WorldWideScience

Sample records for homophilic adhesion mediated

  1. Neural cell adhesion molecule-180-mediated homophilic binding induces epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) down-regulation and uncouples the inhibitory function of EGFR in neurite outgrowth

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Povlsen, Gro Klitgaard; Berezin, Vladimir; Bock, Elisabeth

    2008-01-01

    The neural cell adhesion molecule (NCAM) plays important roles in neuronal development, regeneration, and synaptic plasticity. NCAM homophilic binding mediates cell adhesion and induces intracellular signals, in which the fibroblast growth factor receptor plays a prominent role. Recent studies...

  2. Triple Effect of Mimetic Peptides Interfering with Neural Cell Adhesion Molecule Homophilic Cis Interactions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Li, S. Z.; Kolkova, Kateryna; Rudenko, Olga

    2005-01-01

    The neural cell adhesion molecule (NCAM) is pivotal in neural development, regeneration, and learning. Here we characterize two peptides, termed P1-B and P2, derived from the homophilic binding sites in the first two N-terminal immunoglobulin (Ig) modules of NCAM, with regard to their effects...

  3. Modulation of the homophilic interaction between the first and second Ig modules of neural cell adhesion molecule by heparin

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kulahin, Nikolaj; Rudenko, Olga; Kiselyov, V.

    2005-01-01

    The second Ig module (IgII) of the neural cell adhesion molecule (NCAM) is known to bind to the first Ig module (IgI) of NCAM (so-called homophilic binding) and to interact with heparan sulfate and chondroitin sulfate glycoconjugates. We here show by NMR that the heparin and chondroitin sulfate......II. Accordingly, we show that treatment of cerebellar granule neurons (CGNs) with heparin inhibits NCAM-mediated outgrowth. In contrast, treatment with heparinase III or chondroitinase ABC abrogates NCAM-mediated neurite outgrowth in CGNs emphasizing the importance of the presence of heparan/chondroitin sulfates...

  4. Dennexin peptides modeled after the homophilic binding sites of the neural cell adhesion molecule (NCAM) promote neuronal survival, modify cell adhesion and impair spatial learning

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Køhler, Lene B; Christensen, Claus; Rossetti, Clara

    2010-01-01

    Neural cell adhesion molecule (NCAM)-mediated cell adhesion results in activation of intracellular signaling cascades that lead to cellular responses such as neurite outgrowth, neuronal survival, and modulation of synaptic activity associated with cognitive processes. The crystal structure...... of the immunoglobulin (Ig) 1-2-3 fragment of the NCAM ectodomain has revealed novel mechanisms for NCAM homophilic adhesion. The present study addressed the biological significance of the so called dense zipper formation of NCAM. Two peptides, termed dennexinA and dennexinB, were modeled after the contact interfaces...... between Ig1 and Ig3 and between Ig2 and Ig2, respectively, observed in the crystal structure. Although the two dennexin peptides differed in amino acid sequence, they both modulated cell adhesion, reflected by inhibition of NCAM-mediated neurite outgrowth. Both dennexins also promoted neuronal survival...

  5. Neuritogenic and survival-promoting effects of the P2 peptide derived from a homophilic binding site in the neural cell adhesion molecule

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Martin V; Køhler, Lene B; Ditlevsen, Dorte K

    2004-01-01

    The neural cell adhesion molecule (NCAM) plays a pivotal role in neural development, regeneration, and plasticity. NCAM mediates adhesion and subsequent signal transduction through NCAM-NCAM binding. Recently, a peptide ligand termed P2 corresponding to a 12-amino-acid sequence in the FG loop...... lowered by P2. Finally, treatment of neurons with P2 resulted in phosphorylation of the ser/thr kinase Akt. Thus, a small peptide mimicking homophilic NCAM interaction is capable of inducing differentiation as reflected by neurite outgrowth in several neuronal cell types and inhibiting apoptosis...

  6. Structural basis for PECAM-1 homophilic binding

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Paddock, Cathy; Zhou, Dongwen; Lertkiatmongkol, Panida; Newman, Peter J.; Zhu, Jieqing (MCW)

    2015-12-23

    Platelet endothelial cell adhesion molecule-1 (PECAM-1) is a 130-kDa member of the immunoglobulin gene superfamily (IgSF) that is present on the surface of circulating platelets and leukocytes, and highly expressed at the junctions of confluent endothelial cell monolayers. PECAM-1–mediated homophilic interactions, known to be mediated by its 2 amino-terminal immunoglobulin homology domains, are essential for concentrating PECAM-1 at endothelial cell intercellular junctions, where it functions to facilitate diapedesis, maintain vascular integrity, and transmit survival signals into the cell. Given the importance of PECAM-1–mediated homophilic interactions in mediating each of these cell physiological events, and to reveal the nature and orientation of the PECAM-1–PECAM-1 homophilic-binding interface, we undertook studies aimed at determining the crystal structure of the PECAM-1 homophilic-binding domain, which is composed of amino-terminal immunoglobulin homology domains 1 and 2 (IgD1 and IgD2). The crystal structure revealed that both IgD1 and IgD2 exhibit a classical IgSF fold, having a β-sandwich topology formed by 2 sheets of antiparallel β strands stabilized by the hallmark disulfide bond between the B and F strands. Interestingly, despite previous assignment to the C2 class of immunoglobulin-like domains, the structure of IgD1 reveals that it actually belongs to the I2 set of IgSF folds. Both IgD1 and IgD2 participate importantly in the formation of the trans homophilic-binding interface, with a total buried interface area of >2300 Å2. These and other unique structural features of PECAM-1 allow for the development of an atomic-level model of the interactions that PECAM-1 forms during assembly of endothelial cell intercellular junctions.

  7. Neuroplastin-65 and a mimetic peptide derived from its homophilic binding site modulate neuritogenesis and neuronal plasticity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Owczarek, Sylwia; Soroka, Vladislav; Kiryushko, Darya

    2011-01-01

    Neuroplastin-65 (Np65) is a brain-specific cell adhesion molecule belonging to the immunoglobulin superfamily. Homophilic trans-interaction of Np65 mediates adhesion between cells and modulates synaptic plasticity. This interaction solely occurs through the first immunoglobulin (Ig) module of Np65...

  8. Carbohydrate mediated bacterial adhesion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pieters, Roland J

    2011-01-01

    In the process of adhesion, bacteria often carry proteins on their surface, adhesins, that bind to specific components of tissue cells or the extracellular matrix. In many cases these components are carbohydrate structures. The carbohydrate binding specificities of many bacteria have been uncovered over the years. The design and synthesis of inhibitors of bacterial adhesion has the potential to create new therapeutics for the prevention and possibly treatment of bacterial infections. Unfortunately, the carbohydrate structures often bind only weakly to the adhesion proteins, although drug design approaches can improve the situation. Furthermore, in some cases linking carbohydrates covalently together, to create so-called multivalent systems, can also significantly enhance the inhibitory potency. Besides adhesion inhibition as a potential therapeutic strategy, the adhesion proteins can also be used for detection. Novel methods to do this are being developed. These include the use of microarrays and glyconanoparticles. New developments in these areas are discussed.

  9. Structural basis of cell-cell adhesion by NCAM

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kasper, C; Rasmussen, H; Kastrup, Jette Sandholm Jensen

    2000-01-01

    The neural cell adhesion molecule NCAM, a member of the immunoglobulin superfamily, mediates cell-cell recognition and adhesion via a homophilic interaction. NCAM plays a key role during development and regeneration of the nervous system and is involved in synaptic plasticity associated with memory...

  10. ShcA regulates neurite outgrowth stimulated by neural cell adhesion molecule but not by fibroblast growth factor 2: evidence for a distinct fibroblast growth factor receptor response to neural cell adhesion molecule activation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hinsby, Anders M; Lundfald, Line; Ditlevsen, Dorte K

    2004-01-01

    Homophilic binding in trans of the neural cell adhesion molecule (NCAM) mediates adhesion between cells and leads, via activation of intracellular signaling cascades, to neurite outgrowth in primary neurons as well as in the neuronal cell line PC12. NCAM mediates neurite extension in PC12 cells...

  11. A peptide derived from a trans-homophilic binding site in neural cell adhesion molecule induces neurite outgrowth and neuronal survival

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Køhler, Lene B; Soroka, Vladislav; Korshunova, Irina

    2010-01-01

    The neural cell adhesion molecule (NCAM) plays a key role in neural development, regeneration, and synaptic plasticity. The crystal structure of a fragment of NCAM comprising the three N-terminal immunoglobulin (Ig)-like modules indicates that the first and second Ig modules bind to each other...

  12. The cell adhesion molecule Fasciclin2 regulates brush border length and organization in Drosophila renal tubules

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Halberg, Kenneth Agerlin; Rainey, Stephanie M.; Veland, Iben Rønn

    2016-01-01

    Multicellular organisms rely on cell adhesion molecules to coordinate cell-cell interactions, and to provide navigational cues during tissue formation. In Drosophila, Fasciclin 2 (Fas2) has been intensively studied due to its role in nervous system development and maintenance; yet, Fas2 is most...... role for this well-known cell adhesion molecule, and propose that Fas2-mediated intermicrovillar homophilic adhesion complexes help stabilize the brush border....

  13. Introduction: U.S. Homophile Internationalism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stein, Marc

    2017-01-01

    This article introduces "U.S. Homophile Internationalism," a special issue of the Journal of Homosexuality. The introduction provides a broad overview of the "U.S. Homophile Internationalism" archive and exhibit, which was published on the Outhistory Web site in 2015. The archive and exhibit consists of more than 800 U.S. homophile magazine articles, letters, and other items that referenced non-U.S. regions of the world from 1953 to 1964. The essays in the special issue focus on (1) Africa; (2) Asia and the Pacific; (3) Canada; (4) Latin America and the Caribbean; (5) the Middle East; and (6) Russia, the Soviet Union, and Eastern Europe. There is also an article that addresses the public history and digital humanities dimensions of the project. The introduction concludes by discussing the essays' common goals, themes, and concerns.

  14. Breast cancer cells compete with hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells for intercellular adhesion molecule 1-mediated binding to the bone marrow microenvironment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dhawan, Abhishek; Friedrichs, Jens; Bonin, Malte von; Bejestani, Elham Peshali; Werner, Carsten; Wobus, Manja; Chavakis, Triantafyllos; Bornhäuser, Martin

    2016-08-01

    Adhesion-based cellular interactions involved in breast cancer metastasis to the bone marrow remain elusive. We identified that breast cancer cells directly compete with hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells (HSPCs) for retention in the bone marrow microenvironment. To this end, we established two models of competitive cell adhesion-simultaneous and sequential-to study a potential competition for homing to the niche and displacement of the endogenous HSPCs upon invasion by tumor cells. In both models, breast cancer cells but not non-tumorigenic cells competitively reduced adhesion of HSPCs to bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stromal cells (MSCs) in a tumor cell number-dependent manner. Higher adhesive force between breast cancer cells and MSCs, as compared with HSPCs, assessed by quantitative atomic force microscopy-based single-cell force spectroscopy could partially account for tumor cell mediated reduction in HSPC adhesion to MSCs. Genetic inactivation and blockade studies revealed that homophilic interactions between intercellular adhesion molecule 1 (ICAM-1) expressed on tumor cells and MSCs, respectively, regulate the competition between tumor cells and HSPCs for binding to MSCs. Moreover, tumor cell-secreted soluble ICAM-1(sICAM-1) also impaired HSPC adhesion via blocking CD18-ICAM-1 binding between HSPCs and MSCs. Xenotransplantation studies in NOD.Cg-Prkdc(scid) Il2rg(tm1Wjl)/SzJ mice revealed reduction of human HSPCs in the bone marrow via metastatic breast cancer cells. These findings point to a direct competitive interaction between disseminated breast cancer cells and HSPCs within the bone marrow micro environment. This interaction might also have implications on niche-based tumor support. Therefore, targeting this cross talk may represent a novel therapeutic strategy. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  15. Adhesion-induced receptor segregation and adhesion plaque formation: A model membrane study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kloboucek, A; Behrisch, A; Faix, J; Sackmann, E

    1999-10-01

    A model system to study the control of cell adhesion by receptor-mediated specific forces, universal interactions, and membrane elasticity is established. The plasma membrane is mimicked by reconstitution of homophilic receptor proteins into solid supported membranes and, together with lipopolymers, into giant vesicles with the polymers forming an artificial glycocalix. The homophilic cell adhesion molecule contact site A, a lipid-anchored glycoprotein from cells of the slime mold Dictyostelium discoideum, is used as receptor. The success of the reconstitution, the structure and the dynamics of the model membranes are studied by various techniques including film balance techniques, micro fluorescence, fluorescence recovery after photobleaching, electron microscopy, and phase contrast microscopy. The interaction of the functionalized giant vesicles with the supported bilayer is studied by reflection interference contrast microscopy, and the adhesion strength is evaluated quantitatively by a recently developed technique. At low receptor concentrations adhesion-induced receptor segregation in the membranes leads to decomposition of the contact zone between membranes into domains of strong (receptor-mediated) adhesion and regions of weak adhesion while continuous zones of strong adhesion form at high receptor densities. The adhesion strengths (measured in terms of the spreading pressure S) of the various states of adhesion are obtained locally by analysis of the vesicle contour near the contact line in terms of elastic boundary conditions of adhesion: the balance of tensions and moments. The spreading pressure of the weak adhesion zones is S approximately 10(-9) J/m(2) and is determined by the interplay of gravitation and undulation forces whereas the spreading pressure of the tight adhesion domains is of the order S approximately 10(-6) J/m(2).

  16. A plastic relationship between vinculin-mediated tension and adhesion complex area defines adhesion size and lifetime

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hernández-Varas, Pablo; Berge, Ulrich; Lock, John G.; Strömblad, Staffan

    2015-01-01

    Cell-matrix adhesions are central mediators of mechanotransduction, yet the interplay between force and adhesion regulation remains unclear. Here we use live cell imaging to map time-dependent cross-correlations between vinculin-mediated tension and adhesion complex area, revealing a plastic, context-dependent relationship. Interestingly, while an expected positive cross-correlation dominated in mid-sized adhesions, small and large adhesions display negative cross-correlation. Furthermore, although large changes in adhesion complex area follow vinculin-mediated tension alterations, small increases in area precede vinculin-mediated tension dynamics. Modelling based on this mapping of the vinculin-mediated tension-adhesion complex area relationship confirms its biological validity, and indicates that this relationship explains adhesion size and lifetime limits, keeping adhesions focal and transient. We also identify a subpopulation of steady-state adhesions whose size and vinculin-mediated tension become stabilized, and whose disassembly may be selectively microtubule-mediated. In conclusion, we define a plastic relationship between vinculin-mediated tension and adhesion complex area that controls fundamental cell-matrix adhesion properties. PMID:26109125

  17. Mechanotransduction at cadherin-mediated adhesions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Leckband, D.; le Duc, Q.; Wang, N.; de Rooij, J.

    2011-01-01

    Cell-to-cell junctions are crucial mechanical and signaling hubs that connect cells within tissues and probe the mechanics of the surrounding environment. Although the capacity of cell-to-extracellular-matrix (ECM) adhesions to sense matrix mechanics and proportionally modify cell functions is well

  18. Amphiphilic cationic peptides mediate cell adhesion to plastic surfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rideout, D C; Lambert, M; Kendall, D A; Moe, G R; Osterman, D G; Tao, H P; Weinstein, I B; Kaiser, E T

    1985-09-01

    Four amphiphilic peptides, each with net charges of +2 or more at neutrality and molecular weights under 4 kilodaltons, were found to mediate the adhesion of normal rat kidney fibroblasts to polystyrene surfaces. Two of these peptides, a model for calcitonin (peptide 1, MCT) and melittin (peptide 2, MEL), form amphiphilic alpha-helical structures at aqueous/nonpolar interfaces. The other two, a luteinizing hormone-releasing hormone model (peptide 3, LHM) and a platelet factor model (peptide 4, MPF) form beta-strand structures in amphiphilic environments. Although it contains only 10 residues, LHM mediated adhesion to surfaces coated with solutions containing as little as 10 pmoles/ml of peptide. All four of these peptides were capable of forming monolayers at air-buffer interfaces with collapse pressures greater than 20 dynes/cm. None of these four peptides contains the tetrapeptide sequence Arg-Gly-Asp-Ser, which has been associated with fibronectin-mediated cell adhesion. Ten polypeptides that also lacked the sequence Arg-Gly-Asp-Ser but were nonamphiphilic and/or had net charges less than +2 at neutrality were all incapable of mediating cell adhesion (Pierschbacher and Ruoslahti, 1984). The morphologies of NRK cells spread on polystyrene coated with peptide LHM resemble the morphologies on fibronectin-coated surfaces, whereas cells spread on surfaces coated with MCT or MEL exhibit strikingly different morphologies. The adhesiveness of MCT, MEL, LHM, and MPF implies that many amphiphilic cationic peptides could prove useful as well defined adhesive substrata for cell culture and for studies of the mechanism of cell adhesion.

  19. Gold nanoparticles functionalized with a fragment of the neural cell adhesion molecule L1 stimulate L1-mediated functions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schulz, Florian; Lutz, David; Rusche, Norman; Bastús, Neus G.; Stieben, Martin; Höltig, Michael; Grüner, Florian; Weller, Horst; Schachner, Melitta; Vossmeyer, Tobias; Loers, Gabriele

    2013-10-01

    The neural cell adhesion molecule L1 is involved in nervous system development and promotes regeneration in animal models of acute and chronic injury of the adult nervous system. To translate these conducive functions into therapeutic approaches, a 22-mer peptide that encompasses a minimal and functional L1 sequence of the third fibronectin type III domain of murine L1 was identified and conjugated to gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) to obtain constructs that interact homophilically with the extracellular domain of L1 and trigger the cognate beneficial L1-mediated functions. Covalent conjugation was achieved by reacting mixtures of two cysteine-terminated forms of this L1 peptide and thiolated poly(ethylene) glycol (PEG) ligands (~2.1 kDa) with citrate stabilized AuNPs of two different sizes (~14 and 40 nm in diameter). By varying the ratio of the L1 peptide-PEG mixtures, an optimized layer composition was achieved that resulted in the expected homophilic interaction of the AuNPs. These AuNPs were stable as tested over a time period of 30 days in artificial cerebrospinal fluid and interacted with the extracellular domain of L1 on neurons and Schwann cells, as could be shown by using cells from wild-type and L1-deficient mice. In vitro, the L1-derivatized particles promoted neurite outgrowth and survival of neurons from the central and peripheral nervous system and stimulated Schwann cell process formation and proliferation. These observations raise the hope that, in combination with other therapeutic approaches, L1 peptide-functionalized AuNPs may become a useful tool to ameliorate the deficits resulting from acute and chronic injuries of the mammalian nervous system.The neural cell adhesion molecule L1 is involved in nervous system development and promotes regeneration in animal models of acute and chronic injury of the adult nervous system. To translate these conducive functions into therapeutic approaches, a 22-mer peptide that encompasses a minimal and functional L1

  20. ADAM13 cleavage of cadherin-11 promotes CNC migration independently of the homophilic binding site.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abbruzzese, Genevieve; Becker, Sarah F; Kashef, Jubin; Alfandari, Dominique

    2016-07-15

    The cranial neural crest (CNC) is a highly motile population of cells that is responsible for forming the face and jaw in all vertebrates and perturbing their migration can lead to craniofacial birth defects. Cell motility requires a dynamic modification of cell-cell and cell-matrix adhesion. In the CNC, cleavage of the cell adhesion molecule cadherin-11 by ADAM13 is essential for cell migration. This cleavage generates a shed extracellular fragment of cadherin-11 (EC1-3) that possesses pro-migratory activity via an unknown mechanism. Cadherin-11 plays an important role in modulating contact inhibition of locomotion (CIL) in the CNC to regulate directional cell migration. Here, we show that while the integral cadherin-11 requires the homophilic binding site to promote CNC migration in vivo, the EC1-3 fragment does not. In addition, we show that increased ADAM13 activity or expression of the EC1-3 fragment increases CNC invasiveness in vitro and blocks the repulsive CIL response in colliding cells. This activity requires the presence of an intact homophilic binding site on the EC1-3 suggesting that the cleavage fragment may function as a competitive inhibitor of cadherin-11 adhesion in CIL but not to promote cell migration in vivo. Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  1. Structural origins of clustered protocadherin-mediated neuronal barcoding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rubinstein, Rotem; Goodman, Kerry Marie; Maniatis, Tom; Shapiro, Lawrence; Honig, Barry

    2017-09-01

    Clustered protocadherins mediate neuronal self-recognition and non-self discrimination-neuronal "barcoding"-which underpin neuronal self-avoidance in vertebrate neurons. Recent structural, biophysical, computational, and cell-based studies on protocadherin structure and function have led to a compelling molecular model for the barcoding mechanism. Protocadherin isoforms assemble into promiscuous cis-dimeric recognition units and mediate cell-cell recognition through homophilic trans-interactions. Each recognition unit is composed of two arms extending from the membrane proximal EC6 domains. A cis-dimeric recognition unit with each arm coding adhesive trans homophilic specificity can generate a zipper-like assembly that in turn suggests a chain termination mechanism for self-vs-non-self-discrimination among vertebrate neurons. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Structural Insights into Ail-Mediated Adhesion in Yersinia pestis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yamashita, Satoshi; Lukacik, Petra; Barnard, Travis J.; Noinaj, Nicholas; Felek, Suleyman; Tsang, Tiffany M.; Krukonis, Eric S.; Hinnebusch, B. Joseph; Buchanan, Susan K. (Michigan); (NIH); (Michigan-Med)

    2012-01-30

    Ail is an outer membrane protein from Yersinia pestis that is highly expressed in a rodent model of bubonic plague, making it a good candidate for vaccine development. Ail is important for attaching to host cells and evading host immune responses, facilitating rapid progression of a plague infection. Binding to host cells is important for injection of cytotoxic Yersinia outer proteins. To learn more about how Ail mediates adhesion, we solved two high-resolution crystal structures of Ail, with no ligand bound and in complex with a heparin analog called sucrose octasulfate. We identified multiple adhesion targets, including laminin and heparin, and showed that a 40 kDa domain of laminin called LG4-5 specifically binds to Ail. We also evaluated the contribution of laminin to delivery of Yops to HEp-2 cells. This work constitutes a structural description of how a bacterial outer membrane protein uses a multivalent approach to bind host cells.

  3. Rapid neutrophil adhesion to activated endothelium mediated by GMP-140.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geng, J G; Bevilacqua, M P; Moore, K L; McIntyre, T M; Prescott, S M; Kim, J M; Bliss, G A; Zimmerman, G A; McEver, R P

    1990-02-22

    Granule membrane protein-140 (GMP-140), a membrane glycoprotein of platelet and endothelial cell secretory granules, is rapidly redistributed to the plasma membrane during cellular activation and degranulation. Also known as PADGEM protein, GMP-140 is structurally related to two molecules involved in leukocyte adhesion to vascular endothelium: ELAM-1, a cytokine-inducible endothelial cell receptor for neutrophils, and the MEL-14 lymphocyte homing receptor. These three proteins define a new gene family, termed selectins, each of which contains an N-terminal lectin domain, followed by an epidermal growth factor-like module, a variable number of repeating units related to those in complement-binding proteins, a transmembrane domain, and a short cytoplasmic tail. Here we demonstrate that GMP-140 can mediate leukocyte adhesion, thus establishing a functional similarity with the other selectins. Human neutrophils and promyelocytic HL-60 cells bind specifically to COS cells transfected with GMP-140 complementary DNA and to microtitre wells coated with purified GMP-140. Cell binding does not require active neutrophil metabolism but is dependent on extracellular Ca2+. Within minutes after stimulation with phorbol esters or histamine, human endothelial cells become adhesive for neutrophils; this interaction is inhibited by antibodies to GMP-140. Thus, GMP-140 expressed by activated endothelium might promote rapid neutrophil targeting to sites of acute inflammation.

  4. Adhesion forces and mechanics in mannose-mediated acanthamoeba interactions.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Steven Huth

    Full Text Available The human pathogenic amoeba Acanthamoeba castellanii (A. castellanii causes severe diseases, including acanthamoeba keratitis and encephalitis. Pathogenicity arises from the killing of target-cells by an extracellular killing mechanism, where the crucial first step is the formation of a close contact between A. castellanii and the target-cell. This process is mediated by the glycocalix of the target-cell and mannose has been identified as key mediator. The aim of the present study was to carry out a detailed biophysical investigation of mannose-mediated adhesion of A. castellanii using force spectroscopy on single trophozoites. In detail, we studied the interaction of a mannose-coated cantilever with an A. castellanii trophozoite, as mannose is the decisive part of the cellular glycocalix in mediating pathogenicity. We observed a clear increase of the force to initiate cantilever detachment from the trophozoite with increasing contact time. This increase is also associated with an increase in the work of detachment. Furthermore, we also analyzed single rupture events during the detachment process and found that single rupture processes are associated with membrane tether formation, suggesting that the cytoskeleton is not involved in mannose binding events during the first few seconds of contact. Our study provides an experimental and conceptual basis for measuring interactions between pathogens and target-cells at different levels of complexity and as a function of interaction time, thus leading to new insights into the biophysical mechanisms of parasite pathogenicity.

  5. Adhesive F-actin Waves: A Novel Integrin-Mediated Adhesion Complex Coupled to Ventral Actin Polymerization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Case, Lindsay B.; Waterman, Clare M.

    2011-01-01

    At the leading lamellipodium of migrating cells, protrusion of an Arp2/3-nucleated actin network is coupled to formation of integrin-based adhesions, suggesting that Arp2/3-mediated actin polymerization and integrin-dependent adhesion may be mechanistically linked. Arp2/3 also mediates actin polymerization in structures distinct from the lamellipodium, in “ventral F-actin waves” that propagate as spots and wavefronts along the ventral plasma membrane. Here we show that integrins engage the extracellular matrix downstream of ventral F-actin waves in several mammalian cell lines as well as in primary mouse embryonic fibroblasts. These “adhesive F-actin waves” require a cycle of integrin engagement and disengagement to the extracellular matrix for their formation and propagation, and exhibit morphometry and a hierarchical assembly and disassembly mechanism distinct from other integrin-containing structures. After Arp2/3-mediated actin polymerization, zyxin and VASP are co-recruited to adhesive F-actin waves, followed by paxillin and vinculin, and finally talin and integrin. Adhesive F-actin waves thus represent a previously uncharacterized integrin-based adhesion complex associated with Arp2/3-mediated actin polymerization. PMID:22069459

  6. Cadherin-mediated adhesion regulates posterior body formation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fasanmi Oluwafoyinsa

    2007-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The anterior-posterior axis of the vertebrate embryo undergoes a dramatic elongation during early development. Convergence and extension of the mesoderm, occurring during gastrulation, initiates the narrowing and lengthening of the embryo. However the lengthening of the axis continues during post-gastrula stages in the tailbud region, and is thought to involve convergent extension movements as well as other cell behaviors specific to posterior regions. Results We demonstrate here, using a semi-dominant N-cadherin allele, that members of the classical cadherin subfamily of cell-cell adhesion molecules are required for tailbud elongation in the zebrafish. In vivo imaging of cell behaviors suggests that the extension of posterior axial mesodermal cells is impaired in embryos that carry the semi-dominant N-cadherin allele. This defect most likely results from a general loss of cell-cell adhesion in the tailbud region. Consistent with these observations, N-cadherin is expressed throughout the tailbud during post-gastrulation stages. In addition, we show that N-cadherin interacts synergistically with vang-like 2, a member of the non-canonical Wnt signaling/planar cell polarity pathway, to mediate tail morphogenesis. Conclusion We provide the first evidence here that N-cadherin and other members of the classical cadherin subfamily function in parallel with the planar cell polarity pathway to shape the posterior axis during post-gastrulation stages. These findings further highlight the central role that adhesion molecules play in the cellular rearrangements that drive morphogenesis in vertebrates and identify classical cadherins as major contributors to tail development.

  7. Mini-review: The role of redox in DOPA-mediated marine adhesion

    OpenAIRE

    Nicklisch, Sascha; Waite, J. Herbert

    2012-01-01

    3, 4-Dihydroxyphenylanine (Dopa)-containing proteins are key to wet adhesion in mussels and possibly other sessile organisms also. However, Dopa-mediated adhesive bonding is a hard act to follow in that, at least in mussels, bonding depends on Dopa in both reduced and oxidized forms, for adhesion and cohesion, respectively. Given the vulnerability of Dopa to spontaneous oxidation, the most significant challenge to using it in practical adhesion is controlling Dopa redox in a temporally- and s...

  8. A proteomics view on integrin-mediated adhesions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manninen, Aki; Varjosalo, Markku

    2017-02-01

    Individual cells in multicellular organisms constantly explore their microenvironment, or niche, to obtain spatial information that is used to regulate cell behavior to maintain tissue integrity. The extracellular matrix (ECM) is an important source of such spatial information. Binding of the integrin family receptors to the ECM triggers formation of integrin adhesion complexes (IACs) that link the ECM network to cellular cytoskeleton via remarkably large multiprotein complexes collectively referred to as the integrin adhesome. Recent advances in proteomics have enabled researchers to study the IAC composition in detail. Various biochemical IAC isolation methods and culture conditions have been employed to study the composition and dynamics of integrin-mediated adhesions mainly in fibroblasts and lymphoblasts. These studies have led to identification of daunting lists of potential IAC components. This review focuses on the current status of proteomics-driven research seeking to understand integrin functions by comprehensive analysis of IAC components. These systems level approaches have revealed the complexity of biochemical and biomechanical signals that are processed at IACs and provide a novel insight into how these signals are conveyed to regulate cellular behavior. © 2016 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  9. E-cadherin homophilic ligation inhibits cell growth and epidermal growth factor receptor signaling independently of other cell interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perrais, Michaël; Chen, Xiao; Perez-Moreno, Mirna; Gumbiner, Barry M

    2007-06-01

    E-cadherin function leads to the density-dependent contact inhibition of cell growth. Because cadherins control the overall state of cell contact, cytoskeletal organization, and the establishment of many other kinds of cell interactions, it remains unknown whether E-cadherin directly transduces growth inhibitory signals. To address this question, we have selectively formed E-cadherin homophilic bonds at the cell surface of isolated epithelial cells by using functionally active recombinant E-cadherin protein attached to microspheres. We find that E-cadherin ligation alone reduces the frequency of cells entering the S phase, demonstrating that E-cadherin ligation directly transduces growth inhibitory signals. E-cadherin binding to beta-catenin is required for cell growth inhibition, but beta-catenin/T-cell factor transcriptional activity is not involved in growth inhibition resulting from homophilic binding. Neither E-cadherin binding to p120-catenin nor beta-catenin binding to alpha-catenin, and thereby the actin cytoskeleton, is required for growth inhibition. E-cadherin ligation also inhibits epidermal growth factor (EGF) receptor-mediated growth signaling by a beta-catenin-dependent mechanism. It does not affect EGF receptor autophosphorylation or activation of ERK, but it inhibits transphosphorylation of Tyr845 and activation of signal transducers and activators of transcription 5. Thus, E-cadherin homophilic binding independent of other cell contacts directly transduces growth inhibition by a beta-catenin-dependent mechanism that inhibits selective signaling functions of growth factor receptors.

  10. MHC class II ligation induces CD58 (LFA-3)-mediated adhesion in human T cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, M; Gerwien, J; Geisler, C

    1998-01-01

    MHC class II positive T cells found in areas of inflammation are believed to play an important pathogenetic role in autoimmunity. In experimental models , class II molecules have been shown to regulate adhesion between human T cells. It is, however, not known in detail how class II molecules...... are functionally linked to adhesion molecules. Some data suggest that beta2 integrin (CD11a/CD18) molecules play a role in class-II-induced homotypic adhesion in B cells, monocytes, and virus-transformed or neoplastic cell lines. We have previously obtained evidence that adhesion molecules other than beta2...... integrins might play a role in class-II-mediated adhesion in T cells. To study further class-II-mediated adhesion in T cells, we have taken advantage of (allo)antigen-specific beta2-integrin-negative, CD4-positive T cell lines obtained from a leukocyte adhesion deficiency patient. We show that class II...

  11. The role of phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase in neural cell adhesion molecule-mediated neuronal differentiation and survival

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ditlevsen, Dorte K; Køhler, Lene B; Pedersen, Martin Volmer

    2003-01-01

    The neural cell adhesion molecule, NCAM, is known to stimulate neurite outgrowth from primary neurones and PC12 cells presumably through signalling pathways involving the fibroblast growth factor receptor (FGFR), protein kinase A (PKA), protein kinase C (PKC), the Ras-mitogen activated protein...... kinase (MAPK) pathway and an increase in intracellular Ca2+ levels. Stimulation of neurones with the synthetic NCAM-ligand, C3, induces neurite outgrowth through signalling pathways similar to the pathways activated through physiological, homophilic NCAM-stimulation. We present here data indicating...... indicating a survival-promoting effect of NCAM-stimulation by C3 on cerebellar and dopaminergic neurones induced to undergo apoptosis. This protective effect of C3 included an inhibition of both DNA-fragmentation and caspase-3 activation. The survival-promoting effect of NCAM-stimulation was also shown...

  12. Amino-terminal domain of classic cadherins determines the specificity of the adhesive interactions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Klingelhöfer, Jörg; Troyanovsky, R B; Laur, O Y

    2000-01-01

    Classic cadherins are transmembrane receptors involved in cell type-specific calcium-dependent intercellular adhesion. The specificity of adhesion is mediated by homophilic interactions between cadherins extending from opposing cell surfaces. In addition, classic cadherins can self......-associate forming lateral dimers. Whereas it is widely excepted that lateral dimerization of cadherins is critical for adhesion, details of this process are not known. Yet, no evidence for physical association between different classic cadherins in cells expressing complex cadherin patterns has been reported....... To study lateral and adhesive intercadherin interactions, we examined interactions between two classic cadherins, E- and P-cadherins, in epithelial A-431 cells co-producing both proteins. We showed that these cells exhibited heterocomplexes consisting of laterally assembled E- and P...

  13. The minimal essential unit for cadherin-mediated intercellular adhesion comprises extracellular domains 1 and 2

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Shan, Weisong; Yagita, Yoshiki; Wang, Zhaohui

    2004-01-01

    , the following questions remain unanswered: what is the minimal domain combination that can generate cell adhesion, how is domain organization related to adhesive strength, and does the cytoplasmic domain serve to facilitate extracellular domain interaction? To address these issues, we made serial constructs...... of the extracellular domains of N-cadherin and produced various cell lines to examine adhesion properties. We show that the first domain of N-cadherin alone on the cell surface fails to generate adhesive activity and that the first two domains of N-cadherin form the "minimal essential unit" to mediate cell adhesion...

  14. Adhesions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adhesions are bands of scar-like tissue. Normally, internal tissues and organs have slippery surfaces so they can shift easily as the body moves. Adhesions cause tissues and organs to stick together. They ...

  15. CD13 is a novel mediator of monocytic/endothelial cell adhesion

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mina-Osorio, Paola; Winnicka, Beata; O'Conor, Catherine

    2008-01-01

    During inflammation, cell surface adhesion molecules guide the adhesion and migration of circulating leukocytes across the endothelial cells lining the blood vessels to access the site of injury. The transmembrane molecule CD13 is expressed on monocytes and endothelial cells and has been shown...... to mediate homotypic cell adhesion, which may imply a role for CD13 in inflammatory monocyte trafficking. Here, we show that ligation and clustering of CD13 by mAb or viral ligands potently induce myeloid cell/endothelial adhesion in a signal transduction-dependent manner involving monocytic cytoskeletal...... rearrangement and filopodia formation. Treatment with soluble recombinant (r)CD13 blocks this CD13-dependent adhesion, and CD13 molecules from monocytic and endothelial cells are present in the same immunocomplex, suggesting a direct participation of CD13 in the adhesive interaction. This concept...

  16. Surface Tension Mediated Under-Water Adhesion of Rigid Spheres on Soft, Charged Surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sinha, Shayandev; Das, Siddhartha

    2015-11-01

    Understanding the phenomenon of surface-tension-mediated under-water adhesion is necessary for studying a plethora of physiological and technical phenomena, such as the uptake of bacteria or nanoparticle by cells, attachment of virus on bacterial surfaces, biofouling on large ocean vessels and marine devices, etc. This adhesion phenomenon becomes highly non-trivial in case the soft surface where the adhesion occurs is also charged. Here we propose a theory for analyzing such an under-water adhesion of a rigid sphere on a soft, charged surface, represented by a grafted polyelectrolyte layer (PEL). We develop a model based on the minimization of free energy that, in addition to considering the elastic and the surface-tension-mediated adhesion energies, also accounts for the PEL electric double layer (EDL) induced electrostatic energies. We show that in the presence of surface charges, adhesion gets enhanced. This can be explained by the fact that the increase in the elastic energy is better balanced by the lowering of the EDL energy associated with the adhesion process. The entire behaviour is further dictated by the surface tension components that govern the adhesion energy.

  17. Molecular mechanisms of mechanotransduction in integrin-mediated cell-matrix adhesion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Zhenhai; Lee, Hyunjung; Zhu, Cheng

    2016-11-15

    Cell-matrix adhesion complexes are multi-protein structures linking the extracellular matrix (ECM) to the cytoskeleton. They are essential to both cell motility and function by bidirectionally sensing and transmitting mechanical and biochemical stimulations. Several types of cell-matrix adhesions have been identified and they share many key molecular components, such as integrins and actin-integrin linkers. Mechanochemical coupling between ECM molecules and the actin cytoskeleton has been observed from the single cell to the single molecule level and from immune cells to neuronal cells. However, the mechanisms underlying force regulation of integrin-mediated mechanotransduction still need to be elucidated. In this review article, we focus on integrin-mediated adhesions and discuss force regulation of cell-matrix adhesions and key adaptor molecules, three different force-dependent behaviors, and molecular mechanisms for mechanochemical coupling in force regulation. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. cAMP receptor protein regulates mouse colonization, motility, fimbria-mediated adhesion, and stress tolerance in uropathogenic Proteus mirabilis

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Yi-Lin Tsai; Hsiung-Fei Chien; Kuo-Tong Huang; Wen-Yuan Lin; Shwu-Jen Liaw

    2017-01-01

    .... This study demonstrated that Crp affects numerous virulence-related phenotypes, including colonization of mice, motility, fimbria-mediated adhesion, and glucose stress tolerance in uropathogenic Proteus mirabilis...

  19. The neural cell adhesion molecule

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Berezin, V; Bock, E; Poulsen, F M

    2000-01-01

    During the past year, the understanding of the structure and function of neural cell adhesion has advanced considerably. The three-dimensional structures of several of the individual modules of the neural cell adhesion molecule (NCAM) have been determined, as well as the structure of the complex...... between two identical fragments of the NCAM. Also during the past year, a link between homophilic cell adhesion and several signal transduction pathways has been proposed, connecting the event of cell surface adhesion to cellular responses such as neurite outgrowth. Finally, the stimulation of neurite...

  20. Combined modeling of cell aggregation and adhesion mediated by receptor–ligand interactions under shear flow

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yu Du

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Blood cell aggregation and adhesion to endothelial cells under shear flow are crucial to many biological processes such as thrombi formation, inflammatory cascade, and tumor metastasis, in which these cellular interactions are mainly mediated by the underlying receptor–ligand bindings. While theoretical modeling of aggregation dynamics and adhesion kinetics of interacting cells have been well studied separately, how to couple these two processes remains unclear. Here we develop a combined model that couples cellular aggregation dynamics and adhesion kinetics under shear flow. The impacts of shear rate (or shear stress and molecular binding affinity were elucidated. This study provides a unified model where the action of a fluid flow drives cell aggregation and adhesion under the modulations of the mechanical shear flow and receptor–ligand interaction kinetics. It offers an insight into understanding the relevant biological processes and functions.

  1. Zoledronic acid and atorvastatin inhibit αvβ3-mediated adhesion of breast cancer cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Wilke

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Bone metastases represent common long term complications of patients with breast cancer. Zoledronic acid, an amino-bisphosphonate and mevalonate pathway inhibitor, is an established agent for the treatment of bone metastases. Direct antitumor effects of zoledronic acid have been proposed in breast cancer. Statins are another group of mevalonate pathway inhibitors that have been repeatedly discussed for potential anti-tumor activity. In this study, we tested the hypothesis, whether these agents regulate adhesion of breast cancer cells to extracellular matrix components. Treatment of breast cancer cells with zoledronic acid and atorvastatin, significantly impaired MDA-MB-231 breast cancer cell adhesion on the αvβ3 ligands gelatin and vitronectin, but had no effect on collagen type 1 (α2β1-ligand and fibronectin (α5β1-ligand. Anti-adhesive effects of zoledronic acid were fully reversed by geranylgeranyl pyrophosphate (GGPP, but not by farnesylpyrophosphate (FPP. Furthermore, effects of zoledronic acid and atorvastatin were mimicked by a specific inhibitor of geranylgeranylation GGTI-298. Functional (using integrin array and quantitative (using FACS integrin analyses on MDA-231 cells following zoledronic acid exposure revealed decreased levels of αv and αvβ3 expression. In addition to its effects on integrin mediated adhesion of breast cancer cells, the presence of zoledronic acid caused pronounced morphological changes in MDA-231 cells as seen by F-actin and vinculin rearrangement. Furthermore, phosphorylation of the focal adhesion kinase was inhibited by zoledronic acid. In both cases, changes were fully reversed by GGPP. These results emphasize the role of mevalonate pathway mediated impairment of geranylgeranylation in the anti-adhesive effects of zoledronic acid in breast cancer cells.

  2. In vivo gene transfer and overexpression of focal adhesion kinase (pp125 FAK) mediated by recombinant adenovirus-induced tendon adhesion formation and epitenon cell change.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lou, J; Kubota, H; Hotokezaka, S; Ludwig, F J; Manske, P R

    1997-11-01

    Adhesion formation is a frequent complication of tendon injury repair: however, little is known about its mechanisms. The intracellular focal adhesion kinase (FAK)-related signaling pathway may be one of the mechanisms involved in the induction of tendon adhesions. The replication deficient adenovirus containing the FAK gene (pp125 FAK) was constructed and named Adv-Fak. By in vitro transductions with the recombinant virus, overexpression of the FAK protein was documented in transduced cultured primary tendon cells. By in vivo direct injection of Adv-FAK into the space between the tendon and tendon sheath of White Leghorn chickens, FAK gene transfer with overexpression of the FAK protein was detected by immunohistological staining. The morphology of these stained cells changed from the normal flat shape to cuboid. The group with overexpressed adenovirus-mediated FAK had significant adhesion formation, as seen by increased work of flexion (118.197 +/- 29.616), compared with the group with overexpressed adenovirus-mediated beta-galactosidase (67.507 +/- 36.066) (p applied. Our results show that overexpression of FAK can induce tendon adhesion formation in vivo. This indicates that FAK and the FAK-related signaling pathway may be involved in the process of tendon adhesion formation. Understanding the details of this process may help to prevent tendon adhesion and improve healing.

  3. Democratizing LGBTQ History Online: Digitizing Public History in "U.S. Homophile Internationalism".

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Szegheo Lang, Tamara

    2017-01-01

    This article argues that the online archive and exhibit "U.S. Homophile Internationalism" effectively contributes to the democratizing effects that digital archives and online initiatives are having on the practice of history. "U.S. Homophile Internationalism" is an online archive of over 800 digitized articles, letters, advertisements, and other materials from the U.S. homophile press that reference six non-U.S. regions of the world. It also provides visitors with introductory regional essays, annotated bibliographies, and an interactive map feature. This essay weaves "U.S. Homophile Internationalism" into the debates in community-run LGBTQ archives regarding the digitization of archival materials and the possibilities presented by digital public history. In doing so, it outlines the structure and content of "U.S. Homophile Internationalism," highlighting how it increases the public accessibility of primary sources, encourages historical research on regions of the world that have not been adequately represented in LGBTQ history writing, and creates interactive components to support public engagements with the Web site.

  4. Extracellular Alix regulates integrin-mediated cell adhesions and extracellular matrix assembly.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pan, Shujuan; Wang, Ruoning; Zhou, Xi; Corvera, Joe; Kloc, Malgorzata; Sifers, Richard; Gallick, Gary E; Lin, Sue-Hwa; Kuang, Jian

    2008-08-06

    Alix (ALG-2-interacting protein X), a cytoplasmic adaptor protein involved in endosomal sorting and actin cytoskeleton assembly, is required for the maintenance of fibroblast morphology. As Alix has sequence similarity to adhesin in Entamoeba histolytica, and we observed that Alix is secreted, we determined whether extracellular Alix affects fibroblast morphology. Here, we demonstrate that secreted Alix is deposited on the substratum of non-immortalized WI38 fibroblasts. Antibody binding to extracellular Alix retards WI38 cell adhesion and spreading on fibronectin and vitronectin. Alix knockdown in WI38 cells reduces spreading and fibronectin assembly, and the effect is partially complemented by coating recombinant Alix on the cell substratum. Immortalized NIH/3T3 fibroblasts deposit less Alix on the substratum and have defects in alpha5beta1-integrin functions. Coating recombinant Alix on the culture substratum for NIH/3T3 cells promotes alpha5beta1-integrin-mediated cell adhesions and fibronectin assembly, and these effects require the aa 605-709 region of Alix. These findings demonstrate that a sub-population of Alix localizes extracellularly and regulates integrin-mediated cell adhesions and fibronectin matrix assembly.

  5. CELLULAR INTERACTIONS MEDIATED BY GLYCONECTIDS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    O.Popescu

    1999-01-01

    Full Text Available Cellular interactions involve many types of cell surface molecules and operate via homophilic and/or heterophilic protein-protein and protein-carbohydrate binding. Our investigations in different model-systems (marine invertebrates and mammals have provided direct evidence that a novel class of primordial proteoglycans, named by us gliconectins, can mediate cell adhesion via a new alternative molecular mechanism of polyvalent carbohydrate-carbohydrate binding. Biochemical characterization of isolated and purified glyconectins revealed the presence of specific carbohydrate structures, acidic glycans, different from classical glycosaminoglycans. Such acidic glycans of high molecular weight containing fucose, glucuronic or galacturonic acids, and sulfate groups, originally found in sponges and sea urchin embryos, may represent a new class of carbohydrate carcino-embryonal antigens in mice and humans. Such interactions between biological macromolecules are usually investigated by kinetic binding studies, calorimetric methods, X-ray diffraction, nuclear magnetic resonance, and other spectroscopic analyses. However, these methods do not supply a direct estimation of the intermolecular binding forces that are fundamental for the function of the ligand-receptor association. Recently, we have introduced atomic force microscopy to quantify the binding strength between cell adhesion proteoglycans. Measurement of binding forces intrinsic to cell adhesion proteoglycans is necessary to assess their contribution to the maintenance of the anatomical integrity of multicellular organisms. As a model, we selected the glyconectin 1, a cell adhesion proteoglycan isolated from the marine sponge Microciona prolifera. This glyconectin mediates in vivo cell recognition and aggregation via homophilic, species-specific, polyvalent, and calcium ion-dependent carbohydrate-carbohydrate interactions. Under physiological conditions, an adhesive force of up to 400 piconewtons

  6. Characterization of BASP1-mediated neurite outgrowth

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Korshunova, Irina; Caroni, Pico; Kolkova, Kateryna

    2008-01-01

    The brain acid-soluble protein BASP1 (CAP-23, NAP-22) belongs to the family of growth-associated proteins, which also includes GAP-43, a protein recently shown to regulate neural cell adhesion molecule (NCAM)-mediated neurite outgrowth. Here, the effects of BASP1 overexpression were investigated...... in PC12E2 cells and primary hippocampal neurons. BASP1 overexpression stimulated neurite outgrowth in both cell types. The effects of BASP1 and trans-homophilic NCAM interactions were additive, and BASP1-induced neurite outgrowth was not inhibited by ectopic expression of cytoplasmic NCAM domains...... on neurite outgrowth. Finally, coexpression experiments with dominant negative and wild-type versions of GAP-43 and BASP1 demonstrated that the two proteins could substitute for each other with respect to induction of NCAM-independent neurite outgrowth, whereas BASP1 was unable to replace the stimulatory...

  7. The molecular mechanism of mediation of adsorbed serum proteins to endothelial cells adhesion and growth on biomaterials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Dayun; Lü, Xiaoying; Hong, Ying; Xi, Tingfei; Zhang, Deyuan

    2013-07-01

    To explore molecular mechanism of mediation of adsorbed proteins to cell adhesion and growth on biomaterials, this study examined endothelial cell adhesion, morphology and viability on bare and titanium nitride (TiN) coated nickel titanium (NiTi) alloys and chitosan film firstly, and then identified the type and amount of serum proteins adsorbed on the three surfaces by proteomic technology. Subsequently, the mediation role of the identified proteins to cell adhesion and growth was investigated with bioinformatics analyses, and further confirmed by a series of cellular and molecular biological experiments. Results showed that the type and amount of adsorbed serum proteins associated with cell adhesion and growth was obviously higher on the alloys than on the chitosan film, and these proteins mediated endothelial cell adhesion and growth on the alloys via four ways. First, proteins such as adiponectin in the adsorbed protein layer bound with cell surface receptors to generate signal transduction, which activated cell surface integrins through increasing intracellular calcium level. Another way, thrombospondin 1 in the adsorbed protein layer promoted TGF-β signaling pathway activation and enhanced integrins expression. The third, RGD sequence containing proteins such as fibronectin 1, vitronectin and thrombospondin 1 in the adsorbed protein layer bound with activated integrins to activate focal adhesion pathway, increased focal adhesion formation and actin cytoskeleton organization and mediated cell adhesion and spreading. In addition, the activated focal adhesion pathway promoted the expression of cell growth related genes and resulted in cell proliferation. The fourth route, coagulation factor II (F2) and fibronectin 1 in the adsorbed protein layer bound with cell surface F2 receptor and integrin, activated regulation of actin cytoskeleton pathway and regulated actin cytoskeleton organization. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Saikosaponin D Isolated from Bupleurum falcatum Inhibits Selectin-Mediated Cell Adhesion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Myoung-Jun Jang

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Three saikosaponins were isolated from the MeOH extract of the roots of Bupleurum falcatum L.: saikosaponins B3 (1; B4 (2; and D (3. Of the three, compound 3 inhibited the interaction of selectins (E, L, and P and THP-1 cells with IC50 values of 1.8, 3.0 and 4.3 µM, respectively. Also, the aglycone structure 4 of compound 3 showed moderate inhibitory activity on L-selectin-mediated cell adhesion. From these results, we suspect that compound 3 isolated from Bupleurum falcatum roots would be a good candidate for therapeutic strategies to treat inflammation.

  9. CADM1 is a key receptor mediating human mast cell adhesion to human lung fibroblasts and airway smooth muscle cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elena P Moiseeva

    Full Text Available Mast cells (MCs play a central role in the development of many diseases including asthma and pulmonary fibrosis. Interactions of human lung mast cells (HLMCs with human airway smooth muscle cells (HASMCs are partially dependent on adhesion mediated by cell adhesion molecule-1 (CADM1, but the adhesion mechanism through which HLMCs interact with human lung fibroblasts (HLFs is not known. CADM1 is expressed as several isoforms (SP4, SP1, SP6 in HLMCs, with SP4 dominant. These isoforms differentially regulate HLMC homotypic adhesion and survival.In this study we have investigated the role of CADM1 isoforms in the adhesion of HLMCs and HMC-1 cells to primary HASMCs and HLFs.CADM1 overexpression or downregulation was achieved using adenoviral delivery of CADM1 short hairpin RNAs or isoform-specific cDNAs respectively.Downregulation of CADM1 attenuated both HLMC and HMC-1 adhesion to both primary HASMCs and HLFs. Overexpression of either SP1 or SP4 isoforms did not alter MC adhesion to HASMCs, whereas overexpression of SP4, but not SP1, significantly increased both HMC-1 cell and HLMC adhesion to HLFs. The expression level of CADM1 SP4 strongly predicted the extent of MC adhesion; linear regression indicated that CADM1 accounts for up to 67% and 32% of adhesion to HLFs for HMC-1 cells and HLMCs, respectively. HLFs supported HLMC proliferation and survival through a CADM1-dependent mechanism. With respect to CADM1 counter-receptor expression, HLFs expressed both CADM1 and nectin-3, whereas HASMCs expressed only nectin-3.Collectively these data indicate that the CADM1 SP4 isoform is a key receptor mediating human MC adhesion to HASMCs and HLFs. The differential expression of CADM1 counter-receptors on HLFs compared to HASMCs may allow the specific targeting of either HLMC-HLF or HLMC-HASMC interactions in the lung parenchyma and airways.

  10. CADM1 Is a Key Receptor Mediating Human Mast Cell Adhesion to Human Lung Fibroblasts and Airway Smooth Muscle Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moiseeva, Elena P.; Roach, Katy M.; Leyland, Mark L.; Bradding, Peter

    2013-01-01

    Background Mast cells (MCs) play a central role in the development of many diseases including asthma and pulmonary fibrosis. Interactions of human lung mast cells (HLMCs) with human airway smooth muscle cells (HASMCs) are partially dependent on adhesion mediated by cell adhesion molecule-1 (CADM1), but the adhesion mechanism through which HLMCs interact with human lung fibroblasts (HLFs) is not known. CADM1 is expressed as several isoforms (SP4, SP1, SP6) in HLMCs, with SP4 dominant. These isoforms differentially regulate HLMC homotypic adhesion and survival. Objective In this study we have investigated the role of CADM1 isoforms in the adhesion of HLMCs and HMC-1 cells to primary HASMCs and HLFs. Methods CADM1 overexpression or downregulation was achieved using adenoviral delivery of CADM1 short hairpin RNAs or isoform-specific cDNAs respectively. Results Downregulation of CADM1 attenuated both HLMC and HMC-1 adhesion to both primary HASMCs and HLFs. Overexpression of either SP1 or SP4 isoforms did not alter MC adhesion to HASMCs, whereas overexpression of SP4, but not SP1, significantly increased both HMC-1 cell and HLMC adhesion to HLFs. The expression level of CADM1 SP4 strongly predicted the extent of MC adhesion; linear regression indicated that CADM1 accounts for up to 67% and 32% of adhesion to HLFs for HMC-1 cells and HLMCs, respectively. HLFs supported HLMC proliferation and survival through a CADM1-dependent mechanism. With respect to CADM1 counter-receptor expression, HLFs expressed both CADM1 and nectin-3, whereas HASMCs expressed only nectin-3. Conclusion and Clinical Relevance Collectively these data indicate that the CADM1 SP4 isoform is a key receptor mediating human MC adhesion to HASMCs and HLFs. The differential expression of CADM1 counter-receptors on HLFs compared to HASMCs may allow the specific targeting of either HLMC-HLF or HLMC-HASMC interactions in the lung parenchyma and airways. PMID:23620770

  11. AlphaE-catenin regulates actin dynamics independently of cadherin-mediated cell-cell adhesion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benjamin, Jacqueline M; Kwiatkowski, Adam V; Yang, Changsong; Korobova, Farida; Pokutta, Sabine; Svitkina, Tatyana; Weis, William I; Nelson, W James

    2010-04-19

    alphaE-catenin binds the cell-cell adhesion complex of E-cadherin and beta-catenin (beta-cat) and regulates filamentous actin (F-actin) dynamics. In vitro, binding of alphaE-catenin to the E-cadherin-beta-cat complex lowers alphaE-catenin affinity for F-actin, and alphaE-catenin alone can bind F-actin and inhibit Arp2/3 complex-mediated actin polymerization. In cells, to test whether alphaE-catenin regulates actin dynamics independently of the cadherin complex, the cytosolic alphaE-catenin pool was sequestered to mitochondria without affecting overall levels of alphaE-catenin or the cadherin-catenin complex. Sequestering cytosolic alphaE-catenin to mitochondria alters lamellipodia architecture and increases membrane dynamics and cell migration without affecting cell-cell adhesion. In contrast, sequestration of cytosolic alphaE-catenin to the plasma membrane reduces membrane dynamics. These results demonstrate that the cytosolic pool of alphaE-catenin regulates actin dynamics independently of cell-cell adhesion.

  12. αE-catenin regulates actin dynamics independently of cadherin-mediated cell–cell adhesion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benjamin, Jacqueline M.; Kwiatkowski, Adam V.; Yang, Changsong; Korobova, Farida; Pokutta, Sabine; Svitkina, Tatyana

    2010-01-01

    αE-catenin binds the cell–cell adhesion complex of E-cadherin and β-catenin (β-cat) and regulates filamentous actin (F-actin) dynamics. In vitro, binding of αE-catenin to the E-cadherin–β-cat complex lowers αE-catenin affinity for F-actin, and αE-catenin alone can bind F-actin and inhibit Arp2/3 complex–mediated actin polymerization. In cells, to test whether αE-catenin regulates actin dynamics independently of the cadherin complex, the cytosolic αE-catenin pool was sequestered to mitochondria without affecting overall levels of αE-catenin or the cadherin–catenin complex. Sequestering cytosolic αE-catenin to mitochondria alters lamellipodia architecture and increases membrane dynamics and cell migration without affecting cell–cell adhesion. In contrast, sequestration of cytosolic αE-catenin to the plasma membrane reduces membrane dynamics. These results demonstrate that the cytosolic pool of αE-catenin regulates actin dynamics independently of cell–cell adhesion. PMID:20404114

  13. WF10 Stimulates NK Cell Cytotoxicity by Increasing LFA-1-Mediated Adhesion to Tumor Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Louisa Kühne

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The redox-active chlorite-based drug WF10 (Immunokine was shown to have modulatory effects on both the innate and adaptive immune system in vitro and in vivo. Animal studies suggest that WF10 enhances immunity against tumors. One possible explanation for such an effect is that WF10 stimulates natural killer cell cytotoxicity against malignant cells. Here, we show that WF10 regulates human NK cell cytotoxicity in a time-dependent manner, following an S-shaped kinetic with an initial stimulation of activity followed by a decrease in activity relative to the untreated controls. WF10 does not activate NK cells on its own but co-stimulates NK cell activation mediated by different activating receptors. This is mediated by enhancing NK cell adhesion to target cells through promoting the activation of the integrin LFA-1. These data demonstrate a direct effect of WF10 on the cytotoxicity of human NK cells.

  14. Rapid adhesion of nerve cells to muscle fibers from adult rats is mediated by a sialic acid-binding receptor

    OpenAIRE

    1986-01-01

    Single viable muscle fibers isolated from adult rats by collagenase digestion rapidly bind dissociated spinal neurons or PC-12 cells but not a variety of other cells tested. The adhesion process is calcium- independent, temperature-sensitive, and is not blocked by pretreating cells with inhibitors of energy metabolism or actin polymerization. Adhesion is mediated by a carbohydrate-binding protein and can be inhibited by N-acetylneuraminic acid or mucin, a glycoprotein with high sialic acids c...

  15. Kinetics of LFA-1 mediated adhesion of human neutrophils to ICAM-1-role of E-selectin signaling post-activation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    LFA-1 and Mac-1 are the two integrins involved in the arrest and firm adhesion of neutrophils. LFA-1 plays a role in the early stage of cell arrest while Mac-1 stabilizes firm adhesion. Here, we further elucidated the kinetics of LFA-1 activation and its role in mediating neutrophil adhesion to ICAM...

  16. Fibrin serves as a divalent ligand that regulates neutrophil-mediated melanoma cells adhesion to endothelium under shear conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ozdemir, Tugba; Zhang, Pu; Fu, Changliang

    2012-01-01

    Elevated soluble fibrin (sFn) levels are characteristic of melanoma hematogeneous dissemination, where tumor cells interact intimately with host cells. Melanoma adhesion to the blood vessel wall is promoted by immune cell arrests and tumor-derived thrombin, a serine protease that converts soluble fibrinogen (sFg) into sFn. However, the molecular requirement for sFn-mediated melanoma-polymorphonuclear neutrophils (PMNs) and melanoma-endothelial interactions under physiological flow conditions remain elusive. To understand this process, we studied the relative binding capacities of sFg and sFn receptors e.g., αvβ3 integrin and intercellular adhesion molecule-1 (ICAM-1) expressed on melanoma cells, ICAM-1 on endothelial cells (EC), and CD11b/CD18 (Mac-1) on PMNs. Using a parallel-plate flow chamber, highly metastatic melanoma cells (1205Lu and A375M) and human PMNs were perfused over an EC monolayer expressing ICAM-1 in the presence of sFg or sFn. It was found that both the frequency and lifetime of direct melanoma adhesion or PMN-facilitated melanoma adhesion to the EC in a shear flow were increased by the presence of sFn in a concentration-dependent manner. In addition, sFn fragment D and plasmin-treated sFn failed to increase melanoma adhesion, implying that sFn-bridged cell adhesion requires dimer-mediated receptor-receptor cross-linking. Finally, analysis of the respective kinetics of sFn binding to Mac-1, ICAM-1, and αvβ3 by single bond cell tethering assays suggested that ICAM-1 and αvβ3 are responsible for initial capture and firm adhesion of melanoma cells. These results provide evidence that sFn enhances melanoma adhesion directly to ICAM-1 on the EC, while prolonged shear-resistant melanoma adhesion requires interactions with PMNs. PMID:22262064

  17. Fibrin serves as a divalent ligand that regulates neutrophil-mediated melanoma cells adhesion to endothelium under shear conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ozdemir, Tugba; Zhang, Pu; Fu, Changliang; Dong, Cheng

    2012-04-15

    Elevated soluble fibrin (sFn) levels are characteristic of melanoma hematogeneous dissemination, where tumor cells interact intimately with host cells. Melanoma adhesion to the blood vessel wall is promoted by immune cell arrests and tumor-derived thrombin, a serine protease that converts soluble fibrinogen (sFg) into sFn. However, the molecular requirement for sFn-mediated melanoma-polymorphonuclear neutrophils (PMNs) and melanoma-endothelial interactions under physiological flow conditions remain elusive. To understand this process, we studied the relative binding capacities of sFg and sFn receptors e.g., α(v)β(3) integrin and intercellular adhesion molecule-1 (ICAM-1) expressed on melanoma cells, ICAM-1 on endothelial cells (EC), and CD11b/CD18 (Mac-1) on PMNs. Using a parallel-plate flow chamber, highly metastatic melanoma cells (1205Lu and A375M) and human PMNs were perfused over an EC monolayer expressing ICAM-1 in the presence of sFg or sFn. It was found that both the frequency and lifetime of direct melanoma adhesion or PMN-facilitated melanoma adhesion to the EC in a shear flow were increased by the presence of sFn in a concentration-dependent manner. In addition, sFn fragment D and plasmin-treated sFn failed to increase melanoma adhesion, implying that sFn-bridged cell adhesion requires dimer-mediated receptor-receptor cross-linking. Finally, analysis of the respective kinetics of sFn binding to Mac-1, ICAM-1, and α(v)β(3) by single bond cell tethering assays suggested that ICAM-1 and α(v)β(3) are responsible for initial capture and firm adhesion of melanoma cells. These results provide evidence that sFn enhances melanoma adhesion directly to ICAM-1 on the EC, while prolonged shear-resistant melanoma adhesion requires interactions with PMNs.

  18. Synaptic adhesion molecule IgSF11 regulates synaptic transmission and plasticity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shin, Hyewon; van Riesen, Christoph; Whitcomb, Daniel; Warburton, Julia M.; Jo, Jihoon; Kim, Doyoun; Kim, Sun Gyun; Um, Seung Min; Kwon, Seok-kyu; Kim, Myoung-Hwan; Roh, Junyeop Daniel; Woo, Jooyeon; Jun, Heejung; Lee, Dongmin; Mah, Won; Kim, Hyun; Kaang, Bong-Kiun; Cho, Kwangwook; Rhee, Jeong-Seop; Choquet, Daniel; Kim, Eunjoon

    2016-01-01

    Summary Synaptic adhesion molecules regulate synapse development and plasticity through mechanisms including trans-synaptic adhesion and recruitment of diverse synaptic proteins. We report here that the immunoglobulin superfamily member 11 (IgSF11), a homophilic adhesion molecule preferentially expressed in the brain, is a novel and dual-binding partner of the postsynaptic scaffolding protein PSD-95 and AMPAR glutamate receptors (AMPARs). IgSF11 requires PSD-95 binding for its excitatory synaptic localization. In addition, IgSF11 stabilizes synaptic AMPARs, as shown by IgSF11 knockdown-induced suppression of AMPAR-mediated synaptic transmission and increased surface mobility of AMPARs, measured by high-throughput, single-molecule tracking. IgSF11 deletion in mice leads to suppression of AMPAR-mediated synaptic transmission in the dentate gyrus and long-term potentiation in the CA1 region of the hippocampus. IgSF11 does not regulate the functional characteristics of AMPARs, including desensitization, deactivation, or recovery. These results suggest that IgSF11 regulates excitatory synaptic transmission and plasticity through its tripartite interactions with PSD-95 and AMPARs. PMID:26595655

  19. The Trw type IV secretion system of Bartonella mediates host-specific adhesion to erythrocytes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Muriel Vayssier-Taussat

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Bacterial pathogens typically infect only a limited range of hosts; however, the genetic mechanisms governing host-specificity are poorly understood. The alpha-proteobacterial genus Bartonella comprises 21 species that cause host-specific intraerythrocytic bacteremia as hallmark of infection in their respective mammalian reservoirs, including the human-specific pathogens Bartonella quintana and Bartonella bacilliformis that cause trench fever and Oroya fever, respectively. Here, we have identified bacterial factors that mediate host-specific erythrocyte colonization in the mammalian reservoirs. Using mouse-specific Bartonella birtlesii, human-specific Bartonella quintana, cat-specific Bartonella henselae and rat-specific Bartonella tribocorum, we established in vitro adhesion and invasion assays with isolated erythrocytes that fully reproduce the host-specificity of erythrocyte infection as observed in vivo. By signature-tagged mutagenesis of B. birtlesii and mutant selection in a mouse infection model we identified mutants impaired in establishing intraerythrocytic bacteremia. Among 45 abacteremic mutants, five failed to adhere to and invade mouse erythrocytes in vitro. The corresponding genes encode components of the type IV secretion system (T4SS Trw, demonstrating that this virulence factor laterally acquired by the Bartonella lineage is directly involved in adherence to erythrocytes. Strikingly, ectopic expression of Trw of rat-specific B. tribocorum in cat-specific B. henselae or human-specific B. quintana expanded their host range for erythrocyte infection to rat, demonstrating that Trw mediates host-specific erythrocyte infection. A molecular evolutionary analysis of the trw locus further indicated that the variable, surface-located TrwL and TrwJ might represent the T4SS components that determine host-specificity of erythrocyte parasitism. In conclusion, we show that the laterally acquired Trw T4SS diversified in the Bartonella lineage

  20. DE-cadherin-mediated cell adhesion is essential for maintaining somatic stem cells in the Drosophila ovary.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Xiaoqing; Xie, Ting

    2002-11-12

    Evidence from many systems has shown that stem cells are maintained in "niches" or specific regulatory microenvironments formed by stromal cells. The question of how stem cells are maintained in their niches is important, and further studies will lead to a better understanding of stem cell regulation and enhance the future use of stem cells in regenerative medicine. Here we show that cadherin-mediated cell adhesion is required for anchoring somatic stem cells (SSCs) to their niches in the Drosophila ovary. DE-cadherin and Armadillo/beta-catenin accumulate in the junctions between SSCs and their neighboring cells, inner germarial sheath cells. Removal of DE-cadherin from SSCs results in stem cell loss in the adult ovary. Furthermore, the cadherin-mediated adhesion is also important for maintaining SSCs in their niches before adulthood. This study provides further support that SSCs are located in a niche formed by their neighboring cells. We have previously shown that DE-cadherin-mediated cell adhesion is essential for anchoring germ-line stem cells to their niches in the Drosophila ovary. This study further implicates cadherin-mediated cell adhesion as a general mechanism for anchoring stem cells to their niches in a variety of systems.

  1. New insights into the molecular mechanism of E-cadherin-mediated cell adhesion by free energy calculations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Doro, Fabio; Saladino, Giorgio; Belvisi, Laura

    2015-01-01

    swapping to mediate cell adhesion. However, despite its importance, the molecular mechanism of domain swapping is still debated. Here, we study the conformational changes that lead to activation and dimerization via domain swapping of E-cadherin. Using state-of-the-art enhanced sampling atomistic...

  2. Neural cell adhesion molecule induces intracellular signaling via multiple mechanisms of Ca2+ homeostasis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kiryushko, Darya; Korshunova, Irina; Berezin, Vladimir

    2006-01-01

    The neural cell adhesion molecule (NCAM) plays a pivotal role in the development of the nervous system, promoting neuronal differentiation via homophilic (NCAM-NCAM) as well as heterophilic (NCAM-fibroblast growth factor receptor [FGFR]) interactions. NCAM-induced intracellular signaling has been...

  3. Galaptin Mediates the Effect of Hypergravity on Vascular Smooth Muscle cell (SMC) Adhesion to Laminin Containing Matrices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Enahora, Fatisha T.; Bosah, Francis N.; Harris-Hooker, Sandra; Sanford, Gary L.

    1997-01-01

    Galaptin, an endogenous beta-galactoside specific lectin, has been reported to bind to laminin and subsequently decrease the binding of SMC. Cellular function depend on cell:matrix interactions. Hypergravity (HGrav) affect a number of cellular functions, yet little is known about its affect on cell adhesion. We examined the possibility that galaptin mediates the effects of hypergravity on SMC adherence. Confluent primate aorta SMC cultures were subjected to Hgrav (centrifuged at 6G) for 24 and 48 hr. Cells were non-enzymatically dispersed, pretreated with antisense (AS-oligo) or control sense (SS-oligo) oligonucleotides to galaptin mRNA (0.01 micro g/ml), then seeded in uncoated or ECL-matrix coated plates. Adhesion of cells were monitored after 6 hr. HGrav increased adhesion by 100-300% compared to controls. AS-oligo decreased adhesion for both HGrav and control cells. SS-oligo did not affect adhesion for either HGrav or control cells. These studies show that HGrav affects cell adhesion and that galaptin expression is required for this effect.

  4. Laminin α2-mediated focal adhesion kinase activation triggers Alport glomerular pathogenesis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Duane Delimont

    Full Text Available It has been known for some time that laminins containing α1 and α2 chains, which are normally restricted to the mesangial matrix, accumulate in the glomerular basement membranes (GBM of Alport mice, dogs, and humans. We show that laminins containing the α2 chain, but not those containing the α1 chain activates focal adhesion kinase (FAK on glomerular podocytes in vitro and in vivo. CD151-null mice, which have weakened podocyte adhesion to the GBM rendering these mice more susceptible to biomechanical strain in the glomerulus, also show progressive accumulation of α2 laminins in the GBM, and podocyte FAK activation. Analysis of glomerular mRNA from both models demonstrates significant induction of MMP-9, MMP-10, MMP-12, MMPs linked to GBM destruction in Alport disease models, as well as the pro-inflammatory cytokine IL-6. SiRNA knockdown of FAK in cultured podocytes significantly reduced expression of MMP-9, MMP-10 and IL-6, but not MMP-12. Treatment of Alport mice with TAE226, a small molecule inhibitor of FAK activation, ameliorated fibrosis and glomerulosclerosis, significantly reduced proteinuria and blood urea nitrogen levels, and partially restored GBM ultrastructure. Glomerular expression of MMP-9, MMP-10 and MMP-12 mRNAs was significantly reduced in TAE226 treated animals. Collectively, this work identifies laminin α2-mediated FAK activation in podocytes as an important early event in Alport glomerular pathogenesis and suggests that FAK inhibitors, if safe formulations can be developed, might be employed as a novel therapeutic approach for treating Alport renal disease in its early stages.

  5. Helicobacter pylori adhesion to gastric epithelial cells is mediated by glycan receptors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Magalhães

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available Helicobacter pylori adhesion to gastric epithelial cells constitutes a key step in the establishment of a successful infection of the gastric mucosa. The high representation of outer membrane proteins in the bacterial genome suggests the relevance of those proteins in the establishment of profitable interactions with the host gastric cells. Gastric epithelial cells are protected by a mucous layer gel, mainly consisting of the MUC5AC and MUC6 mucins. In addition to this protective role, mucins harbor glycan-rich domains that constitute preferential binding sites of many pathogens. In this article we review the main players in the process of H. pylori adhesion to gastric epithelial cells, which contribute decisively to the high prevalence and chronicity of H. pylori infection. The BabA adhesin recognizes both H-type 1 and Lewis b blood-group antigens expressed on normal gastric mucosa of secretor individuals, contributing to the initial steps of infection. Upon colonization, persistent infection induces an inflammatory response with concomitant expression of sialylated antigens. The SabA adhesin mediates H. pylori binding to inflamed gastric mucosa by recognizing sialyl-Lewis a and sialyl-Lewis x antigens. The expression of the BabA and SabA adhesins is tightly regulated, permitting the bacteria to rapidly adapt to the changes of glycosylation of the host gastric mucosa that occur during infection, as well as to escape from the inflammatory response. The growing knowledge of the interactions between the bacterial adhesins and the host receptors will contribute to the design of alternative strategies for eradication of the infection.

  6. Chitosan Mediates Germling Adhesion in Magnaporthe oryzae and Is Required for Surface Sensing and Germling Morphogenesis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ivey A Geoghegan

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available The fungal cell wall not only plays a critical role in maintaining cellular integrity, but also forms the interface between fungi and their environment. The composition of the cell wall can therefore influence the interactions of fungi with their physical and biological environments. Chitin, one of the main polysaccharide components of the wall, can be chemically modified by deacetylation. This reaction is catalyzed by a family of enzymes known as chitin deacetylases (CDAs, and results in the formation of chitosan, a polymer of β1,4-glucosamine. Chitosan has previously been shown to accumulate in the cell wall of infection structures in phytopathogenic fungi. Here, it has long been hypothesized to act as a 'stealth' molecule, necessary for full pathogenesis. In this study, we used the crop pathogen and model organism Magnaporthe oryzae to test this hypothesis. We first confirmed that chitosan localizes to the germ tube and appressorium, then deleted CDA genes on the basis of their elevated transcript levels during appressorium differentiation. Germlings of the deletion strains showed loss of chitin deacetylation, and were compromised in their ability to adhere and form appressoria on artificial hydrophobic surfaces. Surprisingly, the addition of exogenous chitosan fully restored germling adhesion and appressorium development. Despite the lack of appressorium development on artificial surfaces, pathogenicity was unaffected in the mutant strains. Further analyses demonstrated that cuticular waxes are sufficient to over-ride the requirement for chitosan during appressorium development on the plant surface. Thus, chitosan does not have a role as a 'stealth' molecule, but instead mediates the adhesion of germlings to surfaces, thereby allowing the perception of the physical stimuli necessary to promote appressorium development. This study thus reveals a novel role for chitosan in phytopathogenic fungi, and gives further insight into the mechanisms

  7. Impact of sub-inhibitory antibiotics on fibronectin-mediated host cell adhesion and invasion by Staphylococcus aureus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rasigade Jean

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Staphylococcus aureus is a well-armed pathogen prevalent in severe infections such as endocarditis and osteomyelitis. Fibronectin-binding proteins A and B, encoded by fnbA/B, are major pathogenesis determinants in these infections through their involvement in S. aureus adhesion to and invasion of host cells. Sub-minimum inhibitory concentrations (sub-MICs of antibiotics, frequently occurring in vivo because of impaired drug diffusion at the infection site, can alter S. aureus phenotype. We therefore investigated their impact on S. aureus fibronectin-mediated adhesiveness and invasiveness. Methods After in vitro challenge of S. aureus 8325-4 and clinical isolates with sub-MICs of major anti-staphylococcal agents, we explored fnbA/B transcription levels, bacterial adhesiveness to immobilised human fibronectin and human osteoblasts in culture, and bacterial invasion of human osteoblasts. Results Oxacillin, moxifloxacin and linezolid led to the development of a hyper-adhesive phenotype in the fibronectin adhesion assay that was consistent with an increase in fnbA/B transcription. Conversely, rifampin treatment decreased fibronectin binding in all strains tested without affecting fnbA/B transcription. Gentamicin and vancomycin had no impact on fibronectin binding or fnbA/B transcription levels. Only oxacillin-treated S. aureus displayed a significantly increased adhesion to cultured osteoblasts, but its invasiveness did not differ from that of untreated controls. Conclusion Our findings demonstrate that several antibiotics at sub-MICs modulate fibronectin binding in S. aureus in a drug-specific fashion. However, hyper- and hypo- adhesive phenotypes observed in controlled in vitro conditions were not fully confirmed in whole cell infection assays. The relevance of adhesion modulation during in vivo infections is thus still uncertain and requires further investigations.

  8. Adhesion, invasion, and agglutination mediated by two trimeric autotransporters in the human uropathogen Proteus mirabilis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alamuri, Praveen; Löwer, Martin; Hiss, Jan A; Himpsl, Stephanie D; Schneider, Gisbert; Mobley, Harry L T

    2010-11-01

    Fimbriae of the human uropathogen Proteus mirabilis are the only characterized surface proteins that contribute to its virulence by mediating adhesion and invasion of the uroepithelia. PMI2122 (AipA) and PMI2575 (TaaP) are annotated in the genome of strain HI4320 as trimeric autotransporters with "adhesin-like" and "agglutinating adhesin-like" properties, respectively. The C-terminal 62 amino acids (aa) in AipA and 76 aa in TaaP are homologous to the translocator domains of YadA from Yersinia enterocolitica and Hia from Haemophilus influenzae. Comparative protein modeling using the Hia three-dimensional structure as a template predicted that each of these domains would contain four antiparallel beta sheets and that they formed homotrimers. Recombinant AipA and TaaP were seen as ∼28 kDa and ∼78 kDa, respectively, in Escherichia coli, and each also formed high-molecular-weight homotrimers, thus supporting this model. E. coli synthesizing AipA or TaaP bound to extracellular matrix proteins with a 10- to 60-fold-higher level of affinity than the control strain. Inactivation of aipA in P. mirabilis strains significantly (P < 0.01) reduced the mutants' ability to adhere to or invade HEK293 cell monolayers, and the functions were restored upon complementation. A 51-aa-long invasin region in the AipA passenger domain was required for this function. E. coli expressing TaaP mediated autoagglutination, and a taaP mutant of P. mirabilis showed significantly (P < 0.05) more reduced aggregation than HI4320. Gly-247 in AipA and Gly-708 in TaaP were indispensable for trimerization and activity. AipA and TaaP individually offered advantages to P. mirabilis in a murine model. This is the first report characterizing trimeric autotransporters in P. mirabilis as afimbrial surface adhesins and autoagglutinins.

  9. Membrane-type 1-matrix metalloproteinase regulates intracellular adhesion molecule-1 (ICAM-1)-mediated monocyte transmigration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sithu, Srinivas D; English, William R; Olson, Paul; Krubasik, Davia; Baker, Andrew H; Murphy, Gillian; D'Souza, Stanley E

    2007-08-24

    We examined the mechanism regulating intercellular cell adhesion molecule-1 (ICAM-1)-dependent monocyte transendothelial migration. Monocyte migration through endothelial cells expressing ICAM-1 alone was comparable to that of tumor necrosis factor-alpha-treated cells. Transmigration was reduced in ICAM-1 lacking the cytoplasmic tail and in tyrosine to alanine substitutions at Tyr-485 and Tyr-474. Tissue inhibitors of matrix metalloproteinases (TIMPs) -2 and -3 blocked transmigration, whereas TIMP-1 was ineffective. This profile suggested a role for membrane-type matrix metalloproteinases (MT-MMPs) in transmigration. Inhibitory antibodies and small interference RNA directed against MT1-MMP blocked transmigration, whereas overexpression of MT1-MMP in endothelial cells or monocytes promoted transmigration. MT1-MMP mediated the ectodomain cleavage of ICAM-1 that was blocked by TIMP-2 and -3. Overexpression of MT1-MMP rescued function in ICAM-1Y485A, and to a lesser extent in the cytoplasmic tail-deleted ICAM-1. In a binding assay, wild-type ICAM-1 bound to purified MT1-MMP while ICAM-1 mutants bound poorly. MT1-MMP co-localized with ICAM-1 at distinct structures in endothelial cells. MT1-MMP localization with cells expressing ICAM-1 mutations was reduced and diffused. These results indicate that the cytoplasmic tail of ICAM-1 regulates leukocyte transmigration through MT1-MMP interaction.

  10. CHLORHEXIDINE INHIBITS L1 CELL ADHESION MOLECULE MEDIATED NEURITE OUTGROWTH IN VITRO

    Science.gov (United States)

    Milstone, Aaron M.; Bamford, Penny; Aucott, Susan W.; Tang, Ningfeng; White, Kimberly R.; Bearer, Cynthia F.

    2013-01-01

    Background Chlorhexidine is a skin disinfectant that reduces skin and mucous membrane bacterial colonization and inhibits organism growth. Despite numerous studies assessing chlorhexidine safety in term infants, residual concerns have limited its use in hospitalized neonates, especially low birth weight preterm infants. The aim of this study was to assess the potential neurotoxicity of chlorhexidine on the developing central nervous system using a well-established in vitro model of neurite outgrowth that includes laminin and L1 cell adhesion molecule (L1) as neurite outgrowth promoting substrates. Methods Cerebellar granule neurons are plated on either poly L-lysine, L1 or laminin. Chlorhexidine, hexachlorophene or their excipients are added to the media. Neurons are grown for 24 h, then fixed and neurite length measured. Results Chlorhexidine significantly reduced the length of neurites grown on L1 but not laminin. Chlorhexidine concentrations as low as 125 ng/ml statistically significantly reduced neurite length on L1. Hexachlorophene did not affect neurite length. Conclusion Chlorhexidine at concentrations detected in the blood following topical applications in preterm infants specifically inhibited L1 mediated neurite outgrowth of cerebellar granule neurons. It is now vital to determine whether the blood brain barrier is permeable to chlorhexidine in preterm infants. PMID:24126818

  11. A serine-rich glycoprotein of Streptococcus sanguis mediates adhesion to platelets via GPIb.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plummer, Christopher; Wu, Hui; Kerrigan, Steven W; Meade, Gerardene; Cox, Dermot; Ian Douglas, C W

    2005-04-01

    Streptococcus sanguis is the most common oral bacterium causing infective endocarditis and its ability to adhere to platelets, leading to their activation and aggregation, is thought to be an important virulent factor. Previous work has shown that S. sanguis can bind directly to platelet glycoprotein (GP) Ib but the nature of the adhesin was unknown. Here, we have shown that a high molecular weight glycoprotein of S. sanguis mediates adhesion to glycocalacin. The bacterial glycoprotein was purified from cell extracts by chromatography on GPIb- and wheatgerm agglutinin affinity matrices and its interaction with GPIb was shown to be sialic acid-dependent. We designated the glycoprotein serine-rich protein A (SrpA). An insertional inactivation mutant lacking the SrpA of S. sanguis showed significantly reduced binding to glycocalacin, reduced adherence to platelets and a prolonged lag time to platelet aggregation. In addition, under flow conditions, platelets rolled and subsequently adhered on films of wild-type S. sanguis cells at low shear (50/s) but did not bind to films of the SrpA mutant. Platelets did not bind to wild-type bacterial cells at high shear (1500/s). These findings help to understand the mechanisms by which the organism might colonize platelet-fibrin vegetations.

  12. "The Madness of the Carnival": Representations of Latin America and the Caribbean in the U.S. Homophile Press.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gleibman, Shlomo

    2017-01-01

    This essay examines representations of Latin America and the Caribbean in U.S. homophile periodicals from 1953 to 1964. The 120 items in ONE, Mattachine Review, and The Ladder that referenced this region depicted Latin America and the Caribbean as different from the United States in a number of ways, in particular as more sexually repressive or more sexually liberal. These representations typically conformed to the general homophile movement tendency to challenge U.S. anti-homosexual campaigns during the "Lavender Scare," while arguing for acceptance based on rights claims. The representations also were based on Cold War, colonial, racist, nationalist, and imperialist frameworks. The essay argues that although the magazines generally affirmed the dominant homophile discourses of respectability and domesticity, they also challenged these discourses by presenting Latin American and Caribbean cultures as gender-nonconforming and sexually promiscuous.

  13. "Some Africans Gave Full Approval of Homosexuality": Representations of Africa in the U.S. Homophile Press, 1953-1964.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thompson, Healy

    2017-01-01

    This essay explores representations of Africa in the three primary U.S. homophile periodicals of the 1950s and early 1960s. It considers 130 articles, letters, and stories in Mattachine Review, ONE, and The Ladder that mentioned Africa or Africans. In doing so, it explores and analyzes the ways that Africa was referenced and represented to understand how those periodicals, their writers, and the U.S. homophile movement understood and were influenced by Africa (or by their perceptions of Africa). The essay argues that views expressed in The Ladder, Mattachine Review, and ONE reflected broader thinking about Africa in the 1950s and early 1960s in focusing on Egypt, relying on U.S. accounts of Africa, and eroticizing the bodies of Africans. But homophile publications also differed from their mainstream counterparts by presenting various African cultures as superior to U.S. culture in their liberal views of and approaches to sexual and gender variance.

  14. Notch signaling mediates the age-associated decrease in adhesion of germline stem cells to the niche.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chen-Yuan Tseng

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Stem cells have an innate ability to occupy their stem cell niche, which in turn, is optimized to house stem cells. Organ aging is associated with reduced stem cell occupancy in the niche, but the mechanisms involved are poorly understood. Here, we report that Notch signaling is increased with age in Drosophila female germline stem cells (GSCs, and this results in their removal from the niche. Clonal analysis revealed that GSCs with low levels of Notch signaling exhibit increased adhesiveness to the niche, thereby out-competing their neighbors with higher levels of Notch; adhesiveness is altered through regulation of E-cadherin expression. Experimental enhancement of Notch signaling in GSCs hastens their age-dependent loss from the niche, and such loss is at least partially mediated by Sex lethal. However, disruption of Notch signaling in GSCs does not delay GSC loss during aging, and nor does it affect BMP signaling, which promotes self-renewal of GSCs. Finally, we show that in contrast to GSCs, Notch activation in the niche (which maintains niche integrity, and thus mediates GSC retention is reduced with age, indicating that Notch signaling regulates GSC niche occupancy both intrinsically and extrinsically. Our findings expose a novel role of Notch signaling in controlling GSC-niche adhesion in response to aging, and are also of relevance to metastatic cancer cells, in which Notch signaling suppresses cell adhesion.

  15. Human heat shock protein (Hsp) 90 interferes with Neisseria meningitidis adhesin A (NadA)-mediated adhesion and invasion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Montanari, Paolo; Bozza, Giuseppe; Capecchi, Barbara; Caproni, Elena; Barrile, Riccardo; Norais, Nathalie; Capitani, Mirco; Sallese, Michele; Cecchini, Paola; Ciucchi, Laura; Gao, Zhenai; Rappuoli, Rino; Pizza, Mariagrazia; Aricò, Beatrice; Merola, Marcello

    2012-03-01

    NadA (N eisseria meningitidisadhesin A), a meningococcal surface protein, mediates adhesion to and invasion of human cells, an activity in which host membrane proteins have been implicated. While investigating these host factors in human epithelial cells by affinity chromatography, we discovered an unanticipated interaction of NadA with heat shock protein (Hsp) 90, a molecular chaperone. The specific in vitro interaction of recombinant soluble NadA and Hsp90 was confirmed by co-immunoprecipitations, dot and far-Western blot. Intriguingly, ADP, but not ATP, was required for this association, and the Hsp90 inhibitor 17-AAG promoted complex formation. Hsp90 binding to an Escherichia coli strain used as carrier to express surface exposed NadA confirmed these results in live bacteria. We also examined RNA interference, plasmid-driven overexpression, addition of exogenous rHsp90 and 17-AAG inhibition in human epithelial cells to further elucidate the involvement of Hsp90 in NadA-mediated adhesion and invasion. Together, these data suggest an inverse correlation between the amount of host Hsp90 and the NadA adhesive/invasive phenotype. Confocal microscopy also demonstrated that meningococci interact with cellular Hsp90, a completely novel finding. Altogether our results show that variation of host Hsp90 expression or activity interferes with adhesive and invasive events driven by NadA. © 2011 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  16. Cadherin-mediated cell sorting not determined by binding or adhesion specificity

    OpenAIRE

    Niessen, Carien M; Gumbiner, Barry M.

    2002-01-01

    Cadherin adhesion molecules play important roles in the establishment of tissue boundaries. Cells expressing different cadherins sort out from each other in cell aggregation assays. To determine the contribution of cadherin binding and adhesion specificity to the sorting process, we examined the adhesion of cells to different purified cadherin proteins. Chinese hamster ovary cell lines expressing one of four different cadherins were allowed to bind to the purified cadherin extracellular domai...

  17. Cadherin-mediated cell sorting not determined by binding or adhesion specificity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niessen, Carien M.; Gumbiner, Barry M.

    2002-01-01

    Cadherin adhesion molecules play important roles in the establishment of tissue boundaries. Cells expressing different cadherins sort out from each other in cell aggregation assays. To determine the contribution of cadherin binding and adhesion specificity to the sorting process, we examined the adhesion of cells to different purified cadherin proteins. Chinese hamster ovary cell lines expressing one of four different cadherins were allowed to bind to the purified cadherin extracellular domains of either human E-cadherin or Xenopus C-cadherin, and the specificity of adhesion was compared with cell-sorting assays. None of the different cadherin-expressing cells exhibited any adhesive specificity toward either of the two purified cadherin substrates, even though these cadherins differ considerably in their primary sequence. In addition, all cells exhibited similar strengthening of adhesion on both substrates. However, this lack of adhesive specificity did not determine whether different cadherin-expressing cells would sort from each other, and the tendency to sort was not predictable by the extent of sequence diversity in their extracellular domains. These results show that cadherins are far more promiscuous in their adhesive-binding capacity than had been expected and that the ability to sort out must be determined by mechanisms other than simple adhesive-binding specificity. PMID:11790800

  18. Amalgam, an axon guidance Drosophila adhesion protein belonging to the immunoglobulin superfamily: Over-expression, purification and biophysical characterization

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zeev-Ben-Mordehai, Tzviya; Paz, Aviv; Peleg, Yoav; Toker, Lilly; Wolf, Sharon G.; Rydberg, Edwin H.; Sussman, Joel L.; Silman, Israel

    Amalgam, a multi-domain member of the immunoglobulin superfamily, possesses homophilic and heterophilic cell adhesion properties. It is required for axon guidance during Drosophila development in which it interacts with the extracellular domain of the transmembrane protein, neurotactin, to promote

  19. In vivo tumor cell adhesion in the pulmonary microvasculature is exclusively mediated by tumor cell - endothelial cell interaction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mees Soeren T

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Metastasis formation is the leading cause of death among colon cancer patients. We established a new in-situ model of in vivo microscopy of the lung to analyse initiating events of metastatic tumor cell adhesion within this typical metastatic target of colon cancer. Methods Anaesthetized CD rats were mechanically ventilated and 106 human HT-29LMM and T84 colon cancer cells were injected intracardially as single cell suspensions. Quantitative in vivo microscopy of the lung was performed in 10 minute intervals for a total of 40 minutes beginning with the time of injection. Results After vehicle treatment of HT-29LMM controls 15.2 ± 5.3; 14.2 ± 7.5; 11.4 ± 5.5; and 15.4 ± 6.5 cells/20 microscopic fields were found adherent within the pulmonary microvasculature in each 10 minute interval. Similar numbers were found after injection of the lung metastasis derived T84 cell line and after treatment of HT-29LMM with unspecific mouse control-IgG. Subsequently, HT-29LMM cells were treated with function blocking antibodies against β1-, β4-, and αv-integrins wich also did not impair tumor cell adhesion in the lung. In contrast, after hydrolization of sialylated glycoproteins on the cells' surface by neuraminidase, we observed impairment of tumor cell adhesion by more than 50% (p Conclusions These results demonstrate that the initial colon cancer cell adhesion in the capillaries of the lung is predominantly mediated by tumor cell - endothelial cell interactions, possibly supported by platelets. In contrast to reports of earlier studies that metastatic tumor cell adhesion occurs through integrin mediated binding of extracellular matrix proteins in liver, in the lung, the continuously lined endothelium appears to be specifically targeted by circulating tumor cells.

  20. Sex With Neighbors: Canada and Canadians in the U.S. Homophile Press.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stein, Marc

    2017-01-01

    This article examines U.S. homophile magazine contributions from and representations of Canada from 1953 to 1964. Drawing on 240 articles, letters, and other items that were published in ONE, Mattachine Review, and The Ladder, the essay first reviews Canadian-authored materials and then shows that U.S. gay and lesbian movement periodicals depicted Canada as more sexually conservative than the United States in three ways and more sexually liberal in one way. The magazines presented Canada as more sexually conservative in its failure to develop an organized gay and lesbian movement, its policies and practices of sexual censorship, and its opposition to progressive homosexual law reform. They portrayed Canada as more sexually liberal in the ways that its mainstream media covered homosexuality. The essay argues that U.S. homophile representations of Canada participated in the ongoing construction and reconstruction of U.S. nationalism. In demonstrating that the magazines generally represented Canada as more sexually conservative than the United States in the years from 1953 to 1964, the essay also shows that more recent depictions of Canada as more sexually liberal are relatively new.

  1. A direct comparison of selectin-mediated transient, adhesive events using high temporal resolution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, M J; Berg, E L; Lawrence, M B

    1999-12-01

    Leukocyte capture and rolling on the vascular endothelium is mediated principally by the selectin family of cell adhesion receptors. In a parallel plate flow chamber, neutrophil rolling on purified selectins or a selectin-ligand substrate was resolved by high speed videomicroscopy as a series of ratchet-like steps with a characteristic time constant (Kaplanski, G., C. Farnarier, O. Tissot, A. Pierres, A.-M. Benoliel, M. C. Alessi, S. Kaplanski, and P. Bongrand. 1993. Biophys. J. 64:1922-1933; Alon, R., D. A. Hammer, and T. A. Springer. 1995. Nature (Lond.). 374:539-542). Under shear, neutrophil arrests due to bond formation events were as brief as 4 ms. Pause time distributions for neutrophils tethering on P-, E-, L-selectin, or peripheral node addressin (PNAd) were compared at estimated single bond forces ranging from 37 to 250 pN. Distributions of selectin mediated pause times were fit to a first order exponential, resulting in a molecular dissociation constant (k(off)) for the respective selectin as a function of force. At estimated single bond forces of 125 pN and below, all three selectin dissociation constants fit the Bell and Hookean spring models of force-driven bond breakage equivalently. Unstressed k(off) values based on the Bell model were 2.4, 2.6, 2.8, 3.8 s(-1) for P-selectin, E-selectin, L-selectin, and PNAd, respectively. Bond separation distances (reactive compliance) were 0.39, 0.18, 1.11, 0.59 A for P-selectin, E-selectin, L-selectin, and PNAd, respectively. Dissociation constants for L-selectin and P-selectin at single bond forces above 125 pN were considerably lower than either Bell or Hookean spring model predictions, suggesting the existence of two regimes of reactive compliance. Additionally, interactions between L-selectin and its leukocyte ligand(s) were more labile in the presence of flow than the L-selectin endothelial ligand, PNAd, suggesting that L-selectin ligands may have different molecular and mechanical properties. Both types of L

  2. Electrochemical evidence for asialoglycoprotein receptor – mediated hepatocyte adhesion and proliferation in three dimensional tissue engineering scaffolds

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vasanthan, Kirthanashri S.; Sethuraman, Swaminathan; Parthasarathy, Meera, E-mail: meera_p@scbt.sastra.edu

    2015-08-26

    Asialoglycoprotein receptor (ASGPR) is one of the recognition motifs on the surface of hepatocytes, which promote their adhesion to extracellular matrix in liver tissue and appropriate artificial surfaces. ASGPR-mediated adhesion is expected to minimize trans-differentiation of hepatocytes in vitro that is generally observed in integrin-mediated adhesion. The aim of the present study is to verify the role of ASGPR in hepatocyte adhesion and proliferation in scaffolds for hepatic tissue engineering. Scanning Electrochemical Microscopy (SECM) is emerging as a suitable non-invasive analytical tool due to its high sensitivity and capability to correlate the morphology and activity of live cells. HepG2 cells and rat primary hepatocytes cultured in Polyvinyl alcohol (PVA)/Gelatin hydrogel scaffolds with and without galactose (a ligand for ASGPR) modification are studied using SECM. Systematic investigation of live cells cultured for different durations in scaffolds of different compositions (9:1 and 8:2 PVA:Gelatin with and without galactose) reveals significant improvement in cell–cell communication and proliferation on galactose incorporated scaffolds, thereby demonstrating the positive influence of ASGPR-mediated adhesion. In this work, we have also developed a methodology to quantify the respiratory activity and intracellular redox activity of live cells cultured in porous tissue engineering scaffolds. Using this methodology, SECM results are compared with routine cell culture assays viz., MTS ((1-Oxyl-2,2,5,5,-tetramethyl-Δ3-pyrroline-3-methyl) Methanethiosulfonate) and Albumin assays to demonstrate the better sensitivity of SECM. In addition, the present study demonstrates SECM as a reliable and sensitive tool to monitor the activity of live cells cultured in scaffolds for tissue engineering, which could be used on a routine basis. - Highlights: • A methodology for electrochemical imaging of polymer scaffolds is proposed. • The new methodology allows

  3. Nonmuscle myosin heavy chain IIA mediates integrin LFA-1 de-adhesion during T lymphocyte migration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morin, Nicole A; Oakes, Patrick W; Hyun, Young-Min; Lee, Dooyoung; Chin, Y Eugene; Chin, Eugene Y; King, Michael R; Springer, Timothy A; Shimaoka, Motomu; Tang, Jay X; Reichner, Jonathan S; Kim, Minsoo

    2008-01-21

    Precise spatial and temporal regulation of cell adhesion and de-adhesion is critical for dynamic lymphocyte migration. Although a great deal of information has been learned about integrin lymphocyte function-associated antigen (LFA)-1 adhesion, the mechanism that regulates efficient LFA-1 de-adhesion from intercellular adhesion molecule (ICAM)-1 during T lymphocyte migration is unknown. Here, we show that nonmuscle myosin heavy chain IIA (MyH9) is recruited to LFA-1 at the uropod of migrating T lymphocytes, and inhibition of the association of MyH9 with LFA-1 results in extreme uropod elongation, defective tail detachment, and decreased lymphocyte migration on ICAM-1, without affecting LFA-1 activation by chemokine CXCL-12. This defect was reversed by a small molecule antagonist that inhibits both LFA-1 affinity and avidity regulation, but not by an antagonist that inhibits only affinity regulation. Total internal reflection fluorescence microscopy of the contact zone between migrating T lymphocytes and ICAM-1 substrate revealed that inactive LFA-1 is selectively localized to the posterior of polarized T lymphocytes, whereas active LFA-1 is localized to their anterior. Thus, during T lymphocyte migration, uropodal adhesion depends on LFA-1 avidity, where MyH9 serves as a key mechanical link between LFA-1 and the cytoskeleton that is critical for LFA-1 de-adhesion.

  4. P-glycoprotein Mediates Postoperative Peritoneal Adhesion Formation by Enhancing Phosphorylation of the Chloride Channel-3

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deng, Lulu; Li, Qin; Lin, Guixian; Huang, Dan; Zeng, Xuxin; Wang, Xinwei; Li, Ping; Jin, Xiaobao; Zhang, Haifeng; Li, Chunmei; Chen, Lixin; Wang, Liwei; Huang, Shulin; Shao, Hongwei; Xu, Bin; Mao, Jianwen

    2016-01-01

    P-glycoprotein (P-gp) is encoded by the multidrug resistance (MDR1) gene and is well studied as a multi-drug resistance transporter. Peritoneal adhesion formation following abdominal surgery remains an important clinical problem. Here, we found that P-gp was highly expressed in human adhesion fibroblasts and promoted peritoneal adhesion formation in a rodent model. Knockdown of P-gp expression by intraperitoneal injection of MDR1-targeted siRNA significantly reduced both the peritoneal adhesion development rate and adhesion grades. Additionally, we found that operative injury up-regulated P-gp expression in peritoneal fibroblasts through the TGF-β1/Smad signaling pathway and histone H3 acetylation. The overexpression of P-gp accelerated migration and proliferation of fibroblasts via volume-activated Cl- current and cell volume regulation by enhancing phosphorylation of the chloride channel-3. Therefore, P-gp plays a critical role in postoperative peritoneal adhesion formation and may be a valuable therapeutic target for preventing the formation of peritoneal adhesions. PMID:26877779

  5. Calpain2 mediates Rab5-driven focal adhesion disassembly and cell migration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mendoza, Pablo A; Silva, Patricio; Díaz, Jorge; Arriagada, Cecilia; Canales, Jimena; Cerda, Oscar; Torres, Vicente A

    2017-11-03

    The early endosome protein Rab5 was recently shown to promote cell migration by enhancing focal adhesion disassembly through mechanisms that remain elusive. Focal adhesion disassembly is associated to proteolysis of talin, in a process that requires calpain2. Since calpain2 has been found at vesicles and endosomal compartments, we hypothesized that Rab5 stimulates calpain2 activity, leading to enhanced focal adhesion disassembly in migrating cells. We observed that calpain2 co-localizes with EEA1-positive early endosomes and co-immunoprecipitates with EEA1 and Rab5 in A549 lung carcinoma cells undergoing spreading, whereas Rab5 knock-down decreased the accumulation of calpain2 at early endosomal-enriched fractions. In addition, Rab5 silencing decreased calpain2 activity, as shown by cleavage of the fluorogenic substrate tBOC-LM-CMAC and the endogenous substrate talin. Accordingly, Rab5 promoted focal adhesion disassembly in a calpain2-dependent manner, as expression of GFP-Rab5 accelerated focal adhesion disassembly in nocodazole-synchronized cells, whereas pharmacological inhibition of calpain2 with N-acetyl-Leu-Leu-Met prevented both focal adhesion disassembly and cell migration induced by Rab5. In summary, these data uncover Rab5 as a novel regulator of calpain2 activity and focal adhesion proteolysis leading to cell migration.

  6. Effect of hypoxia on integrin-mediated adhesion of endothelial progenitor cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaiser, Ralf; Friedrich, Denise; Chavakis, Emmanouil; Böhm, Michael; Friedrich, Erik B

    2012-10-01

    Homing of endothelial progenitor cells (EPCs) is crucial for neoangiogenesis, which might be negatively affected by hypoxia. We investigated the influence of hypoxia on fibronectin binding integrins for migration and cell-matrix-adhesion. AMP-activated kinase (AMPK) and integrin-linked kinase (ILK) were examined as possible effectors of hypoxia. Human EPCs were expanded on fibronectin (FN) and integrin expression was profiled by flow cytometry. Cell-matrix-adhesion- and migration-assays on FN were performed to examine the influence of hypoxia and AMPK-activation. Regulation of AMPK and ILK was shown by Western blot analysis. We demonstrate the presence of integrin β(1), β(2) and α(5) on EPCs. Adhesion to FN is reduced by blocking β(1) and α(5) (49% and 2% of control, P effect. Corresponding effects were shown for migration. Hypoxia and AMPK-activation decrease adhesion on FN. Although total AMPK-expression remains unchanged, phospho-AMPK increases eightfold. The EPCs require α(5) for adhesion on FN. Hypoxia and AMPK-activation decrease adhesion. As α(5) is the major adhesive factor for EPCs on FN, this suggests a link between AMPK and α(5)-integrins. We found novel evidence for a connection between hypoxia, AMPK-activity and integrin activity. This might affect the fate of EPCs in ischaemic tissue. © 2012 The Authors Journal of Cellular and Molecular Medicine © 2012 Foundation for Cellular and Molecular Medicine/Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  7. Reinforcement of integrin-mediated T-Lymphocyte adhesion by TNF-induced Inside-out Signaling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Qian; Huth, Steven; Adam, Dieter; Selhuber-Unkel, Christine

    2016-07-28

    Integrin-mediated leukocyte adhesion to endothelial cells is a crucial step in immunity against pathogens. Whereas the outside-in signaling pathway in response to the pro-inflammatory cytokine tumour necrosis factor (TNF) has already been studied in detail, little knowledge exists about a supposed TNF-mediated inside-out signaling pathway. In contrast to the outside-in signaling pathway, which relies on the TNF-induced upregulation of surface molecules on endothelium, inside-out signaling should also be present in an endothelium-free environment. Using single-cell force spectroscopy, we show here that stimulating Jurkat cells with TNF significantly reinforces their adhesion to fibronectin in a biomimetic in vitro assay for cell-surface contact times of about 1.5 seconds, whereas for larger contact times the effect disappears. Analysis of single-molecule ruptures further demonstrates that TNF strengthens sub-cellular single rupture events at short cell-surface contact times. Hence, our results provide quantitative evidence for the significant impact of TNF-induced inside-out signaling in the T-lymphocyte initial adhesion machinery.

  8. A role for cell adhesion in beryllium-mediated lung disease

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hong-geller, Elizabeth [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2008-01-01

    Chronic beryllium disease (CBD) is a debilitating lung disorder in which exposure to the lightweight metal beryllium (Be) causes the accumulation of beryllium-specific CD4+ T cells in the lung and formation of noncaseating pulmonary granulomas. Treatment for CBD patients who exhibit progressive pulmonary decline is limited to systemic corticosteroids, which suppress the severe host inflammatory response. Studies in the past several years have begun to highlight cell-cell adhesion interactions in the development of Be hypersensitivity and CBD. In particular, the high binding affinity between intercellular adhesion molecule 1 (I-CAM1) on lung epithelial cells and the {beta}{sub 2} integrin LFA-1 on migrating lymphocytes and macrophages regulates the concerted rolling of immune cells to sites of inflammation in the lung. In this review, we discuss the evidence that implicates cell adhesion processes in onset of Be disease and the potential of cell adhesion as an intervention point for development of novel therapies.

  9. Hanging on for the ride: adhesion to the extracellular matrix mediates cellular responses in skeletal muscle morphogenesis and disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goody, Michelle F; Sher, Roger B; Henry, Clarissa A

    2015-05-01

    Skeletal muscle specification and morphogenesis during early development are critical for normal physiology. In addition to mediating locomotion, skeletal muscle is a secretory organ that contributes to metabolic homeostasis. Muscle is a highly adaptable tissue, as evidenced by the ability to increase muscle cell size and/or number in response to weight bearing exercise. Conversely, muscle wasting can occur during aging (sarcopenia), cancer (cancer cachexia), extended hospital stays (disuse atrophy), and in many genetic diseases collectively known as the muscular dystrophies and myopathies. It is therefore of great interest to understand the cellular and molecular mechanisms that mediate skeletal muscle development and adaptation. Muscle morphogenesis transforms short muscle precursor cells into long, multinucleate myotubes that anchor to tendons via the myotendinous junction. This process requires carefully orchestrated interactions between cells and their extracellular matrix microenvironment. These interactions are dynamic, allowing muscle cells to sense biophysical, structural, organizational, and/or signaling changes within their microenvironment and respond appropriately. In many musculoskeletal diseases, these cell adhesion interactions are disrupted to such a degree that normal cellular adaptive responses are not sufficient to compensate for accumulating damage. Thus, one major focus of current research is to identify the cell adhesion mechanisms that drive muscle morphogenesis, with the hope that understanding how muscle cell adhesion promotes the intrinsic adaptability of muscle tissue during development may provide insight into potential therapeutic approaches for muscle diseases. Our objectives in this review are to highlight recent studies suggesting conserved roles for cell-extracellular matrix adhesion in vertebrate muscle morphogenesis and cellular adaptive responses in animal models of muscle diseases. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights

  10. Protein kinase C beta mediates CD40 ligand-induced adhesion of monocytes to endothelial cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zeyu Wu

    Full Text Available Accumulating evidence supports the early involvement of monocyte/macrophage recruitment to activated endothelial cells by leukocyte adhesion molecules during atherogenesis. CD40 and its ligand CD40L are highly expressed in vascular endothelial cells, but its impact on monocyte adhesion and the related molecular mechanisms are not fully understood. The present study was designed to evaluate the direct effect of CD40L on monocytic cell adhesion and gain mechanistic insight into the signaling coupling CD40L function to the proinflammatory response. Exposure of cultured human aortic endothelial cells (HAECs to clinically relevant concentrations of CD40L (20 to 80 ng/mL dose-dependently increased human monocytic THP-1 cells to adhere to them under static condition. CD40L treatment induced the expression of vascular cell adhesion molecule-1 (VCAM-1 mRNA and protein expression in HAECs. Furthermore, exposure of HAECs to CD40L robustly increased the activation of protein kinase C beta (PKCβ in ECs. A selective inhibitor of PKCβ prevented the rise in VCAM-1 and THP-1 cell adhesion to ECs. Moreover, stimulation of ECs to CD40L induced nuclear factor-κB (NF-κB activation. PKCβ inhibition abolished CD40L-induced NF-κB activation, and NF-κB inhibition reduced expression of VCAM-1, each resulting in reduced THP-1 cell adhesion. Our findings provide the evidence that CD40L increases VCAM-1 expression in ECs by activating PKCβ and NF-κB, suggesting a novel mechanism for EC activation. Finally, administration of CD40L resulted in PKCβ activation, increased VCAM-1 expression and activated monocytes adhesiveness to HAECs, processes attenuated by PKCβ inhibitor. Therefore, CD40L may contribute directly to atherogenesis by activating ECs and recruiting monocytes to them.

  11. Association of severe malaria outcomes with platelet-mediated clumping and adhesion to a novel host receptor.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alfredo Mayor

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION: Severe malaria has been attributed partly to the sequestration of Plasmodium falciparum-infected erythrocytes (IEs in the microvasculature of vital host organs. Identification of P. falciparum cytoadherence phenotypes that are associated with severe malaria may lead to the development of novel strategies against life-threatening malaria. METHODS AND FINDINGS: Forty-six P. falciparum isolates from Mozambican children under 5 years of age with severe malaria (cases were examined and compared to 46 isolates from sex and age matched Mozambican children with uncomplicated malaria (controls. Cytoadherence properties such as platelet-mediated clumping, rosetting and adhesion to purified receptors (CD36, ICAM1 and gC1qR, were compared between these matched pairs by non-parametric tests. The most common clinical presentation associated with severe malaria was prostration. Compared to matched controls, prevalence of platelet-mediated clumping was higher in cases (P = .019, in children presenting with prostration (P = .049 and in children with severe anaemia (P = .025. Prevalence of rosetting and gC1qR adhesion were also higher in isolates from cases with severe anemia and multiple seizures, respectively (P = .045 in both cases, than in controls. CONCLUSIONS: These data indicate a role for platelet-mediated clumping, rosetting and adhesion to gC1qR in the pathogenesis of severe malaria. Inhibition of these cytoadherence phenotypes may reduce the occurrence or improve the prognosis of severe malaria outcomes.

  12. AtaA, a new member of the trimeric autotransporter adhesins from Acinetobacter sp. Tol 5 mediating high adhesiveness to various abiotic surfaces.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Masahito Ishikawa

    Full Text Available Acinetobacter sp. Tol 5 exhibits an autoagglutinating nature and noteworthy adhesiveness to various abiotic surfaces from hydrophobic plastics to hydrophilic glass and stainless steel. Although previous studies have suggested that bacterionanofibers on Tol 5 cells are involved in the adhesive phenotype of Tol 5, the fiber that directly mediates Tol 5 adhesion has remained unknown. Here, we present a new member of trimeric autotransporter adhesins designated AtaA, which we discovered by analyzing a less adhesive mutant of Tol 5, T1, obtained by transposon mutagenesis. AtaA forms thinner and shorter nanofibers than fimbriae on Tol 5 cells. We performed target disruption of ataA by allelic marker exchange, and the resulting ΔataA strain was complemented with ataA on the Escherichia coli-Acinetobacter shuttle vector, which was newly constructed. These results proved that AtaA is essential for Tol 5's autoagglutinating nature and high adhesiveness to surfaces of various materials. In addition, the adhesiveness to solid surfaces mediated by AtaA is notably higher than that mediated by YadA of Yersinia enterocolitica WA-314. Moreover, and importantly, these characteristics can be conferred to the non-adhesive, non-agglutinating bacterium Acinetobacter sp. ADP1 in trans by transformation with ataA, with expected applications to microbial immobilization.

  13. Soluble intercellular adhesion molecule 1 and flow-mediated dilatation are related to the estimated risk of coronary heart disease independently from each other

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Witte, D.R.; Broekmans, W.; Kardinaal, A.F.M.; Klopping-Ketelaars, I.A.A.; Poppel, van G.; Bots, M.L.; Kluft, C.; Princen, J.M.G.

    2003-01-01

    Background: Flow mediated dilatation (FMD) of the brachial artery and soluble intercellular adhesion molecule 1 (sICAM-1) are measures of distinct functions of the endothelium, reflecting nitric oxide (NO)-mediated and pro-inflammatory status, respectively. The comparative value of the two measures

  14. The role of phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase in neural cell adhesion molecule-mediated neuronal differentiation and survival

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ditlevsen, Dorte K; Køhler, Lene B; Pedersen, Martin V

    2003-01-01

    that phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3K) is required for NCAM-mediated neurite outgrowth from PC12-E2 cells and from cerebellar and dopaminergic neurones in primary culture, and that the thr/ser kinase Akt/protein kinase B (PKB) is phosphorylated downstream of PI3K after stimulation with C3. Moreover, we present data...... to be dependent on PI3K.......The neural cell adhesion molecule, NCAM, is known to stimulate neurite outgrowth from primary neurones and PC12 cells presumably through signalling pathways involving the fibroblast growth factor receptor (FGFR), protein kinase A (PKA), protein kinase C (PKC), the Ras-mitogen activated protein...

  15. Atomic force microscopy studies of bioprocess engineering surfaces - imaging, interactions and mechanical properties mediating bacterial adhesion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    James, Sean A; Hilal, Nidal; Wright, Chris J

    2017-07-01

    The detrimental effect of bacterial biofilms on process engineering surfaces is well documented. Thus, interest in the early stages of bacterial biofilm formation; in particular bacterial adhesion and the production of anti-fouling coatings has grown exponentially as a field. During this time, Atomic force microscopy (AFM) has emerged as a critical tool for the evaluation of bacterial adhesion. Due to its versatility AFM offers not only insight into the topographical landscape and mechanical properties of the engineering surfaces, but elucidates, through direct quantification the topographical and biomechnical properties of the foulants The aim of this review is to collate the current research on bacterial adhesion, both theoretical and practical, and outline how AFM as a technique is uniquely equipped to provide further insight into the nanoscale world at the bioprocess engineering surface. Copyright © 2017 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  16. Structural basis of the tensile strength of protein complexes mediating cell adhesion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bayas, Marco Vinicio

    This study explores the behaviour of adhesive complexes of cell adhesion molecules undergoing forced detachment. Molecular-forces measurements combined with Steered Molecular Dynamic (SMD) simulations were used to investigate the mechanical response of the CD2 C58 and hemophilic C-cadherin bonds. The CD2-CD58 adhesive complex, important for the adaptive immune response, contains several salt-bridges in the adhesive interface. SMD simulations showed that these inter-protein salt bridges contribute independently to the tensile strength of the complex. Consistent with this, force measurements with the Surface Force Apparatus (SFA) demonstrated that the elimination of single salt bridges weakens the bond. The corresponding loss in adhesion energy of the CD2-CD58 complex correlates with the importance of the salt bridges observed in the simulations. These findings correlate closely with the effect of the elimination of single salt bridges observed in cell aggregation assays and binding measurements. On the other hand, the hemophilic C-cadherin interaction determines specific cell-cell adhesion during development in Xenopus laevis . Single molecule force spectroscopy was used to characterize the multiple bound states between C-cadherin ectodomains. The experiments showed two short-lived bound states associated with the two outermost ectodomains and two long-lived states associated with the full ectodomain. It is likely that the two short-lived states are involved in the specificity of the interaction since previous studies showed that the corresponding states in E-cadherin have different lifetimes. In addition, SMD simulations of the forced dissociation of the strand dieter of C-cadherin suggested a mechanism for the specificity of cadherin interactions.

  17. Receptor-mediated membrane adhesion of lipid-polymer hybrid (LPH) nanoparticles studied by dissipative particle dynamics simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Zhenlong; Gorfe, Alemayehu A.

    2014-12-01

    Lipid-polymer hybrid (LPH) nanoparticles represent a novel class of targeted drug delivery platforms that combine the advantages of liposomes and biodegradable polymeric nanoparticles. However, the molecular details of the interaction between LPHs and their target cell membranes remain poorly understood. We have investigated the receptor-mediated membrane adhesion process of a ligand-tethered LPH nanoparticle using extensive dissipative particle dynamics (DPD) simulations. We found that the spontaneous adhesion process follows a first-order kinetics characterized by two distinct stages: a rapid nanoparticle-membrane engagement, followed by a slow growth in the number of ligand-receptor pairs coupled with structural re-organization of both the nanoparticle and the membrane. The number of ligand-receptor pairs increases with the dynamic segregation of ligands and receptors toward the adhesion zone causing an out-of-plane deformation of the membrane. Moreover, the fluidity of the lipid shell allows for strong nanoparticle-membrane interactions to occur even when the ligand density is low. The LPH-membrane avidity is enhanced by the increased stability of each receptor-ligand pair due to the geometric confinement and the cooperative effect arising from multiple binding events. Thus, our results reveal the unique advantages of LPH nanoparticles as active cell-targeting nanocarriers and provide some general principles governing nanoparticle-cell interactions that may aid future design of LPHs with improved affinity and specificity for a given target of interest.

  18. "But Oh! What Tales": Portraying the Middle East in U.S. Homophile Periodicals of the 1950s and 1960s.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Milo, Marva

    2017-01-01

    This essay examines Middle East representations in U.S. homophile periodicals from 1953 to 1964. The essay uses more than 120 Middle East-related items that were published in ONE, Mattachine Review, and The Ladder to address the periodicals' engagement with the region (particularly ancient history and biblical themes) and discuss the types of sexual "knowledge" that the homophile periodicals created about the region. It then assesses the role of periodicals as a genre in the creation of a transnational homophile community, showing both their potential for democratizing participation in this community and their limits. The essay argues that the periodicals made visible the process of assembling a homosexual identity and the fragmentary nature of the parts it strove to unify. Though the views of key U.S. homophile organizations became hegemonic in the international gay rights movement, the periodicals show a more complex, ambivalent, and contested process.

  19. SIGNR1-mediated phagocytosis, but not SIGNR1-mediated endocytosis or cell adhesion, suppresses LPS-induced secretion of IL-6 from murine macrophages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kawauchi, Yoko; Takagi, Hideaki; Hanafusa, Kei; Kono, Mirei; Yamatani, Minami; Kojima, Naoya

    2015-01-01

    C-type lectin receptors (CLRs) serve as phagocytosis receptors for pathogens and also function as adhesion molecules and in the recognition and endocytosis of glycosylated self-antigens. In the present study, we demonstrated that phagocytosis mediated by a mouse mannose-binding CLR, SIGNR1 significantly suppressed the LPS-induced secretion of the specific pro-inflammatory cytokines from the resident peritoneal macrophages and the mouse macrophage-like cells that express SIGNR1 (RAW-SIGNR1). LPS-induced secretion of IL-6 from peritoneal macrophages suppressed in response to uptake of oligomannose-coated liposomes (OMLs), and the suppression was partly inhibited by treatment with an anti-SIGNR1 antibody. LPS-induced secretion of IL-6 from RAW-SIGNR1 cells was also clearly inhibited by treatment of the cells with OMLs >0.4μm in diameter, but treatment with OMLs treatment of the cells with OMLs. Suppression of the IL-6 secretion was not observed following treatment with oligomannose-containing soluble polymers or when cells were bound to an oligomannose-coated solid phase. Phagocytosis of oligomannose-coated liposomes did not interfere with the transcription of IL-6 mRNA, but did affect IL-6 mRNA stability, leading to suppression of IL-6 secretion. Interestingly, treatment of the cells with Ly290042, a PI3 kinase inhibitor, partly blocked the suppression of LPS-induced secretion of IL-6 by OML. Thus, we conclude that SIGNR1-mediated phagocytosis but not SIGNR1-mediated endocytosis and cell adhesion, suppresses the TLR4-mediated production of specific proinflammatory cytokines via PI3 kinase signaling. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. CD18-mediated adhesion is required for the induction of a proinflammatory phenotype in lung epithelial cells by mononuclear cell-derived extracellular vesicles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neri, Tommaso; Scalise, Valentina; Passalacqua, Ilaria; Giusti, Ilaria; Lombardi, Stefania; Balia, Cristina; D'Alessandro, Delfo; Berrettini, Stefano; Pedrinelli, Roberto; Paggiaro, Pierluigi; Dolo, Vincenza; Celi, Alessandro

    2018-02-21

    Extracellular vesicles are submicron vesicles that upregulate the synthesis of proinflammatory mediators by lung epithelial cells. We investigated whether these structures adhere to lung epithelial cells, and whether adhesion is a prerequisite for their proinflammatory activity. Extracellular vesicles were generated by stimulation of normal human mononuclear cells with the calcium ionophore A23187, and labelled with carboxyfluorescein diacetate succinimidyl ester. Adhesion of vesicles to monolayers of immortalized bronchial epithelial (16HBE) and alveolar (A549) cells was analyzed by fluorescence microscopy. The role of candidate adhesion receptors was evaluated with inhibitory monoclonal antibodies and soluble peptides. The synthesis of proinflammatory mediators was assessed by ELISA. Transmission electron microscopy confirmed the generation of closed vesicles with an approximate size range between 50 and 600 nm. Adhesion of extracellular vesicles to epithelial cells was upregulated upon stimulation of the latter with tumor necrosis factor-α. Adhesion was blocked by an anti-CD18 antibody, by peptides containing the sequence RGD and, to a lesser extent, by an antibody to ICAM-1. The same molecules also blocked the upregulation of the synthesis of interleukin-8 and monocyte chemotactic protein-1 induced by extracellular vesicles. CD18-mediated adhesion of extracellular vesicles is a prerequisite for their proinflammatory activity. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Triptolide-Mediated Apoptosis by Suppression of Focal Adhesion Kinase through Extrinsic and Intrinsic Pathways in Human Melanoma Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Haw-Young Kwon

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Triptolide (TPL has been shown to inhibit cell proliferation and induce apoptosis in various human cancer cells; however, the precise mechanism of apoptosis induced by TPL in human melanoma cells has not yet been elucidated. In this study, we investigated the precise mechanism underlying cytocidal effects of TPL on human melanoma cells. Treatment of human melanoma cells with TPL significantly inhibited cell growth and induced apoptosis, as evidenced by flow cytometry and annexin V-fluorescein isothiocyanate analyses. TPL increased the levels of Fas and Fas-associated death domain (FADD and induced cleavage of Bid by activation of caspase-8 and cytochrome c release from mitochondria to the cytosol, which resulted in activation of caspase-9 and caspase-3. Moreover, TPL-induced apoptosis in SK-MEL-2 cells was mediated through dephosphorylation of focal adhesion kinase (FAK and its cleavage by caspase-8-mediated caspase-3 activation via upregulation of Fas expression. We also found that TPL mediated the dissociation of receptor-interacting protein (RIP from FAK and enhanced the formation of RIP/Fas complex formation initiating cell death. In conclusion, our data firstly demonstrated that TPL induces apoptosis by both extrinsic and intrinsic apoptosis pathways in human melanoma cells and identified that RIP shuttles between Fas and FAK to mediate apoptosis.

  2. Imperial Queerness: The U.S. Homophile Press and Constructions of Sexualities in Asia and the Pacific, 1953-1964.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simpson, Carly

    2017-01-01

    This essay examines the ways in which U.S. homophile magazines represented and constructed Asia and the Pacific from 1953 to 1964. Through an analysis of 209 items that referenced Asia and the Pacific in ONE, Mattachine Review, and the Ladder, the essay argues that U.S. homophiles referenced the region in three primary ways: first, to create relationships, allies, and exchanges with people living in the region; second, to highlight the inferiority of the East and superiority of the West; and, third, to reveal the cross-cultural and transhistorical nature of homosexuality. These references were influenced by Orientalism, colonialism, and the Cold War, which framed Asia and the Pacific as both sexually and culturally backward, but also as a potential tourist destination for gay men and lesbian women.

  3. Multiple conserved cell adhesion protein interactions mediate neural wiring of a sensory circuit in C. elegans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Byunghyuk; Emmons, Scott W

    2017-09-13

    Nervous system function relies on precise synaptic connections. A number of widely-conserved cell adhesion proteins are implicated in cell recognition between synaptic partners, but how these proteins act as a group to specify a complex neural network is poorly understood. Taking advantage of known connectivity in C. elegans, we identified and studied cell adhesion genes expressed in three interacting neurons in the mating circuits of the adult male. Two interacting pairs of cell surface proteins independently promote fasciculation between sensory neuron HOA and its postsynaptic target interneuron AVG: BAM-2/neurexin-related in HOA binds to CASY-1/calsyntenin in AVG; SAX-7/L1CAM in sensory neuron PHC binds to RIG-6/contactin in AVG. A third, basal pathway results in considerable HOA-AVG fasciculation and synapse formation in the absence of the other two. The features of this multiplexed mechanism help to explain how complex connectivity is encoded and robustly established during nervous system development.

  4. Lebestatin, a disintegrin from Macrovipera venom, inhibits integrin-mediated cell adhesion, migration and angiogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olfa, Kallech-Ziri; José, Luis; Salma, Daoud; Amine, Bazaa; Najet, Srairi Abid; Nicolas, Andreotti; Maxime, Lehmann; Raoudha, Zouari; Kamel, Mabrouk; Jacques, Marvaldi; Jean-Marc, Sabatier; Mohamed, El Ayeb; Naziha, Marrakchi

    2005-12-01

    Lebestatin, a new member of the lysine-threonine-serine (KTS)-disintegrin family, was purified to homogeneity from Tunisian snake (Macrovipera lebetina) venom. It is a single-chain polypeptide composed of 41 amino acids. The amino-acid sequence of lebestatin shows that it displays a pattern of cysteines similar to other short disintegrins, but contains the sequence KTS rather than RGD in its integrin-binding loop. Lebestatin presents a high homology with obtustatin and viperistatin. Lebestatin interacts specifically with the alpha1beta1 integrin. It was thus able to inhibit both adhesion and migration of PC12 and alpha1beta1 integrin-expressing CHO cells (CHO-alpha1) to type I and IV collagens. This disintegrin also affected adhesion and migration of endothelial cells and exhibited an anti-angiogenic effect in vivo when using the 8-day-old embryo chick chorioallantoic membrane model.

  5. Spatiotemporal distribution of different extracellular polymeric substances and filamentation mediate Xylella fastidiosa adhesion and biofilm formation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Janissen, Richard; Murillo, Duber M; Niza, Barbara; Sahoo, Prasana K; Nobrega, Marcelo M; Cesar, Carlos L; Temperini, Marcia L A; Carvalho, Hernandes F; de Souza, Alessandra A; Cotta, Monica A

    2015-04-20

    Microorganism pathogenicity strongly relies on the generation of multicellular assemblies, called biofilms. Understanding their organization can unveil vulnerabilities leading to potential treatments; spatially and temporally-resolved comprehensive experimental characterization can provide new details of biofilm formation, and possibly new targets for disease control. Here, biofilm formation of economically important phytopathogen Xylella fastidiosa was analyzed at single-cell resolution using nanometer-resolution spectro-microscopy techniques, addressing the role of different types of extracellular polymeric substances (EPS) at each stage of the entire bacterial life cycle. Single cell adhesion is caused by unspecific electrostatic interactions through proteins at the cell polar region, where EPS accumulation is required for more firmly-attached, irreversibly adhered cells. Subsequently, bacteria form clusters, which are embedded in secreted loosely-bound EPS, and bridged by up to ten-fold elongated cells that form the biofilm framework. During biofilm maturation, soluble EPS forms a filamentous matrix that facilitates cell adhesion and provides mechanical support, while the biofilm keeps anchored by few cells. This floating architecture maximizes nutrient distribution while allowing detachment upon larger shear stresses; it thus complies with biological requirements of the bacteria life cycle. Using new approaches, our findings provide insights regarding different aspects of the adhesion process of X. fastidiosa and biofilm formation.

  6. Antifungal defense of probiotic Lactobacillus rhamnosus GG is mediated by blocking adhesion and nutrient depletion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mailänder-Sánchez, Daniela; Braunsdorf, Christina; Grumaz, Christian; Müller, Christoph; Lorenz, Stefan; Stevens, Philip; Wagener, Jeanette; Hebecker, Betty; Hube, Bernhard; Bracher, Franz; Sohn, Kai; Schaller, Martin

    2017-01-01

    Candida albicans is an inhabitant of mucosal surfaces in healthy individuals but also the most common cause of fungal nosocomial blood stream infections, associated with high morbidity and mortality. As such life-threatening infections often disseminate from superficial mucosal infections we aimed to study the use of probiotic Lactobacillus rhamnosus GG (LGG) in prevention of mucosal C. albicans infections. Here, we demonstrate that LGG protects oral epithelial tissue from damage caused by C. albicans in our in vitro model of oral candidiasis. Furthermore, we provide insights into the mechanisms behind this protection and dissect direct and indirect effects of LGG on C. albicans pathogenicity. C. albicans viability was not affected by LGG. Instead, transcriptional profiling using RNA-Seq indicated dramatic metabolic reprogramming of C. albicans. Additionally, LGG had a significant impact on major virulence attributes, including adhesion, invasion, and hyphal extension, whose reduction, consequently, prevented epithelial damage. This was accompanied by glucose depletion and repression of ergosterol synthesis, caused by LGG, but also due to blocked adhesion sites. Therefore, LGG protects oral epithelia against C. albicans infection by preventing fungal adhesion, invasion and damage, driven, at least in parts, by metabolic reprogramming due to nutrient limitation caused by LGG.

  7. Antifungal defense of probiotic Lactobacillus rhamnosus GG is mediated by blocking adhesion and nutrient depletion.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniela Mailänder-Sánchez

    Full Text Available Candida albicans is an inhabitant of mucosal surfaces in healthy individuals but also the most common cause of fungal nosocomial blood stream infections, associated with high morbidity and mortality. As such life-threatening infections often disseminate from superficial mucosal infections we aimed to study the use of probiotic Lactobacillus rhamnosus GG (LGG in prevention of mucosal C. albicans infections. Here, we demonstrate that LGG protects oral epithelial tissue from damage caused by C. albicans in our in vitro model of oral candidiasis. Furthermore, we provide insights into the mechanisms behind this protection and dissect direct and indirect effects of LGG on C. albicans pathogenicity. C. albicans viability was not affected by LGG. Instead, transcriptional profiling using RNA-Seq indicated dramatic metabolic reprogramming of C. albicans. Additionally, LGG had a significant impact on major virulence attributes, including adhesion, invasion, and hyphal extension, whose reduction, consequently, prevented epithelial damage. This was accompanied by glucose depletion and repression of ergosterol synthesis, caused by LGG, but also due to blocked adhesion sites. Therefore, LGG protects oral epithelia against C. albicans infection by preventing fungal adhesion, invasion and damage, driven, at least in parts, by metabolic reprogramming due to nutrient limitation caused by LGG.

  8. The Receptor for Advanced Glycation End-Products (RAGE) Is Only Present in Mammals, and Belongs to a Family of Cell Adhesion Molecules (CAMs)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sessa, Luca; Gatti, Elena; Zeni, Filippo; Antonelli, Antonella; Catucci, Alessandro; Koch, Michael; Pompilio, Giulio; Fritz, Günter

    2014-01-01

    The human receptor for advanced glycation endproducts (RAGE) is a multiligand cell surface protein belonging to the immunoglobulin superfamily, and is involved in inflammatory and immune responses. Most importantly, RAGE is considered a receptor for HMGB1 and several S100 proteins, which are Damage-Associated Molecular Pattern molecules (DAMPs) released during tissue damage. In this study we show that the Ager gene coding for RAGE first appeared in mammals, and is closely related to other genes coding for cell adhesion molecules (CAMs) such as ALCAM, BCAM and MCAM that appeared earlier during metazoan evolution. RAGE is expressed at very low levels in most cells, but when expressed at high levels, it mediates cell adhesion to extracellular matrix components and to other cells through homophilic interactions. Our results suggest that RAGE evolved from a family of CAMs, and might still act as an adhesion molecule, in particular in the lung where it is highly expressed or under pathological conditions characterized by an increase of its protein levels. PMID:24475194

  9. Ligand bound beta1 integrins inhibit procaspase-8 for mediating cell adhesion-mediated drug and radiation resistance in human leukemia cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Doris Estrugo

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Chemo- and radiotherapeutic responses of leukemia cells are modified by integrin-mediated adhesion to extracellular matrix. To further characterize the molecular mechanisms by which beta1 integrins confer radiation and chemoresistance, HL60 human acute promyelocytic leukemia cells stably transfected with beta1 integrin and A3 Jurkat T-lymphoma cells deficient for Fas-associated death domain protein or procaspase-8 were examined. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Upon exposure to X-rays, Ara-C or FasL, suspension and adhesion (fibronectin (FN, laminin, collagen-1; 5-100 microg/cm(2 coating concentration cultures were processed for measurement of apoptosis, mitochondrial transmembrane potential (MTP, caspase activation, and protein analysis. Overexpression of beta1 integrins enhanced the cellular sensitivity to X-rays and Ara-C, which was counteracted by increasing concentrations of matrix proteins in association with reduced caspase-3 and -8 activation and MTP breakdown. Usage of stimulatory or inhibitory anti beta1 integrin antibodies, pharmacological caspase or phosphatidylinositol-3 kinase (PI3K inhibitors, coprecipitation experiments and siRNA-mediated beta1 integrin silencing provided further data showing an interaction between FN-ligated beta1 integrin and PI3K/Akt for inhibiting procaspase-8 cleavage. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: The presented data suggest that the ligand status of beta1 integrins is critical for their antiapoptotic effect in leukemia cells treated with Ara-C, FasL or ionizing radiation. The antiapoptotic actions involve formation of a beta1 integrin/Akt complex, which signals to prevent procaspase-8-mediated induction of apoptosis in a PI3K-dependent manner. Antagonizing agents targeting beta1 integrin and PI3K/Akt signaling in conjunction with conventional therapies might effectively reduce radiation- and drug-resistant tumor populations and treatment failure in hematological malignancies.

  10. Ligand Bound β1 Integrins Inhibit Procaspase-8 for Mediating Cell Adhesion-Mediated Drug and Radiation Resistance in Human Leukemia Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hess, Franziska; Scherthan, Harry; Belka, Claus; Cordes, Nils

    2007-01-01

    Background Chemo- and radiotherapeutic responses of leukemia cells are modified by integrin-mediated adhesion to extracellular matrix. To further characterize the molecular mechanisms by which β1 integrins confer radiation and chemoresistance, HL60 human acute promyelocytic leukemia cells stably transfected with β1 integrin and A3 Jurkat T-lymphoma cells deficient for Fas-associated death domain protein or procaspase-8 were examined. Methodology/Principal Findings Upon exposure to X-rays, Ara-C or FasL, suspension and adhesion (fibronectin (FN), laminin, collagen-1; 5–100 µg/cm2 coating concentration) cultures were processed for measurement of apoptosis, mitochondrial transmembrane potential (MTP), caspase activation, and protein analysis. Overexpression of β1 integrins enhanced the cellular sensitivity to X-rays and Ara-C, which was counteracted by increasing concentrations of matrix proteins in association with reduced caspase-3 and -8 activation and MTP breakdown. Usage of stimulatory or inhibitory anti β1 integrin antibodies, pharmacological caspase or phosphatidylinositol-3 kinase (PI3K) inhibitors, coprecipitation experiments and siRNA-mediated β1 integrin silencing provided further data showing an interaction between FN-ligated β1 integrin and PI3K/Akt for inhibiting procaspase-8 cleavage. Conclusions/Significance The presented data suggest that the ligand status of β1 integrins is critical for their antiapoptotic effect in leukemia cells treated with Ara-C, FasL or ionizing radiation. The antiapoptotic actions involve formation of a β1 integrin/Akt complex, which signals to prevent procaspase-8-mediated induction of apoptosis in a PI3K-dependent manner. Antagonizing agents targeting β1 integrin and PI3K/Akt signaling in conjunction with conventional therapies might effectively reduce radiation- and drug-resistant tumor populations and treatment failure in hematological malignancies. PMID:17342203

  11. E-Cadherin Homophilic Ligation Inhibits Cell Growth and Epidermal Growth Factor Receptor Signaling Independently of Other Cell Interactions

    OpenAIRE

    Perrais, Michaël; Chen, Xiao; Perez-Moreno, Mirna; Gumbiner, Barry M.

    2007-01-01

    E-cadherin function leads to the density-dependent contact inhibition of cell growth. Because cadherins control the overall state of cell contact, cytoskeletal organization, and the establishment of many other kinds of cell interactions, it remains unknown whether E-cadherin directly transduces growth inhibitory signals. To address this question, we have selectively formed E-cadherin homophilic bonds at the cell surface of isolated epithelial cells by using functionally active recombinant E-c...

  12. Positive and negative regulation by SLP-76/ADAP and Pyk2 of chemokine-stimulated T-lymphocyte adhesion mediated by integrin α4β1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dios-Esponera, Ana; Isern de Val, Soledad; Sevilla-Movilla, Silvia; García-Verdugo, Rosa; García-Bernal, David; Arellano-Sánchez, Nohemí; Cabañas, Carlos; Teixidó, Joaquin

    2015-01-01

    Stimulation by chemokines of integrin α4β1–dependent T-lymphocyte adhesion is a crucial step for lymphocyte trafficking. The adaptor Vav1 is required for chemokine-activated T-cell adhesion mediated by α4β1. Conceivably, proteins associating with Vav1 could potentially modulate this adhesion. Correlating with activation by the chemokine CXCL12 of T-lymphocyte attachment to α4β1 ligands, a transient stimulation in the association of Vav1 with SLP-76, Pyk2, and ADAP was observed. Using T-cells depleted for SLP-76, ADAP, or Pyk2, or expressing Pyk2 kinase–inactive forms, we show that SLP-76 and ADAP stimulate chemokine-activated, α4β1-mediated adhesion, whereas Pyk2 opposes T-cell attachment. While CXCL12-promoted generation of high-affinity α4β1 is independent of SLP-76, ADAP, and Pyk2, the strength of α4β1-VCAM-1 interaction and cell spreading on VCAM-1 are targets of regulation by these three proteins. GTPase assays, expression of activated or dominant-negative Rac1, or combined ADAP and Pyk2 silencing indicated that Rac1 activation by CXCL12 is a common mediator response in SLP-76–, ADAP-, and Pyk2-regulated cell adhesion involving α4β1. Our data strongly suggest that chemokine-stimulated associations between Vav1, SLP-76, and ADAP facilitate Rac1 activation and α4β1-mediated adhesion, whereas Pyk2 opposes this adhesion by limiting Rac1 activation. PMID:26202465

  13. Biological adhesion of the flatworm Macrostomum lignano relies on a duo-gland system and is mediated by a cell type-specific intermediate filament protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lengerer, Birgit; Pjeta, Robert; Wunderer, Julia; Rodrigues, Marcelo; Arbore, Roberto; Schärer, Lukas; Berezikov, Eugene; Hess, Michael W; Pfaller, Kristian; Egger, Bernhard; Obwegeser, Sabrina; Salvenmoser, Willi; Ladurner, Peter

    2014-02-12

    Free-living flatworms, in both marine and freshwater environments, are able to adhere to and release from a substrate several times within a second. This reversible adhesion relies on adhesive organs comprised of three cell types: an adhesive gland cell, a releasing gland cell, and an anchor cell, which is a modified epidermal cell responsible for structural support. However, nothing is currently known about the molecules that are involved in this adhesion process. In this study we present the detailed morphology of the adhesive organs of the free-living marine flatworm Macrostomum lignano. About 130 adhesive organs are located in a horse-shoe-shaped arc along the ventral side of the tail plate. Each organ consists of exactly three cells, an adhesive gland cell, a releasing gland cell, and an anchor cell. The necks of the two gland cells penetrate the anchor cell through a common pore. Modified microvilli of the anchor cell form a collar surrounding the necks of the adhesive- and releasing glands, jointly forming the papilla, the outer visible part of the adhesive organs. Next, we identified an intermediate filament (IF) gene, macif1, which is expressed in the anchor cells. RNA interference mediated knock-down resulted in the first experimentally induced non-adhesion phenotype in any marine animal. Specifically, the absence of intermediate filaments in the anchor cells led to papillae with open tips, a reduction of the cytoskeleton network, a decline in hemidesmosomal connections, and to shortened microvilli containing less actin. Our findings reveal an elaborate biological adhesion system in a free-living flatworm, which permits impressively rapid temporary adhesion-release performance in the marine environment. We demonstrate that the structural integrity of the supportive cell, the anchor cell, is essential for this adhesion process: the knock-down of the anchor cell-specific intermediate filament gene resulted in the inability of the animals to adhere. The RNAi

  14. Ligand Activation of the Androgen Receptor Downregulates E-Cadherin-Mediated Cell Adhesion and Promotes Apoptosis of Prostatic Cancer Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joanna Nightingale

    2003-07-01

    Full Text Available Androgen independence is the major cause of endocrine therapy failure in advanced prostate cancer (PC. To examine the effects of human androgen receptor (AR expression on growth of human PC cells, transfection of full-length AR cDNA in an androgen-insensitive human prostatic adenocarcinoma cell line (DU145 was performed. Transcriptional activity of AR was confirmed by the MMTV luciferase assay and AR expression was assessed by reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction, Western blotting, and immunocytochemistry. Two stable transfectant cell lines expressing functional AR were established and passaged over 60 times. Under standard culture conditions, AR expression in transfected cells was predominantly cytoplasmic. Exposure to dihydrotestosterone (DHT; 60 pM-10 nM resulted in a rapid (maximal at 30 minutes translocation of AR to the nucleus. Treatment with DHT (5 nM caused a significant reduction in cell-cell adhesion and aggregation accompanied by a decrease in E-cadherin expression. This was associated with up to 40% inhibition of proliferation and approximately two-fold increase in apoptosis. These results suggest that gene transfer-mediated AR expression in DU145 cells confers sensitivity to DHT, modulates cell-cell adhesion through E-cadherin, and suppresses cell growth by inhibiting proliferation and promoting apoptosis. This provides a model for studies of AR-regulated cell signalling and identification of novel androgenregulated genes in PC.

  15. Notch promotes vascular maturation by inducing integrin-mediated smooth muscle cell adhesion to the endothelial basement membrane.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scheppke, Lea; Murphy, Eric A; Zarpellon, Alessandro; Hofmann, Jennifer J; Merkulova, Alona; Shields, David J; Weis, Sara M; Byzova, Tatiana V; Ruggeri, Zaverio M; Iruela-Arispe, M Luisa; Cheresh, David A

    2012-03-01

    Vascular development and angiogenesis initially depend on endothelial tip cell invasion, which is followed by a series of maturation steps, including lumen formation and recruitment of perivascular cells. Notch ligands expressed on the endothelium and their cognate receptors expressed on perivascular cells are involved in blood vessel maturation, though little is known regarding the Notch-dependent effectors that facilitate perivascular coverage of nascent vessels. Here, we report that vascular smooth muscle cell (VSMC) recognition of the Notch ligand Jagged1 on endothelial cells leads to expression of integrin αvβ3 on VSMCs. Once expressed, integrin αvβ3 facilitates VSMC adhesion to VWF in the endothelial basement membrane of developing retinal arteries, leading to vessel maturation. Genetic or pharmacologic disruption of Jagged1, Notch, αvβ3, or VWF suppresses VSMC coverage of nascent vessels and arterial maturation during vascular development. Therefore, we define a Notch-mediated interaction between the developing endothelium and VSMCs leading to adhesion of VSMCs to the endothelial basement membrane and arterial maturation.

  16. Graphene oxide flakes as a cellular adhesive: prevention of reactive oxygen species mediated death of implanted cells for cardiac repair.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Jooyeon; Kim, Bokyoung; Han, Jin; Oh, Jaewon; Park, Subeom; Ryu, Seungmi; Jung, Subin; Shin, Jung-Youn; Lee, Beom Seob; Hong, Byung Hee; Choi, Donghoon; Kim, Byung-Soo

    2015-05-26

    Mesenchymal stem cell (MSC) implantation has emerged as a potential therapy for myocardial infarction (MI). However, the poor survival of MSCs implanted to treat MI has significantly limited the therapeutic efficacy of this approach. This poor survival is primarily due to reactive oxygen species (ROS) generated in the ischemic myocardium after the restoration of blood flow. ROS primarily causes the death of implanted MSCs by inhibiting the adhesion of the MSCs to extracellular matrices at the lesion site (i.e., anoikis). In this study, we proposed the use of graphene oxide (GO) flakes to protect the implanted MSCs from ROS-mediated death and thereby improve the therapeutic efficacy of the MSCs. GO can adsorb extracellular matrix (ECM) proteins. The survival of MSCs, which had adhered to ECM protein-adsorbed GO flakes and were subsequently exposed to ROS in vitro or implanted into the ischemia-damaged and reperfused myocardium, significantly exceeded that of unmodified MSCs. Furthermore, the MSC engraftment improved by the adhesion of MSCs to GO flakes prior to implantation enhanced the paracrine secretion from the MSCs following MSC implantation, which in turn promoted cardiac tissue repair and cardiac function restoration. This study demonstrates that GO can effectively improve the engraftment and therapeutic efficacy of MSCs used to repair the injury of ROS-abundant ischemia and reperfusion by protecting implanted cells from anoikis.

  17. Myosin II activity regulates vinculin recruitment to focal adhesions through FAK-mediated paxillin phosphorylation

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Ana M. Pasapera; Ian C. Schneider; Erin Rericha; David D. Schlaepfer; Clare M. Waterman

    2010-01-01

    ...) are myosin II and extracellular matrix (ECM) stiffness dependent. Myosin II activity promotes FAK/ Src-mediated phosphorylation of paxillin on tyrosines 31 and 118 and vinculin association with paxillin...

  18. Integrin αVβ3 and αVβ5 are required for leukemia inhibitory factor-mediated the adhesion of trophoblast cells to the endometrial cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chung, Tae-Wook; Park, Mi-Ju; Kim, Hyung Sik; Choi, Hee-Jung; Ha, Ki-Tae

    2016-01-22

    The embryo implantation including adhesion between trophoblast and endometrium is a crucial process for the successful pregnancy. LIF and adhesion molecules including integrins are known as significant factors for embryo implantation. However, the function of LIF on the regulation of adhesion molecule expression and promotion of trophoblast adhesion to endometrial cells has not been fully elucidated. Here we show that LIF significantly induced mRNA expression of ITGAV, ITGB3, and ITGB5 in endometrial cells, as evidenced by RT-PCR and qRT-PCR analysis. Based on the results from treatment of antagonist for LIF receptor (hLA), LIF positively regulates expression of integrin αV, β3, and β5, and adhesion of the human trophectoderm-derived JAr cells to endometrial Ishikawa cells. Furthermore, the adhesion between trophoblastic cells and LIF-stimulated endometrial cells was significantly reduced by neutralization of LIF-mediated integrin β3 and β5 expression on endometrial cell surface with integrin subunit β3 and β5 antibodies. Taken together, we firstly demonstrate that LIF enhances the adhesion of trophoblastic cells to endometrial cells by up-regulating expression of integrin heterodimer αVβ3 and αVβ5, indicating the promotion of endometrial receptivity for embryo implantation. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Kinectin-mediated endoplasmic reticulum dynamics supports focal adhesion growth in the cellular lamella.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Xin; Tee, Yee Han; Heng, Justin K; Zhu, Yajuan; Hu, Xian; Margadant, Felix; Ballestrem, Christoph; Bershadsky, Alexander; Griffiths, Gareth; Yu, Hanry

    2010-11-15

    Focal adhesions (FAs) control cell shape and motility, which are important processes that underlie a wide range of physiological functions. FA dynamics is regulated by cytoskeleton, motor proteins and small GTPases. Kinectin is an integral endoplasmic reticulum (ER) membrane protein that extends the ER along microtubules. Here, we investigated the influence of the ER on FA dynamics within the cellular lamella by disrupting the kinectin-kinesin interaction by overexpressing the minimal kinectin-kinesin interaction domain on kinectin in cells. This perturbation resulted in a morphological change to a rounded cell shape and reduced cell spreading and migration. Immunofluorescence and live-cell imaging demonstrated a kinectin-dependent ER extension into the cellular lamella and ER colocalisation with FAs within the cellular lamella. FRAP experiments showed that ER contact with FAs was accompanied with an increase in FA protein recruitment to FAs. Disruption of the kinectin-kinesin interaction caused a reduction in FA protein recruitment to FAs. This suggests that the ER supports FA growth within the cellular lamella. Microtubule targeting to FAs is known to promote adhesion disassembly; however, ER contact increased FA size even in the presence of microtubules. Our results suggest a scenario whereby kinectin-kinesin interaction facilitates ER transport along microtubules to support FA growth.

  20. Adhesion-mediated self-renewal abilities of Ph+ blastoma cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Funayama, Keiji; Saito-Kurimoto, Yumi [Department of Integrative Bioscience and Biomedical Engineering, Waseda University, 4-3-1 Ohkubo, Shinjuku-ku, Tokyo 169-555 (Japan); Ebihara, Yasuhiro [Institute of Medical Science, University of Tokyo, 4-6-1 Shirokenedai, Minato-ku, Tokyo (Japan); Shimane, Miyuki; Nomura, Hitoshi [Department of Integrative Bioscience and Biomedical Engineering, Waseda University, 4-3-1 Ohkubo, Shinjuku-ku, Tokyo 169-555 (Japan); Tsuji, Ko-ichiro [Institute of Medical Science, University of Tokyo, 4-6-1 Shirokenedai, Minato-ku, Tokyo (Japan); Asano, Shigetaka, E-mail: asgtkmd@waseda.jp [Department of Integrative Bioscience and Biomedical Engineering, Waseda University, 4-3-1 Ohkubo, Shinjuku-ku, Tokyo 169-555 (Japan)

    2010-05-28

    The Philadelphia chromosome-positive blastoma, maintained by serial subcutaneous transplantation in nude mice, is a highly proliferating biological mass consisting of homogenous CD34{sup +}CD38{sup -} myeloblastoid cells. These cells newly evolved from pluripotent leukemia stem cells of chronic myeloid leukemia in the chronic phase. Therefore, this mass may provide a unique tool for better understanding cellular and molecular mechanisms of self-renewal of leukemia stem cells. In this paper, we demonstrated that intravenously injected blastoma cells can cause Ph+ blastic leukemia with multiple invasive foci in NOD/SCID mice but not in nude mice. In addition, using an in vitro culture system, we clearly showed that blastoma cell adhesion to OP9 stromal cells accelerates blastoma cell proliferation that is associated with up-regulation of BMI1 gene expression; increased levels of {beta}-catenin and the Notch1 intra-cellular domain; and changed the expression pattern of variant CD44 forms, which are constitutively expressed in these blastoma cells. These findings strongly suggest that adhesion of leukemic stem cells to stromal cells via CD44 might be indispensable for their cellular defense against attack by immune cells and for maintenance of their self-renewal ability.

  1. Biofilm mediates Enterococcus faecalis adhesion, invasion and survival into bovine mammary epithelial cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elhadidy, M; Zahran, E

    2014-03-01

    We proposed in this study that during intramammary infection, biofilm formation may facilitate adherence and colonization of Enterococcus faecalis to mammary gland epithelium. This was established by comparing six different Ent. faecalis isolates with different biofilm-forming profiles for their adhesive, invasive and survival capabilities to bovine mammary epithelial cell line (MAC-T). Our results showed increased ability of the biofilm-producer Ent. faecalis strains to adhere, invade and survive inside MAC-T cells rather than nonbiofilm-producer strains. We showed that growth of bacteria in bovine milk significantly augmented the adherence and invasion of all tested strains, and this feature was abolished again when strains were subcultured in brain heart infusion broth. Moreover, growth in bovine milk significantly increased biofilm formation by all tested strains. These results indicated that biofilm formation by Ent. faecalis, especially after expressing milk-dependent induction, may have special relevance in the pathogenesis of Ent. faecalis mastitis during intramammary infection by enhancing bovine mammary epithelial adhesion and colonization. Results obtained from current work highlighted the role of biofilm in the pathogenesis of Enterococcus faecalis mastitis. Those biofilm-forming strains might be substantial as useful antigens in diagnostic assays and as future vaccine candidates to control Ent. faecalis mastitis. © 2013 The Society for Applied Microbiology.

  2. Src homology 2-domain containing leukocyte-specific phosphoprotein of 76 kDa is mandatory for TCR-mediated inside-out signaling, but dispensable for CXCR4-mediated LFA-1 activation, adhesion, and migration of T cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horn, Jessica; Wang, Xiaoqian; Reichardt, Peter; Stradal, Theresia E; Warnecke, Nicole; Simeoni, Luca; Gunzer, Matthias; Yablonski, Deborah; Schraven, Burkhart; Kliche, Stefanie

    2009-11-01

    Engagement of the TCR or of chemokine receptors such as CXCR4 induces adhesion and migration of T cells via so-called inside-out signaling pathways. The molecular processes underlying inside-out signaling events are as yet not completely understood. In this study, we show that TCR- and CXCR4-mediated activation of integrins critically depends on the membrane recruitment of the adhesion- and degranulation-promoting adapter protein (ADAP)/Src kinase-associated phosphoprotein of 55 kDa (SKAP55)/Rap1-interacting adapter protein (RIAM)/Rap1 module. We further demonstrate that the Src homology 2 domain containing leukocyte-specific phosphoprotein of 76 kDa (SLP76) is crucial for TCR-mediated inside-out signaling and T cell/APC interaction. Besides facilitating membrane recruitment of ADAP, SKAP55, and RIAM, SLP76 regulates TCR-mediated inside-out signaling by controlling the activation of Rap1 as well as Rac-mediated actin polymerization. Surprisingly, however, SLP76 is not mandatory for CXCR4-mediated inside-out signaling. Indeed, both CXCR4-induced T cell adhesion and migration are not affected by loss of SLP76. Moreover, after CXCR4 stimulation, the ADAP/SKAP55/RIAM/Rap1 module is recruited to the plasma membrane independently of SLP76. Collectively, our data indicate a differential requirement for SLP76 in TCR- vs CXCR4-mediated inside-out signaling pathways regulating T cell adhesion and migration.

  3. The Influence of Homophilous Interactions on Diversity Effects in Group Problem-Solving.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Estévez-Mujica, Claudia P; Acero, Andrés; Jiménez-Leal, William; Garcia-Diaz, César

    2018-01-01

    Increasingly diversity researchers call for further studies of group micro-processes and dynamics to understand the paradoxical effects of diversity on group performance. In this study, based on analyses of in-group, networked, homophilous interactions, we aim to explain further the effects of diversity on group performance in a parallel problem-solving task, both experimentally and computationally. We developed a 'whodunit' problem-solving experiment with 116 participants assigned to different-sized groups. Experimental results show that low diversity and high homophily levels are associated with lower performance while the effects of group size are not significant. To investigate this further, we developed an agent-based computational model (ABM), through which we inspected (a) the effect of different homophily and diversity strengths on performance, and (b) the robustness of such effects across group size variations. Overall, modeling results were consistent with our experimental findings, and revealed that the strength of homophily can drive diversity towards a positive or negative impact on performance. We also observed that increasing group size has a very marginal effect. Our work contributes to a better understanding of the implications of diversity in-group problem-solving by providing an integration of both experimental and computational perspectives in the analysis of group processes.

  4. Role of YAP/TAZ in cell-matrix adhesion-mediated signalling and mechanotransduction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dupont, Sirio

    2016-04-10

    Signalling from the extracellular matrix (ECM) is a fundamental cellular input that sustains proliferation, opposes cell death and regulates differentiation. Through integrins, cells perceive both the chemical composition and physical properties of the ECM. In particular, cell behaviour is profoundly influenced by the mechanical elasticity or stiffness of the ECM, which regulates the ability of cells to develop forces through their contractile actomyosin cytoskeleton and to mature focal adhesions. This mechanosensing ability affects fundamental cellular functions, such that alterations of ECM stiffness is nowadays considered not a simple consequence of pathology, but a causative input driving aberrant cell behaviours. We here discuss recent advances on how mechanical signals intersect nuclear transcription and in particular the activity of YAP/TAZ transcriptional coactivators, known downstream transducers of the Hippo pathway and important effectors of ECM mechanical cues. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Lewis antigen mediated adhesion of freshly removed human bladder tumors to E-selectin

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Skorsteensgaard, Karna; Vestergaard, Else Marie; Langkilde, Niels

    1999-01-01

    and appropriate controls was used for bladder tumor cell adhesion. On the same tumors expression of carbohydrate structures was examined by immunohistochemistry and Western blotting. RESULTS: No tumor bound to P-selectin. Nine tumors showed a high number of cells binding to E-selectin, 5 showed intermediate......-stainings were smeared indicating a mucin-type carrier molecule, but 115, 55 and 40 kDa bands carrying Le(a) and/or Le(b) epitopes were present in all tumors that bound. The Le(a) structure, as detected by blotting, was the only structure necessary for binding in the center of the wells (p ....001), and was correlated to number of bound cells (p cells (p cell membranes correlated with frequent binding (p

  6. A novel function of Junctional Adhesion Molecule-C in mediating melanoma cell metastasis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Langer, Harald F.; Orlova, Valeria V.; Xie, Changping; Kaul, Sunil; Schneider, Darius; Lonsdorf, Anke S.; Fahrleitner, Manuela; Choi, Eun Young; Dutoit, Vanessa; Pellegrini, Manuela; Grossklaus, Sylvia; Nawroth, Peter P.; Baretton, Gustavo; Santoso, Sentot; Hwang, Sam T.; Arnold, Bernd; Chavakis, Triantafyllos

    2011-01-01

    Hematogenous dissemination of melanoma is a life-threatening complication of this malignant tumor. Here, we identified Junctional Adhesion Molecule-C (JAM-C) as a novel player in melanoma metastasis to the lung. JAM-C expression was identified in human and murine melanoma cell lines, in human malignant melanoma, as well as in metastatic melanoma including melanoma lung metastasis. JAM-C expressed on both murine B16 melanoma cells as well as on endothelial cells, promoted the transendothelial migration of the melanoma cells. We generated mice with inactivation of JAM-C. JAM-C−/− mice as well as endothelial-specific JAM-C-deficient mice displayed significantly decreased B16 melanoma cell metastasis to the lung, whereas treatment of mice with soluble JAM-C prevented melanoma lung metastasis. Together, JAM-C represents a novel therapeutic target for melanoma metastasis. PMID:21593193

  7. Role of YAP/TAZ in cell-matrix adhesion-mediated signalling and mechanotransduction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dupont, Sirio, E-mail: sirio.dupont@unipd.it

    2016-04-10

    Signalling from the extracellular matrix (ECM) is a fundamental cellular input that sustains proliferation, opposes cell death and regulates differentiation. Through integrins, cells perceive both the chemical composition and physical properties of the ECM. In particular, cell behaviour is profoundly influenced by the mechanical elasticity or stiffness of the ECM, which regulates the ability of cells to develop forces through their contractile actomyosin cytoskeleton and to mature focal adhesions. This mechanosensing ability affects fundamental cellular functions, such that alterations of ECM stiffness is nowadays considered not a simple consequence of pathology, but a causative input driving aberrant cell behaviours. We here discuss recent advances on how mechanical signals intersect nuclear transcription and in particular the activity of YAP/TAZ transcriptional coactivators, known downstream transducers of the Hippo pathway and important effectors of ECM mechanical cues.

  8. Cationic polymer mediated bacterial clustering: Cell-adhesive properties of homo- and copolymers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Louzao, Iria; Sui, Cheng; Winzer, Klaus; Fernandez-Trillo, Francisco; Alexander, Cameron

    2015-09-01

    New anti-infective materials are needed urgently as alternatives to conventional biocides. It has recently been established that polymer materials designed to bind to the surface of bacteria can induce the formation of cell clusters which enhance the expression of quorum sensing controlled phenotypes. These materials are relevant for anti-infective strategies as they have the potential to inhibit adhesion while at the same time modulating Quorum Sensing (QS) controlled virulence. Here we carefully evaluate the role that charge and catechol moieties in these polymers play on the binding. We investigate the ability of the cationic polymers poly(N-[3-(dimethylamino)propyl] methacrylamide) (pDMAPMAm, P1), poly(N-dopamine methacrylamide-co-N-[3-(dimethylamino)propyl] methacrylamide) (pDMAm-co-pDMAPMAm, P2) and p(3,4-dihydroxy-l-phenylalanine methacrylamide), p(l-DMAm, P3) to cluster a range of bacteria, such as Staphylococcus aureus (Gram-positive), Vibrio harveyi, Escherichia coli and Pseudomonas aeruginosa (Gram-negative) under conditions of varying pH (6, 7 and 8) and polymer concentration (0.1 and 0.5mg/mL). We identify that clustering ability is strongly dependent on the balance between charge and hydrophobicity. Moreover, our results suggest that catechol moieties have a positive effect on adhesive properties, but only in the presence of cationic residues such as for P2. Overall, our results highlight the subtle interplay between dynamic natural surfaces and synthetic materials, as well as the need to consider synergistic structure-property relationship when designing antimicrobial polymers. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. Bacterial Adhesion & Blocking Bacterial Adhesion

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vejborg, Rebecca Munk

    2008-01-01

    components. These substances may both mediate and stabilize the bacterial biofilm. Finally, several adhesive structures were examined, and a novel physiological biofilm phenotype in E.coli biofilms was characterized, namely cell chain formation. The autotransporter protein, antigen 43, was implicated...

  10. Nuclear factor kappaB-mediated down-regulation of adhesion molecules: possible mechanism for inhibitory activity of bigelovin against inflammatory monocytes adhesion to endothelial cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nam, Kung-Woo; Oh, Goo Taeg; Seo, Eun-Kyoung; Kim, Kyeong Ho; Koo, Uk; Lee, Sung-Jin; Mar, Woongchon

    2009-06-22

    The flowers of Inula britannica L. var. chinensis (Rupr.) Reg. (Compositae) are used in traditional medicine to treat asthma, chronic bronchitis, and acute pleurisy in China and Korea. However, the pharmacological actions of Inula britannica L. var. chinensis on endothelial cells and inflammatory monocytes are not clear. In this study, we investigated whether bigelovin, a sesquiterpene lactone isolated from the flowers of Inula britannica L. var. chinensis, inhibits monocyte adhesion and adhesion molecule expression in brain endothelial cells. We measured tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-alpha)-enhanced Raw264.7 monocyte binding to brain endothelial cells and the levels of cell adhesion molecules, including vascular adhesion molecule-1 (VCAM-1), intracellular adhesion molecule-1 (ICAM-1), and endothelial-selectin (E-selectin) on the surface of brain endothelial cells. Bigelovin significantly inhibited these in a dose-dependent manner without affecting cell viability. Furthermore, bigelovin suppressed the nuclear factor kappaB (NF-kappaB) promoter-driven luciferase activity, NF-kappaB activation, and degradation of NF-kappaB inhibitor protein alpha (IkappaBalpha). These results indicate that bigelovin inhibits inflammatory monocyte adhesion to endothelial cells and the expression of VCAM-1, ICAM-1, and E-selectin by blocking IkappaBalpha degradation and NF-kappaB activation.

  11. The adhesion GPCR BAI1 mediates macrophage ROS production and microbicidal activity against Gram-negative bacteria

    Science.gov (United States)

    Billings, Emily A.; Lee, Chang Sup; Owen, Katherine A.; D’Souza, Ryan S.; Ravichandran, Kodi S.; Casanova, James E.

    2016-01-01

    The detection of microbes and initiation of an innate immune response occur through pattern recognition receptors (PRRs), which are critical for the production of inflammatory cytokines and activation of the cellular microbicidal machinery. In particular, the production of reactive oxygen species (ROS) by the NADPH oxidase complex is a critical component of the macrophage bactericidal machinery. We previously characterized brain-specific angiogenesis inhibitor 1 (BAI1), a member of the adhesion family of G protein (heterotrimeric guanine nucleotide–binding protein)–coupled receptors (GPCRs), as a PRR that mediates the selective phagocytic uptake of Gram-negative bacteria by macrophages. We showed that BAI1 promoted phagosomal ROS production through activation of the Rho family guanosine triphosphatase (GTPase) Rac1, thereby stimulating NADPH oxidase activity. Primary BAI1-deficient macrophages exhibited attenuated Rac GTPase activity and reduced ROS production in response to several Gram-negative bacteria, resulting in impaired microbicidal activity. Furthermore, in a peritoneal infection model, BAI1-deficient mice exhibited increased susceptibility to death by bacterial challenge because of impaired bacterial clearance. Together, these findings suggest that BAI1 mediates the clearance of Gram-negative bacteria by stimulating both phagocytosis and NADPH oxidase activation, thereby coupling bacterial detection to the cellular microbicidal machinery. PMID:26838550

  12. The PI3-kinase delta inhibitor idelalisib (GS-1101) targets integrin-mediated adhesion of chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL) cell to endothelial and marrow stromal cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fiorcari, Stefania; Brown, Wells S; McIntyre, Bradley W; Estrov, Zeev; Maffei, Rossana; O'Brien, Susan; Sivina, Mariela; Hoellenriegel, Julia; Wierda, William G; Keating, Michael J; Ding, Wei; Kay, Neil E; Lannutti, Brian J; Marasca, Roberto; Burger, Jan A

    2013-01-01

    CLL cell trafficking between blood and tissue compartments is an integral part of the disease process. Idelalisib, a phosphoinositide 3-kinase delta (PI3Kδ) inhibitor causes rapid lymph node shrinkage, along with an increase in lymphocytosis, prior to inducing objective responses in CLL patients. This characteristic activity presumably is due to CLL cell redistribution from tissues into the blood, but the underlying mechanisms are not fully understood. We therefore analyzed idelalisib effects on CLL cell adhesion to endothelial and bone marrow stromal cells (EC, BMSC). We found that idelalisib inhibited CLL cell adhesion to EC and BMSC under static and shear flow conditions. TNFα-induced VCAM-1 (CD106) expression in supporting layers increased CLL cell adhesion and accentuated the inhibitory effect of idelalisib. Co-culture with EC and BMSC also protected CLL from undergoing apoptosis, and this EC- and BMSC-mediated protection was antagonized by idelalisib. Furthermore, we demonstrate that CLL cell adhesion to EC and VLA-4 (CD49d) resulted in the phosphorylation of Akt, which was sensitive to inhibition by idelalisib. These findings demonstrate that idelalisib interferes with integrin-mediated CLL cell adhesion to EC and BMSC, providing a novel mechanism to explain idelalisib-induced redistribution of CLL cells from tissues into the blood.

  13. Structural determinants of adhesion by Protocadherin-19 and implications for its role in epilepsy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cooper, Sharon R.; Jontes, James D.; Sotomayor, Marcos

    2016-10-26

    Non-clustered δ-protocadherins are homophilic cell adhesion molecules essential for the development of the vertebrate nervous system, as several are closely linked to neurodevelopmental disorders. Mutations inprotocadherin-19(PCDH19) result in a female-limited, infant-onset form of epilepsy (PCDH19-FE). Over 100 mutations inPCDH19have been identified in patients with PCDH19-FE, about half of which are missense mutations in the adhesive extracellular domain. Neither the mechanism of homophilic adhesion by PCDH19, nor the biochemical effects of missense mutations are understood. Here we present a crystallographic structure of the minimal adhesive fragment of the zebrafish Pcdh19 extracellular domain. This structure reveals the adhesive interface for Pcdh19, which is broadly relevant to both non-clustered δ and clustered protocadherin subfamilies. In addition, we show that several PCDH19-FE missense mutations localize to the adhesive interface and abolish Pcdh19 adhesion inin vitroassays, thus revealing the biochemical basis of their pathogenic effects during brain development.

  14. Effect of alpha 2,6 sialylation on integrin-mediated adhesion of breast cancer cells to fibronectin and collagen IV.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuan, Ye; Wu, Larry; Shen, Siqi; Wu, Shiyong; Burdick, Monica M

    2016-03-15

    To determine the role of sialylation on α5β1 and α2β1 integrins in the regulation of adhesion between breast cancer cells and extracellular matrix (ECM). Static cell adhesion assays were performed to quantify avidity of breast cancer cells to ECM. The effects of sialidases on α2,6 sialylation was assessed by flow cytometry using biotin conjugated Sambucus nigra lectin. Lectin affinity assays were used to determine expression of α2,6 sialylated integrins. Cell migration and invasion were investigated by wound healing and transwell invasion assays. α2, α5 and β1 integrins had considerable α2,6 sialylation on MDA-MB-231 cells, whereas signals from MCF-7 cells were undetectable. Cleavage of α2,6 sialylation increased adhesion of MDA-MB-231 cells to ECM, while adhesion of MCF-7 cells was unaffected, consistent with the latter's lack of endogenous α2,6 sialylated surface integrins. Neither surface expression of α2β1 and α5β1 integrins, nor activated β1 integrin, changed in MDA-MB-231 cells after sialidase treatment. However, sialidase treatment did not have significant impact on migration or invasion of MDA-MB-231 cells. Cell adhesion is an important early step of cancer metastasis, yet the roles of sialylation in regulating integrin-mediated breast cancer cell adhesion in comparison to migration and invasion are not well-understood. Our data suggest desialylation of α2,6-sialylated integrins increases adhesion, but not migration or invasion, of MDA-MB-231 cells to ECM without altering integrin expression. It should be considered that α2,6 sialylation may play different roles in regulating cell adhesion of different cancer cells when developing potential therapeutics targeting α2,6 sialylation. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  15. Crystal structure of the Ig1 domain of the neural cell adhesion molecule NCAM2 displays domain swapping.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rasmussen, Kim K; Kulahin, Nikolaj; Kristensen, Ole; Poulsen, Jens-Christian N; Sigurskjold, Bent W; Kastrup, Jette S; Berezin, Vladimir; Bock, Elisabeth; Walmod, Peter S; Gajhede, Michael

    2008-10-24

    The crystal structure of the first immunoglobulin (Ig1) domain of neural cell adhesion molecule 2 (NCAM2/OCAM/RNCAM) is presented at a resolution of 2.7 A. NCAM2 is a member of the immunoglobulin superfamily of cell adhesion molecules (IgCAMs). In the structure, two Ig domains interact by domain swapping, as the two N-terminal beta-strands are interchanged. beta-Strand swapping at the terminal domain is the accepted mechanism of homophilic interactions amongst the cadherins, another class of CAMs, but it has not been observed within the IgCAM superfamily. Gel-filtration chromatography demonstrated the ability of NCAM2 Ig1 to form dimers in solution. Taken together, these observations suggest that beta-strand swapping could have a role in the molecular mechanism of homophilic binding for NCAM2.

  16. Expression of the Immunoglobulin Superfamily Cell Adhesion Molecules in the Developing Spinal Cord and Dorsal Root Ganglion

    OpenAIRE

    Zirong Gu; Fumiyasu Imai; In Jung Kim; Hiroko Fujita; Kei ichi Katayama; Kensaku Mori; Yoshihiro Yoshihara; Yutaka Yoshida

    2015-01-01

    Cell adhesion molecules belonging to the immunoglobulin superfamily (IgSF) control synaptic specificity through hetero- or homophilic interactions in different regions of the nervous system. In the developing spinal cord, monosynaptic connections of exquisite specificity form between proprioceptive sensory neurons and motor neurons, however, it is not known whether IgSF molecules participate in regulating this process. To determine whether IgSF molecules influence the establishment of synapti...

  17. Tumor necrosis factor-alpha-converting enzyme (TACE/ADAM-17) mediates the ectodomain cleavage of intercellular adhesion molecule-1 (ICAM-1).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsakadze, Nina L; Sithu, Srinivas D; Sen, Utpal; English, William R; Murphy, Gillian; D'Souza, Stanley E

    2006-02-10

    Ectodomain shedding has emerged as an important regulatory step in the function of transmembrane proteins. Intercellular adhesion molecule-1 (ICAM-1), an adhesion receptor that mediates inflammatory and immune responses, undergoes shedding in the presence of inflammatory mediators and phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate (PMA). The shedding of ICAM-1 in ICAM-1-transfected 293 cells upon PMA stimulation and in endothelial cells upon tumor necrosis factor-alpha stimulation was blocked by metalloproteinase inhibitors, whereas serine protease inhibitors were ineffective. p-Aminophenylmercuric acetate, a mercuric compound that is known to activate matrix metalloproteinases, up-regulated ICAM-1 shedding. TIMP-3 (but not TIMP-1 or -2) effectively blocked cleavage. This profile suggests the involvement of the ADAM family of proteases in the cleavage of ICAM-1. The introduction of enzymatically active tumor necrosis factor-alpha-converting enzyme (TACE) into ICAM-1-expressing cells up-regulated cleavage. Small interfering RNA directed against TACE blocked ICAM-1 cleavage. ICAM-1 transfected into TACE-/- fibroblasts did not show increased shedding over constitutive levels in the presence of PMA, whereas cleavage did occur in ICAM-1-transfected TACE+/+ cells. These results indicate that ICAM-1 shedding is mediated by TACE. Blocking the shedding of ICAM-1 altered the cell adhesive function, as ICAM-1-mediated cell adhesion was up-regulated in the presence of TACE small interfering RNA and TIMP-3, but not TIMP-1. However, cleavage was found to occur at multiple sites within the stalk domain of ICAM-1, and numerous point mutations within the region did not affect cleavage, indicating that TACE-mediated cleavage of ICAM-1 may not be sequence-specific.

  18. Cell adhesion controlled by adhesion G protein-coupled receptor GPR124/ADGRA2 is mediated by a protein complex comprising intersectins and Elmo-Dock.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hernández-Vásquez, Magda Nohemí; Adame-García, Sendi Rafael; Hamoud, Noumeira; Chidiac, Rony; Reyes-Cruz, Guadalupe; Gratton, Jean Philippe; Côté, Jean-François; Vázquez-Prado, José

    2017-07-21

    Developmental angiogenesis and the maintenance of the blood-brain barrier involve endothelial cell adhesion, which is linked to cytoskeletal dynamics. GPR124 (also known as TEM5/ADGRA2) is an adhesion G protein-coupled receptor family member that plays a pivotal role in brain angiogenesis and in ensuring a tight blood-brain barrier. However, the signaling properties of GPR124 remain poorly defined. Here, we show that ectopic expression of GPR124 promotes cell adhesion, additive to extracellular matrix-dependent effect, coupled with filopodia and lamellipodia formation and an enrichment of a pool of the G protein-coupled receptor at actin-rich cellular protrusions containing VASP, a filopodial marker. Accordingly, GPR124-expressing cells also displayed increased activation of both Rac and Cdc42 GTPases. Mechanistically, we uncover novel direct interactions between endogenous GPR124 and the Rho guanine nucleotide exchange factors Elmo/Dock and intersectin (ITSN). Small fragments of either Elmo or ITSN1 that bind GPR124 blocked GPR124-induced cell adhesion. In addition, Gβγ interacts with the C-terminal tail of GPR124 and promotes the formation of a GPR124-Elmo complex. Furthermore, GPR124 also promotes the activation of the Elmo-Dock complex, as measured by Elmo phosphorylation on a conserved C-terminal tyrosine residue. Interestingly, Elmo and ITSN1 also interact with each other independently of their GPR124-recognition regions. Moreover, endogenous phospho-Elmo and ITSN1 co-localize with GPR124 at lamellipodia of adhering endothelial cells, where GPR124 expression contributes to polarity acquisition during wound healing. Collectively, our results indicate that GPR124 promotes cell adhesion via Elmo-Dock and ITSN. This constitutes a previously unrecognized complex formed of atypical and conventional Rho guanine nucleotide exchange factors for Rac and Cdc42 that is putatively involved in GPR124-dependent angiogenic responses. © 2017 by The American Society for

  19. Ubc9 Binds to ADAP and Is Required for Rap1 Membrane Recruitment, Rac1 Activation, and Integrin-Mediated T Cell Adhesion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiong, Yiwei; Ye, Chengjin; Yang, Naiqi; Li, Madanqi; Liu, Hebin

    2017-11-10

    Although the immune adaptor adhesion and degranulation-promoting adaptor protein (ADAP) acts as a key mediator of integrin inside-out signaling leading to T cell adhesion, the regulation of this adaptor during integrin activation and clustering remains unclear. We now identify Ubc9, the sole small ubiquitin-related modifier E2 conjugase, as an essential regulator of ADAP where it is required for TCR-induced membrane recruitment of the small GTPase Rap1 and its effector protein RapL and for activation of the small GTPase Rac1 in T cell adhesion. We show that Ubc9 interacted directly with ADAP in vitro and in vivo, and the association was increased in response to anti-CD3 stimulation. The Ubc9-binding domain on ADAP was mapped to a nuclear localization sequence (aa 674-700) within ADAP. Knockdown of Ubc9 by short hairpin RNA or expression of the Ubc9-binding-deficient ADAP mutant significantly decreased TCR-induced integrin adhesion to ICAM-1 and fibronectin, as well as LFA-1 clustering, although it had little effect on the TCR proximal signaling responses and TCR-induced IL-2 transcription. Furthermore, downregulation of Ubc9 impaired TCR-mediated Rac1 activation and attenuated the membrane targeting of Rap1 and RapL, but not Rap1-interacting adaptor molecule. Taken together, our data demonstrate for the first time, to our knowledge, that Ubc9 acts as a functional binding partner of ADAP and plays a selective role in integrin-mediated T cell adhesion via modulation of Rap1-RapL membrane recruitment and Rac1 activation. Copyright © 2017 by The American Association of Immunologists, Inc.

  20. Enhancive effects of Lewis y antigen on CD44-mediated adhesion and spreading of human ovarian cancer cell line RMG-I

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liu Juanjuan

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background This study aimed to investigate the molecular structural relationship between cell adhesive molecule CD44 and Lewis y antigen, and determine the effects of Lewis y antigen on CD44-mediated adhesion and spreading of ovarian cancer cell line RMG-I and the Lewis y antigen-overexpressed cell line RMG-I-H. Methods The expression of CD44 in RMG-I and RMG-I-H cells before and after treatment of Lewis y monoclonal antibody was detected by immunocytochemistry; the expression of Lewis y antigen and CD44 was detected by Western Blot. The structural relationship between Lewis y antigen and CD44 was determined by immunoprecipitation and confocal laser scanning microscopy. The adhesion and spreading of RMG-I and RMG-I-H cells on hyaluronic acid (HA were observed. The expression of CD44 mRNA in RMG-I and RMG-I-H cells was detected by real-time RT-PCR. Results Immunocytochemistry revealed that the expression of CD44 was significantly higher in RMG-I-H cells than in RMG-I cells (P P P P P > 0.05. Conclusion Lewis y antigen strengthens CD44-mediated adhesion and spreading of ovarian cancer cells.

  1. The Spontaneously Adhesive Leukocyte Function-associated Antigen-1 (LFA-1) Integrin in Effector T Cells Mediates Rapid Actin- and Calmodulin-dependent Adhesion Strengthening to Ligand under Shear Flow*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lek, Hwee San; Morrison, Vicky L.; Conneely, Michael; Campbell, Paul A.; McGloin, David; Kliche, Stefanie; Watts, Colin; Prescott, Alan; Fagerholm, Susanna C.

    2013-01-01

    Integrins in effector T cells are highly expressed and important for trafficking of these cells and for their effector functions. However, how integrins are regulated in effector T cells remains poorly characterized. Here, we have investigated effector T cell leukocyte function-associated antigen-1 (LFA-1) regulation in primary murine effector T cells. These cells have high LFA-1 integrin expression and display high spontaneous binding to intercellular adhesion molecule-1 (ICAM-1) ligand under static conditions. In addition, these cells are able to migrate spontaneously on ICAM-1. Atomic force microscopy measurements showed that the force required for unbinding of integrin-ligand interactions increases over time (0.5–20-s contact time). The maximum unbinding force for this interaction was ∼140 piconewtons at 0.5-s contact time, increasing to 580 piconewtons at 20-s contact time. Also, the total work required to disrupt the interaction increased over the 20-s contact time, indicating LFA-1-mediated adhesion strengthening in primary effector T cells over a very quick time frame. Effector T cells adhered spontaneously to ICAM-1 under conditions of shear flow, in the absence of chemokine stimulation, and this binding was independent of protein kinase B/Akt and protein kinase C kinase activity, but dependent on calcium/calmodulin signaling and an intact actin cytoskeleton. These results indicate that effector T cell integrins are highly expressed and spontaneously adhesive in the absence of inside-out integrin signaling but that LFA-1-mediated firm adhesion under conditions of shear flow requires downstream integrin signaling, which is dependent on calcium/calmodulin and the actin cytoskeleton. PMID:23585567

  2. E-selectin and very late activation antigen-4 mediate adhesion of hematopoietic progenitor cells to bone marrow endothelium

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rood, P. M.; Dercksen, M. W.; Cazemier, H.; Kerst, J. M.; von dem Borne, A. E.; Gerritsen, W. R.; van der Schoot, C. E.

    2000-01-01

    Adhesion of CD34+ hematopoietic progenitor cells (HPCs) to sinusoidal endothelium probably plays a key role in homing of transplanted CD34+ HPCs to the bone marrow (BM). We have investigated the role of various adhesion molecules in the interaction of purified CD34+ HPCs derived from BM or

  3. Quercetin inhibits LPS-induced adhesion molecule expression and oxidant production in human aortic endothelial cells by p38-mediated Nrf2 activation and antioxidant enzyme induction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Chuan; Zhang, Wei-Jian; Frei, Balz

    2016-10-01

    Atherosclerosis, the underlying cause of ischemic heart disease and stroke, is an inflammatory disease of arteries in a hyperlipidemic milieu. Endothelial expression of cellular adhesion molecules, such as endothelial-leukocyte adhesion molecule-1 (E-selectin) and intercellular adhesion molecule-1 (ICAM-1), plays a critical role in the initiation and progression of atherosclerosis. The dietary flavonoid, quercetin, has been reported to inhibit expression of cellular adhesion molecules, but the underlying mechanisms are incompletely understood. In this study, we found that quercetin dose-dependently (5-20µM) inhibits lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced mRNA and protein expression of E-selectin and ICAM-1 in human aortic endothelial cells (HAEC). Incubation of HAEC with quercetin also significantly reduced LPS-induced oxidant production, but did not inhibit activation of the nuclear factor-kappaB (NF-κB). Furthermore, quercetin induced activation of the nuclear factor erythroid 2-related factor 2 (Nrf2) and subsequent mRNA and protein expression of the antioxidant enzymes, heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1), NAD(P)H dehydrogenase, quinone 1, and glutamate-cysteine ligase. The induction of Nrf2 and antioxidant enzymes was partly inhibited by the p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase (p38) inhibitor, SB203580. Our results suggest that quercetin suppresses LPS-induced oxidant production and adhesion molecule expression by inducing Nrf2 activation and antioxidant enzyme expression, which is partially mediated by p38; and the inhibitory effect of quercetin on adhesion molecule expression is not due to inhibition of NF-κB activation, but instead due to antioxidant-independent effects of HO-1. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  4. Evaluation of boronate-containing polymer brushes and gels as substrates for carbohydrate-mediated adhesion and cultivation of animal cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ivanov, Alexander E; Kumar, Ashok; Nilsang, Suthasinee; Aguilar, Maria-Rosa; Mikhalovska, Lyubov I; Savina, Irina N; Nilsson, Lars; Scheblykin, Ivan G; Kuzimenkova, Marina V; Galaev, Igor Yu

    2010-02-01

    Boronate-containing thin polyacrylamide gels (B-Gel), polymer brushes (B-Brush) and chemisorbed organosilane layers (B-COSL) were prepared on the surface of glass slides and studied as substrates for carbohydrate-mediated cell adhesion. B-COSL- and B-Brush-modified glass samples exhibited multiple submicron structures densely and irregularly distributed on the glass surface, as found by scanning electron microscopy and atomic force microscopy. B-Gel was ca. 0.1 mm thick and contained pores with effective size of 1-2 microm in the middle and of 5-20 microm on the edges of the gel sample as found by confocal laser scanning microscopy. Evidence for the presence of phenylboronic acid in the samples was given by time-of-flight secondary ion mass-spectrometry (ToF SIMS), contact angle measurements performed in the presence of fructose, and staining with Alizarin Red S dye capable of formation specific, fluorescent complexes with boronic acids. A comparative study of adhesion and cultivation of animal cells on the above substrates was carried out using murine hybridoma M2139 cell line as a model. M2139 cells adhered to the substrates in the culture medium without glucose or sodium pyruvate at pH 8.0, and then were cultivated in the same medium at pH 7.2 for 4 days. It was found that the substrates of B-Brush type were superior both regarding cell adhesion and viability of the adhered cells, among the substrates studied. MTT assay confirmed proliferation of M2139 cells on B-Brush substrates. Some cell adhesion was also registered in the macropores of B-Gel substrate. The effects of surface microstructure of the boronate-containing polymers on cell adhesion are discussed. Transparent glass substrates grafted with boronate-containing copolymers offer good prospects for cell adhesion studies and development of cell-based assays.

  5. Dock mediates Scar- and WASp-dependent actin polymerization through interaction with cell adhesion molecules in founder cells and fusion-competent myoblasts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaipa, Balasankara Reddy; Shao, Huanjie; Schäfer, Gritt; Trinkewitz, Tatjana; Groth, Verena; Liu, Jianqi; Beck, Lothar; Bogdan, Sven; Abmayr, Susan M; Önel, Susanne-Filiz

    2013-01-01

    The formation of the larval body wall musculature of Drosophila depends on the asymmetric fusion of two myoblast types, founder cells (FCs) and fusion-competent myoblasts (FCMs). Recent studies have established an essential function of Arp2/3-based actin polymerization during myoblast fusion, formation of a dense actin focus at the site of fusion in FCMs, and a thin sheath of actin in FCs and/or growing muscles. The formation of these actin structures depends on recognition and adhesion of myoblasts that is mediated by cell surface receptors of the immunoglobulin superfamily. However, the connection of the cell surface receptors with Arp2/3-based actin polymerization is poorly understood. To date only the SH2-SH3 adaptor protein Crk has been suggested to link cell adhesion with Arp2/3-based actin polymerization in FCMs. Here, we propose that the SH2-SH3 adaptor protein Dock, like Crk, links cell adhesion with actin polymerization. We show that Dock is expressed in FCs and FCMs and colocalizes with the cell adhesion proteins Sns and Duf at cell-cell contact points. Biochemical data in this study indicate that different domains of Dock are involved in binding the cell adhesion molecules Duf, Rst, Sns and Hbs. We emphasize the importance of these interactions by quantifying the enhanced myoblast fusion defects in duf dock, sns dock and hbs dock double mutants. Additionally, we show that Dock interacts biochemically and genetically with Drosophila Scar, Vrp1 and WASp. Based on these data, we propose that Dock links cell adhesion in FCs and FCMs with either Scar- or Vrp1-WASp-dependent Arp2/3 activation.

  6. Adhesion and nanomechanics of pili from the probiotic Lactobacillus rhamnosus GG.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tripathi, Prachi; Beaussart, Audrey; Alsteens, David; Dupres, Vincent; Claes, Ingmar; von Ossowski, Ingemar; de Vos, Willem M; Palva, Airi; Lebeer, Sarah; Vanderleyden, Jos; Dufrêne, Yves F

    2013-04-23

    Knowledge of the mechanisms by which bacterial pili adhere to host cells and withstand external forces is critical to our understanding of their functional roles and offers exciting avenues in biomedicine for controlling the adhesion of bacterial pathogens and probiotics. While much progress has been made in the nanoscale characterization of pili from Gram-negative bacteria, the adhesive and mechanical properties of Gram-positive bacterial pili remain largely unknown. Here, we use single-molecule atomic force microscopy to unravel the binding mechanism of pili from the probiotic Gram-positive bacterium Lactobacillus rhamnosus GG (LGG). First, we show that SpaC, the key adhesion protein of the LGG pilus, is a multifunctional adhesin with broad specificity. SpaC forms homophilic trans-interactions engaged in bacterial aggregation and specifically binds mucin and collagen, two major extracellular components of host epithelial layers. Homophilic and heterophilic interactions display similar binding strengths and dissociation rates. Next, pulling experiments on living bacteria demonstrate that LGG pili exhibit two unique mechanical responses, that is, zipper-like adhesion involving multiple SpaC molecules distributed along the pilus length and nanospring properties enabling pili to resist high force. These mechanical properties may represent a generic mechanism among Gram-positive bacterial pili for strengthening adhesion and withstanding shear stresses in the natural environment. The single-molecule experiments presented here may help us to design molecules capable of promoting or inhibiting bacterial-host interactions.

  7. Adhesion of ADP-activated platelets to intact endothelium under stagnation point flow in vitro is mediated by the integrin alphaIIbeta3.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reininger, A J; Korndörfer, M A; Wurzinger, L J

    1998-05-01

    As we demonstrated earlier, platelets adhere to intact endothelium provided they are activated and convectively transported against the endothelial surface. To identify the platelet receptors involved we superfused cultured endothelium with activated platelet rich plasma (PRP) by means of the Stagnation Point Flow Adhesio- Aggregometer while blocking various platelet receptors. Inhibition was performed with the tetrapeptide RGDS, the non-peptide Ro-43-8857, or a monoclonal antibody directed against integrin alphaIIbeta3. Platelet deposition was video-recorded and quantified by image analysis. Infusion of RGDS or Ro-43-8857 into ADP-stimulated PRP completely prevented adhesion as well as subsequent aggregation. Interrupting the inhibitor infusion while ADP stimulation persisted, prompted adhesion and aggregation, demonstrating the reversibility of the inhibition. Platelet adhesion was irreversibly blocked by preincubation of the PRP with the moab against alphaIIbeta3. Its specific binding was confirmed by immunoelectron microscopy. Our results suggest that platelet adhesion to intact endothelium is mediated via platelet integrin alphaIIbeta3.

  8. An Elmo-Dock complex locally controls Rho GTPases and actin remodeling during cadherin-mediated adhesion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toret, Christopher P; Collins, Caitlin; Nelson, W James

    2014-12-08

    Cell-cell contact formation is a dynamic process requiring the coordination of cadherin-based cell-cell adhesion and integrin-based cell migration. A genome-wide RNA interference screen for proteins required specifically for cadherin-dependent cell-cell adhesion identified an Elmo-Dock complex. This was unexpected as Elmo-Dock complexes act downstream of integrin signaling as Rac guanine-nucleotide exchange factors. In this paper, we show that Elmo2 recruits Dock1 to initial cell-cell contacts in Madin-Darby canine kidney cells. At cell-cell contacts, both Elmo2 and Dock1 are essential for the rapid recruitment and spreading of E-cadherin, actin reorganization, localized Rac and Rho GTPase activities, and the development of strong cell-cell adhesion. Upon completion of cell-cell adhesion, Elmo2 and Dock1 no longer localize to cell-cell contacts and are not required subsequently for the maintenance of cell-cell adhesion. These studies show that Elmo-Dock complexes are involved in both integrin- and cadherin-based adhesions, which may help to coordinate the transition of cells from migration to strong cell-cell adhesion. © 2014 Toret et al.

  9. Identification of amino acids involved in the Flo11p-mediated adhesion of Saccharomyces cerevisiae to a polystyrene surface using phage display with competitive elution

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mortensen, Henrik Dam; Dupont, Kitt; Jespersen, Lene

    2007-01-01

    Aims: To identify the main amino acids involved in the Flo11p-mediated adhesion of Saccharomyces cerevisiae to the polystyrene surface PolySorp. Methods and Results: Using a combination of phage display and competitive elution revealed that 12-mer peptides of phages from competitive panning with S....... cerevisiae FLO11 wild-type (TBR1) cells had a higher consensus than those from competitive panning with S. cerevisiae flo11¿ mutant (TBR5) cells, suggesting that the wild-type cells interact with the plastic surface in a stronger and more similar way than the mutant cells. Tryptophan and proline were more...... abundant in the peptides of phages from competitive elution with FLO11 cells than in those from competitive elution with flo11¿ cells. Furthermore, two phages with hydrophobic peptides containing 1 or 2 tryptophan, and 3 or 5 proline, residues inhibited the adhesion of FLO11 cells to PolySorp more than...

  10. Inhibition of type 1 fimbriae-mediated Escherichia coli adhesion and biofilm formation by trimeric cluster thiomannosides conjugated to diamond nanoparticles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khanal, Manakamana; Larsonneur, Fanny; Raks, Victoriia; Barras, Alexandre; Baumann, Jean-Sébastien; Martin, Fernando Ariel; Boukherroub, Rabah; Ghigo, Jean-Marc; Ortiz Mellet, Carmen; Zaitsev, Vladimir; Garcia Fernandez, Jose M.; Beloin, Christophe; Siriwardena, Aloysius; Szunerits, Sabine

    2015-01-01

    Recent advances in nanotechnology have seen the development of a number of microbiocidal and/or anti-adhesive nanoparticles displaying activity against biofilms. In this work, trimeric thiomannoside clusters conjugated to nanodiamond particles (ND) were targeted for investigation. NDs have attracted attention as a biocompatible nanomaterial and we were curious to see whether the high mannose glycotope density obtained upon grouping monosaccharide units in triads might lead to the corresponding ND-conjugates behaving as effective inhibitors of E. coli type 1 fimbriae-mediated adhesion as well as of biofilm formation. The required trimeric thiosugar clusters were obtained through a convenient thiol-ene ``click'' strategy and were subsequently conjugated to alkynyl-functionalized NDs using a Cu(i)-catalysed ``click'' reaction. We demonstrated that the tri-thiomannoside cluster-conjugated NDs (ND-Man3) show potent inhibition of type 1 fimbriae-mediated E. coli adhesion to yeast and T24 bladder cells as well as of biofilm formation. The biofilm disrupting effects demonstrated here have only rarely been reported in the past for analogues featuring such simple glycosidic motifs. Moreover, the finding that the tri-thiomannoside cluster (Man3N3) is itself a relatively efficient inhibitor, even when not conjugated to any ND edifice, suggests that alternative mono- or multivalent sugar-derived analogues might also be usefully explored for E. coli-mediated biofilm disrupting properties.Recent advances in nanotechnology have seen the development of a number of microbiocidal and/or anti-adhesive nanoparticles displaying activity against biofilms. In this work, trimeric thiomannoside clusters conjugated to nanodiamond particles (ND) were targeted for investigation. NDs have attracted attention as a biocompatible nanomaterial and we were curious to see whether the high mannose glycotope density obtained upon grouping monosaccharide units in triads might lead to the corresponding

  11. Radiation results in IL-8 mediated intercellular signaling that increases adhesion between monocytic cells and aortic endothelium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kucik, Dennis; Babitz, Stephen; Dunaway, Chad; Steele, Chad

    Epidemiological evidence has established terrestrial radiation exposure as a risk factor for cardiovascular disease. For example, a major side effect of therapeutic radiation, especially for breast and head-and-neck cancers, is atherosclerosis, which can result in stroke years after treatment. Similarly, atomic bomb survivors were significantly more likely to die of cardiovascular disease than their countrymen. Even radiation technologists, prior to 1950 (when regulations governing shielding and occupational exposure were less rigorous) had an increased risk of clinically significant atherosclerosis. We have recently shown that 600 MeV (56) Fe similarly exacerbates plaque formation in the apoE mouse atherosclerosis model at doses 4-7 fold lower than required for x-rays to produce a similar pro-atherogenic effect. This raises concern that exposure to cosmic radiation might pose a similar risk for astronauts. Because so little is known about the mechanism of pro-atherogenic radiation effects, however, the current strategy to minimize risk from terrestrial radiation sources is to limit exposure. For astronauts on deep space missions, exposure to a significant amount of radiation will be unavoidable. Therefore, an understanding of the mechanism of radiation-induced atherosclerosis will be essential in order to develop countermeasures. Radiation can cause increased adhesiveness of vascular endothelium, leading to inappropriate accumulation of monocytes and other white blood cells, which can initiate a self-perpetuating inflammatory response. This vascular inflammation is an early event in atherosclerosis that can eventually lead to clinically significant cardiovascular events such as myocardial infarction and stroke. We showed earlier that x-rays, (56) Fe, and (28) Si all accelerate development of atherosclerosis in the apoE -/- mouse model. We also demonstrated that both x-rays and heavy ions increase adhesion of monocytic cells to vascular human aortic endothelial

  12. Genomics and X-ray microanalysis indicate that Ca2+ and thiols mediate the aggregation and adhesion of Xylella fastidiosa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leite B.

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available The availability of the genome sequence of the bacterial plant pathogen Xylella fastidiosa, the causal agent of citrus variegated chlorosis, is accelerating important investigations concerning its pathogenicity. Plant vessel occlusion is critical for symptom development. The objective of the present study was to search for information that would help to explain the adhesion of X. fastidiosa cells to the xylem. Scanning electron microscopy revealed that adhesion may occur without the fastidium gum, an exopolysaccharide produced by X. fastidiosa, and X-ray microanalysis demonstrated the presence of elemental sulfur both in cells grown in vitro and in cells found inside plant vessels, indicating that the sulfur signal is generated by the pathogen surface. Calcium and magnesium peaks were detected in association with sulfur in occluded vessels. We propose an explanation for the adhesion and aggregation process. Thiol groups, maintained by the enzyme peptide methionine sulfoxide reductase, could be active on the surface of the bacteria and appear to promote cell-cell aggregation by forming disulfide bonds with thiol groups on the surface of adjacent cells. The enzyme methionine sulfoxide reductase has been shown to be an auxiliary component in the adhesiveness of some human pathogens. The negative charge conferred by the ionized thiol group could of itself constitute a mechanism of adhesion by allowing the formation of divalent cation bridges between the negatively charged bacteria and predominantly negatively charged xylem walls.

  13. Modulation of Selectin-Mediated Adhesion of Flowing Lymphoma and Bone Marrow Cells by Immobilized SDF-1

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elizabeth A. Hedges

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available The α-chemokine, stromal-derived factor-1 (SDF-1, has been linked to the homing of circulating tumor cells to bone. SDF-1 is expressed by bone microvascular cells and osteoblasts and normally functions to attract blood-borne hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells to marrow. It has been shown that treatment of cancer cells with soluble SDF-1 results in a more aggressive phenotype; however, the relevance of the administration of the soluble protein is unclear. As such, a flow device was functionalized with P-selectin and SDF-1 to mimic the bone marrow microvasculature and the initial steps of cell adhesion. The introduction of SDF-1 onto the adhesive surface was found to significantly enhance the adhesion of lymphoma cells, as well as low-density bone marrow cells (LDBMC, both in terms of the number of adherent cells and the strength of cell adhesion. Thus, SDF-1 has a synergistic effect with P-selectin on cancer cell adhesion and may be sufficient to promote preferential metastasis to bone.

  14. Proteomic dataset of the sea urchin Paracentrotus lividus adhesive organs and secreted adhesive

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lebesgue, Nicolas; da Costa, Gonçalo; Ribeiro, Raquel Mesquita; Ribeiro-Silva, Cristina; Martins, Gabriel G; Matranga, Valeria; Scholten, Arjen; Cordeiro, Carlos; Heck, Albert J R; Santos, Romana

    Sea urchins have specialized adhesive organs called tube feet, which mediate strong but reversible adhesion. Tube feet are composed by a disc, producing adhesive and de-adhesive secretions for substratum attachment, and a stem for movement. After detachment the secreted adhesive remains bound to the

  15. Cell adhesion assay to determine the interaction between NGL-3 with LAR cell adhesion molecules

    OpenAIRE

    sprotocols

    2015-01-01

    In the cell adhesion assay, two groups of cells expressing different cell adhesion molecules are mixed together to determine whether the adhesion molecules can interact with each other and whether their interaction mediates cell adhesion. We used this assay to determine the interaction of NGL-3 with other synaptic cell adhesion molecules including LAR.

  16. High glucose-mediated overexpression of ICAM-1 in human vaginal epithelial cells increases adhesion of Candida albicans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mikamo, Hiroshige; Yamagishi, Yuka; Sugiyama, Hiroyuki; Sadakata, Hisato; Miyazaki, Shun; Sano, Takako; Tomita, Tsutomu

    2017-09-18

    To investigate the involvement of ICAM-1 in the adhesion of Candida to the genitourinary epithelial cells in high glucose, we examined the adhesion of Candida albicans or Candida glabrata to human vaginal epithelial cells (VK2/E6E7) or human vulvovaginal epidermal cells (A431). These cells were cultured in 100, 500 or 3000 mg/dL glucose for three days and inoculated with Candida for 60 minutes. Followed by, adhering of Candida to the cells, which were counted. While the adhesion of Candida albicans to VK2/E6E7 significantly increased in the high glucose, A431 did not. We next examined the expression of ICAM-1 as a ligand on the epithelial cells. ICAM-1 expression was increased in VK2/E6E7 cultured in the high glucose; however, the expression level in A431 was not high compared with VK2/E6E7. This data suggested that ICAM-1 functions as one of ligands in the adhesion of Candida albicans to the vaginal epithelial cells in a high glucose environment. Impact statement What is already known on the subject: Candida's complement receptor is involved in the adhesion to epithelial cells. The expression of this receptor has been reported to increase as glucose concentration increases. This is considered as a contributing factor to the high risk for vulvovaginal candidiasis (VVC) in diabetes. On the host side, diabetic patients have a factor that facilitates adhesion of Candida to epithelial cells. This factor has been unknown until recently. What the results of this study add: In this study, we used a vaginal epithelial cell line and showed that the adhesion of C. albicans to cells increased at higher glucose concentrations. At the same time, ICAM-1 expression of cells also increased. Thereby, it is suggested that the expression of ICAM-1 in vaginal epithelial cells is increased by glucose such as urinary sugar in diabetic patients and is a condition for facilitating adhesion of Candida. What the implications are of these findings for clinical practice and/or further

  17. Homonationalism Before Homonationalism: Representations of Russia, Eastern Europe, and the Soviet Union in the U.S. Homophile Press, 1953-1964.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Serykh, Dasha

    2017-01-01

    This essay focuses on representations of Russia, the Soviet Union, and Eastern Europe in U.S. homophile periodicals from 1953 to 1964. Extending the application of Jasbir Puar's concept of homonationalism to the Cold War period, the essay examines 128 articles and other items that were published in ONE, Mattachine Review, and The Ladder and demonstrates that these periodicals often engaged in homonationalist discourses when constructing the Russian, Soviet, and Eastern European "other." Negative constructions of these regions were sometimes used to affirm the political alignment of the homophile authors with the American nation. At other times, negative constructions were used in comparative assessments that critiqued both the United States and the Soviet and Eastern European regions. In contrast, positive constructions of Russian, Soviet, and Eastern European peoples and cultures were used as evidence that non-heteronormative desires and bodies had legitimate places in many "primitive" cultures and existed across all nations and periods.

  18. Complement-Mediated Enhancement of Monocyte Adhesion to Endothelial Cells by HLA Antibodies, and Blockade by a Specific Inhibitor of the Classical Complement Cascade, TNT003

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valenzuela, Nicole M.; Thomas, Kimberly A.; Mulder, Arend; Parry, Graham C.; Panicker, Sandip; Reed, Elaine F.

    2017-01-01

    Background Antibody-mediated rejection (AMR) of most solid organs is characterized by evidence of complement activation and/or intragraft macrophages (C4d + and CD68+ biopsies). We previously demonstrated that crosslinking of HLA I by antibodies triggered endothelial activation and monocyte adhesion. We hypothesized that activation of the classical complement pathway at the endothelial cell surface by HLA antibodies would enhance monocyte adhesion through soluble split product generation, in parallel with direct endothelial activation downstream of HLA signaling. Methods Primary human aortic endothelial cells (HAEC) were stimulated with HLA class I antibodies in the presence of intact human serum complement. C3a and C5a generation, endothelial P-selectin expression, and adhesion of human primary and immortalized monocytes (Mono Mac 6) were measured. Alternatively, HAEC or monocytes were directly stimulated with purified C3a or C5a. Classical complement activation was inhibited by pretreatment of complement with an anti-C1s antibody (TNT003). Results Treatment of HAEC with HLA antibody and human complement increased the formation of C3a and C5a. Monocyte recruitment by human HLA antibodies was enhanced in the presence of intact human serum complement or purified C3a or C5a. Specific inhibition of the classical complement pathway using TNT003 or C1q-depleted serum significantly reduced adhesion of monocytes in the presence of human complement. Conclusions Despite persistent endothelial viability in the presence of HLA antibodies and complement, upstream complement anaphylatoxin production exacerbates endothelial exocytosis and leukocyte recruitment. Upstream inhibition of classical complement may be therapeutic to dampen mononuclear cell recruitment and endothelial activation characteristic of microvascular inflammation during AMR. PMID:28640789

  19. The Kindlin 3 Pleckstrin Homology Domain Has an Essential Role in Lymphocyte Function-associated Antigen 1 (LFA-1) Integrin-mediated B Cell Adhesion and Migration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hart, Rosie; Stanley, Paula; Chakravarty, Probir; Hogg, Nancy

    2013-01-01

    The protein kindlin 3 is mutated in the leukocyte adhesion deficiency III (LAD-III) disorder, leading to widespread infection due to the failure of leukocytes to migrate into infected tissue sites. To gain understanding of how kindlin 3 controls leukocyte function, we have focused on its pleckstrin homology (PH) domain and find that deletion of this domain eliminates the ability of kindlin 3 to participate in adhesion and migration of B cells mediated by the leukocyte integrin lymphocyte function-associated antigen 1 (LFA-1). PH domains are often involved in membrane localization of proteins through binding to phosphoinositides. We show that the kindlin 3 PH domain has binding affinity for phosphoinositide PI(3,4,5)P3 over PI(4,5)P2. It has a major role in membrane association of kindlin 3 that is enhanced by the binding of LFA-1 to intercellular adhesion molecule 1 (ICAM-1). A splice variant, kindlin 3-IPRR, has a four-residue insert in the PH domain at a critical site that influences phosphoinositide binding by enhancing binding to PI(4,5)P2 as well as by binding to PI(3,4,5)P3. However kindlin 3-IPRR is unable to restore the ability of LAD-III B cells to adhere to and migrate on LFA-1 ligand ICAM-1, potentially by altering the dynamics or PI specificity of binding to the membrane. Thus, the correct functioning of the kindlin 3 PH domain is central to the role that kindlin 3 performs in guiding lymphocyte adhesion and motility behavior, which in turn is required for a successful immune response. PMID:23595985

  20. Adhesion and degranulation promoting adapter protein (ADAP is a central hub for phosphotyrosine-mediated interactions in T cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marc Sylvester

    Full Text Available TCR stimulation leads to an increase in cellular adhesion among other outcomes. The adhesion and degranulation promoting adapter protein (ADAP is known to be rapidly phosphorylated after T cell stimulation and relays the TCR signal to adhesion molecules of the integrin family. While three tyrosine phosphorylation sites have been characterized biochemically, the binding capabilities and associated functions of several other potential phosphotyrosine motifs remain unclear. Here, we utilize in vitro phosphorylation and mass spectrometry to map novel phosphotyrosine sites in the C-terminal part of human ADAP (486-783. Individual tyrosines were then mutated to phenylalanine and their relevance for cellular adhesion and migration was tested experimentally. Functionally important tyrosine residues include two sites within the folded hSH3 domains of ADAP and two at the C-terminus. Furthermore, using a peptide pulldown approach in combination with stable isotope labeling in cell culture (SILAC we identified SLP-76, PLCgamma, PIK3R1, Nck, CRK, Gads, and RasGAP as phospho-dependent binding partners of a central YDDV motif of ADAP. The phosphorylation-dependent interaction between ADAP and Nck was confirmed by yeast two-hybrid analysis, immunoprecipitation and binary pulldown experiments, indicating that ADAP directly links integrins to modulators of the cytoskeleton independent of SLP-76.

  1. Mammary gland-specific ablation of focal adhesion kinase reduces the incidence of p53-mediated mammary tumour formation.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Miltenburg, van M.H.; Nimwegen, van M.J.; Tijdens, R.B.; Lalai, R.A.; Kuiper, R.; Klarenbeek, S.; Schouten, P.C.; Vries, de A.; Jonkers, J.M.M.; Water, van de B.

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND Elevated expression of focal adhesion kinase (FAK) occurs in numerous human cancers including colon-, cervix- and breast cancer. Although several studies have implicated FAK in mammary tumour formation induced by ectopic oncogene expression, evidence supporting a role for FAK in

  2. Platelet adhesion on endothelium early after vein grafting mediates leukocyte recruitment and intimal hyperplasia in a murine model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tseng, Chi-Nan; Chang, Ya-Ting; Lengquist, Mariette; Kronqvist, Malin; Hedin, Ulf; Eriksson, Einar E

    2015-04-01

    Intimal hyperplasia (IH) is the substrate for accelerated atherosclerosis and limited patency of vein grafts. However, there is still no specific treatment targeting IH following graft surgery. In this study, we used a mouse model of vein grafting to investigate the potential for early intervention with platelet function for later development of graft IH. We transferred the inferior vena cava (IVC) from donor C57BL/6 mice to the carotid artery in recipients using a cuff technique. We found extensive endothelial injury and platelet adhesion one hour following grafting. Adhesion of leukocytes was distinct in areas of platelet adhesion. Platelet and leukocyte adhesion was strongly reduced in mice receiving a function-blocking antibody against the integrin αIIbβ3. This was followed by a reduction of IH one month following grafting. Depletion of platelets using antiserum also reduced IH at later time points. These findings indicate platelets as pivotal to leukocyte recruitment to the wall of vein grafts. In conclusion, the data also highlight early intervention of platelets and inflammation as potential treatment for later formation of IH and accelerated atherosclerosis following bypass surgery.

  3. ENO1 promotes tumor proliferation and cell adhesion mediated drug resistance (CAM-DR) in Non-Hodgkin's Lymphomas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhu, Xinghua; Miao, Xiaobing; Wu, Yaxun; Li, Chunsun; Guo, Yan; Liu, Yushan; Chen, Yali; Lu, Xiaoyun [Department of Pathology, Affiliated Cancer Hospital of Nantong University, 30 North Tongyang Road, Pingchao, Nantong 226361, Jiangsu (China); Wang, Yuchan, E-mail: wangyuchannt@126.com [Department of Pathogen and Immunology, Medical College, Nantong University, 19 Qixiu Road, Nantong 226001, Jiangsu (China); He, Song, E-mail: hesongnt@126.com [Department of Pathology, Affiliated Cancer Hospital of Nantong University, 30 North Tongyang Road, Pingchao, Nantong 226361, Jiangsu (China)

    2015-07-15

    Enolases are glycolytic enzymes responsible for the ATP-generated conversion of 2-phosphoglycerate to phosphoenolpyruvate. In addition to the glycolytic function, Enolase 1 (ENO1) has been reported up-regulation in several tumor tissues. In this study, we investigated the expression and biologic function of ENO1 in Non-Hodgkin's Lymphomas (NHLs). Clinically, by western blot analysis we observed that ENO1 expression was apparently higher in diffuse large B-cell lymphoma than in the reactive lymphoid tissues. Subsequently, immunohistochemical staining of 144 NHLs suggested that the expression of ENO1 was significantly lower in the indolent lymphomas compared with the progressive lymphomas. Further, we identified ENO1 as an independent prognostic factor, and it was significantly correlated with overall survival of NHL patients. In addition, we found that ENO1 could promote cell proliferation, regulate cell cycle associated gene and PI3K/AKT signaling pathway in NHLs. Finally, we verified that ENO1 participated in the process of lymphoma cell adhesion mediated drug resistance (CAM-DR). Adhesion to FN or HS5 cells significantly protected OCI-Ly8 and Daudi cells from cytotoxicity compared with those cultured in suspension, and these effects were attenuated when transfected with ENO1-siRNA. Based on the study, we propose that inhibition of ENO1 expression may be a novel strategy for therapy for NHLs patients, and it may be a target for drug resistance. - Highlights: • ENO1 expression is reversely correlated with clinical outcomes of patients with NHLs. • ENO1 promotes the proliferation of NHL cells. • ENO1 regulates cell adhesion mediated drug resistance.

  4. Effects of fluorescent dyes on selectin and integrin-mediated stages of adhesion and migration of flowing leukocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abbitt, K B; Rainger, G E; Nash, G B

    2000-05-26

    Fluorescent dyes assist visualisation of leukocytes for intravital studies of adhesion or for in vitro studies utilising whole blood. We have used in vitro flow-based assays to investigate the effects of three fluorescent dyes (acridine orange, AO, 5-100 microg/ml; calcein-AM, C-AM, 5-20 microg/ml; rhodamine 6G, R6G, 10-100 microg/ml) on adhesion and migration of isolated neutrophils and mononuclear cells. AO had little effect on the number or velocity of neutrophils rolling on P-selectin presented by a surface coated with platelets. However, AO did cause a dose- and time-dependent conversion of rolling to immobilisation. Pretreatment of neutrophils with an antibody against CD18 prevented this conversion to stationary adhesion, indicating that beta(2) integrins were activated by AO. C-AM had little effect on neutrophil behaviour, but tended to cause some immobilisation at the highest concentration. R6G did not affect the number of neutrophils that bound to the platelet monolayer or the percentage rolling, but the rolling velocity of the neutrophils was increased in a dose-dependent manner. None of the dyes impaired the ability of neutrophils to respond to formyl peptide by converting from rolling to stationary adhesion. Neither C-AM nor R-6G reduced the number of flowing neutrophils or mononuclear cells binding to endothelial cells stimulated with tumour necrosis factor. Interestingly, R-6G inhibited transendothelial migration of mononuclear cells but not neutrophils, while C-AM did not affect transmigration of either cell type. The dose-dependent effects of dyes should be taken into consideration when designing any experimental protocol. AO does not appear to be a suitable dye for adhesion studies. R6G and C-AM can be used at approximately 10 microg/ml (a concentration at which cells can be clearly visualised) although R-6G specifically inhibits the migratory response of mononuclear cells.

  5. Intercellular adhesion molecule 1 mediates migration of Th1 and Th17 cells across human retinal vascular endothelium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bharadwaj, Arpita S; Schewitz-Bowers, Lauren P; Wei, Lai; Lee, Richard W J; Smith, Justine R

    2013-10-23

    Autoimmune inflammation of the retina causes vision loss in the majority of affected individuals. Th1 or Th17 cells initiate the disease on trafficking from the circulation into the eye across the retinal vascular endothelium. We investigated the ability of human Th1- and Th17-polarized cells to cross a simulated human retinal endothelium, and examined the role of IgG superfamily members in this process. Th1- and Th17-polarized cell populations were generated from human peripheral blood CD4(+) T cells, using two Th1- and Th17-polarizing protocols. Transendothelial migration assays were performed over 18 hours in Boyden chambers, after seeding the transwell membrane with human retinal endothelial cells. In some assays intercellular adhesion molecule 1 (ICAM-1), vascular cell adhesion molecule 1 (VCAM-1), or activated leukocyte cell adhesion molecule (ALCAM) blocking antibody, or isotype- and concentration-matched control antibody, was added to the upper chambers. Th1- and Th17-polarized cells migrated equally efficiently across the human retinal endothelial monolayer. The percentage of IL-17(+) IFN-γ(-) Th17-polarized cells was reduced following migration. Blocking ICAM-1, but not VCAM-1 or ALCAM, significantly reduced migration of Th1- and Th17-polarized cells for a majority of human donors. Taken in the context of other literature on transendothelial migration, our results illustrate the importance of investigating the specific tissue and vascular endothelium when considering helper T cell migration in autoimmune inflammation. Our findings further indicate that while generalizations about involvement of specific adhesion molecules in uveitis and other autoimmune disease may be possible, these may not apply to individual patients universally. The observations are relevant to the use of adhesion blockade for therapeutic purposes.

  6. Angiomotin is a novel component of cadherin-11/β-catenin/p120 complex and is critical for cadherin-11-mediated cell migration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ortiz, Angelica; Lee, Yu-Chen; Yu, Guoyu; Liu, Hsuan-Chen; Lin, Song-Chang; Bilen, Melmet Asim; Cho, Hyojin; Yu-Lee, Li-Yuan; Lin, Sue-Hwa

    2015-01-01

    Loss of E-cadherin and up-regulation of mesenchymal cadherins, a hallmark of the epithelial–mesenchymal transition, contributes to migration and dissemination of cancer cells. Expression of human cadherin-11 (Cad11), also known as osteoblast cadherin, in prostate cancer increases the migration of prostate cancer cells. How Cad11 mediates cell migration is unknown. Using the human Cad11 cytoplasmic domain in pulldown assays, we identified human angiomotin (Amot), known to be involved in cell polarity, migration, and Hippo pathway, as a component of the Cad11 protein complex. Deletion analysis showed that the last C-terminal 10 amino acids in Cad11 cytoplasmic domain are required for Amot binding. Further, Cad11 preferentially interacts with Amot-p80 than Amot-p130 isoform and binds directly to the middle domain of Amot-p80. Cad11-Amot interaction affects Cad11-mediated cell migration, but not homophilic adhesion, as deletion of Amot binding motif of Cad11 (Cad11-ΔAmot) did not abolish Cad11-mediated cell–cell adhesion of mouse L cells, but significantly reduced Cad11-mediated cell migration of human C4-2B4 and PC3-mm2 prostate cancer cells and human HEK293T cells. Together, our studies identified Amot-p80 as a novel component of the Cad11 complex and demonstrated that Amot-p80 is critical for Cad11-mediated cell migration.—Ortiz, A., Lee, Y.-C., Yu, G., Liu, H.-C., Lin, S.-C., Bilen, M. A., Cho, H., Yu-Lee, L.-Y., Lin, S.-H. Angiomotin is a novel component of cadherin-11/β-catenin/p120 complex and is critical for cadherin-11-mediated cell migration. PMID:25466890

  7. Oligomerization-induced conformational change in the C-terminal region of Nel-like molecule 1 (NELL1) protein is necessary for the efficient mediation of murine MC3T3-E1 cell adhesion and spreading.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakamura, Yoko; Hasebe, Ai; Takahashi, Kaneyoshi; Iijima, Masumi; Yoshimoto, Nobuo; Maturana, Andrés D; Ting, Kang; Kuroda, Shun'ichi; Niimi, Tomoaki

    2014-04-04

    NELL1 is a large oligomeric secretory glycoprotein that functions as an osteoinductive factor. NELL1 contains several conserved domains, has structural similarities to thrombospondin 1, and supports osteoblastic cell adhesion through integrins. To define the structural requirements for NELL1-mediated cell adhesion, we prepared a series of recombinant NELL1 proteins (intact, deleted, and cysteine-mutant) from a mammalian expression system and tested their activities. A deletion analysis demonstrated that the C-terminal cysteine-rich region of NELL1 is critical for the cell adhesion activity of NELL1. Reducing agent treatment decreased the cell adhesion activity of full-length NELL1 but not of its C-terminal fragments, suggesting that the intramolecular disulfide bonds within this region are not functionally necessary but that other disulfide linkages in the N-terminal region of NELL1 may be involved in cell adhesion activity. By replacing cysteine residues with serines around the coiled-coil domain of NELL1, which is responsible for oligomerization, we created a mutant NELL1 protein that was unable to form homo-oligomers, and this monomeric mutant showed substantially lower cell adhesion activity than intact NELL1. These results suggest that an oligomerization-induced conformational change in the C-terminal region of NELL1 is important for the efficient mediation of cell adhesion and spreading by NELL1.

  8. Oligomerization-induced Conformational Change in the C-terminal Region of Nel-like Molecule 1 (NELL1) Protein Is Necessary for the Efficient Mediation of Murine MC3T3-E1 Cell Adhesion and Spreading*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakamura, Yoko; Hasebe, Ai; Takahashi, Kaneyoshi; Iijima, Masumi; Yoshimoto, Nobuo; Maturana, Andrés D.; Ting, Kang; Kuroda, Shun'ichi; Niimi, Tomoaki

    2014-01-01

    NELL1 is a large oligomeric secretory glycoprotein that functions as an osteoinductive factor. NELL1 contains several conserved domains, has structural similarities to thrombospondin 1, and supports osteoblastic cell adhesion through integrins. To define the structural requirements for NELL1-mediated cell adhesion, we prepared a series of recombinant NELL1 proteins (intact, deleted, and cysteine-mutant) from a mammalian expression system and tested their activities. A deletion analysis demonstrated that the C-terminal cysteine-rich region of NELL1 is critical for the cell adhesion activity of NELL1. Reducing agent treatment decreased the cell adhesion activity of full-length NELL1 but not of its C-terminal fragments, suggesting that the intramolecular disulfide bonds within this region are not functionally necessary but that other disulfide linkages in the N-terminal region of NELL1 may be involved in cell adhesion activity. By replacing cysteine residues with serines around the coiled-coil domain of NELL1, which is responsible for oligomerization, we created a mutant NELL1 protein that was unable to form homo-oligomers, and this monomeric mutant showed substantially lower cell adhesion activity than intact NELL1. These results suggest that an oligomerization-induced conformational change in the C-terminal region of NELL1 is important for the efficient mediation of cell adhesion and spreading by NELL1. PMID:24563467

  9. The Effect of Thermal Fluctuation on the Receptor-Mediated Adhesion of a Cell Membrane to an Elastic Substrate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bahador Marzban

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Mechanics of the bilayer membrane play an important role in many biological and bioengineering problems such as cell–substrate and cell–nanomaterial interactions. In this work, we study the effect of thermal fluctuation and the substrate elasticity on the cell membrane–substrate adhesion. We model the adhesion of a fluctuating membrane on an elastic substrate as a two-step reaction comprised of the out-of-plane membrane fluctuation and the receptor–ligand binding. The equilibrium closed bond ratio as a function of substrate rigidity was computed by developing a coupled Fourier space Brownian dynamics and Monte Carlo method. The simulation results show that there exists a crossover value of the substrate rigidity at which the closed bond ratio is maximal.

  10. Enhanced adhesion of Campylobacter jejuni to abiotic surfaces is mediated by membrane proteins in oxygen-enriched conditions.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sheiam Sulaeman

    Full Text Available Campylobacter jejuni is responsible for the major foodborne bacterial enteritis in humans. In contradiction with its fastidious growth requirements, this microaerobic pathogen can survive in aerobic food environments, suggesting that it must employ a variety of protection mechanisms to resist oxidative stress. For the first time, C. jejuni 81-176 inner and outer membrane subproteomes were analyzed separately using two-dimensional protein electrophoresis (2-DE of oxygen-acclimated cells and microaerobically grown cells. LC-MS/MS analyses successfully identified 42 and 25 spots which exhibited a significantly altered abundance in the IMP-enriched fraction and in the OMP-enriched fraction, respectively, in response to oxidative conditions. These spots corresponded to 38 membrane proteins that could be grouped into different functional classes: (i transporters, (ii chaperones, (iii fatty acid metabolism, (iv adhesion/virulence and (v other metabolisms. Some of these proteins were up-regulated at the transcriptional level in oxygen-acclimated cells as confirmed by qRT-PCR. Downstream analyses revealed that adhesion of C. jejuni to inert surfaces and swarming motility were enhanced in oxygen-acclimated cells or paraquat-stressed cells, which could be explained by the higher abundance of membrane proteins involved in adhesion and biofilm formation. The virulence factor CadF, over-expressed in the outer membrane of oxygen-acclimated cells, contributes to the complex process of C. jejuni adhesion to inert surfaces as revealed by a reduction in the capability of C. jejuni 81-176 ΔCadF cells compared to the isogenic strain.Taken together, these data demonstrate that oxygen-enriched conditions promote the over-expression of membrane proteins involved in both the biofilm initiation and virulence of C. jejuni.

  11. Cellular settings mediating Src Substrate switching between focal adhesion kinase tyrosine 861 and CUB-domain-containing protein 1 (CDCP1) tyrosine 734.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wortmann, Andreas; He, Yaowu; Christensen, Melinda E; Linn, Mayla; Lumley, John W; Pollock, Pamela M; Waterhouse, Nigel J; Hooper, John D

    2011-12-09

    Reciprocal interactions between Src family kinases (SFKs) and focal adhesion kinase (FAK) are critical during changes in cell attachment. Recently it has been recognized that another SFK substrate, CUB-domain-containing protein 1 (CDCP1), is differentially phosphorylated during these events. However, the molecular processes underlying SFK-mediated phosphorylation of CDCP1 are poorly understood. Here we identify a novel mechanism in which FAK tyrosine 861 and CDCP1-Tyr-734 compete as SFK substrates and demonstrate cellular settings in which SFKs switch between these sites. Our results show that stable CDCP1 expression induces robust SFK-mediated phosphorylation of CDCP1-Tyr-734 with concomitant loss of p-FAK-Tyr-861 in adherent HeLa cells. SFK substrate switching in these cells is dependent on the level of expression of CDCP1 and is also dependent on CDCP1-Tyr-734 but is independent of CDCP1-Tyr-743 and -Tyr-762. In HeLa CDCP1 cells, engagement of SFKs with CDCP1 is accompanied by an increase in phosphorylation of Src-Tyr-416 and a change in cell morphology to a fibroblastic appearance dependent on CDCP1-Tyr-734. SFK switching between FAK-Tyr-861 and CDCP1-Tyr-734 also occurs during changes in adhesion of colorectal cancer cell lines endogenously expressing these two proteins. Consistently, increased p-FAK-Tyr-861 levels and a more epithelial morphology are seen in colon cancer SW480 cells silenced for CDCP1. Unlike protein kinase Cδ, FAK does not appear to form a trimeric complex with Src and CDCP1. These data demonstrate novel aspects of the dynamics of SFK-mediated cell signaling that may be relevant during cancer progression.

  12. Lanthanum Chloride Inhibits LPS Mediated Expressions of Pro-Inflammatory Cytokines and Adhesion Molecules in HUVECs: Involvement of NF-κB-Jmjd3 Signaling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xia Chen

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Background/Aims: To investigate the regulation of LaCl3 on lipopolysaccharides (LPS-induced pro-inflammatory cytokines and adhesion molecules in human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs. Methods: Primary cultured HUVECs were pretreated with 2.5 µM LaCl3 for 30 min followed by 1 µg/ml LPS for 2 h. Pro-inflammatory cytokine and adhesion molecule expressions were determined by real-time RT-PCR and ELISA. NF-κB/p65 nuclear translocation was examined by immunofluorescence and immuno-blot, and its DNA-binding activity was measured by chemiluminescence. Recruitment of NF-κB/p65, Jmjd3, and H3K27me3 to gene promoter regions was determined by ChIP-qPCR. Results: LaCl3 exhibited no cytotoxic effects to primary HUVECs at concentrations ≤ 50 µM. LPS-mediated TNF-α, IL-1β, IL-6, MMP-9, and ICAM-1 production, nuclear translocation, and DNA-binding activity of NF-κB/p65, as well as Jmjd3 expression, were all reduced significantly by LaCl3. Furthermore, LaCl3 treatment significantly impaired LPS-induced enrichment of NF-κB/p65 to the promoter regions of TNF-α, MMP-9, IL-1β, ICAM-1, and IL-6; and of Jmjd3 to the promoter regions of TNF-α, MMP-9, IL-1β, and IL-6. H3K27me3 abundance in the promoter regions of TNF-α and ICAM-1 increased significantly in following LaCl3 treatment. Conclusion: LaCl3 inhibits pro-inflammatory cytokine and adhesion molecule expressions induced by LPS in HUVECs. NF-κB and histone demethylase Jmjd3 are involved in this effect.

  13. A novel monoclonal antibody to human laminin α5 chain strongly inhibits integrin-mediated cell adhesion and migration on laminins 511 and 521.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zenebech Wondimu

    Full Text Available Laminins, a large family of αβγ heterotrimeric proteins mainly found in basement membranes, are strong promoters of adhesion and migration of multiple cell types, such as tumor and immune cells, via several integrin receptors. Among laminin α (LMα chains, α5 displays the widest tissue distribution in adult life and is synthesized by most cell types. Here, we have generated and characterized five novel monoclonal antibodies (mAbs to the human LMα5 chain to further study the biological relevance of α5 laminins, such as laminins 511 (α5β1γ1 and 521 (α5β2γ1. As detected by ELISA, immunohistochemistry, immunoprecipitation and Western blotting, each antibody displayed unique properties when compared to mAb 4C7, the prototype LMα5 antibody. Of greatest interest, mAb 8G9, but not any other antibody, strongly inhibited α3β1/α6β1 integrin-mediated adhesion and migration of glioma, melanoma, and carcinoma cells on laminin-511 and, together with mAb 4C7, on laminin-521. Accordingly, mAb 8G9 abolished the interaction of soluble α3β1 integrin with immobilized laminins 511 and 521. Binding of mAb 8G9 to laminin-511 was unaffected by the other mAbs to the LMα5 chain but largely hindered by mAb 4E10 to a LMβ1 chain epitope near the globular domain of laminin-511. Thus, mAb 8G9 defines a novel epitope localized at or near the integrin-binding globular domain of the LMα5 chain, which is essential for cell adhesion and migration, and identifies a potential therapeutic target in malignant and inflammatory diseases.

  14. Biophysics of cadherin adhesion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leckband, Deborah; Sivasankar, Sanjeevi

    2012-01-01

    Since the identification of cadherins and the publication of the first crystal structures, the mechanism of cadherin adhesion, and the underlying structural basis have been studied with a number of different experimental techniques, different classical cadherin subtypes, and cadherin fragments. Earlier studies based on biophysical measurements and structure determinations resulted in seemingly contradictory findings regarding cadherin adhesion. However, recent experimental data increasingly reveal parallels between structures, solution binding data, and adhesion-based biophysical measurements that are beginning to both reconcile apparent differences and generate a more comprehensive model of cadherin-mediated cell adhesion. This chapter summarizes the functional, structural, and biophysical findings relevant to cadherin junction assembly and adhesion. We emphasize emerging parallels between findings obtained with different experimental approaches. Although none of the current models accounts for all of the available experimental and structural data, this chapter discusses possible origins of apparent discrepancies, highlights remaining gaps in current knowledge, and proposes challenges for further study.

  15. Breast cancer cell migration is regulated through junctional adhesion molecule-A-mediated activation of Rap1 GTPase.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    McSherry, Elaine A

    2011-03-23

    ABSTRACT: INTRODUCTION: The adhesion protein junctional adhesion molecule-A (JAM-A) regulates epithelial cell morphology and migration, and its over-expression has recently been linked with increased risk of metastasis in breast cancer patients. As cell migration is an early requirement for tumor metastasis, we sought to identify the JAM-A signalling events regulating migration in breast cancer cells. METHODS: MCF7 breast cancer cells (which express high endogenous levels of JAM-A) and primary cultures from breast cancer patients were used for this study. JAM-A was knocked down in MCF7 cells using siRNA to determine the consequences for cell adhesion, cell migration and the protein expression of various integrin subunits. As we had previously demonstrated a link between the expression of JAM-A and β1-integrin, we examined activation of the β1-integrin regulator Rap1 GTPase in response to JAM-A knockdown or functional antagonism. To test whether JAM-A, Rap1 and β1-integrin lie in a linear pathway, we tested functional inhibitors of all three proteins separately or together in migration assays. Finally we performed immunoprecipitations in MCF7 cells and primary breast cells to determine the binding partners connecting JAM-A to Rap1 activation. RESULTS: JAM-A knockdown in MCF7 breast cancer cells reduced adhesion to, and migration through, the β1-integrin substrate fibronectin. This was accompanied by reduced protein expression of β1-integrin and its binding partners αV- and α5-integrin. Rap1 activity was reduced in response to JAM-A knockdown or inhibition, and pharmacological inhibition of Rap1 reduced MCF7 cell migration. No additive anti-migratory effect was observed in response to simultaneous inhibition of JAM-A, Rap1 and β1-integrin, suggesting that they lie in a linear migratory pathway. Finally, in an attempt to elucidate the binding partners putatively linking JAM-A to Rap1 activation, we have demonstrated the formation of a complex between JAM-A, AF

  16. Breast cancer cell migration is regulated through junctional adhesion molecule-A-mediated activation of Rap1 GTPase.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    McSherry, Elaine A

    2012-02-01

    INTRODUCTION: The adhesion protein junctional adhesion molecule-A (JAM-A) regulates epithelial cell morphology and migration, and its over-expression has recently been linked with increased risk of metastasis in breast cancer patients. As cell migration is an early requirement for tumor metastasis, we sought to identify the JAM-A signalling events regulating migration in breast cancer cells. METHODS: MCF7 breast cancer cells (which express high endogenous levels of JAM-A) and primary cultures from breast cancer patients were used for this study. JAM-A was knocked down in MCF7 cells using siRNA to determine the consequences for cell adhesion, cell migration and the protein expression of various integrin subunits. As we had previously demonstrated a link between the expression of JAM-A and beta1-integrin, we examined activation of the beta1-integrin regulator Rap1 GTPase in response to JAM-A knockdown or functional antagonism. To test whether JAM-A, Rap1 and beta1-integrin lie in a linear pathway, we tested functional inhibitors of all three proteins separately or together in migration assays. Finally we performed immunoprecipitations in MCF7 cells and primary breast cells to determine the binding partners connecting JAM-A to Rap1 activation. RESULTS: JAM-A knockdown in MCF7 breast cancer cells reduced adhesion to, and migration through, the beta1-integrin substrate fibronectin. This was accompanied by reduced protein expression of beta1-integrin and its binding partners alphaV- and alpha5-integrin. Rap1 activity was reduced in response to JAM-A knockdown or inhibition, and pharmacological inhibition of Rap1 reduced MCF7 cell migration. No additive anti-migratory effect was observed in response to simultaneous inhibition of JAM-A, Rap1 and beta1-integrin, suggesting that they lie in a linear migratory pathway. Finally, in an attempt to elucidate the binding partners putatively linking JAM-A to Rap1 activation, we have demonstrated the formation of a complex between

  17. Breast cancer cell migration is regulated through junctional adhesion molecule-A-mediated activation of Rap1 GTPase

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    McSherry, Elaine A

    2011-03-23

    Abstract Introduction The adhesion protein junctional adhesion molecule-A (JAM-A) regulates epithelial cell morphology and migration, and its over-expression has recently been linked with increased risk of metastasis in breast cancer patients. As cell migration is an early requirement for tumor metastasis, we sought to identify the JAM-A signalling events regulating migration in breast cancer cells. Methods MCF7 breast cancer cells (which express high endogenous levels of JAM-A) and primary cultures from breast cancer patients were used for this study. JAM-A was knocked down in MCF7 cells using siRNA to determine the consequences for cell adhesion, cell migration and the protein expression of various integrin subunits. As we had previously demonstrated a link between the expression of JAM-A and β1-integrin, we examined activation of the β1-integrin regulator Rap1 GTPase in response to JAM-A knockdown or functional antagonism. To test whether JAM-A, Rap1 and β1-integrin lie in a linear pathway, we tested functional inhibitors of all three proteins separately or together in migration assays. Finally we performed immunoprecipitations in MCF7 cells and primary breast cells to determine the binding partners connecting JAM-A to Rap1 activation. Results JAM-A knockdown in MCF7 breast cancer cells reduced adhesion to, and migration through, the β1-integrin substrate fibronectin. This was accompanied by reduced protein expression of β1-integrin and its binding partners αV- and α5-integrin. Rap1 activity was reduced in response to JAM-A knockdown or inhibition, and pharmacological inhibition of Rap1 reduced MCF7 cell migration. No additive anti-migratory effect was observed in response to simultaneous inhibition of JAM-A, Rap1 and β1-integrin, suggesting that they lie in a linear migratory pathway. Finally, in an attempt to elucidate the binding partners putatively linking JAM-A to Rap1 activation, we have demonstrated the formation of a complex between JAM-A, AF-6

  18. Endoglin involvement in integrin-mediated cell adhesion as a putative pathogenic mechanism in Hereditary Hemorrhagic Telangectasia type 1 (HHT1

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elisa eRossi

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Mutations in the endoglin gene (ENG are responsible for approximately 50% of all cases with Hereditary Hemorrhagic Telangectasia (HHT. Because of the absence of effective treatments for HHT symptoms, studies aimed at identifying novel biological functions of endoglin which could serve as therapeutic targets of the disease are needed. Endoglin is an endothelial membrane protein, whose most studied function has been its role as an auxiliary receptor in the TGF-β receptor complex. However, several lines of evidence suggest the involvement of endoglin in TGF-β-independent functions. Endoglin displays, within its zona pellucida (ZP domain, an RGD motif, which is a prototypic sequence involved in integrin-based interactions with other proteins. Indeed, we have recently described a novel role for endothelial endoglin in leukocyte trafficking and extravasation via its interaction with leukocyte integrins. In addition, functional, as well as protein and gene expression analysis have shown that ectopic endoglin represses the synthesis of several members of the integrin family and modulates integrin-mediated cell adhesions. This review focuses on the tight link between endoglin and integrins and how the role of endothelial endoglin in integrin-dependent cell adhesion processes can provide a better understanding of the pathogenic mechanisms leading to vascular lesions in endoglin haploinsufficient HHT1 patients.

  19. The adaptor protein SAP directly associates with PECAM-1 and regulates PECAM-1-mediated-cell adhesion in T-like cell lines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Proust, Richard; Crouin, Catherine; Gandji, Leslie Yewakon; Bertoglio, Jacques; Gesbert, Franck

    2014-04-01

    SAP is a small cytosolic adaptor protein expressed in hematopoietic lineages whose main function is to regulate intracellular signaling pathways induced by the triggering of members of the SLAM receptor family. In this paper, we have identified the adhesion molecule PECAM-1 as a new partner for SAP in a conditional yeast two-hybrid screen. PECAM-1 is an immunoglobulin-like molecule expressed by endothelial cells and leukocytes, which possesses both pro- and anti-inflammatory properties. However, little is known about PECAM-1 functions in T cells. We show that SAP directly and specifically interacts with the cytosolic tyrosine 686 of PECAM-1. We generated different T-like cell lines in which SAP or PECAM-1 are expressed or down modulated and we demonstrate that a diminished SAP expression correlates with a diminished PECAM-1-mediated adhesion. Although SAP has mainly been shown to associate with SLAM receptors, we evidence here that SAP is a new actor downstream of PECAM-1. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. ADP-ribosylation factor 1 (ARF1) takes part in cell proliferation and cell adhesion-mediated drug resistance (CAM-DR).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Xiaohong; Wang, Qiru; He, Yunhua; Ding, Linlin; Zhong, Fei; Ou, Yangyu; Shen, Yaodong; Liu, Hong; He, Song

    2017-05-01

    Cell adhesion-mediated drug resistance (CAM-DR) remains the primary obstacle in human multiple myeloma (MM) therapy. In this study, we aimed at investigating the expression and biologic function of ARF1 in MM. We determined that ARF1 expression was positively correlated with cell proliferation and knockdown of ARF1 contributed to CAM-DR. The enhancement in the adhesion of MM cells to fibronectin (FN) or the bone marrow stroma cell line HS-5 cells translated to an increased CAM-DR phenotype. Importantly, we showed that this CAM-DR phenotype was correlated with the phosphorylation of Akt and ERK in MM cells. Moreover, we sought to determine whether ARF1 could interact with p27 in RPMI8226 cells. Knockdown of ARF1 also significantly decreased pT157-p27 protein expression in RPMI8226 cells. Our research shows ARF1 may reverse CAM-DR by regulating phosphorylation of p27 at T157 in MM. Taken together, our data shed new light on the molecular mechanism of CAM-DR in MM, and targeting ARF1 may be a novel therapeutic approach for improving the effectiveness of chemotherapy in MM.

  1. Epithelial adhesion mediated by pilin SpaC is required for Lactobacillus rhamnosus GG-induced cellular responses

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Ardita, Courtney S; Mercante, Jeffrey W; Kwon, Young Man; Luo, Liping; Crawford, Madelyn E; Powell, Domonica N; Jones, Rheinallt M; Neish, Andrew S

    2014-01-01

    ...). However, how strain GG induces these responses is unknown. Here, we report that strain GG's probiotic benefits are dependent on the bacterial-epithelial interaction mediated by the SpaC pilin subunit...

  2. Amino acid sequences mediating vascular cell adhesion molecule 1 binding to integrin alpha 4: homologous DSP sequence found for JC polyoma VP1 coat protein

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael Andrew Meyer

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available The JC polyoma viral coat protein VP1 was analyzed for amino acid sequences homologies to the IDSP sequence which mediates binding of VLA-4 (integrin alpha 4 to vascular cell adhesion molecule 1. Although the full sequence was not found, a DSP sequence was located near the critical arginine residue linked to infectivity of the virus and binding to sialic acid containing molecules such as integrins (3. For the JC polyoma virus, a DSP sequence was found at residues 70, 71 and 72 with homology also noted for the mouse polyoma virus and SV40 virus. Three dimensional modeling of the VP1 molecule suggests that the DSP loop has an accessible site for interaction from the external side of the assembled viral capsid pentamer.

  3. Lectin receptor kinases participate in protein-protein interactions to mediate plasma membrane-cell wall adhesions in Arabidopsis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gouget, A.; Senchou, V.; Govers, F.; Sanson, A.; Barre, A.; Rougé, P.; Pont-Lezica, R.; Canut, H.

    2006-01-01

    Interactions between plant cell walls and plasma membranes are essential for cells to function properly, but the molecules that mediate the structural continuity between wall and membrane are unknown. Some of these interactions, which are visualized upon tissue plasmolysis in Arabidopsis

  4. Pervanadate-induced shedding of the intercellular adhesion molecule (ICAM)-1 ectodomain is mediated by membrane type-1 matrix metalloproteinase (MT1-MMP).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Essick, E; Sithu, S; Dean, W; D'Souza, S

    2008-07-01

    In several vascular diseases, the ectodomain of intercellular adhesion molecule (ICAM)-1 is shed by the proteolytic activity of a zinc-dependent endopeptidase, releasing a soluble form of the protein (sICAM-1), a common marker for inflammatory diseases. Since reactive oxygen species (ROS) generated during prolonged inflammation are known to induce shedding or cleavage of several transmembrane proteins, we sought to explore the cleavage and enzymatic effects that the pervanadate, via oxidation and subsequent inactivation of protein tyrosine phosphatase, has on ICAM-1 cleavage. In these studies, we used endothelial cells (ECs) and 293 human embryonic kidney (HEK) cells expressing high-levels of surface ICAM-1. In addition, use of specific tissue inhibitors of metalloproteinases (TIMPs), small interfering (si)RNA designed to knockdown endopeptidase activity, and an immunocolocalization assay were employed to determine the identity of a specific metalloproteinase mediating pervanadate-induced sICAM-1 shedding. Our data indicate that membrane type-1 matrix metalloproteinase (MT1-MMP) is involved in pervanadate-mediated shedding of the sICAM-1 ectodomain in both cell types. Immunostaining and confocal microscopy provide visual evidence that ICAM-1 and MT1-MMP colocalize at the cellular surface following pervanadate treatment, further implicating the involvement of MT1-MMP activity in this mode of ICAM-1 shedding.

  5. Epithelial adhesion mediated by pilin SpaC is required for Lactobacillus rhamnosus GG-induced cellular responses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ardita, Courtney S; Mercante, Jeffrey W; Kwon, Young Man; Luo, Liping; Crawford, Madelyn E; Powell, Domonica N; Jones, Rheinallt M; Neish, Andrew S

    2014-08-01

    Lactobacillus rhamnosus GG is a widely used probiotic, and the strain's salutary effects on the intestine have been extensively documented. We previously reported that strain GG can modulate inflammatory signaling, as well as epithelial migration and proliferation, by activating NADPH oxidase 1-catalyzed generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS). However, how strain GG induces these responses is unknown. Here, we report that strain GG's probiotic benefits are dependent on the bacterial-epithelial interaction mediated by the SpaC pilin subunit. By comparing strain GG to an isogenic mutant that lacks SpaC (strain GGΩspaC), we establish that SpaC is necessary for strain GG to adhere to gut mucosa, that SpaC contributes to strain GG-induced epithelial generation of ROS, and that SpaC plays a role in strain GG's capacity to stimulate extracellular signal-regulated kinase/mitogen-activated protein kinase (ERK/MAPK) signaling in enterocytes. In addition, we show that SpaC is required for strain GG-mediated stimulation of cell proliferation and protection against radiologically inflicted intestinal injury. The identification of a critical surface protein required for strain GG to mediate its probiotic influence advances our understanding of the molecular basis for the symbiotic relationship between some commensal bacteria of the gut lumen and enterocytes. Further insights into this relationship are critical for the development of novel approaches to treat intestinal diseases. Copyright © 2014, American Society for Microbiology. All Rights Reserved.

  6. Beta-1 integrin-mediated adhesion may be initiated by multiple incomplete bonds, thus accounting for the functional importance of receptor clustering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vitte, Joana; Benoliel, Anne-Marie; Eymeric, Philippe; Bongrand, Pierre; Pierres, Anne

    2004-06-01

    The regulation of cell integrin receptors involves modulation of membrane expression, shift between different affinity states, and topographical redistribution on the cell membrane. Here we attempted to assess quantitatively the functional importance of receptor clustering. We studied beta-1 integrin-mediated attachment of THP-1 cells to fibronectin-coated surfaces under low shear flow. Cells displayed multiple binding events with a half-life of the order of 1 s. The duration of binding events after the first second after arrest was quantitatively accounted for by a model assuming the existence of a short-time intermediate binding state with 3.6 s(-1) dissociation rate and 1.3 s(-1) transition frequency toward a more stable state. Cell binding to surfaces coated with lower fibronectin densities was concluded to be mediated by single molecular interactions, whereas multiple bonds were formed Cell treatment with microfilament inhibitors or a neutral antiintegrin antibody decreased bond number without changing aforementioned kinetic parameters whereas a function enhancing antibody increased the rate of bond formation and/or the lifetime of intermediate state. Receptor aggregation was induced by treating cells with neutral antiintegrin antibody and antiimmunoglobulin antibodies. A semiquantitative confocal microscopy study suggested that this treatment increased between 40% and 100% the average number of integrin receptors located in a volume of approximately 0.045 microm(3) surrounding each integrin. This aggregation induced up to 2.7-fold increase of the average number of bonds. Flow cytometric analysis of fluorescent ligand binding showed that THP-1 cells displayed low-affinity beta-1 integrins with a dissociation constant in the micromolar range. It is concluded that the initial step of cell adhesion was mediated by multiple incomplete bonds rather than a single equilibrium-state ligand receptor association. This interpretation accounts for the functional

  7. Adhesive Categories

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lack, Stephen; Sobocinski, Pawel

    2003-01-01

    We introduce adhesive categories, which are categories with structure ensuring that pushouts along monomorphisms are well-behaved. Many types of graphical structures used in computer science are shown to be examples of adhesive categories. Double-pushout graph rewriting generalises well...... to rewriting on arbitrary adhesive categories....

  8. Adhesive Categories

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lack, Stephen; Sobocinski, Pawel

    2004-01-01

    We introduce adhesive categories, which are categories with structure ensuring that pushouts along monomorphisms are well-behaved. Many types of graphical structures used in computer science are shown to be examples of adhesive categories. Double-pushout graph rewriting generalises well...... to rewriting on arbitrary adhesive categories....

  9. Met-Independent Hepatocyte Growth Factor-mediated regulation of cell adhesion in human prostate cancer cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Davis Rodney

    2006-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Prostate cancer cells communicate reciprocally with the stromal cells surrounding them, inside the prostate, and after metastasis, within the bone. Each tissue secretes factors for interpretation by the other. One stromally-derived factor, Hepatocyte Growth Factor (HGF, was found twenty years ago to regulate invasion and growth of carcinoma cells. Working with the LNCaP prostate cancer progression model, we found that these cells could respond to HGF stimulation, even in the absence of Met, the only known HGF receptor. The new HGF binding partner we find on the cell surface may help to clarify conflicts in the past literature about Met expression and HGF response in cancer cells. Methods We searched for Met or any HGF binding partner on the cells of the PC3 and LNCaP prostate cancer cell models, using HGF immobilized on agarose beads. By using mass spectrometry analyses and sequencing we have identified nucleolin protein as a novel HGF binding partner. Antibodies against nucleolin (or HGF were able to ameliorate the stimulatory effects of HGF on met-negative prostate cancer cells. Western blots, RT-PCR, and immunohistochemistry were used to assess nucleolin levels during prostate cancer progression in both LNCaP and PC3 models. Results We have identified HGF as a major signaling component of prostate stromal-conditioned media (SCM and have implicated the protein nucleolin in HGF signal reception by the LNCaP model prostate cancer cells. Antibodies that silence either HGF (in SCM or nucleolin (on the cell surfaces eliminate the adhesion-stimulatory effects of the SCM. Likewise, addition of purified HGF to control media mimics the action of SCM. C4-2, an LNCaP lineage-derived, androgen-independent human prostate cancer cell line, responds to HGF in a concentration-dependent manner by increasing its adhesion and reducing its migration on laminin substratum. These HGF effects are not due to shifts in the expression levels of

  10. Adhesive fiber stratification in uropathogenic Escherichia coli biofilms unveils oxygen-mediated control of type 1 pili.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kyle A Floyd

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Bacterial biofilms account for a significant number of hospital-acquired infections and complicate treatment options, because bacteria within biofilms are generally more tolerant to antibiotic treatment. This resilience is attributed to transient bacterial subpopulations that arise in response to variations in the microenvironment surrounding the biofilm. Here, we probed the spatial proteome of surface-associated single-species biofilms formed by uropathogenic Escherichia coli (UPEC, the major causative agent of community-acquired and catheter-associated urinary tract infections. We used matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization (MALDI time-of-flight (TOF imaging mass spectrometry (IMS to analyze the spatial proteome of intact biofilms in situ. MALDI-TOF IMS revealed protein species exhibiting distinct localizations within surface-associated UPEC biofilms, including two adhesive fibers critical for UPEC biofilm formation and virulence: type 1 pili (Fim localized exclusively to the air-exposed region, while curli amyloid fibers localized to the air-liquid interface. Comparison of cells grown aerobically, fermentatively, or utilizing an alternative terminal electron acceptor showed that the phase-variable fim promoter switched to the "OFF" orientation under oxygen-deplete conditions, leading to marked reduction of type 1 pili on the bacterial cell surface. Conversely, S pili whose expression is inversely related to fim expression were up-regulated under anoxic conditions. Tethering the fim promoter in the "ON" orientation in anaerobically grown cells only restored type 1 pili production in the presence of an alternative terminal electron acceptor beyond oxygen. Together these data support the presence of at least two regulatory mechanisms controlling fim expression in response to oxygen availability and may contribute to the stratification of extracellular matrix components within the biofilm. MALDI IMS facilitated the discovery of these

  11. Adhesive fiber stratification in uropathogenic Escherichia coli biofilms unveils oxygen-mediated control of type 1 pili.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Floyd, Kyle A; Moore, Jessica L; Eberly, Allison R; Good, James A D; Shaffer, Carrie L; Zaver, Himesh; Almqvist, Fredrik; Skaar, Eric P; Caprioli, Richard M; Hadjifrangiskou, Maria

    2015-03-01

    Bacterial biofilms account for a significant number of hospital-acquired infections and complicate treatment options, because bacteria within biofilms are generally more tolerant to antibiotic treatment. This resilience is attributed to transient bacterial subpopulations that arise in response to variations in the microenvironment surrounding the biofilm. Here, we probed the spatial proteome of surface-associated single-species biofilms formed by uropathogenic Escherichia coli (UPEC), the major causative agent of community-acquired and catheter-associated urinary tract infections. We used matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization (MALDI) time-of-flight (TOF) imaging mass spectrometry (IMS) to analyze the spatial proteome of intact biofilms in situ. MALDI-TOF IMS revealed protein species exhibiting distinct localizations within surface-associated UPEC biofilms, including two adhesive fibers critical for UPEC biofilm formation and virulence: type 1 pili (Fim) localized exclusively to the air-exposed region, while curli amyloid fibers localized to the air-liquid interface. Comparison of cells grown aerobically, fermentatively, or utilizing an alternative terminal electron acceptor showed that the phase-variable fim promoter switched to the "OFF" orientation under oxygen-deplete conditions, leading to marked reduction of type 1 pili on the bacterial cell surface. Conversely, S pili whose expression is inversely related to fim expression were up-regulated under anoxic conditions. Tethering the fim promoter in the "ON" orientation in anaerobically grown cells only restored type 1 pili production in the presence of an alternative terminal electron acceptor beyond oxygen. Together these data support the presence of at least two regulatory mechanisms controlling fim expression in response to oxygen availability and may contribute to the stratification of extracellular matrix components within the biofilm. MALDI IMS facilitated the discovery of these mechanisms, and we

  12. Cell-cell communication mediated by the CAR subgroup of immunoglobulin cell adhesion molecules in health and disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matthäus, Claudia; Langhorst, Hanna; Schütz, Laura; Jüttner, René; Rathjen, Fritz G

    2017-06-01

    The immunoglobulin superfamily represents a diverse set of cell-cell contact proteins and includes well-studied members such as NCAM1, DSCAM, L1 or the contactins which are strongly expressed in the nervous system. In this review we put our focus on the biological function of a less understood subgroup of Ig-like proteins composed of CAR (coxsackievirus and adenovirus receptor), CLMP (CAR-like membrane protein) and BT-IgSF (brain and testis specific immunoglobulin superfamily). The CAR-related proteins are type I transmembrane proteins containing an N-terminal variable (V-type) and a membrane proximal constant (C2-type) Ig domain in their extracellular region which are implicated in homotypic adhesion. They are highly expressed during embryonic development in a variety of tissues including the nervous system whereby in adult stages the protein level of CAR and CLMP decreases, only BT-IgSF expression increases within age. CAR-related proteins are concentrated at specialized cell-cell communication sites such as gap or tight junctions and are present at the plasma membrane in larger protein complexes. Considerable progress has been made on the molecular structure and interactions of CAR while research on CLMP and BT-IgSF is at an early stage. Studies on mouse mutants revealed biological functions of CAR in the heart and for CLMP in the gastrointestinal and urogenital systems. Furthermore, CAR and BT-IgSF appear to regulate synaptic function in the hippocampus. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Myosin II activity dependent and independent vinculin recruitment to the sites of E-cadherin-mediated cell-cell adhesion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shih Wenting

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Maintaining proper adhesion between neighboring cells depends on the ability of cells to mechanically respond to tension at cell-cell junctions through the actin cytoskeleton. Thus, identifying the molecules involved in responding to cell tension would provide insight into the maintenance, regulation, and breakdown of cell-cell junctions during various biological processes. Vinculin, an actin-binding protein that associates with the cadherin complex, is recruited to cell-cell contacts under increased tension in a myosin II-dependent manner. However, the precise role of vinculin at force-bearing cell-cell junctions and how myosin II activity alters the recruitment of vinculin at quiescent cell-cell contacts have not been demonstrated. Results We generated vinculin knockdown cells using shRNA specific to vinculin and MDCK epithelial cells. These vinculin-deficient MDCK cells form smaller cell clusters in a suspension than wild-type cells. In wound healing assays, GFP-vinculin accumulated at cell-cell junctions along the wound edge while vinculin-deficient cells displayed a slower wound closure rate compared to vinculin-expressing cells. In the presence of blebbistatin (myosin II inhibitor, vinculin localization at quiescent cell-cell contacts was unaffected while in the presence of jasplakinolide (F-actin stabilizer, vinculin recruitment increased in mature MDCK cell monolayers. Conclusion These results demonstrate that vinculin plays an active role at adherens junctions under increased tension at cell-cell contacts where vinculin recruitment occurs in a myosin II activity-dependent manner, whereas vinculin recruitment to the quiescent cell-cell junctions depends on F-actin stabilization.

  14. Soluble Vascular Adhesion Protein-1 Mediates Spermine Oxidation as Semicarbazide-Sensitive Amine Oxidase: Possible Role in Proliferative Diabetic Retinopathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murata, Miyuki; Noda, Kousuke; Kawasaki, Akiko; Yoshida, Shiho; Dong, Yoko; Saito, Michiyuki; Dong, Zhenyu; Ando, Ryo; Mori, Shohei; Saito, Wataru; Kanda, Atsuhiro; Ishida, Susumu

    2017-09-22

    Purpose/Aim of the study: To explore the possible role of vascular adhesion protein-1 (VAP-1) via its enzymatic function as a semicarbazide-sensitive amine oxidase (SSAO) in the pathogenesis of proliferative diabetic retinopathy (PDR). The levels of soluble VAP-1/SSAO and the unsaturated aldehyde acrolein (ACR)-conjugated protein, Nε-(3-formyl-3, 4-dehydropiperidino) lysine adduct (FDP-Lys), were measured in vitreous fluid samples of PDR and non-diabetic patients using ELISA. Recombinant human VAP-1/SSAO (rhVAP-1/SSAO) was incubated with spermine, with or without semicarbazide or RTU-1096 (a specific inhibitor for VAP-1/SSAO). Immunofluorescence assays were performed to assess the localization of VAP-1/SSAO and FDP-Lys in fibrovascular tissues from patients with PDR. The impact of ACR on cultured retinal capillary endothelial cells was assessed using a cell viability assay and total glutathione (GSH) measurements. The levels of sVAP-1/SSAO and FDP-Lys were elevated in the vitreous fluid of patients with PDR. Incubation of rhVAP-1 with spermine resulted in the generation of hydrogen peroxide and FDP-Lys and the production was inhibited by semicarbazide and RTU-1096. In fibrovascular tissues, FDP-Lys and VAP-1/SSAO were present in endothelial cells. ACR stimulation reduced GSH levels in the cultured endothelial cells in a dose-dependent manner and caused cellular toxicity. Our results indicate the pathological role of sVAP-1/SSAO to generate hydrogen peroxide and toxic aldehyde ACR, both of which are associated with oxidative stress, as a consequence of spermine oxidation in eyes with PDR.

  15. T Cell-Mediated Modulation of Mast Cell Function: Heterotypic Adhesion-Induced Stimulatory or Inhibitory Effects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yoseph A. Mekori

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Close physical proximity between mast cells and T cells has been demonstrated in several T cell mediated inflammatory processes such as rheumatoid arthritis and sarcoidosis. However, the way by which mast cells are activated in these T cell-mediated immune responses has not been fully elucidated. We have identified and characterized a novel mast cell activation pathway initiated by physical contact with activated T cells, and showed that this pathway is associated with degranulation and cytokine release. The signaling events associated with this pathway of mast cell activation have also been elucidated confirming the activation of the Ras MAPK systems. More recently, we hypothesized and demonstrated that mast cells may also be activated by microparticles released from activated T cells that are considered as miniature version of a cell. By extension, microparticles might affect the activity of mast cells, which are usually not in direct contact with T cells at the inflammatory site. Recent works have also focused on the effects of regulatory T cells on mast cells. These reports highlighted the importance of the cytokines IL-2 and IL-9, produced by mast cells and T cells, respectively, in obtaining optimal immune suppression. Finally, physical contact, associated by OX40-OX40L engagement has been found to underlie the down-regulatory effects exerted by regulatory T cells on mast cell function.

  16. Mediatization

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hjarvard, Stig

    2017-01-01

    Mediatization research shares media effects studies' ambition of answering the difficult questions with regard to whether and how media matter and influence contemporary culture and society. The two approaches nevertheless differ fundamentally in that mediatization research seeks answers...... to these general questions by distinguishing between two concepts: mediation and mediatization. The media effects tradition generally considers the effects of the media to be a result of individuals being exposed to media content, i.e. effects are seen as an outcome of mediated communication. Mediatization....... From the perspective of mediatization research, the most important effect of the media stems from their embeddedness in culture and society....

  17. Trypanosoma cruzi-elicited CD8+ T cell-mediated myocarditis: chemokine receptors and adhesion molecules as potential therapeutic targets to control chronic inflammation?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joseli Lannes-Vieira

    2003-04-01

    Full Text Available In Chagas disease, during the acute phase, the establishment of inflammatory processes is crucial for Trypanosoma cruzi control in target tissues and for the establishment of host/parasite equilibrium. However, in about 30% of the patients, inflammation becomes progressive, resulting in chronic disease, mainly characterized by myocarditis. Although several hypothesis have been raised to explain the pathogenesis of chagasic myocardiopathy, including the persistence of the parasite and/or participation of autoimmune processes, the molecular mechanisms underlying the establishment of the inflammatory process leading to parasitism control but also contributing to the maintenance of T. cruzi-elicited chronic myocarditis remain unsolved. Trying to shed light on these questions, we have for several years been working with murine models for Chagas disease that reproduce the acute self-resolving meningoencephalitis, the encephalitis resulting of reactivation described in immunodeficient individuals, and several aspects of the acute and chronic myocarditis. In the present review, our results are summarized and discussed under the light of the current literature. Furthermore, rational therapeutic intervention strategies based on integrin-mediated adhesion and chemokine receptor-driven recruitment of leukocytes are proposed to control T. cruzi-elicited unbalanced inflammation.

  18. The Pmt2p-mediated protein O-Mannosylation is required for morphogenesis, adhesive properties, cell wall integrity and full virulence of Magnaporthe oryzae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Min eGuo

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Protein O-mannosylation is a type of O-glycosylation that is characterized by the addition of mannose residues to target proteins, and is initially catalyzed by evolutionarily conserved protein O-mannosyltransferases (PMTs. In this study, three members of PMT were identified in Magnaporthe oryzae, and the pathogenic roles of MoPmt2, a member of PMT2 subfamily, were analyzed. We found that MoPmt2 is a homolog of Saccharomyces cerevisiae Pmt2 and could complement yeast Pmt2 function in resistance to CFW. Quantitative RT–PCR revealed that MoPmt2 is highly expressed during conidiation, and targeted disruption of MoPmt2 resulted in defects in conidiation and conidia morphology. The MoPmt2 mutants also showed a distinct reduction in fungal growth, which was associated with severe alterations in hyphal polarity. In addition, we found that the MoPmt2 mutants severely reduced virulence on both rice plants and barley leaves. The subsequent examination revealed that the fungal adhesion, conidial germination, CWI and invasive hyphae growth in host cells are responsible for defects on appressorium mediated penetration, and thus attenuated the pathogenicity of MoPmt2 mutants. Taken together, our results suggest that protein O-mannosyltransferase MoPmt2 plays essential roles in fungal growth and development, and is required for the full pathogenicity of M. oryzae.

  19. CAT-1 as a novel CAM stabilizes endothelial integrity and mediates the protective actions of L-Arg via a NO-independent mechanism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Lu; Tian, Shuang; Chen, Yuguo; Mao, Yun; Cui, Sumei; Hu, Aihua; Zhang, Jianliang; Xia, Shen-Ling; Su, Yunchao; Du, Jie; Block, Edward R; Wang, Xing Li; Cui, Zhaoqiang

    2015-10-01

    Interendothelial junctions play an important role in the maintenance of endothelial integrity and the regulation of vascular functions. We report here that cationic amino acid transporter-1 (CAT-1) is a novel interendothelial cell adhesion molecule (CAM). We identified that CAT-1 protein localized at cell-cell adhesive junctions, similar to the classic CAM of VE-cadherin, and knockdown of CAT-1 with siRNA led to an increase in endothelial permeability. In addition, CAT-1 formed a cis-homo-dimer and showed Ca(2+)-dependent trans-homo-interaction to cause homophilic cell-cell adhesion. Co-immunoprecipitation assays showed that CAT-1 can associate with β-catenin. Furthermore, we found that the sub-cellular localization and function of CAT-1 are associated with cell confluency, in sub-confluent ECs CAT-1 proteins distribute on the entire surface and function as L-Arg transporters, but most of the CAT-1 in the confluent ECs are localized at interendothelial junctions and serve as CAMs. Further functional characterization has disclosed that extracellular L-Arg exposure stabilizes endothelial integrity via abating the cell junction disassembly of CAT-1 and blocking the cellular membrane CAT-1 internalization, which provides the new mechanisms for L-Arg paradox and trans-stimulation of cationic amino acid transport system (CAAT). These results suggest that CAT-1 is a novel CAM that directly regulates endothelial integrity and mediates the protective actions of L-Arg to endothelium via a NO-independent mechanism. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Cellular Adhesion and Adhesion Molecules

    OpenAIRE

    SELLER, Zerrin

    2014-01-01

    In recent years, cell adhesion and cell adhesion molecules have been shown to be important for many normal biological processes, including embryonic cell migration, immune system functions and wound healing. It has also been shown that they contribute to the pathogenesis of a large number of common human disorders, such as rheumatoid arthritis and tumor cell metastasis in cancer. In this review, the basic mechanisms of cellular adhesion and the structural and functional features of adhes...

  1. Bacterial adhesion

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Loosdrecht, van M.C.M.

    1988-01-01

    As mentioned in the introduction of this thesis bacterial adhesion has been studied from a variety of (mostly practice oriented) starting points. This has resulted in a range of widely divergent approaches. In order to elucidate general principles in bacterial adhesion phenomena, we felt it

  2. Denture Adhesives

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Devices Home Medical Devices Products and Medical Procedures Dental Devices Denture Adhesives Share Tweet Linkedin Pin it More sharing options ... Manufacturers (February 23, 2011) (PDF - 22KB) More in Dental Devices Denture Adhesives Multiple-Use Dental Dispenser Devices Dental Amalgam About ...

  3. Cell-matrix adhesion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berrier, Allison L; Yamada, Kenneth M

    2007-12-01

    The complex interactions of cells with extracellular matrix (ECM) play crucial roles in mediating and regulating many processes, including cell adhesion, migration, and signaling during morphogenesis, tissue homeostasis, wound healing, and tumorigenesis. Many of these interactions involve transmembrane integrin receptors. Integrins cluster in specific cell-matrix adhesions to provide dynamic links between extracellular and intracellular environments by bi-directional signaling and by organizing the ECM and intracellular cytoskeletal and signaling molecules. This mini review discusses these interconnections, including the roles of matrix properties such as composition, three-dimensionality, and porosity, the bi-directional functions of cellular contractility and matrix rigidity, and cell signaling. The review concludes by speculating on the application of this knowledge of cell-matrix interactions in the formation of cell adhesions, assembly of matrix, migration, and tumorigenesis to potential future therapeutic approaches. 2007 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  4. E-cadherin mediates ultraviolet radiation- and calcium-induced melanin transfer in human skin cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Suman K; Baker, Richard; Sikkink, Stephen K; Nizard, Carine; Schnebert, Sylvianne; Kurfurst, Robin; Tobin, Desmond J

    2017-11-01

    Skin pigmentation is directed by epidermal melanin units, characterized by long-lived and dendritic epidermal melanocytes (MC) that interact with viable keratinocytes (KC) to contribute melanin to the epidermis. Previously, we reported that MC:KC contact is required for melanosome transfer that can be enhanced by filopodi, and by UVR/UVA irradiation, which can upregulate melanosome transfer via Myosin X-mediated control of MC filopodia. Both MC and KC express Ca 2+ -dependent E-cadherins. These homophilic adhesion contacts induce transient increases in intra-KC Ca 2+ , while ultraviolet radiation (UVR) raises intra-MC Ca 2+ via calcium-selective ORAI1 ion channels; both are associated with regulating melanogenesis. However, how Ca 2+ triggers melanin transfer remains unclear. Here we evaluated the role of E-cadherin in UVR-mediated melanin transfer in human skin cells. MC and KC in human epidermis variably express filopodia-associated E-cadherin, Cdc42, VASP and β-catenin, all of which were upregulated by UVR in human MC in vitro. Knockdown of E-cadherin revealed that this cadherin is essential for UVR-induced MC filopodia formation and melanin transfer. Moreover, Ca 2+ induced a dose-dependent increase in filopodia formation and melanin transfer, as well as increased β-catenin, Cdc42, Myosin X and E-cadherin expression in these skin cells. Together, these data suggest that filopodial proteins and E-cadherin, which are upregulated by intracellular (UVR-stimulated) and extracellular Ca 2+ availability, are required for filopodia formation and melanin transfer. This may open new avenues to explore how Ca 2+ signalling influences human pigmentation. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  5. Extracellular signal-regulated kinase-5: Novel mediator of insulin and tumor necrosis factor α-stimulated vascular cell adhesion molecule-1 expression in vascular cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mackesy, Daniel Z; Goalstone, Marc L

    2014-11-01

    Atherosclerosis may be stimulated by the increased presence of insulin and tumor necrosis-factor-α (TNFα) with subsequent expression of vascular cell adhesion molecule-1 (VCAM-1). We hypothesized that extracellular signal-regulated kinase-5 (ERK5) plays an important role in insulin and TNFα-stimulated total and cell surface VCAM-1 expression. Rat aorta vascular endothelial cells were first transfected with either no inhibitory RNA, inactive (scrambled) inhibitory ERK5 RNA (scERK5) or active inhibitory ERK5 RNA (siERK5) and then treated with either (i) no analog; (ii) insulin (1 nM), or TNFα (1 ng/mL) alone, or (iii) insulin plus TNFα for 6 h. Thereafter either total VCAM-1 protein or surface VCAM-1 protein was determined. Genetic inhibition of ERK5 decreased TNFα-stimulated total VCAM-1 expression by 57% and surface expression by 27%. In contrast, genetic inhibition of ERK5 did not significantly decrease insulin-stimulated total or surface VCAM-1 expression. Interestingly, genetic inhibition of ERK5 did not significantly decrease insulin plus TNFα-stimulated total VCAM-1 expression, but significantly (P cell surface VCAM-1 protein expression. Taken together, these results demonstrate that not only does ERK5 have differential mediation of insulin and TNFα-stimulated VCAM-1 expression, but also has differential regulation of insulin plus TNFα-stimulated total and surface VCAM-1 expression, suggesting that other intermediates of the insulin and TNFα intracellular pathways are contributing to atherogenesis. Published 2014. This article is a U.S. Government work and is in the public domain in the USA.

  6. Kv2 Ion Channels Determine the Expression and Localization of the Associated AMIGO-1 Cell Adhesion Molecule in Adult Brain Neurons

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hannah I. Bishop

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Voltage-gated K+ (Kv channels play important roles in regulating neuronal excitability. Kv channels comprise four principal α subunits, and transmembrane and/or cytoplasmic auxiliary subunits that modify diverse aspects of channel function. AMIGO-1, which mediates homophilic cell adhesion underlying neurite outgrowth and fasciculation during development, has recently been shown to be an auxiliary subunit of adult brain Kv2.1-containing Kv channels. We show that AMIGO-1 is extensively colocalized with both Kv2.1 and its paralog Kv2.2 in brain neurons across diverse mammals, and that in adult brain, there is no apparent population of AMIGO-1 outside of that colocalized with these Kv2 α subunits. AMIGO-1 is coclustered with Kv2 α subunits at specific plasma membrane (PM sites associated with hypolemmal subsurface cisternae at neuronal ER:PM junctions. This distinct PM clustering of AMIGO-1 is not observed in brain neurons of mice lacking Kv2 α subunit expression. Moreover, in heterologous cells, coexpression of either Kv2.1 or Kv2.2 is sufficient to drive clustering of the otherwise uniformly expressed AMIGO-1. Kv2 α subunit coexpression also increases biosynthetic intracellular trafficking and PM expression of AMIGO-1 in heterologous cells, and analyses of Kv2.1 and Kv2.2 knockout mice show selective loss of AMIGO-1 expression and localization in neurons lacking the respective Kv2 α subunit. Together, these data suggest that in mammalian brain neurons, AMIGO-1 is exclusively associated with Kv2 α subunits, and that Kv2 α subunits are obligatory in determining the correct pattern of AMIGO-1 expression, PM trafficking and clustering.

  7. Targeting Fyn in Ras-transformed cells induces F-actin to promote adherens junction-mediated cell-cell adhesion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fenton, Sarah E; Hutchens, Kelli A; Denning, Mitchell F

    2015-10-01

    Fyn, a member of the Src family kinases (SFK), is an oncogene in murine epidermis and is associated with cell-cell adhesion turnover and induction of cell migration. Additionally, Fyn upregulation has been reported in multiple tumor types, including cutaneous squamous cell carcinoma (cSCC). Introduction of active H-Ras(G12V) into the HaCaT human keratinocyte cell line resulted in upregulation of Fyn mRNA (200-fold) and protein, while expression of other SFKs remained unaltered. Transduction of active Ras or Fyn was sufficient to induce an epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition in HaCaT cells. Inhibition of Fyn activity, using siRNA or the clinical SFK inhibitor Dasatinib, increased cell-cell adhesion and rapidly (5-60 min) increased levels of cortical F-actin. Fyn inhibition with siRNA or Dasatinib also induced F-actin in MDA-MB-231 breast cancer cells, which have elevated Fyn. F-actin co-localized with adherens junction proteins, and Dasatinib-induced cell-cell adhesion could be blocked by Cytochalasin D, indicating that F-actin polymerization was a key initiator of cell-cell adhesion through the adherens junction. Conversely, inhibiting cell-cell adhesion with low Ca(2+) media did not block Dasatinib-induced F-actin polymerization. Inhibition of the Rho effector kinase ROCK blocked Dasatinib-induced F-actin and cell-cell adhesion, implicating relief of Rho GTPase inhibition as a mechanism of Dasatinib-induced cell-cell adhesion. Finally, topical Dasatinib treatment significantly reduced total tumor burden in the SKH1 mouse model of UV-induced skin carcinogenesis. Together these results identify the promotion of actin-based cell-cell adhesion as a newly described mechanism of action for Dasatinib and suggest that Fyn inhibition may be an effective therapeutic approach in treating cSCC. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  8. Wet adhesion and adhesive locomotion of snails on anti-adhesive non-wetting surfaces.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Neil J Shirtcliffe

    Full Text Available Creating surfaces capable of resisting liquid-mediated adhesion is extremely difficult due to the strong capillary forces that exist between surfaces. Land snails use this to adhere to and traverse across almost any type of solid surface of any orientation (horizontal, vertical or inverted, texture (smooth, rough or granular or wetting property (hydrophilic or hydrophobic via a layer of mucus. However, the wetting properties that enable snails to generate strong temporary attachment and the effectiveness of this adhesive locomotion on modern super-slippy superhydrophobic surfaces are unclear. Here we report that snail adhesion overcomes a wide range of these microscale and nanoscale topographically structured non-stick surfaces. For the one surface which we found to be snail resistant, we show that the effect is correlated with the wetting response of the surface to a weak surfactant. Our results elucidate some critical wetting factors for the design of anti-adhesive and bio-adhesion resistant surfaces.

  9. Wet adhesion and adhesive locomotion of snails on anti-adhesive non-wetting surfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shirtcliffe, Neil J; McHale, Glen; Newton, Michael I

    2012-01-01

    Creating surfaces capable of resisting liquid-mediated adhesion is extremely difficult due to the strong capillary forces that exist between surfaces. Land snails use this to adhere to and traverse across almost any type of solid surface of any orientation (horizontal, vertical or inverted), texture (smooth, rough or granular) or wetting property (hydrophilic or hydrophobic) via a layer of mucus. However, the wetting properties that enable snails to generate strong temporary attachment and the effectiveness of this adhesive locomotion on modern super-slippy superhydrophobic surfaces are unclear. Here we report that snail adhesion overcomes a wide range of these microscale and nanoscale topographically structured non-stick surfaces. For the one surface which we found to be snail resistant, we show that the effect is correlated with the wetting response of the surface to a weak surfactant. Our results elucidate some critical wetting factors for the design of anti-adhesive and bio-adhesion resistant surfaces.

  10. Interaction between Endothelial Protein C Receptor and Intercellular Adhesion Molecule 1 to Mediate Binding of Plasmodium falciparum-Infected Erythrocytes to Endothelial Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Avril, Marion; Bernabeu, Maria; Benjamin, Maxwell; Brazier, Andrew Jay; Smith, Joseph D

    2016-07-12

    Intercellular adhesion molecule 1 (ICAM-1) and the endothelial protein C receptor (EPCR) are candidate receptors for the deadly complication cerebral malaria. However, it remains unclear if Plasmodium falciparum parasites with dual binding specificity are involved in cytoadhesion or different parasite subpopulations bind in brain microvessels. Here, we investigated this issue by studying different subtypes of ICAM-1-binding parasite lines. We show that two parasite lines expressing domain cassette 13 (DC13) of the P. falciparum erythrocyte membrane protein 1 (PfEMP1) family have dual binding specificity for EPCR and ICAM-1 and further mapped ICAM-1 binding to the first DBLβ domain following the PfEMP1 head structure in both proteins. As PfEMP1 head structures have diverged between group A (EPCR binders) and groups B and C (CD36 binders), we also investigated how ICAM-1-binding parasites with different coreceptor binding traits influence P. falciparum-infected erythrocyte binding to endothelial cells. Whereas levels of binding to tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α)-stimulated endothelial cells from the lung and brain by all ICAM-1-binding parasite lines increased, group A (EPCR and ICAM-1) was less dependent than group B (CD36 and ICAM-1) on ICAM-1 upregulation. Furthermore, both group A DC13 parasite lines had higher binding levels to brain endothelial cells (a microvascular niche with limited CD36 expression). This study shows that ICAM-1 is a coreceptor for a subset of EPCR-binding parasites and provides the first evidence of how EPCR and ICAM-1 interact to mediate parasite binding to both resting and TNF-α-activated primary brain and lung endothelial cells. Cerebral malaria is a severe neurological complication of P. falciparum infection associated with infected erythrocyte (IE) binding in cerebral vessels. Yet little is known about the mechanisms by which parasites adhere in the brain or other microvascular sites. Here, we studied parasite lines

  11. The HLA-DR mediated signalling increases the migration and invasion of melanoma cells, the expression and lipid raft recruitment of adhesion receptors, PD-L1 and signal transduction proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Costantini, Francesca; Barbieri, Giovanna

    2017-08-01

    The constitutive expression of Major Histocompatibility Complex (MHC) class II molecules is restricted to professional Antigen-Presenting Cells (APCs), nevertheless almost 50% of melanomas express constitutively the MHC class II molecules. Therefore, in two MHC class II constitutive expressing melanoma cell lines we studied the signalling mediated by the HLA-DR molecules in the aim to understand the consequence of class II mediated signalling on metastatic dissemination of melanoma. In particular, we reported that the HLA-DR mediated signalling play a new role in melanoma progression, increasing the migration and invasion of melanoma cells. Furthermore, we showed that the HLA-DR mediated signalling increases the expression and the lipid raft localisation of class II molecules, PD-L1 receptor, Integrin and CAM adhesion receptors, FAK, AKT and STAT3 signalling proteins. We also showed that the HLA-DR mediated signalling increases the activation of FAK, AKT, ERK, PKC and STAT3 signalling proteins and the expression of ILK, PAX, BRAF, ERK and PKC. Indeed, the results showed suggest that the HLA-DR mediated signalling provides a platform useful to frustrate an effective anti-tumour response and to increase melanoma migration and metastatic dissemination of this cancer. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Atomic force microscopy identifies regions of distinct desmoglein 3 adhesive properties on living keratinocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vielmuth, Franziska; Hartlieb, Eva; Kugelmann, Daniela; Waschke, Jens; Spindler, Volker

    2015-04-01

    Desmosomes provide strong cell-cell adhesion which is crucial for the integrity of tissues such as the epidermis. However, nothing is known about the distribution and binding properties of desmosomal adhesion molecules on keratinocytes. Here we used atomic force microscopy (AFM) to simultaneously visualize the topography of living human keratinocytes and the distribution and binding properties of the desmosomal adhesion molecule desmoglein 3 (Dsg3). Using recombinant Dsg3 as sensor, binding events were detectable diffusely and in clusters on the cell surface and at areas of cell-cell contact. This was blocked by removing Ca(2+) and by addition of Dsg3-specific antibodies indicating homophilic Dsg3 binding. Binding forces of Dsg3 molecules were lower on the cell surface compared to areas of cell-cell contact. Our data for the first time directly demonstrate the occurrence of Dsg3 molecules outside of desmosomes and show that Dsg3 adhesive properties differ depending on their localization. From the clinical editor: Using atomic force microscopy in the study of keratinocytes, this study directly demonstrates the occurrence of desmoglein 3 molecules outside of desmosomes and reveales that the adhesive properties of these molecules do differ depending on their localization. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. DEVELOPMENT OF STRUCTURAL ADHESIVES,

    Science.gov (United States)

    Contents: (A) Structural adhesives for metals; development of better adhesives; development of heat resistance adhesives; development of room...temperature setting adhesives; recent investigations of metal-bonding adhesives; development of production processes and design criteria for metal adhesives... development of non-destructive inspection methods for adhesive bonded structures. (B) European papers; British developments in the field of

  14. Lateral adhesion drives reintegration of misplaced cells into epithelial monolayers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bergstralh, Dan T; Lovegrove, Holly E; St Johnston, Daniel

    2015-11-01

    Cells in simple epithelia orient their mitotic spindles in the plane of the epithelium so that both daughter cells are born within the epithelial sheet. This is assumed to be important to maintain epithelial integrity and prevent hyperplasia, because misaligned divisions give rise to cells outside the epithelium. Here we test this assumption in three types of Drosophila epithelium; the cuboidal follicle epithelium, the columnar early embryonic ectoderm, and the pseudostratified neuroepithelium. Ectopic expression of Inscuteable in these tissues reorients mitotic spindles, resulting in one daughter cell being born outside the epithelial layer. Live imaging reveals that these misplaced cells reintegrate into the tissue. Reducing the levels of the lateral homophilic adhesion molecules Neuroglian or Fasciclin 2 disrupts reintegration, giving rise to extra-epithelial cells, whereas disruption of adherens junctions has no effect. Thus, the reinsertion of misplaced cells seems to be driven by lateral adhesion, which pulls cells born outside the epithelial layer back into it. Our findings reveal a robust mechanism that protects epithelia against the consequences of misoriented divisions.

  15. CD15s/CD62E Interaction Mediates the Adhesion of Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer Cells on Brain Endothelial Cells: Implications for Cerebral Metastasis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jassam, Samah A.; Maherally, Zaynah; Ashkan, Keyoumars; Roncaroli, Federico; Fillmore, Helen L.; Pilkington, Geoffrey J.

    2017-01-01

    Expression of the cell adhesion molecule (CAM), Sialyl Lewis X (CD15s) correlates with cancer metastasis, while expression of E-selectin (CD62E) is stimulated by TNF-α. CD15s/CD62E interaction plays a key role in the homing process of circulating leukocytes. We investigated the heterophilic interaction of CD15s and CD62E in brain metastasis-related cancer cell adhesion. CD15s and CD62E were characterised in human brain endothelium (hCMEC/D3), primary non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) (COR-L105 and A549) and metastatic NSCLC (SEBTA-001 and NCI-H1299) using immunocytochemistry, Western blotting, flow cytometry and immunohistochemistry in human brain tissue sections. TNF-α (25 pg/mL) stimulated extracellular expression of CD62E while adhesion assays, under both static and physiological flow live-cell conditions, explored the effect of CD15s-mAb immunoblocking on adhesion of cancer cell–brain endothelium. CD15s was faintly expressed on hCMEC/D3, while high levels were observed on primary NSCLC cells with expression highest on metastatic NSCLC cells (p cells activated with TNF-α, with lower levels on primary and metastatic NSCLC cells. CD15s and CD62E were expressed on lung metastatic brain biopsies. CD15s/CD62E interaction was localised at adhesion sites of cancer cell–brain endothelium. CD15s immunoblocking significantly decreased cancer cell adhesion to brain endothelium under static and shear stress conditions (p brain metastasis. PMID:28698503

  16. A peptide mimetic targeting trans-homophilic NCAM binding sites promotes spatial learning and neural plasticity in the hippocampus

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kraev, Igor; Henneberger, Christian; Rossetti, Clara

    2011-01-01

    cultures and improves spatial learning in rats, both under basal conditions and under conditions involving a deficit in a key plasticity-promoting posttranslational modification of NCAM, its polysialylation. We also found that plannexin enhances excitatory synaptic transmission in hippocampal area CA1......, where it also increases the number of mushroom spines and the synaptic expression of the AMPAR subunits GluA1 and GluA2. Altogether, these findings provide compelling evidence that plannexin is an important facilitator of synaptic functional, structural and molecular plasticity in the hippocampal CA1......The key roles played by the neural cell adhesion molecule (NCAM) in plasticity and cognition underscore this membrane protein as a relevant target to develop cognitive-enhancing drugs. However, NCAM is a structurally and functionally complex molecule with multiple domains engaged in a variety...

  17. Adhesive plasters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holcombe, Jr., Cressie E.; Swain, Ronald L.; Banker, John G.; Edwards, Charlene C.

    1978-01-01

    Adhesive plaster compositions are provided by treating particles of Y.sub.2 O.sub.3, Eu.sub.2 O.sub.3, Gd.sub.2 O.sub.3 or Nd.sub.2 O.sub.3 with dilute acid solutions. The resulting compositions have been found to spontaneously harden into rigid reticulated masses resembling plaster of Paris. Upon heating, the hardened material is decomposed into the oxide, yet retains the reticulated rigid structure.

  18. Proteomic dataset of the sea urchin Paracentrotus lividus adhesive organs and secreted adhesive

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nicolas Lebesgue

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Sea urchins have specialized adhesive organs called tube feet, which mediate strong but reversible adhesion. Tube feet are composed by a disc, producing adhesive and de-adhesive secretions for substratum attachment, and a stem for movement. After detachment the secreted adhesive remains bound to the substratum as a footprint. Recently, a label-free quantitative proteomic approach coupled with the latest mass-spectrometry technology was used to analyze the differential proteome of Paracentrotus lividus adhesive organ, comparing protein expression levels in the tube feet adhesive part (the disc versus the non-adhesive part (the stem, and also to profile the proteome of the secreted adhesive (glue. This data article contains complementary figures and results related to the research article “Deciphering the molecular mechanisms underlying sea urchin reversible adhesion: a quantitative proteomics approach” (Lebesgue et al., 2016 [1]. Here we provide a dataset of 1384 non-redundant proteins, their fragmented peptides and expression levels, resultant from the analysis of the tube feet differential proteome. Of these, 163 highly over-expressed tube feet disc proteins (>3-fold, likely representing the most relevant proteins for sea urchin reversible adhesion, were further annotated in order to determine the potential functions. In addition, we provide a dataset of 611 non-redundant proteins identified in the secreted adhesive proteome, as well as their functional annotation and grouping in 5 major protein groups related with adhesive exocytosis, and microbial protection. This list was further analyzed to identify the most abundant protein groups and pinpoint putative adhesive proteins, such as Nectin, the most abundant adhesive protein in sea urchin glue. The obtained data uncover the key proteins involved in sea urchins reversible adhesion, representing a step forward to the development of new wet-effective bio-inspired adhesives.

  19. Proteomic dataset of the sea urchin Paracentrotus lividus adhesive organs and secreted adhesive.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lebesgue, Nicolas; da Costa, Gonçalo; Ribeiro, Raquel Mesquita; Ribeiro-Silva, Cristina; Martins, Gabriel G; Matranga, Valeria; Scholten, Arjen; Cordeiro, Carlos; Heck, Albert J R; Santos, Romana

    2016-06-01

    Sea urchins have specialized adhesive organs called tube feet, which mediate strong but reversible adhesion. Tube feet are composed by a disc, producing adhesive and de-adhesive secretions for substratum attachment, and a stem for movement. After detachment the secreted adhesive remains bound to the substratum as a footprint. Recently, a label-free quantitative proteomic approach coupled with the latest mass-spectrometry technology was used to analyze the differential proteome of Paracentrotus lividus adhesive organ, comparing protein expression levels in the tube feet adhesive part (the disc) versus the non-adhesive part (the stem), and also to profile the proteome of the secreted adhesive (glue). This data article contains complementary figures and results related to the research article "Deciphering the molecular mechanisms underlying sea urchin reversible adhesion: a quantitative proteomics approach" (Lebesgue et al., 2016) [1]. Here we provide a dataset of 1384 non-redundant proteins, their fragmented peptides and expression levels, resultant from the analysis of the tube feet differential proteome. Of these, 163 highly over-expressed tube feet disc proteins (>3-fold), likely representing the most relevant proteins for sea urchin reversible adhesion, were further annotated in order to determine the potential functions. In addition, we provide a dataset of 611 non-redundant proteins identified in the secreted adhesive proteome, as well as their functional annotation and grouping in 5 major protein groups related with adhesive exocytosis, and microbial protection. This list was further analyzed to identify the most abundant protein groups and pinpoint putative adhesive proteins, such as Nectin, the most abundant adhesive protein in sea urchin glue. The obtained data uncover the key proteins involved in sea urchins reversible adhesion, representing a step forward to the development of new wet-effective bio-inspired adhesives.

  20. CD151 supports VCAM-1-mediated lymphocyte adhesion to liver endothelium and is upregulated in chronic liver disease and hepatocellular carcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wadkin, James C R; Patten, Daniel A; Kamarajah, Sivesh K; Shepherd, Emma L; Novitskaya, Vera; Berditchevski, Fedor; Adams, David H; Weston, Chris J; Shetty, Shishir

    2017-08-01

    CD151, a member of the tetraspanin family of receptors, is a lateral organizer and modulator of activity of several families of transmembrane proteins. It has been implicated in the development and progression of several cancers, but its role in chronic inflammatory disease is less well understood. Here we show that CD151 is upregulated by distinct microenvironmental signals in a range of chronic inflammatory liver diseases and in primary liver cancer, in which it supports lymphocyte recruitment. CD151 was highly expressed in endothelial cells of the hepatic sinusoids and neovessels developing in fibrotic septa and tumor margins. Primary cultures of human hepatic sinusoidal endothelial cells (HSECs) expressed CD151 at the cell membrane and in intracellular vesicles. CD151 was upregulated by VEGF and HepG2 conditioned media but not by proinflammatory cytokines. Confocal microscopy confirmed that CD151 colocalized with the endothelial adhesion molecule/immunoglobulin superfamily member, VCAM-1. Functional flow-based adhesion assays with primary human lymphocytes and HSECs demonstrated a 40% reduction of lymphocyte adhesion with CD151 blockade. Inhibition of lymphocyte adhesion was similar between VCAM-1 blockade and a combination of CD151/VCAM-1 blockade, suggesting a collaborative role between the two receptors. These studies demonstrate that CD151 is upregulated within the liver during chronic inflammation, where it supports lymphocyte recruitment via liver endothelium. We propose that CD151 regulates the activity of VCAM-1 during lymphocyte recruitment to the human liver and could be a novel anti-inflammatory target in chronic liver disease and hepatocellular cancer prevention. NEW & NOTEWORTHY Chronic hepatitis is characterized by lymphocyte accumulation in liver tissue, which drives fibrosis and carcinogenesis. Here, we demonstrate for the first time that the tetraspanin CD151 supports lymphocyte adhesion to liver endothelium. We show that CD151 is upregulated

  1. MiR-9-5p, miR-675-5p and miR-138-5p Damages the Strontium and LRP5-Mediated Skeletal Cell Proliferation, Differentiation, and Adhesion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Tianhao; Leung, Frankie; Lu, William W

    2016-02-15

    This study was designed to evaluate the effects of strontium on the expression levels of microRNAs (miRNAs) and to explore their effects on skeletal cell proliferation, differentiation, adhesion, and apoptosis. The targets of these miRNAs were also studied. Molecular cloning, cell proliferation assay, cell apoptosis assay, quantitative real-time PCR, and luciferase reporter assay were used. Strontium altered the expression levels of miRNAs in vitro and in vivo. miR-9-5p, miR-675-5p, and miR-138-5p impaired skeletal cell proliferation, cell differentiation and cell adhesion. miR-9-5p and miR-675-5p induced MC3T3-E1 cell apoptosis more specifically than miR-138-5p. miR-9-5p, miR-675-5p, and miR-138-5p targeted glycogen synthase kinase 3 β (GSK3β), ATPase Aminophospholipid Transporter Class I Type 8A Member 2 (ATP8A2), and Eukaryotic Translation Initiation Factor 4E Binding Protein 1 (EIF4EBP1), respectively. Low-density lipoprotein receptor-related protein 5 (LRP5) played a positive role in skeletal development. miR-9-5p, miR-675-5p, and miR-138-5p damage strontium and LRP5-mediated skeletal cell proliferation, differentiation, and adhesion, and induce cell apoptosis by targeting GSK3β, ATP8A2, and EIF4EBP1, respectively.

  2. miR-9-5p, miR-675-5p and miR-138-5p Damages the Strontium and LRP5-Mediated Skeletal Cell Proliferation, Differentiation, and Adhesion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tianhao Sun

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available This study was designed to evaluate the effects of strontium on the expression levels of microRNAs (miRNAs and to explore their effects on skeletal cell proliferation, differentiation, adhesion, and apoptosis. The targets of these miRNAs were also studied. Molecular cloning, cell proliferation assay, cell apoptosis assay, quantitative real-time PCR, and luciferase reporter assay were used. Strontium altered the expression levels of miRNAs in vitro and in vivo. miR-9-5p, miR-675-5p, and miR-138-5p impaired skeletal cell proliferation, cell differentiation and cell adhesion. miR-9-5p and miR-675-5p induced MC3T3-E1 cell apoptosis more specifically than miR-138-5p. miR-9-5p, miR-675-5p, and miR-138-5p targeted glycogen synthase kinase 3 β (GSK3β, ATPase Aminophospholipid Transporter Class I Type 8A Member 2 (ATP8A2, and Eukaryotic Translation Initiation Factor 4E Binding Protein 1 (EIF4EBP1, respectively. Low-density lipoprotein receptor-related protein 5 (LRP5 played a positive role in skeletal development. miR-9-5p, miR-675-5p, and miR-138-5p damage strontium and LRP5-mediated skeletal cell proliferation, differentiation, and adhesion, and induce cell apoptosis by targeting GSK3β, ATP8A2, and EIF4EBP1, respectively.

  3. Alternagin-C, a disintegrin-like protein from the venom of Bothrops alternatus, modulates a2ß1 integrin-mediated cell adhesion, migration and proliferation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Selistre-de-Araujo H.S.

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available The alpha2ß1 integrin is a major collagen receptor that plays an essential role in the adhesion of normal and tumor cells to the extracellular matrix. Alternagin-C (ALT-C, a disintegrin-like protein purified from the venom of the Brazilian snake Bothrops alternatus, competitively interacts with the alpha2ß1 integrin, thereby inhibiting collagen binding. When immobilized in plate wells, ALT-C supports the adhesion of fibroblasts as well as of human vein endothelial cells (HUVEC and does not detach cells previously bound to collagen I. ALT-C is a strong inducer of HUVEC proliferation in vitro. Gene expression analysis was done using an Affimetrix HU-95A probe array with probe sets of ~10,000 human genes. In human fibroblasts growing on collagen-coated plates, ALT-C up-regulates the expression of several growth factors including vascular endothelial growth factor, as well as some cell cycle control genes. Up-regulation of the vascular endothelial growth factor gene and other growth factors could explain the positive effect on HUVEC proliferation. ALT-C also strongly activates protein kinase B phosphorylation, a signaling event involved in endothelial cell survival and angiogenesis. In human neutrophils, ALT-C has a potent chemotactic effect modulated by the intracellular signaling cascade characteristic of integrin-activated pathways. Thus, ALT-C acts as a survival factor, promoting adhesion, migration and endothelial cell proliferation after binding to alpha2ß1 integrin on the cell surface. The biological activities of ALT-C may be helpful as a therapeutic strategy in tissue regeneration as well as in the design of new therapeutic agents targeting alpha2ß1 integrin.

  4. The clinical and biological implications of the focal adhesion kinase pathway in ShenLingLan mediated suppression of cellular migration of ovarian cancer cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Owen S

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available The incidence of ovarian cancer in the UK has increased by almost twenty percent since the 1970’s and the majority of cases are not diagnosed until the late stages, when metastasis is more likely to have occurred. Focal Adhesion Kinase (FAK is one of the key protein complexes which is integral to cell migration and has been linked to a variety of solid tumours. ShenLingLan (SLDM is a traditional herbal medicine which has been formulated for the treatment of solid tumours. This study aimed to establish the impact of SLDM on FAK in ovarian cancer cells in vitro and transcript levels of FAK in an ovarian cancer cohort. FAK and paxillin phosphorylation events stimulated by SLDM treatment were identified using a Kinexus™ antibody based protein array. The impact of SLDM on cell attachment and migration was evaluated using Electric cell-substrate impedance sensing (ECIS, whilst the changes in focal adhesion complex localisation were assessed using immunofluorescence. In an ovarian cancer cohort, differences in FAK and paxillin transcript levels were assessed against key clinical parameters such as differentiation, stage and survival outcome. SLDM treatment of ovarian cancer cells in vitro resulted in the suppression of FAK and paxillin phosphorylation at several sites, which appeared to manifest as decreased cellular attachment and migration in a range of immortalised ovarian cancer cells. Increased FAK and paxillin transcript copies were observed in high grade and poorly differentiated ovarian tumours as well as in tumours from patients with ovarian cancer related incidence. SLDM has a profound effect on the migratory and adhesive properties of ovarian cancer cells, potentially via inhibitory effects on the activation of the FAK pathway, which is aberrant in clinical ovarian cancers.

  5. Adhesion and Cohesion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Anthony von Fraunhofer

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The phenomena of adhesion and cohesion are reviewed and discussed with particular reference to dentistry. This review considers the forces involved in cohesion and adhesion together with the mechanisms of adhesion and the underlying molecular processes involved in bonding of dissimilar materials. The forces involved in surface tension, surface wetting, chemical adhesion, dispersive adhesion, diffusive adhesion, and mechanical adhesion are reviewed in detail and examples relevant to adhesive dentistry and bonding are given. Substrate surface chemistry and its influence on adhesion, together with the properties of adhesive materials, are evaluated. The underlying mechanisms involved in adhesion failure are covered. The relevance of the adhesion zone and its importance with regard to adhesive dentistry and bonding to enamel and dentin is discussed.

  6. A novel co-drug of aspirin and ursolic acid interrupts adhesion, invasion and migration of cancer cells to vascular endothelium via regulating EMT and EGFR-mediated signaling pathways: multiple targets for cancer metastasis prevention and treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Qiao; Liu, Yajun; Li, Tao; Yang, Xiang; Zheng, Guirong; Chen, Hongning; Jia, Lee; Shao, Jingwei

    2016-11-08

    Metastasis currently remains the predominant cause of breast carcinoma treatment failure. The effective targeting of metastasis-related-pathways in cancer holds promise for a new generation of therapeutics. In this study, we developed an novel Asp-UA conjugate, which was composed of classical "old drug" aspirin and low toxicity natural product ursolic acid for targeting breast cancer metastasis. Our results showed that Asp-UA could attenuate the adhesion, migration and invasion of breast cancer MCF-7 and MDA-MB-231 cells in a more safe and effective manner in vitro. Molecular and cellular study demonstrated that Asp-UA significantly down-regulated the expression of cell adhesion and invasion molecules including integrin α6β1, CD44 ,MMP-2, MMP-9, COX-2, EGFR and ERK proteins, and up-regulated the epithelial markers "E-cadherin" and "β-catenin", and PTEN proteins. Furthermore, Asp-UA (80 mg/kg) reduced lung metastasis in a 4T1 murine breast cancer metastasis model more efficiently, which was associated with a decrease in the expression of CD44. More importantly, we did not detect side effects with Asp-UA in mice such as weight loss and main viscera tissues toxicity. Overall, our research suggested that co-drug Asp-UA possessed potential metastasis chemoprevention abilities via influencing EMT and EGFR-mediated pathways and could be a more promising drug candidate for the prevention and/or treatment of breast cancer metastasis.

  7. Deciphering the molecular mechanisms underlying sea urchin reversible adhesion : A quantitative proteomics approach

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lebesgue, Nicolas; da Costa, Gonçalo; Ribeiro, Raquel Mesquita; Ribeiro-Silva, Cristina; Martins, Gabriel G; Matranga, Valeria; Scholten, Arjen; Cordeiro, Carlos; Heck, Albert J R; Santos, Romana

    2016-01-01

    Marine bioadhesives have unmatched performances in wet environments, being an inspiration for biomedical applications. In sea urchins specialized adhesive organs, tube feet, mediate reversible adhesion, being composed by a disc, producing adhesive and de-adhesive secretions, and a motile stem. After

  8. NCAM-mimetic, FGL peptide, restores disrupted fibroblast growth factor receptor (FGFR) phosphorylation and FGFR mediated signaling in neural cell adhesion molecule (NCAM)-deficient mice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Aonurm-Helm, Anu; Berezin, Vladimir; Bock, Elisabeth

    2010-01-01

    ), a member of Src family of tyrosine kinases, Fyn and Raf1 kinase which all activate different intracellular signaling pathways. The objective was to clarify, which signaling pathways are being disrupted in NCAM knockout mice and whether FGL peptide is able to restore observed disruptions. Therefore we...... in all isoforms of NCAM have decreased basal phosphorylation levels of FGFR1 and CaMKII and CaMKIV. Furthermore, NCAM-mimetic, FGL peptide, is found to be able to restore FGFR1, CaMKII and CaMKIV phosphorylation levels and thereby mimic the interactions of NCAM at this receptor in NCAM deficient mice....... Also, we found that Fyn(Tyr530), Raf1, MAP kinases and Akt kinase phosphorylation in adult animals is not affected by NCAM deficiency but interestingly, we found an over-expression of another cell adhesion molecule L1. We conclude that in NCAM deficient mice FGFR1-dependent signaling is disrupted...

  9. Osthole Suppresses the Migratory Ability of Human Glioblastoma Multiforme Cells via Inhibition of Focal Adhesion Kinase-Mediated Matrix Metalloproteinase-13 Expression

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cheng-Fang Tsai

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Glioblastoma multiforme (GBM is the most common type of primary and malignant tumor occurring in the adult central nervous system. GBM often invades surrounding regions of the brain during its early stages, making successful treatment difficult. Osthole, an active constituent isolated from the dried C. monnieri fruit, has been shown to suppress tumor migration and invasion. However, the effects of osthole in human GBM are largely unknown. Focal adhesion kinase (FAK is important for the metastasis of cancer cells. Results from this study show that osthole can not only induce cell death but also inhibit phosphorylation of FAK in human GBM cells. Results from this study show that incubating GBM cells with osthole reduces matrix metalloproteinase (MMP-13 expression and cell motility, as assessed by cell transwell and wound healing assays. This study also provides evidence supporting the potential of osthole in reducing FAK activation, MMP-13 expression, and cell motility in human GBM cells.

  10. Regulation of cell adhesion by protein-tyrosine phosphatases: II. Cell-cell adhesion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sallee, Jennifer L; Wittchen, Erika S; Burridge, Keith

    2006-06-16

    Cell-cell adhesion is critical to the development and maintenance of multicellular organisms. The stability of many adhesions is regulated by protein tyrosine phosphorylation of cell adhesion molecules and their associated components, with high levels of phosphorylation promoting disassembly. The level of tyrosine phosphorylation reflects the balance between protein-tyrosine kinase and protein-tyrosine phosphatase activity. Many protein-tyrosine phosphatases associate with the cadherin-catenin complex, directly regulating the phosphorylation of these proteins, thereby affecting their interactions and the integrity of cell-cell junctions. Tyrosine phosphatases can also affect cell-cell adhesions indirectly by regulating the signaling pathways that control the activities of Rho family G proteins. In addition, receptor-type tyrosine phosphatases can mediate outside-in signaling through both ligand binding and dimerization of their extracellular domains. This review will discuss the role of protein-tyrosine phosphatases in cell-cell interactions, with an emphasis on cadherin-mediated adhesions.

  11. The metal ion-dependent adhesion site motif of the Enterococcus faecalis EbpA pilin mediates pilus function in catheter-associated urinary tract infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nielsen, Hailyn V; Guiton, Pascale S; Kline, Kimberly A; Port, Gary C; Pinkner, Jerome S; Neiers, Fabrice; Normark, Staffan; Henriques-Normark, Birgitta; Caparon, Michael G; Hultgren, Scott J

    2012-01-01

    Though the bacterial opportunist Enterococcus faecalis causes a myriad of hospital-acquired infections (HAIs), including catheter-associated urinary tract infections (CAUTIs), little is known about the virulence mechanisms that it employs. However, the endocarditis- and biofilm-associated pilus (Ebp), a member of the sortase-assembled pilus family, was shown to play a role in a mouse model of E. faecalis ascending UTI. The Ebp pilus comprises the major EbpC shaft subunit and the EbpA and EbpB minor subunits. We investigated the biogenesis and function of Ebp pili in an experimental model of CAUTI using a panel of chromosomal pilin deletion mutants. A nonpiliated pilus knockout mutant (EbpABC(-) strain) was severely attenuated compared to its isogenic parent OG1RF in experimental CAUTI. In contrast, a nonpiliated ebpC deletion mutant (EbpC(-) strain) behaved similarly to OG1RF in vivo because it expressed EbpA and EbpB. Deletion of the minor pilin gene ebpA or ebpB perturbed pilus biogenesis and led to defects in experimental CAUTI. We discovered that the function of Ebp pili in vivo depended on a predicted metal ion-dependent adhesion site (MIDAS) motif in EbpA's von Willebrand factor A domain, a common protein domain among the tip subunits of sortase-assembled pili. Thus, this study identified the Ebp pilus as a virulence factor in E. faecalis CAUTI and also defined the molecular basis of this function, critical knowledge for the rational development of targeted therapeutics. Catheter-associated urinary tract infections (CAUTIs), one of the most common hospital-acquired infections (HAIs), present considerable treatment challenges for physicians. Inherently resistant to several classes of antibiotics and with a propensity to acquire vancomycin resistance, enterococci are particularly worrisome etiologic agents of CAUTI. A detailed understanding of the molecular basis of Enterococcus faecalis pathogenesis in CAUTI is necessary for the development of preventative and

  12. Syndecans, signaling, and cell adhesion

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Couchman, J R; Woods, A

    1996-01-01

    Syndecans are transmembrane proteoglycans which can participate in diverse cell surface interactions, involving extracellular matrix macromolecules, growth factors, protease inhibitors, and even viral entry. Currently, all extracellular interactions are believed to be mediated by distinct...... structures within the heparan sulfate chains, leaving the roles of chondroitin sulfate chains and extracellular portion of the core proteins to be elucidated. Evidence that syndecans are a class of receptor involved in cell adhesion is mounting, and their small cytoplasmic domains may link...

  13. β-1 Integrin-Mediated Adhesion May Be Initiated by Multiple Incomplete Bonds, Thus Accounting for the Functional Importance of Receptor Clustering

    OpenAIRE

    Vitte, Joana; Benoliel, Anne-Marie; Eymeric, Philippe; Bongrand, Pierre; Pierres, Anne

    2004-01-01

    The regulation of cell integrin receptors involves modulation of membrane expression, shift between different affinity states, and topographical redistribution on the cell membrane. Here we attempted to assess quantitatively the functional importance of receptor clustering. We studied β-1 integrin-mediated attachment of THP-1 cells to fibronectin-coated surfaces under low shear flow. Cells displayed multiple binding events with a half-life of the order of 1 s. The duration of binding events a...

  14. Rosetting Plasmodium falciparum-infected erythrocytes bind to human brain microvascular endothelial cells in vitro, demonstrating a dual adhesion phenotype mediated by distinct P. falciparum erythrocyte membrane protein 1 domains.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adams, Yvonne; Kuhnrae, Pongsak; Higgins, Matthew K; Ghumra, Ashfaq; Rowe, J Alexandra

    2014-03-01

    Adhesion interactions between Plasmodium falciparum-infected erythrocytes (IE) and human cells underlie the pathology of severe malaria. IE cytoadhere to microvascular endothelium or form rosettes with uninfected erythrocytes to survive in vivo by sequestering IE in the microvasculature and avoiding splenic clearance mechanisms. Both rosetting and cytoadherence are mediated by the parasite-derived IE surface protein family Plasmodium falciparum erythrocyte membrane protein 1 (PfEMP1). Rosetting and cytoadherence have been widely studied as separate entities; however, the ability of rosetting P. falciparum strains to cytoadhere has received little attention. Here, we show that IE of the IT/R29 strain expressing a rosette-mediating PfEMP1 variant (IT4var09) cytoadhere in vitro to a human brain microvascular endothelial cell line (HBEC-5i). Cytoadherence was inhibited by heparin and by treatment of HBEC-5i with heparinase III, suggesting that the endothelial receptors for IE binding are heparan sulfate proteoglycans. Antibodies to the N-terminal regions of the IT4var09 PfEMP1 variant (NTS-DBL1α and DBL2γ domains) specifically inhibited and reversed cytoadherence down to low concentrations (experiments showed that the NTS-DBLα and DBL2γ domains bind strongly to heparin, with half-maximal binding at a concentration of ∼0.5 μM in both cases. Therefore, cytoadherence of IT/R29 IE is distinct from rosetting, which is primarily mediated by NTS-DBL1α interactions with complement receptor 1. These data show that IT4var09-expressing parasites are capable of dual interactions with both endothelial cells and uninfected erythrocytes via distinct receptor-ligand interactions.

  15. A small physiological electric field mediated responses of extravillous trophoblasts derived from HTR8/SVneo cells: involvement of activation of focal adhesion kinase signaling.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juan Zhang

    Full Text Available Moderate invasion of trophoblast cells into endometrium is essential for the placental development and normal pregnancy. Electric field (EF-induced effects on cellular behaviors have been observed in many cell types. This study was to investigate the effect of physiological direct current EF (dc EF on cellular responses such as elongation, orientation and motility of trophoblast cells. Immortalized first trimester extravillous trophoblast cells (HTR-8/SVneo were exposed to the dc EF at physiological magnitude. Cell images were recorded and analyzed by image analyzer. Cell lysates were used to detect protein expression by Western blot. Cultured in the dc EFs the cells showed elongation, orientation and enhanced migration rate compared with non-EF stimulated cells at field strengths of 100 mV/mm to 200 mV/mm. EF exposure increased focal adhesion kinase (FAK phosphorylation in a time-dependent manner and increased expression levels of MMP-2. Pharmacological inhibition of FAK impaired the EF-induced responses including motility and abrogated the elevation of MMP-2 expression. However, the expression levels of integrins like integrin α1, α5, αV and β1 were not affected by EF stimulation. Our results demonstrate the importance of FAK activation in migration/motility of trophobalst cells driven by EFs. In addition, it raises the feasibility of using applied EFs to promote placentation through effects on trophoblast cells.

  16. Adhesion in microelectronics

    CERN Document Server

    Mittal, K L

    2014-01-01

    This comprehensive book will provide both fundamental and applied aspects of adhesion pertaining to microelectronics in a single and easily accessible source. Among the topics to be covered include; Various theories or mechanisms of adhesionSurface (physical or chemical) characterization of materials as it pertains to adhesionSurface cleaning as it pertains to adhesionWays to improve adhesionUnraveling of interfacial interactions using an array of pertinent techniquesCharacterization of interfaces / interphasesPolymer-polymer adhesionMetal-polymer adhesion  (metallized polymers)Polymer adhesi

  17. The Structure of Treponema pallidum Tp0751 (Pallilysin) Reveals a Non-canonical Lipocalin Fold That Mediates Adhesion to Extracellular Matrix Components and Interactions with Host Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parker, Michelle L; Houston, Simon; Pětrošová, Helena; Lithgow, Karen V; Hof, Rebecca; Wetherell, Charmaine; Kao, Wei-Chien; Lin, Yi-Pin; Moriarty, Tara J; Ebady, Rhodaba; Cameron, Caroline E; Boulanger, Martin J

    2016-09-01

    Syphilis is a chronic disease caused by the bacterium Treponema pallidum subsp. pallidum. Treponema pallidum disseminates widely throughout the host and extravasates from the vasculature, a process that is at least partially dependent upon the ability of T. pallidum to interact with host extracellular matrix (ECM) components. Defining the molecular basis for the interaction between T. pallidum and the host is complicated by the intractability of T. pallidum to in vitro culturing and genetic manipulation. Correspondingly, few T. pallidum proteins have been identified that interact directly with host components. Of these, Tp0751 (also known as pallilysin) displays a propensity to interact with the ECM, although the underlying mechanism of these interactions remains unknown. Towards establishing the molecular mechanism of Tp0751-host ECM attachment, we first determined the crystal structure of Tp0751 to a resolution of 2.15 Å using selenomethionine phasing. Structural analysis revealed an eight-stranded beta-barrel with a profile of short conserved regions consistent with a non-canonical lipocalin fold. Using a library of native and scrambled peptides representing the full Tp0751 sequence, we next identified a subset of peptides that showed statistically significant and dose-dependent interactions with the ECM components fibrinogen, fibronectin, collagen I, and collagen IV. Intriguingly, each ECM-interacting peptide mapped to the lipocalin domain. To assess the potential of these ECM-coordinating peptides to inhibit adhesion of bacteria to host cells, we engineered an adherence-deficient strain of the spirochete Borrelia burgdorferi to heterologously express Tp0751. This engineered strain displayed Tp0751 on its surface and exhibited a Tp0751-dependent gain-of-function in adhering to human umbilical vein endothelial cells that was inhibited in the presence of one of the ECM-interacting peptides (p10). Overall, these data provide the first structural insight into the

  18. The Neural Cell Adhesion Molecule NCAM2/OCAM/RNCAM, a Close Relative to NCAM

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kulahin, Nikolaj; Walmod, Peter

    2008-01-01

    and plasticity of synapses. NCAM shares an overall sequence identity of approximately 44% with the neural cell adhesion molecule 2 (NCAM2), a protein also known as olfactory cell adhesion molecule (OCAM) and Rb-8 neural cell adhesion molecule (RNCAM), and the region-for-region sequence homology between the two......Cell adhesion molecules (CAMs) constitute a large class of plasma membrane-anchored proteins that mediate attachment between neighboring cells and between cells and the surrounding extracellular matrix (ECM). However, CAMs are more than simple mediators of cell adhesion. The neural cell adhesion...

  19. Focal adhesion kinase (FAK mediates the induction of pro-oncogenic and fibrogenic phenotypes in hepatitis C virus (HCV-infected cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anna Alisi

    Full Text Available Hepatitis C Virus (HCV infection is one of the most common etiological factors involved in fibrosis development and its progression to hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC. The pivotal role of hepatic stellate cells (HCSs and extracellular matrix (ECM in fibrogenesis is now certainly accepted, while the network of molecular interactions connecting HCV is emerging as a master regulator of several biological processes including proliferation, inflammation, cytoskeleton and ECM remodeling. In this study, the effects of HCV proteins expression on liver cancer cells, both pro-invasive and pro-fibrogenic phenotypes were explored. As a model of HCV infection, we used permissive Huh7.5.1 hepatoma cells infected with JFH1-derived ccHCV. Conditioned medium from these cells was used to stimulate LX-2 cells, a line of HSCs. We found that the HCV infection of Huh7.5.1 cells decreased adhesion, increased migration and caused the delocalization of alpha-actinin from plasma membrane to cytoplasm and increased expression levels of paxillin. The treatment of LX-2 cells, with conditioned medium from HCV-infected Huh7.5.1 cells, caused an increase in cell proliferation, expression of alpha-smooth muscle actin, hyaluronic acid release and apoptosis rate measured as cleaved poly ADP-ribose polymerase (PARP. These effects were accompanied in Huh7.5.1 cells by an HCV-dependent increasing of FAK activation that physically interacts with phosphorylated paxillin and alpha-actinin, and a rising of tumor necrosis factor alpha production/release. Silencing of FAK by siRNA reverted all effects of HCV infection, both those directed on Huh7.5.1 cells, and those indirect effects on the LX-2 cells. Moreover and interestingly, FAK inhibition enhances apoptosis in HCV-conditioned LX-2 cells. In conclusion, our findings demonstrate that HCV, through FAK activation, may promote cytoskeletal reorganization and a pro-oncogenic phenotype in hepatocyte-like cells, and a fibrogenic phenotype in

  20. Understanding Marine Mussel Adhesion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    H. G. Silverman; F. F. Roberto

    2007-12-01

    In addition to identifying the proteins that have a role in underwater adhesion by marine mussels, research efforts have focused on identifying the genes responsible for the adhesive proteins, environmental factors that may influence protein production, and strategies for producing natural adhesives similar to the native mussel adhesive proteins. The production-scale availability of recombinant mussel adhesive proteins will enable researchers to formulate adhesives that are waterimpervious and ecologically safe and can bind materials ranging from glass, plastics, metals, and wood to materials, such as bone or teeth, biological organisms, and other chemicals or molecules. Unfortunately, as of yet scientists have been unable to duplicate the processes that marine mussels use to create adhesive structures. This study provides a background on adhesive proteins identified in the blue mussel, Mytilus edulis, and introduces our research interests and discusses the future for continued research related to mussel adhesion.

  1. Down syndrome cell adhesion molecule (DSCAM) associates with uncoordinated-5C (UNC5C) in netrin-1-mediated growth cone collapse.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Purohit, Anish A; Li, Weiquan; Qu, Chao; Dwyer, Trisha; Shao, Qiangqiang; Guan, Kun-Liang; Liu, Guofa

    2012-08-03

    In the developing nervous system, neuronal growth cones explore the extracellular environment for guidance cues, which can guide them along specific trajectories toward their targets. Netrin-1, a bifunctional guidance cue, binds to deleted in colorectal cancer (DCC) and DSCAM mediating axon attraction, and UNC5 mediating axon repulsion. Here, we show that DSCAM interacts with UNC5C and this interaction is stimulated by netrin-1 in primary cortical neurons and postnatal cerebellar granule cells. DSCAM partially co-localized with UNC5C in primary neurons and brain tissues. Netrin-1 induces axon growth cone collapse of mouse cerebellum external granule layer (EGL) cells, and the knockdown of DSCAM or UNC5C by specific shRNAs or blocking their signaling by overexpressing dominant negative mutants suppresses netrin-1-induced growth cone collapse. Similarly, the simultaneous knockdown of DSCAM and UNC5C also blocks netrin-1-induced growth cone collapse in EGL cells. Netrin-1 increases tyrosine phosphorylation of endogenous DSCAM, UNC5C, FAK, Fyn, and PAK1, and promotes complex formation of DSCAM with these signaling molecules in primary postnatal cerebellar neurons. Inhibition of Src family kinases efficiently reduces the interaction of DSCAM with UNC5C, FAK, Fyn, and PAK1 and tyrosine phosphorylation of these proteins as well as growth cone collapse of mouse EGL cells induced by netrin-1. The knockdown of DSCAM inhibits netrin-induced tyrosine phosphorylation of UNC5C and Fyn as well as the interaction of UNC5C with Fyn. The double knockdown of both receptors abolishes the induction of Fyn tyrosine phosphorylation by netrin-1. Our study reveals the first evidence that DSCAM coordinates with UNC5C in netrin-1 repulsion.

  2. A rhamnose-rich O-antigen mediates adhesion, virulence, and host colonization for the xylem-limited phytopathogen Xylella fastidiosa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clifford, Jennifer C; Rapicavoli, Jeannette N; Roper, M Caroline

    2013-06-01

    Xylella fastidiosa is a gram-negative, xylem-limited bacterium that causes a lethal disease of grapevine called Pierce's disease. Lipopolysaccharide (LPS) composes approximately 75% of the outer membrane of gram-negative bacteria and, because it is largely displayed on the cell surface, it mediates interactions between the bacterial cell and its surrounding environment. LPS is composed of a conserved lipid A-core oligosaccharide component and a variable O-antigen portion. By targeting a key O-antigen biosynthetic gene, we demonstrate the contribution of the rhamnose-rich O-antigen to surface attachment, cell-cell aggregation, and biofilm maturation: critical steps for successful infection of the host xylem tissue. Moreover, we have demonstrated that a fully formed O-antigen moiety is an important virulence factor for Pierce's disease development in grape and that depletion of the O-antigen compromises its ability to colonize the host. It has long been speculated that cell-surface polysaccharides play a role in X. fastidiosa virulence and this study confirms that LPS is a major virulence factor for this important agricultural pathogen.

  3. Integrin αMβ2 is differently expressed by subsets of human osteoclast precursors and mediates adhesion of classical monocytes to bone

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sprangers, Sara, E-mail: s.l.sprangers@acta.nl [Department of Oral Cell Biology and Functional Anatomy, Academic Centre for Dentistry Amsterdam (ACTA), University of Amsterdam and VU University Amsterdam, MOVE Research Institute Amsterdam, Gustav Mahlerlaan 3004, 1081 LA Amsterdam The Netherlands (Netherlands); Schoenmaker, Ton, E-mail: t.schoenmaker@acta.nl [Department of Oral Cell Biology and Functional Anatomy, Academic Centre for Dentistry Amsterdam (ACTA), University of Amsterdam and VU University Amsterdam, MOVE Research Institute Amsterdam, Gustav Mahlerlaan 3004, 1081 LA Amsterdam The Netherlands (Netherlands); Department of Periodontology, Academic Centre for Dentistry Amsterdam (ACTA), University of Amsterdam and VU University Amsterdam, MOVE Research Institute Amsterdam, Gustav Mahlerlaan 3004, 1081 LA Amsterdam The Netherlands (Netherlands); Cao, Yixuan, E-mail: y.cao@acta.nl [Department of Oral Cell Biology and Functional Anatomy, Academic Centre for Dentistry Amsterdam (ACTA), University of Amsterdam and VU University Amsterdam, MOVE Research Institute Amsterdam, Gustav Mahlerlaan 3004, 1081 LA Amsterdam The Netherlands (Netherlands); Everts, Vincent, E-mail: v.everts@acta.nl [Department of Oral Cell Biology and Functional Anatomy, Academic Centre for Dentistry Amsterdam (ACTA), University of Amsterdam and VU University Amsterdam, MOVE Research Institute Amsterdam, Gustav Mahlerlaan 3004, 1081 LA Amsterdam The Netherlands (Netherlands); Vries, Teun J. de, E-mail: teun.devries@acta.nl [Department of Oral Cell Biology and Functional Anatomy, Academic Centre for Dentistry Amsterdam (ACTA), University of Amsterdam and VU University Amsterdam, MOVE Research Institute Amsterdam, Gustav Mahlerlaan 3004, 1081 LA Amsterdam The Netherlands (Netherlands); Department of Periodontology, Academic Centre for Dentistry Amsterdam (ACTA), University of Amsterdam and VU University Amsterdam, MOVE Research Institute Amsterdam, Gustav Mahlerlaan 3004, 1081 LA Amsterdam The Netherlands (Netherlands)

    2017-01-01

    Bone-degrading osteoclasts are formed through fusion of their monocytic precursors. In the population of human peripheral blood monocytes, three distinct subsets have been identified: classical, intermediate and non-classical monocytes. We have previously shown that when the monocyte subsets are cultured on bone, significantly more osteoclasts are formed from classical monocytes than from intermediate or non-classical monocytes. Considering that this difference does not exist when monocyte subsets are cultured on plastic, we hypothesized that classical monocytes adhere better to the bone surface compared to intermediate and non-classical monocytes. To investigate this, the different monocyte subsets were isolated from human peripheral blood and cultured on slices of human bone in the presence of the cytokine M-CSF. We found that classical monocytes adhere better to bone due to a higher expression of the integrin αMβ2 and that their ability to attach to bone is significantly decreased when the integrin is blocked. This suggests that integrin αMβ2 mediates attachment of osteoclast precursors to bone and thereby enables the formation of osteoclasts.

  4. SC1, an immunoglobulin-superfamily cell adhesion molecule, is involved in the brain metastatic activity of lung cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kubota, Yuka; Kirimura, Naoki; Shiba, Hatsuki; Adachi, Kazuhide; Tsukamoto, Yasuhiro

    2015-10-01

    SC1 is a cell adhesion molecule that belongs to the immunoglobulin superfamily; this molecule was initially purified from the chick embryonic nervous system and was reported to exhibit homophilic adhesion activity. SC1 is transiently expressed in various organs during development and has been identified in numerous neoplastic tissues, including lung cancer and colorectal carcinomas. The present study focused on the encephalic metastasis of lung cancer cells with respect to the potential function of SC1, as this molecule is known to be consistently expressed in the central nervous system as well as lung cancers. SC1 complementary DNA was introduced into A549 cells, a human lung cancer-derived cell line. The stable overexpression of the SC1 protein in A549 cells was demonstrated to enhance the self-aggregation of the cells. In addition, the SC1 transfectants enhanced the metastatic and invasive potential to the encephalic parenchyma following implantation into nude mice. In conclusion, the results of the present study demonstrated that cell adhesion due interactions between SC1 on brain tissue and SC1 on lung cancer cells was involved in the malignant aspects of lung cancer, including invasion and metastasis to the brain.

  5. Chapter 9:Wood Adhesion and Adhesives

    Science.gov (United States)

    Charles R. Frihart

    2013-01-01

    The recorded history of bonding wood dates back at least 3000 years to the Egyptians (Skeist and Miron 1990, River 1994a), and adhesive bonding goes back to early mankind (Keimel 2003). Although wood and paper bonding are the largest applications for adhesives, some of the fundamental aspects leading to good bonds are not fully understood. Better understanding of these...

  6. Novel aspects in the regulation of the leukocyte adhesion cascade

    OpenAIRE

    Chavakis, Emmanouil; Choi, Eun Young; Chavakis, Triantafyllos

    2009-01-01

    Leukocyte recruitment plays a major role in the immune response to infectious pathogens and during inflammatory and autoimmune disorders. The process of leukocyte extravasation from the blood into the inflamed tissue requires a complex cascade of adhesive events between the leukocytes and the endothelium including leukocyte rolling, adhesion and transendothelial migration. Leukocyte-endothelial interactions are mediated by tightly regulated binding interactions between adhesion receptors on b...

  7. Microparticles Engineered to Highly Express Peroxisome Proliferator-Activated Receptor-γ Decreased Inflammatory Mediator Production and Increased Adhesion of Recipient Monocytes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sahler, Julie; Woeller, Collynn F.; Phipps, Richard P.

    2014-01-01

    mRNA levels of several genes including those under PPARγ control. Overall, the delivery of PPARγ from microparticles to human monocytes influenced gene expression, decreased inflammatory mediator production and increased monocyte adherence. These results support the concept that the composition of blood microparticles has a profound impact on the function of cells with which they interact, and likely plays a role in vascular inflammation. PMID:25426628

  8. Microparticles engineered to highly express peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-γ decreased inflammatory mediator production and increased adhesion of recipient monocytes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Julie Sahler

    also changed monocyte mRNA levels of several genes including those under PPARγ control. Overall, the delivery of PPARγ from microparticles to human monocytes influenced gene expression, decreased inflammatory mediator production and increased monocyte adherence. These results support the concept that the composition of blood microparticles has a profound impact on the function of cells with which they interact, and likely plays a role in vascular inflammation.

  9. PH dependent adhesive peptides

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tomich, John; Iwamoto, Takeo; Shen, Xinchun; Sun, Xiuzhi Susan

    2010-06-29

    A novel peptide adhesive motif is described that requires no receptor or cross-links to achieve maximal adhesive strength. Several peptides with different degrees of adhesive strength have been designed and synthesized using solid phase chemistries. All peptides contain a common hydrophobic core sequence flanked by positively or negatively charged amino acids sequences.

  10. Particle adhesion and removal

    CERN Document Server

    Mittal, K L

    2015-01-01

    The book provides a comprehensive and easily accessible reference source covering all important aspects of particle adhesion and removal.  The core objective is to cover both fundamental and applied aspects of particle adhesion and removal with emphasis on recent developments.  Among the topics to be covered include: 1. Fundamentals of surface forces in particle adhesion and removal.2. Mechanisms of particle adhesion and removal.3. Experimental methods (e.g. AFM, SFA,SFM,IFM, etc.) to understand  particle-particle and particle-substrate interactions.4. Mechanics of adhesion of micro- and  n

  11. Sundew adhesive: a naturally occurring hydrogel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Yujian; Wang, Yongzhong; Sun, Leming; Agrawal, Richa; Zhang, Mingjun

    2015-06-06

    Bioadhesives have drawn increasing interest in recent years, owing to their eco-friendly, biocompatible and biodegradable nature. As a typical bioadhesive, sticky exudate observed on the stalked glands of sundew plants aids in the capture of insects and this viscoelastic adhesive has triggered extensive interests in revealing the implied adhesion mechanisms. Despite the significant progress that has been made, the structural traits of the sundew adhesive, especially the morphological characteristics in nanoscale, which may give rise to the viscous and elastic properties of this mucilage, remain unclear. Here, we show that the sundew adhesive is a naturally occurring hydrogel, consisting of nano-network architectures assembled with polysaccharides. The assembly process of the polysaccharides in this hydrogel is proposed to be driven by electrostatic interactions mediated with divalent cations. Negatively charged nanoparticles, with an average diameter of 231.9 ± 14.8 nm, are also obtained from this hydrogel and these nanoparticles are presumed to exert vital roles in the assembly of the nano-networks. Further characterization via atomic force microscopy indicates that the stretching deformation of the sundew adhesive is associated with the flexibility of its fibrous architectures. It is also observed that the adhesion strength of the sundew adhesive is susceptible to low temperatures. Both elasticity and adhesion strength of the sundew adhesive reduce in response to lowering the ambient temperature. The feasibility of applying sundew adhesive for tissue engineering is subsequently explored in this study. Results show that the fibrous scaffolds obtained from sundew adhesive are capable of increasing the adhesion of multiple types of cells, including fibroblast cells and smooth muscle cells, a property that results from the enhanced adsorption of serum proteins. In addition, in light of the weak cytotoxic activity exhibited by these scaffolds towards a variety of

  12. The adhesive strength and initial viscosity of denture adhesives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Jian-Min; Hong, Guang; Dilinuer, Maimaitishawuti; Lin, Hong; Zheng, Gang; Wang, Xin-Zhi; Sasaki, Keiichi

    2014-11-01

    To examine the initial viscosity and adhesive strength of modern denture adhesives in vitro. Three cream-type denture adhesives (Poligrip S, Corect Cream, Liodent Cream; PGS, CRC, LDC) and three powder-type denture adhesives (Poligrip Powder, New Faston, Zanfton; PGP, FSN, ZFN) were used in this study. The initial viscosity was measured using a controlled-stress rheometer. The adhesive strength was measured according to ISO-10873 recommended procedures. All data were analyzed independently by one-way analysis of variance combined with a Student-Newman-Keuls multiple comparison test at a 5% level of significance. The initial viscosity of all the cream-type denture adhesives was lower than the powder-type adhesives. Before immersion in water, all the powder-type adhesives exhibited higher adhesive strength than the cream-type adhesives. However, the adhesive strength of cream-type denture adhesives increased significantly and exceeded the powder-type denture adhesives after immersion in water. For powder-type adhesives, the adhesive strength significantly decreased after immersion in water for 60 min, while the adhesive strength of the cream-type adhesives significantly decreased after immersion in water for 180 min. Cream-type denture adhesives have lower initial viscosity and higher adhesive strength than powder type adhesives, which may offer better manipulation properties and greater efficacy during application.

  13. Syndecan-4 and integrins: combinatorial signaling in cell adhesion

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Couchman, J R; Woods, A

    1999-01-01

    It is now becoming clear that additional transmembrane components can modify integrin-mediated adhesion. Syndecan-4 is a transmembrane heparan sulfate proteoglycan whose external glycosaminoglycan chains can bind extracellular matrix ligands and whose core protein cytoplasmic domain can signal...... during adhesion. Two papers in this issue of JCS demonstrate, through transfection studies, that syndecan-4 plays roles in the formation of focal adhesions and stress fibers. Overexpression of syndecan-4 increases focal adhesion formation, whereas a partially truncated core protein that lacks the binding...... site for protein kinase C(&agr;) and phosphatidylinositol 4, 5-bisphosphate acts as a dominant negative inhibitor of focal adhesion formation. Focal adhesion induction does not require interaction between heparan sulfate glycosaminoglycan and ligand but can occur when non-glycanated core protein...

  14. [Adhesion molecules and cancer].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pierres, A; Benoliel, A M; Bongrand, P

    1999-12-01

    This review was aimed at summarizing recent advances in the understanding of cell adhesion in order to discuss the possible relevance of new knowledge to the exploration of cancer patients and elaboration of therapeutic strategies. During the last 10 years, many adhesion molecules were identified, thus allowing to determine their tissue distribution and functional regulation. The concept of adhesiveness was refined. It is now well known that adhesive rate (i.e., the minimal contact time required for bond formation) and binding strength (i.e., the minimal force required to detach bound cells) are distinct parameters. They may be regulated independently, and influence the cell behavior in different ways. It is now possible to achieve accurate control of tumor cell adhesiveness, either by inhibiting an adhesive mechanism (through monoclonal antibodies, competitive ligands, or inhibition of receptor expression with antisense strategy or gene knock-out) or by promoting a binding mechanism (with receptor transfection or pro-inflammatory stimulation). Recent progress opens new possibilities for diagnosis and treatment. First, the interpretation of experimental data may be improved. Cell adhesive behavior is not entirely accounted for by the density of membrane adhesion receptors. Indeed, adhesion is influenced by receptor connection to the cytoskeleton and structure of the cell coat. An adhesion receptor may be anti-metastatic through an increase in tumor cohesion and cell differentiation, or pro-metastatic, through facilitation of cell migration towards a target tissue. New therapeutic strategies may include anti-adhesive procedure aimed at preventing metastasis formation. The potential importance of a better control of inflammatory processes is also emphasized in view of the influence of these processes on the expression of adhesion molecules.

  15. Molecular mechanisms of NCAM function

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hinsby, Anders M; Berezin, Vladimir; Bock, Elisabeth

    2004-01-01

    receptor that responds to both homophilic and heterophilic cues, as well as a mediator of cell-cell adhesion. This review describes NCAM function at the molecular level. We discuss recent models for extracellular ligand-interactions of NCAM, and the intracellular signaling cascade that follows to define...

  16. Reversible Thermoset Adhesives

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mac Murray, Benjamin C. (Inventor); Tong, Tat H. (Inventor); Hreha, Richard D. (Inventor)

    2016-01-01

    Embodiments of a reversible thermoset adhesive formed by incorporating thermally-reversible cross-linking units and a method for making the reversible thermoset adhesive are provided. One approach to formulating reversible thermoset adhesives includes incorporating dienes, such as furans, and dienophiles, such as maleimides, into a polymer network as reversible covalent cross-links using Diels Alder cross-link formation between the diene and dienophile. The chemical components may be selected based on their compatibility with adhesive chemistry as well as their ability to undergo controlled, reversible cross-linking chemistry.

  17. Adhesion at metal interfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Banerjea, Amitava; Ferrante, John; Smith, John R.

    1991-01-01

    A basic adhesion process is defined, the theory of the properties influencing metallic adhesion is outlined, and theoretical approaches to the interface problem are presented, with emphasis on first-principle calculations as well as jellium-model calculations. The computation of the energies of adhesion as a function of the interfacial separation is performed; fully three-dimensional calculations are presented, and universality in the shapes of the binding energy curves is considered. An embedded-atom method and equivalent-crystal theory are covered in the framework of issues involved in practical adhesion.

  18. Gecko adhesion: evolutionary nanotechnology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Autumn, Kellar; Gravish, Nick

    2008-05-13

    If geckos had not evolved, it is possible that humans would never have invented adhesive nanostructures. Geckos use millions of adhesive setae on their toes to climb vertical surfaces at speeds of over 1ms-1. Climbing presents a significant challenge for an adhesive in requiring both strong attachment and easy rapid removal. Conventional pressure-sensitive adhesives (PSAs) are either strong and difficult to remove (e.g. duct tape) or weak and easy to remove (e.g. sticky notes). The gecko adhesive differs dramatically from conventional adhesives. Conventional PSAs are soft viscoelastic polymers that degrade, foul, self-adhere and attach accidentally to inappropriate surfaces. In contrast, gecko toes bear angled arrays of branched, hair-like setae formed from stiff, hydrophobic keratin that act as a bed of angled springs with similar effective elastic modulus to that of PSAs. Setae are self-cleaning and maintain function for months during repeated use in dirty conditions. Setae are an anisotropic 'frictional adhesive' in that adhesion requires maintenance of a proximally directed shear load, enabling either a tough bond or spontaneous detachment. Gecko-like synthetic adhesives may become the glue of the future-and perhaps the screw of the future as well.

  19. [Blocking of carbohydrate adhesion. A new principle for therapy of many conditions?].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bryne, M; Asheim, H C; Giercksky, K E

    1995-06-20

    Cell adhesion is of fundamental biological importance. In this article we describe the therapeutic potential of blocking carbohydrate dependent adhesion. The animal studies are promising, and there is a realistic hope that "anti-adhesion" therapy for acute conditions like reperfusion injury and severe infections will be of clinical value. Treatment of more chronic diseases like rheumatoid arthritis and cancer by blocking carbohydrate mediated cell adhesion is theoretically possible, but probably more difficult.

  20. Integrin-mediated mechanotransduction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Zhiqi; Guo, Shengzhen S; Fässler, Reinhard

    2016-11-21

    Cells can detect and react to the biophysical properties of the extracellular environment through integrin-based adhesion sites and adapt to the extracellular milieu in a process called mechanotransduction. At these adhesion sites, integrins connect the extracellular matrix (ECM) with the F-actin cytoskeleton and transduce mechanical forces generated by the actin retrograde flow and myosin II to the ECM through mechanosensitive focal adhesion proteins that are collectively termed the "molecular clutch." The transmission of forces across integrin-based adhesions establishes a mechanical reciprocity between the viscoelasticity of the ECM and the cellular tension. During mechanotransduction, force allosterically alters the functions of mechanosensitive proteins within adhesions to elicit biochemical signals that regulate both rapid responses in cellular mechanics and long-term changes in gene expression. Integrin-mediated mechanotransduction plays important roles in development and tissue homeostasis, and its dysregulation is often associated with diseases. © 2016 Sun et al.

  1. Myoferlin depletion elevates focal adhesion kinase and paxillin phosphorylation and enhances cell-matrix adhesion in breast cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blackstone, B N; Li, R; Ackerman, W E; Ghadiali, S N; Powell, H M; Kniss, D A

    2015-04-15

    Breast cancer is the second leading cause of malignant death among women. A crucial feature of metastatic cancers is their propensity to lose adhesion to the underlying basement membrane as they transition to a motile phenotype and invade surrounding tissue. Attachment to the extracellular matrix is mediated by a complex of adhesion proteins, including integrins, signaling molecules, actin and actin-binding proteins, and scaffolding proteins. Focal adhesion kinase (FAK) is pivotal for the organization of focal contacts and maturation into focal adhesions, and disruption of this process is a hallmark of early cancer invasive potential. Our recent work has revealed that myoferlin (MYOF) mediates breast tumor cell motility and invasive phenotype. In this study we demonstrate that noninvasive breast cancer cell lines exhibit increased cell-substrate adhesion and that silencing of MYOF using RNAi in the highly invasive human breast cancer cell line MDA-MB-231 also enhances cell-substrate adhesion. In addition, we detected elevated tyrosine phosphorylation of FAK (FAK(Y397)) and paxillin (PAX(Y118)), markers of focal adhesion protein activation. Morphometric analysis of PAX expression revealed that RNAi-mediated depletion of MYOF resulted in larger, more elongated focal adhesions, in contrast to cells transduced with a control virus (MDA-231(LVC) cells), which exhibited smaller focal contacts. Finally, MYOF silencing in MDA-MB-231 cells exhibited a more elaborate ventral cytoskeletal structure near focal adhesions, typified by pronounced actin stress fibers. These data support the hypothesis that MYOF regulates cell adhesions and cell-substrate adhesion strength and may account for the high degree of motility in invasive breast cancer cells. Copyright © 2015 the American Physiological Society.

  2. Antiobesity Action of ACAM by Modulating the Dynamics of Cell Adhesion and Actin Polymerization in Adipocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murakami, Kazutoshi; Eguchi, Jun; Hida, Kazuyuki; Nakatsuka, Atsuko; Katayama, Akihiro; Sakurai, Miwa; Choshi, Haruki; Furutani, Masumi; Ogawa, Daisuke; Takei, Kohji; Otsuka, Fumio; Wada, Jun

    2016-05-01

    Coxsackie virus and adenovirus receptor-like membrane protein (CLMP) was identified as the tight junction-associated transmembrane protein of epithelial cells with homophilic binding activities. CLMP is also recognized as adipocyte adhesion molecule (ACAM), and it is upregulated in mature adipocytes in rodents and humans with obesity. Here, we present that aP2 promoter-driven ACAM transgenic mice are protected from obesity and diabetes with the prominent reduction of adipose tissue mass and smaller size of adipocytes. ACAM is abundantly expressed on plasma membrane of mature adipocytes and associated with formation of phalloidin-positive polymerized form of cortical actin (F-actin). By electron microscopy, the structure of zonula adherens with an intercellular space of ∼10-20 nm was observed with strict parallelism of the adjoining cell membranes over distances of 1-20 μm, where ACAM and γ-actin are abundantly expressed. The formation of zonula adherens may increase the mechanical strength, inhibit the adipocyte hypertrophy, and improve the insulin sensitivity. © 2016 by the American Diabetes Association. Readers may use this article as long as the work is properly cited, the use is educational and not for profit, and the work is not altered.

  3. Small Molecule Agonists of Cell Adhesion Molecule L1 Mimic L1 Functions In Vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kataria, Hardeep; Lutz, David; Chaudhary, Harshita; Schachner, Melitta; Loers, Gabriele

    2016-09-01

    Lack of permissive mechanisms and abundance of inhibitory molecules in the lesioned central nervous system of adult mammals contribute to the failure of functional recovery after injury, leading to severe disabilities in motor functions and pain. Peripheral nerve injury impairs motor, sensory, and autonomic functions, particularly in cases where nerve gaps are large and chronic nerve injury ensues. Previous studies have indicated that the neural cell adhesion molecule L1 constitutes a viable target to promote regeneration after acute injury. We screened libraries of known drugs for small molecule agonists of L1 and evaluated the effect of hit compounds in cell-based assays in vitro and in mice after femoral nerve and spinal cord injuries in vivo. We identified eight small molecule L1 agonists and showed in cell-based assays that they stimulate neuronal survival, neuronal migration, and neurite outgrowth and enhance Schwann cell proliferation and migration and myelination of neurons in an L1-dependent manner. In a femoral nerve injury mouse model, enhanced functional regeneration and remyelination after application of the L1 agonists were observed. In a spinal cord injury mouse model, L1 agonists improved recovery of motor functions, being paralleled by enhanced remyelination, neuronal survival, and monoaminergic innervation, reduced astrogliosis, and activation of microglia. Together, these findings suggest that application of small organic compounds that bind to L1 and stimulate the beneficial homophilic L1 functions may prove to be a valuable addition to treatments of nervous system injuries.

  4. Adhesive compositions and methods

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Allen, Scott D.; Sendijarevic, Vahid; O' Connor, James

    2017-12-05

    The present invention encompasses polyurethane adhesive compositions comprising aliphatic polycarbonate chains. In one aspect, the present invention encompasses polyurethane adhesives derived from aliphatic polycarbonate polyols and polyisocyanates wherein the polyol chains contain a primary repeating unit having a structure:. In another aspect, the invention provides articles comprising the inventive polyurethane compositions as well as methods of making such compositions.

  5. adhesive intestinal obstruction

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2006-06-01

    Jun 1, 2006 ... ABSTRACT. Background: Adhesions after abdominal and pelvic surgery are a major cause of intestinal obstruction in the western world and the pathology is steadily gaining prominence in our practice. Objective: To determine the magnitude of adhesive intestinal obstruction; to determine the types.

  6. Functionally Graded Adhesives

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-11-01

    commonly used fillers (6). Titanium dioxide is used to add pigment to an adhesive (7). Fumed silica is employed as a rheology modifier (8). The goal of...provide pigment , increase volume, lower cost, modify 2 strength, and alter adhesive properties (3). Calcium carbonate and talc are inexpensive

  7. Soy protein adhesives

    Science.gov (United States)

    Charles R. Frihart

    2010-01-01

    In the quest to manufacture and use building materials that are more environmentally friendly, soy adhesives can be an important component. Trees fix and store carbon dioxide in the atmosphere. After the trees are harvested, machinery converts the wood into strands, which are then bonded together with adhesives to form strandboard, used in constructing long-lasting...

  8. rFN/Cad-11-Modified Collagen Type II Biomimetic Interface Promotes the Adhesion and Chondrogenic Differentiation of Mesenchymal Stem Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Hongfeng; Zhang, Yuan; Li, Zhengsheng; Kang, Fei; Yang, Bo; Kang, Xia; Wen, Can; Yan, Yanfei; Jiang, Bo; Fan, Yujiang

    2013-01-01

    Properties of the cell-material interface are determining factors in the successful function of cells for cartilage tissue engineering. Currently, cell adhesion is commonly promoted through the use of polypeptides; however, due to their lack of complementary or modulatory domains, polypeptides must be modified to improve their ability to promote adhesion. In this study, we utilized the principle of matrix-based biomimetic modification and a recombinant protein, which spans fragments 7–10 of fibronectin module III (heterophilic motif ) and extracellular domains 1–2 of cadherin-11 (rFN/Cad-11) (homophilic motif ), to modify the interface of collagen type II (Col II) sponges. We showed that the designed material was able to stimulate cell proliferation and promote better chondrogenic differentiation of rabbit mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) in vitro than both the FN modified surfaces and the negative control. Further, the Col II/rFN/Cad-11-MSCs composite stimulated cartilage formation in vivo; the chondrogenic effect of Col II alone was much less significant. These results suggested that the rFN/Cad-11-modified collagen type II biomimetic interface has dual biological functions of promoting adhesion and stimulating chondrogenic differentiation. This substance, thus, may serve as an ideal scaffold material for cartilage tissue engineering, enhancing repair of injured cartilage in vivo. PMID:23919505

  9. Prevention of bacterial adhesion

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Klemm, Per; Vejborg, Rebecca Munk; Hancock, Viktoria

    2010-01-01

    Management of bacterial infections is becoming increasingly difficult due to the emergence and increasing prevalence of bacterial pathogens that are resistant to available antibiotics. Conventional antibiotics generally kill bacteria by interfering with vital cellular functions, an approach...... that imposes selection pressure for resistant bacteria. New approaches are urgently needed. Targeting bacterial virulence functions directly is an attractive alternative. An obvious target is bacterial adhesion. Bacterial adhesion to surfaces is the first step in colonization, invasion, and biofilm formation....... As such, adhesion represents the Achilles heel of crucial pathogenic functions. It follows that interference with adhesion can reduce bacterial virulence. Here, we illustrate this important topic with examples of techniques being developed that can inhibit bacterial adhesion. Some of these will become...

  10. Focal adhesion signaling and therapy resistance in cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eke, Iris; Cordes, Nils

    2015-04-01

    Interlocking gene mutations, epigenetic alterations and microenvironmental features perpetuate tumor development, growth, infiltration and spread. Consequently, intrinsic and acquired therapy resistance arises and presents one of the major goals to solve in oncologic research today. Among the myriad of microenvironmental factors impacting on cancer cell resistance, cell adhesion to the extracellular matrix (ECM) has recently been identified as key determinant. Despite the differentiation between cell adhesion-mediated drug resistance (CAMDR) and cell adhesion-mediated radioresistance (CAMRR), the underlying mechanisms share great overlap in integrin and focal adhesion hub signaling and differ further downstream in the complexity of signaling networks between tumor entities. Intriguingly, cell adhesion to ECM is per se also essential for cancer cells similar to their normal counterparts. However, based on the overexpression of focal adhesion hub signaling receptors and proteins and a distinct addiction to particular integrin receptors, targeting of focal adhesion proteins has been shown to potently sensitize cancer cells to different treatment regimes including radiotherapy, chemotherapy and novel molecular therapeutics. In this review, we will give insight into the role of integrins in carcinogenesis, tumor progression and metastasis. Additionally, literature and data about the function of focal adhesion molecules including integrins, integrin-associated proteins and growth factor receptors in tumor cell resistance to radio- and chemotherapy will be elucidated and discussed. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. The role of the focal adhesion protein PINCH1 for the radiosensitivity of adhesion and suspension cell cultures.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Veit Sandfort

    Full Text Available Focal adhesion (FA signaling mediated by adhesion to extracellular matrix and growth factor receptors contributes to the regulation of the cellular stress response to external stimuli. Critical to focal adhesion assembly and signaling is the adapter protein PINCH1. To evaluate whether the prosurvival function of PINCH1 in radiation cell survival depends on cell adhesion, we examined PINCH1(fl/fl and PINCH1(-/- mouse embryonic fibroblasts and human cancer cell lines. Here, we found that the enhanced cellular radiosensitivity mediated by PINCH1 depletion observed under adhesion conditions is conserved when cells are irradiated under suspension conditions. This unsuspected finding could not be explained by the observed modification of adhesion and growth factor associated signaling involving FAK, Paxillin, p130(CAS, Src, AKT, GSK3β and ERK1/2 under suspension and serum withdrawal relative to adhesion conditions with serum. Our data suggest that the adapter protein PINCH1 critically participates in the regulation of the cellular radiosensitivity of normal and malignant cells similarly under adhesion and suspension conditions.

  12. Mussel adhesion - essential footwork.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waite, J Herbert

    2017-02-15

    Robust adhesion to wet, salt-encrusted, corroded and slimy surfaces has been an essential adaptation in the life histories of sessile marine organisms for hundreds of millions of years, but it remains a major impasse for technology. Mussel adhesion has served as one of many model systems providing a fundamental understanding of what is required for attachment to wet surfaces. Most polymer engineers have focused on the use of 3,4-dihydroxyphenyl-l-alanine (Dopa), a peculiar but abundant catecholic amino acid in mussel adhesive proteins. The premise of this Review is that although Dopa does have the potential for diverse cohesive and adhesive interactions, these will be difficult to achieve in synthetic homologs without a deeper knowledge of mussel biology; that is, how, at different length and time scales, mussels regulate the reactivity of their adhesive proteins. To deposit adhesive proteins onto target surfaces, the mussel foot creates an insulated reaction chamber with extreme reaction conditions such as low pH, low ionic strength and high reducing poise. These conditions enable adhesive proteins to undergo controlled fluid-fluid phase separation, surface adsorption and spreading, microstructure formation and, finally, solidification. © 2017. Published by The Company of Biologists Ltd.

  13. Handbook of adhesion

    CERN Document Server

    Packham, D E

    2006-01-01

    This second edition of the successful Handbook of Adhesion provides concise and authoritative articles covering many aspects of the science and technology associated with adhesion and adhesives. It is intended to fill a gap between the necessarily simplified treatment of the student textbook and the full and thorough treatment of the research monograph and review article. The articles are structured in such a way, with internal cross-referencing and external literature references, that the reader can build up a broader and deeper understanding, as their needs require.This second edition includ

  14. Heparin-binding EGF-like growth factor (HB-EGF) promotes cell migration and adhesion via focal adhesion kinase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Su, Yanwei; Besner, Gail E

    2014-06-15

    Cell migration and adhesion are essential in intestinal epithelial wound healing and recovery from injury. Focal adhesion kinase (FAK) plays an important role in cell-extracellular matrix signal transduction. We have previously shown that heparin-binding EGF-like growth factor (HB-EGF) promotes intestinal epithelial cell (IEC) migration and adhesion in vitro. The present study was designed to determine whether FAK is involved in HB-EGF-induced IEC migration and adhesion. A scrape wound healing model of rat IECs was used to examine the effect of HB-EGF on FAK-dependent cell migration in vitro. Immunofluorescence and Western blot analyses were performed to evaluate the effect of HB-EGF on the expression of phosphorylated FAK (p-FAK). Cell adhesion assays were performed to determine the role of FAK in HB-EGF-induced cell adhesion on fibronectin (FN). HB-EGF significantly increased healing after scrape wounding, an effect that was reversed in the presence of an FAK inhibitor 14 (both with P HB-EGF increased p-FAK expression and induced p-FAK redistribution and actin reorganization in migrating rat IECs. Cell adhesion and spreading on FN were significantly increased by HB-EGF (P HB-EGF-induced cell adhesion and spreading on FN (both with P HB-EGF-mediated IEC migration and adhesion. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Adhesion of Lunar Dust

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walton, Otis R.

    2007-01-01

    This paper reviews the physical characteristics of lunar dust and the effects of various fundamental forces acting on dust particles on surfaces in a lunar environment. There are transport forces and adhesion forces after contact. Mechanical forces (i.e., from rover wheels, astronaut boots and rocket engine blast) and static electric effects (from UV photo-ionization and/or tribo-electric charging) are likely to be the major contributors to the transport of dust particles. If fine regolith particles are deposited on a surface, then surface energy-related (e.g., van der Walls) adhesion forces and static-electric-image forces are likely to be the strongest contributors to adhesion. Some measurement techniques are offered to quantify the strength of adhesion forces. And finally some dust removal techniques are discussed.

  16. Bioinspired pressure actuated adhesive system

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Paretkar, D.R.; Kamperman, M.M.G.; Schneider, A.S.; Martina, D.; Creton, C.; Arzt, E.

    2011-01-01

    We developed a dry synthetic adhesive system inspired by gecko feet adhesion that can switch reversibly from adhesion to non-adhesion with applied pressure as external stimulus. Micropatterned polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) surfaces with pillars of 30 µm length and 10 µm diameter were fabricated using

  17. Cohesion and Adhesion with Proteins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Charles R. Frihart

    2016-01-01

    With increasing interest in bio-based adhesives, research on proteins has expanded because historically they have been used by both nature and humans as adhesives. A wide variety of proteins have been used as wood adhesives. Ancient Egyptians most likely used collagens tobond veneer to wood furniture, then came casein (milk), blood, fish scales, and soy adhesives, with...

  18. Prevention of bacterial adhesion

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Klemm, Per; Vejborg, Rebecca Munk; Hancock, Viktoria

    2010-01-01

    Management of bacterial infections is becoming increasingly difficult due to the emergence and increasing prevalence of bacterial pathogens that are resistant to available antibiotics. Conventional antibiotics generally kill bacteria by interfering with vital cellular functions, an approach...... that imposes selection pressure for resistant bacteria. New approaches are urgently needed. Targeting bacterial virulence functions directly is an attractive alternative. An obvious target is bacterial adhesion. Bacterial adhesion to surfaces is the first step in colonization, invasion, and biofilm formation...

  19. Adhesion on Nanoorganized Multilayers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yolla Kazzi

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Nanostructured multilayers composed of alternate organic (alkyldithiol and metallic (gold layers are grafted onto glass plates and prepared in order to modify the mechanical and local dissipative properties of a thin surface layer of the substrate. The adhesion phenomenon between a polyisoprene elastomer and these layers is presented and verified by two theories, namely, Johnson, Kendall, Roberts (JKR and linear elastic fracture mechanics. The increase in adhesion with contact time following a power law has been clearly noted.

  20. Low strength static magnetic field inhibits the proliferation, migration, and adhesion of human vascular smooth muscle cells in a restenosis model through mediating integrins β1-FAK, Ca2+ signaling pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yan; Song, Li-Qiang; Chen, Michael Q; Zhang, Ying-Mei; Li, Jingxia; Feng, Xu-Yang; Li, Weijie; Guo, Wenyi; Jia, Guoliang; Wang, Haichang; Yu, Jin

    2012-12-01

    The proliferation, migration, and adhesion of vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMCs) and their interactions with extracellular matrix are key features of atherosclerosis and restenosis. Recently, there has been evidence that magnetic fields exert multiple effects on the biological performance of cells and may aid in the treatment of vascular disease. However, the effect of a static magnetic field (SMF) on human VSMCs still remains unknown. In this study, we aimed to determine the effects of low strength SMF on human VSMCs in an in vitro restenosis model. A SMF was established using neodymium-yttrium-iron permanent magnet. Human umbilical artery smooth muscle cells (hUASMCs) were isolated and seeded to a fibronectin-coated plate to form an in vitro restenosis model and then exposed to a vertically oriented field of 5 militesla (mT). MTT, transwell, and adhesion assays were used to demonstrate that the proliferation, migration, and adhesion potential of hUASMCs were significantly decreased after exposure to 5 mT SMF for 48 h compared with a non-treated group. Meanwhile, confocal microscopy analysis was used to demonstrate that integrin β(1) clustering was inhibited by exposure to 5 mT SMF. Furthermore, the phosphorylation of focal adhesion kinase (FAK) was markedly inhibited, and the upregulated cytosolic free calcium had been reversed (p strength SMF on hUASMCs could be blocked by the administration of GRGDSP-the blockade of integrins. In conclusion, a low strength SMF can influence the proliferation, migration, and adhesion of VSMCs by inhibiting the clustering of integrin β1, decreasing cytosolic free calcium concentration, and inactivating FAK. With further validation, SMFs may aid in attenuating abnormal VSMCs biological performance and has potential to block atherogenesis and prevent restenosis.

  1. Signaling transduction pathways involved in basophil adhesion and histamine release

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sha, Quan; Poulsen, Lars K.; Gerwien, Jens

    2006-01-01

    Little is known about basophil with respect to the different signaling transduction pathways involved in spontaneous, cytokine or anti-IgE induced adhesion and how this compares to IgE-dependent and IgE-independent mediator secretion. The purpose of the present study was to investigate the roles ...... of beta1 and beta2 integrins in basophil adhesion as well as hosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3K), src-kinases and extracellular signal regulated kinase (ERK) 1/2 in basophil adhesion and histamine release (HR)....

  2. Focal adhesion kinase activation is necessary for stretch-induced alignment and enhanced differentiation of myogenic precursor cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Jens Isak; Pennisi, Cristian Pablo; Fink, Trine

    2017-01-01

    Myogenic precursors sense and dynamically respond to mechanical stimulation through complex integrin-mediated mechanotransduction, in which focal adhesion kinase (FAK) is a fundamental intracellular signaling mediator. When skeletal myoblasts are exposed to uniaxial cyclic tensile strain (UCTS...

  3. Adhesion Molecules in CNS Disorders: Biomarker and Therapeutic Targets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Qingyi; Chen, Sheng; Klebe, Damon; Zhang, John H.; Tang, Jiping

    2015-01-01

    Mounting evidence has been provided regarding the crucial role of leukocyte extravasation and subsequent inflammatory response in several central nervous system (CNS) disorders. The infiltrated leukocytes release pro-inflammatory mediators and activate resident cells, leading to tissue injury. Leukocyte-endothelia interaction is critical for leukocyte extravasation and migration from the intravascular space into the tissue during inflammation. The basic physiology of leukocyte-endothelia interaction has been investigated extensively. Traditionally, three kinds of adhesion molecules, selectin, integrin, and immunoglobulin families, are responsible for this multiple-step interaction. Furthermore, blocking adhesion molecule function by genetic knockout, antagonizing antibodies, or inhibitory pharmacological drugs provides neuroprotection, which is associated with a reduction in leukocyte accumulation with in the tissue. Detection of the soluble form of adhesion molecules has also been proven to predict outcomes in CNS disorders. Lately, vascular adhesion protein-1 (VAP-1), a novel adhesion molecule and endothelial cell surface enzyme, has been implicated as a brake during leukocyte extravasation. In this review, we summarize the functions of traditional adhesion molecules as well as VAP-1 in the leukocyte adhesion cascade. We also discuss the diagnostic and therapeutic potential of adhesion molecules in CNS disorders. PMID:23469854

  4. Pycnogenol prevents peritoneal adhesions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sahbaz, Ahmet; Aynioglu, Oner; Isik, Hatice; Gun, Banu Dogan; Cengil, Osman; Erol, Onur

    2015-12-01

    This study tested the ability of pycnogenol, an extract from the bark of the French maritime pine (Pinus pinaster), to prevent intra-abdominal adhesions. Thirty female Wistar albino rats were separated randomly into three equal groups: Group (1) the control group, which underwent surgery, but was given no drug; Group (2) given 10 mg/kg of pycnogenol dissolved in normal saline intraperitoneally for 10 days after surgery; and Group (3) given 0.1 mL of normal saline for 10 days intraperitoneally after surgery. On post-operative day 10, all of the animals were killed and any adhesions were evaluated macroscopically and histopathologically. The macroscopic adhesion scores (mean ± SD) for Groups 1, 2, and 3 were 2.5 ± 0.53, 0.60 ± 0.70, and 2.0 ± 0.82, respectively. The macroscopic adhesion score was significantly lower in Group 2 than in Groups 1 and 3 (p Pycnogenol was found to be effective at preventing surgery-related adhesions in an animal model.

  5. Mapping cell surface adhesion by rotation tracking and adhesion footprinting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Isaac T. S.; Ha, Taekjip; Chemla, Yann R.

    2017-03-01

    Rolling adhesion, in which cells passively roll along surfaces under shear flow, is a critical process involved in inflammatory responses and cancer metastasis. Surface adhesion properties regulated by adhesion receptors and membrane tethers are critical in understanding cell rolling behavior. Locally, adhesion molecules are distributed at the tips of membrane tethers. However, how functional adhesion properties are globally distributed on the individual cell’s surface is unknown. Here, we developed a label-free technique to determine the spatial distribution of adhesive properties on rolling cell surfaces. Using dark-field imaging and particle tracking, we extract the rotational motion of individual rolling cells. The rotational information allows us to construct an adhesion map along the contact circumference of a single cell. To complement this approach, we also developed a fluorescent adhesion footprint assay to record the molecular adhesion events from cell rolling. Applying the combination of the two methods on human promyelocytic leukemia cells, our results surprisingly reveal that adhesion is non-uniformly distributed in patches on the cell surfaces. Our label-free adhesion mapping methods are applicable to the variety of cell types that undergo rolling adhesion and provide a quantitative picture of cell surface adhesion at the functional and molecular level.

  6. OCAM: A new member of the neural cell adhesion molecule family related to zone-to-zone projection of olfactory and vomeronasal axons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoshihara, Y; Kawasaki, M; Tamada, A; Fujita, H; Hayashi, H; Kagamiyama, H; Mori, K

    1997-08-01

    Zone-to-zone projection of olfactory and vomeronasal sensory axons underlies the topographic and functional mapping of chemoreceptor expression zones of the sensory epithelia onto zonally arranged glomeruli in the main and accessory olfactory bulbs. Here we identified OCAM (R4B12 antigen), an axonal surface glycoprotein expressed by subsets of both olfactory and vomeronasal axons in a zone-specific manner. OCAM is a novel homophilic adhesion molecule belonging to the immunoglobulin superfamily with striking structural homology to neural cell adhesion molecule. In both the main and accessory olfactory systems, OCAM mRNA is expressed by sensory neurons in restricted chemoreceptor expression zones, and OCAM protein-expressing axons project to the glomeruli in the corresponding zones of the main and accessory bulbs. OCAM protein is expressed on subsets of growing sensory axons in explant cultures even in the absence of the target bulb. These results demonstrate a precisely coordinated zonal expression of chemoreceptors and OCAM and suggest that OCAM may play important roles in selective fasciculation and zone-to-zone projection of the primary olfactory axons.

  7. Adhesive particle shielding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klebanoff, Leonard Elliott [Dublin, CA; Rader, Daniel John [Albuquerque, NM; Walton, Christopher [Berkeley, CA; Folta, James [Livermore, CA

    2009-01-06

    An efficient device for capturing fast moving particles has an adhesive particle shield that includes (i) a mounting panel and (ii) a film that is attached to the mounting panel wherein the outer surface of the film has an adhesive coating disposed thereon to capture particles contacting the outer surface. The shield can be employed to maintain a substantially particle free environment such as in photolithographic systems having critical surfaces, such as wafers, masks, and optics and in the tools used to make these components, that are sensitive to particle contamination. The shield can be portable to be positioned in hard-to-reach areas of a photolithography machine. The adhesive particle shield can incorporate cooling means to attract particles via the thermophoresis effect.

  8. Switchable bio-inspired adhesives

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kroner, Elmar

    2015-03-01

    Geckos have astonishing climbing abilities. They can adhere to almost any surface and can run on walls and even stick to ceilings. The extraordinary adhesion performance is caused by a combination of a complex surface pattern on their toes and the biomechanics of its movement. These biological dry adhesives have been intensely investigated during recent years because of the unique combination of adhesive properties. They provide high adhesion, allow for easy detachment, can be removed residue-free, and have self-cleaning properties. Many aspects have been successfully mimicked, leading to artificial, bio-inspired, patterned dry adhesives, and were addressed and in some aspects they even outperform the adhesion capabilities of geckos. However, designing artificial patterned adhesion systems with switchable adhesion remains a big challenge; the gecko's adhesion system is based on a complex hierarchical surface structure and on advanced biomechanics, which are both difficult to mimic. In this paper, two approaches are presented to achieve switchable adhesion. The first approach is based on a patterned polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) polymer, where adhesion can be switched on and off by applying a low and a high compressive preload. The switch in adhesion is caused by a reversible mechanical instability of the adhesive silicone structures. The second approach is based on a composite material consisting of a Nickel- Titanium (NiTi) shape memory alloy and a patterned adhesive PDMS layer. The NiTi alloy is trained to change its surface topography as a function of temperature, which results in a change of the contact area and of alignment of the adhesive pattern towards a substrate, leading to switchable adhesion. These examples show that the unique properties of bio-inspired adhesives can be greatly improved by new concepts such as mechanical instability or by the use of active materials which react to external stimuli.

  9. Switchable Adhesion in Vacuum Using Bio-Inspired Dry Adhesives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Purtov, Julia; Frensemeier, Mareike; Kroner, Elmar

    2015-11-04

    Suction based attachment systems for pick and place handling of fragile objects like glass plates or optical lenses are energy-consuming and noisy and fail at reduced air pressure, which is essential, e.g., in chemical and physical vapor deposition processes. Recently, an alternative approach toward reversible adhesion of sensitive objects based on bioinspired dry adhesive structures has emerged. There, the switching in adhesion is achieved by a reversible buckling of adhesive pillar structures. In this study, we demonstrate that these adhesives are capable of switching adhesion not only in ambient air conditions but also in vacuum. Our bioinspired patterned adhesive with an area of 1 cm(2) provided an adhesion force of 2.6 N ± 0.2 N in air, which was reduced to 1.9 N ± 0.2 N if measured in vacuum. Detachment was induced by buckling of the structures due to a high compressive preload and occurred, independent of air pressure, at approximately 0.9 N ± 0.1 N. The switch in adhesion was observed at a compressive preload between 5.6 and 6.0 N and was independent of air pressure. The difference between maximum adhesion force and adhesion force after buckling gives a reasonable window of operation for pick and place processes. High reversibility of the switching behavior is shown over 50 cycles in air and in vacuum, making the bioinspired switchable adhesive applicable for handling operations of fragile objects.

  10. Towards a computational model of leukocyte adhesion cascade: Leukocyte rolling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khismatullin, Damir

    2005-11-01

    Recruitment of leukocytes into sites of acute and chronic inflammation is a vital component of the innate immune response in humans and plays an important role in cardiovascular diseases, such as ischemia-reperfusion injury and atherosclerosis. Leukocytes extravasate into the inflamed tissue through a multi-step process called "leukocyte adhesion cascade", which involves initial contact of a leukocyte with activated endothelium (tethering), leukocyte rolling, firm adhesion, and transendothelial migration. Recently we developed a fully three-dimensional CFD model of receptor-mediated leukocyte adhesion to endothelium in a parallel-plate flow chamber. The model treats the leukocyte as a viscoelastic cell with the nucleus located in the intracellular space and cylindrical microvilli distributed over the cell membrane. Leukocyte-endothelial adhesion is assumed to be mediated by adhesion molecules expressed on the tips of cell microvilli and on endothelium. We show that the model can predict both shape changes and velocities of rolling leukocytes under physiological flow conditions. Results of this study also indicate that viscosity of the cytoplasm is a critical parameter of leukocyte adhesion, affecting the cell's ability to roll on endothelium. This work is supported by NIH Grant HL- 57446 and NCSA Grant BCS040006 and utilized the NCSA IBM p690.

  11. Wood Composite Adhesives

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gomez-Bueso, Jose; Haupt, Robert

    The global environment, in which phenolic resins are being used for wood composite manufacture, has changed significantly during the last decade. This chapter reviews trends that are driving the use and consumption of phenolic resins around the world. The review begins with recent data on volume usage and regional trends, followed by an analysis of factors affecting global markets. In a section on environmental factors, the impact of recent formaldehyde emission regulations is discussed. The section on economics introduces wood composite production as it relates to the available adhesive systems, with special emphasis on the technical requirement to improve phenolic reactivity. Advances in composite process technology are introduced, especially in regard to the increased demands the improvements place upon adhesive system performance. The specific requirements for the various wood composite families are considered in the context of adhesive performance needs. The results of research into current chemistries are discussed, with a review of recent findings regarding the mechanisms of phenolic condensation and acceleration. Also, the work regarding alternate natural materials, such as carbohydrates, lignins, tannins, and proteinaceous materials, is presented. Finally, new developments in alternative adhesive technologies are reported.

  12. Adhesive tape exfoliation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bohr, Jakob

    2015-01-01

    Single-crystal graphite can be cleaved by the use of an adhesive tape. This was also the initial route for obtaining graphene, a one-layer thick graphite slab. In this letter a few simple and fun considerations are presented in an attempt to shed some light on why this procedure is successful...

  13. Pathogenesis of postoperative adhesion formation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hellebrekers, B.W.J.; Kooistra, T.

    2011-01-01

    Background: Current views on the pathogenesis of adhesion formation are based on the "classical concept of adhesion formation", namely that a reduction in peritoneal fibrinolytic activity following peritoneal trauma is of key importance in adhesion development. Methods: A non-systematic literature

  14. Adhesive bonding of wood materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Charles B. Vick

    1999-01-01

    Adhesive bonding of wood components has played an essential role in the development and growth of the forest products industry and has been a key factor in the efficient utilization of our timber resource. The largest use of adhesives is in the construction industry. By far, the largest amounts of adhesives are used to manufacture building materials, such as plywood,...

  15. Adhesion Casting In Low Gravity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noever, David A.; Cronise, Raymond J.

    1996-01-01

    Adhesion casting in low gravity proposed as technique for making new and improved materials. Advantages of low-gravity adhesion casting, in comparison with adhesion casting in normal Earth gravity, comes from better control over, and greater uniformity of, thicknesses of liquid films that form on and adhere to solid surfaces during casting.

  16. Adhesion and cytoskeletal organisation of fibroblasts in response to fibronectin fragments

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Woods, A; Couchman, J R; Johansson, S

    1986-01-01

    since it mediates cell attachment and inhibits cell adhesion to intact fibronectin. We show here, however, that substrata coated with an isolated cell-binding domain of fibronectin are not sufficient for complete cell adhesion; cells attach and spread but, unlike those adhering to intact fibronectin...

  17. Influence of ionic strength and substratum hydrophobicity on the co-adhesion of oral microbial pairs

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    vanderMei, HC; Busscher, HJ; Bos, R.R.M.

    Co-adhesion between oral microbial pairs (i.e. adhesion of a planktonic micro-organism, University of organism to a sessile organism adhering to a substratum surface) has been described as a highly specific interaction, mediated by stereochemical groups on the interacting microbial cell surfaces,

  18. Tenomodulin expression in the periodontal ligament enhances cellular adhesion.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuske Komiyama

    Full Text Available Tenomodulin (Tnmd is a type II transmembrane protein characteristically expressed in dense connective tissues such as tendons and ligaments. Its expression in the periodontal ligament (PDL has also been demonstrated, though the timing and function remain unclear. We investigated the expression of Tnmd during murine tooth eruption and explored its biological functions in vitro. Tnmd expression was related to the time of eruption when occlusal force was transferred to the teeth and surrounding tissues. Tnmd overexpression enhanced cell adhesion in NIH3T3 and human PDL cells. In addition, Tnmd-knockout fibroblasts showed decreased cell adhesion. In the extracellular portions of Tnmd, the BRICHOS domain or CS region was found to be responsible for Tnmd-mediated enhancement of cell adhesion. These results suggest that Tnmd acts on the maturation or maintenance of the PDL by positively regulating cell adhesion via its BRICHOS domain.

  19. Adhesive properties of Staphylococcus epidermidis probed by atomic force microscopy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hu, Yifan; Ulstrup, Jens; Zhang, Jingdong

    2011-01-01

    Mapping of the surface properties of Staphylococcus epidermidis and of biofilm forming bacteria in general is a key to understand their functions, particularly their adhesive properties. To gain a comprehensive view of the structural and chemical properties of S. epidermidis, four different strains...... (biofilm positive and biofilm negative strains) were analyzed using in situ atomic force microscopy (AFM). Force measurements performed using bare hydrophilic silicon nitride tips disclosed similar adhesive properties for each strain. However, use of hydrophobic tips showed that hydrophobic forces...... are not the driving forces for adhesion of the four strains. Rather, the observation of sawtooth force–distance patterns on the surface of biofilm positive strains documents the presence of modular proteins such as Aap that may mediate cell adhesion. Treatment of two biofilm positive strains with two chemical...

  20. Adhesion and friction in gecko toe attachment and detachment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tian, Yu; Pesika, Noshir; Zeng, Hongbo; Rosenberg, Kenny; Zhao, Boxin; McGuiggan, Patricia; Autumn, Kellar; Israelachvili, Jacob

    2006-12-19

    Geckos can run rapidly on walls and ceilings, requiring high friction forces (on walls) and adhesion forces (on ceilings), with typical step intervals of approximately 20 ms. The rapid switching between gecko foot attachment and detachment is analyzed theoretically based on a tape model that incorporates the adhesion and friction forces originating from the van der Waals forces between the submicron-sized spatulae and the substrate, which are controlled by the (macroscopic) actions of the gecko toes. The pulling force of a spatula along its shaft with an angle between theta 0 and 90 degrees to the substrate, has a "normal adhesion force" contribution, produced at the spatula-substrate bifurcation zone, and a "lateral friction force" contribution from the part of spatula still in contact with the substrate. High net friction and adhesion forces on the whole gecko are obtained by rolling down and gripping the toes inward to realize small pulling angles between the large number of spatulae in contact with the substrate. To detach, the high adhesion/friction is rapidly reduced to a very low value by rolling the toes upward and backward, which, mediated by the lever function of the setal shaft, peels the spatulae off perpendicularly from the substrates. By these mechanisms, both the adhesion and friction forces of geckos can be changed over three orders of magnitude, allowing for the swift attachment and detachment during gecko motion. The results have obvious implications for the fabrication of dry adhesives and robotic systems inspired by the gecko's locomotion mechanism.

  1. Structure and mechanism of cadherins and catenins in cell-cell contacts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pokutta, Sabine; Weis, William I

    2007-01-01

    Cadherins are Ca(2+)-dependent cell adhesion molecules found in several kinds of cell-cell contact, including adherens junctions and desmosomes. In the presence of Ca(2+), cells expressing the same type of cadherin form stable contacts with one another, a phenomenon designated homophilic, or homotypic, adhesion. Most cadherins are single-pass transmembrane proteins whose extracellular regions mediate specific cell-cell interactions. The intracellular faces of these contacts are associated with the actin cytoskeleton in adherens junctions or the intermediate-filament system in desmosomes. The close coordination of the transmembrane adhesion molecules with the cytoskeleton is believed to be essential in coordinating morphogenetic movements of tissues during development and in conferring the appropriate mechanical properties to cell-cell contacts. Structural, biochemical, and biophysical analysis of the molecules that comprise these contacts has provided unique mechanistic insights into the specificity of homophilic adhesion, the functional connection to the underlying cytoskeleton, and the dynamics of junction formation.

  2. Lymphocyte Homing to Bronchus-associated Lymphoid Tissue (BALT) Is Mediated by L-selectin/PNAd, α4β1 Integrin/VCAM-1, and LFA-1 Adhesion Pathways

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Baohui; Wagner, Norbert; Pham, Linh Nguyen; Magno, Vincent; Shan, Zhongyan; Butcher, Eugene C.; Michie, Sara A.

    2003-01-01

    Bronchus-associated lymphoid tissue (BALT) participates in airway immune responses. However, little is known about the lymphocyte–endothelial adhesion cascades that recruit lymphocytes from blood into BALT. We show that high endothelial venules (HEVs) in BALT express substantial levels of VCAM-1, in marked contrast to HEVs in other secondary lymphoid tissues. BALT HEVs also express the L-selectin ligand PNAd. Anti–L-selectin, anti-PNAd, and anti–LFA-1 mAbs almost completely block the homing of B and T lymphocytes into BALT, whereas anti–α4 integrin and anti–VCAM-1 mAbs inhibit homing by nearly 40%. α4β7 integrin and MAdCAM-1 are not involved. Importantly, we found that mAbs against α4 integrin and VCAM-1 significantly block the migration of total T cells (80% memory phenotype) but not naive T and B cells to BALT. These results suggest that an adhesion cascade, which includes L-selectin/PNAd, α4β1 integrin/VCAM-1, and LFA-1, targets specific lymphocyte subsets to BALT. This high level of involvement of α4β1 integrin/VCAM-1 is unique among secondary lymphoid tissues, and may help unify lymphocyte migration pathways and immune responses in BALT and other bronchopulmonary tissues. PMID:12756264

  3. Lymphocyte homing to bronchus-associated lymphoid tissue (BALT) is mediated by L-selectin/PNAd, alpha4beta1 integrin/VCAM-1, and LFA-1 adhesion pathways.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Baohui; Wagner, Norbert; Pham, Linh Nguyen; Magno, Vincent; Shan, Zhongyan; Butcher, Eugene C; Michie, Sara A

    2003-05-19

    Bronchus-associated lymphoid tissue (BALT) participates in airway immune responses. However, little is known about the lymphocyte-endothelial adhesion cascades that recruit lymphocytes from blood into BALT. We show that high endothelial venules (HEVs) in BALT express substantial levels of VCAM-1, in marked contrast to HEVs in other secondary lymphoid tissues. BALT HEVs also express the L-selectin ligand PNAd. Anti-L-selectin, anti-PNAd, and anti-LFA-1 mAbs almost completely block the homing of B and T lymphocytes into BALT, whereas anti-alpha4 integrin and anti-VCAM-1 mAbs inhibit homing by nearly 40%. alpha4beta7 integrin and MAdCAM-1 are not involved. Importantly, we found that mAbs against alpha4 integrin and VCAM-1 significantly block the migration of total T cells (80% memory phenotype) but not naive T and B cells to BALT. These results suggest that an adhesion cascade, which includes L-selectin/PNAd, alpha4beta1 integrin/VCAM-1, and LFA-1, targets specific lymphocyte subsets to BALT. This high level of involvement of alpha4beta1 integrin/VCAM-1 is unique among secondary lymphoid tissues, and may help unify lymphocyte migration pathways and immune responses in BALT and other bronchopulmonary tissues.

  4. Berberine‑attenuated monocyte adhesion to endothelial cells induced by oxidized low‑density lipoprotein via inhibition of adhesion molecule expression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Zhouqing; Cai, Xueli; Li, Sheng; Zhou, Hao; Chu, Maoping; Shan, Peiren; Huang, Weijian

    2013-02-01

    Recruitment of monocytes to endothelial cells is important during early stages of atherosclerosis development. This process is predominantly mediated by cellular adhesion molecules, including vascular cell adhesion molecule‑1 (VCAM‑1) and intercellular adhesion molecule‑1 (ICAM‑1), which are expressed by activated endothelial cells in response to a number of inflammatory stimuli, including oxidized low‑density lipoprotein (oxLDL). Previous studies have demonstrated that berberine, a natural extract from Rhizoma coptidis, prevents oxLDL‑induced endothelial cellular apoptosis. However, its effect on the adhesion of monocytes to endothelial cells and the mechanism associated with this process remains unclear. In the present study, berberine was revealed to markedly reduce oxLDL‑induced monocyte adhesion to human umbilical vein endothelial cells. In addition, the inhibitory mechanism of berberine was associated with suppression of adhesion molecule expression, including VCAM‑1 and ICAM‑1. Results indicate that berberine plays a protective role in the early stages of atherosclerosis.

  5. A ZnO-doped adhesive reduced collagen degradation favouring dentine remineralization

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Toledano, Manuel; Yamauti, Monica; Ruiz-Requena, María Estrella; Osorio, Raquel

    2012-01-01

    The objective of the study was to determine the efficacy of a ZnO-doped etch and rinse adhesive in decreasing MMPs-mediated collagen degradation at the resin-dentine hybrid layer, and increasing bonding stability...

  6. Cadherin-dependent mechanotransduction depends on ligand identity but not affinity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tabdili, Hamid; Langer, Matthew; Shi, Quanming; Poh, Yeh-Chuin; Wang, Ning; Leckband, Deborah

    2012-09-15

    This study investigates the relationship between classical cadherin binding affinities and mechanotransduction through cadherin-mediated adhesions. The mechanical properties of cadherin-dependent intercellular junctions are generally attributed to differences in the binding affinities of classical cadherin subtypes that contribute to cohesive energies between cells. However, cell mechanics and mechanotransduction may also regulate intercellular contacts. We used micropipette measurements to quantify the two-dimensional affinities of cadherins at the cell surface, and two complementary mechanical measurements to assess ligand-dependent mechanotransduction through cadherin adhesions. At the cell surface, the classical cadherins investigated in this study form both homophilic and heterophilic bonds with two-dimensional affinities that differ by less than threefold. In contrast, mechanotransduction through cadherin adhesions is strongly ligand dependent such that homophilic, but not heterophilic ligation mediates mechanotransduction, independent of the cadherin binding affinity. These findings suggest that ligand-selective mechanotransduction may supersede differences in cadherin binding affinities in regulating intercellular contacts.

  7. Management of adhesive capsulitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stupay KL

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Kristen L Stupay,1 Andrew S Neviaser2 1Tulane University School of Medicine, New Orleans, LA, USA; 2George Washington University Medical Faculty Associates, Washington, DC, USA Abstract: Adhesive capsulitis of the shoulder is a condition of capsular contracture that reduces both active and passive glenohumeral motion. The cause of adhesive capsulitis is not known but it is strongly associated with endocrine abnormalities such as diabetes. Diverse terminology and the absence of definitive criteria for diagnosis make evaluating treatment modalities difficult. Many treatment methods have been reported, most with some success, but few have been proved to alter the natural course of this disease. Most afflicted patients will achieve acceptable shoulder function without surgery. Those who remain debilitated after 8–12 months are reasonable candidates for invasive treatments. Here, the various treatment methods and the data to support their use are reviewed. Keywords: frozen shoulder, stiff shoulder, periarthritis, painful shoulder 

  8. Adhesion between cerebroside bilayers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kulkarni, K; Snyder, D S; McIntosh, T J

    1999-11-16

    The structure, hydration properties, and adhesion energy of the membrane glycolipid galactosylceramide (GalCer) were studied by osmotic stress/X-ray diffraction analysis.(1) Fully hydrated GalCer gave a repeat period of 67 A, which decreased less than 2 A with application of applied osmotic pressures as large as 1.6 x 10(9) dyn/cm(2). These results, along with the invariance of GalCer structure obtained by a Fourier analysis of the X-ray data, indicated that there was an extremely narrow fluid space (less than the diameter of a single water molecule) between fully hydrated cerebroside bilayers. Electron density profiles showed that the hydrocarbon chains from apposing GalCer monolayers partially interdigitated in the center of the bilayer. To obtain information on the adhesive properties of GalCer bilayers, we incorporated into the bilayer various mole ratios of the negatively charged lipid dipalmitoylphosphatidylglycerol (DPPG) to provide known electrostatic repulsion between the bilayers. Although 17 and 20 mol % DPPG swelled (disjoined) the GalCer bilayers by an amount predictable from electrostatic double-layer theory, 5, 10, 13, and 15 mol % DPPG did not disjoin the bilayers. By calculating the magnitude of the electrostatic pressure necessary to disjoin the bilayers, we estimated the adhesion energy for GalCer bilayers to be about -1.5 erg/cm(2), a much larger value than that previously measured for phosphatidylcholine bilayers. The observed discontinuous disjoining with increased electrostatic pressure and this relatively large value for adhesion energy indicated the presence of an attractive interaction, in addition to van der Waals attraction, between cerebroside bilayers. Possible attractive interactions are hydrogen bond formation and hydrophobic interactions between the galactose headgroups of apposing GalCer bilayers.

  9. Syndecans and cell adhesion

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Couchman, J R; Chen, L; Woods, A

    2001-01-01

    Now that transmembrane signaling through primary cell-matrix receptors, integrins, is being elucidated, attention is turning to how integrin-ligand interactions can be modulated. Syndecans are transmembrane proteoglycans implicated as coreceptors in a variety of physiological processes, including...... cell adhesion, migration, response to growth factors, development, and tumorigenesis. This review will describe this family of proteoglycans in terms of their structures and functions and their signaling in conjunction with integrins, and indicate areas for future research....

  10. Conserved roles of the prion protein domains on subcellular localization and cell-cell adhesion.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gonzalo P Solis

    Full Text Available Analyses of cultured cells and transgenic mice expressing prion protein (PrP deletion mutants have revealed that some properties of PrP -such as its ability to misfold, aggregate and trigger neurotoxicity- are controlled by discrete molecular determinants within its protein domains. Although the contributions of these determinants to PrP biosynthesis and turnover are relatively well characterized, it is still unclear how they modulate cellular functions of PrP. To address this question, we used two defined activities of PrP as functional readouts: 1 the recruitment of PrP to cell-cell contacts in Drosophila S2 and human MCF-7 epithelial cells, and 2 the induction of PrP embryonic loss- and gain-of-function phenotypes in zebrafish. Our results show that homologous mutations in mouse and zebrafish PrPs similarly affect their subcellular localization patterns as well as their in vitro and in vivo activities. Among PrP's essential features, the N-terminal leader peptide was sufficient to drive targeting of our constructs to cell contact sites, whereas lack of GPI-anchoring and N-glycosylation rendered them inactive by blocking their cell surface expression. Importantly, our data suggest that the ability of PrP to homophilically trans-interact and elicit intracellular signaling is primarily encoded in its globular domain, and modulated by its repetitive domain. Thus, while the latter induces the local accumulation of PrPs at discrete punctae along cell contacts, the former counteracts this effect by promoting the continuous distribution of PrP. In early zebrafish embryos, deletion of either domain significantly impaired PrP's ability to modulate E-cadherin cell adhesion. Altogether, these experiments relate structural features of PrP to its subcellular distribution and in vivo activity. Furthermore, they show that despite their large evolutionary history, the roles of PrP domains and posttranslational modifications are conserved between mouse and

  11. The tripeptide feG inhibits leukocyte adhesion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Davison Joseph S

    2008-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The tripeptide feG (D-Phe-D-Glu-Gly is a potent anti-inflammatory peptide that reduces the severity of type I immediate hypersensitivity reactions, and inhibits neutrophil chemotaxis and adhesion to tissues. feG also reduces the expression of β1-integrin on circulating neutrophils, but the counter ligands involved in the anti-adhesive actions of the peptide are not known. In this study the effects of feG on the adhesion of rat peritoneal leukocytes and extravasated neutrophils to several different integrin selective substrates were evaluated. Results The adhesion of peritoneal leukocytes and extravasated neutrophils from rats to adhesive proteins coated to 96-well plates was dependent upon magnesium (Mg2+ ion, suggestive of integrin-mediated adhesion. feG inhibited leukocyte adhesion, but only if the cells were stimulated with PAF (10-9M, indicating that feG's actions in vitro require cell activation. In the dose range of 10-10M to 10-12M feG inhibited the adhesion of peritoneal leukocytes to fibrinogen and fibronectin, but not IgG, vitronectin or ICAM-1. feG inhibited the binding of extravasated neutrophils to heparin, IgG, fibronectin and CD16 antibody. Antigen-challenge of sensitized rats reduced the adhesion of peritoneal leukocytes to most substrates and abolished the inhibitory effects of feG. However, pretreating the animals with intraperitoneal feG (100 μg/kg 18 h before collecting the cells from the antigen-challenged animal restored the inhibition of adhesion by in vitro feG of peritoneal leukocytes and extravasated neutrophils to fibronectin. Conclusion The modulation of leukocyte adhesion by feG appears to involve actions on αMβ2 integrin, with a possible interaction with the low affinity FcγRIII receptor (CD16. The modulation of cell adhesion by feG is dual in nature. When administered in vivo, feG prevents inflammation-induced reductions in cell adhesion, as well as restoring its inhibitory effect in vitro

  12. Cell adhesion on nanotopography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsai, Irene; Kimura, Masahiro; Stockton, Rebecca; Jacobson, Bruce; Russell, Thomas

    2003-03-01

    Cell adhesion, a key element in understanding the cell-biomaterial interactions, underpins proper cell growth, function and survival. Understanding the parameters influencing cell adhesion is critical for applications in biosensors, implants and bioreactors. A gradient surface is used to study the effect of the surface topography on cell adhesion. A gradient surface is generated by block copolymer and homopolymer blends. The two homopolymers will phase separate on the micron scale and gradually decrease to nano-scale by the microphase separation of the diblock. Gradient surfaces offer a unique opportunity to probe lateral variations in the topography and interactions. Using thin films of mixtures of diblock copolymers of PS-b-MMA with PS and PMMA homopolymers, where the concentration of the PS-b-MMA varies across the surface, a gradient in the size scale of the morphology, from the nanoscopic to microscopic, was produced. By UV exposure, the variation in morphology translated into a variation in topography. The extent of cell spreading and cytoskeleton formation was investigated and marked dependence on the length scale of the surface topography was found.

  13. [Fulminant adhesive arachnoiditis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tomczykiewicz, Kazimierz; Stępień, Adam; Staszewski, Jacek; Sadowska, Marta; Bogusławska-Walecka, Romana

    2012-01-01

    Adhesive arachnoiditis is a rare disease with insidious course. It causes damage of the spinal cord and nerve roots. The causes of adhesive arachnoiditis include earlier traumatic injury of the spinal cord, surgery, intrathecal administration of therapeutic substances (e.g. anaesthetics, chemotherapy) or contrast media, bleeding, and inflammation. It can also be idiopathic or iatrogenic. We present the case of a 42-year-old patient with fulminant adhesive arachnoiditis which was provoked by spinal surgery and caused severe neurological disability with profound, progressive, flaccid paraparesis and bladder dysfunction. The electromyography (EMG) showed serious damage of nerves of both lower limbs at the level of motor roots L2-S2 and damage of the motor neuron at the level of Th11-Th12 on the right side. Magnetic resonance imaging of the lumbosacral and thoracic part of the spinal cord demonstrated cystic liquid spaces in the lumen of the dural sac in the bottom part of the cervical spine and at the Th2-Th10 level, modelling the lateral and anterior surface of the cord. Because of the vast lesions, surgery could not be performed. Conservative treatment and rehabilitation brought only a small clinical improvement.

  14. Development of phosphorylated adhesives

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bilow, N.; Giants, T. W.; Jenkins, R. K.; Campbell, P. L.

    1983-01-01

    The synthesis of epoxy prepolymers containing phosphorus was carried out in such a manner as to provide adhesives containing at least 5 percent of this element. The purpose of this was to impart fire retardant properties to the adhesive. The two epoxy derivatives, bis(4-glycidyl-oxyphenyl)phenylphosphine oxide and bis(4-glycidyl-2-methoxyphenyl)phenylphosphonate, and a curing agent, bis(3-aminophenyl)methylphosphine oxide, were used in conjunction with one another and along with conventional epoxy resins and curing agents to bond Tedlar and Polyphenylethersulfone films to Kerimid-glass syntactic foam-filled honeycomb structures. Elevated temperatures are required to cure the epoxy resins with the phosphorus-contaning diamine; however, when Tedlar is being bonded, lower curing temperatures must be used to avoid shrinkage and the concomitant formation of surface defects. Thus, the phosphorus-containing aromatic amine curing agent cannot be used alone, although it is possible to use it in conjunction with an aliphatic amine which would allow lower cure temperatures to be used. The experimental epoxy resins have not provided adhesive bonds quite as strong as those provided by Epon 828 when compared in peel tests, but the differences are not very significant. It should be noted, if optimum properties are to be realized. In any case the fire retardant characteristics of the neat resin systems obtained are quite pronounced, since in most cases the self-extinguishing properties are evident almost instantly when specimens are removed from a flame.

  15. CADM1 Controls Actin Cytoskeleton Assembly and Regulates Extracellular Matrix Adhesion in Human Mast Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moiseeva, Elena P.; Straatman, Kees R.; Leyland, Mark L.; Bradding, Peter

    2014-01-01

    CADM1 is a major receptor for the adhesion of mast cells (MCs) to fibroblasts, human airway smooth muscle cells (HASMCs) and neurons. It also regulates E-cadherin and alpha6beta4 integrin in other cell types. Here we investigated a role for CADM1 in MC adhesion to both cells and extracellular matrix (ECM). Downregulation of CADM1 in the human MC line HMC-1 resulted not only in reduced adhesion to HASMCs, but also reduced adhesion to their ECM. Time-course studies in the presence of EDTA to inhibit integrins demonstrated that CADM1 provided fast initial adhesion to HASMCs and assisted with slower adhesion to ECM. CADM1 downregulation, but not antibody-dependent CADM1 inhibition, reduced MC adhesion to ECM, suggesting indirect regulation of ECM adhesion. To investigate potential mechanisms, phosphotyrosine signalling and polymerisation of actin filaments, essential for integrin-mediated adhesion, were examined. Modulation of CADM1 expression positively correlated with surface KIT levels and polymerisation of cortical F-actin in HMC-1 cells. It also influenced phosphotyrosine signalling and KIT tyrosine autophosphorylation. CADM1 accounted for 46% of surface KIT levels and 31% of F-actin in HMC-1 cells. CADM1 downregulation resulted in elongation of cortical actin filaments in both HMC-1 cells and human lung MCs and increased cell rigidity of HMC-1 cells. Collectively these data suggest that CADM1 is a key adhesion receptor, which regulates MC net adhesion, both directly through CADM1-dependent adhesion, and indirectly through the regulation of other adhesion receptors. The latter is likely to occur via docking of KIT and polymerisation of cortical F-actin. Here we propose a stepwise model of adhesion with CADM1 as a driving force for net MC adhesion. PMID:24465823

  16. CADM1 controls actin cytoskeleton assembly and regulates extracellular matrix adhesion in human mast cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elena P Moiseeva

    Full Text Available CADM1 is a major receptor for the adhesion of mast cells (MCs to fibroblasts, human airway smooth muscle cells (HASMCs and neurons. It also regulates E-cadherin and alpha6beta4 integrin in other cell types. Here we investigated a role for CADM1 in MC adhesion to both cells and extracellular matrix (ECM. Downregulation of CADM1 in the human MC line HMC-1 resulted not only in reduced adhesion to HASMCs, but also reduced adhesion to their ECM. Time-course studies in the presence of EDTA to inhibit integrins demonstrated that CADM1 provided fast initial adhesion to HASMCs and assisted with slower adhesion to ECM. CADM1 downregulation, but not antibody-dependent CADM1 inhibition, reduced MC adhesion to ECM, suggesting indirect regulation of ECM adhesion. To investigate potential mechanisms, phosphotyrosine signalling and polymerisation of actin filaments, essential for integrin-mediated adhesion, were examined. Modulation of CADM1 expression positively correlated with surface KIT levels and polymerisation of cortical F-actin in HMC-1 cells. It also influenced phosphotyrosine signalling and KIT tyrosine autophosphorylation. CADM1 accounted for 46% of surface KIT levels and 31% of F-actin in HMC-1 cells. CADM1 downregulation resulted in elongation of cortical actin filaments in both HMC-1 cells and human lung MCs and increased cell rigidity of HMC-1 cells. Collectively these data suggest that CADM1 is a key adhesion receptor, which regulates MC net adhesion, both directly through CADM1-dependent adhesion, and indirectly through the regulation of other adhesion receptors. The latter is likely to occur via docking of KIT and polymerisation of cortical F-actin. Here we propose a stepwise model of adhesion with CADM1 as a driving force for net MC adhesion.

  17. Deciphering the molecular mechanisms underlying sea urchin reversible adhesion: A quantitative proteomics approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lebesgue, Nicolas; da Costa, Gonçalo; Ribeiro, Raquel Mesquita; Ribeiro-Silva, Cristina; Martins, Gabriel G; Matranga, Valeria; Scholten, Arjen; Cordeiro, Carlos; Heck, Albert J R; Santos, Romana

    2016-04-14

    Marine bioadhesives have unmatched performances in wet environments, being an inspiration for biomedical applications. In sea urchins specialized adhesive organs, tube feet, mediate reversible adhesion, being composed by a disc, producing adhesive and de-adhesive secretions, and a motile stem. After tube foot detachment, the secreted adhesive remains bound to the substratum as a footprint. Sea urchin adhesive is composed by proteins and sugars, but so far only one protein, Nectin, was shown to be over-expressed as a transcript in tube feet discs, suggesting its involvement in sea urchin adhesion. Here we use high-resolution quantitative mass-spectrometry to perform the first study combining the analysis of the differential proteome of an adhesive organ, with the proteome of its secreted adhesive. This strategy allowed us to identify 163 highly over-expressed disc proteins, specifically involved in sea urchin reversible adhesion; to find that 70% of the secreted adhesive components fall within five protein groups, involved in exocytosis and microbial protection; and to provide evidences that Nectin is not only highly expressed in tube feet discs but is an actual component of the adhesive. These results give an unprecedented insight into the molecular mechanisms underlying sea urchin adhesion, and opening new doors to develop wet-reliable, reversible, and ecological biomimetic adhesives. Sea urchins attach strongly but in a reversible manner to substratum, being a valuable source of inspiration for industrial and biomedical applications. Yet, the molecular mechanisms governing reversible adhesion are still poorly studied delaying the engineering of biomimetic adhesives. We used the latest mass spectrometry techniques to analyze the differential proteome of an adhesive organ and the proteome of its secreted adhesive, allowing us to uncover the key players in sea urchin reversible adhesion. We demonstrate, that Nectin, a protein previously pointed out as potentially

  18. Dental adhesives of the future.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tay, Franklin R; Pashley, David H

    2002-01-01

    The current trend in the development of dentin adhesives attempts to simplify bonding steps and make them more user-friendly. However, optimizing speed and efficiency should be accomplished without major tradeoffs in the quality or durability of resin bonds. Although dentin adhesives have improved tremendously over the past decade, postoperative sensitivity, incomplete marginal seal, premature bond degradation, biocompatibility, and compromised bonding to abnormal substrates are still considered potential problems associated with their use. Advances in different scientific disciplines will enrich the pool from which ideas may be drawn in designing future dentin adhesives. It is probably on the molecular level that we will see the greatest expansion of horizons. With the advances in biomimetics, future dentin adhesive monomers may contain domains derived from protein-based, underwater bioadhesives secreted by aquatic animals such as mussels and barnacles, making them less dependent on the surface energy of the bonding substrates as well as less susceptible to hydrolytic degradation. As adhesive joints produced by contemporary adhesives are brittle in nature, future adhesive design may incorporate biomimetic intermediate-strength domains that can undergo stepwise reversible unfolding in response to varying functional stress levels before ultimate catastrophic failure of the adhesive joint occurs. These domains may also re-establish folded configurations on stress relaxation, making the adhesive both strong and tough. Using the concept of controlled release, future adhesives may contain fluorescent biosensors that can detect pH changes around leaking restorations. They may even have the capacity to heal autonomously, in response to microcracks formed by functional stresses within the adhesive joint. The ability to self-diagnose and self-repair will increase the life expectancy of adhesive restorations. Future dentin adhesives may also assume a more instrumental role

  19. Adhesion prevention in gynaecological surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robertson, Deborah; Lefebvre, Guylaine

    2010-06-01

    To review the etiology and incidence of and associative factors in the formation of adhesions following gynaecological surgery. To review evidence for the use of available means of adhesion prevention following gynaecological surgery. Women undergoing pelvic surgery are at risk of developing abdominal and/or pelvic adhesive disease postoperatively. Surgical technique and commercial adhesion prevention systems may decrease the risk of postoperative adhesion formation. The outcomes measured are the incidence of postoperative adhesions, complications related to the formation of adhesions, and further intervention relative to adhesive disease. Medline, EMBASE, and The Cochrane Library were searched for articles published in English from 1990 to March 2009, using appropriate controlled vocabulary and key words. Results were restricted to systematic reviews, randomized control trials/controlled clinical trials, cohort studies, and meta-analyses specifically addressing postoperative adhesions, adhesion prevention, and adhesive barriers. Searches were updated on a regular basis and incorporated in the guideline to March 2009. Grey (unpublished) literature was identified through searching the websites of health technology assessment and health technology assessment-related agencies, clinical practice guideline collections, clinical trial registries, and national and international medical specialty societies. The quality of evidence was rated using the criteria described in the Report of the Canadian Task Force on Preventive Health Care SUMMARY STATEMENTS: 1. Meticulous surgical technique is a means of preventing adhesions. This includes minimizing tissue trauma, achieving optimal hemostasis, minimizing the risk of infection, and avoiding contaminants (e.g., fecal matter) and the use of foreign materials (e.g., talcum powder) when possible. (II-2). 2. The risk of adhesions increases with the total number of abdominal and pelvic surgeries performed on one patient; every

  20. Kindlin-1 regulates integrin dynamics and adhesion turnover.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Margadant, Coert; Kreft, Maaike; Zambruno, Giovanna; Sonnenberg, Arnoud

    2013-01-01

    Loss-of-function mutations in the gene encoding the integrin co-activator kindlin-1 cause Kindler syndrome. We report a novel kindlin-1-deficient keratinocyte cell line derived from a Kindler syndrome patient. Despite the expression of kindlin-2, the patient's cells display several hallmarks related to reduced function of β1 integrins, including abnormal cell morphology, cell adhesion, cell spreading, focal adhesion assembly, and cell migration. Defective cell adhesion was aggravated by kindlin-2 depletion, indicating that kindlin-2 can compensate to a certain extent for the loss of kindlin-1. Intriguingly, β1 at the cell-surface was aberrantly glycosylated in the patient's cells, and its expression was considerably reduced, both in cells in vitro and in the patient's epidermis. Reconstitution with wild-type kindlin-1 but not with a β1-binding defective mutant restored the aberrant β1 expression and glycosylation, and normalized cell morphology, adhesion, spreading, and migration. Furthermore, the expression of wild-type kindlin-1, but not of the integrin-binding-defective mutant, increased the stability of integrin-mediated cell-matrix adhesions and enhanced the redistribution of internalized integrins to the cell surface. Thus, these data uncover a role for kindlin-1 in the regulation of integrin trafficking and adhesion turnover.

  1. Kindlin-1 regulates integrin dynamics and adhesion turnover.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Coert Margadant

    Full Text Available Loss-of-function mutations in the gene encoding the integrin co-activator kindlin-1 cause Kindler syndrome. We report a novel kindlin-1-deficient keratinocyte cell line derived from a Kindler syndrome patient. Despite the expression of kindlin-2, the patient's cells display several hallmarks related to reduced function of β1 integrins, including abnormal cell morphology, cell adhesion, cell spreading, focal adhesion assembly, and cell migration. Defective cell adhesion was aggravated by kindlin-2 depletion, indicating that kindlin-2 can compensate to a certain extent for the loss of kindlin-1. Intriguingly, β1 at the cell-surface was aberrantly glycosylated in the patient's cells, and its expression was considerably reduced, both in cells in vitro and in the patient's epidermis. Reconstitution with wild-type kindlin-1 but not with a β1-binding defective mutant restored the aberrant β1 expression and glycosylation, and normalized cell morphology, adhesion, spreading, and migration. Furthermore, the expression of wild-type kindlin-1, but not of the integrin-binding-defective mutant, increased the stability of integrin-mediated cell-matrix adhesions and enhanced the redistribution of internalized integrins to the cell surface. Thus, these data uncover a role for kindlin-1 in the regulation of integrin trafficking and adhesion turnover.

  2. Laminin-dependent and laminin-independent adhesion of human melanoma cells to sulfatides

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Roberts, D D; Wewer, U M; Liotta, L A

    1988-01-01

    Sulfatides (galactosylceramide-I3-sulfate) but not neutral glycolipids or gangliosides adsorbed on plastic promote adhesion of the human melanoma cell line G361. Direct adhesion of G361 cells requires densities of sulfatide greater than 1 pmol/mm2. In the presence of laminin, however, specific...... adhesion of G361 cells to sulfatide or seminolipid (galactosylalkylacyl-glycerol-I3-sulfate) but not to other lipids is strongly stimulated and requires only 25 fmol/mm2 of adsorbed lipid. The effects of laminin and sulfatide on adhesion are synergistic, suggesting that laminin is mediating adhesion...... by cross-linking receptors on the melanoma cell surface to sulfatide adsorbed on the plastic. Although thrombospondin binds to sulfatides and G361 cells, it does not enhance, but rather inhibits direct and laminin-dependent G361 cell adhesion to sulfatide. In contrast, C32 melanoma cells also adhere...

  3. Biomimetic emulsions reveal the effect of homeostatic pressure on cell-cell adhesion

    CERN Document Server

    Pontani, Lea-Laetitia; Viasnoff, Virgile; Brujic, Jasna

    2012-01-01

    Cell-cell contacts in tissues are continuously subject to mechanical forces due to homeostatic pressure and active cytoskeleton dynamics. While much is known about the molecular pathways of adhesion, the role of mechanics is less well understood. To isolate the role of pressure we present a dense packing of functionalized emulsion droplets in which surface interactions are tuned to mimic those of real cells. By visualizing the microstructure in 3D we find that a threshold compression force is necessary to overcome electrostatic repulsion and surface elasticity and establish protein-mediated adhesion. Varying the droplet interaction potential maps out a phase diagram for adhesion as a function of force and salt concentration. Remarkably, fitting the data with our theoretical model predicts binder concentrations in the adhesion areas that are similar to those found in real cells. Moreover, we quantify the adhesion size dependence on the applied force and thus reveal adhesion strengthening with increasing homeos...

  4. Cell adhesion heterogeneity reinforces tumour cell dissemination: novel insights from a mathematical model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reher, David; Klink, Barbara; Deutsch, Andreas; Voss-Böhme, Anja

    2017-08-11

    Cancer cell invasion, dissemination, and metastasis have been linked to an epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT) of individual tumour cells. During EMT, adhesion molecules like E-cadherin are downregulated and the decrease of cell-cell adhesion allows tumour cells to dissociate from the primary tumour mass. This complex process depends on intracellular cues that are subject to genetic and epigenetic variability, as well as extrinsic cues from the local environment resulting in a spatial heterogeneity in the adhesive phenotype of individual tumour cells. Here, we use a novel mathematical model to study how adhesion heterogeneity, influenced by intrinsic and extrinsic factors, affects the dissemination of tumour cells from an epithelial cell population. The model is a multiscale cellular automaton that couples intracellular adhesion receptor regulation with cell-cell adhesion. Simulations of our mathematical model indicate profound effects of adhesion heterogeneity on tumour cell dissemination. In particular, we show that a large variation of intracellular adhesion receptor concentrations in a cell population reinforces cell dissemination, regardless of extrinsic cues mediated through the local cell density. However, additional control of adhesion receptor concentration through the local cell density, which can be assumed in healthy cells, weakens the effect. Furthermore, we provide evidence that adhesion heterogeneity can explain the remarkable differences in adhesion receptor concentrations of epithelial and mesenchymal phenotypes observed during EMT and might drive early dissemination of tumour cells. Our results suggest that adhesion heterogeneity may be a universal trigger to reinforce cell dissemination in epithelial cell populations. This effect can be at least partially compensated by a control of adhesion receptor regulation through neighbouring cells. Accordingly, our findings explain how both an increase in intra-tumour adhesion heterogeneity and the

  5. Polymer Claw: Instant Underwater Adhesive

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-09-24

    3.3 UNDERWATER LAP - SHEAR ADHESION 4 3.4 FULL POLYMER CLAW PROTOTYPE 6 ± NEXT STEPS 7 4.1 BIOFOULED SURFACES 7 4.2 RHEOLOGICAL MEASUREMENTS 7...tested underwater, the lap shear adhesion was ~200x stronger than commercial underwater adhesives after 1 hour. This month also marked the...calibrated to apply a force in the 3.4-3.7 lb. range over a 0.5 sq. in. area. 3.3 Underwater Lap - Shear Adhesion The most important test of the improved

  6. Studies on the Adhesive Property of Snail Adhesive Mucus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Newar, Janu; Ghatak, Archana

    2015-11-10

    Many gastropod molluscs are known to secrete mucus which allow these animals to adhere to a substrate while foraging over it. While the mucus is known to provide strong adhesion to both dry and wet surfaces, including both horizontal and vertical ones, no systematic study has been carried out to understand the strength of such adhesion under different conditions. We report here results from preliminary studies on adhesion characteristics of the mucus of a snail found in eastern India, Macrochlamys indica. When perturbed, the snail was found to secrete its adhesive mucus, which was collected and subjected to regular adhesion tests. The hydrated mucus was used as such, and also as mixed with buffer of different pH. These experiments suggest that the mucus was slightly alkaline, and showed the maximum adhesion strength of 9 kPa when present in an alkaline buffer. Preliminary studies indicate that adhesive force is related to the ability of the mucus to incorporate water. In alkaline condition, the gel like mass that it forms, incorporate water from a wet surface and enable strong adhesion.

  7. Soluble NCAM

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Secher, Thomas

    2008-01-01

    The neural cell adhesion molecule (NCAM) is a membrane-bound glycoprotein involved in homophilic interactions that facilitate cell-cell adhesion. In addition to a number of membrane-bound isoforms, NCAM also exists in several soluble isoforms that have been identified in cerebrospinal fluid, blood...... serum, brain tissue, and cell culture media. Soluble NCAM can be produced in a number of ways, such as alternative splicing of the transcript from NCAM1 and enzymatic processing of the extracellular domain at the cell membrane. Soluble NCAM interferes with homophilic NCAM interactions mediated...... by membrane-bound NCAM, thereby reducing NCAM-dependent adhesion, and can modulate neurite outgrowth in vitro-a property that likely is dose-dependent. The biological effects of overexpressing soluble NCAM in transgenic animals include a perturbation of synaptic connectivity and the development of abnormal...

  8. Stretchable, Adhesion-Tunable Dry Adhesive by Surface Wrinkling

    KAUST Repository

    Jeong, Hoon Eui

    2010-02-16

    We introduce a simple yet robust method of fabricating a stretchable, adhesion-tunable dry adhesive by combining replica molding and surface wrinkling. By utilizing a thin, wrinkled polydimethyl siloxane (PDMS) sheet with a thickness of 1 mm with built-in micropillars, active, dynamic control of normal and shear adhesion was achieved. Relatively strong normal (∼10.8 N/cm2) and shear adhesion (∼14.7 N/cm2) forces could be obtained for a fully extended (strained) PDMS sheet (prestrain of∼3%), whereas the forces could be rapidly reduced to nearly zero once the prestrain was released (prestrain of ∼0.5%). Moreover, durability tests demonstrated that the adhesion strength in both the normal and shear directions was maintained over more than 100 cycles of attachment and detachment. © 2010 American Chemical Society.

  9. Improved Adhesion and Compliancy of Hierarchical Fibrillar Adhesives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yasong; Gates, Byron D; Menon, Carlo

    2015-08-05

    The gecko relies on van der Waals forces to cling onto surfaces with a variety of topography and composition. The hierarchical fibrillar structures on their climbing feet, ranging from mesoscale to nanoscale, are hypothesized to be key elements for the animal to conquer both smooth and rough surfaces. An epoxy-based artificial hierarchical fibrillar adhesive was prepared to study the influence of the hierarchical structures on the properties of a dry adhesive. The presented experiments highlight the advantages of a hierarchical structure despite a reduction of overall density and aspect ratio of nanofibrils. In contrast to an adhesive containing only nanometer-size fibrils, the hierarchical fibrillar adhesives exhibited a higher adhesion force and better compliancy when tested on an identical substrate.

  10. Cell adhesion to fibrillin-1: identification of an Arg-Gly-Asp-dependent synergy region and a heparin-binding site that regulates focal adhesion formation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bax, Daniel V; Mahalingam, Yashithra; Cain, Stuart

    2007-01-01

    We have defined the molecular basis of cell adhesion to fibrillin-1, the major structural component of extracellular microfibrils that are associated with elastic fibres. Using human dermal fibroblasts, and recombinant domain swap fragments containing the Arg-Gly-Asp motif, we have demonstrated a......, and confirmed their role in focal adhesion formation. These integrin and syndecan adhesion motifs juxtaposed on fibrillin-1 are evolutionarily conserved and reminiscent of similar functional elements on fibronectin, highlighting their crucial functional importance....... a requirement for upstream domains for integrin-alpha(5)beta(1)-mediated cell adhesion and migration. An adjacent heparin-binding site, which supports focal adhesion formation, was mapped to the fibrillin-1 TB5 motif. Site-directed mutagenesis revealed two arginine residues that are crucial for heparin binding...

  11. 21 CFR 880.5240 - Medical adhesive tape and adhesive bandage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Medical adhesive tape and adhesive bandage. 880... Personal Use Therapeutic Devices § 880.5240 Medical adhesive tape and adhesive bandage. (a) Identification. A medical adhesive tape or adhesive bandage is a device intended for medical purposes that consists...

  12. Effect of fibril shape on adhesive properties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soto, Daniel; Hill, Ginel; Parness, Aaron; Esparza, Noé; Cutkosky, Mark; Kenny, Tom

    2010-08-01

    Research into the gecko's adhesive system revealed a unique architecture for adhesives using tiny hairs. By using a stiff material (β-keratin) to create a highly structured adhesive, the gecko's system demonstrates properties not seen in traditional pressure-sensitive adhesives which use a soft, unstructured planar layer. In contrast to pressure sensitive adhesives, the gecko adhesive displays frictional adhesion, in which increased shear force allows it to withstand higher normal loads. Synthetic fibrillar adhesives have been fabricated but not all demonstrate this frictional adhesion property. Here we report the dual-axis force testing of single silicone rubber pillars from synthetic adhesive arrays. We find that the shape of the adhesive pillar dictates whether frictional adhesion or pressure-sensitive behavior is observed. This work suggests that both types of behavior can be achieved with structures much larger than gecko terminal structures. It also indicates that subtle differences in the shape of these pillars can significantly influence their properties.

  13. Regulative mechanisms of chondrocyte adhesion

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schmal, Hagen; Mehlhorn, Alexander T; Fehrenbach, Miriam

    2006-01-01

    Interaction between chondrocytes and extracellular matrix is considered a key factor in the generation of grafts for matrix-associated chondrocyte transplantation. Therefore, our objective was to study the influence of differentiation status on cellular attachment. Adhesion of chondrocytes...... to collagen type II increased after removal from native cartilage up to the third day in monolayer in a dose-dependent manner. Following dedifferentiation after the second passage, adhesion to collagen types I (-84%) and II (-46%) decreased, whereas adhesion to fibrinogen (+59%) and fibronectin (+43......%) increased. A cartilage construct was developed based on a clinically established collagen type I scaffold. In this matrix, more than 80% of the cells could be immobilized by mechanisms of adhesion, filtration, and cell entrapment. Confocal laser microscopy revealed focal adhesion sites as points of cell...

  14. Biological adhesives and fastening devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wolpert, H. D.

    2012-04-01

    Sea creatures are a leading source to some of the more interesting discoveries in adhesives. Because sea water naturally breaks down even the strongest conventional adhesive, an alternative is important that could be used in repairing or fabricating anything that might have regular contact with moisture such as: Repairing broken and shattered bones, developing a surgical adhesive, use in the dental work, repairing and building ships, and manufacturing plywood. Some of nature's prototypes include the common mussel, limpet, some bacteria and abalone. As we learn more about these adhesives we are also developing non adhesive fasteners, such as mimicked after studying the octopus, burdock burrs (i.e. Velcro®) and the gecko.

  15. WITHDRAWN: The Neural Cell Adhesion Molecule NCAM2/OCAM/RNCAM, a Close Relative to NCAM.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kulahin, Nikolaj; Walmod, Peter S

    2008-03-27

    Cell adhesion molecules (CAMs) constitute a large class of plasma membrane-anchored proteins that mediate attachment between neighboring cells and between cells and the surrounding extracellular matrix (ECM). However, CAMs are more than simple mediators of cell adhesion. The neural cell adhesion molecule (NCAM) is a well characterized, ubiquitously expressed CAM that is highly expressed in the nervous system. In addition to mediating cell adhesion, NCAM participates in a multitude of cellular events, including survival, migration, and differentiation of cells, outgrowth of neurites, and formation and plasticity of synapses. NCAM shares an overall sequence identity of approximately 44% with the neural cell adhesion molecule 2 (NCAM2), a protein also known as olfactory cell adhesion molecule (OCAM) and Rb-8 neural cell adhesion molecule (RNCAM), and the region-for-region sequence homology between the two proteins suggests that they are transcribed from paralogous genes. However, very little is known about the function of NCAM2, although it originally was described more than 20 years ago. In this review we summarize the known properties and functions of NCAM2 and describe some of the differences and similarities between NCAM and NCAM2.

  16. Adhesion testing device

    Science.gov (United States)

    LaPeyronnie, Glenn M. (Inventor); Huff, Charles M. (Inventor)

    2010-01-01

    The present invention provides a testing apparatus and method for testing the adhesion of a coating to a surface. The invention also includes an improved testing button or dolly for use with the testing apparatus and a self aligning button hook or dolly interface on the testing apparatus. According to preferred forms, the apparatus and method of the present invention are simple, portable, battery operated rugged, and inexpensive to manufacture and use, are readily adaptable to a wide variety of uses, and provide effective and accurate testing results. The device includes a linear actuator driven by an electric motor coupled to the actuator through a gearbox and a rotatable shaft. The electronics for the device are contained in the head section of the device. At the contact end of the device, is positioned a self aligning button hook, attached below the load cell located on the actuator shaft.

  17. Dynamics of Nanoparticle Adhesion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carrillo, J.-M. Y.; Dobrynin, A. V.

    2013-03-01

    We performed molecular dynamics simulations and theoretical analysis of nanoparticle pulling off from adhesive substrates. Our theoretical model of nanoparticle detachment is based on the Kramers solution of the stochastic barrier crossing in effective one dimensional potential well. The activation energy, ΔE , for nanoparticle detachment first decreases linearly with increasing the magnitude of the applied force, f, then it follows a power law ΔE ~(f * - f)3/2 as magnitude of the pulling force f approaches a critical detachment force value, f*. These two different regimes in activation energy dependence on magnitude of the applied force are confirmed by analyzing nanoparticle detachment in effective one dimensional potential obtained by Weighted Histogram Analysis Method. Simulations show that detachment of nanoparticle proceeds through neck formation such that magnitude of the activation energy is determined by balancing surface energy of the neck connecting particle to a substrate with elastic energy of nanoparticle deformation. In this regime the activation energy at zero applied force, ΔE0 , for nanoparticle with radius, Rp, shear modulus, G, surface energy, γp, and work of adhesion, W, is a universal function of the dimensionless parameter δ ~γpW - 2 / 3(GRp)-1/3 . Simulation data are described by a scaling function ΔE0 ~γp5 / 2 Rp1 / 2 G - 3 / 2δ - 3 . 75 . Molecular dynamics simulations of nanoparticle detachment show that the Kramers approach fails in the vicinity of the critical detachment force f* where activation energy barrier becomes smaller than kB T . NSF DMR-1004576

  18. Universal adhesives: the next evolution in adhesive dentistry?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alex, Gary

    2015-01-01

    Every so often a new material, technique, or technological breakthrough spurs a paradigm shift in the way dentistry is practiced. The development and evolution of reliable enamel and dentin bonding agents is one such example. Indeed, the so-called "cosmetic revolution" in dentistry blossomed in large part due to dramatic advances in adhesive technology. It is the ability to bond various materials in a reasonably predictable fashion to both enamel and dentin substrates that enables dentists to routinely place porcelain veneers, direct and indirect composites, and a plethora of other restorative and esthetic materials. In fact, the longevity and predictability of many (if not most) current restorative procedures is wholly predicated on the dentist's ability to bond various materials to tooth tissues. Adhesive systems have progressed from the largely ineffective systems of the 1970s and early 1980s to the relatively successful total- and self-etching systems of today. The latest players in the adhesive marketplace are the so-called "universal adhesives." In theory, these systems have the potential to significantly simplify and expedite adhesive protocols and may indeed represent the next evolution in adhesive dentistry. But what defines a universal system, and are all these new systems truly "universal" and everything they are claimed to be? This article will examine the origin, chemistry, strengths, weaknesses, and clinical relevance of this new genre of dental adhesives.

  19. Enhanced adhesion by gecko-inspired hierarchical fibrillar adhesives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murphy, Michael P; Kim, Seok; Sitti, Metin

    2009-04-01

    The complex structures that allow geckos to repeatably adhere to surfaces consist of multilevel branching fibers with specialized tips. We present a novel technique for fabricating similar multilevel structures from polymer materials and demonstrate the fabrication of arrays of two- and three-level structures, wherein each level terminates in flat mushroom-type tips. Adhesion experiments are conducted on two-level fiber arrays on a 12-mm-diameter glass hemisphere, which exhibit both increased adhesion and interface toughness over one-level fiber samples and unstructured control samples. These adhesion enhancements are the result of increased surface conformation as well as increased extension during detachment.

  20. Lipid Raft is required for PSGL-1 ligation induced HL-60 cell adhesion on ICAM-1.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tingshuang Xu

    Full Text Available P-selectin glycoprotein ligand-1 (PSGL-1 and integrins are adhesion molecules that play critical roles in host defense and innate immunity. PSGL-1 mediates leukocyte rolling and primes leukocytes for integrin-mediated adhesion. However, the mechanism that PSGL-1 as a rolling receptor in regulating integrin activation has not been well characterized. Here, we investigate the function of lipid raft in regulating PSGL-1 induced β2 integrin-mediated HL-60 cells adhesion. PSGL-1 ligation with antibody enhances the β2 integrin activation and β2 integrin-dependent adhesion to ICAM-1. Importantly, with the treatment of methyl-β-cyclodextrin (MβCD, we confirm the role of lipid raft in regulating the activation of β2 integrin. Furthermore, we find that the protein level of PSGL-1 decreased in raft fractions in MβCD treated cells. PSGL-1 ligation induces the recruitment of spleen tyrosine kinase (Syk, a tyrosine kinase and Vav1 (the pivotal downstream effector of Syk signaling pathway involved in cytoskeleton regulation to lipid raft. Inhibition of Syk activity with pharmacologic inhibitor strongly reduces HL-60 cells adhesion, implicating Syk is crucial for PSGL-1 mediated β2 integrin activation. Taken together, we report that ligation of PSGL-1 on HL-60 cells activates β2 integrin, for which lipid raft integrity and Syk activation are responsible. These findings have shed new light on the mechanisms that connect leukocyte initial rolling with subsequent adhesion.

  1. Characterization of the in vitro binding and inhibition kinetics of primary amine oxidase/vascular adhesion protein-1 by glucosamine.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Olivieri, Aldo

    2012-04-01

    Primary-amine oxidase (PrAO) catalyzes the oxidative deamination of endogenous and exogenous primary amines and also functions, in some tissues, as an inflammation-inducible endothelial factor, known as vascular adhesion protein-1. VAP-1 mediates the slow rolling and adhesion of lymphocytes to endothelial cells in a number of inflammatory conditions, including inflammation of the synovium.

  2. ACAM, a novel member of the neural IgCAM family, mediates anterior neural tube closure in a primitive chordate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morales Diaz, Heidi; Mejares, Emil; Newman-Smith, Erin; Smith, William C

    2016-01-01

    The neural IgCAM family of cell adhesion molecules, which includes NCAM and related molecules, has evolved via gene duplication and alternative splicing to allow for a wide range of isoforms with distinct functions and homophilic binding properties. A search for neural IgCAMs in ascidians (Ciona intestinalis, Ciona savignyi, and Phallusia mammillata) has identified a novel set of truncated family members that, unlike the known members, lack fibronectin III domains and consist of only repeated Ig domains. Within the tunicates this form appears to be unique to the ascidians, and it was designated ACAM, for Ascidian Cell Adhesion Molecule. In C. intestinalis ACAM is expressed in the developing neural plate and neural tube, with strongest expression in the anterior sensory vesicle precursor. Unlike the two other conventional neural IgCAMs in C. intestinalis, which are expressed maternally and throughout the morula and blastula stages, ACAM expression initiates at the gastrula stage. Moreover, C. intestinalis ACAM is a target of the homeodomain transcription factor OTX, which plays an essential role in the development of the anterior central nervous system. Morpholino (MO) knockdown shows that ACAM is required for neural tube closure. In MO-injected embryos neural tube closure was normal caudally, but the anterior neuropore remained open. A similar phenotype was seen with overexpression of a secreted version of ACAM. The presence of ACAM in ascidians highlights the diversity of this gene family in morphogenesis and neurodevelopment. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Cell Adhesion as Dynamic Interplay of Lock-and-Key, Generic and Elastic Forces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sackmann, E.; Goennenwein, S.

    The selectivity of cell-cell and cell-tissue adhesion is determined by specific short range forces between cell surface proteins. Long range entropic interfacial forces (mediated by repeller molecules and membrane undulations) and adhesion-induced elastic stresses in the cell envelope serve the fine control of the strength and duration of adhesion. The initial step of cell adhesion exhibits typical features of a first order wetting transition resulting in the formation of tight adhesion domains by lateral phase separation of receptors. External lift forces can cause shrinking and unbinding of adhesion sites if the receptors are immobile but induce domain growth if they are mobile. Strong adhesion domains (resisting nano-Newton forces) can form by commitment of some 10,000 receptors enabling cells to control adhesion strength rapidly by varying the receptor and repeller densities on cell surfaces through endocytosis and exocytosis. The adhesion domains can function as constraint reaction spaces facilitating the local assembly of actin stress fibers and control cell signalling processes as shown for the activation of immunological responses by immunological synapses.

  4. Adhesion of smooth and rough phenotypes of Flavobacterium psychrophilum to polystyrene surfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Högfors-Rönnholm, E; Norrgård, J; Wiklund, T

    2015-05-01

    Phenotypic smooth cells of the fish pathogenic bacterium Flavobacterium psychrophilum have previously been reported to be more adhesive to polystyrene surfaces than corresponding rough cells. In this study, the adhesion ability of smooth and rough cells of F. psychrophilum to polystyrene surfaces was investigated in detail with a crystal violet staining method. By treating both polystyrene surfaces with fish mucus and carbohydrates and the bacterial cells with carbohydrates, the involvement of lectins in the adhesion process was investigated. Smooth cells showed significantly higher adhesion ability to untreated polystyrene surfaces compared with corresponding rough cells and increasing water hardness had an inhibitory effect on the adhesion. Treatment of polystyrene surfaces with D-glucose, D-galactose and fish mucus increased the adhesion ability of smooth cells to polystyrene. Furthermore, treatment of the smooth cells with D-glucose, D-galactose and sialic acid decreased the adhesion ability of the cells, indicating that the adhesion is likely mediated by complementary lectins on the surface of the cells. Sodium (meta)periodate treatment of smooth cells also decreased the adhesion ability to polystyrene, suggesting that the lectins, such as the dominating sialic acid-binding lectin, are probably localized in the extracellular polysaccharides surrounding the cells. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  5. T-cell adhesion induced by proteoglycan-immobilized cytokine MIP-1 beta.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanaka, Y; Adams, D H; Hubscher, S; Hirano, H; Siebenlist, U; Shaw, S

    1993-01-07

    Lymphocyte migration from blood into tissue depends on integrin-mediated adhesion to endothelium. Adhesion requires not only integrin ligands on the endothelium, but also activation signals because T-cell integrins cannot bind well until they are activated. The physiological 'triggers' for T-cell adhesion are unknown, but cytokines may be good candidates as they are released during inflammation and trigger adhesion in neutrophils and monocytes. We have identified a cytokine, macrophage inflammatory protein-1 beta (MIP-1 beta), that induces both chemotaxis and adhesion of T cells; MIP-1 beta is most effective at augmenting adhesion of CD8+ T cells to the vascular cell adhesion molecule VCAM-1. We reasoned that, as cytokines in vivo will be rapidly washed away, MIP-1 beta might be bound to endothelial surfaces and so induce adhesion in its immobilized form. Here we show that: (1) MIP-1 beta is present on lymph node endothelium; (2) immobilized MIP-1 beta induces binding of T cells to VCAM-1 in vitro. MIP-1 beta was immobilized by binding to proteoglycan: a conjugate of heparin with bovine serum albumin and cellular proteoglycan CD44 were both effective. We propose that MIP-1 beta and other cytokines with glycosaminoglycan-binding sites will bind to and be presented by endothelial proteoglycans to trigger adhesion selectively not only of lymphocyte subsets, but also of other cell types.

  6. Characterization of the adhesive areas in Sepia tuberculata (Mollusca, Cephalopoda).

    Science.gov (United States)

    von Byern, Janek; Scott, Robyn; Griffiths, Charles; Micossi, Andrea; Grunwald, Ingo; Cyran, Norbert

    2011-10-01

    Adhesion in cephalopods is either mechanical, involving a reduced-pressure system of the arm and tentacle suckers, or is chemically mediated by special adhesive gland structures (as proposed for Euprymna, Idiosepius, and Nautilus). Four species of Sepia (S. typica, S. papillata, S. pulchra, and S. tuberculata) possess grooved structures on the ventral mantle surface and on the fourth arm pair, which are used to attach mechanically to the substratum. Because these areas are often partly covered with sand or debris, it has been hypothesized that chemical substances were involved in this attachment process. This study provides a histochemical and ultrastructural description of the glandular epithelium in the adhesive area of Sepia tuberculata. Two specific glandular cells (Type 1 and Type 2) are present in the epithelium, which differ clearly in their granule size and cellular structure. The aggregation of both cell types and their simultaneous secretion suggest that the secretions of both cell types work synergistically providing a two-component adhesive system which supports the primarily mechanical sucker adhesion by making the arm surface sticky. Copyright © 2011 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  7. Prostaglandins in Cancer Cell Adhesion, Migration, and Invasion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David G. Menter

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Prostaglandins exert a profound influence over the adhesive, migratory, and invasive behavior of cells during the development and progression of cancer. Cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2 and microsomal prostaglandin E2 synthase-1 (mPGES-1 are upregulated in inflammation and cancer. This results in the production of prostaglandin E2 (PGE2, which binds to and activates G-protein-coupled prostaglandin E1-4 receptors (EP1-4. Selectively targeting the COX-2/mPGES-1/PGE2/EP1-4 axis of the prostaglandin pathway can reduce the adhesion, migration, invasion, and angiogenesis. Once stimulated by prostaglandins, cadherin adhesive connections between epithelial or endothelial cells are lost. This enables cells to invade through the underlying basement membrane and extracellular matrix (ECM. Interactions with the ECM are mediated by cell surface integrins by “outside-in signaling” through Src and focal adhesion kinase (FAK and/or “inside-out signaling” through talins and kindlins. Combining the use of COX-2/mPGES-1/PGE2/EP1-4 axis-targeted molecules with those targeting cell surface adhesion receptors or their downstream signaling molecules may enhance cancer therapy.

  8. The FRIABLE1 gene product affects cell adhesion in Arabidopsis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lutz Neumetzler

    Full Text Available Cell adhesion in plants is mediated predominantly by pectins, a group of complex cell wall associated polysaccharides. An Arabidopsis mutant, friable1 (frb1, was identified through a screen of T-DNA insertion lines that exhibited defective cell adhesion. Interestingly, the frb1 plants displayed both cell and organ dissociations and also ectopic defects in organ separation. The FRB1 gene encodes a Golgi-localized, plant specific protein with only weak sequence similarities to known proteins (DUF246. Unlike other cell adhesion deficient mutants, frb1 mutants do not have reduced levels of adhesion related cell wall polymers, such as pectins. Instead, FRB1 affects the abundance of galactose- and arabinose-containing oligosaccharides in the Golgi. Furthermore, frb1 mutants displayed alteration in pectin methylesterification, cell wall associated extensins and xyloglucan microstructure. We propose that abnormal FRB1 action has pleiotropic consequences on wall architecture, affecting both the extensin and pectin matrices, with consequent changes to the biomechanical properties of the wall and middle lamella, thereby influencing cell-cell adhesion.

  9. Focal Adhesion Kinases in Adhesion Structures and Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pierre P. Eleniste

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Cell adhesion to the extracellular matrix (ECM is essential for cell migration, proliferation, and embryonic development. Cells can contact the ECM through a wide range of matrix contact structures such as focal adhesions, podosomes, and invadopodia. Although they are different in structural design and basic function, they share common remodeling proteins such as integrins, talin, paxillin, and the tyrosine kinases FAK, Pyk2, and Src. In this paper, we compare and contrast the basic organization and role of focal adhesions, podosomes, and invadopodia in different cells. In addition, we discuss the role of the tyrosine kinases, FAK, Pyk2, and Src, which are critical for the function of the different adhesion structures. Finally, we discuss the essential role of these tyrosine kinases from the perspective of human diseases.

  10. Photovoltaic module with adhesion promoter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xavier, Grace

    2013-10-08

    Photovoltaic modules with adhesion promoters and methods for fabricating photovoltaic modules with adhesion promoters are described. A photovoltaic module includes a solar cell including a first surface and a second surface, the second surface including a plurality of interspaced back-side contacts. A first glass layer is coupled to the first surface by a first encapsulating layer. A second glass layer is coupled to the second surface by a second encapsulating layer. At least a portion of the second encapsulating layer is bonded directly to the plurality of interspaced back-side contacts by an adhesion promoter.

  11. Structural adhesives directory and databook

    CERN Document Server

    Wilson, Jo

    1996-01-01

    A worldwide directory of commercially available adhesive products for use in a wide range of engineering disciplines. Along with product names and suppliers, basic property data are tabulated and cross-referenced. The book is subdivided according to class of adhesive, with introductions to each class followed by comparison tables and datasheets for each adhesive. The datasheets contain detailed information, from product codes to environmental properties and are therefore of interest across a broad readership. Standardized data will aid the user in cross-comparison between different manufacturers and in easily identifying the required information.

  12. Adhesives from modified soy protein

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Susan [Manhattan, KS; Wang, Donghai [Manhattan, KS; Zhong, Zhikai [Manhattan, KS; Yang, Guang [Shanghai, CN

    2008-08-26

    The present invention provides useful adhesive compositions having similar adhesive properties to conventional UF and PPF resins. The compositions generally include a protein portion and modifying ingredient portion selected from the group consisting of carboxyl-containing compounds, aldehyde-containing compounds, epoxy group-containing compounds, and mixtures thereof. The composition is preferably prepared at a pH level at or near the isoelectric point of the protein. In other preferred forms, the adhesive composition includes a protein portion and a carboxyl-containing group portion.

  13. A local adhesive finger splint.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Macionis, V

    2001-09-01

    A new design of a local static finger splint is proposed. The splint is made by enveloping a length of wire into double-sided adhesive tape. The skin of the region to be immobilized is covered with an adhesive skin dressing, to which the splint is then adhered. This method of attachment gives more freedom in choosing a site of splint application and prevents access obstruction to the wound, blocking of tactile areas, and circulation impairment. The splint is light, low profile, and malleable at ambient temperature. The adhesive splint was used in 5 patients to maintain the first web space open or to immobilize stiff interphalangeal joints in flexion overnight.

  14. Bacterial endotoxin adhesion to different types of orthodontic adhesives

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Priscilla Coutinho ROMUALDO

    Full Text Available Abstract Bacterial endotoxin (LPS adhesion to orthodontic brackets is a known contributing factor to inflammation of the adjacent gingival tissues. Objective The aim of this study was to assess whether LPS adheres to orthodontic adhesive systems, comparing two commercial brands. Material and Methods Forty specimens were fabricated from Transbond XT and Light Bond composite and bonding agent components (n=10/component, then contaminated by immersion in a bacterial endotoxin solution. Contaminated and non-contaminated acrylic resin samples were used as positive and negative control groups, respectively. LPS quantification was performed by the Limulus Amebocyte Lysate QCL-1000™ test. Data obtained were scored and subjected to the Chi-square test using a significance level of 5%. Results There was endotoxin adhesion to all materials (p0.05. There was no significant difference (p>0.05 among commercial brands. Affinity of endotoxin was significantly greater for the bonding agents (p=0.0025. Conclusions LPS adhered to both orthodontic adhesive systems. Regardless of the brand, the endotoxin had higher affinity for the bonding agents than for the composites. There is no previous study assessing the affinity of LPS for orthodontic adhesive systems. This study revealed that LPS adheres to orthodontic adhesive systems. Therefore, additional care is recommended to orthodontic applications of these materials.

  15. Improved adhesive properties of recombinant bifidobacteria expressing the Bifidobacterium bifidum-specific lipoprotein BopA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gleinser, Marita; Grimm, Verena; Zhurina, Daria; Yuan, Jing; Riedel, Christian U

    2012-06-13

    Bifidobacteria belong to one of the predominant bacterial groups in the intestinal microbiota of infants and adults. Several beneficial effects on the health status of their human hosts have been demonstrated making bifidobacteria interesting candidates for probiotic applications. Adhesion of probiotics to the intestinal epithelium is discussed as a prerequisite for colonisation of and persistence in the gastrointestinal tract. In the present study, 15 different strains of bifidobacteria were tested for adhesion. B. bifidum was identified as the species showing highest adhesion to all tested intestinal epithelial cell (IEC) lines. Adhesion of B. bifidum S17 to IECs was strongly reduced after treatment of bacteria with pronase. These results strongly indicate that a proteinaceous cell surface component mediates adhesion of B. bifidum S17 to IECs. In silico analysis of the currently accessible Bifidobacterium genomes identified bopA encoding a lipoprotein as a B. bifidum-specific gene previously shown to function as an adhesin of B. bifidum MIMBb75. The in silico results were confirmed by Southern Blot analysis. Furthermore, Northern Blot analysis demonstrated that bopA is expressed in all B. bifidum strains tested under conditions used to cultivate bacteria for adhesion assays. The BopA gene was successfully expressed in E. coli and purified by Ni-NTA affinity chromatography as a C-terminal His6-fusion. Purified BopA had an inhibitory effect on adhesion of B. bifidum S17 to IECs. Moreover, bopA was successfully expressed in B. bifidum S17 and B. longum/infantis E18. Strains overexpressing bopA showed enhanced adhesion to IECs, clearly demonstrating a role of BopA in adhesion of B. bifidum strains. BopA was identified as a B. bifidum-specific protein involved in adhesion to IECs. Bifidobacterium strains expressing bopA show enhanced adhesion. Our results represent the first report on recombinant bifidobacteria with improved adhesive properties.

  16. Improved adhesive properties of recombinant bifidobacteria expressing the Bifidobacterium bifidum-specific lipoprotein BopA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gleinser Marita

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Bifidobacteria belong to one of the predominant bacterial groups in the intestinal microbiota of infants and adults. Several beneficial effects on the health status of their human hosts have been demonstrated making bifidobacteria interesting candidates for probiotic applications. Adhesion of probiotics to the intestinal epithelium is discussed as a prerequisite for colonisation of and persistence in the gastrointestinal tract. Results In the present study, 15 different strains of bifidobacteria were tested for adhesion. B. bifidum was identified as the species showing highest adhesion to all tested intestinal epithelial cell (IEC lines. Adhesion of B. bifidum S17 to IECs was strongly reduced after treatment of bacteria with pronase. These results strongly indicate that a proteinaceous cell surface component mediates adhesion of B. bifidum S17 to IECs. In silico analysis of the currently accessible Bifidobacterium genomes identified bopA encoding a lipoprotein as a B. bifidum-specific gene previously shown to function as an adhesin of B. bifidum MIMBb75. The in silico results were confirmed by Southern Blot analysis. Furthermore, Northern Blot analysis demonstrated that bopA is expressed in all B. bifidum strains tested under conditions used to cultivate bacteria for adhesion assays. The BopA gene was successfully expressed in E. coli and purified by Ni-NTA affinity chromatography as a C-terminal His6-fusion. Purified BopA had an inhibitory effect on adhesion of B. bifidum S17 to IECs. Moreover, bopA was successfully expressed in B. bifidum S17 and B. longum/infantis E18. Strains overexpressing bopA showed enhanced adhesion to IECs, clearly demonstrating a role of BopA in adhesion of B. bifidum strains. Conclusions BopA was identified as a B. bifidum-specific protein involved in adhesion to IECs. Bifidobacterium strains expressing bopA show enhanced adhesion. Our results represent the first report on recombinant

  17. Adhesive capsulitis: a review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ewald, Anthony

    2011-02-15

    Adhesive capsulitis is a common, yet poorly understood, condition causing pain and loss of range of motion in the shoulder. It can occur in isolation or concomitantly with other shoulder conditions (e.g., rotator cuff tendinopathy, bursitis) or diabetes mellitus. It is often self-limited, but can persist for years and may never fully resolve. The diagnosis is usually clinical, although imaging can help rule out other conditions. The differential diagnosis includes acromioclavicular arthropathy, autoimmune disease (e.g., systemic lupus erythematosus, rheumatoid arthritis), biceps tendinopathy, glenohumeral osteoarthritis, neoplasm, rotator cuff tendinopathy or tear (with or without impingement), and subacromial and subdeltoid bursitis. Several treatment options are commonly used, but few have high-level evidence to support them. Because the condition is often self-limited, observation and reassurance may be considered; however, this may not be acceptable to many patients because of the painful and debilitating nature of the condition. Nonsurgical treatments include analgesics (e.g., acetaminophen, nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs), oral prednisone, and intra-articular corticosteroid injections. Home exercise regimens and physical therapy are often prescribed. Surgical treatments include manipulation of the joint under anesthesia and capsular release.

  18. Expression of the immunoglobulin superfamily cell adhesion molecules in the developing spinal cord and dorsal root ganglion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gu, Zirong; Imai, Fumiyasu; Kim, In Jung; Fujita, Hiroko; Katayama, Kei ichi; Mori, Kensaku; Yoshihara, Yoshihiro; Yoshida, Yutaka

    2015-01-01

    Cell adhesion molecules belonging to the immunoglobulin superfamily (IgSF) control synaptic specificity through hetero- or homophilic interactions in different regions of the nervous system. In the developing spinal cord, monosynaptic connections of exquisite specificity form between proprioceptive sensory neurons and motor neurons, however, it is not known whether IgSF molecules participate in regulating this process. To determine whether IgSF molecules influence the establishment of synaptic specificity in sensory-motor circuits, we examined the expression of 157 IgSF genes in the developing dorsal root ganglion (DRG) and spinal cord by in situ hybridization assays. We find that many IgSF genes are expressed by sensory and motor neurons in the mouse developing DRG and spinal cord. For instance, Alcam, Mcam, and Ocam are expressed by a subset of motor neurons in the ventral spinal cord. Further analyses show that Ocam is expressed by obturator but not quadriceps motor neurons, suggesting that Ocam may regulate sensory-motor specificity in these sensory-motor reflex arcs. Electrophysiological analysis shows no obvious defects in synaptic specificity of monosynaptic sensory-motor connections involving obturator and quadriceps motor neurons in Ocam mutant mice. Since a subset of Ocam+ motor neurons also express Alcam, Alcam or other functionally redundant IgSF molecules may compensate for Ocam in controlling sensory-motor specificity. Taken together, these results reveal that IgSF molecules are broadly expressed by sensory and motor neurons during development, and that Ocam and other IgSF molecules may have redundant functions in controlling the specificity of sensory-motor circuits.

  19. Expression of the immunoglobulin superfamily cell adhesion molecules in the developing spinal cord and dorsal root ganglion.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zirong Gu

    Full Text Available Cell adhesion molecules belonging to the immunoglobulin superfamily (IgSF control synaptic specificity through hetero- or homophilic interactions in different regions of the nervous system. In the developing spinal cord, monosynaptic connections of exquisite specificity form between proprioceptive sensory neurons and motor neurons, however, it is not known whether IgSF molecules participate in regulating this process. To determine whether IgSF molecules influence the establishment of synaptic specificity in sensory-motor circuits, we examined the expression of 157 IgSF genes in the developing dorsal root ganglion (DRG and spinal cord by in situ hybridization assays. We find that many IgSF genes are expressed by sensory and motor neurons in the mouse developing DRG and spinal cord. For instance, Alcam, Mcam, and Ocam are expressed by a subset of motor neurons in the ventral spinal cord. Further analyses show that Ocam is expressed by obturator but not quadriceps motor neurons, suggesting that Ocam may regulate sensory-motor specificity in these sensory-motor reflex arcs. Electrophysiological analysis shows no obvious defects in synaptic specificity of monosynaptic sensory-motor connections involving obturator and quadriceps motor neurons in Ocam mutant mice. Since a subset of Ocam+ motor neurons also express Alcam, Alcam or other functionally redundant IgSF molecules may compensate for Ocam in controlling sensory-motor specificity. Taken together, these results reveal that IgSF molecules are broadly expressed by sensory and motor neurons during development, and that Ocam and other IgSF molecules may have redundant functions in controlling the specificity of sensory-motor circuits.

  20. Application of Organosilane Monolayer Template to Quantitative Evaluation of Cancer Cell Adhesive Ability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanii, Takashi; Sasaki, Kosuke; Ichisawa, Kota; Demura, Takanori; Beppu, Yuichi; Vu, Hoan Anh; Thanh Chi, Hoan; Yamamoto, Hideaki; Sato, Yuko

    2011-06-01

    The adhesive ability of two human pancreatic cancer cell lines was evaluated using organosilane monolayer templates (OMTs). Using the OMT, the spreading area of adhered cells can be limited, and this enables us to focus on the initial attachment process of adhesion. Moreover, it becomes possible to arrange the cells in an array and to quantitatively evaluate the number of attached cells. The adhesive ability of the cancer cells cultured on the OMT was controlled by adding (-)-epigallocatechin-3-gallate (EGCG), which blocks a receptor that mediates cell adhesion and is overexpressed in cancer cells. Measurement of the relative ability of the cancer cells to attach to the OMT revealed that the ability for attachment decreased with increasing EGCG concentration. The results agreed well with the western blot analysis, indicating that the OMT can potentially be employed to evaluate the adhesive ability of various cancer cells.

  1. Surface Physicochemistry and Ionic Strength Affects eDNA's Role in Bacterial Adhesion to Abiotic Surfaces

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Regina, Viduthalai R.; Lokanathan, Arcot R; Modrzynski, Jakub

    2014-01-01

    DNA-mediated adhesion depends on the physicochemical properties of the surface and surrounding liquid. We investigated eDNA alteration of cell surface hydrophobicity and zeta potential, and subsequently quantified the effect of eDNA on the adhesion of Staphylococcus xylosus to glass surfaces functionalised...... ionic strengths. No effect was seen on glass surfaces and carboxyl-functionalised surfaces at high ionic strength, and a reverse effect occurred on amine-functionalised surfaces at low ionic strength. However, eDNA promoted adhesion of cells to hydrophobic surfaces irrespective of the ionic strength......Extracellular DNA (eDNA) is an important structural component of biofilms formed by many bacteria, but few reports have focused on its role in initial cell adhesion. The aim of this study was to investigate the role of eDNA in bacterial adhesion to abiotic surfaces, and determine to which extent e...

  2. Integrative systems and synthetic biology of cell-matrix adhesion sites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zamir, Eli

    2016-09-02

    The complexity of cell-matrix adhesion convolves its roles in the development and functioning of multicellular organisms and their evolutionary tinkering. Cell-matrix adhesion is mediated by sites along the plasma membrane that anchor the actin cytoskeleton to the matrix via a large number of proteins, collectively called the integrin adhesome. Fundamental challenges for understanding how cell-matrix adhesion sites assemble and function arise from their multi-functionality, rapid dynamics, large number of components and molecular diversity. Systems biology faces these challenges in its strive to understand how the integrin adhesome gives rise to functional adhesion sites. Synthetic biology enables engineering intracellular modules and circuits with properties of interest. In this review I discuss some of the fundamental questions in systems biology of cell-matrix adhesion and how synthetic biology can help addressing them.

  3. Allergic Stomatitis From Orthodontic Adhesives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peterson, Mark R; Wong, Priscilla H; Dickson, Scott D; Coop, Christopher A

    2017-03-01

    We report a case of a type IV hypersensitivity reaction causing oral stomatitis, presumed to be the result of common dental adhesives. The case was diagnosed using patch testing to the dental adhesives that were used in the patient. Both of the adhesives tested contained a form of acrylate that is being seen more frequently in the literature as a cause of type IV hypersensitivity reactions. Metals can cause allergic reactions; however, other contact items need to be considered as a cause of oral allergic reactions. Cases of allergic stomatitis are rising and there is question if all-in-one adhesives may be contributing to this rise. Reprint & Copyright © 2017 Association of Military Surgeons of the U.S.

  4. 21 CFR 878.4010 - Tissue adhesive.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Tissue adhesive. 878.4010 Section 878.4010 Food... DEVICES GENERAL AND PLASTIC SURGERY DEVICES Surgical Devices § 878.4010 Tissue adhesive. (a) Tissue adhesive for the topical approximation of skin—(1) Identification. A tissue adhesive for the topical...

  5. An Overview of Dental Adhesive Systems and the Dynamic Tooth-Adhesive Interface.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bedran-Russo, Ana; Leme-Kraus, Ariene A; Vidal, Cristina M P; Teixeira, Erica C

    2017-10-01

    From the conception of resin-enamel adhesion to today's contemporary dental adhesive systems, clinicians are no longer afraid of exploring the many advantages brought by adhesive restorative concepts. To maximize the performance of adhesive-based restorative procedures, practitioners must be familiar with the mechanism of adhesion, clinical indications, proper handling, the inherent limitations of the materials and the biological challenges. This review provides an overview of the current status of restorative dental adhesives, their mechanism of adhesion, mechanisms of degradation of dental adhesive interfaces, how to maximize performance, and future trends in adhesive dentistry. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Fibrillar Adhesive for Climbing Robots

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pamess, Aaron; White, Victor E.

    2013-01-01

    A climbing robot needs to use its adhesive patches over and over again as it scales a slope. Replacing the adhesive at each step is generally impractical. If the adhesive or attachment mechanism cannot be used repeatedly, then the robot must carry an extra load of this adhesive to apply a fresh layer with each move. Common failure modes include tearing, contamination by dirt, plastic deformation of fibers, and damage from loading/ unloading. A gecko-like fibrillar adhesive has been developed that has been shown useful for climbing robots, and may later prove useful for grasping, anchoring, and medical applications. The material consists of a hierarchical fibrillar structure that currently contains two levels, but may be extended to three or four levels in continuing work. The contacting level has tens of thousands of microscopic fibers made from a rubberlike material that bend over and create intimate contact with a surface to achieve maximum van der Waals forces. By maximizing the real area of contact that these fibers make and minimizing the bending energy necessary to achieve that contact, the net amount of adhesion has been improved dramatically.

  7. Nanoscale E-Cadherin ligand patterns show threshold size for cellular adhesion and adherence junction formation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kristensen, Stine H; Pedersen, Gitte Albinus; Nejsum, Lene Niemann

    2012-01-01

    of adherence junctions in epithelial cells. Cells at 100 nm patterns show poor adhesion, while larger pattern sizes show both good adhesion, significant spreading and defined cortical actin. We estimate a threshold of 0.03μm2 for epithelial cellular attachment via E-Cadherin......The role of ligand spatial distribution on the formation of cadherin mediated cell-cell contacts is studied utilizing nanopatterns of E-cadherin ligands. Protein patches ranging in size from 100 nm to 800 nm prepared by colloidal lithography critically influence adhesion, spreading and formation...

  8. Influence of substrate modulus on gecko adhesion

    OpenAIRE

    Klittich, Mena R.; Wilson, Michael C.; Craig Bernard; Rochelle M. Rodrigo; Austin J. Keith; Niewiarowski, Peter H.; Ali Dhinojwala

    2017-01-01

    The gecko adhesion system fascinates biologists and materials scientists alike for its strong, reversible, glue-free, dry adhesion. Understanding the adhesion system?s performance on various surfaces can give clues as to gecko behaviour, as well as towards designing synthetic adhesive mimics. Geckos encounter a variety of surfaces in their natural habitats; tropical geckos, such as Gekko gecko, encounter hard, rough tree trunks as well as soft, flexible leaves. While gecko adhesion on hard su...

  9. EZH2 modulates the DNA methylome and controls T cell adhesion through junctional adhesion molecule-A in lupus patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsou, Pei-Suen; Coit, Patrick; Kilian, Nathan C; Sawalha, Amr H

    2017-10-03

    EZH2 is an epigenetic regulator that mediates H3K27 trimethylation and modulates DNA methylation. The aim of this study is to characterize the role of EZH2 in CD4+ T cells upon lupus pathogenesis. EZH2 expression levels were determined in CD4+ T cells isolated from lupus patients and healthy controls. The epigenetic effects of EZH2 overexpression in CD4+ T cells were evaluated using a genome-wide DNA methylation approach. Gene expression and miRNAs were assessed by qPCR while protein expression was examined by Western blotting. A cell adhesion assay was used to assess adhesion of CD4+ T cells to human microvascular endothelial cells. EZH2 and H3K27me3 levels were increased in CD4+ T cells in lupus compared to healthy controls. MiR-26a and miR-101 downregulated EZH2, and were reduced in lupus CD4+ T cells. Overexpressing EZH2 in CD4+ T cells resulted in significant DNA methylation changes. Genes involved in leukocyte adhesion and migration, including F11R encoding JAM-A, become hypomethylated in CD4+ T cells when EZH2 is overexpressed. Overexpression of EZH2 resulted in increased JAM-A expression and CD4+ T cell adhesion. Pre-incubation of EZH2-transfected CD4+ T cells with neutralizing antibodies against JAM-A significantly blunted cell adhesion. Similarly, CD4+ T cells from lupus patients overexpressed JAM-A and adhered significantly more to endothelial cells compared to T cells from healthy controls. Blocking JAM-A or EZH2 significantly reduced endothelial cell adhesion of lupus CD4+ T cells. We identified a novel role for EZH2 in T cell adhesion mediated by epigenetic remodeling and upregulation of JAM-A. Blocking EZH2 or JAM-A might have a therapeutic potential in lupus by reducing T cell adhesion, migration, and extravasation. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  10. Optimizing Adhesive Design by Understanding Compliance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    King, Daniel R; Crosby, Alfred J

    2015-12-23

    Adhesives have long been designed around a trade-off between adhesive strength and releasability. Geckos are of interest because they are the largest organisms which are able to climb utilizing adhesive toepads, yet can controllably release from surfaces and perform this action over and over again. Attempting to replicate the hierarchical, nanoscopic features which cover their toepads has been the primary focus of the adhesives field until recently. A new approach based on a scaling relation which states that reversible adhesive force capacity scales with (A/C)(1/2), where A is the area of contact and C is the compliance of the adhesive, has enabled the creation of high strength, reversible adhesives without requiring high aspect ratio, fibrillar features. Here we introduce an equation to calculate the compliance of adhesives, and utilize this equation to predict the shear adhesive force capacity of the adhesive based on the material components and geometric properties. Using this equation, we have investigated important geometric parameters which control force capacity and have shown that by controlling adhesive shape, adhesive force capacity can be increased by over 50% without varying pad size. Furthermore, we have demonstrated that compliance of the adhesive far from the interface still influences shear adhesive force capacity. Utilizing this equation will allow for the production of adhesives which are optimized for specific applications in commercial and industrial settings.

  11. Hydrogen sulfide prevents postoperative adhesion in a rat uterine horn model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xia, Ye; Zhu, Yi Zhun; Xu, Congjian

    2017-02-01

    Abdominal adhesions are primarily severe postoperative complications that can cause gynecological problems such as infertility and chronic pelvic pain. Inflammatory mediators are significantly related to adhesion formation, and hydrogen sulfide plays a significant anti-inflammatory role in multiple physiological processes. Therefore, the effect of NaHS, a hydrogen sulfide donor, on postoperative adhesion formation was examined in a rat uterine horn model. A rat uterine horn model was created to evaluate whether NaHS, a hydrogen sulfide donor, could decrease postoperative adhesion formation. Rats were randomly grouped and administrated with different doses of NaHS, where DL-propargylglycine and low-molecular-weight heparin acted as negative and positive controls, respectively. The extent and severity of adhesions were assessed on the 14th postoperative day. Serum of rats was sampled for the determination of 27 cytokines using a chip. The severity and total scores of adhesion in rats given 112μM/kg and 56μM/kg NaHS were significantly less compared with those of the control group (p0.05). At least six cytokines were involved in the procedures for the prevention of adhesion formation, as they varied significantly among different groups. Administration of NaHS could apparently reduce postoperative adhesion in the rat uterine horn model. This preventive effect may be associated with the variation of cytokine that is related to inflammatory. Copyright © 2017 Taiwan Association of Obstetrics & Gynecology. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. Cell adhesion in plants is under the control of putative O-fucosyltransferases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verger, Stéphane; Chabout, Salem; Gineau, Emilie; Mouille, Grégory

    2016-07-15

    Cell-to-cell adhesion in plants is mediated by the cell wall and the presence of a pectin-rich middle lamella. However, we know very little about how the plant actually controls and maintains cell adhesion during growth and development and how it deals with the dynamic cell wall remodeling that takes place. Here we investigate the molecular mechanisms that control cell adhesion in plants. We carried out a genetic suppressor screen and a genetic analysis of cell adhesion-defective Arabidopsis thaliana mutants. We identified a genetic suppressor of a cell adhesion defect affecting a putative O-fucosyltransferase. Furthermore, we show that the state of cell adhesion is not directly linked with pectin content in the cell wall but instead is associated with altered pectin-related signaling. Our results suggest that cell adhesion is under the control of a feedback signal from the state of the pectin in the cell wall. Such a mechanism could be necessary for the control and maintenance of cell adhesion during growth and development. © 2016. Published by The Company of Biologists Ltd.

  13. Rapid induction of neutrophil-endothelial adhesion by endothelial complement fixation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marks, R M; Todd, R F; Ward, P A

    1989-05-25

    The adhesion of neutrophils to vascular endothelium is an early event in their recruitment into acute inflammatory lesions. In evaluating potential neutrophil-endothelial adhesive mechanisms in acute inflammation, important considerations are that adhesion in vivo may occur very rapidly following injury and that the specificity of the reaction resides in altered endothelium. That is, neutrophils adhere only to altered endothelium adjacent to an inflammatory focus, rather than at random as would be expected if activation of neutrophils were the initiator of adhesion. We have explored a possible bridging role for complement in causing early neutrophil-endothelial cell adhesion. The complement system is involved in inflammatory processes, is capable of rapid amplification, and endothelial complement fixation at sites of inflammation could generate an endothelium-restricted signal for neutrophil adhesion. We have now developed a model in which this can be investigated without complicating factors such as immunoglobulin deposition, by constructing a novel molecule, a hybrid of the endothelial binding lectin Ulex europaeus I and of the complement activator cobra venom factor. This molecule has the capacity to cause fixation of complement on human umbilical vein endothelial cells. We show that complement fixation is a potent and rapid stimulus for neutrophil adhesion. Neutrophil adhesion requires only endothelial deposition of C3, and is mediated through the type 3 complement receptor.

  14. Innovative Electrostatic Adhesion Technologies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bryan, Tom; Macleod, Todd; Gagliano, Larry; Williams, Scott; McCoy, Brian

    2015-01-01

    Developing specialized Electro-Static grippers (commercially used in Semiconductor Manufacturing and in package handling) will allow gentle and secure Capture, Soft Docking, and Handling of a wide variety of materials and shapes (such as upper-stages, satellites, arrays, and possibly asteroids) without requiring physical features or cavities for a pincher or probe or using harpoons or nets. Combined with new rigid boom mechanisms or small agile chaser vehicles, flexible, high speed Electro-Static Grippers can enable compliant capture of spinning objects starting from a safe stand-off distance. Electroadhesion (EA) can enable lightweight, ultra-low-power, compliant attachment in space by using an electrostatic force to adhere similar and dissimilar surfaces. A typical EA enabled device is composed of compliant space-rated materials, such as copper-clad polyimide encapsulated by polymers. Attachment is induced by strong electrostatic forces between any substrate material, such as an exterior satellite panel and a compliant EA gripper pad surface. When alternate positive and negative charges are induced in adjacent planar electrodes in an EA surface, the electric fields set up opposite charges on the substrate and cause an electrostatic adhesion between the electrodes and the induced charges on the substrate. Since the electrodes and the polymer are compliant and can conform to uneven or rough surfaces, the electrodes can remain intimately close to the entire surface, enabling high clamping pressures. Clamping pressures of more than 3 N/cm2 in shear can be achieved on a variety of substrates with ultra-low holding power consumption (measured values are less than 20 microW/Newton weight held). A single EA surface geometry can be used to clamp both dielectric and conductive substrates, with slightly different physical mechanisms. Furthermore EA clamping requires no normal force be placed on the substrate, as conventional docking requires. Internally funded research and

  15. Adhesion of Blended Polymer Films.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Staszel, Christopher; Sinha-Ray, Suman; Yarin, Alexander L.; Pourdeyhimi, Behnam

    The adhesive energy of blended and monolithic PCL and PCL-N6 surfaces was measured by blister method and linked to the surface composition of the blended samples. It was shown that PCL does not adhere to N6 after heat-treatment at 55 C, while the monolithic PCL films adhered to the blended samples solely via the PCL islands at the surface. The surface concentration of PCL in the blended samples was established using the novel staining method. It was shown that the surface concentration of PCL differs from its bulk content in the blended samples. The measurements also revealed that the surface concentration of PCL is practically linearly proportionality to the normalized adhesion energy between the blended PCL-N6 samples and monolithic PCL films. Several statistical characteristics of the surfaces of the blended samples were used to characterize their uniformity/non-uniformity. It was shown that increasing the surface uniformity of the adhering component in the blended samples (PCL), one increases the adhesion energy. Moreover, at about 70% of PCL at the surface, the adhesion energy of blended samples to monolithic PCL films could reach the value characterization of the adhesion between two monolithic PCL samples. This work is supported by the Nonwovens Institute, Grant No. 14-163.

  16. Polyurethane adhesives in flat roofs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bogárová Markéta

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available It is necessary to stabilize individual layers of flat roofs, mainly because of wind suction. Apart from anchoring and surcharge, these layers can be secured by bonding. At present gluing is an indispensable and widely used stabilization method. On our market we can found many types of adhesives, most widely used are based on polyurethane. This paper focuses on problematic about stabilization thermal insulation from expanded polystyrene to vapor barrier from bitumen. One of the main issues is to calculate the exact amount of adhesive, which is required to guarantee the resistance against wind suction. In this problematic we can not find help neither in technical data sheets provided by the manufactures. Some of these data sheets contain at least information about amount of adhesive depending on location in roof plane and building height, but they do not specify the strength of such connection. It was therefore resorted to select several representatives polyurethane adhesives and their subsequent testing on specimens simulating the flat roof segment. The paper described the test methodology and results for two types of polyurethane adhesives.

  17. Adhesive polymer films for the prevention of postsurgical adhesions

    OpenAIRE

    Esser, Eva

    2017-01-01

    Current clinically used lipophilic anti-adhesive films, like SurgiWrap®, have to be fixed to the affected tissue using sutures due to their limited adhesiveness and only degrade very slowly within months and years due to the hydrophobicity and the high molecular weight of the used PLA, which effectively inhibits the uptake of water. The aim of this work was to prepare films that have a much faster degradation pathway due to a hydrogel nature and ideally adhere to the tissue by themselves. The...

  18. Molecular mechanisms underlying synergistic adhesion of sickle red blood cells by hypoxia and low nitric oxide bioavailability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gutsaeva, Diana R; Montero-Huerta, Pedro; Parkerson, James B; Yerigenahally, Shobha D; Ikuta, Tohru; Head, C Alvin

    2014-03-20

    The molecular mechanisms by which nitric oxide (NO) bioavailability modulates the clinical expression of sickle cell disease (SCD) remain elusive. We investigated the effect of hypoxia and NO bioavailability on sickle red blood cell (sRBC) adhesion using mice deficient for endothelial NO synthase (eNOS) because their NO metabolite levels are similar to those of SCD mice but without hypoxemia. Whereas sRBC adhesion to endothelial cells in eNOS-deficient mice was synergistically upregulated at the onset of hypoxia, leukocyte adhesion was unaffected. Restoring NO metabolite levels to physiological levels markedly reduced sRBC adhesion to levels seen under normoxia. These results indicate that sRBC adherence to endothelial cells increases in response to hypoxia prior to leukocyte adherence, and that low NO bioavailability synergistically upregulates sRBC adhesion under hypoxia. Although multiple adhesion molecules mediate sRBC adhesion, we found a central role for P-selectin in sRBC adhesion. Hypoxia and low NO bioavailability upregulated P-selectin expression in endothelial cells in an additive manner through p38 kinase pathways. These results demonstrate novel cellular and signaling mechanisms that regulate sRBC adhesion under hypoxia and low NO bioavailability. Importantly, these findings point us toward new molecular targets to inhibit cell adhesion in SCD.

  19. Lignin-Furfural Based Adhesives

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Prajakta Dongre

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Lignin recovered from the hot-water extract of sugar maple (Acer saccharum is used in this study to synthesize adhesive blends to replace phenol-formaldehyde (PF resin. Untreated lignin is characterized by lignin content and nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR analysis. The molecular weight distribution of the lignin and the blends are characterized by size exclusion chromatography (SEC. The effect of pH (0.3, 0.65 and 1, ex situ furfural, and curing conditions on the tensile properties of adhesive reinforced glass fibers is determined and compared to the reinforcement level of commercially available PF resin. The adhesive blend prepared at pH = 0.65 with no added furfural exhibits the highest tensile properties and meets 90% of the PF tensile strength.

  20. Covalent and density-controlled surface immobilization of E-cadherin for adhesion force spectroscopy.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dagmar Fichtner

    Full Text Available E-cadherin is a key cell-cell adhesion molecule but the impact of receptor density and the precise contribution of individual cadherin ectodomains in promoting cell adhesion are only incompletely understood. Investigating these mechanisms would benefit from artificial adhesion substrates carrying different cadherin ectodomains at defined surface density. We therefore developed a quantitative E-cadherin surface immobilization protocol based on the SNAP-tag technique. Extracellular (EC fragments of E-cadherin fused to the SNAP-tag were covalently bound to self-assembled monolayers (SAM of thiols carrying benzylguanine (BG head groups. The adhesive functionality of the different E-cadherin surfaces was then assessed using cell spreading assays and single-cell (SCSF and single-molecule (SMSF force spectroscopy. We demonstrate that an E-cadherin construct containing only the first and second outmost EC domain (E1-2 is not sufficient for mediating cell adhesion and yields only low single cadherin-cadherin adhesion forces. In contrast, a construct containing all five EC domains (E1-5 efficiently promotes cell spreading and generates strong single cadherin and cell adhesion forces. By varying the concentration of BG head groups within the SAM we determined a lateral distance of 5-11 nm for optimal E-cadherin functionality. Integrating the results from SCMS and SMSF experiments furthermore demonstrated that the dissolution of E-cadherin adhesion contacts involves a sequential unbinding of individual cadherin receptors rather than the sudden rupture of larger cadherin receptor clusters. Our method of covalent, oriented and density-controlled E-cadherin immobilization thus provides a novel and versatile platform to study molecular mechanisms underlying cadherin-mediated cell adhesion under defined experimental conditions.

  1. A critical evaluation of bifidobacterial adhesion to the host tissue

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christina Westermann

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Bifidobacteria are common inhabitants of the human gastrointestinal tract that, despite a long history of research, have not shown any pathogenic potential whatsoever. By contrast, some bifidobacteria are associated with a number of health-related benefits for the host. The reported beneficial effects of bifidobacteria include competitive exclusion of pathogens, alleviation of symptoms of irritable bowel syndrome and inflammatory bowel disease, and modulation of intestinal and systemic immune responses. Based on these effects, bifidobacteria are widely used as probiotics by pharmaceutical and dairy industries. In order to exert a beneficial effect bifidobacteria have to, at least transiently, colonize the host in a sufficient population size. Besides other criteria such as resistance to manufacturing processes and intestinal transit, potential probiotic bacteria are tested for adhesion to the host structures including intestinal epithelial cells (IECs, mucus and extracellular matrix (ECM components. In the present review article, we summarize the current knowledge on bifidobacterial structures that mediate adhesion to host tissue and compare these to similar structures of pathogenic bacteria. This reveals that most of the adhesive structures and mechanisms involved in adhesion of bifidobacteria to host tissue are similar or even identical to those employed by pathogens to cause disease. It is thus reasonable to assume that these structures and mechanisms are equally important for commensal or probiotic bacteria and play a similar role in the beneficial effects exerted by bifidobacteria.

  2. Adhesion of Photoactive Microalgae to Surfaces is Switchable by Light

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bäumchen, Oliver; Kreis, Christian; Le Blay, Marine; Linne, Christine; Makowski, Marcin

    The natural habitats of many microorganisms are confined geometries, such as the interstitial space of rocks and soil, where interactions with interfaces and surfaces are of paramount importance. We performed in vivo force spectroscopy experiments on the unicellular biflagellated microalga Chlamydomonas, a prime model organism in cell- and microbiology, and discovered that the flagella-mediated adhesion to surfaces can be switched on and off by light. Time-resolved micropipette experiments show that the light-switchable adhesiveness of the flagella is a completely reversible process that is based on a redistribution of adhesion-promoting flagella-membrane proteins within seconds. Light-switchable adhesion enables the cell to regulate the transition between planktonic and surface-associated state, which possibly represents a significant biological advantage for photoactive microorganisms. In terms of the colonization of surfaces and the formation of biofilms, the findings might have immediate economic and environmental relevance in biotechnological settings, such as photo-bioreactors for the sustainable production of biofuels.

  3. Antagonism of selectin-dependent adhesion of human eosinophils and neutrophils by glycomimetics and oligosaccharide compounds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, M K; Brandley, B K; Anderson, M B; Bochner, B S

    1998-11-01

    Early in inflammation, adhesion occurs between leukocytes and endothelium when selectins bind to sialyl Lewis X (sLex) and related oligosaccharides. We tested novel compounds that mimic sLex for their ability to inhibit selectin-mediated adhesion of human eosinophils and neutrophils in vitro. Neutrophils and eosinophils were isolated by density gradient centrifugation, and eosinophils were further purified by immunomagnetic negative selection. Adhesion to unstimulated or interleukin-1beta-stimulated (5 ng/ml, 4-6 h) umbilical vein endothelial monolayers was tested under static or rotating conditions, where adhesion is primarily E- or L-selectin dependent, respectively. P-selectin-dependent adhesion was tested on immobilized platelets treated with or without phorbol myristate acetate (10(-7) M, 10 min). Stimulus-induced adhesion was always at least 4-fold higher than without stimulus, and selectin dependence was confirmed with specific blocking monoclonal antibodies. E-selectin-dependent adhesion of eosinophils and neutrophils was inhibited by compound GM2296 (the concentration producing 50% inhibition of adhesion [IC50] approximately 0.5-1 mM). E-selectin-dependent adhesion of neutrophils, but not eosinophils, was also inhibited by another compound, sLex with a lipid tail (30 +/- 6% inhibition at 3 mM), whereas compound GM1292 slightly inhibited adhesion of both (23 +/- 5 and 20 +/- 6% inhibition, respectively, at 1 mM). L-selectin-dependent adhesion was more effectively inhibited by GM2296 (IC50 approximately 0.2-0.5 mM), although P-selectin-dependent adhesion was also inhibited (IC50 approximately 1 mM). Inhibition was reversible without affecting viability, and no effect was seen with these compounds in assays testing neutrophil adhesion to immobilized intercellular adhesion molecule-1. Thus, compound GM2296, a carbon-fucosylated derivative of glycyrrhetinic acid, inhibits E-, L-, and P-selectin-dependent eosinophil and neutrophil adhesion. The ability of these

  4. Adhesion dynamics for cellulose nanocomposites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nordgren, Niklas; Lönnberg, Hanna; Hult, Anders; Malmström, Eva; Rutland, Mark W

    2009-10-01

    The efficiency of poly(ε-caprolactone) (PCL) as a matrix polymer for cellulose nanocomposites has been investigated at the macromolecular contact level using atomic force microscopy in a colloidal probe configuration. Model cellulose microspheres grafted with PCL were prepared via ring-opening polymerization. Force measurements between the functionalized particles revealed the adhesion to be highly dependent on the contact time because of a diffusion-controlled mechanism. Moreover, an increase of the temperature to 60 degrees C (close to T(m) for the PCL graft) greatly enhanced the adhesion at the polymer-polymer interface, demonstrating the importance of entanglements in the annealing of composite materials.

  5. Post-translational modification-regulated leukocyte adhesion and migration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loh, Jia Tong; Su, I-Hsin

    2016-06-14

    Leukocytes undergo frequent phenotypic changes and rapidly infiltrate peripheral and lymphoid tissues in order to carry out immune responses. The recruitment of circulating leukocytes into inflamed tissues depends on integrin-mediated tethering and rolling of these cells on the vascular endothelium, followed by transmigration into the tissues. This dynamic process of migration requires the coordination of large numbers of cytosolic and transmembrane proteins whose functional activities are typically regulated by post-translational modifications (PTMs). Our recent studies have shown that the lysine methyltransferase, Ezh2, critically regulates integrin signalling and governs the adhesion dynamics of leukocytes via direct methylation of talin, a key molecule that controls these processes by linking integrins to the actin cytoskeleton. In this review, we will discuss the various modes of leukocyte migration and examine how PTMs of cytoskeletal/adhesion associated proteins play fundamental roles in the dynamic regulation of leukocyte migration. Furthermore, we will discuss molecular details of the adhesion dynamics controlled by Ezh2-mediated talin methylation and the potential implications of this novel regulatory mechanism for leukocyte migration, immune responses, and pathogenic processes, such as allergic contact dermatitis and tumorigenesis.

  6. Silicone-Based Adhesives with Highly Tunable Adhesion Force for Skin-Contact Applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Bong Kuk; Ryu, Jin Hwa; Baek, In-Bok; Kim, Yarkyeon; Jang, Won Ick; Kim, Sang-Hyeob; Yoon, Yong Sun; Kim, Seung Hwan; Hong, Seong-Gu; Byun, Sangwon; Yu, Han Young

    2017-11-01

    A fundamental approach to fabricating silicone-based adhesives with highly tunable adhesion force for the skin-contact applications is presented. Liquid blends consisting of vinyl-multifunctional polydimethylsiloxane (V-PDMS), hydride-terminated PDMS (H-PDMS), and a tackifier composed of a silanol-terminated PDMS/MQ resin mixture and the MQ resin are used as the adhesive materials. The peel adhesion force of addition-cured adhesives on the skin is increased by increasing the H-PDMS molecular weights and the tackifier content, and decreasing the H-PDMS/V-PDMS ratio. There is an inverse relationship between the adhesion force and the Young's modulus. The low-modulus adhesives with a low H-PDMS/V-PDMS ratio exhibit enhanced adhesion properties. The low-modulus adhesives with the high MQ resin content show significantly enhanced adhesion properties. These adhesives exhibit a wide range of modulus (2-499 kPa), and their adhesion force (0.04-5.38 N) is superior to commercially available soft silicone adhesives (0.82-2.79 N). The strong adhesives (>≈2 N) provide sufficient adhesion for fixing the flexible electrocardiogram (ECG) device to the skin in most daily activity. The human ECG signals are successfully recorded in real time. These results suggest that the silicone-based adhesives should be useful as an atraumatic adhesive for the skin-contact applications. © 2017 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  7. Sialylation by ?-galactoside ?-2,6-sialyltransferase and N-glycans regulate cell adhesion and invasion in human anaplastic large cell lymphoma

    OpenAIRE

    Suzuki, Osamu; ABE, MASAFUMI; HASHIMOTO Yuko

    2015-01-01

    The interaction between cell surface glycans and extracellular matrix (ECM) including galectins is known to be closely associated with tumor cell adhesion, invasion and metastasis. We analyzed the roles of cell surface sialylation or glycosylation in galectin or ECM-mediated cell adhesion and invasion of human malignant lymphoma cells. Neuraminidase from Arthrobacter ureafaciens (AU) treatment resulted in reduction of cell adhesion to galectin-8 in human anaplastic large cell lymphoma (H-ALCL...

  8. Reproductive outcome following treatment of intrauterine adhesions ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Conclusion: The reproductive outcome following treatment of intrauterine adhesions in this centre is not encouraging and needs improvement. Adoption of more successful treatment modalities like hysteroscopic adhesiolysis is advocated. . Keywords: Reproductive outcome; Intrauterine adhesions; Abuja Nigerian Journal of ...

  9. Adhesion of Antireflective Coatings in Multijunction Photovoltaics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brock, Ryan; Miller, David C.; Dauskardt, Reinhold H.

    2016-11-21

    The development of a new composite dual cantilever beam (cDCB) thin-film adhesion testing method is reported, which allows the measurement of adhesion on the fragile thin substrates used in multijunction photovoltaics. We address the adhesion of several antireflective coating systems on multijunction cells. By varying interface chemistry and morphology, we demonstrate the ensuing effects on adhesion and help to develop an understanding of how high adhesion can be achieved, as adhesion values ranging from 0.5 J/m2 to 10 J/m2 were measured. Damp Heat (85 degrees C/85% RH) was used to invoke degradation of interfacial adhesion. We show that even with germanium substrates that fracture easily, quantitative measurements of adhesion can still be made at high test yield. The cDCB test is discussed as an important new methodology, which can be broadly applied to any system that makes use of thin, brittle, or otherwise fragile substrates.

  10. Adhesion of biocompatible and biodegradable micropatterned surfaces

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kaiser, J.S.; Kamperman, M.M.G.; Souza, E.J.; Schick, B.; Arzt, E.

    2011-01-01

    We studied the effects of pillar dimensions and stiffness of biocompatible and biodegradable micropatterned surfaces on adhesion on different compliant substrates. The micropatterned adhesives were based on biocompatible polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) and biodegradable poly(lactic-co-glycolic) acid

  11. Syndecan proteoglycans and cell adhesion

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Woods, A; Oh, E S; Couchman, J R

    1998-01-01

    It is now becoming clear that a family of transmembrane proteoglycans, the syndecans, have important roles in cell adhesion. They participate through binding of matrix ligand to their glycosaminoglycan chains, clustering, and the induction of signaling cascades to modify the internal microfilament...

  12. Bio-Inspired Controllable Adhesive

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-12-01

    well as many species of insect, have evolved a robust reversible adhesion mechanism, enabling them to traverse rough, smooth, vertical or inverted...such as enabling microrobotics to explore extraterrestrial surfaces or harsh climates otherwise not accessible to man. Current work is also

  13. Lignin-Furfural Based Adhesives

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Dongre, Prajakta; Driscoll, Mark; Amidon, Thomas; Bujanovic, Biljana

    2015-01-01

    ... (SEC). The effect of pH (0.3, 0.65 and 1), ex situ furfural, and curing conditions on the tensile properties of adhesive reinforced glass fibers is determined and compared to the reinforcement level of commercially available PF resin...

  14. intrauterine adhesions in abuja, nigeria.

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    pain or with recurrent abortions 3, and therefore an important cause of ... therapeutic endoscopy at National Hospital, Abuja,. Nigeria, this paper .... pain. Recurrent 2 2 (100) - - - l (50) abortion. Normal 1 1 (100) - - - - menses. 166 Nigerian Jaurnal of Clinical Practice. Dec. 2006, Vol. 9(2). Intrauterine adhesions. E.R. Efetie.

  15. Intestinal Obstruction from an Adhesion

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Intestinal Obstruction from an Adhesion. Bahd Mimicking Peritonitis due to a _. Complicated Induced Unsafe Abortion: A Case Report. ABSTRACT. Miss EN. a 19—year old nullipara presented at the Accidents and Emergency unit of the Ebonyi State University. Teaching Hospital (EBSUTH), Abakaliki on the 17/5/06 with ...

  16. Ovalbumin as a Wood Adhesive

    Science.gov (United States)

    Charles R. Frihart; Holly Satori; Zhu Rongxian; Michael J. Birkeland

    2014-01-01

    Use of proteins to bond wood dominated industrial production until the middle of the 20th century (1). The ensuing creation of the plywood and glulam beam industries allowed for more efficient use of wood resources than is possible with solid wood products. Many protein sources have been used as adhesives, including plant (soybean) and animal (blood, fish scales,...

  17. Candida biofilms: is adhesion sexy?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soll, David R

    2008-08-26

    The development of Candida albicans biofilms requires two types of adhesion molecule - the Als proteins and Hwp1. Mutational analyses have recently revealed that these molecules play complementary roles, and their characteristics suggest that they may have evolved from primitive mating agglutinins.

  18. Adhesion Receptors Mediate Efficient Non-viral Gene Delivery

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zuhorn, Inge S.; Kalicharan, Dharamdajal; Robillard, George T.; Hoekstra, Dick

    2007-01-01

    For a variety of reasons, including production limitations, potential unanticipated side effects, and an immunological response upon repeated systemic administration, virus-based vectors are as yet not ideal gene delivery vehicles, justifying further research into alternatives. Unlike viral vectors,

  19. Signals mediating cleavage of intercellular adhesion molecule-1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsakadze, Nina L; Sen, Utpal; Zhao, Zhendong; Sithu, Srinivas D; English, William R; D'Souza, Stanley E

    2004-07-01

    ICAM-1, a membrane-bound receptor, is released as soluble ICAM-1 in inflammatory diseases. To delineate mechanisms regulating ICAM-1 cleavage, studies were performed in endothelial cells (EC), human embryonic kidney (HEK)-293 cells transfected with wild-type (WT) ICAM-1, and ICAM-1 containing single tyrosine-to-alanine substitutions (Y474A, Y476A, and Y485A) in the cytoplasmic region. Tyrosine residues at 474 and 485 become phosphorylated upon ICAM-1 ligation and associate with signaling modules. Cleavage was assessed by using an antibody against the cytoplasmic tail of ICAM-1, which recognizes intact ICAM-1 and the 7-kDa membrane-bound fragment remaining after cleavage. Cleavage in HEK-293 WT cells was accelerated by phorbol ester PMA, whereas in EC it was induced by tumor necrosis factor-alpha. In both cell types, a 7-kDa ICAM-1 remnant was detected. Tyrosine phosphatase inhibitors dephostatin and sodium orthovanadate augmented cleavage. PD-98059 (MEK kinase inhibitor), geldanamycin and PP2 (Src kinase inhibitors), and wortmannin (phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase inhibitor) dose-dependently inhibited cleavage in both cell types. SB-203580 (p38 inhibitor) was more effective in EC, and D609 (PLC inhibitor) mostly affected cleavage in HEK-293 cells. Cleavage was drastically decreased in Y474A and Y485A, whereas it was marginally reduced in Y476A. Surprisingly, phosphorylation was not detectable on the 7-kDa fragment of ICAM-1. These results implicate distinct pathways in the cleavage process and suggest a preferred signal transmission route for ICAM-1 shedding in the two cell systems tested. Tyrosine residues Y474 and Y485 within the cytoplasmic sequence of ICAM-1 regulate the cleavage process.

  20. Ligation of the beta4 integrin triggers adhesion behavior of human keratinocytes by an "inside-out" mechanism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kippenberger, Stefan; Loitsch, Stefan; Müller, Jutta; Guschel, Maike; Kaufmann, Roland; Bernd, August

    2004-09-01

    Carcinogenesis is considered as a multistep process involving functional changes in the hemidesmosomal organization. In normal skin keratinocytes, expression of the alpha(6)beta(4) integrin is restricted to the proliferative basal layer and mediates stable adhesion to the underlying basement membrane. Observations in carcinoma cells show a functional and spatial dissociation of the alpha(6)beta(4) integrin from the hemidesmosomal complex, which stimulates cell migration and, therefore, may contribute to carcinoma invasion. We now have evaluated the adhesion behavior of epithelial cells at different stages of transformation in response to activation of the beta(4) integrin. It is demonstrated that ligation of the beta(4) integrin augmented adhesion of carcinoma and pre-carcinoma cells to non-modified plastic. In contrast, adhesion behavior of normal human keratinocytes was not influenced by ligation of the beta(4) integrin. In order to explain the mechanism of beta(4)-mediated adhesion, the hypothesis of an "inside-out" activation of integrins was tested. Evidence is given that for cells expressing the alpha(6)beta(4) integrin, ligation of the beta(4) integrin increased beta(1) integrin-mediated adhesion. Furthermore, ligation of the beta(4) integrin led to phosphorylation of PKB/Akt at both phosphorylation sites. Functional blocking of PKB/Akt by dominant-negative overexpression decreased cell adhesion in response to beta(4) integrin ligation. Taken together, the present data establish a link between the ligation of the beta(4) integrin and beta(1) integrin-mediated cell adhesion in carcinoma and pre-carcinoma cells. Hence, these findings provide further insight into the conversion processes during carcinogenesis and show the beta(4) integrin to be a key regulator of cellular adhesion.

  1. Peritoneal adhesions after laparoscopic gastrointestinal surgery

    OpenAIRE

    Mais, Valerio

    2014-01-01

    Although laparoscopy has the potential to reduce peritoneal trauma and post-operative peritoneal adhesion formation, only one randomized controlled trial and a few comparative retrospective clinical studies have addressed this issue. Laparoscopy reduces de novo adhesion formation but has no efficacy in reducing adhesion reformation after adhesiolysis. Moreover, several studies have suggested that the reduction of de novo post-operative adhesions does not seem to have a significant clinical im...

  2. Transverse Reinforcement of Adhesive Joints

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sapozhnikov, S.; Shakirov, A.

    2015-05-01

    The shear of single-lap adhesive joints causes significant peel stresses in the adhesive layer, which is a particularly urgent problem for low-modulus polyurethane compositions. An experimental and computational analysis of various methods for increasing the load-bearing capacity of the joints by their strengthening with metallic z-elements was carried out. This strengthening hinders their delamination by the action of peel stresses, which allows one to reduce the overall dimensions and weight of adhesive joints. Two main strengthening methods were considered: with steel tapping screws (of diameter 2.5 mm) and blind aluminum rivets (of diameter 4.0 mm). The peculiarity of the strengthening lies in the fact that z-elements of minimum available diameter were used for reducing the effect of stress concentrations on the strength of the joints. The test of specimens for each type of strengthening showed an average increase in the ultimate load by 40% for the threaded reinforcements and by 10% for the rivets. During an analysis of stress state of the joints by the FEM, the nonlinear behavior of constituent materials and stress concentration in the region of reinforcing elements were taken into account. The mechanical properties of the adhesive layer and the GFRP covering were determined in separate experiments. The analysis showed that the weight of the reinforced adhesive joints could be lowered by 20-25% relative to that of unreinforced ones without reducing their load-bearing capacity. An additional effect caused by using the threaded reinforcing elements was a more than threefold increase in their rigidity as compared with that of analogous nonreinforced ones.

  3. Aspirin augments hyaluronidase induced adhesion inhibition ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Postoperative adhesions occur after virtually all abdomino-pelvic surgery and are the leading cause of intestinal obstruction and other gynaecologic problems. We used an animal model to test the efficacy of combined administration of aspirin and hyaluronidase on adhesion formation. Adhesions were induced using ...

  4. Current dental adhesives systems. A narrative review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Milia, Egle; Cumbo, Enzo; Cardoso, Rielson Jose A; Gallina, Giuseppe

    2012-01-01

    Adhesive dentistry is based on the development of materials which establish an effective bond with the tooth tissues. In this context, adhesive systems have attracted considerable research interest in recent years. Successful adhesive bonding depends on the chemistry of the adhesive, on appropriate clinical handling of the material as well as on the knowledge of the morphological changes caused on dental tissue by different bonding procedures. This paper outlines the status of contemporary adhesive systems, with particular emphasis on chemical characteristics and mode of interaction of the adhesives with enamel and dentinal tissues. Dental adhesives are used for several clinical applications and they can be classified based on the clinical regimen in "etch-and-rinse adhesives" and "self-etch adhesives". Other important considerations concern the different anatomical characteristics of enamel and dentine which are involved in the bonding procedures that have also implications for the technique used as well as for the quality of the bond. Etch-and-rinse adhesive systems generally perform better on enamel than self-etching systems which may be more suitable for bonding to dentine. In order to avoid a possible loss of the restoration, secondary caries or pulp damage due to bacteria penetration or due to cytotoxicity effects of eluted adhesive components, careful consideration of several factors is essential in selecting the suitable bonding procedure and adhesive system for the individual patient situation.

  5. Influence of substrate modulus on gecko adhesion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klittich, Mena R.; Wilson, Michael C.; Bernard, Craig; Rodrigo, Rochelle M.; Keith, Austin J.; Niewiarowski, Peter H.; Dhinojwala, Ali

    2017-01-01

    The gecko adhesion system fascinates biologists and materials scientists alike for its strong, reversible, glue-free, dry adhesion. Understanding the adhesion system’s performance on various surfaces can give clues as to gecko behaviour, as well as towards designing synthetic adhesive mimics. Geckos encounter a variety of surfaces in their natural habitats; tropical geckos, such as Gekko gecko, encounter hard, rough tree trunks as well as soft, flexible leaves. While gecko adhesion on hard surfaces has been extensively studied, little work has been done on soft surfaces. Here, we investigate for the first time the influence of macroscale and nanoscale substrate modulus on whole animal adhesion on two different substrates (cellulose acetate and polydimethylsiloxane) in air and find that across 5 orders of magnitude in macroscale modulus, there is no change in adhesion. On the nanoscale, however, gecko adhesion is shown to depend on substrate modulus. This suggests that low surface-layer modulus may inhibit the gecko adhesion system, independent of other influencing factors such as macroscale composite modulus and surface energy. Understanding the limits of gecko adhesion is vital for clarifying adhesive mechanisms and in the design of synthetic adhesives for soft substrates (including for biomedical applications and wearable electronics). PMID:28287647

  6. Nonwoven glass fiber mat reinforces polyurethane adhesive

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roseland, L. M.

    1967-01-01

    Nonwoven glass fiber mat reinforces the adhesive properties of a polyurethane adhesive that fastens hardware to exterior surfaces of aluminum tanks. The mat is embedded in the uncured adhesive. It ensures good control of the bond line and increases the peel strength.

  7. Influence of substrate modulus on gecko adhesion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klittich, Mena R.; Wilson, Michael C.; Bernard, Craig; Rodrigo, Rochelle M.; Keith, Austin J.; Niewiarowski, Peter H.; Dhinojwala, Ali

    2017-03-01

    The gecko adhesion system fascinates biologists and materials scientists alike for its strong, reversible, glue-free, dry adhesion. Understanding the adhesion system’s performance on various surfaces can give clues as to gecko behaviour, as well as towards designing synthetic adhesive mimics. Geckos encounter a variety of surfaces in their natural habitats; tropical geckos, such as Gekko gecko, encounter hard, rough tree trunks as well as soft, flexible leaves. While gecko adhesion on hard surfaces has been extensively studied, little work has been done on soft surfaces. Here, we investigate for the first time the influence of macroscale and nanoscale substrate modulus on whole animal adhesion on two different substrates (cellulose acetate and polydimethylsiloxane) in air and find that across 5 orders of magnitude in macroscale modulus, there is no change in adhesion. On the nanoscale, however, gecko adhesion is shown to depend on substrate modulus. This suggests that low surface-layer modulus may inhibit the gecko adhesion system, independent of other influencing factors such as macroscale composite modulus and surface energy. Understanding the limits of gecko adhesion is vital for clarifying adhesive mechanisms and in the design of synthetic adhesives for soft substrates (including for biomedical applications and wearable electronics).

  8. 21 CFR 878.4380 - Drape adhesive.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Drape adhesive. 878.4380 Section 878.4380 Food and... GENERAL AND PLASTIC SURGERY DEVICES Surgical Devices § 878.4380 Drape adhesive. (a) Identification. A drape adhesive is a device intended to be placed on the skin to attach a surgical drape. (b...

  9. Crosslinking of fibrinogen and fibronectin by free radicals : A possible initial step in adhesion formation in osteoarthritis of the temporomandibular joint

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dijkgraaf, LC; Zardeneta, G; Cordewener, FW; Liem, RSB; Schmitz, JP; de Bont, LGM; Milam, SB

    Purpose: Adhesion formation in osteoarthritis (OA) of the temporomandibular joint (TMJ) typically results in a sustained limitation of joint movement. We propose the hypothesis that free-radical-mediated crosslinking of proteins underlies this adhesion formation in affected joints. Free radicals may

  10. The recognition of adsorbed and denatured proteins of different topographies by β2 integrins and effects on leukocyte adhesion and activation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brevig, T.; Holst, B.; Ademovic, Z.

    2005-01-01

    Leukocyte beta(2) integrins Mac-1 and p150,95 are promiscuous cell-surface receptors that recognise and mediate cell adhesion to a variety of adsorbed and denatured proteins. We used albumin as a model protein to study whether leukocyte adhesion and activation depended on the nm-scale topography...

  11. Initial Homotypic Cell Pair Adhesion in Regenerating Hydra Facilitates Subsequent Adhesion of Homotypic Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takaku, Y.; Hariyama, T.; Tsukahara, Y.

    In Hydra vulgaris at the level of dissociated single cells endodermal cells adhere to each other more readily than to ectodermal cells at the initial adhesion. The time required for adhesion to occur between two adjacent cells is shorter for both endodermal and ectodermal homotypic cell adhesions once the initial adhesion of the first pair of cells has been established. It is confirmed that contact of an aggregated pair with additional homotypic cells facilitates the occurrence of homotypic adhesions; heterotypic adhesions are discouraged. This suggests that adhesion of homotypic cells contributes to an increased readiness for subsequent homotypic cells to adhere.

  12. Effects of Helicobacter pylori Water Extract on Expression of Endothelial Adhesion Molecules

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Norimasa Yoshida

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available The present study investigated whether Helicobacter pylori water extract induces the upregulation of intercellular adhesion molecule-1, vascular cell adhesion molecule-1 and E-selectin on human umbilical vein endothelial cells, using an ELISA. The nature of the substances mediating this upregulation was also analyzed. H pylori water extract derived from type strain (NCTC 11637 significantly upregulated intercellular adhesion molecule-1, vascular cell adhesion molecule-1 and E-selectin to the same extent as interleukin-1. Treatments with extracts from clinical strains showed no significant increases in expression of these adhesion molecules. In a fractionation study, approximately 7 kDa fraction showed peak activity. This activity was tolerant to heating and trypsin digestion. These results indicate that H pylori water extract contains water-soluble, low-molecular, nonprotein substances which induce upregulation of adhesion molecules on human umbilical vein endothelial cells, suggesting that products of H pylori may elicit gastric mucosal inflammation by promoting expression of endothelial adhesion molecules.

  13. Hyperbaric oxygen treatment reduces neutrophil-endothelial adhesion in chronic wound conditions through S-nitrosation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kendall, Alexandra C; Whatmore, Jacqueline L; Winyard, Paul G; Smerdon, Gary R; Eggleton, Paul

    2013-01-01

    Hyperbaric oxygen (HBO) therapy is an effective treatment for diabetic chronic wounds. HBO reduces inflammation and accelerates wound healing, by mechanisms that remain unclear. Here we examined a mechanism by which HBO may reduce neutrophil recruitment, through changes in endothelial and neutrophil adhesion molecule expression and function. Human umbilical vein endothelial cells and neutrophils were exposed to selected chronic wound conditions, comprising hypoxia in the presence of lipopolysaccharide and tumor necrosis factor-alpha, and then treated with HBO. We observed neutrophil adhesion to endothelial cells following treatment with chronic wound conditions, which was reversed by HBO treatment. This was partly explained by reduced expression of endothelial intercellular adhesion molecule-1 and vascular cell adhesion molecule-1 by HBO. No changes in neutrophil adhesion molecule expression (CD18, CD11b, CD62L, CD31) were observed following HBO treatment. However, HBO decreased hydrogen peroxide generation by neutrophils, and induced nitrous oxide-related protein modifications. The transnitrosating agent S-nitroso-L-cysteine ethyl ester (600 μM) also reduced neutrophil adhesion to human umbilical vein endothelial cell monolayers, and the iNOS inhibitor 1400 W (10 μM) and HgCl2, which promotes the decomposition of S-nitrosothiols (1 mM), reversed the effect of HBO, suggesting that S-nitrosation may inhibit neutrophil-endothelial cell adhesion. This study indicates that HBO could reduce inflammation in wounds through reduced neutrophil recruitment, mediated by S-nitrosation. © 2013 by the Wound Healing Society.

  14. Integrin-Matrix Clusters Form Podosome-like Adhesions in the Absence of Traction Forces

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cheng-han Yu

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Matrix-activated integrins can form different adhesion structures. We report that nontransformed fibroblasts develop podosome-like adhesions when spread on fluid Arg-Gly-Asp peptide (RGD-lipid surfaces, whereas they habitually form focal adhesions on rigid RGD glass surfaces. Similar to classic macrophage podosomes, the podosome-like adhesions are protrusive and characterized by doughnut-shaped RGD rings that surround characteristic core components including F-actin, N-WASP, and Arp2/Arp3. Furthermore, there are 18 podosome markers in these adhesions, though they lack matrix metalloproteinases that characterize invadopodia and podosomes of Src-transformed cells. When nontransformed cells develop force on integrin-RGD clusters by pulling RGD lipids to prefabricated rigid barriers (metal lines spaced by 1–2 μm, these podosomes fail to form and instead form focal adhesions. The formation of podosomes on fluid surfaces is mediated by local activation of phosphoinositide 3-kinase (PI3K and the production of phosphatidylinositol-(3,4,5-triphosphate (PIP3 in a FAK/PYK2-dependent manner. Enrichment of PIP3 precedes N-WASP activation and the recruitment of RhoA-GAP ARAP3. We propose that adhesion structures can be modulated by traction force development and that production of PIP3 stimulates podosome formation and subsequent RhoA downregulation in the absence of traction force.

  15. Notch controls cell adhesion in the Drosophila eye.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sujin Bao

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Sporadic evidence suggests Notch is involved in cell adhesion. However, the underlying mechanism is unknown. Here I have investigated an epithelial remodeling process in the Drosophila eye in which two primary pigment cells (PPCs with a characteristic 'kidney' shape enwrap and eventually isolate a group of cone cells from inter-ommatidial cells (IOCs. This paper shows that in the developing Drosophila eye the ligand Delta was transcribed in cone cells and Notch was activated in the adjacent PPC precursors. In the absence of Notch, emerging PPCs failed to enwrap cone cells, and hibris (hbs and sns, two genes coding for adhesion molecules of the Nephrin group that mediate preferential adhesion, were not transcribed in PPC precursors. Conversely, activation of Notch in single IOCs led to ectopic expression of hbs and sns. By contrast, in a single IOC that normally transcribes rst, a gene coding for an adhesion molecule of the Neph1 group that binds Hbs and Sns, activation of Notch led to a loss of rst transcription. In addition, in a Notch mutant where two emerging PPCs failed to enwrap cone cells, expression of hbs in PPC precursors restored the ability of these cells to surround cone cells. Further, expression of hbs or rst in a single rst- or hbs-expressing cell, respectively, led to removal of the counterpart from the membrane within the same cell through cis-interaction and forced expression of Rst in all hbs-expressing PPCs strongly disrupted the remodeling process. Finally, a loss of both hbs and sns in single PPC precursors led to constriction of the apical surface that compromised the 'kidney' shape of PPCs. Taken together, these results indicate that cone cells utilize Notch signaling to instruct neighboring PPC precursors to surround them and Notch controls the remodeling process by differentially regulating four adhesion genes.

  16. Adhesive organ regeneration in Macrostomum lignano.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lengerer, Birgit; Hennebert, Elise; Flammang, Patrick; Salvenmoser, Willi; Ladurner, Peter

    2016-06-02

    Flatworms possess pluripotent stem cells that can give rise to all cell types, which allows them to restore lost body parts after injury or amputation. This makes flatworms excellent model systems for studying regeneration. In this study, we present the adhesive organs of a marine flatworm as a simple model system for organ regeneration. Macrostomum lignano has approximately 130 adhesive organs at the ventral side of its tail plate. One adhesive organ consists of three interacting cells: one adhesive gland cell, one releasing gland cell, and one modified epidermal cell, called an anchor cell. However, no specific markers for these cell types were available to study the regeneration of adhesive organs. We tested 15 commercially available lectins for their ability to label adhesive organs and found one lectin (peanut agglutinin) to be specific to adhesive gland cells. We visualized the morphology of regenerating adhesive organs using lectin- and antibody staining as well as transmission electron microscopy. Our findings indicate that the two gland cells differentiate earlier than the connected anchor cells. Using EdU/lectin staining of partially amputated adhesive organs, we showed that their regeneration can proceed in two ways. First, adhesive gland cell bodies are able to survive partial amputation and reconnect with newly formed anchor cells. Second, adhesive gland cell bodies are cleared away, and the entire adhesive organ is build anew. Our results provide the first insights into adhesive organ regeneration and describe ten new markers for differentiated cells and tissues in M. lignano. The position of adhesive organ cells within the blastema and their chronological differentiation have been shown for the first time. M. lignano can regenerate adhesive organs de novo but also replace individual anchor cells in an injured organ. Our findings contribute to a better understanding of organogenesis in flatworms and enable further molecular investigations of cell

  17. Expression profile of the entire family of Adhesion G protein-coupled receptors in mouse and rat

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ebendal Ted

    2008-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The Adhesion G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs are membrane-bound receptors with long N termini. This family has 33 members in humans. Several Adhesion GPCRs are known to have important physiological functions in CNS development and immune system response mediated by large cell surface ligands. However, the majority of Adhesion GPCRs are still poorly studied orphans with unknown functions. Results In this study we performed the extensive tissue localization analysis of the entire Adhesion GPCR family in rat and mouse. By applying the quantitative real-time PCR technique we have produced comparable expression profile for each of the members in the Adhesion family. The results are compared with literature data and data from the Allen Brain Atlas project. Our results suggest that the majority of the Adhesion GPCRs are either expressed in the CNS or ubiquitously. In addition the Adhesion GPCRs from the same phylogenetic group have either predominant CNS or peripheral expression, although each of their expression profile is unique. Conclusion Our findings indicate that many of Adhesion GPCRs are expressed, and most probably, have function in CNS. The related Adhesion GPCRs are well conserved in their structure and interestingly have considerable overlap in their expression profiles, suggesting similarities among the physiological roles for members within many of the phylogenetically related clusters.

  18. Regulation of CD4(+) T cells by pleural mesothelial cells via adhesion molecule-dependent mechanisms in tuberculous pleurisy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuan, Ming-Li; Tong, Zhao-Hui; Jin, Xiao-Guang; Zhang, Jian-Chu; Wang, Xiao-Juan; Ma, Wan-Li; Yin, Wen; Zhou, Qiong; Ye, Hong; Shi, Huan-Zhong

    2013-01-01

    Intercellular adhesion molecule-1 (ICAM-1) and vascular cell adhesion molecule-1 (VCAM-1) have been demonstrated to be expressed on pleural mesothelial cells (PMCs), and to mediate leukocyte adhesion and migration; however, little is known about whether adhesion molecule-dependent mechanisms are involved in the regulation of CD4(+) T cells by PMCs in tuberculous pleural effusion (TPE). Expressions of ICAM-1 and VCAM-1 on PMCs, as well as expressions of CD11a and CD29, the counter-receptors for ICAM-1 and VCAM-1, respectively, expressed on CD4(+) T cells in TPE were determined using flow cytometry. The immune regulations on adhesion, proliferation, activation, selective expansion of CD4(+) helper T cell subgroups exerted by PMCs via adhesion molecule-dependent mechanisms were explored. Percentages of ICAM-1-positive and VCAM-1‒positive PMCs in TPE were increased compared with PMC line. Interferon-γ enhanced fluorescence intensity of ICAM-1, while IL-4 promoted VCAM-1 expression on PMCs. Percentages of CD11a(high)CD4(+) and CD29(high)CD4(+) T cells in TPE significantly increased as compared with peripheral blood. Prestimulation of PMCs with anti‒ICAM-1 or ‒VCAM-1 mAb significantly inhibited adhesion, activation, as well as effector regulatory T cell expansion induced by PMCs. Our current data showed that adhesion molecule pathways on PMCs regulated adhesion and activation of CD4(+) T cells, and selectively promoted the expansion of effector regulatory T cells.

  19. Vascular smooth muscle cell stiffness and adhesion to collagen I modified by vasoactive agonists.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhongkui Hong

    Full Text Available In vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMCs integrin-mediated adhesion to extracellular matrix (ECM proteins play important roles in sustaining vascular tone and resistance. The main goal of this study was to determine whether VSMCs adhesion to type I collagen (COL-I was altered in parallel with the changes in the VSMCs contractile state induced by vasoconstrictors and vasodilators. VSMCs were isolated from rat cremaster skeletal muscle arterioles and maintained in primary culture without passage. Cell adhesion and cell E-modulus were assessed using atomic force microscopy (AFM by repetitive nano-indentation of the AFM probe on the cell surface at 0.1 Hz sampling frequency and 3200 nm Z-piezo travelling distance (approach and retraction. AFM probes were tipped with a 5 μm diameter microbead functionalized with COL-I (1 mg\\ml. Results showed that the vasoconstrictor angiotensin II (ANG-II; 10-6 significantly increased (p<0.05 VSMC E-modulus and adhesion probability to COL-I by approximately 35% and 33%, respectively. In contrast, the vasodilator adenosine (ADO; 10-4 significantly decreased (p<0.05 VSMC E-modulus and adhesion probability by approximately -33% and -17%, respectively. Similarly, the NO donor (PANOate, 10-6 M, a potent vasodilator, also significantly decreased (p<0.05 the VSMC E-modulus and COL-I adhesion probability by -38% and -35%, respectively. These observations support the hypothesis that integrin-mediated VSMC adhesion to the ECM protein COL-I is dynamically regulated in parallel with VSMC contractile activation. These data suggest that the signal transduction pathways modulating VSMC contractile activation and relaxation, in addition to ECM adhesion, interact during regulation of contractile state.

  20. Adhesives for fixed orthodontic bands.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Millett, Declan T; Glenny, Anne-Marie; Mattick, Rye Cr; Hickman, Joy; Mandall, Nicky A

    2016-10-25

    Orthodontic treatment involves using fixed or removable appliances (dental braces) to correct the positions of teeth. It has been shown that the quality of treatment result obtained with fixed appliances is much better than with removable appliances. Fixed appliances are, therefore, favoured by most orthodontists for treatment. The success of a fixed orthodontic appliance depends on the metal attachments (brackets and bands) being attached securely to the teeth so that they do not become loose during treatment. Brackets are usually attached to the front and side teeth, whereas bands (metal rings that go round the teeth) are more commonly used on the back teeth (molars). A number of adhesives are available to attach bands to teeth and it is important to understand which group of adhesives bond most reliably, as well as reducing or preventing dental decay during the treatment period. To evaluate the effectiveness of the adhesives used to attach bands to teeth during fixed appliance treatment, in terms of:(1) how often the bands come off during treatment; and(2) whether they protect the banded teeth against decay during fixed appliance treatment. The following electronic databases were searched: Cochrane Oral Health's Trials Register (searched 2 June 2016), Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL; 2016, Issue 5) in the Cochrane Library (searched 2 June 2016), MEDLINE Ovid (1946 to 2 June 2016) and EMBASE Ovid (1980 to 2 June 2016). We searched ClinicalTrials.gov and the World Health Organization International Clinical Trials Registry Platform for ongoing trials. No restrictions were placed on the language or date of publication when searching the electronic databases. Randomised and controlled clinical trials (RCTs and CCTs) (including split-mouth studies) of adhesives used to attach orthodontic bands to molar teeth were selected. Patients with full arch fixed orthodontic appliance(s) who had bands attached to molars were included. All review authors

  1. Adhesive Behavior of Single Carbon Nanotubes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maeno, Yohei; Ishikawa, Atsunori; Nakayama, Yoshikazu

    2010-06-01

    We examined the adhesion of a carbon nanotube (CNT) tip using a manipulation technique with a transmission electron microscope. In addition, we estimated the maximum normal adhesion possibility of a CNT-based gecko tape. The adhesive behavior of a single isolated CNT to Au solid surfaces has high normal strength (6.84 nN), which has a linear relation to the cross section of a CNT, indicating the mechanism: van der Waals force was inferred from the contact of two flat surfaces. Adhesion measurements conducted on several surface materials verify that the surface chemistry affects adhesive properties of CNT tips.

  2. A review of high-temperature adhesives

    Science.gov (United States)

    St.clair, A. K.; St.clair, T. L.

    1981-01-01

    The development of high temperature adhesives and polyphenylquinoxalines (PPQ) is reported. Thermoplastic polyimides and linear PPQ adhesive are shown to have potential for bonding both metals and composite structures. A nadic terminated addition polyimide adhesive, LARC-13, and an acetylene terminated phenylquinoxaline (ATPQ) were developed. Both of the addition type adhesives are shown to be more readily processable than linear materials but less thermooxidatively stable and more brittle. It is found that the addition type adhesives are able to perform, at elevated temperatures up to 595 C where linear systems fail thermoplastically.

  3. Inflammatory mediators of coronary artery ectasia

    OpenAIRE

    Yuan, Shi-Min

    2014-01-01

    The exact mechanisms underlying coronary artery ectasia (CAE) remain uncertain. This study aims to investigate whether and how inflammatory mediators play a role in the pathogenesis of CAE. The data sources of this study were located by literature searches on MEDLINE, Highwire Press and Google search engine for the year range 2000-2013. The most sensitive of the four types of plasma inflammatory mediators were cell adhesion molecules and systemic inflammatory markers followed by cytokines, wh...

  4. Gecko adhesion pad: a smart surface?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pesika, Noshir S.; Zeng, Hongbo; Kristiansen, Kai; Zhao, Boxin; Tian, Yu; Autumn, Kellar; Israelachvili, Jacob

    2009-11-01

    Recently, it has been shown that humidity can increase the adhesion of the spatula pads that form the outermost (adhesive) surface of the tokay gecko feet by 50% relative to the main adhesion mechanism (i.e. van der Waals adhesive forces), although the mechanism by which the enhancement is realized is still not well understood. A change in the surface hydrophobicity of a gecko setal array is observed when the array, which supports the spatulae, is exposed to a water drop for more than 20 min, suggesting a change in the hydrophilic-lyophilic balance (HLB), and therefore of the conformation of the surface proteins. A surface force apparatus (SFA) was used to quantify these changes, i.e. in the adhesion and friction forces, while shearing the setal array against a silica surface under (i) dry conditions, (ii) 100% humidity and (iii) when fully immersed in water. The adhesion increased in the humid environment but greatly diminished in water. Although the adhesion forces changed significantly, the friction forces remained unaffected, indicating that the friction between these highly textured surfaces is 'load-controlled' rather than 'adhesion-controlled'. These results demonstrate that the gecko adhesive pads have the ability to exploit environmental conditions to maximize their adhesion and stabilize their friction forces. Future designs of synthetic dry adhesives inspired by the gecko can potentially include similar 'smart' surfaces that adapt to their environment.

  5. Gecko adhesion pad: a smart surface?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pesika, Noshir S [Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering Department, Tulane University, New Orleans, LA 70118 (United States); Zeng Hongbo [Chemical and Materials Engineering Department, University of Alberta, Edmonton, AB, T6G 2V4 (Canada); Kristiansen, Kai; Israelachvili, Jacob [Chemical Engineering Department, University of California, Santa Barbara, CA 93117 (United States); Zhao, Boxin [Chemical Engineering Department and Waterloo Institute of Nanotechnology, University of Waterloo, Ontario, N2L 3G1 (Canada); Tian Yu [State Key Laboratory of Tribology, Department of Precision Instruments, Tsinghua University, Beijing 100084 (China); Autumn, Kellar, E-mail: npesika@tulane.ed [Department of Biology, Lewis and Clark College, Portland, OR 97219 (United States)

    2009-11-18

    Recently, it has been shown that humidity can increase the adhesion of the spatula pads that form the outermost (adhesive) surface of the tokay gecko feet by 50% relative to the main adhesion mechanism (i.e. van der Waals adhesive forces), although the mechanism by which the enhancement is realized is still not well understood. A change in the surface hydrophobicity of a gecko setal array is observed when the array, which supports the spatulae, is exposed to a water drop for more than 20 min, suggesting a change in the hydrophilic-lyophilic balance (HLB), and therefore of the conformation of the surface proteins. A surface force apparatus (SFA) was used to quantify these changes, i.e. in the adhesion and friction forces, while shearing the setal array against a silica surface under (i) dry conditions, (ii) 100% humidity and (iii) when fully immersed in water. The adhesion increased in the humid environment but greatly diminished in water. Although the adhesion forces changed significantly, the friction forces remained unaffected, indicating that the friction between these highly textured surfaces is 'load-controlled' rather than 'adhesion-controlled'. These results demonstrate that the gecko adhesive pads have the ability to exploit environmental conditions to maximize their adhesion and stabilize their friction forces. Future designs of synthetic dry adhesives inspired by the gecko can potentially include similar 'smart' surfaces that adapt to their environment.

  6. Conformal adhesion enhancement on biomimetic microstructured surfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shahsavan, Hamed; Zhao, Boxin

    2011-06-21

    Inspired by the superior adhesive ability of the gecko foot pad, we report an experimental study of conformal adhesion of a soft elastomer thin film on biomimetic micropatterned surfaces (micropillars), showing a remarkable adhesion enhancement due to the surface patterning. The adhesion of a low-surface-energy poly(dimethylsiloxane) tape to a SU-8 micropatterned surface was found be able to increase by 550-fold as the aspect ratio increases from 0 to 6. The dependency of the adhesion enhancement on the aspect ratio is highly nonlinear. A series of peeling experiment coupled with optical interference imaging were performed to investigate the adhesion enhancement as a function of the height of the micropillars and the associated delamination mechanisms. Local elastic energy dissipation, side-wall friction, and plastic deformations were analyzed and discussed in terms of their contributions to the adhesion enhancement. We conclude that the local adhesion and friction events of pulling micropillars out of the embedded polymer film play a primary role in the observed adhesion enhancement. The technical implications of this local friction-based adhesion enhancement mechanism were discussed for the effective assembly of similar or dissimilar material components at small scales. The combined use of the micro/nanostructured surfaces with the van der Waals interactions seem to be a potentially more universal solution than the conventional adhesive bonding technology, which depends on the chemical and viscoelastic properties of the materials. © 2011 American Chemical Society

  7. Dark chocolate consumption improves leukocyte adhesion factors and vascular function in overweight men

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Esser, D.; Mars, M.; Oosterink, E.; Stalmach, A.; Müller, M.R.; Afman, L.A.

    2014-01-01

    Flavanol-enriched chocolate consumption increases endothelium-dependent vasodilation. Most research so far has focused on flow-mediated dilation (FMD) only; the effects on other factors relevant to endothelial health, such as inflammation and leukocyte adhesion, have hardly been addressed. We

  8. Cell Adhesion Molecules of the Immunoglobulin Superfamily in the Nervous System

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Walmod, Peter Schledermann; Pedersen, Martin Volmer; Berezin, Vladimir

    2007-01-01

    to be more than simple regulators of adhesion. Many CAMs are important mediators of intracellular signal transduction, and CAMs are involved in many biological phenomena including migration, proliferation, and differentiation of cells, as well as axonal guidance, neurite outgrowth,and synaptic plasticity...

  9. CXC chemokine ligand 12/stromal cell-derived factor-1 regulates cell adhesion in human colon cancer cells by induction of intercellular adhesion molecule-1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tung, Shui-Yi; Chang, Shun-Fu; Chou, Ming-Hui; Huang, Wen-Shih; Hsieh, Yung-Yu; Shen, Chien-Heng; Kuo, Hsing-Chun; Chen, Cheng-Nan

    2012-10-25

    The CXC chemokine ligand 12 (CXCL12)/stromal cell-derived factor-1 (SDF-1) and CXC receptor 4 (CXCR4) axis is involved in human colorectal cancer (CRC) carcinogenesis and can promote the progression of CRC. Interaction between CRC cells and endothelium is a key event in tumor progression. The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of SDF-1 on the adhesion of CRC cells. Human CRC DLD-1 cells were used to study the effect of SDF-1 on intercellular adhesion molecule-1 (ICAM-1) expression and cell adhesion to endothelium. SDF-1 treatment induced adhesion of DLD-1 cells to the endothelium and increased the expression level of the ICAM-1. Inhibition of ICAM-1 by small interfering RNA (siRNA) and neutralizing antibody inhibited SDF-1-induced cell adhesion. By using specific inhibitors and short hairpin RNA (shRNA), we demonstrated that the activation of ERK, JNK and p38 pathways is critical for SDF-1-induced ICAM-1 expression and cell adhesion. Promoter activity and transcription factor ELISA assays showed that SDF-1 increased Sp1-, C/EBP-β- and NF-κB-DNA binding activities in DLD-1 cells. Inhibition of Sp1, C/EBP-β and NF-κB activations by specific siRNA blocked the SDF-1-induced ICAM-1 promoter activity and expression. The effect of SDF-1 on cell adhesion was mediated by the CXCR4. Our findings support the hypothesis that ICAM-1 up-regulation stimulated by SDF-1 may play an active role in CRC cell adhesion.

  10. Adhesion of liquid droplets to rough surfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Ri; Alizadeh, Azar; Shang, Wen

    2010-10-01

    We study the adhesion of liquid droplets to rough surfaces, focusing on how adhesion changes with surface chemistry and roughness. For hydrophobic surfaces (equilibrium contact angle θ(e)>90°), although increasing surface roughness augments apparent contact angle, it does not necessarily always reduce adhesion. In a domain defined by roughness and equilibrium contact angle, this study identifies regions where adhesion increases or decreases with increasing roughness. The two regions do not border at θ(e)=90°. It is found that making surfaces with low roughness ratio (close to 1) does not reduce adhesion unless the surface material is highly hydrophobic (θ(e)>120°). In other words, to reduce adhesion for existing hydrophobic materials (90°adhesion, the geometry of microstructures should be designed such that wetted fraction decreases with increasing roughness ratio. This study is of particular importance for the design of textured superhydrophobic surfaces.

  11. Activation of GPR4 by Acidosis Increases Endothelial Cell Adhesion through the cAMP/Epac Pathway

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leffler, Nancy R.; Asch, Adam S.; Witte, Owen N.; Yang, Li V.

    2011-01-01

    Endothelium-leukocyte interaction is critical for inflammatory responses. Whereas the tissue microenvironments are often acidic at inflammatory sites, the mechanisms by which cells respond to acidosis are not well understood. Using molecular, cellular and biochemical approaches, we demonstrate that activation of GPR4, a proton-sensing G protein-coupled receptor, by isocapnic acidosis increases the adhesiveness of human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs) that express GPR4 endogenously. Acidosis in combination with GPR4 overexpression further augments HUVEC adhesion with U937 monocytes. In contrast, overexpression of a G protein signaling-defective DRY motif mutant (R115A) of GPR4 does not elicit any increase of HUVEC adhesion, indicating the requirement of G protein signaling. Downregulation of GPR4 expression by RNA interference reduces the acidosis-induced HUVEC adhesion. To delineate downstream pathways, we show that inhibition of adenylate cyclase by inhibitors, 2′,5′-dideoxyadenosine (DDA) or SQ 22536, attenuates acidosis/GPR4-induced HUVEC adhesion. Consistently, treatment with a cAMP analog or a Gi signaling inhibitor increases HUVEC adhesiveness, suggesting a role of the Gs/cAMP signaling in this process. We further show that the cAMP downstream effector Epac is important for acidosis/GPR4-induced cell adhesion. Moreover, activation of GPR4 by acidosis increases the expression of vascular adhesion molecules E-selectin, VCAM-1 and ICAM-1, which are functionally involved in acidosis/GPR4-mediated HUVEC adhesion. Similarly, hypercapnic acidosis can also activate GPR4 to stimulate HUVEC adhesion molecule expression and adhesiveness. These results suggest that acidosis/GPR4 signaling regulates endothelial cell adhesion mainly through the Gs/cAMP/Epac pathway and may play a role in the inflammatory response of vascular endothelial cells. PMID:22110680

  12. Soluble adhesion molecules as markers for sepsis and the potential pathophysiological discrepancy in neonates, children and adults

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-01-01

    Sepsis is a severe and life-threatening systemic inflammatory response to infection that affects all populations and age groups. The pathophysiology of sepsis is associated with aberrant interaction between leukocytes and the vascular endothelium. As inflammation progresses, the adhesion molecules that mediate these interactions become shed from cell surfaces and accumulate in the blood as soluble isoforms that are being explored as potential prognostic disease biomarkers. We critically review the studies that have tested the predictive value of soluble adhesion molecules in sepsis pathophysiology with emphasis on age, as well as the underlying mechanisms and potential roles for inflammatory shedding. Five soluble adhesion molecules are associated with sepsis, specifically, E-selectin, L-selectin and P-selectin, intercellular adhesion molecule-1 and vascular cell adhesion molecule-1. While increased levels of these soluble adhesion molecules generally correlate well with the presence of sepsis, their degree of elevation is still poorly predictive of sepsis severity scores, outcome and mortality. Separate analyses of neonates, children and adults demonstrate significant age-dependent discrepancies in both basal and septic levels of circulating soluble adhesion molecules. Additionally, a range of both clinical and experimental studies suggests protective roles for adhesion molecule shedding that raise important questions about whether these should positively or negatively correlate with mortality. In conclusion, while predictive properties of soluble adhesion molecules have been researched intensively, their levels are still poorly predictive of sepsis outcome and mortality. We propose two novel directions for improving clinical utility of soluble adhesion molecules: the combined simultaneous analysis of levels of adhesion molecules and their sheddases; and taking age-related discrepancies into account. Further attention to these issues may provide better

  13. Cell adhesion molecules and sleep.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Callaghan, Emma Kate; Ballester Roig, Maria Neus; Mongrain, Valérie

    2017-03-01

    Cell adhesion molecules (CAMs) play essential roles in the central nervous system, where some families are involved in synaptic development and function. These synaptic adhesion molecules (SAMs) are involved in the regulation of synaptic plasticity, and the formation of neuronal networks. Recent findings from studies examining the consequences of sleep loss suggest that these molecules are candidates to act in sleep regulation. This review highlights the experimental data that lead to the identification of SAMs as potential sleep regulators, and discusses results supporting that specific SAMs are involved in different aspects of sleep regulation. Further, some potential mechanisms by which SAMs may act to regulate sleep are outlined, and the proposition that these molecules may serve as molecular machinery in the two sleep regulatory processes, the circadian and homeostatic components, is presented. Together, the data argue that SAMs regulate the neuronal plasticity that underlies sleep and wakefulness. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd and Japan Neuroscience Society. All rights reserved.

  14. Fracture toughness of two dentin adhesives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Howard, Kimberly; Söderholm, Karl-Johan M

    2010-12-01

    Test the hypothesis that a self-etching adhesive is more likely to fail at the dentin-adhesive interface than an etch-and-rinse adhesive. Forty-eight composite-dentin short rod chevron-notched specimens were prepared. XP Bond and G Bond were used as adhesives. After 7 days in distilled water at 37°C, each specimen was tested (cross-head speed=0.05 mm/min). Fractured surfaces were inspected and characterized as interfacial failures, composite failures or a combination of interfacial and composite failures. The fracture toughness values (K(IC)) of the two adhesives were compared (Student's t-test and Weibull statistics). Of the specimens bonded with XP Bond, 50% failed at the dentin-adhesive interface, 42% at both the dentin-adhesive and composite interface and 8% in the composite alone. Of the specimens bonded with G Bond, 41% failed at the dentin-adhesive interface, 53% at both the dentin-adhesive and composite interface and 6% in the composite alone. The K(IC) values of the two adhesives differed significantly (pBond had a K(IC) of 0.77±0.11 MNm(-3/2) (n=17), while G Bond a K(IC) of 0.62±0.21 MNm(-3/2) (n=12). The high percentage of mixed failures did not support the hypothesis that the dentin-adhesive interface is clearly less resistant to fracture than the adhesive-composite interface. The finding that cracks occurred in 6-8% in the composite suggests that defects within the composite or at the adhesive-composite interface are important variables to consider in adhesion testing. Copyright © 2010 Academy of Dental Materials. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Transient adhesion of neutrophils to endothelium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lo, S K; Detmers, P A; Levin, S M; Wright, S D

    1989-05-01

    Fluorescently labeled polymorphonuclear leukocytes (PMN) were used to measure adhesion to human umbilical vein endothelial cells (EC) cultured in vitro. Stimulation of PMN with phorbol dibutyrate (PDB), TNF, or C5a caused an increase in adhesion followed by a return to prestimulation levels of adhesion of longer times of incubation. Maximal adhesion of PMN to EC occurred rapidly in response to C5a (5 min) and more slowly with TNF or PDB (15 min). PMN stimulated to adhere with C5a detached from EC by 15 min. PMN from CD11/CD18-deficient patients and PMN incubated with anti-CD18 mAbs failed to bind to EC despite maximal stimulation. Anti-CD11a/CD18 and anti-CD11b/CD18 each partially inhibited adhesion, and a combination of these two reagents completely blocked adhesion. The adhesion we measured was therefore completely dependent on CD11/CD18, and CD11a/CD18 and CD11b/CD18 each contributed to adhesion. Stimuli that enhanced adhesion of PMN to EC also enhanced expression of CD11b/CD18 on the cell surface, but the time course of expression correlated poorly with changes in adhesivity. To determine if changes in the expression of CD11b/CD18 are necessary for the changes in adhesivity, we used enucleate cytoplasts that did not increase expression of CD11b/CD18. Cytoplasts showed a normal rise and fall in adhesivity in response to PDB. We conclude that the transient adhesion of stimulated PMN to naive EC is regulated by changes in the nature of existing CD11/CD18 molecules on the PMN surface. Changes in expression of CD11b/CD18 may contribute to enhancement of adhesivity, but a definite role for this phenomenon has yet to be established.

  16. Polymer Claw: Instant Underwater Adhesive

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-10-23

    Prescribed by ANSI Std. Z39.18 REDD -2012-413 POLYMER CLAW: INSTANT UNDERWATER ADHESIVE Progress Report #8 Prepared for: Dr. Reggie Beach...Report: October 23, 2012 2.ol X\\oZ\\olc] The Johns Hopkins University Applied Physics Laboratory 11100 Johns Hopkins Rd, Laurel, MD 20723 REDD -2012...2- 10/23/12 The Johns Hopkins University Applied Physics Laboratory 11100 Johns Hopkins Rd, Laurel, MD 20723 REDD -2012-413 1 Summary When

  17. A review of our development of dental adhesives--effects of radical polymerization initiators and adhesive monomers on adhesion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ikemura, Kunio; Endo, Takeshi

    2010-03-01

    This paper reviews the development of dental adhesives by collating information of related studies from original scientific papers, reviews, and patent literatures. Through our development, novel radical polymerization initiators, adhesive monomers, and microcapsules were synthesized, and their effects on adhesion were investigated. It was found that 5-monosubstituted barbituric acid (5-MSBA)-containing ternary initiators in conjunction with adhesive monomers contributed to effective adhesion with good polymerization reactivity. Several kinds of novel adhesive monomers bearing carboxyl group, phosphonic acid group or sulfur-containing group were synthesized, and investigated their multi-purpose bonding functions. It was suggested that the flexible methylene chain in the structure of adhesive monomers played a pivotal role in their enhanced bonding durability. It was found that the combination of acidic monomers with sulfur-containing monomer markedly improved adhesion to enamel, dentin, porcelain, alumina, zirconia, non-precious metals and precious metals. A new poly(methyl methacrylate) (PMMA)-type adhesive resin comprising microencapsulated polymerization initiators was also found to exhibit both good formulation stability and excellent adhesive property.

  18. Modeling of Sylgard Adhesive Strength

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stevens, Ralph Robert [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2015-02-03

    Sylgard is the name of a silicone elastomeric potting material manufactured by Dow Corning Corporation.1 Although the manufacturer cites its low adhesive strength as a feature of this product, thin layers of Sylgard do in fact have a non-negligible strength, which has been measured in recent tensile and shear debonding tests. The adhesive strength of thin layers of Sylgard potting material can be important in applications in which components having signi cantly di erent thermal expansion properties are potted together, and the potted assembly is subjected to temperature changes. The tensile and shear tractions developed on the potted surfaces of the components can cause signi cant internal stresses, particularly for components made of low-strength materials with a high area-to-volume ratio. This report is organized as follows: recent Sylgard debonding tests are rst brie y summarized, with particular attention to the adhesion between Sylgard and PBX 9501, and also between Sylgard and aluminum. Next, the type of numerical model that will be used to simulate the debonding behavior exhibited in these tests is described. Then the calibration of the debonding model will be illustrated. Finally, the method by which the model parameters are adjusted (scaled) to be applicable to other, non- tested bond thicknesses is summarized, and all parameters of the model (scaled and unscaled) are presented so that other investigators can reproduce all of the simulations described in this report as well as simulations of the application of interest.

  19. Culinary Medicine-Jalebi Adhesions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kapoor, Vinay K

    2016-02-01

    Culinary terms have been used to describe anatomy (bean-shaped kidneys), pathology (strawberry gall bladder), clinical signs (café-au-lait spots), radiological images (sausage-shaped pancreas), etc. While Indian cuisine is popular all over the world, no Indian dish finds mention in medical terminology. In intra-abdominal adhesions, sometimes, the intestinal loops are so densely adherent that it is difficult to make out proximal from distal and it is impossible to separate them without injuring the bowel resulting in spill of contents-resection is the only option (Fig. 1). Jalebi, an Indian dessert, has a single long tubular strip of fried batter filled with sugary syrup so intertwined that it is impossible to discern its ends; if broken, the syrup spills out-the best way to relish it is to chew the whole piece (Fig. 2). Because of these similarities between them, I propose to name dense intra-abdominal adhesions as 'jalebi adhesions.'

  20. Proteoglycans, ion channels and cell-matrix adhesion

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mitsou, Ioli; Multhaupt, Hinke A.B.; Couchman, John R.

    2017-01-01

    .Recent data now suggest that syndecans can regulate stretchactivated ion channels.The structure and function of the syndecans and the ion channels are reviewed here, along with an analysis of ion channel functions in cell-matrix adhesion.This area sheds new light on the syndecans, not least since evidence......, growth factors and morphogens to enzymes and extracellular matrix (ECM) glycoproteins and collagens.Extracellular interactions with other receptors, such as some integrins, are mediated by the core protein.This places syndecans at the nexus of many cellular responses to extracellular cues in development...

  1. The evaluation of p,p'-DDT exposure on cell adhesion of hepatocellular carcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jin, Xiaoting; Chen, Meilan; Song, Li; Li, Hanqing; Li, Zhuoyu

    2014-08-01

    Many studies have found a positive association between the progression of hepatocellular carcinoma and DDT exposure. These studies mainly focus on the effect of DDT exposure on cell proliferation and epithelial to mesenchymal transition (EMT) promotion. However, the influence of DDT on cell adhesion of hepatocellular carcinoma remains to be unclear. The aim of our study was to determine the effect of p,p'-DDT on cell adhesion of hepatocellular carcinoma in vitro and in vivo. The data showed that p,p'-DDT, exposing HepG2 cells for 6 days, decreased cell-cell adhesion and elevated cell-matrix adhesion. Strikingly, p,p'-DDT increased reactive oxygen species (ROS) content, and this was accompanied by the activation of JAK/STAT3 pathway. Moreover, ROS inhibitor supplement reversed these effects significantly. However, the addition of ER inhibitor, ICI, had no effect on the p,p'-DDT-induced effects. p,p'-DDT altered the mRNA levels of related adhesion molecules, including inhibition of E-cadherin and promotion of N-cadherin along with CD29. Interestingly, the p,p'-DDT-altered adhesion molecules could be reversed with JAK inhibitor or STAT3 inhibitor. Likewise, p,p'-DDT stimulated the JAK/STAT3 pathway in nude mice, as well as altered the mRNA levels of E-cadherin, N-cadherin, and CD29. Taken together, these results indicate that p,p'-DDT profoundly promotes the adhesion process by decreasing cell-cell adhesion and inducing cell-matrix adhesion via the ROS-mediated JAK/STAT3 pathway. All these events account for the carcinogenic potential of p,p'-DDT in liver. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Light-Cured Self-Etch Adhesives Undergo Hydroxyapatite-Triggered Self-Cure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Y; Bai, X; Liu, Y W; Wang, Y

    2016-03-01

    Light cure is a popular mode of curing for dental adhesives. However, it suffers from inadequate light delivery when the restoration site is less accessible, in which case a self-cure mechanism is desirable to salvage any compromised polymerization. We previously reported a novel self-cure system mediated by ethyl 4-(dimethylamino)-benzoate (4E) and hydroxyapatite (HAp). The present work aims to investigate if such self-cure phenomenon takes place in adhesives that underwent prior inadequate light cure and to elucidate if HAp released from the dental etching process is sufficient to trigger it. Model self-etch adhesives were formulated with various components, including bis[2-methacryloyloxy)ethyl]-phosphate (2MP) as acidic monomer and trimethylbenzoyl-diphenylphosphine oxide (TPO) as photoinitiator. In vitro evolution of degree of conversion (DC) of HAp-incorporated adhesives was monitored by infrared spectroscopy during light irradiation and dark storage. Selected adhesives were allowed to etch and extract HAp from enamel, light-cured in situ, and stored in the dark, after which Raman line mapping was used to obtain spatially resolved DC across the enamel-resin interface. Results showed that TPO+4E adhesives reached DC similar to TPO-only counterparts upon completion of light irradiation but underwent another round of initiation that boosted DC to ~100% regardless of HAp level or prior light exposure. When applied to enamel, TPO-only adhesives had ~80% DC in resin, which gradually descended to ~50% in enamel, whereas TPO+4E adhesives consistently scored ~80% DC across the enamel-resin interface. These observations suggest that polymerization of adhesives that underwent insufficient light cure is salvaged by the novel self-cure mechanism, and such salvaging effect can be triggered by HAp released from dental substrate during the etching process. © International & American Associations for Dental Research 2015.

  3. An Evolutionary-Conserved Function of Mammalian Notch Family Members as Cell Adhesion Molecules

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murata, Akihiko; Yoshino, Miya; Hikosaka, Mari; Okuyama, Kazuki; Zhou, Lan; Sakano, Seiji; Yagita, Hideo; Hayashi, Shin-Ichi

    2014-01-01

    Notch family members were first identified as cell adhesion molecules by cell aggregation assays in Drosophila studies. However, they are generally recognized as signaling molecules, and it was unclear if their adhesion function was restricted to Drosophila. We previously demonstrated that a mouse Notch ligand, Delta-like 1 (Dll1) functioned as a cell adhesion molecule. We here investigated whether this adhesion function was conserved in the diversified mammalian Notch ligands consisted of two families, Delta-like (Dll1, Dll3 and Dll4) and Jagged (Jag1 and Jag2). The forced expression of mouse Dll1, Dll4, Jag1, and Jag2, but not Dll3, on stromal cells induced the rapid and enhanced adhesion of cultured mast cells (MCs). This was attributed to the binding of Notch1 and Notch2 on MCs to each Notch ligand on the stromal cells themselves, and not the activation of Notch signaling. Notch receptor-ligand binding strongly supported the tethering of MCs to stromal cells, the first step of cell adhesion. However, the Jag2-mediated adhesion of MCs was weaker and unlike other ligands appeared to require additional factor(s) in addition to the receptor-ligand binding. Taken together, these results demonstrated that the function of cell adhesion was conserved in mammalian as well as Drosophila Notch family members. Since Notch receptor-ligand interaction plays important roles in a broad spectrum of biological processes ranging from embryogenesis to disorders, our finding will provide a new perspective on these issues from the aspect of cell adhesion. PMID:25255288

  4. The Relationship between Platelet Adhesion on Surfaces and the Structure versus the Amount of Adsorbed Fibrinogen

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sivaraman, Balakrishnan

    2009-01-01

    While platelet adhesion to biomaterial surfaces is widely recognized to be related to adsorbed fibrinogen (Fg), it has remained controversial whether platelet adhesion is in response to the adsorbed amount or the adsorbed conformation of this protein. To address this issue, we designed a series of platelet adhesion studies to clearly separate these two factors, thus enabling us to definitively determine whether it is the amount or the conformation of adsorbed Fg that mediates platelet response. Fg was adsorbed to a broad range of surface chemistries from a wide range of solution concentrations, with the amount and conformation of adsorbed Fg determined by absorbance and circular dichroism (CD) spectropolarimetry, respectively. Platelet adhesion response was determined by lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) assay and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). Our results show that platelet adhesion is strongly correlated with the degree of adsorption-induced unfolding of Fg (r2 = 0.96) with essentially no correlation with the amount of Fg adsorbed (r2 = 0.04). Platelet receptor inhibitor studies using an RGDS peptide reduced platelet adhesion by only about 50%, and SEM results show that adherent platelets after RGDS blocking were much more rounded with minimal extended filopodia compared with the unblocked platelets. These results provide definitive proof that the conformation of adsorbed Fg is the critical determinant of platelet adhesion, not the amount of Fg adsorbed, with adsorption-induced unfolding potentially exposing two distinctly different types of platelet binding sites in Fg; one that induces platelet adhesion alone and one that induces both platelet adhesion and activation. PMID:19850334

  5. Light-Cured Self-Etch Adhesives Undergo Hydroxyapatite-Triggered Self-Cure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Y.; Bai, X.; Liu, Y.W.; Wang, Y.

    2015-01-01

    Light cure is a popular mode of curing for dental adhesives. However, it suffers from inadequate light delivery when the restoration site is less accessible, in which case a self-cure mechanism is desirable to salvage any compromised polymerization. We previously reported a novel self-cure system mediated by ethyl 4-(dimethylamino)-benzoate (4E) and hydroxyapatite (HAp). The present work aims to investigate if such self-cure phenomenon takes place in adhesives that underwent prior inadequate light cure and to elucidate if HAp released from the dental etching process is sufficient to trigger it. Model self-etch adhesives were formulated with various components, including bis[2-methacryloyloxy)ethyl]-phosphate (2MP) as acidic monomer and trimethylbenzoyl-diphenylphosphine oxide (TPO) as photoinitiator. In vitro evolution of degree of conversion (DC) of HAp-incorporated adhesives was monitored by infrared spectroscopy during light irradiation and dark storage. Selected adhesives were allowed to etch and extract HAp from enamel, light-cured in situ, and stored in the dark, after which Raman line mapping was used to obtain spatially resolved DC across the enamel-resin interface. Results showed that TPO+4E adhesives reached DC similar to TPO-only counterparts upon completion of light irradiation but underwent another round of initiation that boosted DC to ~100% regardless of HAp level or prior light exposure. When applied to enamel, TPO-only adhesives had ~80% DC in resin, which gradually descended to ~50% in enamel, whereas TPO+4E adhesives consistently scored ~80% DC across the enamel-resin interface. These observations suggest that polymerization of adhesives that underwent insufficient light cure is salvaged by the novel self-cure mechanism, and such salvaging effect can be triggered by HAp released from dental substrate during the etching process. PMID:26635279

  6. KGF Enhances Oral Epithelial Adhesion and Rete Peg Elongation via Integrins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sa, G L; Xiong, X P; Ren, J G; Wang, J Y; Xia, H F; Liu, Z K; He, S G; Zhao, Y F

    2017-12-01

    Oral epithelial adhesion to the lamina propria underlies the physiologic function of the oral mucosa and contributes to resisting bacterial invasion, preventing body fluid loss, and maintaining routine chewing; thus, understanding the factors that positively influence oral epithelial adhesion is a research topic of great interest. Rete pegs contribute to oral epithelial adhesion by enlarging the contact areas, whereas integrins are the major molecules that mediate epithelial cell adhesion to the basement membrane. Keratinocyte growth factor (KGF) can promote both rete peg elongation in the skin and the expression of integrins in various cell types. Herein, we tested the effects of submucosal injection of KGF in the ventral surfaces of rat tongues on oral epithelial adhesion. The data confirmed that topical injection of KGF elevated the adhesive forces, elongated the rete pegs, and increased the abundance of integrins, KGF, and KGF receptor on the rat tongue ventral surface. However, HYD-1 (Lys-Ile-Lys-Met-Val-Ile-Ser-Trp-Lys-Gly), an integrin antagonist, inhibited the KGF-enhanced epithelial adhesion and rete peg elongation. Moreover, KGF promoted the expression of integrin subunits α6, β4, α3, and β1 in human immortalized oral epithelial cells in 2- and 3-dimensional culture systems. In vitro cell attachment assays demonstrated that HYD-1 inhibited the adhesion of human immortalized oral epithelial cells on Matrigel. Strikingly, the expression of integrins, KGF, and KGFR in human masticatory mucosae with longer rete pegs was more abundant than that in the lining mucosae with shorter rete pegs. In addition, rete peg lengths were positively correlated with the expression levels of integrins, KGF, and KGF receptor. These findings indicate that KGF strengthens oral epithelial adhesion and rete peg elongation via integrins.

  7. Proper migration and axon outgrowth of zebrafish cranial motoneuron subpopulations require the cell adhesion molecule MDGA2A.

    OpenAIRE

    Esther Ingold; Vom Berg-Maurer, Colette M; Burckhardt, Christoph J.; André Lehnherr; Philip Rieder; Philip J. Keller; Stelzer, Ernst H; Greber, Urs F.; Neuhauss, Stephan C F; Matthias Gesemann

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT The formation of functional neuronal circuits relies on accurate migration and proper axonal outgrowth of neuronal precursors. On the route to their targets migrating cells and growing axons depend on both, directional information from neurotropic cues and adhesive interactions mediated via extracellular matrix molecules or neighbouring cells. The inactivation of guidance cues or the interference with cell adhesion can cause severe defects in neuronal migration and axon guidance. In ...

  8. Carbon nanotube dry adhesives with temperature-enhanced adhesion over a large temperature range

    OpenAIRE

    Xu, Ming; Du, Feng; Ganguli, Sabyasachi; Roy, Ajit; Dai, Liming

    2016-01-01

    Conventional adhesives show a decrease in the adhesion force with increasing temperature due to thermally induced viscoelastic thinning and/or structural decomposition. Here, we report the counter-intuitive behaviour of carbon nanotube (CNT) dry adhesives that show a temperature-enhanced adhesion strength by over six-fold up to 143?N?cm?2 (4?mm ? 4?mm), among the strongest pure CNT dry adhesives, over a temperature range from ?196 to 1,000??C. This unusual adhesion behaviour leads to temperat...

  9. Human Endometrial CD98 Is Essential for Blastocyst Adhesion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Domínguez, Francisco; Simón, Carlos; Quiñonero, Alicia; Ramírez, Miguel Ángel; González-Muñoz, Elena; Burghardt, Hans; Cervero, Ana; Martínez, Sebastián; Pellicer, Antonio; Palacín, Manuel; Sánchez-Madrid, Francisco; Yáñez-Mó, María

    2010-01-01

    Background Understanding the molecular basis of embryonic implantation is of great clinical and biological relevance. Little is currently known about the adhesion receptors that determine endometrial receptivity for embryonic implantation in humans. Methods and Principal Findings Using two human endometrial cell lines characterized by low and high receptivity, we identified the membrane receptor CD98 as a novel molecule selectively and significantly associated with the receptive phenotype. In human endometrial samples, CD98 was the only molecule studied whose expression was restricted to the implantation window in human endometrial tissue. CD98 expression was restricted to the apical surface and included in tetraspanin-enriched microdomains of primary endometrial epithelial cells, as demonstrated by the biochemical association between CD98 and tetraspanin CD9. CD98 expression was induced in vitro by treatment of primary endometrial epithelial cells with human chorionic gonadotropin, 17-β-estradiol, LIF or EGF. Endometrial overexpression of CD98 or tetraspanin CD9 greatly enhanced mouse blastocyst adhesion, while their siRNA-mediated depletion reduced the blastocyst adhesion rate. Conclusions These results indicate that CD98, a component of tetraspanin-enriched microdomains, appears to be an important determinant of human endometrial receptivity during the implantation window. PMID:20976164

  10. Human endometrial CD98 is essential for blastocyst adhesion.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francisco Domínguez

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Understanding the molecular basis of embryonic implantation is of great clinical and biological relevance. Little is currently known about the adhesion receptors that determine endometrial receptivity for embryonic implantation in humans. METHODS AND PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Using two human endometrial cell lines characterized by low and high receptivity, we identified the membrane receptor CD98 as a novel molecule selectively and significantly associated with the receptive phenotype. In human endometrial samples, CD98 was the only molecule studied whose expression was restricted to the implantation window in human endometrial tissue. CD98 expression was restricted to the apical surface and included in tetraspanin-enriched microdomains of primary endometrial epithelial cells, as demonstrated by the biochemical association between CD98 and tetraspanin CD9. CD98 expression was induced in vitro by treatment of primary endometrial epithelial cells with human chorionic gonadotropin, 17-β-estradiol, LIF or EGF. Endometrial overexpression of CD98 or tetraspanin CD9 greatly enhanced mouse blastocyst adhesion, while their siRNA-mediated depletion reduced the blastocyst adhesion rate. CONCLUSIONS: These results indicate that CD98, a component of tetraspanin-enriched microdomains, appears to be an important determinant of human endometrial receptivity during the implantation window.

  11. Tuning underwater adhesion with cation-π interactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gebbie, Matthew A.; Wei, Wei; Schrader, Alex M.; Cristiani, Thomas R.; Dobbs, Howard A.; Idso, Matthew; Chmelka, Bradley F.; Waite, J. Herbert; Israelachvili, Jacob N.

    2017-05-01

    Cation-π interactions drive the self-assembly and cohesion of many biological molecules, including the adhesion proteins of several marine organisms. Although the origin of cation-π bonds in isolated pairs has been extensively studied, the energetics of cation-π-driven self-assembly in molecular films remains uncharted. Here we use nanoscale force measurements in combination with solid-state NMR spectroscopy to show that the cohesive properties of simple aromatic- and lysine-rich peptides rival those of the strong reversible intermolecular cohesion exhibited by adhesion proteins of marine mussel. In particular, we show that peptides incorporating the amino acid phenylalanine, a functional group that is conspicuously sparing in the sequences of mussel proteins, exhibit reversible adhesion interactions significantly exceeding that of analogous mussel-mimetic peptides. More broadly, we demonstrate that interfacial confinement fundamentally alters the energetics of cation-π-mediated assembly: an insight that should prove relevant for diverse areas, which range from rationalizing biological assembly to engineering peptide-based biomaterials.

  12. Human climbing with efficiently scaled gecko-inspired dry adhesives

    OpenAIRE

    Hawkes, Elliot W.; Eason, Eric V.; Christensen, David L.; Cutkosky, Mark R.

    2015-01-01

    Since the discovery of the mechanism of adhesion in geckos, many synthetic dry adhesives have been developed with desirable gecko-like properties such as reusability, directionality, self-cleaning ability, rough surface adhesion and high adhesive stress. However, fully exploiting these adhesives in practical applications at different length scales requires efficient scaling (i.e. with little loss in adhesion as area grows). Just as natural gecko adhesives have been used as a benchmark for syn...

  13. E. coli Nissle 1917 Affects Salmonella adhesion to porcine intestinal epithelial cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peter Schierack

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The probiotic Escherichia coli strain Nissle 1917 (EcN has been shown to interfere in a human in vitro model with the invasion of several bacterial pathogens into epithelial cells, but the underlying molecular mechanisms are not known. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: In this study, we investigated the inhibitory effects of EcN on Salmonella Typhimurium invasion of porcine intestinal epithelial cells, focusing on EcN effects on the various stages of Salmonella infection including intracellular and extracellular Salmonella growth rates, virulence gene regulation, and adhesion. We show that EcN affects the initial Salmonella invasion steps by modulating Salmonella virulence gene regulation and Salmonella SiiE-mediated adhesion, but not extra- and intracellular Salmonella growth. However, the inhibitory activity of EcN against Salmonella invasion always correlated with EcN adhesion capacities. EcN mutants defective in the expression of F1C fimbriae and flagellae were less adherent and less inhibitory toward Salmonella invasion. Another E. coli strain expressing F1C fimbriae was also adherent to IPEC-J2 cells, and was similarly inhibitory against Salmonella invasion like EcN. CONCLUSIONS: We propose that EcN affects Salmonella adhesion through secretory components. This mechanism appears to be common to many E. coli strains, with strong adherence being a prerequisite for an effective reduction of SiiE-mediated Salmonella adhesion.

  14. Adhesion and wear resistance of materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buckley, D. H.

    1986-01-01

    Recent studies into the nature of bonding at the interface between two solids in contact or a solid and deposited film have provided a better understanding of those properties important to the adhesive wear resistance of materials. Analytical and experimental progress are reviewed. For simple metal systems the adhesive bond forces are related to electronic wave function overlap. With metals in contact with nonmetals, molecular-orbital energy, and density of states, respectively can provide insight into adhesion and wear. Experimental results are presented which correlate adhesive forces measured between solids and the electronic surface structures. Orientation, surface reconstruction, surface segregation, adsorption are all shown to influence adhesive interfacial strength. The interrelationship between adhesion and the wear of the various materials as well as the life of coatings applied to substrates are discussed. Metallic systems addressed include simple metals and alloys and these materials in contact with themselves, both oxide and nonoxide ceramics, diamond, polymers, and inorganic coating compounds, h as diamondlike carbon.

  15. Carbohydrate Coating Reduces Adhesion of Biofilm-Forming Bacillus subtilis to Gold Surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kesel, S.; Mader, A.; Seeberger, P. H.; Lieleg, O.

    2014-01-01

    The growth of bacterial biofilms in pipes and food tanks causes severe problems in industry. Biofilms growing on medical implants or catheters are of great concern, as they can cause serious infections and decrease the functionality of the medical device. The prevention of bacterial adhesion—the first step in colonization and biofilm formation—is therefore very important. Current research comprises alterations in surface properties, the prevention of adhesin biosynthesis, inhibition with receptor analogs, or the development of anti-adhesive vaccines. We present a new approach that allows us to study bacterial adhesion with high sensitivity in real-time while testing several different surfaces in parallel. Using the cantilever-array technique we demonstrate that coating of gold surfaces with mono- or disaccharides results in a reduction of the bacterial adhesion of the biofilm-forming bacterium Bacillus subtilis NCIB 3610 to these gold surfaces. This reduction in bacterial adhesion is independent of the studied carbohydrate. Using several mutant strains, we investigate the underlying molecular interactions, and our results suggest that adhesion to gold surfaces is mediated by thiol groups present in proteins of the bacterial cell membrane or biofilm matrix proteins expressed at low levels by the wild-type strain. Furthermore, our data indicate that the adhesion of B. subtilis NCIB 3610 to carbohydrate-coated gold surfaces is facilitated by interactions between carbohydrates installed on the cantilever gold surface and an exopolysaccharide expressed by this strain. Understanding general and specific contributions of molecular interactions mediating bacterial adhesion will enable its prevention in the future. PMID:25038098

  16. IL-4 increases human endothelial cell adhesiveness for T cells but not for neutrophils.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thornhill, M H; Kyan-Aung, U; Haskard, D O

    1990-04-15

    The adhesion of leukocytes to vascular endothelium is the first step in their passage from the blood into inflammatory tissues. By modulating endothelial cell (EC) adhesiveness for leukocytes, cytokines may regulate leukocyte accumulation and hence the nature and progression of inflammatory responses. We have found that the T cell cytokine IL-4 increases the adhesion of T cells, but not neutrophils, to human umbilical vein EC monolayers. The increase in T cell adhesion induced by IL-4 was dose dependent (ED50 = 5 U/ml) and peaked around 33 U/ml. No increase in adhesion of neutrophils was observed at concentrations of IL-4 up to 1000 U/ml. The kinetic of the increase in T cell adhesion exhibited a steady rise peaking between 18 and 24 h before returning to basal levels by 72 h. The IL-4 specificity of the effect was confirmed by the ability of neutralizing anti-IL-4, but not anti-TNF, antibodies to abolish the effect. The increase in T cell-EC adhesion was due to an effect of IL-4 on EC inasmuch as preincubation of the T cells with IL-4 did not increase T cell binding. Furthermore, preincubation of A549 epithelial cell line monolayers with IL-4 caused no increase in T cell binding whereas A549 cells and EC showed a similarly enhanced adhesiveness for T cells after preincubation with IL-1, TNF, or IFN-gamma. EC treated with IL-4 retained their increased adhesiveness for T cells after light fixation, suggesting that IL-4 up-regulates binding by increasing the expression or accessibility of EC surface receptors for lymphocytes. Although antibodies to intercellular adhesion molecule-1 (CD54) and the beta-chain (CD18) of lymphocyte function-associated Ag-1 (CD11a/CD18) partially inhibited T cell adhesion to unstimulated EC, they did not affect the increase in adhesion due to IL-4 stimulation, indicating that the increased binding resulted from the generation of an alternative binding receptor(s) on the EC membrane. These findings suggest that IL-4 may play a role in the

  17. Regulation of VCAM-1 expression and involvement in cell adhesion to murine microvascular endothelium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bereta, J; Bereta, M; Cohen, S; Cohen, M C

    1993-04-01

    The present studies were undertaken to examine the regulation of murine VCAM-1 expression and the involvement of this molecule in adhesive processes occurring on the surface of microvascular endothelium. Flow cytometric analyses revealed that murine microvascular endothelium (MME) in culture constitutively expresses VCAM-1 and that stimulation of MME by TNF, IL-1, or LPS, but not by PMA or staurosporine, strongly increased the surface expression of this cell adhesion molecule. Stimulation of VCAM-1 expression by TNF may be diminished by ionomycin as well as by inhibitors of protein kinases (H-7 and sangivamycin). However, TGF-beta, which strongly inhibited the adhesiveness of endothelium, had little effect on the expression of VCAM-1. A newly developed adhesion assay, based on the rosette technique, allowed us to distinguish between the adhesive properties of an individual endothelial cell and those of endothelial cell monolayers and demonstrated that inhibition of binding by TGF-beta resulted primarily from its influence on the adhesive properties of individual cells. Studies on the inhibition of cell binding by monoclonal antibodies against mouse VCAM-1 and mouse VLA-4 indicated that VCAM-1 plays a dominant role in mediating the adherence of a variety of cell types, including murine splenocytes and thymocytes, P815 mastocytoma cells, PT 18 mast/basophil cells, human Molt-4 cells, and human eosinophils, to cytokine-activated MME.

  18. Transmigrated neutrophils down-regulate the expression of VCAM-1 on endothelial cells and inhibit the adhesion of flowing lymphocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stone, Philip C W; Lally, Frank; Rahman, Mahbub; Smith, Emily; Buckley, Christopher D; Nash, Gerard B; Rainger, G Ed

    2005-01-01

    As the first leukocytes recruited during inflammation, neutrophils are ideally situated to regulate the subsequent recruitment of mononuclear leukocytes. Here, we found that human neutrophils recruited by endothelial cells (EC), which had been stimulated with tumor necrosis factor alpha for 4 h, inhibited the adhesion of flowing, mixed mononuclear cells or purified lymphocytes over the subsequent 20 h but did not affect the adhesion of a secondary bolus of neutrophils. The degree of inhibition of lymphocyte adhesion increased with the duration of neutrophil-EC contact and with the number of recruited neutrophils. Antibody-blocking studies showed that lymphocyte adhesion was mediated predominantly by vascular cell adhesion molecule-1 (VCAM-1). Recruited neutrophils reduced the EC expression of VCAM-1 but not intercellular adhesion molecule-1 (ICAM-1) or E-selectin in a manner that mirrored the time- and number-dependent reduction in lymphocyte adhesion. VCAM-1 was not shed into the culture supernatant, and a panel of protease inhibitors was unable to reverse its down-regulation, indicating that it was not proteolytically degraded by neutrophils. In EC that had been in contact with neutrophils, the mRNA message for VCAM-1 but not ICAM-1 was down-regulated, indicating that alterations in transcriptional activity were responsible for the reduction in VCAM-1. Thus, under some inflammatory milieu, neutrophils may delay the recruitment of mononuclear leukocytes by regulating the expression of EC adhesion receptors.

  19. Improving controllable adhesion on both rough and smooth surfaces with a hybrid electrostatic/gecko-like adhesive

    OpenAIRE

    Ruffatto, Donald; Parness, Aaron; Spenko, Matthew

    2014-01-01

    This paper describes a novel, controllable adhesive that combines the benefits of electrostatic adhesives with gecko-like directional dry adhesives. When working in combination, the two technologies create a positive feedback cycle whose adhesion, depending on the surface type, is often greater than the sum of its parts. The directional dry adhesive brings the electrostatic adhesive closer to the surface, increasing its effect. Similarly, the electrostatic adhesion helps engage more of the di...

  20. Quantal concept of T-cell activation: adhesion domains as immunological synapses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sackmann, Erich

    2011-06-01

    Adhesion micro-domains (ADs) formed during encounters of lymphocytes with antigen-presenting cells (APC) mediate the genetic expression of quanta of cytokines interleukin-2 (IL-2). The IL-2-induced activation of IL-2 receptors promotes the stepwise progression of the T-cells through the cell cycle, hence their name, immunological synapses. The ADs form short-lived reaction centres controlling the recruitment of activators of the biochemical pathway (the kinases Lck and ZAP) while preventing the access of inhibitors (phosphatase CD45) through steric repulsion forces. CD45 acts as the generator of adhesion domains and, through its role as a spacer protein, also as the promoter of the reaction. In a second phase of T-cell-APC encounters, long-lived global reaction spaces (called supramolecular activation complexes (SMAC)) form by talin-mediated binding of the T-cell integrin (LFA-1) to the counter-receptor ICAM-1, resulting in the formation of ring-like tight adhesion zones (peripheral SMAC). The ADs move to the centre of the intercellular adhesion zone forming the central SMAC, which serve in the recycling of the AD. We propose that cell stimulation is triggered by integrating the effect evoked by the short-lived adhesion domains. Similar global reaction platforms are formed by killer cells to destruct APC. We present a testable mechanical model showing that global reaction spaces (SMAC or dome-like contacts between cytotoxic cells and APC) form by self-organization through delayed activation of the integrin-binding affinity and stabilization of the adhesion zones by F-actin recruitment. The mechanical stability and the polarization of the adhering T-cells are mediated by microtubule-actin cross-talk.

  1. Quantal concept of T-cell activation: adhesion domains as immunological synapses

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sackmann, Erich, E-mail: sackmann@ph.tum.de [Physics Department E22, Technical University Munich, D-85748 Garching (Germany)

    2011-06-15

    Adhesion micro-domains (ADs) formed during encounters of lymphocytes with antigen-presenting cells (APC) mediate the genetic expression of quanta of cytokines interleukin-2 (IL-2). The IL-2-induced activation of IL-2 receptors promotes the stepwise progression of the T-cells through the cell cycle, hence their name, immunological synapses. The ADs form short-lived reaction centres controlling the recruitment of activators of the biochemical pathway (the kinases Lck and ZAP) while preventing the access of inhibitors (phosphatase CD45) through steric repulsion forces. CD45 acts as the generator of adhesion domains and, through its role as a spacer protein, also as the promoter of the reaction. In a second phase of T-cell-APC encounters, long-lived global reaction spaces (called supramolecular activation complexes (SMAC)) form by talin-mediated binding of the T-cell integrin (LFA-1) to the counter-receptor ICAM-1, resulting in the formation of ring-like tight adhesion zones (peripheral SMAC). The ADs move to the centre of the intercellular adhesion zone forming the central SMAC, which serve in the recycling of the AD. We propose that cell stimulation is triggered by integrating the effect evoked by the short-lived adhesion domains. Similar global reaction platforms are formed by killer cells to destruct APC. We present a testable mechanical model showing that global reaction spaces (SMAC or dome-like contacts between cytotoxic cells and APC) form by self-organization through delayed activation of the integrin-binding affinity and stabilization of the adhesion zones by F-actin recruitment. The mechanical stability and the polarization of the adhering T-cells are mediated by microtubule-actin cross-talk.

  2. Pharmacological implications from the adhesion-induced signaling profiles in cultured human retinal pigment epithelial cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wen-Chuan Wu

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Extracellular matrix (ECM plays an active and complex role in regulating cellular behaviors, including proliferation and adhesion. This study aimed at delineating the adhesion-induced signaling profiles in cultured human retinal pigment epithelium (RPE cells and investigating the antiadhesion effect of antiproliferative drugs in this context. RPE R-50 cells grown on various ECM molecules, such as type I and IV collagens, fibronectin, and laminin, were used for adhesion assay and for examining the phosphorylation profiles of signaling mediators including Akt, extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK 1/2, and integrin-linked kinase (ILK using Western blotting. The cells receiving antiproliferative drug treatment at subtoxic doses were used to evaluate their antiadhesive and suppressive effects on kinase activities. ECM coating enhanced adhesion and spreading of RPE cells significantly. The cellular attachment onto ECM-coated surfaces differentially induced Akt, ERK1/2, and ILK phosphorylation, and concomitantly increased p53 phosphorylation and cyclin D1 expression, but decreased Bcl-2/Bax ratios. Treatment with antiproliferative agents, including 5-fluorouracil, mitomycin C, and daunomycin, at subtoxic doses suppressed the ability of RPE cells to adhere to ECM substratum significantly. This suppression was in part mediated through reduction of integrin β1 and β3 expressions and interfering Akt-ILK signaling activity. Mechanistically, blockade of PI3K/Akt signaling resulted in the suppressed adhesion of RPE cells to ECM. These findings support the hypothesis that, in addition to their antimitogenic effect, antiproliferative agents also exhibit suppressive effect on the adhesiveness of cultured RPE cells. Moreover, inhibitors of the PI3K/Akt signaling mediator can potentially be used as therapeutic agents for proliferative vitreoretinopathy.

  3. Role of galectin-3 as an adhesion molecule for neutrophil extravasation during streptococcal pneumonia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sato, Sachiko; Ouellet, Nathalie; Pelletier, Isabelle; Simard, Marie; Rancourt, Ann; Bergeron, Michel G

    2002-02-15

    Recruitment of neutrophils from blood vessels to sites of infection represents one of the most important elements of innate immunity. Movement of neutrophils across blood vessel walls to the site of infection first requires that the migrating cells firmly attach to the endothelial wall. Generally, neutrophil extravasation is mediated at least in part by two classes of adhesion molecules, beta(2) integrins and selectins. However, in the case of streptococcal pneumonia, recent studies have revealed that a significant proportion of neutrophil diapedesis is not mediated by the beta(2) integrin/selectin paradigm. Galectin-3 is a beta-galactoside-binding lectin implicated in inflammatory responses as well as in cell adhesion. Using an in vivo streptococcal pneumonia mouse model, we found that accumulation of galectin-3 in the alveolar space of streptococcus-infected lungs correlates closely with the onset of neutrophil extravasation. Furthermore, immunohistological analysis of infected lung tissue revealed the presence of galectin-3 in the lung tissue areas composed of epithelial and endothelial cell layers as well as of interstitial spaces. In vitro, galectin-3 was able to promote neutrophil adhesion to endothelial cells. Promotion of neutrophil adhesion by galectin-3 appeared to result from direct cross-linking of neutrophils to the endothelium and was dependent on galectin-3 oligomerization. Together, these results suggest that galectin-3 acts as an adhesion molecule that can mediate neutrophil adhesion to endothelial cells. However, accumulation of galectin-3 in lung was not observed during neutrophil emigration into alveoli induced by Escherichia coli infection, where the majority of neutrophil emigration is known to be beta(2) integrin dependent. Thus, based on our results, we propose that galectin-3 plays a role in beta(2) integrin-independent neutrophil extravasation, which occurs during alveolar infection with Streptococcus pneumoniae.

  4. Testing thin film adhesion strength acoustically

    Science.gov (United States)

    Madanshetty, Sameer I.; Wanklyn, Kevin M.; Ji, Hang

    2004-05-01

    A new method of measuring the adhesion strength of thin films to their substrates is reported. The method is based on an analogy with the common tensile test of materials. This is an acoustic method that uses acoustic microcavitation to bring about controlled erosion of the thin film. Based on the insonification pressure and the time to complete erosion, the adhesion strength is assessed. The measurements correctly rank order a set of thin film samples of known adhesion strengths.

  5. Hepatocyte growth factor is a potent trigger of neutrophil adhesion through rapid activation of lymphocyte function-associated antigen-1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mine, S; Tanaka, Y; Suematu, M; Aso, M; Fujisaki, T; Yamada, S; Eto, S

    1998-11-01

    Recruitment of neutrophils into tissue occurs in several pathologic processes such as inflammation, atherosclerosis, thrombosis, and ischemia. In inflammation, the adherence of neutrophils to the endothelium depends on neutrophil integrins. Integrin-mediated adhesion is tightly regulated, ie, integrins do not function if neutrophils are not triggered by certain activation stimuli. We investigated the role of hepatocyte growth factor (HGF) in the adhesion of neutrophils to endothelial cells in inflammation. Our results showed that (a) HGF induced not only lymphocyte function-associated antigen-1 (LFA-1)-mediated adhesion of neutrophils to endothelial cells but also transmigration of neutrophils in a concentration-dependent manner; (b) HGF functionally transformed neutrophil integrin LFA-1 to active form and reduced surface L-selectin expression level; (c) HGF induced F-actin polymerization and cytoskeletal rearrangement within seconds; (d) genistein, a tyrosine kinase inhibitor, as well as wortmannin, a phosphoinositide 3 (PI 3)-kinase inhibitor, inhibited both F-actin polymerization and LFA-1-mediated adhesion of neutrophils to endothelial cells; and (e) neutrophils in cutaneous inflamed tissue highly expressed HGF and serum levels of HGF were elevated in patients with Behçet's disease, which is associated with neutrophilic vasculitis and marked neutrophil accumulation. Our results indicate that HGF plays a pivotal role in integrin-mediated adhesion and transmigration of neutrophils to sites of acute inflammation through cytoskeletal rearrangement activated by tyrosine kinase and PI 3-kinase signaling.

  6. [Adhesive capsulitis of the shoulder].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Revel, M; Ghanem, N

    1999-09-01

    Adhesive capsulitis is a painful stiff shoulder due to the thickening of the capsule and synovium. The main observed changes are hyperhaemia of the synovium and a capsular fibrosis similar to that of Dupuytren's disease. Stiffness involves mainly flexion, lateral rotation and abduction. In most cases, a spontaneous healing is observed within 12 to 30 months. When the capsulitis is disabling and pain still present, a joint distension followed by rehabilitation can be indicated. When the disability is important and mainly due to stiffness, a manipulation under anesthesia with or without arthroscopic release of soft tissues can be indicated.

  7. Adhesive Strength of dry Adhesive Structures Depending on the Thickness of Metal Coating

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Gyu Hye; Kwon, Da Som; Kim, Mi Jung; Kim, Su Hee; Yoon, Ji Won; An, Tea Chang; Hwang, Hui Yun [Andong National Univ., Andong (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-07-15

    Recently, engineering applications have started to adopt solutions inspired by nature. The peculiar adhesive properties of gecko skin are an example, as they allow the animal to move freely on vertical walls and even on ceilings. The high adhesive forces between gecko feet and walls are due to the hierarchical microscopical structure of the skin. In this study, the effect of metal coatings on the adhesive strength of synthetic, hierarchically structured, dry adhesives was investigated. Synthetic dry adhesives were fabricated using PDMS micro-molds prepared by photolithography. Metal coatings on synthetic dry adhesives were formed by plasma sputtering. Adhesive strength was measured by pure shear tests. The highest adhesion strengths were found with coatings composed of 4 nm thick layers of Indium, 8 nm thick layers of Zinc and 6 nm thick layers of Gold, respectively.

  8. Influence of composition on the adhesive strength and initial viscosity of denture adhesives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Jian-min; Hong, Guang; Hayashida, Kentaro; Maeda, Takeshi; Murata, Hiroshi; Sasaki, Keiichi

    2014-01-01

    To investigate the effect of composition on the initial viscosity and adhesive strength between denture adhesives and the denture base. Two types of water-soluble polymers (methoxy ethylene maleic anhydride copolymer [PVM-MA] and sodium carboxymethyl cellulose [CMC]) were used. Samples were divided into three groups. Group 1 contained only PVM-MA; Group 2 contained only CMC; and Group 3 contained PVM-MA and CMC. The initial viscosity and adhesive strength were measured. For Group 1, the initial viscosity increased significantly as PVM-MA content increased. The adhesive strength of Group 1 lasted longer than Group 2. The adhesive strength of Group 3 varied greatly. The ratio of CMC and PVM-MA has a significant effect on the initial viscosity and adhesive strength of denture adhesives. Our results suggest that it is possible to improve the durability of a denture adhesive by combining different water-soluble polymers.

  9. An experimental study on adhesive or anti-adhesive, bio-inspired experimental nanomaterials

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Lepore, Emiliano; Pugno, Nicol

    The proposed book aims to better understand some of the most challenging and disputed topics that could be found in nature, such as adhesive, anti-adhesive or strong mechanisms in plants or animals...

  10. Spatial self-organization in hybrid models of multicellular adhesion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonforti, Adriano; Duran-Nebreda, Salva; Montañez, Raúl; Solé, Ricard

    2016-10-01

    Spatial self-organization emerges in distributed systems exhibiting local interactions when nonlinearities and the appropriate propagation of signals are at work. These kinds of phenomena can be modeled with different frameworks, typically cellular automata or reaction-diffusion systems. A different class of dynamical processes involves the correlated movement of agents over space, which can be mediated through chemotactic movement or minimization of cell-cell interaction energy. A classic example of the latter is given by the formation of spatially segregated assemblies when cells display differential adhesion. Here, we consider a new class of dynamical models, involving cell adhesion among two stochastically exchangeable cell states as a minimal model capable of exhibiting well-defined, ordered spatial patterns. Our results suggest that a whole space of pattern-forming rules is hosted by the combination of physical differential adhesion and the value of probabilities modulating cell phenotypic switching, showing that Turing-like patterns can be obtained without resorting to reaction-diffusion processes. If the model is expanded allowing cells to proliferate and die in an environment where diffusible nutrient and toxic waste are at play, different phases are observed, characterized by regularly spaced patterns. The analysis of the parameter space reveals that certain phases reach higher population levels than other modes of organization. A detailed exploration of the mean-field theory is also presented. Finally, we let populations of cells with different adhesion matrices compete for reproduction, showing that, in our model, structural organization can improve the fitness of a given cell population. The implications of these results for ecological and evolutionary models of pattern formation and the emergence of multicellularity are outlined.

  11. Anti-adhesion molecule therapies in inflammatory bowel disease: touch and go.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stefanelli, Tommaso; Malesci, Alberto; De La Rue, Sarah A; Danese, Silvio

    2008-05-01

    Exploration of the mechanisms underlying the inflammatory bowel diseases [N. Mori, Y. Horie, M.E. Gerritsen, D.C. Anderson, D.N. Granger, Anti-inflammatory drugs and endothelial cell adhesion molecule expression in murine vascular beds. Gut 1999;44:186-95] is a leading field of medical research that drives the application of biological therapies to human diseases. Indeed, many inflammatory mediators can be targeted in the gut by monoclonal antibodies. A recent direction for these therapeutics is targeting of the adhesion molecule family. This molecule family mediates the adhesion and extravasation of leukocytes through the endothelium at sites of inflammation. This is a complex multistep process that has been extensively investigated in recent years; thanks to these studies some adhesion molecules have been identified to specifically mediate leukocyte migration to gut inflammatory sites, like alpha(4)beta(7) integrin. This review outlines the scientific basis behind this therapeutic approach, and describes the principal clinical studies that have been carried out on these new molecules in patients with IBD.

  12. Magnetic resonance imaging of navicular bursa adhesions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holowinski, Maureen E; Solano, Mauricio; Maranda, Louise; García-López, José M

    2012-01-01

    Adhesions occur in the navicular bursa between the deep digital flexor tendon (DDFT) and other structures. Our objectives were to describe the appearance of navicular bursa adhesions on high-field magnetic resonance (MR) images, to compare these findings to findings at navicular bursoscopy, and to determine the prevalence of lesions in the remainder of the podotrochlear apparatus. Sixteen forelimbs from 14 horses that underwent MR imaging and navicular bursoscopy were evaluated. Adhesions were considered type 1 when characterized by a discontinuity in the navicular bursa fluid signal between two structures, type 2 when the navicular bursa fluid signal was disrupted and ill-defined tissue was present between two structures, and type 3 when the fluid signal was disrupted and well-defined tissue was present between two structures. Twenty-six adhesions were suspected on MR images and nineteen were visualized at surgery. The positive predictive value was 50% for type 1 adhesions, 67% for type 2 adhesions, and 100% for type 3 adhesions. Additional lesions were detected in the navicular bursa in 15 limbs, the DDFT in 13, the navicular bone in 15, the collateral sesamoidean ligaments in 9, and the distal sesamoidean impar ligament in 8. A discontinuity in the navicular bursa fluid signal with well-defined tissue between two structures detected on high-field MR images is diagnostic for a navicular bursa adhesion. Additional lesions in the podotrochlear apparatus are common in horses with navicular bursa adhesions. © 2012 Veterinary Radiology & Ultrasound.

  13. Familial adhesive arachnoiditis associated with syringomyelia

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Pasoglou, V; Janin, N; Tebache, M; Tegos, T J; Born, J D; Collignon, L

    2014-01-01

    Adhesive arachnoiditis is a rare condition, often complicated by syringomyelia. This pathologic entity is usually associated with prior spinal surgery, spinal inflammation or infection, and hemorrhage...

  14. The development of aerospace polyimide adhesives

    Science.gov (United States)

    St.clair, A. K.; St.clair, T. L.

    1983-01-01

    Few materials are available which can be used as aerospace adhesives at temperatures in the range of 300 C. The Materials Division at NASA-Langley Research Center developed several high temperature polyimide adhesives to fulfill the stringent needs of current aerospace programs. These adhesives are the result of a decade of basic research studies on the structure property relationships of both linear and addition aromatic polyimides. The development of both in house and commercially available polyimides is reviewed with regards to their potential for use as aerospace adhesives.

  15. Autologous fibrin adhesive in experimental tubal anastomosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rajaram, S; Rusia, U; Agarwal, S; Agarwal, N

    1996-01-01

    To evaluate autologous fibrin in rabbit oviduct anastomosis versus 7-0 vikryl, a conventional suture material used in tubal anastomosis. Thrombin was added to the autologous fibrinogen at the site of anastomosis to obtain a tissue adhesive. The anastomotic time, pregnancy rate, and litter size were evaluated. Three months later, a relaparotomy was done to evaluate patency and degree of adhesions, and a tubal biopsy was taken from the site of anastomosis. Analysis of results showed a statistically significant (P < .001) shortened anastomotic time and superior histopathological union in the tissue adhesive group. Patency rate, pregnancy rate, and degree of adhesions were comparable in both groups.

  16. Eosinophil recruitment and activation: the role of lipid mediators

    OpenAIRE

    Tatiana eLuna-Gomes; Patricia eBozza; Christianne eBandeira-Melo

    2013-01-01

    Eosinophils are effector cells that migrate toward several mediators released at inflammatory sites to perform their multiple functions. The mechanisms driving eosinophil selective accumulation in sites of allergic inflammation are well established and involve several steps controlled by adhesion molecules, priming agents, chemotactic and surviving factors. Even though the majority of studies focused on role of protein mediators like IL-5 and eotaxins, lipid mediators also participate in eosi...

  17. Ultramorphology of pre-treated adhesive interfaces between self-adhesive resin cement and tooth structures

    OpenAIRE

    Pereira,Carolina Nemesio de Barros; DALEPRANE,Bruno; MIRANDA,Giovani Lana Peixoto de; Magalhães,Cláudia Silami de; Moreira, Allyson Nogueira

    2017-01-01

    Abstract Introduction Convencional resin cements can be used in combination with a total-etch system in a conventional mode or as self-adhesive resin cements. The latter are less technique sensitive and able to bond to dental tissues without previous treatment or adhesive layer and requires only a single step to be applied to dental structures. Objective To compare qualitatively the adhesive interfaces of two self-adhesive resin cements and one conventional resin cement after different toot...

  18. Adhesion performance of new hydrolytically stable one-component self-etching enamel/dentin adhesives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salz, Ulrich; Bock, Thorsten

    2010-02-01

    To demonstrate that hydrolytically stable methacrylamide monomers allow one-component self-etching adhesives with comparable adhesive properties and better storage stability than hitherto available methyacrylate-based adhesive formulations. The shear bond strength and storage stability of the new one-component self-etching, methacrylamide-based adhesive AdheSE One F (Ivoclar Vivadent) to enamel and dentin was compared to the methacrylate-based Clearfil S3 Bond (Kuraray), G-Bond (GC), Hybrid Bond (Sun Medical), iBond (Heraeus Kulzer), Optibond All In One (Sybron-Kerr), and the methacrylamide-based Xeno V (Dentsply). Hydrolytic stability and adhesive performance of these adhesives was evaluated by accelerated aging at 42 degrees C over 16 weeks and monthly assessment of shear bond strength to dentin. The null hypothesis was that the bond strength of one-bottle self-etching dental adhesives is independent of storage duration and that, disregarding their higher stability against hydrolysis, methacrylamide- based materials offer performance beyond shelf-life time, comparable to methacrylate-based adhesives. Statistical analysis included 1-way-ANOVA and the Tukey-B post-hoc test (p AdheSE One F) to 16.6 MPa (iBond) and on dentin from 36.1 MPa (Optibond All In One) to 20.5 MPa (G-Bond). During accelerated aging, methacrylate-based adhesives with a pH AdheSE One F and Xeno V were stable for 16 weeks regarding shear bond strength to dentin. The shelf life of one-component self-etching adhesives is determined by their chemical composition. In conventional methacrylate-based adhesives, the inherently acidic environment of such formulations leads to monomer degradation due to hydrolysis. In contrast, methacrylamide-based adhesives are stable to aqueous acid and exhibit much superior storage stability without monomer degradation-related losses in adhesion performance.

  19. Signaling mechanisms of neurite outgrowth induced by the cell adhesion molecules NCAM and N-cadherin

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, S M; Berezin, V; Bock, E

    2008-01-01

    extracellular guidance cues to intracellular events and thereby regulating neurite outgrowth. In this review, we focus on two CAMs, the neural cell adhesion molecule (NCAM) and N-cadherin, and their ability to mediate signaling associated with a neurite outgrowth response. In particular, we will focus on direct......Formation of appropriate neural circuits depends on a complex interplay between extracellular guiding cues and intracellular signaling events that result in alterations of cytoskeletal dynamics and a neurite growth response. Surface-expressed cell adhesion molecules (CAMs) interact...

  20. Cell adhesion and EGFR activation regulate EphA2 expression in cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Alice Bjerregaard; Stockhausen, Marie-Thérése; Poulsen, Hans Skovgaard

    2010-01-01

    family kinases (SRC). Moreover, the results show that adhesion-induced EGFR activation and EphA2 expression is affected by interactions with extracellular matrix (ECM) proteins working as integrin ligands. Stimulation with the EphA2 ligand, ephrinA1 inhibited ERK phosphorylation and cancer cell viability....... These effects were however abolished by activation of the EGF-receptor ligand system favoring Ras/MAPK signaling and cell proliferation. Based on our results, we propose a regulatory mechanism where cell adhesion induces EGFR kinase activation and EphA2 expression; and where the effect of ephrinA1 mediated...

  1. Suppression of lysyl-tRNA synthetase, KRS, causes incomplete epithelial-mesenchymal transition and ineffective cell‑extracellular matrix adhesion for migration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nam, Seo Hee; Kang, Minkyung; Ryu, Jihye; Kim, Hye-Jin; Kim, Doyeun; Kim, Dae Gyu; Kwon, Nam Hoon; Kim, Sunghoon; Lee, Jung Weon

    2016-04-01

    The cell-adhesion properties of cancer cells can be targeted to block cancer metastasis. Although cytosolic lysyl-tRNA synthetase (KRS) functions in protein synthesis, KRS on the plasma membrane is involved in cancer metastasis. We hypothesized that KRS is involved in cell adhesion-related signal transduction for cellular migration. To test this hypothesis, colon cancer cells with modulated KRS protein levels were analyzed for cell-cell contact and cell-substrate adhesion properties and cellular behavior. Although KRS suppression decreased expression of cell-cell adhesion molecules, cells still formed colonies without being scattered, supporting an incomplete epithelial mesenchymal transition. Noteworthy, KRS-suppressed cells still exhibited focal adhesions on laminin, with Tyr397-phopshorylated focal adhesion kinase (FAK), but they lacked laminin-adhesion-mediated extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) and paxillin activation. KRS, p67LR and integrin α6β1 were found to interact, presumably to activate ERK for paxillin expression and Tyr118 phosphorylation even without involvement of FAK, so that specific inhibition of ERK or KRS in parental HCT116 cells blocked cell-cell adhesion and cell-substrate properties for focal adhesion formation and signaling activity. Together, these results indicate that KRS can promote cell-cell and cell-ECM adhesion for migration.

  2. Effect of inorganic fillers in paper on the adhesion of pressure-sensitive adhesives

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weixu Chen; Xiaoyan Tang; John Considine; Kevin T. Turner

    2011-01-01

    Inorganic fillers are inexpensive materials used to increase the density, smoothness and other properties of paper that are important for printing. In the current study, the adhesion of pressure-sensitive adhesives (PSAs), a common type of adhesive used in labels and tapes, to papers containing varying amounts and types of fillers is investigated. Papers with three...

  3. An experimental study of hafting adhesives and the implications for compound tool technology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zipkin, Andrew M; Wagner, Mark; McGrath, Kate; Brooks, Alison S; Lucas, Peter W

    2014-01-01

    Experimental studies of hafting adhesives and modifications to compound tool components can demonstrate the extent to which human ancestors understood and exploited material properties only formally defined by science within the last century. Discoveries of Stone Age hafting adhesives at archaeological sites in Europe, the Middle East, and Africa have spurred experiments that sought to replicate or create models of such adhesives. Most of these studies, however, have been actualistic in design, focusing on replicating ancient applications of adhesive technology. In contrast, this study tested several glues based on Acacia resin within a materials science framework to better understand the effect of each adhesive ingredient on compound tool durability. Using an overlap joint as a model for a compound tool, adhesives formulated with loading agents from a range of particle sizes and mineral compositions were tested for toughness on smooth and rough substrates. Our results indicated that overlap joint toughness is significantly increased by using a roughened joint surface. Contrary to some previous studies, there was no evidence that particle size diversity in a loading agent improved adhesive effectiveness. Generally, glues containing quartz or ochre loading agents in the silt and clay-sized particle class yielded the toughest overlap joints, with the effect of particle size found to be more significant for rough rather than smooth substrate joints. Additionally, no particular ochre mineral or mineral mixture was found to be a clearly superior loading agent. These two points taken together suggest that Paleolithic use of ochre-loaded adhesives and the criteria used to select ochres for this purpose may have been mediated by visual and symbolic considerations rather than purely functional concerns.

  4. An experimental study of hafting adhesives and the implications for compound tool technology.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrew M Zipkin

    Full Text Available Experimental studies of hafting adhesives and modifications to compound tool components can demonstrate the extent to which human ancestors understood and exploited material properties only formally defined by science within the last century. Discoveries of Stone Age hafting adhesives at archaeological sites in Europe, the Middle East, and Africa have spurred experiments that sought to replicate or create models of such adhesives. Most of these studies, however, have been actualistic in design, focusing on replicating ancient applications of adhesive technology. In contrast, this study tested several glues based on Acacia resin within a materials science framework to better understand the effect of each adhesive ingredient on compound tool durability. Using an overlap joint as a model for a compound tool, adhesives formulated with loading agents from a range of particle sizes and mineral compositions were tested for toughness on smooth and rough substrates. Our results indicated that overlap joint toughness is significantly increased by using a roughened joint surface. Contrary to some previous studies, there was no evidence that particle size diversity in a loading agent improved adhesive effectiveness. Generally, glues containing quartz or ochre loading agents in the silt and clay-sized particle class yielded the toughest overlap joints, with the effect of particle size found to be more significant for rough rather than smooth substrate joints. Additionally, no particular ochre mineral or mineral mixture was found to be a clearly superior loading agent. These two points taken together suggest that Paleolithic use of ochre-loaded adhesives and the criteria used to select ochres for this purpose may have been mediated by visual and symbolic considerations rather than purely functional concerns.

  5. Effectiveness of immediate bonding of etch-and-rinse adhesives to simplified ethanol-saturated dentin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guimarães, Leandro Afonso; Almeida, Júlio César Franco; Wang, Linda; D'Alpino, Paulo Henrique Perlatti; Garcia, Fernanda Cristina Pimentel

    2012-01-01

    This study examined the immediate bond strength of etch-and-rinse adhesives to demineralized dentin saturated with either water or absolute ethanol. The research hypothesis was that there would be no difference in bond strength to dentin between water or ethanol wet-bonding techniques. The medium dentin of 20 third molars was exposed (n = 5). The dentin surface was then acid-etched, left moist and randomly assigned to be saturated via either water wet-bonding (WBT) or absolute ethanol wet-bonding (EBT). The specimens were then treated with one of the following etch-and-rinse adhesive systems: a 3-step, water-based system (Adper Scotchbond Multipurpose, or SBMP) or a 2-step, ethanol/water-based system (Adper Single Bond 2, or SB). Resin composite build-ups were then incrementally constructed. After water storage for 24 h at 37°C, the tensile strength of the specimens was tested in a universal testing machine (0.5 mm/min). Data were analyzed by two-way ANOVA and Tukey's test (a = 5%). The failure modes were verified using a stereomicroscope (40'). For both adhesives, no significant difference in bond strength was observed between WBT and EBT (p > 0.05). The highest bond strength was observed for SB, regardless of the bonding technique (p adhesives and bonding techniques was noticed (p = 0.597). There was a predominance of adhesive failures for all tested groups. The EBT and WBT displayed similar immediate bond strength means for both adhesives. The SB adhesive exhibited higher means for all conditions tested. Further investigations are needed to evaluate long-term bonding to dentin mediated by commercial etch-and-rinse adhesives using the EBT approach.

  6. Effectiveness of immediate bonding of etch-and-rinse adhesives to simplified ethanol-saturated dentin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leandro Afonso Guimarães

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available This study examined the immediate bond strength of etch-and-rinse adhesives to demineralized dentin saturated with either water or absolute ethanol. The research hypothesis was that there would be no difference in bond strength to dentin between water or ethanol wet-bonding techniques. The medium dentin of 20 third molars was exposed (n = 5. The dentin surface was then acid-etched, left moist and randomly assigned to be saturated via either water wet-bonding (WBT or absolute ethanol wet-bonding (EBT. The specimens were then treated with one of the following etch-and-rinse adhesive systems: a 3-step, water-based system (Adper Scotchbond Multipurpose, or SBMP or a 2-step, ethanol/water-based system (Adper Single Bond 2, or SB. Resin composite build-ups were then incrementally constructed. After water storage for 24 h at 37°C, the tensile strength of the specimens was tested in a universal testing machine (0.5 mm/min. Data were analyzed by two-way ANOVA and Tukey's test (a = 5%. The failure modes were verified using a stereomicroscope (40'. For both adhesives, no significant difference in bond strength was observed between WBT and EBT (p > 0.05. The highest bond strength was observed for SB, regardless of the bonding technique (p < 0.05. No significant interaction between adhesives and bonding techniques was noticed (p = 0.597. There was a predominance of adhesive failures for all tested groups. The EBT and WBT displayed similar immediate bond strength means for both adhesives. The SB adhesive exhibited higher means for all conditions tested. Further investigations are needed to evaluate long-term bonding to dentin mediated by commercial etch-and-rinse adhesives using the EBT approach.

  7. Effects on in vitro and in vivo angiogenesis induced by small peptides carrying adhesion sequences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Conconi, Maria Teresa; Ghezzo, Francesca; Dettin, Monica; Urbani, Luca; Grandi, Claudio; Guidolin, Diego; Nico, Beatrice; Di Bello, Carlo; Ribatti, Domenico; Parnigotto, Pier Paolo

    2010-07-01

    It is well known that tumor growth is strictly dependent on neo-vessel formation inside the tumor mass and that cell adhesion is required to allow EC proliferation and migration inside the tumor. In this work, we have evaluated the in vitro and in vivo effects on angiogenesis of some peptides, originally designed to promote cell adhesion on biomaterials, containing RGD motif mediating cell adhesion via integrin receptors [RGD, GRGDSPK, and (GRGDSP)(4)K] or the heparin-binding sequence of human vitronectin that interacts with HSPGs [HVP(351-359)]. Cell adhesion, proliferation, migration, and capillary-like tube formation in Matrigel were determined on HUVECs, whereas the effects on in vivo angiogenesis were evaluated using the CAM assay. (GRGDSP)(4)K linear sequence inhibited cell adhesion, decreased cell proliferation, migration and morphogenesis in Matrigel, and induced anti-angiogenic responses on CAM at higher degree than that determined after incubation with RGD or GRGDSPK. Moreover, it counteracted both in vitro and in vivo the pro-angiogenic effects induced by the Fibroblast growth factor (FGF-2). On the other hand, HVP was not able to affect cell adhesion and appeared less effective than (GRGDSP)(4)K. Our data indicate that the activity of RGD-containing peptides is related to their adhesive properties, and their effects are modulated by the number of cell adhesion motifs and the aminoacidic residues next to these sequences. The anti-angiogenic properties of (GRGDSP)(4)K seem to depend on its interaction with integrins, whereas the effects of HVP may be partially due to an impairment of HSPGs/FGF-2.

  8. An Experimental Study of Hafting Adhesives and the Implications for Compound Tool Technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zipkin, Andrew M.; Wagner, Mark; McGrath, Kate; Brooks, Alison S.; Lucas, Peter W.

    2014-01-01

    Experimental studies of hafting adhesives and modifications to compound tool components can demonstrate the extent to which human ancestors understood and exploited material properties only formally defined by science within the last century. Discoveries of Stone Age hafting adhesives at archaeological sites in Europe, the Middle East, and Africa have spurred experiments that sought to replicate or create models of such adhesives. Most of these studies, however, have been actualistic in design, focusing on replicating ancient applications of adhesive technology. In contrast, this study tested several glues based on Acacia resin within a materials science framework to better understand the effect of each adhesive ingredient on compound tool durability. Using an overlap joint as a model for a compound tool, adhesives formulated with loading agents from a range of particle sizes and mineral compositions were tested for toughness on smooth and rough substrates. Our results indicated that overlap joint toughness is significantly increased by using a roughened joint surface. Contrary to some previous studies, there was no evidence that particle size diversity in a loading agent improved adhesive effectiveness. Generally, glues containing quartz or ochre loading agents in the silt and clay-sized particle class yielded the toughest overlap joints, with the effect of particle size found to be more significant for rough rather than smooth substrate joints. Additionally, no particular ochre mineral or mineral mixture was found to be a clearly superior loading agent. These two points taken together suggest that Paleolithic use of ochre-loaded adhesives and the criteria used to select ochres for this purpose may have been mediated by visual and symbolic considerations rather than purely functional concerns. PMID:25383871

  9. Design and fabrication of polymer based dry adhesives inspired by the gecko adhesive system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jin, Kejia

    There has been significant interest in developing dry adhesives mimicking the gecko adhesive system, which offers several advantages compared to conventional pressure sensitive adhesives. Specifically, gecko adhesive pads have anisotropic adhesion properties: the adhesive pads (spatulae) stick strongly when sheared in one direction but are non-adherent when sheared in the opposite direction. This anisotropy property is attributed to the complex topography of the array of fine tilted and curved columnar structures (setae) that bear the spatulae. In this thesis, easy, scalable methods, relying on conventional and unconventional techniques are presented to incorporate tilt in the fabrication of synthetic polymer-based dry adhesives mimicking the gecko adhesive system, which provide anisotropic adhesion properties. In the first part of the study, the anisotropic adhesion and friction properties of samples with various tilt angles to test the validity of a nanoscale tape-peeling model of spatular function are measured. Consistent with the Peel Zone model, samples with lower tilt angles yielded larger adhesion forces. Contact mechanics of the synthetic array were highly anisotropic, consistent with the frictional adhesion model and gecko-like. Based on the original design, a new design of gecko-like dry adhesives was developed which showed superior tribological properties and furthermore showed anisotropic adhesive properties without the need for tilt in the structures. These adhesives can be used to reversibly suspend weights from vertical surfaces (e.g., walls) and, for the first time to our knowledge, horizontal surfaces (e.g., ceilings) by simultaneously and judiciously activating anisotropic friction and adhesion forces. Furthermore, adhesion properties between artificial gecko-inspired dry adhesives and rough substrates with varying roughness are studied. The results suggest that both adhesion and friction forces on a rough substrate depends significantly on the

  10. AN ANALYTICAL STUDY IN ADHESIVE BOWEL OBSTRUCTION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gerald Anand Raja

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND Peritoneal adhesions can be defined as abnormal fibrous bands between organs or tissues or both in the abdominal cavity that are normally separated. Adhesions may be acquired or congenital; however, most are acquired as a result of peritoneal injury, the most common cause of which is abdominopelvic surgery. Less commonly, adhesions may form as the result of inflammatory conditions, intraperitoneal infection or abdominal trauma. The extent of adhesion formation varies from one patient to another and is most dependent on the type and magnitude of surgery performed as well as whether any postoperative complications develop. Fortunately, most patients with adhesions do not experience any overt clinical symptoms. For others, adhesions may lead to any one of a host of problems and can be the cause of significant morbidity and mortality. MATERIALS AND METHODS This is a retrospective study of 50 patients admitted in Government Royapettah Hospital with adhesive bowel obstruction between September 2008 to September 2010. All patients were admitted and managed either conservatively or surgically. RESULTS 1. Adhesive bowel disease is the most common cause for bowel obstruction followed by hernias. 2. Increased incidence is noted in females. 3. Increased incidence of adhesions was documented in gynaecological and colorectal surgeries. 4. Below umbilical incisions have higher propensity for adhesion formation. 5. Laparotomies done for infective aetiology have higher adhesion risks. 6. Most of adhesive obstructions can be managed conservatively. 7. Adhesiolysis preferably laparoscopic can be done. For gangrenous bowel resection and anastomosis or ostomy done. 8. Given the above risk factors, adhesive bowel disease can be prevented to a certain extent. CONCLUSION The formation of peritoneal adhesions continues to plague patients, surgeons and society. Although, research in this area is ongoing, there is currently no method that is 100% effective in

  11. Disinfection effect of dental impression tray adhesives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bensel, Tobias; Pollak, Rita; Stimmelmayr, Michael; Hey, Jeremias

    2013-03-01

    Iatrogenic infections are serious problems in dental offices. Impression tray adhesives are delivered in glass containers with a fixed brush attached inside the cap. Using the brush for application of the impression tray adhesive on a contaminated impression tray or prostheses, pathogen transmission by replacing the cap with the brush is possible. Bacterial strains (patient strains and in vitro strains) were supervaccinated on Columbia agar. The bacterial solution was diluted with TSB and aerobically grown, and starting concentration was 1 × 10(7) cfu/ml. The stock solution was placed on Columbia agar. Alginate, polyether, and silicon impression tray adhesives were applied to the center of the particular blood agar plates and incubated for 48 h. The expansion of the inhibition zone assays were measured using a microscope. Twenty-one different bacterial strains were selected in the saliva samples of 20 patients. The growth inhibition for alginate impression tray adhesive was 1.1 % (±0.3) of the patient strains. The overgrowth of polyether impression tray adhesive was 30.6 % (±9.3) and for silicon impression tray adhesive 11.8 % (±5.0). In in vitro strains, alginate impression tray adhesive performed an inhibition of 0.7 % (±0.3). The overgrowth of polyether impression tray adhesive was 7.0 % (±1.6) and for silicon impression tray adhesive was 6.5 % (±1.3). Using the fixed brush for application of the impression tray adhesive on multiple patients, a cross-contamination cannot be ruled out. An application of the impression tray