoring more symmetric divisions. The ARHGEF2 mutation leads to reduction in the activation of the RhoA/ROCK/MLC pathway crucial for cell migration. We demonstrate that the human brain malformation is recapitulated in Arhgef2 mutant mice and identify an aberrant migration of distinct components of the precerebellar system as a pathomechanism underlying the midbrain-hindbrain phenotype. Our results highlight the crucial function of ARHGEF2 in human brain development and identify a mutation in ARHGEF2 as novel cause of a neurodevelopmental disorder.

  12. Homozygous ARHGEF2 mutation causes intellectual disability and midbrain-hindbrain malformation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuzwa, Scott A.; Hernandez-Miranda, Luis R.; Musante, Luciana; Boltshauser, Eugen; Schindler, Detlev; Hübner, Angela; Reinecker, Hans-Christian; Ropers, Hans-Hilger; Miller, Freda D.; Hübner, Christoph; Kaindl, Angela M.

    2017-01-01

    Mid-hindbrain malformations can occur during embryogenesis through a disturbance of transient and localized gene expression patterns within these distinct brain structures. Rho guanine nucleotide exchange factor (ARHGEF) family members are key for controlling the spatiotemporal activation of Rho GTPase, to modulate cytoskeleton dynamics, cell division, and cell migration. We identified, by means of whole exome sequencing, a homozygous frameshift mutation in the ARHGEF2 as a cause of intellectual disability, a midbrain-hindbrain malformation, and mild microcephaly in a consanguineous pedigree of Kurdish-Turkish descent. We show that loss of ARHGEF2 perturbs progenitor cell differentiation and that this is associated with a shift of mitotic spindle plane orientation, putatively favoring more symmetric divisions. The ARHGEF2 mutation leads to reduction in the activation of the RhoA/ROCK/MLC pathway crucial for cell migration. We demonstrate that the human brain malformation is recapitulated in Arhgef2 mutant mice and identify an aberrant migration of distinct components of the precerebellar system as a pathomechanism underlying the midbrain-hindbrain phenotype. Our results highlight the crucial function of ARHGEF2 in human brain development and identify a mutation in ARHGEF2 as novel cause of a neurodevelopmental disorder. PMID:28453519

  13. A novel homozygous mutation in the FSHR gene is causative for primary ovarian insufficiency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Hongli; Xu, Xiaofei; Han, Ting; Yan, Lei; Cheng, Lei; Qin, Yingying; Liu, Wen; Zhao, Shidou; Chen, Zi-Jiang

    2017-12-01

    To identify the potential FSHR mutation in a Chinese woman with primary ovarian insufficiency (POI). Genetic and functional studies. University-based reproductive medicine center. A POI patient, her family members, and another 192 control women with regular menstruation. Ovarian biopsy was performed in the patient. Sanger sequencing was carried out for the patient, her sister, and parents. The novel variant identified was further confirmed with the use of control subjects. Sanger sequencing and genotype analysis to identify the potential variant of the FSHR gene; hematoxylin and eosin staining of the ovarian section to observe the follicular development; Western blotting and immunofluorescence to detect FSH receptor (FSHR) expression; and cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP) assay to monitor FSH-induced signaling. Histologic examination of the ovaries in the patient revealed follicular development up to the early antral stage. Mutational screening and genotype analysis of the FSHR gene identified a novel homozygous mutation c.175C>T (p.R59X) in exon 2, which was inherited in the autosomal recessive mode from her heterozygous parents but was absent in her sister and the 192 control women. Functional studies demonstrated that in vitro the nonsense mutation caused the loss of full-length FSHR expression and that p.R59X mutant showed no response to FSH stimulation in the cAMP level. The mutation p.R59X in FSHR is causative for POI by means of arresting folliculogenesis. Copyright © 2017 American Society for Reproductive Medicine. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. A homozygous PMS2 founder mutation with an attenuated constitutional mismatch repair deficiency phenotype.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Lili; Hamel, Nancy; Baker, Kristi; McGuffin, Michael J; Couillard, Martin; Gologan, Adrian; Marcus, Victoria A; Chodirker, Bernard; Chudley, Albert; Stefanovici, Camelia; Durandy, Anne; Hegele, Robert A; Feng, Bing-Jian; Goldgar, David E; Zhu, Jun; De Rosa, Marina; Gruber, Stephen B; Wimmer, Katharina; Young, Barbara; Chong, George; Tischkowitz, Marc D; Foulkes, William D

    2015-05-01

    Inherited mutations in DNA mismatch repair genes predispose to different cancer syndromes depending on whether they are mono-allelic or bi-allelic. This supports a causal relationship between expression level in the germline and phenotype variation. As a model to study this relationship, our study aimed to define the pathogenic characteristics of a recurrent homozygous coding variant in PMS2 displaying an attenuated phenotype identified by clinical genetic testing in seven Inuit families from Northern Quebec. Pathogenic characteristics of the PMS2 mutation NM_000535.5:c.2002A>G were studied using genotype-phenotype correlation, single-molecule expression detection and single genome microsatellite instability analysis. This PMS2 mutation generates a de novo splice site that competes with the authentic site. In homozygotes, expression of the full-length protein is reduced to a level barely detectable by conventional diagnostics. Median age at primary cancer diagnosis is 22 years among 13 NM_000535.5:c.2002A>G homozygotes, versus 8 years in individuals carrying bi-allelic truncating mutations. Residual expression of full-length PMS2 transcript was detected in normal tissues from homozygotes with cancers in their 20s. Our genotype-phenotype study of c.2002A>G illustrates that an extremely low level of PMS2 expression likely delays cancer onset, a feature that could be exploited in cancer preventive intervention. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://group.bmj.com/group/rights-licensing/permissions.

  15. Lethal/severe osteogenesis imperfecta in a large family: a novel homozygous LEPRE1 mutation and bone histological findings

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Dijk, Fleur S.; Nikkels, Peter G. J.; den Hollander, Nicolette S.; Nesbitt, Isabel M.; van Rijn, Rick R.; Cobben, Jan M.; Pals, Gerard

    2011-01-01

    We report a large consanguineous Turkish family in which multiple individuals are affected with autosomal recessive lethal or severe osteogenesis imperfecta (OI) due to a novel homozygous LEPRE1 mutation. In one affected individual histological studies of bone tissue were performed, which may

  16. Chronic pancreatitis with pancreaticolithiasis and pseudocyst in a 5-year-old boy with homozygous SPINK1 mutation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kuehn, Axel C.; Hirsch, Wolfgang [University of Leipzig, Department of Diagnostic Radiology - Pediatric Radiology, Faculty of Medicine, Leipzig (Germany); Teich, Niels; Caca, Karel [University of Leipzig, Department of Internal Medicine II - Gastroenterology / Hepatology, Faculty of Medicine, Leipzig (Germany); Limbach, Anne [University of Leipzig, Department of Pediatrics, Faculty of Medicine, Leipzig (Germany)

    2005-09-01

    We report a 5-year-old boy with a 5-month history of symptoms owing to chronic pancreatitis. Abdominal imaging revealed a large pseudocyst in the pancreatic tail and concretions in the main pancreatic duct. Successful endoscopic papillotomy and stent implantation were performed. Genetic testing showed homozygous SPINK1-N34S mutation, which is an established risk factor for chronic pancreatitis. (orig.)

  17. Chronic pancreatitis with pancreaticolithiasis and pseudocyst in a 5-year-old boy with homozygous SPINK1 mutation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kuehn, Axel C.; Hirsch, Wolfgang; Teich, Niels; Caca, Karel; Limbach, Anne

    2005-01-01

    We report a 5-year-old boy with a 5-month history of symptoms owing to chronic pancreatitis. Abdominal imaging revealed a large pseudocyst in the pancreatic tail and concretions in the main pancreatic duct. Successful endoscopic papillotomy and stent implantation were performed. Genetic testing showed homozygous SPINK1-N34S mutation, which is an established risk factor for chronic pancreatitis. (orig.)

  18. A novel homozygous AP4B1 mutation in two brothers with AP-4 deficiency syndrome and ocular anomalies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Accogli, Andrea; Hamdan, Fadi F; Poulin, Chantal; Nassif, Christina; Rouleau, Guy A; Michaud, Jacques L; Srour, Myriam

    2018-04-01

    Adaptor protein complex-4 (AP-4) is a heterotetrameric protein complex which plays a key role in vesicle trafficking in neurons. Mutations in genes affecting different subunits of AP-4, including AP4B1, AP4E1, AP4S1, and AP4M1, have been recently associated with an autosomal recessive phenotype, consisting of spastic tetraplegia, and intellectual disability (ID). The overlapping clinical picture among individuals carrying mutations in any of these genes has prompted the terms "AP-4 deficiency syndrome" for this clinically recognizable phenotype. Using whole-exome sequencing, we identified a novel homozygous mutation (c.991C>T, p.Q331*, NM_006594.4) in AP4B1 in two siblings from a consanguineous Pakistani couple, who presented with severe ID, progressive spastic tetraplegia, epilepsy, and microcephaly. Sanger sequencing confirmed the mutation was homozygous in the siblings and heterozygous in the parents. Similar to previously reported individuals with AP4B1 mutations, brain MRI revealed ventriculomegaly and white matter loss. Interestingly, in addition to the typical facial gestalt reported in other AP-4 deficiency cases, the older brother presented with congenital left Horner syndrome, bilateral optic nerve atrophy and cataract, which have not been previously reported in this condition. In summary, we report a novel AP4B1 homozygous mutation in two siblings and review the phenotype of AP-4 deficiency, speculating on a possible role of AP-4 complex in eye development. © 2018 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  19. A homozygous mutation in a consanguineous family consolidates the role of ALDH1A3 in autosomal recessive microphthalmia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Roos, L; Fang, M; Dali, C

    2013-01-01

    to the identification of new genes. Very recently, homozygous variations within ALDH1A3 have been associated with autosomal recessive microphthalmia with or without cysts or coloboma, and with variable subphenotypes of developmental delay/autism spectrum disorder in eight families. In a consanguineous family where...... three of the five siblings were affected with microphthalmia/coloboma, we identified a novel homozygous missense mutation in ALDH1A3 using exome sequencing. Of the three affected siblings, one had intellectual disability and one had intellectual disability and autism, while the last one presented...... with normal development. This study contributes further to the description of the clinical spectrum associated with ALDH1A3 mutations, and illustrates the interfamilial clinical variation observed in individuals with ALDH1A3 mutations....

  20. Differential functional readthrough over homozygous nonsense mutations contributes to the bleeding phenotype in coagulation factor VII deficiency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Branchini, A; Ferrarese, M; Lombardi, S; Mari, R; Bernardi, F; Pinotti, M

    2016-10-01

    Essentials Potentially null homozygous Factor(F)7 nonsense mutations are associated to variable bleeding symptoms. Readthrough of p.Ser112X (life-threatening) and p.Cys132X (moderate) stop codons was investigated. Readthrough-mediated insertion of wild-type or tolerated residues produce functional proteins. Functional readthrough over homozygous F7 nonsense mutations contributes to the bleeding phenotype. Background Whereas the rare homozygous nonsense mutations causing factor (F)VII deficiency may predict null conditions that are almost completely incompatible with life, they are associated with appreciable differences in hemorrhagic symptoms. The misrecognition of premature stop codons (readthrough) may account for variable levels of functional full-length proteins. Objectives To experimentally evaluate the basal and drug-induced levels of FVII resulting from the homozygous p.Cys132X and p.Ser112X nonsense mutations that are associated with moderate (132X) or life-threatening (112X) symptoms, and that are predicted to undergo readthrough with (132X) or without (112X) production of wild-type FVII. Methods We transiently expressed recombinant FVII (rFVII) nonsense and missense variants in human embryonic kidney 293 cells, and evaluated secreted FVII protein and functional levels by ELISA, activated FX generation, and coagulation assays. Results The levels of functional FVII produced by p.Cys132X and p.Ser112X mutants (rFVII-132X, 1.1% ± 0.2% of wild-type rFVII; rFVII-112X, 0.5% ± 0.1% of wild-type rFVII) were compatible with the occurrence of spontaneous readthrough, which was magnified by the addition of G418 - up to 12% of the wild-type value for the rFVII-132X nonsense variant. The predicted missense variants arising from readthrough abolished (rFVII-132Trp/Arg) or reduced (rFVII-112Trp/Cys/Arg, 22-45% of wild-type levels) secretion and function. These data suggest that the appreciable rescue of p.Cys132X function was driven by reinsertion of the wild

  1. Homozygous and compound heterozygous mutations in the FBN1 gene: unexpected findings in molecular diagnosis of Marfan syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arnaud, Pauline; Hanna, Nadine; Aubart, Mélodie; Leheup, Bruno; Dupuis-Girod, Sophie; Naudion, Sophie; Lacombe, Didier; Milleron, Olivier; Odent, Sylvie; Faivre, Laurence; Bal, Laurence; Edouard, Thomas; Collod-Beroud, Gwenaëlle; Langeois, Maud; Spentchian, Myrtille; Gouya, Laurent; Jondeau, Guillaume; Boileau, Catherine

    2017-02-01

    Marfan syndrome (MFS) is an autosomal-dominant connective tissue disorder usually associated with heterozygous mutations in the gene encoding fibrillin-1 (FBN1). Homozygous and compound heterozygous cases are rare events and have been associated with a clinical severe presentation. Report unexpected findings of homozygosity and compound heterozygosity in the course of molecular diagnosis of heterozygous MFS and compare the findings with published cases. In the context of molecular diagnosis of heterozygous MFS, systematic sequencing of the FBN1 gene was performed in 2500 probands referred nationwide. 1400 probands carried a heterozygous mutation in this gene. Unexpectedly, among them four homozygous cases (0.29%) and five compound heterozygous cases (0.36%) were identified (total: 0.64%). Interestingly, none of these cases carried two premature termination codon mutations in the FBN1 gene. Clinical features for these carriers and their families were gathered and compared. There was a large spectrum of severity of the disease in probands carrying two mutated FBN1 alleles, but none of them presented extremely severe manifestations of MFS in any system compared with carriers of only one mutated FBN1 allele. This observation is not in line with the severe clinical features reported in the literature for four homozygous and three compound heterozygous probands. Homozygotes and compound heterozygotes were unexpectedly identified in the course of molecular diagnosis of MFS. Contrary to previous reports, the presence of two mutated alleles was not associated with severe forms of MFS. Although homozygosity and compound heterozygosity are rarely found in molecular diagnosis, they should not be overlooked, especially among consanguineous families. However, no predictive evaluation of severity should be provided. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://www.bmj.com/company/products-services/rights-and-licensing/.

  2. Costs of insensitive acetylcholinesterase insecticide resistance for the malaria vector Anopheles gambiae homozygous for the G119S mutation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Noel Valérie

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The G119S mutation responsible for insensitive acetylcholinesterase resistance to organophosphate and carbamate insecticides has recently been reported from natural populations of Anopheles gambiae in West Africa. These reports suggest there are costs of resistance associated with this mutation for An. gambiae, especially for homozygous individuals, and these costs could be influential in determining the frequency of carbamate resistance in these populations. Methods Life-history traits of the AcerKis and Kisumu strains of An. gambiae were compared following the manipulation of larval food availability in three separate experiments conducted in an insecticide-free laboratory environment. These two strains share the same genetic background, but differ in being homozygous for the presence or absence of the G119S mutation at the ace-1 locus, respectively. Results Pupae of the resistant strain were significantly more likely to die during pupation than those of the susceptible strain. Ages at pupation were significantly earlier for the resistant strain and their dry starved weights were significantly lighter; this difference in weight remained when the two strains were matched for ages at pupation. Conclusions The main cost of resistance found for An. gambiae mosquitoes homozygous for the G119S mutation was that they were significantly more likely to die during pupation than their susceptible counterparts, and they did so across a range of larval food conditions. Comparing the frequency of G119S in fourth instar larvae and adults emerging from the same populations would provide a way to test whether this cost of resistance is being expressed in natural populations of An. gambiae and influencing the dynamics of this resistance mutation.

  3. Severe coagulation factor VII deficiency caused by a novel homozygous mutation (p. Trp284Gly) in loop 140s.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hao, Xiuping; Cheng, XiaoLi; Ye, Jiajia; Wang, Yingyu; Yang, LiHong; Wang, Mingshan; Jin, Yanhui

    2016-06-01

    Congenital coagulation factor VII (FVII) deficiency is a rare disorder caused by mutation in F7 gene. Herein, we reported a patient who had unexplained hematuria and vertigo with consanguineous parents. He has been diagnosed as having FVII deficiency based on the results of reduced FVII activity (2.0%) and antigen (12.8%). The thrombin generation tests verified that the proband has obstacles in producing thrombin. Direct sequencing analysis revealed a novel homozygous missense mutation p.Trp284Gly. Also noteworthy is the fact that the mutational residue belongs to structurally conserved loop 140s, which majorly undergo rearrangement after FVII activation. Model analysis indicated that the substitution disrupts these native hydrophobic interactions, which are of great importance to the conformation in the activation domain of FVIIa.

  4. A Novel Homozygous Missense Mutation in HOXC13 Leads to Autosomal Recessive Pure Hair and Nail Ectodermal Dysplasia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xiaoxiao; Orseth, Meredith Lee; Smith, J Michael; Brehm, Mary Abigail; Agim, Nnenna Gebechi; Glass, Donald Alexander

    2017-03-01

    Pure hair and nail ectodermal dysplasia (PHNED) is a rare disorder that presents with hypotrichosis and nail dystrophy while sparing other ectodermal structures such as teeth and sweat glands. We describe a homozygous novel missense mutation in the HOXC13 gene that resulted in autosomal recessive PHNED in a Hispanic child. The mutation c.812A>G (p.Gln271Arg) is located within the DNA-binding domain of the HOXC13 gene, cosegregates within the family, and is predicted to be maximally damaging. This is the first reported case of a missense HOXC13 mutation resulting in PHNED and the first reported case of PHNED identified in a North American family. Our findings illustrate the critical role of HOXC13 in human hair and nail development. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  5. Efficacy of Rosuvastatin in Children With Homozygous Familial Hypercholesterolemia and Association With Underlying Genetic Mutations

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Stein, Evan A.; Dann, Eldad J.; Wiegman, Albert; Skovby, Flemming; Gaudet, Daniel; Sokal, Etienne; Charng, Min-Ji; Mohamed, Mafauzy; Luirink, Ilse; Raichlen, Joel S.; Sundén, Mattias; Carlsson, Stefan C.; Raal, Frederick J.; Kastelein, John J. P.

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND Homozygous familial hypercholesterolemia (HoFH), a rare genetic disorder, is characterized by extremely elevated levels of low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C) and accelerated atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease. Statin treatment starts at diagnosis, but no statin has been

  6. CRISPR Correction of a Homozygous Low-Density Lipoprotein Receptor Mutation in Familial Hypercholesterolemia Induced Pluripotent Stem Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Omer, Linda; Hudson, Elizabeth A; Zheng, Shirong; Hoying, James B; Shan, Yuan; Boyd, Nolan L

    2017-11-01

    Familial hypercholesterolemia (FH) is a hereditary disease primarily due to mutations in the low-density lipoprotein receptor (LDLR) that lead to elevated cholesterol and premature development of cardiovascular disease. Homozygous FH patients (HoFH) with two dysfunctional LDLR alleles are not as successfully treated with standard hypercholesterol therapies, and more aggressive therapeutic approaches to control cholesterol levels must be considered. Liver transplant can resolve HoFH, and hepatocyte transplantation has shown promising results in animals and humans. However, demand for donated livers and high-quality hepatocytes overwhelm the supply. Human pluripotent stem cells can differentiate to hepatocyte-like cells (HLCs) with the potential for experimental and clinical use. To be of future clinical use as autologous cells, LDLR genetic mutations in derived FH-HLCs need to be corrected. Genome editing technology clustered-regularly-interspaced-short-palindromic-repeats/CRISPR-associated 9 (CRISPR/Cas9) can repair pathologic genetic mutations in human induced pluripotent stem cells. We used CRISPR/Cas9 genome editing to permanently correct a 3-base pair homozygous deletion in LDLR exon 4 of patient-derived HoFH induced pluripotent stem cells. The genetic correction restored LDLR-mediated endocytosis in FH-HLCs and demonstrates the proof-of-principle that CRISPR-mediated genetic modification can be successfully used to normalize HoFH cholesterol metabolism deficiency at the cellular level.

  7. Homozygous SLC6A17 Mutations Cause Autosomal-Recessive Intellectual Disability with Progressive Tremor, Speech Impairment, and Behavioral Problems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iqbal, Zafar; Willemsen, Marjolein H.; Papon, Marie-Amélie; Musante, Luciana; Benevento, Marco; Hu, Hao; Venselaar, Hanka; Wissink-Lindhout, Willemijn M.; Vulto-van Silfhout, Anneke T.; Vissers, Lisenka E.L.M.; de Brouwer, Arjan P.M.; Marouillat, Sylviane; Wienker, Thomas F.; Ropers, Hans Hilger; Kahrizi, Kimia; Nadif Kasri, Nael; Najmabadi, Hossein; Laumonnier, Frédéric; Kleefstra, Tjitske; van Bokhoven, Hans

    2015-01-01

    We report on Dutch and Iranian families with affected individuals who present with moderate to severe intellectual disability and additional phenotypes including progressive tremor, speech impairment, and behavioral problems in certain individuals. A combination of exome sequencing and homozygosity mapping revealed homozygous mutations c.484G>A (p.Gly162Arg) and c.1898C>G (p.Pro633Arg) in SLC6A17. SLC6A17 is predominantly expressed in the brain, encodes a synaptic vesicular transporter of neutral amino acids and glutamate, and plays an important role in the regulation of glutamatergic synapses. Prediction programs and 3D modeling suggest that the identified mutations are deleterious to protein function. To directly test the functional consequences, we investigated the neuronal subcellular localization of overexpressed wild-type and mutant variants in mouse primary hippocampal neuronal cells. Wild-type protein was present in soma, axons, dendrites, and dendritic spines. p.Pro633Arg altered SLC6A17 was found in soma and proximal dendrites but did not reach spines. p.Gly162Arg altered SLC6A17 showed a normal subcellular distribution but was associated with an abnormal neuronal morphology mainly characterized by the loss of dendritic spines. In summary, our genetic findings implicate homozygous SLC6A17 mutations in autosomal-recessive intellectual disability, and their pathogenic role is strengthened by genetic evidence and in silico and in vitro functional analyses. PMID:25704603

  8. Identification of a Novel Homozygous Nonsense Mutation Confirms the Implication of GNAT1 in Rod-Cone Dystrophy.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cécile Méjécase

    Full Text Available GNAT1, encoding the transducin subunit Gα, is an important element of the phototransduction cascade. Mutations in this gene have been associated with autosomal dominant and autosomal recessive congenital stationary night blindness. Recently, a homozygous truncating GNAT1 mutation was identified in a patient with late-onset rod-cone dystrophy. After exclusion of mutations in genes underlying progressive inherited retinal disorders, by targeted next generation sequencing, a 32 year-old male sporadic case with severe rod-cone dystrophy and his unaffected parents were investigated by whole exome sequencing. This led to the identification of a homozygous nonsense variant, c.963C>A p.(Cys321* in GNAT1, which was confirmed by Sanger sequencing. The mother was heterozygous for this variant whereas the variant was absent in the father. c.963C>A p.(Cys321* is predicted to produce a shorter protein that lacks critical sites for the phototransduction cascade. Our work confirms that the phenotype and the mode of inheritance associated with GNAT1 variants can vary from autosomal dominant, autosomal recessive congenital stationary night blindness to autosomal recessive rod-cone dystrophy.

  9. Homozygous SLC6A17 Mutations Cause Autosomal-Recessive Intellectual Disability with Progressive Tremor, Speech Impairment, and Behavioral Problems

    OpenAIRE

    Iqbal, Zafar; Willemsen, Marjolein H.; Papon, Marie-Amélie; Musante, Luciana; Benevento, Marco; Hu, Hao; Venselaar, Hanka; Wissink-Lindhout, Willemijn M.; Vulto-van Silfhout, Anneke T.; Vissers, Lisenka E.L.M.; de Brouwer, Arjan P.M.; Marouillat, Sylviane; Wienker, Thomas F.; Ropers, Hans Hilger; Kahrizi, Kimia

    2015-01-01

    We report on Dutch and Iranian families with affected individuals who present with moderate to severe intellectual disability and additional phenotypes including progressive tremor, speech impairment, and behavioral problems in certain individuals. A combination of exome sequencing and homozygosity mapping revealed homozygous mutations c.484G>A (p.Gly162Arg) and c.1898C>G (p.Pro633Arg) in SLC6A17. SLC6A17 is predominantly expressed in the brain, encodes a synaptic vesicular transporter of neu...

  10. Acral peeling skin syndrome resulting from a homozygous nonsense mutation in the CSTA gene encoding cystatin A.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krunic, Aleksandar L; Stone, Kristina L; Simpson, Michael A; McGrath, John A

    2013-01-01

    Acral peeling skin syndrome (APSS) is a clinically and genetically heterogeneous disorder. We used whole-exome sequencing to identify the molecular basis of APSS in a consanguineous Jordanian-American pedigree. We identified a homozygous nonsense mutation (p.Lys22X) in the CSTA gene, encoding cystatin A, that was confirmed using Sanger sequencing. Cystatin A is a protease inhibitor found in the cornified cell envelope, and loss-of-function mutations have previously been reported in two cases of exfoliative ichthyosis. Our study expands the molecular pathology of APSS and demonstrates the value of next-generation sequencing in the genetic characterization of inherited skin diseases. © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  11. TP53 p.R337H is a conditional cancer-predisposing mutation: further evidence from a homozygous patient

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Giacomazzi, Juliana; Hainaut, Pierre; Ashton-Prolla, Patricia; Selistre, Simone; Duarte, Juliana; Ribeiro, Jorge Pinto; Vieira, Paulo JC; Souza Macedo, Gabriel de; Rossi, Cristina; Czepielewski, Mauro; Netto, Cristina Brinkmann Oliveira

    2013-01-01

    Adrenocortical carcinomas (ACCs) are among the most common childhood cancers occurring in infants affected with the Li-Fraumeni and Li- Fraumeni-like (LFS/LFL) syndromes, which are caused by dominant germline mutations in the TP53 gene. In Brazil, a particular mutation, occurring in the tetramerisation domain of the gene, p.R337H, is exceedingly common due to a founder effect and is strongly associated with ACC. In this report, we describe the phenotype and long-term clinical follow-up of a female child diagnosed with ACC and homozygous for the TP53 p.R337H founder mutation. At age 11 months, the patient was diagnosed with a virilising anaplastic adrenal cortical tumour, which was completely excised without disturbing the adrenal capsule. Family history was consistent with an LFL tumour pattern, and genotyping identified the TP53 p.R337H mutation in both alleles in genomic DNA from lymphocytes and fibroblasts. Haplotype analysis confirmed the occurrence of the mutation in the same founder haplotype previously described in other Brazilian patients. No other germline or somatic TP53 mutations or rearrangements were identified. At age 9 years, the child was asymptomatic and had no evidence of endocrine derangements. Full body and brain magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) failed to detect any suspicious proliferative lesions, and cardiopulmonary exercise testing results were within the normal reference for the child’s age, ruling out a major exercise capacity deficiency. This is the first clinical and aerobic functional capacity documentation of a patient who carries two mutant TP53 alleles and no wild-type allele. Our results support the hypothesis that TP53 p.R337H, the most common TP53 mutation ever described in any population, is a conditional mutant. Furthermore, our observations over a long period of clinical follow-up suggest that TP53 p.R337H homozygotes do not have a more severe disease phenotype than do heterozygote carriers of the same mutation. Patients with

  12. Krüppel-like factor 1 mutations and expression of hemoglobins F and A2 in homozygous hemoglobin E syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tepakhan, Wanicha; Yamsri, Supawadee; Fucharoen, Goonnapa; Sanchaisuriya, Kanokwan; Fucharoen, Supan

    2015-07-01

    The basis for variability of hemoglobin (Hb) F in homozygous Hb E disease is not well understood. We have examined multiple mutations of the Krüppel-like factor 1 (KLF1) gene; an erythroid specific transcription factor and determined their associations with Hbs F and A2 expression in homozygous Hb E. Four KLF1 mutations including G176AfsX179, T334R, R238H, and -154 (C-T) were screened using specific PCR assays on 461 subjects with homozygous Hb E and 100 normal controls. None of these four mutations were observed in 100 normal controls. Among 461 subjects with homozygous Hb E, 306 had high (≥5 %) and 155 had low (<5 %) Hb F. DNA analysis identified the KLF1 mutations in 35 cases of the former group with high Hb F, including the G176AfsX179 mutation (17/306 = 5.6 %), T334R mutation (9/306 = 2.9 %), -154 (C-T) mutation (7/306 = 2.3 %), and R328H mutation (2/306 = 0.7 %). Only two subjects in the latter group with low Hb F carried the G176AfsX179 and -154 (C-T) mutations. Significant higher Hb A2 level was observed in those of homozygous Hb E with the G176AfsX179 mutation as compared to those without KLF1 mutations. These results indicate that KLF1 is among the genetic factors associated with increased Hbs F and A2, and in combination with other factors could explain the variabilities of these Hb expression in Hb E syndrome.

  13. A homozygous nonsense CEP250 mutation combined with a heterozygous nonsense C2orf71 mutation is associated with atypical Usher syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khateb, Samer; Zelinger, Lina; Mizrahi-Meissonnier, Liliana; Ayuso, Carmen; Koenekoop, Robert K; Laxer, Uri; Gross, Menachem; Banin, Eyal; Sharon, Dror

    2014-07-01

    Usher syndrome (USH) is a heterogeneous group of inherited retinitis pigmentosa (RP) and sensorineural hearing loss (SNHL) caused by mutations in at least 12 genes. Our aim is to identify additional USH-related genes. Clinical examination included visual acuity test, funduscopy and electroretinography. Genetic analysis included homozygosity mapping and whole exome sequencing (WES). A combination of homozygosity mapping and WES in a large consanguineous family of Iranian Jewish origin revealed nonsense mutations in two ciliary genes: c.3289C>T (p.Q1097*) in C2orf71 and c.3463C>T (p.R1155*) in centrosome-associated protein CEP250 (C-Nap1). The latter has not been associated with any inherited disease and the c.3463C>T mutation was absent in control chromosomes. Patients who were double homozygotes had SNHL accompanied by early-onset and severe RP, while patients who were homozygous for the CEP250 mutation and carried a single mutant C2orf71 allele had SNHL with mild retinal degeneration. No ciliary structural abnormalities in the respiratory system were evident by electron microscopy analysis. CEP250 expression analysis of the mutant allele revealed the generation of a truncated protein lacking the NEK2-phosphorylation region. A homozygous nonsense CEP250 mutation, in combination with a heterozygous C2orf71 nonsense mutation, causes an atypical form of USH, characterised by early-onset SNHL and a relatively mild RP. The severe retinal involvement in the double homozygotes indicates an additive effect caused by nonsense mutations in genes encoding ciliary proteins. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://group.bmj.com/group/rights-licensing/permissions.

  14. Homozygous SLC6A17 mutations cause autosomal-recessive intellectual disability with progressive tremor, speech impairment, and behavioral problems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iqbal, Zafar; Willemsen, Marjolein H; Papon, Marie-Amélie; Musante, Luciana; Benevento, Marco; Hu, Hao; Venselaar, Hanka; Wissink-Lindhout, Willemijn M; Vulto-van Silfhout, Anneke T; Vissers, Lisenka E L M; de Brouwer, Arjan P M; Marouillat, Sylviane; Wienker, Thomas F; Ropers, Hans Hilger; Kahrizi, Kimia; Nadif Kasri, Nael; Najmabadi, Hossein; Laumonnier, Frédéric; Kleefstra, Tjitske; van Bokhoven, Hans

    2015-03-05

    We report on Dutch and Iranian families with affected individuals who present with moderate to severe intellectual disability and additional phenotypes including progressive tremor, speech impairment, and behavioral problems in certain individuals. A combination of exome sequencing and homozygosity mapping revealed homozygous mutations c.484G>A (p.Gly162Arg) and c.1898C>G (p.Pro633Arg) in SLC6A17. SLC6A17 is predominantly expressed in the brain, encodes a synaptic vesicular transporter of neutral amino acids and glutamate, and plays an important role in the regulation of glutamatergic synapses. Prediction programs and 3D modeling suggest that the identified mutations are deleterious to protein function. To directly test the functional consequences, we investigated the neuronal subcellular localization of overexpressed wild-type and mutant variants in mouse primary hippocampal neuronal cells. Wild-type protein was present in soma, axons, dendrites, and dendritic spines. p.Pro633Arg altered SLC6A17 was found in soma and proximal dendrites but did not reach spines. p.Gly162Arg altered SLC6A17 showed a normal subcellular distribution but was associated with an abnormal neuronal morphology mainly characterized by the loss of dendritic spines. In summary, our genetic findings implicate homozygous SLC6A17 mutations in autosomal-recessive intellectual disability, and their pathogenic role is strengthened by genetic evidence and in silico and in vitro functional analyses. Copyright © 2015 The American Society of Human Genetics. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. A New Mouse Model of Limb-Girdle Muscular Dystrophy Type 2I Homozygous for the Common L276I Mutation Mimicking the Mild Phenotype in Humans

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Krag, Thomas O; Vissing, John

    2015-01-01

    Limb-girdle muscular dystrophy type 2I (LGMD2I) is caused by mutations in the Fukutin-related protein (FKRP) gene, leading to inadequate glycosylation of α-dystroglycan, an important protein linking the extracellular matrix to the cytoskeleton. We created a mouse model of the common FKRP L276I...... mutation and a hemizygous FKRP L276I knockout model. We studied histopathology and protein expression in the models at different ages and found that homozygous FKRP L276I mice developed a mild progressive myopathy with increased muscle regeneration and fibrosis starting from 1 year of age. This was likely...... in maintaining proper glycosylation of α-dystroglycan. The mild progression in the homozygous FKRP L276I model resembles that in patients with LGMD2I who are homozygous for the L276I mutation. This animal model could, therefore, be relevant for understanding the pathophysiology of and developing a treatment...

  16. Dental phenotype in Jalili syndrome due to a c.1312 dupC homozygous mutation in the CNNM4 gene.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hans U Luder

    Full Text Available Jalili syndrome denotes a recessively inherited combination of an eye disease (cone-rod dystrophy and a dental disorder (amelogenesis imperfecta, which is caused by mutations in the CNNM4 gene. Whereas the ophthalmic consequences of these mutations have been studied comprehensively, the dental phenotype has obtained less attention. A defective transport of magnesium ions by the photoreceptors of the retina is assumed to account for the progressive visual impairment. Since magnesium is also incorporated in the mineral of dental hard tissues, we hypothesized that magnesium concentrations in defective enamel resulting from mutations in CNNM4 would be abnormal, if a similar deficiency of magnesium transport also accounted for the amelogenesis imperfecta. Thus, a detailed analysis of the dental hard tissues was performed in two boys of Kosovan origin affected by Jalili syndrome. Retinal dystrophy of the patients was diagnosed by a comprehensive eye examination and full-field electroretinography. A mutational analysis revealed a c.1312 dupC homozygous mutation in CNNM4, a genetic defect which had already been identified in other Kosovan families and putatively results in loss-of-function of the protein. The evaluation of six primary teeth using light and scanning electron microscopy as well as energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy showed that dental enamel was thin and deficient in mineral, suggesting a hypoplastic/hypomineralized type of amelogenesis imperfecta. The reduced mineral density of enamel was accompanied by decreased amounts of calcium, but significantly elevated levels of magnesium. In dentin, however, a similar mineral deficiency was associated with reduced magnesium and normal calcium levels. It is concluded that the c.1312 dupC mutation of CNNM4 results in mineralization defects of both enamel and dentin, which are associated with significantly abnormal magnesium concentrations. Thus, we could not disprove the hypothesis that a

  17. Odonto-onycho-dermal dysplasia in a patient homozygous for a WNT10A nonsens mutation and mild manifestations of ectodermal dysplasia in carriers of the mutation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bruun Krøigård, Anne; Clemmensen, Ole; Gjørup, Hans

    2016-01-01

    was homozygous for a previously reported pathogenic mutation in the WNT10A gene, c.321C > A, p.Cys107*. The skin and nail abnormalities were for many years interpreted as psoriasis and treated accordingly. A thorough clinical examination revealed hypotrichosis and hyperhidrosis of the soles and dental...... history of tooth anomalies, this lead to the clinical suspicion of a hereditary ectodermal dysplasia. CONCLUSION: This case illustrates the challenges of diagnosing ectodermal dysplasia like OODD and highlights the relevance of interdisciplinary cooperation in the diagnosis of rare conditions....

  18. Methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase homozygous mutation in a young boy with cerebellar infarction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alberto Spalice

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available Posterior circulation vascular occlusive disease in children is a rare and uncommonly reported event. Among the numerous risk factors, the methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase (MTHFR mutation is considered to be a common genetic cause of thrombosis in adults and children. Recently, a link between the MTHFR mutation and cerebrovascular disorders was reported in children. Diffusion tensor imaging (DTI is a great improvement on magnetic resonance imaging (MRI, making the in vivo anatomical and pathological study of the brain and its fibers possible. In our patient cerebellar infarction was associated with MTHFR mutation and, in a standard neurological examination, DTI revealed normal white matter tracts.

  19. Homozygous mutation of focal adhesion kinase in embryonic stem cell derived neurons: normal electrophysiological and morphological properties in vitro

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Komiyama NH

    2006-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Genetically manipulated embryonic stem (ES cell derived neurons (ESNs provide a powerful system with which to study the consequences of gene manipulation in mature, synaptically connected neurons in vitro. Here we report a study of focal adhesion kinase (FAK, which has been implicated in synapse formation and regulation of ion channels, using the ESN system to circumvent the embryonic lethality of homozygous FAK mutant mice. Results Mouse ES cells carrying homozygous null mutations (FAK-/- were generated and differentiated in vitro into neurons. FAK-/- ESNs extended axons and dendrites and formed morphologically and electrophysiologically intact synapses. A detailed study of NMDA receptor gated currents and voltage sensitive calcium currents revealed no difference in their magnitude, or modulation by tyrosine kinases. Conclusion FAK does not have an obligatory role in neuronal differentiation, synapse formation or the expression of NMDA receptor or voltage-gated calcium currents under the conditions used in this study. The use of genetically modified ESNs has great potential for rapidly and effectively examining the consequences of neuronal gene manipulation and is complementary to mouse studies.

  20. Exclusion of homozygous PLCE1 (NPHS3) mutations in 69 families with idiopathic and hereditary FSGS.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Gbadegesin, Rasheed

    2009-02-01

    Focal and segmental glomerulosclerosis (FSGS) is the most common glomerular cause of end-stage kidney disease (ESKD). Although the etiology of FSGS has not been fully elucidated, recent results from the positional cloning of genes mutated in nephrotic syndromes are now beginning to provide insight into the pathogenesis of these diseases. Mutations in PLCE1\\/NPHS3 have recently been reported as a cause of nephrotic syndrome characterized by diffuse mesangial sclerosis (DMS) histology. One single family with a missense mutation had late onset of the disease that was characterized by FSGS. To further define the role of PLCE1 mutations in the etiology of FSGS, we performed mutational analysis in 69 families with FSGS. A total of 69 families with 231 affected individuals were examined. The median age of disease onset was 26 years (range 1-66 years). Onset of ESKD was at a median age of 35.5 years. Seven variants leading to non-synonymous changes were found, of which only two are new variants (exon 4 c.1682 G>A R561Q, exon 31 c.6518A>G K2173R). No known disease-causing mutations were identified in the families screened. PLCE1\\/NPHS3 mutations are not a cause of FSGS in this cohort. The absence of mutations in PLCE1\\/NPHS3 in this study indicates that there are additional genetic causes of FSGS and that hereditary FSGS is a heterogeneous disease. Kindreds appropriate for genome-wide screening are currently being subjected to analysis with the aim of identifying other genetic causes of FSGS.

  1. Novel Homozygous Missense Mutation in RYR1 Leads to Severe Congenital Ptosis, Ophthalmoplegia, and Scoliosis in the Absence of Myopathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dilaver, Nafi; Mazaheri, Neda; Maroofian, Reza; Zeighami, Jawaher; Seifi, Tahere; Zamani, Mina; Sedaghat, Alireza; Shariati, Gholam Reza; Galehdari, Hamid

    2017-12-01

    Ryanodine receptor 1 ( RYR1 ) is an intracellular calcium receptor primarily expressed in skeletal muscle with a role in excitation contraction. Both dominant and recessive mutations in the RYR1 gene cause a range of RYR1 -related myopathies and/or susceptibility to malignant hyperthermia (MH). Recently, an atypical manifestation of ptosis, variably presenting with ophthalmoplegia, facial paralysis, and scoliosis but without significant muscle weakness, has been reported in 9 cases from 4 families with bialleic variants in RYR1 . Two affected children from a consanguineous family with severe congenital ptosis, ophthalmoplegia, scoliosis, and distinctive long faces but without skeletal myopathy were studied. To identify the cause of the hereditary condition, DNA from the proband was subjected to whole exome sequencing (WES). WES revealed a novel homozygous missense variant in RYR1 (c.14066T>A; p.IIe4689Asn), which segregated within the family. Although the phenotype of the affected siblings in this study was similar to previously described cases, the clinical features were more severely expressed. Our findings contribute to the expansion of phenotypes related to RYR1 dysfunction. Additionally, it supports a new RYR1 -related clinical presentation without musculoskeletal involvement. It is important that individuals with RYR1 mutations are considered susceptible to MH, as 70% of the MH cases are caused by mutations in the RYR1 gene.

  2. Homozygous EEF1A2 mutation causes dilated cardiomyopathy, failure to thrive, global developmental delay, epilepsy and early death.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao, Siqi; Smith, Laura L; Padilla-Lopez, Sergio R; Guida, Brandon S; Blume, Elizabeth; Shi, Jiahai; Morton, Sarah U; Brownstein, Catherine A; Beggs, Alan H; Kruer, Michael C; Agrawal, Pankaj B

    2017-09-15

    Eukaryotic elongation factor 1A (EEF1A), is encoded by two distinct isoforms, EEF1A1 and EEF1A2; whereas EEF1A1 is expressed almost ubiquitously, EEF1A2 expression is limited such that it is only detectable in skeletal muscle, heart, brain and spinal cord. Currently, the role of EEF1A2 in normal cardiac development and function is unclear. There have been several reports linking de novo dominant EEF1A2 mutations to neurological issues in humans. We report a pair of siblings carrying a homozygous missense mutation p.P333L in EEF1A2 who exhibited global developmental delay, failure to thrive, dilated cardiomyopathy and epilepsy, ultimately leading to death in early childhood. A third sibling also died of a similar presentation, but DNA was unavailable to confirm the mutation. Functional genomic analysis was performed in S. cerevisiae and zebrafish. In S. cerevisiae, there was no evidence for a dominant-negative effect. Previously identified putative de novo mutations failed to complement yeast strains lacking the EEF1A ortholog showing a major growth defect. In contrast, the introduction of the mutation seen in our family led to a milder growth defect. To evaluate its function in zebrafish, we knocked down eef1a2 expression using translation blocking and splice-site interfering morpholinos. EEF1A2-deficient zebrafish had skeletal muscle weakness, cardiac failure and small heads. Human EEF1A2 wild-type mRNA successfully rescued the morphant phenotype, but mutant RNA did not. Overall, EEF1A2 appears to be critical for normal heart function in humans, and its deficiency results in clinical abnormalities in neurologic function as well as in skeletal and cardiac muscle defects. © The Author 2017. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  3. Homozygous PARK7 Mutation in Parkinson’s Disease: Case Report of Two Brothers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hülya Apaydın

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: Genetic studies for Parkinson’s disease (PD which have been increased during last few years have shown that parkin (PARK2, DJ-1 (PARK7 and PINK-1 (PARK6 mutations can cause autosomal recessive early-onset parkinsonism. OBJECTIVE: The aim of this study was to investigate by genetic screening methods, the presence of possible genetic mutations in two siblings who have developed PD. METHODS: In these two brothers, PD started at the age of 48 with cervical dystonia and bradykinesia on the left arm, and 56 with tremor on the right hand, respectively. Although they had a favorable response to levodopa, they developed wearing-off phenomenon without dyskinesia on the 4th year. Besides dystonia, the younger brother experienced psychosis and impulse control disorder, as well. Family history revealed first degree consanguinity and the father had also a diagnosis of PD. PD progressed rather slowly in both, but unfortunately the older brother died due to lung cancer 10 years after the initial diagnosis of PD, while he was on the stage 2 of Hoehn-Yahr scale. The younger brother is still on our follow-up at the 7th year of his PD. Informed consent was obtained and blood samples were sent to the genetic department of Juntendo University in Japan for genetic analysis. Parkin gene mutation and DJ-1 gene mutation were analyzed on the PARK7 locus, by automated direct nucleotide sequencing and performed gene dosage assay using TaqMan real-time quantitive PCR. RESULTS: After excluding the parkin mutation the presence of PARK7 was detected in both siblings with haplotype analysis. DJ-1 gene mutation analysis responsible for PARK7, revealed a deletion on intron 1. CONCLUSION: A rarely encountered PARK7 mutation was identified in two brothers having slowly progressive PD and a favorable response to levodopa, one of whom also had psychotic symptoms. As in the presented cases, the genetic studies performed on early-onset PD patients with positive family

  4. Homozygous TBC1D24 mutation in two siblings with familial infantile myoclonic epilepsy (FIME) and moderate intellectual disability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poulat, Anne-Lise; Ville, Dorothée; de Bellescize, Julitta; André-Obadia, Nathalie; Cacciagli, Pierre; Milh, Mathieu; Villard, Laurent; Lesca, Gaetan

    2015-03-01

    Mutations in the TBC1D24 gene were first reported in an Italian family with a unique epileptic phenotype consisting of drug-responsive, early-onset idiopathic myoclonic seizures. Patients presented with isolated bilateral or focal myoclonia, which could evolve to long-lasting attacks without loss of consciousness, with a peculiar reflex component, and were associated with generalized tonic-clonic seizures. This entity was named "familial infantile myoclonic epilepsy" (FIME). More recently, TBC1D24 mutations have been shown to cause a variable range of disorders, including epilepsy of various seizure types and severity, non-syndromic deafness, and DOORS syndrome. We report on the electro-clinical features of two brothers, born to first-cousin parents, affected with infantile-onset myoclonic epilepsy. The peculiar epileptic presentation prompted us to perform direct sequencing of the TBC1D24 gene. The patients had very early onset of focal myoclonic fits with variable topography, lasting a few minutes to several hours, without loss of consciousness, which frequently evolved to generalized myoclonus or myoclonic status. Reflex myoclonia were noticed in one patient. Neurological outcome was marked by moderate intellectual disability. Despite the high frequency of seizures, repeated EEG recordings showed normal background rhythm and rare interictal spikes and waves. We found a homozygous missense mutation, c.457G>A/p.Glu153Lys, in the two affected brothers. This observation combined with recent data from the literature, suggest that mutations in TBCD24 cause a pathological continuum, with FIME at the "benign" end and severe drug-refractory epileptic encephalopathy on the severe end. Early-onset myoclonic epilepsy with focal and generalized myoclonic seizures is a common characteristic of this continuum. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. A Homozygous Missense Mutation in TGM5 Abolishes Epidermal Transglutaminase 5 Activity and Causes Acral Peeling Skin Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cassidy, Andrew J.; van Steensel, Maurice A. M.; Steijlen, Peter M.; van Geel, Michel; Velden, Jaap van der; Morley, Susan M.; Terrinoni, Alessandro; Melino, Gerry; Candi, Eleonora; McLean, W. H. Irwin

    2005-01-01

    Peeling skin syndrome is an autosomal recessive genodermatosis characterized by the shedding of the outer epidermis. In the acral form, the dorsa of the hands and feet are predominantly affected. Ultrastructural analysis has revealed tissue separation at the junction between the granular cells and the stratum corneum in the outer epidermis. Genomewide linkage analysis in a consanguineous Dutch kindred mapped the gene to 15q15.2 in the interval between markers D15S1040 and D15S1016. Two homozygous missense mutations, T109M and G113C, were found in TGM5, which encodes transglutaminase 5 (TG5), in all affected persons in two unrelated families. The mutation was present on the same haplotype in both kindreds, indicating a probable ancestral mutation. TG5 is strongly expressed in the epidermal granular cells, where it cross-links a variety of structural proteins in the terminal differentiation of the epidermis to form the cornified cell envelope. An established, in vitro, biochemical cross-linking assay revealed that, although T109M is not pathogenic, G113C completely abolishes TG5 activity. Three-dimensional modeling of TG5 showed that G113C lies close to the catalytic domain, and, furthermore, that this glycine residue is conserved in all known transglutaminases, which is consistent with pathogenicity. Other families with more-widespread peeling skin phenotypes lacked TGM5 mutations. This study identifies the first causative gene in this heterogeneous group of skin disorders and demonstrates that the protein cross-linking function performed by TG5 is vital for maintaining cell-cell adhesion between the outermost layers of the epidermis. PMID:16380904

  6. A novel homozygous truncating GNAT1 mutation implicated in retinal degeneration

    OpenAIRE

    Carrigan, Matthew; Duignan, Emma; Humphries, Pete; Palfi, Arpad; Kenna, Paul F; Farrar, G Jane

    2015-01-01

    Background The GNAT1 gene encodes the ? subunit of the rod transducin protein, a key element in the rod phototransduction cascade. Variants in GNAT1 have been implicated in stationary night-blindness in the past, but unlike other proteins in the same pathway, it has not previously been implicated in retinitis pigmentosa. Methods A panel of 182 retinopathy-associated genes was sequenced to locate disease-causing mutations in patients with inherited retinopathies. Results Sequencing revealed a ...

  7. A Taiwanese Boy With Congenital Generalized Lipodystrophy Caused by Homozygous Ile262fs Mutation in the BSCL2 Gene

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hsiu-Hui Huang

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available Congenital generalized lipodystrophy (CGL is a rare autosomal recessive disease that is characterized by a near-complete absence of adipose tissue from birth or early infancy. Mutations in the BSCL2 gene are known to result in CGL2, a more severe phenotype than CGL1, with earlier onset, more extensive fat loss and biochemical changes, more severe intellectual impairment, and more severe cardiomyopathy. We report a 3-month-old Taiwanese boy with initial presentation of a lack of subcutaneous fat, prominent musculature, generalized eruptive xanthomas, and extreme hypertriglyceridemia. Absence of mechanical adipose tissue in the orbits and scalp was revealed by head magnetic resonance imaging. Hepatomegaly was noticed, and histological examination of a liver biopsy specimen suggested severe hepatic steatosis and periportal necrosis. However, echocardiography indicated no sign of cardiomyopathy and he showed no distinct intellectual impairment that interfered with daily life. About 1 year later, abdominal computed tomography revealed enlargement of kidneys. He had a homozygous insertion of a nucleotide, 783insG (Ile262fs mutation, in exon 7 of the BSCL2 gene. We reviewed the genotype of CGL cases from Japan, India, China and Taiwan, and found that BSCL2 is a major causative gene for CGL in Asian.

  8. Identification of a homozygous PSTPIP1 mutation in a patient with a PAPA-like syndrome responding to canakinumab treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geusau, Alexandra; Mothes-Luksch, Nadine; Nahavandi, Hesam; Pickl, Winfried F; Wise, Carol A; Pourpak, Zahra; Ponweiser, Elisabeth; Eckhart, Leopold; Sunder-Plassmann, Raute

    2013-02-01

    Pyogenic sterile arthritis, pyoderma gangrenosum, and acne (PAPA) syndrome (OMIM 604416) is a rare autosomal dominant inherited autoinflammatory syndrome characterized by pyogenic sterile arthritis and less frequently accompanied by pyoderma gangrenosum and acne. It is associated with dominant missense mutations in the proline-serine-threonine phosphatase-interacting protein 1 gene (PSTPIP1) located on chromosome 15. The patient was diagnosed as having features of a PAPA-like syndrome in which cutaneous manifestations, such as pyoderma gangrenosum and acne fulminans, predominated. Sequencing of the PSTPIP1 gene was performed in the patient and his extended family. The patient's DNA analysis revealed a homozygous nucleotide exchange c.773G>C in the PSTPIP1 gene, leading to the substitution of glycine 258 by alanine (p.Gly258Ala), a previously reported heterozygous polymorphism. Heterozygous changes were identified in both of the patient's parents and in 7 other family members, all of whom were asymptomatic. The patient was treated with canakinumab, a human anti-interleukin 1β monoclonal antibody, which led to rapid remission of the symptoms. To our knowledge, this is the first reported case of the resolution of dermatological symptoms associated with a PAPA-like syndrome using canakinumab treatment. Further study of the p.Gly258Ala variant is warranted to determine whether this mutation has a role in causing an apparently recessive cutaneous syndrome resembling PAPA syndrome.

  9. A Case of Inflammatory Generalized Type of Peeling Skin Syndrome Possibly Caused by a Homozygous Missense Mutation of CDSN.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kawakami, Hiroshi; Uchiyama, Masaki; Maeda, Tatsuo; Tsunoda, Takahiko; Mitsuhashi, Yoshihiko; Tsuboi, Ryoji

    2014-09-01

    A 54-year-old Japanese woman had repetitive superficial skin peeling and ensuing erythematous changes in the sites since infancy. Her parents had a consanguineous marriage, and she was the only individual affected in her family tree. The erythematous changes seemed to worsen in the summer. Histologically, hyperkeratosis and splitting of the epidermis within the stratum corneum was noted, and electron microscopy revealed shedding of corneal cells in the horny layer and normal-looking corneodesmosomes. Gene analysis revealed a homozygous missense mutation at c.1358G>A in CDSN. Electron microscopic examination of the length and number of corneodesmosomes revealed statistically significant shortness and sparsity in the affected individual (mean ± SD 386.2 ± 149.5 nm) compared with that of an age- and site-matched control (406.6 ± 182.3 nm). We speculate that this size shrinkage of corneodesmosomes might be the result of a missense mutation of CDSN and that this could be one of the factors contributing to the pathological process of skin peeling.

  10. A Case of Inflammatory Generalized Type of Peeling Skin Syndrome Possibly Caused by a Homozygous Missense Mutation of CDSN

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hiroshi Kawakami

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available A 54-year-old Japanese woman had repetitive superficial skin peeling and ensuing erythematous changes in the sites since infancy. Her parents had a consanguineous marriage, and she was the only individual affected in her family tree. The erythematous changes seemed to worsen in the summer. Histologically, hyperkeratosis and splitting of the epidermis within the stratum corneum was noted, and electron microscopy revealed shedding of corneal cells in the horny layer and normal-looking corneodesmosomes. Gene analysis revealed a homozygous missense mutation at c.1358G>A in CDSN. Electron microscopic examination of the length and number of corneodesmosomes revealed statistically significant shortness and sparsity in the affected individual (mean ± SD 386.2 ± 149.5 nm compared with that of an age- and site-matched control (406.6 ± 182.3 nm. We speculate that this size shrinkage of corneodesmosomes might be the result of a missense mutation of CDSN and that this could be one of the factors contributing to the pathological process of skin peeling.

  11. High proportion of genetic cases in patients with advanced cardiomyopathy including a novel homozygous Plakophilin 2-gene mutation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Baerbel Klauke

    Full Text Available Cardiomyopathies might lead to end-stage heart disease with the requirement of drastic treatments like bridging up to transplant or heart transplantation. A not precisely known proportion of these diseases are genetically determined. We genotyped 43 index-patients (30 DCM, 10 ARVC, 3 RCM with advanced or end stage cardiomyopathy using a gene panel which covered 46 known cardiomyopathy disease genes. Fifty-three variants with possible impact on disease in 33 patients were identified. Of these 27 (51% were classified as likely pathogenic or pathogenic in the MYH7, MYL2, MYL3, NEXN, TNNC1, TNNI3, DES, LMNA, PKP2, PLN, RBM20, TTN, and CRYAB genes. Fifty-six percent (n = 24 of index-patients carried a likely pathogenic or pathogenic mutation. Of these 75% (n = 18 were familial and 25% (n = 6 sporadic cases. However, severe cardiomyopathy seemed to be not characterized by a specific mutation profile. Remarkably, we identified a novel homozygous PKP2-missense variant in a large consanguineous family with sudden death in early childhood and several members with heart transplantation in adolescent age.

  12. Identification of a novel homozygous mutation, TMPRSS3: c.535G>A, in a Tibetan family with autosomal recessive non-syndromic hearing loss.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dongyan Fan

    Full Text Available Different ethnic groups have distinct mutation spectrums associated with inheritable deafness. In order to identify the mutations responsible for congenital hearing loss in the Tibetan population, mutation screening for 98 deafness-related genes by microarray and massively parallel sequencing of captured target exons was conducted in one Tibetan family with familiar hearing loss. A homozygous mutation, TMPRSS3: c.535G>A, was identified in two affected brothers. Both parents are heterozygotes and an unaffected sister carries wild type alleles. The same mutation was not detected in 101 control Tibetan individuals. This missense mutation results in an amino acid change (p.Ala179Thr at a highly conserved site in the scavenger receptor cysteine rich (SRCR domain of the TMPRSS3 protein, which is essential for protein-protein interactions. Thus, this mutation likely affects the interactions of this transmembrane protein with extracellular molecules. According to our bioinformatic analyses, the TMPRSS3: c.535G>A mutation might damage protein function and lead to hearing loss. These data suggest that the homozygous mutation TMPRSS3: c.535G>A causes prelingual hearing loss in this Tibetan family. This is the first TMPRSS3 mutation found in the Chinese Tibetan population.

  13. Sensory ataxic neuropathy dysarthria and ophthalmoparesis (SANDO) in a sibling pair with a homozygous p.A467T POLG mutation.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    McHugh, John C

    2012-02-01

    Two siblings who developed fifth-decade-onset, concurrent progressive sensory ataxia, dysarthria, and ophthalmoparesis were found to be homozygous for the p.A467T mutation of the polymerase gamma (POLG) gene. The clinical course in both subjects was progression to severe disability. The enlarging spectrum of sensory ataxic neuropathies associated with mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) instability and POLG mutations should be recognized and considered in the differential diagnosis of this unusual presentation.

  14. Mutations in HAMP and HJV genes and their impact on expression of clinical hemochromatosis in a cohort of 100 Spanish patients homozygous for the C282Y mutation of HFE gene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Altès, Albert; Bach, Vanessa; Ruiz, Angels; Esteve, Anna; Felez, Jordi; Remacha, Angel F; Sardà, M Pilar; Baiget, Montserrat

    2009-10-01

    Most hereditary hemochromatosis (HH) patients are homozygous for the C282Y mutation of the HFE gene. Nevertheless, penetrance of the disease is very variable. In some patients, penetrance can be mediated by concomitant mutations in other iron master genes. We evaluated the clinical impact of hepcidin (HAMP) and hemojuvelin mutations in a cohort of 100 Spanish patients homozygous for the C282Y mutation of the HFE gene. HAMP and hemojuvelin mutations were evaluated in all patients by bidirectional direct cycle sequencing. Phenotype-genotype interactions were evaluated. A heterozygous mutation of the HAMP gene (G71D) was found in only one out of 100 cases. Following, we performed a study of several members of that family, and we observed several members had a digenic inheritance of the C282Y mutation of the HFE gene and the G71D mutation of the HAMP gene. This mutation in the HAMP gene did not modify the phenotype of the individuals who were homozygous for the C282Y mutation. One other patient presented a new polymorphism in the hemojuvelin gene, without consequences in iron load or clinical course of the disease. In conclusion, HAMP and hemojuvelin mutations are rare among Spanish HH patients, and their impact in this population is not significant.

  15. Odonto-onycho-dermal dysplasia in a patient homozygous for a WNT10A nonsense mutation and mild manifestations of ectodermal dysplasia in carriers of the mutation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krøigård, Anne Bruun; Clemmensen, Ole; Gjørup, Hans; Hertz, Jens Michael; Bygum, Anette

    2016-03-10

    Odonto-onycho-dermal dysplasia (OODD) is a rare form of ectodermal dysplasia characterized by severe oligodontia, onychodysplasia, palmoplantar hyperkeratosis, dry skin, hypotrichosis, and hyperhidrosis of the palms and soles. The ectodermal dysplasias resulting from biallelic mutations in the WNT10A gene result in highly variable phenotypes, ranging from isolated tooth agenesis to OODD and Schöpf-Schulz-Passarge syndrome (SSPS). We identified a female patient, with consanguineous parents, who was clinically diagnosed with OODD. Genetic testing showed that she was homozygous for a previously reported pathogenic mutation in the WNT10A gene, c.321C > A, p.Cys107*. The skin and nail abnormalities were for many years interpreted as psoriasis and treated accordingly. A thorough clinical examination revealed hypotrichosis and hyperhidrosis of the soles and dental examination revealed agenesis of permanent teeth except the two maxillary central incisors. Skin biopsies from the hyperkeratotic palms and soles showed the characteristic changes of eccrine syringofibroadenomatosis, which has been described in patients with ectodermal dysplasias. Together with a family history of tooth anomalies, this lead to the clinical suspicion of a hereditary ectodermal dysplasia. This case illustrates the challenges of diagnosing ectodermal dysplasia like OODD and highlights the relevance of interdisciplinary cooperation in the diagnosis of rare conditions.

  16. Identification of a novel homozygous mutation in MYO3A in a Chinese family with DFNB30 non-syndromic hearing impairment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qu, Ronggui; Sang, Qing; Xu, Yao; Feng, Ruizhi; Jin, Li; He, Lin; Wang, Lei

    2016-05-01

    Hearing loss is a common sensory impairment. Several genetic loci or genes responsible for non-syndrome hearing loss have been identified, including the well-known deafness genes GJB2, MT-RNR1 and SLC26A4. MYO3A belongs to the myosin superfamily. Previously only three mutations in this gene have been found in an Isreali family with DFNB30, in which patients demonstrated progressive hearing loss. In this study, we characterized a consanguineous Kazakh family with congenital hearing loss. By targeted sequence capture and next-generation sequencing, we identified a homozygous mutation and did bioinformatics analysis to this mutation. A homozygous mutation, MYO3A:c.1841C>T (p.S614F), was identified to be responsible for the disease. Ser614 is located in the motor domain of MYO3A that is highly conserved among different species. Molecular modeling predicts that the conserved Ser614 may play an important role in maintaining the stability of β-sheet and the interaction between neighboring β-strand. This is the second report on MYO3A mutations in deafness and the first report in China. The finding help facilitate establishing a better relationship between MYO3A mutation and hearing phenotypes. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Effects of track structure and cell inactivation on the calculation of heavy ion mutation rates in mammalian cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cucinotta, F. A.; Wilson, J. W.; Shavers, M. R.; Katz, R.

    1996-01-01

    It has long been suggested that inactivation severely effects the probability of mutation by heavy ions in mammalian cells. Heavy ions have observed cross sections of inactivation that approach and sometimes exceed the geometric size of the cell nucleus in mammalian cells. In the track structure model of Katz the inactivation cross section is found by summing an inactivation probability over all impact parameters from the ion to the sensitive sites within the cell nucleus. The inactivation probability is evaluated using the dose-response of the system to gamma-rays and the radial dose of the ions and may be equal to unity at small impact parameters for some ions. We show how the effects of inactivation may be taken into account in the evaluation of the mutation cross sections from heavy ions in the track structure model through correlation of sites for gene mutation and cell inactivation. The model is fit to available data for HPRT mutations in Chinese hamster cells and good agreement is found. The resulting calculations qualitatively show that mutation cross sections for heavy ions display minima at velocities where inactivation cross sections display maxima. Also, calculations show the high probability of mutation by relativistic heavy ions due to the radial extension of ions track from delta-rays in agreement with the microlesion concept. The effects of inactivation on mutations rates make it very unlikely that a single parameter such as LET or Z*2/beta(2) can be used to specify radiation quality for heavy ion bombardment.

  18. Report of Chinese family with severe dermatitis, multiple allergies and metabolic wasting syndrome caused by novel homozygous desmoglein-1 gene mutation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Ruhong; Yan, Ming; Ni, Cheng; Zhang, Jia; Li, Ming; Yao, Zhirong

    2016-10-01

    Recently, homozygous mutations in the desmoglein-1 (DSG1) gene and heterozygous mutation in the desmoplakin (DSP) gene have been demonstrated to be associated with severe dermatitis, multiple allergies and metabolic wasting (SAM) syndrome (Mendelian Inheritance in Man no. 615508). We aim to identify the molecular basis for a Chinese pedigree of SAM syndrome. A Chinese pedigree of SAM syndrome was subjected to mutation detection in the DSG1 gene. Sequence analysis of the DSG1 gene and quantitative reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction analysis for gene expression of DSG1 using cDNA derived from the epidermis of patients and controls were both performed. Skin biopsies were also taken from patients for pathological study and transmission electron microscopy observation. Novel homozygous splicing mutation c.1892-1delG in the exon-intron border of the DSG1 gene has been demonstrated to be associated with SAM syndrome. We report a new family of SAM syndrome of Asian decent and expand the spectrum of mutations in the DSG1 gene. © 2016 Japanese Dermatological Association.

  19. Phenotypes in siblings with homozygous mutations of TRAPPC9 and/or MCPH1 support a bifunctional model of MCPH1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duerinckx, Sarah; Meuwissen, Marije; Perazzolo, Camille; Desmyter, Laurence; Pirson, Isabelle; Abramowicz, Marc

    2018-04-24

    Autosomal recessive intellectual disability (ARID) is vastly heterogeneous. Truncating mutations of TRAPPC9 were reported in 8 ARID families. Autosomal recessive primary microcephaly (MCPH) represents another subgroup of ARID, itself very heterogeneous, where the size of the brain is very small since birth. MCPH1 plays a role at the centrosome via a BRCT1 domain, and in DNA Damage Repair (DDR) via BRCT2 and BRCT3, and it is not clear which of these two mechanisms causes MCPH in man. We studied the phenotype and sequenced the exome in two siblings with MCPH and their unaffected sister. Homozygous mutations of TRAPPC9 (p.Leu178Pro) and of MCPH1 (p.Arg741X) were found in both affected siblings. Brain MRI showed anomalies previously associated with TRAPPC9 defects, supporting the implication of TRAPPC9 in the phenotype. Importantly, the asymptomatic sister with normal head size was homozygous for the MCPH1 truncating mutation and heterozygous for the TRAPPC9 mutation. The affected siblings represent the first ARID cases with a TRAPPC9 missense mutation and with microcephaly of prenatal onset of. Furthermore, their unaffected sister represents strong evidence that the lack of MCPH1 BRCT3 domain does not cause MCPH in man, supporting a bifunctional model of MCPH1 where the centrosomal function is involved in brain volumic development and not the DDR function. © 2018 The Authors. Molecular Genetics & Genomic Medicine published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  20. Association of a homozygous nonsense mutation in the ABCA4 (ABCR) gene with cone-rod dystrophy phenotype in an Italian family.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simonelli, Francesca; Testa, Francesco; Zernant, Jana; Nesti, Anna; Rossi, Settimio; Rinaldi, Ernesto; Allikmets, Rando

    2004-01-01

    Genetic variation in the ABCA4 (ABCR) gene has been associated with several distinct retinal phenotypes, including Stargardt disease/fundus flavimaculatus (STGD/FFM), cone-rod dystrophy (CRD), retinitis pigmentosa (RP) and age-related macular degeneration. The current model of genotype/phenotype association suggests that patients harboring deleterious mutations in both ABCR alleles would develop RP-like retinal pathology. Here we describe ABCA4-associated phenotypes, including a proband with a homozygous nonsense mutation in a family from Southern Italy. The proband had been originally diagnosed with STGD. Ophthalmologic examination included kinetic perimetry, electrophysiological studies and fluorescein angiography. DNA of the affected individual and family members was analyzed for variants in all 50 exons of the ABCA4 gene by screening on the ABCR400 microarray. A homozygous nonsense mutation 2971G>T (G991X) was detected in a patient initially diagnosed with STGD based on funduscopic evidence, including bull's eye depigmentation of the fovea and flecks at the posterior pole extending to the mid-peripheral retina. Since this novel nucleotide substitution results in a truncated, nonfunctional, ABCA4 protein, the patient was examined in-depth for the severity of the disease phenotype. Indeed, subsequent electrophysiological studies determined severely reduced cone amplitude as compared to the rod amplitude, suggesting the diagnosis of CRD. ABCR400 microarray is an efficient tool for determining causal genetic variation, including new mutations. A homozygous protein-truncating mutation in ABCA4 can cause a phenotype ranging from STGD to CRD as diagnosed at an early stage of the disease. Only a combination of comprehensive genotype/phenotype correlation studies will determine the proper diagnosis and prognosis of ABCA4-associated pathology. Copyright 2004 S. Karger AG, Basel

  1. Seemingly neutral polymorphic variants may confer immunity to splicing-inactivating mutations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Karsten Bork; Sørensen, Suzette; Cartegni, Luca

    2007-01-01

    assays to show that a missense mutation in exon 5 of the medium-chain acyl-CoA dehydrogenase (MCAD) gene primarily causes exon skipping by inactivating a crucial exonic splicing enhancer (ESE), thus leading to loss of a functional protein and to MCAD deficiency. This ESE functions by antagonizing...

  2. Hypophosphatemic osteomalacia and bone sclerosis caused by a novel homozygous mutation of the FAM20C gene in an elderly man with a mild variant of Raine syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takeyari, Shinji; Yamamoto, Takehisa; Kinoshita, Yuka; Fukumoto, Seiji; Glorieux, Francis H; Michigami, Toshimi; Hasegawa, Kosei; Kitaoka, Taichi; Kubota, Takuo; Imanishi, Yasuo; Shimotsuji, Tsunesuke; Ozono, Keiichi

    2014-10-01

    Hypophosphatemia and increased serum fibroblast growth factor 23 (FGF23) levels have been reported in young brothers with compound heterozygous mutations for the FAM20C gene; however, rickets was not observed in these cases. We report an adult case of Raine syndrome accompanying hypophosphatemic osteomalacia with a homozygous FAM20C mutation (R408W) associated with increased periosteal bone formation in the long bones and an increase in bone mineral density in the femoral neck. The patient, a 61-year-old man, was born from a cousin-to-cousin marriage. A short stature and severe dental demineralization were reported at an elementary school age. Hypophosphatemia was noted inadvertently at 27years old, at which time he started to take an active vitamin D metabolite (alphacalcidol) and phosphate. He also manifested ossification of the posterior longitudinal ligament. On bone biopsy performed at the age of 41years, we found severe osteomalacia surrounding osteocytes, which appeared to be an advanced form of periosteocytic hypomineralized lesions compared to those reported in patients with X-linked hypophosphatemic rickets. Laboratory data at 61years of age revealed markedly increased serum intact-FGF23 levels, which were likely to be the cause of hypophosphatemia and the decreased level of 1,25(OH)2D. We recently identified a homozygous FAM20C mutation, which was R408W, in this patient. When expressed in HEK293 cells, the R408W mutant protein exhibited impaired kinase activity and secretion. Our findings suggest that certain homozygous FAM20C mutations can cause FGF23-related hypophosphatemic osteomalacia and indicate the multiple roles of FAM20C in bone. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. The homozygous VHL(D126N) missense mutation is associated with dramatically elevated erythropoietin levels, consequent polycythemia, and early onset severe pulmonary hypertension.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarangi, Susmita; Lanikova, Lucie; Kapralova, Katarina; Acharya, Suchitra; Swierczek, Sabina; Lipton, Jeffrey M; Wolfe, Lawrence; Prchal, Josef T

    2014-11-01

    von Hippel-Lindau (VHL) protein is the principal negative regulator of hypoxia sensing mediated by transcription factors. Mutations in exon 3 of the VHL gene lead to Chuvash (VHL(R200W)) and Croatian (VHL(H191D)) polycythemias. Here, we describe an infant of Bangladesh ethnicity with a novel homozygous VHL(D126N) mutation with congenital polycythemia and dramatically elevated erythropoietin (EPO) levels, who developed severe fatal pulmonary hypertension. In contrast to Chuvash polycythemia, erythroid progenitors (BFU-Es) did not reveal a marked EPO hypersensitivity. Further, NF-E2 and RUNX1 transcripts that correlate with BFU-Es EPO hypersensitivity in polycythemic mutations were not elevated. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  4. Adult siblings with homozygous G6PC3 mutations expand our understanding of the severe congenital neutropenia type 4 (SCN4 phenotype

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fernandez Bridget A

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Severe congenital neutropenia type 4 (SCN4 is an autosomal recessive disorder caused by mutations in the third subunit of the enzyme glucose-6-phosphatase (G6PC3. Its core features are congenital neutropenia and a prominent venous skin pattern, and affected individuals have variable birth defects. Oculocutaneous albinism type 4 (OCA4 is caused by autosomal recessive mutations in SLC45A2. Methods We report a sister and brother from Newfoundland, Canada with complex phenotypes. The sister was previously reported by Cullinane et al., 2011. We performed homozygosity mapping, next generation sequencing and conventional Sanger sequencing to identify mutations that cause the phenotype in this family. We have also summarized clinical data from 49 previously reported SCN4 cases with overlapping phenotypes and interpret the medical histories of these siblings in the context of the literature. Results The siblings’ phenotype is due in part to a homozygous mutation in G6PC3, [c.829C > T, p.Gln277X]. Their ages are 38 and 37 years respectively and they are the oldest SCN4 patients published to date. Both presented with congenital neutropenia and later developed Crohn disease. We suggest that the latter is a previously unrecognized SCN4 manifestation and that not all affected individuals have an intellectual disability. The sister also has a homozygous mutation in SLC45A2, which explains her severe oculocutaneous hypopigmentation. Her brother carried one SLC45A2 mutation and was diagnosed with “partial OCA” in childhood. Conclusions This family highlights that apparently novel syndromes can in fact be caused by two known autosomal recessive disorders.

  5. Risk scaling factors from inactivation to chromosome aberrations, mutations and oncogenic transformations in mammalian cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alkaharam, A.S.; Watt, D.E.

    1997-01-01

    Analyses of bio-effect mechanisms of damage to mammalian cells in terms of the quality parameter 'mean free path for primary ionisation', for heavy charged particles, strongly suggests that there is a common mechanism for the biological endpoints of chromosome aberrations, mutations and oncogenic transformation. The lethal lesions are identified as unrepaired double-strand breaks in the intracellular DNA. As data for the various endpoints studied can be represented in a unified scheme, for any radiation type, it follows that radiation risk factors can be determined on the basis of simple ratios to the inactivation cross sections. There are intrinsic physical reasons why neutrons can never reach the saturation level of heavier particles for equal fluences. The probabilities of risk with respect to inactivation, for chromosome dicentrics, mutation of the HPRT gene and of oncogenic transformation are respectively 0.24, 5.8 x 10 -5 , and 4.1 x 10 -3 . (author)

  6. Phenotypical features of two patients diagnosed with PHARC syndrome and carriers of a new homozygous mutation in the ABHD12 gene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frasquet, Marina; Lupo, Vincenzo; Chumillas, María José; Vázquez-Costa, Juan Francisco; Espinós, Carmen; Sevilla, Teresa

    2018-04-15

    PHARC (Polyneuropathy, Hearing loss, Ataxia, Retinitis pigmentosa and Cataracts) (MIM# 612674) is an autosomal recessive neurodegenerative disease caused by mutations in the ABHD12 gene. We evaluated two Spanish siblings affected with pes cavus, sensorimotor neuropathy, hearing loss, retinitis pigmentosa and juvenile cataracts in whom the genetic test of ABHD12 revealed a novel homozygous frameshift mutation, c.211_223del (p.Arg71Tyrfs*26). The earliest clinical manifestation in these patients was a demyelinating neuropathy manifested with a Charcot-Marie-Tooth phenotype over three decades. Progressive hearing loss, cataracts and retinitis pigmentosa appeared after the age of 30. We herein describe the complete clinical picture of these two patients, and focus particularly on neuropathy characteristics. This study supports the fact that although PHARC is rare, its phenotype is very characteristic and we should include its study in patients affected with demyelinating polyneuropathy, hearing loss and retinopathy. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. Severe early onset retinitis pigmentosa in a Moroccan patient with Heimler syndrome due to novel homozygous mutation of PEX1 gene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ratbi, Ilham; Jaouad, Imane Cherkaoui; Elorch, Hamza; Al-Sheqaih, Nada; Elalloussi, Mustapha; Lyahyai, Jaber; Berraho, Amina; Newman, William G; Sefiani, Abdelaziz

    2016-10-01

    Heimler syndrome (HS) is a rare recessive disorder characterized by sensorineural hearing loss (SNHL), amelogenesis imperfecta, nail abnormalities, and occasional or late-onset retinal pigmentation. It is the mildest form known to date of peroxisome biogenesis disorder caused by hypomorphic mutations of PEX1 and PEX6 genes. We report on a second Moroccan family with Heimler syndrome with early onset, severe visual impairment and important phenotypic overlap with Usher syndrome. The patient carried a novel homozygous missense variant c.3140T > C (p.Leu1047Pro) of PEX1 gene. As standard biochemical screening of blood for evidence of a peroxisomal disorder did not provide a diagnosis in the individuals with HS, patients with SNHL and retinal pigmentation should have mutation analysis of PEX1 and PEX6 genes. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  8. Lumacaftor/ivacaftor, a novel agent for the treatment of cystic fibrosis patients who are homozygous for the F580del CFTR mutation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bulloch, Marilyn N; Hanna, Cameron; Giovane, Richard

    2017-10-01

    Cystic Fibrosis (CF) is an autosomal recessive disease affecting up to 90,000 people worldwide. Approximately 73% of patients are homozygous for the F508del cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator [CFTR] mutation. Traditionally treatment has only included supportive care. Therefore, there is a need for safe and effective novel therapies targeting the underlying molecular defects seen with CF. Areas covered: In 2016, the Food and Drug Administration and the European Commission approved LUM/IVA (Orkambi), a CFTR modulator that includes both a CFTR corrector and potentiator, for CF patients homozygous for the F508del CFTR mutation. This article reviews the pharmacologic features, clinical efficacy, and safety of LUM/IVA and summarize the available pre-clinical and clinical data of LUM/IVA use. Expert commentary: LUM/IVA showed modest, but significant improvements from baseline in percent predicted FEV 1 (ppFEV 1 ) as well as a reduction in pulmonary exacerbations by 35% It was shown to be safe for short- and long-term use. Currently, LUM/IVA is the only oral agent in its class available and represents a milestone the development of therapies for the management of CF. Nonetheless, pharmacoeconomic data are necessary to justify its high cost before is use becomes standard of care.

  9. Inactivating mutations in ESCO2 cause SC phocomelia and Roberts syndrome: no phenotype-genotype correlation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schüle, Birgitt; Oviedo, Angelica; Johnston, Kathreen; Pai, Shashidhar; Francke, Uta

    2005-12-01

    The rare, autosomal recessive Roberts syndrome (RBS) is characterized by tetraphocomelia, profound growth deficiency of prenatal onset, craniofacial anomalies, microcephaly, and mental deficiency. SC phocomelia (SC) has a milder phenotype, with a lesser degree of limb reduction and with survival to adulthood. Since heterochromatin repulsion (HR) is characteristic for both disorders and is not complemented in somatic-cell hybrids, it has been hypothesized that the disorders are allelic. Recently, mutations in ESCO2 (establishment of cohesion 1 homolog 2) on 8p21.1 have been reported in RBS. To determine whether ESCO2 mutations are also responsible for SC, we studied three families with SC and two families in which variable degrees of limb and craniofacial abnormalities, detected by fetal ultrasound, led to pregnancy terminations. All cases were positive for HR. We identified seven novel mutations in exons 3-8 of ESCO2. In two families, affected individuals were homozygous--for a 5-nucleotide deletion in one family and a splice-site mutation in the other. In three nonconsanguineous families, probands were compound heterozygous for a single-nucleotide insertion or deletion, a nonsense mutation, or a splice-site mutation. Abnormal splice products were characterized at the RNA level. Since only protein-truncating mutations were identified, regardless of clinical severity, we conclude that genotype does not predict phenotype. Having established that RBS and SC are caused by mutations in the same gene, we delineated the clinical phenotype of the tetraphocomelia spectrum that is associated with HR and ESCO2 mutations and differentiated it from other types of phocomelia that are negative for HR.

  10. A homozygous mutation in the endothelin-3 gene associated with a combined Waardenburg type 2 and Hirschsprung phenotype (Shah-Waardenburg syndrome).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hofstra, R M; Osinga, J; Tan-Sindhunata, G; Wu, Y; Kamsteeg, E J; Stulp, R P; van Ravenswaaij-Arts, C; Majoor-Krakauer, D; Angrist, M; Chakravarti, A; Meijers, C; Buys, C H

    1996-04-01

    Hirschsprung disease (HSCR) or colonic aganglionosis is a congenital disorder characterized by an absence of intramural ganglia along variable lengths of the colon resulting in intestinal obstruction. The incidence of HSCR is 1 in 5,000 live births. Mutations in the RET gene, which codes for a receptor tyrosine kinase, and in EDNRB which codes for the endothelin-B receptor, have been shown to be associated with HSCR in humans. The lethal-spotted mouse which has pigment abnormalities, but also colonic aganglionosis, carries a mutation in the gene coding for endothelin 3 (Edn3), the ligand for the receptor protein encoded by EDNRB. Here, we describe a mutation of the human gene for endothelin 3 (EDN3), homozygously present in a patient with a combined Waardenburg syndrome type 2 (WS2) and HSCR phenotype (Shah-Waardenburg syndrome). The mutation, Cys159Phe, in exon 3 in the ET-3 like domain of EDN3, presumably affects the proteolytic processing of the preproendothelin to the mature peptide EDN3. The patient's parents were first cousins. A previous child in this family had been diagnosed with a similar combination of HSCR, depigmentation and deafness. Depigmentation and deafness were present in other relatives. Moreover, we present a further indication for the involvement of EDNRB in HSCR by reporting a novel mutation detected in one of 40 unselected HSCR patients.

  11. Key tumor suppressor genes inactivated by "greater promoter" methylation and somatic mutations in head and neck cancer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Guerrero-Preston, Rafael; Michailidi, Christina; Marchionni, Luigi; Pickering, Curtis R.; Frederick, Mitchell J.; Myers, Jeffrey N.; Yegnasubramanian, Srinivasan; Hadar, Tal; Noordhuis, Maartje G.; Zizkova, Veronika; Fertig, Elana; Agrawal, Nishant; Westra, William; Koch, Wayne; Califano, Joseph; Velculescu, Victor E.; Sidransky, David

    Tumor suppressor genes (TSGs) are commonly inactivated by somatic mutation and/or promoter methylation; yet, recent high-throughput genomic studies have not identified key TSGs inactivated by both mechanisms. We pursued an integrated molecular analysis based on methylation binding domain sequencing

  12. Distinct Mutations Led to Inactivation of Type 1 Fimbriae Expression in Shigella spp.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bravo, Verónica; Puhar, Andrea; Sansonetti, Philippe; Parsot, Claude; Toro, Cecilia S.

    2015-01-01

    Shigella spp. are responsible for bacillary dysentery in humans. The acquisition or the modification of the virulence plasmid encoding factors promoting entry of bacteria into and dissemination within epithelial cells was a critical step in the evolution of these bacteria from their Escherichia coli ancestor(s). Incorporation of genomic islands (GI) and gene inactivation also shaped interactions between these pathogens and their human host. Sequence analysis of the GI inserted next to the leuX tRNA gene in S. boydii, S. dysenteriae, S. flexneri, S. sonnei and enteroinvasive E. coli (EIEC) suggests that this region initially carried the fec, yjhATS and fim gene clusters. The fim cluster encoding type I fimbriae is systematically inactivated in both reference strains and clinical isolates and distinct mutations are responsible for this inactivation in at least three phylogenetic groups. To investigate consequences of the presence of fimbriae on the outcome of the interaction of Shigella with host cells, we used a S. flexneri strain harboring a plasmid encoding the E. coli fim operon. Production of fimbriae by this recombinant strain increased the ability of bacteria to adhere to and enter into epithelial cells and had no effect on their ability to disseminate from cell to cell. The observations that production of type I fimbriae increases invasion of epithelial cells and that independent mutations abolish fimbriae production in Shigella suggest that these mutations correspond to pathoadaptive events. PMID:25811616

  13. Distinct mutations led to inactivation of type 1 fimbriae expression in Shigella spp.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Verónica Bravo

    Full Text Available Shigella spp. are responsible for bacillary dysentery in humans. The acquisition or the modification of the virulence plasmid encoding factors promoting entry of bacteria into and dissemination within epithelial cells was a critical step in the evolution of these bacteria from their Escherichia coli ancestor(s. Incorporation of genomic islands (GI and gene inactivation also shaped interactions between these pathogens and their human host. Sequence analysis of the GI inserted next to the leuX tRNA gene in S. boydii, S. dysenteriae, S. flexneri, S. sonnei and enteroinvasive E. coli (EIEC suggests that this region initially carried the fec, yjhATS and fim gene clusters. The fim cluster encoding type I fimbriae is systematically inactivated in both reference strains and clinical isolates and distinct mutations are responsible for this inactivation in at least three phylogenetic groups. To investigate consequences of the presence of fimbriae on the outcome of the interaction of Shigella with host cells, we used a S. flexneri strain harboring a plasmid encoding the E. coli fim operon. Production of fimbriae by this recombinant strain increased the ability of bacteria to adhere to and enter into epithelial cells and had no effect on their ability to disseminate from cell to cell. The observations that production of type I fimbriae increases invasion of epithelial cells and that independent mutations abolish fimbriae production in Shigella suggest that these mutations correspond to pathoadaptive events.

  14. Homozygous missense mutation in the LMAN2L gene segregates with intellectual disability in a large consanguineous Pakistani family.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rafiullah, Rafiullah; Aslamkhan, Muhammad; Paramasivam, Nagarajan; Thiel, Christian; Mustafa, Ghulam; Wiemann, Stefan; Schlesner, Matthias; Wade, Rebecca C; Rappold, Gudrun A; Berkel, Simone

    2016-02-01

    Intellectual disability (ID) is a neurodevelopmental disorder affecting 1%-3% of the population worldwide. It is characterised by high phenotypic and genetic heterogeneity and in most cases the underlying cause of the disorder is unknown. In our study we investigated a large consanguineous family from Baluchistan, Pakistan, comprising seven affected individuals with a severe form of autosomal recessive ID (ARID) and epilepsy, to elucidate a putative genetic cause. Whole exome sequencing (WES) of a trio, including a child with ID and epilepsy and its healthy parents that were part of this large family, revealed a homozygous missense variant p.R53Q in the lectin mannose-binding 2-like (LMAN2L) gene. This homozygous variant was co-segregating in the family with the phenotype of severe ID and infantile epilepsy; unaffected family members were heterozygous variant carriers. The variant was predicted to be pathogenic by five different in silico programmes and further three-dimensional structure modelling of the protein suggests that variant p.R53Q may impair protein-protein interaction. LMAN2L (OMIM: 609552) encodes for the lectin, mannose-binding 2-like protein which is a cargo receptor in the endoplasmic reticulum important for glycoprotein transport. Genome-wide association studies have identified an association of LMAN2L to different neuropsychiatric disorders. This is the first report linking LMAN2L to a phenotype of severe ARID and seizures, indicating that the deleterious homozygous p.R53Q variant very likely causes the disorder. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://www.bmj.com/company/products-services/rights-and-licensing/

  15. [Association between homozygous c.318A>GT mutation in exon 2 of the EIF2B5 gene and the infantile form of vanishing white matter leukoencephalopathy].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Esmer, Carmen; Blanco Hernández, Gabriela; Saavedra Alanís, Víctor; Reyes Vaca, Jorge Guillermo; Bravo Oro, Antonio

    Vanishing white matter disease is one of the most frequent leukodystrophies in childhood with an autosomal recessive inheritance. A mutation in one of the genes encoding the five subunits of the eukaryotic initiation factor 2 (EIF2B5) is present in 90% of the cases. The diagnosis can be accomplished by the clinical and neuroradiological findings and molecular tests. We describe a thirteen-month-old male with previous normal neurodevelopment, who was hospitalized for vomiting, hyperthermia and irritability. On examination, cephalic perimeter and cranial pairs were normal. Hypotonia, increased muscle stretching reflexes, generalized white matter hypodensity on cranial tomography were found. Fifteen days after discharge, he suffered minor head trauma presenting drowsiness and focal seizures. Magnetic resonance showed generalized hypointensity of white matter. Vanishing white matter disease was suspected, and confirmed by sequencing of the EIF2B5 gene, revealing a homozygous c.318A> T mutation in exon 2. Subsequently, visual acuity was lost and cognitive and motor deterioration was evident. The patient died at six years of age due to severe pneumonia. This case contributes to the knowledge of the mutational spectrum present in Mexican patients and allows to extend the phenotype associated to this mutation. Copyright © 2017. Publicado por Masson Doyma México S.A.

  16. A novel homozygous mutation IVS6+5G>T in CYP11B1 gene in a Vietnamese patient with 11β-hydroxylase deficiency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, Thi Phuong Mai; Nguyen, Thu Hien; Ngo, Diem Ngoc; Vu, Chi Dung; Nguyen, Thi Kim Lien; Nong, Van Hai; Nguyen, Huy Hoang

    2015-07-10

    Congenital adrenal hyperplasia (CAH) is an autosomal recessive disease which is characterized by a deficiency of one of the enzymes involved in the synthesis of cortisol from cholesterol by the adrenal cortex. CAH cases arising from impaired 11β-hydroxylase are the second most common form. Mutations in the CYP11B1 gene are the cause of 11β-hydroxylase deficiency. This study was performed on a patient with congenital adrenal hyperplasia and with premature development such as enlarged penis, muscle development, high blood pressure, and bone age equivalent of 5 years old at 2 years of chronological age. Biochemical tests for steroids confirmed the diagnosis of CAH. We used PCR and sequencing to screen for mutations in CYP11B1 gene. Results showed that the patient has a novel homozygous mutation of guanine (G) to thymine (T) in intron 6 (IVS6+5G>T). The analysis of this mutation by MaxEntScan boundary software indicated that this mutant could affect the gene splicing during transcription. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. Targeted next-generation sequencing identifies a homozygous nonsense mutation in ABHD12, the gene underlying PHARC, in a family clinically diagnosed with Usher syndrome type 3

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-01

    Background Usher syndrome (USH) is an autosomal recessive genetically heterogeneous disorder with congenital sensorineural hearing impairment and retinitis pigmentosa (RP). We have identified a consanguineous Lebanese family with two affected members displaying progressive hearing loss, RP and cataracts, therefore clinically diagnosed as USH type 3 (USH3). Our study was aimed at the identification of the causative mutation in this USH3-like family. Methods Candidate loci were identified using genomewide SNP-array-based homozygosity mapping followed by targeted enrichment and next-generation sequencing. Results Using a capture array targeting the three identified homozygosity-by-descent regions on chromosomes 1q43-q44, 20p13-p12.2 and 20p11.23-q12, we identified a homozygous nonsense mutation, p.Arg65X, in ABHD12 segregating with the phenotype. Conclusion Mutations of ABHD12, an enzyme hydrolyzing an endocannabinoid lipid transmitter, cause PHARC (polyneuropathy, hearing loss, ataxia, retinitis pigmentosa, and early-onset cataract). After the identification of the ABHD12 mutation in this family, one patient underwent neurological examination which revealed ataxia, but no polyneuropathy. ABHD12 is not known to be related to the USH protein interactome. The phenotype of our patient represents a variant of PHARC, an entity that should be taken into account as differential diagnosis for USH3. Our study demonstrates the potential of comprehensive genetic analysis for improving the clinical diagnosis. PMID:22938382

  18. Targeted next-generation sequencing identifies a homozygous nonsense mutation in ABHD12, the gene underlying PHARC, in a family clinically diagnosed with Usher syndrome type 3.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eisenberger, Tobias; Slim, Rima; Mansour, Ahmad; Nauck, Markus; Nürnberg, Gudrun; Nürnberg, Peter; Decker, Christian; Dafinger, Claudia; Ebermann, Inga; Bergmann, Carsten; Bolz, Hanno Jörn

    2012-09-02

    Usher syndrome (USH) is an autosomal recessive genetically heterogeneous disorder with congenital sensorineural hearing impairment and retinitis pigmentosa (RP). We have identified a consanguineous Lebanese family with two affected members displaying progressive hearing loss, RP and cataracts, therefore clinically diagnosed as USH type 3 (USH3). Our study was aimed at the identification of the causative mutation in this USH3-like family. Candidate loci were identified using genomewide SNP-array-based homozygosity mapping followed by targeted enrichment and next-generation sequencing. Using a capture array targeting the three identified homozygosity-by-descent regions on chromosomes 1q43-q44, 20p13-p12.2 and 20p11.23-q12, we identified a homozygous nonsense mutation, p.Arg65X, in ABHD12 segregating with the phenotype. Mutations of ABHD12, an enzyme hydrolyzing an endocannabinoid lipid transmitter, cause PHARC (polyneuropathy, hearing loss, ataxia, retinitis pigmentosa, and early-onset cataract). After the identification of the ABHD12 mutation in this family, one patient underwent neurological examination which revealed ataxia, but no polyneuropathy. ABHD12 is not known to be related to the USH protein interactome. The phenotype of our patient represents a variant of PHARC, an entity that should be taken into account as differential diagnosis for USH3. Our study demonstrates the potential of comprehensive genetic analysis for improving the clinical diagnosis.

  19. Targeted next-generation sequencing identifies a homozygous nonsense mutation in ABHD12, the gene underlying PHARC, in a family clinically diagnosed with Usher syndrome type 3

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eisenberger Tobias

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Usher syndrome (USH is an autosomal recessive genetically heterogeneous disorder with congenital sensorineural hearing impairment and retinitis pigmentosa (RP. We have identified a consanguineous Lebanese family with two affected members displaying progressive hearing loss, RP and cataracts, therefore clinically diagnosed as USH type 3 (USH3. Our study was aimed at the identification of the causative mutation in this USH3-like family. Methods Candidate loci were identified using genomewide SNP-array-based homozygosity mapping followed by targeted enrichment and next-generation sequencing. Results Using a capture array targeting the three identified homozygosity-by-descent regions on chromosomes 1q43-q44, 20p13-p12.2 and 20p11.23-q12, we identified a homozygous nonsense mutation, p.Arg65X, in ABHD12 segregating with the phenotype. Conclusion Mutations of ABHD12, an enzyme hydrolyzing an endocannabinoid lipid transmitter, cause PHARC (polyneuropathy, hearing loss, ataxia, retinitis pigmentosa, and early-onset cataract. After the identification of the ABHD12 mutation in this family, one patient underwent neurological examination which revealed ataxia, but no polyneuropathy. ABHD12 is not known to be related to the USH protein interactome. The phenotype of our patient represents a variant of PHARC, an entity that should be taken into account as differential diagnosis for USH3. Our study demonstrates the potential of comprehensive genetic analysis for improving the clinical diagnosis.

  20. Inactivation and mutation induction in Saccharomyces cerevisiae exposed to simulated sunlight: evaluation of action spectra.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schenk-Meuser, K; Pawlowsky, K; Kiefer, J

    1992-07-15

    The effectiveness of polychromatic light irradiation was investigated for haploid yeast cells. Inactivation and mutation induction were measured in both a RAD-wildtype strain and an excision-repair defective strain. The behaviour of vegetative "wet" cells was compared to that of dehydrated cells. The aim of the study was to assess the interaction of UVC with other wavelengths in cells of different states of humidity. The irradiation procedure was therefore carried out using a solar simulator either with full spectrum or with a UVC-blocking filter (modified sunlight) added. The results were analysed on the basis of separately determined action spectra. The summation of the efficiency of individual wavelengths was compared to the values obtained from polychromatic irradiation. It is shown that the effects caused by the whole-spectrum irradiation in wet cells can be predicted sufficiently from the calculation, while dried wildtype cells exhibit higher mutation rates. Thus it can be assumed that drying-specific damage leads to lethal and mutagenic lesions which are processed in different ways, causing a synergistic behaviour in mutation induction. Irradiation of vegetative cells with modified sunlight (UVC-) results in less inactivation and lower mutation rates than were calculated. From these results it can be concluded that this antagonistic behaviour is caused by the interaction of near-UV photoproducts.

  1. Impact of kinase activating and inactivating patient mutations on binary PKA interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Röck, Ruth; Mayrhofer, Johanna E; Bachmann, Verena; Stefan, Eduard

    2015-01-01

    The second messenger molecule cAMP links extracellular signals to intracellular responses. The main cellular cAMP effector is the compartmentalized protein kinase A (PKA). Upon receptor initiated cAMP-mobilization, PKA regulatory subunits (R) bind cAMP thereby triggering dissociation and activation of bound PKA catalytic subunits (PKAc). Mutations in PKAc or RIa subunits manipulate PKA dynamics and activities which contribute to specific disease patterns. Mutations activating cAMP/PKA signaling contribute to carcinogenesis or hormone excess, while inactivating mutations cause hormone deficiency or resistance. Here we extended the application spectrum of a Protein-fragment Complementation Assay based on the Renilla Luciferase to determine binary protein:protein interactions (PPIs) of the PKA network. We compared time- and dose-dependent influences of cAMP-elevation on mutually exclusive PPIs of PKAc with the phosphotransferase inhibiting RIIb and RIa subunits and the protein kinase inhibitor peptide (PKI). We analyzed PKA dynamics following integration of patient mutations into PKAc and RIa. We observed that oncogenic modifications of PKAc(L206R) and RIa(Δ184-236) as well as rare disease mutations in RIa(R368X) affect complex formation of PKA and its responsiveness to cAMP elevation. With the cell-based PKA PPI reporter platform we precisely quantified the mechanistic details how inhibitory PKA interactions and defined patient mutations contribute to PKA functions.

  2. Copy number neutral loss of heterozygosity at 17p and homozygous mutations of TP53 are associated with complex chromosomal aberrations in patients newly diagnosed with myelodysplastic syndromes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Svobodova, Karla; Zemanova, Zuzana; Lhotska, Halka; Novakova, Milena; Podskalska, Lucie; Belickova, Monika; Brezinova, Jana; Sarova, Iveta; Izakova, Silvia; Lizcova, Libuse; Berkova, Adela; Siskova, Magda; Jonasova, Anna; Cermak, Jaroslav; Michalova, Kyra

    2016-03-01

    Complex karyotypes are seen in approximately 20% of patients with myelodysplastic syndromes (MDS) and are associated with a high risk of transformation to acute myeloid leukemia and poor outcomes in patients. Copy number neutral loss of heterozygosity (CN-LOH, i.e., both copies of a chromosomal pair or their parts originate from one parent) might contribute to increased genomic instability in the bone-marrow cells of patients with MDS. The pathological potential of CN-LOH, which arises as a clonal aberration in a proportion of somatic cells, consists of tumor suppressor gene and oncogene homozygous mutations. The aim of our study was to evaluate the frequency of CN-LOH at 17p in bone-marrow cells of newly diagnosed MDS patients with complex chromosomal aberrations and to assess its correlation with mutations in the TP53 gene (17p13.1). CN-LOH was detected in 40 chromosomal regions in 21 (29%) of 72 patients analyzed. The changes in 27 of the 40 regions identified were sporadic. The most common finding was CN-LOH of the short arm of chromosome 17, which was detected in 13 (18%) of 72 patients. A mutational analysis confirmed the homozygous mutation of TP53 in all CN-LOH 17p patients, among which two frameshift mutations are not registered in the International Agency for Research on Cancer TP53 Database. CN-LOH 17p correlated with aggressive disease (median overall survival 4 months) and was strongly associated with a complex karyotype in the cohort studied, which might cause rapid disease progression in high-risk MDS. No other CN-LOH region previously recorded in MDS or AML patients (1p, 4q, 7q, 11q, 13q, 19q, 21q) was detected in our cohort of patients with complex karyotype examined at the diagnosis of MDS. The LOH region appeared to be balanced (i.e., with no DNA copy number change) when examined with conventional and molecular cytogenetic methods. Therefore, a microarray that detects single-nucleotide polymorphisms is an ideal method with which to identify and

  3. Inactivation of protein translocation by cold-sensitive mutations in the yajC-secDF operon

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nouwen, N; Driessen, AJM

    2005-01-01

    Most mutations in the yajC-secDF operon identified via genetic screens confer a cold-sensitive growth phenotype. Here we report that two of these mutations confer this cold-sensitive phenotype by inactivating the SecDF-YajC complex in protein translocation.

  4. A novel homozygous Arg222Trp missense mutation in WNT7A in two sisters with severe Al-Awadi/Raas-Rothschild/Schinzel phocomelia syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kantaputra, Piranit N; Mundlos, Stefan; Sripathomsawat, Warissara

    2010-11-01

    Al-Awadi/Raas-Rothschild/Schinzel phocomelia (AARRS) syndrome, a rare autosomal recessive disorder, comprises malformations of upper and lower limbs with severely hypoplastic pelvis and abnormal genitalia. Mutations in WNT7A have been reported as cause of the syndrome. We report on two sisters in a Thai family with short and malformed long bones, absent fibulae, flexion contracture of digits, and a/hypoplastic nails. Fusion between severely malformed femora and slender tibiae has never been reported in patients with WNT7A mutations. Lower limbs were more severely malformed than the upper ones and the pelvis was also severely affected. Multiple fusions of long bones and of the femoral heads to the acetabula were evident. A novel homozygous missense mutation in coding exon 4 of the WNT7A was detected in both affected daughters (c.664C > T) leading to an amino acid exchange from arginine to tryptophan (p.Arg222Trp; R222W). The phenotype is likely to result from an abnormality of all three signaling centers in the developing limb resulting in ventralization with a loss of dorsal structures (aplasia/hypoplasia of nails) a loss of anterior-posterior identity (single distal bones in lower limb without polarity) and an outgrowth defect resulting in distal truncations. © 2010 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  5. Identification of a point mutation in growth factor repeat C of the low density lipoprotein-receptor gene in a patient with homozygous familial hypercholesterolemia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Soutar, A.K.; Knight, B.L.; Patel, D.D.

    1989-01-01

    The coding region of the low density lipoprotein (LDL)-receptor gene from a patient (MM) with homozygous familial hypercholesterolemia (FH) has been sequenced from six overlapping 500-base-pair amplified fragments of the cDNA from cultured skin fibroblasts. Two separate single nucleotide base changes from the normal sequence were detected. The first involved substitution of guanine for adenine in the third position of the codon for amino acid residue Cys-27 and did not affect the protein sequence. The second mutation was substitution of thymine for cytosine in the DNA for the codon for amino acid residue 664, changing the codon from CCG (proline) to CTG (leucine) and introducing a new site for the restriction enzyme PstI. MM is a true homozygote with two identical genes, and the mutation cosegregated with clinically diagnosed FH in his family in which first cousin marriages occurred frequently. LDL receptors in MM's skin fibroblasts bind less LDL than normal and with reduced affinity. Thus this naturally occurring single point mutation affects both intracellular transport of the protein and ligand binding and occurs in growth factor-like repeat C, a region that has not previously been found to influence LDL binding

  6. A homozygous FITM2 mutation causes a deafness-dystonia syndrome with motor regression and signs of ichthyosis and sensory neuropathy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Celia Zazo Seco

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available A consanguineous family from Pakistan was ascertained to have a novel deafness-dystonia syndrome with motor regression, ichthyosis-like features and signs of sensory neuropathy. By applying a combined strategy of linkage analysis and whole-exome sequencing in the presented family, a homozygous nonsense mutation, c.4G>T (p.Glu2*, in FITM2 was identified. FITM2 and its paralog FITM1 constitute an evolutionary conserved protein family involved in partitioning of triglycerides into cellular lipid droplets. Despite the role of FITM2 in neutral lipid storage and metabolism, no indications for lipodystrophy were observed in the affected individuals. In order to obtain independent evidence for the involvement of FITM2 in the human pathology, downregulation of the single Fitm ortholog, CG10671, in Drosophila melanogaster was pursued using RNA interference. Characteristics of the syndrome, including progressive locomotor impairment, hearing loss and disturbed sensory functions, were recapitulated in Drosophila, which supports the causative nature of the FITM2 mutation. Mutation-based genetic counseling can now be provided to the family and insight is obtained into the potential impact of genetic variation in FITM2.

  7. Forecasting the Long-Term Clinical and Economic Outcomes of Lumacaftor/Ivacaftor in Cystic Fibrosis Patients with Homozygous phe508del Mutation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dilokthornsakul, Piyameth; Patidar, Mausam; Campbell, Jonathan D

    2017-12-01

    To forecast lifetime outcomes and cost of lumacaftor/ivacaftor combination therapy in patients with cystic fibrosis (CF) with homozygous phe508del mutation from the US payer perspective. A lifetime Markov model was developed from a US payer perspective. The model included five health states: 1) mild lung disease (percent predicted forced expiratory volume in 1 second [FEV 1 ] >70%), 2) moderate lung disease (40% ≤ FEV 1 ≤ 70%), 3) severe lung disease (FEV 1 < 40%), 4) lung transplantation, and 5) death. All inputs were derived from published literature. We estimated lumacaftor/ivacaftor's improvement in outcomes compared with a non-CF referent population as well as CF-specific mortality estimates. Lumacaftor/ivacaftor was associated with additional 2.91 life-years (95% credible interval 2.55-3.56) and additional 2.42 quality-adjusted life-years (QALYs) (95% credible interval 2.10-2.98). Lumacaftor/ivacaftor was associated with improvements in survival and QALYs equivalent to 27.6% and 20.7%, respectively, for the survival and QALY gaps between CF usual care and their non-CF peers. The incremental lifetime cost was $2,632,249. Lumacaftor/ivacaftor increased life-years and QALYs in CF patients with the homozygous phe508del mutation and moved morbidity and mortality closer to that of their non-CF peers but it came with higher cost. Copyright © 2017 International Society for Pharmacoeconomics and Outcomes Research (ISPOR). Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Pregnancy-associated osteoporosis with a heterozygous deactivating LDL receptor-related protein 5 (LRP5) mutation and a homozygous methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase (MTHFR) polymorphism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cook, Fiona J; Mumm, Steven; Whyte, Michael P; Wenkert, Deborah

    2014-04-01

    Pregnancy-associated osteoporosis (PAO) is a rare, idiopathic disorder that usually presents with vertebral compression fractures (VCFs) within 6 months of a first pregnancy and delivery. Spontaneous improvement is typical. There is no known genetic basis for PAO. A 26-year-old primagravida with a neonatal history of unilateral blindness attributable to hyperplastic primary vitreous sustained postpartum VCFs consistent with PAO. Her low bone mineral density (BMD) seemed to respond to vitamin D and calcium therapy, with no fractures after her next successful pregnancy. Investigation of subsequent fetal losses revealed homozygosity for the methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase (MTHFR) C677T polymorphism associated both with fetal loss and with osteoporosis (OP). Because her neonatal unilateral blindness and OP were suggestive of loss-of-function mutation(s) in the gene that encodes LDL receptor-related protein 5 (LRP5), LRP5 exon and splice site sequencing was also performed. This revealed a unique heterozygous 12-bp deletion in exon 21 (c.4454_4465del, p.1485_1488del SSSS) in the patient, her mother and sons, but not her father or brother. Her mother had a normal BMD, no history of fractures, PAO, ophthalmopathy, or fetal loss. Her two sons had no ophthalmopathy and no skeletal issues. Her osteoporotic father (with a family history of blindness) and brother had low BMDs first documented at ages ∼40 and 32 years, respectively. Serum biochemical and bone turnover studies were unremarkable in all subjects. We postulate that our patient's heterozygous LRP5 mutation together with her homozygous MTHFR polymorphism likely predisposed her to low peak BMD. However, OP did not cosegregate in her family with the LRP5 mutation, the homozygous MTHFR polymorphism, or even the combination of the two, implicating additional genetic or nongenetic factors in her PAO. Nevertheless, exploration for potential genetic contributions to PAO may explain part of the pathogenesis of this

  9. Mutation formation and inactivation of mammalian cells by heavy ions. 3

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Obaturov, G.M.

    1984-01-01

    Using parameter values of equations for cell inactivation cross-sections, theoretical curves were calculated for cell radiosensitivity (α 1 ) in dependence on LET. There is good agreement between calculated and experimental values of α 1 . The yield of lethal mutations of 1st and 2nd types and their sum in dependence on LET was also calculated. It was shown that for low LET ions cell radiosensitivity is caused by the 2nd type of mutation, independent of LET, proportional to DNA mass and inversely proportional to repair rate. For high LET ions when lethal mutation number per one track is more than one, α 1 is caused by the 1st type of mutation, proportional to cell nuclear cross-section and inversely proportional to LET. For intermediate LET ions α 1 is a complicated function of LET. It is follows from the equations that more than 17% of double strand breaks (DSB) take part in lethal mutation formation. Others are either repaired or formed in the process of experimentally determined DSB yield. (author)

  10. Genetic heterogeneity and consanguinity lead to a "double hit": homozygous mutations of MYO7A and PDE6B in a patient with retinitis pigmentosa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldenberg-Cohen, Nitza; Banin, Eyal; Zalzstein, Yael; Cohen, Ben; Rotenstreich, Ygal; Rizel, Leah; Basel-Vanagaite, Lina; Ben-Yosef, Tamar

    2013-01-01

    Retinitis pigmentosa (RP), the most genetically heterogeneous disorder in humans, actually represents a group of pigmentary retinopathies characterized by night blindness followed by visual-field loss. RP can appear as either syndromic or nonsyndromic. One of the most common forms of syndromic RP is Usher syndrome, characterized by the combination of RP, hearing loss, and vestibular dysfunction. The underlying cause of the appearance of syndromic and nonsyndromic RP in three siblings from a consanguineous Israeli Muslim Arab family was studied with whole-genome homozygosity mapping followed by whole exome sequencing. THE FAMILY WAS FOUND TO SEGREGATE NOVEL MUTATIONS OF TWO DIFFERENT GENES: myosin VIIA (MYO7A), which causes type 1 Usher syndrome, and phosphodiesterase 6B, cyclic guanosine monophosphate-specific, rod, beta (PDE6B), which causes nonsyndromic RP. One affected child was homozygous for both mutations. Since the retinal phenotype seen in this patient results from overlapping pathologies, one might expect to find severe retinal degeneration. Indeed, he was diagnosed with RP based on an abnormal electroretinogram (ERG) at a young age (9 months). However, this early diagnosis may be biased, as two of his older siblings had already been diagnosed, leading to increased awareness. At the age of 32 months, he had relatively good vision with normal visual fields. Further testing of visual function and structure at different ages in the three siblings is needed to determine whether the two RP-causing genes mutated in this youngest sibling confer increased disease severity. This report further supports the genetic heterogeneity of RP, and demonstrates how consanguinity could increase intrafamilial clustering of multiple hereditary diseases. Moreover, this report provides a unique opportunity to study the clinical implications of the coexistence of pathogenic mutations in two RP-causative genes in a human patient.

  11. Genetic heterogeneity and consanguinity lead to a “double hit”: Homozygous mutations of MYO7A and PDE6B in a patient with retinitis pigmentosa

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldenberg-Cohen, Nitza; Banin, Eyal; Zalzstein, Yael; Cohen, Ben; Rotenstreich, Ygal; Rizel, Leah; Basel-Vanagaite, Lina

    2013-01-01

    Purpose Retinitis pigmentosa (RP), the most genetically heterogeneous disorder in humans, actually represents a group of pigmentary retinopathies characterized by night blindness followed by visual-field loss. RP can appear as either syndromic or nonsyndromic. One of the most common forms of syndromic RP is Usher syndrome, characterized by the combination of RP, hearing loss, and vestibular dysfunction. Methods The underlying cause of the appearance of syndromic and nonsyndromic RP in three siblings from a consanguineous Israeli Muslim Arab family was studied with whole-genome homozygosity mapping followed by whole exome sequencing. Results The family was found to segregate novel mutations of two different genes: myosin VIIA (MYO7A), which causes type 1 Usher syndrome, and phosphodiesterase 6B, cyclic guanosine monophosphate-specific, rod, beta (PDE6B), which causes nonsyndromic RP. One affected child was homozygous for both mutations. Since the retinal phenotype seen in this patient results from overlapping pathologies, one might expect to find severe retinal degeneration. Indeed, he was diagnosed with RP based on an abnormal electroretinogram (ERG) at a young age (9 months). However, this early diagnosis may be biased, as two of his older siblings had already been diagnosed, leading to increased awareness. At the age of 32 months, he had relatively good vision with normal visual fields. Further testing of visual function and structure at different ages in the three siblings is needed to determine whether the two RP-causing genes mutated in this youngest sibling confer increased disease severity. Conclusions This report further supports the genetic heterogeneity of RP, and demonstrates how consanguinity could increase intrafamilial clustering of multiple hereditary diseases. Moreover, this report provides a unique opportunity to study the clinical implications of the coexistence of pathogenic mutations in two RP-causative genes in a human patient. PMID:23882135

  12. Whole-Exome Sequencing Identifies Homozygous AFG3L2 Mutations in a Spastic Ataxia-Neuropathy Syndrome Linked to Mitochondrial m-AAA Proteases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martinelli, Paola; Cherukuri, Praveen F.; Teer, Jamie K.; Hansen, Nancy F.; Cruz, Pedro; Mullikin for the NISC Comparative Sequencing Program, James C.; Blakesley, Robert W.; Golas, Gretchen; Kwan, Justin; Sandler, Anthony; Fuentes Fajardo, Karin; Markello, Thomas; Tifft, Cynthia; Blackstone, Craig; Rugarli, Elena I.; Langer, Thomas; Gahl, William A.; Toro, Camilo

    2011-01-01

    We report an early onset spastic ataxia-neuropathy syndrome in two brothers of a consanguineous family characterized clinically by lower extremity spasticity, peripheral neuropathy, ptosis, oculomotor apraxia, dystonia, cerebellar atrophy, and progressive myoclonic epilepsy. Whole-exome sequencing identified a homozygous missense mutation (c.1847G>A; p.Y616C) in AFG3L2, encoding a subunit of an m-AAA protease. m-AAA proteases reside in the mitochondrial inner membrane and are responsible for removal of damaged or misfolded proteins and proteolytic activation of essential mitochondrial proteins. AFG3L2 forms either a homo-oligomeric isoenzyme or a hetero-oligomeric complex with paraplegin, a homologous protein mutated in hereditary spastic paraplegia type 7 (SPG7). Heterozygous loss-of-function mutations in AFG3L2 cause autosomal-dominant spinocerebellar ataxia type 28 (SCA28), a disorder whose phenotype is strikingly different from that of our patients. As defined in yeast complementation assays, the AFG3L2Y616C gene product is a hypomorphic variant that exhibited oligomerization defects in yeast as well as in patient fibroblasts. Specifically, the formation of AFG3L2Y616C complexes was impaired, both with itself and to a greater extent with paraplegin. This produced an early-onset clinical syndrome that combines the severe phenotypes of SPG7 and SCA28, in additional to other “mitochondrial” features such as oculomotor apraxia, extrapyramidal dysfunction, and myoclonic epilepsy. These findings expand the phenotype associated with AFG3L2 mutations and suggest that AFG3L2-related disease should be considered in the differential diagnosis of spastic ataxias. PMID:22022284

  13. Whole-exome sequencing identifies homozygous AFG3L2 mutations in a spastic ataxia-neuropathy syndrome linked to mitochondrial m-AAA proteases.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tyler Mark Pierson

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available We report an early onset spastic ataxia-neuropathy syndrome in two brothers of a consanguineous family characterized clinically by lower extremity spasticity, peripheral neuropathy, ptosis, oculomotor apraxia, dystonia, cerebellar atrophy, and progressive myoclonic epilepsy. Whole-exome sequencing identified a homozygous missense mutation (c.1847G>A; p.Y616C in AFG3L2, encoding a subunit of an m-AAA protease. m-AAA proteases reside in the mitochondrial inner membrane and are responsible for removal of damaged or misfolded proteins and proteolytic activation of essential mitochondrial proteins. AFG3L2 forms either a homo-oligomeric isoenzyme or a hetero-oligomeric complex with paraplegin, a homologous protein mutated in hereditary spastic paraplegia type 7 (SPG7. Heterozygous loss-of-function mutations in AFG3L2 cause autosomal-dominant spinocerebellar ataxia type 28 (SCA28, a disorder whose phenotype is strikingly different from that of our patients. As defined in yeast complementation assays, the AFG3L2(Y616C gene product is a hypomorphic variant that exhibited oligomerization defects in yeast as well as in patient fibroblasts. Specifically, the formation of AFG3L2(Y616C complexes was impaired, both with itself and to a greater extent with paraplegin. This produced an early-onset clinical syndrome that combines the severe phenotypes of SPG7 and SCA28, in additional to other "mitochondrial" features such as oculomotor apraxia, extrapyramidal dysfunction, and myoclonic epilepsy. These findings expand the phenotype associated with AFG3L2 mutations and suggest that AFG3L2-related disease should be considered in the differential diagnosis of spastic ataxias.

  14. Efficacy of Rosuvastatin in Children With Homozygous Familial Hypercholesterolemia and Association With Underlying Genetic Mutations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stein, Evan A; Dann, Eldad J; Wiegman, Albert

    2017-01-01

    formally evaluated in, or approved for, HoFH children. OBJECTIVES: The authors sought to assess the LDL-C efficacy of rosuvastatin versus placebo in HoFH children, and the relationship with underlying genetic mutations. METHODS: This was a randomized, double-blind, 12-week, crossover study of rosuvastatin...... 20 mg versus placebo, followed by 12 weeks of open-label rosuvastatin. Patients discontinued all lipid-lowering treatment except ezetimibe and/or apheresis. Clinical and laboratory assessments were performed every 6 weeks. The relationship between LDL-C response and genetic mutations was assessed....../dl (range: 130 to 700 mg/dl) on rosuvastatin, producing a mean 85.4 mg/dl (22.3%) difference (p = 0.005). Efficacy was similar regardless of age or use of ezetimibe or apheresis, and was maintained for 12 weeks. Adverse events were few and not serious. Patients with 2 defective versus 2 negative LDL...

  15. Neonatal severe hyperparathyroidism caused by homozygous mutation in CASR: A rare cause of life-threatening hypercalcemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murphy, Heidi; Patrick, Jessica; Báez-Irizarry, Eileen; Lacassie, Yves; Gómez, Ricardo; Vargas, Alfonso; Barkemeyer, Brian; Kanotra, Sohit; Zambrano, Regina M

    2016-04-01

    Neonatal severe hyperparathyroidism (NSHPT) is a rare, life-threatening condition that presents with severe hypercalcemia, hyperparathyroidism, and osteopenia in the newborn period. Treatment of NSHPT traditionally includes hydration and bisphosphonates; however newer calcimimetic agents, such as cinacalcet, are now being utilized to prevent or delay parathyroidectomy which is technically difficult in the newborn. Medical treatment success is related to calcium sensing receptor (CaSR) genotype. We report a 4-day-old infant who presented with hyperbilirubinemia, poor feeding, weight loss, severe hypotonia and was ultimately diagnosed with NSHPT. The patient's total serum calcium level of 36.8 mg/dL (reference range: 8.5-10.4 mg/dL) is, to our knowledge, the highest ever documented in this setting. Exome data previously obtained on the infant's parents was re-analyzed demonstrating bi-parental heterozygosity for a mutation of the CASR gene: c.206G > A, and Sanger sequencing data confirmed the patient was a homozygote for the same mutation. Though a patient with the same CaSR gene mutation described here has responded to cinacalcet, our patient did not respond and required parathyroidectomy. Though this case has previously been published as a surgical case report, a full report of the medical management and underlying genetic etiology is warranted; this case underscores the importance of disclosing bi-parental heterozygosity for a gene causing severe neonatal disease particularly when treatment is available and illustrates the need for further in vitro studies of this CaSR mutation. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  16. A homozygous mutation in RNU4ATAC as a cause of microcephalic osteodysplastic primordial dwarfism type I (MOPD I) with associated pigmentary disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdel-Salam, Ghada M H; Miyake, Noriko; Eid, Maha M; Abdel-Hamid, Mohamed S; Hassan, Nihal A; Eid, Ola M; Effat, Laila K; El-Badry, Tarek H; El-Kamah, Ghada Y; El-Darouti, Mohamed; Matsumoto, Naomichi

    2011-11-01

    The designation microcephalic osteodysplastic primordial dwarfism (MOPD) refers to a group of autosomal recessive disorders, comprising microcephaly, growth retardation, and a skeletal dysplasia. The different types of MOPD have been delineated on the basis of clinical, radiological, and genetic criteria. We describe two brothers, born to healthy, consanguineous parents, with intrauterine and postnatal growth retardation, microcephaly with abnormal gyral pattern and partial agenesis of corpus callosum, and skeletal anomalies reminiscent of those described in MOPD type I. This was confirmed by the identification of the homozygous g.55G > A mutation of RNU4ATAC encoding U4atac snRNA. The sibs had yellowish-gray hair, fair skin, and deficient retinal pigmentation. Skin biopsy showed abnormal melanin function but OCA genes were normal. The older sib had an intracranial hemorrhage at 1 week after birth, the younger developed chilblains-like lesions at the age 2½ years old but analysis of the SAMHD1 and TREX1 genes did not show any mutations. To the best of our knowledge, vasculopathy and pigmentary disorders have not been reported in MOPD I. Copyright © 2011 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  17. Identification of homozygous WFS1 mutations (p.Asp211Asn, p.Gln486*) causing severe Wolfram syndrome and first report of male fertility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haghighi, Amirreza; Haghighi, Alireza; Setoodeh, Aria; Saleh-Gohari, Nasrollah; Astuti, Dewi; Barrett, Timothy G

    2013-03-01

    Wolfram syndrome (WFS) is a neurodegenerative genetic condition characterized by juvenile-onset of diabetes mellitus and optic atrophy. We studied clinical features and the molecular basis of severe WFS (neurodegenerative complications) in two consanguineous families from Iran. A clinical and molecular genetic investigation was performed in the affected and healthy members of two families. The clinical diagnosis of WFS was confirmed by the existence of diabetes mellitus and optic atrophy in the affected patients, who in addition had severe neurodegenerative complications. Sequencing of WFS1 was undertaken in one affected member from each family. Targeted mutations were tested in all members of relevant families. Patients had most of the reported features of WFS. Two affected males in the first family had fathered unaffected children. We identified two homozygous mutations previously reported with apparently milder phenotypes: family 1: c.631G>A (p.Asp211Asn) in exon 5, and family 2: c.1456C>T (p.Gln486*) in exon 8. Heterozygous carriers were unaffected. This is the first report of male Wolfram patients who have successfully fathered children. Surprisingly, they also had almost all the complications associated with WFS. Our report has implications for genetic counseling and family planning advice for other affected families.

  18. A novel homozygous stop-codon mutation in human HFE responsible for nonsense-mediated mRNA decay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Padula, Maria Carmela; Martelli, Giuseppe; Larocca, Marilena; Rossano, Rocco; Olivieri, Attilio

    2014-09-01

    HFE-hemochromatosis (HH) is an autosomal disease characterized by excessive iron absorption. Homozygotes for H63D variant, and still less H63D heterozygotes, generally do not express HH phenotype. The data collected in our previous study in the province of Matera (Basilicata, Italy) underlined that some H63D carriers showed altered iron metabolism, without additional factors. In this study, we selected a cohort of 10/22 H63D carriers with severe biochemical iron overload (BIO). Additional analysis was performed for studying HFE exons, exon-intron boundaries, and untranslated regions (UTRs) by performing DNA extraction, PCR amplification and sequencing. The results showed a novel substitution (NM_000410.3:c.847C>T) in a patient exon 4 (GenBankJQ478433); it introduces a premature stop-codon (PTC). RNA extraction and reverse-transcription were also performed. Quantitative real-time PCR was carried out for verifying if our aberrant mRNA is targeted for nonsense-mediated mRNA decay (NMD); we observed that patient HFE mRNA was expressed much less than calibrator, suggesting that the mutated HFE protein cannot play its role in iron metabolism regulation, resulting in proband BIO. Our finding is the first evidence of a variation responsible for a PTC in iron cycle genes. The genotype-phenotype correlation observed in our cases could be related to the additional mutation. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Severe Hyperammonemic Encephalopathy Requiring Dialysis Aggravated by Prolonged Fasting and Intermittent High Fat Load in a Ramadan Fasting Month in a Patient with CPTII Homozygous Mutation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phowthongkum, P; Ittiwut, C; Shotelersuk, V

    2017-11-21

    Carnitine palmitoyltransferase II (CPTII) deficiency is a mitochondrial fatty acid oxidation disorder that can present antenatally as congenital brain malformations, or postnatally with lethal neonatal, severe infantile, or the most common adult myopathic forms. No case of severe hyperammonemia without liver dysfunction has been reported. We described a 23-year-old man who presented to the emergency department with seizures and was found to have markedly elevation of serum ammonia. Continuous renal replacement therapy was initiated with successfully decreased ammonia to a safety level. He had a prolonged history of epilepsies and encephalopathic attacks that was associated with high ammonia level. Molecular diagnosis revealed a homozygous mutation in CPTII. The plasma acylcarnitine profile was consistent with the diagnosis. Failure to produce acetyl-CoA, the precursor of urea cycle from fatty acid in prolonged fasting state in Ramadan month, worsening mitochondrial functions from circulating long chain fatty acid and valproate toxicities were believed to contribute to this critical metabolic decompensation. Fatty acid oxidation disorders should be considered in the differential diagnosis of hyperammonemia even without liver dysfunction. To our knowledge, this is the first case of CPTII deficiency presented with severe hyperammonemic encephalopathy required dialysis after prolonged religious related fasting.

  20. Inactivation and mutation of cultured mammalian cells by aluminium characteristic ultrasoft X-rays

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goodhead, D.T.

    1977-01-01

    Microdosimetric distributions for aluminium K characteristic ultrasoft X-rays and 4 He ion track intersections have been calculated and used to analyse recent biological results obtained with these radiations. Results on inactivation and mutation-induction to thioguanine resistance of both V79 Chinese hamster cells and HF19 human diploid fibroblasts in vitro were analysed in terms of the Kellerer-Rossi 'theory of dual radiation action'. The small quantum energy of the aluminium X-ray photons and the very short length of the secondary electrons which they produce highlight the inadequacy of the model. It has been shown that the model predicted r.b.e. values in conflict with those observed unless an additional variable was introduced, but that the introduction of such a variable created mathematical inconsistencies. The experimental evidence is contrary to the conventional usage and basis of the model. (author)

  1. To pace or not to pace: a pilot study of four- and five-gaited Icelandic horses homozygous for the DMRT3 'Gait Keeper' mutation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jäderkvist Fegraeus, K; Hirschberg, I; Árnason, T; Andersson, L; Velie, B D; Andersson, L S; Lindgren, G

    2017-12-01

    The Icelandic horse is a breed known mainly for its ability to perform the ambling four-beat gait 'tölt' and the lateral two-beat gait pace. The natural ability of the breed to perform these alternative gaits is highly desired by breeders. Therefore, the discovery that a nonsense mutation (C>A) in the DMRT3 gene was the main genetic factor for horses' ability to perform gaits in addition to walk, trot and canter was of great interest. Although several studies have demonstrated that homozygosity for the DMRT3 mutation is important for the ability to pace, only about 70% of the homozygous mutant (AA) Icelandic horses are reported to pace. The aim of the study was to genetically compare four- and five-gaited (i.e. horses with and without the ability to pace) AA Icelandic horses by performing a genome-wide association (GWA) analysis. All horses (n = 55) were genotyped on the 670K Axiom Equine Genotyping Array, and a GWA analysis was performed using the genabel package in r. No SNP demonstrated genome-wide significance, implying that the ability to pace goes beyond the presence of a single gene variant. Despite its limitations, the current study provides additional information regarding the genetic complexity of pacing ability in horses. However, to fully understand the genetic differences between four- and five-gaited AA horses, additional studies with larger sample materials and consistent phenotyping are needed. © 2017 Stichting International Foundation for Animal Genetics.

  2. Congenital Chloride-Losing Diarrhea in a Mexican child with the novel homozygous SLC26A3 mutation G393W

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fabian R. Reimold

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Congenital chloride diarrhea is an autosomal recessive disease caused by mutations in the intestinal lumenal membrane Cl-/HCO3- exchanger, SLC26A3.We report here the novel SLC26A3 mutation G393W in a Mexican child, the first such report in a patient from Central America. SLC26A3 G393W expression in Xenopus oocytes exhibits a mild hypomorphic phenotype, with normal surface expression and moderately reduced anion transport function. However, expression of HA-SLC26A3 in HEK-293 cells reveals intracellular retention and greatly decreased steady-state levels of the mutant polypeptide, in contrast to peripheral membrane expression of the wildtype protein. Whereas wildtype HA-SLC26A3 is apically localized in polarized monolayers of filter-grown MDCK cells and Caco2 cells, mutant HA-SLC26A3 G393W exhibits decreased total polypeptide abundance, with reduced or absent surface expression and sparse punctate (or absent intracellular distribution. The WT protein is similarly localized in LLCPK1 cells, but the mutant fails to accumulate to detectable levels. We conclude that the chloride-losing diarrhea phenotype associated with homozygous expression of SLC26A3 G393W likely reflects lack of apical surface expression in enterocytes, secondary to combined abnormalities in polypeptide trafficking and stability. Future progress in development of general or target-specific folding chaperonins and correctors may hold promise for pharmacological rescue of this and similar genetic defects in membrane protein targeting.

  3. Somatic INK4a-ARF locus mutations: a significant mechanism of gene inactivation in squamous cell carcinomas of the head and neck.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poi, M J; Yen, T; Li, J; Song, H; Lang, J C; Schuller, D E; Pearl, D K; Casto, B C; Tsai, M D; Weghorst, C M

    2001-01-01

    The INK4a-ARF locus is located on human chromosome 9p21 and is known to encode two functionally distinct tumor-suppressor genes. The p16(INK4a) (p16) tumor-suppressor gene product is a negative regulator of cyclin-dependent kinases 4 and 6, which in turn positively regulate progression of mammalian cells through the cell cycle. The p14(ARF) tumor-suppressor gene product specifically interacts with human double minute 2, leading to the subsequent stabilization of p53 and G(1) arrest. Previous investigations analyzing the p16 gene in squamous cell carcinomas of the head and neck (SCCHNs) have suggested the predominate inactivating events to be homozygous gene deletions and hypermethylation of the p16 promoter. Somatic mutational inactivation of p16 has been reported to be low (0-10%, with a combined incidence of 25 of 279, or 9%) and to play only a minor role in the development of SCCHN. The present study examined whether this particular mechanism of INK4a/ARF inactivation, specifically somatic mutation, has been underestimated in SCCHN by determining the mutational status of the p16 and p14(ARF) genes in 100 primary SCCHNs with the use of polymerase chain reaction technology and a highly sensitive, nonradioactive modification of single-stranded conformational polymorphism (SSCP) analysis termed "cold" SSCP. Exons 1alpha, 1beta, and 2 of INK4a/ARF were amplified using intron-based primers or a combination of intron- and exon-based primers. A total of 27 SCCHNs (27%) exhibited sequence alterations in this locus, 22 (22%) of which were somatic sequence alterations and five (5%) of which were a single polymorphism in codon 148. Of the 22 somatic alterations, 20 (91%) directly or indirectly involved exon 2, and two (9%) were located within exon 1alpha. No mutations were found in exon 1beta. All 22 somatic mutations would be expected to yield altered p16 proteins, but only 15 of them should affect p14(ARF) proteins. Specific somatic alterations included microdeletions or

  4. Accelerated inactivation of the L-type calcium current due to a mutation in CACNB2b underlies Brugada syndrome

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cordeiro, Jonathan M; Marieb, Mark; Pfeiffer, Ryan

    2009-01-01

    S in which loss of function is caused by accelerated inactivation of I(Ca). The proband, a 32 year old male, displayed a Type I ST segment elevation in two right precordial ECG leads following a procainamide challenge. EP study was positive with induction of polymorphic VT/VF. Interrogation of implanted ICD...... significantly faster in mutant channels between 0 and + 20 mV. Action potential voltage clamp experiments showed that total charge was reduced by almost half compared to WT. We report the first BrS mutation in CaCNB2b resulting in accelerated inactivation of L-type calcium channel current. Our results suggest...

  5. The phenotype of polycythemia due to Croatian homozygous VHL (571C>G:H191D) mutation is different from that of Chuvash polycythemia (VHL 598C>T:R200W).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tomasic, Nikica Ljubas; Piterkova, Lucie; Huff, Chad; Bilic, Ernest; Yoon, Donghoon; Miasnikova, Galina Y; Sergueeva, Adelina I; Niu, Xiaomei; Nekhai, Sergei; Gordeuk, Victor; Prchal, Josef T

    2013-04-01

    Mutations of VHL (a negative regulator of hypoxia-inducible factors) have position-dependent distinct cancer phenotypes. Only two known inherited homozygous VHL mutations exist and they cause polycythemia: Chuvash R200W and Croatian H191D. We report a second polycythemic Croatian H191D homozygote distantly related to the first propositus. Three generations of both families were genotyped for analysis of shared ancestry. Biochemical and molecular tests were performed to better define their phenotypes, with an emphasis on a comparison with Chuvash polycythemia. The VHL H191D mutation did not segregate in the family defined by the known common ancestors of the two subjects, suggesting a high prevalence in Croatians, but haplotype analysis indicated an undocumented common ancestor ∼six generations ago as the founder of this mutation. We show that erythropoietin levels in homozygous VHL H191D individuals are higher than in VHL R200W patients of similar ages, and their native erythroid progenitors, unlike Chuvash R200W, are not hypersensitive to erythropoietin. This observation contrasts with a report suggesting that polycythemia in VHL R200W and H191D homozygotes is due to the loss of JAK2 regulation from VHL R200W and H191D binding to SOCS1. In conclusion, our studies further define the hematologic phenotype of VHL H191D and provide additional evidence for phenotypic heterogeneity associated with the positional effects of VHL mutations.

  6. Bimodal voltage dependence of TRPA1: mutations of a key pore helix residue reveal strong intrinsic voltage-dependent inactivation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wan, Xia; Lu, Yungang; Chen, Xueqin; Xiong, Jian; Zhou, Yuanda; Li, Ping; Xia, Bingqing; Li, Min; Zhu, Michael X; Gao, Zhaobing

    2014-07-01

    Transient receptor potential A1 (TRPA1) is implicated in somatosensory processing and pathological pain sensation. Although not strictly voltage-gated, ionic currents of TRPA1 typically rectify outwardly, indicating channel activation at depolarized membrane potentials. However, some reports also showed TRPA1 inactivation at high positive potentials, implicating voltage-dependent inactivation. Here we report a conserved leucine residue, L906, in the putative pore helix, which strongly impacts the voltage dependency of TRPA1. Mutation of the leucine to cysteine (L906C) converted the channel from outward to inward rectification independent of divalent cations and irrespective to stimulation by allyl isothiocyanate. The mutant, but not the wild-type channel, displayed exclusively voltage-dependent inactivation at positive potentials. The L906C mutation also exhibited reduced sensitivity to inhibition by TRPA1 blockers, HC030031 and ruthenium red. Further mutagenesis of the leucine to all natural amino acids individually revealed that most substitutions at L906 (15/19) resulted in inward rectification, with exceptions of three amino acids that dramatically reduced channel activity and one, methionine, which mimicked the wild-type channel. Our data are plausibly explained by a bimodal gating model involving both voltage-dependent activation and inactivation of TRPA1. We propose that the key pore helix residue, L906, plays an essential role in responding to the voltage-dependent gating.

  7. A homozygous FITM2 mutation causes a deafness-dystonia syndrome with motor regression and signs of ichthyosis and sensory neuropathy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zazo Seco, Celia; Castells-Nobau, Anna; Joo, Seol-Hee

    2017-01-01

    A consanguineous family from Pakistan was ascertained to have a novel deafness-dystonia syndrome with motor regression, ichthyosis-like features and signs of sensory neuropathy. By applying a combined strategy of linkage analysis and whole-exome sequencing in the presented family, a homozygous no...

  8. Homozygous missense mutation (G56R in glycosylphosphatidylinositol-anchored high-density lipoprotein-binding protein 1 (GPI-HBP1 in two siblings with fasting chylomicronemia (MIM 144650

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hegele Robert A

    2007-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Mice with a deleted Gpihbp1 gene encoding glycosylphosphatidylinositol-anchored high-density lipoprotein-binding protein 1 (GPI-HBP1 develop severe chylomicronemia. We screened the coding regions of the human homologue – GPIHBP1 – from the genomic DNA of 160 unrelated adults with fasting chylomicronemia and plasma triglycerides >10 mmol/L, each of whom had normal sequence of the LPL and APOC2 genes. Results One patient with severe type 5 hyperlipoproteinemia (MIM 144650, fasting chylomicronemia and relapsing pancreatitis resistant to standard therapy was found to be homozygous for a novel GPIHBP1 missense variant, namely G56R. This mutation was absent from the genomes of 600 control subjects and 610 patients with hyperlipidemia. The GPIHBP1 G56 residue has been conserved throughout evolution and the G56R mutation was predicted to have compromised function. Her homozygous brother also had refractory chylomicronemia and relapsing pancreatitis together with early coronary heart disease. G56R heterozygotes in the family had fasting mild hypertriglyceridemia. Conclusion Thus, a very rare GPIHBP1 missense mutation appears to be associated with severe hypertriglyceridemia and chylomicronemia.

  9. Novel homozygous mutation, c.400C>T (p.Arg134*), in the PVRL1 gene underlies cleft lip/palate-ectodermal dysplasia syndrome in an Asian patient.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoshida, Kazue; Hayashi, Ryota; Fujita, Hideki; Kubota, Masaya; Kondo, Mai; Shimomura, Yutaka; Niizeki, Hironori

    2015-07-01

    Cleft lip/palate-ectodermal dysplasia syndrome is a rare, autosomal recessive disorder caused by homozygous loss-of-function mutations of the poliovirus receptor-like 1 (PVRL1) gene encoding nectin-1. Nectin-1 is a cell-cell adhesion molecule that is important for the initial step in the formation of adherens junctions and tight junctions; it is expressed in keratinocytes, neurons, and the developing face and palate. Clinical manifestations comprise a unique facial appearance with cleft lip/palate, ectodermal dysplasia, cutaneous syndactyly of the fingers and/or toes, and in some cases, mental retardation. We present the first report, to our knowledge, of an Asian individual with cleft lip/palate-ectodermal dysplasia syndrome with a novel PVRL1 mutation. A 7-year-old Japanese boy, the first child of a consanguineous marriage, showed hypohidrotic ectodermal dysplasia with sparse, brittle, fine, dry hair and hypodontia, the unique facial appearance with cleft lip/palate, cutaneous syndactyly of the fingers and mild mental retardation. Scanning electron microscopic examination of the hair demonstrated pili torti and pili trianguli et canaliculi. Mutation analysis of exon 2 of PVRL1 revealed a novel homozygous nonsense mutation, c.400C>T (p.Arg134*). His parents were heterozygous for the mutant alleles. All four PVRL1 mutations identified in cleft lip/palate-ectodermal dysplasia syndrome to date, including this study, resulted in truncated proteins that lack the transmembrane domain and intracellular domain of nectin-1, which is necessary to initiate the cell-cell adhesion process. © 2015 Japanese Dermatological Association.

  10. Normosmic idiopathic hypogonadotropic hypogonadism due to a novel homozygous nonsense c.C969A (p.Y323X) mutation in the KISS1R gene in three unrelated families.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Demirbilek, Huseyin; Ozbek, M Nuri; Demir, Korcan; Kotan, L Damla; Cesur, Yasar; Dogan, Murat; Temiz, Fatih; Mengen, Eda; Gurbuz, Fatih; Yuksel, Bilgin; Topaloglu, A Kemal

    2015-03-01

    The spectrum of genetic alterations in cases of hypogonadotropic hypogonadism continue to expand. However, KISS1R mutations remain rare. The aim of this study was to understand the molecular basis of normosmic idiopathic hypogonadotropic hypogonadism. Clinical characteristics, hormonal studies and genetic analyses of seven cases with idiopathic normosmic hypogonadotropic hypogonadism (nIHH) from three unrelated consanguineous families are presented. One male presented with absence of pubertal onset and required surgery for severe penoscrotal hypospadias and cryptorchidism, while other two males had absence of pubertal onset. Two of four female cases required replacement therapy for pubertal onset and maintenance, whereas the other two had spontaneous pubertal onset but incomplete maturation. In sequence analysis, we identified a novel homozygous nonsense (p.Y323X) mutation (c.C969A) in the last exon of the KISS1R gene in all clinically affected cases. We identified a homozygous nonsense mutation in the KISS1R gene in three unrelated families with nIHH, which enabled us to observe the phenotypic consequences of this rare condition. Escape from nonsense-mediated decay, and thus production of abnormal proteins, may account for the variable severity of the phenotype. Although KISS1R mutations are extremely rare and can cause a heterogeneous phenotype, analysis of the KISS1R gene should be a part of genetic analysis of patients with nIHH, to allow better understanding of phenotype-genotype relationship of KISS1R mutations and the underlying genetic basis of patients with nIHH. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  11. Induction of mutation in Micrococcus pyogenes by chemical inactivation of sulfhydryl groups

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Clark, J B; Wyss, O; Stone, W S

    1950-08-26

    The purpose of this work was to determine whether this naphthaquinone could induce antibiotic-resistant mutants in Micrococcus pyogenes var. aureus, and to determine if such mutagenicity was due to -SH inactivation.

  12. Germ-line mutations of the p53 tumor suppressor gene in patients with high risk for cancer inactivate the p53 protein.

    OpenAIRE

    Frebourg, T; Kassel, J; Lam, K T; Gryka, M A; Barbier, N; Andersen, T I; Børresen, A L; Friend, S H

    1992-01-01

    Germ-line mutations in the p53 tumor suppressor gene have been observed in patients with Li-Fraumeni syndrome, brain tumors, second malignancies, and breast cancers. It is unclear whether all of these mutations have inactivated p53 and thereby provide an increased risk for cancer. Therefore, it is necessary to establish the biological significance of these germ-line mutations by the functional and structural analysis of the resulting mutant p53 proteins. We analyzed the ability of seven germ-...

  13. [A novel homozygous mutation p.E25X in the HSD3B2 gene causing salt wasting 3β-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenases deficiency in a Chinese pubertal girl: a delayed diagnosis until recurrent ovary cysts].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Yonglan; Zheng, Jipeng; Xie, Ting; Xiao, Qing; Lu, Shaomei; Li, Xiuzhen; Cheng, Jing; Chen, Lihe; Liu, Li

    2014-12-01

    3β- hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase deficiency (3βHSD), a rare form of congenital adrenal hyperplasia (CAH) resulted from mutations in the HSD3B2 gene that impair steroidogenesis in both adrenals and gonads. We report clinical features and the results of HSD3B2 gene analysis of a Chinese pubertal girl with salt wasting 3βHSD deficiency. We retrospectively reviewed clinical presentations and steroid profiles of the patient diagnosed in Guangzhou Women and Children's Medical Center in 2013. PCR and direct sequencing were used to identify any mutation in the HSD3B2 gene. A 13-year-old girl was diagnosed as CAH after birth because of salt-wasting with mild clitorimegaly and then was treated with glucocorticoid replacement. Breast and pubic hair development were normal, and menarche occurred at 12 yr, followed by menstrual bleeding about every 45 days. In the last one year laparoscopic operation and ovariocentesis were performed one after another for recurrent ovary cysts. Under corticoid acetate therapy, ACTH 17.10 pmol/L (normal 0-10.12), testosterone 1.31 nmol/L (normal T (p.E25X) was identified in HSD3B2 gene. The girl was homozygous and her mother was heterozygous, while her father was not identified with this mutation. A classic 3βHSD deficiency is characterized by salt wasting and mild virilization in female. Ovary cysts may be the one of features of gonad phenotype indicating ovary 3βHSD deficiency. A novel homozygous mutation c.73G >T(p.E25X) was related to the classical phenotype.

  14. Similarities and discrepancies in homozygous factor VII defects due to mutations in the region of residues Met298 to Cys310 (exon 8) in the catalytic domain of factor VII.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Girolami, A; Berti de Marinis, G; Bonamigo, E; Vettore, S

    2011-06-01

    Patients with the Arg304Gln mutation in factor VII Padua (FVII Padua) show discrepant activity levels that depend on the thromboplastin used in the assay system. This report investigates the possibility that residues close to Arg304 (exon 8) show the same discrepant behavior. All available homozygous patients with a mutation in a 13-residue region (preceding and following Arg304) have been evaluated. Only the Arg304Trp mutation showed a discrepancy similar to that shown by the Arg304Gln mutation. Other homozygotes failed to show differences, despite their all being positive for cross-reacting material. Another FVII amino acid residue involved in tissue factor binding and activation is Arg79 (exon 4). No comparison could be carried out because no homozygotes for deficiency in this region have ever been described. The relationship between these 2 residues involved in tissue factor binding and activation has not yet been completely clarified; however, Arg residues 79 and 304 are the only 2 residues definitely shown thus far to be involved in this important function.

  15. Life-long course and molecular characterization of the original Dutch family with epidermolysis bullosa simplex with muscular dystrophy due to a homozygous novel plectin point mutation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Koss-Harnes, D; Hoyheim, B; Jonkman, MF; De Groot, WP; De Weerdt, CJ; Nikolic, B; Wiche, G; Gedde-Dahl, T

    Plectin is one of the largest and most versatile cytolinker proteins known. Cloned and sequenced in 1991, it was later shown to have nonsense mutations in recessive epidermolysis bullosa with muscular dystrophy. A dominant mutation in the gene was found to cause epidermolysis bullosa simplex Ogna

  16. Comprehensive genomic profiling reveals inactivating SMARCA4 mutations and low tumor mutational burden in small cell carcinoma of the ovary, hypercalcemic-type.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Douglas I; Chudnovsky, Yakov; Duggan, Bridget; Zajchowski, Deborah; Greenbowe, Joel; Ross, Jeffrey S; Gay, Laurie M; Ali, Siraj M; Elvin, Julia A

    2017-12-01

    Small cell carcinoma of the ovary, hypercalcemic-type (SCCOHT) is a rare, extremely aggressive neoplasm that usually occurs in young women and is characterized by deleterious germline or somatic SMARCA4 mutations. We performed comprehensive genomic profiling (CGP) to potentially identify additional clinically and pathophysiologically relevant genomic alterations in SCCOHT. CGP assessment of all classes of coding alterations in up to 406 genes commonly altered in cancer and intronic regions for up to 31 genes commonly rearranged in cancer was performed on 18 SCCOHT cases (16 exhibiting classic morphology and 2 cases exhibiting exclusive a large cell variant morphology). In addition, a retrospective database search for clinically advanced ovarian tumors with genomic profiles similar to SCCOHT yielded 3 additional cases originally diagnosed as non-SCCOHT. CGP revealed inactivating SMARCA4 alterations and low tumor mutational burden (TMB) (<6mutations/Mb) in 94% (15/16) of SCCOHT with classic morphology. In contrast, both (2/2) cases exhibiting only large cell variant morphology were hypermutated (TMB scores of 90 and 360mut/Mb) and were wildtype for SMARCA4. In our retrospective search, an index ovarian cancer patient harboring inactivating SMARCA4 alterations, initially diagnosed as endometrioid carcinoma, was re-classified as SCCOHT and responded to an SCCOHT chemotherapy regimen. The vast majority of SCCOHT demonstrate genomic SMARCA4 loss with only rare co-occurring alterations. Our data support a role for CGP in the diagnosis and management of SCCOHT and of other lesions with overlapping histological and clinical features, since identifying the former by genomic profile suggests benefit from an appropriate regimen and treatment decisions, as illustrated by an index patient. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. A novel homozygous no-stop mutation in G6PC gene from a Chinese patient with glycogen storage disease type Ia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gu, Lei-Lei; Li, Xin-Hua; Han, Yue; Zhang, Dong-Hua; Gong, Qi-Ming; Zhang, Xin-Xin

    2014-02-25

    Glycogen storage disease type Ia (GSD-Ia) is an autosomal recessive genetic disorder resulting in hypoglycemia, hepatomegaly and growth retardation. It is caused by mutations in the G6PC gene encoding Glucose-6-phosphatase. To date, over 80 mutations have been identified in the G6PC gene. Here we reported a novel mutation found in a Chinese patient with abnormal transaminases, hypoglycemia, hepatomegaly and short stature. Direct sequencing of the coding region and splicing-sites in the G6PC gene revealed a novel no-stop mutation, p.*358Yext*43, leading to a 43 amino-acid extension of G6Pase. The expression level of mutant G6Pase transcripts was only 7.8% relative to wild-type transcripts. This mutation was not found in 120 chromosomes from 60 unrelated healthy control subjects using direct sequencing, and was further confirmed by digestion with Rsa I restriction endonuclease. In conclusion, we revealed a novel no-stop mutation in this study which expands the spectrum of mutations in the G6PC gene. The molecular genetic analysis was indispensable to the diagnosis of GSD-Ia for the patient. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. Novel biallelic mutations in MSH6 and PMS2 genes: gene conversion as a likely cause of PMS2 gene inactivation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Auclair, Jessie; Leroux, Dominique; Desseigne, Françoise; Lasset, Christine; Saurin, Jean Christophe; Joly, Marie Odile; Pinson, Stéphane; Xu, Xiao Li; Montmain, Gilles; Ruano, Eric; Navarro, Claudine; Puisieux, Alain; Wang, Qing

    2007-11-01

    Since the first report by our group in 1999, more than 20 unrelated biallelic mutations in DNA mismatch repair genes (MMR) have been identified. In the present report, we describe two novel cases: one carrying compound heterozygous mutations in the MSH6 gene; and the other, compound heterozygous mutations in the PMS2 gene. Interestingly, the inactivation of one PMS2 allele was likely caused by gene conversion. Although gene conversion has been suggested to be a mutation mechanism underlying PMS2 inactivation, this is the first report of its involvement in a pathogenic mutation. The clinical features of biallelic mutation carriers were similar to other previously described patients, with the presence of café-au-lait spots (CALS), early onset of brain tumors, and colorectal neoplasia. Our data provide further evidence of the existence, although rare, of a distinct recessively inherited syndrome on the basis of MMR constitutional inactivation. The identification of this syndrome should be useful for genetic counseling, especially in families with atypical hereditary nonpolyposis colon cancer (HNPCC) associated with childhood cancers, and for the clinical surveillance of these mutation carriers. 2007 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  19. Inactivating Mutation screening of Exon 6 and Exon 10E of FSHR gene in women with Polycystic Ovarian Syndrome in Vellore population

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sekar, Nishu; Sapre, Madhura; Kale, Vaikhari; Prabhu, Yogamaya D.; Renu, Kaviyarasi; Ramgir, Shalaka S.; Abilash, V. G.

    2017-11-01

    Polycystic Ovarian syndrome (PCOS) is a major cause of infertility in females of reproducing age and is typified by oligo-anovulation, hyperandrogenism, hirsutism and polycystic ovaries. FSHR gene located on chromosome 2 p21 is responsible for the normal follicular development and any deletion or mutation in the gene affects the interaction of FSH with its receptor. Thus, it becomes the candidate gene for PCOS study. Inactivating mutation in FSHR gene limits the receptor’s function by creating a complete block, changing the receptor-ligand complex or the basic hormone signal transduction.To screen the inactivating mutations in Exon 6 and Exon 10E of FSHR gene in women diagnosed with PCOS.PCR-RFLP analysis indicated that there were no inactivating mutations found in Exon 6 and Exon 10E. Variations in hormone levels were seen amongst the PCOS patients. There were no inactivating mutations found in FSHR gene of the women diagnosed with PCOS according to the Rotterdam criteria in Vellore population.

  20. Sex-related hearing impairment in Wolfram syndrome patients identified by inactivating WFS1 mutations

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pennings, RJE; Huygen, PLM; van den Ouweland, JMW; Cryns, K; Dikkeschei, LD; Van Camp, G; Cremers, CWRJ

    2004-01-01

    This study examined the audiovestibular profile of 11 Wolfram syndrome patients (4 males, 7 females) from 7 families, with identified WFS1 mutations, and the audiometric profile of 17 related heterozygous carriers of WFS1 mutations. Patients with Wolfram syndrome showed a downsloping audiogram and

  1. Sex-related hearing impairment in Wolfram syndrome patients identified by inactivating WFS1 mutations.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pennings, R.J.E.; Huygen, P.L.M.; Ouweland, J.M.W. van den; Cryns, K.; Dikkeschei, L.D.; Camp, G. van; Cremers, C.W.R.J.

    2004-01-01

    This study examined the audiovestibular profile of 11 Wolfram syndrome patients (4 males, 7 females) from 7 families, with identified WFS1 mutations, and the audiometric profile of 17 related heterozygous carriers of WFS1 mutations. Patients with Wolfram syndrome showed a downsloping audiogram and

  2. Homozygous germ-line mutation of the PMS2 mismatch repair gene: a unique case report of constitutional mismatch repair deficiency (CMMRD)

    OpenAIRE

    Ramchander, N. C.; Ryan, N. A. J.; Crosbie, E. J.; Evans, D. G.

    2017-01-01

    BackgroundConstitutional mismatch repair deficiency syndrome results from bi-allelic inheritance of mutations affecting the key DNA mismatch repair genes: MLH1, MSH2, MSH6 or PMS2. Individuals with bi-allelic mutations have a dysfunctional mismatch repair system from birth; as a result, constitutional mismatch repair deficiency syndrome is characterised by early onset malignancies. Fewer than 150 cases have been reported in the literature over the past 20 years. This is the first report of th...

  3. Mutations of the catalytic subunit of RAB3GAP cause Warburg Micro syndrome

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Aligianis, Irene A; Johnson, Colin A; Gissen, Paul

    2005-01-01

    Warburg Micro syndrome (WARBM1) is a severe autosomal recessive disorder characterized by developmental abnormalities of the eye and central nervous system and by microgenitalia. We identified homozygous inactivating mutations in RAB3GAP, encoding RAB3 GTPase activating protein, a key regulator...

  4. To Screen Inactivation Mutation of Exon 1 of FSHR Gene in Polycystic Ovarian Syndrome: A South Indian Cohort Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sekar, Nishu; Yeole, Samiksha; Pradeep, Rashmi; Prabhu, Yogamaya D.; Renu, Kaviyarasi; Ramgir, Shalaka S.; Abilash, V. G.

    2017-11-01

    Polycystic ovary syndrome is an endocrine disorder. Irregular menstrual cycle, acne, facial hair and elevated androgen levels are the most common signs for PCOS. PCOS has an estimated prevalence of 4-12% among reproductive age women, thus making it a forerunner in female infertility. FSHR plays an important role in FSH signaling pathway making it an important gene for PCOS. In this study, we aim to focus on any association between the FSHR gene and PCOS. Our study was to evaluate any polymorphism of exon 1 of FSHR gene associated with PCOS.PCR-RFLP technique was performed on the PCOS samples. Hormonal changes were found in the patients. Exon 1 inactivation mutation of FSHR gene was not observed in the patient sample. A study of this association needs to be done using large sample size.

  5. Generation of a human induced pluripotent stem cell line via CRISPR-Cas9 mediated integration of a site-specific homozygous mutation in CHMP2B

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yu Zhang

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Frontotemporal dementia (FTD is an early onset neurodegenerative disease. Mutations in several genes cause familial FTD and one of them is charged multivesicular body protein 2B (CHMP2B on chromosome 3 (FTD3, a component of the endosomal sorting complex required for transport III (ESCRT-III. We have generated an induced pluripotent stem cell (iPSC line of a healthy individual and inserted the CHMP2B IVS5AS G-C gene mutation into both alleles, resulting in aberrant splicing. This human iPSC line provides an ideal model to study CHMP2B-dependent phenotypes of FTD3.

  6. Association of Exon 10A and 10B inactivating mutation of follicle stimulating hormone receptor gene (FSHR) and Polycystic Ovarian Syndrome in Vellore cohort

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sekar, Nishu; Kulkarni, Rucha; Ozalkar, Sharvari; Prabhu, Yogamaya D.; Renu, Kaviyarasi; Ramgir, Shalaka S.; Abilash, V. G.

    2017-11-01

    Polycystic ovarian syndrome is the most common heterogenous endocrine disorder in women. Follicle stimulating hormone receptor is associated with normal development as well as maturation of follicles and triggers estrogen production in granulosa cells of the ovary. Inactivating mutation in FSHR gene correlated with reduction of ovarian function in women is due to damage to receptor function. This study aims to investigate whether inactivating mutations, in follicle stimulating hormone receptor gene is related to polycystic ovarian morphology in women with PCOS. Genomic DNA isolated from 15 subjects from Sandhya Hospital, Vellore (10 patients with PCOS and 5 healthy controls) was taken for this study. Patient data included a clinical report, hormonal levels, and ovarian morphological details. DNA isolation was followed by DNA amplification by polymerase chain reaction using Exon 10 A and Exon 10 B primers. The PCR-RFLP analysis was performed using Dde1 restriction enzyme. Here we discuss inactivating mutation found in Exon 10 of FSHR gene in patients with PCOS.The absence of inactivating mutation was observed through PCR-RFLP study on Exon 10A and Exon 10B.

  7. Generation of a human induced pluripotent stem cell line via CRISPR-Cas9 mediated integration of a site-specific homozygous mutation in CHMP2B

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zhang, Yu; Schmid, Benjamin; Nielsen, Troels T.

    2016-01-01

    Frontotemporal dementia (FTD) is an early onset neurodegenerative disease. Mutations in several genes cause familial FTD and one of them is charged multivesicular body protein 2B (CHMP2B) on chromosome 3 (FTD3), a component of the endosomal sorting complex required for transport III (ESCRT-III). ...

  8. Nuclear envelope alterations in fibroblasts from LGMD1B patients carrying nonsense Y259X heterozygous or homozygous mutation in lamin A/C gene.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Muchir, A.; Engelen, B.G.M. van; Lammens, M.M.Y.; Mislow, J.M.; McNally, E.; Schwartz, K.; Bonne, G.

    2003-01-01

    Mutations in the LMNA gene encoding nuclear lamins A and C are responsible for seven inherited disorders affecting specific tissues. We have analyzed skin fibroblasts from a patient with type 1B limb-girdle muscular dystrophy and from her deceased newborn grandchild carrying, respectively, a

  9. Homozygous Familial Hypercholesterolemia Patients With Identical Mutations Variably Express the LDLR (Low-Density Lipoprotein Receptor): Implications for the Efficacy of Evolocumab.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thedrez, Aurélie; Blom, Dirk J; Ramin-Mangata, Stéphane; Blanchard, Valentin; Croyal, Mikaël; Chemello, Kévin; Nativel, Brice; Pichelin, Matthieu; Cariou, Bertrand; Bourane, Steeve; Tang, Lihua; Farnier, Michel; Raal, Frederick J; Lambert, Gilles

    2018-03-01

    Evolocumab, a PCSK9 (proprotein convertase subtilisin kexin type 9)-neutralizing antibody, lowers low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C) in homozygous familial hypercholesterolemic (HoFH) patients with reduced LDLR (low-density lipoprotein receptor) function. However, their individual responses are highly variable, even among carriers of identical LDLR genetic defects. We aimed to elucidate why HoFH patients variably respond to PCSK9 inhibition. Lymphocytes were isolated from 22 HoFH patients enrolled in the TAUSSIG trial (Trial Assessing Long Term Use of PCSK9 Inhibition in Subjects With Genetic LDL Disorders). Ten patients were true homozygotes (FH1/FH1) and 5 identical compound heterozygotes (FH1/FH2). Lymphocytes were plated with or without mevastatin, recombinant PCSK9 (rPCSK9), or a PCSK9-neutralizing antibody. Cell surface LDLR expression was analyzed by flow cytometry. All HoFH lymphocytes had reduced cell surface LDLR expression compared with non-FH lymphocytes, for each treatment modality. Lymphocytes from FH1/FH2 patients (LDLR defective/negative) displayed the lowest LDLR expression levels followed by lymphocytes from FH1/FH1 patients (defective/defective). Mevastatin increased, whereas rPCSK9 reduced LDLR expression. The PCSK9-neutralizing antibody restored LDLR expression. Lymphocytes displaying higher LDLR expression levels were those isolated from patients presenting with lowest levels of LDL-C and apolipoprotein B, before and after 24 weeks of evolocumab treatment. These negative correlations remained significant in FH1/FH1 patients and appeared more pronounced when patients with apolipoprotein E3/E3 genotypes were analyzed separately. Significant positive correlations were found between the levels of LDLR expression and the percentage reduction in LDL-C on evolocumab treatment. Residual LDLR expression in HoFH is a major determinant of LDL-C levels and seems to drive their individual response to evolocumab. © 2017 American Heart Association

  10. Whole-exome sequencing identified a homozygous FNBP4 mutation in a family with a condition similar to microphthalmia with limb anomalies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kondo, Yukiko; Koshimizu, Eriko; Megarbane, Andre; Hamanoue, Haruka; Okada, Ippei; Nishiyama, Kiyomi; Kodera, Hirofumi; Miyatake, Satoko; Tsurusaki, Yoshinori; Nakashima, Mitsuko; Doi, Hiroshi; Miyake, Noriko; Saitsu, Hirotomo; Matsumoto, Naomichi

    2013-07-01

    Microphthalmia with limb anomalies (MLA), also known as Waardenburg anophthalmia syndrome or ophthalmoacromelic syndrome, is a rare autosomal recessive disorder. Recently, we and others successfully identified SMOC1 as the causative gene for MLA. However, there are several MLA families without SMOC1 abnormality, suggesting locus heterogeneity in MLA. We aimed to identify a pathogenic mutation in one Lebanese family having an MLA-like condition without SMOC1 mutation by whole-exome sequencing (WES) combined with homozygosity mapping. A c.683C>T (p.Thr228Met) in FNBP4 was found as a primary candidate, drawing the attention that FNBP4 and SMOC1 may potentially modulate BMP signaling. Copyright © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  11. [The audiological analysis in the patients homozygous for the c.-23+1G>A mutation in the GJB2 gene presenting with the loss of hearing in Yakutiya].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teryutin, F M; Barashkov, N A; Kunel'skaya, N L; Pshennikova, V G; Solov'ev, A V

    2016-01-01

    In the course of previous investigations carried out in the Republic of Sakha (Yakutiya), we have identified the main molecular-genetic factor responsible for the hereditary impairment of hearing among the indigenous population (mostly the Yakuts).The disease was shown to be attributable to the c.-23+1G>A mutation localized in the splice donor site (exon 1) of the GJB2 (Cx26) gene. The present study involved the comprehensive audiological analysis of the patients homozygous for the c.-23+1G>A mutation in the GJB2 gene based on the results of the study of a large sample of the patients residing in Yakutiya. All individuals with the GJB2 genotype c.-23+1G>A/c.-23-1G>A (n=108) at the mean age of 14.32±4.7 years (all ethnic Yakuts)were examined with the use oftonal threshold audiometry for air conduction testing at the frequencies of 0.25, 0.5, 1.0, 2.0, 4.0, and 8.0 kHz and bone conduction testing at the frequencies of 0.25, 0.5, 1.0, and 4.0 with a step of 5.0 dB.The results of the ASSR test were used whenever tonal threshold audiometry proved impracticable The data obtained in the study characterize the allelic form of the disease associated with the GJB2 genotype c.-23+1G>A/c.-23-1G>A as the congenital bilateral symmetric (90.1%), sensorineural (90.1%) form of hearing impairment of variable severity (from grade 1 to complete deafness) with the «flat» audiological profile (median slope not more than 5.0 dB in the extended frequency range (EFR) of 0.5, 1.0, 2.0, and 4.0, kHz). It is concluded that the results of the audiological analysis performed in the present study give evidence of relatively homogeneous but variable in terms of severity impairment of hearing in the patients homozygous for the c.-23+1G>A mutation in the GJB2 (Cx26) gene. It may serve as a positive prognostic sign to be used in the development and prescription of hearing aids.

  12. Germ-line mutations of the p53 tumor suppressor gene in patients with high risk for cancer inactivate the p53 protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frebourg, T; Kassel, J; Lam, K T; Gryka, M A; Barbier, N; Andersen, T I; Børresen, A L; Friend, S H

    1992-07-15

    Germ-line mutations in the p53 tumor suppressor gene have been observed in patients with Li-Fraumeni syndrome, brain tumors, second malignancies, and breast cancers. It is unclear whether all of these mutations have inactivated p53 and thereby provide an increased risk for cancer. Therefore, it is necessary to establish the biological significance of these germ-line mutations by the functional and structural analysis of the resulting mutant p53 proteins. We analyzed the ability of seven germ-line mutant proteins observed in patients with Li-Fraumeni syndrome, second primary neoplasms, or familial breast cancer to block the growth of malignant cells and compared the structural properties of the mutant proteins to that of the wild-type protein. Six of seven missense mutations disrupted the growth inhibitory properties and structure of the wild-type protein. One germ-line mutation retained the features of the wild-type p53. Genetic analysis of the breast cancer family in which this mutation was observed indicated that this germ-line mutation was not associated with the development of cancer. These results demonstrate that germ-line p53 mutations observed in patients with Li-Fraumeni syndrome and with second malignancies have inactivated the p53 tumor suppressor gene. The inability of the germ-line p53 mutants to block the growth of malignant cells can explain why patients with these germ-line mutations have an increased risk for cancer. The observation of a functionally silent germ-line mutation indicates that, before associating a germ-line tumor suppressor gene mutation with cancer risk, it is prudent to consider its functional significance.

  13. Germ-line mutations of the p53 tumor suppressor gene in patients with high risk for cancer inactivate the p53 protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frebourg, T; Kassel, J; Lam, K T; Gryka, M A; Barbier, N; Andersen, T I; Børresen, A L; Friend, S H

    1992-01-01

    Germ-line mutations in the p53 tumor suppressor gene have been observed in patients with Li-Fraumeni syndrome, brain tumors, second malignancies, and breast cancers. It is unclear whether all of these mutations have inactivated p53 and thereby provide an increased risk for cancer. Therefore, it is necessary to establish the biological significance of these germ-line mutations by the functional and structural analysis of the resulting mutant p53 proteins. We analyzed the ability of seven germ-line mutant proteins observed in patients with Li-Fraumeni syndrome, second primary neoplasms, or familial breast cancer to block the growth of malignant cells and compared the structural properties of the mutant proteins to that of the wild-type protein. Six of seven missense mutations disrupted the growth inhibitory properties and structure of the wild-type protein. One germ-line mutation retained the features of the wild-type p53. Genetic analysis of the breast cancer family in which this mutation was observed indicated that this germ-line mutation was not associated with the development of cancer. These results demonstrate that germ-line p53 mutations observed in patients with Li-Fraumeni syndrome and with second malignancies have inactivated the p53 tumor suppressor gene. The inability of the germ-line p53 mutants to block the growth of malignant cells can explain why patients with these germ-line mutations have an increased risk for cancer. The observation of a functionally silent germ-line mutation indicates that, before associating a germ-line tumor suppressor gene mutation with cancer risk, it is prudent to consider its functional significance. Images PMID:1631137

  14. Homozygous germ-line mutation of the PMS2 mismatch repair gene: a unique case report of constitutional mismatch repair deficiency (CMMRD).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramchander, N C; Ryan, N A J; Crosbie, E J; Evans, D G

    2017-04-05

    Constitutional mismatch repair deficiency syndrome results from bi-allelic inheritance of mutations affecting the key DNA mismatch repair genes: MLH1, MSH2, MSH6 or PMS2. Individuals with bi-allelic mutations have a dysfunctional mismatch repair system from birth; as a result, constitutional mismatch repair deficiency syndrome is characterised by early onset malignancies. Fewer than 150 cases have been reported in the literature over the past 20 years. This is the first report of the founder PMS2 mutation - NM_000535.5:c.1500del (p.Val501TrpfsTer94) in exon 11 and its associated cancers in this family. The proband is 30 years old and is alive today. She is of Pakistani ethnic origin and a product of consanguinity. She initially presented aged 24 with painless bleeding per-rectum from colorectal polyps and was referred to clinical genetics. Clinical examination revealed two café-au-lait lesions, lichen planus, and a dermoid cyst. Her sister had been diagnosed in childhood with an aggressive brain tumour followed by colorectal cancer. During follow up, the proband developed 37 colorectal adenomatous polyps, synchronous ovarian and endometrial adenocarcinomas, and ultimately a metachronous gastric adenocarcinoma. DNA sequencing of peripheral lymphocytes revealed a bi-allelic inheritance of the PMS2 mutation NM_000535.5:c.1500del (p.Val501TrpfsTer94) in exon 11. Ovarian tumour tissue demonstrated low microsatellite instability. To date, she has had a total abdominal hysterectomy, bilateral salpingo-oophorectomy, and a total gastrectomy. Aspirin and oestrogen-only hormone replacement therapy provide some chemoprophylaxis and manage postmenopausal symptoms, respectively. An 18-monthly colonoscopy surveillance programme has led to the excision of three high-grade dysplastic colorectal tubular adenomatous polyps. The proband's family pedigree displays multiple relatives with cancers including a likely case of 'true' Turcot syndrome. Constitutional mismatch repair

  15. Immuno-inhibitory PD-L1 can be induced by a peptidoglycan/NOD2 mediated pathway in primary monocytic cells and is deficient in Crohn's patients with homozygous NOD2 mutations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hewitt, Rachel E; Pele, Laetitia C; Tremelling, Mark; Metz, Andrew; Parkes, Miles; Powell, Jonathan J

    2012-05-01

    Peptidoglycan (PGN) is a ubiquitous bacterial membrane product that, despite its well known pro-inflammatory properties, has also been invoked in immuno-tolerance of the gastrointestinal tract. PGN-induced mucosal IL-10 secretion and downregulation of Toll like receptors are potential mechanisms of action in the gut but there are few data on tolerogenic adaptive immune responses and PGN. Here, using blood-derived mononuclear cells, we showed that PGN induced marked cell surface expression of PD-L1 but not PD-L2 or CD80/CD86, and specifically in the CD14(+) monocytic fraction. This was reproduced at the gene level with rapid induction (<4 h) and, unlike for LPS stimulation, was still sustained at 24 h. Using transfected and native muramyl dipeptide (MDP), which is a cleavage product of PGN and a specific NOD2 agonist, in assays with wild type cells or those from patients with Crohn's disease carrying the Leu1007 frameshift mutation of NOD2, we showed that (i) both NOD2 dependent and independent signalling (appearing TLR2 mediated) occurred for PGN upregulation of PD-L1 (ii) upregulation is lost in response to MDP in patients with the homozygous mutation and (iii) PD-L1 upregulation was unaffected in patients with heterozygous mutations as previously reported for cytokine responses to MDP. The uptake of PGN and its cleavage products by the intestinal mucosa is well recognised and further work should consider PD-L1 upregulation as one potential mechanism of the commensal flora-driven intestinal immuno-tolerance. Indeed, recent work has shown that loss of PD-L1 signalling in the gut breaks CD8(+) T cell tolerance to self antigen and leads to severe autoimmune enteritis. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Truncating Homozygous Mutation of Carboxypeptidase E (CPE in a Morbidly Obese Female with Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus, Intellectual Disability and Hypogonadotrophic Hypogonadism.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Suzanne I M Alsters

    Full Text Available Carboxypeptidase E is a peptide processing enzyme, involved in cleaving numerous peptide precursors, including neuropeptides and hormones involved in appetite control and glucose metabolism. Exome sequencing of a morbidly obese female from a consanguineous family revealed homozygosity for a truncating mutation of the CPE gene (c.76_98del; p.E26RfsX68. Analysis detected no CPE expression in whole blood-derived RNA from the proband, consistent with nonsense-mediated decay. The morbid obesity, intellectual disability, abnormal glucose homeostasis and hypogonadotrophic hypogonadism seen in this individual recapitulates phenotypes in the previously described fat/fat and Cpe knockout mouse models, evidencing the importance of this peptide/hormone-processing enzyme in regulating body weight, metabolism, and brain and reproductive function in humans.

  17. Mutation in the protease cleavage site of GDF9 increases ovulation rate and litter size in heterozygous ewes and causes infertility in homozygous ewes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Souza, C J H; McNeilly, A S; Benavides, M V; Melo, E O; Moraes, J C F

    2014-10-01

    Litter size (LS) in sheep is determined mainly by ovulation rate (OR). Several polymorphisms have been identified in the growth differentiation factor 9 (GDF9) gene that result in an increase in OR and prolificacy of sheep. Screening the databank of the Brazilian Sheep Breeders Association for triplet delivery, we identified flocks of prolific Ile de France ewes. After resequencing of GDF9, a point mutation (c.943C>T) was identified, resulting in a non-conservative amino acid change (p.Arg315Cys) in the cleavage site of the propeptide. This new allele was called Vacaria (FecG(v) ). A flock of half-sib ewes was evaluated for OR in the first three breeding seasons, and Vacaria heterozygotes had higher OR (P develop up to small antral stages, although with abnormal oocyte morphology and altered arrangement of granulosa cells. After the collapse of the oocyte in most follicles, the remaining cells formed clusters that persisted in the ovary. This SNP is useful to improve selection for dam prolificacy and also as a model to investigate GDF9 post-translation processing and the fate of the follicular cells that remain after the oocyte demise. © 2014 Stichting International Foundation for Animal Genetics.

  18. Depolarized inactivation overcomes impaired activation to produce DRG neuron hyperexcitability in a Nav1.7 mutation in a patient with distal limb pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Jianying; Yang, Yang; Dib-Hajj, Sulayman D; van Es, Michael; Zhao, Peng; Salomon, Jody; Drenth, Joost P H; Waxman, Stephen G

    2014-09-10

    Sodium channel Nav1.7, encoded by SCN9A, is expressed in DRG neurons and regulates their excitability. Genetic and functional studies have established a critical contribution of Nav1.7 to human pain disorders. We have now characterized a novel Nav1.7 mutation (R1279P) from a female human subject with distal limb pain, in which depolarized fast inactivation overrides impaired activation to produce hyperexcitability and spontaneous firing in DRG neurons. Whole-cell voltage-clamp recordings in human embryonic kidney (HEK) 293 cells demonstrated that R1279P significantly depolarizes steady-state fast-, slow-, and closed-state inactivation. It accelerates deactivation, decelerates inactivation, and facilitates repriming. The mutation increases ramp currents in response to slow depolarizations. Our voltage-clamp analysis showed that R1279P depolarizes channel activation, a change that was supported by our multistate structural modeling. Because this mutation confers both gain-of-function and loss-of-function attributes on the Nav1.7 channel, we tested the impact of R1279P expression on DRG neuron excitability. Current-clamp studies reveal that R1279P depolarizes resting membrane potential, decreases current threshold, and increases firing frequency of evoked action potentials within small DRG neurons. The populations of spontaneously firing and repetitively firing neurons were increased by expressing R1279P. These observations indicate that the dominant proexcitatory gating changes associated with this mutation, including depolarized steady-state fast-, slow-, and closed-state inactivation, faster repriming, and larger ramp currents, override the depolarizing shift of activation, to produce hyperexcitability and spontaneous firing of nociceptive neurons that underlie pain. Copyright © 2014 the authors 0270-6474/14/3412328-13$15.00/0.

  19. Oral manifestations, dental management, and a rare homozygous mutation of the PRDM12 gene in a boy with hereditary sensory and autonomic neuropathy type VIII: a case report and review of the literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elhennawy, Karim; Reda, Seif; Finke, Christian; Graul-Neumann, Luitgard; Jost-Brinkmann, Paul-Georg; Bartzela, Theodosia

    2017-08-15

    Hereditary sensory and autonomic neuropathy type VIII is a rare autosomal recessive inherited disorder. Chen et al. recently identified the causative gene and characterized biallelic mutations in the PR domain-containing protein 12 gene, which plays a role in the development of pain-sensing nerve cells. Our patient's family was included in Chen and colleagues' study. We performed a literature review of the PubMed library (January 1985 to December 2016) on hereditary sensory and autonomic neuropathy type I to VIII genetic disorders and their orofacial manifestations. This case report is the first to describe the oral manifestations, and their treatment, of the recently discovered hereditary sensory and autonomic neuropathy type VIII in the medical and dental literature. We report on the oral manifestations and dental management of an 8-month-old white boy with hereditary sensory and autonomic neuropathy-VIII over a period of 16 years. Our patient was homozygous for a mutation of PR domain-containing protein 12 gene and was characterized by insensitivity to pain and thermal stimuli, self-mutilation behavior, reduced sweat and tear production, absence of corneal reflexes, and multiple skin and bone infections. Oral manifestations included premature loss of teeth, associated with dental traumata and self-mutilation, severe soft tissue injuries, dental caries and submucosal abscesses, hypomineralization of primary teeth, and mandibular osteomyelitis. The lack of scientific knowledge on hereditary sensory and autonomic neuropathy due to the rarity of the disease often results in a delay in diagnosis, which is of substantial importance for the prevention of many complications and symptoms. Interdisciplinary work of specialized medical and dental teams and development of a standardized treatment protocols are essential for the management of the disease. There are many knowledge gaps concerning the management of patients with hereditary sensory and autonomic neuropathy

  20. Homozygous familial hypercholesterolaemia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cuchel, Marina; Bruckert, Eric; Ginsberg, Henry N

    2014-01-01

    AIMS: Homozygous familial hypercholesterolaemia (HoFH) is a rare life-threatening condition characterized by markedly elevated circulating levels of low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C) and accelerated, premature atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease (ACVD). Given recent insights into the......AIMS: Homozygous familial hypercholesterolaemia (HoFH) is a rare life-threatening condition characterized by markedly elevated circulating levels of low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C) and accelerated, premature atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease (ACVD). Given recent insights...... into the heterogeneity of genetic defects and clinical phenotype of HoFH, and the availability of new therapeutic options, this Consensus Panel on Familial Hypercholesterolaemia of the European Atherosclerosis Society (EAS) critically reviewed available data with the aim of providing clinical guidance...... 5 and no later than 8 years. The number of therapeutic approaches has increased following approval of lomitapide and mipomersen for HoFH. Given the severity of ACVD, we recommend regular follow-up, including Doppler echocardiographic evaluation of the heart and aorta annually, stress testing and...

  1. Next generation sequencing of Cytokeratin 20-negative Merkel cell carcinoma reveals ultraviolet-signature mutations and recurrent TP53 and RB1 inactivation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harms, Paul W; Collie, Angela M B; Hovelson, Daniel H; Cani, Andi K; Verhaegen, Monique E; Patel, Rajiv M; Fullen, Douglas R; Omata, Kei; Dlugosz, Andrzej A; Tomlins, Scott A; Billings, Steven D

    2016-03-01

    Merkel cell carcinoma is a rare but highly aggressive cutaneous neuroendocrine carcinoma. Cytokeratin 20 (CK20) is expressed in ~95% of Merkel cell carcinomas and is useful for distinction from morphologically similar entities including metastatic small-cell lung carcinoma. Lack of CK20 expression may make diagnosis of Merkel cell carcinoma more challenging, and has unknown biological significance. Approximately 80% of CK20-positive Merkel cell carcinomas are associated with the oncogenic Merkel cell polyomavirus. Merkel cell carcinomas lacking Merkel cell polyomavirus display distinct genetic changes from Merkel cell polyomavirus-positive Merkel cell carcinoma, including RB1 inactivating mutations. Unlike CK20-positive Merkel cell carcinoma, the majority of CK20-negative Merkel cell carcinomas are Merkel cell polyomavirus-negative, suggesting CK20-negative Merkel cell carcinomas predominantly arise through virus-independent pathway(s) and may harbor additional genetic differences from conventional Merkel cell carcinoma. Hence, we analyzed 15 CK20-negative Merkel cell carcinoma tumors (10 Merkel cell polyomavirus-negative, four Merkel cell polyomavirus-positive, and one undetermined) using the Ion Ampliseq Comprehensive Cancer Panel, which assesses copy number alterations and mutations in 409 cancer-relevant genes. Twelve tumors displayed prioritized high-level chromosomal gains or losses (average 1.9 per tumor). Non-synonymous high-confidence somatic mutations were detected in 14 tumors (average 11.9 per tumor). Assessing all somatic coding mutations, an ultraviolet-signature mutational profile was present, and more prevalent in Merkel cell polyomavirus-negative tumors. Recurrent deleterious tumor suppressor mutations affected TP53 (9/15, 60%), RB1 (3/15, 20%), and BAP1 (2/15, 13%). Oncogenic activating mutations included PIK3CA (3/15, 20%), AKT1 (1/15, 7%) and EZH2 (1/15, 7%). In conclusion, CK20-negative Merkel cell carcinoma display overlapping genetic changes

  2. Next Generation Sequencing of Cytokeratin 20-Negative Merkel Cell Carcinoma Reveals Ultraviolet Signature Mutations and Recurrent TP53 and RB1 Inactivation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harms, Paul W.; Collie, Angela M. B.; Hovelson, Daniel H.; Cani, Andi K.; Verhaegen, Monique E.; Patel, Rajiv M.; Fullen, Douglas R.; Omata, Kei; Dlugosz, Andrzej A.; Tomlins, Scott A.; Billings, Steven D.

    2016-01-01

    Merkel cell carcinoma is a rare but highly aggressive cutaneous neuroendocrine carcinoma. Cytokeratin-20 (CK20) is expressed in approximately 95% of Merkel cell carcinomas and is useful for distinction from morphologically similar entities including metastatic small cell lung carcinoma. Lack of CK20 expression may make diagnosis of Merkel cell carcinoma more challenging, and has unknown biological significance. Approximately 80% of CK20-positive Merkel cell carcinomas are associated with the oncogenic Merkel cell polyomavirus. Merkel cell carcinomas lacking Merkel cell polyomavirus display distinct genetic changes from Merkel cell polyomavirus-positive Merkel cell carcinoma, including RB1 inactivating mutations. Unlike CK20-positive Merkel cell carcinoma, the majority of CK20-negative Merkel cell carcinomas are Merkel cell polyomavirus-negative, suggesting CK20-negative Merkel cell carcinomas predominantly arise through virus-independent pathway(s) and may harbor additional genetic differences from conventional Merkel cell carcinoma. Hence, we analyzed 15 CK20-negative Merkel cell carcinoma tumors (ten Merkel cell polyomavirus-negative, four Merkel cell polyomavirus-positive, and one undetermined) using the Ion Ampliseq Comprehensive Cancer Panel, which assesses copy number alterations and mutations in 409 cancer-relevant genes. Twelve tumors displayed prioritized high-level chromosomal gains or losses (average 1.9 per tumor). Non-synonymous high confidence somatic mutations were detected in 14 tumors (average 11.9 per tumor). Assessing all somatic coding mutations, an ultraviolet-signature mutational profile was present, and more prevalent in Merkel cell polyomavirus-negative tumors. Recurrent deleterious tumor suppressor mutations affected TP53 (9/15, 60%), RB1 (3/15, 20%), and BAP1 (2/15, 13%). Oncogenic activating mutations included PIK3CA (3/15, 20%), AKT1 (1/15, 7%)) and EZH2 (1/15, 7%). In conclusion, CK20-negative Merkel cell carcinoma display overlapping

  3. A Catalog of Genes Homozygously Deleted in Human Lung Cancer and the Candidacy of PTPRD as a Tumor Suppressor Gene

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kohno, Takashi; Otsuka, Ayaka; Girard, Luc; Sato, Masanori; Iwakawa, Reika; Ogiwara, Hideaki; Sanchez-Cespedes, Montse; Minna, John D.; Yokota, Jun

    2010-01-01

    A total of 176 genes homozygously deleted in human lung cancer were identified by DNA array-based whole genome scanning of 52 lung cancer cell lines and subsequent genomic PCR in 74 cell lines, including the 52 cell lines scanned. One or more exons of these genes were homozygously deleted in one (1%) to 20 (27%) cell lines. These genes included known tumor suppressor genes, e.g., CDKN2A/p16, RB1, and SMAD4, and candidate tumor suppressor genes whose hemizygous or homozygous deletions were reported in several types of human cancers, such as FHIT, KEAP1, and LRP1B/LRP-DIP. CDKN2A/p16 and p14ARF located in 9p21 were most frequently deleted (20/74, 27%). The PTPRD gene was most frequently deleted (8/74, 11%) among genes mapping to regions other than 9p21. Somatic mutations, including a nonsense mutation, of the PTPRD gene were detected in 8/74 (11%) of cell lines and 4/95 (4%) of surgical specimens of lung cancer. Reduced PTPRD expression was observed in the majority (>80%) of cell lines and surgical specimens of lung cancer. Therefore, PTPRD is a candidate tumor suppressor gene in lung cancer. Microarray-based expression profiling of 19 lung cancer cell lines also indicated that some of the 176 genes, such as KANK and ADAMTS1, are preferentially inactivated by epigenetic alterations. Genetic/epigenetic as well as functional studies of these 176 genes will increase our understanding of molecular mechanisms behind lung carcinogenesis. PMID:20073072

  4. The spectrum of ABCC8 mutations in Norwegian patients with congenital hyperinsulinism of infancy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sandal, T; Laborie, L B; Brusgaard, K

    2009-01-01

    and two families, respectively. KCNJ11 mutations were not found in any patients. Based on our mutation screening, we estimate the minimum birth prevalence of ABCC8-CHI in Norway to 1:70,000 during the past decade. Our results considerably extend the knowledge of the molecular genetics behind CHI...... channel KIR6.2, which are encoded by the genes ABCC8 and KCNJ11, respectively. Activating mutations in the subunit genes can result in monogenic diabetes, whereas inactivating mutations are the most common cause of congenital hyperinsulinism of infancy (CHI). Twenty-six Norwegian probands with CHI were...... analyzed for alterations in ABCC8 and KCNJ11. Fifteen probands (58%) had mutations in the ABCC8 gene. Nine patients were homozygous or compound heterozygous for the mutations, indicating diffuse pancreatic disease. In five patients, heterozygous and paternally inherited mutations were found, suggesting...

  5. SMARCA4 inactivating mutations cause concomitant Coffin–Siris syndrome, microphthalmia and small‐cell carcinoma of the ovary hypercalcaemic type

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mustafa, Noor; Vetro, Annalisa; Notarangelo, Lucia Dora; de Jonge, Hugo; Rinaldi, Berardo; Vergani, Debora; Giglio, Sabrina Rita; Morbini, Patrizia; Zuffardi, Orsetta

    2017-01-01

    Abstract SMARCA4 chromatin remodelling factor is mutated in 11% of Coffin–Siris syndrome (CSS) patients and in almost all small‐cell carcinoma of the ovary hypercalcaemic type (SCCOHT) tumours. Missense mutations with gain‐of‐function or dominant‐negative effects are associated with CSS, whereas inactivating mutations, leading to loss of SMARCA4 expression, have been exclusively found in SCCOHT. We applied whole‐exome sequencing to study a 15‐year‐old patient with mild CSS who concomitantly developed SCCOHT at age 13 years. Interestingly, our patient also showed congenital microphthalmia, which has never previously been reported in CSS patients. We detected a de novo germline heterozygous nonsense mutation in exon 19 of SMARCA4 (c.2935C > T;p.Arg979*), and a somatic frameshift mutation in exon 6 (c.1236_1236delC;p.Gln413Argfs*88), causing complete loss of SMARCA4 immunostaining in the tumour. The immunohistochemical findings are supported by the observation that the c.2935C > T mutant transcript was detected by reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction at a much lower level than the wild‐type allele in whole blood and the lymphoblastoid cell line of the proband, confirming nonsense‐mediated mRNA decay. Accordingly, immunoblotting demonstrated that there was approximately half the amount of SMARCA4 protein in the proband's cells as in controls. This study suggests that SMARCA4 constitutional mutations associated with CSS are not necessarily non‐truncating, and that haploinsufficiency may explain milder CSS phenotypes, as previously reported for haploinsufficient ARID1B. In addition, our case supports the dual role of chromatin remodellers in developmental disorders and cancer, as well as the involvement of SMARCA4 in microphthalmia, confirming previous findings in mouse models and the DECIPHER database. Finally, we speculate that mild CSS might be under‐recognized in a proportion of SCCOHT patients harbouring SMARCA4 mutations

  6. SMARCA4 inactivating mutations cause concomitant Coffin-Siris syndrome, microphthalmia and small-cell carcinoma of the ovary hypercalcaemic type.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Errichiello, Edoardo; Mustafa, Noor; Vetro, Annalisa; Notarangelo, Lucia Dora; de Jonge, Hugo; Rinaldi, Berardo; Vergani, Debora; Giglio, Sabrina Rita; Morbini, Patrizia; Zuffardi, Orsetta

    2017-09-01

    SMARCA4 chromatin remodelling factor is mutated in 11% of Coffin-Siris syndrome (CSS) patients and in almost all small-cell carcinoma of the ovary hypercalcaemic type (SCCOHT) tumours. Missense mutations with gain-of-function or dominant-negative effects are associated with CSS, whereas inactivating mutations, leading to loss of SMARCA4 expression, have been exclusively found in SCCOHT. We applied whole-exome sequencing to study a 15-year-old patient with mild CSS who concomitantly developed SCCOHT at age 13 years. Interestingly, our patient also showed congenital microphthalmia, which has never previously been reported in CSS patients. We detected a de novo germline heterozygous nonsense mutation in exon 19 of SMARCA4 (c.2935C > T;p.Arg979*), and a somatic frameshift mutation in exon 6 (c.1236_1236delC;p.Gln413Argfs*88), causing complete loss of SMARCA4 immunostaining in the tumour. The immunohistochemical findings are supported by the observation that the c.2935C > T mutant transcript was detected by reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction at a much lower level than the wild-type allele in whole blood and the lymphoblastoid cell line of the proband, confirming nonsense-mediated mRNA decay. Accordingly, immunoblotting demonstrated that there was approximately half the amount of SMARCA4 protein in the proband's cells as in controls. This study suggests that SMARCA4 constitutional mutations associated with CSS are not necessarily non-truncating, and that haploinsufficiency may explain milder CSS phenotypes, as previously reported for haploinsufficient ARID1B. In addition, our case supports the dual role of chromatin remodellers in developmental disorders and cancer, as well as the involvement of SMARCA4 in microphthalmia, confirming previous findings in mouse models and the DECIPHER database. Finally, we speculate that mild CSS might be under-recognized in a proportion of SCCOHT patients harbouring SMARCA4 mutations. © 2017 The Authors. The

  7. Independent inactivation of arginine decarboxylase genes by nonsense and missense mutations led to pseudogene formation in Chlamydia trachomatis serovar L2 and D strains

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Graham David E

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Chlamydia have reduced genomes that reflect their obligately parasitic lifestyle. Despite their different tissue tropisms, chlamydial strains share a large number of common genes and have few recognized pseudogenes, indicating genomic stability. All of the Chlamydiaceae have homologs of the aaxABC gene cluster that encodes a functional arginine:agmatine exchange system in Chlamydia (Chlamydophilapneumoniae. However, Chlamydia trachomatis serovar L2 strains have a nonsense mutation in their aaxB genes, and C. trachomatis serovar A and B strains have frameshift mutations in their aaxC homologs, suggesting that relaxed selection may have enabled the evolution of aax pseudogenes. Biochemical experiments were performed to determine whether the aaxABC genes from C. trachomatis strains were transcribed, and mutagenesis was used to identify nucleotide substitutions that prevent protein maturation and activity. Molecular evolution techniques were applied to determine the relaxation of selection and the scope of aax gene inactivation in the Chlamydiales. Results The aaxABC genes were co-transcribed in C. trachomatis L2/434, during the mid-late stage of cellular infection. However, a stop codon in the aaxB gene from this strain prevented the heterologous production of an active pyruvoyl-dependent arginine decarboxylase. Replacing that ochre codon with its ancestral tryptophan codon rescued the activity of this self-cleaving enzyme. The aaxB gene from C. trachomatis D/UW-3 was heterologously expressed as a proenzyme that failed to cleave and form the catalytic pyruvoyl cofactor. This inactive protein could be rescued by replacing the arginine-115 codon with an ancestral glycine codon. The aaxC gene from the D/UW-3 strain encoded an active arginine:agmatine antiporter protein, while the L2/434 homolog was unexpectedly inactive. Yet the frequencies of nonsynonymous versus synonymous nucleotide substitutions show no signs of relaxed

  8. Clinical Course of Homozygous Hemoglobin Constant Spring in Pediatric Patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Komvilaisak, Patcharee; Jetsrisuparb, Arunee; Fucharoen, Goonnapa; Komwilaisak, Ratana; Jirapradittha, Junya; Kiatchoosakun, Pakaphan

    2018-04-17

    Hemoglobin (Hb) Constant Spring is an alpha-globin gene variant due to a mutation of the stop codon resulting in the elongation of the encoded polypeptide from 141 to 172 amino acid residues. Patients with homozygous Hb Constant Spring are usually mildly anemic. We retrospectively describe clinical manifestations, diagnosis, laboratory investigations, treatment, and associated findings in pediatric patients with homozygous Hb Constant Spring followed-up at Srinagarind Hospital. Sixteen pediatric cases (5 males and 11 females) were diagnosed in utero (N=6) or postnatal (n=10). Eleven cases were diagnosed with homozygous Hb Constant Spring, 4 with homozygous Hb Constant Spring with heterozygous Hb E, and 1 with homozygous Hb Constant Spring with homozygous Hb E. Three cases were delivered preterm. Six patients had low birth weights. Clinical manifestations included fetal anemia in 6 cases, hepatomegaly in 1 case, hepatosplenomegaly in 2 cases, splenomegaly in 1 case. Twelve cases exhibited early neonatal jaundice, 9 of which required phototherapy. Six cases received red cell transfusions; 1 (3), >1 (3). After the first few months of life, almost all patients had mild microcytic hypochromic anemia and an increased reticulocyte count with a wide red cell distribution (RDW), but no longer required red cell transfusion. At 1 to 2 years of age, some patients still had mild microcytic hypochromic anemia and some had normocytic hypochromic anemia with Hb around 10 g/dL, increased reticulocyte count and wide RDW. Associated findings included hypothyroidism (2), congenital heart diseases (4), genitourinary abnormalities (3), gastrointestinal abnormalities (2), and developmental delay (1). Pediatric patients with homozygous Hb Constant Spring developed severe anemia in utero and up to the age of 2 to 3 months postnatal, requiring blood transfusions. Subsequently, their anemia was mild with no evidence of hepatosplenomegaly. Their Hb level was above 9 g/dL with hypochromic

  9. Analysis of Transcription Factors Key for Mouse Pancreatic Development Establishes NKX2-2 and MNX1 Mutations as Causes of Neonatal Diabetes in Man

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flanagan, Sarah E.; De Franco, Elisa; Lango Allen, Hana; Zerah, Michele; Abdul-Rasoul, Majedah M.; Edge, Julie A.; Stewart, Helen; Alamiri, Elham; Hussain, Khalid; Wallis, Sam; de Vries, Liat; Rubio-Cabezas, Oscar; Houghton, Jayne A.L.; Edghill, Emma L.; Patch, Ann-Marie; Ellard, Sian; Hattersley, Andrew T.

    2014-01-01

    Summary Understanding transcriptional regulation of pancreatic development is required to advance current efforts in developing beta cell replacement therapies for patients with diabetes. Current knowledge of key transcriptional regulators has predominantly come from mouse studies, with rare, naturally occurring mutations establishing their relevance in man. This study used a combination of homozygosity analysis and Sanger sequencing in 37 consanguineous patients with permanent neonatal diabetes to search for homozygous mutations in 29 transcription factor genes important for murine pancreatic development. We identified homozygous mutations in 7 different genes in 11 unrelated patients and show that NKX2-2 and MNX1 are etiological genes for neonatal diabetes, thus confirming their key role in development of the human pancreas. The similar phenotype of the patients with recessive mutations and mice with inactivation of a transcription factor gene support there being common steps critical for pancreatic development and validate the use of rodent models for beta cell development. PMID:24411943

  10. Antibiotic resistance in Pseudomonas aeruginosa strains with increased mutation frequency due to inactivation of the DNA oxidative repair system

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mandsberg, Lotte F; Ciofu, Oana; Kirkby, N

    2009-01-01

    ,8-dihydro-8-oxodeoxyguanosine) than PAO1 after exposure to PMNs, and they developed resistance to antibiotics more frequently. The mechanisms of resistance were increased β-lactamase production and overexpression of the MexCD-OprJ efflux-pump. Mutations in either the mutT or the mutY gene were found...... in resistant HP clinical isolates from patients with CF, and complementation with wild-type genes reverted the phenotype. In conclusion, oxidative stress might be involved in the development of resistance to antibiotics. We therefore suggest the possible use of antioxidants for CF patients to prevent...

  11. Cellular and subcellular effect of heavy ions: A comparison of the induction of strand breaks and chromosomal aberration with the incidence of inactivation and mutation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kraft, G.; Kraft-Weyrather, W.; Ritter, S.; Scholz, M.; Stanton, J.

    1988-10-01

    Radiobiological effects of heavy charged particles are compared for a large variety of ions from Helium to Uranium and energies between 1 and 1000 MeV/u which correspond to LET values between 10 and 16000 keV/μm. The different cross section for the induction of strand breaks and chromosomal aberrations as well as for inactivation and mutation induction exhibit striking similarities when compared as function of the linear energy transfer (LET). At LET values below 100 keV/μm all data points of one specific effect form one single curve as a function of LET, independent of the atomic number of the ion. In this LET range, the biological effects are independent from the particle energy or track structure and depend only on the energy transfer. Therefore, LET is a good parameter in tis regime. For LET values greater than 100 keV/μm, the curves for the different ions separate from the common curve in order of increasing atomic numbers. In this regime LET is no longer a good parameter and the physical parameters of the formation of particle tracks are important. The similarity of the σ-LET curves for different endpoints indicates that the 'hook-structure' is produced by physical and chemical effects which occur before the biologically relevant lesions are formed. However, from the existing data of biological effects, it can be concluded that the efficiencies for cell killing are always smaller than those extrapolated from X-ray data on the basis of the energy deposition only. Therefore, cells which are directly hit by an HZE particle are not killed and undergo a finite risk of mutation and transformation. (orig.)

  12. Biallelic germline and somatic mutations in malignant mesothelioma: multiple mutations in transcription regulators including mSWI/SNF genes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoshikawa, Yoshie; Sato, Ayuko; Tsujimura, Tohru; Otsuki, Taiichiro; Fukuoka, Kazuya; Hasegawa, Seiki; Nakano, Takashi; Hashimoto-Tamaoki, Tomoko

    2015-02-01

    We detected low levels of acetylation for histone H3 tail lysines in malignant mesothelioma (MM) cell lines resistant to histone deacetylase inhibitors. To identify the possible genetic causes related to the low histone acetylation levels, whole-exome sequencing was conducted with MM cell lines established from eight patients. A mono-allelic variant of BRD1 was common to two MM cell lines with very low acetylation levels. We identified 318 homozygous protein-damaging variants/mutations (18-78 variants/mutations per patient); annotation analysis showed enrichment of the molecules associated with mammalian SWI/SNF (mSWI/SNF) chromatin remodeling complexes and co-activators that facilitate initiation of transcription. In seven of the patients, we detected a combination of variants in histone modifiers or transcription factors/co-factors, in addition to variants in mSWI/SNF. Direct sequencing showed that homozygous mutations in SMARCA4, PBRM1 and ARID2 were somatic. In one patient, homozygous germline variants were observed for SMARCC1 and SETD2 in chr3p22.1-3p14.2. These exhibited extended germline homozygosity and were in regions containing somatic mutations, leading to a loss of BAP1 and PBRM1 expression in MM cell line. Most protein-damaging variants were heterozygous in normal tissues. Heterozygous germline variants were often converted into hemizygous variants by mono-allelic deletion, and were rarely homozygous because of acquired uniparental disomy. Our findings imply that MM might develop through the somatic inactivation of mSWI/SNF complex subunits and/or histone modifiers, including BAP1, in subjects that have rare germline variants of these transcription regulators and/or transcription factors/co-factors, and in regions prone to mono-allelic deletion during oncogenesis. © 2014 UICC.

  13. Craniofacial abnormalities in homozygous Small eye (Sey/Sey) embryos and newborn mice.

    OpenAIRE

    Kaufman, M H; Chang, H H; Shaw, J P

    1995-01-01

    The Small eye (Sey) gene in the mouse is lethal in the homozygous state. It is located on chromosome 2, is a mutation in the Pax-6 gene, and is genetically homologous with the human aniridia 2 (AN2) gene mutation. Numerous studies over the last few years, using genetic and molecular biological approaches, have investigated both the location of the gene as well as its possible mode of action. In the homozygous state, the primary defect appears to be limited to the failure of differentiation of...

  14. Inactivation of the DNA repair gene O6-methylguanine-DNA methyltransferase by promoter hypermethylation is associated with G to A mutations in K-ras in colorectal tumorigenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Esteller, M; Toyota, M; Sanchez-Cespedes, M; Capella, G; Peinado, M A; Watkins, D N; Issa, J P; Sidransky, D; Baylin, S B; Herman, J G

    2000-05-01

    O6-methylguanine DNA methyltransferase (MGMT) is a DNA repair protein that removes mutagenic and cytotoxic adducts from the O6 position of guanine. O6-methylguanine mispairs with thymine during replication, and if the adduct is not removed, this results in conversion from a guanine-cytosine pair to an adenine-thymine pair. In vitro assays show that MGMT expression avoids G to A mutations and MGMT transgenic mice are protected against G to A transitions at ras genes. We have recently demonstrated that the MGMT gene is silenced by promoter methylation in many human tumors, including colorectal carcinomas. To study the relevance of defective MGMT function by aberrant methylation in relation to the presence of K-ras mutations, we studied 244 colorectal tumor samples for MGMT promoter hypermethylation and K-ras mutational status. Our results show a clear association between the inactivation of MGMT by promoter hypermethylation and the appearance of G to A mutations at K-ras: 71% (36 of 51) of the tumors displaying this particular type of mutation had abnormal MGMT methylation, whereas only 32% (12 of 37) of those with other K-ras mutations not involving G to A transitions and 35% (55 of 156) of the tumors without K-ras mutations demonstrated MGMT methylation (P = 0.002). In addition, MGMT loss associated with hypermethylation was observed in the small adenomas, including those that do not yet contain K-ras mutations. Hypermethylation of other genes such as p16INK4a and p14ARF was not associated with either MGMT hypermethylation or K-ras mutation. Our data suggest that epigenetic silencing of MGMT by promoter hypermethylation may lead to a particular genetic change in human cancer, specifically G to A transitions in the K-ras oncogene.

  15. On the effect of certain mutations on the radiosensitivity of haploid and diploid yeast cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sokurova, E.N.; Korogodin, V.I.

    1978-01-01

    Mutation ade 1-6 in haploid cell Saccharomyces cerevisiae increases half as much against radioresistance of cells. Diploid cells lacking in adenine, homozygous by ade 1-6 mutation, are nearly twice as radiosensitive as prototrophic cells. Hence ade 1-6 mutation increases radioresistance of haploid cells and decreases that of diplois. These changes in radioresistance are not connected with variations in the extrapolation number of survival curve, the ability of cells to recover from radiation damages upon cultivation in an innutrient medium, and with the inactivation form ratio. Lack of adenine influences the radioresistance of diploid yeast irrespective of whether it is or it is not affected by homo- or heterozygosity by the locus of mating type

  16. A Homozygous Frameshift Mutation in LRAT Causes Retinitis Punctata Albescens

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Littink, Karin W.; van Genderen, Maria M.; van Schooneveld, Mary J.; Visser, Linda; Riemslag, Frans C. C.; Keunen, Jan E. E.; Bakker, Bjorn; Zonneveld, Marijke N.; den Hollander, Anneke I.; Cremers, Frans P. M.; van den Born, L. Ingeborgh

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: To determine the genetic defect and to describe the clinical characteristics in patients with retinitis punctata albescens (RPA) and fundus albipunctatus (FAP). Design: Case series/observational study. Participants: We included 13 patients affected by RPA or FAP. Methods: Thirteen patients

  17. A Homozygous Frameshift Mutation in LRAT Causes Retinitis Punctata Albescens.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Littink, K.W.; Genderen, M.M. van; Schooneveld, M.J. van; Visser, L.; Riemslag, F.C.; Keunen, J.E.E.; Bakker, B.; Zonneveld, M.N.; Hollander, A.I. den; Cremers, F.P.M.; Born, L.I. van den

    2012-01-01

    PURPOSE: To determine the genetic defect and to describe the clinical characteristics in patients with retinitis punctata albescens (RPA) and fundus albipunctatus (FAP). DESIGN: Case series/observational study. PARTICIPANTS: We included 13 patients affected by RPA or FAP. METHODS: Thirteen patients

  18. Progression of subtle motor signs in PINK1 mutation carriers with mild dopaminergic deficit

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Eggers, C; Schmidt, A; Hagenah, J

    2010-01-01

    While homozygous mutations in the PINK1 gene cause recessively inherited early-onset Parkinson disease (PD), heterozygous mutations have been suggested as a susceptibility factor.......While homozygous mutations in the PINK1 gene cause recessively inherited early-onset Parkinson disease (PD), heterozygous mutations have been suggested as a susceptibility factor....

  19. The production of homozygous tree material

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reinhard F. Stettler; George E. Howe

    1966-01-01

    Homozygous trees will never be the desired ultimate step in a forest tree improvement program. However, they will serve many purposes in forest genetics research: (1) in the detection of genetic markers; (2) in the isolation of traits under simple genetic control for the study of growth and differentiation phenomena; (3) as a tool as well as reference material in the...

  20. Prenatal diagnosis of homozygous familial hypercholesterolaemia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brown, M.S.; Kovanen, P.T.; Goldstein, J.L.; Eeckels, R.; Vandenberghe, K.; Van Den Berghe, H.; Fryns, J.P.; Cassiman, J.J.

    1978-01-01

    Cultured amniotic-fluid cells from a fetus at risk for homozygous familial hypercholesterolaemia (F.H.) almost completely lacked cell-surface receptors for plasma low-density lipoprotein (L.D.L.), as evidenced by direct measurement of binding, uptake, and degradation of 125 I-L.D.L. Functional consequences of L.D.L. binding to the receptor - i.e., suppression of 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl coenzyme A reductase and stimulation of cholesterol esterification - were proportionately reduced when compared with results in cultured amniotic cells from two control fetuses. On the basis of these findings, homozygous F.H. was diagnosed and the pregnancy was terminated at the 20th week. The diagnosis of homozygous F.H. was confirmed by a serum-cholesterol of the aborted fetus of 279 mg/dl, a value 9 times the mean of four control fetuses of similar gestational age. More than 80% of the serum-cholesterol of the affected fetus was contained within L.D.L. Prenatal diagnosis of homozygous F.H. now seems practical; moreover, the finding of a raised serum-L.D.L. in the affected fetus indicates that the L.D.L. receptor is normally functional as early as the 20th week of fetal life. (author)

  1. A novel NaV1.5 voltage sensor mutation associated with severe atrial and ventricular arrhythmias.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Hong-Gang; Zhu, Wandi; Kanter, Ronald J; Silva, Jonathan R; Honeywell, Christina; Gow, Robert M; Pitt, Geoffrey S

    2016-03-01

    Inherited autosomal dominant mutations in cardiac sodium channels (NaV1.5) cause various arrhythmias, such as long QT syndrome and Brugada syndrome. Although dozens of mutations throughout the protein have been reported, there are few reported mutations within a voltage sensor S4 transmembrane segment and few that are homozygous. Here we report analysis of a novel lidocaine-sensitive recessive mutation, p.R1309H, in the NaV1.5 DIII/S4 voltage sensor in a patient with a complex arrhythmia syndrome. We expressed the wild type or mutant NaV1.5 heterologously for analysis with the patch-clamp and voltage clamp fluorometry (VCF) techniques. p.R1309H depolarized the voltage-dependence of activation, hyperpolarized the voltage-dependence of inactivation, and slowed recovery from inactivation, thereby reducing the channel availability at physiologic membrane potentials. Additionally, p.R1309H increased the "late" Na(+) current. The location of the mutation in DIIIS4 prompted testing for a gating pore current. We observed an inward current at hyperpolarizing voltages that likely exacerbates the loss-of-function defects at resting membrane potentials. Lidocaine reduced the gating pore current. The p.R1309H homozygous NaV1.5 mutation conferred both gain-of-function and loss-of-function effects on NaV1.5 channel activity. Reduction of a mutation-induced gating pore current by lidocaine suggested a therapeutic mechanism. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Physical mapping of chromosome 8p22 markers and their homozygous deletion in a metastatic prostate cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bova, G.S.; Pin, S.S.; Isaacs, W.B. [Johns Hopkins Univ. School of Medicine, Baltimore, MD (United States)]|[Brady Urological Institute, Baltimore, MD (United States)] [and others

    1996-07-01

    Numerous studies have implicated the short arm of chromosome 8 as the site of one or more tumor suppressor genes inactivated in carcinogenesis of the prostate, colon, lung, and liver. Previously, we identified a homozygous deletion on chromosome 8p22 in a metastatic prostate cancer. To map this homozygous deletion physically, long-range restriction mapping was performed using yeast artificial chromosomes (YACs) spanning approximately 2 Mb of chromosome band 8p22. Subcloned genomic DNA and cDNA probes isolated by hybrid capture from these YACs were mapped in relation to one another, reinforcing map integrity. Mapped single-copy probes from the region were then applied to DNA isolated from a metastatic prostate cancer containing a chromosome 8p22 homozygous deletion and indicated that its deletion spans 730-970 kb. Candidate genes PRLTS (PDGF-receptor {beta}-like tumor suppressor) and CTSB (cathepsin B) are located outside the region of homozygous deletion. Genethon marker D8S549 is located approximately at the center of this region of homozygous deletion. Two new microsatellite polymorphisms, D8S1991 and D8S1992, also located within the region of homozygous deletion on chromosome 8p22, are described. Physical mapping places cosmid CI8-2644 telomeric to MSR (macrophage scavenger receptor), the reverse of a previously published map, altering the interpretation of published deletion studies. This work should prove helpful in the identification of candidate tumor suppressor genes in this region. 47 refs., 5 figs., 1 tab.

  3. No evidence for functional inactivation of wild-type p53 protein by MDM2 overexpression in gastric carcinogenesis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Blok, P.; Craanen, M. E.; Dekker, W.; Offerhaus, G. J.; Tytgat, G. N.

    1998-01-01

    Inactivation of wild-type p53 during gastric carcinogenesis is usually caused by mutations within exons 5-8 of the p53 gene leading to mutated, usually immunohistochemically detectable p53 proteins. However, functional inactivation of wild-type p53, mimicking mutational inactivation, may also result

  4. Novel inactivating mutations of the DCAF17 gene in American and Turkish families cause male infertility and female subfertility in the mouse model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gurbuz, F; Desai, S; Diao, F; Turkkahraman, D; Wranitz, F; Wood-Trageser, M; Shin, Y-H; Kotan, L D; Jiang, H; Witchel, S; Gurtunca, N; Yatsenko, S; Mysliwec, D; Topaloglu, K; Rajkovic, A

    2018-04-01

    Loss-of-function DCAF17 variants cause hypogonadism, partial alopecia, diabetes mellitus, mental retardation, and deafness with variable clinical presentation. DCAF17 pathogenic variants have been largely reported in the Middle Eastern populations, but the incidence in American families is rare and animal models are lacking. Exome sequencing in 5 women with syndromic hypergonadotropic hypogonadism from 2 unrelated families revealed novel pathogenic variants in the DCAF17 gene. DCAF17 exon 2 (c.127-1G > C) novel homozygous variants were discovered in 4 Turkish siblings, while 1 American was compound heterozygous for 1-stop gain variant in exon 5 (c.C535T; p.Gln179*) and previously described stop gain variant in exon 9 (c.G906A; p.Trp302*). A mouse model mimicking loss of function in exon 2 of Dcaf17 was generated using CRISPR/Cas9 and showed female subfertility and male infertility. Our results identify 2 novel variants, and show that Dcaf17 plays a significant role in mammalian gonadal development and infertility. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  5. Prenatal diagnosis of homozygous β-thalassemia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Loukopoulos, D.

    1980-11-01

    An in vitro test for the prenatal diagnosis of homozygous β-thalassaemia and its application is described. The basic methodology consists in obtaining a minute specimen of placental blood by blind aspiration or foetoscopy at the 18th to 20th week of gestation, incubating a sample in the presence of 3 H-leucine, separating the labelled globin chains by chromatography on sodium carboxymethyl cellulose microcolumns with 8M urea-mercaptoethanol and measuring the radioactivity associated with the β- and γ-chains. The β/(pre-γ+γ) radioactivity ratio is used as an index of adequacy of β-chain synthesis, a value greater than 0.07 being taken as indicative of freedom from disease and a value less than 0.03 indicative of homozygous β-thalassaemia. From 350 women seeking the test, 344 samples were tested; 269 were judged normal or heterozygous, 75 homozygous for β-thalassaemia. Four false negatives were identified, 3 having given borderline β/(pre-γ+γ) ratios. Complications leading to foetal loss fell from 16% over the first year's experience to 8% over the second and 5% over the third. The test is now judged suitable for general use and is indeed being so used

  6. Depolarized Inactivation Overcomes Impaired Activation to Produce DRG Neuron Hyperexcitability in a Nav1.7 Mutation in a Patient with Distal Limb Pain

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Huang, J.; Yang, Y; Dib-Hajj, S.D.; Es, M. van; Zhao, P.; Salomon, J.; Drenth, J.P.; Waxman, S.G.

    2014-01-01

    Sodium channel Nav1.7, encoded by SCN9A, is expressed in DRG neurons and regulates their excitability. Genetic and functional studies have established a critical contribution of Nav1.7 to human pain disorders. We have now characterized a novel Nav1.7 mutation (R1279P) from a female human subject

  7. High resolution melting for mutation scanning of TP53 exons 5–8

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Krypuy, Michael; Dobrovic, Alexander; Ahmed, Ahmed Ashour; Etemadmoghadam, Dariush; Hyland, Sarah J; Australian Ovarian Cancer Study Group; Fazio, Anna de; Fox, Stephen B; Brenton, James D; Bowtell, David D

    2007-01-01

    p53 is commonly inactivated by mutations in the DNA-binding domain in a wide range of cancers. As mutant p53 often influences response to therapy, effective and rapid methods to scan for mutations in TP53 are likely to be of clinical value. We therefore evaluated the use of high resolution melting (HRM) as a rapid mutation scanning tool for TP53 in tumour samples. We designed PCR amplicons for HRM mutation scanning of TP53 exons 5 to 8 and tested them with DNA from cell lines hemizygous or homozygous for known mutations. We assessed the sensitivity of each PCR amplicon using dilutions of cell line DNA in normal wild-type DNA. We then performed a blinded assessment on ovarian tumour DNA samples that had been previously sequenced for mutations in TP53 to assess the sensitivity and positive predictive value of the HRM technique. We also performed HRM analysis on breast tumour DNA samples with unknown TP53 mutation status. One cell line mutation was not readily observed when exon 5 was amplified. As exon 5 contained multiple melting domains, we divided the exon into two amplicons for further screening. Sequence changes were also introduced into some of the primers to improve the melting characteristics of the amplicon. Aberrant HRM curves indicative of TP53 mutations were observed for each of the samples in the ovarian tumour DNA panel. Comparison of the HRM results with the sequencing results revealed that each mutation was detected by HRM in the correct exon. For the breast tumour panel, we detected seven aberrant melt profiles by HRM and subsequent sequencing confirmed the presence of these and no other mutations in the predicted exons. HRM is an effective technique for simple and rapid scanning of TP53 mutations that can markedly reduce the amount of sequencing required in mutational studies of TP53

  8. Presentation of Complex Homozygous Allele in ABCA4 Gene in a Patient with Retinitis Pigmentosa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Māreta Audere

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Retinitis pigmentosa is a degenerative retinal disease characterized by progressive photoreceptor damage, which causes loss of peripheral and night vision and the development of tunnel vision and may result in loss of central vision. This study describes a patient with retinitis pigmentosa caused by a mutation in the ABCA4 gene with complex allele c.1622T>C, p.L541P; c.3113C>T, p.A1038V in homozygous state.

  9. Homozygous PMS2 deletion causes a severe colorectal cancer and multiple adenoma phenotype without extraintestinal cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Will, Olivia; Carvajal-Carmona, Luis G; Gorman, Patricia; Howarth, Kimberley M; Jones, Angela M; Polanco-Echeverry, Guadalupe M; Chinaleong, Jo-Anne; Günther, Thomas; Silver, Andrew; Clark, Susan K; Tomlinson, Ian

    2007-02-01

    We report a patient of Indian descent with parental consanguinity, who developed 10 carcinomas and 35 adenomatous polyps at age 23 and duodenal adenocarcinoma at age 25. He also had dysmorphic features, mental retardation, and café-au-lait spots but no brain tumor. We aimed to establish his molecular diagnosis. Germ-line screening for APC and MYH/MUTYH mutations was normal as was immunohistochemistry for MLH1 and MSH2 proteins. Investigation by array-comparative genomic hybridization revealed deletion of a small region on chromosome 7. Using polymerase chain reaction, this region was refined to a 400-kilobase deletion, which included exons 9-15 of the PMS2 gene, and all coding regions of oncomodulin, TRIAD3, and FSCN1. The deletion was confirmed as homozygous, and both parents were carriers. Immunohistochemistry showed absent PMS2 expression in all tumors and normal tissue. Most tumors showed microsatellite instability, more marked at dinucleotide than mononucleotide repeats. The tumors harbored no somatic mutations in APC, BRAF, AXIN2, or beta-catenin, but KRAS2 and TGFBR2 mutations were found. Our patient represents a novel phenotype for homozygous PMS2 mutation and perhaps the most severe colorectal cancer phenotype-in terms of numbers of malignancies at an early age-described to date. PMS2 mutations-and perhaps other homozygous mismatch repair mutations-should be considered in any patient presenting with multiple gastrointestinal tumors, since our patient could not be distinguished clinically from cases with attenuated familial adenomatous polyposis or MUTYH-associated polyposis.

  10. Inactivation of CDK/pRb pathway normalizes survival pattern of lymphoblasts expressing the FTLD-progranulin mutation c.709-1G>A.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carolina Alquezar

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Mutations in the progranulin (PGRN gene, leading to haploinsufficiency, cause familial frontotemporal lobar degeneration (FTLD-TDP, although the pathogenic mechanism of PGRN deficit is largely unknown. Allelic loss of PGRN was previously shown to increase the activity of cyclin-dependent kinase (CDK CDK6/pRb pathway in lymphoblasts expressing the c.709-1G>A PGRN mutation. Since members of the CDK family appear to play a role in neurodegenerative disorders and in apoptotic death of neurons subjected to various insults, we investigated the role of CDK6/pRb in cell survival/death mechanisms following serum deprivation. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We performed a comparative study of cell viability after serum withdrawal of established lymphoblastoid cell lines from control and carriers of c.709-1G>A PGRN mutation, asymptomatic and FTLD-TDP diagnosed individuals. Our results suggest that the CDK6/pRb pathway is enhanced in the c.709-1G>A bearing lymphoblasts. Apparently, this feature allows PGRN-deficient cells to escape from serum withdrawal-induced apoptosis by decreasing the activity of executive caspases and lowering the dissipation of mitochondrial membrane potential and the release of cytochrome c from the mitochondria. Inhibitors of CDK6 expression levels like sodium butyrate or the CDK6 activity such as PD332991 were able to restore the vulnerability of lymphoblasts from FTLD-TDP patients to trophic factor withdrawal. CONCLUSION/SIGNIFICANCE: The use of PGRN-deficient lymphoblasts from FTLD-TDP patients may be a useful model to investigate cell biochemical aspects of this disease. It is suggested that CDK6 could be potentially a therapeutic target for the treatment of the FTLD-TDP.

  11. Homozygous deletion of TRMT10A as part of a contiguous gene deletion in a syndrome of failure to thrive, delayed puberty, intellectual disability and diabetes mellitus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zung, Amnon; Kori, Michal; Burundukov, Ella; Ben-Yosef, Tamar; Tatoor, Yasmin; Granot, Esther

    2015-12-01

    Two recent reports describe a new syndrome of intellectual disability, short stature, microcephaly, and young onset diabetes or disturbed glucose metabolism in association with inactivating mutations in the TRMT10A gene. We investigated the clinical spectrum presented by a 17-year-old female with a homozygous contiguous gene deletion involving the TRMT10A gene. From infancy, she presented with failure to thrive and microcephaly. Puberty was characterized by a slow and an inconsistent course of progression. Concomitantly, gonadotropin levels fluctuated between low and high levels which were compatible with gonadal failure. Unlike the previous reports, the patient had ketoacidosis at onset of diabetes and islet cell autoantibodies. Nevertheless, glycemic control was excellent (HbA1C 5.0%-6.2%). RT-PCR and Western blot analysis demonstrated a complete abolishment of TRMT10A mRNA and its translated protein. In order to elucidate the nature of diabetes in this patient, endogenous insulin secretion and glycemic control were evaluated by a glucagon stimulation test and continuous glucose monitoring both during insulin treatment and off therapy. Endogenous insulin secretion still persisted 22 months after onset of diabetes and relatively normal glucose levels were kept over 3 days without insulin treatment. The fluctuating course of puberty and diabetes may reflect intermittent apoptotic damages due to sensitization of the relevant cells to various stress agents in the absence of functional TRMT10A. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  12. Isogenic transgenic homozygous fish induced by artificial parthenogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nam, Y K; Cho, Y S; Kim, D S

    2000-12-01

    As a model system for vertebrate transgenesis, fish have many attractive advantages, especially with respect to the characteristics of eggs, allowing us to produce isogenic, transgenic, homozygous vertebrates by combining with chromosome-set manipulation. Here, we describe the large-scale production of isogenic transgenic homozygous animals using our experimental organism, the mud loach Misgurnus mizolepis, by the simple process of artificial parthenogenesis in a single generation. These isogenic fish have retained transgenic homozygous status in a stable manner during the subsequent 5 years, and exhibited increased levels of transgene expression. Furthermore, their isogenic nature was confirmed by cloned transgenic homozygous offspring produced via another step of parthenogenic reproduction of the isogenic homozygous transgenic fish. These results demonstrate that a combination of transgenesis and artificial parthenogenesis will make the rapid utilization of genetically pure homozygous transgenic system in vertebrate transgenesis possible.

  13. Novel Mutations in the PC Gene in Patients with Type B Pyruvate Carboxylase Deficiency

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ostergaard, Elsebet; Duno, Morten; Møller, Lisbeth Birk

    2013-01-01

    We have investigated seven patients with the type B form of pyruvate carboxylase (PC) deficiency. Mutation analysis revealed eight mutations, all novel. In a patient with exon skipping on cDNA analysis, we identified a homozygous mutation located in a potential branch point sequence, the first...... possible branch point mutation in PC. Two patients were homozygous for missense mutations (with normal protein amounts on western blot analysis), and two patients were homozygous for nonsense mutations. In addition, a duplication of one base pair was found in a patient who also harboured a splice site...... mutation. Another splice site mutation led to the activation of a cryptic splice site, shown by cDNA analysis.All patients reported until now with at least one missense mutation have had the milder type A form of PC deficiency. We thus report for the first time two patients with homozygous missense...

  14. Epistatic association mapping in homozygous crop cultivars.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hai-Yan Lü

    Full Text Available The genetic dissection of complex traits plays a crucial role in crop breeding. However, genetic analysis and crop breeding have heretofore been performed separately. In this study, we designed a new approach that integrates epistatic association analysis in crop cultivars with breeding by design. First, we proposed an epistatic association mapping (EAM approach in homozygous crop cultivars. The phenotypic values of complex traits, along with molecular marker information, were used to perform EAM. In our EAM, all the main-effect quantitative trait loci (QTLs, environmental effects, QTL-by-environment interactions and QTL-by-QTL interactions were included in a full model and estimated by empirical Bayes approach. A series of Monte Carlo simulations was performed to confirm the reliability of the new method. Next, the information from all detected QTLs was used to mine novel alleles for each locus and to design elite cross combination. Finally, the new approach was adopted to dissect the genetic basis of seed length in 215 soybean cultivars obtained, by stratified random sampling, from 6 geographic ecotypes in China. As a result, 19 main-effect QTLs and 3 epistatic QTLs were identified, more than 10 novel alleles were mined and 3 elite parental combinations, such as Daqingdou and Zhengzhou790034, were predicted.

  15. [Analysis of USH2A gene mutation in a Chinese family affected with Usher syndrome].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Pengcheng; Liu, Fei; Zhang, Mingchang; Wang, Qiufen; Liu, Mugen

    2015-08-01

    To investigate the disease-causing mutation in a Chinese family affected with Usher syndrome type II. All of the 11 members from the family underwent comprehensive ophthalmologic examination and hearing test, and their genomic DNA were isolated from venous leukocytes. PCR and direct sequencing of USH2A gene were performed for the proband. Wild type and mutant type minigene vectors containing exon 42, intron 42 and exon 43 of the USH2A gene were constructed and transfected into Hela cells by lipofectamine reagent. Reverse transcription (RT)-PCR was carried out to verify the splicing of the minigenes. Pedigree analysis and clinical diagnosis indicated that the patients have suffered from autosomal recessive Usher syndrome type II. DNA sequencing has detected a homozygous c.8559-2A>G mutation of the USH2A gene in the proband, which has co-segregated with the disease in the family. The mutation has affected a conserved splice site in intron 42, which has led to inactivation of the splice site. Minigene experiment has confirmed the retaining of intron 42 in mature mRNA. The c.8559-2A>G mutation in the USH2A gene probably underlies the Usher syndrome type II in this family. The splice site mutation has resulted in abnormal splicing of USH2A pre-mRNA.

  16. A novel homozygous variant in the SMOC1 gene underlying Waardenburg anophthalmia syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ullah, Asmat; Umair, Muhammad; Ahmad, Farooq; Muhammad, Dost; Basit, Sulman; Ahmad, Wasim

    2017-01-01

    Waardenburg anophthalmia syndrome (WAS), also known as ophthalmo-acromelic syndrome or anophthalmia-syndactyly, is a rare congenital disorder that segregates in an autosomal recessive pattern. Clinical features of the syndrome include malformation of the eyes and the skeleton. Mostly, WAS is caused by mutations in the SMOC-1 gene. The present report describes a large consanguineous family of Pakistani origin segregating Waardenburg anophthalmia syndrome in an autosomal recessive pattern. Genotyping followed by Sanger sequencing was performed to search for a candidate gene. SNP genotyping using AffymetrixGeneChip Human Mapping 250K Nsp array established a single homozygous region among affected members on chromosome 14q23.1-q24.3 harboring the SMOC1 gene. Sequencing of the gene revealed a novel homozygous missense mutation (c.812G>A; p.Cys271Tyr) in the family. This is the first report of Waardenburg anophthalmia syndrome caused by a SMOC1 variant in a Pakistani population. The mutation identified in the present investigation extends the body of evidence implicating the gene SMOC-1 in causing WAS.

  17. Inactivation Data.xlsx

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — The data set is a spreadsheet that contains results of inactivation experiments that were conducted to to determine the effectiveness of chlorine in inactivating B....

  18. Inactivation of promoter 1B of APC causes partial gene silencing: evidence for a significant role of the promoter in regulation and causative of familial adenomatous polyposis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rohlin, A; Engwall, Y; Fritzell, K

    2011-01-01

    Familial adenomatous polyposis (FAP) is caused by germline mutations in the adenomatous polyposis coli (APC) gene. Two promoters, 1A and 1B, have been recognized in APC, and 1B is thought to have a minor role in the regulation of the gene. We have identified a novel deletion encompassing half of ...... homozygous inactivation of APC allowing for alternative genetic models as basis for adenoma formation.Oncogene advance online publication, 6 June 2011; doi:10.1038/onc.2011.201....... in a panel of 20 various normal tissues examined. In FAP-related tumors, the APC germline mutation is proposed to dictate the second hit. Mutations leaving two or three out of seven 20-amino-acid repeats in the central domain of APC intact seem to be required for tumorigenesis. We examined adenomas from...... mutation carriers in Family 1 for second hits in the entire gene without any findings, however, loss of the residual expression of the deleterious allele was observed. Three major conclusions of significant importance in relation to the function of APC can be drawn from this study; (i) germline...

  19. Inactivation of the Sema5a gene results in embryonic lethality and defective remodeling of the cranial vascular system

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Fiore, Roberto; Rahim, Belquis; Christoffels, Vincent M.; Moorman, Antoon F. M.; Püschel, Andreas W.

    2005-01-01

    The semaphorins are a large family of proteins involved in the patterning of both the vascular and the nervous systems. In order to analyze the function of the membrane-bound semaphorin 5A (Sema5A), we generated mice homozygous for a null mutation in the Sema5a gene. Homozygous null mutants die

  20. Filaggrin loss-of-function mutations, atopic dermatitis and risk of actinic keratosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Y M F; Egeberg, A; Balslev, E

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Common loss-of-function mutations in filaggrin gene (FLG) represent a strong genetic risk factor for atopic dermatitis (AD). Homozygous mutation carriers typically display ichthyosis vulgaris (IV) and many have concomitant AD. Previously, homozygous, but not heterozygous, filaggrin ge...

  1. Dietary factors and Truncating APC Mutations in Sporadic Colorectal Adenomas

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Diergaarde, B.; Tiemersma, E.W.; Braam, H.; Muijen, van G.N.P.; Nagengast, F.M.; Kok, F.J.; Kampman, E.

    2005-01-01

    Inactivating mutations in APC are thought to be early, initiating events in colorectal carcinogenesis. To gain insight into the relationship between diet and inactivating APC mutations, we evaluated associations between dietary factors and the occurrence of these mutations in a Dutch case-control

  2. Dietary factors and truncating APC mutations in sporadic colorectal adenomas.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Diergaarde, B.; Tiemersma, E.W.; Braam, H.; Muijen, G.N.P. van; Nagengast, F.M.; Kok, F.J.; Kampman, E.

    2005-01-01

    Inactivating mutations in APC are thought to be early, initiating events in colorectal carcinogenesis. To gain insight into the relationship between diet and inactivating APC mutations, we evaluated associations between dietary factors and the occurrence of these mutations in a Dutch case-control

  3. Skewed X-inactivation in cloned mice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Senda, Sho; Wakayama, Teruhiko; Yamazaki, Yukiko; Ohgane, Jun; Hattori, Naka; Tanaka, Satoshi; Yanagimachi, Ryuzo; Shiota, Kunio

    2004-01-01

    In female mammals, dosage compensation for X-linked genes is accomplished by inactivation of one of two X chromosomes. The X-inactivation ratio (a percentage of the cells with inactivated maternal X chromosomes in the whole cells) is skewed as a consequence of various genetic mutations, and has been observed in a number of X-linked disorders. We previously reported that phenotypically normal full-term cloned mouse fetuses had loci with inappropriate DNA methylation. Thus, cloned mice are excellent models to study abnormal epigenetic events in mammalian development. In the present study, we analyzed X-inactivation ratios in adult female cloned mice (B6C3F1). Kidneys of eight naturally produced controls and 11 cloned mice were analyzed. Although variations in X-inactivation ratio among the mice were observed in both groups, the distributions were significantly different (Ansary-Bradley test, P < 0.01). In particular, 2 of 11 cloned mice showed skewed X-inactivation ratios (19.2% and 86.8%). Similarly, in intestine, 1 of 10 cloned mice had a skewed ratio (75.7%). Skewed X-inactivation was observed to various degrees in different tissues of different individuals, suggesting that skewed X-inactivation in cloned mice is the result of secondary cell selection in combination with stochastic distortion of primary choice. The present study is the first demonstration that skewed X-inactivation occurs in cloned animals. This finding is important for understanding both nuclear transfer technology and etiology of X-linked disorders

  4. Inactivation of Caliciviruses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raymond Nims

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available The Caliciviridae family of viruses contains clinically important human and animal pathogens, as well as vesivirus 2117, a known contaminant of biopharmaceutical manufacturing processes employing Chinese hamster cells. An extensive literature exists for inactivation of various animal caliciviruses, especially feline calicivirus and murine norovirus. The caliciviruses are susceptible to wet heat inactivation at temperatures in excess of 60 °C with contact times of 30 min or greater, to UV-C inactivation at fluence ≥30 mJ/cm2, to high pressure processing >200 MPa for >5 min at 4 °C, and to certain photodynamic inactivation approaches. The enteric caliciviruses (e.g.; noroviruses display resistance to inactivation by low pH, while the non-enteric species (e.g.; feline calicivirus are much more susceptible. The caliciviruses are inactivated by a variety of chemicals, including alcohols, oxidizing agents, aldehydes, and β-propiolactone. As with inactivation of viruses in general, inactivation of caliciviruses by the various approaches may be matrix-, temperature-, and/or contact time-dependent. The susceptibilities of the caliciviruses to the various physical and chemical inactivation approaches are generally similar to those displayed by other small, non-enveloped viruses, with the exception that the parvoviruses and circoviruses may require higher temperatures for inactivation, while these families appear to be more susceptible to UV-C inactivation than are the caliciviruses.

  5. Increased yield of heterologous viral glycoprotein in the seeds of homozygous transgenic tobacco plants cultivated underground.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tackaberry, Eilleen S; Prior, Fiona; Bell, Margaret; Tocchi, Monika; Porter, Suzanne; Mehic, Jelica; Ganz, Peter R; Sardana, Ravinder; Altosaar, Illimar; Dudani, Anil

    2003-06-01

    The use of transgenic plants in the production of recombinant proteins for human therapy, including subunit vaccines, is being investigated to evaluate the efficacy and safety of these emerging biopharmaceutical products. We have previously shown that synthesis of recombinant glycoprotein B (gB) of human cytomegalovirus can be targeted to seeds of transgenic tobacco when directed by the rice glutelin 3 promoter, with gB retaining critical features of immunological reactivity (E.S. Tackaberry et al. 1999. Vaccine, 17: 3020-3029). Here, we report development of second generation transgenic plant lines (T1) homozygous for the transgene. Twenty progeny plants from two lines (A23T(1)-2 and A24T(1)-3) were grown underground in an environmentally contained mine shaft. Based on yields of gB in their seeds, the A23T(1)-2 line was then selected for scale-up in the same facility. Analyses of mature seeds by ELISA showedthat gB specific activity in A23T(1)-2 seeds was over 30-fold greater than the best T0 plants from the same transformation series, representing 1.07% total seed protein. These data demonstrate stable inheritance, an absence of transgene inactivation, and enhanced levels of gB expression in a homozygous second generation plant line. They also provide evidence for the suitability of using this environmentally secure facility to grow transgenic plants producing therapeutic biopharmaceuticals.

  6. Qualitative analysis of mouse specific-locus mutations: information on genetic organization, gene expression, and the chromosomal nature of induced lesions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Russell, L.B.

    1982-01-01

    Analysis of mouse specific-locus (SL) mutations at three loci has identified over 33 distinct complementation groups - most of which are probably overlapping deficiencies - and 13 to 14 new functional units. The complementation maps that have been generated for the d-se and c regions include numerous vital functions; however, some of the genes in these regions are non-vital. At such loci, hypomorphic mutants must represent intragenic alterations, and some viable nulls could conceivably be intragenic lesions also. Analysis of SL mutations has provided information on genetic expression. Homozygous deficiencies can be completely viable or can kill at any one of a range of developmental stages. Heterozygonus deficiencies of up to 6 cM or more in genetic length have been recovered and propagated. The time of death of homozygous and the degree of inviability of heterozygous deficiencies are related more to specific content of the missing segment than to its length. Combinations of deficiencies with x-autosome translocations that inactivate the homologous region in a mosaic fashion have shown that organismic lethals are not necessarily cell lethal. The spectrum of mutations induced depends on the nature of the mutagen and the type of germ cell exposed. Radiation of spermatogonia produces intragenic as well as null mutations. Spontaneous mutations have an admixture of types not present in populations of mutations induced in germ cells, and this raises doubts concerning the accuracy of doubling-dose calculations in genetic risk estimation. The analysis of SL mutations has yielded genetic tools for the construction of detailed gene-dosage series, cis-trans comparisons, the mapping of known genes and identification of new genes, genetic rescue of various types, and the identification and isolation of DNA sequences

  7. Avascular necrosis in sickle cell (homozygous S) patients: Predictive ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2013-04-24

    Apr 24, 2013 ... Results: The prevalence of AVN in sickle cell patients was ... Key words: Avascular necrosis, homozygous S, platelet count, sickle cell anemia, white cell count .... frequency of vaso‑occlusive crisis, platelet, and white cell.

  8. Heterozygous and homozygous JAK2(V617F states modeled by induced pluripotent stem cells from myeloproliferative neoplasm patients.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joseph Saliba

    Full Text Available JAK2(V617F is the predominant mutation in myeloproliferative neoplasms (MPN. Modeling MPN in a human context might be helpful for the screening of molecules targeting JAK2 and its intracellular signaling. We describe here the derivation of induced pluripotent stem (iPS cell lines from 2 polycythemia vera patients carrying a heterozygous and a homozygous mutated JAK2(V617F, respectively. In the patient with homozygous JAK2(V617F, additional ASXL1 mutation and chromosome 20 allowed partial delineation of the clonal architecture and assignation of the cellular origin of the derived iPS cell lines. The marked difference in the response to erythropoietin (EPO between homozygous and heterozygous cell lines correlated with the constitutive activation level of signaling pathways. Strikingly, heterozygous iPS cells showed thrombopoietin (TPO-independent formation of megakaryocytic colonies, but not EPO-independent erythroid colony formation. JAK2, PI3K and HSP90 inhibitors were able to block spontaneous and EPO-induced growth of erythroid colonies from GPA(+CD41(+ cells derived from iPS cells. Altogether, this study brings the proof of concept that iPS can be used for studying MPN pathogenesis, clonal architecture, and drug efficacy.

  9. Fetal loss in homozygous mutant Norrie disease mice: a new role of Norrin in reproduction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luhmann, Ulrich F O; Meunier, Dominique; Shi, Wei; Lüttges, Angela; Pfarrer, Christiane; Fundele, Reinald; Berger, Wolfgang

    2005-08-01

    Mutations in the Norrie disease pseudoglioma gene (NDP) are known to cause X-linked recessive Norrie disease. In addition, NDP mutations have been found in other vasoproliferative retinopathies such as familial exudative vitreoretinopathy, retinopathy of prematurity, and Coats disease, suggesting a role for Norrin in vascular development. Here we report that female mice homozygous for the Norrie disease pseudoglioma homolog (Ndph) knockout allele exhibit almost complete infertility, while heterozygous females and hemizygous males are fertile. Histological examinations and RNA in situ hybridization analyses revealed defects in vascular development and decidualization in pregnant Ndph-/- females from embryonic day 7 (E7) onwards, resulting in embryonic loss. Using RT-PCR analyses we also demonstrate, for the first time, the expression of Ndph in mouse uteri and deciduae as well as the expression of NDP in human placenta. Taken together, these data provide strong evidence for Norrin playing an important role in female reproductive tissues. Copyright 2005 Wiley-Liss, Inc

  10. A Clinical, Neuropathological and Genetic Study of Homozygous A467T POLG-Related Mitochondrial Disease.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sanjeev Rajakulendran

    Full Text Available Mutations in the nuclear gene POLG (encoding the catalytic subunit of DNA polymerase gamma are an important cause of mitochondrial disease. The most common POLG mutation, A467T, appears to exhibit considerable phenotypic heterogeneity. The mechanism by which this single genetic defect results in such clinical diversity remains unclear. In this study we evaluate the clinical, neuropathological and mitochondrial genetic features of four unrelated patients with homozygous A467T mutations. One patient presented with the severe and lethal Alpers-Huttenlocher syndrome, which was confirmed on neuropathology, and was found to have a depletion of mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA. Of the remaining three patients, one presented with mitochondrial encephalomyopathy, lactic acidosis and stroke-like episodes (MELAS, one with a phenotype in the Myoclonic Epilepsy, Myopathy and Sensory Ataxia (MEMSA spectrum and one with Sensory Ataxic Neuropathy, Dysarthria and Ophthalmoplegia (SANDO. All three had secondary accumulation of multiple mtDNA deletions. Complete sequence analysis of muscle mtDNA using the MitoChip resequencing chip in all four cases demonstrated significant variation in mtDNA, including a pathogenic MT-ND5 mutation in one patient. These data highlight the variable and overlapping clinical and neuropathological phenotypes and downstream molecular defects caused by the A467T mutation, which may result from factors such as the mtDNA genetic background, nuclear genetic modifiers and environmental stressors.

  11. Mutation and Expression of the DCC Gene in Human Lung Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Takashi Kohno

    2000-07-01

    Full Text Available Chromosome 18q is frequently deleted in lung cancers, a common region of 18q deletions was mapped to chromosome 18g21. Since the DCC candidate tumor suppressor gene has been mapped in this region, mutation and expression of the DCC gene were examined in 46 lung cancer cell lines, consisting of 14 small cell lung carcinomas (SCLCs and 32 non-small cell lung carcinomas (NSCLCs, to elucidate the pathogenetic significance of DCC alterations in human lung carcinogenesis. A heterozygous missense mutation was detected in a NSCLC cell line, Ma26, while homozygous deletion was not detected in any of the cell lines. The DCC gene was expressed in 11 (24% of the 46 cell lines, the incidence of DCC expression was significantly higher in SCLCs (7/14, 50% than in NSCLCs (4/32, 13% (P = .01, Fisher's exact test. Therefore, genetic alterations of DCC are infrequent; however, the levels of DCC expression vary among lung cancer cells, in particular, between SCLCs and NSCLCs. The present result does not implicate DCC as a specific mutational target of 18q deletions in human lung cancer; however, it suggests that DCC is a potential target of inactivation by genetic defects including intron or promoter mutations and/or epigenetic alterations. The present result also suggests that DCC expression is associated with some properties of SCLCs, such as a neuroendocrine (NE feature.

  12. Inactivation of Smad4 in gastric carcinomas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Powell, S M; Harper, J C; Hamilton, S R; Robinson, C R; Cummings, O W

    1997-10-01

    Allelic loss of chromosome 18q has been noted in intestinal type gastric adenocarcinomas. Smad4 is a gene located at 18q that was recently cloned in humans and found to be significantly altered in pancreatic cancers. We sought to determine whether Smad4 genetic alterations played a significant role in gastric tumorigenesis by studying 35 gastric adenocarcinomas of all histopathological types and pathological stages. Microdissected specimens were used for mutational analysis of Smad4 at the nucleotide level, including the entire coding region and intron/exon boundaries. Allelic imbalance was also analyzed at the Smad4 locus using two nearby microsatellite markers. One case of apparent biallelic inactivation of Smad4 was found in our study of 35 gastric carcinomas. A nonsense point mutation at codon 334 was demonstrated, which, similar to other Smad4 mutations, is predicted to truncate the conserved COOH-terminal domain of this protein. This Smad4 C to T transition mutation was proven to be somatically acquired. Allelic loss was also noted on chromosome 18q at a marker near Smad4 in this mutated gastric cancer, apparently producing complete inactivation of Smad4 in this tumor. Significant 18q allelic loss (56% of 34 informative cases) was noted in our gastric carcinomas using microsatellite markers near the Smad4 locus, regardless of histological subtype or pathological stage. Additionally, three cases of microsatellite instability were observed. Thus, Smad4 inactivation was noted in our gastric carcinomas; however, this event was rare. The frequent loss of chromosomal arm 18q observed in gastric cancers suggests the presence of other tumor suppressor genes in this region that are involved in gastric tumorigenesis. Further studies are needed to identify these other targets of inactivation during gastric cancer development.

  13. Genetic inactivation of the Fanconi anemia gene FANCC identified in the hepatocellular carcinoma cell line HuH-7 confers sensitivity towards DNA-interstrand crosslinking agents

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bassermann Florian

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Inactivation of the Fanconi anemia (FA pathway through defects in one of 13 FA genes occurs at low frequency in various solid cancer entities among the general population. As FA pathway inactivation confers a distinct hypersensitivity towards DNA interstrand-crosslinking (ICL-agents, FA defects represent rational targets for individualized therapeutic strategies. Except for pancreatic cancer, however, the prevalence of FA defects in gastrointestinal (GI tumors has not yet been systematically explored. Results A panel of GI cancer cell lines was screened for FA pathway inactivation applying FANCD2 monoubiquitination and FANCD2/RAD51 nuclear focus formation and a newly identified FA pathway-deficient cell line was functionally characterized. The hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC line HuH-7 was defective in FANCD2 monoubiquitination and FANCD2 nuclear focus formation but proficient in RAD51 focus formation. Gene complementation studies revealed that this proximal FA pathway inactivation was attributable to defective FANCC function in HuH-7 cells. Accordingly, a homozygous inactivating FANCC nonsense mutation (c.553C > T, p.R185X was identified in HuH-7, resulting in partial transcriptional skipping of exon 6 and leading to the classic cellular FA hypersensitivity phenotype; HuH-7 cells exhibited a strongly reduced proliferation rate and a pronounced G2 cell cycle arrest at distinctly lower concentrations of ICL-agents than a panel of non-isogenic, FA pathway-proficient HCC cell lines. Upon retroviral transduction of HuH-7 cells with FANCC cDNA, FA pathway functions were restored and ICL-hypersensitivity abrogated. Analyses of 18 surgical HCC specimens yielded no further examples for genetic or epigenetic inactivation of FANCC, FANCF, or FANCG in HCC, suggesting a low prevalence of proximal FA pathway inactivation in this tumor type. Conclusions As the majority of HCC are chemoresistant, assessment of FA pathway function in HCC could

  14. New insights into thyroglobulin gene: molecular analysis of seven novel mutations associated with goiter and hypothyroidism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Citterio, Cintia E; Machiavelli, Gloria A; Miras, Mirta B; Gruñeiro-Papendieck, Laura; Lachlan, Katherine; Sobrero, Gabriela; Chiesa, Ana; Walker, Joanna; Muñoz, Liliana; Testa, Graciela; Belforte, Fiorella S; González-Sarmiento, Rogelio; Rivolta, Carina M; Targovnik, Héctor M

    2013-01-30

    The thyroglobulin (TG) gene is organized in 48 exons, spanning over 270 kb on human chromosome 8q24. Up to now, 62 inactivating mutations in the TG gene have been identified in patients with congenital goiter and endemic or non-endemic simple goiter. The purpose of the present study was to identify and characterize new mutations in the TG gene. We report 13 patients from seven unrelated families with goiter, hypothyroidism and low levels of serum TG. All patients underwent clinical, biochemical and imaging evaluation. Single-strand conformation polymorphism (SSCP) analysis, endonuclease restriction analysis, sequencing of DNA, genotyping, population screening, and bioinformatics studies were performed. Molecular analyses revealed seven novel inactivating TG mutations: c.378C>A [p.Y107X], c.2359C>T [p.R768X], c.2736delG [p.R893fsX946], c.3842G>A [p.C1262Y], c.5466delA [p.K1803fsX1833], c.6000C>G [p.C1981W] and c.6605C>G [p.P2183R] and three previously reported mutations: c.886C>T [p.R277X], c.6701C>A [p.A2215D] and c.7006C>T [p.R2317X]. Six patients from two families were homozygous for p.R277X mutation, four were compound heterozygous mutations (p.Y107X/p.C1262Y, p.R893fsX946/p.A2215D, p.K1803fsX1832/p.R2317X), one carried three identified mutations (p.R277X/p.C1981W-p.P2183R) together with a hypothetical micro deletion and the remaining two siblings from another family with typical phenotype had a single p.R768X mutated allele. In conclusion, our results confirm the genetic heterogeneity of TG defects and the pathophysiological importance of altered TG folding as a consequency of truncated TG proteins and missense mutations located in ACHE-like domain or that replace cysteine. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Molecular analysis of congenital goitres with hypothyroidism caused by defective thyroglobulin synthesis. Identification of a novel c.7006C>T [p.R2317X] mutation and expression of minigenes containing nonsense mutations in exon 7.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Machiavelli, Gloria A; Caputo, Mariela; Rivolta, Carina M; Olcese, María C; Gruñeiro-Papendieck, Laura; Chiesa, Ana; González-Sarmiento, Rogelio; Targovnik, Héctor M

    2010-01-01

    Thyroglobulin (TG) deficiency is an autosomal-recessive disorder that results in thyroid dyshormonogenesis. A number of distinct mutations have been identified as causing human hypothyroid goitre. The purpose of this study was to identify and characterize new mutations in the TG gene in an attempt to increase the understanding of the genetic mechanism responsible for this disorder. A total of six patients from four nonconsanguineous families with marked impairment of TG synthesis were studied. Single-strand conformation polymorphism (SSCP) analysis, sequencing of DNA, genotyping, expression of chimeric minigenes and bioinformatic analysis were performed. Four different inactivating TG mutations were identified: one novel mutation (c.7006C>T [p.R2317X]) and three previously reported (c.886C>T [p.R277X], c.6701C>A [p.A2215D] and c.6725G>A [p.R2223H]). Consequently, one patient carried a compound heterozygous for p.R2223H/p.R2317X mutations; two brothers showed a homozygous p.A2215D substitution and the remaining three patients, from two families with typical phenotype, had a single p.R277X mutated allele. We also showed functional evidences that premature stop codons inserted at different positions in exon 7, which disrupt exonic splicing enhancer (ESE) sequences, do not interfere with exon definition and processing. In this study, we have identified a novel nonsense mutation p.R2317X in the acetylcholinesterase homology domain of TG. We have also observed that nonsense mutations do not interfere with the pre-mRNA splicing of exon 7. The results are in accordance with previous observations confirming the genetic heterogeneity of TG defects.

  16. Multi-kilobase homozygous targeted gene replacement in human induced pluripotent stem cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Byrne, Susan M; Ortiz, Luis; Mali, Prashant; Aach, John; Church, George M

    2015-02-18

    Sequence-specific nucleases such as TALEN and the CRISPR/Cas9 system have so far been used to disrupt, correct or insert transgenes at precise locations in mammalian genomes. We demonstrate efficient 'knock-in' targeted replacement of multi-kilobase genes in human induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSC). Using a model system replacing endogenous human genes with their mouse counterpart, we performed a comprehensive study of targeting vector design parameters for homologous recombination. A 2.7 kilobase (kb) homozygous gene replacement was achieved in up to 11% of iPSC without selection. The optimal homology arm length was around 2 kb, with homology length being especially critical on the arm not adjacent to the cut site. Homologous sequence inside the cut sites was detrimental to targeting efficiency, consistent with a synthesis-dependent strand annealing (SDSA) mechanism. Using two nuclease sites, we observed a high degree of gene excisions and inversions, which sometimes occurred more frequently than indel mutations. While homozygous deletions of 86 kb were achieved with up to 8% frequency, deletion frequencies were not solely a function of nuclease activity and deletion size. Our results analyzing the optimal parameters for targeting vector design will inform future gene targeting efforts involving multi-kilobase gene segments, particularly in human iPSC. © The Author(s) 2014. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Nucleic Acids Research.

  17. Role of KEAP1/NRF2 and TP53 mutations in lung squamous cell carcinoma development and radiotherapy response prediction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeong, Youngtae; Hoang, Ngoc T.; Lovejoy, Alexander; Stehr, Henning; Newman, Aaron M.; Gentles, Andrew J.; Kong, William; Truong, Diana; Martin, Shanique; Chaudhuri, Aadel; Heiser, Diane; Zhou, Li; Say, Carmen; Carter, Justin N.; Hiniker, Susan M.; Loo, Billy W.; West, Robert B.; Beachy, Philip; Alizadeh, Ash A.; Diehn, Maximilian

    2016-01-01

    Lung squamous cell carcinomas (LSCC) pathogenesis remains incompletely understood and biomarkers predicting treatment response remain lacking. Here we describe novel murine LSCC models driven by loss of Trp53 and Keap1, both of which are frequently mutated in human LSCCs. Homozygous inactivation of Keap1 or Trp53 promoted airway basal stem cell (ABSC) self-renewal, suggesting that mutations in these genes lead to expansion of mutant stem cell clones. Deletion of Trp53 and Keap1 in ABSCs, but not more differentiated tracheal cells, produced tumors recapitulating histological and molecular features of human LSCCs, indicating that they represent the likely cell of origin in this model. Deletion of Keap1 promoted tumor aggressiveness, metastasis, and resistance to oxidative stress and radiotherapy (RT). KEAP1/NRF2 mutation status predicted risk of local recurrence after RT in non-small lung cancer (NSCLC) patients and could be non-invasively identified in circulating tumor DNA. Thus, KEAP1/NRF2 mutations could serve as predictive biomarkers for personalization of therapeutic strategies for NSCLCs. PMID:27663899

  18. Stepwise decrease in daptomycin susceptibility in clinical Staphylococcus aureus isolates associated with an initial mutation in rpoB and a compensatory inactivation of the clpX gene

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bæk, Kristoffer Torbjørn; Thøgersen, Louise; Mogensen, René G.

    2015-01-01

    , reduced expression of virulence traits, induced expression of the stress-associated transcriptional regulator, Spx, and slow growth. A subsequent acquired loss-of-function mutation in clpX partly alleviated the growth defect conferred by the rpoB mutation without changing antibiotic susceptibility...

  19. Two novel mutations in the BCKDK (branched-chain keto-acid dehydrogenase kinase) gene are responsible for a neurobehavioral deficit in two pediatric unrelated patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    García-Cazorla, Angels; Oyarzabal, Alfonso; Fort, Joana; Robles, Concepción; Castejón, Esperanza; Ruiz-Sala, Pedro; Bodoy, Susanna; Merinero, Begoña; Lopez-Sala, Anna; Dopazo, Joaquín; Nunes, Virginia; Ugarte, Magdalena; Artuch, Rafael; Palacín, Manuel; Rodríguez-Pombo, Pilar; Alcaide, Patricia; Navarrete, Rosa; Sanz, Paloma; Font-Llitjós, Mariona; Vilaseca, Ma Antonia; Ormaizabal, Aida; Pristoupilova, Anna; Agulló, Sergi Beltran

    2014-04-01

    Inactivating mutations in the BCKDK gene, which codes for the kinase responsible for the negative regulation of the branched-chain α-keto acid dehydrogenase complex (BCKD), have recently been associated with a form of autism in three families. In this work, two novel exonic BCKDK mutations, c.520C>G/p.R174G and c.1166T>C/p.L389P, were identified at the homozygous state in two unrelated children with persistently reduced body fluid levels of branched-chain amino acids (BCAAs), developmental delay, microcephaly, and neurobehavioral abnormalities. Functional analysis of the mutations confirmed the missense character of the c.1166T>C change and showed a splicing defect r.[520c>g;521_543del]/p.R174Gfs1*, for c.520C>G due to the presence of a new donor splice site. Mutation p.L389P showed total loss of kinase activity. Moreover, patient-derived fibroblasts showed undetectable (p.R174Gfs1*) or barely detectable (p.L389P) levels of BCKDK protein and its phosphorylated substrate (phospho-E1α), resulting in increased BCKD activity and the very rapid BCAA catabolism manifested by the patients' clinical phenotype. Based on these results, a protein-rich diet plus oral BCAA supplementation was implemented in the patient homozygous for p.R174Gfs1*. This treatment normalized plasma BCAA levels and improved growth, developmental and behavioral variables. Our results demonstrate that BCKDK mutations can result in neurobehavioral deficits in humans and support the rationale for dietary intervention. © 2014 WILEY PERIODICALS, INC.

  20. Hepatitis B Virus Infection In Patients With Homozygous Sickle Cell ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Nnebe-Agumadu U H, and Abiodun P O. Hepatitis B Virus Infection in Patients with Homozygous Sickle Cell Disease (HbSS): Need for Intervention. Annals Biomedical Sciences 2002; 1:79-87. This is a prospective study of 213 patients with sickle cell anaemia (SCA) (112 males and 101 females) aged 6 months to 18 years ...

  1. Avascular necrosis in sickle cell (homozygous S) patients: Predictive ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ... with the development of AVN. Conclusion: In conclusion, patients with a raised steady state platelet count may have a higher tendency to develop AVN and may require closer orthopedic review and prophylactic intervention. Key words: Avascular necrosis, homozygous S, platelet count, sickle cell anemia, white cell count ...

  2. Adenovirus mediated homozygous endometrial epithelial Pten deletion results in aggressive endometrial carcinoma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Joshi, Ayesha; Ellenson, Lora Hedrick, E-mail: lora.ellenson@med.cornell.edu

    2011-07-01

    Pten is the most frequently mutated gene in uterine endometriod carcinoma (UEC) and its precursor complex atypical hyperplasia (CAH). Because the mutation frequency is similar in CAH and UEC, Pten mutations are thought to occur relatively early in endometrial tumorigenesis. Previous work from our laboratory using the Pten{sup +/-} mouse model has demonstrated somatic inactivation of the wild type allele of Pten in both CAH and UEC. In the present study, we injected adenoviruses expressing Cre into the uterine lumen of adult Pten floxed mice in an attempt to somatically delete both alleles of Pten specifically in the endometrium. Our results demonstrate that biallelic inactivation of Pten results in an increased incidence of carcinoma as compared to the Pten{sup +/-} mouse model. In addition, the carcinomas were more aggressive with extension beyond the uterus into adjacent tissues and were associated with decreased expression of nuclear ER{alpha} as compared to associated CAH. Primary cultures of epithelial and stromal cells were prepared from uteri of Pten floxed mice and Pten was deleted in vitro using Cre expressing adenovirus. Pten deletion was evident in both the epithelial and stromal cells and the treatment of the primary cultures with estrogen had different effects on Akt activation as well as Cyclin D3 expression in the two purified components. This study demonstrates that somatic biallelic inactivation of Pten in endometrial epithelium in vivo results in an increased incidence and aggressiveness of endometrial carcinoma compared to mice carrying a germline deletion of one allele and provides an important in vivo and in vitro model system for understanding the genetic underpinnings of endometrial carcinoma.

  3. Adenovirus mediated homozygous endometrial epithelial Pten deletion results in aggressive endometrial carcinoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Joshi, Ayesha; Ellenson, Lora Hedrick

    2011-01-01

    Pten is the most frequently mutated gene in uterine endometriod carcinoma (UEC) and its precursor complex atypical hyperplasia (CAH). Because the mutation frequency is similar in CAH and UEC, Pten mutations are thought to occur relatively early in endometrial tumorigenesis. Previous work from our laboratory using the Pten +/- mouse model has demonstrated somatic inactivation of the wild type allele of Pten in both CAH and UEC. In the present study, we injected adenoviruses expressing Cre into the uterine lumen of adult Pten floxed mice in an attempt to somatically delete both alleles of Pten specifically in the endometrium. Our results demonstrate that biallelic inactivation of Pten results in an increased incidence of carcinoma as compared to the Pten +/- mouse model. In addition, the carcinomas were more aggressive with extension beyond the uterus into adjacent tissues and were associated with decreased expression of nuclear ERα as compared to associated CAH. Primary cultures of epithelial and stromal cells were prepared from uteri of Pten floxed mice and Pten was deleted in vitro using Cre expressing adenovirus. Pten deletion was evident in both the epithelial and stromal cells and the treatment of the primary cultures with estrogen had different effects on Akt activation as well as Cyclin D3 expression in the two purified components. This study demonstrates that somatic biallelic inactivation of Pten in endometrial epithelium in vivo results in an increased incidence and aggressiveness of endometrial carcinoma compared to mice carrying a germline deletion of one allele and provides an important in vivo and in vitro model system for understanding the genetic underpinnings of endometrial carcinoma.

  4. A novel homozygous missense variant in NECTIN4 (PVRL4) causing ectodermal dysplasia cutaneous syndactyly syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmad, Farooq; Nasir, Abdul; Thiele, Holger; Umair, Muhammad; Borck, Guntram; Ahmad, Wasim

    2018-02-12

    Ectodermal dysplasia syndactyly syndrome 1 (EDSS1) is a rare form of ectodermal dysplasia including anomalies of hair, nails, and teeth along with bilateral cutaneous syndactyly of hands and feet. In the present report, we performed a clinical and genetic characterization of a consanguineous Pakistani family with four individuals affected by EDSS1. We performed exome sequencing using DNA of one affected individual. Exome data analysis identified a novel homozygous missense variant (c.242T>C; p.(Leu81Pro)) in NECTIN4 (PVRL4). Sanger sequencing validated this variant and confirmed its cosegregation with the disease phenotype in the family members. Thus, our report adds a novel variant to the NECTIN4 mutation spectrum and contributes to the NECTIN4-related clinical characterization. © 2018 John Wiley & Sons Ltd/University College London.

  5. Tezacaftor-Ivacaftor in Patients with Cystic Fibrosis Homozygous for Phe508del.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taylor-Cousar, Jennifer L; Munck, Anne; McKone, Edward F; van der Ent, Cornelis K; Moeller, Alexander; Simard, Christopher; Wang, Linda T; Ingenito, Edward P; McKee, Charlotte; Lu, Yimeng; Lekstrom-Himes, Julie; Elborn, J Stuart

    2017-11-23

    Combination treatment with the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) modulators tezacaftor (VX-661) and ivacaftor (VX-770) was designed to target the underlying cause of disease in patients with cystic fibrosis. In this phase 3, randomized, double-blind, multicenter, placebo-controlled, parallel-group trial, we evaluated combination therapy with tezacaftor and ivacaftor in patients 12 years of age or older who had cystic fibrosis and were homozygous for the CFTR Phe508del mutation. Patients were randomly assigned in a 1:1 ratio to receive either 100 mg of tezacaftor once daily and 150 mg of ivacaftor twice daily or matched placebo for 24 weeks. The primary end point was the absolute change in the percentage of the predicted forced expiratory volume in 1 second (FEV 1 ) through week 24 (calculated in percentage points); relative change in the percentage of the predicted FEV 1 through week 24 (calculated as a percentage) was a key secondary end point. Of the 510 patients who underwent randomization, 509 received tezacaftor-ivacaftor or placebo, and 475 completed 24 weeks of the trial regimen. The mean FEV 1 at baseline was 60.0% of the predicted value. The effects on the absolute and relative changes in the percentage of the predicted FEV 1 in favor of tezacaftor-ivacaftor over placebo were 4.0 percentage points and 6.8%, respectively (Pcystic fibrosis and were homozygous for the CFTR Phe508del mutation. (Funded by Vertex Pharmaceuticals; EVOLVE ClinicalTrials.gov number, NCT02347657 .).

  6. Craniofacial abnormalities in homozygous Small eye (Sey/Sey) embryos and newborn mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaufman, M H; Chang, H H; Shaw, J P

    1995-06-01

    The Small eye (Sey) gene in the mouse is lethal in the homozygous state. It is located on chromosome 2, is a mutation in the Pax-6 gene, and is genetically homologous with the human aniridia 2 (AN2) gene mutation. Numerous studies over the last few years, using genetic and molecular biological approaches, have investigated both the location of the gene as well as its possible mode of action. In the homozygous state, the primary defect appears to be limited to the failure of differentiation of the presumptive lens and nasal placodes. Such mice therefore display a characteristic phenotype; they possess neither eyes nor any nasal derivatives. Their heterozygous (Sey/+) and normal (+/+) littermates may be distinguished before birth only by a detailed examination of their eyes. Few detailed morphological/histological studies have been undertaken to date in the Sey/Sey embryos and newborn, and in the present study we describe a variety of craniofacial abnormalities that have not previously been reported. We observed, with one exception, delayed closure of the palate, and the presence in 80% of mice of an abnormal complement of upper incisor teeth, so that 35% possessed 1 supernumerary tooth while 45% possessed 2 supernumerary teeth. In these mice, a total of either 3 or 4, rather than the normal complement of 2, upper incisor teeth were present. Possibly the most unexpected finding, however, was the presence of a median cartilaginous rod-like structure which protruded between the 2 maxillae to give the Alizarin red S and Alcian blue-stained 'cleared' skulls of the newborn mice a characteristic 'unicorn-like' appearance. While this structure appeared to be a rostral extension of the chondrocranium, its exact derivation is unclear.

  7. Mutations in PCBD1 Cause Hypomagnesemia and Renal Magnesium Wasting

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ferre, S.; Baaij, J.H.F. de; Ferreira, P.; Germann, R.; Klerk, J.B. De; Lavrijsen, M.; Zeeland, F. van; Venselaar, H.; Kluijtmans, L.A.; Hoenderop, J.G.J.; Bindels, R.J.M.

    2014-01-01

    Mutations in PCBD1 are causative for transient neonatal hyperphenylalaninemia and primapterinuria (HPABH4D). Until now, HPABH4D has been regarded as a transient and benign neonatal syndrome without complications in adulthood. In our study of three adult patients with homozygous mutations in the

  8. Bilateral leukocoria in a patient with homozygous protein C deficiency

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khan, Nasrat M.; Al-Dohayan, Noura D.; Al-Batiniji, Fatima S.

    2007-01-01

    We describe a bilateral leukocoria and neonatal purpura fulminans in a male infant, born at full term after an unremarkable pregnancy to a healthy consanguineous married couple. Multiple hemorrhagic skin bullae were found at birth on various parts of the body with bilateral leukocoria, organized vitreous hemorrhage, retinal detachment, and intracranial hemorrhage with undetectable levels of protein C activity. We report a clinical case of homozygous protein-C deficiency with severe purpura fulminans and bilateral leukocoria. (author)

  9. Malabsorption of vitamin B12 in homozygous β-thalassemia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vlachos, P.; Liakakos, D.

    1976-01-01

    Schilling tests were performed in ten children aged 5-12 years suffering from homozygous β-thalassemia. 57 Co labelled vitamin B 12 values excreted in the urine have been found much lower than normal and remained low when the same procedure was repeated with the addition of intrinsic factor. The possible factors responsible for this malabsorption of vitamin B 12 seemed to be liver damage and folic acid deficiency. (orig.) [de

  10. Premature Valvular Heart Disease in Homozygous Familial Hypercholesterolemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fahed, Akl C; Shibbani, Kamel; Andary, Rabih R; Arabi, Mariam T; Habib, Robert H; Nguyen, Denis D; Haddad, Fady F; Moubarak, Elie; Nemer, Georges; Azar, Sami T; Bitar, Fadi F

    2017-01-01

    Valvular heart disease frequently occurs as a consequence of premature atherosclerosis in individuals with familial hypercholesterolemia (FH). Studies have primarily focused on aortic valve calcification in heterozygous FH, but there is paucity of data on the incidence of valvular disease in homozygous FH. We performed echocardiographic studies in 33 relatively young patients (mean age: 26 years) with homozygous FH (mean LDL of 447 mg/dL, 73% on LDL apheresis) to look for subclinical valvulopathy. Twenty-one patients had evidence of valvulopathy of the aortic or mitral valves, while seven subjects showed notable mitral regurgitation. Older patients were more likely to have aortic valve calcification (>21 versus ≤21 years: 59% versus 12.5%; p = 0.01) despite lower LDL levels at the time of the study (385 versus 513 mg/dL; p = 0.016). Patients with valvulopathy were older and had comparable LDL levels and a lower carotid intima-media thickness. Our data suggests that, in homozygous FH patients, valvulopathy (1) is present across a wide age spectrum and LDL levels and (2) is less likely to be influenced by lipid-lowering treatment. Echocardiographic studies that focused on aortic root thickening and stenosis and regurgitation are thus likely an effective modality for serial follow-up of subclinical valvular heart disease.

  11. Premature Valvular Heart Disease in Homozygous Familial Hypercholesterolemia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Akl C. Fahed

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Valvular heart disease frequently occurs as a consequence of premature atherosclerosis in individuals with familial hypercholesterolemia (FH. Studies have primarily focused on aortic valve calcification in heterozygous FH, but there is paucity of data on the incidence of valvular disease in homozygous FH. We performed echocardiographic studies in 33 relatively young patients (mean age: 26 years with homozygous FH (mean LDL of 447 mg/dL, 73% on LDL apheresis to look for subclinical valvulopathy. Twenty-one patients had evidence of valvulopathy of the aortic or mitral valves, while seven subjects showed notable mitral regurgitation. Older patients were more likely to have aortic valve calcification (>21 versus ≤21 years: 59% versus 12.5%; p = 0.01 despite lower LDL levels at the time of the study (385 versus 513 mg/dL; p = 0.016. Patients with valvulopathy were older and had comparable LDL levels and a lower carotid intima-media thickness. Our data suggests that, in homozygous FH patients, valvulopathy (1 is present across a wide age spectrum and LDL levels and (2 is less likely to be influenced by lipid-lowering treatment. Echocardiographic studies that focused on aortic root thickening and stenosis and regurgitation are thus likely an effective modality for serial follow-up of subclinical valvular heart disease.

  12. Secondary polycythaemia in a Malay girl with homozygous Hb Tak.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amran, H S; Aziz, M A; George, E; Mahmud, N; Lee, T Y; Md Noor, S

    2017-12-01

    Hb Tak is one of more than 200 high affinity haemoglobin variants reported worldwide. It results from the insertion of two nucleotides (AC) at the termination codon, between codon 146 and codon 147 of the beta-globin gene [Beta 147 (+AC)]. Polycythaemia is the main clinical feature although affected carriers are usually asymptomatic and do not require intervention. Several case studies in this region have reported the co-inheritance of Hb Tak with Hb E, delta beta and beta thalassaemia with one case of homozygous Hb Tak in a Thai boy. In this case report, a cluster of haemoglobin Tak was found in a family of Malay ethnic origin. Cascade family screening was conducted while investigating a 4-year old girl who presented with symptomatic polycythaemia. She had 2 previous Hb analysis done, at 7-month and 2-year-old with the diagnosis of possible Hb Q Thailand and Homozygous Hb D, respectively. Both diagnosis did not fit her clinical presentations. She was plethoric, had reduced exercise tolerance as well as cardiomyopathy. Her parents were consanguineously married and later diagnosed as asymptomatic carriers of Hb Tak. Consequently, re-analysis of the girl's blood sample revealed a homozygous state of Hb Tak. In conclusion, high oxygen affinity haemoglobin like Hb Tak should be considered in the investigation of polycythaemic patients with abnormal Hb analyses. In this case, DNA analysis was crucial in determining the correct diagnosis.

  13. Ultraviolet inactivation of papain

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baugher, J.F.; Grossweiner, L.I.

    1975-01-01

    Flash photolysis transient spectra (lambda > 250 nm) of aqueous papain showed that the initial products are the neutral tryptophan radical Trp (lambdasub(max) 510 nm), the tryptophan triplet state 3 Trp (lambdasub(max) 460 nm), the disulfide bridge electron adduct -SS - - (lambdasub(max) 420 nm) and the hydrated electron esub(aq) - . The -SS - - yield was not altered by nitrous oxide or air, indicating that the formation of this product does not involve electrons in the external medium. The original papain preparation was activated by irradiating under nitrogen. The action spectrum supports previous work attributing the low initial activity to blocking of cysteinyl site 25 with a mixed disulfide. Flask lamp irradiation in nitrogen led to activation at low starting activities and inactivation at higher starting activities, while only inactivation at the same quantum yield was observed with air saturation. The results are consistent with photoionization of an essential tryptophyl residue as the key inactivating step. (author)

  14. Complex phenotype of dyskeratosis congenita and mood dysregulation with novel homozygous RTEL1 and TPH1 variants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ungar, Rachel A; Giri, Neelam; Pao, Maryland; Khincha, Payal P; Zhou, Weiyin; Alter, Blanche P; Savage, Sharon A

    2018-06-01

    Dyskeratosis congenita (DC) is an inherited bone marrow failure syndrome caused by germline mutations in telomere biology genes. Patients have extremely short telomeres for their age and a complex phenotype including oral leukoplakia, abnormal skin pigmentation, and dysplastic nails in addition to bone marrow failure, pulmonary fibrosis, stenosis of the esophagus, lacrimal ducts and urethra, developmental anomalies, and high risk of cancer. We evaluated a patient with features of DC, mood dysregulation, diabetes, and lack of pubertal development. Family history was not available but genome-wide genotyping was consistent with consanguinity. Whole exome sequencing identified 82 variants of interest in 80 genes based on the following criteria: homozygous, <0.1% minor allele frequency in public and in-house databases, nonsynonymous, and predicted deleterious by multiple in silico prediction programs. Six genes were identified likely contributory to the clinical presentation. The cause of DC is likely due to homozygous splice site variants in regulator of telomere elongation helicase 1, a known DC and telomere biology gene. A homozygous, missense variant in tryptophan hydroxylase 1 may be clinically important as this gene encodes the rate limiting step in serotonin biosynthesis, a biologic pathway connected with mood disorders. Four additional genes (SCN4A, LRP4, GDAP1L1, and SPTBN5) had rare, missense homozygous variants that we speculate may contribute to portions of the clinical phenotype. This case illustrates the value of conducting detailed clinical and genomic evaluations on rare patients in order to identify new areas of research into the functional consequences of rare variants and their contribution to human disease. © 2018 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  15. Progressive cerebellar atrophy and polyneuropathy: expanding the spectrum of PNKP mutations

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Poulton, C.; Oegema, R.; Heijsman, D.; Hoogeboom, J.; Schot, R.; Stroink, H.; Willemsen, M.A.A.P.; Verheijen, F.W.; Spek, P. van der; Kremer, A.; Mancini, G.M.S.

    2013-01-01

    We present a neurodegenerative disorder starting in early childhood of two brothers consisting of severe progressive polyneuropathy, severe progressive cerebellar atrophy, microcephaly, mild epilepsy, and intellectual disability. The cause of this rare syndrome was found to be a homozygous mutation

  16. Cell surface fucosylation does not affect development of colon tumors in mice with germline Smad3 mutation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Domino, Steven E.; Karnak, David M.; Hurd, Elizabeth A.

    2006-01-01

    Background/Aims: Neoplasia-related alterations in cell surface α(1,2)fucosylated glycans have been reported in multiple tumors including colon, pancreas, endometrium, cervix, bladder, lung, and choriocarcinoma. Spontaneous colorectal tumors from mice with a germline null mutation of transforming growth factor-β signaling gene Smad3 (Madh3) were tested for α(1,2)fucosylated glycan expression. Methods: Ulex Europaeus Agglutinin-I lectin staining, fucosyltransferase gene northern blot analysis, and a cross of mutant mice with Fut2 and Smad3 germline mutations were performed. Results: Spontaneous colorectal tumors from Smad3 (-/-) homozygous null mice were found to express α(1,2)fucosylated glycans in an abnormal pattern compared to adjacent nonneoplastic colon. Northern blot analysis of α(1,2)fucosyltransferase genes Fut1 and Fut2 revealed that Fut2, but not Fut1, steady-state mRNA levels were significantly increased in tumors relative to adjacent normal colonic mucosa. Mutant mice with a Fut2-inactivating germline mutation were crossed with Smad3 targeted mice. In Smad3 (-/-)/Fut2 (-/-) double knock-out mice, UEA-I lectin staining was eliminated from colon and colon tumors, however, the number and size of tumors present by 24 weeks of age did not vary regardless of the Fut2 genotype. Conclusions: In this model of colorectal cancer, cell surface α(1,2)fucosylation does not affect development of colon tumors. PMID:17264540

  17. STAT3 mutations correlated with hyper-IgE syndrome lead to ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Of all the causes identified for the disease hyper-immunoglobulinemia E syndrome (HIES), a homozygous mutation in tyrosine kinase2 (TYK2) and heterozygous mutations in STAT3 are implicated the defects in Jak/STAT signalling pathway in the pathogenesis of HIES. Mutations of STAT3 have been frequently clinically ...

  18. Homozygous variegate porphyria presenting with developmental and language delay in childhood.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pinder, V A E; Holden, S T; Deshpande, C; Siddiqui, A; Mellerio, J E; Wraige, E; Powell, A M

    2013-10-01

    Variegate porphyria is an autosomal dominant disorder that usually presents with photosensitivity and acute neurological crises in adulthood. It is caused by heterozygous mutations in the protoporphyrinogen oxidase gene (PPOX). A rarer variant, homozygous variegate porphyria (HVP), presents in childhood with recurrent skin blisters and scarring. More variable features of HVP are short stature, brachydactyly, nystagmus, epilepsy, developmental delay and mental retardation. We describe a child who presented with nystagmus, developmental delay and ataxia, combined with a photosensitive eruption. Analysis of porphyrins in plasma, urine and stool supported a clinical diagnosis of HVP. DNA from the patient showed that he is compound heterozygous for two novel missense mutations in the PPOX coding region: c.169G>C (p.Gly57Arg) and c.1259C>G (Pro420Arg). Interestingly, cranial magnetic resonance imaging showed an absence of myelin, a feature not previously reported in HVP, which expands the differential diagnosis of childhood hypomyelinating leucoencephalopathies. © 2013 British Association of Dermatologists.

  19. Mitochondrial leukoencephalopathy and complex II deficiency associated with a recessive SDHB mutation with reduced penetrance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anna Ardissone

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Mitochondrial disease involving complex II is rare among respiratory chain deficiencies and its genetic cause remains often unknown. Two main clinical presentations are associated with this biochemical defect: mitochondrial encephalomyopathy and susceptibility to tumors. Only one homozygous SDHB mutation has been described in a patient with mitochondrial disorder. We report here two sisters, who presented highly different phenotypes (neurological impairment with leukoencephalopathy vs. asymptomatic status and harbored the same homozygous SDHB mutation, suggesting reduced penetrance.

  20. AURKA F31I Polymorphism and Breast Cancer Risk in BRCA1 and BRCA2 Mutation Carriers: A CIMBA study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Couch, Fergus J.; Sinilnikova, Olga; Vierkant, Robert A; Pankratz, V. Shane; Fredericksen, Zachary S.; Stoppa-Lyonnet, Dominique; Coupier, Isabelle; Hughes, David; Hardouin, Agnès; Berthet, Pascaline; Peock, Susan; Cook, Margaret; Baynes, Caroline; Hodgson, Shirley; Morrison, Patrick J.; Porteous, Mary E.; Jakubowska, Anna; Lubinski, Jan; Gronwald, Jacek; Spurdle, Amanda B.; Schmutzler, Rita; Versmold, Beatrix; Engel, Christoph; Meindl, Alfons; Sutter, Christian; Horst, Jurgen; Schaefer, Dieter; Offit, Kenneth; Kirchhoff, Tomas; Andrulis, Irene L.; Ilyushik, Eduard; Glendon, Gordon; Devilee, Peter; Vreeswijk, Maaike P.G.; Vasen, Hans F.A.; Borg, Ake; Backenhorn, Katja; Struewing, Jeffery P.; Greene, Mark H.; Neuhausen, Susan L.; Rebbeck, Timothy R.; Nathanson, Katherine; Domchek, Susan; Wagner, Theresa; Garber, Judy E.; Szabo, Csilla; Zikan, Michal; Foretova, Lenka; Olson, Janet E.; Sellers, Thomas A.; Lindor, Noralane; Nevanlinna, Heli; Tommiska, Johanna; Aittomaki, Kristiina; Hamann, Ute; Rashid, Muhammad U.; Torres, Diana; Simard, Jacques; Durocher, Francine; Guenard, Frederic; Lynch, Henry T.; Isaacs, Claudine; Weitzel, Jeffrey; Olopade, Olufunmilayo I.; Narod, Steven; Daly, Mary B.; Godwin, Andrew K.; Tomlinson, Gail; Easton, Douglas F.; Chenevix-Trench, Georgia; Antoniouon, Antonis C.

    2009-01-01

    The AURKA oncogene is associated with abnormal chromosome segregation and aneuploidy and predisposition to cancer. Amplification of AURKA has been detected at higher frequency in tumors from BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutation carriers than in sporadic breast tumors, suggesting that overexpression of AURKA and inactivation of BRCA1 and BRCA2 co-operate during tumor development and progression. The F31I polymorphism in AURKA has been associated with breast cancer risk in the homozygous state in prior studies. We evaluated whether the AURKA F31I polymorphism modifies breast cancer risk in BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutation carriers from the Consortium of Investigators of Modifiers of BRCA1/2 (CIMBA). CIMBA was established to provide sufficient statistical power through increased numbers of mutation carriers to identify polymorphisms that act as modifiers of cancer risk and can refine breast cancer risk estimates in BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutation carriers. A total of 4935 BRCA1 and 2241 BRCA2 mutation carriers and 11 individuals carrying both BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutations were genotyped for F31I. Overall, homozygosity for the 31I allele was not significantly associated with breast cancer risk in BRCA1 and BRCA2 carriers combined (HR = 0.91; 95% CI 0.77-1.06). Similarly, no significant association was seen in BRCA1 (HR = 0.90; 95% CI 0.75-1.08) or BRCA2 carriers (HR = 0.93; 95% CI 0.67-1.29) or when assessing the modifying effects of either bilateral prophylactic oophorectomy or menopausal status of BRCA1 and BRCA2 carriers. In summary, the F31I polymorphism in AURKA is not associated with a modified risk of breast cancer in BRCA1 and BRCA2 carriers. PMID:17627006

  1. Frequency of Gγ-globin promoter -158 (C>T) XmnI polymorphism in patients with homozygous/compound heterozygous beta thalassaemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ali, Nadir; Ayyub, Muhammad; Khan, Saleem Ahmed; Ahmed, Suhaib; Abbas, Kazim; Malik, Hamid Saeed; Tashfeen, Sunila

    2015-03-01

    Response to hydroxyurea therapy in homozygous or compound heterozygous beta thalassaemia (BT) has been reported as more favourable in the presence of XmnI polymorphism. The prevalence of XmnI polymorphism may vary with BT phenotypes and genotypes, and differs geographically in distribution. Prevalence of XmnI polymorphism is not known in northern Pakistan. To determine the frequency of Gγ-globin promoter -158 (C>T) XmnI polymorphism (XmnI polymorphism) in patients with homozygous or compound heterozygous beta thalassaemia. Polymerase chain reaction (PCR) for common beta thalassaemia mutations and Gγ-globin promoter -158 (C>T) XmnI polymorphism was performed on 107 blood samples of transfusion dependent beta thalassaemia (BT) patients in Pakistan. One hundred samples of unrelated BT traits and 94 samples of healthy subjects as controls were also analysed for BT mutations and XmnI polymorphism. Out of 301 DNA samples, XmnI polymorphism was detected in 71(24%); in normal controls, XmnI polymorphism was detected in 34/94 (36%) subjects; while in homozygous/compound heterozygous BT, it was detected in 14/107(13%) patients (Fisher's exact test, p=.0002). In heterozygous BT group, XmnI polymorphism was detected in 23/100 subjects (Fisher's exact test, p=.03 with normal controls, and p=.049 with homozygous/compound heterozygous BT). The most common BT genotype was Frame Shift (Fr) 8-9/Fr 8-9, and none of the patients with this genotype had XmnI polymorphism. The second most common genotype was IVSI-5/IVSI-5; 4/26 (15%). Cases with this genotype had XmnI polymorphism. XmnI polymorphism in homozygous/compound heterozygous BT group is 13%. The most common genotype associated with XmnI polymorphism was IVSI-5/IVSI-5. Copyright © 2015 King Faisal Specialist Hospital & Research Centre. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. CYP2R1 mutations causing vitamin D-deficiency rickets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thacher, Tom D; Levine, Michael A

    2017-10-01

    CYP2R1 is the principal hepatic 25-hydroxylase responsible for the hydroxylation of parent vitamin D to 25-hydroxyvitamin D [25(OH)D]. Serum concentrations of 25(OH)D reflect vitamin D status, because 25(OH)D is the major circulating metabolite of vitamin D. The 1α-hydroxylation of 25(OH)D in the kidney by CYP27B1 generates the fully active vitamin D metabolite, 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D (1,25(OH) 2 D). The human CYP2R1 gene, located at 11p15.2, has five exons, coding for an enzyme with 501 amino acids. In Cyp2r1-/- knockout mice, serum 25(OH)D levels were reduced by more than 50% compared wild-type mice. Genetic polymorphisms of CYP2R1 account for some of the individual variability of circulating 25(OH)D values in the population. We review the evidence that inactivating mutations in CYP2R1 can lead to a novel form of vitamin D-deficiency rickets resulting from impaired 25-hydroxylation of vitamin D. We sequenced the promoter, exons and intron-exon flanking regions of the CYP2R1 gene in members of 12 Nigerian families with rickets in more than one family member. We found missense mutations (L99P and K242N) in affected members of 2 of 12 families. The L99P mutation had previously been reported as a homozygous defect in an unrelated child of Nigerian origin with rickets. In silico analyses predicted impaired CYP2R1 folding or reduced interaction with substrate vitamin D by L99P and K242N mutations, respectively. In vitro studies of the mutant CYP2R1 proteins in HEK293 cells confirmed normal expression levels but completely absent or markedly reduced 25-hydroxylase activity by the L99P and K242N mutations, respectively. Heterozygous subjects had more moderate biochemical and clinical features of vitamin D deficiency than homozygous subjects. After an oral bolus dose of 50,000 IU of vitamin D 2 or vitamin D 3 , heterozygous subjects had lower increases in serum 25(OH)D than control subjects, and homozygous subjects had minimal increases, supporting a semidominant

  3. Successful Treatment Of Homozygous Familial Hypercholesterolemia Using Cascade Filtration Plasmapheresis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fatih Kardas

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: The aim of our study is to discuss the efficacy of low-density lipoprotein-cholesterol (LDL-C apheresis procedure using the cascade filtration system for pediatric patients with homozygous familial hypercholesterolemia (FH, and to clarify the adverse effects and difficulties. METHODS: LDL apheresis using the cascade filtration system was performed in 3 pediatric patients with homozygous FH. In total, 120 apheresis sessions were performed for all patients. RESULTS: Cascade filtration therapy significantly reduced the mean LDL-C values from 418 ± 62 mg/dl to 145 ± 43 mg/dl (p<0.05. We determined an acute mean reduction in the plasma levels of total cholesterol (57.9%, LDL cholesterol (70.8%, and high-density lipoprotein (HDL cholesterol (40.7%. Treatments were well tolerated. The most frequent clinical adverse effects were hypotension in 3 sessions (2.5%, chills/feeling cold (1.7% in 2 sessions, and nausea and vomiting in 3 sessions (2.5%. CONCLUSION: Our experience with three patients using the cascade filtration system were, good clinical outcomes, laboratory findings, safety of usage, minor adverse effects and technical problems.

  4. Successful treatment of homozygous familial hypercholesterolemia using cascade filtration plasmapheresis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kardaş, Fatih; Cetin, Aysun; Solmaz, Musa; Büyükoğlan, Rüksan; Kaynar, Leylagül; Kendirci, Mustafa; Eser, Bülent; Unal, Ali

    2012-12-01

    The aim of this study was to report the efficacy of low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C) apheresisusing a cascade filtration system in pediatric patients with homozygous familial hypercholesterolemia (FH), and toclarify the associated adverse effects and difficulties. LDL-C apheresis using a cascade filtration system was performed in 3 pediatric patientswith homozygous FH; in total, 120 apheresis sessions were performed. Cascade filtration therapy significantly reduced the mean LDL-C values from 418 ± 62 mg/dL to 145 ± 43 mg/dL (p= 0.011). We observed an acute mean reduction in the plasma level of total cholesterol (57.9%), LDL-C (70.8%),and high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-C) (40.7%). Treatments were well tolerated. The most frequent clinicaladverse effects were hypotension in 3 sessions (2.5%), chills (1.7%) in 2 sessions, and nausea/vomiting in 3 sessions(2.5%). Our experience using the cascade filtration system with 3 patients included good clinical outcomes andlaboratory findings, safe usage, and minor adverse effects and technical problems. None declared.

  5. Homozygous LIPE Mutation in Siblings with Multiple Symmetric Lipomatosis, Partial Lipodystrophy, and Myopathy

    OpenAIRE

    Zolotov, Sagit; Xing, Chao; Mahamid, Riad; Shalata, Adel; Sheikh-Ahmad, Mohammed; Garg, Abhimanyu

    2016-01-01

    Despite considerable progress in identifying causal genes for lipodystrophy syndromes, the molecular basis of some peculiar adipose tissue disorders remains obscure. In an Israeli–Arab pedigree with a novel autosomal recessive, multiple symmetric lipomatosis (MSL), partial lipodystrophy and myopathy, we conducted exome sequencing of two affected siblings to identify the disease-causingmutation. The 41-year-old female proband and her 36-year-old brother reported marked accumulation of subcutan...

  6. ABCD syndrome is caused by a homozygous mutation in the EDNRB gene

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Verheij, JBGM; Kunze, J; Osinga, J; van Essen, AJ; Hofstra, RMW

    2002-01-01

    ABCD syndrome is an autosomal recessive syndrome characterized by albinism, black lock, cell migration disorder of the neurocytes of the gut (Hirschsprung disease [HSCR]), and deafness. This phenotype clearly overlaps with the features of the Shah-Waardenburg syndrome, comprising sensorineural

  7. A novel homozygous truncating GNAT1 mutation implicated in retinal degeneration.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Carrigan, Matthew

    2016-04-01

    The GNAT1 gene encodes the α subunit of the rod transducin protein, a key element in the rod phototransduction cascade. Variants in GNAT1 have been implicated in stationary night-blindness in the past, but unlike other proteins in the same pathway, it has not previously been implicated in retinitis pigmentosa.

  8. Development of antibiotic resistance and up-regulation of the antimutator gene pfpI in mutator Pseudomonas aeruginosa due to inactivation of two DNA oxidative repair genes (mutY, mutM)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mandsberg, Lotte Frigaard; Macia, Maria D.; Bergmann, Kirsten R.

    2011-01-01

    showed only a fivefold increase, whereas the single mutant PAOMMgm (mutM) showed a nonsignificant increase in MR compared with PAO1 and the single mutants. Mutations in the regulator nfxB leading to hyperexpression of MexCD-OprJ efflux pump were found as the mechanism of resistance to ciprofloxacin....... In this study, we constructed a double mutant in mutY and mutM (PAOMY-Mgm) and characterized the phenotype and the gene expression profile using microarray and RT-PCR. PAOMY-Mgm presented 28-fold increases in MR compared with wild-type reference strain PAO1. In comparison, the PAOMYgm (mutY) single mutant...... in the double mutant. A better fitness of the mutator compared with PAO1 was found in growth competition experiments in the presence of ciprofloxacin at concentrations just below minimal inhibitory concentration. Up-regulation of the antimutator gene pfpI, that has been shown to provide protection to oxidative...

  9. Personalized Stem Cell Therapy to Correct Corneal Defects Due to a Unique Homozygous-Heterozygous Mosaicism of Ectrodactyly-Ectodermal Dysplasia-Clefting Syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barbaro, Vanessa; Nasti, Annamaria Assunta; Raffa, Paolo; Migliorati, Angelo; Nespeca, Patrizia; Ferrari, Stefano; Palumbo, Elisa; Bertolin, Marina; Breda, Claudia; Miceli, Francesco; Russo, Antonella; Caenazzo, Luciana; Ponzin, Diego; Palù, Giorgio; Parolin, Cristina; Di Iorio, Enzo

    2016-08-01

    : Ectrodactyly-ectodermal dysplasia-clefting (EEC) syndrome is a rare autosomal dominant disease caused by mutations in the p63 gene. To date, approximately 40 different p63 mutations have been identified, all heterozygous. No definitive treatments are available to counteract and resolve the progressive corneal degeneration due to a premature aging of limbal epithelial stem cells. Here, we describe a unique case of a young female patient, aged 18 years, with EEC and corneal dysfunction, who was, surprisingly, homozygous for a novel and de novo R311K missense mutation in the p63 gene. A detailed analysis of the degree of somatic mosaicism in leukocytes from peripheral blood and oral mucosal epithelial stem cells (OMESCs) from biopsies of buccal mucosa showed that approximately 80% were homozygous mutant cells and 20% were heterozygous. Cytogenetic and molecular analyses excluded genomic alterations, thus suggesting a de novo mutation followed by an allelic gene conversion of the wild-type allele by de novo mutant allele as a possible mechanism to explain the homozygous condition. R311K-p63 OMESCs were expanded in vitro and heterozygous holoclones selected following clonal analysis. These R311K-p63 OMESCs were able to generate well-organized and stratified epithelia in vitro, resembling the features of healthy tissues. This study supports the rationale for the development of cultured autologous oral mucosal epithelial stem cell sheets obtained by selected heterozygous R311K-p63 stem cells, as an effective and personalized therapy for reconstructing the ocular surface of this unique case of EEC syndrome, thus bypassing gene therapy approaches. This case demonstrates that in a somatic mosaicism context, a novel homozygous mutation in the p63 gene can arise as a consequence of an allelic gene conversion event, subsequent to a de novo mutation. The heterozygous mutant R311K-p63 stem cells can be isolated by means of clonal analysis and given their good regenerative

  10. Mutation induction by heavy ions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kiefer, J.; Stoll, U.; Schneider, E.

    1994-10-01

    Mutation induction by heavy ions is compared in yeast and mammalian cells. Since mutants can only be recovered in survivors the influence of inactivation cross sections has to be taken into account. It is shown that both the size of the sensitive cellular site as well as track structure play an important role. Another parameter which influences the probability of mutation induction is repair: Contrary to naive assumptions primary radiation damage does not directly lead to mutations but requires modification to reconstitute the genetic machinery so that mutants can survive. The molecular structure of mutations was analyzed after exposure to deuterons by amplification with the aid of polymerase chain reaction. The results-although preliminary-demonstrate that even with densely ionizing particles a large fraction does not carry big deletions which suggests that point mutations may also be induced by heavy ions.

  11. [Homozygous ectonucleotide pyrophosphatase/phosphodiesterase 1 variants in a girl with hypophosphatemic rickets and literature review].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Z Q; Chen, X B; Song, F Y; Gao, K; Qiu, M F; Qian, Y; Du, M

    2017-11-02

    Objective: To investigate the clinical features and genetic characteristics of patients with ectonucleotide pyrophosphatase/phosphodiesterase 1 (ENPP1) gene variants. Method: The clinical data of a patient with ENPP1 homozygous variants from Capital Institute of Pediatrics was collected, the related literature was searched from China National Knowledge Infrastructure, Wanfang Data Knowledge Service Platform, National Center from Biotechnology Information and PubMed by using search term "ENPP1" , "hypophosphatemic rickets" . The literature retrieval was confined from 1980 to February 2017. The clinical manifestations, bone metabolism examinations, X-RAY and genotypes were reviewed. Result: Our patient was an 11 years old girl, with 7 years history of lower limb malformation. She showed significant valgus deformity of the knee (genu valgum). Metabolic examination revealed reduced level of plasma phosphate (0.86 mmol/L), a normal level of plasma calcium (2.30 mmol/L) and an elevated alkaline phosphatase level of 688 IU/L. The calcium-phosphorus product was 25.9. A homozygous nonsense variants of ENPP1 gene, c.783C>G (p.Tyr261X) in exon 7 was identified in the patient. Both parents were heterozygous carriers. Literature review identified 3 Chinese patients from one publication and 17 cases from twenty one publications around the world. None of the patients was found PHEX variants which is the most common variants among hypophosphatemic rickets patients. The disease onset age was 11 months to 10 years. Eight patients had short stature, five patients had the history of generalized arterial calcification of infancy. Four suffered from deafness, three showed localized calcifications of arteries, three patients manifested pseudoxanthoma elasticum and two suffered from ossification of posterior longitudinal ligament. Nine missense variants, six splicing variants and 4 nonsense variants were reported among these twenty patients. c.783C>G was found in two Chinese patients

  12. Pathogen inactivation techniques.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pelletier, J P R; Transue, S; Snyder, E L

    2006-01-01

    The desire to rid the blood supply of pathogens of all types has led to the development of many technologies aimed at the same goal--eradication of the pathogen(s) without harming the blood cells or generating toxic chemical agents. This is a very ambitious goal, and one that has yet to be achieved. One approach is to shun the 'one size fits all' concept and to target pathogen-reduction agents at the Individual component types. This permits the development of technologies that might be compatible with, for example, plasma products but that would be cytocidal and thus incompatible with platelet concentrates or red blood cell units. The technologies to be discussed include solvent detergent and methylene blue treatments--designed to inactivate plasma components and derivatives; psoralens (S-59--amotosalen) designed to pathogen-reduce units of platelets; and two products aimed at red blood cells, S-303 (a Frale--frangible anchor-linker effector compound) and Inactine (a binary ethyleneimine). A final pathogen-reduction material that might actually allow one material to inactivate all three blood components--riboflavin (vitamin B2)--is also under development. The sites of action of the amotosalen (S-59), the S-303 Frale, Inactine, and riboflavin are all localized in the nucleic acid part of the pathogen. Solvent detergent materials act by dissolving the plasma envelope, thus compromising the integrity of the pathogen membrane and rendering it non-infectious. By disrupting the pathogen's ability to replicate or survive, its infectivity is removed. The degree to which bacteria and viruses are affected by a particular pathogen-reducing technology relates to its Gram-positive or Gram-negative status, to the sporulation characteristics for bacteria, and the presence of lipid or protein envelopes for viruses. Concerns related to photoproducts and other breakdown products of these technologies remain, and the toxicology of pathogen-reduction treatments is a major ongoing area

  13. Free radical inactivation of trypsin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cudina, Ivana; Jovanovic, S.V.

    1988-01-01

    Reactivities of free radical oxidants, radical OH, Br2-anion radical and Cl 3 COO radical and a reductant, CO2-anion radical, with trypsin and reactive protein components were determined by pulse radiolysis of aqueous solutions at pH 7, 20 0 C. Highly reactive free radicals, radical OH, Br2-anion radical and CO2-anion radical, react with trypsin at diffusion controlled rates. Moderately reactive trichloroperoxy radical, k(Cl 3 COO radical + trypsin) preferentially oxidizes histidine residues. The efficiency of inactivation of trypsin by free radicals is inversely proportional to their reactivity. The yields of inactivation of trypsin by radical OH, Br2-anion radical and CO2-anion radical are low, G(inactivation) = 0.6-0.8, which corresponds to ∼ 10% of the initially produced radicals. In contrast, Cl 3 COO radical inactivates trypsin with ∼ 50% efficiency, i.e. G(inactivation) = 3.2. (author)

  14. Inactivation of Microorganisms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alzamora, Stella Maris; Guerrero, Sandra N.; Schenk, Marcela; Raffellini, Silvia; López-Malo, Aurelio

    Minimal processing techniques for food preservation allow better retention of product flavor, texture, color, and nutrient content than comparable conventional treatments. A wide range of novel alternative physical factors have been intensely investigated in the last two decades. These physical factors can cause inactivation of microorganisms at ambient or sublethal temperatures (e.g., high hydrostatic pressure, pulsed electric fields, ultrasound, pulsed light, and ultraviolet light). These technologies have been reported to reduce microorganism population in foods while avoiding the deleterious effects of severe heating on quality. Among technologies, high-energy ultrasound (i.e., intensities higher than 1 W/cm2, frequencies between 18 and 100 kHz) has attracted considerable interest for food preservation applications (Mason et al., 1996; Povey and Mason, 1998).

  15. Mean inactivation dose (D)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vijayakumar, S.; Ng, T.C.; Raudkivi, U.; Meaney, T.J.

    1990-01-01

    By predicting treatment outcome to radiotherapy from in vitro radiobiological parameters, not only individual patient treatments can be tailored, but also new promising treatment protocols can be tried in patients in whom unfavorable outcome is predicted. In this respect, choosing the right parameter can be very important. Unlike D 0 and N which provide information of the distal part of the survival curve, mean inactivation dose (D) estimates overall radiosensitivity. However, the parameters reflecting the response at the clinically relevant low-dose region are neglected in the literature. In a literature survey of 98 papers in which survival curves or D 0 /N were used, only in 2 D was used. In 21 papers the D 0 /n values were important in drawing conclusions. By calculating D in 3 of these 21 papers, we show that the conclusion drawn may be altered with the use of D. The importance of ''low-dose-region-parameters'' is reviewed. (orig.)

  16. Loss-of-function mutations in the thyrotropin receptor gene as a major determinant of hyperthyrotropinemia in a consanguineous community.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tenenbaum-Rakover, Yardena; Grasberger, Helmut; Mamanasiri, Sunee; Ringkananont, Usanee; Montanelli, Lucia; Barkoff, Marla S; Dahood, Ahmad Mahameed-Hag; Refetoff, Samuel

    2009-05-01

    Resistance to TSH (RTSH) is a condition of impaired responsiveness of the thyroid gland to TSH, characterized by elevated serum TSH, low or normal thyroid hormone levels, and hypoplastic or normal-sized thyroid gland. The aim of the study was to evaluate the clinical course and the genotype-phenotype relationship of RTSH caused by two different TSH receptor (TSHR) gene mutations in a consanguineous population. We conducted a clinical and genetic investigation of 46 members of an extended family and 163 individuals living in the same town. In vitro functional studies of the mutant TSHRs were also performed. Two TSHR gene mutations (P68S and L653V) were identified in 33 subjects occurring as homozygous L653V (five subjects), heterozygous L653V (20 subjects), heterozygous P68S (four subjects), and compound heterozygous L653V/P68S (four subjects). With the exception of one individual with concomitant autoimmune thyroid disease, all homozygotes and compound heterozygotes presented with compensated RTSH (high TSH with free T(4) and T(3) in the normal range). Only nine of 24 heterozygotes had mild hyperthyrotropinemia. The L653V mutation resulted in a higher serum TSH concentration and showed a more severe in vitro abnormality than P68S. Haplotype analysis predicted a founder of the L653V six to seven generations earlier, whereas the P68S is older. Cross-sectional and prospective longitudinal studies indicate that TSH and T(4) concentrations remain stable over time. High frequency hyperthyrotropinemia in an Israeli Arab-Muslim consanguineous community is attributed to two inactivating TSHR gene mutations. Concordant genotype-phenotype was demonstrated clinically and by in vitro functional analysis. Retrospective and prospective studies indicate that in the absence of concomitant autoimmune thyroid disease, elevated TSH levels reflect stable compensated RTSH.

  17. 574-586 Mutations in PCBD1 cause hypomagnesemia and renal magnesium wasting

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    S. Ferrè (Silvia); J.H.F. de Baaij (Jeroen); P. Ferreira (Patrick); R. Germann (Roger); J.B.C. de Klerk (Johannes); A.P.M. Lavrijsen (Adriana); F. van Zeeland (Femke); H. Venselaar (Hanka); L.A.J. Kluijtmans (Leo A.); J.G. Hoenderop (Joost); R.J.M. Bindels (René)

    2014-01-01

    textabstractMutations in PCBD1 are causative for transient neonatal hyperphenylalaninemia and primapterinuria (HPABH4D). Until now, HPABH4D has been regarded as a transient and benign neonatal syndrome without complications in adulthood. In our study of three adult patients with homozygous mutations

  18. Characteristic brain MRI findings in ataxia-neuropathy spectrum related to POLG mutation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henao, Adriana I; Pira, Sonia; Herrera, Diego A; Vargas, Sergio A; Montoya, Jorge; Castillo, Mauricio

    2016-02-01

    Patients with mutations in the polymerase gamma gene (POLG) may present with progressive ataxia and in such situations neuroimaging findings may suggest the diagnosis. Herein we report a patient with a POLG gene W748S homozygous mutation and characteristic lesions in the thalamus, cerebellum and inferior olivary nucleus seen on magnetic resonance imaging. © The Author(s) 2016.

  19. BAG3 Directly Interacts with Mutated alphaB-Crystallin to Suppress Its Aggregation and Toxicity

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hishiya, Akinori; Salman, Mortada Najem; Carra, Serena; Kampinga, Harm H.; Takayama, Shinichi

    2011-01-01

    A homozygous disruption or genetic mutation of the bag3 gene causes progressive myofibrillar myopathy in mouse and human skeletal and cardiac muscle disorder while mutations in the small heat shock protein aB-crystallin gene ( CRYAB) are reported to be responsible for myofibrillar myopathy. Here, we

  20. X inactivation in females with X-linked Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Murphy, Sinéad M

    2012-07-01

    X-linked Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease (CMT1X) is the second most common inherited neuropathy, caused by mutations in gap junction beta-1 (GJB1). Males have a uniformly moderately severe phenotype while females have a variable phenotype, suggested to be due to X inactivation. We aimed to assess X inactivation pattern in females with CMT1X and correlate this with phenotype using the CMT examination score to determine whether the X inactivation pattern accounted for the variable phenotype in females with CMT1X. We determined X inactivation pattern in 67 females with CMT1X and 24 controls using the androgen receptor assay. We were able to determine which X chromosome carried the GJB1 mutation in 30 females. There was no difference in X inactivation pattern between patients and controls. In addition, there was no correlation between X inactivation pattern in blood and phenotype. A possible explanation for these findings is that the X inactivation pattern in Schwann cells rather than in blood may explain the variable phenotype in females with CMT1X.

  1. Congenital myopathy is caused by mutation of HACD1

    OpenAIRE

    Muhammad, Emad; Reish, Orit; Ohno, Yusuke; Scheetz, Todd; DeLuca, Adam; Searby, Charles; Regev, Miriam; Benyamini, Lilach; Fellig, Yakov; Kihara, Akio; Sheffield, Val C.; Parvari, Ruti

    2013-01-01

    Congenital myopathies are heterogeneous inherited diseases of muscle characterized by a range of distinctive histologic abnormalities. We have studied a consanguineous family with congenital myopathy. Genome-wide linkage analysis and whole-exome sequencing identified a homozygous non-sense mutation in 3-hydroxyacyl-CoA dehydratase 1 (HACD1) in affected individuals. The mutation results in non-sense mediated decay of the HACD1 mRNA to 31% of control levels in patient muscle and completely abro...

  2. Mutations Inactivating Herpes Simplex Virus 1 MicroRNA miR-H2 Do Not Detectably Increase ICP0 Gene Expression in Infected Cultured Cells or Mouse Trigeminal Ganglia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pan, Dongli; Pesola, Jean M; Li, Gang; McCarron, Seamus; Coen, Donald M

    2017-01-15

    Herpes simplex virus 1 (HSV-1) latency entails the repression of productive ("lytic") gene expression. An attractive hypothesis to explain some of this repression involves inhibition of the expression of ICP0, a lytic gene activator, by a viral microRNA, miR-H2, which is completely complementary to ICP0 mRNA. To test this hypothesis, we engineered mutations that disrupt miR-H2 without affecting ICP0 in HSV-1. The mutant virus exhibited drastically reduced expression of miR-H2 but showed wild-type levels of infectious virus production and no increase in ICP0 expression in lytically infected cells, which is consistent with the weak expression of miR-H2 relative to the level of ICP0 mRNA in that setting. Following corneal inoculation of mice, the mutant was not significantly different from wild-type virus in terms of infectious virus production in the trigeminal ganglia during acute infection, mouse mortality, or the rate of reactivation from explanted latently infected ganglia. Critically, the mutant was indistinguishable from wild-type virus for the expression of ICP0 and other lytic genes in acutely and latently infected mouse trigeminal ganglia. The latter result may be related to miR-H2 being less effective in inhibiting ICP0 expression in transfection assays than a host microRNA, miR-138, which has previously been shown to inhibit lytic gene expression in infected ganglia by targeting ICP0 mRNA. Additionally, transfected miR-138 reduced lytic gene expression in infected cells more effectively than miR-H2. While this study provides little support for the hypothesis that miR-H2 promotes latency by inhibiting ICP0 expression, the possibility remains that miR-H2 might target other genes during latency. Herpes simplex virus 1 (HSV-1), which causes a variety of diseases, can establish lifelong latent infections from which virus can reactivate to cause recurrent disease. Latency is the most biologically interesting and clinically vexing feature of the virus. Ever since

  3. Function of the activated protein C (APC) autolysis loop in activated FVIII inactivation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cramer, Thomas J; Gale, Andrew J

    2011-06-01

    Activated protein C (APC) binds to its substrates activated factor V (FVa) and activated factor VIII (FVIIIa) with a basic exosite that consists of loops 37, 60, 70 and the autolysis loop. These loops have a high density of basic residues, resulting in a positive charge on the surface of APC. Many of these residues are important in the interaction of APC with FVa and FVIIIa. The current study focused on the function of the autolysis loop in the interaction with FVIIIa. This loop was previously shown to interact with FVa, and it inhibits APC inactivation by plasma serpins. Charged residues of the autolysis loop were individually mutated to alanine and the activity of these mutants was assessed in functional FVIIIa inactivation assays. The autolysis loop was functionally important for FVIIIa inactivation. Mutation of R306, K311 and R314 each resulted in significantly reduced FVIIIa inactivation. The inactivating cleavages of FVIIIa at R336 and R562 were affected equally by the mutations. Protein S and FV stimulated cleavage at R562 more than cleavage at R336, independent of mutations in the autolysis loop. Together, these results confirmed that the autolysis loop plays a significant role as part of the basic exosite on APC in the interaction with FVIIIa. © 2011 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  4. HPV-16 L1 genes with inactivated negative RNA elements induce potent immune responses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rollman, Erik; Arnheim, Lisen; Collier, Brian; Oeberg, Daniel; Hall, Haakan; Klingstroem, Jonas; Dillner, Joakim; Pastrana, Diana V.; Buck, Chris B.; Hinkula, Jorma; Wahren, Britta; Schwartz, Stefan

    2004-01-01

    Introduction of point mutations in the 5' end of the human papillomavirus type 16 (HPV-16) L1 gene specifically inactivates negative regulatory RNA processing elements. DNA vaccination of C57Bl/6 mice with the mutated L1 gene resulted in improved immunogenicity for both neutralizing antibodies as well as for broad cellular immune responses. Previous reports on the activation of L1 by codon optimization may be explained by inactivation of the regulatory RNA elements. The modified HPV-16 L1 DNA that induced anti-HPV-16 immunity may be seen as a complementary approach to protein subunit immunization against papillomavirus

  5. Inactivation of Stac3 causes skeletal muscle defects and perinatal death in mice

    OpenAIRE

    Reinholt, Brad Michael

    2012-01-01

    The Src homology 3 domain (SH3) and cysteine rich domain (C1) 3 (Stac3) gene is a novel gene copiously expressed in skeletal muscle. The objective of this research was to determine the role of Stac3 in development, specifically in skeletal muscle. We achieved this objective by evaluating the phenotypic effects of Stac3 gene inactivation on development in mice. At birth homozygous Stac3 null (Stac3-/-) mice died perinatally and remained in fetal position with limp limbs, but possessed otherwis...

  6. A homozygous missense variant in VWA2, encoding an interactor of the Fraser-complex, in a patient with vesicoureteral reflux.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amelie T van der Ven

    Full Text Available Congenital anomalies of the kidney and urinary tract (CAKUT are the most common cause (40-50% of chronic kidney disease (CKD in children. About 40 monogenic causes of CAKUT have so far been discovered. To date less than 20% of CAKUT cases can be explained by mutations in these 40 genes. To identify additional monogenic causes of CAKUT, we performed whole exome sequencing (WES and homozygosity mapping (HM in a patient with CAKUT from Indian origin and consanguineous descent. We identified a homozygous missense mutation (c.1336C>T, p.Arg446Cys in the gene Von Willebrand factor A domain containing 2 (VWA2. With immunohistochemistry studies on kidneys of newborn (P1 mice, we show that Vwa2 and Fraser extracellular matrix complex subunit 1 (Fras1 co-localize in the nephrogenic zone of the renal cortex. We identified a pronounced expression of Vwa2 in the basement membrane of the ureteric bud (UB and derivatives of the metanephric mesenchyme (MM. By applying in vitro assays, we demonstrate that the Arg446Cys mutation decreases translocation of monomeric VWA2 protein and increases translocation of aggregated VWA2 protein into the extracellular space. This is potentially due to the additional, unpaired cysteine residue in the mutated protein that is used for intermolecular disulfide bond formation. VWA2 is a known, direct interactor of FRAS1 of the Fraser-Complex (FC. FC-encoding genes and interacting proteins have previously been implicated in the pathogenesis of syndromic and/or isolated CAKUT phenotypes in humans. VWA2 therefore constitutes a very strong candidate in the search for novel CAKUT-causing genes. Our results from in vitro experiments indicate a dose-dependent neomorphic effect of the Arg446Cys homozygous mutation in VWA2.

  7. Identification of a Novel Dentin Matrix Protein-1 (DMP-1) Mutation and Dental Anomalies in a Kindred with Autosomal Recessive Hypophosphatemia

    OpenAIRE

    Turan, Serap; Aydin, Cumhur; Bereket, Abdullah; Akcay, Teoman; Güran, Tülay; Yaralioglu, Betul Akmen; Bastepe, Murat; Jüppner, Harald

    2009-01-01

    An autosomal recessive form of hypophosphatemia (ARHP) was recently shown to be caused by homozygous mutations in DMP1, the gene encoding dentin matrix protein-1 (DMP-1), a non-collagenous bone matrix protein with an important role in the development and mineralization of bone and teeth. Here, we report a previously not reported consanguineous ARHP kindred in which the three affected individuals carry a novel homozygous DMP-1 mutation. The index case presented at the age of 3 years with bowin...

  8. Fanconi anemia founder mutation in Macedonian patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Madjunkova, Svetlana; Kocheva, Svetlana A; Plaseska-Karanfilska, Dijana

    2014-01-01

    Fanconi anemia (FA) is a rare autosomal recessive disorder clinically characterized by developmental abnormalities, progressive bone marrow failure (BMF) and profound cancer predisposition. Approximately 65% of all affected individuals have mutation in the FANCA (Fanconi anemia complementation group A) gene. The mutation spectrum of the FANCA gene is highly heterogeneous. FA-A is usually associated with private FANCA mutations in individual families. We describe 3 unrelated patients with FA with a similar clinical presentation: BMF, renal anomalies and café-au-lait pigmentation without major skeletal abnormality. The molecular analysis of the FANCA gene using the FA MLPA kit P031-A2/P032 FANCA, showed homozygous deletion of exon 3 in all 3 patients. Molecular analysis of the flanking regions of exon 3 precisely defined unique deletion of 2,040 bp and duplication of C (1788_3828dupC). These are the first 3 patients homozygous for deletion of FANCA exon 3 described to date. Although not related, the patients originated from the same Gypsy-like ethnic population. We conclude that c.190-256_283 + 1680del2040 dupC mutation in the FANCA gene is a founder mutation in Macedonian FA patients of Gypsy-like ethnic origin. Our finding has very strong implications for these patients in formulating diagnostic and carrier-screening strategy for BMF and FA and to enable comprehensive genetic counseling. © 2013 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  9. Identification of a breast cancer family double heterozygote for RAD51C and BRCA2 gene mutations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ahlborn, Lise B; Steffensen, Ane Y; Jønson, Lars

    2015-01-01

    for mutations in the RAD51C and BRCA2 genes. The RAD51C missense mutation p.Arg258His has previously been identified in a homozygous state in a patient with Fanconi anemia. This mutation is known to affect the DNA repair function of the RAD51C protein. The BRCA2 p.Leu3216Leu synonymous mutation has not been...

  10. Functional characterization of a new p53 mutant generated by homozygous deletion in a neuroblastoma cell line

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nakamura, Yohko; Ozaki, Toshinori; Niizuma, Hidetaka; Ohira, Miki; Kamijo, Takehiko; Nakagawara, Akira

    2007-01-01

    p53 is a key modulator of a variety of cellular stresses. In human neuroblastomas, p53 is rarely mutated and aberrantly expressed in cytoplasm. In this study, we have identified a novel p53 mutant lacking its COOH-terminal region in neuroblastoma SK-N-AS cells. p53 accumulated in response to cisplatin (CDDP) and thereby promoting apoptosis in neuroblastoma SH-SY5Y cells bearing wild-type p53, whereas SK-N-AS cells did not undergo apoptosis. We found another p53 (p53ΔC) lacking a part of oligomerization domain and nuclear localization signals in SK-N-AS cells. p53ΔC was expressed largely in cytoplasm and lost the transactivation function. Furthermore, a 3'-part of the p53 locus was homozygously deleted in SK-N-AS cells. Thus, our present findings suggest that p53 plays an important role in the DNA-damage response in certain neuroblastoma cells and it seems to be important to search for p53 mutations outside DNA-binding domain

  11. Mesomelic dwarfism of the Langer type as a homozygous form of dyschondrosteosis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kemperdick, H.; Majewski, F.

    1982-05-01

    A family is described containing a daughter suffering from mesomelic dwarfism of the Langer type and both parents showing a dyschondrosteosis. This family supports the thesis that mesomelic dwarfism of the Langer type represents the homozygous form of dyschondrosteosis.

  12. Simplified methodology for large scale isolation of homozygous transgenic lines of lettuce

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Flavia S. Darqui

    2018-01-01

    Conclusions: This protocol allows a simplified scaling-up of the production of multiple homozygous transgenic progeny lines in the early generations avoiding expensive and time-consuming molecular assays.

  13. A Novel Mutation in the Transglutaminase-1 Gene in an Autosomal Recessive Congenital Ichthyosis Patient

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. Vaigundan

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Structure-function implication on a novel homozygous Trp250/Gly mutation of transglutaminase-1 (TGM1 observed in a patient of autosomal recessive congenital ichthyosis is invoked from a bioinformatics analysis. Structural consequences of this mutation are hypothesized in comparison to homologous enzyme human factor XIIIA accepted as valid in similar structural analysis and are projected as guidelines for future studies at an experimental level on TGM1 thus mutated.

  14. DNA Fragmentation Factor 45 (DFF45 Gene at 1p36.2 Is Homozygously Deleted and Encodes Variant Transcripts in Neuroblastoma Cell Line

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hong Wei Yang

    2001-01-01

    Full Text Available Recently, loss of heterozygosity (LOH studies suggest that more than two tumor suppressor genes lie on the short arm of chromosome 1 (1p in neuroblastoma (NB. To identify candidate tumor suppressor genes in NB, we searched for homozygous deletions in 20 NB cell lines using a high-density STS map spanning chromosome 1 p36, a common LOH region in NB. We found that the 45-kDa subunit of the DNA fragmentation factor (DFF45 gene was homozygously deleted in an NB cell line, NB-1. DFF45 is the chaperon of DFF40, and both molecules are necessary for caspase 3 to induce apoptosis. DFF35, a splicing variant of DFF45, is an inhibitor of DFF40. We examined 20 NB cell lines for expression and mutation of DFF45 gene by reverse transcription (RT-polymerase chain reaction (PCR and RT-PCR-single-strand conformation polymorphism. Some novel variant transcripts of the DFF45 gene were found in NB cell lines, but not in normal adrenal gland and peripheral blood. These variants may not serve as chaperons of DFF40, but as inhibitors like DFF35, thus disrupting the balance between DFF45 and DFF40. No mutations of the DFF45 gene were found in any NB cell line, suggesting that the DFF45 is not a tumor suppressor gene for NB. However, homozygous deletion of the DFF45 gene in the NB-1 cell line may imply the presence of unknown tumor suppressor genes in this region.

  15. Inactivation of IL11 signaling causes craniosynostosis, delayed tooth eruption, and supernumerary teeth

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nieminen, Pekka; Morgan, Neil V; Fenwick, Aimée L

    2011-01-01

    Craniosynostosis and supernumerary teeth most often occur as isolated developmental anomalies, but they are also separately manifested in several malformation syndromes. Here, we describe a human syndrome featuring craniosynostosis, maxillary hypoplasia, delayed tooth eruption, and supernumerary...... teeth. We performed homozygosity mapping in three unrelated consanguineous Pakistani families and localized the syndrome to a region in chromosome 9. Mutational analysis of candidate genes in the region revealed that all affected children harbored homozygous missense mutations (c.662C>G [p.Pro221Arg], c...... for the treatment of craniosynostosis....

  16. Evaluation of Lama5 as a candidate for the mouse ragged (Ra) mutation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Durkin, M E; Albrechtsen, R; Chambers, D M

    1998-01-01

    The laminin alpha5 chain is a component of the basement membranes of many developing and adult tissues. The mouse laminin alpha5 chain gene (Lama5) has been mapped close to the locus of the semidominant ragged (Ra) mutation on distal chromosome 2. The cause of the Ra mutation, which is usually...... lethal in the homozygous state, has not been determined. We have investigated whether a defect in Lama5 is responsible for the ragged mutation, using the RaJ strain. No differences in the level of the laminin alpha5 chain transcript were found in placental RNA from homozygous RaJ mutant embryos compared...... to normal littermates. Antiserum raised against a recombinant laminin alpha5 chain polypeptide stained the basement membranes of both normal and homozygous mutant embryos to a similar extent. More precise mapping of Lama5 on an interspecific Ra backcross indicated that Lama5 is proximal to the Ra locus...

  17. Multiple Patterns of FHIT Gene Homozygous Deletion in Egyptian Breast Cancer Patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ismail, H.M.S.; Zakhary, N.I.; Medhat, A.M.; Karim, A.M.

    2011-01-01

    Fragile histidine triad (FHIT) gene encodes a putative tumour suppressor protein. Loss of Fhit protein in cancer is attributed to different genetic alterations that affect the FHIT gene structure. In this study, we investigated the pattern of homozygous deletion that target the FHIT gene exons 3 to 9 genomic structure in Egyptian breast cancer patients. We have found that 65% (40 out of 62) of the cases exhibited homozygous deletion in at least one FHIT exon. The incidence of homozygous deletion was not associated with patients clinico pathological parameters including patients age, tumour grade, tumour type, and lymph node involvement. Using correlation analysis, we have observed a strong correlation between homozygous deletions of exon 3 and exon 4 (P<0.0001). Deletions in exon 5 were positively correlated with deletions in exon 7 (P<0.0001), Exon 8 (P<0.027), and exon 9 (P=0.04). Additionally, a strong correlation was observed between exons 8 and exon 9 (P<0.0001).We conclude that FHIT gene exons are homozygously deleted at high frequency in Egyptian women population diagnosed with breast cancer. Three different patterns of homozygous deletion were observed in this population indicating different mechanisms of targeting FHIT gene genomic structure.

  18. CYBRD1 as a modifier gene that modulates iron phenotype in HFE p.C282Y homozygous patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pelucchi, Sara; Mariani, Raffaella; Calza, Stefano; Fracanzani, Anna Ludovica; Modignani, Giulia Litta; Bertola, Francesca; Busti, Fabiana; Trombini, Paola; Fraquelli, Mirella; Forni, Gian Luca; Girelli, Domenico; Fargion, Silvia; Specchia, Claudia; Piperno, Alberto

    2012-12-01

    Most patients with hereditary hemochromatosis in the Caucasian population are homozygous for the p.C282Y mutation in the HFE gene. The penetrance and expression of hereditary hemochromatosis differ largely among cases of homozygous p.C282Y. Genetic factors might be involved in addition to environmental factors. In the present study, we analyzed 50 candidate genes involved in iron metabolism and evaluated the association between 214 single nucleotide polymorphisms in these genes and three phenotypic outcomes of iron overload (serum ferritin, iron removed and transferrin saturation) in a large group of 296 p.C282Y homozygous Italians. Polymorphisms were tested for genetic association with each single outcome using linear regression models adjusted for age, sex and alcohol consumption. We found a series of 17 genetic variants located in different genes with possible additive effects on the studied outcomes. In order to evaluate whether the selected polymorphisms could provide a predictive signature for adverse phenotype, we re-evaluated data by dividing patients in two extreme phenotype classes based on the three phenotypic outcomes. We found that only a small improvement in prediction could be achieved by adding genetic information to clinical data. Among the selected polymorphisms, a significant association was observed between rs3806562, located in the 5'UTR of CYBRD1, and transferrin saturation. This variant belongs to the same haplotype block that contains the CYBRD1 polymorphism rs884409, found to be associated with serum ferritin in another population of p.C282Y homozygotes, and able to modulate promoter activity. A luciferase assay indicated that rs3806562 does not have a significant functional role, suggesting that it is a genetic marker linked to the putative genetic modifier rs884409. While our results support the hypothesis that polymorphisms in genes regulating iron metabolism may modulate penetrance of HFE-hereditary hemochromatosis, with emphasis on

  19. A molecular switch driving inactivation in the cardiac K+ channel HERG.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David A Köpfer

    Full Text Available K(+ channels control transmembrane action potentials by gating open or closed in response to external stimuli. Inactivation gating, involving a conformational change at the K(+ selectivity filter, has recently been recognized as a major K(+ channel regulatory mechanism. In the K(+ channel hERG, inactivation controls the length of the human cardiac action potential. Mutations impairing hERG inactivation cause life-threatening cardiac arrhythmia, which also occur as undesired side effects of drugs. In this paper, we report atomistic molecular dynamics simulations, complemented by mutational and electrophysiological studies, which suggest that the selectivity filter adopts a collapsed conformation in the inactivated state of hERG. The selectivity filter is gated by an intricate hydrogen bond network around residues S620 and N629. Mutations of this hydrogen bond network are shown to cause inactivation deficiency in electrophysiological measurements. In addition, drug-related conformational changes around the central cavity and pore helix provide a functional mechanism for newly discovered hERG activators.

  20. The PRRT2 knockout mouse recapitulates the neurological diseases associated with PRRT2 mutations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Michetti, Caterina; Castroflorio, Enrico; Marchionni, Ivan; Forte, Nicola; Sterlini, Bruno; Binda, Francesca; Fruscione, Floriana; Baldelli, Pietro; Valtorta, Flavia; Zara, Federico; Corradi, Anna; Benfenati, Fabio

    2017-03-01

    Heterozygous and rare homozygous mutations in PRoline-Rich Transmembrane protein 2 (PRRT2) underlie a group of paroxysmal disorders including epilepsy, kinesigenic dyskinesia episodic ataxia and migraine. Most of the mutations lead to impaired PRRT2 expression and/or function. Recently, an important role for PRTT2 in the neurotransmitter release machinery, brain development and synapse formation has been uncovered. In this work, we have characterized the phenotype of a mouse in which the PRRT2 gene has been constitutively inactivated (PRRT2 KO). β-galactosidase staining allowed to map the regional expression of PRRT2 that was more intense in the cerebellum, hindbrain and spinal cord, while it was localized to restricted areas in the forebrain. PRRT2 KO mice are normal at birth, but display paroxysmal movements at the onset of locomotion that persist in the adulthood. In addition, adult PRRT2 KO mice present abnormal motor behaviors characterized by wild running and jumping in response to audiogenic stimuli that are ineffective in wild type mice and an increased sensitivity to the convulsive effects of pentylentetrazol. Patch-clamp electrophysiology in hippocampal and cerebellar slices revealed specific effects in the cerebellum, where PRRT2 is highly expressed, consisting in a higher excitatory strength at parallel fiber-Purkinje cell synapses during high frequency stimulation. The results show that the PRRT2 KO mouse reproduces the motor paroxysms present in the human PRRT2-linked pathology and can be proposed as an experimental model for the study of the pathogenesis of the disease as well as for testing personalized therapeutic approaches. Copyright © 2016 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. The Dwarfs of Sindh: severe growth hormone (GH) deficiency caused by a mutation in the GH-releasing hormone receptor gene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baumann, G; Maheshwari, H

    1997-11-01

    We report the discovery of a cluster of severe familial dwarfism in two villages in the Province of Sindh in Pakistan. Dwarfism is proportionate and occurs in members of a kindred with a high degree of consanguinity. Only the last generation is affected, with the oldest dwarf being 28 years old. The mode of inheritance is autosomal recessive. Phenotype analysis and endocrine testing revealed isolated growth hormone deficiency (GHD) as the reason for growth failure. Linkage analysis for the loci of several candidate genes yielded a high lod score for the growth hormone-releasing hormone receptor (GHRH-R) locus on chromosome 7. Amplification and sequencing of the GHRH-R gene in affected subjects demonstrated an amber nonsense mutation (GAG-->TAG; Glu50-->Stop) in exon 3. The mutation, in its homozygous form, segregated 100% with the dwarf phenotype. It predicts a truncation of the GHRH-R in its extracellular domain, which is likely to result in a severely disabled or non-existent receptor protein. Subjects who are heterozygous for the mutation show mild biochemical abnormalities in the growth hormone-releasing hormone (GHRH)--growth hormone--insulin-like growth factor axis, but have only minimal or no growth retardation. The occurrence of an offspring of two dwarfed parents indicates that the GHRH-R is not necessary for fertility in either sex. We conclude that Sindh dwarfism is caused by an inactivating mutation in the GHRH-R gene, resulting in the inability to transmit a GHRH signal and consequent severe isolated GHD.

  2. Association of HFE gene C282Y and H63D mutations with liver cirrhosis in the Lithuanian population

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Simonas Juzėnas

    2016-01-01

    Conclusions: Heterozygous C282Y mutation of the HFE gene was associated with liver cirrhosis in the Lithuanian population. In gender-related analysis, heterozygous C282Y and homozygous H63D mutations were linked to liver cirrhosis in men, not in women.

  3. Mutations in the gene for lipoprotein lipase. A cause for low HDL cholesterol levels in individuals heterozygous for familial hypercholesterolemia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pimstone, S. N.; Gagné, S. E.; Gagné, C.; Lupien, P. J.; Gaudet, D.; Williams, R. R.; Kotze, M.; Reymer, P. W.; Defesche, J. C.; Kastelein, J. J.

    1995-01-01

    Familial hypercholesterolemia (FH) is characterized by elevated plasma concentrations of LDL cholesterol resulting from mutations in the gene for the LDL receptor. Low HDL cholesterol levels are seen frequently in patients both heterozygous and homozygous for mutations in this gene. Suggested

  4. Laser desorption mass spectrometry for point mutation detection

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Taranenko, N.I.; Chung, C.N.; Zhu, Y.F. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States)] [and others

    1996-10-01

    A point mutation can be associated with the pathogenesis of inherited or acquired diseases. Laser desorption mass spectrometry coupled with allele specific polymerase chain reaction (PCR) was first used for point mutation detection. G551D is one of several mutations of the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) gene present in 1-3% of the mutant CFTR alleles in most European populations. In this work, two different approaches were pursued to detect G551D point mutation in the cystic fibrosis gene. The strategy is to amplify the desired region of DNA template by PCR using two primers that overlap one base at the site of the point mutation and which vary in size. If the two primers based on the normal sequence match the target DNA sequence, a normal PCR product will be produced. However, if the alternately sized primers that match the mutant sequence recognize the target DNA, an abnormal PCR product will be produced. Thus, the mass spectrometer can be used to identify patients that are homozygous normal, heterozygous for a mutation or homozygous abnormal at a mutation site. Another approach to identify similar mutations is the use of sequence specific restriction enzymes which respond to changes in the DNA sequence. Mass spectrometry is used to detect the length of the restriction fragments generated by digestion of a PCR generated target fragment. 21 refs., 10 figs., 2 tabs.

  5. Laser desorption mass spectrometry for point mutation detection

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Taranenko, N.I.; Chung, C.N.; Zhu, Y.F. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States)] [and others

    1996-12-31

    A point mutation can be associated with the pathogenesis of inherited or acquired diseases. Laser desorption mass spectrometry coupled with allele specific polymerase chain reaction (PCR) was first used for point mutation detection. G551D is one of several mutations of the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) gene present in 1-3% of the mutant CFTR alleles in most European populations. In this work, two different approaches were pursued to detect G551D point mutation in the cystic fibrosis gene. The strategy is to amplify the desired region of DNA template by PCR using two primers that overlap one base at the site of the point mutation and which vary in size. If the two primers based on the normal sequence match the target DNA sequence, a normal PCR product will be produced. However, if the alternately sized primers that match the mutant sequence recognize the target DNA, an abnormal PCR product will be produced. Thus, the mass spectrometer can be used to identify patients that are homozygous normal, heterozygous for a mutation or homozygous abnormal at a mutation site. Another approach to identify similar mutations is the use of sequence specific restriction enzymes which respond to changes in the DNA sequence. Mass spectrometry is used to detect the length of the restriction fragments by digestion of a PCR generated target fragment. 21 refs., 10 figs., 2 tabs.

  6. 75 FR 6211 - Prospective Grant of Exclusive License: Purified Inactivated Dengue Tetravalent Vaccine...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-02-08

    ... Exclusive License: Purified Inactivated Dengue Tetravalent Vaccine Containing a Common 30 Nucleotide Deletion in the 3'-UTR of Dengue Types 1,2,3, and 4 AGENCY: National Institutes of Health, Public Health...., ``Development of Mutations Useful for Attenuating Dengue Viruses and Chimeric Dengue Viruses''-- European Patent...

  7. Mutation screening of the HGD gene identifies a novel alkaptonuria mutation with significant founder effect and high prevalence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sakthivel, Srinivasan; Zatkova, Andrea; Nemethova, Martina; Surovy, Milan; Kadasi, Ludevit; Saravanan, Madurai P

    2014-05-01

    Alkaptonuria (AKU) is an autosomal recessive disorder; caused by the mutations in the homogentisate 1, 2-dioxygenase (HGD) gene located on Chromosome 3q13.33. AKU is a rare disorder with an incidence of 1: 250,000 to 1: 1,000,000, but Slovakia and the Dominican Republic have a relatively higher incidence of 1: 19,000. Our study focused on studying the frequency of AKU and identification of HGD gene mutations in nomads. HGD gene sequencing was used to identify the mutations in alkaptonurics. For the past four years, from subjects suspected to be clinically affected, we found 16 positive cases among a randomly selected cohort of 41 Indian nomads (Narikuravar) settled in the specific area of Tamil Nadu, India. HGD gene mutation analysis showed that 11 of these patients carry the same homozygous splicing mutation c.87 + 1G > A; in five cases, this mutation was found to be heterozygous, while the second AKU-causing mutation was not identified in these patients. This result indicates that the founder effect and high degree of consanguineous marriages have contributed to AKU among nomads. Eleven positive samples were homozygous for a novel mutation c.87 + 1G > A, that abolishes an intron 2 donor splice site and most likely causes skipping of exon 2. The prevalence of AKU observed earlier seems to be highly increased in people of nomadic origin. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons Ltd/University College London.

  8. Distinct pattern of p53 mutations in bladder cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Spruck, C H; Rideout, W M; Olumi, A F

    1993-01-01

    A distinct mutational spectrum for the p53 tumor suppressor gene in bladder carcinomas was established in patients with known exposures to cigarette smoke. Single-strand conformational polymorphism analysis of exons 5 through 8 of the p53 gene showed inactivating mutations in 16 of 40 (40%) bladder...... tumors from smokers and 13 of 40 (33%) tumors from lifetime nonsmokers. Overall, 13 of the 50 (26%) total point mutations discovered in this and previous work were G:C-->C:G transversions, a relatively rare mutational type in human tumors. In six tumors, identical AGA (Arg)-->ACA (Thr) point mutations...... double mutations, four of which were tandem mutations on the same allele. No double mutations were found in tumors from nonsmoking patients. None of the mutations in smokers were G:C-->T:A transversions, which would be anticipated for exposure to the suspected cigarette smoke carcinogen 4-aminobiphenyl...

  9. Gene mutations in children with chronic pancreatitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Witt, H

    2001-01-01

    In the last few years, several genes have been identified as being associated with hereditary and idiopathic chronic pancreatitis (CP), i.e. PRSS1, CFTR and SPINK1. In this study, we investigated 164 unrelated children and adolescents with CP for mutations in disease-associated genes by direct DNA sequencing, SSCP, RFLP and melting curve analysis. In 15 patients, we detected a PRSS1 mutation (8 with A16V, 5 with R122H, 2 with N29I), and in 34 patients, a SPINK1 mutation (30 with N34S, 4 with others). SPINK1 mutations were predominantly found in patients without a family history (29/121). Ten patients were homozygous for N34S, SPINK1 mutations were most common in 'idiopathic' CP, whereas patients with 'hereditary' CP predominantly showed a PRSS1 mutation (R122H, N29I). In patients without a family history, the most common PRSS1 mutation was A16V (7/121). In conclusion, our data suggest that CP may be inherited in a dominant, recessive or multigenetic manner as a result of mutations in the above-mentioned or as yet unidentified genes. This challenges the concept of idiopathic CP as a nongenetic disorder and the differentiation between hereditary and idiopathic CP. Therefore, we propose to classify CP as either 'primary CP' (with or without a family history) or 'secondary CP' caused by toxic, metabolic or other factors.

  10. Domain IV voltage-sensor movement is both sufficient and rate limiting for fast inactivation in sodium channels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Capes, Deborah L; Goldschen-Ohm, Marcel P; Arcisio-Miranda, Manoel; Bezanilla, Francisco; Chanda, Baron

    2013-08-01

    Voltage-gated sodium channels are critical for the generation and propagation of electrical signals in most excitable cells. Activation of Na(+) channels initiates an action potential, and fast inactivation facilitates repolarization of the membrane by the outward K(+) current. Fast inactivation is also the main determinant of the refractory period between successive electrical impulses. Although the voltage sensor of domain IV (DIV) has been implicated in fast inactivation, it remains unclear whether the activation of DIV alone is sufficient for fast inactivation to occur. Here, we functionally neutralize each specific voltage sensor by mutating several critical arginines in the S4 segment to glutamines. We assess the individual role of each voltage-sensing domain in the voltage dependence and kinetics of fast inactivation upon its specific inhibition. We show that movement of the DIV voltage sensor is the rate-limiting step for both development and recovery from fast inactivation. Our data suggest that activation of the DIV voltage sensor alone is sufficient for fast inactivation to occur, and that activation of DIV before channel opening is the molecular mechanism for closed-state inactivation. We propose a kinetic model of sodium channel gating that can account for our major findings over a wide voltage range by postulating that DIV movement is both necessary and sufficient for fast inactivation.

  11. Portuguese family with the co-occurrence of frontotemporal lobar degeneration and neuronal ceroid lipofuscinosis phenotypes due to progranulin gene mutation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Almeida, Maria R; Macário, Maria C; Ramos, Lina; Baldeiras, Inês; Ribeiro, Maria H; Santana, Isabel

    2016-05-01

    We and others have reported heterozygous progranulin mutations as an important cause of frontotemporal lobar degeneration (FTLD). It has been identified a complete progranulin deficiency because of a homozygous mutation in a sibling pair with neuronal ceroid lipofuscinosis (NCL). Here, we describe the first case of NCL caused by a homozygous progranulin mutation segregating in a family with neuropathological confirmed FTLD. In this FTLD-NCL family, we detail the clinical phenotype, neuropsychological evaluation and imaging data of our proband harboring a homozygous mutation, c.900_901dupGT, with serum progranulin level (progranulin levels in suspected recessive adult-onset NCL cases. Overall, a more holistic neurologic intervention is needed to guarantee a proper genetic counseling in cases like the present family where two distinct phenotypes are generated according to the individuals' mutation state. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Filaggrin compound heterozygous patients carry mutations in trans position

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Carlsen, Berit C; Meldgaard, Michael; Johansen, Jeanne D

    2013-01-01

    by means of allele-specific PCR amplification and analysis of PCR products by agarose gel electrophoresis. All R501X/2282del4 compound heterozygous samples collected over a 4-year period of routine FLG mutation testing were investigated. In total, 37 samples were tested. All thirty-seven R501X/2282del4......More than 40 null mutations in the filaggrin (FLG) gene are described. It is therefore possible to find two different null mutations in one individual (compound heterozygosity). It has been generally perceived that homozygous and compound heterozygous individuals were genotypically comparable......; however, this has not been scientifically investigated. Two different FLG null mutations in the same individual may be in trans position, meaning that each mutation locates to a different allele functionally equivalent to homozygosity, or may be in cis position, meaning that both mutations locate...

  13. Missense and nonsense mutations in melanocortin 1 receptor (MC1R gene of different goat breeds: association with red and black coat colour phenotypes but with unexpected evidences

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Davoli Roberta

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Agouti and Extension loci control the relative amount of eumelanin and pheomelanin production in melanocytes that, in turn, affects pigmentation of skin and hair. The Extension locus encodes the melanocortin 1 receptor (MC1R whose permanent activation, caused by functional mutations, results in black coat colour, whereas other inactivating mutations cause red coat colour in different mammals. Results The whole coding region of the MC1R gene was sequenced in goats of six different breeds showing different coat colours (Girgentana, white cream with usually small red spots in the face; Maltese, white with black cheeks and ears; Derivata di Siria, solid red; Murciano-Granadina, solid black or solid brown; Camosciata delle Alpi, brown with black stripes; Saanen, white; F1 goats and the parental animals. Five single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs were identified: one nonsense mutation (p.Q225X, three missense mutations (p.A81V, p.F250V, and p.C267W, and one silent mutation. The stop codon at position 225 should cause the production of a shorter MC1R protein whose functionality may be altered. These SNPs were investigated in a larger sample of animals belonging to the six breeds. The Girgentana breed was almost fixed for the p.225X allele. However, there was not complete association between the presence of red spots in the face and the presence of this allele in homozygous condition. The same allele was identified in the Derivata di Siria breed. However, its frequency was only 33%, despite the fact that these animals are completely red. The p.267W allele was present in all Murciano-Granadina black goats, whereas it was never identified in the brown ones. Moreover, the same substitution was present in almost all Maltese goats providing evidence of association between this mutation and black coat colour. Conclusion According to the results obtained in the investigated goat breeds, MC1R mutations may determine eumelanic and pheomelanic

  14. CNGA3 mutations in two United Arab Emirates families with achromatopsia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahuja, Yachna; Kohl, Susanne; Traboulsi, Elias I

    2008-07-10

    ACHROMATOPSIA RESULTS FROM MUTATIONS IN ONE OF THREE GENES: cyclic nucleotide-gated channel, alpha-3 (CNGA3); cyclic nucleotide-gated channel, beta-3 (CNGB3); and guanine nucleotide-binding protein, alpha-transducing activity polypeptide 2 (GNAT2). We report the responsible mutations in two United Arab Emirates families who have this autosomal recessive disease. Clinical examinations were performed in seven patients from three nuclear families. Molecular genetic testing for common CNGA3 and CNGB3 mutations was undertaken using standard protocols. All patients were extremely light sensitive and had reduced visual acuity and no color perception. Fundus examinations did not show any visible abnormalities. After further pedigree analysis, two of the families were found to be linked through the paternal line. Two mutations in CNGA3 were identified: Arg283Trp and Gly397Val. Family A, the larger pedigree, had one branch in which two sisters and one brother were homozygous for the Gly397Val mutation and another branch in which a brother and sister were compound heterozygous for both aforenamed mutations. Family B, however, only had two brothers who were homozygous for the Arg283Trp mutation. Achromatopsia in these two United Arab Emirates families results from two different mutations in CNGA3. Two branches of the same pedigree had individuals with both homozygous and compound heterozygous disease, demonstrating a complex molecular pathology in this large family.

  15. A family with hereditary hemochromatosis carrying HFE gene splice site mutation: a case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    NING Huibin

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available ObjectiveTo investigate a new type of HFE gene mutation in a family with hereditary hemochromatosis (HH. MethodsThe analysis of HFE gene was performed for one patient with a confirmed diagnosis of HH and five relatives. Blood genomic DNA was extracted and PCR multiplication was performed for the exon and intron splice sequences of related HFE, HJV, HAMP, transferrin receptor 2 (TfR2, and SLC40A1 genes. After agarose gel electrophoresis and purification, bi-directional direct sequencing was performed to detect mutation sites. ResultsThe proband had abnormal liver function and increases in serum iron, total iron binding capacity, serum ferritin, and transferrin saturation, as well as T→C homozygous mutation in the fourth base of intron 2 in the intervening sequence of the exon EXON2 of HFE gene (IVs 2+4T→C, C/C homozygous, splicing, abnormal. There were no abnormalities in HJV, HAMP, TfR2, and SLC40A1 genes. The proband′s son had the same homozygous mutation, three relatives had heterozygous mutations, and one relative had no abnormal mutations. ConclusionGene detection plays an important role in the diagnosis of hemochromatosis, and IVs 2+4T→C mutation may be a new pathogenic mutation for HH in China.

  16. The Oenothera plastome mutator: effect of UV irradiation and nitroso-methyl urea on mutation frequencies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sears, B.B.; Sokalski, M.B.

    1991-01-01

    Oenothera plants homozygous for a recessive plastome mutator allele (pm) showed spontaneous mutation frequencies for plastome genes that are 200-fold higher than spontaneous levels. Mutations occurred at high frequencies in plants grown in the field, in a glasshouse, or as leaf tip cultures under fluorescent light, indicating that the plastome mutator activity is UV-independent. However, the chlorotic sectors became visible at an earlier stage of development when seedlings were irradiated, compared to seedlings that were not exposed to UV. These results imply that the rate of sorting-out was increased by the irradiation treatment, possibly due to a decrease in the effective number of multiplication-competent plastids, or a reduction in the extent of cytoplasmic mixing. Nitroso-methyl urea treatment of seeds had a dramatic effect on mutation frequency in both wild-type and plastome mutator samples. When the background mutation rates were low, the combination of the plastome mutator nucleus and the chemical mutagenesis treatment resulted in a synergistic effect, suggesting that the plastome mutator may involve a cpDNA repair pathway. (author)

  17. PTEN and DMBT1 homozygous deletion and expression in medulloblastomas and supratentorial primitive neuroectodermal tumors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Inda, María Mar; Mercapide, Javier; Muñoz, Jorge; Coullin, Philippe; Danglot, Giséle; Tuñon, Teresa; Martínez-Peñuela, José María; Rivera, José María; Burgos, Juan J; Bernheim, Alain; Castresana, Javier S

    2004-12-01

    Medulloblastoma, which accounts for 20-25% of all childhood brain tumors, is defined as a primitive neuroectodermal tumor (PNET) located in the cerebellum. Supratentorial PNET are less frequent than medulloblastoma. But their clinical outcome is worse than in medulloblastomas. Chromosome 10q contains at least 2 tumor suppressor genes that might play a role in brain tumor development: PTEN and DMBT1. The aim of this study was to compare the status of homozygous deletion and expression of PTEN and DMBT1 genes in PNET primary tumor samples and cell lines. Homozygous deletions of PTEN and DMBT1 were studied in 32 paraffin-embedded PNET samples (23 medulloblastomas and 9 supratentorial PNET) and in 7 PNET cell lines, by differential PCR and by FISH. PTEN homozygous losses were demonstrated in 7 medulloblastomas (32%) and in no supratentorial PNET, while homozygous deletions of DMBT1 appeared in 1 supratentorial PNET (20%) and in 7 medulloblastomas (33%). No homozygous deletion of PTEN or DMBT1 was detected in any of the PNET cell lines either by differential PCR or by FISH. Expression study of the 2 genes was performed in the 7 PNET cell lines by RT-PCR. One PNET cell line lacked PTEN and DMBT1 expression, while 2 medulloblastoma cell lines did not express DMBT1. Our results add some positive data to the hypothesis that supratentorial PNETs and medulloblastomas might be genetically different.

  18. recA+-dependent inactivation of the lambda repressor in Escherichia coli lysogens by γ-radiation and by tif expression

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    West, S.C.; Powell, K.A.; Emmerson, P.T.

    1975-01-01

    When lambda lysogens of E. coli are induced by γ-radiation the lambda repressor, as measured by its specific binding to lambda DNA, is rapidly inactivated by a recA + -dependent process which does not require new protein synthesis. This rapid inactivation is similar to inactivation of repressor by expression of the temperature sensitive E. coli mutation tif. In contrast, induction by UV irradiation or mitomycin C treatment requires new protein synthesis and there is a lag before the repressor is inactivated (Tomizawa and Ogawa, 1967; Shinagawa and Itoh, 1973). (orig.) [de

  19. six novel mutations in the TSC1 and TSC2 genes

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    M. GLUSHKOVA

    2018-04-30

    Apr 30, 2018 ... RESEARCH ARTICLE ... nant disorder caused by inactivating TSC1 or TSC2 gene variants (Van ... premature protein truncation, while missense mutations are rare ..... TSC2 variants in our cohort are missense, frame-shift.

  20. Pregnancy in a Woman with Homozygous Familial Hypercholesterolemia Not on Low-Density Lipoprotein Apheresis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Akl C. Fahed

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Pregnancy in women with homozygous familial hypercholesterolemia (FH has been rarely reported and might pose risks on the mother and her fetus. Although most reported cases remained on low-density lipoprotein (LDL apheresis, there are no clear guidelines regarding the management of this entity. We report the first case of an uncomplicated pregnancy in a 24-year-old homozygous FH woman who was not maintained on LDL apheresis. FH expresses a wide variability in the phenotype, and management of homozygous FH cases who desire to become pregnant should be individualized based on preconceptional assessment with frequent antenatal follow-up. Decisions on management should be made after weighing the risks versus benefits of LDL apheresis.

  1. Identification of a c.544C>T mutation in WDR34 as a deleterious recessive allele of short rib-polydactyly syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shu-Han You

    2017-12-01

    Conclusion: This study was the first to identify c.544C > T [p.Arg182Trp] mutation in WDR34 in a patient with SRPS. According to the database, the homozygous mutation of c.544C > T in WDR34 was deleterious and the prevalence of heterozygous mutation was relatively higher in Asian population. More studies of this mutation in patients with SRPS are required.

  2. The SHOX region and its mutations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Capone, L; Iughetti, L; Sabatini, S; Bacciaglia, A; Forabosco, A

    2010-06-01

    The short stature homeobox-containing (SHOX) gene lies in the pseudoautosomal region 1 (PAR1) that comprises 2.6 Mb of the short-arm tips of both the X and Y chromosomes. It is known that its heterozygous mutations cause Leri-Weill dyschondrosteosis (LWD) (OMIM #127300), while its homozygous mutations cause a severe form of dwarfism known as Langer mesomelic dysplasia (LMD) (OMIM #249700). The analysis of 238 LWD patients between 1998 and 2007 by multiple authors shows a prevalence of deletions (46.4%) compared to point mutations (21.2%). On the whole, deletions and point mutations account for about 67% of LWD patients. SHOX is located within a 1000 kb desert region without genes. The comparative genomic analysis of this region between genomes of different vertebrates has led to the identification of evolutionarily conserved non-coding DNA elements (CNE). Further functional studies have shown that one of these CNE downstream of the SHOX gene is necessary for the expression of SHOX; this is considered to be typical "enhancer" activity. Including the enhancer, the overall mutation of the SHOX region in LWD patients does not hold in 100% of cases. Various authors have demonstrated the existence of other CNE both downstream and upstream of SHOX regions. The resulting conclusion is that it is necessary to reanalyze all LWD/LMD patients without SHOX mutations for the presence of mutations in the 5'- and 3'-flanking SHOX regions.

  3. Somatic mutations of the histone H3K27 demethylase, UTX, in human cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Haaften, Gijs; Dalgliesh, Gillian L; Davies, Helen; Chen, Lina; Bignell, Graham; Greenman, Chris; Edkins, Sarah; Hardy, Claire; O’Meara, Sarah; Teague, Jon; Butler, Adam; Hinton, Jonathan; Latimer, Calli; Andrews, Jenny; Barthorpe, Syd; Beare, Dave; Buck, Gemma; Campbell, Peter J; Cole, Jennifer; Dunmore, Rebecca; Forbes, Simon; Jia, Mingming; Jones, David; Kok, Chai Yin; Leroy, Catherine; Lin, Meng-Lay; McBride, David J; Maddison, Mark; Maquire, Simon; McLay, Kirsten; Menzies, Andrew; Mironenko, Tatiana; Lee, Mulderrig; Mudie, Laura; Pleasance, Erin; Shepherd, Rebecca; Smith, Raffaella; Stebbings, Lucy; Stephens, Philip; Tang, Gurpreet; Tarpey, Patrick S; Turner, Rachel; Turrell, Kelly; Varian, Jennifer; West, Sofie; Widaa, Sara; Wray, Paul; Collins, V Peter; Ichimura, Koichi; Law, Simon; Wong, John; Yuen, Siu Tsan; Leung, Suet Yi; Tonon, Giovanni; DePinho, Ronald A; Tai, Yu-Tzu; Anderson, Kenneth C; Kahnoski, Richard J.; Massie, Aaron; Khoo, Sok Kean; Teh, Bin Tean; Stratton, Michael R; Futreal, P Andrew

    2010-01-01

    Somatically acquired epigenetic changes are present in many cancers. Epigenetic regulation is maintained via post-translational modifications of core histones. Here, we describe inactivating somatic mutations in the histone lysine demethylase, UTX, pointing to histone H3 lysine methylation deregulation in multiple tumour types. UTX reintroduction into cancer cells with inactivating UTX mutations resulted in slowing of proliferation and marked transcriptional changes. These data identify UTX as a new human cancer gene. PMID:19330029

  4. PMS2 inactivation by a complex rearrangement involving an HERV retroelement and the inverted 100-kb duplicon on 7p22.1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vogt, Julia; Wernstedt, Annekatrin; Ripperger, Tim; Pabst, Brigitte; Zschocke, Johannes; Kratz, Christian; Wimmer, Katharina

    2016-11-01

    Biallelic PMS2 mutations are responsible for more than half of all cases of constitutional mismatch repair deficiency (CMMRD), a recessively inherited childhood cancer predisposition syndrome. The mismatch repair gene PMS2 is partly embedded within one copy of an inverted 100-kb low-copy repeat (LCR) on 7p22.1. In an individual with CMMRD syndrome, PMS2 was found to be homozygously inactivated by a complex chromosomal rearrangement, which separates the 5'-part from the 3'-part of the gene. The rearrangement involves sequences of the inverted 100-kb LCR and a human endogenous retrovirus element and may be associated with an inversion that is indistinguishable from the known inversion polymorphism affecting the ~0.7-Mb sequence intervening the LCR. Its formation is best explained by a replication-based mechanism (RBM) such as fork stalling and template switching/microhomology-mediated break-induced replication (FoSTeS/MMBIR). This finding supports the hypothesis that the inverted LCR can not only facilitate the formation of the non-allelic homologous recombination-mediated inversion polymorphism but it also promotes the occurrence of more complex rearrangements that can be associated with a large inversion, as well, but are mediated by a RBM. This further suggests that among the inversion polymorphism on 7p22.1, more complex rearrangements might be hidden. Furthermore, as the locus is embedded in a common fragile site (CFS) region, this rearrangement also supports the recently raised hypothesis that CFS sequence motifs may facilitate replication-based rearrangement mechanisms.

  5. Establishment of a Conditionally Immortalized Wilms Tumor Cell Line with a Homozygous WT1 Deletion within a Heterozygous 11p13 Deletion and UPD Limited to 11p15.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Artur Brandt

    Full Text Available We describe a stromal predominant Wilms tumor with focal anaplasia and a complex, tumor specific chromosome 11 aberration: a homozygous deletion of the entire WT1 gene within a heterozygous 11p13 deletion and an additional region of uniparental disomy (UPD limited to 11p15.5-p15.2 including the IGF2 gene. The tumor carried a heterozygous p.T41A mutation in CTNNB1. Cells established from the tumor carried the same chromosome 11 aberration, but a different, homozygous p.S45Δ CTNNB1 mutation. Uniparental disomy (UPD 3p21.3pter lead to the homozygous CTNNB1 mutation. The tumor cell line was immortalized using the catalytic subunit of human telomerase (hTERT in conjunction with a novel thermolabile mutant (U19dl89-97tsA58 of SV40 large T antigen (LT. This cell line is cytogenetically stable and can be grown indefinitely representing a valuable tool to study the effect of a complete lack of WT1 in tumor cells. The origin/fate of Wilms tumors with WT1 mutations is currently poorly defined. Here we studied the expression of several genes expressed in early kidney development, e.g. FOXD1, PAX3, SIX1, OSR1, OSR2 and MEIS1 and show that these are expressed at similar levels in the parental and the immortalized Wilms10 cells. In addition the limited potential for muscle/ osteogenic/ adipogenic differentiation similar to all other WT1 mutant cell lines is also observed in the Wilms10 tumor cell line and this is retained in the immortalized cells. In summary these Wilms10 cells are a valuable model system for functional studies of WT1 mutant cells.

  6. Establishment of a Conditionally Immortalized Wilms Tumor Cell Line with a Homozygous WT1 Deletion within a Heterozygous 11p13 Deletion and UPD Limited to 11p15

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brandt, Artur; Löhers, Katharina; Beier, Manfred; Leube, Barbara; de Torres, Carmen; Mora, Jaume; Arora, Parineeta; Jat, Parmjit S.; Royer-Pokora, Brigitte

    2016-01-01

    We describe a stromal predominant Wilms tumor with focal anaplasia and a complex, tumor specific chromosome 11 aberration: a homozygous deletion of the entire WT1 gene within a heterozygous 11p13 deletion and an additional region of uniparental disomy (UPD) limited to 11p15.5-p15.2 including the IGF2 gene. The tumor carried a heterozygous p.T41A mutation in CTNNB1. Cells established from the tumor carried the same chromosome 11 aberration, but a different, homozygous p.S45Δ CTNNB1 mutation. Uniparental disomy (UPD) 3p21.3pter lead to the homozygous CTNNB1 mutation. The tumor cell line was immortalized using the catalytic subunit of human telomerase (hTERT) in conjunction with a novel thermolabile mutant (U19dl89-97tsA58) of SV40 large T antigen (LT). This cell line is cytogenetically stable and can be grown indefinitely representing a valuable tool to study the effect of a complete lack of WT1 in tumor cells. The origin/fate of Wilms tumors with WT1 mutations is currently poorly defined. Here we studied the expression of several genes expressed in early kidney development, e.g. FOXD1, PAX3, SIX1, OSR1, OSR2 and MEIS1 and show that these are expressed at similar levels in the parental and the immortalized Wilms10 cells. In addition the limited potential for muscle/ osteogenic/ adipogenic differentiation similar to all other WT1 mutant cell lines is also observed in the Wilms10 tumor cell line and this is retained in the immortalized cells. In summary these Wilms10 cells are a valuable model system for functional studies of WT1 mutant cells. PMID:27213811

  7. Clinical expression of patients with the D1152H CFTR mutation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Terlizzi, Vito; Carnovale, Vincenzo; Castaldo, Giuseppe; Castellani, Carlo; Cirilli, Natalia; Colombo, Carla; Corti, Fabiola; Cresta, Federico; D'Adda, Alice; Lucarelli, Marco; Lucidi, Vincenzina; Macchiaroli, Annamaria; Madarena, Elisa; Padoan, Rita; Quattrucci, Serena; Salvatore, Donatello; Zarrilli, Federica; Raia, Valeria

    2015-07-01

    Discordant results were reported on the clinical expression of subjects bearing the D1152H CFTR mutation, and also for the small number of cases reported so far. A retrospective review of clinical, genetic and biochemical data was performed from individuals homozygous or compound heterozygous for the D1152H mutation followed in 12 Italian cystic fibrosis (CF) centers. 89 subjects carrying at least D1152H on one allele were identified. 7 homozygous patients had very mild clinical expression. Over half of the 74 subjects compound heterozygous for D1152H and a I-II-III class mutation had borderline or pathological sweat test and respiratory or gastrointestinal symptoms; one third had pulmonary bacteria colonization and 10/74 cases had complications (i.e. diabetes, allergic bronchopulmonary aspergillosis, and hemoptysis). However, their clinical expression was less severe as compared to a group of CF patients homozygous for the F508del mutation. Finally, 8 subjects compound heterozygous for D1152H and a IV-V class mutation showed very mild disease. The natural history of subjects bearing the D1152H mutation is widely heterogeneous and is influenced by the mutation in trans. Copyright © 2014 European Cystic Fibrosis Society. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. Regulation of Na+ channel inactivation by the DIII and DIV voltage-sensing domains.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsu, Eric J; Zhu, Wandi; Schubert, Angela R; Voelker, Taylor; Varga, Zoltan; Silva, Jonathan R

    2017-03-06

    Functional eukaryotic voltage-gated Na + (Na V ) channels comprise four domains (DI-DIV), each containing six membrane-spanning segments (S1-S6). Voltage sensing is accomplished by the first four membrane-spanning segments (S1-S4), which together form a voltage-sensing domain (VSD). A critical Na V channel gating process, inactivation, has previously been linked to activation of the VSDs in DIII and DIV. Here, we probe this interaction by using voltage-clamp fluorometry to observe VSD kinetics in the presence of mutations at locations that have been shown to impair Na V channel inactivation. These locations include the DIII-DIV linker, the DIII S4-S5 linker, and the DIV S4-S5 linker. Our results show that, within the 10-ms timeframe of fast inactivation, the DIV-VSD is the primary regulator of inactivation. However, after longer 100-ms pulses, the DIII-DIV linker slows DIII-VSD deactivation, and the rate of DIII deactivation correlates strongly with the rate of recovery from inactivation. Our results imply that, over the course of an action potential, DIV-VSDs regulate the onset of fast inactivation while DIII-VSDs determine its recovery. © 2017 Hsu et al.

  9. Tumor suppressor genes that escape from X-inactivation contribute to cancer sex bias

    OpenAIRE

    Dunford, Andrew; Weinstock, David M.; Savova, Virginia; Schumacher, Steven E.; Cleary, John P.; Yoda, Akinori; Sullivan, Timothy J.; Hess, Julian M.; Gimelbrant, Alexander A.; Beroukhim, Rameen; Lawrence, Michael S.; Getz, Gad; Lane, Andrew A.

    2016-01-01

    There is a striking and unexplained male predominance across many cancer types. A subset of X chromosome (chrX) genes can escape X-inactivation, which would protect females from complete functional loss by a single mutation. To identify putative “Escape from X-Inactivation Tumor Suppressor” (EXITS) genes, we compared somatic alterations from >4100 cancers across 21 tumor types for sex bias. Six of 783 non-pseudoautosomal region (PAR) chrX genes (ATRX, CNKSR2, DDX3X, KDM5C, KDM6A, and MAGEC3) ...

  10. Disruption of NBS1 gene leads to early embryonic lethality in homozygous null mice and induces specific cancer in heterozygous mice

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kurimasa, Akihiro; Burma, Sandeep; Henrie, Melinda; Ouyang, Honghai; Osaki, Mitsuhiko; Ito, Hisao; Nagasawa, Hatsumi; Little, John B.; Oshimura, Mitsuo; Li, Gloria C.; Chen, David J.

    2002-04-15

    Nijmegen breakage syndrome (NBS) is a rare autosomal recessive chromosome instability syndrome characterized by microcephaly, growth retardation, immunodeficiency, and cancer predisposition, with cellular features similar to that of ataxia telangiectasia (AT). NBS results from mutations in the mammalian gene Nbs1 that codes for a 95-kDa protein called nibrin, NBS1, or p95. To establish an animal model for NBS, we attempted to generate NBS1 knockout mice. However, NBS1 gene knockouts were lethal at an early embryonic stage. NBS1 homozygous(-/-) blastocyst cells cultured in vitro showed retarded growth and subsequently underwent growth arrest within 5 days of culture. Apoptosis, assayed by TUNEL staining, was observed in NBSI homozygous(-/-) blastocyst cells cultured for four days. NBSI heterozygous(+/-) mice were normal, and exhibited no specific phenotype for at least one year. However, fibroblast cells from NBSI heterozygous(+/-) mice displayed an enhanced frequency of spontaneous transformation to anchorage-independent growth as compared to NBS1 wild-type(+/+) cells. Furthermore, heterozygous(+/-) mice exhibited a high incidence of hepatocellular carcinoma after one year compared to wild-type mice, even though no significant differences in the incidence of other tumors such as lung adenocarcinoma and lymphoma were observed. Taken together, these results strongly suggest that NBS1 heterozygosity and reduced NBSI expression induces formation of specific tumors in mice.

  11. Presynaptic congenital myasthenic syndrome with a homozygous sequence variant in LAMA5 combines myopia, facial tics, and failure of neuromuscular transmission.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maselli, Ricardo A; Arredondo, Juan; Vázquez, Jessica; Chong, Jessica X; Bamshad, Michael J; Nickerson, Deborah A; Lara, Marian; Ng, Fiona; Lo, Victoria L; Pytel, Peter; McDonald, Craig M

    2017-08-01

    Defects in genes encoding the isoforms of the laminin alpha subunit have been linked to various phenotypic manifestations, including brain malformations, muscular dystrophy, ocular defects, cardiomyopathy, and skin abnormalities. We report here a severe defect of neuromuscular transmission in a consanguineous patient with a homozygous variant in the laminin alpha-5 subunit gene (LAMA5). The variant c.8046C>T (p.Arg2659Trp) is rare and has a predicted deleterious effect. The affected individual, who also carries a rare homozygous sequence variant in LAMA1, had muscle weakness, myopia, and facial tics. Magnetic resonance imaging of brain showed mild volume loss and periventricular T2 prolongation. Repetitive nerve stimulation revealed 50% decrement of compound muscle action potential amplitudes and 250% facilitation immediately after exercise, Endplate studies identified a profound reduction of the endplate potential quantal content and endplates with normal postsynaptic folding that were denuded or partially occupied by small nerve terminals. Expression studies revealed that p.Arg2659Trp caused decreased binding of laminin alpha-5 to SV2A and impaired laminin-521 cell-adhesion and cell projection support in primary neuronal cultures. In summary, this report describing severe neuromuscular transmission failure in a patient with a LAMA5 mutation expands the list of phenotypes associated with defects in genes encoding alpha-laminins. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  12. The Eag domain regulates the voltage-dependent inactivation of rat Eag1 K+ channels.

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    Ting-Feng Lin

    Full Text Available Eag (Kv10 and Erg (Kv11 belong to two distinct subfamilies of the ether-à-go-go K+ channel family (KCNH. While Erg channels are characterized by an inward-rectifying current-voltage relationship that results from a C-type inactivation, mammalian Eag channels display little or no voltage-dependent inactivation. Although the amino (N-terminal region such as the eag domain is not required for the C-type inactivation of Erg channels, an N-terminal deletion in mouse Eag1 has been shown to produce a voltage-dependent inactivation. To further discern the role of the eag domain in the inactivation of Eag1 channels, we generated N-terminal chimeras between rat Eag (rEag1 and human Erg (hERG1 channels that involved swapping the eag domain alone or the complete cytoplasmic N-terminal region. Functional analyses indicated that introduction of the homologous hERG1 eag domain led to both a fast phase and a slow phase of channel inactivation in the rEag1 chimeras. By contrast, the inactivation features were retained in the reverse hERG1 chimeras. Furthermore, an eag domain-lacking rEag1 deletion mutant also showed the fast phase of inactivation that was notably attenuated upon co-expression with the rEag1 eag domain fragment, but not with the hERG1 eag domain fragment. Additionally, we have identified a point mutation in the S4-S5 linker region of rEag1 that resulted in a similar inactivation phenotype. Biophysical analyses of these mutant constructs suggested that the inactivation gating of rEag1 was distinctly different from that of hERG1. Overall, our findings are consistent with the notion that the eag domain plays a critical role in regulating the inactivation gating of rEag1. We propose that the eag domain may destabilize or mask an inherent voltage-dependent inactivation of rEag1 K+ channels.

  13. Thrombolytic therapy for the treatment of acute ischaemic stroke in adults with homozygous sickle cell disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Majhadi, Loubna; Calvet, David; Rosso, Charlotte; Bartolucci, Pablo

    2017-07-28

    Stroke is a significant cause of morbidity and mortality in patients with homozygous sickle cell disease (SCD). A specific large-vessel vasculopathy is often responsible for both haemorrhagic and ischaemic strokes in patients with SCD. Although intravenous thrombolysis has been considered as a therapeutic option for acute ischaemic strokes in SCD, its use remains debated because of an increased risk of spontaneous intracranial haemorrhage reported in this disease. This risk of haemorrhage is mainly supported by the presence of a Moyamoya syndrome often associated with the specific vasculopathy in patients with homozygous SCD. We report two cases of patients with homozygous SCD treated with intravenous thrombolysis for an acute ischaemic stroke without haemorrhagic transformation. Our cases suggest that reperfusion strategy in acute ischaemic stroke in patients with homozygous SCD can be considered once associated Moyamoya syndrome has been ruled out. An international registry would be of interest as these situations are rare. © BMJ Publishing Group Ltd (unless otherwise stated in the text of the article) 2017. All rights reserved. No commercial use is permitted unless otherwise expressly granted.

  14. Mesomelic dwarfism of the Langer type as a homozygous form of dyschondrosteosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kemperdick, H.; Majewski, F.; Duesseldorf Univ.

    1982-01-01

    A family is described containing a daughter suffering from mesomelic dwarfism of the Langer type and both parents showing a dyschondrosteosis. This family supports the thesis that mesomelic dwarfism of the Langer type represents the homozygous form of dyschondrosteosis. (orig.) [de

  15. Premature Coronary Artery Disease due to Homozygous Familial Hypercholesterolemia in a 12-Year-Old Girl

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Filiz Ekici

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Background: Homozygous familial hypercholesterolemia is a rare inherited metabolic disease caused by low-density lipoprotein receptor abnormality. Patients with homozygous familial hypercholesterolemia have an increased risk of cardiovascular complication that usually occurs in the first decade of life. Here, we report a 12-year-old girl with an unpredicted presentation for coronary artery disease and found to have homozygous familial hypercholesterolemia. Case Report: A 12-year-old girl was admitted to our unit with syncope. Chest X-ray showed bilateral diffuse pneumonic consolidation and mild cardiomegaly. We detected stable ST depression by electrocardiography. Echocardiography showed normal systolic functions. Troponin-1 levels were high (66 mcg/dL, upper limit: 0.04 mcg/dL. Influenza A virus DNA was detected by the respiratory viral panel. After her successful treatment for acute pneumonia and myocarditis due to Influenza A virus, her syncope attacks persisted. Marked ST elevation was observed during exercise electrocardiography. Coronary angiography showed severe occlusions in the coronary arteries. High serum levels of total cholesterol (756 mg/dL and low-density lipoprotein-C (556 mg/dL were noticed. She had no tendon xanthomas. Medical histories revealed that her family members were diagnosed with heterozygous familial hypercholesterolemia. A coronary bypass surgery was performed. Statin and ezetimibe treatments were started. We also planned lipid apheresis. Conclusion: Children with homozygous familial hypercholesterolemia may present with symptoms of premature coronary heart disease requiring a routine lipid test and careful anamnesis.

  16. A patient with common glycogen storage disease type Ib mutations without neutropenia or neutrophil dysfunction

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Martens, DHJ; Kuijpers, TW; Maianski, NA; Rake, JP; Smit, GPA; Visser, G

    We describe a 16-year old boy with glycogen storage disease type Ib, homozygous for the common 1211-1212delCT mutation, who never experienced neutropenia, and did not suffer from frequent infections or inflammatory bowel disease. In addition, neutrophil function tests showed no abnormalities.

  17. Novel LMF1 Nonsense Mutation in a Patient with Severe Hypertriglyceridemia

    OpenAIRE

    Cefalù, Angelo B.; Noto, Davide; Arpi, Maria Luisa; Yin, Fen; Spina, Rossella; Hilden, Hannele; Barbagallo, Carlo M.; Carroccio, Antonio; Tarugi, Patrizia; Squatrito, Sebastiano; Vigneri, Riccardo; Taskinen, Marja-Riitta; Péterfy, Miklós; Averna, Maurizio R.

    2009-01-01

    Context: Lipase maturation factor 1 (LMF1) gene is a novel candidate gene in severe hypertriglyceridemia. Lmf1 is involved in the maturation of lipoprotein lipase (LPL) and hepatic lipase in endoplasmic reticulum. To date only one patient with severe hypertriglyceridemia and related disorders was found to be homozygous for a nonsense mutation in LMF1 gene (Y439X).

  18. Increased microerythrocyte count in homozygous alpha(+-thalassaemia contributes to protection against severe malarial anaemia.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Freya J I Fowkes

    2008-03-01

    Full Text Available The heritable haemoglobinopathy alpha(+-thalassaemia is caused by the reduced synthesis of alpha-globin chains that form part of normal adult haemoglobin (Hb. Individuals homozygous for alpha(+-thalassaemia have microcytosis and an increased erythrocyte count. Alpha(+-thalassaemia homozygosity confers considerable protection against severe malaria, including severe malarial anaemia (SMA (Hb concentration 1.1 x 10(12/l as a result of the reduced mean cell Hb in homozygous alpha(+-thalassaemia. In addition, children homozygous for alpha(+-thalassaemia require a 10% greater reduction in erythrocyte count than children of normal genotype (p = 0.02 for Hb concentration to fall to 50 g/l, the cutoff for SMA. We estimated that the haematological profile in children homozygous for alpha(+-thalassaemia reduces the risk of SMA during acute malaria compared to children of normal genotype (relative risk 0.52; 95% confidence interval [CI] 0.24-1.12, p = 0.09.The increased erythrocyte count and microcytosis in children homozygous for alpha(+-thalassaemia may contribute substantially to their protection against SMA. A lower concentration of Hb per erythrocyte and a larger population of erythrocytes may be a biologically advantageous strategy against the significant reduction in erythrocyte count that occurs during acute infection with the malaria parasite Plasmodium falciparum. This haematological profile may reduce the risk of anaemia by other Plasmodium species, as well as other causes of anaemia. Other host polymorphisms that induce an increased erythrocyte count and microcytosis may confer a similar advantage.

  19. Co-inheritance of α0 -thalassemia elevates Hb A2 level in homozygous Hb E: Diagnostic implications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singha, K; Srivorakun, H; Fucharoen, G; Fucharoen, S

    2017-10-01

    Differentiation of homozygous hemoglobin (Hb) E with and without α 0 -thalassemia is subtle on routine hematological ground. We examined in a large cohort of homozygous Hb E if the level of Hb A 2 is helpful. A total of 592 subjects with homozygous Hb E were recruited from ongoing thalassemia screening program. Additionally, five couples at risk of having fetuses with Hb Bart's hydrops fetalis who were homozygous Hb E were also investigated. Hb analysis was performed using capillary electrophoresis system. Globin genotypes were defined by DNA analysis. Subjects were classified into four groups including pure homozygous Hb E (n=532), homozygous Hb E/α 0 -thalassemia (n=48), Hb Constant Spring EE Bart's disease (n=8), and Hb EE Bart's disease (n=4). The levels of Hb A 2 were found, respectively, to be 4.97±0.69, 6.64±1.02, 4.86±0.87, and 7.60±1.04%. Among five couples at risk, α 0 -thalassemia was identified in three subjects with Hb A 2 >6.0%. Increased Hb A 2 level is a useful marker for differentiation of homozygous Hb E with and without α 0 -thalassemia. This should lead to a significant reduction in number of referral cases of homozygous Hb E for molecular testing of α 0 -thalassemia in routine practice. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  20. Acral peeling skin syndrome associated with a novel CSTA gene mutation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muttardi, K; Nitoiu, D; Kelsell, D P; O'Toole, E A; Batta, K

    2016-06-01

    Acral peeling skin syndrome (APSS) is a rare autosomal recessive condition, characterized by asymptomatic peeling of the skin of the hands and feet, often linked to mutations in the gene TGM5. However, more recently recessive loss of function mutations in CSTA, encoding cystatin A, have been linked with APSS and exfoliative ichthyosis. We describe the clinical features in two sisters with APSS, associated with a novel large homozygous deletion encompassing exon 1 of CSTA. © 2015 British Association of Dermatologists.

  1. Same β-globin gene mutation is present on nine different β-thalassemia chromosomes in a Sardinian population

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pirastu, M.; Galanello, R.; Doherty, M.A.; Tuveri, T.; Cao, A.; Kan, Y.W.

    1987-01-01

    The predominant β-thalassemia in Sardinia is the β 0 type in which no β-globin chains are synthesized in the homozygous state. The authors determined the β-thalassemia mutations in this population by the oligonucleotide-probe method and defined the chromosome haplotypes on which the mutation resides. The same β/sup 39(CAG→TAG)/ nonsense mutation was found on nine different chromosome haplotypes. Although this mutation may have arisen more than once, the multiple haplotypes could also be generated by crossing over and gene conversion events. These findings underscore the frequency of mutational events in the β-globin gene region

  2. Normal X-inactivation mosaicism in corneas of heterozygous FlnaDilp2/+ female mice--a model of human Filamin A (FLNA diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Douvaras Panagiotis

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Some abnormalities of mouse corneal epithelial maintenance can be identified by the atypical mosaic patterns they produce in X-chromosome inactivation mosaics and chimeras. Human FLNA/+ females, heterozygous for X-linked, filamin A gene (FLNA mutations, display a range of disorders and X-inactivation mosaicism is sometimes quantitatively unbalanced. FlnaDilp2/+ mice, heterozygous for an X-linked filamin A (Flna nonsense mutation have variable eye, skeletal and other abnormalities, but X-inactivation mosaicism has not been investigated. The aim of this study was to determine whether X-inactivation mosaicism in the corneal epithelia of FlnaDilp2/+ mice was affected in any way that might predict abnormal corneal epithelial maintenance. Results X-chromosome inactivation mosaicism was studied in the corneal epithelium and a control tissue (liver of FlnaDilp2/+ and wild-type (WT female X-inactivation mosaics, hemizygous for the X-linked, LacZ reporter H253 transgene, using β-galactosidase histochemical staining. The corneal epithelia of FlnaDilp2/+ and WT X-inactivation mosaics showed similar radial, striped patterns, implying epithelial cell movement was not disrupted in FlnaDilp2/+ corneas. Corrected stripe numbers declined with age overall (but not significantly for either genotype individually, consistent with previous reports suggesting an age-related reduction in stem cell function. Corrected stripe numbers were not reduced in FlnaDilp2/+ compared with WT X-inactivation mosaics and mosaicism was not significantly more unbalanced in the corneal epithelia or livers of FlnaDilp2/+ than wild-type Flna+/+ X-inactivation mosaics. Conclusions Mosaic analysis identified no major effect of the mouse FlnaDilp2 mutation on corneal epithelial maintenance or the balance of X-inactivation mosaicism in the corneal epithelium or liver.

  3. Exome-wide Association Study Identifies GREB1L Mutations in Congenital Kidney Malformations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanna-Cherchi, Simone; Khan, Kamal; Westland, Rik; Krithivasan, Priya; Fievet, Lorraine; Rasouly, Hila Milo; Ionita-Laza, Iuliana; Capone, Valentina P; Fasel, David A; Kiryluk, Krzysztof; Kamalakaran, Sitharthan; Bodria, Monica; Otto, Edgar A; Sampson, Matthew G; Gillies, Christopher E; Vega-Warner, Virginia; Vukojevic, Katarina; Pediaditakis, Igor; Makar, Gabriel S; Mitrotti, Adele; Verbitsky, Miguel; Martino, Jeremiah; Liu, Qingxue; Na, Young-Ji; Goj, Vinicio; Ardissino, Gianluigi; Gigante, Maddalena; Gesualdo, Loreto; Janezcko, Magdalena; Zaniew, Marcin; Mendelsohn, Cathy Lee; Shril, Shirlee; Hildebrandt, Friedhelm; van Wijk, Joanna A E; Arapovic, Adela; Saraga, Marijan; Allegri, Landino; Izzi, Claudia; Scolari, Francesco; Tasic, Velibor; Ghiggeri, Gian Marco; Latos-Bielenska, Anna; Materna-Kiryluk, Anna; Mane, Shrikant; Goldstein, David B; Lifton, Richard P; Katsanis, Nicholas; Davis, Erica E; Gharavi, Ali G

    2017-11-02

    Renal agenesis and hypodysplasia (RHD) are major causes of pediatric chronic kidney disease and are highly genetically heterogeneous. We conducted whole-exome sequencing in 202 case subjects with RHD and identified diagnostic mutations in genes known to be associated with RHD in 7/202 case subjects. In an additional affected individual with RHD and a congenital heart defect, we found a homozygous loss-of-function (LOF) variant in SLIT3, recapitulating phenotypes reported with Slit3 inactivation in the mouse. To identify genes associated with RHD, we performed an exome-wide association study with 195 unresolved case subjects and 6,905 control subjects. The top signal resided in GREB1L, a gene implicated previously in Hoxb1 and Shha signaling in zebrafish. The significance of the association, which was p = 2.0 × 10 -5 for novel LOF, increased to p = 4.1 × 10 -6 for LOF and deleterious missense variants combined, and augmented further after accounting for segregation and de novo inheritance of rare variants (joint p = 2.3 × 10 -7 ). Finally, CRISPR/Cas9 disruption or knockdown of greb1l in zebrafish caused specific pronephric defects, which were rescued by wild-type human GREB1L mRNA, but not mRNA containing alleles identified in case subjects. Together, our study provides insight into the genetic landscape of kidney malformations in humans, presents multiple candidates, and identifies SLIT3 and GREB1L as genes implicated in the pathogenesis of RHD. Copyright © 2017 American Society of Human Genetics. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Inhibition of Retinoblastoma Protein Inactivation

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-11-01

    CONTRACT NUMBER Inhibition of Retinoblastoma Protein Inactivation 5b. GRANT NUMBER W81XWH-14-1-0329 5c. PROGRAM ELEMENT NUMBER 6. AUTHOR(S) Seth M...confirmed 108 compounds as giving a dose-response curve with at least 30% inhibition at 10 µM. The flowchart of hit progression is shown on the...Cancer Research Program under Award No. W81XWH-14-1-0329 to S.M.R. Opinions, interpretations, conclusions, and recommendations are those of the author

  5. Recessive Mutations in ACPT, Encoding Testicular Acid Phosphatase, Cause Hypoplastic Amelogenesis Imperfecta.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seymen, Figen; Kim, Youn Jung; Lee, Ye Ji; Kang, Jenny; Kim, Tak-Heun; Choi, Hwajung; Koruyucu, Mine; Kasimoglu, Yelda; Tuna, Elif Bahar; Gencay, Koray; Shin, Teo Jeon; Hyun, Hong-Keun; Kim, Young-Jae; Lee, Sang-Hoon; Lee, Zang Hee; Zhang, Hong; Hu, Jan C-C; Simmer, James P; Cho, Eui-Sic; Kim, Jung-Wook

    2016-11-03

    Amelogenesis imperfecta (AI) is a heterogeneous group of genetic disorders affecting tooth enamel. The affected enamel can be hypoplastic and/or hypomineralized. In this study, we identified ACPT (testicular acid phosphatase) biallelic mutations causing non-syndromic, generalized hypoplastic autosomal-recessive amelogenesis imperfecta (AI) in individuals from six apparently unrelated Turkish families. Families 1, 4, and 5 were affected by the homozygous ACPT mutation c.713C>T (p.Ser238Leu), family 2 by the homozygous ACPT mutation c.331C>T (p.Arg111Cys), family 3 by the homozygous ACPT mutation c.226C>T (p.Arg76Cys), and family 6 by the compound heterozygous ACPT mutations c.382G>C (p.Ala128Pro) and 397G>A (p.Glu133Lys). Analysis of the ACPT crystal structure suggests that these mutations damaged the activity of ACPT by altering the sizes and charges of key amino acid side chains, limiting accessibility of the catalytic core, and interfering with homodimerization. Immunohistochemical analysis confirmed localization of ACPT in secretory-stage ameloblasts. The study results provide evidence for the crucial function of ACPT during amelogenesis. Copyright © 2016 American Society of Human Genetics. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Collagen XVIII Mutation in Knobloch Syndrome with Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahajan, Vinit B.; Olney, Ann Haskins; Garrett, Penny; Chary, Ajit; Dragan, Ecaterina; Lerner, Gary; Murray, Jeffrey; Bassuk, Alexander G.

    2010-01-01

    Knobloch syndrome (KNO) is caused by mutations in the collagen XIII gene (COL18A1) and patients develop encephalocele and vitreoretinal degeneration. Here we report an El Salvadorian family where two sisters showed features of KNO. One of the siblings also developed acute lymphoblastic leukemia. DNA sequencing of COL18A1revealed a homozygous, 2-base pair deletion (c3514-3515delCT) in exon 41, which leads to abnormal collagen XVIII and deficiency of its proteolytic cleavage product endostatin. KNO patients with mutations in COL18A1 may be at risk for endostatin-related conditions including malignancy. PMID:20799329

  7. Immunodeficiency associated with FCN3 mutation and ficolin-3 deficiency

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Munthe-Fog, Lea; Hummelshøj, Tina; Honoré, Christian

    2009-01-01

    Ficolin-3, encoded by the FCN3 gene and expressed in the lung and liver, is a recognition molecule in the lectin pathway of the complement system. Heterozygosity for an FCN3 frameshift mutation (rs28357092), leading to a distortion of the C-terminal end of the molecule, occurs in people without...... disease (allele frequency among whites, 0.01). We describe a patient with recurrent infections who was homozygous for this mutation, who had undetectable serum levels of ficolin-3, and who had a deficiency in ficolin-3-dependent complement activation....

  8. Mitochondrial DNA mutations in mutator mice confer respiration defects and B-cell lymphoma development.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Takayuki Mito

    Full Text Available Mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA mutator mice are proposed to express premature aging phenotypes including kyphosis and hair loss (alopecia due to their carrying a nuclear-encoded mtDNA polymerase with a defective proofreading function, which causes accelerated accumulation of random mutations in mtDNA, resulting in expression of respiration defects. On the contrary, transmitochondrial mito-miceΔ carrying mtDNA with a large-scale deletion mutation (ΔmtDNA also express respiration defects, but not express premature aging phenotypes. Here, we resolved this discrepancy by generating mtDNA mutator mice sharing the same C57BL/6J (B6J nuclear background with that of mito-miceΔ. Expression patterns of premature aging phenotypes are very close, when we compared between homozygous mtDNA mutator mice carrying a B6J nuclear background and selected mito-miceΔ only carrying predominant amounts of ΔmtDNA, in their expression of significant respiration defects, kyphosis, and a short lifespan, but not the alopecia. Therefore, the apparent discrepancy in the presence and absence of premature aging phenotypes in mtDNA mutator mice and mito-miceΔ, respectively, is partly the result of differences in the nuclear background of mtDNA mutator mice and of the broad range of ΔmtDNA proportions of mito-miceΔ used in previous studies. We also provided direct evidence that mtDNA abnormalities in homozygous mtDNA mutator mice are responsible for respiration defects by demonstrating the co-transfer of mtDNA and respiration defects from mtDNA mutator mice into mtDNA-less (ρ(0 mouse cells. Moreover, heterozygous mtDNA mutator mice had a normal lifespan, but frequently developed B-cell lymphoma, suggesting that the mtDNA abnormalities in heterozygous mutator mice are not sufficient to induce a short lifespan and aging phenotypes, but are able to contribute to the B-cell lymphoma development during their prolonged lifespan.

  9. Homozygous mutations in IHH cause acrocapitofemoral dysplasia, an autosomal recessive disorder with cone- shaped epiphyses in hands and hips

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hellemans, J; Coucke, PJ; Giedion, A; De Paepe, A; Kramer, P; Beemer, F; Mortier, GR

    Acrocapitofemoral dysplasia is a recently delineated autosomal recessive skeletal dysplasia, characterized clinically by short stature with short limbs and radiographically by cone-shaped epiphyses, mainly in hands and hips. Genome-wide homozygosity mapping in two consanguineous families linked the

  10. Homozygous SLC6A17 Mutations Cause Autosomal-Recessive Intellectual Disability with Progressive Tremor, Speech Impairment, and Behavioral Problems

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Iqbal, Z.; Willemsen, M.H.; Papon, M.A.; Musante, L.; Benevento, M.; Hu, H; Venselaar, H.; Wissink-Lindhout, W.M.; Silfhout, A.T. van; Vissers, L.E.L.M.; Brouwer, A.P.M. de; Marouillat, S.; Wienker, T.F.; Ropers, H.H.; Kahrizi, K.; Nadif Kasri, N.; Najmabadi, H.; Laumonnier, F.; Kleefstra, T.; Bokhoven, H. van

    2015-01-01

    We report on Dutch and Iranian families with affected individuals who present with moderate to severe intellectual disability and additional phenotypes including progressive tremor, speech impairment, and behavioral problems in certain individuals. A combination of exome sequencing and homozygosity

  11. A homozygous mutation in HESX1 is associated with evolving hypopituitarism due to impaired repressor-corepressor interaction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Carvalho, Luciani R; Woods, Kathryn S; Mendonca, Berenice B

    2003-01-01

    repressor domain (eh1) of HESX1, the first, to our knowledge, to be described in humans, in a girl with evolving combined pituitary hormone deficiency born to consanguineous parents. Neuroimaging revealed a thin pituitary stalk with anterior pituitary hypoplasia and an ectopic posterior pituitary...

  12. Dietary Iron Intake and Serum Ferritin Concentration in 213 Patients Homozygous for the HFEC282Y Hemochromatosis Mutation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Victor R Gordeuk

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: HFEC282Y homozygotes have an increased risk for developing increased iron stores and related disorders. It is controversial whether dietary iron restrictions should be recommended to such individuals.

  13. How much do we know about spontaneous human mutation rates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Crow, J.F. (Univ. of Wisconsin, Madison, WI (United States))

    1993-01-01

    The much larger number of cell divisions between zygote and sperm than between zygote and egg, the increased age of fathers of children with new dominant mutations, and the greater evolution rate of pseudogenes on the Y chromosome than of those on autosomes all point to a much higher mutation rate in human males than in females, as first pointed out by Haldane in his classical study of X-linked hemophilia. The age of the father is the main factor determining the human spontaneous mutation rate, and probably the total mutation rate. The total mutation rate in Drosophila males of genes causing minor reduction in viability is at least 0.4 per sperm and may be considerably higher. The great mutation load implied by a rate of [approx] 1 per zygote can be greatly ameliorated by quasi-transition selection. Corresponding data are not available for the human population. The evolution rate of pseudogenes in primates suggests some 10[sup 2] new mutations per zygote. Presumably the overwhelming majority of these are neutral, but even the approximate fraction is not known. Statistical evidence in Drosophilia shows that mutations with minor effects cause about the same heterozygous impairment of fitness as those that are lethal when homozygous. The magnitude of heterozygous effect is such that almost all mutant genes are eliminated as heterozygotes before ever becoming homozygous. Although quantitative data in the human species are lacking, anecdotal information supports the conclusion that partial dominance is the rule here as well. This suggests that if the human mutation rate were increased or decreased, the effects would be spread over a period of 50-100 generations. 31 refs., 3 figs., 2 tabs.

  14. Reduced rates of gene loss, gene silencing, and gene mutation in Dnmt1-deficient embryonic stem cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Chan, M.F.; van Amerongen, R.; Nijjar, T.; Cuppen, E.; Jones, P.A.; Laird, P.W.

    2001-01-01

    Tumor suppressor gene inactivation is a crucial event in oncogenesis. Gene inactivation mechanisms include events resulting in loss of heterozygosity (LOH), gene mutation, and transcriptional silencing. The contribution of each of these different pathways varies among tumor suppressor genes and by

  15. Charge immobilization of the voltage sensor in domain IV is independent of sodium current inactivation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sheets, Michael F; Hanck, Dorothy A

    2005-02-15

    Recovery from fast inactivation in voltage-dependent Na+ channels is associated with a slow component in the time course of gating charge during repolarization (i.e. charge immobilization), which results from the slow movement of the S4 segments in domains III and IV (S4-DIII and S4-DIV). Previous studies have shown that the non-specific removal of fast inactivation by the proteolytic enzyme pronase eliminated charge immobilization, while the specific removal of fast inactivation (by intracellular MTSET modification of a cysteine substituted for the phenylalanine in the IFM motif, ICMMTSET, in the inactivation particle formed by the linker between domains III and IV) only reduced the amount of charge immobilization by nearly one-half. To investigate the molecular origin of the remaining slow component of charge immobilization we studied the human cardiac Na+ channel (hH1a) in which the outermost arginine in the S4-DIV, which contributes approximately 20% to total gating charge (Qmax), was mutated to a cysteine (R1C-DIV). Gating charge could be fully restored in R1C-DIV by exposure to extracellular MTSEA, a positively charged methanethiosulphonate reagent. The RIC-DIV mutation was combined with ICMMTSET to remove fast inactivation, and the gating currents of R1C-DIV-ICM(MTSET) were recorded before and after modification with MTSEAo. Prior to MTSEAo, the time course of the gating charge during repolarization (off-charge) was best described by a single fast time constant. After MTSEA, the off-charge had both fast and slow components, with the slow component accounting for nearly 35% of Qmax. These results demonstrate that the slow movement of the S4-DIV during repolarization is not dependent upon the normal binding of the inactivation particle.

  16. Identification of MPL R102P Mutation in Hereditary Thrombocytosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bellanné-Chantelot, Christine; Mosca, Matthieu; Marty, Caroline; Favier, Rémi; Vainchenker, William; Plo, Isabelle

    2017-01-01

    The molecular basis of hereditary thrombocytosis is germline mutations affecting the thrombopoietin (TPO)/TPO receptor (MPL)/JAK2 signaling axis. Here, we report one family presenting two cases with a mild thrombocytosis. By sequencing JAK2 and MPL coding exons, we identified a germline MPL R102P heterozygous mutation in the proband and his daughter. Concomitantly, we detected high TPO levels in the serum of these two patients. The mutation was not found in three other unaffected cases from the family except in another proband's daughter who did not present thrombocytosis but had a high TPO level. The MPL R102P mutation was first described in congenital amegakaryocytic thrombocytopenia in a homozygous state with a loss-of-function activity. It was previously shown that MPL R102P was blocked in the endoplasmic reticulum without being able to translocate to the plasma membrane. Thus, this case report identifies for the first time that MPL R102P mutation can differently impact megakaryopoiesis: thrombocytosis or thrombocytopenia depending on the presence of the heterozygous or homozygous state, respectively. The paradoxical effect associated with heterozygous MPL R102P may be due to subnormal cell-surface expression of wild-type MPL in platelets inducing a defective TPO clearance. As a consequence, increased TPO levels may activate megakaryocyte progenitors that express a lower, but still sufficient level of MPL for the induction of proliferation.

  17. Identification of MPL R102P Mutation in Hereditary Thrombocytosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christine Bellanné-Chantelot

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available The molecular basis of hereditary thrombocytosis is germline mutations affecting the thrombopoietin (TPO/TPO receptor (MPL/JAK2 signaling axis. Here, we report one family presenting two cases with a mild thrombocytosis. By sequencing JAK2 and MPL coding exons, we identified a germline MPL R102P heterozygous mutation in the proband and his daughter. Concomitantly, we detected high TPO levels in the serum of these two patients. The mutation was not found in three other unaffected cases from the family except in another proband’s daughter who did not present thrombocytosis but had a high TPO level. The MPL R102P mutation was first described in congenital amegakaryocytic thrombocytopenia in a homozygous state with a loss-of-function activity. It was previously shown that MPL R102P was blocked in the endoplasmic reticulum without being able to translocate to the plasma membrane. Thus, this case report identifies for the first time that MPL R102P mutation can differently impact megakaryopoiesis: thrombocytosis or thrombocytopenia depending on the presence of the heterozygous or homozygous state, respectively. The paradoxical effect associated with heterozygous MPL R102P may be due to subnormal cell-surface expression of wild-type MPL in platelets inducing a defective TPO clearance. As a consequence, increased TPO levels may activate megakaryocyte progenitors that express a lower, but still sufficient level of MPL for the induction of proliferation.

  18. NDST1 missense mutations in autosomal recessive intellectual disability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reuter, Miriam S; Musante, Luciana; Hu, Hao; Diederich, Stefan; Sticht, Heinrich; Ekici, Arif B; Uebe, Steffen; Wienker, Thomas F; Bartsch, Oliver; Zechner, Ulrich; Oppitz, Cornelia; Keleman, Krystyna; Jamra, Rami Abou; Najmabadi, Hossein; Schweiger, Susann; Reis, André; Kahrizi, Kimia

    2014-11-01

    NDST1 was recently proposed as a candidate gene for autosomal recessive intellectual disability in two families. It encodes a bifunctional GlcNAc N-deacetylase/N-sulfotransferase with important functions in heparan sulfate biosynthesis. In mice, Ndst1 is crucial for embryonic development and homozygous null mutations are perinatally lethal. We now report on two additional unrelated families with homozygous missense NDST1 mutations. All mutations described to date predict the substitution of conserved amino acids in the sulfotransferase domain, and mutation modeling predicts drastic alterations in the local protein conformation. Comparing the four families, we noticed significant overlap in the clinical features, including both demonstrated and apparent intellectual disability, muscular hypotonia, epilepsy, and postnatal growth deficiency. Furthermore, in Drosophila, knockdown of sulfateless, the NDST ortholog, impairs long-term memory, highlighting its function in cognition. Our data confirm NDST1 mutations as a cause of autosomal recessive intellectual disability with a distinctive phenotype, and support an important function of NDST1 in human development. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  19. A Founder Mutation in MYO7A Underlies a Significant Proportion of Usher Syndrome in Indigenous South Africans: Implications for the African Diaspora.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roberts, Lisa; George, Siddiqah; Greenberg, Jacquie; Ramesar, Raj S

    2015-10-01

    Research over the past 25 years at the University of Cape Town has led to the identification of causative mutations in 17% of the 1416 families in the Retinal Degenerative Diseases (RDD) biorepository in South Africa. A low rate of mutation detection has been observed in patients of indigenous African origin, hinting at novel genes and mutations in this population. Recently, however, data from our translational research program showed two unrelated indigenous African families with Usher syndrome (USH), with the same homozygous MYO7A mutation. Therefore, the extent to which this mutation contributes toward the disease burden in South Africa was investigated. Cohorts of unrelated indigenous South African probands with different RDD diagnoses were tested for the MYO7A c.6377delC mutation. Familial cosegregation analysis was performed for homozygous probands, clinical data were evaluated, and SNP haplotypes were analyzed. This homozygous MYO7A mutation underlies a remarkable 43% of indigenous African USH cases investigated in this study, the majority of which (60%) were diagnosed clinically with Type 2 USH. All homozygotes shared a common haplotype. This mutation does not appear to cause nonsyndromic vision loss. Of interest is the origin of this common mutation relevant to the Bantu population migration into southern Africa. Further investigation of the phenotype may elucidate the disease biology, and perhaps reveal a larger cohort with the same mutation, with which to assess the impact of environmental and genetic modifiers and evaluate therapeutic trials.

  20. RB1 mutation spectrum in a comprehensive nationwide cohort of retinoblastoma patients

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dommering, Charlotte J.; Mol, Berber M.; Moll, Annette C.; Burton, Margaret; Cloos, Jacqueline; Dorsman, Josephine C.; Meijers-Heijboer, Hanne; van der Hout, Annemarie H.

    Background Retinoblastoma (Rb) is a childhood cancer of the retina, commonly initiated by biallelic inactivation of the RB1 gene. Knowledge of the presence of a heritable RB1 mutation can help in risk management and reproductive decision making. We report here on RB1 mutation scanning in a unique

  1. Digenic mutations involving both the BSND and GJB2 genes detected in Bartter syndrome type IV.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Hong-Han; Feng, Yong; Li, Hai-Bo; Wu, Hong; Mei, Ling-Yun; Wang, Xing-Wei; Jiang, Lu; He, Chu-Feng

    2017-01-01

    Bartter syndrome type IV, characterized by salt-losing nephropathies and sensorineural deafness, is caused by mutations of BSND or simultaneous mutations of both CLCNKA and CLCNKB. GJB2 is the primary causative gene for non-syndromic sensorineural deafness and associated with several syndromic sensorineural deafness. Owing to the rarity of Bartter syndrome, only a few mutations have been reported in the abovementioned causative genes. To investigate the underlying mutations in a Chinese patient with Bartter syndrome type IV, genetic analysis of BSND, CLCNKA, CLCNKB and GJB2 were performed by polymerase chain reaction and direct sequencing. Finally, double homozygous mutations c.22C > T (p.Arg8Trp) and c.127G > A (Val43Ile) were detected in exon 1 of BSND. Intriguingly, compound heterozygous mutations c.235delC (p.Leu79CysfsX3) and c.109G > A (p.Val37Ile) were also revealed in exon 2 of GJB2 in the same patient. No pathogenic mutations were found in CLCNKA and CLCNKB. Our results indicated that the homozygous mutation c.22C > T was the key genetic reason for the proband, and a digenic effect of BSND and GJB2 might contributed to sensorineural deafness. To our knowledge, it was the first report showing that the GJB2 gene mutations were detected in Bartter syndrome. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Complicated biallelic inactivation of Pten in radiation-induced mouse thymic lymphomas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yamaguchi, Yu [Department of Biology, Graduate School of Science, Chiba University, Yayoicho, Inage-ku, Chiba 263-8522 (Japan); Experimental Radiobiology for Children' s Health Research Group, Research Center for Radiation Protection, National Institute of Radiological Sciences, 4-9-1, Anagawa, Inage-ku, Chiba 263-8555 (Japan); Takabatake, Takashi; Kakinuma, Shizuko; Amasaki, Yoshiko; Nishimura, Mayumi; Imaoka, Tatsuhiko; Yamauchi, Kazumi; Shang, Yi [Experimental Radiobiology for Children' s Health Research Group, Research Center for Radiation Protection, National Institute of Radiological Sciences, 4-9-1, Anagawa, Inage-ku, Chiba 263-8555 (Japan); Miyoshi-Imamura, Tomoko [Experimental Radiobiology for Children' s Health Research Group, Research Center for Radiation Protection, National Institute of Radiological Sciences, 4-9-1, Anagawa, Inage-ku, Chiba 263-8555 (Japan); Genetic Counseling Program, Graduate School of Humanities and Sciences, Ochanomizu University, 2-1-1 Otsuka, Bunkyou-ku, Tokyo 112-8610 (Japan); Nogawa, Hiroyuki [Department of Biology, Graduate School of Science, Chiba University, Yayoicho, Inage-ku, Chiba 263-8522 (Japan); Kobayashi, Yoshiro [Department of Biomolecular Science, Faculty of Science, Toho University, Miyama 2-2-1, Funabashi, Chiba 274-8510 (Japan); Shimada, Yoshiya, E-mail: y_shimad@nirsgo.jp [Experimental Radiobiology for Children' s Health Research Group, Research Center for Radiation Protection, National Institute of Radiological Sciences, 4-9-1, Anagawa, Inage-ku, Chiba 263-8555 (Japan)

    2010-04-01

    Inactivation of the phosphatase and tensin homolog gene (Pten) occurs via multiple tissue-dependent mechanisms including epigenetic silencing, point mutations, insertions, and deletions. Although frequent loss of heterozygosity around the Pten locus and plausible involvement of epigenetic silencing have been reported in radiation-induced thymic lymphomas, the proportion of lymphomas with inactivated Pten and the spectrum of causal aberrations have not been extensively characterized. Here, we assessed the mode of Pten inactivation by comprehensive analysis of the expression and alteration of Pten in 23 radiation-induced thymic lymphomas developed in B6C3F1 mice. We found no evidence for methylation-associated silencing of Pten; rather, complex structural abnormalities comprised of missense and nonsense mutations, 1- and 3-bp insertions, and focal deletions were identified in 8 of 23 lymphomas (35%). Sequencing of deletion breakpoints suggested that aberrant V(D)J recombination and microhomology-mediated rearrangement were responsible for the focal deletions. Seven of the 8 lymphomas had biallelic alterations, and 4 of them did not express Pten protein. These Pten aberrations coincided with downstream Akt phosphorylation. In conclusion, we demonstrate that Pten inactivation is frequently biallelic and is caused by a variety of structural abnormalities (rather than by epigenetic silencing) and is involved in radiation-induced lymphomagenesis.

  3. Disruption of the IS6-AID linker affects voltage-gated calcium channel inactivation and facilitation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Findeisen, Felix; Minor, Daniel L

    2009-03-01

    Two processes dominate voltage-gated calcium channel (Ca(V)) inactivation: voltage-dependent inactivation (VDI) and calcium-dependent inactivation (CDI). The Ca(V)beta/Ca(V)alpha(1)-I-II loop and Ca(2+)/calmodulin (CaM)/Ca(V)alpha(1)-C-terminal tail complexes have been shown to modulate each, respectively. Nevertheless, how each complex couples to the pore and whether each affects inactivation independently have remained unresolved. Here, we demonstrate that the IS6-alpha-interaction domain (AID) linker provides a rigid connection between the pore and Ca(V)beta/I-II loop complex by showing that IS6-AID linker polyglycine mutations accelerate Ca(V)1.2 (L-type) and Ca(V)2.1 (P/Q-type) VDI. Remarkably, mutations that either break the rigid IS6-AID linker connection or disrupt Ca(V)beta/I-II association sharply decelerate CDI and reduce a second Ca(2+)/CaM/Ca(V)alpha(1)-C-terminal-mediated process known as calcium-dependent facilitation. Collectively, the data strongly suggest that components traditionally associated solely with VDI, Ca(V)beta and the IS6-AID linker, are essential for calcium-dependent modulation, and that both Ca(V)beta-dependent and CaM-dependent components couple to the pore by a common mechanism requiring Ca(V)beta and an intact IS6-AID linker.

  4. Acute splenic sequestration in a pregnant woman with homozygous sickle-cell anemia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carolina Bastos Maia

    Full Text Available CONTEXT Homozygous (SS sickle-cell anemia complicated by acute splenic sequestration in adults is a rare event, and it has never been reported during pregnancy. CASE REPORT A 25-year-old woman with homozygous (SS sickle-cell disease was hospitalized at 32 weeks' of gestation presenting weakness, abdominal pain, fever and hemoglobin of 2.4 g/dl. Abnormal fetal heart rate was detected by means of cardiotocography, and 5 units of packed red cells were transfused. Cesarean was performed at 37 weeks. Both mother and baby were discharged in a good general condition. CONCLUSION This case report demonstrates the importance of immediate blood transfusion for treatment of fetal distress in cases of splenic sequestration during pregnancy. This treatment is essential for avoiding maternal and fetal complications.

  5. Acute splenic sequestration in a pregnant woman with homozygous sickle-cell anemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maia, Carolina Bastos; Nomura, Roseli Mieko Yamamoto; Igai, Ana Maria Kondo; Fonseca, Guilherme Hencklain; Gualandro, Sandra Menosi; Zugaib, Marcelo

    2013-01-01

    Homozygous (SS) sickle-cell anemia complicated by acute splenic sequestration in adults is a rare event, and it has never been reported during pregnancy. A 25-year-old woman with homozygous (SS) sickle-cell disease was hospitalized at 32 weeks' of gestation presenting weakness, abdominal pain, fever and hemoglobin of 2.4 g/dl. Abnormal fetal heart rate was detected by means of cardiotocography, and 5 units of packed red cells were transfused. Cesarean was performed at 37 weeks. Both mother and baby were discharged in a good general condition. This case report demonstrates the importance of immediate blood transfusion for treatment of fetal distress in cases of splenic sequestration during pregnancy. This treatment is essential for avoiding maternal and fetal complications.

  6. Enhanced vulnerability of human proteins towards disease-associated inactivation through divergent evolution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Medina-Carmona, Encarnación; Fuchs, Julian E; Gavira, Jose A; Mesa-Torres, Noel; Neira, Jose L; Salido, Eduardo; Palomino-Morales, Rogelio; Burgos, Miguel; Timson, David J; Pey, Angel L

    2017-09-15

    Human proteins are vulnerable towards disease-associated single amino acid replacements affecting protein stability and function. Interestingly, a few studies have shown that consensus amino acids from mammals or vertebrates can enhance protein stability when incorporated into human proteins. Here, we investigate yet unexplored relationships between the high vulnerability of human proteins towards disease-associated inactivation and recent evolutionary site-specific divergence of stabilizing amino acids. Using phylogenetic, structural and experimental analyses, we show that divergence from the consensus amino acids at several sites during mammalian evolution has caused local protein destabilization in two human proteins linked to disease: cancer-associated NQO1 and alanine:glyoxylate aminotransferase, mutated in primary hyperoxaluria type I. We demonstrate that a single consensus mutation (H80R) acts as a disease suppressor on the most common cancer-associated polymorphism in NQO1 (P187S). The H80R mutation reactivates P187S by enhancing FAD binding affinity through local and dynamic stabilization of its binding site. Furthermore, we show how a second suppressor mutation (E247Q) cooperates with H80R in protecting the P187S polymorphism towards inactivation through long-range allosteric communication within the structural ensemble of the protein. Our results support that recent divergence of consensus amino acids may have occurred with neutral effects on many functional and regulatory traits of wild-type human proteins. However, divergence at certain sites may have increased the propensity of some human proteins towards inactivation due to disease-associated mutations and polymorphisms. Consensus mutations also emerge as a potential strategy to identify structural hot-spots in proteins as targets for pharmacological rescue in loss-of-function genetic diseases. © The Author 2017. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please

  7. Suppression of cholesterol synthesis in cultured fibroblasts from a patient with homozygous familial hypercholesterolemia by her own low density lipoprotein density fraction. A possible role of apolipoprotein E

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Havekes, L.; Vermeer, B.J.; Wit, E. de

    1980-01-01

    The suppression of cellular cholesterol synthesis by low density lipoprotein (LDL) from a normal and from a homozygous familial hypercholesterolemic subject was measured on normal fibroblasts and on fibroblasts derived from the same homozygous familial hypercholesterolemic patient. On normal

  8. Common Variable Immunodeficiency Caused by FANC Mutations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sekinaka, Yujin; Mitsuiki, Noriko; Imai, Kohsuke; Yabe, Miharu; Yabe, Hiromasa; Mitsui-Sekinaka, Kanako; Honma, Kenichi; Takagi, Masatoshi; Arai, Ayako; Yoshida, Kenichi; Okuno, Yusuke; Shiraishi, Yuichi; Chiba, Kenichi; Tanaka, Hiroko; Miyano, Satoru; Muramatsu, Hideki; Kojima, Seiji; Hira, Asuka; Takata, Minoru; Ohara, Osamu; Ogawa, Seishi; Morio, Tomohiro; Nonoyama, Shigeaki

    2017-07-01

    Common variable immunodeficiency (CVID) is the most common adult-onset primary antibody deficiency disease due to various causative genes. Several genes, which are known to be the cause of different diseases, have recently been reported as the cause of CVID in patients by performing whole exome sequencing (WES) analysis. Here, we found FANC gene mutations as a cause of adult-onset CVID in two patients. B cells were absent and CD4 + T cells were skewed toward CD45RO + memory T cells. T-cell receptor excision circles (TRECs) and signal joint kappa-deleting recombination excision circles (sjKRECs) were undetectable in both patients. Both patients had no anemia, neutropenia, or thrombocytopenia. Using WES, we identified compound heterozygous mutations of FANCE in one patient and homozygous mutation of FANCA in another patient. The impaired function of FANC protein complex was confirmed by a monoubiquitination assay and by chromosome fragility test. We then performed several immunological evaluations including quantitative lymphocyte analysis and TRECs/sjKRECs analysis for 32 individuals with Fanconi anemia (FA). In total, 22 FA patients (68.8%) were found to have immunological abnormalities, suggesting that such immunological findings may be common in FA patients. These data indicate that FANC mutations are involved in impaired lymphogenesis probably by the accumulation of DNA replication stress, leading to CVID. It is important to diagnose FA because it drastically changes clinical management. We propose that FANC mutations can cause isolated immunodeficiency in addition to bone marrow failure and malignancy.

  9. Radiobiological inactivation of Epstein-Barr virus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Henderson, E.; Heston, L.; Grogan, E.; Miller, G.

    1978-01-01

    Lymphocyte transforming properties of B95-8 strain Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) are very sensitive to inactivation by either uv or x irradiation. No dose of irradiation increases the transforming capacity of EBV. The x-ray dose needed for inactivation of EBV transformation (dose that results in 37% survival, 60,000 rads) is similar to the dose required for inactivation of plaque formation by herpes simplex virus type 1 (Fischer strain). Although herpes simplex virus is more sensitive than EBV to uv irradiation, this difference is most likely due to differences in the kinetics or mechanisms of repair of uv damage to the two viruses. The results lead to the hypothesis that a large part, or perhaps all, of the EBV genome is in some way needed to initiate transformation. The abilities of EBV to stimulate host cell DNA synthesis, to induce nuclear antigen, and to immortalize are inactivated in parallel. All clones of marmoset cells transformed by irradiated virus produce extracellular transforming virus. These findings suggest that the abilities of the virus to transform and to replicate complete progeny are inactivated together. The amounts of uv and x irradiation that inactivate transformation by B95-8 virus are less than the dose needed to inactivate early antigen induction by the nontransforming P 3 HR-1 strain of EBV. Based on radiobiological inactivation, 10 to 50% of the genome is needed for early antigen induction

  10. Highly prevalent LIPH founder mutations causing autosomal recessive woolly hair/hypotrichosis in Japan and the genotype/phenotype correlations.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kana Tanahashi

    Full Text Available Mutations in LIPH cause of autosomal recessive woolly hair/hypotrichosis (ARWH, and the 2 missense mutations c.736T>A (p.Cys246Ser and c.742C>A (p.His248Asn are considered prevalent founder mutations for ARWH in the Japanese population. To reveal genotype/phenotype correlations in ARWH cases in Japan and the haplotypes in 14 Japanese patients from 14 unrelated Japanese families. 13 patients had woolly hair, and 1 patient had complete baldness since birth. An LIPH mutation search revealed homozygous c.736T>A mutations in 10 of the patients. Compound heterozygous c.736T>A and c.742C>A mutations were found in 3 of the patients, and homozygous c.742C>A mutation in 1 patient. The phenotype of mild hypotrichosis with woolly hair was restricted to the patients with the homozygous c.736T>A mutation. The severe phenotype of complete baldness was seen in only 1 patient with homozygous c.742C>A. Haplotype analysis revealed that the alleles containing the LIPH c.736T>A mutation had a haplotype identical to that reported previously, although 4 alleles out of 5 chromosomes containing the LIPH c.742C>A mutation had a different haplotype from the previously reported founder allele. These alleles with c.742C>A are thought to be the third founder LIPH mutation causing ARWH. To accurately determine the prevalence of the founder mutations, we investigated allele frequencies of those mutations in 819 Japanese controls. Heterozygous c.736T>A mutations were found in 13 controls (allele frequency: 0.0079; carrier rate: 0.016, and heterozygous c.742C>A mutations were found in 2 controls (allele frequency: 0.0012; carrier rate: 0.0024. In conclusion, this study confirms the more accurate allele frequencies of the pathogenic founder mutations of LIPH and shows that there is a third founder mutation in Japan. In addition, the present findings suggest that the mutation patterns of LIPH might be associated with hypotrichosis severity in ARWH.

  11. Compound heterozygous ASPM mutations in Pakistani MCPH families

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Muhammad, Farooq; Mahmood Baig, Shahid; Hansen, Lars

    2009-01-01

    Autosomal recessive primary microcephaly (MCPH) is characterized by reduced head circumference (50% of all reported families. In spite of the high frequency of MCPH in Pakistan only one case of compound heterozygosity for mutations in ASPM has been reported yet. In this large MCPH study we...... confirmed compound heterozygosity in two and homozygous mutations in 20 families, respectively, showing that up to 10% of families with MCPH caused by ASPM are compound heterozygous. In total we identified 16 different nonsense or frameshift mutations of which 12 were novel thereby increasing the number...... of mutations in ASPM significantly from 35 to 47. We found no correlation between the severity of the condition and the site of truncation. We suggest that the high frequency of compound heterozygosity observed in this study is taken into consideration as part of future genetic testing and counseling...

  12. Homozygous deletion and expression of PTEN and DMBT1 in human primary neuroblastoma and cell lines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muñoz, Jorge; Lázcoz, Paula; Inda, María Mar; Nistal, Manuel; Pestaña, Angel; Encío, Ignacio J; Castresana, Javier S

    2004-05-01

    Neuroblastoma is the most common pediatric solid tumor. Although many allelic imbalances have been described, a bona fide tumor suppressor gene for this disease has not been found yet. In our study, we analyzed 2 genes, PTEN and DMBT1, mapping 10q23.31 and 10q25.3-26.1, respectively, which have been found frequently altered in other kinds of neoplasms. We screened both genes for homozygous deletions in 45 primary neuroblastic tumors and 12 neuroblastoma cell lines. Expression of these genes in cell lines was assessed by RT-PCR analysis. We could detect 2 of 41 (5%) primary tumors harboring PTEN homozygous deletions. Three of 41 (7%) primary tumors and 2 of 12 cell lines presented homozygous losses at the g14 STS on the DMBT1 locus. All cell lines analyzed expressed PTEN, but lack of DMBT1 mRNA expression was detected in 2 of them. We tried to see whether epigenetic mechanisms, such as aberrant promoter hypermethylation, had any role in DMBT1 silencing. The 2 cell lines lacking DMBT1 expression were treated with 5-aza-2'-deoxycytidine; DMBT1 expression was restored in only one of them (MC-IXC). From our work, we can conclude that PTEN and DMBT1 seem to contribute to the development of a small fraction of neuroblastomas, and that promoter hypermethylation might have a role in DMBT1 gene silencing. Copyright 2004 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  13. Photodynamic Inactivation of Mammalian Viruses and Bacteriophages

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liliana Costa

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Photodynamic inactivation (PDI has been used to inactivate microorganisms through the use of photosensitizers. The inactivation of mammalian viruses and bacteriophages by photosensitization has been applied with success since the first decades of the last century. Due to the fact that mammalian viruses are known to pose a threat to public health and that bacteriophages are frequently used as models of mammalian viruses, it is important to know and understand the mechanisms and photodynamic procedures involved in their photoinactivation. The aim of this review is to (i summarize the main approaches developed until now for the photodynamic inactivation of bacteriophages and mammalian viruses and, (ii discuss and compare the present state of the art of mammalian viruses PDI with phage photoinactivation, with special focus on the most relevant mechanisms, molecular targets and factors affecting the viral inactivation process.

  14. Inactivation of DNA mismatch repair by variants of uncertain significance in the PMS2 gene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drost, Mark; Koppejan, Hester; de Wind, Niels

    2013-11-01

    Lynch syndrome (LS) is a common cancer predisposition caused by an inactivating mutation in one of four DNA mismatch repair (MMR) genes. Frequently a variant of uncertain significance (VUS), rather than an obviously pathogenic mutation, is identified in one of these genes. The inability to define pathogenicity of such variants precludes targeted healthcare. Here, we have modified a cell-free assay to test VUS in the MMR gene PMS2 for functional activity. We have analyzed nearly all VUS in PMS2 found thus far and describe loss of MMR activity for five, suggesting the applicability of the assay for diagnosis of LS. © 2013 WILEY PERIODICALS, INC.

  15. Mechanism of Bacillus subtilis spore inactivation by and resistance to supercritical CO2 plus peracetic acid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Setlow, B; Korza, G; Blatt, K M S; Fey, J P; Setlow, P

    2016-01-01

    Determine how supercritical CO2 (scCO2 ) plus peracetic acid (PAA) inactivates Bacillus subtilis spores, factors important in spore resistance to scCO2 -PAA, and if spores inactivated by scCO2 -PAA are truly dead. Spores of wild-type B. subtilis and isogenic mutants lacking spore protective proteins were treated with scCO2 -PAA in liquid or dry at 35°C. Wild-type wet spores (aqueous suspension) were more susceptible than dry spores. Treated spores were examined for viability (and were truly dead), dipicolinic acid (DPA), mutations, permeability to nucleic acid stains, germination under different conditions, energy metabolism and outgrowth. ScCO2 -PAA-inactivated spores retained DPA, and survivors had no notable DNA damage. However, DPA was released from inactivated spores at a normally innocuous temperature (85°C), and colony formation from treated spores was salt sensitive. The inactivated spores germinated but did not outgrow, and these germinated spores had altered plasma membrane permeability and defective energy metabolism. Wet or dry coat-defective spores had increased scCO2 -PAA sensitivity, and dry spores but not wet spores lacking DNA protective proteins were more scCO2 -PAA sensitive. These findings suggest that scCO2 -PAA inactivates spores by damaging spores' inner membrane. The spore coat provided scCO2 -PAA resistance for both wet and dry spores. DNA protective proteins provided scCO2 -PAA resistance only for dry spores. These results provide information on mechanisms of spore inactivation of and resistance to scCO2 -PAA, an agent with increasing use in sterilization applications. © 2015 The Society for Applied Microbiology.

  16. [Research progress of mutational spectrum and pathophysiology of WFS1 gene in Wolfram syndrome and nonsyndromic low frequency sensorineural hearing loss].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, S M; Han, Y H; Wang, H B

    2016-09-07

    Compound homozygous or heterozygous mutations in WFS 1 can lead to autosomal recessive Wolfram syndrome (WS), and heterozygous mutations in WFS 1 can lead to autosomal dominant non-syndromic low frequency sensorineural hearing loss (LFSNHL). In addition, mutations in the WFS region has relationship with diabetes and psychiatric diseases. In this paper, we provide an overview of genetic research with different phenotypes, including WS and LFSNHL.

  17. Simultaneous Occurence of an Autosomal Dominant Inherited MSX1 Mutation and an X-linked Recessive Inherited EDA Mutation in One Chinese Family with Non-syndromic Oligodontia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Xiao Xia; Wong, Sing Wai; Han, Dong; Feng, Hai Lan

    2015-01-01

    To describe the simultaneous occurence of an autosomal dominant inherited MSX1 mutation and an X-linked recessive inherited EDA mutation in one Chinese family with nonsyndromic oligodontia. Clinical data of characteristics of tooth agenesis were collected. MSX1 and EDA gene mutations were detected in a Chinese family of non-syndromic oligodontia. Mild hypodontia in the parents and severe oligodontia in the son was recorded. A novel missense heterozygous mutation c.517C>A (p.Arg173Ser) was detected in the MSX1 gene in the boy and the father. A homozygous missense mutation c.1001G>A (p.Arg334His) was detected in the EDA gene in the boy and the same mutant occurred heterozygously in the mother. Simultaneous occurence of two different gene mutations with different inheritence patterns, which both caused oligodontia, which occurred in one subject and in one family, was reported.

  18. Chloroplast mutations induced by 9-aminoacridine hydrochloride are independent of the plastome mutator in Oenothera.

    Science.gov (United States)

    GuhaMajumdar, M; Baldwin, S; Sears, B B

    2004-02-01

    Oenothera plants homozygous for the recessive plastome mutator allele ( pm) show chloroplast DNA (cpDNA) mutation frequencies that are about 1,000-fold higher than spontaneous levels. The pm-encoded gene product has been hypothesized to have a function in cpDNA replication, repair and/or mutation avoidance. Previous chemical mutagenesis experiments with the alkylating agent nitroso-methyl urea (NMU) showed a synergistic effect of NMU on the induction of mutations in the pm line, suggesting an interaction between the pm-encoded gene product and one of the repair systems that corrects alkylation damage. The goal of the experiments described here was to examine whether the pm activity extends to the repair of damage caused by non-alkylating mutagens. To this end, the intercalating mutagen, 9-aminoacridine hydrochloride (9AA) was tested for synergism with the plastome mutator. A statistical analysis of the data reported here indicates that the pm-encoded gene product is not involved in the repair of the 9AA-induced mutations. However, the recovery of chlorotic sectors in plants derived from the mutagenized seeds shows that 9AA can act as a mutagen of the chloroplast genome.

  19. Tumor suppressor genes that escape from X-inactivation contribute to cancer sex bias

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dunford, Andrew; Weinstock, David M.; Savova, Virginia; Schumacher, Steven E.; Cleary, John P.; Yoda, Akinori; Sullivan, Timothy J.; Hess, Julian M.; Gimelbrant, Alexander A.; Beroukhim, Rameen; Lawrence, Michael S.; Getz, Gad; Lane, Andrew A.

    2016-01-01

    There is a striking and unexplained male predominance across many cancer types. A subset of X chromosome (chrX) genes can escape X-inactivation, which would protect females from complete functional loss by a single mutation. To identify putative “Escape from X-Inactivation Tumor Suppressor” (EXITS) genes, we compared somatic alterations from >4100 cancers across 21 tumor types for sex bias. Six of 783 non-pseudoautosomal region (PAR) chrX genes (ATRX, CNKSR2, DDX3X, KDM5C, KDM6A, and MAGEC3) more frequently harbored loss-of-function mutations in males (based on false discovery rate <0.1), compared to zero of 18,055 autosomal and PAR genes (P<0.0001). Male-biased mutations in genes that escape X-inactivation were observed in combined analysis across many cancers and in several individual tumor types, suggesting a generalized phenomenon. We conclude that biallelic expression of EXITS genes in females explains a portion of the reduced cancer incidence compared to males across a variety of tumor types. PMID:27869828

  20. Tumor-suppressor genes that escape from X-inactivation contribute to cancer sex bias.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dunford, Andrew; Weinstock, David M; Savova, Virginia; Schumacher, Steven E; Cleary, John P; Yoda, Akinori; Sullivan, Timothy J; Hess, Julian M; Gimelbrant, Alexander A; Beroukhim, Rameen; Lawrence, Michael S; Getz, Gad; Lane, Andrew A

    2017-01-01

    There is a striking and unexplained male predominance across many cancer types. A subset of X-chromosome genes can escape X-inactivation, which would protect females from complete functional loss by a single mutation. To identify putative 'escape from X-inactivation tumor-suppressor' (EXITS) genes, we examined somatic alterations from >4,100 cancers across 21 tumor types for sex bias. Six of 783 non-pseudoautosomal region (PAR) X-chromosome genes (ATRX, CNKSR2, DDX3X, KDM5C, KDM6A, and MAGEC3) harbored loss-of-function mutations more frequently in males (based on a false discovery rate < 0.1), in comparison to zero of 18,055 autosomal and PAR genes (Fisher's exact P < 0.0001). Male-biased mutations in genes that escape X-inactivation were observed in combined analysis across many cancers and in several individual tumor types, suggesting a generalized phenomenon. We conclude that biallelic expression of EXITS genes in females explains a portion of the reduced cancer incidence in females as compared to males across a variety of tumor types.

  1. Mutations and epimutations in the origin of cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Peltomaeki, Paeivi, E-mail: Paivi.Peltomaki@Helsinki.Fi

    2012-02-15

    Cancer is traditionally viewed as a disease of abnormal cell proliferation controlled by a series of mutations. Mutations typically affect oncogenes or tumor suppressor genes thereby conferring growth advantage. Genomic instability facilitates mutation accumulation. Recent findings demonstrate that activation of oncogenes and inactivation of tumor suppressor genes, as well as genomic instability, can be achieved by epigenetic mechanisms as well. Unlike genetic mutations, epimutations do not change the base sequence of DNA and are potentially reversible. Similar to genetic mutations, epimutations are associated with specific patterns of gene expression that are heritable through cell divisions. Knudson's hypothesis postulates that inactivation of tumor suppressor genes requires two hits, with the first hit occurring either in somatic cells (sporadic cancer) or in the germline (hereditary cancer) and the second one always being somatic. Studies on hereditary and sporadic forms of colorectal carcinoma have made it evident that, apart from genetic mutations, epimutations may serve as either hit or both. Furthermore, recent next-generation sequencing studies show that epigenetic genes, such as those encoding histone modifying enzymes and subunits for chromatin remodeling systems, are themselves frequent targets of somatic mutations in cancer and can act like tumor suppressor genes or oncogenes. This review discusses genetic vs. epigenetic origin of cancer, including cancer susceptibility, in light of recent discoveries. Situations in which mutations and epimutations occur to serve analogous purposes are highlighted.

  2. Genetic and molecular analyses of UV radiation-induced mutations in the fem-3 gene of Caenorhabditis elegans

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hartman, P S; De Wilde, D; Dwarakanath, V N [Texas Christian Univ., Fort Worth, TX (United States). Dept. of Biology

    1995-06-01

    The utility of a new target gene (fem-3) is described for investigating the molecular nature of mutagenesis in the nematode Caenorhabditis elegans. As a principal attribute, this system allows for the selection, maintenance and molecular analysis of any type of mutation that disrupts the gene, including deletions. In this study, 86 mutant strains were isolated, of which 79 proved to have mutations in fem-3. Twenty of these originally tested as homozygous inviable. Homozygous inviability was expected, as Stewart and coworkers had previously observed that, unlike in other organisms, most UV radiation-induced mutations in C. elegans are chromosomal rearrangements of deficiencies (Mutat. Res 249, 37-54, 1991). However, additional data, including Southern blot analyses on 49 of the strains, indicated that most of the UV radiation-induced fem-3 mutations were not deficiencies, as originally inferred from their homozygous inviability. Instead, the lethals were most likely ``coincident mutations`` in linked, essential genes that were concomitantly induced. As such, they were lost owing to genetic recombination during stock maintenance. As in mammalian cells, yeast and bacteria, the frequency of coincident mutations was much higher than would be predicted by chance. (Author).

  3. Confirmation that RIPK4 mutations cause not only Bartsocas-Papas syndrome but also CHAND syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Busa, Tiffany; Jeraiby, Mohammed; Clémenson, Alix; Manouvrier, Sylvie; Granados, Viviana; Philip, Nicole; Touraine, Renaud

    2017-11-01

    CHAND syndrome is an autosomal recessive disorder characterized by curly hair, ankyloblepharon, and nail dysplasia. Only few patients were reported to date. A homozygous RIPK4 mutation was recently identified by homozygosity mapping and whole exome sequencing in three patients from an expanded consanguineous kindred with a clinical diagnosis of CHAND syndrome. RIPK4 was previously known to be implicated in Bartsocas-Papas syndrome, the autosomal recessive form of popliteal pterygium syndrome. We report here two cases of RIPK4 homozygous mutations in a fetus with severe Bartsocas-Papas syndrome and a patient with CHAND syndrome. The patient with CHAND syndrome harbored the same mutation as the one identified in the family previously reported. We thus confirm the implication of RIPK4 gene in CHAND syndrome in addition to Bartsocas-Papas syndrome and discuss genotype/phenotype correlations. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  4. XPC gene mutations in families with xeroderma pigmentosum from Pakistan; prevalent founder effect.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ijaz, Ambreen; Basit, Sulman; Gul, Ajab; Batool, Lilas; Hussain, Abrar; Afzal, Sibtain; Ramzan, Khushnooda; Ahmad, Jamil; Wali, Abdul

    2018-03-23

    Xeroderma pigmentosum (XP) is a rare autosomal recessive skin disorder characterized by hyperpigmentation, premature skin aging, ocular and cutaneous photosensitivity, and increased risk of skin carcinoma. We investigated seven consanguineous XP families with nine patients from Pakistan. All the Patients exhibited typical clinical symptoms of XP since first year of life. Whole genome SNP genotyping identified a 14 Mb autozygous region segregating with the disease phenotype on chromosome 3p25.1. DNA sequencing of XPC gene revealed a founder homozygous splice site mutation (c.2251-1G>C) in patients from six families (A-F) and a homozygous nonsense mutation (c.1399C>T; p.Gln467*) in patients of family G. This is the first report of XPC mutations, underlying XP phenotype, in Pakistani population. © 2018 Japanese Teratology Society.

  5. Synergistic defects of novo FAS and homozygous UNC13D leading to autoimmune lymphoproliferative syndrome-like disease: A 10-year-old Chinese boy case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gu, Hao; Ma, Jie; Chen, Zhenping; Wang, Jing; Zhang, Rui; Wu, Runhui

    2018-06-01

    Autoimmune lymphoproliferative syndrome (ALPS) usually presents in childhood with fever, nonmalignant splenomegaly and lymphadenopathy along with hemocytopenia. This case report describes a 10-year-old boy presenting with signs of autoimmune disease, splenomegaly, hepatomegaly and resistant hemocytopenia. Sirolimus controlled the relapsed thrombocytopenia after splenectomy. Sequencing of the FAS gene identified two spontaneous heterozygous mutations (c.234 T > G, p.D78E) (c.236dupA, p.P80Tfs*26). The boy's homozygous missense variation (c.2588G > A, p.G863D) (rs140184929) in UNC13D gene had been identified as being related to familial hemophagocytic lymphohistiocytosis (FHL). TCRαβ + CD4/CD8 double-negative T cells (markers of ALPS) were not significantly increased from the outset. Elevated cytokines, such as interferon (IFN)-γ, interleukin (IL)-6 and tumor necrosis factor α decreased to normal levels after splenectomy whereas IL-10 remained high. Immunological analysis of the patient revealed a marked depletion of forkhead-box P3 + expressing regulatory T cells (Treg) and Th17 cells. The obtained data demonstrate that mutations to FAS and UNC13D which result in overwhelming T-cell and macrophage activation, one associated with inhibited Treg cell development and a severe ALPS-like symptom. Therefore, we propose that variations of UND13D may be a risk factor of ALPS development. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  6. SMARCB1/INI1 inactivation in renal medullary carcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calderaro, Julien; Moroch, Julien; Pierron, Gaelle; Pedeutour, Florence; Grison, Camille; Maillé, Pascale; Soyeux, Pascale; de la Taille, Alexandre; Couturier, Jérome; Vieillefond, Annick; Rousselet, Marie Christine; Delattre, Olivier; Allory, Yves

    2012-09-01

    Renal medullary carcinoma (RMC), a rare and highly aggressive tumour which occurs in patients with sickle-cell disease, shares many clinicopathological features with collecting duct carcinoma (CDC). The molecular mechanisms underlying RMC and CDC are mainly unknown, and there is ongoing debate about their status as distinct entities. Loss of expression of SMARCB1/INI1, a chromatin remodelling regulator and repressor of cyclin D1 transcription, has been reported recently in RMC. The aim of our study was to investigate if such loss of expression is specific for RMC. SMARCB1/INI1 genetic alterations and cyclin D1 expression were also studied. Using immunochemistry, neoplastic cells showed complete loss of SMARCB1/INI1 expression in all six cases of RMC but in only one of 22 cases of CDC. In two RMC cases investigated, comparative genomic hybridization demonstrated complete loss of one SMARCB1/INI1 allele, with no other genomic imbalances, and no mutations were found on the remaining allele. Cyclin D1 was expressed in all RMCs, suggesting that SMARCB1/INI1 inactivation may result in increased cyclin D1 transcription. The specific SMARCB1/INI1 inactivation observed in RMCs suggests that RMC and CDC are different entities. © 2012 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  7. Biallelic inactivation of REV7 is associated with Fanconi anemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bluteau, Dominique; Masliah-Planchon, Julien; Clairmont, Connor; Rousseau, Alix; Ceccaldi, Raphael; Dubois d'Enghien, Catherine; Bluteau, Olivier; Cuccuini, Wendy; Gachet, Stéphanie; Peffault de Latour, Régis; Leblanc, Thierry; Socié, Gérard; Baruchel, André; Stoppa-Lyonnet, Dominique; D'Andrea, Alan D; Soulier, Jean

    2016-09-01

    Fanconi anemia (FA) is a recessive genetic disease characterized by congenital abnormalities, chromosome instability, progressive bone marrow failure (BMF), and a strong predisposition to cancer. Twenty FA genes have been identified, and the FANC proteins they encode cooperate in a common pathway that regulates DNA crosslink repair and replication fork stability. We identified a child with severe BMF who harbored biallelic inactivating mutations of the translesion DNA synthesis (TLS) gene REV7 (also known as MAD2L2), which encodes the mutant REV7 protein REV7-V85E. Patient-derived cells demonstrated an extended FA phenotype, which included increased chromosome breaks and G2/M accumulation upon exposure to DNA crosslinking agents, γH2AX and 53BP1 foci accumulation, and enhanced p53/p21 activation relative to cells derived from healthy patients. Expression of WT REV7 restored normal cellular and functional phenotypes in the patient's cells, and CRISPR/Cas9 inactivation of REV7 in a non-FA human cell line produced an FA phenotype. Finally, silencing Rev7 in primary hematopoietic cells impaired progenitor function, suggesting that the DNA repair defect underlies the development of BMF in FA. Taken together, our genetic and functional analyses identified REV7 as a previously undescribed FA gene, which we term FANCV.

  8. Medium-chain acyl-CoA dehydrogenase (MCAD) mutations identified by MS/MS-based prospective screening of newborns differ from those observed in patients with clinical symptoms

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andresen, B S; Dobrowolski, S F; O'Reilly, L

    2001-01-01

    Medium-chain acyl-CoA dehydrogenase (MCAD) deficiency is the most frequently diagnosed mitochondrial beta-oxidation defect, and it is potentially fatal. Eighty percent of patients are homozygous for a common mutation, 985A-->G, and a further 18% have this mutation in only one disease allele. In a...

  9. The relationship between thrombophilic mutations and preeclampsia: a prospective case-control study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yalinkaya, A.; Erdemoglu, M.; Akdeniz, N.; Kale, A.; Kale, E.

    2006-01-01

    Preeclampsia and its association with thrombophillia remain controversial, due to inconsistent results in different studies, which different ethnic groups, selection criteria, and patient numbers. The aim of this study was to determine the relationship between thrombophillia and preeclamptic patients in our region. In a prospective case-control study, we compared 100 consecutive women with preeclampsia and eclampsia (group 1) with 100 normal pregnant women (group 2). All women were tested two months after delivery for mutations of factor V Leiden, methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase (MTHFR), and prothrombin gene mutation mutataion as well as for deficiencies of protein C, protein S, and antithrmbin III. A thrombophilic mutation was found in 42 (42%) and 28(28%) women in group I and group II, respectively (P+0.27, OR 1.5, 95% CI 1.0-2.2). The incidence of Factor V Leiden mutation (heterozygous), prothrombin mutation (heterozygous), prothrombin mutation (homozygous), MTHFR mutation (homozygous) was not statistically significant in group 1 compared with group 2 (P>0.05). Also, deficiencies of protein S, protein c and antithrombin III were not statistically significant in group I com pared with group II (P>0.05). There was no difference in thrombophilic mutations between preeclamptic patients and normal pregnant women in our region. Therefore, we suggest that preeclamptic patients should not be tested for thrombophilia. (author)

  10. Novel USH2A compound heterozygous mutations cause RP/USH2 in a Chinese family.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Xiaowen; Tang, Zhaohui; Li, Chang; Yang, Kangjuan; Gan, Guanqi; Zhang, Zibo; Liu, Jingyu; Jiang, Fagang; Wang, Qing; Liu, Mugen

    2010-03-17

    To identify the disease-causing gene in a four-generation Chinese family affected with retinitis pigmentosa (RP). Linkage analysis was performed with a panel of microsatellite markers flanking the candidate genetic loci of RP. These loci included 38 known RP genes. The complete coding region and exon-intron boundaries of Usher syndrome 2A (USH2A) were sequenced with the proband DNA to screen the disease-causing gene mutation. Restriction fragment length polymorphism (RFLP) analysis and direct DNA sequence analysis were done to demonstrate co-segregation of the USH2A mutations with the family disease. One hundred normal controls were used without the mutations. The disease-causing gene in this Chinese family was linked to the USH2A locus on chromosome 1q41. Direct DNA sequence analysis of USH2A identified two novel mutations in the patients: one missense mutation p.G1734R in exon 26 and a splice site mutation, IVS32+1G>A, which was found in the donor site of intron 32 of USH2A. Neither the p.G1734R nor the IVS32+1G>A mutation was found in the unaffected family members or the 100 normal controls. One patient with a homozygous mutation displayed only RP symptoms until now, while three patients with compound heterozygous mutations in the family of study showed both RP and hearing impairment. This study identified two novel mutations: p.G1734R and IVS32+1G>A of USH2A in a four-generation Chinese RP family. In this study, the heterozygous mutation and the homozygous mutation in USH2A may cause Usher syndrome Type II or RP, respectively. These two mutations expand the mutant spectrum of USH2A.

  11. Four Novel p.N385K, p.V36A, c.1033–1034insT and c.1417–1418delCT Mutations in the Sphingomyelin Phosphodiesterase 1 (SMPD1 Gene in Patients with Types A and B Niemann-Pick Disease (NPD

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    Masoumeh Dehghan Manshadi

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Background: Types A and B Niemann-Pick disease (NPD are autosomal-recessive lysosomal storage disorders caused by the deficient activity of acid sphingomyelinase due to mutations in the sphingomyelin phosphodiesterase 1 (SMPD1 gene. Methods: In order to determine the prevalence and distribution of SMPD1 gene mutations, the genomic DNA of 15 unrelated Iranian patients with types A and B NPD was examined using PCR, DNA sequencing and bioinformatics analysis. Results: Of 8 patients with the p.G508R mutation, 5 patients were homozygous, while the other 3 were heterozygous. One patient was heterozygous for both the p.N385K and p.G508R mutations. Another patient was heterozygous for both the p.A487V and p.G508R mutations. Two patients (one homozygous and one heterozygous showed the p.V36A mutation. One patient was homozygous for the c.1033–1034insT mutation. One patient was homozygous for the c.573delT mutation, and 1 patient was homozygous for the c.1417–1418delCT mutation. Additionally, bioinformatics analysis indicated that two new p.V36A and p.N385K mutations decreased the acid sphingomyelinase (ASM protein stability, which might be evidence to suggest the pathogenicity of these mutations. Conclusion: with detection of these new mutations, the genotypic spectrum of types A and B NPD is extended, facilitating the definition of disease-related mutations. However, more research is essential to confirm the pathogenic effect of these mutations.

  12. Heart-specific expression of laminopathic mutations in transgenic zebrafish.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verma, Ajay D; Parnaik, Veena K

    2017-07-01

    Lamins are key determinants of nuclear organization and function in the metazoan nucleus. Mutations in human lamin A cause a spectrum of genetic diseases that affect cardiac muscle and skeletal muscle as well as other tissues. A few laminopathies have been modeled using the mouse. As zebrafish is a well established model for the study of cardiac development and disease, we have investigated the effects of heart-specific lamin A mutations in transgenic zebrafish. We have developed transgenic lines of zebrafish expressing conserved lamin A mutations that cause cardiac dysfunction in humans. Expression of zlamin A mutations Q291P and M368K in the heart was driven by the zebrafish cardiac troponin T2 promoter. Homozygous mutant embryos displayed nuclear abnormalities in cardiomyocyte nuclei. Expression analysis showed the upregulation of genes involved in heart regeneration in transgenic mutant embryos and a cell proliferation marker was increased in adult heart tissue. At the physiological level, there was deviation of up to 20% from normal heart rate in transgenic embryos expressing mutant lamins. Adult homozygous zebrafish were fertile and did not show signs of early mortality. Our results suggest that transgenic zebrafish models of heart-specific laminopathies show cardiac regeneration and moderate deviations in heart rate during embryonic development. © 2017 International Federation for Cell Biology.

  13. Recent progress of national banking project on homozygous HLA-typed induced pluripotent stem cells in South Korea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rim, Yeri Alice; Park, Narae; Nam, Yoojun; Ham, Dong-Sik; Kim, Ji-Won; Ha, Hye-Yeong; Jung, Ji-Won; Jung, Seung Min; Baek, In Cheol; Kim, Su-Yeon; Kim, Tai-Gyu; Song, Jihwan; Lee, Jennifer; Park, Sung-Hwan; Chung, Nak-Gyun; Yoon, Kun-Ho; Ju, Ji Hyeon

    2018-03-01

    Induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) can be generated by introducing several factors into mature somatic cells. Banking of iPSCs can lead to wider application for treatment and research. In an economical view, it is important to store cells that can cover a high percentage of the population. Therefore, the use of homozygous human leukocyte antigen-iPSCs (HLA-iPSCs) is thought as a potential candidate for effective iPSC banking system for further clinical use. We screened the database stored in the Catholic Hematopoietic Stem Cell Bank of Korea and sorted the most frequent homozygous HLA types of the South Korean population. Blood cells with the selected homozygous HLA types were obtained and transferred to the GMP facility in the Catholic Institute of Cell Therapy. Cells were reprogrammed to iPSCs inside the facility and went through several quality controls. As a result, a total of 13 homozygous GMP-grade iPSC lines were obtained in the facility. The generated iPSCs showed high pluripotency and normal karyotype after reprogramming. Five HLA-homozygous iPSCs had the type that was included in the top five most frequent HLA types. Homozygous HLA-iPSCs can open a new opportunity for further application of iPSCs in clinical research and therapy. Copyright © 2017 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  14. Hematological and Molecular Characterization of a Novel Hb A2 Variant with Homozygous α-Thalassemia-2 in a Southern Thai Individual.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nuinoon, Manit; Jeenduang, Nutjaree; Kesornsit, Aumpika; Horpet, Dararat; Plyduang, Thunyaluk

    2017-05-01

    We report here the hematological and molecular features of a novel δ-globin chain variant found in a Southern Thai woman. Her complete blood count was as follows: red blood cell (RBC) count 5.90 × 10 12 /L, hemoglobin concentration (Hb) 12.6 g/dL, packed cell volume (PCV) 0.41 L/L, mean corpuscular volume (MCV) 69.5 fL, mean corpuscular Hb (MCH) 21.4 pg, mean corpuscular Hb concentration (MCHC) 30.7 g/dL and RBC distribution width (RDW) 13.1%. The blood smear demonstrated microcytic hypochromic RBCs suggestive of thalassemia trait. Hemoglobin analysis identified Hb A 2  + Hb A 2 -Kiriwong (2.4%) and Hb F (0.1%) on high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC). To characterize the α-thalassemia (α-thal) genotype, common α-thal-1 and α-thal-2 alleles were characterized by multiplex gap-polymerase chain reaction (gap-PCR). The results revealed homozygous α-thal-2 (-α 3.7 /-α 3.7 ) in this case. DNA sequencing showed the presence of a novel δ-globin gene mutation [δ77(EF1)His→Arg; HBD: c.233A>G] that we named Hb A 2 -Kiriwong for the village from where the proband lived. In summary, the presence of microcytic hypochromic RBCs in this case was likely the result of the homozygous -α 3.7 (rightward) deletion and was not affected by this Hb A 2 variant.

  15. Homozygous deletion of six genes including corneodesmosin on chromosome 6p21.3 is associated with generalized peeling skin disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teye, Kwesi; Hamada, Takahiro; Krol, Rafal P; Numata, Sanae; Ishii, Norito; Matsuda, Mitsuhiro; Ohata, Chika; Furumura, Minao; Hashimoto, Takashi

    2014-07-01

    Peeling skin syndrome (PSS) is a rare autosomal recessive form of ichthyosis showing skin exfoliation. PSS is divided into acral and generalized PSS, and the latter is further classified into non-inflammatory type (PSS type A) and inflammatory type (PSS type B). PSS type B is now called peeling skin disease (PSD). Different loss-of-function mutations in the corneodesmosin (CDSN) gene have been reported to cause PSD. The aim of this study was to determine genetic basis of disease in a 14-year-old Japanese patient with PSD. Immunohistochemical study showed lack of corneodesmosin (CDSN) in the skin, and standard PCR for genomic DNA failed to amplify CDSN product, suggesting CDSN defect. Multiplex ligation-dependent probe amplification and genomic quantitative real-time PCR analyses detected large homozygous deletion of 59,184bp extending from 40.6kb upstream to 13.2kb downstream of CDSN, which included 6 genes (TCF19, CCHCR1, PSORS1C2, PSORS1C1, CDSN and C6orf15). The continuous gene lost did not result in additional clinical features. Inverted repeats with 85% similarity flanking the deletion breakpoint were considered to mediate the deletion by non-homologous end joining or fork stalling and template switching/microhomology-mediated break-induced replication. Parents were clinically unaffected and were heterozygote carriers of the same deletion, which was absent in 284 ethnically matched control alleles. We also developed simple PCR method, which is useful for detection of this deletion. Although 5 other genes were also deleted, homozygous deletion of CDSN was considered to be responsible for this PSD. Copyright © 2014 Japanese Society for Investigative Dermatology. Published by Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Mitchell-Riley Syndrome: A Novel Mutation in RFX6 Gene

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    Marta Zegre Amorim

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available A novel RFX6 homozygous missense mutation was identified in an infant with Mitchell-Riley syndrome. The most common features of Mitchell-Riley syndrome were present, including severe neonatal diabetes associated with annular pancreas, intestinal malrotation, gallbladder agenesis, cholestatic disease, chronic diarrhea, and severe intrauterine growth restriction. Perijejunal tissue similar to pancreatic tissue was found in the submucosa, a finding that has not been previously reported in this syndrome. This case associating RFX6 mutation with structural and functional pancreatic abnormalities reinforces the RFX6 gene role in pancreas development and β-cell function, adding information to the existent mutation databases.

  17. Mutations induced by X-radiation in the yeast Schizosaccharomyces pombe

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Loprieno, N.; Barale, R.; Baroncelli, S.; Cammellini, A.; Melani, M.; Nieri, R.; Nozzolini, M.; Rossi, A.M.; Pisa Univ.

    1975-01-01

    Experiments on strains of yeast with different genetic backgrounds were done to evaluate the kinetics of inactivation and mutation induction by X-radiation. A system of forward mutation induction in five loci was used and a specific mutation rate was evaluated for the wild type. From a comparison of observations with wild type and radiation-sensitive strains, it may be assumed that in this yeast, mutations are mainly the result of a repair-active process. The range of genotypic and phenotypic influence upon the specific locus mutation rate was evaluated with appropriate biological material and experiments

  18. Simplifying the detection of MUTYH mutations by high resolution melting analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    López-Villar, Isabel; Martínez-López, Joaquín; Ayala, Rosa; Wesselink, Jan; Morillas, Juan Diego; López, Elena; Marín, José Carlos; Díaz-Tasende, José; González, Sara; Robles, Luis

    2010-01-01

    MUTYH-associated polyposis (MAP) is a disorder caused by bi-allelic germline MUTYH mutation, characterized by multiple colorectal adenomas. In order to identify mutations in MUTYH gene we applied High Resolution Melting (HRM) genotyping. HRM analysis is extensively employed as a scanning method for the detection of heterozygous mutations. Therefore, we applied HRM to show effectiveness in detecting homozygous mutations for these clinically important and frequent patients. In this study, we analyzed phenotype and genotype data from 82 patients, with multiple (>= 10) synchronous (19/82) or metachronous (63/82) adenomas and negative APC study (except one case). Analysis was performed by HRM-PCR and direct sequencing, in order to identify mutations in MUTYH exons 7, 12 and 13, where the most prevalent mutations are located. In monoallelic mutation carriers, we evaluated entire MUTYH gene in search of another possible alteration. HRM-PCR was performed with strict conditions in several rounds: the first one to discriminate the heteroduplex patterns and homoduplex patterns and the next ones, in order to refine and confirm parameters. The genotypes obtained were correlated to phenotypic features (number of adenomas (synchronous or metachronous), colorectal cancer (CRC) and family history). MUTYH germline mutations were found in 15.8% (13/82) of patients. The hot spots, Y179C (exon 7) and G396D (exon 13), were readily identified and other mutations were also detected. Each mutation had a reproducible melting profile by HRM, both heterozygous mutations and homozygous mutations. In our study of 82 patients, biallelic mutation is associated with being a carrier of ≥10 synchronous polyps (p = 0.05) and there is no association between biallelic mutation and CRC (p = 0.39) nor family history (p = 0.63). G338H non-pathogenic polymorphism (exon 12) was found in 23.1% (19/82) of patients. In all cases there was concordance between HRM (first and subsequent rounds) and sequencing

  19. Genetic characterization in symptomatic female DMD carriers: lack of relationship between X-inactivation, transcriptional DMD allele balancing and phenotype

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    Brioschi Simona

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Although Duchenne and Becker muscular dystrophies, X-linked recessive myopathies, predominantly affect males, a clinically significant proportion of females manifesting symptoms have also been reported. They represent an heterogeneous group characterized by variable degrees of muscle weakness and/or cardiac involvement. Though preferential inactivation of the normal X chromosome has long been considered the principal mechanism behind disease manifestation in these females, supporting evidence is controversial. Methods Eighteen females showing a mosaic pattern of dystrophin expression on muscle biopsy were recruited and classified as symptomatic (7 or asymptomatic (11, based on the presence or absence of muscle weakness. The causative DMD gene mutations were identified in all cases, and the X-inactivation pattern was assessed in muscle DNA. Transcriptional analysis in muscles was performed in all females, and relative quantification of wild-type and mutated transcripts was also performed in 9 carriers. Dystrophin protein was quantified by immunoblotting in 2 females. Results The study highlighted a lack of relationship between dystrophic phenotype and X-inactivation pattern in females; skewed X-inactivation was found in 2 out of 6 symptomatic carriers and in 5 out of 11 asymptomatic carriers. All females were characterized by biallelic transcription, but no association was found between X-inactivation pattern and allele transcriptional balancing. Either a prevalence of wild-type transcript or equal proportions of wild-type and mutated RNAs was observed in both symptomatic and asymptomatic females. Moreover, very similar levels of total and wild-type transcripts were identified in the two groups of carriers. Conclusions This is the first study deeply exploring the DMD transcriptional behaviour in a cohort of female carriers. Notably, no relationship between X-inactivation pattern and transcriptional behaviour of DMD gene was

  20. PMS2 mutations in childhood cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Vos, Michel; Hayward, Bruce E; Charlton, Ruth; Taylor, Graham R; Glaser, Adam W; Picton, Susan; Cole, Trevor R; Maher, Eamonn R; McKeown, Carole M E; Mann, Jill R; Yates, John R; Baralle, Diana; Rankin, Julia; Bonthron, David T; Sheridan, Eamonn

    2006-03-01

    Until recently, the PMS2 DNA mismatch repair gene has only rarely been implicated as a cancer susceptibility locus. New studies have shown, however, that earlier analyses of this gene have had technical limitations and also that the genetic behavior of mutant PMS2 alleles is unusual, in that, unlike MLH1 or MSH2 mutations, PMS2 mutations show low heterozygote penetrance. As a result, a dominantly inherited cancer predisposition has not been a feature reported in families with PMS2 mutations. Such families have instead been ascertained through childhood-onset cancers in homozygotes or through apparently sporadic colorectal cancer in heterozygotes. We present further information on the phenotype associated with homozygous PMS2 deficiency in 13 patients from six families of Pakistani origin living in the United Kingdom. This syndrome is characterized by café-au-lait skin pigmentation and a characteristic tumor spectrum, including leukemias, lymphomas, cerebral malignancies (such as supratentorial primitive neuroectodermal tumors, astrocytomas, and glioblastomas), and colorectal neoplasia with an onset in early adult life. We present evidence for a founder effect in five families, all of which carried the same R802-->X mutation (i.e., arginine-802 to stop) in PMS2. This cancer syndrome can be mistaken for neurofibromatosis type 1, with important management implications including the risk of the disorder occurring in siblings and the likelihood of tumor development in affected individuals.

  1. [Blood transfusion assessment to 112 homozygous sickle-cell disease patients in university hospital of Brazzaville].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dokekias, A Elira; Ossini, L Ngolet; Tsiba, F O Atipo; Malanda, F; Koko, I; De Montalembert, M

    2009-01-01

    Homozygous, sickle-cell disease (SCD) is responsible for acute complication, especially anaemic crisis and special situation such as acute chest syndrome, stroke and acute priapism. Pregnancy sickle-cell disease presents high risk for the mother and the fetus. In these indications, blood transfusion is the main therapy aiming to reduce anaemia in order to restore hemoglobin's rate or to increase normal Hb proportion. This study aims to assess the short-term efficiency of the red cell transfusion in SCD homozygous form. One hundred and twelve homozygous sickle-cell patients were enrolled in this prospective study: 59 females and 53 males, median age is 21,8 years (extremes: 2 and 45 years). These patients are mostly with very low income. Two groups of patients are included in this study. In the first group, patients present acute anemia crisis caused by infections disease (malaria, bacterial infections). In the second group (20 cases), SCD patients have particularly situations: pregnancy (10 cases); stroke (six cases); cardiac failure (two cases) and priapism (two cases). Transfusion treatment in first group is simple regimen. Transfusion of EC increased median Hb level at 2,9 g/dl (extremes: 1,1 and 4,7). In the second group of patients, 16 cases were transfused by manual partial exchange (1-3) and four patients received simple regimen of transfusion. Median Hb level was 3,1g/dl (extremes: 2,4-4,9 g/dl). HbS percentage reduction was after PTE between -30 and -66,8% (median: -52,6%). According to our diagnostic possibilities (blood serologic test), we have not found any contamination by HIV, HBV and HCV (virus).

  2. Homozygous familial hypercholesterolemia (HoFH in Germany: an epidemiological survey

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Walzer S

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available S Walzer,1 K Travers,2 S Rieder,3 E Erazo-Fischer,3 D Matusiewicz41MArS Market Access and Pricing Strategy UG (hb, Weil am Rhein, Germany; 2United Biosource Corporation, Lexington, USA; 3Alcimed GmbH, Cologne, Germany; 4Institute for Health Care Management and Research, Faculty of Economics and Business Administration, University of Duisburg-Essen, Essen, GermanyIntroduction: In Europe a disease is recognized as rare if less than 1 in 2000 people suffer from the specific disease. In patients with familial homozygous hypercholesterolemia (HoFH the accumulation of low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C leads to generalized atherosclerosis due to an insufficient functioning of the LDL-C receptors. Patients die early sometimes even in the mid-30s, from myocardial infarction or stroke. For the German population, insufficient epidemiological evidence exists.Methods: A systematic literature search in EMBASE and Medline was performed in conjunction with a targeted manual search for epidemiological HoFH studies. Additionally a nationwide survey was conducted in Germany in all identified apheresis- and lipid centers. The purpose of the survey was the validation of the systematic literature search results based on empirical (practice data.Results: In total 961 publications were found, 874 were excluded based on pre-defined exclusion criteria leaving only 87 for further review. After review of the identified abstracts (n = 87 23 publications were identified as epidemiological studies. Only one publication was found which reported a prevalence of 1:1,000,000. The qualitative survey among 187 physicians in Germany also revealed a low prevalence: 95 HoFH patients were identified in 35 centers.Conclusion: The estimated frequency of homozygous familial hypercholesterolemia patients in Germany is around 95 (1:860,000 and the disease should be recognized as rare according to the definition of the European Medical Agency.Keywords: epidemiology, homozygous

  3. Splice, insertion-deletion and nonsense mutations that perturb the phenylalanine hydroxylase transcript cause phenylketonuria in India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bashyam, Murali D; Chaudhary, Ajay K; Kiran, Manjari; Nagarajaram, Hampapathalu A; Devi, Radha Rama; Ranganath, Prajnya; Dalal, Ashwin; Bashyam, Leena; Gupta, Neerja; Kabra, Madhulika; Muranjan, Mamta; Puri, Ratna D; Verma, Ishwar C; Nampoothiri, Sheela; Kadandale, Jayarama S

    2014-03-01

    Phenylketonuria (PKU) is an autosomal recessive metabolic disorder caused by mutational inactivation of the phenylalanine hydroxylase (PAH) gene. Missense mutations are the most common PAH mutation type detected in PKU patients worldwide. We performed PAH mutation analysis in 27 suspected Indian PKU families (including 7 from our previous study) followed by structure and function analysis of specific missense and splice/insertion-deletion/nonsense mutations, respectively. Of the 27 families, disease-causing mutations were detected in 25. A total of 20 different mutations were identified of which 7 "unique" mutations accounted for 13 of 25 mutation positive families. The unique mutations detected exclusively in Indian PKU patients included three recurrent mutations detected in three families each. The 20 mutations included only 5 missense mutations in addition to 5 splice, 4 each nonsense and insertion-deletion mutations, a silent variant in coding region and a 3'UTR mutation. One deletion and two nonsense mutations were characterized to confirm significant reduction in mutant transcript levels possibly through activation of nonsense mediated decay. All missense mutations affected conserved amino acid residues and sequence and structure analysis suggested significant perturbations in the enzyme activity of respective mutant proteins. This is probably the first report of identification of a significantly low proportion of missense PAH mutations from PKU families and together with the presence of a high proportion of splice, insertion-deletion, and nonsense mutations, points to a unique PAH mutation profile in Indian PKU patients. © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  4. Colloid clearance rate changes in children with homozygous-β-thalassemia in relation to blood transfusion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dimitriou, P.A.; Karpathios, T.E.; Antipas, S.E.; Fretzayias, A.M.; Kasfiki, A.G.; Melissinos, K.G.; Matsaniotis, N.S.

    1980-01-01

    The plasma clearance rate of heat denatured human serum albumin (DHAI-125, 5 mg/kg body weight) was studied in 20 children with homozygous-β-thalassemia before and 7-10 days after blood transfusion. A significant increase of the DHAI-125 clearance rate (P < 0.02) was found 7-10 days after blood transfusion while the spleen presented its minimum size. This finding may be relevant to the improved intrasplenic blood circulation after blood transfusion due to the release of the blood trapped within the spleen. (orig.)

  5. Corneal arcus and xanthomas in homozygous familial hypercholesterolemia: First report from China

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xin Meng

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available We report the case of a 12-year-old male who developed corneal arcus and multiple skin lesions with a 10-year history of xanthomas. The lesions appeared over his fingers, hands, elbows, knees, buttocks and feet. Laboratory studies showed a total serum cholesterol level of 752.1 mg/dL; a triglyceride level of 96.6 mg/dL; a low-density lipoprotein cholesterol level of 661.3 mg/dL. Findings were consistent with homozygous familial hypercholesterolemia. To our knowledge, this is the first such case to be reported from China.

  6. HFE gene C282Y, H63D and S65C mutations frequency in the Transylvania region, Romania.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trifa, Adrian P; Popp, Radu A; Militaru, Mariela S; Farcaş, Marius F; Crişan, Tania O; Gana, Ionuţ; Cucuianu, Andrei; Pop, Ioan V

    2012-06-01

    HFE-associated haemochromatosis is one of the most frequent autosomal recessive disorders in the Caucasian population. Although most of the cases are homozygous individuals for the C282Y mutation, another two mutations, H63D and S65C, have been reported to be associated with milder forms of the disease. This study was a first attempt to evaluate the distribution of these HFE gene mutations in the Transylvania region. Two-hundred and twenty-five healthy, unrelated volunteers originating from the Transylvania region, Romania, were screened for the HFE gene C282Y, H63D and S65C mutations, using molecular genetics assays (Polymerase Chain Reaction-Restriction Fragments Length Polymorphism). For the C282Y mutation, 7 heterozygotes (3.1%) were found, but no homozygous individual. In the case of the H63D mutation, 40 heterozygotes (17.8%) and 4 homozygotes (1.75%) for the mutant allele were evidenced. We found a compound heterozygous genotype (C282Y/H63D) in one individual (0.45%). Thus, the allele frequencies of the C282Y and H63D were 1.75% and 10.9%, respectively. Three individuals (1.3%) were found to harbour the S65C mutation in a heterozygous state, but none in a homozygous state: the allele frequency of the mutant allele was 0.75%. The distribution of the HFE gene C282Y, H63D and S65C mutations found in our group matches the tendencies observed in other European countries: a decreasing gradient from Northern to Southern Europe for the C282Y mutation; high frequency for the H63D mutation, and low frequency for the S65C mutation in most of the countries.

  7. Physical inactivation and stabilization of sludges

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alexandre, D.

    1979-07-01

    High temperature conditioning of sludge is a stabilization process that insures sterilization. Both thermal pasteurization and irradiation are inactivation processes. Viruses and parasites are inactivated at 70-80 0 C. Total bacterial destruction requires higher temperatures and/or detention time. Radio sensitivity of pathogens and pertinent treatment parameters are examined. If sludge is to be land disposed, disinfection requires irradiation doses ranging 500 Krad; if cattle feeding is considered, the required dose is 1 Mrad

  8. Microbial Inactivation by Ultrasound Assisted Supercritical Fluids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benedito, Jose; Ortuño, Carmen; Castillo-Zamudio, Rosa Isela; Mulet, Antonio

    A method combining supercritical carbon dioxide (SC-CO2) and high power ultrasound (HPU) has been developed and tested for microbial/enzyme inactivation purposes, at different process conditions for both liquid and solid matrices. In culture media, using only SC-CO2, the inactivation rate of E. coli and S. cerevisiae increased with pressure and temperature; and the total inactivation (7-8 log-cycles) was attained after 25 and 140 min of SC-CO2 (350 bar, 36 °C) treatment, respectively. Using SC-CO2+HPU, the time for the total inactivation of both microorganisms was reduced to only 1-2 min, at any condition selected. The SC-CO2+HPU inactivation of both microorganisms was slower in juices (avg. 4.9 min) than in culture media (avg. 1.5 min). In solid samples (chicken, turkey ham and dry-cured pork cured ham) treated with SC-CO2 and SC-CO2+HPU, the inactivation rate of E. coli increased with temperature. The application of HPU to the SC-CO2 treatments accelerated the inactivation rate of E. coli and that effect was more pronounced in treatments with isotonic solution surrounding the solid food samples. The application of HPU enhanced the SC-CO2 inactivation mechanisms of microorganisms, generating a vigorous agitation that facilitated the CO2 solubilization and the mass transfer process. The cavitation generated by HPU could damage the cell walls accelerating the extraction of vital constituents and the microbial death. Thus, using the combined technique, reasonable industrial processing times and mild process conditions could be used which could result into a cost reduction and lead to the minimization in the food nutritional and organoleptic changes.

  9. Mycobacteria inactivation using Engineered Water Nanostructures (EWNS).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pyrgiotakis, Georgios; McDevitt, James; Gao, Ya; Branco, Alan; Eleftheriadou, Mary; Lemos, Bernardo; Nardell, Edward; Demokritou, Philip

    2014-08-01

    Airborne transmitted pathogens such as Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb) cause serious, often fatal infectious disease with enormous global health implications. Due to their unique cell wall and slow growth, mycobacteria are among the most resilient microbial forms. Herein we evaluate the ability of an emerging, chemical-free, nanotechnology-based method to inactivate M. parafortuitum (Mtb surrogate). This method is based on the transformation of atmospheric water vapor into engineered water nano-structures (EWNS) via electrospray. We demonstrate that the EWNS can interact with and inactivate airborne mycobacteria, reducing their concentration levels significantly. Additionally, EWNS can inactivate M. parafortuitum on surfaces eight times faster than the control. The mechanism of mycobacteria inactivation was also investigated in this study. It was demonstrated that the EWNS effectively deliver the reactive oxygen species, encapsulated during the electrospray process, to the bacteria oxidizing their cell membrane resulting into inactivation. Overall, this is a method with the potential to become an effective intervention technology in the battle against airborne infections. This study demonstrates the feasibility of mycobacterium inactivation in airborne form or on contact surfaces using electrospray activated water nano-structures. Given that the method is free of toxic chemicals, this might become an important tool in the prevention of mycobacterial infections, which are notoriously hard to treat. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Cell inactivation by heavy charged particles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Blakely, E A [Lawrence Berkeley Lab., CA (United States). Cell and Molecular Biology Div.

    1992-06-01

    The inactivation of cells resulting in lethal or aberrant effects by charged particles is of growing interest. Charged particles at extremely high LET are capable of completely eliminating cell-type and cell-line differences in repair capacity. It is still not clear however whether the repair systems are inactivated, or merely that heavy-ion lesions are less repairable. Studies correlating the particle inactivation dose of radioresistant cells with intact DNA analyzed with pulse field gel electrophoresis and other techniques may be useful, but more experiments are also needed to assess the fidelity of repair. For particle irradiations between 40-100 keV/{mu}m there is however evidence for particle-induced activation of specific genes in mammalian cells, and certain repair processes in bacteria. New data are available on the inactivation of developmental processes in several systems including seeds, and cells of the nematode C. elegans. Future experimental and theoretical modeling research emphasis should focus on exploring particle-induced inactivation of endpoints assessing functionality and not just lethality, and on analyzing molecular damage and genetic effects arising in damage but non-inactivated survivors. The discrete nature of selective types of particle damage as a function of radiation quality indicates the value of accelerated ions as probes of normal and aberrant biological processes. Information obtained from molecular analyses of damage and repair must however be integrated into the context of cellular and tissue functions of the organism. (orig.).

  11. Analysis of HFE and non-HFE gene mutations in Brazilian patients with hemochromatosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bittencourt, Paulo Lisboa; Marin, Maria Lúcia Carnevale; Couto, Cláudia Alves; Cançado, Eduardo Luiz Rachid; Carrilho, Flair José; Goldberg, Anna Carla

    2009-01-01

    Approximately one-half of Brazilian patients with hereditary hemochromatosis (HH) are neither homozygous for the C282Y mutation nor compound heterozygous for the H63D and C282Y mutations that are associated with HH in Caucasians. Other mutations have been described in the HFE gene as well as in genes involved in iron metabolism, such as transferrin receptor 2 (TfR2) and ferroportin 1 (SCL40A1). To evaluate the role of HFE, TfR2 and SCL40A1 mutations in Brazilian subjects with HH. Nineteen male subjects (median age 42 [range: 20-72] years) with HH were evaluated using the Haemochromatosis StripAssay A. This assay is capable of detecting twelve HFE mutations, which are V53M, V59M, H63D, H63H, S65C, Q127H, P160delC, E168Q, E168X, W169X, C282Y and Q283, four TfR2 mutations, which are E60X, M172K, Y250X, AVAQ594-597del, and two SCL40A1 mutations, which are N144H and V162del. In our cohort, nine (47%) patients were homozygous for the C282Y mutation, two (11%) were heterozygous for the H63D mutation, and one each (5%) was either heterozygous for C282Y or compound heterozygous for C282Y and H63D. No other mutations in the HFE, TfR2 or SCL40A1 genes were observed in the studied patients. One-third of Brazilian subjects with the classical phenotype of HH do not carry HFE or other mutations that are currently associated with the disease in Caucasians. This observation suggests a role for other yet unknown mutations in the aforementioned genes or in other genes involved in iron homeostasis in the pathogenesis of HH in Brazil.

  12. Tsc2 gene inactivation causes a more severe epilepsy phenotype than Tsc1 inactivation in a mouse model of tuberous sclerosis complex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeng, Ling-Hui; Rensing, Nicholas R; Zhang, Bo; Gutmann, David H; Gambello, Michael J; Wong, Michael

    2011-02-01

    Tuberous Sclerosis Complex (TSC) is an autosomal dominant, multi-system disorder, typically involving severe neurological symptoms, such as epilepsy, cognitive deficits and autism. Two genes, TSC1 and TSC2, encoding the proteins hamartin and tuberin, respectively, have been identified as causing TSC. Although there is a substantial overlap in the clinical phenotype produced by TSC1 and TSC2 mutations, accumulating evidence indicates that TSC2 mutations cause more severe neurological manifestations than TSC1 mutations. In this study, the neurological phenotype of a novel mouse model involving conditional inactivation of the Tsc2 gene in glial-fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP)-positive cells (Tsc2(GFAP1)CKO mice) was characterized and compared with previously generated Tsc1(GFAP1)CKO mice. Similar to Tsc1(GFAP1)CKO mice, Tsc2(GFAP1)CKO mice exhibited epilepsy, premature death, progressive megencephaly, diffuse glial proliferation, dispersion of hippocampal pyramidal cells and decreased astrocyte glutamate transporter expression. However, Tsc2(GFAP1)CKO mice had an earlier onset and higher frequency of seizures, as well as significantly more severe histological abnormalities, compared with Tsc1(GFAP1)CKO mice. The differences between Tsc1(GFAP1)CKO and Tsc2(GFAP1)CKO mice were correlated with higher levels of mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) activation in Tsc2(GFAP1)CKO mice and were reversed by the mTOR inhibitor, rapamycin. These findings provide novel evidence in mouse models that Tsc2 mutations intrinsically cause a more severe neurological phenotype than Tsc1 mutations and suggest that the difference in phenotype may be related to the degree to which Tsc1 and Tsc2 inactivation causes abnormal mTOR activation.

  13. Hb Dartmouth (HBA2: c.200T>C): An α2-Globin Gene Associated with Hb H Disease in One Homozygous Patient.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farashi, Samaneh; Faramarzi Garous, Negin; Ashki, Mehri; Vakili, Shadi; Zeinali, Fatemah; Imanian, Hashem; Azarkeivan, Azita; Najmabadi, Hossein

    2015-01-01

    Hb H (β4) disease is caused by deletion or inactivation of three out of four α-globin genes. A high incidence of Hb H disease has been reported all over the world. There is a wide spectrum of phenotypic presentations, from clinically asymptomatic to having significant hepatosplenomegaly and requiring occasional or even regular blood transfusions, even more severe anemia, Hb Bart's (γ4) hydrops fetalis syndrome that can cause death in the affected fetuses late in gestation. We here present a case who was diagnosed with Hb H disease that represents a new genotype for this hereditary disorder. Hb Dartmouth is a variant caused by a missense mutation at codon 66 of the α2-globin gene (HBA2: c.200T>C), resulting in the substitution of leucine by proline. We here emphasize the importance of this point mutation involving Hb H disease and also the necessity for prenatal diagnosis (PND) for those who carry this point mutation in the heterozygous state.

  14. Primary ciliary dyskinesia-causing mutations in Amish and Mennonite communities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferkol, Thomas W; Puffenberger, Erik G; Lie, Hauw; Helms, Cynthia; Strauss, Kevin A; Bowcock, Anne; Carson, John L; Hazucha, Milan; Morton, D Holmes; Patel, Anand C; Leigh, Margaret W; Knowles, Michael R; Zariwala, Maimoona A

    2013-08-01

    To determine whether individuals with primary ciliary dyskinesia (PCD) from unrelated Amish and Mennonite families harbor a single and unique founder mutation. Subjects from Amish and Mennonite communities in several states were enrolled in the study. All subjects were clinically characterized, and nasal nitric oxide levels were measured. Nasal epithelial scrapings were collected from several subjects for ciliary ultrastructural analyses. DNA was isolated from patients with PCD and their unaffected first- and second-degree relatives. Genome-wide homozygosity mapping, linkage analyses, targeted mutation analyses, and exome sequencing were performed. All subjects from Old-Order Amish communities from Pennsylvania were homozygous for a nonsense mutant DNAH5 allele, c.4348C>T (p.Q1450X). Two affected siblings from an unrelated Mennonite family in Arkansas were homozygous for the same nonsense DNAH5 mutation. Children with PCD from an Amish family from Wisconsin had biallelic DNAH5 mutations, c.4348C>T (p.Q1450X) and c.10815delT (p.P3606HfsX23), and mutations in other genes associated with PCD were also identified in this community. The Amish and Mennonite subjects from geographically dispersed and socially isolated communities had the same founder DNAH5 mutation, owing to the common heritage of these populations. However, disease-causing mutations in other PCD-associated genes were also found in affected individuals in these communities, illustrating the genetic heterogeneity in this consanguineous population. Copyright © 2013 Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Uncoupling of sexual reproduction from homologous recombination in homozygous Oenothera species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rauwolf, U; Greiner, S; Mráček, J; Rauwolf, M; Golczyk, H; Mohler, V; Herrmann, R G; Meurer, J

    2011-07-01

    Salient features of the first meiotic division are independent segregation of chromosomes and homologous recombination (HR). In non-sexually reproducing, homozygous species studied to date HR is absent. In this study, we constructed the first linkage maps of homozygous, bivalent-forming Oenothera species and provide evidence that HR was exclusively confined to the chromosome ends of all linkage groups in our population. Co-segregation of complementary DNA-based markers with the major group of AFLP markers indicates that HR has only a minor role in generating genetic diversity of this taxon despite its efficient adaptation capability. Uneven chromosome condensation during meiosis in Oenothera may account for restriction of HR. The use of plants with ancient chromosomal arm arrangement demonstrates that limitation of HR occurred before and independent from species hybridizations and reciprocal translocations of chromosome arms-a phenomenon, which is widespread in the genus. We propose that consecutive loss of HR favored the evolution of reciprocal translocations, beneficial superlinkage groups and ultimately permanent translocation heterozygosity.

  16. Prevalence of deleterious ATM germline mutations in gastric cancer patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Dong-Sheng; Tao, Hou-Quan; He, Xu-Jun; Long, Ming; Yu, Sheng; Xia, Ying-Jie; Wei, Zhang; Xiong, Zikai; Jones, Sian; He, Yiping; Yan, Hai; Wang, Xiaoyue

    2015-12-01

    Besides CDH1, few hereditary gastric cancer predisposition genes have been previously reported. In this study, we discovered two germline ATM mutations (p.Y1203fs and p.N1223S) in a Chinese family with a history of gastric cancer by screening 83 cancer susceptibility genes. Using a published exome sequencing dataset, we found deleterious germline mutations of ATM in 2.7% of 335 gastric cancer patients of different ethnic origins. The frequency of deleterious ATM mutations in gastric cancer patients is significantly higher than that in general population (p=0.0000435), suggesting an association of ATM mutations with gastric cancer predisposition. We also observed biallelic inactivation of ATM in tumors of two gastric cancer patients. Further evaluation of ATM mutations in hereditary gastric cancer will facilitate genetic testing and risk assessment.

  17. Homozygous Expression of Mutant ELOVL4 Leads to Seizures and Death in a Novel Animal Model of Very Long-Chain Fatty Acid Deficiency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hopiavuori, Blake R; Deák, Ferenc; Wilkerson, Joseph L; Brush, Richard S; Rocha-Hopiavuori, Nicole A; Hopiavuori, Austin R; Ozan, Kathryn G; Sullivan, Michael T; Wren, Jonathan D; Georgescu, Constantin; Szweda, Luke; Awasthi, Vibhudutta; Towner, Rheal; Sherry, David M; Anderson, Robert E; Agbaga, Martin-Paul

    2018-02-01

    Lipids are essential components of the nervous system. However, the functions of very long-chain fatty acids (VLC-FA; ≥ 28 carbons) in the brain are unknown. The enzyme ELOngation of Very Long-chain fatty acids-4 (ELOVL4) catalyzes the rate-limiting step in the biosynthesis of VLC-FA (Agbaga et al., Proc Natl Acad Sci USA 105(35): 12843-12848, 2008; Logan et al., J Lipid Res 55(4): 698-708, 2014), which we identified in the brain as saturated fatty acids (VLC-SFA). Homozygous mutations in ELOVL4 cause severe neuropathology in humans (Ozaki et al., JAMA Neurol 72(7): 797-805, 2015; Mir et al., BMC Med Genet 15: 25, 2014; Cadieux-Dion et al., JAMA Neurol 71(4): 470-475, 2014; Bourassa et al., JAMA Neurol 72(8): 942-943, 2015; Aldahmesh et al., Am J Hum Genet 89(6): 745-750, 2011) and are post-natal lethal in mice (Cameron et al., Int J Biol Sci 3(2): 111-119, 2007; Li et al., Int J Biol Sci 3(2): 120-128, 2007; McMahon et al., Molecular Vision 13: 258-272, 2007; Vasireddy et al., Hum Mol Genet 16(5): 471-482, 2007) from dehydration due to loss of VLC-SFA that comprise the skin permeability barrier. Double transgenic mice with homozygous knock-in of the Stargardt-like macular dystrophy (STDG3; 797-801_AACTT) mutation of Elovl4 with skin-specific rescue of wild-type Elovl4 expression (S + Elovl4 mut/mut mice) develop seizures by P19 and die by P21. Electrophysiological analyses of hippocampal slices showed aberrant epileptogenic activity in S + Elovl4 mut/mut mice. FM1-43 dye release studies showed that synapses made by cultured hippocampal neurons from S + Elovl4 mut/mut mice exhibited accelerated synaptic release kinetics. Supplementation of VLC-SFA to cultured hippocampal neurons from mutant mice rescued defective synaptic release to wild-type rates. Together, these studies establish a critical, novel role for ELOVL4 and its VLC-SFA products in regulating synaptic release kinetics and epileptogenesis. Future studies aimed at understanding the molecular

  18. Hemochromatosis (HFE gene mutations in Brazilian chronic hemodialysis patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F.V. Perícole

    2005-09-01

    Full Text Available Patients with chronic renal insufficiency (CRI have reduced hemoglobin levels, mostly as a result of decreased kidney production of erythropoietin, but the relation between renal insufficiency and the magnitude of hemoglobin reduction has not been well defined. Hereditary hemochromatosis is an inherited disorder of iron metabolism. The importance of the association of hemochromatosis with treatment for anemia among patients with CRI has not been well described. We analyzed the frequency of the C282Y and H63D mutations in the HFE gene in 201 Brazilian individuals with CRI undergoing hemodialysis. The analysis of the effects of HFE mutations on iron metabolism and anemia with biochemical parameters was possible in 118 patients of this study (hemoglobin, hematocrit, ferritin levels, transferrin saturation, and serum iron. A C282Y heterozygous mutation was found in 7/201 (3.4% and H63D homozygous and heterozygous mutation were found in 2/201 (1.0% and 46/201 (22.9%, respectively. The allelic frequencies of the HFE mutations (0.017 for C282Y mutation and 0.124 for H63D mutation did not differ between patients with CRI and healthy controls. Regarding the biochemical parameters, no differences were observed between HFE heterozygous and mutation-negative patients, although ferritin levels were not higher among patients with the H63D mutation (P = 0.08. From what we observed in our study, C282Y/H63D HFE gene mutations are not related to degrees of anemia or iron stores in CRI patients receiving intravenous iron supplementation (P > 0.10. Nevertheless, the present data suggest that the H63D mutation may have an important function as a modulating factor of iron overload in these patients.

  19. The p16INK4alpha/p19ARF gene mutations are infrequent and are mutually exclusive to p53 mutations in Indian oral squamous cell carcinomas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kannan, K; Munirajan, A K; Krishnamurthy, J; Bhuvarahamurthy, V; Mohanprasad, B K; Panishankar, K H; Tsuchida, N; Shanmugam, G

    2000-03-01

    Eighty-seven untreated primary oral squamous cell carcinomas (SCCs) associated with betel quid and tobacco chewing from Indian patients were analysed for the presence of mutations in the commonly shared exon 2 of p16INK4alpha/p19ARF genes. Polymerase chain reaction-single strand conformation polymorphism (PCR-SSCP) and sequencing analysis were used to detect mutations. SSCP analysis indicated that only 9% (8/87) of the tumours had mutation in p16INK4alpha/p19ARF genes. Seventy-two tumours studied here were previously analysed for p53 mutations and 21% (15/72) of them were found to have mutations in p53 gene. Only one tumour was found to have mutation at both p53 and p16INK4alpha/p19ARF genes. Thus, the mutation rates observed were 21% for p53, 9% for p16INK4alpha/p19ARF, and 1% for both. Sequencing analysis revealed two types of mutations; i) G to C (GCAG to CCAG) transversion type mutation at intron 1-exon 2 splice junction and ii) another C to T transition type mutation resulting in CGA to TGA changing arginine to a termination codon at p16INK4alpha gene codon 80 and the same mutation will alter codon 94 of p19ARF gene from CCG to CTG (proline to leucine). These results suggest that p16INK4alpha/p19ARF mutations are less frequent than p53 mutations in Indian oral SCCs. The p53 and p16INK4alpha/p19ARF mutational events are independent and are mutually exclusive suggesting that mutational inactivation of either p53 or p16INK4alpha/p19ARF may alleviate the need for the inactivation of the other gene.

  20. Presence of calreticulin mutations in JAK2-negative polycythemia vera.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Broséus, Julien; Park, Ji-Hye; Carillo, Serge; Hermouet, Sylvie; Girodon, François

    2014-12-18

    Calreticulin (CALR) mutations have been reported in Janus kinase 2 (JAK2)- and myeloproliferative leukemia (MPL)-negative essential thrombocythemia and primary myelofibrosis. In contrast, no CALR mutations have ever been reported in the context of polycythemia vera (PV). Here, we describe 2 JAK2(V617F)-JAK2(exon12)-negative PV patients who presented with a CALR mutation in peripheral granulocytes at the time of diagnosis. In both cases, the CALR mutation was a 52-bp deletion. Single burst-forming units-erythroid (BFU-E) from 1 patient were grown in vitro and genotyped: the same CALR del 52-bp mutation was noted in 31 of the 37 colonies examined; 30 of 31 BFU-E were heterozygous for CALR del 52 bp, and 1 of 31 BFU-E was homozygous for CALR del 52 bp. In summary, although unknown mutations leading to PV cannot be ruled out, our results suggest that CALR mutations can be associated with JAK2-negative PV. © 2014 by The American Society of Hematology.

  1. Mutational spectrum of Xeroderma pigmentosum group A in Egyptian patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amr, Khalda; Messaoud, Olfa; El Darouti, Mohamad; Abdelhak, Sonia; El-Kamah, Ghada

    2014-01-01

    Xeroderma pigmentosum (XP) is a rare autosomal recessive hereditary disease characterized by hyperphotosensitivity, DNA repair defects and a predisposition to skin cancers. The most frequently occurring type worldwide is the XP group A (XPA). There is a close relationship between the clinical features that ranged from severe to mild form and the mutational site in XPA gene. The aim of this study is to carry out the mutational analysis in Egyptian patients with XP-A. This study was carried out on four unrelated Egyptian XP-A families. Clinical features were examined and direct sequencing of the coding region of XPA gene was performed in patients and their parents. Direct sequencing of the whole coding region of the XPA gene revealed the identification of two homozygous nonsense mutations: (c.553C >T; p.(Gln185)) and (c.331G>T; p.(Glu111)), which create premature, stop codon and a homodeletion (c.374delC: p.Thr125Ilefs 15) that leads to frameshift and premature translation termination. We report the identification of one novel XPA gene mutation and two known mutations in four unrelated Egyptian families with Xermoderma pigmentosum. All explored patients presented severe neurological abnormalities and have mutations located in the DNA binding domain. This report gives insight on the mutation spectrum of XP-A in Egypt. This would provide a valuable tool for early diagnosis of this severe disease. © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. Inactivation of pathogenic bacteria in food matrices: high pressure processing, photodynamic inactivation and pressure-assisted photodynamic inactivation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cunha, A.; Couceiro, J.; Bonifácio, D.; Martins, C.; Almeida, A.; Neves, M. G. P. M. S.; Faustino, M. A. F.; Saraiva, J. A.

    2017-09-01

    Traditional food processing methods frequently depend on the application of high temperature. However, heat may cause undesirable changes in food properties and often has a negative impact on nutritional value and organoleptic characteristics. Therefore, reducing the microbial load without compromising the desirable properties of food products is still a technological challenge. High-pressure processing (HPP) can be classified as a cold pasteurization technique, since it is a non-thermal food preservation method that uses hydrostatic pressure to inactivate spoilage microorganisms. At the same time, it increases shelf life and retains the original features of food. Photodynamic inactivation (PDI) is also regarded as promising approach for the decontamination of food matrices. In this case, the inactivation of bacterial cells is achieved by the cytotoxic effects of reactive oxygens species (ROS) produced from the combined interaction of a photosensitizer molecule, light and oxygen. This short review examines some recent developments on the application of HPP and PDI with food-grade photosensitizers for the inactivation of listeriae, taken as a food pathogen model. The results of a proof-of-concept trial of the use of high-pressure as a coadjutant to increase the efficiency of photodynamic inactivation of bacterial endospores is also addressed.

  3. HFE gene mutations and iron status of Brazilian blood donors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santos, P C J L; Cançado, R D; Terada, C T; Rostelato, S; Gonzales, I; Hirata, R D C; Hirata, M H; Chiattone, C S; Guerra-Shinohara, E M

    2010-01-01

    Mutations of the HFE and TFR2 genes have been associated with iron overload. HFE and TFR2 mutations were assessed in blood donors, and the relationship with iron status was evaluated. Subjects (N = 542) were recruited at the Hemocentro da Santa Casa de São Paulo, São Paulo, Brazil. Iron status was not influenced by HFE mutations in women and was independent of blood donation frequency. In contrast, men carrying the HFE 282CY genotype had lower total iron-binding capacity (TIBC) than HFE 282CC genotype carriers. Men who donated blood for the first time and were carriers of the HFE 282CY genotype had higher transferrin saturation values and lower TIBC concentrations than those with the homozygous wild genotype for the HFE C282Y mutation. Moreover, in this group of blood donors, carriers of HFE 63DD plus 63HD genotypes had higher serum ferritin values than those with the homozygous wild genotype for HFE H63D mutation. Multiple linear regression analysis showed that HFE 282CY leads to a 17.21% increase (P = 0.018) and a 83.65% decrease (P = 0.007) in transferrin saturation and TIBC, respectively. In addition, serum ferritin is influenced by age (3.91%, P = 0.001) and the HFE 63HD plus DD genotype (55.84%, P = 0.021). In conclusion, the HFE 282Y and 65C alleles were rare, while the HFE 63D allele was frequent in Brazilian blood donors. The HFE C282Y and H63D mutations were associated with alterations in iron status in blood donors in a gender-dependent manner.

  4. HFE gene mutations and iron status of Brazilian blood donors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P.C.J.L. Santos

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Mutations of the HFE and TFR2 genes have been associated with iron overload. HFE and TFR2 mutations were assessed in blood donors, and the relationship with iron status was evaluated. Subjects (N = 542 were recruited at the Hemocentro da Santa Casa de São Paulo, São Paulo, Brazil. Iron status was not influenced by HFE mutations in women and was independent of blood donation frequency. In contrast, men carrying the HFE 282CY genotype had lower total iron-binding capacity (TIBC than HFE 282CC genotype carriers. Men who donated blood for the first time and were carriers of the HFE 282CY genotype had higher transferrin saturation values and lower TIBC concentrations than those with the homozygous wild genotype for the HFE C282Y mutation. Moreover, in this group of blood donors, carriers of HFE 63DD plus 63HD genotypes had higher serum ferritin values than those with the homozygous wild genotype for HFE H63D mutation. Multiple linear regression analysis showed that HFE 282CY leads to a 17.21% increase (P = 0.018 and a 83.65% decrease (P = 0.007 in transferrin saturation and TIBC, respectively. In addition, serum ferritin is influenced by age (3.91%, P = 0.001 and the HFE 63HD plus DD genotype (55.84%, P = 0.021. In conclusion, the HFE 282Y and 65C alleles were rare, while the HFE 63D allele was frequent in Brazilian blood donors. The HFE C282Y and H63D mutations were associated with alterations in iron status in blood donors in a gender-dependent manner.

  5. Somatic mutations in the transcriptional corepressor gene BCORL1 in adult acute myelogenous leukemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Meng; Collins, Roxane; Jiao, Yuchen; Ouillette, Peter; Bixby, Dale; Erba, Harry; Vogelstein, Bert; Kinzler, Kenneth W; Papadopoulos, Nickolas; Malek, Sami N

    2011-11-24

    To further our understanding of the genetic basis of acute myelogenous leukemia (AML), we determined the coding exon sequences of ∼ 18 000 protein-encoding genes in 8 patients with secondary AML. Here we report the discovery of novel somatic mutations in the transcriptional corepressor gene BCORL1 that is located on the X-chromosome. Analysis of BCORL1 in an unselected cohort of 173 AML patients identified a total of 10 mutated cases (6%) with BCORL1 mutations, whereas analysis of 19 AML cell lines uncovered 4 (21%) BCORL1 mutated cell lines. The majority (87%) of the mutations in BCORL1 were predicted to inactivate the gene product as a result of nonsense mutations, splice site mutation, or out-of-frame insertions or deletions. These results indicate that BCORL1 by genetic criteria is a novel candidate tumor suppressor gene, joining the growing list of genes recurrently mutated in AML.

  6. Inactivation of enteroviruses in sewage with ozone

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ivanova, O.E.; Bogdanov, M.V.; Kazantseva, V.A.; Gabrilevskaia, L.N.; Kodkind, G.K.H.

    The study of ozone inactivation of enteroviruses in sewage showed the presence in sewage of suspensions of organic origin and bacterial flora to influence the rate of inactivation. The inactivation rate of poliomyelitis virus in sewage free from organic suspension and bacterial flora was significantly higher than that in sewage containing such suspension and bacterial flora. The inactivation rate of enteroviruses was found not to depend upon the protein and salt composition and pH of sewage or strain appurtenance of viruses. The inactivation rate of enteroviruses directly depended upon the dose of ozone and time of contact with it. Differences in the resistance of different types of poliomyelitis virus, ECHO and Coxsackie viruses to the effect of ozone are likely exist. These differences are manifested within the range of relatively small doses of ozone. E. coli is more resistant to ozone than entero-viruses. The results of laboratory studies were used to choose the regimen of sanitation of urban sewage to be used in technological cycles of industrial enterprises.

  7. Inactivation of Mycobacterium avium with free chlorine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luh, Jeanne; Mariñas, Benito J

    2007-07-15

    The inactivation kinetics of Mycobacterium avium with free chlorine was characterized by two stages: an initial phase at a relatively fast rate followed by a slower second stage of pseudo first-order kinetics. The inactivation rate of each stage was approximately the same for all experiments performed at a certain condition of pH and temperature; however, variability was observed for the disinfectant exposure at which the transition between the two stages occurred. This variability was not a function of the initial disinfectant concentration, the initial bacterial density, or the bacterial stock. However, the transition to the second stage varied more significantly at high temperatures (30 degrees C), while lower variability was observed at lower temperatures (5 and 20 degrees C). Experiments conducted at pH values in the range of 6-9 revealed that the inactivation of M. avium was primarily due to hypochlorous acid, with little contribution from hypochlorite ion within this pH range. The inactivation kinetics was represented with a two-population model. The activation energies for the resulting pseudo first-order rate constants for the populations with fast and slow kinetics were 100.3 and 96.5 kJ/mol, respectively. The magnitude of these values suggested that for waters of relatively high pH and low temperatures, little inactivation of M. avium would be achieved within treatment plants, providing a seeding source for distribution systems.

  8. Novel ITGB6 mutation in autosomal recessive amelogenesis imperfecta.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seymen, F; Lee, K-E; Koruyucu, M; Gencay, K; Bayram, M; Tuna, E B; Lee, Z H; Kim, J-W

    2015-05-01

    Hereditary defects in tooth enamel formation, amelogenesis imperfecta (AI), can be non-syndromic or syndromic phenotype. Integrins are signaling proteins that mediate cell-cell and cell-extracellular matrix communication, and their involvement in tooth development is well known. The purposes of this study were to identify genetic cause of an AI family and molecular pathogenesis underlying defective enamel formation. We recruited a Turkish family with isolated AI and performed mutational analyses to clarify the underlying molecular genetic etiology. Autozygosity mapping and exome sequencing identified a novel homozygous ITGB6 transversion mutation in exon 4 (c.517G>C, p.Gly173Arg). The glycine at this position in the middle of the βI-domain is conserved among a wide range of vertebrate orthologs and human paralogs. Clinically, the enamel was generally thin and pitted with pigmentation. Thicker enamel was noted at the cervical area of the molars. In this study, we identified a novel homozygous ITGB6 mutation causing isolated AI, and this advances the understanding of normal and pathologic enamel development. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  9. Heavy ion induced mutation in arabidopsis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tano, Shigemitsu [Japan Atomic Energy Research Inst., Takasaki, Gunma (Japan). Takasaki Radiation Chemistry Research Establishment

    1997-03-01

    Heavy ions, He, C, Ar and Ne were irradiated to the seeds of Arabidopsis thaliana for inducing the new mutants. In the irradiated generation (M{sub 1}), germination and survival rate were observed to estimate the relative biological effectiveness in relation to the LET including the inactivation cross section. Mutation frequencies were compared by using three kinds of genetic loci after irradiation with C ions and electrons. Several interesting new mutants were selected in the selfed progenies of heavy ion irradiated seeds. (author)

  10. Mutations in HPSE2 Cause Urofacial Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daly, Sarah B.; Urquhart, Jill E.; Hilton, Emma; McKenzie, Edward A.; Kammerer, Richard A.; Lewis, Malcolm; Kerr, Bronwyn; Stuart, Helen; Donnai, Dian; Long, David A.; Burgu, Berk; Aydogdu, Ozgu; Derbent, Murat; Garcia-Minaur, Sixto; Reardon, Willie; Gener, Blanca; Shalev, Stavit; Smith, Rupert; Woolf, Adrian S.; Black, Graeme C.; Newman, William G.

    2010-01-01

    Urinary voiding dysfunction in childhood, manifesting as incontinence, dysuria, and urinary frequency, is a common condition. Urofacial syndrome (UFS) is a rare autosomal recessive disease characterized by facial grimacing when attempting to smile and failure of the urinary bladder to void completely despite a lack of anatomical bladder outflow obstruction or overt neurological damage. UFS individuals often have reflux of infected urine from the bladder to the upper renal tract, with a risk of kidney damage and renal failure. Whole-genome SNP mapping in one affected individual defined an autozygous region of 16 Mb on chromosome 10q23-q24, within which a 10 kb deletion encompassing exons 8 and 9 of HPSE2 was identified. Homozygous exonic deletions, nonsense mutations, and frameshift mutations in five further unrelated families confirmed HPSE2 as the causative gene for UFS. Mutations were not identified in four additional UFS patients, indicating genetic heterogeneity. We show that HPSE2 is expressed in the fetal and adult central nervous system, where it might be implicated in controlling facial expression and urinary voiding, and also in bladder smooth muscle, consistent with a role in renal tract morphology and function. Our findings have broader implications for understanding the genetic basis of lower renal tract malformations and voiding dysfunction. PMID:20560210

  11. Mutations in HPSE2 cause urofacial syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daly, Sarah B; Urquhart, Jill E; Hilton, Emma; McKenzie, Edward A; Kammerer, Richard A; Lewis, Malcolm; Kerr, Bronwyn; Stuart, Helen; Donnai, Dian; Long, David A; Burgu, Berk; Aydogdu, Ozgu; Derbent, Murat; Garcia-Minaur, Sixto; Reardon, Willie; Gener, Blanca; Shalev, Stavit; Smith, Rupert; Woolf, Adrian S; Black, Graeme C; Newman, William G

    2010-06-11

    Urinary voiding dysfunction in childhood, manifesting as incontinence, dysuria, and urinary frequency, is a common condition. Urofacial syndrome (UFS) is a rare autosomal recessive disease characterized by facial grimacing when attempting to smile and failure of the urinary bladder to void completely despite a lack of anatomical bladder outflow obstruction or overt neurological damage. UFS individuals often have reflux of infected urine from the bladder to the upper renal tract, with a risk of kidney damage and renal failure. Whole-genome SNP mapping in one affected individual defined an autozygous region of 16 Mb on chromosome 10q23-q24, within which a 10 kb deletion encompassing exons 8 and 9 of HPSE2 was identified. Homozygous exonic deletions, nonsense mutations, and frameshift mutations in five further unrelated families confirmed HPSE2 as the causative gene for UFS. Mutations were not identified in four additional UFS patients, indicating genetic heterogeneity. We show that HPSE2 is expressed in the fetal and adult central nervous system, where it might be implicated in controlling facial expression and urinary voiding, and also in bladder smooth muscle, consistent with a role in renal tract morphology and function. Our findings have broader implications for understanding the genetic basis of lower renal tract malformations and voiding dysfunction.

  12. Stanol esters attenuate the aggravating effect of dietary cholesterol on atherosclerosis in homozygous Watanabe rabbits

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schrøder, Malene; Husche, Constanze; Pilegaard, Kirsten

    2009-01-01

    Plant stanols are marketed as natural means to lower blood cholesterol in humans; hence the effect on combined familial hyperlipidemia is not known. The objective was to investigate the effect of stanol esters on blood lipids and aortic atherosclerosis in homozygous WHHL rabbits challenged...... with dietary cholesterol. A total of 36 rabbits, 6 weeks of age, with initial plasma cholesterol of 22.5 mmol/L were assigned to two treatment groups fed a standard rabbit chow with 1 g/kg cholesterol or this diet added 34 g/kg stanol ester, respectively, for 16 weeks. Plasma cholesterol was measured initially...... and at termination, also in lipoproteins. Aortic atherosclerosis was evaluated as cholesterol content and area covered by plaque. Plasma cholesterol was not significantly different between the groups at termination (35.7 mmol/L vs. 35.5 mmol/L). A significant increase in LDL was seen (13.1 mmol/L vs. 16.5 mmol...

  13. Limb defects in homozygous {alpha}-thalassemia: Report of three cases

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chitayat, D.; Thomas, M.; Silver, M.M. [Univ. of Toronto, Ontario (Canada)] [and others

    1997-01-20

    Homozygosity for the South-Asian {alpha}-thalassemia (--{sup SEA}/) deletion is a serious hematological condition that results, in most cases, in intrauterine or postnatal death due to anemia and severe hypoxia of prenatal onset. A relationship between congenital abnormalities and intrauterine hypoxia has been postulated. However, since homozygosity for the (--{sup SEA}/) deletion is most common in underdeveloped countries where detailed autopsies are lacking, the incidence of congenital abnormalities among these babies has not been well delineated. We report on three newborn infants, homozygous for the (--{sup SEA}/) deletion, who were born with limb defects. We postulate that this combination is the result of prenatal hypoxia which may affect other fetal body organs. This should be taken into consideration when prenatal treatment of affected fetuses, with intrauterine blood transfusion, is suggested. 47 refs., 3 figs.

  14. MSX1 Mutation in Witkop Syndrome; A Case Report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Faezeh Ghaderi

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available The Witkop syndrome is a rare autosomal dominant disorder characterized by the absence of several teeth and abnormalities of the nails. This is the first report of a rare genetic tooth and nail syndrome diagnosed in a 2.5-year-old boy with early exfoliation of the primary canine, absence of the primary incisors, and nail dysplasia. A homozygous mutation was identified in 3’-UTR of MSX1 gene in the proband. The parents of the patient had no dental and nail anomalies.

  15. TREM2 mutations are rare in a French cohort of patients with frontotemporal dementia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lattante, Serena; Le Ber, Isabelle; Camuzat, Agnès; Dayan, Sarah; Godard, Chloé; Van Bortel, Inge; De Septenville, Anne; Ciura, Sorana; Brice, Alexis; Kabashi, Edor

    2013-10-01

    Homozygous mutations in TREM2 have been recently identified by exome sequencing in families presenting with frontotemporal dementia (FTD)-like phenotype. No study has evaluated the exact frequency of TREM2 mutations in cohorts of FTD patients so far. We sequenced TREM2 in 175 patients with pure FTD, mostly French, to test whether mutations could be implicated in the pathogenesis of the disease. No disease-causing mutation was identified in 175 individuals from the French cohort of FTD patients. We did not identify the polymorphism p.R47H (rs75932628), strongly associated with an increased risk of developing Alzheimer's disease. We conclude that TREM2 mutations are extremely rare in patients with pure FTD, although further investigation in larger populations is needed. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Expanding the phenotypic and mutational spectrum in microcephalic osteodysplastic primordial dwarfism type I.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdel-Salam, Ghada M H; Abdel-Hamid, Mohamed S; Issa, Mahmoud; Magdy, Ahmed; El-Kotoury, Ahmed; Amr, Khalda

    2012-06-01

    Mutations in the RNU4ATAC gene cause microcephalic osteodysplastic primordial dwarfism type I. It encodes U4atac, a small nuclear RNA that is a component of the minor spliceosome. Six distinct mutations in 30 patients diagnosed as microcephalic osteodysplastic primordial dwarfism type I have been described. We report on three additional patients from two unrelated families presenting with a milder phenotype of microcephalic osteodysplastic primordial dwarfism type I and metopic synostosis. Patient 1 had two novel heterozygous mutations in the 3' prime stem-loop, g.66G > C and g.124G > A while Patients 2 and 3 had a homozygous mutation g.55G > A in the 5' prime stem-loop. Although they manifested the known spectrum of clinical features of microcephalic osteodysplastic primordial dwarfism type I, they lacked evidence of severe developmental delay and neurological symptoms. These findings expand the mutational and phenotypic spectrum of this syndrome. Copyright © 2012 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  17. Dwarfism in homozygous Agc1CreERT mice is associated with decreased expression of aggrecan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rashid, Harunur; Chen, Haiyan; Hassan, Quamarul; Javed, Amjad

    2017-10-01

    Aggrecan (Acan), a large proteoglycan is abundantly expressed in cartilage tissue. Disruption of Acan gene causes dwarfism and perinatal lethality of homozygous mice. Because of sustained expression of Acan in the growth plate and articular cartilage, Agc Cre model has been developed for the regulated ablation of target gene in chondrocytes. In this model, the IRES-CreERT-Neo-pgk transgene is knocked-in the 3'UTR of the Acan gene. We consistently noticed variable weight and size among the Agc Cre littermates, prompting us to examine the cause of this phenotype. Wild-type, Cre-heterozygous (Agc +/Cre ), and Cre-homozygous (Agc Cre/Cre ) littermates were indistinguishable at birth. However, by 1-month, Agc Cre/Cre mice showed a significant reduction in body weight (18-27%) and body length (19-22%). Low body weight and dwarfism was sustained through adulthood and occurred in both genders. Compared with wild-type and Agc +/Cre littermates, long bones and vertebrae were shorter in Agc Cre/Cre mice. Histological analysis of Agc Cre/Cre mice revealed a significant reduction in the length of the growth plate and the thickness of articular cartilage. The amount of proteoglycan deposited in the cartilage of Agc Cre/Cre mice was nearly half of the WT littermates. Analysis of gene expression indicates impaired differentiation of chondrocyte in hyaline cartilage of Agc Cre/Cre mice. Notably, both Acan mRNA and protein was reduced by 50% in Agc Cre/Cre mice. A strong correlation was noted between the level of Acan mRNA and the body length. Importantly, Agc +/Cre mice showed no overt skeletal phenotype. Thus to avoid misinterpretation of data, only the Agc +/Cre mice should be used for conditional deletion of a target gene in the cartilage tissue. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  18. Homozygous Deletions and Recurrent Amplifications Implicate New Genes Involved in Prostate Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wennuan Liu

    2008-08-01

    Full Text Available Prostate cancer cell lines provide ideal in vitro systems for the identification and analysis of prostate tumor suppressors and oncogenes. A detailed characterization of the architecture of prostate cancer cell line genomes would facilitate the study of precise roles of various genes in prostate tumorigenesis in general. To contribute to such a characterization, we used the GeneChip 500K single nucleotide polymorphic (SNP array for analysis of genotypes and relative DNA copy number changes across the genome of 11 cell lines derived from both normal and cancerous prostate tissues. For comparison purposes, we also examined the alterations observed in the cell lines in tumor/normal pairs of clinical samples from 72 patients. Along with genome-wide maps of DNA copy number changes and loss of heterozygosity for these cell lines, we report previously unreported homozygous deletions and recurrent amplifications in prostate cancers in this study. The homozygous deletions affected a number of biologically important genes, including PPP2R2A and BNIP3L identified in this study and CDKN2A/CDKN2B reported previously. Although most amplified genomic regions tended to be large, amplifications at 8q24.21 were of particular interest because the affected regions are relatively small, are found in multiple cell lines, are located near MYC, an oncogene strongly implicated in prostate tumorigenesis, and are known to harbor SNPs that are associated with inherited susceptibility for prostate cancer. The genomic alterations revealed in this study provide an important catalog of positional information relevant to efforts aimed at deciphering the molecular genetic basis of prostate cancer.

  19. APOA5 Q97X Mutation Identified through homozygosity mapping causes severe hypertriglyceridemia in a Chilean consanguineous family

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dussaillant Catalina

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Severe hypertriglyceridemia (HTG has been linked to defects in LPL, APOC2, APOA5, LMF1 and GBIHBP1 genes. However, a number of severe HTG cases are probably caused by as yet unidentified mutations. Very high triglyceride plasma levels (>112 mmol/L at diagnosis were found in two sisters of a Chilean consanguineous family, which is strongly suggestive of a recessive highly penetrant mutation. The aim of this study was to determine the genetic locus responsible for the severe HTG in this family. Methods We carried out a genome-wide linkage study with nearly 300,000 biallelic markers (Illumina Human CytoSNP-12 panel. Using the homozygosity mapping strategy, we searched for chromosome regions with excess of homozygous genotypes in the affected cases compared to non-affected relatives. Results A large homozygous segment was found in the long arm of chromosome 11, with more than 2,500 consecutive homozygous SNP shared by the proband with her affected sister, and containing the APOA5/A4/C3/A1 cluster. Direct sequencing of the APOA5 gene revealed a known homozygous nonsense Q97X mutation (p.Gln97Ter found in both affected sisters but not in non-affected relatives nor in a sample of unrelated controls. Conclusion The Q97X mutation of the APOA5 gene in homozygous status is responsible for the severe hypertriglyceridemia in this family. We have shown that homozygosity mapping correctly pinpointed the genomic region containing the gene responsible for severe hypertriglyceridemia in this consanguineous Chilean family.

  20. APOA5 Q97X mutation identified through homozygosity mapping causes severe hypertriglyceridemia in a Chilean consanguineous family.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dussaillant, Catalina; Serrano, Valentina; Maiz, Alberto; Eyheramendy, Susana; Cataldo, Luis Rodrigo; Chavez, Matías; Smalley, Susan V; Fuentes, Marcela; Rigotti, Attilio; Rubio, Lorena; Lagos, Carlos F; Martinez, José Alfredo; Santos, José Luis

    2012-11-15

    Severe hypertriglyceridemia (HTG) has been linked to defects in LPL, APOC2, APOA5, LMF1 and GBIHBP1 genes. However, a number of severe HTG cases are probably caused by as yet unidentified mutations. Very high triglyceride plasma levels (>112 mmol/L at diagnosis) were found in two sisters of a Chilean consanguineous family, which is strongly suggestive of a recessive highly penetrant mutation. The aim of this study was to determine the genetic locus responsible for the severe HTG in this family. We carried out a genome-wide linkage study with nearly 300,000 biallelic markers (Illumina Human CytoSNP-12 panel). Using the homozygosity mapping strategy, we searched for chromosome regions with excess of homozygous genotypes in the affected cases compared to non-affected relatives. A large homozygous segment was found in the long arm of chromosome 11, with more than 2,500 consecutive homozygous SNP shared by the proband with her affected sister, and containing the APOA5/A4/C3/A1 cluster. Direct sequencing of the APOA5 gene revealed a known homozygous nonsense Q97X mutation (p.Gln97Ter) found in both affected sisters but not in non-affected relatives nor in a sample of unrelated controls. The Q97X mutation of the APOA5 gene in homozygous status is responsible for the severe hypertriglyceridemia in this family. We have shown that homozygosity mapping correctly pinpointed the genomic region containing the gene responsible for severe hypertriglyceridemia in this consanguineous Chilean family.

  1. Autosomal recessive mutations in THOC6 cause intellectual disability: syndrome delineation requiring forward and reverse phenotyping.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amos, J S; Huang, L; Thevenon, J; Kariminedjad, A; Beaulieu, C L; Masurel-Paulet, A; Najmabadi, H; Fattahi, Z; Beheshtian, M; Tonekaboni, S H; Tang, S; Helbig, K L; Alcaraz, W; Rivière, J-B; Faivre, L; Innes, A M; Lebel, R R; Boycott, K M

    2017-01-01

    THOC6 is a part of the THO complex, which is involved in coordinating mRNA processing with export. The THO complex interacts with additional components to form the larger TREX complex (transcription export complex). Previously, a homozygous missense mutation in THOC6 in the Hutterite population was reported in association with syndromic intellectual disability. Using exome sequencing, we identified three unrelated patients with bi-allelic mutations in THOC6 associated with intellectual disability and additional clinical features. Two of the patients were compound heterozygous for a stop and a missense mutation, and the third was homozygous for a missense mutation; the missense mutations were predicted to be pathogenic by in silico analysis and modeling. Clinical features of the three newly identified patients and those previously reported are reviewed; intellectual disability is moderate to severe, and malformations are variable including renal and heart defects, cleft palate, microcephaly, and corpus callosum dysgenesis. Facial features are variable and include tall forehead, short upslanting palpebral fissures +/- deep set eyes, and a long nose with overhanging columella. These subtle facial features render the diagnosis difficult to make in isolation with certainty. Our results expand the mutational and clinical spectrum of this rare disease, confirm that THOC6 is an intellectual disability causing gene, while providing insight into the importance of the THO complex in neurodevelopment. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  2. c.376G>A mutation in WFS1 gene causes Wolfram syndrome without deafness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Safarpour Lima, Behnam; Ghaedi, Hamid; Daftarian, Narsis; Ahmadieh, Hamid; Jamshidi, Javad; Khorrami, Mehdi; Noroozi, Rezvan; Sohrabifar, Nasim; Assarzadegan, Farhad; Hesami, Omid; Taghavi, Shaghayegh; Ahmadifard, Azadeh; Atakhorrami, Minoo; Rahimi-Aliabadi, Simin; Shahmohammadibeni, Neda; Alehabib, Elham; Andarva, Monavvar; Darvish, Hossein; Emamalizadeh, Babak

    2016-02-01

    Wolfram syndrome is one of the rare autosomal recessive, progressive, neurodegenerative disorders, characterized by diabetes mellitus and optic atrophy. Several other features are observed in patients including deafness, ataxia, and peripheral neuropathy. A gene called WFS1 is identified on chromosome 4p, responsible for Wolfram syndrome. We investigated a family consisted of parents and 8 children, which 5 of them have been diagnosed for Wolfram syndrome. WFS1 gene in all family members was sequenced for causative mutations. A mutation (c.376G>A, p.A126T) was found in all affected members in homozygous state and in both parents in heterozygous state. The bioinformatics analysis showed the deleterious effects of this nucleotide change on the structure and function of the protein product. As all of the patients in the family showed the homozygote mutation, and parents were both heterozygote, this mutation is probably the cause of the disease. We identified this mutation in homozygous state for the first time as Wolfram syndrome causation. We also showed that this mutation probably doesn't cause deafness in affected individuals. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  3. Retrospective analysis of cohort database: Phenotypic variability in a large dataset of patients confirmed to have homozygous familial hypercholesterolemia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Frederick J. Raal

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available These data describe the phenotypic variability in a large cohort of patients confirmed to have homozygous familial hypercholesterolemia. Herein, we describe the observed relationship of treated low-density lipoprotein cholesterol with age. We also overlay the low-density lipoprotein receptor gene (LDLR functional status with these phenotypic data. A full description of these data is available in our recent study published in Atherosclerosis, “Phenotype Diversity Among Patients With Homozygous Familial Hypercholesterolemia: A Cohort Study” (Raal et al., 2016 [1].

  4. Generation of a Nrf2 homozygous knockout human embryonic stem cell line using CRISPR/Cas9

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    So-Jung Kim

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Nuclear factor erythroid 2-related factor 2 (NFE2L2 or Nrf2 is a well-known transcription factor that regulates the expression of a large number of anti-oxidant genes in mammalian cells (J.H. Kim et al., 2014. Here, we generated a homozygous Nrf2 knockout human embryonic stem cell (hESC line, H9Nrf2KO-A13, using the CRISPR/Cas9 genome editing method. The Nrf2 homozygous knockout H9 cell line maintains pluripotency, differentiation potential into three germ layers, and a normal karyotype.

  5. Wolfram syndrome: new mutations, different phenotype.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Concetta Aloi

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Wolfram Syndrome (WS is an autosomal recessive neurodegenerative disorder characterized by Diabetes Insipidus, Diabetes Mellitus, Optic Atrophy, and Deafness identified by the acronym "DIDMOAD". The WS gene, WFS1, encodes a transmembrane protein called Wolframin, which recent evidence suggests may serve as a novel endoplasmic reticulum calcium channel in pancreatic β-cells and neurons. WS is a rare disease, with an estimated prevalence of 1/550.000 children, with a carrier frequency of 1/354. The aim of our study was to determine the genotype of WS patients in order to establish a genotype/phenotype correlation. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We clinically evaluated 9 young patients from 9 unrelated families (6 males, 3 females. Basic criteria for WS clinical diagnosis were coexistence of insulin-treated diabetes mellitus and optic atrophy occurring before 15 years of age. Genetic analysis for WFS1 was performed by direct sequencing. Molecular sequencing revealed 5 heterozygous compound and 3 homozygous mutations. All of them were located in exon 8, except one in exon 4. In one proband only an heterozygous mutation (A684V was found. Two new variants c.2663 C>A and c.1381 A>C were detected. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Our study increases the spectrum of WFS1 mutations with two novel variants. The male patient carrying the compound mutation [c.1060_1062delTTC]+[c.2663 C>A] showed the most severe phenotype: diabetes mellitus, optic atrophy (visual acuity 5/10, deafness with deep auditory bilaterally 8000 Hz, diabetes insipidus associated to reduced volume of posterior pituitary and pons. He died in bed at the age of 13 years. The other patient carrying the compound mutation [c.409_424dup16]+[c.1381 A>C] showed a less severe phenotype (DM, OA.

  6. Distinct effects of the recurrent Mlh1G67R mutation on MMR functions, cancer, and meiosis

    OpenAIRE

    Avdievich, Elena; Reiss, Cora; Scherer, Stefan J.; Zhang, Yongwei; Maier, Sandra M.; Jin, Bo; Hou, Harry; Rosenwald, Andreas; Riedmiller, Hubertus; Kucherlapati, Raju; Cohen, Paula E.; Edelmann, Winfried; Kneitz, Burkhard

    2008-01-01

    Mutations in the human DNA mismatch repair (MMR) gene MLH1 are associated with hereditary nonpolyposis colorectal cancer (Lynch syndrome, HNPCC) and a significant proportion of sporadic colorectal cancer. The inactivation of MLH1 results in the accumulation of somatic mutations in the genome of tumor cells and resistance to the genotoxic effects of a variety of DNA damaging agents. To study the effect of MLH1 missense mutations on cancer susceptibility, we generated a mouse line carrying the ...

  7. Cortical atrophy and hypofibrinogenemia due to FGG and TBCD mutations in a single family: a case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stephen, Joshi; Nampoothiri, Sheela; Vinayan, K P; Yesodharan, Dhanya; Remesh, Preetha; Gahl, William A; Malicdan, May Christine V

    2018-05-16

    Blended phenotypes or co-occurrence of independent phenotypically distinct conditions are extremely rare and are due to coincidence of multiple pathogenic mutations, especially due to consanguinity. Hereditary fibrinogen deficiencies result from mutations in the genes FGA, FGB, and FGG, encoding the three different polypeptide chains that comprise fibrinogen. Neurodevelopmental abnormalities have not been associated with fibrinogen deficiencies. In this study, we report an unusual patient with a combination of two independently inherited genetic conditions; fibrinogen deficiency and early onset cortical atrophy. The study describes a male child from consanguineous family presented with hypofibrinogenemia, diffuse cortical atrophy, microcephaly, hypertonia and axonal motor neuropathy. Through a combination of homozygosity mapping and exome sequencing, we identified bi-allelic pathogenic mutations in two genes: a homozygous novel truncating mutation in FGG (c.554del; p.Lys185Argfs*14) and a homozygous missense mutation in TBCD (c.1423G > A;p.Ala475Thr). Loss of function mutations in FGG have been associated with fibrinogen deficiency, while the c.1423G > A mutation in TBCD causes a novel syndrome of neurodegeneration and early onset encephalopathy. Our study highlights the importance of homozygosity mapping and exome sequencing in molecular prenatal diagnosis, especially when multiple gene mutations are responsible for the phenotype.

  8. A Novel Mouse Model of a Patient Mucolipidosis II Mutation Recapitulates Disease Pathology*

    OpenAIRE

    Paton, Leigh; Bitoun, Emmanuelle; Kenyon, Janet; Priestman, David A.; Oliver, Peter L.; Edwards, Benjamin; Platt, Frances M.; Davies, Kay E.

    2014-01-01

    Mucolipidosis II (MLII) is a lysosomal storage disorder caused by loss of N-acetylglucosamine-1-phosphotransferase, which tags lysosomal enzymes with a mannose 6-phosphate marker for transport to the lysosome. In MLII, the loss of this marker leads to deficiency of multiple enzymes and non-enzymatic proteins in the lysosome, leading to the storage of multiple substrates. Here we present a novel mouse model of MLII homozygous for a patient mutation in the GNPTAB gene. Whereas the current gene ...

  9. New MCM8 mutation associated with premature ovarian insufficiency and chromosomal instability in a highly consanguineous Tunisian family.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bouali, Nouha; Francou, Bruno; Bouligand, Jérôme; Imanci, Dilek; Dimassi, Sarra; Tosca, Lucie; Zaouali, Monia; Mougou, Soumaya; Young, Jacques; Saad, Ali; Guiochon-Mantel, Anne

    2017-10-01

    To identify the gene(s) involved in the etiology of premature ovarian insufficiency in a highly consanguineous Tunisian family. Genetic analysis of a large consanguineous family with several affected siblings. University hospital-based cytogenetics and molecular genetics laboratories. A highly consanguineous Tunisian family with several affected siblings born to healthy second-degree cousins. None. Targeted exome sequencing was performed by next-generation sequencing for affected family members. Mutations were validated by Sanger sequencing. Functional experiments were performed to explore the deleterious effects of the identified mutation. DNA damage was induced by increasing mitomycin C (MMC) concentrations on cultured peripheral lymphocytes. Analysis of the next-generation sequencing data revealed a new homozygous missense mutation in the minichromosome maintenance 8 gene (MCM8).This homozygous mutation (c. 482A>C; p.His161Pro) was predicted to be deleterious and segregated with the disease in the family. MCM8 participates in homologous recombination during meiosis and DNA double-stranded break repair by dimerizing with MCM9. Mcm8 knock out results in an early block in follicle development and small gonads. Given this, we tested the chromosomal breakage repair capacity of homozygous and heterozygous MCM8 p.His161Pro mutation on cultured peripheral lymphocytes exposed to increasing MMC concentrations. We found that chromosomal breakage after MMC exposure was significantly higher in cells from homozygously affected individuals than in those from a healthy control. Our findings provide additional support to the view that MCM8 mutations are involved in the primary ovarian insufficiency phenotype. Copyright © 2017 American Society for Reproductive Medicine. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Conditional inactivation of Brca1 in the mouse ovarian surface epithelium results in an increase in preneoplastic changes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Clark-Knowles, Katherine V.; Garson, Kenneth; Jonkers, Jos; Vanderhyden, Barbara C.

    2007-01-01

    Epithelial ovarian cancer (EOC) is thought to arise from the ovarian surface epithelium (OSE); however, the molecular events underlying this transformation are poorly understood. Germline mutations in the BRCA1 tumor suppressor gene result in a significantly increased risk of developing EOC and a large proportion of sporadic EOCs display some sort of BRCA1 dysfunction. Using mice with conditional expression of Brca1, we inactivated Brca1 in the murine OSE and demonstrate that this inactivation results in the development of preneoplastic changes, such as hyperplasia, epithelial invaginations, and inclusion cysts, which arise earlier and are more numerous than in control ovaries. These changes resemble the premalignant lesions that have been reported in human prophylactic oophorectomy specimens from women with BRCA1 germline mutation. We also report that inactivation of Brca1 in primary cultures of murine OSE cells leads to a suppression of proliferation due to increased apoptosis that can be rescued by concomitant inactivation of p53. These observations, along with our finding that these cells display an increased sensitivity to the DNA-damaging agent cisplatin, indicate that loss of function of Brca1 in OSE cells impacts both cellular growth control and DNA-damage repair which results in altered cell behavior manifested as morphological changes in vivo that arise earlier and are more numerous than what can be attributed to ageing

  11. Mutation Analysis of Consanguineous Moroccan Patients with Parkinson’s Disease Combining Microarray and Gene Panel

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ahmed Bouhouche

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available During the last two decades, 15 different genes have been reported to be responsible for the monogenic form of Parkinson’s disease (PD, representing a worldwide frequency of 5–10%. Among them, 10 genes have been associated with autosomal recessive PD, with PRKN and PINK1 being the most frequent. In a cohort of 145 unrelated Moroccan PD patients enrolled since 2013, 19 patients were born from a consanguineous marriage, of which 15 were isolated cases and 4 familial. One patient was homozygous for the common LRRK2 G2019S mutation and the 18 others who did not carry this mutation were screened for exon rearrangements in the PRKN gene using Affymetrix Cytoscan HD microarray. Two patients were determined homozygous for PRKN exon-deletions, while another patient presented with compound heterozygous inheritance (3/18, 17%. Two other patients showed a region of homozygosity covering the 1p36.12 locus and were sequenced for the candidate PINK1 gene, which revealed two homozygous point mutations: the known Q456X mutation in exon 7 and a novel L539F variation in exon 8. The 13 remaining patients were subjected to next-generation sequencing (NGS that targeted a panel of 22 PD-causing genes and overlapping phenotypes. NGS data showed that two unrelated consanguineous patients with juvenile-onset PD (12 and 13 years carried the same homozygous stop mutation W258X in the ATP13A2 gene, possibly resulting from a founder effect; and one patient with late onset (76 years carried a novel heterozygous frameshift mutation in SYNJ1. Clinical analysis showed that patients with the ATP13A2 mutation developed juvenile-onset PD with a severe phenotype, whereas patients having either PRKN or PINK1 mutations displayed early-onset PD with a relatively mild phenotype. By identifying pathogenic mutations in 45% (8/18 of our consanguineous Moroccan PD series, we demonstrate that the combination of chromosomal microarray analysis and NGS is a powerful approach to

  12. Homozygous loss of function BRCA1 variant causing a Fanconi-anemia-like phenotype, a clinical report and review of previous patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freire, Bruna L; Homma, Thais K; Funari, Mariana F A; Lerario, Antônio M; Leal, Aline M; Velloso, Elvira D R P; Malaquias, Alexsandra C; Jorge, Alexander A L

    2018-03-01

    Fanconi Anemia (FA) is a rare and heterogeneous genetic syndrome. It is associated with short stature, bone marrow failure, high predisposition to cancer, microcephaly and congenital malformation. Many genes have been associated with FA. Previously, two adult patients with biallelic pathogenic variant in Breast Cancer 1 gene (BRCA1) had been identified in Fanconi Anemia-like condition. The proband was a 2.5 year-old girl with severe short stature, microcephaly, neurodevelopmental delay, congenital heart disease and dysmorphic features. Her parents were third degree cousins. Routine screening tests for short stature was normal. We conducted whole exome sequencing (WES) of the proband and used an analysis pipeline to identify rare nonsynonymous genetic variants that cause short stature. We identified a homozygous loss-of-function BRCA1 mutation (c.2709T > A; p. Cys903*), which promotes the loss of critical domains of the protein. Cytogenetic study with DEB showed an increased chromosomal breakage. We screened heterozygous parents of the index case for cancer and we detected, in her mother, a metastatic adenocarcinoma in an axillar lymph node with probable primary site in the breast. It is possible to consolidate the FA-like phenotype associated with biallelic loss-of-function BRCA1, characterized by microcephaly, short stature, developmental delay, dysmorphic face features and cancer predisposition. In our case, the WES allowed to establish the genetic cause of short stature in the context of a chromosome instability syndrome. An identification of BRCA1 mutations in our patient allowed precise genetic counseling and also triggered cancer screening for the patient and her family members. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  13. Arrestin gene mutations in autosomal recessive retinitis pigmentosa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakazawa, M; Wada, Y; Tamai, M

    1998-04-01

    To assess the clinical and molecular genetic studies of patients with autosomal recessive retinitis pigmentosa associated with a mutation in the arrestin gene. Results of molecular genetic screening and case reports with DNA analysis and clinical features. University medical center. One hundred twenty anamnestically unrelated patients with autosomal recessive retinitis pigmentosa. DNA analysis was performed by single strand conformation polymorphism followed by nucleotide sequencing to search for a mutation in exon 11 of the arrestin gene. Clinical features were characterized by visual acuity slitlamp biomicroscopy, fundus examinations, fluorescein angiography, kinetic visual field testing, and electroretinography. We identified 3 unrelated patients with retinitis pigmentosa associated with a homozygous 1-base-pair deletion mutation in codon 309 of the arrestin gene designated as 1147delA. All 3 patients showed pigmentary retinal degeneration in the midperipheral area with or without macular involvement. Patient 1 had a sibling with Oguchi disease associated with the same mutation. Patient 2 demonstrated pigmentary retinal degeneration associated with a golden-yellow reflex in the peripheral fundus. Patients 1 and 3 showed features of retinitis pigmentosa without the golden-yellow fundus reflex. Although the arrestin 1147delA has been known as a frequent cause of Oguchi disease, this mutation also may be related to the pathogenesis of autosomal recessive retinitis pigmentosa. This phenomenon may provide evidence of variable expressivity of the mutation in the arrestin gene.

  14. Novel autosomal dominant TNNT1 mutation causing nemaline myopathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Konersman, Chamindra G; Freyermuth, Fernande; Winder, Thomas L; Lawlor, Michael W; Lagier-Tourenne, Clotilde; Patel, Shailendra B

    2017-11-01

    Nemaline myopathy (NEM) is one of the three major forms of congenital myopathy and is characterized by diffuse muscle weakness, hypotonia, respiratory insufficiency, and the presence of nemaline rod structures on muscle biopsy. Mutations in troponin T1 (TNNT1) is 1 of 10 genes known to cause NEM. To date, only homozygous nonsense mutations or compound heterozygous truncating or internal deletion mutations in TNNT1 gene have been identified in NEM. This extended family is of historical importance as some members were reported in the 1960s as initial evidence that NEM is a hereditary disorder. Proband and extended family underwent Sanger sequencing for TNNT1. We performed RT-PCR and immunoblot on muscle to assess TNNT1 RNA expression and protein levels in proband and father. We report a novel heterozygous missense mutation of TNNT1 c.311A>T (p.E104V) that segregated in an autosomal dominant fashion in a large family residing in the United States. Extensive sequencing of the other known genes for NEM failed to identify any other mutant alleles. Muscle biopsies revealed a characteristic pattern of nemaline rods and severe myofiber hypotrophy that was almost entirely restricted to the type 1 fiber population. This novel mutation alters a residue that is highly conserved among vertebrates. This report highlights not only a family with autosomal dominant inheritance of NEM, but that this novel mutation likely acts via a dominant negative mechanism. © 2017 The Authors. Molecular Genetics & Genomic Medicine published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  15. Silent and symptomatic primary carnitine deficiency within the same family due to identical mutations in the organic cation/carnitine transporter OCTN2

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Spiekerkoetter, U.; Huener, G.; Baykal, T.; Demirkol, M.; Duran, M.; Wanders, R.; Nezu, J.; Mayatepek, E.

    2003-01-01

    A family of Turkish origin with primary systemic carnitine deficiency in the father and his two sons is described. In all three individuals, the same homozygous mutation in the OCTN2 gene (R471H) was present and carnitine uptake in fibroblasts was deficient. Whereas one boy became symptomatic with a

  16. Brown-Vialetto-Van Laere syndrome: two siblings with a new mutation and dramatic therapeutic effect of high-dose riboflavin

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Horoz, Ozden O.; Mungan, Neslihan O.; Yildizdas, Dincer; Hergüner, Özlem; Ceylaner, Serdar; Kör, Deniz; Waterham, Hans; Coskun, Turgay

    2016-01-01

    Brown-Vialetto-Van Laere syndrome (BVVLS) is a rare and severe neurometabolic disease. We present two siblings with BVVLS with a novel homozygous mutation in SLC52A3 (formerly C20orf54) gene. The first sibling was admitted with respiratory insufficiency and required mechanical ventilation. After

  17. A novel mutation in the lysyl hydroxylase 1 gene causes decreased lysyl hydroxylase activity in an ehlers-danlos VIA patient

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Walker, L.C.; Overstreet, M.A.; Siddiqui, A.; Paepe, A. de; Ceylaner, G.; Malfait, F.; Symoens, S.; Atsawasuwan, P.; Yamauchi, M.; Ceylaner, S.; Bank, R.A.; Yeowell, H.N.

    2005-01-01

    The clinical diagnosis of a patient with the phenotype of Ehlers-Danlos syndrome type VI was confirmed biochemically by the severely diminished level of lysyl hydroxylase (LH) activity in the patient's skin fibroblasts. A novel homozygous mutation, a single base change of T1360 → G in exon 13 of the

  18. A postnatal role for embryonic myosin revealed by MYH3 mutations that alter TGFbeta signaling and cause autosomal dominant spondylocarpotarsal synostosis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zieba, J.; Zhang, W.; Chong, J.X.; Forlenza, K.N.; Martin, J.H.; Heard, K.; Grange, D.K.; Butler, M.G.; Kleefstra, T.; Lachman, R.S.; Nickerson, D.; Regnier, M.; Cohn, D.H.; Bamshad, M.; Krakow, D.

    2017-01-01

    Spondylocarpotarsal synostosis (SCT) is a skeletal disorder characterized by progressive vertebral, carpal and tarsal fusions, and mild short stature. The majority of affected individuals have an autosomal recessive form of SCT and are homozygous or compound heterozygous for nonsense mutations in

  19. Juvenil hæmokromatose forårsaget af homozygot Gly320Val-mutation på hæmojuvelingenet

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Berg, Line Brunemark; Milman, Nils Thorm; Friis-Hansen, Lennart

    2013-01-01

    Juvenile haemochromatosis caused by a homozygous Gly320Val mutation in the haemojuvelin (HJV) gene was diagnosed in a 12-year-old Danish girl and her 10-year-old sister. Both appeared healthy without clinical or biochemical signs of organ damage. They had iron overload (plasma transferrin saturat...

  20. Growth hormone receptor gene mutations in two Italian patients with Laron Syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fassone, L; Corneli, G; Bellone, S; Camacho-Hübner, C; Aimaretti, G; Cappa, M; Ubertini, G; Bona, G

    2007-05-01

    Laron Syndrome (LS) represents a condition characterized by GH insensitivity caused by molecular defects in the GH receptor (GHR) gene or in the post-receptor signalling pathway. We report the molecular characterization of two unrelated Italian girls from Sicily diagnosed with LS. The DNA sequencing of the GHR gene revealed the presence of different nonsense mutations, occurring in the same background haplotype. The molecular defects occurred in the extracellular domain of the GHR leading to a premature termination signal and to a truncated non-functional receptor. In one patient, a homozygous G to T transversion, in exon 6, led to the mutation GAA to TAA at codon 180 (E180X), while in the second patient a homozygous C to T transition in exon 7 was detected, causing the CGA to TAA substitution at codon 217 (R217X). Both probands presented the polymorphisms Gly168Gly and Ile544Leu in a homozygous state in exons 6 and 10, respectively. The E180X represents a novel defect of the GHR gene, while the R217X mutation has been previously reported in several patients from different ethnic backgrounds but all from countries located in the Mediterranean and Middle Eastern region.

  1. Expanding the clinical and molecular spectrum of PRMT7 mutations: 3 additional patients and review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agolini, E; Dentici, M L; Bellacchio, E; Alesi, V; Radio, F C; Torella, A; Musacchia, F; Tartaglia, M; Dallapiccola, B; Nigro, V; Digilio, M C; Novelli, A

    2018-03-01

    Protein arginine methyltransferase 7 (PRMT7) is a member of a family of enzymes that catalyze the transfer of methyl groups from S-adenosyl-l-methionine to nitrogen atoms on arginine residues. Arginine methylation is involved in multiple biological processes, such as signal transduction, mRNA splicing, transcriptional control, DNA repair, and protein translocation. Currently, 7 patients have been described harboring compound heterozygous or homozygous variants in the PRMT7 gene, causing a novel intellectual disability syndrome, known as SBIDDS syndrome (Short Stature, Brachydactyly, Intellectual Developmental Disability, and Seizures). We report on 3 additional patients from 2 consanguineous families with severe/moderate intellectual disability, short stature, brachydactyly and dysmorphisms. Exome sequencing revealed 2 novel homozygous mutations in PRMT7. Our findings expand the clinical and molecular spectrum of homozygous PRMT7 mutations, associated to the SBIDDS syndrome, showing a possible correlation between the type of mutation and the severity of the phenotype. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  2. Identification of a novel mutation in the human growth hormone receptor gene (GHR) in a patient with Laron syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gennero, Isabelle; Edouard, Thomas; Rashad, Mona; Bieth, Eric; Conte-Aurio, Françoise; Marin, Françoise; Tauber, Maithé; Salles, Jean Pierre; El Kholy, Mohamed

    2007-07-01

    Deletions and mutations in the growth hormone receptor (GHR) gene are the underlying etiology of Laron syndrome (LS) or growth hormone (GH) insensitivity syndrome (GHIS), an autosomal recessive disease. Most patients are distributed in or originate from Mediterranean and Middle-Eastern countries. Sixty mutations have been described so far. We report a novel mutation in the GHR gene in a patient with LS. Genomic DNA sequencing of exon 5 revealed a TT insertion at nucleotide 422 after codon 122. The insertion resulted in a frameshift introducing a premature termination codon that led to a truncated receptor. We present clinical, biochemical and molecular evidence of LS as the result of this homozygous insertion.

  3. A Turkish family with Sjögren-Larsson syndrome caused by a novel ALDH3A2 mutation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Faruk Incecik

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Sjögren-Larsson syndrome (SLS is an inherited neurocutaneous disorder caused by mutations in the aldehyde dehydrogenase family 3 member A2 (ALDH3A2 gene that encodes fatty aldehyde dehydrogenase. Affected patients display ichthyosis, mental retardation, and spastic diplegia. More than 70 mutations in ALDH3A2 have been discovered in SLS patients. We diagnosed two brothers age of 12 and 20 years with characteristic features of this rare syndrome. Magnetic resonance imaging showed demyelinating disease in both of them. We described a novel homozygous, c. 835 T > A (p.Y279N mutation in exon 6 in two patients.

  4. Novel Founder Mutation in FANCA Gene (c.3446_3449dupCCCT) Among Romani Patients from the Balkan Region

    OpenAIRE

    Marija Dimishkovska; Vjosa Mulliqi Kotori; Zoran Gucev; Svetlana Kocheva; Momir Polenakovic; Dijana Plaseska-Karanfilska

    2018-01-01

    Background: Fanconi anemia is a rare autosomal recessive or X-linked disorder characterised by clinical and genetic heterogeneity. Most fanconi anemia patients harbour homozygous or double heterozygous mutations in the FANCA (60-65%), FANCC (10-15%), FANCG (~10%) or FANCD2 (3-6%) genes. We have already reported the FANCA variant c.190–256_283+1680del2040dupC as a founder mutation among Macedonian fanconi anemia patients of Gypsy-like ethnic origin. Here, we present a novel FANCA mutation in t...

  5. Analysis of HLA-A antigens and C282Y and H63D mutations of the HFE gene in Brazilian patients with hemochromatosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bittencourt P.L.

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available The hemochromatosis gene, HFE, is located on chromosome 6 in close proximity to the HLA-A locus. Most Caucasian patients with hereditary hemochromatosis (HH are homozygous for HLA-A3 and for the C282Y mutation of the HFE gene, while a minority are compound heterozygotes for C282Y and H63D. The prevalence of these mutations in non-Caucasian patients with HH is lower than expected. The objective of the present study was to evaluate the frequencies of HLA-A antigens and the C282Y and H63D mutations of the HFE gene in Brazilian patients with HH and to compare clinical and laboratory profiles of C282Y-positive and -negative patients with HH. The frequencies of HLA-A and C282Y and H63D mutations were determined by PCR-based methods in 15 male patients (median age 44 (20-72 years with HH. Eight patients (53% were homozygous and one (7% was heterozygous for the C282Y mutation. None had compound heterozygosity for C282Y and H63D mutations. All but three C282Y homozygotes were positive for HLA-A3 and three other patients without C282Y were shown to be either heterozygous (N = 2 or homozygous (N = 1 for HLA-A3. Patients homozygous for the C282Y mutation had higher ferritin levels and lower age at onset, but the difference was not significant. The presence of C282Y homozygosity in roughly half of the Brazilian patients with HH, together with the findings of HLA-A homozygosity in C282Y-negative subjects, suggest that other mutations in the HFE gene or in other genes involved in iron homeostasis might also be linked to HH in Brazil.

  6. Prognostic value of X-chromosome inactivation in symptomatic female carriers of dystrophinopathy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juan-Mateu Jonàs

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Between 8% and 22% of female carriers of DMD mutations exhibit clinical symptoms of variable severity. Development of symptoms in DMD mutation carriers without chromosomal rearrangements has been attributed to skewed X-chromosome inactivation (XCI favouring predominant expression of the DMD mutant allele. However the prognostic use of XCI analysis is controversial. We aimed to evaluate the correlation between X-chromosome inactivation and development of clinical symptoms in a series of symptomatic female carriers of dystrophinopathy. Methods We reviewed the clinical, pathological and genetic features of twenty-four symptomatic carriers covering a wide spectrum of clinical phenotypes. DMD gene analysis was performed using MLPA and whole gene sequencing in blood DNA and muscle cDNA. Blood and muscle DNA was used for X-chromosome inactivation (XCI analysis thought the AR methylation assay in symptomatic carriers and their female relatives, asymptomatic carriers as well as non-carrier females. Results Symptomatic carriers exhibited 49.2% more skewed XCI profiles than asymptomatic carriers. The extent of XCI skewing in blood tended to increase in line with the severity of muscle symptoms. Skewed XCI patterns were found in at least one first-degree female relative in 78.6% of symptomatic carrier families. No mutations altering XCI in the XIST gene promoter were found. Conclusions Skewed XCI is in many cases familial inherited. The extent of XCI skewing is related to phenotype severity. However, the assessment of XCI by means of the AR methylation assay has a poor prognostic value, probably because the methylation status of the AR gene in muscle may not reflect in all cases the methylation status of the DMD gene.

  7. Penetrance of eye defects in mice heterozygous for mutation of Gli3 is enhanced by heterozygous mutation of Pax6

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Price David J

    2006-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Knowledge of the consequences of heterozygous mutations of developmentally important genes is important for understanding human genetic disorders. The Gli3 gene encodes a zinc finger transcription factor and homozygous loss-of-function mutations of Gli3 are lethal. Humans heterozygous for mutations in this gene suffer Greig cephalopolysyndactyly or Pallister-Hall syndromes, in which limb defects are prominent, and mice heterozygous for similar mutations have extra digits. Here we examined whether eye development, which is abnormal in mice lacking functional Gli3, is defective in Gli3+/- mice. Results We showed that Gli3 is expressed in the developing eye but that Gli3+/- mice have only very subtle eye defects. We then generated mice compound heterozygous for mutations in both Gli3 and Pax6, which encodes another developmentally important transcription factor known to be crucial for eye development. Pax6+/-; Gli3+/- eyes were compared to the eyes of wild-type, Pax6+/- or Gli3+/- siblings. They exhibited a range of abnormalities of the retina, iris, lens and cornea that was more extensive than in single Gli3+/- or Pax6+/- mutants or than would be predicted by addition of their phenotypes. Conclusion These findings indicate that heterozygous mutations of Gli3 can impact on eye development. The importance of a normal Gli3 gene dosage becomes greater in the absence of a normal Pax6 gene dosage, suggesting that the two genes co-operate during eye morphogenesis.

  8. The Charles River "hairless" rat mutation is distinct from the hairless mouse alleles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Panteleyev, A A; Christiano, A M

    2001-02-01

    The Charles River (CR) "hairless" rat is one of the autosomal recessive hypotrichotic animal models actively studied in pharmacologic and dermatologic research. Despite its widespread use, the molecular basis of this monogenic mutation remains unknown, and the skin histologic features of this phenotype have never been described. However, the designation "hairless" has been used as an extension of the hairless mouse (hr) nomenclature on the basis of the clinical absence of hairs in both phenotypes. We present a description of the histopathologic changes in heterozygous and homozygous CR hairless rat mutants during the first month of life. The postnatal homozygous rat skin was characterized by abnormal keratinization of the hair shaft and formation of a thick and dense layer of corneocytes in the lower portion of the epidermal stratum corneum. This layer prevented the improperly keratinized hair shaft from penetrating the skin surface. Starting from the latest stages of hair follicle (HF) development, obvious signs of HF degeneration were observed in homozygous skin. This process was extremely rapid, and by day 12, mainly atrophic HFs with abnormal or broken hairs were present in the skin. Therefore, the mutation in the CR rat abrogates cell proliferation in the hair matrix and affects keratinocyte differentiation in the HF and interfollicular epidermis, a phenotype that is completely distinct from hr/hr. To test whether the CR rat harbored a mutation in the hr gene, we analyzed the coding region of this gene and consensus intron splice site sequences in mutant rats and found no mutation, further supporting phenotypic evidence that the hairless phenotype in CR rats is not allelic with hairless. Finally, using intragenic polymorphisms, we were able to exclude homozygosity at the hairless locus by use of genotypic analysis. Thus, morphologic analysis of successive stages of phenotype development in the CR hairless rat, together with definitive molecular studies

  9. High Pressure Inactivation of HAV within Mussels

    Science.gov (United States)

    The potential of hepatitis A virus (HAV) to be inactivated within Mediterranean mussels (Mytilus galloprovincialis) and blue mussels (Mytilus edulis) by high pressure processing was evaluated. HAV was bioaccumulated within mussels to approximately 6-log10 PFU by exposure of mussels to HAV-contamina...

  10. Inactivation of prion infectivity by ionizing rays

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gominet, M. [Ionisos, ZI les Chatinieres, F01120 Dagneux (France); Vadrot, C.; Austruy, G. [Paris V University, Central Pharmacy of Hospitals, 4 avenue de l' Observatoire, F-75006, Paris (France); Darbord, J.C. [Paris V University, Central Pharmacy of Hospitals, 4 avenue de l' Observatoire, F-75006, Paris (France)], E-mail: darbord@pharmacie.univ-paris5.fr

    2007-11-15

    Inactivation of prion deposits on medical devices or prion contamination in pharmaceutical raw materials is considered as impossible by using gamma irradiation. Early, the guideline WHO/CDS/CSR/APH/2000 has described irradiation as an ineffective process. But, in 2003, S. Miekka et al. noted radiation inactivation of prions in a particular application to purify human albumin, shown by the physical denaturation of the infectious protein (PrP). The aim of our study was to determine the inactivation of prions with a scrapie model (strain C506M3) by irradiating standardised preparations. Results: Gamma irradiation was partially effective, showing a 4-5 log reduction on exposure to 50 kGy. A characteristic effect-dose curve was not observed (25, 50 and 100 kGy), only an increase in the incubation period of the murine disease (229 days with 25 kGy to 290 days with 100 kGy) compared with 170 days without irradiation. Since the inactivation was not a total one, the observed effect is significant. It is proposed that further work be undertaken with the model to investigate the application of gamma radiation known levels of prion contamination.

  11. Inactivation of prion infectivity by ionizing rays

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gominet, M.; Vadrot, C.; Austruy, G.; Darbord, J.C.

    2007-01-01

    Inactivation of prion deposits on medical devices or prion contamination in pharmaceutical raw materials is considered as impossible by using gamma irradiation. Early, the guideline WHO/CDS/CSR/APH/2000 has described irradiation as an ineffective process. But, in 2003, S. Miekka et al. noted radiation inactivation of prions in a particular application to purify human albumin, shown by the physical denaturation of the infectious protein (PrP). The aim of our study was to determine the inactivation of prions with a scrapie model (strain C506M3) by irradiating standardised preparations. Results: Gamma irradiation was partially effective, showing a 4-5 log reduction on exposure to 50 kGy. A characteristic effect-dose curve was not observed (25, 50 and 100 kGy), only an increase in the incubation period of the murine disease (229 days with 25 kGy to 290 days with 100 kGy) compared with 170 days without irradiation. Since the inactivation was not a total one, the observed effect is significant. It is proposed that further work be undertaken with the model to investigate the application of gamma radiation known levels of prion contamination

  12. Pulsed electric field inactivation in a microreactor

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Fox, M.B.

    2006-01-01

    Pulsed electric fields (PEF) is a novel, non-thermal pasteurization method which uses short, high electric field pulses to inactivate microorganisms. The advantage of a pasteurization method like PEF compared to regular heat pasteurization is that the taste, flavour, texture and nutritional value

  13. Epigenetic inactivation of CHFR in human tumors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toyota, Minoru; Sasaki, Yasushi; Satoh, Ayumi; Ogi, Kazuhiro; Kikuchi, Takefumi; Suzuki, Hiromu; Mita, Hiroaki; Tanaka, Nobuyuki; Itoh, Fumio; Issa, Jean-Pierre J; Jair, Kam-Wing; Schuebel, Kornel E; Imai, Kohzoh; Tokino, Takashi

    2003-06-24

    Cell-cycle checkpoints controlling the orderly progression through mitosis are frequently disrupted in human cancers. One such checkpoint, entry into metaphase, is regulated by the CHFR gene encoding a protein possessing forkhead-associated and RING finger domains as well as ubiquitin-ligase activity. Although defects in this checkpoint have been described, the molecular basis and prevalence of CHFR inactivation in human tumors are still not fully understood. To address this question, we analyzed the pattern of CHFR expression in a number of human cancer cell lines and primary tumors. We found CpG methylation-dependent silencing of CHFR expression in 45% of cancer cell lines, 40% of primary colorectal cancers, 53% of colorectal adenomas, and 30% of primary head and neck cancers. Expression of CHFR was precisely correlated with both CpG methylation and deacetylation of histones H3 and H4 in the CpG-rich regulatory region. Moreover, CpG methylation and thus silencing of CHFR depended on the activities of two DNA methyltransferases, DNMT1 and DNMT3b, as their genetic inactivation restored CHFR expression. Finally, cells with CHFR methylation had an intrinsically high mitotic index when treated with microtubule inhibitor. This means that cells in which CHFR was epigenetically inactivated constitute loss-of-function alleles for mitotic checkpoint control. Taken together, these findings shed light on a pathway by which mitotic checkpoint is bypassed in cancer cells and suggest that inactivation of checkpoint genes is much more widespread than previously suspected.

  14. Molecular and biochemical characterization of a unique mutation in CCS, the human copper chaperone to superoxide dismutase

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Huppke, Peter; Brendel, Cornelia; Korenke, Georg Christoph

    2012-01-01

    chaperone mutations have been described to date. We describe a child from a consanguineous family who inherited homozygous mutations in the SLC33A1, encoding an acetyl CoA transporter, and in CCS, encoding the Cu chaperone for superoxide dismutase. The CCS mutation, p.Arg163Trp, predicts substitution...... of a highly conserved arginine residue at position 163, with tryptophan in domain II of CCS, which interacts directly with superoxide dismutase 1 (SOD1). Biochemical analyses of the patient's fibroblasts, mammalian cell transfections, immunoprecipitation assays, and Lys7Δ (CCS homolog) yeast complementation...... support the pathogenicity of the mutation. Expression of CCS was reduced and binding of CCS to SOD1 impaired. As a result, this mutation causes reduced SOD1 activity and may impair other mechanisms important for normal Cu homeostasis. CCS-Arg163Trp represents the primary example of a human mutation...

  15. Retrospective analysis of cohort database: Phenotypic variability in a large dataset of patients confirmed to have homozygous familial hypercholesterolemia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Raal, Frederick J.; Sjouke, Barbara; Hovingh, G. Kees; Isaac, Barton F.

    2016-01-01

    These data describe the phenotypic variability in a large cohort of patients confirmed to have homozygous familial hypercholesterolemia. Herein, we describe the observed relationship of treated low-density lipoprotein cholesterol with age. We also overlay the low-density lipoprotein receptor gene

  16. Association of Xmn I Polymorphism and Hemoglobin E Haplotypes on Postnatal Gamma Globin Gene Expression in Homozygous Hemoglobin E

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Supachai Ekwattanakit

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Background and Objectives. To explore the role of cis-regulatory sequences within the β globin gene cluster at chromosome 11 on human γ globin gene expression related to Hb E allele, we analyze baseline hematological data and Hb F values together with β globin haplotypes in homozygous Hb E. Patients and Methods. 80 individuals with molecularly confirmed homozygous Hb E were analyzed for the β globin haplotypes and Xmn I polymorphism using PCR-RFLPs. 74 individuals with complete laboratory data were further studied for association analyses. Results. Eight different β globin haplotypes were found linked to Hb E alleles; three major haplotypes were (a (III, (b (V, and (c (IV accounting for 94% of Hb E chromosomes. A new haplotype (Th-1 was identified and most likely converted from the major ones. The majority of individuals had Hb F < 5%; only 10.8% of homozygous Hb E had high Hb F (average 10.5%, range 5.8–14.3%. No association was found on a specific haplotype or Xmn I in these individuals with high Hb F, measured by alkaline denaturation. Conclusion. The cis-regulation of γ globin gene expression might not be apparent under a milder condition with lesser globin imbalance such as homozygous Hb E.

  17. Germline RAD51B truncating mutation in a family with cutaneous melanoma

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wadt, Karin A W; Aoude, Lauren G; Golmard, Lisa

    2015-01-01

    Known melanoma predisposition genes only account for around 40% of high-density melanoma families. Other rare mutations are likely to play a role in melanoma predisposition. RAD51B plays an important role in DNA repair through homologous recombination, and inactivation of RAD51B has been implicated...... in tumorigenesis. Thus RAD51B is a good candidate melanoma susceptibility gene, and previously, a germline splicing mutation in RAD51B has been identified in a family with early-onset breast cancer. In order to find genetic variants associated with melanoma predisposition, whole-exome sequencing was carried out...... on blood samples from a three-case cutaneous melanoma family. We identified a novel germline RAD51B nonsense mutation, and we demonstrate reduced expression of RAD51B in melanoma cells indicating inactivation of RAD51B. This is only the second report of a germline truncating RAD51B mutation. While...

  18. Genetic inactivation of Trpml3 does not lead to hearing and vestibular impairment in mice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Simone Jörs

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available TRPML3, a member of the transient receptor potential (TRP family, is an inwardly rectifying, non-selective Ca2+-permeable cation channel that is regulated by extracytosolic Na+ and H+ and can be activated by a variety of small molecules. The severe auditory and vestibular phenotype of the TRPML3(A419P varitint-waddler mutation made this protein particularly interesting for inner ear biology. To elucidate the physiological role of murine TRPML3, we conditionally inactivated Trpml3 in mice. Surprisingly, lack of functional TRPML3 did not lead to circling behavior, balance impairment or hearing loss.

  19. Blue cone monochromatism in a female due to skewed X-inactivation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Frederiksen, Anja Lisbeth; Duno, Morten; Welinder, Lotte G

    2012-01-01

    Blue cone monochromatism (BCM) is a rare cone dystrophy with recessive X-linked inheritance and therefore diagnosed in males whereas females are clinically unaffected. We present a female with clinically manifested BCM. The diagnosis was genetically verified with the identification of one single...... red-green OPN1LW/MW hybrid gene harboring a point mutation c.607C>G, p.Cys203Arg that associates with BCM and in addition a completely biased X-inactivation in DNA isolated from full blood and buccal mucosa. The present case illustrates that females may develop symptoms of recessive X-linked eye...

  20. Presence of atypical thrombopoietin receptor (MPL) mutations in triple-negative essential thrombocythemia patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cabagnols, Xénia; Favale, Fabrizia; Pasquier, Florence; Messaoudi, Kahia; Defour, Jean Philippe; Ianotto, Jean Christophe; Marzac, Christophe; Le Couédic, Jean Pierre; Droin, Nathalie; Chachoua, Ilyas; Favier, Remi; Diop, M'boyba Khadija; Ugo, Valérie; Casadevall, Nicole; Debili, Najet; Raslova, Hana; Bellanné-Chantelot, Christine; Constantinescu, Stefan N; Bluteau, Olivier; Plo, Isabelle; Vainchenker, William

    2016-01-21

    Mutations in signaling molecules of the cytokine receptor axis play a central role in myeloproliferative neoplasm (MPN) pathogenesis. Polycythemia vera is mainly related to JAK2 mutations, whereas a wider mutational spectrum is detected in essential thrombocythemia (ET) with mutations in JAK2, the thrombopoietin (TPO) receptor (MPL), and the calreticulin (CALR) genes. Here, we studied the mutational profile of 17 ET patients negative for JAK2V617F, MPLW515K/L, and CALR mutations, using whole-exome sequencing and next-generation sequencing (NGS) targeted on JAK2 and MPL. We found several signaling mutations including JAK2V617F at very low allele frequency, 1 homozygous SH2B3 mutation, 1 MPLS505N, 1 MPLW515R, and 2 MPLS204P mutations. In the remaining patients, 4 presented a clonal and 7 a polyclonal hematopoiesis, suggesting that certain triple-negative ETs are not MPNs. NGS on 26 additional triple-negative ETs detected only 1 MPLY591N mutation. Functional studies on MPLS204P and MPLY591N revealed that they are weak gain-of-function mutants increasing MPL signaling and conferring either TPO hypersensitivity or independence to expressing cells, but with a low efficiency. Further studies should be performed to precisely determine the frequency of MPLS204 and MPLY591 mutants in a bigger cohort of MPN. © 2016 by The American Society of Hematology.

  1. IDH1/IDH2 but Not TP53 Mutations Predict Prognosis in Bulgarian Glioblastoma Patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gergana Stancheva

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Mutations in genes encoding isocitrate dehydrogenase isoforms 1 (IDH1 and 2 (IDH2 have been associated with good prognosis for patients with brain neoplasias and have been commonly found together with mutated TP53 gene. To determine the prevalence of IDH1, IDH2, and TP53 mutations and their impact on overall survival 106 glioblastoma patients were analysed. IDH1 mutations were detected in 13 and IDH2 mutation in one patient. Two homozygous samples with R132H mutation in IDH1 gene and a novel aberration K129R in IDH2 gene were found. Sixty-four percent of IDH1/IDH2 mutated tumours harboured also a mutation in TP53 gene. Genetic aberrations in TP53 were present in 37 patients. Statistical analysis of the impact of the studied factors on the overall survival showed that the mutations in IDH1/IDH2, but not the ones in TP53, were associated with longer survival. Also, the impact of age on prognosis was confirmed. This is the first comprehensive study on glioblastomas in Bulgaria. Our results suggest that IDH1/IDH2 but not TP53 mutations together with other prognostic factors such as age might be applied in clinical practice for prediction of outcome in patients with glioblastomas.

  2. Cortical inactivation by cooling in small animals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ben eCoomber

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Reversible inactivation of the cortex by surface cooling is a powerful method for studying the function of a particular area. Implanted cooling cryoloops have been used to study the role of individual cortical areas in auditory processing of awake-behaving cats. Cryoloops have also been used in rodents for reversible inactivation of the cortex, but recently there has been a concern that the cryoloop may also cool non-cortical structures either directly or via the perfusion of blood, cooled as it passed close to the cooling loop. In this study we have confirmed that the loop can inactivate most of the auditory cortex without causing a significant reduction in temperature of the auditory thalamus or other sub-cortical structures. We placed a cryoloop on the surface of the guinea pig cortex, cooled it to 2°C and measured thermal gradients across the neocortical surface. We found that the temperature dropped to 20-24°C among cells within a radius of about 2.5mm away from the loop. This temperature drop was sufficient to reduce activity of most cortical cells and led to the inactivation of almost the entire auditory region. When the temperature of thalamus, midbrain, and middle ear were measured directly during cortical cooling, there was a small drop in temperature (about 4°C but this was not sufficient to directly reduce neural activity. In an effort to visualise the extent of neural inactivation we measured the uptake of thallium ions following an intravenous injection. This confirmed that there was a large reduction of activity across much of the ipsilateral cortex and only a small reduction in subcortical structures.

  3. Report of a newly indentified patient with mutations in BMP1 and underlying pathogenetic aspects

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Valencia, María; Caparrós-Martin, Jose A; Sirerol-Piquer, María Salomé

    2014-01-01

    Osteogenesis imperfecta is a genetic condition characterized by bone fragility and recurrent fractures, which in the large majority of patients are caused by defects in the production of type I collagen. Mutations in the gene encoding bone morphogenetic protein 1 (BMP1, also known as procollagen C......-endopeptidase) have been associated with osteogenesis imperfecta in two sib pairs. In this report, we describe an additional patient with osteogenesis imperfecta with normal bone density and a recurrent, homozygous c.34G>C mutation in BMP1. Western blot analysis of dermal fibroblasts from this patient showed...

  4. MRI at 3 Tesla detects no evidence for ischemic brain damage in intensively treated patients with homozygous familial hypercholesterolemia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schmitz, Stephan A.; O'Regan, Declan P.; Fitzpatrick, Julie; Hajnal, Joseph V.; Neuwirth, Clare; Potter, Elizabeth; Tosi, Isabella; Naoumova, Rossi P.

    2007-01-01

    Homozygous familial hypercholesterolemia (FH) is considered a model disease for excessive plasma cholesterol levels. Patients with untreated homozygous FH have a markedly increased risk for premature atherosclerosis. The frequency and extent of ischemic brain damage detectable by high-field magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) after long-term intensive treatment are unknown. In a case control study, five patients with homozygous FH (one male and four females; mean age: 23.6 ± 9.2, range: 12-36 years; mean pre-treatment serum total cholesterol level: 26.9 ± 3.24 mmol/L; all patients with documented atherosclerotic plaques in the carotid arteries) and five age- and sex-matched healthy controls were studied. All patients had been on maximal lipid-lowering medication since early childhood, and four of them were also on treatment with low-density lipoprotein (LDL) apheresis at bi-weekly intervals. Brain MRI was performed at 3 Tesla field strength with fluid-attenuated T2-weighted inversion recovery and T1-weighted spin-echo MR pulse sequences and subsequently evaluated by two independent readers. The maximal lipid-lowering treatment reduced the total serum cholesterol by more than 50% in the patients, but their serum concentrations were still 3.6-fold higher than those found in the controls (11.9 ± 4.2 vs. 4.5 ± 0.5 mmol/L; p < 0.0047). No brain abnormality was observed in any of the patients with homozygous FH. Homozygous FH patients on intensive cholesterol-lowering therapy have no evidence of ischemic brain damage at 3 Tesla MRI despite the remaining high cholesterol levels. (orig.)

  5. MRI at 3 Tesla detects no evidence for ischemic brain damage in intensively treated patients with homozygous familial hypercholesterolemia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schmitz, Stephan A.; O' Regan, Declan P.; Fitzpatrick, Julie; Hajnal, Joseph V. [Hammersmith Hospital Campus, Imaging Sciences Department, MRC Clinical Sciences Centre, Faculty of Medicine, Imperial College, London (United Kingdom); Neuwirth, Clare; Potter, Elizabeth; Tosi, Isabella; Naoumova, Rossi P. [MRC Clinical Sciences Centre, Clinical Research Facility, London (United Kingdom); Hammersmith Hospital, Lipid Clinic, London (United Kingdom)

    2007-11-15

    Homozygous familial hypercholesterolemia (FH) is considered a model disease for excessive plasma cholesterol levels. Patients with untreated homozygous FH have a markedly increased risk for premature atherosclerosis. The frequency and extent of ischemic brain damage detectable by high-field magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) after long-term intensive treatment are unknown. In a case control study, five patients with homozygous FH (one male and four females; mean age: 23.6 {+-} 9.2, range: 12-36 years; mean pre-treatment serum total cholesterol level: 26.9 {+-} 3.24 mmol/L; all patients with documented atherosclerotic plaques in the carotid arteries) and five age- and sex-matched healthy controls were studied. All patients had been on maximal lipid-lowering medication since early childhood, and four of them were also on treatment with low-density lipoprotein (LDL) apheresis at bi-weekly intervals. Brain MRI was performed at 3 Tesla field strength with fluid-attenuated T2-weighted inversion recovery and T1-weighted spin-echo MR pulse sequences and subsequently evaluated by two independent readers. The maximal lipid-lowering treatment reduced the total serum cholesterol by more than 50% in the patients, but their serum concentrations were still 3.6-fold higher than those found in the controls (11.9 {+-} 4.2 vs. 4.5 {+-} 0.5 mmol/L; p < 0.0047). No brain abnormality was observed in any of the patients with homozygous FH. Homozygous FH patients on intensive cholesterol-lowering therapy have no evidence of ischemic brain damage at 3 Tesla MRI despite the remaining high cholesterol levels. (orig.)

  6. Expression of inactive glutathione peroxidase 4 leads to embryonic lethality, and inactivation of the Alox15 gene does not rescue such knock-in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brütsch, Simone Hanna; Wang, Chi Chiu; Li, Lu; Stender, Hannelore; Neziroglu, Nilgün; Richter, Constanze; Kuhn, Hartmut; Borchert, Astrid

    2015-02-01

    Glutathione peroxidases (Gpx) and lipoxygenases (Alox) are functional counterplayers in the metabolism of hydroperoxy lipids that regulate cellular redox homeostasis. Gpx4 is a moonlighting protein that has been implicated not only as an enzyme in anti-oxidative defense, gene expression regulation, and programmed cell death, but also as a structural protein in spermatogenesis. Homozygous Gpx4 knock-out mice are not viable, but molecular reasons for intrauterine lethality are not completely understood. This study was aimed at investigating whether the lack of catalytic activity or the impaired function as structural protein is the dominant reason for embryonic lethality. We further explored whether the pro-oxidative enzyme mouse 12/15 lipoxygenase (Alox15) plays a major role in embryonic lethality of Gpx4-deficient mice. To achieve these goals, we first created knock-in mice, which express a catalytically inactive Gpx4 mutant (Sec46Ala). As homozygous Gpx4-knock-out mice Sec46Ala-Gpx4(+/+) knock-in animals are not viable but undergo intrauterine resorption between embryonic day 6 and 7 (E6-7). In contrast, heterozygous knock-in mice (Sec46Ala-Gpx4(-/+)) are viable, fertile and do not show major phenotypic alterations. Interestingly, homozygous Alox15 deficiency did not rescue the U46A-Gpx4(+/+) mice from embryonic lethality. In fact, when heterozygous U46A-Gpx4(-/+) mice were stepwise crossed into an Alox15-deficent background, no viable U46A-Gpx4(+/+)+Alox15(-/-) individuals were obtained. However, we were able to identify U46A-Gpx4(+/+)+Alox15(-/-) embryos in the state of resorption around E7. These data suggest that the lack of catalytic activity is the major reason for the embryonic lethality of Gpx4(-/-) mice and that systemic inactivation of the Alox15 gene does not rescue homozygous knock-in mice expressing catalytically silent Gpx4.

  7. Targeted inactivation of the murine Abca3 gene leads to respiratory failure in newborns with defective lamellar bodies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hammel, Markus; Michel, Geert; Hoefer, Christina; Klaften, Matthias; Mueller-Hoecker, Josef; Angelis, Martin Hrabe de; Holzinger, Andreas

    2007-01-01

    Mutations in the human ABCA3 gene, encoding an ABC-transporter, are associated with respiratory failure in newborns and pediatric interstitial lung disease. In order to study disease mechanisms, a transgenic mouse model with a disrupted Abca3 gene was generated by targeting embryonic stem cells. While heterozygous animals developed normally and were fertile, individuals homozygous for the altered allele (Abca3-/-) died within one hour after birth from respiratory failure, ABCA3 protein being undetectable. Abca3-/- newborns showed atelectasis of the lung in comparison to a normal gas content in unaffected or heterozygous littermates. Electron microscopy demonstrated the absence of normal lamellar bodies in type II pneumocytes. Instead, condensed structures with apparent absence of lipid content were found. We conclude that ABCA3 is required for the formation of lamellar bodies and lung surfactant function. The phenotype of respiratory failure immediately after birth corresponds to the clinical course of severe ABCA3 mutations in human newborns

  8. HSJ1-related hereditary neuropathies: novel mutations and extended clinical spectrum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gess, Burkhard; Auer-Grumbach, Michaela; Schirmacher, Anja; Strom, Tim; Zitzelsberger, Manuela; Rudnik-Schöneborn, Sabine; Röhr, Dominik; Halfter, Hartmut; Young, Peter; Senderek, Jan

    2014-11-04

    To determine the nature and frequency of HSJ1 mutations in patients with hereditary motor and hereditary motor and sensory neuropathies. Patients were screened for mutations by genome-wide or targeted linkage and homozygosity studies, whole-exome sequencing, and Sanger sequencing. RNA and protein studies of skin fibroblasts were used for functional characterization. We describe 2 additional mutations in the HSJ1 gene in a cohort of 90 patients with autosomal recessive distal hereditary motor neuropathy (dHMN) and Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease type 2 (CMT2). One family with a dHMN phenotype showed the homozygous splice-site mutation c.229+1G>A, which leads to retention of intron 4 in the HSJ1 messenger RNA with a premature stop codon and loss of protein expression. Another family, presenting with a CMT2 phenotype, carried the homozygous missense mutation c.14A>G (p.Tyr5Cys). This mutation was classified as likely disease-related by several automatic algorithms for prediction of possible impact of an amino acid substitution on the structure and function of proteins. Both mutations cosegregated with autosomal recessive inheritance of the disease and were absent from the general population. Taken together, in our cohort of 90 probands, we confirm that HSJ1 mutations are a rare but detectable cause of autosomal recessive dHMN and CMT2. We provide clinical and functional information on an HSJ1 splice-site mutation and report the detailed phenotype of 2 patients with CMT2, broadening the phenotypic spectrum of HSJ1-related neuropathies. © 2014 American Academy of Neurology.

  9. Production of hemizygous and homozygous embryonic stem cell-derived neural progenitor cells from the transgenic alszheimer göttingen minipis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hall, Vanessa Jane; Jacobsen, J.; Gunnarsson, A.

    2011-01-01

    Production of hemizygous and homozygous embryonic stem cell-derived neural progenitor cells from the transgenic alszheimer göttingen minipis......Production of hemizygous and homozygous embryonic stem cell-derived neural progenitor cells from the transgenic alszheimer göttingen minipis...

  10. Hereditary sensory and autonomic neuropathy type IID caused by an SCN9A mutation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuan, Junhui; Matsuura, Eiji; Higuchi, Yujiro; Hashiguchi, Akihiro; Nakamura, Tomonori; Nozuma, Satoshi; Sakiyama, Yusuke; Yoshimura, Akiko; Izumo, Shuji; Takashima, Hiroshi

    2013-04-30

    To identify the clinical features of Japanese patients with suspected hereditary sensory and autonomic neuropathy (HSAN) on the basis of genetic diagnoses. On the basis of clinical, in vivo electrophysiologic, and pathologic findings, 9 Japanese patients with sensory and autonomic nervous dysfunctions were selected. Eleven known HSAN disease-causing genes and 5 related genes were screened using a next-generation sequencer. A homozygous mutation, c.3993delGinsTT, was identified in exon 22 of SCN9A from 2 patients/families. The clinical phenotype was characterized by adolescent or congenital onset with loss of pain and temperature sensation, autonomic nervous dysfunctions, hearing loss, and hyposmia. Subsequently, this mutation was discovered in one of patient 1's sisters, who also exhibited sensory and autonomic nervous system dysfunctions, with recurrent fractures being the most predominant feature. Nerve conduction studies revealed definite asymmetric sensory nerve involvement in patient 1. In addition, sural nerve pathologic findings showed loss of large myelinated fibers in patient 1, whereas the younger patient showed normal sural nerve pathology. We identified a novel homozygous mutation in SCN9A from 2 Japanese families with autosomal recessive HSAN. This loss-of-function SCN9A mutation results in disturbances in the sensory, olfactory, and autonomic nervous systems. We propose that SCN9A mutation results in the new entity of HSAN type IID, with additional symptoms including hyposmia, hearing loss, bone dysplasia, and hypogeusia.

  11. A novel D458V mutation in the SANS PDZ binding motif causes atypical Usher syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalay, E; de Brouwer, A P M; Caylan, R; Nabuurs, S B; Wollnik, B; Karaguzel, A; Heister, J G A M; Erdol, H; Cremers, F P M; Cremers, C W R J; Brunner, H G; Kremer, H

    2005-12-01

    Homozygosity mapping and linkage analysis in a Turkish family with autosomal recessive prelingual sensorineural hearing loss revealed a 15-cM critical region at 17q25.1-25.3 flanked by the polymorphic markers D17S1807 and D17S1806. The maximum two-point lod score was 4.07 at theta=0.0 for the marker D17S801. The linkage interval contains the Usher syndrome 1G gene (USH1G) that is mutated in patients with Usher syndrome (USH) type 1g and encodes the SANS protein. Mutation analysis of USH1G led to the identification of a homozygous missense mutation D458V at the -3 position of the PDZ binding motif of SANS. This mutation was also present homozygously in one out of 64 additional families from Turkey with autosomal recessive nonsyndromic hearing loss and heterozygously in one out of 498 control chromosomes. By molecular modeling, we provide evidence that this mutation impairs the interaction of SANS with harmonin. Ophthalmologic examination and vestibular evaluation of patients from both families revealed mild retinitis pigmentosa and normal vestibular function. These results suggest that these patients suffer from atypical USH.

  12. Mutations in plasmalemma vesicle-associated protein cause severe syndromic protein-losing enteropathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Broekaert, Ilse Julia; Becker, Kerstin; Gottschalk, Ingo; Körber, Friederike; Dötsch, Jörg; Thiele, Holger; Altmüller, Janine; Nürnberg, Peter; Hünseler, Christoph; Cirak, Sebahattin

    2018-04-16

    Protein-losing enteropathy (PLE) is characterised by gastrointestinal protein leakage due to loss of mucosal integrity or lymphatic abnormalities. PLE can manifest as congenital diarrhoea and should be differentiated from other congenital diarrhoeal disorders. Primary PLEs are genetically heterogeneous and the underlying genetic defects are currently emerging. We report an infant with fatal PLE for whom we aimed to uncover the underlying pathogenic mutation. We performed whole exome sequencing (WES) for the index patient. Variants were classified based on the American College of Medical Genetics and Genomics guidelines. WES results and our detailed clinical description of the patient were compared with the literature. We discovered a novel homozygous stop mutation (c.988C>T, p.Q330*) in the Plasmalemma Vesicle-Associated Protein ( PLVAP ) gene in a newborn with fatal PLE, facial dysmorphism, and renal, ocular and cardiac anomalies. The Q330* mutation is predicted to result in complete loss of PLVAP protein expression leading to deletion of the diaphragms of endothelial fenestrae, resulting in plasma protein extravasation and PLE. Recently, another single homozygous stop mutation in PLVAP causing lethal PLE in an infant was reported. Our findings validate PLVAP mutations as a cause of syndromic PLE. Prenatal anomalies, severe PLE and syndromic features may guide the diagnosis of this rare disease. © Article author(s) (or their employer(s) unless otherwise stated in the text of the article) 2018. All rights reserved. No commercial use is permitted unless otherwise expressly granted.

  13. The association of JAK2V617F mutation and leukocytosis with thrombotic events in essential thrombocythemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsiao, Hui-Hua; Yang, Ming-Yu; Liu, Yi-Chang; Lee, Ching-Ping; Yang, Wen-Chi; Liu, Ta-Chih; Chang, Chao-Sung; Lin, Sheng-Fung

    2007-11-01

    The Janus kinase 2 mutation, JAK2 (V617F), and megakaryocytic mutations, MPL (W515L/K), have been identified and correlated with a subtype of essential thrombocythemia (ET) patients. We investigated the frequency of mutations in ET patients and analyzed the relationship with their clinical features. Fifty-three ET patients were enrolled in the study. The amplification refractory mutation system was applied for the mutation survey of the JAK2V617F, while the polymerase chain reaction with sequencing was used for the mutation survey of MPLW515L/K. Thirty-five (66%) patients harboring the JAK2 (V617F) mutation, including 3 homozygous and 32 heterozygous changes, but no MPLW515L/K mutation, were found. During follow-up, 17 (32.1%) patients suffered from documented thrombotic events, with 15 having JAK2V617F mutations. Statistical analysis showed that patients with the JAK2 mutation had significantly higher leukocytes, hemoglobin level, and thrombotic event (p = 0.043, p = 0.001, and p = 0.029, respectively). Thrombotic events were also significantly correlated with leukocytosis and older age. The JAK2V617F mutation was noted in a certain population of ET patients and correlated with leukocytosis, high hemoglobin level, and thrombosis. Therefore, detection of the JAK2V617F mutation can affect not only the diagnosis, but also the management of ET patients.

  14. Inflammatory peeling skin syndrome caused a novel mutation in CDSN.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Telem, Dana Fuchs; Israeli, Shirli; Sarig, Ofer; Sprecher, Eli

    2012-04-01

    Generalized peeling skin syndrome (PSS) is a rare autosomal recessive dermatosis manifesting with continuous exfoliation of the stratum corneum. The inflammatory (type B) subtype of PSS was recently found to be caused by deleterious mutations in the CDSN gene encoding corneodesmosin, a major component of desmosomal junctions in the uppermost layers of the epidermis. In the present study, we assessed a 10-month-old baby, who presented with generalized superficial peeling of the skin. Using PCR amplification and direct sequencing, we identified the third PSS-associated mutation in CDSN, a homozygous 4 bp duplication in the second exon of the gene (c.164_167dup GCCT; p.Thr57ProfsX6). These data further support the notion that corneodesmosin deficiency impairs cell-cell adhesion in the upper epidermis, paving the way for an abnormal inflammatory response due to epidermal barrier disruption.

  15. Mutation of Haemophilus influenzae transforming DNA in vitro with near-ultraviolet radiation: action spectrum

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cabrera-Juarez, E; Setlow, J K [Escuela Nacional de Ciencias Biologicas, Mexico City. Dept. de Bioquimica; Oak Ridge National Lab., Tenn. (USA). Biology Div.)

    1976-05-01

    Mutations were produced in purified transforming DNA from Haemophilus influenzae by near UV radiation and were assayed as mutants among cells transformed with irradiated DNA. The maximum efficiency of mutation induction was at around 334 nm, and the efficiency dropped off steeply at lower and higher wavelengths. The difference between the action spectrum for mutation and that for the oxygen-independent inactivation of transforming DNA, which had a shoulder at 365 nm, indicates that there are different lesions involved in the inactivating and mutagenic effects of near-UV. The presence of histidine during irradiation enhanced the mutagenic effect at 334 and 365 nm, although it protected against inactivation at 365 nm. The effective near-UV wavelengths for in vitro mutation are to some extent the same as the effective wavelengths for mutation in vivo reported previously. These findings indicate that mutations are produced in vivo by near-UV with DNA as the primary target molecule rather than by a secondary non-photochemical reaction between DNA and some other cell component.

  16. Homozygous sequence variants in the WNT10B gene underlie split hand/foot malformation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Asmat Ullah

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Split-hand/split-foot malformation (SHFM, also known as ectrodactyly is a rare genetic disorder. It is a clinically and genetically heterogeneous group of limb malformations characterized by absence/hypoplasia and/or median cleft of hands and/or feet. To date, seven genes underlying SHFM have been identified. This study described four consanguineous families (A-D segregating SHFM in an autosomal recessive manner. Linkage in the families was established to chromosome 12p11.1–q13.13 harboring WNT10B gene. Sequence analysis identified a novel homozygous nonsense variant (p.Gln154* in exon 4 of the WNT10B gene in two families (A and B. In the other two families (C and D, a previously reported variant (c.300_306dupAGGGCGG; p.Leu103Argfs*53 was detected. This study further expands the spectrum of the sequence variants reported in the WNT10B gene, which result in the split hand/foot malformation.

  17. Homozygous deletion in MYL9 expands the molecular basis of megacystis-microcolon-intestinal hypoperistalsis syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moreno, Carolina Araujo; Sobreira, Nara; Pugh, Elizabeth; Zhang, Peng; Steel, Gary; Torres, Fábio Rossi; Cavalcanti, Denise Pontes

    2018-05-01

    Megacystis-microcolon-intestinal hypoperistalsis syndrome (MMIHS) is a severe disease characterized by functional obstruction in the urinary and gastrointestinal tract. The molecular basis of this condition started to be defined recently, and the genes related to the syndrome (ACTG2-heterozygous variant in sporadic cases; and MYH11 (myosin heavy chain 11), LMOD1 (leiomodin 1) and MYLK (myosin light chain (MLC) kinase)-autosomal recessive inheritance), encode proteins involved in the smooth muscle contraction, supporting a myopathic basis for the disease. In the present article, we described a family with two affected siblings with MMIHS born to consanguineous parents and the molecular investigation performed to define the genetic etiology. Previous whole exome sequencing of the affected child and parents did not identify a candidate gene for the disease in this family, but now we present a reanalysis of the data that led to the identification of a homozygous deletion encompassing the last exon of MYL9 (myosin regulatory light chain 9) in the affected individual. MYL9 gene encodes a regulatory myosin MLC and the phosphorylation of this protein is a crucial step in the contraction process of smooth muscle cell. Despite the absence of human or animal phenotype related to MYL9, a cause-effect relationship between MYL9 and the MMIHS seems biologically plausible. The present study reveals a strong candidate gene for autosomal recessive forms of MMIHS, expanding the molecular basis of this disease and reinforces the myopathic basis of this condition.

  18. Decreased iron burden in overweight C282Y homozygous women: Putative role of increased hepcidin production.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Desgrippes, Romain; Lainé, Fabrice; Morcet, Jeff; Perrin, Michèle; Manet, Ghislain; Jezequel, Caroline; Bardou-Jacquet, Edouard; Ropert, Martine; Deugnier, Yves

    2013-05-01

    An excess of visceral adipose tissue could be involved as a modulator of the penetrance of HFE hemochromatosis since fat mass is associated with overexpression of hepcidin and low transferrin saturation was found to be associated with being overweight in women. This study was aimed at assessing the relationship between body mass index (BMI), a surrogate marker of insulin resistance, and iron burden in HFE hemochromatosis. In all, 877 patients from a cohort of C282Y homozygotes were included in the study when BMI at diagnosis and amount of iron removed (AIR) by phlebotomy were available. No relationship between AIR and BMI was found in men, whereas 15.1% (52/345) of women with AIR lean (7.9 mmoL/L ± 4.3) women (P = 0.0005). In C282Y homozygous women, BMI ≥28 kg/m(2) is independently associated with a lower amount of iron removed by phlebotomy. BMI is likely a modulator factor of the phenotypic expression of C282Y homozygosity, likely through an increase of circulating levels of hepcidin. Copyright © 2013 American Association for the Study of Liver Diseases.

  19. Homozygous premature truncation of the HERG protein : the human HERG knockout

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hoorntje, T.; Alders, M.; van Tintelen, P.; van der Lip, K.; Sreeram, N.; van der Wal, A.; Mannens, M.; Wilde, A.

    1999-01-01

    Background-In long-QT syndrome (LQTS), heterozygosity for a mutation in 1 of the K(+) channel genes leads to prolongation of the cardiac action potential, because the aberrant protein exhibits "loss of function." HERG, which is involved in LQT2, is the gene encoding the rapid component of the

  20. Plasma lipoprotein(a) levels in patients with homozygous autosomal dominant hypercholesterolemia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sjouke, Barbara; Yahya, Reyhana; Tanck, Michael W. T.; Defesche, Joep C.; de Graaf, Jacqueline; Wiegman, Albert; Kastelein, John J. P.; Mulder, Monique T.; Hovingh, G. Kees; Roeters van Lennep, Jeanine E.

    2017-01-01

    Patients with autosomal dominant hypercholesterolemia (ADH), caused by mutations in either low-density lipoprotein receptor (LDLR), apolipoprotein B (APOB), or proprotein convertase subtilisin-kexin type 9 (PCSK9) are characterized by high low-density lipoprotein cholesterol levels and in some

  1. Plasma lipoprotein(a) levels in patients with homozygous autosomal dominant hypercholesterolemia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sjouke, B.; Yahya, R.; Tanck, M.W.T.; Defesche, J.C.; Graaf, J. de; Wiegman, A.; Kastelein, J.J.; Mulder, M.T.; Hovingh, G.K.; Roeters van Lennep, J.E.

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Patients with autosomal dominant hypercholesterolemia (ADH), caused by mutations in either low-density lipoprotein receptor (LDLR), apolipoprotein B (APOB), or proprotein convertase subtilisin-kexin type 9 (PCSK9) are characterized by high low-density lipoprotein cholesterol levels and

  2. Homozygous and heterozygous disruptions of ANK3: at the crossroads of neurodevelopmental and psychiatric disorders

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Iqbal, Z.; Vandeweyer, G.; Voet, M. van der; Waryah, A.M.; Zahoor, M.Y.; Besseling, J.A.; Roca, L.T.; Silfhout, A.T. van; Nijhof, B.; Kramer, J.M.; Aa, N. van der; Ansar, M.; Peeters, H.; Helsmoortel, C.; Gilissen, C.F.H.A.; Vissers, L.E.L.M.; Veltman, J.A.; Brouwer, A.P.M. de; Kooy, R. van; Riazuddin, S.; Schenck, A.; Bokhoven, H. van; Rooms, L.

    2013-01-01

    AnkyrinG, encoded by the ANK3 gene, is involved in neuronal development and signaling. It has previously been implicated in bipolar disorder and schizophrenia by association studies. Most recently, de novo missense mutations in this gene were identified in autistic patients. However, the causative

  3. Current Nomenclature of Pseudohypoparathyroidism: Inactivating Parathyroid Hormone/Parathyroid Hormone-Related Protein Signaling Disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turan, Serap

    2017-12-30

    Disorders related to parathyroid hormone (PTH) resistance and PTH signaling pathway impairment are historically classified under the term of pseudohypoparathyroidism (PHP). The disease was first described and named by Fuller Albright and colleagues in 1942. Albright hereditary osteodystrophy (AHO) is described as an associated clinical entity with PHP, characterized by brachydactyly, subcutaneous ossifications, round face, short stature and a stocky build. The classification of PHP is further divided into PHP-Ia, pseudo-PHP (pPHP), PHP-Ib, PHP-Ic and PHP-II according to the presence or absence of AHO, together with an in vivo response to exogenous PTH and the me