WorldWideScience

Sample records for homolog human counterpart

  1. Cat Mammary Tumors: Genetic Models for the Human Counterpart

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Filomena Adega

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available The records are not clear, but Man has been sheltering the cat inside his home for over 12,000 years. The close proximity of this companion animal, however, goes beyond sharing the same roof; it extends to the great similarity found at the cellular and molecular levels. Researchers have found a striking resemblance between subtypes of feline mammary tumors and their human counterparts that goes from the genes to the pathways involved in cancer initiation and progression. Spontaneous cat mammary pre-invasive intraepithelial lesions (hyperplasias and neoplasias and malignant lesions seem to share a wide repertoire of molecular features with their human counterparts. In the present review, we tried to compile all the genetics aspects published (i.e., chromosomal alterations, critical cancer genes and their expression regarding cat mammary tumors, which support the cat as a valuable alternative in vitro cell and animal model (i.e., cat mammary cell lines and the spontaneous tumors, respectively, but also to present a critical point of view of some of the issues that really need to be investigated in future research.

  2. Ageing of the human metaorganism: the microbial counterpart

    OpenAIRE

    Biagi, Elena; Candela, Marco; Fairweather-Tait, Susan; Franceschi, Claudio; Brigidi, Patrizia

    2011-01-01

    Human beings have been recently reviewed as ?metaorganisms? as a result of a close symbiotic relationship with the intestinal microbiota. This assumption imposes a more holistic view of the ageing process where dynamics of the interaction between environment, intestinal microbiota and host must be taken into consideration. Age-related physiological changes in the gastrointestinal tract, as well as modification in lifestyle, nutritional behaviour, and functionality of the host immune system, i...

  3. Aging of the human metaorganism: the microbial counterpart.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biagi, Elena; Candela, Marco; Fairweather-Tait, Susan; Franceschi, Claudio; Brigidi, Patrizia

    2012-02-01

    Human beings have been recently reviewed as 'metaorganisms' as a result of a close symbiotic relationship with the intestinal microbiota. This assumption imposes a more holistic view of the ageing process where dynamics of the interaction between environment, intestinal microbiota and host must be taken into consideration. Age-related physiological changes in the gastrointestinal tract, as well as modification in lifestyle, nutritional behaviour, and functionality of the host immune system, inevitably affect the gut microbial ecosystem. Here we review the current knowledge of the changes occurring in the gut microbiota of old people, especially in the light of the most recent applications of the modern molecular characterisation techniques. The hypothetical involvement of the age-related gut microbiota unbalances in the inflamm-aging, and immunosenescence processes will also be discussed. Increasing evidence of the importance of the gut microbiota homeostasis for the host health has led to the consideration of medical/nutritional applications of this knowledge through the development of probiotic and prebiotic preparations specific for the aged population. The results of the few intervention trials reporting the use of pro/prebiotics in clinical conditions typical of the elderly will be critically reviewed.

  4. Energy metabolism in human pluripotent stem cells and their differentiated counterparts.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sandra Varum

    Full Text Available Human pluripotent stem cells have the ability to generate all cell types present in the adult organism, therefore harboring great potential for the in vitro study of differentiation and for the development of cell-based therapies. Nonetheless their use may prove challenging as incomplete differentiation of these cells might lead to tumoregenicity. Interestingly, many cancer types have been reported to display metabolic modifications with features that might be similar to stem cells. Understanding the metabolic properties of human pluripotent stem cells when compared to their differentiated counterparts can thus be of crucial importance. Furthermore recent data has stressed distinct features of different human pluripotent cells lines, namely when comparing embryo-derived human embryonic stem cells (hESCs and induced pluripotent stem cells (IPSCs reprogrammed from somatic cells.We compared the energy metabolism of hESCs, IPSCs, and their somatic counterparts. Focusing on mitochondria, we tracked organelle localization and morphology. Furthermore we performed gene expression analysis of several pathways related to the glucose metabolism, including glycolysis, the pentose phosphate pathway and the tricarboxylic acid (TCA cycle. In addition we determined oxygen consumption rates (OCR using a metabolic extracellular flux analyzer, as well as total intracellular ATP levels by high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC. Finally we explored the expression of key proteins involved in the regulation of glucose metabolism.Our results demonstrate that, although the metabolic signature of IPSCs is not identical to that of hESCs, nonetheless they cluster with hESCs rather than with their somatic counterparts. ATP levels, lactate production and OCR revealed that human pluripotent cells rely mostly on glycolysis to meet their energy demands. Furthermore, our work points to some of the strategies which human pluripotent stem cells may use to maintain high

  5. Replacement of the human topoisomerase linker domain with the plasmodial counterpart renders the enzyme camptothecin resistant

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Arnò, Barbara; D'Annessa, Ilda; Tesauro, Cinzia

    2013-01-01

    a conformational space much larger than the corresponding domain in the human enzyme. The large linker conformational variability is then linked to important functional properties such as an increased religation rate and a low drug reactivity, demonstrating that the linker domain has a crucial role......A human/plasmodial hybrid enzyme, generated by swapping the human topoisomerase IB linker domain with the corresponding domain of the Plasmodium falciparum enzyme, has been produced and characterized. The hybrid enzyme displays a relaxation activity comparable to the human enzyme......, but it is characterized by a much faster religation rate. The hybrid enzyme is also camptothecin resistant. A 3D structure of the hybrid enzyme has been built and its structural-dynamical properties have been analyzed by molecular dynamics simulation. The analysis indicates that the swapped plasmodial linker samples...

  6. Camelid Ig V genes reveal significant human homology not seen in therapeutic target genes, providing for a powerful therapeutic antibody platform

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klarenbeek, Alex; Mazouari, Khalil El; Desmyter, Aline; Blanchetot, Christophe; Hultberg, Anna; de Jonge, Natalie; Roovers, Rob C; Cambillau, Christian; Spinelli, Sylvia; Del-Favero, Jurgen; Verrips, Theo; de Haard, Hans J; Achour, Ikbel

    2015-01-01

    Camelid immunoglobulin variable (IGV) regions were found homologous to their human counterparts; however, the germline V repertoires of camelid heavy and light chains are still incomplete and their therapeutic potential is only beginning to be appreciated. We therefore leveraged the publicly available HTG and WGS databases of Lama pacos and Camelus ferus to retrieve the germline repertoire of V genes using human IGV genes as reference. In addition, we amplified IGKV and IGLV genes to uncover the V germline repertoire of Lama glama and sequenced BAC clones covering part of the Lama pacos IGK and IGL loci. Our in silico analysis showed that camelid counterparts of all human IGKV and IGLV families and most IGHV families could be identified, based on canonical structure and sequence homology. Interestingly, this sequence homology seemed largely restricted to the Ig V genes and was far less apparent in other genes: 6 therapeutically relevant target genes differed significantly from their human orthologs. This contributed to efficient immunization of llamas with the human proteins CD70, MET, interleukin (IL)-1β and IL-6, resulting in large panels of functional antibodies. The in silico predicted human-homologous canonical folds of camelid-derived antibodies were confirmed by X-ray crystallography solving the structure of 2 selected camelid anti-CD70 and anti-MET antibodies. These antibodies showed identical fold combinations as found in the corresponding human germline V families, yielding binding site structures closely similar to those occurring in human antibodies. In conclusion, our results indicate that active immunization of camelids can be a powerful therapeutic antibody platform. PMID:26018625

  7. Canine spontaneous head and neck squamous cell carcinomas represent their human counterparts at the molecular level.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Deli Liu

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Spontaneous canine head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC represents an excellent model of human HNSCC but is greatly understudied. To better understand and utilize this valuable resource, we performed a pilot study that represents its first genome-wide characterization by investigating 12 canine HNSCC cases, of which 9 are oral, via high density array comparative genomic hybridization and RNA-seq. The analyses reveal that these canine cancers recapitulate many molecular features of human HNSCC. These include analogous genomic copy number abnormality landscapes and sequence mutation patterns, recurrent alteration of known HNSCC genes and pathways (e.g., cell cycle, PI3K/AKT signaling, and comparably extensive heterogeneity. Amplification or overexpression of protein kinase genes, matrix metalloproteinase genes, and epithelial-mesenchymal transition genes TWIST1 and SNAI1 are also prominent in these canine tumors. This pilot study, along with a rapidly growing body of literature on canine cancer, reemphasizes the potential value of spontaneous canine cancers in HNSCC basic and translational research.

  8. Canine spontaneous head and neck squamous cell carcinomas represent their human counterparts at the molecular level.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Deli; Xiong, Huan; Ellis, Angela E; Northrup, Nicole C; Dobbin, Kevin K; Shin, Dong M; Zhao, Shaying

    2015-06-01

    Spontaneous canine head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC) represents an excellent model of human HNSCC but is greatly understudied. To better understand and utilize this valuable resource, we performed a pilot study that represents its first genome-wide characterization by investigating 12 canine HNSCC cases, of which 9 are oral, via high density array comparative genomic hybridization and RNA-seq. The analyses reveal that these canine cancers recapitulate many molecular features of human HNSCC. These include analogous genomic copy number abnormality landscapes and sequence mutation patterns, recurrent alteration of known HNSCC genes and pathways (e.g., cell cycle, PI3K/AKT signaling), and comparably extensive heterogeneity. Amplification or overexpression of protein kinase genes, matrix metalloproteinase genes, and epithelial-mesenchymal transition genes TWIST1 and SNAI1 are also prominent in these canine tumors. This pilot study, along with a rapidly growing body of literature on canine cancer, reemphasizes the potential value of spontaneous canine cancers in HNSCC basic and translational research.

  9. The human counterpart of zebrafish shiraz shows sideroblastic-like microcytic anemia and iron overload.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Camaschella, Clara; Campanella, Alessandro; De Falco, Luigia; Boschetto, Loredana; Merlini, Roberta; Silvestri, Laura; Levi, Sonia; Iolascon, Achille

    2007-08-15

    Inherited microcytic-hypochromic anemias in rodents and zebrafish suggest the existence of corresponding human disorders. The zebrafish mutant shiraz has severe anemia and is embryonically lethal because of glutaredoxin 5 (GRLX5) deletion, insufficient biogenesis of mitochondrial iron-sulfur (Fe/S) clusters, and deregulated iron-regulatory protein 1 (IRP1) activity. This leads to stabilization of transferrin receptor 1 (TfR) RNA, repression of ferritin, and ALA-synthase 2 (ALAS2) translation with impaired heme synthesis. We report the first case of GLRX5 deficiency in a middle-aged anemic male with iron overload and a low number of ringed sideroblasts. Anemia was worsened by blood transfusions but partially reversed by iron chelation. The patient had a homozygous (c.294A>G) mutation that interferes with intron 1 splicing and drastically reduces GLRX5 RNA. As in shiraz, aconitase and H-ferritin levels were low and TfR level was high in the patient's cells, compatible with increased IRP1 binding. Based on the biochemical and clinical phenotype, we hypothesize that IRP2, less degraded by low heme, contributes to the repression of the erythroblasts ferritin and ALAS2, increasing mitochondrial iron. Iron chelation, redistributing iron to the cytosol, might relieve IRP2 excess, improving heme synthesis and anemia. GLRX5 function is highly conserved, but at variance with zebrafish, its defect in humans leads to anemia and iron overload.

  10. Artificial restriction DNA cutters to promote homologous recombination in human cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katada, Hitoshi; Komiyama, Makoto

    2011-02-01

    Homologous recombination is almost the only way to modify the genome in a predetermined fashion, despite its quite low frequency in mammalian cells. It has been already reported that the frequency of this biological process can be notably increased by inducing a double strand break (DSB) at target site. This article presents completely chemistry-based artificial restriction DNA cutter (ARCUT) for the promotion of homologous recombination in human cells. This cutter is composed of Ce(IV)/EDTA complex (molecular scissors) and two strands of peptide nucleic acid (PNA), and contains no proteins. Its scission site in the genome is determined simply by Watson-Crick rule so that ARCUT for desired homologous recombination is easily and straightforwardly designed and synthesized. The site-specificity of the scission is high enough to cut human genome at one target site. The DSB induced by this cutter is satisfactorily recognized by the repair system in human cells and promotes the targeted homologous recombination.

  11. Low-molecular-weight, calcium-dependent phospholipase A{sub 2} genes are linked and map to homologous chromosome regions in mouse and human

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tischfield, J.A.; Chen, Ju; Engle, S.J. [Indiana Univ. School of Medicine, Indianapolis, IN (United States)] [and others

    1996-03-05

    The Group IIA phospholipase gene (PLA2G2A) protein coding regions exhibit significant homology with recently described Group IIC (PLA2G2C) and Group V (PLA2GV) genes. All three genes are present in many mammalian species and are expressed in a tissue-specific pattern. Here, we demonstrate in human that they are tightly linked and map to chromosome 1p34-p36.1. We also show that the homologous mouse loci are tightly linked (no observed recombination) on the distal part of chromosome 4, a region exhibiting synteny with human 1p34-p36. Unlike its rodent counterpart, human PLA2G2C appears to be a nonfunctional pseudogene. 33 refs., 2 figs., 2 tabs.

  12. Structure guided homology model based design and engineering of mouse antibodies for humanization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kurella, Vinodh B; Gali, Reddy

    2014-01-01

    No universal strategy exists for humanizing mouse antibodies, and most approaches are based on primary sequence alignment and grafting. Although this strategy theoretically decreases the immunogenicity of mouse antibodies, it neither addresses conformational changes nor steric clashes that arise due to grafting of human germline frameworks to accommodate mouse CDR regions. To address these issues, we created and tested a structure-based biologic design approach using a de novo homology model to aid in the humanization of 17 unique mouse antibodies. Our approach included building a structure-based de novo homology model from the primary mouse antibody sequence, mutation of the mouse framework residues to the closest human germline sequence and energy minimization by simulated annealing on the humanized homology model. Certain residues displayed force field errors and revealed steric clashes upon closer examination. Therefore, further mutations were introduced to rationally correct these errors. In conclusion, use of de novo antibody homology modeling together with simulated annealing improved the ability to predict conformational and steric clashes that may arise due to conversion of a mouse antibody into the humanized form and would prevent its neutralization when administered in vivo. This design provides a robust path towards the development of a universal strategy for humanization of mouse antibodies using computationally derived antibody homologous structures.

  13. Partial primary structure of human pregnancy zone protein: extensive sequence homology with human alpha 2-macroglobulin

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sottrup-Jensen, Lars; Folkersen, J; Kristensen, Torsten

    1984-01-01

    the results of complete or partial sequence determination of a random selection of 38 tryptic peptides covering 685 residues of the subunit of PZP, that PZP and alpha 2M indeed are extensively homologous. In the stretches of PZP sequenced so far, the degree of identically placed residues in the two proteins......-mediated endocytosis. In this regard our studies indicate a bait region in PZP significantly different from that present in alpha 2M. PZP could be the human equivalent of the acute-phase alpha-macroglobulins (e.g., rat alpha 2M and rabbit alpha 1M) described earlier...

  14. Cloning of human and mouse genes homologous to RAD52, a yeast gene involved in DNA repair and recombination.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    D.F.R. Muris; O.Y. Bezzubova (Olga); J-M. Buerstedde; K. Vreeken; A.S. Balajee; C.J. Osgood; C. Troelstra (Christine); J.H.J. Hoeijmakers (Jan); K. Ostermann; H. Schmidt (Henning); A.T. Natarajan; J.C.J. Eeken; P.H.M. Lohmann (Paul); A. Pastink (Albert)

    1994-01-01

    textabstractThe RAD52 gene of Saccharomyces cerevisiae is required for recombinational repair of double-strand breaks. Using degenerate oligonucleotides based on conserved amino acid sequences of RAD52 and rad22, its counterpart from Schizosaccharomyces pombe, RAD52 homologs from man and mouse were

  15. Modification of human beta-globin locus PAC clones by homologous recombination in Escherichia coli

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    G.P. Patrinos (George); M. de Krom (Mariken); S. Bottardi; R.J. Janssens; E. Katsantoni (Eleni); A.W. Wai; D.J. Sherratt; F.G. Grosveld (Frank); A.M.A. Imam (Ali)

    2000-01-01

    textabstractWe report here modifications of human beta-globin PAC clones by homologous recombination in Escherichia coli DH10B, utilising a plasmid temperature sensitive for replication, the recA gene and a wild-type copy of the rpsL gene which allows for an efficient selection for

  16. Targeting Homologous Recombination in Notch-Driven C. elegans Stem Cell and Human Tumors.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xinzhu Deng

    Full Text Available Mammalian NOTCH1-4 receptors are all associated with human malignancy, although exact roles remain enigmatic. Here we employ glp-1(ar202, a temperature-sensitive gain-of-function C. elegans NOTCH mutant, to delineate NOTCH-driven tumor responses to radiotherapy. At ≤20°C, glp-1(ar202 is wild-type, whereas at 25°C it forms a germline stem cell⁄progenitor cell tumor reminiscent of human cancer. We identify a NOTCH tumor phenotype in which all tumor cells traffic rapidly to G2⁄M post-irradiation, attempt to repair DNA strand breaks exclusively via homology-driven repair, and when this fails die by mitotic death. Homology-driven repair inactivation is dramatically radiosensitizing. We show that these concepts translate directly to human cancer models.

  17. Fowlpox virus encodes nonessential homologs of cellular alpha-SNAP, PC-1, and an orphan human homolog of a secreted nematode protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laidlaw, S M; Anwar, M A; Thomas, W; Green, P; Shaw, K; Skinner, M A

    1998-08-01

    The genome of fowlpox virus (FWPV), type species of the Avipoxviridae, is considerably rearranged compared with that of vaccinia virus (the prototypic poxvirus and type species of the Orthopoxviridae) and is 30% larger. It is likely that the genome of FWPV contains genes in addition to those found in vaccinia virus, probably involved with its replication and survival in the chicken. A 7,470-bp segment of the FWPV genome has five open reading frames (ORFs), two of which encode ankyrin repeat proteins, many examples of which have been found in poxviruses. The remaining ORFs encode homologs of cellular genes not reported in any other virus. ORF-2 encodes a homolog of the yeast Sec17p and mammalian SNAP proteins, crucial to vesicular transport in the exocytic pathway. ORF-3 encodes a homolog of an orphan human protein, R31240_2, encoded on 19p13.2. ORF-3 is also homologous to three proteins (YLS2, YMV6, and C07B5.5) from the free-living nematode Caenorhabditis elegans and to a 43-kDa antigen from the parasitic nematode Trichinella spiralis. ORF-5 encodes a homolog of the mammalian plasma cell antigen PC-1, a type II glycoprotein with exophosphodiesterase activity. The ORFs are present in the virulent precursor, HP1, of the sequenced attenuated virus (FP9) and are conserved in other strains of FWPV. They were shown, by deletion mutagenesis, to be nonessential to virus replication in tissue culture. RNA encoding the viral homolog of PC-1 is expressed strongly early and late in infection, but RNAs encoding the homologs of SNAP and R31240_2 are expressed weakly and late.

  18. Homologous human milk supplement for very low birth weight preterm infant feeding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grance, Thayana Regina de Souza; Serafin, Paula de Oliveira; Thomaz, Débora Marchetti Chaves; Palhares, Durval Batista

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To develop a homologous human milk supplement for very low-birth weight infant feeding, using an original and simplified methodology, to know the nutritional composition of human milk fortified with this supplement and to evaluate its suitability for feeding these infants. METHODS: For the production and analysis of human milk with the homologous additive, 25 human milk samples of 45mL underwent a lactose removal process, lyophilization and then were diluted in 50mL of human milk. Measurements of lactose, proteins, lipids, energy, sodium, potassium, calcium, phosphorus and osmolality were performed. RESULTS: The composition of the supplemented milk was: lactose 9.22±1.00g/dL; proteins 2.20±0.36g/dL; lipids 2.91±0.57g/dL; calories 71.93±8.69kcal/dL; osmolality 389.6±32.4mOsmol/kgH2O; sodium 2.04±0.45mEq/dL; potassium 1.42±0.15mEq/dL; calcium 43.44±2.98mg/dL; and phosphorus 23.69±1.24mg/dL. CONCLUSIONS: According to the nutritional contents analyzed, except for calcium and phosphorus, human milk with the proposed supplement can meet the nutritional needs of the very low-birth weight preterm infant. PMID:25662564

  19. Homologous human milk supplement for very low birth weight preterm infant feeding

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thayana Regina de Souza Grance

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: To develop a homologous human milk supplement for very low-birth weight infant feeding, using an original and simplified methodology, to know the nutritional composition of human milk fortified with this supplement and to evaluate its suitability for feeding these infants. METHODS: For the production and analysis of human milk with the homologous additive, 25 human milk samples of 45mL underwent a lactose removal process, lyophilization and then were diluted in 50mL of human milk. Measurements of lactose, proteins, lipids, energy, sodium, potassium, calcium, phosphorus and osmolality were performed. RESULTS: The composition of the supplemented milk was: lactose 9.22±1.00g/dL; proteins 2.20±0.36g/dL; lipids 2.91±0.57g/dL; calories 71.93±8.69kcal/dL; osmolality 389.6±32.4mOsmol/kgH2O; sodium 2.04±0.45mEq/dL; potassium 1.42±0.15mEq/dL; calcium 43.44±2.98mg/dL; and phosphorus 23.69±1.24mg/dL. CONCLUSIONS: According to the nutritional contents analyzed, except for calcium and phosphorus, human milk with the proposed supplement can meet the nutritional needs of the very low-birth weight preterm infant.

  20. Homologous recombination and human health: the roles of BRCA1, BRCA2, and associated proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prakash, Rohit; Zhang, Yu; Feng, Weiran; Jasin, Maria

    2015-04-01

    Homologous recombination (HR) is a major pathway for the repair of DNA double-strand breaks in mammalian cells, the defining step of which is homologous strand exchange directed by the RAD51 protein. The physiological importance of HR is underscored by the observation of genomic instability in HR-deficient cells and, importantly, the association of cancer predisposition and developmental defects with mutations in HR genes. The tumor suppressors BRCA1 and BRCA2, key players at different stages of HR, are frequently mutated in familial breast and ovarian cancers. Other HR proteins, including PALB2 and RAD51 paralogs, have also been identified as tumor suppressors. This review summarizes recent findings on BRCA1, BRCA2, and associated proteins involved in human disease with an emphasis on their molecular roles and interactions. Copyright © 2015 Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory Press; all rights reserved.

  1. Identification of the porcine homologous of human disease causing trinucleotide repeat sequences

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Madsen, Lone Bruhn; Thomsen, Bo; Sølvsten, Christina Ane Elisabeth

    2007-01-01

    in this paper the identification of porcine noncoding and polyglutamine-encoding TNR regions and the comparison to the homologous TNRs from human, chimpanzee, dog, opossum, rat, and mouse. Several of the porcine TNR regions are highly polymorphic both within and between different breeds. The TNR regions...... are more conserved in terms of repeat length between humans and pigs than between humans and rodents suggesting that TNR lengths could be implicated in mammalian evolution. The TNRs in the FMR2, SCA6, SCA12, and Huntingtin geenes are comparable in length to alleles naturally occurring in humans, and also...... in the porcine genome of TNRs within genes that, in humans, can undergo pathogenic expansions support the usage of the pig as an alternative animal model for studies of TNR evolution, stability, and functional properties....

  2. Homology modeling of human serum paraoxonase1 and its molecular interaction studies with aspirin and cefazolin

    OpenAIRE

    Salman, Mohammed; Malleda, Chandramouli; Suneel, Narayanavari A; Qureshi, Insaf A; Frank, Elizabeth A; D’Souza, Cletus JM

    2011-01-01

    Human serum paraoxonase1 (HuPON1) belongs to the family of A-esterases (EC.3.1.8.1). It is associated with HDL particle and prevents atherosclerosis by cleaving lipid hydroperoxides and other proatherogenic molecules of oxidized low density lipoproteins (LDL). Since the precise structure of HuPON1 is not yet available, the structure-function relationship between HuPON1 and activators/inhibitors is still unknown. Therefore, a theoretical model of HuPON1 was generated using homology modelling a...

  3. Localization of a human homolog of the mouse pericentrin gene (PCNT) to chromosome 21qter

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, Haiming [Univ. of Geneva Medical School (Switzerland); Gos, A.; Morris, M.A. [Cantonal Hospital, Geneva (Switzerland)] [and others

    1996-08-01

    Exon trapping was used to identify portions of genes from cosmid DNA of a human chromosome 21-specific library LL21NC02-Q. More than 650 potential exons have been cloned and characterized to date. Among these, 3 trapped {open_quotes}exons{close_quotes} showed strong homology to different regions of the cDNA for the mouse pericentrin (Pcnt) gene, indicating that these 3 exons are portions of a human homolog of the mouse pericentrin gene. With PCR amplification, Southern blot analysis, and FISH, we have mapped this presumed human pericentrin gene (PCNT) to the long arm of chromosome 21 between marker PFKL and 21qter. Pericentrin is a conserved protein component of the filamentous matrix of the centrosome involved in the initial establishment of the organized microtubule array. No candidate hereditary disorder for pericentrin deficiency/abnormality has yet been mapped in the most distal region of 21q; in addition the role of triplication of the pericentrin gene in the pathophysiology or etiology of trisomy 21 is currently unknown. 16 refs., 3 figs.

  4. Homologous-pairing activity of the human DNA-repair proteins Xrcc3⋅Rad51C

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kurumizaka, Hitoshi; Ikawa, Shukuko; Nakada, Maki; Eda, Keiko; Kagawa, Wataru; Takata, Minoru; Takeda, Shunichi; Yokoyama, Shigeyuki; Shibata, Takehiko

    2001-01-01

    The human Xrcc3 protein is involved in the repair of damaged DNA through homologous recombination, in which homologous pairing is a key step. The Rad51 protein is believed to be the only protein factor that promotes homologous pairing in recombinational DNA repair in mitotic cells. In the brain, however, Rad51 expression is extremely low, whereas XRCC3, a human homologue of Saccharomyces cerevisiae RAD57 that activates the Rad51-dependent homologous pairing with the yeast Rad55 protein, is expressed. In this study, a two-hybrid analysis conducted with the use of a human brain cDNA library revealed that the major Xrcc3-interacting protein is a Rad51 paralog, Rad51C/Rad51L2. The purified Xrcc3⋅Rad51C complex, which shows apparent 1:1 stoichiometry, was found to catalyze the homologous pairing. Although the activity is reduced, the Rad51C protein alone also catalyzed homologous pairing, suggesting that Rad51C is a catalytic subunit for homologous pairing. The DNA-binding activity of Xrcc3⋅Rad51C was drastically decreased in the absence of Xrcc3, indicating that Xrcc3 is important for the DNA binding of Xrcc3⋅Rad51C. Electron microscopic observations revealed that Xrcc3⋅Rad51C and Rad51C formed similar filamentous structures with circular single-stranded DNA. PMID:11331762

  5. Aku, a mutation of the mouse homologous to human alkaptonuria, maps to chromosome 16

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Montagutelli, X.; Lalouette, A.; Guenet, J.L. (Institut Pasteur, Paris (France)); Coude, M.; Kamoun, P. (Hopital Necker, Paris (France)); Forest, M. (Hopital Cochin, Paris (France))

    1994-01-01

    Alkaptonuria is a human hereditary metabolic disease characterized by a very high urinary excretion of homogentisic acid, an intermediary product in the metabolism of tyrosine, in association with ochronosis and arthritis. This disease is due to a deficiency in the enzyme homogentisic acid oxidase and is inherited as an autosomal recessive condition. The authors have found a new recessive mutation (aku) in the mouse that is homologous to human alkaptonuria, during a mutagenesis program with ethylnitrosourea. Affected mice show high levels of urinary homogentisic acid without signs of ochronosis or arthritis. This mutation has been mapped to Chr 16 close to the D16Mit4 locus, in a region of synteny with human 3q. 22 refs., 1 fig., 1 tab.

  6. RI-1: a chemical inhibitor of RAD51 that disrupts homologous recombination in human cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Budke, Brian; Logan, Hillary L; Kalin, Jay H; Zelivianskaia, Anna S; Cameron McGuire, William; Miller, Luke L; Stark, Jeremy M; Kozikowski, Alan P; Bishop, Douglas K; Connell, Philip P

    2012-08-01

    Homologous recombination serves multiple roles in DNA repair that are essential for maintaining genomic stability. We here describe RI-1, a small molecule that inhibits the central recombination protein RAD51. RI-1 specifically reduces gene conversion in human cells while stimulating single strand annealing. RI-1 binds covalently to the surface of RAD51 protein at cysteine 319 that likely destabilizes an interface used by RAD51 monomers to oligomerize into filaments on DNA. Correspondingly, the molecule inhibits the formation of subnuclear RAD51 foci in cells following DNA damage, while leaving replication protein A focus formation unaffected. Finally, it potentiates the lethal effects of a DNA cross-linking drug in human cells. Given that this inhibitory activity is seen in multiple human tumor cell lines, RI-1 holds promise as an oncologic drug. Furthermore, RI-1 represents a unique tool to dissect the network of reaction pathways that contribute to DNA repair in cells.

  7. [Homologous human milk supplement for very low birth weight preterm infant feeding].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grance, Thayana Regina de Souza; Serafin, Paula de Oliveira; Thomaz, Débora Marchetti Chaves; Palhares, Durval Batista

    2015-01-01

    To develop a homologous additive of human milk for feeding the very low weight infants with an original and simplified methodology, to know the nutritional composition of fortified human milk with this additive and to evaluate its suitability for feeding these infants. For the production and analysis of human milk with the homologous additive, 25 human milk samples of 45 mL have undergone a lactose removal process, lyophilization and they were diluted in 50 mL of human milk. Doses of lactose, proteins, lipids, energy, sodium, potassium, calcium, phosphorus and osmolality were measured. The composition of the additive milk was lactose 9.22 ± 1.00 g/dL; proteins 2.20 ± 0.36 g/dL; lipids 2.91 ± 0.57 g/dL; calories 71.93 ± 8.69 kcal/dL; osmolality 389.6 ± 32.4 mOsmol/kg H2O; sodium 2.04 ± 0.45 mEq/dL; potassium 1.42 ± 0.15 mEq/dL; calcium 43.44 ± 2.98 mg/dL; and phosphorus 23.69 ± 1.24 mg/dL. According to the nutritional contents analyzed, except for calcium and phosphorus, the human milk with the proposed additive can achieve the nutritional needs of the very low birth weight preterm infant. Copyright © 2014 Associação de Pediatria de São Paulo. Publicado por Elsevier Editora Ltda. All rights reserved.

  8. Human Cytomegalovirus Encoded Homologs of Cytokines, Chemokines and their Receptors: Roles in Immunomodulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    McSharry, Brian P.; Avdic, Selmir; Slobedman, Barry

    2012-01-01

    Human cytomegalovirus (HCMV), the largest human herpesvirus, infects a majority of the world’s population. Like all herpesviruses, following primary productive infection, HCMV establishes a life-long latent infection, from which it can reactivate years later to produce new, infectious virus. Despite the presence of a massive and sustained anti-HCMV immune response, productively infected individuals can shed virus for extended periods of time, and once latent infection is established, it is never cleared from the host. It has been proposed that HCMV must therefore encode functions which help to evade immune mediated clearance during productive virus replication and latency. Molecular mimicry is a strategy used by many viruses to subvert and regulate anti-viral immunity and HCMV has hijacked/developed a range of functions that imitate host encoded immunomodulatory proteins. This review will focus on the HCMV encoded homologs of cellular cytokines/chemokines and their receptors, with an emphasis on how these virus encoded homologs may facilitate viral evasion of immune clearance. PMID:23202490

  9. Identification of methyllysine peptides binding to chromobox protein homolog 6 chromodomain in the human proteome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Nan; Stein, Richard S L; He, Wei; Komives, Elizabeth; Wang, Wei

    2013-10-01

    Methylation is one of the important post-translational modifications that play critical roles in regulating protein functions. Proteomic identification of this post-translational modification and understanding how it affects protein activity remain great challenges. We tackled this problem from the aspect of methylation mediating protein-protein interaction. Using the chromodomain of human chromobox protein homolog 6 as a model system, we developed a systematic approach that integrates structure modeling, bioinformatics analysis, and peptide microarray experiments to identify lysine residues that are methylated and recognized by the chromodomain in the human proteome. Given the important role of chromobox protein homolog 6 as a reader of histone modifications, it was interesting to find that the majority of its interacting partners identified via this approach function in chromatin remodeling and transcriptional regulation. Our study not only illustrates a novel angle for identifying methyllysines on a proteome-wide scale and elucidating their potential roles in regulating protein function, but also suggests possible strategies for engineering the chromodomain-peptide interface to enhance the recognition of and manipulate the signal transduction mediated by such interactions.

  10. Functional Coverage of the Human Genome by Existing Structures, Structural Genomics Targets, and Homology Models.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    2005-08-01

    Full Text Available The bias in protein structure and function space resulting from experimental limitations and targeting of particular functional classes of proteins by structural biologists has long been recognized, but never continuously quantified. Using the Enzyme Commission and the Gene Ontology classifications as a reference frame, and integrating structure data from the Protein Data Bank (PDB, target sequences from the structural genomics projects, structure homology derived from the SUPERFAMILY database, and genome annotations from Ensembl and NCBI, we provide a quantified view, both at the domain and whole-protein levels, of the current and projected coverage of protein structure and function space relative to the human genome. Protein structures currently provide at least one domain that covers 37% of the functional classes identified in the genome; whole structure coverage exists for 25% of the genome. If all the structural genomics targets were solved (twice the current number of structures in the PDB, it is estimated that structures of one domain would cover 69% of the functional classes identified and complete structure coverage would be 44%. Homology models from existing experimental structures extend the 37% coverage to 56% of the genome as single domains and 25% to 31% for complete structures. Coverage from homology models is not evenly distributed by protein family, reflecting differing degrees of sequence and structure divergence within families. While these data provide coverage, conversely, they also systematically highlight functional classes of proteins for which structures should be determined. Current key functional families without structure representation are highlighted here; updated information on the "most wanted list" that should be solved is available on a weekly basis from http://function.rcsb.org:8080/pdb/function_distribution/index.html.

  11. An extended anchored linkage map and virtual mapping for the american mink genome based on homology to human and dog

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Anistoroaei, Razvan Marian; Ansari, S.; Farid, A.

    2009-01-01

    hybridization (FISH) and/or by means of human/dog/mink comparative homology. The average interval between markers is 8.5 cM and the linkage groups collectively span 1340 cM. In addition, 217 and 275 mink microsatellites have been placed on human and dog genomes, respectively. In conjunction with the existing...

  12. Second human protein with homology to the Escherichia coli abasic endonuclease exonuclease III.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hadi, M Z; Wilson, D M

    2000-01-01

    There are two major apurinic/apyrimidinic (AP) endonuclease/3'-diesterase families designated after the Escherichia coli proteins exonuclease III (ExoIII) and endonuclease IV (EndoIV). These repair proteins function to excise mutagenic and cytotoxic AP sites or 3'-phosphate/phosphoglycolate groups from DNA. In mammals, the predominant repair endonuclease is Ape1, a homolog of ExoIII, whereas a mammalian homolog to EndoIV has not been identified to date. We have identified a human protein termed Ape2 that represents a subclass of the ExoIII family (exhibiting highest similarity to the Saccharomyces cerevisiae ETH1/APN2 gene product) and maintains many of the essential functional residues of the ExoIII-like proteins. The human protein is 518 amino acids with a predicted molecular mass of 57.3 kDa and a pI of 8.65. Unlike Ape1, this protein exhibited only weak ability to complement the repair defects of AP endonuclease/3'-repair-defective bacteria and yeast. Similarly, a weak, but specific, DNA-binding and incision activity for abasic site-containing substrates was observed with partially purified Ape2 protein. APE2 is located on the X chromosome at position p11.21 and consists of six exons. The transcript for APE2 is ubiquitously expressed, suggesting an important function for the encoded protein. An Ape2 green fluorescent fusion protein localized predominantly to the nucleus of HeLa cells, indicating a nuclear function; this localization was dependent on the C-terminal domain. We discuss our results in the context of the evolutionary conservation of the AP endonuclease families and their divergent activities and biological contributions.

  13. Correlation of the dynamics of native human acetylcholinesterase and its inhibited huperzine A counterpart from sub-picoseconds to nanoseconds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trapp, M.; Tehei, M.; Trovaslet, M.; Nachon, F.; Martinez, N.; Koza, M. M.; Weik, M.; Masson, P.; Peters, J.

    2014-01-01

    It is a long debated question whether catalytic activities of enzymes, which lie on the millisecond timescale, are possibly already reflected in variations in atomic thermal fluctuations on the pico- to nanosecond timescale. To shed light on this puzzle, the enzyme human acetylcholinesterase in its wild-type form and complexed with the inhibitor huperzine A were investigated by various neutron scattering techniques and molecular dynamics simulations. Previous results on elastic neutron scattering at various timescales and simulations suggest that dynamical processes are not affected on average by the presence of the ligand within the considered time ranges between 10 ps and 1 ns. In the work presented here, the focus was laid on quasi-elastic (QENS) and inelastic neutron scattering (INS). These techniques give access to different kinds of individual diffusive motions and to the density of states of collective motions at the sub-picoseconds timescale. Hence, they permit going beyond the first approach of looking at mean square displacements. For both samples, the autocorrelation function was well described by a stretched-exponential function indicating a linkage between the timescales of fast and slow functional relaxation dynamics. The findings of the QENS and INS investigation are discussed in relation to the results of our earlier elastic incoherent neutron scattering and molecular dynamics simulations. PMID:24872501

  14. Stimulation of homology-directed gene targeting at an endogenous human locus by a nicking endonuclease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    G.P. van Nierop (Gijs); A.A.F. de Vries (Antoine); M. Holkers (Maarten); K.R. Vrijsen (Krijn); M.A.F.V. Gonçalves (Manuel)

    2009-01-01

    textabstractHomologous recombination (HR) is a highly accurate mechanism of DNA repair that can be exploited for homology-directed gene targeting. Since in most cell types HR occurs very infrequently (̃10.-6to 10.-8), its practical application has been largely restricted to specific experimental

  15. Variable domain structure of {kappa}IV human light chain len : high homology to the murine light chain McPC603.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Huang, D.-B.; Chang, C.-H.; Ainsworth, C.; Johnson, G.; Solomon, A.; Stevens, F. J.; Schiffer, M.; Center for Mechanistic Biology and Biotechnology; Univ. of Tennessee Medical Center

    1997-12-01

    Antibody light chains of the {kappa} subgroup are the predominant light chain component in human immune responses and are used almost exclusively in the antibody repertoire of mice. Human {kappa} light chains comprise four subgroups. To date, all crystallographic studies of human {kappa} light chains were carried out on proteins of the {kappa}I subgroup. The light chain produced by multiple myeloma patient Len, was of the {kappa}IV subgroup, it differed by only one residue from the germ-line gene encoded protein. The variable domain fragment of the light chain was crystallized from ammonium sulfate in space group C222{sub 1}. The crystal structure was determined by molecular replacement and refined at 1.95 Angstrom resolution to an R-factor of 0.15. Protein Len has six additional residues in its CDR1 segment compared to the {kappa}I proteins previously characterized. The {kappa}IV variable domain. Len, differs in only 23 of 113 residues from murine {kappa} light chain McPC603. The RMS deviation upon superimposing their {alpha}-carbons was 0.69 Angstrom. The CDR1 segment of the human and murine variable domains have the same length and conformation although their amino acid sequences differ in 5 out of 17 residues. Structural features were identified that could account for the significantly higher stability of the human {kappa}IV protein relative to its murine counterpart. This human {kappa}IV light chain structure is the closest human homolog to a murine light chain and can be expected to facilitate detailed structural comparisons necessary for effective humanization of murine antibodies.

  16. Ligand-specific homology modeling of human cannabinoid (CB1) receptor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ai, Rizi; Chang, Chia-en A

    2012-09-01

    Cannabinoid (CB1) receptor is a therapeutic drug target, and its structure and conformational changes after ligand binding are of great interest. To study the protein conformations in ligand bound state and assist in drug discovery, CB1 receptor homology models are needed for computer-based ligand screening. The known CB1 ligands are highly diverse structurally, so CB1 receptor may undergo considerable conformational changes to accept different ligands, which is challenging for molecular docking methods. To account for the flexibility of CB1 receptor, we constructed four CB1 receptor models based on four structurally distinct ligands, HU-210, ACEA, WIN55212-2 and SR141716A, using the newest X-ray crystal structures of human β₂ adrenergic receptor and adenosine A(2A) receptor as templates. The conformations of these four CB1-ligand complexes were optimized by molecular dynamics (MD) simulations. The models revealed interactions between CB1 receptor and known binders suggested by experiments and could successfully discriminate known ligands and non-binders in our docking assays. MD simulations were used to study the most flexible ligand, ACEA, in its free and bound states to investigate structural mobility achieved by the rearrangement of the fatty acid chain. Our models may capture important conformational changes of CB1 receptor to help improve accuracy in future CB1 drug screening. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. HOMOLOGY MODELING AND DOCKING STUDIES OF HUMAN CHITOTRIOSIDASE WITH ITS NATURAL INHIBITORS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Deepsikha Roy

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Chitinase inhibitors have been found to have anti-inflammatory potential against asthma, allergic diseases and various other disorders. In this study various naturally occurring chitinase inhibitors against human chitinase (chitotriosidases, CHIT1 were studied with the help of protein-ligand docking. The structure of CHIT1 was modeled by homology modeling tool and validated with the help of various computational tools. Following validation, secondary structure, function and solvent accessibility of the protein was analyzed. A molecular dynamics (MD simulation study was conducted by GROMACS simulation package to study the stability of the structure. This was further followed by docking studies with natural inhibitors like allosamidin, argifin and argadin against CHIT1 by GLIDE docking software. Argadin was observed to have the highest affinity (G-score =-10.955 towards CHIT1 and allosamidin scored the lowest GLIDE score (G-score =-7.741. The structural behavior of the best inhibitor protein complex (CHIT1- argadin was validated through molecular dynamics simulation studies. A structure based virtual screening on the basis of the binding modes of these inhibitor was performed and best scoring hits were identified. The sequence analysis can be further used for the designing of potent drugs against diseases caused by CHIT1, thereby aiding knowledge in the field of research

  18. TDP1 is required for efficient non-homologous end joining in human cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Jing; Summerlin, Matthew; Nitiss, Karin C; Nitiss, John L; Hanakahi, Leslyn A

    2017-12-01

    Tyrosyl-DNA phosphodiesterase 1 (TDP1) can remove a wide variety of 3' and 5' terminal DNA adducts. Genetic studies in yeast identified TDP1 as a regulator of non-homologous end joining (NHEJ) fidelity in the repair of double-strand breaks (DSBs) lacking terminal adducts. In this communication, we show that TDP1 plays an important role in joining cohesive DSBs in human cells. To investigate the role of TDP1 in NHEJ in live human cells we used CRISPR/cas9 to produce TDP1-knockout (TDP1-KO) HEK-293 cells. As expected, human TDP1-KO cells were highly sensitive to topoisomerase poisons and ionizing radiation. Using a chromosomally-integrated NHEJ reporter substrate to compare end joining between wild type and TDP1-KO cells, we found that TDP1-KO cells have a 5-fold reduced ability to repair I-SceI-generated DSBs. Extracts prepared from TDP1-KO cells had reduced NHEJ activity in vitro, as compared to extracts from wild type cells. Analysis of end-joining junctions showed that TDP1 deficiency reduced end-joining fidelity, with a significant increase in insertion events, similar to previous observations in yeast. It has been reported that phosphorylation of TDP1 serine 81 (TDP1-S81) by ATM and DNA-PK stabilizes TDP1 and recruits TDP1 to sites of DNA damage. We found that end joining in TDP1-KO cells was partially restored by the non-phosphorylatable mutant TDP1-S81A, but not by the phosphomimetic TDP1-S81E. We previously reported that TDP1 physically interacted with XLF. In this study, we found that XLF binding by TDP1 was reduced 2-fold by the S81A mutation, and 10-fold by the S81E phosphomimetic mutation. Our results demonstrate a novel role for TDP1 in NHEJ in human cells. We hypothesize that TDP1 participation in human NHEJ is mediated by interaction with XLF, and that TDP1-XLF interactions and subsequent NHEJ events are regulated by phosphorylation of TDP1-S81. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. Structural and Sequence Similarities of Hydra Xeroderma Pigmentosum A Protein to Human Homolog Suggest Early Evolution and Conservation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Apurva Barve

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Xeroderma pigmentosum group A (XPA is a protein that binds to damaged DNA, verifies presence of a lesion, and recruits other proteins of the nucleotide excision repair (NER pathway to the site. Though its homologs from yeast, Drosophila, humans, and so forth are well studied, XPA has not so far been reported from protozoa and lower animal phyla. Hydra is a fresh-water cnidarian with a remarkable capacity for regeneration and apparent lack of organismal ageing. Cnidarians are among the first metazoa with a defined body axis, tissue grade organisation, and nervous system. We report here for the first time presence of XPA gene in hydra. Putative protein sequence of hydra XPA contains nuclear localization signal and bears the zinc-finger motif. It contains two conserved Pfam domains and various characterized features of XPA proteins like regions for binding to excision repair cross-complementing protein-1 (ERCC1 and replication protein A 70 kDa subunit (RPA70 proteins. Hydra XPA shows a high degree of similarity with vertebrate homologs and clusters with deuterostomes in phylogenetic analysis. Homology modelling corroborates the very close similarity between hydra and human XPA. The protein thus most likely functions in hydra in the same manner as in other animals, indicating that it arose early in evolution and has been conserved across animal phyla.

  20. Structural and sequence similarities of hydra xeroderma pigmentosum A protein to human homolog suggest early evolution and conservation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barve, Apurva; Ghaskadbi, Saroj; Ghaskadbi, Surendra

    2013-01-01

    Xeroderma pigmentosum group A (XPA) is a protein that binds to damaged DNA, verifies presence of a lesion, and recruits other proteins of the nucleotide excision repair (NER) pathway to the site. Though its homologs from yeast, Drosophila, humans, and so forth are well studied, XPA has not so far been reported from protozoa and lower animal phyla. Hydra is a fresh-water cnidarian with a remarkable capacity for regeneration and apparent lack of organismal ageing. Cnidarians are among the first metazoa with a defined body axis, tissue grade organisation, and nervous system. We report here for the first time presence of XPA gene in hydra. Putative protein sequence of hydra XPA contains nuclear localization signal and bears the zinc-finger motif. It contains two conserved Pfam domains and various characterized features of XPA proteins like regions for binding to excision repair cross-complementing protein-1 (ERCC1) and replication protein A 70 kDa subunit (RPA70) proteins. Hydra XPA shows a high degree of similarity with vertebrate homologs and clusters with deuterostomes in phylogenetic analysis. Homology modelling corroborates the very close similarity between hydra and human XPA. The protein thus most likely functions in hydra in the same manner as in other animals, indicating that it arose early in evolution and has been conserved across animal phyla.

  1. PXA1, a putative S. cerevisiae homolog of the human adrenoleukyodystrophy gene

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shani, N.; Watkins, P.A.; Valle, D. [Johns Hopkins Univ. School of Medicine, Baltimore, MD (United States)

    1994-09-01

    The adrenoleukodystrophy protein (ALDP) and the 70 kD peroxisomal membrane protein (PMP70) are ATP-binding cassette transporters in the peroxisome membrane. The former is defective in X-linked adrenoleukodystrophy (ALD), a neurodegenerative disorder with defective peroxisome oxidation of very long chain fatty acids; the latter is implicated in Zellweger syndrome, a defect in peroxisome biogenesis. The functions and interactions of ALDP and PMP70 in the peroxisomal membrane are not known. To develop a system in which these questions could be addressed, we sought to clone their yeast homologs. Using RT/PCR with degenerate primers and oleic acid (C18:1) induced yeast RNA as template, we amplified a cDNA segment corresponding to a conserved region of ALDP and PMP70. By sequencing amplified products, we found one with homology to both proteins and used it to clone the corresponding full length yeast gene (PXA1). PXA1 encodes a 758 amino acid protein with 28% and 21% overall identity to ALDP and PMP70, respectively which increases to 47% and 39% in a C terminal region of 178 amino acids. The PXA1 protein precipitates with peroxisomes as shown by immunoblot analysis of cell fractionation gradients. Disruption of PXA1 by homologous recombination results in impaired growth on oleic acid and reduced ability to oxidize oleate. The growth phenotype can be corrected by expression of the wild type PXA1 in the mutant strain. Peroxisomes in the PXA1 mutant yeast strain are intact as judged by catalase distribution and electron microscopy. Given the amino acid similarity, fatty acid oxidation defect and lack of an effect on peroxisomal integrity, we hypothesize that PXA1 may be the yeast ortholog of ALDP. Complementation studies to examine this hypothesis are in progress.

  2. The mouse mutation sarcosinemia (sar) maps to chromosome 2 in a region homologous to human 9q33-q34

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brunialti, A.L.B.; Guenet, J.L. [Institut Pasteur a Paris (France); Harding, C.O.; Wolff, J.A. [Univ. of Wisconsin, Madison, WI (United States)

    1996-08-15

    The autosomal recessive mouse mutation sarcosinemia (sar), which was discovered segregating in the progeny of a male whose premeiotic germ cells had been treated with the mutagen ethylnitrosourea, is characterized by a deficiency in sarcosine dehydrogenase activity. Using an intersubspecific cross, we mapped the sar locus to mouse chromosome 2, approximately 15-18 cM from the centromere. The genetic localization of this locus in the mouse allows the identification of a candidate region in human (9q33-q34) where the homologous disease should map. 15 refs., 2 figs.

  3. Non-homologous End-joining Genes are not Inactivated in Human Radiation-induced Sarcomas with Genomic Instability

    OpenAIRE

    Sandrine H., LEFEVRE; Arnaud, COQUELLE; Nathalie, GONIN LAURENT; Andrej, COR; Nicolas, VOGT; Laurent, CHAUVEINC; Philippe, ANRACT; Bernard, DUTRILLAUX; Sylvie, CHEVILLARD; Bernard, MALFOY; Institut for Histology and Embryology, Medical Faculty; Institut Curie, Service de Radiotherapie; Hopital Cochin. Service de Chirurgie Orthopedique et Oncologique; CEA, DSV DRR; Institut Curie-CNRS-UPMC UMR7147, CEA LRC38

    2005-01-01

    DNA double-strand break (DSB) repair pathways are implicated in the maintenance of genomic stability. However the alterations of these pathways, as may occur in human tumor cells with strong genomic instability, remain poorly characterized. We analyzed the loss of heterozygosity (LOH) and the presence of mutations for a series of genes implicated in DSB repair by non-homologous end-joining in five radiation-induced sarcomas devoid of both active Tp53 and Rb1. LOH was recurrently observed for ...

  4. Molecular cloning of the human homolog of a striatum-enriched phosphatase (STEP) gene and chromosomal mapping of the human and murine loci

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Xu; Luna, J. [Stanford Univ. Medical Center, CA (United States); Francke, U. [Stanford Univ. Medical Center, CA (United States)]|[Yale Univ. School of Medicine, New Haven, CT (United States)

    1995-08-10

    A gene for a protein tyrosine phosphatase (PTPase) was isolated from a human fetal brain cDNA library by PCR amplification. Sequence analysis revealed that the PTPase has a single phosphatase catalytic domain located at the C-terminus that includes the highly conserved amino acid domain [I/V]HCXAGXXR[S/T]GX[F/Y] found in all tyrosine phosphatases. Two proline-rich regions located at the N-terminus may contain putative Src homology domain 3 (SH3) binding motifs. Comparison of the PTPase with a previously cloned striatum enriched phosphatase (STEP) from rat and from mouse exhibited a high degree of identity ({approximately}85-90%) at both the nucleotide and the amino acid levels, indicating that the human PTPase is the homolog of the rat and murine STEP gene. By using a combination of somatic cell hybrid analysis and fluorescence in situ hybridization, we have mapped the human STEP locus to chromosome 11p15.2-p15.1 and the murine STEP gene to chromosome 7B3-B5. These are two regions of known conserved synteny, providing further evidence that the human STEP is a true homolog of the murine STEP gene. Candidate disease genes in the vicinity include Usher syndrome type 1C in human and a mouse mutant locus, twister (twt). 50 refs., 3 figs.

  5. Molecular cloning and expression of Pgp-1. The mouse homolog of the human H-CAM (Hermes) lymphocyte homing receptor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, D F; Ding, J F; Picker, L J; Bargatze, R F; Butcher, E C; Goeddel, D V

    1989-11-15

    Mouse phagocytic glycoprotein-1 (Pgp-1; Ly-24) is a 95-kDa glycoprotein of unknown function that has served as an important T cell/leukocyte differentiation marker. Recent work has suggested that it may be related to a human 85- to 95-kDa glycoprotein (termed variously the Hermes Ag/lymphocyte homing receptor, ECMRIII, P80, and CD44) that is involved in lymphocyte binding to high endothelial venules in the process of lymphocyte homing, and has been implicated in other cell adhesion events. The widespread expression of this molecular class in diverse organ systems suggests a broad role in cellular adhesion, and has led to the unifying designation homing-cellular adhesion molecule (H-CAM). By using human H-CAM cDNA probes, we have isolated a full-length cDNA for the mouse homolog. Comparison of the human and mouse sequences reveals that an N-terminal domain homologous to cartilage proteoglycan core and link proteins, as well as the C-terminal transmembrane and cytoplasmic sequences, are highly conserved (89% and 86% identity, respectively). In contrast, a proximal extracellular domain thought to serve as a target for O-glycosylation and chondroitin sulfate attachment has undergone substantial divergence (only 42% identity). Transient expression of the cDNA in CHO cells followed by immunologic staining confirms that this mouse H-CAM cDNA encodes Pgp-1.1, one of two known Pgp-1 alloantigens.

  6. Localization of a human homolog of the mouse Tiam-1 gene to chromosome 21q22.1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Haiming Chen; Antonarakis, S.E. [Univ. of Geneva Medical School (Switzerland)

    1995-11-01

    Exon trapping was applied to genomic DNA from a chromosome 21-specific cosmid library (LL21NC02-Q) to clone portions of genes from this chromosome. Among a large number of trapped exons, three showed striking homology to different regions of the cDNA for the mouse T-lymphoma invasion and metastasis gene (Tiam-1) at both nucleotide and predicted amino acid sequence levels, suggesting that these three exons are part of a human homolog of the mouse Tiam-1 gene. We mapped this presumed human TIAM1 gene to chromosome 21 by using appropriate somatic cell hybrids, YACs, and cosmids. The TIAM1 gene localizes to YAC 760H5 of the I. Chumakov et al. YAC contig between markers D21S298 and D21S404 in band 21q22.1. This human gene (which is a member of the group of guanine nucleotide-dissociation stimulators that modulate the activity of Rho-like proteins) may be important in the development or metastasis of malignancies that are associated with abnormalities on chromosome 21, including the various forms of leukemia frequent in trisomy 21. 25 refs., 2 figs.

  7. Directed homology

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fahrenberg, Uli

    2004-01-01

    We introduce a new notion of directed homology for semicubical sets. We show that it respects directed homotopy and is functorial, and that it appears to enjoy some good algebraic properties. Our work has applications to higher-dimensional automata.......We introduce a new notion of directed homology for semicubical sets. We show that it respects directed homotopy and is functorial, and that it appears to enjoy some good algebraic properties. Our work has applications to higher-dimensional automata....

  8. Chemical and biological approaches to improve the efficiency of homologous recombination in human cells mediated by artificial restriction DNA cutter.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katada, Hitoshi; Harumoto, Toshimasa; Shigi, Narumi; Komiyama, Makoto

    2012-06-01

    A chemistry-based artificial restriction DNA cutter (ARCUT) was recently prepared from Ce(IV)/EDTA complex and a pair of pseudo-complementary peptide nucleic acids. This cutter has freely tunable scission-site and site specificity. In this article, homologous recombination (HR) in human cells was promoted by cutting a substrate DNA with ARCUT, and the efficiency of this bioprocess was optimized by various chemical and biological approaches. Of two kinds of terminal structure formed by ARCUT, 3'-overhang termini provided by 1.7-fold higher efficiency than 5'-overhang termini. A longer homology length (e.g. 698 bp) was about 2-fold more favorable than shorter one (e.g. 100 bp). When the cell cycle was synchronized to G2/M phase with nocodazole, the HR was promoted by about 2-fold. Repression of the NHEJ-relevant proteins Ku70 and Ku80 by siRNA increased the efficiency by 2- to 3-fold. It was indicated that appropriate combination of all these chemical and biological approaches should be very effective to promote ARCUT-mediated HR in human cells.

  9. Differentiation of Human Induced Pluripotent or Embryonic Stem Cells Decreases the DNA Damage Repair by Homologous Recombination

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kalpana Mujoo

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available The nitric oxide (NO-cyclic GMP pathway contributes to human stem cell differentiation, but NO free radical production can also damage DNA, necessitating a robust DNA damage response (DDR to ensure cell survival. How the DDR is affected by differentiation is unclear. Differentiation of stem cells, either inducible pluripotent or embryonic derived, increased residual DNA damage as determined by γ-H2AX and 53BP1 foci, with increased S-phase-specific chromosomal aberration after exposure to DNA-damaging agents, suggesting reduced homologous recombination (HR repair as supported by the observation of decreased HR-related repair factor foci formation (RAD51 and BRCA1. Differentiated cells also had relatively increased fork stalling and R-loop formation after DNA replication stress. Treatment with NO donor (NOC-18, which causes stem cell differentiation has no effect on double-strand break (DSB repair by non-homologous end-joining but reduced DSB repair by HR. Present studies suggest that DNA repair by HR is impaired in differentiated cells.

  10. Human Cytomegalovirus-Encoded Human Interleukin-10 (IL-10) Homolog Amplifies Its Immunomodulatory Potential by Upregulating Human IL-10 in Monocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Avdic, Selmir; McSharry, Brian P; Steain, Megan; Poole, Emma; Sinclair, John; Abendroth, Allison; Slobedman, Barry

    2016-04-01

    The human cytomegalovirus (HCMV) gene UL111A encodes cytomegalovirus-encoded human interleukin-10 (cmvIL-10), a homolog of the potent immunomodulatory cytokine human interleukin 10 (hIL-10). This viral homolog exhibits a range of immunomodulatory functions, including suppression of proinflammatory cytokine production and dendritic cell (DC) maturation, as well as inhibition of major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class I and class II. Here, we present data showing that cmvIL-10 upregulates hIL-10, and we identify CD14(+)monocytes and monocyte-derived macrophages and DCs as major sources of hIL-10 secretion in response to cmvIL-10. Monocyte activation was not a prerequisite for cmvIL-10-mediated upregulation of hIL-10, which was dose dependent and controlled at the transcriptional level. Furthermore, cmvIL-10 upregulated expression of tumor progression locus 2 (TPL2), which is a regulator of the positive hIL-10 feedback loop, whereas expression of a negative regulator of the hIL-10 feedback loop, dual-specificity phosphatase 1 (DUSP1), remained unchanged. Engagement of the hIL-10 receptor (hIL-10R) by cmvIL-10 led to upregulation of heme oxygenase 1 (HO-1), an enzyme linked with suppression of inflammatory responses, and this upregulation was required for cmvIL-10-mediated upregulation of hIL-10. We also demonstrate an important role for both phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3K) and STAT3 in the upregulation of HO-1 and hIL-10 by cmvIL-10. In addition to upregulating hIL-10, cmvIL-10 could exert a direct immunomodulatory function, as demonstrated by its capacity to upregulate expression of cell surface CD163 when hIL-10 was neutralized. This study identifies a mechanistic basis for cmvIL-10 function, including the capacity of this viral cytokine to potentially amplify its immunosuppressive impact by upregulating hIL-10 expression. Human cytomegalovirus (HCMV) is a large, double-stranded DNA virus that causes significant human disease, particularly in the

  11. Isolation of a Novel Human Gene, MARKLI, Homologous to MARK3 and Its Involvement in Hepatocellular Carcinogenesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tatsushi Kato

    2001-01-01

    Full Text Available Activation of the Writ-signaling pathway is known to play a crucial role in carcinogenesis of various human organs including the colon, liver, prostate, and endometrium. To investigate the mechanisms underlying hepatocellular carcinogenesis, we attempted to identify genes regulated by β-catenin/Tcf complex in a human hepatoma cell line, HepG2, in which an activated form of β-catenin is expressed. By means of cDNA microarray, we isolated a novel human gene, termed MARKLI (MAP/microtubule affinity-regulating kinase-like 1, whose expression was downregulated in response to decreased Tcf/LEF1 activity. The transcript expressed in liver consisted of 3529 nucleotides that contained an open reading frame of 2256 nucleotides, encoding 752 amino acids homologous to human MARK3 (MAP/ microtubule affinity-regulating kinase 3. Expression levels of MARKL1 were markedly elevated in eight of nine HCCs in which nuclear accumulation of β-catenin was observed, which may suggest that MARKL1 plays some role in hepatocellular carcinogenesis.

  12. HOMOLOGY BETWEEN SEGMENTS OF HUMAN HEMOSTATIC PROTEINS AND PROTEINS OF VIRUSES WHICH CAUSE ACUTE RESPIRATORY INFECTIONS OR DISEASES WITH SIMILAR SYMPTOMS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I. N. Zhilinskaya

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: To identify homologous segments of human hemostatic and viral proteins and to assess the role of human hemostatic proteins in viral replication. Materials and Methods: The following viruses were chosen for comparison: influenza B (B/Astrakhan/2/2017, coronaviruses (Hcov229E and SARS-Co, type 1 adenovirus (adenoid 71, measles (ICHINOSE-BA and rubella (Therien. The primary structures of viral proteins and 41 human hemostatic proteins were obtained from open–access www.ncbi.nlm.nih. gov and www.nextprot.org databases, respectively. Sequence homology was determined by comparing 12-amino-acid segments. Those sequences identical in ≥ 8 positions were considered homologous. Results: The analysis shows that viral proteins contain segments which mimic a number of human hemostatic proteins. Most of these segments, except those of adenovirus proteins, are homologous with coagulation factors. The increase in viral virulence, as in case of SARS-Co, correlates with an increased number of segments homologous with hemostatic proteins. Conclusion: Hemostasis plays an important role in viral replication and pathogenesis. The conclusion is consistent with the literature data about the relationship of hemostasis and inflammatory response to viral infections.

  13. No evidence of non-homologous insertions in mouse model of MDD created by replacement of homologous mouse DNA sequence with pathogenic 6-base human CREB1 promoter sequence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zubenko, George S; Hughes, Hugh B

    2012-01-01

    We have recently reported the creation and initial characterization of the first etiology-based recombinant mouse model of major depressive disorder (MDD). This was achieved by replacing the corresponding mouse DNA sequence with a 6-base DNA sequence from the human CREB1 promoter that is associated with the development of MDD in families identified by probands with recurrent, early-onset MDD. The current study explored whether the desired homologous recombination event at the mouse Creb1 gene that resulted in the creation of the mouse model was also accompanied by insertions of the targeting vector at unintended non-homologous locations in the mouse genome. No evidence of insertions of targeting vector sequence was observed at regions other than the mouse Creb1 gene. Copyright © 2011 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  14. A homologous subfamily of satellite III DNA on human chromosomes 14 and 22.

    OpenAIRE

    Choo, K H; Earle, E; McQuillan, C.

    1990-01-01

    We describe a new subfamily of human satellite III DNA that is represented on two different acrocentric chromosomes. This DNA is composed of a tandemly repeated array of diverged 5-base-pair monomer units of the sequence GGAAT or GGAGT. These monomers are organised into a 1.37-kilobase higher-order structure that is itself tandemly reiterated. Using a panel of somatic cell hybrids containing specific human chromosomes, this higher-order structure is demonstrated on chromosomes 14 and 22, but ...

  15. Comparative transcriptome profiling of an SV40-transformed human fibroblast (MRC5CVI and its untransformed counterpart (MRC-5 in response to UVB irradiation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cheng-Wei Chang

    Full Text Available Simian virus 40 (SV40 transforms cells through the suppression of tumor-suppressive responses by large T and small t antigens; studies on the effects of these two oncoproteins have greatly improved our knowledge of tumorigenesis. Large T antigen promotes cellular transformation by binding and inactivating p53 and pRb tumor suppressor proteins. Previous studies have shown that not all of the tumor-suppressive responses were inactivated in SV40-transformed cells; however, the underlying cause is not fully studied. In this study, we investigated the UVB-responsive transcriptome of an SV40-transformed fibroblast (MRC5CVI and that of its untransformed counterpart (MRC-5. We found that, in response to UVB irradiation, MRC-5 and MRC5CVI commonly up-regulated the expression of oxidative phosphorylation genes. MRC-5 up-regulated the expressions of chromosome condensation, DNA repair, cell cycle arrest, and apoptotic genes, but MRC5CVI did not. Further cell death assays indicated that MRC5CVI was more sensitive than MRC-5 to UVB-induced cell death with increased caspase-3 activation; combining with the transcriptomic results suggested that MRC5CVI may undergo UVB-induced cell death through mechanisms other than transcriptional regulation. Our study provides a further understanding of the effects of SV40 transformation on cellular stress responses, and emphasizes the value of SV40-transformed cells in the researches of sensitizing neoplastic cells to radiations.

  16. The human homolog of Escherichia coli endonuclease V is a nucleolar protein with affinity for branched DNA structures.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cathrine Fladeby

    Full Text Available Loss of amino groups from adenines in DNA results in the formation of hypoxanthine (Hx bases with miscoding properties. The primary enzyme in Escherichia coli for DNA repair initiation at deaminated adenine is endonuclease V (endoV, encoded by the nfi gene, which cleaves the second phosphodiester bond 3' of an Hx lesion. Endonuclease V orthologs are widespread in nature and belong to a family of highly conserved proteins. Whereas prokaryotic endoV enzymes are well characterized, the function of the eukaryotic homologs remains obscure. Here we describe the human endoV ortholog and show with bioinformatics and experimental analysis that a large number of transcript variants exist for the human endonuclease V gene (ENDOV, many of which are unlikely to be translated into functional protein. Full-length ENDOV is encoded by 8 evolutionary conserved exons covering the core region of the enzyme, in addition to one or more 3'-exons encoding an unstructured and poorly conserved C-terminus. In contrast to the E. coli enzyme, we find recombinant ENDOV neither to incise nor bind Hx-containing DNA. While both enzymes have strong affinity for several branched DNA substrates, cleavage is observed only with E. coli endoV. We find that ENDOV is localized in the cytoplasm and nucleoli of human cells. As nucleoli harbor the rRNA genes, this may suggest a role for the protein in rRNA gene transactions such as DNA replication or RNA transcription.

  17. Cloning and expression pattern of vat-1 homolog gene in zebrafish.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loeb-Hennard, Christine; Cousin, Xavier; Prengel, Isabel; Kremmer, Elisabeth

    2004-11-01

    The VAT-1 protein is present in the electric organ of marine rays where it is suggested to play a central role in nerve signal transmission. VAT-1 homolog protein was also identified in mouse and human but its function remains to be determined. We have investigated VAT-1 homolog in zebrafish Danio rerio since it is an excellent model amenable to the combination of genetic, molecular and embryological studies. Amino acid sequence analysis shows that the zebrafish VAT-1 homolog shares approximately 51-61% identity with the electric ray, mouse, and human counterparts. By in situ hybridization, vat-1 homolog mRNA is first observed in the trigeminal nuclei at the 8-somite stage. At 20-somite stage, vat-1 homolog is detected in the brain, namely in primary clusters of neurons, in the epiphysis and in the hindbrain. vat-1 homolog is also present in the neural tube but this expression disappears after 72 h post-fertilization. At 24 h post-fertilization, vat-1 homolog starts to be expressed in the developing gut. At later stages, vat-1 homolog is present throughout the brain, appears in the maturing retina and the pharyngeal cavity.

  18. Human genome contains four genes homologous to transforming genes of Harvey and Kirsten murine sarcoma viruses.

    OpenAIRE

    Chang, E H; Gonda, M A; Ellis, R.W.; Scolnick, E M; Lowy, D R

    1982-01-01

    Harvey and Kirsten murine sarcoma viruses each encode a structurally and functionally related 21-kilodalton protein (p21), which is the transforming protein of each virus. Using probes from the 0.9-kilobase (kb) p21-coding region of each virus (called v-Ha-ras and v-Ki-ras, respectively), we have molecularly cloned from normal human genomic DNA the sequences that hybridize to these probes. Four evolutionarily divergent restriction endonuclease fragments were isolated. Two hybridized preferent...

  19. A human urine-derived interleukin 1 inhibitor. Homology with deoxyribonuclease I

    OpenAIRE

    1988-01-01

    We have previously reported that the urine of febrile humans contained large quantities of an inhibitor of IL-1-induced murine thymocyte proliferation that was a glycoprotein between 30 and 40 kD in size. In the present study this factor has been purified to homogeneity using a sequence of eight purification steps (ammonium sulfate precipitation, ion exchange chromatography, molecular sieve chromatography, hydrophobic affinity chromatography, hydroxylapatite chromatography, fast protein liqui...

  20. A homologous subfamily of satellite III DNA on human chromosomes 14 and 22.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choo, K H; Earle, E; McQuillan, C

    1990-10-11

    We describe a new subfamily of human satellite III DNA that is represented on two different acrocentric chromosomes. This DNA is composed of a tandemly repeated array of diverged 5-base-pair monomer units of the sequence GGAAT or GGAGT. These monomers are organised into a 1.37-kilobase higher-order structure that is itself tandemly reiterated. Using a panel of somatic cell hybrids containing specific human chromosomes, this higher-order structure is demonstrated on chromosomes 14 and 22, but not on the remaining acrocentric chromosomes. In situ hybridisation studies have localised the sequence to the proximal p-arm region of these chromosomes. Analysis by pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE) reveals that 70-110 copies of the higher-order structure are tandemly organised on a chromosome into a major domain which appears to be flanked on both sides by non-tandemly repeated genomic DNA. In addition, some of the satellite III sequences are interspersed over a number of other PFGE fragments. This study provides fundamental knowledge on the structure and evolution of the acrocentric chromosomes, and should extend our understanding of the complex process of interchromosomal interaction which may be responsible for Robertsonian translocation and meiotic nondisjunction involving these chromosomes.

  1. HMG-box sequences from microbats homologous to the human SOX30 HMG-box.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bullejos, M; Díaz de la Guardia, R; Barragán, M J; Sánchez, A

    2000-01-01

    SOX genes are a family of genes that encode for proteins which are characterised by the presence of a HMG-domain related to that of the mammalian sex-determining gene (SRY). By definition, the DNA binding domain of SOX genes is at least 50% identical to the 79 amino acid HMG domain of the SRY gene. We report here two HMG-box sequences from two microbat species (R. ferrumequinum and P. Pipistrellus) which were PCR amplified using a primer pair specific to the mouse Sry HMG-box. The high percentage of identity of this sequences with the human and mouse SOX30 HMG-box suggests that they are the SOX30 HMG-box for these two bat species.

  2. Human Lyb-2 homolog CD72 is a marker for progenitor B-cell leukemias.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwarting, R; Castello, R; Moldenhauer, G; Pezzutto, A; von Hoegen, I; Ludwig, W D; Parnes, J R; Dörken, B

    1992-11-01

    S-HCL 2 is the prototype antibody of the recently defined CD72 cluster (human Lyb-2). Under nonreducing conditions, S-HCL 2 monoclonal antibody (mAb) precipitates a glycoprotein of 80-86 kDa. Under reducing conditions, a dimer of 43 and 39 kDa, with core proteins of 40 and 36 kDa, is precipitated. CD72 expression in normal and malignant tissues is different from expression of all other previously described human B-cell antigens. In peripheral blood and bone marrow, the antigen appears to be present on all B lymphocytes, with the exception of plasma cells. In tissue, immunohistochemical staining revealed positivity for all known B-cell compartments; however, pulpa macrophages of the spleen and von Kupffer cells exhibited distinct positivity for CD72 also. Among 83 malignant non-Hodgkin's lymphomas examined by immunohistochemistry (alkaline phosphatase anti-alkaline phosphatase technique), all 54 B-cell lymphomas, including precursor B-cell lymphomas, Burkitt's lymphomas, germinal center lymphomas, chronic lymphocytic leukemias, and hairy cell leukemias, were CD72 positive, but no T-cell lymphomas were. Flow cytometry study of more than 80 mainly acute leukemias (52 B-cell leukemias) showed reactivity with S-HCL 2 mAb over the full range of B-cell differentiation. In particular, very early B cells in cytoplasmic Ig (cIg)-negative, CD19-positive pre-pre-B-cell leukemias and hybrid leukemias (mixed myeloid and B-cell type) were consistently positive for CD72 on the cell surface. Therefore, CD72 may become an important marker for progenitor B-cell leukemias.

  3. Modeling Human Serum Albumin Tertiary Structure to Teach Upper-Division Chemistry Students Bioinformatics and Homology Modeling Basics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petrovic, Dus?an; Zlatovic´, Mario

    2015-01-01

    A homology modeling laboratory experiment has been developed for an introductory molecular modeling course for upper-division undergraduate chemistry students. With this experiment, students gain practical experience in homology model preparation and assessment as well as in protein visualization using the educational version of PyMOL…

  4. Localization of the homolog of a mouse craniofacial mutant to human chromosome 18q11 and evaluation of linkage to human CLP and CPO

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Griffith, A.J.; Burgess, D.L.; Kohrman, D.C.; Yu, J. [Univ. of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI (United States)] [and others

    1996-06-15

    The transgene-induced mutation 9257 and the spontaneous mutation twirler cause craniofacial and inner ear malformations and are located on mouse chromosome 18 near the ataxia locus ax. To map the human homolog of 9257, a probe from the transgene insertion site was used to screen a human genomic library. Analysis of a cross-hybridizing human clone identified a 3-kb conserved sequence block that does not appear to contain protein coding sequence. Analysis of somatic cell hybrid panels assigned the human locus to 18q11. The polymorphic microsatellite markers D18S1001 and D18S1002 were isolated from the human locus and mapped by linkage analysis using the CEPH pedigrees. The 9257 locus maps close to the centromeres of human chromosome 18q and mouse chromosome 18 at the proximal end of a conserved linkage group. To evaluate the role of this locus in human craniofacial disorders, linkage to D18S1002 was tested in 11 families with autosomal dominant nonsyndromic cleft lip and palate and 3 families with autosomal dominant cleft palate only. Obligatory recombinants were observed in 8 of the families, and negative lod scores from the other families indicated that these disorders are not linked to the chromosome 18 loci. 23 refs., 4 figs., 2 tabs.

  5. Depletion of the bloom syndrome helicase stimulates homology-dependent repair at double-strand breaks in human chromosomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yibin; Smith, Krissy; Waldman, Barbara Criscuolo; Waldman, Alan S

    2011-04-03

    Mutation of BLM helicase causes Blooms syndrome, a disorder associated with genome instability, high levels of sister chromatid exchanges, and cancer predisposition. To study the influence of BLM on double-strand break (DSB) repair in human chromosomes, we stably transfected a normal human cell line with a DNA substrate that contained a thymidine kinase (tk)-neo fusion gene disrupted by the recognition site for endonuclease I-SceI. The substrate also contained a closely linked functional tk gene to serve as a recombination partner for the tk-neo fusion gene. We derived two cell lines each containing a single integrated copy of the DNA substrate. In these cell lines, a DSB was introduced within the tk-neo fusion gene by expression of I-SceI. DSB repair events that occurred via homologous recombination (HR) or nonhomologous end-joining (NHEJ) were recovered by selection for G418-resistant clones. DSB repair was examined under conditions of either normal BLM expression or reduced BLM expression brought about by RNA interference. We report that BLM knockdown in both cell lines specifically increased the frequency of HR events that produced deletions by crossovers or single-strand annealing while leaving the frequency of gene conversions unchanged or reduced. We observed no change in the accuracy of individual HR events and no substantial alteration of the nature of individual NHEJ events when BLM expression was reduced. Our work provides the first direct evidence that BLM influences DSB repair pathway choice in human chromosomes and suggests that BLM deficiency can engender genomic instability by provoking an increased frequency of HR events of a potentially deleterious nature. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. [Effects of human and rat interferons-alpha on the behavior of rats of different ages. Comparative study of the homology of amino acid sequences].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loseva, E V; Loginova, N A; Nekliudov, V V; Mats, V N; Kurskaia, O V; Pasikova, N V

    2009-01-01

    Effects of chronic intranasal administration of human and rat interferons alpha on feeding and defensive behavior of rats were studied. Natural leukocyte human interferon "Lokferon" (a mixture of alpha interferon subtypes) and recombinant rat interferon alpha of the first subtype were used in the dose of 350 ME per rat daily. In addition, using the databases NCBI and EBI, we quantitatively estimated homology of amino-acid sequences between different subtypes of human and rat interferons. Both human (mostly in young rats) and rat interferons (mostly in old rats) increased rat feeding behavior after food conditioning to an audio tone. In old (but not in young) rats, both human and rat interferons worsened the ability of time interval assessment. In young (but not old) rats, both interferon kinds improved avoidance conditioning. The degree of homology between different human and rat interferons varied from 72% to 77%. Thus, generally, the effects of rat and human alpha interferons (350 ME) on rat conditioning were similar. This may be due to high degree of homology of amino-acid sequences between the two interferons.

  7. Human Leucocyte Antigen-G (HLA-G and Its Murine Functional Homolog Qa2 in the Trypanosoma cruzi Infection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fabrício C. Dias

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Genetic susceptibility factors, parasite strain, and an adequate modulation of the immune system seem to be crucial for disease progression after Trypanosoma cruzi infection. HLA-G and its murine functional homolog Qa2 have well-recognized immunomodulatory properties. We evaluated the HLA-G 3′ untranslated region (3′UTR polymorphic sites (associated with mRNA stability and target for microRNA binding and HLA-G tissue expression (heart, colon, and esophagus in patients presenting Chagas disease, stratified according to the major clinical variants. Further, we investigated the transcriptional levels of Qa2 and other pro- and anti-inflammatory genes in affected mouse tissues during T. cruzi experimental acute and early chronic infection induced by the CL strain. Chagas disease patients exhibited differential HLA-G 3′UTR susceptibility allele/genotype/haplotype patterns, according to the major clinical variant (digestive/cardiac/mixed/indeterminate. HLA-G constitutive expression on cardiac muscle and colonic cells was decreased in Chagasic tissues; however, no difference was observed for Chagasic and non-Chagasic esophagus tissues. The transcriptional levels of Qa2 and other anti and proinflammatory (CTLA-4, PDCD1, IL-10, INF-γ, and NOS-2 genes were induced only during the acute T. cruzi infection in BALB/c and C57BL/6 mice. We present several lines of evidence indicating the role of immunomodulatory genes and molecules in human and experimental T. cruzi infection.

  8. The splicing factor SF2/ASF binds to ARS homologs in a human rDNA replication origin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Mai; Shah, Dimal; Choung, Hae Yoon Grace; Coffman, Frederick D

    2009-08-15

    The function of the relatively well-studied DNA replication origins in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae is dependent upon interactions between origin replication complex (ORC) proteins and several defined origin sequence elements, including the 11 bp ARS consensus sequence (ACS). Although the ORC proteins, as well as numerous other protein components required for DNA replication initiation, are largely conserved between yeast and mammals, DNA sequences within mammalian replication origins are highly variable and sequences homologous to the yeast ACS elements are generally not present. We have previously identified several replication initiation sites within the nontranscribed spacer region of the human ribosomal RNA gene, and found that two highly utilized sites each contain a homologue of the yeast ACS embedded within a DNA unwinding element and a matrix attachment region. Here we examine protein binding within these initiation sites, and demonstrate that these ACS homologues specifically bind the alternate splicing factor SF2/ASF as well as GAPDH in vitro, and present evidence that the SF2/ASF interaction also occurs within the nuclei of intact cells. As the moderate upregulation of SF2/ASF has been linked to oncogenesis through the promotion of alternatively spliced forms of several regulatory proteins, our results suggest an additional mechanism by which SF2/ASF may influence the transformed cell phenotype.

  9. Crystal structure of a Gammadelta T-cell Receptor Specific for the Human MHC class I Homolog MICA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    B Xu; J Pizarro; M Holmes; C McBeth; V Groh; T Spies; R Strong

    2011-12-31

    {gamma}{delta} T cells play important roles in bridging innate and adaptive immunity, but their recognition mechanisms remain poorly understood. Human {gamma}{delta} T cells of the V{sub {delta}}1 subset predominate in intestinal epithelia and respond to MICA and MICB (MHC class I chain-related, A and B; MIC) self-antigens, mediating responses to tumorigenesis or viral infection. The crystal structure of an MIC-reactive V{sub {delta}}1 {gamma}{delta} T-cell receptor (TCR) showed expected overall structural homology to antibodies, {alpha}{beta}, and other {gamma}{delta} TCRs, but complementary determining region conformations and conservation of V{sub {delta}}1 use revealed an uncharacteristically flat potential binding surface. MIC, likewise, serves as a ligand for the activating immunoreceptor natural killer group 2, D (NKG2D), also expressed on {gamma}{delta} T cells. Although MIC recognition drives both the TCR-dependent stimulatory and NKG2D-dependent costimulatory signals necessary for activation, interaction analyses showed that MIC binding by the two receptors was mutually exclusive. Analysis of relative binding kinetics suggested sequential recognition, defining constraints for the temporal organization of {gamma}{delta} T-cell/target cell interfaces.

  10. Hrq1, a Homolog of the Human RecQ4 Helicase, Acts Catalytically and Structurally to Promote Genome Integrity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matthew L. Bochman

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Human RecQ4 (hRecQ4 affects cancer and aging but is difficult to study because it is a fusion between a helicase and an essential replication factor. Budding yeast Hrq1 is homologous to the disease-linked helicase domain of RecQ4 and, like hRecQ4, is a robust 3′-5′ helicase. Additionally, Hrq1 has the unusual property of forming heptameric rings. Cells lacking Hrq1 exhibited two DNA damage phenotypes: hypersensitivity to DNA interstrand crosslinks (ICLs and telomere addition to DNA breaks. Both activities are rare; their coexistence in a single protein is unprecedented. Resistance to ICLs requires helicase activity, but suppression of telomere addition does not. Hrq1 also affects telomere length by a noncatalytic mechanism, as well as telomerase-independent telomere maintenance. Because Hrq1 binds telomeres in vivo, it probably affects them directly. Thus, the tumor-suppressing activity of RecQ4 could be due to a role in ICL repair and/or suppression of de novo telomere addition.

  11. Diarrheal response of gnotobiotic pigs after fetal infection and neonatal challenge with homologous and heterologous human rotavirus strains.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torres, A; Ji-Huang, L

    1986-12-01

    Pigs exposed in utero to human rotavirus (HRV) strain Wa serotype 1 from 15 to 36 days prior to birth responded immunologically by modifying their clinical response to neonatal oral challenge with a pathogenic dose of homologous Wa or heterologous M serotype 3 HRV. In these cases, diarrhea was prevented in 12 of 14 pigs and greatly reduced in the other two. However, fecal virus shedding was not significantly modified, since it was detected in 12 of 14 pigs. These results suggest the existence of a closer antigenic relationship between these two different HRV serotypes which may only be expressed in an in vivo test system. Exposure of fetal pigs to HRV DS-1 serotype 2 failed to cause infection or to induce any protection when pigs were challenged at birth with HRV Wa. This model for cross-protection studies in gnotobiotic piglets offers good possibilities for the evaluation of potential HRV vaccine candidates, for the in vivo study of antigenic similarities between rotavirus serotypes, and for the understanding of protective immune responses against diarrhea and virus shedding.

  12. The Saccharomyces cerevisiae MEC1 gene, which encodes a homolog of the human ATM gene product, is required for G1 arrest following radiation treatment.

    OpenAIRE

    Siede, W.; Allen, J B; Elledge, S. J.; Friedberg, E C

    1996-01-01

    The Saccharomyces cerevisiae gene MEC1 represents a structural homolog of the human gene ATM mutated in ataxia telangiectasia patients. Like human ataxia telangiectasia cell lines, mec1 mutants are defective in G2 and S-phase cell cycle checkpoints in response to radiation treatment. Here we show an additional defect in G1 arrest following treatment with UV light or gamma rays and map a defective arrest stage at or upstream of START in the yeast cell cycle.

  13. Characterization of a highly conserved human homolog to the chicken neural cell surface protein Bravo/Nr-CAM that maps to chromosome band 7q31

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lane, R.P.; Vielmetter, J.; Dreyer, W.J. [California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, CA (United States)] [and others

    1996-08-01

    The neuronal cell adhesion molecule Bravo/Nr-CAM is a cell surface protein of the immunoglobulin (Ig) superfamily and is closely related to the L1/NgCAM and neurofascin molecules, all of which contain six immunoglobulin domains, five fibronectin repeats, a transmembrane region, and an intracellular domain. Chicken Bravo/Nr-CAM has been shown to interact with other cell surface molecules of the Ig superfamily and has been implicated in specific pathfinding roles of axonal growth cones in the developing nervous system. We now report the characterization of cDNA clones encoding the human Bravo/Nr-CAM protein, which, like its chicken homolog, is composed of six V-like Ig domains and five fibronectin type III repeats. The human Bravo/Nr-CAM homolog also contains a transmembrane and intracellular domain, both of which are 100% conserved at the amino acid level compared to its chicken homolog. Overall, the human Bravo/Nr-CAM homolog is 82% identical to the chicken Bravo/Nr-CAM amino acid sequence. Independent cDNAs encoding four different isoforms were also identified, all of which contain alternatively spliced variants around the fifth fibronectin type III repeat, including one isoform that had been previously identified for chicken Bravo/Nr-CAM. Northern blot analysis reveals one mRNA species of approximately 7.0 kb in adult human brain tissue. Fluorescence in situ hybridization maps the gene for human Bravo/Nr-CAM to human chromosome 7q31.1-q31.2. This chromosomal locus has been previously identified as containing a tumore suppressor candidate gene commonly deleted in certain human cancer tissues. 38 refs., 5 figs.

  14. The Expression of the Ubiquitin Ligase SIAH2 (Seven In Absentia Homolog 2 Is Increased in Human Lung Cancer.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paula Moreno

    Full Text Available Lung cancer is the leading cause of cancer-related deaths worldwide. Overall 5-year survival has shown little improvement over the last decades. Seven in absentia homolog (SIAH proteins are E3 ubiquitin ligases that mediate proteasomal protein degradation by poly-ubiquitination. Even though SIAH proteins play a key role in several biological processes, their role in human cancer remains controversial. The aim of the study was to document SIAH2 expression pattern at different levels (mRNA, protein level and immunohistochemistry in human non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC samples compared to surrounding healthy tissue from the same patient, and to analyse the association with clinicopathological features.One hundred and fifty-two samples from a patient cohort treated surgically for primary lung cancer were obtained for the study. Genic and protein expression levels of SIAH2 were analysed and compared with clinic-pathologic variables.The present study is the first to analyze the SIAH2 expression pattern at different levels (RNA, protein expression and immunohistochemistry in non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC. We found that SIAH2 protein expression is significantly enhanced in human lung adenocarcinoma (ADC and squamous cell lung cancer (SCC. Paradoxically, non-significant changes at RNA level were found, suggesting a post-traductional regulatory mechanism. More importantly, an increased correlation between SIAH2 expression and tumor grade was detected, suggesting that this protein could be used as a prognostic biomarker to predict lung cancer progression. Likewise, SIAH2 protein expression showed a strong positive correlation with fluorodeoxyglucose (2-deoxy-2(18Ffluoro-D-glucose uptake in primary NSCLC, which may assist clinicians in stratifying patients at increased overall risk of poor survival. Additionally, we described an inverse correlation between the expression of SIAH2 and the levels of one of its substrates, the serine/threonine kinase

  15. Crystal structure of human AUH protein, a single-stranded RNA binding homolog of enoyl-CoA hydratase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kurimoto, K; Fukai, S; Nureki, O; Muto, Y; Yokoyama, S

    2001-12-01

    The AU binding homolog of enoyl-CoA hydratase (AUH) is a bifunctional protein that has two distinct activities: AUH binds to RNA and weakly catalyzes the hydration of 2-trans-enoyl-coenzyme A (enoyl-CoA). AUH has no sequence similarity with other known RNA binding proteins, but it has considerable sequence similarity with enoyl-CoA hydratase. A segment of AUH, named the R peptide, binds to RNA. However, the mechanism of the RNA binding activity of AUH remains to be elucidated. We determined the crystal structure of human AUH at 2.2 A resolution. AUH adopts the typical fold of the enoyl-CoA hydratase/isomerase superfamily and forms a hexamer as a dimer of trimers. Interestingly, the surface of the AUH hexamer is positively charged, in striking contrast to the negatively charged surfaces of the other members of the superfamily. Furthermore, wide clefts are uniquely formed between the two trimers of AUH and are highly positively charged with the Lys residues in alpha helix H1, which is located on the edge of the cleft and contains the majority of the R peptide. A mutational analysis showed that the lysine residues in alpha helix H1 are essential to the RNA binding activity of AUH. Alpha helix H1 exposes a row of Lys residues on the solvent-accessible surface. These characteristic Lys residues are named the "lysine comb." The distances between these Lys residues are similar to those between the RNA phosphate groups, suggesting that the lysine comb may continuously bind to a single-stranded RNA. The clefts between the trimers may provide spaces sufficient to accommodate the RNA bases.

  16. Impact of charged particle exposure on homologous DNA double-strand break repair in human blood-derived cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Melanie eRall

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Ionizing radiation generates DNA double-strand breaks (DSB which, unless faithfully repaired, can generate chromosomal rearrangements in hematopoietic stem and/or progenitor cells (HSPC, potentially priming the cells towards a leukemic phenotype. Using an enhanced green fluorescent protein (EGFP-based reporter system, we recently identified differences in the removal of enzyme-mediated DSB in human HSPC versus mature peripheral blood lymphocytes (PBL, particularly regarding homologous DSB repair (HR. Assessment of chromosomal breaks via premature chromosome condensation or γH2AX foci indicated similar efficiency and kinetics of radiation-induced DSB formation and rejoining in PBL and HSPC. Prolonged persistence of chromosomal breaks was observed for higher LET charged particles which are known to induce more complex DNA damage compared to X rays. Consistent with HR deficiency in HSPC observed in our previous study, we noticed here pronounced focal accumulation of 53BP1 after X-ray and carbon ion exposure (intermediate LET in HSPC versus PBL. For higher LET, 53BP1 foci kinetics were similarly delayed in PBL and HSPC suggesting similar failure to repair complex DNA damage. Data obtained with plasmid reporter systems revealed a dose- and LET-dependent HR increase after X-ray, carbon ion and higher LET exposure, particularly in HR-proficient immortalized and primary lymphocytes, confirming preferential use of conservative HR in PBL for intermediate LET damage repair. HR measured adjacent to the leukemia-associated MLL breakpoint cluster sequence in reporter lines revealed dose-dependency of potentially leukemogenic rearrangements underscoring the risk of leukemia-induction by radiation treatment.

  17. Involvement of multimeric protein complexes in mediating the capacitation-dependent binding of human spermatozoa to homologous zonae pellucidae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Redgrove, Kate A; Anderson, Amanda L; Dun, Matthew D; McLaughlin, Eileen A; O'Bryan, Moira K; Aitken, R John; Nixon, Brett

    2011-08-15

    The recognition and binding of a free-swimming spermatozoon to an ovulated oocyte is one of the most important cellular interactions in biology. While traditionally viewed as a simple lock and key mechanism, emerging evidence suggests that this event may require the concerted action of several sperm proteins. In this study we examine the hypothesis that the activity of such proteins may be coordinated by their assembly into multimeric recognition complexes on the sperm surface. Through the novel application of blue native polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (BN-PAGE), we tender the first direct evidence that human spermatozoa do indeed express a number of high molecular weight protein complexes on their surface. Furthermore, we demonstrate that a subset of these complexes displays affinity for homologous zonae pellucidae. Proteomic analysis of two such complexes using electrospray ionization mass spectrometry identified several of the components of the multimeric 20S proteasome and chaperonin-containing TCP-1 (CCT) complexes. The latter complex was also shown to harbor at least one putative zona pellucida binding protein, ZPBP2. Consistent with a role in the mediation of sperm-zona pellucida interaction we demonstrated that antibodies directed against individual subunits of these complexes were able to inhibit sperm binding to zona-intact oocytes. Similarly, these results were able to be recapitulated using native sperm lysates, the zona affinity of which was dramatically reduced by antibody labeling of the complex receptors, or in the case of the 20S proteasome the ubiquitinated zonae ligands. Overall, the strategies employed in this study have provided novel, causal insights into the molecular mechanisms that govern sperm-egg interaction. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Effect of homologous synovial membrane on adult human articular cartilage in organ culture, and failure to influence it with D-penicillamine.

    OpenAIRE

    Jacoby, R K

    1980-01-01

    Adult human articular cartilage has been maintained in organ culture for 8 days, and the culture medium, which was changed on alternate days, was pooled. Normal and rheumatoid cartilage was obtained from patients and 4 types of culture were prepared: (1) cartilage alone; (2) cartilage + D-penicillamine; (3) cartilage + homologous synovium; (4) cartilage, synovium, and D-penicillamine. The hexosamines and hexuronic acid were measured in the cartilage explants and in the medium. The quantity re...

  19. Differential contributory roles of nucleotide excision and homologous recombination repair for enhancing cisplatin sensitivity in human ovarian cancer cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wani Gulzar

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background While platinum-based chemotherapeutic agents are widely used to treat various solid tumors, the acquired platinum resistance is a major impediment in their successful treatment. Since enhanced DNA repair capacity is a major factor in conferring cisplatin resistance, targeting of DNA repair pathways is an effective stratagem for overcoming cisplatin resistance. This study was designed to delineate the role of nucleotide excision repair (NER, the principal mechanism for the removal of cisplatin-induced DNA intrastrand crosslinks, in cisplatin resistance and reveal the impact of DNA repair interference on cisplatin sensitivity in human ovarian cancer cells. Results We assessed the inherent NER efficiency of multiple matched pairs of cisplatin-sensitive and -resistant ovarian cancer cell lines and their expression of NER-related factors at mRNA and protein levels. Our results showed that only the cisplatin-resistant ovarian cancer cell line PEO4 possessed an increased NER capacity compared to its inherently NER-inefficient parental line PEO1. Several other cisplatin-resistant cell lines, including CP70, CDDP and 2008C13, exhibited a normal and parental cell-comparable NER capacity for removing cisplatin-induced DNA intrastrand cross-links (Pt-GG. Concomitant gene expression analysis revealed discordance in mRNA and protein levels of NER factors in various ovarian cancer cell lines and NER proteins level were unrelated to the cisplatin sensitivity of these cell lines. Although knockdown of NER factors was able to compromise the NER efficiency, it only caused a minimal effect on cisplatin sensitivity. On the contrary, downregulation of BRCA2, a critical protein for homologous recombination repair (HRR, significantly enhanced the efficacy of cisplatin in killing ovarian cancer cell line PEO4. Conclusion Our studies indicate that the level of NER factors in ovarian cancer cell lines is neither a determinant of their NER capacity nor

  20. Loss of Expression of Human Spectrin Src Homology Domain Binding Protein 1 is Associated with 10p Loss in Human Prostatic Adenocarcinoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jill A. Macoska

    2001-01-01

    Full Text Available The gene encoding human spectrin Src homology domain binding protein 1, or Hssh3bpl, which is a marker of macropinocytic vesicles and a potential regulator of macropinocytosis, co-localizes to a YAC containing chromosome 10p sequences at loci D10S89 and D10S111 that are frequently deleted in prostate tumors. Expression of Hssh3bp1 was evaluated at the protein level in 17 paired normal and malignant prostate tumor samples using the monoclonal antibody 2G8 to Hssh3bpl. These experiments demonstrated that 4/6 tumors (67% with 10p deletion failed to express Hssh3bp1 protein compared to 5/11 (46% tumors with intact 10p. Thus, loss of Hssh3bp1 expression is concordant with allelic loss of adjacent 10p sequences in human prostate tumors. In addition, two prostate tumor cell lines contain an exon skipping mutation in the Hssh3bp1 gene that leads to the abnormal splicing of the mRNA and loss of a portion of Abl tyrosine kinase SH3 domain binding site in the protein. These data are consistent with a role for Hssh3bp1 as a candidate tumor suppressor gene inactivated during prostate tumorigenesis.

  1. Differential Expression and Clinical Significance of DNA Methyltransferase 3B (DNMT3B), Phosphatase and Tensin Homolog (PTEN) and Human MutL Homologs 1 (hMLH1) in Endometrial Carcinomas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Wenting; Wang, Ying; Fang, Xinzhi; Zhou, Mei; Li, Yiqun; Dong, Ying; Wang, Ruozheng

    2017-02-21

    BACKGROUND The aim of this study was to investigate the expression and the clinicopathologic significance of DNA methyltransferase 3B (DNMT3B), phosphatase and tensin homolog (PTEN) and human MutL homologs 1 (hMLH1) in endometrial carcinomas between Han and Uygur women in Xinjiang. MATERIAL AND METHODS The expression of DNMT3B, PTEN, and hMLH1 in endometrial carcinomas were assessed by immunohistochemistry, followed by an analysis of their relationship to clinical-pathological features and prognosis. RESULTS There were a 61.7% (95/154) overexpression of DNMT3B, 50.0% (77/154) loss of PTEN expression and 18.2% (28/154) loss of hMLH1 expression. The expression of DNMT3B and PTEN in endometrial carcinomas was statistically significantly different between Uygur women and Han women (p=0.001, p=0.010, respectively). DNMT3B expression was statistically significant based on the grade of endometrial carcinomas (p=0.031). PTEN loss was statistically significant between endometrioid carcinomas (ECs) and non endometrioid carcinomas (NECs) (p=0.040). DNMT3B expression was statistically significant in different myometrial invasion groups in Uygur women (p=0.010). Furthermore, the correlation of DNMT3B and PTEN expression was significant in endometrial carcinomas (p=0.021). PTEN expression was statistically significant in the overall survival (OS) rate of women with endometrial cancers (p=0.041). CONCLUSIONS Our findings suggest that PTEN and DNMT3B possess common regulation features as well as certain ethnic differences in expression between Han women and Uygur women. An interaction may exist in the pathogenesis of endometrial carcinoma. DNMT3B was expressed differently in cases of myometrial invasion and PTEN was associated with OS, which suggested that these molecular markers may be useful in the evaluation of the biological behavior of endometrial carcinomas and may be useful indicators of prognosis in women with endometrial carcinomas.

  2. Lack of functional and expression homology between human and mouse aldo-keto reductase 1C enzymes: implications for modelling human cancers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Schrewe Heinrich

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Over recent years, enzymes of the aldo-keto reductase (AKR 1C subfamily have been implicated in the progression of prostate, breast, endometrial and leukemic cancers. This is due to the ability of AKR1C enzymes to modify androgens, estrogens, progesterone and prostaglandins (PGs in a tissue-specific manner, regulating the activity of nuclear receptors and other downstream effects. Evidence supporting a role for AKR1C enzymes in cancer derives mostly from studies with isolated primary cells from patients or immortalized cell lines. Mice are ideal organisms for in vivo studies, using knock-out or over-expression strains. However, the functional conservation of AKR1C enzymes between human and mice has yet to be described. Results In this study, we have characterized and compared the four human (AKR1C1,-1C2, -1C3 and -1C4 and the eight murine (AKR1C6, -1C12, -1C13, -1C14, -1C18, -1C19, -1C20 and -1C21 isoforms in their phylogeny, substrate preference and tissue distribution. We have found divergent evolution between human and murine AKR1C enzymes that was reflected by differing substrate preference. Murine enzymes did not perform the 11β-ketoreduction of prostaglandin (PG D2, an activity specific to human AKR1C3 and important in promoting leukemic cell survival. Instead, murine AKR1C6 was able to perform the 9-ketoreduction of PGE2, an activity absent amongst human isoforms. Nevertheless, reduction of the key steroids androstenedione, 5α-dihydrotestosterone, progesterone and estrone was found in murine isoforms. However, unlike humans, no AKR1C isoforms were detected in murine prostate, testes, uterus and haemopoietic progenitors. Conclusions This study exposes significant lack of phylogenetic and functional homology between human and murine AKR1C enzymes. Therefore, we conclude that mice are not suitable to model the role of AKR1C in human cancers and leukemia.

  3. A DNA fragment from the human X chromosome short arm which detects a partially homologous sequence on the Y chromosomes long arm.

    OpenAIRE

    Koenig, M; Camerino, G.; Heilig, R; Mandel, J L

    1984-01-01

    An X linked human DNA fragment (named DXS31 ) which detects partially homologous sequences on the Y chromosome has been isolated. Regional localisation of the two sex linked sequences was determined using a panel of rodent-human somatic cell hybrids. The X specific sequence is located at the tip of the short arm ( Xp22 .3-pter), i.e. within or close to the region which pairs with the Y chromosome short arm at meiosis. However the Y specific sequence is located in the heterochromatic region of...

  4. The Schizosaccharomyces pombe Hikeshi/Opi10 protein has similar biochemical functions to its human homolog but acts in different physiological contexts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oda, Yuumi; Kimura, Makoto; Kose, Shingo; Fasken, Milo B; Corbett, Anita H; Imamoto, Naoko

    2014-05-21

    Human Hikeshi (HsHikeshi) is a nuclear import carrier for Hsp70s and is required for cell survival after heat shock. The Hikeshi homolog in Schizosaccharomyces pombe (SpHikeshi/Opi10) localizes to the nuclear rim, interacts with the Hsp70 homolog Ssa2, and mediates its nuclear import in a reconstituted mammalian nuclear transport system. However, SpHikeshi/Opi10 is not required for heat stress response and survival after heat stress. Instead, SpHikeshi/Opi10 is required for the normal expression of stress response genes under optimal conditions and for cell growth during glucose deprivation. Here, the functions of SpHikeshi/Opi10 are discussed and compared to the functions of HsHikeshi. Copyright © 2014 Federation of European Biochemical Societies. All rights reserved.

  5. Molecular cloning and characterization of Saccharomyces cerevisiae RAD28, the yeast homolog of the human Cockayne syndrome A (CSA) gene.

    OpenAIRE

    P.K Bhatia; Verhage, R.A.; Brouwer, J; Friedberg, E C

    1996-01-01

    Cockayne syndrome patients exhibit severe developmental and neurological abnormalities. Cells derived from these patients are sensitive to killing by UV radiation and do not support the rapid repair of the transcribed strand of transcriptionally active genes observed in cells from normal individuals. We report the cloning of the Saccharomyces cerevisiae homolog of the Cockayne syndrome A (CSA) gene, which we designate as RAD28. A rad28 null mutant does not manifest increased sensitivity to ki...

  6. Homology, Analogy, and Ethology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beer, Colin G.

    1984-01-01

    Because the main criterion of structural homology (the principle of connections) does not exist for behavioral homology, the utility of the ethological concept of homology has been questioned. The confidence with which behavioral homologies can be claimed varies inversely with taxonomic distance. Thus, conjectures about long-range phylogenetic…

  7. TOGp, the Human Homolog of XMAP215/Dis1, Is Required for Centrosome Integrity, Spindle Pole Organization, and Bipolar Spindle Assembly

    OpenAIRE

    Cassimeris, Lynne; Morabito, Justin

    2004-01-01

    The XMAP215/Dis1 MAP family is thought to regulate microtubule plus-end assembly in part by antagonizing the catastrophe-promoting function of kin I kinesins, yet XMAP215/Dis1 proteins localize to centrosomes. We probed the mitotic function of TOGp (human homolog of XMAP215/Dis1) using siRNA. Cells lacking TOGp assembled multipolar spindles, confirming results of Gergely et al. (2003. Genes Dev. 17, 336–341). Eg5 motor activity was necessary to maintain the multipolar morphology. Depletion of...

  8. Identification of tgh-2, a Filarial Nematode Homolog of Caenorhabditis elegans daf-7 and Human Transforming Growth Factor β, Expressed in Microfilarial and Adult Stages of Brugia malayi

    OpenAIRE

    Gomez-Escobar, Natalia; Gregory, William F.; Maizels, Rick M.

    2000-01-01

    A novel member of the transforming growth factor β (TGF-β) family has been identified in the filarial nematode parasite Brugia malayi by searching the recently developed Expressed Sequence Tag (EST) database produced by the Filarial Genome Project. Designated tgh-2, this new gene shows most similarity to a key product regulating dauer larva formation in Caenorhabditis elegans (DAF-7) and to the human down-modulatory cytokine TGF-β. Homology to DAF-7 extends throughout the length of the 349-am...

  9. Identification of APN2, the Saccharomyces cerevisiae homolog of the major human AP endonuclease HAP1, and its role in the repair of abasic sites

    OpenAIRE

    Johnson, Robert E.; Torres-Ramos, Carlos A.; Izumi, Tadahide; Mitra, Sankar; Prakash, Satya; Prakash, Louise

    1998-01-01

    Abasic (AP) sites arise in DNA through spontaneous base loss and enzymatic removal of damaged bases. APN1 encodes the major AP-endonuclease of Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Human HAP1 (REF1) encodes the major AP endonuclease which, in addition to its role in DNA repair, functions as a redox regulatory protein. We identify APN2, the yeast homolog of HAP1 and provide evidence that Apn1 and Apn2 represent alternate pathways for repairing AP sites. The apn1Δ apn2Δ strain displays a highly elevated le...

  10. A DNA fragment from the human X chromosome short arm which detects a partially homologous sequence on the Y chromosomes long arm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koenig, M; Camerino, G; Heilig, R; Mandel, J L

    1984-05-25

    An X linked human DNA fragment (named DXS31 ) which detects partially homologous sequences on the Y chromosome has been isolated. Regional localisation of the two sex linked sequences was determined using a panel of rodent-human somatic cell hybrids. The X specific sequence is located at the tip of the short arm ( Xp22 .3-pter), i.e. within or close to the region which pairs with the Y chromosome short arm at meiosis. However the Y specific sequence is located in the heterochromatic region of the long arm ( Yq11 -qter) and lies outside from the pairing region. DNAs from several XX male subjects were probed with DXS31 and in all cases a double dose of the X linked fragment was found, and the Y specific fragment was absent. DXS31 detects in chimpanzee a male-female differential pattern identical to that found in man. However results obtained in a more distantly related species, the brown lemur, suggest that the sequences detected by DXS31 in this species might be autosomally coded. The features observed with these X-Y related sequences do not fit with that expected from current hypotheses of homology between the pairing regions of the two sex chromosomes, nor with the pattern observed with other X-Y homologous sequences recently characterized. Our results suggest also that the rule of conservation of X linkage in mammals might not apply to sequences present on the tip of the X chromosome short arm, in bearing with the controversial issue of steroid sulfatase localisation in mouse.

  11. Structural recognition mechanisms between human Src homology domain 3 (SH3) and ALG-2-interacting protein X (Alix).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Xiaoli; Betzi, Stephane; Lugari, Adrien; Opi, Sandrine; Restouin, Audrey; Parrot, Isabelle; Martinez, Jean; Zimmermann, Pascale; Lecine, Patrick; Huang, Mingdong; Arold, Stefan T; Collette, Yves; Morelli, Xavier

    2012-06-21

    The functions of Src family kinases are tightly regulated through Src homology (SH) domain-mediated protein-protein interactions. We previously reported the biophysical characteristics of the apoptosis-linked gene 2-interacting protein X (Alix) in complex with the haemopoietic cell kinase (Hck) SH3 domain. In the current study, we have combined ITC, NMR, SAXS and molecular modeling to determine a 3D model of the complex. We demonstrate that Hck SH3 recognizes an extended linear proline-rich region of Alix. This particular binding mode enables Hck SH3 to sense a specific non-canonical residue situated in the SH3 RT-loop of the kinase. The resulting model helps clarify the mechanistic insights of Alix-Hck interaction. Copyright © 2012 Federation of European Biochemical Societies. All rights reserved.

  12. Molecular cloning and characterization of Saccharomyces cerevisiae RAD28, the yeast homolog of the human Cockayne syndrome A (CSA) gene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhatia, P K; Verhage, R A; Brouwer, J; Friedberg, E C

    1996-10-01

    Cockayne syndrome patients exhibit severe developmental and neurological abnormalities. Cells derived from these patients are sensitive to killing by UV radiation and do not support the rapid repair of the transcribed strand of transcriptionally active genes observed in cells from normal individuals. We report the cloning of the Saccharomyces cerevisiae homolog of the Cockayne syndrome A (CSA) gene, which we designate as RAD28. A rad28 null mutant does not manifest increased sensitivity to killing by UV or gamma radiation or to methyl methanesulfonate. Additionally, the rate of repair of the transcribed and nontranscribed strands of the yeast RPB2 gene in the rad28 mutant is identical to that observed in wild-type cells following exposure to UV light. As previously shown for rad7 rad26 and rad16 rad26 double mutants, the rad28 null mutant shows slightly enhanced sensitivity to UV light in the presence of mutations in the RAD7 or RAD16 gene. Both rad28 and rad26 null mutants are hypermutable following exposure to UV light.

  13. Negative regulation of mitosis in fission yeast by the shk1 interacting protein skb1 and its human homolog, Skb1Hs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gilbreth, M; Yang, P; Bartholomeusz, G; Pimental, R A; Kansra, S; Gadiraju, R; Marcus, S

    1998-12-08

    We previously provided evidence that the protein encoded by the highly conserved skb1 gene is a putative regulator of Shk1, a p21(Cdc42/Rac)-activated kinase (PAK) homolog in the fission yeast Schizosaccharomyces pombe. skb1 null mutants are viable and competent for mating but less elongate than wild-type S. pombe cells, whereas cells that overexpress skb1 are hyperelongated. These phenotypes suggest a possible role for Skb1 as a mitotic inhibitor. Here we show genetic interactions of both skb1 and shk1 with genes encoding key mitotic regulators in S. pombe. Our results indicate that Skb1 negatively regulates mitosis by a mechanism that is independent of the Cdc2-activating phosphatase Cdc25 but that is at least partially dependent on Shk1 and the Cdc2 inhibitory kinase Wee1. We provide biochemical evidence for association of Skb1 and Shk1 with Cdc2 in S. pombe, suggesting that Skb1 and Shk1 inhibit mitosis through interaction with the Cdc2 complex, rather than by an indirect mechanism. These results provide evidence of a previously undescribed role for PAK-related protein kinases as mitotic inhibitors. We also describe the cloning of a human homolog of skb1, SKB1Hs, and show that it can functionally replace skb1 in S. pombe. Thus, the molecular functions of Skb1-related proteins have likely been substantially conserved through evolution.

  14. Structural Characterization of the E2 Domain of APL-1, a C. Elegans Homolog of Human Amyloid Precursor Protein, and its Heparin Binding Site

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hoopes, J.; Liu, X; Xu, X; Demeler, B; Folta-Stogniew, E; Li, C; Ha, Y

    2010-01-01

    The amyloid {beta}-peptide deposit found in the brain tissue of patients with Alzheimer disease is derived from a large heparin-binding protein precursor APP. The biological function of APP and its homologs is not precisely known. Here we report the x-ray structure of the E2 domain of APL-1, an APP homolog in Caenorhabditis elegans, and compare it to the human APP structure. We also describe the structure of APL-1 E2 in complex with sucrose octasulfate, a highly negatively charged disaccharide, which reveals an unexpected binding pocket between the two halves of E2. Based on the crystal structure, we are able to map, using site-directed mutagenesis, a surface groove on E2 to which heparin may bind. Our biochemical data also indicate that the affinity of E2 for heparin is influenced by pH: at pH 5, the binding appears to be much stronger than that at neutral pH. This property is likely caused by histidine residues in the vicinity of the mapped heparin binding site and could be important for the proposed adhesive function of APL-1.

  15. The Over-expression of the β2 Catalytic Subunit of the Proteasome Decreases Homologous Recombination and Impairs DNA Double-Strand Break Repair in Human Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anita Collavoli

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available By a human cDNA library screening, we have previously identified two sequences coding two different catalytic subunits of the proteasome which increase homologous recombination (HR when overexpressed in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Here, we investigated the effect of proteasome on spontaneous HR and DNA repair in human cells. To determine if the proteasome has a role in the occurrence of spontaneous HR in human cells, we overexpressed the β2 subunit of the proteasome in HeLa cells and determined the effect on intrachromosomal HR. Results showed that the overexpression of β2 subunit decreased HR in human cells without altering the cell proteasome activity and the Rad51p level. Moreover, exposure to MG132 that inhibits the proteasome activity reduced HR in human cells. We also found that the expression of the β2 subunit increases the sensitivity to the camptothecin that induces DNA double-strand break (DSB. This suggests that the β2 subunit has an active role in HR and DSB repair but does not alter the intracellular level of the Rad51p.

  16. Expression of human poly (ADP-ribose) polymerase 1 in Saccharomyces cerevisiae: Effect on survival, homologous recombination and identification of genes involved in intracellular localization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    La Ferla, Marco; Mercatanti, Alberto; Rocchi, Giulia; Lodovichi, Samuele; Cervelli, Tiziana; Pignata, Luca [Yeast Genetics and Genomics, Institute of Clinical Physiology, National Council of Research (CNR), via Moruzzi 1, 56122 Pisa (Italy); Caligo, Maria Adelaide [Section of Genetic Oncology, University Hospital and University of Pisa, via Roma 57, 56125 Pisa (Italy); Galli, Alvaro, E-mail: alvaro.galli@ifc.cnr.it [Yeast Genetics and Genomics, Institute of Clinical Physiology, National Council of Research (CNR), via Moruzzi 1, 56122 Pisa (Italy)

    2015-04-15

    Highlights: • The human poly (ADP-ribose) polymerase 1 (PARP-1) gene affects growth and UV-induced homologous recombination in yeast. • PARP-1 chemical inhibition impacts yeast growth and UV-induced recombination. • A genome-wide screen identifies 99 yeast genes that suppress the growth defect inferred by PARP-1. • Bioinformatics analysis identifies 41 human orthologues that may have a role in PARP-1 intracellular localization. • The findings suggest that PARP-1 nuclear localization may affect the response to PARP inhibitors in cancer therapy. - Abstract: The poly (ADP-ribose) polymerase 1 (PARP-1) actively participates in a series of functions within the cell that include: mitosis, intracellular signaling, cell cycle regulation, transcription and DNA damage repair. Therefore, inhibition of PARP1 has a great potential for use in cancer therapy. As resistance to PARP inhibitors is starting to be observed in patients, thus the function of PARP-1 needs to be studied in depth in order to find new therapeutic targets. To gain more information on the PARP-1 activity, we expressed PARP-1 in yeast and investigated its effect on cell growth and UV induced homologous recombination. To identify candidate genes affecting PARP-1 activity and cellular localization, we also developed a yeast genome wide genetic screen. We found that PARP-1 strongly inhibited yeast growth, but when yeast was exposed to the PARP-1 inhibitor 6(5-H) phenantridinone (PHE), it recovered from the growth suppression. Moreover, we showed that PARP-1 produced PAR products in yeast and we demonstrated that PARP-1 reduced UV-induced homologous recombination. By genome wide screening, we identified 99 mutants that suppressed PARP-1 growth inhibition. Orthologues of human genes were found for 41 of these yeast genes. We determined whether the PARP-1 protein level was altered in strains which are deleted for the transcription regulator GAL3, the histone H1 gene HHO1, the HUL4 gene, the

  17. The beta crystallin genes on human chromosome 22 define a new region of homology with mouse chromosome 5

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hulsebos, T. J.; Jenkins, N. A.; Gilbert, D. J.; Copeland, N. G.

    1995-01-01

    The human beta crystallin genes CRYBB2, CRYBB2P1, CRYBB3, and CRYBA4 are located in 22q11.2. Using interspecific backcross analysis, we mapped the mouse homologues of CRYBB2, CRYBB3, and CRYBA4 (i.e., Crybb2, Crybb3, and Cryba4) to the central region of mouse chromosome 5. The homologue of human

  18. Mutational analysis of the high-affinity zinc binding site validates a refined human dopamine transporter homology model.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thomas Stockner

    Full Text Available The high-resolution crystal structure of the leucine transporter (LeuT is frequently used as a template for homology models of the dopamine transporter (DAT. Although similar in structure, DAT differs considerably from LeuT in a number of ways: (i when compared to LeuT, DAT has very long intracellular amino and carboxyl termini; (ii LeuT and DAT share a rather low overall sequence identity (22% and (iii the extracellular loop 2 (EL2 of DAT is substantially longer than that of LeuT. Extracellular zinc binds to DAT and restricts the transporter's movement through the conformational cycle, thereby resulting in a decrease in substrate uptake. Residue H293 in EL2 praticipates in zinc binding and must be modelled correctly to allow for a full understanding of its effects. We exploited the high-affinity zinc binding site endogenously present in DAT to create a model of the complete transmemberane domain of DAT. The zinc binding site provided a DAT-specific molecular ruler for calibration of the model. Our DAT model places EL2 at the transporter lipid interface in the vicinity of the zinc binding site. Based on the model, D206 was predicted to represent a fourth co-ordinating residue, in addition to the three previously described zinc binding residues H193, H375 and E396. This prediction was confirmed by mutagenesis: substitution of D206 by lysine and cysteine affected the inhibitory potency of zinc and the maximum inhibition exerted by zinc, respectively. Conversely, the structural changes observed in the model allowed for rationalizing the zinc-dependent regulation of DAT: upon binding, zinc stabilizes the outward-facing state, because its first coordination shell can only be completed in this conformation. Thus, the model provides a validated solution to the long extracellular loop and may be useful to address other aspects of the transport cycle.

  19. Equivariant ordinary homology and cohomology

    CERN Document Server

    Costenoble, Steven R

    2016-01-01

    Filling a gap in the literature, this book takes the reader to the frontiers of equivariant topology, the study of objects with specified symmetries. The discussion is motivated by reference to a list of instructive “toy” examples and calculations in what is a relatively unexplored field. The authors also provide a reading path for the first-time reader less interested in working through sophisticated machinery but still desiring a rigorous understanding of the main concepts. The subject’s classical counterparts, ordinary homology and cohomology, dating back to the work of Henri Poincaré in topology, are calculational and theoretical tools which are important in many parts of mathematics and theoretical physics, particularly in the study of manifolds. Similarly powerful tools have been lacking, however, in the context of equivariant topology. Aimed at advanced graduate students and researchers in algebraic topology and related fields, the book assumes knowledge of basic algebraic topology and group act...

  20. Identification of APN2, the Saccharomyces cerevisiae homolog of the major human AP endonuclease HAP1, and its role in the repair of abasic sites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, R E; Torres-Ramos, C A; Izumi, T; Mitra, S; Prakash, S; Prakash, L

    1998-10-01

    Abasic (AP) sites arise in DNA through spontaneous base loss and enzymatic removal of damaged bases. APN1 encodes the major AP-endonuclease of Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Human HAP1 (REF1) encodes the major AP endonuclease which, in addition to its role in DNA repair, functions as a redox regulatory protein. We identify APN2, the yeast homolog of HAP1 and provide evidence that Apn1 and Apn2 represent alternate pathways for repairing AP sites. The apn1Delta apn2Delta strain displays a highly elevated level of MMS-induced mutagenesis, which is dependent on the REV3, REV7, and REV1 genes. Our findings indicate that AP sites are highly cytotoxic and mutagenic in eukaryotes, and that the REV3, REV7-encoded DNA polymerase zeta mediates the mutagenic bypass of AP sites.

  1. Efficient Generation of Gene-Modified Pigs Harboring Precise Orthologous Human Mutation via CRISPR/Cas9-Induced Homology-Directed Repair in Zygotes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Xiaoyang; Wang, Lulu; Du, Yinan; Xie, Fei; Li, Liang; Liu, Yu; Liu, Chuanhong; Wang, Shiqiang; Zhang, Shibing; Huang, Xingxu; Wang, Yong; Wei, Hong

    2016-01-01

    Precise genetic mutation of model animals is highly valuable for functional investigation of human mutations. Clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats (CRISPR)/CRISPR-associated 9 (Cas9)-induced homology-directed repair (HDR) is usually used for precise genetic mutation, being limited by the relatively low efficiency compared with that of non-homologous end joining (NHEJ). Although inhibition of NHEJ was shown to enhance HDR-derived mutation, in this work, without inhibition of NHEJ, we first generated gene-modified pigs harboring precise orthologous human mutation (Sox10 c.A325>T) via CRISPR/Cas9-induced HDR in zygotes using single-strand oligo DNA (ssODN) as template with an efficiency as high as 80%, indicating that pig zygotes exhibited high activities of HDR relative to NHEJ and were highly amendable to genetic mutation via CIRSPR/Cas9-induced HDR. Besides, we found a higher concentration of ssODN remarkably reduced HDR-derived mutation in pig zygotes, suggesting a possible balance for optimal HDR-derived mutation in zygotes between the excessive accessibility to HDR templates and the activities of HDR relative to NHEJ which appeared to be negatively correlated to ssODN concentration. In addition, the HDR-derived mutation, as well as those from NHEJ, extensively integrated into various tissues including gonad of founder pig without detected off-targeting, suggesting CRISPR/Cas9-induced HDR in zygotes is a reliable approach for precise genetic mutation in pigs. © 2015 WILEY PERIODICALS, INC.

  2. Chromosomal localization of three repair genes: the xeroderma pigmentosum group C gene and two human homologs of yeast RAD23.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    P.J. van der Spek (Peter); E.M.E. Smit (Elisabeth); H.B. Beverloo (Berna); K. Sugasawa (Kaoru); C. Matsutani; F. Hanaoka (Fumio); J.H.J. Hoeijmakers (Jan); A. Hagemeier

    1994-01-01

    textabstractThe nucleotide excision repair (NER) disorder xeroderma pigmentosum (XP) is characterized by sun (UV) sensitivity, predisposition to skin cancer, and extensive genetic heterogeneity. Recently, we reported the cloning and analysis of three human NER genes, XPC, HHR23A, and HHR23B. The

  3. Verifying a candidate counterpart to gravitational waves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kasliwal, Mansi

    2017-08-01

    With advances in sensitivity of gravitational wave interferometers, the direct detection of neutron star mergers should be imminent. Identification of an electromagnetic counterpart would enable a wealth of astrophysics and answer the long-standing question of whether neutron star mergers are the missing cosmic mines of heavy elements synthesized by the r-process. We will be searching for a fast-fading optical counterpart with the new Zwicky Transient Facility at Palomar Observatory. Here, we propose to use HST/WFC3 to look for infrared emission from a single, most-promising candidate optical counterpart. The infrared emission would serve as a direct diagnostic of the radioactive decay of heavy elements.

  4. Lectures on functor homology

    CERN Document Server

    Touzé, Antoine

    2015-01-01

    This book features a series of lectures that explores three different fields in which functor homology (short for homological algebra in functor categories) has recently played a significant role. For each of these applications, the functor viewpoint provides both essential insights and new methods for tackling difficult mathematical problems. In the lectures by Aurélien Djament, polynomial functors appear as coefficients in the homology of infinite families of classical groups, e.g. general linear groups or symplectic groups, and their stabilization. Djament’s theorem states that this stable homology can be computed using only the homology with trivial coefficients and the manageable functor homology. The series includes an intriguing development of Scorichenko’s unpublished results. The lectures by Wilberd van der Kallen lead to the solution of the general cohomological finite generation problem, extending Hilbert’s fourteenth problem and its solution to the context of cohomology. The focus here is o...

  5. Evaluation of potential models for imprinted and nonimprinted components of human chromosome 15q11-q13 syndromes by fine-structure homology mapping in the mouse

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nicholls, R.D.; Gottlieb, W.; Davda, M. (Univ. of Florida, Gainesville (United States)); Russell, L.B.; Rinchik, E.M. (Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States)); Horsthemke, B. (Universitatsklinikum Essen, Hufelandstrasse (Germany))

    1993-03-01

    Prader-Willi and Angelman syndromes are complex neurobehavioral contiguous gene syndromes whose expression depends on the unmasking of genomic imprinting for different genetic loci in human chromosome 15q11-q13. The homologous chromosomal region in the mouse genome has been fine-mapped by using interspecific (Mus spretus) crosses and overlapping, radiation-induced deletions to evaluate potential animal models for both imprinted and nonimprinted components of these syndromes. Four evolutionarily conserved sequences from human 15q11-q13, including two cDNAs from fetal brain (DN10, D15S12h; DN34, D15S9h-1), a microdissected clone (MN7; D15F37S1h) expressed in mouse brain, and the gene for the [beta]3 subunit of the [gamma]-aminobutyric acid type A receptor (Gabrb3), were mapped in mouse chromosome 7 by analysis of deletions at the pink-eyed dilution (p) locus. Three of these loci are deleted in pre- and postnatally lethal p-locus mutations, which extend up to 5.5 [plus minus] 1.7 centimorgans (cM) proximal to p; D15S9h-1, which maps 1.1 [plus minus] 0.8 cM distal to p and is the mouse homolog of the human gene D15S9 (which shows a DNA methylation imprint), is not deleted in any of the p-locus deletion series. A transcript from the Gabrb3 gene, but not the transcript detected by MN7 at the D15F37S1h locus, is expressed in mice homozygous for the p[sup 6H] deletion, which have an abnormal neurological phenotype. Furthermore, the Gabrb3 transcript is expressed equally well from the maternal or paternal chromosome 7 and, therefore, its expression is not imprinted in mouse brain. Deletions, at the mouse p locus should serve as intermediate genetic reagents and models with which to analyze the genetics and etiology of individual components of human 15q11-q13 disorders. 32 refs., 5 figs.

  6. Identification of a putative binding site for negatively charged surfaces in the fibronectin type II domain of human factor XII--an immunochemical and homology modeling approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Citarella, F; te Velthuis, H; Helmer-Citterich, M; Hack, C E

    2000-12-01

    Monoclonal antibodies directed against functional sites of proteins provide useful tools for structure-function studies. Here we describe a mAb, KOK5, directed against the heavy chain region of human coagulation factor XII (FXII), which inhibits kaolin-induced clotting activity by preventing the binding of FXII to kaolin. Furthermore, mAb KOK5 enhances FXII susceptibility for cleavage by kallikrein and supports FXII autoactivation. Hence, mAb KOK5 likely is directed against the binding site of FXII for negatively charged surfaces. Screening of two phage-displayed random peptide libraries with mAb KOK5 selected phages that could be grouped on the basis of two amino acid consensus sequences: A) FXFQTPXW and B) HQ/LCTHR/KKC. Sequence A contains two motifs: one shares homology with FXII amino acid residues 30-33 (FPFQ), the second one with residues 57-60 (TPNF); both amino acid stretches belonging to the fibronectin type II domain of FXII. Sequence B also reveals homology with part of the fibronectin type II domain, i.e. the stretch 40-47 (HKCTHKGR). A three-dimensional model of FXII residues 28-65, obtained by homology modeling, indicated that the three amino acid stretches 30-33, 40-47 and 57-60 are close to each other and accessible for the solvent, i.e. in a form available for interaction with the monoclonal antibody, suggesting that mAb KOK5 recognizes a discontinuous epitope on the fibronectin type III domain of FXII. Peptides corresponding to FXII sequences 29-37 (FXII29-37) or 39-47 (FXII39-47), were synthesized and tested for the capability to inhibit FXII binding to negatively charged surfaces. Peptide FXII39-47 inhibited the binding of labeled FXII to kaolin and effectively prevented both dextran sulfate- and kaolin-induced activation of the contact system in plasma. Hence, we suggest that the fibronectin type II domain of FXII, in particular residues 39 to 47, contribute to the binding site of FXII for negatively charged surfaces.

  7. Homology modeling and ligand interaction of human trafficking protein particle complex subunit 3-like protein and its correlation with Alzheimer’s disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manoj G

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available In order to understand the mechanism of molecular interactions at active sites of trafficking protein particle complex (TRAPPC subunit 3-like protein (Accession number Q5T215 homology modeling and docking studies were taken up. We generated a three-dimensional (3D model of target protein based on the Crystal structure of Human BET3 protein (PDB code 1SZ7 using modeller software. Under the process of homology modeling 25 models were generated, and the model having the lowest modeler objective function value was chosen for further assessment. The generated model was assessed and validated using PROCHECK software and found to be reliable.With the generated model, we carried out a flexible docking study using the FlexX docking tool available on the Sybyl Software in order to find better antagonist site for drug binding. We carried out a flexible docking with the Palmatic acid and Donepezil as ligands; these were found to bind at LEU87, LYS84 and THR90 residues on given generated protein in our studies. We therefore concluded that the above mentioned residues were the key residue sites for ligand binding showing strong hydrogen bonding contacts.The target protein is more prevalently seen in the amygdala region of brain which forms one of the key subunit of TRAPP complex. As per functional similarity with BET3, target protein might play key role in trafficking abnormally folded A-beta and tau proteins along endoplasmic reticulum to Golgi apparatus there by leading to formation of senile plaques in various regions of brain, whose accumulation causes Alzheimer’s disease.

  8. A Lettuce (Lactuca sativa) Homolog of Human Nogo-B Receptor Interacts with cis-Prenyltransferase and Is Necessary for Natural Rubber Biosynthesis*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qu, Yang; Chakrabarty, Romit; Tran, Hue T.; Kwon, Eun-Joo G.; Kwon, Moonhyuk; Nguyen, Trinh-Don; Ro, Dae-Kyun

    2015-01-01

    Natural rubber (cis-1,4-polyisoprene) is an indispensable biopolymer used to manufacture diverse consumer products. Although a major source of natural rubber is the rubber tree (Hevea brasiliensis), lettuce (Lactuca sativa) is also known to synthesize natural rubber. Here, we report that an unusual cis-prenyltransferase-like 2 (CPTL2) that lacks the conserved motifs of conventional cis-prenyltransferase is required for natural rubber biosynthesis in lettuce. CPTL2, identified from the lettuce rubber particle proteome, displays homology to a human NogoB receptor and is predominantly expressed in latex. Multiple transgenic lettuces expressing CPTL2-RNAi constructs showed that a decrease of CPTL2 transcripts (3–15% CPTL2 expression relative to controls) coincided with the reduction of natural rubber as low as 5%. We also identified a conventional cis-prenyltransferase 3 (CPT3), exclusively expressed in latex. In subcellular localization studies using fluorescent proteins, cytosolic CPT3 was relocalized to endoplasmic reticulum by co-occurrence of CPTL2 in tobacco and yeast at the log phase. Furthermore, yeast two-hybrid data showed that CPTL2 and CPT3 interact. Yeast microsomes containing CPTL2/CPT3 showed enhanced synthesis of short cis-polyisoprenes, but natural rubber could not be synthesized in vitro. Intriguingly, a homologous pair CPTL1/CPT1, which displays ubiquitous expressions in lettuce, showed a potent dolichol biosynthetic activity in vitro. Taken together, our data suggest that CPTL2 is a scaffolding protein that tethers CPT3 on endoplasmic reticulum and is necessary for natural rubber biosynthesis in planta, but yeast-expressed CPTL2 and CPT3 alone could not synthesize high molecular weight natural rubber in vitro. PMID:25477521

  9. A lettuce (Lactuca sativa) homolog of human Nogo-B receptor interacts with cis-prenyltransferase and is necessary for natural rubber biosynthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qu, Yang; Chakrabarty, Romit; Tran, Hue T; Kwon, Eun-Joo G; Kwon, Moonhyuk; Nguyen, Trinh-Don; Ro, Dae-Kyun

    2015-01-23

    Natural rubber (cis-1,4-polyisoprene) is an indispensable biopolymer used to manufacture diverse consumer products. Although a major source of natural rubber is the rubber tree (Hevea brasiliensis), lettuce (Lactuca sativa) is also known to synthesize natural rubber. Here, we report that an unusual cis-prenyltransferase-like 2 (CPTL2) that lacks the conserved motifs of conventional cis-prenyltransferase is required for natural rubber biosynthesis in lettuce. CPTL2, identified from the lettuce rubber particle proteome, displays homology to a human NogoB receptor and is predominantly expressed in latex. Multiple transgenic lettuces expressing CPTL2-RNAi constructs showed that a decrease of CPTL2 transcripts (3-15% CPTL2 expression relative to controls) coincided with the reduction of natural rubber as low as 5%. We also identified a conventional cis-prenyltransferase 3 (CPT3), exclusively expressed in latex. In subcellular localization studies using fluorescent proteins, cytosolic CPT3 was relocalized to endoplasmic reticulum by co-occurrence of CPTL2 in tobacco and yeast at the log phase. Furthermore, yeast two-hybrid data showed that CPTL2 and CPT3 interact. Yeast microsomes containing CPTL2/CPT3 showed enhanced synthesis of short cis-polyisoprenes, but natural rubber could not be synthesized in vitro. Intriguingly, a homologous pair CPTL1/CPT1, which displays ubiquitous expressions in lettuce, showed a potent dolichol biosynthetic activity in vitro. Taken together, our data suggest that CPTL2 is a scaffolding protein that tethers CPT3 on endoplasmic reticulum and is necessary for natural rubber biosynthesis in planta, but yeast-expressed CPTL2 and CPT3 alone could not synthesize high molecular weight natural rubber in vitro. © 2015 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  10. Real Topological Cyclic Homology

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Høgenhaven, Amalie

    , where O(2) is the semi-direct product of T, the multiplicative group of complex number of modulus 1, by the group G=Gal(C/R). We refer to this O(2)-spectrum as the real topological Hochschild homology. This generalization leads to a G-equivariant version of topological cyclic homology, which we call...... real topological cyclic homology. The first part of the thesis computes the G-equivariant homotopy type of the real topological cyclic homology of spherical group rings at a prime p with anti-involution induced by taking inverses in the group. The second part of the thesis investigates the derived G...

  11. Molecular characterization and expression of a novel human leukocyte cell-surface marker homologous to mouse Ly-9

    OpenAIRE

    Fuente García, Miguel Ángel de la; Tovar, Victoria; Villamor, Neus; Zapater, Nuria; Pizcueta, Pilar; Campo, Elias; Jaime Bosch, Jaime; Engel, Pablo

    2001-01-01

    Producción Científica .Ly-9 is a mouse cell-surface glycoprotein that is selectively expressed on thymocytes and on mature T and B lymphocytes. Ly-9 belongs to the CD2 subset of the immunoglobulin superfamily, an emerging family of cell signaling receptors. Recently, a partial human Ly-9 complementary DNA (cDNA) sequence has been described. Full-length cDNA clones were isolated that included the initiation codon, the sequence encoding the full signal peptide, and 14 amino acids more in the...

  12. The Drosophila Medea gene is required downstream of dpp and encodes a functional homolog of human Smad4.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hudson, J B; Podos, S D; Keith, K; Simpson, S L; Ferguson, E L

    1998-04-01

    The Transforming Growth Factor-beta superfamily member decapentaplegic (dpp) acts as an extracellular morphogen to pattern the embryonic ectoderm of the Drosophila embryo. To identify components of the dpp signaling pathway, we screened for mutations that act as dominant maternal enhancers of a weak allele of the dpp target gene zerknŁllt. In this screen, we recovered new alleles of the Mothers against dpp (Mad) and Medea genes. Phenotypic analysis of the new Medea mutations indicates that Medea, like Mad, is required for both embryonic and imaginal disc patterning. Genetic analysis suggests that Medea may have two independently mutable functions in patterning the embryonic ectoderm. Complete elimination of maternal and zygotic Medea activity in the early embryo results in a ventralized phenotype identical to that of null dpp mutants, indicating that Medea is required for all dpp-dependent signaling in embryonic dorsal-ventral patterning. Injection of mRNAs encoding DPP or a constitutively activated form of the DPP receptor, Thick veins, into embryos lacking all Medea activity failed to induce formation of any dorsal cell fates, demonstrating that Medea acts downstream of the thick veins receptor. We cloned Medea and found that it encodes a protein with striking sequence similarity to human SMAD4. Moreover, injection of human SMAD4 mRNA into embryos lacking all Medea activity conferred phenotypic rescue of the dorsal-ventral pattern, demonstrating conservation of function between the two gene products.

  13. Identification and characterization of Nek6 protein kinase, a potential human homolog of NIMA histone H3 kinase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hashimoto, Yoshihiro; Akita, Hidetoshi; Hibino, Mitsunobu; Kohri, Kenjiro; Nakanishi, Makoto

    2002-05-03

    In Aspergillus nidulans, the kinase activity of NIMA (never in mitosis, gene A) is critical for the initiation of mitosis. NIMA regulates mitotic chromatin condensation through phosphorylation of histone H3 at serine 10. In the present study, we identified human Nek6 (hNek6), a member of the mammalian NIMA-related kinases. The predicted hNek6 protein is comprised of 338 amino acids. Northern blot analysis revealed that hNek6 transcripts are ubiquitously expressed with the highest expression found in the heart and skeletal muscle. Lower cell cycle-dependent expression of hNek6 transcripts was observed in the early G1 phase. GFP-fused hNek6 protein showed both nuclear and cytoplasmic localizations in HeLa cells. Fluorescence in situ hybridization using full-length hNek6 cDNA as a probe showed that the hNek6 gene is localized to human chromosome 9q33-34, a region at which the loss of heterozygosity is associated with transitional cell carcinomas. Importantly, recombinant hNek6 protein produced in insect cells effectively phosphorylated histones H1 and H3, but not casein. Thus, these results suggest that, unlike other mammalian NIMA-related kinases, Nek6 is a mitotic histone kinase which regulates chromatin condensation in mammalian cells. Copyright 2002 Elsevier Science (USA).

  14. Anti-inflammatory and vasoprotective activity of a retroviral-derived peptide, homologous to human endogenous retroviruses: endothelial cell effects.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    George J Cianciolo

    Full Text Available Malignant and inflammatory tissues sometimes express endogenous retroviruses or their proteins. A highly-conserved sequence from retroviral transmembrane (TM proteins, termed the "immunosuppressive domain (ID", is associated with inhibition of immune and inflammatory functions. An octadecapeptide (MN10021 from the ID of retroviral TM protein p15E inhibits in vitro release of pro-inflammatory cytokines and increases synthesis of anti-inflammatory IL-10. We sought to determine if MN10021 has significant in vivo effects. MN10021, prepared by solid-phase synthesis, was dimerized through a naturally-occurring, carboxy-terminal cysteine. In vivo anti-inflammatory activity was determined using a murine model of sodium periodate (NaIO(4-induced peritonitis. In vivo vasoprotective effects were determined using: (1 a carrageenan-induced model of disseminated intravascular coagulation (DIC in mice; (2 a reverse passive Arthus model in guinea pigs; and (3 vasoregulatory effects in spontaneously hypertensive rats (SHR. In vitro studies included: (1 binding/uptake of MN10021 using human monocytes, cultured fibroblasts, and vascular endothelial cells (VEC; (2 gene expression by RT-PCR of MN10021-treated VEC; and (3 apoptosis of MN10021-treated VEC exposed to staurosporine or TNF-α. One-tenth nmol MN10021 inhibits 50 percent of the inflammatory response in the mouse peritonitis model. Furthermore, 73 nmol MN10021 completely protects mice in a lethal model of carrageenan-induced DIC and inhibits vascular leak in both the mouse DIC model and a guinea pig reverse passive Arthus reaction. MN10021 binds to and is taken up in a specific manner by both human monocytes and VEC but not by cultured human fibroblasts. Surprisingly, orally-administered MN10021 lowers blood pressure in SHR rats by 10-15% within 1 h suggesting a direct or indirect effect on the vascular endothelium. MN10021 and derived octapeptides induce iNOS (inducible nitric oxide synthase mRNA in VEC

  15. YNK1, the yeast homolog of human metastasis suppressor NM23, is required for repair of UV radiation- and etoposide-induced DNA damage

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yang Mengmeng; Jarrett, Stuart G.; Craven, Rolf [Department of Molecular and Biomedical Pharmacology, College of Medicine, University of Kentucky, Lexington, KY 40536-0298 (United States); Kaetzel, David M. [Department of Molecular and Biomedical Pharmacology, College of Medicine, University of Kentucky, Lexington, KY 40536-0298 (United States)], E-mail: dmkaetz@uky.edu

    2009-01-15

    In humans, NM23-H1 is a metastasis suppressor whose expression is reduced in metastatic melanoma and breast carcinoma cells, and which possesses the ability to inhibit metastatic growth without significant impact on the transformed phenotype. NM23-H1 exhibits three enzymatic activities in vitro, each with potential to maintain genomic stability, a 3'-5' exonuclease and two kinases, nucleoside diphosphate kinase (NDPK), and protein histidine kinase. Herein we have investigated the potential contributions of NM23 proteins to DNA repair in the yeast, Saccharomyces cerevisiae, which contains a single NM23 homolog, YNK1. Ablation of YNK1 delayed repair of UV- and etoposide-induced nuclear DNA damage by 3-6 h. However, YNK1 had no impact upon the kinetics of MMS-induced DNA repair. Furthermore, YNK1 was not required for repair of mitochondrial DNA damage. To determine whether the nuclear DNA repair deficit manifested as an increase in mutation frequency, the CAN1 forward assay was employed. An YNK1 deletion was associated with increased mutation rates following treatment with either UV (2.6x) or MMS (1.6x). Mutation spectral analysis further revealed significantly increased rates of base substitution and frameshift mutations following UV treatment in the ynk1{delta} strain. This study indicates a novel role for YNK1 in DNA repair in yeast, and suggests an anti-mutator function that may contribute to the metastasis suppressor function of NM23-H1 in humans.

  16. YNK1, the yeast homolog of human metastasis suppressor NM23, is required for repair of UV radiation- and etoposide-induced DNA damage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Mengmeng; Jarrett, Stuart G; Craven, Rolf; Kaetzel, David M

    2009-01-15

    In humans, NM23-H1 is a metastasis suppressor whose expression is reduced in metastatic melanoma and breast carcinoma cells, and which possesses the ability to inhibit metastatic growth without significant impact on the transformed phenotype. NM23-H1 exhibits three enzymatic activities in vitro, each with potential to maintain genomic stability, a 3'-5' exonuclease and two kinases, nucleoside diphosphate kinase (NDPK), and protein histidine kinase. Herein we have investigated the potential contributions of NM23 proteins to DNA repair in the yeast, Saccharomyces cerevisiae, which contains a single NM23 homolog, YNK1. Ablation of YNK1 delayed repair of UV- and etoposide-induced nuclear DNA damage by 3-6h. However, YNK1 had no impact upon the kinetics of MMS-induced DNA repair. Furthermore, YNK1 was not required for repair of mitochondrial DNA damage. To determine whether the nuclear DNA repair deficit manifested as an increase in mutation frequency, the CAN1 forward assay was employed. An YNK1 deletion was associated with increased mutation rates following treatment with either UV (2.6x) or MMS (1.6 x). Mutation spectral analysis further revealed significantly increased rates of base substitution and frameshift mutations following UV treatment in the ynk1Delta strain. This study indicates a novel role for YNK1 in DNA repair in yeast, and suggests an anti-mutator function that may contribute to the metastasis suppressor function of NM23-H1 in humans.

  17. A coupling of homology modeling with multiple molecular dynamics simulation for identifying representative conformation of GPCR structures: a case study on human bombesin receptor subtype-3.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nowroozi, Amin; Shahlaei, Mohsen

    2017-02-01

    In this study, a computational pipeline was therefore devised to overcome homology modeling (HM) bottlenecks. The coupling of HM with molecular dynamics (MD) simulation is useful in that it tackles the sampling deficiency of dynamics simulations by providing good-quality initial guesses for the native structure. Indeed, HM also relaxes the severe requirement of force fields to explore the huge conformational space of protein structures. In this study, the interaction between the human bombesin receptor subtype-3 and MK-5046 was investigated integrating HM, molecular docking, and MD simulations. To improve conformational sampling in typical MD simulations of GPCRs, as in other biomolecules, multiple trajectories with different initial conditions can be employed rather than a single long trajectory. Multiple MD simulations of human bombesin receptor subtype-3 with different initial atomic velocities are applied to sample conformations in the vicinity of the structure generated by HM. The backbone atom conformational space distribution of replicates is analyzed employing principal components analysis. As a result, the averages of structural and dynamic properties over the twenty-one trajectories differ significantly from those obtained from individual trajectories.

  18. Modeling of conformational transitions of fibrillogenic peptide, homologous to beta-domain of human alpha-lactalbumin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kadochnikov, V. V.; Egorov, V. V.; Shvetsov, A. V.; Kuklin, A. I.; Isaev-Ivanov, V. V.; Lebedev, D. V.

    2016-01-01

    The behavior of the peptide corresponding to beta domain of human alpha-lactalbumin (GYDTQAIVENNESTEYG, WT) has been simulated by the molecular dynamics method. It is shown that, within the model considered, the monomer of this peptide does not tend to form a stable secondary structure; however, simulation of the behavior of several peptide molecules revealed the occurrence of beta structures due to the formation of intermolecular hydrogen bonds. Since the aforementioned interactions involve the terminal portions of peptides, the influence of the tetrapeptide corresponding to the N-terminal portion of WT, TDYG (R), on the secondary structure has been analyzed. The model calculations show that the interaction of this peptide with WT monomer facilitates formation of beta-structures. It is suggested that peptide R may affect the quaternary structure of WT.

  19. Yeast RAD2, a homolog of human XPG, plays a key role in the regulation of the cell cycle and actin dynamics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mi-Sun Kang

    2013-12-01

    Mutations in the human XPG gene cause Cockayne syndrome (CS and xeroderma pigmentosum (XP. Transcription defects have been suggested as the fundamental cause of CS; however, defining CS as a transcription syndrome is inconclusive. In particular, the function of XPG in transcription has not been clearly demonstrated. Here, we provide evidence for the involvement of RAD2, the Saccharomyces cerevisiae counterpart of XPG, in cell cycle regulation and efficient actin assembly following ultraviolet irradiation. RAD2 C-terminal deletion, which resembles the XPG mutation found in XPG/CS cells, caused cell growth arrest, the cell cycle stalling, a defective α-factor response, shortened lifespan, cell polarity defect, and misregulated actin-dynamics after DNA damage. Overexpression of the C-terminal 65 amino acids of Rad2p was sufficient to induce hyper-cell polarization. In addition, RAD2 genetically interacts with TPM1 during cell polarization. These results provide insights into the role of RAD2 in post-UV irradiation cell cycle regulation and actin assembly, which may be an underlying cause of XPG/CS.

  20. Htid-1, the human homolog of the Drosophila melanogaster l(2)tid tumor suppressor, defines a novel physiological role of APC.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kurzik-Dumke, Ursula; Czaja, Joachim

    2007-09-01

    Htid-1, the human counterpart of the Drosophila tumor suppressor gene lethal(2)tumorous imaginal discs (l(2)tid) encodes three splice forms translated into three cytosolic - Tid50, Tid48 and Tid46 - and three mitochondrial - Tid43, Tid40 and Tid38 - proteins. Here we provide evidence for the association of the endogenous Tid50/Tid48 proteins with the adenomatous polyposis coli (APC) tumor suppressor in normal colon epithelium, colorectal cancer cells and mouse NIH3T3 fibroblasts. Using the Glutathione S-transferase binding assay we show that the N-terminal region including the Armadillo domain (ARM) of APC is sufficient to bind the Tid molecules. Using immunoprecipitation and confocal microscopy we show that the two molecular partners complex at defined areas of the cells with further proteins such as Hsp70, Hsc70, Actin, Dvl and Axin. Our data implicate that the formation of the complex is not associated with APC's involvement in beta-Catenin degradation. Furthermore, though it is linked to Actin it is neither associated with regulation of Actin cytoskeleton due to APC's binding to Asef nor to Tid's binding to Ras-GAP. We suggest that the novel complex acts in maintaining APC's availability for its distinct roles in the Wnt signaling important for the cell to take the right decision, either to switch the cascade OFF or ON, thus, to regulate the onset of proliferation of the cells.

  1. Polyclonal immunoglobulins from a chronic hepatitis C virus patient protect human liver-chimeric mice from infection with a homologous hepatitis C virus strain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vanwolleghem, Thomas; Bukh, Jens; Meuleman, Philip; Desombere, Isabelle; Meunier, Jean-Christophe; Alter, Harvey; Purcell, Robert H; Leroux-Roels, Geert

    2008-06-01

    The role of the humoral immune response in the natural course of hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection is widely debated. Most chronically infected patients have immunoglobulin G (IgG) antibodies capable of neutralizing HCV pseudoparticles (HCVpp) in vitro. It is, however, not clear whether these IgG can prevent a de novo HCV infection in vivo and contribute to the control of viremia in infected individuals. We addressed this question with homologous in vivo protection studies in human liver-urokinase-type plasminogen activator (uPA)(+/+) severe combined immune deficient (SCID) mice. Chimeric mice were loaded with chronic phase polyclonal IgG and challenged 3 days later with a 100% infectious dose of the acute phase H77C virus, both originating from patient H. Passive immunization induced sterilizing immunity in five of eight challenged animals. In the three nonprotected animals, the HCV infection was attenuated, as evidenced by altered viral kinetics in comparison with five control IgG-treated animals. Plasma samples obtained from the mice at viral challenge neutralized H77C-HCVpp at dilutions as high as 1/400. Infection was completely prevented when, before administration to naïve chimeric mice, the inoculum was pre-incubated in vitro at an IgG concentration normally observed in humans. Polyclonal IgG from a patient with a long-standing HCV infection not only displays neutralizing activity in vitro using the HCVpp system, but also conveys sterilizing immunity toward the ancestral HCV strain in vivo, using the human liver-chimeric mouse model. Both experimental systems will be useful tools to identify neutralizing antibodies for future clinical use.

  2. Electromagnetic Counterparts to Black Hole Mergers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schnittman, Jeremy D.

    2011-01-01

    During the final moments of a binary black hole (BH) merger, the gravitational wave (GW) luminosity of the system is greater than the combined electromagnetic (EM) output of the entire observable universe. However, the extremely weak coupling between GWs and ordinary matter makes these waves very difficult to detect directly. Fortunately, the inspirating BH system will interact strongly-on a purely Newtonian level-with any surrounding material in the host galaxy, and this matter can in turn produce unique EM signals detectable at Earth. By identifying EM counterparts to GW sources, we will be able to study the host environments of the merging BHs, in turn greatly expanding the scientific yield of a mission like LISA. Here we present a comprehensive review of the recent literature on the subject of EM counterparts, as well as a discussion of the theoretical and observational advances required to fully realize the scientific potential of the field.

  3. Identification of the human beta A2 crystallin gene (CRYBA2): localization of the gene on human chromosome 2 and of the homologous gene on mouse chromosome 1

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hulsebos, T. J.; Cerosaletti, K. M.; Fournier, R. E.; Sinke, R. J.; Rocchi, M.; Marzella, R.; Jenkins, N. A.; Gilbert, D. J.; Copeland, N. G.

    1995-01-01

    By using primers synthesized on the basis of the bovine beta A2 crystallin gene sequence, we amplified exons 5 and 6 of the human gene (CRYBA2). CRYBA2 was assigned to human chromosome 2 by concordance analysis in human x rodent somatic cell hybrids using the amplified PCR products as probe.

  4. Identification of the human beta A2 crystallin gene (CRYBA2) : localization of the gene on human chromosome 2 and of the homologous gene on mouse chromosome 1

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hulsebos, T J; Cerosaletti, K M; Fournier, R E; Sinke, R J; Rocchi, M; Marzella, R; Jenkins, N A; Gilbert, D J; Copeland, N G

    1995-01-01

    By using primers synthesized on the basis of the bovine beta A2 crystallin gene sequence, we amplified exons 5 and 6 of the human gene (CRYBA2). CRYBA2 was assigned to human chromosome 2 by concordance analysis in human x rodent somatic cell hybrids using the amplified PCR products as probe.

  5. SlgA, encoded by the homolog of the human schizophrenia-associated gene PRODH, acts in clock neurons to regulate Drosophila aggression

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liesbeth Zwarts

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Mutations in the proline dehydrogenase gene PRODH are linked to behavioral alterations in schizophrenia and as part of DiGeorge and velo-cardio-facial syndromes, but the role of PRODH in their etiology remains unclear. Here, we establish a Drosophila model to study the role of PRODH in behavioral disorders. We determine the distribution of the Drosophila PRODH homolog slgA in the brain and show that knockdown and overexpression of human PRODH and slgA in the lateral neurons ventral (LNv lead to altered aggressive behavior. SlgA acts in an isoform-specific manner and is regulated by casein kinase II (CkII. Our data suggest that these effects are, at least partially, due to effects on mitochondrial function. We thus show that precise regulation of proline metabolism is essential to drive normal behavior and we identify Drosophila aggression as a model behavior relevant for the study of the mechanisms that are impaired in neuropsychiatric disorders.

  6. SlgA, encoded by the homolog of the human schizophrenia-associated gene PRODH, acts in clock neurons to regulate Drosophila aggression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zwarts, Liesbeth; Vulsteke, Veerle; Buhl, Edgar; Hodge, James J L; Callaerts, Patrick

    2017-06-01

    Mutations in the proline dehydrogenase gene PRODH are linked to behavioral alterations in schizophrenia and as part of DiGeorge and velo-cardio-facial syndromes, but the role of PRODH in their etiology remains unclear. Here, we establish a Drosophila model to study the role of PRODH in behavioral disorders. We determine the distribution of the Drosophila PRODH homolog slgA in the brain and show that knockdown and overexpression of human PRODH and slgA in the lateral neurons ventral (LNv) lead to altered aggressive behavior. SlgA acts in an isoform-specific manner and is regulated by casein kinase II (CkII). Our data suggest that these effects are, at least partially, due to effects on mitochondrial function. We thus show that precise regulation of proline metabolism is essential to drive normal behavior and we identify Drosophila aggression as a model behavior relevant for the study of the mechanisms that are impaired in neuropsychiatric disorders. © 2017. Published by The Company of Biologists Ltd.

  7. V-akt murine thymoma viral oncogene homolog 3 (AKT3) contributes to poor disease outcome in humans and mice with pneumococcal meningitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valls Serón, Mercedes; Ferwerda, Bart; Engelen-Lee, JooYeon; Geldhoff, Madelijn; Jaspers, Valery; Zwinderman, Aeilko H; Tanck, Michael W; Baas, Frank; van der Ende, Arie; Brouwer, Matthijs C; van de Beek, Diederik

    2016-05-18

    Pneumococcal meningitis is the most common and severe form of bacterial meningitis. Fatality rates are substantial, and long-term sequelae develop in about half of survivors. Here, we have performed a prospective nationwide genetic association study using the Human Exome BeadChip and identified gene variants in encoding dynactin 4 (DCTN4), retinoic acid early transcript 1E (RAET1E), and V-akt murine thymoma viral oncogene homolog 3 (AKT3) to be associated with unfavourable outcome in patients with pneumococcal meningitis. No clinical replication cohort is available, so we validated the role of one of these targets, AKT3, in a pneumococcal meningitis mouse model. Akt3 deficient mice had worse survival and increased histopathology scores for parenchymal damage (infiltration) and vascular infiltration (large meningeal artery inflammation) but similar bacterial loads, cytokine responses, compared to wild-type mice. We found no differences in cerebrospinal fluid cytokine levels between patients with risk or non-risk alleles. Patients with the risk genotype (rs10157763, AA) presented with low scores on the Glasgow Coma Scale and high rate of epileptic seizures. Thus, our results show that AKT3 influences outcome of pneumococcal meningitis.

  8. Expression of human poly (ADP-ribose) polymerase 1 in Saccharomyces cerevisiae: Effect on survival, homologous recombination and identification of genes involved in intracellular localization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    La Ferla, Marco; Mercatanti, Alberto; Rocchi, Giulia; Lodovichi, Samuele; Cervelli, Tiziana; Pignata, Luca; Caligo, Maria Adelaide; Galli, Alvaro

    2015-04-01

    The poly (ADP-ribose) polymerase 1 (PARP-1) actively participates in a series of functions within the cell that include: mitosis, intracellular signaling, cell cycle regulation, transcription and DNA damage repair. Therefore, inhibition of PARP1 has a great potential for use in cancer therapy. As resistance to PARP inhibitors is starting to be observed in patients, thus the function of PARP-1 needs to be studied in depth in order to find new therapeutic targets. To gain more information on the PARP-1 activity, we expressed PARP-1 in yeast and investigated its effect on cell growth and UV induced homologous recombination. To identify candidate genes affecting PARP-1 activity and cellular localization, we also developed a yeast genome wide genetic screen. We found that PARP-1 strongly inhibited yeast growth, but when yeast was exposed to the PARP-1 inhibitor 6(5-H) phenantridinone (PHE), it recovered from the growth suppression. Moreover, we showed that PARP-1 produced PAR products in yeast and we demonstrated that PARP-1 reduced UV-induced homologous recombination. By genome wide screening, we identified 99 mutants that suppressed PARP-1 growth inhibition. Orthologues of human genes were found for 41 of these yeast genes. We determined whether the PARP-1 protein level was altered in strains which are deleted for the transcription regulator GAL3, the histone H1 gene HHO1, the HUL4 gene, the deubiquitination enzyme gene OTU1, the nuclear pore protein POM152 and the SNT1 that encodes for the Set3C subunit of the histone deacetylase complex. In these strains the PARP-1 level was roughly the same as in the wild type. PARP-1 localized in the nucleus more in the snt1Δ than in the wild type strain; after UV radiation, PARP-1 localized in the nucleus more in hho1 and pom152 deletion strains than in the wild type indicating that these functions may have a role on regulating PARP-1 level and activity in the nucleus. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. Cloning of cDNA encoding a Bombyx mori homolog of human oxidation resistance 1 (OXR1) protein from diapause eggs, and analyses of its expression and function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kobayashi, Noriko; Takahashi, Masaki; Kihara, Shouhei; Niimi, Teruyuki; Yamashita, Okitsugu; Yaginuma, Toshinobu

    2014-09-01

    To better understand the molecular mechanisms of diapause initiation, we used the sensitive cDNA subtraction (selective amplification via biotin- and restriction-mediated enrichment) method and isolated a novel gene expressed abundantly in diapause eggs of the silkworm, Bombyx mori, which encodes a homolog of the human oxidation resistance 1 (OXR1) protein. Quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction (qRT-PCR) and Western blotting analyses confirmed that BmOXR1 mRNA and its 140-kDa protein were differentially expressed in diapause eggs compared to non-diapause eggs. OXR1 double-stranded RNA (dsRNA) was injected into diapause-destined eggs before the cellular blastoderm stage, and 4days later, when untreated eggs reached the diapause stage, the OXR1 protein disappeared; however, these eggs remained in diapause, suggesting that BmOXR1 is not essential for diapause initiation and/or maintenance. To further investigate the in vivo function of BmOXR1 apart from its role in diapause, we overexpressed BmOXR1 in Drosophila melanogaster. The fruit fly male adult life-span was significantly extended in the 50%-survival time when adults were reared on diets both with and without H2O2 solution under 25°C incubation. These results suggest that BmOXR1 functions in D. melanogaster via a possible antioxidant effect. As BmOXR1 was expressed mainly in the nuclei of D. melanogaster cells, the mechanism underlying its antioxidation effect appears to be different from that in humans where it is expressed mainly in the mitochondria. Taken together, these results suggest that BmOXR1 might serve as an antioxidant regulator during the early diapause stage. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. MicroRNA-26a suppresses epithelial-mesenchymal transition in human hepatocellular carcinoma by repressing enhancer of zeste homolog 2

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    De-Ning Ma

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Our previous study reported that microRNA-26a (miR-26a inhibited tumor progression by inhibiting tumor angiogenesis and intratumoral macrophage infiltration in hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC. The direct roles of miR-26a on tumor cell invasion remain poorly understood. In this study, we aim to explore the mechanism of miR-26a in modulating epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT in HCC. Methods In vitro cell morphology and cell migration were compared between the hepatoma cell lines HCCLM3 and HepG2, which were established in the previous study. Overexpression and down-regulation of miR-26a were induced in these cell lines, and Western blot and immunofluorescence assays were used to detect the expression of EMT markers. Xenograft nude mouse models were used to observe tumor growth and pulmonary metastasis. Immunohistochemical assays were conducted to study the relationships between miR-26a expression and enhancer of zeste homolog 2 (EZH2 and E-cadherin expression in human HCC samples. Results Down-regulation of miR-26a in HCCLM3 and HepG2 cells resulted in an EMT-like cell morphology and high motility in vitro and increased in tumor growth and pulmonary metastasis in vivo. Through down-regulation of EZH2 expression and up-regulation of E-cadherin expression, miR-26a inhibited the EMT process in vitro and in vivo. Luciferase reporter assay showed that miR-26a directly interacted with EZH2 messenger RNA (mRNA. Furthermore, the expression of miR-26a was positively correlated with E-cadherin expression and inversely correlated with EZH2 expression in human HCC tissue. Conclusions miR-26a inhibited the EMT process in HCC by down-regulating EZH2 expression.

  11. Knockdown of Phospholipase Cε (PLCε) Inhibits Cell Proliferation via Phosphatase and Tensin Homolog Deleted on Chromosome 10 (PTEN)/AKT Signaling Pathway in Human Prostate Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xiao; Fan, Yanru; Du, Zhongbo; Fan, Jiaxin; Hao, Yanni; Wang, Jinhua; Wu, Xiaohou; Luo, Chunli

    2018-01-13

    BACKGROUND Phospholipase Cε (PLCε), a member of the plc family, has been extensively studied to reveal its role in the regulation of different cell functions, but understanding of the underlying mechanisms remains limited. In the present study, we explored the effects of PLCε on PTEN (phosphatase and tensin homolog deleted on chromosome 10) in cell proliferation in prostate cancer cells. MATERIAL AND METHODS We assessed PLCε and PTEN expression in human benign prostate tissues compared to prostate cancer tissues by immunohistochemistry. Lentivirus-shPLCε (LV-shPLCε) was designed to silence PLCε expression in DU145 and PC3 cell lines, and the effectiveness was tested by qRT-PCR and Western blotting. MTT assay and colony formation assay were conducted to observe cell proliferation. Western blotting and immunofluorescence assays were used to detect changed PTEN expression in DU145. RESULTS We observed that PLCε expression was reduced in human benign prostate tissues compared to prostate cancer tissues, while PTEN expression showed the opposite trend. Silencing of the PLCε gene significantly inhibited cell proliferation in DU145 and PC3 cell lines. DU145 is a PTEN-expressing cell, while PC3 is PTEN-deficient. After infection by LV-shPLCε, we noticed that PTEN expression was up-regulated in DU145 cells but not in PC3 cells. Furthermore, we found that PLCε gene knockdown decreased P-AKT protein levels, but AKT protein levels were not affected. Immunofluorescence assays showed that PTEN expression had an intracellular distribution change in the DU145 cell line, and Western blot analysis showed that PTEN was obviously up-regulated in cell nucleus and cytoplasm. CONCLUSIONS PLCε is an oncogene, and knockdown of expression of PLCe inhibits PCa cells proliferation via the PTEN/AKT signaling pathway.

  12. Sphingosine kinase-1, S1P transporter spinster homolog 2 and S1P2 mRNA expressions are increased in liver with advanced fibrosis in human.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sato, Masaya; Ikeda, Hitoshi; Uranbileg, Baasanjav; Kurano, Makoto; Saigusa, Daisuke; Aoki, Junken; Maki, Harufumi; Kudo, Hiroki; Hasegawa, Kiyoshi; Kokudo, Norihiro; Yatomi, Yutaka

    2016-08-26

    The role of sphingosine 1-phosphate (S1P) in liver fibrosis or inflammation was not fully examined in human. Controversy exists which S1P receptors, S1P1 and S1P3 vs S1P2, would be importantly involved in its mechanism. To clarify these matters, 80 patients who received liver resection for hepatocellular carcinoma and 9 patients for metastatic liver tumor were enrolled. S1P metabolism was analyzed in background, non-tumorous liver tissue. mRNA levels of sphingosine kinase 1 (SK1) but not SK2 were increased in livers with fibrosis stages 3-4 compared to those with 0-2 and to normal liver. However, S1P was not increased in advanced fibrotic liver, where mRNA levels of S1P transporter spinster homolog 2 (SPNS2) but not S1P-degrading enzymes were enhanced. Furthermore, mRNA levels of S1P2 but not S1P1 or S1P3 were increased in advanced fibrotic liver. These increased mRNA levels of SK1, SPNS2 and S1P2 in fibrotic liver were correlated with α-smooth muscle actin mRNA levels in liver, and with serum ALT levels. In conclusion, S1P may be actively generated, transported to outside the cells, and bind to its specific receptor in human liver to play a role in fibrosis or inflammation. Altered S1P metabolism in fibrotic liver may be their therapeutic target.

  13. Homology, convergence and parallelism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghiselin, Michael T

    2016-01-05

    Homology is a relation of correspondence between parts of parts of larger wholes. It is used when tracking objects of interest through space and time and in the context of explanatory historical narratives. Homologues can be traced through a genealogical nexus back to a common ancestral precursor. Homology being a transitive relation, homologues remain homologous however much they may come to differ. Analogy is a relationship of correspondence between parts of members of classes having no relationship of common ancestry. Although homology is often treated as an alternative to convergence, the latter is not a kind of correspondence: rather, it is one of a class of processes that also includes divergence and parallelism. These often give rise to misleading appearances (homoplasies). Parallelism can be particularly hard to detect, especially when not accompanied by divergences in some parts of the body. © 2015 The Author(s).

  14. Human MutL homolog 1 immunoexpression in oral leukoplakia and oral squamous cell carcinoma: A prospective study in Indian population

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chaudhari, Narendra T; Tupkari, Jagdish V; Joy, Tabita; Ahire, Manisha S

    2016-01-01

    Background: Mammalian mismatch repair system is responsible for maintaining genomic stability during repeated duplications, and human MutL homolog 1 (hMLH1) protein constitutes an important part of it. Various isolated studies have reported the altered expression of hMLH1 in oral leukoplakia (OL) and oral squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC). Research is lacking in the quantitative estimation and comparison of hMLH1 expression in OL and OSCC. Aims: To evaluate, quantify and compare hMLH1 immunoexpression in normal oral mucosa, OL and OSCC. Settings and Design: Thirty patients of OL and thirty patients of OSCC formed the study group and thirty patients were included in the control group (normal oral mucosa). Formalin-fixed paraffin wax blocks were prepared from the tissue samples. Materials and Methods: Immunohistochemistry for hMLH1 was performed, and the total number of positive cells was counted in high-power fields, and based on that percentage positivity of hMLH1 was calculated in all the cases. Statistical Analysis: Kruskal–Wallis and t-test were used. P leukoplakia and OSCC was 78.26, 54.33 and 40.97 respectively. hMLH1 immunoexpression showed decreasing indexes from control group to leukoplakia and then further to OSCC. hMLH1 expression was significantly lower in OSCC as compared to leukoplakia. There was no significant correlation of mean hMLH1 expression between different clinical and histopathological stages of leukoplakia and OSCC. Conclusions: hMLH1 immunoexpression was inversely related to the degree of dysplasia. These findings suggest that there is a progressive decrease in hMLH1 expression from control to leukoplakia and further to OSCC. Thus, it can be concluded that hMLH1 can be used as a reliable biomarker for malignant transformation. PMID:27721611

  15. Human MutL homolog 1 immunoexpression in oral leukoplakia and oral squamous cell carcinoma: A prospective study in Indian population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chaudhari, Narendra T; Tupkari, Jagdish V; Joy, Tabita; Ahire, Manisha S

    2016-01-01

    Mammalian mismatch repair system is responsible for maintaining genomic stability during repeated duplications, and human MutL homolog 1 (hMLH1) protein constitutes an important part of it. Various isolated studies have reported the altered expression of hMLH1 in oral leukoplakia (OL) and oral squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC). Research is lacking in the quantitative estimation and comparison of hMLH1 expression in OL and OSCC. To evaluate, quantify and compare hMLH1 immunoexpression in normal oral mucosa, OL and OSCC. Thirty patients of OL and thirty patients of OSCC formed the study group and thirty patients were included in the control group (normal oral mucosa). Formalin-fixed paraffin wax blocks were prepared from the tissue samples. Immunohistochemistry for hMLH1 was performed, and the total number of positive cells was counted in high-power fields, and based on that percentage positivity of hMLH1 was calculated in all the cases. Kruskal-Wallis and t-test were used. P leukoplakia and OSCC was 78.26, 54.33 and 40.97 respectively. hMLH1 immunoexpression showed decreasing indexes from control group to leukoplakia and then further to OSCC. hMLH1 expression was significantly lower in OSCC as compared to leukoplakia. There was no significant correlation of mean hMLH1 expression between different clinical and histopathological stages of leukoplakia and OSCC. hMLH1 immunoexpression was inversely related to the degree of dysplasia. These findings suggest that there is a progressive decrease in hMLH1 expression from control to leukoplakia and further to OSCC. Thus, it can be concluded that hMLH1 can be used as a reliable biomarker for malignant transformation.

  16. The Human Homolog of Drosophila Headcase Acts as a Tumor Suppressor through Its Blocking Effect on the Cell Cycle in Hepatocellular Carcinoma.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jun Wang

    Full Text Available The molecular pathogenesis of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC is heterogeneous and extremely complex. Thus, for individual molecular targeted therapy, novel molecular markers are needed. The abnormal expression of the human homolog of Drosophila headcase (HECA homo has been found in pancreatic, colorectal, and oral squamous cell carcinoma. Studies of oral squamous cell carcinoma have also demonstrated that the HECA homo protein can be negatively controlled by the Wnt-pathway and transcription factor 4 (TCF4 and can slow cell division by interacting with cyclins and CDKs. However, the role of HECA in HCC has not been reported elsewhere. Here, immunohistochemical analysis revealed that the downregulation of HECA homo protein occurred in 71.0% (66/93 of HCC cases and was positively correlated with a poorly differentiated grade, high serum AFP level, liver cirrhosis and large tumor size. The expression of HECA homo was detected in five live cell lines. In vitro, the overexpression of HECA homo in HepG2, Huh-7 and MHCC-97H cells could inhibit cell proliferation and colony formation and induce G1 phase arrest. In contrast, the downregulation of HECA homo could promote cell proliferation, colony formation and the cell cycle process. However, neither the overexpression nor downregulation of HECA homo in the three cell lines could affect cell migration or invasion. Collectively, HECA homo is regularly expressed in normal live cells, and the HECA homo protein level is heterogeneously altered in HCC, but the downregulation of HECA homo is more common and positively correlated with several malignant phenotypes. The HECA homo protein can slow cell proliferation to some extent primarily through its blocking effect on the cell cycle. Hence, the HECA homo protein may act as a tumor suppressor in HCC and might be a potential molecular marker for diagnostic classification and targeted therapy in HCC.

  17. Heteronuclear multidimensional NMR and homology modelling studies of the C-terminal nucleotide-binding domain of the human mitochondrial ABC transporter ABCB6

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kurashima-Ito, Kaori [RIKEN, Cellular and Molecular Biology Laboratory (Japan); Ikeya, Teppei [National Institute of Advanced Industrial Science and Technology (AIST), (Japan); Senbongi, Hiroshi [Mitochondrial Diseases Group, MRC Dunn Human NutritionUnit (United Kingdom); Tochio, Hidehito [International Graduate School of Arts and Sciences, Supramolecular Biology, Yokohama City University, Molecular Biophysics Laboratory (Japan); Mikawa, Tsutomu [RIKEN, Cellular and Molecular Biology Laboratory (Japan); Shibata, Takehiko [RIKEN, Shibata Distinguished Senior Scientist Laboratory (Japan); Ito, Yutaka [RIKEN, Cellular and Molecular Biology Laboratory (Japan)], E-mail: ito-yutaka@center.tmu.ac.jp

    2006-05-15

    Human ATP-binding cassette, sub-family B, member 6 (ABCB6) is a mitochondrial ABC transporter, and presumably contributes to iron homeostasis. Aimed at understanding the structural basis for the conformational changes accompanying the substrate-transportation cycle, we have studied the C-terminal nucleotide-binding domain of ABCB6 (ABCB6-C) in both the nucleotide-free and ADP-bound states by heteronuclear multidimensional NMR and homology modelling. A non-linear sampling scheme was utilised for indirectly acquired {sup 13}C and {sup 15}N dimensions of all 3D triple-resonance NMR experiments, in order to overcome the instability and the low solubility of ABCB6-C. The backbone resonances for approximately 25% of non-proline residues, which are mostly distributed around the functionally important loops and in the Helical domain, were not observed for nucleotide-free form of ABCB6-C. From the pH, temperature and magnetic field strength dependencies of the resonance intensities, we concluded that this incompleteness in the assignments is mainly due to the exchange between multiple conformations at an intermediate rate on the NMR timescale. These localised conformational dynamics remained in ADP-bound ABCB6-C except for the loops responsible for adenine base and {alpha}/{beta}-phosphate binding. These results revealed that the localised dynamic cooperativity, which was recently proposed for a prokaryotic ABC MJ1267, also exists in a higher eukaryotic ABC, and is presumably shared by all members of the ABC family. Since the Helical domain is the putative interface to the transmembrane domain, this cooperativity may explain the coupled functions between domains in the substrate-transportation cycle.

  18. Synergistic antineoplastic action of 5-aza-2'deoxycytidine (decitabine in combination with different inhibitors of enhancer of zeste homolog 2 (EZH2 on human lung carcinoma cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nascimento ASF

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Patients with metastatic lung cancer have a very poor prognosis indicating an urgent need to develop more effective chemotherapy. Aberrant promoter DNA methylation can result in the epigenetic silencing of tumor suppressor genes (TSGs in lung cancer. 5-Aza-2’deoxycytidine (5-Aza-CdR, decitabine, an inhibitor of DNA methylation, is able to reactivate silent TSGs. Trimethylation of histone H3 on lysine 27 (H3K27me3 by enhancer of zeste homolog 2 (EZH2 histone methyltransferase can also silence TSGs in lung cancer. 3-Deazaneplanocin-A (DZNep, an inhibitor of EZH2, up-regulates the expression of genes silenced by H3K27me3. In this study we compared the in vitro antineoplastic activity of different inhibitors of EZH2; DZNep, U-4149 and Gsk-126, alone and in combination with 5-Aza-CdR, on the human A549 lung adenocarcinoma cells. U-4149, an analogue of DZNep, was more potent than either DZNep or Gsk-126. The reduction in colony formation was dose- and time-dependent for each EZH2 inhibitors. Combination treatment of 5-Aza-CdR with the EZH2 inhibitors showed a synergistic antineoplastic activity. 5-Aza-CdR and U-4149 was the most potent combination. The in vitro antineoplastic activity of these agents was evaluated by inhibition of growth, colony formation, induction of senescence and apoptosis. All the drug combinations induced signs of senescence and apoptosis. Analysis by gene expression by qRT-PCR showed that the combinations increased the expression of several TSGs to a greater extent that either agent alone. In conclusion, epigenetic therapy that specifically targets DNA and histone methylation has interesting potential for the treatment of lung cancer and merits further investigation.

  19. Hempseed oil induces reactive oxygen species- and C/EBP homologous protein-mediated apoptosis in MH7A human rheumatoid arthritis fibroblast-like synovial cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeong, Mini; Cho, Jaewook; Shin, Jong-Il; Jeon, Yong-Joon; Kim, Jin-Hyun; Lee, Sung-Joon; Kim, Eun-Soo; Lee, Kyungho

    2014-07-03

    The medicinal efficacy of hempseed (Cannabis sativa L.), which is rich in polyunsaturated fatty acids, in atopic dermatitis, inflammation, and rheumatoid arthritis (RA) has been suggested for centuries. Hempseed has been used as a treatment for these diseases in Korean and Chinese folk medicine. The aim of the study is to investigate the effects of hempseed oil (HO) on MH7A human RA fibroblast-like synovial cells. MH7A cells were used to study the anti-rheumatoid effects of hempseed (Cannabis sativa L., cv. Cheungsam/Cannabaceae) oil by investigating cell viability, apoptosis, lipid accumulation, oxidative stress, and endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress-induced apoptosis. HO treatment reduced the survival rate of MH7A cells and promoted apoptotic cell death in a time- and dose-dependent manner. Both lipid accumulation and the level of intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS) increased in HO-treated MH7A cells. Co-treatment with the antioxidant Tiron effectively abrogated the cytotoxic effects of HO; the ROS level was reduced, cell viability was recovered, and apoptotic cell death was significantly diminished. Moreover, HO-treated cells exhibited increased expression of the major ER stress markers, glucose-regulated protein 78 and C/EBP homologous protein (CHOP). The siRNA-mediated knockdown of CHOP prevented HO-induced apoptosis. Our results suggest that HO treatment induced lipid accumulation, ROS production, CHOP expression, and apoptosis in MH7A cells, and that CHOP functions as an anti-rheumatoid factor downstream of HO in MH7A cells. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Metagenomic identification of a novel salt tolerance gene from the human gut microbiome which encodes a membrane protein with homology to a brp/blh-family β-carotene 15,15'-monooxygenase.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eamonn P Culligan

    Full Text Available The human gut microbiome consists of at least 3 million non-redundant genes, 150 times that of the core human genome. Herein, we report the identification and characterisation of a novel stress tolerance gene from the human gut metagenome. The locus, assigned brpA, encodes a membrane protein with homology to a brp/blh-family β-carotene monooxygenase. Cloning and heterologous expression of brpA in Escherichia coli confers a significant salt tolerance phenotype. Furthermore, when cultured in the presence of exogenous β-carotene, cell pellets adopt a red/orange pigmentation indicating the incorporation of carotenoids in the cell membrane.

  1. Kilonova Counterparts of Binary Neutron Star Mergers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Metzger, Brian

    2018-01-01

    The merger of a binary neutron star is accompanied by the ejection of neutron-rich matter into space at velocities up to several tenths that of light, which synthesizes rare heavy isotopes through the rapid neutron capture process (r-process). The radioactive decay of these nuclei was predicted by Metzger et al. (2010) to power an optical transient roughly 1000 times more luminous than a classical nova (a "kilonova"), which is among the most promising electromagnetic counterparts to accompany gravitational wave signal from the merger. I will describe how the luminosities, color, and spectra of the kilonova emission inform the properties of the merging binary (neutron star masses/radii and inclination angle) and the long sought origin of the heaviest elements in the Universe. Results will be discussed in the context of recent discoveries by Advanced LIGO/Virgo.

  2. Gorenstein homological dimensions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Holm, Henrik Granau

    2004-01-01

    In basic homological algebra, the projective, injective and 2at dimensions of modules play an important and fundamental role. In this paper, the closely related Gorenstein projective, Gorenstein injective and Gorenstein 2at dimensions are studied. There is a variety of nice results about Gorenstein...

  3. Schizosaccharomyces pombe Homologs of Human DJ-1 Are Stationary Phase-Associated Proteins That Are Involved in Autophagy and Oxidative Stress Resistance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Jianhua; Huang, Ying

    2015-01-01

    The Parkinson′s disease protein DJ-1 is involved in various cellular functions including detoxification of dicarbonyl compounds, autophagy and oxidative stress response. DJ-1 homologs are widely found in both prokaryotes and eukaryotes, constituting a superfamily of proteins that appear to be involved in stress response. Schizosaccharomyces pombe contains six DJ-1 homologs, designated Hsp3101-Hsp3105 and Sdj1 (previously named SpDJ-1). Here we show that deletion of any one of these six genes somehow affects autophagy during prolonged stationary phase. Furthermore, deletions of each of these DJ-1 homologs result in reduced stationary phase survival. Deletion of sdj1 also increases the sensitivity of stationary-phase cells to oxidative stress induced by hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) whereas overexpression of sdj1 has the opposite effect. Consistent with their role in stationary phase, expression of hsp3101, hsp3102, hsp3105 and sdj1, and to a lesser extent hsp3103 and hsp3104, is increased in stationary phase. The induction of hsp3101, hsp3102, hsp3105 and sdj1 involves the Sty1-regulated transcription factor Atf1 but not the transcription factor Pap1. Our results firmly establish that S. pombe homologs of DJ-1 are stationary-phase associated proteins and are likely involved in autophagy and antioxidant defense in stationary phase of S. pombe cells. PMID:26624998

  4. Schizosaccharomyces pombe Homologs of Human DJ-1 Are Stationary Phase-Associated Proteins That Are Involved in Autophagy and Oxidative Stress Resistance.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yang Su

    Full Text Available The Parkinson's disease protein DJ-1 is involved in various cellular functions including detoxification of dicarbonyl compounds, autophagy and oxidative stress response. DJ-1 homologs are widely found in both prokaryotes and eukaryotes, constituting a superfamily of proteins that appear to be involved in stress response. Schizosaccharomyces pombe contains six DJ-1 homologs, designated Hsp3101-Hsp3105 and Sdj1 (previously named SpDJ-1. Here we show that deletion of any one of these six genes somehow affects autophagy during prolonged stationary phase. Furthermore, deletions of each of these DJ-1 homologs result in reduced stationary phase survival. Deletion of sdj1 also increases the sensitivity of stationary-phase cells to oxidative stress induced by hydrogen peroxide (H2O2 whereas overexpression of sdj1 has the opposite effect. Consistent with their role in stationary phase, expression of hsp3101, hsp3102, hsp3105 and sdj1, and to a lesser extent hsp3103 and hsp3104, is increased in stationary phase. The induction of hsp3101, hsp3102, hsp3105 and sdj1 involves the Sty1-regulated transcription factor Atf1 but not the transcription factor Pap1. Our results firmly establish that S. pombe homologs of DJ-1 are stationary-phase associated proteins and are likely involved in autophagy and antioxidant defense in stationary phase of S. pombe cells.

  5. Schizosaccharomyces pombe Homologs of Human DJ-1 Are Stationary Phase-Associated Proteins That Are Involved in Autophagy and Oxidative Stress Resistance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Su, Yang; Chen, Caiping; Huang, Linting; Yan, Jianhua; Huang, Ying

    2015-01-01

    The Parkinson's disease protein DJ-1 is involved in various cellular functions including detoxification of dicarbonyl compounds, autophagy and oxidative stress response. DJ-1 homologs are widely found in both prokaryotes and eukaryotes, constituting a superfamily of proteins that appear to be involved in stress response. Schizosaccharomyces pombe contains six DJ-1 homologs, designated Hsp3101-Hsp3105 and Sdj1 (previously named SpDJ-1). Here we show that deletion of any one of these six genes somehow affects autophagy during prolonged stationary phase. Furthermore, deletions of each of these DJ-1 homologs result in reduced stationary phase survival. Deletion of sdj1 also increases the sensitivity of stationary-phase cells to oxidative stress induced by hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) whereas overexpression of sdj1 has the opposite effect. Consistent with their role in stationary phase, expression of hsp3101, hsp3102, hsp3105 and sdj1, and to a lesser extent hsp3103 and hsp3104, is increased in stationary phase. The induction of hsp3101, hsp3102, hsp3105 and sdj1 involves the Sty1-regulated transcription factor Atf1 but not the transcription factor Pap1. Our results firmly establish that S. pombe homologs of DJ-1 are stationary-phase associated proteins and are likely involved in autophagy and antioxidant defense in stationary phase of S. pombe cells.

  6. A C. elegans homolog of the Cockayne syndrome complementation group A gene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Babu, Vipin; Hofmann, Kay; Schumacher, Björn

    2014-12-01

    Cockayne syndrome (CS) is a debilitating and complex disorder that results from inherited mutations in the CS complementation genes A and B, CSA and CSB. The links between the molecular functions of the CS genes and the complex pathophysiology of CS are as of yet poorly understood and are the subject of intense debate. While mouse models reflect the complexity of CS, studies on simpler genetic models might shed new light on the consequences of CS mutations. Here we describe a functional homolog of the human CSA gene in Caenorhabditis elegans. Similar to its human counterpart, mutations in the nematode csa-1 gene lead to developmental growth defects as a consequence of DNA lesions. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. Neuronal protein gene product 9.5 (IEF SSP 6104) is expressed in cultured human MRC-5 fibroblasts of normal origin and is strongly down-regulated in their SV40 transformed counterparts

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Honoré, B; Rasmussen, H H; Vandekerckhove, J

    1991-01-01

    of proteins recovered from 2D gels we have identified PGP 9.5 UCH-L1 as polypeptide IEF SSP 6104 (Mr = 27,000, pI = 5.49) in the comprehensive 2D gel cellular protein database of human embryonal lung MRC-5 fibroblasts [(1989) Electrophoresis 10, 76 115; (1990) Electrophoresis 11, 1072 1113]. This protein...

  8. Finding the Electromagnetic Counterparts of Standard Sirens

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kocsis, B.; Frei, Z.; Haiman, Z.; Menou, K.

    The gravitational waves (GWs) emitted during the coalescence of supermassive black holes (SMBHs) will be detectable with the future Laser Interferometric Space Antenna (LISA). The direction and distance can be determined from the accumulated GW signal with a precision that increases rapidly in the final stages of the inspiral. We find that for M = (105 - 107)M⊙ near z = 1 the angular uncertainty decreases under 1° at least several hours before the plunge, allowing a targeted electromagnetic (EM) observation of the final stages of the merger with a wide field instrument. We then calculate the size of the final, three dimensional error volume. Under the plausible assumption that SMBH-SMBH mergers are accompanied by gas accretion leading to Eddington-limited quasar activity, we find that many cases this error volume will contain at most a single quasar for M = (105 - 107) M⊙ near z = 1. This will allow a straightforward test of the hypothesis that GW events are accompanied by bright quasar activity. The identification and observation of counterparts would allow unprecedented tests of the physics of MBH accretion, such as precision-measurements of the Eddington ratio. They would clarify the role of gas as a catalyst in SMBH coalescences, and would also offer an alternative method to constrain cosmological parameters.

  9. Electromagnetic Counterparts of Neutron Star Mergers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Metzger, Brian

    2011-09-01

    The most promising astrophysical sources of gravitational waves (GWs) for ground-based interferometers such as Advanced LIGO are the inspiral and merger of binary neutron star (NS) and black hole systems. Maximizing the benefits of a GW detection will require identifying a coincident electromagnetic (EM) counterpart. One possible source of bright EM emission is a gamma-ray burst (GRB), powered by accretion following the merger. However, for typical viewers outside the opening angle of the GRB jet, prompt emission may be difficult to detect. Another source of isotropic EM emission from NS mergers is a supernova-like optical transient (`kilo-nova'), powered by the radioactive decay of heavy elements synthesized in the ejecta . I will present the first calculations of the optical transients from NS mergers that self consistently determine the radioactive heating using a nuclear reaction network and which determine the resulting light curve with a Monte Carlo radiation transfer calculation. I will compare the predicted brightness and duration of the kilo-nova to the expected off-axis (`orphan') afterglow emission, in order to assess the optimal EM follow-up strategy following a future GW detection.

  10. Syntenic homology of human unique DNA sequences within chromossome regions 5q31, 10q22, 13q32-33 and 19q13.1 in the great apes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vallente-Samonte Rhea U.

    2000-01-01

    Full Text Available Homologies between chromosome banding patterns and DNA sequences in the great apes and humans suggest an apparent common origin for these two lineages. The availability of DNA probes for specific regions of human chromosomes (5q31, 10q22, 13q32-33 and 19q13.1 led us to cross-hybridize these to chimpanzee (Pan troglodytes, PTR, gorilla (Gorilla gorilla, GGO and orangutan (Pongo pygmaeus, PPY chromosomes in a search for equivalent regions in the great apes. Positive hybridization signals to the chromosome 5q31-specific DNA probe were observed at HSA 5q31, PTR 4q31, GGO 4q31 and PPY 4q31, while fluorescent signals using the chromosome 10q22-specific DNA probe were noted at HSA 10q22, PTR 8q22, GGO 8q22 and PPY 7q22. The chromosome arms showing hybridization signals to the Quint-EssentialTM 13-specific DNA probe were identified as HSA 13q32-33, PTR 14q32-33, GGO 14q32-33 and PPY 14q32-33, while those presenting hybridization signals to the chromosome 19q13.1-specific DNA probe were identified as HSA 19q13.1, PTR 20q13, GGO 20q13 and PPY 20q13. All four probes presumably hybridized to homologous chromosomal locations in the apes, which suggests a homology of certain unique DNA sequences among hominoid species.

  11. Algebra V homological algebra

    CERN Document Server

    Shafarevich, I

    1994-01-01

    This book, the first printing of which was published as volume 38 of the Encyclopaedia of Mathematical Sciences, presents a modern approach to homological algebra, based on the systematic use of the terminology and ideas of derived categories and derived functors. The book contains applications of homological algebra to the theory of sheaves on topological spaces, to Hodge theory, and to the theory of modules over rings of algebraic differential operators (algebraic D-modules). The authors Gelfand and Manin explain all the main ideas of the theory of derived categories. Both authors are well-known researchers and the second, Manin, is famous for his work in algebraic geometry and mathematical physics. The book is an excellent reference for graduate students and researchers in mathematics and also for physicists who use methods from algebraic geometry and algebraic topology.

  12. Negative regulation of mitosis in fission yeast by the Shk1interacting protein Skb1 and its human homolog, Skb1Hs

    OpenAIRE

    Gilbreth, Mary; Yang, Peirong; Bartholomeusz, Geoffrey; Pimental, Ruth A.; Kansra, Sanjay; Gadiraju, Ramesh; Marcus, Stevan

    1998-01-01

    We previously provided evidence that the protein encoded by the highly conserved skb1 gene is a putative regulator of Shk1, a p21Cdc42/Rac-activated kinase (PAK) homolog in the fission yeast Schizosaccharomyces pombe. skb1 null mutants are viable and competent for mating but less elongate than wild-type S. pombe cells, whereas cells that overexpress skb1 are hyperelongated. These phenotypes suggest a possible role for Skb1 as a mitotic inhibitor. Here we show genetic interactions of both skb1...

  13. Dynamic protein assemblies in homologous recombination with single DNA molecules

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Heijden, A.H.

    2007-01-01

    What happens when your DNA breaks? This thesis describes experimental work on the single-molecule level focusing on the interaction between DNA and DNA-repair proteins, in particular bacterial RecA and human Rad51, involved in homologous recombination. Homologous recombination and its central event

  14. Locations of the ets subfamily members net, elk1, and sap1 (ELK3, ELK1, and ELK4) on three homologous regions of the mouse and human genomes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Giovane, A.; Sobieszczuk, P. [Institut de Genetique et de Biologie Moleculaire et Cellulaire, Illkirch (France); Mignon, C.; Mattei, M.G.; Wasylyk, B. [INSERM, Marseille (France)

    1995-10-10

    Net, Elk1, and Sap1 are related members of the Ets oncoprotein family. We show by in situ hybridization on banded chromosomes with specific cDNA probes that their map positions on mouse and human chromosomes (respectively) are net, 10C-D1 and 12q22-q23 (now called ELK3), sap1, 1E3-G and 1q32 (ELK4), and elk1, XA1-A3 and Xp11.2-p11.1 (ELK1), as well as a second locus 14q32 (ELK2) unique to the human genome. The results for the mouse net, sap1, and elk1 and human ELK3 genes are new. The human elk1 mapping confirms a previous study. The human ELK4 localization agrees with data published during the preparation of the manuscript. Human ELK3 colocalizes with sap2, and we confirm that they are identical. These results firmly establish for the first time that Net, Elk1, and Sap1 are distinct gene products with different chromosomal localizations in both the mouse and the human genomes. Net, Elk1, and Sap1 are conserved and map to homologous regions of the mouse and human chromosomes. 19 refs., 1 fig., 1 tab.

  15. Stratum, a Homolog of the Human GEF Mss4, Partnered with Rab8, Controls the Basal Restriction of Basement Membrane Proteins in Epithelial Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Olivier Devergne

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available The basement membrane (BM, a sheet of extracellular matrix lining the basal side of epithelia, is essential for epithelial cell function and integrity, yet the mechanisms that control the basal restriction of BM proteins are poorly understood. In epithelial cells, a specialized pathway is dedicated to restrict the deposition of BM proteins basally. Here, we report the identification of a factor in this pathway, a homolog of the mammalian guanine nucleotide exchange factor (GEF Mss4, which we have named Stratum. The loss of Stratum leads to the missecretion of BM proteins at the apical side of the cells, forming aberrant layers in close contact with the plasma membrane. We found that Rab8GTPase acts downstream of Stratum in this process. Altogether, our results uncover the importance of this GEF/Rab complex in specifically coordinating the basal restriction of BM proteins, a critical process for the establishment and maintenance of epithelial cell polarity.

  16. Compositional Homology and Creative Thinking

    OpenAIRE

    Tedesco, S.

    2015-01-01

    The concept of homology is the most solid theoretical basis elaborated by the morphological thinking during its history. The enucleation of some general criteria for the interpretation of homology is today a fundamental tool for life sciences, and for restoring their own opening to the question of qualitative innovation that arose so powerfully in the original Darwinian project. The aim of this paper is to verify the possible uses of the concept of compositional homology in order to provide o...

  17. Grid diagrams and Khovanov homology

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Droz, Jean-Marie; Wagner, Emmanuel

    2009-01-01

    We explain how to compute the Jones polynomial of a link from one of its grid diagrams and we observe a connection between Bigelow’s homological definition of the Jones polynomial and Kauffman’s definition of the Jones polynomial. Consequently, we prove that the Maslov grading on the Seidel–Smith...... symplectic link invariant coincides with the difference between the homological grading on Khovanov homology and the Jones grading on Khovanov homology. We give some evidence for the truth of the Seidel–Smith conjecture....

  18. Substrate and Cation Binding Mechanism of Glutamate Transporter Homologs

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jensen, Sonja

    2017-01-01

    Glutamate transporters and their homologs are membrane proteins that transport glutamate and aspartate together with sodium ions and/or protons. Human glutamate transporters remove the neurotransmitter glutamate after signal transmission. Therefore, glutamate transporters play a great role in

  19. The XC chemokine receptor 1 is a conserved selective marker of mammalian cells homologous to mouse CD8α+ dendritic cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crozat, Karine; Guiton, Rachel; Contreras, Vanessa; Feuillet, Vincent; Dutertre, Charles-Antoine; Ventre, Erwan; Vu Manh, Thien-Phong; Baranek, Thomas; Storset, Anne K.; Marvel, Jacqueline; Boudinot, Pierre; Hosmalin, Anne; Schwartz-Cornil, Isabelle

    2010-01-01

    Human BDCA3+ dendritic cells (DCs) were suggested to be homologous to mouse CD8α+ DCs. We demonstrate that human BDCA3+ DCs are more efficient than their BDCA1+ counterparts or plasmacytoid DCs (pDCs) in cross-presenting antigen and activating CD8+ T cells, which is similar to mouse CD8α+ DCs as compared with CD11b+ DCs or pDCs, although with more moderate differences between human DC subsets. Yet, no specific marker was known to be shared between homologous DC subsets across species. We found that XC chemokine receptor 1 (XCR1) is specifically expressed and active in mouse CD8α+, human BDCA3+, and sheep CD26+ DCs and is conserved across species. The mRNA encoding the XCR1 ligand chemokine (C motif) ligand 1 (XCL1) is selectively expressed in natural killer (NK) and CD8+ T lymphocytes at steady-state and is enhanced upon activation. Moreover, the Xcl1 mRNA is selectively expressed at high levels in central memory compared with naive CD8+ T lymphocytes. Finally, XCR1−/− mice have decreased early CD8+ T cell responses to Listeria monocytogenes infection, which is associated with higher bacterial loads early in infection. Therefore, XCR1 constitutes the first conserved specific marker for cell subsets homologous to mouse CD8α+ DCs in higher vertebrates and promotes their ability to activate early CD8+ T cell defenses against an intracellular pathogenic bacteria. PMID:20479118

  20. The XC chemokine receptor 1 is a conserved selective marker of mammalian cells homologous to mouse CD8alpha+ dendritic cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crozat, Karine; Guiton, Rachel; Contreras, Vanessa; Feuillet, Vincent; Dutertre, Charles-Antoine; Ventre, Erwan; Vu Manh, Thien-Phong; Baranek, Thomas; Storset, Anne K; Marvel, Jacqueline; Boudinot, Pierre; Hosmalin, Anne; Schwartz-Cornil, Isabelle; Dalod, Marc

    2010-06-07

    Human BDCA3+ dendritic cells (DCs) were suggested to be homologous to mouse CD8alpha+ DCs. We demonstrate that human BDCA3+ DCs are more efficient than their BDCA1+ counterparts or plasmacytoid DCs (pDCs) in cross-presenting antigen and activating CD8+ T cells, which is similar to mouse CD8alpha+ DCs as compared with CD11b+ DCs or pDCs, although with more moderate differences between human DC subsets. Yet, no specific marker was known to be shared between homologous DC subsets across species. We found that XC chemokine receptor 1 (XCR1) is specifically expressed and active in mouse CD8alpha+, human BDCA3+, and sheep CD26+ DCs and is conserved across species. The mRNA encoding the XCR1 ligand chemokine (C motif) ligand 1 (XCL1) is selectively expressed in natural killer (NK) and CD8+ T lymphocytes at steady-state and is enhanced upon activation. Moreover, the Xcl1 mRNA is selectively expressed at high levels in central memory compared with naive CD8+ T lymphocytes. Finally, XCR1-/- mice have decreased early CD8+ T cell responses to Listeria monocytogenes infection, which is associated with higher bacterial loads early in infection. Therefore, XCR1 constitutes the first conserved specific marker for cell subsets homologous to mouse CD8alpha+ DCs in higher vertebrates and promotes their ability to activate early CD8+ T cell defenses against an intracellular pathogenic bacteria.

  1. Language evolution: neural homologies and neuroinformatics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arbib, Michael; Bota, Mihail

    2003-11-01

    This paper contributes to neurolinguistics by grounding an evolutionary account of the readiness of the human brain for language in the search for homologies between different cortical areas in macaque and human. We consider two hypotheses for this grounding, that of Aboitiz and Garci;a [Brain Res. Rev. 25 (1997) 381] and the Mirror System Hypothesis of Rizzolatti and Arbib [Trends Neurosci. 21 (1998) 188] and note the promise of computational modeling of neural circuitry of the macaque and its linkage to analysis of human brain imaging data. In addition to the functional differences between the two hypotheses, problems arise because they are grounded in different cortical maps of the macaque brain. In order to address these divergences, we have developed several neuroinformatics tools included in an on-line knowledge management system, the NeuroHomology Database, which is equipped with inference engines both to relate and translate information across equivalent cortical maps and to evaluate degrees of homology for brain regions of interest in different species.

  2. Can human allergy drug fexofenadine, an antagonist of histamine (H1) receptor, be used to treat dog and cat? Homology modeling, docking and molecular dynamic Simulation of three H1 receptors in complex with fexofenadine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sader, Safaa; Cai, Jun; Muller, Anna C G; Wu, Chun

    2017-08-01

    Fexofenadine, a potent antagonist to human histamine 1 (H1) receptor, is a non-sedative third generation antihistamine that is widely used to treat various human allergic conditions such as allergic rhinitis, conjunctivitis and atopic dermatitis. Encouragingly, it's been successfully used to treat canine atopic dermatitis, this supports the notion that it might have a great potential for treating other canine allergic conditions and other mammal pets such as dog. Regrettably, while there is a myriad of studies conducted on the interactions of antihistamines with human H1 receptor, the similar studies on non-human pet H1 are considerably scarce. The published studies using the first and second generation antihistamines drugs have shown that the antihistamine response is varied and unpredictable. Thus, to probe its efficacy on pet, the homology models of dog and cat H1 receptors were built based on the crystal structure of human H1 receptor bound to antagonist doxepin (PDB 3RZE) and fexofenadine was subsequently docked to human, dog and cat H1 receptors. The docked complexes are then subjected to 1000ns molecular dynamics (MD) simulations with explicit membrane. Our calculated MM/GBSA binding energies indicated that fexofenadine binds comparably to the three receptors; and our MD data also showed the binding poses, structural and dynamic features among three receptors are very similar. Therefore, our data supported the application of fexofenadine to the H1 related allergic conditions of dog and cat. Nonetheless, subtle systemic differences among human, dog and cat H1 receptors were also identified. Clearly, there is still a space to develop a more selective, potent and safe antihistamine alternatives such as Fexofenadine for dog or cat based on these differences. Our computation approach might provide a fast and economic way to predict if human antihistamine drugs can also be safely and efficaciously administered to animals. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights

  3. Mod two homology and cohomology

    CERN Document Server

    Hausmann, Jean-Claude

    2014-01-01

    Cohomology and homology modulo 2 helps the reader grasp more readily the basics of a major tool in algebraic topology. Compared to a more general approach to (co)homology this refreshing approach has many pedagogical advantages: It leads more quickly to the essentials of the subject, An absence of signs and orientation considerations simplifies the theory, Computations and advanced applications can be presented at an earlier stage, Simple geometrical interpretations of (co)chains. Mod 2 (co)homology was developed in the first quarter of the twentieth century as an alternative to integral homology, before both became particular cases of (co)homology with arbitrary coefficients. The first chapters of this book may serve as a basis for a graduate-level introductory course to (co)homology. Simplicial and singular mod 2 (co)homology are introduced, with their products and Steenrod squares, as well as equivariant cohomology. Classical applications include Brouwer's fixed point theorem, Poincaré duality, Borsuk-Ula...

  4. Identification, cloning and characterization of a novel 47 kDa murine PKA C subunit homologous to human and bovine Cβ2

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ørstavik Sigurd

    2006-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Two main genes encoding the catalytic subunits Cα and Cβ of cyclic AMP dependent protein kinase (PKA have been identified in all vertebrates examined. The murine, bovine and human Cβ genes encode several splice variants, including the splice variant Cβ2. In mouse Cβ2 has a relative molecular mass of 38 kDa and is only expressed in the brain. In human and bovine Cβ2 has a relative molecular mass of 47 kDa and is mainly expressed in lymphoid tissues. Results We identified a novel 47 kDa splice variant encoded by the mouse Cβ gene that is highly expressed in lymphoid cells. Cloning, expression, and production of a sequence-specific antiserum and characterization of PKA catalytic subunit activities demonstrated the 47 kDa protein to be a catalytically active murine homologue of human and bovine Cβ2. Based on the present results and the existence of a human brain-specifically expressed Cβ splice variant designated Cβ4 that is identical to the former mouse Cβ2 splice variant, the mouse splice variant has now been renamed mouse Cβ4. Conclusion Murine lymphoid tissues express a protein that is a homologue of human and bovine Cβ2. The murine Cβ gene encodes the splice variants Cβ1, Cβ2, Cβ3 and Cβ4, as is the case with the human Cβ gene.

  5. Homology theory on algebraic varieties

    CERN Document Server

    Wallace, Andrew H

    1958-01-01

    Homology Theory on Algebraic Varieties, Volume 6 deals with the principles of homology theory in algebraic geometry and includes the main theorems first formulated by Lefschetz, one of which is interpreted in terms of relative homology and another concerns the Poincaré formula. The actual details of the proofs of these theorems are introduced by geometrical descriptions, sometimes aided with diagrams. This book is comprised of eight chapters and begins with a discussion on linear sections of an algebraic variety, with emphasis on the fibring of a variety defined over the complex numbers. The n

  6. Compositional Homology and Creative Thinking

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Salvatore Tedesco

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available The concept of homology is the most solid theoretical basis elaborated by the morphological thinking during its history. The enucleation of some general criteria for the interpretation of homology is today a fundamental tool for life sciences, and for restoring their own opening to the question of qualitative innovation that arose so powerfully in the original Darwinian project. The aim of this paper is to verify the possible uses of the concept of compositional homology in order to provide of an adequate understanding of the dynamics of creative thinking.

  7. The orphan nuclear receptor ROR{alpha} (RORA) maps to a conserved region of homology on human chromosome 15q21-q22 and mouse chromosome 9

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Giguere, V. [McGill Univ., Montreal (Canada); Beatty, B.; Squire, J. [Hospital for Sick Children, Toronto (Canada)] [and others

    1995-08-10

    ROR{alpha} is a novel member of the steroid/thyroid/retinoid receptor superfamily with unique DNA-binding properties. We have mapped the RORA gene by fluorescence in situ hybridization to human chromosome 15q21-q22. To map the mouse Rora gene, a partial mouse cDNA clone was isolated from brain. Using interspecific backcross analysis, we have mapped the Rora gene to mouse chromosome 9. This places the human RORA gene in the proximity of the PML gene, which is involved in a reciprocal chromosomal translocation t(15:17) with the RARA gene in patients with acute promyelocytic leukemia. 13 refs., 2 figs.

  8. DNA end resection controls the balance between homologous and illegitimate recombination in Escherichia coli.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Siniša Ivanković

    Full Text Available Even a partial loss of function of human RecQ helicase analogs causes adverse effects such as a cancer-prone Werner, Bloom or Rothmund-Thompson syndrome, whereas a complete RecQ deficiency in Escherichia coli is not deleterious for a cell. We show that this puzzling difference is due to different mechanisms of DNA double strand break (DSB resection in E. coli and humans. Coupled helicase and RecA loading activities of RecBCD enzyme, which is found exclusively in bacteria, are shown to be responsible for channeling recombinogenic 3' ending tails toward productive, homologous and away from nonproductive, aberrant recombination events. On the other hand, in recB1080/recB1067 mutants, lacking RecBCD's RecA loading activity while preserving its helicase activity, DSB resection is mechanistically more alike that in eukaryotes (by its uncoupling from a recombinase polymerization step, and remarkably, the role of RecQ also becomes akin of its eukaryotic counterparts in a way of promoting homologous and suppressing illegitimate recombination. The sickly phenotype of recB1080 recQ mutant was further exacerbated by inactivation of an exonuclease I, which degrades the unwound 3' tail. The respective recB1080 recQ xonA mutant showed poor viability, DNA repair and homologous recombination deficiency, and very increased illegitimate recombination. These findings demonstrate that the metabolism of the 3' ending overhang is a decisive factor in tuning the balance of homologous and illegitimate recombination in E. coli, thus highlighting the importance of regulating DSB resection for preserving genome integrity. recB mutants used in this study, showing pronounced RecQ helicase and exonuclease I dependence, make up a suitable model system for studying mechanisms of DSB resection in bacteria. Also, these mutants might be useful for investigating functions of the conserved RecQ helicase family members, and congruently serve as a simpler, more defined model system

  9. Combining Evidence from Homologous Datasets

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Feng, Ao; Allan, James

    2006-01-01

    .... We argue that combining evidence from these "homologous" datasets can give us better representation of the original data, and our experiments show that a model combining all sources outperforms each...

  10. Molecular characterization of the human excision repair gene ERCC-1: cDNA cloning and aminoacid homology with the yeast DNA repair gene RAD10.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    M. van Duin (Mark); J. de Wit (Jan); H. Odijk (Hanny); A. Westerveld (Andries); A. Yasui (Akira); M.H.M. Koken (Marcel); J.H.J. Hoeijmakers (Jan); D. Bootsma (Dirk)

    1986-01-01

    textabstractThe human excision repair gene ERCC-7 was cloned after DNA mediated gene transfer to the CHO mutant 43-38, which is sensitive to ultraviolet light and mitomycin-C. We describe the cloning and sequence analysis of the ERCC-7 cDNA and partial characterization of the gene. ERCC.1 has a size

  11. Identification of homologous regions in human immunodeficiency virus I gp41 and human MHC class II beta 1 domain. I. Monoclonal antibodies against the gp41-derived peptide and patients' sera react with native HLA class II antigens, suggesting a role for autoimmunity in the pathogenesis of acquired immune deficiency syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Golding, H; Robey, F A; Gates, F T; Linder, W; Beining, P R; Hoffman, T; Golding, B

    1988-03-01

    Homologous regions of five amino acids each, were identified in the NH2-terminal domain of human class II beta chains and the COOH terminus of HIV I envelope protein. The homologous regions are highly conserved among different DR and DQ alleles and also among different isolates of HIV. Septamers containing these sequences were synthesized and used for the generation of murine mAbs. The mAbs selected for this study were raised against the HIV I-derived peptide and reacted strongly not only with the immunizing peptide, but also with the homologous class II-derived peptide. These mAbs also reacted with native MHC class II antigens expressed on human B cell lines and on murine fibroblast L cell lines transfected with the genes coding for the alpha and beta chains of human class II antigens. Furthermore, sera from 36% of AIDS patients tested contained antibodies that reacted with the class II-derived peptide, as well as with intact class II molecule-rich cell extracts. Such antibodies in HIV I-infected individuals may recognize self class II antigens, triggering autoimmune mechanisms that could contribute to the development of immunodeficiency in AIDS patients.

  12. Discovery of Azurin-Like Anticancer Bacteriocins from Human Gut Microbiome through Homology Modeling and Molecular Docking against the Tumor Suppressor p53

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chuong Nguyen

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Azurin from Pseudomonas aeruginosa is known anticancer bacteriocin, which can specifically penetrate human cancer cells and induce apoptosis. We hypothesized that pathogenic and commensal bacteria with long term residence in human body can produce azurin-like bacteriocins as a weapon against the invasion of cancers. In our previous work, putative bacteriocins have been screened from complete genomes of 66 dominant bacteria species in human gut microbiota and subsequently characterized by subjecting them as functional annotation algorithms with azurin as control. We have qualitatively predicted 14 putative bacteriocins that possessed functional properties very similar to those of azurin. In this work, we perform a number of quantitative and structure-based analyses including hydrophobic percentage calculation, structural modeling, and molecular docking study of bacteriocins of interest against protein p53, a cancer target. Finally, we have identified 8 putative bacteriocins that bind p53 in a same manner as p28-azurin and azurin, in which 3 peptides (p1seq16, p2seq20, and p3seq24 shared with our previous study and 5 novel ones (p1seq09, p2seq05, p2seq08, p3seq02, and p3seq17 discovered in the first time. These bacteriocins are suggested for further in vitro tests in different neoplastic line cells.

  13. Assignment of Etfdh, Etfb, and Etfa to chromosomes 3, 7, and 13: The mouse homologs of genes respondible for glutaric acidemia type II in human

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    White, R.A.; Dowler, L.L.; Angeloni, S.V. [UMKC School of Medicine, Kansas City, MO (United States); Koeller, D.M. [Univ. of Colorado Health Sciences Center, Denver, CO (United States)

    1996-04-01

    Electron transfer flavoprotein (composed of {alpha} and {beta} subunits) is an obligatory electron acceptor for several dehydrogenases and is located in the mitochondrial matrix. Electrons accepted by electron transfer flavo-protein (ETF) are transferred to the main mitochondrial respiratory chain by the way of ETF dehydrogenase (ETFDH). In humans, deficiency of ETF or ETFDH leads to glutaric acidemia type II, an inherited metabolic disorder that can be fatal in its neonatal form and is characterized by severe hypoketotic hypoglycemia and acidosis. We used cDNA probes for the Etfdh, Etfb, and Etfa genes to determine localization of these mouse genes to chromosomes 3, 7, and 13. 18 refs., 3 figs.

  14. A new family of retroviral long terminal repeat elements in the human genome identified by their homologies to an element 5{prime} to the spider monkey haptoglobin gene

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Erickson, L.M.; Maeda, N. [Univ. of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, NC (United States)

    1995-06-10

    A new family of retroviral long terminal repeats that we name Spm-LTR has been identified as a result of DNA sequence comparisons between the entire Gen-Bank databank and an element, SPHP, located 5{prime} to the haptoglobin gene of spider monkeys. The 18 human Spm-LTR sequences so identified fall into three subtypes. There is no sequence similarity between Spm-LTR elements and any endogenous retroviral LTR sequences previously reported except for general features that define LTRs. However, a previously described repeated sequence (MER-4) forms a portion of the Spm-LTR sequence. 13 refs., 1 fig., 1 tab.

  15. Expression, refolding and spectroscopic characterization of fibronectin type III (FnIII)-homology domains derived from human fibronectin leucine rich transmembrane protein (FLRT)-1,-2, and-3

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Yang, Lila; Falkesgaard, Maria Hansen; Thulstrup, Peter Waaben

    2017-01-01

    The fibronectin leucine rich transmembrane (FLRT) protein family consists in humans of 3 proteins, FLRT1, -2, and -3. The FLRT proteins contain two extracellular domains separated by an unstructured linker. The most membrane distal part is a leucine rich repeat (LRR) domain responsible for both cis......- and trans-interactions, whereas the membrane proximal part is a fibronectin type III (FnIII) domain responsible for a cis-interaction with members of the fibroblast growth factor receptor 1 (FGFR1) family, which results in FGFR tyrosine kinase activation. Whereas the structures of FLRT LRR domains from...

  16. The human homolog of insect-derived growth factor, CECR1, is a candidate gene for features of cat eye syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riazi, M A; Brinkman-Mills, P; Nguyen, T; Pan, H; Phan, S; Ying, F; Roe, B A; Tochigi, J; Shimizu, Y; Minoshima, S; Shimizu, N; Buchwald, M; McDermid, H E

    2000-03-15

    Cat eye syndrome (CES) is a developmental disorder with multiple organ involvement, associated with the duplication of a 2-Mb region of 22q11.2. Using exon trapping and genomic sequence analysis, we have isolated and characterized a gene, CECR1, that maps to this critical region. The protein encoded by CECR1 is similar to previously identified novel growth factors: IDGF from Sarcophaga peregrina (flesh fly) and MDGF from Aplysia californica (sea hare). The CECR1 gene is alternatively spliced and expressed in numerous tissues, with most abundant expression in human adult heart, lung, lymphoblasts, and placenta as well as fetal lung, liver, and kidney. In situ hybridization of a human embryo shows specific expression in the outflow tract and atrium of the developing heart, the VII/VIII cranial nerve ganglion, and the notochord. The location of this gene in the CES critical region and its embryonic expression suggest that the overexpression of CECR1 may be responsible for at least some features of CES, particularly the heart defects. Copyright 2000 Academic Press.

  17. Anatomical Network Comparison of Human Upper and Lower, Newborn and Adult, and Normal and Abnormal Limbs, with Notes on Development, Pathology and Limb Serial Homology vs. Homoplasy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diogo, Rui; Esteve-Altava, Borja; Smith, Christopher; Boughner, Julia C; Rasskin-Gutman, Diego

    2015-01-01

    How do the various anatomical parts (modules) of the animal body evolve into very different integrated forms (integration) yet still function properly without decreasing the individual's survival? This long-standing question remains unanswered for multiple reasons, including lack of consensus about conceptual definitions and approaches, as well as a reasonable bias toward the study of hard tissues over soft tissues. A major difficulty concerns the non-trivial technical hurdles of addressing this problem, specifically the lack of quantitative tools to quantify and compare variation across multiple disparate anatomical parts and tissue types. In this paper we apply for the first time a powerful new quantitative tool, Anatomical Network Analysis (AnNA), to examine and compare in detail the musculoskeletal modularity and integration of normal and abnormal human upper and lower limbs. In contrast to other morphological methods, the strength of AnNA is that it allows efficient and direct empirical comparisons among body parts with even vastly different architectures (e.g. upper and lower limbs) and diverse or complex tissue composition (e.g. bones, cartilages and muscles), by quantifying the spatial organization of these parts-their topological patterns relative to each other-using tools borrowed from network theory. Our results reveal similarities between the skeletal networks of the normal newborn/adult upper limb vs. lower limb, with exception to the shoulder vs. pelvis. However, when muscles are included, the overall musculoskeletal network organization of the upper limb is strikingly different from that of the lower limb, particularly that of the more proximal structures of each limb. Importantly, the obtained data provide further evidence to be added to the vast amount of paleontological, gross anatomical, developmental, molecular and embryological data recently obtained that contradicts the long-standing dogma that the upper and lower limbs are serial homologues

  18. Anatomical Network Comparison of Human Upper and Lower, Newborn and Adult, and Normal and Abnormal Limbs, with Notes on Development, Pathology and Limb Serial Homology vs. Homoplasy.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rui Diogo

    Full Text Available How do the various anatomical parts (modules of the animal body evolve into very different integrated forms (integration yet still function properly without decreasing the individual's survival? This long-standing question remains unanswered for multiple reasons, including lack of consensus about conceptual definitions and approaches, as well as a reasonable bias toward the study of hard tissues over soft tissues. A major difficulty concerns the non-trivial technical hurdles of addressing this problem, specifically the lack of quantitative tools to quantify and compare variation across multiple disparate anatomical parts and tissue types. In this paper we apply for the first time a powerful new quantitative tool, Anatomical Network Analysis (AnNA, to examine and compare in detail the musculoskeletal modularity and integration of normal and abnormal human upper and lower limbs. In contrast to other morphological methods, the strength of AnNA is that it allows efficient and direct empirical comparisons among body parts with even vastly different architectures (e.g. upper and lower limbs and diverse or complex tissue composition (e.g. bones, cartilages and muscles, by quantifying the spatial organization of these parts-their topological patterns relative to each other-using tools borrowed from network theory. Our results reveal similarities between the skeletal networks of the normal newborn/adult upper limb vs. lower limb, with exception to the shoulder vs. pelvis. However, when muscles are included, the overall musculoskeletal network organization of the upper limb is strikingly different from that of the lower limb, particularly that of the more proximal structures of each limb. Importantly, the obtained data provide further evidence to be added to the vast amount of paleontological, gross anatomical, developmental, molecular and embryological data recently obtained that contradicts the long-standing dogma that the upper and lower limbs are

  19. VARIABILITY OF OPTICAL COUNTERPARTS IN THE CHANDRA GALACTIC BULGE SURVEY

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Britt, C. T.; Hynes, R. I.; Johnson, C. B.; Baldwin, A.; Collazzi, A.; Gossen, L. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Louisiana State University, Baton Rouge, LA 70803-4001 (United States); Jonker, P. G.; Torres, M. A. P. [SRON, Netherlands Institute for Space Research, Sorbonnelaan 2, 3584 CA Utrecht (Netherlands); Nelemans, G. [Department of Astrophysics, IMAPP, Radboud University Nijmegen, Heyendaalseweg 135, 6525 AJ, Nijmegen (Netherlands); Maccarone, T. [Department of Physics, Texas Tech University, Box 41051, Science Building, Lubbock, TX 79409-1051 (United States); Steeghs, D.; Greiss, S. [Astronomy and Astrophysics, Department of Physics, University of Warwick, Coventry, CV4 7AL (United Kingdom); Heinke, C. [Department of Physics, University of Alberta, CCIS 4-183, Edmonton, AB T6G 2E1 (Canada); Bassa, C. G. [Jodrell Bank Centre for Astrophysics, School of Physics and Astronomy, University of Manchester, Manchester M13 9PL (United Kingdom); Villar, A. [Department of Physics, Massachussettes Institute of Technology, 77 Massachusetts Avenue, Cambridge, MA 02139-4307 (United States); Gabb, M. [Department of Physics, Florida Atlantic University, 777 Glades Road, Boca Raton, FL 33431-0991 (United States)

    2014-09-01

    We present optical light curves of variable stars consistent with the positions of X-ray sources identified with the Chandra X-ray Observatory for the Chandra Galactic Bulge Survey (GBS). Using data from the Mosaic-II instrument on the Blanco 4 m Telescope at CTIO, we gathered time-resolved photometric data on timescales from ∼2 hr to 8 days over the 3/4 of the X-ray survey containing sources from the initial GBS catalog. Among the light curve morphologies we identify are flickering in interacting binaries, eclipsing sources, dwarf nova outbursts, ellipsoidal variations, long period variables, spotted stars, and flare stars. Eighty-seven percent of X-ray sources have at least one potential optical counterpart. Twenty-seven percent of these candidate counterparts are detectably variable; a much greater fraction than expected for randomly selected field stars, which suggests that most of these variables are real counterparts. We discuss individual sources of interest, provide variability information on candidate counterparts, and discuss the characteristics of the variable population.

  20. Bacterial Over-Expression and Purification of the 3'phosphoadenosine 5'phosphosulfate (PAPS Reductase Domain of Human FAD Synthase: Functional Characterization and Homology Modeling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Barile

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available FAD synthase (FADS, EC 2.7.7.2 is a key enzyme in the metabolic pathway that converts riboflavin into the redox cofactor, FAD. Human FADS is organized in two domains: -the 3'phosphoadenosine 5'phosphosulfate (PAPS reductase domain, similar to yeast Fad1p, at the C-terminus, and -the resembling molybdopterin-binding domain at the N-terminus. To understand whether the PAPS reductase domain of hFADS is sufficient to catalyze FAD synthesis, per se, and to investigate the role of the molybdopterin-binding domain, a soluble “truncated” form of hFADS lacking the N-terminal domain (Δ1-328-hFADS has been over-produced and purified to homogeneity as a recombinant His-tagged protein. The recombinant Δ1-328-hFADS binds one mole of FAD product very tightly as the wild-type enzyme. Under turnover conditions, it catalyzes FAD assembly from ATP and FMN and, at a much lower rate, FAD pyrophosphorolytic hydrolysis. The Δ1-328-hFADS enzyme shows a slight, but not significant, change of Km values (0.24 and 6.23 µM for FMN and ATP, respectively and of kcat (4.2 × 10−2 s−1 compared to wild-type protein in the forward direction. These results demonstrate that the molybdopterin-binding domain is not strictly required for catalysis. Its regulatory role is discussed in light of changes in divalent cations sensitivity of the Δ1-328-hFADS versus wild-type protein.

  1. Comprehensive analysis of interactions between the Src-associated protein in mitosis of 68 kDa and the human Src-homology 3 proteome.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Benedikt Asbach

    Full Text Available The protein Sam68 is involved in many cellular processes such as cell-cycle regulation, RNA metabolism, or signal transduction. Sam68 comprises a central RNA-binding domain flanked by unstructured tails containing docking sites for signalling proteins including seven proline-rich sequences (denoted P0 to P6 as potential SH3-domain binding motifs. To comprehensively assess Sam68-SH3-interactions, we applied a phage-display screening of a library containing all approx. 300 human SH3 domains. Thereby we identified five new (from intersectin 2, the osteoclast stimulating factor OSF, nephrocystin, sorting nexin 9, and CIN85 and seven already known high-confidence Sam68-ligands (mainly from the Src-kinase family, as well as several lower-affinity binders. Interaction of the high-affinity Sam68-binders was confirmed in independent assays in vitro (phage-ELISA, GST-pull-down and in vivo (FACS-based FRET-analysis with CFP- and YFP-tagged proteins. Fine-mapping analyses with peptides established P0, P3, P4, and P5 as exclusive docking-sites for SH3 domains, which showed varying preferences for these motifs. Mutational analyses identified individual residues within the proline-rich motifs being crucial for the interactions. Based on these data, we generated a Sam68-mutant incapable of interacting with SH3 domains any more, as subsequently demonstrated by FRET-analyses. In conclusion, we present a thorough characterization of Sam68's interplay with the SH3 proteome. The observed interaction between Sam68 and OSF complements the known Sam68-Src and OSF-Src interactions. Thus, we propose, that Sam68 functions as a classical scaffold protein in this context, assembling components of an osteoclast-specific signalling pathway.

  2. Molecular mechanism of hTid-1, the human homolog of Drosophila tumor suppressor l(2)Tid, in the regulation of NF-kappaB activity and suppression of tumor growth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Hua; Cenciarelli, Carlo; Nelkin, Gina; Tsan, Rachel; Fan, Dominic; Cheng-Mayer, Cecilia; Fidler, Isaiah J

    2005-01-01

    hTid-1, a human homolog of the Drosophila tumor suppressor l(2)Tid and a novel DnaJ protein, regulates the activity of nuclear factor kappaB (NF-kappaB), but its mechanism is not established. We report here that hTid-1 strongly associated with the cytoplasmic protein complex of NF-kappaB-IkappaB through direct interaction with IkappaBalpha/beta and the IKKalpha/beta subunits of the IkappaB kinase complex. These interactions resulted in suppression of the IKK activity in a J-domain-dependent fashion and led to the cytoplasmic retention and enhanced stability of IkappaB. Overexpression of hTid-1 by using recombinant baculovirus or adenovirus led to inhibition of cell proliferation and induction of apoptosis of human osteosarcoma cells regardless of the p53 expression status. Adherent cultured cells transduced with Ad.hTid-1 detached from the dish surface. Morphological changes consistent with apoptosis and cell death were evident 48 h after Ad.EGFP-hTid-1 transduction. In contrast, cells transduced with Ad.EGFP or Ad.EGFP-hTd-1DeltaN100, a mutant that has the N-terminal J domain deletion and that lost suppressive activity on IKK, continued to proliferate. Similar data were obtained with A375 human melanoma cells. Ad.EGFP or Ad.EGFP-hTd-1DeltaN100 ex vivo-transduced A375 cells injected subcutaneously into nude mice produced growing tumors, whereas Ad.EGFP-hTid-1-transduced cells did not. Collectively, the data suggest that hTid-1 represses the activity of NF-kappaB through physical and functional interactions with the IKK complex and IkappaB and, in doing so, it modulates cell growth and death.

  3. MicroRNA-98 and microRNA-214 post-transcriptionally regulate enhancer of zeste homolog 2 and inhibit migration and invasion in human esophageal squamous cell carcinoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Huang Sheng-Dong

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The enhancer of zeste homolog 2 (EZH2 was found to be overexpressed and associated with tumor metastasis in esophageal squamous cell carcinoma (ESCC. On the other hand, it was reported that miR-26a, miR-98, miR-101, miR-124, miR-138 and miR-214 could inhibit the expression of EZH2 in some tumors. However, the role of miRNAs in the regulation of EZH2 expression in human ESCC has not been documented. The aim of this study was to determine the role of these miRNAs in the regulation of tumor metastasis via EZH2 overexpression in human ESCC. Methods and results The expression of these miRNAs and EZH2 mRNA were examined by qPCR and the expression of EZH2 protein was detected by western blot. The role of these miRNAs in migration and invasion was studied in ESCC cell line (Eca109 transfected with miRNA mimics or cotransfected with miRNA mimics and pcDNA-EZH2 plasmid (without the 3’-UTR of EZH2. Through clinical investigation, we found that miR-98 and miR-214 expression was significantly lower in ESCC tissues than in matched normal tissues, and the expression level of miR-98 and miR-214 was inversely correlated to EZH2 protein expression and the clinical features such as pathological grade, tumor stage and lymph node metastasis in ESCC. In Eca109 cells, overexpression of miR-98 and miR-214 significantly inhibited the migration and invasion of ESCC cells, which was reversed by transfection of EZH2. Conclusions These findings suggest that decreased expression of miR-98 and miR-214 might promote metastasis of human ESCC by inducing accumulation of EZH2 protein.

  4. Mapping of rat brain using the Synuclein-1 monoclonal antibody reveals somatodendritic expression of alpha-synuclein in populations of neurons homologous to those vulnerable to Lewy body formation in human synucleopathies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andringa, Gerda; Du, Fu; Chase, Thomas N; Bennett, M Catherine

    2003-10-01

    The neuronal protein alpha-synuclein has been implicated in the pathogenesis of Parkinson disease and other neurodegenerative diseases. Although many studies report that alpha-synuclein expression is restricted to neuronal presynaptic terminals, this protein aggregates in Lewy bodies in somata that are typically distant from their axon terminals. Few studies have addressed this paradox and there has been no compelling explanation proposed for the apparent discrepancy between the locus of neuronal alpha-synuclein expression and the loci of Lewy bodies in the majority of Parkinson disease cases. We explored this issue by extensively characterizing the monoclonal antibody Synuclein-1 (Syn-1) and using this highly selective antibody to map the distribution of alpha-synuclein throughout rat brain and in human substantia nigra (SN). Additionally, alpha-synuclein expression in rat SN detected by 2 polyclonal antibodies against alpha-synuclein was compared with that detected by the Syn-1 antibody. In contrast with many previous reports, alpha-synuclein was detected by Syn-1 in neuronal somata and dendrites in restricted brain regions, as well as more ubiquitously in axons and terminals. The strongest alpha-synuclein neuronal expression in rat was found in brainstem and cortical regions that are homologous to regions prone to Lewy body formation in humans. The Syn-1 antibody labeled abundant somatodendritic alpha-synuclein in both rat and human SN, a major locus of Lewy body formation and neurodegeneration in Parkinson disease. By contrast, very few immunoreactive somata in the rat SN were labeled by the 2 polyclonal antibodies. We explore possible explanations for the differences in conflicting reports of patterns of alpha-synuclein expression in brain, including differences among antibodies.

  5. Homological stability of diffeomorphism groups

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Berglund, Alexander; Madsen, Ib Henning

    2013-01-01

    In this paper we prove a stability theorem for block diffeomorphisms of 2d -dimensional manifolds that are connected sums of S d ×S d . Combining this with a recent theorem of S. Galatius and O. Randal-Williams and Morlet’s lemma of disjunction, we determine the homology of the classifying space ...

  6. Electromagnetic counterparts to structured jets from gravitational wave detected mergers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lamb, Gavin P.; Kobayashi, Shiho

    2017-12-01

    We show the peak magnitude for orphan afterglows from the jets of gravitational wave (GW) detected black hole/neutron star - neutron star (BH/NS-NS) mergers highly depend on the jet half-opening angle θj. Short γ-ray bursts (GRBs) with a homogeneous jet structure and θj > 10°, the orphan afterglow viewed at the typical inclination for a GW detected event, 38°, are brighter at optical frequencies than the comparable macronova emission. Structured jets, where the energetics and Lorentz factor Γ vary with angle from the central axis, may have low-Γ components where the prompt emission is suppressed; GW electromagnetic (EM) counterparts may reveal a population of failed-GRB orphan afterglows. Using a Monte Carlo method assuming an NS-NS detection limit we show the fraction of GW-EM counterparts from homogeneous, two-component, power-law structured and Gaussian jets where the variable structure models include a wide low energy and Γ component: for homogeneous jets, with a θj = 6° and typical short GRB parameters, we find r-band magnitude mr ≤ 21 counterparts for ∼13.6 per cent of GW detected mergers; where jet structure extends to a half-opening angle of 25°, two-component jets produce mr ≤ 21 counterparts in ∼30 per cent of GW detected mergers, power-law structured-jets result in ∼37 per cent and Gaussian jets with our parameters ∼13 per cent. We show the features in the light curves from orphan afterglows can be used to indicate the presence of extended structure.

  7. Search for Gravitational Wave Counterparts with Fermi GBM

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hui, C. M.

    2017-01-01

    The progenitor of short gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) is believed to be the merger of two compact objects. This type of events will also produce gravitational waves. Since the gravitational waves discovery by LIGO, the search for a joint detection with an electromagnetic counterpart has been ongoing. Fermi GBM detects approximately 40 short GRBs per year, and we have been expanding our search looking for faint events in the GBM data that did not trigger onboard.

  8. A rapid search for the counterpart to an active magnetar

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levan, Andrew

    2016-10-01

    We propose to obtain a fast response observation of a magnetar undergoing an active period. Utilizing rapid, deep, diffraction limited observations with WFC3 we will maximize the chances of obtaining the IR detection of the magnetar. This in turn yields unique constraints on emission mechanisms, enables the measurement of dynamics (e.g. via proper motion) and can associate the magnetar with a given structure (e.g. young cluster or supernova remnant) in the galaxy. The association with a cluster provides means of measuring the stellar age, in turn informing the stellar properties (e.g. mass) of the magnetar progenitors. We have demonstrated the success of this approach with the detection of the counterpart of SGR 1935+2154 with a magnitude (during bursting activity) of F140W(AB) 25.5, a level extremely challenging to detect variability in from the ground, requiring multiple nights of adaptive optics imaging in typical conditions. Indeed, our observations will be senstive to counterparts significantly fainter than it is possible to detect from any ground based observatory. These observations will allow us to break through the observational barrier that has so far prevented us from detecting counterparts to more than two-thirds of magnetar candidates. With these observations we will construct a fuller picture of magnetars, the routes to their creation, and their role as cosmic engines across the Universe.

  9. Homologous and Nonhomologous Recombination Resulting in Deletion: Effects of p53 Status, Microhomology, and Repetitive DNA Length and Orientation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gebow, Dan; Miselis, Nathan; Liber, Howard L.

    2000-01-01

    Repetitive DNA elements frequently are precursors to chromosomal deletions in prokaryotes and lower eukaryotes. However, little is known about the relationship between repeated sequences and deletion formation in mammalian cells. We have created a novel integrated plasmid-based recombination assay to investigate repeated sequence instability in human cells. In a control cell line, the presence of direct or inverted repeats did not appreciably influence the very low deletion frequencies (2 × 10−7 to 9 × 10−7) in the region containing the repeat. Similar to what has been observed in lower eukaryotes, the majority of deletions resulted from the loss of the largest direct repeat present in the system along with the intervening sequence. Interestingly, in closely related cell lines that possess a mutant p53 gene, deletion frequencies in the control and direct-repeat plasmids were 40 to 300 times higher than in their wild-type counterparts. However, mutant p53 cells did not preferentially utilize the largest available homology in the formation of the deletion. Surprisingly, inverted repeats were approximately 10,000 times more unstable in all mutant p53 cells than in wild-type cells. Finally, several deletion junctions were marked by the addition of novel bases that were homologous to one of the preexisting DNA ends. Contrary to our expectations, only 6% of deletions in all cell lines could be classified as arising from nonhomologous recombination. PMID:10805745

  10. Urate-responsive MarR homologs from Burkholderia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grove, Anne

    2010-11-01

    The genus Burkholderia includes a large number of species, some of which are serious human pathogens. A genomic locus is conserved that consists of a gene encoding a member of the multiple antibiotic resistance regulator (MarR) family of transcriptional regulators and a divergently oriented gene encoding a major facilitator transport protein (MFTP), a predicted membrane efflux pump. Homology modeling shows that the MarR homolog conserves the location of four conserved amino acid residues previously shown to bind the ligand urate in the Deinococcus radiodurans-encoded MarR homolog HucR. Analysis of the B. thailandensis-encoded homolog shows that its specific DNA binding to two adjacent sites in the intergenic region between the genes encoding the transcription factor and the MFTP is attenuated by urate and to a lesser extent by xanthine and hypoxanthine, but not by adenine or the product of urate degradation, allantoin. These data suggest the existence of a four amino acid urate-binding signature in a subset of MarR homologs, and that homologs bearing this signature will respond to the ligand urate by attenuated DNA binding. The location of binding sites predicts regulation of the MFTP and prompts a proposal to name the cognate transcription factor MftR (major facilitator transport regulator).

  11. A Phase 1 Human Immunodeficiency Virus Vaccine Trial for Cross-Profiling the Kinetics of Serum and Mucosal Antibody Responses to CN54gp140 Modulated by Two Homologous Prime-Boost Vaccine Regimens

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sven Kratochvil

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available A key aspect to finding an efficacious human immunodeficiency virus (HIV vaccine is the optimization of vaccine schedules that can mediate the efficient maturation of protective immune responses. In the present study, we investigated the effect of alternate booster regimens on the immune responses to a candidate HIV-1 clade C CN54gp140 envelope protein, which was coadministered with the TLR4-agonist glucopyranosyl lipid A-aqueous formulation. Twelve study participants received a common three-dose intramuscular priming series followed by a final booster at either 6 or 12 months. The two homologous prime-boost regimens were well tolerated and induced CN54gp140-specific responses that were observed in both the systemic and mucosal compartments. Levels of vaccine-induced IgG-subclass antibodies correlated significantly with FcγR engagement, and both vaccine regimens were associated with strikingly similar patterns in antibody titer and FcγR-binding profiles. In both groups, identical changes in the antigen (Ag-specific IgG-subclass fingerprint, leading to a decrease in IgG1 and an increase in IgG4 levels, were modulated by booster injections. Here, the dissection of immune profiles further supports the notion that prime-boost strategies are essential for the induction of diverse Ag-specific HIV-1 responses. The results reported here clearly demonstrate that identical responses were effectively and safely induced by both vaccine regimens, indicating that an accelerated 6-month regimen could be employed for the rapid induction of immune responses against CN54gp140 with no apparent impact on the overall quality of the induced immune response. (This study has been registered at http://ClinicalTrials.gov under registration no. NCT01966900.

  12. Bloom DNA helicase facilitates homologous recombination between diverged homologous sequences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kikuchi, Koji; Abdel-Aziz, H Ismail; Taniguchi, Yoshihito; Yamazoe, Mitsuyoshi; Takeda, Shunichi; Hirota, Kouji

    2009-09-25

    Bloom syndrome caused by inactivation of the Bloom DNA helicase (Blm) is characterized by increases in the level of sister chromatid exchange, homologous recombination (HR) associated with cross-over. It is therefore believed that Blm works as an anti-recombinase. Meanwhile, in Drosophila, DmBlm is required specifically to promote the synthesis-dependent strand anneal (SDSA), a type of HR not associating with cross-over. However, conservation of Blm function in SDSA through higher eukaryotes has been a matter of debate. Here, we demonstrate the function of Blm in SDSA type HR in chicken DT40 B lymphocyte line, where Ig gene conversion diversifies the immunoglobulin V gene through intragenic HR between diverged homologous segments. This reaction is initiated by the activation-induced cytidine deaminase enzyme-mediated uracil formation at the V gene, which in turn converts into abasic site, presumably leading to a single strand gap. Ig gene conversion frequency was drastically reduced in BLM(-/-) cells. In addition, BLM(-/-) cells used limited donor segments harboring higher identity compared with other segments in Ig gene conversion event, suggesting that Blm can promote HR between diverged sequences. To further understand the role of Blm in HR between diverged homologous sequences, we measured the frequency of gene targeting induced by an I-SceI-endonuclease-mediated double-strand break. BLM(-/-) cells showed a severer defect in the gene targeting frequency as the number of heterologous sequences increased at the double-strand break site. Conversely, the overexpression of Blm, even an ATPase-defective mutant, strongly stimulated gene targeting. In summary, Blm promotes HR between diverged sequences through a novel ATPase-independent mechanism.

  13. Finding the Electromagnetic Counterparts of Cosmological Standard Sirens

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kocsis, Bence; Frei, Zsolt; Haiman, Zoltán; Menou, Kristen

    2006-01-01

    The gravitational waves (GWs) emitted during the coalescence of supermassive black holes (SMBHs) in the mass range ~104-107 Msolar/(1+z) will be detectable out to high redshifts with the future Laser Interferometer Space Antenna (LISA). The distance and direction to these ``standard sirens'' can be inferred directly from the GW signal, with a precision that depends on the masses, spins, and geometry of the merging system. In a given cosmology, the LISA-measured luminosity distance translates into a redshift shell. We calculate the size and shape of the corresponding three-dimensional error volume in which an electromagnetic counterpart to a LISA event could be found, taking into account errors in the background cosmology (as expected by the time LISA flies), weak gravitational lensing (de)magnification due to inhomogeneities along the line of sight, and potential source-peculiar velocities. Weak-lensing errors largely exceed other sources of uncertainties (by a factor of ~7 for typical sources at z=1). Under the plausible assumption that SMBH-SMBH mergers are accompanied by gas accretion leading to Eddington-limited quasar activity, we then compute the number of quasars that would be found in a typical three-dimensional LISA error volume, as a function of BH mass and event redshift. Low redshifts offer the best opportunities to identify quasar counterparts to cosmological standard sirens. For mergers of ~4×(105-107) Msolar SMBHs, the LISA error volume will typically contain a single near-Eddington quasar at z~1. If SMBHs are spinning rapidly, the error volume is smaller and may contain a unique quasar out to redshift z~3. This will allow a straightforward test of the hypothesis that GW events are accompanied by bright quasar activity and, if the hypothesis proves correct, will guarantee the identification of a unique quasar counterpart to a LISA event, with a B-band luminosity of LB~(1010-1011) Lsolar. Robust counterpart identifications would allow unprecedented

  14. Exceptional cosmetic surgeries on homology spheres

    OpenAIRE

    Ravelomanana, Huygens C.

    2016-01-01

    The cosmetic surgery conjecture is a longstanding conjecture in 3-manifold theory. We present a theorem about exceptional cosmetic surgery for homology spheres. Along the way we prove that if the surgery is not a small seifert $\\mathbb{Z}/2\\mathbb{Z}$-homology sphere or a toroidal irreducible non-Seifert surgery then there is at most one pair of exceptional truly cosmetic slope. We also prove that toroidal truly cosmetic surgeries on integer homology spheres must be integer homology spheres.

  15. Discrete homology theory for metric spaces

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    H. Barcelo (Hélène); V. Capraro (Valerio); J. A. White; H. Barcelo (Hélène)

    2014-01-01

    htmlabstractWe define and study a notion of discrete homology theory for metric spaces. Instead of working with simplicial homology, our chain complexes are given by Lipschitz maps from an n n -dimensional cube to a fixed metric space. We prove that the resulting homology theory satisfies a

  16. Identification of rodent homologs of hepatitis C virus and pegiviruses

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kapoor, Amit; Simmonds, Peter; Scheel, Troels K H

    2013-01-01

    Flaviviridae. The genetic diversity of the rodent hepaciviruses exceeded that observed for hepaciviruses infecting either humans or non-primates, leading to new insights into the origin, evolution, and host range of hepaciviruses. The presence of genes, encoded proteins, and translation elements homologous......UNLABELLED: Hepatitis C virus (HCV) and human pegivirus (HPgV or GB virus C) are globally distributed and infect 2 to 5% of the human population. The lack of tractable-animal models for these viruses, in particular for HCV, has hampered the study of infection, transmission, virulence, immunity...... to those found in human hepaciviruses and pegiviruses suggests the potential for the development of new animal systems with which to model HCV pathogenesis, vaccine design, and treatment. IMPORTANCE: The genetic and biological characterization of animal homologs of human viruses provides insights...

  17. Tumor malignancy is engaged to prokaryotic homolog toolbox.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernandes, Janaina; Guedes, Patrícia G; Lage, Celso Luiz S; Rodrigues, Juliany Cola F; Lage, Claudia de Alencar S

    2012-04-01

    Cancer cells display high proliferation rates and survival provided by high glycolysis, chemoresistance and radioresistance, metabolic features that appear to be activated with malignancy, and seemed to have arisen as early in evolution as in unicellular/prokaryotic organisms. Based on these assumptions, we hypothesize that aggressive phenotypes found in malignant cells may be related to acquired unicellular behavior, launched within a tumor when viral and prokaryotic homologs are overexpressed performing likely robust functions. The ensemble of these expressed viral and prokaryotic close homologs in the proteome of a tumor tissue gives them advantage over normal cells. To assess the hypothesis validity, sequences of human proteins involved in apoptosis, energetic metabolism, cell mobility and adhesion, chemo- and radio-resistance were aligned to homologs present in other life forms, excluding all eukaryotes, using PSI-BLAST, with further corroboration from data available in the literature. The analysis revealed that selected sequences of proteins involved in apoptosis and tumor suppression (as p53 and pRB) scored non-significant (E-value>0.001) with prokaryotic homologs; on the other hand, human proteins involved in cellular chemo- and radio-resistance scored highly significant with prokaryotic and viral homologs (as catalase, E-value=zero). We inferred that such upregulated and/or functionally activated proteins in aggressive malignant cells represent a toolbox of modern human homologs evolved from a similar key set that have granted survival of ancient prokaryotes against extremely harsh environments. According to what has been discussed along this analysis, high mutation rates usually hit hotspots in important conserved protein domains, allowing uncontrolled expansion of more resistant, death-evading malignant clones. That is the case of point mutations in key viral proteins affording viruses escape to chemotherapy, and human homologs of such retroviral

  18. Capability of detecting ultraviolet counterparts of gravitational waves with GLUV

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ridden-Harper, Ryan; Tucker, B. E.; Sharp, R.; Gilbert, J.; Petkovic, M.

    2017-12-01

    With the discovery of gravitational waves (GWs), attention has turned towards detecting counterparts to these sources. In discussions on counterpart signatures and multimessenger follow-up strategies to the GW detections, ultraviolet (UV) signatures have largely been neglected, due to UV facilities being limited to SWIFT, which lacks high-cadence UV survey capabilities. In this paper, we examine the UV signatures from merger models for the major GW sources, highlighting the need for further modelling, while presenting requirements and a design for an effective UV survey telescope. Using the u΄-band models as an analogue, we find that a UV survey telescope requires a limiting magnitude of m_{u^' }}(AB)≈ 24 to fully complement the aLIGO range and sky localization. We show that a network of small, balloon-based UV telescopes with a primary mirror diameter of 30 cm could be capable of covering the aLIGO detection distance from ˜60 to 100 per cent for BNS events and ˜40 per cent for the black hole and a neutron star events. The sensitivity of UV emission to initial conditions suggests that a UV survey telescope would provide a unique data set, which can act as an effective diagnostic to discriminate between models.

  19. Catching homologies by geometric entropy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Felice, Domenico; Franzosi, Roberto; Mancini, Stefano; Pettini, Marco

    2018-02-01

    A geometric entropy is defined in terms of the Riemannian volume of the parameter space of a statistical manifold associated with a given network. As such it can be a good candidate for measuring networks complexity. Here we investigate its ability to single out topological features of networks proceeding in a bottom-up manner: first we consider small size networks by analytical methods and then large size networks by numerical techniques. Two different classes of networks, the random graphs and the scale-free networks, are investigated computing their Betti numbers and then showing the capability of geometric entropy of detecting homologies.

  20. The Homological Nature of Entropy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pierre Baudot

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available We propose that entropy is a universal co-homological class in a theory associated to a family of observable quantities and a family of probability distributions. Three cases are presented: (1 classical probabilities and random variables; (2 quantum probabilities and observable operators; (3 dynamic probabilities and observation trees. This gives rise to a new kind of topology for information processes, that accounts for the main information functions: entropy, mutual-informations at all orders, and Kullback–Leibler divergence and generalizes them in several ways. The article is divided into two parts, that can be read independently. In the first part, the introduction, we provide an overview of the results, some open questions, future results and lines of research, and discuss briefly the application to complex data. In the second part we give the complete definitions and proofs of the theorems A, C and E in the introduction, which show why entropy is the first homological invariant of a structure of information in four contexts: static classical or quantum probability, dynamics of classical or quantum strategies of observation of a finite system.

  1. Flexoelectric and elastic coefficients of odd and even homologous bimesogens

    Science.gov (United States)

    Atkinson, Katie L.; Morris, Stephen M.; Castles, Flynn; Qasim, Malik M.; Gardiner, Damian J.; Coles, Harry J.

    2012-01-01

    It is known that bimesogenic liquid crystals exhibit a marked “odd-even” effect in the flexoelastic ratio (the effective flexoelectric coefficient to the average elastic coefficient), with the ratio being higher for the “odd-spaced” bimesogens (those with an odd number of alkyl groups in the spacer chain) than their neighboring even-spaced counterparts. To determine the contribution of each property to the flexoelastic ratio, we present experimental results on the flexoelectric and elastic coefficients of two homologous nonsymmetric bimesogens which possess odd and even alkyl spacers. Our results show that, although there are differences in the flexoelectric coefficients, there are substantially larger differences in the effective elastic coefficient. Specifically, the odd bimesogen is found to have both a low splay elastic coefficient and a very low bend elastic coefficient which, when combined, results in a significantly lower effective elastic coefficient and consequently a higher flexoelastic ratio.

  2. X-ray Counterparts of Infrared Faint Radio Sources

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schartel, Norbert

    2011-10-01

    Infrared Faint Radio Sources (IFRS) are radio sources with extremely faint or even absent infrared emission in deep Spitzer Surveys. Models of their spectral energy distributions, the ratios of radio to infrared flux densities and their steep radio spectra strongly suggest that IFRS are AGN at high redshifts (2IFRS, but if confirmed, the increased AGN numbers at these redshifts will account for the unresolved part of the X-ray background. The identification of X-ray counterparts of IFRS is considered to be the smoking gun for this hypothesis. We propose to observe 8 IFRS using 30ks pointed observations. X-ray detections of IFRS with different ratios of radio-to-infrared fluxes, will constrain the class-specific SED.

  3. Silicon-based counterpart of alpha-graphyne

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aktürk, E., E-mail: ethem.akturk@adu.edu.tr [Department of Physics, Adnan Menderes University, Aydin 09100 (Turkey); Gökoğlu, G., E-mail: ggokoglu@karabuk.edu.tr [Department of Physics, Karabük University, 78050 Karabük (Turkey)

    2014-03-01

    We present the first principles density functional calculations of electronic structure and energetics of silicon-based counterpart of α-graphyne, labeled as α-silicyne. Both LDA and GGA functionals are applied for exchange–correlation potentials. We show that graphyne-like silicon in 2D buckled structure (equilibrium buckling δz≅0.73 and Δz≅1.45Å) has ≈2.33eV and ≈1.96eV lower energies than planar geometry for GGA and LDA functionals, respectively. The single and triple bond lengths of silicon are consistent with previously reported values. As a different case from graphyne, which is semimetallic, the electronic band structures of buckled α-silicyne do not show Dirac fermion indicating a metallic nature. The metallic character of the system is largely determined by p-electronic states of the triple bonded silicon atoms.

  4. A radio counterpart to a neutron star merger.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hallinan, G; Corsi, A; Mooley, K P; Hotokezaka, K; Nakar, E; Kasliwal, M M; Kaplan, D L; Frail, D A; Myers, S T; Murphy, T; De, K; Dobie, D; Allison, J R; Bannister, K W; Bhalerao, V; Chandra, P; Clarke, T E; Giacintucci, S; Ho, A Y Q; Horesh, A; Kassim, N E; Kulkarni, S R; Lenc, E; Lockman, F J; Lynch, C; Nichols, D; Nissanke, S; Palliyaguru, N; Peters, W M; Piran, T; Rana, J; Sadler, E M; Singer, L P

    2017-10-16

    Gravitational waves have been detected from a binary neutron star merger event, GW170817. The detection of electromagnetic radiation from the same source has shown that the merger occurred in the outskirts of the galaxy NGC 4993, at a distance of 40 megaparsecs from Earth. We report the detection of a counterpart radio source that appears 16 days after the event, allowing us to diagnose the energetics and environment of the merger. The observed radio emission can be explained by either a collimated ultra-relativistic jet viewed off-axis, or a cocoon of mildly relativistic ejecta. Within 100 days of the merger, the radio light curves will distinguish between these models and very long baseline interferometry will have the capability to directly measure the angular velocity and geometry of the debris. Copyright © 2017, American Association for the Advancement of Science.

  5. Exploring the Origin of Differential Binding Affinities of Human Tubulin Isotypes αβII, αβIII and αβIV for DAMA-Colchicine Using Homology Modelling, Molecular Docking and Molecular Dynamics Simulations.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bajarang Vasant Kumbhar

    Full Text Available Tubulin isotypes are found to play an important role in regulating microtubule dynamics. The isotype composition is also thought to contribute in the development of drug resistance as tubulin isotypes show differential binding affinities for various anti-cancer agents. Tubulin isotypes αβII, αβIII and αβIV show differential binding affinity for colchicine. However, the origin of differential binding affinity is not well understood at the molecular level. Here, we investigate the origin of differential binding affinity of a colchicine analogue N-deacetyl-N-(2-mercaptoacetyl-colchicine (DAMA-colchicine for human αβII, αβIII and αβIV isotypes, employing sequence analysis, homology modeling, molecular docking, molecular dynamics simulation and MM-GBSA binding free energy calculations. The sequence analysis study shows that the residue compositions are different in the colchicine binding pocket of αβII and αβIII, whereas no such difference is present in αβIV tubulin isotypes. Further, the molecular docking and molecular dynamics simulations results show that residue differences present at the colchicine binding pocket weaken the bonding interactions and the correct binding of DAMA-colchicine at the interface of αβII and αβIII tubulin isotypes. Post molecular dynamics simulation analysis suggests that these residue variations affect the structure and dynamics of αβII and αβIII tubulin isotypes, which in turn affect the binding of DAMA-colchicine. Further, the binding free-energy calculation shows that αβIV tubulin isotype has the highest binding free-energy and αβIII has the lowest binding free-energy for DAMA-colchicine. The order of binding free-energy for DAMA-colchicine is αβIV ≃ αβII >> αβIII. Thus, our computational approaches provide an insight into the effect of residue variations on differential binding of αβII, αβIII and αβIV tubulin isotypes with DAMA-colchicine and may help to design new

  6. Homology and the nonlinear heat diffusion equation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burgan, J. R.; Munier, A.; Feix, M. R.; Fijalkow, E.

    1984-02-01

    A theorem is presented which generalizes the concept of homology, introduced by Munier et al. (1981), to a large class of nonlinear diffusion coefficients. Possible changes in both initial and boundary conditions induced by self-homologous transformations are investigated. In order to be consistent with previously established definitions, generalized homology is expressed in terms of a Baecklund transformation, the only remaining process to overstep self-similar transformations.

  7. Homology in Electromagnetic Boundary Value Problems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pellikka Matti

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available We discuss how homology computation can be exploited in computational electromagnetism. We represent various cellular mesh reduction techniques, which enable the computation of generators of homology spaces in an acceptable time. Furthermore, we show how the generators can be used for setting up and analysis of an electromagnetic boundary value problem. The aim is to provide a rationale for homology computation in electromagnetic modeling software.

  8. Fermi GBM Counterparts to LIGO Gravitational-Wave Candidates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Racusin, Judith; Blackburn, Lindy; Briggs, Michael; Burns, Eric; Camp, Jordan; Canton, Tito Dal; Christensen, Nelson; Connaughton, Valerie; Goldstein, Adam; Jenke, Peter; Littenberg, Tyson; Shawhan, Peter; Singer, Leo; Veitch, John; Wilson-Hodge, Colleen; Zhang, Binbin

    2016-03-01

    As advanced LIGO begins operations, we eagerly anticipate the detection of gravitational waves (GW) in coincidence with a gamma-ray signal from the Fermi Gamma-ray Burst Monitor (GBM). The most likely source is a short Gamma-Ray Burst (GRB) arising from the merger of two neutron stars. With its broad sky coverage, GBM triggers and localizes more short GRBs than other active space missions, 45 each year, with an estimate of <1-5 within the LIGO detection horizon. Combining GBM and LIGO localization uncertainty regions may provide a smaller region for GW host searches. A joint GBM-LIGO detection increases the confidence in the GW detection and helps characterize the parameters of the merger. Offline searches for weak GRBs that fail to trigger onboard Fermi indicate that additional short GRBs can be detected in the GBM data. I will discuss joint searches to detect and localize GW candidates, and explore how the non-detection in the GBM data of a signal consistent with GW candidates in the LIGO data can affect follow-up strategies for counterpart searches by other observers.

  9. Exactly solvable PT-symmetric Hamiltonian having no Hermitian counterpart

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bender, Carl M.; Mannheim, Philip D.

    2008-07-01

    In a recent paper Bender and Mannheim showed that the unequal-frequency fourth-order derivative Pais-Uhlenbeck oscillator model has a realization in which the energy eigenvalues are real and bounded below, the Hilbert-space inner product is positive definite, and time evolution is unitary. Central to that analysis was the recognition that the Hamiltonian HPU of the model is PT symmetric. This Hamiltonian was mapped to a conventional Dirac-Hermitian Hamiltonian via a similarity transformation whose form was found exactly. The present paper explores the equal-frequency limit of the same model. It is shown that in this limit the similarity transform that was used for the unequal-frequency case becomes singular and that HPU becomes a Jordan-block operator, which is nondiagonalizable and has fewer energy eigenstates than eigenvalues. Such a Hamiltonian has no Hermitian counterpart. Thus, the equal-frequency PT theory emerges as a distinct realization of quantum mechanics. The quantum mechanics associated with this Jordan-block Hamiltonian can be treated exactly. It is shown that the Hilbert space is complete with a set of nonstationary solutions to the Schrödinger equation replacing the missing stationary ones. These nonstationary states are needed to establish that the Jordan-block Hamiltonian of the equal-frequency Pais-Uhlenbeck model generates unitary time evolution.

  10. Fermi GBM Counterparts to LIGO Gravitational-Wave Candidates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burns, Eric; Blackburn, Lindy; Briggs, Michael Stephen; Camp, Jordan; Christensen, Nelson; Connaughton, Valerie; Goldstein, Adam; Littenberg, Tyson; Racusin, Judith L.; Shawhan, Peter S.; Pound Singer, Leo; Veitch, John; Zhang, Binbin

    2016-04-01

    As the advanced configuration of the Laser Interferometer Gravitational-wave Observatory has begun operations, we eagerly anticipate the detection of gravitational waves (GW) with LIGO in coincidence with a gamma-ray signal from the Fermi Gamma-ray Burst Monitor (GBM). The most likely source is a short Gamma-Ray Burst (GRB) arising from the merger of two compact objects. With its broad sky coverage, GBM triggers and localizes more short GRBs than other active space missions, ~40 each year. Combining GBM and LIGO localization uncertainty regions may provide a smaller target to look for the GW host. A joint GBM-LIGO detection increases the confidence in the GW detection and helps characterize the parameters of the merger. Offline searches for weak GRBs that fail to trigger onboard Fermi indicate that additional short GRBs can be detected in the GBM data. I will discuss the implementation and expected benefits of joint searches to detect and localize GW candidates. I will also explore how the non-detection in the GBM data of a signal consistent with GW candidates in the LIGO data can affect follow-up strategies for counterpart searches by other observers.

  11. Gamma Ray Burst Optical Counterpart Search Experiment (GROCSE)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, H. S.; Ables, E.; Bionta, R. M.; Ott, L.; Parker, E.; Akerlof, C.; Lee, B.; Wallace, S.; Barthelmy, S.; Butterworth, P.

    1995-01-01

    GROCSE (Gamma-Ray Optical Counterpart Search Experiments) is a system of automated telescopes that search for simultaneous optical activity associated with gamma ray bursts in response to real-time burst notifications provided by the BATSE/BACODINE network. The first generation system, GROCSE 1, is sensitive down to Mv (approximately) 8.5 and requires an average of 12 seconds to obtain the first images of the gamma ray burst error box defined by the BACODINE trigger. The collaboration is now constructing a second generation system which has a 4 second slewing time and can reach Mv (approximately) 14 with a 5 second exposure. GROCSE 2 consists of 4 cameras on a single mount. Each camera views the night sky through a commercial Canon lens (f/1.8, focal length 200 mm) and utilizes a 2K x 2K Loral CCD. Light weight and low noise custom readout electronics were designed and fabricated for these CCDs. The total field of view of the 4 cameras is 17.6 x 17.6 (degree). GROCSE 2 will be operated by the end of 1995. In this paper, the authors present an overview of the GROCSE system and the results of measurements with a GROCSE 2 prototype unit.

  12. ELECTROMAGNETIC COUNTERPARTS TO BLACK HOLE MERGERS DETECTED BY LIGO

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Loeb, Abraham, E-mail: aloeb@cfa.harvard.edu [Department of Astronomy, Harvard University, 60 Garden St., Cambridge, MA 02138 (United States)

    2016-03-10

    Mergers of stellar-mass black holes (BHs), such as GW150914 observed by Laser Interferometer Gravitational Wave Observatory (LIGO), are not expected to have electromagnetic counterparts. However, the Fermi GBM detector identified a γ-ray transient 0.4 s after the gravitational wave (GW) signal GW150914 with consistent sky localization. I show that the two signals might be related if the BH binary detected by LIGO originated from two clumps in a dumbbell configuration that formed when the core of a rapidly rotating massive star collapsed. In that case, the BH binary merger was followed by a γ-ray burst (GRB) from a jet that originated in the accretion flow around the remnant BH. A future detection of a GRB afterglow could be used to determine the redshift and precise localization of the source. A population of standard GW sirens with GRB redshifts would provide a new approach for precise measurements of cosmological distances as a function of redshift.

  13. The Hunt for a Counterpart to GW150914

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kohler, Susanna

    2016-07-01

    On 14 September 2015, the Laser Interferometer Gravitational-wave Observatory (LIGO) in a pre-operative testing state at the time detected its first sign of gravitational-waves. The LIGO team sprang into action, performing data-quality checks on this unexpected signal. Within two days, they had sent a notification to 63 observing teams at observatories representing the entire electromagnetic spectrum, from radio to gamma-ray wavelengths.Illustration of a binary neutron star merger. The neutron stars 1) inspiral, 2) can produce a short gamma-ray burst, 3) can fling out hot, radioactive material in the form of a kilonova, and 4) form a massive neutron star or black hole with a possible remnant debris disk around it. [NASA/ESA/A. Feild (STScI)]Thus began the very first hunt for an electromagnetic counterpart to a detected gravitational wave signal.What were they looking for?As two compact objects in a binary system merge, the system is expected to emit energy in the form of gravitational waves. If both of the compact objects are black holes, were unlikely to see any electromagnetic radiation in the process, unless the merger is occurring in an (improbable) environment filled with gas and dust.But if one or both of the two compact objects is a neutron star, then there are a number of electromagnetic signatures that could occur due to energetic outflows. If a relativistic jet forms, we could see a short gamma-ray burst and X-ray, optical, and radio afterglows. Sub-relativistic outflows could produce optical and near-infrared signals, or a radio blast wave.Timeline of observations of GW150914, separated by wavelength band, and relative to the time of the gravitational-wave trigger. The top row shows LIGO information releases. The bottom four rows show high-energy, optical, near-infrared, and radio observations, respectively. Click for a closer look! [Abbott et al. 2016]Surprise SignalSince LIGO and Virgo (LIGOs European counterpart), wereprimarily expecting to detect

  14. Characterization of maize allergens - MON810 vs. its non-transgenic counterpart.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fonseca, Cátia; Planchon, Sébastien; Renaut, Jenny; Oliveira, Maria Margarida; Batista, Rita

    2012-04-03

    One of the main concerns about genetically modified foods and their potential impacts on human health is that the introduction of a new/ altered gene may putatively alter the expression of others, namely endogenous allergens. We intended to evaluate, and to compare, using quantitative real time RT-PCR technique, the expression of 5 already known maize allergens (Zea m14, Zea m25, Zea m27kD, 50kD Zein and trypsin inhibitor) in MON 810 vs. its non-transgenic counterpart, throughout seed development (10, 16 and 23days after pollination). We have shown that none of the tested allergen genes presented differential expression, with statistic significance, along all tested seed development stages, in MON810 vs. its conventional counterpart. We have also used bidimensional gel electrophoresis followed by Western blotting with plasma from two maize allergic subjects to characterize their immunologic responses against MON 810 vs. its non-transgenic control. Immunoreactive spots were characterized by MS. We have identified fourteen new IgE-binding proteins present in both transgenic and non-transgenic maize. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. Stability of p53 homologs.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tobias Brandt

    Full Text Available Most proteins have not evolved for maximal thermal stability. Some are only marginally stable, as for example, the DNA-binding domains of p53 and its homologs, whose kinetic and thermodynamic stabilities are strongly correlated. Here, we applied high-throughput methods using a real-time PCR thermocycler to study the stability of several full-length orthologs and paralogs of the p53 family of transcription factors, which have diverse functions, ranging from tumour suppression to control of developmental processes. From isothermal denaturation fluorimetry and differential scanning fluorimetry, we found that full-length proteins showed the same correlation between kinetic and thermodynamic stability as their isolated DNA-binding domains. The stabilities of the full-length p53 orthologs were marginal and correlated with the temperature of their organism, paralleling the stability of the isolated DNA-binding domains. Additionally, the paralogs p63 and p73 were significantly more stable and long-lived than p53. The short half-life of p53 orthologs and the greater persistence of the paralogs may be biologically relevant.

  16. Homotopic Chain Maps Have Equal s-Homology and d-Homology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Z. Kazemi-Baneh

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The homotopy of chain maps on preabelian categories is investigated and the equality of standard homologies and d-homologies of homotopic chain maps is established. As a special case, if X and Y are the same homotopy type, then their nth d-homology R-modules are isomorphic, and if X is a contractible space, then its nth d-homology R-modules for n≠0 are trivial.

  17. Assembly and dynamics of the bacteriophage T4 homologous recombination machinery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Morrical Scott W

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Homologous recombination (HR, a process involving the physical exchange of strands between homologous or nearly homologous DNA molecules, is critical for maintaining the genetic diversity and genome stability of species. Bacteriophage T4 is one of the classic systems for studies of homologous recombination. T4 uses HR for high-frequency genetic exchanges, for homology-directed DNA repair (HDR processes including DNA double-strand break repair, and for the initiation of DNA replication (RDR. T4 recombination proteins are expressed at high levels during T4 infection in E. coli, and share strong sequence, structural, and/or functional conservation with their counterparts in cellular organisms. Biochemical studies of T4 recombination have provided key insights on DNA strand exchange mechanisms, on the structure and function of recombination proteins, and on the coordination of recombination and DNA synthesis activities during RDR and HDR. Recent years have seen the development of detailed biochemical models for the assembly and dynamics of presynaptic filaments in the T4 recombination system, for the atomic structure of T4 UvsX recombinase, and for the roles of DNA helicases in T4 recombination. The goal of this chapter is to review these recent advances and their implications for HR and HDR mechanisms in all organisms.

  18. Negative-strand RNA viruses: The plant-infecting counterparts

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kormelink, R.J.M.; Garcia, M.L.; Goodin, M.; Sasaya, T.; Haenni, A.L.

    2011-01-01

    While a large number of negative-strand (-)RNA viruses infect animals and humans, a relative small number have plants as their primary host. Some of these have been classified within families together with animal/human infecting viruses due to similarities in particle morphology and genome

  19. Homology Groups of a Pipeline Petri Net

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. A. Husainov

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Petri net is said to be elementary if every place can contain no more than one token. In this paper, it is studied topological properties of the elementary Petri net for a pipeline consisting of n functional devices. If the work of the functional devices is considered continuous, we can come to some topological space of “intermediate” states. In the paper, it is calculated the homology groups of this topological space. By induction on n, using the Addition Sequence for homology groups of semicubical sets, it is proved that in dimension 0 and 1 the integer homology groups of these nets are equal to the group of integers, and in the remaining dimensions are zero. Directed homology groups are studied. A connection of these groups with deadlocks and newsletters is found. This helps to prove that all directed homology groups of the pipeline elementary Petri nets are zeroth.

  20. Novel Gbeta Mimic Kelch Proteins (Gpb1 and Gpb2 Connect G-Protein Signaling to Ras via Yeast Neurofibromin Homologs Ira1 and Ira2. A Model for Human NF1

    Science.gov (United States)

    2007-03-01

    yeast Schizosaccharomyces pombe , a kelch-repeat protein, Joseph Heitman, MD, PhD. 4 Ral2 (Ras-like), is involved in cell morphology, conjugation and...half of Kel1 (Kelch-repeat protein 1) is homologous to S. pombe or C. neoformans Ral2. S. cerevisiae Kel1 is involved in cell morphology and mating...Therefore, Kem1 and Kem2 are homologuous to S. pombe Ral2 and the amino terminal half of S. cerevisiae Kel1. We disrupted all three genes (KEM1

  1. Brain networks engaged in audiovisual integration during speech perception revealed by persistent homology-based network filtration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Heejung; Hahm, Jarang; Lee, Hyekyoung; Kang, Eunjoo; Kang, Hyejin; Lee, Dong Soo

    2015-05-01

    The human brain naturally integrates audiovisual information to improve speech perception. However, in noisy environments, understanding speech is difficult and may require much effort. Although the brain network is supposed to be engaged in speech perception, it is unclear how speech-related brain regions are connected during natural bimodal audiovisual or unimodal speech perception with counterpart irrelevant noise. To investigate the topological changes of speech-related brain networks at all possible thresholds, we used a persistent homological framework through hierarchical clustering, such as single linkage distance, to analyze the connected component of the functional network during speech perception using functional magnetic resonance imaging. For speech perception, bimodal (audio-visual speech cue) or unimodal speech cues with counterpart irrelevant noise (auditory white-noise or visual gum-chewing) were delivered to 15 subjects. In terms of positive relationship, similar connected components were observed in bimodal and unimodal speech conditions during filtration. However, during speech perception by congruent audiovisual stimuli, the tighter couplings of left anterior temporal gyrus-anterior insula component and right premotor-visual components were observed than auditory or visual speech cue conditions, respectively. Interestingly, visual speech is perceived under white noise by tight negative coupling in the left inferior frontal region-right anterior cingulate, left anterior insula, and bilateral visual regions, including right middle temporal gyrus, right fusiform components. In conclusion, the speech brain network is tightly positively or negatively connected, and can reflect efficient or effortful processes during natural audiovisual integration or lip-reading, respectively, in speech perception.

  2. “The Scum of the Earth”? Foreign People Smugglers and Their Local Counterparts in Indonesia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Antje Missbach

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Since 2008, the number of asylum seekers and refugees trying to reach Australia from Indonesia by boat has increased. With many of them hailing from conflict-ridden countries such as Afghanistan, Iraq and Sri Lanka, most entered Indonesia with short-term tourist visas or fraudulent papers or no documents at all. It is widely known that a significant number of these ‘irregular’ migrants pay various types of brokers (often labelled, accurately or otherwise, ‘human smugglers’ at least at one stage – either to enter the country or to escape it. As a non-signatory to the UN Refugee Convention, Indonesia does not permit local integration. While a substantial part of these migrants are detained in the 13 immigration detention centres scattered around the archipelago, many roam freely, looking for opportunities for onward migration. Due to the restrictive border protection arrangements between Australia and Indonesia and a number of bilateral intelligence measures for deterring ‘unwanted’ migrants, human smugglers have been gradually forced to adapt strategies, routes and prices. According to much of the available data, most human smugglers are not Indonesians but foreigners who have been lingering in Indonesia for many years. This article demonstrates, moreover, that these foreigners depend upon local contacts to successfully carry out their risky business. Most often, the Indonesian counterparts are solely facilitators or handymen, but in a number of cases Indonesian authorities have also been involved in this highly lucrative business.

  3. Role of the DinB Homologs Rv1537 and Rv3056 in Mycobacterium tuberculosis▿ †

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kana, Bavesh D.; Abrahams, Garth L.; Sung, Nackmoon; Warner, Digby F.; Gordhan, Bhavna G.; Machowski, Edith E.; Tsenova, Liana; Sacchettini, James C.; Stoker, Neil G.; Kaplan, Gilla; Mizrahi, Valerie

    2010-01-01

    The environment encountered by Mycobacterium tuberculosis during infection is genotoxic. Most bacteria tolerate DNA damage by engaging specialized DNA polymerases that catalyze translesion synthesis (TLS) across sites of damage. M. tuberculosis possesses two putative members of the DinB class of Y-family DNA polymerases, DinB1 (Rv1537) and DinB2 (Rv3056); however, their role in damage tolerance, mutagenesis, and survival is unknown. Here, both dinB1 and dinB2 are shown to be expressed in vitro in a growth phase-dependent manner, with dinB2 levels 12- to 40-fold higher than those of dinB1. Yeast two-hybrid analyses revealed that DinB1, but not DinB2, interacts with the β-clamp, consistent with its canonical C-terminal β-binding motif. However, knockout of dinB1, dinB2, or both had no effect on the susceptibility of M. tuberculosis to compounds that form N2-dG adducts and alkylating agents. Similarly, deletion of these genes individually or in combination did not affect the rate of spontaneous mutation to rifampin resistance or the spectrum of resistance-conferring rpoB mutations and had no impact on growth or survival in human or mouse macrophages or in mice. Moreover, neither gene conferred a mutator phenotype when expressed ectopically in Mycobacterium smegmatis. The lack of the effect of altering the complements or expression levels of dinB1 and/or dinB2 under conditions predicted to be phenotypically revealing suggests that the DinB homologs from M. tuberculosis do not behave like their counterparts from other organisms. PMID:20139184

  4. Homologous Recombination in Protozoan Parasites and Recombinase Inhibitors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelso, Andrew A; Waldvogel, Sarah M; Luthman, Adam J; Sehorn, Michael G

    2017-01-01

    Homologous recombination (HR) is a DNA double-strand break (DSB) repair pathway that utilizes a homologous template to fully repair the damaged DNA. HR is critical to maintain genome stability and to ensure genetic diversity during meiosis. A specialized class of enzymes known as recombinases facilitate the exchange of genetic information between sister chromatids or homologous chromosomes with the help of numerous protein accessory factors. The majority of the HR machinery is highly conserved among eukaryotes. In many protozoan parasites, HR is an essential DSB repair pathway that allows these organisms to adapt to environmental conditions and evade host immune systems through genetic recombination. Therefore, small molecule inhibitors, capable of disrupting HR in protozoan parasites, represent potential therapeutic options. A number of small molecule inhibitors were identified that disrupt the activities of the human recombinase RAD51. Recent studies have examined the effect of two of these molecules on the Entamoeba recombinases. Here, we discuss the current understandings of HR in the protozoan parasites Trypanosoma, Leishmania, Plasmodium, and Entamoeba, and we review the small molecule inhibitors known to disrupt human RAD51 activity.

  5. Homologous Recombination in Protozoan Parasites and Recombinase Inhibitors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrew A. Kelso

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Homologous recombination (HR is a DNA double-strand break (DSB repair pathway that utilizes a homologous template to fully repair the damaged DNA. HR is critical to maintain genome stability and to ensure genetic diversity during meiosis. A specialized class of enzymes known as recombinases facilitate the exchange of genetic information between sister chromatids or homologous chromosomes with the help of numerous protein accessory factors. The majority of the HR machinery is highly conserved among eukaryotes. In many protozoan parasites, HR is an essential DSB repair pathway that allows these organisms to adapt to environmental conditions and evade host immune systems through genetic recombination. Therefore, small molecule inhibitors, capable of disrupting HR in protozoan parasites, represent potential therapeutic options. A number of small molecule inhibitors were identified that disrupt the activities of the human recombinase RAD51. Recent studies have examined the effect of two of these molecules on the Entamoeba recombinases. Here, we discuss the current understandings of HR in the protozoan parasites Trypanosoma, Leishmania, Plasmodium, and Entamoeba, and we review the small molecule inhibitors known to disrupt human RAD51 activity.

  6. NudC Nudix hydrolase from Pseudomonas syringae, but not its counterpart from Pseudomonas aeruginosa, is a novel regulator of intracellular redox balance required for growth, motility and biofilm formation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Modzelan, Marta; Kujawa, Martyna; Głąbski, Krzysztof; Jagura-Burdzy, Grażyna; Kraszewska, Elzbieta

    2014-09-01

    Nudix pyrophosphatases, ubiquitous in all organisms, have not been well studied. Recent implications that some of them may be involved in response to stress and in pathogenesis indicate that they play important biological functions. We have investigated NudC Nudix proteins from the plant pathogen Pseudomonas syringae pv. tomato str. DC3000 and from the human pathogen Pseudomonas aeruginosa PAO1161. We found that these homologous enzymes are homodimeric and in vitro preferentially hydrolyse NADH. The P. syringae mutant strain deficient in NudC accumulated NADH and displayed significant defects in growth, motility and biofilm formation. The wild type copy of the nudC gene with its cognate promoter delivered in trans into the nudC mutant restored its fitness. However, introduction of the P. syringae nudC gene under the control of the strong tacp promoter into either P. syringae or P. aeruginosa cells had a toxic effect on both strains. Opposite to P. syringae NudC, the P. aeruginosa NudC deficiency as well as its overproduction had no visible impact on cells. Moreover, P. aeruginosa NudC does not compensate the lack of its counterpart in the P. syringae mutant. These results indicate that NudC from P. syringae, but not from P. aeruginosa is vital for bacteria. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  7. Dualities in Persistent (Co)Homology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    de Silva, Vin; Morozov, Dmitriy; Vejdemo-Johansson, Mikael

    2011-09-16

    We consider sequences of absolute and relative homology and cohomology groups that arise naturally for a filtered cell complex. We establishalgebraic relationships between their persistence modules, and show that they contain equivalent information. We explain how one can use the existingalgorithm for persistent homology to process any of the four modules, and relate it to a recently introduced persistent cohomology algorithm. Wepresent experimental evidence for the practical efficiency of the latter algorithm.

  8. Investigating homology between proteins using energetic profiles.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    James O Wrabl

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Accumulated experimental observations demonstrate that protein stability is often preserved upon conservative point mutation. In contrast, less is known about the effects of large sequence or structure changes on the stability of a particular fold. Almost completely unknown is the degree to which stability of different regions of a protein is generally preserved throughout evolution. In this work, these questions are addressed through thermodynamic analysis of a large representative sample of protein fold space based on remote, yet accepted, homology. More than 3,000 proteins were computationally analyzed using the structural-thermodynamic algorithm COREX/BEST. Estimated position-specific stability (i.e., local Gibbs free energy of folding and its component enthalpy and entropy were quantitatively compared between all proteins in the sample according to all-vs.-all pairwise structural alignment. It was discovered that the local stabilities of homologous pairs were significantly more correlated than those of non-homologous pairs, indicating that local stability was indeed generally conserved throughout evolution. However, the position-specific enthalpy and entropy underlying stability were less correlated, suggesting that the overall regional stability of a protein was more important than the thermodynamic mechanism utilized to achieve that stability. Finally, two different types of statistically exceptional evolutionary structure-thermodynamic relationships were noted. First, many homologous proteins contained regions of similar thermodynamics despite localized structure change, suggesting a thermodynamic mechanism enabling evolutionary fold change. Second, some homologous proteins with extremely similar structures nonetheless exhibited different local stabilities, a phenomenon previously observed experimentally in this laboratory. These two observations, in conjunction with the principal conclusion that homologous proteins generally conserved

  9. GRO J1744-28, search for the counterpart: infrared photometry and spectroscopy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gosling, A.J.; Bandyopadhyay, R.M.; Miller Jones, J.C.A.; Farrell, S.A.

    2007-01-01

    Using VLT/ISAAC, we have detected two candidate counterparts to the bursting pulsar GRO J1744-28, one bright and one faint, both within the X-ray error circles found using XMM-Newton and Chandra. In determining the spectral types of the counterparts we applied three different extinction corrections;

  10. The 11S globulin Sin a 2 from yellow mustard seeds shows IgE cross-reactivity with homologous counterparts from tree nuts and peanut

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sirvent Sofía

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The 11S globulin Sin a 2 is a marker to predict severity of symptoms in mustard allergic patients. The potential implication of Sin a 2 in cross-reactivity with tree nuts and peanut has not been investigated so far. In this work, we studied at the IgG and IgE level the involvement of the 11S globulin Sin a 2 in cross-reactivity among mustard, tree nuts and peanut. Methods Eleven well-characterized mustard-allergic patients sensitized to Sin a 2 were included in the study. A specific anti-Sin a 2 serum was obtained in rabbit. Skin prick tests (SPT, enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA, immunoblotting and IgG or IgE-inhibition immunoblotting experiments using purified Sin a 2, Sin a 1, Sin a 3, mustard, almond, hazelnut, pistachio, walnut or peanut extracts were performed. Results The rabbit anti-Sin a 2 serum showed high affinity and specificity to Sin a 2, which allowed us to demonstrate that Sin a 2 shares IgG epitopes with allergenic 11S globulins from tree nuts (almond, hazelnut, pistachio and walnut but not from peanut. All the patients included in the study had positive skin prick test to tree nuts and/or peanut and we subdivided them into two different groups according to their clinical symptoms after ingestion of such allergenic sources. We showed that 11S globulins contain conserved IgE epitopes involved in cross-reactivity among mustard, tree nuts and peanut as well as species-specific IgE epitopes. Conclusions The allergenic 11S globulin Sin a 2 from mustard is involved in cross-reactivity at the IgE level with tree nuts and peanut. Although the clinical relevance of the cross-reactive IgE epitopes present in 11S globulins needs to be investigated in further detail, our results contribute to improve the diagnosis and management of mustard allergic patients sensitized to Sin a 2.

  11. On the hodological criterion for homology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Macarena eFaunes

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Owen’s pre-evolutionary definition of a homologue as the same organ in different animals under every variety of form and function and its redefinition after Darwin as the same trait in different lineages due to common ancestry entail the same heuristic problem: how to establish sameness. Although different criteria for homology often conflict, there is currently a generalized acceptance of gene expression as the best criterion. This gene-centered view of homology results from a reductionist and preformationist concept of living beings. Here, we adopt an alternative organismic-epigenetic viewpoint, and conceive living beings as systems whose identity is given by the dynamic interactions between their components at their multiple levels of composition. We posit that there cannot be an absolute homology criterion, and instead, homology should be inferred from comparisons at the levels and developmental stages where the delimitation of the compared trait lies. In this line, we argue that neural connectivity, i.e., the hodological criterion, should prevail in the determination of homologies between brain supra-cellular structures, such as the vertebrate pallium.

  12. Allergen homologs in the Euroglyphus maynei draft genome.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S Dean Rider

    Full Text Available Euroglyphus maynei is a house dust mite commonly found in homes worldwide and is the source of allergens that sensitize and induce allergic reactions in humans. It is the source of species-specific allergens as well as allergens that are cross-reactive with the allergens from house dust mites Dermatophagoides farinae and D. pteronyssinus, and the ectoparasitic scabies mite Sarcoptes scabiei. The genomics, proteomics and molecular biology of E. maynei and its allergens have not been as extensively investigated as those of D. farinae, D. pteronyssinus, and S. scabiei where natural and recombinant allergens from these species have been characterized. Until now, little was known about the genome of E. maynei and it allergens but this information will be important for producing recombinant allergens for diagnostic and therapeutic purposes and for understanding the allergic response mechanism by immune effector cells that mediate the allergic reaction. We sequenced and assembled the 59 Mb E. maynei genome to aid the identification of homologs for known allergenic proteins. The predicted proteome shared orthologs with D. farinae and S. scabiei, and included proteins with homology to more than 30 different groups of allergens. However, the majority of allergen candidates could not be assigned as clear orthologs to known mite allergens. The genomic sequence data, predicted proteome, and allergen homologs identified from E. maynei provide insight into the relationships among astigmatid mites and their allergens, which should allow for the development of improved diagnostics and immunotherapy.

  13. Membrane and Protein Interactions of the Pleckstrin Homology Domain Superfamily.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lenoir, Marc; Kufareva, Irina; Abagyan, Ruben; Overduin, Michael

    2015-10-23

    The human genome encodes about 285 proteins that contain at least one annotated pleckstrin homology (PH) domain. As the first phosphoinositide binding module domain to be discovered, the PH domain recruits diverse protein architectures to cellular membranes. PH domains constitute one of the largest protein superfamilies, and have diverged to regulate many different signaling proteins and modules such as Dbl homology (DH) and Tec homology (TH) domains. The ligands of approximately 70 PH domains have been validated by binding assays and complexed structures, allowing meaningful extrapolation across the entire superfamily. Here the Membrane Optimal Docking Area (MODA) program is used at a genome-wide level to identify all membrane docking PH structures and map their lipid-binding determinants. In addition to the linear sequence motifs which are employed for phosphoinositide recognition, the three dimensional structural features that allow peripheral membrane domains to approach and insert into the bilayer are pinpointed and can be predicted ab initio. The analysis shows that conserved structural surfaces distinguish which PH domains associate with membrane from those that do not. Moreover, the results indicate that lipid-binding PH domains can be classified into different functional subgroups based on the type of membrane insertion elements they project towards the bilayer.

  14. Membrane and Protein Interactions of the Pleckstrin Homology Domain Superfamily

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marc Lenoir

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available The human genome encodes about 285 proteins that contain at least one annotated pleckstrin homology (PH domain. As the first phosphoinositide binding module domain to be discovered, the PH domain recruits diverse protein architectures to cellular membranes. PH domains constitute one of the largest protein superfamilies, and have diverged to regulate many different signaling proteins and modules such as Dbl homology (DH and Tec homology (TH domains. The ligands of approximately 70 PH domains have been validated by binding assays and complexed structures, allowing meaningful extrapolation across the entire superfamily. Here the Membrane Optimal Docking Area (MODA program is used at a genome-wide level to identify all membrane docking PH structures and map their lipid-binding determinants. In addition to the linear sequence motifs which are employed for phosphoinositide recognition, the three dimensional structural features that allow peripheral membrane domains to approach and insert into the bilayer are pinpointed and can be predicted ab initio. The analysis shows that conserved structural surfaces distinguish which PH domains associate with membrane from those that do not. Moreover, the results indicate that lipid-binding PH domains can be classified into different functional subgroups based on the type of membrane insertion elements they project towards the bilayer.

  15. Parallelism, deep homology, and evo-devo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hall, Brian K

    2012-01-01

    Parallelism has been the subject of a number of recent studies that have resulted in reassessment of the term and the process. Parallelism has been aligned with homology leaving convergence as the only case of homoplasy, regarded as a transition between homologous and convergent characters, and defined as the independent evolution of genetic traits. Another study advocates abolishing the term parallelism and treating all cases of the independent evolution of characters as convergence. With the sophistication of modern genomics and genetic analysis, parallelism of characters of the phenotype is being discovered to reflect parallel genetic evolution. Approaching parallelism from developmental and genetic perspectives enables us to tease out the degree to which the reuse of pathways represent deep homology and is a major task for evolutionary developmental biology in the coming decades. © 2012 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  16. Relative K-homology and normal operators

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Manuilov, Vladimir; Thomsen, Klaus

    2009-01-01

    -term exact sequence which generalizes the excision six-term exact sequence in the first variable of KK-theory. Subsequently we investigate the relative K-homology which arises from the group of relative extensions by specializing to abelian $C^*$-algebras. It turns out that this relative K-homology carries...... substantial information also in the operator theoretic setting from which the BDF theory was developed and we conclude the paper by extracting some of this information on approximation of normal operators....

  17. Human exonuclease 1 and BLM helicase interact to resect DNA and initiate DNA repair

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nimonkar, Amitabh V.; Özsoy, A. Zeynep; Genschel, Jochen; Modrich, Paul; Kowalczykowski, Stephen C.

    2008-01-01

    The error-free repair of double-stranded DNA breaks by homologous recombination requires processing of broken ends. These processed ends are substrates for assembly of DNA strand exchange proteins that mediate DNA strand invasion. Here, we establish that human BLM helicase, a member of the RecQ family, stimulates the nucleolytic activity of human exonuclease 1 (hExo1), a 5′→3′ double-stranded DNA exonuclease. The stimulation is specific because other RecQ homologs fail to stimulate hExo1. Stimulation of DNA resection by hExo1 is independent of BLM helicase activity and is, instead, mediated by an interaction between the 2 proteins. Finally, we show that DNA ends resected by hExo1 and BLM are used by human Rad51, but not its yeast or bacterial counterparts, to promote homologous DNA pairing. This in vitro system recapitulates initial steps of homologous recombination and provides biochemical evidence for a role of BLM and Exo1 in the initiation of recombinational DNA repair. PMID:18971343

  18. Multi-kilobase homozygous targeted gene replacement in human induced pluripotent stem cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Byrne, Susan M; Ortiz, Luis; Mali, Prashant; Aach, John; Church, George M

    2015-02-18

    Sequence-specific nucleases such as TALEN and the CRISPR/Cas9 system have so far been used to disrupt, correct or insert transgenes at precise locations in mammalian genomes. We demonstrate efficient 'knock-in' targeted replacement of multi-kilobase genes in human induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSC). Using a model system replacing endogenous human genes with their mouse counterpart, we performed a comprehensive study of targeting vector design parameters for homologous recombination. A 2.7 kilobase (kb) homozygous gene replacement was achieved in up to 11% of iPSC without selection. The optimal homology arm length was around 2 kb, with homology length being especially critical on the arm not adjacent to the cut site. Homologous sequence inside the cut sites was detrimental to targeting efficiency, consistent with a synthesis-dependent strand annealing (SDSA) mechanism. Using two nuclease sites, we observed a high degree of gene excisions and inversions, which sometimes occurred more frequently than indel mutations. While homozygous deletions of 86 kb were achieved with up to 8% frequency, deletion frequencies were not solely a function of nuclease activity and deletion size. Our results analyzing the optimal parameters for targeting vector design will inform future gene targeting efforts involving multi-kilobase gene segments, particularly in human iPSC. © The Author(s) 2014. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Nucleic Acids Research.

  19. Identification of the MMS22L-TONSL complex that promotes homologous recombination

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Duro, Eris; Lundin, Cecilia; Ask, Katrine

    2010-01-01

    Budding yeast Mms22 is required for homologous recombination (HR)-mediated repair of stalled or broken DNA replication forks. Here we identify a human Mms22-like protein (MMS22L) and an MMS22L-interacting protein, NF¿BIL2/TONSL. Depletion of MMS22L or TONSL from human cells causes a high level...

  20. Real-time Automatic Search for Multi-wavelength Counterparts of DWF Transients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murphy, Christopher; Cucchiara, Antonino; Andreoni, Igor; Cooke, Jeff; Hegarty, Sarah

    2018-01-01

    The Deeper Wider Faster (DWF) survey aims to find and classify the fastest transients in the Universe. DWF utilizes the Dark Energy Camera (DECam), collecting a continuous sequence of 20s images over a 3 square degree field of view.Once an interesting transient is detected during DWF observations, the DWF collaboration has access to several facilities for rapid follow-up in multiple wavelengths (from gamma to radio).An online web tool has been designed to help with real-time visual classification of possible astrophysical transients in data collected by the DWF observing program. The goal of this project is to create a python-based code to improve the classification process by querying several existing archive databases. Given the DWF transient location and search radius, the developed code will extract a list of possible counterparts and all available information (e.g. magnitude, radio fluxes, distance separation).Thanks to this tool, the human classifier can make a quicker decision in order to trigger the collaboration rapid-response resources.

  1. Optical Counterparts of X-ray Sources in the Whirlpool Galaxy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bichon, Luis

    2018-01-01

    We present preliminary results of our analysis of the optical counterparts of X-ray sources in the Whirlpool Galaxy (M51). We perform a multi-wavelength analysis of the X-ray sources in the Whirlpool Galaxy (M51) with the Hubble Space Telescope and the Chandra X-ray Observatory. We attempt to determine the nature of the X-ray binaries in M51, by estimating the age of the stellar counterparts. Here we present preliminary results of our analysis of the X-ray sources and their optical counterparts.

  2. Cell biology of homologous recombination in yeast

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Eckert-Boulet, Nadine Valerie; Rothstein, Rodney; Lisby, Michael

    2011-01-01

    Homologous recombination is an important pathway for error-free repair of DNA lesions, such as single- and double-strand breaks, and for rescue of collapsed replication forks. Here, we describe protocols for live cell imaging of single-lesion recombination events in the yeast Saccharomyces...

  3. GPCR Homology Model Generation for Lead Optimization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tautermann, Christofer S

    2018-01-01

    The vast increase of recently solved GPCR X-ray structures forms the basis for GPCR homology modeling to atomistic accuracy. Nowadays, homology models can be employed for GPCR-ligand optimization and have been reported as invaluable tools for drug design in the last few years. Elucidation of the complex GPCR pharmacology and the associated GPCR conformations made clear that different homology models have to be constructed for different activation states of the GPCRs. Therefore, templates have to be chosen accordingly to their sequence homology as well as to their activation state. The subsequent ligand placement is nontrivial, as some recent X-ray structures show very unusual ligand binding sites and solvent involvement, expanding the space of the putative ligand binding site from the generic retinal binding pocket to the whole receptor. In the present study, a workflow is presented starting from the selection of the target sequence, guiding through the GPCR modeling process, and finishing with ligand placement and pose validation.

  4. Homological stability for unordered configuration spaces

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Randal-Williams, Oscar

    2013-01-01

    This paper consists of two related parts. In the first part we give a self-contained proof of homological stability for the spaces C_n(M;X) of configurations of n unordered points in a connected open manifold M with labels in a path-connected space X, with the best possible integral stability ran...

  5. Homological algebra in n-abelian categories

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    In this paper, we study the homological theory in n -abelian categories. First, we prove some useful properties of n -abelian categories, such as ( n + 2 ) × ( n + 2 ) -lemma, 5-lemma and n -Horseshoes lemma. Secondly, we introduce the notions of right(left) n -derived functors of left(right) n -exact functors, n -(co)resolutions, ...

  6. Threading homology through algebra selected patterns

    CERN Document Server

    Boffi, Giandomenico

    2006-01-01

    Aimed at graduate students and researchers in mathematics, this book takes homological themes, such as Koszul complexes and their generalizations, and shows how these can be used to clarify certain problems in selected parts of algebra, as well as their success in solving a number of them.

  7. Homology modeling of γ-aminobutyrateaminotransferase, a ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    γ-Aminobutyrate aminotransferase (GABA-AT) is a pyridoxal phosphate dependent homodimeric enzyme of 50-kD subunits. It is a potential drug target against epilepsy. The three-dimensional structure of GABA-AT is not experimentally known, and we thus resorted to homology modelling to build a model based on x-ray ...

  8. Nash equilibria via duality and homological selection

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Keywords. Nash equilibria; Dold–Thom theorem; homological selection. 2010 Mathematics Subject Classification. Primary: 55M05, 55N45, 91A10. 1. Introduction. The main topological problem addressed in this paper is the following: Let X be a metric space and Subk(X) denote the collection of subsets of X with at most.

  9. On the homology length spectrum of surfaces

    OpenAIRE

    Massart, Daniel; Parlier, Hugo

    2014-01-01

    On a surface with a Finsler metric, we investigate the asymptotic growth of the number of closed geodesics of length less than L which minimize length among all geodesic multicurves in the same homology class. An important class of surfaces which are of interest to us are hyperbolic surfaces.

  10. X(3872) and the search for its bottomonium counterpart at the LHC

    CERN Document Server

    Toms, Konstantin; The ATLAS collaboration

    2016-01-01

    X(3872) history and theoretical status overview. ATLAS study of the ψ(2S) and X(3872) production. Search for X(3872) bottomonium counterpart by ATLAS. Search for Xb at CMS. Determination of X(3872) quantum numbers at LHCb.

  11. Independent introductions and admixtures have contributed to adaptation of European maize and its American counterparts.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jean-Tristan Brandenburg

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Through the local selection of landraces, humans have guided the adaptation of crops to a vast range of climatic and ecological conditions. This is particularly true of maize, which was domesticated in a restricted area of Mexico but now displays one of the broadest cultivated ranges worldwide. Here, we sequenced 67 genomes with an average sequencing depth of 18x to document routes of introduction, admixture and selective history of European maize and its American counterparts. To avoid the confounding effects of recent breeding, we targeted germplasm (lines directly derived from landraces. Among our lines, we discovered 22,294,769 SNPs and between 0.9% to 4.1% residual heterozygosity. Using a segmentation method, we identified 6,978 segments of unexpectedly high rate of heterozygosity. These segments point to genes potentially involved in inbreeding depression, and to a lesser extent to the presence of structural variants. Genetic structuring and inferences of historical splits revealed 5 genetic groups and two independent European introductions, with modest bottleneck signatures. Our results further revealed admixtures between distinct sources that have contributed to the establishment of 3 groups at intermediate latitudes in North America and Europe. We combined differentiation- and diversity-based statistics to identify both genes and gene networks displaying strong signals of selection. These include genes/gene networks involved in flowering time, drought and cold tolerance, plant defense and starch properties. Overall, our results provide novel insights into the evolutionary history of European maize and highlight a major role of admixture in environmental adaptation, paralleling recent findings in humans.

  12. Endoplasmic reticulum stress induced by tunicamycin increases resistin messenger ribonucleic acid through the pancreatic endoplasmic reticulum eukaryotic initiation factor 2α kinase-activating transcription factor 4-CAAT/enhancer binding protein-α homologous protein pathway in THP-1 human monocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamada, Junpei; Onuma, Hiroshi; Ochi, Fumihiro; Hirai, Hiroki; Takemoto, Koji; Miyoshi, Akiko; Matsushita, Manami; Kadota, Yuko; Ohashi, Jun; Kawamura, Ryoichi; Takata, Yasunori; Nishida, Wataru; Hashida, Seiichi; Ishii, Eiichi; Osawa, Haruhiko

    2016-05-01

    Resistin, secreted from adipocytes, causes insulin resistance in mice. In humans, the resistin gene is mainly expressed in monocytes and macrophages. Tunicamycin is known to induce endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress, and reduce resistin gene expression in 3T3-L1 mouse adipocytes. The aim of the present study was to examine whether ER stress affects resistin gene expression in human monocytes. The relationship between resistin messenger ribonucleic acid (mRNA) and ER stress markers mRNA was analyzed by reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction in isolated monocytes of 30 healthy volunteers. The effect of endotoxin/lipopolysaccharides or tunicamycin on resistin gene expression was analyzed in THP-1 human monocytes. Signaling pathways leading to resistin mRNA were assessed by the knockdown using small interfering RNA or overexpression of key molecules involved in unfolded protein response. Resistin mRNA was positively associated with immunoglobulin heavy chain-binding protein (BiP) or CAAT/enhancer binding protein-α homologous protein (CHOP) mRNA in human isolated monocytes. In THP-1 cells, lipopolysaccharides increased mRNA of BiP, pancreatic endoplasmic reticulum eukaryotic initiation factor 2α kinase (PERK) and CHOP, as well as resistin. Tunicamycin also increased resistin mRNA. This induction appeared to be dose- and time-dependent. Tunicamycin-induced resistin mRNA was inhibited by chemical chaperone, 4-phenylbutyric acid. The knockdown of either PERK, activating transcription factor 4 (ATF4) or CHOP reduced tunicamycin-induced resistin mRNA. Conversely, overexpression of ATF4 or CHOP increased resistin mRNA. Endoplasmic reticulum stress induced by tunicamycin increased resistin mRNA through the PERK-ATF4-CHOP pathway in THP-1 human monocytes. ER stress could lead to insulin resistance through enhanced resistin gene expression in human monocytes.

  13. Knock-in fibroblasts and transgenic blastocysts for expression of human FGF2 in the bovine β-casein gene locus using CRISPR/Cas9 nuclease-mediated homologous recombination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeong, Young-Hee; Kim, Yeong Ji; Kim, Eun Young; Kim, Se Eun; Kim, Jiwoo; Park, Min Jee; Lee, Hong-Gu; Park, Se Pill; Kang, Man-Jong

    2016-06-01

    Many transgenic domestic animals have been developed to produce therapeutic proteins in the mammary gland, and this approach is one of the most important methods for agricultural and biomedical applications. However, expression and secretion of a protein varies because transgenes are integrated at random sites in the genome. In addition, distal enhancers are very important for transcriptional gene regulation and tissue-specific gene expression. Development of a vector system regulated accurately in the genome is needed to improve production of therapeutic proteins. The objective of this study was to develop a knock-in system for expression of human fibroblast growth factor 2 (FGF2) in the bovine β-casein gene locus. The F2A sequence was fused to the human FGF2 gene and inserted into exon 3 of the β-casein gene. We detected expression of human FGF2 mRNA in the HC11 mouse mammary epithelial cells by RT-PCR and human FGF2 protein in the culture media using western blot analysis when the knock-in vector was introduced. We transfected the knock-in vector into bovine ear fibroblasts and produced knock-in fibroblasts using the clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats (CRISPR)/Cas9 system. Moreover, the CRISPR/Cas9 system was more efficient than conventional methods. In addition, we produced knock-in blastocysts by somatic cell nuclear transfer using the knock-in fibroblasts. Our knock-in fibroblasts may help to create cloned embryos for development of transgenic dairy cattle expressing human FGF2 protein in the mammary gland via the expression system of the bovine β-casein gene.

  14. Conservation of coevolving protein interfaces bridges prokaryote–eukaryote homologies in the twilight zone

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodriguez-Rivas, Juan; Marsili, Simone; Juan, David; Valencia, Alfonso

    2016-01-01

    Protein–protein interactions are fundamental for the proper functioning of the cell. As a result, protein interaction surfaces are subject to strong evolutionary constraints. Recent developments have shown that residue coevolution provides accurate predictions of heterodimeric protein interfaces from sequence information. So far these approaches have been limited to the analysis of families of prokaryotic complexes for which large multiple sequence alignments of homologous sequences can be compiled. We explore the hypothesis that coevolution points to structurally conserved contacts at protein–protein interfaces, which can be reliably projected to homologous complexes with distantly related sequences. We introduce a domain-centered protocol to study the interplay between residue coevolution and structural conservation of protein–protein interfaces. We show that sequence-based coevolutionary analysis systematically identifies residue contacts at prokaryotic interfaces that are structurally conserved at the interface of their eukaryotic counterparts. In turn, this allows the prediction of conserved contacts at eukaryotic protein–protein interfaces with high confidence using solely mutational patterns extracted from prokaryotic genomes. Even in the context of high divergence in sequence (the twilight zone), where standard homology modeling of protein complexes is unreliable, our approach provides sequence-based accurate information about specific details of protein interactions at the residue level. Selected examples of the application of prokaryotic coevolutionary analysis to the prediction of eukaryotic interfaces further illustrate the potential of this approach. PMID:27965389

  15. Homological mirror symmetry and tropical geometry

    CERN Document Server

    Catanese, Fabrizio; Kontsevich, Maxim; Pantev, Tony; Soibelman, Yan; Zharkov, Ilia

    2014-01-01

    The relationship between Tropical Geometry and Mirror Symmetry goes back to the work of Kontsevich and Y. Soibelman (2000), who applied methods of non-archimedean geometry (in particular, tropical curves) to Homological Mirror Symmetry. In combination with the subsequent work of Mikhalkin on the “tropical” approach to Gromov-Witten theory, and the work of Gross and Siebert, Tropical Geometry has now become a powerful tool. Homological Mirror Symmetry is the area of mathematics concentrated around several categorical equivalences connecting symplectic and holomorphic (or algebraic) geometry. The central ideas first appeared in the work of Maxim Kontsevich (1993). Roughly speaking, the subject can be approached in two ways: either one uses Lagrangian torus fibrations of Calabi-Yau manifolds (the so-called Strominger-Yau-Zaslow picture, further developed by Kontsevich and Soibelman) or one uses Lefschetz fibrations of symplectic manifolds (suggested by Kontsevich and further developed by Seidel). Tropical Ge...

  16. Human Resource Management in Selected Japanese Firms, Their Foreign Subsidiaries and Locally Owned Counterparts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jain, Hem C.

    1990-01-01

    Examines differences between Japanese and North American personnel management philosophies. Considers to what extent practices of Japanese corporations have been transferred to subsidiaries in Canada, India, Malaysia, and Singapore, compared to locally owned firms. Shows how cultural factors affect styles of personnel management. (SK)

  17. Homological characterisation of Lambda-ranks

    OpenAIRE

    Howson, Susan

    1999-01-01

    If G is a pro-p, p-adic, Lie group and if $\\Lambda(G)$ denotes the Iwasawa algebra of G then we present a formula for determining the $\\Lambda(G)$-rank of a finitely generated $\\Lambda(G)$-module. This is given in terms of the G homology groups of the module. We explore some consequences of this for the structure of $\\Lambda(G)$-modules.

  18. Surfaces with pulleys and Khovanov homology

    OpenAIRE

    Audoux, Benjamin

    2011-01-01

    International audience; In this short note, we define surfaces with pulleys which are unions of 1 and 2-dimensional manifolds, glued together on a finite number of points of their interiors. Then, by seeing them as cobordisms, we give a refinment of Bar-Natan geometrical construction of Khovanov homology which can be applied to different notions of refined links as links in I-bundle or braid-like links.

  19. Characterization of docosahexaenoic acid (DHA)-induced heme oxygenase -1 (HO-1) expression in human cancer cells: the importance of enhanced BTB and CNC homology 1 (Bach1) degradation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Shuai; Hannafon, Bethany N.; Wolf, Roman F.; Zhou, Jundong; Avery, Jori E.; Wu, Jinchang; Lind, Stuart E.; Ding, Wei-Qun

    2014-01-01

    The effect of DHA on HO-1 expression in cancer cells has never been characterized. This study examines DHA-induced HO-1 expression in human cancer cell model systems. DHA enhanced HO-1 gene expression in a time- and concentration-dependent manner, with maximal induction at 21 hours of treatment. This induction of HO-1 expression was confirmed in vivo using a xenograft nude mouse model fed a fish oil-enriched diet. The increase in HO-1 gene transcription induced by DHA was significantly attenuated by the antioxidant N-Acetyl Cysteine (NAC), suggesting the involvement of oxidative stress. This was supported by direct measurement of lipid peroxide levels after DHA treatment. Using a human HO-1 gene promoter reporter construct, we identified two antioxidant response elements (AREs) that mediate the DHA-induced increase in HO-1 gene transcription. Knockdown of nuclear factor (erythroid-derived 2)-like 2 (Nrf2) expression compromised the DHA-induced increase in HO-1 gene transcription, indicating the importance of the Nrf2 pathway in this event. However, the protein levels of Nrf2 remained unchanged upon DHA treatment. Further studies demonstrated that DHA reduces nuclear Bach1 protein expression by promoting its degradation and attenuates Bach1 binding to the AREs in the HO-1 gene promoter. In contrast, DHA enhanced Nrf2 binding to the AREs without affecting nuclear Nrf2 expression levels, indicating a new cellular mechanism that mediates DHA’s induction of HO-1 gene transcription. To our knowledge, this is the first characterization of DHA induced HO-1 expression in human malignant cells. PMID:24613086

  20. Characterization of docosahexaenoic acid (DHA)-induced heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1) expression in human cancer cells: the importance of enhanced BTB and CNC homology 1 (Bach1) degradation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Shuai; Hannafon, Bethany N; Wolf, Roman F; Zhou, Jundong; Avery, Jori E; Wu, Jinchang; Lind, Stuart E; Ding, Wei-Qun

    2014-05-01

    The effect of docosahexaenoic acid (DHA) on heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1) expression in cancer cells has never been characterized. This study examines DHA-induced HO-1 expression in human cancer cell model systems. DHA enhanced HO-1 gene expression in a time- and concentration-dependent manner, with maximal induction at 21 h of treatment. This induction of HO-1 expression was confirmed in vivo using a xenograft nude mouse model fed a fish-oil-enriched diet. The increase in HO-1 gene transcription induced by DHA was significantly attenuated by the antioxidant N-acetyl cysteine, suggesting the involvement of oxidative stress. This was supported by direct measurement of lipid peroxide levels after DHA treatment. Using a human HO-1 gene promoter reporter construct, we identified two antioxidant response elements (AREs) that mediate the DHA-induced increase in HO-1 gene transcription. Knockdown of nuclear factor (erythroid-derived 2)-like 2 (Nrf2) expression compromised the DHA-induced increase in HO-1 gene transcription, indicating the importance of the Nrf2 pathway in this event. However, the nuclear protein levels of Nrf2 remained unchanged upon DHA treatment. Further studies demonstrated that DHA reduces nuclear Bach1 protein expression by promoting its degradation and attenuates Bach1 binding to the AREs in the HO-1 gene promoter. In contrast, DHA enhanced Nrf2 binding to the AREs without affecting nuclear Nrf2 expression levels, indicating a new cellular mechanism that mediates DHA's induction of HO-1 gene transcription. To our knowledge, this is the first characterization of DHA-induced HO-1 expression in human malignant cells. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Clover calculus for homology 3-spheres via basic algebraic topology

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Auclair, Emmanuel; Lescop, Christine

    2005-01-01

    We present an alternative definition for the Goussarov--Habiro filtration of the Z-module freely generated by oriented integral homology 3-spheres, by means of Lagrangian-preserving homology handlebody replacements (LP-surgeries...

  2. Massive scalar counterpart of gravitational waves in scalarized neutron star binaries

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Jing [Sun Yat-sen University, School of Physics and Astronomy, Guangzhou (China)

    2017-09-15

    In analogy with spontaneous magnetization of ferromagnets below the Curie temperature, a neutron star (NS), with a compactness above a certain critical value, may undergo spontaneous scalarization and exhibit an interior nontrivial scalar configuration. Consequently, the exterior spacetime is changed, and an external scalar field appears, which subsequently triggers a scalarization of its companion. The dynamical interplay produces a gravitational scalar counterpart of tensor gravitational waves. In this paper, we resort to scalar-tensor theory and demonstrate that the gravitational scalar counterpart from a double neutron star (DNS) and a neutron star-white dwarf (NS-WD) system become massive. We report that (1) a gravitational scalar background field, arising from convergence of external scalar fields, plays the role of gravitational scalar counterpart in scalarized DNS binary, and the appearance of a mass-dimensional constant in a Higgs-like gravitational scalar potential is responsible for a massive gravitational scalar counterpart with a mass of the order of the Planck scale; (2) a dipolar gravitational scalar radiated field, resulting from differing binding energies of NS and WD, plays the role of a gravitational scalar counterpart in scalarized orbital shrinking NS-WDs, which oscillates around a local and scalar-energy-density-dependent minimum of the gravitational scalar potential and obtains a mass of the order of about 10{sup -21} eV/c{sup 2}. (orig.)

  3. Massive scalar counterpart of gravitational waves in scalarized neutron star binaries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Jing

    2017-09-01

    In analogy with spontaneous magnetization of ferromagnets below the Curie temperature, a neutron star (NS), with a compactness above a certain critical value, may undergo spontaneous scalarization and exhibit an interior nontrivial scalar configuration. Consequently, the exterior spacetime is changed, and an external scalar field appears, which subsequently triggers a scalarization of its companion. The dynamical interplay produces a gravitational scalar counterpart of tensor gravitational waves. In this paper, we resort to scalar-tensor theory and demonstrate that the gravitational scalar counterpart from a double neutron star (DNS) and a neutron star-white dwarf (NS-WD) system become massive. We report that (1) a gravitational scalar background field, arising from convergence of external scalar fields, plays the role of gravitational scalar counterpart in scalarized DNS binary, and the appearance of a mass-dimensional constant in a Higgs-like gravitational scalar potential is responsible for a massive gravitational scalar counterpart with a mass of the order of the Planck scale; (2) a dipolar gravitational scalar radiated field, resulting from differing binding energies of NS and WD, plays the role of a gravitational scalar counterpart in scalarized orbital shrinking NS-WDs, which oscillates around a local and scalar-energy-density-dependent minimum of the gravitational scalar potential and obtains a mass of the order of about 10^{-21} { {eV/c}}^2.

  4. Observations of the First Electromagnetic Counterpart to a Gravitational-wave Source by the TOROS Collaboration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Díaz, M. C.; Macri, L. M.; Garcia Lambas, D.; Mendes de Oliveira, C.; Nilo Castellón, J. L.; Ribeiro, T.; Sánchez, B.; Schoenell, W.; Abramo, L. R.; Akras, S.; Alcaniz, J. S.; Artola, R.; Beroiz, M.; Bonoli, S.; Cabral, J.; Camuccio, R.; Castillo, M.; Chavushyan, V.; Coelho, P.; Colazo, C.; Costa-Duarte, M. V.; Cuevas Larenas, H.; DePoy, D. L.; Domínguez Romero, M.; Dultzin, D.; Fernández, D.; García, J.; Girardini, C.; Gonçalves, D. R.; Gonçalves, T. S.; Gurovich, S.; Jiménez-Teja, Y.; Kanaan, A.; Lares, M.; Lopes de Oliveira, R.; López-Cruz, O.; Marshall, J. L.; Melia, R.; Molino, A.; Padilla, N.; Peñuela, T.; Placco, V. M.; Quiñones, C.; Ramírez Rivera, A.; Renzi, V.; Riguccini, L.; Ríos-López, E.; Rodriguez, H.; Sampedro, L.; Schneiter, M.; Sodré, L.; Starck, M.; Torres-Flores, S.; Tornatore, M.; Zadrożny, A.

    2017-10-01

    We present the results of prompt optical follow-up of the electromagnetic counterpart of the gravitational-wave event GW170817 by the Transient Optical Robotic Observatory of the South Collaboration. We detected highly significant dimming in the light curves of the counterpart ({{Δ }}g=0.17+/- 0.03 mag, {{Δ }}r=0.14+/- 0.02 mag, {{Δ }}I=0.10+/- 0.03 mag) over the course of only 80 minutes of observations obtained ˜35 hr after the trigger with the T80-South telescope. A second epoch of observations, obtained ˜59 hr after the event with the EABA 1.5 m telescope, confirms the fast fading nature of the transient. The observed colors of the counterpart suggest that this event was a “blue kilonova” relatively free of lanthanides.

  5. Results from GROCSE I: A real-time search for gamma ray burst optical counterparts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, B.; Akerlof, C.; Ables, E.; Bionta, R. M.; Ott, L.; Park, H. S.; Parker, E.; Barthelmy, S.; Butterworth, P.; Cline, T.

    1995-01-01

    The GROCSE I experiment (Gamma-Ray Optical Counterpart Search Experiment) is a rapid slewing wide field of view optical telescope at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory which responds to triggers from the BATSE GRB data telemetry stream that have been processed and distributed by the BACODINE network. GROCSE 1 has been in continuous automated operation since January 1994. As of October 1995, sky images for 22 GRB triggers have been recorded, in some cases while the burst was still emitting gamma rays. The preliminary analysis of eight of these events are presented here. No optical counterparts have yet been detected. Limits for optical emission are given.

  6. Homology Modelling of the GABA Transporter and Analysis of Tiagabine Binding

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Skovstrup, S.; Taboureau, Olivier; Bräuner-Osborne, H.

    2010-01-01

    A homology model of the human GABA transporter (GAT-1) based on the recently reported crystal structures of the bacterial leucine transporter from Aquifex aeolicus (LeuT) was developed. The stability of the resulting model embedded in a membrane environment was analyzed by extensive molecular...

  7. A PHF8 homolog in C. elegans promotes DNA repair via homologous recombination.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Changrim Lee

    Full Text Available PHF8 is a JmjC domain-containing histone demethylase, defects in which are associated with X-linked mental retardation. In this study, we examined the roles of two PHF8 homologs, JMJD-1.1 and JMJD-1.2, in the model organism C. elegans in response to DNA damage. A deletion mutation in either of the genes led to hypersensitivity to interstrand DNA crosslinks (ICLs, while only mutation of jmjd-1.1 resulted in hypersensitivity to double-strand DNA breaks (DSBs. In response to ICLs, JMJD-1.1 did not affect the focus formation of FCD-2, a homolog of FANCD2, a key protein in the Fanconi anemia pathway. However, the dynamic behavior of RPA-1 and RAD-51 was affected by the mutation: the accumulations of both proteins at ICLs appeared normal, but their subsequent disappearance was retarded, suggesting that later steps of homologous recombination were defective. Similar changes in the dynamic behavior of RPA-1 and RAD-51 were seen in response to DSBs, supporting a role of JMJD-1.1 in homologous recombination. Such a role was also supported by our finding that the hypersensitivity of jmjd-1.1 worms to ICLs was rescued by knockdown of lig-4, a homolog of Ligase 4 active in nonhomologous end-joining. The hypersensitivity of jmjd-1.1 worms to ICLs was increased by rad-54 knockdown, suggesting that JMJD-1.1 acts in parallel with RAD-54 in modulating chromatin structure. Indeed, the level of histone H3 Lys9 tri-methylation, a marker of heterochromatin, was higher in jmjd-1.1 cells than in wild-type cells. We conclude that the histone demethylase JMJD-1.1 influences homologous recombination either by relaxing heterochromatin structure or by indirectly regulating the expression of multiple genes affecting DNA repair.

  8. Homological Perturbation Theory for Nonperturbative Integrals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson-Freyd, Theo

    2015-11-01

    We use the homological perturbation lemma to produce explicit formulas computing the class in the twisted de Rham complex represented by an arbitrary polynomial. This is a non-asymptotic version of the method of Feynman diagrams. In particular, we explain that phenomena usually thought of as particular to asymptotic integrals in fact also occur exactly: integrals of the type appearing in quantum field theory can be reduced in a totally algebraic fashion to integrals over an Euler-Lagrange locus, provided this locus is understood in the scheme-theoretic sense, so that imaginary critical points and multiplicities of degenerate critical points contribute.

  9. Genetic Homologies Among Streptomyces violaceoruber Strains

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monson, A. M.; Bradley, S. G.; Enquist, L. W.; Cruces, Griselda

    1969-01-01

    Most of the genetic studies on streptomycetes have been done with cultures erroneously designated as Streptomyces coelicolor. To determine whether these cultures are genetically homologous with the S. violaceoruber nominifer, their deoxyribonucleic acids (DNA) were analyzed, and selected pairs of mutants were crossed. The four cultures used in genetic studies, and called S. coelicolor in the literature, were found to constitute a genospecies, based upon DNA hybridization and recombination tests. In addition, DNA from Actinopycnidium caeruleum formed extensive duplexes with S. violaceoruber DNA. S. violaceoruber cultures and A. caeruleum were distinctly different from the S. coelicolor nominifer. PMID:5370275

  10. Railway vehicle performance optimisation using virtual homologation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Magalhães, H.; Madeira, J. F. A.; Ambrósio, J.; Pombo, J.

    2016-09-01

    Unlike regular automotive vehicles, which are designed to travel in different types of roads, railway vehicles travel mostly in the same route during their life cycle. To accept the operation of a railway vehicle in a particular network, a homologation process is required according to local standard regulations. In Europe, the standards EN 14363 and UIC 518, which are used for railway vehicle acceptance, require on-track tests and/or numerical simulations. An important advantage of using virtual homologation is the reduction of the high costs associated with on-track tests by studying the railway vehicle performance in different operation conditions. This work proposes a methodology for the improvement of railway vehicle design with the objective of its operation in selected railway tracks by using optimisation. The analyses required for the vehicle improvement are performed under control of the optimisation method global and local optimisation using direct search. To quantify the performance of the vehicle, a new objective function is proposed, which includes: a Dynamic Performance Index, defined as a weighted sum of the indices obtained from the virtual homologation process; the non-compensated acceleration, which is related to the operational velocity; and a penalty associated with cases where the vehicle presents an unacceptable dynamic behaviour according to the standards. Thus, the optimisation process intends not only to improve the quality of the vehicle in terms of running safety and ride quality, but also to increase the vehicle availability via the reduction of the time for a journey while ensuring its operational acceptance under the standards. The design variables include the suspension characteristics and the operational velocity of the vehicle, which are allowed to vary in an acceptable range of variation. The results of the optimisation lead to a global minimum of the objective function in which the suspensions characteristics of the vehicle are

  11. Excluded volume effect enhances the homology pairing of model chromosomes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takamiya, Kazunori; Yamamoto, Keisuke; Isami, Shuhei; Nishimori, Hiraku; Awazu, Akinori

    To investigate the structural dynamics of the homology pairing of polymers, we mod- eled the scenario of homologous chromosome pairings during meiosis in Schizosaccharomyces pombe, one of the simplest model organisms of eukaryotes. We consider a simple model consist- ing of pairs of homologous polymers with the same structures that are confined in a cylindrical container, which represents the local parts of chromosomes contained in an elongated nucleus of S. pombe. Brownian dynamics simulations of this model showed that the excluded volume effects among non-homological chromosomes and the transitional dynamics of nuclear shape serve to enhance the pairing of homologous chromosomes.

  12. The medial preoptic and anterior hypothalamic regions of the rhesus monkey: cytoarchitectonic comparison with the human and evidence for sexual dimorphism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Byne, W

    1998-05-18

    Examination of thionin-stained sections through the hypothalamus of the rhesus monkey revealed nuclei that resemble the first, second and third interstitial nuclei of the anterior hypothalamus (INAH1-3) of the human. Volumetric analysis of these nuclei in a small sample of monkeys suggests that the nucleus that resembles INAH3 is larger in males than in females. INAH1-3 have each been reported to be larger in men than in women and each has been considered as a potential candidate for homology with the much-studied sexually dimorphic nucleus of the preoptic area (SDN-POA) of the rat. Positional and cytoarchitectonic criteria suggest that of these nuclei, INAH3 and its potential counterpart in the rhesus monkey are the best candidates for homology with the SDN-POA. While the criteria employed in the present study may be used to suggest homologies, they are not adequate to confirm them. Confirmation of the homologies suggested here must rely on other considerations such as connectivity, neurotransmitter and peptide content, and function. It is hoped that the present report will stimulate interest in further examinations of the rhesus hypothalamus that will test both the suggested homologies and the evidence for sexual dimorphism. Copyright 1998 Elsevier Science B.V.

  13. Towards alignment independent quantitative assessment of homology detection.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Avihay Apatoff

    Full Text Available Identification of homologous proteins provides a basis for protein annotation. Sequence alignment tools reliably identify homologs sharing high sequence similarity. However, identification of homologs that share low sequence similarity remains a challenge. Lowering the cutoff value could enable the identification of diverged homologs, but also introduces numerous false hits. Methods are being continuously developed to minimize this problem. Estimation of the fraction of homologs in a set of protein alignments can help in the assessment and development of such methods, and provides the users with intuitive quantitative assessment of protein alignment results. Herein, we present a computational approach that estimates the amount of homologs in a set of protein pairs. The method requires a prevalent and detectable protein feature that is conserved between homologs. By analyzing the feature prevalence in a set of pairwise protein alignments, the method can estimate the number of homolog pairs in the set independently of the alignments' quality. Using the HomoloGene database as a standard of truth, we implemented this approach in a proteome-wide analysis. The results revealed that this approach, which is independent of the alignments themselves, works well for estimating the number of homologous proteins in a wide range of homology values. In summary, the presented method can accompany homology searches and method development, provides validation to search results, and allows tuning of tools and methods.

  14. [Homologous amelogenin gene test of archaeological samples].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Hu-Qin; Yang, Zhou-Qi; Liu, Fang-E; Zhang, Jin; Zhao, Wen-Ming

    2006-06-01

    Based on the sequence differences of Amelogenin homologous gene in the X and Y chromosomes, a pair of specific primers was designed to identify the sex of archaeological samples. Ancient DNA fragments were extracted from the bones and teeth of sacrificial slaves with an improved method that combines phenol-chloroform extraction, silicon dioxide adsorption with ultrafiltration concentration. The polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (PAGE) was used to detect PCR products. Seven in sixteen samples from eight graves showed positive results and the targeted segments were visible: a male with two bands of 106bp (Amel-X) and 112 bp (Amel-Y), while a female with only one band of 106 bp (Amel-X). Ancient DNA analyzing results from tooth samples are more marked than that from bones. The improved extraction method is more effective for ancient DNA extraction, which reduced the PCR inhibitors and lowered experimental costs. The sex determination technology based on Amelogenin homologous gene is an important and feasible method in the molecular archaeological research.

  15. Cyclic Fatigue Resistance of 3 Proprietary Rotary File Brands and their Analogous EdgeEndo Counterparts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2018-04-26

    PROJECT NUMBER Maj Weyh, David 5e. TASK NUMBER 5f. WORK UNIT NUMBER 7. PERFORMING ORGANIZATION NAME(S) AND ADDRESS(ES) 8. PERFORMING ORGANIZATION...resistance of proprietary files versus their EdgeEndo counterparts were identified. Acknowledgements: Maj David H. Weyh, DDS, Resident, Air Force

  16. Stability patterns for a size-structured population model and its stage-structured counterpart

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zhang, Lai; Pedersen, Michael; Lin, Zhigui

    2015-01-01

    In this paper we compare a general size-structured population model, where a size-structured consumer feeds upon an unstructured resource, to its simplified stage-structured counterpart in terms of equilibrium stability. Stability of the size-structured model is understood in terms of an equivale...... to the population level....

  17. Conservation of context-dependent splicing activity in distant Muscleblind homologs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oddo, Julia C; Saxena, Tanvi; McConnell, Ona L; Berglund, J Andrew; Wang, Eric T

    2016-09-30

    The Muscleblind (MBL) protein family is a deeply conserved family of RNA binding proteins that regulate alternative splicing, alternative polyadenylation, RNA stability and RNA localization. Their inactivation due to sequestration by expanded CUG repeats causes symptoms in the neuromuscular disease myotonic dystrophy. MBL zinc fingers are the most highly conserved portion of these proteins, and directly interact with RNA. We identified putative MBL homologs in Ciona intestinalis and Trichoplax adhaerens, and investigated their ability, as well as that of MBL homologs from human/mouse, fly and worm, to regulate alternative splicing. We found that all homologs can regulate alternative splicing in mouse cells, with some regulating over 100 events. The cis-elements through which each homolog exerts its splicing activities are likely to be highly similar to mammalian Muscleblind-like proteins (MBNLs), as suggested by motif analyses and the ability of expanded CUG repeats to inactivate homolog-mediated splicing. While regulation of specific target exons by MBL/MBNL has not been broadly conserved across these species, genes enriched for MBL/MBNL binding sites in their introns may play roles in cell adhesion, ion transport and axon guidance, among other biological pathways, suggesting a specific, conserved role for these proteins across a broad range of metazoan species. © The Author(s) 2016. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Nucleic Acids Research.

  18. Comparative functional analysis of ribonuclease 1 homologs: molecular insights into evolving vertebrate physiology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lomax, Jo E; Eller, Chelcie H; Raines, Ronald T

    2017-06-21

    Pancreatic-type ribonucleases (ptRNases) comprise a class of highly conserved secretory endoribonucleases in vertebrates. The prototype of this enzyme family is ribonuclease 1 (RNase 1). Understanding the physiological roles of RNase 1 is becoming increasingly important, as engineered forms of the enzyme progress through clinical trials as chemotherapeutic agents for cancer. Here, we present an in-depth biochemical characterization of RNase 1 homologs from a broad range of mammals (human, bat, squirrel, horse, cat, mouse, and cow) and nonmammalian species (chicken, lizard, and frog). We discover that the human homolog of RNase 1 has a pH optimum for catalysis, ability to degrade double-stranded RNA, and affinity for cell-surface glycans that are distinctly higher than those of its homologs. These attributes have relevance for human health. Moreover, the functional diversification of the 10 RNase 1 homologs illuminates the regulation of extracellular RNA and other aspects of vertebrate evolution. © 2017 The Author(s); published by Portland Press Limited on behalf of the Biochemical Society.

  19. Premerger Localization of Gravitational Wave Standard Sirens with LISA: Triggered Search for an Electromagnetic Counterpart

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kocsis, Bence; Haiman, Zoltán; Menou, Kristen

    2008-09-01

    Electromagnetic (EM) counterparts to SMBH binary mergers observed by LISA can be localized to within the field of view of astronomical instruments (~10 deg2) hours to weeks prior to coalescence. The temporal coincidence of any prompt EM counterpart with a gravitationally timed merger may offer the best chance of identifying a unique host galaxy. We discuss the challenges posed by searches for such prompt EM counterparts and propose novel observational strategies to address them. In particular, we discuss the size and shape evolution of the LISA localization error ellipses on the sky and quantify the corresponding requirements for dedicated EM surveys of the area prior to coalescence. A triggered EM counterpart search campaign will require monitoring a several square degree area. It could aim for variability at the 24-27 mag level in optical bands, for example, which corresponds to 1%-10% of the Eddington luminosity of the prime LISA sources of ~106-107 M⊙ BHs at z = 1-2, on timescales of minutes to hours, the orbital timescale of the binary in the last 2-4 weeks of coalescence. A cross-correlation of the period of any variable EM signal with the quasi-periodic gravitational waveform over 10-1000 cycles may aid the detection. Alternatively, EM searches can detect a transient signal accompanying the coalescence. The triggered searches will be ambitious, but if they successfully identify a unique prompt EM counterpart, they will enable new fundamental tests of gravitational physics. We highlight the measurement of differences in the arrival times of photons and gravitons from the same cosmological source as a valuable independent test of the massive character of gravity and of possible violations of Lorentz invariance in the gravity sector.

  20. Productive homologous and non-homologous recombination of hepatitis C virus in cell culture

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Scheel, Troels K H; Galli, Andrea; Li, Yi-Ping

    2013-01-01

    -genotypic recombination could occur, but at a lower frequency than intra-genotypic recombination. Productive recombination of attenuated HCV genomes depended on expression of all HCV proteins and tolerated duplicated sequence. In general, no strong site specificity was observed. Non-homologous recombination was observed...

  1. Two zebrafish G2A homologs activate multiple intracellular signaling pathways in acidic environment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ichijo, Yuta; Mochimaru, Yuta [Laboratory of Cell Signaling Regulation, Department of Life Sciences, School of Agriculture, Meiji University, Kawasaki 214-8571 (Japan); Azuma, Morio [Laboratory of Regulatory Biology, Graduate School of Science and Engineering, University of Toyama, 3190-Gofuku, Toyama 930-8555 (Japan); Satou, Kazuhiro; Negishi, Jun [Laboratory of Cell Signaling Regulation, Department of Life Sciences, School of Agriculture, Meiji University, Kawasaki 214-8571 (Japan); Nakakura, Takashi [Department of Anatomy, Graduate School of Medicine, Teikyo University, 2-11-1 Itabashi-Ku, Tokyo 173-8605 (Japan); Oshima, Natsuki [Laboratory of Cell Signaling Regulation, Department of Life Sciences, School of Agriculture, Meiji University, Kawasaki 214-8571 (Japan); Mogi, Chihiro; Sato, Koichi [Laboratory of Signal Transduction, Institute for Molecular and Cellular Regulation, Gunma University, Maebashi 371-8512 (Japan); Matsuda, Kouhei [Laboratory of Regulatory Biology, Graduate School of Science and Engineering, University of Toyama, 3190-Gofuku, Toyama 930-8555 (Japan); Okajima, Fumikazu [Laboratory of Signal Transduction, Institute for Molecular and Cellular Regulation, Gunma University, Maebashi 371-8512 (Japan); Tomura, Hideaki, E-mail: tomurah@meiji.ac.jp [Laboratory of Cell Signaling Regulation, Department of Life Sciences, School of Agriculture, Meiji University, Kawasaki 214-8571 (Japan)

    2016-01-01

    Human G2A is activated by various stimuli such as lysophosphatidylcholine (LPC), 9-hydroxyoctadecadienoic acid (9-HODE), and protons. The receptor is coupled to multiple intracellular signaling pathways, including the G{sub s}-protein/cAMP/CRE, G{sub 12/13}-protein/Rho/SRE, and G{sub q}-protein/phospholipase C/NFAT pathways. In the present study, we examined whether zebrafish G2A homologs (zG2A-a and zG2A-b) could respond to these stimuli and activate multiple intracellular signaling pathways. We also examined whether histidine residue and basic amino acid residue in the N-terminus of the homologs also play roles similar to those played by human G2A residues if the homologs sense protons. We found that the zG2A-a showed the high CRE, SRE, and NFAT activities, however, zG2A-b showed only the high SRE activity under a pH of 8.0. Extracellular acidification from pH 7.4 to 6.3 ameliorated these activities in zG2A-a-expressing cells. On the other hand, acidification ameliorated the SRE activity but not the CRE and NFAT activities in zG2A-b-expressing cells. LPC or 9-HODE did not modify any activity of either homolog. The substitution of histidine residue at the 174{sup th} position from the N-terminus of zG2A-a to asparagine residue attenuated proton-induced CRE and NFAT activities but not SRE activity. The substitution of arginine residue at the 32nd position from the N-terminus of zG2A-a to the alanine residue also attenuated its high and the proton-induced CRE and NFAT activities. On the contrary, the substitution did not attenuate SRE activity. The substitution of the arginine residue at the 10th position from the N-terminus of zG2A-b to the alanine residue also did not attenuate its high or the proton-induced SRE activity. These results indicate that zebrafish G2A homologs were activated by protons but not by LPC and 9-HODE, and the activation mechanisms of the homologs were similar to those of human G2A. - Highlights: • Zebrafish two G2A homologs are proton

  2. Clustering evolving proteins into homologous families.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chan, Cheong Xin; Mahbob, Maisarah; Ragan, Mark A

    2013-04-08

    Clustering sequences into groups of putative homologs (families) is a critical first step in many areas of comparative biology and bioinformatics. The performance of clustering approaches in delineating biologically meaningful families depends strongly on characteristics of the data, including content bias and degree of divergence. New, highly scalable methods have recently been introduced to cluster the very large datasets being generated by next-generation sequencing technologies. However, there has been little systematic investigation of how characteristics of the data impact the performance of these approaches. Using clusters from a manually curated dataset as reference, we examined the performance of a widely used graph-based Markov clustering algorithm (MCL) and a greedy heuristic approach (UCLUST) in delineating protein families coded by three sets of bacterial genomes of different G+C content. Both MCL and UCLUST generated clusters that are comparable to the reference sets at specific parameter settings, although UCLUST tends to under-cluster compositionally biased sequences (G+C content 33% and 66%). Using simulated data, we sought to assess the individual effects of sequence divergence, rate heterogeneity, and underlying G+C content. Performance decreased with increasing sequence divergence, decreasing among-site rate variation, and increasing G+C bias. Two MCL-based methods recovered the simulated families more accurately than did UCLUST. MCL using local alignment distances is more robust across the investigated range of sequence features than are greedy heuristics using distances based on global alignment. Our results demonstrate that sequence divergence, rate heterogeneity and content bias can individually and in combination affect the accuracy with which MCL and UCLUST can recover homologous protein families. For application to data that are more divergent, and exhibit higher among-site rate variation and/or content bias, MCL may often be the better

  3. Modeling Non-homologous End Joining

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yongfeng

    2013-01-01

    Non-homologous end joining (NHEJ) is the dominant DNA double strand break (DSB) repair pathway and involves several NHEJ proteins such as Ku, DNA-PKcs, XRCC4, Ligase IV and so on. Once DSBs are generated, Ku is first recruited to the DNA end, followed by other NHEJ proteins for DNA end processing and ligation. Because of the direct ligation of break ends without the need for a homologous template, NHEJ turns out to be an error-prone but efficient repair pathway. Some mechanisms have been proposed of how the efficiency of NHEJ repair is affected. The type of DNA damage is an important factor of NHEJ repair. For instance, the length of DNA fragment may determine the recruitment efficiency of NHEJ protein such as Ku [1], or the complexity of the DNA breaks [2] is accounted for the choice of NHEJ proteins and subpathway of NHEJ repair. On the other hand, the chromatin structure also plays a role of the accessibility of NHEJ protein to the DNA damage site. In this talk, some mathematical models of NHEJ, that consist of series of biochemical reactions complying with the laws of chemical reaction (e.g. mass action, etc.), will be introduced. By mathematical and numerical analysis and parameter estimation, the models are able to capture the qualitative biological features and show good agreement with experimental data. As conclusions, from the viewpoint of modeling, how the NHEJ proteins are recruited will be first discussed for connection between the classical sequential model [4] and recently proposed two-phase model [5]. Then how the NHEJ repair pathway is affected, by the length of DNA fragment [6], the complexity of DNA damage [7] and the chromatin structure [8], will be addressed

  4. Whole genome analysis of CRISPR Cas9 sgRNA off-target homologies via an efficient computational algorithm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Hong; Zhou, Michael; Li, Daisy; Manthey, Joseph; Lioutikova, Ekaterina; Wang, Hong; Zeng, Xiao

    2017-11-17

    The beauty and power of the genome editing mechanism, CRISPR Cas9 endonuclease system, lies in the fact that it is RNA-programmable such that Cas9 can be guided to any genomic loci complementary to a 20-nt RNA, single guide RNA (sgRNA), to cleave double stranded DNA, allowing the introduction of wanted mutations. Unfortunately, it has been reported repeatedly that the sgRNA can also guide Cas9 to off-target sites where the DNA sequence is homologous to sgRNA. Using human genome and Streptococcus pyogenes Cas9 (SpCas9) as an example, this article mathematically analyzed the probabilities of off-target homologies of sgRNAs and discovered that for large genome size such as human genome, potential off-target homologies are inevitable for sgRNA selection. A highly efficient computationl algorithm was developed for whole genome sgRNA design and off-target homology searches. By means of a dynamically constructed sequence-indexed database and a simplified sequence alignment method, this algorithm achieves very high efficiency while guaranteeing the identification of all existing potential off-target homologies. Via this algorithm, 1,876,775 sgRNAs were designed for the 19,153 human mRNA genes and only two sgRNAs were found to be free of off-target homology. By means of the novel and efficient sgRNA homology search algorithm introduced in this article, genome wide sgRNA design and off-target analysis were conducted and the results confirmed the mathematical analysis that for a sgRNA sequence, it is almost impossible to escape potential off-target homologies. Future innovations on the CRISPR Cas9 gene editing technology need to focus on how to eliminate the Cas9 off-target activity.

  5. peripheral location of the human late x and"? homologous ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    have now performed this type of analysis on H3-thyn1idine radioautographs, a ... quantitative study of the location of the inactive X has not to our knowledge yet ... With the use of simple random sampling methods a group of 25 metaphases.

  6. Comparative homology modeling of human rhodopsin with several ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Yomi

    2012-01-05

    Jan 5, 2012 ... Earlier work on rhodopsin had revealed the organization of this protein at low resolution 7.5 Å in .... neuroscience. However, more molecular information is needed to understand how rhodopsin and other GPCRs are activated. With the progress in determination of the rhodopsin structure, Teller et al. (2001) ...

  7. High-Risk Alphapapillomavirus Oncogenes Impair the Homologous Recombination Pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wallace, Nicholas A; Khanal, Sujita; Robinson, Kristin L; Wendel, Sebastian O; Messer, Joshua J; Galloway, Denise A

    2017-10-15

    Persistent high-risk genus human Alphapapillomavirus (HPV) infections cause nearly every cervical carcinoma and a subset of tumors in the oropharyngeal tract. During the decades required for HPV-associated tumorigenesis, the cellular genome becomes significantly destabilized. Our analysis of cervical tumors from four separate data sets found a significant upregulation of the homologous-recombination (HR) pathway genes. The increased abundance of HR proteins can be replicated in primary cells by expression of the two HPV oncogenes (E6 and E7) required for HPV-associated transformation. HPV E6 and E7 also enhanced the ability of HR proteins to form repair foci, and yet both E6 and E7 reduce the ability of the HR pathway to complete double-strand break (DSB) repair by about 50%. The HPV oncogenes hinder HR by allowing the process to begin at points in the cell cycle when the lack of a sister chromatid to serve as a homologous template prevents completion of the repair. Further, HPV E6 attenuates repair by causing RAD51 to be mislocalized away from both transient and persistent DSBs, whereas HPV E7 is only capable of impairing RAD51 localization to transient lesions. Finally, we show that the inability to robustly repair DSBs causes some of these lesions to be more persistent, a phenotype that correlates with increased integration of episomal DNA. Together, these data support our hypothesis that HPV oncogenes contribute to the genomic instability observed in HPV-associated malignancies by attenuating the repair of damaged DNA.IMPORTANCE This study expands the understanding of HPV biology, establishing a direct role for both HPV E6 and E7 in the destabilization of the host genome by blocking the homologous repair of DSBs. To our knowledge, this is the first time that both viral oncogenes were shown to disrupt this DSB repair pathway. We show that HPV E6 and E7 allow HR to initiate at an inappropriate part of the cell cycle. The mislocalization of RAD51 away from DSBs in

  8. The Mitochondrial DNA-Associated Protein SWIB5 Influences mtDNA Architecture and Homologous Recombination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blomme, Jonas; Van Aken, Olivier; Van Leene, Jelle; Jégu, Teddy; De Rycke, Riet; De Bruyne, Michiel; Vercruysse, Jasmien; Nolf, Jonah; Van Daele, Twiggy; De Milde, Liesbeth; Vermeersch, Mattias; des Francs-Small, Catherine Colas; De Jaeger, Geert; Benhamed, Moussa; Millar, A Harvey; Inzé, Dirk; Gonzalez, Nathalie

    2017-05-01

    In addition to the nucleus, mitochondria and chloroplasts in plant cells also contain genomes. Efficient DNA repair pathways are crucial in these organelles to fix damage resulting from endogenous and exogenous factors. Plant organellar genomes are complex compared with their animal counterparts, and although several plant-specific mediators of organelle DNA repair have been reported, many regulators remain to be identified. Here, we show that a mitochondrial SWI/SNF (nucleosome remodeling) complex B protein, SWIB5, is capable of associating with mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) in Arabidopsis thaliana Gain- and loss-of-function mutants provided evidence for a role of SWIB5 in influencing mtDNA architecture and homologous recombination at specific intermediate-sized repeats both under normal and genotoxic conditions. SWIB5 interacts with other mitochondrial SWIB proteins. Gene expression and mutant phenotypic analysis of SWIB5 and SWIB family members suggests a link between organellar genome maintenance and cell proliferation. Taken together, our work presents a protein family that influences mtDNA architecture and homologous recombination in plants and suggests a link between organelle functioning and plant development. © 2017 American Society of Plant Biologists. All rights reserved.

  9. The role of Deinococcus radiodurans RecFOR proteins in homologous recombination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Satoh, Katsuya; Kikuchi, Masahiro; Ishaque, Abu M; Ohba, Hirofumi; Yamada, Mitsugu; Tejima, Kouhei; Onodera, Takefumi; Narumi, Issay

    2012-04-01

    Deinococcus radiodurans exhibits extraordinary resistance to the lethal effect of DNA-damaging agents, a characteristic attributed to its highly proficient DNA repair capacity. Although the D. radiodurans genome is clearly devoid of recBC and addAB counterparts as RecA mediators, the genome possesses all genes associated with the RecFOR pathway. In an effort to gain insights into the role of D. radiodurans RecFOR proteins in homologous recombination, we generated recF, recO and recR disruptant strains and characterized the disruption effects. All the disruptant strains exhibited delayed growth relative to the wild-type, indicating that the RecF, RecO and RecR proteins play an important role in cell growth under normal growth conditions. A slight reduction in transformation efficiency was observed in the recF and recO disruptant strains compared to the wild-type strain. Interestingly, disruption of recR resulted in severe reduction of the transformation efficiency. On the other hand, the recF disruptant strain was the most sensitive phenotype to γ rays, UV irradiation and mitomycin C among the three disruptants. In the recF disruptant strain, the intracellular level of the LexA1 protein did not decrease following γ irradiation, suggesting that a large amount of the RecA protein remains inactive despite being induced. These results demonstrate that the RecF protein plays a crucial role in the homologous recombination repair process by facilitating RecA activation in D. radiodurans. Thus, the RecF and RecR proteins are involved in the RecA activation and the stability of incoming DNA, respectively, during RecA-mediated homologous recombination processes that initiated the ESDSA pathway in D. radiodurans. Possible mechanisms that involve the RecFOR complex in homologous intermolecular recombination and homologous recombination repair processes are also discussed. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. Analyses of homologous rotavirus infection in the mouse model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burns, J W; Krishnaney, A A; Vo, P T; Rouse, R V; Anderson, L J; Greenberg, H B

    1995-02-20

    The group A rotaviruses are significant human and veterinary pathogens in terms of morbidity, mortality, and economic loss. Despite its importance, an effective vaccine remains elusive due at least in part to our incomplete understanding of rotavirus immunity and protection. Both large and small animal model systems have been established to address these issues. One significant drawback of these models is the lack of well-characterized wild-type homologous viruses and their cell culture-adapted variants. We have characterized four strains of murine rotaviruses, EC, EHP, EL, and EW, in the infant and adult mouse model using wild-type isolates and cell culture-adapted variants of each strain. Wild-type murine rotaviruses appear to be equally infectious in infant and adult mice in terms of the intensity and duration of virus shedding following primary infection. Spread of infection to naive cagemates is seen in both age groups. Clearance of shedding following primary infection appears to correlate with the development of virus-specific intestinal IgA. Protective immunity is developed in both infant and adult mice following oral infection as demonstrated by a lack of shedding after subsequent wild-type virus challenge. Cell culture-adapted murine rotaviruses appear to be highly attenuated when administered to naive animals and do not spread efficiently to nonimmune cagemates. The availability of these wild-type and cell culture-adapted virus preparations should allow a more systematic evaluation of rotavirus infection and immunity. Furthermore, future vaccine strategies can be evaluated in the mouse model using several fully virulent homologous viruses for challenge.

  11. Inhibition of homologous recombination with vorinostat synergistically enhances ganciclovir cytotoxicity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ladd, Brendon; Ackroyd, Jeffrey J; Hicks, J Kevin; Canman, Christine E; Flanagan, Sheryl A; Shewach, Donna S

    2013-12-01

    The nucleoside analog ganciclovir (GCV) elicits cytotoxicity in tumor cells via a novel mechanism in which drug incorporation into DNA produces minimal disruption of replication, but numerous DNA double strand breaks occur during the second S-phase after drug exposure. We propose that homologous recombination (HR), a major repair pathway for DNA double strand breaks, can prevent GCV-induced DNA damage, and that inhibition of HR will enhance cytotoxicity with GCV. Survival after GCV treatment in cells expressing a herpes simplex virus thymidine kinase was strongly dependent on HR (>14-fold decrease in IC50 in HR-deficient vs. HR-proficient CHO cells). In a homologous recombination reporter assay, the histone deacetylase inhibitor, suberoylanilide hydroxamic acid (SAHA; vorinostat), decreased HR repair events up to 85%. SAHA plus GCV produced synergistic cytotoxicity in U251tk human glioblastoma cells. Elucidation of the synergistic mechanism demonstrated that SAHA produced a concentration-dependent decrease in the HR proteins Rad51 and CtIP. GCV alone produced numerous Rad51 foci, demonstrating activation of HR. However, the addition of SAHA blocked GCV-induced Rad51 foci formation completely and increased γH2AX, a marker of DNA double strand breaks. SAHA plus GCV also produced synergistic cytotoxicity in HR-proficient CHO cells, but the combination was antagonistic or additive in HR-deficient CHO cells. Collectively, these data demonstrate that HR promotes survival with GCV and compromise of HR by SAHA results in synergistic cytotoxicity, revealing a new mechanism for enhancing anticancer activity with GCV. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. Electromagnetic counterparts to gravitational waves from black hole mergers and naked singularities

    CERN Document Server

    Malafarina, Daniele

    2016-01-01

    We consider the question here whether the proposed electromagnetic counterpart of the gravitational wave signals in binary black hole coalescence may be due to the appearance of a `short lived' naked singularity during the merger. We point out that the change in topology that the spacetime undergoes during the merger can cause the appearance of a naked singularity. In case some matter, in the form of a small accretion disk, is present in the surroundings of the black hole system then the emitted luminosity during the merger would allow to distinguish the scenario where the naked singularity forms from the scenario where the horizon exists at all times. In fact the emitted luminosity spectrum would be much higher in the case where a naked singularity forms as opposed to the `pure' black hole case. We suggest that the presence of such a transient naked singularity will explain the high luminosity of an electromagnetic counterpart during the merger much more easily.

  13. A comparative study between South African serial killers and their American counterparts

    OpenAIRE

    2009-01-01

    M.A. This dissertation explores the similarities and differences between South African serial killers and their American counterparts. Seven male candidates, each having committed their reign of terror within the relevant time period, have been included. The candidates compared well in home environments, number of friendships, emotional maturity, abuse undergone, temperament, and anti-social behaviour. Differences were found in comparing family bonding, wealth and education. This dissertat...

  14. Postprandial hypoglycemic effect of mulberry leaf in Goto-Kakizaki rats and counterpart control Wistar rats

    OpenAIRE

    Park, Ji Min; Bong, Ha Yoon; Jeong, Hye In; Kim, Yeon Kyoung; Kim, Ji Yeon; Kwon, Oran

    2009-01-01

    Postprandial hypoglycemic effect of mulberry leaf (Morus alba L.) was compared in two animal models: Goto-Kakizaki (GK) rats, a spontaneous non-obese animal model for type II diabetes, and their counterpart control Wistar rats. First, the effect of a single oral administration of mulberry leaf aqueous extract (MLE) on postprandial glucose responses was determined using maltose or glucose as substrate. With maltose-loading, MLE reduced peak responses of blood glucose significantly in both GK a...

  15. A geometric model for Hochschild homology of Soergel bimodules

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Webster, Ben; Williamson, Geordie

    2008-01-01

    An important step in the calculation of the triply graded link homology of Khovanov and Rozansky is the determination of the Hochschild homology of Soergel bimodules for SL(n). We present a geometric model for this Hochschild homology for any simple group G, as B–equivariant intersection cohomology...... of B×B–orbit closures in G. We show that, in type A, these orbit closures are equivariantly formal for the conjugation B–action. We use this fact to show that, in the case where the corresponding orbit closure is smooth, this Hochschild homology is an exterior algebra over a polynomial ring...

  16. An ectromelia virus profilin homolog interacts with cellular tropomyosin and viral A-type inclusion protein

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Burke Robert D

    2007-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Profilins are critical to cytoskeletal dynamics in eukaryotes; however, little is known about their viral counterparts. In this study, a poxviral profilin homolog, ectromelia virus strain Moscow gene 141 (ECTV-PH, was investigated by a variety of experimental and bioinformatics techniques to characterize its interactions with cellular and viral proteins. Results Profilin-like proteins are encoded by all orthopoxviruses sequenced to date, and share over 90% amino acid (aa identity. Sequence comparisons show highest similarity to mammalian type 1 profilins; however, a conserved 3 aa deletion in mammalian type 3 and poxviral profilins suggests that these homologs may be more closely related. Structural analysis shows that ECTV-PH can be successfully modelled onto both the profilin 1 crystal structure and profilin 3 homology model, though few of the surface residues thought to be required for binding actin, poly(L-proline, and PIP2 are conserved. Immunoprecipitation and mass spectrometry identified two proteins that interact with ECTV-PH within infected cells: alpha-tropomyosin, a 38 kDa cellular actin-binding protein, and the 84 kDa product of vaccinia virus strain Western Reserve (VACV-WR 148, which is the truncated VACV counterpart of the orthopoxvirus A-type inclusion (ATI protein. Western and far-western blots demonstrated that the interaction with alpha-tropomyosin is direct, and immunofluorescence experiments suggest that ECTV-PH and alpha-tropomyosin may colocalize to structures that resemble actin tails and cellular protrusions. Sequence comparisons of the poxviral ATI proteins show that although full-length orthologs are only present in cowpox and ectromelia viruses, an ~ 700 aa truncated ATI protein is conserved in over 90% of sequenced orthopoxviruses. Immunofluorescence studies indicate that ECTV-PH localizes to cytoplasmic inclusion bodies formed by both truncated and full-length versions of the viral ATI protein

  17. Identification, localization, and sequencing of fetal bovine VASA homolog.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bartholomew, Rachel A; Parks, John E

    2007-10-01

    The vasa gene, first described in Drosophila, is purported to be important in germ cell development. Vasa is present across several invertebrate and vertebrate taxa, including frogs, fish, chickens, and humans. Vasa, a DEAD (asparagine-glutamine-alanine-asparagine) box protein shown to function as an RNA helicase in vitro, has not been investigated previously in fetal stage cattle. Total RNA was extracted from bovine fetal gonads obtained at 35-55 days, 55-80 days, and 80-120 days of gestation to amplify a 296 bp reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) product using primers for human vasa. The complete coding sequence of bovine vasa was cloned with 5' and 3' random amplification of cDNA ends polymerase chain reaction (RACE-PCR) and subsequently identified as bovine vasa homolog (BVH). Northern blot analysis revealed that among the tissues examined (gonad, liver, heart, brain, and femur), the vasa gene was expressed in the gonad. This localization, the conserved pattern of gene expression, and the gene sequence suggests that BVH plays a role in bovine germ cell development as proposed for other mammalian species.

  18. Antibody humanization methods - a review and update.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Safdari, Yaghoub; Farajnia, Safar; Asgharzadeh, Mohammad; Khalili, Masoumeh

    2013-01-01

    This article reviews recent advances achieved during recent years on various aspects of antibody humanization theories and techniques. Common methods for producing humanized antibodies including framework-homology-based humanization, germline humanization, complementary determining regions (CDR)-homology-based humanization and specificity determining residues (SDR) grafting, as well as advantages and disadvantages of each of these methods and their applications are discussed.

  19. Induction of osteogenesis by demineralized homologous and xenograft bone matrix

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dall'Agnol Rosiris

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available The osteogenesis induction by demineralized bone matrix grafts remains as a challenge in the reconstructions of the mandible through homologous and xenografts or in implants in abdominal muscle. PURPOSE: Observed the behaviour of implants of demineralized bone matrix at the mandible (right side with homologous graft and left side with xenograft of pig. METHODS: Experimental study with homologous and heterologous implants of demineralized bone matrix at the mandible and in ectopic muscle at the Center of Experimental Surgery of Heliopolis Hospital, Hosphel, São Paulo, Brazil. In 6 white New Zeland rabbits, 46 grafts were performed being 23 with homologous (rabbit and 23 with xenograft (pig. 12 homologous implants (6 at the right side of the mandible and 6 at abdominal muscle of the rabbit and 12 heterologous implants of pigs (6 at the left side of the mandible and 6 at abdominal muscle rabbit were performed with demineralized bone matrix. RESULTS: Osteogenesis was assessed through histologic features after 30 and 60 days. After 1 rabbit dead, osteogenesis (mandible were detected in 9 of 11 (82% rabbits that received homologous matrix, in spite of heterologous implants showed osteogenesis in 6 out of 11 (54% (p=0,18. The abdominal muscle showed induced osteogenesis in 3 out of 11(27% animals with homologous and 0% with heterologous implants (p=0,10. CONCLUSIONS: Osteogenesis induction through homologous grafts in rabbit mandible and abdominal muscle were more effective than xenografts.

  20. Efficacy of homologous peste des petits ruminants vaccine on sheep ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Efficacy of homologous peste des petits ruminants vaccine on sheep and goats at dengi, plateau state, Nigeria. ... Bulletin of Animal Health and Production in Africa ... The effect of homologous peste des petits ruminants vaccine (HPPRV) on flock size, morbidity and mortality in sheep and goats was determined in five ...

  1. CBH1 homologs and varian CBH1 cellulase

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Goedegebuur, Frits; Gualfetti, Peter; Mitchinson, Colin; Neefe, Paulien

    2014-07-01

    Disclosed are a number of homologs and variants of Hypocrea jecorina Cel7A (formerly Trichoderma reesei cellobiohydrolase I or CBH1), nucleic acids encoding the same and methods for producing the same. The homologs and variant cellulases have the amino acid sequence of a glycosyl hydrolase of family 7A wherein one or more amino acid residues are substituted and/or deleted.

  2. Cloning and expression analysis of a LFY homologous gene in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    LEAFY (LFY) homologous genes are necessary for the transition from vegetative to reproductive development in flowering plants. The full-length cDNA of a LFY homolog was successfully isolated from floral buds of Chinese Jujube (Ziziphus jujube Mill.) by degenerate reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction ...

  3. Regulation of homologous recombination at telomeres in budding yeast

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Eckert-Boulet, Nadine; Lisby, Michael

    2010-01-01

    Homologous recombination is suppressed at normal length telomere sequences. In contrast, telomere recombination is allowed when telomeres erode in the absence of telomerase activity or as a consequence of nucleolytic degradation or incomplete replication. Here, we review the mechanisms...... that contribute to regulating mitotic homologous recombination at telomeres and the role of these mechanisms in signalling short telomeres in the budding yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae....

  4. Homology modelling and spectroscopy, a never-ending love story.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Venselaar, H.; Joosten, R.P.; Vroling, B.; Baakman, C.A.; Hekkelman, M.L.; Krieger, E.; Vriend, G.

    2010-01-01

    Homology modelling is normally the technique of choice when experimental structure data are not available but three-dimensional coordinates are needed, for example, to aid with detailed interpretation of results of spectroscopic studies. Herein, the state of the art of homology modelling will be

  5. Statistical Inference for Porous Materials using Persistent Homology.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moon, Chul [Univ. of Georgia, Athens, GA (United States); Heath, Jason E. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Mitchell, Scott A. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    2017-12-01

    We propose a porous materials analysis pipeline using persistent homology. We rst compute persistent homology of binarized 3D images of sampled material subvolumes. For each image we compute sets of homology intervals, which are represented as summary graphics called persistence diagrams. We convert persistence diagrams into image vectors in order to analyze the similarity of the homology of the material images using the mature tools for image analysis. Each image is treated as a vector and we compute its principal components to extract features. We t a statistical model using the loadings of principal components to estimate material porosity, permeability, anisotropy, and tortuosity. We also propose an adaptive version of the structural similarity index (SSIM), a similarity metric for images, as a measure to determine the statistical representative elementary volumes (sREV) for persistence homology. Thus we provide a capability for making a statistical inference of the uid ow and transport properties of porous materials based on their geometry and connectivity.

  6. A recurrent translocation is mediated by homologous recombination between HERV-H elements

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hermetz Karen E

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Chromosome rearrangements are caused by many mutational mechanisms; of these, recurrent rearrangements can be particularly informative for teasing apart DNA sequence-specific factors. Some recurrent translocations are mediated by homologous recombination between large blocks of segmental duplications on different chromosomes. Here we describe a recurrent unbalanced translocation casued by recombination between shorter homologous regions on chromosomes 4 and 18 in two unrelated children with intellectual disability. Results Array CGH resolved the breakpoints of the 6.97-Megabase (Mb loss of 18q and the 7.30-Mb gain of 4q. Sequencing across the translocation breakpoints revealed that both translocations occurred between 92%-identical human endogenous retrovirus (HERV elements in the same orientation on chromosomes 4 and 18. In addition, we find sequence variation in the chromosome 4 HERV that makes one allele more like the chromosome 18 HERV. Conclusions Homologous recombination between HERVs on the same chromosome is known to cause chromosome deletions, but this is the first report of interchromosomal HERV-HERV recombination leading to a translocation. It is possible that normal sequence variation in substrates of non-allelic homologous recombination (NAHR affects the alignment of recombining segments and influences the propensity to chromosome rearrangement.

  7. The radio and infrared counterparts of the ring nebula around HD211564

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cappa, C. E.; Vasquez, J.; Pineault, S.; Cichowolski, S.

    2010-03-01

    We report the detection of the radio and infrared (IR) counterparts of the ring nebula around the WN3(h) star HD211564 (WR152), located to the south-west of the HII region Sh2132. Using radio continuum data from the Canadian Galactic Plane Survey, we identified the radio counterparts of the two concentric rings, of about 9 and 16 arcmin in radius, related to the star. After applying a filling factor f = 0.05-0.12, electron densities and ionized masses are in the range 10-16 cm-3 and 450-700Msolar, respectively. The analysis of the HI gas emission distribution allowed the identification of 5900Msolar of neutral atomic gas with velocities between -52 and -43kms-1 probably linked to the nebula. The region of the nebula is almost free of molecular gas. Only four small clumps were detected, with a total molecular mass of 790Msolar. About 310 Msolar are related to a small IR shell-like source linked to the inner ring, which is also detected in the MSX band A. An IRAS young stellar object candidate is detected in coincidence with the shell-like IR source. We suggest that the optical nebula and its neutral counterparts originated from the stellar winds from the Wolf-Rayet star and its massive progenitor, and are evolving in the envelope of a slowly expanding shell centred at of about 31 pc in radius. The bubble's energy conversion efficiency is in agreement with recent numerical analysis and with observational results.

  8. INTERSTELLAR SCINTILLATION AND THE RADIO COUNTERPART OF THE FAST RADIO BURST FRB 150418

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Akiyama, Kazunori [Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Haystack Observatory, Route 40, Westford, MA 01886 (United States); Johnson, Michael D., E-mail: kazu@haystack.mit.edu [Harvard Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics, 60 Garden Street, Cambridge, MA 02138 (United States)

    2016-06-10

    Keane et al. have recently reported the discovery of a new fast radio burst (FRB), FRB 150418, with a promising radio counterpart at 5.5 and 7.5 GHz—a rapidly decaying source, falling from 200–300 μ Jy to 100 μ Jy on timescales of ∼6 days. This transient source may be associated with an elliptical galaxy at redshift z = 0.492, providing the first firm spectroscopic redshift for an FRB and the ability to estimate the density of baryons in the intergalactic medium via the combination of known redshift and radio dispersion of the FRB. An alternative explanation, first suggested by Williams and Berger, is that the identified counterpart may instead be a compact active galactic nucleus (AGN). The putative counterpart’s variation may then instead be extrinsic, caused by refractive scintillation in the ionized interstellar medium of the Milky Way, which would invalidate the association with FRB 150418. We examine this latter explanation in detail and show that the reported observations are consistent with scintillating radio emission from the core of a radio-loud AGN having a brightness temperature T {sub b} ≳ 10{sup 9} K. Using numerical simulations of the expected scattering for the line of sight to FRB 150418, we provide example images and light curves of such an AGN at 5.5 and 7.5 GHz. These results can be compared with continued radio monitoring to conclusively determine the importance of scintillation for the observed radio variability, and they show that scintillation is a critical consideration for continued searches for FRB counterparts at radio wavelengths.

  9. Hunting Electromagnetic Counterparts of Gravitational-wave Events Using the Zwicky Transient Facility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghosh, Shaon; Chatterjee, Deep; Kaplan, David L.; Brady, Patrick R.; Van Sistine, Angela

    2017-11-01

    Detections of coalescing binary black holes by LIGO have opened a new window of transient astronomy. With increasing sensitivity of LIGO and participation of the Virgo detector in Cascina, Italy, we expect to soon detect coalescence of compact binary systems with one or more neutron stars. These are the prime targets for electromagnetic follow-up of gravitational wave triggers, which holds enormous promise of rich science. However, hunting for electromagnetic counterparts of gravitational wave events is a non-trivial task due to the sheer size of the error regions, which could span hundreds of square degrees. This may require deep observation with large field-of-view telescopes and/or use of galaxy catalogs. The Zwicky Transient facility (ZTF), scheduled to begin operation in 2017, is designed to cover such large sky-localization areas. In this work, we present the strategies of efficiently tiling the sky to facilitate the observation of the gravitational wave error regions using ZTF. To do this, we used simulations consisting of 475 binary neutron star coalescences detected using a mix of two- and three-detector networks. Our studies reveal that, using two overlapping sets of ZTF tiles and a (modified) ranked-tiling algorithm, we can cover the gravitational-wave sky-localization regions with half as many pointings as a simple contour-covering algorithm. We then incorporated the ranked-tiling strategy to study our ability to observe the counterparts. This requires optimization of observation depth and localization area coverage. Our results show that observation in r-band with ˜600 seconds of integration time per pointing seems to be optimum for typical assumed brightnesses of electromagnetic counterparts, if we plan to spend equal amount of time per pointing. However, our results also reveal that we can gain by as much as 50% in detection efficiency if we linearly scale our integration time per pointing based on the tile probability.

  10. DISCOVERY OF A TRANSIENT GAMMA-RAY COUNTERPART TO FRB 131104

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    DeLaunay, J. J.; Murase, K.; Mészáros, P.; Keivani, A.; Messick, C.; Mostafá, M. A.; Oikonomou, F.; Tešić, G.; Turley, C. F. [Department of Physics, Pennsylvania State University, University Park, PA 16802 (United States); Fox, D. B., E-mail: jjd330@psu.edu [Department of Astronomy and Astrophysics, Pennsylvania State University, University Park, PA 16802 (United States)

    2016-11-20

    We report our discovery in Swift satellite data of a transient gamma-ray counterpart (3.2 σ confidence) to the fast radio burst (FRB) FRB 131104, the first such counterpart to any FRB. The transient has a duration T {sub 90} ≳ 100 s and a fluence S{sub γ} ≈ 4 × 10{sup −6} erg cm{sup −2}, increasing the energy budget for this event by more than a billion times; at the nominal z ≈ 0.55 redshift implied by its dispersion measure, the burst’s gamma-ray energy output is E{sub γ} ≈ 5 × 10{sup 51} erg. The observed radio to gamma-ray fluence ratio for FRB 131104 is consistent with a lower limit we derive from Swift observations of another FRB, which is not detected in gamma-rays, and with an upper limit previously derived for the brightest gamma-ray flare from SGR 1806−20, which was not detected in the radio. X-ray, ultraviolet, and optical observations beginning two days after the FRB do not reveal any associated afterglow, supernova, or transient; Swift observations exclude association with the brightest 65% of Swift gamma-ray burst (GRB) X-ray afterglows, while leaving the possibility of an associated supernova at much more than 10% the FRB’s nominal distance, D ≳ 320 Mpc, largely unconstrained. Transient high-luminosity gamma-ray emission arises most naturally in a relativistic outflow or shock breakout, such as, for example, from magnetar flares, GRBs, relativistic supernovae, and some types of galactic nuclear activity. Our discovery thus bolsters the case for an extragalactic origin for some FRBs and suggests that future rapid-response observations might identify long-lived counterparts, resolving the nature of these mysterious phenomena and realizing their promise as probes of cosmology and fundamental physics.

  11. Hunting Electromagnetic Counterparts of Gravitational-wave Events Using the Zwicky Transient Facility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghosh, Shaon; Chatterjee, Deep; Kaplan, David L.; Brady, Patrick R.; Van Sistine, Angela

    2017-11-01

    Detections of coalescing binary black holes by LIGO have opened a new window of transient astronomy. With increasing sensitivity of LIGO and participation of the Virgo detector in Cascina, Italy, we expect to soon detect coalescence of compact binary systems with one or more neutron stars. These are the prime targets for electromagnetic follow-up of gravitational wave triggers, which holds enormous promise of rich science. However, hunting for electromagnetic counterparts of gravitational wave events is a non-trivial task due to the sheer size of the error regions, which could span hundreds of square degrees. This may require deep observation with large field-of-view telescopes and/or use of galaxy catalogs. The Zwicky Transient facility (ZTF), scheduled to begin operation in 2017, is designed to cover such large sky-localization areas. In this work, we present the strategies of efficiently tiling the sky to facilitate the observation of the gravitational wave error regions using ZTF. To do this, we used simulations consisting of 475 binary neutron star coalescences detected using a mix of two- and three-detector networks. Our studies reveal that, using two overlapping sets of ZTF tiles and a (modified) ranked-tiling algorithm, we can cover the gravitational-wave sky-localization regions with half as many pointings as a simple contour-covering algorithm. We then incorporated the ranked-tiling strategy to study our ability to observe the counterparts. This requires optimization of observation depth and localization area coverage. Our results show that observation in r-band with ∼600 seconds of integration time per pointing seems to be optimum for typical assumed brightnesses of electromagnetic counterparts, if we plan to spend equal amount of time per pointing. However, our results also reveal that we can gain by as much as 50% in detection efficiency if we linearly scale our integration time per pointing based on the tile probability.

  12. Radio Counterparts of Compact Binary Mergers Detectable in Gravitational Waves: A Simulation for an Optimized Survey

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hotokezaka, K.; Nissanke, S.; Hallinan, G.; Lazio, T. J. W.; Nakar, E.; Piran, T.

    2016-11-01

    Mergers of binary neutron stars and black hole-neutron star binaries produce gravitational-wave (GW) emission and outflows with significant kinetic energies. These outflows result in radio emissions through synchrotron radiation. We explore the detectability of these synchrotron-generated radio signals by follow-up observations of GW merger events lacking a detection of electromagnetic counterparts in other wavelengths. We model radio light curves arising from (I) sub-relativistic merger ejecta and (II) ultra-relativistic jets. The former produce radio remnants on timescales of a few years and the latter produce γ-ray bursts in the direction of the jet and orphan-radio afterglows extending over wider angles on timescales of weeks. Based on the derived light curves, we suggest an optimized survey at 1.4 GHz with five epochs separated by a logarithmic time interval. We estimate the detectability of the radio counterparts of simulated GW-merger events to be detected by advanced LIGO and Virgo by current and future radio facilities. The detectable distances for these GW merger events could be as high as 1 Gpc. Around 20%-60% of the long-lasting radio remnants will be detectable in the case of the moderate kinetic energy of 3\\cdot {10}50 erg and a circum-merger density of 0.1 {{cm}}-3 or larger, while 5%-20% of the orphan-radio afterglows with kinetic energy of 1048 erg will be detectable. The detection likelihood increases if one focuses on the well-localizable GW events. We discuss the background noise due to radio fluxes of host galaxies and false positives arising from extragalactic radio transients and variable active galactic nuclei, and we show that the quiet radio transient sky is of great advantage when searching for the radio counterparts.

  13. What is the Most Promising Electromagnetic Counterpart of a Neutron Star Binary Merger?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Metzger, B. D.; Berger, E.

    2012-02-01

    The final inspiral of double neutron star and neutron-star-black-hole binaries are likely to be detected by advanced networks of ground-based gravitational wave (GW) interferometers. Maximizing the science returns from such a discovery will require the identification of an electromagnetic counterpart. Here we critically evaluate and compare several possible counterparts, including short-duration gamma-ray bursts (SGRBs), "orphan" optical and radio afterglows, and day-long optical transients powered by the radioactive decay of heavy nuclei synthesized in the merger ejecta ("kilonovae"). We assess the promise of each counterpart in terms of four "Cardinal Virtues": detectability, high fraction, identifiability, and positional accuracy. Taking into account the search strategy for typical error regions of tens of square degrees, we conclude that SGRBs are the most useful to confirm the cosmic origin of a few GW events, and to test the association with neutron star mergers. However, for the more ambitious goal of localizing and obtaining redshifts for a large sample of GW events, kilonovae are instead preferred. Off-axis optical afterglows are detectable for at most tens of percent of events, while radio afterglows are promising only for energetic relativistic ejecta in a high-density medium. Our main recommendations are: (1) an all-sky gamma-ray satellite is essential for temporal coincidence detections, and for GW searches of gamma-ray-triggered events; (2) the Large Synoptic Survey Telescope should adopt a one-day cadence follow-up strategy, ideally with 0.5 hr per pointing to cover GW error regions; and (3) radio searches should focus on the relativistic case, which requires observations for a few months.

  14. Functional Analysis of Amorpha-4,11-Diene Synthase (ADS) Homologs from Non-Artemisinin-Producing Artemisia Species: The Discovery of Novel Koidzumiol and (+)-α-Bisabolol Synthases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muangphrom, Paskorn; Seki, Hikaru; Suzuki, Munenori; Komori, Aya; Nishiwaki, Mika; Mikawa, Ryota; Fukushima, Ery Odette; Muranaka, Toshiya

    2016-08-01

    The production of artemisinin, the most effective antimalarial compound, is limited to Artemisia annua. Enzymes involved in artemisinin biosynthesis include amorpha-4,11-diene synthase (ADS), amorpha-4,11-diene 12-monooxygenase (CYP71AV1) and artemisinic aldehyde Δ(11)13 reductase (DBR2). Although artemisinin and its specific intermediates are not detected in other Artemisia species, we reported previously that CYP71AV1 and DBR2 homologs were expressed in some non-artemisinin-producing Artemisia plants. These homologous enzymes showed similar functions to their counterparts in A. annua and can convert fed intermediates into the following products along the artemisinin biosynthesis in planta These findings suggested a partial artemisinin-producing ability in those species. In this study, we examined genes highly homologous to ADS, the first committed gene in the pathway, in 13 Artemisia species. We detected ADS homologs in A. absinthium, A. kurramensis and A. maritima. We analyzed the enzymatic functions of all of the ADS homologs after obtaining their cDNA. We found that the ADS homolog from A. absinthium exhibited novel activity in the cyclization of farnesyl pyrophosphate (FPP) to koidzumiol, a rare natural sesquiterpenoid. Those from A. kurramensis and A. maritima showed similar, but novel, activities in the cyclization of FPP to (+)-α-bisabolol. The unique functions of the novel sesquiterpene synthases highly homologous to ADS found in this study could provide insight into the molecular basis of the exceptional artemisinin-producing ability in A. annua. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Japanese Society of Plant Physiologists. All rights reserved. For permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  15. Genetic probing of homologous recombination and non-homologous end joining during meiotic prophase in irradiated mouse spermatocytes.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ahmed, E.A.; Philippens, M.E.P.; Kal, H.B.; Rooij, D.G. de; Boer, P. de

    2010-01-01

    This study was designed to obtain a better insight into the relative contribution of homologous recombination (HR) and non-homologous end joining (NHEJ) to the repair of radiation-induced DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs) at first meiotic prophase. Early and late pachytene and early diplotene

  16. All three LDL receptor homology regions of the LDL receptor-related protein bind multiple ligands.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Croy, Johnny E; Shin, William D; Knauer, Mary F; Knauer, Daniel J; Komives, Elizabeth A

    2003-11-11

    The three complete human LDL receptor homology regions of the LDL receptor-related protein (sLRP2, sLRP3, and sLRP4) have been expressed in Pichia pastoris SMD1168 with constitutive coexpression of the receptor-associated protein (RAP). Each sLRP was purified to homogeneity after deglycosylation using a combination of anion-exchange and size exclusion chromatography. Mass spectrometry and N-terminal sequencing confirmed the identity of each fragment at purified yields of several milligrams per liter. Despite the large number of disulfide linkages and glycosylation sites in each LDL receptor homology region (sLRP), all were shown to be competent for binding to several LRP1 ligands. Each sLRP also bound human RAP, which is thought to be a generalized receptor antagonist, in solution-binding experiments. As expected, sLRP2 bound the receptor-binding domain of alpha(2)-macroglobulin (residues 1304-1451). All three sLRPs bound human apolipoprotein-enriched beta very low density lipoprotein, the canonical ligand for this receptor. All three sLRPs also bound lactoferrin and thrombin-protease nexin 1 complexes. Only sLRP4 bound thrombin-antithrombin III complexes. The results show that binding-competent LDL receptor homology regions (sLRPs) can be produced in high yield in P. pastoris and readily purified. Each sLRP has binding sites for multiple ligands, but not all ligand binding could be competed by RAP.

  17. The X-ray counterpart to the gravitational-wave event GW170817

    Science.gov (United States)

    Troja, E.; Piro, L.; van Eerten, H.; Wollaeger, R. T.; Im, M.; Fox, O. D.; Butler, N. R.; Cenko, S. B.; Sakamoto, T.; Fryer, C. L.; Ricci, R.; Lien, A.; Ryan, R. E.; Korobkin, O.; Lee, S.-K.; Burgess, J. M.; Lee, W. H.; Watson, A. M.; Choi, C.; Covino, S.; D’Avanzo, P.; Fontes, C. J.; González, J. Becerra; Khandrika, H. G.; Kim, J.; Kim, S.-L.; Lee, C.-U.; Lee, H. M.; Kutyrev, A.; Lim, G.; Sánchez-Ramírez, R.; Veilleux, S.; Wieringa, M. H.; Yoon, Y.

    2017-11-01

    A long-standing paradigm in astrophysics is that collisions—or mergers—of two neutron stars form highly relativistic and collimated outflows (jets) that power γ-ray bursts of short (less than two seconds) duration. The observational support for this model, however, is only indirect. A hitherto outstanding prediction is that gravitational-wave events from such mergers should be associated with γ-ray bursts, and that a majority of these bursts should be seen off-axis, that is, they should point away from Earth. Here we report the discovery observations of the X-ray counterpart associated with the gravitational-wave event GW170817. Although the electromagnetic counterpart at optical and infrared frequencies is dominated by the radioactive glow (known as a ‘kilonova’) from freshly synthesized rapid neutron capture (r-process) material in the merger ejecta, observations at X-ray and, later, radio frequencies are consistent with a short γ-ray burst viewed off-axis. Our detection of X-ray emission at a location coincident with the kilonova transient provides the missing observational link between short γ-ray bursts and gravitational waves from neutron-star mergers, and gives independent confirmation of the collimated nature of the γ-ray-burst emission.

  18. THE VARIABLE NEAR-INFRARED COUNTERPART OF THE MICROQUASAR GRS 1758–258

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Luque-Escamilla, Pedro L. [Departamento de Ingeniería Mecánica y Minera, EPSJ, Universidad de Jaén, Campus Las Lagunillas s/n, A3-008, 23071 Jaén (Spain); Martí, Josep [Departamento de Física, EPSJ, Universidad de Jaén, Campus Las Lagunillas s/n, A3-420, 23071 Jaén (Spain); Muñoz-Arjonilla, Álvaro J., E-mail: peter@ujaen.es, E-mail: jmarti@ujaen.es, E-mail: ajmunoz@ujaen.es [Grupo de Investigación FQM-322, Universidad de Jaén, Campus Las Lagunillas s/n, A3-065, 23071 Jaén (Spain)

    2014-12-10

    We present a new study of the microquasar system GRS 1758–258 in the near-infrared domain based on archival observations with the Hubble Space Telescope and the NICMOS camera. In addition to confirming the near-infrared counterpart pointed out by Muñoz-Arjonilla et al., we show that this object displays significant photometric variability. From its average magnitudes, we also find that GRS 1758–258 fits well within the correlation between the optical/near-infrared and X-ray luminosity known to exist for low-mass, black-hole candidate X-ray binaries in a hard state. Moreover, the spectral energy distribution built using all radio, near-infrared, and X-ray data available closest in time to the NICMOS observations can be reasonably interpreted in terms of a self-absorbed radio jet and an irradiated accretion disk model around a stellar-mass black hole. All these facts match the expected behavior of a compact binary system and strengthen our confidence in the counterpart identification.

  19. Near-infrared counterparts of three transient very faint neutron star X-ray binaries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shaw, A. W.; Heinke, C. O.; Degenaar, N.; Wijnands, R.; Kaur, R.; Forestell, L. M.

    2017-10-01

    We present near-infrared (NIR) imaging observations of three transient neutron star X-ray binaries, SAX J1753.5-2349, SAX J1806.5-2215 and AX J1754.2-2754. All three sources are members of the class of 'very faint' X-ray transients which exhibit X-ray luminosities LX ≲ 1036 erg s-1. The nature of this class of sources is still poorly understood. We detect NIR counterparts for all three systems and perform multiband photometry for both SAX J1753.5-2349 and SAX J1806.5-2215, including narrow-band Br γ photometry for SAX J1806.5-2215. We find that SAX J1753.5-2349 is significantly redder than the field population, indicating that there may be absorption intrinsic to the system, or perhaps a jet is contributing to the infrared emission. SAX J1806.5-2215 appears to exhibit absorption in Br γ, providing evidence for hydrogen in the system. Our observations of AX J1754.2-2754 represent the first detection of an NIR counterpart for this system. We find that none of the measured magnitudes are consistent with the expected quiescent magnitudes of these systems. Assuming that the infrared radiation is dominated by either the disc or the companion star, the observed magnitudes argue against an ultracompact nature for all three systems.

  20. Discovery of near-ultraviolet counterparts to millisecond pulsars in the globular cluster 47 Tucanae

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rivera-Sandoval, L. E.; van den Berg, M.; Heinke, C. O.; Cohn, H. N.; Lugger, P. M.; Freire, P.; Anderson, J.; Serenelli, A. M.; Althaus, L. G.; Cool, A. M.; Grindlay, J. E.; Edmonds, P. D.; Wijnands, R.; Ivanova, N.

    2015-11-01

    We report the discovery of the likely white dwarf companions to radio millisecond pulsars 47 Tuc Q and 47 Tuc S in the globular cluster 47 Tucanae. These blue stars were found in near-ultraviolet images from the Hubble Space Telescope for which we derived accurate absolute astrometry, and are located at positions consistent with the radio coordinates to within 0.016 arcsec (0.2σ). We present near-ultraviolet and optical colours for the previously identified companion to millisecond pulsar 47 Tuc U, and we unambiguously confirm the tentative prior identifications of the optical counterparts to 47 Tuc T and 47 Tuc Y. For the latter, we present its radio-timing solution for the first time. We find that all five near-ultraviolet counterparts have U300 - B390 colours that are consistent with He white dwarf cooling models for masses ˜0.16-0.3 M⊙ and cooling ages within ˜0.1-6 Gyr. The Hα - R625 colours of 47 Tuc U and 47 Tuc T indicate the presence of a strong Hα absorption line, as expected for white dwarfs with an H envelope.

  1. Off-axis short GRBs from structured jets as counterparts to GW events

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kathirgamaraju, Adithan; Barniol Duran, Rodolfo; Giannios, Dimitrios

    2018-01-01

    Binary neutron star mergers are considered to be the most favourable sources that produce electromagnetic (EM) signals associated with gravitational waves (GWs). These mergers are the likely progenitors of short duration gamma-ray bursts (GRBs). The brief gamma-ray emission (the 'prompt' GRB emission) is produced by ultrarelativistic jets, as a result, this emission is strongly beamed over a small solid angle along the jet. It is estimated to be a decade or more before a short GRB jet within the Laser Interferometer Gravitational-Wave observatory (LIGO) volume points along our line of sight. For this reason, the study of the prompt signal as an EM counterpart to GW events has been sparse. We argue that for a realistic jet model, one whose luminosity and Lorentz factor vary smoothly with angle, the prompt signal can be detected for a significantly broader range of viewing angles. This can lead to an 'off-axis' short GRB as an EM counterpart. Our estimates and simulations show that it is feasible to detect these signals with the aid of the temporal coincidence from a LIGO trigger, even if the observer is substantially misaligned with respect to the jet.

  2. Do Lower Calorie or Lower Fat Foods Have More Sodium Than Their Regular Counterparts?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katherine A. John

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this study was to compare the sodium content of a regular food and its lower calorie/fat counterpart. Four food categories, among the top 20 contributing the most sodium to the US diet, met the criteria of having the most matches between regular foods and their lower calorie/fat counterparts. A protocol was used to search websites to create a list of “matches”, a regular and comparable lower calorie/fat food(s under each brand. Nutrient information was recorded and analyzed for matches. In total, 283 matches were identified across four food categories: savory snacks (N = 44, cheese (N = 105, salad dressings (N = 90, and soups (N = 44. As expected, foods modified from their regular versions had significantly reduced average fat (total fat and saturated fat and caloric profiles. Mean sodium content among modified salad dressings and cheeses was on average 8%–12% higher, while sodium content did not change with modification of savory snacks. Modified soups had significantly lower mean sodium content than their regular versions (28%–38%. Consumers trying to maintain a healthy diet should consider that sodium content may vary in foods modified to be lower in calories/fat.

  3. Search for Infrared Counterparts to X-Ray Point Sources in M 51 and NGC 4559

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clark, David M.; Eikenberry, Stephen S.; Brandl, Bernhard

    2006-02-01

    We propose to use the KPNO-4m telescope to take near-infrared (IR) images of the star-forming galaxies M51 and NGC 4559 to study the environments of their X-ray point sources. We chose these galaxies because of the extensive archival HST optical and Chandra X-ray observations of them. With our proposed observations, we will search for IR counterparts to X-ray binary sources. Many of these point sources are X-ray binaries containing a compact object that is left after the violent death of a massive star. By studying compact objects residing in the young stellar clusters where they formed, we can obtain the most interesting constraints on their environments and progenitor. Using these proposed observations along with HST and Chandra archival images, we will perform multi-wavelength studies on the stellar clusters associated with these X-ray sources. Fitting the photometry to Bruzual- Charlot spectral evolution models, we will estimate cluster mass, age and metallicity range. We will use this to constrain theories of compact object formation and evolution, particularly for the origins of the intermediate-mass black holes (IMBH) thought to power ultra-luminous X-ray sources (ULX). In future observations, we will acquire follow up spectra of the IR counterparts to study the cluster dynamics as well as rule out the possibility some ULXs are background quasars. We are requesting two nights on the KPNO-4m using FLAMINGOS to take J and K_s observations.

  4. Tribological Response of Heat Treated AISI 52100 Steels Against Steel and Ceramic Counterparts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Türedi E.

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available AISI 52100 bearing steels are commonly used in applications requiring high hardness and abrasion resistance. The bearing steels are working under dynamic loads in service conditions and their toughness properties become important. In order to provide the desired mechanical properties, various heat treatments (austenizing, quenching and tempering are usually applied. In this study, AISI 52100 bearing steel samples were austenized at 900°C for ½ h and water quenched to room temperature. Then tempering was carried out at 795°C, 400°C and 200°C for ½ h. In order to investigate the effect of heat treatment conditions on wear behavior, dry friction tests were performed according to ASTM G99-05 Standard with a ‘ball-on-disk’ type tribometer. The samples were tested against steel and ceramic counterparts using the parameters of 100 m distance and 30 N load and 0.063 m/s rotational speed. After wear test, the surface characterization was carried out using microscopy. Wear loss values were calculated using a novel optical method on both flat and counterpart specimens.

  5. Homologous recombination in bovine pestiviruses. Phylogenetic and statistic evidence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Leandro Roberto; Weber, E Laura

    2004-12-01

    Bovine pestiviruses (Bovine Viral Diarrea Virus 1 (BVDV 1) and Bovine Viral Diarrea Virus 2 (BVDV 2)) belong to the genus Pestivirus (Flaviviridae), which is composed of positive stranded RNA viruses causing significant economic losses world-wide. We used phylogenetic and bootstrap analyses to systematically scan alignments of previously sequenced genomes in order to explore further the evolutionary mechanisms responsible for variation in the virus. Previously published data suggested that homologous crossover might be one of the mechanisms responsible for the genomic rearrangements observed in cytopathic (cp) strains of bovine pestiviruses. Nevertheless, homologous recombination involves not just homologous crossovers, but also replacement of a homologous region of the acceptor RNA. Furthermore, cytopathic strains represent dead paths in evolution, since they are isolated exclusively from the fatal cases of mucosal disease. Herein, we report evidence of homologous inter-genotype recombination in the genome of a non-cytopathic (ncp) strain of Bovine Viral Diarrea Virus 1, the type species of the genus Pestivirus. We also show that intra-genotype homologous recombination might be a common phenomenon in both species of Pestivirus. This evidence demonstrates that homologous recombination contribute to the diversification of bovine pestiviruses in nature. Implications for virus evolution, taxonomy and phylogenetics are discussed.

  6. The history of the homology concept and the "Phylogenetisches Symposium".

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hossfeld, Uwe; Olsson, Lennart

    2005-11-01

    The homology concept has had a long and varied history, starting out as a geometrical term in ancient Greece. Here we describe briefly how a typological use of homology to designate organs and body parts in the same position anatomically in different organisms was changed by Darwin's theory of evolution into a phylogenetic concept. We try to indicate the diversity of opinions on how to define and test for homology that has prevailed historically, before the important books by Hennig (1950. Grundzüge einer Theorie der Phylogenetischen Systematik. Deutscher Zentralverlag, Berlin) and Remane (1952. Die Grundlagen des Natürlichen Systems, der Vergleichenden Anatomie und der Phylogenetik. Geest & Portig, Leipzig) brought more rigor into both the debate on homology and into the usage of the term homology among systematists. Homology as a theme has recurred repeatedly throughout the history of the "Phylogenetisches Symposium" and we give a very brief overview of the different aspects of homology that have been discussed at specific symposia over the last 48 years. We also honour the fact that the 2004 symposium was held in Jena by pointing to the roles played by biologists active in Jena, such as Ernst Haeckel and Carl Gegenbaur, in starting the development towards a homology concept concordant with an evolutionary world view. As historians of biology, we emphasize the importance of major treatises on homology and its history that may be little read by systematists active today, and have sometimes also received less attention by historians of biology than they deserve. Prominent among these are the works of Dietrich Starck, who also happened to be both a student, and later a benefactor, of systematics at Jena University.

  7. Insights into hydrocarbon formation by nitrogenase cofactor homologs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Chi Chung; Hu, Yilin; Ribbe, Markus W

    2015-04-14

    The L-cluster is an all-iron homolog of nitrogenase cofactors. Driven by europium(II) diethylenetriaminepentaacetate [Eu(II)-DTPA], the isolated L-cluster is capable of ATP-independent reduction of CO and CN(-) to C1 to C4 and C1 to C6 hydrocarbons, respectively. Compared to its cofactor homologs, the L-cluster generates considerably more CH4 from the reduction of CO and CN(-), which could be explained by the presence of a "free" Fe atom that is "unmasked" by homocitrate as an additional site for methanation. Moreover, the elevated CH4 formation is accompanied by a decrease in the amount of longer hydrocarbons and/or the lengths of the hydrocarbon products, illustrating a competition between CH4 formation/release and C-C coupling/chain extension. These observations suggest the possibility of designing simpler synthetic clusters for hydrocarbon formation while establishing the L-cluster as a platform for mechanistic investigations of CO and CN(-) reduction without complications originating from the heterometal and homocitrate components. Nitrogenase is a metalloenzyme that is highly complex in structure and uniquely versatile in function. It catalyzes two reactions that parallel two important industrial processes: the reduction of nitrogen to ammonia, which parallels the Haber-Bosch process in ammonia production, and the reduction of carbon monoxide to hydrocarbons, which parallels the Fischer-Tropsch process in fuel production. Thus, the significance of nitrogenase can be appreciated from the perspective of the useful products it generates: (i) ammonia, the "fixed" nitrogen that is essential for the existence of the entire human population; and (ii) hydrocarbons, the "recycled" carbon fuel that could be used to directly address the worldwide energy shortage. This article provides initial insights into the catalytic characteristics of various nitrogenase cofactors in hydrocarbon formation. The reported assay system provides a useful tool for mechanistic

  8. Importing the homology concept from biology into developmental psychology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moore, David S

    2013-01-01

    To help introduce the idea of homology into developmental psychology, this article presents some of the concepts, distinctions, and guidelines biologists and philosophers of biology have devised to study homology. Some unresolved issues related to this idea are considered as well. Because homology reflects continuity across time, developmental scientists should find this concept to be useful in the study of psychological/behavioral development, just as biologists have found it essential in the study of the evolution and development of morphological and other characteristics. Copyright © 2012 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  9. V-antigen homologs in pathogenic gram-negative bacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sawa, Teiji; Katoh, Hideya; Yasumoto, Hiroaki

    2014-05-01

    Gram-negative bacteria cause many types of infections in animals from fish and shrimps to humans. Bacteria use Type III secretion systems (TTSSs) to translocate their toxins directly into eukaryotic cells. The V-antigen is a multifunctional protein required for the TTSS in Yersinia and Pseudomonas aeruginosa. V-antigen vaccines and anti-V-antigen antisera confer protection against Yersinia or P. aeruginosa infections in animal models. The V-antigen forms a pentameric cap structure at the tip of the Type III secretory needle; this structure, which has evolved from the bacterial flagellar cap structure, is indispensable for toxin translocation. Various pathogenic gram-negative bacteria such as Photorhabdus luminescens, Vibrio spp., and Aeromonas spp. encode homologs of the V-antigen. Because the V-antigens of pathogenic gram-negative bacteria play a key role in toxin translocation, they are potential therapeutic targets for combatting bacterial virulence. In the USA and Europe, these vaccines and specific antibodies against V-antigens are in clinical trials investigating the treatment of Yersinia or P. aeruginosa infections. Pathogenic gram-negative bacteria are of great interest because of their ability to infect fish and shrimp farms, their potential for exploitation in biological terrorism attacks, and their ability to cause opportunistic infections in humans. Thus, elucidation of the roles of the V-antigen in the TTSS and mechanisms by which these functions can be blocked is critical to facilitating the development of improved anti-V-antigen strategies. © 2014 The Societies and Wiley Publishing Asia Pty Ltd.

  10. Computational identification of mutually homologous Zika virus ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background Zika virus (ZIKV) has been associated with a variety of neuropathologies, including microcephaly. We hypothesize that ZIKV genes activate host microRNAs (miRNAs) causing dysfunctional development of human fetal brains. Objectives/methods A bioinformatics search for miRNA genome-wide binding sites in ...

  11. Computational identification of mutually homologous Zika virus ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Ewen McLean

    2017-04-07

    Apr 7, 2017 ... mediates the epigenetic mechanisms of vitamin D to suppress proliferation of human colorectal cancer cells in vitro and growth of xenograft tumors in mice [37]. We propose that these miRNAs have certain roles in neuro- genesis or in development of microcephaly and may be inhibited by ZIKV infection.

  12. ATR inhibition preferentially targets homologous recombination-deficient tumor cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Krajewska, M.; Fehrmann, R. S. N.; Schoonen, P. M.; Labib, S.; de Vries, E. G. E.; Franke, L.; van Vugt, M. A. T. M.

    Homologous recombination (HR) is required for faithful repair of double-strand DNA breaks. Defects in HR repair cause severe genomic instability and challenge cellular viability. Paradoxically, various cancers are HR defective and have apparently acquired characteristics to survive genomic

  13. Homology of normal chains and cohomology of charges

    CERN Document Server

    Pauw, Th De; Pfeffer, W F

    2017-01-01

    The authors consider a category of pairs of compact metric spaces and Lipschitz maps where the pairs satisfy a linearly isoperimetric condition related to the solvability of the Plateau problem with partially free boundary. It includes properly all pairs of compact Lipschitz neighborhood retracts of a large class of Banach spaces. On this category the authors define homology and cohomology functors with real coefficients which satisfy the Eilenberg-Steenrod axioms, but reflect the metric properties of the underlying spaces. As an example they show that the zero-dimensional homology of a space in our category is trivial if and only if the space is path connected by arcs of finite length. The homology and cohomology of a pair are, respectively, locally convex and Banach spaces that are in duality. Ignoring the topological structures, the homology and cohomology extend to all pairs of compact metric spaces. For locally acyclic spaces, the authors establish a natural isomorphism between their cohomology and the �...

  14. Using molecular dynamics for the refinement of atomistic models of GPCRs by homology modeling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lupala, Cecylia S; Rasaeifar, Bahareh; Gomez-Gutierrez, Patricia; Perez, Juan J

    2017-08-14

    Despite GPCRs sharing a common seven helix bundle, analysis of the diverse crystallographic structures available reveal specific features that might be relevant for ligand design. Despite the number of crystallographic structures of GPCRs steadily increasing, there are still challenges that hamper the availability of new structures. In the absence of a crystallographic structure, homology modeling remains one of the important techniques for constructing 3D models of proteins. In the present study we investigated the use of molecular dynamics simulations for the refinement of GPCRs models constructed by homology modeling. Specifically, we investigated the relevance of template selection, ligand inclusion as well as the length of the simulation on the quality of the GPCRs models constructed. For this purpose we chose the crystallographic structure of the rat muscarinic M3 receptor as reference and constructed diverse atomistic models by homology modeling, using different templates. Specifically, templates used in the present work include the human muscarinic M2; the more distant human histamine H1 and the even more distant bovine rhodopsin as shown in the GPCRs phylogenetic tree. We also investigated the use or not of a ligand in the refinement process. Hence, we conducted the refinement process of the M3 model using the M2 muscarinic as template with tiotropium or NMS docked in the orthosteric site and compared with the results obtained with a model refined without any ligand bound.

  15. CONSTRUCTIVISM AND REFLECTIVISM AS THE LOGICAL COUNTERPARTS IN TESOL: LEARNING THEORY VERSUS TEACHING METHODOLOGY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abdullah al Mahmud

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available The gist of the entire constructivist learning theory is that learners are self-builders of their learning that occurs through a mental process in a social context or communication setting, and teachers as facilitators generate learning by creating the expected environment and/or utilizing the process. This article theoretically proves reflectivism as the logical counterpart of constructivism through establishing their complete interdependence andthen suggests certain strategies of reflection to be used in language teaching for ensuring the best possible constructivist learning of language learners. In doing so, the basic tenets of constructivism and reflective thoughts are elaborated, examining their mutual connection thoroughly in terms of constructivist recommendations. The research also focuses on three case studies to depict how the theory of constructivist learning principles comes into practice through judicious reviews or reflective process.

  16. Optimization of Integer Order Integrators for Deriving Improved Models of Their Fractional Counterparts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maneesha Gupta

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Second and third order digital integrators (DIs have been optimized first using Particle Swarm Optimization (PSO with minimized error fitness function obtained by registering mean, median, and standard deviation values in different random iterations. Later indirect discretization using Continued Fraction Expansion (CFE has been used to ascertain a better fitting of proposed integer order optimized DIs into their corresponding fractional counterparts by utilizing their refined properties, now restored in them due to PSO algorithm. Simulation results for the comparisons of the frequency responses of proposed 2nd and 3rd order optimized DIs and proposed discretized mathematical models of half integrators based on them, with their respective existing operators, have been presented. Proposed integer order PSO optimized integrators as well as fractional order integrators (FOIs have been observed to outperform the existing recently published operators in their respective domains reasonably well in complete range of Nyquist frequency.

  17. A Search for TeV Counterparts to BATSE Gamma-Ray Bursts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Connanughton, V.; Akerlof, C. W.; Barthelmy, S.; Biller, S.; Boyle, P.; Fishman, G. J.; Meegan, C. A.

    1997-01-01

    Intense effort has gone into the observation of optical, radio, and X-ray gamma-ray burst (GRB) counterparts, either simultaneous to the burst or as quasi-steady lingering remnants. Here we report on a similar study at higher energies of 250 GeV and above using ground-based telescopes. The recent technical advances represented by the atmospheric Cherenkov imaging technique (Cawley & Weekes 1995) have opened up the field of gamma-ray astronomy above 250 GeV and raised the possibility that these techniques can be used with excellent fluence sensitivity in exploring the GRB phenomenon. Observations by the Whipple collaboration of nine BATSE positions, one acquired within 2 minutes of the reported BATSE burst time, using coordinates distributed through the BATSE Coordinates Distribution Network (BACODINE) are reported. No evidence of TeV emission is found, and upper limits to the high-energy delayed or extended emission of observed candidates are calculated.

  18. Molecular characteristics of malignant ovarian germ cell tumors and comparison with testicular counterparts

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kraggerud, Sigrid Marie; Hoei-Hansen, Christina E; Alagaratnam, Sharmini

    2013-01-01

    their similarity to pluripotent precursor cells (primordial germ cells, PGCs) and other stem cells. This similarity combined with the process of ovary development, explain why mOGCTs present so early in life, and with greater histological complexity, than most somatic solid tumors.......This review focuses on the molecular characteristics and development of rare malignant ovarian germ cell tumors (mOGCTs). We provide an overview of the genomic aberrations assessed by ploidy, cytogenetic banding, and comparative genomic hybridization. We summarize and discuss the transcriptome...... profiles of mRNA and microRNA (miRNA), and biomarkers (DNA methylation, gene mutation, individual protein expression) for each mOGCT histological subtype. Parallels between the origin of mOGCT and their male counterpart testicular GCT (TGCT) are discussed from the perspective of germ cell development...

  19. Spatial integration by a dielectric slab and its planar graphene-based counterpart.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zangeneh-Nejad, Farzad; Khavasi, Amin

    2017-05-15

    In this contribution a new approach to perform spatial integration is presented using a dielectric slab. Our approach is indeed based on the fact that the transmission coefficient of a simple dielectric slab at its mode excitation angle matches the Fourier-Green's function of first-order integration. Inspired by the mentioned dielectric-based integrator, we further demonstrate its graphene-based counterpart. The latter is not only reconfigurable but also highly miniaturized in contrast to the previously reported designs [Opt. Commun.338, 457 (2015)OPCOB80030-401810.1016/j.optcom.2014.11.007]. Such integrators have the potential to be used in ultrafast analog computation and signal processing.

  20. Targeted recombination between homologous chromosomes for precise breeding in tomato

    OpenAIRE

    Filler Hayut, Shdema; Melamed Bessudo, Cathy; Levy, Avraham A

    2017-01-01

    Homologous recombination (HR) between parental chromosomes occurs stochastically. Here, we report on targeted recombination between homologous chromosomes upon somatic induction of DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs) via CRISPR-Cas9. We demonstrate this via a visual and molecular assay whereby DSB induction between two alleles carrying different mutations in the PHYTOENE SYNTHASE (PSY1) gene results in yellow fruits with wild type red sectors forming via HR-mediated DSB repair. We also show that ...

  1. The structure of information: from probability to homology

    OpenAIRE

    Vigneaux, Juan Pablo

    2017-01-01

    D. Bennequin and P. Baudot introduced a cohomological construction adapted to information theory, called "information cohomology" (see "The homological nature of Entropy", 2015). Our text serves as a detailed introduction to information cohomology, containing the necessary background in probability theory and homological algebra. It makes explicit the link with topos theory, as introduced by Grothendieck, Verdier and their collaborators in the SGA IV. It also contains several new construction...

  2. VizieR Online Data Catalog: A search for ultra-compact HVC counterparts (Sand+, 2015)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sand, D. J.; Crnojevic, D.; Bennet, P.; Willman, B.; Hargis, J.; Strader, J.; Olszewski, E.; Tollerud, E. J.; Simon, J. D.; Caldwell, N.; Guhathakurta, P.; James, B. L.; Koposov, S.; McLeod, B.; Morrell, N.; Peacock, M.; Salinas, R.; Seth, A. C.; Stark, D. P.; Toloba, E.

    2015-10-01

    We have searched all available optical and ultraviolet imaging archives for counterparts to the ultra-compact high-velocity clouds (UCHVCs; see section 2.1 and table 1). In addition to our archival search for counterparts to the UCHVCs, we have also acquired some supplementary imaging of select systems with the Magellan/Megacam in 2013 Jun 11 and 2014 Apr 26-27 and the APO/SPICAM in 2014 Nov 17 (see section 2.2). We have obtained spectroscopic observations for all six of the strong dwarf galaxy candidates identified in our search. ALFALFA-Dw1 (HVC274.68+74.70-123) was observed with the Inamori- Magellan Areal Camera and Spectrograph (IMACS) on the Magellan Baade telescope on 2014 June 17 (UT). GALFA-Dw1 (GALFA source 003.7+10.8+236), also known as Pisces A was observed on 2014 June 29 (UT) using the Goodman High-Throughput Spectrograph on the SOAR 4.1m telescope. GALFA-Dw2 (GALFA source 019.8+11.1+617), also known as Pisces B, was observed on 2014 October 21 (UT) with the Blue Channel Spectrograph on the MMT. GALFA-Dw3 (GALFA source 044.7+13.6+528) and GALFA-Dw4 (GALFA source 086.4+10.8+611) were observed with the 3.5m Astrophysical Research Consortium Telescope at APO on 2014 November 18 (UT) using the Dual Imaging Spectrograph (DIS). The faint, blue optical source coincident with GALFA 162.1+12.5+434 (see Figure 2) was observed on 2014 December 24 (UT) with the Blue Channel Spectrograph on the MMT. (2 data files).

  3. Esc2 and Sgs1 act in functionally distinct branches of the homologous recombination repair pathway in Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mankouri, Hocine W; Ngo, Hien-Ping; Hickson, Ian D

    2009-01-01

    homologous recombination repair (HRR) intermediates. These roles are qualitatively similar to those of Sgs1, the yeast ortholog of the human Bloom's syndrome protein, BLM. However, whereas mutation of either ESC2 or SGS1 leads to the accumulation of unprocessed HRR intermediates in the presence of MMS...

  4. cis-Prenyltransferase interacts with a Nogo-B receptor homolog for dolichol biosynthesis in Panax ginseng Meyer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ngoc Quy Nguyen

    2017-07-01

    Conclusion: Partial complementation of the yeast dolichol biosynthesis mutant rer2Δ suggested that PgCPT1 is involved in dolichol biosynthesis. Direct protein interaction between PgCPT1 and a human Nogo-B receptor homolog suggests that PgCPT1 requires an accessory component for proper function.

  5. Endogenous hepatitis C virus homolog fragments in European rabbit and hare genomes replicate in cell culture.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eliane Silva

    Full Text Available Endogenous retroviruses, non-retroviral RNA viruses and DNA viruses have been found in the mammalian genomes. The origin of Hepatitis C virus (HCV, the major cause of chronic hepatitis, liver cirrhosis, and hepatocellular carcinoma in humans, remains unclear since its discovery. Here we show that fragments homologous to HCV structural and non-structural (NS proteins present in the European rabbit (Oryctolagus cuniculus and hare (Lepus europaeus genomes replicate in bovine cell cultures. The HCV genomic homolog fragments were demonstrated by RT-PCR, PCR, mass spectrometry, and replication in bovine cell cultures by immunofluorescence assay (IFA and immunogold electron microscopy (IEM using specific MAbs for HCV NS3, NS4A, and NS5 proteins. These findings may lead to novel research approaches on the HCV origin, genesis, evolution and diversity.

  6. Inferring protein function from homology using the Princeton Protein Orthology Database (P-POD)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Livstone, Michael S.; Oughtred, Rose; Heinicke, Sven; Vernot, Benjamin; Huttenhower, Curtis; Durand, Dannie; Dolinski, Kara

    2011-01-01

    Inferring a protein’s function by homology is a powerful tool for biologists. The Princeton Protein Orthology Database (P-POD) offers a simple way to visualize and analyze the relationships between homologous proteins in order to infer function. P-POD contains computationally-generated analysis distinguishing orthologs from paralogs combined with curated published information on functional complementation and on human diseases. P-POD also features an applet, Notung, for users to explore and modify phylogenetic trees and generate their own ortholog/paralogs calls. This unit describes how to search P-POD for precomputed data, how to find and use the associated curated information from the literature, and how to use Notung to analyze and refine the results. PMID:21400696

  7. Humanization and Characterization of an Anti-Human TNF-α Murine Monoclonal Antibody

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chiu, Wei-Chun; Lai, Ya-Ping; Chou, Min-Yuan

    2011-01-01

    A murine monoclonal antibody, m357, showing the highly neutralizing activities for human tumor necrosis factor (TNF-α) was chosen to be humanized by a variable domain resurfacing approach. The non-conserved surface residues in the framework regions of both the heavy and light chain variable regions were identified via a molecular modeling of m357 built by computer-assisted homology modeling. By replacing these critical surface residues with the human counterparts, a humanized version, h357, was generated. The humanized h357 IgG1 was then stably expressed in a mammalian cell line and the purified antibody maintained the high antigen binding affinity as compared with the parental m357 based on a soluble TNF-α neutralization bioassay. Furthermore, h357 IgG1 possesses the ability to mediate antibody-dependent cell-mediated cytotoxicity and complement dependent cytotoxicity upon binding to cells bearing the transmembrane form of TNF-α. In a mouse model of collagen antibody-induced arthritis, h357 IgG significantly inhibited disease progression by intra-peritoneal injection of 50 µg/mouse once-daily for 9 consecutive days. These results provided a basis for the development of h357 IgG as therapeutic use. PMID:21305012

  8. Metagenomic gene annotation by a homology-independent approach

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Froula, Jeff; Zhang, Tao; Salmeen, Annette; Hess, Matthias; Kerfeld, Cheryl A.; Wang, Zhong; Du, Changbin

    2011-06-02

    Fully understanding the genetic potential of a microbial community requires functional annotation of all the genes it encodes. The recently developed deep metagenome sequencing approach has enabled rapid identification of millions of genes from a complex microbial community without cultivation. Current homology-based gene annotation fails to detect distantly-related or structural homologs. Furthermore, homology searches with millions of genes are very computational intensive. To overcome these limitations, we developed rhModeller, a homology-independent software pipeline to efficiently annotate genes from metagenomic sequencing projects. Using cellulases and carbonic anhydrases as two independent test cases, we demonstrated that rhModeller is much faster than HMMER but with comparable accuracy, at 94.5percent and 99.9percent accuracy, respectively. More importantly, rhModeller has the ability to detect novel proteins that do not share significant homology to any known protein families. As {approx}50percent of the 2 million genes derived from the cow rumen metagenome failed to be annotated based on sequence homology, we tested whether rhModeller could be used to annotate these genes. Preliminary results suggest that rhModeller is robust in the presence of missense and frameshift mutations, two common errors in metagenomic genes. Applying the pipeline to the cow rumen genes identified 4,990 novel cellulases candidates and 8,196 novel carbonic anhydrase candidates.In summary, we expect rhModeller to dramatically increase the speed and quality of metagnomic gene annotation.

  9. Descent with modification: the unity underlying homology and homoplasy as seen through an analysis of development and evolution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hall, Brian K

    2003-08-01

    Homology is at the foundation of comparative studies in biology at all levels from genes to phenotypes. Homology is similarity because of common descent and ancestry, homoplasy is similarity arrived at via independent evolution. However, given that there is but one tree of life, all organisms, and therefore all features of organisms, share some degree of relationship and similarity one to another. That sharing may be similarity or even identity of structure and the sharing of a most recent common ancestor--as in the homology of the arms of humans and apes--or it may reflect some (often small) degree of similarity, such as that between the wings of insects and the wings of birds, groups whose shared ancestor lies deep within the evolutionary history of the Metazoa. It may reflect sharing of entire developmental pathways, partial sharing, or divergent pathways. This review compares features classified as homologous with the classes of features normally grouped as homoplastic, the latter being convergence, parallelism, reversals, rudiments, vestiges, and atavisms. On the one hand, developmental mechanisms may be conserved, even when a complete structure does not form (rudiments, vestiges), or when a structure appears only in some individuals (atavisms). On the other hand, different developmental mechanisms can produce similar (homologous) features. Joint examination of nearness of relationship and degree of shared development reveals a continuum within an expanded category of homology, extending from homology --> reversals --> rudiments --> vestiges --> atavisms --> parallelism, with convergence as the only class of homoplasy, an idea that turns out to be surprisingly old. This realignment provides a glimmer of a way to bridge phylogenetic and developmental approaches to homology and homoplasy, a bridge that should provide a key pillar for evolutionary developmental biology (evo-devo). It will not, and in a practical sense cannot, alter how homoplastic features are

  10. Homologs of genes expressed in Caenorhabditis elegans GABAergic neurons are also found in the developing mouse forebrain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Earls Laurie R

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In an effort to identify genes that specify the mammalian forebrain, we used a comparative approach to identify mouse homologs of transcription factors expressed in developing Caenorhabditis elegans GABAergic neurons. A cell-specific microarray profiling study revealed a set of transcription factors that are highly expressed in embryonic C. elegans GABAergic neurons. Results Bioinformatic analyses identified mouse protein homologs of these selected transcripts and their expression pattern was mapped in the mouse embryonic forebrain by in situ hybridization. A review of human homologs indicates several of these genes are potential candidates in neurodevelopmental disorders. Conclusions Our comparative approach has revealed several novel candidates that may serve as future targets for studies of mammalian forebrain development.

  11. Homologous amino-terminal radioimmunoassay for rat parathyroid hormone.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calvo, M S; Gundberg, C M; Heath, H; Fox, J

    1991-08-01

    Existing radioimmunoassays for parathyroid hormone (PTH) in rat plasma are based on cross-reactivity of rat PTH (rPTH) with heterologous antisera. We used the synthetic NH2-terminal fragment of rPTH [rPTH-(1-34)] to develop a homologous radioimmunoassay for circulating PTH. An antiserum to rPTH-(1-34) was raised in a goat (G-813), and the same peptide was used as radioligand (125I) and standard. Purification of the label by high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) increased specific binding greater than twofold and sensitivity by 50-100%. With a final antiserum dilution of 1:70,000, maximum specific binding of 30-33%, nonspecific binding of 1-5%, and 50-microliters sample additions, the assay detection limit was 1.8-2.5 pmol/l. A midregional fragment of human PTH did not displace 125I-labeled rPTH-(1-34). HPLC of extracts of rat parathyroid glands and hyperparathyroid plasma showed only a single peak of immunoreactivity that eluted 2 min after rPTH-(1-34). Dose dilution curves for rat parathyroid gland extracts, rPTH-(1-34) added to rat plasma, and endogenous rat plasma PTH all paralleled the standard curve. Immunoreactive PTH (irPTH) was detectable in greater than 90% of fasting normal rat plasma and changed appropriately in response to hyper- and hypocalcemia induced by low-calcium and vitamin D-deficient diets, injections of calcium and EDTA, and after thyroparathyroidectomy. The normal range for rat plasma irPTH was less than 2.0-12 pmol/l, in general agreement with bioassay results of others. Thus rPTH-(1-34) is an excellent immunogen for raising antisera to rPTH, and assays incorporating it may be of great value in studying rat parathyroid physiology.

  12. Topoisomerase II-mediated DNA damage is differently repaired during the cell cycle by non-homologous end joining and homologous recombination.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcelo de Campos-Nebel

    Full Text Available Topoisomerase II (Top2 is a nuclear enzyme involved in several metabolic processes of DNA. Chemotherapy agents that poison Top2 are known to induce persistent protein-mediated DNA double strand breaks (DSB. In this report, by using knock down experiments, we demonstrated that Top2alpha was largely responsible for the induction of gammaH2AX and cytotoxicity by the Top2 poisons idarubicin and etoposide in normal human cells. As DSB resulting from Top2 poisons-mediated damage may be repaired by non-homologous end joining (NHEJ or homologous recombination (HR, we aimed to analyze both DNA repair pathways. We found that DNA-PKcs was rapidly activated in human cells, as evidenced by autophosphorylation at serine 2056, following Top2-mediated DNA damage. The chemical inhibition of DNA-PKcs by wortmannin and vanillin resulted in an increased accumulation of DNA DSB, as evaluated by the comet assay. This was supported by a hypersensitive phenotype to Top2 poisons of Ku80- and DNA-PKcs- defective Chinese hamster cell lines. We also showed that Rad51 protein levels, Rad51 foci formation and sister chromatid exchanges were increased in human cells following Top2-mediated DNA damage. In support, BRCA2- and Rad51C- defective Chinese hamster cells displayed hypersensitivity to Top2 poisons. The analysis by immunofluorescence of the DNA DSB repair response in synchronized human cell cultures revealed activation of DNA-PKcs throughout the cell cycle and Rad51 foci formation in S and late S/G2 cells. Additionally, we found an increase of DNA-PKcs-mediated residual repair events, but not Rad51 residual foci, into micronucleated and apoptotic cells. Therefore, we conclude that in human cells both NHEJ and HR are required, with cell cycle stage specificity, for the repair of Top2-mediated reversible DNA damage. Moreover, NHEJ-mediated residual repair events are more frequently associated to irreversibly damaged cells.

  13. The health concerns and behaviours of primigravida: comparing advanced age pregnant women with their younger counterparts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loke, Alice Yuen; Poon, Chung Fan

    2011-04-01

    This study was to describe and compare the health concerns, behaviours and anxiety of advanced age pregnant women (35 years and older) with their younger counterparts. Women have specific health concerns and behaviours during pregnancy. Delayed childbearing has an increased risk of adverse pregnancy outcomes and advanced age pregnant women may have more health concerns than younger ones. A cross-sectional study. Primigravidae Chinese women aged 35 or older (n = 47) and 188 younger than aged 35 were recruited in February and March of 2005 by convenient sampling from the antenatal clinic of a regional hospital in Hong Kong to complete a questionnaire. Advanced age pregnant women when compared with their counterparts were more likely to have tertiary education (42·6% vs. 28·7%) and a higher family monthly income of Hong Kong $40,001 or more (40·5% vs. 15·4%). They were more likely to be concerned the possibility of miscarriage (63·8% vs. 45·9%) and the physical demands of caring for the newborn (61·7% vs. 45·4%) but were more likely to take up healthy behaviours such as 'eating nutritious food' (100%) and avoiding 'wearing tight clothing and high-heel shoes'(100%). Advanced age women were more likely to be concerned about their 'recovery after childbirth' (63·8% vs. 42·7%), Down's syndrome (70·2% vs. 37·8%) and structural defects of their foetus (78·7% vs. 54·1%). The results of this study provide a background for improving prenatal care catering for the specific health concerns of the advanced aged and promotion of health behaviours among younger pregnant women. Antenatal, obstetric and community health nurses have the responsibility to provide education and support services catering to the special concerns of pregnant women at different ages. Health professionals should promote the prime time for childbearing and deliver messages regarding the potential problems associated with later childbearing at premarital counselling. © 2011 Blackwell Publishing

  14. Multiscale analysis of nonlinear systems using computational homology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Konstantin Mischaikow, Rutgers University/Georgia Institute of Technology, Michael Schatz, Georgia Institute of Technology, William Kalies, Florida Atlantic University, Thomas Wanner,George Mason University

    2010-05-19

    This is a collaborative project between the principal investigators. However, as is to be expected, different PIs have greater focus on different aspects of the project. This report lists these major directions of research which were pursued during the funding period: (1) Computational Homology in Fluids - For the computational homology effort in thermal convection, the focus of the work during the first two years of the funding period included: (1) A clear demonstration that homology can sensitively detect the presence or absence of an important flow symmetry, (2) An investigation of homology as a probe for flow dynamics, and (3) The construction of a new convection apparatus for probing the effects of large-aspect-ratio. (2) Computational Homology in Cardiac Dynamics - We have initiated an effort to test the use of homology in characterizing data from both laboratory experiments and numerical simulations of arrhythmia in the heart. Recently, the use of high speed, high sensitivity digital imaging in conjunction with voltage sensitive fluorescent dyes has enabled researchers to visualize electrical activity on the surface of cardiac tissue, both in vitro and in vivo. (3) Magnetohydrodynamics - A new research direction is to use computational homology to analyze results of large scale simulations of 2D turbulence in the presence of magnetic fields. Such simulations are relevant to the dynamics of black hole accretion disks. The complex flow patterns from simulations exhibit strong qualitative changes as a function of magnetic field strength. Efforts to characterize the pattern changes using Fourier methods and wavelet analysis have been unsuccessful. (4) Granular Flow - two experts in the area of granular media are studying 2D model experiments of earthquake dynamics where the stress fields can be measured; these stress fields from complex patterns of 'force chains' that may be amenable to analysis using computational homology. (5) Microstructure

  15. Multiscale analysis of nonlinear systems using computational homology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Konstantin Mischaikow; Michael Schatz; William Kalies; Thomas Wanner

    2010-05-24

    This is a collaborative project between the principal investigators. However, as is to be expected, different PIs have greater focus on different aspects of the project. This report lists these major directions of research which were pursued during the funding period: (1) Computational Homology in Fluids - For the computational homology effort in thermal convection, the focus of the work during the first two years of the funding period included: (1) A clear demonstration that homology can sensitively detect the presence or absence of an important flow symmetry, (2) An investigation of homology as a probe for flow dynamics, and (3) The construction of a new convection apparatus for probing the effects of large-aspect-ratio. (2) Computational Homology in Cardiac Dynamics - We have initiated an effort to test the use of homology in characterizing data from both laboratory experiments and numerical simulations of arrhythmia in the heart. Recently, the use of high speed, high sensitivity digital imaging in conjunction with voltage sensitive fluorescent dyes has enabled researchers to visualize electrical activity on the surface of cardiac tissue, both in vitro and in vivo. (3) Magnetohydrodynamics - A new research direction is to use computational homology to analyze results of large scale simulations of 2D turbulence in the presence of magnetic fields. Such simulations are relevant to the dynamics of black hole accretion disks. The complex flow patterns from simulations exhibit strong qualitative changes as a function of magnetic field strength. Efforts to characterize the pattern changes using Fourier methods and wavelet analysis have been unsuccessful. (4) Granular Flow - two experts in the area of granular media are studying 2D model experiments of earthquake dynamics where the stress fields can be measured; these stress fields from complex patterns of 'force chains' that may be amenable to analysis using computational homology. (5) Microstructure

  16. Microtubules in bacteria: Ancient tubulins build a five-protofilament homolog of the eukaryotic cytoskeleton.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martin Pilhofer

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Microtubules play crucial roles in cytokinesis, transport, and motility, and are therefore superb targets for anti-cancer drugs. All tubulins evolved from a common ancestor they share with the distantly related bacterial cell division protein FtsZ, but while eukaryotic tubulins evolved into highly conserved microtubule-forming heterodimers, bacterial FtsZ presumably continued to function as single homopolymeric protofilaments as it does today. Microtubules have not previously been found in bacteria, and we lack insight into their evolution from the tubulin/FtsZ ancestor. Using electron cryomicroscopy, here we show that the tubulin homologs BtubA and BtubB form microtubules in bacteria and suggest these be referred to as "bacterial microtubules" (bMTs. bMTs share important features with their eukaryotic counterparts, such as straight protofilaments and similar protofilament interactions. bMTs are composed of only five protofilaments, however, instead of the 13 typical in eukaryotes. These and other results suggest that rather than being derived from modern eukaryotic tubulin, BtubA and BtubB arose from early tubulin intermediates that formed small microtubules. Since we show that bacterial microtubules can be produced in abundance in vitro without chaperones, they should be useful tools for tubulin research and drug screening.

  17. Conservation of the nucleotide excision repair pathway: characterization of hydra Xeroderma Pigmentosum group F homolog.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Apurva Barve

    Full Text Available Hydra, one of the earliest metazoans with tissue grade organization and nervous system, is an animal with a remarkable regeneration capacity and shows no signs of organismal aging. We have for the first time identified genes of the nucleotide excision repair (NER pathway from hydra. Here we report cloning and characterization of hydra homolog of xeroderma pigmentosum group F (XPF gene that encodes a structure-specific 5' endonuclease which is a crucial component of NER. In silico analysis shows that hydra XPF amino acid sequence is very similar to its counterparts from other animals, especially vertebrates, and shows all features essential for its function. By in situ hybridization, we show that hydra XPF is expressed prominently in the multipotent stem cell niche in the central region of the body column. Ectoderm of the diploblastic hydra was shown to express higher levels of XPF as compared to the endoderm by semi-quantitative RT-PCR. Semi-quantitative RT-PCR analysis also demonstrated that interstitial cells, a multipotent and rapidly cycling stem cell lineage of hydra, express higher levels of XPF mRNA than other cell types. Our data show that XPF and by extension, the NER pathway is highly conserved during evolution. The prominent expression of an NER gene in interstitial cells may have implications for the lack of senescence in hydra.

  18. Conservation of the nucleotide excision repair pathway: characterization of hydra Xeroderma Pigmentosum group F homolog.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barve, Apurva; Ghaskadbi, Saroj; Ghaskadbi, Surendra

    2013-01-01

    Hydra, one of the earliest metazoans with tissue grade organization and nervous system, is an animal with a remarkable regeneration capacity and shows no signs of organismal aging. We have for the first time identified genes of the nucleotide excision repair (NER) pathway from hydra. Here we report cloning and characterization of hydra homolog of xeroderma pigmentosum group F (XPF) gene that encodes a structure-specific 5' endonuclease which is a crucial component of NER. In silico analysis shows that hydra XPF amino acid sequence is very similar to its counterparts from other animals, especially vertebrates, and shows all features essential for its function. By in situ hybridization, we show that hydra XPF is expressed prominently in the multipotent stem cell niche in the central region of the body column. Ectoderm of the diploblastic hydra was shown to express higher levels of XPF as compared to the endoderm by semi-quantitative RT-PCR. Semi-quantitative RT-PCR analysis also demonstrated that interstitial cells, a multipotent and rapidly cycling stem cell lineage of hydra, express higher levels of XPF mRNA than other cell types. Our data show that XPF and by extension, the NER pathway is highly conserved during evolution. The prominent expression of an NER gene in interstitial cells may have implications for the lack of senescence in hydra.

  19. PDBalert: automatic, recurrent remote homology tracking and protein structure prediction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Söding Johannes

    2008-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background During the last years, methods for remote homology detection have grown more and more sensitive and reliable. Automatic structure prediction servers relying on these methods can generate useful 3D models even below 20% sequence identity between the protein of interest and the known structure (template. When no homologs can be found in the protein structure database (PDB, the user would need to rerun the same search at regular intervals in order to make timely use of a template once it becomes available. Results PDBalert is a web-based automatic system that sends an email alert as soon as a structure with homology to a protein in the user's watch list is released to the PDB database or appears among the sequences on hold. The mail contains links to the search results and to an automatically generated 3D homology model. The sequence search is performed with the same software as used by the very sensitive and reliable remote homology detection server HHpred, which is based on pairwise comparison of Hidden Markov models. Conclusion PDBalert will accelerate the information flow from the PDB database to all those who can profit from the newly released protein structures for predicting the 3D structure or function of their proteins of interest.

  20. Heterozygous genome assembly via binary classification of homologous sequence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bodily, Paul M; Fujimoto, M; Ortega, Cameron; Okuda, Nozomu; Price, Jared C; Clement, Mark J; Snell, Quinn

    2015-01-01

    Genome assemblers to date have predominantly targeted haploid reference reconstruction from homozygous data. When applied to diploid genome assembly, these assemblers perform poorly, owing to the violation of assumptions during both the contigging and scaffolding phases. Effective tools to overcome these problems are in growing demand. Increasing parameter stringency during contigging is an effective solution to obtaining haplotype-specific contigs; however, effective algorithms for scaffolding such contigs are lacking. We present a stand-alone scaffolding algorithm, ScaffoldScaffolder, designed specifically for scaffolding diploid genomes. The algorithm identifies homologous sequences as found in "bubble" structures in scaffold graphs. Machine learning classification is used to then classify sequences in partial bubbles as homologous or non-homologous sequences prior to reconstructing haplotype-specific scaffolds. We define four new metrics for assessing diploid scaffolding accuracy: contig sequencing depth, contig homogeneity, phase group homogeneity, and heterogeneity between phase groups. We demonstrate the viability of using bubbles to identify heterozygous homologous contigs, which we term homolotigs. We show that machine learning classification trained on these homolotig pairs can be used effectively for identifying homologous sequences elsewhere in the data with high precision (assuming error-free reads). More work is required to comparatively analyze this approach on real data with various parameters and classifiers against other diploid genome assembly methods. However, the initial results of ScaffoldScaffolder supply validity to the idea of employing machine learning in the difficult task of diploid genome assembly. Software is available at http://bioresearch.byu.edu/scaffoldscaffolder.

  1. The OGCleaner: filtering false-positive homology clusters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fujimoto, M Stanley; Suvorov, Anton; Jensen, Nicholas O; Clement, Mark J; Snell, Quinn; Bybee, Seth M

    2017-01-01

    Detecting homologous sequences in organisms is an essential step in protein structure and function prediction, gene annotation and phylogenetic tree construction. Heuristic methods are often employed for quality control of putative homology clusters. These heuristics, however, usually only apply to pairwise sequence comparison and do not examine clusters as a whole. We present the Orthology Group Cleaner (the OGCleaner), a tool designed for filtering putative orthology groups as homology or non-homology clusters by considering all sequences in a cluster. The OGCleaner relies on high-quality orthologous groups identified in OrthoDB to train machine learning algorithms that are able to distinguish between true-positive and false-positive homology groups. This package aims to improve the quality of phylogenetic tree construction especially in instances of lower-quality transcriptome assemblies. https://github.com/byucsl/ogcleaner CONTACT: sfujimoto@gmail.comSupplementary information: Supplementary data are available at Bioinformatics online. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  2. Primary homologies of the circumorbital bones of snakes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palci, Alessandro; Caldwell, Michael W

    2013-09-01

    Some snakes have two circumorbital ossifications that in the current literature are usually referred to as the postorbital and supraorbital. We review the arguments that have been proposed to justify this interpretation and provide counter-arguments that reject those conjectures of primary homology based on the observation of 32 species of lizards and 81 species of snakes (both extant and fossil). We present similarity arguments, both topological and structural, for reinterpretation of the primary homologies of the dorsal and posterior orbital ossifications of snakes. Applying the test of similarity, we conclude that the posterior orbital ossification of snakes is topologically consistent as the homolog of the lacertilian jugal, and that the dorsal orbital ossification present in some snakes (e.g., pythons, Loxocemus, and Calabaria) is the homolog of the lacertilian postfrontal. We therefore propose that the terms postorbital and supraorbital should be abandoned as reference language for the circumorbital bones of snakes, and be replaced with the terms jugal and postfrontal, respectively. The primary homology claim for the snake "postorbital" fails the test of similarity, while the term "supraorbital" is an unnecessary and inaccurate application of the concept of a neomorphic ossification, for an element that passes the test of similarity as a postfrontal. This reinterpretation of the circumorbital bones of snakes is bound to have important repercussions for future phylogenetic analyses and consequently for our understanding of the origin and evolution of snakes. Copyright © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  3. Conservation and co-option in developmental programmes: the importance of homology relationships

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Becker May-Britt

    2005-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract One of the surprising insights gained from research in evolutionary developmental biology (evo-devo is that increasing diversity in body plans and morphology in organisms across animal phyla are not reflected in similarly dramatic changes at the level of gene composition of their genomes. For instance, simplicity at the tissue level of organization often contrasts with a high degree of genetic complexity. Also intriguing is the observation that the coding regions of several genes of invertebrates show high sequence similarity to those in humans. This lack of change (conservation indicates that evolutionary novelties may arise more frequently through combinatorial processes, such as changes in gene regulation and the recruitment of novel genes into existing regulatory gene networks (co-option, and less often through adaptive evolutionary processes in the coding portions of a gene. As a consequence, it is of great interest to examine whether the widespread conservation of the genetic machinery implies the same developmental function in a last common ancestor, or whether homologous genes acquired new developmental roles in structures of independent phylogenetic origin. To distinguish between these two possibilities one must refer to current concepts of phylogeny reconstruction and carefully investigate homology relationships. Particularly problematic in terms of homology decisions is the use of gene expression patterns of a given structure. In the future, research on more organisms other than the typical model systems will be required since these can provide insights that are not easily obtained from comparisons among only a few distantly related model species.

  4. Identification of Oxa1 Homologs Operating in the Eukaryotic Endoplasmic Reticulum

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Andrei Anghel

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Members of the evolutionarily conserved Oxa1/Alb3/YidC family mediate membrane protein biogenesis at the mitochondrial inner membrane, chloroplast thylakoid membrane, and bacterial plasma membrane, respectively. Despite their broad phylogenetic distribution, no Oxa1/Alb3/YidC homologs are known to operate in eukaryotic cells outside the endosymbiotic organelles. Here, we present bioinformatic evidence that the tail-anchored protein insertion factor WRB/Get1, the “endoplasmic reticulum (ER membrane complex” subunit EMC3, and TMCO1 are ER-resident homologs of the Oxa1/Alb3/YidC family. Topology mapping and co-evolution-based modeling demonstrate that Get1, EMC3, and TMCO1 share a conserved Oxa1-like architecture. Biochemical analysis of human TMCO1, the only homolog not previously linked to membrane protein biogenesis, shows that it associates with the Sec translocon and ribosomes. These findings suggest a specific biochemical function for TMCO1 and define a superfamily of proteins—the “Oxa1 superfamily”—whose shared function is to facilitate membrane protein biogenesis.

  5. Persistent homology of time-dependent functional networks constructed from coupled time series

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stolz, Bernadette J.; Harrington, Heather A.; Porter, Mason A.

    2017-04-01

    We use topological data analysis to study "functional networks" that we construct from time-series data from both experimental and synthetic sources. We use persistent homology with a weight rank clique filtration to gain insights into these functional networks, and we use persistence landscapes to interpret our results. Our first example uses time-series output from networks of coupled Kuramoto oscillators. Our second example consists of biological data in the form of functional magnetic resonance imaging data that were acquired from human subjects during a simple motor-learning task in which subjects were monitored for three days during a five-day period. With these examples, we demonstrate that (1) using persistent homology to study functional networks provides fascinating insights into their properties and (2) the position of the features in a filtration can sometimes play a more vital role than persistence in the interpretation of topological features, even though conventionally the latter is used to distinguish between signal and noise. We find that persistent homology can detect differences in synchronization patterns in our data sets over time, giving insight both on changes in community structure in the networks and on increased synchronization between brain regions that form loops in a functional network during motor learning. For the motor-learning data, persistence landscapes also reveal that on average the majority of changes in the network loops take place on the second of the three days of the learning process.

  6. A Likely Redback Millisecond Pulsar Counterpart of 3FGL J0838.8-2829

    Science.gov (United States)

    Halpern, J. P.; Strader, J.; Li, M.

    2017-08-01

    We obtained new optical observations of the X-ray source XMMU J083850.38-282756.8, the previously proposed counterpart of the γ-ray source 3FGL J0838.8-2829. Time-series photometry in the r\\prime band reveals periodic modulation of ≈ 1 mag that is characteristic of the heating of the photosphere of a low-mass companion star by a compact object. The measured orbital period is 5.14817 ± 0.00012 hr. The shape of the light curve is variable, evidently due to the effects of flaring and asymmetric heating. Spectroscopy reveals a companion of type M1 or later, having a radial velocity amplitude of 315 ± 17 km s-1, with period and phasing consistent with the heating interpretation. The mass function of the compact object is 0.69+/- 0.11 {M}⊙ , which allows a neutron star in a high-inclination orbit. Variable, broad Hα emission is seen, which is probably associated with a wind from the companion. These properties, as well as the X-ray and γ-ray luminosities at the inferred distance of millisecond pulsar in its non-accreting state. A search for radio pulsations is needed to confirm this interpretation and derive complete system parameters for modeling, although absorption by the ionized wind could hinder such detection.

  7. Probing extra dimension through gravitational wave observations of compact binaries and their electromagnetic counterparts

    CERN Document Server

    Yu, Hao; Huang, Fa Peng; Wang, Yong-Qiang; Meng, Xin-He; Liu, Yu-Xiao

    2016-01-01

    The gravitational wave (GW) observations of compact binaries and their possible electromagnetic counterparts may be used to probe the nature of the extra dimension. It is widely accepted that gravitons and photons are the only two completely confirmed objects that can travel along the null geodesics in our four-dimensional space-time. But when one considers that there exists the fifth dimension and only the GW can propagate freely in the bulk, the causal propagations of the GW and electromagnetic wave (EMW) are in general different. In this paper, we compute the null geodesics of the GW and EMW in a five-dimensional anti-de Sitter space-time and our four-dimensional universe in the present of the curvature of universe $k$, respectively. We show that for general cases the horizon radius of the GW is longer than the EMW within the equal time. Taking the GW 150914 event detected by the Advanced Laser Interferometer Gravitational-Wave Observatory (LIGO) and the X-ray event detected by the Fermi Gamma-ray Burst Mo...

  8. Captive coyotes compared to their counterparts in the wild: does environmental enrichment help?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shivik, John A; Palmer, Gemma L; Gese, Eric M; Osthaus, Britta

    2009-01-01

    This article attempts to determine the effects of environment (captive or wild) and a simple form of environmental enrichment on the behavior and physiology of a nonhuman animal. Specifically, analyses first compared behavioral budgets and stereotypic behavior of captive coyotes (Canis latrans) in kennels and pens to their counterparts in the wild. Second, experiments examined the effect of a simple form of environmental enrichment for captive coyotes (food-filled bones) on behavioral budgets, stereotypies, and corticosteroid levels. Overall, behavioral budgets of captive coyotes in both kennels and pens were similar to those observed in the wild, but coyotes in captivity exhibited significantly more stereotypic behavior. Intermittently providing a bone generally lowered resting and increased foraging behaviors but did not significantly reduce stereotypic behavior or alter corticosteroid levels. Thus, coyote behavior in captivity can be similar to that exhibited in the wild; in addition, although enrichment can affect proportions of elicited behaviors, abnormal behaviors and corticosteroid levels may require more than a simple form of environmental enrichment for their reduction.

  9. Access and Social Capital: A Profile of Community College and Global Counterparts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rosalind Latiner Raby

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Alternatives to the traditional four-year public and private university include a sector of higher education that offers a more advanced curriculum than secondary school and serves as a local and often lower-cost pathway that gives options for university overflow for adult learners, displaced workers, life-long learners, workforce learners, developmental learners, and non-traditional learners (Raby and Valeau 2009. These institutional types are known by several names including College of Further Education, Community College, Polytechnic, Technical College, and Technical and Further Education (TAFE and are found on all continents. Based on a literature review of 1,083 academic publications these institutions share a mission that views educational access as necessary for growing the economic and social capital that is needed to help students improve lives. Central to this mission is the belief that any amount of post-secondary education is life-enhancing, regardless of length of study or level of completion. This article examines application of this mission at community colleges and global counterparts throughout the world.

  10. Probing the infrared counterparts of diffuse far-ultraviolet sources in the Galaxy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saikia, Gautam; Shalima, P.; Gogoi, Rupjyoti; Pathak, Amit

    2017-12-01

    Recent availability of high quality infrared (IR) data for diffuse regions in the Galaxy and external galaxies have added to our understanding of interstellar dust. A comparison of ultraviolet (UV) and IR observations may be used to estimate absorption, scattering and thermal emission from interstellar dust. In this paper, we report IR and UV observations for selective diffuse sources in the Galaxy. Using archival mid-infrared (MIR) and far-infrared (FIR) observations from Spitzer Space Telescope, we look for counterparts of diffuse far-ultraviolet (FUV) sources observed by the Voyager, Far Ultraviolet Spectroscopic Explorer (FUSE) and Galaxy Evolution Explorer (GALEX) telescopes in the Galaxy. IR emission features at 8 μm are generally attributed to Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbon (PAH) molecules, while emission at 24 μm are attributed to Very Small Grains (VSGs). The data presented here is unique and our study tries to establish a relation between various dust populations. By studying the FUV-IR correlations separately at low and high latitude locations, we have identified the grain component responsible for the diffuse FUV emission.

  11. Are red-tailed hawks and great horned owls diurnal-nocturnal dietary counterparts?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marti, C.D.; Kochert, Michael N.

    1995-01-01

    Red-tailed Hawks (Buteo jamaicensis) and Great Homed Owls (Bubo virginianus)are common in North America where they occupy a wide range of habitats, often sympatrically. The two species are similar in size and have been portrayed as ecological counterparts, eating the same prey by day and night. We tested the trophic similarity of the two species by comparing published dietary data from across the United States. Both species ate primarily mammals and birds, and mean proportions of those two prey types did not differ significantly between diets of the two raptors. Red-tailed Hawks ate significantly more reptiles, and Great Homed Owls significantly more invertebrates. Dietary diversity was not significantly different at the level of prey taxonomic class, and diet overlap between the two species averaged 91%. At the prey species level, dietary overlap averaged only 50%, and at that level Red-tailed Hawk dietary diversity was significantly greater than that of Great Horned Owls. Mean prey mass of Red-tailed Hawks was significantly greater than that of Great Homed Owls. Populations of the two species in the western United States differed trophically more than did eastern populations. We conclude that, although the two species are generalist predators, they take largely different prey species in the same localities resulting in distinctive trophic characteristics.

  12. Probing the Radio Counterpart of Gamma-ray Flaring Region in 3C 84

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nagai Hiroshi

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available The radio source 3C 84 associated with the radio/giant elliptical galaxy NGC 1275 is one of the best targets to probe the radio counterpart of the γ-ray emitting region. Although this source shows clear time variability in γ-ray bands, no clear correlation in radio light curve was found on the timescale of –ray variability. The location of the γ-ray flaring region has been an open question. In this proceeding, we firstly review our previous findings from radio observations. Next we present our new results based on the Very Long Baseline Array (VLBA data at 43 GHz. We discover the limb-brightened structure in the “restarted” jet associated with the 2005 radio outburst. In 1990s, the jet structure was rather ridge-brightening than limbbrightening, despite the observations were done with similar angular resolution. This indicates that the radio jet morphology in terms of the transverse structure has been indeed changed recently. This change in the morphology shows an interesting agreement with the time variation of the γ-ray flux density, i.e., the γ-ray flux density in 1990s was more than 7 times lower than the current one. We argue the possibility that the transition from ridge-brightening to limb-brightening is related to the γ-ray time variability.

  13. BurstCube: A CubeSat for Gravitational Wave Counterparts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perkins, Jeremy S.; Racusin, Judith; Briggs, Michael; de Nolfo, Georgia; Caputo, Regina; Krizmanic, John; McEnery, Julie E.; Shawhan, Peter; Morris, David; Connaughton, Valerie; Kocevski, Dan; Wilson-Hodge, Colleen A.; Hui, Michelle; Mitchell, Lee; McBreen, Sheila

    2018-01-01

    We present BurstCube, a novel CubeSat that will detect and localize Gamma-ray Bursts (GRBs). BurstCube is a selected mission that will detect long GRBs, attributed to the collapse of massive stars, short GRBs (sGRBs), resulting from binary neutron star mergers, as well as other gamma-ray transients in the energy range 10-1000 keV. sGRBs are of particular interest because they are predicted to be the counterparts of gravitational wave (GW) sources soon to be detectable by LIGO/Virgo. BurstCube contains 4 CsI scintillators coupled with arrays of compact low-power Silicon photomultipliers (SiPMs) on a 6U Dellingr bus, a flagship modular platform that is easily modifiable for a variety of 6U CubeSat architectures. BurstCube will complement existing facilities such as Swift and Fermi in the short term, and provide a means for GRB detection, localization, and characterization in the interim time before the next generation future gamma-ray mission flies, as well as space-qualify SiPMs and test technologies for future use on larger gamma-ray missions. The ultimate configuration of BurstCube is to have a set of ~10 BurstCubes to provide all-sky coverage to GRBs for substantially lower cost than a full-scale mission.

  14. Postprandial hypoglycemic effect of mulberry leaf in Goto-Kakizaki rats and counterpart control Wistar rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Ji Min; Bong, Ha Yoon; Jeong, Hye In; Kim, Yeon Kyoung; Kim, Ji Yeon; Kwon, Oran

    2009-01-01

    Postprandial hypoglycemic effect of mulberry leaf (Morus alba L.) was compared in two animal models: Goto-Kakizaki (GK) rats, a spontaneous non-obese animal model for type II diabetes, and their counterpart control Wistar rats. First, the effect of a single oral administration of mulberry leaf aqueous extract (MLE) on postprandial glucose responses was determined using maltose or glucose as substrate. With maltose-loading, MLE reduced peak responses of blood glucose significantly in both GK and Wistar rats (P glucose-loading, MLE also significantly reduced blood glucose concentrations, measured at 30 min, in both animal models (P glucose transport by MLE. Next, dried mulberry leaf powder (MLP) was administered for 8 weeks by inclusion in the diet. By MLP administration, fasting blood glucose was significantly reduced at weeks 4 and 5 (P rats. Insulin, HOMA-IR, C-reactive protein, and triglycerides tended to be decreased by MLP treatment in GK rats. All other biochemical parameters were not changed by MLP administration in GK rats. Collectively, these findings support that MLE has significant postprandial hypoglycemic effect in both non-obese diabetic and healthy animals, which may be beneficial as food supplement to manage postprandial blood glucose. Inhibitions of glucose transport as well as alpha-glucosidase in the small intestine were suggested as possible mechanisms related with the postprandial hypoglycemic effect of MLE.

  15. Moringa oleifera Root Induces Cancer Apoptosis more Effectively than Leave Nanocomposites and Its Free Counterpart

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abd-Rabou, Ahmed A; Abdalla, Aboelfetoh M; Ali, Naglaa A; Zoheir, Khairy MA

    2017-01-01

    Medicinal plants are important elements of indigenous medical system that have persisted in developing countries. Many of the botanical chemo-preventions currently used as potent anticancer agents. However, some important anticancer agents are still extracted from plants because they cannot be synthesized chemically on a commercial scale due to their complex structures that often contain several chiral centers. The aim of this study was to test different extracts from the Moringa oleifera leaves (ML), its PLGA-CS-PEG nanocomposites (MLn), as well as root core (Rc) and outer (Ro) parts for activity against hepatocarcinoma HepG2, breast MCF7, and colorectal HCT 116/ Caco-2 cells in vitro. Nano-composites were prepared and characterized. Then, the nanocomposites and the free counterparts were screened on different propagated cancer cell lines. The underlying cytotoxic impact was followed using apoptosis measurements. All extracts kill the different cancer cells with different ratios, but intriguingly, the root core extract could kill the majority of cancer cells (approximately 70-80%), while sparing normal BHK-21 cells with minimal inhibitory effect (approximately 30-40%). Apoptotic cell increment came to confirm the cytotoxic effects of these extracts on HCT 116 cells (Rc: 212% and Ro: 180%, respectively) and HepG2 cells (ML: 567.5% and MLn: 608%, respectively) compared to control (100%) mechanistically wise. Moringa oleifera nanocomposites may have potential for use as a natural source of anti-cancer compounds. PMID:28843248

  16. The cocoon emission - an electromagnetic counterpart to gravitational waves from neutron star mergers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gottlieb, Ore; Nakar, Ehud; Piran, Tsvi

    2018-01-01

    Short gamma-ray bursts are believed to arise from compact binary mergers (either neutron star-neutron star or black hole-neutron star). If so, their jets must penetrate outflows that are ejected during the merger. As a jet crosses the ejecta, it dissipates its energy, producing a hot cocoon that surrounds it. We present here 3D numerical simulations of jet propagation in mergers' outflows, and we calculate the resulting emission. This emission consists of two components: the cooling emission, the leakage of the thermal energy of the hot cocoon, and the cocoon macronova that arises from the radioactive decay of the cocoon's material. This emission gives a brief (∼1 h) blue, wide angle signal. While the parameters of the outflow and jet are uncertain, for the configurations we have considered, the signal is bright (∼-14 to -15 absolute magnitude) and outshines all other predicted ultraviolet-optical signals. The signal is brighter when the jet breakout time is longer, and its peak brightness does not depend strongly on the highly uncertain opacity. A rapid search for such a signal is a promising strategy to detect an electromagnetic merger counterpart. A detected candidate could be then followed by deep infrared searches for the longer but weaker macronova arising from the rest of the ejecta.

  17. AT 2017gfo: An Anisotropic and Three-component Kilonova Counterpart of GW170817

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perego, Albino; Radice, David; Bernuzzi, Sebastiano

    2017-12-01

    The detection of a kilo/macronova electromagnetic counterpart (AT 2017gfo) of the first gravitational-wave signal compatible with the merger of two neutron stars (GW170817) has confirmed the occurrence of r-process nucleosynthesis in this kind of event. The blue and red components of AT 2017gfo have been interpreted as the signature of multi-component ejecta in the merger dynamics. However, the explanation of AT 2017gfo in terms of the properties of the ejecta and of the ejection mechanisms is still incomplete. In this work, we analyze AT 2017gfo with a new semi-analytic model of kilo/macronova inferred from general-relativistic simulations of the merger and long-term numerical models of the merger aftermath. The model accounts for the anisotropic emission from the three known mass ejecta components: dynamic, winds, and secular outflows from the disk. The early multi-band light curves of AT 2017gfo can only be explained by the presence of a relatively low-opacity component of the ejecta at high latitudes. This points to the key role of weak interactions in setting the ejecta properties and determining the nucleosynthetic yields. Our model also constrains the total ejected mass associated to AT 2017gfo to be between 0.042 and 0.077 {M}⊙ , the observation angle of the source to be between π /12 and 7π /36, and the mass of the disk to be ≳ 0.08 {M}⊙ .

  18. J-GEM observations of an electromagnetic counterpart to the neutron star merger GW170817

    Science.gov (United States)

    Utsumi, Yousuke; Tanaka, Masaomi; Tominaga, Nozomu; Yoshida, Michitoshi; Barway, Sudhanshu; Nagayama, Takahiro; Zenko, Tetsuya; Aoki, Kentaro; Fujiyoshi, Takuya; Furusawa, Hisanori; Kawabata, Koji S.; Koshida, Shintaro; Lee, Chien-Hsiu; Morokuma, Tomoki; Motohara, Kentaro; Nakata, Fumiaki; Ohsawa, Ryou; Ohta, Kouji; Okita, Hirofumi; Tajitsu, Akito; Tanaka, Ichi; Terai, Tsuyoshi; Yasuda, Naoki; Abe, Fumio; Asakura, Yuichiro; Bond, Ian A.; Miyazaki, Shota; Sumi, Takahiro; Tristram, Paul J.; Honda, Satoshi; Itoh, Ryosuke; Itoh, Yoichi; Kawabata, Miho; Morihana, Kumiko; Nagashima, Hiroki; Nakaoka, Tatsuya; Ohshima, Tomohito; Takahashi, Jun; Takayama, Masaki; Aoki, Wako; Baar, Stefan; Doi, Mamoru; Finet, Francois; Kanda, Nobuyuki; Kawai, Nobuyuki; Kim, Ji Hoon; Kuroda, Daisuke; Liu, Wei; Matsubayashi, Kazuya; Murata, Katsuhiro L.; Nagai, Hiroshi; Saito, Tomoki; Saito, Yoshihiko; Sako, Shigeyuki; Sekiguchi, Yuichiro; Tamura, Yoichi; Tanaka, Masayuki; Uemura, Makoto; Yamaguchi, Masaki S.

    2017-12-01

    GW170817 is the first detected gravitational wave source from a neutron star merger. We present the Japanese collaboration for gravitational-wave electro-magnetic (J-GEM) follow-up observations of SSS17a, an electromagnetic counterpart of GW170817. SSS17a shows a 2.5 mag decline in the z band during the period between 1.7 and 7.7 d after the merger. Such a rapid decline is not comparable with supernovae light curves at any epoch. The color of SSS17a also evolves rapidly and becomes redder during later epochs: the z - H color has changed by approximately 2.5 mag during the period between 0.7 and 7.7 d. The rapid evolutions of both the color and the optical brightness are consistent with the expected properties of a kilonova that is powered by the radioactive decay of newly synthesized r-process nuclei. Kilonova models with Lanthanide elements can reproduce the aforementioned observed properties well, which suggests that r-process nucleosynthesis beyond the second peak takes place in SSS17a. However, the absolute magnitude of SSS17a is brighter than the expected brightness of the kilonova models with an ejecta mass of 0.01 M⊙, which suggests a more intense mass ejection (˜0.03 M⊙) or possibly an additional energy source.

  19. An evaluation of automated homology modelling methods at low target template sequence similarity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dalton, James A R; Jackson, Richard M

    2007-08-01

    There are two main areas of difficulty in homology modelling that are particularly important when sequence identity between target and template falls below 50%: sequence alignment and loop building. These problems become magnified with automatic modelling processes, as there is no human input to correct mistakes. As such we have benchmarked several stand-alone strategies that could be implemented in a workflow for automated high-throughput homology modelling. These include three new sequence-structure alignment programs: 3D-Coffee, Staccato and SAlign, plus five homology modelling programs and their respective loop building methods: Builder, Nest, Modeller, SegMod/ENCAD and Swiss-Model. The SABmark database provided 123 targets with at least five templates from the same SCOP family and sequence identities Modeller as the common modelling program, 3D-Coffee outperforms Staccato and SAlign using both multiple templates and the best single template, and across the sequence identity range 20-50%. The mean model RMSD generated from 3D-Coffee using multiple templates is 15 and 28% (or using single templates, 3 and 13%) better than those generated by Staccato and Salign, respectively. 3D-Coffee gives equivalent modelling accuracy from multiple and single templates, but Staccato and SAlign are more successful with single templates, their quality deteriorating as additional lower sequence identity templates are added. Evaluating the different homology modelling programs, on average Modeller performs marginally better in overall modelling than the others tested. However, on average Nest produces the best loops with an 8% improvement by mean RMSD compared to the loops generated by Builder.

  20. Putative antirecombinase Srs2 DNA helicase promotes noncrossover homologous recombination avoiding loss of heterozygosity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miura, Tohru; Shibata, Takehiko; Kusano, Kohji

    2013-10-01

    DNA damage alone or DNA replication fork arrest at damaged sites may induce DNA double-strand breaks and initiate homologous recombination. This event can result in a crossover with a homologous chromosome, causing loss of heterozygosity along the chromosome. It is known that Srs2 acts as an antirecombinase at the replication fork: it is recruited by the SUMO (a small ubiquitin-related modifier)-conjugated DNA-polymerase sliding clamp (PCNA) and interferes with Rad51/Rad52-mediated homologous recombination. Here, we report that Srs2 promotes another type of homologous recombination that produces noncrossover products only, in collaboration with PCNA and Rad51. Srs2 proteins lacking the Rad51-binding domain, PCNA-SUMO-binding motifs, or ATP hydrolysis-dependent DNA helicase activity reduce this noncrossover recombination. However, the removal of either the Rad51-binding domain or the PCNA-binding motif strongly increases crossovers. Srs2 gene mutations are epistatic to mutations in the PCNA modification-related genes encoding PCNA, Siz1 (a SUMO ligase) and Rad6 (a ubiquitin-conjugating protein). Knocking out RAD51 blocked this recombination but enhanced nonhomologous end-joining. We hypothesize that, during DNA double-strand break repair, Srs2 mediates collaboration between the Rad51 nucleofilament and PCNA-SUMO and directs the heteroduplex intermediate to DNA synthesis in a moving bubble. This Rad51/Rad52/Srs2/PCNA-mediated noncrossover pathway avoids both interchromosomal crossover and imprecise end-joining, two potential paths leading to loss of heterozygosity, and contributes to genome maintenance and human health.

  1. Homology groups for particles on one-connected graphs

    Science.gov (United States)

    MaciÄ Żek, Tomasz; Sawicki, Adam

    2017-06-01

    We present a mathematical framework for describing the topology of configuration spaces for particles on one-connected graphs. In particular, we compute the homology groups over integers for different classes of one-connected graphs. Our approach is based on some fundamental combinatorial properties of the configuration spaces, Mayer-Vietoris sequences for different parts of configuration spaces, and some limited use of discrete Morse theory. As one of the results, we derive the closed-form formulae for ranks of the homology groups for indistinguishable particles on tree graphs. We also give a detailed discussion of the second homology group of the configuration space of both distinguishable and indistinguishable particles. Our motivation is the search for new kinds of quantum statistics.

  2. Quantization of gauge fields, graph polynomials and graph homology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kreimer, Dirk, E-mail: kreimer@physik.hu-berlin.de [Humboldt University, 10099 Berlin (Germany); Sars, Matthias [Humboldt University, 10099 Berlin (Germany); Suijlekom, Walter D. van [Radboud University Nijmegen, 6525 AJ Nijmegen (Netherlands)

    2013-09-15

    We review quantization of gauge fields using algebraic properties of 3-regular graphs. We derive the Feynman integrand at n loops for a non-abelian gauge theory quantized in a covariant gauge from scalar integrands for connected 3-regular graphs, obtained from the two Symanzik polynomials. The transition to the full gauge theory amplitude is obtained by the use of a third, new, graph polynomial, the corolla polynomial. This implies effectively a covariant quantization without ghosts, where all the relevant signs of the ghost sector are incorporated in a double complex furnished by the corolla polynomial–we call it cycle homology–and by graph homology. -- Highlights: •We derive gauge theory Feynman from scalar field theory with 3-valent vertices. •We clarify the role of graph homology and cycle homology. •We use parametric renormalization and the new corolla polynomial.

  3. Protein Remote Homology Detection Based on an Ensemble Learning Approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Junjie; Liu, Bingquan; Huang, Dong

    2016-01-01

    Protein remote homology detection is one of the central problems in bioinformatics. Although some computational methods have been proposed, the problem is still far from being solved. In this paper, an ensemble classifier for protein remote homology detection, called SVM-Ensemble, was proposed with a weighted voting strategy. SVM-Ensemble combined three basic classifiers based on different feature spaces, including Kmer, ACC, and SC-PseAAC. These features consider the characteristics of proteins from various perspectives, incorporating both the sequence composition and the sequence-order information along the protein sequences. Experimental results on a widely used benchmark dataset showed that the proposed SVM-Ensemble can obviously improve the predictive performance for the protein remote homology detection. Moreover, it achieved the best performance and outperformed other state-of-the-art methods.

  4. Utility of non-human primates in drug development: Comparison of non-human primate and human drug-metabolizing cytochrome P450 enzymes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uno, Yasuhiro; Uehara, Shotaro; Yamazaki, Hiroshi

    2016-12-01

    Cynomolgus monkeys (Macaca fascicularis, an Old World Monkey) have been widely used as a non-human primate model in preclinical studies because of their genetic and physiological similarity to humans. This trend has been followed by common marmoset (Callithrix jacchus, a New World Monkey). However, drug-metabolism properties in these non-human primates have not been fully understood due to limited information on cytochrome P450 (P450) enzymes, major drug-metabolizing enzymes in humans. Multiple forms of cynomolgus monkey P450 enzymes have been identified and characterized in comparison to those of humans, including a cynomolgus monkey specific form, P450 2C76. Similarly, marmoset P450 1A/B, 2A, 2C, 2D, and 4F enzymes were recently identified and characterized to understand drug metabolism properties. In this research update, updates for marmoset, cynomolgus monkey, and human P450 cDNAs are provided. Marmoset and cynomolgus monkey P450 enzymes showed high sequence homology to their human counterparts and generally had similar substrate recognition functionality to human P450 enzymes; however, they also possibly contribute to limited specific differences in drug oxidative metabolism partly due to small differences in amino acid residues. These findings provide a foundation for successful use of non-human primates as preclinical models and will help to further understand molecular mechanisms of human P450 function. In addition to the P450 enzymes, flavin-containing monooxygenases, another monooxygenase family, in these non-human primates have been found to be involved in the oxidation of a variety of compounds associated with pharmacological and/or toxicological effects in humans and are also described. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Distribution and evolution of het gene homologs in the basidiomycota.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van der Nest, M A; Olson, A; Lind, M; Vélëz, H; Dalman, K; Brandström Durling, M; Karlsson, M; Stenlid, J

    2014-03-01

    In filamentous fungi a system known as somatic incompatibility (SI) governs self/non-self recognition. SI is controlled by a regulatory signaling network involving proteins encoded at the het (heterokaryon incompatible) loci. Despite the wide occurrence of SI, the molecular identity and structure of only a small number of het genes and their products have been characterized in the model fungi Neurospora crassa and Podospora anserina. Our aim was to identify and study the distribution and evolution of putative het gene homologs in the Basidiomycota. For this purpose we used the information available for the model fungi to identify homologs of het genes in other fungi, especially the Basidiomycota. Putative het-c, het-c2 and un-24 homologs, as well as sequences containing the NACHT, HET or WD40 domains present in the het-e, het-r, het-6 and het-d genes were identified in certain members of the Ascomycota and Basidiomycota. The widespread phylogenetic distribution of certain het genes may reflect the fact that the encoded proteins are involved in fundamental cellular processes other than SI. Although homologs of het-S were previously known only from the Sordariomycetes (Ascomycota), we also identified a putative homolog of this gene in Gymnopus luxurians (Basidiomycota, class Agaricomycetes). Furthermore, with the exception of un-24, all of the putative het genes identified occurred mostly in a multi-copy fashion, some with lineage and species-specific expansions. Overall our results indicated that gene duplication followed by gene loss and/or gene family expansion, as well as multiple events of domain fusion and shuffling played an important role in the evolution of het gene homologs of Basidiomycota and other filamentous fungi. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. The Mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA)-Associated Protein SWIB5 Influences mtDNA Architecture and Homologous Recombination

    KAUST Repository

    Blomme, Jonas

    2017-04-19

    In addition to the nucleus, mitochondria and chloroplasts in plant cells also contain genomes. Efficient DNA repair pathways are crucial in these organelles to fix damage resulting from endogenous and exogenous factors. Plant organellar genomes are complex compared with their animal counterparts, and although several plant-specific mediators of organelle DNA repair have been reported, many regulators remain to be identified. Here, we show that a mitochondrial SWI/SNF (nucleosome remodeling) complex B protein, SWIB5, is capable of associating with mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) in Arabidopsis thaliana. Gainand loss-of-function mutants provided evidence for a role of SWIB5 in influencing mtDNA architecture and homologous recombination at specific intermediate-sized repeats both under normal and genotoxic conditions. SWIB5 interacts with other mitochondrial SWIB proteins. Gene expression and mutant phenotypic analysis of SWIB5 and SWIB family members suggests a link between organellar genome maintenance and cell proliferation. Taken together, our work presents a protein family that influences mtDNA architecture and homologous recombination in plants and suggests a link between organelle functioning and plant development.

  7. Mapping of wheat mitochondrial mRNA termini and comparison with breakpoints in DNA homology among plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Boyoung; Acero, Maria M; Bonen, Linda

    2012-11-01

    Mitochondrial DNA rearrangements occur very frequently in flowering plants and when close to genes there must be concomitant acquisition of new regulatory cis-elements. To explore whether there might be limits to such DNA shuffling, we have mapped the termini of mitochondrial mRNAs in wheat, a monocot, and compared them to the known positions for counterpart genes in the eudicot Arabidopsis. Nine genes share homologous 3' UTRs over their full-length and for six of them, the termini map very close to the site of wheat/Arabidopsis DNA rearrangements. Only one such case was seen for comparisons of 5' UTRs, and the 5' ends of mRNAs are typically more heterogeneous than 3' termini. Approximately half of the thirty-one wheat mitochondrial transcriptional units are preceded by CRTA promoter-like motifs, and of the potential stem-loop or tRNA-like structures identified as candidate RNA processing/stability signals near the 5' or 3' ends, several are shared with Arabidopsis. Comparison of the mitochondrial gene flanking sequences from normal fertile wheat (Triticum aestivum) with those of Aegilops kotschyi which is the source of mitochondria present in K-type cytoplasmic male sterile wheat, revealed six cases where mRNAs are precluded from sharing full-length homologous UTRs because of genomic reorganization events, and the presence of short repeats located at the sites of discontinuity points to a reciprocal recombination-mediated mode of rearrangement.

  8. Tribological responses of the WC/a-C film to sliding against different counterparts in air, water and oil

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Shangqi; Wang, Yongxin; Ye, Yuwei; Liu, Xiang; Lu, Xia; Li, Jinlong

    2017-10-01

    The WC/a-C film prepared using a reactive magnetron sputtering system was investigated. The film structure and properties were characterized, and the friction response mechanism between this film and several counterparts was investigated under different environments. The hardness and surface roughness of the counterpart as well as the match between the properties of the counterpart and the film were identified as factors that play a critical role in the friction behaviour. The environment affected the extent of wear through physical and chemical reactions, and mechanical wear with friction chemical reactions was found to be the major mechanism of influence. This study is of great practical interest, as it will help to extend the service life of WC/a-C films and minimize loss during the initial running-in period.

  9. The second Herschel★-ATLAS Data Release - III: optical and near-infrared counterparts in the North Galactic Plane field

    Science.gov (United States)

    Furlanetto, C.; Dye, S.; Bourne, N.; Maddox, S.; Dunne, L.; Eales, S.; Valiante, E.; Smith, M. W.; Smith, D. J. B.; Ivison, R. J.; Ibar, E.

    2018-01-01

    This paper forms part of the second major public data release of the Herschel Astrophysical Terahertz Large Area Survey (H-ATLAS). In this work, we describe the identification of optical and near-infrared counterparts to the submillimetre detected sources in the 177 deg2 North Galactic Plane (NGP) field. We used the likelihood ratio method to identify counterparts in the Sloan Digital Sky Survey and in the UKIRT Imaging Deep Sky Survey within a search radius of 10 arcsec of the H-ATLAS sources with a 4σ detection at 250 μm. We obtained reliable (R ≥ 0.8) optical counterparts with r deep radio data which covers a small region of the NGP field, we found that 80 - 90 per cent of our reliable identifications are correct.

  10. Search for High-Confidence Blazar Candidates and Their MWL Counterparts in the Fermi-LAT Catalog Using Machine Learning

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sabrina Einecke

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available A large fraction of the gamma-ray sources presented in the Third Fermi-LAT source catalog (3FGL is affiliated with counterparts and source types, but 1010 sources remain unassociated and 573 sources are associated with active galaxies of uncertain type. The purpose of this study is to assign blazar classes to these unassociated and uncertain sources, and to link counterparts to the unassociated. A machine learning algorithm is used for the classification, based on properties extracted from the 3FGL, an infrared and an X-ray catalog. To estimate the reliability of the classification, performance measures are considered through validation techniques. The classification yielded purity values around 90% with efficiency values of roughly 50%. The prediction of high-confidence blazar candidates has been conducted successfully, and the possibility to link counterparts in the same procedure has been proven. These findings confirm the relevance of this novel multiwavelength approach.

  11. Susceptibility and pathogenesis of little brown bats (Myotis lucifugus) to heterologous and homologous rabies viruses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davis, April D; Jarvis, Jodie A; Pouliott, Craig E; Morgan, Shannon M D; Rudd, Robert J

    2013-08-01

    Rabies virus (RABV) maintenance in bats is not well understood. Big brown bats (Eptesicus fuscus), little brown bats (Myotis lucifugus), and Mexican free-tailed bats (Tadarida brasiliensis) are the most common bats species in the United States. These colonial bat species also have the most frequent contact with humans and domestic animals. However, the silver-haired bat (Lasionycteris noctivagans) RABV is associated with the majority of human rabies virus infections in the United States and Canada. This is of interest because silver-haired bats are more solitary bats with infrequent human interaction. Our goal was to determine the likelihood of a colonial bat species becoming infected with and transmitting a heterologous RABV. To ascertain the potential of heterologous RABV infection in colonial bat species, little brown bats were inoculated with a homologous RABV or one of two heterologous RABVs. Additionally, to determine if the route of exposure influenced the disease process, bats were inoculated either intramuscularly (i.m.) or subcutaneously (s.c.) with a homologous or heterologous RABV. Our results demonstrate that intramuscular inoculation results in a more rapid progression of disease onset, whereas the incubation time in bats inoculated s.c. is significantly longer. Additionally, cross protection was not consistently achieved in bats previously inoculated with a heterologous RABV following a challenge with a homologous RABV 6 months later. Finally, bats that developed rabies following s.c. inoculation were significantly more likely to shed virus in their saliva and demonstrated increased viral dissemination. In summary, bats inoculated via the s.c. route are more likely to shed virus, thus increasing the likelihood of transmission.

  12. Susceptibility and Pathogenesis of Little Brown Bats (Myotis lucifugus) to Heterologous and Homologous Rabies Viruses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jarvis, Jodie A.; Pouliott, Craig E.; Morgan, Shannon, M. D.; Rudd, Robert J.

    2013-01-01

    Rabies virus (RABV) maintenance in bats is not well understood. Big brown bats (Eptesicus fuscus), little brown bats (Myotis lucifugus), and Mexican free-tailed bats (Tadarida brasiliensis) are the most common bats species in the United States. These colonial bat species also have the most frequent contact with humans and domestic animals. However, the silver-haired bat (Lasionycteris noctivagans) RABV is associated with the majority of human rabies virus infections in the United States and Canada. This is of interest because silver-haired bats are more solitary bats with infrequent human interaction. Our goal was to determine the likelihood of a colonial bat species becoming infected with and transmitting a heterologous RABV. To ascertain the potential of heterologous RABV infection in colonial bat species, little brown bats were inoculated with a homologous RABV or one of two heterologous RABVs. Additionally, to determine if the route of exposure influenced the disease process, bats were inoculated either intramuscularly (i.m.) or subcutaneously (s.c.) with a homologous or heterologous RABV. Our results demonstrate that intramuscular inoculation results in a more rapid progression of disease onset, whereas the incubation time in bats inoculated s.c. is significantly longer. Additionally, cross protection was not consistently achieved in bats previously inoculated with a heterologous RABV following a challenge with a homologous RABV 6 months later. Finally, bats that developed rabies following s.c. inoculation were significantly more likely to shed virus in their saliva and demonstrated increased viral dissemination. In summary, bats inoculated via the s.c. route are more likely to shed virus, thus increasing the likelihood of transmission. PMID:23741002

  13. Khovanov-Rozansky Graph Homology and Composition Product

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wagner, Emmanuel

    2008-01-01

    In analogy with a recursive formula for the HOMFLY-PT polynomial of links given by Jaeger, we give a recursive formula for the graph polynomial introduced by Kauffman and Vogel. We show how this formula extends to the Khovanov–Rozansky graph homology.......In analogy with a recursive formula for the HOMFLY-PT polynomial of links given by Jaeger, we give a recursive formula for the graph polynomial introduced by Kauffman and Vogel. We show how this formula extends to the Khovanov–Rozansky graph homology....

  14. The tedious task of finding homologous noncoding RNA genes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Menzel, Karl Peter; Gorodkin, Jan; Stadler, Peter F

    2009-01-01

    acknowledged. Here, we qualitatively describe a realistic scenario for what a "regular user" (i.e., a nonexpert in a particular RNA family) can do in practice, and what kind of results are likely to be achieved. Despite the indisputable advances in computational RNA biology, the conclusion is discouraging......: BLAST still works better or equally good as other methods unless extensive expert knowledge on the RNA family is included. However, when good curated data are available the recent development yields further improvements in finding remote homologs. Homology search beyond the reach of BLAST hence...... is not at all a routine task....

  15. Ecdysone receptor homologs from mollusks, leeches and a polychaete worm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laguerre, Michel; Veenstra, Jan A

    2010-11-05

    The genomes of the mollusk Lottia gigantea, the leech Helobdella robusta and the polychaete worm Capitella teleta each have a gene encoding an ecdysone receptor homolog. Publicly available genomic and EST sequences also contain evidence for ecdysone receptors in the seahare Aplysia californica, the bobtail squid Euprymna scolopes and the medicinal leech Hirudo medicinalis. Three-dimensional models of the ligand binding domains of these predicted ecdysone receptor homologs suggest that each of them could potentially bind an ecdysone-related steroid. Thus, ecdysone receptors are not limited to arthropods and nematodes. Copyright © 2010 Federation of European Biochemical Societies. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. The concept of homology as a basis for evaluating developmental mechanisms: exploring selective attention across the life-span.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lickliter, Robert; Bahrick, Lorraine E

    2013-01-01

    Research with human infants as well as non-human animal embryos and infants has consistently demonstrated the benefits of intersensory redundancy for perceptual learning and memory for redundantly specified information during early development. Studies of infant affect discrimination, face discrimination, numerical discrimination, sequence detection, abstract rule learning, and word comprehension and segmentation have all shown that intersensory redundancy promotes earlier detection of these properties when compared to unimodal exposure to the same properties. Here we explore the idea that such intersensory facilitation is evident across the life-span and that this continuity is an example of a developmental behavioral homology. We present evidence that intersensory facilitation is most apparent during early phases of learning for a variety of tasks, regardless of developmental level, including domains that are novel or tasks that require discrimination of fine detail or speeded responses. Under these conditions, infants, children, and adults all show intersensory facilitation, suggesting a developmental homology. We discuss the challenge and propose strategies for establishing appropriate guidelines for identifying developmental behavioral homologies. We conclude that evaluating the extent to which continuities observed across development are homologous can contribute to a better understanding of the processes of development. Copyright © 2012 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  17. Quantification of urinary metabolites of principle superior counterpart of benzene; Dosage des metabolites urinaires des principaux homologues superieurs du benzene

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ruetsch, O. [CEA Centre d`Etudes de Fontenay-aux-Roses, 92 (France). Dept. de Protection de la Sante de l`Homme et de Dosimetrie]|[Lille-2 Univ., 59 (France)

    1997-12-31

    In the aim of a medical surveillance of personnel exposed to superior counterpart of benzene, it is advisable to measure in urines, the hippuric, methyl hippuric and mandelic acids, as respective biological indicators of exposure to toluene, to xylenes and styrene (chapter 1). In a first time, we give some generalities on principal superior counterparts of benzene and about the biological surveillance of workers exposed to these products. Then, we present the quantification of their urinary metabolites, as it has be done in the stage. (N.C.)

  18. Dpb11/TopBP1 contributes to genomicstability via homologous recombinationand checkpoint signaling

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Germann, Susanne Manuela

    Homologous recombination (HR) is essential for maintaining genome integrity and is a major pathway for repairing (DSBs). DPB11 is an essential gene conserved from yeast to human (TopBP1), which is involved in initiation of DNA replication and DNA checkpoint signaling. We found that Dpb11 forms foci...... signaling. Importantly, Dpb11 foci are independent of checkpoint kinases Mec1 and Tel1, as well as Rad9, further strengthening the upstream position of Dpb11 in the DNA damage checkpoint response. Moreover, dpb11-PF has a defect in S-phase checkpoint function, albeit to a lesser extent than dpb11-1. Altered...

  19. Life-cycle Analysis of Bioproducts and Their Conventional Counterparts in GREET

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dunn, Jennifer B. [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Adom, Felix [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Sather, Norm [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Han, Jeongwoo [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Snyder, Seth [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); He, Chang [Northwestern Univ., Evanston, IL (United States); Gong, Jian [Northwestern Univ., Evanston, IL (United States); Yue, Dajun [Northwestern Univ., Evanston, IL (United States); You, Fengqi [Northwestern Univ., Evanston, IL (United States)

    2015-09-01

    To further expand upon the literature in this field and to develop a platform for bioproduct LCA, we developed LCA results for ten bioproducts produced either from algal glycerol or from corn stover-derived sugars. We used Argonne National Laboratory’s Greenhouse gases, Regulated Emissions, and Energy use in Transportation (GREETTM) model as the platform for this study. The data and calculations reported herein are available to GREET users in a bioproducts module included in the fall 2015 GREET release. This report documents our approach to this analysis and the results. In Chapter 2, we review the process we underwent to select the bioproducts for analysis based on market and technology readiness criteria. In Chapter 3, we review key parameters for production of the two feedstocks we considered: corn stover and algae. Given the lack of publicly available information about the production of bioproducts, which is caused in large part by the emerging nature of the industry, we developed Aspen Plus® simulations of the processes that could be used to produce each bioproduct. From these simulations, we extracted the energy and material flows of these processes, which were important inputs to the GREET bioproducts module. Chapter 4 provides the details of these Aspen Plus simulations. It is important to compare the LCA results for bioproducts to those for their petroleum counterparts. We therefore also developed material and energy flow data for conventional products based mostly on the literature. These data are described in Chapter 5 and are also included in the GREET bioproducts module. In Chapter 6, we present results from this analysis and examine areas for refinement and future research.

  20. Molecular characteristics of malignant ovarian germ cell tumors and comparison with testicular counterparts: implications for pathogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kraggerud, Sigrid Marie; Hoei-Hansen, Christina E; Alagaratnam, Sharmini; Skotheim, Rolf I; Abeler, Vera M; Rajpert-De Meyts, Ewa; Lothe, Ragnhild A

    2013-06-01

    This review focuses on the molecular characteristics and development of rare malignant ovarian germ cell tumors (mOGCTs). We provide an overview of the genomic aberrations assessed by ploidy, cytogenetic banding, and comparative genomic hybridization. We summarize and discuss the transcriptome profiles of mRNA and microRNA (miRNA), and biomarkers (DNA methylation, gene mutation, individual protein expression) for each mOGCT histological subtype. Parallels between the origin of mOGCT and their male counterpart testicular GCT (TGCT) are discussed from the perspective of germ cell development, endocrinological influences, and pathogenesis, as is the GCT origin in patients with disorders of sex development. Integrated molecular profiles of the 3 main histological subtypes, dysgerminoma (DG), yolk sac tumor (YST), and immature teratoma (IT), are presented. DGs show genomic aberrations comparable to TGCT. In contrast, the genome profiles of YST and IT are different both from each other and from DG/TGCT. Differences between DG and YST are underlined by their miRNA/mRNA expression patterns, suggesting preferential involvement of the WNT/β-catenin and TGF-β/bone morphogenetic protein signaling pathways among YSTs. Characteristic protein expression patterns are observed in DG, YST and IT. We propose that mOGCT develop through different developmental pathways, including one that is likely shared with TGCT and involves insufficient sexual differentiation of the germ cell niche. The molecular features of the mOGCTs underline their similarity to pluripotent precursor cells (primordial germ cells, PGCs) and other stem cells. This similarity combined with the process of ovary development, explain why mOGCTs present so early in life, and with greater histological complexity, than most somatic solid tumors.

  1. Reversal of functional disorders by aspiration, expiration and cough reflexes and their voluntary counterparts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zoltan eTomori

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Agonal gasping provoked by asphyxia can save ~15% of mammals even from untreated ventricular fibrillation, but it fails to revive infants with sudden infant death syndrome. Our systematic study of airway reflexes in cats and other animals indicated that in addition to cough, there are 2 distinct airway reflexes that may contribute to auto-resuscitation. Gasp- and sniff-like spasmodic inspirations can be elicited by nasopharyngeal stimulation, strongly activating the brainstem generator for inspiration, which is also involved in the control of gasping. This aspiration reflex (AspR is characterized by spasmodic inspiration without subsequent active expiration and can be elicited during agonal gasping, caused by brainstem trans-sections in cats. Stimulation of the larynx can activate the generator for expiration to evoke the expiration reflex, manifesting with prompt expiration without preceding inspiration. Stimulation of the oro-pharynx and lower airways provokes the cough reflex which results from activating of both generators. The powerful potential of the AspR resembling auto-resuscitation by gasping can influence the control mechanisms of vital functions, mediating reversal of various functional disorders.The AspR in cats interrupted hypoxic apnea, laryngo- and bronchospasm, apneusis and even transient asphyxic coma, and can normalize various hypo- and hyper-functional disorders. Introduction of a nasogastric catheter evoked similar spasmodic inspirations in premature infants and interrupted hiccough attacks in adults. Coughing on demand can prevent anaphylactic shock and resuscitate the pertinent subject. Sniff representing nasal inspiratory pressure and maximal inspiratory and expiratory pressures are voluntary counterparts of airway reflexes, and are useful for diagnosis and therapy of various cardio-respiratory and neuromuscular disorders.

  2. Energetic particle counterparts for geomagnetic pulsations of Pc1 and IPDP types

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. A. Yahnina

    2003-12-01

    Full Text Available Using the low-altitude NOAA satellite particle data, we study two kinds of localised variations of energetic proton fluxes at low altitude within the anisotropic zone equatorward of the isotropy boundary. These flux variation types have a common feature, i.e. the presence of precipitating protons measured by the MEPED instrument at energies more than 30 keV, but they are distinguished by the fact of the presence or absence of the lower-energy component as measured by the TED detector on board the NOAA satellite. The localised proton precipitating without a low-energy component occurs mostly in the morning-day sector, during quiet geomagnetic conditions, without substorm injections at geosynchronous orbit, and without any signatures of plasmaspheric plasma expansion to the geosynchronous distance. This precipitation pattern closely correlates with ground-based observations of continuous narrow-band Pc1 pulsations in the frequency range 0.1–2 Hz (hereafter Pc1. The precipitation pattern containing the low energy component occurs mostly in the evening sector, under disturbed geomagnetic conditions, and in association with energetic proton injections and significant increases of cold plasma density at geosynchronous orbit. This precipitation pattern is associated with geomagnetic pulsations called Intervals of Pulsations with Diminishing Periods (IPDP, but some minor part of the events is also related to narrow-band Pc1. Both Pc1 and IPDP pulsations are believed to be the electromagnetic ion-cyclotron waves generated by the ion-cyclotron instability in the equatorial plane. These waves scatter energetic protons in pitch angles, so we conclude that the precipitation patterns studied here are the particle counterparts of the ion-cyclotron waves.Key words. Ionosphere (particle precipitation – Magnetospheric physics (energetic particles, precipitating – Space plasma physics (wave-particle interactions

  3. Multiband counterparts of two eclipsing ultraluminous X-ray sources in M 51

    Science.gov (United States)

    Urquhart, R.; Soria, R.; Johnston, HM; Pakull, MW; Motch, C.; Schwope, A.; Miller-Jones, JCA; Anderson, GE

    2018-01-01

    We present the discovery and interpretation of ionized nebulae around two ultraluminous X-ray sources in M 51; both sources share the rare property of showing X-ray eclipses by their companion stars, and are therefore prime targets for follow-up studies. Using archival Hubble Space Telescope images, we found an elongated, 100-pc-long emission-line structure associated with one X-ray source (CXOM51 J132940.0+471237; ULX-1 for simplicity), and a more circular, ionized nebula at the location of the second source (CXOM51 J132939.5+471244; ULX-2 for simplicity). We observed both nebulae with the Large Binocular Telescope's Multi-Object Double Spectrograph. From our analysis of the optical spectra, we argue that the gas in the ULX-1 bubble is shock-ionized, consistent with the effect of a jet with a kinetic power of ≈2 × 1039 erg s-1. Additional X-ray photo-ionization may also be present, to explain the strength of high-ionization lines such as He II λ4686 and [Ne V] λ3426. On the other hand, the emission lines from the ULX-2 bubble are typical for photoionization by normal O stars suggesting that the nebula is actually an H II region not physically related to the ULX but is simply a chance alignment. From archival Very Large Array data, we also detect spatially extended, steep-spectrum radio emission at the location of the ULX-1 bubble (consistent with its jet origin), but no radio counterpart for ULX-2 (consistent with the lack of shock-ionized gas around that source).

  4. VizieR Online Data Catalog: S2CLS: multiwavelength counterparts to SMGs (Chen+, 2016)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, C.-C.; Smail, I.; Ivison, R. J.; Arumugam, V.; Almaini, O.; Conselice, C. J.; Geach, J. E.; Hartley, W. G.; Ma, C.-J.; Mortlock, A.; Simpson, C.; Simpson, J. M.; Swinbank, A. M.; Aretxaga, I.; Blain, A.; Chapman, S. C.; Dunlop, J. S.; Farrah, D.; Halpern, M.; Michalowski, M. J.; van der Werf, P.; Wilkinson, A.; Zavala, J. A.

    2016-05-01

    The SCUBA-2 data at 850um in the UDS field were taken as part of the SCUBA-2 Cosmology Legacy Survey (S2CLS). The full data reduction steps are described fully in J. E. Geach et al. (2016, in preparation). In total we detect 1088 submillimeter sources at >=3.5σ within the region where rms noise is =4.0σ, for which we expect a false detection rate of ~1% based on simulations and source extractions on negative signals. We also define a supplementary sample of 372 submillimeter sources that are detected at 3.5-4.0σ and have a false detection rate of ~10%. In this paper, we provide counterpart candidates for both main and supplementary samples; however, the scientific analyses were performed on the main sample. We have carried out ALMA follow-up observations at 870um on 30 of the brighter SCUBA-2 sources in a Cycle 1 project 2012.1.00090.S (Simpson et al. 2015ApJ...807..128S, 2015ApJ...799...81S). The K-band-based multiwavelength photometry adopted in this paper is based on the UDS data release 8 (DR8) of the UKIRT Infrared Deep Sky Survey (UKIDSS; Lawrence et al. 2007, see II/319). The VLA radio observations at 1.4GHz (20cm) were carried out by the project UDS20 (V. Arumugam et al. 2016, in preparation), which comprises a mosaic of 14 pointings covering a total area of ~1.3deg2 centered on the UDS. The ~1 square degree UDS field contains a rich set of ancillary data (see section 2 for further details). (2 data files).

  5. Tumour necrosis factor and its receptor: a basic structural analysis of two counterparts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wiltgen, Marco; Tilz, Gernot P

    2008-08-01

    Inflammation of vessels is partially caused by tumour necrosis factor (TNF). Although the pharmacological understanding of the main inflammatory protein data is well characterised, basic structural information is rare. For this reason, we developed a method for the representation and analysis of the macromolecular interface between TNF and its receptor, enabling a better understanding of their interaction. In this paper we use structural information on the TNF-receptor complex in the protein (PDB) database as input to calculate an interface contact matrix, based on the distance between individual residues of each counterpart. The two-dimensional matrix is a plot of pairwise interactions between adjacent residues of the two chains in the protein complex. The residue names within each chain are plotted on the respective axis and an entry is made wherever two residues come into close contact. The matrix elements are annotated with physicochemical properties. The interface contact matrix is linked to a 3D visualisation of the macromolecular structure in such a way that mouse clicking on the appropriate part of the interface contact matrix highlights the corresponding residues in the 3D structure. Additionally the residues in the matrix are used to define the molecular surface at the interface. The interface contact matrix enables an overview representation of the residue distribution at the macromolecular interface and an evaluation of interfacial 'hot spots'. The selection of the residues in the interface contact matrix and the highlighting in the 3D structure allow an easy retrieval of the desired information out of the wealth of structural information. The representation with molecular surfaces shows complementary shapes. Many forms of treatment have been developed to reduce excessive TNF activity and their success is based on knowledge of the active sites of TNF. Our macromolecular interface analysis system will help us to define better receptor and acceptor

  6. Ectopically hTERT expressing adult human mesenchymal stem cells are less radiosensitive than their telomerase negative counterpart

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Serakinci, Nedime; Christensen, Rikke; Graakjaer, Jesper

    2007-01-01

    During the past several years increasing evidence indicating that the proliferation capacity of mammalian cells is highly radiosensitive, regardless of the species and the tissue of origin of the cells, has accumulated. It has also been shown that normal bone marrow cells of mice have a similar r...... and high telomerase activity have the advantage of re-establishing the telomeric caps. Udgivelsesdato: 2007-Mar-10...

  7. DEK is required for homologous recombination repair of DNA breaks

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Smith, Eric A; Gole, Boris; Willis, Nicholas A

    2017-01-01

    mice. Furthermore, DEK knockout cells were sensitive to apoptosis with NHEJ inhibition. Thus, we hypothesized DEK plays additional roles in homologous recombination (HR). Using episomal and integrated reporters, we demonstrate that HR repair of conventional DSBs is severely compromised in DEK...

  8. Phenylbutyrate inhibits homologous recombination induced by camptothecin and methyl methanesulfonate

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kaiser, Gitte Schalck; Germann, Susanne Manuela; Westergaard, Tine

    2011-01-01

    . Treatment with PBA is accompanied by a dramatic reduction in histone H4 lysine 8 acetylation. Live cell imaging of homologous recombination proteins indicates that repair of CPT-induced DNA damage is redirected to a non-recombinogenic pathway in the presence of PBA without loss in cell viability...

  9. Synthesis and characterization of new homologous series of ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Two homologous series of unsymmetrical alkylated chalcones and 3,5-diaryl isoxazoles, consisting of 20 members, with various n-alkyl bromides (n=2−7, 10, 12, 14, 16) have been synthesized and studied for their liquid crystalline property. Simple strategy was employed to achieve the target materials. Flexibilityin the ...

  10. Hypoxia influences expression profile of Pleckstrin homology-like ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    The deduced CbPHLDA2 protein of 139 amino acids shared high homology with PHLD2A of other fishes as well as that of vertebrates. Importantly, a single amino acid (asparagine/lysine) insertion was identified in the PH domain of CbPHLDA2 and other fishes, which was absent in other vertebrates studied. Furthermore ...

  11. Homeomorphisms and the homology of non-orientable surfaces

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    R. Narasimhan (Krishtel eMaging) 1461 1996 Oct 15 13:05:22

    Indian Acad. Sci. (Math. Sci.) Vol. 115, No. 3, August 2005, pp. 251–257. © Printed in India. Homeomorphisms and the homology of non-orientable surfaces ... that every element of K is induced by a homeomorphism of F. Further, we shall show that ... (up to sign) the elements representing the boundary components.

  12. Split marker transformation increases homologous integration frequency in Cryptococcus neoformans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fu, J; Hettler, E; Wickes, B L

    2006-03-01

    Gene disruption in Cryptococcus neoformans can be problematic due to high frequencies of ectopic integration and telomerization. To improve the frequency of homologous integration, a transformation strategy was employed called split marker, which utilizes a mixture of DNAs comprised of overlapping truncations of the selectable marker. Five genes were compared for homologous integration frequencies using various constructs. Homologous integration was highest when the split marker approach was used, with rates as high as 60% depending on target gene. A second factor that contributed to an increased homologous integration frequency was strain background, which was highest when a double auxotroph was used as a host. The split marker strategy was combined with an ura-blaster construct, which has been used in other fungi to recycle ura5 or ura3 mutations. When a hisG-URA5-hisG cassette was successfully integrated at the target locus, the URA5 gene could be easily evicted by plating onto 5-FOA agar. The cassette was then successfully used for a second cycle of transformation-eviction. The effectiveness of the split marker disruption strategy suggests that continued investigation and modification of traditional molecular techniques could increase the efficiency of C. neoformans molecular manipulation.

  13. Multiresolution persistent homology for excessively large biomolecular datasets

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xia, Kelin; Zhao, Zhixiong [Department of Mathematics, Michigan State University, East Lansing, Michigan 48824 (United States); Wei, Guo-Wei, E-mail: wei@math.msu.edu [Department of Mathematics, Michigan State University, East Lansing, Michigan 48824 (United States); Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, Michigan State University, East Lansing, Michigan 48824 (United States); Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Michigan State University, East Lansing, Michigan 48824 (United States)

    2015-10-07

    Although persistent homology has emerged as a promising tool for the topological simplification of complex data, it is computationally intractable for large datasets. We introduce multiresolution persistent homology to handle excessively large datasets. We match the resolution with the scale of interest so as to represent large scale datasets with appropriate resolution. We utilize flexibility-rigidity index to access the topological connectivity of the data set and define a rigidity density for the filtration analysis. By appropriately tuning the resolution of the rigidity density, we are able to focus the topological lens on the scale of interest. The proposed multiresolution topological analysis is validated by a hexagonal fractal image which has three distinct scales. We further demonstrate the proposed method for extracting topological fingerprints from DNA molecules. In particular, the topological persistence of a virus capsid with 273 780 atoms is successfully analyzed which would otherwise be inaccessible to the normal point cloud method and unreliable by using coarse-grained multiscale persistent homology. The proposed method has also been successfully applied to the protein domain classification, which is the first time that persistent homology is used for practical protein domain analysis, to our knowledge. The proposed multiresolution topological method has potential applications in arbitrary data sets, such as social networks, biological networks, and graphs.

  14. Homology modelling and bivalent single-chain Fv construction of ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    PRAKASH KUMAR

    structure of SLH10 was modelled by the Insight II molecule simulation software. The structure was refined using the molecular ... the Homology module of the Insight II software package. (Biosym/MSI, San Diego, Accelrys ..... Feng J, Xie Z, Guo N and Shen B 2003 Design and assembly of anti-CD16 ScFv antibody with two ...

  15. New mesogenic homologous series of α-methylcinnamates

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Compounds of a new smectogenic homologous series of -methylcinnamates were prepared by condensing different 4--alkoxybenzoyl chloride with methoxyethyl trans-4-hydroxy- -methylcinnamate. In this series, the first six members are non-mesogenic. -Heptyloxy derivative exhibits monotropic smectic A phase ...

  16. Cloning and expression analysis of a LFY homologous gene in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    madam

    2012-01-10

    Jan 10, 2012 ... LEAFY (LFY) homologous genes are necessary for the transition from vegetative to reproductive development in flowering plants. ... most important developmental switches in the life cycle of angiosperm that involves a ... far in some plant species including potato (Solanum tuberosum) (Guo and Yang, ...

  17. Practical Challenge of Shredded Documents: Clustering of Chinese Homologous Pieces

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nan Xing

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available When recovering a shredded document that has numerous mixed pieces, the difficulty of the recovery process can be reduced by clustering, which is a method of grouping pieces that originally belonged to the same page. Restoring homologous shredded documents (pieces from different pages of the same file is a frequent problem, and because these pieces have nearly indistinguishable visual characteristics, grouping them is extremely difficult. Clustering research has important practical significance for document recovery because homologous pieces are ubiquitous. Because of the wide usage of Chinese and the huge demand for Chinese shredded document recovery, our research focuses on Chinese homologous pieces. In this paper, we propose a method of completely clustering Chinese homologous pieces in which the distribution features of the characters in the pieces and the document layout are used to correlate adjacent pieces and cluster them in different areas of a document. The experimental results show that the proposed method has a good clustering effect on real pieces. For the dataset containing 10 page documents (a total of 462 pieces, its average accuracy is 97.19%.

  18. Monitoring homologous recombination in rice (Oryza sativa L.)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yang Zhuanying; Tang Li [Guangdong Provincial Key Lab of Biotechnology for Plant Development, College of Life Sciences, South China Normal University, Guangzhou 510631 (China); Li Meiru [South China Botanic Garden, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Guangzhou 510650 (China); Chen Lei; Xu Jie [Guangdong Provincial Key Lab of Biotechnology for Plant Development, College of Life Sciences, South China Normal University, Guangzhou 510631 (China); Wu Goujiang [South China Botanic Garden, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Guangzhou 510650 (China); Li Hongqing, E-mail: hqli@scnu.edu.cn [Guangdong Provincial Key Lab of Biotechnology for Plant Development, College of Life Sciences, South China Normal University, Guangzhou 510631 (China)

    2010-09-10

    Here we describe a system to assay homologous recombination during the complete life cycle of rice (Oryza sativa L.). Rice plants were transformed with two copies of non-functional GUS reporter overlap fragments as recombination substrate. Recombination was observed in all plant organs examined, from the seed stage until the flowering stage of somatic plant development. Embryogenic cells exhibited the highest recombination ability with an average of 3 x 10{sup -5} recombination events per genome, which is about 10-fold of that observed in root cells, and two orders of that observed in leaf cells. Histological analysis revealed that recombination events occurred in diverse cell types, but preferentially in cells with small size. Examples of this included embryogenic cells in callus, phloem cells in the leaf vein, and cells located in the root apical meristem. Steady state RNA analysis revealed that the expression levels of rice Rad51 homologs are positively correlated with increased recombination rates in embryogenic calli, roots and anthers. Finally, radiation treatment of plantlets from distinct recombination lines increased the recombination frequency to different extents. These results showed that homologous recombination frequency can be effectively measured in rice using a transgene reporter assay. This system will facilitate the study of DNA damage signaling and homologous recombination in rice, a model monocot.

  19. Quantum algorithms for the Jones polynomial and Khovanov homology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kauffman, Louis H.; Lomonaco, Samuel J., Jr.

    2012-06-01

    This paper generalizes the AJL algorithm for quantum computation of the Jones polynomial to continuous ranges of values on the unit circle for the Jones parameter and shows that the Kauffman-Lomonaco 3-strand algorithm for the Jones polynomial is a special case of this generalization. We then describe a quantum algorithm for the Jones polynomial that is related to Khovanov homology.

  20. The homological content of the Jones representations at $q = -1$

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Egsgaard, Jens Kristian; Fuglede Jørgensen, Søren

    We generalize a discovery of Kasahara and show that the Jones representations of braid groups, when evaluated at $q = -1$, are related to the action on homology of a branched double cover of the underlying punctured disk. As an application, we prove for a large family of pseudo-Anosov mapping cla...

  1. Hidden Markov Models for Protein Domain Homology Identification and Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jablonowski, Karl

    2017-01-01

    Protein domain identification and analysis are cornerstones of modern proteomics. The tools available to protein domain researchers avail a variety of approaches to understanding large protein domain families. Hidden Markov Models (HMM) form the basis for identifying and categorizing evolutionarily linked protein domains. Here I describe the use of HMM models for predicting and identifying Src Homology 2 (SH2) domains within the proteome.

  2. Isolation and characterization of an AGAMOUS homolog from Fraxinus pennsylvanica

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ningxia Du; Paula M. Pijut

    2010-01-01

    An AGAMOUS homolog (FpAG) was isolated from green ash (Fraxinus pennsylvanica) using a reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction method. Southern blot analysis indicated that FpAG was present as a single-copy sequence in the genome of green ash. RNA accumulated in the reproductive tissues (female...

  3. The Mental Homologies of Mammals. Towards an Understanding of Another Mammals World View

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kiley-Worthington, Marthe

    2017-01-01

    /her world view is molded by lifetime experiences (conditional). Such studies are essential to improve their welfare and enriching our lives. Abstract Mammals’ mental homologies include that they look after their young, suckle and protect them; they acquire information about the world by learning. They have five types of sensory receptors and a brain to analyze the information and they feel: that is they are sentient. Mental homologies have been largely ignored by behavioural scientists since Darwin because of certain historical beliefs. This however has not been the case for people who have had to do with non-human mammals who have long recognized their mental similarities to humans. As a result, behavioural science has sponsored some inappropriate research (examples are given). The study of another mammal species epistemology, (knowledge and world view) requires a recognition of these mental homologies. The result of a 25 year multi-disciplinary study indicates that there are nine mammalian mental homologies which define mammals. These are discussed and reviewed and further mental aptitudes which logically follow from these are pointed out. A Conditional Anthropomorphic approach is proposed. By recognizing the body/mind, whole “being” homologies of mammals, we can advance in understanding other mammal species’ and individual’s epistemology (world view), and consequently better their welfare and enrich our own lives. PMID:29168729

  4. Cloning the human betaretrovirus proviral genome from patients with primary biliary cirrhosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Lizhe; Sakalian, Michael; Shen, Zhiwei; Loss, George; Neuberger, James; Mason, Andrew

    2004-01-01

    Patients with primary biliary cirrhosis (PBC) have both serologic and tissue evidence of infection. A recently identified human betaretrovirus was originally cloned from the biliary epithelium cDNA library of a patient with PBC. By conducting a BLASTN search, the initial partial pol gene fragment was found to have 95% to 97% nucleotide homology with mouse mammary tumor virus (MMTV) and with retrovirus sequences derived from human breast cancer samples. Using an anti-p27(CA) MMTV antibody, viral proteins were detected in the perihepatic lymph nodes but not in liver tissue samples from patients with PBC, suggesting a higher viral burden in lymphoid tissue. Therefore, in the current study, we used lymph node DNA to clone the proviral genome of the human betaretrovirus from two patients with PBC using a polymerase chain reaction (PCR) walking methodology with conserved primers complementary to MMTV. The human betaretrovirus genome contains five potential open reading frames (ORF) for Gag, protease (Pro), polymerase (Pol), envelope (Env), and superantigen (Sag) proteins that are collinear with their counterparts in MMTV. Alignment studies performed with characterized MMTV and human breast cancer betaretrovirus amino acid sequences revealed a 93% to 99% identity with the p27 capsid proteins, a 93% to 97% identity with the betaretrovirus envelope proteins, and a 76% to 85% identity with the more variable superantigen proteins. Phylogenetic analysis of known betaretrovirus superantigen proteins showed that the human and murine sequences did not cluster as two distinct species. In conclusion, human betaretrovirus nucleic acid sequences have been cloned from patients with PBC. They share marked homology with MMTV and human breast cancer-derived retrovirus sequences.

  5. Aggression as a Motive for Gossip During Conflict : The Role of Power, Social Value Orientation, and Counterpart's Behavior

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jeuken, E.; Beersma, B.; ten Velden, F.S.; Dijkstra, M.T.M.

    Not much is known about the motives behind the use of gossip in conflict situations. We report a laboratory experiment that examined the influence of social value orientation, counterpart's behavior, and power on the motive to use gossip for indirect aggression in a conflict situation. Results

  6. Subaru/FOCAS Optical Spectroscopy for a possible IceCube-170922A counterpart TXS 0506+056

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morokuma, Tomoki; Tanaka, Yasuyuki T.; Ohta, Kouji; Matsuoka, Yoshiki; Yamashita, Takuji; Kato, Nanako

    2017-10-01

    We performed optical spectroscopic observations on September 30 and October 1, 2017 (UT) with the 8.2-m Subaru telescope and Faint Object Camera and Spectrograph (FOCAS) for TXS 0506+056 which is a possible counterpart to the IceCube-170922A high-energy neutrino event (Tanaka et al. 2017, ATel #10791).

  7. The Effect of Counterpart Material on the Sliding Wear of TiAlN Coatings Deposited by Reactive Cathodic Pulverization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michell Felipe Cano Ordoñez

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available This work aims to study the effect of the counterpart materials (100Cr6, Al2O3 and WC-Co on the tribological properties of TiAlN thin films deposited on AISI H13 steel substrate by reactive magnetron co-sputtering. The structural characterization of the TiAlN films, performed by X-ray diffraction, showed (220 textured fcc crystalline structure. The values of hardness and elastic modulus obtained by nanoindentation were 27 GPa and 420 GPa, respectively, which resulted in films with a relatively high resistance to plastic deformation. Ball-on-disk sliding tests were performed using normal loads of 1 N and 3 N, and 0.10 m/s of tangential velocity. The wear coefficient of the films was determined by measuring the worn area using profilometry every 1000 cycles. The mechanical properties and the chemical stability of the counterpart material, debris formation and the contact stress influences the friction and the wear behavior of the studied tribosystems. Increasing the hardness of the counterpart decreases the coefficient of friction (COF due to lower counterpart material transference and tribofilm formation, which is able to support the contact pressure. High shear stress concentration at the coating/substrate interface was reported for higher load promoting failure of the film-substrate system for all tribopairs

  8. Illustrating and homology modeling the proteins of the Zika virus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ekins, Sean; Liebler, John; Neves, Bruno J; Lewis, Warren G; Coffee, Megan; Bienstock, Rachelle; Southan, Christopher; Andrade, Carolina H

    2016-01-01

    The Zika virus (ZIKV) is a flavivirus of the family Flaviviridae, which is similar to dengue virus, yellow fever and West Nile virus. Recent outbreaks in South America, Latin America, the Caribbean and in particular Brazil have led to concern for the spread of the disease and potential to cause Guillain-Barré syndrome and microcephaly. Although ZIKV has been known of for over 60 years there is very little in the way of knowledge of the virus with few publications and no crystal structures. No antivirals have been tested against it either in vitro or in vivo. ZIKV therefore epitomizes a neglected disease. Several suggested steps have been proposed which could be taken to initiate ZIKV antiviral drug discovery using both high throughput screens as well as structure-based design based on homology models for the key proteins. We now describe preliminary homology models created for NS5, FtsJ, NS4B, NS4A, HELICc, DEXDc, peptidase S7, NS2B, NS2A, NS1, E stem, glycoprotein M, propeptide, capsid and glycoprotein E using SWISS-MODEL. Eleven out of 15 models pass our model quality criteria for their further use. While a ZIKV glycoprotein E homology model was initially described in the immature conformation as a trimer, we now describe the mature dimer conformer which allowed the construction of an illustration of the complete virion. By comparing illustrations of ZIKV based on this new homology model and the dengue virus crystal structure we propose potential differences that could be exploited for antiviral and vaccine design. The prediction of sites for glycosylation on this protein may also be useful in this regard. While we await a cryo-EM structure of ZIKV and eventual crystal structures of the individual proteins, these homology models provide the community with a starting point for structure-based design of drugs and vaccines as well as a for computational virtual screening.

  9. Single-stranded heteroduplex intermediates in λ Red homologous recombination

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhang Youming

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The Red proteins of lambda phage mediate probably the simplest and most efficient homologous recombination reactions yet described. However the mechanism of dsDNA recombination remains undefined. Results Here we show that the Red proteins can act via full length single stranded intermediates to establish single stranded heteroduplexes at the replication fork. We created asymmetrically digestible dsDNA substrates by exploiting the fact that Redα exonuclease activity requires a 5' phosphorylated end, or is blocked by phosphothioates. Using these substrates, we found that the most efficient configuration for dsDNA recombination occurred when the strand that can prime Okazaki-like synthesis contained both homology regions on the same ssDNA molecule. Furthermore, we show that Red recombination requires replication of the target molecule. Conclusions Hence we propose a new model for dsDNA recombination, termed 'beta' recombination, based on the formation of ssDNA heteroduplexes at the replication fork. Implications of the model were tested using (i an in situ assay for recombination, which showed that recombination generated mixed wild type and recombinant colonies; and (ii the predicted asymmetries of the homology arms, which showed that recombination is more sensitive to non-homologies attached to 5' than 3' ends. Whereas beta recombination can generate deletions in target BACs of at least 50 kb at about the same efficiency as small deletions, the converse event of insertion is very sensitive to increasing size. Insertions up to 3 kb are most efficiently achieved using beta recombination, however at greater sizes, an alternative Red-mediated mechanism(s appears to be equally efficient. These findings define a new intermediate in homologous recombination, which also has practical implications for recombineering with the Red proteins.

  10. Post-test analysis of the ROSA/LSTF and PKL counterpart test

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Carlos, S., E-mail: scarlos@iqn.upv.es [Departament d’Enginyeria Química i Nuclear, Universitat Politècnica de València, Camí de Vera, 14, València Spain (Spain); Querol, A., E-mail: anquevi@iqn.upv.es [Departament d’Enginyeria Química i Nuclear, Universitat Politècnica de València, Camí de Vera, 14, València Spain (Spain); Instituto de Seguridad Industrial, Radiofísica y Medioambiental, Universitat Politècnica de València, Camí de Vera, 14, València (Spain); Gallardo, S., E-mail: sergalbe@iqn.upv.es [Departament d’Enginyeria Química i Nuclear, Universitat Politècnica de València, Camí de Vera, 14, València Spain (Spain); Instituto de Seguridad Industrial, Radiofísica y Medioambiental, Universitat Politècnica de València, Camí de Vera, 14, València (Spain); Sanchez-Saez, F., E-mail: frasansa@etsii.upv.es [Departament d’Enginyeria Química i Nuclear, Universitat Politècnica de València, Camí de Vera, 14, València Spain (Spain); and others

    2016-02-15

    Highlights: • TRACE modelization for PKL and ROSA/LSTF installations. • Secondary-side depressurization as accident management action. • CET vs PCT relation. • Analysis of differences in the vessel models. - Abstract: Experimental facilities are scaled models of commercial nuclear power plants, and are of great importance to improve nuclear power plants safety. Thus, the results obtained in the experiments undertaken in such facilities are essential to develop and improve the models implemented in the thermal-hydraulic codes, which are used in safety analysis. The experiments and inter-comparisons of the simulated results are usually performed in the frame of international programmes in which different groups of several countries simulate the behaviour of the plant under the accidental conditions established, using different codes and models. The results obtained are compared and studied to improve the knowledge on codes performance and nuclear safety. Thus, the Nuclear Energy Agency (NEA), in the nuclear safety work area, auspices several programmes which involve experiments in different experimental facilities. Among the experiments proposed in NEA programmes, one on them consisted of performing a counterpart test between ROSA/LSTF and PKL facilities, with the main objective of determining the effectiveness of late accident management actions in a small break loss of coolant accident (SBLOCA). This study was proposed as a result of the conclusion obtained by the NEA Working Group on the Analysis and Management of Accidents, which analyzed different installations and observed differences in the measurements of core exit temperature (CET) and maximum peak cladding temperature (PCT). In particular, the transient consists of a small break loss of coolant accident (SBLOCA) in a hot leg with additional failure of safety systems but with accident management measures (AM), consisting of a fast secondary-side depressurization, activated by the CET. The paper

  11. Pregnant trauma victims experience nearly 2-fold higher mortality compared to their nonpregnant counterparts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deshpande, Neha A; Kucirka, Lauren M; Smith, Randi N; Oxford, Corrina M

    2017-11-01

    Trauma is the leading nonobstetric cause of death in women of reproductive age, and pregnant women in particular may be at increased risk of violent trauma. Management of trauma in pregnancy is complicated by altered maternal physiology, provider expertise, potential disparate imaging, and distorted anatomy. Little is known about the impact of trauma on maternal mortality. We sought to: (1) characterize nonviolent and violent trauma among pregnant women; (2) determine whether pregnancy is associated with increased mortality following traumatic injury; and (3) identify risk factors for trauma-related death in pregnant women. We studied 1148 trauma events among pregnant girls and women and 43,608 trauma events among nonpregnant girls and women of reproductive age (14-49 years) who presented to any accredited trauma center in Pennsylvania for treatment of trauma-related injuries from 2005 through 2015, as captured in the Pennsylvania Trauma Outcome Study. Traumas were categorized as violent (eg, homicide or assault) or nonviolent (eg, motor vehicle accident or accidental fall). We used modified Poisson regression to estimate relative rate of trauma-related death, adjusting for demographic characteristics and severity of trauma. Compared to nonpregnant women, pregnant women and girls had a lower injury severity score (8.9 vs 10.9, P victims had a 1.6-fold higher rate of mortality compared to their nonpregnant counterparts (P victims of nonviolent and violent trauma (adjusted relative risk, 1.69, P = .002, and adjusted relative risk, 1.60, P = .007, respectively). Pregnant trauma victims were less likely to undergo surgery (adjusted relative risk, 0.70, P = .001) and more likely to be transferred to another facility (adjusted relative risk, 1.72, P < .001). Even after adjusting for demographics and injury severity score, violent trauma was associated with 3.14-fold higher mortality in pregnant women and girls compared to nonviolent trauma (adjusted relative risk, 3

  12. Homologous lactoferrin triggers mobilization of the myelocytic lineage of bone marrow in experimental mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zimecki, Michał; Artym, Jolanta; Kocięba, Maja; Kaleta-Kuratewicz, Katarzyna; Kuropka, Piotr; Kuryszko, Jan; Kruzel, Marian

    2013-12-15

    The effects of lactoferrin (LF), an iron binding protein, on myelopoiesis have been studied extensively in vitro and in vivo in human and murine models over the past three decades. Due to the lack of high-quality homologous LFs, however, the conclusions are still unequivocal. Recently, both human and murine LFs have become available as recombinant products expressed in Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cell lines showing mammalian type of glycosylation, thus apparently species compatible. In this study, we present the effects of homologous recombinant mouse LF (rmLF) on myelopoiesis in CBA mice. The myelocytic lineage has been assessed by their appearance in circulating blood and bone marrow, and induction of relevant mediators of inflammation. Intravenous injection of rmLF (100 μg/mouse) resulted in a significantly increased number of myelocytic cells in the circulating blood after 24 h. Mouse serum transferrin, used as a control protein, showed no stimulatory effect. The increase in output of neutrophil precursors, neutrophils, and eosinophils was correlated with a twofold increase of leukocyte concentrations. The analysis of the bone marrow sections confirmed increased myelopoiesis. The alterations in the bone marrow cell composition were statistically significant regarding mature neutrophils (10.8% vs. 27.7%), metamyelocytes (11.4% vs. 16.0%), and myelocytes (2.4% vs. 4.0%). The mobilization of the myelocytic cells in the bone marrow and the increased output of these cells into circulation were accompanied by elevated serum concentrations of interleukin-6 at 6 h and haptoglobin at 24 h following administration of rmLF. In conclusion, the homologous LF elicits significant and transient myelopoiesis in experimental mice.

  13. Different Principles of ADP-Ribose-Mediated Activation and Opposite Roles of the NUDT9 Homology Domain in the TRPM2 Orthologs of Man and Sea Anemone

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Frank Kühn

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available A decisive element in the human cation channel TRPM2 is a region in its cytosolic C-terminus named NUDT9H because of its homology to the NUDT9 enzyme, a pyrophosphatase degrading ADP-ribose (ADPR. In hTRPM2, however, the NUDT9H domain has lost its enzymatic activity but serves as a binding domain for ADPR. As consequence of binding, gating of the channel is initiated. Since ADPR is produced after oxidative DNA damage, hTRPM2 mediates Ca2+ influx in response to oxidative stress which may lead to cell death. In the genome of the sea anemone Nematostella vectensis (nv, a preferred model organism for the evolution of key bilaterian features, a TRPM2 ortholog has been identified that contains a NUDT9H domain as well. Heterologous expression of nvTRPM2 in HEK-293 cells reveals a cation channel with many close similarities to the human counterpart. Most notably, nvTRPM2 is activated by ADPR, and Ca2+ is a co-agonist. However, the intramolecular mechanisms of ADPR gating as well as the role of NUDT9H are strikingly different in the two species. Whereas already subtle changes of NUDT9H abolish ADPR gating in hTRPM2, the region can be completely removed from nvTRPM2 without loss of responses to ADPR. An alternative ADPR binding site seems to be present but has not yet been characterized. The ADP-ribose pyrophosphatase (ADPRase function of nvNUDT9H has been preserved but can be abolished by numerous genetic manipulations. All these manipulations create channels that are sensitive to hydrogen peroxide which fails to induce channel activity in wild-type nvTRPM2. Therefore, the function of NUDT9H in nvTRPM2 is the degradation of ADPR, thereby reducing agonist concentration in the presence of oxidative stress. Thus, the two TRPM2 orthologs have evolved divergently but nevertheless gained analogous functional properties, i.e., gating by ADPR with Ca2+ as co-factor. Opposite roles are played by the respective NUDT9H domains, either binding of ADPR and mediating

  14. Different Principles of ADP-Ribose-Mediated Activation and Opposite Roles of the NUDT9 Homology Domain in the TRPM2 Orthologs of Man and Sea Anemone.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kühn, Frank; Kühn, Cornelia; Lückhoff, Andreas

    2017-01-01

    A decisive element in the human cation channel TRPM2 is a region in its cytosolic C-terminus named NUDT9H because of its homology to the NUDT9 enzyme, a pyrophosphatase degrading ADP-ribose (ADPR). In hTRPM2, however, the NUDT9H domain has lost its enzymatic activity but serves as a binding domain for ADPR. As consequence of binding, gating of the channel is initiated. Since ADPR is produced after oxidative DNA damage, hTRPM2 mediates Ca2+ influx in response to oxidative stress which may lead to cell death. In the genome of the sea anemone Nematostella vectensis (nv), a preferred model organism for the evolution of key bilaterian features, a TRPM2 ortholog has been identified that contains a NUDT9H domain as well. Heterologous expression of nvTRPM2 in HEK-293 cells reveals a cation channel with many close similarities to the human counterpart. Most notably, nvTRPM2 is activated by ADPR, and Ca2+ is a co-agonist. However, the intramolecular mechanisms of ADPR gating as well as the role of NUDT9H are strikingly different in the two species. Whereas already subtle changes of NUDT9H abolish ADPR gating in hTRPM2, the region can be completely removed from nvTRPM2 without loss of responses to ADPR. An alternative ADPR binding site seems to be present but has not yet been characterized. The ADP-ribose pyrophosphatase (ADPRase) function of nvNUDT9H has been preserved but can be abolished by numerous genetic manipulations. All these manipulations create channels that are sensitive to hydrogen peroxide which fails to induce channel activity in wild-type nvTRPM2. Therefore, the function of NUDT9H in nvTRPM2 is the degradation of ADPR, thereby reducing agonist concentration in the presence of oxidative stress. Thus, the two TRPM2 orthologs have evolved divergently but nevertheless gained analogous functional properties, i.e., gating by ADPR with Ca2+ as co-factor. Opposite roles are played by the respective NUDT9H domains, either binding of ADPR and mediating channel activity

  15. No allelic variation in genes with high gliadin homology in patients with celiac disease and type 1 diabetes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Christian; Hansen, Dorte; Husby, Steffen

    2004-01-01

    Celiac disease (CD) is a complex inflammatory disorder of the small intestine, induced by dietary gluten in genetically susceptible individuals. CD is strongly associated with HLA-DQ2 and it has recently been established that gut-derived DQ2-restricted T cells from patients with CD predominantly...... that gut-expressed human celiac epitope homologous peptides are unlikely to represent non-HLA risk factors in the development of celiac disease in Caucasians....... recognize gluten-derived peptides in which specific glutamine residues are deamidated to glutamic acid by tissue transglutaminase. Recently, intestinally expressed human genes with high homology to DQ2-gliadin celiac T-cell epitopes have been identified. Single or double point mutations which would increase...

  16. A novel antibody humanization method based on epitopes scanning and molecular dynamics simulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Ding; Chen, Cai-Feng; Zhao, Bin-Bin; Gong, Lu-Lu; Jin, Wen-Jing; Liu, Jing-Jun; Wang, Jing-Fei; Wang, Tian-Tian; Yuan, Xiao-Hui; He, You-Wen

    2013-01-01

    1-17-2 is a rat anti-human DEC-205 monoclonal antibody that induces internalization and delivers antigen to dendritic cells (DCs). The potentially clinical application of this antibody is limited by its murine origin. Traditional humanization method such as complementarity determining regions (CDRs) graft often leads to a decreased or even lost affinity. Here we have developed a novel antibody humanization method based on computer modeling and bioinformatics analysis. First, we used homology modeling technology to build the precise model of Fab. A novel epitope scanning algorithm was designed to identify antigenic residues in the framework regions (FRs) that need to be mutated to human counterpart in the humanization process. Then virtual mutation and molecular dynamics (MD) simulation were used to assess the conformational impact imposed by all the mutations. By comparing the root-mean-square deviations (RMSDs) of CDRs, we found five key residues whose mutations would destroy the original conformation of CDRs. These residues need to be back-mutated to rescue the antibody binding affinity. Finally we constructed the antibodies in vitro and compared their binding affinity by flow cytometry and surface plasmon resonance (SPR) assay. The binding affinity of the refined humanized antibody was similar to that of the original rat antibody. Our results have established a novel method based on epitopes scanning and MD simulation for antibody humanization.

  17. THE SCUBA-2 COSMOLOGY LEGACY SURVEY: MULTIWAVELENGTH COUNTERPARTS TO 10{sup 3} SUBMILLIMETER GALAXIES IN THE UKIDSS-UDS FIELD

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, Chian-Chou; Smail, Ian; Ma, Cheng-Jiun; Simpson, James M.; Swinbank, A. Mark [Centre for Extragalactic Astronomy, Department of Physics, Durham University, South Road, Durham DH1 3LE (United Kingdom); Ivison, Rob J.; Arumugam, Vinodiran; Mortlock, Alice; Dunlop, James S.; Michałowski, Michał J. [Institute for Astronomy, University of Edinburgh, Royal Observatory, Blackford Hill, Edinburgh EH9 3HJ (United Kingdom); Almaini, Omar; Conselice, Christopher J.; Hartley, Will G. [University of Nottingham, School of Physics and Astronomy, Nottingham, NG7 2RD (United Kingdom); Geach, James E. [Center for Astrophysics Research, Science and Technology Research Institute, University of Hertfordshire, Hatfield AL10 9AB (United Kingdom); Simpson, Chris [Astrophysics Research Institute, Liverpool John Moores University, Liverpool Science Park, 146 Brownlow Hill, Liverpool L3 5RF (United Kingdom); Aretxaga, Itziar [Instituto Nacional de Astrofísica, Óptica y Electrónica (INAOE), Luis Enrique Erro 1, Sta. Ma. Tonantzintla, Puebla (Mexico); Blain, Andrew [Physics and Astronomy, University of Leicester, Leicester, LE1 7RH (United Kingdom); Chapman, Scott C. [Department of Physics and Atmospheric Science, Dalhousie University, 6310 Coburg Road, Halifax, NS B3H 4R2 (Canada); Farrah, Duncan [Department of Physics, Virginia Tech, Blacksburg, VA 24061 (United States); Halpern, Mark [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of British Columbia, 6224 Agricultural Road, Vancouver, BC V6T 1Z1 (Canada); and others

    2016-04-01

    We present multiwavelength identifications for the counterparts of 1088 submillimeter sources detected at 850 μm in the SCUBA-2 Cosmology Legacy Survey study of the UKIRT Infrared Deep Sky Survey-Ultra-Deep Survey (UDS) field. By utilizing an Atacama Large Millimeter Array (ALMA) pilot study on a subset of our bright SCUBA-2 sample as a training set, along with the deep optical–near-infrared (OIR) data available in this field, we develop a novel technique, Optical–IR Triple Color (OIRTC), using z − K, K − [3.6], [3.6] − [4.5] colors to select the candidate submillimeter galaxy (SMG) counterparts. By combining radio identification and the OIRTC technique, we find counterpart candidates for 80% of the Class = 1 ≥ 4σ SCUBA-2 sample, defined as those that are covered by both radio and OIR imaging and the base sample for our scientific analyses. Based on the ALMA training set, we expect the accuracy of these identifications to be 82% ± 20%, with a completeness of 69% ± 16%, essentially as accurate as the traditional p-value technique but with higher completeness. We find that the fraction of SCUBA-2 sources having candidate counterparts is lower for fainter 850 μm sources, and we argue that for follow-up observations sensitive to SMGs with S{sub 850} ≳ 1 mJy across the whole ALMA beam, the fraction with multiple counterparts is likely to be >40% for SCUBA-2 sources at S{sub 850} ≳ 4 mJy. We find that the photometric redshift distribution for the SMGs is well fit by a lognormal distribution, with a median redshift of z = 2.3 ± 0.1. After accounting for the sources without any radio and/or OIRTC counterpart, we estimate the median redshift to be z = 2.6 ± 0.1 for SMGs with S{sub 850} > 1 mJy. We also use this new large sample to study the clustering of SMGs and the far-infrared properties of the unidentified submillimeter sources by stacking their Herschel SPIRE far-infrared emission.

  18. Electrostatic braiding and homologous pairing of DNA double helices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cortini, Ruggero; Kornyshev, Alexei A; Lee, Dominic J; Leikin, Sergey

    2011-08-17

    Homologous pairing and braiding (supercoiling) have crucial effects on genome organization, maintenance, and evolution. Generally, the pairing and braiding processes are discussed in different contexts, independently of each other. However, analysis of electrostatic interactions between DNA double helices suggests that in some situations these processes may be related. Here we present a theory of DNA braiding that accounts for the elastic energy of DNA double helices as well as for the chiral nature of the discrete helical patterns of DNA charges. This theory shows that DNA braiding may be affected, stabilized, or even driven by chiral electrostatic interactions. For example, electrostatically driven braiding may explain the surprising recent observation of stable pairing of homologous double-stranded DNA in solutions containing only monovalent salt. Electrostatic stabilization of left-handed braids may stand behind the chiral selectivity of type II topoisomerases and positive plasmid supercoiling in hyperthermophilic bacteria and archea. Copyright © 2011 Biophysical Society. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Homology and isomorphism: Bourdieu in conversation with New Institutionalism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yingyao

    2016-06-01

    Bourdieusian Field Theory (BFT) provided decisive inspiration for the early conceptual formulation of New Institutionalism (NI). This paper attempts to reinvigorate the stalled intellectual dialogue between NI and BFT by comparing NI's concept of isomorphism with BFT's notion of homology. I argue that Bourdieu's understanding of domination-oriented social action, transposable habitus, and a non-linear causality, embodied in his neglected concept of homology, provides an alternative theorization of field-level convergence to New Institutionalism's central idea of institutional isomorphism. To showcase how BFT can be useful for organizational research, I postulate a habitus-informed and field-conditioned theory of transference to enrich NI's spin-off thesis of 'diffusion'. I propose that while NI can benefit from BFT's potential of bringing social structure back into organizational research, BFT can enrich its social analysis by borrowing from NI's elaboration of the symbolic system of organizations. © London School of Economics and Political Science 2016.

  20. Targeted recombination between homologous chromosomes for precise breeding in tomato.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Filler Hayut, Shdema; Melamed Bessudo, Cathy; Levy, Avraham A

    2017-05-26

    Homologous recombination (HR) between parental chromosomes occurs stochastically. Here, we report on targeted recombination between homologous chromosomes upon somatic induction of DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs) via CRISPR-Cas9. We demonstrate this via a visual and molecular assay whereby DSB induction between two alleles carrying different mutations in the PHYTOENE SYNTHASE (PSY1) gene results in yellow fruits with wild type red sectors forming via HR-mediated DSB repair. We also show that in heterozygote plants containing one psy1 allele immune and one sensitive to CRISPR, repair of the broken allele using the unbroken allele sequence template is a common outcome. In another assay, we show evidence of a somatically induced DSB in a cross between a psy1 edible tomato mutant and wild type Solanum pimpinellifolium, targeting only the S. pimpinellifolium allele. This enables characterization of germinally transmitted targeted somatic HR events, demonstrating that somatically induced DSBs can be exploited for precise breeding of crops.

  1. Intersection spaces, spatial homology truncation, and string theory

    CERN Document Server

    Banagl, Markus

    2010-01-01

    Intersection cohomology assigns groups which satisfy a generalized form of Poincaré duality over the rationals to a stratified singular space. The present monograph introduces a method that assigns to certain classes of stratified spaces cell complexes, called intersection spaces, whose ordinary rational homology satisfies generalized Poincaré duality. The cornerstone of the method is a process of spatial homology truncation, whose functoriality properties are analyzed in detail. The material on truncation is autonomous and may be of independent interest to homotopy theorists. The cohomology of intersection spaces is not isomorphic to intersection cohomology and possesses algebraic features such as perversity-internal cup-products and cohomology operations that are not generally available for intersection cohomology. A mirror-symmetric interpretation, as well as applications to string theory concerning massless D-branes arising in type IIB theory during a Calabi-Yau conifold transition, are discussed.

  2. Homologous recombination in the archaea: the means justify the ends.

    Science.gov (United States)

    White, Malcolm F

    2011-01-01

    The process of information exchange between two homologous DNA duplexes is known as homologous recombination (HR) or double-strand break repair (DSBR), depending on the context. HR is the fundamental process underlying the genome shuffling that expands genetic diversity (for example during meiosis in eukaryotes). DSBR is an essential repair pathway in all three domains of life, and plays a major role in the rescue of stalled or collapsed replication forks, a phenomenon known as recombination-dependent replication (RDR). The process of HR in the archaea is gradually being elucidated, initially from structural and biochemical studies, but increasingly using new genetic systems. The present review focuses on our current understanding of the structures, functions and interactions of archaeal HR proteins, with an emphasis on recent advances. There are still many unknown aspects of archaeal HR, most notably the mechanism of branch migration of Holliday junctions, which is also an open question in eukarya.

  3. Spinal cord reconstitution with homologous neural grafts enables robust corticospinal regeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kadoya, Ken; Lu, Paul; Nguyen, Kenny; Lee-Kubli, Corinne; Kumamaru, Hiromi; Yao, Lin; Knackert, Joshua; Poplawski, Gunnar; Dulin, Jennifer N; Strobl, Hans; Takashima, Yoshio; Biane, Jeremy; Conner, James; Zhang, Su-Chun; Tuszynski, Mark H

    2016-05-01

    The corticospinal tract (CST) is the most important motor system in humans, yet robust regeneration of this projection after spinal cord injury (SCI) has not been accomplished. In murine models of SCI, we report robust corticospinal axon regeneration, functional synapse formation and improved skilled forelimb function after grafting multipotent neural progenitor cells into sites of SCI. Corticospinal regeneration requires grafts to be driven toward caudalized (spinal cord), rather than rostralized, fates. Fully mature caudalized neural grafts also support corticospinal regeneration. Moreover, corticospinal axons can emerge from neural grafts and regenerate beyond the lesion, a process that is potentially related to the attenuation of the glial scar. Rat corticospinal axons also regenerate into human donor grafts of caudal spinal cord identity. Collectively, these findings indicate that spinal cord 'replacement' with homologous neural stem cells enables robust regeneration of the corticospinal projection within and beyond spinal cord lesion sites, achieving a major unmet goal of SCI research and offering new possibilities for clinical translation.

  4. Morse homology for the Yang–Mills gradient flow

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Swoboda, Jan

    2012-01-01

    ...€¢â€¢â€¢ (••••) •••–••• www.elsevier.com/locate/matpur Morse homology for the Yang–Mills gradient flow Jan Swoboda ∗ Max-Planck-Institut...

  5. Quasi-homologous spherically symmetric branes and their symmetry breaking

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Abdalla, M.C.B.; Carlesso, P.F. [UNESP - Universidade Estadual Paulista, Instituto de Fisica Teorica, Rua Dr. Bento Teobaldo Ferraz, 271, Bloco II, Barra-Funda, Caixa Postal 70532-2, Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil); Hoff da Silva, J.M. [UNESP - Universidade Estadual Paulista, Departamento de Fisica e Quimica, Guaratingueta, SP (Brazil)

    2013-06-15

    We revisit the dynamical system-based approach of spherically symmetric vacuum braneworlds, pointing out and studying the existence of a transcritical bifurcation as the dark pressure parameter changes its sign, we analyze some consequences of not discard the brane cosmological constant. For instance, it is noteworthy that the existence of an isothermal state equation between the dark fluid parameters cannot be obtained via the requirement of a quasi-homologous symmetry of the vacuum. (orig.)

  6. Protein Identification Pipeline for the Homology Driven Proteomics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Junqueira, Magno; Spirin, Victor; Balbuena, Tiago Santana; Thomas, Henrik; Adzhubei, Ivan; Sunyaev, Shamil; Shevchenko, Andrej

    2008-01-01

    Homology-driven proteomics is a major tool to characterize proteomes of organisms with unsequenced genomes. This paper addresses practical aspects of automated homology–driven protein identifications by LC-MS/MS on a hybrid LTQ Orbitrap mass spectrometer. All essential software elements supporting the presented pipeline are either hosted at the publicly accessible web server, or are available for free download. PMID:18639657

  7. Persistent homology for the quantitative prediction of fullerene stability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xia, Kelin; Feng, Xin; Tong, Yiying; Wei, Guo Wei

    2015-03-05

    Persistent homology is a relatively new tool often used for qualitative analysis of intrinsic topological features in images and data originated from scientific and engineering applications. In this article, we report novel quantitative predictions of the energy and stability of fullerene molecules, the very first attempt in using persistent homology in this context. The ground-state structures of a series of small fullerene molecules are first investigated with the standard Vietoris-Rips complex. We decipher all the barcodes, including both short-lived local bars and long-lived global bars arising from topological invariants, and associate them with fullerene structural details. Using accumulated bar lengths, we build quantitative models to correlate local and global Betti-2 bars, respectively with the heat of formation and total curvature energies of fullerenes. It is found that the heat of formation energy is related to the local hexagonal cavities of small fullerenes, while the total curvature energies of fullerene isomers are associated with their sphericities, which are measured by the lengths of their long-lived Betti-2 bars. Excellent correlation coefficients (>0.94) between persistent homology predictions and those of quantum or curvature analysis have been observed. A correlation matrix based filtration is introduced to further verify our findings. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  8. Persistent Homology for The Quantitative Prediction of Fullerene Stability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xia, Kelin; Feng, Xin; Tong, Yiying; Wei, Guo Wei

    2014-01-01

    Persistent homology is a relatively new tool often used for qualitative analysis of intrinsic topological features in images and data originated from scientific and engineering applications. In this paper, we report novel quantitative predictions of the energy and stability of fullerene molecules, the very first attempt in employing persistent homology in this context. The ground-state structures of a series of small fullerene molecules are first investigated with the standard Vietoris-Rips complex. We decipher all the barcodes, including both short-lived local bars and long-lived global bars arising from topological invariants, and associate them with fullerene structural details. By using accumulated bar lengths, we build quantitative models to correlate local and global Betti-2 bars respectively with the heat of formation and total curvature energies of fullerenes. It is found that the heat of formation energy is related to the local hexagonal cavities of small fullerenes, while the total curvature energies of fullerene isomers are associated with their sphericities, which are measured by the lengths of their long-lived Betti-2 bars. Excellent correlation coefficients (> 0.94) between persistent homology predictions and those of quantum or curvature analysis have been observed. A correlation matrix based filtration is introduced to further verify our findings. PMID:25523342

  9. Accelerated homologous recombination and subsequent genome modification in Drosophila.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baena-Lopez, Luis Alberto; Alexandre, Cyrille; Mitchell, Alice; Pasakarnis, Laurynas; Vincent, Jean-Paul

    2013-12-01

    Gene targeting by 'ends-out' homologous recombination enables the deletion of genomic sequences and concurrent introduction of exogenous DNA with base-pair precision without sequence constraint. In Drosophila, this powerful technique has remained laborious and hence seldom implemented. We describe a targeting vector and protocols that achieve this at high frequency and with very few false positives in Drosophila, either with a two-generation crossing scheme or by direct injection in embryos. The frequency of injection-mediated gene targeting can be further increased with CRISPR-induced double-strand breaks within the region to be deleted, thus making homologous recombination almost as easy as conventional transgenesis. Our targeting vector replaces genomic sequences with a multifunctional fragment comprising an easy-to-select genetic marker, a fluorescent reporter, as well as an attP site, which acts as a landing platform for reintegration vectors. These vectors allow the insertion of a variety of transcription reporters or cDNAs to express tagged or mutant isoforms at endogenous levels. In addition, they pave the way for difficult experiments such as tissue-specific allele switching and functional analysis in post-mitotic or polyploid cells. Therefore, our method retains the advantages of homologous recombination while capitalising on the mutagenic power of CRISPR.

  10. PAR-TERRA directs homologous sex chromosome pairing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chu, Hsueh-Ping; Froberg, John E; Kesner, Barry; Oh, Hyun Jung; Ji, Fei; Sadreyev, Ruslan; Pinter, Stefan F; Lee, Jeannie T

    2017-08-01

    In mammals, homologous chromosomes rarely pair outside meiosis. One exception is the X chromosome, which transiently pairs during X-chromosome inactivation (XCI). How two chromosomes find each other in 3D space is not known. Here, we reveal a required interaction between the X-inactivation center (Xic) and the telomere in mouse embryonic stem (ES) cells. The subtelomeric, pseudoautosomal regions (PARs) of the two sex chromosomes (X and Y) also undergo pairing in both female and male cells. PARs transcribe a class of telomeric RNA, dubbed PAR-TERRA, which accounts for a vast majority of all TERRA transcripts. PAR-TERRA binds throughout the genome, including to the PAR and Xic. During X-chromosome pairing, PAR-TERRA anchors the Xic to the PAR, creating a 'tetrad' of pairwise homologous interactions (Xic-Xic, PAR-PAR, and Xic-PAR). Xic pairing occurs within the tetrad. Depleting PAR-TERRA abrogates pairing and blocks initiation of XCI, whereas autosomal PAR-TERRA induces ectopic pairing. We propose a 'constrained diffusion model' in which PAR-TERRA creates an interaction hub to guide Xic homology searching during XCI.

  11. Remote homology detection incorporating the context of physicochemical properties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bedoya, Oscar; Tischer, Irene

    2014-02-01

    A new method for remote protein homology detection, called support vector machine incorporating the context of physicochemical properties (SVM-CP), is presented. Recent discriminative methods are based on concatenating information extracted from each protein by considering several physicochemical properties. We show that there are physicochemical properties that reflect the functional or structural characteristics of each specific protein family, but there are also some physicochemical properties that affect the accuracy of the classification techniques. The research highlights the importance of the selection of physicochemical properties in remote homology detection. Most of the methods slide a window over every protein sequence to extract physicochemical information. This extraction is usually performed by giving the same importance to every value in the window, i.e., averaging the physicochemical values in the observation window. SVM-CP takes into account that every residue in a sliding window has a different weight, which reflects the importance or contribution to the representative value of the window. The SVM-CP method reaches a receiver operating characteristic (ROC) score of 0.93462, which is the highest value for a remote homology detection method based on the sequence composition information. © 2013 Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  12. Adiponectin and plant-derived mammalian adiponectin homolog exert a protective effect in murine colitis

    KAUST Repository

    Arsenescu, Violeta

    2011-04-11

    Background: Hypoadiponectinemia has been associated with states of chronic inflammation in humans. Mesenteric fat hypertrophy and low adiponectin have been described in patients with Crohn\\'s disease. We investigated whether adiponectin and the plant-derived homolog, osmotin, are beneficial in a murine model of colitis. Methods: C57BL/6 mice were injected (i.v.) with an adenoviral construct encoding the full-length murine adiponectin gene (AN+DSS) or a reporter-LacZ (Ctr and V+DSS groups) prior to DSS colitis protocol. In another experiment, mice with DSS colitis received either osmotin (Osm+DSS) or saline (DSS) via osmotic pumps. Disease progression and severity were evaluated using body weight, stool consistency, rectal bleeding, colon lengths, and histology. In vitro experiments were carried out in bone marrow-derived dendritic cells. Results: Mice overexpressing adiponectin had lower expression of proinflammatory cytokines (TNF, IL-1β), adipokines (angiotensin, osteopontin), and cellular stress and apoptosis markers. These mice had higher levels of IL-10, alternative macrophage marker, arginase 1, and leukoprotease inhibitor. The plant adiponectin homolog osmotin similarly improved colitis outcome and induced robust IL-10 secretion. LPS induced a state of adiponectin resistance in dendritic cells that was reversed by treatment with PPARγ agonist and retinoic acid. Conclusion: Adiponectin exerted protective effects during murine DSS colitis. It had a broad activity that encompassed cytokines, chemotactic factors as well as processes that assure cell viability during stressful conditions. Reducing adiponectin resistance or using plant-derived adiponectin homologs may become therapeutic options in inflammatory bowel disease. © 2011 Springer Science+Business Media, LLC.

  13. Novel Observational Technique of Gravitational Wave (GW) Events: Detecting and Locating Electromagnetic Counterparts to GW Sources using Dust Scattering Halos

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nederlander, Richard; Paerels, Frits

    2018-01-01

    We discuss a novel observational technique for detecting and locating the electromagnetic counterpart to its GW source, providing astronomers with a several-hour reprieve after a GW event’s occurrence. The technique relies on identifying a dust scattering halo caused by GW-produced X-rays scattering off Galactic dust clouds. The travel time delay of these scattered photons makes them detectable for up to several hours after the prompt event, and the location of the gravitational wave source will be at the geometric center of the halo. The center can be determined with precision sufficient enough to allow the host galaxy to be discerned. This novel technique will be especially relevant for binary black-hole mergers because their counterparts have, as of now, been difficult to detect.

  14. Effect of counterpart metals in carbon-supported Pt-based catalysts prepared using radiation chemical method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okazaki, Tomohisa; Seino, Satoshi; Matsuura, Yoshiyuki; Otake, Hiroaki; Kugai, Junichiro; Ohkubo, Yuji; Nitani, Hiroaki; Nakagawa, Takashi; Yamamoto, Takao A.

    2017-04-01

    The process of nanoparticle formation by radiation chemical synthesis in a heterogeneous system has been investigated. Carbon-supported Pt-based bimetallic nanoparticles were synthesized using a high-energy electron beam. Rh, Cu, Ru, and Sn were used as counterpart metals. The nanoparticles were characterized by inductively coupled plasma atomic emission spectrometry, transmission electron microscopy, X-ray diffraction, and X-ray absorption spectroscopy. PtRh formed a uniform random alloy nanoparticle, while Cu partially formed an alloy with Pt and the remaining Cu existed as CuO. PtRu formed an alloy structure with a composition distribution of a Pt-rich core and Ru-rich shell. No alloying was observed in PtSn, which had a Pt-SnO2 structure. The alloy and oxide formation mechanisms are discussed considering the redox potentials, the standard enthalpy of oxide formation, and the solid solubilities of Pt and the counterpart metals.

  15. Gamma-ray Burst and Gravitational Wave Counterpart Prospects in the MeV Band with AMEGO

    Science.gov (United States)

    Racusin, Judith; AMEGO Team

    2018-01-01

    The All-sky Medium Energy Gamma-ray Observatory (AMEGO) Probe mission concept is uniquely suited to address open questions in Gamma-ray Burst (GRB) science including the search for counterparts to gravitational-wave events. AMEGO is a wide field of view instrument (~60 deg radius) with a broad energy range (~200 keV to >10 GeV) and excellent continuum sensitivity. The sensitivity improvement will allow for probes of GRB emission mechanisms and jet composition in ways that have not been accessible with previous instruments. Potential for polarization measurement may also have profound impacts on the understanding of GRB mechanisms. AMEGO will also be an excellent facility for the search for gravitational wave counterparts to binary mergers including at least one neutron star, which are thought to produce short duration GRBs. This poster will describe how the AMEGO will advance these fields.

  16. Gamma-ray Burst and Gravitational Wave Counterpart Prospects in the MeV Band with AMEGO

    Science.gov (United States)

    Racusin, Judith L.

    2017-08-01

    The All-sky Medium Energy Gamma-ray Observatory (AMEGO) Probe mission concept is uniquely suited to address open questions in Gamma-ray Burst (GRB) science including the search for counterparts to gravitational-wave events. AMEGO is a wide field of view instrument (~60 deg radius) with a broad energy range (~200 keV to >10 GeV) and excellent continuum sensitivity. The sensitivity improvement will allow for probes of GRB emission mechanisms and jet composition in ways that have not been accessible with previous instruments. Potential for polarization measurement may also have profound impacts on the understanding of GRB mechanisms. AMEGO will also be an excellent facility for the search for gravitational wave counterparts to binary mergers including at least one neutron star, which are thought to produce short duration GRBs. This poster will describe how the AMEGO will advance these fields.

  17. VLT observations of the magnetar CXO J164710.2-455216 and the detection of a candidate infrared counterpart

    Science.gov (United States)

    Testa, V.; Mignani, R. P.; Hummel, W.; Rea, N.; Israel, G. L.

    2018-01-01

    We present deep observations of the field of the magnetar CXO J164710.2-455216 in the star cluster Westerlund 1, obtained in the near-infrared with the adaptive optics camera NACO@VLT. We detected a possible candidate counterpart at the Chandra position of the magnetar, of magnitudes J = 23.5 ± 0.2, H = 21.0 ± 0.1 and KS = 20.4 ± 0.1. The KS-band measurements available for two epochs (2006 and 2013) do not show significant signs of variability but only a marginal indication that the flux varied (at the 2σ level), consistent with the fact that the observations were taken when CXO J164710.2-455216 was in quiescence. At the same time, we also present colour-magnitude and colour-colour diagrams in the J, H and KS bands from the 2006 epoch only, the only one with observations in all three bands, showing that the candidate counterpart lies in the main bulk of objects describing a relatively well-defined sequence. Therefore, based on its colours and lack of variability, we cannot yet associate the candidate counterpart to CXO J164710.2-455216. Future near-infrared observations of the field, following up a source outburst, would be crucial to confirm the association with the detection of near-infrared variability and colour evolution.

  18. Search of MeV-GeV counterparts of TeV sources with AGILE in pointing mode

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rappoldi, A.; Lucarelli, F.; Pittori, C.; Longo, F.; Cattaneo, P. W.; Verrecchia, F.; Tavani, M.; Bulgarelli, A.; Chen, A. W.; Colafrancesco, S.; Donnarumma, I.; Giuliani, A.; Morselli, A.; Sabatini, S.; Vercellone, S.

    2016-03-01

    Context. Known TeV sources detected by major Čerenkov telescopes are investigated to identify possible MeV-GeV γ-ray counterparts. Aims: A systematic study of the known sources in the web-based TeVCat catalog has been performed to search for possible γ-ray counterparts on the AGILE data collected during the first period of operations in observing pointing mode. Methods: For each TeV source, a search for a possible γ-ray counterpart that is based on a multi-source maximum likelihood algorithm is performed on the AGILE data taken with the GRID instrument from July 2007 to October 2009. Results: In the case of high-significance detection, the average γ-ray flux is estimated. For cases of low-significance detection the 95% confidence level (CL) flux upper limit is given. 52 TeV sources out of 152 (corresponding to ~34% of the analysed sample) show a significant excess in the AGILE data covering the pointing observation period. Conclusions: This analysis found 26 new AGILE sources with respect to the AGILE reference catalogs, 15 of which are galactic, 7 are extragalactic and 4 are unidentified. Detailed tables with all available information on the analysed sources are presented. An interactive online version of the considered source list including all the analysis results is also available at the website http://www.asdc.asi.it/agiletevcat/

  19. Health and functional status and utilization of health care services among holocaust survivors and their counterparts in Israel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iecovich, Esther; Carmel, Sara

    2010-01-01

    To examine differences in health and functional status and in utilization of health services between holocaust survivors and their counterparts; and (b) to investigate if holocaust survivor status is a significant predictor of health status, functional status, and utilization of health services. The study included 1255 respondents of whom 272 were holocaust survivors. Interviews were conducted face-to-face at the respondents' homes. Participants were asked about their health (self-rated health and comorbidity) and functional (ADL and IADL) status, utilization of inpatient and outpatient health care services, age, gender, education, marital status, length of residence in Israel, and if they were holocaust survivors. Holocaust survivors, who were frailer and more chronically ill compared to their counterparts, visited their family physician and the nurse at the health care clinic more often than their counterparts did, and received more homecare services. Yet, there were no differences between them in the utilization of other health care services such as visits to specialists, emergency department, and hospitalizations. Holocaust survivors are more homebound due to more morbidity and functional limitations and therefore receive more health home care services that offset the utilization of other health services. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Targeting Neuroblastoma Cell Surface Proteins: Recommendations for Homology Modeling of hNET, ALK, and TrkB.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haddad, Yazan; Heger, Zbyněk; Adam, Vojtech

    2017-01-01

    Targeted therapy is a promising approach for treatment of neuroblastoma as evident from the large number of targeting agents employed in clinical practice today. In the absence of known crystal structures, researchers rely on homology modeling to construct template-based theoretical structures for drug design and testing. Here, we discuss three candidate cell surface proteins that are suitable for homology modeling: human norepinephrine transporter (hNET), anaplastic lymphoma kinase (ALK), and neurotrophic tyrosine kinase receptor 2 (NTRK2 or TrkB). When choosing templates, both sequence identity and structure quality are important for homology modeling and pose the first of many challenges in the modeling process. Homology modeling of hNET can be improved using template models of dopamine and serotonin transporters instead of the leucine transporter (LeuT). The extracellular domains of ALK and TrkB are yet to be exploited by homology modeling. There are several idiosyncrasies that require direct attention throughout the process of model construction, evaluation and refinement. Shifts/gaps in the alignment between the template and target, backbone outliers and side-chain rotamer outliers are among the main sources of physical errors in the structures. Low-conserved regions can be refined with loop modeling method. Residue hydrophobicity, accessibility to bound metals or glycosylation can aid in model refinement. We recommend resolving these idiosyncrasies as part of "good modeling practice" to obtain highest quality model. Decreasing physical errors in protein structures plays major role in the development of targeting agents and understanding of chemical interactions at the molecular level.

  1. Post-translational Regulation of Cas9 during G1 Enhances Homology-Directed Repair

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tony Gutschner

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available CRISPR/Cas9 induces DNA double-strand breaks that are repaired by cell-autonomous repair pathways, namely, non-homologous end-joining (NHEJ, or homology-directed repair (HDR. While HDR is absent in G1, NHEJ is active throughout the cell cycle and, thus, is largely favored over HDR. We devised a strategy to increase HDR by directly synchronizing the expression of Cas9 with cell-cycle progression. Fusion of Cas9 to the N-terminal region of human Geminin converted this gene-editing protein into a substrate for the E3 ubiquitin ligase complex APC/Cdh1, resulting in a cell-cycle-tailored expression with low levels in G1 but high expression in S/G2/M. Importantly, Cas9-hGem(1/110 increased the rate of HDR by up to 87% compared to wild-type Cas9. Future developments may enable high-resolution expression of genome engineering proteins, which might increase HDR rates further, and may contribute to a better understanding of DNA repair pathways due to spatiotemporal control of DNA damage induction.

  2. Heterogeneity in the Frequency and Characteristics of Homologous Recombination in Pneumococcal Evolution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hanage, William P.; Harris, Simon R.; Bentley, Stephen; Fraser, Christophe

    2014-01-01

    The bacterium Streptococcus pneumoniae (pneumococcus) is one of the most important human bacterial pathogens, and a leading cause of morbidity and mortality worldwide. The pneumococcus is also known for undergoing extensive homologous recombination via transformation with exogenous DNA. It has been shown that recombination has a major impact on the evolution of the pathogen, including acquisition of antibiotic resistance and serotype-switching. Nevertheless, the mechanism and the rates of recombination in an epidemiological context remain poorly understood. Here, we proposed several mathematical models to describe the rate and size of recombination in the evolutionary history of two very distinct pneumococcal lineages, PMEN1 and CC180. We found that, in both lineages, the process of homologous recombination was best described by a heterogeneous model of recombination with single, short, frequent replacements, which we call micro-recombinations, and rarer, multi-fragment, saltational replacements, which we call macro-recombinations. Macro-recombination was associated with major phenotypic changes, including serotype-switching events, and thus was a major driver of the diversification of the pathogen. We critically evaluate biological and epidemiological processes that could give rise to the micro-recombination and macro-recombination processes. PMID:24786281

  3. The PLAC1-homology region of the ZP domain is sufficient for protein polymerisation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jovine, Luca; Janssen, William G; Litscher, Eveline S; Wassarman, Paul M

    2006-04-06

    Hundreds of extracellular proteins polymerise into filaments and matrices by using zona pellucida (ZP) domains. ZP domain proteins perform highly diverse functions, ranging from structural to receptorial, and mutations in their genes are responsible for a number of severe human diseases. Recently, PLAC1, Oosp1-3, Papillote and CG16798 proteins were identified that share sequence homology with the N-terminal half of the ZP domain (ZP-N), but not with its C-terminal half (ZP-C). The functional significance of this partial conservation is unknown. By exploiting a highly engineered bacterial strain, we expressed in soluble form the PLAC1-homology region of mammalian sperm receptor ZP3 as a fusion to maltose binding protein. Mass spectrometry showed that the 4 conserved Cys residues within the ZP-N moiety of the fusion protein adopt the same disulfide bond connectivity as in full-length native ZP3, indicating that it is correctly folded, and electron microscopy and biochemical analyses revealed that it assembles into filaments. These findings provide a function for PLAC1-like proteins and, by showing that ZP-N is a biologically active folding unit, prompt a re-evaluation of the architecture of the ZP domain and its polymers. Furthermore, they suggest that ZP-C might play a regulatory role in the assembly of ZP domain protein complexes.

  4. The PLAC1-homology region of the ZP domain is sufficient for protein polymerisation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Litscher Eveline S

    2006-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Hundreds of extracellular proteins polymerise into filaments and matrices by using zona pellucida (ZP domains. ZP domain proteins perform highly diverse functions, ranging from structural to receptorial, and mutations in their genes are responsible for a number of severe human diseases. Recently, PLAC1, Oosp1-3, Papillote and CG16798 proteins were identified that share sequence homology with the N-terminal half of the ZP domain (ZP-N, but not with its C-terminal half (ZP-C. The functional significance of this partial conservation is unknown. Results By exploiting a highly engineered bacterial strain, we expressed in soluble form the PLAC1-homology region of mammalian sperm receptor ZP3 as a fusion to maltose binding protein. Mass spectrometry showed that the 4 conserved Cys residues within the ZP-N moiety of the fusion protein adopt the same disulfide bond connectivity as in full-length native ZP3, indicating that it is correctly folded, and electron microscopy and biochemical analyses revealed that it assembles into filaments. Conclusion These findings provide a function for PLAC1-like proteins and, by showing that ZP-N is a biologically active folding unit, prompt a re-evaluation of the architecture of the ZP domain and its polymers. Furthermore, they suggest that ZP-C might play a regulatory role in the assembly of ZP domain protein complexes.

  5. Heterogeneity in the frequency and characteristics of homologous recombination in pneumococcal evolution.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rafal Mostowy

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available The bacterium Streptococcus pneumoniae (pneumococcus is one of the most important human bacterial pathogens, and a leading cause of morbidity and mortality worldwide. The pneumococcus is also known for undergoing extensive homologous recombination via transformation with exogenous DNA. It has been shown that recombination has a major impact on the evolution of the pathogen, including acquisition of antibiotic resistance and serotype-switching. Nevertheless, the mechanism and the rates of recombination in an epidemiological context remain poorly understood. Here, we proposed several mathematical models to describe the rate and size of recombination in the evolutionary history of two very distinct pneumococcal lineages, PMEN1 and CC180. We found that, in both lineages, the process of homologous recombination was best described by a heterogeneous model of recombination with single, short, frequent replacements, which we call micro-recombinations, and rarer, multi-fragment, saltational replacements, which we call macro-recombinations. Macro-recombination was associated with major phenotypic changes, including serotype-switching events, and thus was a major driver of the diversification of the pathogen. We critically evaluate biological and epidemiological processes that could give rise to the micro-recombination and macro-recombination processes.

  6. Homology modeling, docking and structure-based pharmacophore of inhibitors of DNA methyltransferase

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoo, Jakyung; Medina-Franco, José L.

    2011-06-01

    DNA methyltransferase 1 (DNMT1) is an emerging epigenetic target for the treatment of cancer and other diseases. To date, several inhibitors from different structural classes have been published. In this work, we report a comprehensive molecular modeling study of 14 established DNTM1 inhibitors with a herein developed homology model of the catalytic domain of human DNTM1. The geometry of the homology model was in agreement with the proposed mechanism of DNA methylation. Docking results revealed that all inhibitors studied in this work have hydrogen bond interactions with a glutamic acid and arginine residues that play a central role in the mechanism of cytosine DNA methylation. The binding models of compounds such as curcumin and parthenolide suggest that these natural products are covalent blockers of the catalytic site. A pharmacophore model was also developed for all DNMT1 inhibitors considered in this work using the most favorable binding conformations and energetic terms of the docked poses. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first pharmacophore model proposed for compounds with inhibitory activity of DNMT1. The results presented in this work represent a conceptual advance for understanding the protein-ligand interactions and mechanism of action of DNMT1 inhibitors. The insights obtained in this work can be used for the structure-based design and virtual screening for novel inhibitors targeting DNMT1.

  7. Homology directed repair is unaffected by the absence of siRNAs in Drosophila melanogaster.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmidts, Ines; Böttcher, Romy; Mirkovic-Hösle, Milijana; Förstemann, Klaus

    2016-09-30

    Small interfering RNAs (siRNAs) defend the organism against harmful transcripts from exogenous (e.g. viral) or endogenous (e.g. transposons) sources. Recent publications describe the production of siRNAs induced by DNA double-strand breaks (DSB) in Neurospora crassa, Arabidopsis thaliana, Drosophila melanogaster and human cells, which suggests a conserved function. A current hypothesis is that break-induced small RNAs ensure efficient homologous recombination (HR). However, biogenesis of siRNAs is often intertwined with other small RNA species, such as microRNAs (miRNAs), which complicates interpretation of experimental results. In Drosophila, siRNAs are produced by Dcr-2 while miRNAs are processed by Dcr-1. Thus, it is possible to probe siRNA function without miRNA deregulation. We therefore examined DNA double-strand break repair after perturbation of siRNA biogenesis in cultured Drosophila cells as well as mutant flies. Our assays comprised reporters for the single-strand annealing pathway, homologous recombination and sensitivity to the DSB-inducing drug camptothecin. We could not detect any repair defects caused by the lack of siRNAs derived from the broken DNA locus. Since production of these siRNAs depends on local transcription, they may thus participate in RNA metabolism-an established function of siRNAs-rather than DNA repair. © The Author(s) 2016. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Nucleic Acids Research.

  8. Identification and partial characterization of a Salp15 homolog from Ixodes ricinus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, J; Renneker, S; Beyer, D; Kullmann, B; Seitzer, U; Ahmed, J; Bakheit, M A

    2014-04-01

    The immunomodulatory molecule Salp15 is originally described in Ixodes scapularis and has been shown to inhibit CD4 T cell activation. Many Salp15 homologs have been described from Ixodes species, and all were well conserved at C-terminal residues that seem to be essential for the function of the protein. In this study, a gene sequence was amplified from cDNA isolated from engorged female I. ricinus ticks, which was predicted to generate a protein of 12.3 kDa. The protein displayed distinct amino acid differences from previously described I. ricinus Salp15 homologs, with amino acid identity ranging between 46.6% and 93.9%. It was referred to as I. ricinus Salp15-like protein. The protein showed 48.1% sequence identity to I. scapularis Salp15. We analyzed the effect of the recombinant I. ricinus Salp15-like protein on the production of cytokines from human peripheral blood mononuclear cells stimulated with LPS. The recombinant protein exerted no effect on the production of TNF-α and IL-6, but the production of IL-10 was dose-dependently reduced. It can be concluded that I. ricinus Salp15-like protein exerts an immunomodulatory effect on the host. The inhibition of IL-10 production may possibly lead to a retardation of B cell activity. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  9. Genetic selection and DNA sequences of 4.5S RNA homologs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brown, S; Thon, G; Tolentino, E

    1989-01-01

    A general strategy for cloning the functional homologs of an Escherichia coli gene was used to clone homologs of 4.5S RNA from other bacteria. The genes encoding these homologs were selected by their ability to complement a deletion of the gene for 4.5S RNA. DNA sequences of the regions encoding...

  10. Multiple Rad52-Mediated Homology-Directed Repair Mechanisms Are Required to Prevent Telomere Attrition-Induced Senescence in Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Claussin, Clémence; Chang, Michael

    Most human somatic cells express insufficient levels of telomerase, which can result in telomere shortening and eventually senescence, both of which are hallmarks of ageing. Homology-directed repair (HDR) is important for maintaining proper telomere function in yeast and mammals. In Saccharomyces

  11. The PIKE homolog Centaurin gamma regulates developmental timing in Drosophila.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anna Lisa Gündner

    Full Text Available Phosphoinositide-3-kinase enhancer (PIKE proteins encoded by the PIKE/CENTG1 gene are members of the gamma subgroup of the Centaurin superfamily of small GTPases. They are characterized by their chimeric protein domain architecture consisting of a pleckstrin homology (PH domain, a GTPase-activating (GAP domain, Ankyrin repeats as well as an intrinsic GTPase domain. In mammals, three PIKE isoforms with variations in protein structure and subcellular localization are encoded by the PIKE locus. PIKE inactivation in mice results in a broad range of defects, including neuronal cell death during brain development and misregulation of mammary gland development. PIKE -/- mutant mice are smaller, contain less white adipose tissue, and show insulin resistance due to misregulation of AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK and insulin receptor/Akt signaling. here, we have studied the role of PIKE proteins in metabolic regulation in the fly. We show that the Drosophila PIKE homolog, ceng1A, encodes functional GTPases whose internal GAP domains catalyze their GTPase activity. To elucidate the biological function of ceng1A in flies, we introduced a deletion in the ceng1A gene by homologous recombination that removes all predicted functional PIKE domains. We found that homozygous ceng1A mutant animals survive to adulthood. In contrast to PIKE -/- mouse mutants, genetic ablation of Drosophila ceng1A does not result in growth defects or weight reduction. Although metabolic pathways such as insulin signaling, sensitivity towards starvation and mobilization of lipids under high fed conditions are not perturbed in ceng1A mutants, homozygous ceng1A mutants show a prolonged development in second instar larval stage, leading to a late onset of pupariation. In line with these results we found that expression of ecdysone inducible genes is reduced in ceng1A mutants. Together, we propose a novel role for Drosophila Ceng1A in regulating ecdysone signaling-dependent second to

  12. Homology of the open moduli space of curves

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Madsen, Ib Henning

    2012-01-01

    This is a survey on the proof of a generalized version of the Mumford conjecture obtained in joint work with M. Weiss stating that a certain map between some classifying spaces which a priori have different natures induces an isomorphism at the level of integral homology. We also discuss our proof...... of the original Mumford conjecture stating that the stable rational cohomology of the moduli space of Riemann surfaces is a certain polynomial algebra generated by the Mumford–Morita–Miller cohomology classes of even degrees....

  13. Parallel Computation of Persistent Homology using the Blowup Complex

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lewis, Ryan [Stanford Univ., CA (United States); Morozov, Dmitriy [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States)

    2015-04-27

    We describe a parallel algorithm that computes persistent homology, an algebraic descriptor of a filtered topological space. Our algorithm is distinguished by operating on a spatial decomposition of the domain, as opposed to a decomposition with respect to the filtration. We rely on a classical construction, called the Mayer--Vietoris blowup complex, to glue global topological information about a space from its disjoint subsets. We introduce an efficient algorithm to perform this gluing operation, which may be of independent interest, and describe how to process the domain hierarchically. We report on a set of experiments that help assess the strengths and identify the limitations of our method.

  14. The colocalization transition of homologous chromosomes at meiosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nicodemi, Mario; Panning, Barbara; Prisco, Antonella

    2008-06-01

    Meiosis is the specialized cell division required in sexual reproduction. During its early stages, in the mother cell nucleus, homologous chromosomes recognize each other and colocalize in a crucial step that remains one of the most mysterious of meiosis. Starting from recent discoveries on the system molecular components and interactions, we discuss a statistical mechanics model of chromosome early pairing. Binding molecules mediate long-distance interaction of special DNA recognition sequences and, if their concentration exceeds a critical threshold, they induce a spontaneous colocalization transition of chromosomes, otherwise independently diffusing.

  15. A Hochschild homology Euler characteristic for circle actions

    OpenAIRE

    Geoghegan, Ross; Nicas, Andrew

    1998-01-01

    We define a "circle Euler characteristic" of a circle action on a compact manifold or finite complex X. It lies in the first Hochschild homology group of ZG where G is the fundamental group of X. It is analogous in many ways to the ordinary Euler characteristic. One application is an intuitively satisfying formula for the Euler class (integer coefficients) of the normal bundle to a smooth circle action without fixed points on a manifold. In the special case of a 3-dimensional Seifert fibered ...

  16. Transgenic Bacillus thuringiensis (Bt rice is safer to aquatic ecosystems than its non-transgenic counterpart.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guangsheng Li

    Full Text Available Rice lines genetically modified with the crystal toxin genes from Bacillus thuringiensis (Bt have experienced rapid development, with biosafety certificates for two Bt rice lines issued in 2009. There has still been no commercial release of these lines yet due to public concerns about human health and environmental risks. Some studies confirmed that Bt rice was as safe as conventional rice to non-target organisms when pesticides were not applied, however, pesticides are still required in Bt rice to control non-lepidopteran pests. In this study, we assessed the environmental effects of two Bt rice lines expressing either the cry1Ab/1Ac or cry2A genes, respectively, by using zooplanktons as indicator species under normal field management practices using pesticides when required. In the whole rice growing season, non-Bt rice was sprayed 5 times while Bt rice was sprayed 2 times, which ensured both rice achieved a normal yield. Field investigations showed that rice type (Bt and non-Bt significantly influenced zooplankton abundance and diversity, which were up to 95% and 80% lower in non-Bt rice fields than Bt rice fields. Laboratory rearing showed that water from non-Bt rice fields was significantly less suitable for the survival and reproduction of Daphnia magna and Paramecium caudatum in comparison with water from Bt rice fields. Higher pesticide residues were detected in the water from non-Bt than Bt rice fields, accounting for the bad performance of zooplankton in non-Bt field water. Our results demonstrate that Bt rice is safer to aquatic ecosystems than non-Bt rice, and its commercialization will be beneficial for biodiversity restoration in rice-based ecosystems.

  17. In search of an uncultured human-associated TM7 bacterium in the environment.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jorge M Dinis

    Full Text Available We have identified an environmental bacterium in the Candidate Division TM7 with ≥98.5% 16S rDNA gene homology to a group of TM7 bacteria associated with the human oral cavity and skin. The environmental TM7 bacterium (referred to as TM7a-like was readily detectable in wastewater with molecular techniques over two years of sampling. We present the first images of TM7a-like cells through FISH technique and the first images of any TM7 as viable cells through the STARFISH technique. In situ quantification showed TM7 concentration in wastewater up to five times greater than in human oral sites. We speculate that upon further characterization of the physiology and genetics of the TM7a-like bacterium from environmental sources and confirmation of its genomic identity to human-associated counterparts it will serve as model organisms to better understand its role in human health. The approach proposed circumvents difficulties imposed by sampling humans, provides an alternative strategy to characterizing some diseases of unknown etiology, and renders a much needed understanding of the ecophysiological role hundreds of unique Bacteria and Archaea strains play in mixed microbial communities.

  18. In search of an uncultured human-associated TM7 bacterium in the environment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dinis, Jorge M; Barton, David E; Ghadiri, Jamsheed; Surendar, Deepa; Reddy, Kavitha; Velasquez, Fernando; Chaffee, Carol L; Lee, Mei-Chong Wendy; Gavrilova, Helen; Ozuna, Hazel; Smits, Samuel A; Ouverney, Cleber C

    2011-01-01

    We have identified an environmental bacterium in the Candidate Division TM7 with ≥98.5% 16S rDNA gene homology to a group of TM7 bacteria associated with the human oral cavity and skin. The environmental TM7 bacterium (referred to as TM7a-like) was readily detectable in wastewater with molecular techniques over two years of sampling. We present the first images of TM7a-like cells through FISH technique and the first images of any TM7 as viable cells through the STARFISH technique. In situ quantification showed TM7 concentration in wastewater up to five times greater than in human oral sites. We speculate that upon further characterization of the physiology and genetics of the TM7a-like bacterium from environmental sources and confirmation of its genomic identity to human-associated counterparts it will serve as model organisms to better understand its role in human health. The approach proposed circumvents difficulties imposed by sampling humans, provides an alternative strategy to characterizing some diseases of unknown etiology, and renders a much needed understanding of the ecophysiological role hundreds of unique Bacteria and Archaea strains play in mixed microbial communities.

  19. Optical spectroscopic exploration of binding of Cochineal Red A with two homologous serum albumins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bolel, Priyanka; Mahapatra, Niharendu; Halder, Mintu

    2012-04-11

    Cochineal Red A is a negatively charged synthetic azo food colorant and a potential carcinogen. We present here the study of binding of Cochineal Red A with two homologous serum albumins, human (HSA) and bovine (BSA), in aqueous pH 7.4 buffer by optical spectroscopic techniques. Protein intrinsic fluorescence quenching by Cochineal Red A occurs through ground-state static interaction and its binding with BSA is stronger than with HSA. The magnitudes of thermodynamic parameters suggest that dye binding occurs principally via electrostatic complexation. Site-marker competitive binding shows that Cochineal Red A binds primarily to site I of serum albumins. Circular dichroic spectra indicate that dye binding results in some conformational modification of serum albumins. Increased ionic strength of the medium results in lowering of binding. This study provides an important insight into possible means of removal of dye toxicity.

  20. Bloom Syndrome Helicase Promotes Meiotic Crossover Patterning and Homolog Disjunction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hatkevich, Talia; Kohl, Kathryn P; McMahan, Susan; Hartmann, Michaelyn A; Williams, Andrew M; Sekelsky, Jeff

    2017-01-09

    In most sexually reproducing organisms, crossover formation between homologous chromosomes is necessary for proper chromosome disjunction during meiosis I. During meiotic recombination, a subset of programmed DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs) are repaired as crossovers, with the remainder becoming noncrossovers [1]. Whether a repair intermediate is designated to become a crossover is a highly regulated decision that integrates several crossover patterning processes, both along chromosome arms (interference and the centromere effect) and between chromosomes (crossover assurance) [2]. Because the mechanisms that generate crossover patterning have remained elusive for over a century, it has been difficult to assess the relationship between crossover patterning and meiotic chromosome behavior. We show here that meiotic crossover patterning is lost in Drosophila melanogaster mutants that lack the Bloom syndrome helicase. In the absence of interference and the centromere effect, crossovers are distributed more uniformly along chromosomes. Crossovers even occur on the small chromosome 4, which normally never has meiotic crossovers [3]. Regulated distribution of crossovers between chromosome pairs is also lost, resulting in an elevated frequency of homologs that do not receive a crossover, which in turn leads to elevated nondisjunction. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Ontogeny and homology of the claustra in otophysan Ostariophysi (Teleostei).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Britz, Ralf; Hoffmann, Matthias

    2006-08-01

    We studied the ontogeny of the claustrum comparatively in representatives of all otophysan subgroups. The claustrum of cypriniforms has a cartilaginous precursor, the claustral cartilage, which subsequently ossifies perichondrally at its anterior face and develops an extensive lamina of membrane bone. The membrane bone component of the claustrum and its close association with the atrium sinus imparis, a perilymphatic space of the Weberian apparatus, are both synapomorphies of cypriniforms. The characiform claustrum is not preformed in cartilage and originates as a membrane bone ossification, a putative synapomorphy of that taxon. Among siluriforms, the claustrum is present only in more basal groups and originates as an elongate cartilage that ossifies in a characteristic ventrodorsal direction, possibly a synapomorphy of catfishes. Gymnotiforms lack the claustral cartilage and claustrum. We review all previous hypothesis of claustrum homology in light of the above findings and conclude that the most plausible hypothesis is the one originally proposed by Bloch ([1900] Jen Z Naturw 34:1-64) that claustra are homologs of the supradorsals of the first vertebra. Copyright 2006 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  2. Overexpression of enhancer of zests homolog 2 in lymphoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Shan-Qi; Zhang, Yi-Zhuo

    2012-10-01

    This article aimed to review the biological characteristics of enhancer of zests homolog 2 (EZH2), and the transcriptional repression mechanism of action of EZH2 in tumors, particularly in the progression of lymphoma. The data cited in this review were mainly obtained from the articles listed in PubMed and HighWare that were published from March 2004 to April 2012. The search terms were "enhancer of zests homolog 2", "polycomb group", and "lymphoma". Articles regarding the mechanism of EZH2 in post-transcriptional modification, functions of polycomb group proteins, and the roles of EZH2 in lymphoma were selected. EZH2 acts as oncogene and involved in many kinds of tumors. Moreover, it plays an important role in tumorigenesis and lymphomagenesis by promoting the proliferation and aggressiveness of neoplastic cells, facilitating malignant tumor cell diffusion, and mediating transcriptional silencing. EZH2 mediated transcriptional repression through its methyltransferase activity at the chromatin level has certain influence on lymphoma, and there might exist a therapeutic window for the development of new agents and identification of novel diagnostic markers based on EZH2.

  3. Change of gene structure and function by non-homologous end-joining, homologous recombination, and transposition of DNA.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wolfgang Goettel

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available An important objective in genome research is to relate genome structure to gene function. Sequence comparisons among orthologous and paralogous genes and their allelic variants can reveal sequences of functional significance. Here, we describe a 379-kb region on chromosome 1 of maize that enables us to reconstruct chromosome breakage, transposition, non-homologous end-joining, and homologous recombination events. Such a high-density composition of various mechanisms in a small chromosomal interval exemplifies the evolution of gene regulation and allelic diversity in general. It also illustrates the evolutionary pace of changes in plants, where many of the above mechanisms are of somatic origin. In contrast to animals, somatic alterations can easily be transmitted through meiosis because the germline in plants is contiguous to somatic tissue, permitting the recovery of such chromosomal rearrangements. The analyzed region contains the P1-wr allele, a variant of the genetically well-defined p1 gene, which encodes a Myb-like transcriptional activator in maize. The P1-wr allele consists of eleven nearly perfect P1-wr 12-kb repeats that are arranged in a tandem head-to-tail array. Although a technical challenge to sequence such a structure by shotgun sequencing, we overcame this problem by subcloning each repeat and ordering them based on nucleotide variations. These polymorphisms were also critical for recombination and expression analysis in presence and absence of the trans-acting epigenetic factor Ufo1. Interestingly, chimeras of the p1 and p2 genes, p2/p1 and p1/p2, are framing the P1-wr cluster. Reconstruction of sequence amplification steps at the p locus showed the evolution from a single Myb-homolog to the multi-gene P1-wr cluster. It also demonstrates how non-homologous end-joining can create novel gene fusions. Comparisons to orthologous regions in sorghum and rice also indicate a greater instability of the maize genome, probably due to

  4. Characterization of a Toxoplasma gondii calcium calmodulin-dependent protein kinase homolog.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kato, Kentaro; Sugi, Tatsuki; Takemae, Hitoshi; Takano, Ryo; Gong, Haiyan; Ishiwa, Akiko; Horimoto, Taisuke; Akashi, Hiroomi

    2016-07-21

    Toxoplasma gondii is an obligate intracellular parasite of the phylum Apicomplexa and a major pathogen of animals and immunocompromised humans, in whom it causes encephalitis. Understanding the mechanism of tachyzoite invasion is important for the discovery of new drug targets and may serve as a model for the study of other apicomplexan parasites. We previously showed that Plasmodium falciparum expresses a homolog of human calcium calmodulin-dependent protein kinase (CaMK) that is important for host cell invasion. In this study, to identify novel targets for the treatment of Toxoplasma gondii infection (another apicomplexan parasite), we sought to identify a CaMK-like protein in the T. gondii genome and to characterize its role in the life-cycle of this parasite. An in vitro kinase assay was performed to assess the phosphorylation activities of a novel CaMK-like protein in T. gondii by using purified proteins with various concentrations of calcium, calmodulin antagonists, or T. gondii glideosome proteins. Indirect immunofluorescence microscopy was performed to detect the localization of this protein kinase by using the antibodies against this protein and organellar maker proteins of T. gondii. We identified a novel CaMK homolog in T. gondii, T. gondii CaMK-related kinase (TgCaMKrk), which exhibits calmodulin-independent autophosphorylation and substrate phosphorylation activity. However, calmodulin antagonists had no effect on its kinase activity. In T. gondii-infected cells, TgCaMKrk localized to the apical ends of extracellular and intracellular tachyzoites. TgCaMKrk phosphorylated TgGAP45 for phosphorylation in vitro. Our data improve our understanding of T. gondii motility and infection, the interaction between parasite protein kinases and glideosomes, and drug targets for protozoan diseases.

  5. The Effect of the Negotiator's Social Power as a Function of the Counterpart's Emotional Reactions in a Computer Mediated Negotiation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shlomo Hareli

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available A negotiator’s own power and their counterpart’s emotional reaction to the negotiation both influence the outcome of negotiations. The present research addressed the question of their relative importance. On one hand, social power should be potent regardless of the other’s emotions. On the other hand, the counterpart’s emotional reactions inform about the ongoing state of the negotiation, and as such are more diagnostic than the more distal power cue. In a simulated computer mediated negotiation, 248 participants assumed the role of a vendor of computerized avionics test equipment and their objective was to negotiate the price, the warranty period, and the number of software updates that the buyer will receive free of charge. Participants negotiated the sale after being primed with either high or low power or not primed at all (control condition. They received information that their counterpart was either happy or angry or emotionally neutral. The findings showed that even though power was an important factor at the start of negotiations, the informative value of emotion information took precedence over time. This implies that emotional information may erase any advantage that counterparts have in a negotiation thanks to their higher social power.

  6. Detection of an Optical Counterpart to the ALFALFA Ultra-compact High-velocity Cloud AGC 249525

    Science.gov (United States)

    Janesh, William; Rhode, Katherine L.; Salzer, John J.; Janowiecki, Steven; Adams, Elizabeth A. K.; Haynes, Martha P.; Giovanelli, Riccardo; Cannon, John M.

    2017-03-01

    We report on the detection at >98% confidence of an optical counterpart to AGC 249525, an ultra-compact high-velocity cloud (UCHVC) discovered by the Arecibo Legacy Fast ALFA survey blind neutral hydrogen survey. UCHVCs are compact, isolated H I clouds with properties consistent with their being nearby low-mass galaxies, but without identified counterparts in extant optical surveys. Analysis of the resolved stellar sources in deep g- and I-band imaging from the WIYN pODI camera reveals a clustering of possible red giant branch stars associated with AGC 249525 at a distance of 1.64 ± 0.45 Mpc. Matching our optical detection with the H I synthesis map of AGC 249525 from Adams et al. shows that the stellar overdensity is exactly coincident with the highest-density H I contour from that study. Combining our optical photometry and the H I properties of this object yields an absolute magnitude of -7.1≤slant {M}V≤slant -4.5, a stellar mass between 2.2+/- 0.6× {10}4 {M}⊙ and 3.6+/- 1.0× {10}5 {M}⊙ , and an H I to stellar mass ratio between 9 and 144. This object has stellar properties within the observed range of gas-poor ultra-faint dwarfs in the Local Group, but is gas-dominated.

  7. An AGN or a Be star as possible counterparts of 3FGL J0133.3+5930

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martí, J.; Luque-Escamilla, P. L.; Paredes, J. M.; Iwasawa, K.; Galindo, D.; Ribó, M.; Marín-Felip, V.

    2017-03-01

    We present recent results from our program for cross-identification of unassociated gamma-ray sources at low galactic latitudes. The main motivation for this work is the search for new members of the scarce class of gamma-ray binaries and microquasars. Here we report the case of the Fermi LAT source 3FGL J0133.3+5930. Two peculiar objects have been found inside the 95% confidence contour of this unassociated gamma-ray source. One of them is the optically bright Be star TYC 3683-985-1, also consistent with the ROSAT X-ray source 1RXS J013326.9+592946. In this work, we have discovered it to be a new eclipsing binary system. The other is the Swift X-ray source SWIFT J0132.9+ 5932 whose radio, infrared and optical counterpart are still under study. Based on the observational evidence available, SWIFT J0132.9+5932 stands as the most likely counterpart to 3FGL J0133.3+5930. Although its spectral energy distribution appears to be consistent with a stellar system, a possible Active Galactic Nuclei nature cannot be yet ruled out.

  8. An Enhanced Method for Scheduling Observations of Large Sky Error Regions for Finding Optical Counterparts to Transients

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rana, Javed; Singhal, Akshat; Gadre, Bhooshan; Bhalerao, Varun; Bose, Sukanta, E-mail: javed@iucaa.in [Inter-University Centre for Astronomy and Astrophysics, Post Bag 4, Ganeshkhind, Pune 411 007 (India)

    2017-04-01

    The discovery and subsequent study of optical counterparts to transient sources is crucial for their complete astrophysical understanding. Various gamma-ray burst (GRB) detectors, and more notably the ground-based gravitational wave detectors, typically have large uncertainties in the sky positions of detected sources. Searching these large sky regions spanning hundreds of square degrees is a formidable challenge for most ground-based optical telescopes, which can usually image less than tens of square degrees of the sky in a single night. We present algorithms for better scheduling of such follow-up observations in order to maximize the probability of imaging the optical counterpart, based on the all-sky probability distribution of the source position. We incorporate realistic observing constraints such as the diurnal cycle, telescope pointing limitations, available observing time, and the rising/setting of the target at the observatory’s location. We use simulations to demonstrate that our proposed algorithms outperform the default greedy observing schedule used by many observatories. Our algorithms are applicable for follow-up of other transient sources with large positional uncertainties, such as Fermi -detected GRBs, and can easily be adapted for scheduling radio or space-based X-ray follow-up.

  9. Life-cycle fossil energy consumption and greenhouse gas emissions of bioderived chemicals and their conventional counterparts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adom, Felix; Dunn, Jennifer B; Han, Jeongwoo; Sather, Norm

    2014-12-16

    Biomass-derived chemical products may offer reduced environmental impacts compared to their fossil-derived counterparts and could improve profit margins at biorefineries when coproduced with higher-volume, lower-profit margin biofuels. It is important to assess on a life-cycle basis the energy and environmental impacts of these bioproducts as compared to conventional, fossil-derived products. We undertook a life-cycle analysis of eight bioproducts produced from either algal-derived glycerol or corn stover-derived sugars. Selected on the basis of technology readiness and market potential, the bioproducts are propylene glycol, 1,3-propanediol, 3-hydroxypropionic acid, acrylic acid, polyethylene, succinic acid, isobutanol, and 1,4-butanediol. We developed process simulations to obtain energy and material flows in the production of each bioproduct and examined sensitivity of these flows to process design assumptions. Conversion process data for fossil-derived products were based on the literature. Conversion process data were combined with upstream parameters in the Greenhouse gases, Regulated Emissions, and Energy use in Transportation (GREET) model to generate life-cycle greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions and fossil energy consumption (FEC) for each bioproduct and its corresponding petroleum-derived product. The bioproducts uniformly offer GHG emissions reductions compared to their fossil counterparts ranging from 39 to 86% on a cradle-to-grave basis. Similarly, FEC was lower for bioproducts than for conventional products.

  10. Tid1, a cochaperone of the heat shock 70 protein and the mammalian counterpart of the Drosophila tumor suppressor l(2)tid, is critical for early embryonic development and cell survival.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lo, Jeng-Fan; Hayashi, Masaaki; Woo-Kim, Sung; Tian, Bin; Huang, Jing-Feng; Fearns, Colleen; Takayama, Shinichi; Zapata, Juan M; Yang, Young; Lee, Jiing-Dwan

    2004-03-01

    Tid1 is the mammalian counterpart of the Drosophila tumor suppressor Tid56 and is also a DnaJ protein containing a conserved J domain through which it interacts with the heat shock protein 70 (Hsp70) family of chaperone proteins. We generated a Tid1 conditional mutation in mice, and the subsequent global removal of the Tid1 protein was achieved by crossing these conditional knockout mice with general deletor mice. No Tid1(-/-) embryos were detected as early as embryonic day 7.5 (E7.5). Nonetheless, Tid1-deficient blastocysts were viable, hatched, formed an inner cell mass and trophectoderm, and implanted (E4.5), suggesting that the homozygous mutant embryos die between E4.5 and E7.5. To assess the function of Tid1 in embryonic cells, mouse embryonic fibroblasts with the homologous Tid1 floxed allele were produced. Tid1 removal in these cells led to massive cell death. The death of Tid1-deficient cells could be rescued by ectopic expression of wild-type Tid1 but not by expression of the Tid1 protein that had a mutated J domain and was thus incapable of binding to Hsp70. We propose that Tid1 is critical for early mammalian development, most likely for its function in sustaining embryonic-cell survival, which requires its association with Hsp70.

  11. Transcriptional profile of the homologous recombination machinery and characterization of the EhRAD51 recombinase in response to DNA damage in Entamoeba histolytica

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    López-Camarillo César

    2008-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In eukaryotic and prokaryotic cells, homologous recombination is an accurate mechanism to generate genetic diversity, and it is also used to repair DNA double strand-breaks. RAD52 epistasis group genes involved in recombinational DNA repair, including mre11, rad50, nsb1/xrs2, rad51, rad51c/rad57, rad51b/rad55, rad51d, xrcc2, xrcc3, rad52, rad54, rad54b/rdh54 and rad59 genes, have been studied in human and yeast cells. Notably, the RAD51 recombinase catalyses strand transfer between a broken DNA and its undamaged homologous strand, to allow damaged region repair. In protozoan parasites, homologous recombination generating antigenic variation and genomic rearrangements is responsible for virulence variation and drug resistance. However, in Entamoeba histolytica the protozoan parasite responsible for human amoebiasis, DNA repair and homologous recombination mechanisms are still unknown. Results In this paper, we initiated the study of the mechanism for DNA repair by homologous recombination in the primitive eukaryote E. histolytica using UV-C (150 J/m2 irradiated trophozoites. DNA double strand-breaks were evidenced in irradiated cells by TUNEL and comet assays and evaluation of the EhH2AX histone phosphorylation status. In E. histolytica genome, we identified genes homologous to yeast and human RAD52 epistasis group genes involved in DNA double strand-breaks repair by homologous recombination. Interestingly, the E. histolytica RAD52 epistasis group related genes were differentially expressed before and after UV-C treatment. Next, we focused on the characterization of the putative recombinase EhRAD51, which conserves the typical architecture of RECA/RAD51 proteins. Specific antibodies immunodetected EhRAD51 protein in both nuclear and cytoplasmic compartments. Moreover, after DNA damage, EhRAD51 was located as typical nuclear foci-like structures in E. histolytica trophozoites. Purified recombinant EhRAD51 exhibited DNA binding

  12. Homologous recombination and non-homologous end-joining repair pathways in bovine embryos with different developmental competence

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Henrique Barreta, Marcos [Universidade Federal de Santa Catarina, Campus Universitario de Curitibanos, Curitibanos, SC (Brazil); Laboratorio de Biotecnologia e Reproducao Animal-BioRep, Universidade Federal de Santa Maria, Santa Maria, RS (Brazil); Garziera Gasperin, Bernardo; Braga Rissi, Vitor; Cesaro, Matheus Pedrotti de [Laboratorio de Biotecnologia e Reproducao Animal-BioRep, Universidade Federal de Santa Maria, Santa Maria, RS (Brazil); Ferreira, Rogerio [Centro de Educacao Superior do Oeste-Universidade do Estado de Santa Catarina, Chapeco, SC (Brazil); Oliveira, Joao Francisco de; Goncalves, Paulo Bayard Dias [Laboratorio de Biotecnologia e Reproducao Animal-BioRep, Universidade Federal de Santa Maria, Santa Maria, RS (Brazil); Bordignon, Vilceu, E-mail: vilceu.bordignon@mcgill.ca [Department of Animal Science, McGill University, Ste-Anne-De-Bellevue, QC (Canada)

    2012-10-01

    This study investigated the expression of genes controlling homologous recombination (HR), and non-homologous end-joining (NHEJ) DNA-repair pathways in bovine embryos of different developmental potential. It also evaluated whether bovine embryos can respond to DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs) induced with ultraviolet irradiation by regulating expression of genes involved in HR and NHEJ repair pathways. Embryos with high, intermediate or low developmental competence were selected based on the cleavage time after in vitro insemination and were removed from in vitro culture before (36 h), during (72 h) and after (96 h) the expected period of embryonic genome activation. All studied genes were expressed before, during and after the genome activation period regardless the developmental competence of the embryos. Higher mRNA expression of 53BP1 and RAD52 was found before genome activation in embryos with low developmental competence. Expression of 53BP1, RAD51 and KU70 was downregulated at 72 h and upregulated at 168 h post-insemination in response to DSBs induced by ultraviolet irradiation. In conclusion, important genes controlling HR and NHEJ DNA-repair pathways are expressed in bovine embryos, however genes participating in these pathways are only regulated after the period of embryo genome activation in response to ultraviolet-induced DSBs.

  13. Thermus thermophilus as source of thermozymes for biotechnological applications: homologous expression and biochemical characterization of an α-galactosidase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aulitto, Martina; Fusco, Salvatore; Fiorentino, Gabriella; Limauro, Danila; Pedone, Emilia; Bartolucci, Simonetta; Contursi, Patrizia

    2017-02-13

    The genus Thermus, which has been considered for a long time as a fruitful source of biotechnological relevant enzymes, has emerged more recently as suitable host to overproduce thermozymes. Among these, α-galactosidases are widely used in several industrial bioprocesses that require high working temperatures and for which thermostable variants offer considerable advantages over their thermolabile counterparts. Thermus thermophilus HB27 strain was used for the homologous expression of the TTP0072 gene encoding for an α-galactosidase (TtGalA). Interestingly, a soluble and active histidine-tagged enzyme was produced in larger amounts (5 mg/L) in this thermophilic host than in Escherichia coli (0.5 mg/L). The purified recombinant enzyme showed an optimal activity at 90 °C and retained more than 40% of activity over a broad range of pH (from 5 to 8). TtGalA is among the most thermoactive and thermostable α-galactosidases discovered so far, thus pointing to T. thermophilus as cell factory for the recombinant production of biocatalysts active at temperature values over 90 °C.

  14. Calcium-Enhanced Twitching Motility in Xylella fastidiosa Is Linked to a Single PilY1 Homolog.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cruz, Luisa F; Parker, Jennifer K; Cobine, Paul A; De La Fuente, Leonardo

    2014-12-01

    The plant-pathogenic bacterium Xylella fastidiosa is restricted to the xylem vessel environment, where mineral nutrients are transported through the plant host; therefore, changes in the concentrations of these elements likely impact the growth and virulence of this bacterium. Twitching motility, dependent on type IV pili (TFP), is required for movement against the transpiration stream that results in basipetal colonization. We previously demonstrated that calcium (Ca) increases the motility of X. fastidiosa, although the mechanism was unknown. PilY1 is a TFP structural protein recently shown to bind Ca and to regulate twitching and adhesion in bacterial pathogens of humans. Sequence analysis identified three pilY1 homologs in X. fastidiosa (PD0023, PD0502, and PD1611), one of which (PD1611) contains a Ca-binding motif. Separate deletions of PD0023 and PD1611 resulted in mutants that still showed twitching motility and were not impaired in attachment or biofilm formation. However, the response of increased twitching at higher Ca concentrations was lost in the pilY1-1611 mutant. Ca does not modulate the expression of any of the X. fastidiosa PilY1 homologs, although it increases the expression of the retraction ATPase pilT during active movement. The evidence presented here suggests functional differences between the PilY1 homologs, which may provide X. fastidiosa with an adaptive advantage in environments with high Ca concentrations, such as xylem sap. Copyright © 2014, American Society for Microbiology. All Rights Reserved.

  15. In vivo blunt-end cloning through CRISPR/Cas9-facilitated non-homologous end-joining

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geisinger, Jonathan M.; Turan, Sören; Hernandez, Sophia; Spector, Laura P.; Calos, Michele P.

    2016-01-01

    The CRISPR/Cas9 system facilitates precise DNA modifications by generating RNA-guided blunt-ended double-strand breaks. We demonstrate that guide RNA pairs generate deletions that are repaired with a high level of precision by non-homologous end-joining in mammalian cells. We present a method called knock-in blunt ligation for exploiting these breaks to insert exogenous PCR-generated sequences in a homology-independent manner without loss of additional nucleotides. This method is useful for making precise additions to the genome such as insertions of marker gene cassettes or functional elements, without the need for homology arms. We successfully utilized this method in human and mouse cells to insert fluorescent protein cassettes into various loci, with efficiencies up to 36% in HEK293 cells without selection. We also created versions of Cas9 fused to the FKBP12-L106P destabilization domain in an effort to improve Cas9 performance. Our in vivo blunt-end cloning method and destabilization-domain-fused Cas9 variant increase the repertoire of precision genome engineering approaches. PMID:26762978

  16. Supersensitive gastrin assay using antibodies raised against a cholecystokinin homolog.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rehfeld, Jens F; Ericsson, Peter

    2012-04-01

    Peptide hormones may occur in particularly low amounts in samples from small animals. Hence, in a rat microdialysis study conventional immunoassays were not sufficiently sensitive to measure gastrin in the dialysis samples. We therefore exploited the observation that antibodies raised against the homologous hormone cholecystokinin (CCK) occasionally bind gastrin peptides with significantly higher affinity than the proper ligand. The immunoassay thus established could detect 1.0 pmol/l in 15 μl microdialysate, which corresponds to 23 attomol gastrin. Such detection limit is five-fold lower than that obtained with the most avid conventional gastrin antibodies. The results may encourage similar approaches for other peptides using homologue-raised antibodies when supersensitivity is required.

  17. Supersensitive gastrin assay using antibodies raised against a cholecystokinin homolog

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rehfeld, Jens F; Ericsson, Peter

    2012-01-01

    Peptide hormones may occur in particularly low amounts in samples from small animals. Hence, in a rat microdialysis study conventional immunoassays were not sufficiently sensitive to measure gastrin in the dialysis samples. We therefore exploited the observation that antibodies raised against...... the homologous hormone cholecystokinin (CCK) occasionally bind gastrin peptides with significantly higher affinity than the proper ligand. The immunoassay thus established could detect 1.0 pmol/l in 15 μl microdialysate, which corresponds to 23 attomol gastrin. Such detection limit is five-fold lower than...... that obtained with the most avid conventional gastrin antibodies. The results may encourage similar approaches for other peptides using homologue-raised antibodies when supersensitivity is required....

  18. Homology models of main proteinase from coronavirus associated with SARS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Hsuan-Liang; Lin, Jin-Chung; Ho, Yih; Chen, Chin-Wen

    2005-01-01

    In this study, two homology models of the main proteinase (M pro) from the novel coronavirus associated with severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS-CoV) were constructed. These models reveal three distinct functional domains, in which an intervening loop connecting domains II and III as well as a catalytic cleft containing the substrate binding subsites S1 and S2 between domains I and II are observed. S2 exhibits structural variations more significantly than S1 during the 200 ps molecular dynamics simulations because it is located at the open mouth of the catalytic cleft and the amino acid residues lining up this subsite are least conserved. In addition, the higher structural variation of S2 makes it flexible enough to accommodate a bulky hydrophobic residue from the substrate.

  19. Representation theory a homological algebra point of view

    CERN Document Server

    Zimmermann, Alexander

    2014-01-01

      Introducing the representation theory of groups and finite dimensional algebras, this book first studies basic non-commutative ring theory, covering the necessary background of elementary homological algebra and representations of groups to block theory. It further discusses vertices, defect groups, Green and Brauer correspondences and Clifford theory. Whenever possible the statements are presented in a general setting for more general algebras, such as symmetric finite dimensional algebras over a field. Then, abelian and derived categories are introduced in detail and are used to explain stable module categories, as well as derived categories and their main invariants and links between them. Group theoretical applications of these theories are given – such as the structure of blocks of cyclic defect groups – whenever appropriate. Overall, many methods from the representation theory of algebras are introduced. Representation Theory assumes only the most basic knowledge of linear algebra, groups, rings ...

  20. Homologies and homeotic transformation of the theropod 'semilunate' carpal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Xing; Han, Fenglu; Zhao, Qi

    2014-08-13

    The homology of the 'semilunate' carpal, an important structure linking non-avian and avian dinosaurs, has been controversial. Here we describe the morphology of some theropod wrists, demonstrating that the 'semilunate' carpal is not formed by the same carpal elements in all theropods possessing this feature and that the involvement of the lateralmost distal carpal in forming the 'semilunate' carpal of birds is an inheritance from their non-avian theropod ancestors. Optimization of relevant morphological features indicates that these features evolved in an incremental way and the 'semilunate' structure underwent a lateral shift in position during theropod evolution, possibly as a result of selection for foldable wings in birds and their close theropod relatives. We propose that homeotic transformation was involved in the evolution of the 'semilunate' carpal. In combination with developmental data on avian wing digits, this suggests that homeosis played a significant role in theropod hand evolution in general.