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Sample records for homogeneous cell population

  1. Maintaining RNA integrity in a homogeneous population of mammary epithelial cells isolated by Laser Capture Microdissection

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    Helbling Jean-Christophe

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Laser-capture microdissection (LCM that enables the isolation of specific cell populations from complex tissues under morphological control is increasingly used for subsequent gene expression studies in cell biology by methods such as real-time quantitative PCR (qPCR, microarrays and most recently by RNA-sequencing. Challenges are i to select precisely and efficiently cells of interest and ii to maintain RNA integrity. The mammary gland which is a complex and heterogeneous tissue, consists of multiple cell types, changing in relative proportion during its development and thus hampering gene expression profiling comparison on whole tissue between physiological stages. During lactation, mammary epithelial cells (MEC are predominant. However several other cell types, including myoepithelial (MMC and immune cells are present, making it difficult to precisely determine the specificity of gene expression to the cell type of origin. In this work, an optimized reliable procedure for producing RNA from alveolar epithelial cells isolated from frozen histological sections of lactating goat, sheep and cow mammary glands using an infrared-laser based Arcturus Veritas LCM (Applied Biosystems® system has been developed. The following steps of the microdissection workflow: cryosectioning, staining, dehydration and harvesting of microdissected cells have been carefully considered and designed to ensure cell capture efficiency without compromising RNA integrity. Results The best results were obtained when staining 8 μm-thick sections with Cresyl violet® (Ambion, Applied Biosystems® and capturing microdissected cells during less than 2 hours before RNA extraction. In addition, particular attention was paid to animal preparation before biopsies or slaughtering (milking and freezing of tissue blocks which were embedded in a cryoprotective compound before being immersed in isopentane. The amount of RNA thus obtained from ca.150 to 250 acini

  2. Shocks in homogeneous and heterogeneous populations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Finkelstein, Maxim [Department of Mathematical Statistics, University of the Free State, PO Box 339, 9300 Bloemfontein (South Africa) and Max Planck Institute for Demographic Research, Rostock (Germany)]. E-mail: FinkelM.SCI@mail.uovs.ac.za

    2007-05-15

    A system subject to a point process of shocks is considered. Shocks occur in accordance with a non-homogeneous Poisson process. Different criterions of system failures are discussed in a homogeneous case. Two natural settings are analyzed. Heterogeneity is modeled by an unobserved univariate random variable (frailty). It is shown that reliability (safety) analysis for a heterogeneous case can differ dramatically from that for a homogeneous setting. A shock burn-in procedure for a heterogeneous population is described. The corresponding bounds for the failure rates are obtained.

  3. Homogeneity evaluation of mesenchymal stem cells based on electrotaxis analysis

    OpenAIRE

    Kim, Min Sung; Lee, Mi Hee; Kwon, Byeong-Ju; Kim, Dohyun; Koo, Min-Ah; Seon, Gyeung Mi; Park, Jong-Chul

    2017-01-01

    Stem cell therapy that can restore function to damaged tissue, avoid host rejection and reduce inflammation throughout body without use of immunosuppressive drugs. The established methods were used to identify and to isolate specific stem cell markers by FACS or by immunomagnetic cell separation. The procedures for distinguishing population of stem cells took a time and needed many preparations. Here we suggest an electrotaxis analysis as a new method to evaluate the homogeneity of mesenchyma...

  4. Maturation of dendritic cells by recombinant human CD40L-trimer leads to a homogeneous cell population with enhanced surface marker expression and increased cytokine production

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Würtzen, P A; Nissen, Mogens Holst; Claesson, M H

    2001-01-01

    Dendritic cells (DC) have been shown to be potent inducers of specific cytotoxic T-cell responses both in vivo and in vitro. Furthermore, exposure to cytokines such as tumour necrosis factor (TNF)-alpha or CD40 triggering changes DC phenotype and cytokine production and may enhance the T-cell act...... marker expression and high production of pro-inflammatory cytokines. In addition, the induction of responses to allo or recall antigens presented by huCD40LT maturated DC was comparable to the responses obtained with the DC maturated through TNF-alpha exposure.......Dendritic cells (DC) have been shown to be potent inducers of specific cytotoxic T-cell responses both in vivo and in vitro. Furthermore, exposure to cytokines such as tumour necrosis factor (TNF)-alpha or CD40 triggering changes DC phenotype and cytokine production and may enhance the T......-cell activating capacity of the DC. We studied DC phenotype and cytokine production as well as the T-cell proliferation and cytotoxic T lympocyte (CTL) activation induced by DC generated in vitro. In addition, the effect of exposure to recombinant human CD40L-trimer (huCD40LT) on these parameters was investigated...

  5. Spatial distribution and ethnic homogenization of population in Serbia

    OpenAIRE

    Raduški Nada

    2011-01-01

    In the article is going to presented the ethnic picture of the population of the Serbia and the ethnodemographic changes in period 1991-2002, caused by migration, natural movement, changed declaration on national affiliation, as well as some political and socio-economic factors. Ethnocentric migrations (voluntary and forced) primarily influenced on the change of ethnic structure of the Serbia, in the sense of creating nationally more homogeneous region, having in mind the national struc...

  6. Engineered CHO cells for production of diverse, homogeneous glycoproteins

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Yang, Zhang; Wang, Shengjun; Halim, Adnan

    2015-01-01

    Production of glycoprotein therapeutics in Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cells is limited by the cells' generic capacity for N-glycosylation, and production of glycoproteins with desirable homogeneous glycoforms remains a challenge. We conducted a comprehensive knockout screen of glycosyltransferase...

  7. Using noise to control heterogeneity of isogenic populations in homogenous environments.

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    Szymańska, Paulina; Gritti, Nicola; Keegstra, Johannes M; Soltani, Mohammad; Munsky, Brian

    2015-06-18

    We explore the extent to which the phenotypes of individual, genetically identical cells can be controlled independently from each other using only a single homogeneous environmental input. We show that such control is theoretically impossible if restricted to a deterministic setting, but it can be achieved readily if one exploits heterogeneities introduced at the single-cell level due to stochastic fluctuations in gene regulation. Using stochastic analyses of a bistable genetic toggle switch, we develop a control strategy that maximizes the chances that a chosen cell will express one phenotype, while the rest express another. The control mechanism uses UV radiation to enhance identically protein degradation in all cells. Control of individual cells is made possible only by monitoring stochastic protein fluctuations and applying UV control at favorable times and levels. For two identical cells, our stochastic control law can drive protein expression of a chosen cell above its neighbor with a better than 99% success rate. In a population of 30 identical cells, we can drive a given cell to remain consistently within the top 20%. Although cellular noise typically impairs predictability for biological responses, our results show that it can also simultaneously improve controllability for those same responses.

  8. Cell structure imaging with bright and homogeneous nanometric light source.

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    Fukuta, Masahiro; Ono, Atsushi; Nawa, Yasunori; Inami, Wataru; Shen, Lin; Kawata, Yoshimasa; Terekawa, Susumu

    2017-04-01

    Label-free optical nano-imaging of dendritic structures and intracellular granules in biological cells is demonstrated using a bright and homogeneous nanometric light source. The optical nanometric light source is excited using a focused electron beam. A zinc oxide (ZnO) luminescent thin film was fabricated by atomic layer deposition (ALD) to produce the nanoscale light source. The ZnO film formed by ALD emitted the bright, homogeneous light, unlike that deposited by another method. The dendritic structures of label-free macrophage receptor with collagenous structure-expressing CHO cells were clearly visualized below the diffraction limit. The inner fiber structure was observed with 120 nm spatial resolution. Because the bright homogeneous emission from the ZnO film suppresses the background noise, the signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) for the imaging results was greater than 10. The ALD method helps achieve an electron beam excitation assisted microscope with high spatial resolution and high SNR. © 2017 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  9. Assessing metabolic heterogeneity in genetically homogeneous populations of bacteria using SIMS

    Science.gov (United States)

    McClelland, H. L. O.; Fike, D. A.; Jones, C.; Bradley, A. S.

    2016-12-01

    Biogeochemical cycles of elements are catalyzed by microbes, and can be assessed using a wide array of geochemical techniques. As the spatial resolution of these analytical techniques improves over time, it has become apparent that spatial heterogeneity of geochemical processes may impose noise on a range of geochemical signals. This spatial heterogeneity may reflect population structure, as well as metabolic heterogeneity among cells. New analytical approaches are required to understand, at the cellular level, differences in biogeochemical cycling of elements. We are developing such approaches by applying secondary-ion mass spectrometry (SIMS) techniques to populations of model organisms. In this work we report initial results from the analysis of genetically homogeneous cultures of Methylobacterium extorquens PA1, a facultative methylotrophic Alphaproteobacterium that has been extensively studied growing on both single carbon (e.g., methanol) and multi-carbon (e.g., succinate) substrates. PA1 cultures acclimated to succinate exhibited a more pronounced lag when grown on methanol compared with populations acclimated to methanol. However neither acclimation condition results in a pronounced lag during growth on succinate. When grown on a mixture of methanol and succinate, Methylobacterium co-utilize these substrates on a population level. We investigated the degree to which this apparent coutilisation is representative of individual cells, or whether it is a superposition of distinct metabolically specialized subpopulations. To explore this metabolic heterogeneity, we have grown populations of PA1 in liquid media containing a mixture of both methanol and succinate with one or the other substrate labelled with 13C. SIMS analysis of the isotopic composition of each cell allows us to infer the substrate, or mix of substrates, used for anabolic processes in each cell, along with cell-specfic growth rates via the exponential dilution of a 15N label.

  10. Homogeneous expansion of human T-regulatory cells via tumor necrosis factor receptor 2.

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    Okubo, Yoshiaki; Mera, Toshiyuki; Wang, Limei; Faustman, Denise L

    2013-11-06

    T-regulatory cells (T(regs)) are a rare lymphocyte subtype that shows promise for treating infectious disease, allergy, graft-versus-host disease, autoimmunity, and asthma. Clinical applications of T(regs) have not been fully realized because standard methods of expansion ex vivo produce heterogeneous progeny consisting of mixed populations of CD4 + T cells. Heterogeneous progeny are risky for human clinical trials and face significant regulatory hurdles. With the goal of producing homogeneous T(regs), we developed a novel expansion protocol targeting tumor necrosis factor receptors (TNFR) on T(regs). In in vitro studies, a TNFR2 agonist was found superior to standard methods in proliferating human T(regs) into a phenotypically homogeneous population consisting of 14 cell surface markers. The TNFR2 agonist-expanded T(regs) also were functionally superior in suppressing a key T(reg) target cell, cytotoxic T-lymphocytes. Targeting the TNFR2 receptor during ex vivo expansion is a new means for producing homogeneous and potent human T(regs) for clinical opportunities.

  11. An elaboration of theory about preventing outbreaks in homogeneous populations to include heterogeneity or preferential mixing

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    Feng, Zhilan; Hill, Andrew N.; Smith, Philip J.; Glasser, John W.

    2017-01-01

    The goal of many vaccination programs is to attain the population immunity above which pathogens introduced by infectious people (e.g., travelers from endemic areas) will not cause outbreaks. Using a simple meta-population model, we demonstrate that, if sub-populations either differ in characteristics affecting their basic reproduction numbers or if their members mix preferentially, weighted average sub-population immunities cannot be compared with the proportionally-mixing homogeneous population-immunity threshold, as public health practitioners are wont to do. Then we review the effect of heterogeneity in average per capita contact rates on the basic meta-population reproduction number. To the extent that population density affects contacts, for example, rates might differ in urban and rural sub-populations. Other differences among sub-populations in characteristics affecting their basic reproduction numbers would contribute similarly. In agreement with more recent results, we show that heterogeneous preferential mixing among sub-populations increases the basic meta-population reproduction number more than homogeneous preferential mixing does. Next we refine earlier results on the effects of heterogeneity in sub-population immunities and preferential mixing on the effective meta-population reproduction number. Finally, we propose the vector of partial derivatives of the reproduction number with respect to the sub-population immunities as a fundamentally new tool for targeting vaccination efforts. PMID:26375548

  12. Anomaly detection in homogenous populations: A sparse multiple kernel-based regularization method

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chen, Tianshi; Andersen, Martin S.; Chiuso, Alessandro

    2014-01-01

    A problem of anomaly detection in homogenous populations consisting of linear stable systems is studied. The recently introduced sparse multiple kernel based regularization method is applied to solve the problem. A common problem with the existing regularization methods is that there lacks an eff...

  13. A cellular automaton for population diffusion in the homogeneous rectangular area

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    WenJun Zhang

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, a cellular automaton for population diffusion was introduced. A group of discrete partial differential equations was used to simulate population diffusion in the homogeneous rectangular area. The population dynamics was described by Malthus model, Logistic model, and oscillation model. The cellular automaton can be used to analyze the effects of initial distribution of organisms on diffusion process and distribution pattern, to estimate the diffusion speed and possible diffusion directions, and to determine the major regions occupied by organisms.

  14. The Hawk-Dove game in phenotypically homogeneous and heterogeneous populations of finite dimension

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    Laruelle, Annick; da Silva Rocha, André Barreira; Escobedo, Ramón

    2018-02-01

    The Hawk-Dove game played between individuals in populations of finite dimension is analyzed by means of a stochastic model. We take into account both cases when all individuals in the population are either phenotypically homogeneous or heterogeneous. A strategy in the model is a gene representing the probability of playing the Hawk strategy. Individual interactions at the microscopic level are described by a genetic algorithm where evolution results from the interplay among selection, mutation, drift and cross-over of genes. We show that the behavioral patterns observed at the macroscopic level can be reproduced as the emergent result of individual interactions governed by the rules of the Hawk-Dove game at the microscopic level. We study how the results of the genetic algorithm compare with those obtained in evolutionary game theory, finding that, although genes continuously change both their presence and frequency in the population over time, the population average behavior always achieves stationarity and, when this happens, the final average strategy played in the population oscillates around the evolutionarily stable strategy in the homogeneous population case or the neutrally stable set in the heterogeneous population case.

  15. Sources of variability in cytosolic calcium transients triggered by stimulation of homogeneous uro-epithelial cell monolayers.

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    Appleby, Peter A; Shabir, Saqib; Southgate, Jennifer; Walker, Dawn

    2015-04-06

    Epithelial tissue structure is the emergent outcome of the interactions between large numbers of individual cells. Experimental cell biology offers an important tool to unravel these complex interactions, but current methods of analysis tend to be limited to mean field approaches or representation by selected subsets of cells. This may result in bias towards cells that respond in a particular way and/or neglect local, context-specific cell responses. Here, an automated algorithm was applied to examine in detail the individual calcium transients evoked in genetically homogeneous, but asynchronous populations of cultured non-immortalized normal human urothelial cells when subjected to either the global application of an external agonist or a localized scratch wound. The recorded calcium transients were classified automatically according to a set of defined metrics and distinct sub-populations of cells that responded in qualitatively different ways were observed. The nature of this variability in the homogeneous cell population was apportioned to two sources: intrinsic variation in individual cell responses and extrinsic variability due to context-specific factors of the environment, such as spatial heterogeneity. Statistically significant variation in the features of the calcium transients evoked by scratch wounding according to proximity to the wound edge was identified. The manifestation of distinct sub-populations of cells is considered central to the coordination of population-level response resulting in wound closure.

  16. Lifestyle modifies obesity-associated risk of cardiovascular disease in a genetically homogeneous population

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jørgensen, Marit E; Borch-Johnsen, Knut; Bjerregaard, Peter

    2006-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The association between obesity and cardiovascular disease risk differs across populations. Whether such differences in obesity-related risk factors exist within population groups of the same genetic origin but with differences in lifestyle remains to be determined. OBJECTIVE: The aim...... was to analyze whether obesity was associated with the same degree of metabolic disturbances in 2 groups of genetically homogeneous Inuit who were exposed to considerable differences in lifestyle. DESIGN: We studied obesity and cardiovascular disease risk factors in a cross-sectional population survey of 2311...... groups of Inuit living in Greenland and Inuit migrants living in Denmark. The findings indicate that lifestyle factors modify the cardiovascular disease risk associated with obesity....

  17. A spatial analysis of patterns of growth and concentration of population based on homogeneous population censuses: Spain (1877-2001

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    Xavier Franch Auladell

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available This work constitutes a contribution to the analysis of long term patterns of population concentration applied to the case of Spain. The proposed methodology is based on the homogenisation of both data and administrative units which takes the municipal structure of the 2001 census as its base reference. This work seeks to show how applying spatial analysis techniques to this type of homogeneous data series allows us to make more detailed studies of population patterns within a given territory. The most important conclusions that we reached was that, in Spain, sustained population growth has followed a spatial pattern that has become increasingly consolidated over time. The tendencies observed have produced an uneven distribution of population within the national territory marked by the existence of a series of well-defined, and often very localised, areas that spread beyond the limits of the official administrative boundaries.

  18. Interdependent binary choices under social influence: Phase diagram for homogeneous unbiased populations

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    Fernández del Río, Ana; Korutcheva, Elka; de la Rubia, Javier

    2012-07-01

    Coupled Ising models are studied in a discrete choice theory framework, where they can be understood to represent interdependent choice making processes for homogeneous populations under social influence. Two different coupling schemes are considered. The nonlocal or group interdependence model is used to study two interrelated groups making the same binary choice. The local or individual interdependence model represents a single group where agents make two binary choices which depend on each other. For both models, phase diagrams, and their implications in socioeconomic contexts, are described and compared in the absence of private deterministic utilities (zero opinion fields).

  19. Comparative Pathogenicity of Liver Homogenate and Cell Culture Propagated Hydropericardium Syndrome Virus in Broiler Birds

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    M. D. Ahmad, S. Zaman1, M. H. Mushtaq*, A. A. Anjum1 and M. Akram1

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Comparative pathogenicity of liver homogenate and cell culture propagated agents of hydropericardium syndrome was studied in broiler birds. In Experiment I, 25-day-old while in experiment II, broiler birds at different ages were inoculated through different routes. In Experiment I, liver homogenate caused 64% mortality through intramuscular route and 33.33% mortality through oral route. The cell culture propagated HPS virus caused 60 and 13.33% mortality in broiler birds through intramuscular and oral routes, respectively. In Experiment II, none of the day-old-chicks died when challenged with liver homogenate and cell culture propagated HPS virus through S/C and oral route. The liver homogenate and cell culture propagated HPS virus caused higher mortality in different age groups of broiler birds through s/c route compared to oral route. The values of hemoglobin (Hb and packed cell volume (PCV showed highly significant (P<0.05 reduction indicating anemia. The values of Hb and PCV of the broiler birds inoculated with infectious liver homogenate were significantly lower as compared to birds inoculated with cell culture propagated HPS virus. The results indicated that the liver homogenate is more pathogenic than cell culture propagated HPS virus. These changes may be due to adoptability of the original FAdVs (fowl adenovirus after continued passages in the culture of chicken embryo liver cells. Importance of this study in vaccine production is also discussed.

  20. Microfluidic Generation of Monodisperse, Structurally Homogeneous Alginate Microgels for Cell Encapsulation and 3D Cell Culture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Utech, Stefanie; Prodanovic, Radivoje; Mao, Angelo S; Ostafe, Raluca; Mooney, David J; Weitz, David A

    2015-08-05

    Monodisperse alginate microgels (10-50 μm) are created via droplet-based microfluidics by a novel crosslinking procedure. Ionic crosslinking of alginate is induced by release of chelated calcium ions. The process separates droplet formation and gelation reaction enabling excellent control over size and homogeneity under mild reaction conditions. Living mesenchymal stem cells are encapsulated and cultured in the generated 3D microenvironments. © 2015 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  1. Anthropogenics: human influence on global and genetic homogenization of parasite populations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zarlenga, Dante S; Hoberg, Eric; Rosenthal, Benjamin; Mattiucci, Simonetta; Nascetti, Giuseppe

    2014-12-01

    environmental change now plays a primary role in defining where hosts, parasites, and other pathogens occur. This review examines how anthropogenic factors serve as drivers of globalization and genetic homogenization of parasite populations and demonstrates the impact that human intervention has had on the global dissemination of parasites and the accompanying diseases.

  2. Controlling the diversity of cell populations in a stem cell culture

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Heo, Inha; Clevers, Hans

    2015-01-01

    Culturing intestinal stem cells into 3D organoids results in heterogeneous cell populations, reflecting the in vivo cell type diversity. In a recent paper published in Nature, Wang et al. established a culture condition for a highly homogeneous population of intestinal stem cells.

  3. Forward Programming of Cardiac Stem Cells by Homogeneous Transduction with MYOCD plus TBX5.

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    Elisa Belian

    Full Text Available Adult cardiac stem cells (CSCs express many endogenous cardiogenic transcription factors including members of the Gata, Hand, Mef2, and T-box family. Unlike its DNA-binding targets, Myocardin (Myocd-a co-activator not only for serum response factor, but also for Gata4 and Tbx5-is not expressed in CSCs. We hypothesised that its absence was a limiting factor for reprogramming. Here, we sought to investigate the susceptibility of adult mouse Sca1+ side population CSCs to reprogramming by supplementing the triad of GATA4, MEF2C, and TBX5 (GMT, and more specifically by testing the effect of the missing co-activator, Myocd. Exogenous factors were expressed via doxycycline-inducible lentiviral vectors in various combinations. High throughput quantitative RT-PCR was used to test expression of 29 cardiac lineage markers two weeks post-induction. GMT induced more than half the analysed cardiac transcripts. However, no protein was detected for the induced sarcomeric genes Actc1, Myh6, and Myl2. Adding MYOCD to GMT affected only slightly the breadth and level of gene induction, but, importantly, triggered expression of all three proteins examined (α-cardiac actin, atrial natriuretic peptide, sarcomeric myosin heavy chains. MYOCD + TBX was the most effective pairwise combination in this system. In clonal derivatives homogenously expressing MYOCD + TBX at high levels, 93% of cardiac transcripts were up-regulated and all five proteins tested were visualized.(1 GMT induced cardiac genes in CSCs, but not cardiac proteins under the conditions used. (2 Complementing GMT with MYOCD induced cardiac protein expression, indicating a more complete cardiac differentiation program. (3 Homogeneous transduction with MYOCD + TBX5 facilitated the identification of differentiating cells and the validation of this combinatorial reprogramming strategy. Together, these results highlight the pivotal importance of MYOCD in driving CSCs toward a cardiac muscle fate.

  4. Genetics in Pulmonary Arterial Hypertension in a Large Homogeneous Japanese Population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gamou, Shinobu; Kataoka, Masaharu; Aimi, Yuki; Chiba, Tomohiro; Momose, Yuichi; Isobe, Sarasa; Hirayama, Tomomi; Yoshino, Hideaki; Fukuda, Keiichi; Satoh, Toru

    2017-10-10

    Pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH) is a rare but serious disease with a grave prognosis. Bone morphogenetic protein type 2 receptor (BMPR2) gene is a strong pathogenic factor for PAH. As a collaborative team from Kyorin University and Keio University in Japan, we have analyzed the BMPR2 gene in 356 probands and more than 50 family members, including secondary patients. Importantly, the study population is a racially, ethnically, and socially homogeneous population. In PAH patients, there is a high incidence of unique mutations in BMPR2, and several mutations are frequently observed in the Japanese population, suggesting that these common and recurring mutations may be highly pathogenic or have high penetrance, explaining why they are found frequently throughout the world. We have also mapped each breakpoint of exonic deletions/duplications and found that most break and rejoining points are in the Alu elements. Reviewing the distribution of the reported mutations on each exon of BMPR2 revealed that the number and frequency of mutations are imbalanced among exons. The penetrance of BMPR2 gene mutations was threefold higher in females than males. Full elucidation of BMPR2-mediated pathogenic mechanisms in PAH requires persistent efforts to achieve precision or individualized medicine as a therapeutic strategy for PAH. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  5. Stochastic model for computer simulation of the number of cancer cells and lymphocytes in homogeneous sections of cancer tumors

    CERN Document Server

    Castellanos-Moreno, Arnulfo; Corella-Madueño, Adalberto; Gutiérrez-López, Sergio; Rosas-Burgos, Rodrigo

    2014-01-01

    We deal with a small enough tumor section to consider it homogeneous, such that populations of lymphocytes and cancer cells are independent of spatial coordinates. A stochastic model based in one step processes is developed to take into account natural birth and death rates. Other rates are also introduced to consider medical treatment: natural birth rate of lymphocytes and cancer cells; induced death rate of cancer cells due to self-competition, and other ones caused by the activated lymphocytes acting on cancer cells. Additionally, a death rate of cancer cells due to induced apoptosis is considered. Weakness due to the advance of sickness is considered by introducing a lymphocytes death rate proportional to proliferation of cancer cells. Simulation is developed considering different combinations of the parameters and its values, so that several strategies are taken into account to study the effect of anti-angiogenic drugs as well the self-competition between cancer cells. Immune response, with the presence ...

  6. FADS genetic variants and omega-6 polyunsaturated fatty acid metabolism in a homogeneous island population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mathias, Rasika A; Vergara, Candelaria; Gao, Li; Rafaels, Nicholas; Hand, Tracey; Campbell, Monica; Bickel, Carol; Ivester, Priscilla; Sergeant, Susan; Barnes, Kathleen C; Chilton, Floyd H

    2010-09-01

    Long-chain polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFA) orchestrate immunity and inflammation through their capacity to be converted to potent inflammatory mediators. We assessed associations of FADS gene cluster polymorphisms and fasting serum PUFA concentrations in a fully ascertained, geographically isolated founder population of European descent. Concentrations of 22 PUFAs were determined by gas chromatography, of which ten fatty acids and five ratios defining FADS1 and FADS2 activity were tested for genetic association against 16 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNP) in 224 individuals. A cluster of SNPs in tight linkage disequilibrium in the FADS1 gene (rs174537, rs174545, rs174546, rs174553, rs174556, rs174561, rs174568, and rs99780) were strongly associated with arachidonic acid (AA) (P = 5.8 x 10(-7) - 1.7 x 10(-8)) among other PUFAs, but the strongest associations were with the ratio measuring FADS1 activity in the omega-6 series (P = 2.11 x 10(-13) - 1.8 x 10(-20)). The minor allele across all SNPs was consistently associated with decreased omega-6 PUFAs, with the exception of dihomo-gamma-linoleic acid (DHGLA), where the minor allele was consistently associated with increased levels. Our findings in a geographically isolated population with a homogenous dietary environment suggest that variants in the Delta-5 desaturase enzymatic step likely regulate the efficiency of conversion of medium-chain PUFAs to potentially inflammatory PUFAs, such as AA.

  7. Cannabis use and abuse correlates in a homogenous South African schizophrenia population

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    Liezl Koen

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available Objective. Worldwide, cannabis is the most widely used illicit substance, and it has been identified as a correlate in schizophrenia samples for poorer symptomatic and functional outcomes in many international studies. The object of this retrospective study was to identify the prevalence of cannabis use/abuse and the demographic and clinical correlates therefor in a large homogeneous South African schizophrenia population. Methods. As part of a large genetic study, 547 subjects with a diagnosis of schizophrenia were recruited. Demographic and clinical data were collected and each participant underwent a urinary drug screen. Use/abuse of cannabis was defined as using cannabis more than 21 times in a single year. Subjects with and without cannabis use/abuse were statistically compared. Results. Significant differences between the two groups were found in terms of gender, marital status, age of onset of schizophrenia, number of hospitalisations and relapses, alcohol abuse, smoking, the Scale for the Assessment of Positive Symptoms (SAPS scores for hallucinations, delusions, bizarre behaviour and formal thought disorder, and the Scale for the Assessment of Negative Symptoms (SANS score for avolition/apathy. Conclusion. The prevalence of cannabis use/abuse in this study was high, and our findings were comparable with those of previous international studies. Abuse/use started mainly in the teenage years, was more prevalent among males than females, and was associated with negative overall outcomes. There was also a positive correlation between cannabis and nicotine and alcohol use/abuse. Determination of cannabis abuse based solely on history was found to be reliable, and urine cannabis testing appeared to be of limited value in routine management of this group of schizophrenic patients.

  8. Targeting population heterogeneity for optimal cell factories

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Heins, Anna-Lena; Carlqvist, Magnus; Helmark, S.

    To achieve an efficient production process, it is essential to optimize both the strain and the cultivation conditions. Traditionally, a microbial population has been considered homogeneous in optimization studies of fermentation processes. However, research has shown that a typical microbial...... population in a fermentor is heterogeneous. There are indications that such heterogeneity may be both beneficial (facilitates quick adaptation to new conditions) and harmful (reduces yields and productivities) for the robustness of the fermentation process. Significant gradients of e.g. dissolved oxygen...... the heterogeneity level of the population. To further investigate these phenomena and gain a deeper understanding of population heterogeneity, Saccharomyces cerevisiae growth reporter strains based on the expression of green fluorescent protein (GFP) were constructed which enabled us to perform single cell level...

  9. Numerical homogenization of heterogeneous and cellular materials utilizing the finite cell method

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    Düster, Alexander; Sehlhorst, Hans-Georg; Rank, Ernst

    2012-10-01

    We present a new approach for the numerical homogenization of cellular and heterogeneous materials. The procedure is based on the finite cell method, which is applied to efficiently discretize representative volume elements for which effective material properties are computed. The starting point for our homogenization might be either a computer-aided design of a heterogeneous material or a three-dimensional computer tomography (CT-scan) of the specimen of interest. A fully automatic discretization in terms of finite cells, applying a hierarchic extension process to control the discretization error, is utilized to solve the corresponding boundary value problems arising during the homogenization. Special emphasis is placed on the numerical treatment of boundary conditions. To this end we apply the window method, which can be interpreted as a variant of the self-consistency method. Several numerical examples ranging from porous materials to fiber-reinforced composites will be presented, demonstrating the efficiency of our approach. The homogenization procedure will be also applied to a foam, a CT-scan of which is available.

  10. Enhanced photovoltaic properties of perovskite solar cells by TiO2 homogeneous hybrid structure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Su, Pengyu; Fu, Wuyou; Yao, Huizhen; Liu, Li; Ding, Dong; Feng, Fei; Feng, Shuang; Xue, Yebin; Liu, Xizhe; Yang, Haibin

    2017-10-01

    In this paper, we fabricated a TiO2 homogeneous hybrid structure for application in perovskite solar cells (PSCs) under ambient conditions. Under the standard air mass 1.5 global (AM 1.5G) illumination, PSCs based on homogeneous hybrid structure present a maximum power conversion efficiency of 5.39% which is higher than that of pure TiO2 nanosheets. The enhanced properties can be explained by the better contact of TiO2 nanosheets/nanoparticles with CH3NH3PbI3 and fewer pinholes in electron transport materials. The advent of such unique structure opens up new avenues for the future development of high-efficiency photovoltaic cells.

  11. IAP-Based Cell Sorting Results in Homogeneous Transplantable Dopaminergic Precursor Cells Derived from Human Pluripotent Stem Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniela Lehnen

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Human pluripotent stem cell (hPSC-derived mesencephalic dopaminergic (mesDA neurons can relieve motor deficits in animal models of Parkinson's disease (PD. Clinical translation of differentiation protocols requires standardization of production procedures, and surface-marker-based cell sorting is considered instrumental for reproducible generation of defined cell products. Here, we demonstrate that integrin-associated protein (IAP is a cell surface marker suitable for enrichment of hPSC-derived mesDA progenitor cells. Immunomagnetically sorted IAP+ mesDA progenitors showed increased expression of ventral midbrain floor plate markers, lacked expression of pluripotency markers, and differentiated into mature dopaminergic (DA neurons in vitro. Intrastriatal transplantation of IAP+ cells sorted at day 16 of differentiation in a rat model of PD resulted in functional recovery. Grafts from sorted IAP+ mesDA progenitors were more homogeneous in size and DA neuron density. Thus, we suggest IAP-based sorting for reproducible prospective enrichment of mesDA progenitor cells in clinical cell replacement strategies.

  12. Evaluation of Tissue Homogenization to Support the Generation of GMP-Compliant Mesenchymal Stromal Cells from the Umbilical Cord

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ryan J. Emnett

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Recent studies have demonstrated that the umbilical cord (UC is an excellent source of mesenchymal stromal cells (MSCs. However, current protocols for extracting and culturing UC-MSCs do not meet current good manufacturing practice (cGMP standards, in part due to the use of xenogeneic reagents. To support the development of a cGMP-compliant method, we have examined an enzyme-free isolation method utilizing tissue homogenization (t-H followed by culture in human platelet lysate (PL supplemented media. The yield and viability of cells after t-H were comparable to those obtained after collagenase digestion (Col-D. Importantly, kinetic analysis of cultured cells showed logarithmic growth over 10 tested passages, although the rate of cell division was lower for t-H as compared to Col-D. This slower growth of t-H-derived cells was also reflected in their longer population doubling time. Interestingly, there was no difference in the expression of mesenchymal markers and trilineage differentiation potential of cells generated using either method. Finally, t-H-derived cells had greater clonogenic potential compared to Col-D/FBS but not Col-D/PL and were able to maintain CFU-F capacity through P7. This bench scale study demonstrates the possibility of generating therapeutic doses of good quality UC-MSCs within a reasonable length of time using t-H and PL.

  13. A high-throughput, homogeneous microplate assay for agents that kill mammalian tissue culture cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pierce, Michael; Wang, Chunwei; Rebentisch, Matt; Endo, Mark; Stump, Mark; Kamb, Alexander

    2003-06-01

    Screens for cytostasis/cytoxicity have considerable value for the discovery of therapeutic agents and the investigation of the biology of apoptosis. For instance, genetic screens for proteins, protein fragments, peptides, RNAs, or chemicals that kill tissue culture cells may aid in identifying new cancer therapeutic targets. A microplate assay for cell death is needed to achieve throughputs sufficient to sift through thousands of agents from expression or chemical libraries. The authors describe a homogeneous assay for cell death in tissue culture cells compatible with 96- or 384-well plates. In combination with a previously described system for retroviral packaging and transduction, nearly 6000 expression library clones could be screened per week in a 96-well plate format. The screening system may also prove useful for chemical screens.

  14. The emergence of "us and them" in 80 lines of code: modeling group genesis in homogeneous populations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gray, Kurt; Rand, David G; Ert, Eyal; Lewis, Kevin; Hershman, Steve; Norton, Michael I

    2014-04-01

    Psychological explanations of group genesis often require population heterogeneity in identity or other characteristics, whether deep (e.g., religion) or superficial (e.g., eye color). We used agent-based models to explore group genesis in homogeneous populations and found robust group formation with just two basic principles: reciprocity and transitivity. These emergent groups demonstrated in-group cooperation and out-group defection, even though agents lacked common identity. Group formation increased individual payoffs, and group number and size were robust to varying levels of reciprocity and transitivity. Increasing population size increased group size more than group number, and manipulating baseline trust in a population had predictable effects on group genesis. An interactive demonstration of the parameter space and source code for implementing the model are available online.

  15. Homogeneous PCBM layers fabricated by horizontal-dip coating for efficient bilayer heterojunction organic photovoltaic cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huh, Yoon Ho; Bae, In-Gon; Jeon, Hong Goo; Park, Byoungchoo

    2016-10-31

    We herein report a homogeneous [6,6]-phenyl C61 butyric acid methyl ester (PCBM) layer, produced by a solution process of horizontal-dipping (H-dipping) to improve the photovoltaic (PV) effects of bilayer heterojunction organic photovoltaic cells (OPVs) based on a bi-stacked poly(3-hexylthiophene) (P3HT) electron donor layer and a PCBM electron acceptor layer (P3HT/PCBM). It was shown that a homogeneous and uniform coating of PCBM layers in the P3HT/PCBM bilayer OPVs resulted in reliable and reproducible device performance. We recorded a power conversion efficiency (PCE) of 2.89%, which is higher than that (2.00%) of bilayer OPVs with a spin-coated PCBM layer. Moreover, introducing surfactant additives of poly(oxyethylene tridecyl ether) (PTE) into the homogeneous P3HT/PCBM PV layers resulted in the bilayer OPVs showing a PCE value of 3.95%, which is comparable to those of conventional bulk-heterojunction (BHJ) OPVs (3.57-4.13%) fabricated by conventional spin-coating. This improved device performance may be attributed to the selective collection of charge carriers at the interfaces among the active layers and electrodes due to the PTE additives as well as the homogeneous formation of the functional PCBM layer on the P3HT layer. Furthermore, H-dip-coated PCBM layers were deposited onto aligned P3HT layers by a rubbing technique, and the rubbed bilayer OPV exhibited improved in-plane anisotropic PV effects with PCE anisotropy as high as 1.81, which is also higher than that (1.54) of conventional rubbed BHJ OPVs. Our results suggest that the use of the H-dip-coating process in the fabrication of PCBM layers with the PTE interface-engineering additive could be of considerable interest to those seeking to improve PCBM-based opto-electrical organic thin-film devices.

  16. Verification of Cell-Homogenized Whole-Core Transport Calculations in Actual PWR Core Geometry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Akio Yamamoto; Masahiro Tatsumi; Tatsuya Kimoto; Shinya Kosaka; Etsuro Saji

    2000-11-12

    In this paper, a cell-homogenized whole-core transport calculation is applied to a pressurized water reactor (PWR) core and its prediction accuracy on reactivity and power distribution is verified in comparison with cell-heterogeneous whole-core transport calculation results obtained by the method of characteristics. Recent progress in common computer hardware promotes continuous improvements on core calculation methods. Among several different approaches, a three-dimensional pin-by-pin (fine-mesh) core calculation is considered as one of the candidates of advanced methods. In general, although the fine-mesh core calculation explicitly treats each individual pin, it still has three approximations: cell-homogenization, low-level transport theory (usually the SPN or the diffusion approximation) and few-group treatment. Therefore, the impact of these approximations on core characteristics should be evaluated to confirm the feasibility of the three-dimensional fine-mesh core calculation method. This paper focuses on two former approximations, and the impact of these approximations is evaluated.

  17. A Simple and Robust Method for Establishing Homogeneous Mouse Epiblast Stem Cell Lines by Wnt Inhibition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michihiko Sugimoto

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Epiblast stem cells (EpiSCs are pluripotent stem cells derived from epiblasts of postimplantation mouse embryos, and thus provide a useful model for studying “primed” pluripotent states. Here, we devised a simple and robust technique to derive high-quality EpiSCs using an inhibitor of WNT secretion. Using this method, we readily established EpiSC lines with high efficiency and were able to use whole embryonic portions without having to separate the epiblast from the visceral endoderm (VE. Expression analyses revealed that these EpiSCs maintained a homogeneous, undifferentiated status, yet showed high potential for differentiation both in vitro and in teratomas. Unlike EpiSCs derived by the original protocol, new EpiSC lines required continuous treatment with the Wnt inhibitor, suggesting some intrinsic differences from the existing EpiSCs. The homogeneous properties of this new version of EpiSCs should facilitate studies on the establishment and maintenance of a “primed” pluripotent state, and directed differentiation from the primed state.

  18. Low genetic diversity and strong but shallow population differentiation suggests genetic homogenization by metapopulation dynamics in a social spider.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Settepani, V; Bechsgaard, J; Bilde, T

    2014-12-01

    Mating systems and population dynamics influence genetic diversity and structure. Species that experience inbreeding and limited gene flow are expected to evolve isolated, divergent genetic lineages. Metapopulation dynamics with frequent extinctions and colonizations may, on the other hand, deplete and homogenize genetic variation, if extinction rate is sufficiently high compared to the effect of drift in local demes. We investigated these theoretical predictions empirically in social spiders that are highly inbred. Social spiders show intranest mating, female-biased sex ratio, and frequent extinction and colonization events, factors that deplete genetic diversity within nests and populations and limit gene flow. We characterized population genetic structure in Stegodyphus sarasinorum, a social spider distributed across the Indian subcontinent. Species-wide genetic diversity was estimated over approximately 2800 km from Sri Lanka to Himalayas, by sequencing 16 protein-coding nuclear loci. We found 13 SNPs in 6592 bp (π = 0.00045) indicating low species-wide nucleotide diversity. Three genetic lineages were strongly differentiated; however, only one fixed difference among them suggests recent divergence. This is consistent with a scenario of metapopulation dynamics that homogenizes genetic diversity across the species' range. Ultimately, low standing genetic variation may hamper a species' ability to track environmental change and render social inbreeding spiders 'evolutionary dead-ends'. © 2014 European Society For Evolutionary Biology. Journal of Evolutionary Biology © 2014 European Society For Evolutionary Biology.

  19. Diffusion is capable of translating anisotropic apoptosis initiation into a homogeneous execution of cell death.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Huber, Heinrich J

    2010-01-01

    ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND: Apoptosis is an essential cell death process throughout the entire life span of all metazoans and its deregulation in humans has been implicated in many proliferative and degenerative diseases. Mitochondrial outer membrane permeabilisation (MOMP) and activation of effector caspases are key processes during apoptosis signalling. MOMP can be subject to spatial coordination in human cancer cells, resulting in intracellular waves of cytochrome-c release. To investigate the consequences of these spatial anisotropies in mitochondrial permeabilisation on subsequent effector caspase activation, we devised a mathematical reaction-diffusion model building on a set of partial differential equations. RESULTS: Reaction-diffusion modelling suggested that even if strong spatial anisotropies existed during mitochondrial cytochrome c release, these would be eliminated by free diffusion of the cytosolic proteins that instantiate the apoptosis execution network. Experimentally, rapid sampling of mitochondrial permeabilisation and effector caspase activity in individual HeLa cervical cancer cells confirmed predictions of the reaction-diffusion model and demonstrated that the signalling network of apoptosis execution could efficiently translate spatial anisotropies in mitochondrial permeabilisation into a homogeneous effector caspase response throughout the cytosol. Further systems modelling suggested that a more than 10,000-fold impaired diffusivity would be required to maintain spatial anisotropies as observed during mitochondrial permeabilisation until the time effector caspases become activated. CONCLUSIONS: Multi-protein diffusion efficiently contributes to eliminating spatial asynchronies which are present during the initiation of apoptosis execution and thereby ensures homogeneous apoptosis execution throughout the entire cell body. For previously reported biological scenarios in which effector caspase activity was shown to be targeted selectively to

  20. Determination of protein carbonyls in plasma, cell extracts, tissue homogenates, isolated proteins

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Weber, Daniela; Davies, Michael J.; Grune, Tilman

    2015-01-01

    Protein oxidation is involved in regulatory physiological events as well as in damage to tissues and is thought to play a key role in the pathophysiology of diseases and in the aging process. Protein-bound carbonyls represent a marker of global protein oxidation, as they are generated by multiple...... in the most relevant methods to detect protein carbonyls after derivatization with 2,4-dinitrophenylhydrazine with an emphasis on measurement in plasma, cells, organ homogenates, isolated proteins and organelles. Sample preparation, derivatization conditions and protein handling are presented...... for the spectrophotometric and HPLC method as well as for immunoblotting and ELISA. An extensive overview covering these methods in previously published articles is given for researchers who plan to measure protein carbonyls in different samples....

  1. Flow rate calibration to determine cell-derived microparticles and homogeneity of blood components.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noulsri, Egarit; Lerdwana, Surada; Kittisares, Kulvara; Palasuwan, Attakorn; Palasuwan, Duangdao

    2017-08-01

    Cell-derived microparticles (MPs) are currently of great interest to screening transfusion donors and blood components. However, the current approach to counting MPs is not affordable for routine laboratory use due to its high cost. The current study aimed to investigate the potential use of flow-rate calibration for counting MPs in whole blood, packed red blood cells (PRBCs), and platelet concentrates (PCs). The accuracy of flow-rate calibration was investigated by comparing the platelet counts of an automated counter and a flow-rate calibrator. The concentration of MPs and their origins in whole blood (n=100), PRBCs (n=100), and PCs (n=92) were determined using a FACSCalibur. The MPs' fold-changes were calculated to assess the homogeneity of the blood components. Comparing the platelet counts conducted by automated counting and flow-rate calibration showed an r2 of 0.6 (y=0.69x+97,620). The CVs of the within-run and between-run variations of flow-rate calibration were 8.2% and 12.1%, respectively. The Bland-Altman plot showed a mean bias of -31,142platelets/μl. MP enumeration revealed both the difference in MP levels and their origins in whole blood, PRBCs, and PCs. Screening the blood components demonstrated high heterogeneity of the MP levels in PCs when compared to whole blood and PRBCs. The results of the present study suggest the accuracy and precision of flow-rate calibration for enumerating MPs. This flow-rate approach is affordable for assessing the homogeneity of MPs in blood components in routine laboratory practice. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Enzymatic cell wall degradation of high-pressure-homogenized tomato puree and its effect on lycopene bioaccessibility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palmero, Paola; Colle, Ines; Lemmens, Lien; Panozzo, Agnese; Nguyen, Tuyen Thi My; Hendrickx, Marc; Van Loey, Ann

    2016-01-15

    High-pressure homogenization disrupts cell structures, assisting carotenoid release from the matrix and subsequent micellarization. However, lycopene bioaccessibility of tomato puree upon high-pressure homogenization is limited by the formation of a process-induced barrier. In this context, cell wall-degrading enzymes were applied to hydrolyze the formed barrier and enhance lycopene bioaccessibility. The effectiveness of the enzymes in degrading their corresponding substrates was evaluated (consistency, amount of reducing sugars, molar mass distribution and immunolabeling). An in vitro digestion procedure was applied to evaluate the effect of the enzymatic treatments on lycopene bioaccessibility. Enzymatic treatments with pectinases and cellulase were proved to effectively degrade their corresponding cell wall polymers; however, no further significant increase in lycopene bioaccessibility was obtained. A process-induced barrier consisting of cell wall material is not the only factor governing lycopene bioaccessibility upon high-pressure homogenization. © 2015 Society of Chemical Industry.

  3. Lifestyle modifies obesity-associated risk of cardiovascular disease in a genetically homogeneous population

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jørgensen, Marit E; Borch-Johnsen, Knut; Bjerregaard, Peter

    2006-01-01

    was not significantly different in the Inuit populations, but the values of several risk factors were significantly different. At any given level of obesity, Inuit residents in Greenland had lower blood pressure and lower concentrations of triacylglycerol and postchallenge plasma glucose and insulin than did the Inuit...... migrants in Denmark. The trend in the association with obesity categories was different only for HDL cholesterol, with higher concentrations observed in women Inuit migrants in Denmark than in women Inuit residents in Greenland. CONCLUSIONS: The health risk associated with obesity clearly varies within...

  4. Cell patterning without chemical surface modification: Cell cell interactions between printed bovine aortic endothelial cells (BAEC) on a homogeneous cell-adherent hydrogel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, C. Y.; Barron, J. A.; Ringeisen, B. R.

    2006-10-01

    Cell printing offers the unique ability to directly deposit one or multiple cell types directly onto a surface without the need to chemically pre-treat the surface with lithographic methods. We utilize biological laser printing (BioLP ™) to form patterns of bovine aortic endothelial cells (BAECs) onto a homogeneous cell adherent hydrogel surface. These normal cells are shown to retain near-100% viability post-printing. In order to determine whether BAECs encountered shear and/or heat stress during printing, immunocytochemical staining experiments were performed to detect potential expression of heat shock proteins (HSP) by the deposited cells. Printed BAECs expressed HSP at levels similar to negative control cells, indicating that the BioLP process does not expose cells to damaging levels of stress. However, HSP expression was slightly higher at the highest laser energy studied, suggesting more stress was present under these extreme conditions. Printed BAECs also showed preferential asymmetric growth and migration towards each other and away from the originally printed pattern, demonstrating a retained ability for the cells to communicate post-printing.

  5. Genetic structure and demographic history should inform conservation: Chinese cobras currently treated as homogenous show population divergence.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Long-Hui Lin

    Full Text Available An understanding of population structure and genetic diversity is crucial for wildlife conservation and for determining the integrity of wildlife populations. The vulnerable Chinese cobra (Naja atra has a distribution from the mouth of the Yangtze River down to northern Vietnam and Laos, within which several large mountain ranges and water bodies may influence population structure. We combined 12 microsatellite loci and 1117 bp of the mitochondrial cytochrome b gene to explore genetic structure and demographic history in this species, using 269 individuals from various localities in Mainland China and Vietnam. High levels of genetic variation were identified for both mtDNA and microsatellites. mtDNA data revealed two main (Vietnam + southern China + southwestern China; eastern + southeastern China and one minor (comprising only two individuals from the westernmost site clades. Microsatellite data divided the eastern + southeastern China clade further into two genetic clusters, which include individuals from the eastern and southeastern regions, respectively. The Luoxiao and Nanling Mountains may be important barriers affecting the diversification of lineages. In the haplotype network of cytchrome b, many haplotypes were represented within a "star" cluster and this and other tests suggest recent expansion. However, microsatellite analyses did not yield strong evidence for a recent bottleneck for any population or genetic cluster. The three main clusters identified here should be considered as independent management units for conservation purposes. The release of Chinese cobras into the wild should cease unless their origin can be determined, and this will avoid problems arising from unnatural homogenization.

  6. Homogenous Population Genetic Structure of the Non-Native Raccoon Dog (Nyctereutes procyonoides) in Europe as a Result of Rapid Population Expansion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drygala, Frank; Korablev, Nikolay; Ansorge, Hermann; Fickel, Joerns; Isomursu, Marja; Elmeros, Morten; Kowalczyk, Rafał; Baltrunaite, Laima; Balciauskas, Linas; Saarma, Urmas; Schulze, Christoph; Borkenhagen, Peter; Frantz, Alain C

    2016-01-01

    The extent of gene flow during the range expansion of non-native species influences the amount of genetic diversity retained in expanding populations. Here, we analyse the population genetic structure of the raccoon dog (Nyctereutes procyonoides) in north-eastern and central Europe. This invasive species is of management concern because it is highly susceptible to fox rabies and an important secondary host of the virus. We hypothesized that the large number of introduced animals and the species' dispersal capabilities led to high population connectivity and maintenance of genetic diversity throughout the invaded range. We genotyped 332 tissue samples from seven European countries using 16 microsatellite loci. Different algorithms identified three genetic clusters corresponding to Finland, Denmark and a large 'central' population that reached from introduction areas in western Russia to northern Germany. Cluster assignments provided evidence of long-distance dispersal. The results of an Approximate Bayesian Computation analysis supported a scenario of equal effective population sizes among different pre-defined populations in the large central cluster. Our results are in line with strong gene flow and secondary admixture between neighbouring demes leading to reduced genetic structuring, probably a result of its fairly rapid population expansion after introduction. The results presented here are remarkable in the sense that we identified a homogenous genetic cluster inhabiting an area stretching over more than 1500km. They are also relevant for disease management, as in the event of a significant rabies outbreak, there is a great risk of a rapid virus spread among raccoon dog populations.

  7. Chromosome homogeneity in populations of Triatoma brasiliensis Neiva 1911 (Hemiptera - Reduviidae - Triatominae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Panzera Francisco

    2000-01-01

    Full Text Available Triatoma brasiliensis is the most important vector of Chagas disease in the semiarid zone of the Northeast of Brazil. Several authors have reported the occurrence of four chromatic patterns with morphological, ecological, and genetic differences. In order to determine the existence of cytogenetic differentiation between these chromatic forms, we analyzed their karyotypes and the chromosome behavior during the male meiotic process. Triatoma brasiliensis shows distinct and specific chromosome characteristics, which differ from those observed in all other triatomine species. However, no cytogenetic differences were observed between the four chromatic forms of T. brasiliensis. The lack of chromosome differentiation among them could indicate that the populations of this species are in a process of differentiation that does not involve their chromosomal organization.

  8. Genome-wide genetic homogeneity between sexes and populations for human height and body mass index.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Jian; Bakshi, Andrew; Zhu, Zhihong; Hemani, Gibran; Vinkhuyzen, Anna A E; Nolte, Ilja M; van Vliet-Ostaptchouk, Jana V; Snieder, Harold; Esko, Tonu; Milani, Lili; Mägi, Reedik; Metspalu, Andres; Hamsten, Anders; Magnusson, Patrik K E; Pedersen, Nancy L; Ingelsson, Erik; Visscher, Peter M

    2015-12-20

    Sex-specific genetic effects have been proposed to be an important source of variation for human complex traits. Here we use two distinct genome-wide methods to estimate the autosomal genetic correlation (rg) between men and women for human height and body mass index (BMI), using individual-level (n = ∼44 000) and summary-level (n = ∼133 000) data from genome-wide association studies. Results are consistent and show that the between-sex genetic correlation is not significantly different from unity for both traits. In contrast, we find evidence of genetic heterogeneity between sexes for waist-hip ratio (rg = ∼0.7) and between populations for BMI (rg = ∼0.9 between Europe and the USA) but not for height. The lack of evidence for substantial genetic heterogeneity for body size is consistent with empirical findings across traits and species. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  9. Who ‘marries' whom? The influence of societal connectedness, economic and political homogeneity, and population size on jurisdictional consolidations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bhatti, Yosef; Hansen, Kasper Møller

    2011-01-01

    For decades, political scientists have been asking how political jurisdictions are formed and reshaped. Nevertheless, studies of local government jurisdictional formation are few and often plagued with endogeneity since the formation of jurisdictions cannot be separated from sorting effects...... on the likelihood of amalgamation. Societal connectedness, population size and geography are important predictors of amalgamation patterns, while political and economic homogeneity between municipalities does not appear to matter much....... In this article, the unique case of the Danish structural reform is utilised to overcome endogeneity due to migration-related sorting by studying patterns of municipal amalgamations. In the recent Danish reform, 239 of 271 municipal entities were forced to amalgamate simultaneously, while who actually amalgamated...

  10. Adoption of a High-Impact Innovation in a Homogeneous Population

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weiss, Curtis H.; Poncela-Casasnovas, Julia; Glaser, Joshua I.; Pah, Adam R.; Persell, Stephen D.; Baker, David W.; Wunderink, Richard G.; Nunes Amaral, Luís A.

    2014-10-01

    Adoption of innovations, whether new ideas, technologies, or products, is crucially important to knowledge societies. The landmark studies of adoption dealt with innovations having great societal impact (such as antibiotics or hybrid crops) but where determining the utility of the innovation was straightforward (such as fewer side effects or greater yield). Recent large-scale studies of adoption were conducted within heterogeneous populations and focused on products with little societal impact. Here, we focus on a case with great practical significance: adoption by small groups of highly trained individuals of innovations with large societal impact but for which it is impractical to determine the true utility of the innovation. Specifically, we study experimentally the adoption by critical care physicians of a diagnostic assay that complements current protocols for the diagnosis of life-threatening bacterial infections and for which a physician cannot estimate the true accuracy of the assay based on personal experience. We show through computational modeling of the experiment that infection-spreading models—which have been formalized as generalized contagion processes—are not consistent with the experimental data, while a model inspired by opinion models is able to reproduce the empirical data. Our modeling approach enables us to investigate the efficacy of different intervention schemes on the rate and robustness of innovation adoption in the real world. While our study is focused on critical care physicians, our findings have implications for other settings in education, research, and business, where small groups of highly qualified peers make decisions about the adoption of innovations whose utility is difficult if not impossible to gauge.

  11. Geometric effect of the hydrogel grid structure on in vitro formation of homogeneous MIN6 cell clusters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bae, Chae Yun; Min, Mun-kyeong; Kim, Hail; Park, Je-Kyun

    2014-07-07

    A microstructure-based hydrogel was employed to study the relationship between spatial specificity and cellular behavior, including cell fate, proliferation, morphology, and insulin secretion in pancreatic β-cells. To effectively form homogeneous cell clusters in vitro, we made cell-containing hydrogel membrane constructs with an adapted grid structure based on a hexagonal micropattern. Homogeneous cell clusters (average diameter: 83.6 ± 14.2 μm) of pancreatic insulinoma (MIN6) cells were spontaneously generated in the floating hydrogel membrane constructs, including a hexagonal grid structure (size of cavity: 100 μm, interval between cavities: 30 μm). Interestingly, 3D clustering of MIN6 cells mimicking the structure of pancreatic islets was coalesced into a merged aggregate attaching to each hexagonal cavity of the hydrogel grid structure. The fate and insulin secretion of homogeneous cell clusters in the hydrogel grid structure were also assessed. The results of these designable hydrogel-cell membrane constructs suggest that facultative in vitro β-cell proliferation and maintenance can be applied to biofunctional assessments.

  12. Human red blood cell behavior under homogeneous extensional flow in a hyperbolic-shaped microchannel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yaginuma, T; Oliveira, M S N; Lima, R; Ishikawa, T; Yamaguchi, T

    2013-01-01

    It is well known that certain pathological conditions result in a decrease of red blood cells (RBCs) deformability and subsequently can significantly alter the blood flow in microcirculation, which may block capillaries and cause ischemia in the tissues. Microfluidic systems able to obtain reliable quantitative measurements of RBC deformability hold the key to understand and diagnose RBC related diseases. In this work, a microfluidic system composed of a microchannel with a hyperbolic-shaped contraction followed by a sudden expansion is presented. We provide a detailed quantitative description of the degree of deformation of human RBCs under a controlled homogeneous extensional flow field. We measured the deformation index (DI) as well as the velocity of the RBCs travelling along the centerline of the channel for four different flow rates and analyze the impact of the particle Reynolds number. The results show that human RBC deformation tends to reach a plateau value in the region of constant extensional rate, the value of which depends on the extension rate. Additionally, we observe that the presence of a sudden expansion downstream of the hyperbolic contraction modifies the spatial distribution of cells and substantially increases the cell free layer (CFL) downstream of the expansion plane similarly to what is seen in other expansion flows. Beyond a certain value of flow rate, there is only a weak effect of inlet flow rates on the enhancement of the downstream CFL. These in vitro experiments show the potential of using microfluidic systems with hyperbolic-shaped microchannels both for the separation of the RBCs from plasma and to assess changes in RBC deformability in physiological and pathological situations for clinical purposes. However, the selection of the geometry and the identification of the most suitable region to evaluate the changes on the RBC deformability under extensional flows are crucial if microfluidics is to be used as an in vitro clinical

  13. A simple method to generate equal-sized homogenous strata or clusters for population-based sampling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elliott, Michael R

    2011-04-01

    Statistical efficiency and cost efficiency can be achieved in population-based samples through stratification and/or clustering. Strata typically combine subgroups of the population that are similar with respect to an outcome. Clusters are often taken from preexisting units, but may be formed to minimize between-cluster variance, or to equalize exposure to a treatment or risk factor. Area probability sample design procedures for the National Children's Study required contiguous strata and clusters that maximized within-stratum and within-cluster homogeneity while maintaining approximately equal size of the strata or clusters. However, there were few methods that allowed such strata or clusters to be constructed under these contiguity and equal size constraints. A search algorithm generates equal-size cluster sets that approximately span the space of all possible clusters of equal size. An optimal cluster set is chosen based on analysis of variance and convexity criteria. The proposed algorithm is used to construct 10 strata based on demographics and air pollution measures in Kent County, MI, following census tract boundaries. A brief simulation study is also conducted. The proposed algorithm is effective at uncovering underlying clusters from noisy data. It can be used in multi-stage sampling where equal-size strata or clusters are desired. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Homogenous Population Genetic Structure of the Non-Native Raccoon Dog (Nyctereutes procyonoides in Europe as a Result of Rapid Population Expansion.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Frank Drygala

    Full Text Available The extent of gene flow during the range expansion of non-native species influences the amount of genetic diversity retained in expanding populations. Here, we analyse the population genetic structure of the raccoon dog (Nyctereutes procyonoides in north-eastern and central Europe. This invasive species is of management concern because it is highly susceptible to fox rabies and an important secondary host of the virus. We hypothesized that the large number of introduced animals and the species' dispersal capabilities led to high population connectivity and maintenance of genetic diversity throughout the invaded range. We genotyped 332 tissue samples from seven European countries using 16 microsatellite loci. Different algorithms identified three genetic clusters corresponding to Finland, Denmark and a large 'central' population that reached from introduction areas in western Russia to northern Germany. Cluster assignments provided evidence of long-distance dispersal. The results of an Approximate Bayesian Computation analysis supported a scenario of equal effective population sizes among different pre-defined populations in the large central cluster. Our results are in line with strong gene flow and secondary admixture between neighbouring demes leading to reduced genetic structuring, probably a result of its fairly rapid population expansion after introduction. The results presented here are remarkable in the sense that we identified a homogenous genetic cluster inhabiting an area stretching over more than 1500km. They are also relevant for disease management, as in the event of a significant rabies outbreak, there is a great risk of a rapid virus spread among raccoon dog populations.

  15. Short-Term Environmental Effects and Their Influence on Spatial Homogeneity of Organic Solar Cell Functionality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chien, Huei-Ting; Zach, Peter W; Friedel, Bettina

    2017-08-23

    In this study, we focus on the induced degradation and spatial inhomogeneity of organic photovoltaic devices under different environmental conditions, uncoupled from the influence of any auxiliary hole-transport (HT) layer. During testing of the corresponding devices comprising the standard photoactive layer of poly(3-hexylthiophene) as donor, blended with phenyl-C 61 -butyric acid methyl ester as acceptor, a comparison was made between the nonencapsulated devices upon exposure to argon in the dark, dry air in the dark, dry air with illumination, and humid air in the dark. The impact on the active layer's photophysics is discussed, along with the device physics in terms of integral solar cell performance and spatially resolved photocurrent distribution with point-to-point analysis of the diode characteristics to determine the origin of the observed integrated organic photovoltaic device behavior. The results show that even without the widely used hygroscopic HT layer, poly(3,4-ethylenedioxythiophene):poly(styrenesulfonate), humidity is still a major factor in the short-term environmental degradation of organic solar cells with this architecture, and not only oxygen or light, as is often reported. Different from previous reports where water-induced device degradation was spatially homogeneous and formation of Al 2 O 3 islands was only seen for oxygen permeation through pinholes in aluminum, we observed insulating islands merely after humidity exposure in the present study. Further, we demonstrated with laser beam induced current mapping and point-to-point diode analysis that the water-induced performance losses are a result of the exposed device area comprising regions with entirely unaltered high output and intact diode behavior and those with severe degradation showing detrimentally lowered output and voltage-independent charge blocking, which is essentially insulating behavior. It is suggested that this is caused by transport of water through pinholes to the

  16. Association between rs12970134 Near MC4R and adiposity indexes in a homogenous population of Caucasian schoolchildren.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marcovecchio, M Loredana; Capanna, Rita; D'Adamo, Ebe; Mammarella, Sandra; De Lellis, Laura; Chiarelli, Francesco; Cama, Alessandro; Mohn, Angelika

    2014-01-01

    To assess whether previously identified obesity-susceptibility loci were associated with overweight/obesity risk in a homogeneous population of Caucasian schoolchildren and whether these associations varied with age. Seven hundred and forty-five schoolchildren (353 boys, mean age: 8.3 ± 1.4 years) underwent anthropometric assessments. A saliva sample was collected for DNA extraction and assessment of 19 single-nucleotide polymorphisms previously associated with obesity. Only the rs12970134 in the MC4R gene was significantly associated with overweight/obesity risk, with a higher frequency of the AA risk genotype in children with a BMI >85th (8.3%) than in those with a BMI <85th percentile (3.0%), p = 0.001; odds ratio (95% CI) of 1.544 (1.192-1.998), p = 0.001, after adjusting for age, sex and pubertal stage. BMI standard deviation scores (SDS) and waist-to-height ratio (W/Hr) progressively increased across the rs12970134 genotypes (GG vs. AG vs. AA): BMI SDS, p = 0.004; W/Hr, p = 0.009. When dividing the study population into two groups based on the median age of participants (8.3 years), the differences in BMI SDS and W/Hr across the MC4R genotypes persisted only in children older than 8.3 years. In a population of Caucasian schoolchildren, the rs12970134 MC4R variant was significantly associated with excess body weight, particularly in children older than 8 years of age. © 2014 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  17. Genetic homogeneity between two populations of the parthenogenetic lizard Aspidoscelis cozumela Homogeneidad genética entre dos poblaciones de la lagartija partenogenética Aspidoscelis cozumela

    OpenAIRE

    Norma L. Manríquez-Morán; Fausto R. Méndez-de la Cruz

    2008-01-01

    We used skin-grafting to assess the genetic variability between 2 populations of the parthenogenetic lizard Aspidoscelis cozumela. We transplanted 238 skin fragments among individuals of 2 coastal populations at Cozumel Island. Grafts belonging to individuals that survive more than 60 days suggested genetic homogeneity between both populations, consistent with the existence of only 1 clone within this unisexual species.Se utilizó el método de transplantes de piel para evaluar la variabilidad ...

  18. Phase 1 Study of a Sulforaphane-Containing Broccoli Sprout Homogenate for Sickle Cell Disease.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jennifer F Doss

    Full Text Available Sickle cell disease (SCD is the most common inherited hemoglobinopathy worldwide. Our previous results indicate that the reduced oxidative stress capacity of sickle erythrocytes may be caused by decreased expression of NRF2 (Nuclear factor (erythroid-derived 2-like 2, an oxidative stress regulator. We found that activation of NRF2 with sulforaphane (SFN in erythroid progenitors significantly increased the expression of NRF2 targets HMOX1, NQO1, and HBG1 (subunit of fetal hemoglobin in a dose-dependent manner. Therefore, we hypothesized that NRF2 activation with SFN may offer therapeutic benefits for SCD patients by restoring oxidative capacity and increasing fetal hemoglobin concentration. To test this hypothesis, we performed a Phase 1, open-label, dose-escalation study of SFN, contained in a broccoli sprout homogenate (BSH that naturally contains SFN, in adults with SCD. The primary and secondary study endpoints were safety and physiological response to NRF2 activation, respectively. We found that BSH was well tolerated, and the few adverse events that occurred during the trial were not likely related to BSH consumption. We observed an increase in the mean relative whole blood mRNA levels for the NRF2 target HMOX1 (p = 0.02 on the last day of BSH treatment, compared to pre-treatment. We also observed a trend toward increased mean relative mRNA levels of the NRF2 target HBG1 (p = 0.10 from baseline to end of treatment, but without significant changes in HbF protein. We conclude that BSH, in the provided doses, is safe in stable SCD patients and may induce changes in gene expression levels. We therefore propose investigation of more potent NRF2 inducers, which may elicit more robust physiological changes and offer clinical benefits to SCD patients. Trial registration: ClinicalTrials.gov NCT01715480.

  19. A cell model for homogenization of fiber-reinforced composites: General theory and nonlinear elasticity effects

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aidun, J.B.; Addessio, F.L.

    1995-11-01

    The theoretical basis of the homogenization technique developed by Aboudi is presented and assessed. Given the constitutive relations of the constituents, this technique provides an equivalent, homogeneous, constitutive model of unidirectional, continuous-fiber-reinforced composites. The expressions that comprise the first-order version of the technique are given special attention as this treatment has considerable practical value. Nonlinear elasticity effects are added to it. This extension increases the accuracy of numerical simulations of high strain-rate loadings. It is particularly important for any dynamic loading in which shock waves might be produced, including crash safety, armor, and munitions applications. Examples illustrate that elastic nonlinearity can make substantial contributions at strains of only a few per cent. These contributions are greatest during post-yield inelastic deformation. The micromechanics-based homogenization technique is shown to facilitate use of an efficient approximate treatment of elastic nonlinearity in composites with isotropic matrix materials.

  20. Spinal cord homogenates from SOD1 familial amyotrophic lateral sclerosis induce SOD1 aggregation in living cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Edward Pokrishevsky

    Full Text Available Mutant Cu/Zn superoxide dismutase (SOD1 can confer its misfolding on wild-type SOD1 in living cells; the propagation of misfolding can also be transmitted between cells in vitro. Recent studies identified fluorescently-tagged SOD1G85R as a promiscuous substrate that is highly prone to aggregate by a variety of templates, in vitro and in vivo. Here, we utilized several SOD1-GFP reporter proteins with G37R, G85R, or G93A mutations in SOD1. We observed that human spinal cord homogenates prepared from SOD1 familial ALS (FALS can induce significantly more intracellular reporter protein aggregation than spinal cord homogenates from sporadic ALS, Alzheimer's disease, multiple system atrophy or healthy control individuals. We also determined that the induction of reporter protein aggregation by SOD1-FALS tissue homogenates can be attenuated by incubating the cells with the SOD1 misfolding-specific antibody 3H1, or the small molecule 5-fluorouridine. Our study further implicates SOD1 as the seeding particle responsible for the spread of SOD1-FALS neurodegeneration from its initial onset site(s, and demonstrates two potential therapeutic strategies for SOD1-mediated disease. This work also comprises a medium-throughput cell-based platform of screening potential therapeutics to attenuate propagated aggregation of SOD1.

  1. Genotype-phenotype correlations in a mountain population community with high prevalence of Wilson's disease: genetic and clinical homogeneity.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Relu Cocoş

    Full Text Available Wilson's disease is an autosomal recessive disorder caused by more than 500 mutations in ATP7B gene presenting considerably clinical manifestations heterogeneity even in patients with a particular mutation. Previous findings suggested a potential role of additional genetic modifiers and environment factors on phenotypic expression among the affected patients. We conducted clinical and genetic investigations to perform genotype-phenotype correlation in two large families living in a socio-culturally isolated community with the highest prevalence of Wilson's disease ever reported of 1 ∶ 1130. Sequencing of ATP7B gene in seven affected individuals and 43 family members identified a common compound heterozygous genotype, H1069Q/M769H-fs, in five symptomatic and two asymptomatic patients and detected the presence of two out of seven identified single nucleotide polymorphisms in all affected patients. Symptomatic patients had similar clinical phenotype and age at onset (18 ± 1 years showing dysarthria and dysphagia as common clinical features at the time of diagnosis. Moreover, all symptomatic patients presented Kayser-Fleischer rings and lack of dystonia accompanied by unfavourable clinical outcomes. Our findings add value for understanding of genotype-phenotype correlations in Wilson's disease based on a multifamily study in an isolated population with high extent of genetic and environmental homogeneity as opposed to majority of reports. We observed an equal influence of presumed other genetic modifiers and environmental factors on clinical presentation and age at onset of Wilson's disease in patients with a particular genotype. These data provide valuable inferences that could be applied for predicting clinical management in asymptomatic patients in such communities.

  2. Effective Elastic Moduli of Closed-cell Aluminium Foams - Homogenization Method

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Koudelka, P.; Doktor, T.; Valach, J.; Kytýř, Daniel; Jiroušek, Ondřej

    2013-01-01

    Roč. 75, č. 1 (2013), s. 161-170 ISSN 1454-2358 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GAP105/12/0824 Institutional support: RVO:68378297 Keywords : homogenization * metal foam * micromechanical properties Subject RIV: JJ - Other Materials http://www.scientificbulletin.upb.ro/rev_docs_arhiva/full61d_730795.pdf

  3. Microsatellites Reveal Genetic Homogeneity among Outbreak Populations of Crown-of-Thorns Starfish (Acanthaster cf. solaris) on Australia’s Great Barrier Reef

    KAUST Repository

    Harrison, Hugo

    2017-03-10

    Specific patterns in the initiation and spread of reef-wide outbreaks of crown-of-thorns starfish are important, both to understand potential causes (or triggers) of outbreaks and to develop more effective and highly targeted management and containment responses. Using analyses of genetic diversity and structure (based on 17 microsatellite loci), this study attempted to resolve the specific origin for recent outbreaks of crown-of-thorns on Australia’s Great Barrier Reef (GBR). We assessed the genetic structure amongst 2705 starfish collected from 13 coral reefs in four regions that spanned ~1000 km of the GBR. Our results indicate that populations sampled across the full length of the GBR are genetically homogeneous (G’ST = −0.001; p = 0.948) with no apparent genetic structure between regions. Approximate Bayesian computational analyses suggest that all sampled populations had a common origin and that current outbreaking populations of crown-of-thorns starfish (CoTS) in the Swains are not independent of outbreak populations in the northern GBR. Despite hierarchical sampling and large numbers of CoTS genotyped from individual reefs and regions, limited genetic structure meant we were unable to determine a putative source population for the current outbreak of CoTS on the GBR. The very high genetic homogeneity of sampled populations and limited evidence of inbreeding indicate rapid expansion in population size from multiple, undifferentiated latent populations.

  4. Microsatellites Reveal Genetic Homogeneity among Outbreak Populations of Crown-of-Thorns Starfish (Acanthaster cf. solaris on Australia’s Great Barrier Reef

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hugo B. Harrison

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Specific patterns in the initiation and spread of reef-wide outbreaks of crown-of-thorns starfish are important, both to understand potential causes (or triggers of outbreaks and to develop more effective and highly targeted management and containment responses. Using analyses of genetic diversity and structure (based on 17 microsatellite loci, this study attempted to resolve the specific origin for recent outbreaks of crown-of-thorns on Australia’s Great Barrier Reef (GBR. We assessed the genetic structure amongst 2705 starfish collected from 13 coral reefs in four regions that spanned ~1000 km of the GBR. Our results indicate that populations sampled across the full length of the GBR are genetically homogeneous (G’ST = −0.001; p = 0.948 with no apparent genetic structure between regions. Approximate Bayesian computational analyses suggest that all sampled populations had a common origin and that current outbreaking populations of crown-of-thorns starfish (CoTS in the Swains are not independent of outbreak populations in the northern GBR. Despite hierarchical sampling and large numbers of CoTS genotyped from individual reefs and regions, limited genetic structure meant we were unable to determine a putative source population for the current outbreak of CoTS on the GBR. The very high genetic homogeneity of sampled populations and limited evidence of inbreeding indicate rapid expansion in population size from multiple, undifferentiated latent populations.

  5. Explicit time-reversible orbit integration in Particle In Cell codes with static homogeneous magnetic field

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patacchini, L.; Hutchinson, I. H.

    2009-04-01

    A new explicit time-reversible orbit integrator for the equations of motion in a static homogeneous magnetic field - called Cyclotronic integrator - is presented. Like Spreiter and Walter's Taylor expansion algorithm, for sufficiently weak electric field gradients this second order method does not require a fine resolution of the Larmor motion; it has however the essential advantage of being symplectic, hence time-reversible. The Cyclotronic integrator is only subject to a linear stability constraint ( ΩΔ t Democritus can reduce the cost of orbit integration by up to a factor of ten.

  6. The human red cell voltage-dependent cation channel. Part III: Distribution homogeneity and pH dependence

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bennekou, P.; Barksmann, T. L.; Christophersen, P.

    2006-01-01

    The homogeneity of the distribution of the non-selective voltage-dependent cation channel (the NSVDC channel) in the human erythrocyte, and the pH dependence was investigated. Activation of this channel caused a uniform cellular dehydration, which was characterized by the changes in the erythrocyte...... osmotic resistance profiles: After 1/2 h of activation, the osmolarity at 50% hemolysis changed from 73 mM (control) to 34 mM NaCl, corresponding to 0.48% and 0.21% NaCl respectively. Unchanging standard deviations show participation of the entire erythrocyte population, which implies an even distribution...

  7. Polyvinylpyrrolidone-Based Bio-Ink Improves Cell Viability and Homogeneity during Drop-On-Demand Printing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ng, Wei Long; Yeong, Wai Yee; Naing, May Win

    2017-02-16

    Drop-on-demand (DOD) bioprinting has attracted huge attention for numerous biological applications due to its precise control over material volume and deposition pattern in a contactless printing approach. 3D bioprinting is still an emerging field and more work is required to improve the viability and homogeneity of printed cells during the printing process. Here, a general purpose bio-ink was developed using polyvinylpyrrolidone (PVP) macromolecules. Different PVP-based bio-inks (0%-3% w/v) were prepared and evaluated for their printability; the short-term and long-term viability of the printed cells were first investigated. The Z value of a bio-ink determines its printability; it is the inverse of the Ohnesorge number (Oh), which is the ratio between the Reynolds number and a square root of the Weber number, and is independent of the bio-ink velocity. The viability of printed cells is dependent on the Z values of the bio-inks; the results indicated that the cells can be printed without any significant impairment using a bio-ink with a threshold Z value of ≤9.30 (2% and 2.5% w/v). Next, the cell output was evaluated over a period of 30 min. The results indicated that PVP molecules mitigate the cell adhesion and sedimentation during the printing process; the 2.5% w/v PVP bio-ink demonstrated the most consistent cell output over a period of 30 min. Hence, PVP macromolecules can play a critical role in improving the cell viability and homogeneity during the bioprinting process.

  8. Polyvinylpyrrolidone-Based Bio-Ink Improves Cell Viability and Homogeneity during Drop-On-Demand Printing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ng, Wei Long; Yeong, Wai Yee; Naing, May Win

    2017-01-01

    Drop-on-demand (DOD) bioprinting has attracted huge attention for numerous biological applications due to its precise control over material volume and deposition pattern in a contactless printing approach. 3D bioprinting is still an emerging field and more work is required to improve the viability and homogeneity of printed cells during the printing process. Here, a general purpose bio-ink was developed using polyvinylpyrrolidone (PVP) macromolecules. Different PVP-based bio-inks (0%–3% w/v) were prepared and evaluated for their printability; the short-term and long-term viability of the printed cells were first investigated. The Z value of a bio-ink determines its printability; it is the inverse of the Ohnesorge number (Oh), which is the ratio between the Reynolds number and a square root of the Weber number, and is independent of the bio-ink velocity. The viability of printed cells is dependent on the Z values of the bio-inks; the results indicated that the cells can be printed without any significant impairment using a bio-ink with a threshold Z value of ≤9.30 (2% and 2.5% w/v). Next, the cell output was evaluated over a period of 30 min. The results indicated that PVP molecules mitigate the cell adhesion and sedimentation during the printing process; the 2.5% w/v PVP bio-ink demonstrated the most consistent cell output over a period of 30 min. Hence, PVP macromolecules can play a critical role in improving the cell viability and homogeneity during the bioprinting process. PMID:28772551

  9. Polyvinylpyrrolidone-Based Bio-Ink Improves Cell Viability and Homogeneity during Drop-On-Demand Printing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wei Long Ng

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Drop-on-demand (DOD bioprinting has attracted huge attention for numerous biological applications due to its precise control over material volume and deposition pattern in a contactless printing approach. 3D bioprinting is still an emerging field and more work is required to improve the viability and homogeneity of printed cells during the printing process. Here, a general purpose bio-ink was developed using polyvinylpyrrolidone (PVP macromolecules. Different PVP-based bio-inks (0%–3% w/v were prepared and evaluated for their printability; the short-term and long-term viability of the printed cells were first investigated. The Z value of a bio-ink determines its printability; it is the inverse of the Ohnesorge number (Oh, which is the ratio between the Reynolds number and a square root of the Weber number, and is independent of the bio-ink velocity. The viability of printed cells is dependent on the Z values of the bio-inks; the results indicated that the cells can be printed without any significant impairment using a bio-ink with a threshold Z value of ≤9.30 (2% and 2.5% w/v. Next, the cell output was evaluated over a period of 30 min. The results indicated that PVP molecules mitigate the cell adhesion and sedimentation during the printing process; the 2.5% w/v PVP bio-ink demonstrated the most consistent cell output over a period of 30 min. Hence, PVP macromolecules can play a critical role in improving the cell viability and homogeneity during the bioprinting process.

  10. Induced rouleaux formation in interspecies populations of red cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sewchand, L; Canham, P B

    1976-08-01

    A study was made of rouleaux formation between erythrocytes of different species when suspended in Ringer solution with polyvinylpyrrolidone added (PVP with M.W 360 000, 4.0 G/L). PVP was shown previously to be a suitable asymmetric macromolecule for promoting rouleaux formation. For the present study fresh samples of blood were obtained from humans, cats, rats, mice, dogs, rabbits and guinea pigs. Initally homogenous populations of cells were allowed to form rouleaux in the microscope chamber for the purpose of determining the average cellular dimensions for each species. Subsequently red cells from two species at a time were mixed in equal proportions to assess the degree of preference for the cells of one species to form rouleaux among themselves rather than with cells of the other species. The sequencing of the cells in the mixed rouleaux which formed on the coverslip was determined from photomicrographs, using the previously determined knowledge of the cellular dimensions. Although the visual impression was that the rouleaux were composed of a random selection of cells from the mixed population, a preferencnstrated statisically in nine of the ten combinations tested. Only the rat-mouse mixture of cells was excepted, perhaps because these animals are closely related members of the same family.

  11. A 1-min method for homogenous cell seeding in porous scaffolds

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tan, Lijun; Ren, Yijin; Kuijer, Roel

    The aim of this study was to develop and evaluate a simple and rapid cell seeding procedure for both calcium phosphate ceramic scaffolds and polymer scaffolds. Poly(D,L-lactic acid) and beta-tri-calcium phosphate scaffolds were seeded with MC3T3-E1 cells in a syringe. Scaffolds were put in the

  12. Reflector homogenization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sanchez, R.; Ragusa, J.; Santandrea, S. [Commissariat a l' Energie Atomique, Direction de l' Energie Nucleaire, Service d' Etudes de Reacteurs et de Modelisation Avancee, CEA de Saclay, DM2S/SERMA 91 191 Gif-sur-Yvette cedex (France)]. e-mail: richard.sanchez@cea.fr

    2004-07-01

    The problem of the determination of a homogeneous reflector that preserves a set of prescribed albedo is considered. Duality is used for a direct estimation of the derivatives needed in the iterative calculation of the optimal homogeneous cross sections. The calculation is based on the preservation of collapsed multigroup albedo obtained from detailed reference calculations and depends on the low-order operator used for core calculations. In this work we analyze diffusion and transport as low-order operators and argue that the P{sub 0} transfers are the best choice for the unknown cross sections to be adjusted. Numerical results illustrate the new approach for SP{sub N} core calculations. (Author)

  13. Homogenous Alloys of Formamidinium Lead Triiodide and Cesium Tin Triiodide for Efficient Ideal-Bandgap Perovskite Solar Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zong, Yingxia; Wang, Ning; Zhang, Lin; Ju, Ming-Gang; Zeng, Xiao Cheng; Sun, Xiao Wei; Zhou, Yuanyuan; Padture, Nitin P

    2017-10-02

    The alloying behavior between FAPbI3 and CsSnI3 perovskites is studied carefully for the first time, which has led to the realization of single-phase hybrid perovskites of (FAPbI3 )1-x (CsSnI3 )x (0homogenous composition/microstructure at the nanoscale, as confirmed by microscopic characterization. The ideal bandgap of 1.3 eV for single-junction solar cell operation is achieved in the rationally-tailored (FAPbI3 )0.7 (CsSnI3 )0.3 -composition perovskite. Solar cells based on this new perovskite show power conversion efficiency up to 14.6 %. © 2017 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  14. A vesicle cell under collision with a Janus or homogeneous nanoparticle: translocation dynamics and late-stage morphology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arai, Noriyoshi; Yasuoka, Kenji; Zeng, Xiao Cheng

    2013-09-01

    We investigate translocation dynamics of a vesicle cell under collision with a Janus or a homogeneous hydrophobic/hydrophilic nanoparticle. To this end, we perform dissipative particle dynamics simulation by setting the nanoparticle with different initial velocities, different chemical patterns of the surface for the nanoparticle, and different orientations (for the Janus nanoparticle). Particular attention is given to translocation dynamics, in-cell water discharge, and the late-stage morphologies of the vesicle/nanoparticle system after the collision. We observe three late-stage states for the Janus nanoparticle, and four late-stage states for the homogeneous nanoparticles. We find that the late-stage state and the associated dynamical pathway not only depend on the relative velocity but also on the chemical pattern of the nanoparticle surface, as well as on the orientation of the incident Janus nanoparticle. We have examined the time-dependent mean radius of the vesicle, the number of in-cell water beads lost from the vesicle, as well as the collision-induced pore size on the lipid membrane during the course of collision. Our simulation provides microscopic insights into the resilience of the vesicle-cell membrane and dynamical behavior of the vesicle under the attack of a foreign nanoparticle. Knowledge and insights gained through the simulation will have implication to the drug delivery with different chemical coatings.We investigate translocation dynamics of a vesicle cell under collision with a Janus or a homogeneous hydrophobic/hydrophilic nanoparticle. To this end, we perform dissipative particle dynamics simulation by setting the nanoparticle with different initial velocities, different chemical patterns of the surface for the nanoparticle, and different orientations (for the Janus nanoparticle). Particular attention is given to translocation dynamics, in-cell water discharge, and the late-stage morphologies of the vesicle/nanoparticle system after the

  15. CD146/MCAM defines functionality of human bone marrow stromal stem cell populations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Harkness, Linda; Zaher, Walid; Ditzel, Nicholas

    2016-01-01

    Background Identification of surface markers for prospective isolation of functionally homogenous populations of human skeletal (stromal, mesenchymal) stem cells (hMSCs) is highly relevant for cell therapy protocols. Thus, we examined the possible use of CD146 to subtype a heterogeneous h......MSC population. Methods Using flow cytometry and cell sorting, we isolated two distinct hMSC-CD146+ and hMSC-CD146− cell populations from the telomerized human bone marrow-derived stromal cell line (hMSC-TERT). Cells were examined for differences in their size, shape and texture by using high-content analysis...... and additionally for their ability to differentiate toward osteogenesis in vitro and form bone in vivo, and their migrational ability in vivo and in vitro was investigated. Results In vitro, the two cell populations exhibited similar growth rate and differentiation capacity to osteoblasts and adipocytes...

  16. An Electron Microscope Study of VERO Cells Infected with Homogeneous and Heterogeneous Virus of VEE

    Science.gov (United States)

    1974-12-10

    formation of giant viricns with distinctly defined nucleoids (Illustration, B and C). It should be noted tat a najority CC the gient cells observed in these...infection), giant virions with distinctly defined nucleoides were only rarely observed. Instead, on the cell surfaces and also in the intercellular spaces...containing two or more nuclcoids within the sam~e membrane, and particles containinj, i :n.terial of the sam.o density as nucleoids . In this connection, it

  17. Superaligned Carbon Nanotubes Guide Oriented Cell Growth and Promote Electrophysiological Homogeneity for Synthetic Cardiac Tissues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ren, Jing; Xu, Quanfu; Chen, Xiaomeng; Li, Wei; Guo, Kai; Zhao, Yang; Wang, Qian; Zhang, Zhitao; Peng, Huisheng; Li, Yi-Gang

    2017-11-01

    Cardiac engineering of patches and tissues is a promising option to restore infarcted hearts, by seeding cardiac cells onto scaffolds and nurturing their growth in vitro. However, current patches fail to fully imitate the hierarchically aligned structure in the natural myocardium, the fast electrotonic propagation, and the subsequent synchronized contractions. Here, superaligned carbon-nanotube sheets (SA-CNTs) are explored to culture cardiomyocytes, mimicking the aligned structure and electrical-impulse transmission behavior of the natural myocardium. The SA-CNTs not only induce an elongated and aligned cell morphology of cultured cardiomyocytes, but also provide efficient extracellular signal-transmission pathways required for regular and synchronous cell contractions. Furthermore, the SA-CNTs can reduce the beat-to-beat and cell-to-cell dispersion in repolarization of cultured cells, which is essential for a normal beating rhythm, and potentially reduce the occurrence of arrhythmias. Finally, SA-CNT-based flexible one-piece electrodes demonstrate a multipoint pacing function. These combined high properties make SA-CNTs promising in applications in cardiac resynchronization therapy in patients with heart failure and following myocardial infarctions. © 2017 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  18. Optimizing human embryonic stem cells differentiation efficiency by screening size-tunable homogenous embryoid bodies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moon, Sung-Hwan; Ju, Jongil; Park, Soon-Jung; Bae, Daekyeong; Chung, Hyung-Min; Lee, Sang-Hoon

    2014-07-01

    Human embryonic stem cells (hESCs) are generally induced to differentiate by forming spherical structures termed embryoid bodies (EBs) in the presence of soluble growth factors. hEBs are generated by suspending small clumps of hESC colonies; however, the resulting hEBs are heterogeneous because this method lacks the ability to control the number of cells in individual EBs. This heterogeneity affects factors that influence differentiation such as cell-cell contact and the diffusion of soluble factors, and consequently, the differentiation capacity of each EB varies. Here, we fabricated size-tunable concave microwells to control the physical environment, thereby regulating the size of EBs formed from single hESCs. Defined numbers of single hESCs were forced to aggregate and generate uniformly sized EBs with high fidelity, and the size of the EBs was controlled using concave microwells of different diameters. Differentiation patterns in H9- and CHA15-hESCs were affected by EB size in both the absence and presence of growth factors. By screening EB size in the presence of various BMP4 concentrations, a two-fold increase in endothelial cell differentiation was achieved. Because each hESC line has unique characteristics, the findings of this study demonstrate that concave microwells could be used to screen different EB sizes and growth factor concentrations to optimize differentiation for each hESC line. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Genetic homogeneity across Bantu-speaking groups from Mozambique and Angola challenges early split scenarios between East and West Bantu populations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alves, Isabel; Coelho, Margarida; Gignoux, Christopher; Damasceno, Albertino; Prista, Antonio; Rocha, Jorge

    2011-02-01

    The large scale spread of Bantu-speaking populations remains one of the most debated questions in African population history. In this work we studied the genetic structure of 19 Bantu-speaking groups from Mozambique and Angola using a multilocus approach based on 14 newly developed compound haplotype systems (UEPSTRs), each consisting of a rapidly evolving short tandem repeat (STR) closely linked to a unique event polymorphism (UEP). We compared the ability of UEPs, STRs and UEPSTRs to document genetic variation at the intercontinental level and among the African Bantu populations, and found that UEPSTR systems clearly provided more resolution than UEPs or STRs alone. The observed patterns of genetic variation revealed high levels of genetic homogeneity between major populations from Angola and Mozambique, with two main outliers: the Kuvale from Angola and the Chopi from Mozambique. Within Mozambique, two Kaskazi-speaking populations from the far north (Yao and Mwani) and two Nyasa-speaking groups from the Zambezi River basin (Nyungwe and Sena) could be differentiated from the remaining groups, but no further population structure was observed across the country. The close genetic relationship between most sampled Bantu populations is consistent with high degrees of interaction between peoples living in savanna areas located to the south of the rainforest. Our results highlight the role of gene flow during the Bantu expansions and show that the genetic evidence accumulated so far is becoming increasingly difficult to reconcile with widely accepted models postulating an early split between eastern and western Bantu populations.

  20. Genetic homogeneity between two populations of the parthenogenetic lizard Aspidoscelis cozumela Homogeneidad genética entre dos poblaciones de la lagartija partenogenética Aspidoscelis cozumela

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Norma L. Manríquez-Morán

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available We used skin-grafting to assess the genetic variability between 2 populations of the parthenogenetic lizard Aspidoscelis cozumela. We transplanted 238 skin fragments among individuals of 2 coastal populations at Cozumel Island. Grafts belonging to individuals that survive more than 60 days suggested genetic homogeneity between both populations, consistent with the existence of only 1 clone within this unisexual species.Se utilizó el método de transplantes de piel para evaluar la variabilidad genética entre 2 poblaciones de la lagartija partenogenética Aspidoscelis cozumela. Se transplantaron 238 fragmentos de piel entre individuos de 2 poblaciones costeras de Isla Cozumel. Los transplantes pertenecientes a individuos que vivieron más de 60 días, mostraron homogeneidad genética entre ambas poblaciones, lo cual sugiere la existencia de 1 sólo clon dentro de esta especie unisexual.

  1. CD146/MCAM defines functionality of human bone marrow stromal stem cell populations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Harkness, Linda; Zaher, Walid; Ditzel, Nicholas

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Identification of surface markers for prospective isolation of functionally homogenous populations of human skeletal (stromal, mesenchymal) stem cells (hMSCs) is highly relevant for cell therapy protocols. Thus, we examined the possible use of CD146 to subtype a heterogeneous h...... and adipocytes on the basis of gene expression and protein production of lineage-specific markers. In vivo, hMSC-CD146(+) and hMSC-CD146(-) cells formed bone and bone marrow organ when implanted subcutaneously in immune-deficient mice. Bone was enriched in hMSC-CD146(-) cells (12.6 % versus 8.1 %) and bone......MSC population. METHODS: Using flow cytometry and cell sorting, we isolated two distinct hMSC-CD146(+) and hMSC-CD146(-) cell populations from the telomerized human bone marrow-derived stromal cell line (hMSC-TERT). Cells were examined for differences in their size, shape and texture by using high...

  2. Identifying Cell Populations in Flow Cytometry Data Using Phenotypic Signatures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pouyan, Maziyar Baran; Nourani, Mehrdad

    2017-01-01

    Single-cell flow cytometry is a technology that measures the expression of several cellular markers simultaneously for a large number of cells. Identification of homogeneous cell populations, currently done by manual biaxial gating, is highly subjective and time consuming. To overcome the shortcomings of manual gating, automatic algorithms have been proposed. However, the performance of these methods highly depends on the shape of populations and the dimension of the data. In this paper, we have developed a time-efficient method that accurately identifies cellular populations. This is done based on a novel technique that estimates the initial number of clusters in high dimension and identifies the final clusters by merging clusters using their phenotypic signatures in low dimension. The proposed method is called SigClust. We have applied SigClust to four public datasets and compared it with five well known methods in the field. The results are promising and indicate higher performance and accuracy compared to similar approaches reported in literature.

  3. Genetic structure and demographic history should inform conservation: Chinese cobras currently treated as homogenous show population divergence

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Lin, Long-Hui; Qu, Yan-Fu; Li, Hong; Zhou, Kai-Ya; Ji, Xiang

    2012-01-01

    .... The vulnerable Chinese cobra (Naja atra) has a distribution from the mouth of the Yangtze River down to northern Vietnam and Laos, within which several large mountain ranges and water bodies may influence population structure...

  4. Data for discriminating dead/live bacteria in homogenous cell suspensions and the effect of insoluble substrates on turbidimetric measurements

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kwabena O. Duedu

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Estimation of bacterial growth by rapid traditional methods such as spectrophometric measurements at 600 nm (OD600 is not applicable for cultures containing insoluble particles in the growth media. Colony counts are the only suitable alternative but these are laborious and not high-throughput. The data presented in this article is related to the research article entitled “Two-colour fluorescence fluorimetric analysis for direct quantification of bacteria and its application in monitoring bacterial growth in cellulose degradation systems” (Duedu and French, 2017 [1]. This data article presents original primary data describing the discrimination of dead/live bacteria in homogenous cell suspensions and how the presence of insoluble substrates affect the turbidity of the suspensions.

  5. Analysing Scenarios of Cell Population System Development

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. S. Vinogradova

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The article considers an isolated population system consisting of two types of human stem cells, namely normal cells and cells with chromosomal abnormalities (abnormal ones. The system develops in the laboratory (in vitro. The article analyses possible scenarios of the population system development, which are implemented for different values of its parameters. An investigated model of the cell population system takes into account the limited resources. It is represented as a system of two nonlinear differential equations with continuous right-hand part. The model is considered with non-negative values of the variables; the domain is divided into four sets. The model feature is that in each set the right part of the system of differential equations has a different form.The article analyses a quality of the rest points of the system in each of four sets. The analytical conditions for determination of the number of rest points and the quality of rest points, with, at least, one zero coordinate, are obtained.It is shown that the population system under study cannot have more than two points of rest, both coordinates of which are positive (non-zero. It is difficult to determine quality of such rest points depending on the model parameters due to the complexity of the expressions, which define the systems of the first approximation, recorded in a neighborhood of these points of rest. Numerical research results of the stability of these points of rest are obtained, and phase portraits with the specified specific values of the system parameters are demonstrated. The main scenarios for the cell population development are adduced. Analysis of mathematical model shows that a cell population system may remain the system consisting of populations of normal and abnormal cells; it can degenerate into a population of abnormal cells or perish. The scenario, in which there is only the population of normal cells, is not implemented. The numerical simulation

  6. Y-chromosome based evidence for pre-neolithic origin of the genetically homogeneous but diverse Sardinian population: inference for association scans.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniela Contu

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available The island of Sardinia shows a unique high incidence of several autoimmune diseases with multifactorial inheritance, particularly type 1 diabetes and multiple sclerosis. The prior knowledge of the genetic structure of this population is fundamental to establish the optimal design for association studies in these diseases. Previous work suggested that the Sardinians are a relatively homogenous population, but some reports were contradictory and data were largely based on variants subject to selection. For an unbiased assessment of genetic structure, we studied a combination of neutral Y-chromosome variants, 21 biallelic and 8 short tandem repeats (STRs in 930 Sardinian males. We found a high degree of interindividual variation but a homogenous distribution of the detected variability in samples from three separate regions of the island. One haplogroup, I-M26, is rare or absent outside Sardinia and is very common (0.37 frequency throughout the island, consistent with a founder effect. A Bayesian full likelihood analysis (BATWING indicated that the time from the most recent common ancestor (TMRCA of I-M26, was 21.0 (16.0-25.5 thousand years ago (KYA and that the population began to expand 14.0 (7.8-22.0 KYA. These results suggest a largely pre-Neolithic settlement of the island with little subsequent gene flow from outside populations. Consequently, Sardinia is an especially attractive venue for case-control genome wide association scans in common multifactorial diseases. Concomitantly, the high degree of interindividual variation in the current population facilitates fine mapping efforts to pinpoint the aetiologic polymorphisms.

  7. Homogeneous population of the brown alga Sargassum polycystum in Southeast Asia: possible role of recent expansion and asexual propagation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sze Wai Chan

    Full Text Available Southeast Asia has been known as one of the biodiversity hotspots in the world. Repeated glacial cycles during Pleistocene were believed to cause isolation of marine taxa in refugia, resulting in diversification among lineages. Recently, ocean current was also found to be another factor affecting gene flow by restricting larval dispersal in animals. Macroalgae are unique in having mode of reproduction that differs from that of animals. Our study on the phylogeographical pattern of the brown macroalga Sargassum polycystum using nuclear Internal Transcribed Spacer 2 (ITS2, plastidal RuBisCO spacer (Rub spacer and mitochondrial cytochrome oxidase subunit-III (Cox3 as molecular markers revealed genetic homogeneity across 27 sites in Southeast Asia and western Pacific, in sharp contrast to that revealed from most animal studies. Our data suggested that S. polycystum persisted in single refugium during Pleistocene in a panmixia pattern. Expansion occurred more recently after the Last Glacial Maximum and recolonization of the newly flooded Sunda Shelf could have involved asexual propagation of the species. High dispersal ability through floating fronds carrying developing germlings may also contribute to the low genetic diversity of the species.

  8. A millifluidic study of cell-to-cell heterogeneity in growth-rate and cell-division capability in populations of isogenic cells of Chlamydomonas reinhardtii.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shima P Damodaran

    Full Text Available To address possible cell-to-cell heterogeneity in growth dynamics of isogenic cell populations of Chlamydomonas reinhardtii, we developed a millifluidic drop-based device that not only allows the analysis of populations grown from single cells over periods of a week, but is also able to sort and collect drops of interest, containing viable and healthy cells, which can be used for further experimentation. In this study, we used isogenic algal cells that were first synchronized in mixotrophic growth conditions. We show that these synchronized cells, when placed in droplets and kept in mixotrophic growth conditions, exhibit mostly homogeneous growth statistics, but with two distinct subpopulations: a major population with a short doubling-time (fast-growers and a significant subpopulation of slowly dividing cells (slow-growers. These observations suggest that algal cells from an isogenic population may be present in either of two states, a state of restricted division and a state of active division. When isogenic cells were allowed to propagate for about 1000 generations on solid agar plates, they displayed an increased heterogeneity in their growth dynamics. Although we could still identify the original populations of slow- and fast-growers, drops inoculated with a single progenitor cell now displayed a wider diversity of doubling-times. Moreover, populations dividing with the same growth-rate often reached different cell numbers in stationary phase, suggesting that the progenitor cells differed in the number of cell divisions they could undertake. We discuss possible explanations for these cell-to-cell heterogeneities in growth dynamics, such as mutations, differential aging or stochastic variations in metabolites and macromolecules yielding molecular switches, in the light of single-cell heterogeneities that have been reported among isogenic populations of other eu- and prokaryotes.

  9. Solubilized musarinic recognition sites from rat brain and heart: evidence in favor of a homogeneous population of sites

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, J.; Roeske, W.R.; Yamamura, H.I.

    1986-03-01

    The binding characteristics of muscarinic receptors (MAChR) from rat brain and heart (membrane (m-) and 0.5% digitonin solubilized (s-)) were studied at 4/sup 0/C. (/sup 3/H)(-)QNB possessed the same affinity to both m- and s-MAChR (Kd = 20 pM). Pirenzepine (PZ) discriminated two affinities for brain m-MAChR and revealed a single low affinity in heart m-MAChR. S-MAChR from brain and heart displayed similar affinities for PZ ( Ki = 10 and 15 nM). High affinity (/sup 3/H)PZ binding was also found for s-MAChR from both tissues. The receptor affinity for carbachol (CARB) was decreased after solubilization. There was a decrease in the proportion of high affinity state (from 40% to 20% in the brain and from 60% to 15% in the heart) with a 4-fold decrease in the high affinity Ki for CARB. Gpp(NH)p no longer had an effect on the CARB/(/sup 3/H)(-)QNB competition in s-MAChR. Increasing the temperature to 37/sup 0/C caused a 3-6 fold decrease in PZ's affinity to both m- and s-MAChR without altering the ratio of high/low affinity sites. The reduction of PZ's affinity was completely reversible with temperature in m-MAChR and partially reversible in s-MAChR. The authors results suggests that a homogeneous muscarinic recognition site has been solubilized. Solubilization with digitonin results in a separation of the binding site from effector systems and membrane constituents responsible for the tissue specific receptor heterogeneity.

  10. X-chromosome SNP analyses in 11 human Mediterranean populations show a high overall genetic homogeneity except in North-west Africans (Moroccans)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tomas Mas, Carmen; Sanchez Sanchez, Juan Jose; Barbaro, Anna

    2008-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Due to its history, with a high number of migration events, the Mediterranean basin represents a challenging area for population genetic studies. A large number of genetic studies have been carried out in the Mediterranean area using different markers but no consensus has been reached...... of the Mediterranean Sea.A higher migration rate in females versus males was observed by comparing data from X-chromosome, mt-DNA and Y-chromosome SNPs both in the Mediterranean and a wider geographic area.Multilocus association was observed among the 25 SNPs on the X-chromosome in the populations from Ibiza...... and Cosenza. CONCLUSION: Our results support both the hypothesis of (1) a reduced impact of the Neolithic Wave and more recent migration movements in NW-Africa, and (2) the importance of the Strait of Gibraltar as a geographic barrier. In contrast, the high genetic homogeneity observed in the Mediterranean...

  11. Derivation of keratinocytes from chicken embryonic stem cells: Establishment and characterization of differentiated proliferative cell populations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mathilde Couteaudier

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available A common challenge in avian cell biology is the generation of differentiated cell-lines, especially in the keratinocyte lineage. Only a few avian cell-lines are available and very few of them show an interesting differentiation profile. During the last decade, mammalian embryonic stem cell-lines were shown to differentiate into almost all lineages, including keratinocytes. Although chicken embryonic stem cells had been obtained in the 1990s, few differentiation studies toward the ectodermal lineage were reported. Consequently, we explored the differentiation of chicken embryonic stem cells toward the keratinocyte lineage by using a combination of stromal induction, ascorbic acid, BMP4 and chicken serum. During the induction period, we observed a downregulation of pluripotency markers and an upregulation of epidermal markers. Three homogenous cell populations were derived, which were morphologically similar to chicken primary keratinocytes, displaying intracellular lipid droplets in almost every pavimentous cell. These cells could be serially passaged without alteration of their morphology and showed gene and protein expression profiles of epidermal markers similar to chicken primary keratinocytes. These cells represent an alternative to the isolation of chicken primary keratinocytes, being less cumbersome to handle and reducing the number of experimental animals used for the preparation of primary cells.

  12. Phenotype heterogeneity in cancer cell populations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Almeida, Luis [CNRS UMR 7598, LJLL, & INRIA MAMBA team, Sorbonne Universités, UPMC Univ Paris 06, Boîte courrier 187, 4 Pl. Jussieu, 75252 Paris cedex 05, France, luis@ann.jussieu.fr (France); Chisholm, Rebecca [School of Biotechnology and Biomolecular Sciences, University of New South Wales, Sydney, Australia, rebecca.chisholm@gmail.com (Australia); Clairambault, Jean [INRIA MAMBA team & LJLL, UMR 7598, Sorbonne Universités, UPMC Univ Paris 06, Boîte courrier 187, 4 Pl. Jussieu, 75252 Paris cedex 05, France, jean.clairambault@inria.fr, Corresponding author (France); Escargueil, Alexandre [INSERM “Cancer Biology and Therapeutics”, Sorbonne Universités, UPMC Univ Paris 06, UMR-S 938, CDR St Antoine, Hôpital St Antoine, 184 Fbg. St Antoine, 75571 Paris cedex 12, France, alexandre.escargueil@upmc.fr (France); Lorenzi, Tommaso [CMLA, ENS Cachan, 61, Av. du Président Wilson, 94230 Cachan cedex & INRIA MAMBA team, & LJLL, UMR 7598, UPMC Univ Paris 06, Boîte courrier 187, 4 Pl. Jussieu, 75252 Paris cedex 05, France, tommaso.lorenzi@gmail.com (France); Lorz, Alexander [Sorbonne Universités, UPMC Univ Paris 06, LJLL, UMR 7598 & INRIA Boîte courrier 187, 4 Pl. Jussieu, 75252 Paris cedex 05, France, alex.lorz@ann.jussieu.fr (France); Trélat, Emmanuel [Institut Universitaire de France, Sorbonne Universités, UPMC Univ Paris 06, LJLL, UMR 7598, Boîte courrier 187, UPMC Univ Paris 06, 4 Pl. Jussieu, 75252 Paris cedex 05, France, emmanuel.trelat@upmc.fr (France)

    2016-06-08

    Phenotype heterogeneity in cancer cell populations, be it of genetic, epigenetic or stochastic origin, has been identified as a main source of resistance to drug treatments and a major source of therapeutic failures in cancers. The molecular mechanisms of drug resistance are partly understood at the single cell level (e.g., overexpression of ABC transporters or of detoxication enzymes), but poorly predictable in tumours, where they are hypothesised to rely on heterogeneity at the cell population scale, which is thus the right level to describe cancer growth and optimise its control by therapeutic strategies in the clinic. We review a few results from the biological literature on the subject, and from mathematical models that have been published to predict and control evolution towards drug resistance in cancer cell populations. We propose, based on the latter, optimisation strategies of combined treatments to limit emergence of drug resistance to cytotoxic drugs in cancer cell populations, in the monoclonal situation, which limited as it is still retains consistent features of cell population heterogeneity. The polyclonal situation, that may be understood as “bet hedging” of the tumour, thus protecting itself from different sources of drug insults, may lie beyond such strategies and will need further developments. In the monoclonal situation, we have designed an optimised therapeutic strategy relying on a scheduled combination of cytotoxic and cytostatic treatments that can be adapted to different situations of cancer treatments. Finally, we review arguments for biological theoretical frameworks proposed at different time and development scales, the so-called atavistic model (diachronic view relying on Darwinian genotype selection in the coursof billions of years) and the Waddington-like epigenetic landscape endowed with evolutionary quasi-potential (synchronic view relying on Lamarckian phenotype instruction of a given genome by reversible mechanisms), to

  13. The early bird gets the shrimp: Confronting assumptions of isotopic equilibrium and homogeneity in a wild bird population

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wunder, Michael B.; Jehl, Joseph R.; Stricker, Craig A.

    2012-01-01

    1. Because stable isotope distributions in organic material vary systematically across energy gradients that exist in ecosystems, community and population structures, and in individual physiological systems, isotope values in animal tissues have helped address a broad range of questions in animal ecology. It follows that every tissue sample provides an isotopic profile that can be used to study dietary or movement histories of individual animals. Interpretations of these profiles depend on the assumption that metabolic pools are isotopically well mixed and in equilibrium with dietary resources prior to tissue synthesis, and they extend to the population level by assuming isotope profiles are identically distributed for animals using the same proximal dietary resource. As these assumptions are never fully met, studying structure in the variance of tissue isotope values from wild populations is informative. 2. We studied variation in δ13C, δ15N, δ2H and δ18O data for feathers from a population of eared grebes (Podiceps nigricollis) that migrate to Great Salt Lake each fall to moult feathers. During this time, they cannot fly and feed almost exclusively on superabundant brine shrimp (Artemia franciscana). The ecological simplicity of this situation minimized the usual spatial and trophic complexities often present in natural studies of feather isotope values. 3. Ranges and variances of isotope values for the feathers were larger than those from previously published studies that report feather isotopic variance, but they were bimodally distributed in all isotope dimensions. Isotope values for proximal dietary resources and local surface water show that some of the feathers we assumed to have been grown locally must have been grown before birds reached isotopic equilibrium with local diet or immediately prior to arrival at Great Salt Lake. 4. Our study provides novel insights about resource use strategies in eared grebes during migration. More generally, it

  14. Homogeneous Combinations of ASD-ADHD Traits and Their Cognitive and Behavioral Correlates in a Population-Based Sample.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van der Meer, Jolanda M J; Lappenschaar, Martijn G A; Hartman, Catharina A; Greven, Corina U; Buitelaar, Jan K; Rommelse, Nanda N J

    2017-07-01

    Autism Spectrum Disorders (ASD) and ADHD are assumed to be the extreme manifestations of continuous heterogeneous traits that frequently co-occur. This study aims to identify subgroups of children with distinct ASD-ADHD trait profiles in the general population, using measures sensitive across both trait continua, and show how these subgroups differ in cognitive functioning. We examined 378 children (6-13 years) from a population-based sample. Latent class analyses (LCA) detected three concordant classes with low (10.1%), medium (54.2%), or high (13.2%) scores on both traits, and two discordant classes with more ADHD than ASD characteristics (ADHD > ASD, 18.3%) and vice versa (ASD > ADHD, 4.2%). Findings suggest that ASD and ADHD traits usually are strongly related in the unaffected population, and that a minority of children displays atypical discordant trait profiles characterized by differential visual-spatial functioning. This dissociation suggests that heterogeneity in ASD and ADHD is rooted in heterogeneity in the lower unaffected end of the distribution.

  15. Determination of protein carbonyls in plasma, cell extracts, tissue homogenates, isolated proteins: Focus on sample preparation and derivatization conditions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniela Weber

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Protein oxidation is involved in regulatory physiological events as well as in damage to tissues and is thought to play a key role in the pathophysiology of diseases and in the aging process. Protein-bound carbonyls represent a marker of global protein oxidation, as they are generated by multiple different reactive oxygen species in blood, tissues and cells. Sample preparation and stabilization are key steps in the accurate quantification of oxidation-related products and examination of physiological/pathological processes. This review therefore focuses on the sample preparation processes used in the most relevant methods to detect protein carbonyls after derivatization with 2,4-dinitrophenylhydrazine with an emphasis on measurement in plasma, cells, organ homogenates, isolated proteins and organelles. Sample preparation, derivatization conditions and protein handling are presented for the spectrophotometric and HPLC method as well as for immunoblotting and ELISA. An extensive overview covering these methods in previously published articles is given for researchers who plan to measure protein carbonyls in different samples.

  16. Determination of protein carbonyls in plasma, cell extracts, tissue homogenates, isolated proteins: Focus on sample preparation and derivatization conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weber, Daniela; Davies, Michael J; Grune, Tilman

    2015-08-01

    Protein oxidation is involved in regulatory physiological events as well as in damage to tissues and is thought to play a key role in the pathophysiology of diseases and in the aging process. Protein-bound carbonyls represent a marker of global protein oxidation, as they are generated by multiple different reactive oxygen species in blood, tissues and cells. Sample preparation and stabilization are key steps in the accurate quantification of oxidation-related products and examination of physiological/pathological processes. This review therefore focuses on the sample preparation processes used in the most relevant methods to detect protein carbonyls after derivatization with 2,4-dinitrophenylhydrazine with an emphasis on measurement in plasma, cells, organ homogenates, isolated proteins and organelles. Sample preparation, derivatization conditions and protein handling are presented for the spectrophotometric and HPLC method as well as for immunoblotting and ELISA. An extensive overview covering these methods in previously published articles is given for researchers who plan to measure protein carbonyls in different samples. © 2015 Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  17. The early bird gets the shrimp: confronting assumptions of isotopic equilibrium and homogeneity in a wild bird population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wunder, Michael B; Jehl, Joseph R; Stricker, Craig A

    2012-11-01

    1. Because stable isotope distributions in organic material vary systematically across energy gradients that exist in ecosystems, community and population structures, and in individual physiological systems, isotope values in animal tissues have helped address a broad range of questions in animal ecology. It follows that every tissue sample provides an isotopic profile that can be used to study dietary or movement histories of individual animals. Interpretations of these profiles depend on the assumption that metabolic pools are isotopically well mixed and in equilibrium with dietary resources prior to tissue synthesis, and they extend to the population level by assuming isotope profiles are identically distributed for animals using the same proximal dietary resource. As these assumptions are never fully met, studying structure in the variance of tissue isotope values from wild populations is informative. 2. We studied variation in δ(13) C, δ(15) N, δ(2) H and δ(18) O data for feathers from a population of eared grebes (Podiceps nigricollis) that migrate to Great Salt Lake each fall to moult feathers. During this time, they cannot fly and feed almost exclusively on superabundant brine shrimp (Artemia franciscana). The ecological simplicity of this situation minimized the usual spatial and trophic complexities often present in natural studies of feather isotope values. 3. Ranges and variances of isotope values for the feathers were larger than those from previously published studies that report feather isotopic variance, but they were bimodally distributed in all isotope dimensions. Isotope values for proximal dietary resources and local surface water show that some of the feathers we assumed to have been grown locally must have been grown before birds reached isotopic equilibrium with local diet or immediately prior to arrival at Great Salt Lake. 4. Our study provides novel insights about resource use strategies in eared grebes during migration. More generally

  18. Niche-dependent development of functional neuronal networks from embryonic stem cell-derived neural populations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Siebler Mario

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The present work was performed to investigate the ability of two different embryonic stem (ES cell-derived neural precursor populations to generate functional neuronal networks in vitro. The first ES cell-derived neural precursor population was cultivated as free-floating neural aggregates which are known to form a developmental niche comprising different types of neural cells, including neural precursor cells (NPCs, progenitor cells and even further matured cells. This niche provides by itself a variety of different growth factors and extracellular matrix proteins that influence the proliferation and differentiation of neural precursor and progenitor cells. The second population was cultivated adherently in monolayer cultures to control most stringently the extracellular environment. This population comprises highly homogeneous NPCs which are supposed to represent an attractive way to provide well-defined neuronal progeny. However, the ability of these different ES cell-derived immature neural cell populations to generate functional neuronal networks has not been assessed so far. Results While both precursor populations were shown to differentiate into sufficient quantities of mature NeuN+ neurons that also express GABA or vesicular-glutamate-transporter-2 (vGlut2, only aggregate-derived neuronal populations exhibited a synchronously oscillating network activity 2–4 weeks after initiating the differentiation as detected by the microelectrode array technology. Neurons derived from homogeneous NPCs within monolayer cultures did merely show uncorrelated spiking activity even when differentiated for up to 12 weeks. We demonstrated that these neurons exhibited sparsely ramified neurites and an embryonic vGlut2 distribution suggesting an inhibited terminal neuronal maturation. In comparison, neurons derived from heterogeneous populations within neural aggregates appeared as fully mature with a dense neurite network and punctuated

  19. Composition and (in)homogeneity of carotenoid crystals in carrot cells revealed by high resolution Raman imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roman, Maciej; Marzec, Katarzyna M.; Grzebelus, Ewa; Simon, Philipp W.; Baranska, Malgorzata; Baranski, Rafal

    2015-02-01

    Three categories of roots differing in both β/α-carotene ratio and in total carotenoid content were selected based on HPLC measurements: high α- and β-carotene (HαHβ), low α- and high β-carotene (LαHβ), and low α- and low β-carotene (LαLβ). Single carotenoid crystals present in the root cells were directly measured using high resolution Raman imaging technique with 532 nm and 488 nm lasers without compound extraction. Crystals of the HαHβ root had complex composition and consisted of β-carotene accompanied by α-carotene. In the LαHβ and LαLβ roots, measurements using 532 nm laser indicated the presence of β-carotene only, but measurements using 488 nm laser confirmed co-occurrence of xanthophylls, presumably lutein. Thus the results show that independently on carotenoid composition in the root, carotenoid crystals are composed of more than one compound. Individual spectra extracted from Raman maps every 0.2-1.0 μm had similar shapes in the 1500-1550 cm-1 region indicating that different carotenoid molecules were homogeneously distributed in the whole crystal volume. Additionally, amorphous carotenoids were identified and determined as composed of β-carotene molecules but they had a shifted the ν1 band probably due to the effect of bonding of other plant constituents like proteins or lipids.

  20. Homogenization Temperature Measurements in Hydrothermal Diamond-Anvil Cell for Melt and Fluid Inclusions from the Jiajika Pegmatite Deposit, China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, J.; Chou, I.; Yuan, S.; Burruss, R. C.

    2009-12-01

    We measured the total homogenization temperatures (Th) of volatile-rich melt and fluid inclusions under elevated external pressures in a hydrothermal diamond-anvil cell (HDAC) to understand fluid evolution in the Jiajika pegmatite deposit in China, the largest spodumene deposit in Asia. Three types of inclusions were investigated: 1. CH4-H2O (~10 vol. %) bearing aluminosilicate melt inclusions hosted in quartz from granite; 2. CO2-NaCl-H2O (~80 vol. %) inclusions with daughter minerals mainly hosted in spodumene from pegmatite dikes; and 3. CO2-NaCl-H2O inclusions mainly hosted in quartz from pegmatite dikes. During normal microthermometric measurements at atmospheric pressure, most of these inclusions decrepitated at ~300°C. Therefore, we extended the method of Schmidt et al. (1998, Am. Mineral. 83, 995) and Darling and Bassett (2002, Am. Mineral., 87, 67) to melt inclusions in HDAC and conducted long-duration experiments with type 1 and 2 inclusions at one kbar Ar pressure in cold-seal pressure vessels (CSPV) as described by Thomas et al. (2006, Chapter 9 in Mineralogical Association of Canada Short Course, 36, 189). Results in both HDAC and CSPV experiments showed that Th's of type 1 and 2 inclusions were between 600 and 700 °C and between 500 and 700 °C, respectively. In HDAC experiments for type 1 inclusions, daughter minerals melted and coexisted with the fluid phase before total homogenization; however, in type 2 inclusions, daughter minerals dissolved completely in the CO2-NaCl-H2O solution at Th. Results obtained for type 3 inclusions showed that the CO2-rich and CO2-poor inclusions homogenized to liquid CO2 and aqueous phases at 260 - 570 and 240 - 350°C, respectively. Also, Th’s decrease linearly as the external pressure increases; the reduction of Th was ~1.5 °C/kbar, which is similar to ~1.2 °C/kbar reported by Darling and Bassett (ibid.) for the same type of natural fluid inclusions, but is much less than ~4.6 °C/kbar reported by Schmidt et

  1. Pregnancy persistently affects memory T cell populations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kieffer, Tom E C; Faas, Marijke M; Scherjon, Sicco A; Prins, Jelmer R

    2017-02-01

    Pregnancy is an immune challenge to the maternal immune system. The effects of pregnancy on maternal immunity and particularly on memory T cells during and after pregnancy are not fully known. This observational study aims to show the short term and the long term effects of pregnancy on the constitution, size and activation status of peripheral human memory T-lymphocyte populations. Effector memory (EM) and central memory (CM) T-lymphocytes were analyzed using flow cytometry of peripheral blood from 14 nulligravid, 12 primigravid and 15 parous women that were on average 18 months postpartum. The short term effects were shown by the significantly higher CD4+ EM cell and activated CD4+ memory cell proportions in primigravid women compared to nulligravid women. The persistent effects found in this study were the significantly higher proportions of CD4+ EM, CD4+ CM and activated memory T cells in parous women compared to nulligravid women. In contrast to CD4+ cells, activation status of CD8+ memory cells did not differ between the groups. This study shows that pregnancy persistently affects the pre-pregnancy CD4+ memory cell pool in human peripheral blood. During pregnancy, CD4+ T-lymphocytes might differentiate into EM cells followed by persistent higher proportions of CD4+ CM and EM cells postpartum. The persistent effects of pregnancy on memory T cells found in this study support the hypothesis that memory T cells are generated during pregnancy and that these cells could be involved in the lower complication risks in multiparous pregnancies in humans. Copyright © 2016 The Authors. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. Degradation of peptides and proteins of different sizes by homogenates of human MRC5 lung fibroblasts. Aged cells have a decreased ability to degrade shortened proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wharton, S A; Hipkiss, A R

    1985-05-20

    The degradation of haemoglobin and haemoglobin-derived peptide fragments by homogenates of MRC5 fibroblasts has been investigated. Results show that the smaller fragments were degraded more rapidly than larger substrates at both pH 5.5 and pH 7.5. Only the smallest of the soluble cyanogen bromide peptides (Mr 3500) was degraded at pH 7.5. Degradation at pH 5.5 proceeded more rapidly than that at pH 7.5 for all substrates tested but was more marked with the larger substrates. Homogenates prepared from aged cells degraded puromycin peptides and, to a lesser extent, cyanogen bromide peptides at a slower rate, at pH 7.5, than those prepared from younger cells. We suggest that cytosolic degradation is less selective and at least one cytosolic proteolytic activity decreases as cells age.

  3. Purification to homogeneity and properties of glucosidase II from mung bean seedlings and suspension-cultured soybean cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaushal, G P; Pastuszak, I; Hatanaka, K; Elbein, A D

    1990-09-25

    Glucosidase II was purified approximately 1700-fold to homogeneity from Triton X-100 extracts of mung bean microsomes. A single band with a molecular mass of 110 kDa was seen on sodium dodecyl sulfate gels. This band was susceptible to digestion by endoglucosaminidase H or peptide glycosidase F, and the change in mobility of the treated protein indicated the loss of one or two oligosaccharide chains. By gel filtration, the native enzyme was estimated to have a molecular mass of about 220 kDa, suggesting it was composed of two identical subunits. Glucosidase II showed a broad pH optima between 6.8 and 7.5 with reasonable activity even at 8.5, but there was almost no activity below pH 6.0. The purified enzyme could use p-nitrophenyl-alpha-D-glucopyranoside as a substrate but was also active with a number of glucose-containing high-mannose oligosaccharides. Glc2Man9GlcNAc was the best substrate while activity was significantly reduced when several mannose residues were removed, i.e. Glc2Man7-GlcNAc. The rate of activity was lowest with Glc1Man9GlcNAc, demonstrating that the innermost glucose is released the slowest. Evidence that the enzyme is specific for alpha 1,3-glucosidic linkages is shown by the fact that its activity on Glc2Man9GlcNAc was inhibited by nigerose, an alpha 1,3-linked glucose disaccharide, but not by alpha 1,2 (kojibiose)-, alpha 1,4(maltose)-, or alpha 1,6 (isomaltose)-linked glucose disaccharides. Glucosidase II was strongly inhibited by the glucosidase processing inhibitors deoxynojirimycin and 2,6-dideoxy-2,6-imino-7-O-(beta-D- glucopyranosyl)-D-glycero-L-guloheptitol, but less strongly by castanospermine and not at all by australine. Polyclonal antibodies prepared against the mung bean glucosidase II reacted with a 95-kDa protein from suspension-cultured soybean cells that also showed glucosidase II activity. Soybean cells were labeled with either [2-3H]mannose or [6-3H]galactose, and the glucosidase II was isolated by immunoprecipitation

  4. Methods to homogenize electrochemical concentration cell (ECC ozonesonde measurements across changes in sensing solution concentration or ozonesonde manufacturer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. Deshler

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Ozone plays a significant role in the chemical and radiative state of the atmosphere. For this reason there are many instruments used to measure ozone from the ground, from space, and from balloons. Balloon-borne electrochemical cell ozonesondes provide some of the best measurements of the ozone profile up to the mid-stratosphere, providing high vertical resolution, high precision, and a wide geographic distribution. From the mid-1990s to the late 2000s the consistency of long-term records from balloon-borne ozonesondes has been compromised by differences in manufacturers, Science Pump (SP and ENSCI (EN, and differences in recommended sensor solution concentrations, 1.0 % potassium iodide (KI and the one-half dilution: 0.5 %. To investigate these differences, a number of organizations have independently undertaken comparisons of the various ozonesonde types and solution concentrations, resulting in 197 ozonesonde comparison profiles. The goal of this study is to derive transfer functions to allow measurements outside of standard recommendations, for sensor composition and ozonesonde type, to be converted to a standard measurement and thus homogenize the data to the expected accuracy of 5 % (10 % in the stratosphere (troposphere. Subsets of these data have been analyzed previously and intermediate transfer functions derived. Here all the comparison data are analyzed to compare (1 differences in sensor solution composition for a single ozonesonde type, (2 differences in ozonesonde type for a single sensor solution composition, and (3 the World Meteorological Organization's (WMO and manufacturers' recommendations of 1.0 % KI solution for Science Pump and 0.5 % KI for ENSCI. From the recommendations it is clear that ENSCI ozonesondes and 1.0 % KI solution result in higher amounts of ozone sensed. The results indicate that differences in solution composition and in ozonesonde type display little pressure dependence at pressures

  5. Methods to homogenize electrochemical concentration cell (ECC) ozonesonde measurements across changes in sensing solution concentration or ozonesonde manufacturer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deshler, Terry; Stübi, Rene; Schmidlin, Francis J.; Mercer, Jennifer L.; Smit, Herman G. J.; Johnson, Bryan J.; Kivi, Rigel; Nardi, Bruno

    2017-06-01

    Ozone plays a significant role in the chemical and radiative state of the atmosphere. For this reason there are many instruments used to measure ozone from the ground, from space, and from balloons. Balloon-borne electrochemical cell ozonesondes provide some of the best measurements of the ozone profile up to the mid-stratosphere, providing high vertical resolution, high precision, and a wide geographic distribution. From the mid-1990s to the late 2000s the consistency of long-term records from balloon-borne ozonesondes has been compromised by differences in manufacturers, Science Pump (SP) and ENSCI (EN), and differences in recommended sensor solution concentrations, 1.0 % potassium iodide (KI) and the one-half dilution: 0.5 %. To investigate these differences, a number of organizations have independently undertaken comparisons of the various ozonesonde types and solution concentrations, resulting in 197 ozonesonde comparison profiles. The goal of this study is to derive transfer functions to allow measurements outside of standard recommendations, for sensor composition and ozonesonde type, to be converted to a standard measurement and thus homogenize the data to the expected accuracy of 5 % (10 %) in the stratosphere (troposphere). Subsets of these data have been analyzed previously and intermediate transfer functions derived. Here all the comparison data are analyzed to compare (1) differences in sensor solution composition for a single ozonesonde type, (2) differences in ozonesonde type for a single sensor solution composition, and (3) the World Meteorological Organization's (WMO) and manufacturers' recommendations of 1.0 % KI solution for Science Pump and 0.5 % KI for ENSCI. From the recommendations it is clear that ENSCI ozonesondes and 1.0 % KI solution result in higher amounts of ozone sensed. The results indicate that differences in solution composition and in ozonesonde type display little pressure dependence at pressures ≥ 30 hPa, and thus the transfer

  6. Response of Listeria monocytogenes to disinfection stress at the single-cell and population levels as monitored by intracellular pH measurements and viable-cell counts

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kastbjerg, Vicky Gaedt; Nielsen, Dennis S.; Arneborg, Nils

    2009-01-01

    .05). The protective effect of NaCl was reflected by viable-cell counts at a higher concentration of Incimaxx (0.0031%), where the salt-grown population survived better than the population grown without NaCl (P ... that a population of L. monocytogenes cells, whether planktonic or attached, is homogenous with respect to sensitivity to an acidic disinfectant studied on the single-cell level. Hence a major subpopulation more tolerant to disinfectants, and hence more persistent, does not appear to be present....

  7. [Angiotensinogen gene T174M polymorphism: opposite relationships with essential hypertension and obesity in a homogeneous population from Majorca (Baleric Islands, Spain)].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marco, J; Zabay, J M; García-Marco, M A; Gomez, G; Mulet, J M; Munar, M A; Soler, J; Viader, C

    2005-01-01

    Numerous association studies have been performed to evaluate the relationship between the angiotensinogen gene and the essential hypertension, but their results are conflicting. The conflicting results may be explained by methodological reasons, particularly genetic differences in the population samples, phenotypic differences in the hypertensive populations analyzed, lack of appropriate control for other hypertension risk factors in some studies, or limited statistical power among many studies. Furthermore, hypertension is a public health issue of great relevance in Baleric Islands (Spain). For these reasons we performed an association study about the relationship between the M235T, T174M and G-6A diallelic polymorphisms of the angiotensinogen gene and hypertension in a population from Majorca (Balearic Islands), in which a considerable homogeneity with respect to ethnicity and environmental factors could be documented. This population was composed of 109 patients and 107 controls. Alleles of the angiotensinogen gene were determined by PCR and restriction site polymorphism analysis. The different genotypes were tested for association with dependent variables by univariate and multivariate logistic regression analysis. In the univariate analysis we found no evidence of association between the angiotensinogen gene genotypes and hypertension. This lack of association was independent of obesity, familial history of hypertension and diabetes for the genotypes of the polymorphisms M235T and G-6A; however, in the multivariate analysis the T174T174 genotype showed an almost significant positive association with hypertension [OR = 2.76 (95% confidence interval: 1.00-7.65, p = 0.05)]. The T174T174 genotype also showed a significant negative association with obesity [OR = 0.41 (95% confidence interval: 0.18-0.90, p = 0.03)] that remained after adjustment by sex, hypertension and diabetes [OR = 0.26 (95% confidence interval: 0.10-0.65, p = 0.004)]. Our results: a) are in

  8. Cell cycle population effects in perturbation studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Duibhir, Eoghan; Lijnzaad, Philip; Benschop, Joris J; Lenstra, Tineke L; van Leenen, Dik; Groot Koerkamp, Marian J A; Margaritis, Thanasis; Brok, Mariel O; Kemmeren, Patrick; Holstege, Frank C P

    2014-06-21

    Growth condition perturbation or gene function disruption are commonly used strategies to study cellular systems. Although it is widely appreciated that such experiments may involve indirect effects, these frequently remain uncharacterized. Here, analysis of functionally unrelated Saccharyomyces cerevisiae deletion strains reveals a common gene expression signature. One property shared by these strains is slower growth, with increased presence of the signature in more slowly growing strains. The slow growth signature is highly similar to the environmental stress response (ESR), an expression response common to diverse environmental perturbations. Both environmental and genetic perturbations result in growth rate changes. These are accompanied by a change in the distribution of cells over different cell cycle phases. Rather than representing a direct expression response in single cells, both the slow growth signature and ESR mainly reflect a redistribution of cells over different cell cycle phases, primarily characterized by an increase in the G1 population. The findings have implications for any study of perturbation that is accompanied by growth rate changes. Strategies to counter these effects are presented and discussed. © 2014 The Authors. Published under the terms of the CC BY 4.0 license.

  9. Separation and identification of selenotrisulfides in epithelial cell homogenates by LC-ICP-MS and LC-ESI-MS after incubation with selenite

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gabel-Jensen, Charlotte; Gammelgaard, Bente; Bendahl, Lars

    2006-01-01

    To elucidate how selenite is metabolised in the intestine after oral intake, it was incubated with homogenized epithelial cells from pigs. When the metabolites were analysed by LC-ICP-MS, two major selenium metabolites were separated in the supernatant from the homogenate. These metabolites were....... The presence of Cys-Se-SG and GS-Se-SG was verified by LC-ESI-MS. Selenotrisulfides were synthesized by reaction of L-cysteine and L-glutathione with sodium selenite. The reaction mixture contained three main products: selenodicysteine (Cys-Se-Cys), selenocysteine glutathione (Cys......-Se-SG), and selenodiglutathione (GS-Se-SG). The two transient selenium compounds in the epithelial cell incubation mixture co-eluted with the synthesized Cys-Se-SG and GS-Se-SG, respectively. The identities of these compounds were verified by LC-ESI-MS. Hence, these selenium metabolites have now been identified by ESI-MS after...

  10. The immune cell infiltrate populating meningiomas is composed of mature, antigen-experienced T and B cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fang, Liangjuan; Lowther, Daniel E.; Meizlish, Matthew L.; Anderson, Richard C. E.; Bruce, Jeffrey N.; Devine, Lesley; Huttner, Anita J.; Kleinstein, Steven H.; Lee, Jae-Yun; Stern, Joel N. H.; Yaari, Gur; Lovato, Laura; Cronk, Katharine M.; O'Connor, Kevin C.

    2013-01-01

    Background Meningiomas often harbor an immune cell infiltrate that can include substantial numbers of T and B cells. However, their phenotype and characteristics remain undefined. To gain a deeper understanding of the T and B cell repertoire in this tumor, we characterized the immune infiltrate of 28 resected meningiomas representing all grades. Methods Immunohistochemistry was used to grossly characterize and enumerate infiltrating lymphocytes. A molecular analysis of the immunoglobulin variable region of tumor-infiltrating B cells was used to characterize their antigen experience. Flow cytometry of fresh tissue homogenate and paired peripheral blood lymphocytes was used to identify T cell phenotypes and characterize the T cell repertoire. Results A conspicuous B and T cell infiltrate, primarily clustered in perivascular spaces, was present in the microenvironment of most tumors examined. Characterization of 294 tumor-infiltrating B cells revealed clear evidence of antigen experience, in that the cardinal features of an antigen-driven B cell response were present. Meningiomas harbored populations of antigen-experienced CD4+ and CD8+ memory/effector T cells, regulatory T cells, and T cells expressing the immune checkpoint molecules PD-1 and Tim-3, indicative of exhaustion. All of these phenotypes were considerably enriched relative to their frequency in the circulation. The T cell repertoire in the tumor microenvironment included populations that were not reflected in paired peripheral blood. Conclusion The tumor microenvironment of meningiomas often includes postgerminal center B cell populations. These tumors invariably include a selected, antigen-experienced, effector T cell population enriched by those that express markers of an exhausted phenotype. PMID:23978377

  11. The immune cell infiltrate populating meningiomas is composed of mature, antigen-experienced T and B cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fang, Liangjuan; Lowther, Daniel E; Meizlish, Matthew L; Anderson, Richard C E; Bruce, Jeffrey N; Devine, Lesley; Huttner, Anita J; Kleinstein, Steven H; Lee, Jae-Yun; Stern, Joel N H; Yaari, Gur; Lovato, Laura; Cronk, Katharine M; O'Connor, Kevin C

    2013-11-01

    Meningiomas often harbor an immune cell infiltrate that can include substantial numbers of T and B cells. However, their phenotype and characteristics remain undefined. To gain a deeper understanding of the T and B cell repertoire in this tumor, we characterized the immune infiltrate of 28 resected meningiomas representing all grades. Immunohistochemistry was used to grossly characterize and enumerate infiltrating lymphocytes. A molecular analysis of the immunoglobulin variable region of tumor-infiltrating B cells was used to characterize their antigen experience. Flow cytometry of fresh tissue homogenate and paired peripheral blood lymphocytes was used to identify T cell phenotypes and characterize the T cell repertoire. A conspicuous B and T cell infiltrate, primarily clustered in perivascular spaces, was present in the microenvironment of most tumors examined. Characterization of 294 tumor-infiltrating B cells revealed clear evidence of antigen experience, in that the cardinal features of an antigen-driven B cell response were present. Meningiomas harbored populations of antigen-experienced CD4+ and CD8+ memory/effector T cells, regulatory T cells, and T cells expressing the immune checkpoint molecules PD-1 and Tim-3, indicative of exhaustion. All of these phenotypes were considerably enriched relative to their frequency in the circulation. The T cell repertoire in the tumor microenvironment included populations that were not reflected in paired peripheral blood. The tumor microenvironment of meningiomas often includes postgerminal center B cell populations. These tumors invariably include a selected, antigen-experienced, effector T cell population enriched by those that express markers of an exhausted phenotype.

  12. Proliferation of dental follicle-derived cell populations in heat-stress conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yao, S; Gutierrez, D L; He, H; Dai, Y; Liu, D; Wise, G E

    2011-10-01

    Isolation and purification of adult stem cells (ASC) are a great challenge. Our objectives were to determine whether ASC are more heat-tolerant than non-stem cells, and to explore if ASC could be enriched by heat-stress treatments. Rat dental follicle cells were cultured in a variety of media to obtain either a heterogeneous cell population (H-DFC) consisting of stem cells and non-stem cells, or a homogenous cell population (DFC) containing non-stem cells only. Real-time RT-PCR was conducted to compare expression of heat-shock proteins (HSPs) between the two populations. To study heat tolerance, H-DFC and DFC were incubated under heat-stress conditions and cell proliferation was evaluated by alamar blue reduction assay. Furthermore, cells resulting from heat-stress treatments were evaluated for differentiation capability and expression of stem cell markers. H-DFC expressed higher levels of HSP110, HSP70s and HSP27s than did DFC. H-DFC increased levels of proliferation at 40 °C compared to controls grown at 37 °C; no significant reduction in proliferation occurred at temperatures below 40.5 °C. In contrast, DFC showed significant reduction in proliferation under all heat-stress treatments. Heat-stressed H-DFC had increased differentiation capability and increased expression of stem cell markers. Stem cells appear to be more tolerant to heat stress than non-stem cells. Incubation of a heterogeneous cell population in heat-stress conditions resulted in increased stem cell numbers. © 2011 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  13. Proliferation of Dental Follicle Derived Cell Populations in Heat-stress conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yao, Shaomian; Gutierrez, Dina L.; He, Hongzhi; Dai, Yuntao; Liu, Dawen; Wise, Gary E.

    2011-01-01

    Objectives Isolation and purification of adult stem cells (ASC) are a great challenge. Our objectives were to determine if ASC are more heat-tolerant than non-stem cells, and to explore if ASC can be enriched by heat-stress treatments. Methods Rat dental follicle cells were cultured in different media to obtain either a heterogeneous cell population (H-DFC) consisting of stem cells and non-stem cells, or a homogenous cell population (DFC) containing only non-stem cells. Real-time RT-PCR was conducted to compare the expression of heat shock proteins (HSPs) between the two populations. To study the heat tolerance, H-DFC and DFC were incubated under heat stress conditions and cell proliferation was evaluated by an Alamar blue reduction assay. Furthermore, the cells resulting from heat stress treatments were evaluated for their differentiation capability and expression of stem cell markers. Results H-DFC expressed higher levels of HSP110, HSP70s and HSP27s than did the DFC. H-DFC increased proliferation at 40°C as compared to the control grown at37°C, and no significant reduction of proliferation occurred at temperatures below 40.5°C. In contrast, DFC showed significant reductions in proliferation under all heat stress treatments. Moreover, heat stressed H-DFC increased differentiation capability and increased expression of stem cell markers. Conclusion Stem cells appear to be more tolerant to heat-stress than non-stem cells. Incubation of heterogeneous cell population in heat-stress conditions resulted in increased stem cell numbers. PMID:21951291

  14. Using cluster analysis to identify a homogeneous subpopulation of women with polycystic ovarian morphology in a population of non-hyperandrogenic women with regular menstrual cycles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dewailly, D; Alebić, M Š; Duhamel, A; Stojanović, N

    2014-11-01

    Can cluster analysis can be used to identify a homogeneous subpopulation of women with polycystic ovarian morphology (PCOM) within a very large population of control women in a non-subjective way? Identification and exclusion of the cluster corresponding to women with PCOM from controls improved the diagnostic power of serum anti-Müllerian hormone (AMH) level and follicle number per ovary (FNPO) in discriminating between women with or without polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS). There is disagreement as to whether women with PCOM should be excluded from the control population when establishing FNPO and AMH diagnostic thresholds for the definition of PCOS and how to identify such women. It has been demonstrated that cluster analysis can detect women with PCOM within the control population through a set of classifying variables among which the most relevant was AMH. The adequacy of this approach has not been confirmed in other clinical settings. This was a retrospective study using clinical and laboratory data derived from the computerized database. The data were collected from March 2011 to May 2013. The study included 893 patients referred for routine infertility evaluation and treatment. The patients were divided into three groups: (i) the control group (n = 621) included women with regular menstrual cycles and no signs of hyperandrogenism (HA), (ii) the full-blown PCOS group (n = 95) consisted of women who were diagnosed as having PCOS based on the presence of both HA and oligo/amenorrhoea (OA), (iii) the mild PCOS group included women with only two items of the Rotterdam classification, i.e. PCOM at ultrasonography according to the FNPO threshold of 12 or more and either OA (n = 110) or HA (n = 67). After exclusion of women with PCOM from the controls, the AMH threshold of 28 pmol/l with specificity 97.5% and sensitivity 84.2% [area under the curve (AUC) 0.948 (95% confidence interval (CI) 0.915-0.982)] and FNPO threshold of 12 with specificity 92.5% and

  15. Cell membrane fatty acid changes and desaturase expression of Saccharomyces bayanus exposed to high pressure homogenization in relation to the supplementation of exogenous unsaturated fatty acids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Serrazanetti, Diana I; Patrignani, Francesca; Russo, Alessandra; Vannini, Lucia; Siroli, Lorenzo; Gardini, Fausto; Lanciotti, Rosalba

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this work was to study the responses of Saccharomyces bayanus cells exposed to sub-lethal high-pressure homogenization (HPH) and determine whether the plasmatic membrane can sense HPH in the presence, or absence, of exogenous unsaturated fatty acids (UFAs) in the growth medium. High-pressure homogenization damaged and caused the collapse of cell walls and membranes of a portion of cells; however, HPH did not significantly affect S. bayanus cell viability (less than 0.3 Log CFU ml(-1)). HPH strongly affected the membrane fatty acid (FA) composition by increasing the percentage of total UFA when compared with saturated fatty acids. The gene expression showed that the transcription of OLE1, ERG3, and ERG11 increased after HPH. The presence of exogenous UFA abolished HPH-induced effects on the OLE1 and ERG3 genes, increased the percentage of membrane lipids and decreased the expression of OLE1 and ERG3 within 30 min of treatment. The results suggest a key role for UFA in the microbial cell response to sub-lethal stress. In addition, these data provide insight into the molecular basis of the response of S. bayanus to this innovative technology. Elucidation of the mechanism of action for sub-lethal HPH will enable the utilization of this technology to modulate the starter performance at the industrial scale.

  16. Production of simplex RNS and ROS by nanosecond pulse N2/O2 plasma jets with homogeneous shielding gas for inducing myeloma cell apoptosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Zhijie; Xu, Dehui; Liu, Dingxin; Cui, Qingjie; Cai, Haifeng; Li, Qiaosong; Chen, Hailan; Kong, Michael G.

    2017-05-01

    In this paper, atmospheric pressure N2/O2 plasma jets with homogeneous shielding gas excited by nanosecond pulse are obtained to generate simplex reactive nitrogen species (RNS) and reactive oxygen species (ROS), respectively, for the purpose of studying the simplex RNS and ROS to induce the myeloma cell apoptosis with the same discharge power. The results reveal that the cell death rate by the N2 plasma jet with N2 shielding gas is about two times that of the O2 plasma jet with O2 shielding gas for the equivalent treatment time. By diagnosing the reactive species of ONOO-, H2O2, OH and \\text{O}2- in medium, our findings suggest the cell death rate after plasma jets treatment has a positive correlation with the concentration of ONOO-. Therefore, the ONOO- in medium is thought to play an important role in the process of inducing myeloma cell apoptosis.

  17. Use of flow cytometry for high-throughput cell population estimates in fixed brain tissue

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nicole A Young

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available The numbers and types of cells in an area of cortex define its function. Therefore it is essential to characterize the numbers and distributions of total cells in areas of the cortex, as well as to identify numbers of subclasses of neurons and glial cells. To date, the large size of the primate brain and the lack of innovation in cell counting methods have been a roadblock to obtaining high-resolution maps of cell and neuron density across the cortex in humans and non-human primates. Stereological counting methods and the isotropic fractionator are valuable tools for estimating cell numbers, but are better suited to smaller, well-defined brain structures or to cortex as a whole. In the present study, we have extended our flow-cytometry based counting method, the flow fractionator (Collins et al., 2010a, to include high-throughput total cell population estimates in homogenized cortical samples. We demonstrate that our method produces consistent, accurate and repeatable cell estimates quickly. The estimates we report are in excellent agreement with estimates for the same samples obtained using a Neubauer chamber and a fluorescence microscope. We show that our flow cytometry-based method for total cell estimation in homogenized brain tissue is more efficient and more precise than manual counting methods. The addition of automated nuclei counting to our flow fractionator method allows for a fully automated, rapid characterization of total cells and neuronal and non-neuronal populations in human and non-human primate brains, providing valuable data to further our understanding of the functional organization of normal, aging and diseased brains.

  18. Assessment of prion reduction filters in decreasing infectivity of ultracentrifuged 263K scrapie-infected brain homogenates in "spiked" human blood and red blood cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cardone, Franco; Sowemimo-Coker, Samuel; Abdel-Haq, Hanin; Sbriccoli, Marco; Graziano, Silvia; Valanzano, Angelina; Berardi, Vito Angelo; Galeno, Roberta; Puopolo, Maria; Pocchiari, Maurizio

    2014-04-01

    The safety of red blood cells (RBCs) is of concern because of the occurrence of four transfusion-transmitted variant Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease (vCJD) cases in the United Kingdom. The absence of validated screening tests requires the use of procedures to remove prions from blood to minimize the risk of transmission. These procedures must be validated using infectious prions in a form that is as close as possible to one in blood. Units of human whole blood (WB) and RBCs were spiked with high-speed supernatants of 263K scrapie-infected hamster brain homogenates. Spiked samples were leukoreduced and then passed through prion-removing filters (Pall Corporation). In another experiment, RBCs from 263K scrapie-infected hamsters were treated as above, and residual infectivity was measured by bioassay. The overall removal of infectivity by the filters from prion-spiked WB and RBCs was approximately two orders of magnitude. No infectivity was detected in filtered hamster RBCs endogenously infected with scrapie. The use of prion-removing filters may help to reduce the risk of transfusion-transmitted vCJD. To avoid overestimation of prion removal efficiency in validation studies, it may be more appropriate to use supernates from ultracentrifugation of scrapie-infected hamster brain homogenate rather than the current standard brain homogenates. © 2013 American Association of Blood Banks.

  19. Optimal population codes for space: grid cells outperform place cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mathis, Alexander; Herz, Andreas V M; Stemmler, Martin

    2012-09-01

    Rodents use two distinct neuronal coordinate systems to estimate their position: place fields in the hippocampus and grid fields in the entorhinal cortex. Whereas place cells spike at only one particular spatial location, grid cells fire at multiple sites that correspond to the points of an imaginary hexagonal lattice. We study how to best construct place and grid codes, taking the probabilistic nature of neural spiking into account. Which spatial encoding properties of individual neurons confer the highest resolution when decoding the animal's position from the neuronal population response? A priori, estimating a spatial position from a grid code could be ambiguous, as regular periodic lattices possess translational symmetry. The solution to this problem requires lattices for grid cells with different spacings; the spatial resolution crucially depends on choosing the right ratios of these spacings across the population. We compute the expected error in estimating the position in both the asymptotic limit, using Fisher information, and for low spike counts, using maximum likelihood estimation. Achieving high spatial resolution and covering a large range of space in a grid code leads to a trade-off: the best grid code for spatial resolution is built of nested modules with different spatial periods, one inside the other, whereas maximizing the spatial range requires distinct spatial periods that are pairwisely incommensurate. Optimizing the spatial resolution predicts two grid cell properties that have been experimentally observed. First, short lattice spacings should outnumber long lattice spacings. Second, the grid code should be self-similar across different lattice spacings, so that the grid field always covers a fixed fraction of the lattice period. If these conditions are satisfied and the spatial "tuning curves" for each neuron span the same range of firing rates, then the resolution of the grid code easily exceeds that of the best possible place code with the

  20. Ovarian cancer stem cells are enriched in side population and aldehyde dehydrogenase bright overlapping population.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kazuyo Yasuda

    Full Text Available Cancer stem-like cells (CSCs/cancer-initiaiting cells (CICs are defined as a small population of cancer cells that have self-renewal capacity, differentiation potential and high tumor-initiating ability. CSCs/CICs of ovarian cancer have been isolated by side population (SP analysis, ALDEFLUOR assay and using cell surface markers. However, these approaches are not definitive markers for CSCs/CICs, and it is necessary to refine recent methods for identifying more highly purified CSCs/CICs. In this study, we analyzed SP cells and aldehyde dehydrogenese bright (ALDH(Br cells from ovarian cancer cells. Both SP cells and ALDH(Br cells exhibited higher tumor-initiating ability and higher expression level of a stem cell marker, sex determining region Y-box 2 (SOX2, than those of main population (MP cells and ALDH(Low cells, respectively. We analyzed an SP and ALDH(Br overlapping population (SP/ALDH(Br, and the SP/ALDH(Br population exhibited higher tumor-initiating ability than that of SP cells or ALDH(Br cells, enabling initiation of tumor with as few as 10(2 cells. Furthermore, SP/ADLH(Br population showed higher sphere-forming ability, cisplatin resistance, adipocyte differentiation ability and expression of SOX2 than those of SP/ALDH(Low, MP/ALDH(Br and MP/ALDH(Low cells. Gene knockdown of SOX2 suppressed the tumor-initiation of ovarian cancer cells. An SP/ALDH(Br population was detected in several gynecological cancer cells with ratios of 0.1% for HEC-1 endometrioid adenocarcinoma cells to 1% for MCAS ovary mucinous adenocarcinoma cells. Taken together, use of the SP and ALDH(Br overlapping population is a promising approach to isolate highly purified CSCs/CICs and SOX2 might be a novel functional marker for ovarian CSCs/CICs.

  1. Effect of Amniotic Membrane Suspension (AMS) and Amniotic Membrane Homogenate (AMH) on Human Corneal Epithelial Cell Viability, Migration and Proliferation In Vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Ming-Feng; Stachon, Tanja; Langenbucher, Achim; Seitz, Berthold; Szentmáry, Nóra

    2017-03-01

    To analyze the effects of different concentrations of amniotic membrane suspension (AMS) or amniotic membrane homogenate (AMH) on human corneal epithelial cell (HCEC) viability, migration and proliferation. Amniotic membranes (AMs) of 13 placentas were prepared and stored at -80°C. For AMS preparation, following de-freezing, AM pieces were inserted in six-well plates and 5 ml Dulbecco's Modified Eagle's Medium (DMEM)/F12 (with 5% fetal bovine serum, FBS) per gram tissue was added for 96 h. After removal of the AM, the remaining supernatant was collected for experiments. For AMH preparation, following de-freezing, AMs were homogenized in liquid nitrogen and 5 ml DMEM/F12 (with 5% FBS) per gram tissue was added. Following centrifugation, the supernatant was collected for experiments. HCECs were expanded and incubated in DMEM/F12, 5% FBS supplemented by 15%, 30% or 100% AMS or 15% or 30% AMH. Viability was analyzed using Cell Proliferation Kit XTT, migration using wound healing assay and proliferation by the cell proliferation ELISA BrdU kit. HCEC viability remained unchanged using 15% or 30% AMS (p = 1.0 for both); however, it decreased significantly using 100% AMS (p migration increased significantly (p migration remained unchanged and 100% AMS inhibited HCEC migration (p migration, 15% and 30% AMS application seems to be the most appropriate method to support epithelial healing.

  2. Gender differences in stem cell population are induced by pregnancy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    El-Badri, Nagwa S; Groer, Maureen

    2012-10-01

    Gender differences in stem cell population have recently been identified. Blood and tissue samples from women showed consistent elevation of hematopoietic stem cell populations, mesenchymal stem cell populations and endothelial progenitor cells compared to men of similar ages. We and others have shown an increase in hematopoietic stem cell population in pregnant and multiparous women compared to nulliparous women. We propose that pregnancy exposes women to increased levels of stem cells from many sources not available for nulliparous women or for men. During pregnancy, maternal fetal microchimerism results from trafficking of fetal and maternal blood across the placenta. Physiological changes in the maternal blood cellular milieu are also recognized during pregnancy and in the early post partum due to the presence of unique pregnancy associated tissues and hormones. These include the placenta, the amniotic fluid and cord blood. These tissues are highly enriched for different populations of stem cells including hematopoietic stem cells, mesenchymal stem cells and endothelial progenitor cells. Recent studies showed accelerated healing in women affected by cardiovascular insults and stroke, in part due to faster tissue regeneration and stem cell activity. We propose that gender differences in stem cell population are caused in part due to maternal exposure to fetal and unique pregnancy associated tissues, which are significantly enriched in different stem cell populations. Copyright © 2012. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  3. H2 Production over Ni/γ-Al2O3 Catalyst Prepared by a Homogeneous Precipitation Method Using Urea for Direct Internal Reforming (DIR) in a Molten Carbonate Fuel Cell (MCFC)

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Roh, Hyun-Seog; Jung, Youshick; Koo, Kee Young; Jung, Un Ho; Seo, Yong-Seog; Yoon, Wang Lai

    2009-01-01

    Ni/γ-Al2O3 catalysts (Ni content = 52 wt %) have been designed by a homogeneous precipitation method using urea as a precipitation agent for direct internal reforming in a molten carbonate fuel cell...

  4. Creating homogenous strain distribution within 3D cell-encapsulated constructs using a simple and cost-effective uniaxial tensile bioreactor: Design and validation study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Subramanian, Gayathri; Elsaadany, Mostafa; Bialorucki, Callan; Yildirim-Ayan, Eda

    2017-08-01

    Mechanical loading bioreactors capable of applying uniaxial tensile strains are emerging to be a valuable tool to investigate physiologically relevant cellular signaling pathways and biochemical expression. In this study, we have introduced a simple and cost-effective uniaxial tensile strain bioreactor for the application of precise and homogenous uniaxial strains to 3D cell-encapsulated collagen constructs at physiological loading strains (0-12%) and frequencies (0.01-1 Hz). The bioreactor employs silicone-based loading chambers specifically designed to stretch constructs without direct gripping to minimize stress concentration at the ends of the construct and preserve its integrity. The loading chambers are driven by a versatile stepper motor ball-screw actuation system to produce stretching of the constructs. Mechanical characterization of the bioreactor performed through Finite Element Analysis demonstrated that the constructs experienced predominantly uniaxial tensile strain in the longitudinal direction. The strains produced were found to be homogenous over a 15 × 4 × 2 mm region of the construct equivalent to around 60% of the effective region of characterization. The strain values were also shown to be consistent and reproducible during cyclic loading regimes. Biological characterization confirmed the ability of the bioreactor to promote cell viability, proliferation, and matrix organization of cell-encapsulated collagen constructs. This easy-to-use uniaxial tensile strain bioreactor can be employed for studying morphological, structural, and functional responses of cell-embedded matrix systems in response to physiological loading of musculoskeletal tissues. It also holds promise for tissue-engineered strategies that involve delivery of mechanically stimulated cells at the site of injury through a biological carrier to develop a clinically useful therapy for tissue healing. Biotechnol. Bioeng. 2017;114: 1878-1887. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals

  5. Homogeneous pancreatic cancer spheroids mimic growth pattern of circulating tumor cell clusters and macrometastases: displaying heterogeneity and crater-like structure on inner layer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feng, Hao; Ou, Bao-Chi; Zhao, Jing-Kun; Yin, Shuai; Lu, Ai-Guo; Oechsle, Eva; Thasler, Wolfgang E

    2017-05-11

    Pancreatic cancer 3D in vitro models including multicellular tumor spheroid (MCTS), single cell-derived tumor spheroid (SCTS), tissue-derived tumor spheroid, and organotypic models provided powerful platforms to mimic in vivo tumor. Recent work supports that circulating tumor cell (CTC) clusters are more efficient in metastasis seeding than single CTCs. The purpose of this study is to establish 3D culture models which can mimic single CTC, monoclonal CTC clusters, and the expansion of macrometastases. Seven pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma cell lines were used to establish MCTS and SCTS using hanging drop and ultra-low attachment plates. Spheroid immunofluorescence staining, spheroid formation assay, immunoblotting, and literature review were performed to investigate molecular biomarkers and the morphological characteristics of pancreatic tumor spheroids. Single cells experienced different growth patterns to form SCTS, like signet ring-like cells, blastula-like structures, and solid core spheroids. However, golf ball-like hollow spheroids could also be detected, especially when DanG and Capan-1 cells were cultivated with fibroblast-conditioned medium (p cell lines could also establish tumor spheroid with hanging drop plates by adding methylated cellulose. Tumor spheroids derived from pancreatic cancer cell line DanG possessed asymmetrically distributed proliferation center, immune-checkpoint properties. ß-catenin, Ki-67, and F-actin were active surrounding the crater-like structure distributing on the inner layer of viable rim cover of the spheroids, which was relevant to well-differentiated tumor cells. It is possible to establish 3D CTC cluster models from homogenous PDA cell lines using hanging drop and ultra-low attachment plates. PDA cell line displays its own intrinsic properties or heterogeneity. The mechanism of formation of the crater-like structure as well as golf ball-like structure needs further exploration.

  6. Changes in the population of perivascular cells in the bone tissue remodeling zones under microgravity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katkova, Olena; Rodionova, Natalia; Shevel, Ivan

    2016-07-01

    Microgravity and long-term hypokinesia induce reduction both in bone mass and mineral saturation, which can lead to the development of osteoporosis and osteopenia. (Oganov, 2003). Reorganizations and adaptive remodeling processes in the skeleton bones occur in the topographical interconnection with blood capillaries and perivascular cells. Radioautographic studies with 3H- thymidine (Kimmel, Fee, 1980; Rodionova, 1989, 2006) have shown that in osteogenesis zones there is sequential differentiation process of the perivascular cells into osteogenic. Hence the study of populations of perivascular stromal cells in areas of destructive changes is actual. Perivascular cells from metaphysis of the rat femoral bones under conditions of modeling microgravity were studied using electron microscopy and cytochemistry (hindlimb unloading, 28 days duration) and biosatellite «Bion-M1» (duration of flight from April 19 till May 19, 2013 on C57, black mice). It was revealed that both control and test groups populations of the perivascular cells are not homogeneous in remodeling adaptive zones. These populations comprise of adjacent to endothelium poorly differentiated forms and isolated cells with signs of differentiation (specific increased volume of rough endoplasmic reticulum in cytoplasm). Majority of the perivascular cells in the control group (modeling microgravity) reveals reaction to alkaline phosphatase (marker of the osteogenic differentiation). In poorly differentiated cells this reaction is registered in nucleolus, nucleous and cytoplasm. In differentiating cells activity of the alkaline phosphatase is also detected on the outer surface of the cellular membrane. Unlike the control group in the bones of experimental animals reaction to the alkaline phosphatase is registered not in all cells of perivascular population. Part of the differentiating perivascular cells does not contain a product of the reaction. Under microgravity some poorly differentiated perivascular

  7. Idiotype variant cell populations in patients with B cell lymphoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carroll, W L; Lowder, J N; Streifer, R; Warnke, R; Levy, S; Levy, R

    1986-11-01

    Using isolated idiotype (Id) protein we generated panels of antibodies in two patients with follicular lymphoma, one of whom had never received prior chemo-or radiotherapy. Flow cytometry and frozen section tissue staining of tumor with these monoclonal antibodies (mAb) revealed multiple subpopulations within each tumor. Individual mAb stained between 7% and 83% of surface Ig+ cells in the tumor samples. These subpopulations were overlapping and no single antibody recognized all the tumor cells. However, combinations of antibodies seemed to capture total tumor in both cases. In some instances, the percentage of tumor stained by a single mAb varied over time, and differed between lymph nodes sampled at the same time. Because a single species of Id protein was used to generate mAb in each case, it appears that the antibodies were directed against idiotopes variably shared by different populations within each tumor, and this was confirmed by crossblocking studies. Tumor cells from one patient were fused to a nonsecreting heteromyeloma line K6H6/B5, and most of the resulting hybrids secreted Id protein. Four mAb were used to screen the Id proteins secreted by these hybrids, and 11 different variants (16 maximal) were found. Southern blot analysis of rearranged Ig genes was done in two hybrids and biopsy material. Identically rearranged light-chain genes were seen but it appeared as though extensive somatic variation had occurred in heavy chain genes. These studies indicate that: striking Id variation can exist at diagnosis in untreated patients, the percentage of tumor represented by an individual variant may change with time and may differ between tumor sampled from different anatomical locations, and somatic variation appears to be responsible for the observed heterogeneity. Although this degree of variation makes anti-Id antibody therapy more difficult, appropriate combinations of mAb should be more efficacious than single antibodies in such cases.

  8. Study of homogeneous fuel cells type 10 x 10; Estudio de celdas de combustible homogeneas tipo 10 x 10

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Montes, J.L.; Perusquia, R.; Ortiz, J.J. [ININ, 52045 Ocoyoacac, Estado de Mexico (Mexico); Francois, J.L.; Marquez, C.M. [FI-UNAM, 04510 Mexico D.F. (Mexico)]. e-mail: jlmt@nuclear.inin.mx

    2005-07-01

    At the moment in the National Institute of Nuclear Research (ININ) are carried out studies with the purpose of to establish a methodology that allows to carry out the neutron design of fuel cells of type 10 x 10. During the initial stage of the process of cells design, starting from the data that have to do with the planned energy demand it requires to be estimated the average value of the enrichment in U{sup 235} w/o of the one assemble. The experience has shown that the accuracy that is achieved in this estimate it depends, among other factors, of the information (e.g. concentrations of U{sup 235} and Gd{sub 2}O{sub 3}) of the cells that its are disposed in that moment. For what we consider convenient to enlarge the available information by means of a series of calculations of cell physics; and to the one same time some aspects can be studied on the parameters that define the characteristics of a fuel cell. In this work the effect of the presence of different distributions of the concentrations of the fissile material is analyzed and of burnup poisons on the reactivity parameters of the cell as well as in the peak factor of local power (LPPF-Local Power Peaking Factor). (Author)

  9. Enzymatic Fuel Cell-Based Self-Powered Homogeneous Immunosensing Platform via Target-Induced Glucose Release: An Appealing Alternative Strategy for Turn-On Melamine Assay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gu, Chengcheng; Gai, Panpan; Hou, Ting; Li, Haiyin; Xue, Changhui; Li, Feng

    2017-10-18

    Enzymatic fuel cell (EFC)-based self-powered biosensors have attracted considerable attention because of their unique feature of no need for extra power sources during the entire detection process, which endows them with the merits of simplicity, rapidness, low cost, anti-interference, and ease of use. Herein, we proposed, for the first time, an EFC-based self-powered homogeneous immunosensing platform by integrating the target-induced biofuel release and bioconjugate immunoassay for ultrasensitive melamine (ME) detection. In this design, the biofuel, i.e., glucose molecules, was entrapped in the pores of positively charged mesoporous silica nanoparticles and capped by the biogate AuNPs-labeled anti-ME antibody (AuNPs-Ab). The presence of the target ME triggered the entrapped glucose release due to the removal of the biogate via immunoreaction, which resulted in the transfer of electrons produced by glucose oxidation at the bioanode to the biocathode, and thus, the open-circuit voltage of the EFC-based self-powered immunosensor dramatically increased, realizing the ultrasensitive turn-on assay for ME. The limit of detection for ME assay was down to 2.1 pM (S/N = 3), superior to those previously reported in the literature. Notably, real milk samples need no special sample pretreatment for the detection of ME because of the good anti-interference ability of EFC-based self-powered biosensors and the excellent selectivity of the homogeneous immunoassay. Therefore, this appealing self-powered homogeneous immunosensing platform holds great promise as a successful prototype of portable and on-site bioassay in the field of food safety.

  10. Two-Type Reducible Age-Dependent Branching Processes With Non-Homogeneous Poisson Immigration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hyrien, Ollivier; Yanev, Nikolay M

    2011-01-01

    Two type reducible age-dependent branching stochastic processes with non-homogeneous Poisson immigration are considered as models of renewal cell population dynamics. The asymptotic behaviour of the first moments of the process with or without immigration is investigated. Several classes of asymptotic behavior are identified for the population dynamics. Our results are also useful for developing associated methods of statistical inference.

  11. Gene expression heterogeneities in embryonic stem cell populations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Martinez Arias, Alfonso; Brickman, Joshua M

    2011-01-01

    Stem and progenitor cells are populations of cells that retain the capacity to populate specific lineages and to transit this capacity through cell division. However, attempts to define markers for stem cells have met with limited success. Here we consider whether this limited success reflects...... an intrinsic requirement for heterogeneity with stem cell populations. We focus on Embryonic Stem (ES) cells, in vitro derived cell lines from the early embryo that are considered both pluripotent (able to generate all the lineages of the future embryo) and indefinitely self renewing. We examine the relevance...... of recently reported heterogeneities in ES cells and whether these heterogeneities themselves are inherent requirements of functional potency and self renewal....

  12. Cell membrane fatty acid changes and desaturase expression of Saccharomyces bayanus exposed to high pressure homogenization in relation to the supplementation of exogenous unsaturated fatty acids

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Diana Isabella eSerrazanetti

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Aims: The aim of this work was to study the responses of Saccharomyces bayanus cells exposed to sub-lethal high-pressure homogenization (HPH and determine whether the plasmatic membrane can sense HPH in the presence, or absence, of exogenous unsaturated fatty acids (UFAs in the growth medium. Methods and Results: HPH damaged and caused the collapse of cell walls and membranes of a portion of cells; however, HPH did not significantly affect S. bayanus cell viability (less than 0.3 Log CFU ml-1. HPH strongly affected the membrane fatty acid composition by increasing the percentage of total UFA when compared with saturated fatty acids. The gene expression showed that the transcription of OLE1, ERG3 and ERG11 increased after HPH. The presence of exogenous UFA abolished HPH-induced effects on the OLE1 and ERG3 genes, increased the percentage of membrane lipids and decreased the expression of OLE1 and ERG3 within 30 min of treatment. Conclusions: The results suggest a key role for UFA in the microbial cell response to sub-lethal stress. In addition, these data provide insight into the molecular basis of the response of S. bayanus to this innovative technology. Significance and Impact of the Study: Elucidation of the mechanism of action for sub-lethal HPH will enable the utilization of this technology to modulate the starter performance at the industrial scale.

  13. Cancer stem cell-like side population cells in clear cell renal cell carcinoma cell line 769P.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Bin; Huang, Yi Jun; Yao, Zhi Jun; Chen, Xu; Guo, Sheng Jie; Mao, Xiao Peng; Wang, Dao Hu; Chen, Jun Xing; Qiu, Shao Peng

    2013-01-01

    Although cancers are widely considered to be maintained by stem cells, the existence of stem cells in renal cell carcinoma (RCC) has seldom been reported, in part due to the lack of unique surface markers. We here identified cancer stem cell-like cells with side population (SP) phenotype in five human RCC cell lines. Flow cytometry analysis revealed that 769P, a human clear cell RCC cell line, contained the largest amount of SP cells as compared with other four cell lines. These 769P SP cells possessed characteristics of proliferation, self-renewal, and differentiation, as well as strong resistance to chemotherapy and radiotherapy that were possibly related to the ABCB1 transporter. In vivo experiments with serial tumor transplantation in mice also showed that 769P SP cells formed tumors in NOD/SCID mice. Taken together, these results indicate that 769P SP cells have the properties of cancer stem cells, which may play important roles in tumorigenesis and therapy-resistance of RCC.

  14. Transport equations in cell population dynamics II

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohamed Boulanouar

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available In this work, we study the cellular profile in a cell proliferating model presented in Boulanouar [4]. Each cell is characterized by its degree of maturity and its maturation velocity. The boundary conditions generalizes the known biological rules. We study also the degenerate case corresponding to infinite maturation velocity, and describe mathematically the cellular profile.

  15. Population heterogeneity in the surface expression of Ulex europaeus I-lectin (UEA I)-binding sites in cultured malignant and transformed cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Virtanen, I.; Lehtonen, E.; Naervaenen, O.; Leivo, I.; Lehto, V.P.

    1985-11-01

    We studied the binding of fluorochrome-coupled Ulex europaeus I-lectin (UEA-I) to cultured malignant cells: all human malignant and transformed cells and also mouse teratocarcinoma cells examined gave a homogeneous cell membrane-type of surface staining only in some of the cells. Such a population heterogeneity appeared to be independent of the cell cycle. Instead, other lectin conjugates used bound homogeneously to all cell. In permeabilized cells, a juxtanuclear reticular staining of the Golgi apparatus was seen in the UEA-I-positive cells. No staining of the pericellular matrix components, produced by malignant cells grown in serum-free culture medium, could be obtained with TRITC-UEA-I. UEA-I-lectin recognized most polypeptides from A8387 fibrosarcoma cells and HeLa cells, metabolically labelled with (/sup 3/H)fucose. Furthermore, surface labelling of these cells with the neuraminidase-galactose oxidase/sodium borohydride method disclosed that both UEA-I and Ricinus communis agglutinin I revealed the same major surface glycoproteins. Results with metabolically labelled cells showed, in addition, that UEA-I-lectin did not bind to secreted glycoproteins produced by A8387 cells and recognized by other lectins. The results indicate that transformed and malignant cells show a distinct population heterogeneity in their expression of some cell surface-associated fucosyl glycoconjugates. The results also suggest that malignant cells can glycosylate their membrane and secreted glycoproteins in a different manner.

  16. How does cell size regulation affect population growth?

    CERN Document Server

    Lin, Jie

    2016-01-01

    The proliferation of a growing microbial colony is well characterized by the population growth rate. However, at the single-cell level, isogenic cells often exhibit different cell-cycle durations. For evolutionary dynamics, it is thus important to establish the connection between the population growth rate and the heterogeneous single-cell generation time. Existing theories often make the assumption that the generation times of mother and daughter cells are independent. However, it has been shown that to maintain a bounded cell size distribution, cells that grow exponentially at the single-cell level need to adopt cell size regulation, leading to a negative correlation of mother-daughter generation time. In this work, we construct a general framework to describe the population growth in the presence of size regulation. We derive a formula for the population growth rate, which only depends on the variability of single-cell growth rate, independent of other sources of noises. Our work shows that a population ca...

  17. On interfaces between cell populations with different mobilities

    KAUST Repository

    Lorenzi, Tommaso

    2016-11-18

    Partial differential equations describing the dynamics of cell population densities from a fluid mechanical perspective can model the growth of avascular tumours. In this framework, we consider a system of equations that describes the interaction between a population of dividing cells and a population of non-dividing cells. The two cell populations are characterised by different mobilities. We present the results of numerical simulations displaying two-dimensional spherical waves with sharp interfaces between dividing and non-dividing cells. Furthermore, we numerically observe how different ratios between the mobilities change the morphology of the interfaces, and lead to the emergence of finger-like patterns of invasion above a threshold. Motivated by these simulations, we study the existence of one-dimensional travelling wave solutions.

  18. [Isolation and characterization of side population cells in human gastric cancer cell line BGC-823].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Ting; Li, Jin-yi; Lu, Shi-xin

    2012-04-01

    Isolate and characterize the side population (SP) cells with potency of stem cells from human gastric carcinoma cell line BGC-823. SP and non-SP cells were sorted from BGC-823 cells by fluorescence-activated cell sorting (FACS) using Hoechst33342 staining. The tumorigenic ability of the SP cells was assessed by in vivo transplantation into non-obese diabetic/severe combined immunodeficiency mice. SP cells were isolated from BGC-823 cells in a proportion of 0.9% to 2.1% with respect to the whole cell population. The colony formation assay showed that the colony formation rate of the SP cells was significantly higher than that of the non-SP cells (72.56% vs. 49.00%, P line BGC-823 cells. Further characterization of this SP cell population may provide new insights for diagnosis and treatment of gastric cancer.

  19. Transport equations in cell population dynamics I

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohamed Boulanouar

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available In this article, we study a cell proliferating model, where each cell is characterized by its degree of maturity and its maturation velocity. The boundary conditions in this model generalize the known biological rules. We consider also the degenerate case corresponding to infinite maturation velocity. Then we show that this model is governed by a strongly continuous semigroup and give its explicit expression.

  20. Homogeneity of common cosmopolitan inversion frequencies in ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Keywords. Drosophila melanogaster; inversion polymorphism; Southeast Asia; genetic homogeneity; balancing selection. Abstract. East Asian Drosophila melanogaster are known for great variation in morphological and physiological characters among populations, variation that is believed to be maintained by genetic drift.

  1. Identification of cancer stem-like side population cells in ovarian cancer cell line OVCAR-3.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Quanli; Geng, Li; Kvalheim, Gunnar; Gaudernack, Gustav; Suo, Zhenhe

    2009-01-01

    Side population (SP) cells may enrich stem-like cells in many normal and malignant tissues. However, SP method application has drawn special attention to the field of stem cell research, and the existence of SP cells in cell culture is being debated, most probably because different cell lines require different technical modifications, especially when cell staining is considered. In this study, the authors aimed to disclose whether the hoechst33342 staining required extensive optimization for identifying SP cells in the human ovarian cancer cell line OVCAR-3. After systematic evaluations, it was found that only 2.5 microg/mL hoechst33342 staining of the cells for 60 min could get an ideal SP population, which accounted for 0.9% of the whole cell population. The sorted SP cells showed significantly higher colony formation efficiency than the non-side population (NSP) cells, and only the SP cells could form holoclones. Real-time PCR disclosed that SP cells expressed higher levels of "stemness" gene Oct3/4 than the NSP cells did, indicating that the SP cells might harbor cancer stem cells in this cell line. The results highlight the necessity of SP method optimization in cell studies, and the SP cells in this cell line merit further studies when cancer stem cell identification and isolation are considered.

  2. Identification of small-molecule agonists of human relaxin family receptor 1 (RXFP1) by using a homogenous cell-based cAMP assay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Catherine Z; Southall, Noel; Xiao, Jingbo; Marugan, Juan J; Ferrer, Marc; Hu, Xin; Jones, Raisa E; Feng, Shu; Agoulnik, Irina U; Zheng, Wei; Agoulnik, Alexander I

    2013-07-01

    The relaxin hormone is involved in a variety of biological functions, including female reproduction and parturition, as well as regulation of cardiovascular, renal, pulmonary, and hepatic functions. It regulates extracellular matrix remodeling, cell invasiveness, proliferation, differentiation, and overall tissue homeostasis. The G protein-coupled receptor (GPCR) relaxin family receptor 1 (RXFP1) is a cognate relaxin receptor that mainly signals through cyclic AMP second messenger. Although agonists of the receptor could have a wide range of pharmacologic utility, until now there have been no reported small-molecule agonists for relaxin receptors. Here, we report the development of a quantitative high-throughput platform for an RXFP1 agonist screen based on homogenous cell-based HTRF cyclic AMP (cAMP) assay technology. Two small molecules of similar structure were independently identified from a screen of more than 365 677 compounds. Neither compound showed activity in a counterscreen with HEK293T cells transfected with an unrelated GPCR vasopressin 1b receptor. These small-molecule agonists also demonstrated selectivity against the RXFP2 receptor, providing a basis for future medicinal chemistry optimization of selective relaxin receptor agonists.

  3. High-Resolution Respirometry for Simultaneous Measurement of Oxygen and Hydrogen Peroxide Fluxes in Permeabilized Cells, Tissue Homogenate and Isolated Mitochondria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marina Makrecka-Kuka

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Whereas mitochondria are well established as the source of ATP in oxidative phosphorylation (OXPHOS, it is debated if they are also the major cellular sources of reactive oxygen species (ROS. Here we describe the novel approach of combining high-resolution respirometry and fluorometric measurement of hydrogen peroxide (H2O2 production, applied to mitochondrial preparations (permeabilized cells, tissue homogenate, isolated mitochondria. The widely used H2O2 probe Amplex Red inhibited respiration in intact and permeabilized cells and should not be applied at concentrations above 10 µM. H2O2 fluxes were generally less than 1% of oxygen fluxes in physiological substrate and coupling states, specifically in permeabilized cells. H2O2 flux was consistently highest in the Complex II-linked LEAK state, reduced with CI&II-linked convergent electron flow and in mitochondria respiring at OXPHOS capacity, and were further diminished in uncoupled mitochondria respiring at electron transfer system capacity. Simultaneous measurement of mitochondrial respiration and H2O2 flux requires careful optimization of assay conditions and reveals information on mitochondrial function beyond separate analysis of ROS production.

  4. Emergence of cytotoxic resistance in cancer cell populations: Single-cell mechanisms and population-level consequences

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lorenzi, Tommaso [Centre de Mathématiques et de Leurs Applications, ENS Cachan, CNRS, Cachan 94230 Cedex, France & INRIA-Paris-Rocquencourt, MAMBA Team, Domaine de Voluceau, BP105, 78153 Le Chesnay Cedex (France); Chisholm, Rebecca H. [School of Biotechnology and Biomolecular Sciences, University of New South Wales, Sydney NSW 2052 (Australia); Lorz, Alexander; Neves de Almeida, Luís; Clairambault, Jean [Sorbonne Universités, UPMC Univ Paris 06, UMR 7598, Laboratoire Jacques-Louis Lions, F-75005, Paris (France); CNRS, UMR 7598, Laboratoire Jacques-Louis Lions, F-75005, Paris (France); INRIA-Paris-Rocquencourt, MAMBA Team, Domaine de Voluceau, BP105, 78153 Le Chesnay Cedex (France); Larsen, Annette K.; Escargueil, Alexandre [Sorbonne Universités, UPMC Univ Paris 06, F-75005, Paris (France); INSERM, UMR-S 938, Laboratory of “Cancer Biology and Therapeutics”, F-75012, Paris (France)

    2016-06-08

    We formulate an individual-based model and a population model of phenotypic evolution, under cytotoxic drugs, in a cancer cell population structured by the expression levels of survival-potential and proliferation-potential. We apply these models to a recently studied experimental system. Our results suggest that mechanisms based on fundamental laws of biology can reversibly push an actively-proliferating, and drug-sensitive, cell population to transition into a weakly-proliferative and drug-tolerant state, which will eventually facilitate the emergence of more potent, proliferating and drug-tolerant cells.

  5. Nonequilibrium population dynamics of phenotype conversion of cancer cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joseph Xu Zhou

    Full Text Available Tumorigenesis is a dynamic biological process that involves distinct cancer cell subpopulations proliferating at different rates and interconverting between them. In this paper we proposed a mathematical framework of population dynamics that considers both distinctive growth rates and intercellular transitions between cancer cell populations. Our mathematical framework showed that both growth and transition influence the ratio of cancer cell subpopulations but the latter is more significant. We derived the condition that different cancer cell types can maintain distinctive subpopulations and we also explain why there always exists a stable fixed ratio after cell sorting based on putative surface markers. The cell fraction ratio can be shifted by changing either the growth rates of the subpopulations (Darwinism selection or by environment-instructed transitions (Lamarckism induction. This insight can help us to understand the dynamics of the heterogeneity of cancer cells and lead us to new strategies to overcome cancer drug resistance.

  6. Concise Review: Stem Cell Population Biology: Insights from Hematopoiesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    MacLean, Adam L; Lo Celso, Cristina; Stumpf, Michael P H

    2017-01-01

    Stem cells are fundamental to human life and offer great therapeutic potential, yet their biology remains incompletely-or in cases even poorly-understood. The field of stem cell biology has grown substantially in recent years due to a combination of experimental and theoretical contributions: the experimental branch of this work provides data in an ever-increasing number of dimensions, while the theoretical branch seeks to determine suitable models of the fundamental stem cell processes that these data describe. The application of population dynamics to biology is amongst the oldest applications of mathematics to biology, and the population dynamics perspective continues to offer much today. Here we describe the impact that such a perspective has made in the field of stem cell biology. Using hematopoietic stem cells as our model system, we discuss the approaches that have been used to study their key properties, such as capacity for self-renewal, differentiation, and cell fate lineage choice. We will also discuss the relevance of population dynamics in models of stem cells and cancer, where competition naturally emerges as an influential factor on the temporal evolution of cell populations. Stem Cells 2017;35:80-88. © 2016 AlphaMed Press.

  7. Subpopulations of stem-like cells in side population cells from the human bladder transitional cell cancer cell line T24.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ning, Z-F; Huang, Y-J; Lin, T-X; Zhou, Y-X; Jiang, C; Xu, K-W; Huang, H; Yin, X-B; Huang, J

    2009-01-01

    Cancer stem cells can be isolated from human tumours using specific cell surface markers. Bladder cancer cells, however, lack specific cell surface markers, making this approach impracticable. In this study an alternative method was used, involving isolation of side population cells to explore the stem cell characteristics of bladder cancer. Side population cells were isolated from the bladder transitional cell cancer cell line T24 and examined for potential stem cell characteristics related to proliferation, cell cycle distribution, self-renewal and differentiation. It was observed that T24 side population cells have stronger proliferative and colony formation abilities than non-side population cells. Side population cells were also more resistant to chemotherapy and radiotherapy, which may be due to expression of the ATP-binding cassette half-transporter, sub-family G, member 2 protein. Overall, the results suggest that side population cells from the human bladder transitional cell cancer cell line T24 harbour stem-like cells.

  8. Characterization of different cell populations isolated from rat testis peritubular cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galdieri, M; Ricci, G

    1998-05-01

    Peritubular cells, a mixed population of myoid and non-myoid cells obtained by enzymatic treatments of rat seminiferous tubules, are currently utilized as a myoid cell population. We have morphologically and biochemically compared peritubular cells and purified myoid cells isolated from prepubertal rats. The two cell populations appear morphologically similar when cultured in the presence of serum: both appear to be composed of elongated cells when observed by phase-contrast microscopy. However, the two populations differ in the percentage of alkaline phosphatase positive cell since only a minority of the cells present in the peritubular cell population are positive for alkaline phosphatase expression. Secretory activity of myoid cells is higher when compared to the peritubular cell secretion. To the contrary, fibronectin is highly synthesized and secreted by the peritubular cells, suggesting that the non-myoid cells synthesize fibronectin at a high level. Myoid cells have also been cultured in a chemically defined medium without any serum addition. In this experimental condition the cells show a polygonal shape, which remains constant during culture time. Secretory activity and fibronectin synthesis and secretion of the cells cultured without serum are lower when compared to the values obtained in the presence of serum at the beginning of the culture. Moreover, the distribution of the cell-associated fibronectin is modified by the culture conditions: spotted on cells cultured in the absence of serum and fibrillar on cells cultured with serum. We therefore conclude that peritubular cells and myoid cells are significantly different cell populations and that serum addition to the culture medium dramatically influences the morphology and the metabolic activities of the myoid cells.

  9. Homogeneity of Inorganic Glasses

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Martin; Zhang, L.; Keding, Ralf

    2011-01-01

    Homogeneity of glasses is a key factor determining their physical and chemical properties and overall quality. However, quantification of the homogeneity of a variety of glasses is still a challenge for glass scientists and technologists. Here, we show a simple approach by which the homogeneity...... of different glass products can be quantified and ranked. This approach is based on determination of both the optical intensity and dimension of the striations in glasses. These two characteristic values areobtained using the image processing method established recently. The logarithmic ratio between...... the dimension and the intensity is used to quantify and rank the homogeneity of glass products. Compared with the refractive index method, the image processing method has a wider detection range and a lower statistical uncertainty....

  10. Anatomically heterogeneous populations of CB1 cannabinoid receptor-expressing interneurons in the CA3 region of the hippocampus show homogeneous input-output characteristics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szabó, Gergely G; Papp, Orsolya I; Máté, Zoltán; Szabó, Gábor; Hájos, Norbert

    2014-12-01

    A subpopulation of GABAergic cells in cortical structures expresses CB1 cannabinoid receptors (CB1 ) on their axon terminals. To understand the function of these interneurons in information processing, it is necessary to uncover how they are embedded into neuronal circuits. Therefore, the proportion of GABAergic terminals expressing CB1 and the morphological and electrophysiological properties of CB1 -immunoreactive interneurons should be revealed. We investigated the ratio and the origin of CB1 -expressing inhibitory boutons in the CA3 region of the hippocampus. Using immunocytochemical techniques, we estimated that ∼40% of GABAergic axon terminals in different layers of CA3 also expressed CB1 . To identify the inhibitory cell types expressing CB1 in this region, we recorded and intracellularly labeled interneurons in hippocampal slices. CB1 -expressing interneurons showed distinct axonal arborization, and were classified as basket cells, mossy-fiber-associated cells, dendritic-layer-innervating cells or perforant-path-associated cells. In each morphological category, a substantial variability in axonal projection was observed. In contrast to the diverse morphology, the active and passive membrane properties were found to be rather similar. Using paired recordings, we found that pyramidal cells displayed large and fast unitary postsynaptic currents in response to activating basket and mossy-fiber-associated cells, while they showed slower and smaller synaptic events in pairs originating from interneurons that innervate the dendritic layer, which may be due to dendritic filtering. In addition, CB1 activation significantly reduced the amplitude of the postsynaptic currents in each cell pair tested. Our data suggest that CB1 -expressing interneurons with different axonal projections have comparable physiological characteristics, contributing to a similar proportion of GABAergic inputs along the somato-dendritic axis of CA3 pyramidal cells. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals

  11. Isolation of Cancer Stem Cells by Side Population Method.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shimoda, Masayuki; Ota, Masahide; Okada, Yasunori

    2018-01-01

    The Hoechst side population (SP) method is a flow cytometry technique used to obtain stem cells based on the dye efflux properties of the ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transporters. The SP cells are characterized by their capability to efflux the fluorescent DNA-binding dye Hoechst 33342 through their ABC transporters and are enriched in stem cells, which are endowed with a self-renewal capacity and multilineage differentiation potential and express the stemness genes including ABC multidrug transporters. The protocols outlined in this book chapter describe the isolation method of the SP cells from human lung carcinoma cell lines by using Hoechst 33342. In addition, we refer to the propagation method of SP cells by successive rounds of fluorescence-activated cell sorting analysis for SP cells. These approaches will be helpful for the establishment of novel in vitro and in vivo models using cancer stem cells, which may play a key role during carcinogenesis and/or tumor progression.

  12. Cell Differentiation in a Bacillus thuringiensis Population during Planktonic Growth, Biofilm Formation, and Host Infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verplaetse, Emilie; Slamti, Leyla; Gohar, Michel; Lereclus, Didier

    2015-04-28

    Bacillus thuringiensis (Bt) is armed to complete a full cycle in its insect host. During infection, virulence factors are expressed under the control of the quorum sensor PlcR to kill the host. After the host's death, the quorum sensor NprR controls a necrotrophic lifestyle, allowing the vegetative cells to use the insect cadaver as a bioincubator and to survive. Only a part of the Bt population sporulates in the insect cadaver, and the precise composition of the whole population and its evolution over time are unknown. Using fluorescent reporters to record gene expression at the single-cell level, we have determined the differentiation course of a Bt population and explored the lineage existing among virulent, necrotrophic, and sporulating cells. The dynamics of cell differentiation were monitored during growth in homogenized medium, biofilm formation, and colonization of insect larvae. We demonstrated that in the insect host and in planktonic culture in rich medium, the virulence, necrotrophism, and sporulation regulators are successively activated in the same cell. In contrast, in biofilms, activation of PlcR is dispensable for NprR activation and we observed a greater heterogeneity than under the other two growth conditions. We also showed that sporulating cells arise almost exclusively from necrotrophic cells. In biofilm and in the insect cadaver, we identified an as-yet-uncharacterized category of cells that do not express any of the reporters used. Overall, we showed that PlcR, NprR, and Spo0A act as interconnected integrators to allow finely tuned adaptation of the pathogen to its environment. Bt is an entomopathogen found ubiquitously in the environment and is a widely used biopesticide. Studies performed at the population level suggest that the infection process of Bt includes three successive steps (virulence, necrotrophism, and sporulation) controlled by different regulators. This study aimed to determine how these phenotypes are activated at the

  13. Stochastic simulation of structured skin cell population dynamics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakaoka, Shinji; Aihara, Kazuyuki

    2013-03-01

    The epidermis is the outmost skin tissue. It operates as a first defense system to process inflammatory signals and responds by producing inflammatory mediators that promote the recruitment of immune cells. Various skin diseases such as atopic dermatitis occur as a result of the defect of proper skin barrier function and successive impaired inflammatory responses. The onset of such a skin disease links to the disturbed epidermal homeostasis regulated by appropriate self-renewal and differentiation of epidermal stem cells. The theory of physiologically structured population models provides a versatile framework to formulate mathematical models which describe the growth dynamics of a cell population such as the epidermis. In this paper, we develop an algorithm to implement stochastic simulation for a class of physiologically structured population models. We demonstrate that the developed algorithm is applicable to several cell population models and typical age-structured population models. On the basis of the developed algorithm, we investigate stochastic dynamics of skin cell populations and spread of inflammation. It is revealed that demographic stochasticity can bring considerable impact on the outcome of inflammation spread at the tissue level.

  14. Experimental depletion of different renal interstitial cell populations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bohman, S.O.; Sundelin, B.; Forsum, U.; Tribukait, B.

    1988-04-01

    To define different populations of renal interstitial cells and investigate some aspects of their function, we studied the kidneys of normal rats and rats with hereditary diabetes insipidus (DI, Brattleboro) after experimental manipulations expected to alter the number of interstitial cells. DI rats showed an almost complete loss of interstitial cells in their renal papillae after treatment with a high dose of vasopressin. In spite of the lack of interstitial cells, the animals concentrated their urine to the same extent as vasopressin-treated normal rats, indicating that the renomedullary interstitial cells do not have an important function in concentrating the urine. The interstitial cells returned nearly to normal within 1 week off vasopressin treatment, suggesting a rapid turnover rate of these cells. To further distinguish different populations of interstitial cells, we studied the distribution of class II MHC antigen expression in the kidneys of normal and bone-marrow depleted Wistar rats. Normal rats had abundant class II antigen-positive interstitial cells in the renal cortex and outer medulla, but not in the inner medulla (papilla). Six days after 1000 rad whole body irradiation, the stainable cells were almost completely lost, but electron microscopic morphometry showed a virtually unchanged volume density of interstitial cells in the cortex and outer medulla, as well as the inner medulla. Thus, irradiation abolished the expression of the class II antigen but caused no significant depletion of interstitial cells.

  15. Emergence of cytotoxic resistance in cancer cell populations*

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lorenzi Tommaso

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available We formulate an individual-based model and an integro-differential model of phenotypic evolution, under cytotoxic drugs, in a cancer cell population structured by the expression levels of survival-potential and proliferation-potential. We apply these models to a recently studied experimental system. Our results suggest that mechanisms based on fundamental laws of biology can reversibly push an actively-proliferating, and drug-sensitive, cell population to transition into a weakly-proliferative and drug-tolerant state, which will eventually facilitate the emergence of more potent, proliferating and drug-tolerant cells.

  16. Stochastic adaptation and fold-change detection: from single-cell to population behavior

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leier André

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In cell signaling terminology, adaptation refers to a system's capability of returning to its equilibrium upon a transient response. To achieve this, a network has to be both sensitive and precise. Namely, the system must display a significant output response upon stimulation, and later on return to pre-stimulation levels. If the system settles at the exact same equilibrium, adaptation is said to be 'perfect'. Examples of adaptation mechanisms include temperature regulation, calcium regulation and bacterial chemotaxis. Results We present models of the simplest adaptation architecture, a two-state protein system, in a stochastic setting. Furthermore, we consider differences between individual and collective adaptive behavior, and show how our system displays fold-change detection properties. Our analysis and simulations highlight why adaptation needs to be understood in terms of probability, and not in strict numbers of molecules. Most importantly, selection of appropriate parameters in this simple linear setting may yield populations of cells displaying adaptation, while single cells do not. Conclusions Single cell behavior cannot be inferred from population measurements and, sometimes, collective behavior cannot be determined from the individuals. By consequence, adaptation can many times be considered a purely emergent property of the collective system. This is a clear example where biological ergodicity cannot be assumed, just as is also the case when cell replication rates are not homogeneous, or depend on the cell state. Our analysis shows, for the first time, how ergodicity cannot be taken for granted in simple linear examples either. The latter holds even when cells are considered isolated and devoid of replication capabilities (cell-cycle arrested. We also show how a simple linear adaptation scheme displays fold-change detection properties, and how rupture of ergodicity prevails in scenarios where transitions between

  17. Analysis of individual cell trajectories in lattice-gas cellular automaton models for migrating cell populations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mente, Carsten; Voss-Böhme, Anja; Deutsch, Andreas

    2015-04-01

    Collective dynamics of migrating cell populations drive key processes in tissue formation and maintenance under normal and diseased conditions. Collective cell behavior at the tissue level is typically characterized by considering cell density patterns such as clusters and moving cell fronts. However, there are also important observables of collective dynamics related to individual cell behavior. In particular, individual cell trajectories are footprints of emergent behavior in populations of migrating cells. Lattice-gas cellular automata (LGCA) have proven successful to model and analyze collective behavior arising from interactions of migrating cells. There are well-established methods to analyze cell density patterns in LGCA models. Although LGCA dynamics are defined by cell-based rules, individual cells are not distinguished. Therefore, individual cell trajectories cannot be analyzed in LGCA so far. Here, we extend the classical LGCA framework to allow labeling and tracking of individual cells. We consider cell number conserving LGCA models of migrating cell populations where cell interactions are regulated by local cell density and derive stochastic differential equations approximating individual cell trajectories in LGCA. This result allows the prediction of complex individual cell trajectories emerging in LGCA models and is a basis for model-experiment comparisons at the individual cell level.

  18. Distinct types of glial cells populate the Drosophila antenna

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jhaveri Dhanisha

    2005-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The development of nervous systems involves reciprocal interactions between neurons and glia. In the Drosophila olfactory system, peripheral glial cells arise from sensory lineages specified by the basic helix-loop-helix transcription factor, Atonal. These glia wrap around the developing olfactory axons early during development and pattern the three distinct fascicles as they exit the antenna. In the moth Manduca sexta, an additional set of central glia migrate to the base of the antennal nerve where axons sort to their glomerular targets. In this work, we have investigated whether similar types of cells exist in the Drosophila antenna. Results We have used different P(Gal4 lines to drive Green Fluorescent Protein (GFP in distinct populations of cells within the Drosophila antenna. Mz317::GFP, a marker for cell body and perineural glia, labels the majority of peripheral glia. An additional ~30 glial cells detected by GH146::GFP do not derive from any of the sensory lineages and appear to migrate into the antenna from the brain. Their appearance in the third antennal segment is regulated by normal function of the Epidermal Growth Factor receptor and small GTPases. We denote these distinct populations of cells as Mz317-glia and GH146-glia respectively. In the adult, processes of GH146-glial cells ensheath the olfactory receptor neurons directly, while those of the Mz317-glia form a peripheral layer. Ablation of GH146-glia does not result in any significant effects on the patterning of the olfactory receptor axons. Conclusion We have demonstrated the presence of at least two distinct populations of glial cells within the Drosophila antenna. GH146-glial cells originate in the brain and migrate to the antenna along the newly formed olfactory axons. The number of cells populating the third segment of the antenna is regulated by signaling through the Epidermal Growth Factor receptor. These glia share several features of the sorting

  19. The Irish paradigm on the natural progression of hepatitis C virus infection: an investigation in a homogeneous patient population infected with HCV 1b (review).

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Fanning, Liam J

    2012-02-03

    The aetiological agent of chronic hepatitis C is the hepatitis C virus. The hepatitis C virus is spread by parenteral transmission of body fluids, primarily blood or blood products. In 1989, after more than a decade of research, HCV was isolated and characterised. The hepatitis C viral genome is a positive-sense, single-stranded RNA molecule approximately 9.4 kb in length, which encodes a polyprotein of about 3100 amino acids. There are 6 main genotypes of HCV, each further stratified by subtype. In 1994, a cohort of women was identified in Ireland as having been iatrogenically exposed to the hepatitis C virus. The women were all young and exposed as a consequence of the receipt of HCV 1b contaminated anti-D immunoglobulin. The source of the infection was identified as an acutely infected female. As part of a voluntary serological screening programme involving 62,667 people, 704 individuals were identified as seropositive for exposure to the hepatitis C virus; 55.4% were found to be positive for the viral genome 17 years after exposure. Of these women 98% had evidence of inflammation, but surprisingly, a remarkable 49% showed no evidence of fibrosis. Clinicopathology and virological analysis has identified associations between viral load and the histological activity index for inflammation, and, between inflammation and levels of the liver enzyme alanine aminotransferase. Infection at a younger age appears to protect individuals from progression to advanced liver disease. Molecular analyses of host immunogenetic elements shows that particular class II human leukocyte associated antigen alleles are associated with clearance of the hepatitis C virus. Additional class II alleles have been identified that are associated with stable viraemia over an extended period of patient follow-up. Although, investigation of large untreated homogeneous cohorts is likely to become more difficult, as the efficacy of anti-viral therapy improves, further investigation of host and viral

  20. Modelling Spread of Oncolytic Viruses in Heterogeneous Cell Populations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ellis, Michael; Dobrovolny, Hana

    2014-03-01

    One of the most promising areas in current cancer research and treatment is the use of viruses to attack cancer cells. A number of oncolytic viruses have been identified to date that possess the ability to destroy or neutralize cancer cells while inflicting minimal damage upon healthy cells. Formulation of predictive models that correctly describe the evolution of infected tumor systems is critical to the successful application of oncolytic virus therapy. A number of different models have been proposed for analysis of the oncolytic virus-infected tumor system, with approaches ranging from traditional coupled differential equations such as the Lotka-Volterra predator-prey models, to contemporary modeling frameworks based on neural networks and cellular automata. Existing models are focused on tumor cells and the effects of virus infection, and offer the potential for improvement by including effects upon normal cells. We have recently extended the traditional framework to a 2-cell model addressing the full cellular system including tumor cells, normal cells, and the impacts of viral infection upon both populations. Analysis of the new framework reveals complex interaction between the populations and potential inability to simultaneously eliminate the virus and tumor populations.

  1. Homogenization Experiments of Crystal-Rich Inclusions in Spodumene from Jiajika Lithium Deposit, China, under Elevated External Pressures in a Hydrothermal Diamond-Anvil Cell

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jiankang Li

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Extensive studies of the crystal-rich inclusions (CIs hosted in minerals in pegmatite have resulted in substantially different models for the formation mechanism of the pegmatite. In order to evaluate these previously proposed formation mechanisms, the total homogenization processes of CIs hosted in spodumene from the Jiajika pegmatite deposit in Sichuan, China, were observed in situ under external H2O pressures in a new type of hydrothermal diamond-anvil cell (HDAC. The CIs in a spodumene chip were loaded in the sample chamber of HDAC with water, such that the CIs were under preset external H2O pressures during heating to avoid possible decrepitation. Our in situ observations showed that the crystals within the CIs were dissolved in carbonic-rich aqueous fluid during heating and that cristobalite was usually the first mineral being dissolved, followed by zabuyelite and silicate minerals until their total dissolution at temperatures between 500 and 720°C. These observations indicated that the minerals within the CIs were daughter minerals crystallized from an entrapped carbonate- and silica-rich aqueous solution and therefore provided useful information for evaluating the formation models of granitic pegmatites.

  2. Fundamental limits to collective concentration sensing in cell populations

    CERN Document Server

    Fancher, Sean

    2016-01-01

    The precision of concentration sensing is improved when cells communicate. Here we derive the physical limits to concentration sensing for cells that communicate over short distances by directly exchanging small molecules (juxtacrine signaling), or over longer distances by secreting and sensing a diffusive messenger molecule (autocrine signaling). In the latter case, we find that the optimal cell spacing can be large, due to a tradeoff between maintaining communication strength and reducing signal cross-correlations. This leads to the surprising result that autocrine signaling allows more precise sensing than juxtacrine signaling for sufficiently large populations. We compare our results to data from a wide variety of communicating cell types.

  3. Basil extract inhibits the sulfotransferase mediated formation of DNA adducts of the procarcinogen 1'-hydroxyestragole by rat and human liver S9 homogenates and in HepG2 human hepatoma cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jeurissen, S.M.F.; Punt, A.; Delatour, T.; Rietjens, I.M.C.M.

    2008-01-01

    The effects of a basil extract on the sulfation and concomitant DNA adduct formation of the proximate carcinogen 1¿-hydroxyestragole were studied using rat and human liver S9 homogenates and the human hepatoma cell line HepG2. Basil was chosen since it contains the procarcinogen estragole that can

  4. Trail networks formed by populations of immune cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Taeseok Daniel; Kwon, Tae Goo; Park, Jin-sung; Lee, Kyoung J.

    2014-02-01

    Populations of biological cells that communicate with each other can organize themselves to generate large-scale patterns. Examples can be found in diverse systems, ranging from developing embryos, cardiac tissues, chemotaxing ameba and swirling bacteria. The similarity, often shared by the patterns, suggests the existence of some general governing principle. On the other hand, rich diversity and system-specific properties are exhibited, depending on the type of involved cells and the nature of their interactions. The study on the similarity and the diversity constitutes a rapidly growing field of research. Here, we introduce a new class of self-organized patterns of cell populations that we term as ‘cellular trail networks’. They were observed with populations of rat microglia, the immune cells of the brain and the experimental evidence suggested that haptotaxis is the key element responsible for them. The essential features of the observed patterns are well captured by the mathematical model cells that actively crawl and interact with each other through a decomposing but non-diffusing chemical attractant laid down by the cells. Our finding suggests an unusual mechanism of socially cooperative long-range signaling for the crawling immune cells.

  5. Homogeneity and Entropy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tignanelli, H. L.; Vazquez, R. A.; Mostaccio, C.; Gordillo, S.; Plastino, A.

    1990-11-01

    RESUMEN. Presentamos una metodologia de analisis de la homogeneidad a partir de la Teoria de la Informaci6n, aplicable a muestras de datos observacionales. ABSTRACT:Standard concepts that underlie Information Theory are employed in order design a methodology that enables one to analyze the homogeneity of a given data sample. Key : DATA ANALYSIS

  6. γδ T Cells Shape Pre-Immune Peripheral B Cell Populations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Yafei; Getahun, Andrew; Heiser, Ryan A.; Detanico, Thiago O.; Aviszus, Katja; Kirchenbaum, Greg A.; Casper, Tamara L.; Huang, Chunjian; Aydintug, M. Kemal; Carding, Simon R.; Ikuta, Koichi; Huang, Hua; Wysocki, Lawrence J.; Cambier, John C.; O’Brien, Rebecca L.; Born, Willi K.

    2015-01-01

    We previously reported that selective ablation of certain γδ T cell subsets rather than removal of all γδ T cells, strongly affects serum antibody levels in non-immunized mice. This type of manipulation also changed T cells including residual γδ T cells, revealing some interdependence of γδ T cell populations. For example, in mice lacking Vγ4+ and Vγ6+ γδ T cells (B6.TCR-Vγ4−/−/6−/−), we observed expanded Vγ1+ cells, which changed in composition and activation and produced more IL-4 upon stimulation in vitro, increased IL-4 production by αβ T cells as well as spontaneous germinal center formation in the spleen, elevated serum Ig and autoantibodies. We therefore examined B cell populations in this and other γδ-deficient mouse strains. Whereas immature bone marrow B cells remained largely unchanged, peripheral B cells underwent several changes. Specifically, transitional and mature B cells in the spleen of B6.TCR-Vγ4−/−/6−/− mice and other peripheral B cell populations were diminished, most of all splenic marginal zone (MZ) B cells. However, relative frequencies and absolute numbers of antibody-producing cells, and serum levels of antibodies, IL-4 and BAFF, were increased. Cell transfers confirmed that these changes are directly dependent on the altered γδ T cells in this strain, and their enhanced potential of producing IL-4. Further evidence suggests the possibility of direct interactions between γδ T cells and B cells in the splenic MZ. Together, these data demonstrate the capability of γδ T cells of modulating size and productivity of pre-immune peripheral B cell populations. PMID:26582947

  7. Modeling bacterial population growth from stochastic single-cell dynamics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alonso, Antonio A; Molina, Ignacio; Theodoropoulos, Constantinos

    2014-09-01

    A few bacterial cells may be sufficient to produce a food-borne illness outbreak, provided that they are capable of adapting and proliferating on a food matrix. This is why any quantitative health risk assessment policy must incorporate methods to accurately predict the growth of bacterial populations from a small number of pathogens. In this aim, mathematical models have become a powerful tool. Unfortunately, at low cell concentrations, standard deterministic models fail to predict the fate of the population, essentially because the heterogeneity between individuals becomes relevant. In this work, a stochastic differential equation (SDE) model is proposed to describe variability within single-cell growth and division and to simulate population growth from a given initial number of individuals. We provide evidence of the model ability to explain the observed distributions of times to division, including the lag time produced by the adaptation to the environment, by comparing model predictions with experiments from the literature for Escherichia coli, Listeria innocua, and Salmonella enterica. The model is shown to accurately predict experimental growth population dynamics for both small and large microbial populations. The use of stochastic models for the estimation of parameters to successfully fit experimental data is a particularly challenging problem. For instance, if Monte Carlo methods are employed to model the required distributions of times to division, the parameter estimation problem can become numerically intractable. We overcame this limitation by converting the stochastic description to a partial differential equation (backward Kolmogorov) instead, which relates to the distribution of division times. Contrary to previous stochastic formulations based on random parameters, the present model is capable of explaining the variability observed in populations that result from the growth of a small number of initial cells as well as the lack of it compared to

  8. Identification of a population of epidermal squamous cell carcinoma cells with enhanced potential for tumor formation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adhikary, Gautam; Grun, Dan; Kerr, Candace; Balasubramanian, Sivaprakasam; Rorke, Ellen A; Vemuri, Mohan; Boucher, Shayne; Bickenbach, Jackie R; Hornyak, Thomas; Xu, Wen; Fisher, Matthew L; Eckert, Richard L

    2013-01-01

    Epidermal squamous cell carcinoma is among the most common cancers in humans. These tumors are comprised of phenotypically diverse populations of cells that display varying potential for proliferation and differentiation. An important goal is identifying cells from this population that drive tumor formation. To enrich for tumor-forming cells, cancer cells were grown as spheroids in non-attached conditions. We show that spheroid-selected cells form faster growing and larger tumors in immune-compromised mice as compared to non-selected cells. Moreover, spheroid-selected cells gave rise to tumors following injection of as few as one hundred cells, suggesting these cells have enhanced tumor-forming potential. Cells isolated from spheroid-selected tumors retain an enhanced ability to grow as spheroids when grown in non-attached culture conditions. Thus, these tumor-forming cells retain their phenotype following in vivo passage as tumors. Detailed analysis reveals that spheroid-selected cultures are highly enriched for expression of epidermal stem cell and embryonic stem cell markers, including aldehyde dehydrogenase 1, keratin 15, CD200, keratin 19, Oct4, Bmi-1, Ezh2 and trimethylated histone H3. These studies indicate that a subpopulation of cells that possess stem cell-like properties and express stem cell markers can be derived from human epidermal cancer cells and that these cells display enhanced ability to drive tumor formation.

  9. Identification of a population of epidermal squamous cell carcinoma cells with enhanced potential for tumor formation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gautam Adhikary

    Full Text Available Epidermal squamous cell carcinoma is among the most common cancers in humans. These tumors are comprised of phenotypically diverse populations of cells that display varying potential for proliferation and differentiation. An important goal is identifying cells from this population that drive tumor formation. To enrich for tumor-forming cells, cancer cells were grown as spheroids in non-attached conditions. We show that spheroid-selected cells form faster growing and larger tumors in immune-compromised mice as compared to non-selected cells. Moreover, spheroid-selected cells gave rise to tumors following injection of as few as one hundred cells, suggesting these cells have enhanced tumor-forming potential. Cells isolated from spheroid-selected tumors retain an enhanced ability to grow as spheroids when grown in non-attached culture conditions. Thus, these tumor-forming cells retain their phenotype following in vivo passage as tumors. Detailed analysis reveals that spheroid-selected cultures are highly enriched for expression of epidermal stem cell and embryonic stem cell markers, including aldehyde dehydrogenase 1, keratin 15, CD200, keratin 19, Oct4, Bmi-1, Ezh2 and trimethylated histone H3. These studies indicate that a subpopulation of cells that possess stem cell-like properties and express stem cell markers can be derived from human epidermal cancer cells and that these cells display enhanced ability to drive tumor formation.

  10. Estimates of genetic and environmental contribution to 43 quantitative traits support sharing of a homogeneous environment in an isolated population from South Tyrol, Italy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marroni, Fabio; Grazio, Daniela; Pattaro, Cristian; Devoto, Marcella; Pramstaller, Peter

    2008-01-01

    As part of the genomic health care program 'GenNova', we measured 43 quantitative traits in 1,136 subjects living in three isolated villages in South Tyrol (Italy), for which extended genealogical information was available. Thirty-seven of the studied traits had been previously investigated in other populations, while six of them are, to the best of our knowledge, studied here for the first time. For all 43 traits we estimated narrow-sense heritability, individual-specific environmental effects, and shared environmental effects. Estimates of narrow-sense heritability were in good agreement with previous findings. We found significant heritability for all traits; after correcting for multiple testing, all traits except serum concentration of glutamic oxaloacetic transaminase (GOT) and potassium still showed significant heritability. In contrast, the effect of living in the same sibship or village (the so-called sibship and household effects, respectively) was significant for a few traits only, and after correcting for multiple testing no trait showed significant shared environment effect. We suggest that the sharing of a highly similar environment by the subjects included in this study explains the low contribution of the household effects to the overall trait variation. This peculiarity should provide an advantage in gene-mapping projects by reducing environmental bias. (c) 2007 S. Karger AG, Basel

  11. Proximal tubular cells contain a phenotypically distinct, scattered cell population involved in tubular regeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smeets, Bart; Boor, Peter; Dijkman, Henry; Sharma, Shagun V; Jirak, Peggy; Mooren, Fieke; Berger, Katja; Bornemann, Jörg; Gelman, Irwin H; Floege, Jürgen; van der Vlag, Johan; Wetzels, Jack F M; Moeller, Marcus J

    2013-04-01

    Regeneration of injured tubular cells occurs after acute tubular necrosis primarily from intrinsic renal cells. This may occur from a pre-existing intratubular stem/progenitor cell population or from any surviving proximal tubular cell. In this study, we characterize a CD24-, CD133-, and vimentin-positive subpopulation of cells scattered throughout the proximal tubule in normal human kidney. Compared to adjacent 'normal' proximal tubular cells, these CD24-positive cells contained less cytoplasm, fewer mitochondria, and no brush border. In addition, 49 marker proteins are described that are expressed within the proximal tubules in a similar scattered pattern. For eight of these markers, we confirmed co-localization with CD24. In human biopsies of patients with acute tubular necrosis (ATN), the number of CD24-positive tubular cells was increased. In both normal human kidneys and the ATN biopsies, around 85% of proliferating cells were CD24-positive - indicating that this cell population participates in tubular regeneration. In healthy rat kidneys, the novel cell subpopulation was absent. However, upon unilateral ureteral obstruction (UUO), the novel cell population was detected in significant amounts in the injured kidney. In summary, in human renal biopsies, the CD24-positive cells represent tubular cells with a deviant phenotype, characterized by a distinct morphology and marker expression. After acute tubular injury, these cells become more numerous. In healthy rat kidneys, these cells are not detectable, whereas after UUO, they appeared de novo - arguing against the notion that these cells represent a pre-existing progenitor cell population. Our data indicate rather that these cells represent transiently dedifferentiated tubular cells involved in regeneration. Copyright © 2012 Pathological Society of Great Britain and Ireland. Published by John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  12. Side Population Cells Derived from Adult Human Liver Generate Hepatocyte-like Cells In Vitro

    OpenAIRE

    HUSSAIN, SUNNY ZAHEED; Strom, Stephen C.; Kirby, Martha R.; Burns, Sean; Langemeijer, Saskia; Ueda, Takahiro; HSIEH, MATTHEW; Tisdale, John F.

    2005-01-01

    We sought to determine whether hepatic side population (SP) cells derived from adult human liver possess the potential of a novel candidate hepatic stem cell. Human cadaveric donor liver was subjected to collagenase perfusion and hepatocytes were separated from nonparenchymal cells by differential centrifugation. SP cells were isolated from the nonparenchymal portion after Hoechst 33342 staining. Since CD45 is a panleukocyte antigen, CD45-negative SP cells were separated from the vast majorit...

  13. Deconstructing stem cell population heterogeneity: Single-cell analysis and modeling approaches

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Jincheng; Tzanakakis, Emmanuel S.

    2014-01-01

    Isogenic stem cell populations display cell-to-cell variations in a multitude of attributes including gene or protein expression, epigenetic state, morphology, proliferation and proclivity for differentiation. The origins of the observed heterogeneity and its roles in the maintenance of pluripotency and the lineage specification of stem cells remain unclear. Addressing pertinent questions will require the employment of single-cell analysis methods as traditional cell biochemical and biomolecular assays yield mostly population-average data. In addition to time-lapse microscopy and flow cytometry, recent advances in single-cell genomic, transcriptomic and proteomic profiling are reviewed. The application of multiple displacement amplification, next generation sequencing, mass cytometry and spectrometry to stem cell systems is expected to provide a wealth of information affording unprecedented levels of multiparametric characterization of cell ensembles under defined conditions promoting pluripotency or commitment. Establishing connections between single-cell analysis information and the observed phenotypes will also require suitable mathematical models. Stem cell self-renewal and differentiation are orchestrated by the coordinated regulation of subcellular, intercellular and niche-wide processes spanning multiple time scales. Here, we discuss different modeling approaches and challenges arising from their application to stem cell populations. Integrating single-cell analysis with computational methods will fill gaps in our knowledge about the functions of heterogeneity in stem cell physiology. This combination will also aid the rational design of efficient differentiation and reprogramming strategies as well as bioprocesses for the production of clinically valuable stem cell derivatives. PMID:24035899

  14. [Isolation and identification of side population cells in human lung adenocarcinoma cell line A549].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, Tong; Li, Li; Li, Dan-rong; Mao, Nai-quan; Liu, De-seng; Zuo, Chuan-tian; Zhang, Wei; Huang, Ding-ming

    2011-02-01

    To isolate and characterize the side population cells (SP cells) in the lung adenocarcinomas cell line A549. The protein expression of ABCG2 in human lung adenocarcinoma cell line A549 was detected by immunohistochemistry. SP and NSP cells in the cell line A549 were isolated by FACS, and their differentiation was analysed. ABCG2 expression in the two cell subsets was detected by RT-PCR. The cell growth curves, cell division indexes, cell cycles, plate clone formation tests, migration and invasion assays, chemotherapeutic susceptibility tests, tests of the intracellular drug levels, and the tumor cell implantation experiments on nude mice were applied to study the biological properties of the two cell subsets. The expression of ABCG2 in the transplanted tumor in nude mice was detected by immunohistochemistry and RT-PCR. The positive rate of ABCG2 expression in the A549 cells by immunohistochemistry was 2.13%. SP and NSP cells were isolated by FACS. The SP cells could produce both SP and NSP cells, while NSP cells only produced NSP cells. SP cells expressed ABCG2, but NSP cells did not. The proliferation and migration abilities of the two cell subsets were similar, but the invasion and tumorigenic ability of SP cells was significantly higher than that of NSP cells. The susceptibilities to DDP and its intracellular levels of the two cell subsets were similar, but the susceptibilities to 5-FU, VP16, NVB and GEM and their intracellular levels of NSP cells were significantly higher than those of the SP cells. SP cells in the human lung adenocarcinomas cell line A549 is enriched with tumor stem cells. An effective way to get lung adenocarcinomas stem cells is to isolate SP cells by FACS.

  15. A novel perivascular cell population in the zebrafish brain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galanternik, Marina Venero; Castranova, Daniel; Gore, Aniket V; Blewett, Nathan H; Jung, Hyun Min; Stratman, Amber N; Kirby, Martha R; Iben, James; Miller, Mayumi F; Kawakami, Koichi; Maraia, Richard J; Weinstein, Brant M

    2017-01-01

    The blood-brain barrier is essential for the proper homeostasis and function of the CNS, but its mechanism of function is poorly understood. Perivascular cells surrounding brain blood vessels are thought to be important for blood-brain barrier establishment, but their roles are not well defined. Here, we describe a novel perivascular cell population closely associated with blood vessels on the zebrafish brain. Based on similarities in their morphology, location, and scavenger behavior, these cells appear to be the zebrafish equivalent of cells variably characterized as Fluorescent Granular Perithelial cells (FGPs), perivascular macrophages, or ‘Mato Cells’ in mammals. Despite their macrophage-like morphology and perivascular location, zebrafish FGPs appear molecularly most similar to lymphatic endothelium, and our imaging studies suggest that these cells emerge by differentiation from endothelium of the optic choroidal vascular plexus. Our findings provide the first report of a perivascular cell population in the brain derived from vascular endothelium. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.24369.001 PMID:28395729

  16. Characterization of cancer stem-like cells in the side population cells of human gastric cancer cell line MKN-45.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Hai-hong; Cai, Ai-zhen; Wei, Xue-ming; Ding, Li; Li, Feng-zhi; Zheng, Ai-ming; Dai, Da-jiang; Huang, Rong-rong; Cao, Hou-jun; Zhou, Hai-yang; Wang, Jian-mei; Wang, Xue-jing; Shi, Wei; Zhu, Heng; Yuan, Xiao-ying; Chen, Lin

    2013-03-01

    Side population (SP) cells may play a crucial role in tumorigenesis and the recurrence of cancer. Many kinds of cell lines and tissues have demonstrated the presence of SP cells, including several gastric cancer cell lines. This study is aimed to identify the cancer stem-like cells in the SP of gastric cancer cell line MKN-45. We used fluorescence activated cell sorting (FACS) to sort SP cells in the human gastric carcinoma cell line MKN-45 (cells labeled with Hoechst 33342) and then characterized the cancer stem-like properties of SP cells. This study found that the SP cells had higher clone formation efficiency than major population (MP) cells. Five stemness-related gene expression profiles, including OCT-4, SOX-2, NANOG, CD44, and adenosine triphosphate (ATP)-binding cassette transporters gene ABCG2, were tested in SP and MP cells using quantitative real-time reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR). Western blot was used to show the difference of protein expression between SP and MP cells. Both results show that there was significantly higher protein expression in SP cells than in MP cells. When inoculated into non-obese diabetic/severe combined immunodeficiency (NOD/SCID) mice, SP cells show higher tumorigenesis tendency than MP cells. These results indicate that SP cells possess cancer stem cell properties and prove that SP cells from MKN-45 are gastric cancer stem-like cells.

  17. CD34 defines an osteoprogenitor cell population in mouse bone marrow stromal cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Abdallah, Basem M; Al-Shammary, Asma; Skagen, Peter

    2015-01-01

    Bone marrow stromal cells (BMSCs, also known as bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells) and their progenitors have been identified based on retrospective functional criteria. CD markers are employed to define cell populations with distinct functional characteristics. However, defining and pro...

  18. Triplet correlations among similarly tuned cells impact population coding

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Natasha Alexandra Cayco Gajic

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Which statistical features of spiking activity matter for how stimuli are encoded in neural populations? A vast body of work has explored how firing rates in individual cells and correlations in the spikes of cell pairs impact coding. Recent experiments have shown evidence for the existence of higher-order spiking correlations, which describe simultaneous firing in triplets and larger ensembles of cells; however, little is known about their impact on encoded stimulus information. Here, we take a first step toward closing this gap. We vary triplet correlations in small (approximately 10 cell neural populations while keeping single cell and pairwise statistics fixed at typically reported values. This connection with empirically observed lower-order statistics important, as it places strong constraints on the level of triplet correlations that can occur. For each value of triplet correlations, we estimate the performance of the neural population on a two-stimulus discrimination task. We find that the allowed changes in the level of triplet correlations can significantly enhance coding, in particular if triplet correlations differ for the two stimuli. In this scenario, triplet correlations must be included in order to accurately quantify the functionality of neural populations. When both stimuli elicit similar triplet correlations, however, pairwise models provide relatively accurate descriptions of coding accuracy. We explain our findings geometrically via the skew that triplet correlations induce in population-wide distributions of neural responses. Finally, we calculate how many samples are necessary to accurately measure spiking correlations of this type, providing an estimate of the necessary recording times in future experiments.

  19. Homogenous finitary symmetric groups

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Otto‎. ‎H‎. Kegel

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available We characterize strictly diagonal type of embeddings of finitary symmetric groups in terms of cardinality and the characteristic. Namely, we prove the following. Let kappa be an infinite cardinal. If G=underseti=1stackrelinftybigcupG i , where G i =FSym(kappan i , (H=underseti=1stackrelinftybigcupH i , where H i =Alt(kappan i , is a group of strictly diagonal type and xi=(p 1 ,p 2 ,ldots is an infinite sequence of primes, then G is isomorphic to the homogenous finitary symmetric group FSym(kappa(xi (H is isomorphic to the homogenous alternating group Alt(kappa(xi , where n 0 =1,n i =p 1 p 2 ldotsp i .

  20. Homogeneous group, research, institution

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francesca Natascia Vasta

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available The work outlines the complex connection among empiric research, therapeutic programs and host institution. It is considered the current research state in Italy. Italian research field is analyzed and critic data are outlined: lack of results regarding both the therapeutic processes and the effectiveness of eating disorders group analytic treatment. The work investigates on an eating disorders homogeneous group, led into an eating disorder outpatient service. First we present the methodological steps the research is based on including the strong connection among theory and clinical tools. Secondly clinical tools are described and the results commented. Finally, our results suggest the necessity of validating some more specifical hypothesis: verifying the relationship between clinical improvement (sense of exclusion and painful emotions reduction and specific group therapeutic processes; verifying the relationship between depressive feelings, relapses and transition trough a more differentiated groupal field.Keywords: Homogeneous group; Eating disorders; Institutional field; Therapeutic outcome

  1. Homogeneous bilateral block shifts

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Introduction. We write D for the complex unit disc and G for the Möbius group, the group of holo- morphic self-maps of D. A bounded operator T on a Hilbert space H is said to be homogeneous if its spectrum is contained in ¯D and for every g in G there exists a unitary operator U(g) such that g(T ) = U(g). −1. T U (g).

  2. Dynamics of homogeneous nucleation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Toxværd, Søren

    2015-01-01

    The classical nucleation theory for homogeneous nucleation is formulated as a theory for a density fluctuation in a supersaturated gas at a given temperature. But molecular dynamics simulations reveal that it is small cold clusters which initiates the nucleation. The temperature in the nucleating...... or shrink by accretion or evaporation of monomers only but also by an exponentially declining change in cluster size per time step equal to the cluster distribution in the supersaturated gas....

  3. Homogenization of dislocation dynamics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    El Hajj, Ahmad; Ibrahim, Hassan; Monneau, Regis, E-mail: elhajj@cermics.enpc.fr, E-mail: ibrahim@cermics.enpc.fr, E-mail: monneau@cermics.enpc.fr [CERMICS, ENPC, 6 and 8 avenue Blaise Pascal, Cite Descartes, Champs sur Marne, 77455 Marne-la-Valle Cedex 2 (France)

    2009-07-15

    In this paper we consider the dynamics of dislocations with the same Burgers vector, contained in the same glide plane, and moving in a material with periodic obstacles. We study two cases: i) the particular case of parallel straight dislocations and ii) the general case of curved dislocations. In each case, we perform rigorously the homogenization of the dynamics and predict the corresponding effective macroscopic elasto-visco-plastic flow rule.

  4. Homogenization of resonant chiral metamaterials

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andryieuski, Andrei; Menzel, C.; Rockstuhl, Carsten

    2010-01-01

    Homogenization of metamaterials is a crucial issue as it allows to describe their optical response in terms of effective wave parameters as, e.g., propagation constants. In this paper we consider the possible homogenization of chiral metamaterials. We show that for meta-atoms of a certain size...... an analytical criterion for performing the homogenization and a tool to predict the homogenization limit. We show that strong coupling between meta-atoms of chiral metamaterials may prevent their homogenization at all....

  5. Homogeneous M2 duals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Figueroa-O’Farrill, José [School of Mathematics and Maxwell Institute for Mathematical Sciences,The University of Edinburgh,James Clerk Maxwell Building, The King’s Buildings, Peter Guthrie Tait Road,Edinburgh EH9 3FD, Scotland (United Kingdom); Ungureanu, Mara [Humboldt-Universität zu Berlin, Institut für Mathematik,Unter den Linden 6, 10099 Berlin (Germany)

    2016-01-25

    Motivated by the search for new gravity duals to M2 branes with N>4 supersymmetry — equivalently, M-theory backgrounds with Killing superalgebra osp(N|4) for N>4 — we classify (except for a small gap) homogeneous M-theory backgrounds with symmetry Lie algebra so(n)⊕so(3,2) for n=5,6,7. We find that there are no new backgrounds with n=6,7 but we do find a number of new (to us) backgrounds with n=5. All backgrounds are metrically products of the form AdS{sub 4}×P{sup 7}, with P riemannian and homogeneous under the action of SO(5), or S{sup 4}×Q{sup 7} with Q lorentzian and homogeneous under the action of SO(3,2). At least one of the new backgrounds is supersymmetric (albeit with only N=2) and we show that it can be constructed from a supersymmetric Freund-Rubin background via a Wick rotation. Two of the new backgrounds have only been approximated numerically.

  6. A preliminary study of side population cells in human gastric cancer cell line HGC-27.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Ganglong; Sun, Zhenliang; Wenyong, Liu; Dongxia, Ye; Zhao, Runjia; Zhang, Xueli

    2015-03-16

    Cancer stem cell-like side population (SP) cells, which may be responsible for recurrence, tumor metastasis, and resistance to cancer therapy, have been identified and characterized in several types of cell lines from gastric cancer. However, there is no report on isolation of SP cells from human gastric cancer cell line HGC-27. This study aims to analyze the proportion of SP cells in HGC-27 cell line, differentiate SP from non-side population (NSP) cells, and determine whether the SP cells have certain biological properties of stem cells. (1) HGC-27 suspension was prepared and stained with Hoechst33342 and PI for flow cytometric isolation of SP (2). Differences in proliferation and stemness-related gene expression profiles (CD133, CD44, OCT-4, MDR1, EpCAM, and ABCG2) between SP and NSP cells were detected by gastric formation assay and quantitative real-time PCR (3). Oncogenicity of SP and NSP cells was determined in nude mice in vivo. (1) SP cells accounted for 0.1-1.0% of HGC-27 cells, and decreased to 0% after verapamil inhibition. Using flow cytometry, we sorted 7.5×10⁵ SP cells and most HGC-27 cells were NSP cells (2). Gastric formation assay and MTT demonstrated that there was a significant difference in proliferation between SP and NSP cells. Gene expression analysis showed that the expression of genes was significantly higher in SP cells (3). The oncogenicity experiment in nude mice revealed that 105 SP cells were able to form tumors, which demonstrated higher tumorigenicity than non-SP cells. These results collectively suggested that SP cells from HGC-27 cell line have some cancer stem cell properties and could be used for studying the pathogenesis of gastric cancer, which may contribute to discovery of novel therapeutic targets.

  7. Flow cytometry and monoclonal antibodies identify normal liver cell populations antigenically related to oval cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agelli, M; Halay, E D

    1995-01-01

    Oval cells, a non-parenchymal cell population induced to rapidly proliferate in animals treated with carcinogens, are thought to be related to the hypothesized liver stem cells. In normal liver there are poorly defined cells antigenically related to oval cells. These oval cell antigen positive (OCAP) cells present in normal animals are thought to include hepatocyte and bile duct cell precursors. To isolate them, we modified the existing protocols designed for oval cells and used it on normal neonatal rat livers. Using flow cytometry, the percentage of normal liver OCAP-cells varied with the monoclonal antibody (MoAb) to the different oval cell membrane markers used: 12% (MoAb 18.2), 23% (MoAb 270.38), 27% (MoAb 18.11), 31% (MoAb 18.13), and 37% (MoAb 374.3). Macrophages consisted 10% of the cells (MoAb MCA 275); hepatocytes were essentially absent ( < 1%, MoAb 236.4). Our results demonstrate that is possible to obtain significant numbers of normal cells antigenically related to oval cells and that using different MoAbs, different cell populations can be sorted for use in experimental studies testing liver progenitor cell hypothesis.

  8. Modeling population dynamics of mitochondria in mammalian cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kornick, Kellianne; Das, Moumita

    Mitochondria are organelles located inside eukaryotic cells and are essential for several key cellular processes such as energy (ATP) production, cell signaling, differentiation, and apoptosis. All organisms are believed to have low levels of variation in mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA), and alterations in mtDNA are connected to a range of human health conditions, including epilepsy, heart failure, Parkinsons disease, diabetes, and multiple sclerosis. Therefore, understanding how changes in mtDNA accumulate over time and are correlated to changes in mitochondrial function and cell properties can have a profound impact on our understanding of cell physiology and the origins of some diseases. Motivated by this, we develop and study a mathematical model to determine which cellular parameters have the largest impact on mtDNA population dynamics. The model consists of coupled ODEs to describe subpopulations of healthy and dysfunctional mitochondria subject to mitochondrial fission, fusion, autophagy, and mutation. We study the time evolution and stability of each sub-population under specific selection biases and pressures by tuning specific terms in our model. Our results may provide insights into how sub-populations of mitochondria survive and evolve under different selection pressures. This work was supported by a Grant from the Moore Foundation.

  9. Cancer Stem Cells and Side Population Cells in Breast Cancer and Metastasis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thomas W.J. Lennard

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available In breast cancer it is never the primary tumour that is fatal; instead it is the development of metastatic disease which is the major cause of cancer related mortality. There is accumulating evidence that suggests that Cancer Stem Cells (CSC may play a role in breast cancer development and progression. Breast cancer stem cell populations, including side population cells (SP, have been shown to be primitive stem cell-like populations, being long-lived, self-renewing and highly proliferative. SP cells are identified using dual wavelength flow cytometry combined with Hoechst 33342 dye efflux, this ability is due to expression of one or more members of the ABC transporter family. They have increased resistance to chemotherapeutic agents and apoptotic stimuli and have increased migratory potential above that of the bulk tumour cells making them strong candidates for the metastatic spread of breast cancer. Treatment of nearly all cancers usually involves one first-line agent known to be a substrate of an ABC transporter thereby increasing the risk of developing drug resistant tumours. At present there is no marker available to identify SP cells using immunohistochemistry on breast cancer patient samples. If SP cells do play a role in breast cancer progression/Metastatic Breast Cancer (MBC, combining chemotherapy with ABC inhibitors may be able to destroy both the cells making up the bulk tumour and the cancer stem cell population thus preventing the risk of drug resistant disease, recurrence or metastasis.

  10. Cancer Stem Cells and Side Population Cells in Breast Cancer and Metastasis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Britton, Kelly M. [Institute of Genetic Medicine, Newcastle University, International Centre for Life, Central Parkway, Newcastle-upon-Tyne, NE1 3BZ (United Kingdom); Kirby, John A. [Institute of Cellular Medicine, Newcastle University, 3rd Floor William Leech Building, Framlington Place, Newcastle-upon-Tyne, NE2 4HH (United Kingdom); Lennard, Thomas W.J. [Faculty of Medical Sciences, Newcastle University, 3rd Floor William Leech Building, Framlington Place, Newcastle-upon-Tyne, NE2 4HH (United Kingdom); Meeson, Annette P., E-mail: annette.meeson@ncl.ac.uk [Institute of Genetic Medicine, Newcastle University, International Centre for Life, Central Parkway, Newcastle-upon-Tyne, NE1 3BZ (United Kingdom); North East England Stem Cell Institute, Bioscience Centre, International Centre for Life, Central Parkway, Newcastle-upon-Tyne, NE1 3BZ (United Kingdom)

    2011-04-19

    In breast cancer it is never the primary tumour that is fatal; instead it is the development of metastatic disease which is the major cause of cancer related mortality. There is accumulating evidence that suggests that Cancer Stem Cells (CSC) may play a role in breast cancer development and progression. Breast cancer stem cell populations, including side population cells (SP), have been shown to be primitive stem cell-like populations, being long-lived, self-renewing and highly proliferative. SP cells are identified using dual wavelength flow cytometry combined with Hoechst 33342 dye efflux, this ability is due to expression of one or more members of the ABC transporter family. They have increased resistance to chemotherapeutic agents and apoptotic stimuli and have increased migratory potential above that of the bulk tumour cells making them strong candidates for the metastatic spread of breast cancer. Treatment of nearly all cancers usually involves one first-line agent known to be a substrate of an ABC transporter thereby increasing the risk of developing drug resistant tumours. At present there is no marker available to identify SP cells using immunohistochemistry on breast cancer patient samples. If SP cells do play a role in breast cancer progression/Metastatic Breast Cancer (MBC), combining chemotherapy with ABC inhibitors may be able to destroy both the cells making up the bulk tumour and the cancer stem cell population thus preventing the risk of drug resistant disease, recurrence or metastasis.

  11. Association of HLA-DRB3*0202 and serum IgG antibodies to Chlamydia pneumoniae with essential hypertension in a highly homogeneous population from Majorca (Balearic Islands, Spain).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zabay, J M; Marco, J; Soler, J; Contu, L; Cappai, L; Carcassi, C; Gómez, G; Mulet, J M; Munar, M A; Viader, C

    2005-08-01

    Separate studies investigating the relationship of essential hypertension (EH) with the HLA system and with Chlamydia pneumoniae (C. pneumoniae) infection have given conflicting results. Our aim was to clarify these relationships and determine whether the HLA system and C. pneumoniae infection interact with respect to the risk for EH. An association study (110 essential hypertensives and 107 controls) was conducted in a highly homogeneous population in the Balearic Island of Majorca (Spain). Molecular typing of HLA-B and HLA-DRB and quantification of serum levels of IgG antibodies to C. pneumoniae (sIgGa-Cp) were determined. Student's t-test, chi(2)-statistics, logistic regression analysis, and general linear model ANOVA were used for statistical analysis. The results showed that EH was related with HLA-DRB3*0202 in the whole study population, and with levels of sIgGa-Cp>63.5 BU/ml in the group of individuals with sIgGa-Cp>30 BU/ml (OR (95% CI) adjusted for obesity, familial history of EH and diabetes=2.06 (1.07-3.97), P=0.03, and =4.60 (1.06-19.90), P=0.04, respectively). The association between EH and sIgGa-Cp was observed in the DRB3*0202(+) individuals, but not in the DRB3*0202(-) subgroup (OR (95% CI)=11.14 (1.92-64.54), P=0.004, and =0.98 (0.22-4.43), P=0.64, respectively (P of the Mantel-Haenszel test for homogeneity of OR=0.06)). In our population, EH was positively associated with HLA-DRB3*0202 and with high levels of sIgGa-Cp. Moreover, a significant interaction of DRB3*0202 on the effect of sIgGa-Cp was observed, as the association of EH with these antibodies depended on the presence of DRB*0202.

  12. Evaluation of stem-like side population cells in a recurrent nasopharyngeal carcinoma cell line.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoe, Susan Ling Ling; Tan, Lu Ping; Jamal, Juliana; Peh, Suat Cheng; Ng, Ching Ching; Zhang, Wen Cai; Ahmad, Munirah; Khoo, Alan Soo Beng

    2014-01-01

    Side population (SP) assay identifies cells with dye/drug extrusion ability, a characteristic of stem cells. Here, we determined if SP cells exist in a verified cell line originating from recurrent nasopharyngeal carcinoma (NPC) and a xenograft established from recurrent metastatic NPC. These cells were evaluated for stem-like properties via functional assays as well as for tumourigenicity. We used Hoechst 33342 to identify the SP from non-SP (NSP) cells in HK1 NPC cell line and xeno-284 NPC xenograft. The cells were assayed for in vitro characteristics of cancer stem cells (CSC), gene expression and tumourigenicity ability. Student's t test was used to test for significance. Five to ten percent and less than 0.5% of HK1 and xeno-284 NPC cells, respectively, were SP cells. Fumitremorgin C (FTC), as opposed to verapamil, was effective in causing the cells to retain Hoechst 33342 dye. HK1 SP cells formed more holoclones, had more aldehyde dehydrogenase (ALDH) activity, divided asymmetrically and contained slow-proliferating cells. ABCG2, SOX2, TERT, MYC, Hedgehog, Notch, TGFβ and Wnt signalling pathway genes were significantly upregulated in the SP cells. However, despite these differences in vitro, both HK1 SP and NSP cells had an overall similar tumourigenic potential in vivo. HK1 SP cells were ABCG2-specific as confirmed by FTC inhibition and gene expression data. Despite data from in vitro and gene expression experiments suggesting stem-like features, there was no significant difference in tumourigenic potential between SP and NSP cells. We conclude that SP assay alone is not sufficient to identify CSCs in HK1 cells. Our work also suggests the presence of a stem-cell like population among NPC cells which do not display increased tumourigenicity.

  13. Cell population structure prior to bifurcation predicts efficiency of directed differentiation in human induced pluripotent cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bargaje, Rhishikesh; Trachana, Kalliopi; Shelton, Martin N; McGinnis, Christopher S; Zhou, Joseph X; Chadick, Cora; Cook, Savannah; Cavanaugh, Christopher; Huang, Sui; Hood, Leroy

    2017-02-28

    Steering the differentiation of induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) toward specific cell types is crucial for patient-specific disease modeling and drug testing. This effort requires the capacity to predict and control when and how multipotent progenitor cells commit to the desired cell fate. Cell fate commitment represents a critical state transition or "tipping point" at which complex systems undergo a sudden qualitative shift. To characterize such transitions during iPSC to cardiomyocyte differentiation, we analyzed the gene expression patterns of 96 developmental genes at single-cell resolution. We identified a bifurcation event early in the trajectory when a primitive streak-like cell population segregated into the mesodermal and endodermal lineages. Before this branching point, we could detect the signature of an imminent critical transition: increase in cell heterogeneity and coordination of gene expression. Correlation analysis of gene expression profiles at the tipping point indicates transcription factors that drive the state transition toward each alternative cell fate and their relationships with specific phenotypic readouts. The latter helps us to facilitate small molecule screening for differentiation efficiency. To this end, we set up an analysis of cell population structure at the tipping point after systematic variation of the protocol to bias the differentiation toward mesodermal or endodermal cell lineage. We were able to predict the proportion of cardiomyocytes many days before cells manifest the differentiated phenotype. The analysis of cell populations undergoing a critical state transition thus affords a tool to forecast cell fate outcomes and can be used to optimize differentiation protocols to obtain desired cell populations.

  14. Homogeneous Finsler Spaces

    CERN Document Server

    Deng, Shaoqiang

    2012-01-01

    "Homogeneous Finsler Spaces" is the first book to emphasize the relationship between Lie groups and Finsler geometry, and the first to show the validity in using Lie theory for the study of Finsler geometry problems. This book contains a series of new results obtained by the author and collaborators during the last decade. The topic of Finsler geometry has developed rapidly in recent years. One of the main reasons for its surge in development is its use in many scientific fields, such as general relativity, mathematical biology, and phycology (study of algae). This monograph introduc

  15. HOMOGENEOUS NUCLEAR POWER REACTOR

    Science.gov (United States)

    King, L.D.P.

    1959-09-01

    A homogeneous nuclear power reactor utilizing forced circulation of the liquid fuel is described. The reactor does not require fuel handling outside of the reactor vessel during any normal operation including complete shutdown to room temperature, the reactor being selfregulating under extreme operating conditions and controlled by the thermal expansion of the liquid fuel. The liquid fuel utilized is a uranium, phosphoric acid, and water solution which requires no gus exhaust system or independent gas recombining system, thereby eliminating the handling of radioiytic gas.

  16. [Isolation and in vitro characterization of CD133(+) side population cells from laryngeal cancer cell line].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Chun-ping; Zhou, Liang; Xie, Ming; Tao, Lei; Zhang, Ming; Tian, Jie

    2011-09-01

    To investigate an approach enriching cancer stem cells (CSCs) more effectively from laryngeal cancer cell line. CD133(+)SP and CD133(-)SP subpopulation was detected and isolated from Hep-2 cell line using Hoechst33342 dye and phycoerythrin (PE)-conjugated CD133 monoclonal antibody assisted by fluorescence activated cell sorting technology. Sorted CD133(+)SP and CD133(-)SP cells were compared in CSCs-related assays including proliferation, differentiation, spheroid formation and drug sensitivity. CD133(+)SP cells accounted for a very small fraction of (0.30 ± 0.12)% in Hep-2 cell line, far less than the proportion of CD133(+) subgroup and side population subgroup, which were (3.15 ± 0.83)% and (17.1 ± 2.0)% respectively. Intriguingly, CD133(+)SP cells proliferated much faster than CD133(-)SP cells in RPMI1640 and gave rise to CD133(-)SP cells and other heterogeneous cells that formed the bulk of the tumor. In contrast, CD133(-)SP cells were not able to differentiate into CD133(+)SP cells. In serum-free medium CD133(+)SP cells grew as spherical clusters and remained floating. In addition, CD133(+)SP cells manifested the marked resistance to chemotherapy than CD133(-)SP cells. Compared with CD133(-)SP cells, CD133(+)SP subpopulation exhibited extraordinary cancer stem-like properties, were enriched for cancer stem cells more effectively and might serve as an ideal putative candidate for CSCs research in laryngeal cancer.

  17. Cell mass and cell cycle dynamics of an asynchronous budding yeast population

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lencastre Fernandes, Rita; Carlquist, Magnus; Lundin, Luisa

    2013-01-01

    consumption observed during batch cultivation. The good agreement between the proposed multi-scale model (a population balance model [PBM] coupled to an unstructured model) and experimental data (both the overall physiology and cell size and cell cycle distributions) indicates that a mechanistic model...... in experimental single-cell studies has taken place in the last decades. It has however not been fully accompanied by similar contributions within data analysis and mathematical modeling. Indeed, literature reporting, for example, quantitative analyses of experimental single-cell observations and validation...... of model predictions for cell property distributions against experimental data is scarce. This study focuses on the experimental and mathematical description of the dynamics of cell size and cell cycle position distributions, of a population of Saccharomyces cerevisiae, in response to the substrate...

  18. Biological characteristics of side population cells in a self-established human ovarian cancer cell line.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Zhentong; Lv, Shuang; Wang, Yishu; Sun, Meiyu; Chi, Guangfan; Guo, Jun; Song, Peiye; Fu, Xiaoyu; Zhang, Songling; Li, Yulin

    2016-07-01

    The aim of the present study was to establish an ovarian cancer (OC) cell line from ascites of an ovarian serous cystadenocarcinoma patient and investigate the biological characteristics of its side population (SP) cells. The OC cell line was established by isolating, purifying and subculturing primary cells from ascites of an ovarian serous cystadenocarcinoma patient (stage IIIc; grade 3). SP and non-SP (NSP) cells were isolated by fluorescence-activated cell sorting and cultured in serum-free medium and soft agar to compare the tumorsphere and colony formation capacities. Furthermore, SP and NSP cell tumorigenesis was examined by subcutaneous and intraperitoneal injection of the cells to non-obese diabetic/severe combined immune deficiency (NOD/SCID) mice. Drug resistance to cisplatin was examined by cell counting kit-8. The OC cell line was successfully established from ascites of an ovarian serous cystadenocarcinoma patient, which exhibited properties similar to primary tumors subsequent to >50 passages and >2 years of culture. The SP cell ratio was 0.38% in the OC cell line, and a similar SP cell ratio (0.39%) was observed when sorted SP cells were cultured for 3 weeks. Compared with NSP cells, SP cells exhibited increased abilities in differentiation and tumorsphere and colony formation, in addition to the formation of xenografted tumors and ascites and metastasis of the tumors in NOD/SCID mice, even at low cell numbers (3.0×10 3 cells). The xenografted tumors demonstrated histological features similar to primary tumors and expressed the ovarian serous cystadenocarcinoma marker CA125. In addition, SP cells demonstrated a significantly stronger drug resistance to cisplatin compared with NSP and unsorted cells, while treatment with verapamil, an inhibitor of ATP-binding cassette transporters, potently abrogated SP cell drug resistance. In conclusion, the present study verified SP cells from an established OC cell line and characterized the cells with self

  19. Expression of stanniocalcin 1 in thyroid side population cells and thyroid cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hayase, Suguru; Sasaki, Yoshihito; Matsubara, Tsutomu; Seo, Daekwan; Miyakoshi, Masaaki; Murata, Tsubasa; Ozaki, Takashi; Kakudo, Kennichi; Kumamoto, Kensuke; Ylaya, Kris; Cheng, Sheue-yann; Thorgeirsson, Snorri S; Hewitt, Stephen M; Ward, Jerrold M; Kimura, Shioko

    2015-04-01

    Mouse thyroid side population (SP) cells consist of a minor population of mouse thyroid cells that may have multipotent thyroid stem cell characteristics. However the nature of thyroid SP cells remains elusive, particularly in relation to thyroid cancer. Stanniocalcin (STC) 1 and 2 are secreted glycoproteins known to regulate serum calcium and phosphate homeostasis. In recent years, the relationship of STC1/2 expression to cancer has been described in various tissues. Microarray analysis was carried out to determine genes up- and down-regulated in thyroid SP cells as compared with non-SP cells. Among genes up-regulated, stanniocalcin 1 (STC1) was chosen for study because of its expression in various thyroid cells by Western blotting and immunohistochemistry. Gene expression analysis revealed that genes known to be highly expressed in cancer cells and/or involved in cancer invasion/metastasis were markedly up-regulated in SP cells from both intact as well as partial thyroidectomized thyroids. Among these genes, expression of STC1 was found in five human thyroid carcinoma-derived cell lines as revealed by analysis of mRNA and protein, and its expression was inversely correlated with the differentiation status of the cells. Immunohistochemical analysis demonstrated higher expression of STC1 in the thyroid tumor cell line and thyroid tumor tissues from humans and mice. These results suggest that SP cells contain a population of cells that express genes also highly expressed in cancer cells including Stc1, which warrants further study on the role of SP cells and/or STC1 expression in thyroid cancer.

  20. Side population cells isolated from KATO III human gastric cancer cell line have cancer stem cell-like characteristics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    She, Jun-Jun; Zhang, Peng-Ge; Wang, Xuan; Che, Xiang-Ming; Wang, Zi-Ming

    2012-09-07

    To investigate whether the side population (SP) cells possess cancer stem cell-like characteristics in vitro and the role of SP cells in tumorigenic process in gastric cancer. We analyzed the presence of SP cells in different human gastric carcinoma cell lines, and then isolated and identified the SP cells from the KATO III human gastric cancer cell line by flow cytometry. The clonogenic ability and self-renewal were evaluated by clone and sphere formation assays. The related genes were determined by reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction. To compare tumorigenic ability, SP and non-side population (NSP) cells from the KATO III human gastric cancer cell line were subcutaneously injected into nude mice. SP cells from the total population accounted for 0.57% in KATO III, 1.04% in Hs-746T, and 0.02% in AGS (CRL-1739). SP cells could grow clonally and have self-renewal capability in conditioned media. The expression of ABCG2, MDRI, Bmi-1 and Oct-4 was different between SP and NSP cells. However, there was no apparent difference between SP and NSP cells when they were injected into nude mice. SP cells have some cancer stem cell-like characteristics in vitro and can be used for studying the tumorigenic process in gastric cancer.

  1. Homogenization scheme for acoustic metamaterials

    KAUST Repository

    Yang, Min

    2014-02-26

    We present a homogenization scheme for acoustic metamaterials that is based on reproducing the lowest orders of scattering amplitudes from a finite volume of metamaterials. This approach is noted to differ significantly from that of coherent potential approximation, which is based on adjusting the effective-medium parameters to minimize scatterings in the long-wavelength limit. With the aid of metamaterials’ eigenstates, the effective parameters, such as mass density and elastic modulus can be obtained by matching the surface responses of a metamaterial\\'s structural unit cell with a piece of homogenized material. From the Green\\'s theorem applied to the exterior domain problem, matching the surface responses is noted to be the same as reproducing the scattering amplitudes. We verify our scheme by applying it to three different examples: a layered lattice, a two-dimensional hexagonal lattice, and a decorated-membrane system. It is shown that the predicted characteristics and wave fields agree almost exactly with numerical simulations and experiments and the scheme\\'s validity is constrained by the number of dominant surface multipoles instead of the usual long-wavelength assumption. In particular, the validity extends to the full band in one dimension and to regimes near the boundaries of the Brillouin zone in two dimensions.

  2. Multiple dendritic cell populations activate CD4+ T cells after viral stimulation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adele M Mount

    2008-02-01

    Full Text Available Dendritic cells (DC are a heterogeneous cell population that bridge the innate and adaptive immune systems. CD8alpha DC play a prominent, and sometimes exclusive, role in driving amplification of CD8(+ T cells during a viral infection. Whether this reliance on a single subset of DC also applies for CD4(+ T cell activation is unknown. We used a direct ex vivo antigen presentation assay to probe the capacity of flow cytometrically purified DC populations to drive amplification of CD4(+ and CD8(+ T cells following infection with influenza virus by different routes. This study examined the contributions of non-CD8alpha DC populations in the amplification of CD8(+ and CD4(+ T cells in cutaneous and systemic influenza viral infections. We confirmed that in vivo, effective immune responses for CD8(+ T cells are dominated by presentation of antigen by CD8alpha DC but can involve non-CD8alpha DC. In contrast, CD4(+ T cell responses relied more heavily on the contributions of dermal DC migrating from peripheral lymphoid tissues following cutaneous infection, and CD4 DC in the spleen after systemic infection. CD4(+ T cell priming by DC subsets that is dependent upon the route of administration raises the possibility that vaccination approaches could be tailored to prime helper T cell immunity.

  3. Population genetics inside a cell: Mutations and mitochondrial genome maintenance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goyal, Sidhartha; Shraiman, Boris; Gottschling, Dan

    2012-02-01

    In realistic ecological and evolutionary systems natural selection acts on multiple levels, i.e. it acts on individuals as well as on collection of individuals. An understanding of evolutionary dynamics of such systems is limited in large part due to the lack of experimental systems that can challenge theoretical models. Mitochondrial genomes (mtDNA) are subjected to selection acting on cellular as well as organelle levels. It is well accepted that mtDNA in yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae is unstable and can degrade over time scales comparable to yeast cell division time. We utilize a recent technology designed in Gottschling lab to extract DNA from populations of aged yeast cells and deep sequencing to characterize mtDNA variation in a population of young and old cells. In tandem, we developed a stochastic model that includes the essential features of mitochondrial biology that provides a null model for expected mtDNA variation. Overall, we find approximately 2% of the polymorphic loci that show significant increase in frequency as cells age providing direct evidence for organelle level selection. Such quantitative study of mtDNA dynamics is absolutely essential to understand the propagation of mtDNA mutations linked to a spectrum of age-related diseases in humans.

  4. On Decoding Grid Cell Population Codes Using Approximate Belief Propagation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoo, Yongseok; Kim, Woori

    2017-03-01

    Neural systems are inherently noisy. One well-studied example of a noise reduction mechanism in the brain is the population code, where representing a variable with multiple neurons allows the encoded variable to be recovered with fewer errors. Studies have assumed ideal observer models for decoding population codes, and the manner in which information in the neural population can be retrieved remains elusive. This letter addresses a mechanism by which realistic neural circuits can recover encoded variables. Specifically, the decoding problem of recovering a spatial location from populations of grid cells is studied using belief propagation. We extend the belief propagation decoding algorithm in two aspects. First, beliefs are approximated rather than being calculated exactly. Second, decoding noises are introduced into the decoding circuits. Numerical simulations demonstrate that beliefs can be effectively approximated by combining polynomial nonlinearities with divisive normalization. This approximate belief propagation algorithm is tolerant to decoding noises. Thus, this letter presents a realistic model for decoding neural population codes and investigates fault-tolerant information retrieval mechanisms in the brain.

  5. Collective Decision-Making and Oscillatory Behaviors in Cell Populations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fujimoto, Koichi; Sawai, Satoshi

    2013-12-01

    Many examples of oscillations are known in multicellular dynamics, however how properties of individual cells can account for the collective rhythmic behaviors at the tissue level remain elusive. Recently, studies in chemical reactions, synthetic gene circuits, yeast and social amoeba Dictyostelium have greatly enhanced our understanding of collective oscillations in cell populations. From these relatively simple systems, a unified view of how excitable and oscillatory regulations could be tuned and coupled to give rise to tissue-level oscillations is emerging. This chapter reviews recent progress in these and other experimental systems and highlight similarities and differences. We will show how group-level information can be encoded in the oscillations depending on degree of autonomy of single cells and discuss some of their possible biological roles.

  6. Pseudoconvex and Disprisoning Homogeneous Sprays

    CERN Document Server

    Riego, L D

    1994-01-01

    The pseudoconvex and disprisoning conditions for geodesics of linear connections are extended to the solution curves of general homogeneous sprays. The main result is that pseudoconvexity and disprisonment are jointly stable in the fine topology on the space of all homogeneous sprays of any degree of homogeneity.

  7. Characterization of side population cells isolated from the colon cancer cell line SW480.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiong, Binghong; Ma, Li; Hu, Xiang; Zhang, Caiquan; Cheng, Yong

    2014-09-01

    Side population (SP) cells may play a crucial role in tumorigenesis and the recurrence of cancer. Many types of cell lines and tissues have demonstrated the presence of SP cells, including colon cancer cell lines. This study aimed to identify cancer stem cells (CSCs) in the SP of the colon cancer cell line SW480. SP cells were isolated by fluorescence-activated cell sorting (FACS), followed by serum-free medium (SFM) culture. The self-renewal, differentiated progeny, clone formation, proliferation, invasion ability, cell cycle, chemosensitivity and tumorigenic properties in SP and non-SP (NSP) cells were investigated through in vitro culture and in vivo serial transplantation. The expression profiles of ATP-binding cassette (ABC) protein transporters and stem cell-related genes were examined by RT-PCR and western blot analysis. The human colon cancer cell lines SW480, Lovo and HCT116 contain 1.1 ± 0.10, 0.93 ± 0.11 and 1.33 ± 0.05% SP cells, respectively. Flow cytometry analysis revealed that SP cells could differentiate into SP and NSP cells. SP cells had a higher proliferation potency and CFE than NSP cells. Compared to NSP cells, SP cells were also more resistant to CDDP and 5-FU, and were more invasive and displayed increased tumorigenic ability. Moreover, SP cells showed higher mRNA and protein expression of ABCG2, MDR1, OCT-4, NANOG, SOX-2, CD44 and CD133. SP cells isolated from human colon cancer cell lines harbor CSC properties that may be related to the invasive potential and therapeutic resistance of colon cancer.

  8. Characterization of side population cells isolated from the gastric cancer cell line SGC-7901.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Rong; Wu, Xiaoling; Wei, Huang; Tian, Shangkun

    2013-03-01

    Side population (SP) cells are a subset of stem cells that have been isolated from several different gastrointestinal cancer cell lines. Using flow cytometry and the DNA-binding dye Hoechst 33342, we isolated SP cells from SGC-7901 human gastric tumor cell lines and found that they comprise 2.3±0.78% of the tumor cells. Using the Cell Counting Kit-8 (CCK-8) assay, we demonstrated that SP cells have a stronger proliferative activity than non-SP cells. Additionally, we observed tumor mass formation following the cultivation of SP cells in serum-free medium, indicating the capability of these cells for self-renewal. SP cells were observed to undergo non-symmetrical division, which is characteristic of stem cells. A drug resistance assay revealed that SP cells have a high survival rate when exposed to the chemotherapy drug 5-fluorouracil; the results of western blot analysis suggest that this stems from the abundant expression of the chemoresistance-associated proteins ABCG2 and Bcl-2. We also used fluorescence quantitative PCR to reveal that SP cells have relatively high expression levels of the stem cell-related genes Musashi-1 and CD44. In vivo experiments in mice revealed that the subcutaneous injection of 2×10(3) SP cells resulted in the formation of tumors, while the injection of 2×10(4) non-SP cells did not. Cumulatively, our results suggest that gastric tumorigenesis associated with SGC-7901 may partly be driven by the activity of SP cells, which exhibit certain biological characteristics of stem cells. Our results also show that the SP cell sorting method is an effective means for isolating and identifying gastric cancer stem cells during early screening.

  9. Axonal transmission in the retina introduces a small dispersion of relative timing in the ganglion cell population response.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Günther Zeck

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Visual stimuli elicit action potentials in tens of different retinal ganglion cells. Each ganglion cell type responds with a different latency to a given stimulus, thus transforming the high-dimensional input into a temporal neural code. The timing of the first spikes between different retinal projection neurons cells may further change along axonal transmission. The purpose of this study is to investigate if intraretinal conduction velocity leads to a synchronization or dispersion of the population signal leaving the eye. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We 'imaged' the initiation and transmission of light-evoked action potentials along individual axons in the rabbit retina at micron-scale resolution using a high-density multi-transistor array. We measured unimodal conduction velocity distributions (1.3±0.3 m/sec, mean ± SD for axonal populations at all retinal eccentricities with the exception of the central part that contains myelinated axons. The velocity variance within each piece of retina is caused by ganglion cell types that show narrower and slightly different average velocity tuning. Ganglion cells of the same type respond with similar latency to spatially homogenous stimuli and conduct with similar velocity. For ganglion cells of different type intraretinal conduction velocity and response latency to flashed stimuli are negatively correlated, indicating that differences in first spike timing increase (up to 10 msec. Similarly, the analysis of pair-wise correlated activity in response to white-noise stimuli reveals that conduction velocity and response latency are negatively correlated. CONCLUSION/SIGNIFICANCE: Intraretinal conduction does not change the relative spike timing between ganglion cells of the same type but increases spike timing differences among ganglion cells of different type. The fastest retinal ganglion cells therefore act as indicators of new stimuli for postsynaptic neurons. The intraretinal dispersion

  10. HOMOGENEOUS NUCLEAR REACTOR

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hammond, R.P.; Busey, H.M.

    1959-02-17

    Nuclear reactors of the homogeneous liquid fuel type are discussed. The reactor is comprised of an elongated closed vessel, vertically oriented, having a critical region at the bottom, a lower chimney structure extending from the critical region vertically upwardly and surrounded by heat exchanger coils, to a baffle region above which is located an upper chimney structure containing a catalyst functioning to recombine radiolyticallydissociated moderator gages. In operation the liquid fuel circulates solely by convection from the critical region upwardly through the lower chimney and then downwardly through the heat exchanger to return to the critical region. The gases formed by radiolytic- dissociation of the moderator are carried upwardly with the circulating liquid fuel and past the baffle into the region of the upper chimney where they are recombined by the catalyst and condensed, thence returning through the heat exchanger to the critical region.

  11. Diffuse Large B-Cell Lymphoma in the Elderly: Real World Outcomes of Immunochemotherapy in Asian Population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Byun, Ja Min; Lee, Jeong-Ok; Kang, Beodeul; Kim, Ji-Won; Kim, Se Hyun; Kim, Jin Won; Kim, Yu Jung; Lee, Keun-Wook; Bang, Soo-Mee; Lee, Jong Seok

    2016-09-01

    We evaluated the real-life treatment outcomes of elderly patients with diffuse large B-cell lymphoma from a homogenous Asian population and defined the cutoff age for "elderly." The medical records of 192 DLBCL patients aged > 60 years who had received first-line immunochemotherapy were retrospectively evaluated. The treatment schedule, adverse events, and survival outcomes were analyzed overall and stratified by 4 age groups (> 60-64, 65-69, 70-74, and ≥ 75 years). Patient age of ≥ 75 years was associated with a significantly lower complete remission rate (86.5% vs. 81.4% vs. 82.0% vs. 51%; P population, 75 years seems to be a judicious cutoff for predicting treatment outcomes. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. TLR7-expressing cells comprise an interfollicular epidermal stem cell population in murine epidermis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yin, Chaoran; Zhang, Ting; Qiao, Liangjun; Du, Jia; Li, Shuang; Zhao, Hengguang; Wang, Fangfang; Huang, Qiaorong; Meng, Wentong; Zhu, Hongyan; Bu, Hong; Li, Hui; Xu, Hong; Mo, Xianming

    2014-07-25

    Normal interfollicular epidermis (IFE) homeostasis is maintained throughout the entire life by its own stem cells that self-renew and generate progeny that undergo terminal differentiation. However, the fine markers of the stem cells in interfollicular epidermis are not well defined yet. Here we found that TLR7 identified the existence of progenitors and interfollicular epidermal stem cells in murine skin. In vitro, TLR7-expressing cells comprised of two subpopulations that were competent to proliferate and exhibited distinct differentiation potentials. Three-dimensional (3D) organotypic culture and skin reconstitution assays showed that TLR7-expressing cells were able to reconstruct the interfollicular epidermis. Finally, TLR7-expressing cells maintained the intact interfollicular epidermal structures revealed in serial transplantation assays in vivo in mice. Taken together, our results suggest that TLR7-expressing cells comprise an interfollicular epidermal stem cell population.

  13. Side population cells from HXO-Rb44 retinoblastoma cell line have cancer-initiating property.

    Science.gov (United States)

    She, Jun-Jun; Zhang, Peng-Ge; Che, Xiang-Ming; Wang, Xuan; Wang, Zi-Ming

    2011-01-01

    To ascertain whether side population (SP) cells in HXO-Rb44 retinoblastoma cell line have cancer stem cell-like property in vitro and in vivo. We analyzed and sorted SP from HXO-Rb44 retinoblastoma cell line by Hoechst 33342 staining on flow cytometry. SP and NSP cells were determined their ability of proliferation and self-renewal by SP reanalysis, soft agar assay and tumor sphere assay in vitro. Clone formation was detected by seeding HXO-Rb44 and HXO-Rb44 -RFP cells into soft agar. The expression of ABCG2, MDRI, Bmi-1 and Oct-4 was determined by RT-PCR between SP and non-SP (NSP) cells. Moreover, they were injected into nude mice to determine their tumorigency in vivo. SP from HXO-Rb44 retinoblastoma cell line could grow clonally in soft agar assays and form tumor spheres from single cells in conditioned media. The expressions of ABCG2, MDRI, Bmi-1 and Oct-4 were significantly higher in SP than NSP cells. As few as SP cells resulted in tumor formation in 6 of 12 injected sites, however, the injection of NSP cells failed to form new tumor. SP cells isolated by Hoechst 33342 from the HXO-Rb44 retinoblastoma cell line had property of high tumorigency in vivo and in vitro. Therefore, SP might be a target while developing retinoblastoma therapies.

  14. Population genetics of cancer cell clones: possible implications of cancer stem cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Naugler Christopher T

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The population dynamics of the various clones of cancer cells existing within a tumour is complex and still poorly understood. Cancer cell clones can be conceptualized as sympatric asexual species, and as such, the application of theoretical population genetics as it pertains to asexual species may provide additional insights. Results The number of generations of tumour cells within a cancer has been estimated at a minimum of 40, but high cancer cell mortality rates suggest that the number of cell generations may actually be in the hundreds. Such a large number of generations would easily allow natural selection to drive clonal evolution assuming that selective advantages of individual clones are within the range reported for free-living animal species. Tumour cell clonal evolution could also be driven by variation in the intrinsic rates of increase of different clones or by genetic drift. In every scenario examined, the presence of cancer stem cells would require lower selection pressure or less variation in intrinsic rates of increase. Conclusions The presence of cancer stem cells may result in more rapid clonal evolution. Specific predictions from theoretical population genetics may lead to a greater understanding of this process.

  15. Multi-population model of a microbial electrolysis cell.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pinto, R P; Srinivasan, B; Escapa, A; Tartakovsky, B

    2011-06-01

    This work presents a multi-population dynamic model of a microbial electrolysis cell (MEC). The model describes the growth and metabolic activity of fermentative, electricigenic, methanogenic acetoclastic, and methanogenic hydrogenophilic microorganisms and is capable of simulating hydrogen production in a MEC fed with complex organic matter, such as wastewater. The model parameters were estimated with the experimental results obtained in continuous flow MECs fed with acetate or synthetic wastewater. Following successful model validation with an independent data set, the model was used to analyze and discuss the influence of applied voltage and organic load on hydrogen production and COD removal.

  16. Use of flow cytometry for high-throughput cell population estimates in brain tissue

    Science.gov (United States)

    Young, Nicole A.; Flaherty, David K.; Airey, David C.; Varlan, Peter; Aworunse, Feyi; Kaas, Jon H.; Collins, Christine E.

    2012-01-01

    The large size of primate brains is an impediment to obtaining high-resolution cell number maps of the cortex in humans and non-human primates. We present a rapid, flow cytometry-based cell counting method that can be used to estimate cell numbers from homogenized brain tissue samples comprising the entire cortical sheet. The new method, called the flow fractionator, is based on the isotropic fractionator (IF) method (Herculano-Houzel and Lent, 2005), but substitutes flow cytometry analysis for manual, microscope analysis using a Neubauer counting chamber. We show that our flow cytometry-based method for total cell estimation in homogenized brain tissue provides comparable data to that obtained using a counting chamber on a microscope. The advantages of the flow fractionator over existing methods are improved precision of cell number estimates and improved speed of analysis. PMID:22798947

  17. Single-cell protein dynamics reproduce universal fluctuations in cell populations

    CERN Document Server

    Brenner, Naama; Rotella, James S; Salman, Hanna

    2015-01-01

    Protein fluctuations in cell populations have recently been shown to exhibit a universal distribution shape under a broad range of biological realizations. Here, measuring protein content in individual bacteria continuously over ~70 generations, we show that single-cell trajectories fluctuate around their average with the same distribution shape as the population, i.e. their relative fluctuations are ergodic. Analysis of these temporal trajectories reveals that one effective random variable, sampled once each cell cycle, suffices to reconstruct the distribution from the trajectory. This in turn implies that cellular microscopic processes are strongly buffered and population-level protein distributions are insensitive to details of the intracellular dynamics. Probing them thus requires searching for novel universality-breaking experimental perturbations.

  18. Established cell surface markers efficiently isolate highly overlapping populations of skeletal muscle satellite cells by fluorescence-activated cell sorting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maesner, Claire C; Almada, Albert E; Wagers, Amy J

    2016-01-01

    Fluorescent-activated cell sorting (FACS) has enabled the direct isolation of highly enriched skeletal muscle stem cell, or satellite cell, populations from postnatal tissue. Several distinct surface marker panels containing different positively selecting surface antigens have been used to distinguish muscle satellite cells from other non-myogenic cell types. Because functional and transcriptional heterogeneity is known to exist within the satellite cell population, a direct comparison of results obtained in different laboratories has been complicated by a lack of clarity as to whether commonly utilized surface marker combinations select for distinct or overlapping subsets of the satellite cell pool. This study therefore sought to evaluate phenotypic and functional overlap among popular satellite cell sorting paradigms. Utilizing a transgenic Pax7-zsGreen reporter mouse, we compared the overlap between the fluorescent signal of canonical paired homeobox protein 7 (Pax7) expressing satellite cells to cells identified by combinations of surface markers previously published for satellite cells isolation. We designed two panels for mouse skeletal muscle analysis, each composed of markers that exclude hematopoietic and stromal cells (CD45, CD11b, Ter119, CD31, and Sca1), combined with previously published antibody clones recognizing surface markers present on satellite cells (β1-integrin/CXCR4, α7-integrin/CD34, and Vcam1). Cell populations were comparatively analyzed by flow cytometry and FACS sorted for functional assessment of myogenic activity. Consistent with prior reports, each of the commonly used surface marker schemes evaluated here identified a highly enriched satellite cell population, with 89-90 % positivity for Pax7 expression based on zsGreen fluorescence. Distinct surface marker panels were also equivalent in their ability to identify the majority of the satellite cell pool, with 90-93 % of all Pax7-zsGreen positive cells marked by each of the surface

  19. Cell dualism: presence of cells with alternative membrane potentials in growing populations of bacteria and yeasts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ivanov, Volodymyr; Rezaeinejad, Saeid; Chu, Jian

    2013-10-01

    It is considered that all growing cells, for exception of acidophilic bacteria, have negatively charged inside cytoplasmic membrane (Δψ⁻-cells). Here we show that growing populations of microbial cells contain a small portion of cells with positively charged inside cytoplasmic membrane (Δψ⁺-cells). These cells were detected after simultaneous application of the fluorescent probes for positive membrane potential (anionic dye DIBAC⁻) and membrane integrity (propidium iodide, PI). We found in exponentially growing cell populations of Escherichia coli and Saccharomyces cerevisiae that the content of live Δψ⁻-cells was 93.6 ± 1.8 % for bacteria and 90.4 ± 4.0 % for yeasts and the content of live Δψ⁺-cells was 0.9 ± 0.3 % for bacteria and 2.4 ± 0.7 % for yeasts. Hypothetically, existence of Δψ⁺-cells could be due to short-term, about 1 min for bacteria and 5 min for yeasts, change of membrane potential from negative to positive value during the cell cycle. This change has been shown by the reversions of K⁺, Na⁺, and Ca²⁺ ions fluxes across the cell membrane during synchronous yeast culture. The transformation of Δψ(⁻-cells to Δψ⁺-cells can be explained by slow influx of K⁺ ions into Δψ⁻-cell to the trigger level of K⁺ concentration ("compression of potassium spring"), which is forming "alternative" Δψ⁺-cell for a short period, following with fast efflux of K⁺ ions out of Δψ⁺-cell ("release of potassium spring") returning cell to normal Δψ⁻ state. We anticipate our results to be a starting point to reveal the biological role of cell dualism in form of Δψ⁻- and Δψ⁺- cells.

  20. BayesFlow: latent modeling of flow cytometry cell populations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnsson, Kerstin; Wallin, Jonas; Fontes, Magnus

    2016-01-12

    Flow cytometry is a widespread single-cell measurement technology with a multitude of clinical and research applications. Interpretation of flow cytometry data is hard; the instrumentation is delicate and can not render absolute measurements, hence samples can only be interpreted in relation to each other while at the same time comparisons are confounded by inter-sample variation. Despite this, most automated flow cytometry data analysis methods either treat samples individually or ignore the variation by for example pooling the data. A key requirement for models that include multiple samples is the ability to visualize and assess inferred variation, since what could be technical variation in one setting would be different phenotypes in another. We introduce BayesFlow, a pipeline for latent modeling of flow cytometry cell populations built upon a Bayesian hierarchical model. The model systematizes variation in location as well as shape. Expert knowledge can be incorporated through informative priors and the results can be supervised through compact and comprehensive visualizations. BayesFlow is applied to two synthetic and two real flow cytometry data sets. For the first real data set, taken from the FlowCAP I challenge, BayesFlow does not only give a gating which would place it among the top performers in FlowCAP I for this dataset, it also gives a more consistent treatment of different samples than either manual gating or other automated gating methods. The second real data set contains replicated flow cytometry measurements of samples from healthy individuals. BayesFlow gives here cell populations with clear expression patterns and small technical intra-donor variation as compared to biological inter-donor variation. Modeling latent relations between samples through BayesFlow enables a systematic analysis of inter-sample variation. As opposed to other joint gating methods, effort is put at ensuring that the obtained partition of the data corresponds to actual

  1. Biologic characteristics of the side population of human small cell lung cancer cell line H446.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Bo; Yang, Huan; Huang, Yu-Zheng; Yan, Ru-Hong; Liu, Fen-Ju; Zhang, Jun-Ning

    2010-03-01

    Recently, the theory of cancer stem cells (CSCs) has presented new targets and orientations for tumor therapy. The major difficulties in researching CSCs include their isolation and purification. The aim of this study is to identify and characterize the side population (SP) cells in small cell lung cancer (SCLC) cell line H446, which lays the foundation for the isolation and purification of CSCs. Fluorescence-activated cell sorting (FACS) was used to sort SP and non-SP (NSP) cells from H446. Both subgroups were cultivated to survey the capacity to form into suspended tumor cell spheres. Reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) and real-time PCR were used to evaluate the expression levels of the mRNA of CD133, ABCG2, and nucleostemin in both subgroups. The capacity of proliferation and the differences in drug resistance of both subgroups and unsorted cells were tested by the MTT method. The differentiation ability of both subgroups was determined by FACS. Proliferation was determined by subcutaneous tumor formation in nude mice. The percent of Hoechst 33342 negative cells was about (5.1 +/- 0.2)% in H446 by fluorescence microscopy. The percent of SP cells was (6.3 +/- 0.1)% by flow cytometry. SP cells had a stronger capability of forming into tumor spheres than NSP cells. The mRNA expression levels of ABCG2, CD133, and nucleostemin in SP cells were 21.60 +/- 0.26, 7.10 +/- 0.14, and 1.02 +/- 0.08 folds higher than that in NSP cells (P 0.05, respectively). In vivo, SP cells showed better proliferative ability and tougher viability when treated with drugs. SP cells can differentiate into NSP cells, but NSP cells cannot differentiate into SP cells. SP cells had a greater ability to form tumors. The H446 cell line contained some SP cells with stem cell properties. CD133 and ABCG2 may be cancer stem cell markers of SCLC.

  2. Interleukin-7-engineered mesenchymal cells: in vitro effects on naive T-cell population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sportoletti, Paolo; Del Papa, Beatrice; De Ioanni, Mariangela; Moretti, Lorenzo; Bonifacio, Elisabetta; Lanterna, Vania; Bell, Alain; Fettucciari, Katia; Carnevali, Eugenia; Zei, Tiziana; Falzetti, Franca; Martelli, Massimo F; Tabilio, Antonio; Di Ianni, Mauro

    2006-12-01

    T-cell homeostasis is regulated by several molecules; among these, interleukin (IL)-7 plays an essential role in the survival and homeostatic proliferation of peripheral naive T cells. In a previous study, we investigated whether human mesenchymal stromal cells (MSCs) could be engineered with the IL-7 gene to produce functional level of this cytokine. In the present study, we analyzed the impact of different quantities of IL-7 produced by MSCs on the survival and proliferation of a negative immunoselected naive (CD3(+)/CD45RA(+)) T-cell population. Co-cultivation of peripheral naive T cells with MSCs producing low (16 pg/mL) or high (1000 pg/mL) IL-7 levels or in the presence of exogenous IL-7 (0.01 ng/mL and 100 ng/mL) maintained the CD3(+)/CD45RA(+) naive T-cell phenotype. Chemokine receptor CCR7(+) expression was also maintained among this T-cell population. Naive T-cell molecular characteristics were maintained as assessed by the Vbeta spectratyping complexity score, which showed the maintenance of a broad T-cell repertoire. No Th1 or Th2 differentiation was observed, as assessed by interferon-gamma or IL-4 accumulation. In contrast, only MSCs producing high amounts of IL-7 caused increased activation (CD25 31.2% +/- 12% vs 10% +/- 3.5%; P .05), and the phase S cell cycle (15% vs 6.9%, P > .05). Exogenous IL-7 exhibited no significant effect. In conclusion, we demonstrated that IL-7 produced by MSCs has a dose-independent effect on naive T-cell survival while exerting a dose-dependent effect on activation/proliferation. Due to the continuous production of IL-7 by engineered cells, our system is more efficacious than exogenous IL-7.

  3. Clonal cell populations unresponsive to radiosensitization induced by telomerase inhibition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ju, Yeun-Jin; Shin, Hyun-Jin; Park, Jeong-Eun; Juhn, Kyoung-Mi; Woo, Seon Rang; Kim, Hee-Young; Han, Young-Hoon; Hwang, Sang-Gu; Hong, Sung-Hee; Kang, Chang-Mo [Division of Radiation Cancer Research, Korea Institute of Radiological and Medical Sciences, Seoul 139-706 (Korea, Republic of); Yoo, Young-Do [Laboratory of Molecular Cell Biology, Graduate School of Medicine, Korea University College of Medicine, Korea University, Seoul 136-705 (Korea, Republic of); Park, Won-Bong [Division of Natural Science, Seoul Women' s University, Seoul 139-774 (Korea, Republic of); Cho, Myung-Haing [Laboratory of Toxicology, College of Veterinary Medicine, Seoul National University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Park, Gil Hong, E-mail: ghpark@korea.ac.kr [Department of Biochemistry, College of Medicine, Korea University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Kee-Ho, E-mail: khlee@kirams.re.kr [Division of Radiation Cancer Research, Korea Institute of Radiological and Medical Sciences, Seoul 139-706 (Korea, Republic of)

    2010-11-12

    Research highlights: {yields} In our present manuscript, we have clearly showed an interesting but problematic obstacle of a radiosensitization strategy based on telomerase inhibition by showing that: Clonal population unresponsive to this radiosensitization occasionally arise. {yields} The telomere length of unsensitized clones was reduced, as was that of most sensitized clones. {yields} The unsensitized clones did not show chromosome end fusion which was noted in all sensitized clones. {yields} P53 status is not associated with the occurrence of unsensitized clone. {yields} Telomere end capping in unsensitized clone is operative even under telomerase deficiency. -- Abstract: A combination of a radiotherapeutic regimen with telomerase inhibition is valuable when tumor cells are to be sensitized to radiation. Here, we describe cell clones unresponsive to radiosensitization after telomere shortening. After extensive division of individual transformed clones of mTERC{sup -/-} cells, about 22% of clones were unresponsive to radiosensitization even though telomerase action was inhibited. The telomere lengths of unsensitized mTERC{sup -/-} clones were reduced, as were those of most sensitized clones. However, the unsensitized clones did not exhibit chromosomal end-to-end fusion to the extent noted in all sensitized clones. Thus, a defense mechanism preventing telomere erosion is operative even when telomeres become shorter under conditions of telomerase deficiency, and results in unresponsiveness to the radiosensitization generally mediated by telomere shortening.

  4. Immunophenotyping of immune cell populations in the raccoon (Procyon lotor).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heinrich, Franziska; Jungwirth, Nicole; Carlson, Regina; Tipold, Andrea; Böer, Michael; Scheibe, Thomas; Molnár, Viktor; von Dörnberg, Katja; Spitzbarth, Ingo; Puff, Christina; Wohlsein, Peter; Baumgärtner, Wolfgang

    2015-12-15

    The raccoon (Procyon lotor) is a highly adaptable carnivore that has rapidly conquered Europe over the last decades and represents a potential candidate as pathogen reservoir, bearing the risk for transmission of infectious agents, as zoonosis or spill-over, to other wild life and domestic animals and man. Comprehensive investigations of infectious diseases in raccoons require a detailed knowledge of the participating immune cell populations. To close this gap of knowledge, various antibodies were tested for cross-reactivity with leukocytes in lymphoid organs and peripheral blood of raccoons using immunohistochemistry and flow cytometry, respectively. Eight out of 16 antibodies, directed against CD3, CD79α, Pax-5, IgG, CD44, MHC class II, myeloid/histiocyte antigen (MAC387), and Iba-1 exhibited a specific immunoreaction with cells in distinct anatomical compartments in formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded lymphoid tissues. Flow cytometric analysis revealed that 7 out of 18 antibodies directed against CD11c, CD14, CD21, CD44, CD79α, MHC class I and II cross-reacted with peripheral blood-derived raccoon leukocytes. Summarized, the usefulness of several cross-reacting antibodies was determined for the characterization of raccoon immune cells in immunohistochemistry and flow cytometry, offering the opportunity to study the raccoon immune system under normal and diseased conditions. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. Comparison of tumor biology of two distinct cell sub-populations in lung cancer stem cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Jianyu; Sun, Zhiwei; Liu, Yongli; Kong, Liangsheng; Zhou, Shixia; Tang, Junlin; Xing, Hongmei Rosie

    2017-11-14

    Characterization of the stem-like properties of cancer stem cells (CSCs) remain indirect and qualitative, especially the ability of CSCs to undergo asymmetric cell division for self renewal and differentiation, a unique property of cells of stem origin. It is partly due to the lack of stable cellular models of CSCs. In this study, we developed a new approach for CSC isolation and purification to derive a CSC-enriched cell line (LLC-SE). By conducting five consecutive rounds of single cell cloning using the LLC-SE cell line, we obtained two distinct sub-population of cells within the Lewis lung cancer CSCs that employed largely symmetric division for self-renewal (LLC-SD) or underwent asymmetric division for differentiation (LLC-ASD). LLC-SD and LLC-ASD cell lines could be stably passaged in culture and be distinguished by cell morphology, stem cell marker, spheroid formation and subcutaneous tumor initiation efficiency, as well as orthotopic lung tumor growth, progression and survival. The ability LLC-ASD cells to undergo asymmetric division was visualized and quantified by the asymmetric segregation of labeled BrdU and NUMB to one of the two daughter cells in anaphase cell division. The more stem-like LLC-SD cells exhibited higher capacity for tumorigenesis and progression and shorter survival. As few as 10 LLC-SD could initiate subcutaneous tumor growth when transplanted to the athymic mice. Collectively, these observations suggest that the SD-type of cells appear to be on the top of the hierarchical order of the CSCs. Furthermore, they have lead to generated cellular models of CSC self-renewal for future mechanistic investigations.

  6. Increasing cell culture population doublings for long-term growth of finite life span human cell cultures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stampfer, Martha R.; Garbe, James C.

    2016-06-28

    Cell culture media formulations for culturing human epithelial cells are herein described. Also described are methods of increasing population doublings in a cell culture of finite life span human epithelial cells and prolonging the life span of human cell cultures. Using the cell culture media disclosed alone and in combination with addition to the cell culture of a compound associated with anti-stress activity achieves extended growth of pre-stasis cells and increased population doublings and life span in human epithelial cell cultures.

  7. Increasing cell culture population doublings for long-term growth of finite life span human cell cultures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stampfer, Martha R; Garbe, James C

    2015-02-24

    Cell culture media formulations for culturing human epithelial cells are herein described. Also described are methods of increasing population doublings in a cell culture of finite life span human epithelial cells and prolonging the life span of human cell cultures. Using the cell culture media disclosed alone and in combination with addition to the cell culture of a compound associated with anti-stress activity achieves extended growth of pre-stasis cells and increased population doublings and life span in human epithelial cell cultures.

  8. Side Population Cells From an Immortalized Human Liver Epithelial Cell Line Exhibit Hepatic Stem-Like Cell Properties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tokiwa, Takayoshi; Yamazaki, Taisuke; Enosawa, Shin

    2012-01-01

    The existence of hepatic stem cells in human livers is controversial. We investigated whether the side population (SP) cells derived from an immortalized human liver epithelial cell line THLE-5b possess the properties of hepatic stem-like cells. SP cells derived from THLE-5b were isolated using flow cytometry and were assayed for the expression of phenotypic markers by reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction and immunostaining. THLE-5b SP cells retained the capacity to generate both SP and non-SP cells, showed a capacity for self-renewal, and were more efficient in colony formation than non-SP cells. Neither the SP nor the non-SP cells formed tumors when transplanted into athymic nude mice or severe combined immunodeficient mice. The expression level of stem cell-associated markers such as an ATP-binding cassette membrane transporter, epithelial cell adhesion molecule, c-kit, Thy-1, and octomer binding transcription factor 4 was higher in SP cells than in non-SP cells. When cultivated as rotation-mediated aggregates, the expression of liver-specific genes including tryptophan oxygenase and CYP3A4 was up-regulated in SP cells, suggesting that THLE-5b SP cells have the ability to differentiate into a hepatocyte phenotype. One of the clonal cell lines derived from the SP cells expressed stem cell-associated markers. These results indicate that SP cells derived from THLE-5b possess hepatic stem-like cell properties and suggest that THLE-5b can be used as a model of normal human liver progenitor or stem cell line.

  9. Homogeneous Functionalization of Methane.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gunsalus, Niles Jensen; Koppaka, Anjaneyulu; Park, Sae Hume; Bischof, Steven M; Hashiguchi, Brian G; Periana, Roy A

    2017-07-12

    One of the remaining "grand challenges" in chemistry is the development of a next generation, less expensive, cleaner process that can allow the vast reserves of methane from natural gas to augment or replace oil as the source of fuels and chemicals. Homogeneous (gas/liquid) systems that convert methane to functionalized products with emphasis on reports after 1995 are reviewed. Gas/solid, bioinorganic, biological, and reaction systems that do not specifically involve methane functionalization are excluded. The various reports are grouped under the main element involved in the direct reactions with methane. Central to the review is classification of the various reports into 12 categories based on both practical considerations and the mechanisms of the elementary reactions with methane. Practical considerations are based on whether or not the system reported can directly or indirectly utilize O2 as the only net coreactant based only on thermodynamic potentials. Mechanistic classifications are based on whether the elementary reactions with methane proceed by chain or nonchain reactions and with stoichiometric reagents or catalytic species. The nonchain reactions are further classified as CH activation (CHA) or CH oxidation (CHO). The bases for these various classifications are defined. In particular, CHA reactions are defined as elementary reactions with methane that result in a discrete methyl intermediate where the formal oxidation state (FOS) on the carbon remains unchanged at -IV relative to that in methane. In contrast, CHO reactions are defined as elementary reactions with methane where the carbon atom of the product is oxidized and has a FOS less negative than -IV. This review reveals that the bulk of the work in the field is relatively evenly distributed across most of the various areas classified. However, a few areas are only marginally examined, or not examined at all. This review also shows that, while significant scientific progress has been made

  10. Adult pancreas side population cells expand after β cell injury and are a source of insulin-secreting cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ilia Banakh

    Full Text Available Pancreas stem cells are a potential source of insulin-producing β cells for the therapy of diabetes. In adult tissues the 'side population' (SP of cells that effluxes the DNA binding dye Hoechst 33342 through ATP-binding cassette transporters has stem cell properties. We hypothesised therefore that the SP would expand in response to β cell injury and give rise to functional β cells. SP cells were flow sorted from dissociated pancreas cells of adult mice, analysed for phenotype and cultured with growth promoting and differentiation factors before analysis for hormone expression and glucose-stimulated insulin secretion. SP cell number and colony forming potential (CFP increased significantly in models of type diabetes, and after partial pancreatectomy, in the absence of hyperglycaemia. SP cells, ∼1% of total pancreas cells at 1 week of age, were enriched >10-fold for CFP compared to non-SP cells. Freshly isolated SP cells contained no insulin protein or RNA but expressed the homeobox transcription factor Pdx1 required for pancreas development and β cell function. Pdx1, along with surface expression of CD326 (Ep-Cam, was a marker of the colony forming and proliferation potential of SP cells. In serum-free medium with defined factors, SP cells proliferated and differentiated into islet hormone-expressing cells that secreted insulin in response to glucose. Insulin expression was maintained when tissue was transplanted within vascularised chambers into diabetic mice. SP cells in the adult pancreas expand in response to β cell injury and are a source of β cell progenitors with potential for the treatment of diabetes.

  11. Side Population Cells Derived from Adult Human Liver Generate Hepatocyte-like Cells In Vitro

    Science.gov (United States)

    HUSSAIN, SUNNY ZAHEED; STROM, STEPHEN C.; KIRBY, MARTHA R.; BURNS, SEAN; LANGEMEIJER, SASKIA; UEDA, TAKAHIRO; HSIEH, MATTHEW; TISDALE, JOHN F.

    2009-01-01

    We sought to determine whether hepatic side population (SP) cells derived from adult human liver possess the potential of a novel candidate hepatic stem cell. Human cadaveric donor liver was subjected to collagenase perfusion and hepatocytes were separated from nonparenchymal cells by differential centrifugation. SP cells were isolated from the nonparenchymal portion after Hoechst 33342 staining. Since CD45 is a panleukocyte antigen, CD45-negative SP cells were separated from the vast majority of CD45-positive SP cells (90%), and hepatic growth medium was used to culture both groups. Both CD45-negative and CD45-positive hepatic SP cells generated colonies in the hepatic growth medium in 2–3 weeks. The colonies yielded large cells morphologically consistent with human hepatocytes, demonstrating granule-rich cytoplasm, dense, often double nuclei, and intracellular lipofuscin pigment. The cultured cells from both sources were positive for markers of human hepatocytes: HepPar, cytokeratin 8 (CK8), and human albumin. Reverse transcriptase–polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) performed on both groups demonstrated positivity for additional liver markers including human albumin, CK18, α-1 anti-trypsin, and the human cytochrome P450 enzyme CYP2B6. Double immunostaining (CD45 and HepPar) and RT-PCR confirmed that the hepatocyte-like cells derived from the CD45-negative SP cells acquired HepPar positivity but had no detectable CD45 antigen expression. In contrast, the cultured cells derived from the CD45-positive SP cells also acquired HepPar positivity, but only a minimal fraction expressed the CD45 antigen. We conclude that hepatic SP cells derived from the nonparenchymal portion of human liver are a potential source of human hepatocytes irrespective of their CD45 status, and further animal studies will be required to assess their regenerative potential. PMID:16187169

  12. [Radioresistance mechanisms of side population cells in mouse melanoma cell line B16].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matchuk, O N; Zamulaeva, I A; Kovalev, O A; Saenko, A S

    2013-01-01

    As it was shown by us earlier, side population (SP) cells are more resistant to the low-LET radiation than the other part of mouse melanoma B16 cells (Matchuk et al., 2012). The aim of our research was finding some mechanisms of radioresistance, therefore we analyzed SP and nonSP cell cycle distribution, spontaneous and radiation induced DNA double-strand breaks (number of γH2AX foci) and intracellular NO concentration. The results indicate that SP cells have significantly less DNA double-strand breaks after irradiation at dose of 3 Gy than nonSP cells (24.4 vs 40.3, accordingly, P < 0.05 Mann-Whitney Ucriterion). SP cells are more quiescent compared to nonSP G1/G0 fraction is 85 vs 39%, accordingly, P < 0.01 Mann-Whitney U criterion). Most nonSP cells reside in S, G2/M phases (61%), believed to be rather radiosensitive. Thus, the difference of SP and nonSP cells radiosensitivity can be partly explained by peculiarities of cell cycle distribution. NO concentration is 1.5 times higher in SP than nonSP cells (P < 0.05 Mann-Whitney U criterion); since it is known that NO inhibits apoptosis, being one of the mechanisms of genetic stability maintenance, greater number of spontaneous DNA double-strand breaks in SP cells is unsurprising (P < 0.05 Mann-Whitney U criterion). The above-listed results explain considerably the higher resistance of SP cells to the action of low-LET radiation in comparison with other melanoma B16 cells. Further study of this question can become the basis for development of tools to target SP cells and, ultimately, more effective cancer treatment.

  13. Programming strategy for efficient modeling of dynamics in a population of heterogeneous cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hald, Bjørn Olav; Hendriksen, Morten; Sørensen, Preben Graae

    2013-01-01

    Heterogeneity is a ubiquitous property of biological systems. Even in a genetically identical population of a single cell type, cell-to-cell differences are observed. Although the functional behavior of a given population is generally robust, the consequences of heterogeneity are fairly unpredict......Heterogeneity is a ubiquitous property of biological systems. Even in a genetically identical population of a single cell type, cell-to-cell differences are observed. Although the functional behavior of a given population is generally robust, the consequences of heterogeneity are fairly...

  14. Preface of the "Symposium on Mathematical Models and Methods to investigate Heterogeneity in Cell and Cell Population Biology"

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clairambault, Jean

    2016-06-01

    This session investigates hot topics related to mathematical representations of cell and cell population dynamics in biology and medicine, in particular, but not only, with applications to cancer. Methods in mathematical modelling and analysis, and in statistical inference using single-cell and cell population data, should contribute to focus this session on heterogeneity in cell populations. Among other methods are proposed: a) Intracellular protein dynamics and gene regulatory networks using ordinary/partial/delay differential equations (ODEs, PDEs, DDEs); b) Representation of cell population dynamics using agent-based models (ABMs) and/or PDEs; c) Hybrid models and multiscale models to integrate single-cell dynamics into cell population behaviour; d) Structured cell population dynamics and asymptotic evolution w.r.t. relevant traits; e) Heterogeneity in cancer cell populations: origin, evolution, phylogeny and methods of reconstruction; f) Drug resistance as an evolutionary phenotype: predicting and overcoming it in therapeutics; g) Theoretical therapeutic optimisation of combined drug treatments in cancer cell populations and in populations of other organisms, such as bacteria.

  15. Toward Synthetic Spatial Patterns in Engineered Cell Populations with Chemotaxis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duran-Nebreda, Salva; Solé, Ricard V

    2016-07-15

    A major force shaping form and patterns in biology is based in the presence of amplification mechanisms able to generate ordered, large-scale spatial structures out of local interactions and random initial conditions. Turing patterns are one of the best known candidates for such ordering dynamics, and their existence has been proven in both chemical and physical systems. Their relevance in biology, although strongly supported by indirect evidence, is still under discussion. Extensive modeling approaches have stemmed from Turing's pioneering ideas, but further confirmation from experimental biology is required. An alternative possibility is to engineer cells so that self-organized patterns emerge from local communication. Here we propose a potential synthetic design based on the interaction between population density and a diffusing signal, including also directed motion in the form of chemotaxis. The feasibility of engineering such a system and its implications for developmental biology are also assessed.

  16. Computational framework for simulating fluorescence microscope images with cell populations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lehmussola, Antti; Ruusuvuori, Pekka; Selinummi, Jyrki; Huttunen, Heikki; Yli-Harja, Olli

    2007-07-01

    Fluorescence microscopy combined with digital imaging constructs a basic platform for numerous biomedical studies in the field of cellular imaging. As the studies relying on analysis of digital images have become popular, the validation of image processing methods used in automated image cytometry has become an important topic. Especially, the need for efficient validation has arisen from emerging high-throughput microscopy systems where manual validation is impractical. We present a simulation platform for generating synthetic images of fluorescence-stained cell populations with realistic properties. Moreover, we show that the synthetic images enable the validation of analysis methods for automated image cytometry and comparison of their performance. Finally, we suggest additional usage scenarios for the simulator. The presented simulation framework, with several user-controllable parameters, forms a versatile tool for many kinds of validation tasks, and is freely available at http://www.cs.tut.fi/sgn/csb/simcep.

  17. Homogeneous crystal nucleation in polymers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schick, C.; Androsch, R.; Schmelzer, J. W. P.

    2017-11-01

    The pathway of crystal nucleation significantly influences the structure and properties of semi-crystalline polymers. Crystal nucleation is normally heterogeneous at low supercooling, and homogeneous at high supercooling, of the polymer melt. Homogeneous nucleation in bulk polymers has been, so far, hardly accessible experimentally, and was even doubted to occur at all. This topical review summarizes experimental findings on homogeneous crystal nucleation in polymers. Recently developed fast scanning calorimetry, with cooling and heating rates up to 106 K s-1, allows for detailed investigations of nucleation near and even below the glass transition temperature, including analysis of nuclei stability. As for other materials, the maximum homogeneous nucleation rate for polymers is located close to the glass transition temperature. In the experiments discussed here, it is shown that polymer nucleation is homogeneous at such temperatures. Homogeneous nucleation in polymers is discussed in the framework of the classical nucleation theory. The majority of our observations are consistent with the theory. The discrepancies may guide further research, particularly experiments to progress theoretical development. Progress in the understanding of homogeneous nucleation is much needed, since most of the modelling approaches dealing with polymer crystallization exclusively consider homogeneous nucleation. This is also the basis for advancing theoretical approaches to the much more complex phenomena governing heterogeneous nucleation.

  18. Regulation of bacteria population behaviors by AI-2 "consumer cells" and "supplier cells".

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quan, Yufen; Meng, Fankang; Ma, Xinyu; Song, Xinhao; Liu, Xiao; Gao, Weixia; Dang, Yulei; Meng, Yao; Cao, Mingfeng; Song, Cunjiang

    2017-09-19

    Autoinducer-2 (AI-2) is a universal signal molecule and enables an individual bacteria to communicate with each other and ultimately control behaviors of the population. Harnessing the character of AI-2, two kinds of AI-2 "controller cells" ("consumer cells" and "supplier cells") were designed to "reprogram" the behaviors of entire population. For the consumer cells, genes associated with the uptake and processing of AI-2, which includes LsrACDB, LsrFG, LsrK, were overexpressed in varying combinations. Four consumer cell strains were constructed: Escherichia coli MG1655 pLsrACDB (NK-C1), MG1655 pLsrACDBK (NK-C2), MG1655 pLsrACDBFG (NK-C3) and MG1655 pLsrACDBFGK (NK-C4). The key enzymes responsible for production of AI-2, LuxS and Mtn, were also overexpressed, yielding strains MG1655 pLuxS (NK-SU1), and MG1655 pLuxS-Mtn (NK-SU2). All the consumer cells could decrease the environmental AI-2 concentration. NK-C2 and NK-C4 were most effective in AI-2 uptake and inhibited biofilm formation. While suppliers can increase the environmental AI-2 concentration and NK-SU2 was most effective in supplying AI-2 and facilitated biofilm formation. Further, reporter strain, MG1655 pLGFP was constructed. The expression of green fluorescent protein (GFP) in reporter cells was initiated and guided by AI-2. Mixture of consumer cells and reporter cells suggest that consumer cells can decrease the AI-2 concentration. And the supplier cells were co-cultured with reporter cells, indicating that supplier cells can provide more AI-2 compared to the control. The consumer cells and supplier cells could be used to regulate environmental AI-2 concentration and the biofilm formation. They can also modulate the AI-2 concentration when they were co-cultured with reporter cells. It can be envisioned that this system will become useful tools in synthetic biology and researching new antimicrobials.

  19. In silico lineage tracing through single cell transcriptomics identifies a neural stem cell population in planarians.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Molinaro, Alyssa M; Pearson, Bret J

    2016-04-27

    The planarian Schmidtea mediterranea is a master regenerator with a large adult stem cell compartment. The lack of transgenic labeling techniques in this animal has hindered the study of lineage progression and has made understanding the mechanisms of tissue regeneration a challenge. However, recent advances in single-cell transcriptomics and analysis methods allow for the discovery of novel cell lineages as differentiation progresses from stem cell to terminally differentiated cell. Here we apply pseudotime analysis and single-cell transcriptomics to identify adult stem cells belonging to specific cellular lineages and identify novel candidate genes for future in vivo lineage studies. We purify 168 single stem and progeny cells from the planarian head, which were subjected to single-cell RNA sequencing (scRNAseq). Pseudotime analysis with Waterfall and gene set enrichment analysis predicts a molecularly distinct neoblast sub-population with neural character (νNeoblasts) as well as a novel alternative lineage. Using the predicted νNeoblast markers, we demonstrate that a novel proliferative stem cell population exists adjacent to the brain. scRNAseq coupled with in silico lineage analysis offers a new approach for studying lineage progression in planarians. The lineages identified here are extracted from a highly heterogeneous dataset with minimal prior knowledge of planarian lineages, demonstrating that lineage purification by transgenic labeling is not a prerequisite for this approach. The identification of the νNeoblast lineage demonstrates the usefulness of the planarian system for computationally predicting cellular lineages in an adult context coupled with in vivo verification.

  20. Use of Multicolor Flow Cytometry for Isolation of Specific Cell Populations Deriving from Differentiated Human Embryonic Stem Cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mengarelli, Isabella; Fryga, Andrew; Barberi, Tiziano

    2016-01-01

    Flow Cytometry-Sorting (FCM-Sorting) is a technique commonly used to identify and isolate specific types of cells from a heterogeneous population of live cells. Here we describe a multicolor flow cytometry technique that uses five distinct cell surface antigens to isolate four live populations with

  1. Enrichment of skin-derived neural precursor cells from dermal cell populations by altering culture conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bayati, Vahid; Gazor, Rohoullah; Nejatbakhsh, Reza; Negad Dehbashi, Fereshteh

    2016-01-01

    As stem cells play a critical role in tissue repair, their manipulation for being applied in regenerative medicine is of great importance. Skin-derived precursors (SKPs) may be good candidates for use in cell-based therapy as the only neural stem cells which can be isolated from an accessible tissue, skin. Herein, we presented a simple protocol to enrich neural SKPs by monolayer adherent cultivation to prove the efficacy of this method. To enrich neural SKPs from dermal cell populations, we have found that a monolayer adherent cultivation helps to increase the numbers of neural precursor cells. Indeed, we have cultured dermal cells as monolayer under serum-supplemented (control) and serum-supplemented culture, followed by serum free cultivation (test) and compared. Finally, protein markers of SKPs were assessed and compared in both experimental groups and differentiation potential was evaluated in enriched culture. The cells of enriched culture concurrently expressed fibronectin, vimentin and nestin, an intermediate filament protein expressed in neural and skeletal muscle precursors as compared to control culture. In addition, they possessed a multipotential capacity to differentiate into neurogenic, glial, adipogenic, osteogenic and skeletal myogenic cell lineages. It was concluded that serum-free adherent culture reinforced by growth factors have been shown to be effective on proliferation of skin-derived neural precursor cells (skin-NPCs) and drive their selective and rapid expansion.

  2. Concurrent Isolation of 3 Distinct Cardiac Stem Cell Populations From a Single Human Heart Biopsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monsanto, Megan M; White, Kevin S; Kim, Taeyong; Wang, Bingyan J; Fisher, Kristina; Ilves, Kelli; Khalafalla, Farid G; Casillas, Alexandria; Broughton, Kathleen; Mohsin, Sadia; Dembitsky, Walter P; Sussman, Mark A

    2017-07-07

    The relative actions and synergism between distinct myocardial-derived stem cell populations remain obscure. Ongoing debates on optimal cell population(s) for treatment of heart failure prompted implementation of a protocol for isolation of multiple stem cell populations from a single myocardial tissue sample to develop new insights for achieving myocardial regeneration. Establish a robust cardiac stem cell isolation and culture protocol to consistently generate 3 distinct stem cell populations from a single human heart biopsy. Isolation of 3 endogenous cardiac stem cell populations was performed from human heart samples routinely discarded during implantation of a left ventricular assist device. Tissue explants were mechanically minced into 1 mm3 pieces to minimize time exposure to collagenase digestion and preserve cell viability. Centrifugation removes large cardiomyocytes and tissue debris producing a single cell suspension that is sorted using magnetic-activated cell sorting technology. Initial sorting is based on tyrosine-protein kinase Kit (c-Kit) expression that enriches for 2 c-Kit+ cell populations yielding a mixture of cardiac progenitor cells and endothelial progenitor cells. Flowthrough c-Kit- mesenchymal stem cells are positively selected by surface expression of markers CD90 and CD105. After 1 week of culture, the c-Kit+ population is further enriched by selection for a CD133+ endothelial progenitor cell population. Persistence of respective cell surface markers in vitro is confirmed both by flow cytometry and immunocytochemistry. Three distinct cardiac cell populations with individualized phenotypic properties consistent with cardiac progenitor cells, endothelial progenitor cells, and mesenchymal stem cells can be successfully concurrently isolated and expanded from a single tissue sample derived from human heart failure patients. © 2017 American Heart Association, Inc.

  3. Distinct population of highly malignant cells in a head and neck squamous cell carcinoma cell line established by xenograft model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jan Chia-Ing

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The progression and metastasis of solid tumors, including head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC, have been related to the behavior of a small subpopulation of cancer stem cells. Here, we have established a highly malignant HNSCC cell line, SASVO3, from primary tumors using three sequential rounds of xenotransplantation. SASVO3 possesses enhanced tumorigenic ability both in vitro and in vivo. Moreover, SASVO3 exhibits properties of cancer stem cells, including that increased the abilities of sphere-forming, the number of side population cells, the potential of transplanted tumor growth and elevated expression of the stem cell marker Bmi1. Injection of SASVO3 into the tail vein of nude mice resulted in lung metastases. These results are consistent with the postulate that the malignant and/or metastasis potential of HNSCC cells may reside in a stem-like subpopulation.

  4. Monocytes are a rheologically heterogeneous population of cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Evans, S A; Adams, R; Rainger, G E

    2001-01-01

    The effect of increased adhesiveness and decreased deformability of leukocytes following activation can have a profound effect on flow through the microcirculation. Measurement of leukocyte deformability is therefore an important tool in the study of the pathology of vascular diseases. Although much work has been done on the rheological properties of lymphocytes and granulocytes, there is little information available on the larger mononuclear cells, the monocytes. To investigate monocyte rheology, attempts were made to purify monocytes by a variety of methods. Purified monocytes were then filtered through 5 microm polycarbonate filters, with flow profiles (change in volume with time) recorded over 300 seconds. The profiles were analysed by least squares fitting to an appropriate mathematical model. Analysis of filtration data demonstrated 3 distinct sub-populations of monocytes with differing rheological properties. Other workers have characterised monocytes into defined subsets on the basis of their size, phagocytic ability or expression of cell surface markers. The definition of monocytes into defined rheological subsets is a new and useful addition to these studies.

  5. Phenotype overlap in glial cell populations: astroglia, oligodendroglia and NG-2(+) cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alghamdi, Badrah; Fern, Robert

    2015-01-01

    The extent to which NG-2(+) cells form a distinct population separate from astrocytes is central to understanding whether this important cell class is wholly an oligodendrocyte precursor cell (OPC) or has additional functions akin to those classically ascribed to astrocytes. Early immuno-staining studies indicate that NG-2(+) cells do not express the astrocyte marker GFAP, but orthogonal reconstructions of double-labeled confocal image stacks here reveal a significant degree of co-expression in individual cells within post-natal day 10 (P10) and adult rat optic nerve (RON) and rat cortex. Extensive scanning of various antibody/fixation/embedding approaches identified a protocol for selective post-embedded immuno-gold labeling. This first ultrastructural characterization of identified NG-2(+) cells revealed populations of both OPCs and astrocytes in P10 RON. NG-2(+) astrocytes had classic features including the presence of glial filaments but low levels of glial filament expression were also found in OPCs and myelinating oligodendrocytes. P0 RONs contained few OPCs but positively identified astrocytes were observed to ensheath pre-myelinated axons in a fashion previously described as a definitive marker of the oligodendrocyte lineage. Astrocyte ensheathment was also apparent in P10 RONs, was absent from developing nodes of Ranvier and was never associated with compact myelin. Astrocyte processes were also shown to encapsulate some oligodendrocyte somata. The data indicate that common criteria for delineating astrocytes and oligodendroglia are insufficiently robust and that astrocyte features ascribed to OPCs may arise from misidentification.

  6. T Cell Epitope Immunotherapy Induces a CD4+ T Cell Population with Regulatory Activity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Verhoef Adrienne

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available Background Synthetic peptides, representing CD4+ T cell epitopes, derived from the primary sequence of allergen molecules have been used to down-regulate allergic inflammation in sensitised individuals. Treatment of allergic diseases with peptides may offer substantial advantages over treatment with native allergen molecules because of the reduced potential for cross-linking IgE bound to the surface of mast cells and basophils. Methods and Findings In this study we address the mechanism of action of peptide immunotherapy (PIT in cat-allergic, asthmatic patients. Cell-division-tracking dyes, cell-mixing experiments, surface phenotyping, and cytokine measurements were used to investigate immunomodulation in peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs after therapy. Proliferative responses of PBMCs to allergen extract were significantly reduced after PIT. This was associated with modified cytokine profiles generally characterised by an increase in interleukin-10 and a decrease in interleukin-5 production. CD4+ cells isolated after PIT were able to actively suppress allergen-specific proliferative responses of pretreatment CD4neg PBMCs in co-culture experiments. PIT was associated with a significant increase in surface expression of CD5 on both CD4+ and CD8+ PBMCs. Conclusion This study provides evidence for the induction of a population of CD4+ T cells with suppressor/regulatory activity following PIT. Furthermore, up-regulation of cell surface levels of CD5 may contribute to reduced reactivity to allergen.

  7. [Isolation and in vivo tumorigenicity assay of CD133+ side population cells from laryngeal cancer cell line].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Chun-ping; Zhou, Liang; Xie, Ming; Tao, Lei; Zhang, Ming; Tian, Jie

    2012-03-01

    To investigate a valuable strategy for further purifying cancer stem cells (CSCs) from laryngeal cancer cell line. CD133+ side population (SP) and CD133-SP cells were detected and isolated from laryngeal cancer Hep-2 cell line with SP discrimination and CD133 surface marker, assisted by fluorescence activated cell sorting technology. Freshly sorted CD133+SP and CD133-SP cells were xenografted into the subcutaneous space of the right axillary fossa of NOD/SCID mice and tumorigenic capacity of the cells from two subgroups were examine. Cell cycle distributions of the two cell populations were detected. CD133+SP and CD133-SP cells accounted for (0.30±0.12)% and (17.52±1.59)% in Hep-2 cell line, respectively. CD133+SP cells formed tumor nodules in 15 of 16 mice and CD133-SP cells in 7 of 16 mice (Fisher's exact test, Pline.

  8. Homogenization of High-Contrast Brinkman Flows

    KAUST Repository

    Brown, Donald L.

    2015-04-16

    Modeling porous flow in complex media is a challenging problem. Not only is the problem inherently multiscale but, due to high contrast in permeability values, flow velocities may differ greatly throughout the medium. To avoid complicated interface conditions, the Brinkman model is often used for such flows [O. Iliev, R. Lazarov, and J. Willems, Multiscale Model. Simul., 9 (2011), pp. 1350--1372]. Instead of permeability variations and contrast being contained in the geometric media structure, this information is contained in a highly varying and high-contrast coefficient. In this work, we present two main contributions. First, we develop a novel homogenization procedure for the high-contrast Brinkman equations by constructing correctors and carefully estimating the residuals. Understanding the relationship between scales and contrast values is critical to obtaining useful estimates. Therefore, standard convergence-based homogenization techniques [G. A. Chechkin, A. L. Piatniski, and A. S. Shamev, Homogenization: Methods and Applications, Transl. Math. Monogr. 234, American Mathematical Society, Providence, RI, 2007, G. Allaire, SIAM J. Math. Anal., 23 (1992), pp. 1482--1518], although a powerful tool, are not applicable here. Our second point is that the Brinkman equations, in certain scaling regimes, are invariant under homogenization. Unlike in the case of Stokes-to-Darcy homogenization [D. Brown, P. Popov, and Y. Efendiev, GEM Int. J. Geomath., 2 (2011), pp. 281--305, E. Marusic-Paloka and A. Mikelic, Boll. Un. Mat. Ital. A (7), 10 (1996), pp. 661--671], the results presented here under certain velocity regimes yield a Brinkman-to-Brinkman upscaling that allows using a single software platform to compute on both microscales and macroscales. In this paper, we discuss the homogenized Brinkman equations. We derive auxiliary cell problems to build correctors and calculate effective coefficients for certain velocity regimes. Due to the boundary effects, we construct

  9. Homogeneous Spaces and Equivariant Embeddings

    CERN Document Server

    Timashev, DA

    2011-01-01

    Homogeneous spaces of linear algebraic groups lie at the crossroads of algebraic geometry, theory of algebraic groups, classical projective and enumerative geometry, harmonic analysis, and representation theory. By standard reasons of algebraic geometry, in order to solve various problems on a homogeneous space it is natural and helpful to compactify it keeping track of the group action, i.e. to consider equivariant completions or, more generally, open embeddings of a given homogeneous space. Such equivariant embeddings are the subject of this book. We focus on classification of equivariant em

  10. Human endometrial side population cells exhibit genotypic, phenotypic and functional features of somatic stem cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Irene Cervelló

    Full Text Available During reproductive life, the human endometrium undergoes around 480 cycles of growth, breakdown and regeneration should pregnancy not be achieved. This outstanding regenerative capacity is the basis for women's cycling and its dysfunction may be involved in the etiology of pathological disorders. Therefore, the human endometrial tissue must rely on a remarkable endometrial somatic stem cells (SSC population. Here we explore the hypothesis that human endometrial side population (SP cells correspond to somatic stem cells. We isolated, identified and characterized the SP corresponding to the stromal and epithelial compartments using endometrial SP genes signature, immunophenotyping and characteristic telomerase pattern. We analyzed the clonogenic activity of SP cells under hypoxic conditions and the differentiation capacity in vitro to adipogenic and osteogenic lineages. Finally, we demonstrated the functional capability of endometrial SP to develop human endometrium after subcutaneous injection in NOD-SCID mice. Briefly, SP cells of human endometrium from epithelial and stromal compartments display genotypic, phenotypic and functional features of SSC.

  11. Expanding intestinal stem cells in culture

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Heo, Inha; Clevers, Hans

    Culturing intestinal stem cells into 3D organoids results in heterogeneous cell populations, reflecting the in vivo cell type diversity. In a recent paper published in Nature, Wang et al. established a culture condition for a highly homogeneous population of intestinal stem cells.

  12. Identification of a unique hepatocellular carcinoma line, Li-7, with CD13(+) cancer stem cells hierarchy and population change upon its differentiation during culture and effects of sorafenib.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamada, Takeshi; Abei, Masato; Danjoh, Inaho; Shirota, Ryoko; Yamashita, Taro; Hyodo, Ichinosuke; Nakamura, Yukio

    2015-04-11

    cells more effectively than the reverse sequence or either alone. We identified a unique HCC line, Li-7, which not only shows heterogeneity for a CD13(+) CSC hierarchy, but also undergoes a "population change" upon CSC differentiation. Sorafenib targeted the CSC in vitro, supporting the use of this model for screening drugs targeting the CSC. This type of "heterogeneous, unstable" cell line may prove more useful in the CSC era than conventional "homogeneous, stable" cell lines.

  13. Making sense of snapshot data: ergodic principle for clonal cell populations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas, Philipp

    2017-11-01

    Population growth is often ignored when quantifying gene expression levels across clonal cell populations. We develop a framework for obtaining the molecule number distributions in an exponentially growing cell population taking into account its age structure. In the presence of generation time variability, the average acquired across a population snapshot does not obey the average of a dividing cell over time, apparently contradicting ergodicity between single cells and the population. Instead, we show that the variation observed across snapshots with known cell age is captured by cell histories, a single-cell measure obtained from tracking an arbitrary cell of the population back to the ancestor from which it originated. The correspondence between cells of known age in a population with their histories represents an ergodic principle that provides a new interpretation of population snapshot data. We illustrate the principle using analytical solutions of stochastic gene expression models in cell populations with arbitrary generation time distributions. We further elucidate that the principle breaks down for biochemical reactions that are under selection, such as the expression of genes conveying antibiotic resistance, which gives rise to an experimental criterion with which to probe selection on gene expression fluctuations. © 2017 The Author(s).

  14. G3-homogeneous gravitational instantons

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bourliot, F; Petropoulos, P M [Centre de Physique Theorique, CNRS-UMR 7644, Ecole Polytechnique, 91128 Palaiseau Cedex (France); Estes, J [Laboratoire de Physique Theorique, CNRS-UMR 8549, Ecole Normale Superieure, 24 rue Lhomond, F-75231 Paris cedex 05 (France); Spindel, Ph, E-mail: bourliot@cpht.polytechnique.f, E-mail: estes@cpht.polytechnique.f, E-mail: marios@cpht.polytechnique.f, E-mail: philippe.spindel@umons.ac.b [Service de Mecanique et Gravitation, Universite de Mons, 20 Place du Parc, 7000 Mons, Belgique (Belgium)

    2010-05-21

    We provide an exhaustive classification of self-dual four-dimensional gravitational instantons foliated with three-dimensional homogeneous spaces, i.e. homogeneous self-dual metrics on four-dimensional Euclidean spaces admitting a Bianchi simply transitive isometry group. The classification pattern is based on the algebra homomorphisms relating the Bianchi group and the duality group SO(3). New and general solutions are found for Bianchi III.

  15. G3-homogeneous gravitational instantons

    CERN Document Server

    Bourliot, F; Petropoulos, P M; Spindel, Ph

    2009-01-01

    We provide an exhaustive classification of self-dual four-dimensional gravitational instantons foliated with three-dimensional homogeneous spaces, i.e. homogeneous self-dual metrics on four-dimensional Euclidean spaces admitting a Bianchi simply transitive isometry group. The classification pattern is based on the algebra homomorphisms relating the Bianchi group and the duality group SO(3). New and general solutions are found for Bianchi III.

  16. Homogeneous nucleation of magnesium hydroxide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klein, D H; Smith, M D; Driy, J A

    1967-08-01

    The rate of homogeneous nucleation of magnesium hydroxide has been determined as a function of solution concentration, using a quasi-homogeneous precipitation technique and electronic particle counting. The nucleation rate becomes measurable at super-saturations of about 4, and is dependent on the 33rd power of the product aMgaOH(2). The experimental results are consistent with nucleation theory. The nucleus-solution interfacial energy is calculated to be 115 erg/cm(2).

  17. [Obtaining ribosome crystals in homogenates].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bersani, F; Longo, I; Fanti, M; Pettazzoni, P

    1979-08-30

    Chick embryos are homogenized in order to analyse ribosome crystallization. Ribosome crystallization has been induced by hypothermic treatment in chick embryos homogenate. Tetramers and crystals were produced by gradually inducing the temperature over a span of 10 h to 4 degrees C. It has been observed that the concentration of KCl in the buffer is a critical point. It is suggested that the nuclear fraction is engaged in ribosome crystallization.

  18. From invasion to latency: intracellular noise and cell motility as key controls of the competition between resource-limited cellular populations

    KAUST Repository

    Guerrero, Pilar

    2015-04-02

    © 2015, Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg. In this paper we analyse stochastic models of the competition between two resource-limited cell populations which differ in their response to nutrient availability: the resident population exhibits a switch-like response behaviour while the invading population exhibits a bistable response. We investigate how noise in the intracellular regulatory pathways and cell motility influence the fate of the incumbent and invading populations. We focus initially on a spatially homogeneous system and study in detail the role of intracellular noise. We show that in such well-mixed systems, two distinct regimes exist: In the low (intracellular) noise limit, the invader has the ability to invade the resident population, whereas in the high noise regime competition between the two populations is found to be neutral and, in accordance with neutral evolution theory, invasion is a random event. Careful examination of the system dynamics leads us to conclude that (i) even if the invader is unable to invade, the distribution of survival times, PS(t), has a fat-tail behaviour (PS(t)∼t-1) which implies that small colonies of mutants can coexist with the resident population for arbitrarily long times, and (ii) the bistable structure of the invading population increases the stability of the latent population, thus increasing their long-term likelihood of survival, by decreasing the intensity of the noise at the population level. We also examine the effects of spatial inhomogeneity. In the low noise limit we find that cell motility is positively correlated with the aggressiveness of the invader as defined by the time the invader takes to invade the resident population: the faster the invasion, the more aggressive the invader.

  19. Impact of the homogeneous junction breakdown in IBC solar cells on the passivation quality of Al 2 O 3 and SiO 2 : degradation and regeneration behavior

    KAUST Repository

    Müller, Ralph

    2017-09-22

    Within the last years, many different approaches for the simplified fabrication of interdigitated back-contact (IBC) solar cells have been developed. Most of those concepts result in emitter and back-surface field (BSF) regions that are in direct contact to each other which leads to a controlled breakdown under reverse bias at the pn junction. In this work, the influence of the reverse breakdown on the passivation quality of AlO and SiO at the pn junction is investigated, not only shedding light on the degradation but also on the regeneration behavior of the cells. It was found that cells with AlO passivation on the back side degrade during reverse breakdown whereas sister cells with SiO passivation were rather unaffected. Consequently, the degradation seems to be related to the passivation layer. However, it is shown that the passivation can be regenerated even under normal operation condition. A possible explanation is the discharging of interface traps, which are getting recharged already at room temperature.

  20. Cellular Heterogeneity in the Mouse Esophagus Implicates the Presence of a Nonquiescent Epithelial Stem Cell Population

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aaron D. DeWard

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Because the esophageal epithelium lacks a defined stem cell niche, it is unclear whether all basal epithelial cells in the adult esophagus are functionally equivalent. In this study, we showed that basal cells in the mouse esophagus contained a heterogeneous population of epithelial cells, similar to other rapidly cycling tissues such as the intestine or skin. Using a combination of cell-surface markers, we separated primary esophageal tissue into distinct cell populations that harbored differences in stem cell potential. We also used an in vitro 3D organoid assay to demonstrate that Sox2, Wnt, and bone morphogenetic protein signaling regulate esophageal self-renewal. Finally, we labeled proliferating basal epithelial cells in vivo to show differing cell-cycle profiles and proliferation kinetics. Based on our results, we propose that a nonquiescent stem cell population resides in the basal epithelium of the mouse esophagus.

  1. Increasing population growth by asymmetric segregation of a limiting resource during cell division

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Avraham, Nurit; Soifer, Ilya; Carmi, Miri; Barkai, Naama

    .... Notably, while deletion of WHI5 alleviates daughter cell division arrest in low‐zinc conditions, it results in a lower final population size, as cell division rate becomes progressively slower...

  2. When individual behaviour matters: homogeneous and network models in epidemiology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bansal, Shweta; Grenfell, Bryan T; Meyers, Lauren Ancel

    2007-10-22

    Heterogeneity in host contact patterns profoundly shapes population-level disease dynamics. Many epidemiological models make simplifying assumptions about the patterns of disease-causing interactions among hosts. In particular, homogeneous-mixing models assume that all hosts have identical rates of disease-causing contacts. In recent years, several network-based approaches have been developed to explicitly model heterogeneity in host contact patterns. Here, we use a network perspective to quantify the extent to which real populations depart from the homogeneous-mixing assumption, in terms of both the underlying network structure and the resulting epidemiological dynamics. We find that human contact patterns are indeed more heterogeneous than assumed by homogeneous-mixing models, but are not as variable as some have speculated. We then evaluate a variety of methodologies for incorporating contact heterogeneity, including network-based models and several modifications to the simple SIR compartmental model. We conclude that the homogeneous-mixing compartmental model is appropriate when host populations are nearly homogeneous, and can be modified effectively for a few classes of non-homogeneous networks. In general, however, network models are more intuitive and accurate for predicting disease spread through heterogeneous host populations.

  3. Single-cell analysis of population context advances RNAi screening at multiple levels

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Snijder, Berend; Sacher, Raphael; Rämö, Pauli; Liberali, Prisca; Mench, Karin; Wolfrum, Nina; Burleigh, Laura; Scott, Cameron C; Verheije, Monique H|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/239420640; Mercer, Jason; Moese, Stefan; Heger, Thomas; Theusner, Kristina; Jurgeit, Andreas; Lamparter, David; Balistreri, Giuseppe; Schelhaas, Mario; De Haan, Cornelis A M|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/194204510; Marjomäki, Varpu; Hyypiä, Timo; Rottier, Peter J M|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/068451954; Sodeik, Beate; Marsh, Mark; Gruenberg, Jean; Amara, Ali; Greber, Urs; Helenius, Ari; Pelkmans, Lucas

    2012-01-01

    Isogenic cells in culture show strong variability, which arises from dynamic adaptations to the microenvironment of individual cells. Here we study the influence of the cell population context, which determines a single cell's microenvironment, in image-based RNAi screens. We developed a

  4. A sub-cellular viscoelastic model for cell population mechanics.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yousef Jamali

    Full Text Available Understanding the biomechanical properties and the effect of biomechanical force on epithelial cells is key to understanding how epithelial cells form uniquely shaped structures in two or three-dimensional space. Nevertheless, with the limitations and challenges posed by biological experiments at this scale, it becomes advantageous to use mathematical and 'in silico' (computational models as an alternate solution. This paper introduces a single-cell-based model representing the cross section of a typical tissue. Each cell in this model is an individual unit containing several sub-cellular elements, such as the elastic plasma membrane, enclosed viscoelastic elements that play the role of cytoskeleton, and the viscoelastic elements of the cell nucleus. The cell membrane is divided into segments where each segment (or point incorporates the cell's interaction and communication with other cells and its environment. The model is capable of simulating how cells cooperate and contribute to the overall structure and function of a particular tissue; it mimics many aspects of cellular behavior such as cell growth, division, apoptosis and polarization. The model allows for investigation of the biomechanical properties of cells, cell-cell interactions, effect of environment on cellular clusters, and how individual cells work together and contribute to the structure and function of a particular tissue. To evaluate the current approach in modeling different topologies of growing tissues in distinct biochemical conditions of the surrounding media, we model several key cellular phenomena, namely monolayer cell culture, effects of adhesion intensity, growth of epithelial cell through interaction with extra-cellular matrix (ECM, effects of a gap in the ECM, tensegrity and tissue morphogenesis and formation of hollow epithelial acini. The proposed computational model enables one to isolate the effects of biomechanical properties of individual cells and the

  5. Endothelial Progenitor Cell Fraction Contained in Bone Marrow-Derived Mesenchymal Stem Cell Populations Impairs Osteogenic Differentiation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fabian Duttenhoefer

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available In bone tissue engineering (TE endothelial cell-osteoblast cocultures are known to induce synergies of cell differentiation and activity. Bone marrow mononucleated cells (BMCs are a rich source of mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs able to develop an osteogenic phenotype. Endothelial progenitor cells (EPCs are also present within BMC. In this study we investigate the effect of EPCs present in the BMC population on MSCs osteogenic differentiation. Human BMCs were isolated and separated into two populations. The MSC population was selected through plastic adhesion capacity. EPCs (CD34+ and CD133+ were removed from the BMC population and the resulting population was named depleted MSCs. Both populations were cultured over 28 days in osteogenic medium (Dex+ or medium containing platelet lysate (PL. MSC population grew faster than depleted MSCs in both media, and PL containing medium accelerated the proliferation for both populations. Cell differentiation was much higher in Dex+ medium in both cases. Real-time RT-PCR revealed upregulation of osteogenic marker genes in depleted MSCs. Higher values of ALP activity and matrix mineralization analyses confirmed these results. Our study advocates that absence of EPCs in the MSC population enables higher osteogenic gene expression and matrix mineralization and therefore may lead to advanced bone neoformation necessary for TE constructs.

  6. Comparative analysis of cell morphology in sputum samples homogenized with dithiothreitol, N-acetyl-L cysteine, Cytorich(®) red preservative and in cellblock preparations to enhance the sensitivity of sputum cytology for the diagnosis of lung cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saraswathy Veena, Vamadevan; Sara George, Preethi; Jayasree, Kattoor; Sujathan, Kunjuraman

    2015-07-01

    Lung cancer claims highest rate of cancer related mortality worldwide, mainly due to late diagnosis and distant metastasis. Sputum cytology is the simplest, non-invasive and cost effective technique but it has low sensitivity due to lack of robust processing methods to retrieve all the diagnostic materials clogged in mucus, inflammatory exudates and blood. This study have compared conventional pick and smear method of sputum processing with samples prepared by homogenization methods using N-acetyl-l-cysteine, Dithiothreitol (DTT), CytoRich red solution and cell blocks (CBs) with respect to screening time, quality of staining, cellularity, smear background, nuclear and cytoplasmic morphology preservation, and diagnostic efficacy. The significance of CB prepared from homogenised samples for immunocytochemistry, protein extraction, Genomic DNA and RNA extraction were also evaluated on a cohort 3,185 samples. The significance of the morphological features in each of the techniques was statistically analysed using SPSS 11 software. The smear background clarity, staining quality and diagnostic efficacy of samples processed in red solution was found to be superior to the conventional method (P extraction were found possible in CBs as well as from the cell suspension. A combined analysis of smears and CBs found to improve the sensitivity of sputum cytology. The study suggests homogenization of sputum in CytoRich ® red solution and cellblock preparations routinely for all samples to improve the sensitivity of sputum cytology. IHC and DNA extraction can be performed in sputum samples suggesting the role of sputum samples for ancillary techniques. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  7. The effects of stochasticity at the single-cell level and cell size control on the population growth

    OpenAIRE

    Lin, Jie; Amir, Ariel

    2016-01-01

    Establishing a quantitative connection between the population growth rate and the generation times of single cells is a prerequisite for understanding evolutionary dynamics of microbes. However, existing theories fail to account for the experimentally observed correlations between mother-daughter generation times that are unavoidable when cell size is controlled for - which is essentially always the case. Here, we study population-level growth in the presence of cell size control and corrobor...

  8. Cell supermarket: Adipose tissue as a source of stem cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adipose tissue is derived from numerous sources, and in recent years has been shown to provide numerous cells from what seemingly was a population of homogeneous adipocytes. Considering the types of cells that adipose tissue-derived cells may form, these cells may be useful in a variety of clinical ...

  9. Genetic Homogenization of Composite Materials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. Tobola

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available The paper is focused on numerical studies of electromagnetic properties of composite materials used for the construction of small airplanes. Discussions concentrate on the genetic homogenization of composite layers and composite layers with a slot. The homogenization is aimed to reduce CPU-time demands of EMC computational models of electrically large airplanes. First, a methodology of creating a 3-dimensional numerical model of a composite material in CST Microwave Studio is proposed focusing on a sufficient accuracy of the model. Second, a proper implementation of a genetic optimization in Matlab is discussed. Third, an association of the optimization script and a simplified 2-dimensional model of the homogeneous equivalent model in Comsol Multiphysics is proposed considering EMC issues. Results of computations are experimentally verified.

  10. Identification of a cancer stem cell-like side population in the HeLa human cervical carcinoma cell line.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Kefang; Zeng, Jianfang; Luo, Lijing; Yang, Jiaxin; Chen, Jie; Li, Bin; Shen, Keng

    2013-12-01

    The present study aimed to identify the stem cell characteristics of side population (SP) cells sorted from the widely-used HeLa human cervical carcinoma cell line. The SP cells were sorted from the HeLa cell line using fluorescence-activating cell sorting (FACS). Stem cell characteristics of the SP cells, including proliferation, self-renewal, differentiation and the ability to form xenografts, were investigated in vitro and in vivo . The SP cells demonstrated strong tumorigenesis following in vivo transplantation into five to six-week-old female Balb/c mice. The SP cells were observed to be more resistant to chemotherapy and radiotherapy compared with non-side population (NSP) cells. A higher expression of CD133 was observed in the SP cells compared with the NSP cells following FACS. The results demonstrated that the SP cells from the HeLa human cervical carcinoma cell line exhibit stem cell characteristics in vitro and also have a strong ability to form tumors in vivo . The cell surface marker CD133 may serve as a potential molecular marker for the identification of cervical cancer stem cells (CSCs).

  11. Regulatory factors and cell populations involved in skeletal muscle regeneration.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Broek, R.W. Ten; Grefte, S.; Hoff, J.W. von den

    2010-01-01

    Skeletal muscle regeneration is a complex process, which is not yet completely understood. Satellite cells, the skeletal muscle stem cells, become activated after trauma, proliferate, and migrate to the site of injury. Depending on the severity of the myotrauma, activated satellite cells form new

  12. Understanding the influence of tellurium oxide in front Ag paste for contacting silicon solar cells with homogeneous high sheet resistance emitter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ebong, Abasifreke; Bezawada, Nirupama; Batchu, Kartheek

    2017-08-01

    This paper investigates TeO2, one of the front Ag paste additives, to understand its role in low contact and gridline resistances for screen-printed Si solar cell. It is concluded that TeO2 aids the reduction of molten glass frit viscosity during contact co-firing. This in turn, leads to uniform flow of molten glass frit, both in the gridline bulk and interface of gridline and SiN x . Therefore, the uniform wetting and etching of SiN x and consequently larger contact area of metal to Si compared to its counterpart without TeO2. Hence, the current transport mechanism from Si to gridline can be said to be both direct and tunneling. The Raman spectra showed a blue shift in the phase of the TeO2 after contact co-firing in the gridline bulk confirming a crystalline γ-TeO2.

  13. CD34 defines an osteoprogenitor cell population in mouse bone marrow stromal cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Basem M. Abdallah

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Bone marrow stromal cells (BMSCs, also known as bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells and their progenitors have been identified based on retrospective functional criteria. CD markers are employed to define cell populations with distinct functional characteristics. However, defining and prospective isolation of BMSCs and committed progenitors are lacking. Here, we compared the transcriptome profile of CD markers expressed at baseline and during the course of osteoblast and adipocyte differentiation of two well-characterized osteogenic-committed murine BMSCs (mBMSCBone and adipogenic-committed mBMSCs (mBMSCAdipo, respectively. Bioinformatic analysis revealed the presence of a core set of canonical mBMSC CD markers with comparable expression levels in mBMSCBone and mBMSCAdipo at baseline and during their differentiation. We identified 11 CD markers that are differentially expressed between mBMSCAdipo and mBMSCBone. Among these, we identified osteoprogenitor-associated CD markers expressed only in mBMSCBone: CD34, CD54, CD73, CD132, CD200, CD227 and adipoprogenitor-associated CD markers expressed only in mBMSCAdipo: CD53, CD80, CD134, CD141 and CD212. FACS analysis confirmed these results. We selected CD34 for further analysis. CD34 was expressed at baseline of mouse stromal cell line ST2, primary mBMSCs, mBMSCBone and its expression decreased during osteoblast differentiation. FACS-sorted CD34+ primary mBMSCs exhibited higher expression of 70% osteoblast-associated genes, and formed significantly higher heterotopic bone in vivo when implanted subcutaneously in immune-deficient mice compared with CD34− primary mBMSCs. Our results demonstrate that a set of CD markers can distinguish osteoprogenitor versus adipoprogenitor populations of mBMSCs. CD34 is suitable for prospective isolation of mouse bone marrow osteoprogenitors.

  14. Effects of pomegranate seed oil on oxidant/antioxidant balance in heart and kidney homogenates and mitochondria of diabetic rats and high glucose-treated H9c2 cell line.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mollazadeh, Hamid; Boroushaki, Mohammad Taher; Soukhtanloo, Mohammad; Afshari, Amir Reza; Vahedi, Mohammad Mahdi

    2017-01-01

    Oxidative stress is a major cause of diabetes complications. The present study aimed to investigate the beneficial effects of Pomegranate Seed Oil (PSO) on diabetes-induced changes in oxidant/antioxidant balance of the kidney, heart and mitochondria from rats and H9c2 cell line. In these in vivo and in vitro studies, male rats were divided into four groups (twelve each): group 1 served as control, group 2-4 received a single dose of streptozotocin (60 mg/kg, i.p), groups 3 and 4 received PSO (0.36 and 0.72 mg/kg/daily, gavage), respectively. After three weeks, six rats of each group and one week later the remaining animals were anaesthetized and the hearts and kidneys were removed and homogenized. Mitochondrial fractions were separated and enzyme activities were measured in each sample. H9c2 cells were pretreated with high levels of glucose (35 mM), and then, incubated with PSO. Finally, cell viability test, reactive oxygen species production and lipid peroxidation were evaluated. Significant reduction in enzymes activity (Superoxide dismutase, Glutathione S-transferase and Paraoxonase 1), compensatory elevation in Glutathione Reductase, Glutathione Peroxidase and Catalase activity followed by reduction after one week and significant elevation in Oxidative Stress Index (OSI) were observed in diabetic group. PSO treatment resulted in a significant increase in enzymes activity and decreased OSI values compared to diabetic group in both tissue and mitochondrial fractions. PSO remarkably decreased glucose-induced toxicity, ROS level and lipid peroxidation in H9c2 cells. Results suggested that PSO has a protective effect against diabetes-induced alterations in oxidant/antioxidant balance in tissues, mitochondrial and H9c2 cell line.

  15. Single Cell Dynamics Causes Pareto-Like Effect in Stimulated T Cell Populations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cosette, Jérémie; Moussy, Alice; Onodi, Fanny; Auffret-Cariou, Adrien; Neildez-Nguyen, Thi My Anh; Paldi, Andras; Stockholm, Daniel

    2015-12-09

    Cell fate choice during the process of differentiation may obey to deterministic or stochastic rules. In order to discriminate between these two strategies we used time-lapse microscopy of individual murine CD4 + T cells that allows investigating the dynamics of proliferation and fate commitment. We observed highly heterogeneous division and death rates between individual clones resulting in a Pareto-like dominance of a few clones at the end of the experiment. Commitment to the Treg fate was monitored using the expression of a GFP reporter gene under the control of the endogenous Foxp3 promoter. All possible combinations of proliferation and differentiation were observed and resulted in exclusively GFP-, GFP+ or mixed phenotype clones of very different population sizes. We simulated the process of proliferation and differentiation using a simple mathematical model of stochastic decision-making based on the experimentally observed parameters. The simulations show that a stochastic scenario is fully compatible with the observed Pareto-like imbalance in the final population.

  16. Isolation and characterization of side population cells from the human ovarian cancer cell line SK-OV-3.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruan, Zhengyi; Liu, Jianhua; Kuang, Yanping

    2015-12-01

    Ovarian cancer (OC) is the most malignant type of gynecological tumor due to its high recurrence rate following initial treatment. Previous studies have indicated that cancer stem cells (CSCs) may be a potential cause underlying the high proportion of recurrence. Side population (SP) cells isolated from cancer cell lines have been shown to exhibit characteristics associated with CSCs, but studies on SP cells in human ovarian SK-OV-3 cell line are limited. In the present study, the SP cell fraction (4.83% of the total cell population) was isolated using flow cytometry, and analyzed by immunocytochemical analysis and reverse transcription-quantitative polymerase chain reaction. The results showed that SP cells exhibited a high mean fluorescence intensity for CD44, a CSC marker, in addition to elevated expression of the CSCs-associated genes, ATP-binding cassette sub-family G member 2 and Nestin. These findings indicated the stem cell-like features of the SP cells. Furthermore, a colony formation test showed that the isolated SP cells possessed a marked capacity for self-regeneration and proliferation. In addition, a cell cycle assay involving cisplatin indicated that the SP cells were strongly resistant to chemotherapy. In conclusion, the present results suggested that SP cells isolated from the SK-OV-3 cell line exhibited properties typically associated with CSCs. Therefore, the isolated SP cells may be used to provide novel insight into potential therapies against OC.

  17. Stem cell-like differentiation potentials of endometrial side population cells as revealed by a newly developed in vivo endometrial stem cell assay.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kaoru Miyazaki

    Full Text Available Endometrial stem/progenitor cells contribute to the cyclical regeneration of human endometrium throughout a woman's reproductive life. Although the candidate cell populations have been extensively studied, no consensus exists regarding which endometrial population represents the stem/progenitor cell fraction in terms of in vivo stem cell activity. We have previously reported that human endometrial side population cells (ESP, but not endometrial main population cells (EMP, exhibit stem cell-like properties, including in vivo reconstitution of endometrium-like tissues when xenotransplanted into immunodeficient mice. The reconstitution efficiency, however, was low presumably because ESP cells alone could not provide a sufficient microenvironment (niche to support their stem cell activity. The objective of this study was to establish a novel in vivo endometrial stem cell assay employing cell tracking and tissue reconstitution systems and to examine the stem cell properties of ESP through use of this assay.ESP and EMP cells isolated from whole endometrial cells were infected with lentivirus to express tandem Tomato (TdTom, a red fluorescent protein. They were mixed with unlabeled whole endometrial cells and then transplanted under the kidney capsule of ovariectomized immunodeficient mice. These mice were treated with estradiol and progesterone for eight weeks and nephrectomized. All of the grafts reconstituted endometrium-like tissues under the kidney capsules. Immunofluorescence revealed that TdTom-positive cells were significantly more abundant in the glandular, stromal, and endothelial cells of the reconstituted endometrium in mice transplanted with TdTom-labeled ESP cells than those with TdTom-labeled EMP cells.We have established a novel in vivo endometrial stem cell assay in which multi-potential differentiation can be identified through cell tracking during in vivo endometrial tissue reconstitution. Using this assay, we demonstrated that ESP

  18. Stem Cell-Like Differentiation Potentials of Endometrial Side Population Cells as Revealed by a Newly Developed In Vivo Endometrial Stem Cell Assay

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miyazaki, Kaoru; Maruyama, Tetsuo; Masuda, Hirotaka; Yamasaki, Akiko; Uchida, Sayaka; Oda, Hideyuki; Uchida, Hiroshi; Yoshimura, Yasunori

    2012-01-01

    Background Endometrial stem/progenitor cells contribute to the cyclical regeneration of human endometrium throughout a woman's reproductive life. Although the candidate cell populations have been extensively studied, no consensus exists regarding which endometrial population represents the stem/progenitor cell fraction in terms of in vivo stem cell activity. We have previously reported that human endometrial side population cells (ESP), but not endometrial main population cells (EMP), exhibit stem cell-like properties, including in vivo reconstitution of endometrium-like tissues when xenotransplanted into immunodeficient mice. The reconstitution efficiency, however, was low presumably because ESP cells alone could not provide a sufficient microenvironment (niche) to support their stem cell activity. The objective of this study was to establish a novel in vivo endometrial stem cell assay employing cell tracking and tissue reconstitution systems and to examine the stem cell properties of ESP through use of this assay. Methodology/Principal Findings ESP and EMP cells isolated from whole endometrial cells were infected with lentivirus to express tandem Tomato (TdTom), a red fluorescent protein. They were mixed with unlabeled whole endometrial cells and then transplanted under the kidney capsule of ovariectomized immunodeficient mice. These mice were treated with estradiol and progesterone for eight weeks and nephrectomized. All of the grafts reconstituted endometrium-like tissues under the kidney capsules. Immunofluorescence revealed that TdTom-positive cells were significantly more abundant in the glandular, stromal, and endothelial cells of the reconstituted endometrium in mice transplanted with TdTom-labeled ESP cells than those with TdTom-labeled EMP cells. Conclusions/Significance We have established a novel in vivo endometrial stem cell assay in which multi-potential differentiation can be identified through cell tracking during in vivo endometrial tissue

  19. Novel microchip-based tools facilitating live cell imaging and assessment of functional heterogeneity within NK cell populations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elin eForslund

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Each individual has a heterogeneous pool of NK cells consisting of cells that may be specialized towards specific functional responses such as secretion of cytokines or killing of tumor cells. Many conventional methods are not fit to characterize heterogeneous populations as they measure the average response of all cells. Thus, there is a need for experimental platforms that provide single cell resolution. In addition, there are also transient and stochastic variations in functional responses at the single cell level, calling for methods that allow studies of many events over extended times. This paper presents a versatile microchip platform enabling long-term microscopic studies of individual NK cells interacting with target cells. Each microchip contains an array of microwells, optimized for medium or high-resolution time-lapse imaging of single or multiple NK and target cells, or for screening of thousands of isolated NK-target cell interactions. Individual NK cells confined with target cells in small microwells is a suitable setup for high-content screening and rapid assessment of heterogeneity within populations, while microwells of larger dimensions are appropriate for studies of NK cell migration and sequential interactions with multiple target cells. By combining the chip technology with ultrasonic manipulation, NK and target cells can be forced to interact and positioned with high spatial accuracy within individual microwells. This setup effectively and synchronously creates NK-target conjugates at hundreds of parallel positions in the microchip. Thus, this facilitates assessment of temporal aspects of NK-target cell interactions, e.g. conjugation, immune synapse formation and cytotoxic events. The microchip platform presented here can be used to effectively address questions related to fundamental functions of NK cells that can lead to better understanding of how the behavior of individual cells add up to give a functional response at

  20. 75 FR 54351 - Cell and Gene Therapy Clinical Trials in Pediatric Populations; Public Workshop

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-09-07

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration Cell and Gene Therapy Clinical Trials in Pediatric... public workshop entitled ``Cell and Gene Therapy Clinical Trials in Pediatric Populations.'' The purpose... therapy clinical researchers, and other stakeholders regarding best practices related to cell and gene...

  1. Analysing the Influence of the Spontaneous Aneuploidy Frequency on the Cell Population System Cultivation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. A. Nefedov

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper provides a qualitative analysis of M.S. Vinogradova's nonlinear model for dynamics of the cell population system. This system describes the stem cells cultivation in vitro under resource constraints. The system consists of two populations, namely: population of normal cells and population of abnormal cells. Resource constraints are considered as linear dependences of mitosis parameters on the normalized densities of each population.One of the key parameters that effects on the realization of the system evolution scenarios is a parameter that determines a share of the normal cells, which pass, when dividing, into population of the abnormal cells. The paper analyses both the existence conditions of the rest points and the changes of the evolution scenarios of population system with changing abovementioned parameter and other system parameters held fixed. It is shown that there is a saddle-node bifurcation in the system; the bifurcation value of the parameter is found. The paper shows the interval of parameter values in which the favorable scenarios of population system evolution are implemented. It also presents results of mathematical modeling.

  2. GADD45β Determines Chemoresistance and Invasive Growth of Side Population Cells of Human Embryonic Carcinoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Toshihiko Inowa

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Side population (SP cells are an enriched population of stem, and the existence of SP cells has been reported in human cancer cell lines. In this study, we performed an SP analysis using 11 human cancer cell lines and confirmed the presence of SP cells in an embryonic carcinoma cell line, NEC8. NEC8 SP cells showed characteristics of cancer stem cells, such as high growth rate, chemoresistance and high invasiveness. To further characterize the NEC8 SP cells, we used DNA microarrays. Among 38,500 genes, we identified 12 genes that were over-expressed in SP cells and 1 gene that was over-expressed in non-SP cells. Among these 13 genes, we focused on GADD45b. GADD45b was over-expressed in non-SP cells, but the inhibition of GADD45b had no effect on non-SP cells. Paradoxically, the inhibition of GADD45b significantly reduced the viability of NEC8 SP cells. The inhibition of ABCG2, which determines the SP phenotype, had no effect on the invasiveness of NEC8 SP cells, but the inhibition of GADD45b significantly reduced invasiveness. These results suggest that GADD45b, but not ABCG2, might determine the cancer stem cell-like phenotype, such as chemoresistance and the high invasiveness of NEC8 SP cells, and might be a good therapeutic target.

  3. Topological defects in confined populations of spindle-shaped cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duclos, Guillaume; Erlenkämper, Christoph; Joanny, Jean-François; Silberzan, Pascal

    2017-01-01

    Most spindle-shaped cells (including smooth muscles and sarcomas) organize in vivo into well-aligned `nematic’ domains, creating intrinsic topological defects that may be used to probe the behaviour of these active nematic systems. Active non-cellular nematics have been shown to be dominated by activity, yielding complex chaotic flows. However, the regime in which live spindle-shaped cells operate, and the importance of cell-substrate friction in particular, remains largely unexplored. Using in vitro experiments, we show that these active cellular nematics operate in a regime in which activity is effectively damped by friction, and that the interaction between defects is controlled by the system’s elastic nematic energy. Due to the activity of the cells, these defects behave as self-propelled particles and pairwise annihilate until all displacements freeze as cell crowding increases. When confined in mesoscopic circular domains, the system evolves towards two identical +1/2 disclinations facing each other. The most likely reduced positions of these defects are independent of the size of the disk, the cells’ activity or even the cell type, but are well described by equilibrium liquid crystal theory. These cell-based systems thus operate in a regime more stable than other active nematics, which may be necessary for their biological function.

  4. Populism

    OpenAIRE

    Abts, Koenraad; Van Kessel, Stijn

    2015-01-01

    Populism is a concept applied to a wide range of political movements and actors across the globe. There is, at the same time, considerable confusion about the attributes and manifestation of populism, as well as its impact on democracy. This contribution identifies the defining elements of the populist ideology and discusses the varieties in which populism manifests itself, for instance as a component of certain party families. We finally discuss various normative interpretations of populism,...

  5. [Effect of Sijunzi decoction on the proliferation of side population cells of human gastric cancer cell line].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Jing; Qian, Jun; Jia, Jian-guang; Jin, Xin; Yu, Da-jun; Xie, Bo; Qian, Li-yu; Zhang, Li-gong; Guo, Chen-xu

    2014-06-01

    To observe the proliferation changes of the side population of gastric cancer cell line SGC-7901 cells (SP), the non-side population (NSP) cells, and unsorted cells (Total) after intervened by Sijunzi Decoction (SD) containing serum. Sixteen pure bred New Zealand rabbits were equally divided into the normal control group, the low dose SD group (at the daily dose of 7 mL/kg), the middle dose SD group (at the daily dose of 14 mL/kg), and the high dose SD group (at the daily dose of 28 mL/kg) according to the random digit table. Rabbits' serum was extracted after equal volume of corresponding medication was given by gastrogavage twice daily for 2 consecutive weeks. The drug serum was identified using high performance liquid chromatography. SP cells of SGC-7901 were detected using flow cytometry, SP and NSP cells were screened. The proliferation curve of SP, NSP, and Total cells were detected with CCK-8 assay. Changes of their proliferation were also observed. Ginsenoside Rg1, an effective ingredient in SD was detected in prepared drug serum. The proliferation of SGC-7901 SP cells was significantly higher than that of NSP cells and Total cells (P line SGC-7901 SP, NSP, and Total cells could inhibit their proliferation, but its inhibition on SP cells' proliferation was significantly lower than on NSP and Total cells (P line SGC-7901 SP, NSP, and Total cells. But there exist obvious difference in the inhibition among the three groups.

  6. Merging Mixture Components for Cell Population Identification in Flow Cytometry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Greg Finak

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available We present a framework for the identification of cell subpopulations in flow cytometry data based on merging mixture components using the flowClust methodology. We show that the cluster merging algorithm under our framework improves model fit and provides a better estimate of the number of distinct cell subpopulations than either Gaussian mixture models or flowClust, especially for complicated flow cytometry data distributions. Our framework allows the automated selection of the number of distinct cell subpopulations and we are able to identify cases where the algorithm fails, thus making it suitable for application in a high throughput FCM analysis pipeline. Furthermore, we demonstrate a method for summarizing complex merged cell subpopulations in a simple manner that integrates with the existing flowClust framework and enables downstream data analysis. We demonstrate the performance of our framework on simulated and real FCM data. The software is available in the flowMerge package through the Bioconductor project.

  7. Geometry of Homogeneous Bounded Domains

    CERN Document Server

    Vesentini, E

    2011-01-01

    This title includes: S.G. Gindikin, I.I. Pjateckii-Sapiro, E.B. Vinberg: Homogeneous Kahler manifolds; S.G. Greenfield: Extendibility properties of real submanifolds of Cn; W. Kaup: Holomorphische Abbildungen in Hyperbolische Raume; A. Koranyi: Holomorphic and harmonic functions on bounded symmetric domains; J.L. Koszul: Formes harmoniques vectorielles sur les espaces localement symetriques; S. Murakami: Plongements holomorphes de domaines symetriques; and E.M. Stein: The analogues of Fatous' theorem and estimates for maximal functions.

  8. [Biological characteristics of CD55(hig); side population in breast cancer cell line MCF-7].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Chao; Cui, Zhi-chao; Liu, Yun-jiang; Wang, Shi-jie

    2012-05-01

    To determine whether the CD55(hig); expression (CD55(hig);) cells in side population (SP) of the cell line MCF-7 possess characteristics of cancer stem cells. Breast cancer cell line MCF-7 was cultured and the nucleic acid dye Hoechst33342 and Verapami were added. Flow cytometry (FCM) was employed to isolate the cells of SP and mian population (MP), the cells were then labeled with CD55 mAb; mean values of fluorescence intensity of CD55 in SP and MP cells were measured. CD55 mAb was used to mark the unsorted MCF-7 cells, the proportion of CD55(hig); cells was determined, and then CD55(hig); cells were sorted and collected, to observe biological characteristics, such as cell morphology, adherence rate, colony formation and cell cycle distribution as well as nude mice implantation. Mean value of fluorescence intensity of CD55 in SP cells was 100.85±4.57, and mean value of fluorescence intensity of CD55 in MP cells was 50.51±4.75; the proportion of CD55(hig); cell in MCF-7 cells was 2.12%; adherent rate of CD55(hig); cells in 24 h was lower than that in CD55(low); cells and 24 h after inoculation adherent rates of both cells had no significant difference (P>0.05); CD55(hig); cells were mostly spherical and kept in a suspended state at 12 hours after inoculation and culture; CD55(hig); cells had the ability of colony formation, the clone-forming rate of CD55(hig); cells was (20.04±1.07)% when the cells were cultured for one week, it was lower than the rate of (27.14±1.07)% in CD55(low); cells (P<0.01); the ratio of G0/G1 resting cells in CD55(hig); cells was (85.4±3.37)% which was higher than that in CD55(low); cells (58.6±2.55)% and in MCF-7 cells (70.73±4.21)%, which had a statistically significant difference (P<0.05). All nude mice implanted with CD55(hig); cells developed the tumor, and the pathological examination of the transplanted tumor had the properties of malignant cells. A few CD55(hig); cells were found in breast cancer MCF-7 cells, and most of CD55

  9. Stem cell-like properties of the endometrial side population: implication in endometrial regeneration.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hirotaka Masuda

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The human endometrium undergoes cyclical regeneration throughout a woman's reproductive life. Ectopic implantation of endometrial cells through retrograde menstruation gives rise to endometriotic lesions which affect approximately 10% of reproductive-aged women. The high regenerative capacity of the human endometrium at eutopic and ectopic sites suggests the existence of stem/progenitor cells and a unique angiogenic system. The objective of this study was to isolate and characterize putative endometrial stem/progenitor cells and to address how they might be involved in the physiology of endometrium. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We found that approximately 2% of the total cells obtained from human endometrium displayed a side population (SP phenotype, as determined by flow cytometric analysis of Hoechst-stained cells. The endometrial SP (ESP cells exhibited preferential expression of several endothelial cell markers compared to endometrial main population (EMP cells. A medium specific for endothelial cell culture enabled ESP cells to proliferate and differentiate into various types of endometrial cells, including glandular epithelial, stromal and endothelial cells in vitro, whereas in the same medium, EMP cells differentiated only into stromal cells. Furthermore, ESP cells, but not EMP cells, reconstituted organized endometrial tissue with well-delineated glandular structures when transplanted under the kidney capsule of severely immunodeficient mice. Notably, ESP cells generated endothelial cells that migrated into the mouse kidney parenchyma and formed mature blood vessels. This potential for in vivo angiogenesis and endometrial cell regeneration was more prominent in the ESP fraction than in the EMP fraction, as the latter mainly gave rise to stromal cells in vivo. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: These results indicate that putative endometrial stem cells are highly enriched in the ESP cells. These unique characteristics suggest that

  10. Two biochemically distinct populations of histaminocytes separated by isokinetic sedimentation of dispersed rat gastric cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lemmi, C A; Wojdani, A; Adomian, G E; Lechago, J; Dascanio, G; Narhi, L O

    1985-07-01

    Two populations of histaminocytes, with different sedimentation rates (SR), were separated by a computer developed isokinetic gradient using dispersed rat gastric mucosal cells. Histamine content, histidine decarboxylase (HDC) activity and incorporation of radiolabelled histidine metabolites were used to assess the migration of specific cells throughout the gradients. One histaminocyte population, with cells of lower SR, contained high HDC activity and undetectable levels of histamine, whereas the other population, with cells of higher SR, contained lower HDC activity and high concentration of histamine. Both types of histaminocytes incorporated 3H-histidine metabolites. Electron microscopy showed that the fractions containing histaminocytes with lower SR had 3.5 times more endocrine ECL cells than the original population of dispersed fundic cells and lacked A and D cells, whereas the fractions with histaminocytes of higher SR were associated with a 2.7 times higher concentration of A and D cells and with a 7.7 times higher ratio of a variety of partial cells with a distinct mitochondrial morphology. These results are consistent with prior novel information regarding the separation of two populations of rat histaminocytes using different sedimentation techniques.

  11. Further Studies on the Cell Populations of an Intersex Horse

    Science.gov (United States)

    Basrur, P. K.; Kanagawa, H.; Podliachouk, L.

    1970-01-01

    An intersex horse exhibiting cell types of different sex chromosome constitution was subjected to further studies in order to determine whether the house was a mosaic or a chimera. Cultures of gonadal tissue and peripheral blood revealed mainly 64/XX and 64/XY cells, the former predominating in both tissues. The frequency of drumstick-bearing poly-morphonuclear neutrophils in the intersex horse was similar to that noted in normal mares. Blood type analysis using 17 naturally occurring agglutinins and hemolysins revealed partial agglutinations with three antibodies for the factors of the A system (anti-A, anti-F, and anti-I), and partial hemolysis with anti-Fr3 suggesting erythrocyte chimerism probably resulting from intrauterine interchange of blood cell precursors as noted in other domestic animals. On the other hand, the presence of XX and XY cells in cultures of gonads which in our intersex horse were apparently devoid of germ cells, would seem to indicate wholebody chimerism resulting from double fertilization or blastocyst fusion. PMID:4249090

  12. Size distribution of retrovirally marked lineages matches prediction from population measurements of cell cycle behavior

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cai, Li; Hayes, Nancy L.; Takahashi, Takao; Caviness, Verne S Jr; Nowakowski, Richard S.

    2002-01-01

    Mechanisms that regulate neuron production in the developing mouse neocortex were examined by using a retroviral lineage marking method to determine the sizes of the lineages remaining in the proliferating population of the ventricular zone during the period of neuron production. The distribution of clade sizes obtained experimentally in four different injection-survival paradigms (E11-E13, E11-E14, E11-E15, and E12-E15) from a total of over 500 labeled lineages was compared with that obtained from three models in which the average behavior of the proliferating population [i.e., the proportion of cells remaining in the proliferative population (P) vs. that exiting the proliferative population (Q)] was quantitatively related to lineage size distribution. In model 1, different proportions of asymmetric, symmetric terminal, and symmetric nonterminal cell divisions coexisted during the entire developmental period. In model 2, the developmental period was divided into two epochs: During the first, asymmetric and symmetric nonterminal cell divisions occurred, but, during the second, asymmetric and symmetric terminal cell divisions occurred. In model 3, the shifts in P and Q are accounted for by changes in the proportions of the two types of symmetric cell divisions without the inclusion of any asymmetric cell divisions. The results obtained from the retroviral experiments were well accounted for by model 1 but not by model 2 or 3. These findings demonstrate that: 1) asymmetric and both types of symmetric cell divisions coexist during the entire period of neurogenesis in the mouse, 2) neuron production is regulated in the proliferative population by the independent decisions of the two daughter cells to reenter S phase, and 3) neurons are produced by both asymmetric and symmetric terminal cell divisions. In addition, the findings mean that cell death and/or tangential movements of cells in the proliferative population occur at only a low rate and that there are no

  13. Transforming growth factor-β signaling is constantly shaping memory T-cell population

    OpenAIRE

    Ma, Chaoyu; Zhang, Nu

    2015-01-01

    A persistent memory T-cell population is the basis for successful T-cell–based vaccine against pathogens. Numerous extracellular and intracellular molecules have been demonstrated to play critical roles in the differentiation of memory T cells; however, the mechanisms that control the long-term maintenance of memory T cells remain incompletely understood. Here we show that continuous transforming growth factor-β signaling is required to maintain the identity of memory T cells.

  14. The small population of PIG-A mutant cells in myelodysplastic syndromes do not arise from multipotent hematopoietic stem cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pu, Jeffrey J; Hu, Rong; Mukhina, Galina L; Carraway, Hetty E; McDevitt, Michael A; Brodsky, Robert A

    2012-08-01

    Patients with paroxysmal nocturnal hemoglobinuria harbor clonal glycosylphosphatidylinositol-anchor deficient cells arising from a multipotent hematopoietic stem cell acquiring a PIG-A mutation. Many patients with aplastic anemia and myelodysplastic syndromes also harbor small populations of glycosylphosphatidylinositol-anchor deficient cells. Patients with aplastic anemia often evolve into paroxysmal nocturnal hemoglobinuria; however, myelodysplastic syndromes seldom evolve into paroxysmal nocturnal hemoglobinuria. Here, we investigate the origin and clonality of small glycosylphosphatidylinositol-anchor deficient cell populations in aplastic anemia and myelodysplastic syndromes. We used peripheral blood flow cytometry to identify glycosylphosphatidylinositol-anchor deficient blood cells, a proaerolysin-resistant colony forming cell assay to select glycosylphosphatidylinositol-anchor deficient progenitor cells, a novel T-lymphocyte enrichment culture assay with proaerolysin selection to expand glycosylphosphatidylinositol-anchor deficient T lymphocytes, and PIG-A gene sequencing assays to identify and analyze PIG-A mutations in patients with aplastic anemia and myelodysplastic syndromes. Twelve of 15 aplastic anemia patients were found to harbor a small population of glycosylphosphatidylinositol-anchor deficient granulocytes; 11 of them were found to harbor a small population of glycosylphosphatidylinositol-anchor deficient erythrocytes, 10 patients were detected to harbor glycosylphosphatidylinositol-anchor deficient T lymphocytes, and 3 of them were detected only after T-lymphocyte enrichment in proaerolysin selection. PIG-A mutation analyses on 3 patients showed that all of them harbored a matching PIG-A mutation between CFU-GM and enriched T lymphocytes. Two of 26 myelodysplastic syndromes were found to harbor small populations of glycosylphosphatidylinositol-anchor deficient granulocytes and erythrocytes transiently. Bone marrow derived CD34(+) cells from 4

  15. An altered endometrial CD8 tissue resident memory T cell population in recurrent miscarriage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Southcombe, J H; Mounce, G; McGee, K; Elghajiji, A; Brosens, J; Quenby, S; Child, T; Granne, I

    2017-01-23

    When trying to conceive 1% of couples have recurrent miscarriages, defined as three or more consecutive pregnancy losses. This is not accounted for by the known incidence of chromosomal aneuploidy in miscarriage, and it has been suggested that there is an immunological aetiology. The endometrial mucosa is populated by a variety of immune cells which in addition to providing host pathogen immunity must facilitate pregnancy. Here we characterise the endometrial CD8-T cell population during the embryonic window of implantation and find that the majority of cells are tissue resident memory T cells with high levels of CD69 and CD103 expression, proteins that prevent cells egress. We demonstrate that unexplained recurrent miscarriage is associated with significantly decreased expression of the T-cell co-receptor CD8 and tissue residency marker CD69. These cells differ from those found in control women, with less expression of CD127 indicating a lack of homeostatic cell control through IL-7 signalling. Nevertheless this population is resident in the endometrium of women who have RM, more than three months after the last miscarriage, indicating that the memory CD8-T cell population is altered in RM patients. This is the first evidence of a differing pre-pregnancy phenotype in endometrial immune cells in RM.

  16. Synchronization of glycolytic oscillations in a yeast cell population

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dano, S.; Hynne, F.; De Monte, Silvia

    2001-01-01

    The mechanism of active phase synchronization in a suspension of oscillatory yeast cells has remained a puzzle for almost half a century. The difficulty of the problem stems from the fact that the synchronization phenomenon involves the entire metabolic network of glycolysis and fermentation...... the extracellular medium, thus reducing the complexity of the problem without sacrificing the biochemical realism. The parameters of the model can be derived by a systematic expansion from any full-scale model of the yeast cell kinetics with a supercritical Hopf bifurcation. Some parameter values can also...

  17. Cellular population dynamics control the robustness of the stem cell niche

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adam L. MacLean

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Within populations of cells, fate decisions are controlled by an indeterminate combination of cell-intrinsic and cell-extrinsic factors. In the case of stem cells, the stem cell niche is believed to maintain ‘stemness’ through communication and interactions between the stem cells and one or more other cell-types that contribute to the niche conditions. To investigate the robustness of cell fate decisions in the stem cell hierarchy and the role that the niche plays, we introduce simple mathematical models of stem and progenitor cells, their progeny and their interplay in the niche. These models capture the fundamental processes of proliferation and differentiation and allow us to consider alternative possibilities regarding how niche-mediated signalling feedback regulates the niche dynamics. Generalised stability analysis of these stem cell niche systems enables us to describe the stability properties of each model. We find that although the number of feasible states depends on the model, their probabilities of stability in general do not: stem cell–niche models are stable across a wide range of parameters. We demonstrate that niche-mediated feedback increases the number of stable steady states, and show how distinct cell states have distinct branching characteristics. The ecological feedback and interactions mediated by the stem cell niche thus lend (surprisingly high levels of robustness to the stem and progenitor cell population dynamics. Furthermore, cell–cell interactions are sufficient for populations of stem cells and their progeny to achieve stability and maintain homeostasis. We show that the robustness of the niche – and hence of the stem cell pool in the niche – depends only weakly, if at all, on the complexity of the niche make-up: simple as well as complicated niche systems are capable of supporting robust and stable stem cell dynamics.

  18. SR-FTIR spectroscopy of renal epithelial carcinoma side population cells displaying stem cell-like characteristics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hughes, Caryn; Liew, Matthew; Sachdeva, Ashwin; Bassan, Paul; Dumas, Paul; Hart, Claire A; Brown, Mick D; Clarke, Noel W; Gardner, Peter

    2010-12-01

    It is hypothesized that cells with stem cell-like properties may be influential in carcinogenesis, possessing the ability to self-renew, produce differentiated daughter cells and resist environmental or therapeutic injury. This has led to a surge in interest in identifying and characterizing the tumour initiating or cancer stem cell (CSC) with the aim of discovering novel diagnostic and prognostic markers and of understanding the basic biology with the ultimate aim of generating new therapeutic approaches and biomarkers. However, a major hurdle to this process has been the lack of a truly specific cancer stem cell biomarker allied to the rarity of these cells. This has led to problems in characterising these CSCs by traditional '-omic' techniques. Using a renal carcinoma cell line model, we show that synchrotron radiation-Fourier transform infrared (SR-FTIR) spectroscopy is a suitable tool to measure discrete differences in the biochemistry of small numbers of single-cells. Using the chemometric techniques of Principal Component and Linear Discriminant Analysis (PCA and LDA) for multivariate reduction, biochemical differences between the cells from different sub-populations were evaluated. Results found lipid and phosphodiester vibrations to be particularly good discriminating markers in the spectra of these stem-like cells, relative to the more differentiated, proliferating cells that make up the majority of the cell population.

  19. Enriched population of PNS neurons derived from human embryonic stem cells as a platform for studying peripheral neuropathies.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Moran Valensi-Kurtz

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The absence of a suitable cellular model is a major obstacle for the study of peripheral neuropathies. Human embryonic stem cells hold the potential to be differentiated into peripheral neurons which makes them a suitable candidate for this purpose. However, so far the potential of hESC to differentiate into derivatives of the peripheral nervous system (PNS was not investigated enough and in particular, the few trials conducted resulted in low yields of PNS neurons. Here we describe a novel hESC differentiation method to produce enriched populations of PNS mature neurons. By plating 8 weeks hESC derived neural progenitors (hESC-NPs on laminin for two weeks in a defined medium, we demonstrate that over 70% of the resulting neurons express PNS markers and 30% of these cells are sensory neurons. METHODS/FINDINGS: Our method shows that the hNPs express neuronal crest lineage markers in a temporal manner, and by plating 8 weeks hESC-NPs into laminin coated dishes these hNPs were promoted to differentiate and give rise to homogeneous PNS neuronal populations, expressing several PNS lineage-specific markers. Importantly, these cultures produced functional neurons with electrophysiological activities typical of mature neurons. Moreover, supporting this physiological capacity implantation of 8 weeks old hESC-NPs into the neural tube of chick embryos also produced human neurons expressing specific PNS markers in vivo in just a few days. Having the enriched PNS differentiation system in hand, we show for the first time in human PNS neurons the expression of IKAP/hELP1 protein, where a splicing mutation on the gene encoding this protein causes the peripheral neuropathy Familial Dysautonomia. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: We conclude that this differentiation system to produce high numbers of human PNS neurons will be useful for studying PNS related neuropathies and for developing future drug screening applications for these diseases.

  20. Human T-cell Lymphotropic Virus in a Population of Pregnant ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    FOMCS2

    Human T-cell lymphotropic virus in a population of pregnant women and commercial ... Forbi JC,. Virology laboratory,. Innovative Biotech-Keffi, PO Box 30 Keffi,. 1. Abdu Abubakar Street ... neurological syndromes 6. Over 20 million persons ...

  1. Detection of non-CLL-like monoclonal B cell lymphocytosis increases dramatically in the very elderly, while detection of CLL-like populations varies by race: findings in a multiethnic population-based cohort of elderly women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edlefsen, Kerstin L; Cherian, Sindhu; De Roos, Anneclaire J; Getaneh, Asqual; Lessin, Lawrence; Li, Wenjun; Wood, Brent L; Reiner, Alexander P

    2016-10-01

    Monoclonal B cell lymphocytosis (MBL) is both a marker of immune senescence and a potential precursor of B cell malignancy. Most MBL populations have a chronic lymphocytic leukemia-like (CLL-like) immunophenotype, but those that are CD5-negative (non-CLL-like) are also recognized and may represent a distinct diagnostic entity. To date, MBL studies have taken place in relatively homogenous populations, although risk of CLL varies across racial groups and geographic regions. We report flow cytometry data from 597 ethnically diverse 64-94-year-old women from across the USA who are participants in the Women's Health Initiative (WHI) Long-Life Study (LLS). Overall, MBL was detected in 26 % of the participants and included 20.9 % with a CLL-like immunophenotype, 5 % with a non-CLL-like immunophenotype, and 1.3 % with both. White and Hispanic women were more than twice as likely to have a CLL-like MBL population detected than African American women, corrected for age (P = 0.003). By contrast, detection of non-CLL-like MBL did not vary significantly by race, but did increase markedly with advancing age, being present in 12.7 % of those aged 85 and older. We provide new evidence that rates of detection of CLL-like MBL are lower in African Americans, and further suggest that non-CLL-like clonal expansions should be regarded as distinct from CLL-like MBL.

  2. Regulatory effects on the population dynamics and wave propagation in a cell lineage model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Mao-Xiang; Ma, Yu-Qiang; Lai, Pik-Yin

    2016-03-21

    We consider the interplay of cell proliferation, cell differentiation (and de-differentiation), cell movement, and the effect of feedback regulations on the population and propagation dynamics of different cell types in a cell lineage model. Cells are assumed to secrete and respond to negative feedback molecules which act as a control on the cell lineage. The cell densities are described by coupled reaction-diffusion partial differential equations, and the propagating wave front solutions in one dimension are investigated analytically and by numerical solutions. In particular, wavefront propagation speeds are obtained analytically and verified by numerical solutions of the equations. The emphasis is on the effects of the feedback regulations on different stages in the cell lineage. It is found that when the progenitor cell is negatively regulated, the populations of the cell lineage are strongly down-regulated with the steady growth rate of the progenitor cell being driven to zero beyond a critical regulatory strength. An analytic expression for the critical regulation strength in terms of the model parameters is derived and verified by numerical solutions. On the other hand, if the inhibition is acting on the differentiated cells, the change in the population dynamics and wave propagation speed is small. In addition, it is found that only the propagating speed of the progenitor cells is affected by the regulation when the diffusion of the differentiated cells is large. In the presence of de-differentiation, the effect on down-regulating the progenitor population is weakened and there is no effect on the propagation speed due to regulation, suggesting that the effect of regulatory control is diminished by de-differentiation pathways. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Analysis of enteroendocrine cell populations in the human colon

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Martins, Patricia; Fakhry, Josiane; de Oliveira, Enio Chaves

    2017-01-01

    Recent studies have shown that patterns of colocalisation of hormones in enteroendocrine cells are more complex than previously appreciated and that the patterns differ substantially between species. In this study, the human sigmoid colon is investigated by immunohistochemistry for the presence o...

  4. Enrichment of osteogenic cell populations from rat bone marrow stroma.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dolder, J. van den; Jansen, J.A.

    2007-01-01

    The presence of multiple cell types in bone marrow and their varying proportions from isolation to isolation may count for the considerable variation in the outcome of different experiments. The presence of these multiple subpopulations suggests a need for a method that can purify the osteogenic

  5. Transforming growth factor-β signaling is constantly shaping memory T-cell population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Chaoyu; Zhang, Nu

    2015-09-01

    The long-term maintenance of memory T cells is essential for successful vaccines. Both the quantity and the quality of the memory T-cell population must be maintained. The signals that control the maintenance of memory T cells remain incompletely identified. Here we used two genetic models to show that continuous transforming growth factor-β signaling to antigen-specific T cells is required for the differentiation and maintenance of memory CD8(+) T cells. In addition, both infection-induced and microbiota-induced inflammation impact the phenotypic and functional identity of memory CD8(+) T cells.

  6. Infection Spread and Virus Release in Vitro in Cell Populations as a System with Percolation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ochoa, Juan G. Diaz

    The comprehension of the innate immune system of cell populations is not only of interest to understand systems in vivo but also in vitro, for example, in the control of the release of viral particles for the production of vaccines. In this report I introduce a model, based on dynamical networks, that simulates the cell signaling responsible for this innate immune response and its effect on the infection spread and virus production. The central motivation is to represent a cell population that is constantly mixed in a bio-reactor where there is a cell-to-cell signaling of cytokines (which are proteins responsible for the activation of the antiviral response inside the cell). Such signaling allows the definition of clusters of linked immune cells. Additionally, depending on the density of links, it is possible to identify critical threshold parameters associated to a percolation phase transition. I show that the control of this antiviral response is equivalent to a percolation process.

  7. Obesity reversibly depletes the basal cell population and enhances mammary epithelial cell estrogen receptor alpha expression and progenitor activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chamberlin, Tamara; D'Amato, Joseph V; Arendt, Lisa M

    2017-11-29

    Obesity is correlated with an increased risk for developing postmenopausal breast cancer. Since obesity rates continue to rise worldwide, it is important to understand how the obese microenvironment influences normal mammary tissue to increase breast cancer risk. We hypothesized that obesity increases the proportion of luminal progenitor cells, which are thought to be the cells of origin for the most common types of breast cancer, potentially leading to an increased risk for breast cancer. To study the obese microenvironment within the mammary gland, we used a high-fat diet mouse model of obesity and human breast tissue from reduction mammoplasty surgery. We identified changes in breast epithelial cell populations using flow cytometry for cell surface markers, in vitro functional assays and expression of markers on breast tissue sections. In both obese female mice and women, mammary epithelial cell populations demonstrated significant decreases in basal/myoepithelial cells, using either flow cytometry or cell-type-specific markers (SMA and p63). Estrogen receptor alpha (ERα) expression was significantly increased in luminal cells in obese mammary tissue, compared with control mice or breast tissue from lean women. Functional assays demonstrated significantly enhanced mammary epithelial progenitor activity in obese mammary epithelial cells and elevated numbers of ERα-positive epithelial cells that were co-labeled with markers of proliferation. Weight loss in a group of obese mice reversed increases in progenitor activity and ERα expression observed in obese mammary tissue. Obesity enhances ERα-positive epithelial cells, reduces the number of basal/myoepithelial cells, and increases stem/progenitor activity within normal mammary tissue in both women and female mice. These changes in epithelial cell populations induced by obesity are reversible with weight loss. Our findings support further studies to examine how obesity-induced changes in stem/progenitor cells

  8. Isolation and identification of a distinct side population cancer cells in the human epidermal squamous cancer cell line A431.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geng, Songmei; Wang, Qianqian; Wang, Jianli; Hu, Zhishang; Liu, Chunchun; Qiu, Junkang; Zeng, Weihui

    2011-04-01

    Side population (SP) cells have been suggested to be multipotent cancer stem cells. To address whether SP cells exist in epidermal squamous cancer cell line A431, A431 cells dyed with Hoechst 33342 were sorted through flow cytometry. The SP cells were then analyzed by colony-forming and cell proliferation assay. Further, tumorigenicity and microarray analysis were used to compare biological difference between SP and non-SP (NSP) cells. Our results showed that SP cells existed in the A431 cell line, showing higher proliferating and colony-forming ability than NSP cells. Tumors generated from SP cells were larger than those from the NSP cells in NOD/SCID mice. The mRNA microarray profiling revealed that five cancer marker gene expressions were up-regulated and one tumor suppressor gene expression was down-regulated. These findings suggest that SP cells in A431 could contribute to self-renewal, neoplastic transformation, and cancer metastasis of human epidermal squamous cell carcinoma.

  9. Microcarrier-based expansion of adult murine side population stem cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christina A Pacak

    Full Text Available The lack of reliable methods to efficiently isolate and propagate stem cell populations is a significant obstacle to the advancement of cell-based therapies for human diseases. One isolation technique is based on efflux of the fluorophore Hoechst 33342. Using fluorescence-activated cell sorting (FACS, a sub-population containing adult stem cells has been identified in a multitude of tissues in every mammalian species examined. These rare cells are referred to as the 'side population' or SP due to a distinctive FACS profile that results from weak staining by Hoechst dye. Although the SP contains multi-potent cells capable of differentiating toward hematopoietic and mesenchymal lineages; there is currently no method to efficiently expand them. Here, we describe a spinner-flask culture system containing C2C12 myoblasts attached to spherical microcarriers that act to support the growth of non-adherent, post-natal murine skeletal muscle and bone marrow SP cells. Using FACS and hemocytometry, we show expansion of unfractionated EGFP⁺ SP cells over 6 wks. A significant number of these cells retain characteristics of freshly-isolated, unfractionated SP cells with respect to protein expression and dye efflux capacity. Expansion of the SP will permit further study of these heterogeneous cells and determine their therapeutic potential for regenerative and reparative therapies.

  10. Homogenization in chemical reactive flows

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carlos Conca

    2004-03-01

    Full Text Available This paper concerns the homogenization of two nonlinear models for chemical reactive flows through the exterior of a domain containing periodically distributed reactive solid grains (or reactive obstacles. In the first model, the chemical reactions take place on the walls of the grains, while in the second one the fluid penetrates the grains and the reactions take place therein. The effective behavior of these reactive flows is described by a new elliptic boundary-value problem containing an extra zero-order term which captures the effect of the chemical reactions.

  11. Role of heterogeneous cell population on modulation of dendritic cell phenotype and activation of CD8 T cells for use in cell-based immunotherapies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frizzell, Hannah; Park, Jaehyung; Comandante Lou, Natacha; Woodrow, Kim A

    2017-01-01

    Dendritic cell (DC)-based immunotherapies have much utility in their ability to prime antigen-specific adaptive immune responses. However, there does not yet exist a consensus standard to how DCs should be primed. In this study, we aimed to determine the role of heterogeneous co-cultures, composed of both CD11c+ (DCs) and CD11c- cells, in combination with monophosphoryl lipid A (MPLA) stimulation on DC phenotype and function. Upon DC priming in different co-culture ratios, we observed reduced expression of MHCII and CD86 and increased antigen uptake among CD11c+ cells in a CD11c- dependent manner. DCs from all culture conditions were induced to mature by MPLA treatment, as determined by secretion of pro-inflammatory cytokines IL-12 and TNF-α. Antigen-specific stimulation of CD4+ T cells was not modulated by co-culture composition, in terms of proliferation nor levels of IFN-γ. However, the presence of CD11c- cells enhanced cross-presentation to CD8+ T cells compared to purified CD11c+ cells, resulting in increased cell proliferation along with higher IFN-γ production. These findings demonstrate the impact of cell populations present during DC priming, and point to the use of heterogeneous cultures of DCs and innate immune cells to enhance cell-mediated immunity. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Fluorescent probes as a tool for cell population tracking in spontaneously active neural networks derived from human pluripotent stem cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mäkinen, M; Joki, T; Ylä-Outinen, L; Skottman, H; Narkilahti, S; Aänismaa, R

    2013-04-30

    Applications such as 3D cultures and tissue modelling require cell tracking with non-invasive methods. In this work, the suitability of two fluorescent probes, CellTracker, CT, and long chain carbocyanine dye, DiD, was investigated for long-term culturing of labeled human pluripotent stem cell-derived neural cells. We found that these dyes did not affect the cell viability. However, proliferation was decreased in DiD labeled cell population. With both dyes the labeling was stable up to 4 weeks. CT and DiD labeled cells could be co-cultured and, importantly, these mixed populations had their normal ability to form spontaneous electrical network activity. In conclusion, human neural cells can be successfully labeled with these two fluorescent probes without significantly affecting the cell characteristics. These labeled cells could be utilized further in e.g. building controlled neuronal networks for neurotoxicity screening platforms, combining cells with biomaterials for 3D studies, and graft development. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. C-kit+ cells isolated from developing kidneys are a novel population of stem cells with regenerative potential

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rangel, Erika B; Gomes, Samirah A; Dulce, Raul A; Premer, Courtney; Rodrigues, Claudia O; Kanashiro-Takeuchi, Rosemeire M; Oskouei, Behzad; Carvalho, Decio A; Ruiz, Phillip; Reiser, Jochen; Hare, Joshua M

    2013-01-01

    The presence of tissue specific precursor cells is an emerging concept in organ formation and tissue homeostasis. Several progenitors are described in the kidneys. However, their identity as a true stem cell remains elusive. Here, we identify a neonatal kidney-derived c-kit+ cell population that fulfills all of the criteria as a stem cell. These cells were found in the thick ascending limb of Henle's loop and exhibited clonogenicity, self-renewal, and multipotentiality with differentiation capacity into mesoderm and ectoderm progeny. Additionally, c-kit+ cells formed spheres in nonadherent conditions when plated at clonal density and expressed markers of stem cells, progenitors, and differentiated cells. Ex-vivo expanded c-kit+ cells integrated into several compartments of the kidney, including tubules, vessels, and glomeruli, and contributed to functional and morphological improvement of the kidney following acute ischemia-reperfusion injury in rats. Together these findings document a novel neonatal rat kidney c-kit+ stem cell population that can be isolated, expanded, cloned, differentiated, and employed for kidney repair following acute kidney injury. These cells have important biological and therapeutic implications. PMID:23733311

  14. Generational distribution of a Candida glabrata population: Resilient old cells prevail, while younger cells dominate in the vulnerable host.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tejas Bouklas

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Similar to other yeasts, the human pathogen Candida glabrata ages when it undergoes asymmetric, finite cell divisions, which determines its replicative lifespan. We sought to investigate if and how aging changes resilience of C. glabrata populations in the host environment. Our data demonstrate that old C. glabrata are more resistant to hydrogen peroxide and neutrophil killing, whereas young cells adhere better to epithelial cell layers. Consequently, virulence of old compared to younger C. glabrata cells is enhanced in the Galleria mellonella infection model. Electron microscopy images of old C. glabrata cells indicate a marked increase in cell wall thickness. Comparison of transcriptomes of old and young C. glabrata cells reveals differential regulation of ergosterol and Hog pathway associated genes as well as adhesion proteins, and suggests that aging is accompanied by remodeling of the fungal cell wall. Biochemical analysis supports this conclusion as older cells exhibit a qualitatively different lipid composition, leading to the observed increased emergence of fluconazole resistance when grown in the presence of fluconazole selection pressure. Older C. glabrata cells accumulate during murine and human infection, which is statistically unlikely without very strong selection. Therefore, we tested the hypothesis that neutrophils constitute the predominant selection pressure in vivo. When we altered experimentally the selection pressure by antibody-mediated removal of neutrophils, we observed a significantly younger pathogen population in mice. Mathematical modeling confirmed that differential selection of older cells is sufficient to cause the observed demographic shift in the fungal population. Hence our data support the concept that pathogenesis is affected by the generational age distribution of the infecting C. glabrata population in a host. We conclude that replicative aging constitutes an emerging trait, which is selected by the host and

  15. Shaping bacterial population behavior through computer-interfaced control of individual cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chait, Remy; Ruess, Jakob; Bergmiller, Tobias; Tkačik, Gašper; Guet, Călin C

    2017-11-16

    Bacteria in groups vary individually, and interact with other bacteria and the environment to produce population-level patterns of gene expression. Investigating such behavior in detail requires measuring and controlling populations at the single-cell level alongside precisely specified interactions and environmental characteristics. Here we present an automated, programmable platform that combines image-based gene expression and growth measurements with on-line optogenetic expression control for hundreds of individual Escherichia coli cells over days, in a dynamically adjustable environment. This integrated platform broadly enables experiments that bridge individual and population behaviors. We demonstrate: (i) population structuring by independent closed-loop control of gene expression in many individual cells, (ii) cell-cell variation control during antibiotic perturbation, (iii) hybrid bio-digital circuits in single cells, and freely specifiable digital communication between individual bacteria. These examples showcase the potential for real-time integration of theoretical models with measurement and control of many individual cells to investigate and engineer microbial population behavior.

  16. Variability in Beta-Adrenergic Receptor Population in Cultured Chicken Muscle Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Young, Ronald B; Bridge, Kristin Y.; Vaughn, Jeffrey R.

    1998-01-01

    Investigations into expression of the beta-adrenergic receptor (bAR) in chicken skeletal muscle cells in culture were initiated because several beta-adrenergic receptor agonists are known to increase skeletal muscle protein deposition in avian and mammalian species. During initial attempts to study the bAR population on the surface of chicken skeletal muscle cells, we observed a high degree of variability that was later found to be the result of using different batches of horse serum in the cell culture media. The separation between total binding and nonspecific binding in cells grown in two serum samples was approximately two-fold The number of nuclei within multinucleated myotubes was not significantly different in cells grown in the two serum samples. To investigate whether these two sera had an effect on coupling efficiency between bAR population and cAMP production, the ability of these cells to synthesize cAMP was also assessed. Despite the two-fold difference in receptor population, the ability of these cells to synthesize cAMP was not significantly different. Because of the possible link between bAR population and muscle protein, we also determined if the quantity of the major skeletal muscle protein, myosin, was affected by conditions that so drastically affected the bAR population. The quantity of myosin heavy chain was not significantly different.

  17. Sorting and identification of side population cells in the human cervical cancer cell line HeLa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qi, Wenjuan; Zhao, Chao; Zhao, Lijun; Liu, Ning; Li, Xiaoping; Yu, Weidong; Wei, Lihui

    2014-01-13

    Several reports have revealed that cancer stem cells (CSCs) exist in many types of solid tumors. Some studies have demonstrated that side population (SP) cells isolated from diverse cancer lines harbor cancer stem-like properties, but there are few reports examining the characteristic of SP cells in human cervical cancer. The aim of this study is 1) to find out a feasible way to detect the tumor stem-like cells in cervical cancer, and 2) to analyze the properties of the SP cells being sorted. Isolated SP and non-SP cells from human cervical cancer cell line Hela by Hoechst 33342 dying method and flow cytometry analysis. Observing morphology of SP and non-SP cells. The expression of various biomarkers putatively related to cancer stem cells were investigated by immucytochemistry of SP and non-SP cells. We also analyzed cell cycle and cell apoptosis for sorted cells. The oncogenicity of the SP and non-SP cells were analyzed by tumor formation in nonobesediabeti- c/severe combined immune- deficient (NOD/SCID) mice. The drug-resistant and radiation-resistant index between SP, non-SP and Hela cells was estimated by MTS assay. The fraction of SP cells in Hela was approximately 1.07 ± 0.32%. SP cells were smaller and rounder in shape than non-SP cells, and mostly showed colony-like growth. Immunocytochemistry showed that stem cell makers (Oct3/4, CD133, BCRP) were highly expressed in SP cells. Moreover, the number of apoptotic cells among non-SP cells (17.6 ± 3.7%) was significantly higher compared with that among SP cells (4.4 ± 1.2%). The HE staining of in vivo grown tumors result from SP cells showed more poor differentiation, though no significant differences were shown between SP and non-SP cells in NOD/SCID mice tumorigenicity. Furthermore, SP cells demonstrated a higher degree of drug resistance against trichostatin A (TSA) compared with that of non-SP and Hela cells. SP cells were also found to be more resistant against radiotherapy. SP cells

  18. Optimizing homogenization by chaotic unmixing?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weijs, Joost; Bartolo, Denis

    2016-11-01

    A number of industrial processes rely on the homogeneous dispersion of non-brownian particles in a viscous fluid. An ideal mixing would yield a so-called hyperuniform particle distribution. Such configurations are characterized by density fluctuations that grow slower than the standard √{ N}-fluctuations. Even though such distributions have been found in several natural structures, e.g. retina receptors in birds, they have remained out of experimental reach until very recently. Over the last 5 years independent experiments and numerical simulations have shown that periodically driven suspensions can self-assemble hyperuniformally. Simple as the recipe may be, it has one important disadvantage. The emergence of hyperuniform states co-occurs with a critical phase transition from reversible to non reversible particle dynamics. As a consequence the homogenization dynamics occurs over a time that diverges with the system size (critical slowing down). Here, we discuss how this process can be sped up by exploiting the stirring properties of chaotic advection. Among the questions that we answer are: What are the physical mechanisms in a chaotic flow that are relevant for hyperuniformity? How can we tune the flow parameters such to obtain optimal hyperuniformity in the fastest way? JW acknowledges funding by NWO (Netherlands Organisation for Scientific Research) through a Rubicon Grant.

  19. ISOTOPE METHODS IN HOMOGENEOUS CATALYSIS.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    BULLOCK,R.M.; BENDER,B.R.

    2000-12-01

    The use of isotope labels has had a fundamentally important role in the determination of mechanisms of homogeneously catalyzed reactions. Mechanistic data is valuable since it can assist in the design and rational improvement of homogeneous catalysts. There are several ways to use isotopes in mechanistic chemistry. Isotopes can be introduced into controlled experiments and followed where they go or don't go; in this way, Libby, Calvin, Taube and others used isotopes to elucidate mechanistic pathways for very different, yet important chemistries. Another important isotope method is the study of kinetic isotope effects (KIEs) and equilibrium isotope effect (EIEs). Here the mere observation of where a label winds up is no longer enough - what matters is how much slower (or faster) a labeled molecule reacts than the unlabeled material. The most careti studies essentially involve the measurement of isotope fractionation between a reference ground state and the transition state. Thus kinetic isotope effects provide unique data unavailable from other methods, since information about the transition state of a reaction is obtained. Because getting an experimental glimpse of transition states is really tantamount to understanding catalysis, kinetic isotope effects are very powerful.

  20. An imbalance in progenitor cell populations reflects tumour progression in breast cancer primary culture models.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Donatello, Simona

    2011-01-01

    Many factors influence breast cancer progression, including the ability of progenitor cells to sustain or increase net tumour cell numbers. Our aim was to define whether alterations in putative progenitor populations could predict clinicopathological factors of prognostic importance for cancer progression.

  1. The epidermis comprises autonomous compartments maintained by distinct stem cell populations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Page, Mahalia E; Lombard, Patrick; Ng, Felicia

    2013-01-01

    The complex anatomy of the epidermis contains multiple adult stem cell populations, but the extent to which they functionally overlap during homeostasis, wound healing, and tumor initiation remains poorly defined. Here, we demonstrate that Lrig1(+ve) cells are highly proliferative epidermal stem ...

  2. Comparison of the Side Populations in Pretreatment and Postrelapse Neuroblastoma Cell Lines

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-08-01

    Acad Sci USA 103, 11154–11159. [32] Wu C, Wei Q, Utomo V, Nadesan P, Whetstone H, Kandel R, Wunder JS, and Alman BA (2007). Side population cells...Okano H, and Miyake J (2005). Functional expression of ABCG2 transporter in human neural stem/progenitor cells. Neurosci Res 52, 75–82. [37] Thomas SK

  3. An Adult Mouse Thyroid Side Population Cell Line that Exhibits Enriched Epithelial-Mesenchymal Transition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murata, Tsubasa; Iwadate, Manabu; Takizawa, Yoshinori; Miyakoshi, Masaaki; Hayase, Suguru; Yang, Wenjing; Cai, Yan; Yokoyama, Shigetoshi; Nagashima, Kunio; Wakabayashi, Yoshiyuki; Zhu, Jun; Kimura, Shioko

    2017-03-01

    Studies of thyroid stem/progenitor cells have been hampered due to the small organ size and lack of tissue, which limits the yield of these cells. A continuous source that allows the study and characterization of thyroid stem/progenitor cells is desired to push the field forward. A cell line was established from Hoechst-resistant side population cells derived from mouse thyroid that were previously shown to contain stem/progenitor-like cells. Characterization of these cells were carried out by using in vitro two- and three-dimensional cultures and in vivo reconstitution of mice after orthotopic or intravenous injection, in conjunction with quantitative reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction, Western blotting, immunohisto(cyto)chemistry/immunofluorescence, and RNA seq analysis. These cells were named SPTL (side population cell-derived thyroid cell line). Under low serum culturing conditions, SPTL cells expressed the thyroid differentiation marker NKX2-1, a transcription factor critical for thyroid differentiation and function, while no expression of other thyroid differentiation marker genes were observed. SPTL cells formed follicle-like structures in Matrigel ® cultures, which did not express thyroid differentiation marker genes. In mouse models of orthotopic and intravenous injection, the latter following partial thyroidectomy, a few SPTL cells were found in part of the follicles, most of which expressed NKX2-1. SPTL cells highly express genes involved in epithelial-mesenchymal transition, as demonstrated by RNA seq analysis, and exhibit a gene-expression pattern similar to anaplastic thyroid carcinoma. These results demonstrate that SPTL cells have the capacity to differentiate into thyroid to a limited degree. SPTL cells may provide an excellent tool to study stem cells, including cancer stem cells of the thyroid.

  4. Calcium Imaging Reveals Coordinated Simple Spike Pauses in Populations of Cerebellar Purkinje Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jorge E. Ramirez

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available The brain’s control of movement is thought to involve coordinated activity between cerebellar Purkinje cells. The results reported here demonstrate that somatic Ca2+ imaging is a faithful reporter of Na+-dependent “simple spike” pauses and enables us to optically record changes in firing rates in populations of Purkinje cells in brain slices and in vivo. This simultaneous calcium imaging of populations of Purkinje cells reveals a striking spatial organization of pauses in Purkinje cell activity between neighboring cells. The source of this organization is shown to be the presynaptic gamma-Aminobutyric acid producing (GABAergic network, and blocking ionotropic gamma-Aminobutyric acid receptor (GABAARs abolishes the synchrony. These data suggest that presynaptic interneurons synchronize (inactivity between neighboring Purkinje cells, and thereby maximize their effect on downstream targets in the deep cerebellar nuclei.

  5. Population differences in the rate of proliferation of international HapMap cell lines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stark, Amy L; Zhang, Wei; Zhou, Tong; O'Donnell, Peter H; Beiswanger, Christine M; Huang, R Stephanie; Cox, Nancy J; Dolan, M Eileen

    2010-12-10

    The International HapMap Project is a resource for researchers containing genotype, sequencing, and expression information for EBV-transformed lymphoblastoid cell lines derived from populations across the world. The expansion of the HapMap beyond the four initial populations of Phase 2, referred to as Phase 3, has increased the sample number and ethnic diversity available for investigation. However, differences in the rate of cellular proliferation between the populations can serve as confounders in phenotype-genotype studies using these cell lines. Within the Phase 2 populations, the JPT and CHB cell lines grow faster (p HapMap panels into discovery and replication sets must take this into consideration. Copyright © 2010 The American Society of Human Genetics. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Partial Characterization of the Sox2+ Cell Population in an Adult Murine Model of Digit Amputation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agrawal, Vineet; Siu, Bernard F.; Chao, Hsu; Hirschi, Karen K.; Raborn, Eric; Johnson, Scott A.; Tottey, Stephen; Hurley, Katherine B.; Medberry, Chris J.

    2012-01-01

    Tissue regeneration in response to injury in adult mammals is generally limited to select tissues. Nonmammalian species such as newts and axolotls undergo regeneration of complex tissues such as limbs and digits via recruitment and accumulation of local and circulating multipotent progenitors preprogrammed to recapitulate the missing tissue. Directed recruitment and activation of progenitor cells at a site of injury in adult mammals may alter the default wound-healing response from scar tissue toward regeneration. Bioactive molecules derived from proteolytic degradation of extracellular matrix (ECM) proteins have been shown to recruit a variety of progenitor cells in vitro and in vivo to the site of injury. The present study further characterized the population of cells accumulating at the site of injury after treatment with ECM degradation products in a well-established model of murine digit amputation. After a mid-second phalanx digit amputation in 6–8-week-old adult mice, treatment with ECM degradation products resulted in the accumulation of a heterogeneous population of cells, a subset of which expressed the transcription factor Sox2, a marker of pluripotent and adult progenitor cells. Sox2+ cells were localized lateral to the amputated P2 bone and coexpressed progenitor cell markers CD90 and Sca1. Transgenic Sox2 eGFP/+ and bone marrow chimeric mice showed that the bone marrow and blood circulation did not contribute to the Sox2+ cell population. The present study showed that, in addition to circulating progenitor cells, resident tissue-derived cells also populate at the site of injury after treatment with ECM degradation products. Although future work is necessary to determine the contribution of Sox2+ cells to functional tissue at the site of injury, recruitment and/or activation of local tissue-derived cells may be a viable approach to tissue engineering of more complex tissues in adult mammals. PMID:22530556

  7. Evidence of Distinct Tumour-Propagating Cell Populations with Different Properties in Primary Human Hepatocellular Carcinoma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colombo, Federico; Baldan, Francesca; Mazzucchelli, Silvia; Martin-Padura, Ines; Marighetti, Paola; Cattaneo, Alessandra; Foglieni, Barbara; Spreafico, Marta; Guerneri, Silvana; Baccarin, Marco; Bertolini, Francesco; Rossi, Giorgio; Mazzaferro, Vincenzo; Cadamuro, Massimiliano; Maggioni, Marco; Agnelli, Luca; Rebulla, Paolo

    2011-01-01

    Background and Aims Increasing evidence that a number of malignancies are characterised by tumour cell heterogeneity has recently been published, but there is still a lack of data concerning liver cancers. The aim of this study was to investigate and characterise tumour-propagating cell (TPC) compartments within human hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). Methods After long-term culture, we identified three morphologically different tumour cell populations in a single HCC specimen, and extensively characterised them by means of flow cytometry, fluorescence microscopy, karyotyping and microarray analyses, single cell cloning, and xenotransplantation in NOD/SCID/IL2Rγ−/− mice. Results The primary cell populations (hcc-1, -2 and -3) and two clones generated by means of limiting dilutions from hcc-1 (clone-1/7 and -1/8) differently expressed a number of tumour-associated stem cell markers, including EpCAM, CD49f, CD44, CD133, CD56, Thy-1, ALDH and CK19, and also showed different doubling times, drug resistance and tumorigenic potential. Moreover, we found that ALDH expression, in combination with CD44 or Thy-1 negativity or CD56 positivity identified subpopulations with a higher clonogenic potential within hcc-1, hcc-2 and hcc-3 primary cell populations, respectively. Karyotyping revealed the clonal evolution of the cell populations and clones within the primary tumour. Importantly, the primary tumour cell population with the greatest tumorigenic potential and drug resistance showed more chromosomal alterations than the others and contained clones with epithelial and mesenchymal features. Conclusions Individual HCCs can harbor different self-renewing tumorigenic cell types expressing a variety of morphological and phenotypical markers, karyotypic evolution and different gene expression profiles. This suggests that the models of hepatic carcinogenesis should take into account TPC heterogeneity due to intratumour clonal evolution. PMID:21731718

  8. Evidence of distinct tumour-propagating cell populations with different properties in primary human hepatocellular carcinoma.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Federico Colombo

    Full Text Available Increasing evidence that a number of malignancies are characterised by tumour cell heterogeneity has recently been published, but there is still a lack of data concerning liver cancers. The aim of this study was to investigate and characterise tumour-propagating cell (TPC compartments within human hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC.After long-term culture, we identified three morphologically different tumour cell populations in a single HCC specimen, and extensively characterised them by means of flow cytometry, fluorescence microscopy, karyotyping and microarray analyses, single cell cloning, and xenotransplantation in NOD/SCID/IL2Rγ/⁻ mice.The primary cell populations (hcc-1, -2 and -3 and two clones generated by means of limiting dilutions from hcc-1 (clone-1/7 and -1/8 differently expressed a number of tumour-associated stem cell markers, including EpCAM, CD49f, CD44, CD133, CD56, Thy-1, ALDH and CK19, and also showed different doubling times, drug resistance and tumorigenic potential. Moreover, we found that ALDH expression, in combination with CD44 or Thy-1 negativity or CD56 positivity identified subpopulations with a higher clonogenic potential within hcc-1, hcc-2 and hcc-3 primary cell populations, respectively. Karyotyping revealed the clonal evolution of the cell populations and clones within the primary tumour. Importantly, the primary tumour cell population with the greatest tumorigenic potential and drug resistance showed more chromosomal alterations than the others and contained clones with epithelial and mesenchymal features.Individual HCCs can harbor different self-renewing tumorigenic cell types expressing a variety of morphological and phenotypical markers, karyotypic evolution and different gene expression profiles. This suggests that the models of hepatic carcinogenesis should take into account TPC heterogeneity due to intratumour clonal evolution.

  9. Development of ISFET array-based microsystems for bioelectrochemical measurements of cell populations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martinoia, S; Rosso, N; Grattarola, M; Lorenzelli, L; Margesin, B; Zen, M

    2001-12-01

    Monitoring the bioelectrochemical activity of living cells with sensor array-based microsystems represents an emerging technique in a large area of biomedical applications, ranging from basic research to various fields of pharmacological analyses. The main appeal is the ability of these miniaturised microsystems to perform, in real time, non-invasive in-vitro investigations of the physiological state of a cell population. In this paper, we present two different microsystems designed for multisite monitoring of the physiological state of a cell population. The first microsystem, intended for cellular metabolism monitoring, consists of an array of 12 spatially distributed ISFETs to detect small pH variations induced by the cell population. The second microsystem consists of an array of 40 ISFETs and 20 gold microelectrodes and it has been designed to monitor the electrical activity of neurons. This is achieved by direct coupling of the neuronal culture with the ISFET sensitive layer and by utilising gold microelectrodes for neuronal electrical stimulation.

  10. Traffic planning for non-homogeneous traffic

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    These vehicles have widely different static and dynamic characteristics. The traffic is also very different from homogeneous traffic which primarily consists of motorized vehicles. Homogeneous traffic follows strict lane discipline as compared to non-homogeneous traffic. Western traffic planning methodologies mostly address ...

  11. Label-free detection of neuronal differentiation in cell populations using high-throughput live-cell imaging of PC12 cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sebastian Weber

    Full Text Available Detection of neuronal cell differentiation is essential to study cell fate decisions under various stimuli and/or environmental conditions. Many tools exist that quantify differentiation by neurite length measurements of single cells. However, quantification of differentiation in whole cell populations remains elusive so far. Because such populations can consist of both proliferating and differentiating cells, the task to assess the overall differentiation status is not trivial and requires a high-throughput, fully automated approach to analyze sufficient data for a statistically significant discrimination to determine cell differentiation. We address the problem of detecting differentiation in a mixed population of proliferating and differentiating cells over time by supervised classification. Using nerve growth factor induced differentiation of PC12 cells, we monitor the changes in cell morphology over 6 days by phase-contrast live-cell imaging. For general applicability, the classification procedure starts out with many features to identify those that maximize discrimination of differentiated and undifferentiated cells and to eliminate features sensitive to systematic measurement artifacts. The resulting image analysis determines the optimal post treatment day for training and achieves a near perfect classification of differentiation, which we confirmed in technically and biologically independent as well as differently designed experiments. Our approach allows to monitor neuronal cell populations repeatedly over days without any interference. It requires only an initial calibration and training step and is thereafter capable to discriminate further experiments. In conclusion, this enables long-term, large-scale studies of cell populations with minimized costs and efforts for detecting effects of external manipulation of neuronal cell differentiation.

  12. Modelling the collective response of heterogeneous cell populations to stationary gradients and chemical signal relay

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pineda, M.; Eftimie, R.

    2017-12-01

    The directed motion of cell aggregates toward a chemical source occurs in many relevant biological processes. Understanding the mechanisms that control this complex behavior is of great relevance for our understanding of developmental biological processes and many diseases. In this paper, we consider a self-propelled particle model for the movement of heterogeneous subpopulations of chemically interacting cells towards an imposed stable chemical gradient. Our simulations show explicitly how self-organisation of cell populations (which could lead to engulfment or complete cell segregation) can arise from the heterogeneity of chemotactic responses alone. This new result complements current theoretical and experimental studies that emphasise the role of differential cell–cell adhesion on self-organisation and spatial structure of cellular aggregates. We also investigate how the speed of individual cell aggregations increases with the chemotactic sensitivity of the cells, and decreases with the number of cells inside the aggregates

  13. Projective duality and homogeneous spaces

    CERN Document Server

    Tevelev, E A

    2006-01-01

    Projective duality is a very classical notion naturally arising in various areas of mathematics, such as algebraic and differential geometry, combinatorics, topology, analytical mechanics, and invariant theory, and the results in this field were until now scattered across the literature. Thus the appearance of a book specifically devoted to projective duality is a long-awaited and welcome event. Projective Duality and Homogeneous Spaces covers a vast and diverse range of topics in the field of dual varieties, ranging from differential geometry to Mori theory and from topology to the theory of algebras. It gives a very readable and thorough account and the presentation of the material is clear and convincing. For the most part of the book the only prerequisites are basic algebra and algebraic geometry. This book will be of great interest to graduate and postgraduate students as well as professional mathematicians working in algebra, geometry and analysis.

  14. The IL-17A-producing CD8+ T-cell population in psoriatic lesional skin comprises mucosa-associated invariant T cells and conventional T cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teunissen, Marcel B M; Yeremenko, Nataliya G; Baeten, Dominique L P; Chielie, Saskia; Spuls, Phyllis I; de Rie, Menno A; Lantz, Olivier; Res, Pieter C M

    2014-12-01

    IL-17A is pivotal in the etiology of psoriasis, and CD8(+) T cells with the ability to produce this cytokine (Tc17 cells) are over-represented in psoriatic lesions. Here we demonstrate that the frequency of Tc17 cells in peripheral blood of psoriasis patients correlated with the clinical severity of the disease. Analysis of cutaneous-associated lymphocyte antigen expression showed that the blood Tc17 population contains a significantly higher proportion of cells with skin-homing potential compared with the CD8(+) T-cell population lacking IL-17A/IL-22 expression. IL-17A-producing CD8(+) T cells in blood have previously been reported to belong mainly to the mucosa-associated invariant T-cell (MAIT cell) lineage characterized by TCR Vα7.2 chain, CD161, IL-18Rα, and multidrug transporter ABCB1 expression. We demonstrate the presence of CD8(+) MAIT cells in the dermis and epidermis of psoriatic plaques, as well as healthy skin; however, IL-17A-producing CD8(+) MAIT cells were predominantly found in psoriatic skin. Notably, we observed IL-17A production in a large proportion of psoriatic plaque-derived CD8(+) T cells devoid of MAIT cell characteristics, likely representing conventional CD8(+) T cells. In conclusion, we provide supporting evidence that implicates Tc17 cells in the pathogenesis of psoriasis and describe the presence of innate CD8(+) MAIT cells in psoriatic lesions as an alternative source of IL-17A.

  15. Cell lineage distribution atlas of the human stomach reveals heterogeneous gland populations in the gastric antrum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Eunyoung; Roland, Joseph T; Barlow, Brittney J; O'Neal, Ryan; Rich, Amy E; Nam, Ki Taek; Shi, Chanjuan; Goldenring, James R

    2014-11-01

    The glands of the stomach body and antral mucosa contain a complex compendium of cell lineages. In lower mammals, the distribution of oxyntic glands and antral glands define the anatomical regions within the stomach. We examined in detail the distribution of the full range of cell lineages within the human stomach. We determined the distribution of gastric gland cell lineages with specific immunocytochemical markers in entire stomach specimens from three non-obese organ donors. The anatomical body and antrum of the human stomach were defined by the presence of ghrelin and gastrin cells, respectively. Concentrations of somatostatin cells were observed in the proximal stomach. Parietal cells were seen in all glands of the body of the stomach as well as in over 50% of antral glands. MIST1 expressing chief cells were predominantly observed in the body although individual glands of the antrum also showed MIST1 expressing chief cells. While classically described antral glands were observed with gastrin cells and deep antral mucous cells without any parietal cells, we also observed a substantial population of mixed type glands containing both parietal cells and G cells throughout the antrum. Enteroendocrine cells show distinct patterns of localisation in the human stomach. The existence of antral glands with mixed cell lineages indicates that human antral glands may be functionally chimeric with glands assembled from multiple distinct stem cell populations. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://group.bmj.com/group/rights-licensing/permissions.

  16. Three distinct cell populations express extracellular matrix proteins and increase in number during skeletal muscle fibrosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chapman, Mark A; Mukund, Kavitha; Subramaniam, Shankar; Brenner, David; Lieber, Richard L

    2017-02-01

    Tissue extracellular matrix (ECM) provides structural support and creates unique environments for resident cells (Bateman JF, Boot-Handford RP, Lamandé SR. Nat Rev Genet 10: 173-183, 2009; Kjaer M. Physiol Rev 84: 649-98, 2004). However, the identities of cells responsible for creating specific ECM components have not been determined. In striated muscle, the identity of these cells becomes important in disease when ECM changes result in fibrosis and subsequent increased tissue stiffness and dysfunction. Here we describe a novel approach to isolate and identify cells that maintain the ECM in both healthy and fibrotic muscle. Using a collagen I reporter mouse, we show that there are three distinct cell populations that express collagen I in both healthy and fibrotic skeletal muscle. Interestingly, the number of collagen I-expressing cells in all three cell populations increases proportionally in fibrotic muscle, indicating that all cell types participate in the fibrosis process. Furthermore, while some profibrotic ECM and ECM-associated genes are significantly upregulated in fibrotic muscle, the fibrillar collagen gene expression profile is not qualitatively altered. This suggests that muscle fibrosis in this model results from an increased number of collagen I-expressing cells and not the initiation of a specific fibrotic collagen gene expression program. Finally, in fibrotic muscle, we show that these collagen I-expressing cell populations differentially express distinct ECM proteins-fibroblasts express the fibrillar components of ECM, fibro/adipogenic progenitors cells differentially express basal laminar proteins, and skeletal muscle progenitor cells differentially express genes important for the satellite cell. Copyright © 2017 the American Physiological Society.

  17. Identification of neuroblastoma stem cells by characterization of side population cells in the human neuroblastoma SK-N-SH cell line.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qi, Shiqin; Zheng, Jicui; Zhu, Haitao; Yang, Lin; Xiao, Xianmin

    2010-12-01

    The purpose of the study was to sort side population (SP) cells from the neuroblastoma SK-N-SH cell line and to systematically investigate whether this population has stem cell characteristics. Side population and non-SP cells were separated from the SK-N-SH cell line by flow cytometry, and their morphologic characteristics were analyzed by light and electron microscopy. We also used Western blotting to analyze marker proteins, Cell Counting Kit-8 assay for proliferative ability, series differentiation studies for differentiation properties, and Matrigel invasion study and tumorigenicity assay for malignant potential. The SK-N-SH SP cells expressed high levels of stem cell markers, had high proliferative and malignant abilities, and had the capacity for rapid differentiation. The non-SP cells expressed differentiated cell marker proteins at high levels, had low proliferative and malignant abilities, and exhibited slow differentiation. The SK-N-SH SP cells have cancer stem cell-like properties. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Age-Related Change in Vestibular Ganglion Cell Populations in Individuals With Presbycusis and Normal Hearing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gluth, Michael B; Nelson, Erik G

    2017-04-01

    We sought to establish that the decline of vestibular ganglion cell counts uniquely correlates with spiral ganglion cell counts, cochlear hair cell counts, and hearing phenotype in individuals with presbycusis. The relationship between aging in the vestibular system and aging in the cochlea is a topic of ongoing investigation. Histopathologic age-related changes the vestibular system may mirror what is seen in the cochlea, but correlations with hearing phenotype and the impact of presbycusis are not well understood. Vestibular ganglion cells, spiral ganglion cells, and cochlear hair cells were counted in specimens from individuals with presbycusis and normal hearing. These were taken from within a large collection of processed human temporal bones. Correlations between histopathology and hearing phenotype were investigated. Vestibular ganglion cell counts were positively correlated with spiral ganglion cell counts and cochlear hair cell counts and were negatively correlated with hearing phenotype. There was no statistical evidence on linear regression to suggest that the relationship between age and cell populations differed significantly according to whether presbycusis was present or not. Superior vestibular ganglion cells were more negatively correlated with age than inferior ganglion cells. No difference in vestibular ganglion cells was noted based on sex. Vestibular ganglion cell counts progressively deteriorate with age, and this loss correlates closely with changes in the cochlea, as well as hearing phenotype. However, these correlations do not appear to be unique in individuals with presbycusis as compared with those with normal hearing.

  19. Population dynamics during cell proliferation and neuronogenesis in the developing murine neocortex

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nowakowski, Richard S.; Caviness, Verne S Jr; Takahashi, Takao; Hayes, Nancy L.

    2002-01-01

    During the development of the neocortex, cell proliferation occurs in two specialized zones adjacent to the lateral ventricle. One of these zones, the ventricular zone, produces most of the neurons of the neocortex. The proliferating population that resides in the ventricular zone is a pseudostratified ventricular epithelium (PVE) that looks uniform in routine histological preparations, but is, in fact, an active and dynamically changing population. In the mouse, over the course of a 6-day period, the PVE produces approximately 95% of the neurons of the adult neocortex. During this time, the cell cycle of the PVE population lengthens from about 8 h to over 18 h and the progenitor population passes through a total of 11 cell cycles. This 6-day, 11-cell cycle period comprises the "neuronogenetic interval" (NI). At each passage through the cell cycle, the proportion of daughter cells that exit the cell cycle (Q cells) increases from 0 at the onset of the NI to 1 at the end of the NI. The proportion of daughter cells that re-enter the cell cycle (P cells) changes in a complementary fashion from 1 at the onset of the NI to 0 at the end of the NI. This set of systematic changes in the cell cycle and the output from the proliferative population of the PVE allows a quantitative and mathematical treatment of the expansion of the PVE and the growth of the cortical plate that nicely accounts for the observed expansion and growth of the developing neocortex. In addition, we show that the cells produced during a 2-h window of development during specific cell cycles reside in a specific set of laminae in the adult cortex, but that the distributions of the output from consecutive cell cycles overlap. These dynamic events occur in all areas of the PVE underlying the neocortex, but there is a gradient of maturation that begins in the rostrolateral neocortex near the striatotelencephalic junction and which spreads across the surface of the neocortex over a period of 24-36 h. The

  20. Unique spectral markers discern recurrent Glioblastoma cells from heterogeneous parent population

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaur, Ekjot; Sahu, Aditi; Hole, Arti R.; Rajendra, Jacinth; Chaubal, Rohan; Gardi, Nilesh; Dutt, Amit; Moiyadi, Aliasgar; Krishna, C. Murali; Dutt, Shilpee

    2016-01-01

    An inability to discern resistant cells from bulk tumour cell population contributes to poor prognosis in Glioblastoma. Here, we compared parent and recurrent cells generated from patient derived primary cultures and cell lines to identify their unique molecular hallmarks. Although morphologically similar, parent and recurrent cells from different samples showed variable biological properties like proliferation and radiation resistance. However, total RNA-sequencing revealed transcriptional landscape unique to parent and recurrent populations. These data suggest that global molecular differences but not individual biological phenotype could differentiate parent and recurrent cells. We demonstrate that Raman Spectroscopy a label-free, non-invasive technique, yields global information about biochemical milieu of recurrent and parent cells thus, classifying them into distinct clusters based on Principal-Component-Analysis and Principal-Component-Linear-Discriminant-Analysis. Additionally, higher lipid related spectral peaks were observed in recurrent population. Importantly, Raman spectroscopic analysis could further classify an independent set of naïve primary glioblastoma tumour tissues into non-responder and responder groups. Interestingly, spectral features from the non-responder patient samples show a considerable overlap with the in-vitro generated recurrent cells suggesting their similar biological behaviour. This feasibility study necessitates analysis of a larger cohort of naïve primary glioblastoma samples to fully envisage clinical utility of Raman spectroscopy in predicting therapeutic response. PMID:27221528

  1. Fast estimation of motion from selected populations of retinal ganglion cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cerquera, Alexander; Freund, Jan

    2011-02-01

    We explore how the reconstruction efficiency of fast spike population codes varies with population size, population composition and code complexity. Our study is based on experiments with moving light patterns which are projected onto the isolated retina of a turtle Pseudemys scripta elegans. The stimulus features to reconstruct are sequences of velocities kept constant throughout segments of 500 ms. The reconstruction is based on the spikes of a retinal ganglion cell (RGC) population recorded extracellularly via a multielectrode array. Subsequent spike sorting yields the parallel spike trains of 107 RGCs as input to the reconstruction method, here a discriminant analysis trained and tested in jack-knife fashion. Motivated by behavioral response times, we concentrate on fast reconstruction, i.e., within 150 ms following a trigger event defined via significant changes of the population spike rate. Therefore, valid codes involve only few (≤3) spikes per cell. Using only the latency t(1) of each cell (with reference to the trigger event) corresponds to the most parsimonious population code considered. We evaluate the gain in reconstruction efficiency when supplementing t(1) by spike times t(2) and t(3). Furthermore, we investigate whether sub-populations of smaller size benefit significantly from a selection process or whether random compilations are equally efficient. As selection criteria we try different concepts (directionality, reliability, and discriminability). Finally, we discuss the implications of a selection process and its inter-relation with code complexity for optimized reconstruction.

  2. Real-time imaging reveals unique heterogeneous population features in insect cell cultures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hidalgo, David; Paz, Enrique; Palomares, Laura A; Ramírez, Octavio T

    2017-10-10

    Heterogeneity of cellular populations has been frequently observed. We used live cell imaging to follow Sf9 insect cells before and after infection with baculovirus, to understand population dynamics. It was possible to identify in real time cells with distinctive phenotypes. Mobile cells with an elongated bipolar shape were observed. They extended pseudopods and actively moved about the culture surface. The presence of actively moving elongated cells increased when cultures were subjected to oxygen limiting or excessive conditions, suggesting that stress triggered differentiation of cells to the mobile phenotype. A dual reporter baculovirus (DRBac), coding for two fluorescent proteins under promoters with different temporality, was designed to follow sequential phenomena through infection. Oxygen limitation reduced the number of cells that expressed the reporter proteins, possibly because it reduced the efficiency of baculovirus infection. Elongated cells did not show signs of infection. To our knowledge, this is the first time that actively moving cells are observed in real time in Sf9 cultures, which had distinctive responses towards infection. Anoxia was identified as a factor that modulates baculovirus infection. Results open a new approach for understanding the insect-cell baculovirus system. Particular cellular phenotypes with unique traits can be isolated for specific applications. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. Persistence of side population cells with high drug efflux capacity in pancreatic cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Jing; Wang, Chun-You; Liu, Tao; Wu, Bin; Zhou, Feng; Xiong, Jiong-Xin; Wu, He-Shui; Tao, Jing; Zhao, Gang; Yang, Ming; Gou, Shan-Miao

    2008-01-01

    AIM: To investigate the persistence of side population (SP) cells in pancreatic cancer and their role and mechanism in the drug resistance. METHODS: The presentation of side population cells in pancreatic cancer cell line PANC-1 and its proportion change when cultured with Gemcitabine, was detected by Hoechst 33342 staining and FACS analysis. The expression of ABCB1 and ABCG2 was detected by real-time PCR in either SP cells or non-SP cells. RESULTS: SP cells do exist in PANC-1, with a median of 3.3% and a range of 2.1-8.7%. After cultured with Gemcitabine for 3 d, the proportion of SP cells increased significantly (3.8% ± 1.9%, 10.7% ± 3.7%, t = 4.616, P = 0.001 < 0.05). ABCB1 and ABCG2 expressed at higher concentrations in SP as compared with non-SP cells (ABCB1: 1.15 ± 0.72, 5.82 ± 1.16, t = 10.839, P = 0.000 < 0.05; ABCG2: 1.16 ± 0.75, 5.48 ± 0.94, t = 11.305, P = 0.000 < 0.05), which may contribute to the efflux of fluorescent staining and drug resistance. CONCLUSION: SP cells with inherently high resistance to chemotherapeutic agents do exist in pancreatic cancers, which may be candidate cancer stem cells contributing to the relapse of the tumor. PMID:18240351

  4. Characterization of mesenchymal progenitor cell populations from non-epithelial oral mucosa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsumura, S; Higa, K; Igarashi, T; Takaichi, S; Tonogi, M; Shinozaki, N; Shimazaki, J; Yamane, G-y

    2015-04-01

    The characteristics of cell populations extracted from oral mucosal non-epithelial tissues and their ability to differentiate were evaluated in vitro as a potential source of cells for mandibular and corneal regeneration. Oral mucosal non-epithelial cells (OMNECs) were extracted from tissue samples and were studied by flow cytometry and RT-PCR. Cells differentiating into osteoblasts, adipocytes, chondrocytes, neurocytes, or keratocytes were characterized by RT-PCR and cell staining. OMNECs expressed CD44, CD90, CD105, CD166, and STRO-1 antigens, which are markers for mesenchymal stem cells. In addition, Oct3/4, c-Myc, Nanog, KLF4, and Rex, which are expressed by embryonic or pluripotent stem cells, were detected by RT-PCR. Expression of CD49d, CD56, and PDGFRα, proteins closely associated with the neural crest, was observed in OMNECs, as was expression of Twist1, Sox9, Snail1 and Snail2, which are early neural crest and neural markers. Specific differentiation markers were expressed in OMNECs after differentiation into osteoblasts, adipocytes, chondrocytes, or keratocytes. Populations of OMNECs may contain both mesenchymal stem cells and neural crest origin cells and are a potential cell source for autologous regeneration of mandibular or corneal stroma. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  5. Therapeutic implications of an enriched cancer stem-like cell population in a human osteosarcoma cell line

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martins-Neves Sara R

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Osteosarcoma is a bone-forming tumor of mesenchymal origin that presents a clinical pattern that is consistent with the cancer stem cell model. Cells with stem-like properties (CSCs have been identified in several tumors and hypothesized as the responsible for the relative resistance to therapy and tumor relapses. In this study, we aimed to identify and characterize CSCs populations in a human osteosarcoma cell line and to explore their role in the responsiveness to conventional therapies. Methods CSCs were isolated from the human MNNG/HOS cell line using the sphere formation assay and characterized in terms of self-renewal, mesenchymal stem cell properties, expression of pluripotency markers and ABC transporters, metabolic activity and tumorigenicity. Cell's sensitivity to conventional chemotherapeutic agents and to irradiation was analyzed and related with cell cycle-induced alterations and apoptosis. Results The isolated CSCs were found to possess self-renewal and multipotential differentiation capabilities, express markers of pluripotent embryonic stem cells Oct4 and Nanog and the ABC transporters P-glycoprotein and BCRP, exhibit low metabolic activity and induce tumors in athymic mice. Compared with parental MNNG/HOS cells, CSCs were relatively more resistant to both chemotherapy and irradiation. None of the treatments have induced significant cell-cycle alterations and apoptosis in CSCs. Conclusions MNNG/HOS osteosarcoma cells contain a stem-like cell population relatively resistant to conventional chemotherapeutic agents and irradiation. This resistant phenotype appears to be related with some stem features, namely the high expression of the drug efflux transporters P-glycoprotein and BCRP and their quiescent nature, which may provide a biological basis for resistance to therapy and recurrence commonly observed in osteosarcoma.

  6. Side population cells separated from A549 lung cancer cell line possess cancer stem cell-like properties and inhibition of autophagy potentiates the cytotoxic effect of cisplatin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Yang; Fan, Yuxia; Qi, Yu; Liu, Donglei; Wu, Kai; Wen, Fengbiao; Zhao, Song

    2015-08-01

    Recent studies have suggested that cancer stem cells (CSCs) may be responsible for tumorigenesis and contribute to resistance to chemotherapy. Side population (SP) cells are thought to be enriched for CSCs in most types of human tumors. Therefore, the aim of the present study was to sort SP cells using an A549 lung cancer cell line, identify the cancer stem cell-like properties of SP and determine the role of autophagy in the survival of SP cells of lung cancer. SP cells were isolated by fluorescence-activated cell sorter (FACS) from A549 lung cancer cells, and the CSC-like properties were verified through confocal fluorescence imaging, sphere formation assays, cell proliferation and colony formation assay, gene expression in vitro and tumor formation in vivo. The role of autophagy in the survival of SP cells was assessed by western blotting and flow cytometric analysis. A549 lung cancer cells contained 1.10% SP cells. SP cells showed higher abilities of sphere and colony formation, cell proliferation and self-renewal. Moreover, compared to non-SP, SP cells demonstrated a higher mRNA expression of stem cell markers (MDR1, ABCG2 and OCT-4). The clone formation efficiency of SP cells was significantly higher than that non-SP cells under the same conditions. Expression of autophagosomes in SP cells was markedly lower than that in non-SP cells. However, the level of autophagy in SP cells was found to be markedly increased in the presence of cisplatin. In addition, inhibition of autophagy enhanced the effects of apoptosis induced by cisplatin. SP cells from the A549 lung cancer cell line possessed the properties of CSCs and were used to investigate the further characteristics of lung CSCs. SP cells were more resistant to chemotherapy and inhibition of autophagy enhanced the effects of apoptosis induced by the chemotherapeutic agent, cisplatin. These results may provide insight into novel therapeutic targets.

  7. Changes in benign cell populations in cases of cervical cancer and its precursors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burger, G; Jutting, U; Rodenacker, K

    1981-12-01

    In two totally independent experiments, typical intermediate cells were visually selected by experienced cytotechnicians trained in the analysis of monodisperse Papanicolaou-stained ectocervical smears. The smears were carefully diagnosed per se and in correlation with routine smears from the same patients. For specimens of classes exhibiting tumor cells, the diagnosis was histologically verified. About 20 cells per specimen were selected from at least ten specimens per Papanicolaou class, amounting to total sample sizes of about 1,000 cells. In the first experiment, only cell nuclei were SMP scanned; in the second experiment, the whole cells were TV scanned. Correlation and classification analyses were performed; these resulted in the clear demonstration that intermediate cell populations in ectocervical smears are different in patients with different neoplastic gradings.

  8. Effects of developmental variability on the dynamics and self-organization of cell populations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prabhakara, Kaumudi H.; Gholami, Azam; Zykov, Vladimir S.; Bodenschatz, Eberhard

    2017-11-01

    We report experimental and theoretical results for spatiotemporal pattern formation in cell populations, where the parameters vary in space and time due to mechanisms intrinsic to the system, namely Dictyostelium discoideum (D.d.) in the starvation phase. We find that different patterns are formed when the populations are initialized at different developmental stages, or when populations at different initial developmental stages are mixed. The experimentally observed patterns can be understood with a modified Kessler–Levine model that takes into account the initial spatial heterogeneity of the cell populations and a developmental path introduced by us, i.e. the time dependence of the various biochemical parameters. The dynamics of the parameters agree with known biochemical studies. Most importantly, the modified model reproduces not only our results, but also the observations of an independent experiment published earlier. This shows that pattern formation can be used to understand and quantify the temporal evolution of the system parameters.

  9. Peripheral Immune Cell Populations Associated with Cognitive Deficits and Negative Symptoms of Treatment-Resistant Schizophrenia.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emilio Fernandez-Egea

    Full Text Available Hypothetically, psychotic disorders could be caused or conditioned by immunological mechanisms. If so, one might expect there to be peripheral immune system phenotypes that are measurable in blood cells as biomarkers of psychotic states.We used multi-parameter flow cytometry of venous blood to quantify and determine the activation state of 73 immune cell subsets for 18 patients with chronic schizophrenia (17 treated with clozapine, and 18 healthy volunteers matched for age, sex, BMI and smoking. We used multivariate methods (partial least squares to reduce dimensionality and define populations of differentially co-expressed cell counts in the cases compared to controls.Schizophrenia cases had increased relative numbers of NK cells, naïve B cells, CXCR5+ memory T cells and classical monocytes; and decreased numbers of dendritic cells (DC, HLA-DR+ regulatory T-cells (Tregs, and CD4+ memory T cells. Likewise, within the patient group, more severe negative and cognitive symptoms were associated with decreased relative numbers of dendritic cells, HLA-DR+ Tregs, and CD4+ memory T cells. Motivated by the importance of central nervous system dopamine signalling for psychosis, we measured dopamine receptor gene expression in separated CD4+ cells. Expression of the dopamine D3 (DRD3 receptor was significantly increased in clozapine-treated schizophrenia and covaried significantly with differentiated T cell classes in the CD4+ lineage.Peripheral immune cell populations and dopaminergic signalling are disrupted in clozapine-treated schizophrenia. Immuno-phenotypes may provide peripherally accessible and mechanistically specific biomarkers of residual cognitive and negative symptoms in this treatment-resistant subgroup of patients.

  10. A 'fragile cell' sub-population revealed during cytometric assessment of Saccharomyces cerevisiae viability in lipid-limited alcoholic fermentation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delobel, P; Pradal, M; Blondin, B; Tesniere, C

    2012-11-01

    To show that in anaerobic fermentation with limiting lipid nutrients, cell preparation impacts the viability assessment of yeast cells, and to identify the factors involved. Saccharomyces cerevisiae viability was determined using propidium iodide staining and the flow cytometry. Analyses identified intact cells, dead cells and, under certain conditions, the presence of a third subpopulation of apparently damaged cells. This intermediate population could account for up to 40% of the entire cell population. We describe, analyse and discuss the effects of different solutions for cell resuspension on the respective proportion of these three populations, in particular that of the intermediate population. We show that this intermediate cell population forms in the absence of Ca(2+)/Mg(2+). Cell preparation significantly impacts population viability assessment by FCM. The intermediate population, revealed under certain conditions, could be renamed as 'fragile cells'. For these cells, Ca(2+) and Mg(2+) reduce cell membrane permeability to PI. This is the first study that analyses and discusses the factors influencing the formation of an intermediate population when studying viability in yeast alcoholic fermentation. With a wider application in biological research, this study provides important support to the relatively new questioning of propidium iodide staining as a universal cell death indicator. © 2012 The Authors. Letters in Applied Microbiology © 2012 The Society for Applied Microbiology.

  11. Glutamic acid decarboxylase 67 expression by a distinct population of mouse vestibular supporting cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giancarlo eRusso

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available The function of the enzyme glutamate decarboxylase (GAD is to convert glutamate in -aminobutyric acid (GABA.GAD exists as two major isoforms, termed GAD65 and GAD67,.that are usually expressed in GABA-containing neurons in the central nervous system. GAD65 has been proposed to be associated with GABA exocytosis whereas GAD67 with GABA metabolism. In the present immunofluorescence study, we have investigated the presence of the two GAD isoforms in the semicircular canal cristae of wild type and GAD67-GFP knock-in mice. While no evidence for GAD65 expression was found, GAD67 was detected in a distinct population of peripherally-located supporting cells, but not in hair cells or in centrally-located supporting cells. GABA, on the other hand, was found in all supporting cells. The present result indicate that only a discrete population of supporting cells use GAD67 to synthesize GABA. This is the first report of a marker that allows to distinguish two populations of supporting cells in the vestibular epithelium. On the other hand, the lack of GABA and GAD enzymes in hair cells excludes its involvement in afferent transmission.

  12. Cellometer image cytometry as a complementary tool to flow cytometry for verifying gated cell populations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuksin, Dmitry; Kuksin, Christina Arieta; Qiu, Jean; Chan, Leo Li-Ying

    2016-06-15

    Traditionally, many cell-based assays that analyze cell populations and functionalities have been performed using flow cytometry. However, flow cytometers remain relatively expensive and require highly trained operators for routine maintenance and data analysis. Recently, an image cytometry system has been developed by Nexcelom Bioscience (Lawrence, MA, USA) for automated cell concentration and viability measurement using bright-field and fluorescent imaging methods. Image cytometry is analogous to flow cytometry in that gating operations can be performed on the cell population based on size and fluorescent intensity. In addition, the image cytometer is capable of capturing bright-field and fluorescent images, allowing for the measurement of cellular size and fluorescence intensity data. In this study, we labeled a population of cells with an enzymatic vitality stain (calcein-AM) and a cell viability dye (propidium iodide) and compared the data generated by flow and image cytometry. We report that measuring vitality and viability using the image cytometer is as effective as flow cytometric assays and allows for visual confirmation of the sample to exclude cellular debris. Image cytometry offers a direct method for performing fluorescent cell-based assays but also may be used as a complementary tool to flow cytometers for aiding the analysis of more complex samples. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Phototheranostics of CD44-positive cell populations in triple negative breast cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jin, Jiefu; Krishnamachary, Balaji; Mironchik, Yelena; Kobayashi, Hisataka; Bhujwalla, Zaver M

    2016-06-15

    Triple-negative breast cancer (TNBC) is one of the most lethal subtypes of breast cancer that has limited treatment options. Its high rates of recurrence and metastasis have been associated, in part, with a subpopulation of breast cancer stem-like cells that are resistant to conventional therapies. A compendium of markers such as CD44(high)/CD24(low), and increased expression of the ABCG2 transporter and increased aldehyde dehydrogenase (ALDH1), have been associated with these cells. We developed a CD44-targeted monoclonal antibody photosensitizer conjugate for combined fluorescent detection and photoimmunotherapy (PIT) of CD44 expressing cells in TNBC. The CD44-targeted conjugate demonstrated acute cell killing of breast cancer cells with high CD44 expression. This cell death process was dependent upon CD44-specific cell membrane binding combined with near-infrared irradiation. The conjugate selectively accumulated in CD44-positive tumors and caused dramatic tumor shrinkage and efficient elimination of CD44-positive cell populations following irradiation. This novel phototheranostic strategy provides a promising opportunity for the destruction of CD44-positive populations that include cancer stem-like cells, in locally advanced primary and metastatic TNBC.

  14. Bet-hedging in bacteriocin producing Escherichia coli populations: the single cell perspective

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bayramoglu, Bihter; Toubiana, David; van Vliet, Simon; Inglis, R. Fredrik; Shnerb, Nadav; Gillor, Osnat

    2017-02-01

    Production of public goods in biological systems is often a collaborative effort that may be detrimental to the producers. It is therefore sustainable only if a small fraction of the population shoulders the cost while the majority reap the benefits. We modelled this scenario using Escherichia coli populations producing colicins, an antibiotic that kills producer cells’ close relatives. Colicin expression is a costly trait, and it has been proposed that only a small fraction of the population actively expresses the antibiotic. Colicinogenic populations were followed at the single-cell level using time-lapse microscopy, and showed two distinct, albeit dynamic, subpopulations: the majority silenced colicin expression, while a small fraction of elongated, slow-growing cells formed colicin-expressing hotspots, placing a significant burden on expressers. Moreover, monitoring lineages of individual colicinogenic cells showed stochastic switching between expressers and non-expressers. Hence, colicin expressers may be engaged in risk-reducing strategies—or bet-hedging—as they balance the cost of colicin production with the need to repel competitors. To test the bet-hedging strategy in colicin-mediated interactions, competitions between colicin-sensitive and producer cells were simulated using a numerical model, demonstrating a finely balanced expression range that is essential to sustaining the colicinogenic population.

  15. Muscle satellite cells are a functionally heterogeneous population in both somite-derived and branchiomeric muscles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ono, Yusuke; Boldrin, Luisa; Knopp, Paul; Morgan, Jennifer E; Zammit, Peter S

    2010-01-01

    Skeletal muscles of body and limb are derived from somites, but most head muscles originate from cranial mesoderm. The resident stem cells of muscle are satellite cells, which have the same embryonic origin as the muscle in which they reside. Here, we analysed satellite cells with a different ontology, comparing those of the extensor digitorum longus (EDL) of the limb with satellite cells from the masseter of the head. Satellite cell-derived myoblasts from MAS and EDL muscles had distinct gene expression profiles and masseter cells usually proliferated more and differentiated later than those from EDL. When transplanted, however, masseter-derived satellite cells regenerated limb muscles as efficiently as those from EDL. Clonal analysis showed that functional properties differed markedly between satellite cells: ranging from clones that proliferated extensively and gave rise to both differentiated and self-renewed progeny, to others that divided minimally before differentiating completely. Generally, masseter-derived clones were larger and took longer to differentiate than those from EDL. This distribution in cell properties was preserved in both EDL-derived and masseter-derived satellite cells from old mice, although clones were generally less proliferative. Satellite cells, therefore, are a functionally heterogeneous population, with many occupants of the niche exhibiting stem cell characteristics in both somite-derived and branchiomeric muscles.

  16. Quantum counting: Operator methods for discrete population dynamics with applications to cell division.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robinson, T R; Haven, E; Fry, A M

    2017-11-01

    The set of natural numbers may be identified with the spectrum of eigenvalues of an operator (quantum counting), and the dynamical equations of populations of discrete, countable items may be formulated using operator methods. These equations take the form of time dependent operator equations, involving Hamiltonian operators, from which the statistical time dependence of population numbers may be determined. The quantum operator method is illustrated by a novel approach to cell population dynamics. This involves Hamiltonians that mimic the process of stimulated cell division. We evaluate two different models, one in which the stimuli are expended in the division process and one in which the stimuli act as true catalysts. While the former model exhibits only bounded cell population variations, the latter exhibits two distinct regimes; one has bounded population fluctuations about a mean level and in the other, the population can undergo growth to levels that are orders of magnitude above threshold levels, through an instability that could be interpreted as a cancerous growth phase. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. A polarised population of dynamic microtubules mediates homeostatic length control in animal cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Remigio Picone

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available Because physical form and function are intimately linked, mechanisms that maintain cell shape and size within strict limits are likely to be important for a wide variety of biological processes. However, while intrinsic controls have been found to contribute to the relatively well-defined shape of bacteria and yeast cells, the extent to which individual cells from a multicellular animal control their plastic form remains unclear. Here, using micropatterned lines to limit cell extension to one dimension, we show that cells spread to a characteristic steady-state length that is independent of cell size, pattern width, and cortical actin. Instead, homeostatic length control on lines depends on a population of dynamic microtubules that lead during cell extension, and that are aligned along the long cell axis as the result of interactions of microtubule plus ends with the lateral cell cortex. Similarly, during the development of the zebrafish neural tube, elongated neuroepithelial cells maintain a relatively well-defined length that is independent of cell size but dependent upon oriented microtubules. A simple, quantitative model of cellular extension driven by microtubules recapitulates cell elongation on lines, the steady-state distribution of microtubules, and cell length homeostasis, and predicts the effects of microtubule inhibitors on cell length. Together this experimental and theoretical analysis suggests that microtubule dynamics impose unexpected limits on cell geometry that enable cells to regulate their length. Since cells are the building blocks and architects of tissue morphogenesis, such intrinsically defined limits may be important for development and homeostasis in multicellular organisms.

  18. Phenotypic Characterization of Adherent Cells Population CD34+ CD90+ CD105+ Derived from Wharton's Jelly.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walecka, Irena; Gil-Kulik, Paulina; Krzyżanowski, Arkadiusz; Czop, Marcin; Galkowski, Dariusz; Karwat, Jolanta; Chomik, Piotr; Świstowska, Małgorzata; Kwaśniewska, Anna; Bogucka-Kocka, Anna; Kocki, Janusz

    2017-04-19

    BACKGROUND Mesenchymal stromal cells, MSCs, show expression of specific antigens on their surface. The aim of the study is to assess the phenotype of stem cells like isolated from the umbilical cord with respect to the presence of surface antigens CD34, CD90, and CD105 and differences in the expression of surface antigens in cells isolated from freshly sampled material in comparison with the phenotype of cells from in vitro culture. MATERIAL AND METHODS Stem cells collected from the umbilical cord from healthy patients and then cultured in vitro. To assess the phenotype of stem cells, cytometric analysis was carried out. To assess the phenotype of cells we used fluorescently labelled monoclonal antibodies: APC Mouse anti-human CD34, PC5 Mouse anti-human CD90 and PE Mouse anti-human CD105. RESULTS In the case of cells from the umbilical cord and then cultured in vitro for the period of 10-14 days CD34 expression is lower (69,5%) in comparison with the group of cells not cultured. Not cultured cells were demonstrated 37% of cells co-expression of antigens CD34 and CD105, over 21% of CD34/CD90 cells and over 24% of CD105/CD90. Cultured cells group was showed higher percentage of CD90, CD105, CD34/CD105, CD34/CD90, CD105/CD90 in comparison with not cultured cells. CONCLUSIONS Our reults suggested that adherent cells population from umbilical cord, demonstrate CD34 expression In vivo. Moreover, the phenotype of MSCs, mainly in the context of CD34 expression, may vary depending on the place of collection of cells and the length of growing the cell culture.

  19. Towards the rational design of synthetic cells with prescribed population dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dalchau, Neil; Smith, Matthew J.; Martin, Samuel; Brown, James R.; Emmott, Stephen; Phillips, Andrew

    2012-01-01

    The rational design of synthetic cell populations with prescribed behaviours is a long-standing goal of synthetic biology, with the potential to greatly accelerate the development of biotechnological applications in areas ranging from medical research to energy production. Achieving this goal requires well-characterized components, modular implementation strategies, simulation across temporal and spatial scales and automatic compilation of high-level designs to low-level genetic parts that function reliably inside cells. Many of these steps are incomplete or only partially understood, and methods for integrating them within a common design framework have yet to be developed. Here, we address these challenges by developing a prototype framework for designing synthetic cells with prescribed population dynamics. We extend the genetic engineering of cells (GEC) language, originally developed for programming intracellular dynamics, with cell population factors such as cell growth, division and dormancy, together with spatio-temporal simulation methods. As a case study, we use our framework to design synthetic cells with predator–prey interactions that, when simulated, produce complex spatio-temporal behaviours such as travelling waves and spatio-temporal chaos. An analysis of our design reveals that environmental factors such as density-dependent dormancy and reduced extracellular space destabilize the population dynamics and increase the range of genetic variants for which complex spatio-temporal behaviours are possible. Our findings highlight the importance of considering such factors during the design process. We then use our analysis of population dynamics to inform the selection of genetic parts, which could be used to obtain the desired spatio-temporal behaviours. By identifying, integrating and automating key stages of the design process, we provide a computational framework for designing synthetic systems, which could be tested in future laboratory studies

  20. Taxonomic separation of hippocampal networks: principal cell populations and adult neurogenesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roelof Maarten evan Dijk

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available While many differences in hippocampal anatomy have been described between species, it is typically not clear if they are specific to a particular species and related to functional requirements or if they are shared by species of larger taxonomic units. Without such information, it is difficult to infer how anatomical differences may impact on hippocampal function, because multiple taxonomic levels need to be considered to associate behavioral and anatomical changes. To provide information on anatomical changes within and across taxonomic ranks, we present a quantitative assessment of hippocampal principal cell populations in 20 species or strain groups, with emphasis on rodents, the taxonomic group that provides most animals used in laboratory research. Of special interest is the importance of adult hippocampal neurogenesis in species-specific adaptations relative to other cell populations. Correspondence analysis of cell numbers shows that across taxonomic units, phylogenetically related species cluster together, sharing similar proportions of principal cell populations. CA3 and hilus are strong separators that place rodent species into a tight cluster based on their relatively large CA3 and small hilus while non-rodent species (including humans and non-human primates are placed on the opposite side of the spectrum. Hilus and CA3 are also separators within rodents, with a very large CA3 and rather small hilar cell populations separating mole-rats from other rodents that, in turn, are separated from each other by smaller changes in the proportions of CA1 and granule cells. When adult neurogenesis is included, the relatively small populations of young neurons, proliferating cells and hilar neurons become main drivers of taxonomic separation within rodents. The observations provide challenges to the computational modeling of hippocampal function, suggest differences in the organization of hippocampal information streams in rodent and non

  1. [Analysis of the characteristics of side population cells in the human ovarian cancer cell line OVCAR-3].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, Li-Jing; Zhao, Zhe; Zeng, Jian-Fang; Liang, Bing; Yang, Jia-Xin; Cao, Dong-Yan; Shen, Keng

    2012-04-01

    To identify the presence of side population (SP) cells in human ovarian cancer cell line OVCAR-3 and to investigate whether SP cells have the characteristics of cancer stem cells. SP and non-SP (NSP) cells from OVCAR-3 were isolated by fluorescence-activated cell sorting after being stained by DNA-binding dye Hoechst 33342. Limiting dilution transplantation assay, real-time PCR, and drug sensitivity assay were performed to compare the tumorigenic ability, differentiation ability in vivo, the mRNA expression of "stemness" marker (Oct-4, Klf4, and Nanog) and ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transporter (ABCG2, ABCB1, and ABCC2), and response to multiple drugs (cisplatin, paclitaxel, doxorubicin, and mitoxantrone) between SP and NSP cells. A few of SP cells [(1.13 ± 0.39)%] which were sensitive to reserpine were identified in OVCAR-3 cells. The injection of as few as 10(2) SP cells initiated tumors in two of five mice. Tumor latency was 52 - 61 days. However, the NSP cells did not generate any tumors in mice until 10(4) NSP cells were injected (two of five mice). Tumor latency was 64 - 98 days. Tumorigenicity of SP cells was enhanced by at least 100-fold than that of NSP cells. The SP cells regenerated both SP [(2.09 ± 0.73)%] and NSP populations in vivo with a fraction size that was comparable to the original population. The mRNA expression of "stemness" genes Oct-4, Klf4 and ABC transporters ABCG2, ABCC2 genes were elevated in SP cells compared to NSP cells, the fold changes were 1.95 ± 0.41 (P < 0.05), 4.26 ± 0.63 (P < 0.01), 3.22 ± 0.36 (P < 0.01), and 1.76 ± 0.26 (P < 0.01), respectively. The relative activity of SP and NSP cells were 0.757 ± 0.105 versus 0.474 ± 0.035 (P < 0.01), 0.521 ± 0.092 versus 0.384 ± 0.073 (P < 0.05), 0.742 ± 0.051 versus 0.526 ± 0.088 (P < 0.01), and 0.690 ± 0.096 versus 0.466 ± 0.112 (P < 0.01) when they exposed to 0.25 µg/ml cisplatin, 0.01 µmol/L paclitaxel, 0.25 µmol/L doxorubicin, and 0.05 µg/ml mitoxantrone

  2. Using ABCG2-molecule-expressing side population cells to identify cancer stem-like cells in a human ovarian cell line.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dou, Jun; Jiang, Cuilian; Wang, Jing; Zhang, Xian; Zhao, Fengshu; Hu, Weihua; He, Xiangfeng; Li, Xiaoli; Zou, Dandan; Gu, Ning

    2011-03-01

    CSCs (cancer stem cells) are a small subset of cells within a tumour that possesses the characteristics of stem cells and are considered to be responsible for resistance to chemoradiation. Identification of CSCs through stem cell characteristics might have relevant clinical implications. In this study, SP (side population ) cells were sorted from a human ovarian cancer cell line by FACS to determine whether cancer stem cell-like SP cells were present. A very small fraction of SP cells (2.6%) was detected in A2780 cells. SP cells possessed the following characteristics: highly proliferative activity, marked ability for self-renewal in soft agar and culture medium, high expression of ABCG2, drug resistance to vinblastine in vitro, and strong tumourigenic potential in Balb/c nude mice. It is concluded that there exists in the A2780 cell line a small number of SP cells with high expression of ABCG2. The cells have the characteristics of cancer stem-like cells, and identification and cloning of such human SP cells can help in improving therapeutic approaches to ovarian cancer in patients.

  3. Approaches for cytogenetic and molecular analyses of small flow-sorted cell populations from childhood leukemia bone marrow samples

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Obro, Nina Friesgaard; Madsen, Hans O.; Ryder, Lars Peter

    2011-01-01

    defined cell populations with subsequent analyses of leukemia-associated cytogenetic and molecular marker. The approaches described here optimize the use of the same tube of unfixed, antibody-stained BM cells for flow-sorting of small cell populations and subsequent exploratory FISH and PCR-based analyses....

  4. IDENTIFICATION AND KINETICS OF 2 RECENTLY BONE-MARROW-DERIVED B-CELL POPULATIONS IN PERIPHERAL LYMPHOID-TISSUES

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    KROESE, FGM; DEBOER, NK; DEBOER, T; NIEUWENHUIS, P; KANTOR, AB; DEENEN, GJ

    In rats, the glycoprotein Thy-1 is expressed on recently bone marrow (BM)-generated B cells but not on mature recirculating follicular (RF) B cells. Here we demonstrate that Thy-1(+) B cells consist of two phenotypically distinct, but developmentally related, populations: a population of newly

  5. Normalizing for individual cell population context in the analysis of high-content cellular screens

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Knapp Bettina

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background High-content, high-throughput RNA interference (RNAi offers unprecedented possibilities to elucidate gene function and involvement in biological processes. Microscopy based screening allows phenotypic observations at the level of individual cells. It was recently shown that a cell's population context significantly influences results. However, standard analysis methods for cellular screens do not currently take individual cell data into account unless this is important for the phenotype of interest, i.e. when studying cell morphology. Results We present a method that normalizes and statistically scores microscopy based RNAi screens, exploiting individual cell information of hundreds of cells per knockdown. Each cell's individual population context is employed in normalization. We present results on two infection screens for hepatitis C and dengue virus, both showing considerable effects on observed phenotypes due to population context. In addition, we show on a non-virus screen that these effects can be found also in RNAi data in the absence of any virus. Using our approach to normalize against these effects we achieve improved performance in comparison to an analysis without this normalization and hit scoring strategy. Furthermore, our approach results in the identification of considerably more significantly enriched pathways in hepatitis C virus replication than using a standard analysis approach. Conclusions Using a cell-based analysis and normalization for population context, we achieve improved sensitivity and specificity not only on a individual protein level, but especially also on a pathway level. This leads to the identification of new host dependency factors of the hepatitis C and dengue viruses and higher reproducibility of results.

  6. The Analysis of Cell Population Dynamics in Mammary Gland Development and Tumorigenesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    2006-08-01

    dilution transplantations to identify the population with highest MaSC activity. Central cells exhibited four times greater outgrowth capacity than...reasoned that infection of primary MECs in suspension might enhance the transduction of MaSC . In addition to increasing the cell surface area this... MaSCs more efficiently than the monolayer infection method. MaSC are both highly regenerative and multipotent; therefore, if MaSCs are targeted by the

  7. Enrichment and Detection of Circulating Tumor Cells and Other Rare Cell Populations by Microfluidic Filtration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pugia, Michael; Magbanua, Mark Jesus M; Park, John W

    2017-01-01

    The current standard methods for isolating circulating tumor cells (CTCs) from blood involve EPCAM-based immunomagnetic approaches. A major disadvantage of these strategies is that CTCs with low EPCAM expression will be missed. Isolation by size using filter membranes circumvents the reliance on this cell surface marker, and can facilitate the capture not only of EPCAM-negative CTCs but other rare cells as well. These cells that are trapped on the filter membrane can be characterized by immunocytochemistry (ICC) , enumerated and profiled to elucidate their clinical significance. In this chapter, we discuss advances in filtration systems to capture rare cells as well as downstream ICC methods to detect and identify these cells. We highlight our recent clinical study demonstrating the feasibility of using a novel method consisting of automated microfluidic filtration and sequential ICC for detection and enumeration of CTCs, as well as circulating mesenchymal cells (CMCs), circulating endothelial cells (CECs), and putative circulating stem cells (CSCs). We hypothesize that simultaneous analysis of circulating rare cells in blood of cancer patients may lead to a better understanding of disease progression and development of resistance to therapy.

  8. Obesity Alters B Cell and Macrophage Populations in Brown Adipose Tissue.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peterson, Kristin R; Flaherty, David K; Hasty, Alyssa H

    2017-11-01

    The prevalence of obesity continues to rise, and it is understood that regulation of white adipose tissue (WAT) function is important to systemic metabolic homeostasis. Immune cells play a central role in the maintenance of WAT, and their compositions change in number and inflammatory phenotype with the progression of obesity. Because of its energy-burning capabilities, brown adipose tissue (BAT) has become a focus of obesity research. Although novel studies have focused on the function of brown adipocytes in thermogenesis, the tissue as a whole has not been immunologically characterized. BAT immune cell populations were analyzed by flow cytometry and immunohistochemistry in mice with diet-induced obesity (3, 8, or 16 weeks of diet) and in aged mice (1, 6-7, and 10-15 months). The data confirmed the presence of macrophages and eosinophils, as previously reported, and showed that 20% to 30% of the immune cells in BAT were B cells. The number of B cells and eosinophils increased with diet-induced obesity, whereas macrophages decreased. There was no change in number of any immune cell quantified with age. These studies reveal a novel finding of B220 + B cells in BAT and show that BAT immune cell populations change in response to diet-induced obesity. © 2017 The Obesity Society.

  9. The Th17 cell population and the immune homeostasis of the gastrointestinal tract.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rossi, Mauro; Bot, Adrian

    2013-01-01

    Th17 cells are a recently discovered subset of CD4(+) T lymphocytes filling a hole in the repertoire of effector T cells. Th17 cells produce multiple cytokines, with pivotal impact on immune homeostasis, inflammation, and influencing a wide range of intestinal cell targets. The current issue of the International Reviews of Immunology is entirely dedicated to the various roles of Th17 T cells in the immune homeostasis and inflammation occurring in the gut. In addition to describing diverse Th17-mediated molecular pathways, a specific focus is being given to Th17 cell plasticity. This enables the Th17 cells to shift towards a Th1 profile, or to express IL-22, a protective cytokine in experimental colitis. Participation of microbiota-specific Th17 cells to normal immune homeostasis, and their role in the pathogenesis of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD), or of gluten specific-Th17 cells in celiac disease, are also being discussed. Neutralizing antibodies against IL-17A and IL-17F have commenced clinical testing in IBD. In conclusion, Th17 cells emerge as a key immune cell population and further elucidation of their roles and functional plasticity are warranted to support the discovery of novel therapies against IBD and other intestinal disorders.

  10. STEAM STIRRED HOMOGENEOUS NUCLEAR REACTOR

    Science.gov (United States)

    Busey, H.M.

    1958-06-01

    A homogeneous nuclear reactor utilizing a selfcirculating liquid fuel is described. The reactor vessel is in the form of a vertically disposed tubular member having the lower end closed by the tube walls and the upper end closed by a removal fianged assembly. A spherical reaction shell is located in the lower end of the vessel and spaced from the inside walls. The reaction shell is perforated on its lower surface and is provided with a bundle of small-diameter tubes extending vertically upward from its top central portion. The reactor vessel is surrounded in the region of the reaction shell by a neutron reflector. The liquid fuel, which may be a solution of enriched uranyl sulfate in ordinary or heavy water, is mainiained at a level within the reactor vessel of approximately the top of the tubes. The heat of the reaction which is created in the critical region within the spherical reaction shell forms steam bubbles which more upwardly through the tubes. The upward movement of these bubbles results in the forcing of the liquid fuel out of the top of these tubes, from where the fuel passes downwardly in the space between the tubes and the vessel wall where it is cooled by heat exchangers. The fuel then re-enters the critical region in the reaction shell through the perforations in the bottom. The upper portion of the reactor vessel is provided with baffles to prevent the liquid fuel from splashing into this region which is also provided with a recombiner apparatus for recombining the radiolytically dissociated moderator vapor and a control means.

  11. AQUEOUS HOMOGENEOUS REACTORTECHNICAL PANEL REPORT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Diamond, D.J.; Bajorek, S.; Bakel, A.; Flanagan, G.; Mubayi, V.; Skarda, R.; Staudenmeier, J.; Taiwo, T.; Tonoike, K.; Tripp, C.; Wei, T.; Yarsky, P.

    2010-12-03

    Considerable interest has been expressed for developing a stable U.S. production capacity for medical isotopes and particularly for molybdenum- 99 (99Mo). This is motivated by recent re-ductions in production and supply worldwide. Consistent with U.S. nonproliferation objectives, any new production capability should not use highly enriched uranium fuel or targets. Conse-quently, Aqueous Homogeneous Reactors (AHRs) are under consideration for potential 99Mo production using low-enriched uranium. Although the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) has guidance to facilitate the licensing process for non-power reactors, that guidance is focused on reactors with fixed, solid fuel and hence, not applicable to an AHR. A panel was convened to study the technical issues associated with normal operation and potential transients and accidents of an AHR that might be designed for isotope production. The panel has produced the requisite AHR licensing guidance for three chapters that exist now for non-power reactor licensing: Reac-tor Description, Reactor Coolant Systems, and Accident Analysis. The guidance is in two parts for each chapter: 1) standard format and content a licensee would use and 2) the standard review plan the NRC staff would use. This guidance takes into account the unique features of an AHR such as the fuel being in solution; the fission product barriers being the vessel and attached systems; the production and release of radiolytic and fission product gases and their impact on operations and their control by a gas management system; and the movement of fuel into and out of the reactor vessel.

  12. ANOVA and the variance homogeneity assumption: Exploring a better gatekeeper.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Yoosun Jamie; Cribbie, Robert A

    2018-02-01

    Valid use of the traditional independent samples ANOVA procedure requires that the population variances are equal. Previous research has investigated whether variance homogeneity tests, such as Levene's test, are satisfactory as gatekeepers for identifying when to use or not to use the ANOVA procedure. This research focuses on a novel homogeneity of variance test that incorporates an equivalence testing approach. Instead of testing the null hypothesis that the variances are equal against an alternative hypothesis that the variances are not equal, the equivalence-based test evaluates the null hypothesis that the difference in the variances falls outside or on the border of a predetermined interval against an alternative hypothesis that the difference in the variances falls within the predetermined interval. Thus, with the equivalence-based procedure, the alternative hypothesis is aligned with the research hypothesis (variance equality). A simulation study demonstrated that the equivalence-based test of population variance homogeneity is a better gatekeeper for the ANOVA than traditional homogeneity of variance tests. © 2017 The British Psychological Society.

  13. Responses of retinal ganglion cells to extracellular electrical stimulation, from single cell to population: model-based analysis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David Tsai

    Full Text Available Retinal ganglion cells (RGCs, which survive in large numbers following neurodegenerative diseases, could be stimulated with extracellular electric pulses to elicit artificial percepts. How do the RGCs respond to electrical stimulation at the sub-cellular level under different stimulus configurations, and how does this influence the whole-cell response? At the population level, why have experiments yielded conflicting evidence regarding the extent of passing axon activation? We addressed these questions through simulations of morphologically and biophysically detailed computational RGC models on high performance computing clusters. We conducted the analyses on both large-field RGCs and small-field midget RGCs. The latter neurons are unique to primates. We found that at the single cell level the electric potential gradient in conjunction with neuronal element excitability, rather than the electrode center location per se, determined the response threshold and latency. In addition, stimulus positioning strongly influenced the location of RGC response initiation and subsequent activity propagation through the cellular structure. These findings were robust with respect to inhomogeneous tissue resistivity perpendicular to the electrode plane. At the population level, RGC cellular structures gave rise to low threshold hotspots, which limited axonal and multi-cell activation with threshold stimuli. Finally, due to variations in neuronal element excitability over space, following supra-threshold stimulation some locations favored localized activation of multiple cells, while others favored axonal activation of cells over extended space.

  14. Homogeneity and thermodynamic identities in geometrothermodynamics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Quevedo, Hernando [Universidad Nacional Autonoma de Mexico, Instituto de Ciencias Nucleares (Mexico); Universita di Roma ' ' La Sapienza' ' , Dipartimento di Fisica, Rome (Italy); ICRANet, Rome (Italy); Quevedo, Maria N. [Universidad Militar Nueva Granada, Departamento de Matematicas, Facultad de Ciencias Basicas, Bogota (Colombia); Sanchez, Alberto [CIIDET, Departamento de Posgrado, Queretaro (Mexico)

    2017-03-15

    We propose a classification of thermodynamic systems in terms of the homogeneity properties of their fundamental equations. Ordinary systems correspond to homogeneous functions and non-ordinary systems are given by generalized homogeneous functions. This affects the explicit form of the Gibbs-Duhem relation and Euler's identity. We show that these generalized relations can be implemented in the formalism of black hole geometrothermodynamics in order to completely fix the arbitrariness present in Legendre invariant metrics. (orig.)

  15. Establishment of reference CD4+ T cell values for adult Indian population

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ray Krishnangshu

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background CD4+ T lymphocyte counts are the most important indicator of disease progression and success of antiretroviral treatment in HIV infection in resource limited settings. The nationwide reference range of CD4+ T lymphocytes was not available in India. This study was conducted to determine reference values of absolute CD4+ T cell counts and percentages for adult Indian population. Methods A multicentric study was conducted involving eight sites across the country. A total of 1206 (approximately 150 per/centre healthy participants were enrolled in the study. The ratio of male (N = 645 to female (N = 561 of 1.14:1. The healthy status of the participants was assessed by a pre-decided questionnaire. At all centers the CD4+ T cell count, percentages and absolute CD3+ T cell count and percentages were estimated using a single platform strategy and lyse no wash technique. The data was analyzed using the Statistical Package for the Social Scientist (SPSS, version 15 and Prism software version 5. Results The absolute CD4+ T cell counts and percentages in female participants were significantly higher than the values obtained in male participants indicating the true difference in the CD4+ T cell subsets. The reference range for absolute CD4 count for Indian male population was 381-1565 cells/μL and for female population was 447-1846 cells/μL. The reference range for CD4% was 25-49% for male and 27-54% for female population. The reference values for CD3 counts were 776-2785 cells/μL for Indian male population and 826-2997 cells/μL for female population. Conclusion The study used stringent procedures for controlling the technical variation in the CD4 counts across the sites and thus could establish the robust national reference ranges for CD4 counts and percentages. These ranges will be helpful in staging the disease progression and monitoring antiretroviral therapy in HIV infection in India.

  16. Muscle side population cells from dystrophic or injured muscle adopt a fibro-adipogenic fate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Penton, Christopher M; Thomas-Ahner, Jennifer M; Johnson, Eric K; McAllister, Cynthia; Montanaro, Federica

    2013-01-01

    Muscle side population (SP) cells are rare multipotent stem cells that can participate in myogenesis and muscle regeneration upon transplantation. While they have been primarily studied for the development of cell-based therapies for Duchenne muscular dystrophy, little is known regarding their non-muscle lineage choices or whether the dystrophic muscle environment affects their ability to repair muscle. Unfortunately, the study of muscle SP cells has been challenged by their low abundance and the absence of specific SP cell markers. To address these issues, we developed culture conditions for the propagation and spontaneous multi-lineage differentiation of muscle SP cells. Using this approach, we show that SP cells from wild type muscle robustly differentiate into satellite cells and form myotubes without requiring co-culture with myogenic cells. Furthermore, this myogenic activity is associated with SP cells negative for immune (CD45) and vascular (CD31) markers but positive for Pax7, Sca1, and the mesenchymal progenitor marker PDGFRα. Additionally, our studies revealed that SP cells isolated from dystrophic or cardiotoxin-injured muscle fail to undergo myogenesis. Instead, these SP cells rapidly expand giving rise to fibroblast and adipocyte progenitors (FAPs) and to their differentiated progeny, fibroblasts and adipocytes. Our findings indicate that muscle damage affects the lineage choices of muscle SP cells, promoting their differentiation along fibro-adipogenic lineages while inhibiting myogenesis. These results have implications for a possible role of muscle SP cells in fibrosis and fat deposition in muscular dystrophy. In addition, our studies provide a useful in vitro system to analyze SP cell biology in both normal and pathological conditions.

  17. Expression of genes encoding multi-transmembrane proteins in specific primate taste cell populations.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bryan D Moyer

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Using fungiform (FG and circumvallate (CV taste buds isolated by laser capture microdissection and analyzed using gene arrays, we previously constructed a comprehensive database of gene expression in primates, which revealed over 2,300 taste bud-associated genes. Bioinformatics analyses identified hundreds of genes predicted to encode multi-transmembrane domain proteins with no previous association with taste function. A first step in elucidating the roles these gene products play in gustation is to identify the specific taste cell types in which they are expressed. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Using double label in situ hybridization analyses, we identified seven new genes expressed in specific taste cell types, including sweet, bitter, and umami cells (TRPM5-positive, sour cells (PKD2L1-positive, as well as other taste cell populations. Transmembrane protein 44 (TMEM44, a protein with seven predicted transmembrane domains with no homology to GPCRs, is expressed in a TRPM5-negative and PKD2L1-negative population that is enriched in the bottom portion of taste buds and may represent developmentally immature taste cells. Calcium homeostasis modulator 1 (CALHM1, a component of a novel calcium channel, along with family members CALHM2 and CALHM3; multiple C2 domains; transmembrane 1 (MCTP1, a calcium-binding transmembrane protein; and anoctamin 7 (ANO7, a member of the recently identified calcium-gated chloride channel family, are all expressed in TRPM5 cells. These proteins may modulate and effect calcium signalling stemming from sweet, bitter, and umami receptor activation. Synaptic vesicle glycoprotein 2B (SV2B, a regulator of synaptic vesicle exocytosis, is expressed in PKD2L1 cells, suggesting that this taste cell population transmits tastant information to gustatory afferent nerve fibers via exocytic neurotransmitter release. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Identification of genes encoding multi-transmembrane domain proteins

  18. Oral Squamous Cell Carcinoma Mutational Profile in Taiwanese Population | Office of Cancer Clinical Proteomics Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oral squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC) is a major oral cancer subtype that is the fourth most common cancer affecting Taiwanese men. Despite known risk behaviors such as cigarette smoking, alcohol drinking, and betel nut chewing often indulged by Taiwanese men, the genetic contribution to the incidence or progression of OSCC has yet been elucidated in the Taiwanese population.

  19. A stochastic step model of replicative senescence explains ROS production rate in ageing cell populations.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Conor Lawless

    Full Text Available Increases in cellular Reactive Oxygen Species (ROS concentration with age have been observed repeatedly in mammalian tissues. Concomitant increases in the proportion of replicatively senescent cells in ageing mammalian tissues have also been observed. Populations of mitotic human fibroblasts cultured in vitro, undergoing transition from proliferation competence to replicative senescence are useful models of ageing human tissues. Similar exponential increases in ROS with age have been observed in this model system. Tracking individual cells in dividing populations is difficult, and so the vast majority of observations have been cross-sectional, at the population level, rather than longitudinal observations of individual cells.One possible explanation for these observations is an exponential increase in ROS in individual fibroblasts with time (e.g. resulting from a vicious cycle between cellular ROS and damage. However, we demonstrate an alternative, simple hypothesis, equally consistent with these observations which does not depend on any gradual increase in ROS concentration: the Stochastic Step Model of Replicative Senescence (SSMRS. We also demonstrate that, consistent with the SSMRS, neither proliferation-competent human fibroblasts of any age, nor populations of hTERT overexpressing human fibroblasts passaged beyond the Hayflick limit, display high ROS concentrations. We conclude that longitudinal studies of single cells and their lineages are now required for testing hypotheses about roles and mechanisms of ROS increase during replicative senescence.

  20. Numerically exploring habitat fragmentation effects on populations using cell-based coupled map lattices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Michael Bevers; Curtis H. Flather

    1999-01-01

    We examine habitat size, shape, and arrangement effects on populations using a discrete reaction-diffusion model. Diffusion is modeled passively and applied to a cellular grid of territories forming a coupled map lattice. Dispersal mortality is proportional to the amount of nonhabitat and fully occupied habitat surrounding a given cell, with distance decay. After...

  1. Cellular and Molecular Characterization of Microglia : A Unique Immune Cell Population

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sousa, Carole; Biber, Knut; Michelucci, Alessandro

    2017-01-01

    Microglia are essential for the development and function of the adult brain. Microglia arise from erythro-myeloid precursors in the yolk sac and populate the brain rudiment early during development. Unlike monocytes that are constantly renewed from bone marrow hematopoietic stem cells throughout

  2. Population-based Results of Chemoradiotherapy for Limited Stage Small Cell Lung Cancer in The Netherlands

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Damhuis, R.; Widder, J.; Senan, S.

    Aims: Treatment guidelines for limited stage small cell lung cancer (LS-SCLC) favour early concurrent chemoradiotherapy (CRT). Little is known about contemporary, real-world treatment patterns and outcome. We evaluated population-based practice patterns of CRT and corresponding survival in the

  3. Tissue-resident adult stem cell populations of rapidly self-renewing organs

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Barker, N.; Bartfeld, S.; Clevers, H.

    2010-01-01

    The epithelial lining of the intestine, stomach, and skin is continuously exposed to environmental assault, imposing a requirement for regular self-renewal. Resident adult stem cell populations drive this renewal, and much effort has been invested in revealing their identity. Reliable adult stem

  4. A population of mitochondrion-rich cells in the pars recta of mouse kidney.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Forbes, M S; Thornhill, B A; Galarreta, C I; Chevalier, R L

    2016-03-01

    Following perfusion of adult mouse kidney with a solution of nitroblue tetrazolium (NBT), certain epithelial cells in the pars recta (S3) segments of proximal tubules react to form cytoplasmic deposits of blue diformazan particles. Such cells are characterized by dark cytoplasm, small and often elliptical nuclei, elaborate, process-bearing profiles, and abundant mitochondria. The atypical epithelial cells display the additional characteristic of immunoreactivity for a wide spectrum of antigens, including mesenchymal proteins such as vimentin. Though present in kidneys of untreated or sham-operated animals, they are particularly evident under experimental conditions such as unilateral ureteral obstruction (UUO), appearing in both contralateral and obstructed kidneys over the course of a week's duration, but disappearing from the obstructed kidney as it undergoes the profound atrophy attributable to deterioration of the population of its proximal tubules. The cells do not appear in neonatal kidneys, even those undergoing UUO, but begin to be recognizable soon after weaning (28 days). It is possible that diformazan-positive cells in the mouse S3 tubular segment constitute a resident population of cells that can replenish or augment the tubule. Although somewhat similar cells, with dark cytoplasm and vimentin expression, have been described in human, rat, and transgenic mouse kidney (Smeets et al. in J Pathol 229: 645-659, 2013; Berger et al. in Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A 111: 1533-1538, 2014), those cells-known as "scattered tubule cells" or "proximal tubule rare cells"- differ from the S3-specific cells in that they are present throughout the entire proximal tubule, often lack a brush border, and have only a few mitochondria.

  5. Redirecting specificity of T-cell populations for CD19 using the Sleeping Beauty system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Harjeet; Manuri, Pallavi R; Olivares, Simon; Dara, Navid; Dawson, Margaret J; Huls, Helen; Hackett, Perry B; Kohn, Donald B; Shpall, Elizabeth J; Champlin, Richard E; Cooper, Laurence J N

    2008-04-15

    Genetic modification of clinical-grade T cells is undertaken to augment function, including redirecting specificity for desired antigen. We and others have introduced a chimeric antigen receptor (CAR) to enable T cells to recognize lineage-specific tumor antigen, such as CD19, and early-phase human trials are currently assessing safety and feasibility. However, a significant barrier to next-generation clinical studies is developing a suitable CAR expression vector capable of genetically modifying a broad population of T cells. Transduction of T cells is relatively efficient but it requires specialized manufacture of expensive clinical grade recombinant virus. Electrotransfer of naked DNA plasmid offers a cost-effective alternative approach, but the inefficiency of transgene integration mandates ex vivo selection under cytocidal concentrations of drug to enforce expression of selection genes to achieve clinically meaningful numbers of CAR(+) T cells. We report a new approach to efficiently generating T cells with redirected specificity, introducing DNA plasmids from the Sleeping Beauty transposon/transposase system to directly express a CD19-specific CAR in memory and effector T cells without drug selection. When coupled with numerical expansion on CD19(+) artificial antigen-presenting cells, this gene transfer method results in rapid outgrowth of CD4(+) and CD8(+) T cells expressing CAR to redirect specificity for CD19(+) tumor cells.

  6. Targeting population heterogeneity in Saccharomyces cerevisiae batch fermentation for optimal cell factories

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Heins, Anna-Lena; Lencastre Fernandes, Rita; Lundin, L.

    and affect their metabolism and consequently affect the heterogeneity level of the population. To further investigate these phenomena and gain a deeper understanding of population heterogeneity, Saccharomyces cerevisiae growth reporter strains based on the expression of green fluorescent protein (GFP) were...... constructed which enabled us to perform single cell level analysis, and thereby created the possibility to map population heterogeneity. A factorial design with pH, glucose concentration and oxygen level was performed in batch cultivations using the growth reporter strains to evaluate the effect of those...... environmental factors on heterogeneity level and amount of living cells. A highly dynamic behavior with regard to subpopulation distribution during the different growth stages was seen for the batch cultivations. Moreover, it could be demonstrated that the glucose concentration had a clear influence...

  7. Kinetics of biochemical sensing by single cells and populations of cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saakian, David B.

    2017-10-01

    We investigate the collective stationary sensing using N communicative cells, which involves surface receptors, diffusive signaling molecules, and cell-cell communication messengers. We restrict the scenarios to the signal-to-noise ratios (SNRs) for both strong communication and extrinsic noise only. We modified a previous model [Bialek and Setayeshgar, Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. USA 102, 10040 (2005), 10.1073/pnas.0504321102] to eliminate the singularities in the fluctuation correlations by considering a uniform receptor distribution over the surface of each cell with a finite radius a . The modified model enables a simple and rigorous mathematical treatment of the collective sensing phenomenon. We then derive the scaling of the SNR for both juxtacrine and autocrine cases in all dimensions. For the optimal locations of the cells in the autocrine case, we find identical scaling for both two and three dimensions.

  8. Self-consolidating concrete homogeneity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jarque, J. C.

    2007-08-01

    Full Text Available Concrete instability may lead to the non-uniform distribution of its properties. The homogeneity of self-consolidating concrete in vertically cast members was therefore explored in this study, analyzing both resistance to segregation and pore structure uniformity. To this end, two series of concretes were prepared, self-consolidating and traditional vibrated materials, with different w/c ratios and types of cement. The results showed that selfconsolidating concretes exhibit high resistance to segregation, albeit slightly lower than found in the traditional mixtures. The pore structure in the former, however, tended to be slightly more uniform, probably as a result of less intense bleeding. Such concretes are also characterized by greater bulk density, lower porosity and smaller mean pore size, which translates into a higher resistance to pressurized water. For pore diameters of over about 0.5 μm, however, the pore size distribution was found to be similar to the distribution in traditional concretes, with similar absorption rates.En este trabajo se estudia la homogeneidad de los hormigones autocompactantes en piezas hormigonadas verticalmente, determinando su resistencia a la segregación y la uniformidad de su estructura porosa, dado que la pérdida de estabilidad de una mezcla puede conducir a una distribución no uniforme de sus propiedades. Para ello se han fabricado dos tipos de hormigones, uno autocompactante y otro tradicional vibrado, con diferentes relaciones a/c y distintos tipos de cemento. Los resultados ponen de manifiesto que los hormigones autocompactantes presentan una buena resistencia a la segregación, aunque algo menor que la registrada en los hormigones tradicionales. A pesar de ello, su estructura porosa tiende a ser ligeramente más uniforme, debido probablemente a un menor sangrado. Asimismo, presentan una mayor densidad aparente, una menor porosidad y un menor tamaño medio de poro, lo que les confiere mejores

  9. Advancing Homogeneous Antimicrobial Glycoconjugate Vaccines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adamo, Roberto

    2017-05-16

    Since 2004, when the first synthetic glycoconjugate vaccine against the pneumonia and meningitis causing bacterium Haemophilus influenza type b (Hib) approved for human use in Cuba was reported, 34 million doses of the synthetic vaccine have been already distributed in several countries under the commercial name of Quimi-Hib. However, despite the success of this product, no other synthetic glycoconjugate vaccine has been licensed in the following 13 years. As well as avoiding the need to handle pathogens, synthetic glycoconjugates offer clear advantages in terms of product characterization and the possibility to understand the parameters influencing immunogenicity. Nevertheless, large scale application of synthetic sugars has been perceived as challenging because of manufacturing costs and process complexity compared to natural polysaccharides. Chemoenzymatic approaches, one-pot protocols, and automated solid-phase synthesis are rendering carbohydrate production considerably more attractive for industrialization. Here we identify three areas where chemical approaches can advance this progress: (i) chemical or enzymatic methods enabling the delivery of the minimal polysaccharide portion responsible for an effective immune response; (ii) site-selective chemical or enzymatic conjugation strategies for the exploration of the conjugation point in immune responses against carbohydrate-based vaccines, and the consistent preparation of more homogeneous products; (iii) multicomponent constructs targeting receptors responsible for immune response modulation in order to control its quality and magnitude. We discuss how synthesis of bacterial oligosaccharides is useful toward understanding the polysaccharide portion responsible for immunogenicity, and for developing robust and consistent alternatives to natural heterogeneous polysaccharides. The synthesis of sugar analogues can lead to the identification of hydrolytically more stable versions of oligosaccharide antigens. The

  10. Pentoxifylline Inhibits WNT Signalling in β-Cateninhigh Patient-Derived Melanoma Cell Populations.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Beata Talar

    Full Text Available The heterogeneity of melanoma needs to be addressed and combination therapies seem to be necessary to overcome intrinsic and acquired resistance to newly developed immunotherapies and targeted therapies. Although the role of WNT/β-catenin pathway in melanoma was early demonstrated, its contribution to the lack of the melanoma patient response to treatment was only recently recognized. Using patient-derived melanoma cell populations, we investigated the influence of pentoxifylline on melanoma cells with either high or low expression of β-catenin.Our results indicate that pentoxifylline inhibits the activity of the canonical WNT pathway in melanoma cell populations with high basal activity of this signalling. This is supported by lowered overall activity of transcription factors TCF/LEF and reduced nuclear localisation of active β-catenin. Moreover, treatment of β-cateninhigh melanoma cell populations with pentoxifylline induces downregulation of genes that are targets of the WNT/β-catenin pathway including connective tissue growth factor (CTGF and microphthalmia-associated transcription factor (MITF-M, a melanocyte- and melanoma cell-specific regulator.These results suggest that pentoxifylline, a drug approved by the FDA in the treatment of peripheral arterial disease, might be tested in a subset of melanoma patients with elevated activity of β-catenin. This pharmaceutical might be tested as an adjuvant drug in combination therapies when the response to immunotherapy is prevented by high activity of the WNT/β-catenin pathway.

  11. SGNS2: a compartmentalized stochastic chemical kinetics simulator for dynamic cell populations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lloyd-Price, Jason; Gupta, Abhishekh; Ribeiro, Andre S

    2012-11-15

    Cell growth and division affect the kinetics of internal cellular processes and the phenotype diversity of cell populations. Since the effects are complex, e.g. different cellular components are partitioned differently in cell division, to account for them in silico, one needs to simulate these processes in great detail. We present SGNS2, a simulator of chemical reaction systems according to the Stochastic Simulation Algorithm with multi-delayed reactions within hierarchical, interlinked compartments which can be created, destroyed and divided at runtime. In division, molecules are randomly segregated into the daughter cells following a specified distribution corresponding to one of several partitioning schemes, applicable on a per-molecule-type basis. We exemplify its use with six models including a stochastic model of the disposal mechanism of unwanted protein aggregates in Escherichia coli, a model of phenotypic diversity in populations with different levels of synchrony, a model of a bacteriophage's infection of a cell population and a model of prokaryotic gene expression at the nucleotide and codon levels. SGNS2, instructions and examples available at www.cs.tut.fi/~lloydpri/sgns2/ (open source under New BSD license). jason.lloyd-price@tut.fi. Supplementary data are available at Bioinformatics online.

  12. Analysis of immune cell populations in atrial myocardium of patients with atrial fibrillation or sinus rhythm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smorodinova, Natalia; Bláha, Martin; Melenovský, Vojtěch; Rozsívalová, Karolína; Přidal, Jaromír; Ďurišová, Mária; Pirk, Jan; Kautzner, Josef; Kučera, Tomáš

    2017-01-01

    Atrial fibrillation (AF) is the most common arrhythmia and despite obvious clinical importance remains its pathogenesis only partially explained. A relation between inflammation and AF has been suggested by findings of increased inflammatory markers in AF patients. The goal of this study was to characterize morphologically and functionally CD45-positive inflammatory cell populations in atrial myocardium of patients with AF as compared to sinus rhythm (SR). We examined 46 subjects (19 with AF, and 27 in SR) undergoing coronary bypass or valve surgery. Peroperative bioptic samples of the left and the right atrial tissue were examined using immunohistochemistry. The number of CD3+ T-lymphocytes and CD68-KP1+ cells were elevated in the left atrial myocardium of patients with AF compared to those in SR. Immune cell infiltration of LA was related to the rhythm, but not to age, body size, LA size, mitral regurgitation grade, type of surgery, systemic markers of inflammation or presence of diabetes or hypertension. Most of CD68-KP1+ cells corresponded to dendritic cell population based on their morphology and immunoreactivity for DC-SIGN. The numbers of mast cells and CD20+ B-lymphocytes did not differ between AF and SR patients. No foci of inflammation were detected in any sample. An immunohistochemical analysis of samples from patients undergoing open heart surgery showed moderate and site-specific increase of inflammatory cells in the atrial myocardium of patients with AF compared to those in SR, with prevailing population of monocyte-macrophage lineage. These cells and their cytokine products may play a role in atrial remodeling and AF persistence.

  13. Analysis of immune cell populations in atrial myocardium of patients with atrial fibrillation or sinus rhythm.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Natalia Smorodinova

    Full Text Available Atrial fibrillation (AF is the most common arrhythmia and despite obvious clinical importance remains its pathogenesis only partially explained. A relation between inflammation and AF has been suggested by findings of increased inflammatory markers in AF patients.The goal of this study was to characterize morphologically and functionally CD45-positive inflammatory cell populations in atrial myocardium of patients with AF as compared to sinus rhythm (SR.We examined 46 subjects (19 with AF, and 27 in SR undergoing coronary bypass or valve surgery. Peroperative bioptic samples of the left and the right atrial tissue were examined using immunohistochemistry.The number of CD3+ T-lymphocytes and CD68-KP1+ cells were elevated in the left atrial myocardium of patients with AF compared to those in SR. Immune cell infiltration of LA was related to the rhythm, but not to age, body size, LA size, mitral regurgitation grade, type of surgery, systemic markers of inflammation or presence of diabetes or hypertension. Most of CD68-KP1+ cells corresponded to dendritic cell population based on their morphology and immunoreactivity for DC-SIGN. The numbers of mast cells and CD20+ B-lymphocytes did not differ between AF and SR patients. No foci of inflammation were detected in any sample.An immunohistochemical analysis of samples from patients undergoing open heart surgery showed moderate and site-specific increase of inflammatory cells in the atrial myocardium of patients with AF compared to those in SR, with prevailing population of monocyte-macrophage lineage. These cells and their cytokine products may play a role in atrial remodeling and AF persistence.

  14. F protein increases CD4+CD25+ T cell population in patients with chronic hepatitis C.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hashempour, Tayebeh; Bamdad, Taravat; Bergamini, Alberto; Lavergne, Jean Pierre; Haj-Sheykholeslami, Arghavan; Brakier-Gingras, Léa; Ajorloo, Mehdi; Merat, Shahin

    2015-06-01

    HCV is a global health problem with an estimated 230 million chronically infected people worldwide. It has been reported that a 17-kd protein translated from core-encoding genomic region can contribute to immune-mediated mechanisms associated with the development of the chronic disease. Also, Treg cells can be contributed to an inadequate response against the viruses, leading to chronic infection. Here we evaluated the ability of protein F to modulate the frequency of CD4+CD25+FoxP3+T and IL-10+T cells in patients with chronic HCV infection. F gene was amplified and cloned in the expression vector. The protein was purified and used for stimulation of PBMCs in the HCV chronic patients and the control groups. The frequency of CD4+CD25+FoxP3+ T cell-like populations and IL-10-producing CD4+CD25+ T cells was assessed in the HCV-infected patients and in the healthy controls by flow cytometry, which showed an increase of both CD4+CD25+FoxP3+ T cell-like population and IL-10-producing CD4+CD25+ T cells in the HCV-infected patients positive for anti-F antibody. Our results suggest the potential involvement of F and core antigens in increasing the frequency of CD4+CD25+FoxP3+ T cell-like population and IL-10-producing CD4+CD25+ T cells which may be associated with HCV-persistent infection. © FEMS 2015. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  15. Glioblastoma formation from cell population depleted of Prominin1-expressing cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kenji Nishide

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available Prominin1 (Prom1, also known as CD133 in human has been widely used as a marker for cancer stem cells (CSCs, which self-renew and are tumorigenic, in malignant tumors including glioblastoma multiforme (GBM. However, there is other evidence showing that Prom1-negative cancer cells also form tumors in vivo. Thus it remains controversial whether Prom1 is a bona fide marker for CSCs. To verify if Prom1-expressing cells are essential for tumorigenesis, we established a mouse line, whose Prom1-expressing cells can be eliminated conditionally by a Cre-inducible DTA gene on the Prom1 locus together with a tamoxifen-inducible CreER(TM, and generated glioma-initiating cells (GICs-LD by overexpressing both the SV40 Large T antigen and an oncogenic H-Ras(L61 in neural stem cells of the mouse line. We show here that the tamoxifen-treated GICs-LD (GICs-DTA form tumor-spheres in culture and transplantable GBM in vivo. Thus, our studies demonstrate that Prom1-expressing cells are dispensable for gliomagenesis in this mouse model.

  16. Awareness of Stem cells & Health Implications of SHED found in Pediatric Dentition among Indian Population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goomer, Pallvi; Sidhu, Arshpreet Kaur; Tuli, Preety; Kansal, Shinam; Bansal, Kanishka; Thakre, Gauri R

    2014-02-01

    Primary teeth may be an ideal source of postnatal stem cells to regenerate tooth structures and bone, and possibly to treat neural tissue injury or degenerative diseases. SHED (stem cells from human exfoliated deciduous teeth) were identified to be a population of highly proliferative, clonogenic cells capable of differentiating into a variety of cell types including neural cells, adipocytes, and odontoblasts. The present study was carried out to assess the knowledge, awareness & attitude of parents visiting various dental clinics in tricity area of india regarding stem cells from primary teeth and their potential health benefits. A total of 250 parents of pediatric patients seeking dental treatment at various dental clinics in tricity area were included in the study. Parents were personally interviewed with a questionnaire and their responses were immediately computed. Among 250 parents only 95(62%) had knowledge regarding stem cells. While only 47(18.8) were informed regarding stem cells from baby teeth & their benefits. Maximum subjects were informed through internet 21(44.6%) followed by information through friends(23.4%) and dentist(21.2%). Very few were informed through magazines, newspaper and only one (2.1%) person was informed by television. It is important to create more awareness among the populace of our country about the potential health benefits of stem cells from primary teeth. Dentist should educate parents, caregivers and teachers regarding SHED & its benefits, ensuring good health for every Indian child and hence health of future citizens. How to cite the article: Goomer P, Sidhu AK, Tuli P, Kansal S, Bansal K, Thakre GR. Awareness of Stem cells & Health Implications of SHED found in Pediatric Dentition among Indian Population. J Int Oral Health 2014;6(1):44-7.

  17. Imaging membrane intercalating near infrared dyes to track multiple cell populations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roy, Edward J; Sivaguru, Mayandi; Fried, Glenn; Gray, Brian D; Kranz, David M

    2009-08-31

    Given the increasing interest in understanding in vivo migration of different cell types, it would be useful to have a simple method for tracking multiple cell populations in animals. Here we evaluated near infrared (NIR) dyes that intercalate into cell membranes as cell tracking labels, using both high-throughput and high-resolution methods. We tracked cells in tissues containing significant autofluorescence. CellVue Burgundy (ex 683/em 707) and CellVue NIR815 (ex 786/em 814) are especially useful because their spectral properties match the laser and detectors of the LI-COR laser scanner. After labeling cells ex vivo and injecting them into tumor-bearing mice, the distribution of cells in tumor and organs could be quantified in tissue sections with high throughput by scanning many slides at once. For example, we compared brain tumor infiltration and organ distribution of naïve and activated lymphocytes in single animals. High-resolution microscopic examination of the same tissues could be done by a relatively inexpensive modification of an epifluorescence microscope using a custom designed diode laser light source. Light emitting diodes that emit 685 nm and 780 nm light allowed microscopic visualization of the NIR labeled cells in tissues. The NIR dye-labeled cells were visualized with a greater signal/noise ratio compared to visible wavelength dyes such as CFSE, because of the low levels of autofluorescence in the NIR range. We also describe a simple modification of immunohistochemical procedures that allows combined visualization of the hydrophobic NIR dyes and antibody probes of cell markers in unfixed tissue. In combination these techniques will facilitate cell tracking in vivo.

  18. microRNA Expression Profiling of Side Population Cells in Human Lung Cancer and Preliminary Analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaotao XU

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available Background and objective Recent studies indicate that the side population (SP which is an enriched source of cancer stem cells (CSCs is the root cause of tumor growth and development. SP appears to be highly resistant to chemo- and radio-therapy which becomes an important factor in tumor recurrence and metastasis. The aim of this study is to determine the difference of microRNA expression profiles between SP cells and non-SP cells so as to lay necessary basis for research on the function of miRNA in lung cancer stem cells. Methods SP and non-SP cells were isolated using flow cytometry and Hoechst 33342 dye efflux assay from human lung adenocarcinoma A549 cell. The total RNA was extracted. The microarray detection system was employed to analyze whether there was difference in miRNA expression profile between SP and non-SP cells. Results A total of 85 differentially expressed miRNA were found, including 32 over-expression and 53 low-expression miRNA in SP. Conclusion miRNA may play important roles in tumorigenesis of lung cancer stem cell. The study of miRNA contributes to elucidate the molecular mechanism of lung cancer stem cell.

  19. Monitoring intracellular calcium ion dynamics in hair cell populations with Fluo-4 AM.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kateri J Spinelli

    Full Text Available We optimized Fluo-4 AM loading of chicken cochlea to report hair-bundle Ca(2+ signals in populations of hair cells. The bundle Ca(2+ signal reported the physiological state of the bundle and cell; extruding cells had very high bundle Fluo-4 fluorescence, cells with intact bundles and tip links had intermediate fluorescence, and damaged cells with broken tip links had low fluorescence. Moreover, Fluo-4 fluorescence in the bundle correlated with Ca(2+ entry through transduction channels; mechanically activating transduction channels increased the Fluo-4 signal, while breaking tip links with Ca(2+ chelators or blocking Ca(2+ entry through transduction channels each caused bundle and cell-body Fluo-4 fluorescence to decrease. These results show that when tip links break, bundle and soma Ca(2+ decrease, which could serve to stimulate the hair cell's tip-link regeneration process. Measurement of bundle Ca(2+ with Fluo-4 AM is therefore a simple method for assessing mechanotransduction in hair cells and permits an increased understanding of the interplay of tip links, transduction channels, and Ca(2+ signaling in the hair cell.

  20. Geometric classifications of homogeneous production functions

    OpenAIRE

    Chen, Bang-Yen; Vilcu, Gabriel Eduard

    2013-01-01

    In this paper, we completely classify homogeneous production functions with an arbitrary number of inputs whose production hypersurfaces are flat. As an immediate consequence, we obtain a complete classification of homogeneous production functions with two inputs whose production surfaces are developable.

  1. The homogeneous geometries of real hyperbolic space

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Castrillón López, Marco; Gadea, Pedro Martínez; Swann, Andrew Francis

    We describe the holonomy algebras of all canonical connections of homogeneous structures on real hyperbolic spaces in all dimensions. The structural results obtained then lead to a determination of the types, in the sense of Tricerri and Vanhecke, of the corresponding homogeneous tensors. We use ...

  2. Investigations into homogenization of electromagnetic metamaterials

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Clausen, Niels Christian Jerichau

    This dissertation encompasses homogenization methods, with a special interest into their applications to metamaterial homogenization. The first method studied is the Floquet-Bloch method, that is based on the assumption of a material being infinite periodic. Its field can then be expanded in term...

  3. Synthesis of silica nanosphere from homogeneous and ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    WINTEC

    Abstract. Silica nanosphere was synthesized using homogeneous and heterogeneous systems, respectively. In homogeneous system, silica spheres were synthesized without cetyltrimethylammonium bromide (CTABr), which gave bimodal particle size and lower yield (77%). To improve the yield, CTABr was added and ...

  4. Homogeneous nucleation and the Ostwald step rule

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wolde, P.R. ten; Frenkel, D.

    1999-01-01

    We compare the pathways for homogeneous nucleation in a number of different systems. In most cases, the simulations show that the nucleation pathways are markedly different from what is assumed in classical nucleation theory. We find that homogeneous nucleation exhibits, at the microscopic level,

  5. When individual behaviour matters: homogeneous and network models in epidemiology

    OpenAIRE

    Bansal, Shweta; Grenfell, Bryan T.; Meyers, Lauren Ancel

    2007-01-01

    Heterogeneity in host contact patterns profoundly shapes population-level disease dynamics. Many epidemiological models make simplifying assumptions about the patterns of disease-causing interactions among hosts. In particular, homogeneous-mixing models assume that all hosts have identical rates of disease-causing contacts. In recent years, several network-based approaches have been developed to explicitly model heterogeneity in host contact patterns. Here, we use a network perspective to qua...

  6. Selective control of the apoptosis signaling network in heterogeneous cell populations.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Diego Calzolari

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Selective control in a population is the ability to control a member of the population while leaving the other members relatively unaffected. The concept of selective control is developed using cell death or apoptosis in heterogeneous cell populations as an example. Control of apoptosis is essential in a variety of therapeutic environments, including cancer where cancer cell death is a desired outcome and Alzheimer's disease where neuron survival is the desired outcome. However, in both cases these responses must occur with minimal response in other cells exposed to treatment; that is, the response must be selective. METHODOLOGY AND PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Apoptosis signaling in heterogeneous cells is described by an ensemble of gene networks with identical topology but different link strengths. Selective control depends on the statistics of signaling in the ensemble of networks, and we analyze the effects of superposition, non-linearity and feedback on these statistics. Parallel pathways promote normal statistics while series pathways promote skew distributions, which in the most extreme cases become log-normal. We also show that feedback and non-linearity can produce bimodal signaling statistics, as can discreteness and non-linearity. Two methods for optimizing selective control are presented. The first is an exhaustive search method and the second is a linear programming based approach. Though control of a single gene in the signaling network yields little selectivity, control of a few genes typically yields higher levels of selectivity. The statistics of gene combinations susceptible to selective control in heterogeneous apoptosis networks is studied and is used to identify general control strategies. CONCLUSIONS AND SIGNIFICANCE: We have explored two methods for the study of selectivity in cell populations. The first is an exhaustive search method limited to three node perturbations. The second is an effective linear model, based on

  7. Creation of synthetic homogeneous neighbourhoods using zone design algorithms to explore relationships between asthma and deprivation in Strasbourg, France

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sabel, Clive E; Kihal, W.; Bard, D.

    2013-01-01

    , and compare these rates with an index of multiple deprivation (NDI) which we have constructed and reported elsewhere. Higher correlations between Asthma and NDI were found using our newly constructed synthetic zones than using the existing French census areas of similar size. The significance of our work....... In this work, we have developed an experimental approach for the automated design of neighbourhoods using a small tessellated cell as a basic building block. Using the software AZTool, we considered population, shape and homogeneity constraints to develop a highly innovative approach to zone construction....... The paper reports the challenges and compromises involved in building these new synthetic neighbourhoods. We provide a fully worked example of how our new synthetic homogeneous zones perform using data from Strasbourg, France. We examine data on Asthma reported through calls to the emergency services...

  8. Tracking the evolution of cancer cell populations through the mathematical lens of phenotype-structured equations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lorenzi, Tommaso; Chisholm, Rebecca H; Clairambault, Jean

    2016-08-23

    A thorough understanding of the ecological and evolutionary mechanisms that drive the phenotypic evolution of neoplastic cells is a timely and key challenge for the cancer research community. In this respect, mathematical modelling can complement experimental cancer research by offering alternative means of understanding the results of in vitro and in vivo experiments, and by allowing for a quick and easy exploration of a variety of biological scenarios through in silico studies. To elucidate the roles of phenotypic plasticity and selection pressures in tumour relapse, we present here a phenotype-structured model of evolutionary dynamics in a cancer cell population which is exposed to the action of a cytotoxic drug. The analytical tractability of our model allows us to investigate how the phenotype distribution, the level of phenotypic heterogeneity, and the size of the cell population are shaped by the strength of natural selection, the rate of random epimutations, the intensity of the competition for limited resources between cells, and the drug dose in use. Our analytical results clarify the conditions for the successful adaptation of cancer cells faced with environmental changes. Furthermore, the results of our analyses demonstrate that the same cell population exposed to different concentrations of the same cytotoxic drug can take different evolutionary trajectories, which culminate in the selection of phenotypic variants characterised by different levels of drug tolerance. This suggests that the response of cancer cells to cytotoxic agents is more complex than a simple binary outcome, i.e., extinction of sensitive cells and selection of highly resistant cells. Also, our mathematical results formalise the idea that the use of cytotoxic agents at high doses can act as a double-edged sword by promoting the outgrowth of drug resistant cellular clones. Overall, our theoretical work offers a formal basis for the development of anti-cancer therapeutic protocols that

  9. Homogeneity of Prototypical Attributes in Soccer Teams

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christian Zepp

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Research indicates that the homogeneous perception of prototypical attributes influences several intragroup processes. The aim of the present study was to describe the homogeneous perception of the prototype and to identify specific prototypical subcategories, which are perceived as homogeneous within sport teams. The sample consists of N = 20 soccer teams with a total of N = 278 athletes (age M = 23.5 years, SD = 5.0 years. The results reveal that subcategories describing the cohesiveness of the team and motivational attributes are mentioned homogeneously within sport teams. In addition, gender, identification, team size, and the championship ranking significantly correlate with the homogeneous perception of prototypical attributes. The results are discussed on the basis of theoretical and practical implications.

  10. Multilevel Monte Carlo Approaches for Numerical Homogenization

    KAUST Repository

    Efendiev, Yalchin R.

    2015-10-01

    In this article, we study the application of multilevel Monte Carlo (MLMC) approaches to numerical random homogenization. Our objective is to compute the expectation of some functionals of the homogenized coefficients, or of the homogenized solutions. This is accomplished within MLMC by considering different sizes of representative volumes (RVEs). Many inexpensive computations with the smallest RVE size are combined with fewer expensive computations performed on larger RVEs. Likewise, when it comes to homogenized solutions, different levels of coarse-grid meshes are used to solve the homogenized equation. We show that, by carefully selecting the number of realizations at each level, we can achieve a speed-up in the computations in comparison to a standard Monte Carlo method. Numerical results are presented for both one-dimensional and two-dimensional test-cases that illustrate the efficiency of the approach.

  11. An imbalance in progenitor cell populations reflects tumour progression in breast cancer primary culture models

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Donatello, Simona

    2011-04-26

    Abstract Background Many factors influence breast cancer progression, including the ability of progenitor cells to sustain or increase net tumour cell numbers. Our aim was to define whether alterations in putative progenitor populations could predict clinicopathological factors of prognostic importance for cancer progression. Methods Primary cultures were established from human breast tumour and adjacent non-tumour tissue. Putative progenitor cell populations were isolated based on co-expression or concomitant absence of the epithelial and myoepithelial markers EPCAM and CALLA respectively. Results Significant reductions in cellular senescence were observed in tumour versus non-tumour cultures, accompanied by a stepwise increase in proliferation:senescence ratios. A novel correlation between tumour aggressiveness and an imbalance of putative progenitor subpopulations was also observed. Specifically, an increased double-negative (DN) to double-positive (DP) ratio distinguished aggressive tumours of high grade, estrogen receptor-negativity or HER2-positivity. The DN:DP ratio was also higher in malignant MDA-MB-231 cells relative to non-tumourogenic MCF-10A cells. Ultrastructural analysis of the DN subpopulation in an invasive tumour culture revealed enrichment in lipofuscin bodies, markers of ageing or senescent cells. Conclusions Our results suggest that an imbalance in tumour progenitor subpopulations imbalances the functional relationship between proliferation and senescence, creating a microenvironment favouring tumour progression.

  12. Related B cell clones populate the meninges and parenchyma of patients with multiple sclerosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lovato, Laura; Willis, Simon N.; Rodig, Scott J.; Caron, Tyler; Almendinger, Stefany E.; Howell, Owain W.; Reynolds, Richard; Hafler, David A.

    2011-01-01

    In the central nervous system of patients with multiple sclerosis, B cell aggregates populate the meninges, raising the central question as to whether these structures relate to the B cell infiltrates found in parenchymal lesions or instead, represent a separate central nervous system immune compartment. We characterized the repertoires derived from meningeal B cell aggregates and the corresponding parenchymal infiltrates from brain tissue derived primarily from patients with progressive multiple sclerosis. The majority of expanded antigen-experienced B cell clones derived from meningeal aggregates were also present in the parenchyma. We extended this investigation to include 20 grey matter specimens containing meninges, 26 inflammatory plaques, 19 areas of normal appearing white matter and cerebral spinal fluid. Analysis of 1833 B cell receptor heavy chain variable region sequences demonstrated that antigen-experienced clones were consistently shared among these distinct compartments. This study establishes a relationship between extraparenchymal lymphoid tissue and parenchymal infiltrates and defines the arrangement of B cell clones that populate the central nervous system of patients with multiple sclerosis. PMID:21216828

  13. Msx genes define a population of mural cell precursors required for head blood vessel maturation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lopes, Miguel; Goupille, Olivier; Saint Cloment, Cécile; Lallemand, Yvan; Cumano, Ana; Robert, Benoît

    2011-07-01

    Vessels are primarily formed from an inner endothelial layer that is secondarily covered by mural cells, namely vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMCs) in arteries and veins and pericytes in capillaries and veinules. We previously showed that, in the mouse embryo, Msx1(lacZ) and Msx2(lacZ) are expressed in mural cells and in a few endothelial cells. To unravel the role of Msx genes in vascular development, we have inactivated the two Msx genes specifically in mural cells by combining the Msx1(lacZ), Msx2(lox) and Sm22α-Cre alleles. Optical projection tomography demonstrated abnormal branching of the cephalic vessels in E11.5 mutant embryos. The carotid and vertebral arteries showed an increase in caliber that was related to reduced vascular smooth muscle coverage. Taking advantage of a newly constructed Msx1(CreERT2) allele, we demonstrated by lineage tracing that the primary defect lies in a population of VSMC precursors. The abnormal phenotype that ensues is a consequence of impaired BMP signaling in the VSMC precursors that leads to downregulation of the metalloprotease 2 (Mmp2) and Mmp9 genes, which are essential for cell migration and integration into the mural layer. Improper coverage by VSMCs secondarily leads to incomplete maturation of the endothelial layer. Our results demonstrate that both Msx1 and Msx2 are required for the recruitment of a population of neural crest-derived VSMCs.

  14. The Notch pathway is important in maintaining the cancer stem cell population in pancreatic cancer.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ethan V Abel

    Full Text Available Pancreatic cancer stem cells (CSCs represent a small subpopulation of pancreatic cancer cells that have the capacity to initiate and propagate tumor formation. However, the mechanisms by which pancreatic CSCs are maintained are not well understood or characterized.Expression of Notch receptors, ligands, and Notch signaling target genes was quantitated in the CSC and non-CSC populations from 8 primary human pancreatic xenografts. A gamma secretase inhibitor (GSI that inhibits the Notch pathway and a shRNA targeting the Notch target gene Hes1 were used to assess the role of the Notch pathway in CSC population maintenance and pancreatic tumor growth.Notch pathway components were found to be upregulated in pancreatic CSCs. Inhibition of the Notch pathway using either a gamma secretase inhibitor or Hes1 shRNA in pancreatic cancer cells reduced the percentage of CSCs and tumorsphere formation. Conversely, activation of the Notch pathway with an exogenous Notch peptide ligand increased the percentage of CSCs as well as tumorsphere formation. In vivo treatment of orthotopic pancreatic tumors in NOD/SCID mice with GSI blocked tumor growth and reduced the CSC population.The Notch signaling pathway is important in maintaining the pancreatic CSC population and is a potential therapeutic target in pancreatic cancer.

  15. Gene Expression in Single Cells Isolated from the CWR-R1 Prostate Cancer Cell Line and Human Prostate Tissue Based on the Side Population Phenotype.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gangavarapu, Kalyan J; Miller, Austin; Huss, Wendy J

    2016-09-01

    Defining biological signals at the single cell level can identify cancer initiating driver mutations. Techniques to isolate single cells such as microfluidics sorting and magnetic capturing systems have limitations such as: high cost, labor intense, and the requirement of a large number of cells. Therefore, the goal of our current study is to identify a cost and labor effective, reliable, and reproducible technique that allows single cell isolation for analysis to promote regular laboratory use, including standard reverse transcription PCR (RT-PCR). In the current study, we utilized single prostate cells isolated from the CWR-R1 prostate cancer cell line and human prostate clinical specimens, based on the ATP binding cassette (ABC) transporter efflux of dye cycle violet (DCV), side population assay. Expression of four genes: ABCG2; Aldehyde dehydrogenase1A1 (ALDH1A1); androgen receptor (AR); and embryonic stem cell marker, Oct-4, were determined. Results from the current study in the CWR-R1 cell line showed ABCG2 and ALDH1A1 gene expression in 67% of single side population cells and in 17% or 100% of non-side population cells respectively. Studies using single cells isolated from clinical specimens showed that the Oct-4 gene is detected in only 22% of single side population cells and in 78% of single non-side population cells. Whereas, AR gene expression is in 100% single side population and non-side population cells isolated from the same human prostate clinical specimen. These studies show that performing RT-PCR on single cells isolated by FACS can be successfully conducted to determine gene expression in single cells from cell lines and enzymatically digested tissue. While these studies provide a simple yes/no expression readout, the more sensitive quantitative RT-PCR would be able to provide even more information if necessary.

  16. Endothelial Side Population Cells Contribute to Tumor Angiogenesis and Antiangiogenic Drug Resistance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naito, Hisamichi; Wakabayashi, Taku; Kidoya, Hiroyasu; Muramatsu, Fumitaka; Takara, Kazuhiro; Eino, Daisuke; Yamane, Keitaro; Iba, Tomohiro; Takakura, Nobuyuki

    2016-06-01

    Angiogenesis plays a crucial role in tumor growth, with an undisputed contribution of resident endothelial cells (EC) to new blood vessels in the tumor. Here, we report the definition of a small population of vascular-resident stem/progenitor-like EC that contributes predominantly to new blood vessel formation in the tumor. Although the surface markers of this population are similar to other ECs, those from the lung vasculature possess colony-forming ability in vitro and contribute to angiogenesis in vivo These specific ECs actively proliferate in lung tumors, and the percentage of this population significantly increases in the tumor vasculature relative to normal lung tissue. Using genetic recombination and bone marrow transplant models, we show that these cells are phenotypically true ECs and do not originate from hematopoietic cells. After treatment of tumors with antiangiogenic drugs, these specific ECs selectively survived and remained in the tumor. Together, our results established that ECs in the peripheral vasculature are heterogeneous and that stem/progenitor-like ECs play an indispensable role in tumor angiogenesis as EC-supplying cells. The lack of susceptibility of these ECs to antiangiogenic drugs may account for resistance of the tumor to this drug type. Thus, inhibiting these ECs might provide a promising strategy to overcome antiangiogenic drug resistance. Cancer Res; 76(11); 3200-10. ©2016 AACR. ©2016 American Association for Cancer Research.

  17. Magnetic field homogeneity for neutron EDM experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, Melissa

    2016-09-01

    The neutron electric dipole moment (nEDM) is an observable which, if non-zero, would violate time-reversal symmetry, and thereby charge-parity symmetry of nature. New sources of CP violation beyond those found in the standard model of particle physics are already tightly constrained by nEDM measurements. Our future nEDM experiment seeks to improve the precision on the nEDM by a factor of 30, using a new ultracold neutron (UCN) source that is being constructed at TRIUMF. Systematic errors in the nEDM experiment are driven by magnetic field inhomogeneity and instability. The goal field inhomogeneity averaged over the experimental measurement cell (order of 1 m) is 1 nT/m, at a total magnetic field of 1 microTesla. This equates to roughly 10-3 homogeneity. A particularly challenging aspect of the design problem is that nearby magnetic materials will also affect the magnetic inhomogeneity, and this must be taken into account in completing the design. This poster will present the design methodology and status of the main coil for the experiment where we use FEA software (COMSOL) to simulate and analyze the magnetic field. Natural Sciences and Engineering Research Council.

  18. Distinct Populations of Innate CD8+ T Cells Revealed in a CXCR3 Reporter Mouse

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oghumu, Steve; Dong, Ran; Varikuti, Sanjay; Shawler, Todd; Kampfrath, Thomas; Terrazas, Cesar A.; Lezama-Davila, Claudio; Ahmer, Brian M. M.; Whitacre, Caroline C.; Rajagopalan, Sanjay; Locksley, Richard; Sharpe, Arlene H.; Satoskar, Abhay R.

    2013-01-01

    CXCR3, expressed mainly on activated T and NK cells, is implicated in a host of immunological conditions and can contribute either to disease resolution or pathology. We report the generation and characterization of a novel CXCR3 internal ribosome entry site bicistronic enhanced GFP reporter (CIBER) mouse in which enhanced GFP expression correlates with surface levels of CXCR3. Using CIBER mice, we identified two distinct populations of innate CD8+ T cells based on constitutive expression of CXCR3. We demonstrate that CXCR3+ innate CD8+ T cells preferentially express higher levels of Ly6C and CD122, but lower levels of CCR9 compared with CXCR3− innate CD8+ T cells. Furthermore, we show that CXCR3+ innate CD8+ T cells express higher transcript levels of antiapoptotic but lower levels of proapoptotic factors, respond more robustly to IL-2 and IL-15, and produce significantly more IFN-γ and granzyme B. Interestingly, CXCR3+ innate CD8+ T cells do not respond to IL-12 or IL-18 alone, but produce significant amounts of IFN-γ on stimulation with a combination of these cytokines. Taken together, these findings demonstrate that CXCR3+ and CXCR3− innate CD8+ T cells are phenotypically and functionally distinct. These newly generated CIBER mice provide a novel tool for studying the role of CXCR3 and CXCR3-expressing cells in vivo. PMID:23338236

  19. Viral Population Changes during Murine Norovirus Propagation in RAW 264.7 Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Takuya Kitamoto

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Laboratory adaptation of viruses is an essential technique for basic virology research, including the generation of attenuated vaccine strains, although the principles of cell adaptation remain largely unknown. Deep sequencing of murine norovirus (MuNoV S7 during serial passages in RAW264.7 cells showed that the frequencies of viral variants were altered more dynamically than previously reported. Serial passages of the virus following two different multiplicity of infections gave rise to distinct haplotypes, implying that multiple cell-adaptable sequences were present in the founder population. Nucleotide variants lost during passage were assembled into a viral genome representative of that prior to cell adaptation, which was unable to generate viral particles upon infection in cultured cells. In addition, presence of the reconstructed genome interfered with production of infectious particles from viruses that were fully adapted to in vitro culture. Although the key nucleotide changes dictating cell adaptation of MuNoV S7 viral infection are yet to be elucidated, our results revealed the elaborate interplay among selected sequences of viral variants better adapted to propagation in cell culture. Such knowledge will be instrumental in understanding the processes necessary for the laboratory adaptation of viruses, especially to those without relevant cell culture systems.

  20. The Analysis of CD83 Expression on Human Immune Cells Identifies a Unique CD83+-Activated T Cell Population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ju, Xinsheng; Silveira, Pablo A; Hsu, Wei-Hsun; Elgundi, Zehra; Alingcastre, Renz; Verma, Nirupama D; Fromm, Phillip D; Hsu, Jennifer L; Bryant, Christian; Li, Ziduo; Kupresanin, Fiona; Lo, Tsun-Ho; Clarke, Candice; Lee, Kenneth; McGuire, Helen; Fazekas de St Groth, Barbara; Larsen, Stephen R; Gibson, John; Bradstock, Kenneth F; Clark, Georgina J; Hart, Derek N J

    2016-12-15

    CD83 is a member of the Ig gene superfamily, first identified in activated lymphocytes. Since then, CD83 has become an important marker for defining activated human dendritic cells (DC). Several potential CD83 mRNA isoforms have been described, including a soluble form detected in human serum, which may have an immunosuppressive function. To further understand the biology of CD83, we examined its expression in different human immune cell types before and after activation using a panel of mouse and human anti-human CD83 mAb. The mouse anti-human CD83 mAbs, HB15a and HB15e, and the human anti-human CD83 mAb, 3C12C, were selected to examine cytoplasmic and surface CD83 expression, based on their different binding characteristics. Glycosylation of CD83, the CD83 mRNA isoforms, and soluble CD83 released differed among blood DC, monocytes, and monocyte-derived DC, and other immune cell types. A small T cell population expressing surface CD83 was identified upon T cell stimulation and during allogeneic MLR. This subpopulation appeared specifically during viral Ag challenge. We did not observe human CD83 on unstimulated human natural regulatory T cells (Treg), in contrast to reports describing expression of CD83 on mouse Treg. CD83 expression was increased on CD4+, CD8+ T, and Treg cells in association with clinical acute graft-versus-host disease in allogeneic hematopoietic cell transplant recipients. The differential expression and function of CD83 on human immune cells reveal potential new roles for this molecule as a target of therapeutic manipulation in transplantation, inflammation, and autoimmune diseases. Copyright © 2016 by The American Association of Immunologists, Inc.

  1. Cancer stem-like side population cells in the human nasopharyngeal carcinoma cell line cne-2 possess epithelial mesenchymal transition properties in association with metastasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Dan; Xu, Ben-Ling; Zhang, Xu-Hua; Dong, Ming-Min

    2012-07-01

    It has been recently reported that side population (SP) cells in nasopharyngeal carcinoma (NPC) cell lines display characteristics of cancer stem-like cells. However, the biological behavior and the significance of these cells for NPC progression remain unclear. In this study, we isolated SP cells from the NPC cell line CNE-2 by flow cytometry and investigated their biological characteristics. We discovered that SP cells had stronger colony forming abilities compared to the non-side population (NSP) cells, and observed that some SP cells looked more like the shape of mesenchymal cells when cultured in the common polyHEMA-coated flask. When checked by quantitative real-time PCR, the SP cells expressed higher levels of stemness-related genes Oct4, Sox2 and Nanog, and mesenchymal cell-related genes N-cadherin, vimentin and Snail, while they expressed lower levels of the epithelial cell-related gene, E-cadherin. Western blot and immunofluorescence staining methods further verified that SP cells expressed higher vimentin and expressed lower E-cadherin levels. Finally, Transwell invasion assay results indicated that the SP cells had higher invasive potential compared to NSP cells. Collectively, our data reveal that SP cells in the CNE-2 cell line not only possess the properties of cancer stem cells, but also have more mesenchymal cell characteristics which are associated with epithelial mesenchymal transition (EMT) and cancer cell invasion and metastasis. These findings are helpful for developing novel targets for effective clinical treatment of NPC.

  2. Self-renewal of a purified Tie2+ hematopoietic stem cell population relies on mitochondrial clearance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ito, Kyoko; Turcotte, Raphaël; Cui, Jinhua; Zimmerman, Samuel E; Pinho, Sandra; Mizoguchi, Toshihide; Arai, Fumio; Runnels, Judith M; Alt, Clemens; Teruya-Feldstein, Julie; Mar, Jessica C; Singh, Rajat; Suda, Toshio; Lin, Charles P; Frenette, Paul S; Ito, Keisuke

    2016-12-02

    A single hematopoietic stem cell (HSC) is capable of reconstituting hematopoiesis and maintaining homeostasis by balancing self-renewal and cell differentiation. The mechanisms of HSC division balance, however, are not yet defined. Here we demonstrate, by characterizing at the single-cell level a purified and minimally heterogeneous murine Tie2(+) HSC population, that these top hierarchical HSCs preferentially undergo symmetric divisions. The induction of mitophagy, a quality control process in mitochondria, plays an essential role in self-renewing expansion of Tie2(+) HSCs. Activation of the PPAR (peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor)-fatty acid oxidation pathway promotes expansion of Tie2(+) HSCs through enhanced Parkin recruitment in mitochondria. These metabolic pathways are conserved in human TIE2(+) HSCs. Our data thus identify mitophagy as a key mechanism of HSC expansion and suggest potential methods of cell-fate manipulation through metabolic pathways. Copyright © 2016, American Association for the Advancement of Science.

  3. Prediction of difficult laryngoscopy in a homogenous population: The ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Laryngoscopic views were graded according to the Cormack and Lehane (CL) classification. The patients were divided into two groups namely: Difficult Visualisation of the Larynx (DVL) and Easy Visualisation of the Larynx (EVL), multiple logistic regression was done to determine independent predictors of DVL. Results: ...

  4. Role of cell cycle on the cellular uptake and dilution of nanoparticles in a cell population

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kim, Jong Ah; Åberg, Christoffer; Salvati, Anna; Dawson, Kenneth A

    Nanoparticles are considered a primary vehicle for targeted therapies because they can pass biological barriers and enter and distribute within cells by energy-dependent pathways(1-3). So far, most studies have shown that nanoparticle properties, such as size(4-6) and surface(7,8), can influence how

  5. String pair production in non homogeneous backgrounds

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bolognesi, S. [Department of Physics “E. Fermi” University of Pisa, and INFN - Sezione di Pisa,Largo Pontecorvo, 3, Ed. C, 56127 Pisa (Italy); Rabinovici, E. [Racah Institute of Physics, The Hebrew University of Jerusalem,91904 Jerusalem (Israel); Tallarita, G. [Departamento de Ciencias, Facultad de Artes Liberales,Universidad Adolfo Ibáñez, Santiago 7941169 (Chile)

    2016-04-28

    We consider string pair production in non homogeneous electric backgrounds. We study several particular configurations which can be addressed with the Euclidean world-sheet instanton technique, the analogue of the world-line instanton for particles. In the first case the string is suspended between two D-branes in flat space-time, in the second case the string lives in AdS and terminates on one D-brane (this realizes the holographic Schwinger effect). In some regions of parameter space the result is well approximated by the known analytical formulas, either the particle pair production in non-homogeneous background or the string pair production in homogeneous background. In other cases we see effects which are intrinsically stringy and related to the non-homogeneity of the background. The pair production is enhanced already for particles in time dependent electric field backgrounds. The string nature enhances this even further. For spacial varying electrical background fields the string pair production is less suppressed than the rate of particle pair production. We discuss in some detail how the critical field is affected by the non-homogeneity, for both time and space dependent electric field backgrouds. We also comment on what could be an interesting new prediction for the small field limit. The third case we consider is pair production in holographic confining backgrounds with homogeneous and non-homogeneous fields.

  6. Deforestation homogenizes tropical parasitoid-host networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laliberté, Etienne; Tylianakis, Jason M

    2010-06-01

    Human activities drive biotic homogenization (loss of regional diversity) of many taxa. However, whether species interaction networks (e.g., food webs) can also become homogenized remains largely unexplored. Using 48 quantitative parasitoid-host networks replicated through space and time across five tropical habitats, we show that deforestation greatly homogenized network structure at a regional level, such that interaction composition became more similar across rice and pasture sites compared with forested habitats. This was not simply caused by altered consumer and resource community composition, but was associated with altered consumer foraging success, such that parasitoids were more likely to locate their hosts in deforested habitats. Furthermore, deforestation indirectly homogenized networks in time through altered mean consumer and prey body size, which decreased in deforested habitats. Similar patterns were obtained with binary networks, suggesting that interaction (link) presence-absence data may be sufficient to detect network homogenization effects. Our results show that tropical agroforestry systems can support regionally diverse parasitoid-host networks, but that removal of canopy cover greatly homogenizes the structure of these networks in space, and to a lesser degree in time. Spatiotemporal homogenization of interaction networks may alter coevolutionary outcomes and reduce ecological resilience at regional scales, but may not necessarily be predictable from community changes observed within individual trophic levels.

  7. Rejuvenation of the aged muscle stem cell population restores strength to injured aged muscles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cosgrove, Benjamin D.; Gilbert, Penney M.; Porpiglia, Ermelinda; Mourkioti, Foteini; Lee, Steven P.; Corbel, Stephane Y.; Llewellyn, Michael E.; Delp, Scott L.; Blau, Helen M.

    2014-01-01

    The aged suffer from progressive muscle weakness and regenerative failure. We demonstrate that muscle regeneration is impaired with aging due in part to a cell-autonomous functional decline in skeletal muscle stem cells (MuSCs). Two-thirds of aged MuSCs are intrinsically defective relative to young MuSCs, with reduced capacity to repair myofibers and repopulate the stem cell reservoir in vivo following transplantation due to a higher incidence of cells that express senescence markers and that have elevated p38α/β MAPK activity. We show that these limitations cannot be overcome by transplantation into the microenvironment of young recipient muscles. In contrast, subjecting the aged MuSC population to transient inhibition of p38α/β in conjunction with culture on soft hydrogel substrates rapidly expands the residual functional aged MuSC population, rejuvenating its potential for regeneration, serial transplantation, and strengthening damaged muscles of aged mice. These findings reveal a synergy between biophysical and biochemical cues that provides a paradigm for a localized autologous muscle stem cell therapy in aged individuals. PMID:24531378

  8. Rejuvenation of the muscle stem cell population restores strength to injured aged muscles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cosgrove, Benjamin D; Gilbert, Penney M; Porpiglia, Ermelinda; Mourkioti, Foteini; Lee, Steven P; Corbel, Stephane Y; Llewellyn, Michael E; Delp, Scott L; Blau, Helen M

    2014-03-01

    The elderly often suffer from progressive muscle weakness and regenerative failure. We demonstrate that muscle regeneration is impaired with aging owing in part to a cell-autonomous functional decline in skeletal muscle stem cells (MuSCs). Two-thirds of MuSCs from aged mice are intrinsically defective relative to MuSCs from young mice, with reduced capacity to repair myofibers and repopulate the stem cell reservoir in vivo following transplantation. This deficiency is correlated with a higher incidence of cells that express senescence markers and is due to elevated activity of the p38α and p38β mitogen-activated kinase pathway. We show that these limitations cannot be overcome by transplantation into the microenvironment of young recipient muscles. In contrast, subjecting the MuSC population from aged mice to transient inhibition of p38α and p38β in conjunction with culture on soft hydrogel substrates rapidly expands the residual functional MuSC population from aged mice, rejuvenating its potential for regeneration and serial transplantation as well as strengthening of damaged muscles of aged mice. These findings reveal a synergy between biophysical and biochemical cues that provides a paradigm for a localized autologous muscle stem cell therapy for the elderly.

  9. Ovarian Stimulation Affects the Population of Mouse Uterine NK Cells at Early Pregnancy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Parvin Dorfeshan

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to determine the influence of ovarian stimulation on endometrial mouse NK cell population. For superovulation, the female adult NMRI mice were injected i.p. with 10 IU of the pregnant mare serum gonadotropin followed 48 h later by an i.p. injection of 10 IU human chorionic gonadotropin hormone. Ovarian stimulated and nonstimulated mice were mated with fertile male. The presence of vaginal plug proved natural pregnancy, and this day was considered as day one of pregnancy. Tissue samples were prepared from the uterine horn and spleen of both groups of study on 7th day of pregnancy. Serum estradiol-17β and progesterone were measured at the same time. The tissue cryosections were prepared and double stained for CD 161 and CD3 markers, and NK cells population was analyzed. Relative frequency of NK cells was significantly lower in stroma and myometrium in hyperstimulated mice compared with the control group. However, no difference was seen in percentage of NK cells in spleen. The ovarian stimulation influences the proportion of uterine NK cells and may affect the embryo implantation.

  10. Blood groups and red cell acid phosphatase types in a Mixteca population resident in Mexico City.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buentello, L.; García, P.; Lisker, R.; Salamanca, F.; Peñaloza, R.

    1999-01-01

    Several blood groups, ABO, Rh, Ss, Fy, Jk, and red cell acid phosphatase (ACP) types were studied in a native Mixteca population that has resided in Mexico City since 1950. Gene frequencies were obtained and used to establish admixture estimates with blacks and whites. The subjects came from three different geographical areas: High Mixteca, Low Mixteca, and Coast Mixteca. All frequencies were in Hardy-Weinberg equilibrium. The difference in the ABO frequencies was statistically significant when subjects from the three areas were compared simultaneously. Rh frequencies differed only between the High and the Low Mixteca populations. The ACP frequencies were similar between the Low Mixteca population and a previously reported Mestizo population. However, there were significant differences between the High Mixteca group and a Mestizo population, all the subjects being from Oaxaca. This is the first report of Ss, Fy, Jk, and ACP frequencies in a Mixteca population. Am. J. Hum. Biol. 11:525-529, 1999. Copyright 1999 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  11. Mononucleated Blood Cell Populations Display Different Abilities To Transmit Prion Disease by the Transfusion Route

    Science.gov (United States)

    Douet, Jean-Yves; Lacroux, Caroline; Litaise, Claire; Lugan, Séverine; Corbière, Fabien; Arnold, Mark; Simmons, Hugh; Aron, Naima; Costes, Pierrette; Tillier, Cécile; Cassard, Hervé

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Previous experiments carried out in a sheep scrapie model demonstrated that the transfusion of 200 μl of prion-infected whole blood has an apparent 100% efficacy for disease transmission. These experiments also indicated that, despite the apparent low infectious titer, the intravenous administration of white blood cells (WBC) resulted in efficient disease transmission. In the study presented here, using the same transmissible spongiform encephalopathy (TSE) animal model, our aim was to determine the minimal number of white blood cells and the specific abilities of mononucleated cell populations to transmit scrapie by the transfusion route. Our results confirmed that the transfusion of 100 μl, but not 10 μl, of fresh whole blood collected in asymptomatic scrapie-infected donor sheep can transmit the disease. The data also show that the intravenous administration of 105 WBCs is sufficient to cause scrapie in recipient sheep. Cell-sorted CD45R+ (predominantly B lymphocytes), CD4+/CD8+ (T lymphocytes), and CD14+ (monocytes/macrophages) blood cell subpopulations all were shown to contain prion infectivity by bioassays in ovine PrP transgenic mice. However, while the intravenous administration of 106 CD45+ or CD4+/8+ living cells was able to transmit the disease, similar numbers of CD14+ cells failed to infect the recipients. These data support the contention that mononucleated blood cell populations display different abilities to transmit TSE by the transfusion route. They also represent an important input for the risk assessment of blood-borne prion disease transmission and for refining the target performance of leukoreduction processes that currently are applied to mitigate the transmission risk in transfusion medicine. IMPORTANCE Interindividual variant Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease (vCJD) transmission through blood and blood-derived products is considered a major public health issue in transfusion medicine. Over the last decade, TSE in sheep has emerged as a

  12. Isolation and characterization of human trophoblast side-population (SP) cells in primary villous cytotrophoblasts and HTR-8/SVneo cell line.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takao, Tomoka; Asanoma, Kazuo; Kato, Kiyoko; Fukushima, Kotaro; Tsunematsu, Ryosuke; Hirakawa, Toshio; Matsumura, Sueo; Seki, Hiroyuki; Takeda, Satoru; Wake, Norio

    2011-01-01

    Recently, numerous studies have identified that immature cell populations including stem cells and progenitor cells can be found among "side-population" (SP) cells. Although SP cells isolated from some adult tissues have been reported elsewhere, isolation and characterization of human trophoblast SP remained to be reported. In this study, HTR-8/SVneo cells and human primary villous cytotrophoblasts (vCTBs) were stained with Hoechst 33342 and SP and non-SP (NSP) fractions were isolated using a cell sorter. A small population of SP cells was identified in HTR-8/SVneo cells and in vCTBs. SP cells expressed several vCTB-specific markers and failed to express syncytiotrophoblast (STB) or extravillous cytotrophopblast (EVT)-specific differentiation markers. SP cells formed colonies and proliferated on mouse embryonic fibroblast (MEF) feeder cells or in MEF conditioned medium supplemented with heparin/FGF2, and they also showed long-term repopulating property. SP cells could differentiate into both STB and EVT cell lineages and expressed several differentiation markers. Microarray analysis revealed that IL7R and IL1R2 were exclusively expressed in SP cells and not in NSP cells. vCTB cells sorted as positive for both IL7R and IL1R2 failed to express trophoblast differentiation markers and spontaneously differentiated into both STB and EVT in basal medium. These features shown by the SP cells suggested that IL7R and IL1R2 are available as markers to detect the SP cells and that vCTB progenitor cells and trophoblast stem cells were involved in the SP cell population.

  13. Identification of a new stem cell population that generates Drosophila flight muscles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gunage, Rajesh D; Reichert, Heinrich; VijayRaghavan, K

    2014-08-18

    How myoblast populations are regulated for the formation of muscles of different sizes is an essentially unanswered question. The large flight muscles of Drosophila develop from adult muscle progenitor (AMP) cells set-aside embryonically. The thoracic segments are all allotted the same small AMP number, while those associated with the wing-disc proliferate extensively to give rise to over 2500 myoblasts. An initial amplification occurs through symmetric divisions and is followed by a switch to asymmetric divisions in which the AMPs self-renew and generate post-mitotic myoblasts. Notch signaling controls the initial amplification of AMPs, while the switch to asymmetric division additionally requires Wingless, which regulates Numb expression in the AMP lineage. In both cases, the epidermal tissue of the wing imaginal disc acts as a niche expressing the ligands Serrate and Wingless. The disc-associated AMPs are a novel muscle stem cell population that orchestrates the early phases of adult flight muscle development.

  14. Microfabricated cells for chip-scale atomic clock based on coherent population trapping: Fabrication and investigation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S.V. Ermak

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available A universal method for fabrication of miniature cells for frequency standards and quantum magnetometers containing 87Rb atoms in the atmosphere of inert gas neon based on integrated technologies is considered. The results of experimental studies of coherent population trapping signals observed for a series of cells which provided recovery of vapors of an alkali metal from the rubidium dichromate salt with the help of laser radiation are presented. The coherent population trapping signals with a typical linewidth of 2–3 kHz and a signal-to-noise ratio of 1500 in the 1-Hz bandwidth were observed, which allows one to provide a relative frequency stability of atomic clock of 10−11 at 100 s.

  15. Homogenization of precipitation data in Pannonian region

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Medić Nenad Đ.

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Testing the homogeneity of data of meteorological occurrences is very important for ensuring the reliability and accuracy of the data that will later be used in a variety of research related to the assessment and prediction of future trends of climate changes. This paper presents the verification of homogeneity of data on average annual precipitations from 19 meteorological stations in the Pannonian region. For this purpose, it has been used four different statistical tests that are applied on each meteorological station individually. It was found that 4 out of 19 meteorological stations or in 21% of the cases there are in homogeneities of precipitation data.

  16. Higher Order Macro Coefficients in Periodic Homogenization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Conca, Carlos; San Martin, Jorge [Departamento de IngenierIa Matematica, Facultad de Ciencias Fisicas y Matematicas, Universidad de Chile and Centro de Modelamiento Matematico, UMR 2071 CNRS-UChile, Casilla 170/3 - Correo 3, Santiago (Chile); Smaranda, Loredana [Department of Mathematics, Faculty of Mathematics and Computer Science, University of Pitesti, 110040 Pitesti, Str. Targu din Vale Nr.1, Arges (Romania); Vanninathan, Muthusamy, E-mail: cconca@dim.uchile.cl, E-mail: jorge@dim.uchile.cl, E-mail: smaranda@dim.uchile.cl, E-mail: vanni@math.tifrbng.res.in [TIFR-CAM, Post Bag 6503, GKVK Post, Bangalore - 560065 (India)

    2011-09-15

    A first set of macro coefficients known as the homogenized coefficients appear in the homogenization of PDE on periodic structures. If energy is increased or scale is decreased, these coefficients do not provide adequate approximation. Using Bloch decomposition, it is first realized that the above coefficients correspond to the lowest energy and the largest scale. This naturally paves the way to introduce other sets of macro coefficients corresponding to higher energies and lower scales which yield better approximation. The next task is to compare their properties with those of the homogenized coefficients. This article reviews these developments along with some new results yet to be published.

  17. An optimized protocol for the generation and functional analysis of human mast cells from CD34+ enriched cell populations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yin, Yuzhi; Bai, Yun; Olivera, Ana; Desai, Avanti; Metcalfe, Dean D

    2017-09-01

    The culture of mast cells from human tissues such a cord blood, peripheral blood or bone marrow aspirates has advanced our understanding of human mast cells (huMC) degranulation, mediator production and response to pharmacologic agents. However, existing methods for huMC culture tend to be laborious and expensive. Combining technical approaches from several of these protocols, we designed a simplified and more cost effective approach to the culture of mast cells from human cell populations including peripheral blood and cryopreserved cells from lymphocytapheresis. On average, we reduced by 30-50 fold the amount of culture media compared to our previously reported method, while the total MC number generated by this method (2.46±0.63×106 vs. 2.4±0.28×106, respectively, from 1.0×108 lymphocytapheresis or peripheral blood mononuclear blood cells [PBMCs]) was similar to our previous method (2.36±0.70×106), resulting in significant budgetary savings. In addition, we compared the yield of huMCs with or without IL-3 added to early cultures in the presence of stem cell factor (SCF) and interlukin-6 (IL-6) and found that the total MC number generated, while higher with IL-3 in the culture, did not reach statistical significance, suggesting that IL-3, often recommended in the culture of huMCs, is not absolutely required. We then performed a functional analysis by flow cytometry using standard methods and which maximized the data we could obtain from cultured cells. We believe these approaches will allow more laboratories to culture and examine huMC behavior going forward. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  18. Polychromatic flow cytometry is more sensitive than microscopy in detecting small monoclonal plasma cell populations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tran, Daniel N; Smith, Sandy A B C; Brown, David A; Parker, Andrew J C; Joseph, Joanne E; Armstrong, Nicola; Sewell, William A

    2017-03-01

    There is an emerging role for flow cytometry (FC) in the assessment of small populations of plasma cells (PC). However, FC's utility has been questioned due to consistent underestimation of the percentage of PC compared to microscopy. A retrospective study was performed on bone marrow samples analysed by 8-colour FC. Plasma cell populations were classified as polyclonal or monoclonal based on FC analysis. FC findings were compared with microscopy of aspirates, histology and immunohistochemistry of trephine biopsies, and immunofixation (IFX) of serum and/or urine. FC underestimated PC compared to aspirate and trephine microscopy. The 10% diagnostic cutoff for MM on aspirate microscopy corresponded to a 3.5% cutoff on FC. Abnormal plasma cell morphology by aspirate microscopy and clonality by FC correlated in 229 of 294 cases (78%). However, in 50 cases, FC demonstrated a monoclonal population but microscopy reported no abnormality. In 15 cases, abnormalities were reported by microscopy but not by FC. Clonality assessment by trephine microscopy and FC agreed in 251/280 cases (90%), but all 29 discordant cases were monoclonal by FC and not monoclonal by microscopy. These cases had fewer PC and proportionally more polyclonal PC, and when IFX detected a paraprotein, it had the same light chain as in the PC determined by FC. FC was more sensitive in detecting monoclonal populations that were small or accompanied by polyclonal PC. This study supports the inclusion of FC in the evaluation of PC, especially in the assessment of small populations. © 2016 International Clinical Cytometry Society. © 2016 International Clinical Cytometry Society.

  19. Experimentally Verified Parameter Sets for Modelling Heterogeneous Neocortical Pyramidal-Cell Populations.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paul M Harrison

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Models of neocortical networks are increasingly including the diversity of excitatory and inhibitory neuronal classes. Significant variability in cellular properties are also seen within a nominal neuronal class and this heterogeneity can be expected to influence the population response and information processing in networks. Recent studies have examined the population and network effects of variability in a particular neuronal parameter with some plausibly chosen distribution. However, the empirical variability and covariance seen across multiple parameters are rarely included, partly due to the lack of data on parameter correlations in forms convenient for model construction. To addess this we quantify the heterogeneity within and between the neocortical pyramidal-cell classes in layers 2/3, 4, and the slender-tufted and thick-tufted pyramidal cells of layer 5 using a combination of intracellular recordings, single-neuron modelling and statistical analyses. From the response to both square-pulse and naturalistic fluctuating stimuli, we examined the class-dependent variance and covariance of electrophysiological parameters and identify the role of the h current in generating parameter correlations. A byproduct of the dynamic I-V method we employed is the straightforward extraction of reduced neuron models from experiment. Empirically these models took the refractory exponential integrate-and-fire form and provide an accurate fit to the perisomatic voltage responses of the diverse pyramidal-cell populations when the class-dependent statistics of the model parameters were respected. By quantifying the parameter statistics we obtained an algorithm which generates populations of model neurons, for each of the four pyramidal-cell classes, that adhere to experimentally observed marginal distributions and parameter correlations. As well as providing this tool, which we hope will be of use for exploring the effects of heterogeneity in neocortical

  20. I Want More and Better Cells! - An Outreach Project about Stem Cells and Its Impact on the General Population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Varela Amaral, Sara; Forte, Teresa; Ramalho-Santos, João; Girão da Cruz, M Teresa

    2015-01-01

    Although science and technology impact every aspect of modern societies, there is still an extensive gap between science and society, which impairs the full exercise of citizenship. In the particular case of biomedical research increased investment should be accompanied by parallel efforts in terms of public information and engagement. We have carried out a project involving the production and evaluation of educational contents focused on stem cells - illustrated newspaper chronicles, radio interviews, a comic book, and animated videos - and monitored their impact on the Portuguese population. The study of the outreach materials in a heterogeneous sample of the population suggests that they are valuable tools to disseminate scientific messages, and that this is especially true for the comic-book format. Furthermore, the data showed that clear and stimulating outreach materials, that are able to teach new concepts and to promote critical thinking, increase engagement in science at different levels, depending on the depth of the concepts involved. Additionally, these materials can influence political, social and personal attitudes toward science. These results, together with the importance attributed to scientific research in stem cells by the population sampled, validates the diffusion of such materials as a significant contribution towards an overall public understanding and engagement in contemporary science, and this strategy should thus be considered in future projects. Regardless, stringent quality control must be implemented in order to efficiently communicate accurate scientific developments, and the public stimulated in terms of finding additional sources of reliable information.

  1. I Want More and Better Cells! - An Outreach Project about Stem Cells and Its Impact on the General Population.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sara Varela Amaral

    Full Text Available Although science and technology impact every aspect of modern societies, there is still an extensive gap between science and society, which impairs the full exercise of citizenship. In the particular case of biomedical research increased investment should be accompanied by parallel efforts in terms of public information and engagement. We have carried out a project involving the production and evaluation of educational contents focused on stem cells - illustrated newspaper chronicles, radio interviews, a comic book, and animated videos - and monitored their impact on the Portuguese population. The study of the outreach materials in a heterogeneous sample of the population suggests that they are valuable tools to disseminate scientific messages, and that this is especially true for the comic-book format. Furthermore, the data showed that clear and stimulating outreach materials, that are able to teach new concepts and to promote critical thinking, increase engagement in science at different levels, depending on the depth of the concepts involved. Additionally, these materials can influence political, social and personal attitudes toward science. These results, together with the importance attributed to scientific research in stem cells by the population sampled, validates the diffusion of such materials as a significant contribution towards an overall public understanding and engagement in contemporary science, and this strategy should thus be considered in future projects. Regardless, stringent quality control must be implemented in order to efficiently communicate accurate scientific developments, and the public stimulated in terms of finding additional sources of reliable information.

  2. I Want More and Better Cells! – An Outreach Project about Stem Cells and Its Impact on the General Population

    Science.gov (United States)

    Varela Amaral, Sara; Forte, Teresa; Ramalho-Santos, João; Girão da Cruz, M. Teresa

    2015-01-01

    Although science and technology impact every aspect of modern societies, there is still an extensive gap between science and society, which impairs the full exercise of citizenship. In the particular case of biomedical research increased investment should be accompanied by parallel efforts in terms of public information and engagement. We have carried out a project involving the production and evaluation of educational contents focused on stem cells - illustrated newspaper chronicles, radio interviews, a comic book, and animated videos - and monitored their impact on the Portuguese population. The study of the outreach materials in a heterogeneous sample of the population suggests that they are valuable tools to disseminate scientific messages, and that this is especially true for the comic-book format. Furthermore, the data showed that clear and stimulating outreach materials, that are able to teach new concepts and to promote critical thinking, increase engagement in science at different levels, depending on the depth of the concepts involved. Additionally, these materials can influence political, social and personal attitudes toward science. These results, together with the importance attributed to scientific research in stem cells by the population sampled, validates the diffusion of such materials as a significant contribution towards an overall public understanding and engagement in contemporary science, and this strategy should thus be considered in future projects. Regardless, stringent quality control must be implemented in order to efficiently communicate accurate scientific developments, and the public stimulated in terms of finding additional sources of reliable information. PMID:26222053

  3. Retraction note to: Characterization of cancer stem-like cells in the side population cells of human gastric cancer cell line MKN-45.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-11-01

    Retraction Note to: J Zhejiang Univ-Sci B (Biomed & Biotechnol) 2013 Mar.; 14(3):216-223. This article has been retracted at the authors' request, as it contains large portions of text and figures that have been previously published in the following article: Zhang, H., Xi, H., Cai, A., Xia, Q., Wang, X.X., Lu, C., Zhang, Y., Song, Z., Wang, H., Li, Q., Chen, L., Guo, Z., 2013. Not all side population cells contain cancer stem-like cells in human gastric cancer cell lines. Dig. Dis. Sci., 58(1):132-139. [doi:10.1007/s10620-012-2330-1

  4. Dendritic cell populations in patients with self-reported food hypersensitivity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lied GA

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Gülen A Lied1,3,4,*, Petra Vogelsang2,*, Arnold Berstad1,4, Silke Appel2 1Institute of Medicine, 2Broegelmann Research Laboratory, The Gade Institute, University of Bergen, Norway; 3Division of Gastroenterology, Department of Medicine; 4Section of Clinical Allergology, Department of Occupational Medicine, Haukeland University Hospital, Bergen, Norway *These authors contributed equally to this workAbstract: Self-reported hypersensitivity to food is a common condition and many of these patients have indications of intestinal immune activation. Dendritic cells (DCs are recognized as the most potent antigen-presenting cells involved in both initiating immune responses and maintaining tolerance. The aims of this study were to evaluate the DC populations with their phenotype and T cell stimulatory capacity in patients with food hypersensitivity and to study its relationship with atopic disease. Blood samples from 10 patients with self-reported food hypersensitivity, divided into atopic and nonatopic subgroups, and 10 gender- and age-matched healthy controls were analyzed by flow cytometry using the Miltenyi Blood Dendritic cells kit. Monocyte-derived DCs (moDCs were evaluated concerning their phenotype and T cell stimulatory capacity. DC populations and cell surface markers were not significantly different between patients and healthy controls, but moDCs from atopic patients expressed significantly more CD38 compared to moDCs from nonatopic patients. Moreover, lipopolysaccharide stimulated moDCs from atopic patients produced significantly more interleukin-10 compared to nonatopic patients. CD38 expression was correlated to total serum immunoglobulin E levels. These findings support the notion of immune activation in some patients with self-reported food hypersensitivity. They need to be confirmed in a larger cohort.Keywords: food hypersensitivity, atopy, dendritic cells, CD38

  5. Homogeneous operators and projective representations of the ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Abstract. This paper surveys the existing literature on homogeneous operators and their relationships with projective representations of P S L ( 2 , R ) and other Lie groups. It also includes a list of open problems in this area.

  6. Statistical methods for assessment of blend homogeneity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Madsen, Camilla

    2002-01-01

    of internal factors to the blend e.g. the particle size distribution. The relation between particle size distribution and the variation in drug content in blend and tablet samples is discussed. A central problem is to develop acceptance criteria for blends and tablet batches to decide whether the blend......In this thesis the use of various statistical methods to address some of the problems related to assessment of the homogeneity of powder blends in tablet production is discussed. It is not straight forward to assess the homogeneity of a powder blend. The reason is partly that in bulk materials....... Some methods have a focus on exploratory analysis where the aim is to investigate the spatial distribution of drug content in the batch. Other methods presented focus on describing the overall (total) (in)homogeneity of the blend. The overall (in)homogeneity of the blend is relevant as it is closely...

  7. Homogeneous cosmological models in Yang's gravitation theory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fennelly, A. J.; Pavelle, R.

    1979-01-01

    We present a dynamic, spatially homogeneous solution of Yang's pure space gravitational field equations which is non-Einsteinian. The predictions of this cosmological model seem to be at variance with observations.

  8. Layout optimization using the homogenization method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suzuki, Katsuyuki; Kikuchi, Noboru

    1993-01-01

    A generalized layout problem involving sizing, shape, and topology optimization is solved by using the homogenization method for three-dimensional linearly elastic shell structures in order to seek a possibility of establishment of an integrated design system of automotive car bodies, as an extension of the previous work by Bendsoe and Kikuchi. A formulation of a three-dimensional homogenized shell, a solution algorithm, and several examples of computing the optimum layout are presented in this first part of the two articles.

  9. Application of phasor plot and autofluorescence correction for study of heterogeneous cell population

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szmacinski, Henryk; Toshchakov, Vladimir; Lakowicz, Joseph R.

    2014-01-01

    Abstract. Protein-protein interactions in cells are often studied using fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) phenomenon by fluorescence lifetime imaging microscopy (FLIM). Here, we demonstrate approaches to the quantitative analysis of FRET in cell population in a case complicated by a highly heterogeneous donor expression, multiexponential donor lifetime, large contribution of cell autofluorescence, and significant presence of unquenched donor molecules that do not interact with the acceptor due to low affinity of donor-acceptor binding. We applied a multifrequency phasor plot to visualize FRET FLIM data, developed a method for lifetime background correction, and performed a detailed time-resolved analysis using a biexponential model. These approaches were applied to study the interaction between the Toll Interleukin-1 receptor (TIR) domain of Toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4) and the decoy peptide 4BB. TLR4 was fused to Cerulean fluorescent protein (Cer) and 4BB peptide was labeled with Bodipy TMRX (BTX). Phasor displays for multifrequency FLIM data are presented. The analytical procedure for lifetime background correction is described and the effect of correction on FLIM data is demonstrated. The absolute FRET efficiency was determined based on the phasor plot display and multifrequency FLIM data analysis. The binding affinity between TLR4-Cer (donor) and decoy peptide 4BB-BTX (acceptor) was estimated in a heterogeneous HeLa cell population. PMID:24770662

  10. Projection specificity in heterogeneous locus coeruleus cell populations: implications for learning and memory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uematsu, Akira; Tan, Bao Zhen

    2015-01-01

    Noradrenergic neurons in the locus coeruleus (LC) play a critical role in many functions including learning and memory. This relatively small population of cells sends widespread projections throughout the brain including to a number of regions such as the amygdala which is involved in emotional associative learning and the medial prefrontal cortex which is important for facilitating flexibility when learning rules change. LC noradrenergic cells participate in both of these functions, but it is not clear how this small population of neurons modulates these partially distinct processes. Here we review anatomical, behavioral, and electrophysiological studies to assess how LC noradrenergic neurons regulate these different aspects of learning and memory. Previous work has demonstrated that subpopulations of LC noradrenergic cells innervate specific brain regions suggesting heterogeneity of function in LC neurons. Furthermore, noradrenaline in mPFC and amygdala has distinct effects on emotional learning and cognitive flexibility. Finally, neural recording data show that LC neurons respond during associative learning and when previously learned task contingencies change. Together, these studies suggest a working model in which distinct and potentially opposing subsets of LC neurons modulate particular learning functions through restricted efferent connectivity with amygdala or mPFC. This type of model may provide a general framework for understanding other neuromodulatory systems, which also exhibit cell type heterogeneity and projection specificity. PMID:26330494

  11. FGFR signaling maintains a drug persistent cell population following epithelial-mesenchymal transition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Wells S.; Akhand, Saeed Salehin; Wendt, Michael K.

    2016-01-01

    An emerging characteristic of drug resistance in cancer is the induction of epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT). However, the mechanisms of EMT-mediated drug resistance remain poorly defined. Therefore, we conducted long-term treatments of human epidermal growth factor receptor-2 (Her2)-transformed breast cancer cells with either the EGFR/Her2 kinase inhibitor, Lapatinib or TGF-β, a known physiological inducer of EMT. Both of these treatment regimes resulted in robust EMT phenotypes, but upon withdrawal a subpopulation of TGF-β induced cells readily underwent mesenchymal-epithelial transition, where as Lapatinib-induced cells failed to reestablish an epithelial population. The mesenchymal population that remained following TGF-β stimulation and withdrawal was quickly selected for during subsequent Lapatinib treatment, manifesting in inherent drug resistance. The Nanostring cancer progression gene panel revealed a dramatic upregulation of fibroblast growth factor receptor 1 (FGFR1) and its cognate ligand FGF2 in both acquired and inherent resistance. Mechanistically, FGF:Erk1/2 signaling functions to stabilize the EMT transcription factor Twist and thus maintain the mesenchymal and drug resistant phenotype. Finally, Lapatinib resistant cells could be readily eliminated using recently characterized covalent inhibitors of FGFR. Overall our data demonstrate that next-generation targeting of FGFR can be used in combination with Her2-targeted therapies to overcome resistance in this breast cancer subtype. PMID:27825137

  12. Neuroprotection by α2-Adrenergic Receptor Stimulation after Excitotoxic Retinal Injury: A Study of the Total Population of Retinal Ganglion Cells and Their Distribution in the Chicken Retina.

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    Caridad Galindo-Romero

    Full Text Available We have studied the effect of α2-adrenergic receptor stimulation on the total excitotoxically injured chicken retinal ganglion cell population. N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA was intraocularly injected at embryonic day 18 and Brn3a positive retinal ganglion cells (Brn3a+ RGCs were counted in flat-mounted retinas using automated routines. The number and distribution of the Brn3a+ RGCs were analyzed in series of normal retinas from embryonic day 8 to post-hatch day 11 retinas and in retinas 7 or 14 days post NMDA lesion. The total number of Brn3a+ RGCs in the post-hatch retina was approximately 1.9x106 with a density of approximately 9.2x103 cells/mm2. The isodensity maps of normal retina showed that the density decreased with age as the retinal size increased. In contrast to previous studies, we did not find any specific region with increased RGC density, rather the Brn3a+ RGCs were homogeneously distributed over the central retina with decreasing density in the periphery and in the region of the pecten oculli. Injection of 5-10 μg NMDA caused 30-50% loss of Brn3a+ cells and the loss was more severe in the dorsal than in the ventral retina. Pretreatment with brimonidine reduced the loss of Brn3a+ cells both 7 and 14 days post lesion and the protective effect was higher in the dorsal than in the ventral retina. We conclude that α2-adrenergic receptor stimulation reduced the impact of the excitotoxic injury in chicken similarly to what has been shown in mammals. Furthermore, the data show that the RGCs are evenly distributed over in the retina, which challenges previous results that indicate the presence of specific high RGC-density regions of the chicken retina.