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Sample records for homology ph domain

  1. Intrinsic Pleckstrin Homology (PH) Domain Motion in Phospholipase C-β Exposes a Gβγ Protein Binding Site*

    OpenAIRE

    Kadamur, Ganesh; Ross, Elliott M.

    2016-01-01

    Mammalian phospholipase C-β (PLC-β) isoforms are stimulated by heterotrimeric G protein subunits and members of the Rho GTPase family of small G proteins. Although recent structural studies showed how Gαq and Rac1 bind PLC-β, there is a lack of consensus regarding the Gβγ binding site in PLC-β. Using FRET between cerulean fluorescent protein-labeled Gβγ and the Alexa Fluor 594-labeled PLC-β pleckstrin homology (PH) domain, we demonstrate that the PH domain is the minimal Gβγ binding region in...

  2. Intrinsic Pleckstrin Homology (PH) Domain Motion in Phospholipase C-β Exposes a Gβγ Protein Binding Site*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kadamur, Ganesh

    2016-01-01

    Mammalian phospholipase C-β (PLC-β) isoforms are stimulated by heterotrimeric G protein subunits and members of the Rho GTPase family of small G proteins. Although recent structural studies showed how Gαq and Rac1 bind PLC-β, there is a lack of consensus regarding the Gβγ binding site in PLC-β. Using FRET between cerulean fluorescent protein-labeled Gβγ and the Alexa Fluor 594-labeled PLC-β pleckstrin homology (PH) domain, we demonstrate that the PH domain is the minimal Gβγ binding region in PLC-β3. We show that the isolated PH domain can compete with full-length PLC-β3 for binding Gβγ but not Gαq, Using sequence conservation, structural analyses, and mutagenesis, we identify a hydrophobic face of the PLC-β PH domain as the Gβγ binding interface. This PH domain surface is not solvent-exposed in crystal structures of PLC-β, necessitating conformational rearrangement to allow Gβγ binding. Blocking PH domain motion in PLC-β by cross-linking it to the EF hand domain inhibits stimulation by Gβγ without altering basal activity or Gαq response. The fraction of PLC-β cross-linked is proportional to the fractional loss of Gβγ response. Cross-linked PLC-β does not bind Gβγ in a FRET-based Gβγ-PLC-β binding assay. We propose that unliganded PLC-β exists in equilibrium between a closed conformation observed in crystal structures and an open conformation where the PH domain moves away from the EF hands. Therefore, intrinsic movement of the PH domain in PLC-β modulates Gβγ access to its binding site. PMID:27002154

  3. Intrinsic Pleckstrin Homology (PH) Domain Motion in Phospholipase C-β Exposes a Gβγ Protein Binding Site.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kadamur, Ganesh; Ross, Elliott M

    2016-05-20

    Mammalian phospholipase C-β (PLC-β) isoforms are stimulated by heterotrimeric G protein subunits and members of the Rho GTPase family of small G proteins. Although recent structural studies showed how Gαq and Rac1 bind PLC-β, there is a lack of consensus regarding the Gβγ binding site in PLC-β. Using FRET between cerulean fluorescent protein-labeled Gβγ and the Alexa Fluor 594-labeled PLC-β pleckstrin homology (PH) domain, we demonstrate that the PH domain is the minimal Gβγ binding region in PLC-β3. We show that the isolated PH domain can compete with full-length PLC-β3 for binding Gβγ but not Gαq, Using sequence conservation, structural analyses, and mutagenesis, we identify a hydrophobic face of the PLC-β PH domain as the Gβγ binding interface. This PH domain surface is not solvent-exposed in crystal structures of PLC-β, necessitating conformational rearrangement to allow Gβγ binding. Blocking PH domain motion in PLC-β by cross-linking it to the EF hand domain inhibits stimulation by Gβγ without altering basal activity or Gαq response. The fraction of PLC-β cross-linked is proportional to the fractional loss of Gβγ response. Cross-linked PLC-β does not bind Gβγ in a FRET-based Gβγ-PLC-β binding assay. We propose that unliganded PLC-β exists in equilibrium between a closed conformation observed in crystal structures and an open conformation where the PH domain moves away from the EF hands. Therefore, intrinsic movement of the PH domain in PLC-β modulates Gβγ access to its binding site. © 2016 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  4. Membrane and Protein Interactions of the Pleckstrin Homology Domain Superfamily

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    Marc Lenoir

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available The human genome encodes about 285 proteins that contain at least one annotated pleckstrin homology (PH domain. As the first phosphoinositide binding module domain to be discovered, the PH domain recruits diverse protein architectures to cellular membranes. PH domains constitute one of the largest protein superfamilies, and have diverged to regulate many different signaling proteins and modules such as Dbl homology (DH and Tec homology (TH domains. The ligands of approximately 70 PH domains have been validated by binding assays and complexed structures, allowing meaningful extrapolation across the entire superfamily. Here the Membrane Optimal Docking Area (MODA program is used at a genome-wide level to identify all membrane docking PH structures and map their lipid-binding determinants. In addition to the linear sequence motifs which are employed for phosphoinositide recognition, the three dimensional structural features that allow peripheral membrane domains to approach and insert into the bilayer are pinpointed and can be predicted ab initio. The analysis shows that conserved structural surfaces distinguish which PH domains associate with membrane from those that do not. Moreover, the results indicate that lipid-binding PH domains can be classified into different functional subgroups based on the type of membrane insertion elements they project towards the bilayer.

  5. Membrane and Protein Interactions of the Pleckstrin Homology Domain Superfamily.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lenoir, Marc; Kufareva, Irina; Abagyan, Ruben; Overduin, Michael

    2015-10-23

    The human genome encodes about 285 proteins that contain at least one annotated pleckstrin homology (PH) domain. As the first phosphoinositide binding module domain to be discovered, the PH domain recruits diverse protein architectures to cellular membranes. PH domains constitute one of the largest protein superfamilies, and have diverged to regulate many different signaling proteins and modules such as Dbl homology (DH) and Tec homology (TH) domains. The ligands of approximately 70 PH domains have been validated by binding assays and complexed structures, allowing meaningful extrapolation across the entire superfamily. Here the Membrane Optimal Docking Area (MODA) program is used at a genome-wide level to identify all membrane docking PH structures and map their lipid-binding determinants. In addition to the linear sequence motifs which are employed for phosphoinositide recognition, the three dimensional structural features that allow peripheral membrane domains to approach and insert into the bilayer are pinpointed and can be predicted ab initio. The analysis shows that conserved structural surfaces distinguish which PH domains associate with membrane from those that do not. Moreover, the results indicate that lipid-binding PH domains can be classified into different functional subgroups based on the type of membrane insertion elements they project towards the bilayer.

  6. Pleckstrin Homology Domain Diffusion in Dictyostelium Cytoplasm Studied Using Fluorescence Correlation Spectroscopy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Engel, Ruchira; Hink, Mark A.; Bosgraaf, Leonard; Haastert, Peter J.M. van; Visser, Antonie J.W.G.

    2004-01-01

    The translocation of pleckstrin homology (PH) domain-containing proteins from the cytoplasm to the plasma membrane plays an important role in the chemotaxis mechanism of Dictyostelium cells. The diffusion of three PH domain-green fluorescent protein (GFP) fusions (PH2-GFP, PH10-GFP, and PH-CRAC

  7. Pleckstrin homology domain diffusion in Dictyostelium cytoplasm studied using fluorescence correlation spectroscopy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ruchira, A.; Hink, M.A.; Bosgraaf, L.; Haastert, van P.J.M.; Visser, A.J.W.G.

    2004-01-01

    The translocation of pleckstrin homology (PH) domain-containing proteins from the cytoplasm to the plasma membrane plays an important role in the chemotaxis mechanism of Dictyostelium cells. The diffusion of three PH domain-green fluorescent protein (GFP) fusions (PH2-GFP, PH10-GFP, and PH-CRAC

  8. Modes of Interaction of Pleckstrin Homology Domains with Membranes: Toward a Computational Biochemistry of Membrane Recognition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naughton, Fiona B; Kalli, Antreas C; Sansom, Mark S P

    2018-02-02

    Pleckstrin homology (PH) domains mediate protein-membrane interactions by binding to phosphatidylinositol phosphate (PIP) molecules. The structural and energetic basis of selective PH-PIP interactions is central to understanding many cellular processes, yet the molecular complexities of the PH-PIP interactions are largely unknown. Molecular dynamics simulations using a coarse-grained model enables estimation of free-energy landscapes for the interactions of 12 different PH domains with membranes containing PIP 2 or PIP 3 , allowing us to obtain a detailed molecular energetic understanding of the complexities of the interactions of the PH domains with PIP molecules in membranes. Distinct binding modes, corresponding to different distributions of cationic residues on the PH domain, were observed, involving PIP interactions at either the "canonical" (C) and/or "alternate" (A) sites. PH domains can be grouped by the relative strength of their C- and A-site interactions, revealing that a higher affinity correlates with increased C-site interactions. These simulations demonstrate that simultaneous binding of multiple PIP molecules by PH domains contributes to high-affinity membrane interactions, informing our understanding of membrane recognition by PH domains in vivo. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  9. The insulin receptor substrate (IRS)-1 pleckstrin homology domain functions in downstream signaling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vainshtein, I; Kovacina, K S; Roth, R A

    2001-03-16

    The pleckstrin homology (PH) domain of the insulin receptor substrate-1 (IRS-1) plays a role in directing this molecule to the insulin receptor, thereby regulating its tyrosine phosphorylation. In this work, the role of the PH domain in subsequent signaling was studied by constructing constitutively active forms of IRS-1 in which the inter-SH2 domain of the p85 subunit of phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase was fused to portions of the IRS-1 molecule. Chimeric molecules containing the PH domain were found to activate the downstream response of stimulating the Ser/Thr kinase Akt. A chimera containing point mutations in the PH domain that abolished the ability of this domain to bind phosphatidylinositol 4,5-bisphosphate prevented these molecules from activating Akt. These mutations also decreased by about 70% the amount of the constructs present in a particulate fraction of the cells. These results indicate that the PH domain of IRS-1, in addition to directing this protein to the receptor for tyrosine phosphorylation, functions in the ability of this molecule to stimulate subsequent responses. Thus, compromising the function of the PH domain, e.g. in insulin-resistant states, could decrease both the ability of IRS-1 to be tyrosine phosphorylated by the insulin receptor and to link to subsequent downstream targets.

  10. Novel functions of CCM1 delimit the relationship of PTB/PH domains.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Jun; Dubey, Pallavi; Padarti, Akhil; Zhang, Aileen; Patel, Rinkal; Patel, Vipulkumar; Cistola, David; Badr, Ahmed

    2017-10-01

    Three NPXY motifs and one FERM domain in CCM1 makes it a versatile scaffold protein for tethering the signaling components together within the CCM signaling complex (CSC). The cellular role of CCM1 protein remains inadequately expounded. Both phosphotyrosine binding (PTB) and pleckstrin homology (PH) domains were recognized as structurally related but functionally distinct domains. By utilizing molecular cloning, protein binding assays and RT-qPCR to identify novel cellular partners of CCM1 and its cellular expression patterns; by screening candidate PTB/PH proteins and subsequently structurally simulation in combining with current X-ray crystallography and NMR data to defined the essential structure of PTB/PH domain for NPXY-binding and the relationship among PTB, PH and FERM domain(s). We identified a group of 28 novel cellular partners of CCM1, all of which contain either PTB or PH domain(s), and developed a novel classification system for these PTB/PH proteins based on their relationship with different NPXY motifs of CCM1. Our results demonstrated that CCM1 has a wide spectrum of binding to different PTB/PH proteins and perpetuates their specificity to interact with certain PTB/PH domains through selective combination of three NPXY motifs. We also demonstrated that CCM1 can be assembled into oligomers through intermolecular interaction between its F3 lobe in FERM domain and one of the three NPXY motifs. Despite being embedded in FERM domain as F3 lobe, F3 module acts as a fully functional PH domain to interact with NPXY motif. The most salient feature of the study was that both PTB and PH domains are structurally and functionally comparable, suggesting that PTB domain is likely evolved from PH domain with polymorphic structural additions at its N-terminus. A new β1A-strand of the PTB domain was discovered and new minimum structural requirement of PTB/PH domain for NPXY motif-binding was determined. Based on our data, a novel theory of structure, function and

  11. Chemical Shift Assignments of the C-terminal Eps15 Homology Domain-3 EH Domain*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caplan, Steve; Sorgen, Paul L.

    2013-01-01

    The C-terminal Eps15 homology (EH) domain 3 (EHD3) belongs to a eukaryotic family of endocytic regulatory proteins and is involved in the recycling of various receptors from the early endosome to the endocytic recycling compartment or in retrograde transport from the endosomes to the Golgi. EH domains are highly conserved in the EHD family and function as protein-protein interaction units that bind to Asn-Pro-Phe (NPF) motif-containing proteins. The EH domain of EHD1 was the first C-terminal EH domain from the EHD family to be solved by NMR. The differences observed between this domain and proteins with N-terminal EH domains helped describe a mechanism for the differential binding of NPF-containing proteins. Here, structural studies were expanded to include the EHD3 EH domain. While the EHD1 and EHD3 EH domains are highly homologous, they have different protein partners. A comparison of these structures will help determine the selectivity in protein binding between the EHD family members and lead to a better understanding of their unique roles in endocytic regulation. PMID:23754701

  12. Interaction between the PH and START domains of ceramide transfer protein competes with phosphatidylinositol 4-phosphate binding by the PH domain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prashek, Jennifer; Bouyain, Samuel; Fu, Mingui; Li, Yong; Berkes, Dusan; Yao, Xiaolan

    2017-08-25

    De novo synthesis of the sphingolipid sphingomyelin requires non-vesicular transport of ceramide from the endoplasmic reticulum to the Golgi by the multidomain protein ceramide transfer protein (CERT). CERT's N-terminal pleckstrin homology (PH) domain targets it to the Golgi by binding to phosphatidylinositol 4-phosphate (PtdIns(4)P) in the Golgi membrane, whereas its C-terminal StAR-related lipid transfer domain (START) carries out ceramide transfer. Hyperphosphorylation of a serine-rich motif immediately after the PH domain decreases both PtdIns(4)P binding and ceramide transfer by CERT. This down-regulation requires both the PH and START domains, suggesting a possible inhibitory interaction between the two domains. In this study we show that isolated PH and START domains interact with each other. The crystal structure of a PH-START complex revealed that the START domain binds to the PH domain at the same site for PtdIns(4)P-binding, suggesting that the START domain competes with PtdIns(4)P for association with the PH domain. We further report that mutations disrupting the PH-START interaction increase both PtdIns(4)P-binding affinity and ceramide transfer activity of a CERT-serine-rich phosphorylation mimic. We also found that these mutations increase the Golgi localization of CERT inside the cell, consistent with enhanced PtdIns(4)P binding of the mutant. Collectively, our structural, biochemical, and cellular investigations provide important structural insight into the regulation of CERT function and localization. © 2017 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  13. Novel inhibitors induce large conformational changes of GAB1 pleckstrin homology domain and kill breast cancer cells.

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    Lu Chen

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The Grb2-associated binding protein 1 (GAB1 integrates signals from different signaling pathways and is over-expressed in many cancers, therefore representing a new therapeutic target. In the present study, we aim to target the pleckstrin homology (PH domain of GAB1 for cancer treatment. Using homology models we derived, high-throughput virtual screening of five million compounds resulted in five hits which exhibited strong binding affinities to GAB1 PH domain. Our prediction of ligand binding affinities is also in agreement with the experimental KD values. Furthermore, molecular dynamics studies showed that GAB1 PH domain underwent large conformational changes upon ligand binding. Moreover, these hits inhibited the phosphorylation of GAB1 and demonstrated potent, tumor-specific cytotoxicity against MDA-MB-231 and T47D breast cancer cell lines. This effort represents the discovery of first-in-class GAB1 PH domain inhibitors with potential for targeted breast cancer therapy and provides novel insights into structure-based approaches to targeting this protein.

  14. Akt1 binds focal adhesion kinase via the Akt1 kinase domain independently of the pleckstrin homology domain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Basson, M D; Zeng, B; Wang, S

    2015-10-01

    Akt1 and focal adhesion kinase (FAK) are protein kinases that play key roles in normal cell signaling. Individually, aberrant expression of these kinases has been linked to a variety of cancers. Together, Akt1/FAK interactions facilitate cancer metastasis by increasing cell adhesion under conditions of increased extracellular pressure. Pathological and iatrogenic sources of pressure arise from tumor growth against constraining stroma or direct perioperative manipulation. We previously reported that 15 mmHg increased extracellular pressure causes Akt1 to both directly interact with FAK and to phosphorylate and activate it. We investigated the nature of the Akt1/FAK binding by creating truncations of recombinant FAK, conjugated to glutathione S-transferase (GST), to pull down full-length Akt1. Western blots probing for Akt1 showed that FAK/Akt1 binding persisted in FAK truncations consisting of only amino acids 1-126, FAK(NT1), which contains the F1 subdomain of its band 4.1, ezrin, radixin, and moesin (FERM) domain. Using FAK(NT1) as bait, we then pulled down truncated versions of recombinant Akt1 conjugated to HA (human influenza hemagglutinin). Probes for GST-FAK(NT1) showed Akt1-FAK binding to occur in the absence of the both the Akt1 (N)-terminal pleckstrin homology (PH) domain and its adjacent hinge region. The Akt1 (C)-terminal regulatory domain was equally unnecessary for Akt1/FAK co-immunoprecipitation. Truncations involving the Akt1 catalytic domain showed that the domain by itself was enough to pull down FAK. Additionally, a fragment spanning from the PH domain to half way through the catalytic domain demonstrated increased FAK binding compared to full length Akt1. These results begin to delineate the Akt1/FAK interaction and can be used to manipulate their force-activated signal interactions. Furthermore, the finding that the N-terminal half of the Akt1 catalytic domain binds so strongly to FAK when cleaved from the rest of the protein may suggest a means

  15. GRP1 PH Domain, Like AKT1 PH Domain, Possesses a Sentry Glutamate Residue Essential for Specific Targeting to Plasma Membrane PI(3,4,5)P3

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pilling, Carissa; Landgraf, Kyle E.; Falke, Joseph J.

    2011-01-01

    During the appearance of the signaling lipid PI(3,4,5)P3, an important subset of pleckstrin homology (PH) domains target signaling proteins to the plasma membrane. To ensure proper pathway regulation, such PI(3,4,5)P3-specific PH domains must exclude the more prevalant, constitutive plasma membrane lipid PI(4,5)P2 and bind the rare PI(3,4,5)P3 target lipid with sufficiently high affinity. Our previous study of the E17K mutant of protein kinase B (AKT1) PH domain, together with evidence from Carpten et al (1), revealed that the native AKT1 E17 residue serves as a sentry glutamate that excludes PI(4,5)P2, thereby playing an essential role in specific PI(3,4,5)P3 targeting (2). The sentry glutamate hypothesis proposes that an analogous sentry glutamate residue is a widespread feature of PI(3,4,5)P3-specific PH domains, and that charge reversal mutation at the sentry glutamate position will yield both increased PI(4,5)P2 affinity and constitutive plasma membrane targeting. To test this hypothesis the present study investigates the E345 residue, a putative sentry glutamate, of General Receptor for Phosphoinositides 1 (GRP1) PH domain. The results show that incorporation of the E345K charge reversal mutation into GRP1 PH domain enhances PI(4,5)P2 affinity 8-fold and yields constitutive plasma membrane targeting in cells, reminiscent of the effects of the E17K mutation in AKT1 PH domain. Hydrolysis of plasma membrane PI(4,5)P2 releases E345K GRP1 PH domain into the cytoplasm and the efficiency of this release increases when target Arf6 binding is disrupted. Overall, the findings provide strong support for the sentry glutamate hypothesis and suggest that the GRP1 E345K mutation will be linked to changes in cell physiology and human pathologies, as demonstrated for AKT1 E17K (1, 3). Analysis of available PH domain structures suggests that a lone glutamate residue (or, in some cases an aspartate) is a common, perhaps ubiquitous, feature of PI(3,4,5)P3-specific binding

  16. Sequence homolog-based molecular engineering for shifting the enzymatic pH optimum

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    Fuqiang Ma

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Cell-free synthetic biology system organizes multiple enzymes (parts from different sources to implement unnatural catalytic functions. Highly adaption between the catalytic parts is crucial for building up efficient artificial biosynthetic systems. Protein engineering is a powerful technology to tailor various enzymatic properties including catalytic efficiency, substrate specificity, temperature adaptation and even achieve new catalytic functions. However, altering enzymatic pH optimum still remains a challenging task. In this study, we proposed a novel sequence homolog-based protein engineering strategy for shifting the enzymatic pH optimum based on statistical analyses of sequence-function relationship data of enzyme family. By two statistical procedures, artificial neural networks (ANNs and least absolute shrinkage and selection operator (Lasso, five amino acids in GH11 xylanase family were identified to be related to the evolution of enzymatic pH optimum. Site-directed mutagenesis of a thermophilic xylanase from Caldicellulosiruptor bescii revealed that four out of five mutations could alter the enzymatic pH optima toward acidic condition without compromising the catalytic activity and thermostability. Combination of the positive mutants resulted in the best mutant M31 that decreased its pH optimum for 1.5 units and showed increased catalytic activity at pH < 5.0 compared to the wild-type enzyme. Structure analysis revealed that all the mutations are distant from the active center, which may be difficult to be identified by conventional rational design strategy. Interestingly, the four mutation sites are clustered at a certain region of the enzyme, suggesting a potential “hot zone” for regulating the pH optima of xylanases. This study provides an efficient method of modulating enzymatic pH optima based on statistical sequence analyses, which can facilitate the design and optimization of suitable catalytic parts for the construction

  17. Multiscale Simulations Suggest a Mechanism for the Association of the Dok7 PH Domain with PIP-Containing Membranes.

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    Amanda Buyan

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Dok7 is a peripheral membrane protein that is associated with the MuSK receptor tyrosine kinase. Formation of the Dok7/MuSK/membrane complex is required for the activation of MuSK. This is a key step in the complex exchange of signals between neuron and muscle, which lead to neuromuscular junction formation, dysfunction of which is associated with congenital myasthenic syndromes. The Dok7 structure consists of a Pleckstrin Homology (PH domain and a Phosphotyrosine Binding (PTB domain. The mechanism of the Dok7 association with the membrane remains largely unknown. Using multi-scale molecular dynamics simulations we have explored the formation of the Dok7 PH/membrane complex. Our simulations indicate that the PH domain of Dok7 associates with membranes containing phosphatidylinositol phosphates (PIPs via interactions of the β1/β2, β3/β4, and β5/β6 loops, which together form a positively charged surface on the PH domain and interact with the negatively charged headgroups of PIP molecules. The initial encounter of the Dok7 PH domain is followed by formation of additional interactions with the lipid bilayer, and especially with PIP molecules, which stabilizes the Dok7 PH/membrane complex. We have quantified the binding of the PH domain to the model bilayers by calculating a density landscape for protein/membrane interactions. Detailed analysis of the PH/PIP interactions reveal both a canonical and an atypical site to be occupied by the anionic lipid. PH domain binding leads to local clustering of PIP molecules in the bilayer. Association of the Dok7 PH domain with PIP lipids is therefore seen as a key step in localization of Dok7 to the membrane and formation of a complex with MuSK.

  18. The crystal structures of EAP domains from Staphylococcus aureus reveal an unexpected homology to bacterial superantigens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geisbrecht, Brian V; Hamaoka, Brent Y; Perman, Benjamin; Zemla, Adam; Leahy, Daniel J

    2005-04-29

    The Eap (extracellular adherence protein) of Staphylococcus aureus functions as a secreted virulence factor by mediating interactions between the bacterial cell surface and several extracellular host proteins. Eap proteins from different Staphylococcal strains consist of four to six tandem repeats of a structurally uncharacterized domain (EAP domain). We have determined the three-dimensional structures of three different EAP domains to 1.8, 2.2, and 1.35 A resolution, respectively. These structures reveal a core fold that is comprised of an alpha-helix lying diagonally across a five-stranded, mixed beta-sheet. Comparison of EAP domains with known structures reveals an unexpected homology with the C-terminal domain of bacterial superantigens. Examination of the structure of the superantigen SEC2 bound to the beta-chain of a T-cell receptor suggests a possible ligand-binding site within the EAP domain (Fields, B. A., Malchiodi, E. L., Li, H., Ysern, X., Stauffacher, C. V., Schlievert, P. M., Karjalainen, K., and Mariuzza, R. (1996) Nature 384, 188-192). These results provide the first structural characterization of EAP domains, relate EAP domains to a large class of bacterial toxins, and will guide the design of future experiments to analyze EAP domain structure/function relationships.

  19. The PLAC1-homology region of the ZP domain is sufficient for protein polymerisation

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    Litscher Eveline S

    2006-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Hundreds of extracellular proteins polymerise into filaments and matrices by using zona pellucida (ZP domains. ZP domain proteins perform highly diverse functions, ranging from structural to receptorial, and mutations in their genes are responsible for a number of severe human diseases. Recently, PLAC1, Oosp1-3, Papillote and CG16798 proteins were identified that share sequence homology with the N-terminal half of the ZP domain (ZP-N, but not with its C-terminal half (ZP-C. The functional significance of this partial conservation is unknown. Results By exploiting a highly engineered bacterial strain, we expressed in soluble form the PLAC1-homology region of mammalian sperm receptor ZP3 as a fusion to maltose binding protein. Mass spectrometry showed that the 4 conserved Cys residues within the ZP-N moiety of the fusion protein adopt the same disulfide bond connectivity as in full-length native ZP3, indicating that it is correctly folded, and electron microscopy and biochemical analyses revealed that it assembles into filaments. Conclusion These findings provide a function for PLAC1-like proteins and, by showing that ZP-N is a biologically active folding unit, prompt a re-evaluation of the architecture of the ZP domain and its polymers. Furthermore, they suggest that ZP-C might play a regulatory role in the assembly of ZP domain protein complexes.

  20. The K Domain Mediates Homologous and Heterologous Interactions Between FLC and SVP Proteins of Brassica juncea

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    Ma Guanpeng

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available The transcription factors FLOWERING LOCUS C (FLC and SHORT VEGETATIVE PHASE (SVP can interact to form homologous and heterologous protein complexes that regulate flowering time in Brassica juncea Coss. (Mustard.Previous studies showed that protein interactions were mediated by the K domain, which contains the subdomains K1, K2 and K3. However, it remains unknown how the subdomains mediate the interactions between FLC and SVP. In the present study, we constructed several mutants of subdomains K1–K3 and investigated the mechanisms involved in the heterologous interaction of BjFLC/BjSVP and in the homologous interaction of BjFLC/BjFLC or BjSVP/BjSVP. Yeast two-hybrid and β-Galactosidase activity assays showed that the 19 amino acids of the K1 subdomain in BjSVP and the 17 amino acids of the K1 subdomain in BjFLC were functional subdomains that interact with each other to mediate hetero-dimerization. The heterologous interaction was enhanced by the K2 subdomain of BjSVP protein, but weakened by its interhelical domain L2. The heterologous interaction was also enhanced by the K2 subdomain of BjFLC protein, but weakened by its K3 subdomain. The homologous interaction of BjSVP was mediated by the full K-domain. However, the homologous interaction of BjFLC was regulated only by its K1 and weakened by its K2 and K3 subdomains. The results provided new insights into the interactions between FLC and SVP, which will be valuable for further studies on the molecular regulation mechanisms of the regulation of flowering time in B. juncea and other Brassicaceae.

  1. Purification, crystallization, small-angle X-ray scattering and preliminary X-ray diffraction analysis of the SH2 domain of the Csk-homologous kinase

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gunn, Natalie J.; Gorman, Michael A.; Dobson, Renwick C. J.; Parker, Michael W.; Mulhern, Terrence D.

    2011-01-01

    The Src-homology 2 (SH2) domain of Csk-family protein tyrosine kinases acts as a conformational switch to regulate their catalytic activity, which in turn promotes the inhibition of their proto-oncogenic targets, the Src-family kinases. Here, the expression, purification, small-angle X-ray scattering and preliminary diffraction analysis of the SH2 domain of the Csk-homologous kinase is reported. The C-terminal Src kinase (Csk) and Csk-homologous kinase (CHK) are endogenous inhibitors of the proto-oncogenic Src family of protein tyrosine kinases (SFKs). Phosphotyrosyl peptide binding to their Src-homology 2 (SH2) domains activates Csk and CHK, enhancing their ability to suppress SFK signalling; however, the detailed mechanistic basis of this activation event is unclear. The CHK SH2 was expressed in Escherichia coli and the purified protein was characterized as monomeric by synchrotron small-angle X-ray scattering in-line with size-exclusion chromatography. The CHK SH2 crystallized in 0.2 M sodium bromide, 0.1 M bis-Tris propane pH 6.5 and 20% polyethylene glycol 3350 and the best crystals diffracted to ∼1.6 Å resolution. The crystals belonged to space group P2, with unit-cell parameters a = 25.8, b = 34.6, c = 63.2 Å, β = 99.4°

  2. Evolution of Src Homology 2 (SH2) Domain to Recognize Sulfotyrosine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ju, Tong; Niu, Wei; Guo, Jiantao

    2016-09-16

    Protein tyrosine O-sulfation is considered as the most common type of post-translational tyrosine modification in nature and plays important roles in extracellular biomolecular interactions. To facilitate the mapping, biological study, and medicinal application of this type of post-translational modification, we seek to evolve a small protein scaffold that recognizes sulfotyrosine with high affinity. We focused our efforts on the engineering of the Src Homology 2 (SH2) domain, which represents the largest class of known phosphotyrosine-recognition domain in nature and has a highly evolvable binding pocket. By using phage display, we successfully engineered the SH2 domain to recognize sulfotyrosine with high affinity. The best mutant, SH2-60.1, displayed more than 1700 fold higher sulfotyrosine-binding affinity than that of the wild-type SH2 domain. We also demonstrated that the evolved SH2 domain mutants could be used to detect sulfoprotein levels on the cell surface. These evolved SH2 domain mutants can be potentially applied to the study of protein tyrosine O-sulfation with proper experimental designs.

  3. Finding a needle in a haystack: the role of electrostatics in target lipid recognition by PH domains.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Craig N Lumb

    Full Text Available Interactions between protein domains and lipid molecules play key roles in controlling cell membrane signalling and trafficking. The pleckstrin homology (PH domain is one of the most widespread, binding specifically to phosphatidylinositol phosphates (PIPs in cell membranes. PH domains must locate specific PIPs in the presence of a background of approximately 20% anionic lipids within the cytoplasmic leaflet of the plasma membrane. We investigate the mechanism of such recognition via a multiscale procedure combining Brownian dynamics (BD and molecular dynamics (MD simulations of the GRP1 PH domain interacting with phosphatidylinositol (3,4,5-trisphosphate (PI(3,4,5P₃. The interaction of GRP1-PH with PI(3,4,5P₃ in a zwitterionic bilayer is compared with the interaction in bilayers containing different levels of anionic 'decoy' lipids. BD simulations reveal both translational and orientational electrostatic steering of the PH domain towards the PI(3,4,5P₃-containing anionic bilayer surface. There is a payoff between non-PIP anionic lipids attracting the PH domain to the bilayer surface in a favourable orientation and their role as 'decoys', disrupting the interaction of GRP1-PH with the PI(3,4,5P₃ molecule. Significantly, approximately 20% anionic lipid in the cytoplasmic leaflet of the bilayer is nearly optimal to both enhance orientational steering and to localise GRP1-PH proximal to the surface of the membrane without sacrificing its ability to locate PI(3,4,5P₃ within the bilayer plane. Subsequent MD simulations reveal binding to PI(3,4,5P₃, forming protein-phosphate contacts comparable to those in X-ray structures. These studies demonstrate a computational framework which addresses lipid recognition within a cell membrane environment, offering a link between structural and cell biological characterisation.

  4. PH Domain-Arf G Protein Interactions Localize the Arf-GEF Steppke for Cleavage Furrow Regulation in Drosophila.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Donghoon M Lee

    Full Text Available The recruitment of GDP/GTP exchange factors (GEFs to specific subcellular sites dictates where they activate small G proteins for the regulation of various cellular processes. Cytohesins are a conserved family of plasma membrane GEFs for Arf small G proteins that regulate endocytosis. Analyses of mammalian cytohesins have identified a number of recruitment mechanisms for these multi-domain proteins, but the conservation and developmental roles for these mechanisms are unclear. Here, we report how the pleckstrin homology (PH domain of the Drosophila cytohesin Steppke affects its localization and activity at cleavage furrows of the early embryo. We found that the PH domain is necessary for Steppke furrow localization, and for it to regulate furrow structure. However, the PH domain was not sufficient for the localization. Next, we examined the role of conserved PH domain amino acid residues that are required for mammalian cytohesins to bind PIP3 or GTP-bound Arf G proteins. We confirmed that the Steppke PH domain preferentially binds PIP3 in vitro through a conserved mechanism. However, disruption of residues for PIP3 binding had no apparent effect on GFP-Steppke localization and effects. Rather, residues for binding to GTP-bound Arf G proteins made major contributions to this Steppke localization and activity. By analyzing GFP-tagged Arf and Arf-like small G proteins, we found that Arf1-GFP, Arf6-GFP and Arl4-GFP, but not Arf4-GFP, localized to furrows. However, analyses of embryos depleted of Arf1, Arf6 or Arl4 revealed either earlier defects than occur in embryos depleted of Steppke, or no detectable furrow defects, possibly because of redundancies, and thus it was difficult to assess how individual Arf small G proteins affect Steppke. Nonetheless, our data show that the Steppke PH domain and its conserved residues for binding to GTP-bound Arf G proteins have substantial effects on Steppke localization and activity in early Drosophila embryos.

  5. The GRP1 PH domain, like the AKT1 PH domain, possesses a sentry glutamate residue essential for specific targeting to plasma membrane PI(3,4,5)P(3).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pilling, Carissa; Landgraf, Kyle E; Falke, Joseph J

    2011-11-15

    During the appearance of the signaling lipid PI(3,4,5)P(3), an important subset of pleckstrin homology (PH) domains target signaling proteins to the plasma membrane. To ensure proper pathway regulation, such PI(3,4,5)P(3)-specific PH domains must exclude the more prevalant, constitutive plasma membrane lipid PI(4,5)P(2) and bind the rare PI(3,4,5)P(3) target lipid with sufficiently high affinity. Our previous study of the E17K mutant of the protein kinase B (AKT1) PH domain, together with evidence from Carpten et al. [Carpten, J. D., et al. (2007) Nature 448, 439-444], revealed that the native AKT1 E17 residue serves as a sentry glutamate that excludes PI(4,5)P(2), thereby playing an essential role in specific PI(3,4,5)P(3) targeting [Landgraf, K. E., et al. (2008) Biochemistry 47, 12260-12269]. The sentry glutamate hypothesis proposes that an analogous sentry glutamate residue is a widespread feature of PI(3,4,5)P(3)-specific PH domains, and that charge reversal mutation at the sentry glutamate position will yield both increased PI(4,5)P(2) affinity and constitutive plasma membrane targeting. To test this hypothesis, we investigated the E345 residue, a putative sentry glutamate, of the general receptor for phosphoinositides 1 (GRP1) PH domain. The results show that incorporation of the E345K charge reversal mutation into the GRP1 PH domain enhances PI(4,5)P(2) affinity 8-fold and yields constitutive plasma membrane targeting in cells, reminiscent of the effects of the E17K mutation in the AKT1 PH domain. Hydrolysis of plasma membrane PI(4,5)P(2) releases the E345K GRP1 PH domain into the cytoplasm, and the efficiency of this release increases when Arf6 binding is disrupted. Overall, the findings provide strong support for the sentry glutamate hypothesis and suggest that the GRP1 E345K mutation will be linked to changes in cell physiology and human pathologies, as demonstrated for AKT1 E17K [Carpten, J. D., et al. (2007) Nature 448, 439-444; Lindhurst, M. J., et al

  6. Evolution of pH buffers and water homeostasis in eukaryotes: homology between humans and Acanthamoeba proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baig, Abdul M; Zohaib, R; Tariq, S; Ahmad, H R

    2018-02-01

    This study intended to trace the evolution of acid-base buffers and water homeostasis in eukaryotes. Acanthamoeba castellanii  was selected as a model unicellular eukaryote for this purpose. Homologies of proteins involved in pH and water regulatory mechanisms at cellular levels were compared between humans and A. castellanii. Amino acid sequence homology, structural homology, 3D modeling and docking prediction were done to show the extent of similarities between carbonic anhydrase 1 (CA1), aquaporin (AQP), band-3 protein and H + pump. Experimental assays were done with acetazolamide (AZM), brinzolamide and mannitol to observe their effects on the trophozoites of  A. castellanii.  The human CA1, AQP, band-3 protein and H + -transport proteins revealed similar proteins in Acanthamoeba. Docking showed the binding of AZM on amoebal AQP-like proteins.  Acanthamoeba showed transient shape changes and encystation at differential doses of brinzolamide, mannitol and AZM.  Conclusion: Water and pH regulating adapter proteins in Acanthamoeba and humans show significant homology, these mechanisms evolved early in the primitive unicellular eukaryotes and have remained conserved in multicellular eukaryotes.

  7. Aquilegia B gene homologs promote petaloidy of the sepals and maintenance of the C domain boundary

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bharti Sharma

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The model Aquilegia coerulea x “Origami” possesses several interesting floral features, including petaloid sepals that are morphologically distinct from the true petals and a broad domain containing many whorls of stamens. We undertook the current study in an effort to understand the former trait, but additionally uncovered data that inform on the latter. The Aquilegia B gene homolog AqPI is shown to contribute to the production of anthocyanin in the first whorl sepals, although it has no major role in their morphology. Surprisingly, knockdown of AqPI in Aquilegia coerulea x “Origami” also reveals a role for the B class genes in maintaining the expression of the C gene homolog AqAG1 in the outer whorls of stamens. These findings suggest that the transference of pollinator function to the first whorl sepals included a non-homeotic recruitment of the B class genes to promote aspects of petaloidy. They also confirm results in several other Ranunculales that have revealed an unexpected regulatory connection between the B and C class genes.

  8. Determination and validation of mTOR kinase-domain 3D structure by homology modeling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lakhlili W

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Wiame Lakhlili,1 Gwénaël Chevé,2 Abdelaziz Yasri,2 Azeddine Ibrahimi1 1Laboratoire de Biotechnologie (MedBiotech, Faculté de Médecine et de Pharmacie de Rabat, Université Mohammed V de Rabat, Rabat, Morroco; 2OriBase Pharma, Cap Gamma, Parc Euromédecine, Montpellier, France Abstract: The AKT/mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR pathway is considered as one of the commonly activated and deregulated signaling pathways in human cancer. mTOR is associated with other proteins in two molecular complexes: mTOR complex 1/Raptor and the mTOR complex 2/Rictor. Using the crystal structure of the related lipid kinase PI3Kγ, we built a model of the catalytic region of mTOR. The modeling of the three-dimensional (3D structure of the mTOR was performed by homology modeling program SWISS-MODEL. The quality and validation of the obtained model were performed using PROCHECK and PROVE softwares. The overall stereochemical property of the protein was assessed by the Ramachandran plot. The model validation was also done by docking of known inhibitors. In this paper, we describe and validate a 3D model for the mTOR catalytic site.Keywords: mTOR, homology modeling, mTOR kinase-domain, docking

  9. A snapshot of the physical and functional wiring of the Eps15 homology domain network in the nematode

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tsushima, Hanako; Malabarba, Maria Grazia; Confalonieri, Stefano

    2013-01-01

    Protein interaction modules coordinate the connections within and the activity of intracellular signaling networks. The Eps15 Homology (EH) module, a protein-protein interaction domain that is a key feature of the EH-network, was originally identified in a few proteins involved in endocytosis and...

  10. Membrane docking geometry of GRP1 PH domain bound to a target lipid bilayer: an EPR site-directed spin-labeling and relaxation study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Huai-Chun Chen

    Full Text Available The second messenger lipid PIP(3 (phosphatidylinositol-3,4,5-trisphosphate is generated by the lipid kinase PI3K (phosphoinositide-3-kinase in the inner leaflet of the plasma membrane, where it regulates a broad array of cell processes by recruiting multiple signaling proteins containing PIP(3-specific pleckstrin homology (PH domains to the membrane surface. Despite the broad importance of PIP(3-specific PH domains, the membrane docking geometry of a PH domain bound to its target PIP(3 lipid on a bilayer surface has not yet been experimentally determined. The present study employs EPR site-directed spin labeling and relaxation methods to elucidate the membrane docking geometry of GRP1 PH domain bound to bilayer-embedded PIP(3. The model target bilayer contains the neutral background lipid PC and both essential targeting lipids: (i PIP(3 target lipid that provides specificity and affinity, and (ii PS facilitator lipid that enhances the PIP(3 on-rate via an electrostatic search mechanism. The EPR approach measures membrane depth parameters for 18 function-retaining spin labels coupled to the PH domain, and for calibration spin labels coupled to phospholipids. The resulting depth parameters, together with the known high resolution structure of the co-complex between GRP1 PH domain and the PIP(3 headgroup, provide sufficient constraints to define an optimized, self-consistent membrane docking geometry. In this optimized geometry the PH domain engulfs the PIP(3 headgroup with minimal bilayer penetration, yielding the shallowest membrane position yet described for a lipid binding domain. This binding interaction displaces the PIP(3 headgroup from its lowest energy position and orientation in the bilayer, but the headgroup remains within its energetically accessible depth and angular ranges. Finally, the optimized docking geometry explains previous biophysical findings including mutations observed to disrupt membrane binding, and the rapid lateral

  11. Myosin-1A Targets to Microvilli Using Multiple Membrane Binding Motifs in the Tail Homology 1 (TH1) Domain*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mazerik, Jessica N.; Tyska, Matthew J.

    2012-01-01

    One of the most abundant components of the enterocyte brush border is the actin-based monomeric motor, myosin-1a (Myo1a). Within brush border microvilli, Myo1a carries out a number of critical functions at the interface between membrane and actin cytoskeleton. Proper physiological function of Myo1a depends on its ability to bind to microvillar membrane, an interaction mediated by a C-terminal tail homology 1 (TH1) domain. However, little is known about the mechanistic details of the Myo1a-TH1/membrane interaction. Structure-function analysis of Myo1a-TH1 targeting in epithelial cells revealed that an N-terminal motif conserved among class I myosins and a C-terminal motif unique to Myo1a-TH1 are both required for steady state microvillar enrichment. Purified Myo1a bound to liposomes composed of phosphatidylserine and phosphoinositol 4,5-bisphosphate, with moderate affinity in a charge-dependent manner. Additionally, peptides of the N- and C-terminal regions required for targeting were able to compete with Myo1a for binding to highly charged liposomes in vitro. Single molecule total internal reflection fluorescence microscopy showed that these motifs are also necessary for slowing the membrane detachment rate in cells. Finally, Myo1a-TH1 co-localized with both lactadherin-C2 (a phosphatidylserine-binding protein) and PLCδ1-PH (a phosphoinositol 4,5-bisphosphate-binding protein) in microvilli, but only lactaderin-C2 expression reduced brush border targeting of Myo1a-TH1. Together, our results suggest that Myo1a targeting to microvilli is driven by membrane binding potential that is distributed throughout TH1 rather than localized to a single motif. These data highlight the diversity of mechanisms that enable different class I myosins to target membranes in distinct biological contexts. PMID:22367206

  12. Eps homology domain endosomal transport proteins differentially localize to the neuromuscular junction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mate Suzanne E

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Recycling of endosomes is important for trafficking and maintenance of proteins at the neuromuscular junction (NMJ. We have previously shown high expression of the endocytic recycling regulator Eps15 homology domain-containing (EHD1 proteinin the Torpedo californica electric organ, a model tissue for investigating a cholinergic synapse. In this study, we investigated the localization of EHD1 and its paralogs EHD2, EHD3, and EHD4 in mouse skeletal muscle, and assessed the morphological changes in EHD1−/− NMJs. Methods Localization of the candidate NMJ protein EHD1 was assessed by confocal microscopy analysis of whole-mount mouse skeletal muscle fibers after direct gene transfer and immunolabeling. The potential function of EHD1 was assessed by specific force measurement and α-bungarotoxin-based endplate morphology mapping in EHD1−/− mouse skeletal muscle. Results Endogenous EHD1 localized to primary synaptic clefts of murine NMJ, and this localization was confirmed by expression of recombinant green fluorescent protein labeled-EHD1 in murine skeletal muscle in vivo. EHD1−/− mouse skeletal muscle had normal histology and NMJ morphology, and normal specific force generation during muscle contraction. The EHD 1–4 proteins showed differential localization in skeletal muscle: EHD2 to muscle vasculature, EHD3 to perisynaptic regions, and EHD4 to perinuclear regions and to primary synaptic clefts, but at lower levels than EHD1. Additionally, specific antibodies raised against mammalian EHD1-4 recognized proteins of the expected mass in the T. californica electric organ. Finally, we found that EHD4 expression was more abundant in EHD1−/− mouse skeletal muscle than in wild-type skeletal muscle. Conclusion EHD1 and EHD4 localize to the primary synaptic clefts of the NMJ. Lack of obvious defects in NMJ structure and muscle function in EHD1−/− muscle may be due to functional compensation by other EHD paralogs.

  13. Crystallization and preliminary X-ray crystallographic characterization of a cyclic nucleotide-binding homology domain from the mouse EAG potassium channel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marques-Carvalho, Maria João; Morais-Cabral, João Henrique

    2012-01-01

    The crystallization conditions and preliminary crystal characterization of the cytoplasmic cyclic nucleotide-binding homology domain from the mouse EAG potassium channel are reported. The members of the family of voltage-gated KCNH potassium channels play important roles in cardiac and neuronal repolarization, tumour proliferation and hormone secretion. These channels have a C-terminal cytoplasmic domain which is homologous to cyclic nucleotide-binding domains (CNB-homology domains), but it has been demonstrated that channel function is not affected by cyclic nucleotides and that the domain does not bind nucleotides in vitro. Here, the crystallization and preliminary crystallographic analysis of a CNB-homology domain from a member of the KCNH family, the mouse EAG channel, is reported. X-ray diffraction data were collected to 2.2 Å resolution and the crystal belonged to the hexagonal space group P3 1 21

  14. Src-homology 2 domain-containing tyrosine phosphatase 2 promotes oral cancer invasion and metastasis

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-01-01

    Background Tumor invasion and metastasis represent a major unsolved problem in cancer pathogenesis. Recent studies have indicated the involvement of Src-homology 2 domain-containing tyrosine phosphatase 2 (SHP2) in multiple malignancies; however, the role of SHP2 in oral cancer progression has yet to be elucidated. We propose that SHP2 is involved in the progression of oral cancer toward metastasis. Methods SHP2 expression was evaluated in paired oral cancer tissues by using immunohistochemical staining and real-time reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction. Isogenic highly invasive oral cancer cell lines from their respective low invasive parental lines were established using a Boyden chamber assay, and changes in the hallmarks of the epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT) were assessed to evaluate SHP2 function. SHP2 activity in oral cancer cells was reduced using si-RNA knockdown or enforced expression of a catalytically deficient mutant to analyze migratory and invasive ability in vitro and metastasis toward the lung in mice in vivo. Results We observed the significant upregulation of SHP2 in oral cancer tissues and cell lines. Following SHP2 knockdown, the oral cancer cells markedly attenuated migratory and invasion ability. We observed similar results in phosphatase-dead SHP2 C459S mutant expressing cells. Enhanced invasiveness was associated with significant upregulation of E-cadherin, vimentin, Snail/Twist1, and matrix metalloproteinase-2 in the highly invasive clones. In addition, we determined that SHP2 activity is required for the downregulation of phosphorylated ERK1/2, which modulates the downstream effectors, Snail and Twist1 at a transcript level. In lung tissue sections of mice, we observed that HSC3 tumors with SHP2 deletion exhibited significantly reduced metastatic capacity, compared with tumors administered control si-RNA. Conclusions Our data suggest that SHP2 promotes the invasion and metastasis of oral cancer cells. These results

  15. Solution Structure and Backbone Dynamics of the Pleckstrin Homology Domain of the Human Protein Kinase B (PKB/Akt). Interaction with Inositol Phosphates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Auguin, Daniel; Barthe, Philippe; Auge-Senegas, Marie-Therese; Stern, Marc-Henri; Noguchi, Masayuki; Roumestand, Christian

    2004-01-01

    The programmed cell death occurs as part of normal mammalian development. The induction of developmental cell death is a highly regulated process and can be suppressed by a variety of extracellular stimuli. Recently, the ability of trophic factors to promote survival have been attributed, at least in part, to the phosphatidylinositide 3'-OH kinase (PI3K)/Protein Kinase B (PKB, also named Akt) cascade. Several targets of the PI3K/PKB signaling pathway have been identified that may underlie the ability of this regulatory cascade to promote cell survival. PKB possesses a N-terminal Pleckstrin Homology (PH) domain that binds specifically and with high affinity to PtIns(3,4,5)P 3 and PtIns(3,4)P 2 , the PI3K second messengers. PKB is then recruited to the plasma membrane by virtue of its interaction with 3'-OH phosphatidylinositides and activated. Recent evidence indicates that PKB is active in various types of human cancer; constitutive PKB signaling activation is believed to promote proliferation and increased cell survival, thereby contributing to cancer progression. Thus, it has been shown that induction of PKB activity is augmented by the TCL1/MTCP1 oncoproteins through a physical association requiring the PKB PH domain. Here we present the three-dimensional solution structure of the PH domain of the human protein PKB (isoform β). PKBβ-PH is an electrostatically polarized molecule that adopts the same fold and topology as other PH-domains, consisting of a β-sandwich of seven strands capped on one top by an α-helix. The opposite face presents three variable loops that appear poorly defined in the NMR structure. Measurements of 15 N spin relaxation times and heteronuclear 15 N{ 1 H}NOEs showed that this poor definition is due to intrinsic flexibility, involving complex motions on different time scales. Chemical shift mapping studies correctly defined the binding site of Ins(1,3,4,5)P 4 (the head group of PtIns(3,4,5)P 3 ), as was previously proposed from a

  16. Increased Eps15 homology domain 1 and RAB11FIP3 expression regulate breast cancer progression via promoting epithelial growth factor receptor recycling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tong, Dandan; Liang, Ya-Nan; Stepanova, A A; Liu, Yu; Li, Xiaobo; Wang, Letian; Zhang, Fengmin; Vasilyeva, N V

    2017-02-01

    Recent research indicates that the C-terminal Eps15 homology domain 1 is associated with epithelial growth factor receptor-mediated endocytosis recycling in non-small-cell lung cancer. The aim of this study was to determine the clinical significance of Eps15 homology domain 1 gene expression in relation to phosphorylation of epithelial growth factor receptor expression in patients with breast cancer. Primary breast cancer samples from 306 patients were analyzed for Eps15 homology domain 1, RAB11FIP3, and phosphorylation of epithelial growth factor receptor expression via immunohistochemistry. The clinical significance was assessed via a multivariate Cox regression analysis, Kaplan-Meier curves, and the log-rank test. Eps15 homology domain 1 and phosphorylation of epithelial growth factor receptor were upregulated in 60.46% (185/306) and 53.92% (165/306) of tumor tissues, respectively, as assessed by immunohistochemistry. The statistical correlation analysis indicated that Eps15 homology domain 1 overexpression was positively correlated with the increases in phosphorylation of epithelial growth factor receptor ( r = 0.242, p breast cancer for the overall survival in the total, chemotherapy, and human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (-) groups. However, the use of combined expression of Eps15 homology domain 1 and phosphorylation of epithelial growth factor receptor markers is more effective for the disease-free survival in the overall population, chemotherapy, and human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (-) groups. Moreover, the combined markers are also significant prognostic markers of breast cancer in the human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (+), estrogen receptor (+), and estrogen receptor (-) groups. Eps15 homology domain 1 has a tumor suppressor function, and the combined marker of Eps15 homology domain 1/phosphorylation of epithelial growth factor receptor expression was identified as a better prognostic marker in breast cancer diagnosis

  17. Structure of PIN-domain protein PH0500 from Pyrococcus horikoshii

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jeyakanthan, Jeyaraman; Inagaki, Eiji; Kuroishi, Chizu; Tahirov, Tahir H.

    2005-01-01

    The structure of P. horikoshii OT3 protein PH0500 was determined by the multiple anomalous dispersion method and refined in two crystal forms. The protein is a dimer and has a PIN-domain fold. The Pyrococcus horikoshii OT3 protein PH0500 is highly conserved within the Pyrococcus genus of hyperthermophilic archaea and shows low amino-acid sequence similarity with a family of PIN-domain proteins. The protein has been expressed, purified and crystallized in two crystal forms: PH0500-I and PH0500-II. The structure was determined at 2.0 Å by the multiple anomalous dispersion method using a selenomethionyl derivative of crystal form PH0500-I (PH0500-I-Se). The structure of PH0500-I has been refined at 1.75 Å resolution to an R factor of 20.9% and the structure of PH0500-II has been refined at 2.0 Å resolution to an R factor of 23.4%. In both crystal forms as well as in solution the molecule appears to be a dimer. Searches of the databases for protein-fold similarities confirmed that the PH0500 protein is a PIN-domain protein with possible exonuclease activity and involvement in DNA or RNA editing

  18. Purification, crystallization, small-angle X-ray scattering and preliminary X-ray diffraction analysis of the SH2 domain of the Csk-homologous kinase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gunn, Natalie J; Gorman, Michael A; Dobson, Renwick C J; Parker, Michael W; Mulhern, Terrence D

    2011-03-01

    The C-terminal Src kinase (Csk) and Csk-homologous kinase (CHK) are endogenous inhibitors of the proto-oncogenic Src family of protein tyrosine kinases (SFKs). Phosphotyrosyl peptide binding to their Src-homology 2 (SH2) domains activates Csk and CHK, enhancing their ability to suppress SFK signalling; however, the detailed mechanistic basis of this activation event is unclear. The CHK SH2 was expressed in Escherichia coli and the purified protein was characterized as monomeric by synchrotron small-angle X-ray scattering in-line with size-exclusion chromatography. The CHK SH2 crystallized in 0.2 M sodium bromide, 0.1 M bis-Tris propane pH 6.5 and 20% polyethylene glycol 3350 and the best crystals diffracted to ∼1.6 Å resolution. The crystals belonged to space group P2, with unit-cell parameters a=25.8, b=34.6, c=63.2 Å, β=99.4°.

  19. Yeast Fex1p Is a Constitutively Expressed Fluoride Channel with Functional Asymmetry of Its Two Homologous Domains*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Kathryn D.; Gordon, Patricia B.; Rivetta, Alberto; Allen, Kenneth E.; Berbasova, Tetyana; Slayman, Clifford; Strobel, Scott A.

    2015-01-01

    Fluoride is a ubiquitous environmental toxin with which all biological species must cope. A recently discovered family of fluoride export (FEX) proteins protects organisms from fluoride toxicity by removing it from the cell. We show here that FEX proteins in Saccharomyces cerevisiae function as ion channels that are selective for fluoride over chloride and that these proteins are constitutively expressed at the yeast plasma membrane. Continuous expression is in contrast to many other toxin exporters in yeast, and this, along with the fact that two nearly duplicate proteins are encoded in the yeast genome, suggests that the threat posed by fluoride ions is frequent and detrimental. Structurally, eukaryotic FEX proteins consist of two homologous four-transmembrane helix domains folded into an antiparallel dimer, where the orientation of the two domains is fixed by a single transmembrane linker helix. Using phylogenetic sequence conservation as a guide, we have identified several functionally important residues. There is substantial functional asymmetry in the effect of mutation at corresponding sites in the two domains. Specifically, mutations to residues in the C-terminal domain proved significantly more detrimental to function than did similar mutations in the N-terminal domain. Our data suggest particular residues that may be important to anion specificity, most notably the necessity of a positive charge near the end of TMH1 in the C-terminal domain. It is possible that a cationic charge at this location may create an electrostatic well for fluoride ions entering the channel from the cytoplasm. PMID:26055717

  20. Tyrosine Phosphorylation of the Lyn Src Homology 2 (SH2) Domain Modulates Its Binding Affinity and Specificity*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jin, Lily L.; Wybenga-Groot, Leanne E.; Tong, Jiefei; Taylor, Paul; Minden, Mark D.; Trudel, Suzanne; McGlade, C. Jane; Moran, Michael F.

    2015-01-01

    Src homology 2 (SH2) domains are modular protein structures that bind phosphotyrosine (pY)-containing polypeptides and regulate cellular functions through protein-protein interactions. Proteomics analysis showed that the SH2 domains of Src family kinases are themselves tyrosine phosphorylated in blood system cancers, including acute myeloid leukemia, chronic lymphocytic leukemia, and multiple myeloma. Using the Src family kinase Lyn SH2 domain as a model, we found that phosphorylation at the conserved SH2 domain residue Y194 impacts the affinity and specificity of SH2 domain binding to pY-containing peptides and proteins. Analysis of the Lyn SH2 domain crystal structure supports a model wherein phosphorylation of Y194 on the EF loop modulates the binding pocket that engages amino acid side chains at the pY+2/+3 position. These data indicate another level of regulation wherein SH2-mediated protein-protein interactions are modulated by SH2 kinases and phosphatases. PMID:25587033

  1. Tyrosine phosphorylation of the Lyn Src homology 2 (SH2) domain modulates its binding affinity and specificity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jin, Lily L; Wybenga-Groot, Leanne E; Tong, Jiefei; Taylor, Paul; Minden, Mark D; Trudel, Suzanne; McGlade, C Jane; Moran, Michael F

    2015-03-01

    Src homology 2 (SH2) domains are modular protein structures that bind phosphotyrosine (pY)-containing polypeptides and regulate cellular functions through protein-protein interactions. Proteomics analysis showed that the SH2 domains of Src family kinases are themselves tyrosine phosphorylated in blood system cancers, including acute myeloid leukemia, chronic lymphocytic leukemia, and multiple myeloma. Using the Src family kinase Lyn SH2 domain as a model, we found that phosphorylation at the conserved SH2 domain residue Y(194) impacts the affinity and specificity of SH2 domain binding to pY-containing peptides and proteins. Analysis of the Lyn SH2 domain crystal structure supports a model wherein phosphorylation of Y(194) on the EF loop modulates the binding pocket that engages amino acid side chains at the pY+2/+3 position. These data indicate another level of regulation wherein SH2-mediated protein-protein interactions are modulated by SH2 kinases and phosphatases. © 2015 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  2. Two amino acid residues confer different binding affinities of Abelson family kinase SRC homology 2 domains for phosphorylated cortactin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gifford, Stacey M; Liu, Weizhi; Mader, Christopher C; Halo, Tiffany L; Machida, Kazuya; Boggon, Titus J; Koleske, Anthony J

    2014-07-11

    The closely related Abl family kinases, Arg and Abl, play important non-redundant roles in the regulation of cell morphogenesis and motility. Despite similar N-terminal sequences, Arg and Abl interact with different substrates and binding partners with varying affinities. This selectivity may be due to slight differences in amino acid sequence leading to differential interactions with target proteins. We report that the Arg Src homology (SH) 2 domain binds two specific phosphotyrosines on cortactin, a known Abl/Arg substrate, with over 10-fold higher affinity than the Abl SH2 domain. We show that this significant affinity difference is due to the substitution of arginine 161 and serine 187 in Abl to leucine 207 and threonine 233 in Arg, respectively. We constructed Abl SH2 domains with R161L and S187T mutations alone and in combination and find that these substitutions are sufficient to convert the low affinity Abl SH2 domain to a higher affinity "Arg-like" SH2 domain in binding to a phospho-cortactin peptide. We crystallized the Arg SH2 domain for structural comparison to existing crystal structures of the Abl SH2 domain. We show that these two residues are important determinants of Arg and Abl SH2 domain binding specificity. Finally, we expressed Arg containing an "Abl-like" low affinity mutant Arg SH2 domain (L207R/T233S) and find that this mutant, although properly localized to the cell periphery, does not support wild type levels of cell edge protrusion. Together, these observations indicate that these two amino acid positions confer different binding affinities and cellular functions on the distinct Abl family kinases. © 2014 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  3. Heteronuclear multidimensional NMR and homology modelling studies of the C-terminal nucleotide-binding domain of the human mitochondrial ABC transporter ABCB6

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kurashima-Ito, Kaori [RIKEN, Cellular and Molecular Biology Laboratory (Japan); Ikeya, Teppei [National Institute of Advanced Industrial Science and Technology (AIST), (Japan); Senbongi, Hiroshi [Mitochondrial Diseases Group, MRC Dunn Human NutritionUnit (United Kingdom); Tochio, Hidehito [International Graduate School of Arts and Sciences, Supramolecular Biology, Yokohama City University, Molecular Biophysics Laboratory (Japan); Mikawa, Tsutomu [RIKEN, Cellular and Molecular Biology Laboratory (Japan); Shibata, Takehiko [RIKEN, Shibata Distinguished Senior Scientist Laboratory (Japan); Ito, Yutaka [RIKEN, Cellular and Molecular Biology Laboratory (Japan)], E-mail: ito-yutaka@center.tmu.ac.jp

    2006-05-15

    Human ATP-binding cassette, sub-family B, member 6 (ABCB6) is a mitochondrial ABC transporter, and presumably contributes to iron homeostasis. Aimed at understanding the structural basis for the conformational changes accompanying the substrate-transportation cycle, we have studied the C-terminal nucleotide-binding domain of ABCB6 (ABCB6-C) in both the nucleotide-free and ADP-bound states by heteronuclear multidimensional NMR and homology modelling. A non-linear sampling scheme was utilised for indirectly acquired {sup 13}C and {sup 15}N dimensions of all 3D triple-resonance NMR experiments, in order to overcome the instability and the low solubility of ABCB6-C. The backbone resonances for approximately 25% of non-proline residues, which are mostly distributed around the functionally important loops and in the Helical domain, were not observed for nucleotide-free form of ABCB6-C. From the pH, temperature and magnetic field strength dependencies of the resonance intensities, we concluded that this incompleteness in the assignments is mainly due to the exchange between multiple conformations at an intermediate rate on the NMR timescale. These localised conformational dynamics remained in ADP-bound ABCB6-C except for the loops responsible for adenine base and {alpha}/{beta}-phosphate binding. These results revealed that the localised dynamic cooperativity, which was recently proposed for a prokaryotic ABC MJ1267, also exists in a higher eukaryotic ABC, and is presumably shared by all members of the ABC family. Since the Helical domain is the putative interface to the transmembrane domain, this cooperativity may explain the coupled functions between domains in the substrate-transportation cycle.

  4. Inhibition of tumor metastasis by a growth factor receptor bound protein 2 Src homology 2 domain-binding antagonist.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giubellino, Alessio; Gao, Yang; Lee, Sunmin; Lee, Min-Jung; Vasselli, James R; Medepalli, Sampath; Trepel, Jane B; Burke, Terrence R; Bottaro, Donald P

    2007-07-01

    Metastasis, the primary cause of death in most forms of cancer, is a multistep process whereby cells from the primary tumor spread systemically and colonize distant new sites. Blocking critical steps in this process could potentially inhibit tumor metastasis and dramatically improve cancer survival rates; however, our understanding of metastasis at the molecular level is still rudimentary. Growth factor receptor binding protein 2 (Grb2) is a widely expressed adapter protein with roles in epithelial cell growth and morphogenesis, as well as angiogenesis, making it a logical target for anticancer drug development. We have previously shown that a potent antagonist of Grb2 Src homology-2 domain-binding, C90, blocks growth factor-driven cell motility in vitro and angiogenesis in vivo. We now report that C90 inhibits metastasis in vivo in two aggressive tumor models, without affecting primary tumor growth rate. These results support the potential efficacy of this compound in reducing the metastatic spread of primary solid tumors and establish a critical role for Grb2 Src homology-2 domain-mediated interactions in this process.

  5. Characterization of PhPRP1, a histidine domain arabinogalactan protein from Petunia hybrida pistils.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Twomey, Megan C; Brooks, Jenna K; Corey, Jillaine M; Singh-Cundy, Anu

    2013-10-15

    An arabinogalactan protein, PhPRP1, was purified from Petunia hybrida pistils and shown to be orthologous to TTS-1 and TTS-2 from Nicotiana tabacum and NaTTS from Nicotiana alata. Sequence comparisons among these proteins, and CaPRP1 from Capsicum annuum, reveal a conserved histidine-rich domain and two hypervariable domains. Immunoblots show that TTS-1 and PhPRP1 are also expressed in vegetative tissues of tobacco and petunia respectively. In contrast to the molecular mass heterogeneity displayed by the pistil proteins, the different isoforms found in seedlings, roots, and leaves each has a discrete size (37, 80, 160, and 200 kDa) on SDS-PAGE gels. On the basis of their chemistry, distinctive domain architecture, and the unique pattern of expression, we have named this group of proteins HD-AGPs (histidine domain-arabinogalactan proteins). Copyright © 2013 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  6. The ubiquitin-homology protein, DAP-1, associates with tumor necrosis factor receptor (p60) death domain and induces apoptosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liou, M L; Liou, H C

    1999-04-09

    The tumor necrosis factor receptor, p60 (TNF-R1), transduces death signals via the association of its cytoplasmic domain with several intracellular proteins. By screening a mammalian cDNA library using the yeast two-hybrid cloning technique, we isolated a ubiquitin-homology protein, DAP-1, which specifically interacts with the cytoplasmic death domain of TNF-R1. Sequence analysis reveals that DAP-1 shares striking sequence homology with the yeast SMT3 protein that is essential for the maintenance of chromosome integrity during mitosis (Meluh, P. B., and Koshland, D. (1995) Mol. Biol. Cell 6, 793-807). DAP-1 is nearly identical to PIC1, a protein that interacts with the PML tumor suppressor implicated in acute promyelocytic leukemia (Boddy, M. N., Howe, K., Etkin, L. D., Solomon, E., and Freemont, P. S. (1996) Oncogene 13, 971-982), and the sentrin protein, which associates with the Fas death receptor (Okura, T., Gong, L., Kamitani, T., Wada, T., Okura, I., Wei, C. F., Chang, H. M., and Yeh, E. T. (1996) J. Immunol. 157, 4277-4281). The in vivo interaction between DAP-1 and TNF-R1 was further confirmed in mammalian cells. In transient transfection assays, overexpression of DAP-1 suppresses NF-kappaB/Rel activity in 293T cells, a human kidney embryonic carcinoma cell line. Overexpression of either DAP-1 or sentrin causes apoptosis of TNF-sensitive L929 fibroblast cell line, as well as TNF-resistant osteosarcoma cell line, U2OS. Furthermore, the dominant negative Fas-associated death domain protein (FADD) protein blocks the cell death induced by either DAP-1 or FADD. Collectively, these observations highly suggest a role for DAP-1 in mediating TNF-induced cell death signaling pathways, presumably through the recruitment of FADD death effector.

  7. The PH Domain of PDK1 Exhibits a Novel, Phospho-Regulated Monomer-Dimer Equilibrium With Important Implications for Kinase Domain Activation: Single Molecule and Ensemble Studies†

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ziemba, Brian P.; Pilling, Carissa; Calleja, Véronique; Larijani, Banafshé; Falke, Joseph J.

    2013-01-01

    Phosphoinositide-Dependent Kinase-1 (PDK1) is an essential master kinase recruited to the plasma membrane by the binding of its C-terminal PH domain to the signaling lipid phosphatidylinositol-3,4-5-trisphosphate (PIP3). Membrane binding leads to PDK1 phospho-activation, but despite the central role of PDK1 in signaling and cancer biology this activation mechanism remains poorly understood. PDK1 has been shown to exist as a dimer in cells, and one crystal structure of its isolated PH domain exhibits a putative dimer interface. It has been proposed that phosphorylation of PH domain residue T513 (or the phospho-mimetic T513E mutation) may regulate a novel PH domain dimer-monomer equilibrium, thereby converting an inactive PDK1 dimer to an active monomer. However, the oligomeric state(s) of the PH domain on the membrane have not yet been determined, nor whether a negative charge at position 513 is sufficient to regulate its oligomeric state. The present study investigates the binding of purified WT and T513E PDK1 PH domains to lipid bilayers containing the PIP3 target lipid, using both single molecule and ensemble measurements. Single molecule analysis of the brightness of fluorescent PH domain shows that the PIP3-bound WT PH domain on membranes is predominantly dimeric, while the PIP3-bound T513E PH domain is monomeric, demonstrating that negative charge at the T513 position is sufficient to dissociate the PH domain dimer and is thus likely to play a central role in PDK1 monomerization and activation. Single molecule analysis of 2-D diffusion of PH domain-PIP3 complexes reveals that the dimeric WT PH domain diffuses at the same rate a single lipid molecule, indicating that only one of its two PIP3 binding sites is occupied and there is little protein penetration into the bilayer as observed for other PH domains. The 2-D diffusion of T513E PH domain is slower, suggesting the negative charge disrupts local structure in a way that enables greater protein insertion into

  8. Analysis of the hormone-binding domain of steroid receptors using chimeras generated by homologous recombination

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Martinez, Elisabeth D.; Pattabiraman, Nagarajan; Danielsen, Mark

    2005-01-01

    The glucocorticoid receptor and the mineralocorticoid receptor are members of the steroid receptor family that exhibit ligand cross-reactivity. Specificity of steroid receptor action is investigated in the present work by the construction and characterization of chimeras between the glucocorticoid receptor and the mineralocorticoid receptor. We used an innovative approach to make novel steroid receptor proteins in vivo that in general, contrary to our expectations, show increased ligand specificity compared to the parental receptors. We describe a receptor that is specific for the potent synthetic glucocorticoid triamcinolone acetonide and does not bind aldosterone. A further set of chimeras has an increased ability to discriminate between ligands, responding potently to mineralocorticoids and only very weakly to synthetic glucocorticoids. A chimera with the fusion site in the hinge highlights the importance of the region between the DNA-binding and the hormone-binding domains since, unlike both the glucocorticoid and mineralocorticoid receptors, it only responds to mineralocorticoids. One chimera has reduced specificity in that it acts as a general corticoid receptor, responding to glucocorticoids and mineralocorticoids with similar potency and efficacy. Our data suggest that regions of the glucocorticoid and mineralocorticoid receptor hormone-binding domains are functionally non-reciprocal. We present transcriptional, hormone-binding, and structure-modeling evidence that suggests that receptor-specific interactions within and across domains mediate aspects of specificity in transcriptional responses to steroids

  9. Regulation of embryonic hematopoiesis by a cytokine-inducible SH2 domain homolog in zebrafish.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lewis, Rowena S; Noor, Suzita M; Fraser, Fiona W; Sertori, Robert; Liongue, Clifford; Ward, Alister C

    2014-06-15

    Cytokine-inducible SH2 domain-containing protein (CISH), a member of the suppressor of cytokine signaling family of negative feedback regulators, is induced by cytokines that activate STAT5 and can inhibit STAT5 signaling in vitro. However, demonstration of a definitive in vivo role for CISH during development has remained elusive. This study employed expression analysis and morpholino-mediated knockdown in zebrafish in concert with bioinformatics and biochemical approaches to investigate CISH function. Two zebrafish CISH paralogs were identified, cish.a and cish.b, with high overall conservation (43-46% identity) with their mammalian counterparts. The cish.a gene was maternally derived, with transcripts present throughout embryogenesis, and increasing at 4-5 d after fertilization, whereas cish.b expression commenced at 8 h after fertilization. Expression of cish.a was regulated by the JAK2/STAT5 pathway via conserved tetrameric STAT5 binding sites (TTCN3GAA) in its promoter. Injection of morpholinos targeting cish.a, but not cish.b or control morpholinos, resulted in enhanced embryonic erythropoiesis, myelopoiesis, and lymphopoiesis, including a 2- 3-fold increase in erythrocytic markers. This occurred concomitantly with increased activation of STAT5. This study indicates that CISH functions as a conserved in vivo target and regulator of STAT5 in the control of embryonic hematopoiesis. Copyright © 2014 by The American Association of Immunologists, Inc.

  10. Regulation of abiotic stress signalling by Arabidopsis C-terminal domain phosphatase-like 1 requires interaction with a k-homology domain-containing protein.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    In Sil Jeong

    Full Text Available Arabidopsis thaliana CARBOXYL-TERMINAL DOMAIN (CTD PHOSPHATASE-LIKE 1 (CPL1 regulates plant transcriptional responses to diverse stress signals. Unlike typical CTD phosphatases, CPL1 contains two double-stranded (ds RNA binding motifs (dsRBMs at its C-terminus. Some dsRBMs can bind to dsRNA and/or other proteins, but the function of the CPL1 dsRBMs has remained obscure. Here, we report identification of REGULATOR OF CBF GENE EXPRESSION 3 (RCF3 as a CPL1-interacting protein. RCF3 co-purified with tandem-affinity-tagged CPL1 from cultured Arabidopsis cells and contains multiple K-homology (KH domains, which were predicted to be important for binding to single-stranded DNA/RNA. Yeast two-hybrid, luciferase complementation imaging, and bimolecular fluorescence complementation analyses established that CPL1 and RCF3 strongly associate in vivo, an interaction mediated by the dsRBM1 of CPL1 and the KH3/KH4 domains of RCF3. Mapping of functional regions of CPL1 indicated that CPL1 in vivo function requires the dsRBM1, catalytic activity, and nuclear targeting of CPL1. Gene expression profiles of rcf3 and cpl1 mutants were similar during iron deficiency, but were distinct during the cold response. These results suggest that tethering CPL1 to RCF3 via dsRBM1 is part of the mechanism that confers specificity to CPL1-mediated transcriptional regulation.

  11. NGF-Dependent neurite outgrowth in PC12 cells overexpressing the Src homology 2-domain protein shb requires activation of the Rap1 pathway

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lu, L.; Annerén, C.; Reedquist, K. A.; Bos, J. L.; Welsh, M.

    2000-01-01

    The Src homology 2 (SH2) domain adaptor protein Shb has been shown to transmit NGF- and FGF-2-dependent differentiation signals in PC12 cells. To study if this involves signaling through the small GTPase Rap1, Rap1 activity was assessed in Shb-overexpressing PC12 cells. We demonstrate that NGF and

  12. Structure of the interleukin-2 tyrosine kinase Src homology 2 domain; comparison between X-ray and NMR-derived structures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Joseph, Raji E.; Ginder, Nathaniel D.; Hoy, Julie A.; Nix, Jay C.; Fulton, D. Bruce; Honzatko, Richard B.; Andreotti, Amy H.

    2012-01-01

    The interleukin-2 tyrosine kinase Src homology 2 domain was crystallized and its structure was solved to 2.35 Å resolution. The structure reveals a domain-swapped dimer that is related to other dimeric SH2 domains solved previously. The cis–trans-prolyl isomerization that is evident from solution studies of Itk SH2 cannot be observed in the crystal structure. The crystal structure of the interleukin-2 tyrosine kinase Src homology domain (Itk SH2) is described and it is found that unlike in studies of this domain using NMR spectroscopy, cis–trans-prolyl isomerization is not readily detected in the crystal structure. Based on similarities between the Itk SH2 crystal form and the cis form of the Itk SH2 NMR structure, it is concluded that it is likely that the prolyl imide bond at least in part adopts the cis conformation in the crystal form. However, the lack of high-resolution data and the dynamic nature of the proline-containing loop mean that the precise imide-bond conformation cannot be determined and prolyl cis–trans isomerization in the crystal cannot be ruled out. Given the preponderance of structures that have been solved by X-ray crystallography in the Protein Data Bank, this result supports the notion that prolyl isomerization in folded proteins has been underestimated among known structures. Interestingly, while the precise status of the proline residue is ambiguous, Itk SH2 crystallizes as a domain-swapped dimer. The domain-swapped structure of Itk SH2 is similar to the domain-swapped SH2 domains of Grb2 and Nck, with domain swapping occurring at the β-meander region of all three SH2 domains. Thus, for Itk SH2 structural analysis by NMR spectroscopy and X-ray crystallography revealed very different structural features: proline isomerization versus domain-swapped dimerization, respectively

  13. Effect of diphtheria toxin T-domain on endosomal pH

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. J. Labyntsev

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available A key step in the mode of cytotoxic action of diphtheria toxin (DT is the transfer of its catalytic domain (Cd from endosomes into the cytosol. The main activity in this process is performed by the transport domain (Td, but the molecular mechanism of its action remains unknown. We have previously shown that Td can have some influence on the endosomal transport of DT. The aim of this work was to study the effect of diphtheria toxin on the toxin compartmentalization in the intracellular transporting pathway and endosomal pH. We used recombinant fragments of DT, which differed only by the presence of Td in their structure, fused with fluorescent proteins. It was shown that the toxin fragment with Td moved slower by the pathway early-late endosomes-lysosomes, and had a slightly different pattern of colocalization with endosomal markers than DT fragment without Td. In addition, endosomes containing DT fragments with Td had a constant pH of about 6.5 from the 10th to 50th minute of observation, for the same time endosomes containing DT fragments without Td demons­trated a decrease in pH from 6.3 to 5.5. These results indicate that Td inhibits acidification of endosomal medium. One of possible explanations for this may be the effect of the ion channel formed by the T-domain on the process of the endosomal acidification. This property of Td may not only inhibit maturation of endosomes but also inhibit activation of endosomal pH-dependent proteases, and this promotes successful transport of Cd into the cell cytosol.

  14. Aromatic amino acids and their relevance in the specificity of the PH domain

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Morales, J.; Sobol, Margaryta; Rodriguez-Zapata, L.C.; Hozák, Pavel; Castano, E.

    2017-01-01

    Roč. 30, č. 12 (2017), č. článku e2649. ISSN 0952-3499 R&D Projects: GA TA ČR(CZ) TE01020118; GA ČR GAP305/11/2232; GA ČR GA16-03346S; GA ČR GA15-08738S; GA MŠk(CZ) ED1.1.00/02.0109 Institutional support: RVO:68378050 Keywords : PH domain * Phosphatidic acid * Phosphoinositides Subject RIV: EB - Genetics ; Molecular Biology OBOR OECD: Biochemistry and molecular biology Impact factor: 2.175, year: 2016

  15. The Structures of Coiled-Coil Domains from Type III Secretion System Translocators Reveal Homology to Pore-Forming Toxins

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barta, Michael L.; Dickenson, Nicholas E.; Patil, Mrinalini; Keightley, Andrew; Wyckoff, Gerald J.; Picking, William D.; Picking, Wendy L.; Geisbrecht, Brian V. (UMKC); (OKLU)

    2012-03-26

    Many pathogenic Gram-negative bacteria utilize type III secretion systems (T3SSs) to alter the normal functions of target cells. Shigella flexneri uses its T3SS to invade human intestinal cells to cause bacillary dysentery (shigellosis) that is responsible for over one million deaths per year. The Shigella type III secretion apparatus is composed of a basal body spanning both bacterial membranes and an exposed oligomeric needle. Host altering effectors are secreted through this energized unidirectional conduit to promote bacterial invasion. The active needle tip complex of S. flexneri is composed of a tip protein, IpaD, and two pore-forming translocators, IpaB and IpaC. While the atomic structure of IpaD has been elucidated and studied, structural data on the hydrophobic translocators from the T3SS family remain elusive. We present here the crystal structures of a protease-stable fragment identified within the N-terminal regions of IpaB from S. flexneri and SipB from Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium determined at 2.1 {angstrom} and 2.8 {angstrom} limiting resolution, respectively. These newly identified domains are composed of extended-length (114 {angstrom} in IpaB and 71 {angstrom} in SipB) coiled-coil motifs that display a high degree of structural homology to one another despite the fact that they share only 21% sequence identity. Further structural comparisons also reveal substantial similarity to the coiled-coil regions of pore-forming proteins from other Gram-negative pathogens, notably, colicin Ia. This suggests that these mechanistically separate and functionally distinct membrane-targeting proteins may have diverged from a common ancestor during the course of pathogen-specific evolutionary events.

  16. HCV NS5A protein containing potential ligands for both Src homology 2 and 3 domains enhances autophosphorylation of Src family kinase Fyn in B cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakashima, Kenji; Takeuchi, Kenji; Chihara, Kazuyasu; Horiguchi, Tomoko; Sun, Xuedong; Deng, Lin; Shoji, Ikuo; Hotta, Hak; Sada, Kiyonao

    2012-01-01

    Hepatitis C virus (HCV) infects B lymphocytes and induces mixed cryoglobulinemia and B cell non-Hodgkin's lymphoma. The molecular mechanism for the pathogenesis of HCV infection-mediated B cell disorders remains obscure. To identify the possible role for HCV nonstructural 5A (NS5A) protein in B cells, we generated the stable B cell lines expressing Myc-His tagged NS5A. Immunoprecipitation study in the presence or absence of pervanadate (PV) implied that NS5A was tyrosine phosphorylated by pervanadate (PV) treatment of the cells. Therefore we examined pull-down assay by using glutathione S-transferase (GST)-fusion proteins of various Src homology 2 (SH2) domains, which associates with phosphotyrosine within a specific amino acid sequence. The results showed that NS5A specifically bound to SH2 domain of Fyn from PV-treated B cells in addition to Src homology 3 (SH3) domain. Substitution of Arg(176) to Lys in the SH2 domain of Fyn abrogated this interaction. Deletion mutational analysis demonstrated that N-terminal region of NS5A was not required for the interaction with the SH2 domain of Fyn. Tyr(334) was identified as a tyrosine phosphorylation site in NS5A. Far-western analysis revealed that SH2 domain of Fyn directly bound to NS5A. Fyn and NS5A were colocalized in the lipid raft. These results suggest that NS5A directly binds to the SH2 domain of Fyn in a tyrosine phosphorylation-dependent manner. Lastly, we showed that the expression of NS5A in B cells increased phosphorylation of activation loop tyrosine in the kinase domain of Fyn. NS5A containing ligand for both SH2 and SH3 domains enhances an aberrant autophosphorylation and kinase activity of Fyn in B cells.

  17. HCV NS5A protein containing potential ligands for both Src homology 2 and 3 domains enhances autophosphorylation of Src family kinase Fyn in B cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kenji Nakashima

    Full Text Available Hepatitis C virus (HCV infects B lymphocytes and induces mixed cryoglobulinemia and B cell non-Hodgkin's lymphoma. The molecular mechanism for the pathogenesis of HCV infection-mediated B cell disorders remains obscure. To identify the possible role for HCV nonstructural 5A (NS5A protein in B cells, we generated the stable B cell lines expressing Myc-His tagged NS5A. Immunoprecipitation study in the presence or absence of pervanadate (PV implied that NS5A was tyrosine phosphorylated by pervanadate (PV treatment of the cells. Therefore we examined pull-down assay by using glutathione S-transferase (GST-fusion proteins of various Src homology 2 (SH2 domains, which associates with phosphotyrosine within a specific amino acid sequence. The results showed that NS5A specifically bound to SH2 domain of Fyn from PV-treated B cells in addition to Src homology 3 (SH3 domain. Substitution of Arg(176 to Lys in the SH2 domain of Fyn abrogated this interaction. Deletion mutational analysis demonstrated that N-terminal region of NS5A was not required for the interaction with the SH2 domain of Fyn. Tyr(334 was identified as a tyrosine phosphorylation site in NS5A. Far-western analysis revealed that SH2 domain of Fyn directly bound to NS5A. Fyn and NS5A were colocalized in the lipid raft. These results suggest that NS5A directly binds to the SH2 domain of Fyn in a tyrosine phosphorylation-dependent manner. Lastly, we showed that the expression of NS5A in B cells increased phosphorylation of activation loop tyrosine in the kinase domain of Fyn. NS5A containing ligand for both SH2 and SH3 domains enhances an aberrant autophosphorylation and kinase activity of Fyn in B cells.

  18. Ammonium ion transport by the AMT/Rh homolog TaAMT1;1 is stimulated by acidic pH

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Søgaard, Rikke; Alsterfjord, Magnus; Macaulay, Nanna

    2009-01-01

    It is unclear how ammonia is transported by proteins from the Amt/Mep/Rh superfamily. We investigated this for the ammonium transporter TaAMT1;1 from wheat expressed in Xenopus oocytes by two-electrode voltage clamp and radio-labeled uptakes. Inward currents were activated by NH (4......) (+) or methylammonium ions (MeA(+)). Importantly, currents increased fivefold when the external pH was decreased from 7.4 to 5.5; this type of pH dependence is unique and is a strong indication of NH (4) (+) or MeA(+) transport. This was confirmed by the close correlation between the uptake of radio-labeled Me......A(+) and MeA(+)-induced currents. Homology models of members of the Amt/Mep/Rh superfamily exhibited major divergences in their cytoplasmic regions. A point mutation in this region of TaAMT1;1 abolished the pH sensitivity and decreased the apparent affinities for NH (4) (+) and MeA(+). We suggest a model...

  19. Contribution of the first K-homology domain of poly(C)-binding protein 1 to its affinity and specificity for C-rich oligonucleotides

    OpenAIRE

    Yoga, Yano M. K.; Traore, Daouda A. K.; Sidiqi, Mahjooba; Szeto, Chris; Pendini, Nicole R.; Barker, Andrew; Leedman, Peter J.; Wilce, Jacqueline A.; Wilce, Matthew C. J.

    2012-01-01

    Poly-C-binding proteins are triple KH (hnRNP K homology) domain proteins with specificity for single stranded C-rich RNA and DNA. They play diverse roles in the regulation of protein expression at both transcriptional and translational levels. Here, we analyse the contributions of individual αCP1 KH domains to binding C-rich oligonucleotides using biophysical and structural methods. Using surface plasmon resonance (SPR), we demonstrate that KH1 makes the most stable interactions with both RNA...

  20. Selective anticancer activity of a hexapeptide with sequence homology to a non-kinase domain of Cyclin Dependent Kinase 4

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Agarwala Usha

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Cyclin-dependent kinases 2, 4 and 6 (Cdk2, Cdk4, Cdk6 are closely structurally homologous proteins which are classically understood to control the transition from the G1 to the S-phases of the cell cycle by combining with their appropriate cyclin D or cyclin E partners to form kinase-active holoenzymes. Deregulation of Cdk4 is widespread in human cancer, CDK4 gene knockout is highly protective against chemical and oncogene-mediated epithelial carcinogenesis, despite the continued presence of CDK2 and CDK6; and overexpresssion of Cdk4 promotes skin carcinogenesis. Surprisingly, however, Cdk4 kinase inhibitors have not yet fulfilled their expectation as 'blockbuster' anticancer agents. Resistance to inhibition of Cdk4 kinase in some cases could potentially be due to a non-kinase activity, as recently reported with epidermal growth factor receptor. Results A search for a potential functional site of non-kinase activity present in Cdk4 but not Cdk2 or Cdk6 revealed a previously-unidentified loop on the outside of the C'-terminal non-kinase domain of Cdk4, containing a central amino-acid sequence, Pro-Arg-Gly-Pro-Arg-Pro (PRGPRP. An isolated hexapeptide with this sequence and its cyclic amphiphilic congeners are selectively lethal at high doses to a wide range of human cancer cell lines whilst sparing normal diploid keratinocytes and fibroblasts. Treated cancer cells do not exhibit the wide variability of dose response typically seen with other anticancer agents. Cancer cell killing by PRGPRP, in a cyclic amphiphilic cassette, requires cells to be in cycle but does not perturb cell cycle distribution and is accompanied by altered relative Cdk4/Cdk1 expression and selective decrease in ATP levels. Morphological features of apoptosis are absent and cancer cell death does not appear to involve autophagy. Conclusion These findings suggest a potential new paradigm for the development of broad-spectrum cancer specific therapeutics with

  1. Human alpha2-macroglobulin is composed of multiple domains, as predicted by homology with complement component C3.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doan, Ninh; Gettins, Peter G W

    2007-10-01

    Human alpha2M (alpha2-macroglobulin) and the complement components C3 and C4 are thiol ester-containing proteins that evolved from the same ancestral gene. The recent structure determination of human C3 has allowed a detailed prediction of the location of domains within human alpha2M to be made. We describe here the expression and characterization of three alpha(2)M domains predicted to be involved in the stabilization of the thiol ester in native alpha2M and in its activation upon bait region proteolysis. The three newly expressed domains are MG2 (macroglobulin domain 2), TED (thiol ester-containing domain) and CUB (complement protein subcomponents C1r/C1s, urchin embryonic growth factor and bone morphogenetic protein 1) domain. Together with the previously characterized RBD (receptor-binding domain), they represent approx. 42% of the alpha2M polypeptide. Their expression as folded domains strongly supports the predicted domain organization of alpha2M. An X-ray crystal structure of MG2 shows it to have a fibronectin type-3 fold analogous to MG1-MG8 of C3. TED is, as predicted, an alpha-helical domain. CUB is a spliced domain composed of two stretches of polypeptide that flank TED in the primary structure. In intact C3 TED interacts with RBD, where it is in direct contact with the thiol ester, and with MG2 and CUB on opposite, flanking sides. In contrast, these alpha2M domains, as isolated species, show negligible interaction with one another, suggesting that the native conformation of alpha2M, and the consequent thiol ester-stabilizing domain-domain interactions, result from additional restraints imposed by the physical linkage of these domains or by additional domains in the protein.

  2. Investigation of Novel Molecular Targets for Pleckstrin Homology (PH) Domains Found in Oncogenes Implicated in Breast Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    2007-03-01

    protein’s PI3K-dependent roles as a positive regulator of IL- 2 gene induction in T cells (Deckert et al, 1998), NK cell-mediated cytotoxicity...82. Fournier, MV, Guimaraes da Costa, F, Paschoal, ME, Ronco, LV, Carvalho, MG, and Pardee, AB. (1999) Identification of a gene encoding a human...Ipl and Tih1. J Biol Chem. 277(51), 49935-44. Scanlan, MJ, Gout , I, Gordon, CM, Williamson, B, Stockert, E, Gure, AO, Jager, D, Chen, YT, Mackay, A

  3. Identification of Novel Molecular Targets for Pleckstrin Homology (PH) Domains Found in Oncogenes Implicated in Breast Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-03-01

    roles as a positive regulator of IL- 2 gene induction in T cells (Deckert et al, 1998), NK cell-mediated cytotoxicity (Jevremovic et al, 2001), and FcRI...Identification of a gene encoding a human oxysterol-binding protein-homologue: a potential general molecular marker for blood dissemination of solid...Biol. 6(5), 384-385. Scanlan, MJ, Gout , I, Gordon, CM, Williamson, B, Stockert, E, Gure, AO, Jager, D, Chen, YT, Mackay, A, O’Hare, MJ, and Old LJ

  4. Human α2-macroglobulin is composed of multiple domains, as predicted by homology with complement component C3

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doan, Ninh; Gettins, Peter G. W.

    2007-01-01

    Human α2M (α2-macroglobulin) and the complement components C3 and C4 are thiol ester-containing proteins that evolved from the same ancestral gene. The recent structure determination of human C3 has allowed a detailed prediction of the location of domains within human α2M to be made. We describe here the expression and characterization of three α2M domains predicted to be involved in the stabilization of the thiol ester in native α2M and in its activation upon bait region proteolysis. The three newly expressed domains are MG2 (macroglobulin domain 2), TED (thiol ester-containing domain) and CUB (complement protein subcomponents C1r/C1s, urchin embryonic growth factor and bone morphogenetic protein 1) domain. Together with the previously characterized RBD (receptor-binding domain), they represent approx. 42% of the α2M polypeptide. Their expression as folded domains strongly supports the predicted domain organization of α2M. An X-ray crystal structure of MG2 shows it to have a fibronectin type-3 fold analogous to MG1–MG8 of C3. TED is, as predicted, an α-helical domain. CUB is a spliced domain composed of two stretches of polypeptide that flank TED in the primary structure. In intact C3 TED interacts with RBD, where it is in direct contact with the thiol ester, and with MG2 and CUB on opposite, flanking sides. In contrast, these α2M domains, as isolated species, show negligible interaction with one another, suggesting that the native conformation of α2M, and the consequent thiol ester-stabilizing domain–domain interactions, result from additional restraints imposed by the physical linkage of these domains or by additional domains in the protein. PMID:17608619

  5. The SRC homology 2 domain of Rin1 mediates its binding to the epidermal growth factor receptor and regulates receptor endocytosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barbieri, M Alejandro; Kong, Chen; Chen, Pin-I; Horazdovsky, Bruce F; Stahl, Philip D

    2003-08-22

    Activated epidermal growth factor receptors (EGFRs) recruit intracellular proteins that mediate receptor signaling and endocytic trafficking. Rin1, a multifunctional protein, has been shown to regulate EGFR internalization (1). Here we show that EGF stimulation induces a specific, rapid, and transient membrane recruitment of Rin1 and that recruitment is dependent on the Src homology 2 (SH2) domain of Rin1. Immunoprecipitation of EGFR is accompanied by co-immunoprecipitation of Rin1 in a time- and ligand-dependent manner. Association of Rin1 and specifically the SH2 domain of Rin1 with the EGFR was dependent on tyrosine phosphorylation of the intracellular domain of the EGFR. The recruitment of Rin1, observed by light microscopy, indicated that although initially cytosolic, Rin1 was recruited to both plasma membrane and endosomes following EGF addition. Moreover, the expression of the SH2 domain of Rin1 substantially impaired the internalization of EGF without affecting internalization of transferrin. Finally, we found that Rin1 co-immunoprecipitated with a number of tyrosine kinase receptors but not with cargo endocytic receptors. These results indicate that Rin1 provides a link via its SH2 domain between activated tyrosine kinase receptors and the endocytic pathway through the recruitment and activation of Rab5a.

  6. The Surface Layer Homology Domain-Containing Proteins of Alkaliphilic Bacillus pseudofirmus OF4 Play an Important Role in Alkaline Adaptation via Peptidoglycan Synthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fujinami, Shun; Ito, Masahiro

    2018-01-01

    It is well known that the Na + cycle and the cell wall are essential for alkaline adaptation of Na + -dependent alkaliphilic Bacillus species. In Bacillus pseudofirmus OF4, surface layer protein A (SlpA), the most abundant protein in the surface layer (S-layer) of the cell wall, is involved in alkaline adaptation, especially under low Na + concentrations. The presence of a large number of genes that encode S-layer homology (SLH) domain-containing proteins has been suggested from the genome sequence of B. pseudofirmus OF4. However, other than SlpA, the functions of SLH domain-containing proteins are not well known. Therefore, a deletion mutant of the csaB gene, required for the retention of SLH domain-containing proteins on the cell wall, was constructed to investigate its physiological properties. The csaB mutant strain of B. pseudofirmus OF4 had a chained morphology and alkaline sensitivity even under a 230 mM Na + concentration at which there is no growth difference between the parental strain and the slpA mutant strain. Ultra-thin section transmission electron microscopy showed that a csaB mutant strain lacked an S-layer part, and its peptidoglycan (PG) layer was disturbed. The slpA mutant strain also lacked an S-layer part, although its PG layer was not disturbed. These results suggested that the surface layer homology domain-containing proteins of B. pseudofirmus OF4 play an important role in alkaline adaptation via peptidoglycan synthesis.

  7. Changes in signal transducer and activator of transcription 3 (STAT3) dynamics induced by complexation with pharmacological inhibitors of Src homology 2 (SH2) domain dimerization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Resetca, Diana; Haftchenary, Sina; Gunning, Patrick T; Wilson, Derek J

    2014-11-21

    The activity of the transcription factor signal transducer and activator of transcription 3 (STAT3) is dysregulated in a number of hematological and solid malignancies. Development of pharmacological STAT3 Src homology 2 (SH2) domain interaction inhibitors holds great promise for cancer therapy, and a novel class of salicylic acid-based STAT3 dimerization inhibitors that includes orally bioavailable drug candidates has been recently developed. The compounds SF-1-066 and BP-1-102 are predicted to bind to the STAT3 SH2 domain. However, given the highly unstructured and dynamic nature of the SH2 domain, experimental confirmation of this prediction was elusive. We have interrogated the protein-ligand interaction of STAT3 with these small molecule inhibitors by means of time-resolved electrospray ionization hydrogen-deuterium exchange mass spectrometry. Analysis of site-specific evolution of deuterium uptake induced by the complexation of STAT3 with SF-1-066 or BP-1-102 under physiological conditions enabled the mapping of the in silico predicted inhibitor binding site to the STAT3 SH2 domain. The binding of both inhibitors to the SH2 domain resulted in significant local decreases in dynamics, consistent with solvent exclusion at the inhibitor binding site and increased rigidity of the inhibitor-complexed SH2 domain. Interestingly, inhibitor binding induced hot spots of allosteric perturbations outside of the SH2 domain, manifesting mainly as increased deuterium uptake, in regions of STAT3 important for DNA binding and nuclear localization. © 2014 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  8. A phospho-sugar binding domain homologous to NagB enzymes regulates the activity of the central glycolytic genes repressor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doan, Thierry; Martin, Laetitia; Zorrilla, Silvia; Chaix, Denis; Aymerich, Stéphane; Labesse, Gilles; Declerck, Nathalie

    2008-06-01

    CggR belongs to the SorC family of bacterial transcriptional regulators which control the expression of genes and operons involved in carbohydrate catabolism. CggR was first identified in Bacillus subtilis where it represses the gapA operon encoding the five enzymes that catalyze the central part of glycolysis. Here we present a structure/function study demonstrating that the C-terminal region of CggR regulates the DNA binding activity of this repressor in response to binding of a phosphorylated sugar. Molecular modeling of CggR revealed a winged-helix DNA-binding motif followed by a C-terminal domain presenting weak but significant homology with glucosamine-6-phosphate deaminases from the NagB family. In silico ligand screening suggested that the CggR C-terminal domain would bind preferentially bi-phosphorylated compounds, in agreement with previous studies that proposed fructuose-1,6-biphosphate (FBP) as the inducer metabolite. In vitro, FBP was the only sugar compound capable of interfering with CggR cooperative binding to DNA. FBP was also found to protect CggR against trypsin degradation at two arginine residues predicted to reside in a mobile loop forming the active site lid of the NagB enzymes. Replacement of residues predicted to interact with FBP led to mutant CggR with altered repressor activity in vivo but retaining their structural integrity and DNA binding activity in vitro. Interestingly, some of the mutant repressors responded with different specificity towards mono- and di-phospho-fructosides. Based on these results, we propose that the activity of the CggR-like repressors is controlled by a phospho-sugar binding (PSB) domain presenting structural and functional homology with NagB enzymes. (c) 2008 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  9. The PAS fold: A redefinition of the PAS domain based upon structural prediction. A large-scale homology modelling study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hefti, M.H.; Francoijs, C.J.J.; Vries, de S.C.; Dixon, R.; Vervoort, J.J.M.

    2004-01-01

    In the postgenomic era it is essential that protein sequences are annotated correctly in order to help in the assignment of their putative functions. Over 1300 proteins in current protein sequence databases are predicted to contain a PAS domain based upon amino acid sequence alignments. One of the

  10. Time-resolved multimodal analysis of Src Homology 2 (SH2) domain binding in signaling by receptor tyrosine kinases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jadwin, Joshua A; Oh, Dongmyung; Curran, Timothy G; Ogiue-Ikeda, Mari; Jia, Lin; White, Forest M; Machida, Kazuya; Yu, Ji; Mayer, Bruce J

    2016-04-12

    While the affinities and specificities of SH2 domain-phosphotyrosine interactions have been well characterized, spatio-temporal changes in phosphosite availability in response to signals, and their impact on recruitment of SH2-containing proteins in vivo, are not well understood. To address this issue, we used three complementary experimental approaches to monitor phosphorylation and SH2 binding in human A431 cells stimulated with epidermal growth factor (EGF): 1) phospho-specific mass spectrometry; 2) far-Western blotting; and 3) live cell single-molecule imaging of SH2 membrane recruitment. Far-Western and MS analyses identified both well-established and previously undocumented EGF-dependent tyrosine phosphorylation and binding events, as well as dynamic changes in binding patterns over time. In comparing SH2 binding site phosphorylation with SH2 domain membrane recruitment in living cells, we found in vivo binding to be much slower. Delayed SH2 domain recruitment correlated with clustering of SH2 domain binding sites on the membrane, consistent with membrane retention via SH2 rebinding.

  11. Effect of pH on the Structure and DNA Binding of the FOXP2 Forkhead Domain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blane, Ashleigh; Fanucchi, Sylvia

    2015-06-30

    Forkhead box P2 (FOXP2) is a transcription factor expressed in cardiovascular, intestinal, and neural tissues during embryonic development and is implicated in language development. FOXP2 like other FOX proteins contains a DNA binding domain known as the forkhead domain (FHD). The FHD interacts with DNA by inserting helix 3 into the major groove. One of these DNA-protein interactions is a direct hydrogen bond that is formed with His554. FOXP2 is localized in the nuclear compartment that has a pH of 7.5. Histidine contains an imidazole side chain in which the amino group typically has a pKa of ~6.5. It seems possible that pH fluctuations around 6.5 may result in changes in the protonation state of His554 and thus the ability of the FOXP2 FHD to bind DNA. To investigate the effect of pH on the FHD, both the structure and the binding affinity were studied in the pH range of 5-9. This was done in the presence and absence of DNA. The structure was assessed using size exclusion chromatography, far-UV circular dichroism, and intrinsic and extrinsic fluorescence. The results indicated that while pH did not affect the secondary structure in the presence or absence of DNA, the tertiary structure was pH sensitive and the protein was less compact at low pH. Furthermore, the presence of DNA caused the protein to become more compact at low pH and also had the potential to increase the dimerization propensity. Fluorescence anisotropy was used to investigate the effect of pH on the FOXP2 FHD DNA binding affinity. It was found that pH had a direct effect on binding affinity. This was attributed to the altered hydrogen bonding patterns upon protonation or deprotonation of His554. These results could implicate pH as a means of regulating transcription by the FOXP2 FHD, which may also have repercussions for the behavior of this protein in cancer cells.

  12. The PH domain of phosphoinositide-dependent kinase-1 exhibits a novel, phospho-regulated monomer-dimer equilibrium with important implications for kinase domain activation: single-molecule and ensemble studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ziemba, Brian P; Pilling, Carissa; Calleja, Véronique; Larijani, Banafshé; Falke, Joseph J

    2013-07-16

    Phosphoinositide-dependent kinase-1 (PDK1) is an essential master kinase recruited to the plasma membrane by the binding of its C-terminal PH domain to the signaling lipid phosphatidylinositol-3,4,5-trisphosphate (PIP3). Membrane binding leads to PDK1 phospho-activation, but despite the central role of PDK1 in signaling and cancer biology, this activation mechanism remains poorly understood. PDK1 has been shown to exist as a dimer in cells, and one crystal structure of its isolated PH domain exhibits a putative dimer interface. It has been proposed that phosphorylation of PH domain residue T513 (or the phospho-mimetic T513E mutation) may regulate a novel PH domain dimer-monomer equilibrium, thereby converting an inactive PDK1 dimer to an active monomer. However, the oligomeric states of the PH domain on the membrane have not yet been determined, nor whether a negative charge at position 513 is sufficient to regulate its oligomeric state. This study investigates the binding of purified wild-type (WT) and T513E PDK1 PH domains to lipid bilayers containing the PIP3 target lipid, using both single-molecule and ensemble measurements. Single-molecule analysis of the brightness of the fluorescent PH domain shows that the PIP3-bound WT PH domain on membranes is predominantly dimeric while the PIP3-bound T513E PH domain is monomeric, demonstrating that negative charge at the T513 position is sufficient to dissociate the PH domain dimer and is thus likely to play a central role in PDK1 monomerization and activation. Single-molecule analysis of two-dimensional (2D) diffusion of PH domain-PIP3 complexes reveals that the dimeric WT PH domain diffuses at the same rate as a single lipid molecule, indicating that only one of its two PIP3 binding sites is occupied and there is little penetration of the protein into the bilayer as observed for other PH domains. The 2D diffusion of T513E PH domain is slower, suggesting the negative charge disrupts local structure in a way that allows

  13. Phorbol ester and hydrogen peroxide synergistically induce the interaction of diacylglycerol kinase gamma with the Src homology 2 and C1 domains of beta2-chimaerin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yasuda, Satoshi; Kai, Masahiro; Imai, Shin-ichi; Kanoh, Hideo; Sakane, Fumio

    2008-01-01

    DGKgamma (diacylglycerol kinase gamma) was reported to interact with beta2-chimaerin, a GAP (GTPase-activating protein) for Rac, in response to epidermal growth factor. Here we found that PMA and H2O2 also induced the interaction of DGKgamma with beta2-chimaerin. It is noteworthy that simultaneous addition of PMA and H2O2 synergistically enhanced the interaction. In this case, PMA was replaceable by DAG (diacylglycerol). The beta2-chimaerin translocation from the cytoplasm to the plasma membrane caused by PMA plus H2O2 was further enhanced by the expression of DGKgamma. Moreover, DGKgamma apparently enhanced the beta2-chimaerin GAP activity upon cell stimulation with PMA. PMA was found to be mainly required for a conversion of beta2-chimaerin into an active form. On the other hand, H2O2 was suggested to induce a release of Zn2+ from the C1 domain of beta2-chimaerin. By stepwise deletion analysis, we demonstrated that the SH2 (Src homology 2) and C1 domains of beta2-chimaerin interacted with the N-terminal half of catalytic region of DGKgamma. Unexpectedly, the SH2 domain of beta2-chimaerin contributes to the interaction independently of phosphotyrosine. Taken together, these results suggest that the functional link between DGKgamma and beta2-chimaerin has a broad significance in response to a wide range of cell stimuli. Our work offers a novel mechanism of protein-protein interaction, that is, the phosphotyrosine-independent interaction of the SH2 domain acting in co-operation with the C1 domain.

  14. The Three-Dimensional Solution Structure of the Src Homology Domain-2 of the Growth Factor Receptor-Bound Protein-2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Senior, Mary M.; Frederick, Anne F.; Black, Stuart; Murgolo, Nicholas J.; Perkins, Louise M.; Wilson, Oswald; Snow, Mark E.; Wang Yusen

    1998-01-01

    A set of high-resolution three-dimensional solution structures of the Src homology region-2 (SH2) domain of the growth factor receptor-bound protein-2 was determined using heteronuclear NMR spectroscopy. The NMR data used in this study were collected on a stable monomeric protein solution that was free of protein aggregates and proteolysis. The solution structure was determined based upon a total of 1439 constraints, which included 1326 nuclear Overhauser effect distance constraints, 70 hydrogen bond constraints, and 43 dihedral angle constraints. Distance geometry-simulated annealing calculations followed by energy minimization yielded a family of 18 structures that converged to a root-mean-square deviation of 1.09 A for all backbone atoms and 0.40 A for the backbone atoms of the central β-sheet. The core structure of the SH2 domain contains an antiparallel β-sheet flanked by two parallel α-helices displaying an overall architecture that is similar to other known SH2 domain structures. This family of NMR structures is compared to the X-ray structure and to another family of NMR solution structures determined under different solution conditions

  15. Contribution of the first K-homology domain of poly(C)-binding protein 1 to its affinity and specificity for C-rich oligonucleotides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoga, Yano M K; Traore, Daouda A K; Sidiqi, Mahjooba; Szeto, Chris; Pendini, Nicole R; Barker, Andrew; Leedman, Peter J; Wilce, Jacqueline A; Wilce, Matthew C J

    2012-06-01

    Poly-C-binding proteins are triple KH (hnRNP K homology) domain proteins with specificity for single stranded C-rich RNA and DNA. They play diverse roles in the regulation of protein expression at both transcriptional and translational levels. Here, we analyse the contributions of individual αCP1 KH domains to binding C-rich oligonucleotides using biophysical and structural methods. Using surface plasmon resonance (SPR), we demonstrate that KH1 makes the most stable interactions with both RNA and DNA, KH3 binds with intermediate affinity and KH2 only interacts detectibly with DNA. The crystal structure of KH1 bound to a 5'-CCCTCCCT-3' DNA sequence shows a 2:1 protein:DNA stoichiometry and demonstrates a molecular arrangement of KH domains bound to immediately adjacent oligonucleotide target sites. SPR experiments, with a series of poly-C-sequences reveals that cytosine is preferred at all four positions in the oligonucleotide binding cleft and that a C-tetrad binds KH1 with 10 times higher affinity than a C-triplet. The basis for this high affinity interaction is finally detailed with the structure determination of a KH1.W.C54S mutant bound to 5'-ACCCCA-3' DNA sequence. Together, these data establish the lead role of KH1 in oligonucleotide binding by αCP1 and reveal the molecular basis of its specificity for a C-rich tetrad.

  16. A role for the malignant brain tumour (MBT domain protein LIN-61 in DNA double-strand break repair by homologous recombination.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nicholas M Johnson

    Full Text Available Malignant brain tumour (MBT domain proteins are transcriptional repressors that function within Polycomb complexes. Some MBT genes are tumour suppressors, but how they prevent tumourigenesis is unknown. The Caenorhabditis elegans MBT protein LIN-61 is a member of the synMuvB chromatin-remodelling proteins that control vulval development. Here we report a new role for LIN-61: it protects the genome by promoting homologous recombination (HR for the repair of DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs. lin-61 mutants manifest numerous problems associated with defective HR in germ and somatic cells but remain proficient in meiotic recombination. They are hypersensitive to ionizing radiation and interstrand crosslinks but not UV light. Using a novel reporter system that monitors repair of a defined DSB in C. elegans somatic cells, we show that LIN-61 contributes to HR. The involvement of this MBT protein in HR raises the possibility that MBT-deficient tumours may also have defective DSB repair.

  17. A Ferredoxin- and F420H2-Dependent, Electron-Bifurcating, Heterodisulfide Reductase with Homologs in the Domains Bacteria and Archaea

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhen Yan

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Heterodisulfide reductases (Hdr of the HdrABC class are ancient enzymes and a component of the anaerobic core belonging to the prokaryotic common ancestor. The ancient origin is consistent with the widespread occurrence of genes encoding putative HdrABC homologs in metabolically diverse prokaryotes predicting diverse physiological functions; however, only one HdrABC has been characterized and that was from a narrow metabolic group of obligate CO2-reducing methanogenic anaerobes (methanogens from the domain Archaea. Here we report the biochemical characterization of an HdrABC homolog (HdrA2B2C2 from the acetate-utilizing methanogen Methanosarcina acetivorans with unusual properties structurally and functionally distinct from the only other HdrABC characterized. Homologs of the HdrA2B2C2 archetype are present in phylogenetically and metabolically diverse species from the domains Bacteria and Archaea. The expression of the individual HdrA2, HdrB2, and HdrB2C2 enzymes in Escherichia coli, and reconstitution of an active HdrA2B2C2 complex, revealed an intersubunit electron transport pathway dependent on ferredoxin or coenzyme F420 (F420H2 as an electron donor. Remarkably, HdrA2B2C2 couples the previously unknown endergonic oxidation of F420H2 and reduction of ferredoxin with the exergonic oxidation of F420H2 and reduction of the heterodisulfide of coenzyme M and coenzyme B (CoMS-SCoB. The unique electron bifurcation predicts a role for HdrA2B2C2 in Fe(III-dependent anaerobic methane oxidation (ANME by M. acetivorans and uncultured species from ANME environments. HdrA2B2C2, ubiquitous in acetotrophic methanogens, was shown to participate in electron transfer during acetotrophic growth of M. acetivorans and proposed to be essential for growth in the environment when acetate is limiting.

  18. The S-layer homology domain-containing protein SlhA from Paenibacillus alvei CCM 2051(T) is important for swarming and biofilm formation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Janesch, Bettina; Koerdt, Andrea; Messner, Paul; Schäffer, Christina

    2013-01-01

    Swarming and biofilm formation have been studied for a variety of bacteria. While this is well investigated for Gram-negative bacteria, less is known about Gram-positive bacteria, including Paenibacillus alvei, a secondary invader of diseased honeybee colonies infected with Melissococcus pluton, the causative agent of European foulbrood (EFB). Paenibacillus alvei CCM 2051(T) is a Gram-positive bacterium which was recently shown to employ S-layer homology (SLH) domains as cell wall targeting modules to display proteins on its cell surface. This study deals with the newly identified 1335-amino acid protein SlhA from P. alvei which carries at the C‑terminus three consecutive SLH-motifs containing the predicted binding sequences SRGE, VRQD, and LRGD instead of the common TRAE motif. Based on the proof of cell surface location of SlhA by fluorescence microscopy using a SlhA-GFP chimera, the binding mechanism was investigated in an in vitro assay. To unravel a putative function of the SlhA protein, a knockout mutant was constructed. Experimental data indicated that one SLH domain is sufficient for anchoring of SlhA to the cell surface, and the SLH domains of SlhA recognize both the peptidoglycan and the secondary cell wall polymer in vitro. This is in agreement with previous data from the S-layer protein SpaA, pinpointing a wider utilization of that mechanism for cell surface display of proteins in P. alvei. Compared to the wild-type bacterium ΔslhA revealed changed colony morphology, loss of swarming motility and impaired biofilm formation. The phenotype was similar to that of the flagella knockout Δhag, possibly due to reduced EPS production influencing the functionality of the flagella of ΔslhA. This study demonstrates the involvement of the SLH domain-containing protein SlhA in swarming and biofilm formation of P. alvei CCM 2051(T).

  19. The S-layer homology domain-containing protein SlhA from Paenibacillus alvei CCM 2051(T is important for swarming and biofilm formation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bettina Janesch

    Full Text Available Swarming and biofilm formation have been studied for a variety of bacteria. While this is well investigated for Gram-negative bacteria, less is known about Gram-positive bacteria, including Paenibacillus alvei, a secondary invader of diseased honeybee colonies infected with Melissococcus pluton, the causative agent of European foulbrood (EFB.Paenibacillus alvei CCM 2051(T is a Gram-positive bacterium which was recently shown to employ S-layer homology (SLH domains as cell wall targeting modules to display proteins on its cell surface. This study deals with the newly identified 1335-amino acid protein SlhA from P. alvei which carries at the C‑terminus three consecutive SLH-motifs containing the predicted binding sequences SRGE, VRQD, and LRGD instead of the common TRAE motif. Based on the proof of cell surface location of SlhA by fluorescence microscopy using a SlhA-GFP chimera, the binding mechanism was investigated in an in vitro assay. To unravel a putative function of the SlhA protein, a knockout mutant was constructed. Experimental data indicated that one SLH domain is sufficient for anchoring of SlhA to the cell surface, and the SLH domains of SlhA recognize both the peptidoglycan and the secondary cell wall polymer in vitro. This is in agreement with previous data from the S-layer protein SpaA, pinpointing a wider utilization of that mechanism for cell surface display of proteins in P. alvei. Compared to the wild-type bacterium ΔslhA revealed changed colony morphology, loss of swarming motility and impaired biofilm formation. The phenotype was similar to that of the flagella knockout Δhag, possibly due to reduced EPS production influencing the functionality of the flagella of ΔslhA.This study demonstrates the involvement of the SLH domain-containing protein SlhA in swarming and biofilm formation of P. alvei CCM 2051(T.

  20. Gene transfer and expression in human neutrophils. The phox homology domain of p47phox translocates to the plasma membrane but not to the membrane of mature phagosomes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brzezinska Agnieszka A

    2006-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Neutrophils are non-dividing cells with poor survival after isolation. Consequently, exogenous gene expression in neutrophils is challenging. We report here the transfection of genes and expression of active proteins in human primary peripheral neutrophils using nucleofection. Results Exogenous gene expression in human neutrophils was achieved 2 h post-transfection. We show that neutrophils transfected by nucleofection are functional cells, able to respond to soluble and particulate stimuli. They conserved the ability to undergo physiological processes including phagocytosis. Using this technique, we were able to show that the phox homology (PX domain of p47phox localizes to the plasma membrane in human neutrophils. We also show that RhoB, but not the PX domain of p47phox, is translocated to the membrane of mature phagosomes. Conclusion We demonstrated that cDNA transfer and expression of exogenous protein in human neutrophils is compatible with cell viability and is no longer a limitation for the study of protein function in human neutrophils.

  1. Activation of phosphatidylinositol-3 kinase by nerve growth factor involves indirect coupling of the trk proto-oncogene with src homology 2 domains.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohmichi, M; Decker, S J; Saltiel, A R

    1992-10-01

    Growth factor receptor tyrosine kinases can form stable associations with intracellular proteins that contain src homology (SH) 2 domains, including the p85 regulatory subunit of phosphatidylinositol (PI)-3 kinase. The activation of this enzyme by growth factors is evaluated in PC12 pheochromocytoma cells and NIH 3T3 fibroblasts expressing the pp140c-trk nerve growth factor (NGF) receptor (3T3-c-trk). NGF causes the rapid stimulation of PI-3 kinase activity detected in anti-phosphotyrosine, but not in anti-trk, immunoprecipitates. This effect coincides with the tyrosine phosphorylation of two proteins, with molecular masses of of 100 kd and 110 kd, that coimmunoprecipitate with p85. Similar phosphorylation patterns are induced when an immobilized fusion protein containing the amino-terminal SH2 domain of p85 is used to precipitate tyrosine-phosphorylated proteins. Thus, although NGF produces the rapid activation of PI-3 kinase through a mechanism that involves tyrosine phosphorylation, there is no evidence for tyrosine phosphorylation of p85, or for its ligand-dependent association with the NGF receptor. Perhaps another phosphoprotein may link the NGF receptor to this enzyme.

  2. The V-ATPase membrane domain is a sensor of granular pH that controls the exocytotic machinery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poëa-Guyon, Sandrine; Ammar, Mohamed Raafet; Erard, Marie; Amar, Muriel; Moreau, Alexandre W; Fossier, Philippe; Gleize, Vincent; Vitale, Nicolas; Morel, Nicolas

    2013-10-28

    Several studies have suggested that the V0 domain of the vacuolar-type H(+)-adenosine triphosphatase (V-ATPase) is directly implicated in secretory vesicle exocytosis through a role in membrane fusion. We report in this paper that there was a rapid decrease in neurotransmitter release after acute photoinactivation of the V0 a1-I subunit in neuronal pairs. Likewise, inactivation of the V0 a1-I subunit in chromaffin cells resulted in a decreased frequency and prolonged kinetics of amperometric spikes induced by depolarization, with shortening of the fusion pore open time. Dissipation of the granular pH gradient was associated with an inhibition of exocytosis and correlated with the V1-V0 association status in secretory granules. We thus conclude that V0 serves as a sensor of intragranular pH that controls exocytosis and synaptic transmission via the reversible dissociation of V1 at acidic pH. Hence, the V-ATPase membrane domain would allow the exocytotic machinery to discriminate fully loaded and acidified vesicles from vesicles undergoing neurotransmitter reloading.

  3. Absence of SUN-domain protein Slp1 blocks karyogamy and switches meiotic recombination and synapsis from homologs to sister chromatids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vasnier, Christelle; de Muyt, Arnaud; Zhang, Liangran; Tessé, Sophie; Kleckner, Nancy E.; Zickler, Denise; Espagne, Eric

    2014-01-01

    Karyogamy, the process of nuclear fusion is required for two haploid gamete nuclei to form a zygote. Also, in haplobiontic organisms, karyogamy is required to produce the diploid nucleus/cell that then enters meiosis. We identify sun like protein 1 (Slp1), member of the mid–Sad1p, UNC-84–domain ubiquitous family, as essential for karyogamy in the filamentous fungus Sordaria macrospora, thus uncovering a new function for this protein family. Slp1 is required at the last step, nuclear fusion, not for earlier events including nuclear movements, recognition, and juxtaposition. Correspondingly, like other family members, Slp1 localizes to the endoplasmic reticulum and also to its extensions comprising the nuclear envelope. Remarkably, despite the absence of nuclear fusion in the slp1 null mutant, meiosis proceeds efficiently in the two haploid “twin” nuclei, by the same program and timing as in diploid nuclei with a single dramatic exception: the normal prophase program of recombination and synapsis between homologous chromosomes, including loading of recombination and synaptonemal complex proteins, occurs instead between sister chromatids. Moreover, the numbers of recombination-initiating double-strand breaks (DSBs) and ensuing recombinational interactions, including foci of the essential crossover factor Homo sapiens enhancer of invasion 10 (Hei10), occur at half the diploid level in each haploid nucleus, implying per-chromosome specification of DSB formation. Further, the distribution of Hei10 foci shows interference like in diploid meiosis. Centromere and spindle dynamics, however, still occur in the diploid mode during the two meiotic divisions. These observations imply that the prophase program senses absence of karyogamy and/or absence of a homolog partner and adjusts the interchromosomal interaction program accordingly. PMID:25210014

  4. Interactive roles of Ras, insulin receptor substrate-1, and proteins with Src homology-2 domains in insulin signaling in Xenopus oocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chuang, L M; Hausdorff, S F; Myers, M G; White, M F; Birnbaum, M J; Kahn, C R

    1994-11-04

    Insulin receptor substrate-1 (IRS-1) serves as the major immediate substrate of insulin/insulin-like growth factor (IGF)-1 receptors and following tyrosine phosphorylation binds to specific Src homology-2 (SH2) domain-containing proteins including the p85 subunit of phosphatidylinositol (PI) 3-kinase and GRB2, a molecule believed to link IRS-1 to the Ras pathway. To investigate how these SH2-containing signaling molecules interact to regulate insulin/IGF-1 action, IRS-1, glutathione S-transferase (GST)-SH2 domain fusion proteins and Ras proteins were microinjected into Xenopus oocytes. We found that pleiotropic insulin actions are mediated by IRS-1 through two independent, but convergent, pathways involving PI 3-kinase and GRB2. Thus, microinjection of GST-fusion proteins of either p85 or GRB2 inhibited IRS-1-dependent activation of mitogen-activated protein (MAP) and S6 kinases and oocyte maturation, although only the GST-SH2 of p85 reduced insulin-stimulated PI 3-kinase activation. Co-injection of a dominant negative Ras (S17N) with IRS-1 inhibited insulin-stimulated MAP and S6 kinase activation. Micro-injection of activated [Arg12,Thr59]Ras increased basal MAP and S6 kinase activities and sensitized the oocytes to insulin-stimulated maturation without altering insulin-stimulated PI 3-kinase. The Ras-enhanced oocyte maturation response, but not the elevated basal level of MAP and S6 kinase, was partially blocked by the SH2-p85, but not SH2-GRB2. These data strongly suggest that IRS-1 can mediate many of insulin's actions on cellular enzyme activation and cell cycle progression requires binding and activation of multiple different SH2-domain proteins.

  5. C-terminal β9-strand of the cyclic nucleotide-binding homology domain stabilizes activated states of Kv11.1 channels.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chai Ann Ng

    Full Text Available Kv11.1 potassium channels are important for regulation of the normal rhythm of the heartbeat. Reduced activity of Kv11.1 channels causes long QT syndrome type 2, a disorder that increases the risk of cardiac arrhythmias and sudden cardiac arrest. Kv11.1 channels are members of the KCNH subfamily of voltage-gated K(+ channels. However, they also share many similarities with the cyclic nucleotide gated ion channel family, including having a cyclic nucleotide-binding homology (cNBH domain. Kv11.1 channels, however, are not directly regulated by cyclic nucleotides. Recently, crystal structures of the cNBH domain from mEAG and zELK channels, both members of the KCNH family of voltage-gated potassium channels, revealed that a C-terminal β9-strand in the cNBH domain occupied the putative cyclic nucleotide-binding site thereby precluding binding of cyclic nucleotides. Here we show that mutations to residues in the β9-strand affect the stability of the open state relative to the closed state of Kv11.1 channels. We also show that disrupting the structure of the β9-strand reduces the stability of the inactivated state relative to the open state. Clinical mutations located in this β9-strand result in reduced trafficking efficiency, which suggests that binding of the C-terminal β9-strand to the putative cyclic nucleotide-binding pocket is also important for assembly and trafficking of Kv11.1 channels.

  6. Crystal Structures and Thermodynamic Analysis Reveal Distinct Mechanisms of CD28 Phosphopeptide Binding to the Src Homology 2 (SH2) Domains of Three Adaptor Proteins*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Inaba, Satomi; Numoto, Nobutaka; Ogawa, Shuhei; Morii, Hisayuki; Ikura, Teikichi; Abe, Ryo; Ito, Nobutoshi; Oda, Masayuki

    2017-01-01

    Full activation of T cells and differentiation into effector T cells are essential for many immune responses and require co-stimulatory signaling via the CD28 receptor. Extracellular ligand binding to CD28 recruits protein-tyrosine kinases to its cytoplasmic tail, which contains a YMNM motif. Following phosphorylation of the tyrosine, the proteins growth factor receptor-bound protein 2 (Grb2), Grb2-related adaptor downstream of Shc (Gads), and p85 subunit of phosphoinositide 3-kinase may bind to pYMNM (where pY is phosphotyrosine) via their Src homology 2 (SH2) domains, leading to downstream signaling to distinct immune pathways. These three adaptor proteins bind to the same site on CD28 with variable affinity, and all are important for CD28-mediated co-stimulatory function. However, the mechanism of how these proteins recognize and compete for CD28 is unclear. To visualize their interactions with CD28, we have determined the crystal structures of Gads SH2 and two p85 SH2 domains in complex with a CD28-derived phosphopeptide. The high resolution structures obtained revealed that, whereas the CD28 phosphopeptide bound to Gads SH2 is in a bent conformation similar to that when bound to Grb2 SH2, it adopts a more extended conformation when bound to the N- and C-terminal SH2 domains of p85. These differences observed in the peptide-protein interactions correlated well with the affinity and other thermodynamic parameters for each interaction determined by isothermal titration calorimetry. The detailed insight into these interactions reported here may inform the development of compounds that specifically inhibit the association of CD28 with these adaptor proteins to suppress excessive T cell responses, such as in allergies and autoimmune diseases. PMID:27927989

  7. Crystal Structures and Thermodynamic Analysis Reveal Distinct Mechanisms of CD28 Phosphopeptide Binding to the Src Homology 2 (SH2) Domains of Three Adaptor Proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Inaba, Satomi; Numoto, Nobutaka; Ogawa, Shuhei; Morii, Hisayuki; Ikura, Teikichi; Abe, Ryo; Ito, Nobutoshi; Oda, Masayuki

    2017-01-20

    Full activation of T cells and differentiation into effector T cells are essential for many immune responses and require co-stimulatory signaling via the CD28 receptor. Extracellular ligand binding to CD28 recruits protein-tyrosine kinases to its cytoplasmic tail, which contains a YMNM motif. Following phosphorylation of the tyrosine, the proteins growth factor receptor-bound protein 2 (Grb2), Grb2-related adaptor downstream of Shc (Gads), and p85 subunit of phosphoinositide 3-kinase may bind to pYMNM (where pY is phosphotyrosine) via their Src homology 2 (SH2) domains, leading to downstream signaling to distinct immune pathways. These three adaptor proteins bind to the same site on CD28 with variable affinity, and all are important for CD28-mediated co-stimulatory function. However, the mechanism of how these proteins recognize and compete for CD28 is unclear. To visualize their interactions with CD28, we have determined the crystal structures of Gads SH2 and two p85 SH2 domains in complex with a CD28-derived phosphopeptide. The high resolution structures obtained revealed that, whereas the CD28 phosphopeptide bound to Gads SH2 is in a bent conformation similar to that when bound to Grb2 SH2, it adopts a more extended conformation when bound to the N- and C-terminal SH2 domains of p85. These differences observed in the peptide-protein interactions correlated well with the affinity and other thermodynamic parameters for each interaction determined by isothermal titration calorimetry. The detailed insight into these interactions reported here may inform the development of compounds that specifically inhibit the association of CD28 with these adaptor proteins to suppress excessive T cell responses, such as in allergies and autoimmune diseases. © 2017 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  8. Functional Analysis of the Tomato Immune Receptor Ve1 through Domain Swaps with Its Non-Functional Homolog Ve2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rovenich, Hanna; Song, Yin; Liebrand, Thomas W. H.; Masini, Laura; van den Berg, Grardy C. M.; Joosten, Matthieu H. A. J.; Thomma, Bart P. H. J.

    2014-01-01

    Resistance in tomato against race 1 strains of the fungal vascular wilt pathogens Verticillium dahliae and V. albo-atrum is mediated by the Ve locus. This locus comprises two closely linked inversely oriented genes, Ve1 and Ve2, which encode cell surface receptors of the extracellular leucine-rich repeat receptor-like protein (eLRR-RLP) type. While Ve1 mediates Verticillium resistance through monitoring the presence of the recently identified V. dahliae Ave1 effector, no functionality for Ve2 has been demonstrated in tomato. Ve1 and Ve2 contain 37 eLRRs and share 84% amino acid identity, facilitating investigation of Ve protein functionality through domain swapping. In this study it is shown that Ve chimeras in which the first thirty eLRRs of Ve1 were replaced by those of Ve2 remain able to induce HR and activate Verticillium resistance, and that deletion of these thirty eLRRs from Ve1 resulted in loss of functionality. Also the region between eLRR30 and eLRR35 is required for Ve1-mediated resistance, and cannot be replaced by the region between eLRR30 and eLRR35 of Ve2. We furthermore show that the cytoplasmic tail of Ve1 is required for functionality, as truncation of this tail results in loss of functionality. Moreover, the C-terminus of Ve2 fails to activate immune signaling as chimeras containing the C-terminus of Ve2 do not provide Verticillium resistance. Furthermore, Ve1 was found to interact through its C-terminus with the eLRR-containing receptor-like kinase (eLRR-RLK) interactor SOBIR1 that was recently identified as an interactor of eLRR-RLP (immune) receptors. Intriguingly, also Ve2 was found to interact with SOBIR1. PMID:24505431

  9. Different Principles of ADP-Ribose-Mediated Activation and Opposite Roles of the NUDT9 Homology Domain in the TRPM2 Orthologs of Man and Sea Anemone

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Frank Kühn

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available A decisive element in the human cation channel TRPM2 is a region in its cytosolic C-terminus named NUDT9H because of its homology to the NUDT9 enzyme, a pyrophosphatase degrading ADP-ribose (ADPR. In hTRPM2, however, the NUDT9H domain has lost its enzymatic activity but serves as a binding domain for ADPR. As consequence of binding, gating of the channel is initiated. Since ADPR is produced after oxidative DNA damage, hTRPM2 mediates Ca2+ influx in response to oxidative stress which may lead to cell death. In the genome of the sea anemone Nematostella vectensis (nv, a preferred model organism for the evolution of key bilaterian features, a TRPM2 ortholog has been identified that contains a NUDT9H domain as well. Heterologous expression of nvTRPM2 in HEK-293 cells reveals a cation channel with many close similarities to the human counterpart. Most notably, nvTRPM2 is activated by ADPR, and Ca2+ is a co-agonist. However, the intramolecular mechanisms of ADPR gating as well as the role of NUDT9H are strikingly different in the two species. Whereas already subtle changes of NUDT9H abolish ADPR gating in hTRPM2, the region can be completely removed from nvTRPM2 without loss of responses to ADPR. An alternative ADPR binding site seems to be present but has not yet been characterized. The ADP-ribose pyrophosphatase (ADPRase function of nvNUDT9H has been preserved but can be abolished by numerous genetic manipulations. All these manipulations create channels that are sensitive to hydrogen peroxide which fails to induce channel activity in wild-type nvTRPM2. Therefore, the function of NUDT9H in nvTRPM2 is the degradation of ADPR, thereby reducing agonist concentration in the presence of oxidative stress. Thus, the two TRPM2 orthologs have evolved divergently but nevertheless gained analogous functional properties, i.e., gating by ADPR with Ca2+ as co-factor. Opposite roles are played by the respective NUDT9H domains, either binding of ADPR and mediating

  10. A Ferredoxin- and F420H2-Dependent, Electron-Bifurcating, Heterodisulfide Reductase with Homologs in the Domains Bacteria and Archaea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Zhen; Wang, Mingyu; Ferry, James G

    2017-02-07

    Heterodisulfide reductases (Hdr) of the HdrABC class are ancient enzymes and a component of the anaerobic core belonging to the prokaryotic common ancestor. The ancient origin is consistent with the widespread occurrence of genes encoding putative HdrABC homologs in metabolically diverse prokaryotes predicting diverse physiological functions; however, only one HdrABC has been characterized and that was from a narrow metabolic group of obligate CO 2 -reducing methanogenic anaerobes (methanogens) from the domain Archaea Here we report the biochemical characterization of an HdrABC homolog (HdrA2B2C2) from the acetate-utilizing methanogen Methanosarcina acetivorans with unusual properties structurally and functionally distinct from the only other HdrABC characterized. Homologs of the HdrA2B2C2 archetype are present in phylogenetically and metabolically diverse species from the domains Bacteria and Archaea The expression of the individual HdrA2, HdrB2, and HdrB2C2 enzymes in Escherichia coli, and reconstitution of an active HdrA2B2C2 complex, revealed an intersubunit electron transport pathway dependent on ferredoxin or coenzyme F 420 (F 420 H 2 ) as an electron donor. Remarkably, HdrA2B2C2 couples the previously unknown endergonic oxidation of F 420 H 2 and reduction of ferredoxin with the exergonic oxidation of F 420 H 2 and reduction of the heterodisulfide of coenzyme M and coenzyme B (CoMS-SCoB). The unique electron bifurcation predicts a role for HdrA2B2C2 in Fe(III)-dependent anaerobic methane oxidation (ANME) by M. acetivorans and uncultured species from ANME environments. HdrA2B2C2, ubiquitous in acetotrophic methanogens, was shown to participate in electron transfer during acetotrophic growth of M. acetivorans and proposed to be essential for growth in the environment when acetate is limiting. Discovery of the archetype HdrA2B2C2 heterodisulfide reductase with categorically unique properties extends the understanding of this ancient family beyond CO 2

  11. Local pH domains regulate NHE3-mediated Na+ reabsorption in the renal proximal tubule

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burford, James L.; McDonough, Alicia A.; Holstein-Rathlou, Niels-Henrik; Peti-Peterdi, Janos

    2014-01-01

    The proximal tubule Na+/H+ exchanger 3 (NHE3), located in the apical dense microvilli (brush border), plays a major role in the reabsorption of NaCl and water in the renal proximal tubule. In response to a rise in blood pressure NHE3 redistributes in the plane of the plasma membrane to the base of the brush border, where NHE3 activity is reduced. This NHE3 redistribution is assumed to provoke pressure natriuresis; however, it is unclear how NHE3 redistribution per se reduces NHE3 activity. To investigate if the distribution of NHE3 in the brush border can change the reabsorption rate, we constructed a spatiotemporal mathematical model of NHE3-mediated Na+ reabsorption across a proximal tubule cell and compared the model results with in vivo experiments in rats. The model predicts that when NHE3 is localized exclusively at the base of the brush border, it creates local pH microdomains that reduce NHE3 activity by >30%. We tested the model's prediction experimentally: the rat kidney cortex was loaded with the pH-sensitive fluorescent dye BCECF, and cells of the proximal tubule were imaged in vivo using confocal fluorescence microscopy before and after an increase of blood pressure by ∼50 mmHg. The experimental results supported the model by demonstrating that a rise of blood pressure induces the development of pH microdomains near the bottom of the brush border. These local changes in pH reduce NHE3 activity, which may explain the pressure natriuresis response to NHE3 redistribution. PMID:25298526

  12. Homology-modeled ligand-binding domains of medaka estrogen receptors and androgen receptors: A model system for the study of reproduction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cui Jianzhou; Shen Xueyan; Yan Zuowei; Zhao Haobin; Nagahama, Yoshitaka

    2009-01-01

    Estrogen and androgen and their receptors play critical roles in physiological processes such as sexual differentiation and development. Using the available structural models for the human estrogen receptors alpha and beta and androgen receptor as templates, we designed in silico agonist and antagonist models of medaka estrogen receptor (meER) alpha, beta-1, and beta-2, and androgen receptor (meAR) alpha and beta. Using these models, we studied (1) the structural relationship between the ligand-binding domains (LBDs) of ERs and ARs of human and medaka, and (2) whether medaka ER and AR can be potential models for studying the ligand-binding activities of various agonists and antagonists of these receptors by docking analysis. A high level of conservation was observed between the sequences of the ligand-binding domains of meERα and huERα, meERβ1 and huERβ, meERβ2, and huERβ with 62.8%, 66.4%, and 65.1% identity, respectively. The sequence conservation between meARα and huAR, meARβ, and huAR was found with 70.1% and 61.0% of identity, respectively. Thirty-three selected endocrine disrupting chemicals (EDCs), including both agonists and antagonists, were docked into the LBD of ER and AR, and the corresponding docking score for medaka models and human templates were calculated. In order to confirm the conservation of the overall geometry and the binding pocket, the backbone root mean square deviation (RMSD) for Cα atoms was derived from the structure superposition of all 10 medaka homology models to the six human templates. Our results suggested conformational conservation between the ERs and ARs of medaka and human, Thus, medaka could be highly useful as a model system for studies involving estrogen and androgen interaction with their receptors.

  13. Pleckstrin homology-like domain family A, member 3 (PHLDA3 deficiency improves islets engraftment through the suppression of hypoxic damage.

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    Naoaki Sakata

    Full Text Available Islet transplantation is a useful cell replacement therapy that can restore the glycometabolic function of severe diabetic patients. It is known that many transplanted islets failed to engraft, and thus, new approaches for overcoming graft loss that may improve the outcome of future clinical islet transplantations are necessary. Pleckstrin homology-like domain family A, member 3 (PHLDA3 is a known suppressor of neuroendocrine tumorigenicity, yet deficiency of this gene increases islet proliferation, prevents islet apoptosis, and improves their insulin-releasing function without causing tumors. In this study, we examined the potential use of PHLDA3-deficient islets in transplantation. We observed that: 1 transplanting PHLDA3-deficient islets into diabetic mice significantly improved their glycometabolic condition, 2 the improved engraftment of PHLDA3-deficient islets resulted from increased cell survival during early transplantation, and 3 Akt activity was elevated in PHLDA3-deficient islets, especially under hypoxic conditions. Thus, we determined that PHLDA3-deficient islets are more resistant against stresses induced by islet isolation and transplantation. We conclude that use of islets with suppressed PHLDA3 expression could be a novel and promising treatment for improving engraftment and consequent glycemic control in islet transplantation.

  14. Adaptor protein containing PH domain, PTB domain and leucine zipper (APPL1) regulates the protein level of EGFR by modulating its trafficking

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Jae-Rin; Hahn, Hwa-Sun; Kim, Young-Hoon; Nguyen, Hong-Hoa; Yang, Jun-Mo; Kang, Jong-Sun; Hahn, Myong-Joon

    2011-01-01

    Highlights: ► APPL1 regulates the protein level of EGFR in response to EGF stimulation. ► Depletion of APPL1 accelerates the movement of EGF/EGFR from the cell surface to the perinuclear region in response to EGF. ► Knockdown of APPL1 enhances the activity of Rab5. -- Abstract: The EGFR-mediated signaling pathway regulates multiple biological processes such as cell proliferation, survival and differentiation. Previously APPL1 (adaptor protein containing PH domain, PTB domain and leucine zipper 1) has been reported to function as a downstream effector of EGF-initiated signaling. Here we demonstrate that APPL1 regulates EGFR protein levels in response to EGF stimulation. Overexpression of APPL1 enhances EGFR stabilization while APPL1 depletion by siRNA reduces EGFR protein levels. APPL1 depletion accelerates EGFR internalization and movement of EGF/EGFR from cell surface to the perinuclear region in response to EGF treatment. Conversely, overexpression of APPL1 decelerates EGFR internalization and translocation of EGF/EGFR to the perinuclear region. Furthermore, APPL1 depletion enhances the activity of Rab5 which is involved in internalization and trafficking of EGFR and inhibition of Rab5 in APPL1-depleted cells restored EGFR levels. Consistently, APPL1 depletion reduced activation of Akt, the downstream signaling effector of EGFR and this is restored by inhibition of Rab5. These findings suggest that APPL1 is required for EGFR signaling by regulation of EGFR stabilities through inhibition of Rab5.

  15. The Nance-Horan syndrome protein encodes a functional WAVE homology domain (WHD) and is important for co-ordinating actin remodelling and maintaining cell morphology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brooks, Simon P; Coccia, Margherita; Tang, Hao R; Kanuga, Naheed; Machesky, Laura M; Bailly, Maryse; Cheetham, Michael E; Hardcastle, Alison J

    2010-06-15

    Nance-Horan syndrome (NHS) is an X-linked developmental disorder, characterized by bilateral congenital cataracts, dental anomalies, facial dysmorphism and mental retardation. Null mutations in a novel gene, NHS, cause the syndrome. The NHS gene appears to have multiple isoforms as a result of alternative transcription, but a cellular function for the NHS protein has yet to be defined. We describe NHS as a founder member of a new protein family (NHS, NHSL1 and NHSL2). Here, we demonstrate that NHS is a novel regulator of actin remodelling and cell morphology. NHS localizes to sites of cell-cell contact, the leading edge of lamellipodia and focal adhesions. The N-terminus of isoforms NHS-A and NHS-1A, implicated in the pathogenesis of NHS, have a functional WAVE homology domain that interacts with the Abi protein family, haematopoietic stem/progenitor cell protein 300 (HSPC300), Nap1 and Sra1. NHS knockdown resulted in the disruption of the actin cytoskeleton. We show that NHS controls cell morphology by maintaining the integrity of the circumferential actin ring and controlling lamellipod formation. NHS knockdown led to a striking increase in cell spreading. Conversely, ectopic overexpression of NHS inhibited lamellipod formation. Remodelling of the actin cytoskeleton and localized actin polymerization into branched actin filaments at the plasma membrane are essential for mediating changes in cell shape, migration and cell contact. Our data identify NHS as a new regulator of actin remodelling. We suggest that NHS orchestrates actin regulatory protein function in response to signalling events during development.

  16. The Nance–Horan syndrome protein encodes a functional WAVE homology domain (WHD) and is important for co-ordinating actin remodelling and maintaining cell morphology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brooks, Simon P.; Coccia, Margherita; Tang, Hao R.; Kanuga, Naheed; Machesky, Laura M.; Bailly, Maryse; Cheetham, Michael E.; Hardcastle, Alison J.

    2010-01-01

    Nance–Horan syndrome (NHS) is an X-linked developmental disorder, characterized by bilateral congenital cataracts, dental anomalies, facial dysmorphism and mental retardation. Null mutations in a novel gene, NHS, cause the syndrome. The NHS gene appears to have multiple isoforms as a result of alternative transcription, but a cellular function for the NHS protein has yet to be defined. We describe NHS as a founder member of a new protein family (NHS, NHSL1 and NHSL2). Here, we demonstrate that NHS is a novel regulator of actin remodelling and cell morphology. NHS localizes to sites of cell–cell contact, the leading edge of lamellipodia and focal adhesions. The N-terminus of isoforms NHS-A and NHS-1A, implicated in the pathogenesis of NHS, have a functional WAVE homology domain that interacts with the Abi protein family, haematopoietic stem/progenitor cell protein 300 (HSPC300), Nap1 and Sra1. NHS knockdown resulted in the disruption of the actin cytoskeleton. We show that NHS controls cell morphology by maintaining the integrity of the circumferential actin ring and controlling lamellipod formation. NHS knockdown led to a striking increase in cell spreading. Conversely, ectopic overexpression of NHS inhibited lamellipod formation. Remodelling of the actin cytoskeleton and localized actin polymerization into branched actin filaments at the plasma membrane are essential for mediating changes in cell shape, migration and cell contact. Our data identify NHS as a new regulator of actin remodelling. We suggest that NHS orchestrates actin regulatory protein function in response to signalling events during development. PMID:20332100

  17. PD-1 immunoreceptor inhibits B cell receptor-mediated signaling by recruiting src homology 2-domain-containing tyrosine phosphatase 2 to phosphotyrosine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okazaki, Taku; Maeda, Akito; Nishimura, Hiroyuki; Kurosaki, Tomohiro; Honjo, Tasuku

    2001-01-01

    PD-1 is an immunoreceptor that belongs to the immunoglobulin (Ig) superfamily and contains two tyrosine residues in the cytoplasmic region. Studies on PD-1-deficient mice have shown that PD-1 plays critical roles in establishment and/or maintenance of peripheral tolerance, but the mode of action is totally unknown. To study the molecular mechanism for negative regulation of lymphocytes through the PD-1 receptor, we generated chimeric molecules composed of the IgG Fc receptor type IIB (FcγRIIB) extracellular region and the PD-1 cytoplasmic region and expressed them in a B lymphoma cell line, IIA1.6. Coligation of the cytoplasmic region of PD-1 with the B cell receptor (BCR) in IIA1.6 transformants inhibited BCR-mediated growth retardation, Ca2+ mobilization, and tyrosine phosphorylation of effector molecules, including Igβ, Syk, phospholipase C-γ2 (PLCγ2), and ERK1/2, whereas phosphorylation of Lyn and Dok was not affected. Mutagenesis studies indicated that these inhibitory effects do not require the N-terminal tyrosine in the immunoreceptor tyrosine-based inhibitory motif-like sequence, but do require the other tyrosine residue in the C-terminal tail. This tyrosine was phosphorylated and recruited src homology 2-domain-containing tyrosine phosphatase 2 (SHP-2) on coligation of PD-1 with BCR. These results show that PD-1 can inhibit BCR signaling by recruiting SHP-2 to its phosphotyrosine and dephosphorylating key signal transducers of BCR signaling. PMID:11698646

  18. Atomic structure of the sweet-tasting protein thaumatin I at pH 8.0 reveals the large disulfide-rich region in domain II to be sensitive to a pH change

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Masuda, Tetsuya, E-mail: t2masuda@kais.kyoto-u.ac.jp [Division of Food Science and Biotechnology, Graduate School of Agriculture, Kyoto University, Gokasho, Uji, Kyoto 611-0011 (Japan); Department of Natural Resources, Graduate School of Global Environmental Studies, Kyoto University, Gokasho, Uji, Kyoto 611-0011 (Japan); Ohta, Keisuke [Division of Food Science and Biotechnology, Graduate School of Agriculture, Kyoto University, Gokasho, Uji, Kyoto 611-0011 (Japan); Department of Natural Resources, Graduate School of Global Environmental Studies, Kyoto University, Gokasho, Uji, Kyoto 611-0011 (Japan); Mikami, Bunzo [Division of Applied Life Sciences, Graduate School of Agriculture, Kyoto University, Gokasho, Uji, Kyoto 611-0011 (Japan); Kitabatake, Naofumi [Department of Foods and Human Nutrition, Notre Dame Seishin University, Okayama 700-8516 (Japan); Tani, Fumito [Division of Food Science and Biotechnology, Graduate School of Agriculture, Kyoto University, Gokasho, Uji, Kyoto 611-0011 (Japan); Department of Natural Resources, Graduate School of Global Environmental Studies, Kyoto University, Gokasho, Uji, Kyoto 611-0011 (Japan)

    2012-03-02

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Structure of a recombinant thaumatin at pH 8.0 determined at a resolution of 1.0 A. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Substantial fluctuations of a loop in domain II was found in the structure at pH 8.0. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer B-factors for Lys137, Lys163, and Lys187 were significantly affected by pH change. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer An increase in mobility might play an important role in the heat-induced aggregation. -- Abstract: Thaumatin, an intensely sweet-tasting plant protein, elicits a sweet taste at 50 nM. Although the sweetness remains when thaumatin is heated at 80 Degree-Sign C for 4 h under acid conditions, it rapidly declines when heating at a pH above 6.5. To clarify the structural difference at high pH, the atomic structure of a recombinant thaumatin I at pH 8.0 was determined at a resolution of 1.0 A. Comparison to the crystal structure of thaumatin at pH 7.3 and 7.0 revealed the root-mean square deviation value of a C{alpha} atom to be substantially greater in the large disulfide-rich region of domain II, especially residues 154-164, suggesting that a loop region in domain II to be affected by solvent conditions. Furthermore, B-factors of Lys137, Lys163, and Lys187 were significantly affected by pH change, suggesting that a striking increase in the mobility of these lysine residues, which could facilitate a reaction with a free sulfhydryl residue produced via the {beta}-elimination of disulfide bonds by heating at a pH above 7.0. The increase in mobility of lysine residues as well as a loop region in domain II might play an important role in the heat-induced aggregation of thaumatin above pH 7.0.

  19. APS, an adaptor molecule containing PH and SH2 domains, has a negative regulatory role in B cell proliferation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Iseki, Masanori; Kubo-Akashi, Chiyomi; Kwon, Sang-Mo; Yamaguchi, Akiko; Takatsu, Kiyoshi; Takaki, Satoshi

    2005-01-01

    Adaptor molecule containing PH and SH2 domains (APS) is an intracellular adaptor protein that forms part of an adaptor family along with Lnk and SH2-B. APS transcripts are expressed in various tissues including brain, kidney, and muscle, as well as in splenic B cells but not in T cells. We investigated the functions of APS in B cell development and activation by generating APS-transgenic (APS-Tg) mice that overexpressed APS in lymphocytes. The number of B-1 cells in the peritoneal cavity was reduced in APS-Tg mice, as were B-2 cells in the spleen. B cell development in the bone marrow was partially impaired at the transition stage from proliferating large pre-B to small pre-B cells. B cell proliferation induced by B cell receptor (BCR) crosslinking but not by other B cell mitogens was also impaired in APS-Tg mice. APS co-localized with BCR complexes and filamentous actin in activated APS-Tg B cells. Thus, APS appears to play novel negative regulatory roles in BCR signaling, actin reorganization pathways, and control of compartment sizes of B-lineage cells

  20. Phylogenetic analysis of the diacylglycerol kinase family of proteins and identification of multiple highly-specific conserved inserts and deletions within the catalytic domain that are distinctive characteristics of different classes of DGK homologs.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Radhey S Gupta

    Full Text Available Diacylglycerol kinase (DGK family of proteins, which phosphorylates diacylglycerol into phosphatidic acid, play important role in controlling diverse cellular processes in eukaryotic organisms. Most vertebrate species contain 10 different DGK isozymes, which are grouped into 5 different classes based on the presence or absence of specific functional domains. However, the relationships among different DGK isozymes or how they have evolved from a common ancestor is unclear. The catalytic domain constitutes the single largest sequence element within the DGK proteins that is commonly and uniquely shared by all family members, but there is limited understanding of the overall function of this domain. In this work, we have used the catalytic domain sequences to construct a phylogenetic tree for the DGK family members from representatives of the main vertebrate classes and have also examined the distributions of various DGK isozymes in eukaryotic phyla. In a tree based on catalytic domain sequences, the DGK homologs belonging to different classes formed strongly supported clusters which were separated by long branches, and the different isozymes within each class also generally formed monophyletic groupings. Further, our analysis of the sequence alignments of catalytic domains has identified >10 novel sequence signatures consisting of conserved signature indels (inserts or deletions, CSIs that are distinctive characteristics of either particular classes of DGK isozymes, or are commonly shared by members of two or more classes of DGK isozymes. The conserved indels in protein sequences are known to play important functional roles in the proteins/organisms where they are found. Thus, our identification of multiple highly specific CSIs that are distinguishing characteristics of different classes of DGK homologs points to the existence of important differences in the catalytic domain function among the DGK isozymes. The identified CSIs in conjunction with

  1. GMI1, a structural-maintenance-of-chromosomes-hinge domain-containing protein, is involved in somatic homologous recombination in Arabidopsis

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Bohmdorfer, G.; Schleiffer, A.; Brunmeir, R.; Ferscha, S.; Nizhynska, V.; Kozák, Jaroslav; Angelis, Karel; Kreil, D. P.; Schweizer, D.

    2011-01-01

    Roč. 67, č. 3 (2011), s. 420-433 ISSN 0960-7412 R&D Projects: GA MŠk 1M0505; GA MŠk(CZ) LC06004 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50380511 Keywords : structural maintenance of chromosomes * DNA repair * somatic homologous recombination Subject RIV: EI - Biotechnology ; Bionics Impact factor: 6.160, year: 2011

  2. Functional Independence and Interdependence of the Src Homology Domains of Phospholipase C-γ1 in B-Cell Receptor Signal Transduction

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeBell, Karen E.; Stoica, Bogdan A.; Verí, Maria-Concetta; Di Baldassarre, Angela; Miscia, Sebastiano; Graham, Laurie J.; Rellahan, Barbara L.; Ishiai, Masamichi; Kurosaki, Tomohiro; Bonvini, Ezio

    1999-01-01

    B-cell receptor (BCR)-induced activation of phospholipase C-γ1 (PLCγ1) and PLCγ2 is crucial for B-cell function. While several signaling molecules have been implicated in PLCγ activation, the mechanism coupling PLCγ to the BCR remains undefined. The role of PLCγ1 SH2 and SH3 domains at different steps of BCR-induced PLCγ1 activation was examined by reconstitution in a PLCγ-negative B-cell line. PLCγ1 membrane translocation required a functional SH2 N-terminal [SH2(N)] domain, was decreased by mutation of the SH3 domain, but was unaffected by mutation of the SH2(C) domain. Tyrosine phosphorylation did not require the SH2(C) or SH3 domains but depended exclusively on a functional SH2(N) domain, which mediated the association of PLCγ1 with the adapter protein, BLNK. Forcing PLCγ1 to the membrane via a myristoylation signal did not bypass the SH2(N) domain requirement for phosphorylation, indicating that the phosphorylation mediated by this domain is not due to membrane anchoring alone. Mutation of the SH2(N) or the SH2(C) domain abrogated BCR-stimulated phosphoinositide hydrolysis and signaling events, while mutation of the SH3 domain partially decreased signaling. PLCγ1 SH domains, therefore, have interrelated but distinct roles in BCR-induced PLCγ1 activation. PMID:10523627

  3. Enhanced Prediction of Src Homology 2 (SH2) Domain Binding Potentials Using a Fluorescence Polarization-derived c-Met, c-Kit, ErbB, and Androgen Receptor Interactome*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leung, Kin K.; Hause, Ronald J.; Barkinge, John L.; Ciaccio, Mark F.; Chuu, Chih-Pin; Jones, Richard B.

    2014-01-01

    Many human diseases are associated with aberrant regulation of phosphoprotein signaling networks. Src homology 2 (SH2) domains represent the major class of protein domains in metazoans that interact with proteins phosphorylated on the amino acid residue tyrosine. Although current SH2 domain prediction algorithms perform well at predicting the sequences of phosphorylated peptides that are likely to result in the highest possible interaction affinity in the context of random peptide library screens, these algorithms do poorly at predicting the interaction potential of SH2 domains with physiologically derived protein sequences. We employed a high throughput interaction assay system to empirically determine the affinity between 93 human SH2 domains and phosphopeptides abstracted from several receptor tyrosine kinases and signaling proteins. The resulting interaction experiments revealed over 1000 novel peptide-protein interactions and provided a glimpse into the common and specific interaction potentials of c-Met, c-Kit, GAB1, and the human androgen receptor. We used these data to build a permutation-based logistic regression classifier that performed considerably better than existing algorithms for predicting the interaction potential of several SH2 domains. PMID:24728074

  4. H3S10ph broadly marks early-replicating domains in interphase ESCs and shows reciprocal antagonism with H3K9me2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Carol C L; Goyal, Preeti; Karimi, Mohammad M; Abildgaard, Marie H; Kimura, Hiroshi; Lorincz, Matthew C

    2018-01-01

    Phosphorylation of histone H3 at serine 10 (H3S10ph) by Aurora kinases plays an important role in mitosis; however, H3S10ph also marks regulatory regions of inducible genes in interphase mammalian cells, implicating mitosis-independent functions. Using the fluorescent ubiquitin-mediated cell cycle indicator (FUCCI), we found that 30% of the genome in interphase mouse embryonic stem cells (ESCs) is marked with H3S10ph. H3S10ph broadly demarcates gene-rich regions in G1 and is positively correlated with domains of early DNA replication timing (RT) but negatively correlated with H3K9me2 and lamin-associated domains (LADs). Consistent with mitosis-independent kinase activity, this pattern was preserved in ESCs treated with Hesperadin, a potent inhibitor of Aurora B/C kinases. Disruption of H3S10ph by expression of nonphosphorylatable H3.3S10A results in ectopic spreading of H3K9me2 into adjacent euchromatic regions, mimicking the phenotype observed in Drosophila JIL-1 kinase mutants . Conversely, interphase H3S10ph domains expand in Ehmt1 (also known as Glp ) null ESCs, revealing that H3S10ph deposition is restricted by H3K9me2. Strikingly, spreading of H3S10ph at RT transition regions (TTRs) is accompanied by aberrant transcription initiation of genes co-oriented with the replication fork in Ehmt1 -/- and Ehmt2 -/- ESCs, indicating that establishment of repressive chromatin on the leading strand following DNA synthesis may depend upon these lysine methyltransferases. H3S10ph is also anti-correlated with H3K9me2 in interphase murine embryonic fibroblasts (MEFs) and is restricted to intragenic regions of actively transcribing genes by EHMT2. Taken together, these observations reveal that H3S10ph may play a general role in restricting the spreading of repressive chromatin in interphase mammalian cells. © 2018 Chen et al.; Published by Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory Press.

  5. Expression, refolding and spectroscopic characterization of fibronectin type III (FnIII)-homology domains derived from human fibronectin leucine rich transmembrane protein (FLRT)-1,-2, and-3

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Yang, Lila; Falkesgaard, Maria Hansen; Thulstrup, Peter Waaben

    2017-01-01

    various species have been determined, the expression and purification of recombinant FLRT FnIII domains, important steps for further structural and functional characterizations of the proteins, have not yet been described. Here we present a protocol for expressing recombinant FLRT-FnIII domains...... that a strand-strand cystine bridge has significant effect on the stability of the FLRT FnIII fold. We further show by Surface Plasmon Resonance that all three FnIII domains bind to FGFR1, and roughly estimate a Kd for each domain, all Kds being in the µM range....

  6. Identification of a New Interaction Mode between the Src Homology 2 Domain of C-terminal Src Kinase (Csk) and Csk-binding Protein/Phosphoprotein Associated with Glycosphingolipid Microdomains♦

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanaka, Hiroaki; Akagi, Ken-ichi; Oneyama, Chitose; Tanaka, Masakazu; Sasaki, Yuichi; Kanou, Takashi; Lee, Young-Ho; Yokogawa, Daisuke; Dobenecker, Marc-Werner; Nakagawa, Atsushi; Okada, Masato; Ikegami, Takahisa

    2013-01-01

    Proteins with Src homology 2 (SH2) domains play major roles in tyrosine kinase signaling. Structures of many SH2 domains have been studied, and the regions involved in their interactions with ligands have been elucidated. However, these analyses have been performed using short peptides consisting of phosphotyrosine followed by a few amino acids, which are described as the canonical recognition sites. Here, we report the solution structure of the SH2 domain of C-terminal Src kinase (Csk) in complex with a longer phosphopeptide from the Csk-binding protein (Cbp). This structure, together with biochemical experiments, revealed the existence of a novel binding region in addition to the canonical phosphotyrosine 314-binding site of Cbp. Mutational analysis of this second region in cells showed that both canonical and novel binding sites are required for tumor suppression through the Cbp-Csk interaction. Furthermore, the data indicate an allosteric connection between Cbp binding and Csk activation that arises from residues in the βB/βC loop of the SH2 domain. PMID:23548896

  7. Critical role of the Src homology 2 (SH2) domain of neuronal SH2B1 in the regulation of body weight and glucose homeostasis in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morris, David L; Cho, Kae Won; Rui, Liangyou

    2010-08-01

    SH2B1 is an SH2 domain-containing adaptor protein that plays a key role in the regulation of energy and glucose metabolism in both rodents and humans. Genetic deletion of SH2B1 in mice results in obesity and type 2 diabetes. Single-nucleotide polymorphisms in the SH2B1 loci and chromosomal deletions of the SH2B1 loci associate with obesity and insulin resistance in humans. In cultured cells, SH2B1 promotes leptin and insulin signaling by binding via its SH2 domain to phosphorylated tyrosines in Janus kinase 2 and the insulin receptor, respectively. Here we generated three lines of mice to analyze the role of the SH2 domain of SH2B1 in the central nervous system. Transgenic mice expressing wild-type, SH2 domain-defective (R555E), or SH2 domain-alone (DeltaN503) forms of SH2B1 specifically in neurons were crossed with SH2B1 knockout mice to generate KO/SH2B1, KO/R555E, or KO/DeltaN503 compound mutant mice. R555E had a replacement of Arg(555) with Glu within the SH2 domain. DeltaN503 contained an intact SH2 domain but lacked amino acids 1-503. Neuron-specific expression of recombinant SH2B1, but not R555E or DeltaN503, corrected hyperphagia, obesity, glucose intolerance, and insulin resistance in SH2B1 null mice. Neuron-specific expression of R555E in wild-type mice promoted obesity and insulin resistance. These results indicate that in addition to the SH2 domain, N-terminal regions of neuronal SH2B1 are also required for the maintenance of normal body weight and glucose metabolism. Additionally, mutations in the SH2 domain of SH2B1 may increase the susceptibility to obesity and type 2 diabetes in a dominant-negative manner.

  8. Exon organization of the mouse entactin gene corresponds to the structural domains of the polypeptide and has regional homology to the low-density lipoprotein receptor gene

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Durkin, M E; Wewer, U M; Chung, A E

    1995-01-01

    of the mouse entactin gene closely corresponds to the organization of the polypeptide into distinct structural and functional domains. The two amino-terminal globular domains are encoded by three exons each. Single exons encode the two protease-sensitive, O-glycosylated linking regions. The six EGF......Entactin is a widespread basement membrane protein of 150 kDa that binds to type IV collagen and laminin. The complete exon-intron structure of the mouse entactin gene has been determined from lambda genomic DNA clones. The gene spans at least 65 kb and contains 20 exons. The exon organization...

  9. Critical Role of the Src Homology 2 (SH2) Domain of Neuronal SH2B1 in the Regulation of Body Weight and Glucose Homeostasis in Mice

    OpenAIRE

    Morris, David L.; Cho, Kae Won; Rui, Liangyou

    2010-01-01

    SH2B1 is an SH2 domain-containing adaptor protein that plays a key role in the regulation of energy and glucose metabolism in both rodents and humans. Genetic deletion of SH2B1 in mice results in obesity and type 2 diabetes. Single-nucleotide polymorphisms in the SH2B1 loci and chromosomal deletions of the SH2B1 loci associate with obesity and insulin resistance in humans. In cultured cells, SH2B1 promotes leptin and insulin signaling by binding via its SH2 domain to phosphorylated tyrosines ...

  10. Changes in pH and NADPH regulate the DNA binding activity of neuronal PAS domain protein 2, a mammalian circadian transcription factor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoshii, Katsuhiro; Tajima, Fumihisa; Ishijima, Sumio; Sagami, Ikuko

    2015-01-20

    Neuronal PAS domain protein 2 (NPAS2) is a core clock transcription factor that forms a heterodimer with BMAL1 to bind the E-box in the promoter of clock genes and is regulated by various environmental stimuli such as heme, carbon monoxide, and NAD(P)H. In this study, we investigated the effects of pH and NADPH on the DNA binding activity of NPAS2. In an electrophoretic mobility shift (EMS) assay, the pH of the reaction mixture affected the DNA binding activity of the NPAS2/BMAL1 heterodimer but not that of the BMAL1/BMAL1 homodimer. A change in pH from 7.0 to 7.5 resulted in a 1.7-fold increase in activity in the absence of NADPH, and NADPH additively enhanced the activity up to 2.7-fold at pH 7.5. The experiments using truncated mutants revealed that N-terminal amino acids 1-61 of NPAS2 were sufficient to sense the change in both pH and NADPH. We further analyzed the kinetics of formation and DNA binding of the NPAS2/BMAL1 heterodimer at various pH values. In the absence of NADPH, a change in pH from 6.5 to 8.0 decreased the KD(app) value of the E-box from 125 to 22 nM, with an 8-fold increase in the maximal level of DNA binding for the NPAS2/BMAL1 heterodimer. The addition of NADPH resulted in a further decrease in KD(app) to 9 nM at pH 8.0. Furthermore, NPAS2-dependent transcriptional activity in a luciferase assay using NIH3T3 cells also increased with the pH of the culture medium. These results suggest that NPAS2 has a role as a pH and metabolite sensor in regulating circadian rhythms.

  11. pH dependence of cyanide binding to the ferric heme domain of the direct oxygen sensor from Escherichia coli and the effect of alkaline denaturation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bidwai, Anil K; Ok, Esther Y; Erman, James E

    2008-09-30

    The spectrum of the ferric heme domain of the direct oxygen sensor protein from Escherichia coli ( EcDosH) has been measured between pH 3.0 and 12.6. EcDosH undergoes acid denaturation with an apparent p K a of 4.24 +/- 0.05 and a Hill coefficient of 3.1 +/- 0.6 and reversible alkaline denaturation with a p K a of 9.86 +/- 0.04 and a Hill coefficient of 1.1 +/- 0.1. Cyanide binding to EcDosH has been investigated between pH 4 and 11. The EcDosH-cyanide complex is most stable at pH 9 with a K D of 0.29 +/- 0.06 microM. The kinetics of cyanide binding are monophasic between pH 4 and 8. At pH >or=8.5, the reaction is biphasic with the fast phase dependent upon the cyanide concentration and the slow phase independent of cyanide. The slow phase is attributed to conversion of denatured EcDosH to the native state, with a pH-independent rate of 0.052 +/- 0.006 s (-1). The apparent association rate constant for cyanide binding to EcDosH increases from 3.6 +/- 0.1 M (-1) s (-1) at pH 4 to 520 +/- 20 M (-1) s (-1) at pH 11. The dissociation rate constant averages (8.6 +/- 1.3) x 10 (-5) s (-1) between pH 5 and 9, increasing to (1.4 +/- 0.1) x 10 (-3) s (-1) at pH 4 and (2.5 +/- 0.1) x 10 (-3) s (-1) at pH 12.2. The mechanism of cyanide binding is consistent with preferential binding of the cyanide anion to native EcDosH. The reactions of imidazole and H 2O 2 with ferric EcDosH were also investigated and show little reactivity.

  12. Association between receptor protein-tyrosine phosphatase RPTPalpha and the Grb2 adaptor. Dual Src homology (SH) 2/SH3 domain requirement and functional consequences

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Su, J; Yang, L T; Sap, J

    1996-01-01

    domain in Grb2 (, ). We show here that association of Grb2 with RPTPalpha also involves a critical function for the C-terminal SH3 domain of Grb2. Furthermore, Grb2 SH3 binding peptides interfere with RPTPalpha-Grb2 association in vitro, and the RPTPalpha protein can dissociate the Grb2-Sos complex...... in vivo. These observations constitute a novel mode of Grb2 association and suggest a model in which association with a tyrosine-phosphorylated protein restricts the repertoire of SH3 binding proteins with which Grb2 can simultaneously interact. The function of the Tyr798 tyrosine phosphorylation/Grb2...... binding site in RPTPalpha was studied further by expression of wild type or mutant RPTPalpha proteins in PC12 cells. In these cells, wild type RPTPalpha interferes with acidic fibroblast growth factor-induced neurite outgrowth; this effect requires both the catalytic activity and the Grb2 binding Tyr798...

  13. Characterization of Mycobacterium smegmatis PolD2 and PolD1 as RNA/DNA polymerases homologous to the POL domain of bacterial DNA ligase D.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Hui; Bhattarai, Hitesh; Yan, Han-Guang; Shuman, Stewart; Glickman, Michael S

    2012-12-21

    Mycobacteria exploit nonhomologous end-joining (NHEJ) to repair DNA double-strand breaks. The core NHEJ machinery comprises the homodimeric DNA end-binding protein Ku and DNA ligase D (LigD), a modular enzyme composed of a C-terminal ATP-dependent ligase domain (LIG), a central 3'-phosphoesterase domain (PE), and an N-terminal polymerase domain (POL). LigD POL is proficient at adding templated and nontemplated deoxynucleotides and ribonucleotides to DNA ends in vitro and is the catalyst in vivo of unfaithful NHEJ events involving nontemplated single-nucleotide additions to blunt DSB ends. Here, we identify two mycobacterial proteins, PolD1 and PolD2, as stand-alone homologues of the LigD POL domain. Biochemical characterization of PolD1 and PolD2 shows that they resemble LigD POL in their monomeric quaternary structures, their ability to add templated and nontemplated nucleotides to primer-templates and blunt ends, and their preference for rNTPs versus dNTPs. Deletion of polD1, polD2, or both from a Mycobacterium smegmatis strain carrying an inactivating mutation in LigD POL failed to reveal a role for PolD1 or PolD2 in templated nucleotide additions during NHEJ of 5'-overhang DSBs or in clastogen resistance. Whereas our results document the existence and characteristics of new stand-alone members of the LigD POL family of RNA/DNA polymerases, they imply that other polymerases can perform fill-in synthesis during mycobacterial NHEJ.

  14. Effect of NADPH oxidase inhibitor-apocynin on the expression of Src homology-2 domain-containing phosphatase-1 (SHP-1 exposed renal ischemia/reperfusion injury in rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhiming Li

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available This study was designed to evaluate whether NADPH oxidase inhibitor (apocynin preconditioning induces expression of Src homology-2 domain-containing phosphatase-1 (SHP-1 to protect against renal ischemia/reperfusion (I/R injury (RI/RI in rats. Rats were pretreated with 50 mg/kg apocynin, then subjected to 45 min ischemia and 24 h reperfusion. The results indicated that apocynin preconditioning improved the recovery of renal function and nitroso-redox balance, reduced oxidative stress injury and inflammation damage, and upregulated expression of SHP-1 as compared to RI/RI group. Therefore our study demonstrated that apocynin preconditioning provided a protection to the kidney against I/R injury in rats partially through inducing expression of SHP-1.

  15. Expression and crystallographic studies of the D1D2 domains of C4.4A, a homologous protein to the urokinase receptor

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chen, Shanli; Lin, Lin; Yuan, Cai

    2017-01-01

    -diffusion method. The crystals diffracted to 2.7 Å resolution and belonged to space group C2221, with unit-cell parameters a = 55.49, b = 119.63, c = 168.54 Å. The statistics indicated good quality of the data, which form a solid basis for the determination of the C4.4A structure.The two amino-terminal LU domains...... of C4.4A were excised by limited proteolysis and were crystallized using the sitting-drop vapour-diffusion method. The crystals diffracted to 2.7 Å resolution, giving good-quality data....

  16. Pro-domain removal in ASP-2 and the cleavage of the amyloid precursor are influenced by pH

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Austen Brian

    2002-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background One of the signatures of Alzheimer's disease is the accumulation of aggregated amyloid protein, Aβ, in the brain. Aβ arises from cleavage of the Amyloid Precursor protein by β and γ secretases, which present attractive candidates for therapeutic targeting. Two β-secretase candidates, ASP-1 and ASP-2, were identified as aspartic proteases, both of which cleave the amyloid precursor at the β-site. These are produced as immature transmembrane proteins containing a pro-segment. Results ASP-2 expressed in HEK293-cells cleaved the Swedish mutant amyloid precursor at different β-sites at different pHs in vitro. Recent reports show that furin cleaves the pro-peptide of ASP-2, whereas ASP-1 undergoes auto-catalysis. We show that purified recombinant ASP-2 cleaves its own pro-peptide at ph 5 but not pH 8.5 as seen by mass spectrometry, electrophoresis and N-terminal sequencing. Conclusion We suggest that ASP-2 processing as well as activity are influenced by pH, and hence the cellular localisation of the protein may have profound effects on the production of Aβ. These factors should be taken into consideration in the design of potential inhibitors for these enzymes.

  17. A member of a new plant gene family encoding a meprin and TRAF homology (MATH) domain-containing protein is involved in restriction of long distance movement of plant viruses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cosson, Patrick; Sofer, Luc; Schurdi-Levraud, Valérie

    2010-01-01

    Restriction of long distance movement of several potyviruses in Arabidopsis thaliana is controlled by at least three dominant restricted TEV movement (RTM) genes, named RTM1, RTM2 and RTM3 and acts as a non-conventional resistance. RTM1 encodes a protein belonging to the jacalin family and RTM2 encodes a protein which has similarities to small heat shock proteins. The recent cloning of RTM3 which encodes a protein belonging to an unknown protein family of 29 members that has a meprin and TRAF homology (MATH) domain in its N-terminal region and a coiled-coil (CC) domain at its C-terminal end is an important breakthrough for a better understanding of this resistance process. Not only the third gene involved in this resistance has been identified and has allowed revealing a new gene family in plant but the discovery that the RTM3 protein interacts directly with RTM1 strongly suggests that the RTM proteins form a multimeric complex. However, these data also highlight striking similarities of the RTM resistance with the well known R-gene mediated resistance. PMID:20930558

  18. Arabidopsis KHZ1 and KHZ2, two novel non-tandem CCCH zinc-finger and K-homolog domain proteins, have redundant roles in the regulation of flowering and senescence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Zongyun; Jia, Jianheng; Yan, Xiaoyuan; Shi, Huiying; Han, Yuzhen

    2017-12-01

    The two novel CCCH zinc-finger and K-homolog (KH) proteins, KHZ1 and KHZ2, play important roles in regulating flowering and senescence redundantly in Arabidopsis. The CCCH zinc-finger proteins and K-homolog (KH) proteins play important roles in plant development and stress responses. However, the biological functions of many CCCH zinc-finger proteins and KH proteins remain uncharacterized. In Arabidopsis, KHZ1 and KHZ2 are characterized as two novel CCCH zinc-finger and KH domain proteins which belong to subfamily VII in CCCH family. We obtained khz1, khz2 mutants and khz1 khz2 double mutants, as well as overexpression (OE) lines of KHZ1 and KHZ2. Compared with the wild type (WT), the khz2 mutants displayed no defects in growth and development, and the khz1 mutants were slightly late flowering, whereas the khz1 khz2 double mutants showed a pronounced late flowering phenotype. In contrast, artificially overexpressing KHZ1 and KHZ2 led to the early flowering. Consistent with the late flowering phenotype, the expression of flowering repressor gene FLC was up-regulated, while the expression of flowering integrator and floral meristem identity (FMI) genes were down-regulated significantly in khz1 khz2. In addition, we also observed that the OE plants of KHZ1 and KHZ2 showed early leaf senescence significantly, whereas the khz1 khz2 double mutants showed delayed senescence of leaf and the whole plant. Both KHZ1 and KHZ2 were ubiquitously expressed throughout the tissues of Arabidopsis. KHZ1 and KHZ2 were localized to the nucleus, and possessed both transactivation activities and RNA-binding abilities. Taken together, we conclude that KHZ1 and KHZ2 have redundant roles in the regulation of flowering and senescence in Arabidopsis.

  19. A disease-causing mutation illuminates the protein membrane topology of the kidney-expressed prohibitin homology (PHB) domain protein podocin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schurek, Eva-Maria; Völker, Linus A; Tax, Judit; Lamkemeyer, Tobias; Rinschen, Markus M; Ungrue, Denise; Kratz, John E; Sirianant, Lalida; Kunzelmann, Karl; Chalfie, Martin; Schermer, Bernhard; Benzing, Thomas; Höhne, Martin

    2014-04-18

    Mutations in the NPHS2 gene are a major cause of steroid-resistant nephrotic syndrome, a severe human kidney disorder. The NPHS2 gene product podocin is a key component of the slit diaphragm cell junction at the kidney filtration barrier and part of a multiprotein-lipid supercomplex. A similar complex with the podocin ortholog MEC-2 is required for touch sensation in Caenorhabditis elegans. Although podocin and MEC-2 are membrane-associated proteins with a predicted hairpin-like structure and amino and carboxyl termini facing the cytoplasm, this membrane topology has not been convincingly confirmed. One particular mutation that causes kidney disease in humans (podocin(P118L)) has also been identified in C. elegans in genetic screens for touch insensitivity (MEC-2(P134S)). Here we show that both mutant proteins, in contrast to the wild-type variants, are N-glycosylated because of the fact that the mutant C termini project extracellularly. Podocin(P118L) and MEC-2(P134S) did not fractionate in detergent-resistant membrane domains. Moreover, mutant podocin failed to activate the ion channel TRPC6, which is part of the multiprotein-lipid supercomplex, indicative of the fact that cholesterol recruitment to the ion channels, an intrinsic function of both proteins, requires C termini facing the cytoplasmic leaflet of the plasma membrane. Taken together, this study demonstrates that the carboxyl terminus of podocin/MEC-2 has to be placed at the inner leaflet of the plasma membrane to mediate cholesterol binding and contribute to ion channel activity, a prerequisite for mechanosensation and the integrity of the kidney filtration barrier.

  20. A protein-targeting strategy used to develop a selective inhibitor of the E17K point mutation in the PH domain of Akt1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deyle, Kaycie M.; Farrow, Blake; Qiao Hee, Ying; Work, Jeremy; Wong, Michelle; Lai, Bert; Umeda, Aiko; Millward, Steven W.; Nag, Arundhati; Das, Samir; Heath, James R.

    2015-05-01

    Ligands that can bind selectively to proteins with single amino-acid point mutations offer the potential to detect or treat an abnormal protein in the presence of the wild type (WT). However, it is difficult to develop a selective ligand if the point mutation is not associated with an addressable location, such as a binding pocket. Here we report an all-chemical synthetic epitope-targeting strategy that we used to discover a 5-mer peptide with selectivity for the E17K-transforming point mutation in the pleckstrin homology domain of the Akt1 oncoprotein. A fragment of Akt1 that contained the E17K mutation and an I19[propargylglycine] substitution was synthesized to form an addressable synthetic epitope. Azide-presenting peptides that clicked covalently onto this alkyne-presenting epitope were selected from a library using in situ screening. One peptide exhibits a 10:1 in vitro selectivity for the oncoprotein relative to the WT, with a similar selectivity in cells. This 5-mer peptide was expanded into a larger ligand that selectively blocks the E17K Akt1 interaction with its PIP3 (phosphatidylinositol (3,4,5)-trisphosphate) substrate.

  1. Enigma interacts with adaptor protein with PH and SH2 domains to control insulin-induced actin cytoskeleton remodeling and glucose transporter 4 translocation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barrès, Romain; Grémeaux, Thierry; Gual, Philippe; Gonzalez, Teresa; Gugenheim, Jean; Tran, Albert; Le Marchand-Brustel, Yannick; Tanti, Jean-François

    2006-11-01

    APS (adaptor protein with PH and SH2 domains) initiates a phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase-independent pathway involved in insulin-stimulated glucose transport. We recently identified Enigma, a PDZ and LIM domain-containing protein, as a partner of APS and showed that APS-Enigma complex plays a critical role in actin cytoskeleton organization in fibroblastic cells. Because actin rearrangement is important for insulin-induced glucose transporter 4 (Glut 4) translocation, we studied the potential involvement of Enigma in insulin-induced glucose transport in 3T3-L1 adipocytes. Enigma mRNA was expressed in differentiated adipocytes and APS and Enigma were colocalized with cortical actin. Expression of an APS mutant unable to bind Enigma increased the insulin-induced Glut 4 translocation to the plasma membrane. By contrast, overexpression of Enigma inhibited insulin-stimulated glucose transport and Glut 4 translocation without alterations in proximal insulin signaling. This inhibitory effect was prevented with the deletion of the LIM domains of Enigma. Using time-lapse fluorescent microscopy of green fluorescent protein-actin, we demonstrated that the overexpression of Enigma altered insulin-induced actin rearrangements, whereas the expression of Enigma without its LIM domains was without effect. A physiological link between increased expression of Enigma and an alteration in insulin-induced glucose uptake was suggested by the increase in Enigma mRNA expression in adipose tissue of diabetic obese patients. Taken together, these data strongly suggest that the interaction between APS and Enigma is involved in insulin-induced Glut 4 translocation by regulating cortical actin remodeling and raise the possibility that modification of APS/Enigma ratio could participate in the alteration of insulin-induced glucose uptake in adipose tissue.

  2. Time-domain finite elements in optimal control with application to launch-vehicle guidance. PhD. Thesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bless, Robert R.

    1991-01-01

    A time-domain finite element method is developed for optimal control problems. The theory derived is general enough to handle a large class of problems including optimal control problems that are continuous in the states and controls, problems with discontinuities in the states and/or system equations, problems with control inequality constraints, problems with state inequality constraints, or problems involving any combination of the above. The theory is developed in such a way that no numerical quadrature is necessary regardless of the degree of nonlinearity in the equations. Also, the same shape functions may be employed for every problem because all strong boundary conditions are transformed into natural or weak boundary conditions. In addition, the resulting nonlinear algebraic equations are very sparse. Use of sparse matrix solvers allows for the rapid and accurate solution of very difficult optimization problems. The formulation is applied to launch-vehicle trajectory optimization problems, and results show that real-time optimal guidance is realizable with this method. Finally, a general problem solving environment is created for solving a large class of optimal control problems. The algorithm uses both FORTRAN and a symbolic computation program to solve problems with a minimum of user interaction. The use of symbolic computation eliminates the need for user-written subroutines which greatly reduces the setup time for solving problems.

  3. Mutations in the FHA-domain of ectopically expressed NBS1 lead to radiosensitization and to no increase in somatic mutation rates via a partial suppression of homologous recombination

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ohara, Maki; Funyu, Yumi; Ebara, Shunsuke

    2014-01-01

    Ionizing radiation induces DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs). Mammalian cells repair DSBs through multiple pathways, and the repair pathway that is utilized may affect cellular radiation sensitivity. In this study, we examined effects on cellular radiosensitivity resulting from functional alterations in homologous recombination (HR). HR was inhibited by overexpression of the forkhead-associated (FHA) domain-mutated NBS1 (G27D/R28D: FHA-2D) protein in HeLa cells or in hamster cells carrying a human X-chromosome. Cells expressing FHA-2D presented partially (but significantly) HR-deficient phenotypes, which were assayed by the reduction of gene conversion frequencies measured with a reporter assay, a decrease in radiation-induced Mre11 foci formation, and hypersensitivity to camptothecin treatments. Interestingly, ectopic expression of FHA-2D did not increase the frequency of radiation-induced somatic mutations at the HPRT locus, suggesting that a partial reduction of HR efficiency has only a slight effect on genomic stability. The expression of FHA-2D rendered the exponentially growing cell population slightly (but significantly) more sensitive to ionizing radiation. This radiosensitization effect due to the expression of FHA-2D was enhanced when the cells were irradiated with split doses delivered at 24-h intervals. Furthermore, enhancement of radiation sensitivity by split dose irradiation was not seen in contact-inhibited G0/G1 populations, even though the cells expressed FHA-2D. These results suggest that the FHA domain of NBS1 might be an effective molecular target that can be used to induce radiosensitization using low molecular weight chemicals, and that partial inhibition of HR might improve the effectiveness of cancer radiotherapy. (author)

  4. B cell lymphoma-2 (BCL-2) homology domain 3 (BH3) mimetics demonstrate differential activities dependent upon the functional repertoire of pro- and anti-apoptotic BCL-2 family proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Renault, Thibaud T; Elkholi, Rana; Bharti, Archana; Chipuk, Jerry E

    2014-09-19

    The B cell lymphoma-2 (BCL-2) family is the key mediator of cellular sensitivity to apoptosis during pharmacological interventions for numerous human pathologies, including cancer. There is tremendous interest to understand how the proapoptotic BCL-2 effector members (e.g. BCL-2-associated X protein, BAX) cooperate with the BCL-2 homology domain only (BH3-only) subclass (e.g. BCL-2 interacting mediator of death, BIM; BCL-2 interacting-domain death agonist, BID) to induce mitochondrial outer membrane permeabilization (MOMP) and apoptosis and whether these mechanisms may be pharmacologically exploited to enhance the killing of cancer cells. Indeed, small molecule inhibitors of the anti-apoptotic BCL-2 family members have been designed rationally. However, the success of these "BH3 mimetics" in the clinic has been limited, likely due to an incomplete understanding of how these drugs function in the presence of multiple BCL-2 family members. To increase our mechanistic understanding of how BH3 mimetics cooperate with multiple BCL-2 family members in vitro, we directly compared the activity of several BH3-mimetic compounds (i.e. ABT-263, ABT-737, GX15-070, HA14.1, TW-37) in biochemically defined large unilamellar vesicle model systems that faithfully recapitulate BAX-dependent mitochondrial outer membrane permeabilization. Our investigations revealed that the presence of BAX, BID, and BIM differentially regulated the ability of BH3 mimetics to derepress proapoptotic molecules from anti-apoptotic proteins. Using mitochondria loaded with fluorescent BH3 peptides and cells treated with inducers of cell death, these differences were supported. Together, these data suggest that although the presence of anti-apoptotic BCL-2 proteins primarily dictates cellular sensitivity to BH3 mimetics, additional specificity is conferred by proapoptotic BCL-2 proteins. © 2014 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  5. Cell surface expression of channel catfish leukocyte immune-type receptors (IpLITRs) and recruitment of both Src homology 2 domain-containing protein tyrosine phosphatase (SHP)-1 and SHP-2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Montgomery, Benjamin C S; Mewes, Jacqueline; Davidson, Chelsea; Burshtyn, Deborah N; Stafford, James L

    2009-04-01

    Channel catfish leukocyte immune-type receptors (IpLITRs) are immunoglobulin superfamily (IgSF) members believed to play a role in the control and coordination of cellular immune responses in teleost. Putative stimulatory and inhibitory IpLITRs are co-expressed by different types of catfish immune cells (e.g. NK cells, T cells, B cells, and macrophages) but their signaling potential has not been determined. Following cationic polymer-mediated transfections into human cell lines we examined the surface expression, tyrosine phosphorylation, and phosphatase recruitment potential of two types of putative inhibitory IpLITRs using 'chimeric' expression constructs and an epitope-tagged 'native' IpLITR. We also cloned and expressed the teleost Src homology 2 domain-containing protein tyrosine phosphatases (SHP)-1 and SHP-2 and examined their expression in adult tissues and developing zebrafish embryos. Co-immunoprecipitation experiments support the inhibitory signaling potential of distinct IpLITR-types that bound both SHP-1 and SHP-2 following the phosphorylation of tyrosine residues within their cytoplasmic tail (CYT) regions. Phosphatase recruitment by IpLITRs represents an important first step in understanding their influence on immune cell effector functions and suggests that certain inhibitory signaling pathways are conserved among vertebrates.

  6. Pure homology of algebraic varieties

    OpenAIRE

    Weber, Andrzej

    2003-01-01

    We show that for a complete complex algebraic variety the pure component of homology coincides with the image of intersection homology. Therefore pure homology is topologically invariant. To obtain slightly more general results we introduce "image homology" for noncomplete varieties.

  7. Lectures on functor homology

    CERN Document Server

    Touzé, Antoine

    2015-01-01

    This book features a series of lectures that explores three different fields in which functor homology (short for homological algebra in functor categories) has recently played a significant role. For each of these applications, the functor viewpoint provides both essential insights and new methods for tackling difficult mathematical problems. In the lectures by Aurélien Djament, polynomial functors appear as coefficients in the homology of infinite families of classical groups, e.g. general linear groups or symplectic groups, and their stabilization. Djament’s theorem states that this stable homology can be computed using only the homology with trivial coefficients and the manageable functor homology. The series includes an intriguing development of Scorichenko’s unpublished results. The lectures by Wilberd van der Kallen lead to the solution of the general cohomological finite generation problem, extending Hilbert’s fourteenth problem and its solution to the context of cohomology. The focus here is o...

  8. Nuclear transfer alters placental gene expression and associated histone modifications of the placental-specific imprinted gene pleckstrin homology-like domain, family A, member 2 (PHLDA2) in cattle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arnold, Daniel R; Gaspar, Roberta C; da Rocha, Carlos V; Sangalli, Juliano R; de Bem, Tiago H C; Corrêa, Carolina A P; Penteado, João C T; Meirelles, Flavio V; Lopes, Flavia L

    2017-03-01

    Abnormal placental development is frequent in nuclear transfer (NT) pregnancies and is likely to be associated with altered epigenetic reprogramming. In the present study, fetal and placental measurements were taken on Day 60 of gestation in cows with pregnancies produced by AI, IVF and NT. Placentas were collected and subjected to histological evaluation, the expression of genes important in trophoblast differentiation and expression of the placental imprinted gene pleckstrin homology-like domain, family A, member 2 (PHLDA2), as well as chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP) for histone marks within the promoter of PHLDA2. Fewer binucleated cells were observed in NT cotyledons, followed by IVF and AI cotyledons (P<0.05). Expression of heart and neural crest derivatives expressed 1 (HAND1), placental lactogen (PL), pregnancy-associated glycoprotein 9 (PAG-9) and PHLDA2 was elevated in NT cotyledons compared with AI cotyledons. Expression of PHLDA2 was higher in IVF than AI samples (P<0.05). ChIP revealed an increase in the permissive mark dimethylation of lysine 4 on histone H3 (H3K4me2), surprisingly associated with the silent allele of PHLDA2, and a decrease in the inhibitory mark H3K9me2 in NT samples. Thus, genes critical for placental development were altered in NT placentas, including an imprinted gene. Allele-specific changes in the permissive histone mark in the PHLDA2 promoter indicate misregulation of imprinting in clones. Abnormal trophoblast differentiation could have resulted in lower numbers of binucleated cells following NT. These results suggest that the altered expression of imprinted genes associated with NT are also caused by changes in histone modifications.

  9. Structure and dynamics of the human pleckstrin DEP domain: distinct molecular features of a novel DEP domain subfamily.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Civera, Concepcion; Simon, Bernd; Stier, Gunter; Sattler, Michael; Macias, Maria J

    2005-02-01

    Pleckstrin1 is a major substrate for protein kinase C in platelets and leukocytes, and comprises a central DEP (disheveled, Egl-10, pleckstrin) domain, which is flanked by two PH (pleckstrin homology) domains. DEP domains display a unique alpha/beta fold and have been implicated in membrane binding utilizing different mechanisms. Using multiple sequence alignments and phylogenetic tree reconstructions, we find that 6 subfamilies of the DEP domain exist, of which pleckstrin represents a novel and distinct subfamily. To clarify structural determinants of the DEP fold and to gain further insight into the role of the DEP domain, we determined the three-dimensional structure of the pleckstrin DEP domain using heteronuclear NMR spectroscopy. Pleckstrin DEP shares main structural features with the DEP domains of disheveled and Epac, which belong to different DEP subfamilies. However, the pleckstrin DEP fold is distinct from these structures and contains an additional, short helix alpha4 inserted in the beta4-beta5 loop that exhibits increased backbone mobility as judged by NMR relaxation measurements. Based on sequence conservation, the helix alpha4 may also be present in the DEP domains of regulator of G-protein signaling (RGS) proteins, which are members of the same DEP subfamily. In pleckstrin, the DEP domain is surrounded by two PH domains. Structural analysis and charge complementarity suggest that the DEP domain may interact with the N-terminal PH domain in pleckstrin. Phosphorylation of the PH-DEP linker, which is required for pleckstrin function, could regulate such an intramolecular interaction. This suggests a role of the pleckstrin DEP domain in intramolecular domain interactions, which is distinct from the functions of other DEP domain subfamilies found so far.

  10. Homological stabilizer codes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Anderson, Jonas T., E-mail: jonastyleranderson@gmail.com

    2013-03-15

    In this paper we define homological stabilizer codes on qubits which encompass codes such as Kitaev's toric code and the topological color codes. These codes are defined solely by the graphs they reside on. This feature allows us to use properties of topological graph theory to determine the graphs which are suitable as homological stabilizer codes. We then show that all toric codes are equivalent to homological stabilizer codes on 4-valent graphs. We show that the topological color codes and toric codes correspond to two distinct classes of graphs. We define the notion of label set equivalencies and show that under a small set of constraints the only homological stabilizer codes without local logical operators are equivalent to Kitaev's toric code or to the topological color codes. - Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We show that Kitaev's toric codes are equivalent to homological stabilizer codes on 4-valent graphs. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We show that toric codes and color codes correspond to homological stabilizer codes on distinct graphs. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We find and classify all 2D homological stabilizer codes. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We find optimal codes among the homological stabilizer codes.

  11. Atomic structure of the sweet-tasting protein thaumatin I at pH 8.0 reveals the large disulfide-rich region in domain II to be sensitive to a pH change.

    OpenAIRE

    Masuda, Tetsuya; Ohta, Keisuke; Mikami, Bunzo; Kitabatake, Naofumi; Tani, Fumito

    2012-01-01

    Thaumatin, an intensely sweet-tasting plant protein, elicits a sweet taste at 50 nM. Although the sweetness remains when thaumatin is heated at 80 °C for 4h under acid conditions, it rapidly declines when heating at a pH above 6.5. To clarify the structural difference at high pH, the atomic structure of a recombinant thaumatin I at pH 8.0 was determined at a resolution of 1.0Å. Comparison to the crystal structure of thaumatin at pH 7.3 and 7.0 revealed the root-mean square deviation value of ...

  12. Geometric homology revisited

    OpenAIRE

    Ruffino, Fabio Ferrari

    2013-01-01

    Given a cohomology theory, there is a well-known abstract way to define the dual homology theory using the theory of spectra. In [4] the author provides a more geometric construction of the homology theory, using a generalization of the bordism groups. Such a generalization involves in its definition the vector bundle modification, which is a particular case of the Gysin map. In this paper we provide a more natural variant of that construction, which replaces the vector bundle modification wi...

  13. Trichloroacetimidates as Alkylating Reagents and Their Application in the Synthesis of Pyrroloindoline Natural Products and Synthesis of Small Molecule Inhibitors of Src Homology 2 Domain-Containing Inositol Phosphatase (SHIP)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adhikari, Arijit A.

    was applied towards the synthesis of natural products and their analogs. The pyrroloindoline ring system is found in many alkaloids and cyclic peptides which mainly differ in the substitution at the C3a position. To provide rapid access to these natural products a diversity-oriented strategy was established via displacement of C3a-trichloroacetimidate pyrroloindoline. Carbon, oxygen, sulfur and nitrogen nucleophiles were all shown to undergo substitution reactions with these trichloroacetimidates in the presence of a Lewis acid catalyst. In order to demonstrate the utility of this new method it was applied towards the synthesis of arundinine and a formal synthesis of psychotriasine. Current investigations involve the application of this method towards the synthesis of a complex pyrroloindoline natural product kapakahine C and the progress made therein has been discussed. The reactivity of trichloroacetimidates was also investigated for the selective C3-alkylation of 2,3-disubstituted indoles to provide indolenines. Indolenines serve as useful intermediates in the synthesis of many complex alkaloids. Different benzylic and allylic trichloroacetimidates were shown to provide 3,3'-disubstituted indolenines with high yields in the presence of catalytic amounts of Lewis acids. Various substituted indoles were evaluated under these reaction conditions. This methodology was also applied towards the synthesis of the core tetracyclic ring system found in communesin natural products. In addition to the above work, synthesis of small molecule inhibitors of Src Homology 2 Domain-Containing Inositol Phosphatase (SHIP) has also been described. Aberrations in the phosphoinositide 3-kinase (PI3K) cellular signaling pathway can lead to diseased cellular states like cancer. Herein we have reported stereoselective synthesis of two quinoline based small molecule SHIP inhibitors. The lead compounds and their analogs were tested for their activities against SHIP by Malachite green assay

  14. Migration of the guinea pig sperm membrane protein PH-20 from one localized surface domain to another does not occur by a simple diffusion-trapping mechanism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cowan, A E; Myles, D G; Koppel, D E

    1991-03-01

    The redistribution of membrane proteins on the surface of cells is a prevalent feature of differentiation in a variety of cells. In most cases the mechanism responsible for such redistribution is poorly understood. Two potential mechanisms for the redistribution of surface proteins are: (1) passive diffusion coupled with trapping, and (2) active translocation. We have studied the process of membrane protein redistribution for the PH-20 protein of guinea pig sperm, a surface protein required for sperm binding to the egg zona pellucida (P. Primakoff, H. Hyatt, and D. G. Myles (1985). J. Cell Biol. 101, 2239-2244). PH-20 protein is localized to the posterior head plasma menbrane of the mature sperm cell. Following the exocytotic acrosome reaction, PH-20 protein moves into the newly incorporated inner acrosomal membrane (IAM), placing it in a position favorable for a role in binding sperm to the egg zona pellucida (D. G. Myles, and P. Primakoff (1984), J. Cell Biol. 99, 1634-1641). To analyze the mechanistic basis for this protein migration, we have used fluorescence microscopy and digital image processing to characterize PH-20 protein migration in individual cells. PH-20 protein was observed to move against a concentration gradient in the posterior head plasma membrane. This result argues strongly against a model of passive diffusion followed by trapping in the IAM, and instead suggests that an active process serves to concentrate PH-20 protein toward the boundary separating the posterior head and IAM regions. A transient gradient of PH-20 concentration observed in the IAM suggests that once PH-20 protein reaches the IAM, it is freely diffusing. Additionally, we observed that migration of PH-20 protein was calcium dependent.

  15. Domain architecture conservation in orthologs

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-01

    Background As orthologous proteins are expected to retain function more often than other homologs, they are often used for functional annotation transfer between species. However, ortholog identification methods do not take into account changes in domain architecture, which are likely to modify a protein's function. By domain architecture we refer to the sequential arrangement of domains along a protein sequence. To assess the level of domain architecture conservation among orthologs, we carried out a large-scale study of such events between human and 40 other species spanning the entire evolutionary range. We designed a score to measure domain architecture similarity and used it to analyze differences in domain architecture conservation between orthologs and paralogs relative to the conservation of primary sequence. We also statistically characterized the extents of different types of domain swapping events across pairs of orthologs and paralogs. Results The analysis shows that orthologs exhibit greater domain architecture conservation than paralogous homologs, even when differences in average sequence divergence are compensated for, for homologs that have diverged beyond a certain threshold. We interpret this as an indication of a stronger selective pressure on orthologs than paralogs to retain the domain architecture required for the proteins to perform a specific function. In general, orthologs as well as the closest paralogous homologs have very similar domain architectures, even at large evolutionary separation. The most common domain architecture changes observed in both ortholog and paralog pairs involved insertion/deletion of new domains, while domain shuffling and segment duplication/deletion were very infrequent. Conclusions On the whole, our results support the hypothesis that function conservation between orthologs demands higher domain architecture conservation than other types of homologs, relative to primary sequence conservation. This supports the

  16. A PHF8 homolog in C. elegans promotes DNA repair via homologous recombination.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Changrim Lee

    Full Text Available PHF8 is a JmjC domain-containing histone demethylase, defects in which are associated with X-linked mental retardation. In this study, we examined the roles of two PHF8 homologs, JMJD-1.1 and JMJD-1.2, in the model organism C. elegans in response to DNA damage. A deletion mutation in either of the genes led to hypersensitivity to interstrand DNA crosslinks (ICLs, while only mutation of jmjd-1.1 resulted in hypersensitivity to double-strand DNA breaks (DSBs. In response to ICLs, JMJD-1.1 did not affect the focus formation of FCD-2, a homolog of FANCD2, a key protein in the Fanconi anemia pathway. However, the dynamic behavior of RPA-1 and RAD-51 was affected by the mutation: the accumulations of both proteins at ICLs appeared normal, but their subsequent disappearance was retarded, suggesting that later steps of homologous recombination were defective. Similar changes in the dynamic behavior of RPA-1 and RAD-51 were seen in response to DSBs, supporting a role of JMJD-1.1 in homologous recombination. Such a role was also supported by our finding that the hypersensitivity of jmjd-1.1 worms to ICLs was rescued by knockdown of lig-4, a homolog of Ligase 4 active in nonhomologous end-joining. The hypersensitivity of jmjd-1.1 worms to ICLs was increased by rad-54 knockdown, suggesting that JMJD-1.1 acts in parallel with RAD-54 in modulating chromatin structure. Indeed, the level of histone H3 Lys9 tri-methylation, a marker of heterochromatin, was higher in jmjd-1.1 cells than in wild-type cells. We conclude that the histone demethylase JMJD-1.1 influences homologous recombination either by relaxing heterochromatin structure or by indirectly regulating the expression of multiple genes affecting DNA repair.

  17. Chemical shift homology in proteins

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Potts, Barbara C.M.; Chazin, Walter J.

    1998-01-01

    The degree of chemical shift similarity for homologous proteins has been determined from a chemical shift database of over 50 proteins representing a variety of families and folds, and spanning a wide range of sequence homologies. After sequence alignment, the similarity of the secondary chemical shifts of C α protons was examined as a function of amino acid sequence identity for 37 pairs of structurally homologous proteins. A correlation between sequence identity and secondary chemical shift rmsd was observed. Important insights are provided by examining the sequence identity of homologous proteins versus percentage of secondary chemical shifts that fall within 0.1 and 0.3 ppm thresholds. These results begin to establish practical guidelines for the extent of chemical shift similarity to expect among structurally homologous proteins

  18. Mod two homology and cohomology

    CERN Document Server

    Hausmann, Jean-Claude

    2014-01-01

    Cohomology and homology modulo 2 helps the reader grasp more readily the basics of a major tool in algebraic topology. Compared to a more general approach to (co)homology this refreshing approach has many pedagogical advantages: It leads more quickly to the essentials of the subject, An absence of signs and orientation considerations simplifies the theory, Computations and advanced applications can be presented at an earlier stage, Simple geometrical interpretations of (co)chains. Mod 2 (co)homology was developed in the first quarter of the twentieth century as an alternative to integral homology, before both became particular cases of (co)homology with arbitrary coefficients. The first chapters of this book may serve as a basis for a graduate-level introductory course to (co)homology. Simplicial and singular mod 2 (co)homology are introduced, with their products and Steenrod squares, as well as equivariant cohomology. Classical applications include Brouwer's fixed point theorem, Poincaré duality, Borsuk-Ula...

  19. PH sensor

    OpenAIRE

    Artero, C.; Nogueras Cervera, Marc; Manuel Lázaro, Antonio

    2012-01-01

    This paper presents a design of a marine instrument for the measurement of pH in seawater. The measurement system consists of a pH electrode connected to the underwater observatory OBSEA. The extracted data are useful for scientists researching ocean acidification. Peer Reviewed

  20. Compositional Homology and Creative Thinking

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Salvatore Tedesco

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available The concept of homology is the most solid theoretical basis elaborated by the morphological thinking during its history. The enucleation of some general criteria for the interpretation of homology is today a fundamental tool for life sciences, and for restoring their own opening to the question of qualitative innovation that arose so powerfully in the original Darwinian project. The aim of this paper is to verify the possible uses of the concept of compositional homology in order to provide of an adequate understanding of the dynamics of creative thinking.

  1. Repeat-swap homology modeling of secondary active transporters: updated protocol and prediction of elevator-type mechanisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vergara-Jaque, Ariela; Fenollar-Ferrer, Cristina; Kaufmann, Desirée; Forrest, Lucy R

    2015-01-01

    Secondary active transporters are critical for neurotransmitter clearance and recycling during synaptic transmission and uptake of nutrients. These proteins mediate the movement of solutes against their concentration gradients, by using the energy released in the movement of ions down pre-existing concentration gradients. To achieve this, transporters conform to the so-called alternating-access hypothesis, whereby the protein adopts at least two conformations in which the substrate binding sites are exposed to one or other side of the membrane, but not both simultaneously. Structures of a bacterial homolog of neuronal glutamate transporters, GltPh, in several different conformational states have revealed that the protein structure is asymmetric in the outward- and inward-open states, and that the conformational change connecting them involves a elevator-like movement of a substrate binding domain across the membrane. The structural asymmetry is created by inverted-topology repeats, i.e., structural repeats with similar overall folds whose transmembrane topologies are related to each other by two-fold pseudo-symmetry around an axis parallel to the membrane plane. Inverted repeats have been found in around three-quarters of secondary transporter folds. Moreover, the (a)symmetry of these systems has been successfully used as a bioinformatic tool, called "repeat-swap modeling" to predict structural models of a transporter in one conformation using the known structure of the transporter in the complementary conformation as a template. Here, we describe an updated repeat-swap homology modeling protocol, and calibrate the accuracy of the method using GltPh, for which both inward- and outward-facing conformations are known. We then apply this repeat-swap homology modeling procedure to a concentrative nucleoside transporter, VcCNT, which has a three-dimensional arrangement related to that of GltPh. The repeat-swapped model of VcCNT predicts that nucleoside transport also

  2. Repeat-swap homology modeling of secondary active transporters: updated protocol and prediction of elevator-type mechanisms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cristina eFenollar Ferrer

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Secondary active transporters are critical for neurotransmitter clearance and recycling during synaptic transmission and uptake of nutrients. These proteins mediate the movement of solutes against their concentration gradients, by using the energy released in the movement of ions down pre-existing concentration gradients. To achieve this, transporters conform to the so-called alternating-access hypothesis, whereby the protein adopts at least two conformations in which the substrate binding sites are exposed to either the outside or inside of the membrane, but not both simultaneously. Structures of a bacterial homolog of neuronal glutamate transporters, GltPh, in several different conformational states have revealed that the protein structure is asymmetric in the outward- and inward-open states, and that the conformational change connecting them involves a elevator-like movement of a substrate binding domain across the membrane. The structural asymmetry is created by inverted-topology repeats, i.e., structural repeats with similar overall folds whose transmembrane topologies are related to each other by two-fold pseudo-symmetry around an axis parallel to the membrane plane. Inverted repeats have been found in around three-quarters of secondary transporter folds. Moreover, the (asymmetry of these systems has been successfully used as a bioinformatic tool, called repeat-swap modeling to predict structural models of a transporter in one conformation using the known structure of the transporter in the complementary conformation as a template. Here, we describe an updated repeat-swap homology modeling protocol, and calibrate the accuracy of the method using GltPh, for which both inward- and outward-facing conformations are known. We then apply this repeat-swap homology modeling procedure to a concentrative nucleoside transporter, VcCNT, which has a three-dimensional arrangement related to that of GltPh. The repeat-swapped model of VcCNT predicts that

  3. Homology building as a means to define antigenic epitopes on dihydrofolate reductase (DHFR) from Plasmodium falciparum

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Alifrangis, Michael; Christensen, Inge T; Jørgensen, Flemming S

    2004-01-01

    in the gene coding for Pf-DHFR. Furthermore, we wanted to study the potential use of homology models in general and of Pf-DHFR in particular in predicting antigenic malarial surface epitopes. METHODS: A homology model of Pf-DHFR domain was employed to define an epitope for the development of site...

  4. Homology modeling and in silico prediction of Ulcerative colitis associated polymorphisms of NOD1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Majumdar, Ishani; Nagpal, Isha; Paul, Jaishree

    2017-10-01

    Cytosolic pattern recognition receptors play key roles in innate immune response. Nucleotide binding and oligomerisation domain containing protein 1 (NOD1) belonging to the Nod-like receptor C (NLRC) sub-family of Nod-like receptors (NLRs) is important for detection and clearance of intra-cellular Gram negative bacteria. NOD1 is involved in activation of pro-inflammatory pathways. Limited structural data is available for NOD1. Using different templates for each domain of NOD1, we determined the full-length homology model of NOD1. ADP binding amino acids within the nucleotide binding domain (NBD) of NOD1 were also predicted. Key residues in inter-domain interaction were identified by sequence comparison with Oryctolagus cuniculus NOD2, a related protein. Interactions between NBD and winged helix domain (WHD) were found to be conserved in NOD1. Functional and structural effect of single nucleotide polymorphisms within the NOD1 NBD domain associated with susceptibility risk to Ulcerative colitis (UC), an inflammatory disorder of the colon was evaluated by in silico studies. Mutations W219R and L349P were predicted to be damaging and disease associated by prediction programs SIFT, PolyPhen2, PANTHER, SNP&GO, PhD SNP and SNAP2. We further validated the effect of W219R and L349P mutation on NOD1 function in vitro. Elevated mRNA expression of pro-inflammatory cytokines IL8 and IL-1β was seen as compared to the wild type NOD1 in intestinal epithelial cell line HT29 when stimulated with NOD1 ligand. Thus, these mutations may indeed have a bearing on pathogenesis of inflammation during UC. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Formin homology 2 domains occur in multiple contexts in angiosperms

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Cvrčková, F.; Novotný, M.; Pícková, Denisa; Žárský, Viktor

    2004-01-01

    Roč. 5, č. 44 (2004), s. 1-18 ISSN 1471-2164 R&D Projects: GA AV ČR KSK5052113 Keywords : Formin * angiosperms * Arabidopsis Subject RIV: EB - Genetics ; Molecular Biology Impact factor: 3.250, year: 2004

  6. Persistent homology of complex networks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Horak, Danijela; Maletić, Slobodan; Rajković, Milan

    2009-01-01

    Long-lived topological features are distinguished from short-lived ones (considered as topological noise) in simplicial complexes constructed from complex networks. A new topological invariant, persistent homology, is determined and presented as a parameterized version of a Betti number. Complex networks with distinct degree distributions exhibit distinct persistent topological features. Persistent topological attributes, shown to be related to the robust quality of networks, also reflect the deficiency in certain connectivity properties of networks. Random networks, networks with exponential connectivity distribution and scale-free networks were considered for homological persistency analysis

  7. Mechanism of Transport Modulation by an Extracellular Loop in an Archaeal Excitatory Amino Acid Transporter (EAAT) Homolog*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mulligan, Christopher; Mindell, Joseph A.

    2013-01-01

    Secondary transporters in the excitatory amino acid transporter family terminate glutamatergic synaptic transmission by catalyzing Na+-dependent removal of glutamate from the synaptic cleft. Recent structural studies of the aspartate-specific archaeal homolog, GltPh, suggest that transport is achieved by a rigid body, piston-like movement of the transport domain, which houses the substrate-binding site, between the extracellular and cytoplasmic sides of the membrane. This transport domain is connected to an immobile scaffold by three loops, one of which, the 3–4 loop (3L4), undergoes substrate-sensitive conformational change. Proteolytic cleavage of the 3L4 was found to abolish transport activity indicating an essential function for this loop in the transport mechanism. Here, we demonstrate that despite the presence of fully cleaved 3L4, GltPh is still able to sample conformations relevant for transport. Optimized reconstitution conditions reveal that fully cleaved GltPh retains some transport activity. Analysis of the kinetics and temperature dependence of transport accompanied by direct measurements of substrate binding reveal that this decreased transport activity is not due to alteration of the substrate binding characteristics but is caused by the significantly reduced turnover rate. By measuring solute counterflow activity and cross-link formation rates, we demonstrate that cleaving 3L4 severely and specifically compromises one or more steps contributing to the movement of the substrate-loaded transport domain between the outward- and inward-facing conformational states, sparing the equivalent step(s) during the movement of the empty transport domain. These results reveal a hitherto unknown role for the 3L4 in modulating an essential step in the transport process. PMID:24155238

  8. A sensitive short read homology search tool for paired-end read sequencing data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Techa-Angkoon, Prapaporn; Sun, Yanni; Lei, Jikai

    2017-10-16

    Homology search is still a significant step in functional analysis for genomic data. Profile Hidden Markov Model-based homology search has been widely used in protein domain analysis in many different species. In particular, with the fast accumulation of transcriptomic data of non-model species and metagenomic data, profile homology search is widely adopted in integrated pipelines for functional analysis. While the state-of-the-art tool HMMER has achieved high sensitivity and accuracy in domain annotation, the sensitivity of HMMER on short reads declines rapidly. The low sensitivity on short read homology search can lead to inaccurate domain composition and abundance computation. Our experimental results showed that half of the reads were missed by HMMER for a RNA-Seq dataset. Thus, there is a need for better methods to improve the homology search performance for short reads. We introduce a profile homology search tool named Short-Pair that is designed for short paired-end reads. By using an approximate Bayesian approach employing distribution of fragment lengths and alignment scores, Short-Pair can retrieve the missing end and determine true domains. In particular, Short-Pair increases the accuracy in aligning short reads that are part of remote homologs. We applied Short-Pair to a RNA-Seq dataset and a metagenomic dataset and quantified its sensitivity and accuracy on homology search. The experimental results show that Short-Pair can achieve better overall performance than the state-of-the-art methodology of profile homology search. Short-Pair is best used for next-generation sequencing (NGS) data that lack reference genomes. It provides a complementary paired-end read homology search tool to HMMER. The source code is freely available at https://sourceforge.net/projects/short-pair/ .

  9. Same but not alike: Structure, flexibility and energetics of domains in multi-domain proteins are influenced by the presence of other domains.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vishwanath, Sneha; de Brevern, Alexandre G; Srinivasan, Narayanaswamy

    2018-02-01

    The majority of the proteins encoded in the genomes of eukaryotes contain more than one domain. Reasons for high prevalence of multi-domain proteins in various organisms have been attributed to higher stability and functional and folding advantages over single-domain proteins. Despite these advantages, many proteins are composed of only one domain while their homologous domains are part of multi-domain proteins. In the study presented here, differences in the properties of protein domains in single-domain and multi-domain systems and their influence on functions are discussed. We studied 20 pairs of identical protein domains, which were crystallized in two forms (a) tethered to other proteins domains and (b) tethered to fewer protein domains than (a) or not tethered to any protein domain. Results suggest that tethering of domains in multi-domain proteins influences the structural, dynamic and energetic properties of the constituent protein domains. 50% of the protein domain pairs show significant structural deviations while 90% of the protein domain pairs show differences in dynamics and 12% of the residues show differences in the energetics. To gain further insights on the influence of tethering on the function of the domains, 4 pairs of homologous protein domains, where one of them is a full-length single-domain protein and the other protein domain is a part of a multi-domain protein, were studied. Analyses showed that identical and structurally equivalent functional residues show differential dynamics in homologous protein domains; though comparable dynamics between in-silico generated chimera protein and multi-domain proteins were observed. From these observations, the differences observed in the functions of homologous proteins could be attributed to the presence of tethered domain. Overall, we conclude that tethered domains in multi-domain proteins not only provide stability or folding advantages but also influence pathways resulting in differences in

  10. Homological stability of diffeomorphism groups

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Berglund, Alexander; Madsen, Ib Henning

    2013-01-01

    In this paper we prove a stability theorem for block diffeomorphisms of 2d -dimensional manifolds that are connected sums of S d ×S d . Combining this with a recent theorem of S. Galatius and O. Randal-Williams and Morlet’s lemma of disjunction, we determine the homology of the classifying space ...

  11. RPA homologs and ssDNA processing during meiotic recombination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ribeiro, Jonathan; Abby, Emilie; Livera, Gabriel; Martini, Emmanuelle

    2016-06-01

    Meiotic homologous recombination is a specialized process that involves homologous chromosome pairing and strand exchange to guarantee proper chromosome segregation and genetic diversity. The formation and repair of DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs) during meiotic recombination differs from those during mitotic recombination in that the homologous chromosome rather than the sister chromatid is the preferred repair template. The processing of single-stranded DNA (ssDNA) formed on intermediate recombination structures is central to driving the specific outcomes of DSB repair during meiosis. Replication protein A (RPA) is the main ssDNA-binding protein complex involved in DNA metabolism. However, the existence of RPA orthologs in plants and the recent discovery of meiosis specific with OB domains (MEIOB), a widely conserved meiosis-specific RPA1 paralog, strongly suggest that multiple RPA complexes evolved and specialized to subdivide their roles during DNA metabolism. Here we review ssDNA formation and maturation during mitotic and meiotic recombination underlying the meiotic specific features. We describe and discuss the existence and properties of MEIOB and multiple RPA subunits in plants and highlight how they can provide meiosis-specific fates to ssDNA processing during homologous recombination. Understanding the functions of these RPA homologs and how they interact with the canonical RPA subunits is of major interest in the fields of meiosis and DNA repair.

  12. Multiresolution persistent homology for excessively large biomolecular datasets

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xia, Kelin; Zhao, Zhixiong [Department of Mathematics, Michigan State University, East Lansing, Michigan 48824 (United States); Wei, Guo-Wei, E-mail: wei@math.msu.edu [Department of Mathematics, Michigan State University, East Lansing, Michigan 48824 (United States); Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, Michigan State University, East Lansing, Michigan 48824 (United States); Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Michigan State University, East Lansing, Michigan 48824 (United States)

    2015-10-07

    Although persistent homology has emerged as a promising tool for the topological simplification of complex data, it is computationally intractable for large datasets. We introduce multiresolution persistent homology to handle excessively large datasets. We match the resolution with the scale of interest so as to represent large scale datasets with appropriate resolution. We utilize flexibility-rigidity index to access the topological connectivity of the data set and define a rigidity density for the filtration analysis. By appropriately tuning the resolution of the rigidity density, we are able to focus the topological lens on the scale of interest. The proposed multiresolution topological analysis is validated by a hexagonal fractal image which has three distinct scales. We further demonstrate the proposed method for extracting topological fingerprints from DNA molecules. In particular, the topological persistence of a virus capsid with 273 780 atoms is successfully analyzed which would otherwise be inaccessible to the normal point cloud method and unreliable by using coarse-grained multiscale persistent homology. The proposed method has also been successfully applied to the protein domain classification, which is the first time that persistent homology is used for practical protein domain analysis, to our knowledge. The proposed multiresolution topological method has potential applications in arbitrary data sets, such as social networks, biological networks, and graphs.

  13. Domains and domain loss

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Haberland, Hartmut

    2005-01-01

    politicians and in the media, especially in the discussion whether some languages undergo ‘domain loss’ vis-à-vis powerful international languages like English. An objection that has been raised here is that domains, as originally conceived, are parameters of language choice and not properties of languages...

  14. Domain requirements for the Dock adapter protein in growth- cone signaling

    OpenAIRE

    Rao, Yong; Zipursky, S. Lawrence

    1998-01-01

    Tyrosine phosphorylation has been implicated in growth-cone guidance through genetic, biochemical, and pharmacological studies. Adapter proteins containing src homology 2 (SH2) domains and src homology 3 (SH3) domains provide a means of linking guidance signaling through phosphotyrosine to downstream effectors regulating growth-cone motility. The Drosophila adapter, Dreadlocks (Dock), the homolog of mammalian Nck containing three N-terminal SH3 domains and a single SH2 domain, is highly speci...

  15. Src homology domain 2-containing protein-tyrosine phosphatase-1 (SHP-1) binds and dephosphorylates G(alpha)-interacting, vesicle-associated protein (GIV)/Girdin and attenuates the GIV-phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3K)-Akt signaling pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mittal, Yash; Pavlova, Yelena; Garcia-Marcos, Mikel; Ghosh, Pradipta

    2011-09-16

    GIV (Gα-interacting vesicle-associated protein, also known as Girdin) is a bona fide enhancer of PI3K-Akt signals during a diverse set of biological processes, e.g. wound healing, macrophage chemotaxis, tumor angiogenesis, and cancer invasion/metastasis. We recently demonstrated that tyrosine phosphorylation of GIV by receptor and non-receptor-tyrosine kinases is a key step that is required for GIV to directly bind and enhance PI3K activity. Here we report the discovery that Src homology 2-containing phosphatase-1 (SHP-1) is the major protein-tyrosine phosphatase that targets two critical phosphotyrosines within GIV and antagonizes phospho-GIV-dependent PI3K enhancement in mammalian cells. Using phosphorylation-dephosphorylation assays, we demonstrate that SHP-1 is the major and specific protein-tyrosine phosphatase that catalyzes the dephosphorylation of tyrosine-phosphorylated GIV in vitro and inhibits ligand-dependent tyrosine phosphorylation of GIV downstream of both growth factor receptors and GPCRs in cells. In vitro binding and co-immunoprecipitation assays demonstrate that SHP-1 and GIV interact directly and constitutively and that this interaction occurs between the SH2 domain of SHP-1 and the C terminus of GIV. Overexpression of SHP-1 inhibits tyrosine phosphorylation of GIV and formation of phospho-GIV-PI3K complexes, and specifically suppresses GIV-dependent activation of Akt. Consistently, depletion of SHP-1 enhances peak tyrosine phosphorylation of GIV, which coincides with an increase in peak Akt activity. We conclude that SHP-1 antagonizes the action of receptor and non-receptor-tyrosine kinases on GIV and down-regulates the phospho-GIV-PI3K-Akt axis of signaling.

  16. Structure and function of the C-terminal domain of MrpA in the Bacillus subtilis Mrp-antiporter complex--the evolutionary progenitor of the long horizontal helix in complex I.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Virzintiene, Egle; Moparthi, Vamsi K; Al-Eryani, Yusra; Shumbe, Leonard; Górecki, Kamil; Hägerhäll, Cecilia

    2013-10-11

    MrpA and MrpD are homologous to NuoL, NuoM and NuoN in complex I over the first 14 transmembrane helices. In this work, the C-terminal domain of MrpA, outside this conserved area, was investigated. The transmembrane orientation was found to correspond to that of NuoJ in complex I. We have previously demonstrated that the subunit NuoK is homologous to MrpC. The function of the MrpA C-terminus was tested by expression in a previously used Bacillus subtilis model system. At neutral pH, the truncated MrpA still worked, but at pH 8.4, where Mrp-complex formation is needed for function, the C-terminal domain of MrpA was absolutely required. Copyright © 2013 Federation of European Biochemical Societies. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. In vitro guanine nucleotide exchange activity of DHR-2/DOCKER/CZH2 domains.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Côté, Jean-François; Vuori, Kristiina

    2006-01-01

    Rho family GTPases regulate a large variety of biological processes, including the reorganization of the actin cytoskeleton. Like other members of the Ras superfamily of small GTP-binding proteins, Rho GTPases cycle between a GDP-bound (inactive) and a GTP-bound (active) state, and, when active, the GTPases relay extracellular signals to a large number of downstream effectors. Guanine nucleotide exchange factors (GEFs) promote the exchange of GDP for GTP on Rho GTPases, thereby activating them. Most Rho-GEFs mediate their effects through their signature domain known as the Dbl Homology-Pleckstrin Homology (DH-PH) module. Recently, we and others identified a family of evolutionarily conserved, DOCK180-related proteins that also display GEF activity toward Rho GTPases. The DOCK180-family of proteins lacks the canonical DH-PH module. Instead, they rely on a novel domain, termed DHR-2, DOCKER, or CZH2, to exchange GDP for GTP on Rho targets. In this chapter, the experimental approach that we used to uncover the exchange activity of the DHR-2 domain of DOCK180-related proteins will be described.

  18. Homological algebra in -abelian categories

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Deren Luo

    2017-08-16

    Aug 16, 2017 ... Homological algebra in n-abelian categories. 627. We recall the Comparison lemma, together with its dual, plays a central role in the sequel. Lemma 2.1 [13, Comparison lemma 2.1]. Let C be an additive category and X ∈ Ch. ≥0(C) a complex such that for all k ≥ 0the morphism dk+1. X is a weak cokernel ...

  19. Partial amino acid sequence of apolipoprotein(a) shows that it is homologous to plasminogen

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eaton, D.L.; Fless, G.M.; Kohr, W.J.; McLean, J.W.; Xu, Q.T.; Miller, C.G.; Lawn, R.M.; Scanu, A.M.

    1987-01-01

    Apolipoprotein(a) [apo(a)] is a glycoprotein with M/sub r/ ∼ 280,000 that is disulfide linked to apolipoprotein B in lipoprotein(a) particles. Elevated plasma levels of lipoprotein(a) are correlated with atherosclerosis. Partial amino acid sequence of apo(a) shows that it has striking homology to plasminogen. Plasminogen is a plasma serine protease zymogen that consists of five homologous and tandemly repeated domains called kringles and a trypsin-like protease domain. The amino-terminal sequence obtained for apo(a) is homologous to the beginning of kringle 4 but not the amino terminus of plasminogen. Apo(a) was subjected to limited proteolysis by trypsin or V8 protease, and fragments generated were isolated and sequenced. Sequences obtained from several of these fragments are highly (77-100%) homologous to plasminogen residues 391-421, which reside within kringle 4. Analysis of these internal apo(a) sequences revealed that apo(a) may contain at least two kringle 4-like domains. A sequence obtained from another tryptic fragment also shows homology to the end of kringle 4 and the beginning of kringle 5. Sequence data obtained from the two tryptic fragments shows homology with the protease domain of plasminogen. One of these sequences is homologous to the sequences surrounding the activation site of plasminogen. Plasminogen is activated by the cleavage of a specific arginine residue by urokinase and tissue plasminogen activator; however, the corresponding site in apo(a) is a serine that would not be cleaved by tissue plasminogen activator or urokinase. Using a plasmin-specific assay, no proteolytic activity could be demonstrated for lipoprotein(a) particles. These results suggest that apo(a) contains kringle-like domains and an inactive protease domain

  20. Alkaline pH sensor molecules.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murayama, Takashi; Maruyama, Ichiro N

    2015-11-01

    Animals can survive only within a narrow pH range. This requires continual monitoring of environmental and body-fluid pH. Although a variety of acidic pH sensor molecules have been reported, alkaline pH sensor function is not well understood. This Review describes neuronal alkaline pH sensors, grouped according to whether they monitor extracellular or intracellular alkaline pH. Extracellular sensors include the receptor-type guanylyl cyclase, the insulin receptor-related receptor, ligand-gated Cl- channels, connexin hemichannels, two-pore-domain K+ channels, and transient receptor potential (TRP) channels. Intracellular sensors include TRP channels and gap junction channels. Identification of molecular mechanisms underlying alkaline pH sensing is crucial for understanding how animals respond to environmental alkaline pH and how body-fluid pH is maintained within a narrow range. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  1. Divergent Roles of RPA Homologs of the Model Archaeon Halobacterium salinarum in Survival of DNA Damage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Evans, Jessica J; Gygli, Patrick E; McCaskill, Julienne; DeVeaux, Linda C

    2018-04-20

    The haloarchaea are unusual in possessing genes for multiple homologs to the ubiquitous single-stranded DNA binding protein (SSB or replication protein A, RPA) found in all three domains of life. Halobacterium salinarum contains five homologs: two are eukaryotic in organization, two are prokaryotic and are encoded on the minichromosomes, and one is uniquely euryarchaeal. Radiation-resistant mutants previously isolated show upregulation of one of the eukaryotic-type RPA genes. Here, we have created deletions in the five RPA operons. These deletion mutants were exposed to DNA-damaging conditions: ionizing radiation, UV radiation, and mitomycin C. Deletion of the euryarchaeal homolog, although not lethal as in Haloferax volcanii , causes severe sensitivity to all of these agents. Deletion of the other RPA/SSB homologs imparts a variable sensitivity to these DNA-damaging agents, suggesting that the different RPA homologs have specialized roles depending on the type of genomic insult encountered.

  2. Rational Homological Stability for Automorphisms of Manifolds

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Grey, Matthias

    In this thesis we prove rational homological stability for the classifying spaces of the homotopy automorphisms and block di↵eomorphisms of iterated connected sums of products of spheres of a certain connectivity.The results in particular apply to the manifolds       Npg,q  = (#g(Sp x Sq)) - int...... with coefficients in the homology of the universal covering, which is studied using rational homology theory. The result for the block di↵eomorphisms is deduced from the homological stability for the homotopy automorphisms upon using Surgery theory. Themain theorems of this thesis extend the homological stability...

  3. Kuranishi homology and Kuranishi cohomology

    OpenAIRE

    Joyce, Dominic

    2007-01-01

    A Kuranishi space is a topological space with a Kuranishi structure, defined by Fukaya and Ono. Kuranishi structures occur naturally on moduli spaces of J-holomorphic curves in symplectic geometry. Let Y be an orbifold and R a commutative ring or Q-algebra. We define two kinds of Kuranishi homology KH_*(Y;R). The chain complex KC_*(Y;R) defining KH_*(Y;R) is spanned over R by [X,f,G], for X a compact oriented Kuranishi space with corners, f : X --> Y smooth, and G "gauge-fixing data" which ma...

  4. Csk Homologous Kinase, a Potential Regulator of CXCR4-mediated Breast Cancer Cell Metastasis

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-08-31

    SH2 ) and SH3 domains and lacks the consensus tyrosine phosphorylation and myristylation sites found in Src family kinases . CHK has been shown to...0350 TITLE: Csk Homologous Kinase , a Potential Regulator of CXCR4-mediated Breast Cancer Cell Metastasis PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR: Byeong-Chel...1 AUG 2009 - 31 JUL 2010 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER W81XWH-09-1-0350 Csk Homologous Kinase , a Potential Regulator

  5. Persistent homology and string vacua

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cirafici, Michele [Center for Mathematical Analysis, Geometry and Dynamical Systems,Instituto Superior Técnico, Universidade de Lisboa,Av. Rovisco Pais, 1049-001 Lisboa (Portugal); Institut des Hautes Études Scientifiques,Le Bois-Marie, 35 route de Chartres, F-91440 Bures-sur-Yvette (France)

    2016-03-08

    We use methods from topological data analysis to study the topological features of certain distributions of string vacua. Topological data analysis is a multi-scale approach used to analyze the topological features of a dataset by identifying which homological characteristics persist over a long range of scales. We apply these techniques in several contexts. We analyze N=2 vacua by focusing on certain distributions of Calabi-Yau varieties and Landau-Ginzburg models. We then turn to flux compactifications and discuss how we can use topological data analysis to extract physical information. Finally we apply these techniques to certain phenomenologically realistic heterotic models. We discuss the possibility of characterizing string vacua using the topological properties of their distributions.

  6. Equivariant ordinary homology and cohomology

    CERN Document Server

    Costenoble, Steven R

    2016-01-01

    Filling a gap in the literature, this book takes the reader to the frontiers of equivariant topology, the study of objects with specified symmetries. The discussion is motivated by reference to a list of instructive “toy” examples and calculations in what is a relatively unexplored field. The authors also provide a reading path for the first-time reader less interested in working through sophisticated machinery but still desiring a rigorous understanding of the main concepts. The subject’s classical counterparts, ordinary homology and cohomology, dating back to the work of Henri Poincaré in topology, are calculational and theoretical tools which are important in many parts of mathematics and theoretical physics, particularly in the study of manifolds. Similarly powerful tools have been lacking, however, in the context of equivariant topology. Aimed at advanced graduate students and researchers in algebraic topology and related fields, the book assumes knowledge of basic algebraic topology and group act...

  7. Homology in Electromagnetic Boundary Value Problems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pellikka Matti

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available We discuss how homology computation can be exploited in computational electromagnetism. We represent various cellular mesh reduction techniques, which enable the computation of generators of homology spaces in an acceptable time. Furthermore, we show how the generators can be used for setting up and analysis of an electromagnetic boundary value problem. The aim is to provide a rationale for homology computation in electromagnetic modeling software.

  8. Insight into the assembly properties and functional organisation of the magnetotactic bacterial actin-like homolog, MamK.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sanjiv Sonkaria

    Full Text Available Magnetotactic bacteria (MTB synthesize magnetosomes, which are intracellular vesicles comprising a magnetic particle. A series of magnetosomes arrange themselves in chains to form a magnetic dipole that enables the cell to orient itself along the Earth's magnetic field. MamK, an actin-like homolog of MreB has been identified as a central component in this organisation. Gene deletion, fluorescence microscopy and in vitro studies have yielded mechanistic differences in the filament assembly of MamK with other bacterial cytoskeletal proteins within the cell. With little or no information on the structural and behavioural characteristics of MamK outside the cell, the mamK gene from Magnetospirillium gryphiswaldense was cloned and expressed to better understand the differences in the cytoskeletal properties with its bacterial homologues MreB and acitin. Despite the low sequence identity shared between MamK and MreB (22% and actin (18%, the behaviour of MamK monitored by light scattering broadly mirrored that of its bacterial cousin MreB primarily in terms of its pH, salt, divalent metal-ion and temperature dependency. The broad size variability of MamK filaments revealed by light scattering studies was supported by transmission electron microscopy (TEM imaging. Filament morphology however, indicated that MamK conformed to linearly orientated filaments that appeared to be distinctly dissimilar compared to MreB suggesting functional differences between these homologues. The presence of a nucleotide binding domain common to actin-like proteins was demonstrated by its ability to function both as an ATPase and GTPase. Circular dichroism and structural homology modelling showed that MamK adopts a protein fold that is consistent with the 'classical' actin family architecture but with notable structural differences within the smaller domains, the active site region and the overall surface electrostatic potential.

  9. Domain analysis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hjørland, Birger

    2017-01-01

    The domain-analytic approach to knowledge organization (KO) (and to the broader field of library and information science, LIS) is outlined. The article reviews the discussions and proposals on the definition of domains, and provides an example of a domain-analytic study in the field of art studies....... Varieties of domain analysis as well as criticism and controversies are presented and discussed....

  10. Homotopic Chain Maps Have Equal s-Homology and d-Homology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Z. Kazemi-Baneh

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The homotopy of chain maps on preabelian categories is investigated and the equality of standard homologies and d-homologies of homotopic chain maps is established. As a special case, if X and Y are the same homotopy type, then their nth d-homology R-modules are isomorphic, and if X is a contractible space, then its nth d-homology R-modules for n≠0 are trivial.

  11. Relative K-homology and normal operators

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Manuilov, Vladimir; Thomsen, Klaus

    2009-01-01

    -term exact sequence which generalizes the excision six-term exact sequence in the first variable of KK-theory. Subsequently we investigate the relative K-homology which arises from the group of relative extensions by specializing to abelian $C^*$-algebras. It turns out that this relative K-homology carries...

  12. Molecular Cloning And Sequencing Of Disintegrin Like Domain ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Disintegrin-like domain was cloned and sequenced from Cerastes cerastes venom gland tissue. Nested RT-PCR was performed using initial primers designed based on the homology of disintegrins from Trimeresurus flavoviridis, Glodius halys , Agkistrodon halys and Trimeresurus macrosquamatus. The homology was ...

  13. Lectures on homology with internal symmetries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Solovyov, Yu.

    1993-09-01

    Homology with internal symmetries is a natural generalization of cyclic homology introduced, independently, by Connes and Tsygan, which has turned out to be a very useful tool in a number of problems of algebra, geometry topology, analysis and mathematical physics. It suffices to say cycling homology and cohomology are successfully applied in the index theory of elliptic operators on foliations, in the description of the homotopy type of pseudoisotopy spaces, in the theory of characteristic classes in algebraic K-theory. They are also applied in noncommutative differential geometry and in the cohomology of Lie algebras, the branches of mathematics which brought them to life in the first place. Essentially, we consider dihedral homology, which was successfully applied for the description of the homology type of groups of homeomorphisms and diffeomorphisms of simply connected manifolds. (author). 27 refs

  14. Concrete domains

    OpenAIRE

    Kahn, G.; Plotkin, G.D.

    1993-01-01

    This paper introduces the theory of a particular kind of computation domains called concrete domains. The purpose of this theory is to find a satisfactory framework for the notions of coroutine computation and sequentiality of evaluation.

  15. Domain Engineering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bjørner, Dines

    Before software can be designed we must know its requirements. Before requirements can be expressed we must understand the domain. So it follows, from our dogma, that we must first establish precise descriptions of domains; then, from such descriptions, “derive” at least domain and interface requirements; and from those and machine requirements design the software, or, more generally, the computing systems.

  16. Ph3CCOOSnPh3.Ph3PO AND Ph3CCOOSnPh3.Ph3AsO: SYNTHESIS AND INFRARED STUDY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    ABDOU MBAYE

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available The mixture of ethanolic solutions of Ph3CCOOSnPh3 and Ph3PO or Ph3AsO gives Ph3CCOOSnPh3.Ph3PO and Ph3CCOOSnPh3.Ph3AsO adducts which have been characterized by infrared spectroscopy. A discrete structure is suggested for both, the environment around the tin centre being trigonal bipyramidal, the triphenylacetate anion behaving as a mondentate ligand.

  17. Preserved irradiated homologous cartilage for orbital reconstruction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Linberg, J.V.; Anderson, R.L.; Edwards, J.J.; Panje, W.R.; Bardach, J.

    1980-01-01

    Human costal cartilage is an excellent implant material for orbital and periorbital reconstruction because of its light weight, strength, homogeneous consistency and the ease with which it can be carved. Its use has been limited by the necessity of a separate surgical procedure to obtain the material. Preserved irradiated homologous cartilage has been shown to have almost all the autogenous cartilage and is convenient to use. Preserved irradiated homologous cartilage transplants do not elicit rejection reactions, resist infection and rarely undergo absorption

  18. Dualities in persistent (co)homology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    De Silva, Vin; Morozov, Dmitriy; Vejdemo-Johansson, Mikael

    2011-01-01

    We consider sequences of absolute and relative homology and cohomology groups that arise naturally for a filtered cell complex. We establish algebraic relationships between their persistence modules, and show that they contain equivalent information. We explain how one can use the existing algorithm for persistent homology to process any of the four modules, and relate it to a recently introduced persistent cohomology algorithm. We present experimental evidence for the practical efficiency of the latter algorithm

  19. Structures of class A macrophage scavenger receptors. Electron microscopic study of flexible, multidomain, fibrous proteins and determination of the disulfide bond pattern of the scavenger receptor cysteine-rich domain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Resnick, D; Chatterton, J E; Schwartz, K; Slayter, H; Krieger, M

    1996-10-25

    Structures of secreted forms of the human type I and II class A macrophage scavenger receptors were studied using biochemical and biophysical methods. Proteolytic analysis was used to determine the intramolecular disulfide bonds in the type I-specific scavenger receptor cysteine-rich (SRCR) domain: Cys2-Cys7, Cys3-Cys8, and Cys5-Cys6. This pattern is likely to be shared by the highly homologous domains in the many other members of the SRCR domain superfamily. Electron microscopy using rotary shadowing and negative staining showed that the type I and II receptors are extended molecules whose contour lengths are approximately 440 A. They comprised two adjacent fibrous segments, an alpha-helical coiled-coil ( approximately 230 A, including a contribution from the N-terminal spacer domain) and a collagenous triple helix ( approximately 210 A). The type I molecules also contained a C-terminal globular structure ( approximately 58 x 76 A) composed of three SRCR domains. The fibrous domains were joined by an extremely flexible hinge. The angle between these domains varied from 0 to 180 degrees and depended on the conditions of sample preparation. Unexpectedly, at physiologic pH, the prevalent angle seen using rotary shadowing was 0 degrees , resulting in a structure that is significantly more compact than previously suggested. The apparent juxtaposition of the fibrous domains at neutral pH provides a framework for future structure-function studies of these unusual multiligand receptors.

  20. Yeast Ivy1p Is a Putative I-BAR-domain Protein with pH-sensitive Filament Forming Ability in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Itoh, Yuzuru; Kida, Kazuki; Hanawa-Suetsugu, Kyoko; Suetsugu, Shiro

    2016-01-01

    Bin-Amphiphysin-Rvs161/167 (BAR) domains mold lipid bilayer membranes into tubules, by forming a spiral polymer on the membrane. Most BAR domains are thought to be involved in forming membrane invaginations through their concave membrane binding surfaces, whereas some members have convex membrane binding surfaces, and thereby mold membranes into protrusions. The BAR domains with a convex surface form a subtype called the inverse BAR (I-BAR) domain or IRSp53-MIM-homology domain (IMD). Although the mammalian I-BAR domains have been studied, those from other organisms remain elusive. Here, we found putative I-BAR domains in Fungi and animal-like unicellular organisms. The fungal protein containing the putative I-BAR-domain is known as Ivy1p in yeast, and is reportedly localized in the vacuole. The phylogenetic analysis of the I-BAR domains revealed that the fungal I-BAR-domain containing proteins comprise a distinct group from those containing IRSp53 or MIM. Importantly, Ivy1p formed a polymer with a diameter of approximately 20 nm in vitro, without a lipid membrane. The filaments were formed at neutral pH, but disassembled when pH was reverted to basic. Moreover, Ivy1p and the I-BAR domain expressed in mammalian HeLa cells was localized at a vacuole-like structure as filaments as revealed by super-resolved microscopy. These data indicate the pH-sensitive polymer forming ability and the functional conservation of Ivy1p in eukaryotic cells.

  1. Disruption of PH–kinase domain interactions leads to oncogenic activation of AKT in human cancers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parikh, Chaitali; Janakiraman, Vasantharajan; Wu, Wen-I; Foo, Catherine K.; Kljavin, Noelyn M.; Chaudhuri, Subhra; Stawiski, Eric; Lee, Brian; Lin, Jie; Li, Hong; Lorenzo, Maria N.; Yuan, Wenlin; Guillory, Joseph; Jackson, Marlena; Rondon, Jesus; Franke, Yvonne; Bowman, Krista K.; Sagolla, Meredith; Stinson, Jeremy; Wu, Thomas D.; Wu, Jiansheng; Stokoe, David; Stern, Howard M.; Brandhuber, Barbara J.; Lin, Kui; Skelton, Nicholas J.; Seshagiri, Somasekar

    2012-01-01

    The protein kinase v-akt murine thymoma viral oncogene homolog (AKT), a key regulator of cell survival and proliferation, is frequently hyperactivated in human cancers. Intramolecular pleckstrin homology (PH) domain–kinase domain (KD) interactions are important in maintaining AKT in an inactive state. AKT activation proceeds after a conformational change that dislodges the PH from the KD. To understand these autoinhibitory interactions, we generated mutations at the PH–KD interface and found that most of them lead to constitutive activation of AKT. Such mutations are likely another mechanism by which activation may occur in human cancers and other diseases. In support of this likelihood, we found somatic mutations in AKT1 at the PH–KD interface that have not been previously described in human cancers. Furthermore, we show that the AKT1 somatic mutants are constitutively active, leading to oncogenic signaling. Additionally, our studies show that the AKT1 mutants are not effectively inhibited by allosteric AKT inhibitors, consistent with the requirement for an intact PH–KD interface for allosteric inhibition. These results have important implications for therapeutic intervention in patients with AKT mutations at the PH–KD interface. PMID:23134728

  2. SH2 domains: modulators of nonreceptor tyrosine kinase activity

    OpenAIRE

    Filippakopoulos, Panagis; Müller, Susanne; Knapp, Stefan

    2009-01-01

    The Src homology 2 (SH2) domain is a sequence-specific phosphotyrosine-binding module present in many signaling molecules. In cytoplasmic tyrosine kinases, the SH2 domain is located N-terminally to the catalytic kinase domain (SH1) where it mediates cellular localization, substrate recruitment, and regulation of kinase activity. Initially, structural studies established a role of the SH2 domain stabilizing the inactive state of Src family members. However, biochemical characterization showed ...

  3. Searching remote homology with spectral clustering with symmetry in neighborhood cluster kernels.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ujjwal Maulik

    Full Text Available Remote homology detection among proteins utilizing only the unlabelled sequences is a central problem in comparative genomics. The existing cluster kernel methods based on neighborhoods and profiles and the Markov clustering algorithms are currently the most popular methods for protein family recognition. The deviation from random walks with inflation or dependency on hard threshold in similarity measure in those methods requires an enhancement for homology detection among multi-domain proteins. We propose to combine spectral clustering with neighborhood kernels in Markov similarity for enhancing sensitivity in detecting homology independent of "recent" paralogs. The spectral clustering approach with new combined local alignment kernels more effectively exploits the unsupervised protein sequences globally reducing inter-cluster walks. When combined with the corrections based on modified symmetry based proximity norm deemphasizing outliers, the technique proposed in this article outperforms other state-of-the-art cluster kernels among all twelve implemented kernels. The comparison with the state-of-the-art string and mismatch kernels also show the superior performance scores provided by the proposed kernels. Similar performance improvement also is found over an existing large dataset. Therefore the proposed spectral clustering framework over combined local alignment kernels with modified symmetry based correction achieves superior performance for unsupervised remote homolog detection even in multi-domain and promiscuous domain proteins from Genolevures database families with better biological relevance. Source code available upon request.sarkar@labri.fr.

  4. Investigating homology between proteins using energetic profiles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wrabl, James O; Hilser, Vincent J

    2010-03-26

    Accumulated experimental observations demonstrate that protein stability is often preserved upon conservative point mutation. In contrast, less is known about the effects of large sequence or structure changes on the stability of a particular fold. Almost completely unknown is the degree to which stability of different regions of a protein is generally preserved throughout evolution. In this work, these questions are addressed through thermodynamic analysis of a large representative sample of protein fold space based on remote, yet accepted, homology. More than 3,000 proteins were computationally analyzed using the structural-thermodynamic algorithm COREX/BEST. Estimated position-specific stability (i.e., local Gibbs free energy of folding) and its component enthalpy and entropy were quantitatively compared between all proteins in the sample according to all-vs.-all pairwise structural alignment. It was discovered that the local stabilities of homologous pairs were significantly more correlated than those of non-homologous pairs, indicating that local stability was indeed generally conserved throughout evolution. However, the position-specific enthalpy and entropy underlying stability were less correlated, suggesting that the overall regional stability of a protein was more important than the thermodynamic mechanism utilized to achieve that stability. Finally, two different types of statistically exceptional evolutionary structure-thermodynamic relationships were noted. First, many homologous proteins contained regions of similar thermodynamics despite localized structure change, suggesting a thermodynamic mechanism enabling evolutionary fold change. Second, some homologous proteins with extremely similar structures nonetheless exhibited different local stabilities, a phenomenon previously observed experimentally in this laboratory. These two observations, in conjunction with the principal conclusion that homologous proteins generally conserved local stability, may

  5. Investigating homology between proteins using energetic profiles.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    James O Wrabl

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Accumulated experimental observations demonstrate that protein stability is often preserved upon conservative point mutation. In contrast, less is known about the effects of large sequence or structure changes on the stability of a particular fold. Almost completely unknown is the degree to which stability of different regions of a protein is generally preserved throughout evolution. In this work, these questions are addressed through thermodynamic analysis of a large representative sample of protein fold space based on remote, yet accepted, homology. More than 3,000 proteins were computationally analyzed using the structural-thermodynamic algorithm COREX/BEST. Estimated position-specific stability (i.e., local Gibbs free energy of folding and its component enthalpy and entropy were quantitatively compared between all proteins in the sample according to all-vs.-all pairwise structural alignment. It was discovered that the local stabilities of homologous pairs were significantly more correlated than those of non-homologous pairs, indicating that local stability was indeed generally conserved throughout evolution. However, the position-specific enthalpy and entropy underlying stability were less correlated, suggesting that the overall regional stability of a protein was more important than the thermodynamic mechanism utilized to achieve that stability. Finally, two different types of statistically exceptional evolutionary structure-thermodynamic relationships were noted. First, many homologous proteins contained regions of similar thermodynamics despite localized structure change, suggesting a thermodynamic mechanism enabling evolutionary fold change. Second, some homologous proteins with extremely similar structures nonetheless exhibited different local stabilities, a phenomenon previously observed experimentally in this laboratory. These two observations, in conjunction with the principal conclusion that homologous proteins generally conserved

  6. A systematic study of the effect of low pH acid treatment on anti-drug antibodies specific for a domain antibody therapeutic: Impact on drug tolerance, assay sensitivity and post-validation method assessment of ADA in clinical serum samples.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kavita, Uma; Duo, Jia; Crawford, Sean M; Liu, Rong; Valcin, Joan; Gleason, Carol; Dong, Huijin; Gadkari, Snaehal; Dodge, Robert W; Pillutla, Renuka C; DeSilva, Binodh S

    2017-09-01

    We developed a homogeneous bridging anti-drug antibody (ADA) assay on an electro chemiluminescent immunoassay (ECLIA) platform to support the immunogenicity evaluation of a dimeric domain antibody (dAb) therapeutic in clinical studies. During method development we evaluated the impact of different types of acid at various pH levels on polyclonal and monoclonal ADA controls of differing affinities and on/off rates. The data shows for the first time that acids of different pH can have a differential effect on ADA of various affinities and this in turn impacts assay sensitivity and drug tolerance as defined by these surrogate controls. Acid treatment led to a reduction in signal of intermediate and low affinity ADA, but not high affinity or polyclonal ADA. We also found that acid pretreatment is a requisite for dissociation of drug bound high affinity ADA, but not for low affinity ADA-drug complexes. Although we were unable to identify an acid that would allow a 100% retrieval of ADA signal post-treatment, use of glycine pH3.0 enabled the detection of low, intermediate and high affinity antibodies (Abs) to various extents. Following optimization, the ADA assay method was validated for clinical sample analysis. Consistencies within various parameters of the clinical data such as dose dependent increases in ADA rates and titers were observed, indicating a reliable ADA method. Pre- and post-treatment ADA negative or positive clinical samples without detectable drug were reanalyzed in the absence of acid treatment or presence of added exogenous drug respectively to further assess the effectiveness of the final acid treatment procedure. The overall ADA results indicate that assay conditions developed and validated based on surrogate controls sufficed to provide a reliable clinical data set. The effect of low pH acid treatment on possible pre-existing ADA or soluble multimeric target in normal human serum was also evaluated, and preliminary data indicate that acid type and

  7. Phylogeny of the TRAF/MATH domain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zapata, Juan M; Martínez-García, Vanesa; Lefebvre, Sophie

    2007-01-01

    The TNF-receptor associated factor (TRAF) domain (TD), also known as the meprin and TRAF-C homology (MATH) domain is a fold of seven anti-parallel p-helices that participates in protein-protein interactions. This fold is broadly represented among eukaryotes, where it is found associated with a discrete set of protein-domains. Virtually all protein families encompassing a TRAF/MATH domain seem to be involved in the regulation of protein processing and ubiquitination, strongly suggesting a parallel evolution of the TRAF/MATH domain and certain proteolysis pathways in eukaryotes. The restricted number of living organisms for which we have information of their genetic and protein make-up limits the scope and analysis of the MATH domain in evolution. However, the available information allows us to get a glimpse on the origins, distribution and evolution of the TRAF/MATH domain, which will be overviewed in this chapter.

  8. Homological methods, representation theory, and cluster algebras

    CERN Document Server

    Trepode, Sonia

    2018-01-01

    This text presents six mini-courses, all devoted to interactions between representation theory of algebras, homological algebra, and the new ever-expanding theory of cluster algebras. The interplay between the topics discussed in this text will continue to grow and this collection of courses stands as a partial testimony to this new development. The courses are useful for any mathematician who would like to learn more about this rapidly developing field; the primary aim is to engage graduate students and young researchers. Prerequisites include knowledge of some noncommutative algebra or homological algebra. Homological algebra has always been considered as one of the main tools in the study of finite-dimensional algebras. The strong relationship with cluster algebras is more recent and has quickly established itself as one of the important highlights of today’s mathematical landscape. This connection has been fruitful to both areas—representation theory provides a categorification of cluster algebras, wh...

  9. Structural analysis of zwitterionic liquids vs. homologous ionic liquids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Boning; Kuroda, Kosuke; Takahashi, Kenji; Castner, Edward W.

    2018-05-01

    Zwitterionic liquids (Zw-ILs) have been developed that are homologous to monovalent ionic liquids (ILs) and show great promise for controlled dissolution of cellulosic biomass. Using both high energy X-ray scattering and atomistic molecular simulations, this article compares the bulk liquid structural properties for novel Zw-ILs with their homologous ILs. It is shown that the significant localization of the charges on Zw-ILs leads to charge ordering similar to that observed for conventional ionic liquids with monovalent anions and cations. A low-intensity first sharp diffraction peak in the liquid structure factor S(q) is observed for both the Zw-IL and the IL. This is unexpected since both the Zw-IL and IL have a 2-(2-methoxyethoxy)ethyl (diether) functional group on the cationic imidazolium ring and ether functional groups are known to suppress this peak. Detailed analyses show that this intermediate range order in the liquid structure arises for slightly different reasons in the Zw-IL vs. the IL. For the Zw-IL, the ether tails in the liquid are shown to aggregate into nanoscale domains.

  10. A homology theory for smale spaces

    CERN Document Server

    Putnam, Ian F

    2014-01-01

    The author develops a homology theory for Smale spaces, which include the basics sets for an Axiom A diffeomorphism. It is based on two ingredients. The first is an improved version of Bowen's result that every such system is the image of a shift of finite type under a finite-to-one factor map. The second is Krieger's dimension group invariant for shifts of finite type. He proves a Lefschetz formula which relates the number of periodic points of the system for a given period to trace data from the action of the dynamics on the homology groups. The existence of such a theory was proposed by Bowen in the 1970s.

  11. FBH1 helicase disrupts RAD51 filaments in vitro and modulates homologous recombination in mammalian cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Simandlova, Jitka; Zagelbaum, Jennifer; Payne, Miranda J

    2013-01-01

    Efficient repair of DNA double strand breaks and interstrand cross-links requires the homologous recombination (HR) pathway, a potentially error-free process that utilizes a homologous sequence as a repair template. A key player in HR is RAD51, the eukaryotic ortholog of bacterial RecA protein. RAD......51 can polymerize on DNA to form a nucleoprotein filament that facilitates both the search for the homologous DNA sequences and the subsequent DNA strand invasion required to initiate HR. Because of its pivotal role in HR, RAD51 is subject to numerous positive and negative regulatory influences...... filaments on DNA through its ssDNA translocase function. Consistent with this, a mutant mouse embryonic stem cell line with a deletion in the FBH1 helicase domain fails to limit RAD51 chromatin association and shows hyper-recombination. Our data are consistent with FBH1 restraining RAD51 DNA binding under...

  12. Homology and cohomology of Rees semigroup algebras

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Grønbæk, Niels; Gourdeau, Frédéric; White, Michael C.

    2011-01-01

    Let S by a Rees semigroup, and let 1¹(S) be its convolution semigroup algebra. Using Morita equivalence we show that bounded Hochschild homology and cohomology of l¹(S) is isomorphic to those of the underlying discrete group algebra....

  13. Induction of homologous recombination in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simon, J R; Moore, P D

    1988-09-01

    We have investigated the effects of UV irradiation of Saccharomyces cerevisiae in order to distinguish whether UV-induced recombination results from the induction of enzymes required for homologous recombination, or the production of substrate sites for recombination containing regions of DNA damage. We utilized split-dose experiments to investigate the induction of proteins required for survival, gene conversion, and mutation in a diploid strain of S. cerevisiae. We demonstrate that inducing doses of UV irradiation followed by a 6 h period of incubation render the cells resistant to challenge doses of UV irradiation. The effects of inducing and challenge doses of UV irradiation upon interchromosomal gene conversion and mutation are strictly additive. Using the yeast URA3 gene cloned in non-replicating single- and double-stranded plasmid vectors that integrate into chromosomal genes upon transformation, we show that UV irradiation of haploid yeast cells and homologous plasmid DNA sequences each stimulate homologous recombination approximately two-fold, and that these effects are additive. Non-specific DNA damage has little effect on the stimulation of homologous recombination, as shown by studies in which UV-irradiated heterologous DNA was included in transformation/recombination experiments. We further demonstrate that the effect of competing single- and double-stranded heterologous DNA sequences differs in UV-irradiated and unirradiated cells, suggesting an induction of recombinational machinery in UV-irradiated S. cerevisiae cells.

  14. Threading homology through algebra selected patterns

    CERN Document Server

    Boffi, Giandomenico

    2006-01-01

    Aimed at graduate students and researchers in mathematics, this book takes homological themes, such as Koszul complexes and their generalizations, and shows how these can be used to clarify certain problems in selected parts of algebra, as well as their success in solving a number of them.

  15. Cell biology of homologous recombination in yeast

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Eckert-Boulet, Nadine Valerie; Rothstein, Rodney; Lisby, Michael

    2011-01-01

    Homologous recombination is an important pathway for error-free repair of DNA lesions, such as single- and double-strand breaks, and for rescue of collapsed replication forks. Here, we describe protocols for live cell imaging of single-lesion recombination events in the yeast Saccharomyces...

  16. Polar representation of centrifugal pump homologous curves

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Veloso, Marcelo Antonio; Mattos, Joao Roberto Loureiro de

    2008-01-01

    Essential for any mathematical model designed to simulate flow transient events caused by pump operations is the pump performance data. The performance of a centrifugal pump is characterized by four basic parameters: the rotational speed, the volumetric flow rate, the dynamic head, and the hydraulic torque. Any one of these quantities can be expressed as a function of any two others. The curves showing the relationships between these four variables are called the pump characteristic curves, also referred to as four-quadrant curves. The characteristic curves are empirically developed by the pump manufacturer and uniquely describe head and torque as functions of volumetric flow rate and rotation speed. Because of comprising a large amount of points, the four-quadrant configuration is not suitable for computational purposes. However, it can be converted to a simpler form by the development of the homologous curves, in which dynamic head and hydraulic torque ratios are expressed as functions of volumetric flow and rotation speed ratios. The numerical use of the complete set of homologous curves requires specification of sixteen partial curves, being eight for the dynamic head and eight for the hydraulic torque. As a consequence, the handling of homologous curves is still somewhat complicated. In solving flow transient problems that require the pump characteristic data for all the operation zones, the polar form appears as the simplest way to represent the homologous curves. In the polar method, the complete characteristics of a pump can be described by only two closed curves, one for the dynamic head and other for the hydraulic torque, both in function of a single angular coordinate defined adequately in terms of the quotient between volumetric flow ratio and rotation speed ratio. The usefulness and advantages of this alternative method are demonstrated through a practical example in which the homologous curves for a pump of the type used in the main coolant loops of a

  17. Parametric representation of centrifugal pump homologous curves

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Veloso, Marcelo A.; Mattos, Joao R.L. de

    2015-01-01

    Essential for any mathematical model designed to simulate flow transient events caused by pump operations is the pump performance data. The performance of a centrifugal pump is characterized by four basic quantities: the rotational speed, the volumetric flow rate, the dynamic head, and the hydraulic torque. The curves showing the relationships between these four variables are called the pump characteristic curves. The characteristic curves are empirically developed by the pump manufacturer and uniquely describe head and torque as functions of volumetric flow rate and rotation speed. Because of comprising a large amount of points, this configuration is not suitable for computational purposes. However, it can be converted to a simpler form by the development of the homologous curves, in which dynamic head and hydraulic torque ratios are expressed as functions of volumetric flow and rotation speed ratios. The numerical use of the complete set of homologous curves requires specification of sixteen partial curves, being eight for the dynamic head and eight for the hydraulic torque. As a consequence, the handling of homologous curves is still somewhat complicated. In solving flow transient problems that require the pump characteristic data for all the operation zones, the parametric form appears as the simplest way to deal with the homologous curves. In this approach, the complete characteristics of a pump can be described by only two closed curves, one for the dynamic head and other for the hydraulic torque, both in function of a single angular coordinate defined adequately in terms of the quotient between volumetric flow ratio and rotation speed ratio. The usefulness and advantages of this alternative method are demonstrated through a practical example in which the homologous curves for a pump of the type used in the main coolant loops of a pressurized water reactor (PWR) are transformed to the parametric form. (author)

  18. Two zebrafish G2A homologs activate multiple intracellular signaling pathways in acidic environment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ichijo, Yuta; Mochimaru, Yuta [Laboratory of Cell Signaling Regulation, Department of Life Sciences, School of Agriculture, Meiji University, Kawasaki 214-8571 (Japan); Azuma, Morio [Laboratory of Regulatory Biology, Graduate School of Science and Engineering, University of Toyama, 3190-Gofuku, Toyama 930-8555 (Japan); Satou, Kazuhiro; Negishi, Jun [Laboratory of Cell Signaling Regulation, Department of Life Sciences, School of Agriculture, Meiji University, Kawasaki 214-8571 (Japan); Nakakura, Takashi [Department of Anatomy, Graduate School of Medicine, Teikyo University, 2-11-1 Itabashi-Ku, Tokyo 173-8605 (Japan); Oshima, Natsuki [Laboratory of Cell Signaling Regulation, Department of Life Sciences, School of Agriculture, Meiji University, Kawasaki 214-8571 (Japan); Mogi, Chihiro; Sato, Koichi [Laboratory of Signal Transduction, Institute for Molecular and Cellular Regulation, Gunma University, Maebashi 371-8512 (Japan); Matsuda, Kouhei [Laboratory of Regulatory Biology, Graduate School of Science and Engineering, University of Toyama, 3190-Gofuku, Toyama 930-8555 (Japan); Okajima, Fumikazu [Laboratory of Signal Transduction, Institute for Molecular and Cellular Regulation, Gunma University, Maebashi 371-8512 (Japan); Tomura, Hideaki, E-mail: tomurah@meiji.ac.jp [Laboratory of Cell Signaling Regulation, Department of Life Sciences, School of Agriculture, Meiji University, Kawasaki 214-8571 (Japan)

    2016-01-01

    Human G2A is activated by various stimuli such as lysophosphatidylcholine (LPC), 9-hydroxyoctadecadienoic acid (9-HODE), and protons. The receptor is coupled to multiple intracellular signaling pathways, including the G{sub s}-protein/cAMP/CRE, G{sub 12/13}-protein/Rho/SRE, and G{sub q}-protein/phospholipase C/NFAT pathways. In the present study, we examined whether zebrafish G2A homologs (zG2A-a and zG2A-b) could respond to these stimuli and activate multiple intracellular signaling pathways. We also examined whether histidine residue and basic amino acid residue in the N-terminus of the homologs also play roles similar to those played by human G2A residues if the homologs sense protons. We found that the zG2A-a showed the high CRE, SRE, and NFAT activities, however, zG2A-b showed only the high SRE activity under a pH of 8.0. Extracellular acidification from pH 7.4 to 6.3 ameliorated these activities in zG2A-a-expressing cells. On the other hand, acidification ameliorated the SRE activity but not the CRE and NFAT activities in zG2A-b-expressing cells. LPC or 9-HODE did not modify any activity of either homolog. The substitution of histidine residue at the 174{sup th} position from the N-terminus of zG2A-a to asparagine residue attenuated proton-induced CRE and NFAT activities but not SRE activity. The substitution of arginine residue at the 32nd position from the N-terminus of zG2A-a to the alanine residue also attenuated its high and the proton-induced CRE and NFAT activities. On the contrary, the substitution did not attenuate SRE activity. The substitution of the arginine residue at the 10th position from the N-terminus of zG2A-b to the alanine residue also did not attenuate its high or the proton-induced SRE activity. These results indicate that zebrafish G2A homologs were activated by protons but not by LPC and 9-HODE, and the activation mechanisms of the homologs were similar to those of human G2A. - Highlights: • Zebrafish two G2A homologs are proton

  19. EH domain of EHD1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kieken, Fabien; Jovic, Marko; Naslavsky, Naava; Caplan, Steve, E-mail: scaplan@unmc.edu; Sorgen, Paul L. [University of Nebraska Medical Center, Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology and Eppley Cancer Center (United States)], E-mail: psorgen@unmc.edu

    2007-12-15

    EHD1 is a member of the mammalian C-terminal Eps15 homology domain (EH) containing protein family, and regulates the recycling of various receptors from the endocytic recycling compartment to the plasma membrane. The EH domain of EHD1 binds to proteins containing either an Asn-Pro-Phe or Asp-Pro-Phe motif, and plays an important role in the subcellular localization and function of EHD1. Thus far, the structures of five N-terminal EH domains from other proteins have been solved, but to date, the structure of the EH domains from the four C-terminal EHD family paralogs remains unknown. In this study, we have assigned the 133 C-terminal residues of EHD1, which includes the EH domain, and solved its solution structure. While the overall structure resembles that of the second of the three N-terminal Eps15 EH domains, potentially significant differences in surface charge and the structure of the tripeptide-binding pocket are discussed.

  20. EH domain of EHD1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kieken, Fabien; Jovic, Marko; Naslavsky, Naava; Caplan, Steve; Sorgen, Paul L.

    2007-01-01

    EHD1 is a member of the mammalian C-terminal Eps15 homology domain (EH) containing protein family, and regulates the recycling of various receptors from the endocytic recycling compartment to the plasma membrane. The EH domain of EHD1 binds to proteins containing either an Asn-Pro-Phe or Asp-Pro-Phe motif, and plays an important role in the subcellular localization and function of EHD1. Thus far, the structures of five N-terminal EH domains from other proteins have been solved, but to date, the structure of the EH domains from the four C-terminal EHD family paralogs remains unknown. In this study, we have assigned the 133 C-terminal residues of EHD1, which includes the EH domain, and solved its solution structure. While the overall structure resembles that of the second of the three N-terminal Eps15 EH domains, potentially significant differences in surface charge and the structure of the tripeptide-binding pocket are discussed

  1. Kinesin-1 and mitochondrial motility control by discrimination of structurally equivalent but distinct subdomains in Ran-GTP-binding domains of Ran-binding protein 2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patil, Hemangi; Cho, Kyoung-in; Lee, James; Yang, Yi; Orry, Andrew; Ferreira, Paulo A

    2013-03-27

    The pleckstrin homology (PH) domain is a versatile fold that mediates a variety of protein-protein and protein-phosphatidylinositol lipid interactions. The Ran-binding protein 2 (RanBP2) contains four interspersed Ran GTPase-binding domains (RBD(n = 1-4)) with close structural homology to the PH domain of Bruton's tyrosine kinase. The RBD2, kinesin-binding domain (KBD) and RBD3 comprise a tripartite domain (R2KR3) of RanBP2 that causes the unfolding, microtubule binding and biphasic activation of kinesin-1, a crucial anterograde motor of mitochondrial motility. However, the interplay between Ran GTPase and R2KR3 of RanBP2 in kinesin-1 activation and mitochondrial motility is elusive. We use structure-function, biochemical, kinetic and cell-based assays with time-lapse live-cell microscopy of over 260,000 mitochondrial-motility-related events to find mutually exclusive subdomains in RBD2 and RBD3 towards Ran GTPase binding, kinesin-1 activation and mitochondrial motility regulation. The RBD2 and RBD3 exhibit Ran-GTP-independent, subdomain and stereochemical-dependent discrimination on the biphasic kinetics of kinesin-1 activation or regulation of mitochondrial motility. Further, KBD alone and R2KR3 stimulate and suppress, respectively, multiple biophysical parameters of mitochondrial motility. The regulation of the bidirectional transport of mitochondria by either KBD or R2KR3 is highly coordinated, because their kinetic effects are accompanied always by changes in mitochondrial motile events of either transport polarity. These studies uncover novel roles in Ran GTPase-independent subdomains of RBD2 and RBD3, and KBD of RanBP2, that confer antagonizing and multi-modal mechanisms of kinesin-1 activation and regulation of mitochondrial motility. These findings open new venues towards the pharmacological harnessing of cooperative and competitive mechanisms regulating kinesins, RanBP2 or mitochondrial motility in disparate human disorders.

  2. Classification and Lineage Tracing of SH2 Domains Throughout Eukaryotes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Bernard A

    2017-01-01

    Today there exists a rapidly expanding number of sequenced genomes. Cataloging protein interaction domains such as the Src Homology 2 (SH2) domain across these various genomes can be accomplished with ease due to existing algorithms and predictions models. An evolutionary analysis of SH2 domains provides a step towards understanding how SH2 proteins integrated with existing signaling networks to position phosphotyrosine signaling as a crucial driver of robust cellular communication networks in metazoans. However organizing and tracing SH2 domain across organisms and understanding their evolutionary trajectory remains a challenge. This chapter describes several methodologies towards analyzing the evolutionary trajectory of SH2 domains including a global SH2 domain classification system, which facilitates annotation of new SH2 sequences essential for tracing the lineage of SH2 domains throughout eukaryote evolution. This classification utilizes a combination of sequence homology, protein domain architecture and the boundary positions between introns and exons within the SH2 domain or genes encoding these domains. Discrete SH2 families can then be traced across various genomes to provide insight into its origins. Furthermore, additional methods for examining potential mechanisms for divergence of SH2 domains from structural changes to alterations in the protein domain content and genome duplication will be discussed. Therefore a better understanding of SH2 domain evolution may enhance our insight into the emergence of phosphotyrosine signaling and the expansion of protein interaction domains.

  3. Site-Directed Mutagenesis of the Fibronectin Domains in Insulin Receptor-Related Receptor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Igor E. Deyev

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available The orphan insulin receptor-related receptor (IRR, in contrast to its close homologs, the insulin receptor (IR and insulin-like growth factor receptor (IGF-IR can be activated by mildly alkaline extracellular medium. We have previously demonstrated that IRR activation is defined by its extracellular region, involves multiple domains, and shows positive cooperativity with two synergistic sites. By the analyses of point mutants and chimeras of IRR with IR in, we now address the role of the fibronectin type III (FnIII repeats in the IRR pH-sensing. The first activation site includes the intrinsically disordered subdomain ID (646–716 within the FnIII-2 domain at the C-terminus of IRR alpha subunit together with closely located residues L135, G188, R244, H318, and K319 of L1 and C domains of the second subunit. The second site involves residue T582 of FnIII-1 domain at the top of IRR lambda-shape pyramid together with M406, V407, and D408 from L2 domain within the second subunit. A possible importance of the IRR carbohydrate moiety for its activation was also assessed. IRR is normally less glycosylated than IR and IGF-IR. Swapping both FnIII-2 and FnIII-3 IRR domains with those of IR shifted beta-subunit mass from 68 kDa for IRR to about 100 kDa due to increased glycosylation and abolished the IRR pH response. However, mutations of four asparagine residues, potential glycosylation sites in chimera IRR with swapped FnIII-2/3 domains of IR, decreased the chimera glycosylation and resulted in a partial restoration of IRR pH-sensing activity, suggesting that the extensive glycosylation of FnIII-2/3 provides steric hindrance for the alkali-induced rearrangement of the IRR ectodomain.

  4. Structural analysis of the Csk homologous kinase CHK

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mulhern, T.; Chong, Y.-P.; Cheng, H.-C.

    2003-01-01

    Full text: CHK (Csk homologous kinase) is an intracellular protein tyrosine kinase, which is highly expressed in the haematopoietic system and the brain. The in vivo role of CHK is to specifically phosphorylate and deactivate the Src family of protein tyrosine kinases. The members of the Src family: Src, Blk, Fyn, Fgr, Hck, Lck, Lyn, Yes and Yrk are major players in numerous cell signalling pathways and exquisitely tuned control of Src family activity is fundamental to many processes in normal cells (reviewed in Lowell and Soriano, 1996). For example, the Src family kinase Fyn is highly expressed in the brain and its activity is vital for memory and learning. In the haematopoietic system, the Src family kinase Hck controls cytoskeletal reorganization, cell motility and immunologic activation. While the Csk family enzymes are closely related to the Src proteins (∼37% identity), the x-ray crystal structures of Src (Xu et al., 1997) and Csk (Ogawa et al., 2002) do display several important differences. Unlike Src, the Csk the SH2 and SH3 domains do not bind intramolecular ligands and they adopt a strikingly different disposition to that observed in Src. Another interesting feature is that the linkers between the SH3 and SH2 domains and between the SH2 and kinase domains, are in intimate contact with the N-lobe of kinase and both appear to play important roles in regulation of the kinase activity. However, the structural and functional basis of how this can be altered is still unclear. We describe the results of biochemical analyses of CHK mediated deactivation of Hck, which suggest that in addition to direct tail-phosphorylation, protein-protein interactions are important. We also describe heteronuclear NMR studies of the structure and ligand binding properties of the CHK SH2 and SH3 domains with a particular emphasis on the transmission of regulatory signals from the ligand binding sites to the interdomain linkers

  5. Csk Homologous Kinase, a Potential Regulator of CXCR4-Medicated Breast Cancer Cell Metastasis

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-08-01

    is a non-receptor tyrosine kinase and a second member of the Csk family. Like Csk, CHK has Src homology 2 ( SH2 ) and SH3 domains and lacks the...MSCV-retroviral vectors encoding either wild-type CHK or kinase -dead CHK or wild type SH2 domain or SH2 -R147A or SH2 -G129A. All these constructs were... Kinase , a Potential Regulator of CXCR4-Medicated Breast Cancer Cell Metastasis Byeong-Chel Lee The University of Pittsburgh Pittsburgh, PA 15213

  6. PhAST: pharmacophore alignment search tool.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hähnke, Volker; Hofmann, Bettina; Grgat, Tomislav; Proschak, Ewgenij; Steinhilber, Dieter; Schneider, Gisbert

    2009-04-15

    We present a ligand-based virtual screening technique (PhAST) for rapid hit and lead structure searching in large compound databases. Molecules are represented as strings encoding the distribution of pharmacophoric features on the molecular graph. In contrast to other text-based methods using SMILES strings, we introduce a new form of text representation that describes the pharmacophore of molecules. This string representation opens the opportunity for revealing functional similarity between molecules by sequence alignment techniques in analogy to homology searching in protein or nucleic acid sequence databases. We favorably compared PhAST with other current ligand-based virtual screening methods in a retrospective analysis using the BEDROC metric. In a prospective application, PhAST identified two novel inhibitors of 5-lipoxygenase product formation with minimal experimental effort. This outcome demonstrates the applicability of PhAST to drug discovery projects and provides an innovative concept of sequence-based compound screening with substantial scaffold hopping potential. 2008 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  7. Domain crossing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schraefel, M. C.; Rouncefield, Mark; Kellogg, Wendy

    2012-01-01

    In CSCW, how much do we need to know about another domain/culture before we observe, intersect and intervene with designs. What optimally would that other culture need to know about us? Is this a “how long is a piece of string” question, or an inquiry where we can consider a variety of contexts a...

  8. Homologation Reaction of Ketones with Diazo Compounds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Candeias, Nuno R; Paterna, Roberta; Gois, Pedro M P

    2016-03-09

    This review covers the addition of diazo compounds to ketones to afford homologated ketones, either in the presence or in the absence of promoters or catalysts. Reactions with diazoalkanes, aryldiazomethanes, trimethylsilyldiazomethane, α-diazo esters, and disubstituted diazo compounds are covered, commenting on the complex regiochemistry of the reaction and the nature of the catalysts and promoters. The recent reports on the enantioselective version of ketone homologation reactions are gathered in one section, followed by reports on the use of cyclic ketones ring expansion in total synthesis. Although the first reports of this reaction appeared in the literature almost one century ago, the recent achievements, in particular, for the asymmetric version, forecast the development of new breakthroughs in the synthetically valuable field of diazo chemistry.

  9. Homological mirror symmetry and tropical geometry

    CERN Document Server

    Catanese, Fabrizio; Kontsevich, Maxim; Pantev, Tony; Soibelman, Yan; Zharkov, Ilia

    2014-01-01

    The relationship between Tropical Geometry and Mirror Symmetry goes back to the work of Kontsevich and Y. Soibelman (2000), who applied methods of non-archimedean geometry (in particular, tropical curves) to Homological Mirror Symmetry. In combination with the subsequent work of Mikhalkin on the “tropical” approach to Gromov-Witten theory, and the work of Gross and Siebert, Tropical Geometry has now become a powerful tool. Homological Mirror Symmetry is the area of mathematics concentrated around several categorical equivalences connecting symplectic and holomorphic (or algebraic) geometry. The central ideas first appeared in the work of Maxim Kontsevich (1993). Roughly speaking, the subject can be approached in two ways: either one uses Lagrangian torus fibrations of Calabi-Yau manifolds (the so-called Strominger-Yau-Zaslow picture, further developed by Kontsevich and Soibelman) or one uses Lefschetz fibrations of symplectic manifolds (suggested by Kontsevich and further developed by Seidel). Tropical Ge...

  10. Homological stability for unordered configuration spaces

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Randal-Williams, Oscar

    2013-01-01

    This paper consists of two related parts. In the first part we give a self-contained proof of homological stability for the spaces C_n(M;X) of configurations of n unordered points in a connected open manifold M with labels in a path-connected space X, with the best possible integral stability range...... of the spaces C_n(M) can be considered stable when M is a closed manifold. In this case there are no stabilisation maps, but one may still ask if the dimensions of the homology groups over some field stabilise with n. We prove that this is true when M is odd-dimensional, or when the field is F_2 or Q...

  11. Regulation of homologous recombination in eukaryotes

    OpenAIRE

    Heyer, Wolf-Dietrich; Ehmsen, Kirk T.; Liu, Jie

    2010-01-01

    Homologous recombination is required for accurate chromosome segregation during the first meiotic division and constitutes a key repair and tolerance pathway for complex DNA damage including DNA double-stranded breaks, interstrand crosslinks, and DNA gaps. In addition, recombination and replication are inextricably linked, as recombination recovers stalled and broken replication forks enabling the evolution of larger genomes/replicons. Defects in recombination lead to genomic instability and ...

  12. Khovanov homology of graph-links

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nikonov, Igor M [M. V. Lomonosov Moscow State University, Faculty of Mechanics and Mathematics, Moscow (Russian Federation)

    2012-08-31

    Graph-links arise as the intersection graphs of turning chord diagrams of links. Speaking informally, graph-links provide a combinatorial description of links up to mutations. Many link invariants can be reformulated in the language of graph-links. Khovanov homology, a well-known and useful knot invariant, is defined for graph-links in this paper (in the case of the ground field of characteristic two). Bibliography: 14 titles.

  13. Quandle and Biquandle Homology Calculation in R

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roger Fenn

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available In knot theory several knot invariants have been found over the last decades. This paper concerns itself with invariants of several of those invariants, namely the Homology of racks, quandles, biracks and biquandles. The software described in this paper calculates the rack, quandle and degenerate homology groups of racks and biracks. It works for any rack/quandle with finite elements where there are homology coefficients in 'Z'k. The up and down actions can be given either as a function of the elements of 'Z'k or provided as a matrix. When calculating a rack, the down action should coincide with the identity map. We have provided actions for both the general dihedral quandle and the group quandle over 'S'3. We also provide a second function to test if a set with a given action (or with both actions gives rise to a quandle or biquandle. The program is provided as an R package and can be found at https://github.com/ansgarwenzel/quhomology.   AMS subject classification: 57M27; 57M25

  14. Several aspects of some techniques avoiding homologous blood transfusions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    E.C.S.M. van Woerkens (Liesbeth)

    1998-01-01

    textabstractThe use of homologous blood products during anesthesia and surgery is not without risks. Complications due to homologous blood transfusions include transfusion reactions, isosensitization, transmission of infections (including HIV, hepatitis, CMV) and immunosuppression (resuiting in

  15. Computing Homology Group Generators of Images Using Irregular Graph Pyramids

    OpenAIRE

    Peltier , Samuel; Ion , Adrian; Haxhimusa , Yll; Kropatsch , Walter; Damiand , Guillaume

    2007-01-01

    International audience; We introduce a method for computing homology groups and their generators of a 2D image, using a hierarchical structure i.e. irregular graph pyramid. Starting from an image, a hierarchy of the image is built, by two operations that preserve homology of each region. Instead of computing homology generators in the base where the number of entities (cells) is large, we first reduce the number of cells by a graph pyramid. Then homology generators are computed efficiently on...

  16. A new mode of SAM domain mediated oligomerization observed in the CASKIN2 neuronal scaffolding protein

    KAUST Repository

    Smirnova, Ekaterina; Kwan, Jamie J.; Siu, Ryan; Gao, Xin; Zoidl, Georg; Demeler, Borries; Saridakis, Vivian; Donaldson, Logan W.

    2016-01-01

    Background: CASKIN2 is a homolog of CASKIN1, a scaffolding protein that participates in a signaling network with CASK (calcium/calmodulin-dependent serine kinase). Despite a high level of homology between CASKIN2 and CASKIN1, CASKIN2 cannot bind CASK due to the absence of a CASK Interaction Domain and consequently, may have evolved undiscovered structural and functional distinctions.

  17. A new mode of SAM domain mediated oligomerization observed in the CASKIN2 neuronal scaffolding protein

    KAUST Repository

    Smirnova, Ekaterina

    2016-08-22

    Background: CASKIN2 is a homolog of CASKIN1, a scaffolding protein that participates in a signaling network with CASK (calcium/calmodulin-dependent serine kinase). Despite a high level of homology between CASKIN2 and CASKIN1, CASKIN2 cannot bind CASK due to the absence of a CASK Interaction Domain and consequently, may have evolved undiscovered structural and functional distinctions.

  18. Membrane localization is critical for activation of the PICK1 BAR domain

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Madsen, Kenneth L; Eriksen, Jacob; Milan-Lobo, Laura

    2008-01-01

    The PSD-95/Discs-large/ZO-1 homology (PDZ) domain protein, protein interacting with C kinase 1 (PICK1) contains a C-terminal Bin/amphiphysin/Rvs (BAR) domain mediating recognition of curved membranes; however, the molecular mechanisms controlling the activity of this domain are poorly understood....

  19. Trusted Domain

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hjorth, Theis Solberg; Torbensen, Rune

    2012-01-01

    remote access via IP-based devices such as smartphones. The Trusted Domain platform fits existing legacy technologies by managing their interoperability and access controls, and it seeks to avoid the security issues of relying on third-party servers outside the home. It is a distributed system...... of wireless standards, limited resources of embedded systems, etc. Taking these challenges into account, we present a Trusted Domain home automation platform, which dynamically and securely connects heterogeneous networks of Short-Range Wireless devices via simple non-expert user. interactions, and allows......In the digital age of home automation and with the proliferation of mobile Internet access, the intelligent home and its devices should be accessible at any time from anywhere. There are many challenges such as security, privacy, ease of configuration, incompatible legacy devices, a wealth...

  20. Functional characterization of PhGR and PhGRL1 during flower senescence in the petunia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Weiyuan; Liu, Juanxu; Tan, Yinyan; Zhong, Shan; Tang, Na; Chen, Guoju; Yu, Yixun

    2015-09-01

    Petunia PhGRL1 suppression accelerated flower senescence and increased the expression of the genes downstream of ethylene signaling, whereas PhGR suppression did not. Ethylene plays an important role in flowers senescence. Homologous proteins Green-Ripe and Reversion to Ethylene sensitivity1 are positive regulators of ethylene responses in tomato and Arabidopsis, respectively. The petunia flower has served as a model for the study of ethylene response during senescence. In this study, petunia PhGR and PhGRL1 expression was analyzed in different organs, throughout floral senescence, and after exogenous ethylene treatment; and the roles of PhGR and PhGRL1 during petunia flower senescence were investigated. PhGRL1 suppression mediated by virus-induced gene silencing accelerated flower senescence and increased ethylene production; however, the suppression of PhGR did not. Taken together, these data suggest that PhGRL1 is involved in negative regulation of flower senescence, possibly via ethylene production inhibition and consequently reduced ethylene signaling activation.

  1. Evaluating the efficacy of a structure-derived amino acid substitution matrix in detecting protein homologs by BLAST and PSI-BLAST

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nalin CW Goonesekere

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available Nalin CW GoonesekereDepartment of Chemistry and Biochemistry, University of Northern iowa, Cedar Falls, IA, USAAbstract: The large numbers of protein sequences generated by whole genome sequencing projects require rapid and accurate methods of annotation. The detection of homology through computational sequence analysis is a powerful tool in determining the complex evolutionary and functional relationships that exist between proteins. Homology search algorithms employ amino acid substitution matrices to detect similarity between proteins sequences. The substitution matrices in common use today are constructed using sequences aligned without reference to protein structure. Here we present amino acid substitution matrices constructed from the alignment of a large number of protein domain structures from the structural classification of proteins (SCOP database. We show that when incorporated into the homology search algorithms BLAST and PSI-blaST, the structure-based substitution matrices enhance the efficacy of detecting remote homologs. Keywords: computational biology, protein homology, amino acid substitution matrix, protein structure

  2. Homology analyses of the protein sequences of fatty acid synthases from chicken liver, rat mammary gland, and yeast

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chang, Soo-Ik; Hammes, G.G.

    1989-01-01

    Homology analyses of the protein sequences of chicken liver and rat mammary gland fatty acid synthases were carried out. The amino acid sequences of the chicken and rat enzymes are 67% identical. If conservative substitutions are allowed, 78% of the amino acids are matched. A region of low homologies exists between the functional domains, in particular around amino acid residues 1059-1264 of the chicken enzyme. Homologies between the active sites of chicken and rat and of chicken and yeast enzymes have been analyzed by an alignment method. A high degree of homology exists between the active sites of the chicken and rat enzymes. However, the chicken and yeast enzymes show a lower degree of homology. The DADPH-binding dinucleotide folds of the β-ketoacyl reductase and the enoyl reductase sites were identified by comparison with a known consensus sequence for the DADP- and FAD-binding dinucleotide folds. The active sites of all of the enzymes are primarily in hydrophobic regions of the protein. This study suggests that the genes for the functional domains of fatty acid synthase were originally separated, and these genes were connected to each other by using different connecting nucleotide sequences in different species. An alternative explanation for the differences in rat and chicken is a common ancestry and mutations in the joining regions during evolution

  3. Molecular characterization of DnaJ 5 homologs in silkworm Bombyx mori and its expression during egg diapause.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sirigineedi, Sasibhushan; Vijayagowri, Esvaran; Murthy, Geetha N; Rao, Guruprasada; Ponnuvel, Kangayam M

    2014-12-01

    A comparison of the cDNA sequences (1 056 bp) of Bombyx mori DnaJ 5 homolog with B. mori genome revealed that unlike in other Hsps, it has an intron of 234 bp. The DnaJ 5 homolog contains 351 amino acids, of which 70 contain the conserved DnaJ domain at the N-terminal end. This homolog of B. mori has all desirable functional domains similar to other insects, and the 13 different DnaJ homologs identified in B. mori genome were distributed on different chromosomes. The expressed sequence tag database analysis of Hsp40 gene expression revealed higher expression in wing disc followed by diapause-induced eggs. Microarray analysis revealed higher expression of DnaJ 5 homolog at 18th h after oviposition in diapause-induced eggs. Further validation of DnaJ 5 expression through qPCR in diapause-induced and nondiapause eggs at different time intervals revealed higher expression in diapause eggs at 18 and 24 h after oviposition, which coincided with the expression of Hsp70 as the Hsp 40 is its co-chaperone. This study thus provides an outline of the genome organization of Hsp40 gene, and its role in egg diapause induction in B. mori. © 2013 Institute of Zoology, Chinese Academy of Sciences.

  4. PH og modernismen

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ahnfeldt-Mollerup, Merete

    2012-01-01

    Artiklen kaster et kritisk blik på Poul Henningsens samfundsanalyse og dennes sammenhæng med hans design. PH ses i en bredere national og international sammenhæng. Diskussion af designmetoder, æstetik og Bauhaus.......Artiklen kaster et kritisk blik på Poul Henningsens samfundsanalyse og dennes sammenhæng med hans design. PH ses i en bredere national og international sammenhæng. Diskussion af designmetoder, æstetik og Bauhaus....

  5. Hochschild Homology and Cohomology of Klein Surfaces

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Frédéric Butin

    2008-09-01

    Full Text Available Within the framework of deformation quantization, a first step towards the study of star-products is the calculation of Hochschild cohomology. The aim of this article is precisely to determine the Hochschild homology and cohomology in two cases of algebraic varieties. On the one hand, we consider singular curves of the plane; here we recover, in a different way, a result proved by Fronsdal and make it more precise. On the other hand, we are interested in Klein surfaces. The use of a complex suggested by Kontsevich and the help of Groebner bases allow us to solve the problem.

  6. Homology in vertebrates bone mineral structure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Batdehmbehrehl, G.; Chultehm, D.; Sangaa, D.

    1999-01-01

    Using the neutron diffraction method a domination of low crystal syngonic (sp. gr. P63/m) phase Ca 5 [PO 4 ] 3 (OH, F, Cl) in bull and sheep bones as well as in the fossil dinosaur bone has been established and crystal phases in all the bones have identical structure (homology). The result becomes to be an important contribution to fundamental science such as biological evolution and to be useful in medical practice and solution of radiobiological problems connected with vertebrates and man. (author)

  7. Homological Perturbation Theory for Nonperturbative Integrals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson-Freyd, Theo

    2015-11-01

    We use the homological perturbation lemma to produce explicit formulas computing the class in the twisted de Rham complex represented by an arbitrary polynomial. This is a non-asymptotic version of the method of Feynman diagrams. In particular, we explain that phenomena usually thought of as particular to asymptotic integrals in fact also occur exactly: integrals of the type appearing in quantum field theory can be reduced in a totally algebraic fashion to integrals over an Euler-Lagrange locus, provided this locus is understood in the scheme-theoretic sense, so that imaginary critical points and multiplicities of degenerate critical points contribute.

  8. Hepatic receptors for homologous growth hormone in the eel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hirano, T.

    1991-01-01

    The specific binding of 125I-labeled eel growth hormone (eGH) to liver membranes of the eel was examined. The specific binding to the 10,000g pellet was greater than that to the 600g pellet. The specific binding was linear up to about 100 mg fresh tissue, and was saturable with increasing amounts of membrane. The specific binding was pH-, temperature-, and time-dependent, with the optimum pH at 7.4, and greater specific binding was obtained at 15 and 25 degrees than at 35 degrees. Scatchard analysis of liver binding gave an association constant of 1.1 x 10(9) M-1 and a capacity of 105 fmol/mg protein. The receptor preparation was highly specific for GHs. Natural and recombinant eel GHs as well as recombinant salmon GH competed equally with 125I-eGH for the receptor sites of the 10,000g liver membrane. Ovine GH was more potent in displacing the labeled eGH than the homologous eel hormone. Tilapia GH and ovine prolactin (PRL) were needed in greater amounts (40 times) than eGH to displace the labeled eGH. Salmon and tilapia PRLs were still less potent (500 times) than eGH. There was no displacement with eel PRL. No significant change in the specific binding was seen 1 week after hypophysectomy, whereas injection of eGH into the hypophysectomized eel caused a significant reduction after 24 hr. The binding to the membrane fractions from gills, kidney, muscle, intestine, and brain was low and exclusively nonspecific, indicating the presence of specific GH receptors predominantly in the liver

  9. Crystallization and X-ray diffraction analysis of the CH domain of the cotton kinesin GhKCH2

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Qin, Xinghua [China Agricultural University, No. 2 Yuanmingyuanxilu, Haidian District, Beijing 100094, People’s Republic of (China); The Fourth Military Medical University, No. 169 Changlexi Road, Xincheng District, Xi’an 710032, People’s Republic of (China); Chen, Ziwei; Li, Ping; Liu, Guoqin, E-mail: liu@cau.edu.cn [China Agricultural University, No. 2 Yuanmingyuanxilu, Haidian District, Beijing 100094, People’s Republic of (China)

    2016-02-19

    The cloning, expression, purification and crystallization of the CH domain of the plant-specific kinesin GhKCH2 is reported. GhKCH2 belongs to a group of plant-specific kinesins (KCHs) containing an actin-binding calponin homology (CH) domain in the N-terminus. Previous studies revealed that the GhKCH2 CH domain (GhKCH2-CH) had a higher affinity for F-actin (K{sub d} = 0.42 ± 0.02 µM) than most other CH-domain-containing proteins. To understand the underlying mechanism, prokaryotically expressed GhKCH2-CH (amino acids 30–166) was purified and crystallized. Crystals were grown by the sitting-drop vapour-diffusion method using 0.1 M Tris–HCl pH 7.0, 20%(w/v) PEG 8000 as a precipitant. The crystals diffracted to a resolution of 2.5 Å and belonged to space group P2{sub 1}, with unit-cell parameters a = 41.57, b = 81.92, c = 83.00 Å, α = 90.00, β = 97.31, γ = 90.00°. Four molecules were found in the asymmetric unit with a Matthews coefficient of 2.22 Å{sup 3} Da{sup −1}, corresponding to a solvent content of 44.8%.

  10. SANSparallel: interactive homology search against Uniprot.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Somervuo, Panu; Holm, Liisa

    2015-07-01

    Proteins evolve by mutations and natural selection. The network of sequence similarities is a rich source for mining homologous relationships that inform on protein structure and function. There are many servers available to browse the network of homology relationships but one has to wait up to a minute for results. The SANSparallel webserver provides protein sequence database searches with immediate response and professional alignment visualization by third-party software. The output is a list, pairwise alignment or stacked alignment of sequence-similar proteins from Uniprot, UniRef90/50, Swissprot or Protein Data Bank. The stacked alignments are viewed in Jalview or as sequence logos. The database search uses the suffix array neighborhood search (SANS) method, which has been re-implemented as a client-server, improved and parallelized. The method is extremely fast and as sensitive as BLAST above 50% sequence identity. Benchmarks show that the method is highly competitive compared to previously published fast database search programs: UBLAST, DIAMOND, LAST, LAMBDA, RAPSEARCH2 and BLAT. The web server can be accessed interactively or programmatically at http://ekhidna2.biocenter.helsinki.fi/cgi-bin/sans/sans.cgi. It can be used to make protein functional annotation pipelines more efficient, and it is useful in interactive exploration of the detailed evidence supporting the annotation of particular proteins of interest. © The Author(s) 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Nucleic Acids Research.

  11. Functional Coverage of the Human Genome by Existing Structures, Structural Genomics Targets, and Homology Models.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    2005-08-01

    Full Text Available The bias in protein structure and function space resulting from experimental limitations and targeting of particular functional classes of proteins by structural biologists has long been recognized, but never continuously quantified. Using the Enzyme Commission and the Gene Ontology classifications as a reference frame, and integrating structure data from the Protein Data Bank (PDB, target sequences from the structural genomics projects, structure homology derived from the SUPERFAMILY database, and genome annotations from Ensembl and NCBI, we provide a quantified view, both at the domain and whole-protein levels, of the current and projected coverage of protein structure and function space relative to the human genome. Protein structures currently provide at least one domain that covers 37% of the functional classes identified in the genome; whole structure coverage exists for 25% of the genome. If all the structural genomics targets were solved (twice the current number of structures in the PDB, it is estimated that structures of one domain would cover 69% of the functional classes identified and complete structure coverage would be 44%. Homology models from existing experimental structures extend the 37% coverage to 56% of the genome as single domains and 25% to 31% for complete structures. Coverage from homology models is not evenly distributed by protein family, reflecting differing degrees of sequence and structure divergence within families. While these data provide coverage, conversely, they also systematically highlight functional classes of proteins for which structures should be determined. Current key functional families without structure representation are highlighted here; updated information on the "most wanted list" that should be solved is available on a weekly basis from http://function.rcsb.org:8080/pdb/function_distribution/index.html.

  12. N-domain angiotensin-I converting enzyme is expressed in immortalized mesangial, proximal tubule and collecting duct cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mei Wang, Pamella Huey; Andrade, Maria Claudina; Quinto, Beata Marie Redublo; Di Marco, Giovana; Mortara, Renato Arruda; Vio, Carlos P; Casarini, Dulce Elena

    2015-01-01

    Somatic ACE (sACE) is found in glomerulus, proximal tubule and excreted in urine. We hypothesized that N-domain ACE can also be found at these sites. ACE profile was analyzed in mesangial (IMC), proximal (LLC-PK1), distal tubule (MDCK) and collecting duct (IMCD) cells. Cell lysate and culture medium were submitted to gel filtration chromatography, which separated two peaks with ACE activity from cells and medium, except from distal tubule. The first had a high molecular weight and the second, a lower one (65 kDa; N-domain ACE). We focused on N-domain ACE purification and characterization from LLC-PK1. Total LLC-PK1 N-domain ACE purification was achieved by ion-exchange chromatography, which presented only one peak with ACE activity, denominated ACE(int2A). ACE(int2A) activity was influenced by pH, NaCl and temperature. The purified enzyme was inhibited by Captopril and hydrolyzed AngI, Ang1-7 and AcSDKP. Its ability to hydrolyze AcSDKP characterized it as an N-domain ACE. ACE(int2A) also presented high amino acid sequence homology with the N-terminal part of sACE from mouse, rat, human and rabbit. The presence of secreted and intracellular N-domain ACE and sACE in IMC, LLC-PK1 and IMCD cells confirmed our studies along the nephron. We identified, purified and characterized N-domain ACE from LLC-PK1. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. Homologous Recombination—Experimental Systems, Analysis and Significance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuzminov, Andrei

    2014-01-01

    Homologous recombination is the most complex of all recombination events that shape genomes and produce material for evolution. Homologous recombination events are exchanges between DNA molecules in the lengthy regions of shared identity, catalyzed by a group of dedicated enzymes. There is a variety of experimental systems in E. coli and Salmonella to detect homologous recombination events of several different kinds. Genetic analysis of homologous recombination reveals three separate phases of this process: pre-synapsis (the early phase), synapsis (homologous strand exchange) and post-synapsis (the late phase). In E. coli, there are at least two independent pathway of the early phase and at least two independent pathways of the late phase. All this complexity is incongruent with the originally ascribed role of homologous recombination as accelerator of genome evolution: there is simply not enough duplication and repetition in enterobacterial genomes for homologous recombination to have a detectable evolutionary role, and therefore not enough selection to maintain such a complexity. At the same time, the mechanisms of homologous recombination are uniquely suited for repair of complex DNA lesions called chromosomal lesions. In fact, the two major classes of chromosomal lesions are recognized and processed by the two individual pathways at the early phase of homologous recombination. It follows, therefore, that homologous recombination events are occasional reflections of the continual recombinational repair, made possible in cases of natural or artificial genome redundancy. PMID:26442506

  14. Plant Habitat (PH)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Onate, Bryan

    2016-01-01

    The International Space Station (ISS) will soon have a platform for conducting fundamental research of Large Plants. Plant Habitat (PH) is designed to be a fully controllable environment for high-quality plant physiological research. PH will control light quality, level, and timing, temperature, CO2, relative humidity, and irrigation, while scrubbing ethylene. Additional capabilities include leaf temperature and root zone moisture and oxygen sensing. The light cap will have red (630 nm), blue (450 nm), green (525 nm), far red (730 nm) and broad spectrum white LEDs. There will be several internal cameras (visible and IR) to monitor and record plant growth and operations.

  15. Acetylcholine Receptor: Complex of Homologous Subunits

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raftery, Michael A.; Hunkapiller, Michael W.; Strader, Catherine D.; Hood, Leroy E.

    1980-06-01

    The acetylcholine receptor from the electric ray Torpedo californica is composed of five subunits; two are identical and the other three are structurally related to them. Microsequence analysis of the four polypeptides demonstrates amino acid homology among the subunits. Further sequence analysis of both membrane-bound and Triton-solubilized, chromatographically purified receptor gave the stoichiometry of the four subunits (40,000:50,000:60,000:65,000 daltons) as 2:1:1:1, indicating that this protein is a pentameric complex with a molecular weight of 255,000 daltons. Genealogical analysis suggests that divergence from a common ancestral gene occurred early in the evolution of the receptor. This shared ancestry argues that each of the four subunits plays a functional role in the receptor's physiological action.

  16. Regulation of Homologous Recombination by SUMOylation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pinela da Silva, Sonia Cristina

    factors such as the homologous recombination (HR) machinery. HR constitutes the main DSB repair pathway in Saccharomyces cerevisiae and despite being largely considered an error-free process and essential for genome stability, uncontrolled recombination can lead to loss of heterozygosity, translocations......, deletions, and genome rearrangements that can lead to cell death or cancer in humans. The post-translational modification by SUMO (small ubiquitinlike modifier) has proven to be an important regulator of HR and genome integrity, but the molecular mechanisms responsible for these roles are still unclear....... In this study I present new insights for the role of SUMOylation in regulating HR by dissecting the role of SUMO in the interaction between the central HR-mediator protein Rad52 and its paralogue Rad59 and the outcome of recombination. This data provides evidence for the importance of SUMO in promoting protein...

  17. Homological mirror symmetry. New developments and perspectives

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kapustin, Anton; Kreuzer, Maximilian; Schlesinger, Karl-Georg

    2009-01-01

    Homological Mirror Symmetry, the study of dualities of certain quantum field theories in a mathematically rigorous form, has developed into a flourishing subject on its own over the past years. The present volume bridges a gap in the literature by providing a set of lectures and reviews that both introduce and representatively review the state-of-the art in the field from different perspectives. With contributions by K. Fukaya, M. Herbst, K. Hori, M. Huang, A. Kapustin, L. Katzarkov, A. Klemm, M. Kontsevich, D. Page, S. Quackenbush, E. Sharpe, P. Seidel, I. Smith and Y. Soibelman, this volume will be a reference on the topic for everyone starting to work or actively working on mathematical aspects of quantum field theory. (orig.)

  18. HOMOLOGOUS CYCLONES IN THE QUIET SUN

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yu, Xinting; Zhang, Jun; Li, Ting; Zhang, Yuzong; Yang, Shuhong, E-mail: yxt27272@mail.ustc.edu.cn, E-mail: zjun@nao.cas.cn, E-mail: liting@nao.cas.cn, E-mail: yuzong@nao.cas.cn, E-mail: shuhongyang@nao.cas.cn [Key Laboratory of Solar Activity, National Astronomical Observatories, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100012 (China)

    2014-02-20

    Through observations with the Solar Dynamics Observatory Atmospheric Imaging Assembly (AIA) and Helioseismic and Magnetic Imager, we tracked one rotating network magnetic field (RNF) near the solar equator. It lasted for more than 100 hr, from 2013 February 23 to 28. During its evolution, three cyclones were found to be rooted in this structure. Each cyclone event lasted for about 8 to 10 hr. While near the polar region, another RNF was investigated. It lasted for a shorter time (∼70 hr), from 2013 July 7 to 9. There were two cyclones rooted in the RNF and each lasted for 8 and 11 hr, respectively. For the two given examples, the cyclones have a similar dynamic evolution, and thus we put forward a new term: homologous cyclones. The detected brightening in AIA 171 Å maps indicates the release of energy, which is potentially available to heat the corona.

  19. Modeling Non-homologous End Joining

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yongfeng

    2013-01-01

    Non-homologous end joining (NHEJ) is the dominant DNA double strand break (DSB) repair pathway and involves several NHEJ proteins such as Ku, DNA-PKcs, XRCC4, Ligase IV and so on. Once DSBs are generated, Ku is first recruited to the DNA end, followed by other NHEJ proteins for DNA end processing and ligation. Because of the direct ligation of break ends without the need for a homologous template, NHEJ turns out to be an error-prone but efficient repair pathway. Some mechanisms have been proposed of how the efficiency of NHEJ repair is affected. The type of DNA damage is an important factor of NHEJ repair. For instance, the length of DNA fragment may determine the recruitment efficiency of NHEJ protein such as Ku [1], or the complexity of the DNA breaks [2] is accounted for the choice of NHEJ proteins and subpathway of NHEJ repair. On the other hand, the chromatin structure also plays a role of the accessibility of NHEJ protein to the DNA damage site. In this talk, some mathematical models of NHEJ, that consist of series of biochemical reactions complying with the laws of chemical reaction (e.g. mass action, etc.), will be introduced. By mathematical and numerical analysis and parameter estimation, the models are able to capture the qualitative biological features and show good agreement with experimental data. As conclusions, from the viewpoint of modeling, how the NHEJ proteins are recruited will be first discussed for connection between the classical sequential model [4] and recently proposed two-phase model [5]. Then how the NHEJ repair pathway is affected, by the length of DNA fragment [6], the complexity of DNA damage [7] and the chromatin structure [8], will be addressed

  20. More on homological supersymmetric quantum mechanics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Behtash, Alireza

    2018-03-01

    In this work, we first solve complex Morse flow equations for the simplest case of a bosonic harmonic oscillator to discuss localization in the context of Picard-Lefschetz theory. We briefly touch on the exact non-BPS solutions of the bosonized supersymmetric quantum mechanics on algebraic geometric grounds and report that their complex phases can be accessed through the cohomology of WKB 1-form of the underlying singular spectral curve subject to necessary cohomological corrections for nonzero genus. Motivated by Picard-Lefschetz theory, we write down a general formula for the index of N =4 quantum mechanics with background R -symmetry gauge fields. We conjecture that certain symmetries of the refined Witten index and singularities of the moduli space may be used to determine the correct intersection coefficients. A few examples, where this conjecture holds, are shown in both linear and closed quivers with rank-one quiver gauge groups. The R -anomaly removal along the "Morsified" relative homology cycles also called "Lefschetz thimbles" is shown to lead to the appearance of Stokes lines. We show that the Fayet-Iliopoulos parameters appear in the intersection coefficients for the relative homology of the quiver quantum mechanics resulting from dimensional reduction of 2 d N =(2 ,2 ) gauge theory on a circle and explicitly calculate integrals along the Lefschetz thimbles in N =4 C Pk -1 model. The Stokes jumping of coefficients and its relation to wall crossing phenomena is briefly discussed. We also find that the notion of "on-the-wall" index is related to the invariant Lefschetz thimbles under Stokes phenomena. An implication of the Lefschetz thimbles in constructing knots from quiver quantum mechanics is indicated.

  1. Clustering evolving proteins into homologous families.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chan, Cheong Xin; Mahbob, Maisarah; Ragan, Mark A

    2013-04-08

    Clustering sequences into groups of putative homologs (families) is a critical first step in many areas of comparative biology and bioinformatics. The performance of clustering approaches in delineating biologically meaningful families depends strongly on characteristics of the data, including content bias and degree of divergence. New, highly scalable methods have recently been introduced to cluster the very large datasets being generated by next-generation sequencing technologies. However, there has been little systematic investigation of how characteristics of the data impact the performance of these approaches. Using clusters from a manually curated dataset as reference, we examined the performance of a widely used graph-based Markov clustering algorithm (MCL) and a greedy heuristic approach (UCLUST) in delineating protein families coded by three sets of bacterial genomes of different G+C content. Both MCL and UCLUST generated clusters that are comparable to the reference sets at specific parameter settings, although UCLUST tends to under-cluster compositionally biased sequences (G+C content 33% and 66%). Using simulated data, we sought to assess the individual effects of sequence divergence, rate heterogeneity, and underlying G+C content. Performance decreased with increasing sequence divergence, decreasing among-site rate variation, and increasing G+C bias. Two MCL-based methods recovered the simulated families more accurately than did UCLUST. MCL using local alignment distances is more robust across the investigated range of sequence features than are greedy heuristics using distances based on global alignment. Our results demonstrate that sequence divergence, rate heterogeneity and content bias can individually and in combination affect the accuracy with which MCL and UCLUST can recover homologous protein families. For application to data that are more divergent, and exhibit higher among-site rate variation and/or content bias, MCL may often be the better

  2. K-homology and K-cohomology constructions of relations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abd El-Sattar, A. Dabbour; Bayoumy, F.M.

    1990-08-01

    One of the important homology (cohomology) theories, based on systems of covering of the space, is the homology (cohomology) theory of relations. In the present work, by using the idea of K-homology and K-cohomology groups different varieties of the Dowker's theory are introduced and studied. These constructions are defined on the category of pairs of topological spaces and over a pair of coefficient groups. (author). 14 refs

  3. A local homology theory for linearly compact modules

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nguyen Tu Cuong; Tran Tuan Nam

    2004-11-01

    We introduce a local homology theory for linearly modules which is in some sense dual to the local cohomology theory of A. Grothendieck. Some basic properties of local homology modules are shown such as: the vanishing and non-vanishing, the noetherianness of local homology modules. By using duality, we extend some well-known results in theory of local cohomology of A. Grothendieck. (author)

  4. On (co)homology of Frobenius Poisson algebras

    OpenAIRE

    Zhu, Can; Van Oystaeyen, Fred; ZHANG, Yinhuo

    2014-01-01

    In this paper, we study Poisson (co)homology of a Frobenius Poisson algebra. More precisely, we show that there exists a duality between Poisson homology and Poisson cohomology of Frobenius Poisson algebras, similar to that between Hochschild homology and Hochschild cohomology of Frobenius algebras. Then we use the non-degenerate bilinear form on a unimodular Frobenius Poisson algebra to construct a Batalin-Vilkovisky structure on the Poisson cohomology ring making it into a Batalin-Vilkovisk...

  5. A geometric model for Hochschild homology of Soergel bimodules

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Webster, Ben; Williamson, Geordie

    2008-01-01

    An important step in the calculation of the triply graded link homology of Khovanov and Rozansky is the determination of the Hochschild homology of Soergel bimodules for SL(n). We present a geometric model for this Hochschild homology for any simple group G, as B–equivariant intersection cohomology...... on generators whose degree is explicitly determined by the geometry of the orbit closure, and to describe its Hilbert series, proving a conjecture of Jacob Rasmussen....

  6. Heteromorphic Sex Chromosomes: Navigating Meiosis without a Homologous Partner

    OpenAIRE

    Checchi, Paula M.; Engebrecht, JoAnne

    2011-01-01

    Accurate chromosome segregation during meiosis relies on homology between the maternal and paternal chromosomes. Yet by definition, sex chromosomes of the heterogametic sex lack a homologous partner. Recent studies in a number of systems have shed light on the unique meiotic behavior of heteromorphic sex chromosomes, and highlight both the commonalities and differences in divergent species. During meiotic prophase, the homology-dependent processes of pairing, synapsis, and recombination have ...

  7. Domain requirements for the Dock adapter protein in growth- cone signaling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rao, Y; Zipursky, S L

    1998-03-03

    Tyrosine phosphorylation has been implicated in growth-cone guidance through genetic, biochemical, and pharmacological studies. Adapter proteins containing src homology 2 (SH2) domains and src homology 3 (SH3) domains provide a means of linking guidance signaling through phosphotyrosine to downstream effectors regulating growth-cone motility. The Drosophila adapter, Dreadlocks (Dock), the homolog of mammalian Nck containing three N-terminal SH3 domains and a single SH2 domain, is highly specialized for growth-cone guidance. In this paper, we demonstrate that Dock can couple signals in either an SH2-dependent or an SH2-independent fashion in photoreceptor (R cell) growth cones, and that Dock displays different domain requirements in different neurons.

  8. Membrane Localization is Critical for Activation of the PICK1 BAR Domain

    OpenAIRE

    Madsen, Kenneth L.; Eriksen, Jacob; Milan-Lobo, Laura; Han, Daniel S.; Niv, Masha Y.; Ammendrup-Johnsen, Ina; Henriksen, Ulla; Bhatia, Vikram K.; Stamou, Dimitrios; Sitte, Harald H.; McMahon, Harvey T.; Weinstein, Harel; Gether, Ulrik

    2008-01-01

    The PSD-95/Discs-large/ZO-1 homology (PDZ) domain protein, protein interacting with C kinase 1 (PICK1) contains a C-terminal Bin/amphiphysin/Rvs (BAR) domain mediating recognition of curved membranes; however, the molecular mechanisms controlling the activity of this domain are poorly understood. In agreement with negative regulation of the BAR domain by the N-terminal PDZ domain, PICK1 distributed evenly in the cytoplasm, whereas truncation of the PDZ domain caused BAR domain-dependent redis...

  9. Colored Kauffman homology and super-A-polynomials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nawata, Satoshi; Ramadevi, P.; Zodinmawia

    2014-01-01

    We study the structural properties of colored Kauffman homologies of knots. Quadruple-gradings play an essential role in revealing the differential structure of colored Kauffman homology. Using the differential structure, the Kauffman homologies carrying the symmetric tensor products of the vector representation for the trefoil and the figure-eight are determined. In addition, making use of relations from representation theory, we also obtain the HOMFLY homologies colored by rectangular Young tableaux with two rows for these knots. Furthermore, the notion of super-A-polynomials is extended in order to encompass two-parameter deformations of PSL(2,ℂ) character varieties

  10. Imaging Lysosomal pH Alteration in Stressed Cells with a Sensitive Ratiometric Fluorescence Sensor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xue, Zhongwei; Zhao, Hu; Liu, Jian; Han, Jiahuai; Han, Shoufa

    2017-03-24

    The organelle-specific pH is crucial for cell homeostasis. Aberrant pH of lysosomes has been manifested in myriad diseases. To probe lysosome responses to cell stress, we herein report the detection of lysosomal pH changes with a dual colored probe (CM-ROX), featuring a coumarin domain with "always-on" blue fluorescence and a rhodamine-lactam domain activatable to lysosomal acidity to give red fluorescence. With sensitive ratiometric signals upon subtle pH changes, CM-ROX enables discernment of lysosomal pH changes in cells undergoing autophagy, cell death, and viral infection.

  11. .Gov Domains API

    Data.gov (United States)

    General Services Administration — This dataset offers the list of all .gov domains, including state, local, and tribal .gov domains. It does not include .mil domains, or other federal domains outside...

  12. Membrane-sculpting BAR domains generate stable lipid microdomains

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zhao, Hongxia; Michelot, Alphée; Koskela, Essi V.

    2013-01-01

    Bin-Amphiphysin-Rvs (BAR) domain proteins are central regulators of many cellular processes involving membrane dynamics. BAR domains sculpt phosphoinositide-rich membranes to generate membrane protrusions or invaginations. Here, we report that, in addition to regulating membrane geometry, BAR...... domains can generate extremely stable lipid microdomains by "freezing" phosphoinositide dynamics. This is a general feature of BAR domains, because the yeast endocytic BAR and Fes/CIP4 homology BAR (F-BAR) domains, the inverse BAR domain of Pinkbar, and the eisosomal BAR protein Lsp1 induced...... phosphoinositide clustering and halted lipid diffusion, despite differences in mechanisms of membrane interactions. Lsp1 displays comparable low diffusion rates in vitro and in vivo, suggesting that BAR domain proteins also generate stable phosphoinositide microdomains in cells. These results uncover a conserved...

  13. Introduction: History of SH2 Domains and Their Applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Bernard A; Machida, Kazuya

    2017-01-01

    The Src Homology 2 (SH2) domain is the prototypical protein interaction module that lies at the heart of phosphotyrosine signaling. Since its serendipitous discovery, there has been a tremendous advancement in technologies and an array of techniques available for studying SH2 domains and phosphotyrosine signaling. In this chapter, we provide a glimpse of the history of SH2 domains and describe many of the tools and techniques that have been developed along the way and discuss future directions for SH2 domain studies. We highlight the gist of each chapter in this volume in the context of: the structural biology and phosphotyrosine binding; characterizing SH2 specificity and generating prediction models; systems biology and proteomics; SH2 domains in signal transduction; and SH2 domains in disease, diagnostics, and therapeutics. Many of the individual chapters provide an in-depth approach that will allow scientists to interrogate the function and role of SH2 domains.

  14. Genetic interactions between the chromosome axis-associated protein Hop1 and homologous recombination determinants in Schizosaccharomyces pombe.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Simon David; Jarosinska, Olga Dorota; Lorenz, Alexander

    2018-03-17

    Hop1 is a component of the meiosis-specific chromosome axis and belongs to the evolutionarily conserved family of HORMA domain proteins. Hop1 and its orthologs in higher eukaryotes are a major factor in promoting double-strand DNA break formation and inter-homolog recombination. In budding yeast and mammals, they are also involved in a meiotic checkpoint kinase cascade monitoring the completion of double-strand DNA break repair. We used the fission yeast, Schizosaccharomyces pombe, which lacks a canonical synaptonemal complex to test whether Hop1 has a role beyond supporting the generation of double-strand DNA breaks and facilitating inter-homolog recombination events. We determined how mutants of homologous recombination factors genetically interact with hop1, studied the role(s) of the HORMA domain of Hop1, and characterized a bio-informatically predicted interactor of Hop1, Aho1 (SPAC688.03c). Our observations indicate that in fission yeast, Hop1 does require its HORMA domain to support wild-type levels of meiotic recombination and localization to meiotic chromatin. Furthermore, we show that hop1∆ only weakly interacts genetically with mutants of homologous recombination factors, and in fission yeast likely has no major role beyond break formation and promoting inter-homolog events. We speculate that after the evolutionary loss of the synaptonemal complex, Hop1 likely has become less important for modulating recombination outcome during meiosis in fission yeast, and that this led to a concurrent rewiring of genetic pathways controlling meiotic recombination.

  15. Beauty is in the eye of the beholder: proteins can recognize binding sites of homologous proteins in more than one way.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juliette Martin

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Understanding the mechanisms of protein-protein interaction is a fundamental problem with many practical applications. The fact that different proteins can bind similar partners suggests that convergently evolved binding interfaces are reused in different complexes. A set of protein complexes composed of non-homologous domains interacting with homologous partners at equivalent binding sites was collected in 2006, offering an opportunity to investigate this point. We considered 433 pairs of protein-protein complexes from the ABAC database (AB and AC binary protein complexes sharing a homologous partner A and analyzed the extent of physico-chemical similarity at the atomic and residue level at the protein-protein interface. Homologous partners of the complexes were superimposed using Multiprot, and similar atoms at the interface were quantified using a five class grouping scheme and a distance cut-off. We found that the number of interfacial atoms with similar properties is systematically lower in the non-homologous proteins than in the homologous ones. We assessed the significance of the similarity by bootstrapping the atomic properties at the interfaces. We found that the similarity of binding sites is very significant between homologous proteins, as expected, but generally insignificant between the non-homologous proteins that bind to homologous partners. Furthermore, evolutionarily conserved residues are not colocalized within the binding sites of non-homologous proteins. We could only identify a limited number of cases of structural mimicry at the interface, suggesting that this property is less generic than previously thought. Our results support the hypothesis that different proteins can interact with similar partners using alternate strategies, but do not support convergent evolution.

  16. Photoperiodic regulation of flowering in perennial ryegrass involving a CONSTANS-like homolog

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Martin, J.; Storgaard, M.; Andersen, C.H.

    2004-01-01

    Photoperiod and vernalization are the two key environmental factors of the. oral induction of perennial ryegrass (Lolium perenne L.). Transition from vegetative to reproductive growth will only occur after an extended vernalization period, followed by an increase in day length and temperature. Here...... we report on the isolation and characterization of a L. perenne gene (LpCO) that is homologous to CONSTANS, and which is tightly coupled to the. oral inductive long day signal. Like other monocot CO-like proteins, the LpCO contains a zinc finger domain with a non-conserved B-Box2. Although the B-Box2...

  17. CBH1 homologs and varian CBH1 cellulase

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Goedegebuur, Frits; Gualfetti, Peter; Mitchinson, Colin; Neefe, Paulien

    2014-07-01

    Disclosed are a number of homologs and variants of Hypocrea jecorina Cel7A (formerly Trichoderma reesei cellobiohydrolase I or CBH1), nucleic acids encoding the same and methods for producing the same. The homologs and variant cellulases have the amino acid sequence of a glycosyl hydrolase of family 7A wherein one or more amino acid residues are substituted and/or deleted.

  18. The Causes of Quasi-homologous CMEs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, Lijuan; Wang, Yuming; Liu, Rui; Zhou, Zhenjun; Liu, Jiajia; Liu, Kai; Shen, Chenglong; Zhang, Quanhao [CAS Key Laboratory of Geospace Environment, Department of Geophysics and Planetary Sciences, University of Science and Technology of China, Hefei, Anhui, 230026 (China); Temmer, M.; Thalmann, J. K.; Veronig, A. M., E-mail: ymwang@ustc.edu.cn, E-mail: ljliu@mail.ustc.edu.cn [Institute of Physics/IGAM, University of Graz, Universitätsplatz 5/II, A-8010 Graz (Austria)

    2017-08-01

    In this paper, we identified the magnetic source locations of 142 quasi-homologous (QH) coronal mass ejections (CMEs), of which 121 are from solar cycle (SC) 23 and 21 from SC 24. Among those CMEs, 63% originated from the same source location as their predecessor (defined as S-type), while 37% originated from a different location within the same active region as their predecessor (defined as D-type). Their distinctly different waiting time distributions, peaking around 7.5 and 1.5 hr for S- and D-type CMEs, suggest that they might involve different physical mechanisms with different characteristic timescales. Through detailed analysis based on nonlinear force-free coronal magnetic field modeling of two exemplary cases, we propose that the S-type QH CMES might involve a recurring energy release process from the same source location (by magnetic free energy replenishment), whereas the D-type QH CMEs can happen when a flux tube system is disturbed by a nearby CME.

  19. Torus actions, combinatorial topology, and homological algebra

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bukhshtaber, V M; Panov, T E

    2000-01-01

    This paper is a survey of new results and open problems connected with fundamental combinatorial concepts, including polytopes, simplicial complexes, cubical complexes, and arrangements of subspaces. Attention is concentrated on simplicial and cubical subdivisions of manifolds, and especially on spheres. Important constructions are described that enable one to study these combinatorial objects by using commutative and homological algebra. The proposed approach to combinatorial problems is based on the theory of moment-angle complexes recently developed by the authors. The crucial construction assigns to each simplicial complex K with m vertices a T m -space Z K with special bigraded cellular decomposition. In the framework of this theory, well-known non-singular toric varieties arise as orbit spaces of maximally free actions of subtori on moment-angle complexes corresponding to simplicial spheres. It is shown that diverse invariants of simplicial complexes and related combinatorial-geometric objects can be expressed in terms of bigraded cohomology rings of the corresponding moment-angle complexes. Finally, it is shown that the new relationships between combinatorics, geometry, and topology lead to solutions of some well-known topological problems

  20. APPL proteins FRET at the BAR: direct observation of APPL1 and APPL2 BAR domain-mediated interactions on cell membranes using FRET microscopy.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Heidi J Chial

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available Human APPL1 and APPL2 are homologous RAB5 effectors whose binding partners include a diverse set of transmembrane receptors, signaling proteins, and phosphoinositides. APPL proteins associate dynamically with endosomal membranes and are proposed to function in endosome-mediated signaling pathways linking the cell surface to the cell nucleus. APPL proteins contain an N-terminal Bin/Amphiphysin/Rvs (BAR domain, a central pleckstrin homology (PH domain, and a C-terminal phosphotyrosine binding (PTB domain. Previous structural and biochemical studies have shown that the APPL BAR domains mediate homotypic and heterotypic APPL-APPL interactions and that the APPL1 BAR domain forms crescent-shaped dimers. Although previous studies have shown that APPL minimal BAR domains associate with curved cell membranes, direct interaction between APPL BAR domains on cell membranes in vivo has not been reported.Herein, we used a laser-scanning confocal microscope equipped with a spectral detector to carry out fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET experiments with cyan fluorescent protein/yellow fluorescent protein (CFP/YFP FRET donor/acceptor pairs to examine interactions between APPL minimal BAR domains at the subcellular level. This comprehensive approach enabled us to evaluate FRET levels in a single cell using three methods: sensitized emission, standard acceptor photobleaching, and sequential acceptor photobleaching. We also analyzed emission spectra to address an outstanding controversy regarding the use of CFP donor/YFP acceptor pairs in FRET acceptor photobleaching experiments, based on reports that photobleaching of YFP converts it into a CFP-like species.All three methods consistently showed significant FRET between APPL minimal BAR domain FRET pairs, indicating that they interact directly in a homotypic (i.e., APPL1-APPL1 and APPL2-APPL2 and heterotypic (i.e., APPL1-APPL2 manner on curved cell membranes. Furthermore, the results of our experiments

  1. Statistical Inference for Porous Materials using Persistent Homology.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moon, Chul [Univ. of Georgia, Athens, GA (United States); Heath, Jason E. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Mitchell, Scott A. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    2017-12-01

    We propose a porous materials analysis pipeline using persistent homology. We rst compute persistent homology of binarized 3D images of sampled material subvolumes. For each image we compute sets of homology intervals, which are represented as summary graphics called persistence diagrams. We convert persistence diagrams into image vectors in order to analyze the similarity of the homology of the material images using the mature tools for image analysis. Each image is treated as a vector and we compute its principal components to extract features. We t a statistical model using the loadings of principal components to estimate material porosity, permeability, anisotropy, and tortuosity. We also propose an adaptive version of the structural similarity index (SSIM), a similarity metric for images, as a measure to determine the statistical representative elementary volumes (sREV) for persistence homology. Thus we provide a capability for making a statistical inference of the uid ow and transport properties of porous materials based on their geometry and connectivity.

  2. Two appendages homologous between basal bodies and centrioles are formed using distinct Odf2 domains.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tateishi, Kazuhiro; Yamazaki, Yuji; Nishida, Tomoki; Watanabe, Shin; Kunimoto, Koshi; Ishikawa, Hiroaki; Tsukita, Sachiko

    2013-11-11

    Ciliogenesis is regulated by context-dependent cellular cues, including some transduced through appendage-like structures on ciliary basal bodies called transition fibers and basal feet. However, the molecular basis for this regulation is not fully understood. The Odf2 gene product, ODF2/cenexin, is essential for both ciliogenesis and the formation of the distal and subdistal appendages on centrioles, which become basal bodies. We examined the effects of Odf2 deletion constructs on ciliogenesis in Odf2-knockout F9 cells. Electron microscopy revealed that ciliogenesis and transition fiber formation required the ODF2/cenexin fragment containing amino acids (aa) 188-806, whereas basal foot formation required aa 1-59 and 188-806. These sequences also formed distal and subdistal appendages, respectively, indicating that the centriole appendages are molecularly analogous to those on basal bodies. We used the differential formation of appendages by Odf2 deletion constructs to study the incorporation and function of molecules associated with each appendage type. We found that transition fibers and distal appendages were required for ciliogenesis and subdistal appendages stabilized the centrosomal microtubules.

  3. A divergent calponin homology (NN–CH) domain defines a novel family

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schou, Kenneth Bødtker; Andersen, Jens S.; Pedersen, Lotte Bang

    2014-01-01

    and NUF2 share evolutionary ancestry with a novel protein family in mammals comprising, besides NDC80/HEC1 and NUF2, three Intraflagellar Transport (IFT) complex B subunits (IFT81, IFT57, CLUAP1) as well as six proteins with poorly defined function (FAM98A-C, CCDC22, CCDC93 and C14orf166). We show...

  4. Mutational definition of functional domains within the Rev homolog encoded by human endogenous retrovirus K.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bogerd, H P; Wiegand, H L; Yang, J; Cullen, B R

    2000-10-01

    Nuclear export of the incompletely spliced mRNAs encoded by several complex retroviruses, including human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1), is dependent on a virally encoded adapter protein, termed Rev in HIV-1, that directly binds both to a cis-acting viral RNA target site and to the cellular Crm1 export factor. Human endogenous retrovirus K, a family of ancient endogenous retroviruses that is not related to the exogenous retrovirus HIV-1, was recently shown to also encode a Crm1-dependent nuclear RNA export factor, termed K-Rev. Although HIV-1 Rev and K-Rev display little sequence identity, they share the ability not only to bind to Crm1 and to RNA but also to form homomultimers and shuttle between nucleus and cytoplasm. We have used mutational analysis to identify sequences in the 105-amino-acid K-Rev protein required for each of these distinct biological activities. While mutations in K-Rev that inactivate any one of these properties also blocked K-Rev-dependent nuclear RNA export, several K-Rev mutants were comparable to wild type when assayed for any of these individual activities yet nevertheless defective for RNA export. Although several nonfunctional K-Rev mutants acted as dominant negative inhibitors of K-Rev-, but not HIV-1 Rev-, dependent RNA export, these were not defined by their inability to bind to Crm1, as is seen with HIV-1 Rev. In total, this analysis suggests a functional architecture for K-Rev that is similar to, but distinct from, that described for HIV-1 Rev and raises the possibility that viral RNA export mediated by the approximately 25 million-year-old K-Rev protein may require an additional cellular cofactor that is not required for HIV-1 Rev function.

  5. Probing the Tyrosine Phosphorylation State in Breast Cancer by Src Homology 2 Domain Binding

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Mayer, Bruce J

    2006-01-01

    .... The overall goal of this project was to develop a novel molecular diagnostic method, termed SH2 profiling, that can classify cell samples based on their global protein tyrosine phosphorylation state...

  6. Probing the Tyrosine Phosphorylation State in Breast Cancer by Src Homology 2 Domain Binding

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Mayer, Bruce

    2004-01-01

    .... The overall goal of this project is to develop a novel molecular diagnostic method, termed SH2 profiling, that can classify cell samples based on their global protein tyrosine phosphorylation state...

  7. Evaluating the efficacy of a structure-derived amino acid substitution matrix in detecting protein homologs by BLAST and PSI-BLAST.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goonesekere, Nalin Cw

    2009-01-01

    The large numbers of protein sequences generated by whole genome sequencing projects require rapid and accurate methods of annotation. The detection of homology through computational sequence analysis is a powerful tool in determining the complex evolutionary and functional relationships that exist between proteins. Homology search algorithms employ amino acid substitution matrices to detect similarity between proteins sequences. The substitution matrices in common use today are constructed using sequences aligned without reference to protein structure. Here we present amino acid substitution matrices constructed from the alignment of a large number of protein domain structures from the structural classification of proteins (SCOP) database. We show that when incorporated into the homology search algorithms BLAST and PSI-blast, the structure-based substitution matrices enhance the efficacy of detecting remote homologs.

  8. Crotacetin, a novel snake venom C-type lectin, is homolog of convulxin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. Rádis-Baptista

    2005-12-01

    Full Text Available Snake venom (sv C-type lectins encompass a group of hemorrhagic toxins, which are able to interfere with hemostasis. They share significant similarity in their primary structures with C-type lectins of other animals, and also present a conserved carbohydrate recognition domain (CRD. A very well studied sv C-type lectin is the heterodimeric toxin, convulxin (CVX, from the venoms of South American rattlesnakes, Crotalus durissus terrificus and C. d. cascavella. It consists of two subunits, alfa (CVXalpha , 13.9 kDa and beta (CVXbeta , 12.6 kDa, joined by inter and intra-chain disulfide bounds, and is arranged in a tetrameric alpha4beta4 conformation. Convulxin is able to activate platelet and induce their aggregation by acting via p62/GPVI collagen receptor. Several cDNA precursors, homolog of CVX subunits, were cloned by PCR homology screening. As determined by computational analysis, one of them, named crotacetin beta subunit, was predicted as a polypeptide with a tridimensional conformation very similar to other subunits of convulxin-like snake toxins. Crotacetin was purified from C. durissus venoms by gel permeation and reverse phase high performance liquid chromatography. The heterodimeric crotacetin is expressed in the venoms of several C. durissus subspecies, but it is prevalent in the venom of C. durissus cascavella. As inferred from homology modeling, crotacetin induces platelet aggregation but noticeably exhibits antimicrobial activity against Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria.

  9. Resolving RAD51C function in late stages of homologous recombination

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kuznetsov Sergey G

    2007-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract DNA double strand breaks are efficiently repaired by homologous recombination. One of the last steps of this process is resolution of Holliday junctions that are formed at the sites of genetic exchange between homologous DNA. Although various resolvases with Holliday junctions processing activity have been identified in bacteriophages, bacteria and archaebacteria, eukaryotic resolvases have been elusive. Recent biochemical evidence has revealed that RAD51C and XRCC3, members of the RAD51-like protein family, are involved in Holliday junction resolution in mammalian cells. However, purified recombinant RAD51C and XRCC3 proteins have not shown any Holliday junction resolution activity. In addition, these proteins did not reveal the presence of a nuclease domain, which raises doubts about their ability to function as a resolvase. Furthermore, oocytes from infertile Rad51C mutant mice exhibit precocious separation of sister chromatids at metaphase II, a phenotype that reflects a defect in sister chromatid cohesion, not a lack of Holliday junction resolution. Here we discuss a model to explain how a Holliday junction resolution defect can lead to sister chromatid separation in mouse oocytes. We also describe other recent in vitro and in vivo evidence supporting a late role for RAD51C in homologous recombination in mammalian cells, which is likely to be resolution of the Holliday junction.

  10. Persistent Homology fingerprinting of microstructural controls on larger-scale fluid flow in porous media

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moon, C.; Mitchell, S. A.; Callor, N.; Dewers, T. A.; Heath, J. E.; Yoon, H.; Conner, G. R.

    2017-12-01

    Traditional subsurface continuum multiphysics models include useful yet limiting geometrical assumptions: penny- or disc-shaped cracks, spherical or elliptical pores, bundles of capillary tubes, cubic law fracture permeability, etc. Each physics (flow, transport, mechanics) uses constitutive models with an increasing number of fit parameters that pertain to the microporous structure of the rock, but bear no inter-physics relationships or self-consistency. Recent advances in digital rock physics and pore-scale modeling link complex physics to detailed pore-level geometries, but measures for upscaling are somewhat unsatisfactory and come at a high computational cost. Continuum mechanics rely on a separation between small scale pore fluctuations and larger scale heterogeneity (and perhaps anisotropy), but this can break down (particularly for shales). Algebraic topology offers powerful mathematical tools for describing a local-to-global structure of shapes. Persistent homology, in particular, analyzes the dynamics of topological features and summarizes into numeric values. It offers a roadmap to both "fingerprint" topologies of pore structure and multiscale connectedness as well as links pore structure to physical behavior, thus potentially providing a means to relate the dependence of constitutive behaviors of pore structures in a self-consistent way. We present a persistence homology (PH) analysis framework of 3D image sets including a focused ion beam-scanning electron microscopy data set of the Selma Chalk. We extract structural characteristics of sampling volumes via persistence homology and fit a statistical model using the summarized values to estimate porosity, permeability, and connectivity—Lattice Boltzmann methods for single phase flow modeling are used to obtain the relationships. These PH methods allow for prediction of geophysical properties based on the geometry and connectivity in a computationally efficient way. Sandia National Laboratories is a

  11. [Family of ribosomal proteins S1 contains unique conservative domain].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deriusheva, E I; Machulin, A V; Selivanova, O M; Serdiuk, I N

    2010-01-01

    Different representatives of bacteria have different number of amino acid residues in the ribosomal proteins S1. This number varies from 111 (Spiroplasma kunkelii) to 863 a.a. (Treponema pallidum). Traditionally and for lack of this protein three-dimensional structure, its architecture is represented as repeating S1 domains. Number of these domains depends on the protein's length. Domain's quantity and its boundaries data are contained in the specialized databases, such as SMART, Pfam and PROSITE. However, for the same object these data may be very different. For search of domain's quantity and its boundaries, new approach, based on the analysis of dicted secondary structure (PsiPred), was used. This approach allowed us to reveal structural domains in amino acid sequences of S1 proteins and at that number varied from one to six. Alignment of S1 proteins, containing different domain's number, with the S1 RNAbinding domain of Escherichia coli PNPase elicited a fact that in family of ribosomal proteins SI one domain has maximal homology with S1 domain from PNPase. This conservative domain migrates along polypeptide chain and locates in proteins, containing different domain's number, according to specified pattern. In this domain as well in the S1 domain from PNPase, residues Phe-19, Phe-22, His-34, Asp-64 and Arg-68 are clustered on the surface and formed RNA binding site.

  12. Homologous series of induced early mutants in indican rice. Pt.1. The production of homologous series of early mutants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen Xiulan; Yang Hefeng; He Zhentian; Han Yuepeng; Liu Xueyu

    1999-01-01

    The percentage of homologous series of early mutants induced from the same Indican rice variety were almost the same (1.37%∼1.64%) in 1983∼1993, but the ones from the different eco-typical varieties were different. The early variety was 0.73%, the mid variety was 1.51%, and the late variety was 1.97%. The percentage of homologous series of early mutants from the varieties with the same pedigree and relationship were similar, but the one from the cog nation were lower than those from distant varieties. There are basic laws and characters in the homologous series of early mutants: 1. The inhibited phenotype is the basic of the homologous series of early mutants; 2. The production of the homologous series of early mutants is closely related with the growing period of the parent; 3. The parallel mutation of the stem and leaves are simultaneously happened with the variation of early or late maturing; 4. The occurrence of the homologous series of early mutants is in a state of imbalance. According to the law of parallel variability, the production of homologous series of early mutants can be predicted as long as the parents' classification of plant, pedigree and ecological type are identified. Therefore, the early breeding can be guided by the law of homologous series of early mutants

  13. Stringent homology-based prediction of H. sapiens-M. tuberculosis H37Rv protein-protein interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Hufeng; Gao, Shangzhi; Nguyen, Nam Ninh; Fan, Mengyuan; Jin, Jingjing; Liu, Bing; Zhao, Liang; Xiong, Geng; Tan, Min; Li, Shijun; Wong, Limsoon

    2014-04-08

    H. sapiens-M. tuberculosis H37Rv protein-protein interaction (PPI) data are essential for understanding the infection mechanism of the formidable pathogen M. tuberculosis H37Rv. Computational prediction is an important strategy to fill the gap in experimental H. sapiens-M. tuberculosis H37Rv PPI data. Homology-based prediction is frequently used in predicting both intra-species and inter-species PPIs. However, some limitations are not properly resolved in several published works that predict eukaryote-prokaryote inter-species PPIs using intra-species template PPIs. We develop a stringent homology-based prediction approach by taking into account (i) differences between eukaryotic and prokaryotic proteins and (ii) differences between inter-species and intra-species PPI interfaces. We compare our stringent homology-based approach to a conventional homology-based approach for predicting host-pathogen PPIs, based on cellular compartment distribution analysis, disease gene list enrichment analysis, pathway enrichment analysis and functional category enrichment analysis. These analyses support the validity of our prediction result, and clearly show that our approach has better performance in predicting H. sapiens-M. tuberculosis H37Rv PPIs. Using our stringent homology-based approach, we have predicted a set of highly plausible H. sapiens-M. tuberculosis H37Rv PPIs which might be useful for many of related studies. Based on our analysis of the H. sapiens-M. tuberculosis H37Rv PPI network predicted by our stringent homology-based approach, we have discovered several interesting properties which are reported here for the first time. We find that both host proteins and pathogen proteins involved in the host-pathogen PPIs tend to be hubs in their own intra-species PPI network. Also, both host and pathogen proteins involved in host-pathogen PPIs tend to have longer primary sequence, tend to have more domains, tend to be more hydrophilic, etc. And the protein domains from both

  14. PhD Dissertations

    OpenAIRE

    Redazione Reti Medievali (a cura di)

    2010-01-01

    Report of PhD Dissertations.Anna Airò La scrittura delle regole. Politica e istituzioni a Taranto nel Quattrocento, Tesi di dottorato di ricerca in Storia medievale, Università degli studi di Firenze, 2005 Pasquale Arfé La Clavis Physicae II (316-529) di Honorius Augustodunensis. Studio ed edizione critica, Tesi di dottorato in Storia della filosofia medievale, Università degli Studi di Napoli "L'Orientale", 2005 Alessandro Azzimonti Scrittura agiografica e strutture di potere nell'Italia c...

  15. Productive Homologous and Non-homologous Recombination of Hepatitis C Virus in Cell Culture

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yi-Ping; Mikkelsen, Lotte S.; Gottwein, Judith M.; Bukh, Jens

    2013-01-01

    Genetic recombination is an important mechanism for increasing diversity of RNA viruses, and constitutes a viral escape mechanism to host immune responses and to treatment with antiviral compounds. Although rare, epidemiologically important hepatitis C virus (HCV) recombinants have been reported. In addition, recombination is an important regulatory mechanism of cytopathogenicity for the related pestiviruses. Here we describe recombination of HCV RNA in cell culture leading to production of infectious virus. Initially, hepatoma cells were co-transfected with a replicating JFH1ΔE1E2 genome (genotype 2a) lacking functional envelope genes and strain J6 (2a), which has functional envelope genes but does not replicate in culture. After an initial decrease in the number of HCV positive cells, infection spread after 13–36 days. Sequencing of recovered viruses revealed non-homologous recombinants with J6 sequence from the 5′ end to the NS2–NS3 region followed by JFH1 sequence from Core to the 3′ end. These recombinants carried duplicated sequence of up to 2400 nucleotides. HCV replication was not required for recombination, as recombinants were observed in most experiments even when two replication incompetent genomes were co-transfected. Reverse genetic studies verified the viability of representative recombinants. After serial passage, subsequent recombination events reducing or eliminating the duplicated region were observed for some but not all recombinants. Furthermore, we found that inter-genotypic recombination could occur, but at a lower frequency than intra-genotypic recombination. Productive recombination of attenuated HCV genomes depended on expression of all HCV proteins and tolerated duplicated sequence. In general, no strong site specificity was observed. Non-homologous recombination was observed in most cases, while few homologous events were identified. A better understanding of HCV recombination could help identification of natural recombinants

  16. Productive homologous and non-homologous recombination of hepatitis C virus in cell culture

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Scheel, Troels K H; Galli, Andrea; Li, Yi-Ping

    2013-01-01

    . In addition, recombination is an important regulatory mechanism of cytopathogenicity for the related pestiviruses. Here we describe recombination of HCV RNA in cell culture leading to production of infectious virus. Initially, hepatoma cells were co-transfected with a replicating JFH1ΔE1E2 genome (genotype 2a......) lacking functional envelope genes and strain J6 (2a), which has functional envelope genes but does not replicate in culture. After an initial decrease in the number of HCV positive cells, infection spread after 13-36 days. Sequencing of recovered viruses revealed non-homologous recombinants with J6...

  17. Srs2 and Mus81-Mms4 Prevent Accumulation of Toxic Inter-Homolog Recombination Intermediates.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kenji Keyamura

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Homologous recombination is an evolutionally conserved mechanism that promotes genome stability through the faithful repair of double-strand breaks and single-strand gaps in DNA, and the recovery of stalled or collapsed replication forks. Saccharomyces cerevisiae ATP-dependent DNA helicase Srs2 (a member of the highly conserved UvrD family of helicases has multiple roles in regulating homologous recombination. A mutation (srs2K41A resulting in a helicase-dead mutant of Srs2 was found to be lethal in diploid, but not in haploid, cells. In diploid cells, Srs2K41A caused the accumulation of inter-homolog joint molecule intermediates, increased the levels of spontaneous Rad52 foci, and induced gross chromosomal rearrangements. Srs2K41A lethality and accumulation of joint molecules were suppressed by inactivating Rad51 or deleting the Rad51-interaction domain of Srs2, whereas phosphorylation and sumoylation of Srs2 and its interaction with sumoylated proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA were not required for lethality. The structure-specific complex of crossover junction endonucleases Mus81 and Mms4 was also required for viability of diploid, but not haploid, SRS2 deletion mutants (srs2Δ, and diploid srs2Δ mus81Δ mutants accumulated joint molecule intermediates. Our data suggest that Srs2 and Mus81-Mms4 have critical roles in preventing the formation of (or in resolving toxic inter-homolog joint molecules, which could otherwise interfere with chromosome segregation and lead to genetic instability.

  18. SH3 Domains Differentially Stimulate Distinct Dynamin I Assembly Modes and G Domain Activity.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sai Krishnan

    Full Text Available Dynamin I is a highly regulated GTPase enzyme enriched in nerve terminals which mediates vesicle fission during synaptic vesicle endocytosis. One regulatory mechanism involves its interactions with proteins containing Src homology 3 (SH3 domains. At least 30 SH3 domain-containing proteins bind dynamin at its proline-rich domain (PRD. Those that stimulate dynamin activity act by promoting its oligomerisation. We undertook a systematic parallel screening of 13 glutathione-S-transferase (GST-tagged endocytosis-related SH3 domains on dynamin binding, GTPase activity and oligomerisation. No correlation was found between dynamin binding and their potency to stimulate GTPase activity. There was limited correlation between the extent of their ability to stimulate dynamin activity and the level of oligomerisation, indicating an as yet uncharacterised allosteric coupling of the PRD and G domain. We examined the two variants, dynamin Iab and Ibb, which differ in the alternately splice middle domain α2 helix. They responded differently to the panel of SH3s, with the extent of stimulation between the splice variants varying greatly between the SH3s. This study reveals that SH3 binding can act as a heterotropic allosteric regulator of the G domain via the middle domain α2 helix, suggesting an involvement of this helix in communicating the PRD-mediated allostery. This indicates that SH3 binding both stabilises multiple conformations of the tetrameric building block of dynamin, and promotes assembly of dynamin-SH3 complexes with distinct rates of GTP hydrolysis.

  19. Esophageal pH monitoring

    Science.gov (United States)

    pH monitoring - esophageal; Esophageal acidity test ... Esophageal pH monitoring is used to check how much stomach acid is entering the esophagus. It also checks how well the acid is cleared downward into the ...

  20. Detecting false positive sequence homology: a machine learning approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fujimoto, M Stanley; Suvorov, Anton; Jensen, Nicholas O; Clement, Mark J; Bybee, Seth M

    2016-02-24

    Accurate detection of homologous relationships of biological sequences (DNA or amino acid) amongst organisms is an important and often difficult task that is essential to various evolutionary studies, ranging from building phylogenies to predicting functional gene annotations. There are many existing heuristic tools, most commonly based on bidirectional BLAST searches that are used to identify homologous genes and combine them into two fundamentally distinct classes: orthologs and paralogs. Due to only using heuristic filtering based on significance score cutoffs and having no cluster post-processing tools available, these methods can often produce multiple clusters constituting unrelated (non-homologous) sequences. Therefore sequencing data extracted from incomplete genome/transcriptome assemblies originated from low coverage sequencing or produced by de novo processes without a reference genome are susceptible to high false positive rates of homology detection. In this paper we develop biologically informative features that can be extracted from multiple sequence alignments of putative homologous genes (orthologs and paralogs) and further utilized in context of guided experimentation to verify false positive outcomes. We demonstrate that our machine learning method trained on both known homology clusters obtained from OrthoDB and randomly generated sequence alignments (non-homologs), successfully determines apparent false positives inferred by heuristic algorithms especially among proteomes recovered from low-coverage RNA-seq data. Almost ~42 % and ~25 % of predicted putative homologies by InParanoid and HaMStR respectively were classified as false positives on experimental data set. Our process increases the quality of output from other clustering algorithms by providing a novel post-processing method that is both fast and efficient at removing low quality clusters of putative homologous genes recovered by heuristic-based approaches.

  1. SH2 domains: modulators of nonreceptor tyrosine kinase activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Filippakopoulos, Panagis; Müller, Susanne; Knapp, Stefan

    2009-12-01

    The Src homology 2 (SH2) domain is a sequence-specific phosphotyrosine-binding module present in many signaling molecules. In cytoplasmic tyrosine kinases, the SH2 domain is located N-terminally to the catalytic kinase domain (SH1) where it mediates cellular localization, substrate recruitment, and regulation of kinase activity. Initially, structural studies established a role of the SH2 domain stabilizing the inactive state of Src family members. However, biochemical characterization showed that the presence of the SH2 domain is frequently required for catalytic activity, suggesting a crucial function stabilizing the active state of many nonreceptor tyrosine kinases. Recently, the structure of the SH2-kinase domain of Fes revealed that the SH2 domain stabilizes the active kinase conformation by direct interactions with the regulatory helix alphaC. Stabilizing interactions between the SH2 and the kinase domains have also been observed in the structures of active Csk and Abl. Interestingly, mutations in the SH2 domain found in human disease can be explained by SH2 domain destabilization or incorrect positioning of the SH2. Here we summarize our understanding of mechanisms that lead to tyrosine kinase activation by direct interactions mediated by the SH2 domain and discuss how mutations in the SH2 domain trigger kinase inactivation.

  2. The K-homology of nets of C∗-algebras

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruzzi, Giuseppe; Vasselli, Ezio

    2014-12-01

    Let X be a space, intended as a possibly curved space-time, and A a precosheaf of C∗-algebras on X. Motivated by algebraic quantum field theory, we study the Kasparov and Θ-summable K-homology of A interpreting them in terms of the holonomy equivariant K-homology of the associated C∗-dynamical system. This yields a characteristic class for K-homology cycles of A with values in the odd cohomology of X, that we interpret as a generalized statistical dimension.

  3. Identification of a transformer homolog in the acorn worm, Saccoglossus kowalevskii, and analysis of its activity in insect cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suzuki, Masataka G; Tochigi, Mayuko; Sakaguchi, Honami; Aoki, Fugaku; Miyamoto, Norio

    2015-06-01

    The transformer (tra) gene is an intermediate component of the sex determination hierarchy in many insect species. The homolog of tra is also found in two branchiopod crustacean species but is not known outside arthropods. We have isolated a tra homolog in the acorn worm, Saccoglossus kowalevskii, which is a hemichordate belonging to the deuterostome superphylum. The full-length complementary DNA (cDNA) of the S. kowalevskii tra homolog (Sktra) has a 3786-bp open reading frame that encodes a 1261-amino acid sequence including a TRA-CAM domain and an arginine/serine (RS)-rich domain, both of which are characteristic of TRA orthologs. Reverse transcription PCR (RT-PCR) analyses demonstrated that Sktra showed no differences in expression patterns between testes and ovaries, but its expression level was approximately 7.5-fold higher in the testes than in the ovaries. TRA, together with the protein product of the transformer-2 (tra-2) gene, assembles on doublesex (dsx) pre-messenger RNA (mRNA) via the cis-regulatory element, enhancing female-specific splicing of dsx in Drosophila. To understand functional conservation of the SkTRA protein as a dsx-splicing activator, we investigated whether SkTRA is capable of inducing female-specific splicing of the Drosophila dsx. Ectopic expression of Sktra cDNA in insect cultured cells did not induce the female-specific splicing of dsx. On the other hand, forced expression of Sktra-2 (a tra-2 homolog of S. kowalevskii) was able to induce the female-specific dsx splicing. These results demonstrate that the function as a dsx-splicing activator is not conserved in SkTRA even though SkTRA-2 is capable of functionally replacing the Drosophila TRA-2. We have also found a tra homolog in an echinoderm genome. This study provides the first evidence that that tra is conserved not only in arthropods but also in basal species of deuterostoms.

  4. Molecular identification and functional delineation of a glutathione reductase homolog from disk abalone (Haliotis discus discus): Insights as a potent player in host antioxidant defense.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herath, H M L P B; Wickramasinghe, P D S U; Bathige, S D N K; Jayasooriya, R G P T; Kim, Gi-Young; Park, Myoung Ae; Kim, Chul; Lee, Jehee

    2017-01-01

    Glutathione reductase (GSR) is an enzyme that catalyzes the biochemical conversion of oxidized glutathione (GSSG) into the reduced form (GSH). Since the ratio between the two forms of glutathione (GSH/GSSG) is important for the optimal function of GSH to act as an antioxidant against H 2 O 2 , the contribution of GSR as an enzymatic regulatory agent to maintain the proper ratio is essential. Abalones are marine mollusks that frequently encounter environmental factors that can trigger the overproduction of reactive oxygen species (ROS) such as H 2 O 2 . Therefore, we conducted the current study to reveal the molecular and functional properties of a GSR homolog in the disk abalone, Haliotis discus discus. The identified cDNA sequence (2325 bp) has a 1356 bp long open reading frame (ORF), coding for a 909 bp long amino acid sequence, which harbors a pyridine nucleotide-disulfide oxidoreductase domain (171-246 aa), a pyridine nucleotide-disulfide oxidoreductase dimerization domain, and a NAD(P)(+)-binding Rossmann fold superfamily signature domain. Four functional residues: the FAD binding site, glutathione binding site, NADPH binding motif, and assembly domain were identified to be conserved among the other species. The recombinant abalone GSR (rAbGSR) exhibited detectable activity in a standard glutathione reductase activity assay. The optimum pH and optimal temperature for the reaction were found to be 7.0 and 50 °C, respectively, while the ionic strength of the medium had no effect. The enzymatic reaction was vastly inhibited by Cu +2 and Cd +2 ions. A considerable effect of cellular protection was detected with a disk diffusion assay conducted with rAbGSR. Moreover, an MTT assay and flow cytometry confirmed the significance of the protective role of rAbGSR in cell function. Furthermore, AbGSR was found to be ubiquitously distributed in different types of abalone tissues. AbGSR mRNA expression was significantly upregulated in response to three immune challenges

  5. Diversity of Two-Domain Laccase-Like Multicopper Oxidase Genes in Streptomyces spp.: Identification of Genes Potentially Involved in Extracellular Activities and Lignocellulose Degradation during Composting of Agricultural Waste

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Lunhui; Zhang, Jiachao; Chen, Anwei; Chen, Ming; Jiang, Min; Yuan, Yujie; Wu, Haipeng; Lai, Mingyong; He, Yibin

    2014-01-01

    Traditional three-domain fungal and bacterial laccases have been extensively studied for their significance in various biotechnological applications. Growing molecular evidence points to a wide occurrence of more recently recognized two-domain laccase-like multicopper oxidase (LMCO) genes in Streptomyces spp. However, the current knowledge about their ecological role and distribution in natural or artificial ecosystems is insufficient. The aim of this study was to investigate the diversity and composition of Streptomyces two-domain LMCO genes in agricultural waste composting, which will contribute to the understanding of the ecological function of Streptomyces two-domain LMCOs with potential extracellular activity and ligninolytic capacity. A new specific PCR primer pair was designed to target the two conserved copper binding regions of Streptomyces two-domain LMCO genes. The obtained sequences mainly clustered with Streptomyces coelicolor, Streptomyces violaceusniger, and Streptomyces griseus. Gene libraries retrieved from six composting samples revealed high diversity and a rapid succession of Streptomyces two-domain LMCO genes during composting. The obtained sequence types cluster in 8 distinct clades, most of which are homologous with Streptomyces two-domain LMCO genes, but the sequences of clades III and VIII do not match with any reference sequence of known streptomycetes. Both lignocellulose degradation rates and phenol oxidase activity at pH 8.0 in the composting process were found to be positively associated with the abundance of Streptomyces two-domain LMCO genes. These observations provide important clues that Streptomyces two-domain LMCOs are potentially involved in bacterial extracellular phenol oxidase activities and lignocellulose breakdown during agricultural waste composting. PMID:24657870

  6. Homology of normal chains and cohomology of charges

    CERN Document Server

    Pauw, Th De; Pfeffer, W F

    2017-01-01

    The authors consider a category of pairs of compact metric spaces and Lipschitz maps where the pairs satisfy a linearly isoperimetric condition related to the solvability of the Plateau problem with partially free boundary. It includes properly all pairs of compact Lipschitz neighborhood retracts of a large class of Banach spaces. On this category the authors define homology and cohomology functors with real coefficients which satisfy the Eilenberg-Steenrod axioms, but reflect the metric properties of the underlying spaces. As an example they show that the zero-dimensional homology of a space in our category is trivial if and only if the space is path connected by arcs of finite length. The homology and cohomology of a pair are, respectively, locally convex and Banach spaces that are in duality. Ignoring the topological structures, the homology and cohomology extend to all pairs of compact metric spaces. For locally acyclic spaces, the authors establish a natural isomorphism between their cohomology and the �...

  7. Generalized local homology and cohomology for linearly compact modules

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tran Tuan Nam

    2006-07-01

    We study generalized local homology for linearly compact modules. By duality, we get some properties of generalized local cohomology modules and extend well-known properties of local cohomology of A. Grothendieck. (author)

  8. On the homology and the cohomology of certain polycyclic groups

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Majumdar, S.

    1987-10-01

    The homology and the cohomology of infinite non-abelian split extensions of cyclic groups by cyclic groups have been computed through construction of nice free resolutions for these groups. (author). 16 refs

  9. Inhibitory Effect of Berberine on Zeste Homolog 2 (Ezh2 ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    homolog 2 (Ezh2) expressions in KYSE450 human esophageal cancer cells. Methods: ... of the AXL receptor kinase. The results of ... effects of estrogen receptor antagonists on ..... protein EZH2 is involved in progression of prostate cancer.

  10. Matrix factorizations and homological mirror symmetry on the torus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Knapp, Johanna; Omer, Harun

    2007-01-01

    We consider matrix factorizations and homological mirror symmetry on the torus T 2 using a Landau-Ginzburg description. We identify the basic matrix factorizations of the Landau-Ginzburg superpotential and compute the full spectrum taking into account the explicit dependence on bulk and boundary moduli. We verify homological mirror symmetry by comparing three-point functions in the A-model and the B-model

  11. Regulation of homologous recombination at telomeres in budding yeast

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Eckert-Boulet, Nadine; Lisby, Michael

    2010-01-01

    Homologous recombination is suppressed at normal length telomere sequences. In contrast, telomere recombination is allowed when telomeres erode in the absence of telomerase activity or as a consequence of nucleolytic degradation or incomplete replication. Here, we review the mechanisms that contr...... that contribute to regulating mitotic homologous recombination at telomeres and the role of these mechanisms in signalling short telomeres in the budding yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae....

  12. Zeroth Poisson Homology, Foliated Cohomology and Perfect Poisson Manifolds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martínez-Torres, David; Miranda, Eva

    2018-01-01

    We prove that, for compact regular Poisson manifolds, the zeroth homology group is isomorphic to the top foliated cohomology group, and we give some applications. In particular, we show that, for regular unimodular Poisson manifolds, top Poisson and foliated cohomology groups are isomorphic. Inspired by the symplectic setting, we define what a perfect Poisson manifold is. We use these Poisson homology computations to provide families of perfect Poisson manifolds.

  13. Confirming the Revised C-Terminal Domain of the MscL Crystal Structure

    OpenAIRE

    Maurer, Joshua A.; Elmore, Donald E.; Clayton, Daniel; Xiong, Li; Lester, Henry A.; Dougherty, Dennis A.

    2008-01-01

    The structure of the C-terminal domain of the mechanosensitive channel of large conductance (MscL) has generated significant controversy. As a result, several structures have been proposed for this region: the original crystal structure (1MSL) of the Mycobacterium tuberculosis homolog (Tb), a model of the Escherichia coli homolog, and, most recently, a revised crystal structure of Tb-MscL (2OAR). To understand which of these structures represents a physiological conformation, we measured the ...

  14. Structural Characterization of Monomeric/Dimeric State of p59fyn SH2 Domain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huculeci, Radu; Kieken, Fabien; Garcia-Pino, Abel; Buts, Lieven; van Nuland, Nico; Lenaerts, Tom

    2017-01-01

    Src homology 2 (SH2) domains are key modulators in various signaling pathways allowing the recognition of phosphotyrosine sites of different proteins. Despite the fact that SH2 domains acquire their biological functions in a monomeric state, a multitude of reports have shown their tendency to dimerize. Here, we provide a technical description on how to isolate and characterize by gel filtration, circular dichroism (CD), and nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) each conformational state of p59 fyn SH2 domain.

  15. The concept of homology as a basis for evaluating developmental mechanisms: exploring selective attention across the life-span.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lickliter, Robert; Bahrick, Lorraine E

    2013-01-01

    Research with human infants as well as non-human animal embryos and infants has consistently demonstrated the benefits of intersensory redundancy for perceptual learning and memory for redundantly specified information during early development. Studies of infant affect discrimination, face discrimination, numerical discrimination, sequence detection, abstract rule learning, and word comprehension and segmentation have all shown that intersensory redundancy promotes earlier detection of these properties when compared to unimodal exposure to the same properties. Here we explore the idea that such intersensory facilitation is evident across the life-span and that this continuity is an example of a developmental behavioral homology. We present evidence that intersensory facilitation is most apparent during early phases of learning for a variety of tasks, regardless of developmental level, including domains that are novel or tasks that require discrimination of fine detail or speeded responses. Under these conditions, infants, children, and adults all show intersensory facilitation, suggesting a developmental homology. We discuss the challenge and propose strategies for establishing appropriate guidelines for identifying developmental behavioral homologies. We conclude that evaluating the extent to which continuities observed across development are homologous can contribute to a better understanding of the processes of development. Copyright © 2012 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  16. PhD Dissertations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Redazione Reti Medievali (a cura di

    2004-06-01

    Full Text Available Report of PhD Dissertations. Francesco Barone Istituzioni, società ed economia a Catania nel tardo medioevo (XIV-XV secolo, Tesi di dottorato in Storia medievale (XVI ciclo, Università degli Studi di Firenze, 2004   Laura Berti Ceroni Il territorio e le strutture di Cesarea e Classe tra tarda antichità e alto medioevo in rapporto con Ravenna, Tesi di dottorato di ricerca in Storia e Informatica, Università degli studi di Bologna, 2002-2003.   Marco Bicchierai Poppi dalla signoria dei conti Guidi al vicariato del Casentino (1360-1480, Tesi di dottorato in Storia medievale (XIV ciclo, Università degli Studi di Firenze, 2004   Emanuela Garimberti Spatiosa ad habitandum loca. Luoghi e identità nella Historia Langobardorum di Paolo Diacono, Tesi di dottorato in Storia medievale (XV ciclo, Università degli Studi di Bologna, 2004   Lorenzo Tanzini Sistemi normativi e pratiche istituzionali a Firenze dalla fine del XIII all’inizio del XV secolo, Tesi di dottorato di ricerca in Storia medievale (XVI ciclo, Università degli Studi di Firenze, 2004   Stefania Tarquini Pellegrinaggio e asseto urbano di Roma, Tesi di dottorato di ricerca in Storia dei centri, delle vie e della cultura dei pellegrinaggi nel Medioevo euro mediterraneo (XV ciclo, Università degli studi di Lecce, 2003

  17. PhD Dissertations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Redazione Reti Medievali (a cura di

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Report of PhD dissertations. Andrea Brugnoli Una storia locale: l’organizzazione del territorio veronese nel medioevo: trasformazioni della realtà e schemi notarili (IX-metà XII secolo, Tesi di dottorato di ricerca in Scienze Storiche e Antropologiche (XXII ciclo, Università degli Studi di Verona, 2010   Luca Filangieri Famiglie e gruppi dirigenti a Genova (secoli XII-metà XIII, Tesi di dottorato di ricerca in Storia medievale (XXII ciclo, Università degli Studi di Firenze, 2010   Jakub Kujawi ski Wernakularna kolekcja historiograficzna z rękopisu francuskiego nr 688 z Biblioteki Narodowej w Paryżu. Studium źródłoznawcze (La raccolta dei volgarizzamenti delle opere storiografiche nel manoscritto francese 688 della Biblioteca Nazionale di Parigi, Tesi di dottorato, Università “Adam Mickiewicz”, Facoltà di Storia, Pozna, a.a. 2009/2010   Marta Longhi I signori “de Radicata”. Strategie di affermazione familiare e patrimoniale nel Piemonte dei secoli XII-XIV, Tesi di dottorato di ricerca in Istituzioni, Società, Religioni dal Tardo Antico alla fine del Medioevo (XX ciclo, Università di Torino, 2008

  18. PhD Dissertations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Redazione Reti Medievali (a cura di

    2003-06-01

    Full Text Available Reporto of PhD Dissertations.   Mario Dalle Carbonare Società, potere e clientele nell’Irlanda altomedievale (secoli V-IX, Tesi di dottorato di ricerca in Storia sociale europea, Università "Ca' Foscari" di Venezia, 2003 Vieri Mazzoni La legislazione antighibellina e la politica oligarchica della Parte Guelfa di Firenze nel secondo Trecento (1347-1378, Tesi di dottorato di ricerca in Storia Medievale (ciclo XII, Università degli Studi di Firenze   Alma Poloni Pisa dalle origini del movimento popolare alla discesa di Ludovico il Bavaro. I gruppi dirigenti cittadini tra continuità e trasformazione, Tesi di dottorato di ricerca in Storia dell'Europa nel medioevo, Università degli studi di Pisa, 2003   Andrea Puglia Potere marchionale, amministrazione del territorio, società locali dalla morte di Ugo di Tuscia a Guelfo VI di Baviera (1001-1160, Tesi di dottorato di ricerca in Storia medievale, Università degli studi di Milano, 2003

  19. In vivo blunt-end cloning through CRISPR/Cas9-facilitated non-homologous end-joining

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geisinger, Jonathan M.; Turan, Sören; Hernandez, Sophia; Spector, Laura P.; Calos, Michele P.

    2016-01-01

    The CRISPR/Cas9 system facilitates precise DNA modifications by generating RNA-guided blunt-ended double-strand breaks. We demonstrate that guide RNA pairs generate deletions that are repaired with a high level of precision by non-homologous end-joining in mammalian cells. We present a method called knock-in blunt ligation for exploiting these breaks to insert exogenous PCR-generated sequences in a homology-independent manner without loss of additional nucleotides. This method is useful for making precise additions to the genome such as insertions of marker gene cassettes or functional elements, without the need for homology arms. We successfully utilized this method in human and mouse cells to insert fluorescent protein cassettes into various loci, with efficiencies up to 36% in HEK293 cells without selection. We also created versions of Cas9 fused to the FKBP12-L106P destabilization domain in an effort to improve Cas9 performance. Our in vivo blunt-end cloning method and destabilization-domain-fused Cas9 variant increase the repertoire of precision genome engineering approaches. PMID:26762978

  20. Purification of SOCS (Suppressor of Cytokine Signaling) SH2 Domains for Structural and Functional Studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liau, Nicholas P D; Laktyushin, Artem; Babon, Jeffrey J

    2017-01-01

    Src Homology 2 (SH2) domains are protein domains which have a high binding affinity for specific amino acid sequences containing a phosphorylated tyrosine residue. The Suppressors of Cytokine Signaling (SOCS) proteins use an SH2 domain to bind to components of certain cytokine signaling pathways to downregulate the signaling cascade. The recombinantly produced SH2 domains of various SOCS proteins have been used to undertake structural and functional studies elucidating the method of how such targeting occurs. Here, we describe the protocol for the recombinant production and purification of SOCS SH2 domains, with an emphasis on SOCS3.

  1. Cellobiose dehydrogenase of Chaetomium sp. INBI 2-26(-): structural basis of enhanced activity toward glucose at neutral pH.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vasilchenko, Liliya G; Karapetyan, Karen N; Yershevich, Olga P; Ludwig, Roland; Zamocky, Marcel; Peterbauer, Clemens K; Haltrich, Dietmar; Rabinovich, Mikhail L

    2011-05-01

    Cellobiose dehydrogenase (CDH) is an extracellular fungal flavocytochrome specifically oxidizing cellooligosaccharides and lactose to corresponding (-lactones by a variety of electron acceptors. In contrast to basidiomycetous CDHs, CDHs of ascomycetes also display certain activity toward glucose. The objective of this study was to establish the structural reasons of such an activity of CDH from mesophilic ascomycete Chaetomium sp. INBI 2-26 (ChCDH). The complete amino acid sequence of ChCDH displayed high levels of similarity with the amino acid sequences of CDHs from the thermophilic fungi Thielavia heterotallica and Myriococcum thermophilum. Peptide mass fingerprinting of purified ChCDH provided evidence for the oxidation of methionine residues in the FAD-domain. Comparative homology modeling of the structure of the ChCDH FAD-domain in complex with the transition state analog based on the structure of the same complex of basidiomycetous CDH (1NAA) as template indicated possible structural reasons for the enhanced activity of ascomycetous CDHs toward glucose at neutral pH, which is a prerequisite for application of CDH in a variety of biocompatible biosensors and biofuel cells. Copyright © 2011 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  2. Multiscale analysis of nonlinear systems using computational homology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Konstantin Mischaikow; Michael Schatz; William Kalies; Thomas Wanner

    2010-05-24

    This is a collaborative project between the principal investigators. However, as is to be expected, different PIs have greater focus on different aspects of the project. This report lists these major directions of research which were pursued during the funding period: (1) Computational Homology in Fluids - For the computational homology effort in thermal convection, the focus of the work during the first two years of the funding period included: (1) A clear demonstration that homology can sensitively detect the presence or absence of an important flow symmetry, (2) An investigation of homology as a probe for flow dynamics, and (3) The construction of a new convection apparatus for probing the effects of large-aspect-ratio. (2) Computational Homology in Cardiac Dynamics - We have initiated an effort to test the use of homology in characterizing data from both laboratory experiments and numerical simulations of arrhythmia in the heart. Recently, the use of high speed, high sensitivity digital imaging in conjunction with voltage sensitive fluorescent dyes has enabled researchers to visualize electrical activity on the surface of cardiac tissue, both in vitro and in vivo. (3) Magnetohydrodynamics - A new research direction is to use computational homology to analyze results of large scale simulations of 2D turbulence in the presence of magnetic fields. Such simulations are relevant to the dynamics of black hole accretion disks. The complex flow patterns from simulations exhibit strong qualitative changes as a function of magnetic field strength. Efforts to characterize the pattern changes using Fourier methods and wavelet analysis have been unsuccessful. (4) Granular Flow - two experts in the area of granular media are studying 2D model experiments of earthquake dynamics where the stress fields can be measured; these stress fields from complex patterns of 'force chains' that may be amenable to analysis using computational homology. (5) Microstructure

  3. Multiscale analysis of nonlinear systems using computational homology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Konstantin Mischaikow, Rutgers University/Georgia Institute of Technology, Michael Schatz, Georgia Institute of Technology, William Kalies, Florida Atlantic University, Thomas Wanner,George Mason University

    2010-05-19

    This is a collaborative project between the principal investigators. However, as is to be expected, different PIs have greater focus on different aspects of the project. This report lists these major directions of research which were pursued during the funding period: (1) Computational Homology in Fluids - For the computational homology effort in thermal convection, the focus of the work during the first two years of the funding period included: (1) A clear demonstration that homology can sensitively detect the presence or absence of an important flow symmetry, (2) An investigation of homology as a probe for flow dynamics, and (3) The construction of a new convection apparatus for probing the effects of large-aspect-ratio. (2) Computational Homology in Cardiac Dynamics - We have initiated an effort to test the use of homology in characterizing data from both laboratory experiments and numerical simulations of arrhythmia in the heart. Recently, the use of high speed, high sensitivity digital imaging in conjunction with voltage sensitive fluorescent dyes has enabled researchers to visualize electrical activity on the surface of cardiac tissue, both in vitro and in vivo. (3) Magnetohydrodynamics - A new research direction is to use computational homology to analyze results of large scale simulations of 2D turbulence in the presence of magnetic fields. Such simulations are relevant to the dynamics of black hole accretion disks. The complex flow patterns from simulations exhibit strong qualitative changes as a function of magnetic field strength. Efforts to characterize the pattern changes using Fourier methods and wavelet analysis have been unsuccessful. (4) Granular Flow - two experts in the area of granular media are studying 2D model experiments of earthquake dynamics where the stress fields can be measured; these stress fields from complex patterns of 'force chains' that may be amenable to analysis using computational homology. (5) Microstructure

  4. PhMYB4 fine-tunes the floral volatile signature of Petunia x hybrida through PhC4H.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colquhoun, Thomas A; Kim, Joo Young; Wedde, Ashlyn E; Levin, Laura A; Schmitt, Kyle C; Schuurink, Robert C; Clark, David G

    2011-01-01

    In Petunia × hybrida cv 'Mitchell Diploid' (MD), floral volatile benzenoid/phenylpropanoid (FVBP) biosynthesis is controlled spatially, developmentally, and daily at molecular, metabolic, and biochemical levels. Multiple genes have been shown to encode proteins that either directly catalyse a biochemical reaction yielding FVBP compounds or are involved in metabolite flux prior to the formation of FVBP compounds. It was hypothesized that multiple transcription factors are involved in the precise regulation of all necessary genes, resulting in the specific volatile signature of MD flowers. After acquiring all available petunia transcript sequences with homology to Arabidopsis thaliana R2R3-MYB transcription factors, PhMYB4 (named for its close identity to AtMYB4) was identified, cloned, and characterized. PhMYB4 transcripts accumulate to relatively high levels in floral tissues at anthesis and throughout open flower stages, which coincides with the spatial and developmental distribution of FVBP production and emission. Upon RNAi suppression of PhMYB4 (ir-PhMYB4) both petunia cinnamate-4-hydroxylase (PhC4H1 and PhC4H2) gene transcript levels were significantly increased. In addition, ir-PhMYB4 plants emit higher levels of FVBP compounds derived from p-coumaric acid (isoeugenol and eugenol) compared with MD. Together, these results indicate that PhMYB4 functions in the repression of C4H transcription, indirectly controlling the balance of FVBP production in petunia floral tissue (i.e. fine-tunes).

  5. The OGCleaner: filtering false-positive homology clusters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fujimoto, M Stanley; Suvorov, Anton; Jensen, Nicholas O; Clement, Mark J; Snell, Quinn; Bybee, Seth M

    2017-01-01

    Detecting homologous sequences in organisms is an essential step in protein structure and function prediction, gene annotation and phylogenetic tree construction. Heuristic methods are often employed for quality control of putative homology clusters. These heuristics, however, usually only apply to pairwise sequence comparison and do not examine clusters as a whole. We present the Orthology Group Cleaner (the OGCleaner), a tool designed for filtering putative orthology groups as homology or non-homology clusters by considering all sequences in a cluster. The OGCleaner relies on high-quality orthologous groups identified in OrthoDB to train machine learning algorithms that are able to distinguish between true-positive and false-positive homology groups. This package aims to improve the quality of phylogenetic tree construction especially in instances of lower-quality transcriptome assemblies. https://github.com/byucsl/ogcleaner CONTACT: sfujimoto@gmail.comSupplementary information: Supplementary data are available at Bioinformatics online. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  6. Primary homologies of the circumorbital bones of snakes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palci, Alessandro; Caldwell, Michael W

    2013-09-01

    Some snakes have two circumorbital ossifications that in the current literature are usually referred to as the postorbital and supraorbital. We review the arguments that have been proposed to justify this interpretation and provide counter-arguments that reject those conjectures of primary homology based on the observation of 32 species of lizards and 81 species of snakes (both extant and fossil). We present similarity arguments, both topological and structural, for reinterpretation of the primary homologies of the dorsal and posterior orbital ossifications of snakes. Applying the test of similarity, we conclude that the posterior orbital ossification of snakes is topologically consistent as the homolog of the lacertilian jugal, and that the dorsal orbital ossification present in some snakes (e.g., pythons, Loxocemus, and Calabaria) is the homolog of the lacertilian postfrontal. We therefore propose that the terms postorbital and supraorbital should be abandoned as reference language for the circumorbital bones of snakes, and be replaced with the terms jugal and postfrontal, respectively. The primary homology claim for the snake "postorbital" fails the test of similarity, while the term "supraorbital" is an unnecessary and inaccurate application of the concept of a neomorphic ossification, for an element that passes the test of similarity as a postfrontal. This reinterpretation of the circumorbital bones of snakes is bound to have important repercussions for future phylogenetic analyses and consequently for our understanding of the origin and evolution of snakes. Copyright © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  7. A PhD is a PhD is a PhD

    OpenAIRE

    Ostrow, Deborah Anne

    2017-01-01

    A PhD is a PhD is a PhD is a practice-based project that interrogates the process of an artist undertaking PhD research under established criteria. It consists of an exegesis, an original screenplay, and a digital film made for online viewing, with images drawn from a range of documentaries and films found on YouTube. They have been dissected, re-assembled and then re-embedded to YouTube. The source material covers topics such as medicalization of madness, the conspicuous appropriation of uni...

  8. Prokaryotic caspase homologs: phylogenetic patterns and functional characteristics reveal considerable diversity.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Johannes Asplund-Samuelsson

    Full Text Available Caspases accomplish initiation and execution of apoptosis, a programmed cell death process specific to metazoans. The existence of prokaryotic caspase homologs, termed metacaspases, has been known for slightly more than a decade. Despite their potential connection to the evolution of programmed cell death in eukaryotes, the phylogenetic distribution and functions of these prokaryotic metacaspase sequences are largely uncharted, while a few experiments imply involvement in programmed cell death. Aiming at providing a more detailed picture of prokaryotic caspase homologs, we applied a computational approach based on Hidden Markov Model search profiles to identify and functionally characterize putative metacaspases in bacterial and archaeal genomes. Out of the total of 1463 analyzed genomes, merely 267 (18% were identified to contain putative metacaspases, but their taxonomic distribution included most prokaryotic phyla and a few archaea (Euryarchaeota. Metacaspases were particularly abundant in Alphaproteobacteria, Deltaproteobacteria and Cyanobacteria, which harbor many morphologically and developmentally complex organisms, and a distinct correlation was found between abundance and phenotypic complexity in Cyanobacteria. Notably, Bacillus subtilis and Escherichia coli, known to undergo genetically regulated autolysis, lacked metacaspases. Pfam domain architecture analysis combined with operon identification revealed rich and varied configurations among the metacaspase sequences. These imply roles in programmed cell death, but also e.g. in signaling, various enzymatic activities and protein modification. Together our data show a wide and scattered distribution of caspase homologs in prokaryotes with structurally and functionally diverse sub-groups, and with a potentially intriguing evolutionary role. These features will help delineate future characterizations of death pathways in prokaryotes.

  9. A Polychaete's powerful punch: venom gland transcriptomics of Glycera reveals a complex cocktail of toxin homologs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    von Reumont, Björn M; Campbell, Lahcen I; Richter, Sandy; Hering, Lars; Sykes, Dan; Hetmank, Jörg; Jenner, Ronald A; Bleidorn, Christoph

    2014-09-05

    Glycerids are marine annelids commonly known as bloodworms. Bloodworms have an eversible proboscis adorned with jaws connected to venom glands. Bloodworms prey on invertebrates, and it is known that the venom glands produce compounds that can induce toxic effects in animals. Yet, none of these putative toxins has been characterized on a molecular basis. Here we present the transcriptomic profiles of the venom glands of three species of bloodworm, Glycera dibranchiata, Glycera fallax and Glycera tridactyla, as well as the body tissue of G. tridactyla. The venom glands express a complex mixture of transcripts coding for putative toxin precursors. These transcripts represent 20 known toxin classes that have been convergently recruited into animal venoms, as well as transcripts potentially coding for Glycera-specific toxins. The toxins represent five functional categories: Pore-forming and membrane-disrupting toxins, neurotoxins, protease inhibitors, other enzymes, and CAP domain toxins. Many of the transcripts coding for putative Glycera toxins belong to classes that have been widely recruited into venoms, but some are homologs of toxins previously only known from the venoms of scorpaeniform fish and monotremes (stonustoxin-like toxin), turrid gastropods (turripeptide-like peptides), and sea anemones (gigantoxin I-like neurotoxin). This complex mixture of toxin homologs suggests that bloodworms employ venom while predating on macroscopic prey, casting doubt on the previously widespread opinion that G. dibranchiata is a detritivore. Our results further show that researchers should be aware that different assembly methods, as well as different methods of homology prediction, can influence the transcriptomic profiling of venom glands. © The Author(s) 2014. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Society for Molecular Biology and Evolution.

  10. RYBP Is a K63-Ubiquitin-Chain-Binding Protein that Inhibits Homologous Recombination Repair

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad A.M. Ali

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Summary: Ring1-YY1-binding protein (RYBP is a member of the non-canonical polycomb repressive complex 1 (PRC1, and like other PRC1 members, it is best described as a transcriptional regulator. However, several PRC1 members were recently shown to function in DNA repair. Here, we report that RYBP preferentially binds K63-ubiquitin chains via its Npl4 zinc finger (NZF domain. Since K63-linked ubiquitin chains are assembled at DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs, we examined the contribution of RYBP to DSB repair. Surprisingly, we find that RYBP is K48 polyubiquitylated by RNF8 and rapidly removed from chromatin upon DNA damage by the VCP/p97 segregase. High expression of RYBP competitively inhibits recruitment of BRCA1 repair complex to DSBs, reducing DNA end resection and homologous recombination (HR repair. Moreover, breast cancer cell lines expressing high endogenous RYBP levels show increased sensitivity to DNA-damaging agents and poly ADP-ribose polymerase (PARP inhibition. These data suggest that RYBP negatively regulates HR repair by competing for K63-ubiquitin chain binding. : Ali et al. find that RYBP binds K63-linked ubiquitin chains and is removed from DNA damage sites. This K63-ubiquitin binding allows RYBP to hinder the recruitment of BRCA1 and Rad51 to DNA double-strand breaks, thus inhibiting homologous recombination repair. Accordingly, cancer cells expressing high RYBP are more sensitive to DNA-damaging therapies. Keywords: DNA damage response, homologous recombination, ubiquitylation, RYBP, polycomb proteins, double-strand break repair, chromatin, histone modification

  11. The pH Game.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chemecology, 1996

    1996-01-01

    Describes a game that can be used to teach students about the acidity of liquids and substances around their school and enable them to understand what pH levels tell us about the environment. Students collect samples and measure the pH of water, soil, plants, and other natural material. (DDR)

  12. Acidic pH sensing in the bacterial cytoplasm is required for Salmonella virulence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Jeongjoon; Groisman, Eduardo A

    2016-09-01

    pH regulates gene expression, biochemical activities and cellular behaviors. A mildly acidic pH activates the master virulence regulatory system PhoP/PhoQ in the facultative intracellular pathogen Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium. The sensor PhoQ harbors an extracytoplasmic domain implicated in signal sensing, and a cytoplasmic domain controlling activation of the regulator PhoP. We now report that, surprisingly, a decrease in Salmonella's own cytoplasmic pH induces transcription of PhoP-activated genes even when the extracytoplasmic pH remains neutral. Amino acid substitutions in PhoQ's cytoplasmic domain hindered activation by acidic pH and attenuated virulence in mice, but did not abolish activation by low Mg(2+) or the antimicrobial peptide C18G. Conversely, removal of PhoQ's extracytoplasmic domains prevented the response to the latter PhoQ-activating signals but not to acidic pH. PhoP-dependent genes were minimally induced by acidic pH in the non-pathogenic species Salmonella bongori but were activated by low Mg(2+) and C18G as in pathogenic S. enterica. Our findings indicate that the sensor PhoQ enables S. enterica to respond to both host- and bacterial-derived signals that alter its cytoplasmic pH. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  13. [Analysis of DNA-DNA homologies in obligate methylotrophic bacteria].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doronina, N V; Govorukhina, N I; Lysenko, A M; Trotsenko, Iu A

    1988-01-01

    The genotypic affinity of 19 bacterial strains obligately dependent on methanol or methylamine as carbon and energy sources was studied by techniques of molecular DNA hybridization. The high homology level (35-88%) between motile strain Methylophilus methanolovorus V-1447D and nonmotile strain Methylobacillus sp. VSB-792 as well as other motile strains (Pseudomonas methanolica ATCC 21704, Methylomonas methanolica NRRL 5458, Pseudomonas sp. W6, strain A3) indicates that all of them belong to one genus. Rather high level of homology (62-63%) was found between Methylobacillus glycogenes ATCC 29475 and Pseudomonas insueta ATCC 21276 and strain G-10. The motile strain Methylophilus methylotrophus NCIB 10515 has a low homology (below 20%) to other of the studied obligate methylobacteria. Therefore, at least two genetically different genera of obligate methylobacteria can be distinguished, namely Methylophilus and Methylobacillus, the latter being represented by both motile and nonmotile forms.

  14. Induction of intrachromosomal homologous recombination in whole plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Puchta, H.; Swoboda, P.; Hohn, B.

    1995-01-01

    The influence of different factors on frequencies of intrachromosomal homologous recombination in whole Arabidopsis thaliana and tobacco plants was analyzed using a disrupted β-glucuronidase marker gene. Recombination frequencies were enhanced several fold by DNA damaging agents like UV-light or MMS (methyl methanesulfonate). Applying 3-methoxybenzamide (3-MB), an inhibitor of poly(ADP)ribose polymerase (PARP), an enzyme that is postulated to be involved in DNA repair, enhanced homologous recombination frequencies strongly. These findings indicate that homologous recombination is involved in DNA repair and can (at least partially) compensate for other DNA repair pathways. Indications that recombination in plants can be induced by environmental stress factors that are not likely to be involved in DNA metabolism were also found; Arabidopsis plants growing in a medium containing 0.1 M NaCl exhibited elevated recombination frequencies. The possible general effects of ‘environmental’ challenges on genome flexibility are discussed. (author)

  15. Khovanov homology for virtual knots with arbitrary coefficients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Manturov, Vassily O

    2007-01-01

    The Khovanov homology theory over an arbitrary coefficient ring is extended to the case of virtual knots. We introduce a complex which is well-defined in the virtual case and is homotopy equivalent to the original Khovanov complex in the classical case. Unlike Khovanov's original construction, our definition of the complex does not use any additional prescription of signs to the edges of a cube. Moreover, our method enables us to construct a Khovanov homology theory for 'twisted virtual knots' in the sense of Bourgoin and Viro (including knots in three-dimensional projective space). We generalize a number of results of Khovanov homology theory (the Wehrli complex, minimality problems, Frobenius extensions) to virtual knots with non-orientable atoms

  16. Homology groups for particles on one-connected graphs

    Science.gov (United States)

    MaciÄ Żek, Tomasz; Sawicki, Adam

    2017-06-01

    We present a mathematical framework for describing the topology of configuration spaces for particles on one-connected graphs. In particular, we compute the homology groups over integers for different classes of one-connected graphs. Our approach is based on some fundamental combinatorial properties of the configuration spaces, Mayer-Vietoris sequences for different parts of configuration spaces, and some limited use of discrete Morse theory. As one of the results, we derive the closed-form formulae for ranks of the homology groups for indistinguishable particles on tree graphs. We also give a detailed discussion of the second homology group of the configuration space of both distinguishable and indistinguishable particles. Our motivation is the search for new kinds of quantum statistics.

  17. Structural insights into a high affinity nanobody:antigen complex by homology modelling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skottrup, Peter Durand

    2017-09-01

    Porphyromonas gingivalis is a major periodontitis-causing pathogens. P. gingivalis secrete a cysteine protease termed RgpB, which is specific for Arg-Xaa bonds in substrates. Recently, a nanobody-based assay was used to demonstrate that RgpB could represent a novel diagnostic target, thereby simplifying. P. gingivalis detection. The nanobody, VHH7, had a high binding affinity and was specific for RgpB, when tested towards the highly identical RgpA. In this study a homology model of VHH7 was build. The complementarity determining regions (CDR) comprising the paratope residues responsible for RgpB binding were identified and used as input to the docking. Furthermore, residues likely involved in the RgpB epitope was identified based upon RgpB:RgpA alignment and analysis of residue surface accessibility. CDR residues and putitative RgpB epitope residues were used as input to an information-driven flexible docking approach using the HADDOCK server. Analysis of the VHH7:RgpB model demonstrated that the epitope was found in the immunoglobulin-like domain and residue pairs located at the molecular paratope:epitope interface important for complex stability was identified. Collectively, the VHH7 homology model and VHH7:RgpB docking supplies knowledge of the residues involved in the high affinity interaction. This information could prove valuable in the design of an antibody-drug conjugate for specific RgpB targeting. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Promotion of BRCA2-Dependent Homologous Recombination by DSS1 via RPA Targeting and DNA Mimicry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Weixing; Vaithiyalingam, Sivaraja; San Filippo, Joseph; Maranon, David G; Jimenez-Sainz, Judit; Fontenay, Gerald V; Kwon, Youngho; Leung, Stanley G; Lu, Lucy; Jensen, Ryan B; Chazin, Walter J; Wiese, Claudia; Sung, Patrick

    2015-07-16

    The tumor suppressor BRCA2 is thought to facilitate the handoff of ssDNA from replication protein A (RPA) to the RAD51 recombinase during DNA break and replication fork repair by homologous recombination. However, we find that RPA-RAD51 exchange requires the BRCA2 partner DSS1. Biochemical, structural, and in vivo analyses reveal that DSS1 allows the BRCA2-DSS1 complex to physically and functionally interact with RPA. Mechanistically, DSS1 acts as a DNA mimic to attenuate the affinity of RPA for ssDNA. A mutation in the solvent-exposed acidic domain of DSS1 compromises the efficacy of RPA-RAD51 exchange. Thus, by targeting RPA and mimicking DNA, DSS1 functions with BRCA2 in a two-component homologous recombination mediator complex in genome maintenance and tumor suppression. Our findings may provide a paradigm for understanding the roles of DSS1 in other biological processes. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Interaction and dynamics of homologous pairing protein 2 (HOP2) and DNA studied by MD simulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moktan, Hem; Pezza, Roberto; Zhou, Donghua

    2015-03-01

    The homologous pairing protein 2 (Hop2) plays an important role in meiosis and DNA repair. Together with protein Mnd1, Hop2 enhances the strand invasion activity of recombinase Dmc1 by over 30 times, facilitating proper synapsis of homologous chromosomes. We recently determined the NMR structure of the N-terminal domain of Hop2 and proposed a model of Protein-DNA complex based on NMR chemical shift perturbations and mutagenesis studies (Moktan, J Biol Chem 2014 10.1074/jbc.M114.548180). However structure and dynamics of the complex have not been studied at the atomic level yet. Here, we used classical MD simulations to study the interactions between the N-terminal HOP2 and DNA. The simulated results indicate that helix3 (H3) interacts with DNA in major groove and wing1 (W1) interacts mostly in minor groove mainly via direct hydrogen bonds. Also it is found that binding leads to reduced fluctuations in both protein and DNA. Several water bridge interactions have been identified. The residue-wise contributions to the interaction energy were evaluated. Also the functional motion of the protein is analyzed using principal component analysis. The results confirmed the importance of H3 and W1 for the stability of the complex, which is consistent with our previous experimental studies.

  20. Mutagenic Organized Recombination Process by Homologous IN vivo Grouping (MORPHING) for directed enzyme evolution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gonzalez-Perez, David; Molina-Espeja, Patricia; Garcia-Ruiz, Eva; Alcalde, Miguel

    2014-01-01

    Approaches that depend on directed evolution require reliable methods to generate DNA diversity so that mutant libraries can focus on specific target regions. We took advantage of the high frequency of homologous DNA recombination in Saccharomyces cerevisiae to develop a strategy for domain mutagenesis aimed at introducing and in vivo recombining random mutations in defined segments of DNA. Mutagenic Organized Recombination Process by Homologous IN vivo Grouping (MORPHING) is a one-pot random mutagenic method for short protein regions that harnesses the in vivo recombination apparatus of yeast. Using this approach, libraries can be prepared with different mutational loads in DNA segments of less than 30 amino acids so that they can be assembled into the remaining unaltered DNA regions in vivo with high fidelity. As a proof of concept, we present two eukaryotic-ligninolytic enzyme case studies: i) the enhancement of the oxidative stability of a H2O2-sensitive versatile peroxidase by independent evolution of three distinct protein segments (Leu28-Gly57, Leu149-Ala174 and Ile199-Leu268); and ii) the heterologous functional expression of an unspecific peroxygenase by exclusive evolution of its native 43-residue signal sequence.

  1. Khovanov-Rozansky Graph Homology and Composition Product

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wagner, Emmanuel

    2008-01-01

    In analogy with a recursive formula for the HOMFLY-PT polynomial of links given by Jaeger, we give a recursive formula for the graph polynomial introduced by Kauffman and Vogel. We show how this formula extends to the Khovanov–Rozansky graph homology.......In analogy with a recursive formula for the HOMFLY-PT polynomial of links given by Jaeger, we give a recursive formula for the graph polynomial introduced by Kauffman and Vogel. We show how this formula extends to the Khovanov–Rozansky graph homology....

  2. Macdonald operators and homological invariants of the colored Hopf link

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Awata, Hidetoshi; Kanno, Hiroaki

    2011-01-01

    Using a power sum (boson) realization for the Macdonald operators, we investigate the Gukov, Iqbal, Kozcaz and Vafa (GIKV) proposal for the homological invariants of the colored Hopf link, which include Khovanov-Rozansky homology as a special case. We prove the polynomiality of the invariants obtained by GIKV's proposal for arbitrary representations. We derive a closed formula of the invariants of the colored Hopf link for antisymmetric representations. We argue that a little amendment of GIKV's proposal is required to make all the coefficients of the polynomial non-negative integers. (paper)

  3. Phosphosite mapping of P-type plasma membrane H+-ATPase in homologous and heterologous environments

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rudashevskaya, Elena; Ye, Juanying; Jensen, Ole Nørregaard

    2012-01-01

    Phosphorylation is an important posttranslational modification of proteins in living cells and primarily serves regulatory purposes. Several methods were employed for isolating phosphopeptides from proteolytically digested plasma membranes of Arabidopsis thaliana. After a mass spectrometric...... of the phosphosites identified in AHA2 were identical in the plant and fungal systems even though none of the target sequences in AHA2 show homology to proteins of the fungal host. These findings suggest an unexpected accessibility of the terminal regulatory domain of plasma membrane H(+)-ATPase to protein kinase...... analysis of the resulting peptides we could identify 10 different phosphorylation sites in plasma membrane H(+)-ATPases AHA1, AHA2, AHA3, and AHA4/11, five of which have not been reported before, bringing the total number of phosphosites up to 11, which is substantially higher than reported so far for any...

  4. Structural differences of matrix metalloproteinases. Homology modeling and energy minimization of enzyme-substrate complexes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Terp, G E; Christensen, I T; Jørgensen, Flemming Steen

    2000-01-01

    Matrix metalloproteinases are extracellular enzymes taking part in the remodeling of extracellular matrix. The structures of the catalytic domain of MMP1, MMP3, MMP7 and MMP8 are known, but structures of enzymes belonging to this family still remain to be determined. A general approach...... to the homology modeling of matrix metalloproteinases, exemplified by the modeling of MMP2, MMP9, MMP12 and MMP14 is described. The models were refined using an energy minimization procedure developed for matrix metalloproteinases. This procedure includes incorporation of parameters for zinc and calcium ions...... in the AMBER 4.1 force field, applying a non-bonded approach and a full ion charge representation. Energy minimization of the apoenzymes yielded structures with distorted active sites, while reliable three-dimensional structures of the enzymes containing a substrate in active site were obtained. The structural...

  5. Quantifying the mechanisms of domain gain in animal proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buljan, Marija; Frankish, Adam; Bateman, Alex

    2010-01-01

    Protein domains are protein regions that are shared among different proteins and are frequently functionally and structurally independent from the rest of the protein. Novel domain combinations have a major role in evolutionary innovation. However, the relative contributions of the different molecular mechanisms that underlie domain gains in animals are still unknown. By using animal gene phylogenies we were able to identify a set of high confidence domain gain events and by looking at their coding DNA investigate the causative mechanisms. Here we show that the major mechanism for gains of new domains in metazoan proteins is likely to be gene fusion through joining of exons from adjacent genes, possibly mediated by non-allelic homologous recombination. Retroposition and insertion of exons into ancestral introns through intronic recombination are, in contrast to previous expectations, only minor contributors to domain gains and have accounted for less than 1% and 10% of high confidence domain gain events, respectively. Additionally, exonization of previously non-coding regions appears to be an important mechanism for addition of disordered segments to proteins. We observe that gene duplication has preceded domain gain in at least 80% of the gain events. The interplay of gene duplication and domain gain demonstrates an important mechanism for fast neofunctionalization of genes.

  6. Homology modeling, molecular docking and DNA binding studies of nucleotide excision repair UvrC protein from M. tuberculosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parulekar, Rishikesh S; Barage, Sagar H; Jalkute, Chidambar B; Dhanavade, Maruti J; Fandilolu, Prayagraj M; Sonawane, Kailas D

    2013-08-01

    Mycobacterium tuberculosis is a Gram positive, acid-fast bacteria belonging to genus Mycobacterium, is the leading causative agent of most cases of tuberculosis. The pathogenicity of the bacteria is enhanced by its developed DNA repair mechanism which consists of machineries such as nucleotide excision repair. Nucleotide excision repair consists of excinuclease protein UvrABC endonuclease, multi-enzymatic complex which carries out repair of damaged DNA in sequential manner. UvrC protein is a part of this complex and thus helps to repair the damaged DNA of M. tuberculosis. Hence, structural bioinformatics study of UvrC protein from M. tuberculosis was carried out using homology modeling and molecular docking techniques. Assessment of the reliability of the homology model was carried out by predicting its secondary structure along with its model validation. The predicted structure was docked with the ATP and the interacting amino acid residues of UvrC protein with the ATP were found to be TRP539, PHE89, GLU536, ILE402 and ARG575. The binding of UvrC protein with the DNA showed two different domains. The residues from domain I of the protein VAL526, THR524 and LEU521 interact with the DNA whereas, amino acids interacting from the domain II of the UvrC protein included ARG597, GLU595, GLY594 and GLY592 residues. This predicted model could be useful to design new inhibitors of UvrC enzyme to prevent pathogenesis of Mycobacterium and so the tuberculosis.

  7. A localized interaction surface for voltage-sensing domains on the pore domain of a K+ channel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li-Smerin, Y; Hackos, D H; Swartz, K J

    2000-02-01

    Voltage-gated K+ channels contain a central pore domain and four surrounding voltage-sensing domains. How and where changes in the structure of the voltage-sensing domains couple to the pore domain so as to gate ion conduction is not understood. The crystal structure of KcsA, a bacterial K+ channel homologous to the pore domain of voltage-gated K+ channels, provides a starting point for addressing this question. Guided by this structure, we used tryptophan-scanning mutagenesis on the transmembrane shell of the pore domain in the Shaker voltage-gated K+ channel to localize potential protein-protein and protein-lipid interfaces. Some mutants cause only minor changes in gating and when mapped onto the KcsA structure cluster away from the interface between pore domain subunits. In contrast, mutants producing large changes in gating tend to cluster near this interface. These results imply that voltage-sensing domains interact with localized regions near the interface between adjacent pore domain subunits.

  8. Hydrophobic interaction between the SH2 domain and the kinase domain is required for the activation of Csk.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mikkola, Esa T; Gahmberg, Carl G

    2010-06-18

    The protein tyrosine kinase C-terminal Src kinase (Csk) is activated by the engagement of its Src homology (SH) 2 domain. However, the molecular mechanism required for this is not completely understood. The crystal structure of the active Csk indicates that Csk could be activated by contact between the SH2 domain and the beta3-alphaC loop in the N-terminal lobe of the kinase domain. To study the importance of this interaction for the SH2-domain-mediated activation of Csk, we mutated the amino acid residues forming the contacts between the SH2 domain and the beta3-alphaC loop. The mutation of the beta3-alphaC loop Ala228 to glycine and of the SH2 domain Tyr116, Tyr133, Leu138, and Leu149 to alanine resulted in the inability of the SH2 domain ligand to activate Csk. Furthermore, the overexpressed Csk mutants A228G, Y133A/Y116A, L138A, and L149A were unable to efficiently inactivate endogenous Src in human embryonic kidney 293 cells. The results suggest that the SH2-domain-mediated activation of Csk is dependent on the binding of the beta3-alphaC loop Ala228 to the hydrophobic pocket formed by the side chains of Tyr116, Tyr133, Leu138, and Leu149 on the surface of the SH2 domain. Copyright (c) 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Topological Hochschild homology and the Bass trace conjecture

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Berrick, A. J.; Hesselholt, Lars

    2015-01-01

    We use the methods of topological Hochschild homology to shed new light on groups satisfying the Bass trace conjecture. Factorization of the Hattori–Stallings rank map through the Bökstedt–Hsiang–Madsen cyclotomic trace map leads to Linnell's restriction on such groups. As a new consequence...

  10. The homological content of the Jones representations at $q = -1$

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Egsgaard, Jens Kristian; Fuglede Jørgensen, Søren

    We generalize a discovery of Kasahara and show that the Jones representations of braid groups, when evaluated at $q = -1$, are related to the action on homology of a branched double cover of the underlying punctured disk. As an application, we prove for a large family of pseudo-Anosov mapping...

  11. Topological quantum information, virtual Jones polynomials and Khovanov homology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kauffman, Louis H

    2011-01-01

    In this paper, we give a quantum statistical interpretation of the bracket polynomial state sum 〈K〉, the Jones polynomial V K (t) and virtual knot theory versions of the Jones polynomial, including the arrow polynomial. We use these quantum mechanical interpretations to give new quantum algorithms for these Jones polynomials. In those cases where the Khovanov homology is defined, the Hilbert space C(K) of our model is isomorphic with the chain complex for Khovanov homology with coefficients in the complex numbers. There is a natural unitary transformation U:C(K) → C(K) such that 〈K〉 = Trace(U), where 〈K〉 denotes the evaluation of the state sum model for the corresponding polynomial. We show that for the Khovanov boundary operator ∂:C(K) → C(K), we have the relationship ∂U + U∂ = 0. Consequently, the operator U acts on the Khovanov homology, and we obtain a direct relationship between the Khovanov homology and this quantum algorithm for the Jones polynomial. (paper)

  12. Homology of the open moduli space of curves

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Madsen, Ib Henning

    2012-01-01

    This is a survey on the proof of a generalized version of the Mumford conjecture obtained in joint work with M. Weiss stating that a certain map between some classifying spaces which a priori have different natures induces an isomorphism at the level of integral homology. We also discuss our proo...

  13. On the Cogosvili functor generated by a homology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abd El-Satter, A. Dabbour; Mahmoud, S.

    1991-09-01

    In the present work we discuss the Cogosvili functor generated by a homology, and study the construction of the corresponding groups and their induced homomorphisms. Moreover, we investigate the properties of this functor and prove that the set of such functors are isomorphic to the Bauer homotopy theory. (author). 19 refs

  14. Human Fanconi anemia monoubiquitination pathway promotes homologous DNA repair.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakanishi, Koji; Yang, Yun-Gui; Pierce, Andrew J; Taniguchi, Toshiyasu; Digweed, Martin; D'Andrea, Alan D; Wang, Zhao-Qi; Jasin, Maria

    2005-01-25

    Fanconi anemia (FA) is a recessive disorder characterized by congenital abnormalities, progressive bone-marrow failure, and cancer susceptibility. Cells from FA patients are hypersensitive to agents that produce DNA crosslinks and, after treatment with these agents, have pronounced chromosome breakage and other cytogenetic abnormalities. Eight FANC genes have been cloned, and the encoded proteins interact in a common cellular pathway. DNA-damaging agents activate the monoubiquitination of FANCD2, resulting in its targeting to nuclear foci that also contain BRCA1 and BRCA2/FANCD1, proteins involved in homology-directed DNA repair. Given the interaction of the FANC proteins with BRCA1 and BRCA2, we tested whether cells from FA patients (groups A, G, and D2) and mouse Fanca-/- cells with a targeted mutation are impaired for this repair pathway. We find that both the upstream (FANCA and FANCG) and downstream (FANCD2) FA pathway components promote homology-directed repair of chromosomal double-strand breaks (DSBs). The FANCD2 monoubiquitination site is critical for normal levels of repair, whereas the ATM phosphorylation site is not. The defect in these cells, however, is mild, differentiating them from BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutant cells. Surprisingly, we provide evidence that these proteins, like BRCA1 but unlike BRCA2, promote a second DSB repair pathway involving homology, i.e., single-strand annealing. These results suggest an early role for the FANC proteins in homologous DSB repair pathway choice.

  15. Urine pH test

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... urine test Male urinary tract References Bose A, Monk RD, Bushinsky DA. Kidney stones. In: Melmed S, Polonsky ... and its influence on urine pH. J Am Diet Assoc . 1995;95(7):791-797. PMID: 7797810 ...

  16. Exercise and Pulmonary Hypertension (PH)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Situations Find a Doctor PH Care Centers PHA Classroom PHA Registry Insurance Guide Specialty Pharmacy Other Resources ... no published data in the medical literature regarding routine exercise in patients with PAH. However, there are ...

  17. The PCNA-associated protein PARI negatively regulates homologous recombination via the inhibition of DNA repair synthesis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Burkovics, Peter; Dome, Lili; Juhasz, Szilvia

    2016-01-01

    to inhibit homologous recombination (HR) events. Here, we describe a biochemical mechanism in which PARI functions as an HR regulator after replication fork stalling and during double-strand break repair. In our reconstituted biochemical system, we show that PARI inhibits DNA repair synthesis during...... recombination events in a PCNA interaction-dependent way but independently of its UvrD-like helicase domain. In accordance, we demonstrate that PARI inhibits HR in vivo, and its knockdown suppresses the UV sensitivity of RAD18-depleted cells. Our data reveal a novel human regulatory mechanism that limits...

  18. PhEDEx Data Service

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Egeland, Ricky; Wildish, Tony; Huang, Chih-Hao

    2010-01-01

    The PhEDEx Data Service provides access to information from the central PhEDEx database, as well as certificate-authenticated managerial operations such as requesting the transfer or deletion of data. The Data Service is integrated with the 'SiteDB' service for fine-grained access control, providing a safe and secure environment for operations. A plug-in architecture allows server-side modules to be developed rapidly and easily by anyone familiar with the schema, and can automatically return the data in a variety of formats for use by different client technologies. Using HTTP access via the Data Service instead of direct database connections makes it possible to build monitoring web-pages with complex drill-down operations, suitable for debugging or presentation from many aspects. This will form the basis of the new PhEDEx website in the near future, as well as providing access to PhEDEx information and certificate-authenticated services for other CMS dataflow and workflow management tools such as CRAB, WMCore, DBS and the dashboard. A PhEDEx command-line client tool provides one-stop access to all the functions of the PhEDEx Data Service interactively, for use in simple scripts that do not access the service directly. The client tool provides certificate-authenticated access to managerial functions, so all the functions of the PhEDEx Data Service are available to it. The tool can be expanded by plug-ins which can combine or extend the client-side manipulation of data from the Data Service, providing a powerful environment for manipulating data within PhEDEx.

  19. Programmable pH buffers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gough, Dara Van; Huber, Dale L.; Bunker, Bruce C.; Roberts, Mark E.

    2017-01-24

    A programmable pH buffer comprises a copolymer that changes pK.sub.a at a lower critical solution temperature (LCST) in water. The copolymer comprises a thermally programmable polymer that undergoes a hydrophobic-to-hydrophilic phase change at the LCST and an electrolytic polymer that exhibits acid-base properties that are responsive to the phase change. The programmable pH buffer can be used to sequester CO.sub.2 into water.

  20. The N domain of somatic angiotensin-converting enzyme negatively regulates ectodomain shedding and catalytic activity

    OpenAIRE

    Woodman, Zenda L.; Schwager, Sylva L. U.; Redelinghuys, Pierre; Carmona, Adriana K.; Ehlers, Mario R. W.; Sturrock, Edward D.

    2005-01-01

    sACE (somatic angiotensin-converting enzyme) consists of two homologous, N and C domains, whereas the testis isoenzyme [tACE (testis ACE)] consists of a single C domain. Both isoenzymes are shed from the cell surface by a sheddase activity, although sACE is shed much less efficiently than tACE. We hypothesize that the N domain of sACE plays a regulatory role, by occluding a recognition motif on the C domain required for ectodomain shedding and by influencing the catalytic efficiency. To test ...

  1. Membrane-Sculpting BAR Domains Generate Stable Lipid Microdomains

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Hongxia; Michelot, Alphée; Koskela, Essi V.; Tkach, Vadym; Stamou, Dimitrios; Drubin, David G.; Lappalainen, Pekka

    2014-01-01

    SUMMARY Bin-Amphiphysin-Rvs (BAR) domain proteins are central regulators of many cellular processes involving membrane dynamics. BAR domains sculpt phosphoinositide-rich membranes to generate membrane protrusions or invaginations. Here, we report that, in addition to regulating membrane geometry, BAR domains can generate extremely stable lipid microdomains by “freezing” phosphoinositide dynamics. This is a general feature of BAR domains, because the yeast endocytic BAR and Fes/CIP4 homology BAR (F-BAR) domains, the inverse BAR domain of Pinkbar, and the eisosomal BAR protein Lsp1 induced phosphoinositide clustering and halted lipid diffusion, despite differences in mechanisms of membrane interactions. Lsp1 displays comparable low diffusion rates in vitro and in vivo, suggesting that BAR domain proteins also generate stable phosphoinositide microdomains in cells. These results uncover a conserved role for BAR superfamily proteins in regulating lipid dynamics within membranes. Stable microdomains induced by BAR domain scaffolds and specific lipids can generate phase boundaries and diffusion barriers, which may have profound impacts on diverse cellular processes. PMID:24055060

  2. Epitope mapping of the domains of human angiotensin converting enzyme.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kugaevskaya, Elena V; Kolesanova, Ekaterina F; Kozin, Sergey A; Veselovsky, Alexander V; Dedinsky, Ilya R; Elisseeva, Yulia E

    2006-06-01

    Somatic angiotensin converting enzyme (sACE), contains in its single chain two homologous domains (called N- and C-domains), each bearing a functional zinc-dependent active site. The present study aims to define the differences between two sACE domains and to localize experimentally revealed antigenic determinants (B-epitopes) in the recently determined three-dimensional structure of testicular tACE. The predicted linear antigenic determinants of human sACE were determined by peptide scanning ("PEPSCAN") approach. Essential difference was demonstrated between locations of the epitopes in the N- and C-domains. Comparison of arrangement of epitopes in the human domains with the corresponding sequences of some mammalian sACEs enabled to classify the revealed antigenic determinants as variable or conserved areas. The location of antigenic determinants with respect to various structural elements and to functionally important sites of the human sACE C-domain was estimated. The majority of antigenic sites of the C-domain were located at the irregular elements and at the boundaries of secondary structure elements. The data show structural differences between the sACE domains. The experimentally revealed antigenic determinants were in agreement with the recently determined crystal tACE structure. New potential applications are open to successfully produce mono-specific and group-specific antipeptide antibodies.

  3. Structural and Sequence Similarities of Hydra Xeroderma Pigmentosum A Protein to Human Homolog Suggest Early Evolution and Conservation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Apurva Barve

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Xeroderma pigmentosum group A (XPA is a protein that binds to damaged DNA, verifies presence of a lesion, and recruits other proteins of the nucleotide excision repair (NER pathway to the site. Though its homologs from yeast, Drosophila, humans, and so forth are well studied, XPA has not so far been reported from protozoa and lower animal phyla. Hydra is a fresh-water cnidarian with a remarkable capacity for regeneration and apparent lack of organismal ageing. Cnidarians are among the first metazoa with a defined body axis, tissue grade organisation, and nervous system. We report here for the first time presence of XPA gene in hydra. Putative protein sequence of hydra XPA contains nuclear localization signal and bears the zinc-finger motif. It contains two conserved Pfam domains and various characterized features of XPA proteins like regions for binding to excision repair cross-complementing protein-1 (ERCC1 and replication protein A 70 kDa subunit (RPA70 proteins. Hydra XPA shows a high degree of similarity with vertebrate homologs and clusters with deuterostomes in phylogenetic analysis. Homology modelling corroborates the very close similarity between hydra and human XPA. The protein thus most likely functions in hydra in the same manner as in other animals, indicating that it arose early in evolution and has been conserved across animal phyla.

  4. Functional diversity of Csk, Chk, and Src SH2 domains due to a single residue variation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ayrapetov, Marina K; Nam, Nguyen Hai; Ye, Guofeng; Kumar, Anil; Parang, Keykavous; Sun, Gongqin

    2005-07-08

    The C-terminal Src kinase (Csk) family of protein tyrosine kinases contains two members: Csk and Csk homologous kinase (Chk). Both phosphorylate and inactivate Src family kinases. Recent reports suggest that the Src homology (SH) 2 domains of Csk and Chk may bind to different phosphoproteins, which provides a basis for different cellular functions for Csk and Chk. To verify and characterize such a functional divergence, we compared the binding properties of the Csk, Chk, and Src SH2 domains and investigated the structural basis for the functional divergence. First, the study demonstrated striking functional differences between the Csk and Chk SH2 domains and revealed functional similarities between the Chk and Src SH2 domains. Second, structural analysis and mutagenic studies revealed that the functional differences among the three SH2 domains were largely controlled by one residue, Glu127 in Csk, Ile167 in Chk, and Lys200 in Src. Mutating these residues in the Csk or Chk SH2 domain to the Src counterpart resulted in dramatic gain of function similar to Src SH2 domain, whereas mutating Lys200 in Src SH2 domain to Glu (the Csk counterpart) resulted in loss of Src SH2 function. Third, a single point mutation of E127K rendered Csk responsive to activation by a Src SH2 domain ligand. Finally, the optimal phosphopeptide sequence for the Chk SH2 domain was determined. These results provide a compelling explanation for the functional differences between two homologous protein tyrosine kinases and reveal a new structure-function relationship for the SH2 domains.

  5. Analysis of four achaete-scute homologs in Bombyx mori reveals new viewpoints of the evolution and functions of this gene family

    OpenAIRE

    Zhou, Qingxiang; Zhang, Tianyi; Xu, Weihua; Yu, Linlin; Yi, Yongzhu; Zhang, Zhifang

    2008-01-01

    Abstract Background achaete-scute complexe (AS-C) has been widely studied at genetic, developmental and evolutional levels. Genes of this family encode proteins containing a highly conserved bHLH domain, which take part in the regulation of the development of central nervous system and peripheral nervous system. Many AS-C homologs have been isolated from various vertebrates and invertebrates. Also, AS-C genes are duplicated during the evolution of Diptera. Functions besides neural development...

  6. Evolution of Metapostnotum in Flat Wasps (Hymenoptera, Bethylidae: Implications for Homology Assessments in Chrysidoidea.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ricardo Kawada

    Full Text Available Some authors in the past based their conclusions about the limits of the metapostnotum of Chrysidoidea based on the position of the mesophragmo-metaphragmal muscle, rather than aspects of the skeleton and musculature associated with the metapectal-propodeal complex. The latter character system suggests another interpretation of the metapostnotum delimitation. Given this scenario, the main goal of this work is to present a new perspective on the metapostnotum in Chrysidoidea, especially Bethylidae, helping to resolve questions related to the evolution of the metapostnotum. This is based on homologies established by associating of insertion points of ph2-ph3 and ph3-T2 muscles with the delimitation of the respective sclerite the muscles insert into. Our results indicate that, according the position of the metaphragmal muscles, the metapostnotum in Bethylidae is medially expanded in the propodeal disc and has different forms of configuration. Internally, the limits of the metapostnotum can be tracked by the shape of the mesopostnotum, and vice versa. Thus, the anteromedian area of the propodeal disc sensu Evans was reinterpreted in the current study as the metapostnotum. In conjunction with associated structures, we provide evidence to clarify the relationships between the families within Chrysidoidea, although certain families like Embolemidae, Dryinidae and Chrysididae exhibit extreme modifications of the condition found in Aculeata, as observed in Bethylidae. We review the terminology used to describe anatomical features on the metapectal-propodeal complex in Bethylidae in general, and provide a list of recommended terms in accordance with the online Hymenoptera Anatomy Ontology. The morphology of the studied subfamilies are illustrated. Studies that focus on a single structure, across a larger number of taxa, are more insightful and present specific questions that can contribute to broader issues, thus providing a better understanding of the

  7. Tracing the Evolutionary History of the CAP Superfamily of Proteins Using Amino Acid Sequence Homology and Conservation of Splice Sites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abraham, Anup; Chandler, Douglas E

    2017-10-01

    Proteins of the CAP superfamily play numerous roles in reproduction, innate immune responses, cancer biology, and venom toxicology. Here we document the breadth of the CAP (Cysteine-RIch Secretory Protein (CRISP), Antigen 5, and Pathogenesis-Related) protein superfamily and trace the major events in its evolution using amino acid sequence homology and the positions of exon/intron borders within their genes. Seldom acknowledged in the literature, we find that many of the CAP subfamilies present in mammals, where they were originally characterized, have distinct homologues in the invertebrate phyla. Early eukaryotic CAP genes contained only one exon inherited from prokaryotic predecessors and as evolution progressed an increasing number of introns were inserted, reaching 2-5 in the invertebrate world and 5-15 in the vertebrate world. Focusing on the CRISP subfamily, we propose that these proteins evolved in three major steps: (1) origination of the CAP/PR/SCP domain in bacteria, (2) addition of a small Hinge domain to produce the two-domain SCP-like proteins found in roundworms and anthropoids, and (3) addition of an Ion Channel Regulatory domain, borrowed from invertebrate peptide toxins, to produce full length, three-domain CRISP proteins, first seen in insects and later to diversify into multiple subtypes in the vertebrate world.

  8. Crystal structure of the Rasputin NTF2-like domain from Drosophila melanogaster

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vognsen, Tina Reinholdt; Kristensen, Ole

    2012-01-01

    The crystal structure of the NTF2-like domain of the Drosophila homolog of Ras GTPase SH3 Binding Protein (G3BP), Rasputin, was determined at 2.7Å resolution. The overall structure is highly similar to nuclear transport factor 2: It is a homodimer comprised of a ß-sheet and three a-helices forming...

  9. CORAL: aligning conserved core regions across domain families.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fong, Jessica H; Marchler-Bauer, Aron

    2009-08-01

    Homologous protein families share highly conserved sequence and structure regions that are frequent targets for comparative analysis of related proteins and families. Many protein families, such as the curated domain families in the Conserved Domain Database (CDD), exhibit similar structural cores. To improve accuracy in aligning such protein families, we propose a profile-profile method CORAL that aligns individual core regions as gap-free units. CORAL computes optimal local alignment of two profiles with heuristics to preserve continuity within core regions. We benchmarked its performance on curated domains in CDD, which have pre-defined core regions, against COMPASS, HHalign and PSI-BLAST, using structure superpositions and comprehensive curator-optimized alignments as standards of truth. CORAL improves alignment accuracy on core regions over general profile methods, returning a balanced score of 0.57 for over 80% of all domain families in CDD, compared with the highest balanced score of 0.45 from other methods. Further, CORAL provides E-values to aid in detecting homologous protein families and, by respecting block boundaries, produces alignments with improved 'readability' that facilitate manual refinement. CORAL will be included in future versions of the NCBI Cn3D/CDTree software, which can be downloaded at http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/Structure/cdtree/cdtree.shtml. Supplementary data are available at Bioinformatics online.

  10. Intersection spaces, spatial homology truncation, and string theory

    CERN Document Server

    Banagl, Markus

    2010-01-01

    Intersection cohomology assigns groups which satisfy a generalized form of Poincaré duality over the rationals to a stratified singular space. The present monograph introduces a method that assigns to certain classes of stratified spaces cell complexes, called intersection spaces, whose ordinary rational homology satisfies generalized Poincaré duality. The cornerstone of the method is a process of spatial homology truncation, whose functoriality properties are analyzed in detail. The material on truncation is autonomous and may be of independent interest to homotopy theorists. The cohomology of intersection spaces is not isomorphic to intersection cohomology and possesses algebraic features such as perversity-internal cup-products and cohomology operations that are not generally available for intersection cohomology. A mirror-symmetric interpretation, as well as applications to string theory concerning massless D-branes arising in type IIB theory during a Calabi-Yau conifold transition, are discussed.

  11. A homology sound-based algorithm for speech signal interference

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Yi-jiao; Chen, Hou-jin; Li, Ju-peng; Zhang, Zhan-song

    2015-12-01

    Aiming at secure analog speech communication, a homology sound-based algorithm for speech signal interference is proposed in this paper. We first split speech signal into phonetic fragments by a short-term energy method and establish an interference noise cache library with the phonetic fragments. Then we implement the homology sound interference by mixing the randomly selected interferential fragments and the original speech in real time. The computer simulation results indicated that the interference produced by this algorithm has advantages of real time, randomness, and high correlation with the original signal, comparing with the traditional noise interference methods such as white noise interference. After further studies, the proposed algorithm may be readily used in secure speech communication.

  12. The endless tale of non-homologous end-joining.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weterings, Eric; Chen, David J

    2008-01-01

    DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs) are introduced in cells by ionizing radiation and reactive oxygen species. In addition, they are commonly generated during V(D)J recombination, an essential aspect of the developing immune system. Failure to effectively repair these DSBs can result in chromosome breakage, cell death, onset of cancer, and defects in the immune system of higher vertebrates. Fortunately, all mammalian cells possess two enzymatic pathways that mediate the repair of DSBs: homologous recombination and non-homologous end-joining (NHEJ). The NHEJ process utilizes enzymes that capture both ends of the broken DNA molecule, bring them together in a synaptic DNA-protein complex, and finally repair the DNA break. In this review, all the known enzymes that play a role in the NHEJ process are discussed and a working model for the co-operation of these enzymes during DSB repair is presented.

  13. Homology and isomorphism: Bourdieu in conversation with New Institutionalism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yingyao

    2016-06-01

    Bourdieusian Field Theory (BFT) provided decisive inspiration for the early conceptual formulation of New Institutionalism (NI). This paper attempts to reinvigorate the stalled intellectual dialogue between NI and BFT by comparing NI's concept of isomorphism with BFT's notion of homology. I argue that Bourdieu's understanding of domination-oriented social action, transposable habitus, and a non-linear causality, embodied in his neglected concept of homology, provides an alternative theorization of field-level convergence to New Institutionalism's central idea of institutional isomorphism. To showcase how BFT can be useful for organizational research, I postulate a habitus-informed and field-conditioned theory of transference to enrich NI's spin-off thesis of 'diffusion'. I propose that while NI can benefit from BFT's potential of bringing social structure back into organizational research, BFT can enrich its social analysis by borrowing from NI's elaboration of the symbolic system of organizations. © London School of Economics and Political Science 2016.

  14. RTEL1 maintains genomic stability by suppressing homologous recombination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barber, Louise J; Youds, Jillian L; Ward, Jordan D; McIlwraith, Michael J; O'Neil, Nigel J; Petalcorin, Mark I R; Martin, Julie S; Collis, Spencer J; Cantor, Sharon B; Auclair, Melissa; Tissenbaum, Heidi; West, Stephen C; Rose, Ann M; Boulton, Simon J

    2008-10-17

    Homologous recombination (HR) is an important conserved process for DNA repair and ensures maintenance of genome integrity. Inappropriate HR causes gross chromosomal rearrangements and tumorigenesis in mammals. In yeast, the Srs2 helicase eliminates inappropriate recombination events, but the functional equivalent of Srs2 in higher eukaryotes has been elusive. Here, we identify C. elegans RTEL-1 as a functional analog of Srs2 and describe its vertebrate counterpart, RTEL1, which is required for genome stability and tumor avoidance. We find that rtel-1 mutant worms and RTEL1-depleted human cells share characteristic phenotypes with yeast srs2 mutants: lethality upon deletion of the sgs1/BLM homolog, hyperrecombination, and DNA damage sensitivity. In vitro, purified human RTEL1 antagonizes HR by promoting the disassembly of D loop recombination intermediates in a reaction dependent upon ATP hydrolysis. We propose that loss of HR control after deregulation of RTEL1 may be a critical event that drives genome instability and cancer.

  15. FastBLAST: homology relationships for millions of proteins.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Morgan N Price

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: All-versus-all BLAST, which searches for homologous pairs of sequences in a database of proteins, is used to identify potential orthologs, to find new protein families, and to provide rapid access to these homology relationships. As DNA sequencing accelerates and data sets grow, all-versus-all BLAST has become computationally demanding. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We present FastBLAST, a heuristic replacement for all-versus-all BLAST that relies on alignments of proteins to known families, obtained from tools such as PSI-BLAST and HMMer. FastBLAST avoids most of the work of all-versus-all BLAST by taking advantage of these alignments and by clustering similar sequences. FastBLAST runs in two stages: the first stage identifies additional families and aligns them, and the second stage quickly identifies the homologs of a query sequence, based on the alignments of the families, before generating pairwise alignments. On 6.53 million proteins from the non-redundant Genbank database ("NR", FastBLAST identifies new families 25 times faster than all-versus-all BLAST. Once the first stage is completed, FastBLAST identifies homologs for the average query in less than 5 seconds (8.6 times faster than BLAST and gives nearly identical results. For hits above 70 bits, FastBLAST identifies 98% of the top 3,250 hits per query. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: FastBLAST enables research groups that do not have supercomputers to analyze large protein sequence data sets. FastBLAST is open source software and is available at http://microbesonline.org/fastblast.

  16. Supersymmetric domain walls

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bergshoeff, Eric A.; Kleinschmidt, Axel; Riccioni, Fabio

    2012-01-01

    We classify the half-supersymmetric "domain walls," i.e., branes of codimension one, in toroidally compactified IIA/IIB string theory and show to which gauged supergravity theory each of these domain walls belong. We use as input the requirement of supersymmetric Wess-Zumino terms, the properties of

  17. Homologous Recombination in Protozoan Parasites and Recombinase Inhibitors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrew A. Kelso

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Homologous recombination (HR is a DNA double-strand break (DSB repair pathway that utilizes a homologous template to fully repair the damaged DNA. HR is critical to maintain genome stability and to ensure genetic diversity during meiosis. A specialized class of enzymes known as recombinases facilitate the exchange of genetic information between sister chromatids or homologous chromosomes with the help of numerous protein accessory factors. The majority of the HR machinery is highly conserved among eukaryotes. In many protozoan parasites, HR is an essential DSB repair pathway that allows these organisms to adapt to environmental conditions and evade host immune systems through genetic recombination. Therefore, small molecule inhibitors, capable of disrupting HR in protozoan parasites, represent potential therapeutic options. A number of small molecule inhibitors were identified that disrupt the activities of the human recombinase RAD51. Recent studies have examined the effect of two of these molecules on the Entamoeba recombinases. Here, we discuss the current understandings of HR in the protozoan parasites Trypanosoma, Leishmania, Plasmodium, and Entamoeba, and we review the small molecule inhibitors known to disrupt human RAD51 activity.

  18. Phenylbutyrate inhibits homologous recombination induced by camptothecin and methyl methanesulfonate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaiser, Gitte S; Germann, Susanne M; Westergaard, Tine; Lisby, Michael

    2011-08-01

    Homologous recombination is accompanied by extensive changes to chromatin organization at the site of DNA damage. Some of these changes are mediated through acetylation/deacetylation of histones. Here, we show that recombinational repair of DNA damage induced by the anti-cancer drug camptothecin (CPT) and the alkylating agent methyl methanesulfonate (MMS) is blocked by sodium phenylbutyrate (PBA) in the budding yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae. In particular, PBA suppresses CPT- and MMS-induced genetic recombination as well as DNA double-strand break repair during mating-type interconversion. Treatment with PBA is accompanied by a dramatic reduction in histone H4 lysine 8 acetylation. Live cell imaging of homologous recombination proteins indicates that repair of CPT-induced DNA damage is redirected to a non-recombinogenic pathway in the presence of PBA without loss in cell viability. In contrast, the suppression of MMS-induced recombination by PBA is accompanied by a dramatic loss in cell viability. Taken together, our results demonstrate that PBA inhibits DNA damage-induced homologous recombination likely by mediating changes in chromatin acetylation. Moreover, the combination of PBA with genotoxic agents can lead to different cell fates depending on the type of DNA damage inflicted. 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. Prefiltering Model for Homology Detection Algorithms on GPU.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Retamosa, Germán; de Pedro, Luis; González, Ivan; Tamames, Javier

    2016-01-01

    Homology detection has evolved over the time from heavy algorithms based on dynamic programming approaches to lightweight alternatives based on different heuristic models. However, the main problem with these algorithms is that they use complex statistical models, which makes it difficult to achieve a relevant speedup and find exact matches with the original results. Thus, their acceleration is essential. The aim of this article was to prefilter a sequence database. To make this work, we have implemented a groundbreaking heuristic model based on NVIDIA's graphics processing units (GPUs) and multicore processors. Depending on the sensitivity settings, this makes it possible to quickly reduce the sequence database by factors between 50% and 95%, while rejecting no significant sequences. Furthermore, this prefiltering application can be used together with multiple homology detection algorithms as a part of a next-generation sequencing system. Extensive performance and accuracy tests have been carried out in the Spanish National Centre for Biotechnology (NCB). The results show that GPU hardware can accelerate the execution times of former homology detection applications, such as National Centre for Biotechnology Information (NCBI), Basic Local Alignment Search Tool for Proteins (BLASTP), up to a factor of 4.

  20. Superbinder SH2 domains act as antagonists of cell signaling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaneko, Tomonori; Huang, Haiming; Cao, Xuan; Li, Xing; Li, Chengjun; Voss, Courtney; Sidhu, Sachdev S; Li, Shawn S C

    2012-09-25

    Protein-ligand interactions mediated by modular domains, which often play important roles in regulating cellular functions, are generally of moderate affinities. We examined the Src homology 2 (SH2) domain, a modular domain that recognizes phosphorylated tyrosine (pTyr) residues, to investigate how the binding affinity of a modular domain for its ligand influences the structure and cellular function of the protein. We used the phage display method to perform directed evolution of the pTyr-binding residues in the SH2 domain of the tyrosine kinase Fyn and identified three amino acid substitutions that critically affected binding. We generated three SH2 domain triple-point mutants that were "superbinders" with much higher affinities for pTyr-containing peptides than the natural domain. Crystallographic analysis of one of these superbinders revealed that the superbinder SH2 domain recognized the pTyr moiety in a bipartite binding mode: A hydrophobic surface encompassed the phenyl ring, and a positively charged site engaged the phosphate. When expressed in mammalian cells, the superbinder SH2 domains blocked epidermal growth factor receptor signaling and inhibited anchorage-independent cell proliferation, suggesting that pTyr superbinders might be explored for therapeutic applications and useful as biological research tools. Although the SH2 domain fold can support much higher affinity for its ligand than is observed in nature, our results suggest that natural SH2 domains are not optimized for ligand binding but for specificity and flexibility, which are likely properties important for their function in signaling and regulatory processes.

  1. Expression and Production of SH2 Domain Proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Bernard A; Ogiue-Ikeda, Mari; Machida, Kazuya

    2017-01-01

    The Src Homology 2 (SH2) domain lies at the heart of phosphotyrosine signaling, coordinating signaling events downstream of receptor tyrosine kinases (RTKs), adaptors, and scaffolds. Over a hundred SH2 domains are present in mammals, each having a unique specificity which determines its interactions with multiple binding partners. One of the essential tools necessary for studying and determining the role of SH2 domains in phosphotyrosine signaling is a set of soluble recombinant SH2 proteins. Here we describe methods, based on a broad experience with purification of all SH2 domains, for the production of SH2 domain proteins needed for proteomic and biochemical-based studies such as peptide arrays, mass-spectrometry, protein microarrays, reverse-phase microarrays, and high-throughput fluorescence polarization (HTP-FP). We describe stepwise protocols for expression and purification of SH2 domains using GST or poly His-tags, two widely adopted affinity tags. In addition, we address alternative approaches, challenges, and validation studies for assessing protein quality and provide general characteristics of purified human SH2 domains.

  2. Evolution of SH2 domains and phosphotyrosine signalling networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Bernard A.; Nash, Piers D.

    2012-01-01

    Src homology 2 (SH2) domains mediate selective protein–protein interactions with tyrosine phosphorylated proteins, and in doing so define specificity of phosphotyrosine (pTyr) signalling networks. SH2 domains and protein-tyrosine phosphatases expand alongside protein-tyrosine kinases (PTKs) to coordinate cellular and organismal complexity in the evolution of the unikont branch of the eukaryotes. Examination of conserved families of PTKs and SH2 domain proteins provides fiduciary marks that trace the evolutionary landscape for the development of complex cellular systems in the proto-metazoan and metazoan lineages. The evolutionary provenance of conserved SH2 and PTK families reveals the mechanisms by which diversity is achieved through adaptations in tissue-specific gene transcription, altered ligand binding, insertions of linear motifs and the gain or loss of domains following gene duplication. We discuss mechanisms by which pTyr-mediated signalling networks evolve through the development of novel and expanded families of SH2 domain proteins and the elaboration of connections between pTyr-signalling proteins. These changes underlie the variety of general and specific signalling networks that give rise to tissue-specific functions and increasingly complex developmental programmes. Examination of SH2 domains from an evolutionary perspective provides insight into the process by which evolutionary expansion and modification of molecular protein interaction domain proteins permits the development of novel protein-interaction networks and accommodates adaptation of signalling networks. PMID:22889907

  3. Progress towards the development of SH2 domain inhibitors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kraskouskaya, Dziyana; Duodu, Eugenia; Arpin, Carolynn C; Gunning, Patrick T

    2013-04-21

    Src homology 2 (SH2) domains are 100 amino acid modular units, which recognize and bind to tyrosyl-phosphorylated peptide sequences on their target proteins, and thereby mediate intracellular protein-protein interactions. This review summarizes the progress towards the development of synthetic agents that disrupt the function of the SH2 domains in different proteins as well as the clinical relevance of targeting a specific SH2 domain. Since 1986, SH2 domains have been identified in over 110 human proteins, including kinases, transcription factors, and adaptor proteins. A number of these proteins are over-activated in many diseases, including cancer, and their function is highly dependent on their SH2 domain. Thus, inhibition of a protein's function through disrupting that of its SH2 domain has emerged as a promising approach towards the development of novel therapeutic modalities. Although targeting the SH2 domain is a challenging task in molecular recognition, the progress reported here demonstrates the feasibility of such an approach.

  4. The BEACH Domain Protein SPIRRIG Is Essential for Arabidopsis Salt Stress Tolerance and Functions as a Regulator of Transcript Stabilization and Localization.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexandra Steffens

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Members of the highly conserved class of BEACH domain containing proteins (BDCPs have been established as broad facilitators of protein-protein interactions and membrane dynamics in the context of human diseases like albinism, bleeding diathesis, impaired cellular immunity, cancer predisposition, and neurological dysfunctions. Also, the Arabidopsis thaliana BDCP SPIRRIG (SPI is important for membrane integrity, as spi mutants exhibit split vacuoles. In this work, we report a novel molecular function of the BDCP SPI in ribonucleoprotein particle formation. We show that SPI interacts with the P-body core component DECAPPING PROTEIN 1 (DCP1, associates to mRNA processing bodies (P-bodies, and regulates their assembly upon salt stress. The finding that spi mutants exhibit salt hypersensitivity suggests that the local function of SPI at P-bodies is of biological relevance. Transcriptome-wide analysis revealed qualitative differences in the salt stress-regulated transcriptional response of Col-0 and spi. We show that SPI regulates the salt stress-dependent post-transcriptional stabilization, cytoplasmic agglomeration, and localization to P-bodies of a subset of salt stress-regulated mRNAs. Finally, we show that the PH-BEACH domains of SPI and its human homolog FAN (Factor Associated with Neutral sphingomyelinase activation interact with DCP1 isoforms from plants, mammals, and yeast, suggesting the evolutionary conservation of an association of BDCPs and P-bodies.

  5. Paulette Gray, Ph.D.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paulette S. Gray, Ph.D. is the Director for the Division of Extramural Activities (DEA). As the director of the division, she is responsible for the overall scientific, fiscal, and administrative management of the division, including broad strategic planning, development, implementation, and evaluation.

  6. pH in Action

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tijskens, L.M.M.; Biekman, E.S.A.

    2001-01-01

    Based on fundamental chemical relations, well-established in chemical engineering and chemical technology over almost a century, the effects of pH in food and agricultural products will be deduced for different situations and processes. Based on simple equilibria and dissociation of water, salts,

  7. Neuronal pH regulation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vorstrup, S; Jensen, K E; Thomsen, C

    1989-01-01

    The intracellular pH in the brain was studied in six healthy volunteers before and immediately after the administration of 2 g of acetazolamide. Phosphorus-31 nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy by a 1.5 tesla whole-body scanner was used. The chemical shift between the inorganic phosphate...

  8. Citrus PH5-like H+-ATPase genes: identification and transcript analysis to investigate their possible relationship with citrate accumulation in fruits

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cai-Yun eShi

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available PH5 is a petunia gene that encodes a plasma membrane H+-ATPase and determines the vacuolar pH. The citrate content of fruit cell vacuoles influences citrus organoleptic qualities. Although citrus could have PH5-like homologs that are involved in citrate accumulation, the details are still unknown. In this study, extensive data-mining with the PH5 sequence and PCR amplification confirmed that there are at least eight PH5-like genes (CsPH1-8 in the citrus genome. CsPHs have a molecular mass of approximately 100 kDa, and they have high similarity to PhPH5, AtAHA10 or AtAHA2 (from 64.6% to 80.9%. They contain 13-21 exons and 12-20 introns and were evenly distributed into four subgroups of the P3A-subfamily (CsPH1, CsPH2, and CsPH3 in Group I, CsPH4 and CsPH5 in Group II, CsPH6 in Group IV, and CsPH7 and CsPH8 in Group III together with PhPH5. A transcript analysis showed that CsPH1, 3, and 4 were predominantly expressed in mature leaves, whereas CsPH2 and 7 were predominantly expressed in roots, CsPH5 and 6 were predominantly expressed in flowers, and CsPH8 was predominantly expressed in fruit juice sacs. Moreover, the CsPH transcript profiles differed between orange and pummelo, as well as between high-acid and low-acid cultivars. The low-acid orange ‘Honganliu’ exhibits low transcript levels of CsPH3, CsPH4, CsPH5, and CsPH8, whereas the acid-free pummelo has only a low transcript level of CsPH8. In addition, ABA injection increased the citrate content significantly, which was accompanied by the obvious induction of CsPH2, 6, 7, and 8 transcript levels. Taken together, we suggest that CsPH8 seems likely to regulate citrate accumulation in the citrus fruit vacuole.

  9. Genetic selection and DNA sequences of 4.5S RNA homologs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brown, S; Thon, G; Tolentino, E

    1989-01-01

    A general strategy for cloning the functional homologs of an Escherichia coli gene was used to clone homologs of 4.5S RNA from other bacteria. The genes encoding these homologs were selected by their ability to complement a deletion of the gene for 4.5S RNA. DNA sequences of the regions encoding...

  10. Cloning and characterization of a functional human homolog of Escherichia coli endonuclease III

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aspinwall, Richard; Rothwell, Dominic G.; Roldan-Arjona, Teresa; Anselmino, Catherine; Ward, Christopher J.; Cheadle, Jeremy P.; Sampson, Julian R.; Lindahl, Tomas; Harris, Peter C.; Hickson, Ian D.

    1997-01-01

    Repair of oxidative damage to DNA bases is essential to prevent mutations and cell death. Endonuclease III is the major DNA glycosylase activity in Escherichia coli that catalyzes the excision of pyrimidines damaged by ring opening or ring saturation, and it also possesses an associated lyase activity that incises the DNA backbone adjacent to apurinic/apyrimidinic sites. During analysis of the area adjacent to the human tuberous sclerosis gene (TSC2) in chromosome region 16p13.3, we identified a gene, OCTS3, that encodes a 1-kb transcript. Analysis of OCTS3 cDNA clones revealed an open reading frame encoding a predicted protein of 34.3 kDa that shares extensive sequence similarity with E. coli endonuclease III and a related enzyme from Schizosaccharomyces pombe, including a conserved active site region and an iron/sulfur domain. The product of the OCTS3 gene was therefore designated hNTH1 (human endonuclease III homolog 1). The hNTH1 protein was overexpressed in E. coli and purified to apparent homogeneity. The recombinant protein had spectral properties indicative of the presence of an iron/sulfur cluster, and exhibited DNA glycosylase activity on double-stranded polydeoxyribonucleotides containing urea and thymine glycol residues, as well as an apurinic/apyrimidinic lyase activity. Our data indicate that hNTH1 is a structural and functional homolog of E. coli endonuclease III, and that this class of enzymes, for repair of oxidatively damaged pyrimidines in DNA, is highly conserved in evolution from microorganisms to human cells. PMID:8990169

  11. Light-Dependent Expression of Four Cryptic Archaeal Circadian Gene Homologs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael eManiscalco

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Circadian rhythms are important biological signals that have been found in almost all major groups of life from bacteria to man, yet it remains unclear if any members of the second major prokaryotic domain of life, the Archaea, also possess a biological clock. To investigate this question, we examined the regulation of four cyanobacterial-like circadian gene homologs present in the genome of the haloarchaeon Haloferax volcanii. These genes, designated cirA, cirB, cirC, and cirD, display similarity to the KaiC-family of cyanobacterial clock proteins, which act to regulate rhythmic gene expression and to control the timing of cell division. Quantitative RT-PCR analysis was used to examine the expression of each of the four cir genes in response to 12 h light/12 h dark cycles (LD 12:12 during balanced growth in H. volcanii. Our data reveal that there is an approximately two to sixteen-fold increase in cir gene expression when cells are shifted from light to constant darkness and this pattern of gene expression oscillates with the light conditions in a rhythmic manner. Targeted single- and double-gene knockouts in the H. volcanii cir genes results in disruption of light-dependent, rhythmic gene expression, although it does not lead to any significant effect on growth under these conditions. Restoration of light-dependent, rhythmic gene expression was demonstrated by introducing, in trans, a wild-type copy of individual cir genes into knockout strains. These results are noteworthy as this is the first attempt to characterize the transcriptional expression and regulation of the ubiquitous kaiC homologs found among archaeal genomes.

  12. Homologous recombination mediates functional recovery of dysferlin deficiency following AAV5 gene transfer.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    William E Grose

    Full Text Available The dysferlinopathies comprise a group of untreatable muscle disorders including limb girdle muscular dystrophy type 2B, Miyoshi myopathy, distal anterior compartment syndrome, and rigid spine syndrome. As with other forms of muscular dystrophy, adeno-associated virus (AAV gene transfer is a particularly auspicious treatment strategy, however the size of the DYSF cDNA (6.5 kb negates packaging into traditional AAV serotypes known to express well in muscle (i.e. rAAV1, 2, 6, 8, 9. Potential advantages of a full cDNA versus a mini-gene include: maintaining structural-functional protein domains, evading protein misfolding, and avoiding novel epitopes that could be immunogenic. AAV5 has demonstrated unique plasticity with regards to packaging capacity and recombination of virions containing homologous regions of cDNA inserts has been implicated in the generation of full-length transcripts. Herein we show for the first time in vivo that homologous recombination following AAV5.DYSF gene transfer leads to the production of full length transcript and protein. Moreover, gene transfer of full-length dysferlin protein in dysferlin deficient mice resulted in expression levels sufficient to correct functional deficits in the diaphragm and importantly in skeletal muscle membrane repair. Intravascular regional gene transfer through the femoral artery produced high levels of transduction and enabled targeting of specific muscle groups affected by the dysferlinopathies setting the stage for potential translation to clinical trials. We provide proof of principle that AAV5 mediated delivery of dysferlin is a highly promising strategy for treatment of dysferlinopathies and has far-reaching implications for the therapeutic delivery of other large genes.

  13. Sequence homology and expression profile of genes associated with dna repair pathways in Mycobacterium leprae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mukul Sharma

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Survival of Mycobacterium leprae, the causative bacteria for leprosy, in the human host is dependent to an extent on the ways in which its genome integrity is retained. DNA repair mechanisms protect bacterial DNA from damage induced by various stress factors. The current study is aimed at understanding the sequence and functional annotation of DNA repair genes in M. leprae. Methods: T he genome of M. leprae was annotated using sequence alignment tools to identify DNA repair genes that have homologs in Mycobacterium tuberculosis and Escherichia coli. A set of 96 genes known to be involved in DNA repair mechanisms in E. coli and Mycobacteriaceae were chosen as a reference. Among these, 61 were identified in M. leprae based on sequence similarity and domain architecture. The 61 were classified into 36 characterized gene products (59%, 11 hypothetical proteins (18%, and 14 pseudogenes (23%. All these genes have homologs in M. tuberculosis and 49 (80.32% in E. coli. A set of 12 genes which are absent in E. coli were present in M. leprae and in Mycobacteriaceae. These 61 genes were further investigated for their expression profiles in the whole transcriptome microarray data of M. leprae which was obtained from the signal intensities of 60bp probes, tiling the entire genome with 10bp overlaps. Results: It was noted that transcripts corresponding to all the 61 genes were identified in the transcriptome data with varying expression levels ranging from 0.18 to 2.47 fold (normalized with 16SrRNA. The mRNA expression levels of a representative set of seven genes ( four annotated and three hypothetical protein coding genes were analyzed using quantitative Polymerase Chain Reaction (qPCR assays with RNA extracted from skin biopsies of 10 newly diagnosed, untreated leprosy cases. It was noted that RNA expression levels were higher for genes involved in homologous recombination whereas the genes with a low level of expression are involved in the

  14. Sequence homology and expression profile of genes associated with DNA repair pathways in Mycobacterium leprae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, Mukul; Vedithi, Sundeep Chaitanya; Das, Madhusmita; Roy, Anindya; Ebenezer, Mannam

    2017-01-01

    Survival of Mycobacterium leprae, the causative bacteria for leprosy, in the human host is dependent to an extent on the ways in which its genome integrity is retained. DNA repair mechanisms protect bacterial DNA from damage induced by various stress factors. The current study is aimed at understanding the sequence and functional annotation of DNA repair genes in M. leprae. T he genome of M. leprae was annotated using sequence alignment tools to identify DNA repair genes that have homologs in Mycobacterium tuberculosis and Escherichia coli. A set of 96 genes known to be involved in DNA repair mechanisms in E. coli and Mycobacteriaceae were chosen as a reference. Among these, 61 were identified in M. leprae based on sequence similarity and domain architecture. The 61 were classified into 36 characterized gene products (59%), 11 hypothetical proteins (18%), and 14 pseudogenes (23%). All these genes have homologs in M. tuberculosis and 49 (80.32%) in E. coli. A set of 12 genes which are absent in E. coli were present in M. leprae and in Mycobacteriaceae. These 61 genes were further investigated for their expression profiles in the whole transcriptome microarray data of M. leprae which was obtained from the signal intensities of 60bp probes, tiling the entire genome with 10bp overlaps. It was noted that transcripts corresponding to all the 61 genes were identified in the transcriptome data with varying expression levels ranging from 0.18 to 2.47 fold (normalized with 16SrRNA). The mRNA expression levels of a representative set of seven genes ( four annotated and three hypothetical protein coding genes) were analyzed using quantitative Polymerase Chain Reaction (qPCR) assays with RNA extracted from skin biopsies of 10 newly diagnosed, untreated leprosy cases. It was noted that RNA expression levels were higher for genes involved in homologous recombination whereas the genes with a low level of expression are involved in the direct repair pathway. This study provided

  15. Study on homologous series of induced early mutants in Indica rice Ⅱ. the relationship between the homologous series of early mutants induced and the ecotype in Indica rice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen Xiulan; Yang Hefeng; He Zhentian; Han Yuepeng; Liu Xueyu

    2001-01-01

    The induced mutation in light sensitivity of the Indica rice leads to induction of the homologous series of early mutants along with the variation of ecological character and the ecoclimate. The induction of mutants was closely related to the ecotype of Indica rice, the homologous series of early mutants in different level were derived from the different ecotype of the Indica rice, otherwise, the similar homologous series of early mutants were derived from the same ecotypic variety. The induction of the early ecotypic variety derived from the homologous series of early mutants provides the basis and possibility for accelerating the development of the new cultivars. (authors)

  16. A protein-binding domain, EH, identified in the receptor tyrosine kinase substrate Eps15 and conserved in evolution

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wong, W T; Schumacher, C; Salcini, A E

    1995-01-01

    In this report we structurally and functionally define a binding domain that is involved in protein association and that we have designated EH (for Eps15 homology domain). This domain was identified in the tyrosine kinase substrate Eps15 on the basis of regional conservation with several heteroge......In this report we structurally and functionally define a binding domain that is involved in protein association and that we have designated EH (for Eps15 homology domain). This domain was identified in the tyrosine kinase substrate Eps15 on the basis of regional conservation with several...... heterogeneous proteins of yeast and nematode. The EH domain spans about 70 amino acids and shows approximately 60% overall amino acid conservation. We demonstrated the ability of the EH domain to specifically bind cytosolic proteins in normal and malignant cells of mesenchymal, epithelial, and hematopoietic...... (for Eps15-related). Structural comparison of Eps15 and Eps15r defines a family of signal transducers possessing extensive networking abilities including EH-mediated binding and association with Src homology 3-containing proteins....

  17. Conformational dynamics and ligand binding in the multi-domain protein PDC109.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hyun Jin Kim

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available PDC109 is a modular multi-domain protein with two fibronectin type II (Fn2 repeats joined by a linker. It plays a major role in bull sperm binding to the oviductal epithelium through its interactions with phosphorylcholines (PhCs, a head group of sperm cell membrane lipids. The crystal structure of the PDC109-PhC complex shows that each PhC binds to the corresponding Fn2 domain, while the two domains are on the same face of the protein. Long timescale explicit solvent molecular dynamics (MD simulations of PDC109, in the presence and absence of PhC, suggest that PhC binding strongly correlates with the relative orientation of choline-phospholipid binding sites of the two Fn2 domains; unless the two domains tightly bind PhCs, they tend to change their relative orientation by deforming the flexible linker. The effective PDC109-PhC association constant of 28 M(-1, estimated from their potential of mean force is consistent with the experimental result. Principal component analysis of the long timescale MD simulations was compared to the significantly less expensive normal mode analysis of minimized structures. The comparison indicates that difference between relative domain motions of PDC109 with bound and unbound PhC is captured by the first principal component in the principal component analysis as well as the three lowest normal modes in the normal mode analysis. The present study illustrates the use of detailed MD simulations to clarify the energetics of specific ligand-domain interactions revealed by a static crystallographic model, as well as their influence on relative domain motions in a multi-domain protein.

  18. The SACSESS hydrometallurgy domain - an overview

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Geist, A. [Karlsruhe Institute of Technology - KIT, Institute for Nuclear Wsaste Disposal - INE, Karlsruhe (Germany); Taylor, R. [National Nuclear Laboratory, Central Laboratory, Sellafield, Seascale, CA20 1PG (United Kingdom); Ekberg, C. [Chalmers University of Technology, Nuclear Chemistry/Industrial Materials Recycling, SE-412 96 Goeteborg (Sweden); Guilbaud, P.; Bourg, S. [CEA, Centre de Marcoule, Nuclear Energy Division, F-30207 Bagnols-sur-Ceze (France); Modolo, G. [Forschungszentrum Juelich GmbH - FZJ, Institut fuer Energie- und Klimaforschung - IEK-6, Juelich (Germany)

    2016-07-01

    The EURATOM FP7 project SACSESS (Safety of Actinide Separation Processes) is in continuity of a long line of preceding EURATOM projects. SACSESS is organised along four domains, one of them related to the development of hydrometallurgical (i.e. solvent extraction based) actinide separations processes. Within this domain, the most promising processes developed in previous projects are further developed, improving their technology readiness level (TRL) towards the point at which safe industrial implementation will be achievable. The SACSESS reference compounds are: TODGA, CyMe{sub 4}-BTBP, SO{sub 3}-Ph-BTP, HEDTA and DTPA. TODGA is used to co-extract actinides and lanthanides from high-acidity raffinate solutions, separating from the non-lanthanide fission products. TODGA is also used to accelerate the extraction kinetics of CyMe{sub 4}-BTBP. CyMe{sub 4}-BTBP extracts actinides selectively over lanthanides and many other fission products. HEDTA and DTPA are used to strip actinides selectively over lanthanides from an organic phase containing both actinides and lanthanides. SO{sub 3}-Ph-BTP was developed to overcome some of the drawbacks of HEDTA and DTPA, such as the narrow pH window they are effective in.

  19. Mechanism of mRNA-STAR domain interaction: Molecular dynamics simulations of Mammalian Quaking STAR protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, Monika; Anirudh, C R

    2017-10-03

    STAR proteins are evolutionary conserved mRNA-binding proteins that post-transcriptionally regulate gene expression at all stages of RNA metabolism. These proteins possess conserved STAR domain that recognizes identical RNA regulatory elements as YUAAY. Recently reported crystal structures show that STAR domain is composed of N-terminal QUA1, K-homology domain (KH) and C-terminal QUA2, and mRNA binding is mediated by KH-QUA2 domain. Here, we present simulation studies done to investigate binding of mRNA to STAR protein, mammalian Quaking protein (QKI). We carried out conventional MD simulations of STAR domain in presence and absence of mRNA, and studied the impact of mRNA on the stability, dynamics and underlying allosteric mechanism of STAR domain. Our unbiased simulations results show that presence of mRNA stabilizes the overall STAR domain by reducing the structural deviations, correlating the 'within-domain' motions, and maintaining the native contacts information. Absence of mRNA not only influenced the essential modes of motion of STAR domain, but also affected the connectivity of networks within STAR domain. We further explored the dissociation of mRNA from STAR domain using umbrella sampling simulations, and the results suggest that mRNA binding to STAR domain occurs in multi-step: first conformational selection of mRNA backbone conformations, followed by induced fit mechanism as nucleobases interact with STAR domain.

  20. Physical and functional interactions between SH2 and SH3 domains of the Src family protein tyrosine kinase p59fyn

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Panchamoorthy, G.; Fukazawa, T.; Stolz, L.; Payne, G.; Reedquist, K.; Shoelson, S.; Songyang, Z.; Cantley, L.; Walsh, C.; Band, H.

    1994-01-01

    The Src family protein tyrosine kinases participate in signalling through cell surface receptors that lack intrinsic tyrosine kinase domains. All nine members of this family possess adjacent Src homology (SH2 and SH3) domains, both of which are essential for repression of the enzymatic activity. The

  1. p53 regulates the repair of DNA double-strand breaks by both homologous and non-homologous recombination

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Willers, H.; Powell, S.N.; Dahm-Daphi, J.

    2003-01-01

    Full text: p53 is known to suppress spontaneous homologous recombination (HR), while its role in non-homologous recombination (NHR) remains to be clarified. Here, we sought to determine the influence of p53 on the repair of chromosomal double-strand breaks (DSBs) by HR or NHR using specially designed recombination substrates that integrate into the genome. Isogenic mouse fibroblast pairs with or without expression of exogenous p53 protein were utilized. A reporter plasmid carrying a mutated XGPRT gene was chromosomally integrated and DSBs were generated within the plasmid by the I-SceI endonuclease. Subsequent homology-mediated repair from an episomal donor resulted in XGPRT reconstitution and cellular resistance to a selection antibiotic. Analogously, the repair of chromosomal I-SceI breaks by NHR using another novel reporter plasmid restored XGPRT translation. For p53-null cells, the mean frequency of I-SceI break repair via HR was 5.5 x 10 -4 . The p53-Val135 mutant, which previously has been shown to suppress spontaneous HR by 14-fold employing the same cell system and reporter gene, only caused a 2- to 3-fold suppression of break-induced HR. In contrast, a dramatic effect of p53 on repair via NHR was found. Preliminary sequence analysis indicated that there was at least a 1000-fold reduction of illegitimate repair events resulting in loss of sequence at the break sites. The observed effects were mediated by p53 mutants defective in regulation of the cell-cycle and apoptosis. The main findings were: (1) p53 virtually blocked illegitimate rejoining of chromosomal ends. (2) The suppression of homologous DSB repair was less pronounced than the inhibition of spontaneous HR. We hypothesize that p53 allows to a certain extent error-free homology-dependent repair to proceed, while blocking error-prone NHR. The data support and extent a previous model, in which p53 maintains genomic stability by regulating recombination independently of its transactivation function

  2. Carbon-13 NMR study of switch variant anti-dansyl antibodies: Antigen binding and domain-domain interactions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kato, Koichi; Matsunaga, Chigusa; Odaka, Asano; Yamato, Sumie; Takaha, Wakana; Shimada, Ichio; Arata, Yoji (Univ. of Tokyo (Japan))

    1991-07-02

    A {sup 13}C NMR study is reported of switch variant anti-dansyl antibodies, which possess the identical V{sub H}, V{sub L}, and C{sub L} domains in conjunction with highly homologous but not identical heavy-chain constant regions. Each of the antibodies has been selectively labeled with {sup 13}C at the carbonyl carbon of Trp, Tyr, His, or Cys residue by growing hybridoma cells in serum-free medium. Spectral assignments have been made by folowing the procedure described previously for the switch variant antibodies labeled with (1-{sup 13}C)Met. On the basis of the spectral data collected for the antibodies and their proteolytic fragments, the authors discuss how {sup 13}C NMR spectroscopy can be used for the structural analyses of antigen binding and also of domain-domain interactions in the antibody molecule.

  3. Carbon-13 NMR study of switch variant anti-dansyl antibodies: Antigen binding and domain-domain interactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kato, Koichi; Matsunaga, Chigusa; Odaka, Asano; Yamato, Sumie; Takaha, Wakana; Shimada, Ichio; Arata, Yoji

    1991-01-01

    A 13 C NMR study is reported of switch variant anti-dansyl antibodies, which possess the identical V H , V L , and C L domains in conjunction with highly homologous but not identical heavy-chain constant regions. Each of the antibodies has been selectively labeled with 13 C at the carbonyl carbon of Trp, Tyr, His, or Cys residue by growing hybridoma cells in serum-free medium. Spectral assignments have been made by folowing the procedure described previously for the switch variant antibodies labeled with [1- 13 C]Met. On the basis of the spectral data collected for the antibodies and their proteolytic fragments, the authors discuss how 13 C NMR spectroscopy can be used for the structural analyses of antigen binding and also of domain-domain interactions in the antibody molecule

  4. Industrial PhD report: Sustainable Innovation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olesen, Gitte Gylling Hammershøj

    2011-01-01

    Erhvervs PhD rapport udarbejdet i tilknytning til Erhvervs PhD kurset der er obligatorisk for Erhvervs PhD studerende. Rapporten omhandler relationer melllem den akademiske verden og industrien i sammenhæng med PhD projektet, betragtet og analyseret gennem teori om bæredygtig innovation....

  5. Structure of an isolated unglycosylated antibody CH2 domain

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Prabakaran, Ponraj; Vu, Bang K.; Gan, Jianhua; Feng, Yang; Dimitrov, Dimiter S.; Ji, Xinhua

    2008-01-01

    The crystal structure of an isolated unglycosylated antibody C H 2 domain has been determined at 1.7 Å resolution. The C H 2 (C H 3 for IgM and IgE) domain of an antibody plays an important role in mediating effector functions and preserving antibody stability. It is the only domain in human immunoglobulins (Igs) which is involved in weak interchain protein–protein interactions with another C H 2 domain solely through sugar moieties. The N-linked glycosylation at Asn297 is conserved in mammalian IgGs as well as in homologous regions of other antibody isotypes. To examine the structural details of the C H 2 domain in the absence of glycosylation and other antibody domains, the crystal structure of an isolated unglycosylated antibody γ1 C H 2 domain was determined at 1.7 Å resolution and compared with corresponding C H 2 structures from intact Fc, IgG and Fc receptor complexes. Furthermore, the oligomeric state of the protein in solution was studied using size-exclusion chromatography. The results suggested that the unglycosylated human antibody C H 2 domain is a monomer and that its structure is similar to that found in the intact Fc, IgG and Fc receptor complex structures. However, certain structural variations were observed in the Fc receptor-binding sites. Owing to its small size, stability and non-immunogenic Ig template, the C H 2-domain structure could be useful for the development by protein design of antibody domains exerting effector functions and/or antigen specificity and as a robust scaffold in protein-engineering applications

  6. Conserved Domain Database (CDD)

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — CDD is a protein annotation resource that consists of a collection of well-annotated multiple sequence alignment models for ancient domains and full-length proteins.

  7. Deletion of the calmodulin-binding domain of Grb7 impairs cell attachment to the extracellular matrix and migration

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    García-Palmero, Irene; Villalobo, Antonio, E-mail: antonio.villalobo@iib.uam.es

    2013-06-28

    Highlights: •Grb7 is a calmodulin (CaM)-binding protein. •Deleting the CaM-binding site impairs cell attachment and migration. •CaM antagonists inhibit Grb7-mediated cell migration. •We conclude that CaM controls Grb7-mediated cell migration. -- Abstract: The adaptor Grb7 is a calmodulin (CaM)-binding protein that participates in signaling pathways involved in cell migration, proliferation and the control of angiogenesis, and plays a significant role in tumor growth, its metastatic spread and tumor-associated neo-vasculature formation. In this report we show that deletion of the CaM-binding site of Grb7, located in the proximal region of its pleckstrin homology (PH) domain, impairs cell migration, cell attachment to the extracellular matrix, and the reorganization of the actin cytoskeleton occurring during this process. Moreover, we show that the cell-permeable CaM antagonists N-(6-aminohexyl)-5-chloro-1-naphthalenesulfonamide (W-7) and N-(4-aminobutyl)-5-chloro-2-naphthalenesulfonamide (W-13) both retard the migration of cells expressing wild type Grb7, but not the migration of cells expressing the mutant protein lacking the CaM-binding site (Grb7Δ), underscoring the proactive role of CaM binding to Grb7 during this process.

  8. Crystallization and preliminary crystallographic characterization of the PAS domains of EAG and ELK potassium channels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Adaixo, Ricardo; Morais-Cabral, João Henrique

    2010-01-01

    The N-terminal PAS domains from the eukaryotic EAG potassium channels are thought to have a regulatory function. Here the expression, purification, crystallization and preliminary crystallographic characterization of two of these domains are described. Per–Arnt–Sim (PAS) domains are ubiquitous in nature; they are ∼130-amino-acid protein domains that adopt a fairly conserved three-dimensional structure despite their low degree of sequence homology. These domains constitute the N-terminus or, less frequently, the C-terminus of a number of proteins, where they exert regulatory functions. PAS-containing proteins generally display two or more copies of this motif. In this work, the crystallization and preliminary analysis of the PAS domains of two eukaryotic potassium channels from the ether-à-go-go (EAG) family are reported

  9. The colocalization transition of homologous chromosomes at meiosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nicodemi, Mario; Panning, Barbara; Prisco, Antonella

    2008-06-01

    Meiosis is the specialized cell division required in sexual reproduction. During its early stages, in the mother cell nucleus, homologous chromosomes recognize each other and colocalize in a crucial step that remains one of the most mysterious of meiosis. Starting from recent discoveries on the system molecular components and interactions, we discuss a statistical mechanics model of chromosome early pairing. Binding molecules mediate long-distance interaction of special DNA recognition sequences and, if their concentration exceeds a critical threshold, they induce a spontaneous colocalization transition of chromosomes, otherwise independently diffusing.

  10. Homology and cohomology of a class of polycyclic groups

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Majumdar, S.

    1984-11-01

    The homology and the cohomology of the class of polycyclic groups G given by generators h 1 , h 2 ,..., hsub(n+1) and relations h 2 -1 h 1 h 2 =h 1 sup(m 1 ),h 3 -1 h 2 h 3 =h 2 sup(m 2 ),..., hsub(n+1) -1 hsub(n) hsub(n+1)=hsub(n)sup(msub(n)) are determined through the construction of a suitable free ZG resolution for the trivial ZG module Z. (author)

  11. Molecular Mechanisms of SH2- and PTB-Domain-Containing Proteins in Receptor Tyrosine Kinase Signaling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wagner, Melany J.; Stacey, Melissa M.; Liu, Bernard A.; Pawson, Tony

    2013-01-01

    Intracellular signaling is mediated by reversible posttranslational modifications (PTMs) that include phosphorylation, ubiquitination, and acetylation, among others. In response to extracellular stimuli such as growth factors, receptor tyrosine kinases (RTKs) typically dimerize and initiate signaling through phosphorylation of their cytoplasmic tails and downstream scaffolds. Signaling effectors are recruited to these phosphotyrosine (pTyr) sites primarily through Src homology 2 (SH2) domains and pTyr-binding (PTB) domains. This review describes how these conserved domains specifically recognize pTyr residues and play a major role in mediating precise downstream signaling events. PMID:24296166

  12. Molecular mechanisms of SH2- and PTB-domain-containing proteins in receptor tyrosine kinase signaling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wagner, Melany J; Stacey, Melissa M; Liu, Bernard A; Pawson, Tony

    2013-12-01

    Intracellular signaling is mediated by reversible posttranslational modifications (PTMs) that include phosphorylation, ubiquitination, and acetylation, among others. In response to extracellular stimuli such as growth factors, receptor tyrosine kinases (RTKs) typically dimerize and initiate signaling through phosphorylation of their cytoplasmic tails and downstream scaffolds. Signaling effectors are recruited to these phosphotyrosine (pTyr) sites primarily through Src homology 2 (SH2) domains and pTyr-binding (PTB) domains. This review describes how these conserved domains specifically recognize pTyr residues and play a major role in mediating precise downstream signaling events.

  13. Globular, Sponge-like to Layer-like Morphological Transition in 1-n-Alkyl-3-methylimidazolium Octylsulfate Ionic Liquid Homologous Series.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kapoor, Utkarsh; Shah, Jindal K

    2018-01-11

    Segregation of polar and nonpolar domains in ionic liquids for which either the cation or anion is responsible for inducing nonpolar domains is well understood. On the other hand, information regarding the nanoscale heterogeneities originating due to the presence of nonpolar content on both the ions is rudimentary at this point. The present contribution is aimed at addressing this question and focuses on a molecular dynamics simulation study to probe nanoscale structural and aggregation features of the 1-n-alkyl-3-methylimidazolium [C n mim] octylsulfate [C 8 SO 4 ] ionic liquid homologous series (n = 2, 4, 6, 8, 10, and 12). The objective of this work is to determine the effect of increasing alkyl chain length in the cation on nonpolar domain formation, especially when the alkyl chain lengths from both the ions participate in defining such domains. The results indicate that all the ionic liquids form nonpolar domains, morphology of which gradually changes from globular, sponge-like to layer-like structure with increase in the cationic alkyl chain length. The length of the nonpolar domains calculated from the total structure factor for [C 10 mim][C 8 SO 4 ] is considerably higher than that reported for other imidazolium-based ionic liquid containing smaller anions. The structure factor for [C 12 mim][C 8 SO 4 ] ionic liquid contains multiple intermediate peaks separating the charge alternation peak and pre-peak, which points to nonpolar domains of varying lengths, an observation that remains to be validated. Analysis of the heterogeneous order parameters and orientational correlation functions of the alkyl chains further suggests an increase in the spatial heterogeneity and long-range order along the homologous series. The origin of rich diversity of structures obtained by introducing nonpolar content on both the ions is discussed.

  14. Determination of Critical Micellar Concentration of Homologous 2-Alkoxyphenylcarbamoyloxyethyl-Morpholinium Chlorides

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lenka Stopková

    2018-05-01

    Full Text Available The critical micellar concentrations of selected alkyloxy homologues of local anesthetic 4-(2-{[(2-alkoxyphenylcarbamoyl]oxy}ethylmorpholin-4-ium chloride with nc = 2, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, and 9 carbons in alkyloxy tail were determined by absorption spectroscopy in the UV–vis spectral region with the use of a pyrene probe. Within the homologous series of the studied amphiphilic compounds, the ln(cmc was observed to be dependent linearly on the number of carbon atoms nc in the hydrophobic tail: ln(cmc = 0.705–0.966 nc. The Gibbs free energy, necessary for the transfer of the methylene group of the alkoxy chain from the water phase into the inner part of the micelle at the temperature of 25 °C and pH ≈ 4.5–5.0, was found to be −2.39 kJ/mol. The experimentally determined cmc values showed good correlations with the predicted values of the bulkiness of the alkoxy tail expressed as the molar volume of substituent R, as well as with the surface tension of the compounds.

  15. Reversed-phase thin-layer chromatography of homologs of Antimycin-A and related derivatives

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abidi, Sharon L.

    1989-01-01

    Using a reversed-phase high-performance liquid chromatographic (HPLC) technique, a mixture of antimycins A was separated into eight hitherto unreported subcomponents, Ala, Alb, A2a, A2b, A3a, A3b, A4a, and A4b. Although a base-line resolution of the known four major antimycins Al, A2, A3, and A4 was readily achieved with mobile phases containing acetate buffers, the separation of the new antibiotic subcomponents was highly sensitive to variation in mobile phase conditions. The type and composition of organic modifiers, the nature of buffer salts, and the concentration of added electrolytes had profound effects on capacity factors, separation factors, and peak resolution values. Of the numerous chromatographic systems examined, a mobile phase consisting of methanol-water (70:30) and 0.005 M tetrabutylammonium phosphate at pH 3.0 yielded the most satisfactory results for the separation of the subcomponents. Reversed-phase gradient HPLC separation of the dansylated or methylated antibiotic compounds produced superior chromatographic characteristics and the presence of added electrolytes was not a critical factor for achieving separation. Differences in the chromatographic outcome between homologous and structural isomers were interpretated based on a differential solvophobic interaction rationale. Preparative reversed-phase HPLC under optimal conditions enabled isolation of pure samples of the methylated antimycin subcomponents for use in structural studies.

  16. Impact of homologous recombination on individual cellular radiosensitivity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koch, Kerstin; Wrona, Agnieszka; Dikomey, Ekkehard; Borgmann, Kerstin

    2009-01-01

    Purpose: Individual radiosensitivity as measured with in vitro irradiated lymphocytes using metaphase analysis can predict the risk of normal tissue effects after radiotherapy. This parameter is considered to be primarily determined by the cellular repair capacity of DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs). It is now tested to which extent this capacity also depends on homologous recombination (HR), which is a pathway available when cells are in S/G2 phase. Methods: Experiments were performed with CHO K1 cells, in which HR was suppressed via knock-down of RAD51 using RNA interference (RNAi). RAD51 was measured via western and foci formation, cell survival by colony forming, DSBs by γH2AX foci formation, and chromosomal damage using PCC, G0 or G2 assay. Results: In quiescent G1 cells DSB repair is completed 6 h after irradiation. But there is still a substantial fraction of non-repaired DSBs. Most of these DSBs are repaired when G1 cells are stimulated into cell cycle. Suppression of HR by down-regulation of RAD51 did not affect this repair. In contrast, repair was inhibited when cells were irradiated in late S/G2. In line with these data down-regulation of HR did affect survival of cells irradiated in late S/G2, but not in G1. Conclusions: Individual radiosensitivity as measured for G0/1 cells using metaphase analysis does not depend on homologous recombination

  17. On discrete symmetries and torsion homology in F-theory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mayrhofer, Christoph [Arnold-Sommerfeld-Center, Ludwig-Maximilians-Universität München,München (Germany); Palti, Eran; Till, Oskar; Weigand, Timo [Institut für Theoretische Physik, Ruprecht-Karls-Universität Heidelberg,Heidelberg (Germany)

    2015-06-04

    We study the relation between discrete gauge symmetries in F-theory compactifications and torsion homology on the associated Calabi-Yau manifold. Focusing on the simplest example of a ℤ{sub 2} symmetry, we show that there are two physically distinct ways that such a discrete gauge symmetry can arise. First, compactifications of M-Theory on Calabi-Yau threefolds which support a genus-one fibration with a bi-section are known to be dual to six-dimensional F-theory vacua with a ℤ{sub 2} gauge symmetry. We show that the resulting five-dimensional theories do not have a ℤ{sub 2} symmetry but that the latter emerges only in the F-theory decompactification limit. Accordingly the genus-one fibred Calabi-Yau manifolds do not exhibit torsion in homology. Associated to the bi-section fibration is a Jacobian fibration which does support a section. Compactifying on these related but distinct varieties does lead to a ℤ{sub 2} symmetry in five dimensions and, accordingly, we find explicitly an associated torsion cycle. We identify the expected particle and membrane system of the discrete symmetry in terms of wrapped M2 and M5 branes and present a field-theory description of the physics for both cases in terms of circle reductions of six-dimensional theories. Our results and methods generalise straightforwardly to larger discrete symmetries and to four-dimensional compactifications.

  18. Gimeracil sensitizes cells to radiation via inhibition of homologous recombination

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Takagi, Masaru; Sakata, Koh-ichi; Someya, Masanori; Tauchi, Hiroshi; Iijima, Kenta; Matsumoto, Yoshihisa; Torigoe, Toshihiko; Takahashi, Akari; Hareyama, Masato; Fukushima, Masakazu

    2010-01-01

    Background and purpose: 5-Chloro-2,4-dihydroxypyridine (Gimeracil) is a component of an oral fluoropyrimidine derivative S-1. Gimeracil is originally added to S-1 to yield prolonged 5-FU concentrations in tumor tissues by inhibiting dihydropyrimidine dehydrogenase, which degrades 5-FU. We found that Gimeracil by itself had the radiosensitizing effect. Methods and materials: We used various cell lines deficient in non-homologous end-joining (NHEJ) or homologous recombination (HR) as well as DLD-1 and HeLa in clonogenic assay. γ-H2AX focus formation and SCneo assay was performed to examine the effects of Gimeracil on DNA double strand break (DSB) repair mechanisms. Results: Results of γ-H2AX focus assay indicated that Gimeracil inhibited DNA DSB repair. It did not sensitize cells deficient in HR but sensitized those deficient in NHEJ. In SCneo assay, Gimeracil reduced the frequency of neo-positive clones. Additionally, it sensitized the cells in S-phase more than in G0/G1. Conclusions: Gimeracil inhibits HR. Because HR plays key roles in the repair of DSBH caused by radiotherapy, Gimeracil may enhance the efficacy of radiotherapy through the suppression of HR-mediated DNA repair pathways.

  19. Protein homology model refinement by large-scale energy optimization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Hahnbeom; Ovchinnikov, Sergey; Kim, David E; DiMaio, Frank; Baker, David

    2018-03-20

    Proteins fold to their lowest free-energy structures, and hence the most straightforward way to increase the accuracy of a partially incorrect protein structure model is to search for the lowest-energy nearby structure. This direct approach has met with little success for two reasons: first, energy function inaccuracies can lead to false energy minima, resulting in model degradation rather than improvement; and second, even with an accurate energy function, the search problem is formidable because the energy only drops considerably in the immediate vicinity of the global minimum, and there are a very large number of degrees of freedom. Here we describe a large-scale energy optimization-based refinement method that incorporates advances in both search and energy function accuracy that can substantially improve the accuracy of low-resolution homology models. The method refined low-resolution homology models into correct folds for 50 of 84 diverse protein families and generated improved models in recent blind structure prediction experiments. Analyses of the basis for these improvements reveal contributions from both the improvements in conformational sampling techniques and the energy function.

  20. Low pH Cements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Savage, David; Benbow, Steven

    2007-05-01

    The development of low-pH cements for use in geological repositories for radioactive waste stems from concerns over the potential for deleterious effects upon the host rock and other EBS materials (notably bentonite) under the hyperalkaline conditions (pH > 12) of cement pore fluids. Low pH cement (also known as low heat cement) was developed by the cement industry for use where large masses of cement (e.g. dams) could cause problems regarding heat generated during curing. In low pH cements, the amount of cement is reduced by substitution of materials such as fly ash, blast furnace slag, silica fume, and/or non-pozzolanic silica flour. SKB and Posiva have ruled out the use of blast furnace slag and fly-ash and are focusing on silica fume as a blending agent. Currently, no preferred composition has been identified by these agencies. SKB and Posiva have defined a pH limit ≤ 11 for cement grout leachates. To attain this pH, blending agents must comprise at least 50 wt % of dry materials. Because low pH cement has little, or no free portlandite, the cement consists predominantly of calcium silicate hydrate (CSH) gel with a Ca/Si ratio ≤ 0.8. Although there are potential implications for the performance of the spent fuel and cladding due to the presence of hyperalkaline fluids from cement, the principal focus for safety assessment lies with the behaviour of bentonite. There are a number of potential constraints on the interaction of hyperalkaline cement pore fluids with bentonite, including mass balance, thermodynamic issues, mass transport, and kinetics, but none of these is likely to be limiting if conventional OPC cements are employed in repository construction. Nevertheless: Low-pH cements may supply approximately 50 % less hydroxyl ions than conventional OPC for a given volume of cement, but mass balance constraints are complicated by the uncertainty concerning the type of secondary minerals produced during cement-bentonite interaction. The change of aqueous

  1. Low pH Cements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Savage, David; Benbow, Steven [Quintessa Ltd., Henley-on-Thames (United Kingdom)

    2007-05-15

    The development of low-pH cements for use in geological repositories for radioactive waste stems from concerns over the potential for deleterious effects upon the host rock and other EBS materials (notably bentonite) under the hyperalkaline conditions (pH > 12) of cement pore fluids. Low pH cement (also known as low heat cement) was developed by the cement industry for use where large masses of cement (e.g. dams) could cause problems regarding heat generated during curing. In low pH cements, the amount of cement is reduced by substitution of materials such as fly ash, blast furnace slag, silica fume, and/or non-pozzolanic silica flour. SKB and Posiva have ruled out the use of blast furnace slag and fly-ash and are focusing on silica fume as a blending agent. Currently, no preferred composition has been identified by these agencies. SKB and Posiva have defined a pH limit {<=} 11 for cement grout leachates. To attain this pH, blending agents must comprise at least 50 wt % of dry materials. Because low pH cement has little, or no free portlandite, the cement consists predominantly of calcium silicate hydrate (CSH) gel with a Ca/Si ratio {<=} 0.8. Although there are potential implications for the performance of the spent fuel and cladding due to the presence of hyperalkaline fluids from cement, the principal focus for safety assessment lies with the behaviour of bentonite. There are a number of potential constraints on the interaction of hyperalkaline cement pore fluids with bentonite, including mass balance, thermodynamic issues, mass transport, and kinetics, but none of these is likely to be limiting if conventional OPC cements are employed in repository construction. Nevertheless: Low-pH cements may supply approximately 50 % less hydroxyl ions than conventional OPC for a given volume of cement, but mass balance constraints are complicated by the uncertainty concerning the type of secondary minerals produced during cement-bentonite interaction. The change of aqueous

  2. The TIR domain of TIR-NB-LRR resistance proteins is a signaling domain involved in cell death induction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swiderski, Michal R; Birker, Doris; Jones, Jonathan D G

    2009-02-01

    In plants, the TIR (toll interleukin 1 receptor) domain is found almost exclusively in nucleotide-binding (NB) leucine-rich repeat resistance proteins and their truncated homologs, and has been proposed to play a signaling role during resistance responses mediated by TIR containing R proteins. Transient expression in Nicotiana benthamiana leaves of "TIR + 80", the RPS4 truncation without the NB-ARC domain, leads to EDS1-, SGT1-, and HSP90-dependent cell death. Transgenic Arabidopsis plants expressing the RPS4 TIR+80 from either dexamethasone or estradiol-inducible promoters display inducer-dependent cell death. Cell death is also elicited by transient expression of similarly truncated constructs from two other R proteins, RPP1A and At4g19530, but is not elicited by similar constructs representing RPP2A and RPP2B proteins. Site-directed mutagenesis of the RPS4 TIR domain identified many loss-of-function mutations but also revealed several gain-of function substitutions. Lack of cell death induction by the E160A substitution suggests that amino acids outside of the TIR domain contribute to cell death signaling in addition to the TIR domain itself. This is consistent with previous observations that the TIR domain itself is insufficient to induce cell death upon transient expression.

  3. HOMOLOGY MODELING AND MOLECULAR DYNAMICS STUDY OF MYCOBACTERIUM TUBERCULOSIS UREASE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lisnyak Yu. V.

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. M. tuberculosis urease (MTU is an attractive target for chemotherapeutic intervention in tuberculosis by designing new safe and efficient enzyme inhibitors. A prerequisite for designing such inhibitors is an understanding of urease's three-dimensional (3D structure organization. 3D structure of M. tuberculosis urease is unknown. When experimental three-dimensional structure of a protein is not known, homology modeling, the most commonly used computational structure prediction method, is the technique of choice. This paper aimed to build a 3D-structure of M. tuberculosis urease by homology modeling and to study its stability by molecular dynamics simulations. Materials and methods. To build MTU model, five high-resolution X-ray structures of bacterial ureases with three-subunit composition (2KAU, 5G4H, 4UBP, 4СEU, and 4EPB have been selected as templates. For each template five stochastic alignments were created and for each alignment, a three-dimensional model was built. Then, each model was energy minimized and the models were ranked by quality Z-score. The MTU model with highest quality estimation amongst 25 potential models was selected. To further improve structure quality the model was refined by short molecular dynamics simulation that resulted in 20 snapshots which were rated according to their energy and the quality Z-score. The best scoring model having minimum energy was chosen as a final homology model of 3D structure for M. tuberculosis. The final model of MTU was also validated by using PDBsum and QMEAN servers. These checks confirmed good quality of MTU homology model. Results and discussion. Homology model of MTU is a nonamer (homotrimer of heterotrimers, (αβγ3 consisting of 2349 residues. In MTU heterotrimer, sub-units α, β, and γ tightly interact with each other at a surface of approximately 3000 Å2. Sub-unit α contains the enzyme active site with two Ni atoms coordinated by amino acid residues His347, His

  4. Crystal structure of the N domain of human somatic angiotensin I-converting enzyme provides a structural basis for domain-specific inhibitor design.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corradi, Hazel R; Schwager, Sylva L U; Nchinda, Aloysius T; Sturrock, Edward D; Acharya, K Ravi

    2006-03-31

    Human somatic angiotensin I-converting enzyme (sACE) is a key regulator of blood pressure and an important drug target for combating cardiovascular and renal disease. sACE comprises two homologous metallopeptidase domains, N and C, joined by an inter-domain linker. Both domains are capable of cleaving the two hemoregulatory peptides angiotensin I and bradykinin, but differ in their affinities for a range of other substrates and inhibitors. Previously we determined the structure of testis ACE (C domain); here we present the crystal structure of the N domain of sACE (both in the presence and absence of the antihypertensive drug lisinopril) in order to aid the understanding of how these two domains differ in specificity and function. In addition, the structure of most of the inter-domain linker allows us to propose relative domain positions for sACE that may contribute to the domain cooperativity. The structure now provides a platform for the design of "domain-specific" second-generation ACE inhibitors.

  5. Structure and evolution of N-domains in AAA metalloproteases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scharfenberg, Franka; Serek-Heuberger, Justyna; Coles, Murray; Hartmann, Marcus D; Habeck, Michael; Martin, Jörg; Lupas, Andrei N; Alva, Vikram

    2015-02-27

    Metalloproteases of the AAA (ATPases associated with various cellular activities) family play a crucial role in protein quality control within the cytoplasmic membrane of bacteria and the inner membrane of eukaryotic organelles. These membrane-anchored hexameric enzymes are composed of an N-terminal domain with one or two transmembrane helices, a central AAA ATPase module, and a C-terminal Zn(2+)-dependent protease. While the latter two domains have been well studied, so far, little is known about the N-terminal regions. Here, in an extensive bioinformatic and structural analysis, we identified three major, non-homologous groups of N-domains in AAA metalloproteases. By far, the largest one is the FtsH-like group of bacteria and eukaryotic organelles. The other two groups are specific to Yme1: one found in plants, fungi, and basal metazoans and the other one found exclusively in animals. Using NMR and crystallography, we determined the subunit structure and hexameric assembly of Escherichia coli FtsH-N, exhibiting an unusual α+β fold, and the conserved part of fungal Yme1-N from Saccharomyces cerevisiae, revealing a tetratricopeptide repeat fold. Our bioinformatic analysis showed that, uniquely among these proteins, the N-domain of Yme1 from the cnidarian Hydra vulgaris contains both the tetratricopeptide repeat region seen in basal metazoans and a region of homology to the N-domains of animals. Thus, it is a modern-day representative of an intermediate in the evolution of animal Yme1 from basal eukaryotic precursors. Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  6. Organization of functional domains in the docking protein p130Cas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nasertorabi, Fariborz; Garcia-Guzman, Miguel; Briknarova, Klara; Larsen, Elise; Havert, Marnie L.; Vuori, Kristiina; Ely, Kathryn R.

    2004-01-01

    The docking protein p130Cas becomes phosphorylated upon cell adhesion to extracellular matrix proteins, and is thought to play an essential role in cell transformation. Cas transmits signals through interactions with the Src-homology 3 (SH3) and Src-homology 2 domains of FAK or v-Crk signaling molecules, or with 14-3-3 protein, as well as phosphatases PTP1B and PTP-PEST. The large (130 kDa), multi-domain Cas molecule contains an SH3 domain, a Src-binding domain, a serine-rich protein interaction region, and a C-terminal region that participates in protein interactions implicated in antiestrogen resistance in breast cancer. In this study, as part of a long-term goal to examine the protein interactions of Cas by X-ray crystallography and nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy, molecular constructs were designed to express two adjacent domains, the serine-rich domain and the Src-binding domain, that each participate in intermolecular contacts dependent on protein phosphorylation. The protein products are soluble, homogeneous, monodisperse, and highly suitable for structural studies to define the role of Cas in integrin-mediated cell signaling

  7. Structure of the GH1 domain of guanylate kinase-associated protein from Rattus norvegicus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tong, Junsen; Yang, Huiseon; Eom, Soo Hyun; Chun, ChangJu; Im, Young Jun

    2014-01-01

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • The crystal structure of GKAP homology domain 1 (GH1) was determined. • GKAP GH1 is a three-helix bundle connected by short flexible loops. • The predicted helix α4 associates weakly with the helix α3, suggesting dynamic nature of the GH1 domain. - Abstract: Guanylate-kinase-associated protein (GKAP) is a scaffolding protein that links NMDA receptor-PSD-95 to Shank–Homer complexes by protein–protein interactions at the synaptic junction. GKAP family proteins are characterized by the presence of a C-terminal conserved GKAP homology domain 1 (GH1) of unknown structure and function. In this study, crystal structure of the GH1 domain of GKAP from Rattus norvegicus was determined in fusion with an N-terminal maltose-binding protein at 2.0 Å resolution. The structure of GKAP GH1 displays a three-helix bundle connected by short flexible loops. The predicted helix α4 which was not visible in the crystal structure associates weakly with the helix α3 suggesting dynamic nature of the GH1 domain. The strict conservation of GH1 domain across GKAP family members and the lack of a catalytic active site required for enzyme activity imply that the GH1 domain might serve as a protein–protein interaction module for the synaptic protein clustering

  8. Structure of the GH1 domain of guanylate kinase-associated protein from Rattus norvegicus

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tong, Junsen; Yang, Huiseon [College of Pharmacy, Chonnam National University, Gwangju 500-757 (Korea, Republic of); Eom, Soo Hyun [School of Life Sciences, Steitz Center for Structural Biology, and Department of Chemistry, Gwangju Institute of Science and Technology, Gwangju 500-712 (Korea, Republic of); Chun, ChangJu, E-mail: cchun1130@jnu.ac.kr [College of Pharmacy, Chonnam National University, Gwangju 500-757 (Korea, Republic of); Im, Young Jun, E-mail: imyoungjun@jnu.ac.kr [College of Pharmacy, Chonnam National University, Gwangju 500-757 (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-09-12

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • The crystal structure of GKAP homology domain 1 (GH1) was determined. • GKAP GH1 is a three-helix bundle connected by short flexible loops. • The predicted helix α4 associates weakly with the helix α3, suggesting dynamic nature of the GH1 domain. - Abstract: Guanylate-kinase-associated protein (GKAP) is a scaffolding protein that links NMDA receptor-PSD-95 to Shank–Homer complexes by protein–protein interactions at the synaptic junction. GKAP family proteins are characterized by the presence of a C-terminal conserved GKAP homology domain 1 (GH1) of unknown structure and function. In this study, crystal structure of the GH1 domain of GKAP from Rattus norvegicus was determined in fusion with an N-terminal maltose-binding protein at 2.0 Å resolution. The structure of GKAP GH1 displays a three-helix bundle connected by short flexible loops. The predicted helix α4 which was not visible in the crystal structure associates weakly with the helix α3 suggesting dynamic nature of the GH1 domain. The strict conservation of GH1 domain across GKAP family members and the lack of a catalytic active site required for enzyme activity imply that the GH1 domain might serve as a protein–protein interaction module for the synaptic protein clustering.

  9. Molecular and Functional Characterization of FLOWERING LOCUS T Homologs in Allium cepa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ranjith Kumar Manoharan

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Onion bulbing is an important agricultural trait affecting economic value and is regulated by flowering-related genes. FLOWERING LOCUS T (FT-like gene function is crucial for the initiation of flowering in various plant species and also in asexual reproduction in tuber plants. By employing various computational analysis using RNA-Seq data, we identified eight FT-like genes (AcFT encoding PEBP (phosphatidylethanolamine-binding protein domains in Allium cepa. Sequence and phylogenetic analyses of FT-like proteins revealed six proteins that were identical to previously reported AcFT1-6 proteins, as well as one (AcFT7 with a highly conserved region shared with AcFT6 and another (comp106231 with low similarity to MFT protein, but containing a PEBP domain. Homology modelling of AcFT7 proteins showed similar structures and conservation of amino acids crucial for function in AtFT (Arabidopsis and Hd3a (rice, with variation in the C-terminal region. Further, we analyzed AcFT expression patterns in different transitional stages, as well as under SD (short-day, LD (long-day, and drought treatment in two contrasting genotypic lines EM (early maturation, 36101 and LM (late maturation, 36122. The FT transcript levels were greatly affected by various environmental factors such as photoperiod, temperature and drought. Our results suggest that AcFT7 is a member of the FT-like genes in Allium cepa and may be involved in regulation of onion bulbing, similar to other FT genes. In addition, AcFT4 and AcFT7 could be involved in establishing the difference in timing of bulb maturity between the two contrasting onion lines.

  10. Homologous recombination and non-homologous end-joining repair pathways in bovine embryos with different developmental competence

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Henrique Barreta, Marcos; Garziera Gasperin, Bernardo; Braga Rissi, Vitor; Cesaro, Matheus Pedrotti de; Ferreira, Rogério; Oliveira, João Francisco de; Gonçalves, Paulo Bayard Dias; Bordignon, Vilceu

    2012-01-01

    This study investigated the expression of genes controlling homologous recombination (HR), and non-homologous end-joining (NHEJ) DNA-repair pathways in bovine embryos of different developmental potential. It also evaluated whether bovine embryos can respond to DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs) induced with ultraviolet irradiation by regulating expression of genes involved in HR and NHEJ repair pathways. Embryos with high, intermediate or low developmental competence were selected based on the cleavage time after in vitro insemination and were removed from in vitro culture before (36 h), during (72 h) and after (96 h) the expected period of embryonic genome activation. All studied genes were expressed before, during and after the genome activation period regardless the developmental competence of the embryos. Higher mRNA expression of 53BP1 and RAD52 was found before genome activation in embryos with low developmental competence. Expression of 53BP1, RAD51 and KU70 was downregulated at 72 h and upregulated at 168 h post-insemination in response to DSBs induced by ultraviolet irradiation. In conclusion, important genes controlling HR and NHEJ DNA-repair pathways are expressed in bovine embryos, however genes participating in these pathways are only regulated after the period of embryo genome activation in response to ultraviolet-induced DSBs.

  11. Homologous recombination and non-homologous end-joining repair pathways in bovine embryos with different developmental competence

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Henrique Barreta, Marcos [Universidade Federal de Santa Catarina, Campus Universitario de Curitibanos, Curitibanos, SC (Brazil); Laboratorio de Biotecnologia e Reproducao Animal-BioRep, Universidade Federal de Santa Maria, Santa Maria, RS (Brazil); Garziera Gasperin, Bernardo; Braga Rissi, Vitor; Cesaro, Matheus Pedrotti de [Laboratorio de Biotecnologia e Reproducao Animal-BioRep, Universidade Federal de Santa Maria, Santa Maria, RS (Brazil); Ferreira, Rogerio [Centro de Educacao Superior do Oeste-Universidade do Estado de Santa Catarina, Chapeco, SC (Brazil); Oliveira, Joao Francisco de; Goncalves, Paulo Bayard Dias [Laboratorio de Biotecnologia e Reproducao Animal-BioRep, Universidade Federal de Santa Maria, Santa Maria, RS (Brazil); Bordignon, Vilceu, E-mail: vilceu.bordignon@mcgill.ca [Department of Animal Science, McGill University, Ste-Anne-De-Bellevue, QC (Canada)

    2012-10-01

    This study investigated the expression of genes controlling homologous recombination (HR), and non-homologous end-joining (NHEJ) DNA-repair pathways in bovine embryos of different developmental potential. It also evaluated whether bovine embryos can respond to DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs) induced with ultraviolet irradiation by regulating expression of genes involved in HR and NHEJ repair pathways. Embryos with high, intermediate or low developmental competence were selected based on the cleavage time after in vitro insemination and were removed from in vitro culture before (36 h), during (72 h) and after (96 h) the expected period of embryonic genome activation. All studied genes were expressed before, during and after the genome activation period regardless the developmental competence of the embryos. Higher mRNA expression of 53BP1 and RAD52 was found before genome activation in embryos with low developmental competence. Expression of 53BP1, RAD51 and KU70 was downregulated at 72 h and upregulated at 168 h post-insemination in response to DSBs induced by ultraviolet irradiation. In conclusion, important genes controlling HR and NHEJ DNA-repair pathways are expressed in bovine embryos, however genes participating in these pathways are only regulated after the period of embryo genome activation in response to ultraviolet-induced DSBs.

  12. Arrestin-related proteins mediate pH signaling in fungi

    OpenAIRE

    Herranz, Silvia; Rodríguez, José M.; Bussink, Henk-Jan; Sánchez-Ferrero, Juan C.; Arst, Herbert N.; Peñalva, Miguel A.; Vincent, Olivier

    2005-01-01

    Metazoan arrestins bind to seven-transmembrane (7TM) receptors to regulate function. Aspergillus nidulans PalF, a protein involved in the fungal ambient pH signaling pathway, contains arrestin N-terminal and C-terminal domains and binds strongly to two different regions within the C-terminal cytoplasmic tail of the 7TM, putative pH sensor PalH. Upon exposure to alkaline ambient pH, PalF is phosphorylated and, like mammalian β-arrestins, ubiquitinated in a signal-dependent and 7TM protein-depe...

  13. The C. elegans VAPB homolog VPR-1 is a permissive signal for gonad development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cottee, Pauline A; Cole, Tim; Schultz, Jessica; Hoang, Hieu D; Vibbert, Jack; Han, Sung Min; Miller, Michael A

    2017-06-15

    VAMP/synaptobrevin-associated proteins (VAPs) contain an N-terminal major sperm protein domain (MSPd) that is associated with amyotrophic lateral sclerosis. VAPs have an intracellular housekeeping function, as well as an extracellular signaling function mediated by the secreted MSPd. Here we show that the C. elegans VAP homolog VPR-1 is essential for gonad development. vpr-1 null mutants are maternal effect sterile due to arrested gonadogenesis following embryo hatching. Somatic gonadal precursor cells and germ cells fail to proliferate fully and complete their respective differentiation programs. Maternal or zygotic vpr-1 expression is sufficient to induce gonadogenesis and fertility. Genetic mosaic and cell type-specific expression studies indicate that vpr-1 activity is important in the nervous system, germ line and intestine. VPR-1 acts in parallel to Notch signaling, a key regulator of germline stem cell proliferation and differentiation. Neuronal vpr-1 expression is sufficient for gonadogenesis induction during a limited time period shortly after hatching. These results support the model that the secreted VPR-1 MSPd acts at least in part on gonadal sheath cell precursors in L1 to early L2 stage hermaphrodites to permit gonadogenesis. © 2017. Published by The Company of Biologists Ltd.

  14. Direct Involvement of Retinoblastoma Family Proteins in DNA Repair by Non-homologous End-Joining

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rebecca Cook

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Deficiencies in DNA double-strand break (DSB repair lead to genetic instability, a recognized cause of cancer initiation and evolution. We report that the retinoblastoma tumor suppressor protein (RB1 is required for DNA DSB repair by canonical non-homologous end-joining (cNHEJ. Support of cNHEJ involves a mechanism independent of RB1’s cell-cycle function and depends on its amino terminal domain with which it binds to NHEJ components XRCC5 and XRCC6. Cells with engineered loss of RB family function as well as cancer-derived cells with mutational RB1 loss show substantially reduced levels of cNHEJ. RB1 variants disabled for the interaction with XRCC5 and XRCC6, including a cancer-associated variant, are unable to support cNHEJ despite being able to confer cell-cycle control. Our data identify RB1 loss as a candidate driver of structural genomic instability and a causative factor for cancer somatic heterogeneity and evolution.

  15. SAMHD1 Promotes DNA End Resection to Facilitate DNA Repair by Homologous Recombination

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Waaqo Daddacha

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available DNA double-strand break (DSB repair by homologous recombination (HR is initiated by CtIP/MRN-mediated DNA end resection to maintain genome integrity. SAMHD1 is a dNTP triphosphohydrolase, which restricts HIV-1 infection, and mutations are associated with Aicardi-Goutières syndrome and cancer. We show that SAMHD1 has a dNTPase-independent function in promoting DNA end resection to facilitate DSB repair by HR. SAMHD1 deficiency or Vpx-mediated degradation causes hypersensitivity to DSB-inducing agents, and SAMHD1 is recruited to DSBs. SAMHD1 complexes with CtIP via a conserved C-terminal domain and recruits CtIP to DSBs to facilitate end resection and HR. Significantly, a cancer-associated mutant with impaired CtIP interaction, but not dNTPase-inactive SAMHD1, fails to rescue the end resection impairment of SAMHD1 depletion. Our findings define a dNTPase-independent function for SAMHD1 in HR-mediated DSB repair by facilitating CtIP accrual to promote DNA end resection, providing insight into how SAMHD1 promotes genome integrity.

  16. GPCRM: a homology modeling web service with triple membrane-fitted quality assessment of GPCR models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miszta, Przemyslaw; Pasznik, Pawel; Jakowiecki, Jakub; Sztyler, Agnieszka; Latek, Dorota; Filipek, Slawomir

    2018-05-21

    Due to the involvement of G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) in most of the physiological and pathological processes in humans they have been attracting a lot of attention from pharmaceutical industry as well as from scientific community. Therefore, the need for new, high quality structures of GPCRs is enormous. The updated homology modeling service GPCRM (http://gpcrm.biomodellab.eu/) meets those expectations by greatly reducing the execution time of submissions (from days to hours/minutes) with nearly the same average quality of obtained models. Additionally, due to three different scoring functions (Rosetta, Rosetta-MP, BCL::Score) it is possible to select accurate models for the required purposes: the structure of the binding site, the transmembrane domain or the overall shape of the receptor. Currently, no other web service for GPCR modeling provides this possibility. GPCRM is continually upgraded in a semi-automatic way and the number of template structures has increased from 20 in 2013 to over 90 including structures the same receptor with different ligands which can influence the structure not only in the on/off manner. Two types of protein viewers can be used for visual inspection of obtained models. The extended sortable tables with available templates provide links to external databases and display ligand-receptor interactions in visual form.

  17. A Polychaete’s Powerful Punch: Venom Gland Transcriptomics of Glycera Reveals a Complex Cocktail of Toxin Homologs

    Science.gov (United States)

    von Reumont, Björn M.; Richter, Sandy; Hering, Lars; Sykes, Dan; Hetmank, Jörg; Jenner, Ronald A.; Bleidorn, Christoph

    2014-01-01

    Glycerids are marine annelids commonly known as bloodworms. Bloodworms have an eversible proboscis adorned with jaws connected to venom glands. Bloodworms prey on invertebrates, and it is known that the venom glands produce compounds that can induce toxic effects in animals. Yet, none of these putative toxins has been characterized on a molecular basis. Here we present the transcriptomic profiles of the venom glands of three species of bloodworm, Glycera dibranchiata, Glycera fallax and Glycera tridactyla, as well as the body tissue of G. tridactyla. The venom glands express a complex mixture of transcripts coding for putative toxin precursors. These transcripts represent 20 known toxin classes that have been convergently recruited into animal venoms, as well as transcripts potentially coding for Glycera-specific toxins. The toxins represent five functional categories: Pore-forming and membrane-disrupting toxins, neurotoxins, protease inhibitors, other enzymes, and CAP domain toxins. Many of the transcripts coding for putative Glycera toxins belong to classes that have been widely recruited into venoms, but some are homologs of toxins previously only known from the venoms of scorpaeniform fish and monotremes (stonustoxin-like toxin), turrid gastropods (turripeptide-like peptides), and sea anemones (gigantoxin I-like neurotoxin). This complex mixture of toxin homologs suggests that bloodworms employ venom while predating on macroscopic prey, casting doubt on the previously widespread opinion that G. dibranchiata is a detritivore. Our results further show that researchers should be aware that different assembly methods, as well as different methods of homology prediction, can influence the transcriptomic profiling of venom glands. PMID:25193302

  18. Dynamics of Cellular Proliferation during 'Acute Homologous Disease' in Mice

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vitale, B.; Silobrcic, V.; Jurin, M.; Matosic, M.; Tomazic, Vesna [Laboratory for Transplantation and Tumour Immunology, Department of Biology, Institute Ruder Boskovic, Zagreb, Yugoslavia (Croatia)

    1968-08-15

    CBA mice, lethally irradiated and injected with 20 x 10{sup 6} bone-marrow cells derived from C57BL donors, develop a chronic form of 'homologous disease' and die between 20 and 40 days after treatment. If 10 x 10{sup 6} lymph node cells are added to the bone-marrow suspension, all recipients develop 'acute' homologous disease and die 6 to 10 days after irradiation. Different parameters of the disease were systematically observed. Among them, changes in spleen weight indicated early cell proliferation, which reached its maximum on day 4 and progressively decreased later on. Chromosomal analysis showed that all dividing cells in the spleen were of donor origin. Their number decreased concomitantly with the shrinkage and devastation of the organ, which started on day 6. The period of devastation of the spleen fully corresponds to the time in which all animals die. The use of cyclophosphamide in the treatment of 'acute' homologous disease transformed the disease into a chronic form with a mortality very similar to that obtained when only bone-marrow cells were injected. Among other effects, treatment with cyclophosphamide prevented early proliferation of donor cells in the spleen, and delayed spleen weight increase for about 10 days. After that period spleen weight increased, reaching its maximum on day 12. At first only donor type cells could be detected, but towards the end of the period in which spleen weight increase was registered host type cells appeared among the cells in mitosis. Their number gradually increased, and in some cases the majority or all of the dividing cells were of the host type. After a transitional decrease in spleen weight, another peak in cellular proliferation consisting of either host or donor or both types of cells was observed about day 30. In spite of the observed irregularities in the origin of dividing cells, all animals died by day 40 after application of cyclophosphamide. The relationship between proliferation of injected lymph node

  19. Fetal scalp pH testing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fetal scalp blood; Scalp pH testing; Fetal blood testing - scalp; Fetal distress - fetal scalp testing; Labor - fetal scalp testing ... a baby. In these cases, testing the scalp pH can help the doctor decide whether the fetus ...

  20. Acid loading test (pH)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/003615.htm Acid loading test (pH) To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. The acid loading test (pH) measures the ability of the ...

  1. Domain: Labour market

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Oude Mulders, J.; Wadensjö, E.; Hasselhorn, H.M.; Apt, W.

    This domain chapter is dedicated to summarize research on the effects of labour market contextual factors on labour market participation of older workers (aged 50+) and identify research gaps. While employment participation and the timing of (early) retirement is often modelled as an individual

  2. Cellulose binding domain proteins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shoseyov, Oded; Shpiegl, Itai; Goldstein, Marc; Doi, Roy

    1998-01-01

    A cellulose binding domain (CBD) having a high affinity for crystalline cellulose and chitin is disclosed, along with methods for the molecular cloning and recombinant production thereof. Fusion products comprising the CBD and a second protein are likewise described. A wide range of applications are contemplated for both the CBD and the fusion products, including drug delivery, affinity separations, and diagnostic techniques.

  3. Domain-Specific Multimodeling

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hessellund, Anders

    the overall level of abstraction. It does, however, also introduce a new problem of coordinating multiple different languages in a single system. We call this problem the coordination problem. In this thesis, we present the coordination method for domain-specific multimodeling that explicitly targets...

  4. GlycoDomainViewer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Joshi, Hiren J; Jørgensen, Anja; Schjoldager, Katrine T

    2018-01-01

    features, which enhances visibility and accessibility of the wealth of glycoproteomic data being generated. The GlycoDomainViewer enables visual exploration of glycoproteomic data, incorporating information from recent N- and O-glycoproteome studies on human and animal cell lines and some organs and body...

  5. pH sensor calibration procedure

    OpenAIRE

    Artero Delgado, Carola; Nogueras Cervera, Marc; Manuel Lázaro, Antonio; Prat Tasias, Jordi; Prat Farran, Joana d'Arc

    2013-01-01

    This paper describes the calibration of pH sensor located at the OBSEA marine Observatory. This instrument is based on an industrial pH electrode that is connected to a CTD instrument (Conductivity, Temperature, and Depth ). The calibration of the pH sensor has been done using a high precision spectrophotometer pH meter from Institute of Marine Sciences (ICM), and in this way it has been obtained a numerical function for the p H sensor propor...

  6. Improvement in Protein Domain Identification Is Reached by Breaking Consensus, with the Agreement of Many Profiles and Domain Co-occurrence.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juliana Bernardes

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Traditional protein annotation methods describe known domains with probabilistic models representing consensus among homologous domain sequences. However, when relevant signals become too weak to be identified by a global consensus, attempts for annotation fail. Here we address the fundamental question of domain identification for highly divergent proteins. By using high performance computing, we demonstrate that the limits of state-of-the-art annotation methods can be bypassed. We design a new strategy based on the observation that many structural and functional protein constraints are not globally conserved through all species but might be locally conserved in separate clades. We propose a novel exploitation of the large amount of data available: 1. for each known protein domain, several probabilistic clade-centered models are constructed from a large and differentiated panel of homologous sequences, 2. a decision-making protocol combines outcomes obtained from multiple models, 3. a multi-criteria optimization algorithm finds the most likely protein architecture. The method is evaluated for domain and architecture prediction over several datasets and statistical testing hypotheses. Its performance is compared against HMMScan and HHblits, two widely used search methods based on sequence-profile and profile-profile comparison. Due to their closeness to actual protein sequences, clade-centered models are shown to be more specific and functionally predictive than the broadly used consensus models. Based on them, we improved annotation of Plasmodium falciparum protein sequences on a scale not previously possible. We successfully predict at least one domain for 72% of P. falciparum proteins against 63% achieved previously, corresponding to 30% of improvement over the total number of Pfam domain predictions on the whole genome. The method is applicable to any genome and opens new avenues to tackle evolutionary questions such as the reconstruction of

  7. The framing of scientific domains

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dam Christensen, Hans

    2014-01-01

    domains, and UNISIST helps understanding this navigation. Design/methodology/approach The UNISIST models are tentatively applied to the domain of art history at three stages, respectively two modern, partially overlapping domains, as well as an outline of an art historical domain anno c1820...

  8. Caffeine suppresses homologous recombination through interference with RAD51-mediated joint molecule formation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zelensky, Alex N.; Sanchez, Humberto; Ristic, Dejan; Vidic, Iztok; van Rossum-Fikkert, Sari E.; Essers, Jeroen; Wyman, Claire; Kanaar, Roland

    2013-01-01

    Caffeine is a widely used inhibitor of the protein kinases that play a central role in the DNA damage response. We used chemical inhibitors and genetically deficient mouse embryonic stem cell lines to study the role of DNA damage response in stable integration of the transfected DNA and found that caffeine rapidly, efficiently and reversibly inhibited homologous integration of the transfected DNA as measured by several homologous recombination-mediated gene-targeting assays. Biochemical and structural biology experiments revealed that caffeine interfered with a pivotal step in homologous recombination, homologous joint molecule formation, through increasing interactions of the RAD51 nucleoprotein filament with non-homologous DNA. Our results suggest that recombination pathways dependent on extensive homology search are caffeine-sensitive and stress the importance of considering direct checkpoint-independent mechanisms in the interpretation of the effects of caffeine on DNA repair. PMID:23666627

  9. Future trypanosomatid phylogenies: refined homologies, supertrees and networks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stothard JR

    2000-01-01

    Full Text Available There has been good progress in inferring the evolutionary relationships within trypanosomes from DNA data as until relatively recently, many relationships have remained rather speculative. Ongoing molecular studies have provided data that have adequately shown Trypanosoma to be monophyletic and, rather surprisingly, that there are sharply contrasting levels of genetic variation within and between the major trypanosomatid groups. There are still, however, areas of research that could benefit from further development and resolution that broadly fall upon three questions. Are the current statements of evolutionary homology within ribosomal small sub-unit genes in need of refinement? Can the published phylograms be expanded upon to form `supertrees' depicting further relationships? Does a bifurcating tree structure impose an untenable dogma upon trypanosomatid phylogeny where hybridisation or reticulate evolutionary steps have played a part? This article briefly addresses these three questions and, in so doing, hopes to stimulate further interest in the molecular evolution of the group.

  10. Development and homology of the incisor teeth in the rabbit

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Muylle, S.; Simoens, P.; Lauwers, H.

    1996-01-01

    The morphology and development of the incisors were investigated stercomicroscopically, radiographically and by means of serial histologic sections in fetal, juvenile and adult New Zealand White rabbits. A vestigial and a major incisor develop on both sides of the upper and of the lower jaw, while a diphyodont minor incisor is located caudal to the major incisor on both sides of the upper jaw. The present study describes a unique case of incisor polyodontia in an adult wild rabbit, that exhibited all the characteristics of a typical atavistic dentition. From these observations it was deduced that the vestigial and the major incisors in the rabbit are monophyodont and correspond to the first and second incisors respectively, while the minor diphyodont incisor in the upper jaw is homologous with the third incisor

  11. Development and characterization of a homologous radioimmunoassay for equine prolactin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Roser, J.F.; Chang, Y.S.; Papkoff, H.; Li, C.H.

    1984-01-01

    A specific and sensitive homologous radioimmunoassay has been developed for equine prolactin, suitable for measuring prolactin concentrations in serum of horses. The sensitivity of the assay ranged from 0.4 to 0.6 ng/ml and the intra- and inter-assay coefficients of variation averaged 6.9 and 15.4%, respectively, for five doses of hormone. Cross-reactivity with other mammalian and nonmammalian prolactins and growth hormones was less than 20 and 0.3%, respectively. Cross-reactivity with equine growth hormone was less than 0.07%. Equine serum and pituitary extracts showed parallel dilution-response curves with equine prolactin. The percentage recovery of exogenous equine prolactin in serum was 89%. Preliminary analysis of several physiological samples (stallions, pregnant, and nonpregnant mares) yielded values from 0.6 to 12.0 ng/ml

  12. Identification of rodent homologs of hepatitis C virus and pegiviruses

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kapoor, Amit; Simmonds, Peter; Scheel, Troels K H

    2013-01-01

    UNLABELLED: Hepatitis C virus (HCV) and human pegivirus (HPgV or GB virus C) are globally distributed and infect 2 to 5% of the human population. The lack of tractable-animal models for these viruses, in particular for HCV, has hampered the study of infection, transmission, virulence, immunity...... into the origins of human infections and enhances our ability to study their pathogenesis and explore preventive and therapeutic interventions. Horses are the only reported host of nonprimate homologs of hepatitis C virus (HCV). Here, we report the discovery of HCV-like viruses in wild rodents. The majority of HCV...... of small-animal models for HCV, the most common infectious cause of liver failure and hepatocellular carcinoma after hepatitis B virus, and help to explore the health relevance of the highly prevalent human pegiviruses....

  13. The tedious task of finding homologous noncoding RNA genes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Menzel, Karl Peter; Gorodkin, Jan; Stadler, Peter F

    2009-01-01

    User-driven in silico RNA homology search is still a nontrivial task. In part, this is the consequence of a limited precision of the computational tools in spite of recent exciting progress in this area, and to a certain extent, computational costs are still problematic in practice. An important......, and as we argue here, dominating issue is the dependence on good curated (secondary) structural alignments of the RNAs. These are often hard to obtain, not so much because of an inherent limitation in the available data, but because they require substantial manual curation, an effort that is rarely...... acknowledged. Here, we qualitatively describe a realistic scenario for what a "regular user" (i.e., a nonexpert in a particular RNA family) can do in practice, and what kind of results are likely to be achieved. Despite the indisputable advances in computational RNA biology, the conclusion is discouraging...

  14. On the homology of the shoulder girdle in turtles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagashima, Hiroshi; Sugahara, Fumiaki; Takechi, Masaki; Sato, Noboru; Kuratani, Shigeru

    2015-05-01

    The shoulder girdle in turtles is encapsulated in the shell and has a triradiate morphology. Due to its unique configuration among amniotes, many theories have been proposed about the skeletal identities of the projections for the past two centuries. Although the dorsal ramus represents the scapular blade, the ventral two rami remain uncertain. In particular, the ventrorostral process has been compared to a clavicle, an acromion, and a procoracoid based on its morphology, its connectivity to the rest of the skeleton and to muscles, as well as with its ossification center, cell lineage, and gene expression. In making these comparisons, the shoulder girdle skeleton of anurans has often been used as a reference. This review traces the history of the debate on the homology of the shoulder girdle in turtles. And based on the integrative aspects of developmental biology, comparative morphology, and paleontology, we suggest acromion and procoracoid identities for the two ventral processes. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  15. Homology of yeast photoreactivating gene fragment with human genomic digests

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Meechan, P.J.; Milam, K.M.; Cleaver, J.E.

    1984-01-01

    Enzymatic photoreactivation of UV-induced DNA lesions has been demonstrated for a variety of prokaryotic and eukaryotic organisms. Its presence in placental mammals, however, has not been clearly established. The authors attempted to resolve this question by assaying for the presence (or absence) of sequences in human DNA complimentary to a fragment of the photoreactivating gene from S. cerevisiae that has recently been cloned. In another study, DNA from human, chick E. coli and yeast cells was digested with either HindIII of BglII, electrophoresed on a 0.5% agarose gel, transferred (Southern blot) to a nylon membrane and probed for homology against a Sau3A restriction fragment from S. cerevisiae that compliments phr/sup -/ cells. Hybridization to human DNA digests was observed only under relatively non-stringent conditions indicating the gene is not conserved in placental mammals. These results are correlated with current literature data concerning photoreactivating enzymes

  16. PhD students and integrative research

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Fry, G.; Tress, B.; Tress, G.

    2006-01-01

    The training of PhD students is currently very dynamic and varies widely from place to place. We present some examples of this variation and comment on how it may affect the way PhD students cope with integrative studies. Our focus is on the training needs of PhD students studying integrative

  17. Variation in the Subcellular Localization and Protein Folding Activity among Arabidopsis thaliana Homologs of Protein Disulfide Isomerase

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christen Y. L. Yuen

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Protein disulfide isomerases (PDIs catalyze the formation, breakage, and rearrangement of disulfide bonds to properly fold nascent polypeptides within the endoplasmic reticulum (ER. Classical animal and yeast PDIs possess two catalytic thioredoxin-like domains (a, a′ and two non-catalytic domains (b, b′, in the order a-b-b′-a′. The model plant, Arabidopsis thaliana, encodes 12 PDI-like proteins, six of which possess the classical PDI domain arrangement (AtPDI1 through AtPDI6. Three additional AtPDIs (AtPDI9, AtPDI10, AtPDI11 possess two thioredoxin domains, but without intervening b-b′ domains. C-terminal green fluorescent protein (GFP fusions to each of the nine dual-thioredoxin PDI homologs localized predominantly to the ER lumen when transiently expressed in protoplasts. Additionally, expression of AtPDI9:GFP-KDEL and AtPDI10: GFP-KDDL was associated with the formation of ER bodies. AtPDI9, AtPDI10, and AtPDI11 mediated the oxidative folding of alkaline phosphatase when heterologously expressed in the Escherichia coli protein folding mutant, dsbA−. However, only three classical AtPDIs (AtPDI2, AtPDI5, AtPDI6 functionally complemented dsbA−. Interestingly, chemical inducers of the ER unfolded protein response were previously shown to upregulate most of the AtPDIs that complemented dsbA−. The results indicate that Arabidopsis PDIs differ in their localization and protein folding activities to fulfill distinct molecular functions in the ER.

  18. How to Choose the Suitable Template for Homology Modelling of GPCRs: 5-HT7 Receptor as a Test Case.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shahaf, Nir; Pappalardo, Matteo; Basile, Livia; Guccione, Salvatore; Rayan, Anwar

    2016-09-01

    G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) are a super-family of membrane proteins that attract great pharmaceutical interest due to their involvement in almost every physiological activity, including extracellular stimuli, neurotransmission, and hormone regulation. Currently, structural information on many GPCRs is mainly obtained by the techniques of computer modelling in general and by homology modelling in particular. Based on a quantitative analysis of eighteen antagonist-bound, resolved structures of rhodopsin family "A" receptors - also used as templates to build 153 homology models - it was concluded that a higher sequence identity between two receptors does not guarantee a lower RMSD between their structures, especially when their pair-wise sequence identity (within trans-membrane domain and/or in binding pocket) lies between 25 % and 40 %. This study suggests that we should consider all template receptors having a sequence identity ≤50 % with the query receptor. In fact, most of the GPCRs, compared to the currently available resolved structures of GPCRs, fall within this range and lack a correlation between structure and sequence. When testing suitability for structure-based drug design, it was found that choosing as a template the most similar resolved protein, based on sequence resemblance only, led to unsound results in many cases. Molecular docking analyses were carried out, and enrichment factors as well as attrition rates were utilized as criteria for assessing suitability for structure-based drug design. © 2016 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  19. Bacteriophage T5 encodes a homolog of the eukaryotic transcription coactivator PC4 implicated in recombination-dependent DNA replication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steigemann, Birthe; Schulz, Annina; Werten, Sebastiaan

    2013-11-15

    The RNA polymerase II cofactor PC4 globally regulates transcription of protein-encoding genes through interactions with unwinding DNA, the basal transcription machinery and transcription activators. Here, we report the surprising identification of PC4 homologs in all sequenced representatives of the T5 family of bacteriophages, as well as in an archaeon and seven phyla of eubacteria. We have solved the crystal structure of the full-length T5 protein at 1.9Å, revealing a striking resemblance to the characteristic single-stranded DNA (ssDNA)-binding core domain of PC4. Intriguing novel structural features include a potential regulatory region at the N-terminus and a C-terminal extension of the homodimerisation interface. The genome organisation of T5-related bacteriophages points at involvement of the PC4 homolog in recombination-dependent DNA replication, strongly suggesting that the protein corresponds to the hitherto elusive replicative ssDNA-binding protein of the T5 family. Our findings imply that PC4-like factors intervene in multiple unwinding-related processes by acting as versatile modifiers of nucleic acid conformation and raise the possibility that the eukaryotic transcription coactivator derives from ancestral DNA replication, recombination and repair factors. © 2013.

  20. Identification of a serine proteinase homolog (Sp-SPH) involved in immune defense in the mud crab Scylla paramamosain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Qiu-xia; Liu, Hai-peng; Chen, Rong-yuan; Shen, Kai-li; Wang, Ke-jian

    2013-01-01

    Clip domain serine proteinase homologs are involved in many biological processes including immune response. To identify the immune function of a serine proteinase homolog (Sp-SPH), originally isolated from hemocytes of the mud crab, Scylla paramamosain, the Sp-SPH was expressed recombinantly and purified for further studies. It was found that the Sp-SPH protein could bind to a number of bacteria (including Aeromonas hydrophila, Escherichia coli, Staphylococcus aureus, Vibrio fluvialis, Vibrio harveyi and Vibrio parahemolyticus), bacterial cell wall components such as lipopolysaccharide or peptidoglycan (PGN), and β-1, 3-glucan of fungus. But no direct antibacterial activity of Sp-SPH protein was shown by using minimum inhibitory concentration or minimum bactericidal concentration assays. Nevertheless, the Sp-SPH protein was found to significantly enhance the crab hemocyte adhesion activity (paired t-test, Pparahemolyticus which were both recognized by Sp-SPH protein, if pre-incubated with Sp-SPH protein, respectively. Whereas, the crabs died much faster when challenged with Vibrio alginolyiicus, a pathogenic bacterium not recognized by Sp-SPH protein, compared to those of crabs challenged with A. hydrophila or V. parahemolyticus when pre-coated with Sp-SPH protein. Taken together, these data suggested that Sp-SPH molecule might play an important role in immune defense against bacterial infection in the mud crab S. paramamosain.

  1. Identification of a Serine Proteinase Homolog (Sp-SPH) Involved in Immune Defense in the Mud Crab Scylla paramamosain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Qiu-xia; Liu, Hai-peng; Chen, Rong-yuan; Shen, Kai-li; Wang, Ke-jian

    2013-01-01

    Clip domain serine proteinase homologs are involved in many biological processes including immune response. To identify the immune function of a serine proteinase homolog (Sp-SPH), originally isolated from hemocytes of the mud crab, Scylla paramamosain, the Sp-SPH was expressed recombinantly and purified for further studies. It was found that the Sp-SPH protein could bind to a number of bacteria (including Aeromonas hydrophila, Escherichia coli, Staphylococcus aureus, Vibrio fluvialis, Vibrio harveyi and Vibrio parahemolyticus), bacterial cell wall components such as lipopolysaccharide or peptidoglycan (PGN), and β-1, 3-glucan of fungus. But no direct antibacterial activity of Sp-SPH protein was shown by using minimum inhibitory concentration or minimum bactericidal concentration assays. Nevertheless, the Sp-SPH protein was found to significantly enhance the crab hemocyte adhesion activity (paired t-test, Pparahemolyticus which were both recognized by Sp-SPH protein, if pre-incubated with Sp-SPH protein, respectively. Whereas, the crabs died much faster when challenged with Vibrio alginolyiicus, a pathogenic bacterium not recognized by Sp-SPH protein, compared to those of crabs challenged with A. hydrophila or V. parahemolyticus when pre-coated with Sp-SPH protein. Taken together, these data suggested that Sp-SPH molecule might play an important role in immune defense against bacterial infection in the mud crab S. paramamosain. PMID:23724001

  2. Direct association between the Ret receptor tyrosine kinase and the Src homology 2-containing adapter protein Grb7.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pandey, A; Liu, X; Dixon, J E; Di Fiore, P P; Dixit, V M

    1996-05-03

    Adapter proteins containing Src homology 2 (SH2) domains link transmembrane receptor protein-tyrosine kinases to downstream signal transducing molecules. A family of SH2 containing adapter proteins including Grb7 and Grb10 has been recently identified. We had previously shown that Grb10 associates with Ret via its SH2 domain in an activation-dependent manner (Pandey, A., Duan, H., Di Fiore, P.P., and Dixit, V.M. (1995) J. Biol, Chem. 270, 21461-21463). We now demonstrate that the related adapter molecule Grb7 also associates with Ret in vitro and in vivo, and that the binding of the SH2 domain of Grb7 to Ret is direct. This binding is dependent upon Ret autophosphorylation since Grb7 is incapable of binding a kinase-defective mutant of Ret. Thus two members of the Grb family, Grb7 and Grb10, likely relay signals emanating from Ret to other, as yet, unidentified targets within the cell.

  3. Loss of C. elegans GON-1, an ADAMTS9 Homolog, Decreases Secretion Resulting in Altered Lifespan and Dauer Formation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sawako Yoshina

    Full Text Available ADAMTS9 is a metalloprotease that cleaves components of the extracellular matrix and is also implicated in transport from the endoplasmic reticulum (ER to the Golgi. It has been reported that an ADAMTS9 gene variant is associated with type 2 diabetes. The underlying pathology of type 2 diabetes is insulin resistance and beta-cell dysfunction. However, the molecular mechanisms underlying ADAMTS9 function in beta cells and peripheral tissues are unknown. We show that loss of C. elegans GON-1, an ADAMTS9 homolog, alters lifespan and dauer formation. GON-1 loss impairs secretion of proteins such as insulin orthologs and TGF-beta, and additionally impacts insulin/IGF-1 signaling in peripheral tissues. The function of the GON domain, but not the protease domain, is essential for normal lifespan and dauer formation in these scenarios. We conclude that the GON domain is critical for ADAMTS9/GON-1 function across species, which should help the understanding of type 2 diabetes in humans.

  4. A Helicobacter pylori Homolog of Eukaryotic Flotillin Is Involved in Cholesterol Accumulation, Epithelial Cell Responses and Host Colonization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Melanie L. Hutton

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available The human pathogen Helicobacter pylori acquires cholesterol from membrane raft domains in eukaryotic cells, commonly known as “lipid rafts.” Incorporation of this cholesterol into the H. pylori cell membrane allows the bacterium to avoid clearance by the host immune system and to resist the effects of antibiotics and antimicrobial peptides. The presence of cholesterol in H. pylori bacteria suggested that this pathogen may have cholesterol-enriched domains within its membrane. Consistent with this suggestion, we identified a hypothetical H. pylori protein (HP0248 with homology to the flotillin proteins normally found in the cholesterol-enriched domains of eukaryotic cells. As shown for eukaryotic flotillin proteins, HP0248 was detected in detergent-resistant membrane fractions of H. pylori. Importantly, H. pylori HP0248 mutants contained lower levels of cholesterol than wild-type bacteria (P < 0.01. HP0248 mutant bacteria also exhibited defects in type IV secretion functions, as indicated by reduced IL-8 responses and CagA translocation in epithelial cells (P < 0.05, and were less able to establish a chronic infection in mice than wild-type bacteria (P < 0.05. Thus, we have identified an H. pylori flotillin protein and shown its importance for bacterial virulence. Taken together, the data demonstrate important roles for H. pylori flotillin in host-pathogen interactions. We propose that H. pylori flotillin may be required for the organization of virulence proteins into membrane raft-like structures in this pathogen.

  5. Internal and External Reconnection Series Homologous Solar Flares

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sterling, Alphonse C.; Moore, Ronald L.

    2001-01-01

    Using data from the extreme ultraviolet imaging telescope (EIT) on SOHO and the soft X-ray telescope (SXT) on Yohkoh, we examine a series of morphologically homologous solar flares occurring in National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) active region 8210 over May 1-2, 1998. An emerging flux region (EFR) impacted against a sunspot to the west and next to a coronal hole to the east is the source of the repeated flaring. An SXT sigmoid parallels the EFR's neutral line at the site of the initial flaring in soft X rays. In EIT each flaring episode begins with the formation of a crinkle pattern external to the EFR. These EIT crinkles move out from, and then in toward, the EFR with velocities approx. 20 km/ s. A shrinking and expansion of the width of the coronal hole coincides with the crinkle activity, and generation and evolution of a postflare loop system begins near the time of crinkle formation. Using a schematic based on magnetograms of the region, we suggest that these observations are consistent with the standard reconnection-based model for solar eruptions but are modified by the presence of the additional magnetic fields of the sunspot and coronal hole. In the schematic, internal reconnection begins inside of the EFR-associated fields, unleashing a flare, postflare loops, and a coronal mass ejection (CME). External reconnection, first occurring between the escaping CME and the coronal hole field and second occurring between fields formed as a result of the first external reconnection, results in the EIT crinkles and changes in the coronal hole boundary. By the end of the second external reconnection, the initial setup is reinstated; thus the sequence can repeat, resulting in morphologically homologous eruptions. Our inferred magnetic topology is similar to that suggested in the "breakout model" of eruptions although we cannot determine if our eruptions are released primarily by the breakout mechanism (external reconnection) or, alternatively

  6. Function of Rad51 paralogs in eukaryotic homologous recombinational repair

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu, N.; Skowronek, K.

    2003-01-01

    Full text: Homologous recombinational repair (HRR) is an important mechanism for maintaining genetic integrity and cancer prevention by accurately repair of DNA double strand breaks induced by environmental insults or occurred in DNA replication. A critical step in HRR is the polymerization of Rad51 on single stranded DNA to form nuclear protein filaments, the later conduct DNA strand paring and exchange between homologous strands. A number of proteins, including replication protein A (RPA), Rad52 and Rad51 paralogs, are suggested to modulate or facilitate the process of Rad51 filament formation. Five Rad51 paralogs, namely XRCC2, XRCC3, Rad51B, Rad51C and Rad51D have been identified in eucaryotic cells. These proteins show distant protein sequence identity to Rad51, to yeast Rad51 paralogs (Rad55 and Rad57) and to each other. Hamster or chicken mutants of Rad51 paralogs exhibit hypersensitivity to a variety of DNA damaging agents, especially cross-linking agents, and are defective in assembly of Rad51 onto HRR site after DNA damage. Recent data from our and other labs showed that Rad51 paralogs constitute two distinct complexes in cell extracts, one contains XRCC2, Rad51B, Rad51C and Rad51D, and the other contains Rad51C and XRCC3. Rad51C is involved in both complexes. Our results also showed that XRCC3-Rad51C complex interacts with Rad51 in vivo. Furthermore, overexpression of Rad52 can partially suppress the hypersensitivity of XRCC2 mutant irs1 to ionizing radiation and corrected the defects in Rad51 focus formation. These results suggest that XRCC2 and other Rad51 paralogs play a mediator function to Rad51 in the early stage of HRR

  7. DNA damage, homology-directed repair, and DNA methylation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Concetta Cuozzo

    2007-07-01

    Full Text Available To explore the link between DNA damage and gene silencing, we induced a DNA double-strand break in the genome of Hela or mouse embryonic stem (ES cells using I-SceI restriction endonuclease. The I-SceI site lies within one copy of two inactivated tandem repeated green fluorescent protein (GFP genes (DR-GFP. A total of 2%-4% of the cells generated a functional GFP by homology-directed repair (HR and gene conversion. However, approximately 50% of these recombinants expressed GFP poorly. Silencing was rapid and associated with HR and DNA methylation of the recombinant gene, since it was prevented in Hela cells by 5-aza-2'-deoxycytidine. ES cells deficient in DNA methyl transferase 1 yielded as many recombinants as wild-type cells, but most of these recombinants expressed GFP robustly. Half of the HR DNA molecules were de novo methylated, principally downstream to the double-strand break, and half were undermethylated relative to the uncut DNA. Methylation of the repaired gene was independent of the methylation status of the converting template. The methylation pattern of recombinant molecules derived from pools of cells carrying DR-GFP at different loci, or from an individual clone carrying DR-GFP at a single locus, was comparable. ClustalW analysis of the sequenced GFP molecules in Hela and ES cells distinguished recombinant and nonrecombinant DNA solely on the basis of their methylation profile and indicated that HR superimposed novel methylation profiles on top of the old patterns. Chromatin immunoprecipitation and RNA analysis revealed that DNA methyl transferase 1 was bound specifically to HR GFP DNA and that methylation of the repaired segment contributed to the silencing of GFP expression. Taken together, our data support a mechanistic link between HR and DNA methylation and suggest that DNA methylation in eukaryotes marks homologous recombined segments.

  8. A fluorescence polarization based screening assay for identification of small molecule inhibitors of the PICK1 PDZ domain

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thorsen, Thor S; Madsen, Kenneth L; Dyhring, Tino

    2011-01-01

    PDZ (PSD-95/Discs-large/ZO-1 homology) domains represent putative targets in several diseases including cancer, stroke, addiction and neuropathic pain. Here we describe the application of a simple and fast screening assay based on fluorescence polarization (FP) to identify inhibitors of the PDZ...

  9. Structural Basis for Endosomal Targeting by the Bro1 Domain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Jaewon; Sitaraman, Sujatha; Hierro, Aitor; Beach, Bridgette M.; Odorizzi, Greg; Hurley, James H.

    2010-01-01

    Summary Proteins delivered to the lysosome or the yeast vacuole via late endosomes are sorted by the ESCRT complexes and by associated proteins, including Alix and its yeast homolog Bro1. Alix, Bro1, and several other late endosomal proteins share a conserved 160 residue Bro1 domain whose boundaries, structure, and function have not been characterized. The crystal structure of the Bro1 domain of Bro1 reveals a folded core of 367 residues. The extended Bro1 domain is necessary and sufficient for binding to the ESCRT-III subunit Snf7 and for the recruitment of Bro1 to late endosomes. The structure resembles a boomerang with its concave face filled in and contains a triple tetratricopeptide repeat domain as a substructure. Snf7 binds to a conserved hydrophobic patch on Bro1 that is required for protein complex formation and for the protein-sorting function of Bro1. These results define a conserved mechanism whereby Bro1 domain-containing proteins are targeted to endosomes by Snf7 and its orthologs. PMID:15935782

  10. Oral Region Homologies in Paleozoic Crinoids and Other Plesiomorphic Pentaradial Echinoderms

    OpenAIRE

    Kammer, Thomas W.; Sumrall, Colin D.; Zamora, Samuel; Ausich, William I.; Deline, Bradley

    2013-01-01

    The phylogenetic relationships between major groups of plesiomorphic pentaradial echinoderms, the Paleozoic crinoids, blastozoans, and edrioasteroids, are poorly understood because of a lack of widely recognized homologies. Here, we present newly recognized oral region homologies, based on the Universal Elemental Homology model for skeletal plates, in a wide range of fossil taxa. The oral region of echinoderms is mainly composed of the axial, or ambulacral, skeleton, which apparently evolved ...

  11. In vitro site selection of a consensus binding site for the Drosophila melanogaster Tbx20 homolog midline.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nima Najand

    Full Text Available We employed in vitro site selection to identify a consensus binding sequence for the Drosophila melanogaster Tbx20 T-box transcription factor homolog Midline. We purified a bacterially expressed T-box DNA binding domain of Midline, and used it in four rounds of precipitation and polymerase-chain-reaction based amplification. We cloned and sequenced 54 random oligonucleotides selected by Midline. Electromobility shift-assays confirmed that 27 of these could bind the Midline T-box. Sequence alignment of these 27 clones suggests that Midline binds as a monomer to a consensus sequence that contains an AGGTGT core. Thus, the Midline consensus binding site we define in this study is similar to that defined for vertebrate Tbx20, but differs from a previously reported Midline binding sequence derived through site selection.

  12. TENCompetence Domain Model

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    2006-01-01

    This is the version 1.1 of the TENCompetence Domain Model (version 1.0 released at 19-6-2006; version 1.1 at 9-11-2008). It contains several files: a) a pdf with the model description, b) three jpg files with class models (also in the pdf), c) a MagicDraw zip file with the model itself, d) a release

  13. Construction and validation of a homology model of the human voltage-gated proton channel hHV1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kulleperuma, Kethika; Smith, Susan M E; Morgan, Deri; Musset, Boris; Holyoake, John; Chakrabarti, Nilmadhab; Cherny, Vladimir V; DeCoursey, Thomas E; Pomès, Régis

    2013-04-01

    The topological similarity of voltage-gated proton channels (H(V)1s) to the voltage-sensing domain (VSD) of other voltage-gated ion channels raises the central question of whether H(V)1s have a similar structure. We present the construction and validation of a homology model of the human H(V)1 (hH(V)1). Multiple structural alignment was used to construct structural models of the open (proton-conducting) state of hH(V)1 by exploiting the homology of hH(V)1 with VSDs of K(+) and Na(+) channels of known three-dimensional structure. The comparative assessment of structural stability of the homology models and their VSD templates was performed using massively repeated molecular dynamics simulations in which the proteins were allowed to relax from their initial conformation in an explicit membrane mimetic. The analysis of structural deviations from the initial conformation based on up to 125 repeats of 100-ns simulations for each system reveals structural features consistently retained in the homology models and leads to a consensus structural model for hH(V)1 in which well-defined external and internal salt-bridge networks stabilize the open state. The structural and electrostatic properties of this open-state model are compatible with proton translocation and offer an explanation for the reversal of charge selectivity in neutral mutants of Asp(112). Furthermore, these structural properties are consistent with experimental accessibility data, providing a valuable basis for further structural and functional studies of hH(V)1. Each Arg residue in the S4 helix of hH(V)1 was replaced by His to test accessibility using Zn(2+) as a probe. The two outermost Arg residues in S4 were accessible to external solution, whereas the innermost one was accessible only to the internal solution. Both modeling and experimental data indicate that in the open state, Arg(211), the third Arg residue in the S4 helix in hH(V)1, remains accessible to the internal solution and is located near the

  14. Homologous series of induced early mutants in Indica rice. Pt.3: The relationship between the induction of homologous series of early mutants and its different pedigree

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen Xiulan; Yang Hefeng; He Zhentian; Han Yuepeng; Liu Xueyu

    2002-01-01

    The percentage of homologous series of early mutants (PHSEM) induced by irradiation was closely related to its pedigree. This study showed that PHSEM for varieties with the same pedigree were similar, and there were three different level of dominance (high, low and normal) in the homologous series induced from different pedigree. The PHSEM for varieties derived form distant-relative-parents were higher than that derived from close-relative-parents. There was the dominance pedigree for the induction of homologous series of early mutants. IR8(Peta x DGWG), IR127 (Cpslo x Sigadis) and IR24 (IR8 x IR127) were dominant pedigree, and varieties derived from them could be easily induced the homologous series of early mutants

  15. SH2 Domain Histochemistry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buhs, Sophia; Nollau, Peter

    2017-01-01

    Among posttranslational modifications, the phosphorylation of tyrosine residues is a key modification in cell signaling. Because of its biological importance, characterization of the cellular state of tyrosine phosphorylation is of great interest. Based on the unique properties of endogenously expressed SH2 domains recognizing tyrosine phosphorylated signaling proteins with high specificity we have developed an alternative approach, coined SH2 profiling, enabling us to decipher complex patterns of tyrosine phosphorylation in various normal and cancerous tissues. So far, SH2 profiling has largely been applied for the analysis of protein extracts with the limitation that information on spatial distribution and intensity of tyrosine phosphorylation within a tissue is lost. Here, we describe a novel SH2 domain based strategy for differential characterization of the state of tyrosine phosphorylation in formaldehyde-fixed and paraffin-embedded tissues. This approach demonstrates that SH2 domains may serve as very valuable tools for the analysis of the differential state of tyrosine phosphorylation in primary tissues fixed and processed under conditions frequently applied by routine pathology laboratories.

  16. Structure of a two-CAP-domain protein from the human hookworm parasite Necator americanus

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Asojo, Oluwatoyin A., E-mail: oasojo@unmc.edu [Pathology and Microbiology Department, 986495 Nebraska Medical Center, Omaha, NE 68198-6495 (United States)

    2011-05-01

    The first structure of a two-CAP-domain protein, Na-ASP-1, from the major human hookworm parasite N. americanus refined to a resolution limit of 2.2 Å is presented. Major proteins secreted by the infective larval stage hookworms upon host entry include Ancylostoma secreted proteins (ASPs), which are characterized by one or two CAP (cysteine-rich secretory protein/antigen 5/pathogenesis related-1) domains. The CAP domain has been reported in diverse phylogenetically unrelated proteins, but has no confirmed function. The first structure of a two-CAP-domain protein, Na-ASP-1, from the major human hookworm parasite Necator americanus was refined to a resolution limit of 2.2 Å. The structure was solved by molecular replacement (MR) using Na-ASP-2, a one-CAP-domain ASP, as the search model. The correct MR solution could only be obtained by truncating the polyalanine model of Na-ASP-2 and removing several loops. The structure reveals two CAP domains linked by an extended loop. Overall, the carboxyl-terminal CAP domain is more similar to Na-ASP-2 than to the amino-terminal CAP domain. A large central cavity extends from the amino-terminal CAP domain to the carboxyl-terminal CAP domain, encompassing the putative CAP-binding cavity. The putative CAP-binding cavity is a characteristic cavity in the carboxyl-terminal CAP domain that contains a His and Glu pair. These residues are conserved in all single-CAP-domain proteins, but are absent in the amino-terminal CAP domain. The conserved His residues are oriented such that they appear to be capable of directly coordinating a zinc ion as observed for CAP proteins from reptile venoms. This first structure of a two-CAP-domain ASP can serve as a template for homology modeling of other two-CAP-domain proteins.

  17. Structure of a two-CAP-domain protein from the human hookworm parasite Necator americanus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Asojo, Oluwatoyin A.

    2011-01-01

    The first structure of a two-CAP-domain protein, Na-ASP-1, from the major human hookworm parasite N. americanus refined to a resolution limit of 2.2 Å is presented. Major proteins secreted by the infective larval stage hookworms upon host entry include Ancylostoma secreted proteins (ASPs), which are characterized by one or two CAP (cysteine-rich secretory protein/antigen 5/pathogenesis related-1) domains. The CAP domain has been reported in diverse phylogenetically unrelated proteins, but has no confirmed function. The first structure of a two-CAP-domain protein, Na-ASP-1, from the major human hookworm parasite Necator americanus was refined to a resolution limit of 2.2 Å. The structure was solved by molecular replacement (MR) using Na-ASP-2, a one-CAP-domain ASP, as the search model. The correct MR solution could only be obtained by truncating the polyalanine model of Na-ASP-2 and removing several loops. The structure reveals two CAP domains linked by an extended loop. Overall, the carboxyl-terminal CAP domain is more similar to Na-ASP-2 than to the amino-terminal CAP domain. A large central cavity extends from the amino-terminal CAP domain to the carboxyl-terminal CAP domain, encompassing the putative CAP-binding cavity. The putative CAP-binding cavity is a characteristic cavity in the carboxyl-terminal CAP domain that contains a His and Glu pair. These residues are conserved in all single-CAP-domain proteins, but are absent in the amino-terminal CAP domain. The conserved His residues are oriented such that they appear to be capable of directly coordinating a zinc ion as observed for CAP proteins from reptile venoms. This first structure of a two-CAP-domain ASP can serve as a template for homology modeling of other two-CAP-domain proteins

  18. On the function of chitin synthase extracellular domains in biomineralization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weiss, Ingrid M; Lüke, Florian; Eichner, Norbert; Guth, Christina; Clausen-Schaumann, Hauke

    2013-08-01

    Molluscs with various shell architectures evolved around 542-525 million years ago, as part of a larger phenomenon related to the diversification of metazoan phyla. Molluscs deposit minerals in a chitin matrix. The mollusc chitin is synthesized by transmembrane enzymes that contain several unique extracellular domains. Here we investigate the assembly mechanism of the chitin synthase Ar-CS1 via its extracellular domain ArCS1_E22. The corresponding transmembrane protein ArCS1_E22TM accumulates in membrane fractions of the expression host Dictyostelium discoideum. Soluble recombinant ArCS1_E22 proteins can be purified as monomers only at basic pH. According to confocal fluorescence microscopy experiments, immunolabeled ArCS1_E22 proteins adsorb preferably to aragonitic nacre platelets at pH 7.75. At pH 8.2 or pH 9.0 the fluorescence signal is less intense, indicating that protein-mineral interaction is reduced with increasing pH. Furthermore, ArCS1_E22 forms regular nanostructures on cationic substrates as revealed by atomic force microscopy (AFM) experiments on modified mica cleavage planes. These experiments suggest that the extracellular domain ArCS1_E22 is involved in regulating the multiple enzyme activities of Ar-CS1 such as chitin synthesis and myosin movements by interaction with mineral surfaces and eventually by protein assembly. The protein complexes could locally probe the status of mineralization according to pH unless ions and pCO2 are balanced with suitable buffer substances. Taking into account that the intact enzyme could act as a force sensor, the results presented here provide further evidence that shell formation is coordinated physiologically with precise adjustment of cellular activities to the structure, topography and stiffness at the mineralizing interface. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. p68 Sam is a substrate of the insulin receptor and associates with the SH2 domains of p85 PI3K.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sánchez-Margalet, V; Najib, S

    1999-07-23

    The 68 kDa Src substrate associated during mitosis is an RNA binding protein with Src homology 2 and 3 domain binding sites. A role for Src associated in mitosis 68 as an adaptor protein in signaling transduction has been proposed in different systems such as T-cell receptors. In the present work, we have sought to assess the possible role of Src associated in mitosis 68 in insulin receptor signaling. We performed in vivo studies in HTC-IR cells and in vitro studies using recombinant Src associated in mitosis 68, purified insulin receptor and fusion proteins containing either the N-terminal or the C-terminal Src homology 2 domain of p85 phosphatidylinositol-3-kinase. We have found that Src associated in mitosis 68 is a substrate of the insulin receptor both in vivo and in vitro. Moreover, tyrosine-phosphorylated Src associated in mitosis 68 was found to associate with p85 phosphatidylinositol-3-kinase in response to insulin, as assessed by co-immunoprecipitation studies. Therefore, Src associated in mitosis 68 may be part of the signaling complexes of insulin receptor along with p85. In vitro studies demonstrate that Src associated in mitosis 68 associates with the Src homology 2 domains of p85 after tyrosine phosphorylation by the activated insulin receptor. Moreover, tyr-phosphorylated Src associated in mitosis 68 binds with a higher affinity to the N-terminal Src homology 2 domain of p85 compared to the C-terminal Src homology 2 domain of p85, suggesting a preferential association of Src associated in mitosis 68 with the N-terminal Src homology 2 domain of p85. This association may be important for the link of the signaling with RNA metabolism.

  20. Dynamic regulation of gastric surface pH by luminal pH

    OpenAIRE

    Chu, Shaoyou; Tanaka, Shin; Kaunitz, Jonathan D.; Montrose, Marshall H.

    1999-01-01

    In vivo confocal imaging of the mucosal surface of rat stomach was used to measure pH noninvasively under the mucus gel layer while simultaneously imaging mucus gel thickness and tissue architecture. When tissue was superfused at pH 3, the 25 μm adjacent to the epithelial surface was relatively alkaline (pH 4.1 ± 0.1), and surface alkalinity was enhanced by topical dimethyl prostaglandin E2 (pH 4.8 ± 0.2). Luminal pH was changed from pH 3 to pH 5 to mimic the fasted-to-fed transition in intra...

  1. Intramolecular cross-linking in a bacterial homolog of mammalian SLC6 neurotransmitter transporters suggests an evolutionary conserved role of transmembrane segments 7 and 8

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kniazeff, Julie; Loland, Claus Juul; Goldberg, Naomi

    2005-01-01

    The extracellular concentration of the neurotransmitters dopamine, serotonin, norepinephrine, GABA and glycine is tightly controlled by plasma membrane transporters belonging to the SLC6 gene family. A very large number of putative transport proteins with a remarkable homology to the SLC6...... proximity between TM 7 and 8 in the tertiary structure of TnaT as previously suggested for the mammalian counterparts. Furthermore, the inhibition of uptake upon cross-linking the two cysteines provides indirect support for a conserved conformational role of these transmembrane domains in the transport...

  2. Insights into hydrocarbon formation by nitrogenase cofactor homologs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Chi Chung; Hu, Yilin; Ribbe, Markus W

    2015-04-14

    The L-cluster is an all-iron homolog of nitrogenase cofactors. Driven by europium(II) diethylenetriaminepentaacetate [Eu(II)-DTPA], the isolated L-cluster is capable of ATP-independent reduction of CO and CN(-) to C1 to C4 and C1 to C6 hydrocarbons, respectively. Compared to its cofactor homologs, the L-cluster generates considerably more CH4 from the reduction of CO and CN(-), which could be explained by the presence of a "free" Fe atom that is "unmasked" by homocitrate as an additional site for methanation. Moreover, the elevated CH4 formation is accompanied by a decrease in the amount of longer hydrocarbons and/or the lengths of the hydrocarbon products, illustrating a competition between CH4 formation/release and C-C coupling/chain extension. These observations suggest the possibility of designing simpler synthetic clusters for hydrocarbon formation while establishing the L-cluster as a platform for mechanistic investigations of CO and CN(-) reduction without complications originating from the heterometal and homocitrate components. Nitrogenase is a metalloenzyme that is highly complex in structure and uniquely versatile in function. It catalyzes two reactions that parallel two important industrial processes: the reduction of nitrogen to ammonia, which parallels the Haber-Bosch process in ammonia production, and the reduction of carbon monoxide to hydrocarbons, which parallels the Fischer-Tropsch process in fuel production. Thus, the significance of nitrogenase can be appreciated from the perspective of the useful products it generates: (i) ammonia, the "fixed" nitrogen that is essential for the existence of the entire human population; and (ii) hydrocarbons, the "recycled" carbon fuel that could be used to directly address the worldwide energy shortage. This article provides initial insights into the catalytic characteristics of various nitrogenase cofactors in hydrocarbon formation. The reported assay system provides a useful tool for mechanistic

  3. Homologous Basal Ganglia Network Models in Physiological and Parkinsonian Conditions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jyotika Bahuguna

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available The classical model of basal ganglia has been refined in recent years with discoveries of subpopulations within a nucleus and previously unknown projections. One such discovery is the presence of subpopulations of arkypallidal and prototypical neurons in external globus pallidus, which was previously considered to be a primarily homogeneous nucleus. Developing a computational model of these multiple interconnected nuclei is challenging, because the strengths of the connections are largely unknown. We therefore use a genetic algorithm to search for the unknown connectivity parameters in a firing rate model. We apply a binary cost function derived from empirical firing rate and phase relationship data for the physiological and Parkinsonian conditions. Our approach generates ensembles of over 1,000 configurations, or homologies, for each condition, with broad distributions for many of the parameter values and overlap between the two conditions. However, the resulting effective weights of connections from or to prototypical and arkypallidal neurons are consistent with the experimental data. We investigate the significance of the weight variability by manipulating the parameters individually and cumulatively, and conclude that the correlation observed between the parameters is necessary for generating the dynamics of the two conditions. We then investigate the response of the networks to a transient cortical stimulus, and demonstrate that networks classified as physiological effectively suppress activity in the internal globus pallidus, and are not susceptible to oscillations, whereas parkinsonian networks show the opposite tendency. Thus, we conclude that the rates and phase relationships observed in the globus pallidus are predictive of experimentally observed higher level dynamical features of the physiological and parkinsonian basal ganglia, and that the multiplicity of solutions generated by our method may well be indicative of a natural

  4. Studies of Flerovium and Element 115 Homologs with Macrocyclic Extractants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Despotopulos, John D. [Univ. of Nevada, Las Vegas, NV (United States)

    2015-03-12

    Study of the chemistry of the heaviest elements, Z ≥ 104, poses a unique challenge due to their low production cross-sections and short half-lives. Chemistry also must be studied on the one-atom-at-a-time scale, requiring automated, fast, and very efficient chemical schemes. Recent studies of the chemical behavior of copernicium (Cn, element 112) and flerovium (Fl, element 114) together with the discovery of isotopes of these elements with half-lives suitable for chemical studies have spurred a renewed interest in the development of rapid systems designed to study the chemical properties of elements with Z ≥ 114. This dissertation explores both extraction chromatography and solvent extraction as methods for development of a rapid chemical separation scheme for the homologs of flerovium (Pb, Sn, Hg) and element 115 (Bi, Sb), with the goal of developing a chemical scheme that, in the future, can be applied to on-line chemistry of both Fl and element 115. Carrier-free radionuclides, used in these studies, of the homologs of Fl and element 115 were obtained by proton activation of high-purity metal foils at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) Center for Accelerator Mass Spectrometry (CAMS): natIn(p,n)113Sn, natSn(p,n)124Sb, and Au(p,n)197m,gHg. The carrier-free activity was separated from the foils by novel separation schemes based on ion exchange and extraction chromatography techniques. Carrier-free Pb and Bi isotopes were obtained from development of a novel generator based on cation exchange chromatography using the 232U parent to generate 212Pb and 212Bi. Macrocyclic extractants, specifically crown ethers and their derivatives, were chosen for these studies; crown ethers show high selectivity for metal ions. Finally. a potential chemical system for Fl was established based on the Eichrom Pb resin, and insight to an improved system based on thiacrown ethers is

  5. Identification of a novel MLPK homologous gene MLPKn1 and its expression analysis in Brassica oleracea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Qiguo; Shi, Songmei; Liu, Yudong; Pu, Quanming; Liu, Xiaohuan; Zhang, Ying; Zhu, Liquan

    2016-09-01

    M locus protein kinase, one of the SRK-interacting proteins, is a necessary positive regulator for the self-incompatibility response in Brassica. In B. rapa, MLPK is expressed as two different transcripts, MLPKf1 and MLPKf2, and either isoform can complement the mlpk/mlpk mutation. The AtAPK1B gene has been considered to be the ortholog of BrMLPK, and AtAPK1B has no role in self-incompatibility (SI) response in A. thaliana SRK-SCR plants. Until now, what causes the MLPK and APK1B function difference during SI response in Brassica and A. thaliana SRKb-SCRb plants has remained unknown. Here, in addition to the reported MLPKf1/2, we identified the new MLPKf1 homologous gene MLPKn1 from B. oleracea. BoMLPKn1 and BoMLPKf1 shared nucleotide sequence identity as high as 84.3 %, and the most striking difference consisted in two fragment insertions in BoMLPKn1. BoMLPKn1 and BoMLPKf1 had a similar gene structure; both their deduced amino acid sequences contained a typical plant myristoylation consensus sequence and a Ser/Thr protein kinase domain. BoMLPKn1 was widely expressed in petal, sepal, anther, stigma and leaf. Genome-wide survey revealed that the B. oleracea genome contained three MLPK homologous genes: BoMLPKf1/2, BoMLPKn1 and Bol008343n. The B. rapa genome also contained three MLPK homologous genes, BrMLPKf1/2, BraMLPKn1 and Bra040929. Phylogenetic analysis revealed that BoMLPKf1/2 and BrMLPKf1/2 were phylogenetically more distant from AtAPK1A than Bol008343n, Bra040929, BraMLPKn1 and BoMLPKn1, Synteny analysis revealed that the B. oleracea chromosomal region containing BoMLPKn1 displayed high synteny with the A. thaliana chromosomal region containing APK1B, whereas the B. rapa chromosomal region containing BraMLPKn1 showed high synteny with the A. thaliana chromosomal region containing APK1B. Together, these results revealed that BoMLPKn1/BraMLPKn1, and not the formerly reported BoMLPKf1/2 (BrMLPKf1/2), was the orthologous genes of AtAPK1B, and no ortholog of Bo

  6. Domain decomposition method for solving elliptic problems in unbounded domains

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khoromskij, B.N.; Mazurkevich, G.E.; Zhidkov, E.P.

    1991-01-01

    Computational aspects of the box domain decomposition (DD) method for solving boundary value problems in an unbounded domain are discussed. A new variant of the DD-method for elliptic problems in unbounded domains is suggested. It is based on the partitioning of an unbounded domain adapted to the given asymptotic decay of an unknown function at infinity. The comparison of computational expenditures is given for boundary integral method and the suggested DD-algorithm. 29 refs.; 2 figs.; 2 tabs

  7. Cloning, Expression, Sequence Analysis and Homology Modeling of the Prolyl Endoprotease from Eurygaster integriceps Puton

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ravi Chandra Yandamuri

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available eurygaster integriceps Puton, commonly known as sunn pest, is a major pest of wheat in Northern Africa, the Middle East and Eastern Europe. This insect injects a prolyl endoprotease into the wheat, destroying the gluten. The purpose of this study was to clone the full length cDNA of the sunn pest prolyl endoprotease (spPEP for expression in E. coli and to compare the amino acid sequence of the enzyme to other known PEPs in both phylogeny and potential tertiary structure. Sequence analysis shows that the 5ꞌ UTR contains several putative transcription factor binding sites for transcription factors known to be expressed in Drosophila that might be useful targets for inhibition of the enzyme. The spPEP was first identified as a prolyl endoprotease by Darkoh et al., 2010. The enzyme is a unique serine protease of the S9A family by way of its substrate recognition of the gluten proteins, which are greater than 30 kD in size. At 51% maximum identity to known PEPs, homology modeling using SWISS-MODEL, the porcine brain PEP (PDB: 2XWD was selected in the database of known PEP structures, resulting in a predicted tertiary structure 99% identical to the porcine brain PEP structure. A Km for the recombinant spPEP was determined to be 210 ± 53 µM for the zGly-Pro-pNA substrate in 0.025 M ethanolamine, pH 8.5, containing 0.1 M NaCl at 37 °C with a turnover rate of 172 ± 47 µM Gly-Pro-pNA/s/µM of enzyme.

  8. PhERF6, interacting with EOBI, negatively regulates fragrance biosynthesis in petunia flowers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Fei; Xiao, Zhina; Yang, Li; Chen, Qian; Shao, Lu; Liu, Juanxu; Yu, Yixun

    2017-09-01

    In petunia, the production of volatile benzenoids/phenylpropanoids determines floral aroma, highly regulated by development, rhythm and ethylene. Previous studies identified several R2R3-type MYB trans-factors as positive regulators of scent biosynthesis in petunia flowers. Ethylene response factors (ERFs) have been shown to take part in the signal transduction of hormones, and regulation of metabolism and development processes in various plant species. Using virus-induced gene silencing technology, a negative regulator of volatile benzenoid biosynthesis, PhERF6, was identified by a screen for regulators of the expression of genes related to scent production. PhERF6 expression was temporally and spatially connected with scent production and was upregulated by exogenous ethylene. Up-/downregulation of the mRNA level of PhERF6 affected the expression of ODO1 and several floral scent-related genes. PhERF6 silencing led to a significant increase in the concentrations of volatiles emitted by flowers. Yeast two-hybrid, bimolecular fluorescence complementation and co-immunoprecipitation assays indicated that PhERF6 interacted with the N-terminus of EOBI, which includes two DNA binding domains. Our results show that PhERF6 negatively regulates volatile production in petunia flowers by competing for the binding of the c-myb domains of the EOBI protein with the promoters of genes related to floral scent. © 2017 The Authors. New Phytologist © 2017 New Phytologist Trust.

  9. Topological data analysis as a morphometric method: using persistent homology to demarcate a leaf morphospace

    Science.gov (United States)

    Current morphometric methods that comprehensively measure shape cannot compare the disparate leaf shapes found in flowering plants and are sensitive to processing artifacts. Here we describe a persistent homology approach to measuring shape. Persistent homology is a topological method (concerned wit...

  10. Homologous Recombination as a Replication Fork Escort: Fork-Protection and Recovery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Audrey Costes

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Homologous recombination is a universal mechanism that allows DNA repair and ensures the efficiency of DNA replication. The substrate initiating the process of homologous recombination is a single-stranded DNA that promotes a strand exchange reaction resulting in a genetic exchange that promotes genetic diversity and DNA repair. The molecular mechanisms by which homologous recombination repairs a double-strand break have been extensively studied and are now well characterized. However, the mechanisms by which homologous recombination contribute to DNA replication in eukaryotes remains poorly understood. Studies in bacteria have identified multiple roles for the machinery of homologous recombination at replication forks. Here, we review our understanding of the molecular pathways involving the homologous recombination machinery to support the robustness of DNA replication. In addition to its role in fork-recovery and in rebuilding a functional replication fork apparatus, homologous recombination may also act as a fork-protection mechanism. We discuss that some of the fork-escort functions of homologous recombination might be achieved by loading of the recombination machinery at inactivated forks without a need for a strand exchange step; as well as the consequence of such a model for the stability of eukaryotic genomes.

  11. Density parameter estimation for finding clusters of homologous proteins-tracing actinobacterial pathogenicity lifestyles

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Röttger, Richard; Kalaghatgi, Prabhav; Sun, Peng

    2013-01-01

    Homology detection is a long-standing challenge in computational biology. To tackle this problem, typically all-versus-all BLAST results are coupled with data partitioning approaches resulting in clusters of putative homologous proteins. One of the main problems, however, has been widely neglecte...

  12. Failure of homologous synapsis and sex-specific reproduction problems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hiroki eKurahashi

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available The prophase of meiosis I ensures the correct segregation of chromosomes to each daughter cell. This includes the pairing, synapsis and recombination of homologous chromosomes. A subset of chromosomal abnormalities, including translocation and inversion, disturbs these processes, resulting in the failure to complete synapsis. This activates the meiotic pachytene checkpoint, and the gametes are fated to undergo cell cycle arrest and subsequent apoptosis. Spermatogenic cells appear to be more vulnerable to the pachytene checkpoint, and male carriers of chromosomal abnormalities are more susceptible to infertility. In contrast, oocytes tend to bypass the checkpoint and instead generate other problems, such as chromosome imbalance that often leads to recurrent pregnancy loss in female carriers. Recent advances in genetic manipulation technologies have increased our knowledge about the pachytene checkpoint and surveillance systems that detect chromosomal synapsis. This review focuses on the consequences of synapsis failure in humans and provides an overview of the mechanisms involved. We also discuss the sexual dimorphism of the involved pathways that leads to the differences in reproductive outcomes between males and females.

  13. Concerning the dynamic instability of actin homolog ParM

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Popp, David; Yamamoto, Akihiro; Iwasa, Mitsusada; Narita, Akihiro; Maeda, Kayo; Maeda, Yuichiro

    2007-01-01

    Using in vitro TIRF- and electron-microscopy, we reinvestigated the dynamics of native ParM, a prokaryotic DNA segregation protein and actin homolog. In contrast to a previous study, which used a cysteine ParM mutant, we find that the polymerization process of wild type ATP-ParM filaments consists of a polymerization phase and a subsequent steady state phase, which is dynamically unstable, like that of microtubules. We find that the apparent bidirectional polymerization of ParM, is not due to the intrinsic nature of this filament, but results from ParM forming randomly oriented bundles in the presence of crowding agents. Our results imply, that in the bacterium, ParM filaments spontaneously form bipolar bundles. Due to their intrinsic dynamic instability, ParM bundles can efficiently 'search' the cytoplasmic lumen for DNA, bind it equally well at the bipolar ends and segregate it approximately symmetrically, by the insertion of ParM subunits at either end

  14. Homologous radioimmunoassay for human epidermal growth factor (urogastrone)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dailey, G.E.; Kraus, J.W.; Orth, D.N.

    1978-01-01

    Epidermal growth factor (EGF), a polypeptide hormone originally discovered in the mouse submaxillary gland, stimulates growth in a variety of tissues in several species. This hormone has recently been identified in human urine. A homologous RIA for human EGF (RIA-hEGF) has been developed. In general, levels were similar to those recently reported using a heterologous RIA system. Twenty-four-hour urinary excretion of RIA-hEGF by normal adult males and females was 63.0 +- 3.0 and 52.0 +- 3.5 (mean +- SE) μg/total vol, or 29.7 +- 1.1 and 39.8 +- 1.7 μg/g creatinine, respectively. Excretion by females taking oral contraceptives was significantly greater (60.1 +- 2.7 μg/g creatinine; P 0.05). Several of those with very low values had histories of alcohol abuse. Excretion by patients with Cushing's syndrome was normal. Patients with psoriasis or recovering from major burns excreted both abnormally high and abnormally low levels of RIA-hEGF, with no obvious correlation to their clinical condition. There was no apparent diurnal or postprandial variation in urinary RIA-hEGF excretion by normal subjects. An excellent linear correlation was observed between RIA-hEGF and creatinine concentrations in each urine sample for each subject, suggesting that RIA-hEGF concentration in a random urine sample provides a valid index of 24-h RIA-hEGF excretion

  15. A persistent homology approach to collective behavior in insect swarms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sinhuber, Michael; Ouellette, Nicholas T.

    Various animals from birds and fish to insects tend to form aggregates, displaying self-organized collective swarming behavior. Due to their frequent occurrence in nature and their implications for engineered, collective systems, these systems have been investigated and modeled thoroughly for decades. Common approaches range from modeling them with coupled differential equations on the individual level up to continuum approaches. We present an alternative, topology-based approach for describing swarming behavior at the macroscale rather than the microscale. We study laboratory swarms of Chironomus riparius, a flying, non-biting midge. To obtain the time-resolved three-dimensional trajectories of individual insects, we use a multi-camera stereoimaging and particle-tracking setup. To investigate the swarming behavior in a topological sense, we employ a persistent homology approach to identify persisting structures and features in the insect swarm that elude a direct, ensemble-averaging approach. We are able to identify features of sub-clusters in the swarm that show behavior distinct from that of the remaining swarm members. The coexistence of sub-swarms with different features resembles some non-biological systems such as active colloids or even thermodynamic systems.

  16. A somatic origin of homologous Robertsonian translocations and isochromosomes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Robinson, W.P.; Bernasconi, F.; Schinzel, A.A. (Univ. of Zurich (Switzerland)); Basaran, S.; Yueksel-Apak, M. (Univ. of Istanbul (Turkey)); Neri, G. (Universita Cattolica, Rome (Italy)); Serville, F. (Hopital d' Enfants Pellegrin, Bordeaux (France)); Balicek, P.; Haluza, R. (Univ. Hospital of Hradeck Kralove, Hradec Kralove (Czech Republic)); Farah, L.M.S. (Escuola Paulista de Medicina, Sao Paulo (Brazil)) (and others)

    1994-02-01

    One t(14q 14q), three t(15q 15q), two t(21q21q), and two t(22q22q) nonmosaic, apparently balanced, de novo Robertsonian translocation cases were investigated with polymorphic markers to establish the origin of the translocated chromosomes. Four cases had results indicative of an isochromosome: one t(14q14q) case with mild mental retardation and maternal uniparental disomy (UPD) for chromosome 14, one t(15q15q) case with the Prader-Willi syndrome and UPD(15), a phenotypically normal carrier of t(22q22q) with maternal UPD(22), and a phenotypically normal t(21q21q) case of paternal UPD(21). All UPD cases showed complete homozygosity throughout the involved chromosome, which is supportive of a postmeiotic origin. In the remaining four cases, maternal and paternal inheritance of the involved chromosome was found, which unambiguously implies a somatic origin. One t(15q15q) female had a child with a ring chromosome 15, which was also of probable postmeiotic origin as recombination between grandparental haplotypes had occurred prior to ring formation. UPD might be expected to result from de novo Robertsonian translocations of meiotic origin; however, all de novo homologous translocation cases, so far reported, with UPD of chromosomes 14, 15, 21, or 22 have been isochromosomes. These data provide the first direct evidence that nonmosaic Robertsonian translocations, as well as isochromosomes, are commonly the result of a mitotic exchange. 75 refs., 1 fig., 4 tabs.

  17. Dilogarithm identities in conformal field theory and group homology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dupont, J.L.

    1994-01-01

    Recently, Rogers' dilogarithm identities have attracted much attention in the setting of conformal field theory as well as lattice model calculations. One of the connecting threads is an identity of Richmond-Szekeres that appeared in the computation of central charges in conformal field theory. We show that the Richmond-Szekeres identity and its extension by Kirillov-Reshetikhin (equivalent to an identity found earlier by Lewin) can be interpreted as a lift of a generator of the third integral homology of a finite cyclic subgroup sitting inside the projective special linear group of all 2x2 real matrices viewed as a discrete group. This connection allows us to clarify a few of the assertions and conjectures stated in the work of Nahm-Recknagel-Terhoven concerning the role of algebraic K-theory and Thurston's program on hyperbolic 3-manifolds. Specifically, it is not related to hyperbolic 3-manifolds as suggested but is more appropriately related to the group manifold of the universal covering group of the projective special linear group of all 2x2 real matrices viewed as a topological group. This also resolves the weaker version of the conjecture as formulated by Kirillov. We end with a summary of a number of open conjectures on the mathematical side. (orig.)

  18. Predictive factors for homologous transfusion during paediatric scoliosis surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dupuis, Claire; Michelet, Daphné; Hilly, Julie; Diallo, Thierno; Vidal, Christophe; Delivet, Honorine; Nivoche, Yves; Mazda, Keyvan; Dahmani, Souhayl

    2015-12-01

    Blood saving strategies during paediatric spinal surgery often include recombinant erythropoietin (rEPO) and antifibrinolytic therapy (AFT). The goal of this study was to investigate additional preventive factors involved in the risk of blood transfusion. This prospective study was designed with the aim of identifying factors associated with the perioperative (defined as the intraoperative and the first postoperative day) probability of homologous red cell transfusion during scoliosis surgery in children operated during a one year period in our institution. The predictors analysed were: age, weight less than the 3rd percentile (W 255 minutes. ROC analysis for the latter model found an area under the curve of 0.9 (95% confidence interval: 0.8-0.97). The accuracy of the model was 92.3% (97.4% for non-transfusion and 69.2% for transfusion). Multivariate sensitivity analysis excluding patients with no preoperative administration of EPO found similar results. The current results indicate that optimising nutritional status might prevent allogenic blood transfusion and requires further investigation. Copyright © 2015 Société française d’anesthésie et de réanimation (Sfar). Published by Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  19. Homology among tet determinants in conjugative elements of streptococci

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Smith, M.D.; Hazum, S.; Guild, W.R.

    1981-10-01

    A mutation to tetracycline sensitivity in a resistant strain of Streptococcus pneumoniae was shown by several criteria to be due to a point mutation in the conjugative o(cat-tet) element found in the chromosomes of strains derived from BM6001, a clinical strain resistant to tetracycline and chloramphenicol. Strains carrying the mutation were transformed back to tetracycline resistance with the high efficiency of a point marker by donor deoxyribonucleic acids from its ancestral strain and from nine other clinical isolates of pneumococcus and by deoxyribonucleic acids from Group D Streptococcus faecalis and Group B Streptococcus agalactiae strains that also carry conjugative tet elements in their chromosomes. It was not transformed to resistance by tet plasmid deoxyribonucleic acids from either gram-negative or gram-positive species, except for one that carried transposon TN916, the conjugative tet element present in the chromosomes of some S. faecalis strains. The results showed that the tet determinants in conjugative elements of several streptococcal species share a high degree of deoxyribonucleic acid sequence homology and suggested that they differ from other tet genes.

  20. Surface structure evolution in a homologous series of ionic liquids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haddad, Julia; Pontoni, Diego; Murphy, Bridget M; Festersen, Sven; Runge, Benjamin; Magnussen, Olaf M; Steinrück, Hans-Georg; Reichert, Harald; Ocko, Benjamin M; Deutsch, Moshe

    2018-02-06

    Interfaces of room temperature ionic liquids (RTILs) are important for both applications and basic science and are therefore intensely studied. However, the evolution of their interface structure with the cation's alkyl chain length [Formula: see text] from Coulomb to van der Waals interaction domination has not yet been studied for even a single broad homologous RTIL series. We present here such a study of the liquid-air interface for [Formula: see text], using angstrom-resolution X-ray methods. For [Formula: see text], a typical "simple liquid" monotonic surface-normal electron density profile [Formula: see text] is obtained, like those of water and organic solvents. For [Formula: see text], increasingly more pronounced nanoscale self-segregation of the molecules' charged moieties and apolar chains yields surface layering with alternating regions of headgroups and chains. The layering decays into the bulk over a few, to a few tens, of nanometers. The layering periods and decay lengths, their linear [Formula: see text] dependence, and slopes are discussed within two models, one with partial-chain interdigitation and the other with liquid-like chains. No surface-parallel long-range order is found within the surface layer. For [Formula: see text], a different surface phase is observed above melting. Our results also impact general liquid-phase issues like supramolecular self-aggregation and bulk-surface structure relations.

  1. Distant relationships amongst protein domains

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    ncbs

    Homologous sequences of individual superfamily members are aligned and amino acid exchanges at individual positions were scored for conservation. Step – 1. Identification of structural motifs. Page 7. Alignment with Homologues. Page 8. il8 like proteins. 0. 50. 100. 150. 200. 250. 1. 6. 11. 16. 21. 26. 31. 36. 41. 46. 51.

  2. Functional Domain Driven Design

    OpenAIRE

    Herrera Guzmán, Sergio

    2016-01-01

    Las tecnologías están en constante expansión y evolución, diseñando nuevas técnicas para cumplir con su fin. En el desarrollo de software, las herramientas y pautas para la elaboración de productos software constituyen una pieza en constante evolución, necesarias para la toma de decisiones sobre los proyectos a realizar. Uno de los arquetipos para el desarrollo de software es el denominado Domain Driven Design, donde es importante conocer ampliamente el negocio que se desea modelar en form...

  3. Feature-level domain adaptation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kouw, Wouter M.; Van Der Maaten, Laurens J P; Krijthe, Jesse H.

    2016-01-01

    -level domain adaptation (flda), that models the dependence between the two domains by means of a feature-level transfer model that is trained to describe the transfer from source to target domain. Subsequently, we train a domain-adapted classifier by minimizing the expected loss under the resulting transfer...... modeled via a dropout distribution, which allows the classiffier to adapt to differences in the marginal probability of features in the source and the target domain. Our experiments on several real-world problems show that flda performs on par with state-of-the-art domainadaptation techniques.......Domain adaptation is the supervised learning setting in which the training and test data are sampled from different distributions: training data is sampled from a source domain, whilst test data is sampled from a target domain. This paper proposes and studies an approach, called feature...

  4. Compensating for Incomplete Domain Knowledge

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Scott, Lynn M; Drezner, Steve; Rue, Rachel; Reyes, Jesse

    2007-01-01

    .... First, many senior leader positions require experience in more than one functional or operational domain, but it is difficult to develop a corps of senior leaders with all the required combinations of domain knowledge...

  5. PCR artifact in testing for homologous recombination in genomic editing in zebrafish.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Minho Won

    Full Text Available We report a PCR-induced artifact in testing for homologous recombination in zebrafish. We attempted to replace the lnx2a gene with a donor cassette, mediated by a TALEN induced double stranded cut. The donor construct was flanked with homology arms of about 1 kb at the 5' and 3' ends. Injected embryos (G0 were raised and outcrossed to wild type fish. A fraction of the progeny appeared to have undergone the desired homologous recombination, as tested by PCR using primer pairs extending from genomic DNA outside the homology region to a site within the donor cassette. However, Southern blots revealed that no recombination had taken place. We conclude that recombination happened during PCR in vitro between the donor integrated elsewhere in the genome and the lnx2a locus. We conclude that PCR alone may be insufficient to verify homologous recombination in genome editing experiments in zebrafish.

  6. Ligand binding by PDZ domains

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chi, Celestine N.; Bach, Anders; Strømgaard, Kristian

    2012-01-01

    , for example, are particularly rich in these domains. The general function of PDZ domains is to bring proteins together within the appropriate cellular compartment, thereby facilitating scaffolding, signaling, and trafficking events. The many functions of PDZ domains under normal physiological as well...... as pathological conditions have been reviewed recently. In this review, we focus on the molecular details of how PDZ domains bind their protein ligands and their potential as drug targets in this context....

  7. Summarization by domain ontology navigation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andreasen, Troels; Bulskov, Henrik

    2013-01-01

    of the subject. In between these two extremes, conceptual summaries encompass selected concepts derived using background knowledge. We address in this paper an approach where conceptual summaries are provided through a conceptualization as given by an ontology. The ontology guiding the summarization can...... be a simple taxonomy or a generative domain ontology. A domain ontology can be provided by a preanalysis of a domain corpus and can be used to condense improved summaries that better reflects the conceptualization of a given domain....

  8. Conservation of the glycoprotein B homologs of the Kaposi’s sarcoma-associated herpesvirus (KSHV/HHV8) and Old World primate rhadinoviruses of chimpanzees and macaques

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bruce, A. Gregory; Horst, Jeremy A.; Rose, Timothy M.

    2016-01-01

    The envelope-associated glycoprotein B (gB) is highly conserved within the Herpesviridae and plays a critical role in viral entry. We analyzed the evolutionary conservation of sequence and structural motifs within the Kaposi’s sarcoma-associated herpesvirus (KSHV) gB and homologs of Old World primate rhadinoviruses belonging to the distinct RV1 and RV2 rhadinovirus lineages. In addition to gB homologs of rhadinoviruses infecting the pig-tailed and rhesus macaques, we cloned and sequenced gB homologs of RV1 and RV2 rhadinoviruses infecting chimpanzees. A structural model of the KSHV gB was determined, and functional motifs and sequence variants were mapped to the model structure. Conserved domains and motifs were identified, including an “RGD” motif that plays a critical role in KSHV binding and entry through the cellular integrin αVβ3. The RGD motif was only detected in RV1 rhadinoviruses suggesting an important difference in cell tropism between the two rhadinovirus lineages. PMID:27070755

  9. Comparative analysis of glutaredoxin domains from bacterial opportunistic pathogens

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Leeper, Thomas; Zhang, Suxin; Van Voorhis, Wesley C.; Myler, Peter J.; Varani, Gabriele

    2011-01-01

    NMR structures of the glutaredoxin (GLXR) domains from Br. melitensis and Ba. henselae have been determined as part of the SSGCID initiative. Comparison of the domains with known structures reveals overall structural similarity between these proteins and previously determined E. coli GLXR structures, with minor changes associated with the position of helix 1 and with regions that diverge from similar structures found in the closest related human homolog. Glutaredoxin proteins (GLXRs) are essential components of the glutathione system that reductively detoxify substances such as arsenic and peroxides and are important in the synthesis of DNA via ribonucleotide reductases. NMR solution structures of glutaredoxin domains from two Gram-negative opportunistic pathogens, Brucella melitensis and Bartonella henselae, are presented. These domains lack the N-terminal helix that is frequently present in eukaryotic GLXRs. The conserved active-site cysteines adopt canonical proline/tyrosine-stabilized geometries. A difference in the angle of α-helix 2 relative to the β-sheet surface and the presence of an extended loop in the human sequence suggests potential regulatory regions and/or protein–protein interaction motifs. This observation is consistent with mutations in this region that suppress defects in GLXR–ribonucleotide reductase interactions. These differences between the human and bacterial forms are adjacent to the dithiol active site and may permit species-selective drug design

  10. Structure of the Nucleoprotein Binding Domain of Mokola Virus Phosphoprotein▿

    Science.gov (United States)

    Assenberg, René; Delmas, Olivier; Ren, Jingshan; Vidalain, Pierre-Olivier; Verma, Anil; Larrous, Florence; Graham, Stephen C.; Tangy, Frédéric; Grimes, Jonathan M.; Bourhy, Hervé

    2010-01-01

    Mokola virus (MOKV) is a nonsegmented, negative-sense RNA virus that belongs to the Lyssavirus genus and Rhabdoviridae family. MOKV phosphoprotein P is an essential component of the replication and transcription complex and acts as a cofactor for the viral RNA-dependent RNA polymerase. P recruits the viral polymerase to the nucleoprotein-bound viral RNA (N-RNA) via an interaction between its C-terminal domain and the N-RNA complex. Here we present a structure for this domain of MOKV P, obtained by expression of full-length P in Escherichia coli, which was subsequently truncated during crystallization. The structure has a high degree of homology with P of rabies virus, another member of Lyssavirus genus, and to a lesser degree with P of vesicular stomatitis virus (VSV), a member of the related Vesiculovirus genus. In addition, analysis of the crystal packing of this domain reveals a potential binding site for the nucleoprotein N. Using both site-directed mutagenesis and yeast two-hybrid experiments to measure P-N interaction, we have determined the relative roles of key amino acids involved in this interaction to map the region of P that binds N. This analysis also reveals a structural relationship between the N-RNA binding domain of the P proteins of the Rhabdoviridae and the Paramyxoviridae. PMID:19906936

  11. A lipid binding domain in sphingosine kinase 2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Don, Anthony S.; Rosen, Hugh

    2009-01-01

    The lipid second messenger sphingosine 1-phosphate (S1P) is a critical mediator of cellular proliferation and survival signals, and is essential for vasculogenesis and neurogenesis. S1P formation is catalysed by sphingosine kinases 1 and 2 (Sphk1 and Sphk2). We have found that the endogenous glycolipid sulfatide (3-O-sulfogalactosylceramide) binds to and inhibits the activity of Sphk2 and the closely related ceramide kinase (Cerk), but not Sphk1. Using sulfatide as a probe, we mapped the lipid binding domain to the N-terminus of Sphk2 (residues 1-175), a region of sequence that is absent in Sphk1, but aligns with a pleckstrin homology domain in Cerk. Accordingly, Sphk2 bound to phosphatidylinositol monophosphates but not to abundant cellular phospholipids. Deleting the N-terminal domain reduced Sphk2 membrane localisation in cells. We have therefore identified a lipid binding domain in Sphk2 that is important for the enzyme's sub-cellular localisation.

  12. Probing SH2-domains using Inhibitor Affinity Purification (IAP).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Höfener, Michael; Heinzlmeir, Stephanie; Kuster, Bernhard; Sewald, Norbert

    2014-01-01

    Many human diseases are correlated with the dysregulation of signal transduction processes. One of the most important protein interaction domains in the context of signal transduction is the Src homology 2 (SH2) domain that binds phosphotyrosine residues. Hence, appropriate methods for the investigation of SH2 proteins are indispensable in diagnostics and medicinal chemistry. Therefore, an affinity resin for the enrichment of all SH2 proteins in one experiment would be desirable. However, current methods are unable to address all SH2 proteins simultaneously with a single compound or a small array of compounds. In order to overcome these limitations for the investigation of this particular protein family in future experiments, a dipeptide-derived probe has been designed, synthesized and evaluated. This probe successfully enriched 22 SH2 proteins from mixed cell lysates which contained 50 SH2 proteins. Further characterization of the SH2 binding properties of the probe using depletion and competition experiments indicated its ability to enrich complexes consisting of SH2 domain bearing regulatory PI3K subunits and catalytic phosphoinositide 3-kinase (PI3K) subunits that have no SH2 domain. The results make this probe a promising starting point for the development of a mixed affinity resin with complete SH2 protein coverage. Moreover, the additional findings render it a valuable tool for the evaluation of PI3K complex interrupting inhibitors.

  13. pH distribution in human tumors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thistlethwaite, A.J.; Leeper, D.B.; Moylan, D.J.; Nerlinger, R.E.

    1984-01-01

    pH distribution in human tumors is being determined to evaluate this parameter as a prognostic indicator of hyperthermia response. pH is measured by a modified glass pH electrode (21g, model MI 408, Microelectrodes, Inc., Londonderry, NH) inserted through an 18g open-ended Angiocath. Eight tumors have been evaluated to date; and of those, 3 were also assayed after the first heat treatment coincident with determination of blood flow. Tumors were between 2-5 cm, of various histologies, and of primary, recurrent, or metastatic origin. 2-4 measurements were made per tumor. Pretreatment readings were between 6.4 and 7.2 pH units. As tumor blood flow increased after 1 hr heating (41.5 - 43 0 ) pH rose 0.1 - 0.3 units. Normal rat muscle yields pH readings of 7.35 - 7.45. Although there was considerable heterogeneity of pH within tumors, accuracy and drift were not a problem. 5-15 min were required for pH stabilization after catheter insertion and <5 min after electrode insertion. A saline wheal was used for anesthesia to preclude modification of pH by anesthetics. Patient tolerance has not been a problems. This study suggests that human tumor tissue has a preponderance of areas more acidic than normal tissue. This may serve to sensitize tumor cells to hyperthermia and provide a prognostic indicator of tumor response

  14. N-terminal domains of human DNA polymerase lambda promote primer realignment during translesion DNA synthesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taggart, David J.; Dayeh, Daniel M.; Fredrickson, Saul W.; Suo, Zucai

    2014-01-01

    The X-family DNA polymerases λ (Polλ) and β (Polβ) possess similar 5′-2-deoxyribose-5-phosphatelyase (dRPase) and polymerase domains. Besides these domains, Polλ also possesses a BRCA1 C-terminal (BRCT) domain and a proline-rich domain at its N terminus. However, it is unclear how these non-enzymatic domains contribute to the unique biological functions of Polλ. Here, we used primer extension assays and a newly developed high-throughput short oligonucleotide sequencing assay (HT-SOSA) to compare the efficiency of lesion bypass and fidelity of human Polβ, Polλ and two N-terminal deletion constructs of Polλ during the bypass of either an abasic site or a 8-oxo-7,8-dihydro-2′-deoxyguanosine (8-oxodG) lesion. We demonstrate that the BRCT domain of Polλ enhances the efficiency of abasic site bypass by approximately 1.6-fold. In contrast, deletion of the N-terminal domains of Polλ did not affect the efficiency of 8-oxodG bypass relative to nucleotide incorporations opposite undamaged dG. HT-SOSA analysis demonstrated that Polλ and Polβ preferentially generated −1 or −2 frameshift mutations when bypassing an abasic site and the single or double base deletion frequency was highly sequence dependent. Interestingly, the BRCT and proline-rich domains of Polλ cooperatively promoted the generation of −2 frameshift mutations when the abasic site was situated within a sequence context that was susceptible to homology-driven primer realignment. Furthermore, both N-terminal domains of Polλ increased the generation of −1 frameshift mutations during 8-oxodG bypass and influenced the frequency of substitution mutations produced by Polλ opposite the 8-oxodG lesion. Overall, our data support a model wherein the BRCT and proline-rich domains of Polλ act cooperatively to promote primer/template realignment between DNA strands of limited sequence homology. This function of the N-terminal domains may facilitate the role of Polλ as a gap-filling polymerase

  15. DC-SIGN neck domain is a pH-sensor controlling oligomerization: SAXS and hydrodynamic studies of extracellular domain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tabarani, Georges; Thépaut, Michel; Stroebel, David; Ebel, Christine; Vivès, Corinne; Vachette, Patrice; Durand, Dominique; Fieschi, Franck

    2009-08-07

    DC-SIGN is a C-type lectin receptor of dendritic cells and is involved in the early stages of numerous infectious diseases. DC-SIGN is organized into a tetramer enabling multivalent interaction with pathogens. Once formed, the DC-SIGN-pathogen complex can be internalized into compartments of increasing acidity. We have studied the pH dependence of the oligomerization state and conformation of the entire extracellular domain and neck region. We present evidence for equilibrium between the monomeric and tetrameric states of the extracellular domain, which exhibits a marked dependence with respect to both pH and ionic strength. Using solution x-ray scattering we have obtained a molecular envelope of the extracellular domain in which a model has been built. Our results highlight the central role of the neck domain in the pH-sensitive control of the oligomerization state, in the extended conformation of the protein, and in carbohydrate recognition domain organization and presentation. This work opens new insight into the molecular mechanism of ligand release and points to new avenues to block the first step of this important infection pathway.

  16. Different Binding Properties and Function of CXXC Zinc Finger Domains in Dnmt1 and Tet1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meilinger, Daniela; Bultmann, Sebastian; Fellinger, Karin; Hasenöder, Stefan; Wang, Mengxi; Qin, Weihua; Söding, Johannes; Spada, Fabio; Leonhardt, Heinrich

    2011-01-01

    Several mammalian proteins involved in chromatin and DNA modification contain CXXC zinc finger domains. We compared the structure and function of the CXXC domains in the DNA methyltransferase Dnmt1 and the methylcytosine dioxygenase Tet1. Sequence alignment showed that both CXXC domains have a very similar framework but differ in the central tip region. Based on the known structure of a similar MLL1 domain we developed homology models and designed expression constructs for the isolated CXXC domains of Dnmt1 and Tet1 accordingly. We show that the CXXC domain of Tet1 has no DNA binding activity and is dispensable for catalytic activity in vivo. In contrast, the CXXC domain of Dnmt1 selectively binds DNA substrates containing unmethylated CpG sites. Surprisingly, a Dnmt1 mutant construct lacking the CXXC domain formed covalent complexes with cytosine bases both in vitro and in vivo and rescued DNA methylation patterns in dnmt1−/− embryonic stem cells (ESCs) just as efficiently as wild type Dnmt1. Interestingly, neither wild type nor ΔCXXC Dnmt1 re-methylated imprinted CpG sites of the H19a promoter in dnmt1−/− ESCs, arguing against a role of the CXXC domain in restraining Dnmt1 methyltransferase activity on unmethylated CpG sites. PMID:21311766

  17. Different binding properties and function of CXXC zinc finger domains in Dnmt1 and Tet1.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carina Frauer

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Several mammalian proteins involved in chromatin and DNA modification contain CXXC zinc finger domains. We compared the structure and function of the CXXC domains in the DNA methyltransferase Dnmt1 and the methylcytosine dioxygenase Tet1. Sequence alignment showed that both CXXC domains have a very similar framework but differ in the central tip region. Based on the known structure of a similar MLL1 domain we developed homology models and designed expression constructs for the isolated CXXC domains of Dnmt1 and Tet1 accordingly. We show that the CXXC domain of Tet1 has no DNA binding activity and is dispensable for catalytic activity in vivo. In contrast, the CXXC domain of Dnmt1 selectively binds DNA substrates containing unmethylated CpG sites. Surprisingly, a Dnmt1 mutant construct lacking the CXXC domain formed covalent complexes with cytosine bases both in vitro and in vivo and rescued DNA methylation patterns in dnmt1⁻/⁻ embryonic stem cells (ESCs just as efficiently as wild type Dnmt1. Interestingly, neither wild type nor ΔCXXC Dnmt1 re-methylated imprinted CpG sites of the H19a promoter in dnmt1⁻/⁻ ESCs, arguing against a role of the CXXC domain in restraining Dnmt1 methyltransferase activity on unmethylated CpG sites.

  18. Diverse binding site structures revealed in homology models of polyreactive immunoglobulins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramsland, Paul A.; Guddat, Luke W.; Edmundson, Allen B.; Raison, Robert L.

    1997-09-01

    We describe here computer-assisted homology models of the combiningsite structure of three polyreactive immunoglobulins. Template-based modelsof Fv (VL-VH) fragments were derived forthe surface IgM expressed by the malignant CD5 positive B cells from threepatients with chronic lymphocytic leukaemia (CLL). The conserved frameworkregions were constructed using crystal coordinates taken from highlyhomologous human variable domain structures (Pot and Hil). Complementaritydetermining regions (CDRs) were predicted by grafting loops, taken fromknown immunoglobulin structures, onto the Fv framework models. The CDRtemplates were chosen, where possible, to be of the same length and of highresidue identity or similarity. LCDR1, 2 and 3 as well as HCDR1 and 2 forthe Fv were constructed using this strategy. For HCDR3 prediction, adatabase containing the Cartesian coordinates of 30 of these loops wascompiled from unliganded antibody X-ray crystallographic structures and anHCDR3 of the same length as that of the B CLL Fv was selected as a template.In one case (Yar), the resulting HCDR3 model gave unfavourable interactionswhen incorporated into the Fv model. This HCDR3 was therefore modelled usingan alternative strategy of construction of the loop stems, using apreviously described HCDR3 conformation (Pot), followed by chain closurewith a β-turn. The template models were subjected to positionalrefinement using energy minimisation and molecular dynamics simulations(X-PLOR). An electrostatic surface description (GRASP) did not reveal acommon structural feature within the binding sites of the three polyreactiveFv. Thus, polyreactive immunoglobulins may recognise similar and multipleantigens through a diverse array of binding site structures.

  19. Adhesive proteins of stalked and acorn barnacles display homology with low sequence similarities.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jaimie-Leigh Jonker

    Full Text Available Barnacle adhesion underwater is an important phenomenon to understand for the prevention of biofouling and potential biotechnological innovations, yet so far, identifying what makes barnacle glue proteins 'sticky' has proved elusive. Examination of a broad range of species within the barnacles may be instructive to identify conserved adhesive domains. We add to extensive information from the acorn barnacles (order Sessilia by providing the first protein analysis of a stalked barnacle adhesive, Lepas anatifera (order Lepadiformes. It was possible to separate the L. anatifera adhesive into at least 10 protein bands using SDS-PAGE. Intense bands were present at approximately 30, 70, 90 and 110 kilodaltons (kDa. Mass spectrometry for protein identification was followed by de novo sequencing which detected 52 peptides of 7-16 amino acids in length. None of the peptides matched published or unpublished transcriptome sequences, but some amino acid sequence similarity was apparent between L. anatifera and closely-related Dosima fascicularis. Antibodies against two acorn barnacle proteins (ab-cp-52k and ab-cp-68k showed cross-reactivity in the adhesive glands of L. anatifera. We also analysed the similarity of adhesive proteins across several barnacle taxa, including Pollicipes pollicipes (a stalked barnacle in the order Scalpelliformes. Sequence alignment of published expressed sequence tags clearly indicated that P. pollicipes possesses homologues for the 19 kDa and 100 kDa proteins in acorn barnacles. Homology aside, sequence similarity in amino acid and gene sequences tended to decline as taxonomic distance increased, with minimum similarities of 18-26%, depending on the gene. The results indicate that some adhesive proteins (e.g. 100 kDa are more conserved within barnacles than others (20 kDa.

  20. An artificial functional family filter in homolog searching in next-generation sequencing metagenomics.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ruofei Du

    Full Text Available In functional metagenomics, BLAST homology search is a common method to classify metagenomic reads into protein/domain sequence families such as Clusters of Orthologous Groups of proteins (COGs in order to quantify the abundance of each COG in the community. The resulting functional profile of the community is then used in downstream analysis to correlate the change in abundance to environmental perturbation, clinical variation, and so on. However, the short read length coupled with next-generation sequencing technologies poses a barrier in this approach, essentially because similarity significance cannot be discerned by searching with short reads. Consequently, artificial functional families are produced, in which those with a large number of reads assigned decreases the accuracy of functional profile dramatically. There is no method available to address this problem. We intended to fill this gap in this paper. We revealed that BLAST similarity scores of homologues for short reads from COG protein members coding sequences are distributed differently from the scores of those derived elsewhere. We showed that, by choosing an appropriate score cut-off, we are able to filter out most artificial families and simultaneously to preserve sufficient information in order to build the functional profile. We also showed that, by incorporated application of BLAST and RPS-BLAST, some artificial families with large read counts can be further identified after the score cutoff filtration. Evaluated on three experimental metagenomic datasets with different coverages, we found that the proposed method is robust against read coverage and consistently outperforms the other E-value cutoff methods currently used in literatures.