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Sample records for homology ph domain

  1. Intrinsic Pleckstrin Homology (PH) Domain Motion in Phospholipase C-β Exposes a Gβγ Protein Binding Site.

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    Kadamur, Ganesh; Ross, Elliott M

    2016-05-20

    Mammalian phospholipase C-β (PLC-β) isoforms are stimulated by heterotrimeric G protein subunits and members of the Rho GTPase family of small G proteins. Although recent structural studies showed how Gαq and Rac1 bind PLC-β, there is a lack of consensus regarding the Gβγ binding site in PLC-β. Using FRET between cerulean fluorescent protein-labeled Gβγ and the Alexa Fluor 594-labeled PLC-β pleckstrin homology (PH) domain, we demonstrate that the PH domain is the minimal Gβγ binding region in PLC-β3. We show that the isolated PH domain can compete with full-length PLC-β3 for binding Gβγ but not Gαq, Using sequence conservation, structural analyses, and mutagenesis, we identify a hydrophobic face of the PLC-β PH domain as the Gβγ binding interface. This PH domain surface is not solvent-exposed in crystal structures of PLC-β, necessitating conformational rearrangement to allow Gβγ binding. Blocking PH domain motion in PLC-β by cross-linking it to the EF hand domain inhibits stimulation by Gβγ without altering basal activity or Gαq response. The fraction of PLC-β cross-linked is proportional to the fractional loss of Gβγ response. Cross-linked PLC-β does not bind Gβγ in a FRET-based Gβγ-PLC-β binding assay. We propose that unliganded PLC-β exists in equilibrium between a closed conformation observed in crystal structures and an open conformation where the PH domain moves away from the EF hands. Therefore, intrinsic movement of the PH domain in PLC-β modulates Gβγ access to its binding site. © 2016 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  2. Molecular basis of phosphatidylinositol 4-phosphate and ARF1 GTPase recognition by the FAPP1 pleckstrin homology (PH) domain.

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    He, Ju; Scott, Jordan L; Heroux, Annie; Roy, Siddhartha; Lenoir, Marc; Overduin, Michael; Stahelin, Robert V; Kutateladze, Tatiana G

    2011-05-27

    Four-phosphate-adaptor protein 1 (FAPP1) regulates secretory transport from the trans-Golgi network (TGN) to the plasma membrane. FAPP1 is recruited to the Golgi through binding of its pleckstrin homology (PH) domain to phosphatidylinositol 4-phosphate (PtdIns(4)P) and a small GTPase ADP-ribosylation factor 1 (ARF1). Despite the critical role of FAPP1 in membrane trafficking, the molecular basis of its dual function remains unclear. Here, we report a 1.9 Å resolution crystal structure of the FAPP1 PH domain and detail the molecular mechanisms of the PtdIns(4)P and ARF1 recognition. The FAPP1 PH domain folds into a seven-stranded β-barrel capped by an α-helix at one edge, whereas the opposite edge is flanked by three loops and the β4 and β7 strands that form a lipid-binding pocket within the β-barrel. The ARF1-binding site is located on the outer side of the β-barrel as determined by NMR resonance perturbation analysis, mutagenesis, and measurements of binding affinities. The two binding sites have little overlap, allowing FAPP1 PH to associate with both ligands simultaneously and independently. Binding to PtdIns(4)P is enhanced in an acidic environment and is required for membrane penetration and tubulation activity of FAPP1, whereas the GTP-bound conformation of the GTPase is necessary for the interaction with ARF1. Together, these findings provide structural and biochemical insight into the multivalent membrane anchoring by the PH domain that may augment affinity and selectivity of FAPP1 toward the TGN membranes enriched in both PtdIns(4)P and GTP-bound ARF1.

  3. Cancer associated E17K mutation causes rapid conformational drift in AKT1 pleckstrin homology (PH domain.

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    Ambuj Kumar

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: AKT1 (v-akt murine thymoma viral oncogene homologue 1 kinase is one of the most frequently activated proliferated and survival pathway of cancer. Recently it has been shown that E17K mutation in the Pleckstrin Homology (PH domain of AKT1 protein leads to cancer by amplifying the phosphorylation and membrane localization of protein. The mutant has shown resistance to AKT1/2 inhibitor VIII drug molecule. In this study we have demonstrated the detailed structural and molecular consequences associated with the activity regulation of mutant protein. METHODS: The docking score exhibited significant loss in the interaction affinity to AKT1/2 inhibitor VIII drug molecule. Furthermore, the molecular dynamics simulation studies presented an evidence of rapid conformational drift observed in mutant structure. RESULTS: There was no stability loss in mutant as compared to native structure and the major cation-π interactions were also shown to be retained. Moreover, the active residues involved in membrane localization of protein exhibited significant rise in NHbonds formation in mutant. The rise in NHbond formation in active residues accounts for the 4-fold increase in the membrane localization potential of protein. CONCLUSION: The overall result suggested that, although the mutation did not induce any stability loss in structure, the associated pathological consequences might have occurred due to the rapid conformational drifts observed in the mutant AKT1 PH domain. GENERAL SIGNIFICANCE: The methodology implemented and the results obtained in this work will facilitate in determining the core molecular mechanisms of cancer-associated mutations and in designing their potential drug inhibitors.

  4. Identification of Novel Molecular Targets for Pleckstrin Homology (PH) Domains Found in Oncogenes Implicated in Breast Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-03-01

    a PH domain- independent manner, is unaffected by perifosine treatment . I therefore surmised that perifosine might act by directly interfering with...Biol. 6(5), 384-385. Scanlan, MJ, Gout , I, Gordon, CM, Williamson, B, Stockert, E, Gure, AO, Jager, D, Chen, YT, Mackay, A, O’Hare, MJ, and Old LJ

  5. Activated RhoA Binds to the Pleckstrin Homology (PH) Domain of PDZ-RhoGEF, a Potential Site for Autoregulation

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    Chen, Zhe; Medina, Frank; Liu, Mu-ya; Thomas, Celestine; Sprang, Stephen R.; Sternweis, Paul C. (UTSMC); (Montana)

    2010-07-19

    Guanine nucleotide exchange factors (GEFs) catalyze exchange of GDP for GTP by stabilizing the nucleotide-free state of the small GTPases through their Dbl homology/pleckstrin homology (DH {center_dot} PH) domains. Unconventionally, PDZ-RhoGEF (PRG), a member of the RGS-RhoGEFs, binds tightly to both nucleotide-free and activated RhoA (RhoA {center_dot} GTP). We have characterized the interaction between PRG and activated RhoA and determined the structure of the PRG-DH {center_dot} PH-RhoA {center_dot} GTP{gamma}S (guanosine 5{prime}-O-[{gamma}-thio]triphosphate) complex. The interface bears striking similarity to a GTPase-effector interface and involves the switch regions in RhoA and a hydrophobic patch in PRG-PH that is conserved among all Lbc RhoGEFs. The two surfaces that bind activated and nucleotide-free RhoA on PRG-DH {center_dot} PH do not overlap, and a ternary complex of PRG-DH {center_dot} PH bound to both forms of RhoA can be isolated by size-exclusion chromatography. This novel interaction between activated RhoA and PH could play a key role in regulation of RhoGEF activity in vivo.

  6. Identification of Toxoplasma TgPH1, a pleckstrin homology domain-containing protein that binds to the phosphoinositide PI(3,5)P2.

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    Daher, Wassim; Morlon-Guyot, Juliette; Alayi, Tchilabalo Dilezitoko; Tomavo, Stan; Wengelnik, Kai; Lebrun, Maryse

    2016-05-01

    The phosphoinositide phosphatidylinositol-3,5-bisphosphate (PI(3,5)P2) plays crucial roles in the maintenance of lysosome/vacuole morphology, membrane trafficking and regulation of endolysosome-localized membrane channel activity. In Toxoplasma gondii, we previously reported that PI(3,5)P2 is essential for parasite survival by controlling homeostasis of the apicoplast, a particular organelle of algal origin. Here, by using a phosphoinositide pull-down assay, we identified TgPH1 in Toxoplasma a protein conserved in many apicomplexan parasites. TgPH1 binds specifically to PI(3,5)P2, shows punctate intracellular localization, but plays no vital role for tachyzoite growth in vitro. TgPH1 is a protein predominantly formed by a pleckstrin homology (PH) domain. So far, PH domains have been described to bind preferentially to bis- or trisphosphate phosphoinositides containing two adjacent phosphates (i.e. PI(3,4)P2, PI(4,5)P2, PI(3,4,5)P3). Therefore, our study reveals an unusual feature of TgPH1 which binds preferentially to PI(3,5)P2.

  7. Identification of Novel Molecular Targets for Pleckstrin Homology (PH) Domains Found in Oncogenes Implicated in Breast Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    2005-03-01

    which is mutated in X-linked agammaglobulinemia (XLA) [47, 48], and is the ’standard’ residue that is mutated to impair phosphoinositide binding by PH...I., CHAPMAN, V., PAUL, Biol. 1996, 255, 14-21. W E., Colocalization of X-linked 39 FUSHMAN, D., NAJMABADI-KASKE, T., agammaglobulinemia and X-linked

  8. Pleckstrin homology domains and the cytoskeleton.

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    Lemmon, Mark A; Ferguson, Kathryn M; Abrams, Charles S

    2002-02-20

    Pleckstrin homology (PH) domains are 100-120 amino acid protein modules best known for their ability to bind phosphoinositides. All possess an identical core beta-sandwich fold and display marked electrostatic sidedness. The binding site for phosphoinositides lies in the center of the positively charged face. In some cases this binding site is well defined, allowing highly specific and strong ligand binding. In several of these cases the PH domains specifically recognize 3-phosphorylated phosphoinositides, allowing them to drive membrane recruitment in response to phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase activation. Examples of these PH domain-containing proteins include certain Dbl family guanine nucleotide exchange factors, protein kinase B, PhdA, and pleckstrin-2. PH domain-mediated membrane recruitment of these proteins contributes to regulated actin assembly and cell polarization. Many other PH domain-containing cytoskeletal proteins, such as spectrin, have PH domains that bind weakly, and to all phosphoinositides. In these cases, the individual phosphoinositide interactions may not be sufficient for membrane association, but appear to require self-assembly of their host protein and/or cooperation with other anchoring motifs within the same molecule to drive membrane attachment.

  9. Definition and identification of homology domains.

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    Lawrence, C B; Goldman, D A

    1988-03-01

    A method is described for identifying and evaluating regions of significant similarity between two sequences. The notion of a 'homology domain' is employed which defines the boundaries of a region of sequence homology containing no insertions or deletions. The relative significance of different potential homology domains is evaluated using a non-linear similarity score related to the probability of finding the observed level of similarity in the region by chance. The sensitivity of the method is demonstrated by simulating the evolution of homology domains and applying the method to their detection. Several examples of the use of homology domain identification are given.

  10. Membrane and Protein Interactions of the Pleckstrin Homology Domain Superfamily.

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    Lenoir, Marc; Kufareva, Irina; Abagyan, Ruben; Overduin, Michael

    2015-10-23

    The human genome encodes about 285 proteins that contain at least one annotated pleckstrin homology (PH) domain. As the first phosphoinositide binding module domain to be discovered, the PH domain recruits diverse protein architectures to cellular membranes. PH domains constitute one of the largest protein superfamilies, and have diverged to regulate many different signaling proteins and modules such as Dbl homology (DH) and Tec homology (TH) domains. The ligands of approximately 70 PH domains have been validated by binding assays and complexed structures, allowing meaningful extrapolation across the entire superfamily. Here the Membrane Optimal Docking Area (MODA) program is used at a genome-wide level to identify all membrane docking PH structures and map their lipid-binding determinants. In addition to the linear sequence motifs which are employed for phosphoinositide recognition, the three dimensional structural features that allow peripheral membrane domains to approach and insert into the bilayer are pinpointed and can be predicted ab initio. The analysis shows that conserved structural surfaces distinguish which PH domains associate with membrane from those that do not. Moreover, the results indicate that lipid-binding PH domains can be classified into different functional subgroups based on the type of membrane insertion elements they project towards the bilayer.

  11. Membrane and Protein Interactions of the Pleckstrin Homology Domain Superfamily

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    Marc Lenoir

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available The human genome encodes about 285 proteins that contain at least one annotated pleckstrin homology (PH domain. As the first phosphoinositide binding module domain to be discovered, the PH domain recruits diverse protein architectures to cellular membranes. PH domains constitute one of the largest protein superfamilies, and have diverged to regulate many different signaling proteins and modules such as Dbl homology (DH and Tec homology (TH domains. The ligands of approximately 70 PH domains have been validated by binding assays and complexed structures, allowing meaningful extrapolation across the entire superfamily. Here the Membrane Optimal Docking Area (MODA program is used at a genome-wide level to identify all membrane docking PH structures and map their lipid-binding determinants. In addition to the linear sequence motifs which are employed for phosphoinositide recognition, the three dimensional structural features that allow peripheral membrane domains to approach and insert into the bilayer are pinpointed and can be predicted ab initio. The analysis shows that conserved structural surfaces distinguish which PH domains associate with membrane from those that do not. Moreover, the results indicate that lipid-binding PH domains can be classified into different functional subgroups based on the type of membrane insertion elements they project towards the bilayer.

  12. Pleckstrin Homology (PH) Domain Leucine-rich Repeat Protein Phosphatase Controls Cell Polarity by Negatively Regulating the Activity of Atypical Protein Kinase C.

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    Xiong, Xiaopeng; Li, Xin; Wen, Yang-An; Gao, Tianyan

    2016-11-25

    The proper establishment of epithelial polarity allows cells to sense and respond to signals that arise from the microenvironment in a spatiotemporally controlled manner. Atypical PKCs (aPKCs) are implicated as key regulators of epithelial polarity. However, the molecular mechanism underlying the negative regulation of aPKCs remains largely unknown. In this study, we demonstrated that PH domain leucine-rich repeat protein phosphatase (PHLPP), a novel family of Ser/Thr protein phosphatases, plays an important role in regulating epithelial polarity by controlling the phosphorylation of both aPKC isoforms. Altered expression of PHLPP1 or PHLPP2 disrupted polarization of Caco2 cells grown in 3D cell cultures as indicated by the formation of aberrant multi-lumen structures. Overexpression of PHLPP resulted in a decrease in aPKC phosphorylation at both the activation loop and the turn motif sites; conversely, knockdown of PHLPP increased aPKC phosphorylation. Moreover, in vitro dephosphorylation experiments revealed that both aPKC isoforms were substrates of PHLPP. Interestingly, knockdown of PKCζ, but not PKCι, led to similar disruption of the polarized lumen structure, suggesting that PKCζ likely controls the polarization process of Caco2 cells. Furthermore, knockdown of PHLPP altered the apical membrane localization of aPKCs and reduced the formation of aPKC-Par3 complex. Taken together, our results identify a novel role of PHLPP in regulating aPKC and cell polarity. © 2016 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  13. Modulation of oncogenic DBL activity by phosphoinositol phosphate binding to pleckstrin homology domain.

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    Russo, C; Gao, Y; Mancini, P; Vanni, C; Porotto, M; Falasca, M; Torrisi, M R; Zheng, Y; Eva, A

    2001-06-01

    The Dbl family guanine nucleotide exchange factors (GEFs) contain a region of sequence similarity consisting of a catalytic Dbl homology (DH) domain in tandem with a pleckstrin homology (PH) domain. PH domains are involved in the regulated targeting of signaling molecules to plasma membranes by protein-protein and/or protein-lipid interactions. Here we show that Dbl PH domain binding to phosphatidylinositol 4,5-bisphosphate and phosphatidylinositol 3,4,5-triphosphate results in the inhibition of Dbl GEF activity on Rho family GTPase Cdc42. Phosphatidylinositol 4,5-bisphosphate binding to the PH domain significantly inhibits the Cdc42 interactive activity of the DH domain suggesting that the DH domain is subjected to the PH domain modulation under the influence of phosphoinositides (PIPs). We generated Dbl mutants unable to interact with PIPs. These mutants retained GEF activity on Cdc42 in the presence of PIPs and showed a markedly enhanced activating potential for both Cdc42 and RhoA in vivo while displaying decreased cellular transforming activity. Immunofluorescence analysis of NIH3T3 transfectants revealed that whereas the PH domain localizes to actin stress fibers and plasma membrane, the PH mutants are no longer detectable on the plasma membrane. These results suggest that modulation of PIPs in both the GEF catalytic activity and the targeting to plasma membrane determines the outcome of the biologic activity of Dbl.

  14. Disruption of the interface between the pleckstrin homology (PH) and kinase domains of Akt protein is sufficient for hydrophobic motif site phosphorylation in the absence of mTORC2.

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    Warfel, Noel A; Niederst, Matt; Newton, Alexandra C

    2011-11-11

    The pro-survival kinase Akt requires phosphorylation at two conserved residues, the activation loop site (Thr-308) and the hydrophobic motif site (Ser-473), for maximal activation. Previous reports indicate that mTORC2 is necessary for phosphorylation of the hydrophobic motif and that this site is not phosphorylated in cells lacking components of the mTORC2 complex, such as Sin1. Here we show that Akt can be phosphorylated at the hydrophobic motif site (Ser-473) in the absence of mTORC2. First, increasing the levels of PIP(3) in Sin1(-/-) MEFs by (i) expression of a constitutively active PI3K or (ii) relief of a negative feedback loop on PI3K by prolonged inhibition of mTORC1 or S6K is sufficient to rescue hydrophobic motif phosphorylation of Akt. The resulting accumulation of PIP(3) at the plasma membrane results in Ser-473 phosphorylation. Second, constructs of Akt in which the PH domain is constitutively disengaged from the kinase domain are phosphorylated at the hydrophobic motif site in Sin1(-/-) MEFs; both myristoylated-Akt and Akt lacking the PH domain are phosphorylated at Ser-473. Thus, disruption of the interface between the PH and kinase domains of Akt bypasses the requirement for mTORC2. In summary, these data support a model in which Akt can be phosphorylated at Ser-473 and activated in the absence of mTORC2 by mechanisms that depend on removal of the PH domain from the kinase domain.

  15. Computational Analysis of the Binding Specificities of PH Domains

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    Zhi Jiang

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Pleckstrin homology (PH domains share low sequence identities but extremely conserved structures. They have been found in many proteins for cellular signal-dependent membrane targeting by binding inositol phosphates to perform different physiological functions. In order to understand the sequence-structure relationship and binding specificities of PH domains, quantum mechanical (QM calculations and sequence-based combined with structure-based binding analysis were employed in our research. In the structural aspect, the binding specificities were shown to correlate with the hydropathy characteristics of PH domains and electrostatic properties of the bound inositol phosphates. By comparing these structure properties with sequence-based profiles of physicochemical properties, PH domains can be classified into four functional subgroups according to their binding specificities and affinities to inositol phosphates. The method not only provides a simple and practical paradigm to predict binding specificities for functional genomic research but also gives new insight into the understanding of the basis of diseases with respect to PH domain structures.

  16. Control of intramolecular interactions between the pleckstrin homology and Dbl homology domains of Vav and Sos1 regulates Rac binding.

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    Das, B; Shu, X; Day, G J; Han, J; Krishna, U M; Falck, J R; Broek, D

    2000-05-19

    Vav and Sos1 are Dbl family guanine nucleotide exchange factors, which activate Rho family GTPases in response to phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase products. A pleckstrin homology domain adjacent to the catalytic Dbl homology domain via an unknown mechanism mediates the effects of phosphoinositides on guanine nucleotide exchange activity. Here we tested the possibility that phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase substrates and products control an interaction between the pleckstrin homology domain and the Dbl homology domain, thereby explaining the inhibitory effects of phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase substrates and stimulatory effects of the products. Binding studies using isolated fragments of Vav and Sos indicate phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase substrate promotes the binding of the pleckstrin homology domain to the Dbl homology domain and blocks Rac binding to the DH domain, whereas phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase products disrupt the Dbl homology/pleckstrin homology interactions and permit Rac binding. Additionally, Lck phosphorylation of Vav, a known activating event, reduces the affinities between the Vav Dbl homology and pleckstrin homology domains and permits Rac binding. We also show Vav activation in cells, as monitored by phosphorylation of Vav, Vav association with phosphatidylinositol 3,4,5-trisphosphate, and Vav guanine nucleotide exchange activity, is blocked by the phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase inhibitor wortmannin. These results suggest the molecular mechanisms for activation of Vav and Sos1 require disruption of inhibitory intramolecular interactions involving the pleckstrin homology and Dbl homology domains.

  17. A conserved hydrophobic surface of the LARG pleckstrin homology domain is critical for RhoA activation in cells.

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    Aittaleb, Mohamed; Gao, Guang; Evelyn, Chris R; Neubig, Richard R; Tesmer, John J G

    2009-11-01

    Leukemia associated Rho guanine nucleotide exchange factor (LARG) activates RhoA in response to signals received by specific classes of cell surface receptors. The catalytic core of LARG is a Dbl homology (DH) domain whose activity is modulated by an adjacent pleckstrin homology (PH) domain. In this study, we used a transcriptional assay and confocal microscopy to examine the roles of several novel structural features of the LARG DH/PH domains, including a conserved and exposed hydrophobic patch on the PH domain that mediates protein-protein interactions in crystal structures of LARG and its close homolog PDZ-RhoGEF. Mutation of the hydrophobic patch has no effect on nucleotide exchange activity in vitro, but abolished the ability of LARG to activate RhoA and to induce stress fiber formation in cultured cells. The activity of these mutants could be rescued by fusion with exogenous membrane-targeting domains. However, because membrane recruitment by activated G alpha(13) subunits was not sufficient to rescue activity of a hydrophobic patch mutant, the LARG PH domain cannot solely contribute to membrane targeting. Instead, it seems likely that the domain is involved in regulatory interactions with other proteins near the membrane surface. We also show that the hydrophobic patch of the PH domain is likely important for the activity of all Lbc subfamily RhoGEFs.

  18. Interaction between the PH and START domains of ceramide transfer protein competes with phosphatidylinositol 4-phosphate binding by the PH domain.

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    Prashek, Jennifer; Bouyain, Samuel; Fu, Mingui; Li, Yong; Berkes, Dusan; Yao, Xiaolan

    2017-08-25

    De novo synthesis of the sphingolipid sphingomyelin requires non-vesicular transport of ceramide from the endoplasmic reticulum to the Golgi by the multidomain protein ceramide transfer protein (CERT). CERT's N-terminal pleckstrin homology (PH) domain targets it to the Golgi by binding to phosphatidylinositol 4-phosphate (PtdIns(4)P) in the Golgi membrane, whereas its C-terminal StAR-related lipid transfer domain (START) carries out ceramide transfer. Hyperphosphorylation of a serine-rich motif immediately after the PH domain decreases both PtdIns(4)P binding and ceramide transfer by CERT. This down-regulation requires both the PH and START domains, suggesting a possible inhibitory interaction between the two domains. In this study we show that isolated PH and START domains interact with each other. The crystal structure of a PH-START complex revealed that the START domain binds to the PH domain at the same site for PtdIns(4)P-binding, suggesting that the START domain competes with PtdIns(4)P for association with the PH domain. We further report that mutations disrupting the PH-START interaction increase both PtdIns(4)P-binding affinity and ceramide transfer activity of a CERT-serine-rich phosphorylation mimic. We also found that these mutations increase the Golgi localization of CERT inside the cell, consistent with enhanced PtdIns(4)P binding of the mutant. Collectively, our structural, biochemical, and cellular investigations provide important structural insight into the regulation of CERT function and localization. © 2017 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  19. A crystallographic view of interactions between Dbs and Cdc42: PH domain-assisted guanine nucleotide exchange

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    Rossman, Kent L.; Worthylake, David K.; Snyder, Jason T; Siderovski, David P.; Campbell, Sharon L; Sondek, John

    2002-01-01

    Dbl-related oncoproteins are guanine nucleotide exchange factors (GEFs) specific for Rho guanosine triphosphatases (GTPases) and invariably possess tandem Dbl (DH) and pleckstrin homology (PH) domains. While it is known that the DH domain is the principal catalytic subunit, recent biochemical data indicate that for some Dbl-family proteins, such as Dbs and Trio, PH domains may cooperate with their associated DH domains in promoting guanine nucleotide exchange of Rho GTPases. In order to gain ...

  20. Structure and lipid-binding properties of the kindlin-3 pleckstrin homology domain

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    Ni, Tao; Kalli, Antreas C.; Naughton, Fiona B.; Yates, Luke A.; Naneh, Omar; Kozorog, Mirijam; Anderluh, Gregor

    2017-01-01

    Kindlins co-activate integrins alongside talin. They possess, like talin, a FERM domain (4.1-erythrin–radixin–moiesin domain) comprising F0–F3 subdomains, but with a pleckstrin homology (PH) domain inserted in the F2 subdomain that enables membrane association. We present the crystal structure of murine kindlin-3 PH domain determined at a resolution of 2.23 Å and characterise its lipid binding using biophysical and computational approaches. Molecular dynamics simulations suggest flexibility in the PH domain loops connecting β-strands forming the putative phosphatidylinositol phosphate (PtdInsP)-binding site. Simulations with PtdInsP-containing bilayers reveal that the PH domain associates with PtdInsP molecules mainly via the positively charged surface presented by the β1–β2 loop and that it binds with somewhat higher affinity to PtdIns(3,4,5)P3 compared with PtdIns(4,5)P2. Surface plasmon resonance (SPR) with lipid headgroups immobilised and the PH domain as an analyte indicate affinities of 300 µM for PtdIns(3,4,5)P3 and 1 mM for PtdIns(4,5)P2. In contrast, SPR studies with an immobilised PH domain and lipid nanodiscs as the analyte show affinities of 0.40 µM for PtdIns(3,4,5)P3 and no affinity for PtdIns(4,5)P2 when the inositol phosphate constitutes 5% of the total lipids (∼5 molecules per nanodisc). Reducing the PtdIns(3,4,5)P3 composition to 1% abolishes nanodisc binding to the PH domain, as does site-directed mutagenesis of two lysines within the β1–β2 loop. Binding of PtdIns(3,4,5)P3 by a canonical PH domain, Grp1, is not similarly influenced by SPR experimental design. These data suggest a role for PtdIns(3,4,5)P3 clustering in the binding of some PH domains and not others, highlighting the importance of lipid mobility and clustering for the biophysical assessment of protein–membrane interactions. PMID:27974389

  1. Loss of phosphatidylinositol 3-phosphate binding by the C-terminal Tiam-1 pleckstrin homology domain prevents in vivo Rac1 activation without affecting membrane targeting.

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    Baumeister, Mark A; Martinu, Lenka; Rossman, Kent L; Sondek, John; Lemmon, Mark A; Chou, Margaret M

    2003-03-28

    Dbl family guanine nucleotide exchange factors (GEFs) for Rho family small GTPases invariably contain a pleckstrin homology (PH) domain that immediately follows their Dbl homology (DH) domain. Although the DH domain is responsible for GEF activity, the role of the PH domain is less clear. We previously reported that PH domains from several Dbl family members bind phosphoinositides with very low affinity (K(d) values in the 10 microM range). This suggests that, unlike several other PH domains, those from Dbl proteins will not function as independent membrane-targeting modules. To determine the functional relevance of low affinity phosphoinositide binding, we mutated the corresponding PH domain from Tiam-1 to abolish its weak, specific binding to phosphatidylinositol 3-phosphate. We first confirmed in vitro that phosphoinositide binding by the isolated DH/PH domain was impaired by the mutations but that intrinsic GEF activity was unaffected. We then introduced the PH domain mutations into full-length Tiam-1 and found that its ability to activate Rac1 or serum response factor in vivo was abolished. Immunofluorescence studies showed that membrane targeting of Tiam-1 was essentially unaffected by mutations in the C-terminal PH domain. Our studies therefore indicate that low affinity phosphatidylinositol 3-phosphate binding by the C-terminal PH domain may be critical for in vivo regulation and activity of Tiam-1 but that the PH domain exerts its regulatory effects without altering membrane targeting. We suggest instead that ligand binding to the PH domain induces conformational and/or orientational changes at the membrane surface that are required for maximum exchange activity of its adjacent DH domain.

  2. Dynamin GTPase Regulation is Altered by PH Domain Mutations Found in Centronuclear Myopathy Patients

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    Kenniston, J.; Lemmon, M

    2010-01-01

    The large GTPase dynamin has an important membrane scission function in receptor-mediated endocytosis and other cellular processes. Self-assembly on phosphoinositide-containing membranes stimulates dynamin GTPase activity, which is crucial for its function. Although the pleckstrin-homology (PH) domain is known to mediate phosphoinositide binding by dynamin, it remains unclear how this promotes activation. Here, we describe studies of dynamin PH domain mutations found in centronuclear myopathy (CNM) that increase dynamin's GTPase activity without altering phosphoinositide binding. CNM mutations in the PH domain C-terminal {alpha}-helix appear to cause conformational changes in dynamin that alter control of the GTP hydrolysis cycle. These mutations either 'sensitize' dynamin to lipid stimulation or elevate basal GTPase rates by promoting self-assembly and thus rendering dynamin no longer lipid responsive. We also describe a low-resolution structure of dimeric dynamin from small-angle X-ray scattering that reveals conformational changes induced by CNM mutations, and defines requirements for domain rearrangement upon dynamin self-assembly at membrane surfaces. Our data suggest that changes in the PH domain may couple lipid binding to dynamin GTPase activation at sites of vesicle invagination.

  3. Substrate specificity and recognition is conferred by the pleckstrin homology domain of the Dbl family guanine nucleotide exchange factor P-Rex2.

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    Joseph, Raji E; Norris, F A

    2005-07-29

    Dbl family guanine nucleotide exchange factors (GEFs) are characterized by the presence of a catalytic Dbl homology domain followed invariably by a lipid-binding pleckstrin homology (PH) domain. To date, substrate recognition and specificity of this family of GEFs has been reported to be mediated exclusively via the Dbl homology domain. Here we report the novel and unexpected finding that, in the Dbl family Rac-specific GEF P-Rex2, it is the PH domain that confers substrate specificity and recognition. Moreover, the beta3beta4 loop of the PH domain of P-Rex2 is the determinant for Rac1 recognition, as substitution of the beta3beta4 loop of the PH domain of Dbs (a RhoA- and Cdc42-specific GEF) with that of P-Rex2 confers Rac1-specific binding capability to the PH domain of Dbs. The contact interface between the PH domain of P-Rex2 and Rac1 involves the switch loop and helix 3 of Rac1. Moreover, substitution of helix 3 of Cdc42 with that of Rac1 now enables the PH domain of P-Rex2 to bind this Cdc42 chimera. Despite having the ability to recognize this chimeric Cdc42, P-Rex2 is unable to catalyze nucleotide exchange on Cdc42, suggesting that recognition of substrate and catalysis are two distinct events. Thus substrate recognition can now be added to the growing list of functions that are being attributed to the PH domain of Dbl family GEFs.

  4. Crystal Structures of the BAR-PH and PTB Domains of Human APPL1

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    Li,J.; Mao, X.; Dong, L.; Liu, F.; Tong, L.

    2007-01-01

    APPL1 interacts with adiponectin receptors and other important signaling molecules. It contains a BAR and a PH domain near its N terminus, and the two domains may function as a unit (BAR-PH domain). We report here the crystal structures of the BAR-PH and PTB domains of human APPL1. The structures reveal novel features for BAR domain dimerization and for the interactions between the BAR and PH domains. The BAR domain dimer of APPL1 contains two four-helical bundles, whereas other BAR domain dimers have only three helices in each bundle. The PH domain is located at the opposite ends of the BAR domain dimer. Yeast two-hybrid assays confirm the interactions between the BAR and PH domains. Lipid binding assays show that the BAR, PH, and PTB domains can bind phospholipids. The ability of APPL1 to interact with multiple signaling molecules and phospholipids supports an important role for this adaptor in cell signaling.

  5. Pleckstrin homology domain containing 6 protein (PLEKHA6) polymorphisms are associated with psychopathology and response to treatment in schizophrenic patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spellmann, Ilja; Rujescu, Dan; Musil, Richard; Meyerwas, Sebastian; Giegling, Ina; Genius, Just; Zill, Peter; Dehning, Sandra; Cerovecki, Anja; Seemüller, Florian; Schennach, Rebecca; Hartmann, Annette M; Schäfer, Martin; Müller, Norbert; Möller, Hans-Jürgen; Riedel, Michael

    2014-06-03

    Pleckstrin homology domain (PH domain) comprises approximately 120 amino acids and is integrated in a wide range of proteins involved in intracellular signaling or as constituents of the cytoskeleton. This domain can bind phosphatidylinositol (3,4,5)-triphosphate and phosphatidylinositol (4,5)-biphosphate and proteins such as the βγ-subunits of heterotrimeric G proteins and protein kinase C. Associations with psychiatric diseases have not been investigated yet. To identify genes involved in response to antipsychotics, mice were treated with haloperidol (1mg/kg, n = 11) or saline (n = 12) for one week. By analyzing microarray data, we observed an increase of pleckstrin homology domain containing 6 (PLEKHA6) gene expression. Furthermore, we genotyped 263 schizophrenic patients, who were treated monotherapeutically with different antipsychotics within randomized-controlled trials. Psychopathology was measured weekly using the PANSS for a minimum of four and a maximum of twelve weeks. Correlations between PANSS subscale scores at baseline and PANSS improvement scores after four weeks of treatment and genotypes were calculated by using a linear model for all investigated SNPs. We found associations between four PLEKHA6 polymorphisms (rs17333933 (T/G), rs3126209 (C/T), rs4951338 (A/G) and rs100900571 (T/C)) and different PANSS subscales at baseline. Furthermore two different polymorphisms (rs7513240 (T/C), rs4951353 (A/G)) were found to be associated with therapy response in terms of a significant correlation with different PANSS improvement subscores after four weeks of antipsychotic treatment. Our observation of an association between genetic polymorphisms of a protein of the PH domain and psychopathology data in schizophrenic patients might be indicative for an involvement of PLEKHA6 in the pathophysiology of schizophrenia and the therapy response towards antipsychotics.

  6. Structural, biochemical, and functional characterization of the cyclic nucleotide binding homology domain from the mouse EAG1 potassium channel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marques-Carvalho, Maria J; Sahoo, Nirakar; Muskett, Frederick W; Vieira-Pires, Ricardo S; Gabant, Guillaume; Cadene, Martine; Schönherr, Roland; Morais-Cabral, João H

    2012-10-12

    KCNH channels are voltage-gated potassium channels with important physiological functions. In these channels, a C-terminal cytoplasmic region, known as the cyclic nucleotide binding homology (CNB-homology) domain displays strong sequence similarity to cyclic nucleotide binding (CNB) domains. However, the isolated domain does not bind cyclic nucleotides. Here, we report the X-ray structure of the CNB-homology domain from the mouse EAG1 channel. Through comparison with the recently determined structure of the CNB-homology domain from the zebrafish ELK (eag-like K(+)) channel and the CNB domains from the MlotiK1 and HCN (hyperpolarization-activated cyclic nucleotide-gated) potassium channels, we establish the structural features of CNB-homology domains that explain the low affinity for cyclic nucleotides. Our structure establishes that the "self-liganded" conformation, where two residues of the C-terminus of the domain are bound in an equivalent position to cyclic nucleotides in CNB domains, is a conserved feature of CNB-homology domains. Importantly, we provide biochemical evidence that suggests that there is also an unliganded conformation where the C-terminus of the domain peels away from its bound position. A functional characterization of this unliganded conformation reveals a role of the CNB-homology domain in channel gating. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. In vitro and in vivo activity of novel small-molecule inhibitors targeting the pleckstrin homology domain of protein kinase B/AKT.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moses, Sylvestor A; Ali, M Ahad; Zuohe, Song; Du-Cuny, Lei; Zhou, Li Li; Lemos, Robert; Ihle, Nathan; Skillman, A Geoffrey; Zhang, Shuxing; Mash, Eugene A; Powis, Garth; Meuillet, Emmanuelle J

    2009-06-15

    The phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase/AKT signaling pathway plays a critical role in activating survival and antiapoptotic pathways within cancer cells. Several studies have shown that this pathway is constitutively activated in many different cancer types. The goal of this study was to discover novel compounds that bind to the pleckstrin homology (PH) domain of AKT, thereby inhibiting AKT activation. Using proprietary docking software, 22 potential PH domain inhibitors were identified. Surface plasmon resonance spectroscopy was used to measure the binding of the compounds to the expressed PH domain of AKT followed by an in vitro activity screen in Panc-1 and MiaPaCa-2 pancreatic cancer cell lines. We identified a novel chemical scaffold in several of the compounds that binds selectively to the PH domain of AKT, inducing a decrease in AKT activation and causing apoptosis at low micromolar concentrations. Structural modifications of the scaffold led to compounds with enhanced inhibitory activity in cells. One compound, 4-dodecyl-N-(1,3,4-thiadiazol-2-yl)benzenesulfonamide, inhibited AKT and its downstream targets in cells as well as in pancreatic cancer cell xenografts in immunocompromised mice; it also exhibited good antitumor activity. In summary, a pharmacophore for PH domain inhibitors targeting AKT function was developed. Computer-aided modeling, synthesis, and testing produced novel AKT PH domain inhibitors that exhibit promising preclinical properties.

  8. Finding a needle in a haystack: the role of electrostatics in target lipid recognition by PH domains.

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    Craig N Lumb

    Full Text Available Interactions between protein domains and lipid molecules play key roles in controlling cell membrane signalling and trafficking. The pleckstrin homology (PH domain is one of the most widespread, binding specifically to phosphatidylinositol phosphates (PIPs in cell membranes. PH domains must locate specific PIPs in the presence of a background of approximately 20% anionic lipids within the cytoplasmic leaflet of the plasma membrane. We investigate the mechanism of such recognition via a multiscale procedure combining Brownian dynamics (BD and molecular dynamics (MD simulations of the GRP1 PH domain interacting with phosphatidylinositol (3,4,5-trisphosphate (PI(3,4,5P₃. The interaction of GRP1-PH with PI(3,4,5P₃ in a zwitterionic bilayer is compared with the interaction in bilayers containing different levels of anionic 'decoy' lipids. BD simulations reveal both translational and orientational electrostatic steering of the PH domain towards the PI(3,4,5P₃-containing anionic bilayer surface. There is a payoff between non-PIP anionic lipids attracting the PH domain to the bilayer surface in a favourable orientation and their role as 'decoys', disrupting the interaction of GRP1-PH with the PI(3,4,5P₃ molecule. Significantly, approximately 20% anionic lipid in the cytoplasmic leaflet of the bilayer is nearly optimal to both enhance orientational steering and to localise GRP1-PH proximal to the surface of the membrane without sacrificing its ability to locate PI(3,4,5P₃ within the bilayer plane. Subsequent MD simulations reveal binding to PI(3,4,5P₃, forming protein-phosphate contacts comparable to those in X-ray structures. These studies demonstrate a computational framework which addresses lipid recognition within a cell membrane environment, offering a link between structural and cell biological characterisation.

  9. Membrane binding and self-association of the epsin N-terminal homology domain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lai, Chun-Liang; Jao, Christine C; Lyman, Edward; Gallop, Jennifer L; Peter, Brian J; McMahon, Harvey T; Langen, Ralf; Voth, Gregory A

    2012-11-09

    Epsin possesses a conserved epsin N-terminal homology (ENTH) domain that acts as a phosphatidylinositol 4,5-bisphosphate-lipid-targeting and membrane-curvature-generating element. Upon binding phosphatidylinositol 4,5-bisphosphate, the N-terminal helix (H(0)) of the ENTH domain becomes structured and aids in the aggregation of ENTH domains, which results in extensive membrane remodeling. In this article, atomistic and coarse-grained (CG) molecular dynamics (MD) simulations are used to investigate the structure and the stability of ENTH domain aggregates on lipid bilayers. EPR experiments are also reported for systems composed of different ENTH-bound membrane morphologies, including membrane vesicles as well as preformed membrane tubules. The EPR data are used to help develop a molecular model of ENTH domain aggregates on preformed lipid tubules that are then studied by CG MD simulation. The combined computational and experimental approach suggests that ENTH domains exist predominantly as monomers on vesiculated structures, while ENTH domains self-associate into dimeric structures and even higher-order oligomers on the membrane tubes. The results emphasize that the arrangement of ENTH domain aggregates depends strongly on whether the local membrane curvature is isotropic or anisotropic. The molecular mechanism of ENTH-domain-induced membrane vesiculation and tubulation and the implications of the epsin's role in clathrin-mediated endocytosis resulting from the interplay between ENTH domain membrane binding and ENTH domain self-association are also discussed. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. PH Domain-Arf G Protein Interactions Localize the Arf-GEF Steppke for Cleavage Furrow Regulation in Drosophila.

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    Donghoon M Lee

    Full Text Available The recruitment of GDP/GTP exchange factors (GEFs to specific subcellular sites dictates where they activate small G proteins for the regulation of various cellular processes. Cytohesins are a conserved family of plasma membrane GEFs for Arf small G proteins that regulate endocytosis. Analyses of mammalian cytohesins have identified a number of recruitment mechanisms for these multi-domain proteins, but the conservation and developmental roles for these mechanisms are unclear. Here, we report how the pleckstrin homology (PH domain of the Drosophila cytohesin Steppke affects its localization and activity at cleavage furrows of the early embryo. We found that the PH domain is necessary for Steppke furrow localization, and for it to regulate furrow structure. However, the PH domain was not sufficient for the localization. Next, we examined the role of conserved PH domain amino acid residues that are required for mammalian cytohesins to bind PIP3 or GTP-bound Arf G proteins. We confirmed that the Steppke PH domain preferentially binds PIP3 in vitro through a conserved mechanism. However, disruption of residues for PIP3 binding had no apparent effect on GFP-Steppke localization and effects. Rather, residues for binding to GTP-bound Arf G proteins made major contributions to this Steppke localization and activity. By analyzing GFP-tagged Arf and Arf-like small G proteins, we found that Arf1-GFP, Arf6-GFP and Arl4-GFP, but not Arf4-GFP, localized to furrows. However, analyses of embryos depleted of Arf1, Arf6 or Arl4 revealed either earlier defects than occur in embryos depleted of Steppke, or no detectable furrow defects, possibly because of redundancies, and thus it was difficult to assess how individual Arf small G proteins affect Steppke. Nonetheless, our data show that the Steppke PH domain and its conserved residues for binding to GTP-bound Arf G proteins have substantial effects on Steppke localization and activity in early Drosophila embryos.

  11. PH Domain-Arf G Protein Interactions Localize the Arf-GEF Steppke for Cleavage Furrow Regulation in Drosophila.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Donghoon M; Rodrigues, Francisco F; Yu, Cao Guo; Swan, Michael; Harris, Tony J C

    2015-01-01

    The recruitment of GDP/GTP exchange factors (GEFs) to specific subcellular sites dictates where they activate small G proteins for the regulation of various cellular processes. Cytohesins are a conserved family of plasma membrane GEFs for Arf small G proteins that regulate endocytosis. Analyses of mammalian cytohesins have identified a number of recruitment mechanisms for these multi-domain proteins, but the conservation and developmental roles for these mechanisms are unclear. Here, we report how the pleckstrin homology (PH) domain of the Drosophila cytohesin Steppke affects its localization and activity at cleavage furrows of the early embryo. We found that the PH domain is necessary for Steppke furrow localization, and for it to regulate furrow structure. However, the PH domain was not sufficient for the localization. Next, we examined the role of conserved PH domain amino acid residues that are required for mammalian cytohesins to bind PIP3 or GTP-bound Arf G proteins. We confirmed that the Steppke PH domain preferentially binds PIP3 in vitro through a conserved mechanism. However, disruption of residues for PIP3 binding had no apparent effect on GFP-Steppke localization and effects. Rather, residues for binding to GTP-bound Arf G proteins made major contributions to this Steppke localization and activity. By analyzing GFP-tagged Arf and Arf-like small G proteins, we found that Arf1-GFP, Arf6-GFP and Arl4-GFP, but not Arf4-GFP, localized to furrows. However, analyses of embryos depleted of Arf1, Arf6 or Arl4 revealed either earlier defects than occur in embryos depleted of Steppke, or no detectable furrow defects, possibly because of redundancies, and thus it was difficult to assess how individual Arf small G proteins affect Steppke. Nonetheless, our data show that the Steppke PH domain and its conserved residues for binding to GTP-bound Arf G proteins have substantial effects on Steppke localization and activity in early Drosophila embryos.

  12. The Crystal Structures of EAP Domains from Staphylococcus aureus Reveal an Unexpected Homology to Bacterial Superantigens

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Geisbrecht, B V; Hamaoka, B Y; Perman, B; Zemla, A; Leahy, D J

    2005-10-14

    The Eap (extracellular adherence protein) of Staphylococcus aureus functions as a secreted virulence factor by mediating interactions between the bacterial cell surface and several extracellular host proteins. Eap proteins from different Staphylococcal strains consist of four to six tandem repeats of a structurally uncharacterized domain (EAP domain). We have determined the three-dimensional structures of three different EAP domains to 1.8, 2.2, and 1.35 {angstrom} resolution, respectively. These structures reveal a core fold that is comprised of an {alpha}-helix lying diagonally across a five-stranded, mixed {beta}-sheet. Comparison of EAP domains with known structures reveals an unexpected homology with the C-terminal domain of bacterial superantigens. Examination of the structure of the superantigen SEC2 bound to the {beta}-chain of a T-cell receptor suggests a possible ligand-binding site within the EAP domain (Fields, B. A., Malchiodi, E. L., Li, H., Ysern, X., Stauffacher, C. V., Schlievert, P. M., Karjalainen, K., and Mariuzza, R. (1996) Nature 384, 188-192). These results provide the first structural characterization of EAP domains, relate EAP domains to a large class of bacterial toxins, and will guide the design of future experiments to analyze EAP domain structure/function relationships.

  13. Lipids Regulate Lck Protein Activity through Their Interactions with the Lck Src Homology 2 Domain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sheng, Ren; Jung, Da-Jung; Silkov, Antonina; Kim, Hyunjin; Singaram, Indira; Wang, Zhi-Gang; Xin, Yao; Kim, Eui; Park, Mi-Jeong; Thiagarajan-Rosenkranz, Pallavi; Smrt, Sean; Honig, Barry; Baek, Kwanghee; Ryu, Sungho; Lorieau, Justin; Kim, You-Me; Cho, Wonhwa

    2016-08-19

    Lymphocyte-specific protein-tyrosine kinase (Lck) plays an essential role in T cell receptor (TCR) signaling and T cell development, but its activation mechanism is not fully understood. To explore the possibility that plasma membrane (PM) lipids control TCR signaling activities of Lck, we measured the membrane binding properties of its regulatory Src homology 2 (SH2) and Src homology 3 domains. The Lck SH2 domain binds anionic PM lipids with high affinity but with low specificity. Electrostatic potential calculation, NMR analysis, and mutational studies identified the lipid-binding site of the Lck SH2 domain that includes surface-exposed basic, aromatic, and hydrophobic residues but not the phospho-Tyr binding pocket. Mutation of lipid binding residues greatly reduced the interaction of Lck with the ζ chain in the activated TCR signaling complex and its overall TCR signaling activities. These results suggest that PM lipids, including phosphatidylinositol 4,5-bisphosphate and phosphatidylinositol 3,4,5-trisphosphate, modulate interaction of Lck with its binding partners in the TCR signaling complex and its TCR signaling activities in a spatiotemporally specific manner via its SH2 domain. © 2016 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  14. Defining the specificity space of the human SRC homology 2 domain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Haiming; Li, Lei; Wu, Chenggang; Schibli, David; Colwill, Karen; Ma, Sucan; Li, Chengjun; Roy, Protiva; Ho, Krystina; Songyang, Zhou; Pawson, Tony; Gao, Youhe; Li, Shawn S-C

    2008-04-01

    Src homology 2 (SH2) domains are the largest family of interaction modules encoded by the human genome to recognize tyrosine-phosphorylated sequences and thereby play pivotal roles in transducing and controlling cellular signals emanating from protein-tyrosine kinases. Different SH2 domains select for distinct phosphopeptides, and the function of a given SH2 domain is often dictated by the specific motifs that it recognizes. Therefore, deciphering the phosphotyrosyl peptide motif recognized by an SH2 domain is the key to understanding its cellular function. Here we cloned all 120 SH2 domains identified in the human genome and determined the phosphotyrosyl peptide binding properties of 76 SH2 domains by screening an oriented peptide array library. Of these 76, we defined the selectivity for 43 SH2 domains and refined the binding motifs for another 33 SH2 domains. We identified a number of novel binding motifs, which are exemplified by the BRDG1 SH2 domain that selects specifically for a bulky, hydrophobic residue at P + 4 relative to the Tyr(P) residue. Based on the oriented peptide array library data, we developed scoring matrix-assisted ligand identification (or SMALI), a Web-based program for predicting binding partners for SH2-containing proteins. When applied to SH2D1A/SAP (SLAM-associated protein), a protein whose mutation or deletion underlies the X-linked lymphoproliferative syndrome, SMALI not only recapitulated known interactions but also identified a number of novel interacting proteins for this disease-associated protein. SMALI also identified a number of potential interactors for BRDG1, a protein whose function is largely unknown. Peptide in-solution binding analysis demonstrated that a SMALI score correlates well with the binding energy of a peptide to a given SH2 domain. The definition of the specificity space of the human SH2 domain provides both the necessary molecular basis and a platform for future exploration of the functions for SH2-containing

  15. Membrane docking geometry of GRP1 PH domain bound to a target lipid bilayer: an EPR site-directed spin-labeling and relaxation study.

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    Huai-Chun Chen

    Full Text Available The second messenger lipid PIP(3 (phosphatidylinositol-3,4,5-trisphosphate is generated by the lipid kinase PI3K (phosphoinositide-3-kinase in the inner leaflet of the plasma membrane, where it regulates a broad array of cell processes by recruiting multiple signaling proteins containing PIP(3-specific pleckstrin homology (PH domains to the membrane surface. Despite the broad importance of PIP(3-specific PH domains, the membrane docking geometry of a PH domain bound to its target PIP(3 lipid on a bilayer surface has not yet been experimentally determined. The present study employs EPR site-directed spin labeling and relaxation methods to elucidate the membrane docking geometry of GRP1 PH domain bound to bilayer-embedded PIP(3. The model target bilayer contains the neutral background lipid PC and both essential targeting lipids: (i PIP(3 target lipid that provides specificity and affinity, and (ii PS facilitator lipid that enhances the PIP(3 on-rate via an electrostatic search mechanism. The EPR approach measures membrane depth parameters for 18 function-retaining spin labels coupled to the PH domain, and for calibration spin labels coupled to phospholipids. The resulting depth parameters, together with the known high resolution structure of the co-complex between GRP1 PH domain and the PIP(3 headgroup, provide sufficient constraints to define an optimized, self-consistent membrane docking geometry. In this optimized geometry the PH domain engulfs the PIP(3 headgroup with minimal bilayer penetration, yielding the shallowest membrane position yet described for a lipid binding domain. This binding interaction displaces the PIP(3 headgroup from its lowest energy position and orientation in the bilayer, but the headgroup remains within its energetically accessible depth and angular ranges. Finally, the optimized docking geometry explains previous biophysical findings including mutations observed to disrupt membrane binding, and the rapid lateral

  16. Identificaiton of Shc Src Homology 2 Domain-Binding Peptoid – Peptide Hybrids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Won Jun; Kim, Sung Eun; Stephen, Andrew G.; Weidlich, Iwona; Giubellino, Alessio; Liu, Fa; Worthy, Karen M.; Bindu, Lakshman; Fivash, Matthew J.; Nicklaus, Marc C.; Bottaro, Donald P.; Fisher, Robert J.; Burke, Terrence R.

    2009-01-01

    A fluorescence anisotropy (FA) competition – based Shc Src homology 2 (SH2) domain-binding was established using the high affinity fluorescein isothiocyanate (FITC)-containing peptide, FITC-NH-(CH2)4-CO-pY-Q-G-L-S-amide (8; Kd = 0.35 μM). Examination of a series of open – chain bis-alkenylamide containing peptides, prepared as ring – closing metathesis precursors, showed that the highest affinities were obtained by replacement of the original Gly residue with Nα-substituted Gly (NSG) “peptoid” residues. This provided peptoid-peptide hybrids of the form, “Ac-pY-Q-[NSG]-L-amide.” Depending on the NSG substituent, certain of these hybrids exhibited up to 40 – fold higher Shc SH2 domain binding affinity than the parent Gly-containing peptide (IC50 = 248 μM), (for example, N-homo-allyl analogue 50; IC50 = 6 μM). To our knowledge, this work represents the first successful example of the application of peptoid-peptide hybrids in the design of SH2 domain-binding antagonists. These results could provide a foundation for further structural optimization of Shc SH2 domain-binding peptide mimetics. PMID:19226165

  17. Identification of Shc Src homology 2 domain-binding peptoid-peptide hybrids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Won Jun; Kim, Sung-Eun; Stephen, Andrew G; Weidlich, Iwona; Giubellino, Alessio; Liu, Fa; Worthy, Karen M; Bindu, Lakshman; Fivash, Matthew J; Nicklaus, Marc C; Bottaro, Donald P; Fisher, Robert J; Burke, Terrence R

    2009-03-26

    A fluorescence anisotropy (FA) competition-based Shc Src homology 2 (SH2) domain-binding was established using the high affinity fluorescein isothiocyanate (FITC) containing peptide, FITC-NH-(CH2)4-CO-pY-Q-G-L-S-amide (8; Kd = 0.35 microM). Examination of a series of open-chain bis-alkenylamide containing peptides, prepared as ring-closing metathesis precursors, showed that the highest affinities were obtained by replacement of the original Gly residue with N alpha-substituted Gly (NSG) "peptoid" residues. This provided peptoid-peptide hybrids of the form "Ac-pY-Q-[NSG]-L-amide." Depending on the NSG substituent, certain of these hybrids exhibited up to 40-fold higher Shc SH2 domain-binding affinity than the parent Gly-containing peptide (IC50 = 248 microM) (for example, for N-homoallyl analogue 50, IC50 = 6 microM). To our knowledge, this work represents the first successful example of the application of peptoid-peptide hybrids in the design of SH2 domain-binding antagonists. These results could provide a foundation for further structural optimization of Shc SH2 domain-binding peptide mimetics.

  18. Role of Internal Water on Protein Thermal Stability: The Case of Homologous G Domains.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rahaman, Obaidur; Kalimeri, Maria; Melchionna, Simone; Hénin, Jérôme; Sterpone, Fabio

    2015-07-23

    In this work, we address the question of whether the enhanced stability of thermophilic proteins has a direct connection with internal hydration. Our model systems are two homologous G domains of different stability: the mesophilic G domain of the elongation factor thermal unstable protein from E. coli and the hyperthermophilic G domain of the EF-1α protein from S. solfataricus. Using molecular dynamics simulation at the microsecond time scale, we show that both proteins host water molecules in internal cavities and that these molecules exchange with the external solution in the nanosecond time scale. The hydration free energy of these sites evaluated via extensive calculations is found to be favorable for both systems, with the hyperthermophilic protein offering a slightly more favorable environment to host water molecules. We estimate that, under ambient conditions, the free energy gain due to internal hydration is about 1.3 kcal/mol in favor of the hyperthermophilic variant. However, we also find that, at the high working temperature of the hyperthermophile, the cavities are rather dehydrated, meaning that under extreme conditions other molecular factors secure the stability of the protein. Interestingly, we detect a clear correlation between the hydration of internal cavities and the protein conformational landscape. The emerging picture is that internal hydration is an effective observable to probe the conformational landscape of proteins. In the specific context of our investigation, the analysis confirms that the hyperthermophilic G domain is characterized by multiple states and it has a more flexible structure than its mesophilic homologue.

  19. Crystal structure of the guanylate kinase domain from discs large homolog 1 (DLG1/SAP97).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mori, Shinji; Tezuka, Yuta; Arakawa, Akihiko; Handa, Noriko; Shirouzu, Mikako; Akiyama, Tetsu; Yokoyama, Shigeyuki

    2013-06-07

    Discs large homolog 1 (DLG1/SAP97) is involved in the development and regulation of neuronal and immunological synapses. DLG1 is a member of the membrane associated guanylate kinase (MAGUK) family of proteins, which function as molecular scaffolds. The C-terminal guanylate kinase (GK) domain of DLG1 binds peptides with a phosphorylated serine residue. In this study, we solved the crystal structure of the GK domain of human DLG1. The C-terminal tail of DLG1 is bound to the peptide-binding site of an adjacent symmetry-related DLG1 GK molecule. The binding direction of the C-terminal tail to the peptide-binding site is opposite to that of the phosphorylated LGN peptide in complex with the rat DLG1 GK domain. The C-terminal tail forms a 310 helix, which is also different from the conformation of the phosphorylated LGN peptide. Nevertheless, the side chain interactions of the C-terminal tail with the DLG1 GK domain are similar to those of the phosphorylated LGN peptide.

  20. The N-terminal domain of apolipoprotein B-100: structural characterization by homology modeling

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    Khachfe Hassan M

    2007-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Apolipoprotein B-100 (apo B-100 stands as one of the largest proteins in humans. Its large size of 4536 amino acids hampers the production of X-ray diffraction quality crystals and hinders in-solution NMR analysis, and thus necessitates a domain-based approach for the structural characterization of the multi-domain full-length apo B. Results The structure of apo B-17 (the N-terminal 17% of apolipoprotein B-100 was predicted by homology modeling based on the structure of the N-terminal domain of lipovitellin (LV, a protein that shares not only sequence similarity with B17, but also a functional aspect of lipid binding and transport. The model structure was first induced to accommodate the six disulfide bonds found in that region, and then optimized using simulated annealing. Conclusion The content of secondary structural elements in this model structure correlates well with the reported data from other biophysical probes. The overall topology of the model conforms with the structural outline corresponding to the apo B-17 domain as seen in the EM representation of the complete LDL structure.

  1. Structural Analysis of the Carboxy Terminal PH Domain of Pleckstrin Bound to D-myo-Inositol 1,2,3,5,6-pentakisphosphate

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jackson,S.; Zhang, Y.; Haslam, R.; Junop, M.

    2007-01-01

    Pleckstrin homology (PH) domains are one of the most prevalent domains in the human proteome and represent the major phosphoinositide-binding module. These domains are often found in signaling proteins and function predominately by targeting their host proteins to the cell membrane. Inositol phosphates, which are structurally similar to phosphoinositides, are not only known to play a role as signaling molecules but are also capable of being bound by PH domains. In the work presented here it is shown that the addition of commercial myo-inositol hexakisphosphate (IP6) inhibited the binding of the carboxy terminal PH domain of pleckstrin (C-PH) to phosphatidylinositol 3, 4-bisphosphate with an IC50 of 7.5 {mu}M. In an attempt to characterize this binding structurally, C-PH was crystallized in the presence of IP6 and the structure was determined to 1.35 Angstroms . Examination of the resulting electron density unexpectedly revealed the bound ligand to be D-myo-inositol 1, 2,3, 5,6-pentakisphosphate. The discovery of D-myo-inositol 1, 2,3, 5,6-pentakisphosphate in the crystal structure suggests that the inhibitory effects observed in the binding studies may be due to this ligand rather than IP6. Analysis of the protein-ligand interaction demonstrated that this myo-inositol pentakisphosphate isomer interacts specifically with protein residues known to be involved in phosphoinositide binding. In addition to this, a structural alignment of other PH domains bound to inositol phosphates containing either four or five phosphate groups revealed that the majority of phosphate groups occupy conserved locations in the binding pockets of PH domains. These findings, taken together with other recently reported studies suggest that myo-inositol pentakisphosphates could act to regulate PH domain-phosphoinositide interactions by directly competing for binding, thus playing an important role as signaling molecules.

  2. Inositol pentakisphosphate isomers bind PH domains with varying specificity and inhibit phosphoinositide interactions

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    Schultz Carsten

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background PH domains represent one of the most common domains in the human proteome. These domains are recognized as important mediators of protein-phosphoinositide and protein-protein interactions. Phosphoinositides are lipid components of the membrane that function as signaling molecules by targeting proteins to their sites of action. Phosphoinositide based signaling pathways govern a diverse range of important cellular processes including membrane remodeling, differentiation, proliferation and survival. Myo-Inositol phosphates are soluble signaling molecules that are structurally similar to the head groups of phosphoinositides. These molecules have been proposed to function, at least in part, by regulating PH domain-phosphoinositide interactions. Given the structural similarity of inositol phosphates we were interested in examining the specificity of PH domains towards the family of myo-inositol pentakisphosphate isomers. Results In work reported here we demonstrate that the C-terminal PH domain of pleckstrin possesses the specificity required to discriminate between different myo-inositol pentakisphosphate isomers. The structural basis for this specificity was determined using high-resolution crystal structures. Moreover, we show that while the PH domain of Grp1 does not possess this high degree of specificity, the PH domain of protein kinase B does. Conclusions These results demonstrate that some PH domains possess enough specificity to discriminate between myo-inositol pentakisphosphate isomers allowing for these molecules to differentially regulate interactions with phosphoinositides. Furthermore, this work contributes to the growing body of evidence supporting myo-inositol phosphates as regulators of important PH domain-phosphoinositide interactions. Finally, in addition to expanding our knowledge of cellular signaling, these results provide a basis for developing tools to probe biological pathways.

  3. Inositol Pentakisphosphate Isomers Bind PH Domains with Varying Specificity and Inhibit Phosphoinositide Interactions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    S Jackson; S Al-Saigh; C Schultz; M Junop

    2011-12-31

    PH domains represent one of the most common domains in the human proteome. These domains are recognized as important mediators of protein-phosphoinositide and protein-protein interactions. Phosphoinositides are lipid components of the membrane that function as signaling molecules by targeting proteins to their sites of action. Phosphoinositide based signaling pathways govern a diverse range of important cellular processes including membrane remodeling, differentiation, proliferation and survival. Myo-Inositol phosphates are soluble signaling molecules that are structurally similar to the head groups of phosphoinositides. These molecules have been proposed to function, at least in part, by regulating PH domain-phosphoinositide interactions. Given the structural similarity of inositol phosphates we were interested in examining the specificity of PH domains towards the family of myo-inositol pentakisphosphate isomers. In work reported here we demonstrate that the C-terminal PH domain of pleckstrin possesses the specificity required to discriminate between different myo-inositol pentakisphosphate isomers. The structural basis for this specificity was determined using high-resolution crystal structures. Moreover, we show that while the PH domain of Grp1 does not possess this high degree of specificity, the PH domain of protein kinase B does. These results demonstrate that some PH domains possess enough specificity to discriminate between myo-inositol pentakisphosphate isomers allowing for these molecules to differentially regulate interactions with phosphoinositides. Furthermore, this work contributes to the growing body of evidence supporting myo-inositol phosphates as regulators of important PH domain-phosphoinositide interactions. Finally, in addition to expanding our knowledge of cellular signaling, these results provide a basis for developing tools to probe biological pathway.

  4. Determination and validation of mTOR kinase-domain 3D structure by homology modeling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lakhlili W

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Wiame Lakhlili,1 Gwénaël Chevé,2 Abdelaziz Yasri,2 Azeddine Ibrahimi1 1Laboratoire de Biotechnologie (MedBiotech, Faculté de Médecine et de Pharmacie de Rabat, Université Mohammed V de Rabat, Rabat, Morroco; 2OriBase Pharma, Cap Gamma, Parc Euromédecine, Montpellier, France Abstract: The AKT/mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR pathway is considered as one of the commonly activated and deregulated signaling pathways in human cancer. mTOR is associated with other proteins in two molecular complexes: mTOR complex 1/Raptor and the mTOR complex 2/Rictor. Using the crystal structure of the related lipid kinase PI3Kγ, we built a model of the catalytic region of mTOR. The modeling of the three-dimensional (3D structure of the mTOR was performed by homology modeling program SWISS-MODEL. The quality and validation of the obtained model were performed using PROCHECK and PROVE softwares. The overall stereochemical property of the protein was assessed by the Ramachandran plot. The model validation was also done by docking of known inhibitors. In this paper, we describe and validate a 3D model for the mTOR catalytic site.Keywords: mTOR, homology modeling, mTOR kinase-domain, docking

  5. Functional Analysis of the Bacteriophage T4 Rad50 Homolog (gp46) Coiled-coil Domain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barfoot, Tasida; Herdendorf, Timothy J; Behning, Bryanna R; Stohr, Bradley A; Gao, Yang; Kreuzer, Kenneth N; Nelson, Scott W

    2015-09-25

    Rad50 and Mre11 form a complex involved in the detection and processing of DNA double strand breaks. Rad50 contains an anti-parallel coiled-coil with two absolutely conserved cysteine residues at its apex. These cysteine residues serve as a dimerization domain and bind a Zn(2+) cation in a tetrathiolate coordination complex known as the zinc-hook. Mutation of the zinc-hook in bacteriophage T4 is lethal, indicating the ability to bind Zn(2+) is critical for the functioning of the MR complex. In vitro, we found that complex formation between Rad50 and a peptide corresponding to the C-terminal domain of Mre11 enhances the ATPase activity of Rad50, supporting the hypothesis that the coiled-coil is a major conduit for communication between Mre11 and Rad50. We constructed mutations to perturb this domain in the bacteriophage T4 Rad50 homolog. Deletion of the Rad50 coiled-coil and zinc-hook eliminates Mre11 binding and ATPase activation but does not affect its basal activity. Mutation of the zinc-hook or disruption of the coiled-coil does not affect Mre11 or DNA binding, but their activation of Rad50 ATPase activity is abolished. Although these mutants excise a single nucleotide at a normal rate, they lack processivity and have reduced repetitive exonuclease rates. Restricting the mobility of the coiled-coil eliminates ATPase activation and repetitive exonuclease activity, but the ability to support single nucleotide excision is retained. These results suggest that the coiled-coiled domain adopts at least two conformations throughout the ATPase/nuclease cycle, with one conformation supporting enhanced ATPase activity and processivity and the other supporting nucleotide excision.

  6. S-layer homology domain proteins Csac_0678 and Csac_2722 are implicated in plant polysaccharide deconstruction by the extremely thermophilic bacterium Caldicellulosiruptor saccharolyticus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ozdemir, Inci; Blumer-Schuette, Sara E; Kelly, Robert M

    2012-02-01

    The genus Caldicellulosiruptor contains extremely thermophilic bacteria that grow on plant polysaccharides. The genomes of Caldicellulosiruptor species reveal certain surface layer homology (SLH) domain proteins that have distinguishing features, pointing to a role in lignocellulose deconstruction. Two of these proteins in Caldicellulosiruptor saccharolyticus (Csac_0678 and Csac_2722) were examined from this perspective. In addition to three contiguous SLH domains, the Csac_0678 gene encodes a glycoside hydrolase family 5 (GH5) catalytic domain and a family 28 carbohydrate-binding module (CBM); orthologs to Csac_0678 could be identified in all genome-sequenced Caldicellulosiruptor species. Recombinant Csac_0678 was optimally active at 75°C and pH 5.0, exhibiting both endoglucanase and xylanase activities. SLH domain removal did not impact Csac_0678 GH activity, but deletion of the CBM28 domain eliminated binding to crystalline cellulose and rendered the enzyme inactive on this substrate. Csac_2722 is the largest open reading frame (ORF) in the C. saccharolyticus genome (predicted molecular mass of 286,516 kDa) and contains two putative sugar-binding domains, two Big4 domains (bacterial domains with an immunoglobulin [Ig]-like fold), and a cadherin-like (Cd) domain. Recombinant Csac_2722, lacking the SLH and Cd domains, bound to cellulose and had detectable carboxymethylcellulose (CMC) hydrolytic activity. Antibodies directed against Csac_0678 and Csac_2722 confirmed that these proteins bound to the C. saccharolyticus S-layer. Their cellular localization and functional biochemical properties indicate roles for Csac_0678 and Csac_2722 in recruitment and hydrolysis of complex polysaccharides and the deconstruction of lignocellulosic biomass. Furthermore, these results suggest that related SLH domain proteins in other Caldicellulosiruptor genomes may also be important contributors to plant biomass utilization.

  7. Structural Characterization of the E2 Domain of APL-1, a C. Elegans Homolog of Human Amyloid Precursor Protein, and its Heparin Binding Site

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hoopes, J.; Liu, X; Xu, X; Demeler, B; Folta-Stogniew, E; Li, C; Ha, Y

    2010-01-01

    The amyloid {beta}-peptide deposit found in the brain tissue of patients with Alzheimer disease is derived from a large heparin-binding protein precursor APP. The biological function of APP and its homologs is not precisely known. Here we report the x-ray structure of the E2 domain of APL-1, an APP homolog in Caenorhabditis elegans, and compare it to the human APP structure. We also describe the structure of APL-1 E2 in complex with sucrose octasulfate, a highly negatively charged disaccharide, which reveals an unexpected binding pocket between the two halves of E2. Based on the crystal structure, we are able to map, using site-directed mutagenesis, a surface groove on E2 to which heparin may bind. Our biochemical data also indicate that the affinity of E2 for heparin is influenced by pH: at pH 5, the binding appears to be much stronger than that at neutral pH. This property is likely caused by histidine residues in the vicinity of the mapped heparin binding site and could be important for the proposed adhesive function of APL-1.

  8. Osmotic shock-dependent redistribution of diacylglycerol kinase η1 to non-ionic detergent-resistant membrane via pleckstrin homology and C1 domains.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsutomo, Daisuke; Isozaki, Takeshi; Sakai, Hiromichi; Sakane, Fumio

    2013-02-01

    Diacylglycerol kinase (DGK) participates in regulating the intracellular concentrations of two bioactive lipids, diacylglycerol and phosphatidic acid. DGKη1 is a type II isozyme that contains a pleckstrin homology (PH) domain and a pair of C1 domains at the N-terminus and separated catalytic domains (catalytic subdomain-a and b). We previously reported that DGKη1 expressed in COS-7 cells is translocated from the cytoplasm to punctate granules that partially include endosomes in response to stress stimuli such as osmotic shock. However, the biochemical properties of the stress-dependent behaviour of DGKη1 remain unknown. Here, we have found that DGKη1 is redistributed from the cytosol to the non-ionic detergent (Nonidet P-40)-resistant membrane (DRM) in response to osmotic shock. Our results strongly suggested that the Nonidet P-40 insolubility of DGKη1 is due to neither cytoskeleton localization nor lipid raft association, implying that DGKη1 is distributed to detergent-resistant membrane microdomains that have a low lipid-to-protein ratio. We revealed, using a series of DGKη1 deletion mutants, that the PH and C1 domains play a pivotal role in osmotic shock-dependent DRM redistribution, whereas catalytic subdomain-a negatively regulates the event.

  9. A snapshot of the physical and functional wiring of the Eps15 homology domain network in the nematode

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tsushima, Hanako; Malabarba, Maria Grazia; Confalonieri, Stefano;

    2013-01-01

    Protein interaction modules coordinate the connections within and the activity of intracellular signaling networks. The Eps15 Homology (EH) module, a protein-protein interaction domain that is a key feature of the EH-network, was originally identified in a few proteins involved in endocytosis and...

  10. The Tiam1 Guanine Nucleotide Exchange Factor is Auto-inhibited by its Pleckstrin Homology Coiled-Coil Extension Domain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Zhen; Gakhar, Lokesh; Bain, Fletcher E; Spies, Maria; Fuentes, Ernesto J

    2017-09-07

    T-cell lymphoma invasion and metastasis 1 (Tiam1) is a Dbl-family guanine nucleotide exchange factor (GEF) that specifically activates the Rho-family GTPase Rac1 in response to upstream signals, thereby regulating cellular processes including cell adhesion and migration. Tiam1 contains multiple domains, including an N-terminal Pleckstrin homology coiled-coiled extension (PHn-CC-Ex) and catalytic Dbl-homology and C-terminal Pleckstrin homology (DH-PHc) domain. Previous studies indicate that larger fragments of Tiam1, such the region encompassing the N-terminal to C-terminal Pleckstrin homology domains (PHn-PHc) are auto-inhibited. However, the domains in this region responsible for inhibition remain unknown. Here, we show that the PHn-CC-Ex domain inhibits Tiam1 GEF activity by directly interacting with the catalytic DH-PHc domain, preventing Rac1 binding and activation. Enzyme kinetics experiments suggested that Tiam1 is auto-inhibited through occlusion of the catalytic site, rather than by allostery. Small angle X-ray scattering and ensemble modeling yielded models of the PHn-PHc fragment that indicate it is in equilibrium between open and closed conformational states. Finally, single-molecule experiments support a model in which conformational sampling between the open and closed states of Tiam1 contributes to Rac1 dissociation. Our results highlight the role of the PHn-CC-Ex domain in Tiam1 GEF regulation, and suggest a combinatorial model for GEF inhibition and activation of the Rac1 signaling pathway. Copyright © 2017, The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology.

  11. Floret-shaped solid domains on giant fluid lipid vesicles induced by pH

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sofou, Stavroula; Bandekar, Amey

    2012-02-01

    Lateral lipid phase separation and domain formation induced by changes in pH is significant in liposome-based drug delivery: environmentally responsive lipid heterogeneities can be tuned to alter collective membrane properties such as drug release and drug carrier reactivity impacting, therefore, the therapeutic outcomes. At the micron-meter scale, fluorescence microscopy on Giant Unilamellar fluid Vesicles (GUVs) shows that lowering pH (from 7.0 to 5.0) promotes the condensation of titratable PS or PA lipids into beautiful floret-shaped solid domains in which lipids are tightly packed via H-bonding and VdWs interactions. Solid domains phenomenologically comprise a circular ``core'' cap beyond which interfacial instabilities emerge resembling leaf-like stripes of almost vanishing Gaussian curvature independent of GUVs' preparation path and in agreement with a general condensation mechanism. Increasing incompressibility of domains is strongly correlated with larger number of thinner stripes per domain, and increasing relative rigidity of domains with smaller core cap areas. Line tension drives domain ripening, however the final domain shape is a result of enhanced incompressibility and rigidity maximized by domain coupling across the bilayer. Introduction of a transmembrane osmotic gradient (hyperosmotic on the outer lipid leaflet) allows the domain condensation process to reach its maximum extent which, however, is limited by the minimal expansivity of the continuous fluid membrane.

  12. Eps 15 Homology Domain (EHD)-1 Remodels Transverse Tubules in Skeletal Muscle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Demonbreun, Alexis R; Swanson, Kaitlin E; Rossi, Ann E; Deveaux, H Kieran; Earley, Judy U; Allen, Madison V; Arya, Priyanka; Bhattacharyya, Sohinee; Band, Hamid; Pytel, Peter; McNally, Elizabeth M

    2015-01-01

    We previously showed that Eps15 homology domain-containing 1 (EHD1) interacts with ferlin proteins to regulate endocytic recycling. Myoblasts from Ehd1-null mice were found to have defective recycling, myoblast fusion, and consequently smaller muscles. When expressed in C2C12 cells, an ATPase dead-EHD1 was found to interfere with BIN1/amphiphysin 2. We now extended those findings by examining Ehd1-heterozygous mice since these mice survive to maturity in normal Mendelian numbers and provide a ready source of mature muscle. We found that heterozygosity of EHD1 was sufficient to produce ectopic and excessive T-tubules, including large intracellular aggregates that contained BIN1. The disorganized T-tubule structures in Ehd1-heterozygous muscle were accompanied by marked elevation of the T-tubule-associated protein DHPR and reduction of the triad linker protein junctophilin 2, reflecting defective triads. Consistent with this, Ehd1-heterozygous muscle had reduced force production. Introduction of ATPase dead-EHD1 into mature muscle fibers was sufficient to induce ectopic T-tubule formation, seen as large BIN1 positive structures throughout the muscle. Ehd1-heterozygous mice were found to have strikingly elevated serum creatine kinase and smaller myofibers, but did not display findings of muscular dystrophy. These data indicate that EHD1 regulates the maintenance of T-tubules through its interaction with BIN1 and links T-tubules defects with elevated creatine kinase and myopathy.

  13. Eps 15 Homology Domain (EHD-1 Remodels Transverse Tubules in Skeletal Muscle.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexis R Demonbreun

    Full Text Available We previously showed that Eps15 homology domain-containing 1 (EHD1 interacts with ferlin proteins to regulate endocytic recycling. Myoblasts from Ehd1-null mice were found to have defective recycling, myoblast fusion, and consequently smaller muscles. When expressed in C2C12 cells, an ATPase dead-EHD1 was found to interfere with BIN1/amphiphysin 2. We now extended those findings by examining Ehd1-heterozygous mice since these mice survive to maturity in normal Mendelian numbers and provide a ready source of mature muscle. We found that heterozygosity of EHD1 was sufficient to produce ectopic and excessive T-tubules, including large intracellular aggregates that contained BIN1. The disorganized T-tubule structures in Ehd1-heterozygous muscle were accompanied by marked elevation of the T-tubule-associated protein DHPR and reduction of the triad linker protein junctophilin 2, reflecting defective triads. Consistent with this, Ehd1-heterozygous muscle had reduced force production. Introduction of ATPase dead-EHD1 into mature muscle fibers was sufficient to induce ectopic T-tubule formation, seen as large BIN1 positive structures throughout the muscle. Ehd1-heterozygous mice were found to have strikingly elevated serum creatine kinase and smaller myofibers, but did not display findings of muscular dystrophy. These data indicate that EHD1 regulates the maintenance of T-tubules through its interaction with BIN1 and links T-tubules defects with elevated creatine kinase and myopathy.

  14. Activation of p115-RhoGEF requires direct association of Gα13 and the Dbl homology domain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Zhe; Guo, Liang; Hadas, Jana; Gutowski, Stephen; Sprang, Stephen R; Sternweis, Paul C

    2012-07-20

    RGS-containing RhoGEFs (RGS-RhoGEFs) represent a direct link between the G(12) class of heterotrimeric G proteins and the monomeric GTPases. In addition to the canonical Dbl homology (DH) and pleckstrin homology domains that carry out the guanine nucleotide exchange factor (GEF) activity toward RhoA, these RhoGEFs also possess RGS homology (RH) domains that interact with activated α subunits of G(12) and G(13). Although the GEF activity of p115-RhoGEF (p115), an RGS-RhoGEF, can be stimulated by Gα(13), the exact mechanism of the stimulation has remained unclear. Using combined studies with small angle x-ray scattering, biochemistry, and mutagenesis, we identify an additional binding site for activated Gα(13) in the DH domain of p115. Small angle x-ray scattering reveals that the helical domain of Gα(13) docks onto the DH domain, opposite to the surface of DH that binds RhoA. Mutation of a single tryptophan residue in the α3b helix of DH reduces binding to activated Gα(13) and ablates the stimulation of p115 by Gα(13). Complementary mutations at the predicted DH-binding site in the αB-αC loop of the helical domain of Gα(13) also affect stimulation of p115 by Gα(13). Although the GAP activity of p115 is not required for stimulation by Gα(13), two hydrophobic motifs in RH outside of the consensus RGS box are critical for this process. Therefore, the binding of Gα(13) to the RH domain facilitates direct association of Gα(13) to the DH domain to regulate its exchange activity. This study provides new insight into the mechanism of regulation of the RGS-RhoGEF and broadens our understanding of G protein signaling.

  15. Eps homology domain endosomal transport proteins differentially localize to the neuromuscular junction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mate Suzanne E

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Recycling of endosomes is important for trafficking and maintenance of proteins at the neuromuscular junction (NMJ. We have previously shown high expression of the endocytic recycling regulator Eps15 homology domain-containing (EHD1 proteinin the Torpedo californica electric organ, a model tissue for investigating a cholinergic synapse. In this study, we investigated the localization of EHD1 and its paralogs EHD2, EHD3, and EHD4 in mouse skeletal muscle, and assessed the morphological changes in EHD1−/− NMJs. Methods Localization of the candidate NMJ protein EHD1 was assessed by confocal microscopy analysis of whole-mount mouse skeletal muscle fibers after direct gene transfer and immunolabeling. The potential function of EHD1 was assessed by specific force measurement and α-bungarotoxin-based endplate morphology mapping in EHD1−/− mouse skeletal muscle. Results Endogenous EHD1 localized to primary synaptic clefts of murine NMJ, and this localization was confirmed by expression of recombinant green fluorescent protein labeled-EHD1 in murine skeletal muscle in vivo. EHD1−/− mouse skeletal muscle had normal histology and NMJ morphology, and normal specific force generation during muscle contraction. The EHD 1–4 proteins showed differential localization in skeletal muscle: EHD2 to muscle vasculature, EHD3 to perisynaptic regions, and EHD4 to perinuclear regions and to primary synaptic clefts, but at lower levels than EHD1. Additionally, specific antibodies raised against mammalian EHD1-4 recognized proteins of the expected mass in the T. californica electric organ. Finally, we found that EHD4 expression was more abundant in EHD1−/− mouse skeletal muscle than in wild-type skeletal muscle. Conclusion EHD1 and EHD4 localize to the primary synaptic clefts of the NMJ. Lack of obvious defects in NMJ structure and muscle function in EHD1−/− muscle may be due to functional compensation by other EHD paralogs.

  16. Arabidopsis myosin XI sub-domains homologous to the yeast myo2p organelle inheritance sub-domain target subcellular structures in plant cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sattarzadeh, Amirali; Schmelzer, Elmon; Hanson, Maureen R.

    2013-01-01

    Myosin XI motor proteins transport plant organelles on the actin cytoskeleton. The Arabidopsis gene family that encodes myosin XI has 13 members, 12 of which have sub-domains within the tail region that are homologous to well-characterized cargo-binding domains in the yeast myosin V myo2p. Little is presently known about the cargo-binding domains of plant myosin XIs. Prior experiments in which most or all of the tail regions of myosin XIs have been fused to yellow fluorescent protein (YFP) and transiently expressed have often not resulted in fluorescent labeling of plant organelles. We identified 42 amino-acid regions within 12 Arabidopsis myosin XIs that are homologous to the yeast myo2p tail region known to be essential for vacuole and mitochondrial inheritance. A YFP fusion of the yeast region expressed in plants did not label tonoplasts or mitochondria. We investigated whether the homologous Arabidopsis regions, termed by us the “PAL” sub-domain, could associate with subcellular structures following transient expression of fusions with YFP in Nicotiana benthamiana. Seven YFP::PAL sub-domain fusions decorated Golgi and six were localized to mitochondria. In general, the myosin XI PAL sub-domains labeled organelles whose motility had previously been observed to be affected by mutagenesis or dominant negative assays with the respective myosins. Simultaneous transient expression of the PAL sub-domains of myosin XI-H, XI-I, and XI-K resulted in inhibition of movement of mitochondria and Golgi. PMID:24187546

  17. Arabidopsis myosin XI sub-domains homologous to the yeast myo2p organelle inheritance sub-domain target subcellular structures in plant cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amirali eSattarzadeh

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Myosin XI motor proteins transport plant organelles on the actin cytoskeleton. The Arabidopsis gene family that encodes myosin XI has 13 members, 12 of which have sub-domains within the tail region that are homologous to well-characterized cargo-binding domains in the yeast myosin V myo2p. Little is presently known about the cargo-binding domains of plant myosin XIs. Prior experiments in which most or all of the tail regions of myosin XIs have been fused to yellow fluorescent protein (YFP and transiently expressed have often not resulted in fluorescent labeling of plant organelles. We identified 42 amino-acid regions within 12 Arabidopsis myosin XIs that are homologous to the yeast myo2p tail region known to be essential for vacuole and mitochondrial inheritance. A YFP fusion of the yeast region expressed in plants did not label tonoplasts or mitochondria. We investigated whether the homologous Arabidopsis regions, termed by us the PAL sub-domain, could associate with subcellular structures following transient expression of fusions with YFP in Nicotiana benthamiana. Seven YFP::PAL sub-domain fusions decorated Golgi and six were localized to mitochondria. In general, the myosin XI PAL sub-domains labeled organelles whose motility had previously been observed to be affected by mutagenesis or dominant negative assays with the respective myosins. Simultaneous transient expression of the PAL sub-domains of myosin XI-H, XI-I, and XI-K resulted in inhibition of movement of mitochondria and Golgi.

  18. Solution structure and backbone dynamics of the pleckstrin homology domain of the human protein kinase B (PKB/Akt). Interaction with inositol phosphates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Auguin, Daniel; Barthe, Philippe; Augé-Sénégas, Marie-Thérèse; Stern, Marc-Henri; Noguchi, Masayuki; Roumestand, Christian

    2004-02-01

    The programmed cell death occurs as part of normal mammalian development. The induction of developmental cell death is a highly regulated process and can be suppressed by a variety of extracellular stimuli. Recently, the ability of trophic factors to promote survival have been attributed, at least in part, to the phosphatidylinositide 3'-OH kinase (PI3K)/Protein Kinase B (PKB, also named Akt) cascade. Several targets of the PI3K/PKB signaling pathway have been identified that may underlie the ability of this regulatory cascade to promote cell survival. PKB possesses a N-terminal Pleckstrin Homology (PH) domain that binds specifically and with high affinity to PtIns(3,4,5)P(3) and PtIns(3,4)P(2), the PI3K second messengers. PKB is then recruited to the plasma membrane by virtue of its interaction with 3'-OH phosphatidylinositides and activated. Recent evidence indicates that PKB is active in various types of human cancer; constitutive PKB signaling activation is believed to promote proliferation and increased cell survival, thereby contributing to cancer progression. Thus, it has been shown that induction of PKB activity is augmented by the TCL1/MTCP1 oncoproteins through a physical association requiring the PKB PH domain. Here we present the three-dimensional solution structure of the PH domain of the human protein PKB (isoform beta). PKBbeta-PH is an electrostatically polarized molecule that adopts the same fold and topology as other PH-domains, consisting of a beta-sandwich of seven strands capped on one top by an alpha-helix. The opposite face presents three variable loops that appear poorly defined in the NMR structure. Measurements of (15)N spin relaxation times and heteronuclear (15)N[(1)H]NOEs showed that this poor definition is due to intrinsic flexibility, involving complex motions on different time scales. Chemical shift mapping studies correctly defined the binding site of Ins(1,3,4,5)P(4) (the head group of PtIns(3,4,5)P(3)), as was previously proposed

  19. The PH Domain of PDK1 Exhibits a Novel, Phospho-Regulated Monomer-Dimer Equilibrium With Important Implications for Kinase Domain Activation: Single Molecule and Ensemble Studies†

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ziemba, Brian P.; Pilling, Carissa; Calleja, Véronique; Larijani, Banafshé; Falke, Joseph J.

    2013-01-01

    Phosphoinositide-Dependent Kinase-1 (PDK1) is an essential master kinase recruited to the plasma membrane by the binding of its C-terminal PH domain to the signaling lipid phosphatidylinositol-3,4-5-trisphosphate (PIP3). Membrane binding leads to PDK1 phospho-activation, but despite the central role of PDK1 in signaling and cancer biology this activation mechanism remains poorly understood. PDK1 has been shown to exist as a dimer in cells, and one crystal structure of its isolated PH domain exhibits a putative dimer interface. It has been proposed that phosphorylation of PH domain residue T513 (or the phospho-mimetic T513E mutation) may regulate a novel PH domain dimer-monomer equilibrium, thereby converting an inactive PDK1 dimer to an active monomer. However, the oligomeric state(s) of the PH domain on the membrane have not yet been determined, nor whether a negative charge at position 513 is sufficient to regulate its oligomeric state. The present study investigates the binding of purified WT and T513E PDK1 PH domains to lipid bilayers containing the PIP3 target lipid, using both single molecule and ensemble measurements. Single molecule analysis of the brightness of fluorescent PH domain shows that the PIP3-bound WT PH domain on membranes is predominantly dimeric, while the PIP3-bound T513E PH domain is monomeric, demonstrating that negative charge at the T513 position is sufficient to dissociate the PH domain dimer and is thus likely to play a central role in PDK1 monomerization and activation. Single molecule analysis of 2-D diffusion of PH domain-PIP3 complexes reveals that the dimeric WT PH domain diffuses at the same rate a single lipid molecule, indicating that only one of its two PIP3 binding sites is occupied and there is little protein penetration into the bilayer as observed for other PH domains. The 2-D diffusion of T513E PH domain is slower, suggesting the negative charge disrupts local structure in a way that enables greater protein insertion into

  20. The pleckstrin homology domain of phospholipase D1 accelerates EGFR endocytosis by increasing the expression of the Rab5 effector, rabaptin-5.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Mi Hee; Choi, Kang-Yell; Min, Do Sik

    2015-12-18

    Endocytosis is differentially regulated by hypoxia-inducible factor-1α (HIF-1α) and phospholipase D (PLD). However, the relationship between HIF-1α and PLD in endocytosis is unknown. HIF-1α is degraded through the prolyl hydroxylase (PHD)/von Hippel-Lindau (VHL) ubiquitination pathway in an oxygen-dependent manner. Here, we show that PLD1 recovers the decrease in epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) endocytosis induced by HIF-1α independent of lipase activity via the Rab5-mediated endosome fusion pathway. EGF-induced interaction of PLD1 with HIF-1α, PHD and VHL may contribute to EGFR endocytosis. The pleckstrin homology domain (PH) of PLD1 itself promotes degradation of HIF-1α, then accelerates EGFR endocytosis via upregulation of rabaptin-5 and suppresses tumor progression. These findings reveal a novel role of the PLD1-PH domain as a positive regulator of endocytosis and provide a link between PLD1 and HIF-1α in the EGFR endocytosis pathway.

  1. Thermal and Chemical Stability of Two Homologous POZ/BTB Domains of KCTD Proteins Characterized by a Different Oligomeric Organization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luciano Pirone

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available POZ/BTB domains are widespread modules detected in a variety of different biological contexts. Here, we report a biophysical characterization of the POZ/BTB of KCTD6, a protein that is involved in the turnover of the muscle small ankyrin-1 isoform 5 and, in combination with KCTD11, in the ubiquitination and degradation of HDAC1. The analyses show that the domain is a tetramer made up by subunits with the expected α/ structure. A detailed investigation of its stability, carried out in comparison with the homologous pentameric POZ/BTB domain isolated from KCTD5, highlights a number of interesting features, which are shared by the two domains despite their different organization. Their thermal/chemical denaturation curves are characterized by a single and sharp inflection point, suggesting that the denaturation of the two domains is a cooperative two-state process. Furthermore, both domains present a significant content of secondary structure in their denatured state and a reversible denaturation process. We suggest that the ability of these domains to fold and unfold reversibly, a property that is somewhat unexpected for these oligomeric assemblies, may have important implications for their biological function. Indeed, these properties likely favor the formation of heteromeric associations that may be essential for the intricate regulation of the processes in which these proteins are involved.

  2. Heterogeneous dynamics in DNA site discrimination by the structurally homologous DNA-binding domains of ETS-family transcription factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Gaofei; Tolic, Ana; Bashkin, James K; Poon, Gregory M K

    2015-04-30

    The ETS family of transcription factors exemplifies current uncertainty in how eukaryotic genetic regulators with overlapping DNA sequence preferences achieve target site specificity. PU.1 and Ets-1 represent archetypes for studying site discrimination by ETS proteins because their DNA-binding domains are the most divergent in sequence, yet they share remarkably superimposable DNA-bound structures. To gain insight into the contrasting thermodynamics and kinetics of DNA recognition by these two proteins, we investigated the structure and dynamics of site discrimination by their DNA-binding domains. Electrophoretic mobilities of complexes formed by the two homologs with circularly permuted binding sites showed significant dynamic differences only for DNA complexes of PU.1. Free solution measurements by dynamic light scattering showed PU.1 to be more dynamic than Ets-1; moreover, dynamic changes are strongly coupled to site discrimination by PU.1, but not Ets-1. Interrogation of the protein/DNA interface by DNA footprinting showed similar accessibility to dimethyl sulfate for PU.1/DNA and Ets-1/DNA complexes, indicating that the dynamics of PU.1/DNA complexes reside primarily outside that interface. An information-based analysis of the two homologs' binding motifs suggests a role for dynamic coupling in PU.1's ability to enforce a more stringent sequence preference than Ets-1 and its proximal sequence homologs. © The Author(s) 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Nucleic Acids Research.

  3. Clip domain serine protease and its homolog respond to Vibrio challenge in Chinese white shrimp, Fenneropenaeus chinensis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ren, Qian; Xu, Zhen-Long; Wang, Xian-Wei; Zhao, Xiao-Fan; Wang, Jin-Xing

    2009-05-01

    Clip domain serine proteases and their homologs are involved in invertebrate innate immunity, including hemolymph coagulation, antimicrobial peptide synthesis, cell adhesion, and melanization. Recognition of pathogens by pattern recognition receptors can trigger activation of a serine protease cascade. We report here the cDNA cloning of a serine protease (FcSP) and a serine protease homolog (FcSPH) from Chinese white shrimp, Fenneropenaeus chinensis. Both FcSP and FcSPH possess a clip domain at the N-terminal and an SP or SP-like domain at the C-terminal. In contrast to FcSP, FcSPH lacks a catalytic residue and is catalytically inactive. Tissue distribution and time course qRT-PCR analysis indicates that FcSP and FcSPH can respond to Vibrio anguillarum challenge in hemocytes, hepatopancreas and intestine. In situ hybridization analysis shows that FcSP is distributed in hemocytes and gills, and originated mainly from the hemocytes. FcSPH protein is expressed in gills and stomach of non-challenged shrimp. Its expression in gill mainly originates from the hemocytes in it. Two immunoreactive bands of FcSP can be detected in gills and stomach of non-challenged shrimp. FcSP protein is partially cleaved in non-challenged shrimp, while FcSPH protein is unprocessed in unchallenged shrimp and is partially cleaved after V. anguillarum challenge. Our results suggest that this Clip domain serine protease and its homolog may be involved in the serine protease cascade and play an important role in innate immunity of the shrimp.

  4. Plasticity of BRCA2 function in homologous recombination: genetic interactions of the PALB2 and DNA binding domains.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nicolas Siaud

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available The breast cancer suppressor BRCA2 is essential for the maintenance of genomic integrity in mammalian cells through its role in DNA repair by homologous recombination (HR. Human BRCA2 is 3,418 amino acids and is comprised of multiple domains that interact with the RAD51 recombinase and other proteins as well as with DNA. To gain insight into the cellular function of BRCA2 in HR, we created fusions consisting of various BRCA2 domains and also introduced mutations into these domains to disrupt specific protein and DNA interactions. We find that a BRCA2 fusion peptide deleted for the DNA binding domain and active in HR is completely dependent on interaction with the PALB2 tumor suppressor for activity. Conversely, a BRCA2 fusion peptide deleted for the PALB2 binding domain is dependent on an intact DNA binding domain, providing a role for this conserved domain in vivo; mutagenesis suggests that both single-stranded and double-stranded DNA binding activities in the DNA binding domain are required for its activity. Given that PALB2 itself binds DNA, these results suggest alternative mechanisms to deliver RAD51 to DNA. In addition, the BRCA2 C terminus contains both RAD51-dependent and -independent activities which are essential to HR in some contexts. Finally, binding the small peptide DSS1 is essential for activity when its binding domain is present, but not when it is absent. Our results reveal functional redundancy within the BRCA2 protein and emphasize the plasticity of this large protein built for optimal HR function in mammalian cells. The occurrence of disease-causing mutations throughout BRCA2 suggests sub-optimal HR from a variety of domain modulations.

  5. Biochemical Activities of the Wiskott-Aldrich Syndrome Homology Region 2 Domains of Sarcomere Length Short (SALS) Protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tóth, Mónika Ágnes; Majoros, Andrea Kinga; Vig, Andrea Teréz; Migh, Ede; Nyitrai, Miklós; Mihály, József; Bugyi, Beáta

    2016-01-01

    Drosophila melanogaster sarcomere length short (SALS) is a recently identified Wiskott-Aldrich syndrome protein homology 2 (WH2) domain protein involved in skeletal muscle thin filament regulation. SALS was shown to be important for the establishment of the proper length and organization of sarcomeric actin filaments. Here, we present the first detailed characterization of the biochemical activities of the tandem WH2 domains of SALS (SALS-WH2). Our results revealed that SALS-WH2 binds both monomeric and filamentous actin and shifts the monomer-filament equilibrium toward the monomeric actin. In addition, SALS-WH2 can bind to but fails to depolymerize phalloidin- or jasplakinolide-bound actin filaments. These interactions endow SALS-WH2 with the following two major activities in the regulation of actin dynamics: SALS-WH2 sequesters actin monomers into non-polymerizable complexes and enhances actin filament disassembly by severing, which is modulated by tropomyosin. We also show that profilin does not influence the activities of the WH2 domains of SALS in actin dynamics. In conclusion, the tandem WH2 domains of SALS are multifunctional regulators of actin dynamics. Our findings suggest that the activities of the WH2 domains do not reconstitute the presumed biological function of the full-length protein. Consequently, the interactions of the WH2 domains of SALS with actin must be tuned in the cellular context by other modules of the protein and/or sarcomeric components for its proper functioning.

  6. Vibriobactin biosynthesis in Vibrio cholerae: VibH is an amide synthase homologous to nonribosomal peptide synthetase condensation domains.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keating, T A; Marshall, C G; Walsh, C T

    2000-12-19

    The Vibrio cholerae siderophore vibriobactin is biosynthesized from three molecules of 2,3-dihydroxybenzoate (DHB), two molecules of L-threonine, and one of norspermidine. Of the four genes positively implicated in vibriobactin biosynthesis, we have here expressed, purified, and assayed the products of three: vibE, vibB, and vibH. All three are homologous to nonribosomal peptide synthetase (NRPS) domains: VibE is a 2,3-dihydroxybenzoate-adenosyl monophosphate ligase, VibB is a bifunctional isochorismate lyase-aryl carrier protein (ArCP), and VibH is a novel amide synthase that represents a free-standing condensation (C) domain. VibE and VibB are homologous to EntE and EntB from Escherichia coli enterobactin synthetase; VibE activates DHB as the acyl adenylate and then transfers it to the free thiol of the phosphopantetheine arm of VibB's ArCP domain. VibH then condenses this DHB thioester (the donor) with the small molecule norspermidine (the acceptor), forming N(1)-(2, 3-dihydroxybenzoyl)norspermidine (DHB-NSPD) with a k(cat) of 600 min(-1) and a K(m) for acyl-VibB of 0.88 microM and for norspermidine of 1.5 mM. Exclusive monoacylation of a primary amine of norspermidine was observed. VibH also tolerates DHB-acylated EntB and 1,7-diaminoheptane, octylamine, and hexylamine as substrates, albeit at lowered catalytic efficiencies. DHB-NSPD possesses one of three acylations required for mature vibriobactin, and its formation confirms VibH's role in vibriobactin biosynthesis. VibH is a unique NRPS condensation domain that acts upon an upstream carrier-protein-bound donor and a downstream amine, turning over a soluble amide product, in contrast to an archetypal NRPS-embedded C domain that condenses two carrier protein thioesters.

  7. A snapshot of the physical and functional wiring of the Eps15 homology domain network in the nematode

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tsushima, Hanako; Malabarba, Maria Grazia; Confalonieri, Stefano;

    2013-01-01

    Protein interaction modules coordinate the connections within and the activity of intracellular signaling networks. The Eps15 Homology (EH) module, a protein-protein interaction domain that is a key feature of the EH-network, was originally identified in a few proteins involved in endocytosis...... physiological roles of the EH-network is in neurotransmission. In addition, we found that the proteins of the network intersect, and possibly coordinate, a number of "territories" of cellular activity including endocytosis/recycling/vesicle transport, actin dynamics, general metabolism and signal transduction...

  8. Time-domain measurement of fluorescence lifetime variation with pH

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ryder, Alan G.; Power, Sarah; Glynn, Thomas J.; Morrison, John J.

    2001-07-01

    Advances in the design and miniaturization of the lasers and electronics required for Time Correlated Single Photon Counting (TCSPC) measurement of fluorescence lifetime have simplified the use of the time domain method. We have assembled a compact portable system that is capable of measuring lifetimes down to approximately 200 ps (with deconvolution) and that can operate at a range of excitation and emission wavelengths. The excitation sources are pulsed LEDs and laser diodes with a maximum pulse rate of 40 MHz and are easily interchanged. Furthermore, the development of violet and blue GaN LEDs and laser diodes is expanding the range of fluorophores available for fluorescence lifetime measurement of ion concentrations. pH sensitive fluorophores have a wide range of biological and clinical applications. The use of fluorescence lifetime rather than intensity to measure pH has a number of advantages including the reduction of effects due to the photobleaching, scattering, and intensity variations in the excitation source. Using our compact TCSPC instrumentation we have measured the dependence of fluorescence lifetimes on pH for a range of dyes in phosphate buffer over the physiologically important range of 6.0 to 8.0. Most dyes exhibit only a small variation in lifetime (pH range; however, acridine exhibits a large variation in lifetime and hence shows promise as a pH indicator.

  9. A PALB2-interacting domain in RNF168 couples homologous recombination to DNA break-induced chromatin ubiquitylation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Luijsterburg, Martijn S; Typas, Dimitris; Caron, Marie-Christine

    2017-01-01

    DNA double-strand breaks (DSB) elicit a ubiquitylation cascade that controls DNA repair pathway choice. This cascade involves the ubiquitylation of histone H2A by the RNF168 ligase and the subsequent recruitment of RIF1, which suppresses homologous recombination (HR) in G1 cells. The RIF1-dependent...... recognizes histone ubiquitylation by physically associating with ubiquitin-bound RNF168. This direct interaction is mediated by the newly identified PALB2-interacting domain (PID) in RNF168 and the WD40 domain in PALB2, and drives DNA repair by facilitating the assembly of PALB2-containing HR complexes...... at DSBs. Our findings demonstrate that RNF168 couples PALB2-dependent HR to H2A ubiquitylation to promote DNA repair and preserve genome integrity....

  10. Increased Eps15 homology domain 1 and RAB11FIP3 expression regulate breast cancer progression via promoting epithelial growth factor receptor recycling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tong, Dandan; Liang, Ya-Nan; Stepanova, A A; Liu, Yu; Li, Xiaobo; Wang, Letian; Zhang, Fengmin; Vasilyeva, N V

    2017-02-01

    Recent research indicates that the C-terminal Eps15 homology domain 1 is associated with epithelial growth factor receptor-mediated endocytosis recycling in non-small-cell lung cancer. The aim of this study was to determine the clinical significance of Eps15 homology domain 1 gene expression in relation to phosphorylation of epithelial growth factor receptor expression in patients with breast cancer. Primary breast cancer samples from 306 patients were analyzed for Eps15 homology domain 1, RAB11FIP3, and phosphorylation of epithelial growth factor receptor expression via immunohistochemistry. The clinical significance was assessed via a multivariate Cox regression analysis, Kaplan-Meier curves, and the log-rank test. Eps15 homology domain 1 and phosphorylation of epithelial growth factor receptor were upregulated in 60.46% (185/306) and 53.92% (165/306) of tumor tissues, respectively, as assessed by immunohistochemistry. The statistical correlation analysis indicated that Eps15 homology domain 1 overexpression was positively correlated with the increases in phosphorylation of epithelial growth factor receptor ( r = 0.242, p homology domain 1 alone is a significant prognostic marker of breast cancer for the overall survival in the total, chemotherapy, and human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (-) groups. However, the use of combined expression of Eps15 homology domain 1 and phosphorylation of epithelial growth factor receptor markers is more effective for the disease-free survival in the overall population, chemotherapy, and human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (-) groups. Moreover, the combined markers are also significant prognostic markers of breast cancer in the human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (+), estrogen receptor (+), and estrogen receptor (-) groups. Eps15 homology domain 1 has a tumor suppressor function, and the combined marker of Eps15 homology domain 1/phosphorylation of epithelial growth factor receptor expression was identified as

  11. Ab initio and homology based prediction of protein domains by recursive neural networks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mooney Catherine

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Proteins, especially larger ones, are often composed of individual evolutionary units, domains, which have their own function and structural fold. Predicting domains is an important intermediate step in protein analyses, including the prediction of protein structures. Results We describe novel systems for the prediction of protein domain boundaries powered by Recursive Neural Networks. The systems rely on a combination of primary sequence and evolutionary information, predictions of structural features such as secondary structure, solvent accessibility and residue contact maps, and structural templates, both annotated for domains (from the SCOP dataset and unannotated (from the PDB. We gauge the contribution of contact maps, and PDB and SCOP templates independently and for different ranges of template quality. We find that accurately predicted contact maps are informative for the prediction of domain boundaries, while the same is not true for contact maps predicted ab initio. We also find that gap information from PDB templates is informative, but, not surprisingly, less than SCOP annotations. We test both systems trained on templates of all qualities, and systems trained only on templates of marginal similarity to the query (less than 25% sequence identity. While the first batch of systems produces near perfect predictions in the presence of fair to good templates, the second batch outperforms or match ab initio predictors down to essentially any level of template quality. We test all systems in 5-fold cross-validation on a large non-redundant set of multi-domain and single domain proteins. The final predictors are state-of-the-art, with a template-less prediction boundary recall of 50.8% (precision 38.7% within ± 20 residues and a single domain recall of 80.3% (precision 78.1%. The SCOP-based predictors achieve a boundary recall of 74% (precision 77.1% again within ± 20 residues, and classify single domain proteins as

  12. Definition of Munc13-homology-domains and characterization of a novel ubiquitously expressed Munc13 isoform.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koch, H; Hofmann, K; Brose, N

    2000-07-01

    Munc13 proteins constitute a family of three highly homologous molecules (Munc13-1, Munc13-2 and Munc13-3). With the exception of a ubiquitously expressed Munc13-2 splice variant, Munc13 proteins are brain-specific. Munc13-1 has a central priming function in synaptic vesicle exocytosis from glutamatergic synapses. In order to identify Munc13-like proteins that may regulate secretory processes in non-glutamatergic neurons or non-neuronal cells, we developed protein profiles for two Munc13-homology-domains (MHDs). MHDs are present in a wide variety of proteins, some of which have previously been implicated in membrane trafficking reactions. Taking advantage of partial sequences in the human expressed sequence tag (EST) database, we characterized a novel, ubiquitously expressed, rat protein (Munc13-4) that belongs to a subfamily of Munc13-like molecules, in which the typical Munc13-like domain structure is conserved. Munc13-4 is predominantly expressed in lung where it is localized to goblet cells of the bronchial epithelium and to alveolar type II cells, both of which are cell types with secretory function. In the present study we identify a group of novel proteins, some of which may function in a Munc13-like manner to regulate membrane trafficking. The MHD profiles described in the present study are useful tools for the identification of Munc13-like proteins, that would otherwise have remained undetected.

  13. Domain structures and molecular evolution of class I and class II major histocompatibility gene complex (MHC) products deduced from amino acid and nucleotide sequence homologies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohnishi, K

    1984-01-01

    Domain structures of class I and class II MHC products were analyzed from a viewpoint of amino acid and nucleotide sequence homologies. Alignment statistics revealed that class I (transplantation) antigen H chains consist of four mutually homologous domains, and that class II (HLA-DR) antigen beta and alpha chains are both composed of three mutually homologous ones. The N-terminal three and two domains of class I and class II (both beta and alpha) gene products, respectively, all of which being approximately 90 residues long, were concluded to be homologous to beta2-microglobulin (beta2M). The membrane-embedded C-terminal shorter domains of these MHC products were also found to be homologous to one another and to the third domain of class I H chains. Class I H chains were found to be more closely related to class II alpha chains than to class II beta chains. Based on these findings, an exon duplication history from a common ancestral gene encoding a beta2M-like primodial protein of one-domain-length up to the contemporary MHC products was proposed.

  14. Effect of diphtheria toxin T-domain on endosomal pH

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. J. Labyntsev

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available A key step in the mode of cytotoxic action of diphtheria toxin (DT is the transfer of its catalytic domain (Cd from endosomes into the cytosol. The main activity in this process is performed by the transport domain (Td, but the molecular mechanism of its action remains unknown. We have previously shown that Td can have some influence on the endosomal transport of DT. The aim of this work was to study the effect of diphtheria toxin on the toxin compartmentalization in the intracellular transporting pathway and endosomal pH. We used recombinant fragments of DT, which differed only by the presence of Td in their structure, fused with fluorescent proteins. It was shown that the toxin fragment with Td moved slower by the pathway early-late endosomes-lysosomes, and had a slightly different pattern of colocalization with endosomal markers than DT fragment without Td. In addition, endosomes containing DT fragments with Td had a constant pH of about 6.5 from the 10th to 50th minute of observation, for the same time endosomes containing DT fragments without Td demons­trated a decrease in pH from 6.3 to 5.5. These results indicate that Td inhibits acidification of endosomal medium. One of possible explanations for this may be the effect of the ion channel formed by the T-domain on the process of the endosomal acidification. This property of Td may not only inhibit maturation of endosomes but also inhibit activation of endosomal pH-dependent proteases, and this promotes successful transport of Cd into the cell cytosol.

  15. Crystal structure of the homology domain of the eukaryotic DNA replication proteins Sld3/Treslin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Itou, Hiroshi; Muramatsu, Sachiko; Shirakihara, Yasuo; Araki, Hiroyuki

    2014-09-02

    The initiation of eukaryotic chromosomal DNA replication requires the formation of an active replicative helicase at the replication origins of chromosomal DNA. Yeast Sld3 and its metazoan counterpart Treslin are the hub proteins mediating protein associations critical for the helicase formation. Here, we show the crystal structure of the central domain of Sld3 that is conserved in Sld3/Treslin family of proteins. The domain consists of two segments with 12 helices and is sufficient to bind to Cdc45, the essential helicase component. The structure model of the Sld3-Cdc45 complex, which is crucial for the formation of the active helicase, is proposed.

  16. Homology modeling of NR2B modulatory domain of NMDA receptor and analysis of ifenprodil binding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marinelli, Luciana; Cosconati, Sandro; Steinbrecher, Thomas; Limongelli, Vittorio; Bertamino, Alessia; Novellino, Ettore; Case, David A

    2007-10-01

    NMDA receptors are glutamate-gated ion channels (iGluRs) that are involved in several important physiological functions such as neuronal development, synaptic plasticity, learning, and memory. Among iGluRs, NMDA receptors have been perhaps the most actively investigated for their role in chronic neurodegeneration such as Alzheimer's, Parkinson's, and Huntington's diseases. Recent studies have shown that the NTD of subunit NR2B modulates ion channel gating through the binding of allosteric modulators such as the prototypical compound ifenprodil. In the present paper, the construction of a three-dimensional model for the NR2B modulatory domain is described and docking calculations allow, for the first time, definition of the ifenprodil binding pose at an atomic level and fully explain all the available structure-activity relationships. Moreover, in an attempt to add further insight into the ifenprodil mechanism of action, as it is not completely clear if it binds and stabilizes an open or a closed conformation of the NR2B modulatory domain, a matter, which is fundamental for the rational design of NMDA antagonists, MD simulations followed by an MM-PBSA analysis were performed. These calculations reveal that the closed conformation of the R1-R2 domain, rather than the open, constitutes the high affinity binding site for ifenprodil and that a profound stabilization of the closed conformation upon ifenprodil binding occurs. Thus, for a rational design and/or for virtual screening experiments, the closed conformation of the R1-R2 domain should be taken into account and our 3D model can provide valuable hints for the design of NR2B-selective antagonists.

  17. Pleckstrin homology domain-containing protein PHLDB3 supports cancer growth via a negative feedback loop involving p53

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chao, Tengfei; Zhou, Xiang; Cao, Bo; Liao, Peng; Liu, Hongbing; Chen, Yun; Park, Hee-Won; Zeng, Shelya X.; Lu, Hua

    2016-01-01

    The tumour suppressor p53 transactivates the expression of its target genes to exert its functions. Here, we identify a pleckstrin homology domain-containing protein (PHLDB3)-encoding gene as a p53 target. PHLDB3 overexpression increases proliferation and restrains apoptosis of wild-type p53-harboring cancer cells by reducing p53 protein levels. PHLDB3 binds to MDM2 (mouse double minute 2 homolog) and facilitates MDM2-mediated ubiquitination and degradation of p53. Knockdown of PHLDB3 more efficiently inhibits the growth of mouse xenograft tumours derived from human colon cancer HCT116 cells that contain wild type p53 compared with p53-deficient HCT116 cells, and also sensitizes tumour cells to doxorubicin and 5-Fluorouracil. Analysis of cancer genomic databases reveals that PHLDB3 is amplified and/or highly expressed in numerous human cancers. Altogether, these results demonstrate that PHLDB3 promotes tumour growth by inactivating p53 in a negative feedback fashion and suggest PHLDB3 as a potential therapeutic target in various human cancers. PMID:28008906

  18. A point mutation in the extracellular domain activates LET-23, the Caenorhabditis elegans epidermal growth factor receptor homolog.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katz, W S; Lesa, G M; Yannoukakos, D; Clandinin, T R; Schlessinger, J; Sternberg, P W

    1996-01-01

    The let-23 gene encodes a Caenorhabditis elegans homolog of the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) necessary for vulval development. We have characterized a mutation of let-23 that activates the receptor and downstream signal transduction, leading to excess vulval differentiation. This mutation alters a conserved cysteine residue in the extracellular domain and is the first such point mutation in the EGFR subfamily of tyrosine kinases. Mutation of a different cysteine in the same subdomain causes a strong loss-of-function phenotype, suggesting that cysteines in this region are important for function and nonequivalent. Vulval precursor cells can generate either of two subsets of vulval cells (distinct fates) in response to sa62 activity. The fates produced depended on the copy number of the mutation, suggesting that quantitative differences in receptor activity influence the decision between these two fates. PMID:8552080

  19. Tirucallic acids are novel pleckstrin homology domain-dependent Akt inhibitors inducing apoptosis in prostate cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Estrada, Aydee C; Syrovets, Tatiana; Pitterle, Kai; Lunov, Oleg; Büchele, Berthold; Schimana-Pfeifer, Judith; Schmidt, Thomas; Morad, Samy A F; Simmet, Thomas

    2010-03-01

    Activation of the serine/threonine kinase Akt is associated with aggressive clinical behavior of prostate cancer. We found that the human prostate cancer cell lines LNCaP and PC-3 express predominantly Akt1 and Akt2. Selective down-regulation of Akt1, but not Akt2, by short-hairpin RNA reduced the viability of prostate cancer cells. In addition, structurally different Akt inhibitors were cytotoxic for the prostate cancer cells, confirming that the Akt pathway is indispensable for their viability. We have purified the tetracyclic triterpenoids 3-oxo-tirucallic acid, 3-alpha-acetoxy-tirucallic acid, and 3-beta-acetoxy-tirucallic acid from the oleogum resin of Boswellia carterii to chemical homogeneity. The acetoxy-derivatives in particular potently inhibited the activities of human recombinant Akt1 and Akt2 and of constitutively active Akt immunoprecipitated from PC-3 cells, whereas inhibitor of nuclear factor-kappaB kinases remained unaffected. Docking data indicated that these tetracyclic triterpenoids form hydrogen bonds within the phosphatidylinositol binding pocket of the Akt pleckstrin homology domain. Accordingly, 3-beta-acetoxy-tirucallic acid did not inhibit the activity of Akt1 lacking the pleckstrin homology domain. In the prostate cancer cell lines investigated, these compounds inhibited the phosphorylation of cellular Akt and the Akt signaling pathways, including glycogen synthase kinase-3beta and BAD phosphorylation, nuclear accumulation of p65, the androgen receptor, beta-catenin, and c-Myc. These events culminated in the induction of apoptosis in prostate cancer, but not in nontumorigenic cells. The tirucallic acid derivatives inhibited proliferation and induced apoptosis in tumors xenografted onto chick chorioallantoic membranes and decreased the growth of pre-established prostate tumors in nude mice without overt systemic toxicity. Thus, tirucallic acid derivatives represent a new class of Akt inhibitors with antitumor properties.

  20. Origin and Status of Homologous Proteins of Biomineralization (Biosilicification in the Taxonomy of Phylogenetic Domains

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Igor E. Pamirsky

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The taxonomic affiliation (in the systematisation of viruses, and biological domains of known peptides and proteins of biomineralization (silicateins, silaffins, silacidins and silicase and their primary structure homologues were analyzed (methods in silico; using Uniprot database. The total number of known peptides and proteins of biosilicification was counted. The data of the quantitative distribution of the detected homologues found in nature are presented. The similarity of the primary structures of silaffins, silacidins, silicateins, silicase, and their homologues was 21–94%, 45–98%, 39–50%, and 28–40%, respectively. These homologues are found in many organisms, from the Protista to the higher plants and animals, including humans, as well as in bacteria and extracellular agents, and they perform a variety of biological functions, such as biologically controlled mineralisation. The provisional classification of these biomineralization proteins is presented. The interrelation of the origin of the first organic polymers and biomineralization is discussed.

  1. A PALB2-interacting domain in RNF168 couples homologous recombination to DNA break-induced chromatin ubiquitylation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luijsterburg, Martijn S; Typas, Dimitris; Caron, Marie-Christine; Wiegant, Wouter W; van den Heuvel, Diana; Boonen, Rick A; Couturier, Anthony M; Mullenders, Leon H; Masson, Jean-Yves; van Attikum, Haico

    2017-01-01

    DNA double-strand breaks (DSB) elicit a ubiquitylation cascade that controls DNA repair pathway choice. This cascade involves the ubiquitylation of histone H2A by the RNF168 ligase and the subsequent recruitment of RIF1, which suppresses homologous recombination (HR) in G1 cells. The RIF1-dependent suppression is relieved in S/G2 cells, allowing PALB2-driven HR to occur. With the inhibitory impact of RIF1 relieved, it remains unclear how RNF168-induced ubiquitylation influences HR. Here, we uncover that RNF168 links the HR machinery to H2A ubiquitylation in S/G2 cells. We show that PALB2 indirectly recognizes histone ubiquitylation by physically associating with ubiquitin-bound RNF168. This direct interaction is mediated by the newly identified PALB2-interacting domain (PID) in RNF168 and the WD40 domain in PALB2, and drives DNA repair by facilitating the assembly of PALB2-containing HR complexes at DSBs. Our findings demonstrate that RNF168 couples PALB2-dependent HR to H2A ubiquitylation to promote DNA repair and preserve genome integrity. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.20922.001 PMID:28240985

  2. Sprouty-Related Ena/Vasodilator-Stimulated Phosphoprotein Homology 1-Domain-Containing Protein-2 Critically Regulates Influenza A Virus-Induced Pneumonia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ito, Toshihiro; Itakura, Junya; Takahashi, Sakuma; Sato, Miwa; Mino, Megumi; Fushimi, Soichiro; Yamada, Masao; Morishima, Tuneo; Kunkel, Steven L; Matsukawa, Akihiro

    2016-07-01

    Influenza A virus causes acute respiratory infections that induce annual epidemics and occasional pandemics. Although a number of studies indicated that the virus-induced intracellular signaling events are important in combating influenza virus infection, the mechanism how specific molecule plays a critical role among various intracellular signaling events remains unknown. Raf/MEK/extracellular signal-regulated kinase cascade is one of the key signaling pathways during influenza virus infection, and the Sprouty-related Ena/vasodilator-stimulated phosphoprotein homology 1-domain-containing protein has recently been identified as a negative regulator of Raf-dependent extracellular signal-regulated kinase activation. Here, we examined the role of Raf/MEK/extracellular signal-regulated kinase cascade through sprouty-related Ena/vasodilator-stimulated phosphoprotein homology 1-domain-containing protein in influenza A viral infection because the expression of sprouty-related Ena/vasodilator-stimulated phosphoprotein homology 1-domain-containing protein was significantly enhanced in human influenza viral-induced pneumonia autopsy samples. Prospective animal trial. Research laboratory. Wild-type and sprouty-related Ena/vasodilator-stimulated phosphoprotein homology 1-domain-containing protein-2 knockout mice inoculated with influenza A. Wild-type or sprouty-related Ena/vasodilator-stimulated phosphoprotein homology 1-domain-containing protein-2 knockout mice were infected by intranasal inoculation of influenza A (A/PR/8). An equal volume of phosphate-buffered saline was inoculated intranasally into mock-infected mice. Influenza A infection of sprouty-related Ena/vasodilator-stimulated phosphoprotein homology 1-domain-containing protein-2 knockout mice led to higher mortality with greater viral load, excessive inflammation, and enhanced cytokine production than wild-type mice. Administration of MEK inhibitor, U0126, improved mortality and reduced both viral load and

  3. Direct observation of the uncapping of capping protein-capped actin filaments by CARMIL homology domain 3.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fujiwara, Ikuko; Remmert, Kirsten; Hammer, John A

    2010-01-22

    Bulk solution assays have shown that the isolated CARMIL homology 3 (CAH3) domain from mouse and Acanthamoeba CARMIL rapidly and potently restores actin polymerization when added to actin filaments previously capped with capping protein (CP). To demonstrate this putative uncapping activity directly, we used total internal reflection microscopy to observe single, CP-capped actin filaments before and after the addition of the CAH3 domain from mouse CARMIL-1 (mCAH3). The addition of mCAH3 rapidly restored the polymerization of individual capped filaments, consistent with uncapping. To verify uncapping, filaments were capped with recombinant mouse CP tagged with monomeric green fluorescent protein (mGFP-CP). Restoration of polymerization upon the addition of mCAH3 was immediately preceded by the complete dissociation of mGFP-CP from the filament end, confirming the CAH3-driven uncapping mechanism. Quantitative analyses showed that the percentage of capped filaments that uncapped increased as the concentration of mCAH3 was increased, reaching a maximum of approximately 90% at approximately 250 nm mCAH3. Moreover, the time interval between mCAH3 addition and uncapping decreased as the concentration of mCAH3 increased, with the half-time of CP at the barbed end decreasing from approximately 30 min without mCAH3 to approximately 10 s with a saturating amount of mCAH3. Finally, using mCAH3 tagged with mGFP, we obtained direct evidence that the complex of CP and mCAH3 has a small but measurable affinity for the barbed end, as inferred from previous studies and kinetic modeling. We conclude that the isolated CAH3 domain of CARMIL (and presumably the intact molecule as well) possesses the ability to uncap CP-capped actin filaments.

  4. Direct Observation of the Uncapping of Capping Protein-capped Actin Filaments by CARMIL Homology Domain 3*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fujiwara, Ikuko; Remmert, Kirsten; Hammer, John A.

    2010-01-01

    Bulk solution assays have shown that the isolated CARMIL homology 3 (CAH3) domain from mouse and Acanthamoeba CARMIL rapidly and potently restores actin polymerization when added to actin filaments previously capped with capping protein (CP). To demonstrate this putative uncapping activity directly, we used total internal reflection microscopy to observe single, CP-capped actin filaments before and after the addition of the CAH3 domain from mouse CARMIL-1 (mCAH3). The addition of mCAH3 rapidly restored the polymerization of individual capped filaments, consistent with uncapping. To verify uncapping, filaments were capped with recombinant mouse CP tagged with monomeric green fluorescent protein (mGFP-CP). Restoration of polymerization upon the addition of mCAH3 was immediately preceded by the complete dissociation of mGFP-CP from the filament end, confirming the CAH3-driven uncapping mechanism. Quantitative analyses showed that the percentage of capped filaments that uncapped increased as the concentration of mCAH3 was increased, reaching a maximum of ∼90% at ∼250 nm mCAH3. Moreover, the time interval between mCAH3 addition and uncapping decreased as the concentration of mCAH3 increased, with the half-time of CP at the barbed end decreasing from ∼30 min without mCAH3 to ∼10 s with a saturating amount of mCAH3. Finally, using mCAH3 tagged with mGFP, we obtained direct evidence that the complex of CP and mCAH3 has a small but measurable affinity for the barbed end, as inferred from previous studies and kinetic modeling. We conclude that the isolated CAH3 domain of CARMIL (and presumably the intact molecule as well) possesses the ability to uncap CP-capped actin filaments. PMID:19926785

  5. Regulation of abiotic stress signalling by Arabidopsis C-terminal domain phosphatase-like 1 requires interaction with a k-homology domain-containing protein.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    In Sil Jeong

    Full Text Available Arabidopsis thaliana CARBOXYL-TERMINAL DOMAIN (CTD PHOSPHATASE-LIKE 1 (CPL1 regulates plant transcriptional responses to diverse stress signals. Unlike typical CTD phosphatases, CPL1 contains two double-stranded (ds RNA binding motifs (dsRBMs at its C-terminus. Some dsRBMs can bind to dsRNA and/or other proteins, but the function of the CPL1 dsRBMs has remained obscure. Here, we report identification of REGULATOR OF CBF GENE EXPRESSION 3 (RCF3 as a CPL1-interacting protein. RCF3 co-purified with tandem-affinity-tagged CPL1 from cultured Arabidopsis cells and contains multiple K-homology (KH domains, which were predicted to be important for binding to single-stranded DNA/RNA. Yeast two-hybrid, luciferase complementation imaging, and bimolecular fluorescence complementation analyses established that CPL1 and RCF3 strongly associate in vivo, an interaction mediated by the dsRBM1 of CPL1 and the KH3/KH4 domains of RCF3. Mapping of functional regions of CPL1 indicated that CPL1 in vivo function requires the dsRBM1, catalytic activity, and nuclear targeting of CPL1. Gene expression profiles of rcf3 and cpl1 mutants were similar during iron deficiency, but were distinct during the cold response. These results suggest that tethering CPL1 to RCF3 via dsRBM1 is part of the mechanism that confers specificity to CPL1-mediated transcriptional regulation.

  6. Intra-domain phage display (ID-PhD of peptides and protein mini-domains censored from canonical pIII phage display

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katrina F Tjhung

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, we describe multivalent display of peptide and protein sequences typically censored from traditional N-terminal display on protein pIII of filamentous bacteriophage M13. Using site-directed mutagenesis of commercially available M13KE phage cloning vector, we introduced sites that permit efficient cloning using restriction enzymes between domains N1 and N2 of the pIII protein. As infectivity of phage is directly linked to the integrity of the connection between N1 and N2 domains, intra-domain phage display (ID-PhD allows for simple quality control of the display and the natural variations in the displayed sequences. Additionally, direct linkage to phage propagation allows efficient monitoring of sequence cleavage, providing a convenient system for selection and evolution of protease-susceptible or protease-resistant sequences. As an example of the benefits of such an ID-PhD system, we displayed a charged FLAG sequence, which is known to be post-translationally excised from pIII when displayed on the N-terminus. ID-PhD of FLAG exhibited sub-nanomolar apparent Kd suggesting multivalent nature of the display. A TEV-protease recognition sequence (TEVrs co-expressed in tandem with FLAG, allowed us to demonstrate that 99.9997% of the phage displayed the FLAG-TEVrs tandem and can be recognized and cleaved by TEV-protease. The residual 0.0003% consisted of phage clones that have excised the insert from their genome. ID-PhD is also amenable to display of protein mini-domains, such as the 33-residue minimized Z-domain of protein A. We show that it is thus possible to use ID-PhD for multivalent display and selection of mini-domain proteins (Affibodies, scFv, etc..

  7. Merkel cell carcinoma expresses K homology domain-containing protein overexpressed in cancer similar to other high-grade neuroendocrine carcinomas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pryor, Jennifer G; Simon, Rochelle A; Bourne, Patricia A; Spaulding, Betsy O; Scott, Glynis A; Xu, Haodong

    2009-02-01

    Merkel cell carcinoma is an uncommon and aggressive primary cutaneous neuroendocrine carcinoma with a high rate of recurrence and metastasis. Optimal management is controversial; consequently, it is imperative to identify the signaling pathways involved in the pathogenesis of Merkel cell carcinoma so that effective therapeutic targeting agents can be developed. We previously reported that K homology domain-containing protein overexpressed in cancer is expressed in high-grade neuroendocrine carcinomas of the lung and extrapulmonary small cell carcinomas. The K homology domain-containing protein overexpressed in cancer (KOC), also known as L523S and IMP-3, is an insulin-like growth factor II messenger RNA-binding protein that promotes tumor cell proliferation by enhancing insulin-like growth factor II protein expression. Expression of KOC in Merkel cell carcinoma has not been investigated. We studied 20 Merkel cell carcinomas by immunohistochemistry using a monoclonal antibody against L523S/KOC. Of 20 Merkel cell carcinomas, 18 (90%) overexpressed KOC, with 11 (55%) overexpressing KOC in greater than 90% of tumor cells, 3 (15%) overexpressing KOC in 50% to 90% of tumor cells, 3 (15%) overexpressing KOC in 10% to 50% of tumor cells, and 1 (5%) overexpressing KOC in less than 10% of tumor cells. The immunostaining intensity was variable, with moderate to strong staining in 14 cases and weak staining in the remaining 4. Extent of expression of K homology domain-containing protein overexpressed in cancer predicted metastasis (P = .04) and was weakly correlated with increased tumor size (P = .08). In conclusion, Merkel cell carcinoma expresses K homology domain-containing protein overexpressed in cancer with an expression pattern similar to high-grade neuroendocrine carcinomas of the lung and extrapulmonary small cell carcinomas. We propose K homology domain-containing protein overexpressed in cancer as a potential target molecule for the treatment of high

  8. Ammonium ion transport by the AMT/Rh homolog TaAMT1;1 is stimulated by acidic pH

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Søgaard, Rikke; Alsterfjord, Magnus; Macaulay, Nanna

    2009-01-01

    It is unclear how ammonia is transported by proteins from the Amt/Mep/Rh superfamily. We investigated this for the ammonium transporter TaAMT1;1 from wheat expressed in Xenopus oocytes by two-electrode voltage clamp and radio-labeled uptakes. Inward currents were activated by NH (4......) (+) or methylammonium ions (MeA(+)). Importantly, currents increased fivefold when the external pH was decreased from 7.4 to 5.5; this type of pH dependence is unique and is a strong indication of NH (4) (+) or MeA(+) transport. This was confirmed by the close correlation between the uptake of radio-labeled Me......A(+) and MeA(+)-induced currents. Homology models of members of the Amt/Mep/Rh superfamily exhibited major divergences in their cytoplasmic regions. A point mutation in this region of TaAMT1;1 abolished the pH sensitivity and decreased the apparent affinities for NH (4) (+) and MeA(+). We suggest a model...

  9. Distinct regions of Galpha13 participate in its regulatory interactions with RGS homology domain-containing RhoGEFs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kreutz, Barry; Hajicek, Nicole; Yau, Douglas M; Nakamura, Susumu; Kozasa, Tohru

    2007-08-01

    Galpha12 and Galpha13 transduce signals from G protein-coupled receptors to RhoA through RhoGEFs containing an RGS homology (RH) domain, such as p115 RhoGEF or leukemia-associated RhoGEF (LARG). The RH domain of p115 RhoGEF or LARG binds with high affinity to active forms of Galpha12 and Galpha13 and confers specific GTPase-activating protein (GAP) activity, with faster GAP responses detected in Galpha13 than in Galpha12. At the same time, Galpha13, but not Galpha12, directly stimulates the RhoGEF activity of p115 RhoGEF or nonphosphorylated LARG in reconstitution assays. In order to better understand the molecular mechanism by which Galpha13 regulates RhoGEF activity through interaction with RH-RhoGEFs, we sought to identify the region(s) of Galpha13 involved in either the GAP response or RhoGEF activation. For this purpose, we generated chimeras between Galpha12 and Galpha13 subunits and characterized their biochemical activities. In both cell-based and reconstitution assays of RhoA activation, we found that replacing the carboxyl-terminal region of Galpha12 (residues 267-379) with that of Galpha13 (residues 264-377) conferred gain-of-function to the resulting chimeric subunit, Galpha12C13. The inverse chimera, Galpha13C12, exhibited basal RhoA activation which was similar to Galpha12. In contrast to GEF assays, GAP assays showed that Galpha12C13 or Galpha13C12 chimeras responded to the GAP activity of p115 RhoGEF or LARG in a manner similar to Galpha12 or Galpha13, respectively. We conclude from these results that the carboxyl-terminal region of Galpha13 (residues 264-377) is essential for its RhoGEF stimulating activity, whereas the amino-terminal alpha helical and switch regions of Galpha12 and Galpha13 are responsible for their differential GAP responses to the RH domain.

  10. Two separate functions are encoded by the carboxyl-terminal domains of the yeast cyclase-associated protein and its mammalian homologs. Dimerization and actin binding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zelicof, A; Protopopov, V; David, D; Lin, X Y; Lustgarten, V; Gerst, J E

    1996-07-26

    The yeast adenylyl cyclase-associated protein, CAP, was identified as a component of the RAS-activated cyclase complex. CAP consists of two functional domains separated by a proline-rich region. One domain, which localizes to the amino terminus, mediates RAS signaling through adenylyl cyclase, while a domain at the carboxyl terminus is involved in the regulation of cell growth and morphogenesis. Recently, the carboxyl terminus of yeast CAP was shown to sequester actin, but whether this function has been conserved, and is the sole function of this domain, is unclear. Here, we demonstrate that the carboxyl-terminal domains of CAP and CAP homologs have two separate functions. We show that carboxyl-terminals of both yeast CAP and a mammalian CAP homolog, MCH1, bind to actin. We also show that this domain contains a signal for dimerization, allowing both CAP and MCH1 to form homodimers and heterodimers. The properties of actin binding and dimerization are mediated by separate regions on the carboxyl terminus; the last 27 amino acids of CAP being critical for actin binding. Finally, we present evidence that links a segment of the proline-rich region of CAP to its localization in yeast. Together, these results suggest that all three domains of CAP proteins are functional.

  11. The WW domain of Yes-associated protein binds a proline-rich ligand that differs from the consensus established for Src homology 3-binding modules.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, H I; Sudol, M

    1995-08-15

    The WW domain has previously been described as a motif of 38 semiconserved residues found in seemingly unrelated proteins, such as dystrophin, Yes-associated protein (YAP), and two transcriptional regulators, Rsp-5 and FE65. The molecular function of the WW domain has been unknown until this time. Using a functional screen of a cDNA expression library, we have identified two putative ligands of the WW domain of YAP, which we named WBP-1 and WBP-2. Peptide sequence comparison between the two partial clones revealed a homologous region consisting of a proline-rich domain followed by a tyrosine residue (with the shared sequence PPPPY), which we shall call the PY motif. Binding assays and site-specific mutagenesis have shown that the PY motif binds with relatively high affinity and specificity to the WW domain of YAP, with the preliminary consensus XPPXY being critical for binding. Herein, we have implicated the WW domain with a role in mediating protein-protein interactions, as a variant of the paradigm set by Src homology 3 domains and their proline-rich ligands.

  12. The Structures of Coiled-Coil Domains from Type III Secretion System Translocators Reveal Homology to Pore-Forming Toxins

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barta, Michael L.; Dickenson, Nicholas E.; Patil, Mrinalini; Keightley, Andrew; Wyckoff, Gerald J.; Picking, William D.; Picking, Wendy L.; Geisbrecht, Brian V. (UMKC); (OKLU)

    2012-03-26

    Many pathogenic Gram-negative bacteria utilize type III secretion systems (T3SSs) to alter the normal functions of target cells. Shigella flexneri uses its T3SS to invade human intestinal cells to cause bacillary dysentery (shigellosis) that is responsible for over one million deaths per year. The Shigella type III secretion apparatus is composed of a basal body spanning both bacterial membranes and an exposed oligomeric needle. Host altering effectors are secreted through this energized unidirectional conduit to promote bacterial invasion. The active needle tip complex of S. flexneri is composed of a tip protein, IpaD, and two pore-forming translocators, IpaB and IpaC. While the atomic structure of IpaD has been elucidated and studied, structural data on the hydrophobic translocators from the T3SS family remain elusive. We present here the crystal structures of a protease-stable fragment identified within the N-terminal regions of IpaB from S. flexneri and SipB from Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium determined at 2.1 {angstrom} and 2.8 {angstrom} limiting resolution, respectively. These newly identified domains are composed of extended-length (114 {angstrom} in IpaB and 71 {angstrom} in SipB) coiled-coil motifs that display a high degree of structural homology to one another despite the fact that they share only 21% sequence identity. Further structural comparisons also reveal substantial similarity to the coiled-coil regions of pore-forming proteins from other Gram-negative pathogens, notably, colicin Ia. This suggests that these mechanistically separate and functionally distinct membrane-targeting proteins may have diverged from a common ancestor during the course of pathogen-specific evolutionary events.

  13. The Src homology 3 binding domain is required for lysophosphatidic acid 3 receptor-mediated cellular viability in melanoma cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jia, Wei; Tran, Sterling K; Ruddick, Caitlin A; Murph, Mandi M

    2015-01-28

    The LPA3 receptor is a G protein-coupled receptor that binds extracellular lysophosphatidic acid and mediates intracellular signaling cascades. Although we previously reported that receptor inhibition using siRNA or chemical inhibition obliterates the viability of melanoma cells, the mechanism was unclear. Herein we hypothesized that amino acids comprising the Src homology 3 (SH3) ligand binding motif, R/K-X-X-V/P-X-X-P or (216)-KTNVLSP-(222), within the third intracellular loop of LPA3 were critical in mediating this outcome. Therefore, we performed site-directed mutagenesis of the lysine, valine and proline, replacing these amino acids with alanines, and evaluated the changes in viability, proliferation, ERK1/2 signaling and calcium in response to lysophosphatidic acid. Our results show that enforced LPA3 expression in SK-MEL-2 cells enhanced their resiliency by allowing these cells to oppose any loss of viability during growth in serum-free medium for up to 96 h, in contrast to parental SK-MEL-2 cells, which show a significant decline in viability. Similarly, site-directed alanine substitutions of valine and proline, V219A/P222A or 2aa-SK-MEL-2 cells, did not significantly alter viability, but adding a further alanine to replace the lysine, K216A/V219A/P222A or 3aa-SK-MEL-2 cells, obliterated this function. In addition, an inhibitor of the LPA3 receptor had no impact on the parental SK-MEL-2, 2aa-SK-MEL-2 or 3aa-SK-MEL-2 cells, but significantly reduced viability among wt-LPA3-SK-MEL-2 cells. Taken together, the data suggest that the SH3 ligand binding domain of LPA3 is required to mediate viability in melanoma cells.

  14. Hypoxia influences expression profile of Pleckstrin homology-like domain, family A, member 2 in Indian catfish, Clarias batrachus (Linnaeus, 1758): A new candidate gene for hypoxia tolerance in fish

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Vindhya Mohindra; Ratnesh K Tripathi; Prabhaker Yadav; Rajeev K Singh; Kuldeep K Lal

    2014-06-01

    Several physiologically important genes were found to be regulated by hypoxia at the transcriptional level. The Pleckstrin homology-like domain, family A, member 2 (PHLDA2) gene was previously identified as an imprinted gene. The present study was aimed to determine the structure of complete cDNA and the deduced protein of PHLDA2 along with analysing the changes in its mRNA expression in Clarias batrachus tissues under hypoxic conditions. The complete cDNA of CbPHLDA2 gene consisted of 1009 nucleotides with an open reading frame of 417 nucleotides. The deduced CbPHLDA2 protein of 139 amino acids shared high homology with PHLD2A of other fishes as well as that of vertebrates. Importantly, a single amino acid (asparagine/lysine) insertion was identified in the PH domain of CbPHLDA2 and other fishes, which was absent in other vertebrates studied. Furthermore, under normoxic conditions, CbPHLDA2 was constitutively expressed with varying levels in analysed tissues. Short- and long-term hypoxia exposure resulted in significant changes in the expression of CbPHLDA2 in liver, spleen, head kidney, brain and muscle in a time-dependent manner. The results suggested that CbPHLDA2 might play an important role for adaptive significance under hypoxia.

  15. Molecular Dynamic Simulation to Explore the Molecular Basis of Btk-PH Domain Interaction with Ins(1,3,4,5P4

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dan Lu

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Bruton’s tyrosine kinase contains a pleckstrin homology domain, and it specifically binds inositol 1,3,4,5-tetrakisphosphate (Ins(1,3,4,5P4, which is involved in the maturation of B cells. In this paper, we studied 12 systems including the wild type and 11 mutants, K12R, S14F, K19E, R28C/H, E41K, L11P, F25S, Y40N, and K12R-R28C/H, to investigate any change in the ligand binding site of each mutant. Molecular dynamics simulations combined with the method of molecular mechanics/Poisson-Boltzmann solvent-accessible surface area have been applied to the twelve systems, and reasonable mutant structures and their binding free energies have been obtained as criteria in the final classification. As a result, five structures, K12R, K19E, R28C/H, and E41K mutants, were classified as “functional mutations,” whereas L11P, S14F, F25S, and Y40N were grouped into “folding mutations.” This rigorous study of the binding affinity of each of the mutants and their classification provides some new insights into the biological function of the Btk-PH domain and related mutation-causing diseases.

  16. HCV NS5A protein containing potential ligands for both Src homology 2 and 3 domains enhances autophosphorylation of Src family kinase Fyn in B cells.

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    Kenji Nakashima

    Full Text Available Hepatitis C virus (HCV infects B lymphocytes and induces mixed cryoglobulinemia and B cell non-Hodgkin's lymphoma. The molecular mechanism for the pathogenesis of HCV infection-mediated B cell disorders remains obscure. To identify the possible role for HCV nonstructural 5A (NS5A protein in B cells, we generated the stable B cell lines expressing Myc-His tagged NS5A. Immunoprecipitation study in the presence or absence of pervanadate (PV implied that NS5A was tyrosine phosphorylated by pervanadate (PV treatment of the cells. Therefore we examined pull-down assay by using glutathione S-transferase (GST-fusion proteins of various Src homology 2 (SH2 domains, which associates with phosphotyrosine within a specific amino acid sequence. The results showed that NS5A specifically bound to SH2 domain of Fyn from PV-treated B cells in addition to Src homology 3 (SH3 domain. Substitution of Arg(176 to Lys in the SH2 domain of Fyn abrogated this interaction. Deletion mutational analysis demonstrated that N-terminal region of NS5A was not required for the interaction with the SH2 domain of Fyn. Tyr(334 was identified as a tyrosine phosphorylation site in NS5A. Far-western analysis revealed that SH2 domain of Fyn directly bound to NS5A. Fyn and NS5A were colocalized in the lipid raft. These results suggest that NS5A directly binds to the SH2 domain of Fyn in a tyrosine phosphorylation-dependent manner. Lastly, we showed that the expression of NS5A in B cells increased phosphorylation of activation loop tyrosine in the kinase domain of Fyn. NS5A containing ligand for both SH2 and SH3 domains enhances an aberrant autophosphorylation and kinase activity of Fyn in B cells.

  17. Distinct domains of M-T2, the myxoma virus tumor necrosis factor (TNF) receptor homolog, mediate extracellular TNF binding and intracellular apoptosis inhibition.

    OpenAIRE

    Schreiber, M; Sedger, L; McFadden, G

    1997-01-01

    The myxoma virus tumor necrosis factor (TNF) receptor homolog, M-T2, is expressed both as a secreted glycoprotein that inhibits the cytolytic activity of rabbit TNF-alpha and as an endoglycosidase H-sensitive intracellular species that prevents myxoma virus-infected CD4+ T lymphocytes from undergoing apoptosis. To compare the domains of M-T2 mediating extracellular TNF inhibition and intracellular apoptosis inhibition, recombinant myxoma viruses expressing nested C-terminal truncations of M-T...

  18. Mutually exclusive binding of APPL(PH) to BAR domain and Reptin regulates β-catenin dependent transcriptional events.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rashid, Sajid; Parveen, Zahida; Ferdous, Saba; Bibi, Nousheen

    2013-12-01

    Reptin functions in a wide range of biological processes including chromatin remodelling, nucleolar organization and transcriptional regulation of WNT signalling. As β-catenin dependent transcriptional repression and activation events involve binding of Reptin and histone deacetylase 1 to APPL endocytic proteins, this complex has become an important target to identify molecules governing endocytic processes and WNT signalling. Here, we describe the structural basis of APPL binding to Reptin to explore their mode of binding in context with APPL1/APPL2 dimerization. There is an evidence that both PH and BAR domains of APPL proteins exhibit alternately conserved regions involved in hetero-dimerization process and our in-silico data also corroborate this fact. Moreover, APPL2(PH) domain binds to the BAR domain region encompassing a nuclear localization signal. We conclude that APPL(PH) binding to BAR domain and Reptin is mutually exclusive which regulates the nucleocytoplasmic shuttling of Reptin. Furthermore, Reptin is unable to bind with membrane-associated APPL proteins. These observations were further expanded by experimental approaches where we identified a novel point mutation D316N lying in the APPL1(PH) domain which resulted in a significantly reduced binding with Reptin. By luciferase assays, we observed that overexpression of APPL1(D316N) and APPL1(WT) stimulated β-catenin/TCF dependent transcriptional activity in a similar manner which suggested that binding of Reptin to APPL1 is not necessary for β-catenin dependent target gene expression. Overall, our data attempt to highlight a comparative role of APPL proteins in controlling β-catenin dependent transcription mechanism which may improve our understanding of gene regulation.

  19. The Translocation Domain of Botulinum Neurotoxin A Moderates the Propensity of the Catalytic Domain to Interact with Membranes at Acidic pH

    Science.gov (United States)

    Araye, Anne; Goudet, Amélie; Barbier, Julien; Pichard, Sylvain; Baron, Bruno; England, Patrick; Pérez, Javier; Zinn-Justin, Sophie; Chenal, Alexandre; Gillet, Daniel

    2016-01-01

    Botulinum neurotoxin A (BoNT/A) is composed of three domains: a catalytic domain (LC), a translocation domain (HN) and a receptor-binding domain (HC). Like most bacterial toxins BoNT/A is an amphitropic protein, produced in a soluble form that is able to interact, penetrate and/or cross a membrane to achieve its toxic function. During intoxication BoNT/A is internalized by the cell by receptor-mediated endocytosis. Then, LC crosses the membrane of the endocytic compartment and reaches the cytosol. This translocation is initiated by the low pH found in this compartment. It has been suggested that LC passes in an unfolded state through a transmembrane passage formed by HN. We report here that acidification induces no major conformational change in either secondary or tertiary structures of LC and HN of BoNT/A in solution. GdnHCl-induced denaturation experiments showed that the stability of LC and HN increases as pH drops, and that HN further stabilizes LC. Unexpectedly we found that LC has a high propensity to interact with and permeabilize anionic lipid bilayers upon acidification without the help of HN. This property is downplayed when LC is linked to HN. HN thus acts as a chaperone for LC by enhancing its stability but also as a moderator of the membrane interaction of LC. PMID:27070312

  20. The Translocation Domain of Botulinum Neurotoxin A Moderates the Propensity of the Catalytic Domain to Interact with Membranes at Acidic pH.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Araye, Anne; Goudet, Amélie; Barbier, Julien; Pichard, Sylvain; Baron, Bruno; England, Patrick; Pérez, Javier; Zinn-Justin, Sophie; Chenal, Alexandre; Gillet, Daniel

    2016-01-01

    Botulinum neurotoxin A (BoNT/A) is composed of three domains: a catalytic domain (LC), a translocation domain (HN) and a receptor-binding domain (HC). Like most bacterial toxins BoNT/A is an amphitropic protein, produced in a soluble form that is able to interact, penetrate and/or cross a membrane to achieve its toxic function. During intoxication BoNT/A is internalized by the cell by receptor-mediated endocytosis. Then, LC crosses the membrane of the endocytic compartment and reaches the cytosol. This translocation is initiated by the low pH found in this compartment. It has been suggested that LC passes in an unfolded state through a transmembrane passage formed by HN. We report here that acidification induces no major conformational change in either secondary or tertiary structures of LC and HN of BoNT/A in solution. GdnHCl-induced denaturation experiments showed that the stability of LC and HN increases as pH drops, and that HN further stabilizes LC. Unexpectedly we found that LC has a high propensity to interact with and permeabilize anionic lipid bilayers upon acidification without the help of HN. This property is downplayed when LC is linked to HN. HN thus acts as a chaperone for LC by enhancing its stability but also as a moderator of the membrane interaction of LC.

  1. Selective anticancer activity of a hexapeptide with sequence homology to a non-kinase domain of Cyclin Dependent Kinase 4

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Agarwala Usha

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Cyclin-dependent kinases 2, 4 and 6 (Cdk2, Cdk4, Cdk6 are closely structurally homologous proteins which are classically understood to control the transition from the G1 to the S-phases of the cell cycle by combining with their appropriate cyclin D or cyclin E partners to form kinase-active holoenzymes. Deregulation of Cdk4 is widespread in human cancer, CDK4 gene knockout is highly protective against chemical and oncogene-mediated epithelial carcinogenesis, despite the continued presence of CDK2 and CDK6; and overexpresssion of Cdk4 promotes skin carcinogenesis. Surprisingly, however, Cdk4 kinase inhibitors have not yet fulfilled their expectation as 'blockbuster' anticancer agents. Resistance to inhibition of Cdk4 kinase in some cases could potentially be due to a non-kinase activity, as recently reported with epidermal growth factor receptor. Results A search for a potential functional site of non-kinase activity present in Cdk4 but not Cdk2 or Cdk6 revealed a previously-unidentified loop on the outside of the C'-terminal non-kinase domain of Cdk4, containing a central amino-acid sequence, Pro-Arg-Gly-Pro-Arg-Pro (PRGPRP. An isolated hexapeptide with this sequence and its cyclic amphiphilic congeners are selectively lethal at high doses to a wide range of human cancer cell lines whilst sparing normal diploid keratinocytes and fibroblasts. Treated cancer cells do not exhibit the wide variability of dose response typically seen with other anticancer agents. Cancer cell killing by PRGPRP, in a cyclic amphiphilic cassette, requires cells to be in cycle but does not perturb cell cycle distribution and is accompanied by altered relative Cdk4/Cdk1 expression and selective decrease in ATP levels. Morphological features of apoptosis are absent and cancer cell death does not appear to involve autophagy. Conclusion These findings suggest a potential new paradigm for the development of broad-spectrum cancer specific therapeutics with

  2. Are the surface layer homology domains essential for cell surface display and glycosylation of the S-layer protein from Paenibacillus alvei CCM 2051T?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Janesch, Bettina; Messner, Paul; Schäffer, Christina

    2013-02-01

    Paenibacillus alvei CCM 2051(T) cells are decorated with a two-dimensional (2D) crystalline array comprised of the glycosylated S-layer protein SpaA. At its N terminus, SpaA possesses three consecutive surface layer (S-layer) homology (SLH) domains containing the amino acid motif TRAE, known to play a key role in cell wall binding, as well as the TVEE and TRAQ variations thereof. SpaA is predicted to be anchored to the cell wall by interaction of the SLH domains with a peptidoglycan (PG)-associated, nonclassical, pyruvylated secondary cell wall polymer (SCWP). In this study, we have analyzed the role of the three predicted binding motifs within the SLH domains by mutating them into TAAA motifs, either individually, pairwise, or all of them. Effects were visualized in vivo by homologous expression of chimeras made of the mutated S-layer proteins and enhanced green fluorescent protein and in an in vitro binding assay using His-tagged SpaA variants and native PG-containing cell wall sacculi that either contained SCWP or were deprived of it. Experimental data indicated that (i) the TRAE, TVEE, and TRAQ motifs are critical for the binding function of SLH domains, (ii) two functional motifs are sufficient for cell wall binding, regardless of the domain location, (iii) SLH domains have a dual-recognition function for the SCWP and the PG, and (iv) cell wall anchoring is not necessary for SpaA glycosylation. Additionally, we showed that the SLH domains of SpaA are sufficient for in vivo cell surface display of foreign proteins at the cell surface of P. alvei.

  3. Cross-species analyses identify the BNIP-2 and Cdc42GAP homology (BCH domain as a distinct functional subclass of the CRAL_TRIO/Sec14 superfamily.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anjali Bansal Gupta

    Full Text Available The CRAL_TRIO protein domain, which is unique to the Sec14 protein superfamily, binds to a diverse set of small lipophilic ligands. Similar domains are found in a range of different proteins including neurofibromatosis type-1, a Ras GTPase-activating Protein (RasGAP and Rho guanine nucleotide exchange factors (RhoGEFs. Proteins containing this structural protein domain exhibit a low sequence similarity and ligand specificity while maintaining an overall characteristic three-dimensional structure. We have previously demonstrated that the BNIP-2 and Cdc42GAP Homology (BCH protein domain, which shares a low sequence homology with the CRAL_TRIO domain, can serve as a regulatory scaffold that binds to Rho, RhoGEFs and RhoGAPs to control various cell signalling processes. In this work, we investigate 175 BCH domain-containing proteins from a wide range of different organisms. A phylogenetic analysis with ~100 CRAL_TRIO and similar domains from eight representative species indicates a clear distinction of BCH-containing proteins as a novel subclass within the CRAL_TRIO/Sec14 superfamily. BCH-containing proteins contain a hallmark sequence motif R(R/Kh(R/K(R/KNL(R/KxhhhhHPs ('h' is large and hydrophobic residue and 's' is small and weekly polar residue and can be further subdivided into three unique subtypes associated with BNIP-2-N, macro- and RhoGAP-type protein domains. A previously unknown group of genes encoding 'BCH-only' domains is also identified in plants and arthropod species. Based on an analysis of their gene-structure and their protein domain context we hypothesize that BCH domain-containing genes evolved through gene duplication, intron insertions and domain swapping events. Furthermore, we explore the point of divergence between BCH and CRAL-TRIO proteins in relation to their ability to bind small GTPases, GAPs and GEFs and lipid ligands. Our study suggests a need for a more extensive analysis of previously uncharacterized BCH, 'BCH

  4. Small pH and salt variations radically alter the thermal stability of metal-binding domains in the copper transporter, Wilson disease protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nilsson, Lina; Ådén, Jörgen; Niemiec, Moritz S; Nam, Kwangho; Wittung-Stafshede, Pernilla

    2013-10-24

    Although strictly regulated, pH and solute concentrations in cells may exhibit temporal and spatial fluctuations. Here we study the effect of such changes on the stability, structure, and dynamics in vitro and in silico of a two-domain construct (WD56) of the fifth and sixth metal-binding domains of the copper transport protein, ATP7B (Wilson disease protein). We find that the thermal stability of WD56 is increased by 40 °C when increasing the pH from 5.0 to 7.5. In contrast, addition of salt at pH 7.2 decreases WD56 stability by up to 30 °C. In agreement with domain-domain coupling, fractional copper loading increases the stability of both domains. HSQC chemical shift changes demonstrate that, upon lowering the pH from 7.2 to 6, both His in WD6 as well as the second Cys of the copper site in each domain become protonated. MD simulations reveal increased domain-domain fluctuations at pH 6 and in the presence of high salt concentration, as compared to at pH 7 and low salt concentration. Thus, the surface charge distribution at high pH contributes favorably to overall WD56 stability. By introducing more positive charges by lowering the pH, or by diminishing charge-charge interactions by salt, fluctuations among the domains are increased and thereby overall stability is reduced. Copper transfer activity also depends on pH: delivery of copper from chaperone Atox1 to WD56 is more efficient at pH 7.2 than at pH 6 by a factor of 30. It appears that WD56 is an example where the free energy landscapes for folding and function are linked via structural stability.

  5. Activation of p115-RhoGEF Requires Direct Association of G[alpha subscript 13] and the Dbl Homology Domain

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, Zhe; Guo, Liang; Hadas, Jana; Gutowski, Stephen; Sprang, Stephen R.; Sternweis, Paul C. (IIT); (UTSMC); (Montana)

    2012-09-05

    RGS-containing RhoGEFs (RGS-RhoGEFs) represent a direct link between the G{sub 12} class of heterotrimeric G proteins and the monomeric GTPases. In addition to the canonical Dbl homology (DH) and pleckstrin homology domains that carry out the guanine nucleotide exchange factor (GEF) activity toward RhoA, these RhoGEFs also possess RGS homology (RH) domains that interact with activated {alpha} subunits of G{sub 12} and G{sub 13}. Although the GEF activity of p115-RhoGEF (p115), an RGS-RhoGEF, can be stimulated by G{alpha}{sub 13}, the exact mechanism of the stimulation has remained unclear. Using combined studies with small angle x-ray scattering, biochemistry, and mutagenesis, we identify an additional binding site for activated G{alpha}{sub 13} in the DH domain of p115. Small angle x-ray scattering reveals that the helical domain of G{alpha}{sub 13} docks onto the DH domain, opposite to the surface of DH that binds RhoA. Mutation of a single tryptophan residue in the {alpha}3b helix of DH reduces binding to activated G{alpha}{sub 13} and ablates the stimulation of p115 by G{alpha}{sub 13}. Complementary mutations at the predicted DH-binding site in the {alpha}B-{alpha}C loop of the helical domain of G{alpha}{sub 13} also affect stimulation of p115 by G{alpha}{sub 13}. Although the GAP activity of p115 is not required for stimulation by G{alpha}{sub 13}, two hydrophobic motifs in RH outside of the consensus RGS box are critical for this process. Therefore, the binding of G{alpha}{sub 13} to the RH domain facilitates direct association of G{alpha}{sub 13} to the DH domain to regulate its exchange activity. This study provides new insight into the mechanism of regulation of the RGS-RhoGEF and broadens our understanding of G protein signaling.

  6. Effects of pH on aggregation kinetics of the repeat domain of a functional amyloid, Pmel17

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pfefferkorn, Candace M.; McGlinchey, Ryan P.; Lee, Jennifer C.

    2010-01-01

    Pmel17 is a functional amyloidogenic protein whose fibrils act as scaffolds for pigment deposition in human skin and eyes. We have used the repeat domain (RPT, residues 315–444), an essential luminal polypeptide region of Pmel17, as a model system to study conformational changes from soluble unstructured monomers to β-sheet-containing fibrils. Specifically, we report on the effects of solution pH (4 → 7) mimicking pH conditions of melanosomes, acidic organelles where Pmel17 fibrils are formed. Local, secondary, and fibril structure were monitored via intrinsic Trp fluorescence, circular dichroism spectroscopy, and transmission electron microscopy, respectively. We find that W423 is a highly sensitive probe of amyloid assembly with spectral features reflecting local conformational and fibril morphological changes. A critical pH regime (5 ± 0.5) was identified for fibril formation suggesting the involvement of at least three carboxylic acids in the structural rearrangement necessary for aggregation. Moreover, we demonstrate that RPT fibril morphology can be transformed directly by changing solution pH. Based on these results, we propose that intramelanosomal pH regulates Pmel17 amyloid formation and its subsequent dissolution in vivo. PMID:21106765

  7. Time-domain fluorescence methods as applied to pH sensing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lippitsch, Max E.; Draxler, Sonja; Leiner, Marc J. P.

    1993-04-01

    Sensors based on luminescence suffer from the fact that during the operating time of the instrument changes in source intensity, light throughput, detector sensitivity, indicator quantum yield, and indicator concentration are inevitable and have to be overcome by extensive referencing and recalibration procedures. Sensors based on luminescence decay time should not suffer from these drawbacks. Decay-time sensing has relied so far on dynamic quenching, which is not well suited for pH measurements. Several other mechanisms are described in this contribution. The conditions necessary for an indicator to be useful in a decay time based pH sensing scheme are clarified and the suitability of this scheme is demonstrated.

  8. On the Role of Internal Water on Protein Thermal Stability: the Case of Homologous G-domains

    OpenAIRE

    Rahaman, Obaidur; Kalimeri, Maria; Melchionna, Simone; Hénin, Jérôme; Sterpone, Fabio

    2014-01-01

    In this work we address the question whether the enhanced stability of thermophilic proteins has a direct connection with internal hydration. Our model systems are two homologues G-domains of different stability: the mesophilic G domain of the Elongation-Factor thermal unstable protein from E. coli and the hyperthermophilic G domain of the EF-α protein from S. solfataricus. Using molecular dynamics simulation at the microsecond time-scale we show that both proteins host water molecules in int...

  9. The pH sensibility of actin-bundling LIM proteins is governed by the acidic properties of their C-terminal domain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moes, Danièle; Hoffmann, Céline; Dieterle, Monika; Moreau, Flora; Neumann, Katrin; Papuga, Jessica; Furtado, Angela Tavares; Steinmetz, André; Thomas, Clément

    2015-08-19

    Actin-bundling Arabidopsis LIM proteins are subdivided into two subfamilies differing in their pH sensitivity. Widely-expressed WLIMs are active under low and high physiologically-relevant pH conditions, whereas pollen-enriched PLIMs are inactivated by pH values above 6.8. By a domain swapping approach we identified the C-terminal (Ct) domain of PLIMs as the domain responsible for pH responsiveness. Remarkably, this domain conferred pH sensitivity to LIM proteins, when provided "in trans" (i.e., as a single, independent, peptide), indicating that it operates through the interaction with another domain. An acidic 6xc-Myc peptide functionally mimicked the Ct domain of PLIMs and efficiently inhibited LIM actin bundling activity under high pH conditions. Together, our data suggest a model where PLIMs are regulated by an intermolecular interaction between their acidic Ct domain and another, yet unidentified, domain. Copyright © 2015 Federation of European Biochemical Societies. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. N-terminal GNBP homology domain of Gram-negative binding protein 3 functions as a beta-1,3-glucan binding motif in Tenebrio molitor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Hanna; Kwon, Hyun-Mi; Park, Ji-Won; Kurokawa, Kenji; Lee, Bok Luel

    2009-08-31

    The Toll signalling pathway in invertebrates is responsible for defense against Gram-positive bacteria and fungi, leading to the expression of antimicrobial peptides via NF-kappaB-like transcription factors. Gram-negative binding protein 3 (GNBP3) detects beta-1,3-glucan, a fungal cell wall component, and activates a three step serine protease cascade for activation of the Toll signalling pathway. Here, we showed that the recombinant N-terminal domain of Tenebrio molitor GNBP3 bound to beta-1,3-glucan, but did not activate down-stream serine protease cascade in vitro. Reversely, the N-terminal domain blocked GNBP3-mediated serine protease cascade activation in vitro and also inhibited beta-1,3-glucan-mediated antimicrobial peptide induction in Tenebrio molitor larvae. These results suggest that the N-terminal GNBP homology domain of GNBP3 functions as a beta-1,3-glucan binding domain and the C-terminal domain of GNBP3 may be required for the recruitment of immediate down-stream serine protease zymogen during Toll signalling pathway activation.

  11. Exon organization of the mouse entactin gene corresponds to the structural domains of the polypeptide and has regional homology to the low-density lipoprotein receptor gene

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Durkin, M E; Wewer, U M; Chung, A E

    1995-01-01

    Entactin is a widespread basement membrane protein of 150 kDa that binds to type IV collagen and laminin. The complete exon-intron structure of the mouse entactin gene has been determined from lambda genomic DNA clones. The gene spans at least 65 kb and contains 20 exons. The exon organization...... of the mouse entactin gene closely corresponds to the organization of the polypeptide into distinct structural and functional domains. The two amino-terminal globular domains are encoded by three exons each. Single exons encode the two protease-sensitive, O-glycosylated linking regions. The six EGF......-like repeats and the single thyroglobulin-type repeat are each encoded by separate exons. The carboxyl-terminal half of entactin displays sequence homology to the growth factor-like region of the low-density lipoprotein receptor, and in both genes this region is encoded by eight exons. The positions of four...

  12. Strategies for development of functionally equivalent promoters with minimum sequence homology for transgene expression in plants: cis-elements in a novel DNA context versus domain swapping.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhullar, Simran; Chakravarthy, Suma; Advani, Sonia; Datta, Sudipta; Pental, Deepak; Burma, Pradeep Kumar

    2003-06-01

    The cauliflower mosaic virus 35S (35S) promoter has been extensively used for the constitutive expression of transgenes in dicotyledonous plants. The repetitive use of the same promoter is known to induce transgene inactivation due to promoter homology. As a way to circumvent this problem, we tested two different strategies for the development of synthetic promoters that are functionally equivalent but have a minimum sequence homology. Such promoters can be generated by (a) introducing known cis-elements in a novel or synthetic stretch of DNA or (b) "domain swapping," wherein domains of one promoter can be replaced with functionally equivalent domains from other heterologous promoters. We evaluated the two strategies for promoter modifications using domain A (consisting of minimal promoter and subdomain A1) of the 35S promoter as a model. A set of modified 35S promoters were developed whose strength was compared with the 35S promoter per se using beta-glucuronidase as the reporter gene. Analysis of the expression of the reporter gene in transient assay system showed that domain swapping led to a significant fall in promoter activity. In contrast, promoters developed by placing cis-elements in a novel DNA context showed levels of expression comparable with that of the 35S. Two promoter constructs Mod2A1T and Mod3A1T were then designed by placing the core sequences of minimal promoter and subdomain A1 in divergent DNA sequences. Transgenics developed in tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum) with the two constructs and with 35S as control were used to assess the promoter activity in different tissues of primary transformants. Mod2A1T and Mod3A1T were found to be active in all of the tissues tested, at levels comparable with that of 35S. Further, the expression of the Mod2A1T promoter in the seedlings of the T1 generation was also similar to that of the 35S promoter. The present strategy opens up the possibility of creating a set of synthetic promoters with minimum sequence

  13. Local pH domains regulate NHE3-mediated Na+ reabsorption in the renal proximal tubule

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burford, James L.; McDonough, Alicia A.; Holstein-Rathlou, Niels-Henrik; Peti-Peterdi, Janos

    2014-01-01

    The proximal tubule Na+/H+ exchanger 3 (NHE3), located in the apical dense microvilli (brush border), plays a major role in the reabsorption of NaCl and water in the renal proximal tubule. In response to a rise in blood pressure NHE3 redistributes in the plane of the plasma membrane to the base of the brush border, where NHE3 activity is reduced. This NHE3 redistribution is assumed to provoke pressure natriuresis; however, it is unclear how NHE3 redistribution per se reduces NHE3 activity. To investigate if the distribution of NHE3 in the brush border can change the reabsorption rate, we constructed a spatiotemporal mathematical model of NHE3-mediated Na+ reabsorption across a proximal tubule cell and compared the model results with in vivo experiments in rats. The model predicts that when NHE3 is localized exclusively at the base of the brush border, it creates local pH microdomains that reduce NHE3 activity by >30%. We tested the model's prediction experimentally: the rat kidney cortex was loaded with the pH-sensitive fluorescent dye BCECF, and cells of the proximal tubule were imaged in vivo using confocal fluorescence microscopy before and after an increase of blood pressure by ∼50 mmHg. The experimental results supported the model by demonstrating that a rise of blood pressure induces the development of pH microdomains near the bottom of the brush border. These local changes in pH reduce NHE3 activity, which may explain the pressure natriuresis response to NHE3 redistribution. PMID:25298526

  14. Selective anticancer activity of a hexapeptide with sequence homology to a non-kinase domain of Cyclin Dependent Kinase 4

    OpenAIRE

    Agarwala Usha; Blaydes Jeremy P; Maurer Richard I; Essex Jon W; Kilburn Jeremy D; Warenius Hilmar M; Seabra Laurence A

    2011-01-01

    Abstract Background Cyclin-dependent kinases 2, 4 and 6 (Cdk2, Cdk4, Cdk6) are closely structurally homologous proteins which are classically understood to control the transition from the G1 to the S-phases of the cell cycle by combining with their appropriate cyclin D or cyclin E partners to form kinase-active holoenzymes. Deregulation of Cdk4 is widespread in human cancer, CDK4 gene knockout is highly protective against chemical and oncogene-mediated epithelial carcinogenesis, despite the c...

  15. Mechanistic Heterogeneity in Site Recognition by the Structurally Homologous DNA-binding Domains of the ETS Family Transcription Factors Ets-1 and PU.1*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Shuo; Linde, Miles H.; Munde, Manoj; Carvalho, Victor D.; Wilson, W. David; Poon, Gregory M. K.

    2014-01-01

    ETS family transcription factors regulate diverse genes through binding at cognate DNA sites that overlap substantially in sequence. The DNA-binding domains of ETS proteins (ETS domains) are highly conserved structurally yet share limited amino acid homology. To define the mechanistic implications of sequence diversity within the ETS family, we characterized the thermodynamics and kinetics of DNA site recognition by the ETS domains of Ets-1 and PU.1, which represent the extremes in amino acid divergence among ETS proteins. Even though the two ETS domains bind their optimal sites with similar affinities under physiologic conditions, their nature of site recognition differs strikingly in terms of the role of hydration and counter ion release. The data suggest two distinct mechanisms wherein Ets-1 follows a “dry” mechanism that rapidly parses sites through electrostatic interactions and direct protein-DNA contacts, whereas PU.1 utilizes hydration to interrogate sequence-specific sites and form a long-lived complex relative to the Ets-1 counterpart. The kinetic persistence of the high affinity PU.1·DNA complex may be relevant to an emerging role of PU.1, but not Ets-1, as a pioneer transcription factor in vivo. In addition, PU.1 activity is critical to the development and function of macrophages and lymphocytes, which present osmotically variable environments, and hydration-dependent specificity may represent an important regulatory mechanism in vivo, a hypothesis that finds support in gene expression profiles of primary murine macrophages. PMID:24952944

  16. Salt shock-inducible Photosystem I cyclic electron transfer in Synechocystis PCC6803 relies on binding of ferredoxin : NADP(+) reductase to the thylakoid membranes via its CpcD phycobilisome-linker homologous N-terminal domain

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Thor, JJ; Jeanjean, R; Havaux, M; Sjollema, KA; Joset, F; Hellingwerf, KJ; Matthijs, HCP

    2000-01-01

    Relative to ferredoxin:NADP(+) reductase (FNR) from chloroplasts, the comparable enzyme in cyanobacteria contains an additional 9 kDa domain at its amino-terninus, The domain is homologous to the phycocyanin associated linker polypeptide CpcD of the light harvesting phycobilisome antennae. The pheno

  17. Salt shock-inducible Photosystem I cyclic electron transfer in Synechocystis PCC6803 relies on binding of ferredoxin : NADP(+) reductase to the thylakoid membranes via its CpcD phycobilisome-linker homologous N-terminal domain

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Thor, JJ; Jeanjean, R; Havaux, M; Sjollema, KA; Joset, F; Hellingwerf, KJ; Matthijs, HCP

    2000-01-01

    Relative to ferredoxin:NADP(+) reductase (FNR) from chloroplasts, the comparable enzyme in cyanobacteria contains an additional 9 kDa domain at its amino-terninus, The domain is homologous to the phycocyanin associated linker polypeptide CpcD of the light harvesting phycobilisome antennae. The pheno

  18. ANKRD54 preferentially selects Bruton's Tyrosine Kinase (BTK) from a Human Src-Homology 3 (SH3) domain library.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gustafsson, Manuela O; Mohammad, Dara K; Ylösmäki, Erkko; Choi, Hyunseok; Shrestha, Subhash; Wang, Qing; Nore, Beston F; Saksela, Kalle; Smith, C I Edvard

    2017-01-01

    Bruton's Tyrosine Kinase (BTK) is a cytoplasmic protein tyrosine kinase with a fundamental role in B-lymphocyte development and activation. The nucleocytoplasmic shuttling of BTK is specifically modulated by the Ankyrin Repeat Domain 54 (ANKRD54) protein and the interaction is known to be exclusively SH3-dependent. To identify the spectrum of the ANKRD54 SH3-interactome, we applied phage-display screening of a library containing all the 296 human SH3 domains. The BTK-SH3 domain was the prime interactor. Quantitative western blotting analysis demonstrated the accuracy of the screening procedure. Revealing the spectrum and specificity of ANKRD54-interactome is a critical step toward functional analysis in cells and tissues.

  19. De-DUFing the DUFs: Deciphering distant evolutionary relationships of Domains of Unknown Function using sensitive homology detection methods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mudgal, Richa; Sandhya, Sankaran; Chandra, Nagasuma; Srinivasan, Narayanaswamy

    2015-07-31

    In the post-genomic era where sequences are being determined at a rapid rate, we are highly reliant on computational methods for their tentative biochemical characterization. The Pfam database currently contains 3,786 families corresponding to "Domains of Unknown Function" (DUF) or "Uncharacterized Protein Family" (UPF), of which 3,087 families have no reported three-dimensional structure, constituting almost one-fourth of the known protein families in search for both structure and function. We applied a 'computational structural genomics' approach using five state-of-the-art remote similarity detection methods to detect the relationship between uncharacterized DUFs and domain families of known structures. The association with a structural domain family could serve as a start point in elucidating the function of a DUF. Amongst these five methods, searches in SCOP-NrichD database have been applied for the first time. Predictions were classified into high, medium and low- confidence based on the consensus of results from various approaches and also annotated with enzyme and Gene ontology terms. 614 uncharacterized DUFs could be associated with a known structural domain, of which high confidence predictions, involving at least four methods, were made for 54 families. These structure-function relationships for the 614 DUF families can be accessed on-line at http://proline.biochem.iisc.ernet.in/RHD_DUFS/ . For potential enzymes in this set, we assessed their compatibility with the associated fold and performed detailed structural and functional annotation by examining alignments and extent of conservation of functional residues. Detailed discussion is provided for interesting assignments for DUF3050, DUF1636, DUF1572, DUF2092 and DUF659. This study provides insights into the structure and potential function for nearly 20 % of the DUFs. Use of different computational approaches enables us to reliably recognize distant relationships, especially when they converge to a

  20. HOMOLOGY MODELING AND MOLECULAR DYNAMICS STUDIES OF EC1 DOMAIN OF VE-CADHERIN TO ELUCIDATE DOCKING INTERACTION WITH CADHERIN-DERIVED PEPTIDE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vivitri Dewi Prasasty

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available VE-cadherin is a protein in the cadherin family that is found at the adherens junctions of the microvessel endothelial cells of the Blood-Brain Barrier (BBB. It is recognized as the homotypic cell adhesion molecules and there is limited structural information on how VE-cadherins mediate cell-cell adhesion. It has been shown that the EC1 domain of cadherins is important for the homophilic interactions for cell-cell adhesion. Therefore, the aims of this study are to model the structure of the EC1 domain of VE-cadherin, study its molecular dynamics properties and evaluate its interactions with cadherin peptides. In this study, the sequence alignment between EC1 domain of VE-cadherin and the template protein were conducted by CLUSTALW2 platform. The SWISS-MODEL platform performed the homology modeling of the EC1 domain of VE-cadherin structure. Structural refinement was done by using KOBAMIN. Some validation analysis platforms also were conducted included PROCHECK, VERIFY3D, ERRAT and MOLPROBITY to check the allowed residues region in Ramachandran Plot (RP and the quality of the structure. The most favored region was found 95.5% in RP value and overall model structure quality is 71.34%. Molecular Dynamics (MD was run under CABS-FLEX to determine the flexibility of the residue index. The RMSD value of MD is 1.5Å per residue index. Eventually, molecular docking by AUTODOCK VINA was conducted to investigate protein-ligand interaction. From docking, it is found that the affinity energy is -4.8 kcal/mol which has the most favorable binding of EC1 domain with the peptide.

  1. Contribution of the first K-homology domain of poly(C)-binding protein 1 to its affinity and specificity for C-rich oligonucleotides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoga, Yano M K; Traore, Daouda A K; Sidiqi, Mahjooba; Szeto, Chris; Pendini, Nicole R; Barker, Andrew; Leedman, Peter J; Wilce, Jacqueline A; Wilce, Matthew C J

    2012-06-01

    Poly-C-binding proteins are triple KH (hnRNP K homology) domain proteins with specificity for single stranded C-rich RNA and DNA. They play diverse roles in the regulation of protein expression at both transcriptional and translational levels. Here, we analyse the contributions of individual αCP1 KH domains to binding C-rich oligonucleotides using biophysical and structural methods. Using surface plasmon resonance (SPR), we demonstrate that KH1 makes the most stable interactions with both RNA and DNA, KH3 binds with intermediate affinity and KH2 only interacts detectibly with DNA. The crystal structure of KH1 bound to a 5'-CCCTCCCT-3' DNA sequence shows a 2:1 protein:DNA stoichiometry and demonstrates a molecular arrangement of KH domains bound to immediately adjacent oligonucleotide target sites. SPR experiments, with a series of poly-C-sequences reveals that cytosine is preferred at all four positions in the oligonucleotide binding cleft and that a C-tetrad binds KH1 with 10 times higher affinity than a C-triplet. The basis for this high affinity interaction is finally detailed with the structure determination of a KH1.W.C54S mutant bound to 5'-ACCCCA-3' DNA sequence. Together, these data establish the lead role of KH1 in oligonucleotide binding by αCP1 and reveal the molecular basis of its specificity for a C-rich tetrad.

  2. On the Role of Internal Water on Protein Thermal Stability: the Case of Homologous G-domains

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rahaman, Obaidur; Kalimeri, Maria; Melchionna, Simone; Hénin, Jérôme; Sterpone, Fabio

    2016-01-01

    In this work we address the question whether the enhanced stability of thermophilic proteins has a direct connection with internal hydration. Our model systems are two homologues G-domains of different stability: the mesophilic G domain of the Elongation-Factor thermal unstable protein from E. coli and the hyperthermophilic G domain of the EF-α protein from S. solfataricus. Using molecular dynamics simulation at the microsecond time-scale we show that both proteins host water molecules in internal cavities and that these molecules exchange with the external solution in the nanosecond time scale. The hydration free energy of these sites evaluated via extensive calculations is found to be favourable for both systems, with the hyperthermophilic protein offering a slightly more favourable environment to host water molecules. We estimate that under ambient conditions, the free energy gain due to internal hydration is about 1.3 kcal/mol in favor of the hyperthermophilic variant. However, we also find that at the high working temperature of the hyperthermophile, the cavities are rather dehydrated, meaning that at extreme conditions other molecular factors secure the stability of the protein. Interestingly, we detect a clear correlation between the hydration of internal cavities and the protein conformational landscape. The emerging picture is that internal hydration is an effective observable to probe the conformational landscape of proteins. In the specific context of our investigation, the analysis confirms that the hyperthermophilic G-domain is characterized by multiple states and it has a more flexible structure than its mesophilic homologue. PMID:25317828

  3. Plant homologs of mammalian MBT-domain protein-regulated KDM1 histone lysine demethylases do not interact with plant Tudor/PWWP/MBT-domain proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sadiq, Irfan; Keren, Ido; Citovsky, Vitaly

    2016-02-19

    Histone lysine demethylases of the LSD1/KDM1 family play important roles in epigenetic regulation of eukaryotic chromatin, and they are conserved between plants and animals. Mammalian LSD1 is thought to be targeted to its substrates, i.e., methylated histones, by an MBT-domain protein SFMBT1 that represents a component of the LSD1-based repressor complex and binds methylated histones. Because MBT-domain proteins are conserved between different organisms, from animals to plants, we examined whether the KDM1-type histone lysine demethylases KDM1C and FLD of Arabidopsis interact with the Arabidopsis Tudor/PWWP/MBT-domain SFMBT1-like proteins SL1, SL2, SL3, and SL4. No such interaction was detected using the bimolecular fluorescence complementation assay in living plant cells. Thus, plants most likely direct their KDM1 chromatin-modifying enzymes to methylated histones of the target chromatin by a mechanism different from that employed by the mammalian cells.

  4. Crystal Structure of the Cytoplasmic N-Terminal Domain of Subunit I, a Homolog of Subunit a, of V-ATPase

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Srinivasan, Sankaranarayanan; Vyas, Nand K.; Baker, Matthew L.; Quiocho, Florante A. (Baylor)

    2012-02-27

    Subunit 'a' is associated with the membrane-bound (VO) complex of eukaryotic vacuolar H{sup +}-ATPase acidification machinery. It has also been shown recently to be involved in diverse membrane fusion/secretory functions independent of acidification. Here, we report the crystal structure of the N-terminal cytosolic domain from the Meiothermus ruber subunit 'I' homolog of subunit a. The structure is composed of a curved long central {alpha}-helix bundle capped on both ends by two lobes with similar {alpha}/{beta} architecture. Based on the structure, a reasonable model of its eukaryotic subunit a counterpart was obtained. The crystal structure and model fit well into reconstructions from electron microscopy of prokaryotic and eukaryotic vacuolar H{sup +}-ATPases, respectively, clarifying their orientations and interactions and revealing features that could enable subunit a to play a role in membrane fusion/secretion.

  5. A role for the malignant brain tumour (MBT domain protein LIN-61 in DNA double-strand break repair by homologous recombination.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nicholas M Johnson

    Full Text Available Malignant brain tumour (MBT domain proteins are transcriptional repressors that function within Polycomb complexes. Some MBT genes are tumour suppressors, but how they prevent tumourigenesis is unknown. The Caenorhabditis elegans MBT protein LIN-61 is a member of the synMuvB chromatin-remodelling proteins that control vulval development. Here we report a new role for LIN-61: it protects the genome by promoting homologous recombination (HR for the repair of DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs. lin-61 mutants manifest numerous problems associated with defective HR in germ and somatic cells but remain proficient in meiotic recombination. They are hypersensitive to ionizing radiation and interstrand crosslinks but not UV light. Using a novel reporter system that monitors repair of a defined DSB in C. elegans somatic cells, we show that LIN-61 contributes to HR. The involvement of this MBT protein in HR raises the possibility that MBT-deficient tumours may also have defective DSB repair.

  6. Conditional Knockout of Src Homology 2 Domain-containing Protein Tyrosine Phosphatase-2 in Myeloid Cells Attenuates Renal Fibrosis after Unilateral Ureter Obstruction

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jing-Fei Teng; Kai Wang; Yao Li; Fa-Jun Qu; Qing Yuan; Xin-Gang Cui; Quan-Xing Wang

    2015-01-01

    Background:Src homology 2 domain-containing protein tyrosine phosphatase-2 (SHP-2) is a kind of intracellular protein tyrosine phosphatase.Studies have revealed its roles in various disease,however,whether SHP-2 involves in renal fibrosis remains unclear.The aim of this study was to explore the roles of myeloid cells SHP-2 in renal interstitial fibrosis.Methods:Myeloid cells SHP-2 gene was conditionally knocked-out (CKO) in mice using loxP-Cre system,and renal interstitial fibrosis was induced by unilateral ureter obstruction (UUO).The total collagen deposition in the renal interstitium was assessed using picrosirius red stain.F4/80 immunostaing was used to evaluate macrophage infiltration in renal tubular interstitium.Quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction and enzyme linked immunosorbent assay were used to analyze the production of cytokines in the kidney.Transferase-mediated dUTP nick-end labeling stain was used to assess the apoptotic renal tubular epithelial cells.Results:Src homology 2 domain-containing protein tyrosine phosphatase-2 gene CKO in myeloid cells significantly reduced collagen deposition in the renal interstitium after UUO.Macrophage infiltration was evidently decreased in renal tubular interstitium of SHP-2 CKO mice.Meanwhile,the production of pro-inflammatory cytokines was significantly suppressed in SHP-2 CKO mice.However,no significant difference was observed in the number of apoptotic renal tubular epithelial cells between wild-type and SHP-2 CKO mice.Conclusions:Our observations suggested that SHP-2 in myeloid cells plays a pivotal role in the pathogenesis of renal fibrosis,and that silencing of SHP-2 gene in myeloid cells may protect renal from inflammatory damage and prevent renal fibrosis after renal injury.

  7. Eps15 homology domain containing protein of Plasmodium falciparum (PfEHD) associates with endocytosis and vesicular trafficking towards neutral lipid storage site.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thakur, Vandana; Asad, Mohd; Jain, Shaifali; Hossain, Mohammad E; Gupta, Akanksha; Kaur, Inderjeet; Rathore, Sumit; Ali, Shakir; Khan, Nida J; Mohmmed, Asif

    2015-11-01

    The human malaria parasite, Plasmodium falciparum, takes up numerous host cytosolic components and exogenous nutrients through endocytosis during the intra-erythrocytic stages. Eps15 homology domain-containing proteins (EHDs) are conserved NTPases, which are implicated in membrane remodeling and regulation of specific endocytic transport steps in eukaryotic cells. In the present study, we have characterized the dynamin-like C-terminal Eps15 homology domain containing protein of P. falciparum (PfEHD). Using a GFP-targeting approach, we studied localization and trafficking of PfEHD in the parasite. The PfEHD-GFP fusion protein was found to be a membrane bound protein that associates with vesicular network in the parasite. Time-lapse microscopy studies showed that these vesicles originate at parasite plasma membrane, migrate through the parasite cytosol and culminate into a large multi-vesicular like structure near the food-vacuole. Co-staining of food vacuole membrane showed that the multi-vesicular structure is juxtaposed but outside the food vacuole. Labeling of parasites with neutral lipid specific dye, Nile Red, showed that this large structure is neutral lipid storage site in the parasites. Proteomic analysis identified endocytosis modulators as PfEHD associated proteins in the parasites. Treatment of parasites with endocytosis inhibitors obstructed the development of PfEHD-labeled vesicles and blocked their targeting to the lipid storage site. Overall, our data suggests that the PfEHD is involved in endocytosis and plays a role in the generation of endocytic vesicles at the parasite plasma membrane, that are subsequently targeted to the neutral lipid generation/storage site localized near the food vacuole.

  8. A Minimal Rac Activation Domain in the Unconventional Guanine Nucleotide Exchange Factor Dock180†

    OpenAIRE

    Xin WU; Ramachandran, Sekar; Cerione, Richard A.; Erickson, Jon W.

    2011-01-01

    Guanine nucleotide exchange factors (GEFs) activate Rho GTPases by catalyzing the exchange of bound GDP for GTP, thereby resulting in downstream effector recognition. Two metazoan families of GEFs have been described: Dbl-GEF family members that share conserved Dbl homology (DH) and Pleckstrin homology (PH) domains and the more recently described Dock180 family members that share little sequence homology with the Dbl family and are characterized by conserved Dock homology regions 1 and 2 (DHR...

  9. A Ferredoxin- and F420H2-Dependent, Electron-Bifurcating, Heterodisulfide Reductase with Homologs in the Domains Bacteria and Archaea

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Zhen

    2017-01-01

    ABSTRACT Heterodisulfide reductases (Hdr) of the HdrABC class are ancient enzymes and a component of the anaerobic core belonging to the prokaryotic common ancestor. The ancient origin is consistent with the widespread occurrence of genes encoding putative HdrABC homologs in metabolically diverse prokaryotes predicting diverse physiological functions; however, only one HdrABC has been characterized and that was from a narrow metabolic group of obligate CO2-reducing methanogenic anaerobes (methanogens) from the domain Archaea. Here we report the biochemical characterization of an HdrABC homolog (HdrA2B2C2) from the acetate-utilizing methanogen Methanosarcina acetivorans with unusual properties structurally and functionally distinct from the only other HdrABC characterized. Homologs of the HdrA2B2C2 archetype are present in phylogenetically and metabolically diverse species from the domains Bacteria and Archaea. The expression of the individual HdrA2, HdrB2, and HdrB2C2 enzymes in Escherichia coli, and reconstitution of an active HdrA2B2C2 complex, revealed an intersubunit electron transport pathway dependent on ferredoxin or coenzyme F420 (F420H2) as an electron donor. Remarkably, HdrA2B2C2 couples the previously unknown endergonic oxidation of F420H2 and reduction of ferredoxin with the exergonic oxidation of F420H2 and reduction of the heterodisulfide of coenzyme M and coenzyme B (CoMS-SCoB). The unique electron bifurcation predicts a role for HdrA2B2C2 in Fe(III)-dependent anaerobic methane oxidation (ANME) by M. acetivorans and uncultured species from ANME environments. HdrA2B2C2, ubiquitous in acetotrophic methanogens, was shown to participate in electron transfer during acetotrophic growth of M. acetivorans and proposed to be essential for growth in the environment when acetate is limiting. PMID:28174314

  10. Mechanistic heterogeneity in site recognition by the structurally homologous DNA-binding domains of the ETS family transcription factors Ets-1 and PU.1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Shuo; Linde, Miles H; Munde, Manoj; Carvalho, Victor D; Wilson, W David; Poon, Gregory M K

    2014-08-01

    ETS family transcription factors regulate diverse genes through binding at cognate DNA sites that overlap substantially in sequence. The DNA-binding domains of ETS proteins (ETS domains) are highly conserved structurally yet share limited amino acid homology. To define the mechanistic implications of sequence diversity within the ETS family, we characterized the thermodynamics and kinetics of DNA site recognition by the ETS domains of Ets-1 and PU.1, which represent the extremes in amino acid divergence among ETS proteins. Even though the two ETS domains bind their optimal sites with similar affinities under physiologic conditions, their nature of site recognition differs strikingly in terms of the role of hydration and counter ion release. The data suggest two distinct mechanisms wherein Ets-1 follows a "dry" mechanism that rapidly parses sites through electrostatic interactions and direct protein-DNA contacts, whereas PU.1 utilizes hydration to interrogate sequence-specific sites and form a long-lived complex relative to the Ets-1 counterpart. The kinetic persistence of the high affinity PU.1 · DNA complex may be relevant to an emerging role of PU.1, but not Ets-1, as a pioneer transcription factor in vivo. In addition, PU.1 activity is critical to the development and function of macrophages and lymphocytes, which present osmotically variable environments, and hydration-dependent specificity may represent an important regulatory mechanism in vivo, a hypothesis that finds support in gene expression profiles of primary murine macrophages. © 2014 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  11. The S-layer homology domain-containing protein SlhA from Paenibacillus alvei CCM 2051(T is important for swarming and biofilm formation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bettina Janesch

    Full Text Available Swarming and biofilm formation have been studied for a variety of bacteria. While this is well investigated for Gram-negative bacteria, less is known about Gram-positive bacteria, including Paenibacillus alvei, a secondary invader of diseased honeybee colonies infected with Melissococcus pluton, the causative agent of European foulbrood (EFB.Paenibacillus alvei CCM 2051(T is a Gram-positive bacterium which was recently shown to employ S-layer homology (SLH domains as cell wall targeting modules to display proteins on its cell surface. This study deals with the newly identified 1335-amino acid protein SlhA from P. alvei which carries at the C‑terminus three consecutive SLH-motifs containing the predicted binding sequences SRGE, VRQD, and LRGD instead of the common TRAE motif. Based on the proof of cell surface location of SlhA by fluorescence microscopy using a SlhA-GFP chimera, the binding mechanism was investigated in an in vitro assay. To unravel a putative function of the SlhA protein, a knockout mutant was constructed. Experimental data indicated that one SLH domain is sufficient for anchoring of SlhA to the cell surface, and the SLH domains of SlhA recognize both the peptidoglycan and the secondary cell wall polymer in vitro. This is in agreement with previous data from the S-layer protein SpaA, pinpointing a wider utilization of that mechanism for cell surface display of proteins in P. alvei. Compared to the wild-type bacterium ΔslhA revealed changed colony morphology, loss of swarming motility and impaired biofilm formation. The phenotype was similar to that of the flagella knockout Δhag, possibly due to reduced EPS production influencing the functionality of the flagella of ΔslhA.This study demonstrates the involvement of the SLH domain-containing protein SlhA in swarming and biofilm formation of P. alvei CCM 2051(T.

  12. Characterization of phosphopeptide motifs specific for the Src homology 2 domains of signal transducer and activator of transcription 1 (STAT1) and STAT3.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wiederkehr-Adam, Michèle; Ernst, Philipp; Müller, Kurt; Bieck, Elke; Gombert, Frank O; Ottl, Johannes; Graff, Patrick; Grossmüller, Fred; Heim, Markus H

    2003-05-02

    Signal transducers and activators of transcription (STAT) 1 and STAT3 are activated by overlapping but distinct sets of cytokines. STATs are recruited to the different cytokine receptors through their Src homology (SH) 2 domains that make highly specific interactions with phosphotyrosine-docking sites on the receptors. We used a degenerate phosphopeptide library synthesized on 35-microm TentaGel beads and fluorescence-activated bead sorting to determine the sequence specificity of the peptide-binding sites of the SH2 domains of STAT1 and STAT3. The large bead library allowed not only peptide sequencing of pools of beads but also of single beads. The method was validated through surface plasmon resonance measurements of the affinities of different peptides to the STAT SH2 domains. Furthermore, when selected peptides were attached to a truncated erythropoietin receptor and stably expressed in DA3 cells, activation of STAT1 or STAT3 could be achieved by stimulation with erythropoietin. The combined analysis of pool sequencing, the individual peptide sequences, and plasmon resonance measurements allowed the definition of SH2 domain binding motifs. STAT1 preferentially binds peptides with the motif phosphotyrosine-(aspartic acid/glutamic acid)-(proline/arginine)-(arginine/proline/glutamine), whereby a negatively charged amino acid at +1 excludes a proline at +2 and vice versa. STAT3 preferentially binds peptides with the motif phosphotyrosine-(basic or hydrophobic)-(proline or basic)-glutamine. For both STAT1 and STAT3, specific high affinity phosphopeptides were identified that can be used for the design of inhibitory molecules.

  13. Homology modelling of the core domain of the endogenous lectin comitin: structural basis for its mannose-binding specificity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barre, A; Van Damme, E J; Peumans, W J; Rougé, P

    1999-03-01

    The N-terminal core domain of comitin from the slime mold Dictyostelium discoideum has been modelled from the X-ray coordinates of the monocot mannose-binding lectin from snowdrop (Galanthus nivalis). Docking experiments performed on the three-dimensional model showed that two of the three mannose-binding sites of the comitin monomer are functional. They are located at both ends of the comitin dimer whereas the actin-interacting region occurs in the central hinge region where both monomers are non covalently associated. This distribution is fully consistent with the bifunctional character of comitin which is believed to link the Golgi vesicles exhibiting mannosylated membrane glycans to the actin cytoskeleton in the cell.

  14. Adaptor protein containing PH domain, PTB domain and leucine zipper (APPL1) regulates the protein level of EGFR by modulating its trafficking

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Jae-Rin; Hahn, Hwa-Sun; Kim, Young-Hoon; Nguyen, Hong-Hoa [Department of Molecular Cell Biology, Center for Molecular Medicine, Samsung Biomedical Research Institute, Sungkyunkwan University School of Medicine, Suwon 440-746 (Korea, Republic of); Yang, Jun-Mo [Department of Dermatology, Sungkyunkwan University School of Medicine, Samsung Medical Center, Seoul 135-710 (Korea, Republic of); Kang, Jong-Sun, E-mail: kangj01@skku.edu [Department of Molecular Cell Biology, Center for Molecular Medicine, Samsung Biomedical Research Institute, Sungkyunkwan University School of Medicine, Suwon 440-746 (Korea, Republic of); Hahn, Myong-Joon, E-mail: hahnmj@skku.edu [Department of Molecular Cell Biology, Center for Molecular Medicine, Samsung Biomedical Research Institute, Sungkyunkwan University School of Medicine, Suwon 440-746 (Korea, Republic of)

    2011-11-11

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer APPL1 regulates the protein level of EGFR in response to EGF stimulation. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Depletion of APPL1 accelerates the movement of EGF/EGFR from the cell surface to the perinuclear region in response to EGF. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Knockdown of APPL1 enhances the activity of Rab5. -- Abstract: The EGFR-mediated signaling pathway regulates multiple biological processes such as cell proliferation, survival and differentiation. Previously APPL1 (adaptor protein containing PH domain, PTB domain and leucine zipper 1) has been reported to function as a downstream effector of EGF-initiated signaling. Here we demonstrate that APPL1 regulates EGFR protein levels in response to EGF stimulation. Overexpression of APPL1 enhances EGFR stabilization while APPL1 depletion by siRNA reduces EGFR protein levels. APPL1 depletion accelerates EGFR internalization and movement of EGF/EGFR from cell surface to the perinuclear region in response to EGF treatment. Conversely, overexpression of APPL1 decelerates EGFR internalization and translocation of EGF/EGFR to the perinuclear region. Furthermore, APPL1 depletion enhances the activity of Rab5 which is involved in internalization and trafficking of EGFR and inhibition of Rab5 in APPL1-depleted cells restored EGFR levels. Consistently, APPL1 depletion reduced activation of Akt, the downstream signaling effector of EGFR and this is restored by inhibition of Rab5. These findings suggest that APPL1 is required for EGFR signaling by regulation of EGFR stabilities through inhibition of Rab5.

  15. Conformational response of influenza A M2 transmembrane domain to amantadine drug binding at low pH (pH 5.5

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elka R. Georgieva

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available The M2 protein from influenza A plays important roles in its viral cycle. It contains a single transmembrane helix, which oligomerizes into a homotetrameric proton channel that conducts in the low-pH environment of the host-cell endosome and Golgi apparatus, leading to virion uncoating at an early stage of infection. We studied conformational rearrangements that occur in the M2 core transmembrane domain residing on the lipid bilayer, flanked by juxtamembrane residues (M2TMD21-49 fragment, upon its interaction with amantadine drug at pH 5.5 when M2 is conductive. We also tested the role of specific mutation and lipid chain length. Electron spin resonance (ESR spectroscopy and electron microscopy were applied to M2TMD21-49, labeled at the residue L46C with either nitroxide spin-label or Nanogold® reagent, respectively. Electron microscopy confirmed that M2TMD21-49 reconstituted into DOPC/POPS at 1:10,000 peptide-to-lipid molar ratio (P/L either with or without amantadine, is an admixture of monomers, dimers, and tetramers, confirming our model based on a dimer intermediate in the assembly of M2TMD21-49. As reported by double electron-electron resonance (DEER, in DOPC/POPS membranes amantadine shifts oligomer equilibrium to favor tetramers, as evidenced by an increase in DEER modulation depth for P/L’s ranging from 1:18,000 to 1:160. Furthermore, amantadine binding shortens the inter-spin distances (for nitroxide labels by 5-8 Å, indicating drug induced channel closure on the C-terminal side. No such effect was observed for the thinner membrane of DLPC/DLPS, emphasizing the role of bilayer thickness. The analysis of continuous wave (cw ESR spectra of spin-labeled L46C residue provides additional support to a more compact helix bundle in amantadine-bound M2TMD21-49 through increased motional ordering. In contrast to wild-type M2TMD21-49, the amantadine-bound form does not exhibit noticeable conformational changes in the case of G34A mutation

  16. Reverse genetics generation of chimeric infectious Junin/Lassa virus is dependent on interaction of homologous glycoprotein stable signal peptide and G2 cytoplasmic domains.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Albariño, César G; Bird, Brian H; Chakrabarti, Ayan K; Dodd, Kimberly A; White, David M; Bergeron, Eric; Shrivastava-Ranjan, Punya; Nichol, Stuart T

    2011-01-01

    The Arenaviridae are a diverse and globally distributed collection of viruses that are maintained primarily by rodent reservoirs. Junin virus (JUNV) and Lassa virus (LASV) can both cause significant outbreaks of severe and often fatal human disease throughout their respective areas of endemicity. In an effort to improve upon the existing live attenuated JUNV Candid1 vaccine, we generated a genetically homogenous stock of this virus from cDNA copies of the virus S and L segments by using a reverse genetics system. Further, these cDNAs were used in combination with LASV cDNAs to successfully generate two recombinant Candid1 JUNV/LASV chimeric viruses (via envelope glycoprotein [GPC] exchange). It was found that while the GPC extravirion domains were readily exchangeable, homologous stable signal peptide (SSP) and G2 transmembrane and cytoplasmic tail domains were essential for correct GPC maturation and production of infectious chimeric viruses. The switching of the JUNV and LASV G1/G2 ectodomains within the Candid1 vaccine background did not alter the attenuated phenotype of the vaccine strain in a lethal mouse model. These recombinant chimeric viruses shed light on the fundamental requirements of arenavirus GPC maturation and may serve as a strategy for the development of bivalent JUNV and LASV vaccine candidates.

  17. Gene transfer and expression in human neutrophils. The phox homology domain of p47phox translocates to the plasma membrane but not to the membrane of mature phagosomes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brzezinska Agnieszka A

    2006-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Neutrophils are non-dividing cells with poor survival after isolation. Consequently, exogenous gene expression in neutrophils is challenging. We report here the transfection of genes and expression of active proteins in human primary peripheral neutrophils using nucleofection. Results Exogenous gene expression in human neutrophils was achieved 2 h post-transfection. We show that neutrophils transfected by nucleofection are functional cells, able to respond to soluble and particulate stimuli. They conserved the ability to undergo physiological processes including phagocytosis. Using this technique, we were able to show that the phox homology (PX domain of p47phox localizes to the plasma membrane in human neutrophils. We also show that RhoB, but not the PX domain of p47phox, is translocated to the membrane of mature phagosomes. Conclusion We demonstrated that cDNA transfer and expression of exogenous protein in human neutrophils is compatible with cell viability and is no longer a limitation for the study of protein function in human neutrophils.

  18. Hydroxylation of aspartic acid in domains homologous to the epidermal growth factor precursor is catalyzed by a 2-oxoglutarate-dependent dioxygenase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stenflo, J; Holme, E; Lindstedt, S; Chandramouli, N; Huang, L H; Tam, J P; Merrifield, R B

    1989-01-01

    3-Hydroxyaspartic acid and 3-hydroxyasparagine are two rare amino acids that are present in domains homologous to the epidermal growth factor precursor in vitamin K-dependent plasma proteins as well as in proteins that do not require vitamin K for normal biosynthesis. They are formed by posttranslational hydroxylation of aspartic acid and asparagine, respectively. The first epidermal growth factor-like domain in factor IX (residues 45-87) was synthesized with aspartic acid in position 64, replacing 3-hydroxyaspartic acid. It was used as substrate in a hydroxylase assay with rat liver microsomes as the source of enzyme and reaction conditions that satisfy the requirements of 2-oxoglutarate-dependent dioxygenases. The synthetic peptide stimulated the 2-oxoglutarate decarboxylation in contrast to synthetic, modified epidermal growth factor (Met-21 and His-22 deleted and Glu-24 replaced by Asp) and synthetic peptides corresponding to residues 60-71 in human factor IX. This indicates that the hydroxylase is a 2-oxoglutarate-dependent dioxygenase with a selective substrate requirement. Images PMID:2492106

  19. Rescue of amyloid-Beta-induced inhibition of nicotinic acetylcholine receptors by a peptide homologous to the nicotine binding domain of the alpha 7 subtype.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arthur A Nery

    Full Text Available Alzheimer's disease (AD is characterized by brain accumulation of the neurotoxic amyloid-β peptide (Aβ and by loss of cholinergic neurons and nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChRs. Recent evidence indicates that memory loss and cognitive decline in AD correlate better with the amount of soluble Aβ than with the extent of amyloid plaque deposits in affected brains. Inhibition of nAChRs by soluble Aβ40 is suggested to contribute to early cholinergic dysfunction in AD. Using phage display screening, we have previously identified a heptapeptide, termed IQ, homologous to most nAChR subtypes, binding with nanomolar affinity to soluble Aβ40 and blocking Aβ-induced inhibition of carbamylcholine-induced currents in PC12 cells expressing α7 nAChRs. Using alanine scanning mutagenesis and whole-cell current recording, we have now defined the amino acids in IQ essential for reversal of Aβ40 inhibition of carbamylcholine-induced responses in PC12 cells, mediated by α7 subtypes and other endogenously expressed nAChRs. We further investigated the effects of soluble Aβ, IQ and analogues of IQ on α3β4 nAChRs recombinantly expressed in HEK293 cells. Results show that nanomolar concentrations of soluble Aβ40 potently inhibit the function of α3β4 nAChRs, and that subsequent addition of IQ or its analogues does not reverse this effect. However, co-application of IQ makes the inhibition of α3β4 nAChRs by Aβ40 reversible. These findings indicate that Aβ40 inhibits different subtypes of nAChRs by interacting with specific receptor domains homologous to the IQ peptide, suggesting that IQ may be a lead for novel drugs to block the inhibition of cholinergic function in AD.

  20. Role of a novel PH-kinase domain interface in PKB/Akt regulation: structural mechanism for allosteric inhibition.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Véronique Calleja

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Protein kinase B (PKB/Akt belongs to the AGC superfamily of related serine/threonine protein kinases. It is a key regulator downstream of various growth factors and hormones and is involved in malignant transformation and chemo-resistance. Full-length PKB protein has not been crystallised, thus studying the molecular mechanisms that are involved in its regulation in relation to its structure have not been simple. Recently, the dynamics between the inactive and active conformer at the molecular level have been described. The maintenance of PKB's inactive state via the interaction of the PH and kinase domains prevents its activation loop to be phosphorylated by its upstream activator, phosphoinositide-dependent protein kinase-1 (PDK1. By using a multidisciplinary approach including molecular modelling, classical biochemical assays, and Förster resonance energy transfer (FRET/two-photon fluorescence lifetime imaging microscopy (FLIM, a detailed model depicting the interaction between the different domains of PKB in its inactive conformation was demonstrated. These findings in turn clarified the molecular mechanism of PKB inhibition by AKT inhibitor VIII (a specific allosteric inhibitor and illustrated at the molecular level its selectivity towards different PKB isoforms. Furthermore, these findings allude to the possible function of the C-terminus in sustaining the inactive conformer of PKB. This study presents essential insights into the quaternary structure of PKB in its inactive conformation. An understanding of PKB structure in relation to its function is critical for elucidating its mode of activation and discovering how to modulate its activity. The molecular mechanism of inhibition of PKB activation by the specific drug AKT inhibitor VIII has critical implications for determining the mechanism of inhibition of other allosteric inhibitors and for opening up opportunities for the design of new generations of modulator drugs.

  1. Cellular delivery and photochemical release of a caged inositol-pyrophosphate induces PH-domain translocation in cellulo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pavlovic, Igor; Thakor, Divyeshsinh T; Vargas, Jessica R; McKinlay, Colin J; Hauke, Sebastian; Anstaett, Philipp; Camuña, Rafael C; Bigler, Laurent; Gasser, Gilles; Schultz, Carsten; Wender, Paul A; Jessen, Henning J

    2016-02-04

    Inositol pyrophosphates, such as diphospho-myo-inositol pentakisphosphates (InsP7), are an important family of signalling molecules, implicated in many cellular processes and therapeutic indications including insulin secretion, glucose homeostasis and weight gain. To understand their cellular functions, chemical tools such as photocaged analogues for their real-time modulation in cells are required. Here we describe a concise, modular synthesis of InsP7 and caged InsP7. The caged molecule is stable and releases InsP7 only on irradiation. While photocaged InsP7 does not enter cells, its cellular uptake is achieved using nanoparticles formed by association with a guanidinium-rich molecular transporter. This novel synthesis and unprecedented polyphosphate delivery strategy enable the first studies required to understand InsP7 signalling in cells with controlled spatiotemporal resolution. It is shown herein that cytoplasmic photouncaging of InsP7 leads to translocation of the PH-domain of Akt, an important signalling-node kinase involved in glucose homeostasis, from the membrane into the cytoplasm.

  2. The expression of the imprinted gene pleckstrin homology-like domain family A member 2 in placental tissues of preeclampsia and its effects on the proliferation, migration and invasion of trophoblast cells JEG-3.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jin, Feng; Qiao, Chong; Luan, Nannan; Shang, Tao

    2015-11-01

    Preeclampsia (PE) is one of the most common hypertensive disorders and is a leading cause of morbidity and mortality for pregnant women and perinatal babies. Additionally, pleckstrin homology-like domain family A member 2 (PHLDA2) is associated with placental dysfunction. However, the effect of PHLDA2 on trophoblast cell proliferation, migration and invasion has not been investigated. In this study, 15 PE patients and 15 normal pregnant women were recruited and clinical characteristics were summarized. Pleckstrin homology-like domain family A member 2 levels in placental tissues were examined using real-time PCR and western blot. Overexpression plasmid and PHLDA2 siRNA was introduced into JEG-3 cells, respectively. Cell proliferation was measured using MTT assay and flow cytometry. Cell migration and invasion capacities were assessed by wound healing and Transwell assays. It was found that PE patients collectively presented proteinuria, elevated systolic blood pressure (SBP) and diastolic blood pressure (DBP), and lower gestational ages and birth weights. Pleckstrin homology-like domain family A member 2 levels in the preeclamptic placenta were significantly upregulated. Pleckstrin homology-like domain family A member 2 overexpression significantly arrested cells in the G0/G1 phase, inhibited cell proliferation and suppressed the migration and invasion of JEG-3 cells. Pleckstrin homology-like domain family A member 2 knockdown significantly blocked the cells in the S phase of the cell cycle. Knockdown of PHLDA2 alleviated the inhibition on the migration and invasion of trophoblast cells JEG-3. These findings illustrate that PHLDA2 may participate in PE pathogenesis and indicate its potential application in the early diagnosis of PE. © 2015 Wiley Publishing Asia Pty Ltd.

  3. Polymorphisms of clip domain serine proteinase and serine proteinase homolog in the swimming crab Portunus trituberculatus and their association with Vibrio alginolyticus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Meng; Liu, Yuan; Hui, Min; Song, Chengwen; Cui, Zhaoxia

    2016-05-01

    Clip domain serine proteases (cSPs) and their homologs (SPHs) play an important role in various biological processes that are essential components of extracellular signaling cascades, especially in the innate immune responses of invertebrates. Here, polymorphisms of PtcSP and PtSPH from the swimming crab Portunus trituberculatus were investigated to explore their association with resistance/ susceptibility to Vibrio alginolyticus. Polymorphic loci were identified using Clustal X, and characterized with SPSS 16.0 software, and then the significance of genotype and allele frequencies between resistant and susceptible stocks was determined by a χ2 test. A total of 109 and 77 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) were identified in the genomic fragments of PtcSP and PtSPH, respectively. Notably, nearly half of PtSPH polymorphisms were found in the non-coding exon 1. Fourteen SNPs investigated were significantly associated with susceptibility/resistance to V. alginolyticus (P<0.05). Among them, eight SNPs were observed in introns, and one synonymous, four non-synonymous SNPs and one ins-del were found in coding exons. In addition, five simple sequence repeats (SSRs) were detected in intron 3 of PtcSP. Although there was no statistically significant difference of allele frequencies, the SSRs showed different polymorphic alleles on the basis of the repeat number between resistant and susceptible stocks. After further validation, polymorphisms investigated here might be applied to select potential molecular markers of P. trituberculatus with resistance to V. alginolyticus.

  4. Polymorphisms of clip domain serine proteinase and serine proteinase homolog in the swimming crab Portunus trituberculatus and their association with Vibrio alginolyticus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Meng; Liu, Yuan; Hui, Min; Song, Chengwen; Cui, Zhaoxia

    2017-03-01

    Clip domain serine proteases (cSPs) and their homologs (SPHs) play an important role in various biological processes that are essential components of extracellular signaling cascades, especially in the innate immune responses of invertebrates. Here, polymorphisms of PtcSP and PtSPH from the swimming crab Portunus trituberculatus were investigated to explore their association with resistance/susceptibility to Vibrio alginolyticus. Polymorphic loci were identified using Clustal X, and characterized with SPSS 16.0 software, and then the significance of genotype and allele frequencies between resistant and susceptible stocks was determined by a χ 2 test. A total of 109 and 77 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) were identified in the genomic fragments of PtcSP and PtSPH, respectively. Notably, nearly half of PtSPH polymorphisms were found in the non-coding exon 1. Fourteen SNPs investigated were significantly associated with susceptibility/resistance to V. alginolyticus ( P <0.05). Among them, eight SNPs were observed in introns, and one synonymous, four non-synonymous SNPs and one ins-del were found in coding exons. In addition, five simple sequence repeats (SSRs) were detected in intron 3 of PtcSP. Although there was no statistically significant difference of allele frequencies, the SSRs showed different polymorphic alleles on the basis of the repeat number between resistant and susceptible stocks. After further validation, polymorphisms investigated here might be applied to select potential molecular markers of P. trituberculatus with resistance to V. alginolyticus.

  5. Oligomerization of DH Domain Is Essential for Dbl-Induced Transformation

    OpenAIRE

    Zhu, Kejin; Debreceni, Balazs; Bi, Feng; Zheng, Yi

    2001-01-01

    The dbl oncogene product (onco-Dbl) is the prototype member of a family of guanine nucleotide exchange factors (GEFs) for Rho GTPases. The Dbl homology (DH) domain of onco-Dbl is responsible for the GEF catalytic activity, and the DH domain, together with the immediately adjacent pleckstrin homology (PH) domain, constitutes the minimum module bearing transforming function. In the present study, we demonstrate that the onco-Dbl protein exists in oligomeric form in vitro and in cells. The oligo...

  6. Effect of pH on the structure of the recombinant C-terminal domain of Nephila clavipes dragline silk protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gauthier, Martin; Leclerc, Jérémie; Lefèvre, Thierry; Gagné, Stéphane M; Auger, Michèle

    2014-12-08

    Spider silk proteins undergo a complex series of molecular events before being converted into an outstanding hierarchically organized fiber. Recent literature has underlined the crucial role of the C-terminal domain in silk protein stability and fiber formation. However, the effect of pH remains to be clarified. We have thus developed an efficient purification protocol to obtain stable native-like recombinant MaSp1 C-terminal domain of Nephila clavipes (NCCTD). Its structure was investigated as a function of pH using circular dichroism, fluorescence and solution NMR spectroscopy. The results show that the NCCTD structure is very sensitive to pH and suggest that a molten globule state occurs at pH 5.0 and below. Electronic microscopy images also indicate fiber formation at low pH and coarser globular particles at more basic pH. The results are consistent with a spinning process model where the NCCTD acts as an aggregation nucleus favoring the β-aggregation of the hydrophobic polyalanine repeats upon spinning.

  7. Domain Modeling: NP_001035207.1 [SAHG[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available NP_001035207.1 chr11 Pleckstrin-homology domain (PH domain) c1u2ba_ chr11/NP_001035207.1/NP_001035207....1_apo_1279-1403.pdb d1fgya_ chr11/NP_001035207.1/NP_001035207.1_holo_1279-1403.pdb psi-bl

  8. Eps15 Homology Domain-containing Protein 3 Regulates Cardiac T-type Ca2+ Channel Targeting and Function in the Atria*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Curran, Jerry; Musa, Hassan; Kline, Crystal F.; Makara, Michael A.; Little, Sean C.; Higgins, John D.; Hund, Thomas J.; Band, Hamid; Mohler, Peter J.

    2015-01-01

    Proper trafficking of membrane-bound ion channels and transporters is requisite for normal cardiac function. Endosome-based protein trafficking of membrane-bound ion channels and transporters in the heart is poorly understood, particularly in vivo. In fact, for select cardiac cell types such as atrial myocytes, virtually nothing is known regarding endosomal transport. We previously linked the C-terminal Eps15 homology domain-containing protein 3 (EHD3) with endosome-based protein trafficking in ventricular cardiomyocytes. Here we sought to define the roles and membrane protein targets for EHD3 in atria. We identify the voltage-gated T-type Ca2+ channels (CaV3.1, CaV3.2) as substrates for EHD3-dependent trafficking in atria. Mice selectively lacking EHD3 in heart display reduced expression and targeting of both Cav3.1 and CaV3.2 in the atria. Furthermore, functional experiments identify a significant loss of T-type-mediated Ca2+ current in EHD3-deficient atrial myocytes. Moreover, EHD3 associates with both CaV3.1 and CaV3.2 in co-immunoprecipitation experiments. T-type Ca2+ channel function is critical for proper electrical conduction through the atria. Consistent with these roles, EHD3-deficient mice demonstrate heart rate variability, sinus pause, and atrioventricular conduction block. In summary, our findings identify CaV3.1 and CaV3.2 as substrates for EHD3-dependent protein trafficking in heart, provide in vivo data on endosome-based trafficking pathways in atria, and implicate EHD3 as a key player in the regulation of atrial myocyte excitability and cardiac conduction. PMID:25825486

  9. Lethal mutations in the major homology region and their suppressors act by modulating the dimerization of the rous sarcoma virus capsid protein C-terminal domain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dalessio, Paula M; Craven, Rebecca C; Lokhandwala, Parvez M; Ropson, Ira J

    2013-02-01

    An infective retrovirus requires a mature capsid shell around the viral replication complex. This shell is formed by about 1500 capsid protein monomers, organized into hexamer and pentamer rings that are linked to each other by the dimerization of the C-terminal domain (CTD). The major homology region (MHR), the most highly conserved protein sequence across retroviral genomes, is part of the CTD. Several mutations in the MHR appear to block infectivity by preventing capsid formation. Suppressor mutations have been identified that are distant in sequence and structure from the MHR and restore capsid formation. The effects of two lethal and two suppressor mutations on the stability and function of the CTD were examined. No correlation with infectivity was found for the stability of the lethal mutations (D155Y-CTD, F167Y-CTD) and suppressor mutations (R185W-CTD, I190V-CTD). The stabilities of three double mutant proteins (D155Y/R185W-CTD, F167Y/R185W-CTD, and F167Y/I190V-CTD) were additive. However, the dimerization affinity of the mutant proteins correlated strongly with biological function. The CTD proteins with lethal mutations did not dimerize, while those with suppressor mutations had greater dimerization affinity than WT-CTD. The suppressor mutations were able to partially correct the dimerization defect caused by the lethal MHR mutations in double mutant proteins. Despite their dramatic effects on dimerization, none of these residues participate directly in the proposed dimerization interface in a mature capsid. These findings suggest that the conserved sequence of the MHR has critical roles in the conformation(s) of the CTD that are required for dimerization and correct capsid maturation. Copyright © 2012 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  10. Directed homology

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fahrenberg, Uli

    2004-01-01

    We introduce a new notion of directed homology for semicubical sets. We show that it respects directed homotopy and is functorial, and that it appears to enjoy some good algebraic properties. Our work has applications to higher-dimensional automata.......We introduce a new notion of directed homology for semicubical sets. We show that it respects directed homotopy and is functorial, and that it appears to enjoy some good algebraic properties. Our work has applications to higher-dimensional automata....

  11. KOC (K homology domain containing protein overexpressed in cancer): a novel molecular marker that distinguishes between benign and malignant lesions of the pancreas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yantiss, Rhonda K; Woda, Bruce A; Fanger, Gary R; Kalos, M; Whalen, Giles F; Tada, Hiroomi; Andersen, Dana K; Rock, Kenneth L; Dresser, Karen

    2005-02-01

    KOC (K homology domain containing protein overexpressed in cancer) is a novel oncofetal RNA-binding protein highly expressed in pancreatic carcinomas. Recently, Corixa Corporation developed a monoclonal antibody specific for KOC that can be used with standard immunohistochemical techniques. The purposes of this study were 1) to assess KOC mRNA expression in pancreatic carcinoma, 2) to determine the pattern of KOC immunoexpression among benign, borderline, and malignant pancreatic epithelial lesions, and 3) to evaluate the utility of the KOC antibody in distinguishing between these entities. mRNA was isolated from fresh pancreatic tissues (19 carcinomas, 2 normal pancreas, 1 chronic pancreatitis) and amplified using standard RT-PCR techniques. Fifteen of 19 (79%) carcinomas overexpressed KOC mRNA relative to non-neoplastic tissue samples and expression increased progressively with tumor stage: the mean copy number of KOC mRNA transcripts was 1.5, 11.1, 31, and 28 for stage I, II, III, and IV carcinomas, respectively, compared with 0.9 and 1 for normal pancreatic tissue and chronic pancreatitis, respectively. Immunostains using the KOC antibody were performed on 50 surgical resection specimens (38 invasive adenocarcinomas, 3 intraductal papillary-mucinous neoplasms, 2 mucinous cystic neoplasms, 7 chronic pancreatitis). KOC staining was present in 37 of 38 (97%) carcinomas: the staining reaction was moderate or strong in 36 of 38 (94%) and present in >50% of the tumor cells in 35 of 38 (92%) cases. Severe dysplasia of the ductal epithelium, present in 19 foci of intraductal papillary mucinous carcinoma, mucinous cystadenocarcinoma, and grade 3 pancreatic intraepithelial neoplasia (PanIN3) showed strong or moderate staining in 15 (79%) cases, whereas foci of mild and moderate dysplasia (intraductal papillary-mucinous neoplasms and mucinous cystic neoplasms with adenoma and/or moderate dysplasia, PanIN1, and PanIN2) were uniformly negative for this marker in 25 and 22

  12. Replacement of Porcine CD163 Scavenger Receptor Cysteine-Rich Domain 5 with a CD163-Like Homolog Confers Resistance of Pigs to Genotype 1 but Not Genotype 2 Porcine Reproductive and Respiratory Syndrome Virus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wells, Kevin D; Bardot, Rachel; Whitworth, Kristin M; Trible, Benjamin R; Fang, Ying; Mileham, Alan; Kerrigan, Maureen A; Samuel, Melissa S; Prather, Randall S; Rowland, Raymond R R

    2017-01-15

    CD163 knockout (KO) pigs are resistant to infection with genotype 2 (type 2) porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus (PRRSV). Furthermore, the substitution of CD163 scavenger receptor cysteine-rich (SRCR) domain 5 with a homolog of human CD163-like (hCD163L1) SRCR 8 domain confers resistance of transfected HEK cells to type 1 PRRSV. As a means to understand the role of domain 5 in PRRSV infection with both type 1 and type 2 viruses, pigs were genetically modified (GM) to possess one of the following genotypes: complete knockout (KO) of CD163, deletions within SRCR domain 5, or replacement (domain swap) of SRCR domain 5 with a synthesized exon encoding a homolog of hCD163L1 SRCR domain 8. Immunophenotyping of porcine alveolar macrophages (PAMs) showed that pigs with the KO or SRCR domain 5 deletion did not express CD163. When placed in culture, PAMs from pigs with the CD163 KO phenotype were completely resistant to a panel consisting of six type 1 and nine type 2 isolates. PAMs from pigs that possessed the hCD163L1 domain 8 homolog expressed CD163 and supported the replication of all type 2 isolates, but no type 1 viruses. Infection of CD163-modified pigs with representative type 1 and type 2 viruses confirmed the in vitro results. The results confirm that CD163 is the likely receptor for all PRRS viruses. Even though type 1 and type 2 viruses are considered phenotypically similar at several levels, there is a distinct difference between the viral genotypes in the recognition of CD163. Genetic modification of the CD163 gene creates the opportunity to develop production animals that are resistant to PRRS, the costliest viral disease to ever face the swine industry. The results create further opportunities to develop refinements in the modification of CD163 with the goal of making pigs refractory to infection while retaining important CD163 functions. Copyright © 2017 American Society for Microbiology.

  13. Homological descent for motivic homology theories

    OpenAIRE

    Geisser, Thomas

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to give homological descent theorems for motivic homology theories (for example, Suslin homology) and motivic Borel-Moore homology theories (for example, higher Chow groups) for certain hypercoverings.

  14. The calcium-induced conformation and glycosylation of scavenger-rich cysteine repeat (SRCR) domains of glycoprotein 340 influence the high affinity interaction with antigen I/II homologs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Purushotham, Sangeetha; Deivanayagam, Champion

    2014-08-01

    Oral streptococci adhere to tooth-immobilized glycoprotein 340 (GP340) via the surface protein antigen I/II (AgI/II) and its homologs as the first step in pathogenesis. Studying this interaction using recombinant proteins, we observed that calcium increases the conformational stability of the scavenger-rich cysteine repeat (SRCRs) domains of GP340. Our results also show that AgI/II adheres specifically with nanomolar affinity to the calcium-induced SRCR conformation in an immobilized state and not in solution. This interaction is significantly dependent on the O-linked carbohydrates present on the SRCRs. This study also establishes that a single SRCR domain of GP340 contains the two surfaces to which the apical and C-terminal regions of AgI/II noncompetitively adhere. Compared with the single SRCR domain, the three tandem SRCR domains displayed a collective/cooperative increase in their bacterial adherence and aggregation. The previously described SRCRP2 peptide that was shown to aggregate several oral streptococci displayed limited aggregation and also nonspecific adherence compared to SRCR domains. Finally, we show distinct species-specific adherence/aggregation between Streptococcus mutans AgI/II and Streptococcus gordonii SspB in their interaction with the SRCRs. This study concludes that identification of the metal ion and carbohydrate adherence motifs on both SRCRs and AgI/II homologs could lead to the development of anti-adhesive inhibitors that could deter the adherence of pathogenic oral streptococci and thereby prevent the onset of infections.

  15. Local pH domains regulate NHE3-mediated Na⁺ reabsorption in the renal proximal tubule.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brasen, Jens Christian; Burford, James L; McDonough, Alicia A; Holstein-Rathlou, Niels-Henrik; Peti-Peterdi, Janos

    2014-12-01

    The proximal tubule Na(+)/H(+) exchanger 3 (NHE3), located in the apical dense microvilli (brush border), plays a major role in the reabsorption of NaCl and water in the renal proximal tubule. In response to a rise in blood pressure NHE3 redistributes in the plane of the plasma membrane to the base of the brush border, where NHE3 activity is reduced. This NHE3 redistribution is assumed to provoke pressure natriuresis; however, it is unclear how NHE3 redistribution per se reduces NHE3 activity. To investigate if the distribution of NHE3 in the brush border can change the reabsorption rate, we constructed a spatiotemporal mathematical model of NHE3-mediated Na(+) reabsorption across a proximal tubule cell and compared the model results with in vivo experiments in rats. The model predicts that when NHE3 is localized exclusively at the base of the brush border, it creates local pH microdomains that reduce NHE3 activity by >30%. We tested the model's prediction experimentally: the rat kidney cortex was loaded with the pH-sensitive fluorescent dye BCECF, and cells of the proximal tubule were imaged in vivo using confocal fluorescence microscopy before and after an increase of blood pressure by ∼50 mmHg. The experimental results supported the model by demonstrating that a rise of blood pressure induces the development of pH microdomains near the bottom of the brush border. These local changes in pH reduce NHE3 activity, which may explain the pressure natriuresis response to NHE3 redistribution.

  16. Alignment of Homologous Chromosomes and Effective Repair of Programmed DNA Double-Strand Breaks during Mouse Meiosis Require the Minichromosome Maintenance Domain Containing 2 (MCMDC2) Protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Finsterbusch, Friederike; Ravindranathan, Ramya; Dereli, Ihsan; Stanzione, Marcello; Tränkner, Daniel; Tóth, Attila

    2016-10-01

    Orderly chromosome segregation during the first meiotic division requires meiotic recombination to form crossovers between homologous chromosomes (homologues). Members of the minichromosome maintenance (MCM) helicase family have been implicated in meiotic recombination. In addition, they have roles in initiation of DNA replication, DNA mismatch repair and mitotic DNA double-strand break repair. Here, we addressed the function of MCMDC2, an atypical yet conserved MCM protein, whose function in vertebrates has not been reported. While we did not find an important role for MCMDC2 in mitotically dividing cells, our work revealed that MCMDC2 is essential for fertility in both sexes due to a crucial function in meiotic recombination. Meiotic recombination begins with the introduction of DNA double-strand breaks into the genome. DNA ends at break sites are resected. The resultant 3-prime single-stranded DNA overhangs recruit RAD51 and DMC1 recombinases that promote the invasion of homologous duplex DNAs by the resected DNA ends. Multiple strand invasions on each chromosome promote the alignment of homologous chromosomes, which is a prerequisite for inter-homologue crossover formation during meiosis. We found that although DNA ends at break sites were evidently resected, and they recruited RAD51 and DMC1 recombinases, these recombinases were ineffective in promoting alignment of homologous chromosomes in the absence of MCMDC2. Consequently, RAD51 and DMC1 foci, which are thought to mark early recombination intermediates, were abnormally persistent in Mcmdc2-/- meiocytes. Importantly, the strand invasion stabilizing MSH4 protein, which marks more advanced recombination intermediates, did not efficiently form foci in Mcmdc2-/- meiocytes. Thus, our work suggests that MCMDC2 plays an important role in either the formation, or the stabilization, of DNA strand invasion events that promote homologue alignment and provide the basis for inter-homologue crossover formation during

  17. Expression, refolding and spectroscopic characterization of fibronectin type III (FnIII)-homology domains derived from human fibronectin leucine rich transmembrane protein (FLRT)-1,-2, and-3

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Yang, Lila; Falkesgaard, Maria Hansen; Thulstrup, Peter Waaben

    2017-01-01

    The fibronectin leucine rich transmembrane (FLRT) protein family consists in humans of 3 proteins, FLRT1, -2, and -3. The FLRT proteins contain two extracellular domains separated by an unstructured linker. The most membrane distal part is a leucine rich repeat (LRR) domain responsible for both cis......- and trans-interactions, whereas the membrane proximal part is a fibronectin type III (FnIII) domain responsible for a cis-interaction with members of the fibroblast growth factor receptor 1 (FGFR1) family, which results in FGFR tyrosine kinase activation. Whereas the structures of FLRT LRR domains from...... in inclusion bodies in Escherichia coli. His-tags permitted affinity purification of the domains, which subsequently were refolded on a Ni-NTA agarose column by reducing the concentration of urea. The refolding was confirmed by circular dichroism (CD) and 1H-NMR. By thermal unfolding experiments we show...

  18. Electrostatics analysis of the mutational and pH effects of the N-terminal domain self-association of the major ampullate spidroin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barroso da Silva, Fernando Luís; Pasquali, Samuela; Derreumaux, Philippe; Dias, Luis Gustavo

    2016-07-07

    Spider silk is a fascinating material combining mechanical properties such as maximum strength and high toughness comparable or better than man-made materials, with biocompatible degradability characteristics. Experimental measurements have shown that pH triggers the dimer formation of the N-terminal domain (NTD) of the major ampullate spidroin 1 (MaSp 1). A coarse-grained model accounting for electrostatics, van der Waals and pH-dependent charge-fluctuation interactions, by means of Monte Carlo simulations, gave us a more comprehensive view of the NTD dimerization process. A detailed analysis of the electrostatic properties and free energy derivatives for the NTD homoassociation was carried out at different pH values and salt concentrations for the protein wild type and for several mutants. We observed an enhancement of dipole-dipole interactions at pH 6 due to the ionization of key amino acids, a process identified as the main driving force for dimerization. Analytical estimates based on the DVLO theory framework corroborate our findings. Molecular dynamics simulations using the OPEP coarse-grained force field for proteins show that the mutant E17Q is subject to larger structural fluctuations when compared to the wild type. Estimates of the association rate constants for this mutant were evaluated by the Debye-Smoluchowski theory and are in agreement with the experimental data when thermally relaxed structures are used instead of the crystallographic data. Our results can contribute to the design of new mutants with specific association properties.

  19. Simulation of homology models for the extracellular domains (ECD) of ErbB3, ErbB4 and the ErbB2-ErbB3 complex in their active conformations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Franco-Gonzalez, Juan Felipe; Ramos, Javier; Cruz, Victor L; Martínez-Salazar, Javier

    2013-02-01

    Epidermal growth factor receptors (EGFR) are associated with a number of biological processes and are becoming increasingly recognized as important therapeutic targets against cancer. In this work, we provide models based on homology for the extracellular domains (ECD) of ErbB3 and ErbB4 in their active conformations, including a Heregulin ligand, followed by further refinement of the models by molecular dynamics simulations at atomistic scale. We compare the results with a model built for ErbB2 based on crystallographic information and analyze the common features observed among members of the family, namely, the periscope movement of the dimerization arm and the hinge displacement of domain IV. Finally, we refine a model for the interaction of the ECDs corresponding to a ErbB2-ErbB3 heterodimer, which is widely recognized to have a high impact in cancer development.

  20. The WW domain of Yes-associated protein binds a proline-rich ligand that differs from the consensus established for Src homology 3-binding modules.

    OpenAIRE

    Chen, H I; Sudol, M.

    1995-01-01

    The WW domain has previously been described as a motif of 38 semiconserved residues found in seemingly unrelated proteins, such as dystrophin, Yes-associated protein (YAP), and two transcriptional regulators, Rsp-5 and FE65. The molecular function of the WW domain has been unknown until this time. Using a functional screen of a cDNA expression library, we have identified two putative ligands of the WW domain of YAP, which we named WBP-1 and WBP-2. Peptide sequence comparison between the two p...

  1. Mildly Acidic pH Triggers an Irreversible Conformational Change in the Fusion Domain of Herpes Simplex Virus 1 Glycoprotein B and Inactivation of Viral Entry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weed, Darin J; Pritchard, Suzanne M; Gonzalez, Floricel; Aguilar, Hector C; Nicola, Anthony V

    2017-03-01

    Herpes simplex virus (HSV) entry into a subset of cells requires endocytosis and endosomal low pH. Preexposure of isolated virions to mildly acidic pH of 5 to 6 partially inactivates HSV infectivity in an irreversible manner. Acid inactivation is a hallmark of viruses that enter via low-pH pathways; this occurs by pretriggering conformational changes essential for fusion. The target and mechanism(s) of low-pH inactivation of HSV are unclear. Here, low-pH-treated HSV-1 was defective in fusion activity and yet retained normal levels of attachment to cell surface heparan sulfate and binding to nectin-1 receptor. Low-pH-triggered conformational changes in gB reported to date are reversible, despite irreversible low-pH inactivation. gB conformational changes and their reversibility were measured by antigenic analysis with a panel of monoclonal antibodies and by detecting changes in oligomeric conformation. Three-hour treatment of HSV-1 virions with pH 5 or multiple sequential treatments at pH 5 followed by neutral pH caused an irreversible >2.5 log infectivity reduction. While changes in several gB antigenic sites were reversible, alteration of the H126 epitope was irreversible. gB oligomeric conformational change remained reversible under all conditions tested. Altogether, our results reveal that oligomeric alterations and fusion domain changes represent distinct conformational changes in gB, and the latter correlates with irreversible low-pH inactivation of HSV. We propose that conformational change in the gB fusion domain is important for activation of membrane fusion during viral entry and that in the absence of a host target membrane, this change results in irreversible inactivation of virions.IMPORTANCE HSV-1 is an important pathogen with a high seroprevalence throughout the human population. HSV infects cells via multiple pathways, including a low-pH route into epithelial cells, the primary portal into the host. HSV is inactivated by low-pH preexposure, and gB, a

  2. Bacterial over-expression and purification of the 3'phosphoadenosine 5'phosphosulfate (PAPS) reductase domain of human FAD synthase: functional characterization and homology modeling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miccolis, Angelica; Galluccio, Michele; Giancaspero, Teresa Anna; Indiveri, Cesare; Barile, Maria

    2012-12-11

    FAD synthase (FADS, EC 2.7.7.2) is a key enzyme in the metabolic pathway that converts riboflavin into the redox cofactor, FAD. Human FADS is organized in two domains: -the 3'phosphoadenosine 5'phosphosulfate (PAPS) reductase domain, similar to yeast Fad1p, at the C-terminus, and -the resembling molybdopterin-binding domain at the N-terminus. To understand whether the PAPS reductase domain of hFADS is sufficient to catalyze FAD synthesis, per se, and to investigate the role of the molybdopterin-binding domain, a soluble "truncated" form of hFADS lacking the N-terminal domain (Δ(1-328)-hFADS) has been over-produced and purified to homogeneity as a recombinant His-tagged protein. The recombinant Δ(1-328)-hFADS binds one mole of FAD product very tightly as the wild-type enzyme. Under turnover conditions, it catalyzes FAD assembly from ATP and FMN and, at a much lower rate, FAD pyrophosphorolytic hydrolysis. The Δ(1-328)-hFADS enzyme shows a slight, but not significant, change of K(m) values (0.24 and 6.23 µM for FMN and ATP, respectively) and of k(cat) (4.2 × 10-2 s-1) compared to wild-type protein in the forward direction. These results demonstrate that the molybdopterin-binding domain is not strictly required for catalysis. Its regulatory role is discussed in light of changes in divalent cations sensitivity of the Δ(1-328)-hFADS versus wild-type protein.

  3. A frameshift mutation in the HuP2 paired domain of the probable human homolog of murine Pax-3 is responsible for Waardenburg syndrome type 1 in an Indonesian family.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morell, R; Friedman, T B; Moeljopawiro, S; Hartono; Soewito; Asher, J H

    1992-07-01

    Waardenburg syndrome type 1 (WS1) is an autosomal dominant disorder characterized by deafness, dystopia canthorum, heterochromia iridis, white forelock, and premature greying. A similar phenotype is caused in the mouse by mutations in the Pax-3 gene. This observation, together with comparisons of conserved syntenies in the murine and human genetic maps, suggested that at least some WS1 mutations should occur in HuP2, the probable human homolog of Pax-3. Two mutations in the HuP2 sequence of individuals with WS1 have been reported recently. Both of them occur in the highly conserved paired box region of the gene, which encodes a DNA binding domain. The functional consequences of these mutations are at present speculative. We report here a 14 bp deletion in the paired domain encoded by exon 2 of HuP2 in an Indonesian family segregating for WS1. This frameshift mutation results in a premature termination codon in exon 3. The HuP2 product is a truncated protein lacking most of the paired domain and all of the predicted homeo domain. We propose that the WS1 phenotype in this family is due to loss of function of HuP2 and discuss two mechanisms for the dominant effect of this mutation.

  4. PRL-1 protein promotes ERK1/2 and RhoA protein activation through a non-canonical interaction with the Src homology 3 domain of p115 Rho GTPase-activating protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bai, Yunpeng; Luo, Yong; Liu, Sijiu; Zhang, Lujuan; Shen, Kui; Dong, Yuanshu; Walls, Chad D; Quilliam, Lawrence A; Wells, Clark D; Cao, Youjia; Zhang, Zhong-Yin

    2011-12-09

    Phosphatases of the regenerating liver (PRL) play oncogenic roles in cancer development and metastasis. Although previous studies indicate that PRL-1 promotes cell growth and migration by activating both the ERK1/2 and RhoA pathways, the mechanism by which it activates these signaling events remains unclear. We have identified a PRL-1-binding peptide (Peptide 1) that shares high sequence identity with a conserved motif in the Src homology 3 (SH3) domain of p115 Rho GTPase-activating protein (GAP). p115 RhoGAP directly binds PRL-1 in vitro and in cells via its SH3 domain. Structural analyses of the PRL-1·Peptide 1 complex revealed a novel protein-protein interaction whereby a sequence motif within the PxxP ligand-binding site of the p115 RhoGAP SH3 domain occupies a folded groove within PRL-1. This prevents the canonical interaction between the SH3 domain of p115 RhoGAP and MEKK1 and results in activation of ERK1/2. Furthermore, PRL-1 binding activates RhoA signaling by inhibiting the catalytic activity of p115 RhoGAP. The results demonstrate that PRL-1 binding to p115 RhoGAP provides a coordinated mechanism underlying ERK1/2 and RhoA activation.

  5. Disease-Homologous Mutation in the Cation Diffusion Facilitator Protein MamM Causes Single-Domain Structural Loss and Signifies Its Importance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barber-Zucker, Shiran; Uebe, René; Davidov, Geula; Navon, Yotam; Sherf, Dror; Chill, Jordan H; Kass, Itamar; Bitton, Ronit; Schüler, Dirk; Zarivach, Raz

    2016-08-23

    Cation diffusion facilitators (CDF) are highly conserved, metal ion efflux transporters that maintain divalent transition metal cation homeostasis. Most CDF proteins contain two domains, the cation transporting transmembrane domain and the regulatory cytoplasmic C-terminal domain (CTD). MamM is a magnetosome-associated CDF protein essential for the biomineralization of magnetic iron-oxide particles in magnetotactic bacteria. To investigate the structure-function relationship of CDF cytoplasmic domains, we characterized a MamM M250P mutation that is synonymous with the disease-related mutation L349P of the human CDF protein ZnT-10. Our results show that the M250P exchange in MamM causes severe structural changes in its CTD resulting in abnormal reduced function. Our in vivo, in vitro and in silico studies indicate that the CTD fold is critical for CDF proteins' proper function and support the previously suggested role of the CDF cytoplasmic domain as a CDF regulatory element. Based on our results, we also suggest a mechanism for the effects of the ZnT-10 L349P mutation in human.

  6. ANKRD54 preferentially selects Bruton’s Tyrosine Kinase (BTK) from a Human Src-Homology 3 (SH3) domain library

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohammad, Dara K.; Ylösmäki, Erkko; Choi, Hyunseok; Shrestha, Subhash; Wang, Qing; Nore, Beston F.; Saksela, Kalle; Smith, C. I. Edvard

    2017-01-01

    Bruton’s Tyrosine Kinase (BTK) is a cytoplasmic protein tyrosine kinase with a fundamental role in B-lymphocyte development and activation. The nucleocytoplasmic shuttling of BTK is specifically modulated by the Ankyrin Repeat Domain 54 (ANKRD54) protein and the interaction is known to be exclusively SH3-dependent. To identify the spectrum of the ANKRD54 SH3-interactome, we applied phage-display screening of a library containing all the 296 human SH3 domains. The BTK-SH3 domain was the prime interactor. Quantitative western blotting analysis demonstrated the accuracy of the screening procedure. Revealing the spectrum and specificity of ANKRD54-interactome is a critical step toward functional analysis in cells and tissues. PMID:28369144

  7. Structural basis of Robo proline-rich motif recognition by the srGAP1 Src homology 3 domain in the Slit-Robo signaling pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xiaofeng; Chen, Yushu; Liu, Yiwei; Gao, Jia; Gao, Feng; Bartlam, Mark; Wu, Jane Y; Rao, Zihe

    2006-09-22

    The Slit-Robo (sr) GTPase-activating protein (GAPs) are important components in the intracellular pathway mediating Slit-Robo signaling in axon guidance and cell migration. We report the first crystal structure of the srGAP1 SH3 domain at 1.8-A resolution. The unusual side chain conformation of the conserved Phe-13 in the P1 pocket renders the ligand binding pocket shallow and narrow, which contributes toward the low binding affinity. Moreover, the opposing electrostatic charge and the hydrophobic properties of the P3 specificity pocket are consistent with the observed binding characteristics of the srGAP1 SH3 domain to its ligand. Surface plasmon resonance experiments indicate that the srGAP1 SH3 domain interacts with its natural ligand inaCtoN orientation. The srGAP1 SH3 domain can bind to both the CC2 and CC3 motifs in vitro. The N-terminal two acidic residues in the CC3 motif recognition site are necessary for srGAP1 SH3 domain binding. A longer CC3 peptide (CC3-FL) binds with greater affinity than its shorter counterpart, suggesting that the residues surrounding the proline-rich core are important for protein-peptide interactions. Our study reveals previously unknown properties of the srGAP-Robo interaction. Our data provide a structural basis for the srGAP-Robo interaction, consistent with the role of the Robo intracellular domain in interacting with other downstream signaling molecules and mediating versatile and dynamic responses to axon guidance and cell migration cues.

  8. A cytohesin homolog in Dictyostelium amoebae.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Christina Shina

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Dictyostelium, an amoeboid motile cell, harbors several paralogous Sec7 genes that encode members of three distinct subfamilies of the Sec7 superfamily of Guanine nucleotide exchange factors. Among them are proteins of the GBF/BIG family present in all eukaryotes. The third subfamily represented with three members in D. discoideum is the cytohesin family that has been thought to be metazoan specific. Cytohesins are characterized by a Sec7 PH tandem domain and have roles in cell adhesion and migration. PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Dictyostelium SecG exhibits highest homologies to the cytohesins. It harbors at its amino terminus several ankyrin repeats that are followed by the Sec7 PH tandem domain. Mutants lacking SecG show reduced cell-substratum adhesion whereas cell-cell adhesion that is important for development is not affected. Accordingly, multicellular development proceeds normally in the mutant. During chemotaxis secG(- cells elongate and migrate in a directed fashion towards cAMP, however speed is moderately reduced. SIGNIFICANCE: The data indicate that SecG is a relevant factor for cell-substrate adhesion and reveal the basic function of a cytohesin in a lower eukaryote.

  9. Homology of SMP domains to the TULIP superfamily of lipid-binding proteins provides a structural basis for lipid exchange between ER and mitochondria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kopec, Klaus O; Alva, Vikram; Lupas, Andrei N

    2010-08-15

    Mitochondria must uptake some phospholipids from the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) for the biogenesis of their membranes. They convert one of these lipids, phosphatidylserine, to phosphatidylethanolamine, which can be re-exported via the ER to all other cellular membranes. The mechanisms underlying these exchanges between ER and mitochondria are poorly understood. Recently, a complex termed ER-mitochondria encounter structure (ERMES) was shown to be necessary for phospholipid exchange in budding yeast. However, it is unclear whether this complex is merely an inter-organelle tether or also the transporter. ERMES consists of four proteins: Mdm10, Mdm34 (Mmm2), Mdm12 and Mmm1, three of which contain the uncharacterized SMP domain common to a number of eukaryotic membrane-associated proteins. Here, we show that the SMP domain belongs to the TULIP superfamily of lipid/hydrophobic ligand-binding domains comprising members of known structure. This relationship suggests that the SMP domains of the ERMES complex mediate lipid exchange between ER and mitochondria.

  10. The PIKE homolog Centaurin gamma regulates developmental timing in Drosophila.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gündner, Anna Lisa; Hahn, Ines; Sendscheid, Oliver; Aberle, Hermann; Hoch, Michael

    2014-01-01

    Phosphoinositide-3-kinase enhancer (PIKE) proteins encoded by the PIKE/CENTG1 gene are members of the gamma subgroup of the Centaurin superfamily of small GTPases. They are characterized by their chimeric protein domain architecture consisting of a pleckstrin homology (PH) domain, a GTPase-activating (GAP) domain, Ankyrin repeats as well as an intrinsic GTPase domain. In mammals, three PIKE isoforms with variations in protein structure and subcellular localization are encoded by the PIKE locus. PIKE inactivation in mice results in a broad range of defects, including neuronal cell death during brain development and misregulation of mammary gland development. PIKE -/- mutant mice are smaller, contain less white adipose tissue, and show insulin resistance due to misregulation of AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) and insulin receptor/Akt signaling. here, we have studied the role of PIKE proteins in metabolic regulation in the fly. We show that the Drosophila PIKE homolog, ceng1A, encodes functional GTPases whose internal GAP domains catalyze their GTPase activity. To elucidate the biological function of ceng1A in flies, we introduced a deletion in the ceng1A gene by homologous recombination that removes all predicted functional PIKE domains. We found that homozygous ceng1A mutant animals survive to adulthood. In contrast to PIKE -/- mouse mutants, genetic ablation of Drosophila ceng1A does not result in growth defects or weight reduction. Although metabolic pathways such as insulin signaling, sensitivity towards starvation and mobilization of lipids under high fed conditions are not perturbed in ceng1A mutants, homozygous ceng1A mutants show a prolonged development in second instar larval stage, leading to a late onset of pupariation. In line with these results we found that expression of ecdysone inducible genes is reduced in ceng1A mutants. Together, we propose a novel role for Drosophila Ceng1A in regulating ecdysone signaling-dependent second to third instar

  11. The PIKE homolog Centaurin gamma regulates developmental timing in Drosophila.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anna Lisa Gündner

    Full Text Available Phosphoinositide-3-kinase enhancer (PIKE proteins encoded by the PIKE/CENTG1 gene are members of the gamma subgroup of the Centaurin superfamily of small GTPases. They are characterized by their chimeric protein domain architecture consisting of a pleckstrin homology (PH domain, a GTPase-activating (GAP domain, Ankyrin repeats as well as an intrinsic GTPase domain. In mammals, three PIKE isoforms with variations in protein structure and subcellular localization are encoded by the PIKE locus. PIKE inactivation in mice results in a broad range of defects, including neuronal cell death during brain development and misregulation of mammary gland development. PIKE -/- mutant mice are smaller, contain less white adipose tissue, and show insulin resistance due to misregulation of AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK and insulin receptor/Akt signaling. here, we have studied the role of PIKE proteins in metabolic regulation in the fly. We show that the Drosophila PIKE homolog, ceng1A, encodes functional GTPases whose internal GAP domains catalyze their GTPase activity. To elucidate the biological function of ceng1A in flies, we introduced a deletion in the ceng1A gene by homologous recombination that removes all predicted functional PIKE domains. We found that homozygous ceng1A mutant animals survive to adulthood. In contrast to PIKE -/- mouse mutants, genetic ablation of Drosophila ceng1A does not result in growth defects or weight reduction. Although metabolic pathways such as insulin signaling, sensitivity towards starvation and mobilization of lipids under high fed conditions are not perturbed in ceng1A mutants, homozygous ceng1A mutants show a prolonged development in second instar larval stage, leading to a late onset of pupariation. In line with these results we found that expression of ecdysone inducible genes is reduced in ceng1A mutants. Together, we propose a novel role for Drosophila Ceng1A in regulating ecdysone signaling-dependent second to

  12. The solution structure of the periplasmic domain of the TonB system ExbD protein reveals an unexpected structural homology with siderophore-binding proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garcia-Herrero, Alicia; Peacock, R Sean; Howard, S Peter; Vogel, Hans J

    2007-11-01

    The transport of iron complexes through outer membrane transporters from Gram-negative bacteria is highly dependent on the TonB system. Together, the three components of the system, TonB, ExbB and ExbD, energize the transport of iron complexes through the outer membrane by utilizing the proton motive force across the cytoplasmic membrane. The three-dimensional (3D) structure of the periplasmic domain of TonB has previously been determined. However, no detailed structural information for the other two components of the TonB system is currently available and their role in the iron-uptake process is not yet clearly understood. ExbD from Escherichia coli contains 141 residues distributed in three domains: a small N-terminal cytoplasmic region, a single transmembrane helix and a C-terminal periplasmic domain. Here we describe the first well-defined solution structure of the periplasmic domain of ExbD (residues 44-141) solved by multidimensional nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy. The monomeric structure presents three clearly distinct regions: an N-terminal flexible tail (residues 44-63), a well-defined folded region (residues 64-133) followed by a small C-terminal flexible region (residues 134-141). The folded region is formed by two alpha-helices that are located on one side of a single beta-sheet. The central beta-sheet is composed of five beta-strands, with a mixed parallel and antiparallel arrangement. Unexpectedly, this fold closely resembles that found in the C-terminal lobe of the siderophore-binding proteins FhuD and CeuE. The ExbD periplasmic domain has a strong tendency to aggregate in vitro and 3D-TROSY (transverse relaxation optimized spectroscopy) NMR experiments of the deuterated protein indicate that the multimeric protein has nearly identical secondary structure to that of the monomeric form. Chemical shift perturbation studies suggest that the Glu-Pro region (residues 70-83) of TonB can bind weakly to the surface and the flexible C

  13. Characterization of Mycobacterium smegmatis PolD2 and PolD1 as RNA/DNA polymerases homologous to the POL domain of bacterial DNA ligase D.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Hui; Bhattarai, Hitesh; Yan, Han-Guang; Shuman, Stewart; Glickman, Michael S

    2012-12-21

    Mycobacteria exploit nonhomologous end-joining (NHEJ) to repair DNA double-strand breaks. The core NHEJ machinery comprises the homodimeric DNA end-binding protein Ku and DNA ligase D (LigD), a modular enzyme composed of a C-terminal ATP-dependent ligase domain (LIG), a central 3'-phosphoesterase domain (PE), and an N-terminal polymerase domain (POL). LigD POL is proficient at adding templated and nontemplated deoxynucleotides and ribonucleotides to DNA ends in vitro and is the catalyst in vivo of unfaithful NHEJ events involving nontemplated single-nucleotide additions to blunt DSB ends. Here, we identify two mycobacterial proteins, PolD1 and PolD2, as stand-alone homologues of the LigD POL domain. Biochemical characterization of PolD1 and PolD2 shows that they resemble LigD POL in their monomeric quaternary structures, their ability to add templated and nontemplated nucleotides to primer-templates and blunt ends, and their preference for rNTPs versus dNTPs. Deletion of polD1, polD2, or both from a Mycobacterium smegmatis strain carrying an inactivating mutation in LigD POL failed to reveal a role for PolD1 or PolD2 in templated nucleotide additions during NHEJ of 5'-overhang DSBs or in clastogen resistance. Whereas our results document the existence and characteristics of new stand-alone members of the LigD POL family of RNA/DNA polymerases, they imply that other polymerases can perform fill-in synthesis during mycobacterial NHEJ.

  14. Mapping of the mouse homolog of the human runt domain gene, AML2, to the distal region of mouse chromosome 4

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Avraham, K.B.; Copeland, N.G.; Jenkins, N.A. [National Cancer Institute-Frederick Cancer Research and Development Center, MD (United States)] [and others

    1995-01-20

    AML2 is a runt domain belonging to a group of transcription factors that appear to play a role in Drosophila embryogenesis and mammalian oncogenic transformation. AML2 maps to human chromosome 1p36, a region involved in the t(1;3)(p36;q21) translocation found in association with myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS), myeloproliferative disease (MPD), and acute nonlymphocytic leukemia. 9 refs., 1 fig.

  15. Crystallization and preliminary X-ray analysis of ginkbilobin-2 from Ginkgo biloba seeds: a novel antifungal protein with homology to the extracellular domain of plant cysteine-rich receptor-like kinases

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Miyakawa, Takuya; Sawano, Yoriko; Miyazono, Ken-ichi [Department of Applied Biochemical Chemistry, Graduate School of Agricultural and Life Sciences, University of Tokyo, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo 113-8657 (Japan); Hatano, Ken-ichi [Department of Chemistry and Chemical Biology, Faculty of Engineering, Gunma University, Kiryu, Gunma 376-8515 (Japan); Tanokura, Masaru, E-mail: amtanok@mail.ecc.u-tokyo.ac.jp [Department of Applied Biochemical Chemistry, Graduate School of Agricultural and Life Sciences, University of Tokyo, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo 113-8657 (Japan)

    2007-09-01

    Purification and crystallization of ginkbilobin-2 and its selenomethionine derivative allowed the collection of complete data to 2.38 Å resolution and multiwavelength anomalous diffraction data sets, respectively. The antifungal protein ginkbilobin-2 (Gnk2) from Ginkgo biloba seeds does not show homology to other pathogenesis-related proteins, but does show homology to the extracellular domain of plant cysteine-rich receptor-like kinases. Native Gnk2 purified from ginkgo nuts and the selenomethionine derivative of recombinant Gnk2 (SeMet-rGnk2) were crystallized by the sitting-drop vapour-diffusion method using different precipitants. X-ray diffraction data were collected from Gnk2 at 2.38 Å resolution and from SeMet-rGnk2 at 2.79 Å resolution using a synchrotron-radiation source. The crystals of both proteins belonged to the primitive cubic space group P2{sub 1}3, with unit-cell parameters a = b = c = 143.2 Å.

  16. Effect of NADPH oxidase inhibitor-apocynin on the expression of Src homology-2 domain-containing phosphatase-1 (SHP-1 exposed renal ischemia/reperfusion injury in rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhiming Li

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available This study was designed to evaluate whether NADPH oxidase inhibitor (apocynin preconditioning induces expression of Src homology-2 domain-containing phosphatase-1 (SHP-1 to protect against renal ischemia/reperfusion (I/R injury (RI/RI in rats. Rats were pretreated with 50 mg/kg apocynin, then subjected to 45 min ischemia and 24 h reperfusion. The results indicated that apocynin preconditioning improved the recovery of renal function and nitroso-redox balance, reduced oxidative stress injury and inflammation damage, and upregulated expression of SHP-1 as compared to RI/RI group. Therefore our study demonstrated that apocynin preconditioning provided a protection to the kidney against I/R injury in rats partially through inducing expression of SHP-1.

  17. Src homology 2 domain-containing inositol-5-phosphatase and CCAAT enhancer-binding protein beta are targeted by miR-155 in B cells of Emicro-MiR-155 transgenic mice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Costinean, Stefan; Sandhu, Sukhinder K; Pedersen, Irene M

    2009-01-01

    We showed that Emicro-MiR-155 transgenic mice develop acute lymphoblastic leukemia/high-grade lymphoma. Most of these leukemias start at approximately 9 months irrespective of the mouse strain. They are preceded by a polyclonal pre-B-cell proliferation, have variable clinical presentation......, are transplantable, and develop oligo/monoclonal expansion. In this study, we show that in these transgenic mice the B-cell precursors have the highest MiR-155 transgene expression and are at the origin of the leukemias. We determine that Src homology 2 domain-containing inositol-5-phosphatase (SHIP) and CCAAT...... a chain of events that leads to the accumulation of large pre-B cells and acute lymphoblastic leukemia/high-grade lymphoma....

  18. Association of Piebaldism, multiple café-au-lait macules, and intertriginous freckling: clinical evidence of a common pathway between KIT and sprouty-related, ena/vasodilator-stimulated phosphoprotein homology-1 domain containing protein 1 (SPRED1).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chiu, Yvonne E; Dugan, Stefanie; Basel, Donald; Siegel, Dawn H

    2013-01-01

    Piebaldism is a rare genodermatosis caused by KIT mutations. We report the case of a 5-year-old boy who had the white forelock and leukoderma of piebaldism, but the presence of many café-au-lait macules and axillary and inguinal freckling complicated the diagnosis. Patients with similar cutaneous findings have been previously reported, and their disorder has been attributed to an overlap of piebaldism and neurofibromatosis type 1. Legius syndrome is a recently described syndrome caused by Sprouty-related, Ena/vasodilator-stimulated phosphoprotein homology-1 domain containing protein 1 (SPRED1) mutations that also has multiple café-au-lait macules and intertriginous freckling. Based on our current understanding of KIT and SPRED1 protein interactions, we propose that café-au-lait macules and freckling may be seen in some patients with piebaldism and does not necessarily represent coexistence of neurofibromatosis type 1.

  19. Molecular characterization and functional analysis of two petunia PhEILs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Feng Liu

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Ethylene plays an important role in flower senescence of many plants. Arabidopsis ETHYLENE INSENSITIVE3 (EIN3 and its homolog EIL1 are the downstream component of ethylene signaling transduction. However, the function of EILs during flower senescence remains unknown. Here, a petunia EIL gene, PhEIL2, was isolated. Phylogenetic tree showed that PhEIL1, whose coding gene is previously isolated, and PhEIL2 are the homologs of Arabidopsis AtEIL3 and AtEIL1, respectively. The expression of both PhEIL1 and PhEIL2 is the highest in corollas and increased during corolla senescence. Ethylene treatment increased the mRNA level of PhEIL1 but reduced that of PhEIL2. VIGS-mediated both PhEIL1 and PhEIL2 silencing delayed flower senescence, and significantly reduced ethylene production and the expression of PhERF3 and PhCP2, two senescence-associated genes in petunia flowers. The PhEIL2 protein activating transcription domain is identified in the 353-612-amino acids at C-terminal of PhEIL2 and yeast two-hybrid and BiFC assays show that PhEIL2 interacts with PhEIL1, suggesting that PhEIL1 and PhEIL2 might form heterodimers to recognize their targets. These molecular characterizations of PhEIL1 and PhEIL2 in petunia are different with those of in Vigna radiata and Arabidopsis.

  20. Functional implications of C-terminus of TBX5 with high homology to C-terminal domain of yeast DNA-directed RNA polymerase Ⅱ largest subunit

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHOU Zhu-ren; GONG Li-guo; GENG Wen-qing; QIU Guang-rong; SUN Kai-lai

    2008-01-01

    @@ TBX5, as a member of the T-box-containing transcription factor family, encodes a protein of 518 amino acids and is expressed in the embryonic heart and developing limb tissues.1 The coding region of TBX5 cDNA is 1.5 kb with eight exons including the N-terminal portion, the DNA binding domain and C-terminal region. We reported that the abnormality in transcription level of the TbX5 gene might be the mechanism underlying human simple congenital heart disease in the absence of TBX5 mutations.

  1. The Tudor domain protein Tapas, a homolog of the vertebrate Tdrd7, functions in the piRNA pathway to regulate retrotransposons in germline of Drosophila melanogaster.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patil, Veena S; Anand, Amit; Chakrabarti, Alisha; Kai, Toshie

    2014-10-06

    Piwi-interacting RNAs (piRNAs) are a special class of small RNAs that provide defense against transposable elements in animal germline cells. In Drosophila, germline piRNAs are thought to be processed at a unique perinuclear structure, the nuage, that houses piRNA pathway proteins including the Piwi clade of Argonaute family proteins, along with several Tudor domain proteins, RNA helicases and nucleases. We previously demonstrated that Tudor domain protein Tejas (Tej), an ortholog of vertebrate Tdrd5, is an important component of the piRNA pathway. In the current study, we identified the paralog of the Drosophila tej gene, tapas (tap), which is an ortholog of vertebrate Tdrd7. Like Tej, Tap is localized at the nuage. Alone, tap loss leads to a mild increase in transposon expression and decrease in piRNAs targeting transposons expressed in the germline. The tap gene genetically interacts with other piRNA pathway genes and we also show that Tap physically interacts with piRNA pathway components, such as Piwi family proteins Aubergine and Argonaute3 and the RNA helicases Spindle-E and Vasa. Together with tej, tap is required for survival of germline cells during early stages and for polarity formation. We further observed that loss of tej and tap together results in more severe defects in the piRNA pathway in germline cells compared to single mutants: the double-mutant ovaries exhibit mis-localization of piRNA pathway components and significantly greater reduction of piRNAs against transposons predominantly expressed in germline compared to single mutants. The single or double mutants did not have any reduction in piRNAs mapping to transposons predominantly expressed in gonadal somatic cells or those derived from unidirectional clusters such as flamenco. Consistently, the loss of both tej and tap function resulted in mis-localization of Piwi in germline cells, whereas Piwi remained localized to the nucleus in somatic cells. Our observations suggest that tej and tap

  2. Homology and causes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Valen, L M

    1982-09-01

    Homology is resemblance caused by a continuity of information. In biology it is a unified developmental phenomenon. Homologies among and within individuals intergrade in several ways, so historical homology cannot be separated sharply from repetitive homology. Nevertheless, the consequences of historical and repetitive homologies can be mutually contradictory. A detailed discussion of the rise and fall of the "premolar-analogy" theory of homologies of mammalian molar-tooth cusps exemplifies such a contradiction. All other hypotheses of historical homology which are based on repetitive homology, such as the foliar theory of the flower considered phyletically, are suspect.

  3. Structure-Function Study of the N-terminal Domain of Exocyst Subunit Sec3

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baek, Kyuwon; Knödler, Andreas; Lee, Sung Haeng; Zhang, Xiaoyu; Orlando, Kelly; Zhang, Jian; Foskett, Trevor J.; Guo, Wei; Dominguez, Roberto (UPENN)

    2010-04-19

    The exocyst is an evolutionarily conserved octameric complex involved in polarized exocytosis from yeast to humans. The Sec3 subunit of the exocyst acts as a spatial landmark for exocytosis through its ability to bind phospholipids and small GTPases. The structure of the N-terminal domain of Sec3 (Sec3N) was determined ab initio and defines a new subclass of pleckstrin homology (PH) domains along with a new family of proteins carrying this domain. Respectively, N- and C-terminal to the PH domain Sec3N presents an additional {alpha}-helix and two {beta}-strands that mediate dimerization through domain swapping. The structure identifies residues responsible for phospholipid binding, which when mutated in cells impair the localization of exocyst components at the plasma membrane and lead to defects in exocytosis. Through its ability to bind the small GTPase Cdc42 and phospholipids, the PH domain of Sec3 functions as a coincidence detector at the plasma membrane.

  4. Homology, Analogy, and Ethology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beer, Colin G.

    1984-01-01

    Because the main criterion of structural homology (the principle of connections) does not exist for behavioral homology, the utility of the ethological concept of homology has been questioned. The confidence with which behavioral homologies can be claimed varies inversely with taxonomic distance. Thus, conjectures about long-range phylogenetic…

  5. 发现2个FGFR1细胞外段同源的cDNA片段%Discovery of two FGFR1 extracellular domain homologous-cDNA fragments

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    郭京丽; 吴秀丽; 王丽颖; 杨贵贞

    2000-01-01

    Objective: To clone and express fibroblast growth factor receptorl.Methods: RT-PCR is used to isolate FGFR1 cDNA.R-esults:In the process of isolating the extracellular domain cDNA of fibroblast growth factor receptor 1 (FGFR1) from human lung fibroblasts,discovered two cDNA species. After analysis of the cDNAs by cloning and sequencing, have indentified that the two species are FGFR1 extra-cellular domain homologous-cDNA. Conclusion: Don' t know the function of the two cDNA but it is very important that a net phenomenon in theresearch should be taken and studied. Here only present the discovery of the isoforms whose functions will be studied in the future.%目的:克隆表达人成纤维细胞生长因子受体。方法:采用RT-PCR法。结果:在钓取人cDNA的过程中,意外地钓取到2个与FGFR1细胞外段同源的cDNA片段,经克隆和DNA序列分析发现它们是FGFR1细胞外源的cDNA片段。结论:虽然对这2个cDNA片段的功能尚不明确,但这种抓住新现象并进行探究的意识对科研很重要。

  6. Combinatorial Floer Homology

    CERN Document Server

    de Silva, Vin; Salamon, Dietmar

    2012-01-01

    We define combinatorial Floer homology of a transverse pair of noncontractibe nonisotopic embedded loops in an oriented 2-manifold without boundary, prove that it is invariant under isotopy, and prove that it is isomorphic to the original Lagrangian Floer homology.

  7. PH motifs in PAR1&2 endow breast cancer growth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kancharla, A.; Maoz, M.; Jaber, M.; Agranovich, D.; Peretz, T.; Grisaru-Granovsky, S.; Uziely, B.; Bar-Shavit, R.

    2015-01-01

    Although emerging roles of protease-activated receptor1&2 (PAR1&2) in cancer are recognized, their underlying signalling events are poorly understood. Here we show signal-binding motifs in PAR1&2 that are critical for breast cancer growth. This occurs via the association of the pleckstrin homology (PH) domain with Akt/PKB as a key signalling event of PARs. Other PH-domain signal-proteins such as Etk/Bmx and Vav3 also associate with PAR1 and PAR2 through their PH domains. PAR1 and PAR2 bind with priority to Etk/Bmx. A point mutation in PAR2, H349A, but not in R352A, abrogates PH-protein association and is sufficient to markedly reduce PAR2-instigated breast tumour growth in vivo and placental extravillous trophoblast (EVT) invasion in vitro. Similarly, the PAR1 mutant hPar1-7A, which is unable to bind the PH domain, reduces mammary tumours and EVT invasion, endowing these motifs with physiological significance and underscoring the importance of these previously unknown PAR1 and PAR2 PH-domain-binding motifs in both pathological and physiological invasion processes. PMID:26600192

  8. The molecular evolution of PL10 homologs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chang Ti-Cheng

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background PL10 homologs exist in a wide range of eukaryotes from yeast, plants to animals. They share a DEAD motif and belong to the DEAD-box polypeptide 3 (DDX3 subfamily with a major role in RNA metabolism. The lineage-specific expression patterns and various genomic structures and locations of PL10 homologs indicate these homologs have an interesting evolutionary history. Results Phylogenetic analyses revealed that, in addition to the sex chromosome-linked PL10 homologs, DDX3X and DDX3Y, a single autosomal PL10 putative homologous sequence is present in each genome of the studied non-rodent eutheria. These autosomal homologous sequences originated from the retroposition of DDX3X but were pseudogenized during the evolution. In rodents, besides Ddx3x and Ddx3y, we found not only Pl10 but another autosomal homologous region, both of which also originated from the Ddx3x retroposition. These retropositions occurred after the divergence of eutheria and opossum. In contrast, an additional X putative homologous sequence was detected in primates and originated from the transposition of DDX3Y. The evolution of PL10 homologs was under positive selection and the elevated Ka/Ks ratios were observed in the eutherian lineages for DDX3Y but not PL10 and DDX3X, suggesting relaxed selective constraints on DDX3Y. Contrary to the highly conserved domains, several sites with relaxed selective constraints flanking the domains in the mammalian PL10 homologs may play roles in enhancing the gene function in a lineage-specific manner. Conclusion The eutherian DDX3X/DDX3Y in the X/Y-added region originated from the translocation of the ancient PL10 ortholog on the ancestral autosome, whereas the eutherian PL10 was retroposed from DDX3X. In addition to the functional PL10/DDX3X/DDX3Y, conserved homologous regions on the autosomes and X chromosome are present. The autosomal homologs were also derived from DDX3X, whereas the additional X-homologs were derived

  9. Nuclear transfer alters placental gene expression and associated histone modifications of the placental-specific imprinted gene pleckstrin homology-like domain, family A, member 2 (PHLDA2) in cattle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arnold, Daniel R; Gaspar, Roberta C; da Rocha, Carlos V; Sangalli, Juliano R; de Bem, Tiago H C; Corrêa, Carolina A P; Penteado, João C T; Meirelles, Flavio V; Lopes, Flavia L

    2017-03-01

    Abnormal placental development is frequent in nuclear transfer (NT) pregnancies and is likely to be associated with altered epigenetic reprogramming. In the present study, fetal and placental measurements were taken on Day 60 of gestation in cows with pregnancies produced by AI, IVF and NT. Placentas were collected and subjected to histological evaluation, the expression of genes important in trophoblast differentiation and expression of the placental imprinted gene pleckstrin homology-like domain, family A, member 2 (PHLDA2), as well as chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP) for histone marks within the promoter of PHLDA2. Fewer binucleated cells were observed in NT cotyledons, followed by IVF and AI cotyledons (P<0.05). Expression of heart and neural crest derivatives expressed 1 (HAND1), placental lactogen (PL), pregnancy-associated glycoprotein 9 (PAG-9) and PHLDA2 was elevated in NT cotyledons compared with AI cotyledons. Expression of PHLDA2 was higher in IVF than AI samples (P<0.05). ChIP revealed an increase in the permissive mark dimethylation of lysine 4 on histone H3 (H3K4me2), surprisingly associated with the silent allele of PHLDA2, and a decrease in the inhibitory mark H3K9me2 in NT samples. Thus, genes critical for placental development were altered in NT placentas, including an imprinted gene. Allele-specific changes in the permissive histone mark in the PHLDA2 promoter indicate misregulation of imprinting in clones. Abnormal trophoblast differentiation could have resulted in lower numbers of binucleated cells following NT. These results suggest that the altered expression of imprinted genes associated with NT are also caused by changes in histone modifications.

  10. The Bcl-2 homology domain 3 (BH3)-only proteins Bim and bid are functionally active and restrained by anti-apoptotic Bcl-2 family proteins in healthy liver.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kodama, Takahiro; Hikita, Hayato; Kawaguchi, Tsukasa; Saito, Yoshinobu; Tanaka, Satoshi; Shigekawa, Minoru; Shimizu, Satoshi; Li, Wei; Miyagi, Takuya; Kanto, Tatsuya; Hiramatsu, Naoki; Tatsumi, Tomohide; Takehara, Tetsuo

    2013-10-18

    An intrinsic pathway of apoptosis is regulated by the B-cell lymphoma-2 (Bcl-2) family proteins. We previously reported that a fine rheostatic balance between the anti- and pro-apoptotic multidomain Bcl-2 family proteins controls hepatocyte apoptosis in the healthy liver. The Bcl-2 homology domain 3 (BH3)-only proteins set this rheostatic balance toward apoptosis upon activation in the diseased liver. However, their involvement in healthy Bcl-2 rheostasis remains unknown. In the present study, we focused on two BH3-only proteins, Bim and Bid, and we clarified the Bcl-2 network that governs hepatocyte life and death in the healthy liver. We generated hepatocyte-specific Bcl-xL- or Mcl-1-knock-out mice, with or without disrupting Bim and/or Bid, and we examined hepatocyte apoptosis under physiological conditions. We also examined the effect of both Bid and Bim disruption on the hepatocyte apoptosis caused by the inhibition of Bcl-xL and Mcl-1. Spontaneous hepatocyte apoptosis in Bcl-xL- or Mcl-1-knock-out mice was significantly ameliorated by Bim deletion. The disruption of both Bim and Bid completely prevented hepatocyte apoptosis in Bcl-xL-knock-out mice and weakened massive hepatocyte apoptosis via the additional in vivo knockdown of mcl-1 in these mice. Finally, the hepatocyte apoptosis caused by ABT-737, which is a Bcl-xL/Bcl-2/Bcl-w inhibitor, was completely prevented in Bim/Bid double knock-out mice. The BH3-only proteins Bim and Bid are functionally active but are restrained by the anti-apoptotic Bcl-2 family proteins under physiological conditions. Hepatocyte integrity is maintained by the dynamic and well orchestrated Bcl-2 network in the healthy liver.

  11. Real Topological Cyclic Homology

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Høgenhaven, Amalie

    The main topics of this thesis are real topological Hochschild homology and real topological cyclic homology. If a ring or a ring spectrum is equipped with an anti-involution, then it induces additional structure on the topological Hochschild homology spectrum. The group O(2) acts on the spectrum......, where O(2) is the semi-direct product of T, the multiplicative group of complex number of modulus 1, by the group G=Gal(C/R). We refer to this O(2)-spectrum as the real topological Hochschild homology. This generalization leads to a G-equivariant version of topological cyclic homology, which we call...... real topological cyclic homology. The first part of the thesis computes the G-equivariant homotopy type of the real topological cyclic homology of spherical group rings at a prime p with anti-involution induced by taking inverses in the group. The second part of the thesis investigates the derived G...

  12. Lectures on functor homology

    CERN Document Server

    Touzé, Antoine

    2015-01-01

    This book features a series of lectures that explores three different fields in which functor homology (short for homological algebra in functor categories) has recently played a significant role. For each of these applications, the functor viewpoint provides both essential insights and new methods for tackling difficult mathematical problems. In the lectures by Aurélien Djament, polynomial functors appear as coefficients in the homology of infinite families of classical groups, e.g. general linear groups or symplectic groups, and their stabilization. Djament’s theorem states that this stable homology can be computed using only the homology with trivial coefficients and the manageable functor homology. The series includes an intriguing development of Scorichenko’s unpublished results. The lectures by Wilberd van der Kallen lead to the solution of the general cohomological finite generation problem, extending Hilbert’s fourteenth problem and its solution to the context of cohomology. The focus here is o...

  13. The effect of pH on recombinant C-terminal domain of Botulinum Neurotoxin type E (rBoNT/E-HCC

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Seyed Jafar Mousavy

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Recombinant proteins are tending to be the most favorable vaccine-candidates against botulism. Recombinant Carboxy-terminal of botulinum neurotoxin serotype E (rBoNT/E-HCC has been introduced as an efficient vaccine against botulism type E. In this report, we made an effort to investigate the effect of different pH on protein structure to assess if rBoNT/E-HCC could be used as a vaccine for oral administration. Initially, rBoNT/E-HCC was expressed and purified. Structural changes of rBoNT/E-HCC at several pH conditions were studied by various techniques including circular dichroism (CD, fluorescence, aggregation and UV-Vis spectroscopy. The results showed the more compact and more stable structure for rBoNT/E-HCC at acidic pH, and loosely folded structure at alkaline pH. Our finding as the first step of rBoNT/E-HCC evaluation, hopefully introduce it as a suitable vaccine candidate for oral administration.

  14. Lectures on knot homology

    CERN Document Server

    Nawata, Satoshi

    2015-01-01

    We provide various formulations of knot homology that are predicted by string dualities. In addition, we also explain the rich algebraic structure of knot homology which can be understood in terms of geometric representation theory in these formulations. These notes are based on lectures in the workshop "Physics and Mathematics of Link Homology" at Centre de Recherches Math\\'ematiques, Universit\\'e de Montr\\'eal.

  15. Kinase domain mutations of BCR-ABL frequently precede imatinib-based therapy and give rise to relapse in patients with de novo Philadelphia-positive acute lymphoblastic leukemia (Ph+ ALL).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pfeifer, Heike; Wassmann, Barbara; Pavlova, Anna; Wunderle, Lydia; Oldenburg, Johannes; Binckebanck, Anja; Lange, Thoralf; Hochhaus, Andreas; Wystub, Silvia; Brück, Patrick; Hoelzer, Dieter; Ottmann, Oliver G

    2007-07-15

    Acquired imatinib resistance in advanced Philadelphia-positive acute lymphoblastic leukemia (Ph(+) ALL) has been associated with mutations in the kinase domain (KD) of BCR-ABL. We examined the prevalence of KD mutations in newly diagnosed and imatinib-naive Ph(+) ALL patients and assessed their clinical relevance in the setting of uniform frontline therapy with imatinib in combination with chemotherapy. Patients enrolled in the German Multicenter Study Group for Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia (GMALL) trial ADE10 for newly diagnosed elderly Ph(+) ALL were retrospectively examined for the presence of BCR-ABL KD mutations by denaturing high-performance liquid chromatography (D-HPLC), cDNA sequencing, and allele-specific polymerase chain reaction (PCR). A KD mutation was detected in a minor subpopulation of leukemic cells in 40% of newly diagnosed and imatinib-naive patients. At relapse, the dominant cell clone harbored an identical mutation in 90% of cases, the overall prevalence of mutations at relapse was 80%. P-loop mutations predominated and were not associated with an inferior hematologic or molecular remission rate or shorter remission duration compared with unmutated BCR-ABL. BCR-ABL mutations conferring high-level imatinib resistance are present in a substantial proportion of patients with de novo Ph(+) ALL and eventually give rise to relapse. This provides a rationale for the frontline use of kinase inhibitors active against these BCR-ABL mutants.

  16. BCR-ABL1 compound mutations combining key kinase domain positions confer clinical resistance to ponatinib in Ph chromosome-positive leukemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zabriskie, Matthew S; Eide, Christopher A; Tantravahi, Srinivas K; Vellore, Nadeem A; Estrada, Johanna; Nicolini, Franck E; Khoury, Hanna J; Larson, Richard A; Konopleva, Marina; Cortes, Jorge E; Kantarjian, Hagop; Jabbour, Elias J; Kornblau, Steven M; Lipton, Jeffrey H; Rea, Delphine; Stenke, Leif; Barbany, Gisela; Lange, Thoralf; Hernández-Boluda, Juan-Carlos; Ossenkoppele, Gert J; Press, Richard D; Chuah, Charles; Goldberg, Stuart L; Wetzler, Meir; Mahon, Francois-Xavier; Etienne, Gabriel; Baccarani, Michele; Soverini, Simona; Rosti, Gianantonio; Rousselot, Philippe; Friedman, Ran; Deininger, Marie; Reynolds, Kimberly R; Heaton, William L; Eiring, Anna M; Pomicter, Anthony D; Khorashad, Jamshid S; Kelley, Todd W; Baron, Riccardo; Druker, Brian J; Deininger, Michael W; O'Hare, Thomas

    2014-09-08

    Ponatinib is the only currently approved tyrosine kinase inhibitor (TKI) that suppresses all BCR-ABL1 single mutants in Philadelphia chromosome-positive (Ph(+)) leukemia, including the recalcitrant BCR-ABL1(T315I) mutant. However, emergence of compound mutations in a BCR-ABL1 allele may confer ponatinib resistance. We found that clinically reported BCR-ABL1 compound mutants center on 12 key positions and confer varying resistance to imatinib, nilotinib, dasatinib, ponatinib, rebastinib, and bosutinib. T315I-inclusive compound mutants confer high-level resistance to TKIs, including ponatinib. In vitro resistance profiling was predictive of treatment outcomes in Ph(+) leukemia patients. Structural explanations for compound mutation-based resistance were obtained through molecular dynamics simulations. Our findings demonstrate that BCR-ABL1 compound mutants confer different levels of TKI resistance, necessitating rational treatment selection to optimize clinical outcome.

  17. Seifert fibered homology spheres with trivial Heegaard Floer homology

    OpenAIRE

    Eftekhary, Eaman

    2009-01-01

    We show that among Seifert fibered integer homology spheres, Poincare sphere (with either orientation) is the only non-trivial example which has trivial Heegaard Floer homology. Together with an earlier result, this shows that if an integer homology sphere has trivial Heegaard Floer homology, then it is a connected sum of a number of Poincare spheres and hyperbolic homology spheres.

  18. An interpretation of E_n-homology as functor homology

    OpenAIRE

    Livernet, Muriel; Richter, Birgit

    2009-01-01

    We prove that E_n-homology of non-unital commutative algebras can be described as functor homology when one considers functors from a certain category of planar trees with n levels. For different n these homology theories are connected by natural maps, ranging from Hochschild homology and its higher order versions to Gamma homology.

  19. On Galaxies and Homology

    OpenAIRE

    Novak, Gregory S.; Jonsson, Patrik; Primack, Joel R.; Cox, Thomas J.; Dekel, Avishai

    2012-01-01

    The definition of homology for single-component galaxies is clear, but for multi-component (luminous and dark matter) galaxies there is some ambiguity. We attempt to clarify the situation by carefully separating the different concepts of homology that have been used to date. We argue that the most useful definition is that a set of galaxies is homologous if they are the same in all respects up to a set of three dimensional scaling constants which may differ from one galaxy to the next. Noting...

  20. Role of Structure-Based Changes due to Somatic Mutation in Highly Homologous DNA-Binding and DNA-Hydrolyzing Autoantibodies Exemplified by A23P Substitution in the VH Domain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. V. Kozyr

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Anti-DNA autoantibodies are responsible for tissue injury in lupus. A subset of DNA-specific antibodies capable of DNA cleavage can be even more harmful after entering the living cells by destroying nuclear DNA. Origins of anti-DNA autoantibodies are not fully understood, and the mechanism of induction of DNA-cleaving activity remains speculative. The autoantibody BV04-01 derived from lupus-prone mouse is the only DNA-hydrolyzing immunoglobulin with known 3D structure. Identification and analysis of antibodies homologous to BV04-01 may help to understand molecular bases and origins of DNA-cleaving activity of autoantibodies. BLAST search identified murine anti-DNA autoantibody MRL-4 with sequences of variable region genes highly homologous to those of autoantibody BV04-01. Despite significant homology to BV04-01, not only MRL-4 had no DNA-cleaving activity, but also reversion of its unusual P23 mutation to the germline alanine resulted in a dramatic loss of affinity to DNA. Contrary to this effect, transfer of the P23 mutation to the BV04-01 has resulted in a significant drop in DNA binding and almost complete loss of catalytic activity. In the present paper we analyzed the properties of two homologous autoantibodies and mutants thereof and discussed the implications of unusual somatic mutations for the development of autoantibodies with DNA-binding and DNA-hydrolyzing activity.

  1. HOMOLOGY RIGIDITY OF GRASSMANNIANS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Li Fang; Duan Haibao

    2009-01-01

    Applying the theory of GrSbner basis to the Schubert presentation for the cohomology of Grassmannians [2], we extend the homology rigidity results known for the classical Grassmaniaas to the exceptional cases.

  2. Homology, convergence and parallelism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghiselin, Michael T

    2016-01-05

    Homology is a relation of correspondence between parts of parts of larger wholes. It is used when tracking objects of interest through space and time and in the context of explanatory historical narratives. Homologues can be traced through a genealogical nexus back to a common ancestral precursor. Homology being a transitive relation, homologues remain homologous however much they may come to differ. Analogy is a relationship of correspondence between parts of members of classes having no relationship of common ancestry. Although homology is often treated as an alternative to convergence, the latter is not a kind of correspondence: rather, it is one of a class of processes that also includes divergence and parallelism. These often give rise to misleading appearances (homoplasies). Parallelism can be particularly hard to detect, especially when not accompanied by divergences in some parts of the body. © 2015 The Author(s).

  3. Sutures and contact homology I

    CERN Document Server

    Colin, Vincent; Honda, Ko; Hutchings, Michael

    2010-01-01

    We define a relative version of contact homology for contact manifolds with convex boundary, and prove basic properties of this relative contact homology. Similar considerations also hold for embedded contact homology.

  4. Enigma interacts with adaptor protein with PH and SH2 domains to control insulin-induced actin cytoskeleton remodeling and glucose transporter 4 translocation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Barres, Romain; Grémeaux, Thierry; Gual, Philippe

    2006-01-01

    a critical role in actin cytoskeleton organization in fibroblastic cells. Because actin rearrangement is important for insulin-induced glucose transporter 4 (Glut 4) translocation, we studied the potential involvement of Enigma in insulin-induced glucose transport in 3T3-L1 adipocytes. Enigma m......RNA was expressed in differentiated adipocytes and APS and Enigma were colocalized with cortical actin. Expression of an APS mutant unable to bind Enigma increased the insulin-induced Glut 4 translocation to the plasma membrane. By contrast, overexpression of Enigma inhibited insulin-stimulated glucose transport...... and Glut 4 translocation without alterations in proximal insulin signaling. This inhibitory effect was prevented with the deletion of the LIM domains of Enigma. Using time-lapse fluorescent microscopy of green fluorescent protein-actin, we demonstrated that the overexpression of Enigma altered insulin...

  5. The Low pH Unfolded State of the C-terminal Domain of the Ribosomal Protein L9 Contains Significant Secondary Structure in the Absence of Denaturant but is No More Compact than the Low pH Urea Unfolded State

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shan, Bing; Bhattacharya, Shibani; Eliezer, David; Raleigh, Daniel P

    2009-01-01

    There is considerable interest in the properties of the unfolded states of proteins, particularly unfolded states which can be populated in the absence of high concentrations of denaturants. Interest in the unfolded state ensemble reflects the fact that it is the starting point for protein folding as well as the reference state for protein stability studies, and can be the starting state for pathological aggregation. The unfolded state of the C-terminal domain (residues 58 to 149) of the ribosomal protein L9 (CTL9) can be populated in the absence of denaturant at low pH. CTL9 is a 92 residue globular α, β protein. The low pH unfolded state contains more secondary structure than low pH urea unfolded state but it is not a molten globule. Backbone (1H, 13C and 15N) NMR assignments as well as side chain 13Cβ and 1Hβ assignments and 15N R2 values were obtained for the pH 2.0 unfolded form of CTL9 and for the urea unfolded state at pH 2.5. Analysis of the deviations of the chemical shifts from random coil values indicates that residues that comprise the two helices in the native state show a clear preference to adopt helical φ, ψ angles in the pH 2.0 unfolded state. There is a less pronounced but nevertheless clear tendency for residues 107 to 124 to preferentially populate helical φ, ψ values in the unfolded state. The urea unfolded state has no detectable tendency to populate any type of secondary structure even though it is as compact as the pH 2.0 unfolded state. Comparison of the two unfolded forms of CTL9 provides direct experimental evidence that states which differ significantly in their secondary structure can have identical hydrodynamic properties. This in turn demonstrates that global parameters such as Rh or Rg are very poor indicators of “random coil” behavior. PMID:18707127

  6. Singular (Lipschitz) homology and homology of integral currents

    OpenAIRE

    Riedweg, Christian; Schäppi, Daniel

    2009-01-01

    We compare the homology groups $H_n ^{IC}(X)$ of the chain complex of integral currents with compact support of a metric space $X$ with the singular Lipschitz homology $H^L_n (X)$ and with ordinary singular homology. If $X$ satisfies certain cone inequalities all these homology theories coincide. On the other hand, for the Hawaiian Earring the homology of integral currents differs from the singular Lipschitz homology and it differs also from the classical singular homology $H_n(X)$.

  7. Braid Floer homology

    Science.gov (United States)

    van den Berg, J. B.; Ghrist, R.; Vandervorst, R. C.; Wójcik, W.

    2015-09-01

    Area-preserving diffeomorphisms of a 2-disc can be regarded as time-1 maps of (non-autonomous) Hamiltonian flows on R / Z ×D2. The periodic flow-lines define braid (conjugacy) classes, up to full twists. We examine the dynamics relative to such braid classes and define a new invariant for such classes, the BRAID FLOER HOMOLOGY. This refinement of Floer homology, originally used for the Arnol'd Conjecture, yields a Morse-type forcing theory for periodic points of area-preserving diffeomorphisms of the 2-disc based on braiding. Contributions of this paper include (1) a monotonicity lemma for the behavior of the nonlinear Cauchy-Riemann equations with respect to algebraic lengths of braids; (2) establishment of the topological invariance of the resulting braid Floer homology; (3) a shift theorem describing the effect of twisting braids in terms of shifting the braid Floer homology; (4) computation of examples; and (5) a forcing theorem for the dynamics of Hamiltonian disc maps based on braid Floer homology.

  8. Membrane binding domains

    OpenAIRE

    Hurley, James H.

    2006-01-01

    Eukaryotic signaling and trafficking proteins are rich in modular domains that bind cell membranes. These binding events are tightly regulated in space and time. The structural, biochemical, and biophysical mechanisms for targeting have been worked out for many families of membrane binding domains. This review takes a comparative view of seven major classes of membrane binding domains, the C1, C2, PH, FYVE, PX, ENTH, and BAR domains. These domains use a combination of specific headgroup inter...

  9. Gorenstein homological dimensions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Holm, Henrik Granau

    2004-01-01

    In basic homological algebra, the projective, injective and 2at dimensions of modules play an important and fundamental role. In this paper, the closely related Gorenstein projective, Gorenstein injective and Gorenstein 2at dimensions are studied. There is a variety of nice results about Gorenstein...

  10. Gorenstein homological dimensions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Holm, Henrik Granau

    2004-01-01

    In basic homological algebra, the projective, injective and 2at dimensions of modules play an important and fundamental role. In this paper, the closely related Gorenstein projective, Gorenstein injective and Gorenstein 2at dimensions are studied. There is a variety of nice results about Gorenstein...

  11. Benchmarking the next generation of homology inference tools.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saripella, Ganapathi Varma; Sonnhammer, Erik L L; Forslund, Kristoffer

    2016-09-01

    Over the last decades, vast numbers of sequences were deposited in public databases. Bioinformatics tools allow homology and consequently functional inference for these sequences. New profile-based homology search tools have been introduced, allowing reliable detection of remote homologs, but have not been systematically benchmarked. To provide such a comparison, which can guide bioinformatics workflows, we extend and apply our previously developed benchmark approach to evaluate the 'next generation' of profile-based approaches, including CS-BLAST, HHSEARCH and PHMMER, in comparison with the non-profile based search tools NCBI-BLAST, USEARCH, UBLAST and FASTA. We generated challenging benchmark datasets based on protein domain architectures within either the PFAM + Clan, SCOP/Superfamily or CATH/Gene3D domain definition schemes. From each dataset, homologous and non-homologous protein pairs were aligned using each tool, and standard performance metrics calculated. We further measured congruence of domain architecture assignments in the three domain databases. CSBLAST and PHMMER had overall highest accuracy. FASTA, UBLAST and USEARCH showed large trade-offs of accuracy for speed optimization. Profile methods are superior at inferring remote homologs but the difference in accuracy between methods is relatively small. PHMMER and CSBLAST stand out with the highest accuracy, yet still at a reasonable computational cost. Additionally, we show that less than 0.1% of Swiss-Prot protein pairs considered homologous by one database are considered non-homologous by another, implying that these classifications represent equivalent underlying biological phenomena, differing mostly in coverage and granularity. Benchmark datasets and all scripts are placed at (http://sonnhammer.org/download/Homology_benchmark). forslund@embl.de Supplementary data are available at Bioinformatics online. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press.

  12. Monopole Floer homology for rational homology 3-spheres

    OpenAIRE

    Froyshov, Kim A.

    2010-01-01

    We give a new construction of monopole Floer homology for $\\text{spin}^c$ rational homology $3$ -spheres. As applications, we define two invariants of certain $4$ -manifolds with $b_1=1$ and $b^+=0$ .

  13. Chicken Ig-like receptor B2, a member of a multigene family, is mainly expressed on B lymphocytes, recruits both Src homology 2 domain containing protein tyrosine phosphatase (SHP)-1 and SHP-2, and inhibits proliferation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Viertlboeck, B.C.; Crooijmans, R.P.M.A.; Groenen, M.A.M.; Gobel, T.W.

    2004-01-01

    Ig-like inhibitory receptors have been the focus of intensive research particularly in mouse and human. We report the cloning and characterization of three novel inhibitory chicken Ig-like receptors (CHIR) that display a two Ig-domain extracellular structure, a transmembrane region lacking charged

  14. Algebra V homological algebra

    CERN Document Server

    Shafarevich, I

    1994-01-01

    This book, the first printing of which was published as volume 38 of the Encyclopaedia of Mathematical Sciences, presents a modern approach to homological algebra, based on the systematic use of the terminology and ideas of derived categories and derived functors. The book contains applications of homological algebra to the theory of sheaves on topological spaces, to Hodge theory, and to the theory of modules over rings of algebraic differential operators (algebraic D-modules). The authors Gelfand and Manin explain all the main ideas of the theory of derived categories. Both authors are well-known researchers and the second, Manin, is famous for his work in algebraic geometry and mathematical physics. The book is an excellent reference for graduate students and researchers in mathematics and also for physicists who use methods from algebraic geometry and algebraic topology.

  15. Rabinowitz Floer homology: A survey

    CERN Document Server

    Albers, Peter

    2010-01-01

    Rabinowitz Floer homology is the semi-infinite dimensional Morse homology associated to the Rabinowitz action functional used in the pioneering work of Rabinowitz. Gradient flow lines are solutions of a vortex-like equation. In this survey article we describe the construction of Rabinowitz Floer homology and its applications to symplectic and contact topology, global Hamiltonian perturbations and the study of magnetic fields.

  16. HomologMiner: looking for homologous genomic groups in whole genomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hou, Minmei; Berman, Piotr; Hsu, Chih-Hao; Harris, Robert S

    2007-04-15

    Complex genomes contain numerous repeated sequences, and genomic duplication is believed to be a main evolutionary mechanism to obtain new functions. Several tools are available for de novo repeat sequence identification, and many approaches exist for clustering homologous protein sequences. We present an efficient new approach to identify and cluster homologous DNA sequences with high accuracy at the level of whole genomes, excluding low-complexity repeats, tandem repeats and annotated interspersed repeats. We also determine the boundaries of each group member so that it closely represents a biological unit, e.g. a complete gene, or a partial gene coding a protein domain. We developed a program called HomologMiner to identify homologous groups applicable to genome sequences that have been properly marked for low-complexity repeats and annotated interspersed repeats. We applied it to the whole genomes of human (hg17), macaque (rheMac2) and mouse (mm8). Groups obtained include gene families (e.g. olfactory receptor gene family, zinc finger families), unannotated interspersed repeats and additional homologous groups that resulted from recent segmental duplications. Our program incorporates several new methods: a new abstract definition of consistent duplicate units, a new criterion to remove moderately frequent tandem repeats, and new algorithmic techniques. We also provide preliminary analysis of the output on the three genomes mentioned above, and show several applications including identifying boundaries of tandem gene clusters and novel interspersed repeat families. All programs and datasets are downloadable from www.bx.psu.edu/miller_lab.

  17. Periodic cyclic homology of affine Hecke algebras

    CERN Document Server

    Solleveld, Maarten

    2009-01-01

    This is the author's PhD-thesis, which was written in 2006. The version posted here is identical to the printed one. Instead of an abstract, the short list of contents: Preface 5 1 Introduction 9 2 K-theory and cyclic type homology theories 13 3 Affine Hecke algebras 61 4 Reductive p-adic groups 103 5 Parameter deformations in affine Hecke algebras 129 6 Examples and calculations 169 A Crossed products 223 Bibliography 227 Index 237 Samenvatting 245 Curriculum vitae 253

  18. Field homology: a meaningful definition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cookson, K

    2001-02-01

    Field homology refers to populations of cells that derive from evolutionarily conserved regions of embryos but are distributed across sets of adult morphological structures that cannot be placed in one-to-one correspondance. The concept of field homology has proven especially attractive to comparative neurologists because it allows them to deal with the fact that sets of nuclei or nuclear subdivisions often cannot be compared on a one-to-one basis across phyletic groups. However, the concept of field homology has recently come under criticism. It has been argued that field homology is theoretically impossible because it requires sequences of developmental stages to be both evolutionarily conserved and evolutionarily modified. It has also been argued that field homology allows overly vague comparisons of adult morphological structures, fails to account for homologous structures that derive from non-homologous embryonic sources, and establishes overly rigid links between embryonic and adult morphology. All of these criticisms may be adequately addressed by explaining field homology in terms of differentiation. The present paper explains field homology in terms of differentiation using the amniote dorsal thalamus to illustrate major points. It is concluded that field homology is a meaningful concept when defined in terms of differentiation, applied to appropriate cases, and properly limited in its comparisons of adult structures.

  19. Rhythmical bimanual force production: homologous and non-homologous muscles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kennedy, Deanna M; Boyle, Jason B; Rhee, Joohyun; Shea, Charles H

    2015-01-01

    The experiment was designed to determine participants' ability to coordinate a bimanual multifrequency pattern of isometric forces using homologous or non-homologous muscles. Lissajous feedback was provided to reduce perceptual and attentional constraints. The primary purpose was to determine whether the activation of homologous and non-homologous muscles resulted in different patterns of distortions in the left limb forces that are related to the forces produced by the right limb. The task was to rhythmically produce a 1:2 pattern of isometric forces by exerting isometric forces on the left side force transducer with the left arm that was coordinated with the pattern of isometric forces produced on the right side force transducer with the right arm. The results indicated that participants were able to 'tune-in' a 1:2 coordination patterns using homologous (triceps muscles of the left and right limbs) and using non-homologous muscles (biceps left limb and triceps right limb) when provided Lissajous feedback. However, distinct but consistent and identifiable distortions in the left limb force traces were observed for both the homologous and non-homologous tasks. For the homologous task, the interference occurred in the left limb when the right limb was initiating and releasing force. For the non-homologous task, the interference in the left limb force occurred only when the right limb was releasing force. In both conditions, the interference appeared to continue from the point of force initiation and/or release to peak force velocity. The overall results are consistent with the notion that neural crosstalk manifests differently during the coordination of the limbs depending upon whether homologous or non-homologous muscles are activated.

  20. Homology, homoplasy, novelty, and behavior.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hall, Brian K

    2013-01-01

    Richard Owen coined the modern definition of homology in 1843. Owen's conception of homology was pre-evolutionary, nontransformative (homology maintained basic plans or archetypes), and applied to the fully formed structures of animals. I sketch out the transition to an evolutionary approach to homology in which all classes of similarity are interpreted against the single branching tree of life, and outline the evidence for the application of homology across all levels and features of the biological hierarchy, including behavior. Owen contrasted homology with analogy. While this is not incorrect it is a pre-evolutionary contrast. Lankester [Lankester [1870] Journal of Natural History, 6 (31), 34-43] proposed homoplasy as the class of homology applicable to features formed by independent evolution. Today we identify homology, convergence, parallelism, and novelties as patterns of evolutionary change. A central issue in homology [Owen [1843] Lectures on comparative anatomy and physiology of the invertebrate animals, delivered at the Royal College of Surgeons in 1843. London: Longman, Brown, Green & Longmans] has been whether homology of features-the "same" portion of the brain in different species, for example-depends upon those features sharing common developmental pathways. Owen did not require this criterion, although he observed that homologues often do share developmental pathways (and we now know, often share gene pathways). A similar situation has been explored in the study of behavior, especially whether behaviors must share a common structural, developmental, neural, or genetic basis to be classified as homologous. However, and importantly, development and genes evolve. As shown with both theory and examples, morphological and behavioral features of the phenotype can be homologized as structural or behavioral homologues, respectively, even when their developmental or genetic bases differ (are not homologous). Copyright © 2012 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  1. A Domain Analysis Bibliography

    Science.gov (United States)

    1990-06-01

    Bauhaus , a prototype CASE workstation for D-SAPS development. [ARAN88A] Guillermo F. Arango. Domain Engineering for Software Reuse. PhD thesis...34 VITA90B: Domain Analysis within the ISEC Rapid Center 48 CMU/SEI-90-SR-3 Appendix III Alphabetical by Organization/Project BAUHAUS * ALLE87A

  2. Contribution of intracellular calcium and pH in ischemic uncoupling of cardiac gap junction channels formed of connexins 43, 40, and 45: a critical function of C-terminal domain.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giriraj Sahu

    Full Text Available Ischemia is known to inhibit gap junction (GJ mediated intercellular communication. However the detail mechanisms of this inhibition are largely unknown. In the present study, we determined the vulnerability of different cardiac GJ channels formed of connexins (Cxs 43, 40, and 45 to simulated ischemia, by creating oxygen glucose deprived (OGD condition. 5 minutes of OGD decreased the junctional conductance (Gj of Cx43, Cx40 and Cx45 by 53±3%, 64±1% and 85±2% respectively. Reduction of Gj was prevented completely by restricting the change of both intracellular calcium ([Ca(2+]i and pH (pHi with potassium phosphate buffer. Clamping of either [Ca(2+]i or pHi, through BAPTA (2 mM or HEPES (80 mM respectively, offered partial resistance to ischemic uncoupling. Anti-calmodulin antibody attenuated the uncoupling of Cx43 and Cx45 significantly but not of Cx40. Furthermore, OGD could reduce only 26±2% of Gj in C-terminus (CT truncated Cx43 (Cx43-Δ257. Tethering CT of Cx43 to the CT-truncated Cx40 (Cx40-Δ249, and Cx45 (Cx45-Δ272 helped to resist OGD mediated uncoupling. Moreover, CT domain played a significant role in determining the junction current density and plaque diameter. Our results suggest; OGD mediated uncoupling of GJ channels is primarily due to elevated [Ca(2+]i and acidic pHi, though the latter contributes more. Among Cx43, Cx40 and Cx45, Cx43 is the most resistant to OGD while Cx45 is the most sensitive one. CT of Cx43 has major necessary elements for OGD induced uncoupling and it can complement CT of Cx40 and Cx45.

  3. Computational Homology for Software Validation

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-03-01

    COMPUTATIONAL HOMOLOGY FOR SOFTWARE VALIDATION SYRACUSE UNIVERSITY MARCH 2015 FINAL TECHNICAL REPORT APPROVED FOR PUBLIC RELEASE; DISTRIBUTION...COVERED (From - To) SEP 2011 – SEP 2014 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE COMPUTATIONAL HOMOLOGY FOR SOFTWARE VALIDATION 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER FA8750-11-2-0275 5b...verdict as to whether the application of persistent homology to the problem of obtaining objective signatures that would indicate the present or absence

  4. Detection of a novel mutation in the SRC homology domain 2 (SH2) of Bruton`s tyrosine kinase and direct female carrier evaluation in a family with x-linked agammaglobulinemia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schuster, V.; Seidenspinner, S.; Wolfgang Kreth, H. [Univ. of Wuerzburg (Germany)

    1996-05-03

    X-linked agammaglobulinemia (XLA) is an inherited immunodeficiency disease with a block in differentiation from pre-B to B cells resulting in a selective defect in the humoral immune response. Affected males have very low concentrations of serum immunoglobulins leading predominantly to recurrent bacterial infections beginning at age 6 to 18 months. The gene responsible for XLA was identified recently to encode a cytoplasmatic tyrosine kinase (Bruton`s tyrosine kinase, BTK). We have analyzed the BTK gene in a large family in which two brothers presented with the severe phenotype of XLA. Genomic DNA of affected boys and from healthy relatives was amplified by PCR with primers specific for the putative promoter region and for all 19 exons, including flanking intron boundaries, and subsequently screened for mutations using single strand conformation polymorphism (SSCP) analysis. Altered single strand band patterns were found using primers specific for exon 10, 15, and 18. Direct cycle-sequencing of these BTK segments detected two known polymorphisms in intron 14 and in exon 18. Sequencing of exon 10 from two boys with XLA demonstrated a novel point mutation in the SH2 domain of BTK. Direct identification of healthy female carriers in three generations was performed by amplification mutagenesis using PCR with a modified first primer. This method can easily be applied also to prenatal diagnosis. 25 refs., 3 figs.

  5. Grid diagrams and Khovanov homology

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Droz, Jean-Marie; Wagner, Emmanuel

    2009-01-01

    We explain how to compute the Jones polynomial of a link from one of its grid diagrams and we observe a connection between Bigelow’s homological definition of the Jones polynomial and Kauffman’s definition of the Jones polynomial. Consequently, we prove that the Maslov grading on the Seidel......–Smith symplectic link invariant coincides with the difference between the homological grading on Khovanov homology and the Jones grading on Khovanov homology. We give some evidence for the truth of the Seidel–Smith conjecture....

  6. Structural and biophysical characterization of the cytoplasmic domains of human BAP29 and BAP31.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quistgaard, Esben M; Löw, Christian; Moberg, Per; Guettou, Fatma; Maddi, Karthik; Nordlund, Pär

    2013-01-01

    Two members of the B-cell associated 31 (BAP31) family are found in humans; BAP29 and BAP31. These are ubiquitously expressed receptors residing in the endoplasmic reticulum. BAP31 functions in sorting of membrane proteins and in caspase-8 mediated apoptosis, while BAP29 appears to mainly corroborate with BAP31 in sorting. The N-terminal half of these proteins is membrane-bound while the C-terminal half is cytoplasmic. The latter include the so called variant of death effector domain (vDED), which shares weak sequence homology with DED domains. Here we present two structures of BAP31 vDED determined from a single and a twinned crystal, grown at pH 8.0 and pH 4.2, respectively. These structures show that BAP31 vDED forms a dimeric parallel coiled coil with no structural similarity to DED domains. Solution studies support this conclusion and strongly suggest that an additional α-helical domain is present in the C-terminal cytoplasmic region, probably forming a second coiled coil. The thermal stability of BAP31 vDED is quite modest at neutral pH, suggesting that it may assemble in a dynamic fashion in vivo. Surprisingly, BAP29 vDED is partially unfolded at pH 7, while a coiled coil is formed at pH 4.2 in vitro. It is however likely that folding of the domain is triggered by other factors than low pH in vivo. We found no evidence for direct interaction of the cytoplasmic domains of BAP29 and BAP31.

  7. Structural and biophysical characterization of the cytoplasmic domains of human BAP29 and BAP31.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Esben M Quistgaard

    Full Text Available Two members of the B-cell associated 31 (BAP31 family are found in humans; BAP29 and BAP31. These are ubiquitously expressed receptors residing in the endoplasmic reticulum. BAP31 functions in sorting of membrane proteins and in caspase-8 mediated apoptosis, while BAP29 appears to mainly corroborate with BAP31 in sorting. The N-terminal half of these proteins is membrane-bound while the C-terminal half is cytoplasmic. The latter include the so called variant of death effector domain (vDED, which shares weak sequence homology with DED domains. Here we present two structures of BAP31 vDED determined from a single and a twinned crystal, grown at pH 8.0 and pH 4.2, respectively. These structures show that BAP31 vDED forms a dimeric parallel coiled coil with no structural similarity to DED domains. Solution studies support this conclusion and strongly suggest that an additional α-helical domain is present in the C-terminal cytoplasmic region, probably forming a second coiled coil. The thermal stability of BAP31 vDED is quite modest at neutral pH, suggesting that it may assemble in a dynamic fashion in vivo. Surprisingly, BAP29 vDED is partially unfolded at pH 7, while a coiled coil is formed at pH 4.2 in vitro. It is however likely that folding of the domain is triggered by other factors than low pH in vivo. We found no evidence for direct interaction of the cytoplasmic domains of BAP29 and BAP31.

  8. A PHF8 homolog in C. elegans promotes DNA repair via homologous recombination.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Changrim Lee

    Full Text Available PHF8 is a JmjC domain-containing histone demethylase, defects in which are associated with X-linked mental retardation. In this study, we examined the roles of two PHF8 homologs, JMJD-1.1 and JMJD-1.2, in the model organism C. elegans in response to DNA damage. A deletion mutation in either of the genes led to hypersensitivity to interstrand DNA crosslinks (ICLs, while only mutation of jmjd-1.1 resulted in hypersensitivity to double-strand DNA breaks (DSBs. In response to ICLs, JMJD-1.1 did not affect the focus formation of FCD-2, a homolog of FANCD2, a key protein in the Fanconi anemia pathway. However, the dynamic behavior of RPA-1 and RAD-51 was affected by the mutation: the accumulations of both proteins at ICLs appeared normal, but their subsequent disappearance was retarded, suggesting that later steps of homologous recombination were defective. Similar changes in the dynamic behavior of RPA-1 and RAD-51 were seen in response to DSBs, supporting a role of JMJD-1.1 in homologous recombination. Such a role was also supported by our finding that the hypersensitivity of jmjd-1.1 worms to ICLs was rescued by knockdown of lig-4, a homolog of Ligase 4 active in nonhomologous end-joining. The hypersensitivity of jmjd-1.1 worms to ICLs was increased by rad-54 knockdown, suggesting that JMJD-1.1 acts in parallel with RAD-54 in modulating chromatin structure. Indeed, the level of histone H3 Lys9 tri-methylation, a marker of heterochromatin, was higher in jmjd-1.1 cells than in wild-type cells. We conclude that the histone demethylase JMJD-1.1 influences homologous recombination either by relaxing heterochromatin structure or by indirectly regulating the expression of multiple genes affecting DNA repair.

  9. Role of the C-Terminal SH3 Domain and N-Terminal Tyrosine Phosphorylation in Regulation of Tim and Related Dbl-Family Proteins†

    OpenAIRE

    Marielle E Yohe; Rossman, Kent; Sondek, John

    2008-01-01

    Dbl-related oncoproteins are guanine nucleotide exchange factors (GEFs) specific for Rho-family GTPases and typically possess tandem Dbl (DH) and pleckstrin homology (PH) domains that act in concert to catalyze exchange. Although the exchange potential of many Dbl-family proteins is constitutively activated by truncation, the precise mechanisms of regulation for many Dbl-family proteins are unknown. Tim and Vav are distantly related Dbl-family proteins that are similarly regulated; their Dbl ...

  10. Repeat-swap homology modeling of secondary active transporters: updated protocol and prediction of elevator-type mechanisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vergara-Jaque, Ariela; Fenollar-Ferrer, Cristina; Kaufmann, Desirée; Forrest, Lucy R

    2015-01-01

    Secondary active transporters are critical for neurotransmitter clearance and recycling during synaptic transmission and uptake of nutrients. These proteins mediate the movement of solutes against their concentration gradients, by using the energy released in the movement of ions down pre-existing concentration gradients. To achieve this, transporters conform to the so-called alternating-access hypothesis, whereby the protein adopts at least two conformations in which the substrate binding sites are exposed to one or other side of the membrane, but not both simultaneously. Structures of a bacterial homolog of neuronal glutamate transporters, GltPh, in several different conformational states have revealed that the protein structure is asymmetric in the outward- and inward-open states, and that the conformational change connecting them involves a elevator-like movement of a substrate binding domain across the membrane. The structural asymmetry is created by inverted-topology repeats, i.e., structural repeats with similar overall folds whose transmembrane topologies are related to each other by two-fold pseudo-symmetry around an axis parallel to the membrane plane. Inverted repeats have been found in around three-quarters of secondary transporter folds. Moreover, the (a)symmetry of these systems has been successfully used as a bioinformatic tool, called "repeat-swap modeling" to predict structural models of a transporter in one conformation using the known structure of the transporter in the complementary conformation as a template. Here, we describe an updated repeat-swap homology modeling protocol, and calibrate the accuracy of the method using GltPh, for which both inward- and outward-facing conformations are known. We then apply this repeat-swap homology modeling procedure to a concentrative nucleoside transporter, VcCNT, which has a three-dimensional arrangement related to that of GltPh. The repeat-swapped model of VcCNT predicts that nucleoside transport also

  11. Ahcyl2 upregulates NBCe1-B via multiple serine residues of the PEST domain-mediated association.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Pil Whan; Ahn, Jeong Yeal; Yang, Dongki

    2016-07-01

    Inositol-1,4,5-triphosphate [IP3] receptors binding protein released with IP3 (IRBIT) was previously reported as an activator of NBCe1-B. Recent studies have characterized IRBIT homologue S-Adenosylhomocysteine hydrolase-like 2 (AHCYL2). AHCYL2 is highly homologous to IRBIT (88%) and heteromerizes with IRBIT. The two important domains in the N-terminus of AHCYL2 are a PEST domain and a coiled-coil domain which are highly comparable to those in IRBIT. Therefore, in this study, we tried to identify the role of those domains in mouse AHCYL2 (Ahcyl2), and we succeeded in identifying PEST domain of Ahcyl2 as a regulation region for NBCe1-B activity. Site directed mutagenesis and coimmunoprecipitation assay showed that NBCe1-B binds to the N-terminal Ahcyl2-PEST domain, and its binding is determined by the phosphorylation of 4 critical serine residues (Ser151, Ser154, Ser157, and Ser160) in Ahcyl2 PEST domain. Also we revealed that 4 critical serine residues in Ahcyl2 PEST domain are indispensable for the activation of NBCe1-B using measurement of intracellular pH experiment. Thus, these results suggested that the NBCe1-B is interacted with 4 critical serine residues in Ahcyl2 PEST domain, which play an important role in intracellular pH regulation through NBCe1-B.

  12. Relative Homological Algebra Volume 1

    CERN Document Server

    2011-01-01

    This is the second revised edition of an introduction to contemporary relative homological algebra. It supplies important material essential to understand topics in algebra, algebraic geometry and algebraic topology. Each section comes with exercises providing practice problems for students as well as additional important results for specialists. The book is also suitable for an introductory course in commutative and ordinary homological algebra.

  13. Evolving the Concept of Homology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naples, Virginia L.; Miller, Jon S.

    2009-01-01

    Understanding homology is fundamental to learning about evolution. The present study shows an exercise that can be varied in complexity, for which students compile research illustrating the fate of homologous fish skull elements, and assemble a mural to serve as a learning aid. The skull of the most primitive living Actinopterygian (bony fish),…

  14. Domains and domain loss

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Haberland, Hartmut

    2005-01-01

    The domain concept, originally suggested by Schmidt-Rohr in the 1930’s (as credited in Fishman’s writings in the 1970s), was an attempt to sort out different areas of language use in multilingual societies, which are relevant for language choice. In Fishman’s version, domains were considered...... not described in terms of domains, and recent research e.g. about the multilingual communities in the Danish-German border area seems to confirm this....

  15. Homology theory on algebraic varieties

    CERN Document Server

    Wallace, Andrew H

    1958-01-01

    Homology Theory on Algebraic Varieties, Volume 6 deals with the principles of homology theory in algebraic geometry and includes the main theorems first formulated by Lefschetz, one of which is interpreted in terms of relative homology and another concerns the Poincaré formula. The actual details of the proofs of these theorems are introduced by geometrical descriptions, sometimes aided with diagrams. This book is comprised of eight chapters and begins with a discussion on linear sections of an algebraic variety, with emphasis on the fibring of a variety defined over the complex numbers. The n

  16. Compositional Homology and Creative Thinking

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Salvatore Tedesco

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available The concept of homology is the most solid theoretical basis elaborated by the morphological thinking during its history. The enucleation of some general criteria for the interpretation of homology is today a fundamental tool for life sciences, and for restoring their own opening to the question of qualitative innovation that arose so powerfully in the original Darwinian project. The aim of this paper is to verify the possible uses of the concept of compositional homology in order to provide of an adequate understanding of the dynamics of creative thinking.

  17. Fivebranes and 3-manifold homology

    CERN Document Server

    Gukov, Sergei; Vafa, Cumrun

    2016-01-01

    Motivated by physical constructions of homological knot invariants, we study their analogs for closed 3-manifolds. We show that fivebrane compactifications provide a universal description of various old and new homological invariants of 3-manifolds. In terms of 3d/3d correspondence, such invariants are given by the Q-cohomology of the Hilbert space of partially topologically twisted 3d N=2 theory T[M_3] on a Riemann surface with defects. We demonstrate this by concrete and explicit calculations in the case of monopole/Heegaard Floer homology and a 3-manifold analog of Khovanov-Rozansky link homology. The latter gives a categorification of Chern-Simons partition function. Some of the new key elements include the explicit form of the S-transform and a novel connection between categorification and a previously mysterious role of Eichler integrals in Chern-Simons theory.

  18. Fivebranes and 3-manifold homology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gukov, Sergei; Putrov, Pavel; Vafa, Cumrun

    2017-07-01

    Motivated by physical constructions of homological knot invariants, we study their analogs for closed 3-manifolds. We show that fivebrane compactifications provide a universal description of various old and new homological invariants of 3-manifolds. In terms of 3d/3d correspondence, such invariants are given by the Q-cohomology of the Hilbert space of partially topologically twisted 3d N=2 theory T[ M 3] on a Riemann surface with defects. We demonstrate this by concrete and explicit calculations in the case of monopole/Heegaard Floer homology and a 3-manifold analog of Khovanov-Rozansky link homology. The latter gives a categorification of Chern-Simons partition function. Some of the new key elements include the explicit form of the S-transform and a novel connection between categorification and a previously mysterious role of Eichler integrals in Chern-Simons theory.

  19. The evolution of function within the Nudix homology clan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Srouji, John R; Xu, Anting; Park, Annsea; Kirsch, Jack F; Brenner, Steven E

    2017-05-01

    The Nudix homology clan encompasses over 80,000 protein domains from all three domains of life, defined by homology to each other. Proteins with a domain from this clan fall into four general functional classes: pyrophosphohydrolases, isopentenyl diphosphate isomerases (IDIs), adenine/guanine mismatch-specific adenine glycosylases (A/G-specific adenine glycosylases), and nonenzymatic activities such as protein/protein interaction and transcriptional regulation. The largest group, pyrophosphohydrolases, encompasses more than 100 distinct hydrolase specificities. To understand the evolution of this vast number of activities, we assembled and analyzed experimental and structural data for 205 Nudix proteins collected from the literature. We corrected erroneous functions or provided more appropriate descriptions for 53 annotations described in the Gene Ontology Annotation database in this family, and propose 275 new experimentally-based annotations. We manually constructed a structure-guided sequence alignment of 78 Nudix proteins. Using the structural alignment as a seed, we then made an alignment of 347 "select" Nudix homology domains, curated from structurally determined, functionally characterized, or phylogenetically important Nudix domains. Based on our review of Nudix pyrophosphohydrolase structures and specificities, we further analyzed a loop region downstream of the Nudix hydrolase motif previously shown to contact the substrate molecule and possess known functional motifs. This loop region provides a potential structural basis for the functional radiation and evolution of substrate specificity within the hydrolase family. Finally, phylogenetic analyses of the 347 select protein domains and of the complete Nudix homology clan revealed general monophyly with regard to function and a few instances of probable homoplasy. Proteins 2017; 85:775-811. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2016 The Authors. Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  20. Structure and function of the C-terminal domain of MrpA in the Bacillus subtilis Mrp-antiporter complex--the evolutionary progenitor of the long horizontal helix in complex I.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Virzintiene, Egle; Moparthi, Vamsi K; Al-Eryani, Yusra; Shumbe, Leonard; Górecki, Kamil; Hägerhäll, Cecilia

    2013-10-11

    MrpA and MrpD are homologous to NuoL, NuoM and NuoN in complex I over the first 14 transmembrane helices. In this work, the C-terminal domain of MrpA, outside this conserved area, was investigated. The transmembrane orientation was found to correspond to that of NuoJ in complex I. We have previously demonstrated that the subunit NuoK is homologous to MrpC. The function of the MrpA C-terminus was tested by expression in a previously used Bacillus subtilis model system. At neutral pH, the truncated MrpA still worked, but at pH 8.4, where Mrp-complex formation is needed for function, the C-terminal domain of MrpA was absolutely required.

  1. Object-oriented persistent homology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Bao; Wei, Guo-Wei

    2016-01-01

    Persistent homology provides a new approach for the topological simplification of big data via measuring the life time of intrinsic topological features in a filtration process and has found its success in scientific and engineering applications. However, such a success is essentially limited to qualitative data classification and analysis. Indeed, persistent homology has rarely been employed for quantitative modeling and prediction. Additionally, the present persistent homology is a passive tool, rather than a proactive technique, for classification and analysis. In this work, we outline a general protocol to construct object-oriented persistent homology methods. By means of differential geometry theory of surfaces, we construct an objective functional, namely, a surface free energy defined on the data of interest. The minimization of the objective functional leads to a Laplace-Beltrami operator which generates a multiscale representation of the initial data and offers an objective oriented filtration process. The resulting differential geometry based object-oriented persistent homology is able to preserve desirable geometric features in the evolutionary filtration and enhances the corresponding topological persistence. The cubical complex based homology algorithm is employed in the present work to be compatible with the Cartesian representation of the Laplace-Beltrami flow. The proposed Laplace-Beltrami flow based persistent homology method is extensively validated. The consistence between Laplace-Beltrami flow based filtration and Euclidean distance based filtration is confirmed on the Vietoris-Rips complex for a large amount of numerical tests. The convergence and reliability of the present Laplace-Beltrami flow based cubical complex filtration approach are analyzed over various spatial and temporal mesh sizes. The Laplace-Beltrami flow based persistent homology approach is utilized to study the intrinsic topology of proteins and fullerene molecules. Based on a

  2. Object-oriented Persistent Homology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Bao; Wei, Guo-Wei

    2016-01-15

    Persistent homology provides a new approach for the topological simplification of big data via measuring the life time of intrinsic topological features in a filtration process and has found its success in scientific and engineering applications. However, such a success is essentially limited to qualitative data classification and analysis. Indeed, persistent homology has rarely been employed for quantitative modeling and prediction. Additionally, the present persistent homology is a passive tool, rather than a proactive technique, for classification and analysis. In this work, we outline a general protocol to construct object-oriented persistent homology methods. By means of differential geometry theory of surfaces, we construct an objective functional, namely, a surface free energy defined on the data of interest. The minimization of the objective functional leads to a Laplace-Beltrami operator which generates a multiscale representation of the initial data and offers an objective oriented filtration process. The resulting differential geometry based object-oriented persistent homology is able to preserve desirable geometric features in the evolutionary filtration and enhances the corresponding topological persistence. The cubical complex based homology algorithm is employed in the present work to be compatible with the Cartesian representation of the Laplace-Beltrami flow. The proposed Laplace-Beltrami flow based persistent homology method is extensively validated. The consistence between Laplace-Beltrami flow based filtration and Euclidean distance based filtration is confirmed on the Vietoris-Rips complex for a large amount of numerical tests. The convergence and reliability of the present Laplace-Beltrami flow based cubical complex filtration approach are analyzed over various spatial and temporal mesh sizes. The Laplace-Beltrami flow based persistent homology approach is utilized to study the intrinsic topology of proteins and fullerene molecules. Based on a

  3. The semaphorontic view of homology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Havstad, Joyce C; Assis, Leandro C S; Rieppel, Olivier

    2015-11-01

    The relation of homology is generally characterized as an identity relation, or alternatively as a correspondence relation, both of which are transitive. We use the example of the ontogenetic development and evolutionary origin of the gnathostome jaw to discuss identity and transitivity of the homology relation under the transformationist and emergentist paradigms respectively. Token identity and consequent transitivity of homology relations are shown to be requirements that are too strong to allow the origin of genuine evolutionary novelties. We consequently introduce the concept of compositional identity that is grounded in relations prevailing between parts (organs and organ systems) of a whole (organism). We recognize an ontogenetic identity of parts within a whole throughout the sequence of successive developmental stages of those parts: this is an intra-organismal character identity maintained throughout developmental trajectory. Correspondingly, we recognize a phylogenetic identity of homologous parts within two or more organisms of different species: this is an inter-species character identity maintained throughout evolutionary trajectory. These different dimensions of character identity--ontogenetic (through development) and phylogenetic (via shared evolutionary history)--break the transitivity of homology relations. Under the transformationist paradigm, the relation of homology reigns over the entire character (-state) transformation series, and thus encompasses the plesiomorphic as well as the apomorphic condition of form. In contrast, genuine evolutionary novelties originate not through transformation of ancestral characters (-states), but instead through deviating developmental trajectories that result in alternate characters. Under the emergentist paradigm, homology is thus synonymous with synapomorphy. © 2015 The Authors. Journal of Experimental Zoology Part B: Molecular and Developmental Evolution Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  4. A monopole homology for integral homology 3-spheres

    OpenAIRE

    Li, Weiping

    2014-01-01

    To an integral homology 3-sphere Y, we assign a well-defined {\\mathbb Z}-graded (monopole) homology MH*(Y, Ih(Q; h0)) whose construction in principle follows from the instanton Floer theory with the dependence of the spectral flow Ih(Q; h0), where Q is the unique U(1)-reducible monopole of the Seiberg-Witten equation on Y and h0 is a reference perturbation datum. The definition uses the moduli space of monopoles on Y \\times {\\mathbb R} introduced by Seiberg-Witten in studying smooth ...

  5. Mutations in carboxy-terminal part of E2 including PKR/eIF2αphosphorylation homology domain and interferon sensitivity determining region of nonstructural 5A of hepatitis C virus 1b:Their correlation with response to interferon monotherapy and viral load

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Koji Ukai; Masatoshi Ishigami; Kentaro Yoshioka; Naoto Kawabe; Yoshiaki Katano; Kazuhiko Hayashi; Takashi Honda; Motoyoshi Yano; Hidemi Goto

    2006-01-01

    AIM: To study the amino acid substitutions in the carboxy (C)-terminal part of E2 protein and in the interferon (IFN) sensitivity determining region (ISDR)and their correlation with response to IFN and viral load in 85 hepatitis C virus (HCV)-1b-infected patients treated with IFN.METHODS: The C-terminal part of E2 (codons 617-711)including PKR/eIF2α phosphorylation homology domain (PePHD) and ISDR was sequenced in 85 HCV-1b-infected patients treated by IFN monotherapy.RESULTS: The amino acid substitutions in PePHD detected only in 4 of 85 patients were not correlated either with response to IFN or with viral load. The presence of substitutions in a N-terminal variable region (codons 617-641) in the C-terminal part of E2was significantly correlated with both small viral load (33.9% vs 13.8%, P=0.0394) and sustained response to IFN (25.0% vs 6.9%,P=0.0429). Four or more substitutions in ISDR were significantly correlated with both small viral load (78.6% vs 16.2%, P<0.0001) and sustained response to IFN (85.7% vs 2.9%, P<0.0001).In multivariate analysis, ISDR in nonstructural (NS) 5A (OR=0.39, P<0.0001) and N-terminal variable region (OR=0.51, P=0.039) was selected as the independent predictors for small viral load, and ISDR (OR=39.0, P<0.0001) was selected as the only independent predictor for sustained response.CONCLUSION: The N-terminal variable region in the C-terminal part of E2 correlates with both response to IFN monotherapy and viral load and is one of the factors independently associated with a small viral load.

  6. Homology of locally semialgebraic spaces

    CERN Document Server

    Delfs, Hans

    1991-01-01

    Locally semialgebraic spaces serve as an appropriate framework for studying the topological properties of varieties and semialgebraic sets over a real closed field. This book contributes to the fundamental theory of semialgebraic topology and falls into two main parts. The first dealswith sheaves and their cohomology on spaces which locally look like a constructible subset of a real spectrum. Topics like families of support, homotopy, acyclic sheaves, base-change theorems and cohomological dimension are considered. In the second part a homology theory for locally complete locally semialgebraic spaces over a real closed field is developed, the semialgebraic analogue of classical Bore-Moore-homology. Topics include fundamental classes of manifolds and varieties, Poincare duality, extensions of the base field and a comparison with the classical theory. Applying semialgebraic Borel-Moore-homology, a semialgebraic ("topological") approach to intersection theory on varieties over an algebraically closed field of ch...

  7. Binding domains of Bacillus anthracis phage endolysins recognize cell culture age-related features on the bacterial surface.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paskaleva, Elena E; Mundra, Ruchir V; Mehta, Krunal K; Pangule, Ravindra C; Wu, Xia; Glatfelter, Willing S; Chen, Zijing; Dordick, Jonathan S; Kane, Ravi S

    2015-01-01

    Bacteriolytic enzymes often possess a C-terminal binding domain that recognizes specific motifs on the bacterial surface and a catalytic domain that cleaves covalent linkages within the cell wall peptidoglycan. PlyPH, one such lytic enzyme of bacteriophage origin, has been reported to be highly effective against Bacillus anthracis, and can kill up to 99.99% of the viable bacteria. The bactericidal activity of this enzyme, however, appears to be strongly dependent on the age of the bacterial culture. Although highly bactericidal against cells in the early exponential phase, the enzyme is substantially less effective against stationary phase cells, thus limiting its application in real-world settings. We hypothesized that the binding domain of PlyPH may differ in affinity to cells in different Bacillus growth stages and may be primarily responsible for the age-restricted activity. We therefore employed an in silico approach to identify phage lysins differing in their specificity for the bacterial cell wall. Specifically we focused our attention on Plyβ, an enzyme with improved cell wall-binding ability and age-independent bactericidal activity. Although PlyPH and Plyβ have dissimilar binding domains, their catalytic domains are highly homologous. We characterized the biocatalytic mechanism of Plyβ by identifying the specific bonds cleaved within the cell wall peptidoglycan. Our results provide an example of the diversity of phage endolysins and the opportunity for these biocatalysts to be used for broad-based protection from bacterial pathogens.

  8. Homology group on manifolds and their foldings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Abu-Saleem

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, we introduce the definition of the induced unfolding on the homology group. Some types of conditional foldings restricted on the elements of the homology groups are deduced. The effect of retraction on the homology group of a manifold is dicussed. The unfolding of variation curvature of manifolds on their homology group are represented. The relations between homology group of the manifold and its folding are deduced.

  9. Discovery of eight novel divergent homologs expressed in cattle placenta.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larson, Joshua H; Kumar, Charu G; Everts, Robin E; Green, Cheryl A; Everts-van der Wind, Annelie; Band, Mark R; Lewin, Harris A

    2006-05-16

    Ten divergent homologs were identified using a subtractive bioinformatic analysis of 12,614 cattle placenta expressed sequence tags followed by comparative, evolutionary, and gene expression studies. Among the 10 divergent homologs, 8 have not been identified previously. These were named as follows: cattle cerebrum and skeletal muscle-specific transcript 1 (CSSMST1), cattle intestine-specific transcript 1 (CIST1), hepatitis A virus cellular receptor 1 amino-terminal domain-containing protein (HAVCRNDP), prolactin-related proteins 8, 9, and 11 (PRP8, PRP9, and PRP11, respectively) and secreted and transmembrane protein 1A and 1B (SECTM1A and SECTM1B, respectively). In addition, two previously known divergent genes were identified, trophoblast Kunitz domain protein 1 (TKDP1) and a new splice variant of TKDP4. Nucleotide substitution analysis provided evidence for positive selection in members of the PRP gene family, SECTM1A and SECTM1B. Gene expression profiles, motif predictions, and annotations of homologous sequences indicate immunological and reproductive functions of the divergent homologs. The genes identified in this study are thus of evolutionary and physiological importance and may have a role in placental adaptations.

  10. Multiresolution persistent homology for excessively large biomolecular datasets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xia, Kelin; Zhao, Zhixiong; Wei, Guo-Wei

    2015-01-01

    Although persistent homology has emerged as a promising tool for the topological simplification of complex data, it is computationally intractable for large datasets. We introduce multiresolution persistent homology to handle excessively large datasets. We match the resolution with the scale of interest so as to represent large scale datasets with appropriate resolution. We utilize flexibility-rigidity index to access the topological connectivity of the data set and define a rigidity density for the filtration analysis. By appropriately tuning the resolution of the rigidity density, we are able to focus the topological lens on the scale of interest. The proposed multiresolution topological analysis is validated by a hexagonal fractal image which has three distinct scales. We further demonstrate the proposed method for extracting topological fingerprints from DNA molecules. In particular, the topological persistence of a virus capsid with 273 780 atoms is successfully analyzed which would otherwise be inaccessible to the normal point cloud method and unreliable by using coarse-grained multiscale persistent homology. The proposed method has also been successfully applied to the protein domain classification, which is the first time that persistent homology is used for practical protein domain analysis, to our knowledge. The proposed multiresolution topological method has potential applications in arbitrary data sets, such as social networks, biological networks, and graphs. PMID:26450288

  11. Multiresolution persistent homology for excessively large biomolecular datasets

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xia, Kelin; Zhao, Zhixiong [Department of Mathematics, Michigan State University, East Lansing, Michigan 48824 (United States); Wei, Guo-Wei, E-mail: wei@math.msu.edu [Department of Mathematics, Michigan State University, East Lansing, Michigan 48824 (United States); Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, Michigan State University, East Lansing, Michigan 48824 (United States); Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Michigan State University, East Lansing, Michigan 48824 (United States)

    2015-10-07

    Although persistent homology has emerged as a promising tool for the topological simplification of complex data, it is computationally intractable for large datasets. We introduce multiresolution persistent homology to handle excessively large datasets. We match the resolution with the scale of interest so as to represent large scale datasets with appropriate resolution. We utilize flexibility-rigidity index to access the topological connectivity of the data set and define a rigidity density for the filtration analysis. By appropriately tuning the resolution of the rigidity density, we are able to focus the topological lens on the scale of interest. The proposed multiresolution topological analysis is validated by a hexagonal fractal image which has three distinct scales. We further demonstrate the proposed method for extracting topological fingerprints from DNA molecules. In particular, the topological persistence of a virus capsid with 273 780 atoms is successfully analyzed which would otherwise be inaccessible to the normal point cloud method and unreliable by using coarse-grained multiscale persistent homology. The proposed method has also been successfully applied to the protein domain classification, which is the first time that persistent homology is used for practical protein domain analysis, to our knowledge. The proposed multiresolution topological method has potential applications in arbitrary data sets, such as social networks, biological networks, and graphs.

  12. Ph3CCOOSnPh3.Ph3PO AND Ph3CCOOSnPh3.Ph3AsO: SYNTHESIS AND INFRARED STUDY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    ABDOU MBAYE

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available The mixture of ethanolic solutions of Ph3CCOOSnPh3 and Ph3PO or Ph3AsO gives Ph3CCOOSnPh3.Ph3PO and Ph3CCOOSnPh3.Ph3AsO adducts which have been characterized by infrared spectroscopy. A discrete structure is suggested for both, the environment around the tin centre being trigonal bipyramidal, the triphenylacetate anion behaving as a mondentate ligand.

  13. Mediators of homologous DNA pairing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zelensky, Alex; Kanaar, Roland; Wyman, Claire

    2014-10-09

    Homologous DNA pairing and strand exchange are at the core of homologous recombination. These reactions are promoted by a DNA-strand-exchange protein assembled into a nucleoprotein filament comprising the DNA-pairing protein, ATP, and single-stranded DNA. The catalytic activity of this molecular machine depends on control of its dynamic instability by accessory factors. Here we discuss proteins known as recombination mediators that facilitate formation and functional activation of the DNA-strand-exchange protein filament. Although the basics of homologous pairing and DNA-strand exchange are highly conserved in evolution, differences in mediator function are required to cope with differences in how single-stranded DNA is packaged by the single-stranded DNA-binding protein in different species, and the biochemical details of how the different DNA-strand-exchange proteins nucleate and extend into a nucleoprotein filament. The set of (potential) mediator proteins has apparently expanded greatly in evolution, raising interesting questions about the need for additional control and coordination of homologous recombination in more complex organisms. Copyright © 2014 Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory Press; all rights reserved.

  14. Homological Type of Geometric Transitions

    CERN Document Server

    Rossi, Michele

    2010-01-01

    The present paper gives an account and quantifies the change in topology induced by small and type II geometric transitions, by introducing the notion of the \\emph{homological type} of a geometric transition. The obtained results agree with, and go further than, most results and estimates, given to date by several authors, both in mathematical and physical literature.

  15. Homological stability of diffeomorphism groups

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Berglund, Alexander; Madsen, Ib Henning

    2013-01-01

    In this paper we prove a stability theorem for block diffeomorphisms of 2d -dimensional manifolds that are connected sums of S d ×S d . Combining this with a recent theorem of S. Galatius and O. Randal-Williams and Morlet’s lemma of disjunction, we determine the homology of the classifying space ...

  16. Parallel Computation of Persistent Homology using the Blowup Complex

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lewis, Ryan [Stanford Univ., CA (United States); Morozov, Dmitriy [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States)

    2015-04-27

    We describe a parallel algorithm that computes persistent homology, an algebraic descriptor of a filtered topological space. Our algorithm is distinguished by operating on a spatial decomposition of the domain, as opposed to a decomposition with respect to the filtration. We rely on a classical construction, called the Mayer--Vietoris blowup complex, to glue global topological information about a space from its disjoint subsets. We introduce an efficient algorithm to perform this gluing operation, which may be of independent interest, and describe how to process the domain hierarchically. We report on a set of experiments that help assess the strengths and identify the limitations of our method.

  17. The minimum amount of homology required for homologous recombination in mammalian cells.

    OpenAIRE

    Rubnitz, J; Subramani, S

    1984-01-01

    Although DNA sequence homology is believed to be a prerequisite for homologous recombination events in procaryotes and eucaryotes, no systematic study has been done on the minimum amount of homology required for homologous recombination in mammalian cells. We have used simian virus 40-pBR322 hybrid plasmids constructed in vitro as substrates to quantitate intramolecular homologous recombination in cultured monkey cells. Excision of wild-type simian virus 40 DNA by homologous recombination was...

  18. Minimax Rates for Homology Inference

    CERN Document Server

    Balakrishnan, Sivaraman; Sheehy, Don; Singh, Aarti; Wasserman, Larry

    2011-01-01

    Often, high dimensional data lie close to a low-dimensional submanifold and it is of interest to understand the geometry of these submanifolds. The homology groups of a manifold are important topological invariants that provide an algebraic summary of the manifold. These groups contain rich topological information, for instance, about the connected components, holes, tunnels and sometimes the dimension of the manifold. In this paper, we consider the statistical problem of estimating the homology of a manifold from noisy samples under several different noise models. We derive upper and lower bounds on the minimax risk for this problem. Our upper bounds are based on estimators which are constructed from a union of balls of appropriate radius around carefully selected points. In each case we establish complementary lower bounds using Le Cam's lemma.

  19. Sutured Floer homology and hypergraphs

    CERN Document Server

    Juhász, András; Rasmussen, Jacob

    2011-01-01

    By applying Seifert's algorithm to a special alternating diagram of a link L, one obtains a Seifert surface F of L. We show that the support of the sutured Floer homology of the sutured manifold complementary to F is affine isomorphic to the set of lattice points given as hypertrees in a certain hypergraph that is naturally associated to the diagram. This implies that the Floer groups in question are supported in a set of Spin^c structures that are the integer lattice points of a convex polytope. This property has an immediate extension to Seifert surfaces arising from homogeneous link diagrams (including all alternating and positive diagrams). In another direction, together with work in progress of the second author and others, our correspondence suggests a method for computing the "top" coefficients of the HOMFLY polynomial of a special alternating link from the sutured Floer homology of a Seifert surface complement for a certain dual link.

  20. Homologous recombination in Leishmania enriettii.

    OpenAIRE

    1991-01-01

    We have used derivatives of the recently developed stable transfection vector pALT-Neo to formally demonstrate that Leishmania enriettii contains the enzymatic machinery necessary for homologous recombination. This observation has implications for gene regulation, gene amplification, genetic diversity, and the maintenance of tandemly repeated gene families in the Leishmania genome as well as in closely related organisms, including Trypanosoma brucei. Two plasmids containing nonoverlapping del...

  1. Domain analysis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hjørland, Birger

    2017-01-01

    The domain-analytic approach to knowledge organization (KO) (and to the broader field of library and information science, LIS) is outlined. The article reviews the discussions and proposals on the definition of domains, and provides an example of a domain-analytic study in the field of art studie....... Varieties of domain analysis as well as criticism and controversies are presented and discussed....

  2. Homologous recombination in Leishmania enriettii.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tobin, J F; Laban, A; Wirth, D F

    1991-02-01

    We have used derivatives of the recently developed stable transfection vector pALT-Neo to formally demonstrate that Leishmania enriettii contains the enzymatic machinery necessary for homologous recombination. This observation has implications for gene regulation, gene amplification, genetic diversity, and the maintenance of tandemly repeated gene families in the Leishmania genome as well as in closely related organisms, including Trypanosoma brucei. Two plasmids containing nonoverlapping deletions of the chloramphenicol acetyltransferase (CAT) gene, as well as the neomycin-resistance gene, were cotransfected into L. enriettii. Analysis of the DNA from these cells by Southern blotting and plasmid rescue revealed that a full-length or doubly deleted CAT gene could be reconstructed by homologous crossing-over and/or gene conversion between the two deletion plasmids. Additionally, parasites cotransfected with pALT-Neo and pALT-CAT-S, a plasmid containing two copies of the chimeric alpha-tubulin-CAT gene, resulted in G418-resistant parasites expressing high levels of CAT activity. The structure of the DNA within these cells, as shown by Southern blot analysis and the polymerase chain reaction, is that which would be expected from a homologous exchange event occurring between the two plasmids.

  3. Deep homology: a view from systematics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scotland, Robert W

    2010-05-01

    Over the past decade, it has been discovered that disparate aspects of morphology - often of distantly related groups of organisms - are regulated by the same genetic regulatory mechanisms. Those discoveries provide a new perspective on morphological evolutionary change. A conceptual framework for exploring these research findings is termed 'deep homology'. A comparative framework for morphological relations of homology is provided that distinguishes analogy, homoplasy, plesiomorphy and synapomorphy. Four examples - three from plants and one from animals - demonstrate that homologous developmental mechanisms can regulate a range of morphological relations including analogy, homoplasy and examples of uncertain homology. Deep homology is part of a much wider range of phenomena in which biological (genes, regulatory mechanisms, morphological traits) and phylogenetic levels of homology can both be disassociated. Therefore, to understand homology, precise, comparative, independent statements of both biological and phylogenetic levels of homology are necessary.

  4. Homology requirements for recombination in Escherichia coli.

    OpenAIRE

    Watt, V M; Ingles, C J; Urdea, M S; Rutter, W J

    1985-01-01

    The DNA sequence homology required for recombination in Escherichia coli has been determined by measuring the recombination frequency between insulin DNA in a miniplasmid pi VX and a homologous sequence in a bacteriophage lambda vector. A minimum of approximately equal to 20 base pairs in a completely homologous segment is required for significant recombination. There is an exponential increase in the frequency of recombination when the length of homologous DNA is increased from 20 base pairs...

  5. Lagrangian Quantum Homology for Lagrangian cobordism

    OpenAIRE

    Singer, Berit

    2015-01-01

    We extend the definition of Lagrangian quantum homology to monotone Lagrangian cobordism and establish its general algebraic properties. In particular we develop a relative version of Lagrangian quantum homology associated to a cobordism relative to a part of its boundary and study relations of this invariant to the ambient quantum homology.

  6. Discrete homology theory for metric spaces

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    H. Barcelo (Hélène); V. Capraro (Valerio); J. A. White; H. Barcelo (Hélène)

    2014-01-01

    htmlabstractWe define and study a notion of discrete homology theory for metric spaces. Instead of working with simplicial homology, our chain complexes are given by Lipschitz maps from an n n -dimensional cube to a fixed metric space. We prove that the resulting homology theory satisfies a

  7. Virtual Khovanov homology using cobordisms

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tubbenhauer, Daniel

    2014-01-01

    We give a geometric interpretation of the Khovanov complex for virtual links. Geometric interpretation means that we use a cobordism structure like D. Bar-Natan, but we allow non orientable cobordisms. Like D. Bar-Natans geometric complex our construction should work for virtual tangles too....... This geometric complex allows, in contrast to the geometric version of V. Turaev and P. Turner, a direct extension of the classical Khovanov complex (h=t=0) and of the variant of Lee (h=0,t=1). Furthermore we give a classification of all unoriented TQFTs which can be used to define virtual link homologies...

  8. Virtual Khovanov homology using cobordisms

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tubbenhauer, Daniel

    2014-01-01

    We give a geometric interpretation of the Khovanov complex for virtual links. Geometric interpretation means that we use a cobordism structure like D. Bar-Natan, but we allow non orientable cobordisms. Like D. Bar-Natans geometric complex our construction should work for virtual tangles too....... This geometric complex allows, in contrast to the geometric version of V. Turaev and P. Turner, a direct extension of the classical Khovanov complex (h=t=0) and of the variant of Lee (h=0,t=1). Furthermore we give a classification of all unoriented TQFTs which can be used to define virtual link homologies...

  9. Mutation of domain III and domain VI in L gene conserved domain of Nipah virus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jalani, Siti Aishah; Ibrahim, Nazlina

    2016-11-01

    Nipah virus (NiV) is the etiologic agent responsible for the respiratory illness and causes fatal encephalitis in human. NiV L protein subunit is thought to be responsible for the majority of enzymatic activities involved in viral transcription and replication. The L protein which is the viral RNA dependent RNA polymerase has high sequence homology among negative sense RNA viruses. In negative stranded RNA viruses, based on sequence alignment six conserved domain (domain I-IV) have been determined. Each domain is separated on variable regions that suggest the structure to consist concatenated functional domain. To directly address the roles of domains III and VI, site-directed mutations were constructed by the substitution of bases at sequences 2497, 2500, 5528 and 5532. Each mutated L gene can be used in future studies to test the ability for expression on in vitro translation.

  10. The Homological Nature of Entropy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pierre Baudot

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available We propose that entropy is a universal co-homological class in a theory associated to a family of observable quantities and a family of probability distributions. Three cases are presented: (1 classical probabilities and random variables; (2 quantum probabilities and observable operators; (3 dynamic probabilities and observation trees. This gives rise to a new kind of topology for information processes, that accounts for the main information functions: entropy, mutual-informations at all orders, and Kullback–Leibler divergence and generalizes them in several ways. The article is divided into two parts, that can be read independently. In the first part, the introduction, we provide an overview of the results, some open questions, future results and lines of research, and discuss briefly the application to complex data. In the second part we give the complete definitions and proofs of the theorems A, C and E in the introduction, which show why entropy is the first homological invariant of a structure of information in four contexts: static classical or quantum probability, dynamics of classical or quantum strategies of observation of a finite system.

  11. Homologous gene replacement in Physarum

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Burland, T.G. [Univ. of Wisconsin, Madison, WI (United States); Pallotta, D. [Laval Univ., Quebec (Canada)

    1995-01-01

    The protist Physarum polycephalum is useful for analysis of several aspects of cellular and developmental biology. To expand the opportunities for experimental analysis of this organism, we have developed a method for gene replacement. We transformed Physarum amoebae with plasmid DNA carrying a mutant allele, ardD{Delta}1, of the ardD actin gene; ardD{Delta}1 mutates the critical carboxy-terminal region of the gene product. Because ardD is not expressed in the amoeba, replacement of ardD{sup +} with ardD{Delta}1 should not be lethal for this cell type. Transformants were obtained only when linear plasmid DNA was used. Most transformants carried one copy of ardD{Delta}1 in addition to ardD{sup +}, but in two (5%), ardD{sup +} was replaced by a single copy of ardD{Delta}1. This is the first example of homologous gene replacement in Physarum. ardD{Delta}1 was stably maintained in the genome through growth, development and meiosis. We found no effect of ardD{Delta}l on viability, growth, or development of any of the various cell types of Physarum. Thus, the carboxy-terminal region of the ardD product appears not to perform a unique essential role in growth or development. Nevertheless, this method for homologous gene replacement can be applied to analyze the function of any cloned gene. 38 refs., 6 figs., 1 tab.

  12. Weak homology of elliptical galaxies

    CERN Document Server

    Bertin, G; Principe, M D

    2002-01-01

    We start by studying a small set of objects characterized by photometric profiles that have been pointed out to deviate significantly from the standard R^{1/4} law. For these objects we confirm that a generic R^{1/n} law, with n a free parameter, can provide superior fits (the best-fit value of n can be lower than 2.5 or higher than 10), better than those that can be obtained by a pure R^{1/4} law, by an R^{1/4}+exponential model, and by other dynamically justified self--consistent models. Therefore, strictly speaking, elliptical galaxies should not be considered homologous dynamical systems. Still, a case for "weak homology", useful for the interpretation of the Fundamental Plane of elliptical galaxies, could be made if the best-fit parameter n, as often reported, correlates with galaxy luminosity L, provided the underlying dynamical structure also follows a systematic trend with luminosity. We demonstrate that this statement may be true even in the presence of significant scatter in the correlation n(L). Pr...

  13. A Phenomenological and Dynamic View of Homology: Homologs as Persistently Reproducible Modules.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suzuki, Daichi G; Tanaka, Senji

    2017-01-01

    Homology is a fundamental concept in biology. However, the metaphysical status of homology, especially whether a homolog is a part of an individual or a member of a natural kind, is still a matter of intense debate. The proponents of the individuality view of homology criticize the natural kind view of homology by pointing out that homologs are subject to evolutionary transformation, and natural kinds do not change in the evolutionary process. Conversely, some proponents of the natural kind view of homology argue that a homolog can be construed both as a part of an individual and a member of a natural kind. They adopt the Homeostatic Property Cluster (HPC) theory of natural kinds, and the theory seems to strongly support their construal. Note that this construal implies the acceptance of essentialism. However, looking back on the history of the concept of homology, we should not overlook the fact that the individuality view was proposed to reject the essentialist interpretation of homology. Moreover, the essentialist notions of natural kinds can, in our view, mislead biologists about the phenomena of homology. Consequently, we need a non-essentialist view of homology, which we name the "persistently reproducible module" (PRM) view. This view highlights both the individual-like and kind-like aspects of homologs while stripping down both essentialist and anti-essentialist interpretations of homology. In this article, we articulate the PRM view of homology and explain why it is recommended over the other two views.

  14. Botulinum neurotoxin homologs in non-Clostridium species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mansfield, Michael J; Adams, Jeremy B; Doxey, Andrew C

    2015-01-30

    Clostridial neurotoxins (CNTs) are the deadliest toxins known and the causative agents of botulism and tetanus. Despite their structural and functional complexity, no CNT homologs are currently known outside Clostridium. Here, we report the first homologs of Clostridium CNTs within the genome of the rice fermentation organism Weissella oryzae SG25. One gene in W. oryzae S25 encodes a protein with a four-domain architecture and HExxH protease motif common to botulinum neurotoxins (BoNTs). An adjacent gene with partial similarity to CNTs is also present, and both genes seem to have been laterally transferred into the W. oryzae genome from an unknown source. Identification of mobile, CNT-related genes outside of Clostridium has implications for our understanding of the evolution of this important toxin family. Copyright © 2015 Federation of European Biochemical Societies. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. Homology modeling and molecular dynamics study on Schwanniomyces occidentalis alpha-amylase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sefidbakht, Yahya; Ranaei Siadat, Omid; Taheri, Fatemeh

    2017-02-01

    With consumers growing increasingly aware of environmental issues, industries find enzymes as a reasonable alternative over physical conditions and chemical catalysts. Amylases are important hydrolase enzymes, which have been widely used in variety of industrial process such as pharmaceutical, food, and fermentation industries. Among amylases α-Amylase is in maximum demand due to its wide range of applications. The homology modeling study on Schwanniomyces occidentalis amylase (AMY1, UniProt identifier number: P19269) was performed by Modeller using Aspergillus oryzae (6TAA) as the template. The resulting structure was analyzed for validity and subjected to 14 ns of molecular dynamics (MD) simulation trough GROMACS. The validity of obtained model may represent that utilized OPLS force field is suitable for calcium-containing enzymes. DSSP secondary structure and contact map analysis represent the conservation of domain A TIM barrel feature together with calcium ion coordination sphere. Investigating the covariance matrix followed by principle component analyses for the first five eigenvectors of both trajectories indicate a little more flexibility for AMY1 structure. The electrostatic calculation for the final structures shows similar isoelectric point and superimposed buffering zone in the 5-8 pH range.

  16. Insight into the assembly properties and functional organisation of the magnetotactic bacterial actin-like homolog, MamK.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sanjiv Sonkaria

    Full Text Available Magnetotactic bacteria (MTB synthesize magnetosomes, which are intracellular vesicles comprising a magnetic particle. A series of magnetosomes arrange themselves in chains to form a magnetic dipole that enables the cell to orient itself along the Earth's magnetic field. MamK, an actin-like homolog of MreB has been identified as a central component in this organisation. Gene deletion, fluorescence microscopy and in vitro studies have yielded mechanistic differences in the filament assembly of MamK with other bacterial cytoskeletal proteins within the cell. With little or no information on the structural and behavioural characteristics of MamK outside the cell, the mamK gene from Magnetospirillium gryphiswaldense was cloned and expressed to better understand the differences in the cytoskeletal properties with its bacterial homologues MreB and acitin. Despite the low sequence identity shared between MamK and MreB (22% and actin (18%, the behaviour of MamK monitored by light scattering broadly mirrored that of its bacterial cousin MreB primarily in terms of its pH, salt, divalent metal-ion and temperature dependency. The broad size variability of MamK filaments revealed by light scattering studies was supported by transmission electron microscopy (TEM imaging. Filament morphology however, indicated that MamK conformed to linearly orientated filaments that appeared to be distinctly dissimilar compared to MreB suggesting functional differences between these homologues. The presence of a nucleotide binding domain common to actin-like proteins was demonstrated by its ability to function both as an ATPase and GTPase. Circular dichroism and structural homology modelling showed that MamK adopts a protein fold that is consistent with the 'classical' actin family architecture but with notable structural differences within the smaller domains, the active site region and the overall surface electrostatic potential.

  17. On 0-homology of categorical at zero semigroups

    OpenAIRE

    Novikov, B. V.; Polyakova, L. Yu.

    2008-01-01

    The isomorphism of 0-homology groups of a categorical at zero semigroup and homology groups of its 0-reflector is proved. Some applications of 0-homology to Eilenberg-MacLane homology of semigroups are given.

  18. Khovanov homology of links and graphs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stosic, Marko

    2006-05-01

    In this thesis we work with Khovanov homology of links and its generalizations, as well as with the homology of graphs. Khovanov homology of links consists of graded chain complexes which are link invariants, up to chain homotopy, with graded Euler characteristic equal to the Jones polynomial of the link. Hence, it can be regarded as the "categorification" of the Jones polynomial. We prove that the first homology group of positive braid knots is trivial. Futhermore, we prove that non-alternating torus knots are homologically thick. In addition, we show that we can decrease the number of full twists of torus knots without changing low-degree homology and consequently that there exists stable homology for torus knots. We also prove most of the above properties for Khovanov-Rozansky homology. Concerning graph homology, we categorify the dichromatic (and consequently Tutte) polynomial for graphs, by categorifying an infinite set of its one-variable specializations. We categorify explicitly the one-variable specialization that is an analog of the Jones polynomial of an alternating link corresponding to the initial graph. Also, we categorify explicitly the whole two-variable dichromatic polynomial of graphs by using Koszul complexes. textbf{Key-words:} Khovanov homology, Jones polynomial, link, torus knot, graph, dichromatic polynomial

  19. Equivariant ordinary homology and cohomology

    CERN Document Server

    Costenoble, Steven R

    2016-01-01

    Filling a gap in the literature, this book takes the reader to the frontiers of equivariant topology, the study of objects with specified symmetries. The discussion is motivated by reference to a list of instructive “toy” examples and calculations in what is a relatively unexplored field. The authors also provide a reading path for the first-time reader less interested in working through sophisticated machinery but still desiring a rigorous understanding of the main concepts. The subject’s classical counterparts, ordinary homology and cohomology, dating back to the work of Henri Poincaré in topology, are calculational and theoretical tools which are important in many parts of mathematics and theoretical physics, particularly in the study of manifolds. Similarly powerful tools have been lacking, however, in the context of equivariant topology. Aimed at advanced graduate students and researchers in algebraic topology and related fields, the book assumes knowledge of basic algebraic topology and group act...

  20. Homologous recombination and its regulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krejci, Lumir; Altmannova, Veronika; Spirek, Mario; Zhao, Xiaolan

    2012-01-01

    Homologous recombination (HR) is critical both for repairing DNA lesions in mitosis and for chromosomal pairing and exchange during meiosis. However, some forms of HR can also lead to undesirable DNA rearrangements. Multiple regulatory mechanisms have evolved to ensure that HR takes place at the right time, place and manner. Several of these impinge on the control of Rad51 nucleofilaments that play a central role in HR. Some factors promote the formation of these structures while others lead to their disassembly or the use of alternative repair pathways. In this article, we review these mechanisms in both mitotic and meiotic environments and in different eukaryotic taxa, with an emphasis on yeast and mammal systems. Since mutations in several proteins that regulate Rad51 nucleofilaments are associated with cancer and cancer-prone syndromes, we discuss how understanding their functions can lead to the development of better tools for cancer diagnosis and therapy. PMID:22467216

  1. Persistent homology and string vacua

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cirafici, Michele [Center for Mathematical Analysis, Geometry and Dynamical Systems,Instituto Superior Técnico, Universidade de Lisboa,Av. Rovisco Pais, 1049-001 Lisboa (Portugal); Institut des Hautes Études Scientifiques,Le Bois-Marie, 35 route de Chartres, F-91440 Bures-sur-Yvette (France)

    2016-03-08

    We use methods from topological data analysis to study the topological features of certain distributions of string vacua. Topological data analysis is a multi-scale approach used to analyze the topological features of a dataset by identifying which homological characteristics persist over a long range of scales. We apply these techniques in several contexts. We analyze N=2 vacua by focusing on certain distributions of Calabi-Yau varieties and Landau-Ginzburg models. We then turn to flux compactifications and discuss how we can use topological data analysis to extract physical information. Finally we apply these techniques to certain phenomenologically realistic heterotic models. We discuss the possibility of characterizing string vacua using the topological properties of their distributions.

  2. Homology and the hierarchy of biological systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sommer, Ralf J

    2008-07-01

    Homology is the similarity between organisms due to common ancestry. Introduced by Richard Owen in 1843 in a paper entitled "Lectures on comparative anatomy and physiology of the invertebrate animals", the concept of homology predates Darwin's "Origin of Species" and has been very influential throughout the history of evolutionary biology. Although homology is the central concept of all comparative biology and provides a logical basis for it, the definition of the term and the criteria of its application remain controversial. Here, I will discuss homology in the context of the hierarchy of biological organization. I will provide insights gained from an exemplary case study in evolutionary developmental biology that indicates the uncoupling of homology at different levels of biological organization. I argue that continuity and hierarchy are separate but equally important issues of homology. (c) 2008 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  3. Phosphorylation-independent dual-site binding of the FHA domain of KIF13 mediates phosphoinositide transport via centaurin [alpha]1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tong, Yufeng; Tempel, Wolfram; Wang, Hui; Yamada, Kaori; Shen, Limin; Senisterra, Guillermo A.; MacKenzie, Farrell; Chishti, Athar H.; Park, Hee-Won (Toronto); (UICM)

    2011-11-07

    Phosphatidylinositol 3,4,5-triphosphate (PIP3) plays a key role in neuronal polarization and axon formation. PIP3-containing vesicles are transported to axon tips by the kinesin KIF13B via an adaptor protein, centaurin {alpha}1 (CENTA1). KIF13B interacts with CENTA1 through its forkhead-associated (FHA) domain. We solved the crystal structures of CENTA1 in ligand-free, KIF13B-FHA domain-bound, and PIP3 head group (IP4)-bound conformations, and the CENTA1/KIF13B-FHA/IP4 ternary complex. The first pleckstrin homology (PH) domain of CENTA1 specifically binds to PIP3, while the second binds to both PIP3 and phosphatidylinositol 3,4-biphosphate (PI(3,4)P2). The FHA domain of KIF13B interacts with the PH1 domain of one CENTA1 molecule and the ArfGAP domain of a second CENTA1 molecule in a threonine phosphorylation-independent fashion. We propose that full-length KIF13B and CENTA1 form heterotetramers that can bind four phosphoinositide molecules in the vesicle and transport it along the microtubule.

  4. Design of pH sensitive binding proteins from the hyperthermophilic Sso7d scaffold.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nimish Gera

    Full Text Available We have engineered pH sensitive binding proteins for the Fc portion of human immunoglobulin G (hIgG (hFc using two different strategies - histidine scanning and random mutagenesis. We obtained an hFc-binding protein, Sso7d-hFc, through mutagenesis of the Sso7d protein from the hyperthermophilic archaeon Sulfolobus solfataricus; Sso7d-hFc was isolated from a combinatorial library of Sso7d mutants using yeast surface display. Subsequently, we identified a pH sensitive mutant, Sso7d-his-hFc, through systematic evaluation of Sso7d-hFc mutants containing single histidine substitutions. In parallel, we also developed a yeast display screening strategy to isolate a different pH sensitive hFc binder, Sso7d-ev-hFc, from a library of mutants obtained by random mutagenesis of a pool of hFc binders. In contrast to Sso7d-hFc, both Sso7d-his-hFc and Sso7d-ev-hFc have a higher binding affinity for hFc at pH 7.4 than at pH 4.5. The Sso7d-mutant hFc binders can be recombinantly expressed at high yield in E. coli and are monomeric in solution. They bind an epitope in the CH3 domain of hFc that has high sequence homology in all four hIgG isotypes (hIgG(1-4, and recognize hIgG(1-4 as well as deglycosylated hIgG in western blotting assays. pH sensitive hFc binders are attractive candidates for use in chromatography, to achieve elution of IgG under milder pH conditions. However, the surface density of immobilized hFc binders, as well as the avidity effect arising from the multivalent interaction of dimeric hFc with the capture surface, influences the pH dependence of dissociation from the capture surface. Therefore, further studies are needed to evaluate if the Sso7d mutants identified in this study are indeed useful as affinity ligands in chromatography.

  5. Homology in Electromagnetic Boundary Value Problems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matti Pellikka

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available We discuss how homology computation can be exploited in computational electromagnetism. We represent various cellular mesh reduction techniques, which enable the computation of generators of homology spaces in an acceptable time. Furthermore, we show how the generators can be used for setting up and analysis of an electromagnetic boundary value problem. The aim is to provide a rationale for homology computation in electromagnetic modeling software.

  6. The growth rate of symplectic homology and affine varieties

    CERN Document Server

    McLean, Mark

    2010-01-01

    We will show that the cotangent bundle of an integrally hyperbolic manifold is not symplectomorphic to any smooth affine variety. We will also show that the unit cotangent bundle of such a manifold is not Stein fillable by a Stein domain whose completion is symplectomorphic to a smooth affine variety. For instance, these results hold when our manifolds are simply connected with at least one Betti number greater than the corresponding Betti number of the n torus. We use an invariant called the growth rate of symplectic homology to prove this result.

  7. Homology-independent metrics for comparative genomics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coutinho, Tarcisio José Domingos; Franco, Glória Regina; Lobo, Francisco Pereira

    2015-01-01

    A mainstream procedure to analyze the wealth of genomic data available nowadays is the detection of homologous regions shared across genomes, followed by the extraction of biological information from the patterns of conservation and variation observed in such regions. Although of pivotal importance, comparative genomic procedures that rely on homology inference are obviously not applicable if no homologous regions are detectable. This fact excludes a considerable portion of "genomic dark matter" with no significant similarity - and, consequently, no inferred homology to any other known sequence - from several downstream comparative genomic methods. In this review we compile several sequence metrics that do not rely on homology inference and can be used to compare nucleotide sequences and extract biologically meaningful information from them. These metrics comprise several compositional parameters calculated from sequence data alone, such as GC content, dinucleotide odds ratio, and several codon bias metrics. They also share other interesting properties, such as pervasiveness (patterns persist on smaller scales) and phylogenetic signal. We also cite examples where these homology-independent metrics have been successfully applied to support several bioinformatics challenges, such as taxonomic classification of biological sequences without homology inference. They where also used to detect higher-order patterns of interactions in biological systems, ranging from detecting coevolutionary trends between the genomes of viruses and their hosts to characterization of gene pools of entire microbial communities. We argue that, if correctly understood and applied, homology-independent metrics can add important layers of biological information in comparative genomic studies without prior homology inference.

  8. Crystal structures of trypanosomal histidyl-tRNA synthetase illuminate differences between eukaryotic and prokaryotic homologs

    OpenAIRE

    Merritt, Ethan A.; Arakaki, Tracy L; Gillespie, J Robert; Larson, Eric T.; Kelley, Angela; Mueller, Natascha; Napuli, Alberto J.; Kim, Jessica; Li ZHANG; Verlinde, Christophe L M J; Fan, Erkang; Zucker, Frank; Buckner, Frederick S.; Van Voorhis, Wesley C.; Hol, Wim G. J.

    2010-01-01

    Crystal structures of histidyl-tRNA synthetase from the eukaryotic parasites Trypanosoma brucei and Trypanosoma cruzi provide a first structural view of a eukaryotic form of this enzyme, and reveal differences from bacterial homologs. Histidyl-tRNA synthetases in general contain an extra domain inserted between conserved motifs 2 and 3 of the Class II aminoacyl-tRNA synthetase catalytic core. The current structures show that the three dimensional topology of this domain is very different in b...

  9. Homotopic Chain Maps Have Equal s-Homology and d-Homology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Z. Kazemi-Baneh

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The homotopy of chain maps on preabelian categories is investigated and the equality of standard homologies and d-homologies of homotopic chain maps is established. As a special case, if X and Y are the same homotopy type, then their nth d-homology R-modules are isomorphic, and if X is a contractible space, then its nth d-homology R-modules for n≠0 are trivial.

  10. Homology building as a means to define antigenic epitopes on dihydrofolate reductase (DHFR) from Plasmodium falciparum

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Alifrangis, Michael; Christensen, Inge T; Jørgensen, Flemming S

    2004-01-01

    in the gene coding for Pf-DHFR. Furthermore, we wanted to study the potential use of homology models in general and of Pf-DHFR in particular in predicting antigenic malarial surface epitopes. METHODS: A homology model of Pf-DHFR domain was employed to define an epitope for the development of site......-specific antibodies against Pf-DHFR. The homology model suggested an exposed loop encompassing amino acid residues 64-100. A synthetic peptide of 37-mers whose sequence corresponded to the sequence of amino acid residues 64-100 of Pf-DHFR was synthesized and used to immunize mice for antibodies. Additionally...... of homology models in general and of Pf-DHFR in particular in predicting antigenic malarial surface epitopes....

  11. Knots in homology spheres which have simple knot Floer homology are trivial

    OpenAIRE

    Eftekhary, Eaman

    2010-01-01

    We show that if K is a non-trivial knot inside a homology sphere X, the rank of the knot Floer homology group associated with K is strictly bigger than the rank of the Heegaard Floer homology group associated with X.

  12. Buoyancy instability of homologous implosions

    CERN Document Server

    Johnson, Bryan M

    2015-01-01

    I consider the hydrodynamic stability of imploding gases as a model for inertial confinement fusion capsules, sonoluminescent bubbles and the gravitational collapse of astrophysical gases. For oblate modes under a homologous flow, a monatomic gas is governed by the Schwarzschild criterion for buoyant stability. Under buoyantly unstable conditions, fluctuations experience power-law growth in time, with a growth rate that depends upon mean flow gradients and is independent of mode number. If the flow accelerates throughout the implosion, oblate modes amplify by a factor (2C)^(|N0| ti)$, where C is the convergence ratio of the implosion, N0 is the initial buoyancy frequency and ti is the implosion time scale. If, instead, the implosion consists of a coasting phase followed by stagnation, oblate modes amplify by a factor exp(pi |N0| ts), where N0 is the buoyancy frequency at stagnation and ts is the stagnation time scale. Even under stable conditions, vorticity fluctuations grow due to the conservation of angular...

  13. DNA Sequence Alignment during Homologous Recombination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greene, Eric C

    2016-05-27

    Homologous recombination allows for the regulated exchange of genetic information between two different DNA molecules of identical or nearly identical sequence composition, and is a major pathway for the repair of double-stranded DNA breaks. A key facet of homologous recombination is the ability of recombination proteins to perfectly align the damaged DNA with homologous sequence located elsewhere in the genome. This reaction is referred to as the homology search and is akin to the target searches conducted by many different DNA-binding proteins. Here I briefly highlight early investigations into the homology search mechanism, and then describe more recent research. Based on these studies, I summarize a model that includes a combination of intersegmental transfer, short-distance one-dimensional sliding, and length-specific microhomology recognition to efficiently align DNA sequences during the homology search. I also suggest some future directions to help further our understanding of the homology search. Where appropriate, I direct the reader to other recent reviews describing various issues related to homologous recombination.

  14. Homology in classical and molecular biology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patterson, C

    1988-11-01

    Hypotheses of homology are the basis of comparative morphology and comparative molecular biology. The kinds of homologous and nonhomologous relations in classical and molecular biology are explored through the three tests that may be applied to a hypothesis of homology: congruence, conjunction, and similarity. The same three tests apply in molecular comparisons and in morphology, and in each field they differentiate eight kinds of relation. These various relations are discussed and compared. The unit or standard of comparison differs in morphology and in molecular biology; in morphology it is the adult or life cycle, but with molecules it is the haploid genome. In morphology the congruence test is decisive in separating homology and nonhomology, whereas with molecular sequence data similarity is the decisive test. Consequences of this difference are that the boundary between homology and nonhomology is not the same in molecular biology as in morphology, that homology and synapomorphy can be equated in morphology but not in all molecular comparisons, and that there is no detected molecular equivalent of convergence. Since molecular homology may reflect either species phylogeny or gene phylogeny, there are more kinds of homologous relation between molecular sequences than in morphology. The terms paraxenology and plerology are proposed for two of these kinds--respectively, the consequence of multiple xenology and of gene conversion.

  15. DNA Sequence Alignment during Homologous Recombination*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greene, Eric C.

    2016-01-01

    Homologous recombination allows for the regulated exchange of genetic information between two different DNA molecules of identical or nearly identical sequence composition, and is a major pathway for the repair of double-stranded DNA breaks. A key facet of homologous recombination is the ability of recombination proteins to perfectly align the damaged DNA with homologous sequence located elsewhere in the genome. This reaction is referred to as the homology search and is akin to the target searches conducted by many different DNA-binding proteins. Here I briefly highlight early investigations into the homology search mechanism, and then describe more recent research. Based on these studies, I summarize a model that includes a combination of intersegmental transfer, short-distance one-dimensional sliding, and length-specific microhomology recognition to efficiently align DNA sequences during the homology search. I also suggest some future directions to help further our understanding of the homology search. Where appropriate, I direct the reader to other recent reviews describing various issues related to homologous recombination. PMID:27129270

  16. Why do bacteria engage in homologous recombination?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vos, M.

    2009-01-01

    Microbiologists have long recognized that the uptake and incorporation of homologous DNA from outside the cell is a common feature of bacteria, with important implications for their evolution. However, the exact reasons why bacteria engage in homologous recombination remain elusive. This Opinion

  17. Why do bacteria engage in homologous recombination?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vos, M.

    2009-01-01

    Microbiologists have long recognized that the uptake and incorporation of homologous DNA from outside the cell is a common feature of bacteria, with important implications for their evolution. However, the exact reasons why bacteria engage in homologous recombination remain elusive. This Opinion art

  18. Synthetic Homology in Homotopy Type Theory

    OpenAIRE

    Graham, Robert

    2017-01-01

    This paper defines homology in homotopy type theory, in the process stable homotopy groups are also defined. Previous research in synthetic homotopy theory is relied on, in particular the definition of cohomology. This work lays the foundation for a computer checked construction of homology.

  19. GENE SEQUENCE HOMOLOGY OF CHEMOKINES ACROSS SPECIES

    Science.gov (United States)

    The abundance of expressed gene and protein sequences available in the biological information databases facilitates comparison of protein homologies. A high degree of sequence similarity typically implies homology regarding structure and function and may provide clues to antibody cross-react...

  20. Traces of differential forms and Hochschild homology

    CERN Document Server

    Hübl, Reinhold

    1989-01-01

    This monograph provides an introduction to, as well as a unification and extension of the published work and some unpublished ideas of J. Lipman and E. Kunz about traces of differential forms and their relations to duality theory for projective morphisms. The approach uses Hochschild-homology, the definition of which is extended to the category of topological algebras. Many results for Hochschild-homology of commutative algebras also hold for Hochschild-homology of topological algebras. In particular, after introducing an appropriate notion of completion of differential algebras, one gets a natural transformation between differential forms and Hochschild-homology of topological algebras. Traces of differential forms are of interest to everyone working with duality theory and residue symbols. Hochschild-homology is a useful tool in many areas of k-theory. The treatment is fairly elementary and requires only little knowledge in commutative algebra and algebraic geometry.

  1. Homological evolutionary vector fields in Korteweg-de Vries, Liouville, Maxwell, and several other models

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kiselev, Arthemy V.

    2012-01-01

    We review the construction of homological evolutionary vector fields on infinite jet spaces and partial differential equations. We describe the applications of this concept in three tightly inter-related domains: the variational Poisson formalism (e.g., for equations of Korteweg-de Vries type), geom

  2. Photoperiodic regulation of flowering in perennial ryegrass involving a CONSTANS-like homolog

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Martin, J.; Storgaard, M.; Andersen, C.H.

    2004-01-01

    we report on the isolation and characterization of a L. perenne gene (LpCO) that is homologous to CONSTANS, and which is tightly coupled to the. oral inductive long day signal. Like other monocot CO-like proteins, the LpCO contains a zinc finger domain with a non-conserved B-Box2. Although the B-Box2...

  3. PH og modernismen

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ahnfeldt-Mollerup, Merete

    2012-01-01

    Artiklen kaster et kritisk blik på Poul Henningsens samfundsanalyse og dennes sammenhæng med hans design. PH ses i en bredere national og international sammenhæng. Diskussion af designmetoder, æstetik og Bauhaus.......Artiklen kaster et kritisk blik på Poul Henningsens samfundsanalyse og dennes sammenhæng med hans design. PH ses i en bredere national og international sammenhæng. Diskussion af designmetoder, æstetik og Bauhaus....

  4. Multi-domain proteins in the three kingdoms of life: orphan domains and other unassigned regions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ekman, Diana; Björklund, Asa K; Frey-Skött, Johannes; Elofsson, Arne

    2005-04-22

    Comparative studies of the proteomes from different organisms have provided valuable information about protein domain distribution in the kingdoms of life. Earlier studies have been limited by the fact that only about 50% of the proteomes could be matched to a domain. Here, we have extended these studies by including less well-defined domain definitions, Pfam-B and clustered domains, MAS, in addition to Pfam-A and SCOP domains. It was found that a significant fraction of these domain families are homologous to Pfam-A or SCOP domains. Further, we show that all regions that do not match a Pfam-A or SCOP domain contain a significantly higher fraction of disordered structure. These unstructured regions may be contained within orphan domains or function as linkers between structured domains. Using several different definitions we have re-estimated the number of multi-domain proteins in different organisms and found that several methods all predict that eukaryotes have approximately 65% multi-domain proteins, while the prokaryotes consist of approximately 40% multi-domain proteins. However, these numbers are strongly dependent on the exact choice of cut-off for domains in unassigned regions. In conclusion, all eukaryotes have similar fractions of multi-domain proteins and disorder, whereas a high fraction of repeating domain is distinguished only in multicellular eukaryotes. This implies a role for repeats in cell-cell contacts while the other two features are important for intracellular functions.

  5. Conformational heterogeneity of the aspartate transporter Glt(Ph)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hänelt, Inga; Wunnicke, Dorith; Bordignon, Enrica; Steinhoff, Heinz-Juergen; Slotboom, Dirk Jan

    2013-01-01

    Glt(Ph) is a Pyrococcus horikoshii homotrimeric Na+-coupled aspartate transporter that belongs to the glutamate transporter family. Each protomer consists of a trimerization domain involved in subunit interaction and a transporting domain with the substrate-binding site. Here, we have studied the co

  6. The minimal essential unit for cadherin-mediated intercellular adhesion comprises extracellular domains 1 and 2

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Shan, Weisong; Yagita, Yoshiki; Wang, Zhaohui

    2004-01-01

    N-cadherin comprises five homologous extracellular domains, a transmembrane, and a cytoplasmic domain. The extracellular domains of N-cadherin play important roles in homophilic cell adhesion, but the contribution of each domain to this phenomenon has not been fully evaluated. In particular, the ...

  7. Ligand-guided homology modelling of the GABAB2 subunit of the GABAB receptor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freyd, Thibaud; Warszycki, Dawid; Mordalski, Stefan; Bojarski, Andrzej J; Sylte, Ingebrigt; Gabrielsen, Mari

    2017-01-01

    γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA) is the main inhibitory neurotransmitter in the central nervous system, and disturbances in the GABAergic system have been implicated in numerous neurological and neuropsychiatric diseases. The GABAB receptor is a heterodimeric class C G protein-coupled receptor (GPCR) consisting of GABAB1a/b and GABAB2 subunits. Two GABAB receptor ligand binding sites have been described, namely the orthosteric GABA binding site located in the extracellular GABAB1 Venus fly trap domain and the allosteric binding site found in the GABAB2 transmembrane domain. To date, the only experimentally solved three-dimensional structures of the GABAB receptor are of the Venus fly trap domain. GABAB receptor allosteric modulators, however, show great therapeutic potential, and elucidating the structure of the GABAB2 transmembrane domain may lead to development of novel drugs and increased understanding of the allosteric mechanism of action. Despite the lack of x-ray crystal structures of the GABAB2 transmembrane domain, multiple crystal structures belonging to other classes of GPCRs than class A have been released within the last years. More closely related template structures are now available for homology modelling of the GABAB receptor. Here, multiple homology models of the GABAB2 subunit of the GABAB receptor have been constructed using templates from class A, B and C GPCRs, and docking of five clusters of positive allosteric modulators and decoys has been undertaken to select models that enrich the active compounds. Using this ligand-guided approach, eight GABAB2 homology models have been chosen as possible structural representatives of the transmembrane domain of the GABAB2 subunit. To the best of our knowledge, the present study is the first to describe homology modelling of the transmembrane domain of the GABAB2 subunit and the docking of positive allosteric modulators in the receptor.

  8. Homology--history of a concept.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Panchen, A L

    1999-01-01

    The concept of homology is traceable to Aristotle, but Belon's comparison in 1555 of a human skeleton with that of a bird expressed it overtly. Before the late 18th century, the dominant view of the pattern of organisms was the scala naturae--even Linnaeus with his divergent hierarchical classification did not necessarily see the resulting taxonomic pattern as a natural phenomenon. The divergent hierarchy, rather than the acceptance of phylogeny, was the necessary spur to discussion of homology and the concept of analogy. Lamarck, despite his proposal of evolution, attributed homology to his escalator naturae and analogy to convergent acquired characters. Significantly, it was the concept of serial homology that emerged at the end of the 18th century, although comparison between organisms became popular soon after, and was boosted by the famous Cuvier/Geoffroy Saint-Hilaire debate of the 1830s. The concepts of homology and analogy were well understood by the pre- (or anti-) evolutionary comparative anatomists before the general acceptance of phylogeny, and they were defined by Owen in 1843. The acceptance of evolution led to the idea that homology should be defined by common ancestry, and to the confusion between definition and explanation. The term 'homoplasy', introduced by Lankester in 1870, also arose from a phylogenetic explanation of homology.

  9. Hidden torsion, 3-manifolds, and homology cobordism

    CERN Document Server

    Cha, Jae Choon

    2011-01-01

    This paper continues our exploration of homology cobordism of 3-manifolds using our recent results on Cheeger-Gromov rho-invariants associated to amenable representations. We introduce a new type of torsion in 3-manifold groups we call hidden torsion, and an algebraic approximation we call local hidden torsion. We construct infinitely many hyperbolic 3-manifolds which have local hidden torsion in the transfinite lower central subgroup. By realizing Cheeger-Gromov invariants over amenable groups, we show that our hyperbolic 3-manifolds are not pairwise homology cobordant, yet remain indistinguishable by any prior known homology cobordism invariants.

  10. Threading homology through algebra selected patterns

    CERN Document Server

    Boffi, Giandomenico

    2006-01-01

    Aimed at graduate students and researchers in mathematics, this book takes homological themes, such as Koszul complexes and their generalizations, and shows how these can be used to clarify certain problems in selected parts of algebra, as well as their success in solving a number of them. - ;Threading Homology through Algebra takes homological themes (Koszul complexes and their variations, resolutions in general) and shows how these affect the perception of certain problems in selected parts of algebra, as well as their success in solving a number of them. The text deals with regular local ri

  11. MutS2 Promotes Homologous Recombination in Bacillus subtilis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burby, Peter E; Simmons, Lyle A

    2017-01-15

    Bacterial MutS proteins are subdivided into two families, MutS1 and MutS2. MutS1 family members recognize DNA replication errors during their participation in the well-characterized mismatch repair (MMR) pathway. In contrast to the well-described function of MutS1, the function of MutS2 in bacteria has remained less clear. In Helicobacter pylori and Thermus thermophilus, MutS2 has been shown to suppress homologous recombination. The role of MutS2 is unknown in the Gram-positive bacterium Bacillus subtilis In this work, we investigated the contribution of MutS2 to maintaining genome integrity in B. subtilis We found that deletion of mutS2 renders B. subtilis sensitive to the natural antibiotic mitomycin C (MMC), which requires homologous recombination for repair. We demonstrate that the C-terminal small MutS-related (Smr) domain is necessary but not sufficient for tolerance to MMC. Further, we developed a CRISPR/Cas9 genome editing system to test if the inducible prophage PBSX was the underlying cause of the observed MMC sensitivity. Genetic analysis revealed that MMC sensitivity was dependent on recombination and not on nucleotide excision repair or a symptom of prophage PBSX replication and cell lysis. We found that deletion of mutS2 resulted in decreased transformation efficiency using both plasmid and chromosomal DNA. Further, deletion of mutS2 in a strain lacking the Holliday junction endonuclease gene recU resulted in increased MMC sensitivity and decreased transformation efficiency, suggesting that MutS2 could function redundantly with RecU. Together, our results support a model where B. subtilis MutS2 helps to promote homologous recombination, demonstrating a new function for bacterial MutS2. Cells contain pathways that promote or inhibit recombination. MutS2 homologs are Smr-endonuclease domain-containing proteins that have been shown to function in antirecombination in some bacteria. We present evidence that B. subtilis MutS2 promotes recombination

  12. Domain Modeling: NP_004079.3 [SAHG[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available NP_004079.3 chr10 The solution structure of the BRCT domain from human polymerase r...eveals homology with the TdT BRCT domain p2htfa_ chr10/NP_004079.3/NP_004079.3_apo_25-125.pdb blast 0 ...

  13. Domain Modeling: NP_851851.1 [SAHG[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available NP_851851.1 chr22 BCR-homology GTPase activation domain (BH-domain) d1rgpa_ chr22/NP_851851.1/NP_851851.1..._apo_222-417.pdb d1grnb_ chr22/NP_851851.1/NP_851851.1_holo_222-417.pdb blast 268R GDP 1 ...

  14. Plant Habitat (PH)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Onate, Bryan

    2016-01-01

    The International Space Station (ISS) will soon have a platform for conducting fundamental research of Large Plants. Plant Habitat (PH) is designed to be a fully controllable environment for high-quality plant physiological research. PH will control light quality, level, and timing, temperature, CO2, relative humidity, and irrigation, while scrubbing ethylene. Additional capabilities include leaf temperature and root zone moisture and oxygen sensing. The light cap will have red (630 nm), blue (450 nm), green (525 nm), far red (730 nm) and broad spectrum white LEDs. There will be several internal cameras (visible and IR) to monitor and record plant growth and operations.

  15. The homologous recombination system of Ustilago maydis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holloman, William K; Schirawski, Jan; Holliday, Robin

    2008-08-01

    Homologous recombination is a high fidelity, template-dependent process that is used in repair of damaged DNA, recovery of broken replication forks, and disjunction of homologous chromosomes in meiosis. Much of what is known about recombination genes and mechanisms comes from studies on baker's yeast. Ustilago maydis, a basidiomycete fungus, is distant evolutionarily from baker's yeast and so offers the possibility of gaining insight into recombination from an alternative perspective. Here we have surveyed the genome of U. maydis to determine the composition of its homologous recombination system. Compared to baker's yeast, there are fundamental differences in the function as well as in the repertoire of dedicated components. These include the use of a BRCA2 homolog and its modifier Dss1 rather than Rad52 as a mediator of Rad51, the presence of only a single Rad51 paralog, and the absence of Dmc1 and auxiliary meiotic proteins.

  16. Dualities in Persistent (Co)Homology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    de Silva, Vin; Morozov, Dmitriy; Vejdemo-Johansson, Mikael

    2011-09-16

    We consider sequences of absolute and relative homology and cohomology groups that arise naturally for a filtered cell complex. We establishalgebraic relationships between their persistence modules, and show that they contain equivalent information. We explain how one can use the existingalgorithm for persistent homology to process any of the four modules, and relate it to a recently introduced persistent cohomology algorithm. Wepresent experimental evidence for the practical efficiency of the latter algorithm.

  17. INVHOGEN: a database of homologous invertebrate genes

    OpenAIRE

    Paulsen, Ingo; von Haeseler, Arndt

    2005-01-01

    Classification of proteins into families of homologous sequences constitutes the basis of functional analysis or of evolutionary studies. Here we present INVertebrate HOmologous GENes (INVHOGEN), a database combining the available invertebrate protein genes from UniProt (consisting of Swiss-Prot and TrEMBL) into gene families. For each family INVHOGEN provides a multiple protein alignment, a maximum likelihood based phylogenetic tree and taxonomic information about the sequences. It is possib...

  18. Dualities in Persistent (Co)Homology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    de Silva, Vin; Morozov, Dmitriy; Vejdemo-Johansson, Mikael

    2011-09-16

    We consider sequences of absolute and relative homology and cohomology groups that arise naturally for a filtered cell complex. We establishalgebraic relationships between their persistence modules, and show that they contain equivalent information. We explain how one can use the existingalgorithm for persistent homology to process any of the four modules, and relate it to a recently introduced persistent cohomology algorithm. Wepresent experimental evidence for the practical efficiency of the latter algorithm.

  19. The homologous recombination system of Ustilago maydis

    OpenAIRE

    Holloman, William K.; Schirawski, Jan; Holliday, Robin

    2008-01-01

    Homologous recombination is a high fidelity, template-dependent process that is used in repair of damaged DNA, recovery of broken replication forks, and disjunction of homologous chromosomes in meiosis. Much of what is known about recombination genes and mechanisms comes from studies on baker's yeast. Ustilago maydis, a basidiomycete fungus, is distant evolutionarily from baker's yeast and so offers the possibility of gaining insight into recombination from an alternative perspective. Here we...

  20. Chromosome movements promoted by the mitochondrial protein SPD-3 are required for homology search during Caenorhabditis elegans meiosis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leticia Labrador

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Pairing of homologous chromosomes during early meiosis is essential to prevent the formation of aneuploid gametes. Chromosome pairing includes a step of homology search followed by the stabilization of homolog interactions by the synaptonemal complex (SC. These events coincide with dramatic changes in nuclear organization and rapid chromosome movements that depend on cytoskeletal motors and are mediated by SUN-domain proteins on the nuclear envelope, but how chromosome mobility contributes to the pairing process remains poorly understood. We show that defects in the mitochondria-localizing protein SPD-3 cause a defect in homolog pairing without impairing nuclear reorganization or SC assembly, which results in promiscuous installation of the SC between non-homologous chromosomes. Preventing SC assembly in spd-3 mutants does not improve homolog pairing, demonstrating that SPD-3 is required for homology search at the start of meiosis. Pairing center regions localize to SUN-1 aggregates at meiosis onset in spd-3 mutants; and pairing-promoting proteins, including cytoskeletal motors and polo-like kinase 2, are normally recruited to the nuclear envelope. However, quantitative analysis of SUN-1 aggregate movement in spd-3 mutants demonstrates a clear reduction in mobility, although this defect is not as severe as that seen in sun-1(jf18 mutants, which also show a stronger pairing defect, suggesting a correlation between chromosome-end mobility and the efficiency of pairing. SUN-1 aggregate movement is also impaired following inhibition of mitochondrial respiration or dynein knockdown, suggesting that mitochondrial function is required for motor-driven SUN-1 movement. The reduced chromosome-end mobility of spd-3 mutants impairs coupling of SC assembly to homology recognition and causes a delay in meiotic progression mediated by HORMA-domain protein HTP-1. Our work reveals how chromosome mobility impacts the different early meiotic events that promote

  1. Chromosome movements promoted by the mitochondrial protein SPD-3 are required for homology search during Caenorhabditis elegans meiosis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leticia Labrador

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Pairing of homologous chromosomes during early meiosis is essential to prevent the formation of aneuploid gametes. Chromosome pairing includes a step of homology search followed by the stabilization of homolog interactions by the synaptonemal complex (SC. These events coincide with dramatic changes in nuclear organization and rapid chromosome movements that depend on cytoskeletal motors and are mediated by SUN-domain proteins on the nuclear envelope, but how chromosome mobility contributes to the pairing process remains poorly understood. We show that defects in the mitochondria-localizing protein SPD-3 cause a defect in homolog pairing without impairing nuclear reorganization or SC assembly, which results in promiscuous installation of the SC between non-homologous chromosomes. Preventing SC assembly in spd-3 mutants does not improve homolog pairing, demonstrating that SPD-3 is required for homology search at the start of meiosis. Pairing center regions localize to SUN-1 aggregates at meiosis onset in spd-3 mutants; and pairing-promoting proteins, including cytoskeletal motors and polo-like kinase 2, are normally recruited to the nuclear envelope. However, quantitative analysis of SUN-1 aggregate movement in spd-3 mutants demonstrates a clear reduction in mobility, although this defect is not as severe as that seen in sun-1(jf18 mutants, which also show a stronger pairing defect, suggesting a correlation between chromosome-end mobility and the efficiency of pairing. SUN-1 aggregate movement is also impaired following inhibition of mitochondrial respiration or dynein knockdown, suggesting that mitochondrial function is required for motor-driven SUN-1 movement. The reduced chromosome-end mobility of spd-3 mutants impairs coupling of SC assembly to homology recognition and causes a delay in meiotic progression mediated by HORMA-domain protein HTP-1. Our work reveals how chromosome mobility impacts the different early meiotic events that promote

  2. The Evolutionary Relationship of the Domain Architectures in the RhoGEF-containing Proteins

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Qing-Lan Sun; Hong-Jun Zhou; Kui Lin

    2005-01-01

    Domain insertions and deletions lead to variations in the domain architectures of the proteins from their common ancestor. In this work, we investigated four groups of the RhoGEF-containing proteins from different organisms with domain architectures RhoGEF-PH-SH3, SH3-RhoGEF-PH, RhoGEF-PH, and SH3-RhoGEF defined in the Pfam database. The phylogenetic trees were constructed using each individual domain and/or the combinations of all the domains. The phylogenetic analysis suggests that RhoGEF-PH-SH3 and SH3-RhoGEF-PH might have evolved from RhoGEF-PH through the insertion of SH3 independently, while SH3-RhoGEF of proteins in fruit fly might have evolved from SH3-RhoGEF-PH by the degeneration of PH domain.

  3. A Khovanov Type Link Homology with Geometric Interpretation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Mei Li ZHANG; Feng Chun LEI

    2016-01-01

    We study a Khovanov type homology close to the original Khovanov homology theory from Frobenius system. The homology is an invariant for oriented links up to isotopy by applying a tautological functor on the geometric complex. The homology has also geometric descriptions by introducing the genus generating operations. We prove that Jones Polynomial is equal to a suitable Euler characteristic of the homology groups. As an application, we compute the homology groups of (2, k)-torus knots for every k∈N.

  4. pH Basics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lunelli, Bruno; Scagnolari, Francesco

    2009-01-01

    The exposition of the pervasive concept of pH, of its foundations and implementation as a meaningful quantitative measurement, in nonspecialist university texts is often not easy to follow because too many of its theoretical and operative underpinnings are neglected. To help the inquiring student we provide a concise introduction to the depth just…

  5. Homolog pairing and segregation in Drosophila meiosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McKee, B D

    2009-01-01

    Pairing of homologous chromosomes is fundamental to their reliable segregation during meiosis I and thus underlies sexual reproduction. In most eukaryotes homolog pairing is confined to prophase of meiosis I and is accompanied by frequent exchanges, known as crossovers, between homologous chromatids. Crossovers give rise to chiasmata, stable interhomolog connectors that are required for bipolar orientation (orientation to opposite poles) of homologs during meiosis I. Drosophila is unique among model eukaryotes in exhibiting regular homolog pairing in mitotic as well as meiotic cells. I review the results of recent molecular studies of pairing in both mitosis and meiosis in Drosophila. These studies show that homolog pairing is continuous between pre-meiotic mitosis and meiosis but that pairing frequencies and patterns are altered during the mitotic-meiotic transition. They also show that, with the exception of X-Y pairing in male meiosis, which is mediated specifically by the 240-bp rDNA spacer repeats, chromosome pairing is not restricted to specific sites in either mitosis or meiosis. Instead, virtually all chromosome regions, both heterochromatic and euchromatic, exhibit autonomous pairing capacity. Mutations that reduce the frequencies of both mitotic and meiotic pairing have been recently described, but no mutations that abolish pairing completely have been discovered, and the genetic control of pairing in Drosophila remains to be elucidated.

  6. On the hodological criterion for homology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faunes, Macarena; Francisco Botelho, João; Ahumada Galleguillos, Patricio; Mpodozis, Jorge

    2015-01-01

    Owen's pre-evolutionary definition of a homolog as "the same organ in different animals under every variety of form and function" and its redefinition after Darwin as "the same trait in different lineages due to common ancestry" entail the same heuristic problem: how to establish "sameness."Although different criteria for homology often conflict, there is currently a generalized acceptance of gene expression as the best criterion. This gene-centered view of homology results from a reductionist and preformationist concept of living beings. Here, we adopt an alternative organismic-epigenetic viewpoint, and conceive living beings as systems whose identity is given by the dynamic interactions between their components at their multiple levels of composition. We posit that there cannot be an absolute homology criterion, and instead, homology should be inferred from comparisons at the levels and developmental stages where the delimitation of the compared trait lies. In this line, we argue that neural connectivity, i.e., the hodological criterion, should prevail in the determination of homologies between brain supra-cellular structures, such as the vertebrate pallium.

  7. On the hodological criterion for homology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faunes, Macarena; Francisco Botelho, João; Ahumada Galleguillos, Patricio; Mpodozis, Jorge

    2015-01-01

    Owen's pre-evolutionary definition of a homolog as “the same organ in different animals under every variety of form and function” and its redefinition after Darwin as “the same trait in different lineages due to common ancestry” entail the same heuristic problem: how to establish “sameness.”Although different criteria for homology often conflict, there is currently a generalized acceptance of gene expression as the best criterion. This gene-centered view of homology results from a reductionist and preformationist concept of living beings. Here, we adopt an alternative organismic-epigenetic viewpoint, and conceive living beings as systems whose identity is given by the dynamic interactions between their components at their multiple levels of composition. We posit that there cannot be an absolute homology criterion, and instead, homology should be inferred from comparisons at the levels and developmental stages where the delimitation of the compared trait lies. In this line, we argue that neural connectivity, i.e., the hodological criterion, should prevail in the determination of homologies between brain supra-cellular structures, such as the vertebrate pallium. PMID:26157357

  8. High-resolution crystal structure of the PDZ1 domain of human protein tyrosine phosphatase PTP-Bas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Sang-Ok; Lee, Mi-Kyung; Ku, Bonsu; Bae, Kwang-Hee; Lee, Sang Chul; Lim, Heon M; Kim, Seung Jun; Chi, Seung-Wook

    2016-09-23

    Protein tyrosine phosphatase-Basophil (PTP-Bas) is a membrane-associated protein tyrosine phosphatase with five PDZ domains and is involved in apoptosis, tumorigenesis, and insulin signaling. The interaction between PTP-Bas and tandem-PH-domain-containing protein 1/2 (TAPP1/2) plays an essential role in the regulation of insulin signaling. Despite its high sequence homology with the other PDZ domains, only the PDZ1 domain of PTP-Bas showed distinct binding specificity for TAPP1/2. Although the interaction between PTP-Bas PDZ1 and TAPP1/2 is a therapeutic target for diabetes, the structural basis for the interaction has not been elucidated. In the present study, we determined the crystal structure of the PTP-Bas PDZ1 domain at 1.6 Å resolution. In addition, we calculated the structural models of complexes of PTP-Bas PDZ1 and the C-terminal peptides of TAPP1/2 (referred to as TAPP1p/2p). Structural comparison with the PTP-Bas PDZ2/RA-GEF2 peptide complex revealed a structural basis for distinct binding specificity of PTP-Bas PDZ1 for TAPP1p/2p peptides. Our high-resolution crystal structure of PTP-Bas PDZ1 will serve as a useful template for rational structure-based design of novel anti-diabetes therapeutics.

  9. Trusted Domain

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hjorth, Theis Solberg; Torbensen, Rune

    2012-01-01

    that enables secure end-to-end communication with home automation devices, and it supports device revocations as well as a structure of intersecting sets of nodes for scalability. Devices in the Trusted Domain are registered in a list that is distributed using a robust epidemic protocol optimized...

  10. Domain crossing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schraefel, M. C.; Rouncefield, Mark; Kellogg, Wendy

    2012-01-01

    In CSCW, how much do we need to know about another domain/culture before we observe, intersect and intervene with designs. What optimally would that other culture need to know about us? Is this a “how long is a piece of string” question, or an inquiry where we can consider a variety of contexts a...

  11. Investigating homology between proteins using energetic profiles.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    James O Wrabl

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Accumulated experimental observations demonstrate that protein stability is often preserved upon conservative point mutation. In contrast, less is known about the effects of large sequence or structure changes on the stability of a particular fold. Almost completely unknown is the degree to which stability of different regions of a protein is generally preserved throughout evolution. In this work, these questions are addressed through thermodynamic analysis of a large representative sample of protein fold space based on remote, yet accepted, homology. More than 3,000 proteins were computationally analyzed using the structural-thermodynamic algorithm COREX/BEST. Estimated position-specific stability (i.e., local Gibbs free energy of folding and its component enthalpy and entropy were quantitatively compared between all proteins in the sample according to all-vs.-all pairwise structural alignment. It was discovered that the local stabilities of homologous pairs were significantly more correlated than those of non-homologous pairs, indicating that local stability was indeed generally conserved throughout evolution. However, the position-specific enthalpy and entropy underlying stability were less correlated, suggesting that the overall regional stability of a protein was more important than the thermodynamic mechanism utilized to achieve that stability. Finally, two different types of statistically exceptional evolutionary structure-thermodynamic relationships were noted. First, many homologous proteins contained regions of similar thermodynamics despite localized structure change, suggesting a thermodynamic mechanism enabling evolutionary fold change. Second, some homologous proteins with extremely similar structures nonetheless exhibited different local stabilities, a phenomenon previously observed experimentally in this laboratory. These two observations, in conjunction with the principal conclusion that homologous proteins generally conserved

  12. On the hodological criterion for homology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Macarena eFaunes

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Owen’s pre-evolutionary definition of a homologue as the same organ in different animals under every variety of form and function and its redefinition after Darwin as the same trait in different lineages due to common ancestry entail the same heuristic problem: how to establish sameness. Although different criteria for homology often conflict, there is currently a generalized acceptance of gene expression as the best criterion. This gene-centered view of homology results from a reductionist and preformationist concept of living beings. Here, we adopt an alternative organismic-epigenetic viewpoint, and conceive living beings as systems whose identity is given by the dynamic interactions between their components at their multiple levels of composition. We posit that there cannot be an absolute homology criterion, and instead, homology should be inferred from comparisons at the levels and developmental stages where the delimitation of the compared trait lies. In this line, we argue that neural connectivity, i.e., the hodological criterion, should prevail in the determination of homologies between brain supra-cellular structures, such as the vertebrate pallium.

  13. Discovery of a Homolog of Siderophilin in a Plant

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yun-Biao FEI; Peng-Xiu CAO; Su-Qin GAO; Ling-Bo WEI; Bin WANG

    2005-01-01

    Members belonging to the siderophilin family are iron-binding and iron-transporting proteins,which includes transferrin and lactoferrin. They have only been found in animals previously. If siderophilin could be found in and isolated from a plant, its production and subsequent extensive application could be increased. The present study is the first to report the discovery of a homolog of siderophilin in a plant. In order to purify antifreeze proteins from Ammopiptanthus mongolicus (Maxim.) Cheng f., the authors processed the proteins from the leaves using techniques such as column chromatography using DEAE-Cellulose-52, gel filtration via Sephacryl S-100 HR medium, hydrophobic interaction chromatography, and sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis. Mass spectroscopy was performed on the three proteins purified and the sequence of one of the proteins (containing 32 amino acids) was found to have 97%homology with the corresponding part of one type of human lactoferrin. Moreover, one of the two peptides belongs to an iron-binding domain. So, it is possible that siderophilin also exists in plants and plays a role as an antibacterial and antifungal, among other actions.

  14. Refined homology model of monoacylglycerol lipase: toward a selective inhibitor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bowman, Anna L.; Makriyannis, Alexandros

    2009-11-01

    Monoacylglycerol lipase (MGL) is primarily responsible for the hydrolysis of 2-arachidonoylglycerol (2-AG), an endocannabinoid with full agonist activity at both cannabinoid receptors. Increased tissue 2-AG levels consequent to MGL inhibition are considered therapeutic against pain, inflammation, and neurodegenerative disorders. However, the lack of MGL structural information has hindered the development of MGL-selective inhibitors. Here, we detail a fully refined homology model of MGL which preferentially identifies MGL inhibitors over druglike noninhibitors. We include for the first time insight into the active-site geometry and potential hydrogen-bonding interactions along with molecular dynamics simulations describing the opening and closing of the MGL helical-domain lid. Docked poses of both the natural substrate and known inhibitors are detailed. A comparison of the MGL active-site to that of the other principal endocannabinoid metabolizing enzyme, fatty acid amide hydrolase, demonstrates key differences which provide crucial insight toward the design of selective MGL inhibitors as potential drugs.

  15. Hyper(co)homology for exact left covariant functors and a homology theory for topological spaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sklyarenko, E. G.

    1995-06-01

    Contents Introduction §1. Strong cohomology of dual complexes §2. Hyperhomology §3. Examples §4. Typical limit relations for Steenrod-Sitnikov homology §5. The strong homology of topological spaces §6. On the special position held by singular theory Bibliography

  16. 17-4 PH and 15-5 PH

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Howard T.

    1995-01-01

    17-4 PH and 15-5 PH are extremely useful and versatile precipitation-hardening stainless steels. Armco 17-4 PH is well suited for the magnetic particle inspection requirements of Aerospace Material Specification. Armco 15-5 PH and 17-4 PH are produced in billet, plate, bar, and wire. Also, 15-5 PH is able to meet the stringent mechanical properties required in the aerospace and nuclear industries. Both products are easy to heat treat and machine, making them very useful in many applications.

  17. Borel-Moore homology and cap product operations

    OpenAIRE

    Hanamura, Masaki

    2016-01-01

    We show that, for a simplicial complex, the supported cap product operation on Borel-Moore homology coincides with the supported cap product on simplicial homology. For this purpose we introduce the supported cap product for locally finite singular homology, and compare the cap product on the three homology theories.

  18. [DNA homologous recombination repair in mammalian cells].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Popławski, Tomasz; Błasiak, Janusz

    2006-01-01

    DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs) are the most serious DNA damage. Due to a great variety of factors causing DSBs, the efficacy of their repair is crucial for the cell's functioning and prevents DNA fragmentation, chromosomal translocation and deletion. In mammalian cells DSBs can be repaired by non-homologous end joining (NHEJ), homologous recombination (HRR) and single strand annealing (SSA). HRR can be divided into the first and second phase. The first phase is initiated by sensor proteins belonging to the MRN complex, that activate the ATM protein which target HRR proteins to obtain the second response phase--repair. HRR is precise because it utilizes a non-damaged homologous DNA fragment as a template. The key players of HRR in mammalian cells are MRN, RPA, Rad51 and its paralogs, Rad52 and Rad54.

  19. INVHOGEN: a database of homologous invertebrate genes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paulsen, Ingo; von Haeseler, Arndt

    2006-01-01

    Classification of proteins into families of homologous sequences constitutes the basis of functional analysis or of evolutionary studies. Here we present INVertebrate HOmologous GENes (INVHOGEN), a database combining the available invertebrate protein genes from UniProt (consisting of Swiss-Prot and TrEMBL) into gene families. For each family INVHOGEN provides a multiple protein alignment, a maximum likelihood based phylogenetic tree and taxonomic information about the sequences. It is possible to download the corresponding GenBank flatfiles, the alignment and the tree in Newick format. Sequences and related information have been structured in an ACNUC database under a client/server architecture. Thus, complex selections can be performed. An external graphical tool (FamFetch) allows access to the data to evaluate homology relationships between genes and distinguish orthologous from paralogous sequences. Thus, INVHOGEN complements the well-known HOVERGEN database. The databank is available at http://www.bi.uni-duesseldorf.de/~invhogen/invhogen.html.

  20. Homologous recombination in plants: an antireview.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lieberman-Lazarovich, Michal; Levy, Avraham A

    2011-01-01

    Homologous recombination (HR) is a central cellular process involved in many aspects of genome maintenance such as DNA repair, replication, telomere maintenance, and meiotic chromosomal segregation. HR is highly conserved among eukaryotes, contributing to genome stability as well as to the generation of genetic diversity. It has been intensively studied, for almost a century, in plants and in other organisms. In this antireview, rather than reviewing existing knowledge, we wish to underline the many open questions in plant HR. We will discuss the following issues: how do we define homology and how the degree of homology affects HR? Are there any plant-specific HR qualities, how extensive is functional conservation and did HR proteins acquire new functions? How efficient is HR in plants and what are the cis and the trans factors that regulate it? Finally, we will give the prospects for enhancing the rates of gene targeting and meiotic HR for plant breeding purposes.

  1. Live cell imaging with protein domains capable of recognizing phosphatidylinositol 4,5-bisphosphate; a comparative study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lemmon Mark A

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Phosphatidylinositol 4,5-bisphosphate [PtdIns(4,5P2] is a critically important regulatory phospholipid found in the plasma membrane of all eukaryotic cells. In addition to being a precursor of important second messengers, PtdIns(4,5P2 also regulates ion channels and transporters and serves the endocytic machinery by recruiting clathrin adaptor proteins. Visualization of the localization and dynamic changes in PtdIns(4,5P2 levels in living cells is critical to understanding the biology of PtdIns(4,5P2. This has been mostly achieved with the use of the pleckstrin homology (PH domain of PLCδ1 fused to GFP. Here we report on a comparative analysis of several recently-described yeast PH domains as well as the mammalian Tubby domain to evaluate their usefulness as PtdIns(4,5P2 imaging tools. Results All of the yeast PH domains that have been previously shown to bind PtdIns(4,5P2 showed plasma membrane localization but only a subset responded to manipulations of plasma membrane PtdIns(4,5P2. None of these domains showed any advantage over the PLCδ1PH-GFP reporter and were compromised either in their expression levels, nuclear localization or by causing peculiar membrane structures. In contrast, the Tubby domain showed high membrane localization consistent with PtdIns(4,5P2 binding and displayed no affinity for the soluble headgroup, Ins(1,4,5P3. Detailed comparison of the Tubby and PLCδ1PH domains showed that the Tubby domain has a higher affinity for membrane PtdIns(4,5P2 and therefore displays a lower sensitivity to report on changes of this lipid during phospholipase C activation. Conclusion These results showed that both the PLCδ1PH-GFP and the GFP-Tubby domain are useful reporters of PtdIns(4,5P2 changes in the plasma membrane, with distinct advantages and disadvantages. While the PLCδ1PH-GFP is a more sensitive reporter, its Ins(1,4,5P3 binding may compromise its accuracy to measure PtdIns(4,5P2changes. The Tubby domain

  2. Crystal structure of an archaeal actin homolog.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roeben, Annette; Kofler, Christine; Nagy, István; Nickell, Stephan; Hartl, F Ulrich; Bracher, Andreas

    2006-04-21

    Prokaryotic homologs of the eukaryotic structural protein actin, such as MreB and ParM, have been implicated in determination of bacterial cell shape, and in the segregation of genomic and plasmid DNA. In contrast to these bacterial actin homologs, little is known about the archaeal counterparts. As a first step, we expressed a predicted actin homolog of the thermophilic archaeon Thermoplasma acidophilum, Ta0583, and determined its crystal structure at 2.1A resolution. Ta0583 is expressed as a soluble protein in T.acidophilum and is an active ATPase at physiological temperature. In vitro, Ta0583 forms sheets with spacings resembling the crystal lattice, indicating an inherent propensity to form filamentous structures. The fold of Ta0583 contains the core structure of actin and clearly belongs to the actin/Hsp70 superfamily of ATPases. Ta0583 is approximately equidistant from actin and MreB on the structural level, and combines features from both eubacterial actin homologs, MreB and ParM. The structure of Ta0583 co-crystallized with ADP indicates that the nucleotide binds at the interface between the subdomains of Ta0583 in a manner similar to that of actin. However, the conformation of the nucleotide observed in complex with Ta0583 clearly differs from that in complex with actin, but closely resembles the conformation of ParM-bound nucleotide. On the basis of sequence and structural homology, we suggest that Ta0583 derives from a ParM-like actin homolog that was once encoded by a plasmid and was transferred into a common ancestor of Thermoplasma and Ferroplasma. Intriguingly, both genera are characterized by the lack of a cell wall, and therefore Ta0583 could have a function in cellular organization.

  3. Homological Algebra of Semimodules and Semicontramodules

    CERN Document Server

    Positselski, Leonid

    2010-01-01

    This is a monograph in semi-infinite homological algebra, concentrated mostly on the semi-infinite theory of associative algebraic structures, but including also some material on the semi-infinite homology and cohomology of Lie algebras and topological groups. The main objects of study are the double-sided derived functors SemiExt and SemiTor, and the phenomenon of comodule-contramodule correspondence, connecting them with the more conventional, one-sided Ext and CtrTor. Contramodules, introduced originally by Eilenberg and Moore in 1960's but almost forgotten for four decades, play a very pro

  4. Relative Derived Equivalences and Relative Homological Dimensions

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Sheng Yong PAN

    2016-01-01

    Let A be a small abelian category. For a closed subbifunctor F of Ext1A (−,−), Buan has generalized the construction of Verdier’s quotient category to get a relative derived category, where he localized with respect to F-acyclic complexes. In this paper, the homological properties of relative derived categories are discussed, and the relation with derived categories is given. For Artin algebras, using relative derived categories, we give a relative version on derived equivalences induced by F-tilting complexes. We discuss the relationships between relative homological dimensions and relative derived equivalences.

  5. Homological and homotopical Dehn functions are different

    CERN Document Server

    Abrams, Aaron; Dani, Pallavi; Young, Robert

    2012-01-01

    The homological and homotopical Dehn functions are different ways of measuring the difficulty of filling a closed curve inside a group or a space. The homological Dehn function measures fillings of cycles by chains, while the homotopical Dehn function measures fillings of curves by disks. Since the two definitions involve different sorts of boundaries and fillings, there is no a priori relationship between the two functions, but prior to this work there were no known examples of finitely-presented groups for which the two functions differ. This paper gives the first such examples, constructed by amalgamating a free-by-cyclic group with several Bestvina-Brady groups.

  6. New mesogenic homologous series of -methylcinnamates

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    R A Vora; A K Prajapati

    2001-04-01

    Compounds of a new smectogenic homologous series of -methylcinnamates were prepared by condensing different 4--alkoxybenzoyl chloride with methoxyethyl trans-4-hydroxy- -methylcinnamate. In this series, the first six members are non-mesogenic. -Heptyloxy derivative exhibits monotropic smectic A phase whereas rest of the members exhibit enantiotropic smectic A mesophase. The compounds are characterized by combination of elemental analysis and spectroscopic techniques. Enthalpies of few homologues are measured by DSC techniques. Fluorescent properties are also observed. The thermal stabilities of the present series are compared with those of other structurally related mesogenic homologous series.

  7. Homology and cohomology of Rees semigroup algebras

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Grønbæk, Niels; Gourdeau, Frédéric; White, Michael C.

    2011-01-01

    Let S by a Rees semigroup, and let 1¹(S) be its convolution semigroup algebra. Using Morita equivalence we show that bounded Hochschild homology and cohomology of l¹(S) is isomorphic to those of the underlying discrete group algebra.......Let S by a Rees semigroup, and let 1¹(S) be its convolution semigroup algebra. Using Morita equivalence we show that bounded Hochschild homology and cohomology of l¹(S) is isomorphic to those of the underlying discrete group algebra....

  8. pH matters

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Inaba, Masanori; Quinson, Jonathan; Arenz, Matthias

    2017-01-01

    We investigated the influence of the ink properties of proton exchange membrane fuel cell (PEMFC) catalysts on the oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) activity determined in thin film rotating disk electrode (TF-RDE) measurements. It was found that the adaption of a previously reported ink recipe...... to home-made catalysts does not lead to satisfying results, although reported work could be reproduced using commercial catalyst samples. It is demonstrated that the pH of the catalyst ink, which has not been addressed in previous TF-RDE studies, is an important parameter that needs to be carefully...

  9. Binding of PLCδ1PH-GFP to Ptdlns(4,5)P2 prevents inhibition of phospholipase C-mediated hydrolysis of Ptdlns(4,5)P2 by neomycin

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Chuan WANG; Xiao-na DU; Qing-zhong JIA; Hai-lin ZHANG

    2005-01-01

    Aim: To investigate the effects of the pleckstrin homology (PH) domain of phospholipase Cδ1 (PLCδ1PH) on inhibition of phospholipase C (PLC)-mediated hydrolysis of phosphatidylinositol 4,5-bisphosphate [PtdIns(4,5)P2] by neomycin.Methods: A fusion construct of green fluorescent protein (GFP) and PLCδ1PH (PLCδ1PH-GFP), which is known to bind Ptdlns(4,5)P2 specifically, together with laser-scanning confocal microscopy, was used to trace PtdIns(4,5)P2 translocation.Results: Stimulation of the type 1 muscarinic receptor and the bradykinin 2 receptor induced a reversible PLCδ1PH-GFP translocation from the membrane to the cytosol in COS-7 cells. PLC inhibitor U73122 blocked the translocation.Wortmannin, a known PtdIns kinase inhibitor, did not affect the translocation induced by ACh, but blocked recovery after translocation, indicating that PtdIns(4,5)P2 hydrolysis occurs through receptor-mediated PLC activation.Neomycin, a commonly used phospholipase C blocker, failed to block the receptor-induced PLCδ1PH-GFP translocation, indicating that neomycin is unable to block PLC-mediated PtdIns(4,5)P2 hydrolysis. However, in the absence of PLCδ1PH-GFP expression, neomycin abolished the receptor-induced hydrolysis of PtdIns(4,5)P2 by PLC. Conclusion: Although PLCδ1PH and neomycin bind to PtdIns(4,5)P2 in a similar way, they have distinct effects on receptor-mediated activation of PLC and PtdIns(4,5)P2 hydrolysis.

  10. Relative Binding Free Energy Calculations Applied to Protein Homology Models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cappel, Daniel; Hall, Michelle Lynn; Lenselink, Eelke B; Beuming, Thijs; Qi, Jun; Bradner, James; Sherman, Woody

    2016-12-27

    A significant challenge and potential high-value application of computer-aided drug design is the accurate prediction of protein-ligand binding affinities. Free energy perturbation (FEP) using molecular dynamics (MD) sampling is among the most suitable approaches to achieve accurate binding free energy predictions, due to the rigorous statistical framework of the methodology, correct representation of the energetics, and thorough treatment of the important degrees of freedom in the system (including explicit waters). Recent advances in sampling methods and force fields coupled with vast increases in computational resources have made FEP a viable technology to drive hit-to-lead and lead optimization, allowing for more efficient cycles of medicinal chemistry and the possibility to explore much larger chemical spaces. However, previous FEP applications have focused on systems with high-resolution crystal structures of the target as starting points-something that is not always available in drug discovery projects. As such, the ability to apply FEP on homology models would greatly expand the domain of applicability of FEP in drug discovery. In this work we apply a particular implementation of FEP, called FEP+, on congeneric ligand series binding to four diverse targets: a kinase (Tyk2), an epigenetic bromodomain (BRD4), a transmembrane GPCR (A2A), and a protein-protein interaction interface (BCL-2 family protein MCL-1). We apply FEP+ using both crystal structures and homology models as starting points and find that the performance using homology models is generally on a par with the results when using crystal structures. The robustness of the calculations to structural variations in the input models can likely be attributed to the conformational sampling in the molecular dynamics simulations, which allows the modeled receptor to adapt to the "real" conformation for each ligand in the series. This work exemplifies the advantages of using all-atom simulation methods with

  11. Seiberg-Witten-Floer Theory for Homology 3-Spheres

    CERN Document Server

    Wang, B L

    1996-01-01

    We give the definition of the Seiberg-Witten-Floer homology group for a homology 3-sphere. Its Euler characteristic number is a Casson-type invariant. For a four-manifold with boundary a homology sphere, a relative Seiberg-Witten invariant is defined taking values in the Seiberg-Witten-Floer homology group, these relative Seiberg-Witten invariants are applied to certain homology spheres bounding Stein surfaces.

  12. An integumentary mucin (FIM-B.1) from Xenopus laevis homologous with von Willebrand factor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Probst, J C; Gertzen, E M; Hoffmann, W

    1990-07-03

    We present a new protein from X. laevis skin termed "frog integumentary mucin B.1" (FIM-B.1) with a general structure similar to FIM-A.1 (formerly "spasmolysin"). The central region consisting of tandem repeats of 11 amino acid residues is probably a target for extensive O-glycosylation, whereas the C-terminal cysteine-rich domain shows pronounced homology with the C1-C2 domains and the C-terminal end of von Willebrand factor. Furthermore, we describe homology with antistasin, an anticoagulant peptide from a leech. We also discuss some implications concerning the evolutionary origin of von Willebrand factor. In situ hybridization studies revealed the expression of FIM-B.1 exclusively in mucous glands of the skin. This is comparable with FIM-A.1 but is in contrast to all other physiologically active peptides, which are synthesized in granular glands.

  13. Two zebrafish G2A homologs activate multiple intracellular signaling pathways in acidic environment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ichijo, Yuta; Mochimaru, Yuta [Laboratory of Cell Signaling Regulation, Department of Life Sciences, School of Agriculture, Meiji University, Kawasaki 214-8571 (Japan); Azuma, Morio [Laboratory of Regulatory Biology, Graduate School of Science and Engineering, University of Toyama, 3190-Gofuku, Toyama 930-8555 (Japan); Satou, Kazuhiro; Negishi, Jun [Laboratory of Cell Signaling Regulation, Department of Life Sciences, School of Agriculture, Meiji University, Kawasaki 214-8571 (Japan); Nakakura, Takashi [Department of Anatomy, Graduate School of Medicine, Teikyo University, 2-11-1 Itabashi-Ku, Tokyo 173-8605 (Japan); Oshima, Natsuki [Laboratory of Cell Signaling Regulation, Department of Life Sciences, School of Agriculture, Meiji University, Kawasaki 214-8571 (Japan); Mogi, Chihiro; Sato, Koichi [Laboratory of Signal Transduction, Institute for Molecular and Cellular Regulation, Gunma University, Maebashi 371-8512 (Japan); Matsuda, Kouhei [Laboratory of Regulatory Biology, Graduate School of Science and Engineering, University of Toyama, 3190-Gofuku, Toyama 930-8555 (Japan); Okajima, Fumikazu [Laboratory of Signal Transduction, Institute for Molecular and Cellular Regulation, Gunma University, Maebashi 371-8512 (Japan); Tomura, Hideaki, E-mail: tomurah@meiji.ac.jp [Laboratory of Cell Signaling Regulation, Department of Life Sciences, School of Agriculture, Meiji University, Kawasaki 214-8571 (Japan)

    2016-01-01

    Human G2A is activated by various stimuli such as lysophosphatidylcholine (LPC), 9-hydroxyoctadecadienoic acid (9-HODE), and protons. The receptor is coupled to multiple intracellular signaling pathways, including the G{sub s}-protein/cAMP/CRE, G{sub 12/13}-protein/Rho/SRE, and G{sub q}-protein/phospholipase C/NFAT pathways. In the present study, we examined whether zebrafish G2A homologs (zG2A-a and zG2A-b) could respond to these stimuli and activate multiple intracellular signaling pathways. We also examined whether histidine residue and basic amino acid residue in the N-terminus of the homologs also play roles similar to those played by human G2A residues if the homologs sense protons. We found that the zG2A-a showed the high CRE, SRE, and NFAT activities, however, zG2A-b showed only the high SRE activity under a pH of 8.0. Extracellular acidification from pH 7.4 to 6.3 ameliorated these activities in zG2A-a-expressing cells. On the other hand, acidification ameliorated the SRE activity but not the CRE and NFAT activities in zG2A-b-expressing cells. LPC or 9-HODE did not modify any activity of either homolog. The substitution of histidine residue at the 174{sup th} position from the N-terminus of zG2A-a to asparagine residue attenuated proton-induced CRE and NFAT activities but not SRE activity. The substitution of arginine residue at the 32nd position from the N-terminus of zG2A-a to the alanine residue also attenuated its high and the proton-induced CRE and NFAT activities. On the contrary, the substitution did not attenuate SRE activity. The substitution of the arginine residue at the 10th position from the N-terminus of zG2A-b to the alanine residue also did not attenuate its high or the proton-induced SRE activity. These results indicate that zebrafish G2A homologs were activated by protons but not by LPC and 9-HODE, and the activation mechanisms of the homologs were similar to those of human G2A. - Highlights: • Zebrafish two G2A homologs are proton

  14. Homological Perturbation Theory and Mirror Symmetry

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jian ZHOU

    2003-01-01

    We explain how deformation theories of geometric objects such as complex structures,Poisson structures and holomorphic bundle structures lead to differential Gerstenhaber or Poisson al-gebras. We use homological perturbation theory to construct A∞ algebra structures on the cohomology,and their canonically defined deformations. Such constructions are used to formulate a version of A∞algebraic mirror symmetry.

  15. Homological stability for unordered configuration spaces

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Randal-Williams, Oscar

    2013-01-01

    This paper consists of two related parts. In the first part we give a self-contained proof of homological stability for the spaces C_n(M;X) of configurations of n unordered points in a connected open manifold M with labels in a path-connected space X, with the best possible integral stability range...... of 2* \\leq n. Along the way we give a new proof of the high connectivity of the complex of injective words. If the manifold has dimension at least three, we show that in rational homology the stability range may be improved to * \\leq n. In the second part we study to what extent the homology...... of the spaces C_n(M) can be considered stable when M is a closed manifold. In this case there are no stabilisation maps, but one may still ask if the dimensions of the homology groups over some field stabilise with n. We prove that this is true when M is odd-dimensional, or when the field is F_2 or Q...

  16. Khovanov homology for virtual tangles and applications

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tubbenhauer, Daniel

    We extend the cobordism based categorification of the virtual Jones polynomial to virtual tangles. This extension is combinatorial and has semi-local properties. We use the semi-local property to prove an applications, i.e. we give a discussion of Lee's degeneration of virtual homology....

  17. Persistent homology in graph power filtrations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parks, Allen D; Marchette, David J

    2016-10-01

    The persistence of homological features in simplicial complex representations of big datasets in R (n) resulting from Vietoris-Rips or Čech filtrations is commonly used to probe the topological structure of such datasets. In this paper, the notion of homological persistence in simplicial complexes obtained from power filtrations of graphs is introduced. Specifically, the rth complex, r ≥ 1, in such a power filtration is the clique complex of the rth power G(r) of a simple graph G. Because the graph distance in G is the relevant proximity parameter, unlike a Euclidean filtration of a dataset where regional scale differences can be an issue, persistence in power filtrations provides a scale-free insight into the topology of G. It is shown that for a power filtration of G, the girth of G defines an r range over which the homology of the complexes in the filtration are guaranteed to persist in all dimensions. The role of chordal graphs as trivial homology delimiters in power filtrations is also discussed and the related notions of 'persistent triviality', 'transient noise' and 'persistent periodicity' in power filtrations are introduced.

  18. Homology stability for the general linear group

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Maazen, Hendrik

    1979-01-01

    This thesis studies the homology stability problem for general linear groups over Euclidean rings and over subrings of the field of rational numbers. Affine linear groups, acting on affine space rather than linear space, are also considered. In order to get stability results one establishes that cer

  19. Regulation of Homologous Recombination by SUMOylation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pinela da Silva, Sonia Cristina

    factors such as the homologous recombination (HR) machinery. HR constitutes the main DSB repair pathway in Saccharomyces cerevisiae and despite being largely considered an error-free process and essential for genome stability, uncontrolled recombination can lead to loss of heterozygosity, translocations...

  20. Cell biology of homologous recombination in yeast

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Eckert-Boulet, Nadine Valerie; Rothstein, Rodney; Lisby, Michael

    2011-01-01

    Homologous recombination is an important pathway for error-free repair of DNA lesions, such as single- and double-strand breaks, and for rescue of collapsed replication forks. Here, we describe protocols for live cell imaging of single-lesion recombination events in the yeast Saccharomyces...

  1. Threading homology through algebra selected patterns

    CERN Document Server

    Boffi, Giandomenico

    2006-01-01

    Aimed at graduate students and researchers in mathematics, this book takes homological themes, such as Koszul complexes and their generalizations, and shows how these can be used to clarify certain problems in selected parts of algebra, as well as their success in solving a number of them.

  2. Gorenstein Homological Dimensions and Change of Rings

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xiaoyan YANG

    2012-01-01

    In this paper,we shall be concerned with what happens of Gorenstein homological dimensions when certain modifications are made to a ring. The five structural operations addressed later are the formation of excellent extensions,localizations,Morita equivalences,polynomial extensions and power series extensions.

  3. Homological stability for unordered configuration spaces

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Randal-Williams, Oscar

    2013-01-01

    This paper consists of two related parts. In the first part we give a self-contained proof of homological stability for the spaces C_n(M;X) of configurations of n unordered points in a connected open manifold M with labels in a path-connected space X, with the best possible integral stability range...

  4. Persistent Homology for Random Fields and Complexes

    CERN Document Server

    Adler, Robert J; Borman, Matthew S; Subag, Eliran; Weinberger, Shmuel

    2010-01-01

    We discuss and review recent developments in the area of applied algebraic topology, such as persistent homology and barcodes. In particular, we discuss how these are related to understanding more about manifold learning from random point cloud data, the algebraic structure of simplicial complexes determined by random vertices, and, in most detail, the algebraic topology of the excursion sets of random fields.

  5. Homology stability for the general linear group

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Maazen, Hendrik

    1979-01-01

    This thesis studies the homology stability problem for general linear groups over Euclidean rings and over subrings of the field of rational numbers. Affine linear groups, acting on affine space rather than linear space, are also considered. In order to get stability results one establishes that

  6. Khovanov homology for virtual tangles and applications

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tubbenhauer, Daniel

    We extend the cobordism based categorification of the virtual Jones polynomial to virtual tangles. This extension is combinatorial and has semi-local properties. We use the semi-local property to prove an applications, i.e. we give a discussion of Lee's degeneration of virtual homology....

  7. Crystallization and X-ray diffraction analysis of the CH domain of the cotton kinesin GhKCH2

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Qin, Xinghua [China Agricultural University, No. 2 Yuanmingyuanxilu, Haidian District, Beijing 100094, People’s Republic of (China); The Fourth Military Medical University, No. 169 Changlexi Road, Xincheng District, Xi’an 710032, People’s Republic of (China); Chen, Ziwei; Li, Ping; Liu, Guoqin, E-mail: liu@cau.edu.cn [China Agricultural University, No. 2 Yuanmingyuanxilu, Haidian District, Beijing 100094, People’s Republic of (China)

    2016-02-19

    The cloning, expression, purification and crystallization of the CH domain of the plant-specific kinesin GhKCH2 is reported. GhKCH2 belongs to a group of plant-specific kinesins (KCHs) containing an actin-binding calponin homology (CH) domain in the N-terminus. Previous studies revealed that the GhKCH2 CH domain (GhKCH2-CH) had a higher affinity for F-actin (K{sub d} = 0.42 ± 0.02 µM) than most other CH-domain-containing proteins. To understand the underlying mechanism, prokaryotically expressed GhKCH2-CH (amino acids 30–166) was purified and crystallized. Crystals were grown by the sitting-drop vapour-diffusion method using 0.1 M Tris–HCl pH 7.0, 20%(w/v) PEG 8000 as a precipitant. The crystals diffracted to a resolution of 2.5 Å and belonged to space group P2{sub 1}, with unit-cell parameters a = 41.57, b = 81.92, c = 83.00 Å, α = 90.00, β = 97.31, γ = 90.00°. Four molecules were found in the asymmetric unit with a Matthews coefficient of 2.22 Å{sup 3} Da{sup −1}, corresponding to a solvent content of 44.8%.

  8. Deletion analysis of AGD1 reveals domains crucial for plasma membrane recruitment and function in root hair polarity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoo, Cheol-Min; Naramoto, Satoshi; Sparks, J Alan; Khan, Bibi Rafeiza; Nakashima, Jin; Fukuda, Hiroo; Blancaflor, Elison B

    2017-06-23

    AGD1, a plant ACAP-type ADP-ribosylation factor-GTPase activating protein (ARF-GAP), functions in specifying root hair polarity in Arabidopsis thaliana To better understand how AGD1 modulates root hair growth, we generated full-length and domain-deleted AGD1-green fluorescent protein (GFP) constructs, and followed their localization during root hair development. AGD1-GFP localized to the cytoplasm and was recruited to specific regions of the root hair plasma membrane (PM). Distinct PM AGD1-GFP signal was first detected along the site of root hair bulge formation. The construct continued to mark the PM at the root hair apical dome, but only during periods of reduced growth. During rapid tip growth, AGD1-GFP labeled the PM of the lateral flanks and dissipated from the apical-most PM. Deletion analysis and a single domain GFP fusion revealed that the pleckstrin homology (PH) domain is the minimal unit required for recruitment of AGD1 to the PM. Our results indicate that differential recruitment of AGD1 to specific PM domains is an essential component of the membrane trafficking machinery that facilitates root hair developmental phase transitions and responses to changes in the root microenvironment. © 2017. Published by The Company of Biologists Ltd.

  9. A new mode of SAM domain mediated oligomerization observed in the CASKIN2 neuronal scaffolding protein

    KAUST Repository

    Smirnova, Ekaterina

    2016-08-22

    Background: CASKIN2 is a homolog of CASKIN1, a scaffolding protein that participates in a signaling network with CASK (calcium/calmodulin-dependent serine kinase). Despite a high level of homology between CASKIN2 and CASKIN1, CASKIN2 cannot bind CASK due to the absence of a CASK Interaction Domain and consequently, may have evolved undiscovered structural and functional distinctions.

  10. Laryngopharyngeal pH measurement

    OpenAIRE

    Spurrier, E; Clancy, M; Deakin, C

    2004-01-01

    Methods: Cohorts of unconscious adult ED and elective surgical patients were recruited. The posterior pharyngeal wall pH was measured immediately before and after intubation. Pharyngeal pH was used to indicate risk of aspiration, and pH change to assess the efficacy of cricoid pressure.

  11. Expression and purification of the modification-dependent restriction enzyme BisI and its homologous enzymes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Shuang-Yong; Klein, Pernelle; Degtyarev, Sergey Kh; Roberts, Richard J

    2016-06-29

    The methylation-dependent restriction endonuclease (REase) BisI (G(m5)C ↓ NGC) is found in Bacillus subtilis T30. We expressed and purified the BisI endonuclease and 34 BisI homologs identified in bacterial genomes. 23 of these BisI homologs are active based on digestion of (m5)C-modified substrates. Two major specificities were found among these BisI family enzymes: Group I enzymes cut GCNGC containing two to four (m5)C in the two strands, or hemi-methylated sites containing two (m5)C in one strand; Group II enzymes only cut GCNGC sites containing three to four (m5)C, while one enzyme requires all four cytosines to be modified for cleavage. Another homolog, Esp638I cleaves GCS ↓ SGC (relaxed specificity RCN ↓ NGY, containing at least four (m5)C). Two BisI homologs show degenerate specificity cleaving unmodified DNA. Many homologs are small proteins ranging from 150 to 190 amino acid (aa) residues, but some homologs associated with mobile genetic elements are larger and contain an extra C-terminal domain. More than 156 BisI homologs are found in >60 bacterial genera, indicating that these enzymes are widespread in bacteria. They may play an important biological function in restricting pre-modified phage DNA.

  12. Hepatoma-derived growth factor-related protein 2 promotes DNA repair by homologous recombination

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baude, Annika; Aaes, Tania Løve; Zhai, Beibei; Al-Nakouzi, Nader; Oo, Htoo Zarni; Daugaard, Mads; Rohde, Mikkel; Jäättelä, Marja

    2016-01-01

    We have recently identified lens epithelium-derived growth factor (LEDGF/p75, also known as PSIP1) as a component of the homologous recombination DNA repair machinery. Through its Pro-Trp-Trp-Pro (PWWP) domain, LEDGF/p75 binds to histone marks associated with active transcription and promotes DNA end resection by recruiting DNA endonuclease retinoblastoma-binding protein 8 (RBBP8/CtIP) to broken DNA ends. Here we show that the structurally related PWWP domain-containing protein, hepatoma-derived growth factor-related protein 2 (HDGFRP2), serves a similar function in homologous recombination repair. Its depletion compromises the survival of human U2OS osteosarcoma and HeLa cervix carcinoma cells and impairs the DNA damage-induced phosphorylation of replication protein A2 (RPA2) and the recruitment of DNA endonuclease RBBP8/CtIP to DNA double strand breaks. In contrast to LEDGF/p75, HDGFRP2 binds preferentially to histone marks characteristic for transcriptionally silent chromatin. Accordingly, HDGFRP2 is found in complex with the heterochromatin-binding chromobox homologue 1 (CBX1) and Pogo transposable element with ZNF domain (POGZ). Supporting the functionality of this complex, POGZ-depleted cells show a similar defect in DNA damage-induced RPA2 phosphorylation as HDGFRP2-depleted cells. These data suggest that HDGFRP2, possibly in complex with POGZ, recruits homologous recombination repair machinery to damaged silent genes or to active genes silenced upon DNA damage. PMID:26721387

  13. SLC4A11 Three-Dimensional Homology Model Rationalizes Corneal Dystrophy-Causing Mutations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Badior, Katherine E; Alka, Kumari; Casey, Joseph R

    2017-03-01

    We studied the structural effects of point mutations of a membrane protein that cause genetic disease. SLC4A11 is a membrane transport protein (OH(-) /H(+) /NH3 /H2 O) of basolateral corneal endothelium, whose mutations cause some cases of congenital hereditary endothelial dystrophy and Fuchs endothelial corneal dystrophy. We created a three-dimensional homology model of SLC4A11 membrane domain, using Band 3 (SLC4A1) crystal structure as template. The homology model was assessed in silico and by analysis of mutants designed on the basis of the model. Catalytic pathway mutants p.Glu675Gln, p.His724Arg, and p.His724Ala impaired SLC4A11 transport. p.Ala720Leu, in a region of extended structure of the proposed translocation pore, failed to mature to the cell surface. p.Gly509Lys, located in an open region at the core domain/gate domain interface, had wild-type level of transport function. The molecular phenotype of 37 corneal dystrophy-causing point mutants was rationalized, based on their location in the homology model. Four map to the substrate translocation pathway, 25 to regions of close transmembrane helix packing, three to the dimeric interface, and five lie in extramembraneous loops. The model provides a view of the spectrum of effects of disease mutations on membrane protein structure and provides a tool to analyze pathogenicity of additional newly discovered SLC4A11 mutants. © 2016 WILEY PERIODICALS, INC.

  14. Tomato FRUITFULL homologs regulate fruit ripening via ethylene biosynthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shima, Yoko; Fujisawa, Masaki; Kitagawa, Mamiko; Nakano, Toshitsugu; Kimbara, Junji; Nakamura, Nobutaka; Shiina, Takeo; Sugiyama, Junichi; Nakamura, Toshihide; Kasumi, Takafumi; Ito, Yasuhiro

    2014-01-01

    Certain MADS-box transcription factors play central roles in regulating fruit ripening. RIPENING INHIBITOR (RIN), a tomato MADS-domain protein, acts as a global regulator of ripening, affecting the climacteric rise of ethylene, pigmentation changes, and fruit softening. Previously, we showed that two MADS-domain proteins, the FRUITFULL homologs FUL1 and FUL2, form complexes with RIN. Here, we characterized the FUL1/FUL2 loss-of-function phenotype in co-suppressed plants. The transgenic plants produced ripening-defective fruits accumulating little or no lycopene. Unlike a previous study on FUL1/FUL2 suppressed tomatoes, our transgenic fruits showed very low levels of ethylene production, and this was associated with suppression of the genes for 1-aminocyclopropane-1-carboxylic acid synthase, a rate-limiting enzyme in ethylene synthesis. FUL1/FUL2 suppression also caused the fruit to soften in a manner independent of ripening, possibly due to reduced cuticle thickness in the peel of the suppressed tomatoes.

  15. The S1-S2 linker determines the distinct pH sensitivity between ZmK2.1 and KAT1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Li; Yang, Shun-Ying; Guo, Man-Yuan; Huang, Ya-Nan; Sentenac, Hervé; Véry, Anne-Aliénor; Su, Yan-Hua

    2016-03-01

    Efficient stomatal opening requires activation of KAT-type K(+) channels, which mediate K(+) influx into guard cells. Most KAT-type channels are functionally facilitated by extracellular acidification. However, despite sequence and structural homologies, the maize counterpart of Arabidopsis KAT1 (ZmK2.1) is resistant to pH activation. To understand the structural determinant that results in the differential pH activation of these counterparts, we analysed chimeric channels and channels with point mutations for ZmK2.1 and its closest Arabidopsis homologue KAT1. Exchange of the S1-S2 linkers altered the pH sensitivity between the two channels, suggesting that the S1-S2 linker is essentially involved in the pH sensitivity. The effects of D92 mutation within the linker motif together with substitution of the first half of the linker largely resemble the effects of substitution of the complete linker. Topological modelling predicts that one of the two cysteines located on the outer face section of the S5 domain may serve as a potential titratable group that interacts with the S1-S2 linker. The difference between ZmK2.1 and KAT1 is predicted to be the result of the distance of the stabilized linkers from the titratable group. In KAT1, residue K85 within the linker forms a hydrogen bond with C211 that enables the pH activation; conversely, the linker of ZmK2.1 is distantly located and thus does not interact with the equivalent titration group (C208). Thus, in addition to the known structural contributors to the proton activation of KAT channels, we have uncovered a previously unidentified component that is strongly involved in this complex proton activation network.

  16. Alternatively Spliced Homologous Exons Have Ancient Origins and Are Highly Expressed at the Protein Level

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abascal, Federico; Ezkurdia, Iakes; Rodriguez-Rivas, Juan; Rodriguez, Jose Manuel; del Pozo, Angela; Vázquez, Jesús; Valencia, Alfonso; Tress, Michael L.

    2015-01-01

    Alternative splicing of messenger RNA can generate a wide variety of mature RNA transcripts, and these transcripts may produce protein isoforms with diverse cellular functions. While there is much supporting evidence for the expression of alternative transcripts, the same is not true for the alternatively spliced protein products. Large-scale mass spectroscopy experiments have identified evidence of alternative splicing at the protein level, but with conflicting results. Here we carried out a rigorous analysis of the peptide evidence from eight large-scale proteomics experiments to assess the scale of alternative splicing that is detectable by high-resolution mass spectroscopy. We find fewer splice events than would be expected: we identified peptides for almost 64% of human protein coding genes, but detected just 282 splice events. This data suggests that most genes have a single dominant isoform at the protein level. Many of the alternative isoforms that we could identify were only subtly different from the main splice isoform. Very few of the splice events identified at the protein level disrupted functional domains, in stark contrast to the two thirds of splice events annotated in the human genome that would lead to the loss or damage of functional domains. The most striking result was that more than 20% of the splice isoforms we identified were generated by substituting one homologous exon for another. This is significantly more than would be expected from the frequency of these events in the genome. These homologous exon substitution events were remarkably conserved—all the homologous exons we identified evolved over 460 million years ago—and eight of the fourteen tissue-specific splice isoforms we identified were generated from homologous exons. The combination of proteomics evidence, ancient origin and tissue-specific splicing indicates that isoforms generated from homologous exons may have important cellular roles. PMID:26061177

  17. Alternatively Spliced Homologous Exons Have Ancient Origins and Are Highly Expressed at the Protein Level.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Federico Abascal

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Alternative splicing of messenger RNA can generate a wide variety of mature RNA transcripts, and these transcripts may produce protein isoforms with diverse cellular functions. While there is much supporting evidence for the expression of alternative transcripts, the same is not true for the alternatively spliced protein products. Large-scale mass spectroscopy experiments have identified evidence of alternative splicing at the protein level, but with conflicting results. Here we carried out a rigorous analysis of the peptide evidence from eight large-scale proteomics experiments to assess the scale of alternative splicing that is detectable by high-resolution mass spectroscopy. We find fewer splice events than would be expected: we identified peptides for almost 64% of human protein coding genes, but detected just 282 splice events. This data suggests that most genes have a single dominant isoform at the protein level. Many of the alternative isoforms that we could identify were only subtly different from the main splice isoform. Very few of the splice events identified at the protein level disrupted functional domains, in stark contrast to the two thirds of splice events annotated in the human genome that would lead to the loss or damage of functional domains. The most striking result was that more than 20% of the splice isoforms we identified were generated by substituting one homologous exon for another. This is significantly more than would be expected from the frequency of these events in the genome. These homologous exon substitution events were remarkably conserved--all the homologous exons we identified evolved over 460 million years ago--and eight of the fourteen tissue-specific splice isoforms we identified were generated from homologous exons. The combination of proteomics evidence, ancient origin and tissue-specific splicing indicates that isoforms generated from homologous exons may have important cellular roles.

  18. Relative K-homology and normal operators

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Manuilov, Vladimir; Thomsen, Klaus

    2009-01-01

    Let $A$ be a $C^*$-algebra, $J \\subset A$ a $C^*$-subalgebra, and let $B$ be a stable $C^*$-algebra. Under modest assumptions we organize invertible $C^*$-extensions of $A$ by $B$ that are trivial when restricted onto $J$ to become a group $\\mathrm{Ext}_J^{-1}(A,B)$, which can be computed by a six......-term exact sequence which generalizes the excision six-term exact sequence in the first variable of KK-theory. Subsequently we investigate the relative K-homology which arises from the group of relative extensions by specializing to abelian $C^*$-algebras. It turns out that this relative K-homology carries...... substantial information also in the operator theoretic setting from which the BDF theory was developed and we conclude the paper by extracting some of this information on approximation of normal operators....

  19. Homologous pairing in stretched supercoiled DNA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strick, T. R.; Croquette, V.; Bensimon, D.

    1998-01-01

    By using elastic measurements on single DNA molecules, we show that stretching a negatively supercoiled DNA activates homologous pairing in physiological conditions. These experiments indicate that a stretched unwound DNA locally denatures to alleviate the force-driven increase in torsional stress. This is detected by hybridization with 1 kb of homologous single-stranded DNA probes. The stretching force involved (≈2 pN) is small compared with those typically developed by molecular motors, suggesting that this process may be relevant to DNA processing in vivo. We used this technique to monitor the progressive denaturation of DNA as it is unwound and found that distinct, stable denaturation bubbles formed, beginning in A+T-rich regions. PMID:9724746

  20. Homological mirror symmetry and tropical geometry

    CERN Document Server

    Catanese, Fabrizio; Kontsevich, Maxim; Pantev, Tony; Soibelman, Yan; Zharkov, Ilia

    2014-01-01

    The relationship between Tropical Geometry and Mirror Symmetry goes back to the work of Kontsevich and Y. Soibelman (2000), who applied methods of non-archimedean geometry (in particular, tropical curves) to Homological Mirror Symmetry. In combination with the subsequent work of Mikhalkin on the “tropical” approach to Gromov-Witten theory, and the work of Gross and Siebert, Tropical Geometry has now become a powerful tool. Homological Mirror Symmetry is the area of mathematics concentrated around several categorical equivalences connecting symplectic and holomorphic (or algebraic) geometry. The central ideas first appeared in the work of Maxim Kontsevich (1993). Roughly speaking, the subject can be approached in two ways: either one uses Lagrangian torus fibrations of Calabi-Yau manifolds (the so-called Strominger-Yau-Zaslow picture, further developed by Kontsevich and Soibelman) or one uses Lefschetz fibrations of symplectic manifolds (suggested by Kontsevich and further developed by Seidel). Tropical Ge...

  1. Translated points and Rabinowitz Floer homology

    CERN Document Server

    Albers, Peter

    2011-01-01

    We prove that if a contact manifold admits an exact filling then every local contactomorphism isotopic to the identity admits a translated point in the interior of its support, in the sense of Sandon [San11b]. In addition we prove that if the Rabinowitz Floer homology of the filling is non-zero then every contactomorphism isotopic to the identity admits a translated point, and if the Rabinowitz Floer homology of the filling is infinite dimensional then every contactmorphism isotopic to the identity has either infinitely many translated points, or a translated point on a closed leaf. Moreover if the contact manifold has dimension greater than or equal to 3, the latter option generically doesn't happen. Finally, we prove that a generic contactomorphism on $\\mathbb{R}^{2n+1}$ has infinitely many geometrically distinct iterated translated points all of which lie in the interior of its support.

  2. Homological Pisot Substitutions and Exact Regularity

    CERN Document Server

    Barge, Marcy; Jones, Leslie; Sadun, Lorenzo

    2010-01-01

    We consider one-dimensional substitution tiling spaces where the dilatation (stretching factor) is a degree d Pisot number, and where the first rational Cech cohomology is d-dimensional. We construct examples of such "homological Pisot" substitutions that do not have pure discrete spectra. These examples are not unimodular, and we conjecture that the coincidence rank must always divide a power of the norm of the dilatation. To support this conjecture, we show that homological Pisot substitutions exhibit an Exact Regularity Property (ERP), in which the number of occurrences of a patch for a return length is governed strictly by the length. The ERP puts strong constraints on the measure of any cylinder set in the corresponding tiling space.

  3. PhD Dissertations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Redazione Reti Medievali (a cura di

    2003-12-01

    Full Text Available Report of PhD Dissertations. Guido Antonioli Conservator pacis et iustitie. La signoria di Taddeo Pepoli a Bologna (1337-1347, Tesi di dottorato di ricerca in Filologia romanza e cultura medievale (XIII ciclo, Università degli Studi di Bologna, 2001   Elisabetta Filippini «In vassallatico episcopi permanere debent». Rapporti vassallatici e concessioni beneficiali dei vescovi di Cremona fra X e XIII secolo, Tesi di dottorato di Ricerca in Storia Medievale (XV ciclo, Università Cattolica del Sacro Cuore di Milano, 2003   Marco Meschini, Innocenzo III e il "negotium pacis et fidei" in Linguadoca tra il 1198 e il 1215, Tesi di dottorato di ricerca in Storia medievale, Università Cattolica del Sacro Cuore, 2003   Fabrizio Ricciardelli The Politics of Exclusion in Florence (1215-1434, thesis submitted in partial fulfilment of the requirements for the degree of Doctor of Philosophy in History, University of Warwick, Department of History, April 2003 Renata Salvarani Baptizare pueros et decimas dare. Cura delle anime, strutturazione ecclesiastica e organizzazione delle campagne in area gardesana fra VIII e XIII secolo (diocesi di Brescia, Verona, Mantova e Trento, Tesi di dottorato in Storia medievale (XV ciclo, Università Cattolica del Sacro Cuore di Milano, 2002-2003   Vito Sibilio Le parole della prima crociata, Tesi di dottorato di ricerca in Storia dei centri delle vie e della cultura dei pellegrinaggi nel medioevo euromediterraneo, Università degli studi di Lecce, 2003

  4. PhD Dissertations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Redazione Reti Medievali (a cura di

    2000-06-01

    Full Text Available Report of PhD Dissertations.   Miguel Calleja Puerta El conde Suero Vermúdez, su parentela y su entorno social. La aristocracia leonesa en los siglos XI y XII, Tesis de doctorado en Historia, Universidad de Oviedo (España, 2000   Adele Cilento Potere e monachesimo nella Calabria bizantina: relazioni e interferenze (secc. IX-XI, Tesi di dottorato di ricerca in Storia medievale (X ciclo, Università degli Studi di Torino, 2000   Amedeo De Vincentiis Firenze e i signori. Sperimentazioni istituzionali e modelli di regime nelle signorie fiorentine degli Angioini (fine XIII - metà XIV secolo, Tesi di dottorato di ricerca in Storia medioevale (XI ciclo, Università degli Studi di Milano, 1999   Marco Folin Il sistema politico di un antico Stato italiano: i ducati estensi nella prima Età moderna (1452-1598, Tesi di dottorato di ricerca in Storia, Scuola Normale superiore di Pisa, 2000   Barbara Frale Guardiani del Santuario. Le radici orientali del processo contro l’ordine del Tempio (1128 - 1314, Tesi di dottorato di ricerca in Storia sociale d’Europa (XI ciclo, Università "Ca’ Foscari" di Venezia, 2000

  5. PhD Dissertations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Redazione Reti Medievali (a cura di

    2003-06-01

    Full Text Available Reporto of PhD Dissertations.   Mario Dalle Carbonare Società, potere e clientele nell’Irlanda altomedievale (secoli V-IX, Tesi di dottorato di ricerca in Storia sociale europea, Università "Ca' Foscari" di Venezia, 2003 Vieri Mazzoni La legislazione antighibellina e la politica oligarchica della Parte Guelfa di Firenze nel secondo Trecento (1347-1378, Tesi di dottorato di ricerca in Storia Medievale (ciclo XII, Università degli Studi di Firenze   Alma Poloni Pisa dalle origini del movimento popolare alla discesa di Ludovico il Bavaro. I gruppi dirigenti cittadini tra continuità e trasformazione, Tesi di dottorato di ricerca in Storia dell'Europa nel medioevo, Università degli studi di Pisa, 2003   Andrea Puglia Potere marchionale, amministrazione del territorio, società locali dalla morte di Ugo di Tuscia a Guelfo VI di Baviera (1001-1160, Tesi di dottorato di ricerca in Storia medievale, Università degli studi di Milano, 2003

  6. PhD Dissertations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Redazione Reti Medievali (a cura di

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Report of PhD dissertations. Andrea Brugnoli Una storia locale: l’organizzazione del territorio veronese nel medioevo: trasformazioni della realtà e schemi notarili (IX-metà XII secolo, Tesi di dottorato di ricerca in Scienze Storiche e Antropologiche (XXII ciclo, Università degli Studi di Verona, 2010   Luca Filangieri Famiglie e gruppi dirigenti a Genova (secoli XII-metà XIII, Tesi di dottorato di ricerca in Storia medievale (XXII ciclo, Università degli Studi di Firenze, 2010   Jakub Kujawi ski Wernakularna kolekcja historiograficzna z rękopisu francuskiego nr 688 z Biblioteki Narodowej w Paryżu. Studium źródłoznawcze (La raccolta dei volgarizzamenti delle opere storiografiche nel manoscritto francese 688 della Biblioteca Nazionale di Parigi, Tesi di dottorato, Università “Adam Mickiewicz”, Facoltà di Storia, Pozna, a.a. 2009/2010   Marta Longhi I signori “de Radicata”. Strategie di affermazione familiare e patrimoniale nel Piemonte dei secoli XII-XIV, Tesi di dottorato di ricerca in Istituzioni, Società, Religioni dal Tardo Antico alla fine del Medioevo (XX ciclo, Università di Torino, 2008

  7. PhD Dissertations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Redazione Reti Medievali (a cura di

    2004-06-01

    Full Text Available Report of PhD Dissertations. Francesco Barone Istituzioni, società ed economia a Catania nel tardo medioevo (XIV-XV secolo, Tesi di dottorato in Storia medievale (XVI ciclo, Università degli Studi di Firenze, 2004   Laura Berti Ceroni Il territorio e le strutture di Cesarea e Classe tra tarda antichità e alto medioevo in rapporto con Ravenna, Tesi di dottorato di ricerca in Storia e Informatica, Università degli studi di Bologna, 2002-2003.   Marco Bicchierai Poppi dalla signoria dei conti Guidi al vicariato del Casentino (1360-1480, Tesi di dottorato in Storia medievale (XIV ciclo, Università degli Studi di Firenze, 2004   Emanuela Garimberti Spatiosa ad habitandum loca. Luoghi e identità nella Historia Langobardorum di Paolo Diacono, Tesi di dottorato in Storia medievale (XV ciclo, Università degli Studi di Bologna, 2004   Lorenzo Tanzini Sistemi normativi e pratiche istituzionali a Firenze dalla fine del XIII all’inizio del XV secolo, Tesi di dottorato di ricerca in Storia medievale (XVI ciclo, Università degli Studi di Firenze, 2004   Stefania Tarquini Pellegrinaggio e asseto urbano di Roma, Tesi di dottorato di ricerca in Storia dei centri, delle vie e della cultura dei pellegrinaggi nel Medioevo euro mediterraneo (XV ciclo, Università degli studi di Lecce, 2003

  8. .Gov Domains API

    Data.gov (United States)

    General Services Administration — This dataset offers the list of all .gov domains, including state, local, and tribal .gov domains. It does not include .mil domains, or other federal domains outside...

  9. Nash equilibria via duality and homological selection

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Arnab Basu; Samik Basu; Mahan MJ

    2014-11-01

    Given a multifunction from to the -fold symmetric product Sym$_{k}(X)$, we use the Dold–Thom theorem to establish a homological selection theorem. This is used to establish existence of Nash equilibria. Cost functions in problems concerning the existence of Nash equilibria are traditionally multilinear in the mixed strategies. The main aim of this paper is to relax the hypothesis of multilinearity. We use basic intersection theory, Poincaré duality in addition to the Dold–Thom theorem.

  10. Homological Methods in Equations of Mathematical Physics

    OpenAIRE

    Krasil'shchik, Joseph; Verbovetsky, Alexander

    1998-01-01

    These lecture notes are a systematic and self-contained exposition of the cohomological theories naturally related to partial differential equations: the Vinogradov C-spectral sequence and the C-cohomology, including the formulation in terms of the horizontal (characteristic) cohomology. Applications to computing invariants of differential equations are discussed. The lectures contain necessary introductory material on the geometric theory of differential equations and homological algebra.

  11. Homology and phylogeny and their automated inference

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fuellen, Georg

    2008-06-01

    The analysis of the ever-increasing amount of biological and biomedical data can be pushed forward by comparing the data within and among species. For example, an integrative analysis of data from the genome sequencing projects for various species traces the evolution of the genomes and identifies conserved and innovative parts. Here, I review the foundations and advantages of this “historical” approach and evaluate recent attempts at automating such analyses. Biological data is comparable if a common origin exists (homology), as is the case for members of a gene family originating via duplication of an ancestral gene. If the family has relatives in other species, we can assume that the ancestral gene was present in the ancestral species from which all the other species evolved. In particular, describing the relationships among the duplicated biological sequences found in the various species is often possible by a phylogeny, which is more informative than homology statements. Detecting and elaborating on common origins may answer how certain biological sequences developed, and predict what sequences are in a particular species and what their function is. Such knowledge transfer from sequences in one species to the homologous sequences of the other is based on the principle of ‘my closest relative looks and behaves like I do’, often referred to as ‘guilt by association’. To enable knowledge transfer on a large scale, several automated ‘phylogenomics pipelines’ have been developed in recent years, and seven of these will be described and compared. Overall, the examples in this review demonstrate that homology and phylogeny analyses, done on a large (and automated) scale, can give insights into function in biology and biomedicine.

  12. Domain definition and target classification for CASP6.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tress, Michael; Tai, Chin-Hsien; Wang, Guoli; Ezkurdia, Iakes; López, Gonzalo; Valencia, Alfonso; Lee, Byungkook; Dunbrack, Roland L

    2005-01-01

    Assessment of structure predictions in CASP6 was based on single domains isolated from experimentally determined structures, which were categorized into comparative modeling, fold recognition, and new fold targets. Domain definitions were defined upon visual examination of the structures with the aid of automated domain-parsing programs. Domain categorization was determined by comparison of the target structures with those in the Protein Data Bank at the time each target expired and a variety of sequence and structure-based methods to determine potential homologous relationships. 2005 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  13. Dental homologies in lamniform sharks (Chondrichthyes: Elasmobranchii).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shimada, Kenshu

    2002-01-01

    The dentitions of lamniform sharks are said to exhibit a unique heterodonty called the "lamnoid tooth pattern." The presence of an inflated hollow "dental bulla" on each jaw cartilage allows the recognition of homologous teeth across most modern macrophagous lamniforms based on topographic correspondence through the "similarity test." In most macrophagous lamniforms, three tooth rows are supported by the upper dental bulla: two rows of large anterior teeth followed by a row of small intermediate teeth. The lower tooth row occluding between the two rows of upper anterior teeth is the first lower anterior tooth row. Like the first and second lower anterior tooth rows, the third lower tooth row is supported by the dental bulla and may be called the first lower intermediate tooth row. The lower intermediate tooth row occludes between the first and second upper lateral tooth rows situated distal to the upper dental bulla, and the rest of the upper and lower tooth rows, all called lateral tooth rows, occlude alternately. Tooth symmetry cannot be used to identify their dental homology. The presence of dental bullae can be regarded as a synapomorphy of Lamniformes and this character is more definable than the "lamnoid tooth pattern." The formation of the tooth pattern appears to be related to the evolution of dental bullae. This study constitutes the first demonstration of supraspecific tooth-to-tooth dental homologies in nonmammalian vertebrates.

  14. Homology among divergent Paleozoic tetrapod clades.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carroll, R L

    1999-01-01

    A stringent definition of homology is necessary to establish phylogenetic relationships among Paleozoic amphibians. Many derived characters exhibited by divergent clades of Carboniferous lepospondyls resemble those achieved convergently among Cenozoic squamates that have elongate bodies and reduced limbs, and by lineages of modern amphibians that have undergone miniaturization. Incongruent character distribution, poorly resolved cladograms and functionally improbable character transformations determined by phylogenetic analysis suggest that convergence was also common among Paleozoic amphibians with a skull length under 3 cm, including lepospondyls, early amniotes and the putative ancestors of modern amphibians. For this reason, it is injudicious to equate apparent synapomorphy (perceived common presence of a particular derived character in two putative sister-taxa) with strict homology of phylogenetic origin. Identification of homology by the similarity of structure, anatomical position and pattern of development is insufficient to establish the synapomorphy of bone and limb loss or precocial ossification of vertebral centra, which are common among small Paleozoic amphibians. The only way in which synapomorphies can be established definitively is through the discovery and recognition of the trait in question in basal members of each of the clades under study, and in their immediate common ancestors.

  15. Irradiated homologous costal cartilage for augmentation rhinoplasty

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lefkovits, G. (Lenox Hill Hospital, New York, NY (USA))

    1990-10-01

    Although the ideal reconstructive material for augmentation rhinoplasty continues to challenge plastic surgeons, there exists no report in the literature that confines the use of irradiated homologous costal cartilage, first reported by Dingman and Grabb in 1961, to dorsal nasal augmentation. The purpose of this paper is to present a retrospective analysis of the author's experience using irradiated homologous costal cartilage in augmentation rhinoplasty. Twenty-seven dorsal nasal augmentations were performed in 24 patients between 16 and 49 years of age with a follow-up ranging from 1 to 27 months. Good-to-excellent results were achieved in 83.3% (20 of 24). Poor results requiring revision were found in 16.7% (4 of 24). Complication rates included 7.4% infection (2 of 27) and 14.8% warping (4 of 27). The resorption rate was zero. These results compare favorably with other forms of nasal augmentation. Advantages and disadvantages of irradiated homologous costal cartilage are discussed.

  16. Note on homological modeling of the electric circuits

    OpenAIRE

    2014-01-01

    Based on a simple example, it is explained how the homological analysis may be applied for modeling of the electric circuits. The homological branch, mesh and nodal analyses are presented. Geometrical interpretations are given.

  17. Homology and ontogeny: pattern and process in comparative developmental biology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scholtz, Gerhard

    2005-11-01

    In this article the interface between development and homology is discussed. Development is here interpreted as a sequence of evolutionarily independent stages. Any approach stressing the importance of specific developmental stages is rejected. A homology definition is favoured which includes similarity, and complexity serves as a test for homology. Complexity is seen as the possibility of subdividing a character into evolutionarily independent corresponding substructures. Topology as a test for homology is critically discussed because corresponding positions are not necessarily indicative of homology. Complexity can be used twofold for homology assessments of development: either stages or processes of development are homologized. These two approaches must not be con-flated. This distinction leads to the conclusion that there is no ontogenetic homology "criterion".

  18. PhD Dissertations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Redazione Reti Medievali (a cura di

    2005-06-01

    Full Text Available Report of PhD Dissertations. Federica Cengarle Le investiture feudali di Filippo Maria Visconti (1412-1447, Tesi di dottorato di ricerca in Storia medievale, Università degli Studi di Milano, 2005 Silvia Coazzin Liberi domini totius castri. L'aristocrazia rurale "minore" nel Senese e nella Toscana meridionale. Forme di egemonia, assetto sociale e patrimoniale di lignaggi, famiglie e gruppi consortili di castello (secc. XI-XIV, Tesi di dottorato di ricerca in Storia medievale, Università degli studi di Firenze, 2005 Maria Elena Cortese Signori e castelli. Famiglie aristocratiche, dominati signorili e trasformazioni insediative nel comitatus fiorentino (fine X-metà XII secolo, Tesi di dottorato di ricerca in Storia medievale, Università degli studi di Firenze, 2005 Patrizia Meli Gabriele Malaspina marchese di Fosdinovo: il condottiero ed il politico, Tesi di dottorato di ricerca in Storia medievale, Università degli studi di Firenze, 2005 Federica Pessotto La Morea franca. Economia e istituzioni tra Oriente e Occidente nei secoli XIII e XIV, Tesi di dottorato di ricerca in Istituzioni, Società e Religioni dal Tardoantico alla fine del Medioevo, Università degli studi di Torino, 2003 Lorenzo Pubblici Dal Caucaso al Mar d’Azov. L’impatto dell’invasione mongola nella Caucasia fra nomadismo e civiltà sedentaria (1204-1395, Tesi di dottorato di ricerca in Storia medievale, Università degli studi di Firenze, 2005 [01/05] Riccardo Rao "Comunia". Risorse collettive e patrimoniali dei maggiori comuni subalpini (secoli XII - inizio XIV, Tesi di dottorato di ricerca in Storia medioevale, Università degli Studi di Milano, 2005 Alessandro Soddu Feudalesimo e potere signorile in Sardegna nei secoli XI-XIV.  La signoria territoriale dei Malaspina, Tesi di dottorato di ricerca in Storia, Università "Pompeu Fabra" di Barcellona, 2004

  19. PhD Dissertations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Redazione Reti Medievali (a cura di

    2002-06-01

    Full Text Available Report of PhD dissertation. Laura Baietto Una politica per le città. Rapporti fra papato, vescovi e comuni nell'Italia centro-settentrionale da Innocenzo III a Gregorio IX, Tesi di dottorato di ricerca in Storia Medievale, Università degli Studi di Torino, 2002   Giuseppe Banfo Compresenze e sovrapposizioni di poteri territoriali di qualità diversa tra X e XIII: il caso del basso Monferrato, Tesi di dottorato di ricerca in Storia medievale, Università degli Studi di Torino, 2002   Francesca Dell'Acqua La vetrata tra l'età tardo imperiale e l'altomedioevo: le fonti, l'archeologia, Tesi di Perfezionamento in Storia dell'Arte Medievale, Scuola Normale Superiore di Pisa, 2001   Primo Giovanni Embriaco I vescovi di Albenga e gli sviluppi signorili nella Liguria occidentale (secoli XI-XIII, Tesi di dottorato di ricerca in Storia medievale, Università degli Studi di Torino, 2001   Antonella Ghignoli Documenti e proprietà altomedievali. Fondamenti e problemi dell'esegesi storica delle fonti documentarie nello specchio della tradizione delle carte pisane dei secoli VIII-XI, Tesi di dottorato di ricerca in Storia medievale, Università degli Studi di Firenze, 2002   Vito Loré Espansione monastica e mutamenti politici. La Trinità di Cava nei suoi rapporti con i sovrani longobardi e normanni e con l'aristocrazia territoriale. Secoli XI-XII, Tesi di dottorato di ricerca in Storia medievale, Università degli Studi di Firenze, 2002   Rosaria Stracuzzi Messina nel '400, Tesi di dottorato di ricerca in Storia medievale, Università degli Studi di Palermo, 2001   Stefania Tamburini Le "portate" ecclesiastiche nel piviere di San Giovanni in Firenze nel 1427. Spunti per una riflessione sul patrimonio ecclesiastico della diocesi fiorentina,Tesi di dottorato di ricerca in Storia e informatica, Università degli Studi di Bologna, 2001

  20. An ectromelia virus profilin homolog interacts with cellular tropomyosin and viral A-type inclusion protein

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Burke Robert D

    2007-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Profilins are critical to cytoskeletal dynamics in eukaryotes; however, little is known about their viral counterparts. In this study, a poxviral profilin homolog, ectromelia virus strain Moscow gene 141 (ECTV-PH, was investigated by a variety of experimental and bioinformatics techniques to characterize its interactions with cellular and viral proteins. Results Profilin-like proteins are encoded by all orthopoxviruses sequenced to date, and share over 90% amino acid (aa identity. Sequence comparisons show highest similarity to mammalian type 1 profilins; however, a conserved 3 aa deletion in mammalian type 3 and poxviral profilins suggests that these homologs may be more closely related. Structural analysis shows that ECTV-PH can be successfully modelled onto both the profilin 1 crystal structure and profilin 3 homology model, though few of the surface residues thought to be required for binding actin, poly(L-proline, and PIP2 are conserved. Immunoprecipitation and mass spectrometry identified two proteins that interact with ECTV-PH within infected cells: alpha-tropomyosin, a 38 kDa cellular actin-binding protein, and the 84 kDa product of vaccinia virus strain Western Reserve (VACV-WR 148, which is the truncated VACV counterpart of the orthopoxvirus A-type inclusion (ATI protein. Western and far-western blots demonstrated that the interaction with alpha-tropomyosin is direct, and immunofluorescence experiments suggest that ECTV-PH and alpha-tropomyosin may colocalize to structures that resemble actin tails and cellular protrusions. Sequence comparisons of the poxviral ATI proteins show that although full-length orthologs are only present in cowpox and ectromelia viruses, an ~ 700 aa truncated ATI protein is conserved in over 90% of sequenced orthopoxviruses. Immunofluorescence studies indicate that ECTV-PH localizes to cytoplasmic inclusion bodies formed by both truncated and full-length versions of the viral ATI protein

  1. Characterization of human gene encoding SLA/LP autoantigen and its conserved homologs in mouse,fish,fly,and worm

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Chun-Xia Wang; Andreas Teufel; Uta Cheruti; Joachim Gr(o)tzinger; Peter R Galle; Ansgar W Lohse; Johannes Herkel

    2006-01-01

    AIM: To approach the elusive function of the SLA/LP molecule, we have characterized genomic organization and conservation of the major antigenic and functional properties of the SLA/LP molecule in various species.METHODS: By means of computational biology, we have characterized the complete SLA/LP gene, mRNA and deduced protein sequences in man, mouse,zebrafish, fly, and worm.RESULTS: The human SLA/LP gene sequence of approximately 39 kb, which maps to chromosome 4p15.2, is organized in 11 exons, of which 10 or 11 are translated, depending on the splice variant. Homologous molecules were identified in several biological model organisms. The various homologous protein sequences showed a high degree of similarity or homology, notably at those residues that are of functional importance. The only domain of the human protein sequence that lacks significant homology with homologous sequences is the major antigenic epitope recognized by autoantibodies from autoimmune hepatitis (AIH) patients.CONCLUSION: The SLA/LP molecule and its functionally relevant residues have been highly conserved throughout the evoluti n, suggesting an indispensable function of the molecule. The finding that the only non-conserved domain is the dominant antigenic epitope of the human SLA/LP sequence, suggests that SLA/LP autoimmunity is autoantigen-driven rather than being driven by molecular mimicry.

  2. pH induced contrast in viscoelasticity imaging of biopolymers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yapp, R D; Insana, M F

    2009-01-01

    Understanding contrast mechanisms and identifying discriminating features is at the heart of diagnostic imaging development. This report focuses on how pH influences the viscoelastic properties of biopolymers to better understand the effects of extracellular pH on breast tumour elasticity imaging. Extracellular pH is known to decrease as much as 1 pH unit in breast tumours, thus creating a dangerous environment that increases cellular mutatation rates and therapeutic resistance. We used a gelatin hydrogel phantom to isolate the effects of pH on a polymer network with similarities to the extracellular matrix in breast stroma. Using compressive unconfined creep and stress relaxation measurements, we systematically measured the viscoelastic features sensitive to pH by way of time domain models and complex modulus analysis. These results are used to determine the sensitivity of quasi-static ultrasonic elasticity imaging to pH. We found a strong elastic response of the polymer network to pH, such that the matrix stiffness decreases as pH was reduced, however the viscous response of the medium to pH was negligible. While physiological features of breast stroma such as proteoglycans and vascular networks are not included in our hydrogel model, observations in this study provide insight into viscoelastic features specific to pH changes in the collagenous stromal network. These observations suggest that the large contrast common in breast tumours with desmoplasia may be reduced under acidic conditions, and that viscoelastic features are unlikely to improve discriminability. PMID:19174599

  3. Contribution of the CR domain to P-selectin lectin domain allostery by regulating the orientation of the EGF domain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lü, Shouqin; Chen, Shenbao; Mao, Debin; Zhang, Yan; Long, Mian

    2015-01-01

    The allostery of P-selectin has been studied extensively with a focus on the Lec and EGF domains, whereas the contribution of the CR domain remains unclear. Here, molecular dynamics simulations (MDS) combined with homology modeling were preformed to investigate the impact of the CR domain on P-selectin allostery. The results indicated that the CR domain plays a role in the allosteric dynamics of P-selectin in two ways. First, the CR1 domain tends to stabilize the low affinity of P-selectin during the equilibration processes with the transition inhibition from the S1 to S1' state by restraining the extension of the bent EGF orientation, or with the relaxation acceleration of the S2 state by promoting the bending of the extended EGF orientation. Second, the existence of CR domain increases intramolecular extension prior to complex separation, increasing the time available for the allosteric shift during forced dissociation with a prolonged bond duration. These findings further our understanding of the structure-function relationship of P-selectin with the enriched micro-structural bases of the CR domain.

  4. PhD Dissertations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Redazione Reti Medievali (a cura di

    2004-12-01

    Full Text Available Report of PhD Dissertations. Massimo Della Misericordia Divenire comunità. Comuni rurali, poteri signorili, identità sociali in Valtellina e nella montagna lombarda nel tardo medioevo, Tesi di dottorato in Storia medievale (XIV ciclo, Università degli Studi di Torino, 2003   Mariano Dell’Omo Il monastero di S. Liberatore alla Maiella centro dell’irradiazione di Montecassino nell’Abruzzo medievale e moderno. Contributo alla storia dell’organizzazione patrimoniale e della civiltà monastica cassinese nell’Italia centrale attraverso i documenti di S. Liberatore conservati nell’Archivio di Montecassino. Introduzione storica, paleografica e archivistica. Edizione dei documenti più antichi (†798-1000 e regesti di quelli posteriori (1005-1735, Tesi di dottorato in Storia Ecclesiastica, Facoltà di Storia Ecclesiastica, Pontificia Università Gregoriana di Roma,  2004   Giulia Lorenzoni Conquistare e governare la città. Forme di potere e istituzioni nel primo anno della signoria viscontea a Bologna (ottobre 1350-novembre 1351, Tesi di dottorato in Storia medievale (XVI ciclo, Università degli Studi di Bologna, 2004   Federica Monteleone Il viaggio di Carlo Magno in Terra Santa. Un’esperienza di pellegrinaggio nella tradizione europea occidentale, Tesi di dottorato di ricerca in Storia dei centri, delle vie e della cultura dei pellegrinaggi nel Medioevo euro mediterraneo (XV ciclo   Francesca Pucci Donati Fra teorie mediche e pratica quotidiana: i calendari dietetici dell’Occidente latino altomedievale (secoli IX-XI, Tesi di dottorato di ricerca in Storia medievale (XV ciclo, Università degli studi di Bologna, 2004 Alberto Ricciardi L’Epistolario di Lupo di Ferrières come fonte per la storia degli intellettuali nell’età di Carlo il Calvo, Tesi di dottorato in Storia medievale (XV ciclo, Università degli Studi di Bologna, 2004   Francesco Paolo Terlizzi I trattati dell'Anonimo Normanno: ricerche di ecclesiologia, Tesi

  5. Sequence basis of Barnacle Cement Nanostructure is Defined by Proteins with Silk Homology

    Science.gov (United States)

    So, Christopher R.; Fears, Kenan P.; Leary, Dagmar H.; Scancella, Jenifer M.; Wang, Zheng; Liu, Jinny L.; Orihuela, Beatriz; Rittschof, Dan; Spillmann, Christopher M.; Wahl, Kathryn J.

    2016-11-01

    Barnacles adhere by producing a mixture of cement proteins (CPs) that organize into a permanently bonded layer displayed as nanoscale fibers. These cement proteins share no homology with any other marine adhesives, and a common sequence-basis that defines how nanostructures function as adhesives remains undiscovered. Here we demonstrate that a significant unidentified portion of acorn barnacle cement is comprised of low complexity proteins; they are organized into repetitive sequence blocks and found to maintain homology to silk motifs. Proteomic analysis of aggregate bands from PAGE gels reveal an abundance of Gly/Ala/Ser/Thr repeats exemplified by a prominent, previously unidentified, 43 kDa protein in the solubilized adhesive. Low complexity regions found throughout the cement proteome, as well as multiple lysyl oxidases and peroxidases, establish homology with silk-associated materials such as fibroin, silk gum sericin, and pyriform spidroins from spider silk. Distinct primary structures defined by homologous domains shed light on how barnacles use low complexity in nanofibers to enable adhesion, and serves as a starting point for unraveling the molecular architecture of a robust and unique class of adhesive nanostructures.

  6. Single-molecule imaging of DNA pairing by RecA reveals a three-dimensional homology search.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Forget, Anthony L; Kowalczykowski, Stephen C

    2012-02-08

    DNA breaks can be repaired with high fidelity by homologous recombination. A ubiquitous protein that is essential for this DNA template-directed repair is RecA. After resection of broken DNA to produce single-stranded DNA (ssDNA), RecA assembles on this ssDNA into a filament with the unique capacity to search and find DNA sequences in double-stranded DNA (dsDNA) that are homologous to the ssDNA. This homology search is vital to recombinational DNA repair, and results in homologous pairing and exchange of DNA strands. Homologous pairing involves DNA sequence-specific target location by the RecA-ssDNA complex. Despite decades of study, the mechanism of this enigmatic search process remains unknown. RecA is a DNA-dependent ATPase, but ATP hydrolysis is not required for DNA pairing and strand exchange, eliminating active search processes. Using dual optical trapping to manipulate DNA, and single-molecule fluorescence microscopy to image DNA pairing, we demonstrate that both the three-dimensional conformational state of the dsDNA target and the length of the homologous RecA-ssDNA filament have important roles in the homology search. We discovered that as the end-to-end distance of the target dsDNA molecule is increased, constraining the available three-dimensional (3D) conformations of the molecule, the rate of homologous pairing decreases. Conversely, when the length of the ssDNA in the nucleoprotein filament is increased, homology is found faster. We propose a model for the DNA homology search process termed 'intersegmental contact sampling', in which the intrinsic multivalent nature of the RecA nucleoprotein filament is used to search DNA sequence space within 3D domains of DNA, exploiting multiple weak contacts to rapidly search for homology. Our findings highlight the importance of the 3D conformational dynamics of DNA, reveal a previously unknown facet of the homology search, and provide insight into the mechanism of DNA target location by this member of a

  7. Deletion of a KU80 homolog enhances homologous recombination in the thermotolerant yeast Kluyveromyces marxianus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choo, Jin Ho; Han, Changpyo; Kim, Jae-Young; Kang, Hyun Ah

    2014-10-01

    Targeted gene replacement in the thermotolerant yeast Kluyveromyces marxianus KCTC 17555 has been hampered by its propensity to non-homologous end joining (NHEJ). To enhance homologous recombination (HR) by blocking NHEJ, we identified and disrupted the K. marxianus KU80 gene. The ku80 deletion mutant strain (Kmku80∆) of K. marxianus KCTC 17555 did not show apparent growth defects under several conditions with the exception of exposure to tunicamycin. The targeted disruption of the three model genes, KmLEU2, KmPDC1, and KmPDC5, was increased by 13-70 % in Kmku80∆, although the efficiency was greatly affected by the length of the homologous flanking fragments. In contrast, the double HR frequency was 0-13.7 % in the wild-type strain even with flanking fragments 1 kb long. Therefore, Kmku80∆ promises to be a useful recipient strain for targeted gene manipulation.

  8. Excluded volume effect enhances the homology pairing of model chromosomes

    CERN Document Server

    Takamiya, Kazunori; Isami, Shuhei; Nishimori, Hiraku; Awazu, Akinori

    2015-01-01

    To investigate the structural dynamics of the homology pairing of polymers, we mod- eled the scenario of homologous chromosome pairings during meiosis in Schizosaccharomyces pombe, one of the simplest model organisms of eukaryotes. We consider a simple model consist- ing of pairs of homologous polymers with the same structures that are confined in a cylindrical container, which represents the local parts of chromosomes contained in an elongated nucleus of S. pombe. Brownian dynamics simulations of this model showed that the excluded volume effects among non-homological chromosomes and the transitional dynamics of nuclear shape serve to enhance the pairing of homologous chromosomes.

  9. Excluded volume effect enhances the homology pairing of model chromosomes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takamiya, Kazunori; Yamamoto, Keisuke; Isami, Shuhei; Nishimori, Hiraku; Awazu, Akinori

    To investigate the structural dynamics of the homology pairing of polymers, we mod- eled the scenario of homologous chromosome pairings during meiosis in Schizosaccharomyces pombe, one of the simplest model organisms of eukaryotes. We consider a simple model consist- ing of pairs of homologous polymers with the same structures that are confined in a cylindrical container, which represents the local parts of chromosomes contained in an elongated nucleus of S. pombe. Brownian dynamics simulations of this model showed that the excluded volume effects among non-homological chromosomes and the transitional dynamics of nuclear shape serve to enhance the pairing of homologous chromosomes.

  10. Exponential growth of colored HOMFLY-PT homology

    CERN Document Server

    Wedrich, Paul

    2016-01-01

    We define reduced colored sl(N) link homologies and use deformation spectral sequences to characterize their dependence on color and rank. We then define reduced colored HOMFLY-PT homologies and prove that they arise as large N limits of sl(N) homologies. Together, these results allow proofs of many aspects of the physically conjectured structure of the family of type A link homologies. In particular, we verify a conjecture of Gorsky, Gukov and Sto\\v{s}i\\'c about the growth of colored HOMFLY-PT homologies.

  11. Domain Modeling: NP_689585.3 [SAHG[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available NP_689585.3 chr1 Solution structure of the fibronectin type-III domain of mouse myo...sin-binding protein C, Fast-type homolog c1x5ya_ chr1/NP_689585.3/NP_689585.3_apo_1004-1106.pdb psi-blast 0 ...

  12. Domain Modeling: NP_733751.2 [SAHG[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available NP_733751.2 chr7 Methyltransferase domain of human suppressor of variegation 3-9 ho...molog 2 p2r3aa_ chr7/NP_733751.2/NP_733751.2_holo_4641-4911.pdb swppa 4707G,4708C,4709A,4710R,4711S,4712E,47

  13. Domain Modeling: NP_001035932.1 [SAHG[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available NP_001035932.1 chr2 Crystal structure of the small GTPase Rab27B complexed with the... Slp homology domain of Slac2-a/melanophilin p2zetd_ chr2/NP_001035932.1/NP_001035932.1_holo_4-144.pdb blast

  14. PRIMO: An Interactive Homology Modeling Pipeline

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glenister, Michael

    2016-01-01

    The development of automated servers to predict the three-dimensional structure of proteins has seen much progress over the years. These servers make calculations simpler, but largely exclude users from the process. In this study, we present the PRotein Interactive MOdeling (PRIMO) pipeline for homology modeling of protein monomers. The pipeline eases the multi-step modeling process, and reduces the workload required by the user, while still allowing engagement from the user during every step. Default parameters are given for each step, which can either be modified or supplemented with additional external input. PRIMO has been designed for users of varying levels of experience with homology modeling. The pipeline incorporates a user-friendly interface that makes it easy to alter parameters used during modeling. During each stage of the modeling process, the site provides suggestions for novice users to improve the quality of their models. PRIMO provides functionality that allows users to also model ligands and ions in complex with their protein targets. Herein, we assess the accuracy of the fully automated capabilities of the server, including a comparative analysis of the available alignment programs, as well as of the refinement levels used during modeling. The tests presented here demonstrate the reliability of the PRIMO server when producing a large number of protein models. While PRIMO does focus on user involvement in the homology modeling process, the results indicate that in the presence of suitable templates, good quality models can be produced even without user intervention. This gives an idea of the base level accuracy of PRIMO, which users can improve upon by adjusting parameters in their modeling runs. The accuracy of PRIMO’s automated scripts is being continuously evaluated by the CAMEO (Continuous Automated Model EvaluatiOn) project. The PRIMO site is free for non-commercial use and can be accessed at https://primo.rubi.ru.ac.za/. PMID:27855192

  15. PRIMO: An Interactive Homology Modeling Pipeline.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hatherley, Rowan; Brown, David K; Glenister, Michael; Tastan Bishop, Özlem

    2016-01-01

    The development of automated servers to predict the three-dimensional structure of proteins has seen much progress over the years. These servers make calculations simpler, but largely exclude users from the process. In this study, we present the PRotein Interactive MOdeling (PRIMO) pipeline for homology modeling of protein monomers. The pipeline eases the multi-step modeling process, and reduces the workload required by the user, while still allowing engagement from the user during every step. Default parameters are given for each step, which can either be modified or supplemented with additional external input. PRIMO has been designed for users of varying levels of experience with homology modeling. The pipeline incorporates a user-friendly interface that makes it easy to alter parameters used during modeling. During each stage of the modeling process, the site provides suggestions for novice users to improve the quality of their models. PRIMO provides functionality that allows users to also model ligands and ions in complex with their protein targets. Herein, we assess the accuracy of the fully automated capabilities of the server, including a comparative analysis of the available alignment programs, as well as of the refinement levels used during modeling. The tests presented here demonstrate the reliability of the PRIMO server when producing a large number of protein models. While PRIMO does focus on user involvement in the homology modeling process, the results indicate that in the presence of suitable templates, good quality models can be produced even without user intervention. This gives an idea of the base level accuracy of PRIMO, which users can improve upon by adjusting parameters in their modeling runs. The accuracy of PRIMO's automated scripts is being continuously evaluated by the CAMEO (Continuous Automated Model EvaluatiOn) project. The PRIMO site is free for non-commercial use and can be accessed at https://primo.rubi.ru.ac.za/.

  16. Impact of homologous and non-homologous recombination in the genomic evolution of Escherichia coli.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Didelot, Xavier; Méric, Guillaume; Falush, Daniel; Darling, Aaron E

    2012-06-19

    Escherichia coli is an important species of bacteria that can live as a harmless inhabitant of the guts of many animals, as a pathogen causing life-threatening conditions or freely in the non-host environment. This diversity of lifestyles has made it a particular focus of interest for studies of genetic variation, mainly with the aim to understand how a commensal can become a deadly pathogen. Many whole genomes of E. coli have been fully sequenced in the past few years, which offer helpful data to help understand how this important species evolved. We compared 27 whole genomes encompassing four phylogroups of Escherichia coli (A, B1, B2 and E). From the core-genome we established the clonal relationships between the isolates as well as the role played by homologous recombination during their evolution from a common ancestor. We found strong evidence for sexual isolation between three lineages (A+B1, B2, E), which could be explained by the ecological structuring of E. coli and may represent on-going speciation. We identified three hotspots of homologous recombination, one of which had not been previously described and contains the aroC gene, involved in the essential shikimate metabolic pathway. We also described the role played by non-homologous recombination in the pan-genome, and showed that this process was highly heterogeneous. Our analyses revealed in particular that the genomes of three enterohaemorrhagic (EHEC) strains within phylogroup B1 have converged from originally separate backgrounds as a result of both homologous and non-homologous recombination. Recombination is an important force shaping the genomic evolution and diversification of E. coli, both by replacing fragments of genes with an homologous sequence and also by introducing new genes. In this study, several non-random patterns of these events were identified which correlated with important changes in the lifestyle of the bacteria, and therefore provide additional evidence to explain the

  17. APPL proteins FRET at the BAR: direct observation of APPL1 and APPL2 BAR domain-mediated interactions on cell membranes using FRET microscopy.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Heidi J Chial

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Human APPL1 and APPL2 are homologous RAB5 effectors whose binding partners include a diverse set of transmembrane receptors, signaling proteins, and phosphoinositides. APPL proteins associate dynamically with endosomal membranes and are proposed to function in endosome-mediated signaling pathways linking the cell surface to the cell nucleus. APPL proteins contain an N-terminal Bin/Amphiphysin/Rvs (BAR domain, a central pleckstrin homology (PH domain, and a C-terminal phosphotyrosine binding (PTB domain. Previous structural and biochemical studies have shown that the APPL BAR domains mediate homotypic and heterotypic APPL-APPL interactions and that the APPL1 BAR domain forms crescent-shaped dimers. Although previous studies have shown that APPL minimal BAR domains associate with curved cell membranes, direct interaction between APPL BAR domains on cell membranes in vivo has not been reported. METHODOLOGY: Herein, we used a laser-scanning confocal microscope equipped with a spectral detector to carry out fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET experiments with cyan fluorescent protein/yellow fluorescent protein (CFP/YFP FRET donor/acceptor pairs to examine interactions between APPL minimal BAR domains at the subcellular level. This comprehensive approach enabled us to evaluate FRET levels in a single cell using three methods: sensitized emission, standard acceptor photobleaching, and sequential acceptor photobleaching. We also analyzed emission spectra to address an outstanding controversy regarding the use of CFP donor/YFP acceptor pairs in FRET acceptor photobleaching experiments, based on reports that photobleaching of YFP converts it into a CFP-like species. CONCLUSIONS: All three methods consistently showed significant FRET between APPL minimal BAR domain FRET pairs, indicating that they interact directly in a homotypic (i.e., APPL1-APPL1 and APPL2-APPL2 and heterotypic (i.e., APPL1-APPL2 manner on curved cell membranes

  18. Railway vehicle performance optimisation using virtual homologation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Magalhães, H.; Madeira, J. F. A.; Ambrósio, J.; Pombo, J.

    2016-09-01

    Unlike regular automotive vehicles, which are designed to travel in different types of roads, railway vehicles travel mostly in the same route during their life cycle. To accept the operation of a railway vehicle in a particular network, a homologation process is required according to local standard regulations. In Europe, the standards EN 14363 and UIC 518, which are used for railway vehicle acceptance, require on-track tests and/or numerical simulations. An important advantage of using virtual homologation is the reduction of the high costs associated with on-track tests by studying the railway vehicle performance in different operation conditions. This work proposes a methodology for the improvement of railway vehicle design with the objective of its operation in selected railway tracks by using optimisation. The analyses required for the vehicle improvement are performed under control of the optimisation method global and local optimisation using direct search. To quantify the performance of the vehicle, a new objective function is proposed, which includes: a Dynamic Performance Index, defined as a weighted sum of the indices obtained from the virtual homologation process; the non-compensated acceleration, which is related to the operational velocity; and a penalty associated with cases where the vehicle presents an unacceptable dynamic behaviour according to the standards. Thus, the optimisation process intends not only to improve the quality of the vehicle in terms of running safety and ride quality, but also to increase the vehicle availability via the reduction of the time for a journey while ensuring its operational acceptance under the standards. The design variables include the suspension characteristics and the operational velocity of the vehicle, which are allowed to vary in an acceptable range of variation. The results of the optimisation lead to a global minimum of the objective function in which the suspensions characteristics of the vehicle are

  19. Identification of plant microRNA homologs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dezulian, Tobias; Remmert, Michael; Palatnik, Javier F; Weigel, Detlef; Huson, Daniel H

    2006-02-01

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are a recently discovered class of non-coding RNAs that regulate gene and protein expression in plants and animals. MiRNAs have so far been identified mostly by specific cloning of small RNA molecules, complemented by computational methods. We present a computational identification approach that is able to identify candidate miRNA homologs in any set of sequences, given a query miRNA. The approach is based on a sequence similarity search step followed by a set of structural filters.

  20. Detailed assessment of homology detection using different substitution matrices

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI Jing; WANG Wei

    2006-01-01

    Homology detection plays a key role in bioinformatics, whereas substitution matrix is one of the most important components in homology detection. Thus, besides the improvement of alignment algorithms, another effective way to enhance the accuracy of homology detection is to use proper substitution matrices or even construct new matrices.A study on the features of various matrices and on the comparison of the performances between different matrices in homology detection enable us to choose the most proper or optimal matrix for some specific applications. In this paper, by taking BLOSUM matrices as an example, some detailed features of matrices in homology detection are studied by calculating the distributions of numbers of recognized proteins over different sequence identities and sequence lengths. Our results clearly showed that different matrices have different preferences and abilities to the recognition of remote homologous proteins. Furthermore, detailed features of the various matrices can be used to improve the accuracy of homology detection.

  1. Prediction of VH-VL domain orientation for antibody variable domain modeling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bujotzek, Alexander; Dunbar, James; Lipsmeier, Florian; Schäfer, Wolfgang; Antes, Iris; Deane, Charlotte M; Georges, Guy

    2015-04-01

    The antigen-binding site of antibodies forms at the interface of their two variable domains, VH and VL, making VH-VL domain orientation a factor that codetermines antibody specificity and affinity. Preserving VH-VL domain orientation in the process of antibody engineering is important in order to retain the original antibody properties, and predicting the correct VH-VL orientation has also been recognized as an important factor in antibody homology modeling. In this article, we present a fast sequence-based predictor that predicts VH-VL domain orientation with Q(2) values ranging from 0.54 to 0.73 on the evaluation set. We describe VH-VL orientation in terms of the six absolute ABangle parameters that have recently been proposed as a means to separate the different degrees of freedom of VH-VL domain orientation. In order to assess the impact of adjusting VH-VL orientation according to our predictions, we use the set of antibody structures of the recently published Antibody Modeling Assessment (AMA) II study. In comparison to the original AMAII homology models, we find an improvement in the accuracy of VH-VL orientation modeling, which also translates into an improvement in the average root-mean-square deviation with regard to the crystal structures.

  2. Resonance for loop homology of spheres

    CERN Document Server

    Hingston, Nancy

    2011-01-01

    A Riemannian or Finsler metric on a compact manifold M gives rise to a length function on the free loop space \\Lambda M, whose critical points are the closed geodesics in the given metric. If X is a homology class on \\Lambda M, the minimax critical level cr(X) is a critical value. Let M be a sphere of dimension >2, and fix a metric g and a coefficient field G. We prove that the limit as deg(X) goes to infinity of cr(X)/deg(X) exists. We call this limit the "global mean frequency" of M. As a consequence we derive resonance statements for closed geodesics on spheres; in particular either all homology on \\Lambda M of sufficiently high degreee lies hanging on closed geodesics whose mean frequency (average index / length) equals the global mean frequency, or there is a sequence of infinitely many closed geodesics whose mean frequencies converge to the global mean frequency. The proof uses the Chas-Sullivan product and results of Goresky-Hingston [GH].

  3. Comments On The Two-Dimensional Landau-Ginzburg Approach To Link Homology

    CERN Document Server

    Galakhov, Dmitry

    2016-01-01

    We describe rules for computing a homology theory of knots and links in $\\mathbb{R}^3$. It is derived from the theory of framed BPS states bound to domain walls separating two-dimensional Landau-Ginzburg models with (2,2) supersymmetry. We illustrate the rules with some sample computations, obtaining results consistent with Khovanov homology. We show that of the two Landau-Ginzburg models discussed in this context by Gaiotto and Witten one, (the so-called Yang-Yang-Landau-Ginzburg model) does not lead to topological invariants of links while the other, based on a model with target space equal to the universal cover of the moduli space of $SU(2)$ magnetic monopoles, will indeed produce a topologically invariant theory of knots and links.

  4. High-Performance Computational Electromagnetics in Frequency-Domain and Time-Domain

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-03-04

    aforementioned contributions, for a given 1In view of its applications to seismic wave propagation Dr. Amlani’s PhD thesis received two awards at Cal- tech, one...for wave scattering problems. PhD thesis, California Institute of Technol- ogy, 2014. Available at http://www.its.caltech.edu/~obruno/preprints...solutions for some of the most challenging scattering problems in science and engineering. Electromagnetic scattering . Frequency domain solvers. Integral

  5. Neuronal pH regulation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vorstrup, S; Jensen, K E; Thomsen, C

    1989-01-01

    The intracellular pH in the brain was studied in six healthy volunteers before and immediately after the administration of 2 g of acetazolamide. Phosphorus-31 nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy by a 1.5 tesla whole-body scanner was used. The chemical shift between the inorganic phosphate...... and the phosphocreatine resonance frequencies was used for indirect assessment of the intracellular pH. The mean baseline intracellular pH was 7.05 +/- 0.04 (SD). The mean pH changes obtained at 15-min intervals within the first hour of acetazolamide administration were -0.03 +/- 0.04 (SD), -0.02 +/- 0.03 (SD), and 0.......00 +/- 0.04 (SD), i.e., no statistically significant pH decrease was observed during the period where extracellular pH is known to drop markedly. Although several factors contribute to the lack of change of the intraneuronal pH, we will discuss that this observation in addition might suggest a direct...

  6. Cloning and characterization of PhPI9 involved in floral development from Phalaenopsis Orchid

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    GUO Bin; DAI Wei; CHEN Donghong; WEI Xing; MING Feng

    2007-01-01

    In the attempt to discover new genes involved in the floral development in monoeotyledonousin species,we have cloned and characterized the homologous PISTALLATA-like (PI-like) gone from Phalaenopsis hybrid cultivar named PhPI9 (Phalaenopsis PI STILLATA # 9).The eDNA of PhPI9 has a fragment of 834 bp and has 60% identity with the PISTILATA from Arabidopsis.The deduced amino acid sequence of PhPI9 had the typical PI-motif.It also formed a subelade with other monoeot PI-type genes in phylogenetie analysis.Southern analysis showed that PhPI9 was present in the Phalaenopsis orchid genome as a single copy.Furthermore,it was expressed only in the lip of the Phalaenopsis flower and no expression was detected in vegetative organs.Thus,as a B-function MADS-box gone,PhP19 specifies floral organ identity in orchids.

  7. Should nucleotide sequence analyzing computer algorithms always extend homologies by extending homologies?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burnett, L; Basten, A; Hensley, W J

    1986-01-10

    Most computer algorithms used for comparing or aligning nucleotide sequences rely on the premise that the best way to extend a homology between the two sequences is to select a match rather than a mismatch. We have tested this assumption and found that it is not always valid.

  8. Hotspots of homologous recombination in the human genome: not all homologous sequences are equal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lupski, James R

    2004-01-01

    Homologous recombination between alleles or non-allelic paralogous sequences does not occur uniformly but is concentrated in 'hotspots' with high recombination rates. Recent studies of these hotspots show that they do not share common sequence motifs, but they do have other features in common.

  9. Hotspots of homologous recombination in the human genome: not all homologous sequences are equal

    OpenAIRE

    Lupski, James R

    2004-01-01

    Homologous recombination between alleles or non-allelic paralogous sequences does not occur uniformly but is concentrated in 'hotspots' with high recombination rates. Recent studies of these hotspots show that they do not share common sequence motifs, but they do have other features in common.

  10. Structural and functional characterization of a complex between the acidic transactivation domain of EBNA2 and the Tfb1/p62 subunit of TFIIH.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Philippe R Chabot

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Infection with the Epstein-Barr virus (EBV can lead to a number of human diseases including Hodgkin's and Burkitt's lymphomas. The development of these EBV-linked diseases is associated with the presence of nine viral latent proteins, including the nuclear antigen 2 (EBNA2. The EBNA2 protein plays a crucial role in EBV infection through its ability to activate transcription of both host and viral genes. As part of this function, EBNA2 associates with several host transcriptional regulatory proteins, including the Tfb1/p62 (yeast/human subunit of the general transcription factor IIH (TFIIH and the histone acetyltransferase CBP(CREB-binding protein/p300, through interactions with its C-terminal transactivation domain (TAD. In this manuscript, we examine the interaction of the acidic TAD of EBNA2 (residues 431-487 with the Tfb1/p62 subunit of TFIIH and CBP/p300 using nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR spectroscopy, isothermal titration calorimeter (ITC and transactivation studies in yeast. NMR studies show that the TAD of EBNA2 binds to the pleckstrin homology (PH domain of Tfb1 (Tfb1PH and that residues 448-471 (EBNA2₄₄₈₋₄₇₁ are necessary and sufficient for this interaction. NMR structural characterization of a Tfb1PH-EBNA2₄₄₈₋₄₇₁ complex demonstrates that the intrinsically disordered TAD of EBNA2 forms a 9-residue α-helix in complex with Tfb1PH. Within this helix, three hydrophobic amino acids (Trp458, Ile461 and Phe462 make a series of important interactions with Tfb1PH and their importance is validated in ITC and transactivation studies using mutants of EBNA2. In addition, NMR studies indicate that the same region of EBNA2 is also required for binding to the KIX domain of CBP/p300. This study provides an atomic level description of interactions involving the TAD of EBNA2 with target host proteins. In addition, comparison of the Tfb1PH-EBNA2₄₄₈₋₄₇₁ complex with structures of the TAD of p53 and VP16 bound

  11. Covalent structure of biodegradative threonine dehydratase of Escherichia coli: homology with other dehydratases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Datta, P; Goss, T J; Omnaas, J R; Patil, R V

    1987-01-01

    The 987-base-pair coding region of the tdc gene of Escherichia coli K-12 encoding biodegradative threonine dehydratase [Tdc; L-threonine hydro-lyase (deaminating), EC 4.2.1.16], previously cloned in this laboratory, was sequenced. The deduced polypeptide consists of 329 amino acid residues with a calculated Mr of 35,238. Although the purified enzyme was shown to contain tryptophan, no tryptophan codon was found in the tdc reading frame. Incubation of purified Tdc with [14C]tryptophan revealed apparent "covalent" binding of tryptophan, indicating posttranslational modification of the enzyme. A heptapeptide, 54Thr-55Gly-56Ser-57Phe-58Lys-59Ile- 60Arg, was found to contain Lys-58, which binds pyridoxal phosphate coenzyme. A comparison of amino acid sequences between the Tdc polypeptide and the biosynthetic threonine dehydratases of yeast (encoded by ILV1) and E. coli (encoded by ilvA) and the E. coli D-serine dehydratase (DsdA, encoded by dsdA) revealed various extents of homology: five domains of the Tdc polypeptide were 63-93% homologous with the yeast enzyme, and three of these same regions were 80% homologous with the biosynthetic E. coli dehydratase; two different domains showed 67% and 83% homology with DsdA. In addition, two other sequences were highly conserved in all four proteins, one of which was shown to contain the conserved lysine residue that binds pyridoxal phosphate in the Tdc and DsdA polypeptides. These observations suggest that, despite their diverse origin and metabolic significance, these enzymes may have evolved from a common ancestral protein.

  12. Pf-Rel, a Rel/Nuclear Factor-κB Homolog Identified from the Pearl Oyster, Pinctada fucata

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xi WU; Xunhao XIONG; Liping XIE; Rongqing ZHANG

    2007-01-01

    Transcription factor Rel/nuclear factor-kappa B (NF-κB) has been the focus of many studies since its discovery in 1986. Different homologs of Rel/NF-κB have been found in both vertebrate and invertebrate.A cDNA clone encoding a putative Rel/NF-κB homolog (designated Pf-Rel) was isolated from the pearl oyster, Pinctadafucata. The sequence of Pf-Rel consists of the Rel homology domain, IPT NF-κB domain and C-terminal transactivation domain. Sequence analysis of Pf-Rel shows that it shares high similarity with other Rel/NF-κB family proteins, especially within the conserved domains. Reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction analysis revealed that Pf-Rel mRNA was expressed ubiquitously. Further in situ hybridization analysis showed that Pf-Rel mRNA was expressed mainly at the outer epithelial cells of the middle fold and the inner epithelial cells of the outer fold. The identification and characterization of pearl oyster Pf-Rel help to further investigate the involvement of Rel/NF-κB in oyster immunity and other biological processes.

  13. Homologous Recombination—Experimental Systems, Analysis and Significance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuzminov, Andrei

    2014-01-01

    Homologous recombination is the most complex of all recombination events that shape genomes and produce material for evolution. Homologous recombination events are exchanges between DNA molecules in the lengthy regions of shared identity, catalyzed by a group of dedicated enzymes. There is a variety of experimental systems in E. coli and Salmonella to detect homologous recombination events of several different kinds. Genetic analysis of homologous recombination reveals three separate phases of this process: pre-synapsis (the early phase), synapsis (homologous strand exchange) and post-synapsis (the late phase). In E. coli, there are at least two independent pathway of the early phase and at least two independent pathways of the late phase. All this complexity is incongruent with the originally ascribed role of homologous recombination as accelerator of genome evolution: there is simply not enough duplication and repetition in enterobacterial genomes for homologous recombination to have a detectable evolutionary role, and therefore not enough selection to maintain such a complexity. At the same time, the mechanisms of homologous recombination are uniquely suited for repair of complex DNA lesions called chromosomal lesions. In fact, the two major classes of chromosomal lesions are recognized and processed by the two individual pathways at the early phase of homologous recombination. It follows, therefore, that homologous recombination events are occasional reflections of the continual recombinational repair, made possible in cases of natural or artificial genome redundancy. PMID:26442506

  14. SH3 Domains Differentially Stimulate Distinct Dynamin I Assembly Modes and G Domain Activity.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sai Krishnan

    Full Text Available Dynamin I is a highly regulated GTPase enzyme enriched in nerve terminals which mediates vesicle fission during synaptic vesicle endocytosis. One regulatory mechanism involves its interactions with proteins containing Src homology 3 (SH3 domains. At least 30 SH3 domain-containing proteins bind dynamin at its proline-rich domain (PRD. Those that stimulate dynamin activity act by promoting its oligomerisation. We undertook a systematic parallel screening of 13 glutathione-S-transferase (GST-tagged endocytosis-related SH3 domains on dynamin binding, GTPase activity and oligomerisation. No correlation was found between dynamin binding and their potency to stimulate GTPase activity. There was limited correlation between the extent of their ability to stimulate dynamin activity and the level of oligomerisation, indicating an as yet uncharacterised allosteric coupling of the PRD and G domain. We examined the two variants, dynamin Iab and Ibb, which differ in the alternately splice middle domain α2 helix. They responded differently to the panel of SH3s, with the extent of stimulation between the splice variants varying greatly between the SH3s. This study reveals that SH3 binding can act as a heterotropic allosteric regulator of the G domain via the middle domain α2 helix, suggesting an involvement of this helix in communicating the PRD-mediated allostery. This indicates that SH3 binding both stabilises multiple conformations of the tetrameric building block of dynamin, and promotes assembly of dynamin-SH3 complexes with distinct rates of GTP hydrolysis.

  15. Increased homologous integration frequency in Yarrowia lipolytica strains defective in non-homologous end-joining.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kretzschmar, Anne; Otto, Christina; Holz, Martina; Werner, Severine; Hübner, Linda; Barth, Gerold

    2013-05-01

    The ascomycetous yeast Yarrowia lipolytica has been established as model system for studies of several research topics as well as for biotechnological processes in the last two decades. However, frequency of heterologous recombination is high in this yeast species, and so knockouts of genes are laborious to achieve. Therefore, the aim of this study was to check whether a reduction of non-homologous end-joining (NHEJ) of double strand breaks (DSB) results in a strong increase of proportion of homologous recombinants. The Ku70-Ku80 heterodimer is known as an essential protein complex of the NHEJ. We show that deletion of YlKU70 and/or YlKU80 results in an increase of the rate of transformants with homologous recombination (HR) up to 85 % in each case. However, it never reaches near 100 % of HR in any case as described for some other yeast. Furthermore, we demonstrated that growth of Δylku strains was similar to that of the wild-type strain. In addition, no differences were detected between the Δylku strains and the parent strain in respect to sensitivity to the mutagenic agent EMS as well as to the antibiotics hygromycin, bleomycin and nourseothricin. However, Δylku70 and Δylku80 strain showed a slightly higher sensitivity against UV rays. Thus, the new constructed Δylku strains are attractive recipient strains for homologous integration of DNA fragments and a valuable tool for directed knockouts of genes. Nevertheless, our data suggest the existence of another system of non-homologous recombination what may be subject of further investigation.

  16. Phosphorylation and Functional Properties of the IIA Domain of the Lactose Transport Protein of Streptococcus thermophilus

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gunnewijk, M.G W; Postma, P.W.; Poolman, B.

    1999-01-01

    The lactose-H+ symport protein (LacS) of Streptococcus thermophilus has a carboxyl-terminal regulatory domain (IIALacS) that is homologous to a family of proteins and protein domains of the phosphoenolpyruvate: carbohydrate phosphotransferase system (PTS) in various organisms, of which IIAGlc of Esc

  17. The WWE domain: a common interaction module in protein ubiquitination and ADP ribosylation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aravind, L

    2001-05-01

    Sequence profile analysis was used to detect a conserved globular domain in several proteins including deltex, Trip12 and poly-ADP-ribose polymerase homologs. It was named the WWE domain after its most conserved residues and is predicted to mediate specific protein-protein interactions in ubiquitin and ADP-ribose conjugation systems.

  18. Insights into Brain Architectures from the Homological Scaffolds of Functional Connectivity Networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lord, Louis-David; Expert, Paul; Fernandes, Henrique M; Petri, Giovanni; Van Hartevelt, Tim J; Vaccarino, Francesco; Deco, Gustavo; Turkheimer, Federico; Kringelbach, Morten L

    2016-01-01

    In recent years, the application of network analysis to neuroimaging data has provided useful insights about the brain's functional and structural organization in both health and disease. This has proven a significant paradigm shift from the study of individual brain regions in isolation. Graph-based models of the brain consist of vertices, which represent distinct brain areas, and edges which encode the presence (or absence) of a structural or functional relationship between each pair of vertices. By definition, any graph metric will be defined upon this dyadic representation of the brain activity. It is however unclear to what extent these dyadic relationships can capture the brain's complex functional architecture and the encoding of information in distributed networks. Moreover, because network representations of global brain activity are derived from measures that have a continuous response (i.e., interregional BOLD signals), it is methodologically complex to characterize the architecture of functional networks using traditional graph-based approaches. In the present study, we investigate the relationship between standard network metrics computed from dyadic interactions in a functional network, and a metric defined on the persistence homological scaffold of the network, which is a summary of the persistent homology structure of resting-state fMRI data. The persistence homological scaffold is a summary network that differs in important ways from the standard network representations of functional neuroimaging data: (i) it is constructed using the information from all edge weights comprised in the original network without applying an ad hoc threshold and (ii) as a summary of persistent homology, it considers the contributions of simplicial structures to the network organization rather than dyadic edge-vertices interactions. We investigated the information domain captured by the persistence homological scaffold by computing the strength of each node in the

  19. A homology model of Xyloglucan Xylosyltransferase 2 reveals critical amino acids involved in substrate binding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Culbertson, Alan T; Tietze, Alesia A; Tietze, Daniel; Chou, Yi-Hsiang; Smith, Adrienne L; Young, Zachary T; Zabotina, Olga A

    2016-09-01

    In dicotyledonous plants, xyloglucan (XyG) is the most abundant hemicellulose of the primary cell wall. The enzymes involved in XyG biosynthesis have been identified through reverse-genetics and activity was characterized by heterologous expression. Currently, there is no information on the atomic structures or amino acids involved in activity or substrate binding of any of the Golgi-localized XyG biosynthetic enzymes. A homology model of the xyloglucan xylosyltransferase 2 (XXT2) catalytic domain was built on the basis of the crystal structure of A64Rp. Molecular dynamics simulations revealed that the homology model retains the glycosyltransferase (GT)-A fold of the template structure used to build the homology model indicating that XXT2 likely has a GT-A fold. According to the XXT2 homology model, six amino acids (Phe204, Lys207, Asp228, Ser229, Asp230, His378) were selected and their contribution in catalytic activity was investigated. Site-directed mutagenesis studies show that Asp228, Asp230 and His378 are critical for XXT2 activity and are predicted to be involved in coordination of manganese ion. Lys207 was also found to be critical for protein activity and the homology model indicates a critical role in substrate binding. Additionally, Phe204 mutants have less of an impact on XXT2 activity with the largest effect when replaced with a polar residue. This is the first study that investigates the amino acids involved in substrate binding of the XyG-synthesizing xylosyltransferases and contributes to the understanding of the mechanisms of polysaccharide-synthesizing GTs and XyG biosynthesis. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  20. Domain Modeling: NP_067651.2 [SAHG[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available NP_067651.2 chr4 Crystal Structure of A N-terminal Fragment of SKAP-HOM Containing ...both the Helical Dimerization Domain and the PH Domain c2otxb_ chr4/NP_067651.2/NP_067651.2_apo_1-250.pdb psi-blast 0 ...

  1. PhEDEx Data Service

    Science.gov (United States)

    Egeland, Ricky; Wildish, Tony; Huang, Chih-Hao

    2010-04-01

    The PhEDEx Data Service provides access to information from the central PhEDEx database, as well as certificate-authenticated managerial operations such as requesting the transfer or deletion of data. The Data Service is integrated with the "SiteDB" service for fine-grained access control, providing a safe and secure environment for operations. A plug-in architecture allows server-side modules to be developed rapidly and easily by anyone familiar with the schema, and can automatically return the data in a variety of formats for use by different client technologies. Using HTTP access via the Data Service instead of direct database connections makes it possible to build monitoring web-pages with complex drill-down operations, suitable for debugging or presentation from many aspects. This will form the basis of the new PhEDEx website in the near future, as well as providing access to PhEDEx information and certificate-authenticated services for other CMS dataflow and workflow management tools such as CRAB, WMCore, DBS and the dashboard. A PhEDEx command-line client tool provides one-stop access to all the functions of the PhEDEx Data Service interactively, for use in simple scripts that do not access the service directly. The client tool provides certificate-authenticated access to managerial functions, so all the functions of the PhEDEx Data Service are available to it. The tool can be expanded by plug-ins which can combine or extend the client-side manipulation of data from the Data Service, providing a powerful environment for manipulating data within PhEDEx.

  2. Programmable pH buffers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gough, Dara Van; Huber, Dale L.; Bunker, Bruce C.; Roberts, Mark E.

    2017-01-24

    A programmable pH buffer comprises a copolymer that changes pK.sub.a at a lower critical solution temperature (LCST) in water. The copolymer comprises a thermally programmable polymer that undergoes a hydrophobic-to-hydrophilic phase change at the LCST and an electrolytic polymer that exhibits acid-base properties that are responsive to the phase change. The programmable pH buffer can be used to sequester CO.sub.2 into water.

  3. PhEDEx Data Service

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Egeland, Ricky [University of Minnesota, Twin Cities (United States); Wildish, Tony [Princeton University (United States); Huang, Chih-Hao [Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory (United States)

    2010-04-01

    The PhEDEx Data Service provides access to information from the central PhEDEx database, as well as certificate-authenticated managerial operations such as requesting the transfer or deletion of data. The Data Service is integrated with the 'SiteDB' service for fine-grained access control, providing a safe and secure environment for operations. A plug-in architecture allows server-side modules to be developed rapidly and easily by anyone familiar with the schema, and can automatically return the data in a variety of formats for use by different client technologies. Using HTTP access via the Data Service instead of direct database connections makes it possible to build monitoring web-pages with complex drill-down operations, suitable for debugging or presentation from many aspects. This will form the basis of the new PhEDEx website in the near future, as well as providing access to PhEDEx information and certificate-authenticated services for other CMS dataflow and workflow management tools such as CRAB, WMCore, DBS and the dashboard. A PhEDEx command-line client tool provides one-stop access to all the functions of the PhEDEx Data Service interactively, for use in simple scripts that do not access the service directly. The client tool provides certificate-authenticated access to managerial functions, so all the functions of the PhEDEx Data Service are available to it. The tool can be expanded by plug-ins which can combine or extend the client-side manipulation of data from the Data Service, providing a powerful environment for manipulating data within PhEDEx.

  4. [Contemporary concepts of homology in biology (a theoretical review)].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pavlinov, I Ia

    2011-01-01

    A brief review of the contemporary theoretical concepts of homology being developed basically in systematics and phylogenetics as well as in developmental biology is presented. Ontologically, both homology and analogy represent a kind of correspondence considered from the standpoint of nominalism, realism, and conceptualism. According to their nominalistic treatment, both are described by a set-theory approximation which makes them classes (in the logical sense). The realistic treatment provides their holistic view according to which a homologue is an anatomical or evolutionary singular while analogue remains a class. The conceptualistic treatment means that there are real (objective) correspondences existing among real (objective) entities while fixation of any of them is based on certain theoretical presumptions adopted by a researcher; homology as a natural kind (including homeostatic property cluster) seems to be most consistent with such a treatment. Realistic view of homology makes it "absolute", while two others make discrimination of homology and analogy strictly relative. Two basic general homology concepts have been developed in recent literature--taxic and transformational ones; the first considers respective correspondences as structure relations, the second as process relations. The taxic homology is nearly the same as classical typological one (Owen), while transformational homology unites all its phylogenetic, ontogenetic (developmental) and transformation-typological definitions. Process-structuralistic approach seems to unite both taxic and transformational ones. The latter makes it possible to apply general homology concept not only to structures but to processes as well. It is stressed that homology is not identical to the similarity, the latter being just the means for revealing the former. Some closer consideration is given to phylogenetic, ontogenetic and genetic treatments of homology; significant uncertainty is shown to exist between them

  5. Alleles of the homologous recombination gene, RAD59, identify multiple responses to disrupted DNA replication in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liddell, Lauren C; Manthey, Glenn M; Owens, Shannon N; Fu, Becky X H; Bailis, Adam M

    2013-10-14

    In Saccharomyces cerevisiae, Rad59 is required for multiple homologous recombination mechanisms and viability in DNA replication-defective rad27 mutant cells. Recently, four rad59 missense alleles were found to have distinct effects on homologous recombination that are consistent with separation-of-function mutations. The rad59-K166A allele alters an amino acid in a conserved α-helical domain, and, like the rad59 null allele diminishes association of Rad52 with double-strand breaks. The rad59-K174A and rad59-F180A alleles alter amino acids in the same domain and have genetically similar effects on homologous recombination. The rad59-Y92A allele alters a conserved amino acid in a separate domain, has genetically distinct effects on homologous recombination, and does not diminish association of Rad52 with double-strand breaks. In this study, rad59 mutant strains were crossed with a rad27 null mutant to examine the effects of the rad59 alleles on the link between viability, growth and the stimulation of homologous recombination in replication-defective cells. Like the rad59 null allele, rad59-K166A was synthetically lethal in combination with rad27. The rad59-K174A and rad59-F180A alleles were not synthetically lethal in combination with rad27, had effects on growth that coincided with decreased ectopic gene conversion, but did not affect mutation, unequal sister-chromatid recombination, or loss of heterozygosity. The rad59-Y92A allele was not synthetically lethal when combined with rad27, stimulated ectopic gene conversion and heteroallelic recombination independently from rad27, and was mutually epistatic with srs2. Unlike rad27, the stimulatory effect of rad59-Y92A on homologous recombination was not accompanied by effects on growth rate, cell cycle distribution, mutation, unequal sister-chromatid recombination, or loss of heterozygosity. The synthetic lethality conferred by rad59 null and rad59-K166A alleles correlates with their inhibitory effect on association

  6. ECOD: new developments in the evolutionary classification of domains

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schaeffer, R. Dustin; Liao, Yuxing; Cheng, Hua; Grishin, Nick V.

    2017-01-01

    Evolutionary Classification Of protein Domains (ECOD) (http://prodata.swmed.edu/ecod) comprehensively classifies protein with known spatial structures maintained by the Protein Data Bank (PDB) into evolutionary groups of protein domains. ECOD relies on a combination of automatic and manual weekly updates to achieve its high accuracy and coverage with a short update cycle. ECOD classifies the approximately 120 000 depositions of the PDB into more than 500 000 domains in ∼3400 homologous groups. We show the performance of the weekly update pipeline since the release of ECOD, describe improvements to the ECOD website and available search options, and discuss novel structures and homologous groups that have been classified in the recent updates. Finally, we discuss the future directions of ECOD and further improvements planned for the hierarchy and update process. PMID:27899594

  7. Homological mirror symmetry. New developments and perspectives

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kapustin, Anton [California Inst. of Tech., Pasadena, CA (United States); Kreuzer, Maximilian [Technische Univ., Vienna (Austria). Inst. fuer Theoretische Physik; Schlesinger, Karl-Georg (eds.) [Vienna Univ. (Austria). Inst. fuer Theoretische Physik

    2009-07-01

    Homological Mirror Symmetry, the study of dualities of certain quantum field theories in a mathematically rigorous form, has developed into a flourishing subject on its own over the past years. The present volume bridges a gap in the literature by providing a set of lectures and reviews that both introduce and representatively review the state-of-the art in the field from different perspectives. With contributions by K. Fukaya, M. Herbst, K. Hori, M. Huang, A. Kapustin, L. Katzarkov, A. Klemm, M. Kontsevich, D. Page, S. Quackenbush, E. Sharpe, P. Seidel, I. Smith and Y. Soibelman, this volume will be a reference on the topic for everyone starting to work or actively working on mathematical aspects of quantum field theory. (orig.)

  8. Chatter detection in turning using persistent homology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khasawneh, Firas A.; Munch, Elizabeth

    2016-03-01

    This paper describes a new approach for ascertaining the stability of stochastic dynamical systems in their parameter space by examining their time series using topological data analysis (TDA). We illustrate the approach using a nonlinear delayed model that describes the tool oscillations due to self-excited vibrations in turning. Each time series is generated using the Euler-Maruyama method and a corresponding point cloud is obtained using the Takens embedding. The point cloud can then be analyzed using a tool from TDA known as persistent homology. The results of this study show that the described approach can be used for analyzing datasets of delay dynamical systems generated both from numerical simulation and experimental data. The contributions of this paper include presenting for the first time a topological approach for investigating the stability of a class of nonlinear stochastic delay equations, and introducing a new application of TDA to machining processes.

  9. Towards Stratification Learning through Homology Inference

    CERN Document Server

    Bendich, Paul; Wang, Bei

    2010-01-01

    A topological approach to stratification learning is developed for point cloud data drawn from a stratified space. Given such data, our objective is to infer which points belong to the same strata. First we define a multi-scale notion of a stratified space, giving a stratification for each radius level. We then use methods derived from kernel and cokernel persistent homology to cluster the data points into different strata, and we prove a result which guarantees the correctness of our clustering, given certain topological conditions; some geometric intuition for these topological conditions is also provided. Our correctness result is then given a probabilistic flavor: we give bounds on the minimum number of sample points required to infer, with probability, which points belong to the same strata. Finally, we give an explicit algorithm for the clustering, prove its correctness, and apply it to some simulated data.

  10. Role of discs large homolog 5

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Frauke Friedrichs; Monika Stoll

    2006-01-01

    In 2004, an association of genetic variation in the discs large homolog 5 (DLG5) gene with inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) was described in two large European study samples[1]. The initial report of DLG5 as a novel IBD susceptibility gene sparked a multitude of studies investigating its effect on CD and IBD, respectively,leading to controversial findings and ongoing discussions concerning the validity of the initial association finding and its role in the aetiology of Crohn disease. This review aims to summarize the current state of knowledge and to place the reported findings in the context of current concepts of complex diseases. This includes aspects of statistical power, phenotype differences and genetic heterogeneity between different populations as well as gene-gene and gene-environment interactions.

  11. Regulation of Homologous Recombination by SUMOylation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pinela da Silva, Sonia Cristina

    Double-strand breaks (DSBs) are one of the most deleterious types of DNA lesions challenging genome integrity. The DNA damage response (DDR) promotes fast and effective detection and repair of the damaged DNA, leading to cell cycle arrest through checkpoint activation and the recruitment of repair...... factors such as the homologous recombination (HR) machinery. HR constitutes the main DSB repair pathway in Saccharomyces cerevisiae and despite being largely considered an error-free process and essential for genome stability, uncontrolled recombination can lead to loss of heterozygosity, translocations....... In this study I present new insights for the role of SUMOylation in regulating HR by dissecting the role of SUMO in the interaction between the central HR-mediator protein Rad52 and its paralogue Rad59 and the outcome of recombination. This data provides evidence for the importance of SUMO in promoting protein...

  12. How homologous recombination maintains telomere integrity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tacconi, Eliana M C; Tarsounas, Madalena

    2015-06-01

    Telomeres protect the ends of linear chromosomes against loss of genetic information and inappropriate processing as damaged DNA and are therefore crucial to the maintenance of chromosome integrity. In addition to providing a pathway for genome-wide DNA repair, homologous recombination (HR) plays a key role in telomere replication and capping. Consistent with this, the genomic instability characteristic of HR-deficient cells and tumours is driven in part by telomere dysfunction. Here, we discuss the mechanisms by which HR modulates the response to intrinsic cellular challenges that arise during telomere replication, as well as its impact on the assembly of telomere protective structures. How normal and tumour cells differ in their ability to maintain telomeres is deeply relevant to the search for treatments that would selectively eliminate cells whose capacity for HR-mediated repair has been compromised.

  13. [Homology and carbapenemase gene in Acinetobacter baumannii].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Qun; Deng, Shuang; Li, Hongling; Zou, Mingxiang

    2012-11-01

    To study the antibiotic resistance evolution, homology, phenotypes and genotypes of carbapenemase in Acinetobacter baumannii from clinical isolates. A total of 72 strains of Acinetobacter baumannii were isolated from Xiangya Hospital of Central South University from March to May 2012. Antimicrobial susceptibility test was carried out by automatic microorganism clinical analytical system VITEK-II. The homology of the 72 strains was analyzed by enterobacterial repetitive intergenic consensus-PCR (ERIC-PCR). Modified Hodge test was used to screen carbapenemases of the strains. Carbapenemase genes blaOXA-23, blaOXA-40 and blaOXA-58 were also amplified and sequenced. The 72 strains of Acinetobacter baumannii remained sensitive to cefoperazone/sulbactam (resistance rate 8.33%), followed by Amikacin. Otherwise, they were resistant to most of the antimicrobial agents (resistance rate more than 70%). The 72 strains were identified as 7 epidemic clones, A-G, by means of ERIC-PCR and the phylogenetic relationship among D, E, F and G was very close, suggesting a nosocomial infection possibility. Totally 56 strains produced carbapenemase; 61 strains were positive for carbapenemase gene blaOXA-23 and 1 strain positive for blaOXA-58. All strains were negative for carbapenemase gene blaOXA-40. Acinetobacter baumannii strains isolated clinically are resistant to most of the antimicrobial agents and nosocomial infection had been observed. Most of the strains produce carbapenemase, among which, blaOXA-23 gene is the main carbapenemase gene. blaOXA-58 gene exists in the Acinetobacter baumannii isolates from Hunan Province.

  14. Modeling Non-homologous End Joining

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yongfeng

    2013-01-01

    Non-homologous end joining (NHEJ) is the dominant DNA double strand break (DSB) repair pathway and involves several NHEJ proteins such as Ku, DNA-PKcs, XRCC4, Ligase IV and so on. Once DSBs are generated, Ku is first recruited to the DNA end, followed by other NHEJ proteins for DNA end processing and ligation. Because of the direct ligation of break ends without the need for a homologous template, NHEJ turns out to be an error-prone but efficient repair pathway. Some mechanisms have been proposed of how the efficiency of NHEJ repair is affected. The type of DNA damage is an important factor of NHEJ repair. For instance, the length of DNA fragment may determine the recruitment efficiency of NHEJ protein such as Ku [1], or the complexity of the DNA breaks [2] is accounted for the choice of NHEJ proteins and subpathway of NHEJ repair. On the other hand, the chromatin structure also plays a role of the accessibility of NHEJ protein to the DNA damage site. In this talk, some mathematical models of NHEJ, that consist of series of biochemical reactions complying with the laws of chemical reaction (e.g. mass action, etc.), will be introduced. By mathematical and numerical analysis and parameter estimation, the models are able to capture the qualitative biological features and show good agreement with experimental data. As conclusions, from the viewpoint of modeling, how the NHEJ proteins are recruited will be first discussed for connection between the classical sequential model [4] and recently proposed two-phase model [5]. Then how the NHEJ repair pathway is affected, by the length of DNA fragment [6], the complexity of DNA damage [7] and the chromatin structure [8], will be addressed

  15. The Chromosomal Courtship Dance-homolog pairing in early meiosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klutstein, Michael; Cooper, Julia Promisel

    2014-02-01

    The intermingling of genomes that characterizes sexual reproduction requires haploid gametes in which parental homologs have recombined. For this, homologs must pair during meiosis. In a crowded nucleus where sequence homology is obscured by the enormous scale and packaging of the genome, partner alignment is no small task. Here we review the early stages of this process. Chromosomes first establish an initial docking site, usually at telomeres or centromeres. The acquisition of chromosome-specific patterns of binding factors facilitates homolog recognition. Chromosomes are then tethered to the nuclear envelope (NE) and subjected to nuclear movements that 'shake off' inappropriate contacts while consolidating homolog associations. Thereafter, homolog connections are stabilized by building the synaptonemal complex or its equivalent and creating genetic crossovers. Recent perspectives on the roles of these stages will be discussed.

  16. Impact of homologous and non-homologous recombination in the genomic evolution of Escherichia coli

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Didelot Xavier

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Escherichia coli is an important species of bacteria that can live as a harmless inhabitant of the guts of many animals, as a pathogen causing life-threatening conditions or freely in the non-host environment. This diversity of lifestyles has made it a particular focus of interest for studies of genetic variation, mainly with the aim to understand how a commensal can become a deadly pathogen. Many whole genomes of E. coli have been fully sequenced in the past few years, which offer helpful data to help understand how this important species evolved. Results We compared 27 whole genomes encompassing four phylogroups of Escherichia coli (A, B1, B2 and E. From the core-genome we established the clonal relationships between the isolates as well as the role played by homologous recombination during their evolution from a common ancestor. We found strong evidence for sexual isolation between three lineages (A+B1, B2, E, which could be explained by the ecological structuring of E. coli and may represent on-going speciation. We identified three hotspots of homologous recombination, one of which had not been previously described and contains the aroC gene, involved in the essential shikimate metabolic pathway. We also described the role played by non-homologous recombination in the pan-genome, and showed that this process was highly heterogeneous. Our analyses revealed in particular that the genomes of three enterohaemorrhagic (EHEC strains within phylogroup B1 have converged from originally separate backgrounds as a result of both homologous and non-homologous recombination. Conclusions Recombination is an important force shaping the genomic evolution and diversification of E. coli, both by replacing fragments of genes with an homologous sequence and also by introducing new genes. In this study, several non-random patterns of these events were identified which correlated with important changes in the lifestyle of the bacteria, and

  17. AcmD, a homolog of the major autolysin AcmA of Lactococcus lactis, binds to the cell wall and contributes to cell separation and autolysis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ganesh Ram R Visweswaran

    Full Text Available Lactococcus lactis expresses the homologous glucosaminidases AcmB, AcmC, AcmA and AcmD. The latter two have three C-terminal LysM repeats for peptidoglycan binding. AcmD has much shorter intervening sequences separating the LysM repeats and a lower iso-electric point (4.3 than AcmA (10.3. Under standard laboratory conditions AcmD was mainly secreted into the culture supernatant. An L. lactis acmAacmD double mutant formed longer chains than the acmA single mutant, indicating that AcmD contributes to cell separation. This phenotype could be complemented by plasmid-encoded expression of AcmD in the double mutant. No clear difference in cellular lysis and protein secretion was observed between both mutants. Nevertheless, overexpression of AcmD resulted in increased autolysis when AcmA was present (as in the wild type strain or when AcmA was added to the culture medium of an AcmA-minus strain. Possibly, AcmD is mainly active within the cell wall, at places where proper conditions are present for its binding and catalytic activity. Various fusion proteins carrying either the three LysM repeats of AcmA or AcmD were used to study and compare their cell wall binding characteristics. Whereas binding of the LysM domain of AcmA took place at pHs ranging from 4 to 8, LysM domain of AcmD seems to bind strongest at pH 4.

  18. RPA homologs and ssDNA processing during meiotic recombination

    OpenAIRE

    Ribeiro, Jonathan; Abby, Emilie; Livera, Gabriel; Martini, Emmanuelle

    2015-01-01

    Meiotic homologous recombination is a specialized process that involves homologous chromosome pairing and strand exchange to guarantee proper chromosome segregation and genetic diversity. The formation and repair of DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs) during meiotic recombination differs from those during mitotic recombination in that the homologous chromosome rather than the sister chromatid is the preferred repair template. The processing of single-stranded DNA (ssDNA) formed on intermediate re...

  19. Heteromorphic Sex Chromosomes: Navigating Meiosis without a Homologous Partner

    OpenAIRE

    Checchi, Paula M.; Engebrecht, JoAnne

    2011-01-01

    Accurate chromosome segregation during meiosis relies on homology between the maternal and paternal chromosomes. Yet by definition, sex chromosomes of the heterogametic sex lack a homologous partner. Recent studies in a number of systems have shed light on the unique meiotic behavior of heteromorphic sex chromosomes, and highlight both the commonalities and differences in divergent species. During meiotic prophase, the homology-dependent processes of pairing, synapsis, and recombination have ...

  20. Benchmarking the next generation of homology inference tools

    OpenAIRE

    Saripella, Ganapathi Varma; Sonnhammer, Erik L.L.; Forslund, Kristoffer

    2016-01-01

    Motivation: Over the last decades, vast numbers of sequences were deposited in public databases. Bioinformatics tools allow homology and consequently functional inference for these sequences. New profile-based homology search tools have been introduced, allowing reliable detection of remote homologs, but have not been systematically benchmarked. To provide such a comparison, which can guide bioinformatics workflows, we extend and apply our previously developed benchmark approach to evaluate t...

  1. A sign assignment in totally twisted Khovanov homology

    OpenAIRE

    Manion, Andrew

    2011-01-01

    We lift the characteristic-2 totally twisted Khovanov homology of Roberts and Jaeger to a theory with integer coefficients. The result is a complex computing reduced odd Khovanov homology for knots. This complex is equivalent to a spanning-tree complex whose differential is explicit modulo a sign ambiguity coming from the need to choose a sign assignment in the definition of odd Khovanov homology.

  2. A divergent calponin homology (NN–CH) domain defines a novel family

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schou, Kenneth Bødtker; Andersen, Jens S.; Pedersen, Lotte Bang

    2014-01-01

    Microtubules are dynamic polymers of tubulin dimers that undergo continuous assembly and disassembly. A mounting number of microtubule-associated proteins (MAPs) regulate the dynamic behavior of microtubules and hence the assembly and disassembly of disparate microtubule structures within the cell...... and NUF2 share evolutionary ancestry with a novel protein family in mammals comprising, besides NDC80/HEC1 and NUF2, three Intraflagellar Transport (IFT) complex B subunits (IFT81, IFT57, CLUAP1) as well as six proteins with poorly defined function (FAM98A-C, CCDC22, CCDC93 and C14orf166). We show...

  3. A cyclophilin homology domain-independent role for Nup358 in HIV-1 infection

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Meehan, A.M.; Saenz, D.T.; Guevera, R.; Morrison, J.H.; Peretz, M.; Fadel, H.J.; Hamada, M.; Deursen, J. van; Poeschla, E.M.

    2014-01-01

    The large nucleoporin Nup358/RanBP2 forms eight filaments that project from the nuclear pore into the cytoplasm where they function as docking platforms for nucleocytoplasmic transport receptors. RNAi screens have implicated Nup358 in the HIV-1 life cycle. The 164 C-terminal amino acids of this 3,22

  4. A divergent calponin homology (NN–CH) domain defines a novel family

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schou, Kenneth Bødtker; Andersen, Jens S.; Pedersen, Lotte Bang

    2014-01-01

    and NUF2 share evolutionary ancestry with a novel protein family in mammals comprising, besides NDC80/HEC1 and NUF2, three Intraflagellar Transport (IFT) complex B subunits (IFT81, IFT57, CLUAP1) as well as six proteins with poorly defined function (FAM98A-C, CCDC22, CCDC93 and C14orf166). We show...

  5. [Homologous recombination among bacterial genomes: the measurement and identification].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xianwei, Yang; Ruifu, Yang; Yujun, Cui

    2016-02-01

    Homologous recombination is one of important sources in shaping the bacterial population diversity, which disrupts the clonal relationship among different lineages through horizontal transferring of DNA-segments. As consequence of blurring the vertical inheritance signals, the homologous recombination raises difficulties in phylogenetic analysis and reconstruction of population structure. Here we discuss the impacts of homologous recombination in inferring phylogenetic relationship among bacterial isolates, and summarize the tools and models separately used in recombination measurement and identification. We also highlight the merits and drawbacks of various approaches, aiming to assist in the practical application for the analysis of homologous recombination in bacterial evolution research.

  6. On the digital homology groups of digital images

    CERN Document Server

    Lee, Dae-Woong

    2011-01-01

    In this article we study the digital homology groups of digital images which are based on the singular homology groups of topological spaces in algebraic topology. Specifically, we define a digitally standard $n$-simplex, a digitally singular $n$-simplex, and the digital homology groups of digital images with $k$-adjacency relations. We then construct a covariant functor from a category of digital images and digitally continuous functions to the one of abelian groups and group homomorphisms, and investigate some fundamental and interesting properties of digital homology groups of digital images, such as the digital version of the dimension axiom which is one of the Eilenberg-Steenrod axioms.

  7. A geometric model for Hochschild homology of Soergel bimodules

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Webster, Ben; Williamson, Geordie

    2008-01-01

    An important step in the calculation of the triply graded link homology of Khovanov and Rozansky is the determination of the Hochschild homology of Soergel bimodules for SL(n). We present a geometric model for this Hochschild homology for any simple group G, as B–equivariant intersection cohomology...... of B×B–orbit closures in G. We show that, in type A, these orbit closures are equivariantly formal for the conjugation B–action. We use this fact to show that, in the case where the corresponding orbit closure is smooth, this Hochschild homology is an exterior algebra over a polynomial ring...

  8. The cytogenetics of homologous chromosome pairing in meiosis in plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bozza, C G; Pawlowski, W P

    2008-01-01

    Three activities hallmark meiotic cell division: homologous chromosome pairing, synapsis, and recombination. Recombination and synapsis are well-studied but homologous pairing still holds many black boxes. In the past several years, many studies in plants have yielded insights into the mechanisms of chromosome pairing interactions. Research in several plant species showed the importance of telomere clustering on the nuclear envelope (telomere bouquet formation) in facilitating alignment of homologous chromosomes. Homologous pairing was also shown to be tied to the early stages of recombination by mutant analyses in Arabidopsis and maize. In contrast, little is known about the mechanisms that guide homolog interaction after their rough alignment by the bouquet and before the close-range recombination-dependent homology search. The relatively large and complex genomes of plants may require additional mechanisms, not needed in small genome eukaryotes, to distinguish between local homology of duplicated genes or transposable elements and global chromosomal homology. Plants provide an excellent large genome model for the study of homologous pairing and dissection of this process. 2008 S. Karger AG, Basel

  9. Protein domain prediction

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ingolfsson, Helgi; Yona, Golan

    2008-01-01

    Domains are considered to be the building blocks of protein structures. A protein can contain a single domain or multiple domains, each one typically associated with a specific function. The combination of domains determines the function of the protein, its subcellular localization and the interacti

  10. AltMV TGB1 Nucleolar Localization Requires Homologous Interaction and Correlates with Cell Wall Localization Associated with Cell-to-Cell Movement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nam, Jiryun; Nam, Moon; Bae, Hanhong; Lee, Cheolho; Lee, Bong-Chun; Hammond, John; Lim, Hyoun-Sub

    2013-12-01

    The Potexvirus Alternanthera mosaic virus (AltMV) has multifunctional triple gene block (TGB) proteins, among which our studies have focused on the properties of the TGB1 protein. The TGB1 of AltMV has functions including RNA binding, RNA silencing suppression, and cell-to-cell movement, and is known to form homologous interactions. The helicase domains of AltMV TGB1 were separately mutated to identify which regions are involved in homologous TGB1 interactions. The yeast two hybrid system and Bimolecular Fluorescence Complementation (BiFC) in planta were utilized to examine homologous interactions of the mutants. Helicase motif I of AltMV TGB1 was found to be critical to maintain homologous interactions. Mutations in the remaining helicase motifs did not inhibit TGB1 homologous interactions. In the absence of homologous interaction of TGB1, subcellular localization of helicase domain I mutants showed distinctively different patterns from that of WT TGB1. These results provide important information to study viral movement and replication of AltMV.

  11. Deciphering the function of lactococcal phage ul36 Sak domains.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scaltriti, Erika; Moineau, Sylvain; Launay, Hélène; Masson, Jean-Yves; Rivetti, Claudio; Ramoni, Roberto; Campanacci, Valérie; Tegoni, Mariella; Cambillau, Christian

    2010-06-01

    Virulent phages are responsible for milk fermentation failures in the dairy industry, due to their ability to infect starter cultures containing strains of Lactococcus lactis. Single-strand annealing proteins (SSAPs) have been found in several lactococcal phages, among which Sak in the phage ul36. Sak has been recently shown to be a functional homolog of the human protein RAD52, involved in homologous recombination. A comparison between full-length Sak and its N- and C-terminal domains was carried out to elucidate functional characteristics of each domain. We performed HPLC-SEC, AFM and SPR experiments to evaluate oligomerization states and compare the affinities to DNA. We have shown that the N-terminal domain (1-171) is essential and sufficient for oligomerization and binding to DNA, while the C-terminal domain (172-252) does not bind DNA nor oligomerize. Modelisation of Sak N-terminal domain suggests that DNA may bind a positively charged crevice that runs external to the ring. Annealing and stimulation of RecA strand exchange indicate that only the N-terminal domain is capable of single-strand annealing and both domains do not stimulate the RecA strand exchange reaction. We propose that Sak N-terminus is involved in DNA binding and annealing while the C-terminus may serve to contact Sak partners.

  12. DNA-Pairing and Annealing Processes in Homologous Recombination and Homology-Directed Repair

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morrical, Scott W.

    2015-01-01

    The formation of heteroduplex DNA is a central step in the exchange of DNA sequences via homologous recombination, and in the accurate repair of broken chromosomes via homology-directed repair pathways. In cells, heteroduplex DNA largely arises through the activities of recombination proteins that promote DNA-pairing and annealing reactions. Classes of proteins involved in pairing and annealing include RecA-family DNA-pairing proteins, single-stranded DNA (ssDNA)-binding proteins, recombination mediator proteins, annealing proteins, and nucleases. This review explores the properties of these pairing and annealing proteins, and highlights their roles in complex recombination processes including the double Holliday junction (DhJ) formation, synthesis-dependent strand annealing, and single-strand annealing pathways—DNA transactions that are critical both for genome stability in individual organisms and for the evolution of species. PMID:25646379

  13. Mutational analysis of a ras catalytic domain

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Willumsen, B M; Papageorge, A G; Kung, H F

    1986-01-01

    domain that were dispensable for transformation and six other segments that were required for transformation. Segments that were necessary for guanosine nucleotide (GDP) binding corresponded to three of the segments that were essential for transformation; two of the three segments share strong sequence...... homology with other purine nucleotide-binding proteins. Loss of GDP binding was associated with apparent instability of the protein. Lesions in two of the three other required regions significantly reduced GDP binding, while small lesions in the last required region did not impair GDP binding or membrane...

  14. Beauty is in the eye of the beholder: proteins can recognize binding sites of homologous proteins in more than one way.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juliette Martin

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Understanding the mechanisms of protein-protein interaction is a fundamental problem with many practical applications. The fact that different proteins can bind similar partners suggests that convergently evolved binding interfaces are reused in different complexes. A set of protein complexes composed of non-homologous domains interacting with homologous partners at equivalent binding sites was collected in 2006, offering an opportunity to investigate this point. We considered 433 pairs of protein-protein complexes from the ABAC database (AB and AC binary protein complexes sharing a homologous partner A and analyzed the extent of physico-chemical similarity at the atomic and residue level at the protein-protein interface. Homologous partners of the complexes were superimposed using Multiprot, and similar atoms at the interface were quantified using a five class grouping scheme and a distance cut-off. We found that the number of interfacial atoms with similar properties is systematically lower in the non-homologous proteins than in the homologous ones. We assessed the significance of the similarity by bootstrapping the atomic properties at the interfaces. We found that the similarity of binding sites is very significant between homologous proteins, as expected, but generally insignificant between the non-homologous proteins that bind to homologous partners. Furthermore, evolutionarily conserved residues are not colocalized within the binding sites of non-homologous proteins. We could only identify a limited number of cases of structural mimicry at the interface, suggesting that this property is less generic than previously thought. Our results support the hypothesis that different proteins can interact with similar partners using alternate strategies, but do not support convergent evolution.

  15. Crotacetin, a novel snake venom C-type lectin, is homolog of convulxin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. Rádis-Baptista

    2005-12-01

    Full Text Available Snake venom (sv C-type lectins encompass a group of hemorrhagic toxins, which are able to interfere with hemostasis. They share significant similarity in their primary structures with C-type lectins of other animals, and also present a conserved carbohydrate recognition domain (CRD. A very well studied sv C-type lectin is the heterodimeric toxin, convulxin (CVX, from the venoms of South American rattlesnakes, Crotalus durissus terrificus and C. d. cascavella. It consists of two subunits, alfa (CVXalpha , 13.9 kDa and beta (CVXbeta , 12.6 kDa, joined by inter and intra-chain disulfide bounds, and is arranged in a tetrameric alpha4beta4 conformation. Convulxin is able to activate platelet and induce their aggregation by acting via p62/GPVI collagen receptor. Several cDNA precursors, homolog of CVX subunits, were cloned by PCR homology screening. As determined by computational analysis, one of them, named crotacetin beta subunit, was predicted as a polypeptide with a tridimensional conformation very similar to other subunits of convulxin-like snake toxins. Crotacetin was purified from C. durissus venoms by gel permeation and reverse phase high performance liquid chromatography. The heterodimeric crotacetin is expressed in the venoms of several C. durissus subspecies, but it is prevalent in the venom of C. durissus cascavella. As inferred from homology modeling, crotacetin induces platelet aggregation but noticeably exhibits antimicrobial activity against Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria.

  16. Resolving RAD51C function in late stages of homologous recombination

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kuznetsov Sergey G

    2007-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract DNA double strand breaks are efficiently repaired by homologous recombination. One of the last steps of this process is resolution of Holliday junctions that are formed at the sites of genetic exchange between homologous DNA. Although various resolvases with Holliday junctions processing activity have been identified in bacteriophages, bacteria and archaebacteria, eukaryotic resolvases have been elusive. Recent biochemical evidence has revealed that RAD51C and XRCC3, members of the RAD51-like protein family, are involved in Holliday junction resolution in mammalian cells. However, purified recombinant RAD51C and XRCC3 proteins have not shown any Holliday junction resolution activity. In addition, these proteins did not reveal the presence of a nuclease domain, which raises doubts about their ability to function as a resolvase. Furthermore, oocytes from infertile Rad51C mutant mice exhibit precocious separation of sister chromatids at metaphase II, a phenotype that reflects a defect in sister chromatid cohesion, not a lack of Holliday junction resolution. Here we discuss a model to explain how a Holliday junction resolution defect can lead to sister chromatid separation in mouse oocytes. We also describe other recent in vitro and in vivo evidence supporting a late role for RAD51C in homologous recombination in mammalian cells, which is likely to be resolution of the Holliday junction.

  17. Protein conformation and disease : pathological consequences of analogous mutations in homologous proteins.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stevens, F. J.; Pokkuluri, P. R.; Schiffer, M.; Biosciences Division

    2000-12-19

    The antibody light chain variable domain (V{sub L}){sup 1} and myelin protein zero (MPZ) are representatives of the functionally diverse immunoglobulin superfamily. The V{sub L} is a subunit of the antigen-binding component of antibodies, while MPZ is the major membrane-linked constituent of the myelin sheaths that coat peripheral nerves. Despite limited amino acid sequence homology, the conformations of the core structures of the two proteins are largely superimposable. Amino acid variations in V{sub L} account for various conformational disease outcomes, including amyloidosis. However, the specific amino acid changes in V{sub L} that are responsible for disease have been obscured by multiple concurrent primary structure alterations. Recently, certain demyelination disorders have been linked to point mutations and single amino acid polymorphisms in MPZ. We demonstrate here that some pathogenic variations in MPZ correspond to changes suspected of determining amyloidosis in V{sub L}. This unanticipated observation suggests that studies of the biophysical origin of conformational disease in one member of a superfamily of homologous proteins may have implications throughout the superfamily. In some cases, findings may account for overt disease; in other cases, due to the natural repertoire of inherited polymorphisms, variations in a representative protein may predict subclinical impairment of homologous proteins.

  18. LEDGF (p75) promotes DNA-end resection and homologous recombination

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Daugaard, Mads; Baude, Annika; Fugger, Kasper

    2012-01-01

    ) by the homologous recombination repair pathway. Depletion of LEDGF impairs the recruitment of C-terminal binding protein interacting protein (CtIP) to DNA DSBs and the subsequent CtIP-dependent DNA-end resection. LEDGF is constitutively associated with chromatin through its Pro-Trp-Trp-Pro (PWWP) domain that binds......Lens epithelium-derived growth factor p75 splice variant (LEDGF) is a chromatin-binding protein known for its antiapoptotic activity and ability to direct human immunodeficiency virus into active transcription units. Here we show that LEDGF promotes the repair of DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs...... preferentially to epigenetic methyl-lysine histone markers characteristic of active transcription units. LEDGF binds CtIP in a DNA damage-dependent manner, thereby enhancing its tethering to the active chromatin and facilitating its access to DNA DSBs. These data highlight the role of PWWP-domain proteins in DNA...

  19. Specific interactions outside the proline-rich core of two classes of Src homology 3 ligands.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feng, S; Kasahara, C; Rickles, R J; Schreiber, S L

    1995-01-01

    Two dodecapeptides belonging to distinct classes of Src homology 3 (SH3) ligands and selected from biased phage display libraries were used to investigate interactions between a specificity pocket in the Src SH3 domain and ligant residues flanking the proline-rich core. The solution structures of c-Src SH3 complexed with these peptides were solved by NMR. In addition to proline-rich, polyproline type II helix-forming core, the class I and II ligands each possesses a flanking sequence that occupies a large pocket between the RT and n-Src loops of the SH3 domain. Structural and mutational analyses illustrate how the two classes of SH3 ligands exploit a specificity pocket on the receptor differently to increase binding affinity and specificity. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 2 Fig. 3 Fig. 4 Fig. 5 Fig. 6 Fig. 7 PMID:8618911

  20. Complete Cohomologies and Some Homological Invariants

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Javad Asadollahi; Shokrollah Salarian

    2007-01-01

    There is a complete cohomology theory developed over a commutative noetherian ring in which injectives take the role of projectives in Vogel's construction of complete cohomology theory. We study the interaction between this complete cohomology, that is referred to as I-complete cohomology, and Vogel's one and give some sufficient conditions for their equivalence. Using I-complete functors, we assign a new homological invariant to any finitely generated module over an arbitrary commutative noetherian local ring,that would generalize Auslander's delta invariant. We generalize the results about the δ-invariant to arbitrary rings and give a sufficient condition for the vanishing of this new invariant. We also introduce an analogue of the notion of the index of a Gorenstein local ring, introduced by Auslander, for arbitrary local rings and study its behavior under flat extensions of local rings. Finally, we study the connection between the index and Loewy length of a local ring and generalize the main result of [11] to arbitrary rings.

  1. Altering symplectic manifolds by homologous recombination

    CERN Document Server

    Abouzaid, Mohammed

    2010-01-01

    We use symplectic cohomology to study the non-uniqueness of symplectic structures on the smooth manifolds underlying affine varieties. Starting with a Lefschetz fibration on such a variety and a finite set of primes, the main new tool is a method, which we call homologous recombination, for constructing a Lefschetz fibration whose total space is smoothly equivalent to the original variety, but for which symplectic cohomology with coefficients in the given set of primes vanishes (there is also a simpler version that kills symplectic cohomology completely). Rather than relying on a geometric analysis of periodic orbits of a flow, the computation of symplectic cohomology depends on describing the Fukaya category associated to the new fibration. As a consequence we use a result of McLean to prove, for example, that an affine variety of real dimension greater than or equal to 4 supports infinitely many different (Wein)stein structures of finite type, and, assuming a mild cohomological condition, uncountably many d...

  2. Precise genome editing by homologous recombination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoshijima, K; Jurynec, M J; Grunwald, D J

    2016-01-01

    Simple and efficient methods are presented for creating precise modifications of the zebrafish genome. Edited alleles are generated by homologous recombination between the host genome and double-stranded DNA (dsDNA) donor molecules, stimulated by the induction of double-strand breaks at targeted loci in the host genome. Because several kilobase-long tracts of sequence can be exchanged, multiple genome modifications can be generated simultaneously at a single locus. Methods are described for creating: (1) alleles with simple sequence changes or in-frame additions, (2) knockin/knockout alleles that express a reporter protein from an endogenous locus, and (3) conditional alleles in which exons are flanked by recombinogenic loxP sites. Significantly, our approach to genome editing allows the incorporation of a linked reporter gene into the donor sequences so that successfully edited alleles can be identified by virtue of expression of the reporter. Factors affecting the efficiency of genome editing are discussed, including the finding that dsDNA products of I-SceI meganuclease enzyme digestion are particularly effective as donor molecules for gene-editing events. Reagents and procedures are described for accomplishing efficient genome editing in the zebrafish.

  3. The Causes of Quasi-homologous CMEs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Lijuan; Wang, Yuming; Liu, Rui; Zhou, Zhenjun; Temmer, M.; Thalmann, J. K.; Liu, Jiajia; Liu, Kai; Shen, Chenglong; Zhang, Quanhao; Veronig, A. M.

    2017-08-01

    In this paper, we identified the magnetic source locations of 142 quasi-homologous (QH) coronal mass ejections (CMEs), of which 121 are from solar cycle (SC) 23 and 21 from SC 24. Among those CMEs, 63% originated from the same source location as their predecessor (defined as S-type), while 37% originated from a different location within the same active region as their predecessor (defined as D-type). Their distinctly different waiting time distributions, peaking around 7.5 and 1.5 hr for S- and D-type CMEs, suggest that they might involve different physical mechanisms with different characteristic timescales. Through detailed analysis based on nonlinear force-free coronal magnetic field modeling of two exemplary cases, we propose that the S-type QH CMES might involve a recurring energy release process from the same source location (by magnetic free energy replenishment), whereas the D-type QH CMEs can happen when a flux tube system is disturbed by a nearby CME.

  4. Regulation of homologous recombination at telomeres in budding yeast

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Eckert-Boulet, Nadine; Lisby, Michael

    2010-01-01

    Homologous recombination is suppressed at normal length telomere sequences. In contrast, telomere recombination is allowed when telomeres erode in the absence of telomerase activity or as a consequence of nucleolytic degradation or incomplete replication. Here, we review the mechanisms...... that contribute to regulating mitotic homologous recombination at telomeres and the role of these mechanisms in signalling short telomeres in the budding yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae....

  5. CBH1 homologs and varian CBH1 cellulase

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Goedegebuur, Frits; Gualfetti, Peter; Mitchinson, Colin; Neefe, Paulien

    2014-07-01

    Disclosed are a number of homologs and variants of Hypocrea jecorina Cel7A (formerly Trichoderma reesei cellobiohydrolase I or CBH1), nucleic acids encoding the same and methods for producing the same. The homologs and variant cellulases have the amino acid sequence of a glycosyl hydrolase of family 7A wherein one or more amino acid residues are substituted and/or deleted.

  6. CBH1 homologs and varian CBH1 cellulase

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goedegebuur, Frits; Gualfetti, Peter; Mitchinson, Colin; Neefe, Paulien

    2014-07-01

    Disclosed are a number of homologs and variants of Hypocrea jecorina Cel7A (formerly Trichoderma reesei cellobiohydrolase I or CBH1), nucleic acids encoding the same and methods for producing the same. The homologs and variant cellulases have the amino acid sequence of a glycosyl hydrolase of family 7A wherein one or more amino acid residues are substituted and/or deleted.

  7. Dynamic protein assemblies in homologous recombination with single DNA molecules

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Heijden, A.H.

    2007-01-01

    What happens when your DNA breaks? This thesis describes experimental work on the single-molecule level focusing on the interaction between DNA and DNA-repair proteins, in particular bacterial RecA and human Rad51, involved in homologous recombination. Homologous recombination and its central event

  8. [DNA homology in various strains of nitrogen-fixing bacteria].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vardevanian, P O; Minasbekian, L A; Parsadanian, M A

    2000-01-01

    Melting temperature and GC content were evaluated for DNA of some nitrogen-fixing bacteria of Rhizobium leguminosarum and Onobrychis spp. (Adans). The degree of homology between strains of the same species was determined. A combination of thermal denaturing and molecular hybridization can serve as a rapid test for evaluating the genome homology of the organisms compared.

  9. About the globular homology of higher dimensional automata

    OpenAIRE

    Gaucher, Philippe

    2000-01-01

    We introduce a new simplicial nerve of higher dimensional automata whose homology groups yield a new definition of the globular homology. With this new definition, the drawbacks noticed with the construction of math.CT/9902151 disappear. Moreover the important morphisms which associate to every globe its corresponding branching area and merging area of execution paths become morphisms of simplicial sets.

  10. Computability of Homology for Compact Absolute Neighbourhood Retracts

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    P.J. Collins (Pieter); A. Bauer; P. Hertling; K.-I. Ko

    2009-01-01

    textabstractIn this note we discuss the information needed to compute the homology groups of a topological space. We argue that the natural class of spaces to consider are the compact absolute neighbourhood retracts, since for these spaces the homology groups are finite. We show that we need to

  11. Molecular Phylogenetics and the Perennial Problem of Homology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Inkpen, S Andrew; Doolittle, W Ford

    2016-12-01

    The concept of homology has a long history, during much of which the issue has been how to reconcile similarity and common descent when these are not coextensive. Although thinking molecular phylogeneticists have learned not to say "percent homology," the problems are deeper than that and unresolved.

  12. The tedious task of finding homologous noncoding RNA genes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Menzel, Karl Peter; Gorodkin, Jan; Stadler, Peter F

    2009-01-01

    : BLAST still works better or equally good as other methods unless extensive expert knowledge on the RNA family is included. However, when good curated data are available the recent development yields further improvements in finding remote homologs. Homology search beyond the reach of BLAST hence...

  13. Stringent homology-based prediction of H. sapiens-M. tuberculosis H37Rv protein-protein interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Hufeng; Gao, Shangzhi; Nguyen, Nam Ninh; Fan, Mengyuan; Jin, Jingjing; Liu, Bing; Zhao, Liang; Xiong, Geng; Tan, Min; Li, Shijun; Wong, Limsoon

    2014-04-08

    H. sapiens-M. tuberculosis H37Rv protein-protein interaction (PPI) data are essential for understanding the infection mechanism of the formidable pathogen M. tuberculosis H37Rv. Computational prediction is an important strategy to fill the gap in experimental H. sapiens-M. tuberculosis H37Rv PPI data. Homology-based prediction is frequently used in predicting both intra-species and inter-species PPIs. However, some limitations are not properly resolved in several published works that predict eukaryote-prokaryote inter-species PPIs using intra-species template PPIs. We develop a stringent homology-based prediction approach by taking into account (i) differences between eukaryotic and prokaryotic proteins and (ii) differences between inter-species and intra-species PPI interfaces. We compare our stringent homology-based approach to a conventional homology-based approach for predicting host-pathogen PPIs, based on cellular compartment distribution analysis, disease gene list enrichment analysis, pathway enrichment analysis and functional category enrichment analysis. These analyses support the validity of our prediction result, and clearly show that our approach has better performance in predicting H. sapiens-M. tuberculosis H37Rv PPIs. Using our stringent homology-based approach, we have predicted a set of highly plausible H. sapiens-M. tuberculosis H37Rv PPIs which might be useful for many of related studies. Based on our analysis of the H. sapiens-M. tuberculosis H37Rv PPI network predicted by our stringent homology-based approach, we have discovered several interesting properties which are reported here for the first time. We find that both host proteins and pathogen proteins involved in the host-pathogen PPIs tend to be hubs in their own intra-species PPI network. Also, both host and pathogen proteins involved in host-pathogen PPIs tend to have longer primary sequence, tend to have more domains, tend to be more hydrophilic, etc. And the protein domains from both

  14. Remarks on Khovanov Homology and the Potts Model

    CERN Document Server

    Kauffman, Louis H

    2009-01-01

    This paper is about Khovanov homology and its relationships with statistical mechanics models such as the Ising model and the Potts model. The paper gives a relatively self-contained introduction to Khovanov homology, and also to a reformulation of the Potts model in terms of a bracket state sum expansion on a knot diagram K(G) related to a planar graph G via the medial construction. We consider the original Khovanov homology and also the homology defined by Stosic via the dichromatic polynomial, and examine those values of the Potts model where the partition function can be expressed in terms of homological Euler characteristics. These points occur at imaginary temperature, and consequences of this phenomenon will be studied in subsequent work. This paper is dedicated to Oleg Viro on his 60-th birthday.

  15. DNA strand exchange and RecA homologs in meiosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, M Scott; Bishop, Douglas K

    2014-12-04

    Homology search and DNA strand-exchange reactions are central to homologous recombination in meiosis. During meiosis, these processes are regulated such that the probability of choosing a homolog chromatid as recombination partner is enhanced relative to that of choosing a sister chromatid. This regulatory process occurs as homologous chromosomes pair in preparation for assembly of the synaptonemal complex. Two strand-exchange proteins, Rad51 and Dmc1, cooperate in regulated homology search and strand exchange in most organisms. Here, we summarize studies on the properties of these two proteins and their accessory factors. In addition, we review current models for the assembly of meiotic strand-exchange complexes and the possible mechanisms through which the interhomolog bias of recombination partner choice is achieved.

  16. The Tomato FRUITFULL Homologs TDR4/FUL1 and MBP7/FUL2 Regulate Ethylene-Independent Aspects of Fruit Ripening

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bemer, M.; Karlova, R.B.; Ballester, A.R.; Tikunov, Y.M.; Bovy, A.G.; Wolters-Arts, M.; Barros Rossetto, de P.; Angenent, G.C.; Maagd, de R.A.

    2012-01-01

    Tomato (Solanum lycopersicum) contains two close homologs of the Arabidopsis thaliana MADS domain transcription factor FRUITFULL (FUL), FUL1 (previously called TDR4) and FUL2 (previously MBP7). Both proteins interact with the ripening regulator RIPENING INHIBITOR (RIN) and are expressed during fruit

  17. Loss of collectrin, an angiotensin-converting enzyme 2 homolog, uncouples endothelial nitric oxide synthase and causes hypertension and vascular dysfunction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cechova, Sylvia; Zeng, Qing; Billaud, Marie

    2013-01-01

    Collectrin is an orphan member of the renin-angiotensin system and is a homolog of angiotensin-converting enzyme 2, sharing ≈50% sequence identity. Unlike angiotensin-converting enzyme 2, collectrin lacks any catalytic domain. Collectrin has been shown to function as a chaperone of amino acid tra...

  18. Domains via Graphs

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANG Guoqiang; CHEN Yixiang

    2001-01-01

    This paper provides a concrete and simple introduction to two pillars of domain theory: (1) solving recursive domain equations, and (2) universal and saturated domains. Our exposition combines Larsen and Winskel's idea on solving domain equations using information systems with Girard's idea of stable domain theory in the form of coherence spaces, or graphs.Detailed constructions are given for universal and even homogeneous objects in two categories of graphs: one representing binary complete, prime algebraic domains with complete primes covering the bottom; the other representing ω-algebraic, prime algebraic lattices. The backand-forth argument in model theory helps to enlighten the constructions.

  19. PhEDEx Data Service

    CERN Document Server

    Egeland, Ricky; Huang, Chih-Hao

    2009-01-01

    The PhEDEx Data Service provides access to information from the central PhEDEx database, as well as certificate-authenticated managerial operations such as requesting the transfer or deletion of data. The Data Service is integrated with the SiteDB service for fine-grained access control, providing a safe and secure environment for operations. A plug-in architecture allows server-side modules to be developed rapidly and easily by anyone familiar with the schema, and can automatically return the data in a variety of formats for use by different client technologies. Using HTTP access via the Data Service instead of direct database connections makes it possible to build monitoring web-pages with complex drill-down operations, suitable for debugging or presentation from many aspects. This will form the basis of the new PhEDEx website in the near future, as well as providing access to PhEDEx information and certificate-authenticated services for other CMS dataflow and workflow management tools such as CRAB, WMCore,...

  20. pH in Action

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tijskens, L.M.M.; Biekman, E.S.A.

    2001-01-01

    Based on fundamental chemical relations, well-established in chemical engineering and chemical technology over almost a century, the effects of pH in food and agricultural products will be deduced for different situations and processes. Based on simple equilibria and dissociation of water, salts, ac