WorldWideScience

Sample records for homopolygalacturonan molecular size

  1. Size of linear superpositions in molecular nanomagnets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Troiani, F.; Zanardi, P.

    2013-09-01

    Molecular nanomagnets are zero-dimensional spin systems that exhibit quantum-mechanical behavior at low temperatures. Exploiting quantum-information theoretic measures, we quantify here the size of linear superpositions that can be generated within the ground multiplet of high- and low-spin nanomagnets. Amongst the former class of systems, we mainly focus on Mn12 and Fe8. General criteria for maximizing such measures are also outlined, and illustrated with reference to spin clusters of different geometries. The actual character (micro or macroscopic) of linear superpositions in low-spin systems is inherently ill-defined. Here, this issue is addressed with specific reference to the Cr7Ni and V15 molecules, characterized by an S=1/2 ground state. In both cases, the measures we obtain are larger than those of a single s=1/2 spin but not proportionate to the number and value of the constituent spins.

  2. Soil microbial carbon turnover decreases with increasing molecular size

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malik, Ashish; Gleixner, Gerd

    2014-05-01

    It is well established that soil microorganisms play an important role in respiration of newly fixed plant carbon. Recent results show that they also contribute significantly to soil organic matter (SOM) formation. We hypothesized that different molecular size classes of compounds in soil microbial biomass (SMB) have variable turnover time and in consequence influence SOM formation differentially. Here we used natural differences in carbon stable isotope signatures (δ13C values) after C3-C4 vegetation change to track newly fixed C4 plant carbon into SMB molecular size classes. SMB was obtained by chloroform fumigation extraction and δ13C values of its size classes were measured using size exclusion chromatography coupled online to liquid chromatography-isotope ratio mass spectrometry (SEC-LC-IRMS). Resolved SMB was assigned to 5 size classes: 1800-9800 Da, 800-1800 Da, 380-800 Da, 180-380 Da and 50-180 Da. The contribution of recent C4 plant carbon to size classes of SMB decreased with increasing molecular weight (MW). It ranged from 77±19% in the lowest MW size class size class to 41±14% in the 1800-9800 Da size class in 'Sandy' soil and from 59±18% in the lowest MW size class to 8±15% in the highest MW size class in 'Clayey' soil. A decreasing carbon turnover of compounds in SMB extracts along a continuum of molecular size from small to large implies that low molecular weight microbial compounds are rapidly metabolized products that link to fast respiratory carbon fluxes, whereas high molecular weight ones could be products of microbial synthesis like structural compounds that have slower turnover rates and link to slower SOM formation.

  3. Sample size and power calculation for molecular biology studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jung, Sin-Ho

    2010-01-01

    Sample size calculation is a critical procedure when designing a new biological study. In this chapter, we consider molecular biology studies generating huge dimensional data. Microarray studies are typical examples, so that we state this chapter in terms of gene microarray data, but the discussed methods can be used for design and analysis of any molecular biology studies involving high-dimensional data. In this chapter, we discuss sample size calculation methods for molecular biology studies when the discovery of prognostic molecular markers is performed by accurately controlling false discovery rate (FDR) or family-wise error rate (FWER) in the final data analysis. We limit our discussion to the two-sample case.

  4. Investigation of molecular size of transcription factor TFIIE in solution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Itoh, Yoshiyuki; Unzai, Satoru; Sato, Mamoru; Nagadoi, Aritaka; Okuda, Masahiko; Nishimura, Yoshifumi; Akashi, Satoko

    2005-11-15

    Human general transcription factor IIE (TFIIE), a component of a transcription preinitiation complex associated with RNA polymerase II, was characterized by size-exclusion chromatography, mass spectrometry, analytical ultracentrifugation, and small-angle X-ray scattering (SAXS). Recombinant human TFIIE was purified to homogeneity and shown to contain equimolar amounts of TFIIEalpha (50 kDa) and TFIIEbeta (35 kDa) by SDS-PAGE. In the analysis of size-exclusion chromatography of the purified sample, as already reported, TFIIE was shown to be a 170-kDa alpha(2)beta(2) heterotetramer. However, by using electrospray ionization mass spectrometry the purified sample gave the molecular mass of 84,152 +/- 5, indicating that TFIIE is an alphabeta heterodimer but not a heterotetramer. Analytical ultracentrifugation experiment of TFIIE provided that only a single component with the molecular mass of ca. 80,000 existed in solution, also suggesting an alphabeta heterodimer. In addition, its extraordinarily rod-like molecular shape was confirmed by SAXS. It is likely that the rod-like molecular shape of TFIIE has misled larger molecular size in size-exclusion chromatography, which was calibrated by globular proteins. It is demonstrated that TFIIE exists as a heterodimer under our present conditions in solution, although two molecules of heterodimer might be required for the formation of the preinitiation complex with RNA polymerase II for starting the transcription process. (c) 2005 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  5. Molecular size analysis of capsular polysaccharide preparations from Streptococcus pneumoniae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bednar, B; Hennessey, J P

    1993-04-23

    Purified capsular polysaccharide preparations from Streptococcus pneumoniae serotypes 4, 6B, 9V, 14, 18C, 19F, and 23F were analyzed by high performance size exclusion chromatography (HPSEC) with multi-angle laser light scattering (MALLS), specific viscosity (SV), and refractive index (RI) detection to determine the molecular size and molar mass of each of the pneumococcal (Pn) polysaccharides. The Mw's of the polysaccharides ranged from a low of 606 kg/mol for Pn4 to a high of 1145 kg/mol for Pn9V, and the z-average radii of gyration ranged from 59 nm for Pn14 to 72 nm for Pn18C. Estimations of molar mass of the highly anionic polysaccharides (all but Pn14) by the universal calibration approach were unsuccessful, resulting in a 27-53% overestimate of the Mw's though application of Mark-Houwink-Sakurada coefficients calculated from the HPSEC-MALLS/SV/RI data resulted in estimates of Mw that were in agreement with the MALLS estimates for all but the Pn4 preparation. These results emphasize the need for direct measurement of both molecular size and intrinsic viscosity distributions for definitive characterization of the molar mass, hydrodynamic volume, rigidity, and drainage of complex biological polymers such as the pneumococcal polysaccharides.

  6. Size-dependent blinking of molecular aggregate total emission

    Science.gov (United States)

    Savchenko, V. V.; Zimin, A. A.; Ignatova, N. Yu; Kimberg, V.; Gel’mukhanov, F.; Polyutov, S. P.

    2017-11-01

    Molecular aggregates are well known for their customizable optical properties. Vibronic coupling in monomers forming such aggregates offers rich opportunities for property tuning. We study generic molecular aggregate models of growing complexity (from a dimer up to a decamer) and report how vibronic coupling affects aggregate fluorescence intensity. The total aggregate fluorescence intensity is a measure sensitive to both vibronic coupling and Coulomb coupling between monomer transition densities. Using an exact diagonalization approach in the two-particle basis set, we show how the interplay between Coulomb and vibronic coupling affects aggregate fluorescence. Moreover, for H-aggregates we predict a periodic variation of the fluorescence intensity with aggregate size and show that vibronic interaction decreases the effect.

  7. Phytodegradation of Ethanolamines by Cyperus alternifolius: Effect of Molecular Size.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dolphen, R; Thiravetyan, P

    2015-01-01

    Our screening of plants showed that Cyperus alternifolius (Umbrella papyrus) had the highest efficiency removal in real wastewater containing monoethanolamine-higher than Echinodorus cordifolius (Creeping Burrhead), Thalia geniculata (Alligator Flag), Acorus calamus (Sweet Flag), and Dracaena sanderiana (Lucky Bamboo). Therefore, this research studied the degradation of monoethanolamine (MEA), diethanolamine (DEA), and triethanolamine (TEA) by C. alternifolius. Plants could degrade TEA into DEA, then into MEA, and then further into acetic acid. The accumulation of ethanolamines was found mainly in plant stems, which had the highest biomass. This demonstrated that the molecular size is closely related to a diffusion coefficient that affects the removal rate through plant bodies. A smaller molecular weight-MEA (MW = 61.08 g mol(-1))-was taken up the fastest, followed by DEA (MW = 105.14 g mol(-1)) and TEA (MW = 149.19 g mol(-1)), the highest molecular weight. The plants' toxicity when exposed to ethanolamines elucidated that MEA had the highest toxicity, followed by DEA and TEA. In addition, the application of C. alternifolius in monoethanolamine-contaminated wastewater revealed that plant could completely uptake MEA at day 5 from an initial MEA concentration of 18 mM. The result indicated that C. alternifolius has the potential to remove ethanolamines and can be applied to ethanolamine-contaminated wastewater.

  8. Quantifying the size of linear superpositions in molecular nanomagnets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Troiani, Filippo; Zanardi, Paolo

    2014-03-01

    Molecular nanomagnets are relatively complex spin systems that exhibit quantum mechanical behavior at low temperatures. Exploiting quantum-information theoretic measures we quantify the size of linear superpositions that can be generated within the ground multiplet of high-spin nanomagnets. In particular, we consider the prototypical single-molecule magnets (namely Mn12 and Fe8) , characterized by a ferrimagnetic spin ordering in the ground state. We show that the size of these linear superpositions are comparable to those achievable in mesoscopic systems, and be further enhanced by increasing the asymmetry between the sublattices, and by reducing the competition between exchange interactions within the nanomagnets. The same tools are also applied to the study of low-spin molecules, such as Cr7Ni and V15, characterized by antiferromagnetic interactions between the constituent spins. The size of the linear superpositions that have been generated within their S =1/2 ground doublets is contrasted with that of single s =1/2 spins.

  9. Effective particle size from molecular dynamics simulations in fluids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ju, Jianwei; Welch, Paul M.; Rasmussen, Kim Ø.; Redondo, Antonio; Vorobieff, Peter; Kober, Edward M.

    2017-12-01

    We report molecular dynamics simulations designed to investigate the effective size of colloidal particles suspended in a fluid in the vicinity of a rigid wall where all interactions are defined by smooth atomic potential functions. These simulations are used to assess how the behavior of this system at the atomistic length scale compares to continuum mechanics models. In order to determine the effective size of the particles, we calculate the solvent forces on spherical particles of different radii as a function of different positions near and overlapping with the atomistically defined wall and compare them to continuum models. This procedure also then determines the effective position of the wall. Our analysis is based solely on forces that the particles sense, ensuring self-consistency of the method. The simulations were carried out using both Weeks-Chandler-Andersen and modified Lennard-Jones (LJ) potentials to identify the different contributions of simple repulsion and van der Waals attractive forces. Upon correction for behavior arising the discreteness of the atomic system, the underlying continuum physics analysis appeared to be correct down to much less than the particle radius. For both particle types, the effective radius was found to be ˜ 0.75σ , where σ defines the length scale of the force interaction (the LJ diameter). The effective "hydrodynamic" radii determined by this means are distinct from commonly assumed values of 0.5σ and 1.0σ , but agree with a value developed from the atomistic analysis of the viscosity of such systems.

  10. Dust coagulation and fragmentation in molecular clouds. II. The opacity of the dust aggregate size distribution

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ormel, C.W.; Min, M.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/277318416; Tielens, A. G. G. M.; Dominik, C.; Paszun, D.

    2011-01-01

    The dust size distribution in molecular clouds can be strongly affected by ice-mantle formation and (subsequent) grain coagulation. Following previous work where the dust size distribution has been calculated from a state-of-the art collision model for dust aggregates that involves both coagulation

  11. Experiments for the Undergraduate Laboratory that Illustrate the Size-Exclusion Properties of Zeolite Molecular Sieves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cooke, Jason; Henderson, Eric J.

    2009-01-01

    Experiments are presented that demonstrate the size-exclusion properties of zeolites and reveal the reason for naming zeolites "molecular sieves". If an IR spectrometer is available, the adsorption or exclusion of alcohols of varying sizes from dichloromethane or chloroform solutions can be readily demonstrated by monitoring changes in the…

  12. Molecular size and solubility conditions of polysilane macromolecules with different topology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mavrič, Andraž; Badasyan, Artem; Fanetti, Mattia; Valant, Matjaz

    2016-10-01

    Solubility of polysilane macromolecules has so far been a scientific as well as technological problem due to a lack of understanding of their proper molecular size and agglomeration/de-agglomeration conditions. Here we show that, in contrary to previous reports, the polysilane molecules are inherently small enough to be, under right conditions, dissolved. We used a dynamic light scattering and a differential scanning calorimetry to show that even under a dilute regime the polymer molecules are agglomerated at room temperature and undergo de-agglomeration at slightly elevated temperatures of around 40 °C. The de-agglomeration results in formation of stable solutions of the polymer molecules of different topological structure in different organic solvents. We determined the polymer molecular sizes to be around 20 nm, much lower than previously reported. The measured molecular size was confirmed by transmission electron microscope imaging of the individual molecules.

  13. Size dependent surface energy of nanoplates: Molecular dynamics and nanoscale continuum theory correlations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jamshidian, M.; Dehghani, A.; Talaei, M. S.; Rabczuk, T.

    2018-01-01

    A nanoscale gradient continuum theory along with molecular dynamics simulations are employed to investigate the size-dependent surface energy of nanoplates. Molecular dynamics simulations reveal that upon nanoplate thickness reduction, the redistribution of surface energy density along thickness direction causes the decrease of the surface energy of nanoplate free surfaces. Via introducing a calibration benchmark, the length scale model parameter of the gradient continuum theory is methodically determined. The calibrated continuum theory is shown to well predict the size-dependent surface energy and the associated redistribution of surface energy density within nanoplates.

  14. Size and number of DNA molecules from Chinese hamster ovary cells determined by molecular autoradiography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Todd, M.B.

    1980-06-01

    A new method for visualization of separable subunits of DNA is described. Autoradiography of tritium-labeled DNA from one or a few nuclei, lysed with detergent, moderate salt, and proteases, and gently deposited on a filter, allows determination of subunit molecular weight, size distribution, number per nucleus, and organization. The shape of the size distribution of CHO subunit images is similar to that of CHO mitotic chromosomes, and the numbers of subunits per nucleus supports a model of eight subunits per chromosome.

  15. Equilibrium partitioning of macromolecules in confining geometries: Improved universality with a new molecular size parameter

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wang, Yanwei; Peters, Günther H.J.; Hansen, Flemming Yssing

    2008-01-01

    structures (CABS), allows the computation of equilibrium partition coefficients as a function of confinement size solely based on a single sampling of the configuration space of a macromolecule in bulk. Superior in computational speed to previous computational methods, CABS is capable of handling slits...... parameter for characterization of spatial confinement effects on macromolecules. Results for the equilibrium partition coefficient in the weak confinement regime depend only on the ratio ofR-s to the confinement size regardless of molecular details....

  16. The rate of DNA evolution: effects of body size and temperature on the molecular clock.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gillooly, James F; Allen, Andrew P; West, Geoffrey B; Brown, James H

    2005-01-04

    Observations that rates of molecular evolution vary widely within and among lineages have cast doubts on the existence of a single "molecular clock." Differences in the timing of evolutionary events estimated from genetic and fossil evidence have raised further questions about the accuracy of molecular clocks. Here, we present a model of nucleotide substitution that combines theory on metabolic rate with the now-classic neutral theory of molecular evolution. The model quantitatively predicts rate heterogeneity and may reconcile differences in molecular- and fossil-estimated dates of evolutionary events. Model predictions are supported by extensive data from mitochondrial and nuclear genomes. By accounting for the effects of body size and temperature on metabolic rate, this model explains heterogeneity in rates of nucleotide substitution in different genes, taxa, and thermal environments. This model also suggests that there is indeed a single molecular clock, as originally proposed by Zuckerkandl and Pauling [Zuckerkandl, E. & Pauling, L. (1965) in Evolving Genes and Proteins, eds. Bryson, V. & Vogel, H. J. (Academic, New York), pp. 97-166], but that it "ticks" at a constant substitution rate per unit of mass-specific metabolic energy rather than per unit of time. This model therefore links energy flux and genetic change. More generally, the model suggests that body size and temperature combine to control the overall rate of evolution through their effects on metabolism.

  17. Molecular adsorption on silicon (001: A systematic evaluation of size effects in slab and cluster models

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. F. Tracey

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available First-principles calculations are in wide use today to describe chemical processes occurring on the silicon (001 surface. The number of atoms that can be explicitly treated is limited and hence size-constraints are invariably required; this applies to both cluster and periodic slab approaches. Using a trial set of seven molecular adsorbate configurations, we examine the dependence of calculated adsorption energies on several size parameters, namely thickness and in-plane unit cell size for slab models, as well as thickness, length, and width for cluster models. Size-converged adsorption energies are estimated by extrapolation, and are used to assess the accuracy of the more typically-sized slabs and clusters in common use today. Use of a DFT method that can be applied to both slabs and clusters allows us to assess the performance of these two approaches on an equal footing.

  18. Structural stability of nano-sized crystals of HMX: A molecular dynamics simulation study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akkbarzade, H.; Parsafar, G. A.; Bayat, Y.

    2012-01-01

    The interaction potential energy and heat of sublimation of nanoparticles of HMX crystal polymorphs are studied by using molecular dynamics methods with a previously developed force field [Bedrov, et al., J. Comput.-Aided Mol. Des. 8 (2001) 77]. Molecular dynamics simulations of nanoparticles with 10, 20, 30, 40, 50, 60, 70, 80, 90, and 100 molecules of HMX are carried out at 300 K. The intermolecular, intramolecular and total interaction energies per mole for the nanoparticles are calculated at 300 K. Then, we have calculated sublimation enthalpy of HMX crystal polymorphs with different sizes. For the all sizes, the β-HMX is found to be the most stable phase, due to having the least total interaction energy. Also, α-HMX is more stable than δ-HMX. An increase in the sublimation enthalpy with the size of the nanoparticle can be seen.

  19. Grain size dependence of penetration depth of hydrogen injection into polycrystalline graphite by molecular simulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saito, Seiki; Ito, Atsushi M.; Takayama, Arimichi; Nakamura, Hiroaki

    2014-11-01

    Many different carbon materials are developed for diverse applications for industrial and scientific uses. It is known that the amount of hydrogen retained in carbon materials under plasma irradiation strongly depends on the structural characteristics of the material, such as grain size. To clarify the cause of the difference in the amount of hydrogen retained in different carbon materials, hydrogen atom injection into polycrystalline graphite is investigated on the atomic scale by a hybrid simulation technique consisting of binary-collision-approximation-based simulation and molecular dynamics simulation. Then, the incident energy and grain size dependences of the penetration profile of incident hydrogen atoms are carefully investigated.

  20. How molecular internal-geometric parameters affect PB-PEO polymersome size in aqueous solution

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Habel, Joachim Erich Otto; Ogbonna, Anayo; Larsen, Nanna

    2016-01-01

    is the ratio between the hydrophilic block volume and the entire diblock volume. However the polymersome size distribution also depends on molecular weight (Mn) and in order to gain insight on how f and Mn together determine polymersome size, we prepared PB-PEO diblock copolymers with different block lengths...... and analyzed vesicle morphology via Dynamic light scattering (DLS) and Freeze-fracture transmission electron microscopy (FF-TEM). We found three main regimes: high f / low Mn with polymersomes of mixed diameter, high f / high Mn with mainly large polymersomes and low f, with mainly small polymersomes...

  1. Molecular target size of the vanilloid (capsaicin) receptor in pig dorsal root ganglia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Szallasi, A.; Blumberg, P.M. (National Cancer Institute, Bethesda, MD (USA))

    1991-01-01

    The size of the vanilloid receptor was examined by high-energy radiation inactivation analysis of the binding of ({sup 3}H)resiniferatoxin to pig dorsal root ganglion membranes; it was found to be 270 {plus minus} 25 kDa. This value most likely represents the size of a receptor complex rather than of an individual subunit. Other ligand-gated cation channel complexes have reported molecular weights in this range, e.g. 300 kDa for the acetylcholine receptor.

  2. Size and molecular flexibility of sugars determine the storage stability of freeze-dried proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tonnis, W F; Mensink, M A; de Jager, A; van der Voort Maarschalk, K; Frijlink, H W; Hinrichs, W L J

    2015-03-02

    Protein-based biopharmaceuticals are generally produced as aqueous solutions and stored refrigerated to obtain sufficient shelf life. Alternatively, proteins may be freeze-dried in the presence of sugars to allow storage stability at ambient conditions for prolonged periods. However, to act as a stabilizer, these sugars should remain in the glassy state during storage. This requires a sufficiently high glass transition temperature (Tg). Furthermore, the sugars should be able to replace the hydrogen bonds between the protein and water during drying. Frequently used disaccharides are characterized by a relatively low Tg, rendering them sensitive to plasticizing effects of residual water, which strongly reduces the Tg values of the formulation. Larger sugars generally have higher Tgs, but it is assumed that these sugars are limited in their ability to interact with the protein due to steric hindrance. In this paper, the size and molecular flexibility of sugars was related to their ability to stabilize proteins. Four diverse proteins varying in size from 6 kDa to 540 kDa were freeze-dried in the presence of different sugars varying in size and molecular flexibility. Subsequently, the different samples were subjected to an accelerated stability test. Using protein specific assays and intrinsic fluorescence, stability of the proteins was monitored. It was found that the smallest sugar (disaccharide trehalose) best preserved the proteins, but also that the Tg of the formulations was only just high enough to maintain sufficient vitrification. When trehalose-based formulations are exposed to high relative humidities, water uptake by the product reduces the Tgs too much. In that respect, sugars with higher Tgs are desired. Addition of polysaccharide dextran 70 kDa to trehalose greatly increased the Tg of the formulation. Moreover, this combination also improved the stability of the proteins compared to dextran only formulations. The molecularly flexible oligosaccharide

  3. The biased reptation model of DNA gel electrophoresis: mobility vs molecular size and gel concentration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slater, G W; Noolandi, J

    1989-10-01

    The biased reptation model provides a good framework for interpreting the results of continuous field DNA electrophoresis experiments performed in agarose gels. Here we discuss the main features of the mobility-molecular size and mobility-gel concentration diagrams as obtained from new extensive computer simulations of the model. Our aim is to suggest a global and coherent picture of this widely used yet poorly understood experimental technique, and to point out the areas where a systematic experimental study is still needed.

  4. Molecular diversity patterns among various phytoplankton size-fractions in West Greenland in late summer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elferink, Stephanie; Neuhaus, Stefan; Wohlrab, Sylke; Toebe, Kerstin; Voß, Daniela; Gottschling, Marc; Lundholm, Nina; Krock, Bernd; Koch, Boris P.; Zielinski, Oliver; Cembella, Allan; John, Uwe

    2017-03-01

    Arctic regions have experienced pronounced biological and biophysical transformations as a result of global change processes over the last several decades. Current hypotheses propose an elevated impact of those environmental changes on the biodiversity, community composition and metabolic processes of species. The effects on ecosystem function and services, particularly when invasive or toxigenic harmful species become dominant, can be expressed over a wide range of temporal and spatial scales in plankton communities. Our study focused on the comparison of molecular biodiversity of three size-fractions (micro-, nano-, picoplankton) in the coastal pelagic zone of West Greenland and their association with environmental parameters. Molecular diversity was assessed via parallel amplicon sequencing the 28S rRNA hypervariable D1/D2 region. We showed that biodiversity distribution within the area of Uummannaq Fjord, Vaigat Strait and Disko Bay differed markedly within and among size-fractions. In general, we observed a higher diversity within the picoplankton size fraction compared to the nano- and microplankton. In multidimensional scaling analysis, community composition of all three size fractions correlated with cell size, silicate and phosphate, chlorophyll a (chl a) and dinophysistoxin (DTX). Individually, each size fraction community composition also correlated with other different environmental parameters, i.e. temperature and nitrate. We observed a more homogeneous community of the picoplankton across all stations compared to the larger size classes, despite different prevailing environmental conditions of the sampling areas. This suggests that habitat niche occupation for larger-celled species may lead to higher functional trait plasticity expressed as an enhanced range of phenotypes, whereas smaller organisms may compensate for lower potential plasticity with higher diversity. The presence of recently identified toxigenic harmful algal bloom (HAB) species (such

  5. Biomimetic supercontainers for size-selective electrochemical sensing of molecular ions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Netzer, Nathan L.; Must, Indrek; Qiao, Yupu; Zhang, Shi-Li; Wang, Zhenqiang; Zhang, Zhen

    2017-04-01

    New ionophores are essential for advancing the art of selective ion sensing. Metal-organic supercontainers (MOSCs), a new family of biomimetic coordination capsules designed using sulfonylcalix[4]arenes as container precursors, are known for their tunable molecular recognition capabilities towards an array of guests. Herein, we demonstrate the use of MOSCs as a new class of size-selective ionophores dedicated to electrochemical sensing of molecular ions. Specifically, a MOSC molecule with its cavities matching the size of methylene blue (MB+), a versatile organic molecule used for bio-recognition, was incorporated into a polymeric mixed-matrix membrane and used as an ion-selective electrode. This MOSC-incorporated electrode showed a near-Nernstian potentiometric response to MB+ in the nano- to micro-molar range. The exceptional size-selectivity was also evident through contrast studies. To demonstrate the practical utility of our approach, a simulated wastewater experiment was conducted using water from the Fyris River (Sweden). It not only showed a near-Nernstian response to MB+ but also revealed a possible method for potentiometric titration of the redox indicator. Our study thus represents a new paradigm for the rational design of ionophores that can rapidly and precisely monitor molecular ions relevant to environmental, biomedical, and other related areas.

  6. Biogeography of soil organic matter molecular structure across multiple soil size fractions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meier, C. L.; Neff, J.

    2009-12-01

    Recent work suggests that there is a common soil decomposition sequence whereby plant inputs are metabolized into a physiologically constrained set of compounds originating from microbes that may persist in soil over relatively long time-scales. Plant inputs tend to be found in coarse particulate fractions (>180 μm) with relatively fast turnover times, while microbially derived compounds tend to accrue in the finer silt + clay fractions (180 μm would be chemically similar, and would be characterized by lignin and other plant-derived compounds; and 2) fractions 180 μm fractions (pplant material is not incorporated into soil C pools with relatively long turnover times. However, a principal components analysis (PCA) showed that the >180 μm coarse particulate fractions also contained compounds associated with microbial origins, indicating that microbial C is not limited to <53 μm size fractions. The PCA also revealed that samples within each of the three size fractions did not cluster together (i.e. they did not share a common molecular structure), but we did note that: 1) cold alpine and sub-alpine sites were unique and chemically similar; and 2) tropical forest soils were unique and chemically similar. Moreover, we observed large differences in molecular structure for dry desert/savannah sites with varying vegetation types (trees vs. grass) and varying geologic substrates. Taken together, these observations argue that temperature, vegetation, and underlying geology influence soil molecular structure, but support for a common decomposition sequence is mixed.

  7. Effects of organic acids of different molecular size on phosphate removal by HZO-201 nanocomposite.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Bin; Hua, Ming; Zhang, Yanyang; Zhang, Weiming; Lv, Lu; Pan, Bingcai

    2017-01-01

    Various organic acids in wastewater effluent could significantly influence the performance of phosphate adsorbent. This study focused on the effects of organic acids of different-molecular-size on phosphate adsorption by a novel nanocomposite HZO-201. Three organic acids (gallic acid (GA), tannic acid (TA) and humic acid (HA)) with distinct molecular size (HA > TA > GA) were chosen for this purpose. Both isotherm and kinetic tests of phosphate adsorption were conducted in the single-phosphate and binary system, and a series of microscopic techniques (i.e., XPS, FT-IR and SEM-EDX) and N2 adsorption-desorption test were employed to explore the underlying mechanism. It was found that GA could greatly weaken phosphate adsorption capability of HZO-201 by directly competing for ammonium group on the nanocomposite, TA exhibited significant inhibition on phosphate adsorption rate mainly through pore constriction/blockage, while HA posed negligible impact on phosphate adsorption because of the size exclusion effect. It was also observed that although GA, TA and HA showed substantial influence on bulky HZO due to complexation, their impact on the nano-HZO loaded inside HZO-201 was little. The covalently bounded ammonium group and the networking pore structure of HZO-201 may play important roles in it. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Role of NOM molecular size on iodo-trihalomethane formation during chlorination and chloramination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Jie; Chen, Dan-Dan; Li, Lei; Li, Wen-Wei; Mu, Yang; Yu, Han-Qing

    2016-10-01

    Natural organic matter (NOM) is the major precursor for the generation of disinfection byproducts (DBPs) during disinfection, but the role of the NOM molecular size on the formation of iodinated DBPs (I-DBPs) is still unclear. The objective of this study was to evaluate the function of the NOM molecular size on the formation of iodo-trihalomethane (I-THMs) during chlorination and chloramination. Humic acid was adopted as the NOM matrix and fractionated into four molecular weight (MW) groups. Various parameters, including iodide, bromide, NOM concentrations, pH, and pre-chlorination time, were investigated for each MW fraction. During chlorination, high MW fractions (i.e., MW > 100 K Da and 50 K NOM concentration, the formation of I-THMs increased for small MW fractions, while a slight reduction occurred for high MW fractions during chlorination. Higher pH resulted in more I-THM formation for small MW fractions, while the opposite was true for high MW fractions during chlorination. Compared to small MW fractions, bromide was relatively more reactive with high MW fractions in the formation of I-THMs during chlorination. During chloramination, the I-THM yields decreased with the increasing NOM concentration for high MW fractions. The concentration of bromine-containing I-THMs decreased with increasing pH for all MW fractions during chloramination. Additionally, with the prolongation of pre-chlorination time, the total amount of I-THMs decreased remarkably for MWs higher than 3 K Da, while a slight change for MW lower than 3 K Da occurred during chloramination. The results from this study suggest that the molecular weight of the NOM plays an important role in the formation of I-THMs during chlorination and chloramination. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Determination of nanoparticle size distribution together with density or molecular weight by 2D analytical ultracentrifugation

    KAUST Repository

    Carney, Randy P.

    2011-06-07

    Nanoparticles are finding many research and industrial applications, yet their characterization remains a challenge. Their cores are often polydisperse and coated by a stabilizing shell that varies in size and composition. No single technique can characterize both the size distribution and the nature of the shell. Advances in analytical ultracentrifugation allow for the extraction of the sedimentation (s) and diffusion coefficients (D). Here we report an approach to transform the s and D distributions of nanoparticles in solution into precise molecular weight (M), density (?P) and particle diameter (dp) distributions. M for mixtures of discrete nanocrystals is found within 4% of the known quantities. The accuracy and the density information we achieve on nanoparticles are unparalleled. A single experimental run is sufficient for full nanoparticle characterization, without the need for standards or other auxiliary measurements. We believe that our method is of general applicability and we discuss its limitations. 2011 Macmillan Publishers Limited. All rights reserved.

  10. Finite-size effects on the lattice dynamics in spin crossover nanomaterials. II. Molecular dynamics simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mikolasek, Mirko; Nicolazzi, William; Terki, Férial; Molnár, Gábor; Bousseksou, Azzedine

    2017-07-01

    In the first part of this work, an experimental study of the lattice dynamics of spin crossover nanoparticles was performed using the nuclear inelastic scattering (NIS). A size dependence of low energy phonon modes appears under 10 nm, but its origin is not well understood. In this paper, we investigate the phonon confinement effects in the framework of molecular dynamics simulations by modeling three-dimensional nanoparticles considering a cubic lattice with an octahedral pattern. The vibrational density of states is computed and compared to the experiment. The simulations allow one to highlight both the role of the phonon quantification and the role of the size and shape distributions of particles on the extracted parameters leading to a better understanding of the experimental results.

  11. Continuously Adjustable, Molecular-Sieving “Gate” on 5A Zeolite for Distinguishing Small Organic Molecules by Size

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Zhuonan; Huang, Yi; Xu, Weiwei L.; Wang, Lei; Bao, Yu; Li, Shiguang; Yu, Miao

    2015-09-01

    Zeolites/molecular sieves with uniform, molecular-sized pores are important for many adsorption-based separation processes. Pore size gaps, however, exist in the current zeolite family. This leads to a great challenge of separating molecules with size differences at ~0.01 nm level. Here, we report a novel concept, pore misalignment, to form a continuously adjustable, molecular-sieving “gate” at the 5A zeolite pore entrance without sacrificing the internal capacity. Misalignment of the micropores of the alumina coating with the 5A zeolite pores was related with and facilely adjusted by the coating thickness. For the first time, organic molecules with sub-0.01 nm size differences were effectively distinguished via appropriate misalignment. This novel concept may have great potential to fill the pore size gaps of the zeolite family and realize size-selective adsorption separation.

  12. Finite-size effects on molecular dynamics interfacial thermal-resistance predictions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liang, Zhi; Keblinski, Pawel

    2014-08-01

    Using molecular dynamics simulations, we study the role of finite size effects on the determination of interfacial thermal resistance between two solids characterized by high phonon mean free paths. In particular, we will show that a direct, heat source-sink method leads to strong size effect, associated with ballistic phonon transport to and from, and specular reflections at the simulation domain boundary. Lack of proper account for these effects can lead to incorrect predictions about the role of interfacial bonding and structure on interfacial thermal resistance. We also show that the finite size effect can be dramatically reduced by introduction of rough external boundaries leading to diffuse phonon scattering, as explicitly demonstrated by phonon wave-packet simulations. Finally, we demonstrate that when careful considerations are given to the effects associated with the finite heat capacity of the simulation domains and phonon scattering from the external surfaces, a size-independent interfacial resistance can be properly extracted from the time integral of the correlation function of heat power across the interface. Our work demonstrates that reliable and consistent values of the interfacial thermal resistance can be obtained by equilibrium and nonequilibrium methods with a relatively small computational cost.

  13. Starch digestion mechanistic information from the time evolution of molecular size distributions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Witt, Torsten; Gidley, Michael J; Gilbert, Robert G

    2010-07-28

    Size-exclusion chromatography [SEC, also termed gel permeation chromatography (GPC)] is used to measure the time evolution of the distributions of molecular size and of branch length as starch is subjected to in vitro digestion, including studying the development of enzyme-resistant starch. The method is applied to maize starches with varying amylose contents; the starches were extruded so as to provide an analogue for processed food. The initial rates of digestion of amylose and amylopectin components were found to be the same for high-amylose starches. A small starch species, not present in the original starting material, was formed during the digestion process; this new species has a slower digestion rate and is probably formed by retrogradation of longer branches of amylose and amylopectin as they are partially or wholly liberated from their parent starch molecule during the digestion process. The data suggest that the well-known connection between high amylose content and resistant starch arises from the greater number of longer branches, which can form the small retrograded species. The method is useful for the purpose of comparisons between different starches undergoing the process of digestion, by observing the changes in their molecular structures, as an adjunct to detailed studies of the enzyme-resistant fraction.

  14. Evidence of a Conserved Molecular Response to Selection for Increased Brain Size in Primates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boddy, Amy M; Harrison, Peter W; Montgomery, Stephen H; Caravas, Jason A; Raghanti, Mary Ann; Phillips, Kimberley A; Mundy, Nicholas I; Wildman, Derek E

    2017-03-01

    The adaptive significance of human brain evolution has been frequently studied through comparisons with other primates. However, the evolution of increased brain size is not restricted to the human lineage but is a general characteristic of primate evolution. Whether or not these independent episodes of increased brain size share a common genetic basis is unclear. We sequenced and de novo assembled the transcriptome from the neocortical tissue of the most highly encephalized nonhuman primate, the tufted capuchin monkey (Cebus apella). Using this novel data set, we conducted a genome-wide analysis of orthologous brain-expressed protein coding genes to identify evidence of conserved gene-phenotype associations and species-specific adaptations during three independent episodes of brain size increase. We identify a greater number of genes associated with either total brain mass or relative brain size across these six species than show species-specific accelerated rates of evolution in individual large-brained lineages. We test the robustness of these associations in an expanded data set of 13 species, through permutation tests and by analyzing how genome-wide patterns of substitution co-vary with brain size. Many of the genes targeted by selection during brain expansion have glutamatergic functions or roles in cell cycle dynamics. We also identify accelerated evolution in a number of individual capuchin genes whose human orthologs are associated with human neuropsychiatric disorders. These findings demonstrate the value of phenotypically informed genome analyses, and suggest at least some aspects of human brain evolution have occurred through conserved gene-phenotype associations. Understanding these commonalities is essential for distinguishing human-specific selection events from general trends in brain evolution. © The Author(s) 2017. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Society for Molecular Biology and Evolution.

  15. Characterization of macromolecular complexes in red wine: Composition, molecular mass distribution and particle size.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bindon, Keren A; Carew, Anna L; Mierczynska-Vasilev, Agnieszka; Kassara, Stella; Kerslake, Fiona; Smith, Paul A

    2016-05-15

    Precipitates were prepared from two compositionally different Pinot noir wines with addition of excess ethanol, and contained primarily polysaccharide, tannin and protein. The ethanol-soluble material was further fractionated into polymeric (tannin) and monomeric phenolics. Tannin associated with precipitates was of a higher molecular mass than that remaining in ethanolic solution. Wine fractions were reconstituted at the ratios of the original wine and analyzed using nanoparticle tracking analysis. The average particle size of the tannin fraction was 75-89 nm, and increased when combined with the precipitate (≅ 200 nm). Addition of the monomeric fraction to the tannin-precipitate complex increased both the incidence and concentration of smaller particles, reducing the average particle size. The formation of aggregates occurred in all fractions and only minor differences in particle size distribution were found between wines. Differences in particle concentration between wines appear to be due to differences in the total concentration of macromolecules rather than compositional differences. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Molecular Clusters Size of Puerariae thomsonii Radix Aqueous Decoction and Relevance to Oral Absorption

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gong Wang

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available The multi-component system of traditional Chinese medicine (TCM is very complicated. The clusters are dynamic aggregates whose molecules are held together by hydrogen-bonded, Van der Waals forces or the opposite charges of particles attract each other. In this paper, field emission scanning electron microscopy proved that molecules form clusters in Pueraria thomsonii Benth (Fenge water decoction. Four kinds of Fenge water decoction, 0.07 g∙mL−1 (F-1, 0.1 g∙mL−1 (F-2, 0.17 g∙mL−1 (F-3, 0.35 g∙mL−1 (F-4; F-1, average diameter of molecular was about 120 nm; F-2, 195 nm; F-3, 256 nm; and F-4, 480 nm. The molecular size was shown to depend on concentration. Rabbits were given equal does of 2.8 g∙kg−1, to perfuse F-1, F-2, F-3, F-4 in volume of 80 mL, 56 mL, 33 mL, 17 mL, respectively. At 0–180 min to collect 2 mL blood from the rabbit ears middle arteries for metabolism fingerprints, the results show the particle size of molecular is smaller, the absorption of drugs is better instead. The acute blood stasis model rats were treatment with Fenge decoction of 1.5 g∙kg−1 for 14 days, the concentrations of Ang II in plasma were significantly lower in F-1 and F-2 groups than those in model group (p < 0.01 or p < 0.05, but there were no significantly difference in F-3 and F-4 groups than those in model group (p > 0.05. Despite the molecular aggregation is a common physical phenomenon, it influence on the kind and amount of molecule per unit volume. Molecules morphology influence on the absorption behavior of drugs in vivo therefore is to have an impact on pharmacological function.

  17. The one-sample PARAFAC approach reveals molecular size distributions of fluorescent components in dissolved organic matter

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wünsch, Urban; Murphy, Kathleen R.; Stedmon, Colin

    2017-01-01

    Molecular size plays an important role in dissolved organic matter (DOM) biogeochemistry, but its relationship with the fluorescent fraction of DOM (FDOM) remains poorly resolved. Here high-performance size exclusion chromatography (HPSEC) was coupled to fluorescence emission-excitation (EEM...

  18. The disappearance of macromolecules from the peritoneal cavity during continuous ambulatory peritoneal dialysis (CAPD) is not dependent on molecular size

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Krediet, R. T.; Struijk, D. G.; Koomen, G. C.; Hoek, F. J.; Arisz, L.

    1990-01-01

    The transport of macromolecules from the circulation to the peritoneal cavity is a size-selective restricted process, while the transport of these solutes from the peritoneal cavity is probably mainly by lymphatic absorption. If so, it should be independent of molecular size. Therefore, we studied

  19. AN INSIGHT INTO THE MOLECULAR STRUCTURE AND FUNCTION OF POLYGALACTURONASE INHIBITING PROTEIN (PGIP

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anju Meshram

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Plants lack the system of circulating antibodies, thus defense mechanism in plants depends on the capability of recognition and interaction with the invading pathogenic microorganisms and neutralising their effect via specific interactions. The first barrier of defense in plants is the cell wall made up of pectin consisting of homogalacturonan, rhamnogalacturonan I and rhamnogalacturonan II. The major component of pectin is homogalacturonan. Pathogenic fungi secrete polygalacturonase (PG to degrade the homopolygalacturonan of cell wall. Thus plants have pathogenesis-related protein in the cell wall to neutralise the effect of PG known as polygalacturonase inhibiting protein (PGIP. The interaction between PGIP and PG is very specific and effective and differs in different pathogenic fungi and plant species due to the components of plant system. The article presents a critical review on the molecular association of PGIP with PG in nature. An insight has been provided for the use of PGIP in the extracellular localization of mature proteins, in the inhibition of fungal infection, as an elicitor of immune response in plants with great economic and agricultural importance across the world.

  20. Functionality in Electrospun Nanofibrous Membranes Based on Fiber’s Size, Surface Area, and Molecular Orientation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Akihiko Tanioka

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Electrospinning is a versatile method for forming continuous thin fibers based on an electrohydrodynamic process. This method has the following advantages: (i the ability to produce thin fibers with diameters in the micrometer and nanometer ranges; (ii one-step forming of the two- or three-dimensional nanofiber network assemblies (nanofibrous membranes; and (iii applicability for a broad spectrum of molecules, such as synthetic and biological polymers and polymerless sol-gel systems. Electrospun nanofibrous membranes have received significant attention in terms of their practical applications. The major advantages of nanofibers or nanofibrous membranes are the functionalities based on their nanoscaled-size, highly specific surface area, and highly molecular orientation. These functionalities of the nanofibrous membranes can be controlled by their fiber diameter, surface chemistry and topology, and internal structure of the nanofibers. This report focuses on our studies and describes fundamental aspects and applications of electrospun nanofibrous membranes.

  1. Defined-size DNA triple crossover construct for molecular electronics: modification, positioning and conductance properties

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Linko, Veikko; Paasonen, Seppo-Tapio; Jussi Toppari, J [Nanoscience Center, Department of Physics, University of Jyvaeskylae, PO Box 35, FIN-40014 (Finland); Leppiniemi, Jenni; Hytoenen, Vesa P, E-mail: veikko.linko@jyu.fi [Institute of Biomedical Technology, University of Tampere and Tampere University Hospital, FIN-33014 (Finland)

    2011-07-08

    We present a novel, defined-size, small and rigid DNA template, a so-called B-A-B complex, based on DNA triple crossover motifs (TX tiles), which can be utilized in molecular scale patterning for nanoelectronics, plasmonics and sensing applications. The feasibility of the designed construct is demonstrated by functionalizing the TX tiles with one biotin-triethylene glycol (TEG) and efficiently decorating them with streptavidin, and furthermore by positioning and anchoring single thiol-modified B-A-B complexes to certain locations on a chip via dielectrophoretic trapping. Finally, we characterize the conductance properties of the non-functionalized construct, first by measuring DC conductivity and second by utilizing AC impedance spectroscopy in order to describe the conductivity mechanism of a single B-A-B complex using a detailed equivalent circuit model. This analysis also reveals further information about the conductivity of DNA structures in general.

  2. Characterization of landfill leachates by molecular size distribution, biodegradability, and inert chemical oxygen demand.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amaral, Míriam C S; Ferreira, Cynthia F A; Lange, Liséte Celina; Aquino, Sérgio F

    2009-05-01

    This work presents results from a detailed characterization of landfill leachates of different ages from a landfill in a major Brazilian city. This characterization consists of determining the molecular size distribution and the inert chemical oxygen demand (COD) and the biodegradability of both aerobic and anaerobic processes. Results show that leachate with a high COD concentration leachate has low biodegradability. A significant fraction of the COD is not characterized as protein, carbohydrate, or lipids, which reinforces the hypothesis that the remaining fraction was present in all leachate fractions (less than 1 kDa; between 1 and 10 kDa; between 10 and 100 kDa; and greater than 100 kDa) and is refractory. These results suggest that leachates with such characteristics require treatment systems that use physical-chemical processes as a pre- or post-treatment step to biological processes.

  3. Comparative characterization of humic substances extracted from freshwater and peat of different apparent molecular sizes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eliane Sloboda Rigobello

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available This paper compares the structural characteristics of aquatic humic substances (AHS with humic substances from peat (HSP through different analytical techniques, including elemental analysis, solid state 13C cross polarization/magic-angle-spinning nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy (13C CP-MAS NMR, ultraviolet/visible (UV/Vis spectroscopy and Fourier transform infrared (FTIR spectroscopy and total organic carbon (TOC. The AHS were extracted from water collected in a tributary of the Itapanhaú River (Bertioga/SP using XAD 8 resin, and the HSP were extracted from peat collected in the Mogi Guaçu River bank (Luis Antonio/SP with a KOH solution. After dialysis, both AHS and HSP extracts were filtered in membrane of 0.45 µm pore size (Fraction F1: < 0.45 µm and fractioned by ultrafiltration in different apparent molecular sizes (AMS (F2: 100 kDa-0.45 μm; F3: 30 kDa-100 kDa and F4: < 30 kDa. The extracts with the lowest AMS (F3 and F4 showed a higher number of aliphatic carbons than aromatic carbons, a higher concentration of groups containing oxygen and a higher percentage of fulvic acids (FA than humic acids (HA for both AHS and HSP. However, the AHS presented higher FA than HA content in relation to the HSP and distinct structural properties.

  4. Size effect on local magnetic moments in ferrimagnetic molecular complexes: an XMCD investigation

    CERN Document Server

    Champion, G; Cartier-Dit-Moulin, C; Arrio, M A; Sainctavit, P; Zacchigna, M; Zangrando, M; Finazzi, M; Parmigiani, F; Mathoniere, C

    2003-01-01

    Molecular chemistry allows to synthesize new magnetic systems with controlled properties such as size, magnetization or anisotropy. The theoretical study of the magnetic properties of small molecules (from 2 to 10 metallic cations per molecule) predicts that the magnetization at saturation of each ion does not reach the expected value for uncoupled ions when the magnetic interaction is antiferromagnetic. The quantum origin of this effect is due to the linear combination of several spin states building the wave function of the ground state and clusters of finite size and of finite spin value exhibit this property. When single crystals are available, spin densities on each atom can be experimentally given by polarized neutron diffraction (PND) experiments. In the case of bimetallic MnCu powdered samples, we will show that x-ray magnetic circular dichroism (XMCD) spectroscopy can be used to follow the evolution of the spin distribution on the Mn sup I sup I and Cu sup I sup I sites when passing from a dinuclear ...

  5. Effects of Microbubble Size on Ultrasound-Induced Transdermal Delivery of High-Molecular-Weight Drugs.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ai-Ho Liao

    Full Text Available The transdermal delivery of a wide range of high-molecular-weight drugs is limited by the stratum corneum layer of the epidermis representing a significant barrier to penetration across the skin. This study first determined the different effects of different-size ultrasound (US contrast agents and microbubbles (MBs for enhancing the transdermal delivery of high-molecular-weight drugs. The effects of US-mediated different-size (1.4, 2.1, and 3.5 μm MBs (as a contrast agent and ascorbyl tetraisopalmitate (VC-IP on enhancing skin transdermal delivery were demonstrated both in vitro and in vivo. The results indicated that at a power density of 3 W/cm2 the penetration depth in group US combined with 3.5-μm MBs and penetrating VC-IP (U+3.5 was 34% and 14% higher than those in groups US combined with 1.4-μm MBs and penetrating VC-IP (U+1.4 and US combined with 2.1-μm MBs and penetrating VC-IP (U+2.1, respectively, for the agarose phantoms, while the corresponding increases for pigskin were 37% and 19%.In terms of the skin permeation of VC-IP, the VC-IP concentration in group U+3.5 was 23% and 10% higher in than those in groups U+1.4 and U+2.1, respectively. The whitening effect (luminosity index of mice skin in group U+3.5 had increased (significantly by 28% after 1 week, by 34% after 2 weeks, and tended to stabilize after 3 weeks (45% in C57BL/6J mice over a 4-week experimental period. The results obtained in this study indicate that combining US with MBs of different sizes can produce different degrees of skin permeability so as to enhance the delivery of VC-IP to inhibit melanogenesis, without damaging the skin in mice.

  6. Size-dependent melting modes and behaviors of Ag nanoparticles: a molecular dynamics study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liang, Tianshou; Zhou, Dejian; Wu, Zhaohua; Shi, Pengpeng

    2017-12-01

    The size-dependent melting behaviors and mechanisms of Ag nanoparticles (NPs) with diameters of 3.5–16 nm were investigated by molecular dynamics (MD). Two distinct melting modes, non-premelting and premelting with transition ranges of about 7–8 nm, for Ag NPs were demonstrated via the evolution of distribution and transition of atomic physical states during annealing. The small Ag NPs (3.5–7 nm) melt abruptly without a stable liquid shell before the melting point, which is characterized as non-premelting. A solid-solid crystal transformation is conducted through the migration of adatoms on the surface of Ag NPs with diameters of 3.5–6 nm before the initial melting, which is mainly responsible for slightly increasing the melting point of Ag NPs. On the other hand, surface premelting of Ag NPs with diameters of 8–16 nm propagates from the outer shell to the inner core with initial anisotropy and late isotropy as the temperature increases, and the close-packed facets {111} melt by a side-consumed way which is responsible for facets {111} melting in advance relative to the crystallographic plane {111}. Once a stable liquid shell is formed, its size-independent minimum thickness is obtained, and a three-layer structure of atomic physical states is set up. Lastly, the theory of point defect-pair (vacancy-interstitial) severing as the mechanism of formation and movement of the solid-liquid interface was also confirmed. Our study provides a basic understanding and theoretical guidance for the research, production and application of Ag NPs.

  7. Molecular turnover time of soil organic matter in particle-size fractions of an arable soil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bol, Roland; Poirier, Natacha; Balesdent, Jérôme; Gleixner, Gerd

    2009-08-30

    The composition and molecular residence time of soil organic matter (SOM) in four particle-size fractions (POM >200 microm, POM 63-200 microm, silt and clay) were determined using Curie-point pyrolysis/gas chromatography coupled on-line to mass spectrometry. The fractions were isolated from soils, either continuously with a C(3) wheat (soil (13)C value = -26.4 per thousand), or transferred to a C(4) maize (soil (13)C value = -20.2 per thousand) cropping system 23 years ago. Pyrograms contained up to 45 different pyrolysis peaks; 37 (ca. 85%) were identifiable compounds. Lignins and carbohydrates dominated the POM fractions, proteins were abundant, but lignin was (nearly) absent in the silt and clay fractions. The mean turnover time (MRT) for the pyrolysis products in particulate organic matter (POM) was generally lignin) based on chemical recalcitrance was not observed in these arable soils. Association/presence of C with silt or clays in soils clearly increased MRT values, but in an as yet unresolved manner (i.e. 'truly' stabilized, or potentially still 'labile' but just not accessible C). 2009 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  8. Calculation of molecular weights of humic substances from colligative data: Application to aquatic humus and its molecular size fractions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reuter, J. H.; Perdue, E. M.

    1981-11-01

    A rigorous mathematical expression for the dependence of colligative properties on acid dissociation of water soluble humic substances is presented. New data for number average molecular weights of a river derived humic material and its gel permeation Chromatographic fractions are compared with M¯n values obtained by a reevaluation of previously published experimental observations on soil and water fulvic acids. The results reveal a remarkable similarity of fulvic acids from widely different sources with respect to number-average molecular weight.

  9. The rate of DNA evolution: Effects of body size and temperature on the molecular clock

    OpenAIRE

    Gillooly, James F.; Andrew P. Allen; West, Geoffrey B.; Brown, James H.

    2004-01-01

    Observations that rates of molecular evolution vary widely within and among lineages have cast doubts on the existence of a single “molecular clock.” Differences in the timing of evolutionary events estimated from genetic and fossil evidence have raised further questions about the accuracy of molecular clocks. Here, we present a model of nucleotide substitution that combines theory on metabolic rate with the now-classic neutral theory of molecular evolution. The model quantitatively predicts ...

  10. A practical law to predict the appearance sizes of multiply charged rare-gas and molecular clusters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonhommeau, David A.

    2017-10-01

    A dimensionless law depending on cluster size N is derived from the Rayleigh limit expressed in reduced Lennard-Jones (LJ) units to predict the critical sizes nc (z) of clusters carrying z positive charges. This relationship provides suitable estimates of nc (z) (z = 2 - 4) for rare-gas clusters, including neon clusters whose predicted critical sizes deviate from experimental expectations by less than 12% for different choices of LJ parameters. An extension to 11 nonpolar and 15 polar molecular clusters, from dimers to aromatic hydrocarbons, is achieved that demonstrates the broad applicability of the formula despite inaccuracies for highly polar systems.

  11. Molecular size of alpha 1- and beta-adrenoceptors in rat brain cortex as determined by a radiation inactivation method.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mogilnicka, E; Nielsen, M

    1986-04-02

    Frozen whole rat cerebral cortex was exposed to 10 MeV electrons from a linear accelerator. Based on the theory of target size analysis, the in situ molecular weight of alpha 1-adrenoceptors (labelled by [3H]prazosin) and beta-adrenoceptors (labelled by [3H]dihydroalprenolol) was 57 800 daltons and 42 600 daltons, respectively.

  12. Molecular size fractionation of soil Fulvic Acid by Gel Filtration Chromatography and analysis of their fluorescence characteristics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shin, Hyun-Sang [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of); Chung, Kun-Ho; Lee, Wan-No; Cho, Yeong-Hyun; Choi, Geun-Sik; Lee, Chang-Woo [Seoul National Univ. of Technology, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2004-04-15

    The molecular size distribution and fluorescence properties of soil Fulvic Acids (FA) were characterized by using Gel Filtration Chromatography (GFC) and luminescence spectroscopy. The objectives of this work were to fractionate the FA extracted from a forest soil into different nominal molecular size using GFC system and to characterize the fluorescence properties (excitation, emission and synchronous) of these fractions using luminescence spectrometer. The GFC column was calibrated with polyethylene glycols, acetone and dextrane Blue. The total permeation volume of the GFC system was 404 mL and the void volume 130 mL. The GFC molecular weight of the soil FA was in the range of 190{approx}8,900 Dalton and the molecular weight at the peak on the chromatogram was 930 Dalton. The fluorescence intensity ratio (I{sub 498nm}/I{sub 392nm}) was found to be increased with an increasing molecular weight. This results may suggest that the fulvic acid fractions with high molecular weight have large amount of the condensed aromatic compound.

  13. Uveal melanoma prognostication: from lesion size and cell type to molecular class.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gill, Harmeet S; Char, Devron H

    2012-06-01

    To review the evidence for molecular genetic testing of uveal melanoma in the context of prognostic indicators of metastasis and tumour-related mortality. Review of the literature and personal experiences of the authors. We conducted a MEDLINE, Embase, and PubMed literature search (1980-2011) for English-language abstracts and full-text references regarding molecular genetic testing of uveal melanoma. Search terms included uveal, melanoma, cytogenetic, gene, and molecular. All studies in which patients with primary uveal melanoma underwent molecular genetic testing with survival data for disease-related metastasis and mortality were reviewed. From 176 identified articles, 40 were scientific studies of uveal melanomas that included histologic and molecular genetic analysis. Of those, 24 included survival data, correlation of molecular genetic features with other prognostic indicators, or both. Cytogenetic and microarray gene expression analysis allows uveal melanoma lesions to be classified as high risk or low risk for metastasis and disease-related mortality. Gene expression profiling supersedes clinical, histologic, and cytogenetic prognosticators. Uveal melanoma comprises a heterogeneous group of malignancies based on its molecular biology. Molecular class by gene expression profiling has the most strongly predictive value for uveal melanoma metastasis and mortality. Copyright © 2012 Canadian Ophthalmological Society. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Comparable investigation of the molecular size distribution and the amount of humic substances isolated from ONKALO, Olkiluoto, 2011

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Luste, S.; Maekelae, J.; Manninen, P. [Ramboll Finland Oy, Espoo (Finland)

    2012-06-15

    The humic substances (HS) at groundwater from ONKALO, Olkiluoto were studied in order to determine the apparent molecular size distribution and the amount of humic substances. Humic substances were isolated from the water sample using DAX-8 resin and eluted with 0.1 M NaOH. The molecular size distribution was defined using high performance size exclusion chromatography (HPSEC) and ultraviolet (UV) and refractive index (RI) detector. In the SEC calibration (polystyrene sulfonate) sodium salts (PSS) were employed. Different eluents (NaNO{sub 3}, Na-acetate and asetonitrile) with phosphate buffer and distinct ionic strengths were studied in order to optimize the determination method. The amount of humic substances was determined using total organic carbon (TOC) measurements. The results were compared with the previous ones in order to find out the variation of different methods (HPSEC) and to follow up the HS quantity (TOC). The method developed during the study is considered to be suitable for the HS molecular size distribution follow up, although the method development is suggested to be continued. (orig.)

  15. Icosahedron-fcc transition size by molecular dynamics simulation of Lennard-Jones clusters at a finite temperature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ikeshoji, T; Torchet, G; de Feraudy, M F; Koga, K

    2001-03-01

    We studied finite-temperature ensembles of solid clusters produced by cooling liquid droplets either by evaporation or by a thermostat through a molecular dynamics calculation using the Lennard-Jones potential. The ensembles consist of either single or binary component clusters with 25% of the atoms 8% smaller in diameter than the other 75%. These clusters (380 clusters in total) exhibit various structures in the size range of n=160-2200, where n is the number of atoms in a cluster. For increasing size, the clusters show a gradual transition from icosahedral to a variety of structures: decahedral, face centered cubic, a small amount of hexagonal, and some icosahedral structures. They are asymmetrical or faulted. Electron diffraction patterns calculated with average structure factors of clusters after grouping them into several size regions are very similar to those experimentally observed. The size transition is around n=450 for single component clusters whatever the cooling process, evaporation or thermostat. This size is smaller than the experimental transition size estimated for argon clusters formed in a supersonic expansion. The transition size for binary component clusters is around n=600 for evaporative cooling, and larger for thermostatic cooling. The larger transition size found for the binary component clusters is consistent with the large icosahedral Au-Fe and Au-Cu alloy clusters observed experimentally.

  16. Influence of the apparent molecular size of humic substances on the efficiency of coagulation using Fenton's reagent

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    MARCELO DE JULIO

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available This work used Fenton's reagent as a coagulating agent in the treatment of water samples with high true colour caused by humic substances (HS extracted from peat. In addition, the effects of the apparent molecular size of HS on coagulation, flocculation and flotation were studied. To that end, four distinct water samples having the same true colour were prepared using HS with different molecular sizes, which were obtained by ultrafiltration fractioning. Through optimisation of coagulant dosage and coagulation pH, as well as posterior construction of coagulation diagrams for each water sample, it was verified that the sample prepared with the smallest apparent molecular size of HS was the most difficult to treat, requiring higher coagulant (Fenton's reagent dosages than samples prepared with larger HS molecular sizes. Furthermore, filtration experiments after dissolved air flotation (DAF were carried out in an attempt to simulate conventional treatment. The most representative results in filtered water were: apparent colour ≤ 3 HU; turbidity Este trabalho empregou o reagente de Fenton como agente coagulante no tratamento de águas contendo cor elevada causada pela introdução de substâncias húmicas extraídas de turfa. Além disto, foi estudado o efeito do tamanho molecular aparente das substâncias húmicas na eficiência da coagulação, floculação e flotação de águas; para isto foram preparadas quatro águas distintas apresentado a mesma cor verdadeira, mas com substâncias húmicas de diferentes tamanhos moleculares, obtidas por fracionamento por ultrafiltração. Por meio da otimização da dosagem de coagulante e respectivo pH de coagulação e posterior construção dos diagramas de coagulação para cada água de estudo, verificou-se que a água preparada com as substâncias húmicas de menor tamanho molecular aparente apresentou maior grau de dificuldade para tratamento, requerendo dosagens de coagulante (reagente de Fenton bem

  17. Extension of the Dubinin-Astakhov equation for evaluating the micropore size distribution of a modified carbon molecular sieve.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gil, A; Korili, S A; Cherkashinin, G Yu

    2003-06-15

    A new method for the characterization of the pore size distribution of microporous solids is applied on data obtained for activated carbon molecular sieve samples. In this method, based on the Dubinin-Astakhov equation, a simple numerical algorithm is used for the reconstruction of the micropore size distribution from the integral equation that represents the experimental nitrogen adsorption isotherm. The results are compared with the ones obtained on the basis of the well-known Horvath-Kawazoe method. The samples used in this study come from a carbon molecular sieve that has been treated with solutions of concentrated HNO3 at various temperatures and with solutions of H2O2 of various concentrations.

  18. Nano- and Micro-sized Molecularly Imprinted Polymer Particles on Solid Surfaces

    OpenAIRE

    Kamra, Tripta

    2015-01-01

    Molecularly imprinted polymers (MIPs) are artificial receptors made by imprinting template molecules in a polymer matrix followed by their removal through washing to obtain a specific and selective template cavities. This property of the MIPs have made them a very efficient material for diverse applications such as chromatography, purification, drug sensing, etc. Recently, zero-dimensional polymer materials, in the present case molecularly imprinted polymer nanoparticles (MIP nanoparticles), ...

  19. Microbe-associated molecular pattern (MAMP) signatures, synergy, size and charge

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Aslam, Shazia N.; Erbs, Gitte; Morrissey, Kate L.

    2009-01-01

    Triggering of defences by microbes has mainly been investigated using single elicitors or microbe-associated molecular patterns (MAMPs), but MAMPs are released in planta as complex mixtures together with endogenous oligogalacturonan (OGA) elicitor. We investigated the early responses in Arabidopsis...

  20. Self-consistent field theory based molecular dynamics with linear system-size scaling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Richters, Dorothee [Institute of Mathematics and Center for Computational Sciences, Johannes Gutenberg University Mainz, Staudinger Weg 9, D-55128 Mainz (Germany); Kühne, Thomas D., E-mail: kuehne@uni-mainz.de [Institute of Physical Chemistry and Center for Computational Sciences, Johannes Gutenberg University Mainz, Staudinger Weg 7, D-55128 Mainz (Germany); Technical and Macromolecular Chemistry, University of Paderborn, Warburger Str. 100, D-33098 Paderborn (Germany)

    2014-04-07

    We present an improved field-theoretic approach to the grand-canonical potential suitable for linear scaling molecular dynamics simulations using forces from self-consistent electronic structure calculations. It is based on an exact decomposition of the grand canonical potential for independent fermions and does neither rely on the ability to localize the orbitals nor that the Hamilton operator is well-conditioned. Hence, this scheme enables highly accurate all-electron linear scaling calculations even for metallic systems. The inherent energy drift of Born-Oppenheimer molecular dynamics simulations, arising from an incomplete convergence of the self-consistent field cycle, is circumvented by means of a properly modified Langevin equation. The predictive power of the present approach is illustrated using the example of liquid methane under extreme conditions.

  1. Effects of system size and cooling rate on the structure and properties of sodium borosilicate glasses from molecular dynamics simulations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deng, Lu; Du, Jincheng

    2018-01-14

    Borosilicate glasses form an important glass forming system in both glass science and technologies. The structure and property changes of borosilicate glasses as a function of thermal history in terms of cooling rate during glass formation and simulation system sizes used in classical molecular dynamics (MD) simulation were investigated with recently developed composition dependent partial charge potentials. Short and medium range structural features such as boron coordination, Si and B Qn distributions, and ring size distributions were analyzed to elucidate the effects of cooling rate and simulation system size on these structure features and selected glass properties such as glass transition temperature, vibration density of states, and mechanical properties. Neutron structure factors, neutron broadened pair distribution functions, and vibrational density of states were calculated and compared with results from experiments as well as ab initio calculations to validate the structure models. The results clearly indicate that both cooling rate and system size play an important role on the structures of these glasses, mainly by affecting the 3B and 4B distributions and consequently properties of the glasses. It was also found that different structure features and properties converge at different sizes or cooling rates; thus convergence tests are needed in simulations of the borosilicate glasses depending on the targeted properties. The results also shed light on the complex thermal history dependence on structure and properties in borosilicate glasses and the protocols in MD simulations of these and other glass materials.

  2. An efficient size-dependent shear deformable shell model and molecular dynamics simulation for axial instability analysis of silicon nanoshells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sahmani, S; Aghdam, M M; Bahrami, M

    2017-10-01

    Understanding the size-dependent behavior of structures at nanoscale is essential in order to have an effective design of nanosystems. In the current investigation, the surface elasticity theory is extended to study the nonlinear buckling and postbuckling response of axially loaded silicon cylindrical naoshells. Thereby, an efficient size-dependent shear deformable shell model is developed including the size effect of surface free energy. A boundary layer theory of shell buckling in conjunction with a perturbation-based solution methodology is employed to predict the size dependency in the buckling loads and postbuckling behavior of silicon nanoshells having various thicknesses. After that, on the basis of the Tersoff empirical potential, a molecular dynamics (MD) simulation is performed for a silicon cylindrical nanoshell with thickness of four times of silicon lattice constant, the critical buckling load and critical shortening of which are extracted and compared with those of the developed non-classical shell model. It is demonstrated that by taking the effects of surface free energy into account, a very good agreement is achieved between the results of the developed size-dependent continuum shell model and those of MD simulation. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Effects of system size and cooling rate on the structure and properties of sodium borosilicate glasses from molecular dynamics simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deng, Lu; Du, Jincheng

    2018-01-01

    Borosilicate glasses form an important glass forming system in both glass science and technologies. The structure and property changes of borosilicate glasses as a function of thermal history in terms of cooling rate during glass formation and simulation system sizes used in classical molecular dynamics (MD) simulation were investigated with recently developed composition dependent partial charge potentials. Short and medium range structural features such as boron coordination, Si and B Qn distributions, and ring size distributions were analyzed to elucidate the effects of cooling rate and simulation system size on these structure features and selected glass properties such as glass transition temperature, vibration density of states, and mechanical properties. Neutron structure factors, neutron broadened pair distribution functions, and vibrational density of states were calculated and compared with results from experiments as well as ab initio calculations to validate the structure models. The results clearly indicate that both cooling rate and system size play an important role on the structures of these glasses, mainly by affecting the 3B and 4B distributions and consequently properties of the glasses. It was also found that different structure features and properties converge at different sizes or cooling rates; thus convergence tests are needed in simulations of the borosilicate glasses depending on the targeted properties. The results also shed light on the complex thermal history dependence on structure and properties in borosilicate glasses and the protocols in MD simulations of these and other glass materials.

  4. Massively parallel molecular-dynamics simulation of ice crystallisation and melting: The roles of system size, ensemble, and electrostatics

    Science.gov (United States)

    English, Niall J.

    2014-12-01

    Ice crystallisation and melting was studied via massively parallel molecular dynamics under periodic boundary conditions, using approximately spherical ice nano-particles (both "isolated" and as a series of heterogeneous "seeds") of varying size, surrounded by liquid water and at a variety of temperatures. These studies were performed for a series of systems ranging in size from ˜1 × 106 to 8.6 × 106 molecules, in order to establish system-size effects upon the nano-clusters" crystallisation and dissociation kinetics. Both "traditional" four-site and "single-site" and water models were used, with and without formal point charges, dipoles, and electrostatics, respectively. Simulations were carried out in the microcanonical and isothermal-isobaric ensembles, to assess the influence of "artificial" thermo- and baro-statting, and important disparities were observed, which declined upon using larger systems. It was found that there was a dependence upon system size for both ice growth and dissociation, in that larger systems favoured slower growth and more rapid melting, given the lower extent of "communication" of ice nano-crystallites with their periodic replicae in neighbouring boxes. Although the single-site model exhibited less variation with system size vis-à-vis the multiple-site representation with explicit electrostatics, its crystallisation-dissociation kinetics was artificially fast.

  5. Evidence of a Conserved Molecular Response to Selection for Increased Brain Size in Primates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harrison, Peter W.; Caravas, Jason A.; Raghanti, Mary Ann; Phillips, Kimberley A.; Mundy, Nicholas I.

    2017-01-01

    The adaptive significance of human brain evolution has been frequently studied through comparisons with other primates. However, the evolution of increased brain size is not restricted to the human lineage but is a general characteristic of primate evolution. Whether or not these independent episodes of increased brain size share a common genetic basis is unclear. We sequenced and de novo assembled the transcriptome from the neocortical tissue of the most highly encephalized nonhuman primate, the tufted capuchin monkey (Cebus apella). Using this novel data set, we conducted a genome-wide analysis of orthologous brain-expressed protein coding genes to identify evidence of conserved gene–phenotype associations and species-specific adaptations during three independent episodes of brain size increase. We identify a greater number of genes associated with either total brain mass or relative brain size across these six species than show species-specific accelerated rates of evolution in individual large-brained lineages. We test the robustness of these associations in an expanded data set of 13 species, through permutation tests and by analyzing how genome-wide patterns of substitution co-vary with brain size. Many of the genes targeted by selection during brain expansion have glutamatergic functions or roles in cell cycle dynamics. We also identify accelerated evolution in a number of individual capuchin genes whose human orthologs are associated with human neuropsychiatric disorders. These findings demonstrate the value of phenotypically informed genome analyses, and suggest at least some aspects of human brain evolution have occurred through conserved gene–phenotype associations. Understanding these commonalities is essential for distinguishing human-specific selection events from general trends in brain evolution. PMID:28391320

  6. Thermal conductivity of vitreous silica from molecular dynamics simulations: The effects of force field, heat flux and system size

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tian, Ye; Du, Jincheng; Han, Wei; Zu, Xiaotao; Yuan, Xiaodong; Zheng, Wanguo

    2017-02-01

    The thermal conductivity of vitreous silica is computed using the direct method in molecular dynamics simulations with three sets of empirical force fields, including the BKS, Teter, and ReaxFF, to investigate their performance in thermal characterization. Various heat flux and system sizes are used in the simulations to evaluate the statistical uncertainty and the finite-size effect. While all these potentials can reproduce realistic silica structures, the ReaxFF provides better agreement with experiments at 300 K than the BKS and Teter, which is due to its improved description of low-frequency vibrations. Increasing the heat flux and cross-sectional area tends to reduce the calculated standard deviation induced by thermal fluctuations, thus contributing to more accurate thermal conductivity predictions.

  7. Molecular strain typing of Brucella abortus isolates from Italy by two VNTR allele sizing technologies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Santis, Riccardo; Ancora, Massimo; De Massis, Fabrizio; Ciammaruconi, Andrea; Zilli, Katiuscia; Di Giannatale, Elisabetta; Pittiglio, Valentina; Fillo, Silvia; Lista, Florigio

    2013-10-01

    Brucellosis, one of the most important re-emerging zoonoses in many countries, is caused by bacteria belonging to the genus Brucella. Furthermore these bacteria represent potential biological warfare agents and the identification of species and biovars of field strains may be crucial for tracing back source of infection, allowing to discriminate naturally occurring outbreaks instead of bioterrorist events. In the last years, multiple-locus variable-number tandem repeat analysis (MLVA) has been proposed as complement of the classical biotyping methods and it has been applied for genotyping large collections of Brucella spp. At present, the MLVA band profiles may be resolved by automated or manual procedures. The Lab on a chip technology represents a valid alternative to standard genotyping techniques (as agarose gel electrophoresis) and it has been previously used for Brucella genotyping. Recently, a new high-throughput genotyping analysis system based on capillary gel electrophoresis, the QIAxcel, has been described. The aim of the study was to evaluate the ability of two DNA sizing equipments, the QIAxcel System and the Lab chip GX, to correctly call alleles at the sixteen loci including one frequently used MLVA assay for Brucella genotyping. The results confirmed that these technologies represent a meaningful advancement in high-throughput Brucella genotyping. Considering the accuracy required to confidently resolve loci discrimination, QIAxcel shows a better ability to measure VNTR allele sizes compared to LabChip GX.

  8. Charge- and Size-Selective Molecular Separation using Ultrathin Cellulose Membranes

    KAUST Repository

    Puspasari, Tiara

    2016-08-30

    To date, it is still a challenge to prepare high-flux and highselectivity microporous membranes thinner than 20 nm without introducing defects. In this work, we report for the first time the application of cellulose membranes for selective separation of small molecules. A freestanding cellulose membrane as thin as 10 nm has been prepared through regeneration of trimethylsilyl cellulose (TMSC). The freestanding membrane can be transferred to any desired substrate and shows a normalized flux as high as 700 L m−2 h−1 bar−1 when supported by a porous alumina disc. According to filtration experiments, the membrane exhibits precise size-sieving performances with an estimated pore size between 1.5–3.5 nm depending on the regeneration period and initial TMSC concentration. A perfect discrimination of anionic molecules over neutral species is demonstrated. Moreover, the membrane demonstrates high reproducibility, high scale-up potential, and excellent stability over two months.

  9. The effect of alcohols on red blood cell mechanical properties and membrane fluidity depends on their molecular size.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sonmez, Melda; Ince, Huseyin Yavuz; Yalcin, Ozlem; Ajdžanović, Vladimir; Spasojević, Ivan; Meiselman, Herbert J; Baskurt, Oguz K

    2013-01-01

    The role of membrane fluidity in determining red blood cell (RBC) deformability has been suggested by a number of studies. The present investigation evaluated alterations of RBC membrane fluidity, deformability and stability in the presence of four linear alcohols (methanol, ethanol, propanol and butanol) using ektacytometry and electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) spectroscopy. All alcohols had a biphasic effect on deformability such that it increased then decreased with increasing concentration; the critical concentration for reversal was an inverse function of molecular size. EPR results showed biphasic changes of near-surface fluidity (i.e., increase then decrease) and a decreased fluidity of the lipid core; rank order of effectiveness was butanol > propanol > ethanol > methanol, with a significant correlation between near-surface fluidity and deformability (r = 0.697; palcohol enhanced the impairment of RBC deformability caused by subjecting cells to 100 Pa shear stress for 300 s, with significant differences from control being observed at higher concentrations of all four alcohols. The level of hemolysis was dependent on molecular size and concentration, whereas echinocytic shape transformation (i.e., biconcave disc to crenated morphology) was observed only for ethanol and propanol. These results are in accordance with available data obtained on model membranes. They document the presence of mechanical links between RBC deformability and near-surface membrane fluidity, chain length-dependence of the ability of alcohols to alter RBC mechanical behavior, and the biphasic response of RBC deformability and near-surface membrane fluidity to increasing alcohol concentrations.

  10. The Effect of Alcohols on Red Blood Cell Mechanical Properties and Membrane Fluidity Depends on Their Molecular Size

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sonmez, Melda; Ince, Huseyin Yavuz; Yalcin, Ozlem; Ajdžanović, Vladimir; Spasojević, Ivan; Meiselman, Herbert J.; Baskurt, Oguz K.

    2013-01-01

    The role of membrane fluidity in determining red blood cell (RBC) deformability has been suggested by a number of studies. The present investigation evaluated alterations of RBC membrane fluidity, deformability and stability in the presence of four linear alcohols (methanol, ethanol, propanol and butanol) using ektacytometry and electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) spectroscopy. All alcohols had a biphasic effect on deformability such that it increased then decreased with increasing concentration; the critical concentration for reversal was an inverse function of molecular size. EPR results showed biphasic changes of near-surface fluidity (i.e., increase then decrease) and a decreased fluidity of the lipid core; rank order of effectiveness was butanol > propanol > ethanol > methanol, with a significant correlation between near-surface fluidity and deformability (r = 0.697; palcohol enhanced the impairment of RBC deformability caused by subjecting cells to 100 Pa shear stress for 300 s, with significant differences from control being observed at higher concentrations of all four alcohols. The level of hemolysis was dependent on molecular size and concentration, whereas echinocytic shape transformation (i.e., biconcave disc to crenated morphology) was observed only for ethanol and propanol. These results are in accordance with available data obtained on model membranes. They document the presence of mechanical links between RBC deformability and near-surface membrane fluidity, chain length-dependence of the ability of alcohols to alter RBC mechanical behavior, and the biphasic response of RBC deformability and near-surface membrane fluidity to increasing alcohol concentrations. PMID:24086751

  11. Adsorption of volatile organic compounds by metal-organic frameworks MIL-101: influence of molecular size and shape.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Kun; Sun, Qian; Xue, Feng; Lin, Daohui

    2011-11-15

    Adsorption of gaseous volatile organic compounds (VOCs) on metal-organic frameworks MIL-101, a novel porous adsorbent with extremely large Langmuir surface area of 5870 m(2)/g and pore volume of 1.85 cm(3)/g, and the influence of VOC molecular size and shape on adsorption were investigated in this study. We observed that MIL-101 is a potential superior adsorbent for the sorptive removal of VOCs including polar acetone and nonpolar benzene, toluene, ethylbeznene, and xylenes. MIL-101 is of higher adsorption capacities for all selected VOCs than zeolite, activated carbon and other reported adsorbents. Adsorption of VOCs on MIL-101 is captured by a pore filling mechanism, showing the size and shape selectivity of VOC molecules. These prove to be a negative linear relationship between the volume adsorption capacities of VOCs and their molecular cross-sectional area values. Most VOC molecules, such as acetone, benzene, toluene, ethylbenzene and p-xylene, enter into MIL-101 pores with the planes having the minimum diameters. However, m-xylene and o-xylene may fill into the pores with the planes having the maximum diameters because of the preferred interaction of MIL-101 with the two methyl groups of adsorbate molecules. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. Evaporation of liquid droplets of nano- and micro-meter size as a function of molecular mass and intermolecular interactions: experiments and molecular dynamics simulations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hołyst, Robert; Litniewski, Marek; Jakubczyk, Daniel

    2017-09-13

    Transport of heat to the surface of a liquid is a limiting step in the evaporation of liquids into an inert gas. Molecular dynamics (MD) simulations of a two component Lennard-Jones (LJ) fluid revealed two modes of energy transport from a vapour to an interface of an evaporating droplet of liquid. Heat is transported according to the equation of temperature diffusion, far from the droplet of radius R. The heat flux, in this region, is proportional to temperature gradient and heat conductivity in the vapour. However at some distance from the interface, Aλ, (where λ is the mean free path in the gas), the temperature has a discontinuity and heat is transported ballistically i.e. by direct individual collisions of gas molecules with the interface. This ballistic transport reduces the heat flux (and consequently the mass flux) by the factor R/(R + Aλ) in comparison to the flux obtained from temperature diffusion. Thus it slows down the evaporation of droplets of sizes R ∼ Aλ and smaller (practically for sizes from 103 nm down to 1 nm). We analyzed parameter A as a function of interactions between molecules and their masses. The rescaled parameter, A(kBTb/ε11)1/2, is a linear function of the ratio of the molecular mass of the liquid molecules to the molecular mass of the gas molecules, m1/m2 (for a series of chemically similar compounds). Here ε11 is the interaction parameter between molecules in the liquid (proportional to the enthalpy of evaporation) and Tb is the temperature of the gas in the bulk. We tested the predictions of MD simulations in experiments performed on droplets of ethylene glycol, diethylene glycol, triethylene glycol and tetraethylene glycol. They were suspended in an electrodynamic trap and evaporated into dry nitrogen gas. A changes from ∼1 (for ethylene glycol) to approximately 10 (for tetraethylene glycol) and has the same dependence on molecular parameters as obtained for the LJ fluid in MD simulations. The value of x = A(kBTb/ε11

  13. Surface hydrophilic modification with a sugar moiety for a uniform-sized polymer molecularly imprinted for phenobarbital in serum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hua, Kuichang; Zhang, Lei; Zhang, Zhenhui; Guo, Yong; Guo, Tianying

    2011-08-01

    A uniform-sized polymer molecularly imprinted for phenobarbital, which is surface modified by a sugar moiety, has been prepared through a two-step swelling polymerization method using polystyrene beads as seeds, phenobarbital as the template, 4-vinylpyridine as a functional monomer, ethylene glycol dimethacrylate as a cross-linker and 2-O-meth-acryloyloxyethoxyl-(2,3,4,6- tetra-O-acetyl-β-d-galactopyranosyl)-(1-4)-2,3,6-tri-O-acetyl-β-d-glucopyranoside as a surface-modifying glycomonomer, respectively. After deprotecting the glycopolymer, a surface sugar moiety-modified, hydrophilic, molecularly imprinted polymer for phenobarbital (glyco-MIP) was obtained. The resulting polymer beads were packed into a stainless steel column to evaluate their chromatographic characteristics by high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC). Good selectivity for phenobarbital was obtained with the glyco-MIP compared to the unmodified molecularly imprinted polymer, which revealed that the recognition sites of phenobarbital were unchanged with sugar moiety surface modification. Furthermore, bovine serum albumin was almost completely recovered from the glyco-MIP column, which indicates that the glyco-MIP materials can be used to separate and analyze drugs in complex samples, such as biological samples. The results of pretreatment with and analysis of phenobarbital in serum suggest that this material can be used to analyze phenobarbital in serum through a pretreatment and reverse-phase HPLC analysis process. Copyright © 2011 Acta Materialia Inc. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Iron Binding and Iron Removal Efficiency of Desferrioxamine Based Polymeric Iron Chelators: Influence of Molecular Size and Chelator Density.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamilton, Jasmine L; Ul-Haq, Muhammad Imran; Creagh, A Louise; Haynes, Charles A; Kizhakkedathu, Jayachandran N

    2017-03-01

    Desferrioxamine (DFO) is a clinically approved, high affinity iron chelator used for the treatment of iron overload. Due to its short half-life and toxicity, DFO is administered for 8-12 h per day, 5-7 d per week. In this manuscript, the influence of molecular properties of hyperbranched polyglycerol (HPG)-DFO conjugates on their iron binding by isothermal titration calorimetry, iron removal efficiency from ferritin in presence and absence of a low molecular weight (MW) iron chelator, and protection against iron mediated oxidation of proteins is reported. The iron binding properties of HPG-DFO are slightly altered with size and DFO density of conjugates. The lower MW conjugate shows greater iron removal efficiency at room temperature, however, the efficacy of high MW conjugates increases at physiological temperature. The iron removal from ferritin by HPG-DFO conjugates increases significantly in presence of a low MW chelator, suggesting the potential of combination therapy. The molecular properties of the polymer scaffold also have influence on the prevention of iron mediated oxidation of proteins by the conjugates. The results therefore help to define the iron binding thermodynamics of HPG-DFO and their dependence on MW, and can be extended to improve the general understanding of polymeric chelator-iron interactions in situ. © 2016 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  15. Physical Selectivity of Molecularly Imprinted polymers evaluated through free volume size distributions derived from Positron Lifetime Spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pasang, T.; Ranganathaiah, C.

    2015-06-01

    The technique of imprinting molecules of various sizes in a stable structure of polymer matrix has derived multitudes of applications. Once the template molecule is extracted from the polymer matrix, it leaves behind a cavity which is physically (size and shape) and chemically (functional binding site) compatible to the particular template molecule. Positron Annihilation Lifetime Spectroscopy (PALS) is a well known technique to measure cavity sizes precisely in the nanoscale and is not being used in the field of MIPs effectively. This method is capable of measuring nanopores and hence suitable to understand the physical selectivity of the MIPs better. With this idea in mind, we have prepared molecular imprinted polymers (MIPs) with methacrylicacid (MAA) as monomer and EGDMA as cross linker in different molar ratio for three different size template molecules, viz. 4-Chlorophenol (4CP)(2.29 Å), 2-Nephthol (2NP) (3.36 Å) and Phenolphthalein (PP) (4.47Å). FTIR and the dye chemical reactions are used to confirm the complete extraction of the template molecules from the polymer matrix. The free volume size and its distribution have been derived from the measured o-Ps lifetime spectra. Based on the free volume distribution analysis, the percentage of functional cavities for the three template molecules are determined. Percentage of functional binding cavities for 4-CP molecules has been found out to be 70.2% and the rest are native cavities. Similarly for 2NP it is 81.5% and nearly 100% for PP. Therefore, PALS method proves to be very precise and accurate for determining the physical selectivity of MIPs.

  16. Cyclic Bis-porphyrin-Based Flexible Molecular Containers: Controlling Guest Arrangements and Supramolecular Catalysis by Tuning Cavity Size.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mondal, Pritam; Sarkar, Sabyasachi; Rath, Sankar Prasad

    2017-05-23

    Three cyclic zinc(II) bis-porphyrins (CB) with highly flexible linkers are employed as artificial molecular containers that efficiently encapsulate/coordinate various aromatic aldehydes within their cavities. Interestingly, the arrangements of guests and their reactivity inside the molecular clefts are significantly influenced by the cavity size of the cyclic containers. In the presence of polycyclic aromatic aldehydes, such as 3-formylperylene, as a guest, the cyclic bis-porphyrin host with a smaller cavity (CB1) forms a 1:1 sandwich complex. Upon slightly increasing the spacer length and thereby the cavity size, the cyclic host (CB2) encapsulates two molecules of 3-formylperylene that are also stacked together due to strong π-π interactions between them and CH-π interactions with the porphyrin rings. However, in the cyclic host (CB3) with an even larger cavity, two metal centers of the bis-porphyrin axially coordinate two molecules of 3-formylperylene within its cavity. Different arrangements of guest inside the cyclic bis-porphyrin hosts are investigated by using UV/Vis, ESI-MS, and 1 H NMR spectroscopy, along with X-ray structure determination of the host-guest complexes. Moreover, strong binding of guests within the cyclic bis-porphyrin hosts support the robust nature of the host-guest assemblies in solution. Such preferential binding of the bis-porphyrinic cavity towards aromatic aldehydes through encapsulation/coordination has been employed successfully to catalyze the Knoevenagel condensation of a series of polycyclic aldehydes with active methylene compounds (such as Meldrum's acid and 1, 3-dimethylbarbituric acid) under ambient conditions. Interestingly, the yields of the condensed products significantly increase upon increasing spacer lengths of the cyclic bis-porphyrins because more substrates can then be encapsulated within the cavity. Such controllable cavity size of the cyclic containers has profound implications for constructing highly

  17. Molecular dynamics simulation of thermal accommodation coefficients for laser-induced incandescence sizing of nickel particles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daun, K. J.; Titantah, J. T.; Karttunen, M.

    2012-04-01

    Extending time-resolved laser-induced incandescence (TiRe-LII), a diagnostic traditionally used to characterize soot and other carbonaceous particles, into a tool for measuring metal nanoparticles requires knowledge of the thermal accommodation coefficient for those systems. This parameter can be calculated using molecular dynamics (MD) simulations provided the interatomic potential is known between the gas molecule and surface atoms, but this is not often the case for many gas/surface combinations. In this instance, researchers often resort to the Lorentz-Berthelot combination rules to estimate the gas/surface potential using parameters derived for homogeneous systems. This paper compares this methodology with a more accurate approach based on ab initio derived potentials to estimate the thermal accommodation coefficient for laser-energized nickel nanoparticles in argon. Results show that the Lorentz-Berthelot combining rules overestimate the true potential well depth by an order of magnitude, resulting in perfect thermal accommodation, whereas the more accurate ab initio derived potential predicts an accommodation coefficient in excellent agreement with experimentally-determined values for other metal nanoparticle aerosols. This result highlights the importance of accurately characterizing the gas/surface potential when using MD to estimate thermal accommodation coefficients for TiRe-LII.

  18. Size effect in the melting and freezing behaviors of Al/Ti core-shell nanoparticles using molecular dynamics simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jin-Ping, Zhang; Yang-Yang, Zhang; Er-Ping, Wang; Cui-Ming, Tang; Xin-Lu, Cheng; Qiu-Hui, Zhang

    2016-03-01

    The thermal stability of Ti@Al core/shell nanoparticles with different sizes and components during continuous heating and cooling processes is examined by a molecular dynamics simulation with embedded atom method. The thermodynamic properties and structure evolution during continuous heating and cooling processes are investigated through the characterization of the potential energy, specific heat distribution, and radial distribution function (RDF). Our study shows that, for fixed Ti core size, the melting temperature decreases with Al shell thickness, while the crystallizing temperature and glass formation temperature increase with Al shell thickness. Diverse melting mechanisms have been discovered for different Ti core sized with fixed Al shell thickness nanoparticles. The melting temperature increases with the Ti core radius. The trend agrees well with the theoretical phase diagram of bimetallic nanoparticles. In addition, the glass phase formation of Al-Ti nanoparticles for the fast cooling rate of 12 K/ps, and the crystal phase formation for the low cooling rate of 0.15 K/ps. The icosahedron structure is formed in the frozen 4366 Al-Ti atoms for the low cooling rate. Project supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant No. 21401064), the Science & Technology Development Program of Henan Province, China (Grant No. 142300410282), and the Program of Henan Educational Committee, China (Grant No. 13B140986).

  19. Facing the estimation of effective population size based on molecular markers: comparison of estimators

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jimenez Mena, Belen; Verrier, Etienne; Hospital, Frederic

    We performed a simulation study of several estimators of the effective population size (Ne): NeH = estimator based on the rate of decrease in heterozygosity; NeT = estimator based on the temporal method; NeLD = linkage disequilibrium-based method. We first focused on NeH, which presented...... under scenarios of 3 and 20 bi-allelic loci. Increasing the number of loci largely improved the performance of NeT and NeLD. We highlight the value of NeT and NeLD when large numbers of bi-allelic loci are available, which is nowadays the case for SNPs markers....... an increase in the variability of values over time. The distance from the mean and the median to the true Ne increased over time too. This was caused by the fixation of alleles through time due to genetic drift and the changes in the distribution of allele frequencies. We compared the three estimators of Ne...

  20. Role of surface oxidation on the size dependent mechanical properties of nickel nanowires: a ReaxFF molecular dynamics study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aral, Gurcan; Islam, Md Mahbubul; van Duin, Adri C T

    2017-12-05

    Highly reactive metallic nickel (Ni) is readily oxidized by oxygen (O2) molecules even at low temperatures. The presence of the naturally resulting pre-oxide shell layer on metallic Ni nano materials such as Ni nanowires (NW) is responsible for degrading the deformation mechanisms and related mechanical properties. However, the role of the pre-oxide shell layer on the metallic Ni NW coupled with the complicated mechanical deformation mechanism and related properties have not yet been fully and independently understood. For this reason, the ReaxFF reactive force field for Ni/O interactions was used to investigate the effect of surface oxide layers and the size-dependent mechanical properties of Ni NWs under precisely controlled tensile loading conditions. To directly quantify the size dependent surface oxidation effect on the tensile mechanical deformation behaviour and related properties for Ni NWs, first, ReaxFF-molecular dynamics (MD) simulations were carried out to study the oxidation kinetics on the free surface of Ni NWs in a molecular O2 environment as a function of various diameters (D = 5.0, 6.5, and 8.0 nm) of the NWs, but at the same length. Single crystalline, pure metallic Ni NWs were also studied as a reference. The results of the oxidation simulations indicate that a surface oxide shell layer with limiting thickness of ∼1.0 nm was formed on the free surface of the bare Ni NW, typically via dissociation of the O-O bonds and the subsequent formation of Ni-O bonds. Furthermore, we investigated the evolution of the size-dependent intrinsic mechanical elastic properties of the core-oxide shell (Ni/NixOy) NWs by comparing them with their un-oxidized counterparts under constant uniaxial tensile loading. We found that the oxide shell layer significantly decreases the mechanical properties of metallic Ni NW as well as facilitates the initiation of plastic deformation as a function of decreasing diameter. The disordered oxide shell layer on the Ni NW

  1. Size effects of 109° domain walls in rhombohedral barium titanate single crystals—A molecular statics analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Endres, Florian, E-mail: florian.endres@ltm.uni-erlangen.de; Steinmann, Paul, E-mail: paul.steinmann@ltm.uni-erlangen.de [Department of Mechanical Engineering, University of Erlangen - Nuremberg, Paul-Gordan Str. 3, 91052 Erlangen (Germany)

    2016-01-14

    Ferroelectric functional materials are of great interest in science and technology due to their electromechanically coupled material properties. Therefore, ferroelectrics, such as barium titanate, are modeled and simulated at the continuum scale as well as at the atomistic scale. Due to recent advancements in related manufacturing technologies the modeling and simulation of smart materials at the nanometer length scale is getting more important not only to predict but also fundamentally understand the complex material behavior of such materials. In this study, we analyze the size effects of 109° nanodomain walls in ferroelectric barium titanate single crystals in the rhombohedral phase using a recently proposed extended molecular statics algorithm. We study the impact of domain thicknesses on the spontaneous polarization, the coercive field, and the lattice constants. Moreover, we discuss how the electromechanical coupling of an applied electric field and the introduced strain in the converse piezoelectric effect is affected by the thickness of nanodomains.

  2. The effect of alcohols on red blood cell mechanical properties and membrane fluidity depends on their molecular size.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Melda Sonmez

    Full Text Available The role of membrane fluidity in determining red blood cell (RBC deformability has been suggested by a number of studies. The present investigation evaluated alterations of RBC membrane fluidity, deformability and stability in the presence of four linear alcohols (methanol, ethanol, propanol and butanol using ektacytometry and electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR spectroscopy. All alcohols had a biphasic effect on deformability such that it increased then decreased with increasing concentration; the critical concentration for reversal was an inverse function of molecular size. EPR results showed biphasic changes of near-surface fluidity (i.e., increase then decrease and a decreased fluidity of the lipid core; rank order of effectiveness was butanol > propanol > ethanol > methanol, with a significant correlation between near-surface fluidity and deformability (r = 0.697; p<0.01. The presence of alcohol enhanced the impairment of RBC deformability caused by subjecting cells to 100 Pa shear stress for 300 s, with significant differences from control being observed at higher concentrations of all four alcohols. The level of hemolysis was dependent on molecular size and concentration, whereas echinocytic shape transformation (i.e., biconcave disc to crenated morphology was observed only for ethanol and propanol. These results are in accordance with available data obtained on model membranes. They document the presence of mechanical links between RBC deformability and near-surface membrane fluidity, chain length-dependence of the ability of alcohols to alter RBC mechanical behavior, and the biphasic response of RBC deformability and near-surface membrane fluidity to increasing alcohol concentrations.

  3. Molecular refinement of the 1p36 deletion syndrome reveals size diversity and a preponderance of maternally derived deletions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Y Q; Heilstedt, H A; Bedell, J A; May, K M; Starkey, D E; McPherson, J D; Shapira, S K; Shaffer, L G

    1999-02-01

    The deletion of chromosome 1p36 is a newly recognized, relatively common contiguous gene deletion syndrome with a variable phenotype. The clinical features have recently been delineated and molecular analysis indicates that the prevalence of certain phenotypic features appears to correlate with deletion size. Phenotype/genotype comparisons have allowed the assignment of certain clinical features to specific deletion intervals, significantly narrowing the regions within which to search for candidate genes. We have extensively characterized the deletion regions in 30 cases using microsatellite markers and fluorescence in situ hybridization analyses. The map order of 28 microsatellite markers spanning the deletion region was obtained by a combination of genotypic analysis and physical mapping. The deletion region was divided into six intervals and breakpoints were found to cluster in mainly two regions. Molecular analysis of the deletions showed that two patients had complex re-arrangements; these cases shared their distal and proximal breakpoints in the two common breakpoint regions. Of the de novo deletions ( n = 28) in whichparental samples were available and the analysis was informative ( n = 27), there were significantly morematernally derived deletions ( n = 21) than paternally derived deletions ( n = 6) (chi1(2) = 8.35, P deletion panel have delineated specific areas in which to focus the search for the causative genes for the features of this syndrome.

  4. Molecular weight dependence of the intrinsic size effect on Tg in AAO template-supported polymer nanorods: A DSC study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Askar, Shadid; Wei, Tong; Tan, Anthony W.; Torkelson, John M.

    2017-05-01

    Many studies have established a major effect of nanoscale confinement on the glass transition temperature (Tg) of polystyrene (PS), most commonly in thin films with one or two free surfaces. Here, we characterize smaller yet significant intrinsic size effects (in the absence of free surfaces or significant attractive polymer-substrate interactions) on the Tg and fragility of PS. Melt infiltration of various molecular weights (MWs) of PS into anodic aluminum oxide (AAO) templates is used to create nanorods supported on AAO with rod diameter (d) ranging from 24 to 210 nm. The Tg (both as Tg,onset and fictive temperature) and fragility values are characterized by differential scanning calorimetry. No intrinsic size effect is observed for 30 kg/mol PS in template-supported nanorods with d = 24 nm. However, effects on Tg are present for PS nanorods with Mn and Mw ≥ ˜175 kg/mol, with effects increasing in magnitude with increasing MW. For example, in 24-nm-diameter template-supported nanorods, Tg, rod - Tg, bulk = -2.0 to -2.5 °C for PS with Mn = 175 kg/mol and Mw = 182 kg/mol, and Tg, rod - Tg, bulk = ˜-8 °C for PS with Mn = 929 kg/mol and Mw = 1420 kg/mol. In general, reductions in Tg occur when d ≤ ˜2Rg, where Rg is the bulk polymer radius of gyration. Thus, intrinsic size effects are significant when the rod diameter is smaller than the diameter (2Rg) associated with the spherical volume pervaded by coils in bulk. We hypothesize that the Tg reduction occurs when chain segment packing frustration is sufficiently perturbed by confinement in the nanorods. This explanation is supported by observed reductions in fragility with the increasing extent of confinement. We also explain why these small intrinsic size effects do not contradict reports that the Tg-confinement effect in supported PS films with one free surface exhibits little or no MW dependence.

  5. Cooling rate and size effects on the medium-range structure of multicomponent oxide glasses simulated by molecular dynamics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tilocca, Antonio [Department of Chemistry, University College London, 20 Gordon Street, London WC1H 0AJ (United Kingdom)

    2013-09-21

    A set of molecular dynamics simulations were performed to investigate the effect of cooling rate and system size on the medium-range structure of melt-derived multicomponent silicate glasses, represented by the quaternary 45S5 Bioglass composition. Given the significant impact of the glass degradation on applications of these materials in biomedicine and nuclear waste disposal, bulk structural features which directly affect the glass dissolution process are of particular interest. Connectivity of the silicate matrix, ion clustering and nanosegregation, distribution of ring and chain structural patterns represent critical features in this context, which can be directly extracted from the models. A key issue is represented by the effect of the computational approach on the corresponding glass models, especially in light of recent indications questioning the suitability of conventional MD approaches (that is, involving melt-and-quench of systems containing ∼10{sup 3} atoms at cooling rates of 5-10 K/ps) when applied to model these glasses. The analysis presented here compares MD models obtained with conventional and nonconventional cooling rates and system sizes, highlighting the trend and range of convergence of specific structural features in the medium range. The present results show that time-consuming computational approaches involving much lower cooling rates and/or significantly larger system sizes are in most cases not necessary in order to obtain a reliable description of the medium-range structure of multicomponent glasses. We identify the convergence range for specific properties and use them to discuss models of several glass compositions for which a possible influence of cooling-rate or size effects had been previously hypothesized. The trends highlighted here represent an important reference to obtain reliable models of multicomponent glasses and extract converged medium-range structural features which affect the glass degradation and thus their

  6. Nano-Sized Cyclodextrin-Based Molecularly Imprinted Polymer Adsorbents for Perfluorinated Compounds—A Mini-Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abdalla H. Karoyo

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Recent efforts have been directed towards the design of efficient and contaminant selective remediation technology for the removal of perfluorinated compounds (PFCs from soils, sediments, and aquatic environments. While there is a general consensus on adsorption-based processes as the most suitable methodology for the removal of PFCs from aquatic environments, challenges exist regarding the optimal materials design of sorbents for selective uptake of PFCs. This article reviews the sorptive uptake of PFCs using cyclodextrin (CD-based polymer adsorbents with nano- to micron-sized structural attributes. The relationship between synthesis of adsorbent materials and their structure relate to the overall sorption properties. Hence, the adsorptive uptake properties of CD-based molecularly imprinted polymers (CD-MIPs are reviewed and compared with conventional MIPs. Further comparison is made with non-imprinted polymers (NIPs that are based on cross-linking of pre-polymer units such as chitosan with epichlorohydrin in the absence of a molecular template. In general, MIPs offer the advantage of selectivity, chemical tunability, high stability and mechanical strength, ease of regeneration, and overall lower cost compared to NIPs. In particular, CD-MIPs offer the added advantage of possessing multiple binding sites with unique physicochemical properties such as tunable surface properties and morphology that may vary considerably. This mini-review provides a rationale for the design of unique polymer adsorbent materials that employ an intrinsic porogen via incorporation of a macrocyclic compound in the polymer framework to afford adsorbent materials with tunable physicochemical properties and unique nanostructure properties.

  7. Nano-Sized Cyclodextrin-Based Molecularly Imprinted Polymer Adsorbents for Perfluorinated Compounds-A Mini-Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karoyo, Abdalla H; Wilson, Lee D

    2015-06-04

    Recent efforts have been directed towards the design of efficient and contaminant selective remediation technology for the removal of perfluorinated compounds (PFCs) from soils, sediments, and aquatic environments. While there is a general consensus on adsorption-based processes as the most suitable methodology for the removal of PFCs from aquatic environments, challenges exist regarding the optimal materials design of sorbents for selective uptake of PFCs. This article reviews the sorptive uptake of PFCs using cyclodextrin (CD)-based polymer adsorbents with nano- to micron-sized structural attributes. The relationship between synthesis of adsorbent materials and their structure relate to the overall sorption properties. Hence, the adsorptive uptake properties of CD-based molecularly imprinted polymers (CD-MIPs) are reviewed and compared with conventional MIPs. Further comparison is made with non-imprinted polymers (NIPs) that are based on cross-linking of pre-polymer units such as chitosan with epichlorohydrin in the absence of a molecular template. In general, MIPs offer the advantage of selectivity, chemical tunability, high stability and mechanical strength, ease of regeneration, and overall lower cost compared to NIPs. In particular, CD-MIPs offer the added advantage of possessing multiple binding sites with unique physicochemical properties such as tunable surface properties and morphology that may vary considerably. This mini-review provides a rationale for the design of unique polymer adsorbent materials that employ an intrinsic porogen via incorporation of a macrocyclic compound in the polymer framework to afford adsorbent materials with tunable physicochemical properties and unique nanostructure properties.

  8. The effects of particle size and molecular targeting on the intratumoral and subcellular distribution of polymeric nanoparticles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Helen; Fonge, Humphrey; Hoang, Bryan; Reilly, Raymond M; Allen, Christine

    2010-08-02

    The current study describes the impact of particle size and/or molecular targeting (epidermal growth factor, EGF) on the in vivo transport of block copolymer micelles (BCMs) in athymic mice bearing human breast cancer xenografts that express differential levels of EGF receptors (EGFR). BCMs with diameters of 25 nm (BCM-25) and 60 nm (BCM-60) were labeled with indium-111 ((111)In) or a fluorescent probe to provide a quantitative and qualitative means of evaluating their whole body, intratumoral, and subcellular distributions. BCM-25 was found to clear rapidly from the plasma compared to BCM-60, leading to an almost 2-fold decrease in their total tumor accumulation. However, the tumoral clearance of BCM-25 was delayed through EGF functionalization, enabling the targeted BCM-25 (T-BCM-25) to achieve a comparable level of total tumor deposition as the nontargeted BCM-60 (NT-BCM-60). Confocal fluorescence microscopy combined with MATLAB analyses revealed that NT-BCM-25 diffuses further away from the blood vessels (D(mean) = 42 +/- 9 microm) following extravasation, compared to NT-BCM-60 which mainly remains in the perivascular regions (D(mean) = 23 +/- 4 microm). The introduction of molecular targeting imposes the "binding site barrier" effect, which retards the tumor penetration of T-BCM-25 (D(mean) = 29 +/- 7 microm, p < 0.05). The intrinsic nuclear translocation property of EGF/EGFR leads to a significant increase in the nuclear uptake of T-BCM-25 in vitro and in vivo via active transport. Overall, these results highlight the need to consider multiple design parameters in the development of nanosystems for delivery of anticancer agents.

  9. Nano-Sized Cyclodextrin-Based Molecularly Imprinted Polymer Adsorbents for Perfluorinated Compounds—A Mini-Review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karoyo, Abdalla H.; Wilson, Lee D.

    2015-01-01

    Recent efforts have been directed towards the design of efficient and contaminant selective remediation technology for the removal of perfluorinated compounds (PFCs) from soils, sediments, and aquatic environments. While there is a general consensus on adsorption-based processes as the most suitable methodology for the removal of PFCs from aquatic environments, challenges exist regarding the optimal materials design of sorbents for selective uptake of PFCs. This article reviews the sorptive uptake of PFCs using cyclodextrin (CD)-based polymer adsorbents with nano- to micron-sized structural attributes. The relationship between synthesis of adsorbent materials and their structure relate to the overall sorption properties. Hence, the adsorptive uptake properties of CD-based molecularly imprinted polymers (CD-MIPs) are reviewed and compared with conventional MIPs. Further comparison is made with non-imprinted polymers (NIPs) that are based on cross-linking of pre-polymer units such as chitosan with epichlorohydrin in the absence of a molecular template. In general, MIPs offer the advantage of selectivity, chemical tunability, high stability and mechanical strength, ease of regeneration, and overall lower cost compared to NIPs. In particular, CD-MIPs offer the added advantage of possessing multiple binding sites with unique physicochemical properties such as tunable surface properties and morphology that may vary considerably. This mini-review provides a rationale for the design of unique polymer adsorbent materials that employ an intrinsic porogen via incorporation of a macrocyclic compound in the polymer framework to afford adsorbent materials with tunable physicochemical properties and unique nanostructure properties. PMID:28347047

  10. Scalable Electron Correlation Methods. 2. Parallel PNO-LMP2-F12 with Near Linear Scaling in the Molecular Size.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Qianli; Werner, Hans-Joachim

    2015-11-10

    We present an efficient explicitly correlated pair natural orbital local second-order Møller-Plesset perturbation theory (PNO-LMP2-F12) method. The method is an extension of our previously reported PNO-LMP2 approach [ Werner et al. J. Chem. Theory Comput. 2015 , 11 , 484 ]. Near linear scaling with the size of molecule is achieved by using domain approximations on both virtual and occupied orbitals, local density fitting (DF), and local resolution of the identity (RI), and by exploiting the sparsity of the local molecular orbitals (LMOs) as well as of projected atomic orbitals (PAOs). All large data structures used in the method are stored in distributed memory using Global Arrays (GAs) to achieve near inverse-linear scaling with the number of processing cores, provided that the GAs can be efficiently and independently accessed from all cores. The effect of the various domain approximations is tested for a wide range of chemical reactions. The PNO-LMP2-F12 reaction energies deviate from the canonical DF-MP2-F12 results by ≤1 kJ mol(-1) using triple-ζ (VTZ-F12) basis sets and are close to the complete basis set limits. PNO-LMP2-F12 calculations on molecules of chemical interest involving a few thousand basis functions can be performed within an hour or less using a few nodes on a small computer cluster.

  11. Influence of template/functional monomer/cross‐linking monomer ratio on particle size and binding properties of molecularly imprinted nanoparticles

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Yoshimatsu, Keiichi; Yamazaki, Tomohiko; Chronakis, Ioannis S.

    2012-01-01

    A series of molecularly imprinted polymer nanoparticles have been synthesized employing various template/functional monomer/crosslinking monomer ratio and characterized in detail to elucidate the correlation between the synthetic conditions used and the properties (e.g., particle size and templat...... tuning of particle size and binding properties are required to fit practical applications. © 2011 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. J Appl Polym Sci, 2012...

  12. Silver Thiolate Nano-sized Molecular Clusters and Their Supramolecular Covalent Frameworks: An Approach Toward Pre-templated Synthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Zi-Yi; Tam, Dennis Y S; Zhang, Leon Li-Min; Mak, Thomas C W

    2017-10-18

    A series of seven new complexes including silver-thiolate molecular clusters and their covalent supramolecular frameworks have been assembled from the silver carbide precursor Ag2 C2 using a C2(2-) pre-templated approach. Herein, two prototype clusters Ag14 (SR)6 and CO3 @Agm (SR)10 (R=isopropyl, cyclohexyl or tert-butyl; m=18 or 20) are employed to construct cluster-based metal-organic frameworks of different dimensions. In particular, both new ellipsoidal tetradecanuclear molecular cluster compounds, namely, Ag14 (S-iPr)6 (CO2 CF3 )8 ⋅(DMSO)6 (two polymorphic forms 1, 2) and [Ag14 (S-Cy)6 (CO2 CF3 )8 (DMSO)4 ]⋅(DMSO)3 (3), and a cluster-based metal-organic framework {Ag3 [Ag14 (S-iPr)6 (CO2 CF3 )11 (H2 O)3 CH3 OH]⋅(H2 O)2.5 }n (4) have been isolated and structurally characterized. Furthermore, increased acidity of the reaction mixture afforded three carboxylate-templated cluster based frameworks: a chain-like compound {[HN(CH3 )2 CO]⋅[CO3 @Ag18 (S-tBu)10 (NO3 )7 (DMF)4 ]⋅DMF}n (5), as well as two layer-type compounds, namely, {Ag[CO3 @Ag20 (S-iPr)10 (CO2 CF3 )9 (CO2 HCF3 )(CH3 OH)2 ]}n (6) and {Ag2 [CO3 @Ag20 (S-Cy)10 (CO2 CF3 )10 (CO2 HCF3 )2 (H2 O)2 ]⋅(H2 O)3 ⋅(CH3 OH)3 }n (7) exhibiting sql-net characteristics. It is demonstrated that the C≡C(2-) pre-template, which draws several Ag(+) ions together to form the C2 @Agn entity, plays an indispensable role in the syntheses of these compounds. Furthermore, covalent linkage of these nano-sized silver thiolate clusters from one- to three-dimensions revealed enormous potential for the future development of silver cluster-based frameworks. © 2017 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  13. Applicability and Reliability of Gel-Filtration to Study Aquatic Humic Substances Revisited - the Effects of Ph on Molecular-Size Distributions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Shaw, P.J.; De Haan, H.; Jones, R.I.

    1994-01-01

    The effect of pH on the molecular size distribution of dissolved humic substances (DHS) in surface waters from four different lakes in northern Europe was studied using Sephadex G‐100 gel filtration chromatography (GFC). New methods for the analysis of the elution profiles obtained are introduced,

  14. Role of Carboxylate ligands in the Synthesis of AuNPs: Size Control, Molecular Interaction and Catalytic Activity

    KAUST Repository

    Aljohani, Hind Abdullah

    2016-05-22

    then describe the effect of the concentrations and of various type of the stabilizer, and the post-synthesis treatment on gold nanoparticles size. In Chapter 4, we focus on determining the nature of the interactions at molecular level between citrate (and other carboxylate-containing ligands) and AuNP in terms of the mode of coordination at the surface, and the formal oxidation state of Au when interacting with these negatively charged carboxylate ligands (i.e., LX- in the Green formalism). We achieve this by combining very advanced 13C CP/MAS, 23Na MAS and low-temperature SSNMR, high-resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM) and density functional theory (DFT) calculations. A particular emphasis will be based on SS-NMR. In Chapter 5, we study the influence of pretreatment of 1% Au/TiO2 catalysts on the resulting activity in the oxidation of carbon monoxide, the effect of the concentration and the type of the ligands on the catalytic activity. The catalysts were characterized by TPO, XRD, and TEM spectroscopy.

  15. Sensitive and molecular size-selective detection of proteins using a chip-based and heteroliganded gold nanoisland by localized surface plasmon resonance spectroscopy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hong Surin

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract A highly sensitive and molecular size-selective method for the detection of proteins using heteroliganded gold nanoislands and localized surface plasmon resonance (LSPR is described. Two different heteroligands with different chain lengths (3-mercaptopionicacid and decanethiol were used in fabricating nanoholes for the size-dependent separation of a protein in comparison with its aggregate. Their ratios on gold nanoisland were optimized for the sensitive detection of superoxide dismutase (SOD1. This protein has been implicated in the pathology of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS. Upon exposure of the optimized gold nanoisland to a solution of SOD1 and aggregates thereof, changes in the LSPR spectra were observed which are attributed to the size-selective and covalent chemical binding of SOD1 to the nanoholes. With a lower detection limit of 1.0 ng/ml, the method can be used to selectively detect SOD1 in the presence of aggregates at the molecular level.

  16. High Pressure Size Exclusion Chromatography (HPSEC) Determination of Dissolved Organic Matter Molecular Weight Revisited: Accounting for Changes in Stationary Phases, Analytical Standards, and Isolation Methods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McAdams, Brandon C; Aiken, George R; McKnight, Diane M; Arnold, William A; Chin, Yu-Ping

    2018-01-16

    We reassessed the molecular weight of dissolved organic matter (DOM) determined by high pressure size exclusion chromatography (HPSEC) using measurements made with different columns and various generations of polystyrenesulfonate (PSS) molecular weight standards. Molecular weight measurements made with a newer generation HPSEC column and PSS standards from more recent lots are roughly 200 to 400 Da lower than initial measurements made in the early 1990s. These updated numbers match DOM molecular weights measured by colligative methods and fall within a range of values calculated from hydroxyl radical kinetics. These changes suggest improved accuracy of HPSEC molecular weight measurements that we attribute to improved accuracy of PSS standards and changes in the column packing. We also isolated DOM from wetlands in the Prairie Pothole Region (PPR) using XAD-8, a cation exchange resin, and PPL, a styrene-divinylbenzene media, and observed little difference in molecular weight and specific UV absorbance at 280 nm (SUVA 280 ) between the two solid phase extraction resins, suggesting they capture similar DOM moieties. PPR DOM also showed lower SUVA 280 at similar weights compared to DOM isolates from a global range of environments, which we attribute to oxidized sulfur in PPR DOM that would increase molecular weight without affecting SUVA 280 .

  17. Simple physicochemical properties related with lipophilicity, polarity, molecular size and ionization status exert significant impact on the transfer of drugs and chemicals into human breast milk.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vasios, George; Kosmidi, Aggeliki; Kalantzi, Olga-Ioanna; Tsantili-Kakoulidou, Anna; Kavantzas, Nikolaos; Theocharis, Stamatios; Giaginis, Constantinos

    2016-09-06

    The transfer of xenobiotic compounds into human breast milk has raised serious concerns in the last few years. The present study is aimed to assess whether simple physicochemical properties exert significant impact on human breast milk transfer of drugs and chemicals. A large data set of 375 xenobiotic compounds with available experimental milk to plasma (M/P) ratios was systematically compiled from the literature and explored with their physicochemical properties being further analyzed with respect to their extent to transfer into breast milk. Xenobiotic compounds with increased breast milk transfer (M/P ≥ 1) were characterized by enhanced lipophilicity and decreased molecular size (p physicochemical properties related with lipophilicity, polarity, molecular size and ionization status exert significant impact on drugs and chemicals transport into human breast milk.

  18. Molecular size-dependent abundance and composition of dissolved organic matter in river, lake and sea waters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Huacheng; Guo, Laodong

    2017-06-15

    Dissolved organic matter (DOM) is ubiquitous in natural waters. The ecological role and environmental fate of DOM are highly related to the chemical composition and size distribution. To evaluate size-dependent DOM quantity and quality, water samples were collected from river, lake, and coastal marine environments and size fractionated through a series of micro- and ultra-filtrations with different membranes having different pore-sizes/cutoffs, including 0.7, 0.4, and 0.2 μm and 100, 10, 3, and 1 kDa. Abundance of dissolved organic carbon, total carbohydrates, chromophoric and fluorescent components in the filtrates decreased consistently with decreasing filter/membrane cutoffs, but with a rapid decline when the filter cutoff reached 3 kDa, showing an evident size-dependent DOM abundance and composition. About 70% of carbohydrates and 90% of humic- and protein-like components were measured in the properties of DOM, such as specific ultraviolet absorbance, spectral slope, and biological and humification indices also varied significantly with membrane cutoffs. In addition, different ultrafiltration membranes with the same manufacture-rated cutoff also gave rise to different DOM retention efficiencies and thus different colloidal abundances and size spectra. Thus, the size-dependent DOM properties were related to both sample types and membranes used. Our results here provide not only baseline data for filter pore-size selection when exploring DOM ecological and environmental roles, but also new insights into better understanding the physical definition of DOM and its size continuum in quantity and quality in aquatic environments. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Size and shape of the repetitive domain of high molecular weight wheat gluten proteins. II. Hydrodynamic studies

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Swieten, E; Friesen, RR; de Kruif, CG; Robillard, GT; Kruif, Cees G. de

    This study describes the hydrodynamic properties of the repetitive domain of high molecular weight (HMW) wheat proteins, which complement the small-angle scattering (SANS) experiments performed in the first paper of this series. The sedimentation coefficients, so, and diffusion coefficients, D, were

  20. Ultra-Tuning of the Rare-Earth fcu-MOF Aperture Size for Selective Molecular Exclusion of Branched Paraffins

    KAUST Repository

    Assen, Ayalew Hussen Assen

    2015-10-02

    Using isoreticular chemistry allows the design and construction of a new rare-earth metal (RE) fcu-MOF with a suitable aperture size for practical steric adsorptive separations. The judicious choice of a relatively short organic building block, namely fumarate, to bridge the 12-connected RE hexanuclear clusters has afforded the contraction of the well-defined RE-fcu-MOF triangular window aperture, the sole access to the two interconnected octahedral and tetrahedral cages. The newly constructed RE (Y and Tb) fcu-MOF analogues display unprecedented total exclusion of branched paraffins from normal paraffins. The resultant window aperture size of about 4.7 Å, regarded as a sorbate-size cut-off, enabled a complete sieving of branched paraffins from normal paraffins. The results are supported by collective single gas and mixed gas/vapor adsorption and calorimetric studies.

  1. Inferring Population Size History from Large Samples of Genome-Wide Molecular Data - An Approximate Bayesian Computation Approach.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Simon Boitard

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Inferring the ancestral dynamics of effective population size is a long-standing question in population genetics, which can now be tackled much more accurately thanks to the massive genomic data available in many species. Several promising methods that take advantage of whole-genome sequences have been recently developed in this context. However, they can only be applied to rather small samples, which limits their ability to estimate recent population size history. Besides, they can be very sensitive to sequencing or phasing errors. Here we introduce a new approximate Bayesian computation approach named PopSizeABC that allows estimating the evolution of the effective population size through time, using a large sample of complete genomes. This sample is summarized using the folded allele frequency spectrum and the average zygotic linkage disequilibrium at different bins of physical distance, two classes of statistics that are widely used in population genetics and can be easily computed from unphased and unpolarized SNP data. Our approach provides accurate estimations of past population sizes, from the very first generations before present back to the expected time to the most recent common ancestor of the sample, as shown by simulations under a wide range of demographic scenarios. When applied to samples of 15 or 25 complete genomes in four cattle breeds (Angus, Fleckvieh, Holstein and Jersey, PopSizeABC revealed a series of population declines, related to historical events such as domestication or modern breed creation. We further highlight that our approach is robust to sequencing errors, provided summary statistics are computed from SNPs with common alleles.

  2. Branched polymers characterized by comprehensive two-dimensional separations with fully orthogonal mechanisms: molecular-topology fractionation×size-exclusion chromatography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edam, Rob; Mes, Edwin P C; Meunier, David M; Van Damme, Freddy A; Schoenmakers, Peter J

    2014-10-31

    Polymer separations under non-conventional conditions have been explored to obtain a separation of long-chain branched polymers from linear polymers with identical hydrodynamic size. In separation media with flow-through channels of the same order as the size of the analyte molecules in solution, the separation and the elution order of polymers are strongly affected by the flow rate. At low flow rates, the largest polymers are eluted last. At high flow rates, they are eluted first. By tuning the channel size and flow rate, conditions can be found where separation becomes independent of molar mass or size of linear polymers. Long-chain branched polymers did experience lower migration rates under these conditions and can be separated from linear polymers. This type of separation is referred to as molecular-topology fractionation (MTF) at critical conditions. Separation by comprehensive two-dimensional molecular-topology fractionation and size-exclusion chromatography (MTF×SEC) was used to study the retention characteristics of MTF. Branching selectivity was demonstrated for three- and four-arm "star" polystyrenes of 3-5×10(6)g/mol molar mass. Baseline separation could be obtained between linear polymer, Y-shaped molecules, and X-shaped molecules in a single experiment at constant flow rate. For randomly branched polymers, the branching selectivity inevitably results in an envelope of peaks, because it is not possible to fully resolve the huge numbers of different branched and linear polymers of varying molar mass. It was concluded that MTF involves partial deformation of polymer coils in solution. The increased coil density and resistance to deformation can explain the different retention behavior of branched molecules. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. Self-reduction and size controlled synthesis of silver nanoparticles on carbon nanospheres by grafting triazine-based molecular layer for conductivity improvement

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sang, Jing [Department of Frontier Materials and Function Engineering, Graduate School of Engineering, Iwate University, 4-3-5 Ueda, Morioka 020-8551 (Japan); Aisawa, Sumio, E-mail: aisawa@iwate-u.ac.jp [Department of Frontier Materials and Function Engineering, Graduate School of Engineering, Iwate University, 4-3-5 Ueda, Morioka 020-8551 (Japan); Hirahara, Hidetoshi [Department of Frontier Materials and Function Engineering, Graduate School of Engineering, Iwate University, 4-3-5 Ueda, Morioka 020-8551 (Japan); Kudo, Takahiro [Sulfur Chemical Institute, 210, Collabo MIU, 4-3-5, Ueda, Morioka 020-0066 (Japan); Mori, Kunio [Department of Frontier Materials and Function Engineering, Graduate School of Engineering, Iwate University, 4-3-5 Ueda, Morioka 020-8551 (Japan); Sulfur Chemical Institute, 210, Collabo MIU, 4-3-5, Ueda, Morioka 020-0066 (Japan)

    2016-02-28

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • Homogenous Ag NPs were fabricated on CNs at 25 °C without using predeposition and reducing agent. • The mechanism of covalent bonding between Ag NPs and CNs was studied. • The Ag NPs substantially improve the CNs conductivity. • UV irradiation was used to make silver crystal grow up and control the Ag NPs’ size. - Abstract: A facile, self-reduction and size controlled synthesis method has been explored to fabricate silver nanoparticles (Ag NPs) on carbon nanosphere (CNs) under mild conditions. Without using predeposition of seed metals and reducing agent, a uniform and complete layer of Ag NPs was formed through grafting a molecular layer on CNs surfaces under UV irradiation. The size and thickness of Ag NPs were effectively tuned by adjusting the UV irradiation time. This direct formation of Ag NPs was attributed to self seed in aqueous Ag(NH{sub 3}){sub 2}{sup +} complex solution through a triazine-based silane coupling agent molecular layer, even at 25 °C. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM), Transmission electron microscope (TEM), and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) were employed to characterize the Ag NPs’ properties. A substantial conductivity improvement of prepared Ag NPs on carbon nanosphere was demonstrated. The presented method is simple and environmentally friendly and thus should be of significant value for the industrial fabrication of Ag NPs on carbon nanosphere in conduct electricity paint and coating applications.

  4. Radiation inactivation (target size analysis) of the gonadotropin-releasing hormone receptor: evidence for a high molecular weight complex

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Conn, P.M.; Venter, J.C.

    1985-04-01

    In the present study we used radiation inactivation (target size analysis) to measure the functional mol wt of the GnRH receptor while it is still a component of the plasma membrane. This technique is based on the observation that an inverse relationship exists between the dose-dependent inactivation of a macromolecule by ionizing radiation and the size of that macromolecule. This method demonstrates a mol wt of 136,346 +/- 8120 for the GnRH receptor. This estimate is approximately twice that obtained (60,000) by photoaffinity labeling with a radioactive GnRH analog followed by electrophoresis under denaturing conditions and, accordingly, presents the possibility that the functional receptor consists of a high mol wt complex in its native state. The present studies indicate that the GnRH receptor is either a single weight class of protein or several closely related weight classes, such as might occur due to protein glycosylation.

  5. Analysis of Molecular Size Distributions of Cellulose Molecules during Hydrolysis of Cellulose by Recombinant Cellulomonas fimi β-1,4-Glucanases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stålbrand, Henrik; Mansfield, Shawn D.; Saddler, John N.; Kilburn, Douglas G.; Warren, R. Antony J.; Gilkes, Neil R.

    1998-01-01

    Four β-1,4-glucanases (cellulases) of the cellulolytic bacterium Cellulomonas fimi were purified from Escherichia coli cells transformed with recombinant plasmids. Previous analyses using soluble substrates had suggested that CenA and CenC were endoglucanases while CbhA and CbhB resembled the exo-acting cellobiohydrolases produced by cellulolytic fungi. Analysis of molecular size distributions during cellulose hydrolysis by the individual enzymes confirmed these preliminary findings and provided further evidence that endoglucanase CenC has a more processive hydrolytic activity than CenA. The significant differences between the size distributions obtained during hydrolysis of bacterial microcrystalline cellulose and acid-swollen cellulose can be explained in terms of the accessibility of β-1,4-glucan chains to enzyme attack. Endoglucanases and cellobiohydrolases were much more easily distinguished when the acid-swollen substrate was used. PMID:9647802

  6. Origin of the Domesticated Horticultural Species and Molecular Bases of Fruit Shape and Size Changes during the Domestication, Taking Tomato as an Example

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liang SUN

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Domestication of crop plants is the foundation of modern agriculture, which brings forth desirable changes in cultivated species that distinguish them from their wild relatives. This resulted in the origin of crop species at known geographical locations coinciding with the transition of human societies from hunter-gather to agrarian civilizations. Fruit size and shape are very important traits for horticulture industry, as well as for studying the domestication of the horticultural species. In this review, we have summarized the origin of some widely-grown horticultural crops and also the molecular bases of the fruit size and shape changes of the horticultural crops during the domestication, taking tomato as an example.

  7. Extending the molecular size in accurate quantum-chemical calculations: the equilibrium structure and spectroscopic properties of uracil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Puzzarini, Cristina; Barone, Vincenzo

    2011-04-21

    The equilibrium structure of uracil has been investigated using both theoretical and experimental data. With respect to the former, quantum-chemical calculations at the coupled-cluster level in conjunction with a triple-zeta basis set have been carried out. Extrapolation to the basis set limit, performed employing the second-order Møller-Plesset perturbation theory, and inclusion of core-correlation and diffuse-function corrections have also been considered. Based on the available rotational constants for various isotopic species together with corresponding computed vibrational corrections, the semi-experimental equilibrium structure of uracil has been determined for the first time. Theoretical and semi-experimental structures have been found in remarkably good agreement, thus pointing out the limitations of previous experimental determinations. Molecular and spectroscopic properties of uracil have then been studied by means of the composite computational approach introduced for the molecular structure evaluation. Among the results achieved, we mention the revision of the dipole moment. On the whole, it has been proved that the computational procedure presented is able to provide parameters with the proper accuracy to support experimental investigations of large molecules of biological interest.

  8. Scalable electron correlation methods I.: PNO-LMP2 with linear scaling in the molecular size and near-inverse-linear scaling in the number of processors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Werner, Hans-Joachim; Knizia, Gerald; Krause, Christine; Schwilk, Max; Dornbach, Mark

    2015-02-10

    We propose to construct electron correlation methods that are scalable in both molecule size and aggregated parallel computational power, in the sense that the total elapsed time of a calculation becomes nearly independent of the molecular size when the number of processors grows linearly with the molecular size. This is shown to be possible by exploiting a combination of local approximations and parallel algorithms. The concept is demonstrated with a linear scaling pair natural orbital local second-order Møller-Plesset perturbation theory (PNO-LMP2) method. In this method, both the wave function manifold and the integrals are transformed incrementally from projected atomic orbitals (PAOs) first to orbital-specific virtuals (OSVs) and finally to pair natural orbitals (PNOs), which allow for minimum domain sizes and fine-grained accuracy control using very few parameters. A parallel algorithm design is discussed, which is efficient for both small and large molecules, and numbers of processors, although true inverse-linear scaling with compute power is not yet reached in all cases. Initial applications to reactions involving large molecules reveal surprisingly large effects of dispersion energy contributions as well as large intramolecular basis set superposition errors in canonical MP2 calculations. In order to account for the dispersion effects, the usual selection of PNOs on the basis of natural occupation numbers turns out to be insufficient, and a new energy-based criterion is proposed. If explicitly correlated (F12) terms are included, fast convergence to the MP2 complete basis set (CBS) limit is achieved. For the studied reactions, the PNO-LMP2-F12 results deviate from the canonical MP2/CBS and MP2-F12 values by <1 kJ mol(-1), using triple-ζ (VTZ-F12) basis sets.

  9. Use of Strain Gradient Theory for Modeling the Size-Dependent Pull-In of Rotational Nano-Mirror in the Presence of Molecular Force

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beni, Y. Tadi; Abadyan, M.

    2013-07-01

    Experiments reveal that mechanical behavior of nanostructures is size-dependent. Herein, the size dependent pull-in instability of torsional nano-mirror is investigated using strain gradient nonclassic continuum theory. The governing equation of the mirror is derived taking the effect of electrostatic Coulomb and molecular van der Waals (vdW) forces into account. Variation of the rotation angle of the mirror as a function of the applied voltage is obtained and the instability parameters i.e., pull-in voltage and pull-in angle are determined. Nano-mirrors with square and circular cross-sectional beams are investigated as case studies. It is found that when the thickness of the torsional nano-beam is comparable with the intrinsic material length scales, size effect can substantially increase the instability parameters of the rotational mirror. Moreover, the effect of vdW forces on the size-dependent pull-in instability of the system is discussed. The proposed model is able to predict the experimental results more accurately than the previous classic models and reduce the gap between experiment and previous theories.

  10. Molecular weight distribution of polysaccharides from edible seaweeds by high-performance size-exclusion chromatography (HPSEC).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gómez-Ordóñez, Eva; Jiménez-Escrig, Antonio; Rupérez, Pilar

    2012-05-15

    Biological properties of polysaccharides from seaweeds are related to their composition and structure. Many factors such as the kind of sugar, type of linkage or sulfate content of algal biopolymers exert an influence in the relationship between structure and function. Besides, the molecular weight (MW) also plays an important role. Thus, a simple, reliable and fast HPSEC method with refractive index detection was developed and optimized for the MW estimation of soluble algal polysaccharides. Chromatogram shape and repeatability of retention time was considerably improved when sodium nitrate was used instead of ultrapure water as mobile phase. Pullulan and dextran standards of different MW were used for method calibration and validation. Also, main polysaccharide standards from brown (alginate, fucoidan, laminaran) and red seaweeds (kappa- and iota-carrageenan) were used for quantification and method precision and accuracy. Relative standard deviation (RSD) of repeatability for retention time, peak areas and inter-day precision was below 0.7%, 2.5% and 2.6%, respectively, which indicated good repeatability and precision. Recoveries (96.3-109.8%) also showed its fairly good accuracy. Regarding linearity, main polysaccharide standards from brown or red seaweeds showed a highly satisfactory correlation coefficient (r>0.999). Moreover, a good sensitivity was shown, with corresponding limits of detection and quantitation in mg/mL of 0.05-0.21 and 0.16-0.31, respectively. The method was applied to the MW estimation of standard algal polysaccharides, as well as to the soluble polysaccharide fractions from the brown seaweed Saccharina latissima and the red Mastocarpus stellatus, respectively. Although distribution of molecular weight was broad, the good repeatability for retention time provided a good precision in MW estimation of polysaccharides. Water- and alkali-soluble fractions from S. latissima ranged from very high (>2400 kDa) to low MW compounds (1400 kDa to red

  11. Synthesis, antimicrobial activity and molecular docking of novel tetracyclic scaffolds incorporating a flavonoid framework with medium sized oxygen heterocycles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dongamanti, Ashok; Aamate, Vikas Kumar; Devulapally, Mohan Gandhi; Gundu, Srinivas; Kotni, Meena Kumari; Manga, Vijjulatha; Balasubramanian, Sridhar; Ernala, Prasad

    2015-02-15

    A convenient approach for the synthesis of novel tetracyclic scaffolds incorporating a flavonoid framework with medium sized heterocyclic rings (eight-, nine-, ten- and eleven-membered rings) containing two oxygen atoms from flavonols through alkylation using different dibromoalkanes was described. The synthesized compounds were established based on the spectral data and X-ray crystal structure for 6c. The synthesized compounds were evaluated for their in vitro antimicrobial activity. Docking studies were carried out for most active two compounds 6f and 6i. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Selective adhesion, lipid exchange and membrane-fusion processes between vesicles of various sizes bearing complementary molecular recognition groups.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marchi-Artzner, V; Gulik-Krzywicki, T; Guedeau-Boudeville, M A; Gosse, C; Sanderson, J M; Dedieu, J C; Lehn, J M

    2001-06-18

    Equimolar mixtures of large unilamellar vesicles (LUVs) obtained from mixtures of egg lecithin and lipids containing complementary hydrogen bonding head groups (barbituric acid (BAR) and 2,4,6-triaminopyrimidine (TAP)) were shown to aggregate and fuse. These events have been studied in detail using electron microscopy and dynamic light scattering, and by fluorimetry using membrane or water-soluble fluorescence probes. It was shown that aggregation was followed by two competitive processes: a) lipid mixing leading to redispersion of the vesicles; b) fusion events generating much larger vesicles. In order to better understand the nature of the interaction, the effects of ionic strength and surface concentration of recognition lipids on the aggregation process were investigated by dynamic light scattering. Additionally, it was possible to inhibit the aggregation kinetics through addition of a soluble barbituric acid competitor. The study was extended to giant unilamellar vesicles (GUVs) to investigate the size effect and visualise the phenomena in situ. The interactions between complementary LUVs and GUVs or GUVs and GUVs were studied by optical microscopy using dual fluorescent labelling of both vesicle populations. A selective adhesion of LUVs onto GUVs was observed by electron and optical microscopies, whereas no aggregation took place in case of a GUV/GUV mixture. Furthermore, a fusion assay of GUV and LUV using the difference of size between GUV and LUV and calceine self-quenching showed that no mixing between the aqueous pools occured. © 2001 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH, Weinheim, Fed. Rep. of Germany.

  13. Self-reduction and size controlled synthesis of silver nanoparticles on carbon nanospheres by grafting triazine-based molecular layer for conductivity improvement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sang, Jing; Aisawa, Sumio; Hirahara, Hidetoshi; Kudo, Takahiro; Mori, Kunio

    2016-02-01

    A facile, self-reduction and size controlled synthesis method has been explored to fabricate silver nanoparticles (Ag NPs) on carbon nanosphere (CNs) under mild conditions. Without using predeposition of seed metals and reducing agent, a uniform and complete layer of Ag NPs was formed through grafting a molecular layer on CNs surfaces under UV irradiation. The size and thickness of Ag NPs were effectively tuned by adjusting the UV irradiation time. This direct formation of Ag NPs was attributed to self seed in aqueous Ag(NH3)2+ complex solution through a triazine-based silane coupling agent molecular layer, even at 25 °C. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM), Transmission electron microscope (TEM), and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) were employed to characterize the Ag NPs' properties. A substantial conductivity improvement of prepared Ag NPs on carbon nanosphere was demonstrated. The presented method is simple and environmentally friendly and thus should be of significant value for the industrial fabrication of Ag NPs on carbon nanosphere in conduct electricity paint and coating applications.

  14. Polymer Physics Prize Lecture: Self-assemblies of Giant Molecular Shape Amphiphiles as a New Platform for Engineering Structures with Sub-Nanometer Feature Sizes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Stephen Z. D.

    2013-03-01

    Utilizing nano-building blocks rather than atoms to construct and engineer new structures is a fresh approach to design and develop functional materials for the purpose of transferring and amplifying microscopic functionality to macroscopic materials' property. As one of the important elements of these nano-building blocks, giant molecular shape amphiphiles (GMSAs) provide a latest platform for generating self-assembled ordered structures at nanometer scale, which are stabilized by collective physical bonds (such as collective hydrogen bonding). In this talk, two topics will be focused on. First, composed of functionalized hydrophilic molecular nanoparticles as the heads with rigid shape and fixed volume, and tethered polymer chains as the tails (such as giant molecular surfactants and lipids and other topologies), these GMSAs of various architectures can self-assemble into highly diversified, thermodynamically stable microstructures at sub-10 nm length scale in the bulk, thin film and solution states. Second, GMSAs could also be constructed solely from nanoparticles interconnected via different numbers of the rigid linkages in specific symmetry, simulating the overall shapes of small molecules but with sizes that are one-order of magnitude larger in length and three-order of magnitude larger in volume. Giant crystal structures can then be obtained from this class of ``giant molecules'' via supramolecular crystallization. These findings are not only scientifically intriguing in understanding the physical principles underlying their self-assembly, but also technologically relevant in industrial applications.

  15. [Determination of the distribution of relative molecular mass of organic matter by high pressure size exclusion chromatography with UV and TOC detectors].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Han; Dong, Bing-Zhi

    2012-09-01

    An on-line high pressure size exclusion chromatography (HPSEC) with UV and TOC detectors was adapted to examine the distribution of relative molecular mass of natural organic matter (NOM). Through synchronous determination of UV254 and TOC responses in a wide range of relative molecular mass, it was possible to accurately characterize the structure of NOM, especially for some non-aromatic and non-conjugated double bond organics which have low response to UV. It was found that, TOC detector was capable of detecting all kinds of organic matters, including sucrose, sodium alginate and other hydrophilic organic compounds. The sample volume had a positively linear correlation with the TOC response, indicating that the larger volume would produce stronger responses. The effect of ion strength was relatively low, shown by the small decrease of peak area (1.2% ) from none to 0.2 mol x L(-1) NaCl. The pH value of tested samples should be adjusted to neutral or acidic because when the samples were alkaline, the results might be inaccurate. Compared to the sample solvents adopted as ultrapure water, the samples prepared by mobile phase solvents had less interference to salt boundary peak. The on-line HPSEC-UV-TOC can be used accurately to characterize the distribution of relative molecular mass and its four fractions in River Xiang.

  16. Cation solvation with quantum chemical effects modeled by a size-consistent multi-partitioning quantum mechanics/molecular mechanics method.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watanabe, Hiroshi C; Kubillus, Maximilian; Kubař, Tomáš; Stach, Robert; Mizaikoff, Boris; Ishikita, Hiroshi

    2017-07-21

    In the condensed phase, quantum chemical properties such as many-body effects and intermolecular charge fluctuations are critical determinants of the solvation structure and dynamics. Thus, a quantum mechanical (QM) molecular description is required for both solute and solvent to incorporate these properties. However, it is challenging to conduct molecular dynamics (MD) simulations for condensed systems of sufficient scale when adapting QM potentials. To overcome this problem, we recently developed the size-consistent multi-partitioning (SCMP) quantum mechanics/molecular mechanics (QM/MM) method and realized stable and accurate MD simulations, using the QM potential to a benchmark system. In the present study, as the first application of the SCMP method, we have investigated the structures and dynamics of Na + , K + , and Ca 2+ solutions based on nanosecond-scale sampling, a sampling 100-times longer than that of conventional QM-based samplings. Furthermore, we have evaluated two dynamic properties, the diffusion coefficient and difference spectra, with high statistical certainty. Furthermore the calculation of these properties has not previously been possible within the conventional QM/MM framework. Based on our analysis, we have quantitatively evaluated the quantum chemical solvation effects, which show distinct differences between the cations.

  17. Lineage Diversity and Size Disparity in Musteloidea: Testing Patterns of Adaptive Radiation Using Molecular and Fossil-Based Methods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Law, Chris J; Slater, Graham J; Mehta, Rita S

    2018-01-01

    Adaptive radiation is hypothesized to be a primary mechanism that drives the remarkable species diversity and morphological disparity across the Tree of Life. Tests for adaptive radiation in extant taxa are traditionally estimated from calibrated molecular phylogenies with little input from extinct taxa. With 85 putative species in 33 genera and over 400 described extinct species, the carnivoran superfamily Musteloidea is a prime candidate to investigate patterns of adaptive radiation using both extant- and fossil-based macroevolutionary methods. The species diversity and equally impressive ecological and phenotypic diversity found across Musteloidea is often attributed to two adaptive radiations coinciding with two major climate events, the Eocene-Oligocene transition and the Mid-Miocene Climate Transition. Here, we compiled a novel time-scaled phylogeny for 88% of extant musteloids and used it as a framework for testing the predictions of adaptive radiation hypotheses with respect to rates of lineage diversification and phenotypic evolution. Contrary to expectations, we found no evidence for rapid bursts of lineage diversification at the origin of Musteloidea, and further analyses of lineage diversification rates using molecular and fossil-based methods did not find associations between rates of lineage diversification and the Eocene-Oligocene transition or Mid-Miocene Climate Transition as previously hypothesized. Rather, we found support for decoupled diversification dynamics driven by increased clade carrying capacity in the branches leading to a subclade of elongate mustelids. Supporting decoupled diversification dynamics between the subclade of elongate mustelids and the ancestral musteloid regime is our finding of increased rates of body length evolution, but not body mass evolution, within the decoupled mustelid subclade. The lack of correspondence in rates of body mass and length evolution suggest that phenotypic evolutionary rates under a single

  18. Submicron sized ultra-high molecular weight polyethylene wear particle analysis from revised SB Charité III total disc replacements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Punt, Ilona; Baxter, Ryan; van Ooij, André; Willems, Paul; van Rhijn, Lodewijk; Kurtz, Steven; Steinbeck, Marla

    2011-09-01

    Submicron sized particles are frequently observed in retrieved total hip and knee periprosthetic tissues and appear to be critical in the activation of the phagocytic inflammatory response. In this paper the concentration, size and shape of ultra-high molecular weight polyethylene (UHMWPE) wear particles between 0.05 and 2.00μm were determined after isolation from periprosthetic tissues from retrieved lumbar SB Charité III total disc replacements (TDR) using scanning electron microscopy (SEM). For comparison, UHMWPE wear particles were isolated from γ-radiation-air sterilized total hip arthroplasty (THA) revision tissues. The mean concentration of UHMWPE particles in TDR tissues was 1.6×10(9)g(-1)tissue (range 1.3-2.0), which was significantly lower than the concentration of 2.3×10(9)g(-1) THA revision tissue (range 1.8-3.2) (P=0.03). The mean particle size (equivalent circular diameter: TDR, 0.46μm; THA 0.53μm, P=0.60) and mean shape were comparable between TDR and THA (aspect ratio: TDR, 1.89; THA, 1.99, P=0.35; roundness: TDR, 0.58; THA, 0.56, P=0.35). However, the TDR particles tended to be smaller and more round. Although no correlations were found between visible damage to the UHMWPE core and the concentration or shape of the UHMWPE particles, a positive correlation was found between increasing particle size and increasing rim penetration of the TDR core (P=0.04). The presence of UHMWPE particles of similar size and shape in TDR tissue, albeit lower in concentration, might explain why, unlike THA, pain rather than osteolysis is the major reason for revision surgery. Copyright © 2011 Acta Materialia Inc. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Molecular dynamics simulations of the effect of shape and size of SiO2 nanoparticle dopants on insulation paper cellulose

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Chao; Zhang, Song; Li, Xu; Zhou, Qu

    2016-12-01

    The effect of silica nanoparticle (Nano-SiO2) dopants on insulation paper cellulose, and the interaction between them, was investigated using molecular dynamics simulations. The mechanical properties, interactions, and cellulose-Nano-SiO2 compatibility of composite models of cellulose doped with Nano-SiO2 were studied. An increase in Nano-SiO2 size leads to a decrease in the mechanical properties, and a decrease in the anti-deformation ability of the composite model. The binding energies and bond energies per surface area of the composite models indicate that the bonding interaction between spherical Nano-SiO2 and cellulose is the strongest among the four different Nano-SiO2 shapes that are investigated. The solubilities of the four composite models decrease with increasing Nano-SiO2 size, and the difference between the solubility of pure cellulose and those of the composite models increases with increasing Nano-SiO2 size. Good doping effects with the highest cellulose-Nano-SiO2 compatibility are achieved for the cellulose model doped with spherical Nano-SiO2 of 10 Å in diameter. These findings provide a method for modifying the mechanical properties of cellulose by doping, perhaps for improving insulation dielectrics.

  20. Molecular dynamics simulations of the effect of shape and size of SiO2 nanoparticle dopants on insulation paper cellulose

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chao Tang

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available The effect of silica nanoparticle (Nano-SiO2 dopants on insulation paper cellulose, and the interaction between them, was investigated using molecular dynamics simulations. The mechanical properties, interactions, and cellulose-Nano-SiO2 compatibility of composite models of cellulose doped with Nano-SiO2 were studied. An increase in Nano-SiO2 size leads to a decrease in the mechanical properties, and a decrease in the anti-deformation ability of the composite model. The binding energies and bond energies per surface area of the composite models indicate that the bonding interaction between spherical Nano-SiO2 and cellulose is the strongest among the four different Nano-SiO2 shapes that are investigated. The solubilities of the four composite models decrease with increasing Nano-SiO2 size, and the difference between the solubility of pure cellulose and those of the composite models increases with increasing Nano-SiO2 size. Good doping effects with the highest cellulose-Nano-SiO2 compatibility are achieved for the cellulose model doped with spherical Nano-SiO2 of 10 Å in diameter. These findings provide a method for modifying the mechanical properties of cellulose by doping, perhaps for improving insulation dielectrics.

  1. Seasonal Variation of Fungal Spores in Size-fractionated Ambient Particulate Matter in Beijing, China, Based on Molecular Tracer Measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liang, L.; Engling, G.; He, K.

    2015-12-01

    Fungal aerosols were found to be the dominant fraction of biological aerosol components in the coarse mode in the atmosphere, influencing human health, the biosphere, atmospheric chemistry and climate. However, the total abundance of fungal spores in the atmosphere is rather uncertain and likely underestimated to a large extent by traditional Colony Forming Units (CFU) assays. Flow cytometry (FCM) was utilized in combination with fluorescent stains for the rapid counting of ambient fungal spores in this study. And, the sugar alcohols, mannitol and arabitol, proposed as molecular tracers for fungal aerosol were measured in PM2.5 and PM10 at an urban site in Beijing, China. The annual average concentrations of arabitol in PM2.5 and PM10 at the urban site were 7.4±9.4 ng m-3 and 21.0±20.4 ng m-3, and the respective mannitol concentrations were 10.3±9.5 ng m-3 and 31.9±26.9 ng m-3. Compared to PM2.5, the seasonal average concentrations of arabitol and mannitol in PM10 were varied more significantly. During summer and autumn higher arabitol and mannitol levels than during spring and winter were observed in coarse particles. Statistics analysis was further grouped into typical dry season (December 2010 to March 2011) and typical wet season (July 2011 to September 2011), revealed the different variation of fungal spores in different seasons. Moreover, the FCM results had significant positive correlation with the concentrations of the fungal tracers (R2 was 0.75 and 0.70 for arabitol and mannitol, respectively), supporting the utility of these sugar alcohols as effective fungal tracers.

  2. Molecular shape, architecture, and size of P2X4 receptors determined using fluorescence resonance energy transfer and electron microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Young, Mark T; Fisher, James A; Fountain, Samuel J; Ford, Robert C; North, R Alan; Khakh, Baljit S

    2008-09-19

    P2X receptors are ATP-gated nonselective cation channels with important physiological roles. However, their structures are poorly understood. Here, we analyzed the architecture of P2X receptors using fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) microscopy and direct structure determination using electron microscopy. FRET efficiency measurements indicated that the distance between the C-terminal tails of P2X(4) receptors was 5.6 nm. Single particle analysis of purified P2X(4) receptors was used to determine the three-dimensional structure at a resolution of 21A; the orientation of the particle with respect to the membrane was assigned by labeling the intracellular C termini with 1.8-nm gold particles and the carbohydrate-rich ectodomain with lectin. We found that human P2X(4) is a globular torpedo-like molecule with an approximate volume of 270 nm(3) and a compact propeller-shaped ectodomain. In this structure, the distance between the centers of the gold particles was 6.1 nm, which closely matches FRET data. Thus, our data provide the first views of the architecture, shape, and size of single P2X receptors, furthering our understanding of this important family of ligand-gated ion channels.

  3. Determination of the Molecular Weight of Low-Molecular-Weight Heparins by Using High-Pressure Size Exclusion Chromatography on Line with a Triple Detector Array and Conventional Methods

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Antonella Bisio

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available The evaluation of weight average molecular weight (Mw and molecular weight distribution represents one of the most controversial aspects concerning the characterization of low molecular weight heparins (LMWHs. As the most commonly used method for the measurement of such parameters is high performance size exclusion chromatography (HP-SEC, the soundness of results mainly depends on the appropriate calibration of the chromatographic columns used. With the aim of meeting the requirement of proper Mw standards for LMWHs, in the present work the determination of molecular weight parameters (Mw and Mn by HP-SEC combined with a triple detector array (TDA was performed. The HP-SEC/TDA technique permits the evaluation of polymeric samples by exploiting the combined and simultaneous action of three on-line detectors: light scattering detectors (LALLS/RALLS; refractometer and viscometer. Three commercial LMWH samples, enoxaparin, tinzaparin and dalteparin, a γ-ray depolymerized heparin (γ-Hep and its chromatographic fractions, and a synthetic pentasaccharide were analysed by HP-SEC/TDA. The same samples were analysed also with a conventional HP-SEC method employing refractive index (RI and UV detectors and two different chromatographic column set, silica gel and polymeric gel columns. In both chromatographic systems, two different calibration curves were built up by using (i γ-Hep chromatographic fractions and the corresponding Mw parameters obtained via HP-SEC/TDA; (ii the whole γ-Hep preparation with broad Mw dispersion and the corresponding cumulative distribution function calculated via HP-SEC/TDA. In addition, also a chromatographic column calibration according to European Pharmacopoeia indication was built up. By comparing all the obtained results, some important differences among Mw and size distribution values of the three LMWHs were found with the five different calibration methods and with HP-SEC/TDA method. In particular, the detection of

  4. Height and Body Size in Childhood, Adolescence and Young Adulthood and Breast Cancer Risk According to Molecular Subtype in the Nurses’ Health Studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Warner, Erica T.; Hu, Rong; Collins, Laura C.; Beck, Andrew H.; Schnitt, Stuart; Rosner, Bernard; Eliassen, A. Heather; Michels, Karin B.; Willett, Walter C.; Tamimi, Rulla M.

    2016-01-01

    Height and body size in childhood and young adulthood have been consistently associated with breast cancer risk; whether associations differ across molecular subtypes is unclear. In a pooled analysis of the Nurses’ Health Studies we prospectively examined the association of four exposures: height, body mass index (BMI) at age 18, childhood and adolescent somatotypes, with breast cancer risk according to molecular subtypes defined by immunohistochemical markers. We used multivariable-adjusted Cox proportional hazards regression to estimate hazard ratios (HR) and 95% confidence intervals (CI).We identified 2983 luminal A, 1281 luminal B, 318 HER2-enriched, 408 basal-like and 128 unclassified tumors. Height was positively associated with all subtypes (p-heterogeneity=0.78). BMI at age 18 (p-heterogeneity=0.001), childhood (p-heterogeneity=0.51) and adolescent somatotype (p-heterogeneity=0.046) were inversely associated, but with differences in magnitude of association. BMI at age 18 of ≥25 kg/m2 (compared to 20-21.9 kg/m2) was associated with a 52% decreased risk of HER2-enriched (HR: 0.48, 95%CI: 0.26-0.91; p-trend <0.0001) and 39% reduced risk of basal-like tumors (HR: 0.61, 95% CI: 0.36-1.02; p-trend=0.008). Compared to the lowest category, women in the highest adolescent body size category were 71% less likely to develop HER2-enriched (HR: 0.29, 95%CI: 0.10-0.85; p-trend=0.0005) and 60% less likely to develop basal-like (HR: 0.40, 95%CI: 0.17-0.95; p-trend=0.0008). Height was positively associated with risk of all breast cancer molecular subtypes. BMI at age 18 and childhood and adolescent were inversely associated with risk of most breast cancer molecular subtypes with somewhat stronger associations with HER2-enriched and basal-like subtypes. PMID:27590596

  5. Molecular imaging of cell death in tumors. Increasing annexin A5 size reduces contribution of phosphatidylserine-targeting function to tumor uptake.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lisette Ungethüm

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: Annexin A5 is a phosphatidylserine binding protein that binds dying cells in vivo. Annexin A5 is a potential molecular imaging agent to determine efficacy of anti-cancer therapy in patients. Its rapid clearance from circulation limits tumor uptake and, hence, its sensitivity. The aim of this study is to determine if non-invasive imaging of cell death in tumors will benefit from increasing circulation time of annexin A5 by increasing its size. PROCEDURES: Annexin A5 size was increased by complexation of biotinylated annexin A5 with Alexa-Fluor680-labeled streptavidin. The non-binding variant of annexin A5, M1234, was used as negative control. The HT29 colon carcinoma xenograft model in NMRI nude mice was used to measure tumor uptake in vivo. Tumor uptake of fluorescent annexin A5-variants was measured using non-invasive optical imaging. RESULTS: The annexin A5-streptavidin complex (4 ∶ 1, moles:moles, Mw ∼ 200 kDa binds phosphatidylserine-expressing membranes with a Hill-coefficient of 5.7 ± 0.5 for Ca2+-binding and an EC50 of 0.9 ± 0.1 mM Ca2+ (EC50 is the Ca2+ concentration required for half maximal binding(annexin A5: Hill-coefficient 3.9 ± 0.2, EC50 1.5 ± 0.2 mM Ca2+. Circulation half-life of annexin A5-streptavidin is ± 21 minutes (circulation half-life of annexin A5 is ± 4 min.. Tumor uptake of annexin A5-streptavidin was higher and persisted longer than annexin A5-uptake but depended less on phosphatidylserine binding. CONCLUSION: Increasing annexin A5 size prolongs circulation times and increases tumor uptake, but decreases contribution of PS-targeting to tumor uptake and abolishes power to report efficacy of therapy.

  6. Epitaxial growth of coronene and hexa-peri-benzocoronene on MoS 2(0001) and graphite (0001): a LEED study of molecular size effects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zimmermann, U.; Karl, N.

    The molecular order in thin films of the aromatic hydrocarbon coronene, C 24H 12, and its larger homologue, hexa-peri-benzocoronene ("HBC"), C 42H 18, obtained by vacuum-deposition onto the (0001) cleavage plane of graphite and molybdenite, MoS 2, has been investigated by low-intensity low-energy electron diffraction (LEED). Under well-defined preparation conditions (low evaporation rates and moderate substrate temperatures), epitaxial films could be obtained; their epitaxial relations could be characterized by well-resolved LEED-patterns. For coverages in the monolayer region, commensurate graphite (0001)-p(√21 × √21 R ± 10.9°)-coronene and MoS 2(0001)-p(√13 × √13 R ± 13.9°)-coronene superstructures are formed, while hexa-peri-benzoncoronen forms commensurate graphite (0001)-p(√31 × √31 R ± 9.0°)-HBC and MoS 2(0001)-p(√21 × √21 R ± 10.9°)-HBC superstructures. From the dependence of the observed superstructure lattice constants on the size and shape of the adsorbed molecules relative to the respective substrate surface lattice constants a parallel orientation of the molecular planes with respect to the substrate surface can be inferred. It is shown that under the influence of the substrate the distances and azimuthal orientations of the molecules are determined by the closest packing permitted by their in-plane van der Waals radii. These structures are different from the respective bulk crystal structures. For the system coronene on MoS 2 a model of film formation is proposed.

  7. Single Cell Analysis Linking Ribosomal (r)DNA and rRNA Copy Numbers to Cell Size and Growth Rate Provides Insights into Molecular Protistan Ecology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fu, Rao; Gong, Jun

    2017-11-01

    Ribosomal (r)RNA and rDNA have been golden molecular markers in microbial ecology. However, it remains poorly understood how ribotype copy number (CN)-based characteristics are linked with diversity, abundance, and activity of protist populations and communities observed at organismal levels. Here, we applied a single-cell approach to quantify ribotype CNs in two ciliate species reared at different temperatures. We found that in actively growing cells, the per-cell rDNA and rRNA CNs scaled with cell volume (CV) to 0.44 and 0.58 powers, respectively. The modeled rDNA and rRNA concentrations thus appear to be much higher in smaller than in larger cells. The observed rRNA:rDNA ratio scaled with CV 0.14 . The maximum growth rate could be well predicted by a combination of per-cell ribotype CN and temperature. Our empirical data and modeling on single-cell ribotype scaling are in agreement with both the metabolic theory of ecology and the growth rate hypothesis, providing a quantitative framework for linking cellular rDNA and rRNA CNs with body size, growth (activity), and biomass stoichiometry. This study also demonstrates that the expression rate of rRNA genes is constrained by cell size, and favors biomass rather than abundance-based interpretation of quantitative ribotype data in population and community ecology of protists. © 2017 The Authors. Journal of Eukaryotic Microbiology published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. on behalf of International Society of Protistologists.

  8. New aids for the non-invasive prenatal diagnosis of achondroplasia: dysmorphic features, charts of fetal size and molecular confirmation using cell-free fetal DNA in maternal plasma

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Chitty, L. S.; Griffin, D. R.; Meaney, C.; Barrett, A.; Khalil, A.; Pajkrt, E.; Cole, T. J.

    2011-01-01

    To improve the prenatal diagnosis of achondroplasia by constructing charts of fetal size, defining frequency of sonographic features and exploring the role of non-invasive molecular diagnosis based on cell-free fetal deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) in maternal plasma. Data on fetuses with a confirmed

  9. Analysis of nano-sized irradiation-induced defects in Fe-base materials by means of small angle neutron scattering and molecular dynamics simulations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yu, G.

    2008-12-15

    of RAFM steels with Molecular Dynamics (MD) simulations of main expected nano-sized defects in irradiated pure Fe and Fe-He alloys, as model materials for RAFM steels, and simulations of their corresponding TEM images and SANS signals. In particular, the SANS signal of various types of defects was simulated for the first time. The methodology used in this work was the following: (i) SANS experiments were performed by applying a strong saturating magnetic field to unirradiated and irradiated specimens of three types of RAFM steels, namely the European EUROFER 97, the Japanese F82H and the Swiss OPTIMAX A steels. The available irradiated specimens included specimens which had been irradiated with 590 MeV protons in the Proton IRradiation EXperiment (PIREX) facility at the Paul Scherrer Institute (PSI) at temperatures in the range of 50-350 °C to doses in the range of 0.3-2.0 dpa. SANS spectra as well as values of the so-called A ratio, which represents the ratio of the total scattered intensity to the nuclear scattered intensity, were obtained for the various irradiation doses and temperatures investigated. (ii) MD simulations of atomic displacement cascades in pure Fe and in Fe-He alloys were performed using Embedded Atom Method (EAM) many-body interatomic potentials. The main nano-sized defects that should be produced in RAFM steels under irradiation were created by means of MD in pure Fe. These included dislocation loops of various types, voids, helium bubbles with various He concentration and Cr precipitates. (iii) TEM images of cascade damage and all the defects created by MD were simulated in the dark field/weak beam imaging modes by using the Electron Microscopy Software (EMS) developed by P.A. Stadelmann (EPFL) and analyzed in terms of variations of contrast intensities versus depth inside the specimen. (iv) The SANS signal provided by cascade damage and all the defects created by MD was simulated by using a slightly modified version of EMS, accounting for

  10. A direct route for the synthesis of nanometer-sized Bi2WO6 particles loaded on a spherical MCM-48 mesoporous molecular sieve.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Lin; Wang, Lingzhi; Zhang, Jinlong

    2010-11-14

    Bi(2)WO(6) nanoparticles loaded on a spherical MCM-48 mesoporous molecular sieve with a high photocatalytic activity in the visible-light range was synthesized for the first time using a facile one-step process.

  11. Cell size control in yeast.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turner, Jonathan J; Ewald, Jennifer C; Skotheim, Jan M

    2012-05-08

    Cell size is an important adaptive trait that influences nearly all aspects of cellular physiology. Despite extensive characterization of the cell-cycle regulatory network, the molecular mechanisms coupling cell growth to division, and thereby controlling cell size, have remained elusive. Recent work in yeast has reinvigorated the size control field and suggested provocative mechanisms for the distinct functions of setting and sensing cell size. Further examination of size-sensing models based on spatial gradients and molecular titration, coupled with elucidation of the pathways responsible for nutrient-modulated target size, may reveal the fundamental principles of eukaryotic cell size control. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Molecular size distribution of dissolved organic matter in water of the Pearl River and trihalomethane formation characteristics with chlorine and chlorine dioxide treatments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Zhen-Ye; Gu, Ji-Dong; Fan, Xiao-Jun; Li, Hai-Bo

    2006-06-30

    River water sample was collected from Guangzhou section of the Pearl River to investigate soluble organic fractions and formation of trihalomethane (THMs) after chlorine and chlorine dioxide treatments. The water sample was passed through Amicon YC-05, YM-1, YM-3, YM-10, YM-30, YM-100 and ZM-500 series membranes after a pre-treatment. The molecular weight distribution and the specific ultra-violet absorbance (SUVA(254)) of each fraction obtained from membrane were analyzed, and these fractions were further disinfected with chlorine and chlorine dioxide. The results showed that reverse osmosis (RO) fraction contained mainly dissolved organic matter (DOM) from the water sample, suggesting that the water has been highly contaminated by anthropogenic activities. Meanwhile, the THMs concentration and SUVA(254) increased gradually as the molecular weight of the obtained fractions reduced, indicating that the low molecular weight DOM was the major THMs precursor in the disinfection process with chlorine and chlorine dioxide. The results suggest that THMs in source water of Pearl River could be effectively reduced when pollution of human activity is greatly controlled. Between the two disinfection processes tested, chlorine dioxide produced less THMs than chlorine in this study.

  13. New aids for the non-invasive prenatal diagnosis of achondroplasia: dysmorphic features, charts of fetal size and molecular confirmation using cell-free fetal DNA in maternal plasma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chitty, L S; Griffin, D R; Meaney, C; Barrett, A; Khalil, A; Pajkrt, E; Cole, T J

    2011-03-01

    To improve the prenatal diagnosis of achondroplasia by constructing charts of fetal size, defining frequency of sonographic features and exploring the role of non-invasive molecular diagnosis based on cell-free fetal deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) in maternal plasma. Data on fetuses with a confirmed diagnosis of achondroplasia were obtained from our databases, records reviewed, sonographic features and measurements determined and charts of fetal size constructed using the LMS (lambda-mu-sigma) method and compared with charts used in normal pregnancies. Cases referred to our regional genetics laboratory for molecular diagnosis using cell-free fetal DNA were identified and results reviewed. Twenty-six cases were scanned in our unit. Fetal size charts showed that femur length was usually on or below the 3(rd) centile by 25 weeks' gestation, and always below the 3(rd) by 30 weeks. Head circumference was above the 50(th) centile, increasing to above the 95(th) when compared with normal for the majority of fetuses. The abdominal circumference was also increased but to a lesser extent. Commonly reported sonographic features were bowing of the femora, frontal bossing, short fingers, a small chest and polyhydramnios. Analysis of cell-free fetal DNA in six pregnancies confirmed the presence of the c.1138G > A mutation in the FGRF3 gene in four cases with achondroplasia, but not the two subsequently found to be growth restricted. These data should improve the accuracy of diagnosis of achondroplasia based on sonographic findings, and have implications for targeted molecular confirmation that can reliably and safely be carried out using cell-free fetal DNA. Copyright © 2011 ISUOG. Published by John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  14. Molecular Characterization of Bovine SMO Gene and Effects of Its Genetic Variations on Body Size Traits in Qinchuan Cattle (Bos taurus).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Ya-Ran; Gui, Lin-Sheng; Li, Yao-Kun; Jiang, Bi-Jie; Wang, Hong-Cheng; Zhang, Ying-Ying; Zan, Lin-Sen

    2015-07-27

    Smoothened (Smo)-mediated Hedgehog (Hh) signaling pathway governs the patterning, morphogenesis and growth of many different regions within animal body plans. This study evaluated the effects of genetic variations of the bovine SMO gene on economically important body size traits in Chinese Qinchuan cattle. Altogether, eight single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs: 1-8) were identified and genotyped via direct sequencing covering most of the coding region and 3'UTR of the bovine SMO gene. Both the p.698Ser.>Ser. synonymous mutation resulted from SNP1 and the p.700Ser.>Pro. non-synonymous mutation caused by SNP2 mapped to the intracellular C-terminal tail of bovine Smo protein; the other six SNPs were non-coding variants located in the 3'UTR. The linkage disequilibrium was analyzed, and five haplotypes were discovered in 520 Qinchuan cattle. Association analyses showed that SNP2, SNP3/5, SNP4 and SNP6/7 were significantly associated with some body size traits (p 0.05). Meanwhile, cattle with wild-type combined haplotype Hap1/Hap1 had significantly (p < 0.05) greater body length than those with Hap2/Hap2. Our results indicate that variations in the SMO gene could affect body size traits of Qinchuan cattle, and the wild-type haplotype Hap1 together with the wild-type alleles of these detected SNPs in the SMO gene could be used to breed cattle with superior body size traits. Therefore, our results could be helpful for marker-assisted selection in beef cattle breeding programs.

  15. Studying physisorption processes and molecular friction of cycloparaphenylene molecules on graphene nano-sized flakes: role of π⋯π and CH⋯π interactions

    OpenAIRE

    Pérez-Guardiola, Andrés; Pérez-Jiménez, Ángel J.; Sancho-Garcia, Juan-Carlos

    2017-01-01

    We theoretically study, by means of dispersion-corrected and cost-effective methods, the strength of non-covalent interactions between cyclic organic nanorings (i.e. [8]cycloparaphenylene molecule) and nano-sized (e.g. C96H24) graphene flakes acting as substrates. Both CH⋯π and π⋯π driven interactions are investigated, according to the relative orientation between the two weakly interacting monomers, whose potential energy profiles are accurately calculated in both cases. These configurations...

  16. Density and size control of InP/GaInP quantum dots on GaAs substrate grown by gas source molecular beam epitaxy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rödel, R; Bauer, A; Kremling, S; Reitzenstein, S; Höfling, S; Kamp, M; Worschech, L; Forchel, A

    2012-01-13

    We demonstrate a method to controllably reduce the density of self-assembled InP quantum dots (QDs) by cyclic deposition with growth interruptions. Varying the number of cycles enabled a reduction of the QD density from 7.4 × 10(10) cm(-2) to 1.8 × 10(9) cm(-2) for the same total amount of deposited InP. Simultaneously, a systematic increase of the QD size could be observed. Emission characteristics of different-sized InP QDs were analyzed. Excitation power dependent and time-resolved measurements confirm a transition from type I to type II band alignment for large InP quantum dots. Photon autocorrelation measurements of type I QDs performed under pulsed excitation reveal pronounced antibunching (g((2))(τ = 0) = 0.06 ± 0.03) as expected for a single-photon emitter. The described growth routine has great promise for the exploitation of InP QDs as quantum emitters.

  17. Simulation study on the effects of chemical structure and molecular size on the acceptor strength in poly(3-hexylthiophene)-based copolymer with alternating donor and acceptor for photovoltaic applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rassamesard, Areefen; Pengpan, Teparksorn

    2017-02-01

    This research assessed the effects of various chemical structures and molecular sizes on the simulated geometric parameters, electron structures, and spectroscopic properties of single-chain complex alternating donor-acceptor (D-A) monomers and copolymers that are intended for use as photoactive layer in a polymer solar cell by using Kohn-Sham density functional theory with B3LYP exchange-correlation functional. The 3-hexylthiophene (3HT) was selected for electron donor, while eight chemicals, namely thiazole (Z), thiadiazole (D), thienopyrazine (TP), thienothiadiazole (TD), benzothiadiazole (BT), thiadiazolothieno-pyrazine (TPD), oxadiazole (OXD) and 5-diphenyl-1,2,4-triazole (TAZ), were employed as electron acceptor functional groups. The torsional angle, bridge bond length, intramolecular charge transfer, energy levels, and molecular orbitals were analyzed. The simulation results reveal that the geometry and electron structure of donor-acceptor monomer and copolymer are significantly impacted by heterocyclic rings, heteroatoms, fused rings, degree of steric hindrance and coplanarity of the acceptor molecular structure. Planar conformation was obtained from the D copolymer, and a pseudo-planar structure with the TD copolymer. The TAZ acceptor exhibited strong steric hindrance due to its bulky structure and non-planarity of its structure. An analysis of the electron structures indicated that the degree of intramolecular electron-withdrawing capability had the rank order TAZ  group provides a compromise in the characteristics of a donor-acceptor copolymer, useful in a polymeric candidate material for the photoactive layer in a polymer solar cell.

  18. Design and synthesis of new type I bicontinuous cubic lyotropic liquid crystal monomers based on the gemini framework for molecular-size separation applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wiesenauer, Brian R.

    The overall objective of this thesis research was the design and synthesis of new type I bicontinuous cubic (QI) phase-forming, gemini-shaped lyotropic liquid crystal (LLC) monomers for the preparation of nanoporous polymer membrane materials. These new QI-phase LLC monomers were designed to overcome several shortcomings of previously developed QI-phase LLC monomers in the Gin research group that include expensive and difficult synthesis, poor film processibility, and limited blendability with additives. The first method for obtaining this objective was the synthesis of six homologues of a new gemini ammonium LLC monomer, two of which exhibit a QI phase with water. Both of these LLCs form a robust Q I phase such that a gel of these materials can be fully infused into a microporous support membrane and then cross-linked to maintain the LLC phase structure. The resulting QI-phase polymer film showed a uniform pore size of 0.86 nm in water nanofiltration and desalination experiments. This QI monomer platform is less costly and less rigorous to synthesize than previously synthesized phosphonium-based gemini QI LLC monomers. These new LLC monomers also have the ability to blend with the hydrophobic, commercially available cross-linkable elastomer vinyl-EPDM (v-EPDM) to form breathable composite barrier materials. In the appropriate composition, melt-infused gemini ammonium monomer/v-EPDM polymer membranes exhibit extremely high pure water vapor fluxes, and high rejection of toxic industrial chemical vapors. A new cross-linkable gemini LLC monomer based on charged imidazolium units was also developed that forms a QI phase with glycerol. This new LLC monomer can be solution-cast from MeOH and UV-irradiated to form cross-linked thin-film composite QI membranes with slightly larger effective pore size (0.96 nm) than the previous systems. A related goal of this thesis research was to develop methods for systematically tuning the effective pore size of nanoporous QI polymer

  19. Simultaneous determination of the styrene unit content and assessment of molecular weight of triblock copolymers in adhesives by a size exclusion chromatography method.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Mingfang; Wang, Yuerong; Luo, Pei; Zhang, Hongyang; Zhang, Min; Hu, Ping

    2017-10-01

    The content of styrene units in nonhydrogenated and hydrogenated styrene-butadiene-styrene and styrene-isoprene-styrene triblock copolymers significantly influences product performance. A size exclusion chromatography method was developed to determine the average styrene content of triblock copolymers blended with tackifier in adhesives. A complete separation of the triblock copolymer from the other additives was realized with size exclusion chromatography. The peak area ratio of the UV and refraction index signals of the copolymers at the same effective elution volume was correlated to the average styrene unit content using nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy with commercial copolymers as standards. The obtained calibration curves showed good linearity for both the hydrogenated and nonhydrogenated styrene-butadiene-styrene and styrene-isoprene-styrene triblock copolymers (r = 0.974 for styrene contents of 19.3-46.3% for nonhydrogenated ones and r = 0.970 for the styrene contents of 23-58.2% for hydrogenated ones). For copolymer blends, the developed method provided more accurate average styrene unit contents than nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy provided. These results were validated using two known copolymer blends consisting of either styrene-isoprene-styrene or hydrogenated styrene-butadiene-styrene and a hydrocarbon tackifying resin as well as an unknown adhesive with styrene-butadiene-styrene and an aromatic tackifying resin. The methodology can be readily applied to styrene-containing polymers in blends such as poly(acrylonitrile-butadiene styrene). © 2017 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  20. A molecular simulation study on the role of ion sizes and dielectric images in near-surface ion distribution far from the strong coupling limit

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Zhi-yong; Ma, Yu-qiang

    2012-06-01

    A series of Monte Carlo simulations of the planar electric double layers are carried out in the primitive model for two electrolyte mixtures next to a smooth and uniformly charged hard wall representing an ideal biological interface with low and moderate surface charge densities. The structural information of the double layers is applied to reveal charge inversion and overcharging through the addition of multivalent electrolyte at a certain physiological concentration. Various values for the radius of the ions are taken into account to capture the impact of short-range correlations. Meanwhile, the influence of image charges on ion distribution is analyzed, which stems from dielectric discontinuity between the interior and exterior of the membrane matrix. It is clearly shown that depending on the amount of foreign salt, the large size of charged species regardless of its polarity plays a positive role in promoting charge inversion. Moreover, our findings indicate that charge inversion do not signify the reversal of the electrophoretic mobility, in consistent with the recent theoretical predictions by Horno and co-workers [J. Colloid Interface Sci. 356, 325 (2011)], 10.1016/j.jcis.2010.12.063. In addition, the depletion effect triggered by repulsive image forces which are intertwined with the excluded volume correlations gives rise to an anomalous overcharging for low surface charged surface in the high concentrations of trivalent salt. Overall, the ion distribution in a double layer is exclusively governed by entropic and electrostatic contributions but with preferentially leading status for different magnitudes of surface charge.

  1. Size matter!

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Pelle Guldborg; Jespersen, Andreas Maaløe; Skov, Laurits Rhoden

    2015-01-01

    trash bags according to size of plates and weighed in bulk. Results Those eating from smaller plates (n=145) left significantly less food to waste (aver. 14,8g) than participants eating from standard plates (n=75) (aver. 20g) amounting to a reduction of 25,8%. Conclusions Our field experiment tests...

  2. Rhizosphere size

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuzyakov, Yakov; Razavi, Bahar

    2017-04-01

    Estimation of the soil volume affected by roots - the rhizosphere - is crucial to assess the effects of plants on properties and processes in soils and dynamics of nutrients, water, microorganisms and soil organic matter. The challenges to assess the rhizosphere size are: 1) the continuum of properties between the root surface and root-free soil, 2) differences in the distributions of various properties (carbon, microorganisms and their activities, various nutrients, enzymes, etc.) along and across the roots, 3) temporal changes of properties and processes. Thus, to describe the rhizosphere size and root effects, a holistic approach is necessary. We collected literature and own data on the rhizosphere gradients of a broad range of physico-chemical and biological properties: pH, CO2, oxygen, redox potential, water uptake, various nutrients (C, N, P, K, Ca, Mg, Mn and Fe), organic compounds (glucose, carboxylic acids, amino acids), activities of enzymes of C, N, P and S cycles. The collected data were obtained based on the destructive approaches (thin layer slicing), rhizotron studies and in situ visualization techniques: optodes, zymography, sensitive gels, 14C and neutron imaging. The root effects were pronounced from less than 0.5 mm (nutrients with slow diffusion) up to more than 50 mm (for gases). However, the most common effects were between 1 - 10 mm. Sharp gradients (e.g. for P, carboxylic acids, enzyme activities) allowed to calculate clear rhizosphere boundaries and so, the soil volume affected by roots. The first analyses were done to assess the effects of soil texture and moisture as well as root system and age on these gradients. The most properties can be described by two curve types: exponential saturation and S curve, each with increasing and decreasing concentration profiles from the root surface. The gradient based distribution functions were calculated and used to extrapolate on the whole soil depending on the root density and rooting intensity. We

  3. Molecular nanomagnets

    CERN Document Server

    Gatteschi, Dante; Villain, Jacques

    2006-01-01

    Nanomagnetism is a rapidly expanding area of research which appears to be able to provide novel applications. Magnetic molecules are at the very bottom of the possible size of nanomagnets and they provide a unique opportunity to observe the coexistence of classical and quantum properties. The discovery in the early 90's that a cluster comprising twelve manganese ions shows hysteresis of molecular origin, and later proved evidence of quantum effects, opened a new research area whichis still flourishing through the collaboration of chemists and physicists. This book is the first attempt to cover

  4. The Biosynthetic Basis of Cell Size Control.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmoller, Kurt M; Skotheim, Jan M

    2015-12-01

    Cell size is an important physiological trait that sets the scale of all biosynthetic processes. Although physiological studies have revealed that cells actively regulate their size, the molecular mechanisms underlying this regulation have remained unclear. Here we review recent progress in identifying the molecular mechanisms of cell size control. We focus on budding yeast, where cell growth dilutes a cell cycle inhibitor to couple growth and division. We discuss a new model for size control based on the titration of activator and inhibitor molecules whose synthesis rates are differentially dependent on cell size. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Genome size evolution: sizing mammalian genomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Redi, C A; Capanna, E

    2012-01-01

    The study of genome size (GS) and its variation is so fascinating to the scientific community because it constitutes the link between the present-day analytical and molecular studies of the genome and the old trunk of the holistic and synthetic view of the genome. The GS of several taxa vary over a broad range and do not correlate with the complexity of the organisms (the C-value paradox). However, the biology of transposable elements has let us reach a satisfactory view of the molecular mechanisms that give rise to GS variation and novelties, providing a less perplexing view of the significance of the GS (C-enigma). The knowledge of the composition and structure of a genome is a pre-requisite for trying to understand the evolution of the main genome signature: its size. The radiation of mammals provides an approximately 180-million-year test case for theories of how GS evolves. It has been found from data-mining GS databases that GS is a useful cyto-taxonomical instrument at the level of orders/superorders, providing genomic signatures characterizing Monotremata, Marsupialia, Afrotheria, Xenarthra, Laurasiatheria, and Euarchontoglires. A hypothetical ancestral mammalian-like GS of 2.9-3.7 pg has been suggested. This value appears compatible with the average values calculated for the high systematic levels of the extant Monotremata (∼2.97 pg) and Marsupialia (∼4.07 pg), suggesting invasion of mobile DNA elements concurrently with the separation of the older clades of Afrotheria (∼5.5 pg) and Xenarthra (∼4.5 pg) with larger GS, leaving the Euarchontoglires (∼3.4 pg) and Laurasiatheria (∼2.8 pg) genomes with fewer transposable elements. However, the paucity of GS data (546 mammalian species sized from 5,488 living species) for species, genera, and families calls for caution. Considering that mammalian species may be vanished even before they are known, GS data are sorely needed to phenotype the effects brought about by their variation and to validate any

  6. A compact molecular beam machine

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jansen, P.; Chandler, D.W.; Strecker, K.E.

    2009-01-01

    We have developed a compact, low cost, modular, crossed molecular beam machine. The new apparatus utilizes several technological advancements in molecular beams valves, ion detection, and vacuum pumping to reduce the size, cost, and complexity of a molecular beam apparatus. We apply these

  7. The size of the nucleosome

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bohr, Jakob; Olsen, Kasper

    2011-01-01

    The structural origin of the size of the 11 nm nucleosomal disc is addressed. On the nanometer length-scale the organization of DNA as chromatin in the chromosomes involves a coiling of DNA around the histone core of the nucleosome. We suggest that the size of the nucleosome core particle...... is dictated by the fulfillment of two criteria: One is optimizing the volume fraction of the DNA double helix; this requirement for close-packing has its root in optimizing atomic and molecular interactions. The other criterion being that of having a zero strain-twist coupling; being a zero-twist structure......-pairs of the linker-DNA is included the estimate of the size of an ideal nucleosome is in close agreement with the experimental numbers. Interestingly, the size of the nucleosome is shown to be a consequence of intrinsic properties of the DNA double helix....

  8. Size scaling of static friction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Braun, O M; Manini, Nicola; Tosatti, Erio

    2013-02-22

    Sliding friction across a thin soft lubricant film typically occurs by stick slip, the lubricant fully solidifying at stick, yielding and flowing at slip. The static friction force per unit area preceding slip is known from molecular dynamics (MD) simulations to decrease with increasing contact area. That makes the large-size fate of stick slip unclear and unknown; its possible vanishing is important as it would herald smooth sliding with a dramatic drop of kinetic friction at large size. Here we formulate a scaling law of the static friction force, which for a soft lubricant is predicted to decrease as f(m)+Δf/A(γ) for increasing contact area A, with γ>0. Our main finding is that the value of f(m), controlling the survival of stick slip at large size, can be evaluated by simulations of comparably small size. MD simulations of soft lubricant sliding are presented, which verify this theory.

  9. Mesoporous molecular sieve catalysts

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Højholt, Karen Thrane

    This thesis deals with a very specific class of molecular sieves known as zeolites. Zeolites are a class of crystalline aluminosilicates characterised by pores or cavities of molecular dimensions as part of their crystal structure. In this work zeolites were modified for the use and understanding...... of different catalytic applications. Primarily the zeolites were modified regarding the porosity and the introduction of metals to the framework. The obtained materials were used as solid acid catalysts, as an inert matrix for stabilising metal nanoparticles and as an anchoring material for molecular metal...... be used as solid acid catalysts but can also be used as a size-selective matrix. It was shown that it is possible to encapsulate 1-2 nm sized gold nanoparticles by silicalite-1 or ZSM-5 zeolite crystals thereby forming a sintering-stable and substrate size-selective oxidation catalyst. After carrying out...

  10. Black Sprayable Molecular Adsorber Coating Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — This novel molecular adsorber coating would alleviate the size, weight, and complexity issues of traditional molecular adsorber puck.  A flexible tape version...

  11. Investigation of solvation of iron nanoclusters in ionic liquid 1-butyl-1,1,1-trimethylammonium methane sulfonate using molecular dynamics simulations: Effect of cluster size at different temperatures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abbaspour, Mohsen; Akbarzadeh, Hamed; Yousefi, Parnian; Razmkhah, Mohammad

    2017-10-15

    The systems composed of metal nanoclusters in ionic liquids are relevant for applications in lubrication, electrochemical devices, catalysis, and chemical processes. The mechanism of solvation and interactions of these systems are not understood at present. In this work, we have simulated iron nanoclusters with different sizes in ionic liquid 1-butyl-1,1,1-trimethylammonium methane sulfonate [N1114][C1SO3] at two temperatures (300 and 500K) and at atmospheric pressure. We have investigated the effects of cluster size and the temperature on some of the thermodynamics, structural and dynamical properties of the systems. Our results also show that the absolute value of solvation energy increases as the nanocluster size increases. Also the absolute solvation energy increases as the temperature increases. It is also shown that the effect of the cluster size is much more than the effect of the temperature. Our structural investigations indicate at least two shells (a double layer) around the nanocluster and the anions are closer to the cluster surface than the cations. The self-diffusion coefficients of cations, anions, and iron clusters have been also presented and discussed in this work. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. STAINING SECTIONS OF WATER-MISCIBLE RESINS .1. EFFECTS OF THE MOLECULAR-SIZE OF THE STAIN, AND OF RESIN CROSS-LINKING, ON THE STAINING OF GLYCOL METHACRYLATE EMBEDDED TISSUES

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    GERRITS, PO; HOROBIN, RW; WRIGHT, DJ

    1990-01-01

    Penetration of hydrophilic acid and basic dyes into sections cut from glycol methacrylate (GMA)-embedded tissues was studied; as were the effects on such staining of superficial coatings of thin layers of GMA. Dye size was a major factor in controlling penetration of resin and staining of tissues.

  13. Magnetismo Molecular (Molecular Magentism)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reis, Mario S [Universidade Federal Fluminense, Brasil; Moreira Dos Santos, Antonio F [ORNL

    2010-07-01

    The new synthesis processes in chemistry open a new world of research, new and surprising materials never before found in nature can now be synthesized and, as a wonderful result, observed a series of physical phenomena never before imagined. Among these are many new materials the molecular magnets, the subject of this book and magnetic properties that are often reflections of the quantum behavior of these materials. Aside from the wonderful experience of exploring something new, the theoretical models that describe the behavior these magnetic materials are, in most cases, soluble analytically, which allows us to know in detail the physical mechanisms governing these materials. Still, the academic interest in parallel this subject, these materials have a number of properties that are promising to be used in technological devices, such as in computers quantum magnetic recording, magnetocaloric effect, spintronics and many other devices. This volume will journey through the world of molecular magnets, from the structural description of these materials to state of the art research.

  14. Molecular hematology

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Provan, Drew; Gribben, John

    2010-01-01

    ... The molecular basis of hemophilia, 219 Paul LF Giangrande 4 The genetics of acute myeloid leukemias, 42 Carolyn J Owen & Jude Fitzgibbon 19 The molecular basis of von Willebrand disease, 233 Luciano Baronc...

  15. A compact molecular beam machine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jansen, Paul; Chandler, David W; Strecker, Kevin E

    2009-08-01

    We have developed a compact, low cost, modular, crossed molecular beam machine. The new apparatus utilizes several technological advancements in molecular beams valves, ion detection, and vacuum pumping to reduce the size, cost, and complexity of a molecular beam apparatus. We apply these simplifications to construct a linear molecular beam machine as well as a crossed-atomic and molecular beam machine. The new apparatus measures almost 50 cm in length, with a total laboratory footprint less than 0.25 m(2) for the crossed-atomic and molecular beam machine. We demonstrate the performance of the apparatus by measuring the rotational temperature of nitric oxide from three common molecular beam valves and by observing collisional energy transfer in nitric oxide from a collision with argon.

  16. Molecular thermodynamic analysis for assessing the relationship between reentrant swelling behavior and ternary liquid-liquid equilibrium for poly(N-isopropylacrylamide) nanometer-sized gel particles in a water-tetrahydrofuran cosolvent system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jung, Sang Chul; Bae, Young Chan

    2012-02-23

    The influence of phase separation on swelling behavior was investigated based on the thermodynamic framework of reswelling phenomena. The cloud-point for a ternary system of water(1)-tetrahydrofuran (THF)(2)-poly(N-isopropylacrylamide)(3) was examined by thermo-optical analysis (TOA). Nanometer-sized N-isopropylacrylamide (NIPA) gel particles were prepared by precipitation polymerization, and their swelling behaviors were determined using photon correlation spectroscopy (PCS). NIPA gel particles underwent reswelling when the ratio of water to THF was varied. First, the modified double lattice model (MDL) was employed to determine ternary interaction energy parameters for the liquid-liquid equilibrium (LLE) of linear poly-NIPA in a water-THF cosolvent system. The reentrant swelling equilibria of the NIPA gel in the water-THF system were then calculated using the interaction energy parameters. © 2012 American Chemical Society

  17. Fullerenes: multitask components in molecular machinery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mateo-Alonso, Aurelio; Guldi, Dirk M; Paolucci, Francesco; Prato, Maurizio

    2007-01-01

    Molecular machines are molecular-scale devices that carry out predetermined tasks derived from molecular motion. This Minireview illustrates how fullerenes can be used as multitask building blocks in molecular machinery, providing new perspectives for fullerenes. Indeed, C(60) can be applied as a photo- and electroactive stopper owing to its size, as a probe for molecular motion as a result of its well-defined physicochemical properties, and to induce motion through pi-pi interactions. Such molecular motion can be employed to modulate light-driven electron-transfer events, extending the potential applications of molecular machines to the typical fields of application of fullerenes.

  18. Molecular pharmacognosy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, LuQi; Xiao, PeiGen; Guo, LanPing; Gao, WenYuan

    2010-06-01

    This article analyzes the background and significance of molecular pharmacognosy, including the molecular identification of medicinal raw materials, phylogenetic evolution of medicinal plants and animals, evaluation and preservation of germplasm resources for medicinal plants and animals, etiology of endangerment and protection of endangered medicinal plants and animals, biosynthesis and bioregulation of active components in medicinal plants, and characteristics and the molecular bases of top-geoherbs.

  19. Molecular Gastronomy

    OpenAIRE

    Burke, Roisin; This, Herve; Kelly, Alan

    2016-01-01

    Molecular gastronomy may be defined as the scientific discipline that explores the phenomena occurring during culinary transformations. In contrast with traditional approaches of food science and technology, which considered mostly the chemistry, physics, or biology of food ingredients and industrial transformations, the focus is on phenomena occurring during the preparation of dishes. Applications building on the principles of molecular gastronomy, such as ‘Molecular Cooking’ and ‘Note-by-No...

  20. Size and Political Participation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lassen, David Dreyer; Serritzlew, Søren

    This paper uses a novel research design to re-examine the causal effect of jurisdiction size on political participation. Two waves of municipal consolidation in Denmark, in 1970 and in 2005, provide exogenous variation in jurisdiction size.......This paper uses a novel research design to re-examine the causal effect of jurisdiction size on political participation. Two waves of municipal consolidation in Denmark, in 1970 and in 2005, provide exogenous variation in jurisdiction size....

  1. Bra sizing and fit

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Daanen, H.A.M.

    2007-01-01

    It is often reported that 70% or more of the women wear the wrong-sized bra. A fact is that many women complain about bra fit even though the number of available sizes varies from 20 to 100. Sizing of bras is based on under bust circumference and its difference with circumference over the bust (cup

  2. Molecular dynamics

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bergstra, J.A.; Bethke, I.

    2002-01-01

    Molecular dynamics is a model for the structure and meaning of object based programming systems. In molecular dynamics the memory state of a system is modeled as a fluid consisting of a collection of molecules. Each molecule is a collection of atoms with bindings between them. A computation is

  3. Molecular motors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allemand, Jean François Desbiolles, Pierre

    2015-10-01

    How do we move? More precisely, what are the molecular mechanisms that can explain that our muscles, made of very small components can move at a osopic scale? To answer these questions we must introduce molecular motors. Those motors are proteins, or small protein assemblies that, in our cells, transform chemical energy into mechanical work. Then, like we could do for a oscopic motor, used in a car or in a fan, we are going to study the basic behavior of these molecular machines, present what are their energy sources, calculate their power, their yield. If molecular motors are crucial for our oscopic movements, we are going to see that they are also essential to cellular transport and that considering the activity of some enzymes as molecular motors bring some interesting new insights on their activity.

  4. Sample size for beginners.

    OpenAIRE

    Florey, C D

    1993-01-01

    The common failure to include an estimation of sample size in grant proposals imposes a major handicap on applicants, particularly for those proposing work in any aspect of research in the health services. Members of research committees need evidence that a study is of adequate size for there to be a reasonable chance of a clear answer at the end. A simple illustrated explanation of the concepts in determining sample size should encourage the faint hearted to pay more attention to this increa...

  5. Molecular geometry

    CERN Document Server

    Rodger, Alison

    1995-01-01

    Molecular Geometry discusses topics relevant to the arrangement of atoms. The book is comprised of seven chapters that tackle several areas of molecular geometry. Chapter 1 reviews the definition and determination of molecular geometry, while Chapter 2 discusses the unified view of stereochemistry and stereochemical changes. Chapter 3 covers the geometry of molecules of second row atoms, and Chapter 4 deals with the main group elements beyond the second row. The book also talks about the complexes of transition metals and f-block elements, and then covers the organometallic compounds and trans

  6. Molecular Haeckel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elinson, Richard P; Kezmoh, Lorren

    2010-07-01

    More than a century ago, Ernst Haeckel created embryo drawings to illustrate the morphological similarity of vertebrate early embryos. These drawings have been both widely presented and frequently criticized. At the same time that the idea of morphological similarity was recently attacked, there has been a growing realization of molecular similarities in the development of tissues and organs. We have surveyed genes expressed in vertebrate embryos, and we have used them to construct drawings that we call Molecular Haeckels. The Molecular Haeckels emphasize that, based on gene expression, there is a greater similarity among vertebrate embryos than even Haeckel might have imagined. (c) 2010 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  7. Molecular Origami

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Resonance – Journal of Science Education; Volume 5; Issue 9. Molecular Origami - Modular Construction of Platonic Solids as Models for Reversible Assemblies. Subramania Ranganathan. General Article Volume 5 Issue 9 September 2000 pp 82-91 ...

  8. Determination of Sample Size

    OpenAIRE

    Naing, Nyi Nyi

    2003-01-01

    There is a particular importance of determining a basic minimum required ‘n’ size of the sample to recognize a particular measurement of a particular population. This article has highlighted the determination of an appropriate size to estimate population parameters.

  9. Cell-Size Control.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amodeo, Amanda A; Skotheim, Jan M

    2016-04-01

    Cells of a given type maintain a characteristic cell size to function efficiently in their ecological or organismal context. They achieve this through the regulation of growth rates or by actively sensing size and coupling this signal to cell division. We focus this review on potential size-sensing mechanisms, including geometric, external cue, and titration mechanisms. Mechanisms that titrate proteins against DNA are of particular interest because they are consistent with the robust correlation of DNA content and cell size. We review the literature, which suggests that titration mechanisms may underlie cell-size sensing in Xenopus embryos, budding yeast, and Escherichia coli, whereas alternative mechanisms may function in fission yeast. Copyright © 2016 Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory Press; all rights reserved.

  10. Molecular fountain.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Strecker, Kevin E.; Chandler, David W.

    2009-09-01

    A molecular fountain directs slowly moving molecules against gravity to further slow them to translational energies that they can be trapped and studied. If the molecules are initially slow enough they will return some time later to the position from which they were launched. Because this round trip time can be on the order of a second a single molecule can be observed for times sufficient to perform Hz level spectroscopy. The goal of this LDRD proposal was to construct a novel Molecular Fountain apparatus capable of producing dilute samples of molecules at near zero temperatures in well-defined user-selectable, quantum states. The slowly moving molecules used in this research are produced by the previously developed Kinematic Cooling technique, which uses a crossed atomic and molecular beam apparatus to generate single rotational level molecular samples moving slowly in the laboratory reference frame. The Kinematic Cooling technique produces cold molecules from a supersonic molecular beam via single collisions with a supersonic atomic beam. A single collision of an atom with a molecule occurring at the correct energy and relative velocity can cause a small fraction of the molecules to move very slowly vertically against gravity in the laboratory. These slowly moving molecules are captured by an electrostatic hexapole guiding field that both orients and focuses the molecules. The molecules are focused into the ionization region of a time-of-flight mass spectrometer and are ionized by laser radiation. The new molecular fountain apparatus was built utilizing a new design for molecular beam apparatus that has allowed us to miniaturize the apparatus. This new design minimizes the volumes and surface area of the machine allowing smaller pumps to maintain the necessary background pressures needed for these experiments.

  11. Does size matter?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Carreras, B. A. [BACV Solutions, 110 Mohawk Road, Oak Ridge, Tennessee 37830 (United States); Physics Department, College of Natural Science and Mathematics and Geophysical Institute, University of Alaska, Fairbanks, Alaska 99775 (United States); Physics Department, Universidad Carlos III de Madrid, Madrid (Spain); Newman, D. E., E-mail: denewman@alaska.edu [Physics Department, College of Natural Science and Mathematics and Geophysical Institute, University of Alaska, Fairbanks, Alaska 99775 (United States); Physics Department, Universidad Carlos III de Madrid, Madrid (Spain); Dobson, Ian [ECpE Department, Iowa State University, Ames, Iowa 50011 (United States)

    2014-06-15

    Failures of the complex infrastructures society depends on having enormous human and economic cost that poses the question: Are there ways to optimize these systems to reduce the risks of failure? A dynamic model of one such system, the power transmission grid, is used to investigate the risk from failure as a function of the system size. It is found that there appears to be optimal sizes for such networks where the risk of failure is balanced by the benefit given by the size.

  12. Does size matter?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carreras, B. A.; Newman, D. E.; Dobson, Ian

    2014-06-01

    Failures of the complex infrastructures society depends on having enormous human and economic cost that poses the question: Are there ways to optimize these systems to reduce the risks of failure? A dynamic model of one such system, the power transmission grid, is used to investigate the risk from failure as a function of the system size. It is found that there appears to be optimal sizes for such networks where the risk of failure is balanced by the benefit given by the size.

  13. Sample size methodology

    CERN Document Server

    Desu, M M

    2012-01-01

    One of the most important problems in designing an experiment or a survey is sample size determination and this book presents the currently available methodology. It includes both random sampling from standard probability distributions and from finite populations. Also discussed is sample size determination for estimating parameters in a Bayesian setting by considering the posterior distribution of the parameter and specifying the necessary requirements. The determination of the sample size is considered for ranking and selection problems as well as for the design of clinical trials. Appropria

  14. Sample size for beginners.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Florey, C D

    1993-05-01

    The common failure to include an estimation of sample size in grant proposals imposes a major handicap on applicants, particularly for those proposing work in any aspect of research in the health services. Members of research committees need evidence that a study is of adequate size for there to be a reasonable chance of a clear answer at the end. A simple illustrated explanation of the concepts in determining sample size should encourage the faint hearted to pay more attention to this increasingly important aspect of grantsmanship.

  15. Rigid molecular foams

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Steckle, W.P. Jr. [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States); Mitchell, M.A. [Chemidal Corp., Palatine, IL (United States); Aspen, P.G. [Simula Inc., Phoenix, AZ (United States)

    1998-12-31

    This is the final report of a three-year, Laboratory Directed Research and Development (LDRD) project at the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL). Organic analogues to inorganic zeolites would be a significant step forward in engineered porous materials and would provide advantages in range, selectivity, tailorability, and processing. Rigid molecular foams or {open_quotes}organic zeolites{close_quotes} would not be crystalline materials and could be tailored over a broader range of pore sizes and volumes. A novel process for preparing hypercrosslinked polymeric foams has been developed via a Friedel-Crafts polycondensation reaction. A series of rigid hypercrosslinked foams have been prepared using simple rigid polyaromatic hydrocarbons including benzene, biphenyl, m-terphenyl, diphenylmethane, and polystyrene, with dichloroxylene (DCX) as the pore size. After drying the foams are robust and rigid. Densities of the resulting foams can range from 0.15 g/cc to 0.75 g/cc. Nitrogen adsorption studies have shown that by judiciously selecting monomers and the crosslinking agent along with the level of crosslinking and the cure time of the resulting gel, the pore size, pore size distribution, and the total surface area of the foam can be tailored. Surface areas range from 160 to 1,200 m{sup 2}/g with pore sizes ranging from 6 {angstrom} to 2,000 {angstrom}.

  16. Molecular Electronics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jennum, Karsten Stein

    This thesis includes the synthesis and characterisation of organic compounds designed for molecular electronics. The synthesised organic molecules are mainly based on two motifs, the obigo(phenyleneethynylenes) (OPE)s and tetrathiafulvalene (TTF) as shown below. These two scaffolds (OPE and TTF...... transistors (Part 2). The synthetic protocols rely on stepwise Sonogashira coupling reactions. Conductivity studies on various OPE-based molecular wires reveal that mere OPE compounds have a higher electrical resistance compared to the cruciform based wires (up to 9 times higher). The most spectacular result...... be potential candidates for future molecular electronics Synthesis of a new donor-acceptor chromophore based on a benzoquinone- TTF motif (QuinoneDTF) is also described herein (Part 2). Reaction of this molecule with acid induces a colour change from purple to orange. The purple colour can be restored...

  17. Does size really matter?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Maj; Hyland, Philip; Karstoft, Karen-Inge

    2017-01-01

    words, does the size of PTSD really matter? Methods: The aim was investigated by examining differences in diagnostic rates between the two diagnostic systems and independently examining the model fit of the competing DSM-5 and ICD-11 models of PTSD across three trauma samples: university students (N...... diagnostic criteria only the ICD-11 model can reflect the configuration of symptoms satisfactorily. Thus, size does matter when assessing PTSD....

  18. Compressors selection and sizing

    CERN Document Server

    Brown, Royce N

    2005-01-01

    This practical reference provides in-depth information required to understand and properly estimate compressor capabilities and to select the proper designs. Engineers and students will gain a thorough understanding of compression principles, equipment, applications, selection, sizing, installation, and maintenance. The many examples clearly illustrate key aspects to help readers understand the ""real world"" of compressor technology.Compressors: Selection and Sizing, third edition is completely updated with new API standards. Additions requested by readers include a new section on di

  19. Small domain-size multiblock copolymer electrolytes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pistorino, Jonathan; Eitouni, Hany Basam

    2016-09-20

    New block polymer electrolytes have been developed which have higher conductivities than previously reported for other block copolymer electrolytes. The new materials are constructed of multiple blocks (>5) of relatively low domain size. The small domain size provides greater protection against formation of dendrites during cycling against lithium in an electrochemical cell, while the large total molecular weight insures poor long range alignment, which leads to higher conductivity. In addition to higher conductivity, these materials can be more easily synthesized because of reduced requirements on the purity level of the reagents.

  20. Molecular pathways

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cox, Thomas R; Erler, Janine Terra

    2014-01-01

    that 45% of deaths in the developed world are linked to fibrotic disease. Fibrosis and cancer are known to be inextricably linked; however, we are only just beginning to understand the common and overlapping molecular pathways between the two. Here, we discuss what is known about the intersection...... of fibrosis and cancer, with a focus on cancer metastasis, and highlight some of the exciting new potential clinical targets that are emerging from analysis of the molecular pathways associated with these two devastating diseases. Clin Cancer Res; 20(14); 3637-43. ©2014 AACR....

  1. Molecular modeling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aarti Sharma

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available The use of computational chemistry in the development of novel pharmaceuticals is becoming an increasingly important tool. In the past, drugs were simply screened for effectiveness. The recent advances in computing power and the exponential growth of the knowledge of protein structures have made it possible for organic compounds to be tailored to decrease the harmful side effects and increase the potency. This article provides a detailed description of the techniques employed in molecular modeling. Molecular modeling is a rapidly developing discipline, and has been supported by the dramatic improvements in computer hardware and software in recent years.

  2. Molecular Adsorber Coating

    Science.gov (United States)

    Straka, Sharon; Peters, Wanda; Hasegawa, Mark; Hedgeland, Randy; Petro, John; Novo-Gradac, Kevin; Wong, Alfred; Triolo, Jack; Miller, Cory

    2011-01-01

    A document discusses a zeolite-based sprayable molecular adsorber coating that has been developed to alleviate the size and weight issues of current ceramic puck-based technology, while providing a configuration that more projects can use to protect against degradation from outgassed materials within a spacecraft, particularly contamination-sensitive instruments. This coating system demonstrates five times the adsorption capacity of previously developed adsorber coating slurries. The molecular adsorber formulation was developed and refined, and a procedure for spray application was developed. Samples were spray-coated and tested for capacity, thermal optical/radiative properties, coating adhesion, and thermal cycling. Work performed during this study indicates that the molecular adsorber formulation can be applied to aluminum, stainless steel, or other metal substrates that can accept silicate-based coatings. The coating can also function as a thermal- control coating. This adsorber will dramatically reduce the mass and volume restrictions, and is less expensive than the currently used molecular adsorber puck design.

  3. Latitudinal clines in Drosophila melanogaster: body size, allozyme ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Unknown

    tions has a heritable component, but not which genes contribute to such genetic differences in body size. In D. melanogaster, not only body size but many other traits, ranging from wing shape to molecular chaperones, ...... apparently complex role of genes, such as those involved in insulin signalling, in the control of insect.

  4. Size effects of pore density and solute size on water osmosis through nanoporous membrane.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Kuiwen; Wu, Huiying

    2012-11-15

    Understanding the behavior of osmotic transport across nanoporous membranes at molecular level is critical to their design and applications, and it is also beneficial to the comprehension of the mechanism of biological transmembrane transport processes. Pore density is an important parameter for nanoporous membranes. To better understand the influence of pore density on osmotic transport, we have performed systematic molecular dynamics simulations on water osmosis across nanoporous membranes with different pore densities (i.e., number of pores per unit area of membrane). The simulation results reveal that significant size effects occur when the pore density is so high that the center-to-center distance between neighboring nanopores is comparable to the solute size. The size effects are independent of the pore diameter and solute concentration. A simple quantitative correlation between pore density, solute size, and osmotic flux has been established. The results are excellently consistent with the theoretical predictions. It is also shown that solute hydration plays an important role in real osmotic processes. Solute hydration strengthens the size effects of pore density on osmotic processes due to the enlarged effective solute size induced by hydration. The influence of pore density, solute size, and solute hydration on water osmosis through nanoporous membranes can be introduced to eliminate the deviations of real osmotic processes from ideal behavior.

  5. Low molecular weight heparins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bergqvist, D

    1996-08-01

    Low molecular weight heparins (LMWHs) differ from unfractionated heparin (UFH) in a number of characteristics, which is probably due to differences in molecular weight distribution. From a clinical point of view the better subcutaneous bioavailability and longer biological half-life are important, making it sufficient to inject LMWHs once-daily only. For practical purposes it is also important that LMWHs be used without monitoring. They are effective as prophylaxis against postoperative venous thromboembolism after all types of surgery; in most studies, more effective than UFH. In most studies, this effect can be obtained safely and with less bleeding than with UFH. LMWHs compare favourably with UFH for starting treatment of deep vein thrombosis, as well as an anticoagulant during haemodialysis. Adverse effects such as thrombocytopenia and osteoporosis are more common with UFH than with LMWHs. Studies evaluating whether or not LMWHs can replace UFH in arterial diseases are still few with small sample sizes. Thus further systematic research is needed.

  6. FORT Molecular Ecology Laboratory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oyler-McCance, Sara J.; Stevens, P.D.

    2011-01-01

    The mission of the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) at the Fort Collins Science Center Molecular Ecology Laboratory is to use the tools and concepts of molecular genetics to address a variety of complex management questions and conservation issues facing the management of the Nation's fish and wildlife resources. Together with our partners, we design and implement studies to document genetic diversity and the distribution of genetic variation among individuals, populations, and species. Information from these studies is used to support wildlife-management planning and conservation actions. Current and past studies have provided information to assess taxonomic boundaries, inform listing decisions made under the Endangered Species Act, identify unique or genetically depauperate populations, estimate population size or survival rates, develop management or recovery plans, breed wildlife in captivity, relocate wildlife from one location to another, and assess the effects of environmental change.

  7. Molecular gastronomy

    Science.gov (United States)

    This, Hervé

    2005-01-01

    For centuries, cooks have been applying recipes without looking for the mechanisms of the culinary transformations. A scientific discipline that explores these changes from raw ingredients to eating the final dish, is developing into its own field, termed molecular gastronomy. Here, one of the founders of the discipline discusses its aims and importance.

  8. Molecular farming

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Merck, K.B.; Vereijken, J.M.

    2006-01-01

    Molecular Farming is a new and emerging technology that promises relatively cheap and flexible production of large quantities of pharmaceuticals in genetically modified plants. Many stakeholders are involved in the production of pharmaceuticals in plants, which complicates the discussion on the

  9. Otimização do tamanho de população sob acasalamento seletivo na seleção assistida por marcadores moleculares Optimization of the population size under selective mating in the selection assisted by molecular markers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcelo Jangarelli

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Foram simulados diferentes tamanhos populacionais para estimar os valores fenotípicos na seleção assistida por marcadores para características quantitativas com valores de herdabilidade de 0,10; 0,40 e 0,70. Procedeu-se à análise de agrupamento com os desempenhos fenotípicos, cuja finalidade foi obter estruturas de classificação entre as amostras visando à otimização na detecção de QTL. O sistema de simulação genética (Genesys foi utilizado para a simulação de três genomas (cada qual com uma única característica cuja distinção estava no valor da herdabilidade e das populações base e inicial. Cada população inicial foi submetida à seleção assistida por marcadores por 20 gerações consecutivas, em que os genitores selecionados acasalavam-se seletivamente, entre os melhores e os piores. Essa estratégia seletiva de acasalamento mostrou-se eficiente na redução do número de indivíduos requeridos em uma população para mapeamento de QTL. À medida que aumenta a magnitude da herdabilidade, menores tamanhos populacionais são exigidos para manter similaridades nos incrementos fenotípicos. O emprego de amostras com 300, 250 e 200 ou mais indivíduos para as herdabilidades de 0,10; 0,40 e 0,70, respectivamente, é desnecessário, tendo em vista as inferências equivalentes indicadas pelos métodos de otimização de Tocher e da ligação completa, oriundas do sistema de análises estatísticas e genéticas (SAEG.Different population sizes were simulated to estimate the phenotypic values in the selection assisted by markers for quantitative characteristics with heritability values of 0.10, 0.40 and 0.70. Cluster analysis with the phenotypic performance was carried out aiming at obtaining classification structure among the samples to optimize QTL detection. The genetic simulation system (Genesys was used for the simulation of three genomes (each one consisting of a single characteristic whose distinction was the value

  10. Ethics and sample size.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bacchetti, Peter; Wolf, Leslie E; Segal, Mark R; McCulloch, Charles E

    2005-01-15

    The belief is widespread that studies are unethical if their sample size is not large enough to ensure adequate power. The authors examine how sample size influences the balance that determines the ethical acceptability of a study: the balance between the burdens that participants accept and the clinical or scientific value that a study can be expected to produce. The average projected burden per participant remains constant as the sample size increases, but the projected study value does not increase as rapidly as the sample size if it is assumed to be proportional to power or inversely proportional to confidence interval width. This implies that the value per participant declines as the sample size increases and that smaller studies therefore have more favorable ratios of projected value to participant burden. The ethical treatment of study participants therefore does not require consideration of whether study power is less than the conventional goal of 80% or 90%. Lower power does not make a study unethical. The analysis addresses only ethical acceptability, not optimality; large studies may be desirable for other than ethical reasons.

  11. Synthesis, molecular structure, spectroscopic investigations and ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    explosives, pesticides, drugs, and perfumes.8,9. With continued shrinking of the size of conven- tional silicon-based electronics, molecular electronics has been proposed to be the future nanoscale electronic devices.10 Recently, many potentially applicable molec- ular electronic devices, like molecular switches, field-.

  12. Dynamics and Thermodynamics of Molecular Machines

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Golubeva, Natalia

    2014-01-01

    to their microscopic size, molecular motors are governed by principles fundamentally different from those describing the operation of man-made motors such as car engines. In this dissertation the dynamic and thermodynamic properties of molecular machines are studied using the tools of nonequilibrium statistical...

  13. Size makes a difference

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Matthiessen, Jeppe; Fagt, Sisse; Biltoft-Jensen, Anja Pia

    2003-01-01

    items was obtained from a 4-day weighed food record (Study 1). Trends in portion sizes of commercial foods were examined by gathering information from major food manufacturers and fast food chains (Study 2). Data on intakes and sales of sugar-sweetened soft drinks and confectionery were obtained through...... increased over time, and in particular in the last 10 years. Study 3: The development in portion sizes of commercial foods has been paralleled by a sharp increase of more than 50% in the sales of sugar-sweetened soft drinks and confectionery like sweets, chocolate and ice creams since the 1970s. Conclusions...

  14. Molecular cytogenetics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carpenter, N J

    2001-09-01

    In the past decade, clinical cytogenetics has undergone remarkable advancement as molecular biology techniques have been applied to conventional chromosome analysis. The limitations of conventional banding analysis in the accurate diagnosis and interpretation of certain chromosome abnormalities have largely been overcome by these new technologies, which include fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH), comparative genomic hybridization (CGH), and multicolor FISH (M-FISH, SKY, and Rx-FISH). Clinical applications include diagnosis of microdeletion and microduplication syndromes, detection of subtelomeric rearrangements in idiopathic mental retardation, identification of marker and derivative chromosomes, prenatal diagnosis of trisomy syndromes, and gene rearrangements and gene amplification in tumors. Molecular cytogenetic methods have expanded the possibilities for precise genetic diagnoses, which are extremely important for clinical management of patients and appropriate counseling of their families.

  15. Molecular Modelling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aarti Sharma

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available

    The use of computational chemistry in the development of novel pharmaceuticals is becoming an increasingly important
    tool. In the past, drugs were simply screened for effectiveness. The recent advances in computing power and
    the exponential growth of the knowledge of protein structures have made it possible for organic compounds to tailored to
    decrease harmful side effects and increase the potency. This article provides a detailed description of the techniques
    employed in molecular modeling. Molecular modelling is a rapidly developing discipline, and has been supported from
    the dramatic improvements in computer hardware and software in recent years.

  16. Molecular belts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Evans, Paul J; Jasti, Ramesh

    2014-01-01

    Rigid hydrocarbon macrocycles with radially-oriented π-systems and continuous conjugation have attracted great interest in recent years. These molecular belts have novel optoelectronic properties and host-guest behavior. Certain belts may also ultimately lead to a rational synthesis of carbon nanotubes. The high strain associated with the nonplanar, conjugated backbones requires the development of new synthetic methods, and clever synthetic design. Herein we describe the synthetic history and properties of these structurally simple but synthetically challenging molecules.

  17. Molecular Imprinting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dufaud, V.; Bonneviot, L.

    Our senses of smell and taste are able to recognise molecules selectively, to the point where they can even discriminate between different chiral states. This property, called molecular recognition, is essential to all forms of life [1]. It is based on the principle of a specific interaction between a receptor or host and a target molecule, which will be identified among a multitude of others, then selectively adsorbed. If the host is endowed with reactive functions, the attached molecule may be transported or transformed. Enzymes are the archetypal host molecules exploiting the idea of molecular recognition. Their complexation sites comprise a hydrophobic pocket with definite shape within which amino acid residues are located in a precisely defined way. The combined effect of these different characteristics underlies not only the affinity for some specific substrate, but also the transformation of this substrate into the desired product [2]. In fact, the phenomena actually brought into play are much more involved, being made up of an ensemble of physicochemical events that act together in a cooperative way, either simultaneously or sequentially, and in which the molecular processes are difficult to follow in detail.

  18. Size and Reputation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jakobsen, Peter Viggo; Ringsmose, Jens

    2015-01-01

    American public gratitude than the UK. While London has been accused of losing Basra and Musa Qaleh, Copenhagen has been showered with praise and top-posts in NATO. This article explains why demonstrating how the differences in size and reputation gave rise to different expectations of the special...

  19. Sizing up visualizations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jakobsen, Mikkel Rønne; Hornbæk, Kasper

    2011-01-01

    techniques with varying display sizes (13.8, 1.5, and 0.17 megapixels). Participants navigated geographical maps to find specific locations, compare items, and follow routes. Results show that for multi-scale navigation, classic interactive visualization techniques did not benefit from being scaled...

  20. Molecular Modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holmes, Jon L.

    1999-06-01

    Molecular modeling has trickled down from the realm of pharmaceutical and research laboratories into the realm of undergraduate chemistry instruction. It has opened avenues for the visualization of chemical concepts that previously were difficult or impossible to convey. I am sure that many of you have developed exercises using the various molecular modeling tools. It is the desire of this Journal to become an avenue for you to share these exercises among your colleagues. It is to this end that Ron Starkey has agreed to edit such a column and to publish not only the description of such exercises, but also the software documents they use. The WWW is the obvious medium to distribute this combination and so accepted submissions will appear online as a feature of JCE Internet. Typical molecular modeling exercise: finding conformation energies. Molecular Modeling Exercises and Experiments is the latest feature column of JCE Internet, joining Conceptual Questions and Challenge Problems, Hal's Picks, and Mathcad in the Chemistry Curriculum. JCE Internet continues to seek submissions in these areas of interest and submissions of general interest. If you have developed materials and would like to submit them, please see our Guide to Submissions for more information. The Chemical Education Resource Shelf, Equipment Buyers Guide, and WWW Site Review would also like to hear about chemistry textbooks and software, equipment, and WWW sites, respectively. Please consult JCE Internet Features to learn more about these resources at JCE Online. Email Announcements Would you like to be informed by email when the latest issue of the Journal is available online? when a new JCE Software title is shipping? when a new JCE Internet article has been published or is available for Open Review? when your subscription is about to expire? A new feature of JCE Online makes this possible. Visit our Guestbook to learn how. When you submit the form on this page, which includes your email address

  1. Nuclear size isomers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ogloblin Alexey

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Developing of methods of measuring the radii of nuclei in their highly excited states led to observation of those with dimensions enhanced and, probably, diminished in comparison with the corresponding ground states. Experimental data including very recent ones demonstrating that such “size isomers” belong to two groups: excited states having neutron halos (in 13C, 11Be and 9Be and some specific cluster states (in 12C, 13C and 11B, are discussed.

  2. Group Size and Conformity

    OpenAIRE

    Bond, Rod

    2005-01-01

    Abstract This paper reviews theory and research on the relationship between group size and conformity and presents a meta-analysis of 125 Asch-type conformity studies. It questions the assumption of a single function made in formal models of social influence and proposes instead that the function will vary depending on which social influence process predominates. It is argued that normative influence is lik...

  3. Molecular plasmonics

    CERN Document Server

    Fritzsche, Wolfgang

    2014-01-01

    Adopting a novel approach, this book provides a unique ""molecular perspective"" on plasmonics, concisely presenting the fundamentals and applications in a way suitable for beginners entering this hot field as well as for experienced researchers and practitioners. It begins by introducing readers to the optical effects that occur at the nanoscale and particularly their modification in the presence of biomolecules, followed by a concise yet thorough overview of the different methods for the actual fabrication of nanooptical materials. Further chapters address the relevant nanooptics, as well as

  4. Aerosol mobility size spectrometer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Jian; Kulkarni, Pramod

    2007-11-20

    A device for measuring aerosol size distribution within a sample containing aerosol particles. The device generally includes a spectrometer housing defining an interior chamber and a camera for recording aerosol size streams exiting the chamber. The housing includes an inlet for introducing a flow medium into the chamber in a flow direction, an aerosol injection port adjacent the inlet for introducing a charged aerosol sample into the chamber, a separation section for applying an electric field to the aerosol sample across the flow direction and an outlet opposite the inlet. In the separation section, the aerosol sample becomes entrained in the flow medium and the aerosol particles within the aerosol sample are separated by size into a plurality of aerosol flow streams under the influence of the electric field. The camera is disposed adjacent the housing outlet for optically detecting a relative position of at least one aerosol flow stream exiting the outlet and for optically detecting the number of aerosol particles within the at least one aerosol flow stream.

  5. Molecular dynamics using quasielastic neutron scattering

    CERN Document Server

    Mitra, S

    2003-01-01

    Quasielastic neutron scattering (QENS) technique is well suited to study the molecular motions (rotations and translations) in solids or liquids. It offers a unique possibility of analysing spatial dimensions of atomic or molecular processes in their development over time. We describe here some of the systems studied using the QENS spectrometer, designed, developed and commissioned at Dhruva reactor in Trombay. We have studied a variety of systems to investigate the molecular motion, for example, simple molecular solids, molecules adsorbed in confined medium like porous systems or zeolites, monolayer-protected nano-sized metal clusters, water in Portland cement as it cures with time, etc. (author)

  6. Multimodal Raindrop Size Distributions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sauvageot, Henri; Koffi, Manlandon

    2000-08-01

    The raindrop size distributions (DSDs) observed over a short span usually have an erratic shape, with several relative maxima. This multimodal structure is studied from disdrometer data acquired in tropical and midlatitude areas. It is shown that some modes of DSDs have a persistence larger than several minutes and can be spotted from one DSD to the next one as they migrate through the size classes. It is demonstrated that Nm, the number of modes of DSDs, for diameter larger than 2 mm, is not related to the mean rain rate but depends on the rain-rate fluctuations. Statistical evidence of such a relation is given. The spread of DSDs is found to be dependent on its multimodal structure, that is, on Nm. The large values of Nm are associated with low values of slope and intercept N0 of the fitted exponential distribution.In order to explain the dependence of the DSD shape on Nm, a conceptual model is proposed in which the modes are interpreted as resulting from an overlapping of rain shafts. The associated DSD is termed a synthetic drop size distribution (SDSD). It is shown that the overlapping of rain shafts generated from a sequence of rain cells of increasing intensity, such as observed at the leading edge of a convective system, results in undersloping SDSDs. In the reverse configuration, that is, with a sequence of rain cells with decreasing intensity, such as observed at the ending edge of a convective system, it results in oversloping SDSDs. Observations in agreement with these conclusions are presented. The readability of the modal structure of the DSDs depends on several factors in such a way that an apparent multimodal structure is not necessary for a DSD to be an SDSD. It is suggested that most of the DSDs observed at the ground are synthetic DSDs.

  7. Large litter sizes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sandøe, Peter; Rutherford, K.M.D.; Berg, Peer

    2012-01-01

    possible to achieve a drop in relative piglet mortality and the related welfare problems. However, there will be a growing problem with the need to use foster or nurse sows which may have negative effects on both sows and piglets. This gives rise to new challenges for management....... adverse consequences for animal welfare of Danish breeding for large litter sizes due to increased piglet mortality and the subsequent attempts to reverse these consequences by breeding for number of live piglets at day five rather than number of piglets born. By this change of breeding goal it seems...

  8. Study on Compatibility of Polymer Hydrodynamic Size and Pore Throat Size for Honggang Reservoir

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dan-Dan Yin

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Long core flow experiment was conducted to study problems like excessive injection pressure and effective lag of oil wells during the polymer flooding in Honggang reservoir in Jilin oilfield. According to the changes in viscosity and hydrodynamic dimensions before and after polymer solution was injected into porous media, the compatibility of polymer hydrodynamic dimension and the pore throat size was studied in this experiment. On the basis of the median of radius R of pore throats in rocks with different permeability, dynamic light scattering method (DLS was adopted to measure the hydrodynamic size Rh of polymer solution with different molecular weights. The results state that three kinds of 1500 mg/L concentration polymer solution with 2000 × 104, 1500 × 104, and 1000 × 104 molecular weight matched well with the pore throat in rocks with permeability of 300 mD, 180 mD, and 75 mD in sequence. In this case, the ratios of core pore throat radius median to the size of polymer molecular clew R/Rh are 6.16, 5.74, and 6.04. For Honggang oil reservoir in Jilin, when that ratio ranges from 5.5 to 6.0, the compatibility of polymer and the pore structure will be relatively better.

  9. The Molecular Atlas Project

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silverberg, Jesse; Yin, Peng

    The promise of super-resolution microscopy is a technology to discover new biological mechanisms that occur at smaller length scales then previously observable. However, with higher-resolution, we generally lose the larger spatial context of the image itself. The Molecular Atlas Project (MAP) directly asks how these competing interests between super-resolution imaging and broader spatially contextualized information can be reconciled. MAP enables us to acquire, visualize, explore, and annotate proteomic image data representing 7 orders of magnitude in length ranging from molecular (nm) to tissue (cm) scales. This multi-scale understanding is made possible by combining multiplexed DNA-PAINT, a DNA nanotechnology approach to super-resolution imaging, with ``big-data'' strategies for information management and image visualization. With these innovations combined, MAP enables us to explore cell-specific heterogeneity in ductal carcinoma for every cellin a cm-sized tissue section, analyze organoid growth for advances in high-throughput tissue-on-a-chip technology, and examine individual synapses for connectome mapping over extremely wide areas. Ultimately, MAP is a fundamentally new way to interact with multiscale biophysical data.

  10. Afterimage size is modulated by size-contrast illusions.

    OpenAIRE

    Sperandio, Irene; Lak, Armin; Goodale, Melvyn

    2012-01-01

    Traditionally, the perceived size of negative afterimages has been examined in relation to E. Emmert's law (1881), a size-distance equation that states that changes in perceived size of an afterimage are a function of the distance of the surface on which it is projected. Here, we present evidence that the size of an afterimage is also modulated by its surrounding context. We employed a new version of the Ebbinghaus-Titchener illusion with flickering surrounding stimuli and a static inner targ...

  11. Asymptotic size determines species abundance in the marine size spectrum

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Ken Haste; Beyer, Jan

    2006-01-01

    The majority of higher organisms in the marine environment display indeterminate growth; that is, they continue to grow throughout their life, limited by an asymptotic size. We derive the abundance of species as a function of their asymptotic size. The derivation is based on size-spectrum theory...

  12. Size reduction machine

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fricke, V.

    1999-12-15

    The Size Reduction Machine (SRM) is a mobile platform capable of shearing various shapes and types of metal components at a variety of elevations. This shearing activity can be performed without direct physical movement and placement of the shear head by the operator. The base unit is manually moved and roughly aligned to each cut location. The base contains the electronics: hydraulic pumps, servos, and actuators needed to move the shear-positioning arm. The movable arm allows the shear head to have six axes of movement and to cut to within 4 inches of a wall surface. The unit has a slick electrostatic capture coating to assist in external decontamination. Internal contamination of the unit is controlled by a high-efficiency particulate air (HEPA) filter on the cooling inlet fan. The unit is compact enough to access areas through a 36-inch standard door opening. This paper is an Innovative Technology Summary Report designed to provide potential users with the information they need to quickly determine if a technology would apply to a particular environmental management problem. They also are designed for readers who may recommend that a technology be considered by prospective users.

  13. Variable pixel size ionospheric tomography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Dunyong; Zheng, Hongwei; Wang, Yanjun; Nie, Wenfeng; Li, Chaokui; Ao, Minsi; Hu, Wusheng; Zhou, Wei

    2017-06-01

    A novel ionospheric tomography technique based on variable pixel size was developed for the tomographic reconstruction of the ionospheric electron density (IED) distribution. In variable pixel size computerized ionospheric tomography (VPSCIT) model, the IED distribution is parameterized by a decomposition of the lower and upper ionosphere with different pixel sizes. Thus, the lower and upper IED distribution may be very differently determined by the available data. The variable pixel size ionospheric tomography and constant pixel size tomography are similar in most other aspects. There are some differences between two kinds of models with constant and variable pixel size respectively, one is that the segments of GPS signal pay should be assigned to the different kinds of pixel in inversion; the other is smoothness constraint factor need to make the appropriate modified where the pixel change in size. For a real dataset, the variable pixel size method distinguishes different electron density distribution zones better than the constant pixel size method. Furthermore, it can be non-chided that when the effort is spent to identify the regions in a model with best data coverage. The variable pixel size method can not only greatly improve the efficiency of inversion, but also produce IED images with high fidelity which are the same as a used uniform pixel size method. In addition, variable pixel size tomography can reduce the underdetermined problem in an ill-posed inverse problem when the data coverage is irregular or less by adjusting quantitative proportion of pixels with different sizes. In comparison with constant pixel size tomography models, the variable pixel size ionospheric tomography technique achieved relatively good results in a numerical simulation. A careful validation of the reliability and superiority of variable pixel size ionospheric tomography was performed. Finally, according to the results of the statistical analysis and quantitative comparison, the

  14. Sizing Up the Situation

    Science.gov (United States)

    2004-01-01

    Hailstorm damage to the Space Shuttle's External Tank inspired a NASA innovation with extensive photography applications. In order to measure the defects caused by the storm, Kennedy Space Center used telephoto lenses to zoom in on the tank and view the damage clearly. However, since there was no reference object in the image, the engineers could not determine the scale of the damage. In photographic situations similar to this, an object, such as a ruler, is placed within the field of view. This allows a person to look at a photograph and have a visual indication of the scale of the objects in it. In the External Tank situation, however, this procedure was not possible. As a solution, Kennedy developed the Scaling and Measurement Device for Photographic Images, which provides a non-intrusive means of adding a scale to a photograph. In addition to meeting Kennedy's needs, scaling images is extremely important in crime and accident scene investigations, oil and chemical tank monitoring, and aerial photography. The innovation consists of a tool that attaches directly to a camera or charge coupled device using a standard screw. Two lasers fitted to the device provide parallel beams that are set 1 inch apart. These lasers enable the device to project a pattern into the field of view. When a photograph is taken, the image of the laser pattern appears, along with the image of the object under investigation, allowing the viewer quantifiable information as to the size of the object. The laser beams are accurate to approximately 200 feet. Windows-based software was developed to work with the scaling device tool. The software provides further techniques to measure objects in photographs and digital images. By using the software, any object in the image can be measured diagonally, vertically, and horizontally. The device and its software enable the user to determine two-dimensional measurements within a photograph.

  15. Size-exclusion chromatography of perfluorosulfonated ionomers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mourey, T H; Slater, L A; Galipo, R C; Koestner, R J

    2011-08-26

    A size-exclusion chromatography (SEC) method in N,N-dimethylformamide containing 0.1 M LiNO(3) is shown to be suitable for the determination of molar mass distributions of three classes of perfluorosulfonated ionomers, including Nafion(®). Autoclaving sample preparation is optimized to prepare molecular solutions free of aggregates, and a solvent exchange method concentrates the autoclaved samples to enable the use of molar-mass-sensitive detection. Calibration curves obtained from light scattering and viscometry detection suggest minor variation in the specific refractive index increment across the molecular size distributions, which introduces inaccuracies in the calculation of local absolute molar masses and intrinsic viscosities. Conformation plots that combine apparent molar masses from light scattering detection with apparent intrinsic viscosities from viscometry detection partially compensate for the variations in refractive index increment. The conformation plots are consistent with compact polymer conformations, and they provide Mark-Houwink-Sakurada constants that can be used to calculate molar mass distributions without molar-mass-sensitive detection. Unperturbed dimensions and characteristic ratios calculated from viscosity-molar mass relationships indicate unusually free rotation of the perfluoroalkane backbones and may suggest limitations to applying two-parameter excluded volume theories for these ionomers. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. Particle sizes from sectional data

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pawlas, Zbynek; Nyengaard, Jens Randel; Jensen, Eva Bjørn Vedel

    2009-01-01

    We propose a new statistical method for obtaining information about particle size distributions from sectional data without specific assumptions about particle shape. The method utilizes recent advances in local stereology. We show how to estimate separately from sectional data the variance due...... to the local stereological estimation procedure and the variance due to the variability of particle sizes in the population. Methods for judging the difference between the distribution of estimated particle sizes and the distribution of true particle sizes are also provided....

  17. Effect of small mapping population sizes on reliability of quantitative ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    A limitation of quantitative trait loci (QTL) mapping is that accuracy of determining QTL position and effects are largely determined by population size. Despite the importance of this concept, known as the "Beavis effect there has generally been a lack of understanding by molecular geneticists and breeders. One possible ...

  18. A Size Exclusion Chromatography Laboratory with Unknowns for Introductory Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    McIntee, Edward J.; Graham, Kate J.; Colosky, Edward C.; Jakubowski, Henry V.

    2015-01-01

    Size exclusion chromatography is an important technique in the separation of biological and polymeric samples by molecular weight. While a number of laboratory experiments have been published that use this technique for the purification of large molecules, this is the first report of an experiment that focuses on purifying an unknown small…

  19. Prediction of bread-making quality using size exclusion high ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Variation in the distribution of protein molecular weight in wheat (Triticum aestivum), influences breadmaking quality of wheat cultivars, resulting in either poor or good bread. The objective of this study was to predict breadmaking quality of wheat cultivars using size exclusion high performance liquid chromatography.

  20. Sizing of scramjet vehicles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ingenito, A.; Gulli, S.; Bruno, C.

    2011-10-01

    The current European project LAPCAT II has the ambitious goal to define a conceptual vehicle capable of achieving the antipodal range Brussels-Sydney (~18,000 km) in about 2 h at Mach number Ma = 8. At this high speed, the requirement of high lift to drag (L/D) ratio is critical to high performance, because of high skin friction and wave drag: in fact, as the Mach number increases, the L/D ratio decreases. The design of the vehicle architecture (shape and propulsion system) is, as a consequence, crucial to achieve a reasonably high L/D. In this work, critical parameters for the preliminary sizing of a hypersonic airbreathing airliner have been identified. In particular, for a given Technology Readiness Level (TRL) and mission requirements, a solution space of possible vehicle architectures at cruise have been obtained. In this work, the Gross Weight at Take-Off (TOGW) was deliberately discarded as a constraint, based on previous studies by Czysz and Vanderkerkhove [1]. Typically, limiting from the beginning, the TOGW leads to a vicious spiral where weight and propulsion system requirements keep growing, eventually denying convergence. In designing passenger airliners, in fact, it is the payload that is assumed fixed from the start, not the total weight. In order to screen the solutions found, requirements for taking-off (TO) and landing as well as the trajectory have been accounted for. A consistent solution has finally been obtained by imposing typical airliner constraints: emergency take-off and landing. These constraints enable singling out a realistic design from the broad family of vehicles capable of performing the given mission. This vehicle has been obtained by integrating not only aerodynamics, trajectory, and airliner constraints, but also by integrating the propulsion system, the trimming devices and by doing some adjustments to the conceptual vehicle shape (i. e., spatular nose). Thus, the final vehicle is the result of many iterations in the design

  1. Fluctuation Solution Theory Properties from Molecular Simulation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Abildskov, Jens; Wedberg, R.; O’Connell, John P.

    2013-01-01

    The thermodynamic properties obtained in the Fluctuation Solution Theory are based on spatial integrals of molecular TCFs between component pairs in the mixture. Molecular simulation, via either MD or MC calculations, can yield these correlation functions for model inter- and intramolecular...... potential functions. However, system-size limitations and statistical noise cause uncertainties in the functions at long range, and thus uncertainties or errors in the integrals. A number of methods such as truncation, distance shifting, long-range modeling, transforms, DCF matching, finite-size scaling...

  2. Size did not matter: An evolutionary account of the variation in penis size and size anxiety

    OpenAIRE

    Menelaos Apostolou

    2016-01-01

    The human penis exhibits considerable variation in size, while a substantial proportion of the adult male population experiences size anxiety. This paper employs an evolutionary framework in order to understand this variation, as well as the concern men exhibit about the adequacy of the size of their penis. It is argued that female choice has been one important sexual selection force, responsible for shaping the size of the penis. However, this force has been relatively weak, because women do...

  3. Sauropod dinosaurs evolved moderately sized genomes unrelated to body size.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Organ, Chris L; Brusatte, Stephen L; Stein, Koen

    2009-12-22

    Sauropodomorph dinosaurs include the largest land animals to have ever lived, some reaching up to 10 times the mass of an African elephant. Despite their status defining the upper range for body size in land animals, it remains unknown whether sauropodomorphs evolved larger-sized genomes than non-avian theropods, their sister taxon, or whether a relationship exists between genome size and body size in dinosaurs, two questions critical for understanding broad patterns of genome evolution in dinosaurs. Here we report inferences of genome size for 10 sauropodomorph taxa. The estimates are derived from a Bayesian phylogenetic generalized least squares approach that generates posterior distributions of regression models relating genome size to osteocyte lacunae volume in extant tetrapods. We estimate that the average genome size of sauropodomorphs was 2.02 pg (range of species means: 1.77-2.21 pg), a value in the upper range of extant birds (mean = 1.42 pg, range: 0.97-2.16 pg) and near the average for extant non-avian reptiles (mean = 2.24 pg, range: 1.05-5.44 pg). The results suggest that the variation in size and architecture of genomes in extinct dinosaurs was lower than the variation found in mammals. A substantial difference in genome size separates the two major clades within dinosaurs, Ornithischia (large genomes) and Saurischia (moderate to small genomes). We find no relationship between body size and estimated genome size in extinct dinosaurs, which suggests that neutral forces did not dominate the evolution of genome size in this group.

  4. Well-defined mono(η3-allyl)nickel complex MONi(η3-C3H5) (M = Si or Al) grafted onto silica or alumina: A molecularly dispersed nickel precursor for syntheses of supported small size nickel nanoparticles

    KAUST Repository

    Li, Lidong

    2014-01-01

    Preparing evenly-dispersed small size nickel nanoparticles over inert oxides remains a challenge today. In this context, a versatile method to prepare supported small size nickel nanoparticles (ca. 1-3 nm) with narrow size distribution via a surface organometallic chemistry (SOMC) route is described. The grafted mono(η3-allyl)nickel complexes MONi(η 3-C3H5) (M = Si or Al) as precursors are synthesized and fully characterized by elemental analysis, FTIR spectroscopy and paramagnetic solid-state NMR. © 2014 the Partner Organisations.

  5. Size Matters: Individual Variation in Ectotherm Growth and Asymptotic Size.

    Science.gov (United States)

    King, Richard B; Stanford, Kristin M; Jones, Peter C; Bekker, Kent

    2016-01-01

    Body size, and, by extension, growth has impacts on physiology, survival, attainment of sexual maturity, fecundity, generation time, and population dynamics, especially in ectotherm animals that often exhibit extensive growth following attainment of sexual maturity. Frequently, growth is analyzed at the population level, providing useful population mean growth parameters but ignoring individual variation that is also of ecological and evolutionary significance. Our long-term study of Lake Erie Watersnakes, Nerodia sipedon insularum, provides data sufficient for a detailed analysis of population and individual growth. We describe population mean growth separately for males and females based on size of known age individuals (847 captures of 769 males, 748 captures of 684 females) and annual growth increments of individuals of unknown age (1,152 males, 730 females). We characterize individual variation in asymptotic size based on repeated measurements of 69 males and 71 females that were each captured in five to nine different years. The most striking result of our analyses is that asymptotic size varies dramatically among individuals, ranging from 631-820 mm snout-vent length in males and from 835-1125 mm in females. Because female fecundity increases with increasing body size, we explore the impact of individual variation in asymptotic size on lifetime reproductive success using a range of realistic estimates of annual survival. When all females commence reproduction at the same age, lifetime reproductive success is greatest for females with greater asymptotic size regardless of annual survival. But when reproduction is delayed in females with greater asymptotic size, lifetime reproductive success is greatest for females with lower asymptotic size when annual survival is low. Possible causes of individual variation in asymptotic size, including individual- and cohort-specific variation in size at birth and early growth, warrant further investigation.

  6. Size Matters: Individual Variation in Ectotherm Growth and Asymptotic Size

    Science.gov (United States)

    King, Richard B.

    2016-01-01

    Body size, and, by extension, growth has impacts on physiology, survival, attainment of sexual maturity, fecundity, generation time, and population dynamics, especially in ectotherm animals that often exhibit extensive growth following attainment of sexual maturity. Frequently, growth is analyzed at the population level, providing useful population mean growth parameters but ignoring individual variation that is also of ecological and evolutionary significance. Our long-term study of Lake Erie Watersnakes, Nerodia sipedon insularum, provides data sufficient for a detailed analysis of population and individual growth. We describe population mean growth separately for males and females based on size of known age individuals (847 captures of 769 males, 748 captures of 684 females) and annual growth increments of individuals of unknown age (1,152 males, 730 females). We characterize individual variation in asymptotic size based on repeated measurements of 69 males and 71 females that were each captured in five to nine different years. The most striking result of our analyses is that asymptotic size varies dramatically among individuals, ranging from 631–820 mm snout-vent length in males and from 835–1125 mm in females. Because female fecundity increases with increasing body size, we explore the impact of individual variation in asymptotic size on lifetime reproductive success using a range of realistic estimates of annual survival. When all females commence reproduction at the same age, lifetime reproductive success is greatest for females with greater asymptotic size regardless of annual survival. But when reproduction is delayed in females with greater asymptotic size, lifetime reproductive success is greatest for females with lower asymptotic size when annual survival is low. Possible causes of individual variation in asymptotic size, including individual- and cohort-specific variation in size at birth and early growth, warrant further investigation. PMID

  7. On the Relationship between Pollen Size and Genome Size

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Charles A. Knight

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Here we test whether genome size is a predictor of pollen size. If it were, inferences of ancient genome size would be possible using the abundant paleo-palynolgical record. We performed regression analyses across 464 species of pollen width and genome size. We found a significant positive trend. However, regression analysis using phylogentically independent contrasts did not support the correlated evolution of these traits. Instead, a large split between angiosperms and gymnosperms for both pollen width and genome size was revealed. Sister taxa were not more likely to show a positive contrast when compared to deeper nodes. However, significantly more congeneric species had a positive trend than expected by chance. These results may reflect the strong selection pressure for pollen to be small. Also, because pollen grains are not metabolically active when measured, their biology is different than other cells which have been shown to be strongly related to genome size, such as guard cells. Our findings contrast with previously published research. It was our hope that pollen size could be used as a proxy for inferring the genome size of ancient species. However, our results suggest pollen is not a good candidate for such endeavors.

  8. Understanding molecular structure from molecular mechanics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allinger, Norman L

    2011-04-01

    Molecular mechanics gives us a well known model of molecular structure. It is less widely recognized that valence bond theory gives us structures which offer a direct interpretation of molecular mechanics formulations and parameters. The electronic effects well-known in physical organic chemistry can be directly interpreted in terms of valence bond structures, and hence quantitatively calculated and understood. The basic theory is outlined in this paper, and examples of the effects, and their interpretation in illustrative examples is presented.

  9. Molecular outflows in starburst nuclei

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roy, Arpita; Nath, Biman B.; Sharma, Prateek; Shchekinov, Yuri

    2016-12-01

    Recent observations have detected molecular outflows in a few nearby starburst nuclei. We discuss the physical processes at work in such an environment in order to outline a scenario that can explain the observed parameters of the phenomenon, such as the molecular mass, speed and size of the outflows. We show that outflows triggered by OB associations, with NOB ≥ 105 (corresponding to a star formation rate (SFR)≥1 M⊙ yr-1 in the nuclear region), in a stratified disc with mid-plane density n0 ˜ 200-1000 cm-3 and scaleheight z0 ≥ 200(n0/102 cm-3)-3/5 pc, can form molecules in a cool dense and expanding shell. The associated molecular mass is ≥107 M⊙ at a distance of a few hundred pc, with a speed of several tens of km s-1. We show that an SFR surface density of 10 ≤ ΣSFR ≤ 50 M⊙ yr-1 kpc-2 favours the production of molecular outflows, consistent with observed values.

  10. Invasive surgery reduces infarct size and preserves cardiac function in a porcine model of myocardial infarction

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    G.P.J. van Hout (G. P J); M.P.J. Teuben (Michel P.J.); M. Heeres (Marjolein); S. de Maat (Steven); R. Jong (Rosa); C. Maas (Coen); L.H.J.A. Kouwenberg (Lisanne H.J.A.); L. Koenderman (Leo); W.W. van Solinge (Wouter W.); S.C.A. de Jager (Saskia); G. Pasterkamp (Gerard); I.E. Hoefer (Imo)

    2015-01-01

    textabstract& Sons Ltd and Foundation for Cellular and Molecular Medicine. Reperfusion injury following myocardial infarction (MI) increases infarct size (IS) and deteriorates cardiac function. Cardioprotective strategies in large animal MI models often failed in clinical trials, suggesting

  11. Size did not matter: An evolutionary account of the variation in penis size and size anxiety

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Menelaos Apostolou

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available The human penis exhibits considerable variation in size, while a substantial proportion of the adult male population experiences size anxiety. This paper employs an evolutionary framework in order to understand this variation, as well as the concern men exhibit about the adequacy of the size of their penis. It is argued that female choice has been one important sexual selection force, responsible for shaping the size of the penis. However, this force has been relatively weak, because women do not consider the size of their partners’ penis to be the most important determinant of their sexual satisfaction. Also, in ancestral human societies, sexual satisfaction was a secondary concern, while women had limited space to exercise mate choice. The mismatch between ancestral and modern conditions, with female choice being stronger in the present than in the past, causes anxiety in men about their ability to satisfy their partners, which is also manifested in their concerns about size.

  12. Morphological and molecular evaluation of some Egyptian ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ete

    2014-01-08

    Jan 8, 2014 ... (physical and chemical) and two molecular markers; Inter simple sequence repeat (ISSR) and amplified fragment length polymorphism .... Diseased, bruised and injured fruit were rejected, and sound fruit of uniform size and ..... molasses, vinegar and extract dyes and natural colors. It could be noted that ...

  13. Bubble size distribution of foam

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    den Engelsen, C.W.; den Engelsen, C.W.; Isarin, J.C.; Warmoeskerken, Marinus; Groot Wassink, J.; Groot Wassink, J.

    2002-01-01

    A procedure based upon image analysis has been adopted to study the influence of several physical parameters on bubble size in foam. A procedure has been described to account for the distribution of bubble size. Foam was generated in a rotor-stator mixer. In the present research, the nature of the

  14. Population Density and Group Size

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tucker, James; Friedman, S. Thomas

    1972-01-01

    This study looks at the relationship between the size of the small interacting group (in numbers of persons) and its environment; in this case, the density of its immediate population. Results indicated a significant inverse relationship between population density and the size of small interacting groups. (Author)

  15. Measuring the Sizes of Stars

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Stars, other than the Sun, appear to our unaided eyes aspoints of light. Large telescopes show an image whose sizeis dictated by refractive index irregularities in the Earth's atmosphere.The size of this blurring is much greater than thatof the star, and hence it is difficult to measure the stellar size.Fizeau showed how one ...

  16. The importance of effect sizes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    B. Winkens; Dr. Sil Aarts; M. van den Akker

    2013-01-01

    KEY MESSAGE: •  Statistical significance testing alone is not the most adequate manner to evaluate if there is indeed a clinically relevant effect •  Effect sizes should be added to significance testing •  Effect sizes facilitate the decision whether a clinically relevant effect is found, helps

  17. Firm Size and Export Intensity

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    E. Verwaal (Ernst); A.C.D. Donkers (Bas)

    2001-01-01

    textabstractThis paper presents a unifying theory, explaining the different relationships between firm size and export intensity that have been found in previous studies. We propose that transaction costs economies and different types of resources induce a moderating effect on the firm size and

  18. Sibship Size and Educational Attainment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jæger, Mads Meier

    2009-01-01

    Studies on family background often explain the negative effect of sibship size on educational attainment by one of two theories: the Confluence Model (CM) or the Resource Dilution Hypothesis (RDH). However, as both theories - for substantively different reasons - predict that sibship size should ...

  19. Ultrasound molecular imaging: Moving toward clinical translation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Abou-Elkacem, Lotfi; Bachawal, Sunitha V.; Willmann, Jürgen K., E-mail: willmann@stanford.edu

    2015-09-15

    Highlights: • Ultrasound molecular imaging is a highly sensitive modality. • A clinical grade ultrasound contrast agent has entered first in human clinical trials. • Several new potential future clinical applications of ultrasound molecular imaging are being explored. - Abstract: Ultrasound is a widely available, cost-effective, real-time, non-invasive and safe imaging modality widely used in the clinic for anatomical and functional imaging. With the introduction of novel molecularly-targeted ultrasound contrast agents, another dimension of ultrasound has become a reality: diagnosing and monitoring pathological processes at the molecular level. Most commonly used ultrasound molecular imaging contrast agents are micron sized, gas-containing microbubbles functionalized to recognize and attach to molecules expressed on inflamed or angiogenic vascular endothelial cells. There are several potential clinical applications currently being explored including earlier detection, molecular profiling, and monitoring of cancer, as well as visualization of ischemic memory in transient myocardial ischemia, monitoring of disease activity in inflammatory bowel disease, and assessment of arteriosclerosis. Recently, a first clinical grade ultrasound contrast agent (BR55), targeted at a molecule expressed in neoangiogenesis (vascular endothelial growth factor receptor type 2; VEGFR2) has been introduced and safety and feasibility of VEGFR2-targeted ultrasound imaging is being explored in first inhuman clinical trials in various cancer types. This review describes the design of ultrasound molecular imaging contrast agents, imaging techniques, and potential future clinical applications of ultrasound molecular imaging.

  20. Food aroma affects bite size

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    de Wijk René A

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background To evaluate the effect of food aroma on bite size, a semisolid vanilla custard dessert was delivered repeatedly into the mouth of test subjects using a pump while various concentrations of cream aroma were presented retronasally to the nose. Termination of the pump, which determined bite size, was controlled by the subject via a push button. Over 30 trials with 10 subjects, the custard was presented randomly either without an aroma, or with aromas presented below or near the detection threshold. Results Results for ten subjects (four females and six males, aged between 26 and 50 years, indicated that aroma intensity affected the size of the corresponding bite as well as that of subsequent bites. Higher aroma intensities resulted in significantly smaller sizes. Conclusions These results suggest that bite size control during eating is a highly dynamic process affected by the sensations experienced during the current and previous bites.

  1. Missing portion sizes in FFQ

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Køster-Rasmussen, Rasmus; Siersma, Volkert Dirk; Halldorson, Thorhallur I.

    2015-01-01

    of portion sizes based on information about anthropometry, sex, physical activity and age. Energy intakes computed with standard portion sizes, defined as sex-specific medians (median), or with portion sizes estimated with multinomial logistic regression (MLR), ‘comparable categories’ (Coca) or k...... with the reference, the root-mean-square errors of the mean daily total energy intake (in kJ) computed with portion sizes estimated by the four methods were (men; women): median (1118; 1061), MLR (1060; 1051), Coca (1230; 1146), KNN (1281; 1181). The equivalent biases (mean error) were (in kJ): median (579; 469......), MLR (248; 178), Coca (234; 188), KNN (−340; 218). Conclusions: The methods MLR and Coca provided the best agreement with the reference. The stochastic methods allowed for estimation of meaningful portion sizes by conditioning on information about physiology and they were suitable for multiple...

  2. Cell Size Regulation in Bacteria

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amir, Ariel

    2014-05-01

    Various bacteria such as the canonical gram negative Escherichia coli or the well-studied gram positive Bacillus subtilis divide symmetrically after they approximately double their volume. Their size at division is not constant, but is typically distributed over a narrow range. Here, we propose an analytically tractable model for cell size control, and calculate the cell size and interdivision time distributions, as well as the correlations between these variables. We suggest ways of extracting the model parameters from experimental data, and show that existing data for E. coli supports partial size control, and a particular explanation: a cell attempts to add a constant volume from the time of initiation of DNA replication to the next initiation event. This hypothesis accounts for the experimentally observed correlations between mother and daughter cells as well as the exponential dependence of size on growth rate.

  3. Grain size distribution in sheared polycrystals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarkar, Tanmoy; Biswas, Santidan; Chaudhuri, Pinaki; Sain, Anirban

    2017-12-01

    Plastic deformation in solids induced by external stresses is of both fundamental and practical interest. Using both phase field crystal modeling and molecular dynamics simulations, we study the shear response of monocomponent polycrystalline solids. We subject mesocale polycrystalline samples to constant strain rates in a planar Couette flow geometry for studying its plastic flow, in particular its grain deformation dynamics. As opposed to equilibrium solids where grain dynamics is mainly driven by thermal diffusion, external stress/strain induce a much higher level of grain deformation activity in the form of grain rotation, coalescence, and breakage, mediated by dislocations. Despite this, the grain size distribution of this driven system shows only a weak power-law correction to its equilibrium log-normal behavior. We interpret the grain reorganization dynamics using a stochastic model.

  4. Artificial neural network based particle size prediction of polymeric nanoparticles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Youshia, John; Ali, Mohamed Ehab; Lamprecht, Alf

    2017-10-01

    Particle size of nanoparticles and the respective polydispersity are key factors influencing their biopharmaceutical behavior in a large variety of therapeutic applications. Predicting these attributes would skip many preliminary studies usually required to optimize formulations. The aim was to build a mathematical model capable of predicting the particle size of polymeric nanoparticles produced by a pharmaceutical polymer of choice. Polymer properties controlling the particle size were identified as molecular weight, hydrophobicity and surface activity, and were quantified by measuring polymer viscosity, contact angle and interfacial tension, respectively. A model was built using artificial neural network including these properties as input with particle size and polydispersity index as output. The established model successfully predicted particle size of nanoparticles covering a range of 70-400nm prepared from other polymers. The percentage bias for particle prediction was 2%, 4% and 6%, for the training, validation and testing data, respectively. Polymer surface activity was found to have the highest impact on the particle size followed by viscosity and finally hydrophobicity. Results of this study successfully highlighted polymer properties affecting particle size and confirmed the usefulness of artificial neural networks in predicting the particle size and polydispersity of polymeric nanoparticles. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. Size Matters!. Birth Size and a Size-Independent Stochastic Term Determine Asexual Reproduction Dynamics in Freshwater Planarians

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas, Michael A.; Quinodoz, Sofia; Schötz, Eva-Maria

    2012-09-01

    Asexual reproduction by division in higher organisms is rare, because a prerequisite is the ability to regenerate an entire organism from a piece of the original body. Freshwater planarians are one of the few animals that can reproduce this way, but little is known about the regulation of their reproduction cycles or strategies. We have previously shown that a planarian's reproduction strategy is randomized to include fragmentations, producing multiple offspring, as well as binary fissions, and can be partially explained by a maximum relative entropy principle. In this study we attempt to decompose the factors controlling their reproduction cycle. Based on recent studies on the cell cycle of budding yeast, which suggest that molecular noise in gene expression and cell size at birth together control cell cycle variability, we investigated whether the variability in planarian reproduction waiting times could be similarly regulated. We find that such a model can indeed explain the observed distribution of waiting times between birth and next reproductive event, suggesting that birth size and a stochastic noise term govern the reproduction dynamics of asexual planarians.

  6. Constraints on extra dimensions from precision molecular spectroscopy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Salumbides, E.J.; Schellekens, A.N.; Gato-Rivera, B.; Ubachs, W.M.G.

    2015-01-01

    Accurate investigations of quantum-level energies in molecular systems are shown to provide a testing ground to constrain the size of compactified extra dimensions. This is made possible by recent progress in precision metrology with ultrastable lasers on energy levels in neutral molecular hydrogen

  7. Biological motion distorts size perception

    Science.gov (United States)

    Veto, Peter; Einhäuser, Wolfgang; Troje, Nikolaus F.

    2017-02-01

    Visual illusions explore the limits of sensory processing and provide an ideal testbed to study perception. Size illusions - stimuli whose size is consistently misperceived - do not only result from sensory cues, but can also be induced by cognitive factors, such as social status. Here we investigate, whether the ecological relevance of biological motion can also distort perceived size. We asked observers to judge the size of point-light walkers (PLWs), configurations of dots whose movements induce the perception of human movement, and visually matched control stimuli (inverted PLWs). We find that upright PLWs are consistently judged as larger than inverted PLWs, while static point-light figures do not elicit the same effect. We also show the phenomenon using an indirect paradigm: observers judged the relative size of a disc that followed an inverted PLW larger than a disc following an upright PLW. We interpret this as a contrast effect: The upright PLW is perceived larger and thus the subsequent disc is judged smaller. Together, these results demonstrate that ecologically relevant biological-motion stimuli are perceived larger than visually matched control stimuli. Our findings present a novel case of illusory size perception, where ecological importance leads to a distorted perception of size.

  8. Materialised Ideals Sizes and Beauty

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kirsi Laitala

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Today’s clothing industry is based on a system where clothes are made in ready-to-wear sizes and meant to fit most people. Studies have pointed out that consumers are discontent with the use of these systems: size designations are not accurate enough to find clothing that fits, and different sizes are poorly available. This article discusses in depth who these consumers are, and which consumer groups are the most dissatisfied with today’s sizing systems. Results are based on a web survey where 2834 Nordic consumers responded, complemented with eight in-depth interviews, market analysis on clothing sizes and in-store trouser size measurements. Results indicate that higher shares of the consumers who have a body out of touch with the existing beauty ideals express discontentment with the sizing systems and the poor selection available. In particular, large women, very large men, and thin, short men are those who experience less priority in clothing stores and have more difficulties in finding clothes that fit. Consumers tend to blame themselves when the clothes do not fit their bodies, while our study points out that the industry is to blame as they do not produce clothing for all customers.

  9. Review of Nanoindentation Size Effect: Experiments and Atomistic Simulation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    George Z. Voyiadjis

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Nanoindentation is a well-stablished experiment to study the mechanical properties of materials at the small length scales of micro and nano. Unlike the conventional indentation experiments, the nanoindentation response of the material depends on the corresponding length scales, such as indentation depth, which is commonly termed the size effect. In the current work, first, the conventional experimental observations and theoretical models of the size effect during nanoindentation are reviewed in the case of crystalline metals, which are the focus of the current work. Next, the recent advancements in the visualization of the dislocation structure during the nanoindentation experiment is discussed, and the observed underlying mechanisms of the size effect are addressed. Finally, the recent computer simulations using molecular dynamics are reviewed as a powerful tool to investigate the nanoindentation experiment and its governing mechanisms of the size effect.

  10. Cellular detonations in nano-sized aluminum particle gas suspensions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khmel, TA

    2017-10-01

    Formation of cellular detonation structures in monodisperse nano-sized aluminum particle – oxygen suspensions is studied by methods of numerical simulations of two-dimensional detonation flows. The detonation combustion are described within the semi-empirical model developed earlier which takes into account transition of the regime of aluminum particle combustion from diffusion to kinetic for micro-sized and nano-sized particles. The free-molecular effects are considered in the processes of heat and velocity relaxation of the phases. The specific features of the cellular detonation of nanoparticle suspensions comparing with micron-sized suspensions are irregular cellular structures, much higher pick pressure values, and relatively larger detonation cells. This is due to high value of activation energy of reduced chemical reaction of aluminum particle combustion in kinetic regime.

  11. Cavitation erosion size scale effects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rao, P. V.; Buckley, D. H.

    1984-01-01

    Size scaling in cavitation erosion is a major problem confronting the design engineers of modern high speed machinery. An overview and erosion data analysis presented in this paper indicate that the size scale exponent n in the erosion rate relationship as a function of the size or diameter can vary from 1.7 to 4.9 depending on the type of device used. There is, however, a general agreement as to the values of n if the correlations are made with constant cavitation number.

  12. Analog design centering and sizing

    CERN Document Server

    Graeb, Helmut E

    2007-01-01

    Here is a compendium of fundamental problem formulations of analog design centering and sizing. It provides a differentiated knowledge about the many tasks of analog design centering and sizing. In particular, coverage formulates the worst-case problem. The book stands at the interface between process technology and design technology, detailing how the two are required to reach a solution. It presents a mathematically founded description based on numerical optimization and statistics. This volume will enable analog and mixed-signal designers to assess CAD solution methods that are presented to them as well as help developers of analog CAD tools to formulate and develop solution approaches for analog design centering and sizing.

  13. Progress in molecular precursors for electronic materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Buhro, W.E. [Washington Univ., St. Louis, MO (United States)

    1996-09-01

    Molecular-precursor chemistry provides an essential underpinning to all electronic-materials technologies, including photovoltaics and related areas of direct interest to the DOE. Materials synthesis and processing is a rapidly developing field in which advances in molecular precursors are playing a major role. This article surveys selected recent research examples that define the exciting current directions in molecular-precursor science. These directions include growth of increasingly complex structures and stoichiometries, surface-selective growth, kinetic growth of metastable materials, growth of size-controlled quantum dots and quantum-dot arrays, and growth at progressively lower temperatures. Continued progress in molecular-precursor chemistry will afford precise control over the crystal structures, nanostructures, and microstructures of electronic materials.

  14. Gas Sensors Based on Molecular Imprinting Technology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yumin; Zhang, Jin; Liu, Qingju

    2017-07-04

    Molecular imprinting technology (MIT); often described as a method of designing a material to remember a target molecular structure (template); is a technique for the creation of molecularly imprinted polymers (MIPs) with custom-made binding sites complementary to the target molecules in shape; size and functional groups. MIT has been successfully applied to analyze; separate and detect macromolecular organic compounds. Furthermore; it has been increasingly applied in assays of biological macromolecules. Owing to its unique features of structure specificity; predictability; recognition and universal application; there has been exploration of the possible application of MIPs in the field of highly selective gas sensors. In this present study; we outline the recent advances in gas sensors based on MIT; classify and introduce the existing molecularly imprinted gas sensors; summarize their advantages and disadvantages; and analyze further research directions.

  15. Molecular Cluster Perturbation Theory. I. Formalism

    CERN Document Server

    Byrd, Jason N; Molt,, Robert W; Bartlett, Rodney J; Sanders, Beverly A; Lotrich, Victor F

    2014-01-01

    We present second-order molecular cluster perturbation theory (MCPT(2)), a methodology to calculate arbitrarily large systems with explicit calculation of individual wavefunctions in a coupled cluster framework. This new MCPT(2) framework uses coupled cluster perturbation theory and an expansion in terms of molecular dimer interactions to obtain molecular wavefunctions that are infinite order in both the electronic fluctuation operator and all possible dimer (and products of dimers) interactions. The MCPT(2) framework has been implemented in the new SIA/ACES parallel architecture, making use of the advanced dynamic memory control and fine grained parallelism to perform very large explicit molecular cluster calculations. To illustrate the power of this method, we have computed energy shifts and lattice site dipole moments for the polar and non-polar configurations of solid hydrogen fluoride by scaling an explicit lattice to the bulk limit. The explicit lattice size without periodic boundary conditions was scal...

  16. Cell size, genome size and the dominance of Angiosperms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simonin, K. A.; Roddy, A. B.

    2016-12-01

    Angiosperms are capable of maintaining the highest rates of photosynthetic gas exchange of all land plants. High rates of photosynthesis depends mechanistically both on efficiently transporting water to the sites of evaporation in the leaf and on regulating the loss of that water to the atmosphere as CO2 diffuses into the leaf. Angiosperm leaves are unique in their ability to sustain high fluxes of liquid and vapor phase water transport due to high vein densities and numerous, small stomata. Despite the ubiquity of studies characterizing the anatomical and physiological adaptations that enable angiosperms to maintain high rates of photosynthesis, the underlying mechanism explaining why they have been able to develop such high leaf vein densities, and such small and abundant stomata, is still incomplete. Here we ask whether the scaling of genome size and cell size places a fundamental constraint on the photosynthetic metabolism of land plants, and whether genome downsizing among the angiosperms directly contributed to their greater potential and realized primary productivity relative to the other major groups of terrestrial plants. Using previously published data we show that a single relationship can predict guard cell size from genome size across the major groups of terrestrial land plants (e.g. angiosperms, conifers, cycads and ferns). Similarly, a strong positive correlation exists between genome size and both stomatal density and vein density that together ultimately constrains maximum potential (gs, max) and operational stomatal conductance (gs, op). Further the difference in the slopes describing the covariation between genome size and both gs, max and gs, op suggests that genome downsizing brings gs, op closer to gs, max. Taken together the data presented here suggests that the smaller genomes of angiosperms allow their final cell sizes to vary more widely and respond more directly to environmental conditions and in doing so bring operational photosynthetic

  17. Sample size determination and power

    CERN Document Server

    Ryan, Thomas P, Jr

    2013-01-01

    THOMAS P. RYAN, PhD, teaches online advanced statistics courses for Northwestern University and The Institute for Statistics Education in sample size determination, design of experiments, engineering statistics, and regression analysis.

  18. Analysis of glass fibre sizing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Petersen, Helga Nørgaard; Kusano, Yukihiro; Brøndsted, Povl

    2014-01-01

    Glass fibre reinforced polymer composites are widely used for industrial and engineering applications which include construction, aerospace, automotive and wind energy industry. During the manufacturing glass fibres, they are surface-treated with an aqueous solution. This process and the treated...... surfaces are called sizing. The sizing influences the properties of the interface between fibres and a matrix, and subsequently affects mechanical properties of composites. In this work the sizing of commercially available glass fibres was analysed so as to study the composition and chemical structures....... Soxhlet extraction was used to extract components of the sizing from the glass fibres. The glass fibres, their extracts and coated glass plates were analysed by Thermo-Gravimetric Analysis combined with a mass spectrometer (TGA-MS), and Attenuated Total Reflectance Fourier Transform Infrared (ATR...

  19. Aerosol Size Distributions In Auckland.

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Coulson, G.; Olivares, G.; Talbot, Nicholas

    2016-01-01

    Roč. 50, č. 1 (2016), s. 23-28 E-ISSN 1836-5876 Institutional support: RVO:67985858 Keywords : aerosol size distribution * particle number concentration * roadside Subject RIV: CF - Physical ; Theoretical Chemistry

  20. Basic molecular spectroscopy

    CERN Document Server

    Gorry, PA

    1985-01-01

    BASIC Molecular Spectroscopy discusses the utilization of the Beginner's All-purpose Symbolic Instruction Code (BASIC) programming language in molecular spectroscopy. The book is comprised of five chapters that provide an introduction to molecular spectroscopy through programs written in BASIC. The coverage of the text includes rotational spectra, vibrational spectra, and Raman and electronic spectra. The book will be of great use to students who are currently taking a course in molecular spectroscopy.

  1. Artificial molecular motors

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kassem, Salma; van Leeuwen, Thomas; Lubbe, Anouk S.; Wilson, Miriam R.; Feringa, Ben L.; Leigh, David A.

    2017-01-01

    Motor proteins are nature's solution for directing movement at the molecular level. The field of artificial molecular motors takes inspiration from these tiny but powerful machines. Although directional motion on the nanoscale performed by synthetic molecular machines is a relatively new

  2. Molecular mechanisms of photosynthesis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Youvan, D.C.; Marrs, B.L.

    1987-06-01

    Knowledge of the molecular interactions, structure and genetic basis of the photosynthetic reaction center makes it possible to ask more detailed questions about its function. Spectroscopy, X-ray crystallography and molecular genetics combine to give a detailed picture of events in photosynthesis and shown how particular molecules contribute to the process. The molecular biology of the photosynthesis center of Rhodopseudomonas is investigated.

  3. Molecular capture in protein nanotubes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qu, Xue; Komatsu, Teruyuki

    2010-01-26

    We describe molecular capturing properties of protein nanotubes with a controllable ligand binding affinity and size selectivity. These practical biocylinders were prepared using an alternating layer-by-layer (LbL) assembly of protein and oppositely charged poly(amino acid) into the nanoporous polycarbonate (PC) membrane (pore diameter, 400 nm), with subsequent dissolution of the template. The tube wall typically comprises six layers of poly-L-arginine (PLA) and human serum albumin (HSA) [(PLA/HSA)(3)]. Use of high molecular weight PLA (M(w) = ca. 70 000) yielded robust nanotubes, which are available as lyophilized powder. The (PLA/HSA)(3) nanotubes swelled considerably in water, although the outer diameter was almost unaltered. Uranyl ion, 3,3'-diethylthiacarbocyanine iodide, and zinc(II) protoporphyrin IX (ZnPP) were bound to the HSA component in the cylinder wall. Similar nanotubes comprising recombinant HSA mutant [rHSA(His)], which has a strong binding affinity for ZnPP, captured this ligand more tightly. Furthermore, addition of excess myristic acid released ZnPP from the tubes through a ligand replacement reaction. The hybrid nanotubes bearing a single avidin layer as an internal surface captured FITC-biotin efficiently. Biotin-labeled nanoparticles are also incorporated into the tubes when their particle size is sufficiently small to enter the pores. Subsequent TEM observation revealed a line of loaded nanoparticles (100 nm) in the one-dimensional space interior.

  4. Estimation of census and effective population sizes: the increasing usefulness of DNA-based approaches

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gordon Luikart; Nils Ryman; David A. Tallmon; Michael K. Schwartz; Fred W. Allendorf

    2010-01-01

    Population census size (NC) and effective population sizes (Ne) are two crucial parameters that influence population viability, wildlife management decisions, and conservation planning. Genetic estimators of both NC and Ne are increasingly widely used because molecular markers are increasingly available, statistical methods are improving rapidly, and genetic estimators...

  5. Sexual dimorphism in plumage and size in Black-tailed Godwits Limosa limosa limosa

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schroeder, Julia; Lourenco, Pedro M.; van der Velde, Marco; Hooijmeijer, Jos C.E.W.; Both, Christiaan; Piersma, Theunis; Heg, Dik

    2008-01-01

    Systematic sex-related differences in size and plumage are informative of sex-specific selection pressures. Here, we present an analysis of sexual dimorphism in body size and plumage of Black-tailed Godwits Limosa limosa limosa from a breeding population in The Netherlands. Molecular methods were

  6. Molecular computing origins and promises

    CERN Document Server

    Rambidi, Nicholas G

    2014-01-01

    Molecular Computing explores whether molecular primitives can prove to be real alternatives to contemporary semiconductor means. The text discusses molecular primitives and circuitry for information processing devices.

  7. Self body-size perception in an insect.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ben-Nun, Amir; Guershon, Moshe; Ayali, Amir

    2013-05-01

    Animals negotiating complex environments encounter a wide range of obstacles of different shapes and sizes. It is greatly beneficial for the animal to react to such obstacles in a precise, context-specific manner, in order to avoid harm or even simply to minimize energy expenditure. An essential key challenge is, therefore, an estimation of the animal's own physical characteristics, such as body size. A further important aspect of self body-size perception (or SBSP) is the need to update it in accordance with changes in the animal's size and proportions. Despite the major role of SBSP in functional behavior, little is known about if and how it is mediated. Here, we demonstrate that insects are also capable of self perception of body size and that this is a vital factor in allowing them to adjust their behavior following the sudden and dramatic growth associated with periodic molting. We reveal that locusts' SBSP is strongly correlated with their body size. However, we show that the dramatic change in size accompanying adult emergence is not sufficient to create a new and updated SBSP. Rather, this is created and then consolidated only following the individuals' experience and interaction with the physical environment. Behavioral or pharmacological manipulations can both result in maintenance of the old larval SBSP. Our results emphasize the importance of learning and memory-related processes in the development and update of SBSP, and highlight the advantage of insects as good models for a detailed study on the neurobiological and molecular aspects of SBSP.

  8. Nano-Sized Ultrasound Contrast Agent: Salting-Out Method

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Margaret A. Wheatley

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Tumor imaging by ultrasound is greatly enhanced by the use of ultrasound contrast agents (UCAs, stabilized, gas-filled bodies. They are generally less than 7 μm to pass freely through the capillary bed. Development of a nano-sized agent would enable them to extravasate through the leaky pores of angiogenic vessels. We describe the development of an echogenic, nano-sized polylactic acid UCA by adaptation of a salting-out method. The viscosity of the initial colloidal suspension (concentration and molecular weight of protective colloid [polyvinyl alcohol (PVA] and concentration of polymer was key in determining particle size and polydispersity (increasing viscosity increased both. Addition of the porogens ammonium carbonate and camphor, required to produce hollow echogenic capsules, also increased the size (eg, 5 wt% PVA, mean solid nanocapsule size 386 ± 25 nm, polydispersity index 0.367 ± 0.14, and mean UCA size 640 ± 18 nm, polydispersity index 0.308 ± 0.027. Viscosity had the opposite effect on echogenicity of the resultant nano-UCA, which ranged from 21.69 ± 0.78 dB for 2% PVA to 12.1 ± 0.8 dB for 10% PVA. The UCA prepared with 10% PVA, however, had a longer half-life in the ultrasound beam (t½ > 15 minutes vs t½ < 10 minutes, suggesting a thicker shell. Optimization will require compromise among size, echogenicity, and stability.

  9. Genome size increases in recently diverged hornwort clades.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bainard, Jillian D; Villarreal, Juan Carlos

    2013-08-01

    As our knowledge of plant genome size estimates continues to grow, one group has continually been neglected: the hornworts. Hornworts (Anthocerotophyta) have been traditionally grouped with liverworts and mosses because they share a haploid dominant life cycle; however, recent molecular studies place hornworts as the sister lineage to extant tracheophytes. Given the scarcity of information regarding the DNA content of hornworts, our objective was to estimate the 1C-value for a range of hornwort species within a phylogenetic context. Using flow cytometry, we estimated genome size for 36 samples representing 24 species. This accounts for roughly 10% of known hornwort species. Haploid genome sizes (1C-value) ranged from 160 Mbp or 0.16 pg (Leiosporoceros dussii) to 719 Mbp or 0.73 pg (Nothoceros endiviifolius). The average 1C-value was 261 ± 104 Mbp (0.27 ± 0.11 pg). Ancestral reconstruction of genome size on a hornwort phylogeny suggests a small ancestral genome size and revealed increases in genome size in the most recently divergent clades. Much more work is needed to understand DNA content variation in this phylogenetically important group, but this work has significantly increased our knowledge of genome size variation in hornworts.

  10. Size dependence of efficiency at maximum power of heat engine

    KAUST Repository

    Izumida, Y.

    2013-10-01

    We perform a molecular dynamics computer simulation of a heat engine model to study how the engine size difference affects its performance. Upon tactically increasing the size of the model anisotropically, we determine that there exists an optimum size at which the model attains the maximum power for the shortest working period. This optimum size locates between the ballistic heat transport region and the diffusive heat transport one. We also study the size dependence of the efficiency at the maximum power. Interestingly, we find that the efficiency at the maximum power around the optimum size attains a value that has been proposed as a universal upper bound, and it even begins to exceed the bound as the size further increases. We explain this behavior of the efficiency at maximum power by using a linear response theory for the heat engine operating under a finite working period, which naturally extends the low-dissipation Carnot cycle model [M. Esposito, R. Kawai, K. Lindenberg, C. Van den Broeck, Phys. Rev. Lett. 105, 150603 (2010)]. The theory also shows that the efficiency at the maximum power under an extreme condition may reach the Carnot efficiency in principle.© EDP Sciences Società Italiana di Fisica Springer-Verlag 2013.

  11. Neutron spectroscopy of molecular nanomagnets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baker, M. L.; Mutka, H.

    2012-11-01

    This short overview gives an account on the use of neutron spectroscopy for the examination of molecular nanomagnets, systems constructed by crystalline arrangement of finite size clusters (usually with regular form) of interacting moment carrying atoms - magnetic molecules. Opposed to extended magnetic systems with bands of collective excitations such as spin-waves the molecular nanomagnets are entities with local properties, each magnetic molecule possessing a finite number of energy levels that can be solved exactly for small enough systems. In essence, the number of states remains finite despite growing rapidly with increasing number of magnetic centers and the value of the spin quantum number. Increasingly large numbers of states and more complex exchange networks lead to the need for approximative treatments, the validity of which can be checked with neutron spectroscopy. Molecular nanomagnets provide interesting examples of physics and magnetochemistry, illustrated here with a few examples that highlight the power of neutron spectroscopy for precise investigation of the energy level structure and spatial configuration of the magnetic exchange parameters.

  12. Genome Size and Species Diversification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kraaijeveld, Ken

    2010-12-01

    Theoretically, there are reasons to believe that large genome size should favour speciation. Several major factors contributing to genome size, such as duplications and transposable element activity have been proposed to facilitate the formation of new species. However, it is also possible that small genome size promotes speciation. For example, selection for genome reduction may be resolved in different ways in incipient species, leading to incompatibilities. Mutations and chromosomal rearrangements may also be more stably inherited in smaller genomes. Here I review the following lines of empirical evidence bearing on this question: (i) Correlations between genome size and species richness of taxa are often negative. (ii) Fossil evidence in lungfish shows that the accumulation of DNA in the genomes of this group coincided with a reduction in species diversity. (iii) Estimates of speciation interval in mammals correlate positively with genome size. (iv) Genome reductions are inferred at the base of particular species radiations and genome expansions at the base of others. (v) Insect clades that have been increasing in diversity up to the present have smaller genomes than clades that have remained stable or have decreased in diversity. The general pattern emerging from these observations is that higher diversification rates are generally found in small-genome taxa. Since diversification rates are the net effect of speciation and extinction, large genomes may thus either constrain speciation rate, increase extinction rate, or both. I argue that some of the cited examples are unlikely to be explained by extinction alone.

  13. Genome size variation in Begonia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dewitte, Angelo; Leus, Leen; Eeckhaut, Tom; Vanstechelman, Ives; Van Huylenbroeck, Johan; Van Bockstaele, Erik

    2009-10-01

    The genome sizes of a Begonia collection comprising 37 species and 23 hybrids of African, Asiatic, Middle American, and South American origin were screened using flow cytometry. Within the collection, 1C values varied between 0.23 and 1.46 pg DNA. Genome sizes were, in most cases, not positively correlated with chromosome number, but with pollen size. A 12-fold difference in mean chromosome size was found between the genotypes with the largest and smallest chromosomes. In general, chromosomes from South American genotypes were smaller than chromosomes of African, Asian, or Middle American genotypes, except for B. boliviensis and B. pearcei. Cytological chromosome studies in different genotypes showed variable chromosome numbers, length, width, and total chromosome volume, which confirmed the diversity in genome size. Large secondary constrictions were present in several investigated genotypes. These data show that chromosome number and structure exhibit a great deal of variation within the genus Begonia, and likely help to explain the large number of taxa found within the genus.

  14. Experiments on clutch size and nest size in passerine birds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slagsvold, Tore

    1989-08-01

    Results of experiments on three passerine species suggest that brood size may be constrained by nest size, since the breeding success of pairs provided with large nestcups was greater than that of those provided with small artificial nestcups. These results may have important implications, e.g. to the design of experiments involving manipulation of clutch and brood size. A small nestcup is requisite for successful hatching during the incubation period, but a large one for successful rearing during the nestling period. In nature this difference may select for types of nesting materials that are elastic, such as mosses and lichens. However, experiments showed that such materials rapidly absorb rainwater but only slowly dry out. In addition, because large nests dry out more slowly than small nests, selection will favour small nests among those open-nesting species that have exposed nests. A further possible nest size constraint on open-nesters is nest predation. However, no difference in the predation rate was found in experiments with small and large artificial nests.

  15. Investigating the effective hydrodynamic size of dextran coated iron oxide nanoparticles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vaishnava, Prem; Gumber, Vikas; Regmi, Rajesh; Black, Correy; Dixit, Ambesh; Naik, Vaman; Sudakar, Chandran; Naik, Ratna; Lawes, Gavin

    2010-04-01

    We report synthesis and functionalization of magnetite nanoparticles by coating with dextran having 5, 15-20, 60-90, and 670 kDa molecular weights. The hydrodynamic radii of the functionalized nanoparticles suspended in water measured by dynamic light scattering technique assuming the bulk value for viscosity, were 91, 100, 106, and 132 nm, respectively. By measuring the ac magnetic loss, we determined the effective sizes to be 105, 113, 122, and 136 nm, respectively. The sizes measured by these techniques are approximately twice as large as expected given the iron oxide nanoparticle size and surfactant molecular chain length, at least for the lower molecular weight dextran. Comparing the results of hydrodynamic sizes studies, we conclude that the effective viscosity for the coated nanoparticles may be different than the bulk viscosity of the carrier liquid.

  16. Modeling and Sizing of Supercapacitors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    PETREUS, D.

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available Faced with numerous challenges raised by the requirements of the modern industries for higher power and higher energy, supercapacitors study started playing an important role in offering viable solutions for some of these requirements. This paper presents the surface redox reactions based modeling in order to study the origin of high capacity of EDLC (electrical double-layer capacitor for better understanding the working principles of supercapacitors. Some application-dependent sizing methods are also presented since proper sizing can increase the efficiency and the life cycle of the supercapacitor based systems.

  17. Size of quorum sensing communities

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ferkinghoff-Borg, Jesper; Sams, Thomas

    2014-01-01

    Ensembles of bacteria are able to coordinate their phenotypic behavior in accordance with the size, density, and growth state of the ensemble. This is achieved through production and exchange of diffusible signal molecules in a cell–cell regulatory system termed quorum sensing. In the generic...... by a geometric factor which incorporates the boundary conditions constitutes an appropriate size measure. The geometric factor is the square of the radius for a spherical colony or a hemisphere attached to a reflecting surface. If surrounded by a rapidly exchanged medium, the geometric factor is divided by three...

  18. Thermodynamic Stability of Structure H Hydrates Based on the Molecular Properties of Large Guest Molecules

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ryo Ohmura

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available This paper report analyses of thermodynamic stability of structure-H clathrate hydrates formed with methane and large guest molecules in terms of their gas phase molecular sizes and molar masses for the selection of a large guest molecule providing better hydrate stability. We investigated the correlation among the gas phase molecular sizes, the molar masses of large molecule guest substances, and the equilibrium pressures. The results suggest that there exists a molecular-size value for the best stability. Also, at a given molecule size, better stability may be available when the large molecule guest substance has a larger molar mass.

  19. Variability in human body size

    Science.gov (United States)

    Annis, J. F.

    1978-01-01

    The range of variability found among homogeneous groups is described and illustrated. Those trends that show significantly marked differences between sexes and among a number of racial/ethnic groups are also presented. Causes of human-body size variability discussed include genetic endowment, aging, nutrition, protective garments, and occupation. The information is presented to aid design engineers of space flight hardware and equipment.

  20. Class size versus class composition

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jones, Sam

    Raising schooling quality in low-income countries is a pressing challenge. Substantial research has considered the impact of cutting class sizes on skills acquisition. Considerably less attention has been given to the extent to which peer effects, which refer to class composition, also may affect...

  1. Size, productivity, and international banking

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Buch, Claudia M.; Koch, Catherine T.; Koetter, Michael

    2011-01-01

    Heterogeneity in size and productivity is central to models that explain which manufacturing firms expert. This study presents descriptive evidence on similar heterogeneity among international banks as financial services providers. A novel and detailed bank-level data set reveals the volume and mode

  2. On the optimal sizing problem

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vidal, Rene Victor Valqui

    1994-01-01

    The paper studies the problem of determining the number and dimensions of sizes of apparel so as to maximize profits. It develops a simple one-variable bisection search algorithm that gives the optimal solution. An example is solved interactively using a Macintosh LC and Math CAD, a mathematical...

  3. Food aroma affects bite size

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wijk, de R.A.; Polet, I.A.; Boek, W.; Coenraad, S.; Bult, J.H.F.

    2012-01-01

    Background
    To evaluate the effect of food aroma on bite size, a semisolid vanilla custard dessert was delivered repeatedly into the mouth of test subjects using a pump while various concentrations of cream aroma were presented retronasally to the nose. Termination of the pump, which determined

  4. Automated measurement of diatom size

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spaulding, Sarah A.; Jewson, David H.; Bixby, Rebecca J.; Nelson, Harry; McKnight, Diane M.

    2012-01-01

    Size analysis of diatom populations has not been widely considered, but it is a potentially powerful tool for understanding diatom life histories, population dynamics, and phylogenetic relationships. However, measuring cell dimensions on a light microscope is a time-consuming process. An alternative technique has been developed using digital flow cytometry on a FlowCAM® (Fluid Imaging Technologies) to capture hundreds, or even thousands, of images of a chosen taxon from a single sample in a matter of minutes. Up to 30 morphological measures may be quantified through post-processing of the high resolution images. We evaluated FlowCAM size measurements, comparing them against measurements from a light microscope. We found good agreement between measurement of apical cell length in species with elongated, straight valves, including small Achnanthidium minutissimum (11-21 µm) and largeDidymosphenia geminata (87–137 µm) forms. However, a taxon with curved cells, Hannaea baicalensis (37–96 µm), showed differences of ~ 4 µm between the two methods. Discrepancies appear to be influenced by the choice of feret or geodesic measurement for asymmetric cells. We describe the operating conditions necessary for analysis of size distributions and present suggestions for optimal instrument conditions for size analysis of diatom samples using the FlowCAM. The increased speed of data acquisition through use of imaging flow cytometers like the FlowCAM is an essential step for advancing studies of diatom populations.

  5. Microeconomic principles explain an optimal genome size in bacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ranea, Juan A G; Grant, Alastair; Thornton, Janet M; Orengo, Christine A

    2005-01-01

    Bacteria can clearly enhance their survival by expanding their genetic repertoire. However, the tight packing of the bacterial genome and the fact that the most evolved species do not necessarily have the biggest genomes suggest there are other evolutionary factors limiting their genome expansion. To clarify these restrictions on size, we studied those protein families contributing most significantly to bacterial-genome complexity. We found that all bacteria apply the same basic and ancestral 'molecular technology' to optimize their reproductive efficiency. The same microeconomics principles that define the optimum size in a factory can also explain the existence of a statistical optimum in bacterial genome size. This optimum is reached when the bacterial genome obtains the maximum metabolic complexity (revenue) for minimal regulatory genes (logistic cost).

  6. Molecular Population Genetics

    OpenAIRE

    Casillas, S?nia; Barbadilla, Antonio

    2017-01-01

    Molecular population genetics aims to explain genetic variation and molecular evolution from population genetics principles. The field was born 50 years ago with the first measures of genetic variation in allozyme loci, continued with the nucleotide sequencing era, and is currently in the era of population genomics. During this period, molecular population genetics has been revolutionized by progress in data acquisition and theoretical developments. The conceptual elegance of the neutral theo...

  7. [Molecular diagnostics in melanoma].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lang, R; Bauer, J W; Laimer, M

    2015-04-01

    The molecular landscape of melanoma is changing more rapidly than ever since new molecular technology approaches have made it possible to examine human melanoma for genetic alterations underlying the disease. In recent years, these approaches have identified new familial melanoma susceptibility genes, most of them also conferring risk to other cancers. This has implications for clinical testing and surveillance. Furthermore, molecular testing of melanoma to determine therapeutic eligibility for targeted therapies is now standard of care and should be familiar to the dermatologist.

  8. Molecular heat pump

    OpenAIRE

    Segal, Dvira; Nitzan, Abraham

    2005-01-01

    We propose a novel molecular device that pumps heat against a thermal gradient. The system consists of a molecular element connecting two thermal reservoirs that are characterized by different spectral properties. The pumping action is achieved by applying an external force that periodically modulates molecular levels. This modulation affects periodic oscillations of the internal temperature of the molecule and the strength of its coupling to each reservoir resulting in a net heat flow in the...

  9. A molecular protocol for diagnosing myotonic dystrophy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guida, M; Marger, R S; Papp, A C; Snyder, P J; Sedra, M S; Kissel, J T; Mendell, J R; Prior, T W

    1995-01-01

    Myotonic dystrophy (DM) is an autosomal dominant genetic disease caused by an unstable CTG repeat sequence in the 3' untranslated region of the myotonin protein kinase gene. The CTG repeat is present 5-30 times in the normal population, whereas DM patients have CTG expansions of 50 to several thousand repeats. The age of onset of the disorder and the severity of the phenotype is roughly correlated with the size of the CTG expansion. We developed a molecular protocol for the diagnosis of DM based on an initial polymerase chain reaction screen to detect normal-sized alleles and small expansions, followed by an improved Southern protocol to detect larger expansions.

  10. Molecularly Imprinted Filtering Adsorbents for Odor Sensing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sho Shinohara

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Versatile odor sensors that can discriminate among huge numbers of environmental odorants are desired in many fields, including robotics, environmental monitoring, and food production. However, odor sensors comparable to an animal’s nose have not yet been developed. An animal’s olfactory system recognizes odor clusters with specific molecular properties and uses this combinatorial information in odor discrimination. This suggests that measurement and clustering of odor molecular properties (e.g., polarity, size using an artificial sensor is a promising approach to odor sensing. Here, adsorbents composed of composite materials with molecular recognition properties were developed for odor sensing. The selectivity of the sensor depends on the adsorbent materials, so specific polymeric materials with particular solubility parameters were chosen to adsorb odorants with various properties. The adsorption properties of the adsorbents could be modified by mixing adsorbent materials. Moreover, a novel molecularly imprinted filtering adsorbent (MIFA, composed of an adsorbent substrate covered with a molecularly imprinted polymer (MIP layer, was developed to improve the odor molecular recognition ability. The combination of the adsorbent and MIP layer provided a higher specificity toward target molecules. The MIFA thus provides a useful technique for the design and control of adsorbents with adsorption properties specific to particular odor molecules.

  11. Ultrasound Molecular Imaging: Moving Towards Clinical Translation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abou-Elkacem, Lotfi; Bachawal, Sunitha V.; Willmann, Jürgen K.

    2015-01-01

    Ultrasound is a widely available, cost-effective, real-time, non-invasive and safe imaging modality widely used in the clinic for anatomical and functional imaging. With the introduction of novel molecularly-targeted ultrasound contrast agents, another dimension of ultrasound has become a reality: diagnosing and monitoring pathological processes at the molecular level. Most commonly used ultrasound molecular imaging contrast agents are micron sized, gas-containing microbubbles functionalized to recognize and attach to molecules expressed on inflamed or angiogenic vascular endothelial cells. There are several potential clinical applications currently being explored including earlier detection, molecular profiling, and monitoring of cancer, as well as visualization of ischemic memory in transient myocardial ischemia, monitoring of disease activity in inflammatory bowel disease, and assessment of arteriosclerosis. Recently, a first clinical grade ultrasound contrast agent (BR55), targeted at a molecule expressed in neoangiogenesis (vascular endothelial growth factor receptor type 2; VEGFR2) has been introduced and safety and feasibility of VEGFR2-targeted ultrasound imaging is being explored in first inhuman clinical trials in various cancer types. This review describes the design of ultrasound molecular imaging contrast agents, imaging techniques, and potential future clinical applications of ultrasound molecular imaging. PMID:25851932

  12. Ultrasound molecular imaging: Moving toward clinical translation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abou-Elkacem, Lotfi; Bachawal, Sunitha V; Willmann, Jürgen K

    2015-09-01

    Ultrasound is a widely available, cost-effective, real-time, non-invasive and safe imaging modality widely used in the clinic for anatomical and functional imaging. With the introduction of novel molecularly-targeted ultrasound contrast agents, another dimension of ultrasound has become a reality: diagnosing and monitoring pathological processes at the molecular level. Most commonly used ultrasound molecular imaging contrast agents are micron sized, gas-containing microbubbles functionalized to recognize and attach to molecules expressed on inflamed or angiogenic vascular endothelial cells. There are several potential clinical applications currently being explored including earlier detection, molecular profiling, and monitoring of cancer, as well as visualization of ischemic memory in transient myocardial ischemia, monitoring of disease activity in inflammatory bowel disease, and assessment of arteriosclerosis. Recently, a first clinical grade ultrasound contrast agent (BR55), targeted at a molecule expressed in neoangiogenesis (vascular endothelial growth factor receptor type 2; VEGFR2) has been introduced and safety and feasibility of VEGFR2-targeted ultrasound imaging is being explored in first inhuman clinical trials in various cancer types. This review describes the design of ultrasound molecular imaging contrast agents, imaging techniques, and potential future clinical applications of ultrasound molecular imaging. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Translational Molecular Nuclear Cardiology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thackeray, James T; Bengel, Frank M

    2016-02-01

    Increased rollout and availability of preclinical imaging provides a foundation for development of novel molecular nuclear imaging agents. The current armamentarium of radiotracers available for nuclear cardiology allows for the interrogation of critical molecular processes involved in a myriad of cardiovascular disorders, including altered metabolism, ventricular remodeling, sympathetic neuronal activation, and systemic inflammation. Effective translational molecular imaging requires coordination of clinical need with tracer development and molecular biology, leading to the identification of ideal translational imaging compounds. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. The modern molecular clock.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bromham, Lindell; Penny, David

    2003-03-01

    The discovery of the molecular clock--a relatively constant rate of molecular evolution--provided an insight into the mechanisms of molecular evolution, and created one of the most useful new tools in biology. The unexpected constancy of rate was explained by assuming that most changes to genes are effectively neutral. Theory predicts several sources of variation in the rate of molecular evolution. However, even an approximate clock allows time estimates of events in evolutionary history, which provides a method for testing a wide range of biological hypotheses ranging from the origins of the animal kingdom to the emergence of new viral epidemics.

  15. Polymer friction Molecular Dynamics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sivebæk, Ion Marius; Samoilov, Vladimir N.; Persson, Bo N. J.

    We present molecular dynamics friction calculations for confined hydrocarbon solids with molecular lengths from 20 to 1400 carbon atoms. Two cases are considered: a) polymer sliding against a hard substrate, and b) polymer sliding on polymer. In the first setup the shear stresses are relatively...... independent of molecular length. For polymer sliding on polymer the friction is significantly larger, and dependent on the molecular chain length. In both cases, the shear stresses are proportional to the squeezing pressure and finite at zero load, indicating an adhesional contribution to the friction force....

  16. Study on Relation between Hydrodynamic Feature Size of HPAM and Pore Size of Reservoir Rock in Daqing Oilfield

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qing Fang

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The flow mechanism of the injected fluid was studied by the constant pressure core displacement experiments in the paper. It is assumed under condition of the constant pressure gradient in deep formation based on the characteristic of pressure gradient distribution between the injection and production wells and the mobility of different polymer systems in deep reservoir. Moreover, the flow rate of steady stream was quantitatively analyzed and the critical flow pressure gradient of different injection parameters polymer solutions in different permeability cores was measured. The result showed that polymer hydrodynamic feature size increases with the increasing molecular weight. If the concentration of polymer solutions overlaps beyond critical concentration, then molecular chains entanglement will be occur and cause the augment of its hydrodynamic feature size. The polymer hydrodynamic feature size decreased as the salinity of the dilution water increased. When the median radius of the core pore and throat was 5–10 times of the polymer system hydrodynamic feature size, the polymer solution had a better compatibility with the microscopic pore structure of the reservoir. The estimation of polymer solutions mobility in the porous media can be used to guide the polymer displacement plan and select the optimum injection parameters.

  17. Nanoscale molecularly imprinted polymers and method thereof

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hart, Bradley R [Brentwood, CA; Talley, Chad E [Brentwood, CA

    2008-06-10

    Nanoscale molecularly imprinted polymers (MIP) having polymer features wherein the size, shape and position are predetermined can be fabricated using an xy piezo stage mounted on an inverted microscope and a laser. Using an AMF controller, a solution containing polymer precursors and a photo initiator are positioned on the xy piezo and hit with a laser beam. The thickness of the polymeric features can be varied from a few nanometers to over a micron.

  18. Size effects in crystal plasticity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Borg, Ulrik

    2007-01-01

    growth and interaction between neighboring voids, and on a comparison between the developed strain gradient crystal plasticity theory and a discrete dislocation plasticity theory. Furthermore, voids and rigid inclusions in isotropic materials have been studied using a strain gradient plasticity theory......Numerical analyses of plasticity size effects have been carried out for different problems using a developed strain gradient crystal plasticiy theory. The theory employs higher order stresses as work conjugates to slip gradients and uses higher order boundary conditions. Problems on localization...... of plastic flow in a single crystal, grain boundary effects in a bicrystal, and grain size effects in a polycrystal are studied. Single crystals containing micro-scale voids have also been analyzed at different loading conditions with focus on the stress and deformation fields around the voids, on void...

  19. Surface tension of different sized single-component droplets, according to macroscopic data obtained using the lattice gas model and the critical droplet size during phase formation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tovbin, Yu. K.; Zaitseva, E. S.; Rabinovich, A. B.

    2017-10-01

    Size dependences of the surface tension of spherical single-component droplets are calculated using equations of the lattice gas model for 19 compounds. Parameters of the model are found from experimental data on the surface tension of these compounds for a macroscopic planar surface. The chosen low-molecular compounds satisfy the law of corresponding states. To improve agreement with the experimental data, Lennard-Jones potential parameters are varied within 10% deviations. The surface tensions of different sized equilibrium droplets are calculated at elevated and lowered temperatures. It is found that the surface tension of droplets grows monotonically as the droplet size increases from zero to its bulk value. The droplet size R 0 corresponding to zero surface tension corresponds to the critical size of the emergence of a new phase. The critical droplet sizes in the new phase of the considered compounds are estimated for the first time.

  20. SIZE OF LIVESTOCK AGRICULTURAL OPERATIONS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bazbanela Stere

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available The main goal of the paper is to map the performance of Romanian farms from the perspective of livestock agricultural operations using principal component analysis technique (PCA and similarities between Romania and other countries from UE. The empirical results reveal that animal breedings farms are grouped into two categories :small and middle sized farms ; and the fact that Romania , one of Europe’s major forces in the field of livestock husbandry, has come to be one of the biggest importers of food products, although, by tradition, it is one of the continent’s countries with ideal conditions for breeding all species of animals. When clustering the countries we observ that in countries such as Greece, Italy, Portugal, Spain, cow farms, for example, do not exceed 10-16 heads and in Holland, England, Denmark, Belgium and France, the average farm size reaches 30-70 heads of milk cows. The cluster analysis revealed that in livestock operations, animal stock is the one that generates production, while the animal number indicates the size of the livestock unit.

  1. Huntington Disease: Molecular Diagnostics Approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bastepe, Murat; Xin, Winnie

    2015-10-06

    Huntington disease (HD) is caused by expansion of a CAG trinucleotide repeat in the first exon of the Huntingtin (HTT) gene. Molecular testing of Huntington disease for diagnostic confirmation and disease prediction requires detection of the CAG repeat expansion. There are three main types of HD genetic testing: (1) diagnostic testing to confirm or rule out disease, (2) presymptomatic testing to determine whether an at-risk individual inherited the expanded allele, and (3) prenatal testing to determine whether the fetus has inherited the expanded allele. This unit includes protocols that describe the complementary use of polymerase chain reactions (PCR) and Southern blot hybridization to accurately measure the CAG trinucleotide repeat size and interpret the test results. In addition, an indirect linkage analysis that does not reveal the unwanted parental HD status in a prenatal testing will also be discussed. Copyright © 2015 John Wiley & Sons, Inc.

  2. Molecular Stirrers in Action

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Chen, Jiawen; Kistemaker, Jos C. M.; Robertus, Jort; Feringa, Ben L.

    2014-01-01

    A series of first-generation light-driven molecular motors with rigid substituents of varying length was synthesized to act as "molecular stirrers". Their rotary motion was studied by H-1 NMR and UV-vis absorption spectroscopy in a variety of solvents with different polarity and viscosity.

  3. Molecular microbial ecology manual

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kowalchuk, G.A.; Bruijn, de F.J.; Head, I.M.; Akkermans, A.D.L.

    2004-01-01

    The field of microbial ecology has been revolutionized in the past two decades by the introduction of molecular methods into the toolbox of the microbial ecologist. This molecular arsenal has helped to unveil the enormity of microbial diversity across the breadth of the earth's ecosystems, and has

  4. Ionic and Molecular Liquids

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chaban, Vitaly V.; Prezhdo, Oleg

    2013-01-01

    applications of RTILs in combination with molecular liquids, concentrating on three significant areas: (1) the use of molecular liquids to decrease the viscosity of RTILs; (2) the role of RTIL micelle formation in water and organic solvents; and (3) the ability of RTILs to adsorb pollutant gases. Current...

  5. Molecular phosphates and siloxanes

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Administrator

    There has been immense interest and enthusiasm recently among chemists to develop materials at low temperatures through molecular routes. Especially interesting are the studies carried out on molecular phosphonates 1 and siloxanes 2,3 by Roesky, Tilley,. Mason, Feher and others. This presentation focuses on the ...

  6. Principles of molecular oncology

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Bronchud, Miguel H

    2008-01-01

    ...-threatening diseases. Many new molecularly targeted diagnostics and therapeutics described in this text, developed based on the rapid growth in our understanding of the molecular basis of cancer, already substantially improve survival of patients with previously lethal malignancies, and also improve quality of life because of fewer toxicities. Clearly re...

  7. Making molecular machines work

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Browne, Wesley R.; Feringa, Ben L.

    2006-01-01

    In this review we chart recent advances in what is at once an old and very new field of endeavour the achievement of control of motion at the molecular level including solid-state and surface-mounted rotors, and its natural progression to the development of synthetic molecular machines. Besides a

  8. The Molecular Basis of Human Brain Evolution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Enard, Wolfgang

    2016-10-24

    Humans are a remarkable species, especially because of the remarkable properties of their brain. Since the split from the chimpanzee lineage, the human brain has increased three-fold in size and has acquired abilities for vocal learning, language and intense cooperation. To better understand the molecular basis of these changes is of great biological and biomedical interest. However, all the about 16 million fixed genetic changes that occurred during human evolution are fully correlated with all molecular, cellular, anatomical and behavioral changes that occurred during this time. Hence, as humans and chimpanzees cannot be crossed or genetically manipulated, no direct evidence for linking particular genetic and molecular changes to human brain evolution can be obtained. Here, I sketch a framework how indirect evidence can be obtained and review findings related to the molecular basis of human cognition, vocal learning and brain size. In particular, I discuss how a comprehensive comparative approach, leveraging cellular systems and genomic technologies, could inform the evolution of our brain in the future. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Molecular Structure of Human-Liver Glycogen.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bin Deng

    Full Text Available Glycogen is a highly branched glucose polymer which is involved in maintaining blood-sugar homeostasis. Liver glycogen contains large composite α particles made up of linked β particles. Previous studies have shown that the binding which links β particles into α particles is impaired in diabetic mice. The present study reports the first molecular structural characterization of human-liver glycogen from non-diabetic patients, using transmission electron microscopy for morphology and size-exclusion chromatography for the molecular size distribution; the latter is also studied as a function of time during acid hydrolysis in vitro, which is sensitive to certain structural features, particularly glycosidic vs. proteinaceous linkages. The results are compared with those seen in mice and pigs. The molecular structural change during acid hydrolysis is similar in each case, and indicates that the linkage of β into α particles is not glycosidic. This result, and the similar morphology in each case, together imply that human liver glycogen has similar molecular structure to those of mice and pigs. This knowledge will be useful for future diabetes drug targets.

  10. Family size and child development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Polit, D F

    1982-12-01

    For some time now there has been a multidisciplinary interest in the effects of family size on children's development and on their overall life outcomes. In general, available evidence indicates that children from small families tend to accrue advantages in many developmental areas, while children from larger families are, as a group, relatively disadvantaged. Care needs to be taken when drawing conclusions from correlational research, yet there is growing evidence that even when the social class of families is accounted for, children from smaller families fare better on many measures of development than those from large families. 1 of the best documented research findings is that children from smaller families perform better on tests of intellectual ability than children from large families. Efforts to understand why family size should affect intellectual performance have intensified in recent years. Many explanations have been offered, but the explanation termed the "confluence model" has attracted the most interest and controversy. According to this model, a child's intellectual development is a function of the intellectual environment provided by the family. That environment is conceptualized as the average of absolute intelligence of all family members. A child is born with an absolute intelligence of zero. The arrival of each additional child has the effect of lowering the family's intellectual environment. Thus, children from larger families grow up in a less enriched environment and tend to perform less well on measures of ability. A 2nd component of the confluence model is necessary to explain the phenomenon that "only" children fail to perform as well as might be expected on intelligence tests. According to the confluence model, the only child discontinuity results from the absence of an opportunity to tutor younger siblings. Available evidence indicates that family size exerts an effect on educational and occupational achievement over and above its

  11. Theoretical molecular biophysics

    CERN Document Server

    Scherer, Philipp O J

    2017-01-01

    This book gives an introduction to molecular biophysics. It starts from material properties at equilibrium related to polymers, dielectrics and membranes. Electronic spectra are developed for the understanding of elementary dynamic processes in photosynthesis including proton transfer and dynamics of molecular motors. Since the molecular structures of functional groups of bio-systems were resolved, it has become feasible to develop a theory based on the quantum theory and statistical physics with emphasis on the specifics of the high complexity of bio-systems. This introduction to molecular aspects of the field focuses on solvable models. Elementary biological processes provide as special challenge the presence of partial disorder in the structure which does not destroy the basic reproducibility of the processes. Apparently the elementary molecular processes are organized in a way to optimize the efficiency. Learning from nature by means exploring the relation between structure and function may even help to b...

  12. The economics of urban size.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alonso, W

    1971-01-01

    An aggregative economic approach to the theory of city size is presented along with some empirical findings which suggest that even the largest cities have not yet reached excessive sizes from the point of view of growth and productivity. Urban magnitude is no simple 1 dimensional phenomenon. Modern urban centers are surrounded by very large, diffuse zonal boundaries, within which there are marked variations in the proportion of firms and people associated with that center, and in the intensity of the association. In sum, population does not constitute a conventional, countable set. In general, population will be considered as the basic magnitude and as a conventionally definable number. Most approaches to city size have emphasized the presumed diseconomy of urban scale and have sought to establish that population at which costs per capita are least, regarding this as optimal. It is argued here that both the logic and the factual basis of this approach are faulty. The argument of minimum costs is insufficient in its own terms. Such an objective is reasonable only if output per capita is constant, but it appears that output per capita is an increasing function of urban size. In that case, a more sensible objective of public policy would deal with the relation of outputs and inputs, rather than only with inputs. In every country for which evidence was found, local product per capita (or some index for it, such as income or wages) rises with urban size, and where comparable figures on cost are available, these rise far more slowly if at all. Although all of the data desirable are not available for any single country, the overall pattern is clear. Possibly the most surprising element in the data is the marked decline with increasing density in Social Overhead Captial Stocks (SOCS) per capita. This runs counter to common belief that the bigger the city the more infrastructure per capita is needed and may be the result of such effects as the greater linear quantities of

  13. Meeting in Florida: Using Asymmetric Flow Field-Flow Fractionation (AF4) to Determine C60 Colloidal Size Distributions

    Science.gov (United States)

    The study of nanomaterials in environmental systems requires robust and specific analytical methods. Analytical methods which discriminate based on particle size and molecular composition are not widely available. Asymmetric Flow Field-Flow Fractionation (AF4) is a separation...

  14. Molecular phylogeny of Arthrotardigrada (Tardigrada).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jørgensen, Aslak; Faurby, Søren; Hansen, Jesper G; Møbjerg, Nadja; Kristensen, Reinhardt M

    2010-03-01

    Tardigrades are microscopic ecdysozoans with a worldwide distribution covering marine, limnic and terrestrial habitats. They are regarded as a neglected phylum with regard to studies of their phylogeny. During the last decade molecular data have been included in the investigation of tardigrades. However, the marine arthrotardigrades are still poorly sampled due to their relative rarity, difficult identification and minute size even for tardigrades. In the present study, we have sampled various arthrotardigrades and sequenced the 18S and partial 28S ribosomal subunits. The phylogenetic analyses based on Bayesian inference and maximum parsimony inferred Heterotardigrada (Arthrotardigrada+Echiniscoidea) and Eutardigrada to be monophyletic. Arthrotardigrada was inferred to be paraphyletic as the monophyletic Echiniscoidea is included within the arthrotardigrades. The phylogenetic positions of Stygarctidae and Batillipedidae are poorly resolved with low branch support. The Halechiniscidae is inferred to be polyphyletic as the currently recognized Styraconyxinae is not part of the family. Archechiniscus is the sister-group to the Halechiniscidae and Orzeliscus is placed as one of the basal halechiniscids. The phylogeny of the included eutardigrade taxa resembles the current molecular phylogenies. The genetic diversity within Arthrotardigrada is much larger (18S 15.1-26.5%, 28S 7.2-20.7%) than within Eutardigrada (18S 1.0-12.6%, 28S 1.3-8.2%). This can be explained by higher substitution rates in the arthrotardigrades or by a much younger evolutionary age of the sampled eutardigrades. Copyright 2009 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Molecular Components of Catalytic Selectivity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Somorjai, Gabor A.; Park, Jeong Y.

    2008-07-02

    Selectivity, that is, to produce one molecule out of many other thermodynamically feasible product molecules, is the key concept to develop 'clean manufacturing' processes that do not produce byproducts (green chemistry). Small differences in potential energy barriers for elementary reaction steps control which reaction channel is more likely to yield the desired product molecule (selectivity), instead of the overall activation energy for the reaction that controls turnover rates (activity). Recent studies have demonstrated the atomic- or molecular-level tailoring of parameters such as the surface structures of active sites that give rise to nanoparticle size and shape dependence of turnover rates and reaction selectivities. Here, we highlight seven molecular components that influence reaction selectivities. These include: surface structure, adsorbate-induced restructuring, adsorbate mobility, reaction intermediates, surface composition, charge transport, and oxidation states for model metal single crystal and colloid nanoparticle catalysts. We show examples of their functioning and describe in-situ instruments that permit us to investigate their roles in surface reactions.

  16. Finite-size and shape effects on vortex configurations in superconducting isosceles right triangles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Wenjuan; Zhao, H. J.; Li, B.; Shi, Z. X.

    2017-12-01

    We numerically studied vortex configurations in superconducting isosceles right triangles. We found the solution of the London equation using Green’s function method. Then the Gibbs free energy for an arbitrary configuration was obtained. Using molecular dynamic simulation, we calculated the stable configurations for specific vorticities. The filling rulers were revealed by analyzing these states. Moreover, by changing the sample size, we found that many configurations are sensitive to sample size, which shows a very strong size effect. Lastly, general rules of the size effect were summarized.

  17. Implant debris particle size affects serum protein adsorption which may contribute to particle size-based bioreactivity differences

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reddy, Anand; Caicedo, Marco; Samelko, Lauryn; Jacobs, Joshua J; Hallab, Nadim James

    2014-01-01

    Biologic reactivity to orthopedic implant debris mediates long-term clinical performance of total joint arthroplasty implants. However, why some facets of implant debris are more pro-inflammatory remains controversial such as particle size, shape, base material etc. This precludes accurate prediction and optimal design of modern total joint replacements. We hypothesized that debris particle size can influence adsorbed protein film composition and affect subsequent bioreactivity. We measured size-dependent protein film-adsorption, and adsorbed protein film-dependent cytokine release using equal surface areas of different sized cobalt-chromium-alloy (CoCr-alloy) particle and in vitro challenge of human macrophages (THP-1 and human primary). Smaller 5μm vs 70μm sized particles preferentially adsorbed more serum protein in general (p<0.03), where higher molecular weight serum proteins consistent with IgG were identified. Additionally, 5μm CoCr-alloy particles pre-coated with different protein biofilms (IgG vs albumin) resulted in differential cytokine expression where albumin-coated particles induced more TNF-α and IgG-coated particles induced more IL-1β release from human monocyte/macrophages. In these preliminary in vitro studies we demonstrated the capability of equal surface areas of different particle sizes to influence adsorbed protein composition and that adsorbed protein differences on identical particles can translate into complex differences in bioreactivity. Together this suggests adsorbed protein differences on different sized particles of the same material may be a contributing mechanism by which different sized particles induce differences in reactivity. PMID:24941408

  18. The macroevolution of size and complexity in insect male genitalia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rudoy, Andrey; Ribera, Ignacio

    2016-01-01

    The evolution of insect male genitalia has received much attention, but there is still a lack of data on the macroevolutionary origin of its extraordinary variation. We used a calibrated molecular phylogeny of 71 of the 150 known species of the beetle genus Limnebius to study the evolution of the size and complexity of the male genitalia in its two subgenera, Bilimneus, with small species with simple genitalia, and Limnebius s.str., with a much larger variation in size and complexity. We reconstructed ancestral values of complexity (perimeter and fractal dimension of the aedeagus) and genital and body size with Bayesian methods. Complexity evolved more in agreement with a Brownian model, although with evidence of weak directional selection to a decrease or increase in complexity in the two subgenera respectively, as measured with an excess of branches with negative or positive change. On the contrary, aedeagus size, the variable with the highest rates of evolution, had a lower phylogenetic signal, without significant differences between the two subgenera in the average change of the individual branches of the tree. Aedeagus size also had a lower correlation with time and no evidence of directional selection. Rather than to directional selection, it thus seems that the higher diversity of the male genitalia in Limnebius s.str. is mostly due to the larger variance of the phenotypic change in the individual branches of the tree for all measured variables.

  19. The macroevolution of size and complexity in insect male genitalia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrey Rudoy

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available The evolution of insect male genitalia has received much attention, but there is still a lack of data on the macroevolutionary origin of its extraordinary variation. We used a calibrated molecular phylogeny of 71 of the 150 known species of the beetle genus Limnebius to study the evolution of the size and complexity of the male genitalia in its two subgenera, Bilimneus, with small species with simple genitalia, and Limnebius s.str., with a much larger variation in size and complexity. We reconstructed ancestral values of complexity (perimeter and fractal dimension of the aedeagus and genital and body size with Bayesian methods. Complexity evolved more in agreement with a Brownian model, although with evidence of weak directional selection to a decrease or increase in complexity in the two subgenera respectively, as measured with an excess of branches with negative or positive change. On the contrary, aedeagus size, the variable with the highest rates of evolution, had a lower phylogenetic signal, without significant differences between the two subgenera in the average change of the individual branches of the tree. Aedeagus size also had a lower correlation with time and no evidence of directional selection. Rather than to directional selection, it thus seems that the higher diversity of the male genitalia in Limnebius s.str. is mostly due to the larger variance of the phenotypic change in the individual branches of the tree for all measured variables.

  20. Size Estimates in Inverse Problems

    KAUST Repository

    Di Cristo, Michele

    2014-01-06

    Detection of inclusions or obstacles inside a body by boundary measurements is an inverse problems very useful in practical applications. When only finite numbers of measurements are available, we try to detect some information on the embedded object such as its size. In this talk we review some recent results on several inverse problems. The idea is to provide constructive upper and lower estimates of the area/volume of the unknown defect in terms of a quantity related to the work that can be expressed with the available boundary data.

  1. Molecular Programming with DNA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Winfree, Erik

    2009-05-01

    Information can be stored in molecules and processed by molecular reactions. Molecular information processing is at the heart of all biological systems; might it soon also be at the heart of non-biological synthetic chemical systems? Perhaps yes. One technological approach comes from DNA nanotechnology and DNA computing, where DNA is used as a non-biological informational polymer that can be rationally designed to create a rich class of molecular systems -- for example, DNA molecules that self-assemble precisely, that fold into complex nanoscale objects, that act as mechanical actuators and molecular motors, and that make decisions based on digital and analog logic. I will argue that to fully exploit their design potential, we will need to invent programming languages for specifying the behavior of information-based molecular systems, to create theoretical tools for understanding and analyzing the behavior of molecular programs, to develop compilers that automate the design of molecules with the desired behaviors, and to expand experimental techniques so that the implementation and debugging of complex molecular systems becomes as commonplace and practical as computer programming.

  2. Molecular markers in melanoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kashani-Sabet, M

    2014-01-01

    The last few years have witnessed the dawn of the molecular era in melanoma treatment. With the advent of successful therapy targeting mutant BRAF, melanoma is leading the field of cancer research in the molecular approach to therapy of advanced disease. Attempting to keep pace with advances in therapy are advances in the molecular assessment of melanoma progression, facilitated by the availability of genome-wide approaches to interrogate the malignant phenotype. At the DNA level, this has included approaches such as comparative genomic hybridization. At the RNA level, this has consisted of gene expression profiling using various assay methodologies. In certain instances, markers identified using these platforms have been further examined and developed using fluorescence in situ hybridization and immunohistochemical analysis. In this article, we will review recent progress in the development of novel molecular markers for melanoma that are nearing clinical application. We will review developments in the molecular classification of melanoma, in the molecular diagnosis of melanoma, and in the molecular assessment of melanoma prognosis. © 2013 British Association of Dermatologists.

  3. Molecular Population Genetics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Casillas, Sònia; Barbadilla, Antonio

    2017-03-01

    Molecular population genetics aims to explain genetic variation and molecular evolution from population genetics principles. The field was born 50 years ago with the first measures of genetic variation in allozyme loci, continued with the nucleotide sequencing era, and is currently in the era of population genomics. During this period, molecular population genetics has been revolutionized by progress in data acquisition and theoretical developments. The conceptual elegance of the neutral theory of molecular evolution or the footprint carved by natural selection on the patterns of genetic variation are two examples of the vast number of inspiring findings of population genetics research. Since the inception of the field, Drosophila has been the prominent model species: molecular variation in populations was first described in Drosophila and most of the population genetics hypotheses were tested in Drosophila species. In this review, we describe the main concepts, methods, and landmarks of molecular population genetics, using the Drosophila model as a reference. We describe the different genetic data sets made available by advances in molecular technologies, and the theoretical developments fostered by these data. Finally, we review the results and new insights provided by the population genomics approach, and conclude by enumerating challenges and new lines of inquiry posed by increasingly large population scale sequence data. Copyright © 2017 Casillas and Barbadilla.

  4. Nanoconfined catalytic Ångström-size motors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Colberg, Peter H., E-mail: pcolberg@chem.utoronto.ca; Kapral, Raymond, E-mail: rkapral@chem.utoronto.ca [Chemical Physics Theory Group, Department of Chemistry, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario M5S 3H6 (Canada)

    2015-11-14

    Self-propelled chemically powered synthetic micron and nano-scale motors are being intensively studied because of the wide range of potential applications that exploit their directed motion. This paper considers even smaller Ångström-size synthetic motors. Such very small motors in bulk solution display effects arising from their self-propulsion. Recent experiments have shown that small-molecule catalysts and single enzyme molecules exhibit properties that have been attributed to their chemical activity. Molecular dynamics is used to investigate the properties of very small Ångström-size synthetic chemically powered sphere-dimer motors in a simple atomic-like solvent confined between walls separated by distances of tens of nanometers. Evidence for strong structural ordering of the motors between the walls, which reflects the finite size of solvent molecules and depends on solvent depletion forces, is provided. Dynamical properties, such as average motor velocity, orientational relaxation, and mean square displacement, are anisotropic and depend on the distance from the walls. This research provides information needed for potential applications that use molecular-scale motors in the complex confined geometries encountered in biology and the laboratory.

  5. Heteronanojunctions with atomic size control using a lab-on-chip electrochemical approach with integrated microfluidics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lunca Popa, P; Dalmas, G; Faramarzi, V; Dayen, J F; Majjad, H; Doudin, B [Institut de Physique et Chimie des Materiaux de Strasbourg, UMR 7504 CNRS-UdS, 23 rue du Loess, BP 43, 67034 Strasbourg (France); Kemp, N T, E-mail: petpo@ifm.liu.se, E-mail: bernard.doudin@ipcms.u-strasbg.fr [Department of Physics, University of Hull, Cottingham Road, Kingston-upon-Hull, HU6 7RX (United Kingdom)

    2011-05-27

    A versatile tool for electrochemical fabrication of heteronanojunctions with nanocontacts made of a few atoms and nanogaps of molecular spacing is presented. By integrating microfluidic circuitry in a lab-on-chip approach, we keep control of the electrochemical environment in the vicinity of the nanojunction and add new versatility for exchanging and controlling the junction's medium. Nanocontacts made of various materials by successive local controlled depositions are demonstrated, with electrical properties revealing sizes reaching a few atoms only. Investigations on benchmark molecular electronics material, trapped between electrodes, reveal the possibility to create nanogaps of size matching those of molecules. We illustrate the interest of a microfluidic approach by showing that exposure of a fabricated molecular junction to controlled high solvent flows can be used as a reliability criterion for the presence of molecular entities in a gap.

  6. Molecular heat pump.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Segal, Dvira; Nitzan, Abraham

    2006-02-01

    We propose a molecular device that pumps heat against a thermal gradient. The system consists of a molecular element connecting two thermal reservoirs that are characterized by different spectral properties. The pumping action is achieved by applying an external force that periodically modulates molecular levels. This modulation affects periodic oscillations of the internal temperature of the molecule and the strength of its coupling to each reservoir resulting in a net heat flow in the desired direction. The heat flow is examined in the slow and fast modulation limits and for different modulation wave forms, thus making it possible to optimize the device performance.

  7. Molecularly Imprinted Membranes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trotta, Francesco; Biasizzo, Miriam; Caldera, Fabrizio

    2012-01-01

    Although the roots of molecularly imprinted polymers lie in the beginning of 1930s in the past century, they have had an exponential growth only 40–50 years later by the works of Wulff and especially by Mosbach. More recently, it was also proved that molecular imprinted membranes (i.e., polymer thin films) that show recognition properties at molecular level of the template molecule are used in their formation. Different procedures and potential application in separation processes and catalysis are reported. The influences of different parameters on the discrimination abilities are also discussed. PMID:24958291

  8. Size-exclusion chromatography-mass spectrometry with m-nitrobenzyl alcohol as post-column additive for direct characterization of size variants of monoclonal antibodies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Chong-Feng; Zang, Li; Weiskopf, Andrew

    2014-06-01

    Size-exclusion chromatography (SEC) is commonly used to monitor low molecular weight fragments and aggregates present in recombinant monoclonal antibody (mAb) biopharmaceuticals. It has been previously demonstrated that SEC could be coupled with mass spectrometry (MS) to directly measure the molecular weights of these protein species to aid in their identification. However, the use of certain mobile phase modifiers led to compromised sensitivity in MS detection. In this work, we demonstrate that the use of m-nitrobenzyl alcohol (m-NBA) as a post-column additive in an SEC-MS method is able to improve the ionization of antibody light chain and heavy chain approximately 7-fold and 2-fold, respectively, and thus allows the MS detection of low-abundance size variants present in mAb biopharmaceuticals. Application of the 15-min reducing SEC-UV/MS method enabled the direct identification of size variants present in an IgG1 mAb sample. One high molecular weight species observed under reducing conditions was identified to be a thioether-linked heterodimer of light chain and heavy chain. Multiple lower molecular weight species were found to result from cleavage of the heavy chain at a number of sites throughout the conserved sequence. The reducing SEC-UV/MS method provides a straightforward approach for identification of size variants present in mAb and may be applicable generally to all types of mAb biopharmaceuticals. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. 7 CFR 51.1402 - Size classification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Size classification. 51.1402 Section 51.1402... STANDARDS) United States Standards for Grades of Pecans in the Shell 1 Size Classification § 51.1402 Size classification. Size of pecans may be specified in connection with the grade in accordance with one of the...

  10. 7 CFR 51.1903 - Size classification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Size classification. 51.1903 Section 51.1903... STANDARDS) United States Consumer Standards for Fresh Tomatoes Size and Maturity Classification § 51.1903 Size classification. The following terms may be used for describing the size of the tomatoes in any lot...

  11. Four equivalent lot-sizing models

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    W. van den Heuvel (Wilco); A.P.M. Wagelmans (Albert)

    2007-01-01

    textabstractWe study the following lot-sizing models that recently appeared in the literature: a lot-sizing model with a remanufacturing option, a lot-sizing model with production time windows, and a lot-sizing model with cumulative capacities. We show the equivalence of these models with a

  12. Revising the forty-year old paradigm: from Giant Molecular Clouds to Molecular Gas Clusters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colombo, Dario; Rosolowsky, Erik William; Duarte Cabral, Ana; Ginsburg, Adam; Hughes, Annie; Kalinova Dimitrova, Veselina

    2015-08-01

    Since the first large surveys of early 80s, the statistical description of Giant Molecular Cloud properties has provided important insights into the physics that govern the star formation itself. However, those statistics heavily rely on the performance of automatic identification algorithms that are often seriously affected by the survey design — notably sensitivity and resolution.In this presentation, I will discuss how some of the limitations of commonly used algorithms can be overcome by considering the cloud segmentation problem in the broad framework of the graph theory. Additionally, the clustering analysis provides a natural and robust mathematical description of the molecular ISM discrete features that might be viewed as “Molecular Gas Clusters”.In particular, the algorithm we designed (SCIMES - Spectral Clustering for Molecular Emission Segmentation) applies the spectral clustering approach to look for relevant objects within topological graphs of emission (dendrograms) from star-forming clouds. SCIMES appears especially useful for the cloud identification within complex molecular emission data cubes since, in contrast to other algorithms, it does not over-divide structures, faithfully reproducing the work of the human eyes.To prove this, I will show the cloud decomposition obtained by SCIMES from the CO High Resolution Survey, where the clustering approach allows to automatically identify a variety of gas morphologies including coherent filamentary structures and holes within the molecular ISM. To calculate the cloud physical properties, distances to the clouds are attributed through the dendrograms using data from the BOLOCAM Survey, while the cloud size-line width relation is explored using a Principal Component Analysis approach as well as in the classical way.Finally, I will discuss how SCIMES introduces a new philosophy in the identification of the molecular clouds, where virtually every property of the molecular emission might be used for the

  13. Size and composition dependence of the frozen structures in Co-based bimetallic clusters

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Guojian [Key Laboratory of Electromagnetic Processing of Materials (Ministry of Education), Northeastern University, Shenyang 110819 (China); Wang, Qiang, E-mail: wangq@mail.neu.edu.cn [Key Laboratory of Electromagnetic Processing of Materials (Ministry of Education), Northeastern University, Shenyang 110819 (China); Cao, Yongze; Du, Jiaojiao; He, Jicheng [Key Laboratory of Electromagnetic Processing of Materials (Ministry of Education), Northeastern University, Shenyang 110819 (China)

    2012-01-09

    This Letter studies the size-dependent freezing of Co, Co–Ni, and Co–Cu clusters by using molecular dynamics with embedded atom method. Size effect occurs in these three types of clusters. The clusters with large sizes always freeze to form their bulk-like structures. However, the frozen structures for small sizes are generally related to their compositions. The icosahedral clusters are formed for Co clusters (for ⩽3.2 nm diameter) and also for Co–Ni clusters but at a larger size range (for ⩽4.08 nm). Upon the Co–Cu clusters, decahedral structure is obtained for small size (for 2.47 nm). The released energy induced the structural transformation plays a key role in the frozen structures. These results indicate that the preformed clusters with special structures can be tuned by controlling their compositions and sizes. -- Highlights: ► The size effect occurs in the Co, Co–Ni, and Co–Cu clusters. ► The clusters with large sizes always freeze to form their bulk-like structures. ► The frozen structures for small sizes are generally related to their compositions. ► Icosahedron is formed for Co and also for Co–Ni but at a larger size range. ► Upon the Co–Cu clusters, decahedral structure is obtained for small size.

  14. Population Genetics with Fluctuating Population Sizes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chotibut, Thiparat; Nelson, David R.

    2017-05-01

    Standard neutral population genetics theory with a strictly fixed population size has important limitations. An alternative model that allows independently fluctuating population sizes and reproduces the standard neutral evolution is reviewed. We then study a situation such that the competing species are neutral at the equilibrium population size but population size fluctuations nevertheless favor fixation of one species over the other. In this case, a separation of timescales emerges naturally and allows adiabatic elimination of a fast population size variable to deduce the fluctuation-induced selection dynamics near the equilibrium population size. The results highlight the incompleteness of the standard population genetics with a strictly fixed population size.

  15. Atomic & Molecular Interactions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    2002-07-12

    The Gordon Research Conference (GRC) on Atomic & Molecular Interactions was held at Roger Williams University, Bristol, RI. Emphasis was placed on current unpublished research and discussion of the future target areas in this field.

  16. Appendix II. Molecular Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    The study of crop evolution, origins, and conservation entails the assessment of genetic variability with and between populations and species at different genetic, evolutionary, and taxonomic hierarchical levels. Molecular biology has greatly increased the amount of data and computational intensity...

  17. Natural Product Molecular Fossils.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Falk, Heinz; Wolkenstein, Klaus

    The natural products synthesized by organisms that were living a long time ago gave rise to their molecular fossils. These can consist of either the original unchanged compounds or they may undergo peripheral transformations in which their skeletons remain intact. In cases when molecular fossils can be traced to their organismic source, they are termed "geological biomarkers".This contribution describes apolar and polar molecular fossils and, in particular biomarkers, along the lines usually followed in organic chemistry textbooks, and points to their bioprecursors when available. Thus, the apolar compounds are divided in linear and branched alkanes followed by alicyclic compounds and aromatic and heterocyclic molecules, and, in particular, the geoporphyrins. The polar molecular fossils contain as functional groups or constituent units ethers, alcohols, phenols, carbonyl groups, flavonoids, quinones, and acids, or are polymers like kerogen, amber, melanin, proteins, or nucleic acids. The final sections discuss the methodology used and the fundamental processes encountered by the biomolecules described, including diagenesis, catagenesis, and metagenesis.

  18. Molecular Machines: Nanoscale gadgets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garcia-Garibay, Miguel A.

    2008-06-01

    Meeting their biological counterparts halfway, artificial molecular machines embedded in liquid crystals, crystalline solids and mesoporous materials are poised to meet the demands of the next generation of functional materials.

  19. Are there molecular signatures?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bennett, W.P.

    1995-10-01

    This report describes molecular signatures and mutational spectrum analysis. The mutation spectrum is defined as the type and location of DNA base change. There are currently about five well documented cases. Mutations and radon-associated tumors are discussed.

  20. The Molecular Foundry (TMF)

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — Founded in 2006 by the Department of Energy (DOE), the Molecular Foundry is a critical part of the DOE's National Nanotechnology Initiative, a multi-agency framework...

  1. Human papillomavirus molecular biology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harden, Mallory E; Munger, Karl

    Human papillomaviruses are small DNA viruses with a tropism for squamous epithelia. A unique aspect of human papillomavirus molecular biology involves dependence on the differentiation status of the host epithelial cell to complete the viral lifecycle. A small group of these viruses are the etiologic agents of several types of human cancers, including oral and anogenital tract carcinomas. This review focuses on the basic molecular biology of human papillomaviruses. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. Molecular electronic junction transport

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Solomon, Gemma C.; Herrmann, Carmen; Ratner, Mark

    2012-01-01

    Whenasinglemolecule,oracollectionofmolecules,isplacedbetween two electrodes and voltage is applied, one has a molecular transport junction. We discuss such junctions, their properties, their description, and some of their applications. The discussion is qualitative rather than quantitative......, and focuses on mechanism, structure/function relations, regimes and mechanisms of transport, some molecular regularities, and some substantial challenges facing the field. Because there are many regimes and mechanisms in transport junctions, we will discuss time scales, geometries, and inelastic scattering...

  3. Molecular imaging in oncology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schober, Otmar; Riemann, Burkhard (eds.) [Universitaetsklinikum Muenster (Germany). Klinik fuer Nuklearmedizin

    2013-02-01

    Considers in detail all aspects of molecular imaging in oncology, ranging from basic research to clinical applications in the era of evidence-based medicine. Examines technological issues and probe design. Discusses preclinical studies in detail, with particular attention to multimodality imaging. Presents current clinical use of PET/CT, SPECT/CT, and optical imagingWritten by acknowledged experts. The impact of molecular imaging on diagnostics, therapy, and follow-up in oncology is increasing significantly. The process of molecular imaging includes key biotarget identification, design of specific molecular imaging probes, and their preclinical evaluation, e.g., in vivo using small animal studies. A multitude of such innovative molecular imaging probes have already entered clinical diagnostics in oncology. There is no doubt that in future the emphasis will be on multimodality imaging in which morphological, functional, and molecular imaging techniques are combined in a single clinical investigation that will optimize diagnostic processes. This handbook addresses all aspects of molecular imaging in oncology, ranging from basic research to clinical applications in the era of evidence-based medicine. The first section is devoted to technology and probe design, and examines a variety of PET and SPECT tracers as well as multimodality probes. Preclinical studies are then discussed in detail, with particular attention to multimodality imaging. In the third section, diverse clinical applications are presented, and the book closes by looking at future challenges. This handbook will be of value to all who are interested in the revolution in diagnostic oncology that is being brought about by molecular imaging.

  4. Molecular toxicity of nanomaterials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Xue-Ling; Yang, Sheng-Tao; Xing, Gengmei

    2014-10-01

    With the rapid developments in the fields of nanoscience and nanotechnlogy, more and more nanomaterials and their based consumer products have been used into our daily life. The safety concerns of nanomaterials have been well recognized by the scientific community and the public. Molecular mechanism of interactions between nanomaterials and biosystems is the most essential topic and final core of the biosafety. In the last two decades, nanotoxicology developed very fast and toxicity phenomena of nanomaterials have been reported. To achieve better understanding and detoxication of nanomaterials, thorough studies of nanotoxicity at molecular level are important. The interactions between nanomaterials and biomolecules have been widely investigated as the first step toward the molecular nanotoxicology. The consequences of such interactions have been discussed in the literature. Besides this, the chemical mechanism of nanotoxicology is gaining more attention, which would lead to a better design of nontoxic nanomaterials. In this review, we focus on the molecular nanotoxicology and explore the toxicity of nanomaterials at molecular level. The molecular level studies of nanotoxicology are summarized and the published nanotoxicological data are revisited.

  5. Nanoplatform-based molecular imaging

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Chen, Xiaoyuan

    2011-01-01

    "Nanoplathform-Based Molecular Imaging provides rationale for using nanoparticle-based probes for molecular imaging, then discusses general strategies for this underutilized, yet promising, technology...

  6. The "child size medicines" concept

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nsabagasani, Xavier; Okeng, Jasper Ogwal; Mbonye, Anthony

    2015-01-01

    Background In 2007, the World Health Organization (WHO) launched the ‘make medicines child size’ (MMCS) campaign by urging countries to prioritize procurement of medicines with appropriate strengths for children’s age and weight and, in child-friendly formulations of rectal and flexible oral solid...... of policy provisions for the MMCS recommendations. Results For most medicines for the selected diseases, appropriate strength for children’s age and weight was addressed especially in the EMHSLU 2012. However, policy documents neither referred to ‘child size medicines’ concept nor provided for flexible oral...... health policy documents reflected limited adherence to the MMCS recommendations. This and failure to use evidence based medicines may result into treatment failure and or death. A revision of the current policies and guidelines to better reflect ‘child size’, child appropriate and evidence based...

  7. Molecular clock in neutral protein evolution

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wilke Claus O

    2004-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background A frequent observation in molecular evolution is that amino-acid substitution rates show an index of dispersion (that is, ratio of variance to mean substantially larger than one. This observation has been termed the overdispersed molecular clock. On the basis of in silico protein-evolution experiments, Bastolla and coworkers recently proposed an explanation for this observation: Proteins drift in neutral space, and can temporarily get trapped in regions of substantially reduced neutrality. In these regions, substitution rates are suppressed, which results in an overall substitution process that is not Poissonian. However, the simulation method of Bastolla et al. is representative only for cases in which the product of mutation rate μ and population size Ne is small. How the substitution process behaves when μNe is large is not known. Results Here, I study the behavior of the molecular clock in in silico protein evolution as a function of mutation rate and population size. I find that the index of dispersion decays with increasing μNe, and approaches 1 for large μNe . This observation can be explained with the selective pressure for mutational robustness, which is effective when μNe is large. This pressure keeps the population out of low-neutrality traps, and thus steadies the ticking of the molecular clock. Conclusions The molecular clock in neutral protein evolution can fall into two distinct regimes, a strongly overdispersed one for small μNe, and a mostly Poissonian one for large μNe. The former is relevant for the majority of organisms in the plant and animal kingdom, and the latter may be relevant for RNA viruses.

  8. Ductility and work hardening in nano-sized metallic glasses

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, D. Z., E-mail: dzchen@caltech.edu [Division of Engineering and Applied Sciences, California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, California 91125 (United States); Gu, X. W. [Department of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, California 91125 (United States); An, Q.; Goddard, W. A. [Materials and Process Simulation Center, California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, California 91125 (United States); Greer, J. R. [Division of Engineering and Applied Sciences, California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, California 91125 (United States); The Kavli Nanoscience Institute, California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, California 91125 (United States)

    2015-02-09

    In-situ nano-tensile experiments on 70 nm-diameter free-standing electroplated NiP metallic glass nanostructures reveal tensile true strains of ∼18%, an amount comparable to compositionally identical 100 nm-diameter focused ion beam samples and ∼3 times greater than 100 nm-diameter electroplated samples. Simultaneous in-situ observations and stress-strain data during post-elastic deformation reveal necking and work hardening, features uncharacteristic for metallic glasses. The evolution of free volume within molecular dynamics-simulated samples suggests a free surface-mediated relaxation mechanism in nano-sized metallic glasses.

  9. Morphogenesis of simple leaves: regulation of leaf size and shape.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodriguez, Ramiro E; Debernardi, Juan M; Palatnik, Javier F

    2014-01-01

    Plants produce new organs throughout their life span. Leaves first initiate as rod-like structures protruding from the shoot apical meristem, while they need to pass through different developmental stages to become the flat organ specialized in photosynthesis. Leaf morphogenesis is an active process regulated by many genes and pathways that can generate organs with a wide variety of sizes and shapes. Important differences in leaf architecture can be seen among different species, but also in single individuals. A key aspect of leaf morphogenesis is the precise control of cell proliferation. Modification or manipulation of this process may lead to leaves with different sizes and shapes, and changes in the organ margins and curvature. Many genes required for leaf development have been identified in Arabidopsis thaliana, and the mechanisms underlying leaf morphogenesis are starting to be unraveled at the molecular level. © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  10. Size dependent studies of metal nanoparticles with bio-fluorophores

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patil, Ajeetkumar; Ballary, Steffy; George, Sajan D.; Chidangil, Santhosh

    2017-06-01

    Interaction of noble metal nanoparticles (NPs) with fluorophores has been an important research area in the field of material science and biomedical field. In the proximity of a metal nanoparticle, there is a quenching or enhancement in the intrinsic fluorescence of the fluorophore . The conditional quenching of the fluorescence can be used for negative sensing whereas enhancement in the fluorescence can be used to gain greater sensitivity and high signal to noise ratio in the molecular sensing/imaging. The current work deals with the systematic studies to understand the fluorescence quenching for few bio-fluorophores (NADH and FAD) when interacted with different sized silver nano-particles of (10nm, 40nm and 100nm). Home assembled Laser Induced Fluorescence (LIF) set-up was used to study the fluorescence quenching of NADH and FAD for different sized silver nanoparticles.

  11. Revolving Vernier Mechanism Controls Size of Linear Homomultimer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uchida, Takeo; Abe, Keita; Endo, Yuma; Ichiseki, Shosei; Akita, Satoru; Liu, Shiyun; Aradachi, Sho; Saito, Masataka; Fukuchi, Akihiko; Kikkawa, Taiyo; Dammaretz, Theo; Kawamata, Ibuki; Suzuki, Yuki; Nomura, Shin-Ichiro M; Murata, Satoshi

    2017-11-01

    A new kind of the Vernier mechanism that is able to control the size of linear assembly of DNA origami nanostructures is proposed. The mechanism is realized by mechanical design of DNA origami, which consists of a hollow cylinder and a rotatable shaft in it connected through the same scaffold. This nanostructure stacks with each other by the shape complementarity at its top and bottom surfaces of the cylinder, while the number of stacking is limited by twisting angle of the shaft. Experiments have shown that the size distribution of multimeric assembly of the origami depends on the twisting angle of the shaft; the average lengths of the multimer are decamer, hexamer, and tetramer for 0°, 10°, and 20° twist, respectively. In summary, it is possible to affect the number of polymerization by adjusting the precise shape and movability of a molecular structure. © 2017 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  12. Molecular Imprinting Techniques Used for the Preparation of Biosensors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gizem Ertürk

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Molecular imprinting is the technology of creating artificial recognition sites in polymeric matrices which are complementary to the template in their size, shape and spatial arrangement of the functional groups. Molecularly imprinted polymers (MIPs and their incorporation with various transducer platforms are among the most promising approaches for detection of several analytes. There are a variety of molecular imprinting techniques used for the preparation of biomimetic sensors including bulk imprinting, surface imprinting (soft lithography, template immobilization, grafting, emulsion polymerization and epitope imprinting. This chapter presents an overview of all of these techniques with examples from particular publications.

  13. Artificial Molecular Machines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balzani; Credi; Raymo; Stoddart

    2000-10-02

    The miniaturization of components used in the construction of working devices is being pursued currently by the large-downward (top-down) fabrication. This approach, however, which obliges solid-state physicists and electronic engineers to manipulate progressively smaller and smaller pieces of matter, has its intrinsic limitations. An alternative approach is a small-upward (bottom-up) one, starting from the smallest compositions of matter that have distinct shapes and unique properties-namely molecules. In the context of this particular challenge, chemists have been extending the concept of a macroscopic machine to the molecular level. A molecular-level machine can be defined as an assembly of a distinct number of molecular components that are designed to perform machinelike movements (output) as a result of an appropriate external stimulation (input). In common with their macroscopic counterparts, a molecular machine is characterized by 1) the kind of energy input supplied to make it work, 2) the nature of the movements of its component parts, 3) the way in which its operation can be monitored and controlled, 4) the ability to make it repeat its operation in a cyclic fashion, 5) the timescale needed to complete a full cycle of movements, and 6) the purpose of its operation. Undoubtedly, the best energy inputs to make molecular machines work are photons or electrons. Indeed, with appropriately chosen photochemically and electrochemically driven reactions, it is possible to design and synthesize molecular machines that do work. Moreover, the dramatic increase in our fundamental understanding of self-assembly and self-organizational processes in chemical synthesis has aided and abetted the construction of artificial molecular machines through the development of new methods of noncovalent synthesis and the emergence of supramolecular assistance to covalent synthesis as a uniquely powerful synthetic tool. The aim of this review is to present a unified view of the field

  14. Structure–performance characterization for carbon molecular sieve membranes using molecular scale gas probes

    KAUST Repository

    Rungta, Meha

    2015-04-01

    © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved. Understanding the relationship between carbon molecular sieve (CMS) pore structure and corresponding gas separation performance enables optimization for a given gas separation application. The final pyrolysis temperature and starting polymer precursor are the two critical parameters in controlling CMS performance. This study considers structure and performance changes of CMS derived from a commercially available polymer precursor at different pyrolysis temperatures. As reviewed in this paper, most traditional characterization methods based on microscopy, X-ray diffraction, spectroscopy, sorption-based pore size distribution measurements etc. provide limited information for relating separation performance to the CMS morphology and structural changes. A useful alternative approach based on different sized gases as molecular scale probes of the CMS pore structure was successfully used here in conjunction with separation data to provide critical insights into the structure-performance relationships of the engineered CMS.

  15. Consolidation of nanometer-sized aluminum single crystals: Microstructure and defects evolutions

    KAUST Repository

    Afify, N. D.

    2014-04-01

    Deriving bulk materials with ultra-high mechanical strength from nanometer-sized single metalic crystals depends on the consolidation procedure. We present an accurate molecular dynamics study to quantify microstructure responses to consolidation. Aluminum single crystals with an average size up to 10.7 nm were hydrostatically compressed at temperatures up to 900 K and pressures up to 5 GPa. The consolidated material developed an average grain size that grew exponentially with the consolidation temperature, with a growth rate dependent on the starting average grain size and the consolidation pressure. The evolution of the microstructure was accompanied by a significant reduction in the concentration of defects. The ratio of vacancies to dislocation cores decreased with the average grain size and then increased after reaching a critical average grain size. The deformation mechanisms of poly-crystalline metals can be better understood in the light of the current findings. © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. Simulations of the effect of particle size on texture and force transmission in bidisperse granular composites

    OpenAIRE

    Preechawuttipong Itthichai; Jongchansitto Pawarut

    2017-01-01

    The objective of this study is to investigate the influence of the particle size ratio on texture and force transmission in two-dimensional cohesionless binary granular composties by using molecular dynamics (MD) simulations. Four numerical composite samples, which differ in terms of the particle size ratios, are used in this study. The samples are composed of two constitutive materials with a stiffness ratio of four between the higher one termed as stiff particle and another termed as soft p...

  17. Spectroscopic and conformational properties of size-fractions acid separated from a lignite humic

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Conte, P.; Spaccini, R.; Smejkalova, D.; Nebbioso, A.; Piccolo, A. [University of Naples Federico 2, Portici (Italy)

    2007-10-15

    A lignite humic acid (HA) was fractionated by preparative high performance size-exclusion chromatography (HPSEC) in seven different size-fractions. The size-fractions were characterized by cross polarization (CP) magic angle spinning (MAS) {sup 13}C NMR spectroscopy and a further analytical HPSEC elution under UV and fluorescence detection. The alkyl hydrophobic components mainly distributed in the largest molecular-size-fraction, whereas the amount of oxidized carbons increased with decreasing size of fractions. Cross polarization time (T{sub CH}) and proton spin-lattice relaxation time in the rotating frame (T{sub 1p}(H)) were measured from variable contact time (VCT) experiments. The bulk HA was characterized by the shortest T{sub CH} values and the longest T{sub 1p}(H) values which suggested, respectively, one, an aggregation of components in a large conformation that favored a fast H-C cross polarization, and, two, consequent steric hindrances that prevented fast local molecular motions and decreased proton relaxation rates. Conversely, the separated size-fractions showed longer T{sub CH} values and shorter T{sub 1p}(H) values than the bulk HA, thereby indicating that they were constituted by a larger number of mobile molecular conformations. The UV and fluorescence absorptions were both low in the large size-fractions that mainly contained alkyl carbons, whereas they increased in the olephinic- and aromatic-rich fractions with intermediate molecular-size, and decreased again in the smaller fractions which were predominantly composed by oxidized carbons. These results support the supramolecular structure of humic Substances and indicate that the observed variation in conformational distribution in humic association may be used to explain environmental processes with additional precision.

  18. Dynamics of Dissolved Organic Matter and Microbes in Seawater through Sub-Micron Particle Size Analyses

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Goes, J.I.; Balch, W.M.; Vaughn, J.M.; Gomes, H.R.

    processes responsible for the dynamics of DOM rely on monitoring the consumption and breakdown of specific compounds of phytoplankton origin, generally, through the use of labeled precursors and substrates (Kirchman et al., 1991; Fry et al., 1996; Rich et al... attempts to determine the molecular weight or size spectrum of DOM using size exclusion chromatography, but these have generally proven unsatisfactory (Beckett et al., 1987). One reason is that DOM is exposed to high shear stresses during separation...

  19. Production of carbon molecular sieves from illinois coals. An assessment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lizzio, Anthony A.; Rostam-Abadi, Massoud

    1991-01-01

    Chars were produced from an Illinois No. 2 bituminous coal under various pyrolysis and activation conditions and tested for their molecular sieve properties. The amount of N2 compared to the amount of CO2 adsorbed by each char was used as a preliminary indicator of its molecular sieve properties. This relatively simple, but apparently useful test was confirmed by successfully characterizing the well-known molecular sieve properties of a commercial zeolite and molecular sieve carbon. In addition, coal chars having relatively high surface areas (800-1800 m2/g) were produced and tested for their molecular sieving capabilities. These carbon materials, which have high adsorption capacities and relatively narrow pore size distributions, should be ideal candidates for the commercial production of CMS.

  20. Porous Particles: Controlling Molecular Diffusion within Metal-Organic Frameworks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jee, Ah-Young; Sindoro, Melinda; Granick, Steve

    2014-03-01

    Systematic investigation of molecular diffusion under nanoconfinement is carried out utilizing pore tunability of ionic metal-organic frameworks (MOFs). The translational and rotational diffusion of specially-selected guest dyes is evaluated by fluorescence correlation microscopy (FCS). A curious novel technique is demonstrated of controlling diffusion by switching counterions. Systematically, this study provides generalizable examples of how pore size, guest size, and host-guest interaction affect diffusion within nanopores.

  1. The Dark Molecular Gas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wolfire, Mark G.; Hollenbach, David; McKee, Christopher F.

    2010-06-01

    The mass of molecular gas in an interstellar cloud is often measured using line emission from low rotational levels of CO, which are sensitive to the CO mass, and then scaling to the assumed molecular hydrogen H2 mass. However, a significant H2 mass may lie outside the CO region, in the outer regions of the molecular cloud where the gas-phase carbon resides in C or C+. Here, H2 self-shields or is shielded by dust from UV photodissociation, whereas CO is photodissociated. This H2 gas is "dark" in molecular transitions because of the absence of CO and other trace molecules, and because H2 emits so weakly at temperatures 10 K mass such as gamma rays produced in cosmic-ray collisions with the gas and far-infrared/submillimeter wavelength dust continuum radiation. In this paper, we theoretically model this dark mass and find that the fraction of the molecular mass in this dark component is remarkably constant (~0.3 for average visual extinction through the cloud \\bar{A}_V ≃ 8) and insensitive to the incident ultraviolet radiation field strength, the internal density distribution, and the mass of the molecular cloud as long as \\bar{A}_V, or equivalently, the product of the average hydrogen nucleus column and the metallicity through the cloud, is constant. We also find that the dark mass fraction increases with decreasing \\bar{A}_V, since relatively more molecular H2 material lies outside the CO region in this case.

  2. Preliminary characterization of glass fiber sizing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Noergaard Petersen, H.; Almdal, K. [Technical Univ. of Denmark. DTU Nanotech, Kgs. Lyngby (Denmark); Kusano, Y.; Broendsted, P. [Technical Univ. of Denmark. DTU Wind Energy, Risoe Campus, Roskilde (Denmark)

    2013-09-01

    Glass fiber surfaces are treated with sizing during manufacturing. Sizing consists of several components, including a film former and a silane coupling agent that is important for adhesion between glass fibers and a matrix. Although the sizing highly affects the composite interface and thus the strength of the composites, little is known about the structure and chemistry of the sizing. A part of sizing was extracted by soxhlet extraction. The fibers were subsequently burned and some fibers were merely burned for analysis of glass fiber and sizing. The results showed that the analyzed fibers had amounts of bonded and physisorbed sizing similar to what has been presented in literature. An estimated sizing thickness was found to be approximately 100 nm. It is indicated that an epoxy-resin containing film former and a polyethylene oxide lubricant are present, yet no silanes or other sizing components were identified in the extractant. (Author)

  3. Molecular clumps photoevaporation in ionized regions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Decataldo, D.; Ferrara, A.; Pallottini, A.; Gallerani, S.; Vallini, L.

    2017-11-01

    We study the photoevaporation of molecular clumps exposed to a UV radiation field including hydrogen-ionizing photons (hν > 13.6 eV) produced by massive stars or quasars. We follow the propagation and collision of shock waves inside clumps and take into account self-shielding effects, determining the evolution of clump size and density with time. The structure of the ionization-photodissociation region is obtained for different initial clump masses (M = 0.01-104 M⊙) and impinging fluxes (G0 = 102-105 in units of the Habing flux). The cases of molecular clumps engulfed in the H ii region of an OB star and clumps carried within quasar outflows are treated separately. We find that the clump undergoes in both cases an initial shock-contraction phase and a following expansion phase, which lets the radiation penetrate in until the clump is completely evaporated. Typical evaporation time-scales are ≃0.01 Myr in the stellar case and 0.1 Myr in the quasar case, where the clump mass is 0.1 M⊙ and 103 M⊙, respectively. We find that clump lifetimes in quasar outflows are compatible with their observed extension, suggesting that photoevaporation is the main mechanism regulating the size of molecular outflows.

  4. Size Effect and Deformation Mechanism in Twinned Copper Nanowires

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jiapeng Sun

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Molecular dynamics simulations were performed to demonstrate the synergistic effects of the extrinsic size (nanowire length and intrinsic size (twin boundary spacing on the failure manner, yield strength, ductility and deformation mechanism of the twinned nanowires containing high density coherent twin boundaries CTBs paralleled to the nanowires’ axis. The twinned nanowires show an intense extrinsic size effect, i.e., shorter is stronger and more ductile, and an intense intrinsic size effect, i.e., thinner is stronger. Notably, the strengthening effect degradation of CTBs in the twinned nanowires is observed with an increase in nanowire length: remarkable strengthening effect can be obtained for the short nanowires, but the strengthening effect becomes less pronounced for the long nanowires. The twinned nanowires fail via a ductile manner or via a brittle manner depending on the synergistic effect of the nanowire length and twin boundary spacing. By atomic-level observation of the plastic deformation, we found that the emission of a trailing 30° partial from the free surface controls the yield behavior of the twinned nanowires. We also found that the special zigzag extended dislocations are formed by the dislocation–CTBs interactions, and propagate to sustain the plastic deformation.

  5. Mosquito consumption by insectivorous bats: does size matter?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gonsalves, Leroy; Bicknell, Brian; Law, Brad; Webb, Cameron; Monamy, Vaughan

    2013-01-01

    Insectivorous bats have often been touted as biological control for mosquito populations. However, mosquitoes generally represent only a small proportion of bat diet. Given the small size of mosquitoes, restrictions imposed on prey detectability by low frequency echolocation, and variable field metabolic rates (FMR), mosquitoes may not be available to or profitable for all bats. This study investigated whether consumption of mosquitoes was influenced by bat size, which is negatively correlated with echolocation frequency but positively correlated with bat FMR. To assess this, we investigated diets of five eastern Australian bat species (Vespadelus vulturnus Thomas, V. pumilus Gray, Miniopterus australis Tomes, Nyctophilus gouldi Tomes and Chalinolobus gouldii Gray) ranging in size from 4-14 g in coastal forest, using molecular analysis of fecal DNA. Abundances of potential mosquito and non-mosquito prey were concurrently measured to provide data on relative prey abundance. Aedes vigilax was locally the most abundant mosquito species, while Lepidoptera the most abundant insect order. A diverse range of prey was detected in bat feces, although members of Lepidoptera dominated, reflecting relative abundance at trap sites. Consumption of mosquitoes was restricted to V. vulturnus and V. pumilus, two smaller sized bats (4 and 4.5 g). Although mosquitoes were not commonly detected in feces of V. pumilus, they were present in feces of 55 % of V. vulturnus individuals. To meet nightly FMR requirements, Vespadelus spp. would need to consume ~600-660 mosquitoes on a mosquito-only diet, or ~160-180 similar sized moths on a moth-only diet. Lower relative profitability of mosquitoes may provide an explanation for the low level of mosquito consumption among these bats and the absence of mosquitoes in feces of larger bats. Smaller sized bats, especially V. vulturnus, are likely to be those most sensitive to reductions in mosquito abundance and should be monitored during mosquito

  6. Mosquito consumption by insectivorous bats: does size matter?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leroy Gonsalves

    Full Text Available Insectivorous bats have often been touted as biological control for mosquito populations. However, mosquitoes generally represent only a small proportion of bat diet. Given the small size of mosquitoes, restrictions imposed on prey detectability by low frequency echolocation, and variable field metabolic rates (FMR, mosquitoes may not be available to or profitable for all bats. This study investigated whether consumption of mosquitoes was influenced by bat size, which is negatively correlated with echolocation frequency but positively correlated with bat FMR. To assess this, we investigated diets of five eastern Australian bat species (Vespadelus vulturnus Thomas, V. pumilus Gray, Miniopterus australis Tomes, Nyctophilus gouldi Tomes and Chalinolobus gouldii Gray ranging in size from 4-14 g in coastal forest, using molecular analysis of fecal DNA. Abundances of potential mosquito and non-mosquito prey were concurrently measured to provide data on relative prey abundance. Aedes vigilax was locally the most abundant mosquito species, while Lepidoptera the most abundant insect order. A diverse range of prey was detected in bat feces, although members of Lepidoptera dominated, reflecting relative abundance at trap sites. Consumption of mosquitoes was restricted to V. vulturnus and V. pumilus, two smaller sized bats (4 and 4.5 g. Although mosquitoes were not commonly detected in feces of V. pumilus, they were present in feces of 55 % of V. vulturnus individuals. To meet nightly FMR requirements, Vespadelus spp. would need to consume ~600-660 mosquitoes on a mosquito-only diet, or ~160-180 similar sized moths on a moth-only diet. Lower relative profitability of mosquitoes may provide an explanation for the low level of mosquito consumption among these bats and the absence of mosquitoes in feces of larger bats. Smaller sized bats, especially V. vulturnus, are likely to be those most sensitive to reductions in mosquito abundance and should be monitored

  7. Synaptic size dynamics as an effectively stochastic process.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Statman, Adiel; Kaufman, Maya; Minerbi, Amir; Ziv, Noam E; Brenner, Naama

    2014-10-01

    Long-term, repeated measurements of individual synaptic properties have revealed that synapses can undergo significant directed and spontaneous changes over time scales of minutes to weeks. These changes are presumably driven by a large number of activity-dependent and independent molecular processes, yet how these processes integrate to determine the totality of synaptic size remains unknown. Here we propose, as an alternative to detailed, mechanistic descriptions, a statistical approach to synaptic size dynamics. The basic premise of this approach is that the integrated outcome of the myriad of processes that drive synaptic size dynamics are effectively described as a combination of multiplicative and additive processes, both of which are stochastic and taken from distributions parametrically affected by physiological signals. We show that this seemingly simple model, known in probability theory as the Kesten process, can generate rich dynamics which are qualitatively similar to the dynamics of individual glutamatergic synapses recorded in long-term time-lapse experiments in ex-vivo cortical networks. Moreover, we show that this stochastic model, which is insensitive to many of its underlying details, quantitatively captures the distributions of synaptic sizes measured in these experiments, the long-term stability of such distributions and their scaling in response to pharmacological manipulations. Finally, we show that the average kinetics of new postsynaptic density formation measured in such experiments is also faithfully captured by the same model. The model thus provides a useful framework for characterizing synapse size dynamics at steady state, during initial formation of such steady states, and during their convergence to new steady states following perturbations. These findings show the strength of a simple low dimensional statistical model to quantitatively describe synapse size dynamics as the integrated result of many underlying complex processes.

  8. Preliminary characterization of glass fiber sizing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Petersen, Helga Nørgaard; Kusano, Yukihiro; Brøndsted, Povl

    2013-01-01

    Glass fiber surfaces are treated with sizing during manufacturing. Sizing consists of several components, including a film former and a silane coupling agent that is important for adhesion between glass fibers and a matrix. Although the sizing highly affects the composite interface and thus...... the strength of the composites, little is known about the structure and chemistry of the sizing. A part of sizing was extracted by soxhlet extraction. The fibers were subsequently burned and some fibers were merely burned for analysis of glass fiber and sizing. The results showed that the analyzed fibers had...

  9. Molecular genetics in aquaculture

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liliana Di Stasio

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Great advances in molecular genetics have deeply changed the way of doing research in aquaculture, as it has already done in other fields. The molecular revolution started in the 1980’s, thanks to the widespread use of restriction enzymes and Polymerase Chain Reaction technology, which makes it possible to easily detect the genetic variability directly at the DNA level. In aquaculture, the molecular data are used for several purposes, which can be clustered into two main groups. The first one, focused on individuals, includes the sex identification and parentage assignment, while the second one, focused on populations, includes the wide area of the genetic characterization, aimed at solving taxonomic uncertainties, preserving genetic biodiversity and detecting genetic tags. For the future, the increase in the number of molecular markers and the construction of high density genetic maps, as well as the implementation of genomic resources (including genome sequencing, are expected to provide tools for the genetic improvement of aquaculture species through Marked Assisted Selection. In this review the characteristics of different types of molecular markers, along with their applications to a variety of aquaculture issues are presented.

  10. Size-energy relationships in ecological communities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sewall, Brent J; Freestone, Amy L; Hawes, Joseph E; Andriamanarina, Ernest

    2013-01-01

    Hypotheses that relate body size to energy use are of particular interest in community ecology and macroecology because of their potential to facilitate quantitative predictions about species interactions and to clarify complex ecological patterns. One prominent size-energy hypothesis, the energetic equivalence hypothesis, proposes that energy use from shared, limiting resources by populations or size classes of foragers will be independent of body size. Alternative hypotheses propose that energy use will increase with body size, decrease with body size, or peak at an intermediate body size. Despite extensive study, however, size-energy hypotheses remain controversial, due to a lack of directly-measured data on energy use, a tendency to confound distinct scaling relationships, and insufficient attention to the ecological contexts in which predicted relationships are likely to occur. Our goal, therefore, was to directly evaluate size-energy hypotheses while clarifying how results would differ with alternate methods and assumptions. We comprehensively tested size-energy hypotheses in a vertebrate frugivore guild in a tropical forest in Madagascar. Our test of size-energy hypotheses, which is the first to examine energy intake directly, was consistent with the energetic equivalence hypothesis. This finding corresponds with predictions of metabolic theory and models of energy distribution in ecological communities, which imply that body size does not confer an advantage in competition for energy among populations or size classes of foragers. This result was robust to different assumptions about energy regulation. Our results from direct energy measurement, however, contrasted with those obtained with conventional methods of indirect inference from size-density relationships, suggesting that size-density relationships do not provide an appropriate proxy for size-energy relationships as has commonly been assumed. Our research also provides insights into mechanisms

  11. Size-energy relationships in ecological communities.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brent J Sewall

    Full Text Available Hypotheses that relate body size to energy use are of particular interest in community ecology and macroecology because of their potential to facilitate quantitative predictions about species interactions and to clarify complex ecological patterns. One prominent size-energy hypothesis, the energetic equivalence hypothesis, proposes that energy use from shared, limiting resources by populations or size classes of foragers will be independent of body size. Alternative hypotheses propose that energy use will increase with body size, decrease with body size, or peak at an intermediate body size. Despite extensive study, however, size-energy hypotheses remain controversial, due to a lack of directly-measured data on energy use, a tendency to confound distinct scaling relationships, and insufficient attention to the ecological contexts in which predicted relationships are likely to occur. Our goal, therefore, was to directly evaluate size-energy hypotheses while clarifying how results would differ with alternate methods and assumptions. We comprehensively tested size-energy hypotheses in a vertebrate frugivore guild in a tropical forest in Madagascar. Our test of size-energy hypotheses, which is the first to examine energy intake directly, was consistent with the energetic equivalence hypothesis. This finding corresponds with predictions of metabolic theory and models of energy distribution in ecological communities, which imply that body size does not confer an advantage in competition for energy among populations or size classes of foragers. This result was robust to different assumptions about energy regulation. Our results from direct energy measurement, however, contrasted with those obtained with conventional methods of indirect inference from size-density relationships, suggesting that size-density relationships do not provide an appropriate proxy for size-energy relationships as has commonly been assumed. Our research also provides insights

  12. A Path to Soluble Molecularly Imprinted Polymers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verma, Abhilasha; Murray, George M.

    2011-01-01

    Molecular imprinting is a technique for making a selective binding site for a specific chemical. The technique involves building a polymeric scaffold of molecular complements containing the target molecule. Subsequent removal of the target leaves a cavity with a structural “memory” of the target. Molecularly imprinted polymers (MIPs) can be employed as selective adsorbents of specific molecules or molecular functional groups. In addition, sensors for specific molecules can be made using optical transduction through lumiphores residing in the imprinted site. We have found that the use of metal ions as chromophores can improve selectivity due to selective complex formation. The combination of molecular imprinting and spectroscopic selectivity can result in sensors that are highly sensitive and nearly immune to interferences. A weakness of conventional MIPs with regard to processing is the insolubility of crosslinked polymers. Traditional MIPs are prepared either as monoliths and ground into powders or are prepared in situ on a support. This limits the applicability of MIPs by imposing tedious or difficult processes for their inclusion in devices. The size of the particles hinders diffusion and slows response. These weaknesses could be avoided if a means were found to prepare individual macromolecules with crosslinked binding sites with soluble linear polymeric arms. This process has been made possible by controlled free radical polymerization techniques that can form pseudo-living polymers. Modern techniques of controlled free radical polymerization allow the preparation of block copolymers with potentially crosslinkable substituents in specific locations. The inclusion of crosslinkable mers proximate to the binding complex in the core of a star polymer allows the formation of molecularly imprinted macromolecules that are soluble and processable. Due to the much shorter distance for diffusion, the polymers exhibit rapid responses. This paper reviews the methods

  13. Electrospray ionization mass spectrometry of terrestrial humic substances and their size fractions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Piccolo, A. [Dipartimento di Scienze del Suolo, della Pianta e dell' Ambiente, Universita di Napoli Federico II, Via Universita 100, 80055, Portici (Italy); Spiteller, M. [Institute of Environmental Research (INFU), University of Dortmund, Otto-Hahn-Strasse 6, 44227, Dortmund (Germany)

    2003-11-01

    Electrospray ionization mass spectrometry (ESI-MS) was used to evaluate the average molecular mass of terrestrial humic substances, such as humic (HA) and fulvic (FA) acids from a soil, and humic acid from a lignite (NDL). Their ESI mass spectra, by direct infusion, gave average molecular masses comparable to those previously obtained for aquatic humic materials. The soil HA and FA were further separated in size-fractions by preparative high performance size exclusion chromatography (HPSEC) and analyzed with ESI-MS by both direct infusion and a further on-line analytical HPSEC. Unexpectedly, their average molecular mass was only slightly less than for the bulk sample and, despite different nominal molecular size, did not substantially vary among size-fractions. The values increased significantly (up to around 1200 Da) after on-line analytical HPSEC for the HA bulk sample, at both pH 8 and 4, and for the HA size-fractions when pH was reduced from 8 to 4. It was noticed that HA size-fractions at pH 8 were separated by on-line HPSEC in further peaks showing average masses which progressively increased with elution volume. Furthermore, when the HA and NDL bulk samples were sequentially ultracentrifuged at increasing rotational speed, their supernatants showed mass values which were larger than bulk samples and increased with rotational speed. These variations in mass values indicate that the electrospray ionization is dependent on the composition of the humic molecular mixtures and increases when their heterogeneity is progressively reduced. It is suggested that the dominance of hydrophobic compounds in humic supramolecular associations may inhibit the electrospray ionization of hydrophilic components. Our results show that ESI-MS is reasonably applicable to humic substances only after an extensive reduction of their chemical complexity. (orig.)

  14. [Molecular techniques in mycology].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodríguez-Tudela, Juan Luis; Cuesta, Isabel; Gómez-López, Alicia; Alastruey-Izquierdo, Ana; Bernal-Martínez, Leticia; Cuenca-Estrella, Manuel

    2008-11-01

    An increasing number of molecular techniques for the diagnosis of fungal infections have been developed in the last few years, due to the growing prevalence of mycoses and the length of time required for diagnosis when classical microbiological methods are used. These methods are designed to resolve the following aspects of mycological diagnosis: a) Identification of fungi to species level by means of sequencing relevant taxonomic targets; b) early clinical diagnosis of invasive fungal infections; c) detection of molecular mechanisms of resistance to antifungal agents; and d) molecular typing of fungi. Currently, these methods are restricted to highly developed laboratories. However, some of these techniques will probably be available in daily clinical practice in the near future.

  15. Evolutionary molecular medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nesse, Randolph M; Ganten, Detlev; Gregory, T Ryan; Omenn, Gilbert S

    2012-05-01

    Evolution has long provided a foundation for population genetics, but some major advances in evolutionary biology from the twentieth century that provide foundations for evolutionary medicine are only now being applied in molecular medicine. They include the need for both proximate and evolutionary explanations, kin selection, evolutionary models for cooperation, competition between alleles, co-evolution, and new strategies for tracing phylogenies and identifying signals of selection. Recent advances in genomics are transforming evolutionary biology in ways that create even more opportunities for progress at its interfaces with genetics, medicine, and public health. This article reviews 15 evolutionary principles and their applications in molecular medicine in hopes that readers will use them and related principles to speed the development of evolutionary molecular medicine.

  16. Theoretical Molecular Biophysics

    CERN Document Server

    Scherer, Philipp

    2010-01-01

    "Theoretical Molecular Biophysics" is an advanced study book for students, shortly before or after completing undergraduate studies, in physics, chemistry or biology. It provides the tools for an understanding of elementary processes in biology, such as photosynthesis on a molecular level. A basic knowledge in mechanics, electrostatics, quantum theory and statistical physics is desirable. The reader will be exposed to basic concepts in modern biophysics such as entropic forces, phase separation, potentials of mean force, proton and electron transfer, heterogeneous reactions coherent and incoherent energy transfer as well as molecular motors. Basic concepts such as phase transitions of biopolymers, electrostatics, protonation equilibria, ion transport, radiationless transitions as well as energy- and electron transfer are discussed within the frame of simple models.

  17. Controlling the Size of Autocorrelation Robust Tests

    OpenAIRE

    Pötscher, Benedikt M.; Preinerstorfer, David

    2016-01-01

    Autocorrelation robust tests are notorious for suffering from size distortions and power problems. We investigate under which conditions the size of autocorrelation robust tests can be controlled by an appropriate choice of critical value.

  18. Sizing of Microparticles from Angular Scattering Ratio

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hjorth, Poul G.; Karamehmedovic, Mirza

    This technical note deals with light scattering measurements for sizing of micrometer-scale particles in a suspension.......This technical note deals with light scattering measurements for sizing of micrometer-scale particles in a suspension....

  19. Size-effect of germanium nanocrystals

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ou, Haiyan; Ou, Yiyu; Liu, Chuan

    2011-01-01

    Different sizes of Ge nanocrystals embedded in a SiO2 matrix were formed by PECVD, and analyzed by TEM. Size effect of Ge nanocystals was demonstrated by Raman spectroscopy after excluding the thermal effect....

  20. The NGDC Seafloor Sediment Grain Size Database

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The NGDC (now NCEI) Seafloor Sediment Grain Size Database contains particle size data for over 17,000 seafloor samples worldwide. The file was begun by NGDC in 1976...

  1. The size of the labor wards

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Milland, Maria; Christoffersen, Jens; Hedegaard, Morten

    2013-01-01

    To assess possible associations between the size of labor units and the frequency of approved obstetric claims.......To assess possible associations between the size of labor units and the frequency of approved obstetric claims....

  2. Substructured multibody molecular dynamics.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Grest, Gary Stephen; Stevens, Mark Jackson; Plimpton, Steven James; Woolf, Thomas B. (Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, MD); Lehoucq, Richard B.; Crozier, Paul Stewart; Ismail, Ahmed E.; Mukherjee, Rudranarayan M. (Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute, Troy, NY); Draganescu, Andrei I.

    2006-11-01

    We have enhanced our parallel molecular dynamics (MD) simulation software LAMMPS (Large-scale Atomic/Molecular Massively Parallel Simulator, lammps.sandia.gov) to include many new features for accelerated simulation including articulated rigid body dynamics via coupling to the Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute code POEMS (Parallelizable Open-source Efficient Multibody Software). We use new features of the LAMMPS software package to investigate rhodopsin photoisomerization, and water model surface tension and capillary waves at the vapor-liquid interface. Finally, we motivate the recipes of MD for practitioners and researchers in numerical analysis and computational mechanics.

  3. Valency and molecular structure

    CERN Document Server

    Cartmell, E

    1977-01-01

    Valency and Molecular Structure, Fourth Edition provides a comprehensive historical background and experimental foundations of theories and methods relating to valency and molecular structures. In this edition, the chapter on Bohr theory has been removed while some sections, such as structures of crystalline solids, have been expanded. Details of structures have also been revised and extended using the best available values for bond lengths and bond angles. Recent developments are mostly noted in the chapter on complex compounds, while a new chapter has been added to serve as an introduction t

  4. Molecular beam epitaxy

    CERN Document Server

    Pamplin, Brian R

    1980-01-01

    Molecular Beam Epitaxy introduces the reader to the use of molecular beam epitaxy (MBE) in the generation of III-V and IV-VI compounds and alloys and describes the semiconductor and integrated optics reasons for using the technique. Topics covered include semiconductor superlattices by MBE; design considerations for MBE systems; periodic doping structure in gallium arsenide (GaAs); nonstoichiometry and carrier concentration control in MBE of compound semiconductors; and MBE techniques for IV-VI optoelectronic devices. The use of MBE to fabricate integrated optical devices and to study semicond

  5. Open source molecular modeling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pirhadi, Somayeh; Sunseri, Jocelyn; Koes, David Ryan

    2016-09-01

    The success of molecular modeling and computational chemistry efforts are, by definition, dependent on quality software applications. Open source software development provides many advantages to users of modeling applications, not the least of which is that the software is free and completely extendable. In this review we categorize, enumerate, and describe available open source software packages for molecular modeling and computational chemistry. An updated online version of this catalog can be found at https://opensourcemolecularmodeling.github.io. Copyright © 2016 The Author(s). Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Molecular subgroups of medulloblastoma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Northcott, Paul A; Dubuc, Adrian M; Pfister, Stefan; Taylor, Michael D

    2014-01-01

    Recent efforts at stratifying medulloblastomas based on their molecular features have revolutionized our understanding of this morbidity. Collective efforts by multiple independent groups have subdivided medulloblastoma from a single disease into four distinct molecular subgroups characterized by disparate transcriptional signatures, mutational spectra, copy number profiles and, most importantly, clinical features. We present a summary of recent studies that have contributed to our understanding of the core medulloblastoma subgroups, focusing largely on clinically relevant discoveries that have already, and will continue to, shape research. PMID:22853794

  7. Synergetics of molecular systems

    CERN Document Server

    Lupichev, Lev N; Kadantsev, Vasiliy N

    2014-01-01

    Synergetics is the quantitative study of multicomponent systems that exhibit nonlinear dynamics and cooperativity. This book specifically considers basic models of the nonlinear dynamics of molecular systems and discusses relevant applications in biological physics and the polymer sciences.Emphasis is placed on specific solutions to the dynamical equations that correspond to the coherent formation of spatial-temporal structures, such as solitons, kinks and breathers, in particular. The emergence of these patterns in molecular structures provides a variety of information on their structural pro

  8. Molecular epidemiology of Blastocystis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fadime Eroğlu

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Blastocystis pathogenicity and classification was newly illuminated with molecular genetic studies and recently the parasite was found in the focus of many researchers. Several molecular methods such as; polymerase chain reaction (PCR, PCR-restriction fragment length polymorphism, random amplified polymorphic DNA, real-time polymerase chain reaction and DNA sequencing analyses can be used in genotyping of Blastocystis. Blastocystis parasites may cause diarrhea, abdominal pain, bloating, gas, irritability, anorexia, cramps, vomiting, dehydration, insomnia, nausea, loss of appetite, weight loss, fatigue symptoms and also could be asymptomatic cases. In this review, it was aimed to summarize the associations between Blastocystis subtypes and pathogenicity.

  9. Size-Energy Relationships in Ecological Communities

    OpenAIRE

    Brent J Sewall; Amy L. Freestone; Hawes, Joseph E.; Ernest Andriamanarina

    2013-01-01

    Hypotheses that relate body size to energy use are of particular interest in community ecology and macroecology because of their potential to facilitate quantitative predictions about species interactions and to clarify complex ecological patterns. One prominent size-energy hypothesis, the energetic equivalence hypothesis, proposes that energy use from shared, limiting resources by populations or size classes of foragers will be independent of body size. Alternative hypotheses propose that en...

  10. Integrated Multiscale Modeling of Molecular Computing Devices

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jerzy Bernholc

    2011-02-03

    photolithography will some day reach a miniaturization limit, forcing designers of Si-based electronics to pursue increased performance by other means. Any other alternative approach would have the unenviable task of matching the ability of Si technology to pack more than a billion interconnected and addressable devices on a chip the size of a thumbnail. Nevertheless, the prospects of developing alternative approaches to fabricate electronic devices have spurred an ever-increasing pace of fundamental research. One of the promising possibilities is molecular electronics (ME), self-assembled molecular-based electronic systems composed of single-molecule devices in ultra dense, ultra fast molecular-sized components. This project focused on developing accurate, reliable theoretical modeling capabilities for describing molecular electronics devices. The participants in the project are given in Table 1. The primary outcomes of this fundamental computational science grant are publications in the open scientific literature. As listed below, 62 papers have been published from this project. In addition, the research has also been the subject of more than 100 invited talks at conferences, including several plenary or keynote lectures. Many of the goals of the original proposal were completed. Specifically, the multi-disciplinary group developed a unique set of capabilities and tools for investigating electron transport in fabricated and self-assembled nanostructures at multiple length and time scales.

  11. Molecular imaging with theranostic nanoparticles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jokerst, Jesse V; Gambhir, Sanjiv S

    2011-10-18

    Nanoparticles (NPs) offer diagnostic and therapeutic capabilities not available with small molecules or microscale tools. As the field of molecular imaging has emerged from the blending of molecular biology with medical imaging, NP imaging is increasingly common for both therapeutic and diagnostic applications. The term theranostic describes technology with concurrent and complementary diagnostic and therapeutic capabilities. Although NPs have been FDA-approved for clinical use as transport vehicles for nearly 15 years, full translation of their theranostic potential is incomplete. However, NPs have shown remarkable success in the areas of drug delivery and magnetic resonance imaging. Emerging applications include image-guided resection, optical/photoacoustic imaging in vivo, contrast-enhanced ultrasound, and thermoablative therapy. Diagnosis with NPs in molecular imaging involves the correlation of the signal with a phenotype. The location and intensity of NP signals emanating from a living subject indicate the disease area's size, stage, and biochemical signature. Therapy with NPs uses the image for resection or delivery of a small molecule or RNA therapeutic. Ablation of the affected area is also possible via heat or radioactivity. The ideal theranostic NP includes several features: (1) it selectively and rapidly accumulates in diseased tissue; (2) it reports biochemical and morphological characteristics of the area; (3) it delivers an effective therapeutic; and (4) it is safe and biodegrades with nontoxic byproducts. Such a system contains a central imaging core surrounded by small molecule therapeutics. The system targets via ligands such as IgG and is protected from immune scavengers by a cloak of protective polymer. Although no NP has achieved all of the above criteria, many NPs possess one or more of these features. While the most clinically translatable NPs have been used in the field of magnetic resonance imaging, other types in development are quickly

  12. Molecular Imaging with Theranostic Nanoparticles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jokerst, Jesse V.; Gambhir, Sanjiv S.

    2011-01-01

    Conspectus Nanoparticles offer diagnostic and therapeutic capabilities impossible with small molecules or micro-scale tools. As molecular biology merges with medical imaging to form the field of molecular imaging, nanoparticle imaging is increasingly common with both therapeutic and diagnostic applications. The term theranostic indicates technology with concurrent and complementary diagnostic and therapeutic capabilities. When performed with sub-micron materials, the field may be termed theranostic nanomedicine. Although nanoparticles have been FDA-approved for clinical use as transport vehicles for nearly 15 years, full translation of their theranostic potential is incomplete. Still, remarkable successes with nanoparticles have been realized in the areas of drug delivery and magnetic resonance imaging. Emerging applications include image-guided resection, optical/photoacoustic imaging in vivo, contrast-enhanced ultrasound, and thermoablative therapy. Diagnosis with nanoparticles in molecular imaging involves correlating signal to a phenotype. The disease’s size, stage, and biochemical signature can be gleaned from the location and intensity of nanoparticle signal emanating from a living subject. Therapy with NP uses the image for resection or delivery of small molecule or RNA thererapeutic. Ablation of the affected area is also possible via heat or radioactivity. The ideal theranostic NP: (1) selectively and rapidly accumulates in diseased tissue, (2) reports biochemical and morphological characteristics of the area, (3) delivers a non-invasive therapeutic, and (4) is safe and biodegrades with non-toxic byproducts. Above is a schematic of such a system which contains a central imaging core (yellow) surrounded by small molecule therapeutics (red). The system targets via ligands such as IgG (pink) and is protected from immune scavengers by a cloak of protective polymer (green). While no nanoparticle has achieved all of the above features, many NPs do fulfill one

  13. The Wisdom of Class-Size Reduction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Graue, Elizabeth; Hatch, Kelly; Rao, Kalpana; Oen, Denise

    2007-01-01

    In this study, the authors explore the implementation of a statewide class-size reduction program in nine high-poverty schools. Through qualitative methods, they examined how schools used class-size reduction to change staffing patterns and instructional programs. Requiring changes in space allocation, class-size reduction was accomplished through…

  14. 7 CFR 51.2284 - Size classification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Size classification. 51.2284 Section 51.2284... Size classification. The following classifications are provided to describe the size of any lot... shall conform to the requirements of the specified classification as defined below: (a) Halves. Lot...

  15. 7 CFR 51.344 - Size.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... the Department of Agriculture AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE (Standards, Inspections, Marketing Practices), DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE REGULATIONS AND STANDARDS UNDER THE AGRICULTURAL MARKETING ACT OF 1946... Standards for Grades of Apples for Processing Size § 51.344 Size. (a) The minimum and maximum sizes or range...

  16. Genetic size and growth in goats

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ogink, N.W.M.

    1993-01-01

    Since the last century, many biologists have studied the effects of size differences between species on the rate of their metabolic processes. in 1980, Taylor published the genetic size-scaling theory which incorporated the existing knowledge on size effects, and introduced two formal

  17. School size effects: review and conceptual analysis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Scheerens, Jaap; Hendriks, Maria A.; Luyten, Johannes W.; Luyten, Hans; Hendriks, Maria; Scheerens, Jaap

    2014-01-01

    In this chapter, a review of international review studies on school size effects is presented. Next, ingredients of a more contextualized and tentative causal mediation model of school size effects are discussed. The chapter is completed by a short overview of school size effects as found in

  18. Size effects in foams : Experiments and modeling

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tekoglu, C.; Gibson, L. J.; Pardoen, T.; Onck, P. R.

    Mechanical properties of cellular solids depend on the ratio of the sample size to the cell size at length scales where the two are of the same order of magnitude. Considering that the cell size of many cellular solids used in engineering applications is between 1 and 10 mm, it is not uncommon to

  19. Is the myonuclear domain size fixed?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Meer, S.F.T.; Jaspers, R. T.; Degens, H.

    2011-01-01

    It has been suggested that the number of myonuclei in a muscle fibre changes in proportion to the change in fibre size, resulting in a constant myonuclear domain size, defined as the cytoplasmic volume per myonucleus. The myonuclear domain size varies, however, between fibre types and is inversely

  20. Molecularly Imprinted Nanomaterials for Sensor Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Irshad, Muhammad; Iqbal, Naseer; Mujahid, Adnan; Afzal, Adeel; Hussain, Tajamal; Sharif, Ahsan; Ahmad, Ejaz; Athar, Muhammad Makshoof

    2013-01-01

    Molecular imprinting is a well-established technology to mimic antibody-antigen interaction in a synthetic platform. Molecularly imprinted polymers and nanomaterials usually possess outstanding recognition capabilities. Imprinted nanostructured materials are characterized by their small sizes, large reactive surface area and, most importantly, with rapid and specific analysis of analytes due to the formation of template driven recognition cavities within the matrix. The excellent recognition and selectivity offered by this class of materials towards a target analyte have found applications in many areas, such as separation science, analysis of organic pollutants in water, environmental analysis of trace gases, chemical or biological sensors, biochemical assays, fabricating artificial receptors, nanotechnology, etc. We present here a concise overview and recent developments in nanostructured imprinted materials with respect to various sensor systems, e.g., electrochemical, optical and mass sensitive, etc. Finally, in light of recent studies, we conclude the article with future perspectives and foreseen applications of imprinted nanomaterials in chemical sensors. PMID:28348356

  1. Molecular simulation and modeling of complex I.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hummer, Gerhard; Wikström, Mårten

    2016-07-01

    Molecular modeling and molecular dynamics simulations play an important role in the functional characterization of complex I. With its large size and complicated function, linking quinone reduction to proton pumping across a membrane, complex I poses unique modeling challenges. Nonetheless, simulations have already helped in the identification of possible proton transfer pathways. Simulations have also shed light on the coupling between electron and proton transfer, thus pointing the way in the search for the mechanistic principles underlying the proton pump. In addition to reviewing what has already been achieved in complex I modeling, we aim here to identify pressing issues and to provide guidance for future research to harness the power of modeling in the functional characterization of complex I. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled Respiratory complex I, edited by Volker Zickermann and Ulrich Brandt. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. Solid silica nanoparticles: applications in molecular imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shirshahi, Vahid; Soltani, Madjid

    2015-01-01

    Silica and silica-based nanoparticles have been widely used for therapeutic and diagnostic applications in cancer mainly through delivery of drugs, genes and contrast agents. Development of synthesis methods has provided the possibility of fabricating silica nanoparticles with different sizes in nanometer ranges as well as silica-based multimodal nanoparticles with many innovative properties and intriguing applications in biomedicine. The surface of silica particles facilitates different methods of surface modifications and allows conjugation of various biomolecules such as proteins and nucleic acids. In this review, different methods of fabrication of silica and silica-based nanoparticles, their surface modification and the application of these nanoparticles in molecular imaging are discussed. Overall, the aim of this review is to address the development of silica and silica-based multifunctional nanoparticles that are introduced mainly for molecular imaging applications using optical, magnetic (MRI), X-ray (computed tomography) and multimodal imaging techniques. Copyright © 2014 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  3. Impact of vacancies on the thermal conductivity of graphene nanoribbons: A molecular dynamics simulation study

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Noshin, Maliha; Khan, Asir Intisar; Navid, Ishtiaque Ahmed; Uddin, H. M. Ahsan; Subrina, Samia

    2017-01-01

    Equilibrium molecular dynamics simulation using 2nd generation Reactive Bond Order interatomic potential has been performed to model the thermal transport of nanometer sized zigzag defected graphene nanoribbons (GNRs...

  4. Absolute molecular sieve separation of ethylene/ethane mixtures with silver zeolite A.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aguado, Sonia; Bergeret, Gérard; Daniel, Cecile; Farrusseng, David

    2012-09-12

    Absolute ethylene/ethane separation is achieved by ethane exclusion on silver-exchanged zeolite A adsorbent. This molecular sieving type separation is attributed to the pore size of the adsorbent, which falls between ethylene and ethane kinetic diameters.

  5. The effect of nanoparticle size on in vivo pharmacokinetics and cellular interaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoshyar, Nazanin; Gray, Samantha; Han, Hongbin; Bao, Gang

    2016-01-01

    Nanoparticle-based technologies offer exciting new approaches to disease diagnostics and therapeutics. To take advantage of unique properties of nanoscale materials and structures, the size, shape and/or surface chemistry of nanoparticles need to be optimized, allowing their functionalities to be tailored for different biomedical applications. Here we review the effects of nanoparticle size on cellular interaction and in vivo pharmacokinetics, including cellular uptake, biodistribution and circulation half-life of nanoparticles. Important features of nanoparticle probes for molecular imaging and modeling of nanoparticle size effects are also discussed. PMID:27003448

  6. Dilution of the cell cycle inhibitor Whi5 controls budding yeast cell size

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmoller, Kurt M.; Turner, J.J.; Kõivomägi, M.; Skotheim, Jan M.

    2015-01-01

    Cell size fundamentally affects all biosynthetic processes by determining the scale of organelles and influencing surface transport1,2. Although extensive studies have identified many mutations affecting cell size, the molecular mechanisms underlying size control have remained elusive3. In budding yeast, size control occurs in G1 phase prior to Start, the point of irreversible commitment to cell division4,5. It was previously thought that activity of the G1 cyclin Cln3 increased with cell size to trigger Start by initiating the inhibition of the transcriptional inhibitor Whi56-8. However, while Cln3 concentration does modulate the rate at which cells pass Start, we found that its synthesis increases in proportion to cell size so that its total concentration is nearly constant during pre-Start G1. Rather than increasing Cln3 activity, we identify decreasing Whi5 activity — due to the dilution of Whi5 by cell growth — as a molecular mechanism through which cell size controls proliferation. Whi5 is synthesized in S/G2/M phases of the cell cycle in a largely size-independent manner. This results in smaller daughter cells being born with higher Whi5 concentrations that extend their pre-Start G1 phase. Thus, at its most fundamental level, budding yeast size control results from the differential scaling of Cln3 and Whi5 synthesis rates with cell size. More generally, our work shows that differential size-dependency of protein synthesis can provide an elegant mechanism to coordinate cellular functions with growth. PMID:26390151

  7. Dilution of the cell cycle inhibitor Whi5 controls budding-yeast cell size.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmoller, Kurt M; Turner, J J; Kõivomägi, M; Skotheim, Jan M

    2015-10-08

    Cell size fundamentally affects all biosynthetic processes by determining the scale of organelles and influencing surface transport. Although extensive studies have identified many mutations affecting cell size, the molecular mechanisms underlying size control have remained elusive. In the budding yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae, size control occurs in G1 phase before Start, the point of irreversible commitment to cell division. It was previously thought that activity of the G1 cyclin Cln3 increased with cell size to trigger Start by initiating the inhibition of the transcriptional inhibitor Whi5 (refs 6-8). Here we show that although Cln3 concentration does modulate the rate at which cells pass Start, its synthesis increases in proportion to cell size so that its total concentration is nearly constant during pre-Start G1. Rather than increasing Cln3 activity, we identify decreasing Whi5 activity--due to the dilution of Whi5 by cell growth--as a molecular mechanism through which cell size controls proliferation. Whi5 is synthesized in S/G2/M phases of the cell cycle in a largely size-independent manner. This results in smaller daughter cells being born with higher Whi5 concentrations that extend their pre-Start G1 phase. Thus, at its most fundamental level, size control in budding yeast results from the differential scaling of Cln3 and Whi5 synthesis rates with cell size. More generally, our work shows that differential size-dependency of protein synthesis can provide an elegant mechanism to coordinate cellular functions with growth.

  8. The effect of microscopic friction and size distributions on conditional probability distributions in soft particle packings

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Saitoh, K.; Magnanimo, Vanessa; Luding, Stefan

    2016-01-01

    Employing two-dimensional molecular dynamics (MD) simulations of soft particles, we study their non-affine responses to quasi-static isotropic compression where the effects of microscopic friction between the particles in contact and particle size distributions are examined. To quantify complicated

  9. Anti-TNFα domain antibody construct CEP-37247: Full antibody functionality at half the size

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Gay, Robert D; Clarke, Adam W; Elgundi, Zehra; Domagala, Teresa; Simpson, Raina J; Le, Nga B; Doyle, Anthony G; Jennings, Phil A

    2010-01-01

    .... As a homodimer, with each chain comprising V L dAb, truncated C H 1, hinge, C H 2 and C H 3 domains, CEP-37247 has a molecular mass of approximately 78kDa, which is about half the size of a conventional IgG molecule...

  10. Synthesis of novel size exclusion chromatography support by surface initiated aqueous atom transfer radical polymerization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coad, Bryan R; Kizhakkedathu, Jayachandran N; Haynes, Charles A; Brooks, Donald E

    2007-11-06

    We report the use of aqueous surface-initiated atom transfer radical polymerization (SI-ATRP) to grow polymer brushes from a "gigaporous" polymeric chromatography support for use as a novel size exclusion chromatography medium. Poly(N,N-dimethylacrylamide) (PDMA) was grown from hydrolyzable surface initiators via SI-ATRP catalyzed by 1,1,4,7,10,10-hexamethyltriethylenetetramine (HMTETA)/CuCl. Grafted polymer was characterized semiquantitatively by ATR-FTIR and also cleaved and quantitatively characterized for mass, molecular weight, and polydispersity via analytical SEC/MALLS. The synthesis provides control over graft density and allows the creation of dense brushes. Incorporation of negative surface charge was found to be crucial for improving the initiation efficiency. As polymer molecular weight and density could be controlled through reaction conditions, the resulting low-polydispersity grafted polymer brush medium is shown to be suitable for use as a customizable size exclusion chromatography medium for investigating the principals of entropic interaction chromatography. All packed media investigated showed size-dependent partitioning of solutes, even for low graft density systems. Increasing the molecular weight of the grafts allowed solutes more access to the volume fraction in the column available for partitioning. Compared to low graft density media, increased graft density caused eluted solute probes to be retained less within the column and allowed for greater size discrimination of probes whose molecular weights were less than 10(4) kDa.

  11. Size exclusion HPLC of proteins for evaluation of durum wheat quality

    Science.gov (United States)

    The present research aimed to assess size exclusion HPLC (SE-HPLC) in protein molecular weight distribution determination for quality evaluation of durum semolina. Semolina samples were milled from 13 durum genotypes grown at 7 locations in 2009 and 2010 in ND. Sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS) buffer ...

  12. Probing Zeolite Crystal Architecture and Structural Imperfections using Differently Sized Fluorescent Organic Probe Molecules

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hendriks, Frank C.; Schmidt, Joel E.; Rombouts, Jeroen A.; Lammertsma, Koop; Bruijnincx, Pieter C.A.; Weckhuysen, Bert M.

    2017-01-01

    A micro-spectroscopic method has been developed to probe the accessibility of zeolite crystals using a series of fluorescent 4-(4-diethylaminostyryl)-1-methylpyridinium iodide (DAMPI) probes of increasing molecular size. Staining large zeolite crystals with MFI (ZSM-5) topology and subsequent

  13. Functionalized Carbon Molecular Sieve membranes containing Ag-nanoclusters

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Barsema, J.N.; Balster, J.H.; Jordan, V.; van der Vegt, N.F.A.; Wessling, Matthias

    2003-01-01

    In Carbon Molecular Sieve (CMS) membranes, the separation of O2 and N2 is primarily based on the difference in size between the gas molecules. To enhance the separation properties of these CMS membranes it is necessary to functionalize the carbon matrix with materials that show a high affinity to

  14. Insights into the effect of nanoconfinement on molecular interactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Yang; Wang, Shuangshou; Ye, Jin; Li, Daojin; Liu, Zhen; Wu, Xingcai

    2014-07-01

    Being confined within nanoscale space, substances may exhibit unique physicochemical properties. The effect of nanoconfinement on molecular interactions is of significance, but a sound understanding has not been established yet. Here we present a quantitative study on boronate affinity (covalent) and electrostatic (non-covalent) interactions confined within mesoporous silica. We show that both interactions were enhanced by the confinement and that the enhancement depended on the closeness of the interacting location, as well as on the difference between the pore size and the molecular size. The overall enhancement could reach 3 orders of magnitude.Being confined within nanoscale space, substances may exhibit unique physicochemical properties. The effect of nanoconfinement on molecular interactions is of significance, but a sound understanding has not been established yet. Here we present a quantitative study on boronate affinity (covalent) and electrostatic (non-covalent) interactions confined within mesoporous silica. We show that both interactions were enhanced by the confinement and that the enhancement depended on the closeness of the interacting location, as well as on the difference between the pore size and the molecular size. The overall enhancement could reach 3 orders of magnitude. Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available: Experimental details, characterization data, protein stability test, measurement of adsorption isotherms, data analysis. See DOI: 10.1039/c4nr01440e

  15. Exploring the diversity and molecular evolution of shrews (family ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Given the life history characteristics of shrews (high metabolic rate in Soricinae, small body size, fast generation time and generally short life span), the metabolic theory predicts accelerated nucleotide turnover in this family. By examining the molecular evolution of the cytochrome b molecule, this study identifies both ...

  16. Lack of consistence between morphological and molecular genetic ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    tdtzeng

    2011-02-14

    Feb 14, 2011 ... To estimate the demographic history and genetic diversity of this species complex off ... Analyses of molecular variance and FST revealed no significant genetic structure for .... Code of sampling site, sample size (n), number of variety I and variety II, number of haplotypes, gene diversity (h) and nucleotide ...

  17. Molecular dynamics study on the relaxation properties of bilayered ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    2017-08-31

    Aug 31, 2017 ... Abstract. The influence of defects on the relaxation properties of bilayered graphene (BLG) has been studied by molecular dynamics simulation in nanometre sizes. Type and position of defects were taken into account in the calculated model. The results show that great changes begin to occur in the ...

  18. Molecular radio-oncology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baumann, Michael; Krause, Mechthild; Cordes, Nils (eds.) [Technische Univ. Dresden (Germany). Faculty of Medicine and University Hospital

    2016-07-01

    This book concisely reviews our current understanding of hypoxia, molecular targeting, DNA repair, cancer stem cells, and tumor pathophysiology, while also discussing novel strategies for putting these findings into practice in daily clinical routine. Radiotherapy is an important part of modern multimodal cancer treatment, and the past several years have witnessed not only substantial improvements in radiation techniques and the use of new beam qualities, but also major strides in our understanding of molecular tumor biology and tumor radiation response. Against this backdrop, the book highlights recent efforts to identify reasonable and clinically applicable biomarkers using broad-spectrum tissue microarrays and high-throughput systems biology approaches like genomics and epigenomics. In particular, it describes in detail how such molecular information is now being exploited for diagnostic imaging and imaging throughout treatment using the example of positron emission tomography. By discussing all these issues in the context of modern radiation oncology, the book provides a broad, up-to-date overview of the molecular aspects of radiation oncology that will hopefully foster its further optimization.

  19. Research on Molecular Lasers

    Science.gov (United States)

    1974-11-01

    subcontractor, grantee. Department of De- fense aciivlty or other organization (corporate author) issuing the report. 2a. REPORT SECUHTY...Atoms," Paper MD8- 4th Conference en Chemica ] and Molecular Lasers., St. Louis, Mo. October 21-23, 1974. 3. M.I. Buchwald and G.J. Wolga

  20. Molecular diagnostics in genodermatoses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schaffer, Julie V

    2012-12-01

    In recent years, there has been tremendous progress in elucidating the molecular bases of genodermatoses. The interface between genetics and dermatology has broadened with the identification of "new" heritable disorders, improved recognition of phenotypic spectrums, and integration of molecular and clinical data to simplify disease categorization and highlight relationships between conditions. With the advent of next-generation sequencing and other technological advances, dermatologists have promising new tools for diagnosis of genodermatoses. This article first addresses phenotypic characterization and classification with the use of online databases, considering concepts of clinical and genetic heterogeneity. Indications for genetic testing related to medical care and patient/family decision making are discussed. Standard genetic testing is reviewed, including resources for finding specialized laboratories, methods of gene analysis, and patient/family counseling. The benefits and challenges associated with multigene panels, array-based analysis (eg, copy number variation, linkage, and homozygosity), and whole-exome or whole-genome sequencing are then examined. Specific issues relating to molecular analysis of mosaic skin conditions and prenatal/preimplantation diagnosis are also presented. Use of the modern molecular diagnostics described herein enhance our ability to counsel, monitor, and treat patients and families affected by genodermatoses, with broader benefits of providing insights into cutaneous physiology and multifactorial skin disorders. Copyright © 2012 Frontline Medical Communications. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Molecular studies of achondroplasia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nahar Risha

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Achondroplasia (ACH is the most frequent form of short-limbed dwarfi sm, caused by mutations in the FGFR3 gene. It follows an autosomal dominant inheritance, though most cases are sporadic. The molecular techniques are the only available methods to confi rm the diagnosis of a skeletal dysplasia. Clinical and radiological features are only suggestive and not confi rmatory. The present study was conducted to fi nd out how often the clinical diagnosis of achondroplasia is verifi ed on molecular studies. Materials and Methods: From 1998 through 2007, we carried out molecular analysis for the two common mutations in the FGFR3 gene in 130 cases clinically suspected to have ACH. Results: A diagnostic mutation was identifi ed in 53 (40.8% cases. The common mutation (1138G>A was present in 50 (94.7% of the positive cases, while the rare 1138 G>C substitution was found in three (5.3%. Conclusion: This study shows that confi rmation of clinical diagnosis of ACH by molecular genetic testing is essential to distinguish it from other skeletal dysplasias, to plan therapeutic options, and to offer genetic counseling. Management (medical and surgical in patients confi rmed to have ACH, is briefl y discussed.

  2. The molecular universe

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tielens, A. G. G. M.

    2013-07-01

    Molecular absorption and emission bands dominate the visible, infrared, and submillimeter spectra of most objects with associated gas. These observations reveal a surprisingly rich array of molecular species and attest to a complex chemistry taking place in the harsh environment of the interstellar medium of galaxies. Molecules are truly everywhere and an important component of interstellar gas. This review surveys molecular observations in the various spectral windows and summarizes the chemical and physical processes involved in the formation and evolution of interstellar molecules. The rich organic inventory of space reflects the multitude of chemical processes involved that, on the one hand, build up molecules an atom at a time and, on the other hand, break down large molecules injected by stars to smaller fragments. Both this bottom-up and the trickle-down chemistry are reviewed. The emphasis is on understanding the characteristics of complex polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon molecules and fullerenes and their role in chemistry as well as the intricate interaction of gas-phase ion-molecule and neutral-neutral reactions and the chemistry taking place on grain surfaces in dense clouds in setting the organic inventory of regions of star and planet formation and their implications for the chemical history of the Solar System. Many aspects of molecular astrophysics are illustrated with recent observations of the HIFI instrument on the Herschel Space Observatory.

  3. Biophysics of molecular gastronomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brenner, Michael P; Sörensen, Pia M

    2015-03-26

    Chefs and scientists exploring biophysical processes have given rise to molecular gastronomy. In this Commentary, we describe how a scientific understanding of recipes and techniques facilitates the development of new textures and expands the flavor palette. The new dishes that result engage our senses in unexpected ways. PAPERCLIP. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Molecular gastronomy in Spain

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    García-Segovia, P.; Garrido, M. D.; Vercet, A.

    2014-01-01

    Beyond the overwhelming international success of Ferrán Adria, Spain has been one of the countries with a more active implication in molecular gastronomy as a scientific discipline but also in the use of ingredients, technologies, and equipment from the scientific and technological universe...... with scientists for facing the future of Spanish gastronomy....

  5. Digitotalar dysmorphism: Molecular elucidation

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Dominantly inherited digitotalar dysmorphism (DTD), which is characterised by flexion contractures of digits and 'rocker-bottom' feet due to a vertical talus, was first described in a South African family of European stock in 1972. We review the clinical manifestations and document the molecular basis for DTD in this prototype ...

  6. Molecular ion photofragment spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bustamente, S.W.

    1983-11-01

    A new molecular ion photofragment spectrometer is described which features a supersonic molecular beam ion source and a radio frequency octapole ion trap interaction region. This unique combination allows several techniques to be applied to the problem of detecting a photon absorption event of a molecular ion. In particular, it may be possible to obtain low resolution survey spectra of exotic molecular ions by using a direct vibrational predissociation process, or by using other more indirect detection methods. The use of the spectrometer is demonstrated by measuring the lifetime of the O/sub 2//sup +/(/sup 4/..pi../sub u/) metastable state which is found to consist of two main components: the /sup 4/..pi../sub 5/2/ and /sup 4/..pi../sub -1/2/ spin components having a long lifetime (approx. 129 ms) and the /sup 4/..pi../sub 3/2/ and /sup 4/..pi../sub 1/2/ spin components having a short lifetime (approx. 6 ms).

  7. An ab initio molecular

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Chemical Engineering, Nanjing University of Science and Technology, Nanjing 210094, China. bSchool of Materials Science and Engineering, Nanjing Institute of Technology, Nanjing 211167, China e-mail: ... and formation of first products of two molecular crystals pentaerythritol tetranitrate (PETN) and 5-nitro-2,4-.

  8. Multiphotochromic molecular systems

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Fihey, Arnaud; Perrier, Aurélie; Browne, Wesley R; Jacquemin, Denis

    2015-01-01

    Molecular systems encompassing more than one photochromic entity can be used to build highly functional materials, thanks to their potential multi-addressability and/or multi-response properties. Over the last decade, the synthesis and spectroscopic and kinetic characterisation as well as the

  9. Molecular theory of capillarity

    CERN Document Server

    Rowlinson, J S

    2002-01-01

    History of thought on molecular origins of surface phenomena offers a critical and detailed examination and assessment of modern theories, focusing on statistical mechanics and application of results in mean-field approximation to model systems. Emphasis on liquid-gas surface, with a focus on liquid-liquid surfaces in the final chapters. 1989 edition.

  10. Molecular confocal laser endomicroscopy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Karstensen, John Gásdal; Klausen, Pia Helene; Saftoiu, Adrian

    2014-01-01

    of the studies in this research field have been conducted in animal facilities or in vitro, while only a limited number of trials have actually been carried out in vivo. Therefore, safety issues still needs further evaluations. This review will present an overview of the implications and pitfalls, as well...... as future challenges of molecular CLE in gastrointestinal diseases....

  11. Do class size effects differ across grades?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nandrup, Anne Brink

    size cap that creates exogenous variation in class sizes. Significant (albeit modest) negative effects of class size increases are found for children on primary school levels. The effects on math abilities are statistically different across primary and secondary school. Larger classes do not affect......This paper contributes to the class size literature by analyzing whether short-run class size effects are constant across grade levels in compulsory school. Results are based on administrative data on all pupils enroled in Danish public schools. Identification is based on a government-imposed class...

  12. Analysis of Twisting of Cellulose Nanofibrils in Atomistic Molecular Dynamics Simulations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Paavilainen, S.; Rog, T.; Vattulainen, I.

    2011-01-01

    We use atomistic molecular dynamics simulations to study the crystal structure of cellulose nanofibrils, whose sizes are comparable with the crystalline parts in commercial nanocellulose. The simulations show twisting, whose rate of relaxation is strongly temperature dependent. Meanwhile, no sign......We use atomistic molecular dynamics simulations to study the crystal structure of cellulose nanofibrils, whose sizes are comparable with the crystalline parts in commercial nanocellulose. The simulations show twisting, whose rate of relaxation is strongly temperature dependent. Meanwhile...

  13. Molecular evolution of human species D adenoviruses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robinson, Christopher M; Seto, Donald; Jones, Morris S; Dyer, David W; Chodosh, James

    2011-08-01

    Adenoviruses are medium-sized double stranded DNA viruses that infect vertebrates. Human adenoviruses cause an array of diseases. Currently there are 56 human adenovirus types recognized and characterized within seven species (A-G). Of those types, a majority belongs to species D. In this review, the genomic conservation and diversity are examined among human adenoviruses within species D, particularly in contrast to other human adenovirus species. Specifically, homologous recombination is presented as a driving force for the molecular evolution of human adenoviruses and the emergence of new adenovirus pathogens. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. Transform extension for block-based hybrid video codec with decoupling transform sizes from prediction sizes and coding sizes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Jing; Li, Ge; Fan, Kui; Guo, Xiaoqiang

    2017-09-01

    In the block-based hybrid video coding framework, transform is applied to the residual signal resulting from intra/inter prediction. Thus in the most of video codecs, transform block (TB) size is equal to the prediction block (PB) size. To further improve coding efficiency, recent video coding techniques have supported decoupling transform and prediction sizes. By splitting one prediction block into small transform blocks, the Residual Quad-tree (RQT) structure attempts to search the best transform size. However, in the current RQT, the transform size cannot be larger than the size of prediction block. In this paper, we introduce a transform extension method by decoupling transform sizes from prediction sizes and coding sizes. In addition to getting the transform block within the current PB partition, we combine multiple adjacent PBs to form a larger TB and select best block size accordingly. According to our experiment on top of the newest reference software (ITM17.0) of MPEG Internet Video Coding (IVC) standard, consistent coding performance gains are obtained.

  15. Reversible Size Control of Silver Nanoclusters via Ligand-exchange

    KAUST Repository

    Bootharaju, Megalamane Siddaramappa

    2015-05-21

    The properties of atomically monodisperse noble metal nanoclusters (NCs) are intricately intertwined with their precise molecular formula. The vast majority of size-specific NC syntheses start from the reduction of the metal salt and thiol ligand mixture. Only in gold was it recently shown that ligand-exchange could induce the growth of NCs from one atomically precise species to another; a process of yet unknown reversibility. Here, we present a process for the ligand-exchange-induced growth of atomically precise silver NCs, in a biphasic liquid-liquid system, which is particularly of interest because of its complete reversibility and ability to occur at room temperature. We explore this phenomenon in-depth using Ag35(SG)18 [SG= glutathionate] and Ag44(4-FTP)30 [4-FTP= 4-fluorothiophenol] as model systems. We show that the ligand-exchange conversion of Ag35(SG)18 into Ag44(4-FTP)30 is rapid (< 5 min) and direct, while the reverse process proceeds slowly through intermediate cluster sizes. We adapt a recently developed theory of reverse Ostwald ripening to model the NCs’ interconvertibility. The model’s predictions are in good agreement with the experimental observations, and they highlight the importance of small changes in the ligand-metal binding energy in determining the final equilibrium NC size. Based on the insight provided by this model, we demonstrated experimentally that by varying the choice of ligands, ligand-exchange can be used to obtain different sized NCs. The findings in this work establish ligand-exchange as a versatile tool for tuning cluster sizes.

  16. Visuomotor Dissociation in Cerebral Scaling of Size.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Potgieser, Adriaan R E; de Jong, Bauke M

    2016-01-01

    Estimating size and distance is crucial in effective visuomotor control. The concept of an internal coordinate system implies that visual and motor size parameters are scaled onto a common template. To dissociate perceptual and motor components in such scaling, we performed an fMRI experiment in which 16 right-handed subjects copied geometric figures while the result of drawing remained out of sight. Either the size of the example figure varied while maintaining a constant size of drawing (visual incongruity) or the size of the examples remained constant while subjects were instructed to make changes in size (motor incongruity). These incongruent were compared to congruent conditions. Statistical Parametric Mapping (SPM8) revealed brain activations related to size incongruity in the dorsolateral prefrontal and inferior parietal cortex, pre-SMA / anterior cingulate and anterior insula, dominant in the right hemisphere. This pattern represented simultaneous use of a 'resized' virtual template and actual picture information requiring spatial working memory, early-stage attention shifting and inhibitory control. Activations were strongest in motor incongruity while right pre-dorsal premotor activation specifically occurred in this condition. Visual incongruity additionally relied on a ventral visual pathway. Left ventral premotor activation occurred in all variably sized drawing while constant visuomotor size, compared to congruent size variation, uniquely activated the lateral occipital cortex additional to superior parietal regions. These results highlight size as a fundamental parameter in both general hand movement and movement guided by objects perceived in the context of surrounding 3D space.

  17. Visuomotor Dissociation in Cerebral Scaling of Size

    Science.gov (United States)

    Potgieser, Adriaan R. E.; de Jong, Bauke M.

    2016-01-01

    Estimating size and distance is crucial in effective visuomotor control. The concept of an internal coordinate system implies that visual and motor size parameters are scaled onto a common template. To dissociate perceptual and motor components in such scaling, we performed an fMRI experiment in which 16 right-handed subjects copied geometric figures while the result of drawing remained out of sight. Either the size of the example figure varied while maintaining a constant size of drawing (visual incongruity) or the size of the examples remained constant while subjects were instructed to make changes in size (motor incongruity). These incongruent were compared to congruent conditions. Statistical Parametric Mapping (SPM8) revealed brain activations related to size incongruity in the dorsolateral prefrontal and inferior parietal cortex, pre-SMA / anterior cingulate and anterior insula, dominant in the right hemisphere. This pattern represented simultaneous use of a ‘resized’ virtual template and actual picture information requiring spatial working memory, early-stage attention shifting and inhibitory control. Activations were strongest in motor incongruity while right pre-dorsal premotor activation specifically occurred in this condition. Visual incongruity additionally relied on a ventral visual pathway. Left ventral premotor activation occurred in all variably sized drawing while constant visuomotor size, compared to congruent size variation, uniquely activated the lateral occipital cortex additional to superior parietal regions. These results highlight size as a fundamental parameter in both general hand movement and movement guided by objects perceived in the context of surrounding 3D space. PMID:26963705

  18. Visuomotor Dissociation in Cerebral Scaling of Size.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adriaan R E Potgieser

    Full Text Available Estimating size and distance is crucial in effective visuomotor control. The concept of an internal coordinate system implies that visual and motor size parameters are scaled onto a common template. To dissociate perceptual and motor components in such scaling, we performed an fMRI experiment in which 16 right-handed subjects copied geometric figures while the result of drawing remained out of sight. Either the size of the example figure varied while maintaining a constant size of drawing (visual incongruity or the size of the examples remained constant while subjects were instructed to make changes in size (motor incongruity. These incongruent were compared to congruent conditions. Statistical Parametric Mapping (SPM8 revealed brain activations related to size incongruity in the dorsolateral prefrontal and inferior parietal cortex, pre-SMA / anterior cingulate and anterior insula, dominant in the right hemisphere. This pattern represented simultaneous use of a 'resized' virtual template and actual picture information requiring spatial working memory, early-stage attention shifting and inhibitory control. Activations were strongest in motor incongruity while right pre-dorsal premotor activation specifically occurred in this condition. Visual incongruity additionally relied on a ventral visual pathway. Left ventral premotor activation occurred in all variably sized drawing while constant visuomotor size, compared to congruent size variation, uniquely activated the lateral occipital cortex additional to superior parietal regions. These results highlight size as a fundamental parameter in both general hand movement and movement guided by objects perceived in the context of surrounding 3D space.

  19. On the Size Distribution of Sand

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, Michael

    2016-01-01

    by Bagnold and confirmed in numerous empirical studies. The model implies that the size distribution of a sand deposit is a logarithmic normal-inverse Gaussian (NIG) distribution, which is one of the generalized hyperbolic distributions. The model modifies a previous model, which implied a log-normal size-distribution......, variance and skewness of the log-size distribution to the physical parameters of the model. The results might be useful when comparing empirical size-distributions from different deposits. It is argued that size-distributions with the same general shape as the NIG-distributions can be obtained also when......A model is presented of the development of the size distribution of sand while it is transported from a source to a deposit. The model provides a possible explanation of the log-hyperbolic shape that is frequently found in unimodal grain size distributions in natural sand deposits, as pointed out...

  20. Size effects in manufacturing of metallic components

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vollertsen, F; Biermann, D; Hansen, Hans Nørgaard

    2009-01-01

    In manufacturing of metallic components, the size of the part plays an important role for the process behaviour. This is due to so called size effects, which lead to changes in the process behaviour even if the relationship between the main geometrical features is kept constant. The aim of this p......In manufacturing of metallic components, the size of the part plays an important role for the process behaviour. This is due to so called size effects, which lead to changes in the process behaviour even if the relationship between the main geometrical features is kept constant. The aim...... of this paper is to give a systematic review on Such effects and their potential use or remedy. First, the typology of size effects will be explained, followed by a description of size effects on strength and tribology. The last three sections describe size effects on formability, forming processes and cutting...

  1. Size-Dependent Particle Dynamics in Entangled Polymer Nanocomposites

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mangal, Rahul; Srivastava, Samanvaya; Narayanan, Suresh; Archer, Lynden A.

    2016-01-19

    Polymer-grafted nanoparticles with diameter d homogeneously dispersed in entangled polymer melts with varying random coil radius R0, but fixed entanglement mesh size ae, are used to study particle motions in entangled polymers. We focus on materials in the transition region between the continuum regime (d > R0), where the classical Stokes-Einstein (S-E) equation is known to describe polymer drag on particles, and the non-continuum regime (d < ae), in which several recent studies report faster diffusion of particles than expected from continuum S-E analysis, based on the bulk polymer viscosity. Specifically, we consider dynamics of particles with sizes d ≥ ae in entangled polymers with varying molecular weight Mw in order to investigate how the transition from non-continuum to continuum dynamics occur. We take advantage of favorable enthalpic interactions between SiO2 nanoparticles tethered with PEO molecules and entangled PMMA host polymers to create model nanoparticle-polymer composites, in which spherical nanoparticles are uniformly dispersed in entangled polymers. Investigation of the particle dynamics via X-ray photon correlation spectroscopy measurements reveal a transition from fast to slow particle motion as the PMMA molecular weight is increased beyond the entanglement threshold, with a much weaker Mw dependence for Mw>Me than expected from S-E analysis based on bulk viscosity of entangled PMMA melts. We rationalize these observations using a simple force balance analysis around particles and find that nanoparticle motion in entangled melts can be described using a variant of the S-E analysis in which motion of particles is assumed to only disturb sub-chain entangled host segments with sizes comparable to the particle diameter.

  2. Label-free molecular imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Junqi; Li, Qi; Fu, Rongxin; Wang, Tongzhou; Wang, Ruliang; Huang, Guoliang

    2014-03-01

    Optical microscopy technology has achieved great improvements in the 20th century. The detection limit has reached about twenty nanometers (with near-field optics, STED, PALM and STORM). But in the application areas such as life science, medical science, clinical treatment and especially in vivo dynamic measurement, mutual restrictions still exist between numeric aperture/magnification and working distance, fluorescent dependent, and between resolution and frame rate/field size, etc. This paper explores a hyperspectral scanning super-resolution label free molecules imaging method based on the white light interferometry. The vertical detection resolution was approximate to 1 nm which is the thickness of a single molecular layer and dynamic measuring range of thickness reaches to 10 μm. The spectrum-shifting algorithm is developed for robust restructure of images when the pixels are overlapped. Micro-biochip with protein binding and DNA amplification could be detected by using this spectral scanning super-resolution molecules imaging in label free. This method has several advantages as following: Firstly, the decoding and detecting steps are combined into one step. It makes tests faster and easier. Secondly, we used thickness-coded, minimized chips instead of a large microarray chip to carry the probes. This accelerates the interaction of the biomolecules. Thirdly, since only one kind of probes are attached to our thickness-coded, minimized chip, users can only pick out the probes they are interested in for a test without wasting unnecessary probes and chips.

  3. Cooperative stochastic binding and unbinding explain synaptic size dynamics and statistics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shomar, Aseel; Geyrhofer, Lukas; Ziv, Noam E; Brenner, Naama

    2017-07-01

    Synapses are dynamic molecular assemblies whose sizes fluctuate significantly over time-scales of hours and days. In the current study, we examined the possibility that the spontaneous microscopic dynamics exhibited by synaptic molecules can explain the macroscopic size fluctuations of individual synapses and the statistical properties of synaptic populations. We present a mesoscopic model, which ties the two levels. Its basic premise is that synaptic size fluctuations reflect cooperative assimilation and removal of molecules at a patch of postsynaptic membrane. The introduction of cooperativity to both assimilation and removal in a stochastic biophysical model of these processes, gives rise to features qualitatively similar to those measured experimentally: nanoclusters of synaptic scaffolds, fluctuations in synaptic sizes, skewed, stable size distributions and their scaling in response to perturbations. Our model thus points to the potentially fundamental role of cooperativity in dictating synaptic remodeling dynamics and offers a conceptual understanding of these dynamics in terms of central microscopic features and processes.

  4. Cooperative stochastic binding and unbinding explain synaptic size dynamics and statistics.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aseel Shomar

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Synapses are dynamic molecular assemblies whose sizes fluctuate significantly over time-scales of hours and days. In the current study, we examined the possibility that the spontaneous microscopic dynamics exhibited by synaptic molecules can explain the macroscopic size fluctuations of individual synapses and the statistical properties of synaptic populations. We present a mesoscopic model, which ties the two levels. Its basic premise is that synaptic size fluctuations reflect cooperative assimilation and removal of molecules at a patch of postsynaptic membrane. The introduction of cooperativity to both assimilation and removal in a stochastic biophysical model of these processes, gives rise to features qualitatively similar to those measured experimentally: nanoclusters of synaptic scaffolds, fluctuations in synaptic sizes, skewed, stable size distributions and their scaling in response to perturbations. Our model thus points to the potentially fundamental role of cooperativity in dictating synaptic remodeling dynamics and offers a conceptual understanding of these dynamics in terms of central microscopic features and processes.

  5. Two-dimensional vibrational spectroscopy of rotaxane-based molecular machines

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bodis, P.; Panman, M.R.; Bakker, B.H.; Mateo-Alonso, A.; Prato, M.; Buma, W.J.; Brouwer, A.M.; Kay, E.R.; Leigh, D.A.; Woutersen, S.

    2009-01-01

    It has recently become possible to synthesize mechanical devices the size of a single molecule. Although it is tempting to regard such molecular machines as nanoscale versions of their macroscopic analogs, many notions from macroscopic mechanics no longer apply at a molecular level. For instance,

  6. Study of Molecular-Shape Selectivity of Zeolites by Gas Chromatography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chao, Pei-Yu; Chuang, Yao-Yuan; Ho, Grace Hsiuying; Chuang, Shiow-Huey; Tsai, Tseng-Chang; Lee, Chi-Young; Tsai, Shang-Tien; Huang, Jun-Fu

    2008-01-01

    A sorption experiment using a gas chromatograph is described that can help students understand the "molecular-shape selectivity" behavior of zeolites in the subnano regime. Hexane isomers are used as probe molecules to demonstrate the sorption phenomena. In the experiment, a zeolite adsorbs certain hexane isomers with molecular sizes smaller than…

  7. Plasmid size can affect the ability of Escherichia coli to produce high-quality plasmids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Junlin; Yang, Yong

    2012-11-01

    Large molecular weight plasmids are often used in gene therapy and DNA vaccines. To investigate the effect of plasmid size on the performance of Escherichia coli host strains during plasmid preparation, we employed E. coli JM109 and TOP10 cells to prepare four plasmids ranging from 4.7 to 16.8 kb in size. Each plasmid was extracted from JM109 and TOP10 cells using an alkaline lysis mini-preparation method. However, when commercial kits were used to extract the same plasmids from JM109 cells, the large molecular weight plasmids substantially degraded, compared with their smaller counterparts. No degradation was observed when the four plasmids were extracted from E. coli TOP10 cells using the same commercial kit. We conclude, therefore, that the performance of E. coli in high quality plasmid preparations can be affected by plasmid size.

  8. The size of the thyroid hormone receptor in chromatin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gruol, D J; Kempner, E S

    1982-01-25

    We have used radiation inactivation and target theory to determine the size of the functional unit for T3 binding in rat liver chromatin. The process involves exposure of frozen chromatin samples to a beam of high energy electrons produced in a linear accelerator and subsequent measurement of the residual capacity to bind hormone. Our experiments were carried out using three forms of solubilized chromatin: 1) sonicated, containing the receptor in fragments which sedimented faster than 30 S; 2) digested by nuclease, containing the receptor in a form which sedimented at 5-6 S; 3) digested by nuclease and made 0.5 M in KCl, containing the receptor in a form which sedimented at 3.8 S. We have shown that in each sample preparation the receptor retained the ability to bind T3 with the same capacity and affinity that had previously been measured with high molecular weight chromatin. Irradiation caused a reduction in the capacity to bind T3 but did not change the affinity of the remaining receptors for the hormone. In each preparation, the radiation resulted in a simple exponential loss of binding capacity with dose, indicating that a single target size was detected. Within the variation of the measurements, the target size for each form of the receptor was the same, 59,000 daltons.

  9. Evolution of genome size and complexity in Pinus.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alison M Morse

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Genome evolution in the gymnosperm lineage of seed plants has given rise to many of the most complex and largest plant genomes, however the elements involved are poorly understood. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Gymny is a previously undescribed retrotransposon family in Pinus that is related to Athila elements in Arabidopsis. Gymny elements are dispersed throughout the modern Pinus genome and occupy a physical space at least the size of the Arabidopsis thaliana genome. In contrast to previously described retroelements in Pinus, the Gymny family was amplified or introduced after the divergence of pine and spruce (Picea. If retrotransposon expansions are responsible for genome size differences within the Pinaceae, as they are in angiosperms, then they have yet to be identified. In contrast, molecular divergence of Gymny retrotransposons together with other families of retrotransposons can account for the large genome complexity of pines along with protein-coding genic DNA, as revealed by massively parallel DNA sequence analysis of Cot fractionated genomic DNA. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Most of the enormous genome complexity of pines can be explained by divergence of retrotransposons, however the elements responsible for genome size variation are yet to be identified. Genomic resources for Pinus including those reported here should assist in further defining whether and how the roles of retrotransposons differ in the evolution of angiosperm and gymnosperm genomes.

  10. Developing a size indicator for fish populations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yong Chen

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available Monitoring temporal and/or spatial variations in fish size-at-age data can often provide fisheries managers with important information about the status of fish stocks and therefore help them identify necessary changes in management policies. However, due to the multivariate nature of size-at-age data, commonly used single-age-based approaches ignore covariance between sizes of different age groups. Different results may therefore be derived when evaluating temporal variations using different age groups for the comparison. The possibility of atypical errors in size-at-age data due to ageing and measurement errors further complicates the comparison. We propose a two-step approach for developing an indicator for monitoring temporal and/or spatial variation in size-at-age data. A robust approach, minimum volume ellipsoid analysis, is used to identify possible outliers in size-at-age data. Then a weighted principal component analysis is applied to the data with the identified outliers down-weighted. An indicator is defined from the resultant principal components for monitoring temporal/spatial variations in size-at-age data. We illustrate the proposed approach with size-at-age data for cod (Gadus morhua in the northwest Atlantic, NAFO subdivision 3Ps. The overall size-at-age indicator identified shows that the pre-1980 year classes tend to have a much higher size-at-age than the post-1980 year classes.

  11. Well-Defined Molecular Magnesium Hydride Clusters : Relationship between Size and Hydrogen-Elimination Temperature

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Intemann, Julia; Spielmann, Jan; Sirsch, Peter; Harder, Sjoerd

    A new tetranuclear magnesium hydride cluster, [{NN-(MgH)2}2], which was based on a NN-coupled bis--diketiminate ligand (NN2-), was obtained from the reaction of [{NN-(MgnBu)2}2] with PhSiH3. Its crystal structure reveals an almost-tetrahedral arrangement of Mg atoms and two different sets of hydride

  12. Manipulation of Single Molecular Hydrogen in a Size-tunable Nanogap

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Hui; He, Haiyan; Li, Shaowei; Ho, Wilson; Wu, Ruqian

    2014-03-01

    The determination of weak bonds in physisorption systems remains as a major challenge for modern density functional approaches. In addition, it becomes important to use the tip of scanning tunneling microscope (STM) to manipulate chemical bonds. Here we study the adsorption geometries, translational and rotational motions, and vibrations of a single H2 molecule trapped in the gap of STM-tip and Au (110) reconstructed surface, using the density functional theory calculations. The tip-substrate separation is used as an adjustable parameters. We find that the stable adsorption geometry, H2 bondlength, H-H stretching frequency, and H2-Au bouncing frequency strongly depends on the tip-substrate distance. Computational results agree well with STM data, both indicate the strong role of STM tip on the behavior H2 motions. The new insights established through this work are useful for the understanding of puzzling observations, and should be applicable for the analysis of other physisorption systems. Work at Fudan was supported by the 1000-Talent funds. Work at UCI was supported by the National Science Foundation under CHE-0802913 and computing time at XSEDE.

  13. Size and molecular flexibility of sugars determine the storage stability of freeze-dried proteins

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tonnis, W. F.; Mensink, M. A.; de Jager, A.; Maarschalk, K. van der Voort; Frijlink, H. W.; Hinrichs, W. L. J.

    Protein-based biopharmaceuticals are generally produced as aqueous solutions and stored refrigerated to obtain sufficient shelf life. Alternatively, proteins may be freeze-dried in the presence of sugars to allow storage stability at ambient conditions for prolonged periods. However, to act as a

  14. Molecular Filtration in Nanotubule Membranes: Sorting Molecules on the Basis of Size and Chemistry

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Jirage, Kshama

    1998-01-01

    Membrane based chemical separations is an emerging field of research. This is because membrane-based separations are potentially less energy intensive and more cost effective than competing separation methods...

  15. Molecular dynamics study of fracture kinetics in nano-sized metal rods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Golovnev, I. F.; Golovneva, E. I.

    2017-12-01

    The paper provides a study to clarify the influence of temperature on fracture in metal nanostructures under constant-rate uniaxial deformation. The temperature range is from 0 to 550 K, and the movable clamp velocity is from 50 to 500 m/s. It is shown that the temperature exerts a strong effect both on the macroscale characteristics of fracture (fracture site, number of structural fragments, clamp stress) and on its kinetic characteristics (time of reaching maximum clamp stress, fracture time, mass transfer, and necking).

  16. Molecular-like Redox Activity and Size-dependent Electrocatalysis of Inorganic Hybrid Nanoparticles

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chi, Qijin; Zhu, Nan; Ulstrup, Jens

    The development of low-cost, robust and high-efficient nanoscale electrocatalysts is arguably a dream approach to the use of nanomaterials as key building blocks in design and construction of chemical and biological sensing devices as well as fuel cells. Electroactive nanoparticles are a type of ...

  17. Size as a determinant of reading speed

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bailey, I.; Clear, R.; Berman, S.

    1992-03-01

    The speed of reading unrelated words as a function of luminance, size, and contrast, was measured with an eye movement monitor for fifteen young adults. Subjects read up to 5,000 words in a test session, with the exact number depending upon their acuity. The size of the smallest legible print at a given luminance and contrast for these subjects was found to fit well to the Blackwell-Taylor detection threshold data above about 1 minute of arc. At lower sizes inclusion of a resolution size term provided an excellent fit. Reading speed was fit to a number of visual performance models. It was found that for most subjects that a ratio of the print size to an estimate of the threshold print size (a VL{sub size}) gave the best fits to the data. The threshold size was computed with a fit to the Blackwell-Taylor detection threshold data, modified to include a resolution size term as above. For the sole remaining subject a slightly better fit was obtained with a VL{sub contrast} model, where again the thresholds were modified by a limiting size term. The implication of these results for visual performance modeling is discussed. The reading speed for all subjects varied rapidly with size near the acuity limit, but became almost independent of visibility parameters as long as size is two times the acuity limit. These results show that size is a powerful determinant of reading speed, and suggest that minification of about 1/2 power could be used as a field test for adequate visibility.

  18. Size as a determinant of reading speed

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bailey, I.; Clear, R.; Berman, S.

    1992-03-01

    The speed of reading unrelated words as a function of luminance, size, and contrast, was measured with an eye movement monitor for fifteen young adults. Subjects read up to 5,000 words in a test session, with the exact number depending upon their acuity. The size of the smallest legible print at a given luminance and contrast for these subjects was found to fit well to the Blackwell-Taylor detection threshold data above about 1 minute of arc. At lower sizes inclusion of a resolution size term provided an excellent fit. Reading speed was fit to a number of visual performance models. It was found that for most subjects that a ratio of the print size to an estimate of the threshold print size (a VL[sub size]) gave the best fits to the data. The threshold size was computed with a fit to the Blackwell-Taylor detection threshold data, modified to include a resolution size term as above. For the sole remaining subject a slightly better fit was obtained with a VL[sub contrast] model, where again the thresholds were modified by a limiting size term. The implication of these results for visual performance modeling is discussed. The reading speed for all subjects varied rapidly with size near the acuity limit, but became almost independent of visibility parameters as long as size is two times the acuity limit. These results show that size is a powerful determinant of reading speed, and suggest that minification of about 1/2 power could be used as a field test for adequate visibility.

  19. Genome size in Anthurium evaluated in the context of karyotypes and phenotypes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bliss, Barbara J; Suzuki, Jon Y

    2012-01-01

    Anthurium is an important horticultural crop from the family Araceae, order Alismatales, a lineage considered to have diverged from other monocots prior to the cereals. Genome size and its distribution in Anthurium were investigated to gain a basic understanding of genome organization in this large genus and to forge a firm foundation for advancement of molecular approaches for the study of Anthurium. Currently, genome size estimates have been reported for only two Anthurium samples. Bulk nuclear DNA content estimates were obtained by flow cell cytometry using leaf tissue collected from Anthurium species of different subgeneric groups and from commercial cultivars. The most current and well-supported topology of subgeneric, sectional relationships was applied to present genome size estimates in the context of reported chromosome counts, karyotypes, putative phylogenetic relationships, observed phenotypes and pedigree. Genome size estimates based on bulk nuclear DNA content for 77 accessions representing 34 species and 9 cultivars were obtained, including initial estimates for 33 Anthurium species, and both the smallest (Anthurium obtusum; Tetraspermium) and largest (Anthurium roseospadix; Calomystrium) Anthurium genome sizes reported to date. Genome size did not distinguish any subgeneric section, but ranged 5-fold (4.42-20.83 pg/2 C) despite consistent 2N= 30 chromosome counts. Intraspecies genome size variation >20 % is reported for Anthurium ravenii, A. watermaliense and A. gracile. Genome size estimates for Anthurium species spanning 13 recognized subgeneric sections indicate that genome size does not generally correlate with chromosome count or phylogenetic relationships. Mechanisms of genome expansion and contraction, including amplification and reduction of repetitive elements, polyploidy, chromosome reorganization/loss, may be involved in genome evolution in Anthurium as in other species. The new information on Anthurium genome sizes provides a platform for

  20. Fine tuning of molecular rotor function in photochemical molecular switches

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    ter Wiel, Matthijs K. J.; Feringa, Ben L.

    2009-01-01

    Molecular switches are used as scaffolds for the construction of controlled molecular rotors. The internal position of the switching entity in the molecule controls the dynamic behaviour of the rotor moiety in the molecule. Six new molecular motors with o-xylyl rotor moieties were prepared on the

  1. Interactive molecular dynamics

    CERN Document Server

    Schroeder, Daniel V

    2015-01-01

    Physics students now have access to interactive molecular dynamics simulations that can model and animate the motions of hundreds of particles, such as noble gas atoms, that attract each other weakly at short distances but repel strongly when pressed together. Using these simulations, students can develop an understanding of forces and motions at the molecular scale, nonideal fluids, phases of matter, thermal equilibrium, nonequilibrium states, the Boltzmann distribution, the arrow of time, and much more. This article summarizes the basic features and capabilities of such a simulation, presents a variety of student exercises using it at the introductory and intermediate levels, and describes some enhancements that can further extend its uses. A working simulation code, in HTML5 and JavaScript for running within any modern Web browser, is provided as an online supplement.

  2. Molecular and Cellular Signaling

    CERN Document Server

    Beckerman, Martin

    2005-01-01

    A small number of signaling pathways, no more than a dozen or so, form a control layer that is responsible for all signaling in and between cells of the human body. The signaling proteins belonging to the control layer determine what kinds of cells are made during development and how they function during adult life. Malfunctions in the proteins belonging to the control layer are responsible for a host of human diseases ranging from neurological disorders to cancers. Most drugs target components in the control layer, and difficulties in drug design are intimately related to the architecture of the control layer. Molecular and Cellular Signaling provides an introduction to molecular and cellular signaling in biological systems with an emphasis on the underlying physical principles. The text is aimed at upper-level undergraduates, graduate students and individuals in medicine and pharmacology interested in broadening their understanding of how cells regulate and coordinate their core activities and how diseases ...

  3. Molecular stirrers in action.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Jiawen; Kistemaker, Jos C M; Robertus, Jort; Feringa, Ben L

    2014-10-22

    A series of first-generation light-driven molecular motors with rigid substituents of varying length was synthesized to act as "molecular stirrers". Their rotary motion was studied by (1)H NMR and UV-vis absorption spectroscopy in a variety of solvents with different polarity and viscosity. Quantitative analyses of kinetic and thermodynamic parameters show that the rotary speed is affected by the rigidity of the substituents and the length of the rigid substituents and that the differences in speed are governed by entropy effects. Most pronounced is the effect of solvent viscosity on the rotary motion when long, rigid substituents are present. The α values obtained by the free volume model, supported by DFT calculations, demonstrate that during the rotary process of the motor, as the rigid substituent becomes longer, an increased rearranging volume is needed, which leads to enhanced solvent displacement and retardation of the motor.

  4. Topology in Molecular Biology

    CERN Document Server

    Monastyrsky, Michail Ilych

    2007-01-01

    The book presents a class of new results in molecular biology for which topological methods and ideas are important. These include: the large-scale conformation properties of DNA; computational methods (Monte Carlo) allowing the simulation of large-scale properties of DNA; the tangle model of DNA recombination and other applications of Knot theory; dynamics of supercoiled DNA and biocatalitic properties of DNA; the structure of proteins; and other very recent problems in molecular biology. The text also provides a short course of modern topology intended for the broad audience of biologists and physicists. The authors are renowned specialists in their fields and some of the new results presented here are documented for the first time in monographic form.

  5. Polyaromatic molecular peanuts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yazaki, Kohei; Akita, Munetaka; Prusty, Soumyakanta; Chand, Dillip Kumar; Kikuchi, Takashi; Sato, Hiroyasu; Yoshizawa, Michito

    2017-06-01

    Mimicking biological structures such as fruits and seeds using molecules and molecular assemblies is a great synthetic challenge. Here we report peanut-shaped nanostructures comprising two fullerene molecules fully surrounded by a dumbbell-like polyaromatic shell. The shell derives from a molecular double capsule composed of four W-shaped polyaromatic ligands and three metal ions. Mixing the double capsule with various fullerenes (that is, C60, C70 and Sc3N@C80) gives rise to the artificial peanuts with lengths of ~3 nm in quantitative yields through the release of the single metal ion. The rational use of both metal-ligand coordination bonds and aromatic-aromatic π-stacking interactions as orthogonal chemical glue is essential for the facile preparation of the multicomponent, biomimetic nanoarchitectures.

  6. An artificial molecular pump

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Chuyang; McGonigal, Paul R.; Schneebeli, Severin T.; Li, Hao; Vermeulen, Nicolaas A.; Ke, Chenfeng; Stoddart, J. Fraser

    2015-06-01

    Carrier proteins consume fuel in order to pump ions or molecules across cell membranes, creating concentration gradients. Their control over diffusion pathways, effected entirely through noncovalent bonding interactions, has inspired chemists to devise artificial systems that mimic their function. Here, we report a wholly artificial compound that acts on small molecules to create a gradient in their local concentration. It does so by using redox energy and precisely organized noncovalent bonding interactions to pump positively charged rings from solution and ensnare them around an oligomethylene chain, as part of a kinetically trapped entanglement. A redox-active viologen unit at the heart of a dumbbell-shaped molecular pump plays a dual role, first attracting and then repelling the rings during redox cycling, thereby enacting a flashing energy ratchet mechanism with a minimalistic design. Our artificial molecular pump performs work repetitively for two cycles of operation and drives rings away from equilibrium toward a higher local concentration.

  7. [Molecular mechanisms of macroevolution].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tikhodeev, O N

    2005-01-01

    The present paper is devoted to the evolutionary role of genetic modules shuffing. The mechanisms capable to produce new molecular functions and significant complications of ontogenesis are reviewed. Two-step model of macroevolution is proposed. This model comprises: (1) Arising of a new combination of genetic modules. This step does not result in formation of a new taxon but makes necessary ground for that process. (2) Precise structure completing of the new combination of modules and corresponding genome optimization by use of various mechanisms including point mutations. This step concerns many genes and finally leads to formation of a new taxon. It is shown that arising of new combinations of genetic modules might work out as molecular basis for progressive evolution, while alternative structural completing of the same combination might result in adaptive radiation.

  8. Molecular Imaging Mass Spectrometry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kovac, S.

    2009-05-01

    Full Text Available Molecular imaging mass spectrometry (IMS is a recently developed method for direct determination of spatial distribution of biopolymers, preferably proteins on cell surface and tissues. Imaging mass spectrometry data are mainly based on Matrix-Assisted Laser Desorption/Ionization- Time of Flight (MALDI TOF. The MALDI TOF based imaging mass spectrometry was applied for determination of changes in kidney tissue of sensitive mice after poisoning with aristolochic acid I. The second application presented here were changes in the gastric tissue in mice after infection with Helicobacter pylori, as a model of gastric cancer in humans caused by this pathogen microorganism. Molecular imaging mass spectrometry can be applied in medicine, mostly for identification of candidate biomarkers for malignant and non-malignant diseases. Furthermore, imaging MS has almost unlimited capacity in agriculture, food technology and biotechnology, e. g. for monitoring, process development and quality control of manufactured tissue of animal, plant and microbial origin.

  9. Portion Size Labeling and Intended Soft Drink Consumption: The Impact of Labeling Format and Size Portfolio

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vermeer, Willemijn M.; Steenhuis, Ingrid H. M.; Leeuwis, Franca H.; Bos, Arjan E. R.; de Boer, Michiel; Seidell, Jacob C.

    2010-01-01

    Objective: To assess what portion size labeling "format" is most promising in helping consumers selecting appropriate soft drink sizes, and whether labeling impact depends on the size portfolio. Methods: An experimental study was conducted in fast-food restaurants in which 2 labeling formats (ie, reference portion size and small/medium/large…

  10. Experimental Study Using Functional Size Measurement in Building Estimation Models for Software Project Size

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Condori-Fernandez, Nelly; Daneva, Maia; Buglione, Luigi; Ormandjieva, Olga; Ormandjieva, O.; Constantinides, C.; Abran, A.; Lee, R.

    2010-01-01

    This paper reports on an experiment that investigates the predictability of software project size from software product size. The predictability research problem is analyzed at the stage of early requirements by accounting the size of functional requirements as well as the size of non-functional

  11. Primer on molecular genetics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1992-04-01

    This report is taken from the April 1992 draft of the DOE Human Genome 1991--1992 Program Report, which is expected to be published in May 1992. The primer is intended to be an introduction to basic principles of molecular genetics pertaining to the genome project. The material contained herein is not final and may be incomplete. Techniques of genetic mapping and DNA sequencing are described.

  12. Molecular-beam scattering

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vernon, M.F.

    1983-07-01

    The molecular-beam technique has been used in three different experimental arrangements to study a wide range of inter-atomic and molecular forces. Chapter 1 reports results of a low-energy (0.2 kcal/mole) elastic-scattering study of the He-Ar pair potential. The purpose of the study was to accurately characterize the shape of the potential in the well region, by scattering slow He atoms produced by expanding a mixture of He in N/sub 2/ from a cooled nozzle. Chapter 2 contains measurements of the vibrational predissociation spectra and product translational energy for clusters of water, benzene, and ammonia. The experiments show that most of the product energy remains in the internal molecular motions. Chapter 3 presents measurements of the reaction Na + HCl ..-->.. NaCl + H at collision energies of 5.38 and 19.4 kcal/mole. This is the first study to resolve both scattering angle and velocity for the reaction of a short lived (16 nsec) electronic excited state. Descriptions are given of computer programs written to analyze molecular-beam expansions to extract information characterizing their velocity distributions, and to calculate accurate laboratory elastic-scattering differential cross sections accounting for the finite apparatus resolution. Experimental results which attempted to determine the efficiency of optically pumping the Li(2/sup 2/P/sub 3/2/) and Na(3/sup 2/P/sub 3/2/) excited states are given. A simple three-level model for predicting the steady-state fraction of atoms in the excited state is included.

  13. Untying molecular friction knots

    OpenAIRE

    Kirmizialtin, Serdal; Makarov, Dmitrii E.

    2006-01-01

    Motivated by recent advances in single molecule manipulation techniques that enabled several groups to tie knots in individual polymer strands and to monitor their dynamics, we have used computer simulations to study "friction knots" joining a pair of polymer strands. The key property of a friction knot splicing two ropes is that it becomes jammed when the ropes are pulled apart. In contrast, molecular friction knots eventually become undone by thermal motion. We show that depending on the kn...

  14. Molecular opacities for exoplanets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bernath, Peter F

    2014-04-28

    Spectroscopic observations of exoplanets are now possible by transit methods and direct emission. Spectroscopic requirements for exoplanets are reviewed based on existing measurements and model predictions for hot Jupiters and super-Earths. Molecular opacities needed to simulate astronomical observations can be obtained from laboratory measurements, ab initio calculations or a combination of the two approaches. This discussion article focuses mainly on laboratory measurements of hot molecules as needed for exoplanet spectroscopy.

  15. Graphs in molecular biology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Falcon Seth

    2007-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Graph theoretical concepts are useful for the description and analysis of interactions and relationships in biological systems. We give a brief introduction into some of the concepts and their areas of application in molecular biology. We discuss software that is available through the Bioconductor project and present a simple example application to the integration of a protein-protein interaction and a co-expression network.

  16. Molecular diagnostics of periodontitis

    OpenAIRE

    Izabela Korona-Głowniak; Radosław Siwiec; Marcin Berger; Anna Malm; Jolanta Szymańska

    2017-01-01

    The microorganisms that form dental plaque are the main cause of periodontitis. Their identification and the understanding of the complex relationships and interactions that involve these microorganisms, environmental factors and the host’s health status enable improvement in diagnostics and targeted therapy in patients with periodontitis. To this end, molecular diagnostics techniques (both techniques based on the polymerase chain reaction and those involving nucleic acid analysis via hybridi...

  17. Molecular biomethods handbook

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Walker, John M; Rapley, Ralph

    2008-01-01

    ... the reader to a selection of analytical and preparative techniques that we considered to be frequently used by research workers in the field of molecular biology. Clearly, within the constraints of a single volume we had to be selective in the techniques we described. Since the first edition was published, science has continued to move on apace. For example, the use of microarray technology is now commonplace, nanotechnology has entered the scientific literature, microfluidic technology has be...

  18. First Temperate Exoplanet Sized Up

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-03-01

    Combining observations from the CoRoT satellite and the ESO HARPS instrument, astronomers have discovered the first "normal" exoplanet that can be studied in great detail. Designated Corot-9b, the planet regularly passes in front of a star similar to the Sun located 1500 light-years away from Earth towards the constellation of Serpens (the Snake). "This is a normal, temperate exoplanet just like dozens we already know, but this is the first whose properties we can study in depth," says Claire Moutou, who is part of the international team of 60 astronomers that made the discovery. "It is bound to become a Rosetta stone in exoplanet research." "Corot-9b is the first exoplanet that really does resemble planets in our solar system," adds lead author Hans Deeg. "It has the size of Jupiter and an orbit similar to that of Mercury." "Like our own giant planets, Jupiter and Saturn, the planet is mostly made of hydrogen and helium," says team member Tristan Guillot, "and it may contain up to 20 Earth masses of other elements, including water and rock at high temperatures and pressures." Corot-9b passes in front of its host star every 95 days, as seen from Earth [1]. This "transit" lasts for about 8 hours, and provides astronomers with much additional information on the planet. This is fortunate as the gas giant shares many features with the majority of exoplanets discovered so far [2]. "Our analysis has provided more information on Corot-9b than for other exoplanets of the same type," says co-author Didier Queloz. "It may open up a new field of research to understand the atmospheres of moderate- and low-temperature planets, and in particular a completely new window in our understanding of low-temperature chemistry." More than 400 exoplanets have been discovered so far, 70 of them through the transit method. Corot-9b is special in that its distance from its host star is about ten times larger than that of any planet previously discovered by this method. And unlike all such

  19. Molecular imaging of breast cancer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Munnink, T. H. Oude; Nagengast, W. B.; Brouwers, A. H.; Schroder, C. P.; Hospers, G. A.; Lub-de Hooge, M. N.; van der Wall, E.; van Diest, P. J.; de Vries, E. G. E.

    2009-01-01

    Molecular imaging of breast cancer can potentially be used for breast cancer screening, staging, restaging, response evaluation and guiding therapies. Techniques for molecular breast cancer imaging include magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), optical imaging, and radionuclide imaging with positron

  20. a Molecular Fountain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Cunfeng; van der Poel, Aernout P. P.; Ubachs, Wim; Bethlem, Hendrick

    2017-06-01

    The resolution of any spectroscopic experiment is limited by the coherent interaction time between the probe radiation and the particle that is being studied. The introduction of cooling techniques for atoms and ions has resulted in a dramatic increase of interaction times and accuracy, it is hoped that molecular cooling techniques will lead to a similar increase. Here we demonstrate the first molecular fountain, a development which permits hitherto unattainably long interrogation times with molecules. In our experiment, beams of ammonia molecules are decelerated, trapped and cooled using inhomogeneous electric fields and subsequently launched. Using a combination of quadrupole lenses and buncher elements, the beam is shaped such that it has a large position spread and a small velocity spread (corresponding to a transverse temperature of less than 10μK and a longitudinal temperature of less than 1μK) while the molecules are in free fall, but strongly focused at the detection region. The molecules are in free fall for up to 266 milliseconds, making it possible, in principle, to perform sub-Hz measurements in molecular systems and paving the way for stringent tests of fundamental physics theories.

  1. Molecularly Imprinted Biodegradable Nanoparticles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gagliardi, Mariacristina; Bertero, Alice; Bifone, Angelo

    2017-01-01

    Biodegradable polymer nanoparticles are promising carriers for targeted drug delivery in nanomedicine applications. Molecu- lar imprinting is a potential strategy to target polymer nanoparticles through binding of endogenous ligands that may promote recognition and active transport into specific cells and tissues. However, the lock-and-key mechanism of molecular imprinting requires relatively rigid cross-linked structures, unlike those of many biodegradable polymers. To date, no fully biodegradable molecularly imprinted particles have been reported in the literature. This paper reports the synthesis of a novel molecularly- imprinted nanocarrier, based on poly(lactide-co-glycolide) (PLGA) and acrylic acid, that combines biodegradability and molec- ular recognition properties. A novel three-arm biodegradable cross-linker was synthesized by ring-opening polymerization of glycolide and lactide initiated by glycerol. The resulting macromer was functionalized by introduction of end-functions through reaction with acryloyl chloride. Macromer and acrylic acid were used for the synthesis of narrowly-dispersed nanoparticles by radical polymerization in diluted conditions in the presence of biotin as template molecule. The binding capacity of the imprinted nanoparticles towards biotin and biotinylated bovine serum albumin was twentyfold that of non-imprinted nanoparti- cles. Degradation rates and functional performances were assessed in in vitro tests and cell cultures, demonstrating effective biotin-mediated cell internalization.

  2. Molecular basis of alcoholism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Most, Dana; Ferguson, Laura; Harris, R Adron

    2014-01-01

    Acute alcohol intoxication causes cellular changes in the brain that last for hours, while chronic alcohol use induces widespread neuroadaptations in the nervous system that can last a lifetime. Chronic alcohol use and the progression into dependence involve the remodeling of synapses caused by changes in gene expression produced by alcohol. The progression of alcohol use, abuse, and dependence can be divided into stages, which include intoxication, withdrawal, and craving. Each stage is associated with specific changes in gene expression, cellular function, brain circuits, and ultimately behavior. What are the molecular mechanisms underlying the transition from recreational use (acute) to dependence (chronic)? What cellular adaptations result in drug memory retention, leading to the persistence of addictive behaviors, even after prolonged drug abstinence? Research into the neurobiology of alcoholism aims to answer these questions. This chapter will describe the molecular adaptations caused by alcohol use and dependence, and will outline key neurochemical participants in alcoholism at the molecular level, which are also potential targets for therapy. © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. Reviewing Molecular Clouds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernandez Lopez, Manuel

    2017-07-01

    The star formation process involves a wide range of spatial scales, densities and temperatures. Herschel observations of the cold and low density molecular gas extending tens of parsecs, that constitutes the bulk of the molecular clouds of the Milky Way, have shown a network of dense structures in the shape of filaments. These filaments supposedly condense into higher density clumps to form individual stars or stellar clusters. The study of the kinematics of the filaments through single-dish observations suggests the presence of gas flows along the filaments, oscillatory motions due to gravity infall, and the existence of substructure inside filaments that may be threaded by twisted fibers. A few molecular clouds have been mapped with interferometric resolutions bringing more insight into the filament structure. Compression due to large-scale supersonic flows is the preferred mechanism to explain filament formation although the exact nature of the filaments, their origin and evolution are still not well understood. Determining the turbulence drivers behind the origin of the filaments, the relative importance of turbulence, gravity and magnetic fields on regulating the filament structure and evolution, and providing detailed insight on the substructure inside the filaments are among the current open questions in this research area.

  4. Molecular Neuropathology of Gliomas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guido Reifenberger

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Gliomas are the most common primary human brain tumors. They comprise a heterogeneous group of benign and malignant neoplasms that are histologically classified according to the World Health Organization (WHO classification of tumors of the nervous system. Over the past 20 years the cytogenetic and molecular genetic alterations associated with glioma formation and progression have been intensely studied and genetic profiles as additional aids to the definition of brain tumors have been incorporated in the WHO classification. In fact, first steps have been undertaken in supplementing classical histopathological diagnosis by the use of molecular tests, such as MGMT promoter hypermethylation in glioblastomas or detection of losses of chromosome arms 1p and 19q in oligodendroglial tumors. The tremendous progress that has been made in the use of array-based profiling techniques will likely contribute to a further molecular refinement of glioma classification and lead to the identification of glioma core pathways that can be specifically targeted by more individualized glioma therapies.

  5. NATO Advanced Research Workshop on Molecular Engineering for Advanced Materials

    CERN Document Server

    Schaumburg, Kjeld

    1995-01-01

    An important aspect of molecular engineering is the `property directed' synthesis of large molecules and molecular assemblies. Synthetic expertise has advanced to a state which allows the assembly of supramolecules containing thousands of atoms using a `construction kit' of molecular building blocks. Expansion in the field is driven by the appearance of new building blocks and by an improved understanding of the rules for joining them in the design of nanometer-sized devices. Another aspect is the transition from supramolecules to materials. At present no single molecule (however large) has been demonstrated to function as a device, but this appears to be only a matter of time. In all of this research, which has a strongly multidisciplinary character, both existing and yet to be developed analytical techniques are and will remain indispensable. All this and more is discussed in Molecular Engineering for Advanced Materials, which provides a masterly and up to date summary of one of the most challenging researc...

  6. Estimating Search Engine Index Size Variability

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Van den Bosch, Antal; Bogers, Toine; De Kunder, Maurice

    2016-01-01

    One of the determining factors of the quality of Web search engines is the size of their index. In addition to its influence on search result quality, the size of the indexed Web can also tell us something about which parts of the WWW are directly accessible to the everyday user. We propose a novel...... method of estimating the size of a Web search engine’s index by extrapolating from document frequencies of words observed in a large static corpus of Web pages. In addition, we provide a unique longitudinal perspective on the size of Google and Bing’s indices over a nine-year period, from March 2006...... until January 2015. We find that index size estimates of these two search engines tend to vary dramatically over time, with Google generally possessing a larger index than Bing. This result raises doubts about the reliability of previous one-off estimates of the size of the indexed Web. We find...

  7. Molecular techniques in fisheries

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Goswami, U.

    stream_size 2 stream_content_type text/plain stream_name Genetic_Biotechnol_Tool_Aquacult_Fish_1998_60.pdf.txt stream_source_info Genetic_Biotechnol_Tool_Aquacult_Fish_1998_60.pdf.txt Content-Encoding ISO-8859-1 Content-Type text.../plain; charset=ISO-8859-1 ...

  8. A merchant ship size optimization model

    OpenAIRE

    Choi, Ki-Chul

    1983-01-01

    Approved for public release; distribution in unlimited. This paper analyzes how a shipowner or charterer may determine the specification of optimal ship size for a given route with respect to certain market requirements . The theory of optimal ship size, a methodology for estimating scale economics, and the various factors affecting ship size are examined using a typical conventional cargo ship and bulk cargo carriers based on shipowners ' cost data. http://archi...

  9. Effective Size of Nonrandom Mating Populations

    OpenAIRE

    Caballero, A.; Hill, W. G.

    1992-01-01

    Nonrandom mating whereby parents are related is expected to cause a reduction in effective population size because their gene frequencies are correlated and this will increase the genetic drift. The published equation for the variance effective size, N(e), which includes the possibility of nonrandom mating, does not take into account such a correlation, however. Further, previous equations to predict effective sizes in populations with partial sib mating are shown to be different, but also in...

  10. Aggregate size distributions in hydrophobic flocculation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chairoj Rattanakawin

    2003-07-01

    Full Text Available The evolution of aggregate (floc size distributions resulting from hydrophobic flocculation has been investigated using a laser light scattering technique. By measuring floc size distributions it is possible to distinguish clearly among floc formation, growth and breakage. Hydrophobic flocculation of hematite suspensions with sodium oleate under a variety of agitating conditions produces uni-modal size distributions. The size distribution of the primary particles is shifted to larger floc sizes when the dispersed suspension is coagulated by pH adjustment. By adding sodium oleate to the pre-coagulated suspension, the distribution progresses further to the larger size. However, prolonged agitation degrades the formed flocs, regressing the distribution to the smaller size. Median floc size derived from the distribution is also used as performance criterion. The median floc size increases rapidly at the initial stage of the flocculation, and decreases with the extended agitation time and intensity. Relatively weak flocs are produced which may be due to the low dosage of sodium oleate used in this flocculation study. It is suggested that further investigation should focus on optimum reagent dosage and non-polar oil addition to strengthen these weak flocs.

  11. How to calculate sample size and why.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Jeehyoung; Seo, Bong Soo

    2013-09-01

    Calculating the sample size is essential to reduce the cost of a study and to prove the hypothesis effectively. Referring to pilot studies and previous research studies, we can choose a proper hypothesis and simplify the studies by using a website or Microsoft Excel sheet that contains formulas for calculating sample size in the beginning stage of the study. There are numerous formulas for calculating the sample size for complicated statistics and studies, but most studies can use basic calculating methods for sample size calculation.

  12. Sample size determination for the fluctuation experiment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Qi

    2017-01-01

    The Luria-Delbrück fluctuation experiment protocol is increasingly employed to determine microbial mutation rates in the laboratory. An important question raised at the planning stage is "How many cultures are needed?" For over 70 years sample sizes have been determined either by intuition or by following published examples where sample sizes were chosen intuitively. This paper proposes a practical method for determining the sample size. The proposed method relies on existing algorithms for computing the expected Fisher information under two commonly used mutant distributions. The role of partial plating in reducing sample size is discussed. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. Particle size distribution instrument. Topical report 13

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Okhuysen, W.; Gassaway, J.D.

    1995-04-01

    The development of an instrument to measure the concentration of particles in gas is described in this report. An in situ instrument was designed and constructed which sizes individual particles and counts the number of occurrences for several size classes. Although this instrument was designed to detect the size distribution of slag and seed particles generated at an experimental coal-fired magnetohydrodynamic power facility, it can be used as a nonintrusive diagnostic tool for other hostile industrial processes involving the formation and growth of particulates. Two of the techniques developed are extensions of the widely used crossed beam velocimeter, providing simultaneous measurement of the size distribution and velocity of articles.

  14. Performance of population size on Knapsack problem

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David Oyewola

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, an investigation of a performance of population size on the genetic algorithm (GA for a knapsack problem is considered. Population sizes between 10 and 200 chromosomes in the population are tested. In order to obtain meaningful information about the performance of the population size, a considerable number of independent runs of the GA are performed. Accurate model parameters values are obtained in reasonable computational time. Further increase of the population size, does not improve the solution accuracy. Moreover, the computational time is increased significantly.

  15. Matters of fiber size and myonuclear domain

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Karlsen, Anders; Couppé, Christian; Andersen, Jesper L.

    2015-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: The relationship between fiber size and myonuclear content is understood poorly. METHODS: Biopsy cross-sections from young and old trained and untrained healthy individuals were analyzed for fiber area and myonuclei, and 2 fiber size-dependent cluster analyses were performed. RESULTS...... in fibers type II fibers below 3,000 μm(2) was observed in the old. DISCUSSION: These findings suggest that age-related reductions in myonuclear domain size could be explained by a larger proportion of small fibers and highlight the usefulness of fiber size...

  16. Biofunctional Understanding and Judgment of Size

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zheng eJin

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Research has shown that the meaningfulness of the material increases judged size, whereas symmetry decreases size judgments. These findings have been interpreted in terms of information processing, with a greater quantity of information leading to a judgment of larger size. An alternative view based on biofunctional understanding theory emphasizes the quality of affordance-triggered biological activity as reported and observed in attitudes toward playing sports, effortless understanding, knowledge-in-action, meditative wisdom, and body-mind cycle of adaptation. This alternative implies that affordance biofunctional activity is naturally size-diminishinging as it moves toward coherence and size-expanding as it moves away from coherence influencing judgments of size accordingly. Here we tested this hypothesis in the realm of sensorimotor integration. Our first experiment showed that phonologically unpronounced or symmetric symbols elicit smaller size judgments than phonologically pronounced and asymmetric symbols. Next, we manipulated the quantity of meaning with the affordance (possibilities for biofunctional activity orthogonally in a second experiment, results indicated that meaning affects size judgments only in the absence of phonological information. We conclude that the biofunctional activity affordance may be responsible for observed differences in size judgment.

  17. Molecular Transporters for Desalination Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-08-02

    May-2009 17-Feb-2014 Approved for Public Release; Distribution Unlimited Molecular transporters for desalination applications The views, opinions and...12211 Research Triangle Park, NC 27709-2211 desalination biomimetric membranes activated chemical transport REPORT DOCUMENTATION PAGE 11. SPONSOR...ABSTRACT Molecular transporters for desalination applications Report Title The primary goal of the ‘Molecular Transporter’ program was to develop a precise

  18. DETERMINACIÓN DE SEXO EN AVES MEDIANTE HERRAMIENTAS MOLECULARES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    MATTA CAMACHO NUBIA E.

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available

    size: x-small;">RESUMEN

    size: x-small;">La ausencia de dimorfismo sexual en los estadios juveniles y durante la edad adulta de gran cantidad de especies de aves, dificulta o imposibilita la determinación del sexo basados en el fenotipo. El empleo de marcadores moleculares para determinar el sexo de las aves es una herramienta útil debido a la exactitud y rapidez de los resultados y a su vez se constituye en un método que minimiza el estrés durante la toma de muestra, comparado con otras técnicas invasivas que pudieran afectar la salud o estabilidad biológica del animal. La determinación temprana del sexo en aves resulta de especial relevancia cuando se consideran programas de conservación ex situ, producción, explotación y estudios de ecología de poblaciones. Esta revisión presenta las metodologías usadas para determinar el sexo, haciendo especial énfasis en herramientas moleculares, presentando sus ventajas y limitaciones.

    size: x-small;">Palabras clave: dimorfismo sexual, aves, CHD, tipificación molecular cromosoma W, cromosoma Z.


    size="1" />

    size: x-small;">ABSTRACT

    size: x-small;">The lack of sexual dimorphism in nestling, juvenile or adult birds of large number of avian species, makes it difficult or impossible sex determination based on phenotipic characteristics. To use molecular markers for bird sex determination is a rapid and safe procedure; moreover this methodology minimizes the stress during sampling, compared to other invasive techniques that could affect the health or biological stability of the animal. The early sex determination in birds is of particular importance when considering ex situ conservation programs, production

  19. [Molecular pathology: applications of molecular biology in pathological anatomy].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wistuba, I I

    2001-07-01

    The rapid development of molecular biology techniques as well as recent progress in the understanding of genetic and molecular basis of human diseases have had enormous impact in the practice of clinical pathology. Since new diagnostic (molecular) tools are now available, the concept of Molecular Pathology is emerging. Molecular Pathology is defined by the use of molecular biology techniques and the type of specimens that are involved in its practice, basically ARN and ADN, extracted from cytological and tissue specimens. Although most methods used in molecular pathology and their applications are still under investigation and clinical validation they have great potential in several areas of pathological diagnosis, particularly on infectious and neoplastic diseases. Introduction of these techniques in pathology laboratories in our country should significantly enhance the diagnostic and research skills in the field.

  20. The effect of chitosan molecular weight on the properties of alginate ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Purpose: The aim of the present study was to investigate the effect of chitosan molecular weight on size, size distribution, release rate, mucoadhesive properties and electrostatic bonding of alginate/chitosan microparticles containing prednisolone. Methods: Three mucoadhesive alginate/chitosan microparticle formulations, ...