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Sample records for homing endonuclease encoded

  1. Selfish DNA: Homing Endonucleases Find a Home

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Edgell, David R

    2009-01-01

    ...] . Intriguingly, many self-splicing introns (and inteins) are also mobile genetic elements at the DNA level because they encode mobility-promoting proteins termed homing endonucleases that have the interesting property of being site-specific but sequence-tolerant DNA endonucleases [4–7] . Intron-encoded homing endonucleases recognize a site, the homing ...

  2. I-ApeI: a novel intron-encoded LAGLIDADG homing endonuclease from the archaeon, Aeropyrum pernix K1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nomura, Norimichi; Morinaga, Yayoi; Shirai, Nobuaki; Sako, Yoshihiko

    2005-01-01

    Over 50 introns have been reported in archaeal rRNA genes (rDNAs), a subset of which nests putative homing endonuclease (HEase) genes. Here, we report the identification and characterization of a novel archaeal LAGLIDADG-type HEase, I-ApeI, encoded by the ApeK1.S908 intron within the 16S rDNA of Aeropyrum pernix K1. I-ApeI consists of 222 amino acids and harbors two LAGLIDADG-like sequences. It recognizes the 20 bp non-palindromic sequence 5′-GCAAGGCTGAAAC↓TTAAAGG and cleaves target DNA to produce protruding tetranucleotide 3′ ends. Either Mn2+ or Co2+ can be substituted for Mg2+ as a cofactor in the cleavage reaction. Of the 20 bases within the minimal recognition site, 7 are essential for cleavage and are located at positions proximal to the cleavage sites. PMID:16049020

  3. I-ApeKI [corrected]: a novel intron-encoded LAGLIDADG homing endonuclease from the archaeon, Aeropyrum pernix K1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nomura, Norimichi; Morinaga, Yayoi; Shirai, Nobuaki; Sako, Yoshihiko

    2005-07-26

    Over 50 introns have been reported in archaeal rRNA genes (rDNAs), a subset of which nests putative homing endonuclease (HEase) genes. Here, we report the identification and characterization of a novel archaeal LAGLIDADG-type HEase, I-ApeKI [corrected], encoded by the ApeK1.S908 intron within the 16S rDNA of Aeropyrum pernix K1. I-ApeKI [corrected] consists of 222 amino acids and harbors two LAGLIDADG-like sequences. It recognizes the 20 bp non-palindromic sequence 5'-GCAAGGCTGAAAC downward arrowTTAAAGG and cleaves target DNA to produce protruding tetranucleotide 3' ends. Either Mn2+ or Co2+ can be substituted for Mg2+ as a cofactor in the cleavage reaction. Of the 20 bases within the minimal recognition site, 7 are essential for cleavage and are located at positions proximal to the cleavage sites.

  4. PCR-based bioprospecting for homing endonucleases in fungal mitochondrial rRNA genes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hafez, Mohamed; Guha, Tuhin Kumar; Shen, Chen; Sethuraman, Jyothi; Hausner, Georg

    2014-01-01

    Fungal mitochondrial genomes act as "reservoirs" for homing endonucleases. These enzymes with their DNA site-specific cleavage activities are attractive tools for genome editing and gene therapy applications. Bioprospecting and characterization of naturally occurring homing endonucleases offers an alternative to synthesizing artificial endonucleases. Here, we describe methods for PCR-based screening of fungal mitochondrial rRNA genes for homing endonuclease encoding sequences, and we also provide protocols for the purification and biochemical characterization of putative native homing endonucleases.

  5. The mitochondrial LSU rRNA group II intron of Ustilago maydis encodes an active homing endonuclease likely involved in intron mobility.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anja Pfeifer

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The a2 mating type locus gene lga2 is critical for uniparental mitochondrial DNA inheritance during sexual development of Ustilago maydis. Specifically, the absence of lga2 results in biparental inheritance, along with efficient transfer of intronic regions in the large subunit rRNA gene between parental molecules. However, the underlying role of the predicted LAGLIDADG homing endonuclease gene I-UmaI located within the group II intron LRII1 has remained unresolved. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We have investigated the enzymatic activity of I-UmaI in vitro based on expression of a tagged full-length and a naturally occurring mutant derivative, which harbors only the N-terminal LAGLIDADG domain. This confirmed Mg²⁺-dependent endonuclease activity and cleavage at the LRII1 insertion site to generate four base pair extensions with 3' overhangs. Specifically, I-UmaI recognizes an asymmetric DNA sequence with a minimum length of 14 base pairs (5'-GACGGGAAGACCCT-3' and tolerates subtle base pair substitutions within the homing site. Enzymatic analysis of the mutant variant indicated a correlation between the activity in vitro and intron homing. Bioinformatic analyses revealed that putatively functional or former functional I-UmaI homologs are confined to a few members within the Ustilaginales and Agaricales, including the phylogenetically distant species Lentinula edodes, and are linked to group II introns inserted into homologous positions in the LSU rDNA. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: The present data provide strong evidence that intron homing efficiently operates under conditions of biparental inheritance in U. maydis. Conversely, uniparental inheritance may be critical to restrict the transmission of mobile introns. Bioinformatic analyses suggest that I-UmaI-associated introns have been acquired independently in distant taxa and are more widespread than anticipated from available genomic data.

  6. Schizosaccharomyces pombe encodes a mutated AP endonuclease 1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laerdahl, Jon K; Korvald, Hanne; Nilsen, Line; Dahl-Michelsen, Kristin; Rognes, Torbjørn; Bjørås, Magnar; Alseth, Ingrun

    2011-03-07

    Mutagenic and cytotoxic apurinic/apyrimidinic (AP) sites are among the most frequent lesions in DNA. Repair of AP sites is initiated by AP endonucleases and most organisms possess two or more of these enzymes. Saccharomyces cerevisiae has AP endonuclease 1 (Apn1) as the major enzymatic activity with AP endonuclease 2 (Apn2) being an important backup. Schizosaccharomyces pombe also encodes two potential AP endonucleases, and Apn2 has been found to be the main repair activity, while Apn1 has no, or only a limited role in AP site repair. Here we have identified a new 5' exon (exon 1) in the apn1 gene and show that the inactivity of S. pombe Apn1 is due to a nonsense mutation in the fifth codon of this new exon. Reversion of this mutation restored the AP endonuclease activity of S. pombe Apn1. Interestingly, the apn1 nonsense mutation was only found in laboratory strains derived from L972 h(-) and not in unrelated isolates of S. pombe. Since all S. pombe laboratory strains originate from L972 h(-), it appears that all experiments involving S. pombe have been conducted in an apn1(-) mutant strain with a corresponding DNA repair deficiency. These observations have implications both for future research in S. pombe and for the interpretation of previously conducted epistatis analysis. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. A site-specific endonuclease encoded by a typical archaeal intron

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dalgaard, Jacob; Garrett, Roger Antony; Belfort, Malene

    1993-01-01

    . Additionally, although the archaeal and group I introns have entirely different structural properties and splicing pathways, I-Dmo I shares sequence similarity, in the form of the LAGLI-DADG motif, with group I intron endonucleases of eukaryotes. These observations support the independent evolutionary origin......The protein encoded by the archaeal intron in the 23S rRNA gene of the hyperthermophile Desulfurococcus mobilis is a double-strand DNase that, like group I intron homing endonucleases, is capable of cleaving an intronless allele of the gene. This enzyme, I-Dmo I, is unusual among the intron...... endonucleases in that it is thermostable and is expressed only from linear and cyclized intron species and not from the precursor RNA. However, in analogy to its eukaryotic counterparts, but unlike the bacteriophage enzymes, I-Dmo I makes a staggered double-strand cut that generates 4-nt 3' extensions...

  8. Three new active members of the I-OnuI family of homing endonucleases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bilto, Iman M; Guha, Tuhin K; Wai, Alvan; Hausner, Georg

    2017-08-01

    In vitro characterization of 3 LAGLIDADG-type homing endonucleases (HEs) (I-CcaI, I-CcaII, and I-AstI) that belong to the I-OnuI family showed that they are functional HEs that cleave their respective cognate target sites. These endonucleases are encoded within group ID introns and appear to be orthologues that have inserted into 3 different mitochondrial genes: rns, rnl, and cox3. The endonuclease activity of I-CcaI was tested using various substrates, and its minimum DNA recognition sequence was estimated to be 26 nt. This set of HEs may provide some insight into how these types of mobile elements can migrate into new locations. This study provides additional endonucleases that can be added to the catalog of currently available HEs that may have various biotechnology applications.

  9. Inteins, introns, and homing endonucleases: recent revelations about the life cycle of parasitic genetic elements

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hilario Elena

    2006-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Self splicing introns and inteins that rely on a homing endonuclease for propagation are parasitic genetic elements. Their life-cycle and evolutionary fate has been described through the homing cycle. According to this model the homing endonuclease is selected for function only during the spreading phase of the parasite. This phase ends when the parasitic element is fixed in the population. Upon fixation the homing endonuclease is no longer under selection, and its activity is lost through random processes. Recent analyses of these parasitic elements with functional homing endonucleases suggest that this model in its most simple form is not always applicable. Apparently, functioning homing endonuclease can persist over long evolutionary times in populations and species that are thought to be asexual or nearly asexual. Here we review these recent findings and discuss their implications. Reasons for the long-term persistence of a functional homing endonuclease include: More recombination (sexual and as a result of gene transfer than previously assumed for these organisms; complex population structures that prevent the element from being fixed; a balance between active spreading of the homing endonuclease and a decrease in fitness caused by the parasite in the host organism; or a function of the homing endonuclease that increases the fitness of the host organism and results in purifying selection for the homing endonuclease activity, even after fixation in a local population. In the future, more detailed studies of the population dynamics of the activity and regulation of homing endonucleases are needed to decide between these possibilities, and to determine their relative contributions to the long term survival of parasitic genes within a population. Two outstanding publications on the amoeba Naegleria group I intron (Wikmark et al. BMC Evol Biol 2006, 6:39 and the PRP8 inteins in ascomycetes (Butler et al.BMC Evol Biol 2006, 6:42 provide

  10. Engineering a Nickase on the Homing Endonuclease I-DmoI Scaffold

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Molina, Rafael; Marcaida, María José; Redondo, Pilar

    2015-01-01

    Homing endonucleases are useful tools for genome modification because of their capability to recognize and cleave specifically large DNA targets. These endonucleases generate a DNA double strand break that can be repaired by the DNA damage response machinery. The break can be repaired by homologo...

  11. In vitro Inactivation of Latent HSV by Targeted Mutagenesis Using an HSV-specific Homing Endonuclease

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    Martine Aubert

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Following acute infection, herpes simplex virus (HSV establishes latency in sensory neurons, from which it can reactivate and cause recurrent disease. Available antiviral therapies do not affect latent viral genomes; therefore, they do not prevent reactivation following therapy cessation. One possible curative approach involves the introduction of DNA double strand breaks in latent HSV genomes by rare-cutting endonucleases, leading to mutagenesis of essential viral genes. We tested this approach in an in vitro HSV latency model using the engineered homing endonuclease (HE HSV1m5, which recognizes a sequence in the HSV-1 gene UL19, encoding the virion protein VP5. Coexpression of the 3′-exonuclease Trex2 with HEs increased HE-mediated mutagenesis frequencies up to sixfold. Following HSV1m5/Trex2 delivery with adeno-associated viral (AAV vectors, the target site was mutated in latent HSV genomes with no detectable cell toxicity. Importantly, HSV production by latently infected cells after reactivation was decreased after HSV1m5/Trex2 exposure. Exposure to histone deacetylase inhibitors prior to HSV1m5/Trex2 treatment increased mutagenesis frequencies of latent HSV genomes another two- to fivefold, suggesting that chromatin modification may be a useful adjunct to gene-targeting approaches. These results support the continuing development of HEs and other nucleases (ZFNs, TALENs, CRISPRs for cure of chronic viral infections.

  12. In vitro Inactivation of Latent HSV by Targeted Mutagenesis Using an HSV-specific Homing Endonuclease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aubert, Martine; Boyle, Nicole M; Stone, Daniel; Stensland, Laurence; Huang, Meei-Li; Magaret, Amalia S; Galetto, Roman; Rawlings, David J; Scharenberg, Andrew M; Jerome, Keith R

    2014-02-04

    Following acute infection, herpes simplex virus (HSV) establishes latency in sensory neurons, from which it can reactivate and cause recurrent disease. Available antiviral therapies do not affect latent viral genomes; therefore, they do not prevent reactivation following therapy cessation. One possible curative approach involves the introduction of DNA double strand breaks in latent HSV genomes by rare-cutting endonucleases, leading to mutagenesis of essential viral genes. We tested this approach in an in vitro HSV latency model using the engineered homing endonuclease (HE) HSV1m5, which recognizes a sequence in the HSV-1 gene UL19, encoding the virion protein VP5. Coexpression of the 3'-exonuclease Trex2 with HEs increased HE-mediated mutagenesis frequencies up to sixfold. Following HSV1m5/Trex2 delivery with adeno-associated viral (AAV) vectors, the target site was mutated in latent HSV genomes with no detectable cell toxicity. Importantly, HSV production by latently infected cells after reactivation was decreased after HSV1m5/Trex2 exposure. Exposure to histone deacetylase inhibitors prior to HSV1m5/Trex2 treatment increased mutagenesis frequencies of latent HSV genomes another two- to fivefold, suggesting that chromatin modification may be a useful adjunct to gene-targeting approaches. These results support the continuing development of HEs and other nucleases (ZFNs, TALENs, CRISPRs) for cure of chronic viral infections.Molecular Therapy-Nucleic Acids (2014) 3, e1; doi:10.1038/mtna.2013.75; published online 4 February 2014.

  13. Using Group II Introns for Attenuating the In Vitro and In Vivo Expression of a Homing Endonuclease

    OpenAIRE

    Tuhin Kumar Guha; Georg Hausner

    2016-01-01

    In Chaetomium thermophilum (DSM 1495) within the mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) small ribosomal subunit (rns) gene a group IIA1 intron interrupts an open reading frame (ORF) encoded within a group I intron (mS1247). This arrangement offers the opportunity to examine if the nested group II intron could be utilized as a regulatory element for the expression of the homing endonuclease (HEase). Constructs were generated where the codon-optimized ORF was interrupted with either the native group IIA1 in...

  14. HIGLE is a bifunctional homing endonuclease that directly interacts with HYL1 and SERRATE in Arabidopsis thaliana

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cho, Seok Keun; Ryu, Moon Young; Poulsen, Christian

    2017-01-01

    A highly coordinated complex known as the microprocessor precisely processes primary transcripts of MIRNA genes into mature miRNAs. In plants, the microprocessor minimally consists of three components: Dicer-like protein 1 (DCL1), HYPONASTIC LEAF 1 (HYL1), and SERRATE (SE). To precisely modulate mi......RNA maturation, the microprocessor cooperates with at least 12 proteins in plants. In addition, we here show the involvement of a novel gene, HYL1-interacting GIY-YIG-like endonuclease (HIGLE). The encoded protein has a GIY-YIG domain that is generally found within a class of homing endonucleases. HIGLE directly...... interacts with the microprocessor components HYL1 and SE. Unlike the functions of other GIY-YIG endonucleases, the catalytic core of HIGLE has both DNase and RNase activities that sufficiently processes miRNA precursors into short fragments in vitro....

  15. Chilo iridescent virus (CIV) ORF 012L encodes a protein with both exonuclease and endonuclease functions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dizman, Yesim Akturk; Muratoglu, Hacer; Sandalli, Cemal; Nalcacioglu, Remziye; Demirbag, Zihni

    2016-11-01

    Chilo iridescent virus (CIV) is the type member of the genus Iridovirus within the family Iridoviridae. The virions of CIV contain a single linear dsDNA molecule that is circularly permuted and terminally redundant. The genome of CIV contains an open reading frame (ORF 012L) encoding a protein homologous to exonuclease II of Schizosaccharomyces pombe. In this study, we focused on the characterization of CIV ORF 012L. The target ORF was cloned into the pET28a vector, expressed in E. coli strain BL21 (DE3) pLysS with an N-terminal His tag and purified to homogeneity by using Ni-NTA affinity chromatography. Biochemical characterization of the purified CIV 012L confirmed that this viral protein is a functional 5'-3' exonuclease that digests 3'-biotin-labelled oligonucleotides and linear double-stranded DNA (dsDNA) molecules from their 5' termini in a highly processive manner. CIV 012L also has a potent endonuclease activity on dsDNA in vitro. In addition, CIV 012L converted supercoiled plasmid DNA (replicative form I, RFI) into the open circular form (RFII) and then open circular form into linear form (RFIII). Endonuclease activity of CIV 012L was optimal in the presence of 10 mM Mg(2+) or 30 mM Mn(2+) ions and at 150 mM NaCl or KCl salt concentrations. The highest endonuclease activity was obtained at pH 8, and it reached a maximum at 55 °C. The CIV 012L protein showed deficiencies for both double- and single-stranded RNAs.

  16. A homing endonuclease and the 50-nt ribosomal bypass sequence of phage T4 constitute a mobile DNA cassette

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonocora, Richard P.; Zeng, Qinglu; Abel, Ethan V.; Shub, David A.

    2011-01-01

    Since its initial description more than two decades ago, the ribosome bypass (or “hop”) sequence of phage T4 stands out as a uniquely extreme example of programmed translational frameshifting. The gene for a DNA topoisomerase subunit of T4 has been split by a 1-kb insertion into two genes that retain topoisomerase function. A second 50-nt insertion, beginning with an in-phase stop codon, is inserted near the start of the newly created downstream gene 60. Instead of terminating at this stop codon, approximately half of the ribosomes skip 50 nucleotides and continue translation in a new reading frame. However, no functions, regulatory or otherwise, have been imputed for the truncated peptide that results from termination at codon 46 or for the bypass sequence itself. Moreover, how this unusual mRNA organization arose and why it is maintained have never been explained. We show here that a homing endonuclease (MobA) is encoded in the insertion that created gene 60, and the mobA gene together with the bypass sequence constitute a mobile DNA cassette. The bypass sequence provides protection against self-cleavage by the nuclease, whereas the nuclease promotes horizontal spread of the entire cassette to related bacteriophages. Group I introns frequently provide protection against self-cleavage by associated homing endonucleases. We present a scenario by which the bypass sequence, which is otherwise a unique genetic element, might have been derived from a degenerate group I intron. PMID:21930924

  17. Zinc finger nuclease and homing endonuclease-mediated assembly of multigene plant transformation vectors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeevi, Vardit; Liang, Zhuobin; Arieli, Uri; Tzfira, Tzvi

    2012-01-01

    Binary vectors are an indispensable component of modern Agrobacterium tumefaciens-mediated plant genetic transformation systems. A remarkable variety of binary plasmids have been developed to support the cloning and transfer of foreign genes into plant cells. The majority of these systems, however, are limited to the cloning and transfer of just a single gene of interest. Thus, plant biologists and biotechnologists face a major obstacle when planning the introduction of multigene traits into transgenic plants. Here, we describe the assembly of multitransgene binary vectors by using a combination of engineered zinc finger nucleases (ZFNs) and homing endonucleases. Our system is composed of a modified binary vector that has been engineered to carry an array of unique recognition sites for ZFNs and homing endonucleases and a family of modular satellite vectors. By combining the use of designed ZFNs and commercial restriction enzymes, multiple plant expression cassettes were sequentially cloned into the acceptor binary vector. Using this system, we produced binary vectors that carried up to nine genes. Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) protoplasts and plants were transiently and stably transformed, respectively, by several multigene constructs, and the expression of the transformed genes was monitored across several generations. Because ZFNs can potentially be engineered to digest a wide variety of target sequences, our system allows overcoming the problem of the very limited number of commercial homing endonucleases. Thus, users of our system can enjoy a rich resource of plasmids that can be easily adapted to their various needs, and since our cloning system is based on ZFN and homing endonucleases, it may be possible to reconstruct other types of binary vectors and adapt our vectors for cloning on multigene vector systems in various binary plasmids.

  18. Reverse transcriptase and endonuclease activities encoded by Penelope-like retroelements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pyatkov, Konstantin I.; Arkhipova, Irina R.; Malkova, Natalia V.; Finnegan, David J.; Evgen'ev, Michael B.

    2004-01-01

    Penelope-like elements are a class of retroelement that have now been identified in >50 species belonging to at least 10 animal phyla. The Penelope element isolated from Drosophila virilis is the only transpositionally active representative of this class isolated so far. The single ORF of Penelope and its relatives contains regions homologous to a reverse transcriptase of atypical structure and to the GIY-YIG, or Uri, an endonuclease (EN) domain not previously found in retroelements. We have expressed the single ORF of Penelope in a baculovirus expression system and have shown that it encodes a polyprotein with reverse transcriptase activity that requires divalent cations (Mn2+ and Mg2+). We have also expressed and purified the EN domain in Escherichia coli and have demonstrated that it has EN activity in vitro. Mutations in the conserved residues of the EN catalytic module abolish its nicking activity, whereas the DNA-binding properties of the mutant proteins remain unaffected. Only one strand of the target sequence is cleaved, and there is a certain degree of cleavage specificity. We propose that the Penelope EN cleaves the target DNA during transposition, generating a primer for reverse transcription. Our results show that an active Uri EN has been adopted by a retrotransposon. PMID:15465912

  19. Intermolecular interaction between a branching ribozyme and associated homing endonuclease mRNA

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Birgisdottir, Asa B; Nielsen, Henrik; Beckert, Bertrand

    2011-01-01

    Abstract RNA tertiary interactions involving docking of GNRA (N; any base; R; purine) hairpin loops into helical stem structures on other regions of the same RNA are one of the most common RNA tertiary interactions. In this study, we investigated a tertiary association between a GAAA hairpin......-like motif (UCUAAG-CAAGA) found within the HEG P1. The biological role of this interaction appears to be linked to the homing endonuclease expression by promoting post-cleavage release of the lariat capped mRNA. These findings add to our understanding of how protein-coding genes embedded in nuclear ribosomal...

  20. Divalent metal ion differentially regulates the sequential nicking reactions of the GIY-YIG homing endonuclease I-BmoI.

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    Benjamin P Kleinstiver

    Full Text Available Homing endonucleases are site-specific DNA endonucleases that function as mobile genetic elements by introducing double-strand breaks or nicks at defined locations. Of the major families of homing endonucleases, the modular GIY-YIG endonucleases are least understood in terms of mechanism. The GIY-YIG homing endonuclease I-BmoI generates a double-strand break by sequential nicking reactions during which the single active site of the GIY-YIG nuclease domain must undergo a substantial reorganization. Here, we show that divalent metal ion plays a significant role in regulating the two independent nicking reactions by I-BmoI. Rate constant determination for each nicking reaction revealed that limiting divalent metal ion has a greater impact on the second strand than the first strand nicking reaction. We also show that substrate mutations within the I-BmoI cleavage site can modulate the first strand nicking reaction over a 314-fold range. Additionally, in-gel DNA footprinting with mutant substrates and modeling of an I-BmoI-substrate complex suggest that amino acid contacts to a critical GC-2 base pair are required to induce a bottom-strand distortion that likely directs conformational changes for reaction progress. Collectively, our data implies mechanistic roles for divalent metal ion and substrate bases, suggesting that divalent metal ion facilitates the re-positioning of the GIY-YIG nuclease domain between sequential nicking reactions.

  1. Characterization of the restriction enzyme-like endonuclease encoded by the Entamoeba histolytica non-long terminal repeat retrotransposon EhLINE1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yadav, Vijay Pal; Mandal, Prabhat Kumar; Rao, Desirazu N; Bhattacharya, Sudha

    2009-12-01

    The genome of the human pathogen Entamoeba histolytica, a primitive protist, contains non-long terminal repeat retrotransposable elements called EhLINEs. These encode reverse transcriptase and endonuclease required for retrotransposition. The endonuclease shows sequence similarity with bacterial restriction endonucleases. Here we report the salient enzymatic features of one such endonuclease. The kinetics of an EhLINE1-encoded endonuclease catalyzed reaction, determined under steady-state and single-turnover conditions, revealed a significant burst phase followed by a slower steady-state phase, indicating that release of product could be the slower step in this reaction. For circular supercoiled DNA the K(m) was 2.6 x 10(-8) M and the k(cat) was 1.6 x 10(-2) sec(-1). For linear E. histolytica DNA substrate the K(m) and k(cat) values were 1.3 x 10(-8) M and 2.2 x 10(-4) sec(-1) respectively. Single-turnover reaction kinetics suggested a noncooperative mode of hydrolysis. The enzyme behaved as a monomer. While Mg(2+) was required for activity, 60% activity was seen with Mn(2+) and none with other divalent metal ions. Substitution of PDX(12-14)D (a metal-binding motif) with PAX(12-14)D caused local conformational change in the protein tertiary structure, which could contribute to reduced enzyme activity in the mutated protein. The protein underwent conformational change upon the addition of DNA, which is consistent with the known behavior of restriction endonucleases. The similarities with bacterial restriction endonucleases suggest that the EhLINE1-encoded endonuclease was possibly acquired from bacteria through horizontal gene transfer. The loss of strict sequence specificity for nicking may have been subsequently selected to facilitate spread of the retrotransposon to intergenic regions of the E. histolytica genome.

  2. Crystal Structure of the Homing Endonuclease I-CvuI Provides a New Template for Genome Modification

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Molina, Rafael; Redondo, Pilar; López-Méndez, Blanca

    2015-01-01

    Homing endonucleases recognize and generate a DNA double-strand break, which has been used to promote gene targeting. These enzymes recognize long DNA stretches; they are highly sequence-specific enzymes and display a very low frequency of cleavage even in complete genomes. Although a large numbe...

  3. Structure and dynamics of mesophilic variants from the homing endonuclease I-DmoI

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Alba, Josephine; Marcaida, Maria Jose; Prieto, Jesus

    2017-01-01

    this particular application, many efforts have been made to generate mesophilic variants of I-DmoI that function at lower temperatures than the wild-type. Here, we report a structural and computational analysis of two I-DmoI mesophilic mutants. Despite very limited structural variations between the crystal......I-DmoI, from the hyperthermophilic archaeon Desulfurococcus mobilis, belongs to the LAGLIDADG homing endonuclease protein family. Its members are highly specific enzymes capable of recognizing long DNA target sequences, thus providing potential tools for genome manipulation. Working towards...... structures of these variants and the wild-type, a different dynamical behaviour near the cleavage sites is observed. In particular, both the dynamics of the water molecules and the protein perturbation effect on the cleavage site correlate well with the changes observed in the experimental enzymatic activity....

  4. Structure and dynamics of mesophilic variants from the homing endonuclease I-DmoI

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alba, Josephine; Marcaida, Maria Jose; Prieto, Jesus; Montoya, Guillermo; Molina, Rafael; D'Abramo, Marco

    2017-12-01

    I-DmoI, from the hyperthermophilic archaeon Desulfurococcus mobilis, belongs to the LAGLIDADG homing endonuclease protein family. Its members are highly specific enzymes capable of recognizing long DNA target sequences, thus providing potential tools for genome manipulation. Working towards this particular application, many efforts have been made to generate mesophilic variants of I-DmoI that function at lower temperatures than the wild-type. Here, we report a structural and computational analysis of two I-DmoI mesophilic mutants. Despite very limited structural variations between the crystal structures of these variants and the wild-type, a different dynamical behaviour near the cleavage sites is observed. In particular, both the dynamics of the water molecules and the protein perturbation effect on the cleavage site correlate well with the changes observed in the experimental enzymatic activity.

  5. Using Group II Introns for Attenuating the In Vitro and In Vivo Expression of a Homing Endonuclease.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tuhin Kumar Guha

    Full Text Available In Chaetomium thermophilum (DSM 1495 within the mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA small ribosomal subunit (rns gene a group IIA1 intron interrupts an open reading frame (ORF encoded within a group I intron (mS1247. This arrangement offers the opportunity to examine if the nested group II intron could be utilized as a regulatory element for the expression of the homing endonuclease (HEase. Constructs were generated where the codon-optimized ORF was interrupted with either the native group IIA1 intron or a group IIB type intron. This study showed that the expression of the HEase (in vivo in Escherichia coli can be regulated by manipulating the splicing efficiency of the HEase ORF-embedded group II introns. Exogenous magnesium chloride (MgCl2 stimulated the expression of a functional HEase but the addition of cobalt chloride (CoCl2 to growth media antagonized the expression of HEase activity. Ultimately the ability to attenuate HEase activity might be useful in precision genome engineering, minimizing off target activities, or where pathways have to be altered during a specific growth phase.

  6. Using Group II Introns for Attenuating the In Vitro and In Vivo Expression of a Homing Endonuclease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guha, Tuhin Kumar; Hausner, Georg

    2016-01-01

    In Chaetomium thermophilum (DSM 1495) within the mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) small ribosomal subunit (rns) gene a group IIA1 intron interrupts an open reading frame (ORF) encoded within a group I intron (mS1247). This arrangement offers the opportunity to examine if the nested group II intron could be utilized as a regulatory element for the expression of the homing endonuclease (HEase). Constructs were generated where the codon-optimized ORF was interrupted with either the native group IIA1 intron or a group IIB type intron. This study showed that the expression of the HEase (in vivo) in Escherichia coli can be regulated by manipulating the splicing efficiency of the HEase ORF-embedded group II introns. Exogenous magnesium chloride (MgCl2) stimulated the expression of a functional HEase but the addition of cobalt chloride (CoCl2) to growth media antagonized the expression of HEase activity. Ultimately the ability to attenuate HEase activity might be useful in precision genome engineering, minimizing off target activities, or where pathways have to be altered during a specific growth phase. PMID:26909494

  7. Host Factors Influencing the Retrohoming Pathway of Group II Intron RmInt1, Which Has an Intron-Encoded Protein Naturally Devoid of Endonuclease Activity.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rafael Nisa-Martínez

    Full Text Available Bacterial group II introns are self-splicing catalytic RNAs and mobile retroelements that have an open reading frame encoding an intron-encoded protein (IEP with reverse transcriptase (RT and RNA splicing or maturase activity. Some IEPs carry a DNA endonuclease (En domain, which is required to cleave the bottom strand downstream from the intron-insertion site for target DNA-primed reverse transcription (TPRT of the inserted intron RNA. Host factors complete the insertion of the intron. By contrast, the major retrohoming pathway of introns with IEPs naturally lacking endonuclease activity, like the Sinorhizobium meliloti intron RmInt1, is thought to involve insertion of the intron RNA into the template for lagging strand DNA synthesis ahead of the replication fork, with possible use of the nascent strand to prime reverse transcription of the intron RNA. The host factors influencing the retrohoming pathway of such introns have not yet been described. Here, we identify key candidates likely to be involved in early and late steps of RmInt1 retrohoming. Some of these host factors are common to En+ group II intron retrohoming, but some have different functions. Our results also suggest that the retrohoming process of RmInt1 may be less dependent on the intracellular free Mg2+ concentration than those of other group II introns.

  8. Large scale purification and characterization of TraI endonuclease encoded by sex factor plasmid R100.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fukuda, H; Ohtsubo, E

    1995-09-08

    The TraI protein encoded by plasmid R100 was purified in a large scale by monitoring the strand- and site-specific nicking activity at the origin of transfer, oriT. The N-terminal amino acid sequence of the purified protein was identical to that deduced from the DNA sequence of an open reading frame encoding TraI. The TraI protein is a DNA helicase which is highly processive and unwinds DNA in the 5' to 3' direction. The Stokes radius and the sedimentation coefficient for the TraI protein in 200 mM NaCl indicate that the protein is a rod-shaped monomer, whose native molecular weight is 186,000. Chemical cross-linking analysis revealed that there exist more dimers of TraI under the low salt conditions, under which both nicking and unwinding reactions catalyzed by TraI are the most efficient, indicating that the TraI protein is functionally active in a dimer form. TraI hardly introduced a nick into the linearized plasmid DNA and only slightly into the relaxed closed circular DNA, indicating that TraI requires superhelical structure of substrate DNA for the nicking reaction. Deletion analysis in the oriT region revealed that a particular region of 54 base pairs containing oriT is required for the nicking reaction.

  9. Antibody to a human DNA repair protein allows for cloning of a Drosophila cDNA that encodes an apurinic endonuclease

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kelley, M.R. (Dept. of Biochemistry and Biophysics, Loyola Univ. Medical School, Maywood, IL (US)); Venugopal, S.; Harless, J.; Deutsch, W.A. (Louisiana State Univ., Baton Rouge, LA (USA). Dept. of Biochemistry)

    1989-03-01

    The cDNA of a Drosophila DNA repair gene, AP3, was cloned by screening an embryonic lambda gt11 expression library with an antibody that was originally prepared against a purified human apurinicapyrimidine (AP) endonuclease. The 1.2-kilobase (kb) AP3 cDNA mapped to a region on the third chromosome where a number of mutagen-sensitive alleles were located. The cDNA clone yielded an in vitro translation product of 35,000 daltons, in agreement with the predicted size of the translation product of the only open reading frame of AP3, and identical to the molecular size of an AP endonuclease activity recovered following sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrymalide gel electrophoresis of Drosophilia extracts. The C-terminal portion of the predicted protein contained regions of presumptive DNA-binding domains, while the DNA sequence at the amino end of AP3 showed similarity to the Escherichia coli recA gene. AP3 is expressed as an abundant 1.3-kb mRNA that is detected throughout the life cycle of Drosophila melanogaster. Another 3.5-klb mRNA also hybridized to the AP3 cDNA, but species was restricted to the early stages of development.

  10. Group I introns and associated homing endonuclease genes reveals a clinal structure for Porphyra spiralis var. amplifolia (Bangiales, Rhodophyta along the Eastern coast of South America

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matioli Sergio R

    2008-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Group I introns are found in the nuclear small subunit ribosomal RNA gene (SSU rDNA of some species of the genus Porphyra (Bangiales, Rhodophyta. Size polymorphisms in group I introns has been interpreted as the result of the degeneration of homing endonuclease genes (HEG inserted in peripheral loops of intron paired elements. In this study, intron size polymorphisms were characterized for different Porphyra spiralis var. amplifolia (PSA populations on the Southern Brazilian coast, and were used to infer genetic relationships and genetic structure of these PSA populations, in addition to cox2-3 and rbcL-S regions. Introns of different sizes were tested qualitatively for in vitro self-splicing. Results Five intron size polymorphisms within 17 haplotypes were obtained from 80 individuals representing eight localities along the distribution of PSA in the Eastern coast of South America. In order to infer genetic structure and genetic relationships of PSA, these polymorphisms and haplotypes were used as markers for pairwise Fst analyses, Mantel's test and median joining network. The five cox2-3 haplotypes and the unique rbcL-S haplotype were used as markers for summary statistics, neutrality tests Tajima's D and Fu's Fs and for median joining network analyses. An event of demographic expansion from a population with low effective number, followed by a pattern of isolation by distance was obtained for PSA populations with the three analyses. In vitro experiments have shown that introns of different lengths were able to self-splice from pre-RNA transcripts. Conclusion The findings indicated that degenerated HEGs are reminiscent of the presence of a full-length and functional HEG, once fixed for PSA populations. The cline of HEG degeneration determined the pattern of isolation by distance. Analyses with the other markers indicated an event of demographic expansion from a population with low effective number. The different degrees of

  11. Complex group-I introns in nuclear SSU rDNA of red and green algae: evidence of homing-endonuclease pseudogenes in the Bangiophyceae

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Haugen, P; Huss, V A; Nielsen, Henrik

    1999-01-01

    The green alga Scenedesmus pupukensis and the red alga Porphyra spiralis contain large group-IC1 introns in their nuclear small subunit ribosomal RNA genes due to the presence of open reading frames at the 5' end of the introns. The putative 555 amino-acid Scenedesmus-encoded protein harbors...

  12. Creation of a type IIS restriction endonuclease with a long recognition sequence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lippow, Shaun M; Aha, Patti M; Parker, Matthew H; Blake, William J; Baynes, Brian M; Lipovsek, Dasa

    2009-05-01

    Type IIS restriction endonucleases cleave DNA outside their recognition sequences, and are therefore particularly useful in the assembly of DNA from smaller fragments. A limitation of type IIS restriction endonucleases in assembly of long DNA sequences is the relative abundance of their target sites. To facilitate ligation-based assembly of extremely long pieces of DNA, we have engineered a new type IIS restriction endonuclease that combines the specificity of the homing endonuclease I-SceI with the type IIS cleavage pattern of FokI. We linked a non-cleaving mutant of I-SceI, which conveys to the chimeric enzyme its specificity for an 18-bp DNA sequence, to the catalytic domain of FokI, which cuts DNA at a defined site outside the target site. Whereas previously described chimeric endonucleases do not produce type IIS-like precise DNA overhangs suitable for ligation, our chimeric endonuclease cleaves double-stranded DNA exactly 2 and 6 nt from the target site to generate homogeneous, 5', four-base overhangs, which can be ligated with 90% fidelity. We anticipate that these enzymes will be particularly useful in manipulation of DNA fragments larger than a thousand bases, which are very likely to contain target sites for all natural type IIS restriction endonucleases.

  13. Catalytic activity control of restriction endonuclease--triplex forming oligonucleotide conjugates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silanskas, Arunas; Zaremba, Mindaugas; Sasnauskas, Giedrius; Siksnys, Virginijus

    2012-02-15

    Targeting of individual genes in complex genomes requires endonucleases of extremely high specificity. To direct cleavage at the unique site(s) in the genome, both naturally occurring and artificial enzymes have been developed. These include homing endonucleases, zinc-finger nucleases, transcription activator-like effector nucleases, and restriction or chemical nucleases coupled to a triple-helix forming oligonucleotide (TFO). The desired cleavage has been demonstrated both in vivo and in vitro for several model systems. However, to limit cleavage strictly to unique sites and avoid undesired reactions, endonucleases with controlled activity are highly desirable. In this study we present a proof-of-concept demonstration of two strategies to generate restriction endonuclease-TFO conjugates with controllable activity. First, we combined the restriction endonuclease caging and TFO coupling procedures to produce a caged MunI-TFO conjugate, which can be activated by UV-light upon formation of a triple helix. Second, we coupled TFO to a subunit interface mutant of restriction endonuclease Bse634I which shows no activity due to impaired dimerization but is assembled into an active dimer when two Bse634I monomers are brought into close proximity by triple helix formation at the targeted site. Our results push the restriction endonuclease-TFO conjugate technology one step closer to potential in vivo applications.

  14. Problem-Solving Test: Restriction Endonuclease Mapping

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szeberenyi, Jozsef

    2011-01-01

    The term "restriction endonuclease mapping" covers a number of related techniques used to identify specific restriction enzyme recognition sites on small DNA molecules. A method for restriction endonuclease mapping of a 1,000-basepair (bp)-long DNA molecule is described in the fictitious experiment of this test. The most important fact needed to…

  15. Isothermal detection of RNA with restriction endonucleases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Lei; Nakayama, Shizuka; Yitbarek, Saron; Greenfield, Isabel; Sintim, Herman O

    2011-01-07

    Herein, we demonstrate how to detect nucleic acids that do not contain restriction endonuclease recognition sites with restriction endonucleases. We show that the topology of DNA probes used in this detection strategy remarkably affects the efficiency of RNA/DNA detection.

  16. Polymorphic restriction endonuclease fragment segregates and correlates with the gene for HLA-B8.

    OpenAIRE

    Cann, H M; Ascanio, L; Paul, P; Marcadet, A; Dausset, J; Cohen, D

    1983-01-01

    Cellular DNA from HLA-typed individuals was digested with the restriction endonuclease EcoRV. After electrophoresis and transfer to a hybridization membrane, the restriction endonuclease fragments were probed with cDNA carrying the nucleotide sequence encoding a class 1 HLA gene. Polymorphism for presence or absence of various EcoRV fragments was noted in a panel of unrelated HLA-typed individuals. A polymorphic 8.6-kilobase pair EcoRV fragment was found which correlated in the panel with the...

  17. Visualizing phosphodiester-bond hydrolysis by an endonuclease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Molina, Rafael; Stella, Stefano; Redondo, Pilar

    2015-01-01

    The enzymatic hydrolysis of DNA phosphodiester bonds has been widely studied, but the chemical reaction has not yet been observed. Here we follow the generation of a DNA double-strand break (DSB) by the Desulfurococcus mobilis homing endonuclease I-DmoI, trapping sequential stages of a two....... This third metal ion has a crucial role, triggering the consecutive hydrolysis of the targeted phosphodiester bonds in the DNA strands and leaving its position once the DSB is generated. The multiple structures show the orchestrated conformational changes in the protein residues, nucleotides and metals...

  18. Selection of restriction endonucleases using artificial cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Yu; Roberts, Richard J

    2007-01-01

    We describe in this article an in vitro system for the selection of restriction endonucleases using artificial cells. The artificial cells are generated in the form of a water-in-oil emulsion by in vitro compartmentalization. Each aqueous compartment contains a reconstituted transcription/translation mix along with the dispersed DNA templates. In the compartments containing endonuclease genes, an endonuclease expressed in vitro cleaves its own DNA template adjacent to the gene, leaving a sticky end. The pooled DNA templates are then ligated to an adaptor with a compatible end. The endonuclease genes are then enriched by adaptor-specific PCR on the ligation mix. We demonstrate that the system can achieve at least 100-fold enrichment in a single round of selection. It is sensitive enough to enrich an active endonuclease gene from a 1:10(5) model library in 2-3 rounds of selection. Finally, we describe experiments where we selected endonuclease genes directly from a bacterial genomic DNA source in three rounds of selections: the known PstI gene from Providencia stuartii and the new TspMI gene from Thermus sp. manalii. This method provides a unique tool for cloning restriction endonuclease genes and has many other potential applications.

  19. PMS2 endonuclease activity has distinct biological functions and is essential for genome maintenance

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Oers, Johanna M. M.; Roa, Sergio; Werling, Uwe; Liu, Yiyong; Genschel, Jochen; Sellers, Rani S.; Modrich, Paul; Scharff, Matthew D.; Edelmann, Winfried

    2010-01-01

    The DNA mismatch repair protein PMS2 was recently found to encode a novel endonuclease activity. To determine the biological functions of this activity in mammals, we generated endonuclease-deficient Pms2E702K knock-in mice. Pms2EK/EK mice displayed increased genomic mutation rates and a strong cancer predisposition. In addition, class switch recombination, but not somatic hypermutation, was impaired in Pms2EK/EK B cells, indicating a specific role in Ig diversity. In contrast to Pms2−/− mice, Pms2EK/EK male mice were fertile, indicating that this activity is dispensable in spermatogenesis. Therefore, the PMS2 endonuclease activity has distinct biological functions and is essential for genome maintenance and tumor suppression. PMID:20624957

  20. Massively parallel characterization of restriction endonucleases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamps-Hughes, Nick; Quimby, Aine; Zhu, Zhenyu; Johnson, Eric A

    2013-06-01

    Restriction endonucleases are highly specific in recognizing the particular DNA sequence they act on. However, their activity is affected by sequence context, enzyme concentration and buffer composition. Changes in these factors may lead to either ineffective cleavage at the cognate restriction site or relaxed specificity allowing cleavage of degenerate 'star' sites. Additionally, uncharacterized restriction endonucleases and engineered variants present novel activities. Traditionally, restriction endonuclease activity is assayed on simple substrates such as plasmids and synthesized oligonucleotides. We present and use high-throughput Illumina sequencing-based strategies to assay the sequence specificity and flanking sequence preference of restriction endonucleases. The techniques use fragmented DNA from sequenced genomes to quantify restriction endonuclease cleavage on a complex genomic DNA substrate in a single reaction. By mapping millions of restriction site-flanking reads back to the Escherichia coli and Drosophila melanogaster genomes we were able to quantitatively characterize the cognate and star site activity of EcoRI and MfeI and demonstrate genome-wide decreases in star activity with engineered high-fidelity variants EcoRI-HF and MfeI-HF, as well as quantify the influence on MfeI cleavage conferred by flanking nucleotides. The methods presented are readily applicable to all type II restriction endonucleases that cleave both strands of double-stranded DNA.

  1. BspRI restriction endonuclease: cloning, expression in Escherichia coli and sequential cleavage mechanism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raskó, Tamás; Dér, András; Klement, Eva; Slaska-Kiss, Krystyna; Pósfai, Eszter; Medzihradszky, Katalin F; Marshak, Daniel R; Roberts, Richard J; Kiss, Antal

    2010-11-01

    The GGCC-specific restriction endonuclease BspRI is one of the few Type IIP restriction endonucleases, which were suggested to be a monomer. Amino acid sequence information obtained by Edman sequencing and mass spectrometry analysis was used to clone the gene encoding BspRI. The bspRIR gene is located adjacently to the gene of the cognate modification methyltransferase and encodes a 304 aa protein. Expression of the bspRIR gene in Escherichia coli was dependent on the replacement of the native TTG initiation codon with an ATG codon, explaining previous failures in cloning the gene using functional selection. A plasmid containing a single BspRI recognition site was used to analyze kinetically nicking and second-strand cleavage under steady-state conditions. Cleavage of the supercoiled plasmid went through a relaxed intermediate indicating sequential hydrolysis of the two strands. Results of the kinetic analysis of the first- and second-strand cleavage are consistent with cutting the double-stranded substrate site in two independent binding events. A database search identified eight putative restriction-modification systems in which the predicted endonucleases as well as the methyltransferases share high sequence similarity with the corresponding protein of the BspRI system. BspRI and the related putative restriction endonucleases belong to the PD-(D/E)XK nuclease superfamily.

  2. A newly discovered Bordetella species carries a transcriptionally active CRISPR-Cas with a small Cas9 endonuclease

    Science.gov (United States)

    The Cas9 endonuclease of the Type II-a clustered regularly interspersed short palindromic repeats (CRISPR), of Streptococcus pyogenes (SpCas9) has been adapted as a widely used tool for genome editing and genome engineering. Herein, we describe a gene encoding a novel Cas9 ortholog (BpsuCas9) and th...

  3. Temporal dynamics of methyltransferase and restriction endonuclease accumulation in individual cells after introducing a restriction-modification system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morozova, Natalia; Sabantsev, Anton; Bogdanova, Ekaterina; Fedorova, Yana; Maikova, Anna; Vedyaykin, Alexey; Rodic, Andjela; Djordjevic, Marko; Khodorkovskii, Mikhail; Severinov, Konstantin

    2016-01-29

    Type II restriction-modification (R-M) systems encode a restriction endonuclease that cleaves DNA at specific sites, and a methyltransferase that modifies same sites protecting them from restriction endonuclease cleavage. Type II R-M systems benefit bacteria by protecting them from bacteriophages. Many type II R-M systems are plasmid-based and thus capable of horizontal transfer. Upon the entry of such plasmids into a naïve host with unmodified genomic recognition sites, methyltransferase should be synthesized first and given sufficient time to methylate recognition sites in the bacterial genome before the toxic restriction endonuclease activity appears. Here, we directly demonstrate a delay in restriction endonuclease synthesis after transformation of Escherichia coli cells with a plasmid carrying the Esp1396I type II R-M system, using single-cell microscopy. We further demonstrate that before the appearance of the Esp1396I restriction endonuclease the intracellular concentration of Esp1396I methyltransferase undergoes a sharp peak, which should allow rapid methylation of host genome recognition sites. A mathematical model that satisfactorily describes the observed dynamics of both Esp1396I enzymes is presented. The results reported here were obtained using a functional Esp1396I type II R-M system encoding both enzymes fused to fluorescent proteins. Similar approaches should be applicable to the studies of other R-M systems at single-cell level. © The Author(s) 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Nucleic Acids Research.

  4. Home

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rokeya Sakhawat Hossain

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available A fiery feminist piece that argues that Indian women are all homeless; animals have homes but Indian women have none, because they have to depend on the mercy of their "keepers"; therefore, Indian women live a life worse than animals.

  5. Antibiotic resistance and restriction endonucleases in fecal enterococci of chamois (Rupicapra rupicapra Linnaeus, 1758).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vandžurová, A; Hrašková, I; Júdová, J; Javorský, P; Pristaš, P

    2012-07-01

    Two hundred eighty-four isolates of enterococci from feces of wild living chamois from alpine environments were tested for sensitivity to three antibiotics. Low frequency of resistance was observed in studied enterococcal populations (about 5 % for tetracycline and erythromycin and 0 % for ampicillin). In six animals, the population of enterococci lacked any detectable resistance. Our data indicated that enterococcal population in feces of the majority of studied animals did not encounter mobile genetic elements encoding antibiotic resistance probably due to spatial separation and/or due to low exposure to the antibiotics. Based on resistance profiles observed, three populations were analyzed for the presence of restriction endonucleases. The restriction enzymes from two isolates-31K and 1K-were further purified and characterized. Restriction endonuclease Efa1KI recognizes CCWGG sequence and is an isoschizomer of BstNI. Endonuclease Efc31KI, a BsmAI isoschizomer, recognizes the sequence GTCTC and it is a first restriction endonuclease identified in Enterococcus faecium. Our data indicate that restriction-modification (R-M) systems do not represent an efficient barrier for antibiotic resistance spreading; enterococcal populations colonized by antibiotics resistance genes were also colonized by the R-M systems.

  6. Altered UV resistance and UV mutational spectrum in repair-proficient murine fibroblasts expressing endonuclease V.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kusewitt, D F; Dyble, J; Sherburn, T E; Ryan, S L; Ji, J Y

    1998-03-01

    In previously reported studies, we transfected repair-proficient murine fibroblasts with the denV gene of bacteriophage T4 and showed that expression of encoded endonuclease V markedly enhanced cyclobutane pyrimidine dimer (CPD) repair and reduced the frequency of ultraviolet radiation (UV)-induced mutations. In the present studies, we compared the spectra of UV-induced mutations at the hprt locus in denV-transfected and control cells. A significant difference in mutation types was observed. While multiple base deletions and single base insertions were found in denV-transfected but not control cells, multiple tandem and non-tandem point mutations identified in control cells were absent in denV-transfected cells. When we compared colony survival following UV exposure in the two cell lines, it appeared that endonuclease V expression did not enhance UV resistance, instead denV-transfected cells had increased susceptibility to low fluences of UV. The effects of endonuclease V expression on UV resistance and on UV mutational spectrum are likely to be due both to the removal of CPDs and to the novel enzymatic activity of endonuclease V.

  7. Second human protein with homology to the Escherichia coli abasic endonuclease exonuclease III.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hadi, M Z; Wilson, D M

    2000-01-01

    There are two major apurinic/apyrimidinic (AP) endonuclease/3'-diesterase families designated after the Escherichia coli proteins exonuclease III (ExoIII) and endonuclease IV (EndoIV). These repair proteins function to excise mutagenic and cytotoxic AP sites or 3'-phosphate/phosphoglycolate groups from DNA. In mammals, the predominant repair endonuclease is Ape1, a homolog of ExoIII, whereas a mammalian homolog to EndoIV has not been identified to date. We have identified a human protein termed Ape2 that represents a subclass of the ExoIII family (exhibiting highest similarity to the Saccharomyces cerevisiae ETH1/APN2 gene product) and maintains many of the essential functional residues of the ExoIII-like proteins. The human protein is 518 amino acids with a predicted molecular mass of 57.3 kDa and a pI of 8.65. Unlike Ape1, this protein exhibited only weak ability to complement the repair defects of AP endonuclease/3'-repair-defective bacteria and yeast. Similarly, a weak, but specific, DNA-binding and incision activity for abasic site-containing substrates was observed with partially purified Ape2 protein. APE2 is located on the X chromosome at position p11.21 and consists of six exons. The transcript for APE2 is ubiquitously expressed, suggesting an important function for the encoded protein. An Ape2 green fluorescent fusion protein localized predominantly to the nucleus of HeLa cells, indicating a nuclear function; this localization was dependent on the C-terminal domain. We discuss our results in the context of the evolutionary conservation of the AP endonuclease families and their divergent activities and biological contributions.

  8. Identification of APN2, the Saccharomyces cerevisiae homolog of the major human AP endonuclease HAP1, and its role in the repair of abasic sites

    OpenAIRE

    Johnson, Robert E.; Torres-Ramos, Carlos A.; Izumi, Tadahide; Mitra, Sankar; Prakash, Satya; Prakash, Louise

    1998-01-01

    Abasic (AP) sites arise in DNA through spontaneous base loss and enzymatic removal of damaged bases. APN1 encodes the major AP-endonuclease of Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Human HAP1 (REF1) encodes the major AP endonuclease which, in addition to its role in DNA repair, functions as a redox regulatory protein. We identify APN2, the yeast homolog of HAP1 and provide evidence that Apn1 and Apn2 represent alternate pathways for repairing AP sites. The apn1Δ apn2Δ strain displays a highly elevated le...

  9. Assembly of Francisella novicida Cpf1 endonuclease in complex with guide RNA and target DNA

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Alcón, Pablo; Montoya, Guillermo; Stella, Stefano

    2017-01-01

    a target DNA preceded by a 5'-TTN-3' protospacer-adjacent motif (PAM) complementary to the RNA guide. To obtain structural insight into the inner workings of Cpf1, the crystallization of an active complex containing the full extent of the crRNA and a 31-nucleotide dsDNA target was attempted. The gene...... encoding Cpf1 from Francisella novicida was cloned, overexpressed and purified. The crRNA was transcribed and purified in vitro. Finally, the ternary FnCpf1-crRNA-DNA complex was assembled and purified by preparative electrophoresis before crystallization. Crystals belonging to space group C2221, with unit...... into six types and 19 subtypes according to conservation of the cas gene and loci organization. Recently, a new protein with endonuclease activity belonging to class 2 type V has been identified. This endonuclease, termed Cpf1, in complex with a single CRISPR RNA (crRNA) is able to recognize and cleave...

  10. How driving endonuclease genes can be used to combat pests and disease vectors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Godfray, H Charles J; North, Ace; Burt, Austin

    2017-09-11

    Driving endonuclease genes (DEGs) spread through a population by a non-Mendelian mechanism. In a heterozygote, the protein encoded by a DEG causes a double-strand break in the homologous chromosome opposite to where its gene is inserted and when the break is repaired using the homologue as a template the DEG heterozygote is converted to a homozygote. Some DEGs occur naturally while several classes of endonucleases can be engineered to spread in this way, with CRISPR-Cas9 based systems being particularly flexible. There is great interest in using driving endonuclease genes to impose a genetic load on insects that vector diseases or are economic pests to reduce their population density, or to introduce a beneficial gene such as one that might interrupt disease transmission. This paper reviews both the population genetics and population dynamics of DEGs. It summarises the theory that guides the design of DEG constructs intended to perform different functions. It also reviews the studies that have explored the likelihood of resistance to DEG phenotypes arising, and how this risk may be reduced. The review is intended for a general audience and mathematical details are kept to a minimum.

  11. Restriction endonuclease EcaI from Enterobacter cloacae

    OpenAIRE

    Hobom, G.; Schwarz, E.; Melzer, M.; Mayer, H.

    1981-01-01

    Restriction endonuclease EcaI obtained from Enterobacter cloacae DSM30056 recognizes the group of heptanucleotide palindromes 5′-G[unk]G-T-N-A-C-C-3′, and on cleavage (arrow) produces fragments with 5′-terminal pentanucleotide extensions. It is identical in specificity with restriction endonuclease BstEII from Bacillus stearothermophilus ET.

  12. The human homolog of Escherichia coli endonuclease V is a nucleolar protein with affinity for branched DNA structures.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cathrine Fladeby

    Full Text Available Loss of amino groups from adenines in DNA results in the formation of hypoxanthine (Hx bases with miscoding properties. The primary enzyme in Escherichia coli for DNA repair initiation at deaminated adenine is endonuclease V (endoV, encoded by the nfi gene, which cleaves the second phosphodiester bond 3' of an Hx lesion. Endonuclease V orthologs are widespread in nature and belong to a family of highly conserved proteins. Whereas prokaryotic endoV enzymes are well characterized, the function of the eukaryotic homologs remains obscure. Here we describe the human endoV ortholog and show with bioinformatics and experimental analysis that a large number of transcript variants exist for the human endonuclease V gene (ENDOV, many of which are unlikely to be translated into functional protein. Full-length ENDOV is encoded by 8 evolutionary conserved exons covering the core region of the enzyme, in addition to one or more 3'-exons encoding an unstructured and poorly conserved C-terminus. In contrast to the E. coli enzyme, we find recombinant ENDOV neither to incise nor bind Hx-containing DNA. While both enzymes have strong affinity for several branched DNA substrates, cleavage is observed only with E. coli endoV. We find that ENDOV is localized in the cytoplasm and nucleoli of human cells. As nucleoli harbor the rRNA genes, this may suggest a role for the protein in rRNA gene transactions such as DNA replication or RNA transcription.

  13. Catalytic domain of restriction endonuclease BmrI as a cleavage module for engineering endonucleases with novel substrate specificities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chan, Siu-hong; Bao, Yongming; Ciszak, Ewa; Laget, Sophie; Xu, Shuang-yong

    2007-01-01

    Creating endonucleases with novel sequence specificities provides more possibilities to manipulate DNA. We have created a chimeric endonuclease (CH-endonuclease) consisting of the DNA cleavage domain of BmrI restriction endonuclease and C.BclI, a controller protein of the BclI restriction-modification system. The purified chimeric endonuclease, BmrI198-C.BclI, cleaves DNA at specific sites in the vicinity of the recognition sequence of C.BclI. Double-strand (ds) breaks were observed at two sites: 8 bp upstream and 18 bp within the C-box sequence. Using DNA substrates with deletions of C-box sequence, we show that the chimeric endonuclease requires the 5' half of the C box only for specific cleavage. A schematic model is proposed for the mode of protein-DNA binding and DNA cleavage. The present study demonstrates that the BmrI cleavage domain can be used to create combinatorial endonucleases that cleave DNA at specific sequences dictated by the DNA-binding partner. The resulting endonucleases will be useful in vitro and in vivo to create ds breaks at specific sites and generate deletions.

  14. High-resolution structure of the N-terminal endonuclease domain of the Lassa virus L polymerase in complex with magnesium ions.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gregor D Wallat

    Full Text Available Lassa virus (LASV causes deadly hemorrhagic fever disease for which there are no vaccines and limited treatments. LASV-encoded L polymerase is required for viral RNA replication and transcription. The functional domains of L-a large protein of 2218 amino acid residues-are largely undefined, except for the centrally located RNA-dependent RNA polymerase (RdRP motif. Recent structural and functional analyses of the N-terminal region of the L protein from lymphocytic choriomeningitis virus (LCMV, which is in the same Arenaviridae family as LASV, have identified an endonuclease domain that presumably cleaves the cap structures of host mRNAs in order to initiate viral transcription. Here we present a high-resolution crystal structure of the N-terminal 173-aa region of the LASV L protein (LASV L173 in complex with magnesium ions at 1.72 Å. The structure is highly homologous to other known viral endonucleases of arena- (LCMV NL1, orthomyxo- (influenza virus PA, and bunyaviruses (La Crosse virus NL1. Although the catalytic residues (D89, E102 and K122 are highly conserved among the known viral endonucleases, LASV L endonuclease structure shows some notable differences. Our data collected from in vitro endonuclease assays and a reporter-based LASV minigenome transcriptional assay in mammalian cells confirm structural prediction of LASV L173 as an active endonuclease. The high-resolution structure of the LASV L endonuclease domain in complex with magnesium ions should aid the development of antivirals against lethal Lassa hemorrhagic fever.

  15. Identification of APN2, the Saccharomyces cerevisiae homolog of the major human AP endonuclease HAP1, and its role in the repair of abasic sites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, R E; Torres-Ramos, C A; Izumi, T; Mitra, S; Prakash, S; Prakash, L

    1998-10-01

    Abasic (AP) sites arise in DNA through spontaneous base loss and enzymatic removal of damaged bases. APN1 encodes the major AP-endonuclease of Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Human HAP1 (REF1) encodes the major AP endonuclease which, in addition to its role in DNA repair, functions as a redox regulatory protein. We identify APN2, the yeast homolog of HAP1 and provide evidence that Apn1 and Apn2 represent alternate pathways for repairing AP sites. The apn1Delta apn2Delta strain displays a highly elevated level of MMS-induced mutagenesis, which is dependent on the REV3, REV7, and REV1 genes. Our findings indicate that AP sites are highly cytotoxic and mutagenic in eukaryotes, and that the REV3, REV7-encoded DNA polymerase zeta mediates the mutagenic bypass of AP sites.

  16. In silico analysis of evolutionary patterns in restriction endonucleases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Tiratha Raj; Pardasani, Kamal Raj

    2009-01-01

    Restriction endonucleases represent one of the best studied examples of DNA binding proteins. Type II restriction endonucleases recognize short sequences of foreign DNA and cleave the target on both strands with remarkable sequence specificity. Type II restriction endonucleases are part of restriction modification systems. Restriction modification systems occur ubiquitously among bacteria and archaea. Restriction endonucleases are indispensable tools in molecular biology and biotechnology. They are important model system for specific protein-nucleic acid interactions and also serve as good example for investigating structural, functional and evolutionary relationships among various biomolecules. The interaction between restriction endonucleases and their recognition sequences plays a crucial role in biochemical activities like catalytic site/metal binding, DNA repair and recombination etc. We study various patterns in restriction endonucleases type II and analyzed their structural, functional and evolutionary role. Our studies support X-ray crystallographic studies, arguing for divergence and molecular evolution. Conservation patterns of the nuclease superfamily have also been analyzed by estimating site-specific evolutionary rates for the analyzed structures related to respective chains in this study.

  17. RNA aptamer inhibitors of a restriction endonuclease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mondragón, Estefanía; Maher, L James

    2015-09-03

    Restriction endonucleases (REases) recognize and cleave short palindromic DNA sequences, protecting bacterial cells against bacteriophage infection by attacking foreign DNA. We are interested in the potential of folded RNA to mimic DNA, a concept that might be applied to inhibition of DNA-binding proteins. As a model system, we sought RNA aptamers against the REases BamHI, PacI and KpnI using systematic evolution of ligands by exponential enrichment (SELEX). After 20 rounds of selection under different stringent conditions, we identified the 10 most enriched RNA aptamers for each REase. Aptamers were screened for binding and specificity, and assayed for REase inhibition. We obtained eight high-affinity (Kd ∼12-30 nM) selective competitive inhibitors (IC50 ∼20-150 nM) for KpnI. Predicted RNA secondary structures were confirmed by in-line attack assay and a 38-nt derivative of the best anti-KpnI aptamer was sufficient for inhibition. These competitive inhibitors presumably act as KpnI binding site analogs, but lack the primary consensus KpnI cleavage sequence and are not cleaved by KpnI, making their potential mode of DNA mimicry fascinating. Anti-REase RNA aptamers could have value in studies of REase mechanism and may give clues to a code for designing RNAs that competitively inhibit DNA binding proteins including transcription factors. © The Author(s) 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Nucleic Acids Research.

  18. Solitary restriction endonucleases in prokaryotic genomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ershova, Anna S; Karyagina, Anna S; Vasiliev, Mikhail O; Lyashchuk, Alexander M; Lunin, Vladimir G; Spirin, Sergey A; Alexeevski, Andrei V

    2012-11-01

    Prokaryotic restriction-modification (R-M) systems defend the host cell from the invasion of a foreign DNA. They comprise two enzymatic activities: specific DNA cleavage activity and DNA methylation activity preventing cleavage. Typically, these activities are provided by two separate enzymes: a DNA methyltransferase (MTase) and a restriction endonuclease (RE). In the absence of a corresponding MTase, an RE of Type II R-M system is highly toxic for the cell. Genes of the R-M system are linked in the genome in the vast majority of annotated cases. There are only a few reported cases in which the genes of MTase and RE from one R-M system are not linked. Nevertheless, a few hundreds solitary RE genes are present in the Restriction Enzyme Database (http://rebase.neb.com) annotations. Using the comparative genomic approach, we analysed 272 solitary RE genes. For 57 solitary RE genes we predicted corresponding MTase genes located distantly in a genome. Of the 272 solitary RE genes, 99 are likely to be fragments of RE genes. Various explanations for the existence of the remaining 116 solitary RE genes are also discussed.

  19. Screening for restriction endonucleases in methane-oxidizing bacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Romanovskaya, V A; Alexeyev, M F; Gun'kovskaya, N V; Stolyar, S M; Shatohina, E S; Malashenko Yu, R

    1992-01-01

    51 methane-oxidizing bacteria strains such as Methylomonas methanica, M. rubra, Methylococcus capsulatus, M. thermophilus, M. luteus, M. ucrainicus, M. whittenburyi, Methylosinus trichosporium, M. sporium, Methylocystis parvus isolated from various ecological niches and geographical regions of the Ukraine and also the strains received from R. Whittenbury and Y. Heyer were screened for restriction endonucleases. Type II restriction endonucleases were detected in IMV B-3112 (= 12 b), IMV B-3027 (= 26), IMV B-3019 (= 9 c), IMV B-3017 (= 17 c), IMV B-3226 (= 26 v), IMV B-3033 (= Y), IMV B-3100 (= 100) and IMV B-3494 (= 1E494). The results obtained were indicative of relatively high frequency of restriction enzymes occurrence in methane-oxidizing bacteria. There were Kpn I (Asp 7181) restriction endonuclease isoschizomers in crude extracts of IMV B-3112, B-3017, B-3019, B-3027 isolated from fresh-water silt as well as in IMV B-3226 strain isolated from waste-water silt. Although these isolates had bee previously considered as untypical strains of M. ucrainicus, more detailed study of their properties allowed placing them with Methylovarius luteus (= Methylococcus luteus). IMV B-3494 strain was identified as Methylococcus capsulatus. Strain IMV B-3033 had earlier been allocated to Methylovarius whittenburyi (= Methylococcus whittenburyi). Specificity of restriction endonucleases of this strain was not tested. Therefore, for the first time restriction endonucleases were detected in methane-oxidizing bacteria. 8 strains (3 species) among 51 strains (13 species) were found to produce restriction endonucleases displaying three different types of specificity in the least. Producers of restriction endonucleases having Kpn I (Asp 7181) specificity were isolated from different water and silt samples of the Dnieper flood-land more than 20 years ago.

  20. Expression, purification and crystallization of two endonuclease III enzymes from Deinococcus radiodurans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarre, Aili; Ökvist, Mats; Klar, Tobias; Moe, Elin; Timmins, Joanna

    2014-12-01

    Endonuclease III is a bifunctional DNA glycosylase that removes a wide range of oxidized bases in DNA. Deinococcus radiodurans is an extreme radiation-resistant and desiccation-resistant bacterium and possesses three genes encoding endonuclease III enzymes in its genome: DR2438 (EndoIII-1), DR0289 (EndoIII-2) and DR0982 (EndoIII-3). Here, EndoIII-1 and an N-terminally truncated form of EndoIII-3 (EndoIII-3Δ76) have been expressed, purified and crystallized, and preliminary X-ray crystallographic analyses have been performed to 2.15 and 1.31 Å resolution, respectively. The EndoIII-1 crystals belonged to the monoclinic space group C2, with unit-cell parameters a = 181.38, b = 38.56, c = 37.09 Å, β = 89.34° and one molecule per asymmetric unit. The EndoIII-3Δ76 crystals also belonged to the monoclinic space group C2, but with unit-cell parameters a = 91.47, b = 40.53, c = 72.47 Å, β = 102.53° and one molecule per asymmetric unit. The EndoIII-1 structure was determined by molecular replacement, while the truncated EndoIII-3Δ76 structure was determined by single-wavelength anomalous dispersion phasing. Refinement of the structures is in progress.

  1. Expression of flap endonuclease-1 during meiosis in a basidiomycete, Coprinus cinereus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamaguchi, Taiki; Namekawa, Satoshi H; Hamada, Fumika N; Kasai, Nobuyuki; Nara, Takayuki; Watanabe, Kei; Iwabata, Kazuki; Ishizaki, Takashi; Ishii, Satomi; Koshiyama, Akiyo; Inagaki, Sachiyo; Kimura, Seisuke; Sakaguchi, Kengo

    2004-05-01

    In the basidiomycete Coprinus cinereus (C. cinereus), which shows a highly synchronous meiotic cell cycle, the meiotic prophase I cells demonstrate flap endonuclease-1 activity. To investigate its role during meiosis, we isolated a C. cinereus cDNA homolog of flap endonuclease-1 (CcFEN-1), 1377bp in length with the open reading frame (ORF) encoding a predicted molecular mass of 51 kDa. At amino-acid residues Glu276-Pro345, a specific inserted sequence composed of 70 amino acids rich in polar forms was found to exist, without sequence identity to other eukaryotic FEN-1 or the polar amino acid rich sequences found in C. cinereus PCNA and C. cinereus DNA ligase IV, although the lengths and percentages of polar amino acids were similar. Northern hybridization analysis indicated CcFEN-1 to be expressed not only in the pre-meiotic S phase but also in meiotic prophase I. The roles of CcFEN-1 during meiosis are discussed.

  2. Assembly of Francisella novicida Cpf1 endonuclease in complex with guide RNA and target DNA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alcón, Pablo; Montoya, Guillermo; Stella, Stefano

    2017-07-01

    Bacteria and archaea use the CRISPR-Cas system as an adaptive response against infection by foreign nucleic acids. Owing to its remarkable flexibility, this mechanism has been harnessed and adopted as a powerful tool for genome editing. The CRISPR-Cas system includes two classes that are subdivided into six types and 19 subtypes according to conservation of the cas gene and loci organization. Recently, a new protein with endonuclease activity belonging to class 2 type V has been identified. This endonuclease, termed Cpf1, in complex with a single CRISPR RNA (crRNA) is able to recognize and cleave a target DNA preceded by a 5'-TTN-3' protospacer-adjacent motif (PAM) complementary to the RNA guide. To obtain structural insight into the inner workings of Cpf1, the crystallization of an active complex containing the full extent of the crRNA and a 31-nucleotide dsDNA target was attempted. The gene encoding Cpf1 from Francisella novicida was cloned, overexpressed and purified. The crRNA was transcribed and purified in vitro. Finally, the ternary FnCpf1-crRNA-DNA complex was assembled and purified by preparative electrophoresis before crystallization. Crystals belonging to space group C2221, with unit-cell parameters a = 85.2, b = 137.6, c = 320.5 Å, were obtained and subjected to preliminary diffraction experiments.

  3. Nuclease escape elements protect messenger RNA against cleavage by multiple viral endonucleases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muller, Mandy; Glaunsinger, Britt A

    2017-08-01

    During lytic Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpesvirus (KSHV) infection, the viral endonu- clease SOX promotes widespread degradation of cytoplasmic messenger RNA (mRNA). However, select mRNAs, including the transcript encoding interleukin-6 (IL-6), escape SOX-induced cleavage. IL-6 escape is mediated through a 3' UTR RNA regulatory element that overrides the SOX targeting mechanism. Here, we reveal that this protective RNA element functions to broadly restrict cleavage by a range of homologous and non-homologous viral endonucleases. However, it does not impede cleavage by cellular endonucleases. The IL-6 protective sequence may be representative of a larger class of nuclease escape elements, as we identified a similar protective element in the GADD45B mRNA. The IL-6 and GADD45B-derived elements display similarities in their sequence, putative structure, and several associated RNA binding proteins. However, the overall composition of their ribonucleoprotein complexes appears distinct, leading to differences in the breadth of nucleases restricted. These findings highlight how RNA elements can selectively control transcript abundance in the background of widespread virus-induced mRNA degradation.

  4. Natural transformation of an engineered Helicobacter pylori strain deficient in type II restriction endonucleases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Xue-Song; Blaser, Martin J

    2012-07-01

    Restriction-modification (RM) systems are important for bacteria to limit foreign DNA invasion. The naturally competent bacterium Helicobacter pylori has highly diverse strain-specific type II systems. To evaluate the roles of strain-specific restriction in H. pylori natural transformation, a markerless type II restriction endonuclease-deficient (REd) mutant was constructed. We deleted the genes encoding all four active type II restriction endonucleases in H. pylori strain 26695 using sacB-mediated counterselection. Transformation by donor DNA with exogenous cassettes methylated by Escherichia coli was substantially (1.7 and 2.0 log(10) for cat and aphA, respectively) increased in the REd strain. There also was significantly increased transformation of the REd strain by donor DNA from other H. pylori strains, to an extent corresponding to their shared type II R-M system strain specificity with 26695. Comparison of the REd and wild-type strains indicates that restriction did not affect the length of DNA fragment integration during natural transformation. There also were no differentials in cell growth or susceptibility to DNA damage. In total, the data indicate that the type II REd mutant has enhanced competence with no loss of growth or repair facility compared to the wild type, facilitating H. pylori mutant construction and other genetic engineering.

  5. Restriction endonucleases: natural and directed evolution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gupta, Richa; Capalash, Neena; Sharma, Prince

    2012-05-01

    Type II restriction endonucleases (REs) are highly sequence-specific compared with other classes of nucleases. PD-(D/E)XK nucleases, initially represented by only type II REs, now comprise a large and extremely diverse superfamily of proteins and, although sharing a structurally conserved core, typically display little or no detectable sequence similarity except for the active site motifs. Sequence similarity can only be observed in methylases and few isoschizomers. As a consequence, REs are classified according to combinations of functional properties rather than on the basis of genetic relatedness. New alignment matrices and classification systems based on structural core connectivity and cleavage mechanisms have been developed to characterize new REs and related proteins. REs recognizing more than 300 distinct specificities have been identified in RE database (REBASE: http://rebase.neb.com/cgi-bin/statlist ) but still the need for newer specificities is increasing due to the advancement in molecular biology and applications. The enzymes have undergone constant evolution through structural changes in protein scaffolds which include random mutations, homologous recombinations, insertions, and deletions of coding DNA sequences but rational mutagenesis or directed evolution delivers protein variants with new functions in accordance with defined biochemical or environmental pressures. Redesigning through random mutation, addition or deletion of amino acids, methylation-based selection, synthetic molecules, combining recognition and cleavage domains from different enzymes, or combination with domains of additional functions change the cleavage specificity or substrate preference and stability. There is a growing number of patents awarded for the creation of engineered REs with new and enhanced properties.

  6. Genomic Disruption of VEGF-A Expression in Human Retinal Pigment Epithelial Cells Using CRISPR-Cas9 Endonuclease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yiu, Glenn; Tieu, Eric; Nguyen, Anthony T; Wong, Brittany; Smit-McBride, Zeljka

    2016-10-01

    To employ type II clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats (CRISPR)-Cas9 endonuclease to suppress ocular angiogenesis by genomic disruption of VEGF-A in human RPE cells. CRISPR sequences targeting exon 1 of human VEGF-A were computationally identified based on predicted Cas9 on- and off-target probabilities. Single guide RNA (gRNA) cassettes with these target sequences were cloned into lentiviral vectors encoding the Streptococcuspyogenes Cas9 endonuclease (SpCas9) gene. The lentiviral vectors were used to infect ARPE-19 cells, a human RPE cell line. Frequency of insertion or deletion (indel) mutations was assessed by T7 endonuclease 1 mismatch detection assay; mRNA levels were assessed with quantitative real-time PCR; and VEGF-A protein levels were determined by ELISA. In vitro angiogenesis was measured using an endothelial cell tube formation assay. Five gRNAs targeting VEGF-A were selected based on the highest predicted on-target probabilities, lowest off-target probabilities, or combined average of both scores. Lentiviral delivery of the top-scoring gRNAs with SpCas9 resulted in indel formation in the VEGF-A gene at frequencies up to 37.0% ± 4.0% with corresponding decreases in secreted VEGF-A protein up to 41.2% ± 7.4% (P CRISPR-Cas9 endonuclease system may reduce VEGF-A secretion from human RPE cells and suppress angiogenesis, supporting the possibility of employing gene editing for antiangiogenesis therapy in ocular diseases.

  7. Crystallization of the xeroderma pigmentosum group F endonuclease from Aeropyrum pernix.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lally, John; Newman, Matthew; Murray-Rust, Judith; Fadden, Andrew; Kawarabayasi, Yutaka; McDonald, Neil

    2004-09-01

    The xeroderma pigmentosa group F protein (XPF) is a founding member of a family of 3'-flap endonucleases that play an essential role in nucleotide-excision repair, DNA replication and recombination. The XPF gene has been cloned from Aeropyrum pernix, encoding a 254-residue protein (apXPF). Recombinant protein was produced in Escherichia coli and purified by three chromatographic steps. Three different crystal forms of apXPF were grown in trigonal, monoclinic and triclinic systems. The trigonal crystals diffracted to 2.8 A and were grown in the presence of double-stranded DNA. Monoclinic crystals were grown without DNA and diffracted to 3.2 A. Triclinic crystals were grown from a truncated apXPF protein lacking the tandem helix-hairpin-helix motifs and diffracted to 2.1 A.

  8. DNA Modification Methylase Activity of Escherichia coli Restriction Endonucleases K and P

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haberman, Allan; Heywood, Janet; Meselson, Matthew

    1972-01-01

    The highly purified restriction endonucleases of E. coli K and coliphage P1 transfer methyl groups from S-adenosylmethionine to adenine residues of unmodified DNA. Incubation of unmodified DNA with endonucleases K or P and S-adenosylmethionine renders the DNA resistant to restriction. The enzymes, therefore, have both restriction endonuclease and modification methylase activities. PMID:4564204

  9. Type I restriction endonucleases are true catalytic enzymes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bianco, Piero R; Xu, Cuiling; Chi, Min

    2009-06-01

    Type I restriction endonucleases are intriguing, multifunctional complexes that restrict DNA randomly, at sites distant from the target sequence. Restriction at distant sites is facilitated by ATP hydrolysis-dependent, translocation of double-stranded DNA towards the stationary enzyme bound at the recognition sequence. Following restriction, the enzymes are thought to remain associated with the DNA at the target site, hydrolyzing copious amounts of ATP. As a result, for the past 35 years type I restriction endonucleases could only be loosely classified as enzymes since they functioned stoichiometrically relative to DNA. To further understand enzyme mechanism, a detailed analysis of DNA cleavage by the EcoR124I holoenzyme was done. We demonstrate for the first time that type I restriction endonucleases are not stoichiometric but are instead catalytic with respect to DNA. Further, the mechanism involves formation of a dimer of holoenzymes, with each monomer bound to a target sequence and, following cleavage, each dissociates in an intact form to bind and restrict subsequent DNA molecules. Therefore, type I restriction endonucleases, like their type II counterparts, are true enzymes. The conclusion that type I restriction enzymes are catalytic relative to DNA has important implications for the in vivo function of these previously enigmatic enzymes.

  10. The Restriction Endonuclease Cleavage Map of Rat Liver Mitochondrial DNA

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bakker, H.; Holtrop, M.; Terpstra, P.

    1977-01-01

    Mitochondrial DNA from rat liver contains six sites for cleavage by the restriction endonucleases Hind III and EcoRI. A large stretch of DNA, comprising about 40% of the mitochondrial genome is not cleaved by either of the enzymes; eight cleavage sites are located on a DNA stretch of 35% of the

  11. AP endonuclease independent repair of abasic sites in Schizosaccharomyces pombe

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nilsen, Line; Forstrøm, Rune J.; Bjørås, Magnar; Alseth, Ingrun

    2012-01-01

    Abasic (AP) sites are formed spontaneously and are inevitably intermediates during base excision repair of DNA base damages. AP sites are both mutagenic and cytotoxic and key enzymes for their removal are AP endonucleases. However, AP endonuclease independent repair initiated by DNA glycosylases performing β,δ-elimination cleavage of the AP sites has been described in mammalian cells. Here, we describe another AP endonuclease independent repair pathway for removal of AP sites in Schizosaccharomyces pombe that is initiated by a bifunctional DNA glycosylase, Nth1 and followed by cleavage of the baseless sugar residue by tyrosyl phosphodiesterase Tdp1. We propose that repair is completed by the action of a polynucleotide kinase, a DNA polymerase and finally a DNA ligase to seal the gap. A fission yeast double mutant of the major AP endonuclease Apn2 and Tdp1 shows synergistic increase in MMS sensitivity, substantiating that Apn2 and Tdp1 process the same substrate. These results add new knowledge to the complex cellular response to AP sites, which could be exploited in chemotherapy where synthetic lethality is a key strategy of treatment. PMID:22084197

  12. Identification of Campylobacter pyloridis isolates by restriction endonuclease DNA analysis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Langenberg, W.; Rauws, E. A.; Widjojokusumo, A.; Tytgat, G. N.; Zanen, H. C.

    1986-01-01

    Campylobacter pyloridis isolates recovered from gastric biopsy specimens of 16 patients were examined by restriction endonuclease DNA analysis with HindIII. For 8 of these 16 patients two different isolates were compared to study the persistence of the colonizing strains and the stability of their

  13. AP endonuclease independent repair of abasic sites in Schizosaccharomyces pombe.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nilsen, Line; Forstrøm, Rune J; Bjørås, Magnar; Alseth, Ingrun

    2012-03-01

    Abasic (AP) sites are formed spontaneously and are inevitably intermediates during base excision repair of DNA base damages. AP sites are both mutagenic and cytotoxic and key enzymes for their removal are AP endonucleases. However, AP endonuclease independent repair initiated by DNA glycosylases performing β,δ-elimination cleavage of the AP sites has been described in mammalian cells. Here, we describe another AP endonuclease independent repair pathway for removal of AP sites in Schizosaccharomyces pombe that is initiated by a bifunctional DNA glycosylase, Nth1 and followed by cleavage of the baseless sugar residue by tyrosyl phosphodiesterase Tdp1. We propose that repair is completed by the action of a polynucleotide kinase, a DNA polymerase and finally a DNA ligase to seal the gap. A fission yeast double mutant of the major AP endonuclease Apn2 and Tdp1 shows synergistic increase in MMS sensitivity, substantiating that Apn2 and Tdp1 process the same substrate. These results add new knowledge to the complex cellular response to AP sites, which could be exploited in chemotherapy where synthetic lethality is a key strategy of treatment.

  14. A Complete Cleavage Map of Neurospora crassa mtDNA Obtained with Endonucleases Eco RI and Bam HI

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Terpstra, P.; Holtrop, M.

    1977-01-01

    A physical map of Neurospora crassa mitochondrial DNA has been constructed using specific fragments obtained with restriction endonucleases. The DNA has 5 cleavage sites for endonuclease Bam HI, 12 for endonuclease Eco RI and more than 30 for endonuclease Hind III. The sequence of the Eco RI and Bam

  15. Genotyping with CRISPR-Cas-derived RNA-guided endonucleases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Jong Min; Kim, Daesik; Kim, Seokjoong; Kim, Jin-Soo

    2014-01-01

    Restriction fragment length polymorphism (RFLP) analysis is one of the oldest, most convenient and least expensive methods of genotyping, but is limited by the availability of restriction endonuclease sites. Here we present a novel method of employing CRISPR/Cas-derived RNA-guided engineered nucleases (RGENs) in RFLP analysis. We prepare RGENs by complexing recombinant Cas9 protein derived from Streptococcus pyogenes with in vitro transcribed guide RNAs that are complementary to the DNA sequences of interest. Then, we genotype recurrent mutations found in cancer and small insertions or deletions (indels) induced in cultured cells and animals by RGENs and other engineered nucleases such as transcription activator-like effector nucleases (TALENs). Unlike T7 endonuclease I or Surveyor assays that are widely used for genotyping engineered nuclease-induced mutations, RGEN-mediated RFLP analysis can detect homozygous mutant clones that contain identical biallelic indel sequences and is not limited by sequence polymorphisms near the nuclease target sites.

  16. Identification of leptospiral isolates by bacterial restriction endonuclease analysis (Brenda

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Venkatesha M

    2001-01-01

    Full Text Available DNA samples from 19 reference serovars belonging to 19 different serogroups of Leptospira interrogans and two serovars belonging to Leptospira biflexa were examined by bacterial restriction endonuclease analysis using EcoR I and Hae III enzymes. All the serovars gave unique restriction patterns that differed from each other. DNA from 10 local isolates digested with these enzymes produced patterns which on comparison with the standard patterns produced by reference strains could be identified to serovar level.

  17. Saccharomyces cerevisiae MutLα IS A MISMATCH REPAIR ENDONUCLEASE*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kadyrov, Farid A.; Holmes, Shannon F.; Arana, Mercedes E.; Lukianova, Olga A.; O’Donnell, Mike; Kunkel, Thomas A.; Modrich, Paul

    2008-01-01

    MutL homologs are crucial for mismatch repair and genetic stability, but their function is not well understood. Human MutLα (MLH1-PMS2 heterodimer) harbors a latent endonuclease that is dependent on integrity of a PMS2 DQHA(X)2E(X)4E motif (Kadyrov et al. (2006) Cell 126, 297-308). This sequence element is conserved in many MutL homologs, including the PMS1 subunit of Saccharomyces cerevisiae MutLα, but is absent in MutL proteins from bacteria like Escherichia coli that rely on d(GATC) methylation for strand directionality. We show that yeast MutLα is a strand-directed endonuclease that incises DNA in a reaction that depends on a mismatch, yMutSα, yRFC, yPCNA, ATP, and a pre-existing strand break, whereas E. coli MutL is not. Amino acid substitution within the PMS1 DQHA(X)2E(X)4E motif abolishes yMutLα endonuclease activity in vitro and confers strong genetic instability in vivo, but does not affect yMutLα ATPase activity or the ability of the protein to support assembly of the yMutLα•yMutSα•heteroduplex ternary complex. The loaded form of yPCNA may play an important effector role in directing yMutLα incision to the discontinuous strand of a nicked heteroduplex. PMID:17951253

  18. The Fidelity Index provides a systematic quantitation of star activity of DNA restriction endonucleases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Hua; Therrien, Caitlin; Blanchard, Aine; Guan, Shengxi; Zhu, Zhenyu

    2008-05-01

    Restriction endonucleases are the basic tools of molecular biology. Many restriction endonucleases show relaxed sequence recognition, called star activity, as an inherent property under various digestion conditions including the optimal ones. To quantify this property we propose the concept of the Fidelity Index (FI), which is defined as the ratio of the maximum enzyme amount showing no star activity to the minimum amount needed for complete digestion at the cognate recognition site for any particular restriction endonuclease. Fidelity indices for a large number of restriction endonucleases are reported here. The effects of reaction vessel, reaction volume, incubation mode, substrate differences, reaction time, reaction temperature and additional glycerol, DMSO, ethanol and Mn(2+) on the FI are also investigated. The FI provides a practical guideline for the use of restriction endonucleases and defines a fundamental property by which restriction endonucleases can be characterized.

  19. Evolutionary and biogeographical implications of degraded LAGLIDADG endonuclease functionality and group I intron occurrence in stony corals (Scleractinia) and mushroom corals (Corallimorpharia).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Celis, Juan Sebastián; Edgell, David R; Stelbrink, Björn; Wibberg, Daniel; Hauffe, Torsten; Blom, Jochen; Kalinowski, Jörn; Wilke, Thomas

    2017-01-01

    Group I introns and homing endonuclease genes (HEGs) are mobile genetic elements, capable of invading target sequences in intron-less genomes. LAGLIDADG HEGs are the largest family of endonucleases, playing a key role in the mobility of group I introns in a process known as 'homing'. Group I introns and HEGs are rare in metazoans, and can be mainly found inserted in the COXI gene of some sponges and cnidarians, including stony corals (Scleractinia) and mushroom corals (Corallimorpharia). Vertical and horizontal intron transfer mechanisms have been proposed as explanations for intron occurrence in cnidarians. However, the central role of LAGLIDADG motifs in intron mobility mechanisms remains poorly understood. To resolve questions regarding the evolutionary origin and distribution of group I introns and HEGs in Scleractinia and Corallimorpharia, we examined intron/HEGs sequences within a comprehensive phylogenetic framework. Analyses of LAGLIDADG motif conservation showed a high degree of degradation in complex Scleractinia and Corallimorpharia. Moreover, the two motifs lack the respective acidic residues necessary for metal-ion binding and catalysis, potentially impairing horizontal intron mobility. In contrast, both motifs are highly conserved within robust Scleractinia, indicating a fully functional endonuclease capable of promoting horizontal intron transference. A higher rate of non-synonymous substitutions (Ka) detected in the HEGs of complex Scleractinia and Corallimorpharia suggests degradation of the HEG, whereas lower Ka rates in robust Scleractinia are consistent with a scenario of purifying selection. Molecular-clock analyses and ancestral inference of intron type indicated an earlier intron insertion in complex Scleractinia and Corallimorpharia in comparison to robust Scleractinia. These findings suggest that the lack of horizontal intron transfers in the former two groups is related to an age-dependent degradation of the endonuclease activity. Moreover

  20. Bifunctional TaqII restriction endonuclease: redefining the prototype DNA recognition site and establishing the Fidelity Index for partial cleaving

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Zylicz-Stachula, Agnieszka; Zołnierkiewicz, Olga; Sliwińska, Katarzyna; Jeżewska-Frąckowiak, Joanna; Skowron, Piotr M

    2011-01-01

    The TaqII enzyme is a member of the Thermus sp. enzyme family that we propounded previously within Type IIS restriction endonucleases, containing related thermophilic bifunctional endonucleases-methyltransferases from various Thermus sp...

  1. Substrate generation for endonucleases of CRISPR/cas systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zoephel, Judith; Dwarakanath, Srivatsa; Richter, Hagen; Plagens, André; Randau, Lennart

    2012-09-08

    The interaction of viruses and their prokaryotic hosts shaped the evolution of bacterial and archaeal life. Prokaryotes developed several strategies to evade viral attacks that include restriction modification, abortive infection and CRISPR/Cas systems. These adaptive immune systems found in many Bacteria and most Archaea consist of clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeat (CRISPR) sequences and a number of CRISPR associated (Cas) genes (Fig. 1) (1-3). Different sets of Cas proteins and repeats define at least three major divergent types of CRISPR/Cas systems (4). The universal proteins Cas1 and Cas2 are proposed to be involved in the uptake of viral DNA that will generate a new spacer element between two repeats at the 5' terminus of an extending CRISPR cluster (5). The entire cluster is transcribed into a precursor-crRNA containing all spacer and repeat sequences and is subsequently processed by an enzyme of the diverse Cas6 family into smaller crRNAs (6-8). These crRNAs consist of the spacer sequence flanked by a 5' terminal (8 nucleotides) and a 3' terminal tag derived from the repeat sequence (9). A repeated infection of the virus can now be blocked as the new crRNA will be directed by a Cas protein complex (Cascade) to the viral DNA and identify it as such via base complementarity(10). Finally, for CRISPR/Cas type 1 systems, the nuclease Cas3 will destroy the detected invader DNA (11,12) . These processes define CRISPR/Cas as an adaptive immune system of prokaryotes and opened a fascinating research field for the study of the involved Cas proteins. The function of many Cas proteins is still elusive and the causes for the apparent diversity of the CRISPR/Cas systems remain to be illuminated. Potential activities of most Cas proteins were predicted via detailed computational analyses. A major fraction of Cas proteins are either shown or proposed to function as endonucleases (4). Here, we present methods to generate crRNAs and precursor-cRNAs for

  2. Nucleosomes Inhibit Cas9 Endonuclease Activity in Vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hinz, John M; Laughery, Marian F; Wyrick, John J

    2015-12-08

    During Cas9 genome editing in eukaryotic cells, the bacterial Cas9 enzyme cleaves DNA targets within chromatin. To understand how chromatin affects Cas9 targeting, we characterized Cas9 activity on nucleosome substrates in vitro. We find that Cas9 endonuclease activity is strongly inhibited when its target site is located within the nucleosome core. In contrast, the nucleosome structure does not affect Cas9 activity at a target site within the adjacent linker DNA. Analysis of target sites that partially overlap with the nucleosome edge indicates that the accessibility of the protospacer-adjacent motif (PAM) is the critical determinant of Cas9 activity on a nucleosome.

  3. Restriction glycosylases: involvement of endonuclease activities in the restriction process.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yingbiao; Matsuzaka, Tomoyuki; Yano, Hirokazu; Furuta, Yoshikazu; Nakano, Toshiaki; Ishikawa, Ken; Fukuyo, Masaki; Takahashi, Noriko; Suzuki, Yutaka; Sugano, Sumio; Ide, Hiroshi; Kobayashi, Ichizo

    2017-02-17

    All restriction enzymes examined are phosphodiesterases generating 3΄-OH and 5΄-P ends, but one restriction enzyme (restriction glycosylase) excises unmethylated bases from its recognition sequence. Whether its restriction activity involves endonucleolytic cleavage remains unclear. One report on this enzyme, R.PabI from a hyperthermophile, ascribed the breakage to high temperature while another showed its weak AP lyase activity generates atypical ends. Here, we addressed this issue in mesophiles. We purified R.PabI homologs from Campylobacter coli (R.CcoLI) and Helicobacter pylori (R.HpyAXII) and demonstrated their DNA cleavage, DNA glycosylase and AP lyase activities in vitro at 37°C. The AP lyase activity is more coupled with glycosylase activity in R.CcoLI than in R.PabI. R.CcoLI/R.PabI expression caused restriction of incoming bacteriophage/plasmid DNA and endogenous chromosomal DNA within Escherichia coli at 37°C. The R.PabI-mediated restriction was promoted by AP endonuclease action in vivo or in vitro. These results reveal the role of endonucleolytic DNA cleavage in restriction and yet point to diversity among the endonucleases. The cleaved ends are difficult to repair in vivo, which may indicate their biological significance. These results support generalization of the concept of restriction–modification system to the concept of self-recognizing epigenetic system, which combines any epigenetic labeling and any DNA damaging.

  4. Apurinic endonuclease activity of yeast Apn2 protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Unk, I; Haracska, L; Johnson, R E; Prakash, S; Prakash, L

    2000-07-21

    Abasic (apurinic/apyrimidinic; AP) sites are generated in vivo through spontaneous base loss and by enzymatic removal of bases damaged by alkylating agents and reactive oxygen species. In Saccharomyces cerevisiae, the APN1 and APN2 genes function in alternate pathways of AP site removal. Apn2-like proteins have been identified in other eukaryotes including humans, and these proteins form a distinct subfamily within the exonuclease III (ExoIII)/Ape1/Apn2 family of proteins. Apn2 and other members of this subfamily contain a carboxyl-terminal extension not present in the ExoIII/Ape1-like proteins. Here, we purify the Apn2 protein from yeast and show that it is a class II AP endonuclease. Deletion of the carboxyl terminus does not affect the AP endonuclease activity of the protein, but this protein is defective in the removal of AP sites in vivo. The carboxyl terminus may enable Apn2 to complex with other proteins, and such a multiprotein assembly may be necessary for the efficient recognition and cleavage of AP sites in vivo.

  5. Recombinant plasmids for encoding restriction enzymes DpnI and DpnII of streptococcus pneumontae

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lacks, Sanford A.

    1990-01-01

    Chromosomal DNA cassettes containing genes encoding either the DpnI or DpnII restriction endonucleases from Streptococcus pneumoniae are cloned into a streptococcal vector, pLS101. Large amounts of the restriction enzymes are produced by cells containing the multicopy plasmids, pLS202 and pLS207, and their derivatives pLS201, pLS211, pLS217, pLS251 and pLS252.

  6. Recombinant plasmids for encoding restriction enzymes DpnI and DpnII of Streptococcus pneumontae

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lacks, S.A.

    1990-10-02

    Chromosomal DNA cassettes containing genes encoding either the DpnI or DpnII restriction endonucleases from Streptococcus pneumoniae are cloned into a streptococcal vector, pLS101. Large amounts of the restriction enzymes are produced by cells containing the multicopy plasmids, pLS202 and pLS207, and their derivatives pLS201, pLS211, pLS217, pLS251 and pLS252. 9 figs.

  7. The cap-snatching endonuclease of influenza virus polymerase resides in the PA subunit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dias, Alexandre; Bouvier, Denis; Crépin, Thibaut; McCarthy, Andrew A; Hart, Darren J; Baudin, Florence; Cusack, Stephen; Ruigrok, Rob W H

    2009-04-16

    The influenza virus polymerase, a heterotrimer composed of three subunits, PA, PB1 and PB2, is responsible for replication and transcription of the eight separate segments of the viral RNA genome in the nuclei of infected cells. The polymerase synthesizes viral messenger RNAs using short capped primers derived from cellular transcripts by a unique 'cap-snatching' mechanism. The PB2 subunit binds the 5' cap of host pre-mRNAs, which are subsequently cleaved after 10-13 nucleotides by the viral endonuclease, hitherto thought to reside in the PB2 (ref. 5) or PB1 (ref. 2) subunits. Here we describe biochemical and structural studies showing that the amino-terminal 209 residues of the PA subunit contain the endonuclease active site. We show that this domain has intrinsic RNA and DNA endonuclease activity that is strongly activated by manganese ions, matching observations reported for the endonuclease activity of the intact trimeric polymerase. Furthermore, this activity is inhibited by 2,4-dioxo-4-phenylbutanoic acid, a known inhibitor of the influenza endonuclease. The crystal structure of the domain reveals a structural core closely resembling resolvases and type II restriction endonucleases. The active site comprises a histidine and a cluster of three acidic residues, conserved in all influenza viruses, which bind two manganese ions in a configuration similar to other two-metal-dependent endonucleases. Two active site residues have previously been shown to specifically eliminate the polymerase endonuclease activity when mutated. These results will facilitate the optimisation of endonuclease inhibitors as potential new anti-influenza drugs.

  8. Cloning and characterization of the prs gene encoding phosphoribosylpyrophosphate synthetase of Escherichia coli

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hove-Jensen, Bjarne

    1985-01-01

    by lysogenic complementation. The prs gene resided on a 5.6 kilobase-pair (kbp) DNA fragment generated by hydrolysis with restriction endonuclease BamHI. The nearby gene pth, encoding peptidyl-tRNA hydrolase, was also on this fragment. Subcloning of the fragment in the multi-copy plasmid pBR322 and subsequent...

  9. Cofactor requirement of HpyAV restriction endonuclease.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Siu-Hong Chan

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Helicobacter pylori is the etiologic agent of common gastritis and a risk factor for gastric cancer. It is also one of the richest sources of Type II restriction-modification (R-M systems in microorganisms. PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We have cloned, expressed and purified a new restriction endonuclease HpyAV from H. pylori strain 26695. We determined the HpyAV DNA recognition sequence and cleavage site as CCTTC 6/5. In addition, we found that HpyAV has a unique metal ion requirement: its cleavage activity is higher with transition metal ions than in Mg(++. The special metal ion requirement of HpyAV can be attributed to the presence of a HNH catalytic site similar to ColE9 nuclease instead of the canonical PD-X-D/EXK catalytic site found in many other REases. Site-directed mutagenesis was carried out to verify the catalytic residues of HpyAV. Mutation of the conserved metal-binding Asn311 and His320 to alanine eliminated cleavage activity. HpyAV variant H295A displayed approximately 1% of wt activity. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Some HNH-type endonucleases have unique metal ion cofactor requirement for optimal activities. Homology modeling and site-directed mutagenesis confirmed that HpyAV is a member of the HNH nuclease family. The identification of catalytic residues in HpyAV paved the way for further engineering of the metal binding site. A survey of sequenced microbial genomes uncovered 10 putative R-M systems that show high sequence similarity to the HpyAV system, suggesting lateral transfer of a prototypic HpyAV-like R-M system among these microorganisms.

  10. Cofactor requirement of HpyAV restriction endonuclease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chan, Siu-Hong; Opitz, Lars; Higgins, Lauren; O'loane, Diana; Xu, Shuang-Yong

    2010-02-05

    Helicobacter pylori is the etiologic agent of common gastritis and a risk factor for gastric cancer. It is also one of the richest sources of Type II restriction-modification (R-M) systems in microorganisms. We have cloned, expressed and purified a new restriction endonuclease HpyAV from H. pylori strain 26695. We determined the HpyAV DNA recognition sequence and cleavage site as CCTTC 6/5. In addition, we found that HpyAV has a unique metal ion requirement: its cleavage activity is higher with transition metal ions than in Mg(++). The special metal ion requirement of HpyAV can be attributed to the presence of a HNH catalytic site similar to ColE9 nuclease instead of the canonical PD-X-D/EXK catalytic site found in many other REases. Site-directed mutagenesis was carried out to verify the catalytic residues of HpyAV. Mutation of the conserved metal-binding Asn311 and His320 to alanine eliminated cleavage activity. HpyAV variant H295A displayed approximately 1% of wt activity. Some HNH-type endonucleases have unique metal ion cofactor requirement for optimal activities. Homology modeling and site-directed mutagenesis confirmed that HpyAV is a member of the HNH nuclease family. The identification of catalytic residues in HpyAV paved the way for further engineering of the metal binding site. A survey of sequenced microbial genomes uncovered 10 putative R-M systems that show high sequence similarity to the HpyAV system, suggesting lateral transfer of a prototypic HpyAV-like R-M system among these microorganisms.

  11. Cleavage and protection of locked nucleic acid-modified DNA by restriction endonucleases

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Crouzier, Lucile; Dubois, Camille; Wengel, Jesper

    2012-01-01

    Locked nucleic acid (LNA) is one of the most prominent nucleic acid analogues reported so far. We herein for the first time report cleavage by restriction endonuclease of LNA-modified DNA oligonucleotides. The experiments revealed that RsaI is an efficient enzyme capable of recognizing and cleaving...... LNA-modified DNA oligonucleotides. Furthermore, introduction of LNA nucleotides protects against cleavage by the restriction endonucleases PvuII, PstI, SacI, KpnI and EcoRI....

  12. The amino acid linker between the endonuclease and helicase domains of adeno-associated virus type 5 Rep plays a critical role in DNA-dependent oligomerization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maggin, Jenna E; James, Jeffrey A; Chappie, Joshua S; Dyda, Fred; Hickman, Alison Burgess

    2012-03-01

    The adeno-associated virus (AAV) genome encodes four Rep proteins, all of which contain an SF3 helicase domain. The larger Rep proteins, Rep78 and Rep68, are required for viral replication, whereas Rep40 and Rep52 are needed to package AAV genomes into preformed capsids; these smaller proteins are missing the site-specific DNA-binding and endonuclease domain found in Rep68/78. Other viral SF3 helicases, such as the simian virus 40 large T antigen and the papillomavirus E1 protein, are active as hexameric assemblies. However, Rep40 and Rep52 have not been observed to form stable oligomers on their own or with DNA, suggesting that important determinants of helicase multimerization lie outside the helicase domain. Here, we report that when the 23-residue linker that connects the endonuclease and helicase domains is appended to the adeno-associated virus type 5 (AAV5) helicase domain, the resulting protein forms discrete complexes on DNA consistent with single or double hexamers. The formation of these complexes does not require the Rep binding site sequence, nor is it nucleotide dependent. These complexes have stimulated ATPase and helicase activities relative to the helicase domain alone, indicating that they are catalytically relevant, a result supported by negative-stain electron microscopy images of hexameric rings. Similarly, the addition of the linker region to the AAV5 Rep endonuclease domain also confers on it the ability to bind and multimerize on nonspecific double-stranded DNA. We conclude that the linker is likely a key contributor to Rep68/78 DNA-dependent oligomerization and may play an important role in mediating Rep68/78's conversion from site-specific DNA binding to nonspecific DNA unwinding.

  13. The role of yeast DNA 3'-phosphatase Tpp1 and rad1/Rad10 endonuclease in processing spontaneous and induced base lesions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karumbati, Anandi S; Deshpande, Rajashree A; Jilani, Arshad; Vance, John R; Ramotar, Dindial; Wilson, Thomas E

    2003-08-15

    Tpp1 is a DNA 3'-phosphatase in Saccharomyces cerevisiae that is believed to act during strand break repair. It is homologous to one domain of mammalian polynucleotide kinase/3'-phosphatase. Unlike in yeast, we found that Tpp1 could confer resistance to methylmethane sulfonate when expressed in bacteria that lack abasic endonuclease/3'-phosphodiesterase function. This species difference was due to the absence of delta-lyase activity in S. cerevisiae, since expression of bacterial Fpg conferred Tpp1-dependent resistance to methylmethane sulfonate in yeast lacking the abasic endonucleases Apn1 and Apn2. In contrast, beta-only lyases increased methylmethane sulfonate sensitivity independently of Tpp1, which was explained by the inability of Tpp1 to cleave 3' alpha,beta-unsaturated aldehydes. In parallel experiments, mutations of TPP1 and RAD1, encoding part of the Rad1/Rad10 3'-flap endonuclease, caused synthetic growth defects in yeast strains lacking Apn1. In contrast, Fpg expression led to a partial rescue of apn1 apn2 rad1 synthetic lethality by converting lesions into Tpp1-cleavable 3'-phosphates. The collected experiments reveal a profound toxicity of strand breaks with irreparable 3' blocking lesions, and extend the function of the Rad1/Rad10 salvage pathway to 3'-phosphates. They further demonstrate a role for Tpp1 in repairing endogenously created 3'-phosphates. The source of these phosphates remains enigmatic, however, because apn1 tpp1 rad1 slow growth could be correlated with neither the presence of a yeast delta-lyase, the activity of the 3'-phosphate-generating enzyme Tdp1, nor levels of endogenous oxidation.

  14. Archaeal rRNA operons, intron splicing and homing endonucleases, RNA polymerase operons and phylogeny

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Garrett, Roger Antony; Aagaard, Claus Sindbjerg; Andersen, Morten

    1994-01-01

    Over the past decade our laboratory has had a strong interest in defining the phylogenetic status of the archaea. This has involved determining and analysing the sequences of operons of both rRNAs and RNA polymerases and it led to the discovery of the first archaeal rRNA intron. What follows...

  15. Type II restriction endonucleases--a historical perspective and more.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pingoud, Alfred; Wilson, Geoffrey G; Wende, Wolfgang

    2014-07-01

    This article continues the series of Surveys and Summaries on restriction endonucleases (REases) begun this year in Nucleic Acids Research. Here we discuss 'Type II' REases, the kind used for DNA analysis and cloning. We focus on their biochemistry: what they are, what they do, and how they do it. Type II REases are produced by prokaryotes to combat bacteriophages. With extreme accuracy, each recognizes a particular sequence in double-stranded DNA and cleaves at a fixed position within or nearby. The discoveries of these enzymes in the 1970s, and of the uses to which they could be put, have since impacted every corner of the life sciences. They became the enabling tools of molecular biology, genetics and biotechnology, and made analysis at the most fundamental levels routine. Hundreds of different REases have been discovered and are available commercially. Their genes have been cloned, sequenced and overexpressed. Most have been characterized to some extent, but few have been studied in depth. Here, we describe the original discoveries in this field, and the properties of the first Type II REases investigated. We discuss the mechanisms of sequence recognition and catalysis, and the varied oligomeric modes in which Type II REases act. We describe the surprising heterogeneity revealed by comparisons of their sequences and structures. © The Author(s) 2014. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Nucleic Acids Research.

  16. The wonders of flap endonucleases: structure, function, mechanism and regulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Finger, L David; Atack, John M; Tsutakawa, Susan; Classen, Scott; Tainer, John; Grasby, Jane; Shen, Binghui

    2012-01-01

    Processing of Okazaki fragments to complete lagging strand DNA synthesis requires coordination among several proteins. RNA primers and DNA synthesised by DNA polymerase α are displaced by DNA polymerase δ to create bifurcated nucleic acid structures known as 5'-flaps. These 5'-flaps are removed by Flap Endonuclease 1 (FEN), a structure-specific nuclease whose divalent metal ion-dependent phosphodiesterase activity cleaves 5'-flaps with exquisite specificity. FENs are paradigms for the 5' nuclease superfamily, whose members perform a wide variety of roles in nucleic acid metabolism using a similar nuclease core domain that displays common biochemical properties and structural features. A detailed review of FEN structure is undertaken to show how DNA substrate recognition occurs and how FEN achieves cleavage at a single phosphate diester. A proposed double nucleotide unpairing trap (DoNUT) is discussed with regards to FEN and has relevance to the wider 5' nuclease superfamily. The homotrimeric proliferating cell nuclear antigen protein (PCNA) coordinates the actions of DNA polymerase, FEN and DNA ligase by facilitating the hand-off intermediates between each protein during Okazaki fragment maturation to maximise through-put and minimise consequences of intermediates being released into the wider cellular environment. FEN has numerous partner proteins that modulate and control its action during DNA replication and is also controlled by several post-translational modification events, all acting in concert to maintain precise and appropriate cleavage of Okazaki fragment intermediates during DNA replication.

  17. Selective microbial genomic DNA isolation using restriction endonucleases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barnes, Helen E; Liu, Guohong; Weston, Christopher Q; King, Paula; Pham, Long K; Waltz, Shannon; Helzer, Kimberly T; Day, Laura; Sphar, Dan; Yamamoto, Robert T; Forsyth, R Allyn

    2014-01-01

    To improve the metagenomic analysis of complex microbiomes, we have repurposed restriction endonucleases as methyl specific DNA binding proteins. As an example, we use DpnI immobilized on magnetic beads. The ten minute extraction technique allows specific binding of genomes containing the DpnI Gm6ATC motif common in the genomic DNA of many bacteria including γ-proteobacteria. Using synthetic genome mixtures, we demonstrate 80% recovery of Escherichia coli genomic DNA even when only femtogram quantities are spiked into 10 µg of human DNA background. Binding is very specific with less than 0.5% of human DNA bound. Next Generation Sequencing of input and enriched synthetic mixtures results in over 100-fold enrichment of target genomes relative to human and plant DNA. We also show comparable enrichment when sequencing complex microbiomes such as those from creek water and human saliva. The technique can be broadened to other restriction enzymes allowing for the selective enrichment of trace and unculturable organisms from complex microbiomes and the stratification of organisms according to restriction enzyme enrichment.

  18. Peculiarities of Crystallization of the Restriction Endonuclease EcoRII

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karpove, Elizaveta; Pusey, M.arc L.

    1998-01-01

    Nucleases interfere with most standard molecular biology procedures. We have purified and crystallized the restriction endonuclease EcoRII, which belongs to the type II of restriction- modification enzyme, to study the protein crystallization process using a "non standard" macromolecule. A procedure for the purification of EcoRII was developed and 99% pure protein as determined by SDS PAGE electrophoresis obtained. Light scattering experiments were performed to assist in screening protein suitable crystallization conditions. The second virial coefficient was determined as a function of precipitating salt concentration, using sodium chloride, ammonium sulfate, and sodium sulfate. Small (maximum size approximately 0.2 mm) well shaped crystals have been obtained. Larger poorly formed crystals (ca 0.5 mm) have also been obtained, but we have been unable to mount them for diff-raction analysis due to their extreme fragility. Crystallization experiments with PEG have shown that using this precipitant, the best crystals are obtained from slightly over-saturated solutions. Use of higher precipitant concentration leads to dendritic crystal formation. EcoRII is difficult to solubilize and meticulous attention must be paid to the presence of reducing agents.

  19. Investigation of mutations induced by radiation and restriction endonucleases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haworth, Kim E.

    The effects of gamma radiation and restriction endonuclease (RE) induced DNA double strand breaks (dsb) upon the mutation frequency and the surviving fraction of three Chinese hamster cell lines V79-4, CHO-K1 and an X-ray sensitive dsb repair deficient cell line xrs-5 were studied. The X-ray sensitive xrs-5 cell line was shown to be more sensitive to both the lethal and the mutagenic effects of gamma radiation having a substantially lower surviving fraction and a higher thymidine kinase (tk) mutation frequency per unit dose than the parental CHO-K1 cells. The frequency of induced hprt- mutations in the V79-4 cell line was comparable to the induced frequency of tk mutations in the CHO-K1 cells. The effect of blunt- and cohesive- ended dsb upon the surviving fraction and the induced mutation frequency was studied by porating different Chinese hamster cell lines (CHO-K1, V79-4 and xrs-5) with RE using Streptolysin O (SLO). The surviving fraction of the different cell lines was reduced with increasing concentrations of Pvu II. Increases in the concentration of Pvu II produced increases in the frequency of hypoxyanthine guanine phosphoribosyl transferase (hprt) mutations in the V79-4 cells and tk mutations in the CHO-K1 and xrs-5 cells. However, the xrs-5 cells were shown to be hypomutable to Pvu II compared with the parental CHO-K1 cells. EcoR1 was ineffective at inducing tk mutations in the CHO-Kl cells but was as effective as Pvu II at inducing hprt mutations in the V79-4 cells. None of the spontaneously induced V79-4 hprt- mutant cells were shown to have observable molecular deletions when analysed by PCR deletion screening. One third of the radiation induced hprt - mutants were shown to be deletions. However, too few mutant cells were analysed for any non-random distribution of deletions to be observed. Half of the hprt- mutants induced by SLO poration alone were shown to be due to deletions of oi\\e or more exons. The distribution of the DNA deletions in SLO hprt

  20. SLX4 Assembles a Telomere Maintenance Toolkit by Bridging Multiple Endonucleases with Telomeres

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bingbing Wan

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available SLX4 interacts with several endonucleases to resolve structural barriers in DNA metabolism. SLX4 also interacts with telomeric protein TRF2 in human cells. The molecular mechanism of these interactions at telomeres remains unknown. Here, we report the crystal structure of the TRF2-binding motif of SLX4 (SLX4TBM in complex with the TRFH domain of TRF2 (TRF2TRFH and map the interactions of SLX4 with endonucleases SLX1, XPF, and MUS81. TRF2 recognizes a unique HxLxP motif on SLX4 via the peptide-binding site in its TRFH domain. Telomeric localization of SLX4 and associated nucleases depend on the SLX4-endonuclease and SLX4-TRF2 interactions and the protein levels of SLX4 and TRF2. SLX4 assembles an endonuclease toolkit that negatively regulates telomere length via SLX1-catalyzed nucleolytic resolution of telomere DNA structures. We propose that the SLX4-TRF2 complex serves as a double-layer scaffold bridging multiple endonucleases with telomeres for recombination-based telomere maintenance.

  1. Simple and sensitive fluorescence assay of restriction endonuclease on graphene oxide

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gang, Jong Back [Dept. of Nano Chemistry, Gachon University, Incheon (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-09-15

    Restriction endonucleases hydrolyze internal phosphodiester bonds at specific sites in a DNA sequence. These enzymes are essential in a variety of fields, such as biotechnology and clinical diagnostics. It is of great importance and necessity for the scientific and biomedical use of enzymes to measure endonuclease activity. In this study, graphene oxide (GO) has been used as a platform to measure enzyme activity with high sensitivity. To increase the detection sensitivity of Hinf I, the endonuclease-digested reaction was treated with exonuclease III (Exo III) and a fluorescence assay was conducted to measure the emission. Results showed that Exo III treatment enhanced 2.7-fold signal-to-background ratio for the detection of Hinf I compared with that done without Exo III in the presence of GO.

  2. Protein NCRII-18: the role of gene fusion in the molecular evolution of restriction endonucleases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ibryashkina, Elena M; Solonin, Alexander S; Zakharova, Marina V

    2017-06-01

    This work first constructed the fusion protein NCRII-18 by fusing the restriction endonuclease Ecl18kI gene and part of the gene coding for the N-terminal domain of the endonuclease EcoRII. The fusion of the EcoRII N-terminal domain leads to a change in the properties of the recombinant protein. Unlike Ecl18kI, which made the basis of NCRII-18, the fusion protein predominantly recognizes the CCWGG sites, having lost the capability of interacting with the CCSGG sites. Experimental data support the hypothesis of a close evolutionary relationship between type IIE and IIP restriction endonucleases via a recombination between domains with active site structure and elements for recognition with domains responsible for recognition of DNA sequences. © 2017 Federation of European Biochemical Societies.

  3. The DNA repair endonuclease Mus81 facilitates fast DNA replication in the absence of exogenous damage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fu, Haiqing; Martin, Melvenia M.; Regairaz, Marie; Huang, Liang; You, Yang; Lin, Chi-Mei; Ryan, Michael; Kim, RyangGuk; Shimura, Tsutomu; Pommier, Yves; Aladjem, Mirit I.

    2015-01-01

    The Mus81 endonuclease resolves recombination intermediates and mediates cellular responses to exogenous replicative stress. Here, we show that Mus81 also regulates the rate of DNA replication during normal growth by promoting replication fork progression while reducing the frequency of replication initiation events. In the absence of Mus81 endonuclease activity, DNA synthesis is slowed and replication initiation events are more frequent. In addition, Mus81 deficient cells fail to recover from exposure to low doses of replication inhibitors and cell viability is dependent on the XPF endonuclease. Despite an increase in replication initiation frequency, cells lacking Mus81 use the same pool of replication origins as Mus81-expressing cells. Therefore, decelerated DNA replication in Mus81 deficient cells does not initiate from cryptic or latent origins not used during normal growth. These results indicate that Mus81 plays a key role in determining the rate of DNA replication without activating a novel group of replication origins. PMID:25879486

  4. DNA-hosted Hoechst dyes: application for label-free fluorescent monitoring of endonuclease activity and inhibition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Xiao-Qin; Guo, Su-Miao; Zhang, Min; Zhou, Ming; Ye, Bang-Ce

    2014-11-21

    A simple and facile approach was developed for monitoring EcoRI endonuclease activity and inhibition, in which a hairpin-like DNA containing restriction cutting site for EcoRI endonuclease acts as the sensing element and Hoechst dyes as the signal indicator in a label-free format.

  5. Lundep, a sand fly salivary endonuclease increases Leishmania parasite survival in neutrophils and inhibits XIIa contact activation in human plasma.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrezza C Chagas

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Neutrophils are the host's first line of defense against infections, and their extracellular traps (NET were recently shown to kill Leishmania parasites. Here we report a NET-destroying molecule (Lundep from the salivary glands of Lutzomyia longipalpis. Previous analysis of the sialotranscriptome of Lu. longipalpis showed the potential presence of an endonuclease. Indeed, not only was the cloned cDNA (Lundep shown to encode a highly active ss- and dsDNAse, but also the same activity was demonstrated to be secreted by salivary glands of female Lu. longipalpis. Lundep hydrolyzes both ss- and dsDNA with little sequence specificity with a calculated DNase activity of 300000 Kunitz units per mg of protein. Disruption of PMA (phorbol 12 myristate 13 acetate- or parasite-induced NETs by treatment with recombinant Lundep or salivary gland homogenates increases parasite survival in neutrophils. Furthermore, co-injection of recombinant Lundep with metacyclic promastigotes significantly exacerbates Leishmania infection in mice when compared with PBS alone or inactive (mutagenized Lundep. We hypothesize that Lundep helps the parasite to establish an infection by allowing it to escape from the leishmanicidal activity of NETs early after inoculation. Lundep may also assist blood meal intake by lowering the local viscosity caused by the release of host DNA and as an anticoagulant by inhibiting the intrinsic pathway of coagulation.

  6. Multiplex loop-mediated isothermal amplification detection by sequence-based barcodes coupled with nicking endonuclease-mediated pyrosequencing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liang, Chao; Chu, Yanan; Cheng, Sijia; Wu, Haiping; Kajiyama, Tomoharu; Kambara, Hideki; Zhou, Guohua

    2012-04-17

    The loop-mediated isothermal amplification (LAMP) is a well-developed method for replicating a targeted DNA sequence with a high specificity, but multiplex LAMP detection is difficult because LAMP amplicons are very complicated in structure. To allow simultaneous detection of multiple LAMP products, a series of target-specific barcodes were designed and tagged in LAMP amplicons by FIP primers. The targeted barcodes were decoded by pyrosequencing on nicked LAMP amplicons. To enable the nicking reaction to occur just near the barcode regions, the recognition sequence of the nicking endonuclease (NEase) was also introduced into the FIP primer. After the nicking reaction, pyrosequencing started at the nicked 3' end when the added deoxyribonucleoside triphosphate (dNTP) was complementary to the non-nicked strand. To efficiently encode multiple targets, the barcodes were designed with a reporter base and two stuffer bases, so that the decoding of a target-specific barcode only required a single peak in a pyrogram. We have successfully detected the four kinds of pathogens including hepatitis B virus (HBV), hepatitis C virus (HCV), human immunodeficiency virus (HIV), and Treponema pallidum (TP), which are easily infected in blood, by a 4-plex LAMP in a single tube, indicating that barcoded LAMP coupled with NEase-mediated pyrosequencing is a simple, rapid, and reliable way in multiple target identification.

  7. Cleavage and protection of locked nucleic acid-modified DNA by restriction endonucleases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crouzier, Lucile; Dubois, Camille; Wengel, Jesper; Veedu, Rakesh N

    2012-07-15

    Locked nucleic acid (LNA) is one of the most prominent nucleic acid analogues reported so far. We herein for the first time report cleavage by restriction endonuclease of LNA-modified DNA oligonucleotides. The experiments revealed that RsaI is an efficient enzyme capable of recognizing and cleaving LNA-modified DNA oligonucleotides. Furthermore, introduction of LNA nucleotides protects against cleavage by the restriction endonucleases PvuII, PstI, SacI, KpnI and EcoRI. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Home Care

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... and respiratory ), social workers, personal care aides, home medical equipment suppliers, and most importantly, informal caregivers (e.g., ... also available to help with home assessment. Assistive Technology to improve home safety can also be an ...

  9. Mm19, a Mycoplasma meleagridis Major Surface Nuclease that Is Related to the RE_AlwI Superfamily of Endonucleases.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elhem Yacoub

    Full Text Available Mycoplasma meleagridis infection is widespread in turkeys, causing poor growth and feathering, airsacculitis, osteodystrophy, and reduction in hatchability. Like most mycoplasma species, M. meleagridis is characterized by its inability to synthesize purine and pyrimidine nucleotides de novo. Consistent with this intrinsic deficiency, we here report the cloning, expression, and characterization of a M. meleagridis gene sequence encoding a major surface nuclease, referred to as Mm19. Mm19 consists of a 1941-bp ORF encoding a 646-amino-acid polypeptide with a predicted molecular mass of 74,825 kDa. BLASTP analysis revealed a significant match with the catalytic/dimerization domain of type II restriction enzymes of the RE_AlwI superfamily. This finding is consistent with the genomic location of Mm19 sequence, which dispalys characteristics of a typical type II restriction-modification locus. Like intact M. meleagridis cells, the E. coli-expressed Mm19 fusion product was found to exhibit a nuclease activity against plasmid DNA, double-stranded DNA, single-stranded DNA, and RNA. The Mm19-associated nuclease activity was consistently enhanced with Mg2+ divalent cations, a hallmark of type II restriction enzymes. A rabbit hyperimmune antiserum raised against the bacterially expressed Mm19 strongly reacted with M. meleagridis intact cells and fully neutralized the surface-bound nuclease activity. Collectively, the results show that M. meleagridis expresses a strong surface-bound nuclease activity, which is the product of a single gene sequence that is related to the RE_AlwI superfamily of endonucleases.

  10. An encoding device and a method of encoding

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2012-01-01

    The present invention relates to an encoding device, such as an optical position encoder, for encoding input from an object, and a method for encoding input from an object, for determining a position of an object that interferes with light of the device. The encoding device comprises a light source...... in the area in the space and may interfere with the light, which interference may be encoded into a position or activation....

  11. Structural studies on metal-containing enzymes: T4 endonuclease VII and D. gigas formate dehydrogenase

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Raaijmakers, H.C.A.

    2001-01-01

    Many biological processes require metal ions, and many of these metal-ion functions involve metalloproteins. The metal ions in metalloproteins are often critical to the protein's function, structure, or stability. This thesis focuses on two of these proteins, bacteriophage T4 endonuclease

  12. [Flap endonuclease-1 and its role in the processes of DNA metabolism in eucaryotic cells].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nazarkina, Zh K; Lavrik, O I; Khodyreva, S N

    2008-01-01

    Flap endonuclease-1 (FEN1) is a structure specific endonuclease. The natural substrates of FEN1 are 5'-flap structures formed by three DNA chains one of them has unannealed flapped 5'-end (flap). Flap structures are the intermediates of different processes of DNA metabolism, such as DNA recombination, Okazaki fragment maturation during replication of lagging strand, as well as strand displacement DNA synthesis in base excision repair. FEN1 also possesses 5'-exonuclease activity and newly discovered gap endonuclease activity. FEN1 is known to interact physically and functionally with a number of DNA replication and repair proteins such as the proliferating cell nuclear antigen, helicase/nuclease Dna2, WRN and BLM proteins, replication protein A, apurinic/apyrimidinic endonuclease 1, DNA polymerase beta, poly(ADP-riboso) polymerase 1, high mobility group protein 1, integrase of human immunodeficiency virus, transcription coactivator p300, chromatin proteins, cyclin-dependent kinases (Cdk1, Cdk2, Cyclin A). FEN1 activity is significant for maintaining the integrity of repeat sequences in genome. Recent data suppose the correlation between the abnormality of hFEN1 activity and arising/progression of neurodegenerative and cancer diseases. FEN1 has the dramatic effect on cell growth and development thereby attracting the interest to this enzyme.

  13. Structural aspects of catalytic mechanisms of endonucleases and their binding to nucleic acids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhukhlistova, N. E.; Balaev, V. V.; Lyashenko, A. V.; Lashkov, A. A.

    2012-05-01

    Endonucleases (EC 3.1) are enzymes of the hydrolase class that catalyze the hydrolytic cleavage of deoxyribonucleic and ribonucleic acids at any region of the polynucleotide chain. Endonucleases are widely used both in biotechnological processes and in veterinary medicine as antiviral agents. Medical applications of endonucleases in human cancer therapy hold promise. The results of X-ray diffraction studies of the spatial organization of endonucleases and their complexes and the mechanism of their action are analyzed and generalized. An analysis of the structural studies of this class of enzymes showed that the specific binding of enzymes to nucleic acids is characterized by interactions with nitrogen bases and the nucleotide backbone, whereas the nonspecific binding of enzymes is generally characterized by interactions only with the nucleic-acid backbone. It should be taken into account that the specificity can be modulated by metal ions and certain low-molecular-weight organic compounds. To test the hypotheses about specific and nonspecific nucleic-acid-binding proteins, it is necessary to perform additional studies of atomic-resolution three-dimensional structures of enzyme-nucleic-acid complexes by methods of structural biology.

  14. Efficient fdCas9 Synthetic Endonuclease with Improved Specificity for Precise Genome Engineering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aouida, Mustapha; Eid, Ayman; Ali, Zahir; Cradick, Thomas; Lee, Ciaran; Deshmukh, Harshavardhan; Atef, Ahmed; AbuSamra, Dina; Gadhoum, Samah Zeineb; Merzaban, Jasmeen; Bao, Gang; Mahfouz, Magdy

    2015-01-01

    The Cas9 endonuclease is used for genome editing applications in diverse eukaryotic species. A high frequency of off-target activity has been reported in many cell types, limiting its applications to genome engineering, especially in genomic medicine. Here, we generated a synthetic chimeric protein between the catalytic domain of the FokI endonuclease and the catalytically inactive Cas9 protein (fdCas9). A pair of guide RNAs (gRNAs) that bind to sense and antisense strands with a defined spacer sequence range can be used to form a catalytically active dimeric fdCas9 protein and generate double-strand breaks (DSBs) within the spacer sequence. Our data demonstrate an improved catalytic activity of the fdCas9 endonuclease, with a spacer range of 15–39 nucleotides, on surrogate reporters and genomic targets. Furthermore, we observed no detectable fdCas9 activity at known Cas9 off-target sites. Taken together, our data suggest that the fdCas9 endonuclease variant is a superior platform for genome editing applications in eukaryotic systems including mammalian cells. PMID:26225561

  15. Molecular Recognition of DNA Damage Sites by Apurinic/Apyrimidinic Endonucleases

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Braun, W. A.

    2005-07-28

    The DNA repair/redox factor AP endonuclease 1 (APE1) is a multifunctional protein which is known to to be essential for DNA repair activity in human cells. Structural/functional analyses of the APE activity is thus been an important research field to assess cellular defense mechanisms against ionizing radiation.

  16. PCNA function in the activation and strand direction of MutLα endonuclease in mismatch repair

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pluciennik, Anna; Dzantiev, Leonid; Iyer, Ravi R.; Constantin, Nicoleta; Kadyrov, Farid A.; Modrich, Paul

    2010-01-01

    MutLα (MLH1–PMS2) is a latent endonuclease that is activated in a mismatch-, MutSα-, proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA)-, replication factor C (RFC)-, and ATP-dependent manner, with nuclease action directed to the heteroduplex strand that contains a preexisting break. RFC depletion experiments and use of linear DNAs indicate that RFC function in endonuclease activation is limited to PCNA loading. Whereas nicked circular heteroduplex DNA is a good substrate for PCNA loading and for endonuclease activation on the incised strand, covalently closed, relaxed circular DNA is a poor substrate for both reactions. However, covalently closed supercoiled or bubble-containing relaxed heteroduplexes, which do support PCNA loading, also support MutLα activation, but in this case cleavage strand bias is largely abolished. Based on these findings we suggest that PCNA has two roles in MutLα function: The clamp is required for endonuclease activation, an effect that apparently involves interaction of the two proteins, and by virtue of its loading orientation, PCNA determines the strand direction of MutLα incision. These results also provide a potential mechanism for activation of mismatch repair on nonreplicating DNA, an effect that may have implications for the somatic phase of triplet repeat expansion. PMID:20713735

  17. Structural aspects of catalytic mechanisms of endonucleases and their binding to nucleic acids

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhukhlistova, N. E.; Balaev, V. V.; Lyashenko, A. V.; Lashkov, A. A., E-mail: alashkov83@gmail.com [Russian Academy of Sciences, Shubnikov Institute of Crystallography (Russian Federation)

    2012-05-15

    Endonucleases (EC 3.1) are enzymes of the hydrolase class that catalyze the hydrolytic cleavage of deoxyribonucleic and ribonucleic acids at any region of the polynucleotide chain. Endonucleases are widely used both in biotechnological processes and in veterinary medicine as antiviral agents. Medical applications of endonucleases in human cancer therapy hold promise. The results of X-ray diffraction studies of the spatial organization of endonucleases and their complexes and the mechanism of their action are analyzed and generalized. An analysis of the structural studies of this class of enzymes showed that the specific binding of enzymes to nucleic acids is characterized by interactions with nitrogen bases and the nucleotide backbone, whereas the nonspecific binding of enzymes is generally characterized by interactions only with the nucleic-acid backbone. It should be taken into account that the specificity can be modulated by metal ions and certain low-molecular-weight organic compounds. To test the hypotheses about specific and nonspecific nucleic-acid-binding proteins, it is necessary to perform additional studies of atomic-resolution three-dimensional structures of enzyme-nucleic-acid complexes by methods of structural biology.

  18. Efficient fdCas9 Synthetic Endonuclease with Improved Specificity for Precise Genome Engineering

    KAUST Repository

    Aouida, Mustapha

    2015-07-30

    The Cas9 endonuclease is used for genome editing applications in diverse eukaryotic species. A high frequency of off-target activity has been reported in many cell types, limiting its applications to genome engineering, especially in genomic medicine. Here, we generated a synthetic chimeric protein between the catalytic domain of the FokI endonuclease and the catalytically inactive Cas9 protein (fdCas9). A pair of guide RNAs (gRNAs) that bind to sense and antisense strands with a defined spacer sequence range can be used to form a catalytically active dimeric fdCas9 protein and generate double-strand breaks (DSBs) within the spacer sequence. Our data demonstrate an improved catalytic activity of the fdCas9 endonuclease, with a spacer range of 15–39 nucleotides, on surrogate reporters and genomic targets. Furthermore, we observed no detectable fdCas9 activity at known Cas9 off-target sites. Taken together, our data suggest that the fdCas9 endonuclease variant is a superior platform for genome editing applications in eukaryotic systems including mammalian cells.

  19. Assaying multiple restriction endonucleases functionalities and inhibitions on DNA microarray with multifunctional gold nanoparticle probes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Lan; Zhu, Zhijun; Li, Tao; Wang, Zhenxin

    2014-02-15

    Herein, a double-stranded (ds) DNA microarray-based resonance light scattering (RLS) assay with multifunctional gold nanoparticle (GNP) probes has been developed for studying restriction endonuclease functionality and inhibition. Because of decreasing significantly melting temperature, the enzyme-cleaved dsDNAs easily unwind to form single-stranded (ss) DNAs. The ssDNAs are hybridized with multiplex complementary ssDNAs functionalized GNP probes followed by silver enhancement and RLS detection. Three restriction endonucleases (EcoRI, BamHI and EcoRV) and three potential inhibitors (doxorubicin hydrochloride (DOX), ethidium bromide (EB) and an EcoRI-derived helical peptide (α4)) were selected to demonstrate capability of the assay. Enzyme activities of restriction endonucleases are detected simultaneously with high specificity down to the limits of 2.0 × 10(-2)U/mL for EcoRI, 1.1 × 10(-2)U/mL for BamHI and 1.6 × 10(-2)U/mL for EcoRV, respectively. More importantly, the inhibitory potencies of three inhibitors are showed quantitatively, indicating that our approach has great promise for high-throughput screening of restriction endonuclease inhibitors. © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. Arthrobacter luteus restriction endonuclease cleavage map of X174 RF DNA

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vereijken, J.M.; Mansfeld, A.D.M. van; Baas, P.D.; Jansz, H.S.

    1975-01-01

    Cleavage of X174 RF DNA with the restriction endonuclease from Arthrobacter luteus (Alu I) produces 23 fragments of approximately 24–1100 base pairs in length. The order of most of these fragments has been established by digestion of Haemophilus influenzae Rd (Hind II) and Haemophilus aegyptius (Hae

  1. Sequence-dependent cleavage of mismatched DNA by Ban I restriction endonuclease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Weimin; Zhu, Dan; Keohavong, Phouthone

    2017-10-01

    Restriction enzymes have previously shown the ability to cleave DNA substrates with mismatched base(s) in recognition sequences; in this study, Ban I endonuclease demonstrated this same ability. Single base substitutions were introduced, and fragments containing various types of unpaired base(s) (heteroduplex fragments) within the Ban I endonuclease recognition sequence, 5'-G|GPyPuCC-3', were generated. Each of the heteroduplex fragments was treated with Ban I endonuclease and analyzed by denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis. Our results showed that heteroduplex fragments containing mismatched bases at either the first or third position of the Ban I recognition sequence or, because of the symmetrical structure of the sequence, the sixth or fourth position on the opposite strand were cleaved by the enzyme. Furthermore, these cleaved fragments contained at least one strand corresponding to the original Ban I recognition sequence. Fragments with mismatches formed by an A (noncanonical, nc) opposite a purine (canonical, ca) or a T (nc) opposite a pyrimidine (ca) were cleaved more efficiently than other types of mismatched bases. These results may help elucidate the mechanisms by which DNA and protein interact during the process of DNA cleavage by Ban I endonuclease. Copyright © 2017 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  2. Problem-solving test: digestion of a plasmid with restriction endonucleases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szeberényi, József

    2013-01-01

    Terms to be familiar with before you start to solve the test: plasmid, restriction endonuclease, agarose gel electrophoresis, ethidium bromide staining, autoradiography, Coomassie staining, Southern blotting, linear and circular DNA, superhelical DNA, exonuclease, modification methylase, palindrome, sticky and blunt ends, nicked circular DNA. Copyright © 2013 International Union of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  3. Direct endonuclease digestion and multi-analysis of restriction fragment length polymorphisms by microchip electrophoresis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akamine, Rie; Yatsushiro, Shouki; Yamamura, Shouhei; Kido, Jun-ichi; Shinohara, Yasuo; Baba, Yoshinobu; Kataoka, Masatoshi

    2009-12-05

    A high-performance multi-analysis system for genotypic mutation by means of restriction fragment length polymorphisms (RFLP) involving endonuclease treatment of PCR-amplified DNA on a microchip and subsequent analysis by microchip electrophoresis for DNA sizing was developed. A Hitachi SV1210 system, with which 12 samples can be analyzed on a plastic chip with good accuracy as to DNA sizing between 25 and 300 bp, was employed for RFLP analysis. We performed RFLP analysis of the ABO genotypes of blood donors for whom the ABO type was known. Six blood samples were analyzed by PCR to amplify two different regions of the genomic DNA, each of the amplified DNAs containing a different nucleotide polymorphism. To analyze the genes at polymorphic sites 261 and 526, restriction endonucleases Kpn I and Ban I were employed, respectively. When an amplified DNA was digested with each endonuclease on a microchip for 20 min, sequential analysis revealed the presence or absence of the respective restriction site. This analysis was performed within 7 min using a 1/10 volume of a DNA sample in comparison with the conventional method, and the estimated DNA size differed from the predicted size by less than 10 bp. The results indicate the potential of microchip electrophoresis for RFLP with on-chip direct endonuclease digestion and sequential analysis, offering high resolution in a short time.

  4. Accurate scanning of the BssHII endonuclease in search for its DNA cleavage site

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Berkhout, B.; van Wamel, J.

    1996-01-01

    A facilitated diffusion mechanism has been proposed to account for the kinetic efficiency with which restriction endonucleases are able to locate DNA recognition sites. Such a mechanism involves the initial formation of a nonspecific complex upon collision of the protein with the DNA, with the

  5. Insights into the DNA cleavage mechanism of human LINE-1 retrotransposon endonuclease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Repanas, K.; Fuentes, G.; Cohen, S.; Bonvin, A.M.J.J.; Perrakis, A.

    2008-01-01

    The human LINE-1 endonuclease (L1-EN) contributes in defining the genomic integration sites of the abundant human L1 and Alu retrotransposons. LINEs have been considered as possible vehicles for gene delivery and understanding the mechanism of L1-EN could help engineering them as genetic tools. We

  6. Impact of a homing intein on recombination frequency and organismal fitness

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naor, Adit; Altman-Price, Neta; Soucy, Shannon M.; Green, Anna G.; Mitiagin, Yulia; Turgeman-Grott, Israela; Davidovich, Noam; Gophna, Uri

    2016-01-01

    Inteins are parasitic genetic elements that excise themselves at the protein level by self-splicing, allowing the formation of functional, nondisrupted proteins. Many inteins contain a homing endonuclease (HEN) domain and rely on its activity for horizontal propagation. However, successful invasion of an entire population will make this activity redundant, and the HEN domain is expected to degenerate quickly under these conditions. Several theories have been proposed for the continued existence of the both active HEN and noninvaded alleles within a population. However, to date, these models were not directly tested experimentally. Using the natural cell fusion ability of the halophilic archaeon Haloferax volcanii we were able to examine this question in vivo, by mating polB intein-positive [insertion site c in the gene encoding DNA polymerase B (polB-c)] and intein-negative cells and examining the dispersal efficiency of this intein in a natural, polyploid population. Through competition between otherwise isogenic intein-positive and intein-negative strains we determined a surprisingly high fitness cost of over 7% for the polB-c intein. Our laboratory culture experiments and samples taken from Israel’s Mediterranean coastline show that the polB-c inteins do not efficiently take over an inteinless population through mating, even under ideal conditions. The presence of the HEN/intein promoted recombination when intein-positive and intein-negative cells were mated. Increased recombination due to HEN activity contributes not only to intein dissemination but also to variation at the population level because recombination tracts during repair extend substantially from the homing site. PMID:27462108

  7. Engineering strand-specific DNA nicking enzymes from the type IIS restriction endonucleases BsaI, BsmBI, and BsmAI.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Zhenyu; Samuelson, James C; Zhou, Jing; Dore, Andrew; Xu, Shuang-Yong

    2004-03-26

    More than 80 type IIA/IIS restriction endonucleases with different recognition specificities are now known. In contrast, only a limited number of strand-specific nicking endonucleases are currently available. To overcome this limitation, a novel genetic screening method was devised to convert type IIS restriction endonucleases into strand-specific nicking endonucleases. The genetic screen consisted of four steps: (1) random mutagenesis to create a plasmid library, each bearing an inactivated endonuclease gene; (2) restriction digestion of plasmids containing the wild-type and the mutagenized endonuclease gene; (3) back-crosses with the wild-type gene by ligation to the wild-type N-terminal or C-terminal fragment; (4) transformation of the ligated DNA into a pre-modified host and screening for nicking endonuclease activity in total cell culture or cell extracts of the transformants. Nt.BsaI and Nb.BsaI nicking endonucleases were isolated from BsaI using this genetic screen. In addition, site-directed mutagenesis was carried out to isolate BsaI nicking variants with minimal double-stranded DNA cleavage activity. The equivalent amino acid substitutions were introduced into BsmBI and BsmAI restriction endonucleases with similar recognition sequence and significant amino acid sequence identity and their nicking variants were successfully isolated. This work provides strong evidence that some type IIS restriction endonucleases carry two separate active sites. When one of the active sites is inactivated, the type IIS restriction endonuclease may nick only one strand.

  8. Home, Smart Home

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Ellen Kathrine; Olesen, Gitte Gylling Hammershøj; Mullins, Michael

    2013-01-01

    The article places focus on how smart technologies integrated in a one family- home and particular the window offer unique challenges and opportunities for designing buildings with the best possible environments for people and nature. Toward an interdisciplinary approach, we address the interaction...... between daylight defined in technical terms and daylight defined in aesthetic, architectural terms. Through field-tests of a Danish carbon-neutral home and an analysis of five key design parameters, we explore the contradictions and potentials in smart buildings, using the smart window as example of how...... to the energy design is central. The study illuminates an approach of the design of smart houses as living organisms by connecting technology with the needs of the occupants with the power and beauty of daylight....

  9. Video time encoding machines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lazar, Aurel A; Pnevmatikakis, Eftychios A

    2011-03-01

    We investigate architectures for time encoding and time decoding of visual stimuli such as natural and synthetic video streams (movies, animation). The architecture for time encoding is akin to models of the early visual system. It consists of a bank of filters in cascade with single-input multi-output neural circuits. Neuron firing is based on either a threshold-and-fire or an integrate-and-fire spiking mechanism with feedback. We show that analog information is represented by the neural circuits as projections on a set of band-limited functions determined by the spike sequence. Under Nyquist-type and frame conditions, the encoded signal can be recovered from these projections with arbitrary precision. For the video time encoding machine architecture, we demonstrate that band-limited video streams of finite energy can be faithfully recovered from the spike trains and provide a stable algorithm for perfect recovery. The key condition for recovery calls for the number of neurons in the population to be above a threshold value.

  10. IDENTIFICATION OF ENCODED BEADS

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2005-01-01

    The present invention is relates to methods for the identification of spatially encoded beaded or granulated matrices comprising a plurality of immobilised particles. The identification is based on a distance matrix determination or based on a set of geometrical figures, such a triangles...

  11. Endonuclease-containing Penelope retrotransposons in the bdelloid rotifer Adineta vaga exhibit unusual structural features and play a role in expansion of host gene families

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-01

    Background Penelope-like elements (PLEs) are an enigmatic group of retroelements sharing a common ancestor with telomerase reverse transcriptases. In our previous studies, we identified endonuclease-deficient PLEs that are associated with telomeres in bdelloid rotifers, small freshwater invertebrates best known for their long-term asexuality and high foreign DNA content. Completion of the high-quality draft genome sequence of the bdelloid rotifer Adineta vaga provides us with the opportunity to examine its genomic transposable element (TE) content, as well as TE impact on genome function and evolution. Results We performed an exhaustive search of the A. vaga genome assembly, aimed at identification of canonical PLEs combining both the reverse transcriptase (RT) and the GIY-YIG endonuclease (EN) domains. We find that the RT/EN-containing Penelope families co-exist in the A. vaga genome with the EN-deficient RT-containing Athena retroelements. Canonical PLEs are present at very low copy numbers, often as a single-copy, and there is no evidence that they might preferentially co-mobilize EN-deficient PLEs. We also find that Penelope elements can participate in expansion of A. vaga multigene families via trans-action of their enzymatic machinery, as evidenced by identification of intron-containing host genes framed by the Penelope terminal repeats and characteristic target-site duplications generated upon insertion. In addition, we find that Penelope open reading frames (ORFs) in several families have incorporated long stretches of coding sequence several hundred amino acids (aa) in length that are highly enriched in asparagine residues, a phenomenon not observed in other retrotransposons. Conclusions Our results show that, despite their low abundance and low transcriptional activity in the A. vaga genome, endonuclease-containing Penelope elements can participate in expansion of host multigene families. We conclude that the terminal repeats represent the cis

  12. Conserved structural chemistry for incision activity in structurally non-homologous apurinic/apyrimidinic endonuclease APE1 and endonuclease IV DNA repair enzymes.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tsutakawa, Susan E.; Shin, David S.; Mol, Clifford D.; Izum, Tadahide; Arvai, Andrew S.; Mantha, Anil K.; Szczesny, Bartosz; Ivanov, Ivaylo N.; Hosfield, David J.; Maiti, Buddhadev; Pique, Mike E.; Frankel, Kenneth A.; Hitomi, Kenichi; Cunningham, Richard P.; Mitra, Sankar; Tainer, John A.

    2013-03-22

    Non-coding apurinic/apyrimidinic (AP) sites in DNA form spontaneously and as DNA base excision repair intermediates are the most common toxic and mutagenic in vivo DNA lesion. For repair, AP sites must be processed by 5' AP endonucleases in initial stages of base repair. Human APE1 and bacterial Nfo represent the two conserved 5' AP endonuclease families in the biosphere; they both recognize AP sites and incise the phosphodiester backbone 5' to the lesion, yet they lack similar structures and metal ion requirements. Here, we determined and analyzed crystal structures of a 2.4 ? resolution APE1-DNA product complex with Mg(2+) and a 0.92 Nfo with three metal ions. Structural and biochemical comparisons of these two evolutionarily distinct enzymes characterize key APE1 catalytic residues that are potentially functionally similar to Nfo active site components, as further tested and supported by computational analyses. We observe a magnesium-water cluster in the APE1 active site, with only Glu-96 forming the direct protein coordination to the Mg(2+). Despite differences in structure and metal requirements of APE1 and Nfo, comparison of their active site structures surprisingly reveals strong geometric conservation of the catalytic reaction, with APE1 catalytic side chains positioned analogously to Nfo metal positions, suggesting surprising functional equivalence between Nfo metal ions and APE1 residues. The finding that APE1 residues are positioned to substitute for Nfo metal ions is supported by the impact of mutations on activity. Collectively, the results illuminate the activities of residues, metal ions, and active site features for abasic site endonucleases.

  13. [Restriction endonuclease digest - melting curve analysis: a new SNP genotyping and its application in traditional Chinese medicine authentication].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Chao; Huang, Lu-Qi; Yuan, Yuan; Chen, Min; Hou, Jing-Yi; Wu, Zhi-Gang; Lin, Shu-Fang

    2014-04-01

    Single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNP) is an important molecular marker in traditional Chinese medicine research, and it is widely used in TCM authentication. The present study created a new genotyping method by combining restriction endonuclease digesting with melting curve analysis, which is a stable, rapid and easy doing SNP genotyping method. The new method analyzed SNP genotyping of two chloroplast SNP which was located in or out of the endonuclease recognition site, the results showed that when attaching a 14 bp GC-clamp (cggcgggagggcgg) to 5' end of the primer and selecting suited endonuclease to digest the amplification products, the melting curve of Lonicera japonica and Atractylodes macrocephala were all of double peaks and the adulterants Shan-yin-hua and A. lancea were of single peaks. The results indicated that the method had good stability and reproducibility for identifying authentic medicines from its adulterants. It is a potential SNP genotyping method and named restriction endonuclease digest - melting curve analysis.

  14. Identification of Egyptian Fasciola species by PCR and restriction endonucleases digestion of the nuclear small subunit ribosomal RNA gene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    El-Gozamy, Bothina R; Shoukry, Nahla M

    2009-08-01

    Fascioliasis is one of the familiar zoonotic health problems of worldwide distribution including Egypt. In this study, a simple and rapid polymerase chain reaction/restriction fragment length polymorphisms (PCR/RFLPs) assay, using the common restriction endonucleases Aval, EcoRI, Eael, Sac11 and Avail was applied to differentiate between both Fasciola gigantica and F. hepatica. The five restriction endonucleases were used to differentiate between the two species of Fasciola based on -1950 bp long sequence of the 18S nuclear small subunit ribosomal RNA gene. Aval and EcoRI restriction endonucleases failed to differentiate between the two Fasciola species when each restriction enzyme gave the same restriction patterns in both of them. However, F. gigantica and F. hepatica were well-differentiated when their small subunit ribosomal DNA were digested with Eael and Sac 11 restriction endonucleases.

  15. Home Safety

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Furniture Tip-Overs filter Water and Drowning Apply Water and Drowning filter Space and Place: (-) Remove Home filter Home Car and Road Apply Car and Road filter Sports and Play Apply Sports and Play filter Type: Activities for ...

  16. Home hemodialysis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Agar, John W; Perkins, Anthony; Heaf, James G

    2015-01-01

    We describe the infrastructure that is necessary for hemodialysis in the home focusing on physical requirements, the organization of plumbing and water, and the key features that should guide the selection of machines that are suitable for home use.......We describe the infrastructure that is necessary for hemodialysis in the home focusing on physical requirements, the organization of plumbing and water, and the key features that should guide the selection of machines that are suitable for home use....

  17. Dipankar Home

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Pramana – Journal of Physics. Dipankar Home. Articles written in Pramana – Journal of Physics. Volume 56 Issue 2-3 February-March 2001 pp 179-187. Facets of tripartite entanglement · Dipankar Home · More Details Abstract Fulltext PDF. Tripartite entangled states of systems 1, 2 and 3 involving ...

  18. Neural Semantic Encoders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Munkhdalai, Tsendsuren; Yu, Hong

    2017-04-01

    We present a memory augmented neural network for natural language understanding: Neural Semantic Encoders. NSE is equipped with a novel memory update rule and has a variable sized encoding memory that evolves over time and maintains the understanding of input sequences through read, compose and write operations. NSE can also access multiple and shared memories. In this paper, we demonstrated the effectiveness and the flexibility of NSE on five different natural language tasks: natural language inference, question answering, sentence classification, document sentiment analysis and machine translation where NSE achieved state-of-the-art performance when evaluated on publically available benchmarks. For example, our shared-memory model showed an encouraging result on neural machine translation, improving an attention-based baseline by approximately 1.0 BLEU.

  19. Spectroelectrochemical insights into structural and redox properties of immobilized endonuclease III and its catalytically inactive mutant.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moe, Elin; Rollo, Filipe; Silveira, Célia M; Sezer, Murat; Hildebrandt, Peter; Todorovic, Smilja

    2018-01-05

    Endonuclease III is a Fe-S containing bifunctional DNA glycosylase which is involved in the repair of oxidation damaged DNA. Here we employ surface enhanced IR spectroelectrochemistry and electrochemistry to study the enzyme from the highly radiation- and desiccation-resistant bacterium Deinococcus radiodurans (DrEndoIII2). The experiments are designed to shed more light onto specific parameters that are currently proposed to govern damage search and recognition by endonucleases III. We demonstrate that electrostatic interactions required for the redox activation of DrEndoIII2 may result in high electric fields that alter its structural and thermodynamic properties. Analysis of inactive DrEndoIII2 (K132A/D150A double mutant) interacting with undamaged DNA, and the active enzyme interacting with damaged DNA also indicate that the electron transfer is modulated by subtle differences in the protein-DNA complex. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. UVI31+ is a DNA endonuclease that dynamically localizes to chloroplast pyrenoids in C. reinhardtii.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manish Shukla

    Full Text Available UVI31+ is an evolutionarily conserved BolA family protein. In this study we examine the presence, localization and possible functions of this protein in the context of a unicellular alga, Chlamydomonas reinhardtii. UVI31+ in C. reinhardtii exhibits DNA endonuclease activity and is induced upon UV stress. Further, UVI31+ that normally localizes to the cell wall and pyrenoid regions gets redistributed into punctate foci within the whole chloroplast, away from the pyrenoid, upon UV stress. The observed induction upon UV-stress as well as the endonuclease activity suggests plausible role of this protein in DNA repair. We have also observed that UV31+ is induced in C. reinhardtii grown in dark conditions, whereby the protein localization is enhanced in the pyrenoid. Biomolecular interaction between the purified pyrenoids and UVI31+ studied by NMR demonstrates the involvement of the disordered loop domain of the protein in its interaction.

  1. Does quantum entanglement in DNA synchronize the catalytic centers of type II restriction endonucleases?

    CERN Document Server

    Kurian, P; Lindesay, J

    2014-01-01

    Several living systems have been examined for their apparent optimization of structure and function for quantum behavior at biological length scales. Orthodox type II endonucleases, the largest class of restriction enzymes, recognize four-to-eight base pair sequences of palindromic DNA, cut both strands symmetrically, and act without an external metabolite such as ATP. While it is known that these enzymes induce strand breaks by attacking phosphodiester bonds, what remains unclear is the mechanism by which cutting occurs in concert at the catalytic centers. Previous studies indicate the primacy of intimate DNA contacts made by the specifically bound enzyme in coordinating the two synchronized cuts. We propose that collective electronic behavior in the DNA helix generates coherent oscillations, quantized through boundary conditions imposed by the endonuclease, that provide the energy required to break two phosphodiester bonds. Such quanta may be preserved in the presence of thermal noise and electromagnetic in...

  2. Identification of two groups of Mycobacterium paratuberculosis strains by restriction endonuclease analysis and DNA hybridization.

    OpenAIRE

    Collins, D M; Gabric, D M; de Lisle, G W

    1990-01-01

    Genomic DNA was prepared from four reference strains of Mycobacterium paratuberculosis and 46 isolates of this organism from New Zealand, Australia, Canada, and Norway and also from two mycobactin-dependent "wood pigeon" strains. The DNA was characterized by restriction endonuclease analysis, both with and without DNA hybridization, with a probe specific to a repetitive DNA sequence in M. paratuberculosis. Both techniques differentiated M. paratuberculosis strains into two groups, but DNA hyb...

  3. Endonuclease VIII-like 3 (Neil3) DNA glycosylase promotes neurogenesis induced by hypoxia-ischemia

    OpenAIRE

    Sejersted, Yngve; Hildrestrand, Gunn A.; Kunke, David; Rolseth, Veslemøy; Krokeide, Silje Z.; Neurauter, Christine G.; Suganthan, Rajikala; Atneosen-Åsegg, Monica; Fleming, Aaron M.; Saugstad, Ola D.; Burrows, Cynthia J.; Luna, Luisa; Bjørås, Magnar

    2011-01-01

    Neural stem/progenitor cell proliferation and differentiation are required to replace damaged neurons and regain brain function after hypoxic-ischemic events. DNA base lesions accumulating during hypoxic-ischemic stress are removed by DNA glycosylases in the base-excision repair pathway to prevent cytotoxicity and mutagenesis. Expression of the DNA glycosylase endonuclease VIII-like 3 (Neil3) is confined to regenerative subregions in the embryonic and perinatal brains. Here we show profound n...

  4. Engineering of restriction endonucleases: using methylation activity of the bifunctional endonuclease Eco57I to select the mutant with a novel sequence specificity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rimseliene, Renata; Maneliene, Zita; Lubys, Arvydas; Janulaitis, Arvydas

    2003-03-21

    Type II restriction endonucleases (REs) are widely used tools in molecular biology, biotechnology and diagnostics. Efforts to generate new specificities by structure-guided design and random mutagenesis have been unsuccessful so far. We have developed a new procedure called the methylation activity-based selection (MABS) for generating REs with a new specificity. MABS uses a unique property of bifunctional type II REs to methylate DNA targets they recognize. The procedure includes three steps: (1) conversion of a bifunctional RE into a monofunctional DNA-modifying enzyme by cleavage center disruption; (2) mutagenesis and selection of mutants with altered DNA modification specificity based on their ability to protect predetermined DNA targets; (3) reconstitution of the cleavage center's wild-type structure. The efficiency of the MABS technique was demonstrated by altering the sequence specificity of the bifunctional RE Eco57I from 5'-CTGAAG to 5'-CTGRAG, and thus generating the mutant restriction endonuclease (and DNA methyltransferase) of a specificity not known before. This study provides evidence that MABS is a promising technique for generation of REs with new specificities.

  5. Investigation of the salicylaldehyde thiosemicarbazone scaffold for inhibition of influenza virus PA endonuclease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rogolino, Dominga; Bacchi, Alessia; De Luca, Laura; Rispoli, Gabriele; Sechi, Mario; Stevaert, Annelies; Naesens, Lieve; Carcelli, Mauro

    2015-10-01

    The influenza virus PA endonuclease is an attractive target for the development of novel anti-influenza virus therapeutics, which are urgently needed because of the emergence of drug-resistant viral strains. Reported PA inhibitors are assumed to chelate the divalent metal ion(s) (Mg²⁺ or Mn²⁺) in the enzyme's catalytic site, which is located in the N-terminal part of PA (PA-Nter). In the present work, a series of salicylaldehyde thiosemicarbazone derivatives have been synthesized and evaluated for their ability to inhibit the PA-Nter catalytic activity. Compounds 1-6 have been evaluated against influenza virus, both in enzymatic assays with influenza virus PA-Nter and in virus yield assays in MDCK cells. In order to establish a structure-activity relationship, the hydrazone analogue of the most active thiosemicarbazone has also been evaluated. Since chelation may represent a mode of action of such class of molecules, we studied the interaction of two of them, one with and one without biological activity versus the PA enzyme, towards Mg²⁺, the ion that is probably involved in the endonuclease activity of the heterotrimeric influenza polymerase complex. The crystal structure of the magnesium complex of the o-vanillin thiosemicarbazone ligand 1 is also described. Moreover, docking studies of PA endonuclease with compounds 1 and 2 were performed, to further analyse the possible mechanism of action of this class of inhibitors.

  6. Structure of the endonuclease domain of MutL: unlicensed to cut

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pillon, Monica C.; Lorenowicz, Jessica J.; Uckelmann, Michael; Klocko, Andrew D.; Mitchell, Ryan R.; Chung, Yu Seon; Modrich, Paul; Walker, Graham C.; Simmons, Lyle A.; Friedhoff, Peter; Guarné, Alba

    2010-01-01

    Summary DNA mismatch repair corrects errors that have escaped polymerase proofreading, increasing replication fidelity 100- to 1000-fold in organisms ranging from bacteria to humans. The MutL protein plays a central role in mismatch repair by coordinating multiple protein-protein interactions that signal strand removal upon mismatch recognition by MutS. Here we report the crystal structure of the endonuclease domain of Bacillus subtilis MutL. The structure is organized in dimerization and regulatory subdomains connected by a helical lever spanning the conserved endonuclease motif. Additional conserved motifs cluster around the lever and define a Zn2+-binding site that is critical for MutL function in vivo. The structure unveils a powerful inhibitory mechanism to prevent undesired DNA nicking and allows us to propose a model describing how the interaction with MutS and the processivity clamp could license the endonuclease activity of MutL. The structure also provides a molecular framework to propose and test additional roles of MutL in mismatch repair. PMID:20603082

  7. Structure and mutagenesis of the DNA modification-dependent restriction endonuclease AspBHI.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horton, John R; Nugent, Rebecca L; Li, Andrew; Mabuchi, Megumu Yamada; Fomenkov, Alexey; Cohen-Karni, Devora; Griggs, Rose M; Zhang, Xing; Wilson, Geoffrey G; Zheng, Yu; Xu, Shuang-yong; Cheng, Xiaodong

    2014-03-07

    The modification-dependent restriction endonuclease AspBHI recognizes 5-methylcytosine (5mC) in the double-strand DNA sequence context of (C/T)(C/G)(5mC)N(C/G) (N = any nucleotide) and cleaves the two strands a fixed distance (N12/N16) 3' to the modified cytosine. We determined the crystal structure of the homo-tetrameric AspBHI. Each subunit of the protein comprises two domains: an N-terminal DNA-recognition domain and a C-terminal DNA cleavage domain. The N-terminal domain is structurally similar to the eukaryotic SET and RING-associated (SRA) domain, which is known to bind to a hemi-methylated CpG dinucleotide. The C-terminal domain is structurally similar to classic Type II restriction enzymes and contains the endonuclease catalytic-site motif of DX20EAK. To understand how specific amino acids affect AspBHI recognition preference, we generated a homology model of the AspBHI-DNA complex, and probed the importance of individual amino acids by mutagenesis. Ser41 and Arg42 are predicted to be located in the DNA minor groove 5' to the modified cytosine. Substitution of Ser41 with alanine (S41A) and cysteine (S41C) resulted in mutants with altered cleavage activity. All 19 Arg42 variants resulted in loss of endonuclease activity.

  8. Simple and cost-effective restriction endonuclease analysis of human adenoviruses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adhikary, Arun Kumar; Hanaoka, Nozomu; Fujimoto, Tsuguto

    2014-01-01

    Restriction endonuclease analyses (REAs) constitute the only inexpensive molecular approach capable of typing and characterizing human adenovirus (HAdV) strains based on the entire genome. However, the application of this method is limited by the need for time-consuming and labor-intensive procedures. We herein developed a simple and cost-effective REA for assessing HAdV. The method consists of (1) simple and cost-effective DNA extraction, (2) fast restriction endonuclease (RE) digestion, and (3) speedy mini agarose gel electrophoresis. In this study, DNA was isolated according to the kit-based method and 21.0 to 28.0  μg of viral DNA was extracted from prototypes (HAdV-1, HAdV-3, HAdV-4, and HAdV-37) in each flask. The amount of DNA ranged from 11.4 to 57.0  μg among the HAdV-3 (n=73) isolates. The obtained viral DNA was found to be applicable to more than 10 types of REAs. Fast-cut restriction endonucleases (REs) were able to digest the DNA within 15 minutes, and restriction fragments were easily separated via horizontal mini agarose gel electrophoresis. The whole procedure for 10 samples can be completed within approximately six hours (the conventional method requires at least two days). These results show that our REA is potentially applicable in many laboratories in which HAdVs are isolated.

  9. On the role of steric clashes in methylation control of restriction endonuclease activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mierzejewska, Karolina; Bochtler, Matthias; Czapinska, Honorata

    2016-01-08

    Restriction-modification systems digest non-methylated invading DNA, while protecting host DNA against the endonuclease activity by methylation. It is widely believed that the methylated DNA would not 'fit' into the binding site of the endonuclease in the productive orientation, and thus steric clashes should account for most of the protection. We test this concept statistically by grafting methyl groups in silico onto non-methylated DNA in co-crystal structures with restriction endonucleases. Clash scores are significantly higher for protective than non-protective methylation (P < 0.05% according to the Wilcoxon rank sum test). Structural data alone are sufficient to distinguish between protective and non-protective DNA methylation with 90% confidence and decision thresholds of 1.1 Å and 48 Å(3) for the most severe distance-based and cumulative volume-based clash with the protein, respectively (0.1 Å was deducted from each interatomic distance to allow for coordinate errors). The most severe clashes are more pronounced for protective methyl groups attached to the nitrogen atoms (N6-methyladenines and N4-methylcytosines) than for C5-methyl groups on cytosines. Cumulative clashes are comparable for all three types of protective methylation. © The Author(s) 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Nucleic Acids Research.

  10. Restriction endonuclease AgeI is a monomer which dimerizes to cleave DNA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tamulaitiene, Giedre; Jovaisaite, Virginija; Tamulaitis, Gintautas; Songailiene, Inga; Manakova, Elena; Zaremba, Mindaugas; Grazulis, Saulius; Xu, Shuang-Yong; Siksnys, Virginijus

    2017-04-07

    Although all Type II restriction endonucleases catalyze phosphodiester bond hydrolysis within or close to their DNA target sites, they form different oligomeric assemblies ranging from monomers, dimers, tetramers to higher order oligomers to generate a double strand break in DNA. Type IIP restriction endonuclease AgeI recognizes a palindromic sequence 5΄-A/CCGGT-3΄ and cuts it ('/' denotes the cleavage site) producing staggered DNA ends. Here, we present crystal structures of AgeI in apo and DNA-bound forms. The structure of AgeI is similar to the restriction enzymes that share in their target sites a conserved CCGG tetranucleotide and a cleavage pattern. Structure analysis and biochemical data indicate, that AgeI is a monomer in the apo-form both in the crystal and in solution, however, it binds and cleaves the palindromic target site as a dimer. DNA cleavage mechanism of AgeI is novel among Type IIP restriction endonucleases. © The Author(s) 2016. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Nucleic Acids Research.

  11. RNA-dependent DNA endonuclease Cas9 of the CRISPR system: Holy Grail of genome editing?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gasiunas, Giedrius; Siksnys, Virginijus

    2013-11-01

    Tailor-made nucleases for precise genome modification, such as zinc finger or TALE nucleases, currently represent the state-of-the-art for genome editing. These nucleases combine a programmable protein module which guides the enzyme to the target site with a nuclease domain which cuts DNA at the addressed site. Reprogramming of these nucleases to cut genomes at specific locations requires major protein engineering efforts. RNA-guided DNA endonuclease Cas9 of the type II (clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeat) CRISPR-Cas system uses CRISPR RNA (crRNA) as a guide to locate the DNA target and the Cas9 protein to cut DNA. Easy programmability of the Cas9 endonuclease using customizable RNAs brings unprecedented flexibility and versatility for targeted genome modification. We highlight the potential of the Cas9 RNA-guided DNA endonuclease as a novel tool for genome surgery, and discuss possible constraints and future prospects. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Homing oneself

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Winther, Ida Wentzel

    2009-01-01

    What is home? A building, a physical and mental phenomenon, or a concept?  There are many homes and ways `to home oneself´. Many of us quite often dwell in other places than at home (as professional commuters between two places, as travellers staying in hotels, as children of divorced parents...... expands on the notion that home indicates more than a house, but also responds to the overuse of the concept home. The aim of this article is to examine how home is done, stretched between everyday life, practices, dreams, loss and cultural ideas of home. My intention is not to remove home......, but to revitalize it to prevent it from turning into a pell-mell or a zombie (Beck 1999). This is important because we are moving away from the hegemonic idea of one home to the tactics of feeling at home, even in more mobile ways. The study is cross-disciplinary, drawing on cultural phenomenology, the history...

  13. Cloning, sequencing and expression of cDNA encoding growth ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Journal of Biosciences; Volume 26; Issue 3. Cloning, sequencing ... The full-length cDNA clone is 1132 bp in length, coding for an open reading frame (ORF) of 603 bp; the reading frame encodes a putative polypeptide of 200 amino acids including the signal sequence of 22 amino acids. The 5′ and 3′ ...

  14. Translational independence between overlapping genes for a restriction endonuclease and its transcriptional regulator

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Blumenthal Robert M

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Most type II restriction-modification (RM systems have two independent enzymes that act on the same DNA sequence: a modification methyltransferase that protects target sites, and a restriction endonuclease that cleaves unmethylated target sites. When RM genes enter a new cell, methylation must occur before restriction activity appears, or the host's chromosome is digested. Transcriptional mechanisms that delay endonuclease expression have been identified in some RM systems. A substantial subset of those systems is controlled by a family of small transcription activators called C proteins. In the PvuII system, C.PvuII activates transcription of its own gene, along with that of the downstream endonuclease gene. This regulation results in very low R.PvuII mRNA levels early after gene entry, followed by rapid increase due to positive feedback. However, given the lethal consequences of premature REase accumulation, transcriptional control alone might be insufficient. In C-controlled RM systems, there is a ± 20 nt overlap between the C termination codon and the R (endonuclease initiation codon, suggesting possible translational coupling, and in many cases predicted RNA hairpins could occlude the ribosome binding site for the endonuclease gene. Results Expression levels of lacZ translational fusions to pvuIIR or pvuIIC were determined, with the native pvuII promoter having been replaced by one not controlled by C.PvuII. In-frame pvuIIC insertions did not substantially decrease either pvuIIC-lacZ or pvuIIR-lacZ expression (with or without C.PvuII provided in trans. In contrast, a frameshift mutation in pvuIIC decreased expression markedly in both fusions, but mRNA measurements indicated that this decrease could be explained by transcriptional polarity. Expression of pvuIIR-lacZ was unaffected when the pvuIIC stop codon was moved 21 nt downstream from its WT location, or 25 or 40 bp upstream of the pvuIIR initiation codon. Disrupting

  15. Translational independence between overlapping genes for a restriction endonuclease and its transcriptional regulator.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaw, Meenakshi K; Blumenthal, Robert M

    2010-11-19

    Most type II restriction-modification (RM) systems have two independent enzymes that act on the same DNA sequence: a modification methyltransferase that protects target sites, and a restriction endonuclease that cleaves unmethylated target sites. When RM genes enter a new cell, methylation must occur before restriction activity appears, or the host's chromosome is digested. Transcriptional mechanisms that delay endonuclease expression have been identified in some RM systems. A substantial subset of those systems is controlled by a family of small transcription activators called C proteins. In the PvuII system, C.PvuII activates transcription of its own gene, along with that of the downstream endonuclease gene. This regulation results in very low R.PvuII mRNA levels early after gene entry, followed by rapid increase due to positive feedback. However, given the lethal consequences of premature REase accumulation, transcriptional control alone might be insufficient. In C-controlled RM systems, there is a ± 20 nt overlap between the C termination codon and the R (endonuclease) initiation codon, suggesting possible translational coupling, and in many cases predicted RNA hairpins could occlude the ribosome binding site for the endonuclease gene. Expression levels of lacZ translational fusions to pvuIIR or pvuIIC were determined, with the native pvuII promoter having been replaced by one not controlled by C.PvuII. In-frame pvuIIC insertions did not substantially decrease either pvuIIC-lacZ or pvuIIR-lacZ expression (with or without C.PvuII provided in trans). In contrast, a frameshift mutation in pvuIIC decreased expression markedly in both fusions, but mRNA measurements indicated that this decrease could be explained by transcriptional polarity. Expression of pvuIIR-lacZ was unaffected when the pvuIIC stop codon was moved 21 nt downstream from its WT location, or 25 or 40 bp upstream of the pvuIIR initiation codon. Disrupting the putative hairpins had no significant

  16. A Flap Endonuclease (TcFEN1) Is Involved in Trypanosoma cruzi Cell Proliferation, DNA Repair, and Parasite Survival.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ponce, Ivan; Aldunate, Carmen; Valenzuela, Lucia; Sepúlveda, Sofia; Garrido, Gilda; Kemmerling, Ulrike; Cabrera, Gonzalo; Galanti, Norbel

    2017-07-01

    FLAP endonucleases (FEN) are involved both in DNA replication and repair by processing DNA intermediaries presenting a nucleotide flap using its phosphodiesterase activity. In spite of these important functions in DNA metabolism, this enzyme was not yet studied in Trypanosomatids. Trypanosoma cruzi, the ethiological agent of Chagas disease, presents two dividing cellular forms (epimastigote and amastigote) and one non-proliferative, infective form (trypomastigote). The parasite survives DNA damage produced by reactive species generated in its hosts. The activity of a T. cruzi FLAP endonuclease (TcFEN1) was determined in the three cellular forms of the parasite using a DNA substrate generated by annealing three different oligonucleotides to form a double-stranded DNA with a 5' flap in the middle. This activity showed optimal pH and temperature similar to other known FENs. The substrate cut by the flap endonuclease activity could be ligated by the parasite generating a repaired DNA product. A DNA flap endonuclease coding sequence found in the T. cruzi genome (TcFEN1) was cloned, inserted in parasite expression vectors and transfected to epimastigotes. The purified native recombinant protein showed DNA flap endonuclease activity. This endonuclease was found located in the parasite nucleus of transfected epimastigotes and its over-expression increased both parasite proliferation and survival to H 2 O 2 . The presence of a flap endonuclease activity in T. cruzi and its nuclear location are indicative of the participation of this enzyme in DNA processing of flap fragments during DNA replication and repair in this parasite of ancient evolutive origin. J. Cell. Biochem. 118: 1722-1732, 2017. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  17. Crystal structure of endonuclease G in complex with DNA reveals how it nonspecifically degrades DNA as a homodimer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Jason L J; Wu, Chyuan-Chuan; Yang, Wei-Zen; Yuan, Hanna S

    2016-12-01

    Endonuclease G (EndoG) is an evolutionarily conserved mitochondrial protein in eukaryotes that digests nucleus chromosomal DNA during apoptosis and paternal mitochondrial DNA during embryogenesis. Under oxidative stress, homodimeric EndoG becomes oxidized and converts to monomers with diminished nuclease activity. However, it remains unclear why EndoG has to function as a homodimer in DNA degradation. Here, we report the crystal structure of the Caenorhabditis elegans EndoG homologue, CPS-6, in complex with single-stranded DNA at a resolution of 2.3 Å. Two separate DNA strands are bound at the ββα-metal motifs in the homodimer with their nucleobases pointing away from the enzyme, explaining why CPS-6 degrades DNA without sequence specificity. Two obligatory monomeric CPS-6 mutants (P207E and K131D/F132N) were constructed, and they degrade DNA with diminished activity due to poorer DNA-binding affinity as compared to wild-type CPS-6. Moreover, the P207E mutant exhibits predominantly 3'-to-5' exonuclease activity, indicating a possible endonuclease to exonuclease activity change. Thus, the dimer conformation of CPS-6 is essential for maintaining its optimal DNA-binding and endonuclease activity. Compared to other non-specific endonucleases, which are usually monomeric enzymes, EndoG is a unique dimeric endonuclease, whose activity hence can be modulated by oxidation to induce conformational changes. © The Author(s) 2016. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Nucleic Acids Research.

  18. Enzymatic cleavage of type II restriction endonucleases on the 2'-O-methyl nucleotide and phosphorothioate substituted DNA.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guojie Zhao

    Full Text Available The effects of nucleotide analogue substitution on the cleavage efficiencies of type II restriction endonucleases have been investigated. Six restriction endonucleases (EcoRV, SpeI, XbaI, XhoI, PstI and SphI were investigated respectively regarding their cleavage when substrates were substituted by 2'-O-methyl nucleotide (2'-OMeN and phosphorothioate (PS. Substitutions were made in the recognition sequence and the two nucleotides flanking the recognition sequence for each endonuclease. The endonuclease cleavage efficiencies were determined using FRET-based assay. Results demonstrated a position-dependent inhibitory effect of substitution on the cleavage efficiency for all the six endonucleases. In general, the 2'-OMeN substitutions had greater impact than the PS substitutions on the enzymatic activities. Nucleotides of optimal substitutions for protection against RE cleavage were identified. Experimental results and conclusions in this study facilitate our insight into the DNA-protein interactions and the enzymatic cleavage mechanism, particularly for those whose detailed structure information is not available. In addition, the information could benefit the development of bioengineering and synthetic biology.

  19. Enzymatic cleavage of type II restriction endonucleases on the 2'-O-methyl nucleotide and phosphorothioate substituted DNA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Guojie; Li, Jun; Tong, Zhaoxue; Zhao, Bin; Mu, Runqing; Guan, Yifu

    2013-01-01

    The effects of nucleotide analogue substitution on the cleavage efficiencies of type II restriction endonucleases have been investigated. Six restriction endonucleases (EcoRV, SpeI, XbaI, XhoI, PstI and SphI) were investigated respectively regarding their cleavage when substrates were substituted by 2'-O-methyl nucleotide (2'-OMeN) and phosphorothioate (PS). Substitutions were made in the recognition sequence and the two nucleotides flanking the recognition sequence for each endonuclease. The endonuclease cleavage efficiencies were determined using FRET-based assay. Results demonstrated a position-dependent inhibitory effect of substitution on the cleavage efficiency for all the six endonucleases. In general, the 2'-OMeN substitutions had greater impact than the PS substitutions on the enzymatic activities. Nucleotides of optimal substitutions for protection against RE cleavage were identified. Experimental results and conclusions in this study facilitate our insight into the DNA-protein interactions and the enzymatic cleavage mechanism, particularly for those whose detailed structure information is not available. In addition, the information could benefit the development of bioengineering and synthetic biology.

  20. Encoding the Factorisation Calculus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Reuben N. S. Rowe

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Jay and Given-Wilson have recently introduced the Factorisation (or SF- calculus as a minimal fundamental model of intensional computation. It is a combinatory calculus containing a special combinator, F, which is able to examine the internal structure of its first argument. The calculus is significant in that as well as being combinatorially complete it also exhibits the property of structural completeness, i.e. it is able to represent any function on terms definable using pattern matching on arbitrary normal forms. In particular, it admits a term that can decide the structural equality of any two arbitrary normal forms. Since SF-calculus is combinatorially complete, it is clearly at least as powerful as the more familiar and paradigmatic Turing-powerful computational models of Lambda Calculus and Combinatory Logic. Its relationship to these models in the converse direction is less obvious, however. Jay and Given-Wilson have suggested that SF-calculus is strictly more powerful than the aforementioned models, but a detailed study of the connections between these models is yet to be undertaken. This paper begins to bridge that gap by presenting a faithful encoding of the Factorisation Calculus into the Lambda Calculus preserving both reduction and strong normalisation. The existence of such an encoding is a new result. It also suggests that there is, in some sense, an equivalence between the former model and the latter. We discuss to what extent our result constitutes an equivalence by considering it in the context of some previously defined frameworks for comparing computational power and expressiveness.

  1. Halfway Home.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sandham, Jessica L.

    1998-01-01

    Describes the pros and cons of Alaska's unique Family Partnership Charter School, which oversees distribution of public funding to home-schooling families, offers support to help home-schooling parents meet district standards on their own terms, and monitors required purchase of teacher time and expenditures. A sidebar describes an Alaskan…

  2. Nursing Homes

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... homes have nursing aides and skilled nurses on hand 24 hours a day. Some nursing homes are set up like a hospital. The staff provides medical care, as well as physical, speech and occupational therapy. There might be a nurses' station on each ...

  3. Nursing Homes

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... to time. At least one-third of nursing home residents have problematic behaviors. These behaviors may include verbal and physical abuse, ... accessible are they? How close is the nursing home to family members? How close is it to the ... is the food like? How much do basic services cost? What ...

  4. Unimaginable homes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Møller, Kristian; Klausen, Maja

    2018-01-01

    The chapter draw from critical mediatization theory, critical intimacy theory, and cultural gerontology and asks: How do elderly people practice their mediatized homes? Which roles do media play in constituting and disturbing the flows of bodies into the home? Moreover: how do dominant categoriza...

  5. Metal ion dependence of DNA cleavage by SepMI and EhoI restriction endonucleases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belkebir, Abdelkarim; Azeddoug, Houssine

    2013-02-22

    Most of type II restriction endonucleases show an absolute requirement for divalent metal ions as cofactors for DNA cleavage. While Mg(2+) is the natural cofactor other metal ions can substitute it and mediate the catalysis, however Ca(2+) (alone) only supports DNA binding. To investigate the role of Mg(2+) in DNA cleavage by restriction endonucleases, we have studied the Mg(2+) and Mn(2+) concentration dependence of DNA cleavage by SepMI and EhoI. Digestion reactions were carried out at different Mg(2+) and Mn(2+) concentrations at constant ionic strength. These enzymes showed different behavior regarding the ions requirement, SepMI reached near maximal level of activity between 10 and 20mM while no activity was detected in the presence of Mn(2+) and in the presence of Ca(2+) cleavage activity was significantly decreased. However, EhoI was more highly active in the presence of Mn(2+) than in the presence of Mg(2+) and can be activated by Ca(2+). Our results propose the two-metal ion mechanism for EhoI and the one-metal ion mechanism for SepMI restriction endonuclease. The analysis of the kinetic parameters under steady state conditions showed that SepMI had a K(m) value for pTrcHisB DNA of 6.15 nM and a V(max) of 1.79×10(-2)nM min(-1), while EhoI had a K(m) for pUC19 plasmid of 8.66 nM and a V(max) of 2×10(-2)nM min(-1). Copyright © 2012 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  6. Purification of Restriction Endonuclease EcoRII and its Co-Crystallization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karpova, E. A.; Chen, L.; Meehan, E.; Pusey, M.; Rose, M. Franklin (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    Restriction endonuclease EcoRII (EcoRII) is a homodimeric DNA-binding protein. It belongs to the type II family of restriction-modification enzymes (subclass IIe). EcoRII recognizes the nucleotide sequence 5'-CCWGG (W=A or T) and cleaves the phosphodiester bond preceding the first cytosine. Methylation at C5 of the second cytosine inhibits cleavage. The enzyme has a unique ability to search for the presence of two substrate sites before cleavage. To the best of our knowledge no other subclass IIe restriction endonuclease has been crystallized yet, without or with a DNA-substrate. We have recently grown and characterized the crystals of this enzyme (1) Here we report on the result of co-crystallization experiments of EcoRII with an 11 b.p. oligonucleotide substrate. The dissociation constant (Kd) EcoRII: 11 b.p. was determined earlier (unpublished results). The needle-like crystals of oligonucleotide-EcoRII protein complex were obtained with this substrate by the technique of vapor diffusion hanging drops. The crystals obtained were washed and dissolved in an aliquot of 10 mM Tris-HCl buffer, pH=7.5. Running a portion of this solution on the SDS-get indicated the presence of endonuclease in the solution. A UV-spectrophotometric test of a second portion confirmed the presence of DNA. We are now working on improvement of the DNA-EcoRII protein crystals. Results obtained from these and ongoing efforts will be reported.

  7. Molecular dynamics simulations of deoxyribonucleic acids and repair enzyme T4 endonuclease V

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pinak, Miroslav

    1999-01-01

    This report describes the results of molecular dynamics (MD) simulation of deoxyribonucleic acids (DNA) and specific repair enzyme T4 endonuclease V. Namely research described here is focused on the examination of specific recognition process, in which this repair enzyme recognizes the damaged site on the DNA molecule-thymine dimer (TD). TD is frequent DNA damage induced by UV radiation in sun light and unless properly repaired it may be mutagenic or lethal for cell, and is also considered among the major causes of skin cancer. T4 endonuclease V is a DNA specific repair enzyme from bacteriophage T4 that catalyzes the first reaction step of TD repair pathway. MD simulations of three molecules - native DNA dodecamer (12 base pairs), DNA of the same sequence of nucleotides as native one but with TD, and repair enzyme T4 endonuclease V - were performed for 1 ns individually for each molecule. Simulations were analyzed to determine the role of electrostatic interaction in the recognition process. It is found that electrostatic energies calculated for amino acids of the enzyme have positive values of around +15 kcal/mol. The electrostatic energy of TD site has negative value of approximately -9 kcal/mol, different from the nearly neutral value of the respective thymines site of the native DNA. The electrostatic interaction of TD site with surrounding water environment differs from the electrostatic interaction of other nucleotides. Differences found between TD site and respective thymines site of native DNA indicate that the electrostatic energy is an important factor contributing to proper recognition of TD site during scanning process in which enzyme scans the DNA. In addition to the electrostatic energy, the important factor in recognition process might be structural complementarity of enzyme and bent DNA with TD. There is significant kink formed around TD site, that is not observed in native DNA. (author)

  8. Creation of targeted inversion mutations in plants using an RNA-guided endonuclease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Congsheng Zhang

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Inversions are DNA rearrangements that are essential for plant gene evolution and adaptation to environmental changes. We demonstrate the creation of targeted inversions and previously reported targeted deletion mutations via delivery of a pair of RNA-guided endonucleases (RGENs of CRISPR/Cas9. The efficiencies of the targeted inversions were 2.6% and 2.2% in the Arabidopsis FLOWERING TIME (AtFT and TERMINAL FLOWER 1 (AtTFL1 loci, respectively. Thus, we successfully established an approach that can potentially be used to introduce targeted DNA inversions of interest for functional studies and crop improvement.

  9. Structure of the Cpf1 endonuclease R-loop complex after target DNA cleavage

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stella, Stefano; Alcón, Pablo; Montoya, Guillermo

    2017-01-01

    Cpf1 is an RNA-guided endonuclease that is emerging as a powerful genome-editing tool. Here we provide insight into its DNA-targeting mechanism by determining the structure of Francisella novicida Cpf1 with the triple-stranded R-loop generated after DNA cleavage. The structure reveals the machine...... and the crRNA-DNA hybrid, avoiding DNA re-annealing. Mutations in key residues reveal a mechanism linking the PAM and DNA nuclease sites. Analysis of the Cpf1 structures proposes a singular working model of RNA-guided DNA cleavage, suggesting new avenues for redesign of Cpf1....

  10. Purification, crystallization, X-ray diffraction analysis and phasing of an engineered single-chain PvuII restriction endonuclease

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Meramveliotaki, Chrysi [Department of Science, Agricultural University of Athens, Athens (Greece); Department of Biology, University of Crete, PO Box 2208, GR-71110 Heraklion, Crete (Greece); Institute of Molecular Biology and Biotechnology (IMBB), PO Box 1527, GR-71110 Heraklion, Crete (Greece); Department of Agricultural Biotechnology, Agricultural University of Athens, Athens (Greece); Kotsifaki, Dina [Institute of Molecular Biology and Biotechnology (IMBB), PO Box 1527, GR-71110 Heraklion, Crete (Greece); Androulaki, Maria [Department of Science, Agricultural University of Athens, Athens (Greece); Department of Biology, University of Crete, PO Box 2208, GR-71110 Heraklion, Crete (Greece); Institute of Molecular Biology and Biotechnology (IMBB), PO Box 1527, GR-71110 Heraklion, Crete (Greece); Department of Agricultural Biotechnology, Agricultural University of Athens, Athens (Greece); Hountas, Athanasios [Department of Science, Agricultural University of Athens, Athens (Greece); Eliopoulos, Elias [Department of Agricultural Biotechnology, Agricultural University of Athens, Athens (Greece); Kokkinidis, Michael, E-mail: kokkinid@imbb.forth.gr [Department of Biology, University of Crete, PO Box 2208, GR-71110 Heraklion, Crete (Greece); Institute of Molecular Biology and Biotechnology (IMBB), PO Box 1527, GR-71110 Heraklion, Crete (Greece); Department of Science, Agricultural University of Athens, Athens (Greece)

    2007-10-01

    PvuII is the first type II restriction endonuclease to be converted from its wild-type homodimeric form into an enzymatically active single-chain variant. The enzyme was crystallized and phasing was successfully performed by molecular replacement. The restriction endonuclease PvuII from Proteus vulgaris has been converted from its wild-type homodimeric form into the enzymatically active single-chain variant scPvuII by tandemly joining the two subunits through the peptide linker Gly-Ser-Gly-Gly. scPvuII, which is suitable for the development of programmed restriction endonucleases for highly specific DNA cleavage, was purified and crystallized. The crystals diffract to a resolution of 2.35 Å and belong to space group P4{sub 2}, with unit-cell parameters a = b = 101.92, c = 100.28 Å and two molecules per asymmetric unit. Phasing was successfully performed by molecular replacement.

  11. Interdomain communication in the endonuclease/motor subunit of type I restriction-modification enzyme EcoR124I.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sinha, Dhiraj; Shamayeva, Katsiaryna; Ramasubramani, Vyas; Řeha, David; Bialevich, Vitali; Khabiri, Morteza; Guzanová, Alena; Milbar, Niv; Weiserová, Marie; Csefalvay, Eva; Carey, Jannette; Ettrich, Rüdiger

    2014-07-01

    Restriction-modification systems protect bacteria from foreign DNA. Type I restriction-modification enzymes are multifunctional heteromeric complexes with DNA-cleavage and ATP-dependent DNA translocation activities located on endonuclease/motor subunit HsdR. The recent structure of the first intact motor subunit of the type I restriction enzyme from plasmid EcoR124I suggested a mechanism by which stalled translocation triggers DNA cleavage via a lysine residue on the endonuclease domain that contacts ATP bound between the two helicase domains. In the present work, molecular dynamics simulations are used to explore this proposal. Molecular dynamics simulations suggest that the Lys-ATP contact alternates with a contact with a nearby loop housing the conserved QxxxY motif that had been implicated in DNA cleavage. This model is tested here using in vivo and in vitro experiments. The results indicate how local interactions are transduced to domain motions within the endonuclease/motor subunit.

  12. Genome of orf virus. Restriction endonuclease analysis of viral DNA isolated from lesions of orf in sheep

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Robinson, A.J.; Ellis, G.; Balassu, T. (Massay Univ., Palmerston North (New Zealand). Dept. of Veterinary Pathology and Public Health)

    1982-01-01

    The purification of orf virus directly from scab material from clinical cases of orf in sheep and restriction endonuclease analysis of the viral DNA is described. Between 7 x 10/sup 9/ and 1.6 x 10/sup 11/ virus particles, and 0.7 to 22.8 ..mu..g of viral DNA could be recovered from lg of scab material. Considerable heterogeneity was observed between different field isolates when restriction endonuclease digests of orf DNA were compared by gel electrophoresis. It was also shown, for two isolates that these fragment patterns did not change after plaque purification and passage in cell culture. It is suggested that restriction endonuclease analysis of viral DNA offers a convenient method of identification of isolates of orf virus. The molecular weight of orf DNA was determined and found to be 88.8 x 10/sup 6/.

  13. Molecular diversity of Pasteurella multocida isolated from cattle and buffaloes in East Azerbaijan province based on restriction endonuclease analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    jalal shayegh

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available In order to increase information about the molecular diversity of Pasteurella multocida isolated from cattle and buffalo, 2 buffalo and 8 cattle isolates were investigated by Restriction Endonuclease Analysis (REA. REA was performed with Hha-I Endonuclease which established 2 distinct profiles: I and II.  Cattle and buffalo isolates fell into both REA profiles. Contrary to previous studies, the genetic diversity of the isolates was negligible. Considering the similarity of cattle and buffalo isolates is the present study, further studies witch larger samples should be carried out to investigate the possibility of inter-species transmission.

  14. A model of EcoRII restriction endonuclease action: the active complex is most likely formed by one protein subunit and one DNA recognition site

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karpova, E. A.; Kubareva, E. A.; Shabarova, Z. A.

    1999-01-01

    To elucidate the mechanism of interaction of restriction endonuclease EcoRII with DNA, we studied by native gel electrophoresis the binding of this endonuclease to a set of synthetic DNA-duplexes containing the modified or canonical recognition sequence 5'-d(CCA/TGG)-3'. All binding substrate or substrate analogues tested could be divided into two major groups: (i) duplexes that, at the interaction with endonuclease EcoRII, form two types of stable complexes on native gel in the absence of Mg2+ cofactor; (ii) duplexes that form only one type of complex, observed both in the presence and absence of Mg2+. Unlike the latter, duplexes under the first group can be hydrolyzed by endonuclease. Data obtained suggest that the active complex is most likely formed by one protein subunit and one DNA recognition sequence. A model of EcoRII endonuclease action is presented.

  15. Home Hemodialysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... weeks of home hemodialysis training. Diet and Liquids Strict limits on liquids, phosphorus, sodium, and potassium Fewer ... Health Information Diabetes Digestive Diseases Kidney Disease Weight Management Liver Disease Urologic Diseases Endocrine Diseases Diet & Nutrition ...

  16. Nursing Home

    OpenAIRE

    Allocca Hernandez, Giacomo Antonio

    2016-01-01

    Getting old involves a lot of changes in life. Family and social relations change and mobility can decrease. These variations require new settings, and of course special care. A nursing home is a place dedicated to help with this situation. Sometimes nursing homes can be perceived as mere institutions by society, and even by future residents. Inside, senior citizens are suppose to spend the rest of their lives doing the same activities day after day. How can we improve these days? Archite...

  17. Polymerase-endonuclease amplification reaction (PEAR for large-scale enzymatic production of antisense oligonucleotides.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaolong Wang

    Full Text Available Antisense oligonucleotides targeting microRNAs or their mRNA targets prove to be powerful tools for molecular biology research and may eventually emerge as new therapeutic agents. Synthetic oligonucleotides are often contaminated with highly homologous failure sequences. Synthesis of a certain oligonucleotide is difficult to scale up because it requires expensive equipment, hazardous chemicals and a tedious purification process. Here we report a novel thermocyclic reaction, polymerase-endonuclease amplification reaction (PEAR, for the amplification of oligonucleotides. A target oligonucleotide and a tandem repeated antisense probe are subjected to repeated cycles of denaturing, annealing, elongation and cleaving, in which thermostable DNA polymerase elongation and strand slipping generate duplex tandem repeats, and thermostable endonuclease (PspGI cleavage releases monomeric duplex oligonucleotides. Each round of PEAR achieves over 100-fold amplification. The product can be used in one more round of PEAR directly, and the process can be further repeated. In addition to avoiding dangerous materials and improved product purity, this reaction is easy to scale up and amenable to full automation. PEAR has the potential to be a useful tool for large-scale production of antisense oligonucleotide drugs.

  18. RPA activates the XPF‐ERCC1 endonuclease to initiate processing of DNA interstrand crosslinks

    KAUST Repository

    Abdullah, Ummi B

    2017-06-13

    During replication‐coupled DNA interstrand crosslink (ICL) repair, the XPF‐ERCC1 endonuclease is required for the incisions that release, or “unhook”, ICLs, but the mechanism of ICL unhooking remains largely unknown. Incisions are triggered when the nascent leading strand of a replication fork strikes the ICL. Here, we report that while purified XPF‐ERCC1 incises simple ICL‐containing model replication fork structures, the presence of a nascent leading strand, modelling the effects of replication arrest, inhibits this activity. Strikingly, the addition of the single‐stranded DNA (ssDNA)‐binding replication protein A (RPA) selectively restores XPF‐ERCC1 endonuclease activity on this structure. The 5′–3′ exonuclease SNM1A can load from the XPF‐ERCC1‐RPA‐induced incisions and digest past the crosslink to quantitatively complete the unhooking reaction. We postulate that these collaborative activities of XPF‐ERCC1, RPA and SNM1A might explain how ICL unhooking is achieved in vivo.

  19. A domain in human EXOG converts apoptotic endonuclease to DNA-repair exonuclease

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Szymanski, Michal R.; Yu, Wangsheng; Gmyrek, Aleksandra M.; White, Mark A.; Molineux, Ian J.; Lee, J. Ching; Yin, Y. Whitney

    2017-05-03

    Human EXOG (hEXOG) is a 5'-exonuclease that is crucial for mitochondrial DNA repair; the enzyme belongs to a nonspecific nuclease family that includes the apoptotic endonuclease EndoG. Here we report biochemical and structural studies of hEXOG, including structures in its apo form and in a complex with DNA at 1.81 and 1.85 Å resolution, respectively. A Wing domain, absent in other ββα-Me members, suppresses endonuclease activity, but confers on hEXOG a strong 5'-dsDNA exonuclease activity that precisely excises a dinucleotide using an intrinsic ‘tape-measure’. The symmetrical apo hEXOG homodimer becomes asymmetrical upon binding to DNA, providing a structural basis for how substrate DNA bound to one active site allosterically regulates the activity of the other. These properties of hEXOG suggest a pathway for mitochondrial BER that provides an optimal substrate for subsequent gap-filling synthesis by DNA polymerase γ.

  20. Telomere-associated endonuclease-deficient Penelope-like retroelements in diverse eukaryotes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gladyshev, Eugene A.; Arkhipova, Irina R.

    2007-01-01

    The evolutionary origin of telomerases, enzymes that maintain the ends of linear chromosomes in most eukaryotes, is a subject of debate. Penelope-like elements (PLEs) are a recently described class of eukaryotic retroelements characterized by a GIY-YIG endonuclease domain and by a reverse transcriptase domain with similarity to telomerases and group II introns. Here we report that a subset of PLEs found in bdelloid rotifers, basidiomycete fungi, stramenopiles, and plants, representing four different eukaryotic kingdoms, lack the endonuclease domain and are located at telomeres. The 5′ truncated ends of these elements are telomere-oriented and typically capped by species-specific telomeric repeats. Most of them also carry several shorter stretches of telomeric repeats at or near their 3′ ends, which could facilitate utilization of the telomeric G-rich 3′ overhangs to prime reverse transcription. Many of these telomere-associated PLEs occupy a basal phylogenetic position close to the point of divergence from the telomerase-PLE common ancestor and may descend from the missing link between early eukaryotic retroelements and present-day telomerases. PMID:17483479

  1. Atypical myxomatosis--virus isolation, experimental infection of rabbits and restriction endonuclease analysis of the isolate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Psikal, I; Smíd, B; Rodák, L; Valícek, L; Bendová, J

    2003-08-01

    Atypical form of myxomatosis, which caused non-lethal and clinically mild disease in domestic rabbits 1 month after immunization with a commercially available vaccine MXT, is described. The isolated myxoma virus designated as Litovel 2 (Li-2) did not induce systemic disease following subcutaneous and intradermal applications in susceptible experimental rabbits but led to the immune response demonstrated by ELISA. No severe disease was induced in those Li-2 inoculated rabbits by challenge with the virulent strains Lausanne (Lu) or Sanar (SA), while the control animals showed nodular form of myxomatosis with lethal course of the illness. Restriction fragment length polymorphism (RFLP) of genomic DNA with KpnI and BamHI endonucleases was used for genetic characterization of the Li-2 isolate, the vaccine strain MXT and both virulent strains Lu and SA, respectively. In general, RFLP analysis has shown to be informative for inferring genetic relatedness between myxoma viruses. Based on restriction endonuclease DNA fragment size distribution, it was evident that the pathogenic strain SA is genetically related to the reference strain Lu and the isolate Li-2 is more related, but not identical, to the vaccination strain MXT.

  2. Identification and characterization of inhibitors of human apurinic/apyrimidinic endonuclease APE1.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anton Simeonov

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available APE1 is the major nuclease for excising abasic (AP sites and particular 3'-obstructive termini from DNA, and is an integral participant in the base excision repair (BER pathway. BER capacity plays a prominent role in dictating responsiveness to agents that generate oxidative or alkylation DNA damage, as well as certain chain-terminating nucleoside analogs and 5-fluorouracil. We describe within the development of a robust, 1536-well automated screening assay that employs a deoxyoligonucleotide substrate operating in the red-shifted fluorescence spectral region to identify APE1 endonuclease inhibitors. This AP site incision assay was used in a titration-based high-throughput screen of the Library of Pharmacologically Active Compounds (LOPAC(1280, a collection of well-characterized, drug-like molecules representing all major target classes. Prioritized hits were authenticated and characterized via two high-throughput screening assays -- a Thiazole Orange fluorophore-DNA displacement test and an E. coli endonuclease IV counterscreen -- and a conventional, gel-based radiotracer incision assay. The top, validated compounds, i.e. 6-hydroxy-DL-DOPA, Reactive Blue 2 and myricetin, were shown to inhibit AP site cleavage activity of whole cell protein extracts from HEK 293T and HeLa cell lines, and to enhance the cytotoxic and genotoxic potency of the alkylating agent methylmethane sulfonate. The studies herein report on the identification of novel, small molecule APE1-targeted bioactive inhibitor probes, which represent initial chemotypes towards the development of potential pharmaceuticals.

  3. A unique family of Mrr-like modification-dependent restriction endonucleases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Yu; Cohen-Karni, Devora; Xu, Derrick; Chin, Hang Gyeong; Wilson, Geoffrey; Pradhan, Sriharsa; Roberts, Richard J

    2010-09-01

    Mrr superfamily of homologous genes in microbial genomes restricts modified DNA in vivo. However, their biochemical properties in vitro have remained obscure. Here, we report the experimental characterization of MspJI, a remote homolog of Escherichia coli's Mrr and show it is a DNA modification-dependent restriction endonuclease. Our results suggest MspJI recognizes (m)CNNR (R = G/A) sites and cleaves DNA at fixed distances (N(12)/N(16)) away from the modified cytosine at the 3' side (or N(9)/N(13) from R). Besides 5-methylcytosine, MspJI also recognizes 5-hydroxymethylcytosine but is blocked by 5-glucosylhydroxymethylcytosine. Several other close homologs of MspJI show similar modification-dependent endonuclease activity and display substrate preferences different from MspJI. A unique feature of these modification-dependent enzymes is that they are able to extract small DNA fragments containing modified sites on genomic DNA, for example ∼32 bp around symmetrically methylated CG sites and ∼31 bp around methylated CNG sites. The digested fragments can be directly selected for high-throughput sequencing to map the location of the modification on the genomic DNA. The MspJI enzyme family, with their different recognition specificities and cleavage properties, provides a basis on which many future methods can build to decode the epigenomes of different organisms.

  4. Probing the dynamics of restriction endonuclease NgoMIV-DNA interaction by single-molecule FRET.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tutkus, Marijonas; Sasnauskas, Giedrius; Rutkauskas, Danielis

    2017-12-01

    Many type II restriction endonucleases require two copies of their recognition sequence for optimal activity. Concomitant binding of two DNA sites by such an enzyme produces a DNA loop. Here we exploit single-molecule Förster resonance energy transfer (smFRET) of surface-immobilized DNA fragments to study the dynamics of DNA looping induced by tetrameric endonuclease NgoMIV. We have employed a DNA fragment with two NgoMIV recognition sites and a FRET dye pair such that upon protein-induced DNA looping the dyes are brought to close proximity resulting in a FRET signal. The dynamics of DNA-NgoMIV interactions proved to be heterogeneous, with individual smFRET trajectories exhibiting broadly different average looped state durations. Distinct types of the dynamics were attributed to different types of DNA-protein complexes, mediated either by one NgoMIV tetramer simultaneously bound to two specific sites ("slow" trajectories) or by semi-specific interactions of two DNA-bound NgoMIV tetramers ("fast" trajectories), as well as to conformational heterogeneity of individual NgoMIV molecules. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  5. Detecting Faults from Encoded Information

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Persis, Claudio De

    2003-01-01

    The problem of fault detection for linear continuous-time systems via encoded information is considered. The encoded information is received at a remote location by the monitoring deiice and assessed to infer the occurrence of the fault. A class of faults is considered which allows to use a simple

  6. Snails home

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dunstan, D. J.; Hodgson, D. J.

    2014-06-01

    Many gardeners and horticulturalists seek non-chemical methods to control populations of snails. It has frequently been reported that snails that are marked and removed from a garden are later found in the garden again. This phenomenon is often cited as evidence for a homing instinct. We report a systematic study of the snail population in a small suburban garden, in which large numbers of snails were marked and removed over a period of about 6 months. While many returned, inferring a homing instinct from this evidence requires statistical modelling. Monte Carlo techniques demonstrate that movements of snails are better explained by drift under the influence of a homing instinct than by random diffusion. Maximum likelihood techniques infer the existence of two groups of snails in the garden: members of a larger population that show little affinity to the garden itself, and core members of a local garden population that regularly return to their home if removed. The data are strongly suggestive of a homing instinct, but also reveal that snail-throwing can work as a pest management strategy.

  7. Recruitment and positioning determine the specific role of the XPF-ERCC1 endonuclease in interstrand crosslink repair

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Klein Douwel, Daisy; Hoogenboom, Wouter S; Boonen, Rick Acm; Knipscheer, Puck

    2017-01-01

    XPF-ERCC1 is a structure-specific endonuclease pivotal for several DNA repair pathways and, when mutated, can cause multiple diseases. Although the disease-specific mutations are thought to affect different DNA repair pathways, the molecular basis for this is unknown. Here we examine the function of

  8. Recruitment of the nucleotide excision repair endonuclease XPG to sites of UV-induced DNA damage depends on functional TFIIH

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    A. Zotter (Angelika); A.B. Houtsmuller (Adriaan); M.S. Luijsterburg (Martijn); D.O. Warmerdam (Daniël); S.M. Ibrahim (Shehu); A.L. Nigg (Alex); W.A. van Cappellen (Gert); J.H.J. Hoeijmakers (Jan); R. van Driel; W. Vermeulen (Wim)

    2006-01-01

    textabstractThe structure-specific endonuclease XPG is an indispensable core protein of the nucleotide excision repair (NER) machinery. XPG cleaves the DNA strand at the 3′ side of the DNA damage. XPG binding stabilizes the NER preincision complex and is essential for the 5′ incision by the

  9. RECQ5 Helicase Cooperates with MUS81 Endonuclease in Processing Stalled Replication Forks at Common Fragile Sites during Mitosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Di Marco, Stefano; Hasanova, Zdenka; Kanagaraj, Radhakrishnan

    2017-01-01

    The MUS81-EME1 endonuclease cleaves late replication intermediates at common fragile sites (CFSs) during early mitosis to trigger DNA-repair synthesis that ensures faithful chromosome segregation. Here, we show that these DNA transactions are promoted by RECQ5 DNA helicase in a manner dependent o...

  10. The structure-specific endonuclease Ercc1-Xpf is required for targeted gene replacement in embryonic stem cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    L.J. Niedernhofer (Laura); J. Essers (Jeroen); G. Weeda (Geert); H.B. Beverloo (Berna); J. de Wit (Jan); M. Muijtjens (Manja); H. Odijk (Hanny); J.H.J. Hoeijmakers (Jan); R. Kanaar (Roland)

    2001-01-01

    textabstractThe Ercc1-Xpf heterodimer, a highly conserved structure-specific endonuclease, functions in multiple DNA repair pathways that are pivotal for maintaining genome stability, including nucleotide excision repair, interstrand crosslink repair and homologous recombination. Erccl-Xpf incises

  11. Genetic location of a mutant of bacteriophage T4 deficient in the ability to induce endonuclease II.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ray, P; Sinha, N K; Warner, H R; Snustad, D P

    1972-01-01

    Reciprocal three-factor crosses and the use of a partial revertant of a putative ribonucleotide reductase mutant of Escherichia coli B/5 as indicator have made it possible to map denA (deficient in endonuclease II) between nrd-11 (ribonucleotide reductase gene B) and amM69 (gene 63) on the bacteriophage T4 chromosome.

  12. Endonuclease G, a candidate human enzyme for the initiation of genomic inversion in herpes simplex type 1 virus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Ke-Jung; Zemelman, Boris V; Lehman, I Robert

    2002-06-07

    The herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1) a sequence is present as a direct repeat at the two termini of the 152-kilobase viral genome and as an inverted repeat at the junction of the two unique components L and S. During replication, the HSV-1 genome undergoes inversion of L and S, producing an equimolar mixture of the four possible isomers. Isomerization is believed to result from recombination triggered by breakage at the a sequence, a recombinational hot spot. We have identified an enzyme in HeLa cell extracts that preferentially cleaves the a sequence and have purified it to near homogeneity. Microsequencing showed it to be human endonuclease G, an enzyme with a strong preference for G+C-rich sequences. Endonuclease G appears to be the only cellular enzyme that can specifically cleave the a sequence. Endonuclease G also showed the predicted recombination properties in an in vitro recombination assay. Based on these findings, we propose that endonuclease G initiates the a sequence-mediated inversion of the L and S components during HSV-1 DNA replication.

  13. Type II restriction endonuclease R.Eco29kI is a member of the GIY-YIG nuclease superfamily

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Feder Marcin

    2007-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The majority of experimentally determined crystal structures of Type II restriction endonucleases (REases exhibit a common PD-(D/EXK fold. Crystal structures have been also determined for single representatives of two other folds: PLD (R.BfiI and half-pipe (R.PabI, and bioinformatics analyses supported by mutagenesis suggested that some REases belong to the HNH fold. Our previous bioinformatic analysis suggested that REase R.Eco29kI shares sequence similarities with one more unrelated nuclease superfamily, GIY-YIG, however so far no experimental data were available to support this prediction. The determination of a crystal structure of the GIY-YIG domain of homing endonuclease I-TevI provided a template for modeling of R.Eco29kI and prompted us to validate the model experimentally. Results Using protein fold-recognition methods we generated a new alignment between R.Eco29kI and I-TevI, which suggested a reassignment of one of the putative catalytic residues. A theoretical model of R.Eco29kI was constructed to illustrate its predicted three-dimensional fold and organization of the active site, comprising amino acid residues Y49, Y76, R104, H108, E142, and N154. A series of mutants was constructed to generate amino acid substitutions of selected residues (Y49A, R104A, H108F, E142A and N154L and the mutant proteins were examined for their ability to bind the DNA containing the Eco29kI site 5'-CCGCGG-3' and to catalyze the cleavage reaction. Experimental data reveal that residues Y49, R104, E142, H108, and N154 are important for the nuclease activity of R.Eco29kI, while H108 and N154 are also important for specific DNA binding by this enzyme. Conclusion Substitutions of residues Y49, R104, H108, E142 and N154 predicted by the model to be a part of the active site lead to mutant proteins with strong defects in the REase activity. These results are in very good agreement with the structural model presented in this work and with our

  14. Home Dissolution

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gram-Hanssen, Kirsten; Bech-Danielsen, Claus

    2008-01-01

    Building a home and creating a family are highly inter­connec­ted processes. So what happens with the home when people separate or divorce? In this paper we address this question both from a quantitative and a qualitative approach. Based on an extensive database with socio-economic background data...... of 42,000 separated Danish couples in 2002, we follow the housing careers of both partners, to see how the housing situation of different types of people was affected by the separation. In the qualitative approach, nine interviews with couples who have parted shed light on the emotions and practical...

  15. Atomic Structure and Biochemical Characterization of an RNA Endonuclease in the N Terminus of Andes Virus L Protein.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yaiza Fernández-García

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Andes virus (ANDV is a human-pathogenic hantavirus. Hantaviruses presumably initiate their mRNA synthesis by using cap structures derived from host cell mRNAs, a mechanism called cap-snatching. A signature for a cap-snatching endonuclease is present in the N terminus of hantavirus L proteins. In this study, we aimed to solve the atomic structure of the ANDV endonuclease and characterize its biochemical features. However, the wild-type protein was refractory to expression in Escherichia coli, presumably due to toxic enzyme activity. To circumvent this problem, we introduced attenuating mutations in the domain that were previously shown to enhance L protein expression in mammalian cells. Using this approach, 13 mutant proteins encompassing ANDV L protein residues 1-200 were successfully expressed and purified. Protein stability and nuclease activity of the mutants was analyzed and the crystal structure of one mutant was solved to a resolution of 2.4 Å. Shape in solution was determined by small angle X-ray scattering. The ANDV endonuclease showed structural similarities to related enzymes of orthobunya-, arena-, and orthomyxoviruses, but also differences such as elongated shape and positively charged patches surrounding the active site. The enzyme was dependent on manganese, which is bound to the active site, most efficiently cleaved single-stranded RNA substrates, did not cleave DNA, and could be inhibited by known endonuclease inhibitors. The atomic structure in conjunction with stability and activity data for the 13 mutant enzymes facilitated inference of structure-function relationships in the protein. In conclusion, we solved the structure of a hantavirus cap-snatching endonuclease, elucidated its catalytic properties, and present a highly active mutant form, which allows for inhibitor screening.

  16. New concepts in PCM encoding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yun, Paul M.

    The Pulse Coded Modulation (PCM) Encoder Systems used in telemetry have gained enormous flexibility for various applications because the input data channels and frame sync codes are programmable via the EEPROMs or UVEPROMs. The firmware in the current PCM Encoder Systems can be readily tailored for a specific application to monitor numerous types of analog channels, as well as digital channels. However, the current PCM Encoder Systems require several types of strap options which dictate not only a limited choice of gains and offsets, but also a fixed choice of the premodulation filter characteristics. The brain of the 1000 PCM Encoder is the Digital Signal Processor (DSP) which eliminates the fixed premodulation filter characteristics via digital filter functions, and also eliminates strap options via general purpose microprocessor functions.

  17. A physical map of human Alu repeats cleavage by restriction endonucleases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chernukhin Valery A

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Alu repetitive elements are the abundant sequences in human genome. Diversity of DNA sequences of these elements makes difficult the construction of theoretical patterns of Alu repeats cleavage by restriction endonucleases. We have proposed a method of restriction analysis of Alu repeats sequences in silico. Results Simple software to analyze Alu repeats database has been suggested and Alu repeats digestion patterns for several restriction enzymes' recognition sites have been constructed. Restriction maps of Alu repeats cleavage for corresponding restriction enzymes have been calculated and plotted. Theoretical data have been compared with experimental results on DNA hydrolysis with restriction enzymes, which we obtained earlier. Conclusion Alu repeats digestions provide the main contribution to the patterns of human chromosomal DNA cleavage. This corresponds to the experimental data on total human DNA hydrolysis with restriction enzymes.

  18. Crystallization and preliminary X-ray analysis of flap endonuclease 1 (FEN1) from Desulfurococcus amylolyticus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mase, Tomoko; Kubota, Keiko; Miyazono, Ken-ichi; Kawarabayasi, Yutaka; Tanokura, Masaru

    2009-09-01

    Flap endonuclease 1 (FEN1) is a structure-specific nuclease that removes 5'-overhanging flaps in DNA repair and removes the RNA/DNA primer during maturation of the Okazaki fragment in lagging-strand DNA replication. FEN1 from the hyperthermophilic archaeon Desulfurococcus amylolyticus was expressed in Escherichia coli, purified and crystallized using the sitting-drop vapour-diffusion method with monoammonium dihydrogen phosphate as the precipitant at pH 8.3. X-ray diffraction data were collected to 2.00 A resolution. The space group of the crystal was determined as the primitive hexagonal space group P321, with unit-cell parameters a = b = 103.76, c = 84.58 A. The crystal contained one molecule in the asymmetric unit.

  19. Structure of flap endonuclease 1 from the hyperthermophilic archaeon Desulfuro­coccus amylolyticus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mase, Tomoko; Kubota, Keiko; Miyazono, Ken-ichi; Kawarabayasi, Yutaka; Tanokura, Masaru

    2011-01-01

    Flap endonuclease 1 (FEN1) is a key enzyme in DNA repair and DNA replication. It is a structure-specific nuclease that removes 5′-overhanging flaps and the RNA/DNA primer during maturation of the Okazaki fragment. Homologues of FEN1 exist in a wide range of bacteria, archaea and eukaryotes. In order to further understand the structural basis of the DNA recognition, binding and cleavage mechanism of FEN1, the structure of FEN1 from the hyperthermophilic archaeon Desulfurococcus amylolyticus (DaFEN1) was determined at 2.00 Å resolution. The overall fold of DaFEN1 was similar to those of other archaeal FEN1 proteins; however, the helical clamp and the flexible loop exhibited a putative substrate-binding pocket with a unique conformation. PMID:21301087

  20. Alternative nucleophilic substrates for the endonuclease activities of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 integrase

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ealy, Julie B. [Department of Medicine, Penn State College of Medicine, Milton S. Hershey Medical Center, 500 University Drive, PO Box 850, Mail Services H036, Hershey, PA 17033 (United States); Department of Chemistry, Penn State Lehigh Valley, 2809 E. Saucon Valley Road, Center Valley, PA 18034 (United States); Sudol, Malgorzata [Department of Medicine, Penn State College of Medicine, Milton S. Hershey Medical Center, 500 University Drive, PO Box 850, Mail Services H036, Hershey, PA 17033 (United States); Krzeminski, Jacek; Amin, Shantu [Department of Pharmacology, Penn State College of Medicine, Milton S. Hershey Medical Center, 500 University Drive, Hershey, PA 17033 (United States); Katzman, Michael, E-mail: mkatzman@psu.edu [Department of Medicine, Penn State College of Medicine, Milton S. Hershey Medical Center, 500 University Drive, PO Box 850, Mail Services H036, Hershey, PA 17033 (United States); Department of Microbiology and Immunology, Penn State College of Medicine, Milton S. Hershey Medical Center, 500 University Drive, Hershey, PA 17033 (United States)

    2012-11-10

    Retroviral integrase can use water or some small alcohols as the attacking nucleophile to nick DNA. To characterize the range of compounds that human immunodeficiency virus type 1 integrase can accommodate for its endonuclease activities, we tested 45 potential electron donors (having varied size and number or spacing of nucleophilic groups) as substrates during site-specific nicking at viral DNA ends and during nonspecific nicking reactions. We found that integrase used 22 of the 45 compounds to nick DNA, but not all active compounds were used for both activities. In particular, 13 compounds were used for site-specific and nonspecific nicking, 5 only for site-specific nicking, and 4 only for nonspecific nicking; 23 other compounds were not used for either activity. Thus, integrase can accommodate a large number of nucleophilic substrates but has selective requirements for its different activities, underscoring its dynamic properties and providing new information for modeling and understanding integrase.

  1. The basic N-terminal domain of TRF2 limits recombination endonuclease action at human telomeres.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saint-Léger, Adélaïde; Koelblen, Melanie; Civitelli, Livia; Bah, Amadou; Djerbi, Nadir; Giraud-Panis, Marie-Josèphe; Londoño-Vallejo, Arturo; Ascenzioni, Fiorentina; Gilson, Eric

    2014-01-01

    The stability of mammalian telomeres depends upon TRF2, which prevents inappropriate repair and checkpoint activation. By using a plasmid integration assay in yeasts carrying humanized telomeres, we demonstrated that TRF2 possesses the intrinsic property to both stimulate initial homologous recombination events and to prevent their resolution via its basic N-terminal domain. In human cells, we further showed that this TRF2 domain prevents telomere shortening mediated by the resolvase-associated protein SLX4 as well as GEN1 and MUS81, 2 different types of endonucleases with resolvase activities. We propose that various types of resolvase activities are kept in check by the basic N-terminal domain of TRF2 in order to favor an accurate repair of the stalled forks that occur during telomere replication.

  2. Sequential and Multistep Substrate Interrogation Provides the Scaffold for Specificity in Human Flap Endonuclease 1

    KAUST Repository

    Sobhy, M.

    2013-06-06

    Human flap endonuclease 1 (FEN1), one of the structure-specific 5\\' nucleases, is integral in replication, repair, and recombination of cellular DNA. The 5\\' nucleases share significant unifying features yet cleave diverse substrates at similar positions relative to 5\\' end junctions. Using single-molecule Förster resonance energy transfer, we find a multistep mechanism that verifies all substrate features before inducing the intermediary-DNA bending step that is believed to unify 5\\' nuclease mechanisms. This is achieved by coordinating threading of the 5\\' flap of a nick junction into the conserved capped-helical gateway, overseeing the active site, and bending by binding at the base of the junction. We propose that this sequential and multistep substrate recognition process allows different 5\\' nucleases to recognize different substrates and restrict the induction of DNA bending to the last common step. Such mechanisms would also ensure the protection ofDNA junctions from nonspecific bending and cleavage. 2013 The Authors.

  3. Insights on copper coordination and reactivity of endonuclease EcoRI by ESR spectroscopy and modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ji, Ming

    2009-03-01

    The cleavage of DNA by restriction endonuclease EcoRI is catalyzed by metal ions such as Mg^2+. However, Cu^2+ does not catalyze the cleavage of DNA by EcoRI. In order to understand the functional difference between Cu^2+ and Mg^2+, coordination of Cu^2+ in the EcoRI--DNA complex was clarified by ESR and MD simulation. There are two Cu^2+ components in the specific EcoRI-DNA complex. Each component has one N atom from histidine imidazole and one oxygen atom from the phosphate backbone of DNA coordinate to Cu^2+ based on the ESR experimental results. MD simulation further confirmed that the Nδ atom of His114 imidazole and one oxygen atom from the phosphate backbone of DNA coordinate to Cu^2+. Difference in the coordination of Cu^2+ and Mg^2+ explains their different functional behaviors.

  4. A web-based restriction endonuclease tool for mycobacteriophage cluster prediction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gissendanner, Chris R; Wiedemeier, Allison M D; Wiedemeier, Paul D; Minton, Russell L; Bhuiyan, Swapan; Harmson, Jeremy S; Findley, Ann M

    2014-10-01

    A recent explosion in the amount of genomic data has revealed a large genetic diversity in the bacteriophages that infect Mycobacterium smegmatis. In an effort to assess the novelty of newly described mycobacteriophage isolates and provide a preliminary determination of their probable cluster assignment prior to full genome sequencing, we have developed a systematic approach that relies on restriction endonuclease analysis. We demonstrate that a web-based tool, the Phage Enzyme Tool (or PET), is capable of rapidly facilitating this analysis and exhibits reliability in the putative placement of mycobacteriophages into specific clusters of previously sequenced phages. We propose that this tool represents a useful analytical step in the initial study of phage genomes and that this tool will increase the efficiency of phage genome characterization and enhance the educational activities involving mycobacteriophage discovery. © 2014 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  5. Cleavage of DNA containing 5-fluorocytosine or 5-fluorouracil by type II restriction endonucleases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olszewska, Agata; Dadová, Jitka; Mačková, Michaela; Hocek, Michal

    2015-11-01

    A systematic study of the cleavage of DNA sequences containing 5-fluorocytosine or 5-fluorouracil by type II restriction endonucleases (REs) was performed and the results compared with the same sequences containing natural pyrimidine bases, uracil or 5-methylcytosine. The results show that some REs recognize fluorine as a hydrogen on cytosine and cleave the corresponding sequences where the presence of m5dC leads to blocking of the cleavage. However, on uracil, the same REs recognize the F as a methyl surrogate and cleave the sequences which are not cleaved if uracil is incorporated instead of thymine. These results are interesting for understanding the recognition of DNA sequences by REs and for manipulation of the specific DNA cutting. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Role of Magnesium Ions in DNA Recognition by the EcoRV Restriction Endonuclease

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zahran, Mai [ORNL; Berezniak, Tomasz [University of Heidelberg; Imhof, Petra [University of Heidelberg; Smith, Jeremy C [ORNL

    2011-01-01

    The restriction endonuclease EcoRV binds two magnesium ions. One of these ions, Mg2+A, binds to the phosphate group where the cleavage occurs and is required for catalysis, but the role of the other ion, Mg2+B is debated. Here, multiple independent molecular dynamics simulations suggest that Mg2+B is crucial for achieving a tightly bound protein DNA complex and stabilizing a conformation that allows cleavage. In the absence of Mg2+B in all simulations the protein DNA hydrogen bond network is significantly disrupted and the sharp kink at the central base pair step of the DNA, which is observed in the two-metal complex, is not present. Also, the active site residues rearrange in such a way that the formation of a nucleophile, required for DNA hydrolysis, is unlikely.

  7. Crystallization and preliminary X-ray diffraction analysis of the small subunit of the heterodimeric restriction endonuclease R.BspD6I

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kachalova, Galina S. [Max-Planck Unit for Structural Molecular Biology, Hamburg 22607 (Germany); Yunusova, Alfiya K.; Artyukh, Rimma I.; Rogulin, Eugeny A.; Perevyazova, Tatyana A.; Zheleznaya, Ludmila A. [Institute of Theoretical and Experimental Biophysics, Pushchino 142290 (Russian Federation); Matvienko, Nickolay I. [Institute of Protein Research, Pushchino 14229 (Russian Federation); Bartunik, Hans D., E-mail: bartunik@mpghdb.desy.de [Max-Planck Unit for Structural Molecular Biology, Hamburg 22607 (Germany)

    2007-09-01

    The crystallization of the small subunit of the heterodimeric restriction endonuclease R.BspD6I and diffraction data collection to 1.5 Å resolution are reported. The heterodimeric restriction endonuclease R.BspD6I is composed of a small subunit with a cleavage site and a large subunit, containing a recognition domain and a cleavage domain, that may function separately as a monomeric nicking endonuclease. Here, the crystallization of the small subunit and diffraction data collection to 1.5 Å resolution are reported.

  8. CgII cleaves DNA using a mechanism distinct from other ATP-dependent restriction endonucleases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toliusis, Paulius; Zaremba, Mindaugas; Silanskas, Arunas; Szczelkun, Mark D; Siksnys, Virginijus

    2017-08-21

    The restriction endonuclease CglI from Corynebacterium glutamicum recognizes an asymmetric 5'-GCCGC-3' site and cleaves the DNA 7 and 6/7 nucleotides downstream on the top and bottom DNA strands, respectively, in an NTP-hydrolysis dependent reaction. CglI is composed of two different proteins: an endonuclease (R.CglI) and a DEAD-family helicase-like ATPase (H.CglI). These subunits form a heterotetrameric complex with R2H2 stoichiometry. However, the R2H2·CglI complex has only one nuclease active site sufficient to cut one DNA strand suggesting that two complexes are required to introduce a double strand break. Here, we report studies to evaluate the DNA cleavage mechanism of CglI. Using one- and two-site circular DNA substrates we show that CglI does not require two sites on the same DNA for optimal catalytic activity. However, one-site linear DNA is a poor substrate, supporting a mechanism where CglI complexes must communicate along the one-dimensional DNA contour before cleavage is activated. Based on experimental data, we propose that adenosine triphosphate (ATP) hydrolysis by CglI produces translocation on DNA preferentially in a downstream direction from the target, although upstream translocation is also possible. Our results are consistent with a mechanism of CglI action that is distinct from that of other ATP-dependent restriction-modification enzymes. © The Author(s) 2017. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Nucleic Acids Research.

  9. Three structure-selective endonucleases are essential in the absence of BLM helicase in Drosophila.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sabrina L Andersen

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available DNA repair mechanisms in mitotically proliferating cells avoid generating crossovers, which can contribute to genome instability. Most models for the production of crossovers involve an intermediate with one or more four-stranded Holliday junctions (HJs, which are resolved into duplex molecules through cleavage by specialized endonucleases. In vitro studies have implicated three nuclear enzymes in HJ resolution: MUS81-EME1/Mms4, GEN1/Yen1, and SLX4-SLX1. The Bloom syndrome helicase, BLM, plays key roles in preventing mitotic crossover, either by blocking the formation of HJ intermediates or by removing HJs without cleavage. Saccharomyces cerevisiae mutants that lack Sgs1 (the BLM ortholog and either Mus81-Mms4 or Slx4-Slx1 are inviable, but mutants that lack Sgs1 and Yen1 are viable. The current view is that Yen1 serves primarily as a backup to Mus81-Mms4. Previous studies with Drosophila melanogaster showed that, as in yeast, loss of both DmBLM and MUS81 or MUS312 (the ortholog of SLX4 is lethal. We have now recovered and analyzed mutations in Drosophila Gen. As in yeast, there is some redundancy between Gen and mus81; however, in contrast to the case in yeast, GEN plays a more predominant role in responding to DNA damage than MUS81-MMS4. Furthermore, loss of DmBLM and GEN leads to lethality early in development. We present a comparison of phenotypes occurring in double mutants that lack DmBLM and either MUS81, GEN, or MUS312, including chromosome instability and deficiencies in cell proliferation. Our studies of synthetic lethality provide insights into the multiple functions of DmBLM and how various endonucleases may function when DmBLM is absent.

  10. Ultrasensitive electrochemical detection of microRNA with star trigon structure and endonuclease mediated signal amplification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miao, Peng; Wang, Bidou; Yu, Zhiqiang; Zhao, Jing; Tang, Yuguo

    2015-01-15

    MicroRNAs play important roles in gene regulation. They can be used as effective biomarkers for diagnosis and prognosis of diseases like cancers. Due to their intrinsic properties of short length, low abundance and sequence homology among family members, it is difficult to realize sensitive and selective detection with economical use of time and cost. Herein, we report an ultrasensitive electrochemical method for microRNA analysis employing two oligonucleotides and one endonuclease. Generally, a glassy carbon electrode is first covered with gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) mediated by poly(diallyldimethylammonium chloride) (PDDA). Then, thiolated capture probe (CP) with methylene blue (MB) labeled at 5' end is modified on the pretreated electrode. Hybridization occurs among target microRNA, CP and auxiliary probe (AP), forming a star trigon structure on the electrode surface. Subsequently, endonuclease recognizes and cleaves CP on CP/AP duplex, releasing microRNA and AP back to the solution. The two regenerated elements can then form another star trigon with other CP molecules, initiating cycles of CP cleavage and MB departure. Significant decrease of electrochemical signals is thus observed, which can be used to reflect the concentration of microRNA. This proposed method has a linear response to microRNA in a wide range from 100 aM to 1 nM and the sensitivity of attomolar level can be achieved. Moreover, it has high selectivity against single-base mismatch sequences and can be used directly in serum samples. Therefore, this method shows great feasibility for the detection of microRNA and may have potential applications in cancer diagnosis and prognosis. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. Interplay between structure-specific endonucleases for crossover control during Caenorhabditis elegans meiosis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Takamune T Saito

    Full Text Available The number and distribution of crossover events are tightly regulated at prophase of meiosis I. The resolution of Holliday junctions by structure-specific endonucleases, including MUS-81, SLX-1, XPF-1 and GEN-1, is one of the main mechanisms proposed for crossover formation. However, how these nucleases coordinately resolve Holliday junctions is still unclear. Here we identify both the functional overlap and differences between these four nucleases regarding their roles in crossover formation and control in the Caenorhabditis elegans germline. We show that MUS-81, XPF-1 and SLX-1, but not GEN-1, can bind to HIM-18/SLX4, a key scaffold for nucleases. Analysis of synthetic mitotic defects revealed that MUS-81 and SLX-1, but not XPF-1 and GEN-1, have overlapping roles with the Bloom syndrome helicase ortholog, HIM-6, supporting their in vivo roles in processing recombination intermediates. Taking advantage of the ease of genetic analysis and high-resolution imaging afforded by C. elegans, we examined crossover designation, frequency, distribution and chromosomal morphology in single, double, triple and quadruple mutants of the structure-specific endonucleases. This revealed that XPF-1 functions redundantly with MUS-81 and SLX-1 in executing crossover formation during meiotic double-strand break repair. Analysis of crossover distribution revealed that SLX-1 is required for crossover suppression at the center region of the autosomes. Finally, analysis of chromosome morphology in oocytes at late meiosis I stages uncovered that SLX-1 and XPF-1 promote meiotic chromosomal stability by preventing formation of chromosomal abnormalities. We propose a model in which coordinate action between structure-specific nucleases at different chromosome domains, namely MUS-81, SLX-1 and XPF-1 at the arms and SLX-1 at the center region, exerts positive and negative regulatory roles, respectively, for crossover control during C. elegans meiosis.

  12. Home Seismometer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horiuchi, S.; Yamamoto, S.; Nakmaura, H.; Wu, C.; Rydelek, P.; Kachi, M.

    2007-12-01

    We have developed an automated system for analyzing Hi-net seismograms for earthquake early warning (EEW) in Japan. Because of limitations imposed by station spacing, our system generally cannot issue an EEW to areas within about 30 km distance of the earthquake's hypocenter. We estimate that about 10 times the number of stations would be needed to issue an EEW in these areas, but the overhead would be cost prohibitive for governmental agencies. The practical deployment of EEW in Japan has started in October, 2007 and millions of people are expected to purchase and install the receiving/alarm unit of EEW. Since most of these units are connected to internet and equipped with a CPU and memory, we realized that the addition of an inexpensive seismometer and digitizer would transform the receiver into a real-time seismic observatory, which we are calling a home seismometer; these modifications only cost about $20. The home seismometer can help to generate alerts at the time of the occurrence of a large local earthquake by using locally observed data. Also, home seismograms can be used to estimate the amplification factor in sedimentary layers, which will be used to determine the site correction for shaking intensity by comparing the waveform data from the home seismometer against those from nearby Hi-net or K-NET stations. This amplification factor, which is essentially the basis of a shake-map with very-high spatial resolution, will help to establish a safety index of houses/buildings for large earthquakes, since a structure located at a site with large seismic amplification can be damaged more seriously than those with small amplification factors. The installation of home seismometers will create an extremely dense seismic network that is without precedence. We are developing an automatic system that collects waveform data from all home seismometer installations, calculates earthquake parameters in real-time, and then sends back alarms signals based on computed

  13. Returning home

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Agergaard, Jytte; Brøgger, Ditte

    2016-01-01

    Migration to domestic and international destinations has become an emblematic feature of Nepal’s societal changes. Part of this development is education migration from rural to urban areas within the borders of Nepal, an often overlooked but increasingly important aspect of contemporary migration...... flows. By focusing on these educational migrants, this paper explores how they connect to their rural homes. Guided by a critical reading of the migration-development scholarship, the paper examines how migrants and their relatives make sense of educational migrants’ remitting and returning practices......, and by comparing three groups of educational migrants, the migrants’ reasons for staying connected and sending remittances are scrutinized. The paper finds that although educational migrants do not generate extensive economic remittances for local development in Nepal, they stay connected to their rural homes...

  14. Home Bias

    OpenAIRE

    田端, 克至; タバタ, カツシ; Katsushi, TABATA

    2002-01-01

    This article discussed on, what we call, the home bias puzzle and international equity investment transactions, in which international security has less been invested in foreign countries After 1989, US and German foreign capital outflow have drastically increased, however. It is the background why this article focuses on these maters. Some changes might be happen in the international financial market. These developments in the world have important implications for us.

  15. Bifunctional TaqII restriction endonuclease: redefining the prototype DNA recognition site and establishing the Fidelity Index for partial cleaving

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Żylicz-Stachula Agnieszka

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The TaqII enzyme is a member of the Thermus sp. enzyme family that we propounded previously within Type IIS restriction endonucleases, containing related thermophilic bifunctional endonucleases-methyltransferases from various Thermus sp.: TaqII, Tth111II, TthHB27I, TspGWI, TspDTI and TsoI. These enzymes show significant nucleotide and amino acid sequence similarities, a rare phenomenon among restriction endonucleases, along with similarities in biochemical properties, molecular size, DNA recognition sequences and cleavage sites. They also feature some characteristics of Types I and III. Results Barker et al. reported the Type IIS/IIC restriction endonuclease TaqII as recognizing two distinct cognate site variants (5'-GACCGA-3' and 5'-CACCCA-3' while cleaving 11/9 nucleotides downstream. We used four independent methods, namely, shotgun cloning and sequencing, restriction pattern analysis, digestion of particular custom substrates and GeneScan analysis, to demonstrate that the recombinant enzyme recognizes only 5'-GACCGA-3' sites and cleaves 11/9 nucleotides downstream. We did not observe any 5'-CACCCA-3' cleavage under a variety of conditions and site arrangements tested. We also characterized the enzyme biochemically and established new digestion conditions optimal for practical enzyme applications. Finally, we developed and propose a new version of the Fidelity Index - the Fidelity Index for Partial Cleavage (FI-PC. Conclusions The DNA recognition sequence of the bifunctional prototype TaqII endonuclease-methyltransferase from Thermus aquaticus has been redefined as recognizing only 5'-GACCGA-3' cognate sites. The reaction conditions (pH and salt concentrations were designed either to minimize (pH = 8.0 and 10 mM ammonium sulphate or to enhance star activity (pH = 6.0 and no salt. Redefinition of the recognition site and reaction conditions makes this prototype endonuclease a useful tool for DNA manipulation; as yet, this

  16. Bifunctional TaqII restriction endonuclease: redefining the prototype DNA recognition site and establishing the Fidelity Index for partial cleaving.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zylicz-Stachula, Agnieszka; Zołnierkiewicz, Olga; Sliwińska, Katarzyna; Jeżewska-Frąckowiak, Joanna; Skowron, Piotr M

    2011-12-05

    The TaqII enzyme is a member of the Thermus sp. enzyme family that we propounded previously within Type IIS restriction endonucleases, containing related thermophilic bifunctional endonucleases-methyltransferases from various Thermus sp.: TaqII, Tth111II, TthHB27I, TspGWI, TspDTI and TsoI. These enzymes show significant nucleotide and amino acid sequence similarities, a rare phenomenon among restriction endonucleases, along with similarities in biochemical properties, molecular size, DNA recognition sequences and cleavage sites. They also feature some characteristics of Types I and III. Barker et al. reported the Type IIS/IIC restriction endonuclease TaqII as recognizing two distinct cognate site variants (5'-GACCGA-3' and 5'-CACCCA-3') while cleaving 11/9 nucleotides downstream. We used four independent methods, namely, shotgun cloning and sequencing, restriction pattern analysis, digestion of particular custom substrates and GeneScan analysis, to demonstrate that the recombinant enzyme recognizes only 5'-GACCGA-3' sites and cleaves 11/9 nucleotides downstream. We did not observe any 5'-CACCCA-3' cleavage under a variety of conditions and site arrangements tested. We also characterized the enzyme biochemically and established new digestion conditions optimal for practical enzyme applications. Finally, we developed and propose a new version of the Fidelity Index - the Fidelity Index for Partial Cleavage (FI-PC). The DNA recognition sequence of the bifunctional prototype TaqII endonuclease-methyltransferase from Thermus aquaticus has been redefined as recognizing only 5'-GACCGA-3' cognate sites. The reaction conditions (pH and salt concentrations) were designed either to minimize (pH = 8.0 and 10 mM ammonium sulphate) or to enhance star activity (pH = 6.0 and no salt). Redefinition of the recognition site and reaction conditions makes this prototype endonuclease a useful tool for DNA manipulation; as yet, this enzyme has no practical applications. The extension of

  17. The Medical Home

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... the Flu Vaccine? Eating Disorders Arrhythmias The Medical Home KidsHealth > For Parents > The Medical Home Print A ... for your child. What Does the Term "Medical Home" Mean? A medical home isn't a place ...

  18. Multidimensionally encoded magnetic resonance imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Fa-Hsuan

    2013-07-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) typically achieves spatial encoding by measuring the projection of a q-dimensional object over q-dimensional spatial bases created by linear spatial encoding magnetic fields (SEMs). Recently, imaging strategies using nonlinear SEMs have demonstrated potential advantages for reconstructing images with higher spatiotemporal resolution and reducing peripheral nerve stimulation. In practice, nonlinear SEMs and linear SEMs can be used jointly to further improve the image reconstruction performance. Here, we propose the multidimensionally encoded (MDE) MRI to map a q-dimensional object onto a p-dimensional encoding space where p > q. MDE MRI is a theoretical framework linking imaging strategies using linear and nonlinear SEMs. Using a system of eight surface SEM coils with an eight-channel radiofrequency coil array, we demonstrate the five-dimensional MDE MRI for a two-dimensional object as a further generalization of PatLoc imaging and O-space imaging. We also present a method of optimizing spatial bases in MDE MRI. Results show that MDE MRI with a higher dimensional encoding space can reconstruct images more efficiently and with a smaller reconstruction error when the k-space sampling distribution and the number of samples are controlled. Copyright © 2012 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  19. Fly Photoreceptors Encode Phase Congruency.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Uwe Friederich

    Full Text Available More than five decades ago it was postulated that sensory neurons detect and selectively enhance behaviourally relevant features of natural signals. Although we now know that sensory neurons are tuned to efficiently encode natural stimuli, until now it was not clear what statistical features of the stimuli they encode and how. Here we reverse-engineer the neural code of Drosophila photoreceptors and show for the first time that photoreceptors exploit nonlinear dynamics to selectively enhance and encode phase-related features of temporal stimuli, such as local phase congruency, which are invariant to changes in illumination and contrast. We demonstrate that to mitigate for the inherent sensitivity to noise of the local phase congruency measure, the nonlinear coding mechanisms of the fly photoreceptors are tuned to suppress random phase signals, which explains why photoreceptor responses to naturalistic stimuli are significantly different from their responses to white noise stimuli.

  20. Effects of gemcitabine on APE/ref-1 endonuclease activity in pancreatic cancer cells, and the therapeutic potential of antisense oligonucleotides

    OpenAIRE

    Lau, J P; Weatherdon, K L; Skalski, V; Hedley, D. W.

    2004-01-01

    Apurinic/apyrimidinic endonuclease (APE) is a key enzyme involved in DNA base excision repair (BER) that is often expressed at elevated levels in human cancers. Pancreatic cancer cells treated with the nucleoside analogue gemcitabine (2?, 2?-difluoro-2?deoxycytidine) showed increases in APE/redox effector factor (ref-1) protein levels (approximately two-fold for Panc-1 and six-fold for MiaPaCa-2), with corresponding increases in endonuclease activity. These results suggested that the activati...

  1. Genetically Encoded Fluorescent Redox Probes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hui-Wang Ai

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Redox processes are involved in almost every cell of the body as a consequence of aerobic life. In the past decades, redox biology has been increasingly recognized as one of the key themes in cell signaling. The progress has been accelerated by development of fluorescent probes that can monitor redox conditions and dynamics in cells and cell compartments. This short paper focuses on fluorescent redox probes that are genetically encoded, and discusses their properties, molecular mechanism, advantages and pitfalls. Our recent work on reaction-based encoded probes that are responsive to particular redox signaling molecules is also reviewed. Future challenges and directions are also commented.

  2. Genetically encoded fluorescent redox probes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ren, Wei; Ai, Hui-Wang

    2013-11-11

    Redox processes are involved in almost every cell of the body as a consequence of aerobic life. In the past decades, redox biology has been increasingly recognized as one of the key themes in cell signaling. The progress has been accelerated by development of fluorescent probes that can monitor redox conditions and dynamics in cells and cell compartments. This short paper focuses on fluorescent redox probes that are genetically encoded, and discusses their properties, molecular mechanism, advantages and pitfalls. Our recent work on reaction-based encoded probes that are responsive to particular redox signaling molecules is also reviewed. Future challenges and directions are also commented.

  3. Catalytic and non-catalytic roles of the CtIP endonuclease in double-strand break end resection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Makharashvili, Nodar; Tubbs, Anthony T.; Yang, Soo-Hyun; Wang, Hailong; Barton, Olivia; Zhou, Yi; Deshpande, Rajashree A.; Lee, Ji-Hoon; Lobrich, Markus; Sleckman, Barry P.; Wu, Xiaohua; Paull, Tanya T.

    2014-01-01

    Summary The CtIP protein is known to function in 5′ strand resection during homologous recombination similar to the budding yeast Sae2 protein, although its role in this process is unclear. Here we characterize recombinant human CtIP and find that it exhibits 5′ flap endonuclease activity on branched DNA structures, independent of the MRN complex. Phosphorylation of CtIP at known ATM-dependent sites and other sites is essential for its catalytic activity, although the S327 and T847 phosphorylation sites are dispensable. A catalytic mutant of CtIP that is deficient in endonuclease activity exhibits wild-type levels of homologous recombination at restriction enzyme-generated breaks but is deficient in processing topoisomerase adducts and radiation-induced breaks in human cells, suggesting that the nuclease activity of CtIP is specifically required for the removal of DNA adducts at sites of DNA breaks. PMID:24837676

  4. Epigenetic Segregation of Microbial Genomes from Complex Samples Using Restriction Endonucleases HpaII and McrB.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Guohong; Weston, Christopher Q; Pham, Long K; Waltz, Shannon; Barnes, Helen; King, Paula; Sphar, Dan; Yamamoto, Robert T; Forsyth, R Allyn

    2016-01-01

    We describe continuing work to develop restriction endonucleases as tools to enrich targeted genomes of interest from diverse populations. Two approaches were developed in parallel to segregate genomic DNA based on cytosine methylation. First, the methyl-sensitive endonuclease HpaII was used to bind non-CG methylated DNA. Second, a truncated fragment of McrB was used to bind CpG methylated DNA. Enrichment levels of microbial genomes can exceed 100-fold with HpaII allowing improved genomic detection and coverage of otherwise trace microbial genomes from sputum. Additionally, we observe interesting enrichment results that correlate with the methylation states not only of bacteria, but of fungi, viruses, a protist and plants. The methods presented here offer promise for testing biological samples for pathogens and global analysis of population methylomes.

  5. Epigenetic Segregation of Microbial Genomes from Complex Samples Using Restriction Endonucleases HpaII and McrB.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guohong Liu

    Full Text Available We describe continuing work to develop restriction endonucleases as tools to enrich targeted genomes of interest from diverse populations. Two approaches were developed in parallel to segregate genomic DNA based on cytosine methylation. First, the methyl-sensitive endonuclease HpaII was used to bind non-CG methylated DNA. Second, a truncated fragment of McrB was used to bind CpG methylated DNA. Enrichment levels of microbial genomes can exceed 100-fold with HpaII allowing improved genomic detection and coverage of otherwise trace microbial genomes from sputum. Additionally, we observe interesting enrichment results that correlate with the methylation states not only of bacteria, but of fungi, viruses, a protist and plants. The methods presented here offer promise for testing biological samples for pathogens and global analysis of population methylomes.

  6. Quantum Entanglement in the Genome? The Role of Quantum Effects in Catalytic Synchronization of Type II Restriction Endonucleases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kurian, P.

    Several living systems have been examined for their exhibition of macroscopic quantum effects, showcasing biology's apparent optimization of structure and function for quantum behavior. Prevalent in lower organisms with analogues in eukaryotes, type II restriction endonucleases are the largest class of restriction enzymes. Orthodox type II endonucleases recognize four-to-eight base pair sequences of palindromic DNA, cut both strands symmetrically, and act without an external metabolite such as ATP. While it is known that these enzymes induce strand breaks by nucleophilic attack on opposing phosphodiester bonds of the DNA helix, what remains unclear is the mechanism by which cutting occurs in concert at the catalytic centers. Previous studies indicate the primacy of intimate DNA contacts made by the specifically bound enzyme in coordinating the two synchronized cuts. We propose that collective electronic behavior in the DNA helix generates coherent oscillations---quantized through boundary conditions imposed by the endonuclease---that provide the energy required to break two phosphodiester bonds. Such quanta may be preserved in the presence of thermal noise and electromagnetic interference through the specific complex's exclusion of water and ions surrounding the helix, with the enzyme serving as a decoherence shield. Clamping energy imparted by the decoherence shield is comparable with zero-point modes of the dipole-dipole oscillations in the DNA recognition sequence. The palindromic mirror symmetry of this sequence should conserve parity during the process. Experimental data corroborate that symmetric bond-breaking ceases when the symmetry of the endonuclease complex is violated, or when environmental parameters are perturbed far from biological optima. Persistent correlation between states in DNA sequence across spatial separations of any length---a characteristic signature of quantum entanglement---may be explained by such a physical mechanism.

  7. Role of endonucleases XPF and XPG in nucleotide excision repair of platinated DNA and cisplatin/oxaliplatin cytotoxicity

    OpenAIRE

    Graf, Nora; Ang, Wee Han; Zhu, Guangyu; Myint, MyatNoeZin; Lippard, Stephen J.

    2011-01-01

    Resistance of tumor cells to platinum anticancer agents poses a major problem in cancer chemotherapy. One of the mechanisms associated with platinum-based drug resistance is the enhanced capacity of the cell to carry out nucleotide excision repair (NER) on platinum-damaged DNA. Endonucleases XPF and XPG are critical components of NER, responsible for excising the damaged DNA strand to remove the DNA lesion. Here, we investigated possible consequences of down-regulation of XPF and XPG gene exp...

  8. Apurinic/Apyrimidinic Endonuclease 1 Upregulation Reduces Oxidative DNA Damage and Protects Hippocampal Neurons from Ischemic Injury

    OpenAIRE

    Leak, Rehana K.; Li, Peiying; Zhang, Feng; Sulaiman, Hassan H.; Weng, Zhongfang; Wang, Guohua; Stetler, R. Anne; Shi, Yejie; Cao, Guodong; Gao, Yanqin; Chen, Jun

    2015-01-01

    Aims: Apurinic/apyrimidinic endonuclease 1 (APE1) is a multifunctional enzyme that participates in base-excision repair of oxidative DNA damage and in the redox activation of transcription factors. We tested the hypothesis that APE1 upregulation protects neuronal structure and function against transient global cerebral ischemia (tGCI). Results: Upregulation of APE1 by low-dose proton irradiation (PI) or by transgene overexpression protected hippocampal CA1 neurons against tGCI-induced cell lo...

  9. Biological significance of facilitated diffusion in protein-DNA interactions. Applications to T4 endonuclease V-initiated DNA repair

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dowd, D.R.; Lloyd, R.S. (Vanderbilt Univ. School of Medicine, Nashville, TN (USA))

    1990-02-25

    Facilitated diffusion along nontarget DNA is employed by numerous DNA-interactive proteins to locate specific targets. Until now, the biological significance of DNA scanning has remained elusive. T4 endonuclease V is a DNA repair enzyme which scans nontarget DNA and processively incises DNA at the site of pyrimidine dimers which are produced by exposure to ultraviolet (UV) light. In this study we tested the hypothesis that there exists a direct correlation between the degree of processivity of wild type and mutant endonuclease V molecules and the degree of enhanced UV resistance which is conferred to repair-deficient Eshcerichia coli. This was accomplished by first creating a series of endonuclease V mutants whose in vitro catalytic activities were shown to be very similar to that of the wild type enzyme. However, when the mechanisms by which these enzymes search nontarget DNA for its substrate were analyzed in vitro and in vivo, the mutants displayed varying degrees of nontarget DNA scanning ranging from being nearly as processive as wild type to randomly incising dimers within the DNA population. The ability of these altered endonuclease V molecules to enhance UV survival in DNA repair-deficient E. coli then was assessed. The degree of enhanced UV survival was directly correlated with the level of facilitated diffusion. This is the first conclusive evidence directly relating a reduction of in vivo facilitated diffusion with a change in an observed phenotype. These results support the assertion that the mechanisms which DNA-interactive proteins employ in locating their target sites are of biological significance.

  10. Biological significance of facilitated diffusion in protein-DNA interactions. Applications to T4 endonuclease V-initiated DNA repair.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dowd, D R; Lloyd, R S

    1990-02-25

    Facilitated diffusion along nontarget DNA is employed by numerous DNA-interactive proteins to locate specific targets. Until now, the biological significance of DNA scanning has remained elusive. T4 endonuclease V is a DNA repair enzyme which scans nontarget DNA and processively incises DNA at the site of pyrimidine dimers which are produced by exposure to ultraviolet (UV) light. In this study we tested the hypothesis that there exists a direct correlation between the degree of processivity of wild type and mutant endonuclease V molecules and the degree of enhanced UV resistance which is conferred to repair-deficient Eshcerichia coli. This was accomplished by first creating a series of endonuclease V mutants whose in vitro catalytic activities were shown to be very similar to that of the wild type enzyme. However, when the mechanisms by which these enzymes search nontarget DNA for its substrate were analyzed in vitro and in vivo, the mutants displayed varying degrees of nontarget DNA scanning ranging from being nearly as processive as wild type to randomly incising dimers within the DNA population. The ability of these altered endonuclease V molecules to enhance UV survival in DNA repair-deficient E. coli then was assessed. The degree of enhanced UV survival was directly correlated with the level of facilitated diffusion. This is the first conclusive evidence directly relating a reduction of in vivo facilitated diffusion with a change in an observed phenotype. These results support the assertion that the mechanisms which DNA-interactive proteins employ in locating their target sites are of biological significance.

  11. [Endonuclease modified comet assay for oxidative DNA damage induced by detection of genetic toxicants].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Jian; Li, Hongli; Zhai, Qingfeng; Qiu, Yugang; Niu, Yong; Dai, Yufei; Zheng, Yuxin; Duan, Huawei

    2014-03-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the use of the lesion-specific endonucleases-modified comet assay for analysis of DNA oxidation in cell lines. DNA breaks and oxidative damage were evaluated by normal alkaline and formamidopyrimidine-DNA-glycosylase (FPG) modified comet assays. Cytotoxicity were assessed by MTT method. The human bronchial epithelial cell (16HBE) were treated with benzo (a) pyrene (B(a)P), methyl methanesulfonate (MMS), colchicine (COL) and vincristine (VCR) respectively, and the dose is 20 µmol/L, 25 mg/ml, 5 mg/L and 0.5 mg/L for 24 h, respectively. Oxidative damage was also detected by levels of reactive oxygen species in treated cells. Four genotoxicants give higher cytotoxicity and no significant changes on parameters of comet assay treated by enzyme buffer. Cell survival rate were (59.69 ± 2.60) %, (54.33 ± 2.81) %, (53.11 ± 4.00) %, (51.43 ± 3.92) % in four groups, respectively. There was the direct DNA damage induced by test genotoxicants presented by tail length, Olive tail moment (TM) and tail DNA (%) in the comet assay. The presence of FPG in the assays increased DNA migration in treated groups when compared to those without it, and the difference was statistically significant which indicated that the clastogen and aneugen could induce oxidative damage in DNA strand. In the three parameters, the Olive TM was changed most obviously after genotoxicants treatment. In the contrast group, the Olive TM of B(a) P,MMS, COL,VCR in the contrast groups were 22.99 ± 17.33, 31.65 ± 18.86, 19.86 ± 9.56 and 17.02 ± 9.39, respectively, after dealing with the FPG, the Olive TM were 34.50 ± 17.29, 43.80 ± 10.06, 33.10 ± 12.38, 28.60 ± 10.53, increased by 58.94%, 38.48%, 66.86% and 68.21%, respectively (t value was 3.91, 3.89, 6.66 and 3.87, respectively, and all P comet assay appears more specific for detecting oxidative DNA damage induced by genotoxicants exposure, and the application of comet assay will be expanded. The endonuclease

  12. Early Decoding and Encoding Strategies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldwater-Rozensher, Susan; Hebard, Amy J.

    A combination of case study observation and mini-experimentation techniques were used to examine a number of issues of relevance in the study of the acquisition of beginning reading skills. Six children were divided equally among three instructional modes: phonics, whole word, and mixed. They were asked to decode and encode words, and their…

  13. Structural and functional analysis of the symmetrical Type I restriction endonuclease R.EcoR124I(NT.

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    James E Taylor

    Full Text Available Type I restriction-modification (RM systems are comprised of two multi-subunit enzymes, the methyltransferase (∼160 kDa, responsible for methylation of DNA, and the restriction endonuclease (∼400 kDa, responsible for DNA cleavage. Both enzymes share a number of subunits. An engineered RM system, EcoR124I(NT, based on the N-terminal domain of the specificity subunit of EcoR124I was constructed that recognises the symmetrical sequence GAAN(7TTC and is active as a methyltransferase. Here, we investigate the restriction endonuclease activity of R. EcoR124I(NTin vitro and the subunit assembly of the multi-subunit enzyme. Finally, using small-angle neutron scattering and selective deuteration, we present a low-resolution structural model of the endonuclease and locate the motor subunits within the multi-subunit enzyme. We show that the covalent linkage between the two target recognition domains of the specificity subunit is not required for subunit assembly or enzyme activity, and discuss the implications for the evolution of Type I enzymes.

  14. Structural basis for the substrate selectivity of PvuRts1I, a 5-hydroxymethylcytosine DNA restriction endonuclease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shao, Chen; Wang, Chengliang; Zang, Jianye

    2014-09-01

    5-Hydroxymethylation is a curious modification of cytosine that was discovered some decades ago, but its functional role in eukaryotes still awaits elucidation. 5-Hydroxymethylcytosine is an epigenetic marker that is crucial for multiple biological processes. The profile is altered under certain disease conditions such as cancer, Huntington's disease and Alzheimer's disease. Using the DNA-modification-dependent restriction endonuclease AbaSI coupled with sequencing (Aba-seq), the hydroxymethylome can be deciphered at the resolution of individual bases. The method is based on the enzymatic properties of AbaSI, a member of the PvuRts1I family of endonucleases. PvuRts1I is a modification-dependent endonuclease with high selectivity for 5-hydroxymethylcytosine over 5-methylcytosine and cytosine. In this study, the crystal structure of PvuRts1I was determined in order to understand and improve the substrate selectivity. A nuclease domain and an SRA-like domain are located at the N- and C-termini, respectively. Through comparison with other SRA-domain structures, the SRA-like domain was proposed to be the 5-hmC recognition module. Several mutants of PvuRts1I with enzymatic activity restricted to 5-hydroxymethylcytosine only were generated based on the structural analysis, and these enzyme variants are appropriate for separating the hydroxymethylome from the wider methylome.

  15. Characterization of LlaKI, a New Metal Ion-Independent Restriction Endonuclease from Lactococcus lactis KLDS4.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belkebir, Abdelkarim; Azeddoug, Houssine

    2012-01-01

    Requirement of divalent cations for DNA cleavage is a general feature of type II restriction enzymes with the exception of few members of this group. A new type II restriction endonuclease has been partially purified from Lactococcus lactis KLDS4. The enzyme was denoted as LlaKI and showed to recognize and cleave the same site as FokI. The enzyme displayed a denatured molecular weight of 50 kDa and behaved as a dimer in solution as evidenced by the size exclusion chromatography. To investigate the role of divalent cations in DNA cleavage by LlaKI, digestion reactions were carried out at different Mg(2+), Mn(2+), and Ca(2+) concentrations. Unlike most of type II restriction endonucleases, LlaKI did not require divalent metal ions to cleave DNA and is one of the few metal-independent restriction endonucleases found in bacteria. The enzyme showed near-maximal levels of activity in 10 mM Tris-HCl pH 7.9, 50 mM NaCl, 10 mM MgCl2, and 1 mM dithiothreitol at 30°C. The presence of DNA modification was also determined and was correlated with the correspondent restriction enzyme.

  16. Quantifying DNA double-strand breaks induced by site-specific endonucleases in living cells by ligation-mediated purification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chailleux, Catherine; Aymard, François; Caron, Pierre; Daburon, Virginie; Courilleau, Céline; Canitrot, Yvan; Legube, Gaëlle; Trouche, Didier

    2014-03-01

    Recent advances in our understanding of the management and repair of DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs) rely on the study of targeted DSBs that have been induced in living cells by the controlled activity of site-specific endonucleases, usually recombinant restriction enzymes. Here we describe a protocol for quantifying these endonuclease-induced DSBs; this quantification is essential to an interpretation of how DSBs are managed and repaired. A biotinylated double-stranded oligonucleotide is ligated to enzyme-cleaved genomic DNA, allowing the purification of the cleaved DNA on streptavidin beads. The extent of cleavage is then quantified either by quantitative PCR (qPCR) at a given site or at multiple sites by genome-wide techniques (e.g., microarrays or high-throughput sequencing). This technique, named ligation-mediated purification, can be performed in 2 d. It is more accurate and sensitive than existing alternative methods, and it is compatible with genome-wide analysis. It allows the amount of endonuclease-mediated breaks to be precisely compared between two conditions or across the genome, thereby giving insight into the influence of a given factor or of various chromatin contexts on local repair parameters.

  17. Sequential and Multistep Substrate Interrogation Provides the Scaffold for Specificity in Human Flap Endonuclease 1

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohamed A. Sobhy

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Human flap endonuclease 1 (FEN1, one of the structure-specific 5′ nucleases, is integral in replication, repair, and recombination of cellular DNA. The 5′ nucleases share significant unifying features yet cleave diverse substrates at similar positions relative to 5′ end junctions. Using single-molecule Förster resonance energy transfer, we find a multistep mechanism that verifies all substrate features before inducing the intermediary-DNA bending step that is believed to unify 5′ nuclease mechanisms. This is achieved by coordinating threading of the 5′ flap of a nick junction into the conserved capped-helical gateway, overseeing the active site, and bending by binding at the base of the junction. We propose that this sequential and multistep substrate recognition process allows different 5′ nucleases to recognize different substrates and restrict the induction of DNA bending to the last common step. Such mechanisms would also ensure the protection of DNA junctions from nonspecific bending and cleavage.

  18. Polymorphism of the Flap Endonuclease 1 Gene in Keratoconus and Fuchs Endothelial Corneal Dystrophy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katarzyna A. Wojcik

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Oxidative stress is implicated in the pathogenesis of many diseases, including serious ocular diseases, keratoconus (KC and Fuchs endothelial corneal dystrophy (FECD. Flap endonuclease 1 (FEN1 plays an important role in the repair of oxidative DNA damage in the base excision repair pathway. We determined the association between two single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs, c.–441G>A (rs174538 and g.61564299G>T (rs4246215, in the FEN1 gene and the occurrence of KC and FECD. This study involved 279 patients with KC, 225 patients with FECD and 322 control individuals. Polymerase chain reaction (PCR and length polymorphism restriction fragment analysis (RFLP were applied. The T/T genotype of the g.61564299G>T polymorphism was associated with an increased occurrence of KC and FECD. There was no association between the c.–441G>A polymorphism and either disease. However, the GG haplotype of both polymorphisms was observed more frequently and the GT haplotype less frequently in the KC group than the control. The AG haplotype was associated with increased FECD occurrence. Our findings suggest that the g.61564299G>T and c.–441G>A polymorphisms in the FEN1 gene may modulate the risk of keratoconus and Fuchs endothelial corneal dystrophy.

  19. Restriction endonuclease triggered bacterial apoptosis as a mechanism for long time survival.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagamalleswari, Easa; Rao, Sandhya; Vasu, Kommireddy; Nagaraja, Valakunja

    2017-08-21

    Programmed cell death (PCD) under certain conditions is one of the features of bacterial altruism. Given the bacterial diversity and varied life style, different PCD mechanisms must be operational that remain largely unexplored. We describe restriction endonuclease (REase) mediated cell death by an apoptotic pathway, beneficial for isogenic bacterial communities. Cell death is pronounced in stationary phase and when the enzyme exhibits promiscuous DNA cleavage activity. We have elucidated the molecular mechanism of REase mediated cell killing and demonstrate that released nutrients from dying cells support the growth of the remaining cells in the population. These findings illustrate a new intracellular moonlighting role for REases which are otherwise established host defence arsenals. REase induced PCD appears to be a cellular design to replenish nutrients for cells undergoing starvation stress and the phenomenon could be wide spread in bacteria, given the abundance of restriction-modification (R-M) systems in the microbial population. © The Author(s) 2017. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Nucleic Acids Research.

  20. Human AP Endonuclease 1: A Potential Marker for the Prediction of Environmental Carcinogenesis Risk

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jae Sung Park

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Human apurinic/apyrimidinic endonuclease 1 (APE1 functions mainly in DNA repair as an enzyme removing AP sites and in redox signaling as a coactivator of various transcription factors. Based on these multifunctions of APE1 within cells, numerous studies have reported that the alteration of APE1 could be a crucial factor in development of human diseases such as cancer and neurodegeneration. In fact, the study on the combination of an individual’s genetic make-up with environmental factors (gene-environment interaction is of great importance to understand the development of diseases, especially lethal diseases including cancer. Recent reports have suggested that the human carcinogenic risk following exposure to environmental toxicants is affected by APE1 alterations in terms of gene-environment interactions. In this review, we initially outline the critical APE1 functions in the various intracellular mechanisms including DNA repair and redox regulation and its roles in human diseases. Several findings demonstrate that the change in expression and activity as well as genetic variability of APE1 caused by environmental chemical (e.g., heavy metals and cigarette smoke and physical carcinogens (ultraviolet and ionizing radiation is likely associated with various cancers. These enable us to ultimately suggest APE1 as a vital marker for the prediction of environmental carcinogenesis risk.

  1. An AP endonuclease functions in active DNA demethylation and gene imprinting in Arabidopsis [corrected].

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yan Li

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Active DNA demethylation in plants occurs through base excision repair, beginning with removal of methylated cytosine by the ROS1/DME subfamily of 5-methylcytosine DNA glycosylases. Active DNA demethylation in animals requires the DNA glycosylase TDG or MBD4, which functions after oxidation or deamination of 5-methylcytosine, respectively. However, little is known about the steps following DNA glycosylase action in the active DNA demethylation pathways in plants and animals. We show here that the Arabidopsis APE1L protein has apurinic/apyrimidinic endonuclease activities and functions downstream of ROS1 and DME. APE1L and ROS1 interact in vitro and co-localize in vivo. Whole genome bisulfite sequencing of ape1l mutant plants revealed widespread alterations in DNA methylation. We show that the ape1l/zdp double mutant displays embryonic lethality. Notably, the ape1l+/-zdp-/- mutant shows a maternal-effect lethality phenotype. APE1L and the DNA phosphatase ZDP are required for FWA and MEA gene imprinting in the endosperm and are important for seed development. Thus, APE1L is a new component of the active DNA demethylation pathway and, together with ZDP, regulates gene imprinting in Arabidopsis.

  2. Mitochondrial Targeted Endonuclease III DNA Repair Enzyme Protects against Ventilator Induced Lung Injury in Mice

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    Masahiro Hashizume

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available The mitochondrial targeted DNA repair enzyme, 8-oxoguanine DNA glycosylase 1, was previously reported to protect against mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA damage and ventilator induced lung injury (VILI. In the present study we determined whether mitochondrial targeted endonuclease III (EndoIII which cleaves oxidized pyrimidines rather than purines from damaged DNA would also protect the lung. Minimal injury from 1 h ventilation at 40 cmH2O peak inflation pressure (PIP was reversed by EndoIII pretreatment. Moderate lung injury due to ventilation for 2 h at 40 cmH2O PIP produced a 25-fold increase in total extravascular albumin space, a 60% increase in W/D weight ratio, and marked increases in MIP-2 and IL-6. Oxidative mtDNA damage and decreases in the total tissue glutathione (GSH and the GSH/GSSH ratio also occurred. All of these indices of injury were attenuated by mitochondrial targeted EndoIII. Massive lung injury caused by 2 h ventilation at 50 cmH2O PIP was not attenuated by EndoIII pretreatment, but all untreated mice died prior to completing the two hour ventilation protocol, whereas all EndoIII-treated mice lived for the duration of ventilation. Thus, mitochondrial targeted DNA repair enzymes were protective against mild and moderate lung damage and they enhanced survival in the most severely injured group.

  3. DNA interrogation by the CRISPR RNA-guided endonuclease Cas9

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sternberg, Samuel H.; Redding, Sy; Jinek, Martin; Greene, Eric C.; Doudna, Jennifer A.

    2014-03-01

    The clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats (CRISPR)-associated enzyme Cas9 is an RNA-guided endonuclease that uses RNA-DNA base-pairing to target foreign DNA in bacteria. Cas9-guide RNA complexes are also effective genome engineering agents in animals and plants. Here we use single-molecule and bulk biochemical experiments to determine how Cas9-RNA interrogates DNA to find specific cleavage sites. We show that both binding and cleavage of DNA by Cas9-RNA require recognition of a short trinucleotide protospacer adjacent motif (PAM). Non-target DNA binding affinity scales with PAM density, and sequences fully complementary to the guide RNA but lacking a nearby PAM are ignored by Cas9-RNA. Competition assays provide evidence that DNA strand separation and RNA-DNA heteroduplex formation initiate at the PAM and proceed directionally towards the distal end of the target sequence. Furthermore, PAM interactions trigger Cas9 catalytic activity. These results reveal how Cas9 uses PAM recognition to quickly identify potential target sites while scanning large DNA molecules, and to regulate scission of double-stranded DNA.

  4. How quantum entanglement in DNA synchronizes double-strand breakage by type II restriction endonucleases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kurian, P; Dunston, G; Lindesay, J

    2016-02-21

    Macroscopic quantum effects in living systems have been studied widely in pursuit of fundamental explanations for biological energy transport and sensing. While it is known that type II endonucleases, the largest class of restriction enzymes, induce DNA double-strand breaks by attacking phosphodiester bonds, the mechanism by which simultaneous cutting is coordinated between the catalytic centers remains unclear. We propose a quantum mechanical model for collective electronic behavior in the DNA helix, where dipole-dipole oscillations are quantized through boundary conditions imposed by the enzyme. Zero-point modes of coherent oscillations would provide the energy required for double-strand breakage. Such quanta may be preserved in the presence of thermal noise by the enzyme's displacement of water surrounding the DNA recognition sequence. The enzyme thus serves as a decoherence shield. Palindromic mirror symmetry of the enzyme-DNA complex should conserve parity, because symmetric bond-breaking ceases when the symmetry of the complex is violated or when physiological parameters are perturbed from optima. Persistent correlations in DNA across longer spatial separations-a possible signature of quantum entanglement-may be explained by such a mechanism. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Early endonuclease-mediated evasion of RNA sensing ensures efficient coronavirus replication.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eveline Kindler

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Coronaviruses are of veterinary and medical importance and include highly pathogenic zoonotic viruses, such as SARS-CoV and MERS-CoV. They are known to efficiently evade early innate immune responses, manifesting in almost negligible expression of type-I interferons (IFN-I. This evasion strategy suggests an evolutionary conserved viral function that has evolved to prevent RNA-based sensing of infection in vertebrate hosts. Here we show that the coronavirus endonuclease (EndoU activity is key to prevent early induction of double-stranded RNA (dsRNA host cell responses. Replication of EndoU-deficient coronaviruses is greatly attenuated in vivo and severely restricted in primary cells even during the early phase of the infection. In macrophages we found immediate induction of IFN-I expression and RNase L-mediated breakdown of ribosomal RNA. Accordingly, EndoU-deficient viruses can retain replication only in cells that are deficient in IFN-I expression or sensing, and in cells lacking both RNase L and PKR. Collectively our results demonstrate that the coronavirus EndoU efficiently prevents simultaneous activation of host cell dsRNA sensors, such as Mda5, OAS and PKR. The localization of the EndoU activity at the site of viral RNA synthesis-within the replicase complex-suggests that coronaviruses have evolved a viral RNA decay pathway to evade early innate and intrinsic antiviral host cell responses.

  6. DNA interrogation by the CRISPR RNA-guided endonuclease Cas9

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sternberg, Samuel H.; Redding, Sy; Jinek, Martin; Greene, Eric C.; Doudna, Jennifer A.

    2014-01-01

    The CRISPR-associated enzyme Cas9 is an RNA-guided endonuclease that uses RNA:DNA base-pairing to target foreign DNA in bacteria. Cas9:guide RNA complexes are also effective genome engineering agents in animals and plants. Here we use single-molecule and bulk biochemical experiments to determine how Cas9:RNA interrogates DNA to find specific cleavage sites. We show that both binding and cleavage of DNA by Cas9:RNA require recognition of a short trinucleotide protospacer adjacent motif (PAM). Non-target DNA binding affinity scales with PAM density, and sequences fully complementary to the guide RNA but lacking a nearby PAM are ignored by Cas9:RNA. DNA strand separation and RNA:DNA heteroduplex formation initiate at the PAM and proceed directionally towards the distal end of the target sequence. Furthermore, PAM interactions trigger Cas9 catalytic activity. These results reveal how Cas9 employs PAM recognition to quickly identify potential target sites while scanning large DNA molecules, and to regulate dsDNA scission. PMID:24476820

  7. Single-molecule FRET unveils induced-fit mechanism for substrate selectivity in flap endonuclease 1

    KAUST Repository

    Rashid, Fahad

    2017-02-23

    Human flap endonuclease 1 (FEN1) and related structure-specific 5\\'nucleases precisely identify and incise aberrant DNA structures during replication, repair and recombination to avoid genomic instability. Yet, it is unclear how the 5\\'nuclease mechanisms of DNA distortion and protein ordering robustly mediate efficient and accurate substrate recognition and catalytic selectivity. Here, single-molecule sub-millisecond and millisecond analyses of FEN1 reveal a protein-DNA induced-fit mechanism that efficiently verifies substrate and suppresses off-target cleavage. FEN1 sculpts DNA with diffusion-limited kinetics to test DNA substrate. This DNA distortion mutually \\'locks\\' protein and DNA conformation and enables substrate verification with extreme precision. Strikingly, FEN1 never misses cleavage of its cognate substrate while blocking probable formation of catalytically competent interactions with noncognate substrates and fostering their pre-incision dissociation. These findings establish FEN1 has practically perfect precision and that separate control of induced-fit substrate recognition sets up the catalytic selectivity of the nuclease active site for genome stability.

  8. Comparative Structural and Functional Analysis of Bunyavirus and Arenavirus Cap-Snatching Endonucleases.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juan Reguera

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Segmented negative strand RNA viruses of the arena-, bunya- and orthomyxovirus families uniquely carry out viral mRNA transcription by the cap-snatching mechanism. This involves cleavage of host mRNAs close to their capped 5' end by an endonuclease (EN domain located in the N-terminal region of the viral polymerase. We present the structure of the cap-snatching EN of Hantaan virus, a bunyavirus belonging to hantavirus genus. Hantaan EN has an active site configuration, including a metal co-ordinating histidine, and nuclease activity similar to the previously reported La Crosse virus and Influenza virus ENs (orthobunyavirus and orthomyxovirus respectively, but is more active in cleaving a double stranded RNA substrate. In contrast, Lassa arenavirus EN has only acidic metal co-ordinating residues. We present three high resolution structures of Lassa virus EN with different bound ion configurations and show in comparative biophysical and biochemical experiments with Hantaan, La Crosse and influenza ENs that the isolated Lassa EN is essentially inactive. The results are discussed in the light of EN activation mechanisms revealed by recent structures of full-length influenza virus polymerase.

  9. Structure-guided sequence specificity engineering of the modification-dependent restriction endonuclease LpnPI.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sasnauskas, Giedrius; Zagorskaitė, Evelina; Kauneckaitė, Kotryna; Tamulaitiene, Giedre; Siksnys, Virginijus

    2015-07-13

    The eukaryotic Set and Ring Associated (SRA) domains and structurally similar DNA recognition domains of prokaryotic cytosine modification-dependent restriction endonucleases recognize methylated, hydroxymethylated or glucosylated cytosine in various sequence contexts. Here, we report the apo-structure of the N-terminal SRA-like domain of the cytosine modification-dependent restriction enzyme LpnPI that recognizes modified cytosine in the 5'-C(mC)DG-3' target sequence (where mC is 5-methylcytosine or 5-hydroxymethylcytosine and D = A/T/G). Structure-guided mutational analysis revealed LpnPI residues involved in base-specific interactions and demonstrated binding site plasticity that allowed limited target sequence degeneracy. Furthermore, modular exchange of the LpnPI specificity loops by structural equivalents of related enzymes AspBHI and SgrTI altered sequence specificity of LpnPI. Taken together, our results pave the way for specificity engineering of the cytosine modification-dependent restriction enzymes. © The Author(s) 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Nucleic Acids Research.

  10. Enhancement of PCR Detection Limit by Single-Tube Restriction Endonuclease-PCR (RE-PCR).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Datta, Sibnarayan; Budhauliya, Raghvendra; Chatterjee, Soumya; Vanlalhmuaka; Veer, Vijay; Chakravarty, Runu

    2016-06-01

    Polymerase chain reaction (PCR) is widely used in biological research and diagnostics because of its high sensitivity and specificity. However, the sensitivity of PCR is strongly influenced by topological characteristics of the template. Supercoiled templates are known to inhibit PCR, whereas linearized forms of the same supercoiled templates facilitate PCR. This study was conducted to compare the PCR efficiency of circular supercoiled DNA templates to their restriction endonuclease (RE)-mediated linearized forms. Additionally, we also evaluated the possibility of RE digestion of the circular supercoiled templates within the complete PCR buffer. Following a systematic approach, we demonstrated that circular supercoiled templates could be efficiently linearized by RE in the complete PCR buffer itself. This allowed linearization of circular supercoiled templates and their subsequent amplification in the PCR buffer in a single-tube format. Using this extremely simple RE-PCR approach, we documented up to tenfold increases in detection efficiency of PCR with two different circular supercoiled templates of clinical origin, including an international calibration standard. This inexpensive and easy approach to increasing PCR sensitivity can be easily adapted to any standard PCR protocol aimed at amplifying circular supercoiled genomes. Apart from its application in the development of sensitive clinical diagnostic PCR assays for a large number of organisms, this method could also prove to be very useful in simplifying the existing protocols for other applications where pre-PCR restriction digestion is required, such as mutation detection, genotyping, and selective template amplification.

  11. High pressure activation of the Mrr restriction endonuclease in Escherichia coli involves tetramer dissociation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bourges, Anaïs C; Torres Montaguth, Oscar E; Ghosh, Anirban; Tadesse, Wubishet M; Declerck, Nathalie; Aertsen, Abram; Royer, Catherine A

    2017-05-19

    A sub-lethal hydrostatic pressure (HP) shock of ∼100 MPa elicits a RecA-dependent DNA damage (SOS) response in Escherichia coli K-12, despite the fact that pressure cannot compromise the covalent integrity of DNA. Prior screens for HP resistance identified Mrr (Methylated adenine Recognition and Restriction), a Type IV restriction endonuclease (REase), as instigator for this enigmatic HP-induced SOS response. Type IV REases tend to target modified DNA sites, and E. coli Mrr activity was previously shown to be elicited by expression of the foreign M.HhaII Type II methytransferase (MTase), as well. Here we measured the concentration and stoichiometry of a functional GFP-Mrr fusion protein using in vivo fluorescence fluctuation microscopy. Our results demonstrate that Mrr is a tetramer in unstressed cells, but shifts to a dimer after HP shock or co-expression with M.HhaII. Based on the differences in reversibility of tetramer dissociation observed for wild-type GFP-Mrr and a catalytic mutant upon HP shock compared to M.HhaII expression, we propose a model by which (i) HP triggers Mrr activity by directly pushing inactive Mrr tetramers to dissociate into active Mrr dimers, while (ii) M.HhaII triggers Mrr activity by creating high affinity target sites on the chromosome, which pull the equilibrium from inactive tetrameric Mrr toward active dimer. © The Author(s) 2017. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Nucleic Acids Research.

  12. Insights on the Structural Details of Endonuclease EcoRI-DNA Complexes by Electron Spin Resonance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarver, Jessica

    2009-03-01

    Pulsed electron spin resonance (ESR) was used to probe the binding specificity of EcoRI, a restriction endonuclease. Using site-directed spin labeling, a nitroxide side chain was incorporated into the protein, enabling the use of ESR to study structural details of EcoRI. Distance measurements were performed on EcoRI mutants when bound to varying sequences of DNA using the Double Electron-Electron Resonance experiment. These distances demonstrated that the average structure in the arm regions of EcoRI, thought to play a major role in binding specificity, is the same when the protein binds to different sequences of DNA. Also, it was determined that the arms exhibit higher flexibility when bound to sequences other than the specific sequence due to the larger distance distributions acquired from these spin labeled complexes. Molecular dynamics (MD) simulations were performed on the spin-label-modified specific EcoRI-DNA crystal structure to model the average nitroxide orientation. The distance distributions from MD were found to be narrower than experiment, indicating the need for a more rigorous sampling of the nitroxide conformers in silico.

  13. The dynamics of the monomeric restriction endonuclease BcnI during its interaction with DNA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kostiuk, Georgij; Dikic, Jasmina; Schwarz, Friedrich W; Sasnauskas, Giedrius; Seidel, Ralf; Siksnys, Virginijus

    2017-06-02

    Endonucleases that generate DNA double strand breaks often employ two independent subunits such that the active site from each subunit cuts either DNA strand. Restriction enzyme BcnI is a remarkable exception. It binds to the 5΄-CC/SGG-3΄ (where S = C or G, '/' designates the cleavage position) target as a monomer forming an asymmetric complex, where a single catalytic center approaches the scissile phosphodiester bond in one of DNA strands. Bulk kinetic measurements have previously shown that the same BcnI molecule cuts both DNA strands at the target site without dissociation from the DNA. Here, we analyse the BcnI DNA binding and target recognition steps at the single molecule level. We find, using FRET, that BcnI adopts either 'open' or 'closed' conformation in solution. Next, we directly demonstrate that BcnI slides over long distances on DNA using 1D diffusion and show that sliding is accompanied by occasional jumping events, where the enzyme leaves the DNA and rebinds immediately at a distant site. Furthermore, we quantify the dynamics of the BcnI interactions with cognate and non-cognate DNA, and determine the preferred binding orientation of BcnI to the target site. These results provide new insights into the intricate dynamics of BcnI-DNA interactions. © The Author(s) 2017. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Nucleic Acids Research.

  14. Crystallization and preliminary X-ray diffraction analysis of restriction endonuclease EcoRII

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karpova, E. A.; Meehan, E.; Pusey, M. L.; Chen, L.

    1999-01-01

    Crystals of the restriction endonuclease EcoRII have been obtained by the vapor-diffusion technique in the presence of ammonium sulfate or polyethylene glycol. The best crystals were grown with ammonium sulfate as a precipitant. Crystals with dimensions of up to 0.6 x 0. 6 x 0.6 mm have been observed. The crystals diffract to about 4.0 A resolution at a cryo-temperature of 100 K using a rotating-anode X-ray source and a Rigaku R-AXIS IV imaging-plate detector. The space group has been determined to be either I23 or I2(1)3, with unit-cell parameters a = b = c = 160.3 A, alpha = beta = gamma = 90 degrees. The crystal asymmetric unit contains two protein molecules, and self-rotation function analysis shows a pseudo-twofold symmetry relating the two monomers. Attempts to improve the resolution of crystal diffraction and to search for heavy-atom derivatives are under way.

  15. Primary processing of CRISPR RNA by the endonuclease Cas6 in Staphylococcus epidermidis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wakefield, Noelle; Rajan, Rakhi; Sontheimer, Erik J

    2015-10-07

    In many bacteria and archaea, an adaptive immune system (CRISPR-Cas) provides immunity against foreign genetic elements. This system uses CRISPR RNAs (crRNAs) derived from the CRISPR array, along with CRISPR-associated (Cas) proteins, to target foreign nucleic acids. In most CRISPR systems, endonucleolytic processing of crRNA precursors (pre-crRNAs) is essential for the pathway. Here we study the Cas6 endonuclease responsible for crRNA processing in the Type III-A CRISPR-Cas system from Staphylococcus epidermidis RP62a, a model for Type III-A CRISPR-Cas systems, and define substrate requirements for SeCas6 activity. We find that SeCas6 is necessary and sufficient for full-length crRNA biogenesis in vitro, and that it relies on both sequence and stem-loop structure in the 3' half of the CRISPR repeat for recognition and processing. Copyright © 2015 Federation of European Biochemical Societies. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. Nicking endonuclease and target recycles signal amplification assisted quantum dots for fluorescence detection of DNA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Niu Shuyan; Li Quanyi; Qu Lijing; Wang Wei [Key Lab of Eco-chemical Engineering, Ministry of Education, College of Chemistry and Molecular Engineering, Qingdao University of Science and Technology, Qingdao 266042 (China)

    2010-11-08

    An ultrasensitive fluorescence detection method for DNA based on nicking endonuclease (NEase) and target recycles assisted with CdTe quantum dots (QDs) is reported. In the detection system, when the target DNA is present, it hybridizes with a linker strand to from a duplex, in which the NEase recognizes specific nucleotide sequences and cleaves the linker strand. After nicking, the fragments of the linker strand spontaneously dissociate from the target DNA and another linker strand hybridizes to the target to trigger another strand-scission cycle. On the other hand, when the target was absent, no duplex is formed and no fragment of linker strand is produced. Then CdTe QDs and magnetic beads (MBs), which were all modified with DNA sequences complementary to that of the linker strands are added to the solution to detect the presence of a target DNA. The signal was generated through the difference in Foerster resonance energy transfer (FRET) between the MB and CdTe QDs. This method indicates that one target DNA leads to cleavage of hundreds of linker DNA, increasing detection sensitivity by nearly three orders of magnitude. This method should be applicable whenever there is a requirement to detect a specific DNA sequence and can also be used for multicomponent detection.

  17. Sensitive fluorescent detection of DNA methyltransferase using nicking endonuclease-mediated multiple primers-like rolling circle amplification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Juan; Li, Xiao-Yu; Du, Yi-Chen; Zhang, Li-Na; Liu, Ke-Ke; Zhu, Li-Na; Kong, De-Ming

    2017-05-15

    Sensitive and reliable detection of DNA methyltransferase (MTase) is of great significance for both early tumor diagnosis and therapy. In this study, a simple, label-free and sensitive DNA MTase-sensing method was developed on the basis of a nicking endonuclease-mediated multiple primers-like rolling circle amplification (RCA) strategy. In this method, a dumbbell RCA template was prepared by blunt-end ligation of two molecules of hairpin DNA. In addition to the primer-binding sequence, the dumbbell template contained another three important parts: 5'-CCGG-3' sequences in double-stranded stems, nicking endonuclease recognition sites and C-rich sequences in single-stranded loops. The introduction of 5'-CCGG-3' sequences allows the dumbbell template to be destroyed by the restriction endonuclease, HpaII, but is not destroyed in the presence of the target MTase-M.SssI MTase. The introduction of nicking endonuclease recognition sites makes the M.SssI MTase-protected dumbbell template-mediated RCA proceed in a multiple primers-like exponential mode, thus providing the RCA with high amplification efficiency. The introduction of C-rich sequences may promote the folding of amplification products into a G-quadruplex structure, which is specifically recognized by the commercially available fluorescent probe thioflavin T. Improved RCA amplification efficiency and specific fluorescent recognition of RCA products provide the M.SssI MTase-sensing platform with high sensitivity. When a dumbbell template containing four nicking endonuclease sites is used, highly specific M.SssI MTase activity detection can be achieved in the range of 0.008-50U/mL with a detection limit as low as 0.0011U/mL. Simple experimental operation and mix-and-detection fluorescent sensing mode ensures that M.SssI MTase quantitation works well in a real-time RCA mode, thus further simplifying the sensing performance and making high throughput detection possible. The proposed MTase-sensing strategy was also

  18. Involvement of two endonuclease III homologs in the base excision repair pathway for the processing of DNA alkylation damage in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hanna, Michelle; Chow, Barbara L; Morey, Natalie J; Jinks-Robertson, Sue; Doetsch, Paul W; Xiao, Wei

    2004-01-05

    DNA base excision repair (BER) is initiated by DNA glycosylases that recognize and remove damaged bases. The phosphate backbone adjacent to the resulting apurinic/apyrimidinic (AP) site is then cleaved by an AP endonuclease or glycosylase-associated AP lyase to invoke subsequent BER steps. We have used a genetic approach in Saccharomyces cerevisiae to determine whether or not AP sites are blocks to DNA replication and the biological consequences if AP sites persist in the genome. We previously reported that yeast cells deficient in the two AP endonucleases (apn1 apn2 double mutant) are extremely sensitive to killing by a model DNA alkylating agent methyl methanesulfonate (MMS) and that this sensitivity can be reduced by deleting the MAG1 3-methyladenine DNA glycosylase gene. Here we report that in the absence of the AP endonucleases, deletion of two Escherichia coli endonuclease III homologs, NTG1 and NTG2, partially suppresses MMS-induced killing, which indicates that the AP lyase products are deleterious unless they are further processed by an AP endonuclease. The severe MMS sensitivity seen in AP endonuclease deficient strains can also be rescued by treatment of cells with the AP lyase inhibitor methoxyamine, which suggests that the product of AP lyase action on an AP site is indeed an extremely toxic lesion. In addition to the AP endonuclease interactions, deletion of NTG1 and NTG2 enhances the mag1 mutant sensitivity to MMS, whereas overexpression of MAG1 in either the ntg1 or ntg2 mutant severely affects cell growth. These results help to delineate alkylation base lesion flow within the BER pathway.

  19. Genetically Encoded Fluorescent Redox Probes

    OpenAIRE

    Hui-Wang Ai; Wei Ren

    2013-01-01

    Redox processes are involved in almost every cell of the body as a consequence of aerobic life. In the past decades, redox biology has been increasingly recognized as one of the key themes in cell signaling. The progress has been accelerated by development of fluorescent probes that can monitor redox conditions and dynamics in cells and cell compartments. This short paper focuses on fluorescent redox probes that are genetically encoded, and discusses their properties, molecular mechanism, adv...

  20. Home Care Services

    Science.gov (United States)

    Home care is care that allows a person with special needs stay in their home. It might be for people who are getting ... are chronically ill, recovering from surgery, or disabled. Home care services include Personal care, such as help ...

  1. Dementia - home care

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Supplements Videos & Tools Español You Are Here: Home → Medical Encyclopedia → Dementia - home care URL of this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/007428.htm Dementia - home care To use the ...

  2. Exercise at Home

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Home Health Insights Exercise & Weight Exercise at Home Exercise at Home Make an Appointment Ask a Question ... with the movement and contact your provider. Posture Exercises Better posture means better breathing and movement. Axial ...

  3. HOME Grantee Areas

    Data.gov (United States)

    Department of Housing and Urban Development — The HOME Investment Partnership Program (HOME) is authorized under Title II of the Cranston-Gonzalez National Affordable Housing Act. HOME provides formula grants to...

  4. Dominant mutations in S. cerevisiae PMS1 identify the Mlh1-Pms1 endonuclease active site and an exonuclease 1-independent mismatch repair pathway.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Catherine E Smith

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Lynch syndrome (hereditary nonpolypsis colorectal cancer or HNPCC is a common cancer predisposition syndrome. Predisposition to cancer in this syndrome results from increased accumulation of mutations due to defective mismatch repair (MMR caused by a mutation in one of the mismatch repair genes MLH1, MSH2, MSH6 or PMS2/scPMS1. To better understand the function of Mlh1-Pms1 in MMR, we used Saccharomyces cerevisiae to identify six pms1 mutations (pms1-G683E, pms1-C817R, pms1-C848S, pms1-H850R, pms1-H703A and pms1-E707A that were weakly dominant in wild-type cells, which surprisingly caused a strong MMR defect when present on low copy plasmids in an exo1Δ mutant. Molecular modeling showed these mutations caused amino acid substitutions in the metal coordination pocket of the Pms1 endonuclease active site and biochemical studies showed that they inactivated the endonuclease activity. This model of Mlh1-Pms1 suggested that the Mlh1-FERC motif contributes to the endonuclease active site. Consistent with this, the mlh1-E767stp mutation caused both MMR and endonuclease defects similar to those caused by the dominant pms1 mutations whereas mutations affecting the predicted metal coordinating residue Mlh1-C769 had no effect. These studies establish that the Mlh1-Pms1 endonuclease is required for MMR in a previously uncharacterized Exo1-independent MMR pathway.

  5. Cell-autonomous progeroid changes in conditional mouse models for repair endonuclease XPG deficiency.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sander Barnhoorn

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available As part of the Nucleotide Excision Repair (NER process, the endonuclease XPG is involved in repair of helix-distorting DNA lesions, but the protein has also been implicated in several other DNA repair systems, complicating genotype-phenotype relationship in XPG patients. Defects in XPG can cause either the cancer-prone condition xeroderma pigmentosum (XP alone, or XP combined with the severe neurodevelopmental disorder Cockayne Syndrome (CS, or the infantile lethal cerebro-oculo-facio-skeletal (COFS syndrome, characterized by dramatic growth failure, progressive neurodevelopmental abnormalities and greatly reduced life expectancy. Here, we present a novel (conditional Xpg-/- mouse model which -in a C57BL6/FVB F1 hybrid genetic background- displays many progeroid features, including cessation of growth, loss of subcutaneous fat, kyphosis, osteoporosis, retinal photoreceptor loss, liver aging, extensive neurodegeneration, and a short lifespan of 4-5 months. We show that deletion of XPG specifically in the liver reproduces the progeroid features in the liver, yet abolishes the effect on growth or lifespan. In addition, specific XPG deletion in neurons and glia of the forebrain creates a progressive neurodegenerative phenotype that shows many characteristics of human XPG deficiency. Our findings therefore exclude that both the liver as well as the neurological phenotype are a secondary consequence of derailment in other cell types, organs or tissues (e.g. vascular abnormalities and support a cell-autonomous origin caused by the DNA repair defect itself. In addition they allow the dissection of the complex aging process in tissue- and cell-type-specific components. Moreover, our data highlight the critical importance of genetic background in mouse aging studies, establish the Xpg-/- mouse as a valid model for the severe form of human XPG patients and segmental accelerated aging, and strengthen the link between DNA damage and aging.

  6. Structure of the Cpf1 endonuclease R-loop complex after target DNA cleavage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stella, Stefano; Alcón, Pablo; Montoya, Guillermo

    2017-06-22

    Cpf1 is an RNA-guided endonuclease that is emerging as a powerful genome-editing tool. Here we provide insight into its DNA-targeting mechanism by determining the structure of Francisella novicida Cpf1 with the triple-stranded R-loop generated after DNA cleavage. The structure reveals the machinery involved in DNA unwinding to form a CRISPR RNA (crRNA)-DNA hybrid and a displaced DNA strand. The protospacer adjacent motif (PAM) is recognized by the PAM-interacting domain. The loop-lysine helix-loop motif in this domain contains three conserved lysine residues that are inserted in a dentate manner into the double-stranded DNA. Unzipping of the double-stranded DNA occurs in a cleft arranged by acidic and hydrophobic residues facilitating the crRNA-DNA hybrid formation. The PAM single-stranded DNA is funnelled towards the nuclease site through a mixed hydrophobic and basic cavity. In this catalytic conformation, the PAM-interacting domain and the helix-loop-helix motif in the REC1 domain adopt a 'rail' shape and 'flap-on' conformations, respectively, channelling the PAM strand into the cavity. A steric barrier between the RuvC-II and REC1 domains forms the 'septum', separating the displaced PAM strand and the crRNA-DNA hybrid, avoiding DNA re-annealing. Mutations in key residues reveal a mechanism linking the PAM and DNA nuclease sites. Analysis of the Cpf1 structures proposes a singular working model of RNA-guided DNA cleavage, suggesting new avenues for redesign of Cpf1.

  7. Total sequence decomposition distinguishes functional modules, "molegos" in apurinic/apyrimidinic endonucleases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Braun Werner

    2002-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Total sequence decomposition, using the web-based MASIA tool, identifies areas of conservation in aligned protein sequences. By structurally annotating these motifs, the sequence can be parsed into individual building blocks, molecular legos ("molegos", that can eventually be related to function. Here, the approach is applied to the apurinic/apyrimidinic endonuclease (APE DNA repair proteins, essential enzymes that have been highly conserved throughout evolution. The APEs, DNase-1 and inositol 5'-polyphosphate phosphatases (IPP form a superfamily that catalyze metal ion based phosphorolysis, but recognize different substrates. Results MASIA decomposition of APE yielded 12 sequence motifs, 10 of which are also structurally conserved within the family and are designated as molegos. The 12 motifs include all the residues known to be essential for DNA cleavage by APE. Five of these molegos are sequentially and structurally conserved in DNase-1 and the IPP family. Correcting the sequence alignment to match the residues at the ends of two of the molegos that are absolutely conserved in each of the three families greatly improved the local structural alignment of APEs, DNase-1 and synaptojanin. Comparing substrate/product binding of molegos common to DNase-1 showed that those distinctive for APEs are not directly involved in cleavage, but establish protein-DNA interactions 3' to the abasic site. These additional bonds enhance both specific binding to damaged DNA and the processivity of APE1. Conclusion A modular approach can improve structurally predictive alignments of homologous proteins with low sequence identity and reveal residues peripheral to the traditional "active site" that control the specificity of enzymatic activity.

  8. DNA and Protein Requirements for Substrate Conformational Changes Necessary for Human Flap Endonuclease-1-catalyzed Reaction*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Algasaier, Sana I.; Exell, Jack C.; Bennet, Ian A.; Thompson, Mark J.; Gotham, Victoria J. B.; Shaw, Steven J.; Craggs, Timothy D.; Finger, L. David; Grasby, Jane A.

    2016-01-01

    Human flap endonuclease-1 (hFEN1) catalyzes the essential removal of single-stranded flaps arising at DNA junctions during replication and repair processes. hFEN1 biological function must be precisely controlled, and consequently, the protein relies on a combination of protein and substrate conformational changes as a prerequisite for reaction. These include substrate bending at the duplex-duplex junction and transfer of unpaired reacting duplex end into the active site. When present, 5′-flaps are thought to thread under the helical cap, limiting reaction to flaps with free 5′-termini in vivo. Here we monitored DNA bending by FRET and DNA unpairing using 2-aminopurine exciton pair CD to determine the DNA and protein requirements for these substrate conformational changes. Binding of DNA to hFEN1 in a bent conformation occurred independently of 5′-flap accommodation and did not require active site metal ions or the presence of conserved active site residues. More stringent requirements exist for transfer of the substrate to the active site. Placement of the scissile phosphate diester in the active site required the presence of divalent metal ions, a free 5′-flap (if present), a Watson-Crick base pair at the terminus of the reacting duplex, and the intact secondary structure of the enzyme helical cap. Optimal positioning of the scissile phosphate additionally required active site conserved residues Tyr40, Asp181, and Arg100 and a reacting duplex 5′-phosphate. These studies suggest a FEN1 reaction mechanism where junctions are bound and 5′-flaps are threaded (when present), and finally the substrate is transferred onto active site metals initiating cleavage. PMID:26884332

  9. Induction of Apurinic Endonuclease 1 Overexpression by Endoplasmic Reticulum Stress in Hepatoma Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tsung-Lin Cheng

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC is one of the most common malignancies worldwide with poor prognosis due to resistance to conventional chemotherapy and limited efficacy of radiotherapy. Previous studies have noted the induction of endoplasmic reticulum stress or apurinic endonuclease 1 (APE1 expression in many tumors. Therefore, the aim of this study was to investigate the relationship between endoplasmic reticulum (ER stress and APE1 in hepatocellular carcinoma. Here we investigate the expression of APE1 during ER stress in HepG2 and Huh-7 cell lines. Tunicamycin or brefeldin A, two ER stress inducers, increased APE1 and GRP78, an ER stress marker, expression in HepG2 and Huh-7 cells. Induction of APE1 expression was observed through transcription level in response to ER stress. APE1 nuclear localization during ER stress was determined using immunofluorescence assays in HepG2 cells. Furthermore, expression of Hepatitis B virus pre-S2∆ large mutant surface protein (pre-S2∆, an ER stress-induced protein, also increased GRP78 and APE1 expression in the normal hepatocyte NeHepLxHT cell line. Similarly, tumor samples showed higher expression of APE1 in ER stress-correlated liver cancer tissue in vivo. Our results demonstrate that ER stress and HBV pre-S2∆ increased APE1 expression, which may play an important role in resistance to chemotherapeutic agents or tumor development. Therefore, these data provide an important chemotherapeutic strategy in ER stress and HBV pre-S2∆-associated tumors.

  10. Altered endoribonuclease activity of apurinic/apyrimidinic endonuclease 1 variants identified in the human population.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wan Cheol Kim

    Full Text Available Apurinic/apyrimidinic endonuclease 1 (APE1 is the major mammalian enzyme in the DNA base excision repair pathway and cleaves the DNA phosphodiester backbone immediately 5' to abasic sites. APE1 also has 3'-5' DNA exonuclease and 3' DNA phosphodiesterase activities, and regulates transcription factor DNA binding through its redox regulatory function. The human APE1 has recently been shown to endonucleolytically cleave single-stranded regions of RNA. Towards understanding the biological significance of the endoribonuclease activity of APE1, we examined eight different amino acid substitution variants of APE1 previously identified in the human population. Our study shows that six APE1 variants, D148E, Q51H, I64V, G241R, R237A, and G306A, exhibit a 76-85% reduction in endoribonuclease activity against a specific coding region of the c-myc RNA, yet fully retain the ability to cleave apurinic/apyrimidinic DNA. We found that two APE1 variants, L104R and E126D, exhibit a unique RNase inhibitor-resistant endoribonuclease activity, where the proteins cleave c-myc RNA 3' of specific single-stranded guanosine residues. Expression of L104R and E126D APE1 variants in bacterial Origami cells leads to a 60-80% reduction in colony formation and a 1.5-fold increase in cell doubling time, whereas the other variants, which exhibit diminished endoribonuclease activity, had no effect. These data indicate that two human APE1 variants exhibit a unique endoribonuclease activity, which correlates with their ability to induce cytotoxicity or slow down growth in bacterial cells and supports the notion of their biological functionality.

  11. Hall effect encoding of brushless dc motors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berard, C. A.; Furia, T. J.; Goldberg, E. A.; Greene, R. C.

    1970-01-01

    Encoding mechanism integral to the motor and using the permanent magnets embedded in the rotor eliminates the need for external devices to encode information relating the position and velocity of the rotating member.

  12. Genetically encoded fluorescent redox sensors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lukyanov, Konstantin A; Belousov, Vsevolod V

    2014-02-01

    Life is a constant flow of electrons via redox couples. Redox reactions determine many if not all major cellular functions. Until recently, redox processes remained hidden from direct observation in living systems due to the lack of adequate methodology. Over the last years, imaging tools including small molecule probes and genetically encoded sensors appeared, which provided, for the first time, an opportunity to visualize and, in some cases, quantify redox reactions in live cells. Genetically encoded fluorescent redox probes, such as HyPer, rxYFP and roGFPs, have been used in several models, ranging from cultured cells to transgenic animals, and now enough information has been collected to highlight advantages and pitfalls of these probes. In this review, we describe the main types of genetically encoded redox probes, their essential properties, advantages and disadvantages. We also provide an overview of the most important, in our opinion, results obtained using these probes. Finally, we discuss redox-dependent photoconversions of GFP and other prospective directions in redox probe development. Fluorescent protein-based redox probes have important advantages such as high specificity, possibility of transgenesis and fine subcellular targeting. For proper selection of a redox sensor for a particular model, it is important to understand that HyPer and roGFP2-Orp1 are the probes for H2O2, whereas roGFP1/2, rxYFP and roGFP2-Grx1 are the probes for GSH/GSSG redox state. Possible pH changes should be carefully controlled in experiments with HyPer and rxYFP. Genetically encoded redox probes are the only instruments allowing real-time monitoring of reactive oxygen species and thiol redox state in living cells and tissues. We believe that in the near future the palette of FP-based redox probes will be expanded to red and far-red parts of the spectrum and to other important reactive species such as NO, O2 and superoxide. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled

  13. Holographically Encoded Volume Phase Masks

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-07-13

    optics ,” Nat. Photonics 4, 188–193 (2010). 26. H. Kogelnik, “Coupled wave theory for thick volume holograms ,” Bell System Tech. J. 45(9), 2909–2944...phase masks Marc SeGall, Ivan Divliansky,* Clémence Jollivet, Axel Schülzgen, and Leonid B. Glebov University of Central Florida, College of Optics and...satisfying the Bragg condition of the hologram . Moreover, this approach enables the capability to encode and multiplex several phase masks into a single

  14. Extrahelical (CAG)/(CTG) triplet repeat elements support proliferating cell nuclear antigen loading and MutLα endonuclease activation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pluciennik, Anna; Burdett, Vickers; Baitinger, Celia; Iyer, Ravi R; Shi, Kevin; Modrich, Paul

    2013-07-23

    MutLα endonuclease can be activated on covalently continuous DNA that contains a MutSα- or MutSβ-recognizable lesion and a helix perturbation that supports proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA) loading by replication factor C, providing a potential mechanism for triggering mismatch repair on nonreplicating DNA. Because mouse models for somatic expansion of disease-associated (CAG)n/(CTG)n triplet repeat sequences have implicated both MutSβ and MutLα and have suggested that expansions can occur in the absence of replication, we have asked whether an extrahelical (CAG)n or (CTG)n element is sufficient to trigger MutLα activation. (CAG)n and (CTG)n extrusions in relaxed closed circular DNA do in fact support MutSβ-, replication factor C-, and PCNA-dependent activation of MutLα endonuclease, which can incise either DNA strand. Extrahelical elements of two or three repeat units are the preferred substrates for MutLα activation, and extrusions of this size also serve as moderately effective sites for loading the PCNA clamp. Relaxed heteroduplex DNA containing a two or three-repeat unit extrusion also triggers MutSβ- and MutLα-endonuclease-dependent mismatch repair in nuclear extracts of human cells. This reaction occurs without obvious strand bias at about 10% the rate of that observed with otherwise identical nicked heteroduplex DNA. These findings provide a mechanism for initiation of triplet repeat processing in nonreplicating DNA that is consistent with several features of the model of Gomes-Pereira et al. [Gomes-Pereira M, Fortune MT, Ingram L, McAbney JP, Monckton DG (2004) Hum Mol Genet 13(16):1815-1825]. They may also have implications for triplet repeat processing at a replication fork.

  15. Small molecule activation of apurinic/apyrimidinic endonuclease 1 reduces DNA damage induced by cisplatin in cultured sensory neurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Georgiadis, Millie M; Chen, Qiujia; Meng, Jingwei; Guo, Chunlu; Wireman, Randall; Reed, April; Vasko, Michael R; Kelley, Mark R

    2016-05-01

    Although chemotherapy-induced peripheral neuropathy (CIPN) affects approximately 5-60% of cancer patients, there are currently no treatments available in part due to the fact that the underlying causes of CIPN are not well understood. One contributing factor in CIPN may be persistence of DNA lesions resulting from treatment with platinum-based agents such as cisplatin. In support of this hypothesis, overexpression of the base excision repair (BER) enzyme, apurinic/apyrimidinic endonuclease 1 (APE1), reduces DNA damage and protects cultured sensory neurons treated with cisplatin. Here, we address stimulation of APE1's endonuclease through a small molecule, nicorandil, as a means of mimicking the beneficial effects observed for overexpression of APE1. Nicorandil, was identified through high-throughput screening of small molecule libraries and found to stimulate APE1 endonuclease activity by increasing catalytic efficiency approximately 2-fold. This stimulation is primarily due to an increase in kcat. To prevent metabolism of nicorandil, an approved drug in Europe for the treatment of angina, cultured sensory neurons were pretreated with nicorandil and daidzin, an aldehyde dehydrogenase 2 inhibitor, resulting in decreased DNA damage but not altered transmitter release by cisplatin. This finding suggests that activation of APE1 by nicorandil in cisplatin-treated cultured sensory neurons does not imbalance the BER pathway in contrast to overexpression of the kinetically faster R177A APE1. Taken together, our results suggest that APE1 activators can be used to reduce DNA damage induced by cisplatin in cultured sensory neurons, although further studies will be required to fully assess their protective effects. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. Extrahelical (CAG)/(CTG) triplet repeat elements support proliferating cell nuclear antigen loading and MutLα endonuclease activation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pluciennik, Anna; Burdett, Vickers; Baitinger, Celia; Iyer, Ravi R.; Shi, Kevin; Modrich, Paul

    2013-01-01

    MutLα endonuclease can be activated on covalently continuous DNA that contains a MutSα- or MutSβ-recognizable lesion and a helix perturbation that supports proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA) loading by replication factor C, providing a potential mechanism for triggering mismatch repair on nonreplicating DNA. Because mouse models for somatic expansion of disease-associated (CAG)n/(CTG)n triplet repeat sequences have implicated both MutSβ and MutLα and have suggested that expansions can occur in the absence of replication, we have asked whether an extrahelical (CAG)n or (CTG)n element is sufficient to trigger MutLα activation. (CAG)n and (CTG)n extrusions in relaxed closed circular DNA do in fact support MutSβ-, replication factor C-, and PCNA-dependent activation of MutLα endonuclease, which can incise either DNA strand. Extrahelical elements of two or three repeat units are the preferred substrates for MutLα activation, and extrusions of this size also serve as moderately effective sites for loading the PCNA clamp. Relaxed heteroduplex DNA containing a two or three-repeat unit extrusion also triggers MutSβ- and MutLα-endonuclease-dependent mismatch repair in nuclear extracts of human cells. This reaction occurs without obvious strand bias at about 10% the rate of that observed with otherwise identical nicked heteroduplex DNA. These findings provide a mechanism for initiation of triplet repeat processing in nonreplicating DNA that is consistent with several features of the model of Gomes-Pereira et al. [Gomes-Pereira M, Fortune MT, Ingram L, McAbney JP, Monckton DG (2004) Hum Mol Genet 13(16):1815–1825]. They may also have implications for triplet repeat processing at a replication fork. PMID:23840062

  17. Exploring both sequence detection and restriction endonuclease cleavage kinetics by recognition site via single-molecule microfluidic trapping.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Weilin; Muller, Susan J

    2011-02-07

    We demonstrate the feasibility of a single-molecule microfluidic approach to both sequence detection and obtaining kinetic information for restriction endonucleases on dsDNA. In this method, a microfluidic stagnation point flow is designed to trap, hold, and linearize double-stranded (ds) genomic DNA to which a restriction endonuclease has been pre-bound sequence-specifically. By introducing the cofactor magnesium, we determine the binding location of the enzyme by the cleavage process of dsDNA as in optical restriction mapping, however here the DNA need not be immobilized on a surface. We note that no special labeling of the enzyme is required, which makes it simpler than our previous scheme using stagnation point flows for sequence detection. Our accuracy in determining the location of the recognition site is comparable to or better than other single molecule techniques due to the fidelity with which we can control the linearization of the DNA molecules. In addition, since the cleavage process can be followed in real time, information about the cleavage kinetics, and subtle differences in binding and cleavage frequencies among the recognition sites, may also be obtained. Data for the five recognition sites for the type II restriction endonuclease EcoRI on λ-DNA are presented as a model system. While the roles of the varying fluid velocity and tension along the chain backbone on the measured kinetics remain to be determined, we believe this new method holds promise for a broad range of studies of DNA-protein interactions, including the kinetics of other DNA cleavage processes, the dissociation of a restriction enzyme from the cleaved substrate, and other macromolecular cleavage processes.

  18. Interaction of apurinic/apyrimidinic endonuclease 2 (Apn2) with Myh1 DNA glycosylase in fission yeast.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jin, Jin; Hwang, Bor-Jang; Chang, Po-Wen; Toth, Eric A; Lu, A-Lien

    2014-03-01

    Oxidative DNA damage is repaired primarily by the base excision repair (BER) pathway in a process initiated by removal of base lesions or mismatched bases by DNA glycosylases. MutY homolog (MYH, MUTYH, or Myh1) is a DNA glycosylase which excises adenine paired with the oxidative lesion 8-oxo-7,8-dihydroguanine (8-oxoG, or G°), thus reducing G:C to T:A mutations. The resulting apurinic/apyrimidinic (AP) site is processed by an AP-endonuclease or a bifunctional glycosylase/lyase. We show here that the major Schizosaccharomyces pombe AP endonuclease, Apn2, binds to the inter-domain connector located between the N- and C-terminal domains of Myh1. This Myh1 inter-domain connector also interacts with the Hus1 subunit of the Rad9-Rad1-Hus1 checkpoint clamp. Mutagenesis studies indicate that Apn2 and Hus1 bind overlapping but different sequence motifs on Myh1. Mutation on I(261) of Myh1 reduces its interaction with Hus1, but only slightly attenuates its interaction with Apn2. However, E(262) of Myh1 is a key determinant for both Apn2 and Hus1 interactions. Like human APE1, Apn2 has 3'-phosphodiesterase activity. However, unlike hAPE1, Apn2 has a weak AP endonuclease activity which cleaves the AP sites generated by Myh1 glycosylase. Functionally, Apn2 stimulates Myh1 glycosylase activity and Apn2 phosphodiesterase activity is stimulated by Myh1. The cross stimulation of Myh1 and Apn2 enzymatic activities is dependent on their physical interaction. Thus, Myh1 and Apn2 constitute an initial BER complex. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. Next-generation sequencing of multiple individuals per barcoded library by deconvolution of sequenced amplicons using endonuclease fragment analysis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Jeppe D; Pereira, Vania; Pietroni, Carlotta

    2014-01-01

    The simultaneous sequencing of samples from multiple individuals increases the efficiency of next-generation sequencing (NGS) while also reducing costs. Here we describe a novel and simple approach for sequencing DNA from multiple individuals per barcode. Our strategy relies on the endonuclease...... digestion of PCR amplicons prior to library preparation, creating a specific fragment pattern for each individual that can be resolved after sequencing. By using both barcodes and restriction fragment patterns, we demonstrate the ability to sequence the human melanocortin 1 receptor (MC1R) genes from 72...

  20. Next-generation sequencing of multiple individuals per barcoded library by deconvolution of sequenced amplicons using endonuclease fragment analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andersen, Jeppe D; Pereira, Vania; Pietroni, Carlotta; Mikkelsen, Martin; Johansen, Peter; Børsting, Claus; Morling, Niels

    2014-08-01

    The simultaneous sequencing of samples from multiple individuals increases the efficiency of next-generation sequencing (NGS) while also reducing costs. Here we describe a novel and simple approach for sequencing DNA from multiple individuals per barcode. Our strategy relies on the endonuclease digestion of PCR amplicons prior to library preparation, creating a specific fragment pattern for each individual that can be resolved after sequencing. By using both barcodes and restriction fragment patterns, we demonstrate the ability to sequence the human melanocortin 1 receptor (MC1R) genes from 72 individuals using only 24 barcoded libraries.

  1. Peculiarities of the interaction of the restriction endonuclease BspD6I with DNA containing its recognition site.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abrosimova, Liudmila A; Kubareva, Elena A; Migur, Anzhela Yu; Gavshina, Aleksandra V; Ryazanova, Aleksandra Yu; Norkin, Maxim V; Perevyazova, Tatiana A; Wende, Wolfgang; Hianik, Tibor; Zheleznaya, Liudmila A; Oretskaya, Tatiana S

    2016-09-01

    Nicking endonucleases are enzymes that recognize specific sites in double-stranded DNA and cleave only one strand at a predetermined position. These enzymes are involved in DNA replication and repair; they can also function as subunits of bacterial heterodimeric restriction endonucleases. One example of such a proteins is the restriction endonuclease BspD6I (R.BspD6I) from Bacillus species strain D6, which consists of the large subunit - nicking endonuclease BspD6I (Nt.BspD6I), and the small subunit (ss.BspD6I). Nt.BspD6I can function independently. Similar enzymes are now widely used in numerous biotechnological applications. The aim of this study was to investigate the fundamental properties of two subunits of R.BspD6I and their interdependence in the course of R.BspD6I activity. The binding and hydrolysis of DNA duplexes by R.BspD6I are primary analyzed by gel electrophoresis. To elucidate the difference between Nt.BspD6I interaction with the substrate and product of hydrolysis, the thickness shear mode acoustic method is used. The thermodynamic and kinetic parameters of the Nt.BspD6I interaction with DNA are determined. For the first time we demonstrated that Nt.BspD6I bends the DNA during complex formation. Nt.BspD6I is able to form complexes with the product nicked in the top strand and ss.BspD6I cleaves the bottom strand of the DNA consecutively. Furthermore, the influence of dA methylation in the R.BspD6I recognition site on ss.BspD6I activity is analyzed. The obtained results provide evidence that Nt.BspD6I coordinates the activity of R.BspD6I by strictly coupling of the bottom strand cleavage by ss.BspD6I to the top strand cleavage. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. Genomic DNA restriction endonuclease from Pasteurella multocida isolated from Indonesia, katha strain and reference strains and analysed by PFGE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Supar

    2003-10-01

    Full Text Available Pasteurella multocida strains are the causative disease agents of wide range of domestic and wild animals in Indonesia. The most important serotypes are associated with Hemorrhagic septicaemic (HS diseases in cattle and buffaloes, cholera in ducks and chickens. The HS disease associated with P. multocia in large ruminants in Indonesia is controled by killed whole cell vaccines produced by the use of P. multocida Katha strains. There is no discriminatory data of the molecular biology technique has been applied to investigate P. multocida isolates from different geographic locations in Indonesia. The purpose of this studies were to observe the genetic diversity among P. multocida isolated from various geograpic locations and compared with Katha vaccine strain and other reference strains. A total samples of 38 isolates and strains of P. multocida were analysed by means of pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE. Each sample was grown in nutrient broth, cells were separeted by centrifugation. Whole cell pellet was mixed with agarose and then prepared agarose plugs. The genomic DNA of each sample was digested in situ (plug with either restriction endonuclease of ApaI and/or BamHI. The digested genomic DNA of each sample was analysed by PFGE, the genomic DNA restricted profile of each sample was compared with others. The use of ApaI restriction endonuclease digestion and analysed by PFGE, demonstrated that 34 out of 38 P. multocia samples could be differentiated into 16 ApaI types, whereas based on the BamHI digestion of these samples were differentiated into 20 BamHI types. Genomic DNA restriction pattern of Indonesian P. multocida isolates originated from cattle and buffaloes associated with haemorrhagic septicaemic diseases demonstrated different pattern to those of vaccine Katha strain, poultry strains as well as the reference strains currenly kept at Balitvet Culture Collection (BCC unit. Two P. multocida isolates derived from ducks with cholera

  3. Interaction of apurinic/apyrimidinic endonuclease 2 (Apn2) with Myh1 DNA glycosylase in fission yeast

    OpenAIRE

    Jin, Jin; Hwang, Bor-Jang; Chang, Po-Wen; Toth, Eric A.; Lu, A-Lien

    2014-01-01

    Oxidative DNA damage is repaired primarily by the base excision repair (BER) pathway in a process initiated by removal of base lesions or mismatched bases by DNA glycosylases. MutY homolog (MYH, MUTYH, or Myh1) is a DNA glycosylase which excises adenine paired with the oxidative lesion 8-oxo-7,8-dihydroguanine (8-oxoG, or Go), thus reducing G:C to T:A mutations. The resulting apurinic/apyrimidinic (AP) site is processed by an AP-endonuclease or a bifunctional glycosylase/lya...

  4. The major role of human AP-endonuclease homolog Apn2 in repair of abasic sites in Schizosaccharomyces pombe

    OpenAIRE

    Ribar, Balazs; Izumi, Tadahide; Mitra, Sankar

    2004-01-01

    The abasic (AP) sites, the major mutagenic and cytotoxic genomic lesions, induced directly by oxidative stress and indirectly after excision of damaged bases by DNA glycosylases, are repaired by AP-endonucleases (APEs). Among two APEs in Saccharomyces cerevisiae, Apn1 provides the major APE activity, and Apn2, the ortholog of the mammalian APE, provides back-up activity. We have cloned apn1 and apn2 genes of Schizosaccharomyces pombe, and have shown that inactivation of Apn2 and not Apn1 sens...

  5. Crystal structure and DNA-binding property of the ATPase domain of bacterial mismatch repair endonuclease MutL from Aquifex aeolicus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fukui, Kenji; Iino, Hitoshi; Baba, Seiki; Kumasaka, Takashi; Kuramitsu, Seiki; Yano, Takato

    2017-09-01

    DNA mismatch repair (MMR) system corrects mismatched bases that are generated mainly by DNA replication errors. The repair system excises the error-containing single-stranded region and enables the re-synthesis of the strand. In the early reactions of MMR, MutL endonuclease incises the newly-synthesized/error-containing strand of the duplex to initiate the downstream excision reaction. MutL endonuclease consists of the N-terminal ATPase and C-terminal endonuclease domains. In this study, we report the crystal structure of the ATPase domain of MutL endonuclease from Aquifex aeolicus. The overall structure of the domain was similar to those of human MutL homologs and Escherichia coli MutL, although E. coli MutL has no endonuclease activity. The ATPase domain was comprised of two subdomains: the N-terminal ATP-binding subdomain and the C-terminal α-β sandwich subdomain. Site-directed mutagenesis experiment identified DNA-interacting eight basic amino acid residues, which were distributed across both the two subdomains and formed a DNA-binding cleft. Docking simulation between the structures of the ATPase and endonuclease domains generated a reliable model structure for the full-length A. aeolicus MutL, which satisfies our previous result of small-angle X-ray scattering analysis. On the basis of the model structure and further experimental results, we concluded that the two separate DNA-binding sites in the full-length A. aeolicus MutL simultaneously bind a dsDNA molecule. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. Autoscreening of restriction endonucleases for PCR-restriction fragment length polymorphism identification of fungal species, with Pleurotus spp. as an example.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Zhi-Hui; Huang, Ji-Xiang; Yao, Yi-Jian

    2007-12-01

    A molecular method based on PCR-restriction fragment length polymorphism (RFLP) analysis of internal transcribed spacer (ITS) ribosomal DNA sequences was designed to rapidly identify fungal species, with members of the genus Pleurotus as an example. Based on the results of phylogenetic analysis of ITS sequences from Pleurotus, a PCR-RFLP endonuclease autoscreening (PRE Auto) program was developed to screen restriction endonucleases for discriminating multiple sequences from different species. The PRE Auto program analyzes the endonuclease recognition sites and calculates the sizes of the fragments in the sequences that are imported into the program in groups according to species recognition. Every restriction endonuclease is scored through the calculation of the average coefficient for the sequence groups and the average coefficient for the sequences within a group, and then virtual electrophoresis maps for the selected restriction enzymes, based on the results of the scoring system, are displayed for the rapid determination of the candidate endonucleases. A total of 85 haplotypes representing 151 ITS sequences were used for the analysis, and 2,992 restriction endonucleases were screened to find the candidates for the identification of species. This method was verified by an experiment with 28 samples representing 12 species of Pleurotus. The results of the digestion by the restriction enzymes showed the same patterns of DNA fragments anticipated by the PRE Auto program, apart from those for four misidentified samples. ITS sequences from 14 samples (of which nine sequences were obtained in this study), including four originally misidentified samples, confirmed the species identities revealed by the PCR-RFLP analysis. The method developed here can be used for the identification of species of other living microorganisms.

  7. Molecular mechanisms for protein-encoded inheritance

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wiltzius, Jed J.W.; Landau, Meytal; Nelson, Rebecca; Sawaya, Michael R.; Apostol, Marcin I.; Goldschmidt, Lukasz; Soriaga, Angela B.; Cascio, Duilio; Rajashankar, Kanagalaghatta; Eisenberg, David; (Cornell); (HHMI)

    2009-12-01

    In prion inheritance and transmission, strains are phenotypic variants encoded by protein 'conformations'. However, it is unclear how a protein conformation can be stable enough to endure transmission between cells or organisms. Here we describe new polymorphic crystal structures of segments of prion and other amyloid proteins, which offer two structural mechanisms for the encoding of prion strains. In packing polymorphism, prion strains are encoded by alternative packing arrangements (polymorphs) of {beta}-sheets formed by the same segment of a protein; in segmental polymorphism, prion strains are encoded by distinct {beta}-sheets built from different segments of a protein. Both forms of polymorphism can produce enduring conformations capable of encoding strains. These molecular mechanisms for transfer of protein-encoded information into prion strains share features with the familiar mechanism for transfer of nucleic acid-encoded information into microbial strains, including sequence specificity and recognition by noncovalent bonds.

  8. Creation of a novel telomere-cutting endonuclease based on the EN domain of telomere-specific non-long terminal repeat retrotransposon, TRAS1

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yoshitake Kazutoshi

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The ends of chromosomes, termed telomeres consist of repetitive DNA. The telomeric sequences shorten with cell division and, when telomeres are critically abbreviated, cells stop proliferating. However, in cancer cells, by the expression of telomerase which elongates telomeres, the cells can continue proliferating. Many approaches for telomere shortening have been pursued in the past, but to our knowledge, cutting telomeres in vivo has not so far been demonstrated. In addition, there is lack of information on the cellular effects of telomere shortening in human cells. Results Here, we created novel chimeric endonucleases to cut telomeres by fusing the endonuclease domain (TRAS1EN of the silkworm's telomere specific non-long terminal repeat retrotransposon TRAS1 to the human telomere-binding protein, TRF1. An in vitro assay demonstrated that the TRAS1EN-TRF1 chimeric endonucleases (T-EN and EN-T cut the human (TTAGGGn repeats specifically. The concentration of TRAS1EN-TRF1 chimeric endonucleases necessary for the cleavage of (TTAGGGn repeats was about 40-fold lower than that of TRAS1EN alone. When TRAS1EN-TRF1 endonucleases were introduced into human U2OS cancer cells using adenovirus vectors, the enzymes localized at telomeres of nuclei, cleaved and shortened the telomeric DNA by double-strand breaks. When human U2OS and HFL-1 fibroblast cells were infected with EN-T recombinant adenovirus, their cellular proliferation was suppressed for about 2 weeks after infection. In contrast, the TRAS1EN mutant (H258A chimeric endonuclease fused with TRF1 (ENmut-T did not show the suppression effect. The EN-T recombinant adenovirus induced telomere shortening in U2OS cells, activated the p53-dependent pathway and caused the senescence associated cellular responses, while the ENmut-T construct did not show such effects. Conclusions A novel TRAS1EN-TRF1 chimeric endonuclease (EN-T cuts the human telomeric repeats (TTAGGGn specifically in

  9. Dynamical encoding of cursive handwriting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singer, Y; Tishby, N

    1994-01-01

    A model-based approach to on-line cursive handwriting analysis and recognition is presented and evaluated. In this model, on-line handwriting is considered as a modulation of a simple cycloidal pen motion, described by two coupled oscillations with a constant linear drift along the line of the writing. By slow modulations of the amplitudes and phase lags of the two oscillators, a general pen trajectory can be efficiently encoded. These parameters are then quantized into a small number of values without altering the writing intelligibility. A general procedure for the estimation and quantization of these cycloidal motion parameters for arbitrary handwriting is presented. The result is a discrete motor control representation of the continuous pen motion, via the quantized levels of the model parameters. This motor control representation enables successful word spotting and matching of cursive scripts. Our experiments clearly indicate the potential of this dynamic representation for complete cursive handwriting recognition.

  10. Engineering Genetically Encoded FRET Sensors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lindenburg, Laurens; Merkx, Maarten

    2014-01-01

    Förster Resonance Energy Transfer (FRET) between two fluorescent proteins can be exploited to create fully genetically encoded and thus subcellularly targetable sensors. FRET sensors report changes in energy transfer between a donor and an acceptor fluorescent protein that occur when an attached sensor domain undergoes a change in conformation in response to ligand binding. The design of sensitive FRET sensors remains challenging as there are few generally applicable design rules and each sensor must be optimized anew. In this review we discuss various strategies that address this shortcoming, including rational design approaches that exploit self-associating fluorescent domains and the directed evolution of FRET sensors using high-throughput screening. PMID:24991940

  11. The NF1 gene contains hotspots for L1 endonuclease-dependent de novo insertion.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katharina Wimmer

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Long interspersed (L1 and Alu elements are actively amplified in the human genome through retrotransposition of their RNA intermediates by the -100 still retrotranspositionally fully competent L1 elements. Retrotransposition can cause inherited disease if such an element is inserted near or within a functional gene. Using direct cDNA sequencing as the primary assay for comprehensive NF1 mutation analysis, we uncovered in 18 unrelated index patients splicing alterations not readily explained at the genomic level by an underlying point-mutation or deletion. Improved PCR protocols avoiding allelic drop-out of the mutant alleles uncovered insertions of fourteen Alu elements, three L1 elements, and one poly(T stretch to cause these splicing defects. Taken together, the 18 pathogenic L1 endonuclease-mediated de novo insertions represent the largest number of this type of mutations characterized in a single human gene. Our findings show that retrotransposon insertions account for as many as -0.4% of all NF1 mutations. Since altered splicing was the main effect of the inserted elements, the current finding was facilitated by the use of RNA-based mutation analysis protocols, resulting in improved detection compared to gDNA-based approaches. Six different insertions clustered in a relatively small 1.5-kb region (NF1 exons 21(16-23(18 within the 280-kb NF1 gene. Furthermore, three different specific integration sites, one of them located in this cluster region, were each used twice, i.e. NM_000267.3(NF1:c.1642-1_1642 in intron 14(10c, NM_000267.3(NF1:c.2835_2836 in exon 21(16, and NM_000267.3(NF1:c.4319_4320 in exon 33(25. Identification of three loci that each served twice as integration site for independent retrotransposition events as well as 1.5-kb cluster region harboring six independent insertions supports the notion of non-random insertion of retrotransposons in the human genome. Currently, little is known about which features make sites

  12. Naturally-occurring, dually-functional fusions between restriction endonucleases and regulatory proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liang, Jixiao; Blumenthal, Robert M

    2013-10-02

    Restriction-modification (RM) systems appear to play key roles in modulating gene flow among bacteria and archaea. Because the restriction endonuclease (REase) is potentially lethal to unmethylated new host cells, regulation to ensure pre-expression of the protective DNA methyltransferase (MTase) is essential to the spread of RM genes. This is particularly true for Type IIP RM systems, in which the REase and MTase are separate, independently-active proteins. A substantial subset of Type IIP RM systems are controlled by an activator-repressor called C protein. In these systems, C controls the promoter for its own gene, and for the downstream REase gene that lacks its own promoter. Thus MTase is expressed immediately after the RM genes enter a new cell, while expression of REase is delayed until sufficient C protein accumulates. To study the variation in and evolution of this regulatory mechanism, we searched for RM systems closely related to the well-studied C protein-dependent PvuII RM system. Unexpectedly, among those found were several in which the C protein and REase genes were fused. The gene for CR.NsoJS138I fusion protein (nsoJS138ICR, from the bacterium Niabella soli) was cloned, and the fusion protein produced and partially purified. Western blots provided no evidence that, under the conditions tested, anything other than full-length fusion protein is produced. This protein had REase activity in vitro and, as expected from the sequence similarity, its specificity was indistinguishable from that for PvuII REase, though the optimal reaction conditions were different. Furthermore, the fusion was active as a C protein, as revealed by in vivo activation of a lacZ reporter fusion to the promoter region for the nsoJS138ICR gene. Fusions between C proteins and REases have not previously been characterized, though other fusions have (such as between REases and MTases). These results reinforce the evidence for impressive modularity among RM system proteins, and raise

  13. An AP endonuclease 1-DNA polymerase beta complex: theoretical prediction of interacting surfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abyzov, Alexej; Uzun, Alper; Strauss, Phyllis R; Ilyin, Valentin A

    2008-04-25

    Abasic (AP) sites in DNA arise through both endogenous and exogenous mechanisms. Since AP sites can prevent replication and transcription, the cell contains systems for their identification and repair. AP endonuclease (APEX1) cleaves the phosphodiester backbone 5' to the AP site. The cleavage, a key step in the base excision repair pathway, is followed by nucleotide insertion and removal of the downstream deoxyribose moiety, performed most often by DNA polymerase beta (pol-beta). While yeast two-hybrid studies and electrophoretic mobility shift assays provide evidence for interaction of APEX1 and pol-beta, the specifics remain obscure. We describe a theoretical study designed to predict detailed interacting surfaces between APEX1 and pol-beta based on published co-crystal structures of each enzyme bound to DNA. Several potentially interacting complexes were identified by sliding the protein molecules along DNA: two with pol-beta located downstream of APEX1 (3' to the damaged site) and three with pol-beta located upstream of APEX1 (5' to the damaged site). Molecular dynamics (MD) simulations, ensuring geometrical complementarity of interfaces, enabled us to predict interacting residues and calculate binding energies, which in two cases were sufficient (approximately -10.0 kcal/mol) to form a stable complex and in one case a weakly interacting complex. Analysis of interface behavior during MD simulation and visual inspection of interfaces allowed us to conclude that complexes with pol-beta at the 3'-side of APEX1 are those most likely to occur in vivo. Additional multiple sequence analyses of APEX1 and pol-beta in related organisms identified a set of correlated mutations of specific residues at the predicted interfaces. Based on these results, we propose that pol-beta in the open or closed conformation interacts and makes a stable interface with APEX1 bound to a cleaved abasic site on the 3' side. The method described here can be used for analysis in any DNA

  14. An AP endonuclease 1-DNA polymerase beta complex: theoretical prediction of interacting surfaces.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexej Abyzov

    2008-04-01

    Full Text Available Abasic (AP sites in DNA arise through both endogenous and exogenous mechanisms. Since AP sites can prevent replication and transcription, the cell contains systems for their identification and repair. AP endonuclease (APEX1 cleaves the phosphodiester backbone 5' to the AP site. The cleavage, a key step in the base excision repair pathway, is followed by nucleotide insertion and removal of the downstream deoxyribose moiety, performed most often by DNA polymerase beta (pol-beta. While yeast two-hybrid studies and electrophoretic mobility shift assays provide evidence for interaction of APEX1 and pol-beta, the specifics remain obscure. We describe a theoretical study designed to predict detailed interacting surfaces between APEX1 and pol-beta based on published co-crystal structures of each enzyme bound to DNA. Several potentially interacting complexes were identified by sliding the protein molecules along DNA: two with pol-beta located downstream of APEX1 (3' to the damaged site and three with pol-beta located upstream of APEX1 (5' to the damaged site. Molecular dynamics (MD simulations, ensuring geometrical complementarity of interfaces, enabled us to predict interacting residues and calculate binding energies, which in two cases were sufficient (approximately -10.0 kcal/mol to form a stable complex and in one case a weakly interacting complex. Analysis of interface behavior during MD simulation and visual inspection of interfaces allowed us to conclude that complexes with pol-beta at the 3'-side of APEX1 are those most likely to occur in vivo. Additional multiple sequence analyses of APEX1 and pol-beta in related organisms identified a set of correlated mutations of specific residues at the predicted interfaces. Based on these results, we propose that pol-beta in the open or closed conformation interacts and makes a stable interface with APEX1 bound to a cleaved abasic site on the 3' side. The method described here can be used for analysis in

  15. Use of an rRNA probe and restriction endonuclease analysis to fingerprint Pasteurella multocida isolated from turkeys and wildlife.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Snipes, K P; Hirsh, D C; Kasten, R W; Hansen, L M; Hird, D W; Carpenter, T E; McCapes, R H

    1989-01-01

    Twenty-five isolates of the bacterium Pasteurella multocida were characterized (fingerprinted) phenotypically and genotypically in order to compare the abilities of various techniques to differentiate strains for epidemiologic studies of fowl cholera. Isolates were obtained over a 16-month period from turkeys dying from fowl cholera (six outbreak flocks) and from wildlife captured on premises with a history of the disease. The characteristics compared included (i) serotype, (ii) subspecies, (iii) antibiogram, (iv) presence of plasmid DNA, (v) restriction endonuclease analysis patterns of whole-cell DNA, and (vi) ribotype. Ribotyping, a method of highlighting DNA restriction site heterogeneity by using an rRNA probe, worked well for differentiating the strains of P. multocida when the majority of the other techniques could not. Ribotyping results correlated directly with and confirmed results obtained from restriction endonuclease analysis. Ribotyping demonstrated the presence of up to three strains of P. multocida in one outbreak flock, recurrence of a single strain in five of the flocks over an 11-month period, and the presence of common strains in turkeys and wildlife on the premises. Images PMID:2768471

  16. Resolution of the EcoRII restriction endonuclease-DNA complex structure in solution using fluorescence spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Subach, Fedor; Kirsanova, Olga; Liquier, Jean; Gromova, Elizaveta S

    2008-12-01

    The X-ray structure for the type IIE EcoRII restriction endonuclease has been resolved [X.E. Zhou, Y. Wang, M. Reuter, M. Mucke, D.H. Kruger, E.J. Meehan and L. Chen. Crystal structure of type IIE restriction endonuclease EcoRII reveals an autoinhibition mechanism by a novel effector-binding fold. J. Mol. Biol. 335 (2004) 307-319.], but the structure of the R.EcoRII-DNA complex is still unknown. The aim of this article was to examine the structure of the pre-reactive R.EcoRII-DNA complex in solution by fluorescence spectroscopy. The structure for the R.EcoRII-DNA complex was resolved by determining the fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) between two fluorescent dyes, covalently attached near the EcoRII recognition sites, that were located at opposite ends of a lengthy two-site DNA molecule. Analysis of the FRET data from the two-site DNA revealed a likely model for the arrangement of the two EcoRII recognition sites relative to each other in the R.EcoRII-DNA complex in the presence of Ca(2+) ions. According to this model, the R.EcoRII binds the two-site DNA and forms a DNA loop in which the EcoRII recognition sites are 20+/-10 A distant to each other and situated at an angle of 70+/-10 degrees.

  17. Functional significance of protein assemblies predicted by the crystal structure of the restriction endonuclease BsaWI.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tamulaitis, Gintautas; Rutkauskas, Marius; Zaremba, Mindaugas; Grazulis, Saulius; Tamulaitiene, Giedre; Siksnys, Virginijus

    2015-09-18

    Type II restriction endonuclease BsaWI recognizes a degenerated sequence 5'-W/CCGGW-3' (W stands for A or T, '/' denotes the cleavage site). It belongs to a large family of restriction enzymes that contain a conserved CCGG tetranucleotide in their target sites. These enzymes are arranged as dimers or tetramers, and require binding of one, two or three DNA targets for their optimal catalytic activity. Here, we present a crystal structure and biochemical characterization of the restriction endonuclease BsaWI. BsaWI is arranged as an 'open' configuration dimer and binds a single DNA copy through a minor groove contacts. In the crystal primary BsaWI dimers form an indefinite linear chain via the C-terminal domain contacts implying possible higher order aggregates. We show that in solution BsaWI protein exists in a dimer-tetramer-oligomer equilibrium, but in the presence of specific DNA forms a tetramer bound to two target sites. Site-directed mutagenesis and kinetic experiments show that BsaWI is active as a tetramer and requires two target sites for optimal activity. We propose BsaWI mechanism that shares common features both with dimeric Ecl18kI/SgrAI and bona fide tetrameric NgoMIV/SfiI enzymes. © The Author(s) 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Nucleic Acids Research.

  18. Catalytic and noncatalytic roles of the CtIP endonuclease in double-strand break end resection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Makharashvili, Nodar; Tubbs, Anthony T; Yang, Soo-Hyun; Wang, Hailong; Barton, Olivia; Zhou, Yi; Deshpande, Rajashree A; Lee, Ji-Hoon; Lobrich, Markus; Sleckman, Barry P; Wu, Xiaohua; Paull, Tanya T

    2014-06-19

    The carboxy-terminal binding protein (CtBP)-interacting protein (CtIP) is known to function in 5' strand resection during homologous recombination, similar to the budding yeast Sae2 protein, but its role in this process is unclear. Here, we characterize recombinant human CtIP and find that it exhibits 5' flap endonuclease activity on branched DNA structures, independent of the MRN complex. Phosphorylation of CtIP at known damage-dependent sites and other sites is essential for its catalytic activity, although the S327 and T847 phosphorylation sites are dispensable. A catalytic mutant of CtIP that is deficient in endonuclease activity exhibits wild-type levels of homologous recombination at restriction enzyme-generated breaks but is deficient in processing topoisomerase adducts and radiation-induced breaks in human cells, suggesting that the nuclease activity of CtIP is specifically required for the removal of DNA adducts at sites of DNA breaks. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Restriction endonucleases from invasive Neisseria gonorrhoeae cause double-strand breaks and distort mitosis in epithelial cells during infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weyler, Linda; Engelbrecht, Mattias; Mata Forsberg, Manuel; Brehwens, Karl; Vare, Daniel; Vielfort, Katarina; Wojcik, Andrzej; Aro, Helena

    2014-01-01

    The host epithelium is both a barrier against, and the target for microbial infections. Maintaining regulated cell growth ensures an intact protective layer towards microbial-induced cellular damage. Neisseria gonorrhoeae infections disrupt host cell cycle regulation machinery and the infection causes DNA double strand breaks that delay progression through the G2/M phase. We show that intracellular gonococci upregulate and release restriction endonucleases that enter the nucleus and damage human chromosomal DNA. Bacterial lysates containing restriction endonucleases were able to fragment genomic DNA as detected by PFGE. Lysates were also microinjected into the cytoplasm of cells in interphase and after 20 h, DNA double strand breaks were identified by 53BP1 staining. In addition, by using live-cell microscopy and NHS-ester stained live gonococci we visualized the subcellular location of the bacteria upon mitosis. Infected cells show dysregulation of the spindle assembly checkpoint proteins MAD1 and MAD2, impaired and prolonged M-phase, nuclear swelling, micronuclei formation and chromosomal instability. These data highlight basic molecular functions of how gonococcal infections affect host cell cycle regulation, cause DNA double strand breaks and predispose cellular malignancies.

  20. Cleavage of phosphorothioated DNA and methylated DNA by the type IV restriction endonuclease ScoMcrA.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guang Liu

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Many taxonomically diverse prokaryotes enzymatically modify their DNA by replacing a non-bridging oxygen with a sulfur atom at specific sequences. The biological implications of this DNA S-modification (phosphorothioation were unknown. We observed that simultaneous expression of the dndA-E gene cluster from Streptomyces lividans 66, which is responsible for the DNA S-modification, and the putative Streptomyces coelicolor A(32 Type IV methyl-dependent restriction endonuclease ScoA3McrA (Sco4631 leads to cell death in the same host. A His-tagged derivative of ScoA3McrA cleaved S-modified DNA and also Dcm-methylated DNA in vitro near the respective modification sites. Double-strand cleavage occurred 16-28 nucleotides away from the phosphorothioate links. DNase I footprinting demonstrated binding of ScoA3McrA to the Dcm methylation site, but no clear binding could be detected at the S-modified site under cleavage conditions. This is the first report of in vitro endonuclease activity of a McrA homologue and also the first demonstration of an enzyme that specifically cleaves S-modified DNA.

  1. Computational study of hydration at the TD damaged site of DNA in complex with repair enzyme T4 endonuclease V

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pinak, Miroslav [Japan Atomic Energy Research Inst., Tokai, Ibaraki (Japan). Tokai Research Establishment

    2000-02-01

    An analysis of the distribution of water around DNA surface focusing on the role of the distribution of water molecules in the proper recognition of damaged site by repair enzyme T4 Endonuclease V was performed. The native DNA dodecamer, dodecamer with the thymine dimer (TD) and complex of DNA and part of repair enzyme T4 Endonuclease V were examined throughout the 500 ps of molecular dynamics simulation. During simulation the number of water molecules close to the DNA atoms and the residence time were calculated. There is an increase in number of water molecules lying in the close vicinity to TD if compared with those lying close to two native thymines (TT). Densely populated area with water molecules around TD is one of the factors detected by enzyme during scanning process. The residence time was found higher for molecule of the complex and the six water molecules were found occupying the stabile positions between the TD and catalytic center close to atoms P, C3' and N3. These molecules originate water mediated hydrogen bond network that contribute to the stability of complex required for the onset of repair process. (author)

  2. Meals in nursing homes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kofod, Jens Erik; Birkemose, A.

    2004-01-01

    Undernutrition is present among 33% of nursing home residents in Denmark. Hence, it is relevant to examine the meal situation at nursing homes to single out factors that may increase or reduce the residents' food intake. in the ongoing Danish nursing home debate it is claimed that a new type...... of nursing home improves the residents' meal situation with a positive effect on nutrition. The aim of this work is to test the general hypothesis that (i) residents appreciate the meal situation in these nursing homes and (ii) nutritional status of the residents is improved in this type of nursing home....... This study was carried out in four Danish nursing homes at various locations in Denmark. The methods used are qualitative interviews and observations at four nursing homes in combination with measurement of body mass index (BMI) at two of the four nursing homes. Undernutrition is defined as a BMI below 20...

  3. SnoVault and encodeD: A novel object-based storage system and applications to ENCODE metadata.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hitz, Benjamin C; Rowe, Laurence D; Podduturi, Nikhil R; Glick, David I; Baymuradov, Ulugbek K; Malladi, Venkat S; Chan, Esther T; Davidson, Jean M; Gabdank, Idan; Narayana, Aditi K; Onate, Kathrina C; Hilton, Jason; Ho, Marcus C; Lee, Brian T; Miyasato, Stuart R; Dreszer, Timothy R; Sloan, Cricket A; Strattan, J Seth; Tanaka, Forrest Y; Hong, Eurie L; Cherry, J Michael

    2017-01-01

    The Encyclopedia of DNA elements (ENCODE) project is an ongoing collaborative effort to create a comprehensive catalog of functional elements initiated shortly after the completion of the Human Genome Project. The current database exceeds 6500 experiments across more than 450 cell lines and tissues using a wide array of experimental techniques to study the chromatin structure, regulatory and transcriptional landscape of the H. sapiens and M. musculus genomes. All ENCODE experimental data, metadata, and associated computational analyses are submitted to the ENCODE Data Coordination Center (DCC) for validation, tracking, storage, unified processing, and distribution to community resources and the scientific community. As the volume of data increases, the identification and organization of experimental details becomes increasingly intricate and demands careful curation. The ENCODE DCC has created a general purpose software system, known as SnoVault, that supports metadata and file submission, a database used for metadata storage, web pages for displaying the metadata and a robust API for querying the metadata. The software is fully open-source, code and installation instructions can be found at: http://github.com/ENCODE-DCC/snovault/ (for the generic database) and http://github.com/ENCODE-DCC/encoded/ to store genomic data in the manner of ENCODE. The core database engine, SnoVault (which is completely independent of ENCODE, genomic data, or bioinformatic data) has been released as a separate Python package.

  4. Novelty's effect on memory encoding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rangel-Gomez, Mauricio; Janenaite, Sigita; Meeter, Martijn

    2015-07-01

    It is often thought that novelty benefits memory formation. However, support for this idea mostly comes from paradigms that are open to alternative explanations. In the present study we manipulated novelty in a word-learning task through task-irrelevant background images. These background images were either standard (presented repeatedly), or novel (presented only once). Two types of background images were used: Landscape pictures and fractals. EEG was also recorded during encoding. Contrary to the idea that novelty aids memory formation, memory performance was not affected by the novelty of the background. In the evoked response potentials, we found evidence of distracting effects of novelty: both the N1 and P3b components were smaller to words studied with novel backgrounds, and the amplitude of the N2b component correlated negatively with subsequent retrieval. We conclude that although evidence from other studies does suggest benefits on a longer time scale, novelty has no instantaneous benefits for learning. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. Universal dynamic goniometer for rotary encoders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smirnov, Nikolai V.; Latyev, Svjatoslav M.; Naumova, Anastasiia I.

    2017-06-01

    A novel dynamic goniometer for the accuracy of rotary encoders has been developed on the base of the method of comparison with the reference encoder. The set-up of the goniometer considers all constructive and informative characteristics of measured encoders. The novel goniometer construction uses the new compensating method of instrumental errors in automatic working process. The advantages of the dynamic goniometer in combination with an optical rotary encoder at the reduction of the measuring time and a simultaneous increase of the accuracy.

  6. Continuous monitoring of restriction endonuclease cleavage activity by universal molecular beacon light quenching coupled with real-time polymerase chain reaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xiaomin; Song, Chen; Zhao, Meiping; Li, Yuanzong

    2008-10-01

    We describe a method for sensitive monitoring of restriction endonuclease kinetics and activity by use of a universal molecular beacon (U-MB) coupled with real-time polymerase chain reaction (PCR). The method is used to monitor the progress of DNA cleavage in a sealed reaction tube and offers more accurate and high-throughput detection. The template has a universal tail hybridized with the U-MB and the remaining sequence is complementary to one of the restriction endonuclease digestion products. The U-MB is replaced by the extension of digested product and the fluorescence quenches. With this concept, one universal fluorescence probe can be used in different enzyme analytical systems. In the work described here, homogenous assays were performed with the restriction endonucleases AluI, EcoRI, XhoI, and SacI at smoothly controlled temperature. Cleavage efficiencies were determined, and the potential applications of this method were discussed. Furthermore, the AluI and EcoRI cleavage reactions were monitored online at varying substrate concentrations at the molecular level, and K(m), V(max), and K(cat) values were calculated. The results suggest that U-MB monitoring of restriction endonuclease assays based on real-time PCR will be very useful for high-throughput, sensitive, and precise assays for enzyme activity screening and evolutionary biotechnology analysis.

  7. Microinjection of Micrococcus luteus UV-endonuclease restores UV-induced unscheduled DNA synthesis in cells of 9 xeroderma pigmentosum complementation groups.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    A.J.R. de Jonge; W. Vermeulen (Wim); W. Keijzer; J.H.J. Hoeijmakers (Jan); D. Bootsma (Dirk)

    1985-01-01

    textabstractThe UV-induced unscheduled DNA synthesis (UDS) in cultured cells of excision-deficient xeroderma pigmentosum (XP) complementation groups A through I was assayed after injection of Micrococcus luteus UV-endonuclease using glass microneedles. In all complementation groups a restoration of

  8. Comparison of the mismatch-specific endonuclease method and denaturing high-performance liquid chromatography for the identification of HBB gene mutations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hung, Chia-Cheng; Su, Yi-Ning; Lin, Chia-Yun; Chang, Yin-Fei; Chang, Chien-Hui; Cheng, Wen-Fang; Chen, Chi-An; Lee, Chien-Nan; Lin, Win-Li

    2008-01-01

    Background Beta-thalassemia is a common autosomal recessive hereditary disease in the Meditertanean, Asia and African areas. Over 600 mutations have been described in the beta-globin (HBB), of which more than 200 are associated with a beta-thalassemia phenotype. Results We used two highly-specific mutation screening methods, mismatch-specific endonuclease and denaturing high-performance liquid chromatography, to identify mutations in the HBB gene. The sensitivity and specificity of these two methods were compared. We successfully distinguished mutations in the HBB gene by the mismatch-specific endonuclease method without need for further assay. This technique had 100% sensitivity and specificity for the study sample. Conclusion Compared to the DHPLC approach, the mismatch-specific endonuclease method allows mutational screening of a large number of samples because of its speed, sensitivity and adaptability to semi-automated systems. These findings demonstrate the feasibility of using the mismatch-specific endonuclease method as a tool for mutation screening. PMID:18694524

  9. Comparison of the mismatch-specific endonuclease method and denaturing high-performance liquid chromatography for the identification of HBB gene mutations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cheng Wen-Fang

    2008-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Beta-thalassemia is a common autosomal recessive hereditary disease in the Meditertanean, Asia and African areas. Over 600 mutations have been described in the beta-globin (HBB, of which more than 200 are associated with a beta-thalassemia phenotype. Results We used two highly-specific mutation screening methods, mismatch-specific endonuclease and denaturing high-performance liquid chromatography, to identify mutations in the HBB gene. The sensitivity and specificity of these two methods were compared. We successfully distinguished mutations in the HBB gene by the mismatch-specific endonuclease method without need for further assay. This technique had 100% sensitivity and specificity for the study sample. Conclusion Compared to the DHPLC approach, the mismatch-specific endonuclease method allows mutational screening of a large number of samples because of its speed, sensitivity and adaptability to semi-automated systems. These findings demonstrate the feasibility of using the mismatch-specific endonuclease method as a tool for mutation screening.

  10. Design of the influenza virus inhibitors targeting the PA endonuclease using 3D-QSAR modeling, side-chain hopping, and docking.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Zhihui; Zhang, Lijie; Fu, Haiyang; Wang, Zhonghua; Lin, Jianping

    2014-01-15

    With the emergence of drug resistance and the structural determination of the PA N-terminal domain (PAN), influenza endonucleases have become an attractive target for antiviral therapies for influenza infection. Here, we combined 3D-QSAR with side-chain hopping and molecular docking to produce novel structures as endonuclease inhibitors. First, a new molecular library was generated with side-chain hopping on an existing template molecule, L-742001, using an in-house fragment library that targets bivalent-cation-binding proteins. Then, the best 3D-QSAR model (AAAHR.500), with q(2)=0.76 and r(2)=0.97 from phase modeling, was constructed from 23 endonuclease inhibitors and validated with 17 test compounds. The AAAHR.500 model was then used to select effective candidates from the new molecular library. Combining 3D-QSAR with docking using Glide and Autodock, 13 compounds were considered the most likely candidate inhibitors. Docking studies showed that the binding modes of these compounds were consistent with the crystal structures of known inhibitors. These compounds could serve as potential endonuclease inhibitors for further biological activity tests. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. DNA recognition by the SwaI restriction endonuclease involves unusual distortion of an 8 base pair A:T-rich target.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, Betty W; Heiter, Daniel F; Lunnen, Keith D; Wilson, Geoffrey G; Stoddard, Barry L

    2017-02-17

    R.SwaI, a Type IIP restriction endonuclease, recognizes a palindromic eight base pair (bp) symmetric sequence, 5΄-ATTTAAAT-3΄, and cleaves that target at its center to generate blunt-ended DNA fragments. Here, we report three crystal structures of SwaI: unbound enzyme, a DNA-bound complex with calcium ions; and a DNA-bound, fully cleaved complex with magnesium ions. We compare these structures to two structurally similar ‘PD-D/ExK’ restriction endonucleases (EcoRV and HincII) that also generate blunt-ended products, and to a structurally distinct enzyme (the HNH endonuclease PacI) that also recognizes an 8-bp target site consisting solely of A:T base pairs. Binding by SwaI induces an extreme bend in the target sequence accompanied by un-pairing and re-ordering of its central A:T base pairs. This result is reminiscent of a more dramatic target deformation previously described for PacI, implying that long A:T-rich target sites might display structural or dynamic behaviors that play a significant role in endonuclease recognition and cleavage.

  12. Type III restriction endonuclease EcoP15I is a heterotrimeric complex containing one Res subunit with several DNA-binding regions and ATPase activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wyszomirski, Karol H; Curth, Ute; Alves, Jürgen; Mackeldanz, Petra; Möncke-Buchner, Elisabeth; Schutkowski, Mike; Krüger, Detlev H; Reuter, Monika

    2012-04-01

    For efficient DNA cleavage, the Type III restriction endonuclease EcoP15I communicates with two inversely oriented recognition sites in an ATP-dependent process. EcoP15I consists of methylation (Mod) and restriction (Res) subunits forming a multifunctional enzyme complex able to methylate or to cleave DNA. In this study, we determined by different analytical methods that EcoP15I contains a single Res subunit in a Mod(2)Res stoichiometry. The Res subunit comprises a translocase (Tr) domain carrying functional motifs of superfamily 2 helicases and an endonuclease domain with a PD..D/EXK motif. We show that the isolated Tr domain retains ATP-hydrolyzing activity and binds single- and double-stranded DNA in a sequence-independent manner. To localize the regions of DNA binding, we screened peptide arrays representing the entire Res sequence for their ability to interact with DNA. We discovered four DNA-binding regions in the Tr domain and two DNA-binding regions in the endonuclease domain. Modelling of the Tr domain shows that these multiple DNA-binding regions are located on the surface, free to interact with DNA. Interestingly, the positions of the DNA-binding regions are conserved among other Type III restriction endonucleases.

  13. Cloning and analysis of the DNA polymerase-encoding gene from Thermus filiformis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jung, S E; Choi, J J; Kim, H K; Kwon, S T

    1997-12-31

    The gene encoding Thermus filiformis (Tfi) DNA polymerase was cloned and its nucleotide sequence was determined. The primary structure of Tfi DNA polymerase was deduced from its nucleotide sequence. Tfi DNA polymerase is comprised of 833 amino acid residues and its molecular mass was determined to be 93,890 Da. The deduced amino acid sequence of Tfi DNA polymerase showed a high sequence homology to E. coli DNA polymerase I-like DNA polymerases: 78.5% homology to Taq DNA polymerase, 78.4% to Tca DNA polymerase, and 41.8% to E. coli DNA polymerase I. An extremely high sequence identity was observed in the region containing polymerase activity. The G + C content of the coding region for the Tfi DNA polymerase gene was 68.5%, which was higher than that of the chromosomal DNA (65%). The G + C contents in the first, second, and third positions of the codons used were 71.8%, 40.9%, and 92.7% respectively. Codon usage in Tfi DNA polymerase was heavily biased towards the use of G + C in the third position. Rare codons with U or A as the third base were sometimes used to avoid using GA(A/T) TC and TCGA sequences, as they are recognition sites for the restriction endonucleases TfiI and TaqI.

  14. Ostomy Home Skills Program

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... kit contains: A booklet with information on the operation, home skills such as emptying and changing a pouch, problem solving, and home management. A DVD with demonstration of each skill Stoma ...

  15. National Nursing Home Survey

    Science.gov (United States)

    The National Nursing Home Survey provides includes characteristics such as size of nursing home facilities, ownership, Medicare/Medicaid certification, occupancy rate, number of days of care provided, and expenses.

  16. Home Health Compare

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — Home Health Compare has information about the quality of care provided by Medicare-certified home health agencies throughout the nation. Medicare-certified means the...

  17. Home Health Aides

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... State & Area Data Explore resources for employment and wages by state and area for home health aides and personal care aides. Similar Occupations Compare the job duties, education, job growth, and pay of home health aides ...

  18. Ostomy Home Skills Program

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... UOAA). The skills kit contains: A booklet with information on the operation, home skills such as emptying and changing a pouch, problem solving, and home management. A DVD with demonstration of each skill Stoma ...

  19. Ostomy Home Skills Program

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Bundled Payment Models Surgeons as Institutional Employees Our Changing Health Care System ACS Surgery News Statements About ... the operation, home skills such as emptying and changing a pouch, problem solving, and home management. A ...

  20. Home Canning and Botulism

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... this? Submit What's this? Submit Button Past Emails Home Canning and Botulism Language: English (US) Español (Spanish) ... myself and others safe when it comes to home-canned foods? Many cases of foodborne botulism have ...

  1. Eye Injuries at Home

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Steps to Safer Champagne Celebrations Eye Injuries at Home Leer en Español: Lesiones de los Ojos en ... chore is being done. Preventing Eye Injuries at Home Wearing protective eyewear will prevent 90 percent of ...

  2. Community Nursing Home (CNH)

    Data.gov (United States)

    Department of Veterans Affairs — The Community Nursing Home (CNH) database contains a list of all Community Nursing Home facilities under local contract to Veterans Health Administration (VHA). CNH...

  3. Ostomy Home Skills Program

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Shop ( 0 ) Cart Donate American College of Surgeons Education Patients and Family Skills Programs Ostomy Home Skills Program Ostomy Home Skills Program Adult Ostomy Pediatric Ostomy Programa de Destrezas para manejo ...

  4. Nursing Home Quality Initiative

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — This Nursing Home Quality Initiative (NHQI) website provides consumer and provider information regarding the quality of care in nursing homes. NHQI discusses quality...

  5. Home blood sugar testing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diabetes - home glucose testing; Diabetes - home blood sugar testing ... day Your blood sugar level The amount of carbohydrates you ate The type and dose of your diabetes medicine The type of any exercise you do ...

  6. Ostomy Home Skills Program

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... ACS Careers at ACS About ACS Career Types Working at ACS ... Education Patients and Family Skills Programs Ostomy Home Skills Program Ostomy Home Skills Program Adult Ostomy ...

  7. HOME Rent Limits

    Data.gov (United States)

    Department of Housing and Urban Development — In accordance with 24 CFR Part 92.252, HUD provides maximum HOME rent limits. The maximum HOME rents are the lesser of: The fair market rent for existing housing for...

  8. TRAVEL AND HOME LEAVE

    CERN Multimedia

    Human Resources Division

    2002-01-01

    Administrative procedures for : Travel to the home station and home leave (hl) Additional travel to the home station (at) Travel to the home station and home leave for family reasons (hlf) As part of the process of simplifying administrative procedures, HR and AS Divisions have devised a new, virtually automatic procedure for payment of travel expenses to the home station. The changes are aimed at rationalising administrative procedures and not at reducing benefits. The conditions of eligibility are unchanged. The new procedure, which will be operational with effect from 1st June 2002, will greatly simplify the administrative processing of claims for travel expenses and the recording of home leaves. Currently, requests for payment are introduced manually into the Advances and Claims system (AVCL) by divisional secretariats. All travel to the home station starting prior to 1st June 2002 will be processed according to the existing system whereas that starting on 1st June and after will be processed accordi...

  9. Assembly of Francisella novicida Cpf1 endonuclease in complex with guide RNA and target DNA

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Alcón, Pablo; Montoya, Guillermo; Stella, Stefano

    2017-01-01

    Bacteria and archaea use the CRISPR-Cas system as an adaptive response against infection by foreign nucleic acids. Owing to its remarkable flexibility, this mechanism has been harnessed and adopted as a powerful tool for genome editing. The CRISPR-Cas system includes two classes that are subdivided...... encoding Cpf1 from Francisella novicida was cloned, overexpressed and purified. The crRNA was transcribed and purified in vitro. Finally, the ternary FnCpf1-crRNA-DNA complex was assembled and purified by preparative electrophoresis before crystallization. Crystals belonging to space group C2221, with unit...

  10. Ostomy Home Skills Program

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Ostomy Home Skills Program Ostomy Home Skills Program Adult Ostomy Pediatric Ostomy Programa de Destrezas para manejo Doméstico de Ostomía Ostomy Home Skills Program Adult Ostomy Pediatric Ostomy Programa de Destrezas para manejo ...

  11. Ostomy Home Skills Program

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Ostomy Home Skills Program Adult Ostomy Pediatric Ostomy Programa de Destrezas para manejo Doméstico de Ostomía Ostomy Home Skills Program Adult Ostomy Pediatric Ostomy Programa de Destrezas para manejo Doméstico de Ostomía The Ostomy Home Skills Kit ...

  12. Asthma Home Environment Checklist

    Science.gov (United States)

    This checklist guides home care visitors in identifying environmental asthma triggers most commonly found in homes. It includes sections on the building, home interior and room interior and provides low-cost action steps for remediation. EPA 402-F-03-030.

  13. Home Schooling Goes Mainstream

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaither, Milton

    2009-01-01

    This article reports that while home schooling may have particular appeal to celebrities, over the last decade families of all kinds have embraced the practice for widely varying reasons: no longer is home schooling exclusive to Christian fundamentalism and the countercultural Left. Along with growing acceptance of home schooling nationally has…

  14. Schooling at Home.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Long, Joyce Fleck

    2001-01-01

    Presents one family's experience with home schooling, explaining that no two home schools are alike, which is both a strength and a weakness of the movement. The paper discusses the parent's educational philosophy and the family's personal curriculum and pedagogical choices. It concludes by examining the growing trend in home schooling. (SM)

  15. School@Home.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hammons, Christopher W.

    2001-01-01

    Describes home schooling movement and argues home schooling is viable alternative to public education system. Discusses increase in home-schooled students applying to college, taking and performing well on college entrance exams (ACT and SAT), engaging in extracurricular activities, and succeeding in college. Addresses and refutes criticisms of…

  16. Home in the Making

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kreuzer, Maria; von Wallpach, Sylvia; Muehlbacher, Hans

    2016-01-01

    In a context of unprecedented migration home reaches high relevance. This study aims at understanding the (re-)construction of home by first generation consumer migrants. The findings provide insights into consumers’ (re-)construction of various dimensions of home and identify “inner home” as a new...

  17. Healthy Homes Tools

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peek, Gina; Lyon, Melinda; Russ, Randall

    2012-01-01

    Extension is focusing on healthy homes programming. Extension educators are not qualified to diagnose consumers' medical problems as they relate to housing. We cannot give medical advice. Instead, we can help educate consumers about home conditions that may affect their well-being. Extension educators need appropriate healthy homes tools to…

  18. About Home gateway mashups

    OpenAIRE

    Schneps-schneppe, Manfred; Namiot, Dmitry

    2013-01-01

    This paper discusses Home Gateway Initiative software and telecom mashups. Can we use IMS for mashups and how to do that? What is impact of Home Gateway Initiative decisions to application developers and what can we expect to see on the application market for home devices.

  19. Home Within Me

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kreuzer, Maria; Mühlbacher, Hans; von Wallpach, Sylvia

    2017-01-01

    ). Home, however, is a multi-dimensional concept and reaching a universal definition is nearly impossible (Moore, 2000). Therefore, this research project aims to answer the following research questions: 1) What is the meaning of home? 2) How do consumers experience home? And 3) What is the role...

  20. 47 CFR 11.32 - EAS Encoder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... must additionally provide the following minimum specifications: (1) Encoder programming. Access to encoder programming shall be protected by a lock or other security measures and be configured so that... fundamental frequencies of 853 and 960 Hz and not vary over ±0.5 Hz. (ii) Harmonic Distortion. The total...

  1. Effects of diazepam on encoding processes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gorissen, M.; Eling, P.; Luijtelaar, G. van; Coenen, A.

    1995-01-01

    Benzodiazepines are known to induce amnesic effects. To specify these effects more precisely, 40 healthy volunteers were given 15 mg diazepam or placebo. Effects on a chain of encoding operations were investigated: activation of memory representations, spreading of activation, semantic encoding and

  2. Regularity-Preserving but not Reflecting Encodings

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Endrullis, J.; Grabmayer, C.A.; Hendriks, R.D.A.; Palamidessi, C.

    2015-01-01

    Encodings, that is, injective functions from words to words, have been studied extensively in several settings. In computability theory the notion of encoding is crucial for defining computability on arbitrary domains, as well as for comparing the power of models of computation. In language theory

  3. Cellular encoding for interactive evolutionary robotics

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    F.C. Gruau; K. Quatramaran

    1996-01-01

    textabstractThis work reports experiments in interactive evolutionary robotics. The goal is to evolve an Artificial Neural Network (ANN) to control the locomotion of an 8-legged robot. The ANNs are encoded using a cellular developmental process called cellular encoding. In a previous work similar

  4. Encoding information using Laguerre Gaussian modes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trichili, Abderrahmen; Dudley, Angela; Ben Salem, Amine; Ndagano, Bienvenu; Zghal, Mourad; Forbes, Andrew

    2015-08-01

    We experimentally demonstrate an information encoding protocol using the two degrees of freedom of Laguerre Gaussian modes having different radial and azimuthal components. A novel method, based on digital holography, for information encoding and decoding using different data transmission scenarios is presented. The effects of the atmospheric turbulence introduced in free space communication is discussed as well.

  5. [Polymorphism of genes encoding proteins of DNA repair vs. occupational and environmental exposure to lead, arsenic and pesticides].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bukowski, Karol; Woźniak, Katarzyna

    2017-10-12

    Genetic polymorphism is associated with the occurrence of at least 2 different alleles in the locus with a frequency higher than 1% in the population. Among polymorphisms we can find single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) and polymorphism of variable number of tandem repeats. The presence of certain polymorphisms in genes encoding DNA repair enzymes is associated with the speed and efficiency of DNA repair and can protect or expose humans to the effects provoked by xenobiotics. Chemicals, such as lead, arsenic pesticides are considered to exhibit strong toxicity. There are many different polymorphisms in genes encoding DNA repair enzymes, which determine the speed and efficiency of DNA damage repair induced by these xenobiotics. In the case of lead, the influence of various polymorphisms, such as APE1 (apurinic/apyrimidinic endonuclease 1) (rs1130409), hOGG1 (human 8-oxoguanine glycosylase) (rs1052133), XRCC1 (X-ray repair cross-complementing protein group 1) (rs25487), XRCC1 (rs1799782) and XRCC3 (X-ray repair cross-complementing protein group 3) (rs861539) were described. For arsenic polymorphisms, such as ERCC2 (excision repair cross-complementing) (rs13181), XRCC3 (rs861539), APE1 (rs1130409) and hOGG1 (rs1052133) were examined. As to pesticides, separate and combined effects of polymorphisms in genes encoding DNA repair enzymes, such as XRCC1 (rs1799782), hOGG1 (rs1052133), XRCC4 (X-ray repair cross-complementing protein group 4) (rs28360135) and the gene encoding the detoxification enzyme PON1 paraoxonase (rs662) were reported. Med Pr 2018;69(1). This work is available in Open Access model and licensed under a CC BY-NC 3.0 PL license.

  6. Cross-linking of bromodeoxyuridine-substituted oligonucleotides to the EcoRI and EcoRV restriction endonucleases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wolfes, H; Fliess, A; Winkler, F; Pingoud, A

    1986-09-01

    We have synthesized several self-complementary oligodeoxynucleotides which contain bromodeoxyuridine in various positions within and outside of the recognition sequence for the EcoRI and EcoRV restriction endonucleases. These oligodeoxynucleotides are cleaved in the presence of Mg2+ by their respective enzyme. Upon irradiation by long-wavelength ultraviolet light and in the absence of Mg2+ they are cross-linked in low yield to their enzymes, forming 1:1 and 1:2 (oligodeoxynucleotide:enzyme subunit) adducts. Cross-linking occurs with both specific and non-specific complexes. With EcoRI the site of cross-linking was determined to be at or close to Met-137, i.e. in a region of the molecule implicated by other studies from our laboratory [Scholtissek et al. (1986) J. Biol. Chem. 261, 2228-2234] in the binding and cleavage of the substrate.

  7. MmoSTI restriction endonuclease, isolated from Morganella morganii infecting a tropical moth, Actias selene, cleaving 5'-|CCNGG-3' sequences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skowron, Marta A; Zebrowska, Joanna; Wegrzyn, Grzegorz; Skowron, Piotr M

    2016-02-01

    A type II restriction endonuclease, MmoSTI, from the pathogenic bacterium Morganella morganii infecting a tropical moth, Actias selene, has been detected and biochemically characterized, as a potential etiological differentiation factor. The described REase recognizes interrupted palindromes, i.e., 5'-CCNGG-3' sequences and cleaves DNA leaving 5-nucleotide (nt) long, single-stranded (ss), 5'-cohesive ends, which was determined by three complementary methods: (i) cleavage of custom and standard DNA substrates, (ii) run-off sequencing of cleavage products, and (iii) shotgun cloning and sequencing of bacteriophage lambda (λ) DNA digested with MmoSTI. MmoSTI, the first 5'-CCNGG-3' REase characterized from M. morganii, is a neoschizomer of ScrFI, which cleaves DNA leaving 1-nt long, ss, 5'-cohesive ends. It is a high-frequency cutter and can be isolated from easily cultured bacteria, thus it can potentially serve as a tool for DNA manipulations.

  8. Polymerase synthesis of DNAs bearing vinyl groups in the major groove and their cleavage by restriction endonucleases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mačková, Michaela; Pohl, Radek; Hocek, Michal

    2014-10-13

    DNA molecules containing 5-vinyluracil, 5-vinylcytosine, or 7-deaza-7-vinyladenine were prepared by polymerase incorporation of the corresponding vinyl-modified 2'-deoxyribonucleoside triphosphates, and the influence of the vinyl group in the major groove of DNA on the cleavage by diverse type II restriction endonucleases (REs) was studied. The presence of 5-vinyluracil was tolerated by most of the REs, whereas only some REs were able to cleave sequences containing 7-deaza-7-vinyladenine. The enzyme ScaI was found to cleave DNA containing 5-vinylcytosine efficiently but not DNA containing the related 5-ethynylcytosine. All other REs failed to cleave sequences containing any cytosine modifications. © 2014 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  9. Self-perpetuating development of encoding biases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lewicki, P; Hill, T; Sasaki, I

    1989-12-01

    The process of encoding new information involves the imposition of preexisting interpretive categories on newly encountered stimuli, even if the categories do not match perfectly those stimuli. We hypothesized that such encoding of stimuli as supportive of preexisting encoding dispositions may become a source of a perceiver's subjective experiences that support these dispositions. Through this nonconsciously operating mechanism, encoding rules may gradually develop in a self-perpetuating manner, even in the absence of any objectively supportive evidence. Results demonstrated this self-perpetuating process in three studies involving different stimulus materials and experimental tasks (matrix-scanning paradigm and two "intuitive judgment" tasks). The self-perpetuating development of encoding biases is discussed as one of the elementary mechanisms involved in the development of interpretive categories and other individually differentiated cognitive dispositions.

  10. The Arabic Diatessaron Project: Digitalizing, Encoding, Lemmatization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giuliano Lancioni

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available The Arabic Diatessaron Project (henceforth ADP is an international research project in Digital Humanities that aims to collect, digitalise and encode all known manuscripts of the Arabic Diatessaron (henceforth AD, a text that has been relatively neglected in scholarly research. ADP’s final goal is to provide a number of tools that can enable scholars to effectively query, compare and investigate all known variants of the text that will be encoded as far as possible in compliance with the Text Encoding Initiative (TEI guidelines. The paper addresses a number of issues involved in the process of digitalising manuscripts included in the two existing editions (Ciasca 1888 and Marmardji 1935, adding variants in unedited manuscripts, encoding and lemmatising the text. Issues involved in the design of the ADP include presentation of variants, choice of the standard text, applicability of TEI guidelines, automatic translation between different encodings, cross-edition concordances and principles of lemmatisation.

  11. Synthesis of extended nanoscale optical encoders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wickersham, Charles E; Kerr, Daniel H S; Lipman, Everett A

    2010-12-15

    An optical encoder is a device that uses an interrupted light source-sensor pair to map linear or rotational motion onto a periodic signal. Simple, inexpensive optical encoders are used for precise positioning in machines such as desktop printers, disk drives, and astronomical telescopes. A strand of DNA labeled with a series of Förster resonance energy transfer acceptor dyes can perform the same function at the nanometer scale, producing a periodic fluorescence signal that encodes the movement of a single donor-labeled molecular motor with high spatial and temporal resolution. Previous measurements of this type have employed encoders limited to five acceptor dyes, and hence five signal periods, restricting the range of motion that could be followed. Here we describe two methods for synthesizing double-stranded DNA containing several to hundreds of regularly spaced dyes on one strand. Distinct functional groups incorporated at the encoder ends enable tethering for single-molecule measurements.

  12. The DNA repair endonuclease XPG interacts directly and functionally with the WRN helicase defective in Werner syndrome

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Trego, Kelly S.; Chernikova, Sophia B.; Davalos, Albert R.; Perry, J. Jefferson P.; Finger, L. David; Ng, Cliff; Tsai, Miaw-Sheue; Yannone, Steven M.; Tainer, John A.; Campisi, Judith; Cooper, Priscilla K.

    2011-04-20

    XPG is a structure-specific endonuclease required for nucleotide excision repair (NER). XPG incision defects result in the cancer-prone syndrome xeroderma pigmentosum, whereas truncating mutations of XPG cause the severe postnatal progeroid developmental disorder Cockayne syndrome. We show that XPG interacts directly with WRN protein, which is defective in the premature aging disorder Werner syndrome, and that the two proteins undergo similar sub-nuclear redistribution in S-phase and co-localize in nuclear foci. The co-localization was observed in mid- to late-S-phase, when WRN moves from nucleoli to nuclear foci that have been shown to contain protein markers of both stalled replication forks and telomeric proteins. We mapped the interaction between XPG and WRN to the C-terminal domains of each and show that interaction with the C-terminal domain of XPG strongly stimulates WRN helicase activity. WRN also possesses a competing DNA single-strand annealing activity that, combined with unwinding, has been shown to coordinate regression of model replication forks to form Holliday junction/chicken foot intermediate structures. We tested whether XPG stimulated WRN annealing activity and found that XPG itself has intrinsic strand annealing activity that requires the unstructured R- and C-terminal domains, but not the conserved catalytic core or endonuclease activity. Annealing by XPG is cooperative, rather than additive, with WRN annealing. Taken together, our results suggest a novel function for XPG in S-phase that is at least in part carried out coordinately with WRN, and which may contribute to the severity of the phenotypes that occur upon loss of XPG.

  13. Positioning the 5'-flap junction in the active site controls the rate of flap endonuclease-1-catalyzed DNA cleavage

    KAUST Repository

    Song, Bo

    2018-02-09

    Flap endonucleases catalyze cleavage of single-stranded DNA flaps formed during replication, repair and recombination, and are therefore essential for genome processing and stability. Recent crystal structures of DNA-bound human flap endonuclease (hFEN1) offer new insights into how conformational changes in the DNA and hFEN1 may facilitate the reaction mechanism. For example, previous biochemical studies of DNA conformation performed under non-catalytic conditions with Ca2+ have suggested that base unpairing at the 5\\'-flap:template junction is an important step in the reaction, but the new structural data suggest otherwise. To clarify the role of DNA changes in the kinetic mechanism, we measured a series of transient steps - from substrate binding to product release - during the hFEN1-catalyzed reaction in the presence of Mg2+. We found that while hFEN1 binds and bends DNA at a fast, diffusion-limited rate, much slower Mg2+-dependent conformational changes in DNA around the active site are subsequently necessary and rate-limiting for 5\\'-flap cleavage. These changes are reported overall by fluorescence of 2-aminopurine at the 5\\'-flap:template junction, indicating that local DNA distortion (e.g., disruption of base stacking observed in structures), associated with positioning the 5\\'-flap scissile phosphodiester bond in the hFEN1 active site, controls catalysis. hFEN1 residues with distinct roles in the catalytic mechanism, including those binding metal ions (Asp-34, Asp-181), steering the 5\\'-flap through the active site and binding the scissile phosphate (Lys-93, Arg-100), and stacking against the base 5\\' to the scissile phosphate (Tyr-40), all contribute to these rate-limiting conformational changes, ensuring efficient and specific cleavage of 5\\'-flaps.

  14. Crystal structure of the R-protein of the multisubunit ATP-dependent restriction endonuclease NgoAVII.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tamulaitiene, Giedre; Silanskas, Arunas; Grazulis, Saulius; Zaremba, Mindaugas; Siksnys, Virginijus

    2014-12-16

    The restriction endonuclease (REase) NgoAVII is composed of two proteins, R.NgoAVII and N.NgoAVII, and shares features of both Type II restriction enzymes and Type I/III ATP-dependent restriction enzymes (see accompanying paper Zaremba et al., 2014). Here we present crystal structures of the R.NgoAVII apo-protein and the R.NgoAVII C-terminal domain bound to a specific DNA. R.NgoAVII is composed of two domains: an N-terminal nucleolytic PLD domain; and a C-terminal B3-like DNA-binding domain identified previously in BfiI and EcoRII REases, and in plant transcription factors. Structural comparison of the B3-like domains of R.NgoAVII, EcoRII, BfiI and the plant transcription factors revealed a conserved DNA-binding surface comprised of N- and C-arms that together grip the DNA. The C-arms of R.NgoAVII, EcoRII, BfiI and plant B3 domains are similar in size, but the R.NgoAVII N-arm which makes the majority of the contacts to the target site is much longer. The overall structures of R.NgoAVII and BfiI are similar; however, whilst BfiI has stand-alone catalytic activity, R.NgoAVII requires an auxiliary cognate N.NgoAVII protein and ATP hydrolysis in order to cleave DNA at the target site. The structures we present will help formulate future experiments to explore the molecular mechanisms of intersubunit crosstalk that control DNA cleavage by R.NgoAVII and related endonucleases. © The Author(s) 2014. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Nucleic Acids Research.

  15. Digital Living at Home

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Pernille Viktoria Kathja; Christiansen, Ellen Tove

    2013-01-01

    Does living with digital technology inevitably lead to digital living? Users talking about a digital home control system, they have had in their homes for eight years, indicate that there is more to living with digital technology than a functional-operational grip on regulation. Our analysis...... of these user voices has directed us towards a ‘home-keeping’ design discourse, which opens new horizons for design of digital home control systems by allowing users to perform as self-determined controllers and groomers of their habitat. The paper concludes by outlining the implications of a ‘home...

  16. Strategy Guideline: Demonstration Home

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Savage, C.; Hunt, A.

    2012-12-01

    This guideline will provide a general overview of the different kinds of demonstration home projects, a basic understanding of the different roles and responsibilities involved in the successful completion of a demonstration home, and an introduction into some of the lessons learned from actual demonstration home projects. Also, this guideline will specifically look at the communication methods employed during demonstration home projects. And lastly, we will focus on how to best create a communication plan for including an energy efficient message in a demonstration home project and carry that message to successful completion.

  17. Strategy Guideline. Demonstration Home

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hunt, A.; Savage, C.

    2012-12-01

    This guideline will provide a general overview of the different kinds of demonstration home projects, a basic understanding of the different roles and responsibilities involved in the successful completion of a demonstration home, and an introduction into some of the lessons learned from actual demonstration home projects. Also, this guideline will specifically look at the communication methods employed during demonstration home projects. And lastly, we will focus on how to best create a communication plan for including an energy efficient message in a demonstration home project and carry that message to successful completion.

  18. A model for visual memory encoding.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rodolphe Nenert

    Full Text Available Memory encoding engages multiple concurrent and sequential processes. While the individual processes involved in successful encoding have been examined in many studies, a sequence of events and the importance of modules associated with memory encoding has not been established. For this reason, we sought to perform a comprehensive examination of the network for memory encoding using data driven methods and to determine the directionality of the information flow in order to build a viable model of visual memory encoding. Forty healthy controls ages 19-59 performed a visual scene encoding task. FMRI data were preprocessed using SPM8 and then processed using independent component analysis (ICA with the reliability of the identified components confirmed using ICASSO as implemented in GIFT. The directionality of the information flow was examined using Granger causality analyses (GCA. All participants performed the fMRI task well above the chance level (>90% correct on both active and control conditions and the post-fMRI testing recall revealed correct memory encoding at 86.33 ± 5.83%. ICA identified involvement of components of five different networks in the process of memory encoding, and the GCA allowed for the directionality of the information flow to be assessed, from visual cortex via ventral stream to the attention network and then to the default mode network (DMN. Two additional networks involved in this process were the cerebellar and the auditory-insular network. This study provides evidence that successful visual memory encoding is dependent on multiple modules that are part of other networks that are only indirectly related to the main process. This model may help to identify the node(s of the network that are affected by a specific disease processes and explain the presence of memory encoding difficulties in patients in whom focal or global network dysfunction exists.

  19. A model for visual memory encoding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nenert, Rodolphe; Allendorfer, Jane B; Szaflarski, Jerzy P

    2014-01-01

    Memory encoding engages multiple concurrent and sequential processes. While the individual processes involved in successful encoding have been examined in many studies, a sequence of events and the importance of modules associated with memory encoding has not been established. For this reason, we sought to perform a comprehensive examination of the network for memory encoding using data driven methods and to determine the directionality of the information flow in order to build a viable model of visual memory encoding. Forty healthy controls ages 19-59 performed a visual scene encoding task. FMRI data were preprocessed using SPM8 and then processed using independent component analysis (ICA) with the reliability of the identified components confirmed using ICASSO as implemented in GIFT. The directionality of the information flow was examined using Granger causality analyses (GCA). All participants performed the fMRI task well above the chance level (>90% correct on both active and control conditions) and the post-fMRI testing recall revealed correct memory encoding at 86.33 ± 5.83%. ICA identified involvement of components of five different networks in the process of memory encoding, and the GCA allowed for the directionality of the information flow to be assessed, from visual cortex via ventral stream to the attention network and then to the default mode network (DMN). Two additional networks involved in this process were the cerebellar and the auditory-insular network. This study provides evidence that successful visual memory encoding is dependent on multiple modules that are part of other networks that are only indirectly related to the main process. This model may help to identify the node(s) of the network that are affected by a specific disease processes and explain the presence of memory encoding difficulties in patients in whom focal or global network dysfunction exists.

  20. Creating a new home

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gram-Hanssen, Kirsten; Bech-Danielsen, Claus

    2012-01-01

    Housing research is increasingly focusing on how different groups of residents use their dwelling and transform it into a home. In this article, we look at the homes of immigrants in Danish social housing. The article is based on qualitative interviews with Somali, Iraqi and Turkish immigrants......, and it includes a review of the literature regarding the home in general, as well as a discussion on the home for immigrants. Literature argues that the home and the meaning of the dwelling are socially constructed rather than depending on universal human needs. This means that immigrants from other cultures...... might find another meaning in the concept of 'home' than their Danish neighbours. Thus the main issue for our research is to ascertain the extent to which immigrants are able to identify with their dwelling and to establish 'home' in Danish social housing. Does the meaning of the dwelling amongst...

  1. Leaving home in Denmark

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Rikke Skovgaard

    2015-01-01

    The paper focuses on ethnic differences in the timing and patterns of leaving the parental home. Leaving home is a key transition in the life course of the individual, and extensive research has been conducted on the timing and patterns of leaving it. However, ethnic differences in these patterns...... of leaving home. Results showed that while some differences disappeared when controlling for covariates, others persisted, thus indicating ethnic differences in home-leaving patterns. A strong link between leaving home and marriage was substantiated for Turks, but not for Somalis. The home-leaving patterns...... of Somalis were much more similar to those of Danes. Overall, Turkish descendants were similar to Turkish immigrants but with some differentiation. The analyses identified the existence of ethnic differences in home-leaving patterns but also found evidence of a shift towards less traditional patterns, i...

  2. Eldercare at Home: Choosing a Nursing Home

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... a regular basis? Residents can give you valuable insights. Talk with nursing assistants and observe them with ... a pleasant manner? Can residents bring furniture and personal items from home? Are there pet animals in ...

  3. LHC@home gets new home

    CERN Multimedia

    Oates, John

    2007-01-01

    "The distributed computing project LHC@home is moving to London from Cern in Switzerland. Researchers at Qeen Mary University have been trialling the system since June, but are now ready for the offical launch" (1 page)

  4. Encoding of coordination complexes with XML.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vinoth, P; Sankar, P

    2017-09-01

    An in-silico system to encode structure, bonding and properties of coordination complexes is developed. The encoding is achieved through a semantic XML markup frame. Composition of the coordination complexes is captured in terms of central atom and ligands. Structural information of central atom is detailed in terms of electron status of valence electron orbitals. The ligands are encoded with specific reference to the electron environment of ligand centre atoms. Behaviour of ligands to form low or high spin complexes is accomplished by assigning a Ligand Centre Value to every ligand based on the electronic environment of ligand centre atom. Chemical ontologies are used for categorization purpose and to control different hybridization schemes. Complexes formed by the central atoms of transition metal, non-transition elements belonging to s-block, p-block and f-block are encoded with a generic encoding platform. Complexes of homoleptic, heteroleptic and bridged types are also covered by this encoding system. Utility of the encoded system to predict redox electron transfer reaction in the coordination complexes is demonstrated with a simple application. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Reactivating Fetal Hemoglobin Expression in Human Adult Erythroblasts Through BCL11A Knockdown Using Targeted Endonucleases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carmen F Bjurström

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available We examined the efficiency, specificity, and mutational signatures of zinc finger nucleases (ZFNs, transcriptional activator-like effector nucleases (TALENs, and clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeat (CRISPR/Cas9 systems designed to target the gene encoding the transcriptional repressor BCL11A, in human K562 cells and human CD34+ progenitor cells. ZFNs and TALENs were delivered as in vitro transcribed mRNA through electroporation; CRISPR/Cas9 was codelivered by Cas9 mRNA with plasmid-encoded guideRNA (gRNA (pU6.g1 or in vitro transcribed gRNA (gR.1. Analyses of efficacy revealed that for these specific reagents and the delivery methods used, the ZFNs gave rise to more allelic disruption in the targeted locus compared to the TALENs and CRISPR/Cas9, which was associated with increased levels of fetal hemoglobin in erythroid cells produced in vitro from nuclease-treated CD34+ cells. Genome-wide analysis to evaluate the specificity of the nucleases revealed high specificity of this specific ZFN to the target site, while specific TALENs and CRISPRs evaluated showed off-target cleavage activity. ZFN gene-edited CD34+ cells had the capacity to engraft in NOD-PrkdcSCID-IL2Rγnull mice, while retaining multi-lineage potential, in contrast to TALEN gene-edited CD34+ cells. CRISPR engraftment levels mirrored the increased relative plasmid-mediated toxicity of pU6.g1/Cas9 in hematopoietic stem/progenitor cells (HSPCs, highlighting the value for the further improvements of CRISPR/Cas9 delivery in primary human HSPCs.

  6. Home range and travels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stickel, L.F.; King, John A.

    1968-01-01

    The concept of home range was expressed by Seton (1909) in the term 'home region,' which Burr (1940, 1943) clarified with a definition of home range and exemplified in a definitive study of Peromyscus in the field. Burt pointed out the ever-changing characteristics of home-range area and the consequent absence of boundaries in the usual sense--a finding verified by investigators thereafter. In the studies summarized in this paper, sizes of home ranges of Peromyscus varied within two magnitudes, approximately from 0.1 acre to ten acres, in 34 studies conducted in a variety of habitats from the seaside dunes of Florida to the Alaskan forests. Variation in sizes of home ranges was correlated with both environmental and physiological factors; with habitat it was conspicuous, both in the same and different regions. Food supply also was related to size of home range, both seasonally and in relation to habitat. Home ranges generally were smallest in winter and largest in spring, at the onset of the breeding season. Activity and size also were affected by changes in weather. Activity was least when temperatures were low and nights were bright. Effects of rainfall were variable. Sizes varied according to sex and age; young mice remained in the parents' range until they approached maturity, when they began to travel more widely. Adult males commonly had larger home ranges than females, although there were a number of exceptions. An inverse relationship between population density and size of home range was shown in several studies and probably is the usual relationship. A basic need for activity and exploration also appeared to influence size of home range. Behavior within the home range was discussed in terms of travel patterns, travels in relation to home sites and refuges, territory, and stability of size of home range. Travels within the home range consisted of repeated use of well-worn trails to sites of food, shelter, and refuge, plus more random exploratory travels

  7. HomePort

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Madsen, Per Printz

    2009-01-01

    In the last couple of year's computer based home control systems are getting more and more common in modern homes. For instance these systems take care of light control, heat control and security systems.  The latest trend is to use wireless communication like Z-Wave and ZigBee to interconnect...... different components in these systems. One of the characteristics is that each system, like for instance heat and light, has their own specific way of using the communication system.   This paper describes a way to connect different home control systems through an intelligent gateway, called a Home......Port. The HomePort consists of a number of Subsystem communication drivers, a virtual communication layer, an interpreter and a PC- based compiler for a high level control language, called GIL (Gateway intelligence language). The focus in this paper will be on the upper two layers in the Home...

  8. Encoding information using laguerre gaussian modes

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Trichili, A

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available The authors experimentally demonstrate an information encoding protocol using the two degrees of freedom of Laguerre Gaussian modes having different radial and azimuthal components. A novel method, based on digital holography, for information...

  9. Using XML to encode TMA DES metadata

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Oliver Lyttleton

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: The Tissue Microarray Data Exchange Specification (TMA DES is an XML specification for encoding TMA experiment data. While TMA DES data is encoded in XML, the files that describe its syntax, structure, and semantics are not. The DTD format is used to describe the syntax and structure of TMA DES, and the ISO 11179 format is used to define the semantics of TMA DES. However, XML Schema can be used in place of DTDs, and another XML encoded format, RDF, can be used in place of ISO 11179. Encoding all TMA DES data and metadata in XML would simplify the development and usage of programs which validate and parse TMA DES data. XML Schema has advantages over DTDs such as support for data types, and a more powerful means of specifying constraints on data values. An advantage of RDF encoded in XML over ISO 11179 is that XML defines rules for encoding data, whereas ISO 11179 does not. Materials and Methods: We created an XML Schema version of the TMA DES DTD. We wrote a program that converted ISO 11179 definitions to RDF encoded in XML, and used it to convert the TMA DES ISO 11179 definitions to RDF. Results: We validated a sample TMA DES XML file that was supplied with the publication that originally specified TMA DES using our XML Schema. We successfully validated the RDF produced by our ISO 11179 converter with the W3C RDF validation service. Conclusions: All TMA DES data could be encoded using XML, which simplifies its processing. XML Schema allows datatypes and valid value ranges to be specified for CDEs, which enables a wider range of error checking to be performed using XML Schemas than could be performed using DTDs.

  10. Using XML to encode TMA DES metadata.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lyttleton, Oliver; Wright, Alexander; Treanor, Darren; Lewis, Paul

    2011-01-01

    The Tissue Microarray Data Exchange Specification (TMA DES) is an XML specification for encoding TMA experiment data. While TMA DES data is encoded in XML, the files that describe its syntax, structure, and semantics are not. The DTD format is used to describe the syntax and structure of TMA DES, and the ISO 11179 format is used to define the semantics of TMA DES. However, XML Schema can be used in place of DTDs, and another XML encoded format, RDF, can be used in place of ISO 11179. Encoding all TMA DES data and metadata in XML would simplify the development and usage of programs which validate and parse TMA DES data. XML Schema has advantages over DTDs such as support for data types, and a more powerful means of specifying constraints on data values. An advantage of RDF encoded in XML over ISO 11179 is that XML defines rules for encoding data, whereas ISO 11179 does not. We created an XML Schema version of the TMA DES DTD. We wrote a program that converted ISO 11179 definitions to RDF encoded in XML, and used it to convert the TMA DES ISO 11179 definitions to RDF. We validated a sample TMA DES XML file that was supplied with the publication that originally specified TMA DES using our XML Schema. We successfully validated the RDF produced by our ISO 11179 converter with the W3C RDF validation service. All TMA DES data could be encoded using XML, which simplifies its processing. XML Schema allows datatypes and valid value ranges to be specified for CDEs, which enables a wider range of error checking to be performed using XML Schemas than could be performed using DTDs.

  11. Reading Neural Encodings using Phase Space Methods

    OpenAIRE

    Abarbanel, Henry D. I.; Tumer, Evren C.

    2003-01-01

    Environmental signals sensed by nervous systems are often represented in spike trains carried from sensory neurons to higher neural functions where decisions and functional actions occur. Information about the environmental stimulus is contained (encoded) in the train of spikes. We show how to "read" the encoding using state space methods of nonlinear dynamics. We create a mapping from spike signals which are output from the neural processing system back to an estimate of the analog input sig...

  12. Ostomy Home Skills Program

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Donate American College of Surgeons Education Patients and Family Skills Programs ... The Ostomy Home Skills Kit supports patients with educational and simulation materials to learn ...

  13. Dying at home

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kiyanda, Brigitte Gagnon; Dechêne, Geneviève; Marchand, Robert

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Objective To demonstrate that it is possible for a team of palliative care nurses in an urban centre to care for more than 50% of their terminally ill patients at home until they die, and that medical care delivered in the home is a determining factor in death at home versus death in a hospital. Design Analysis of place of death of terminally ill patients who died in 2012 and 2013 (N = 212) and who had been cared for by palliative care nurses, by type of medical care. Setting The centre local de services communautaires (CLSC) in Verdun, Que, an urban neighbourhood in southwest Montreal. Participants A total of 212 terminally ill patients. Main outcome measures Rate of deaths at home. Results Of the 212 patients cared for at home by palliative care nurses, 56.6% died at home; 62.6% received medical home care from CLSC physicians, compared with 5.0% who did not receive medical home care from any physician. Conclusion Combined with a straightforward restructuring of the nursing care delivered by CLSCs, development of medical services delivered in the home would enable the more than 50% of terminally ill patients in Quebec who are cared for by CLSCs to die at home—something that most of them wish for. PMID:25873716

  14. Interaction of apurinic/apyrimidinic endonucleases Nfo and ExoA with the DNA integrity scanning protein DisA in the processing of oxidative DNA damage during Bacillus subtilis spore outgrowth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campos, Silvia S; Ibarra-Rodriguez, Juan R; Barajas-Ornelas, Rocío C; Ramírez-Guadiana, Fernando H; Obregón-Herrera, Armando; Setlow, Peter; Pedraza-Reyes, Mario

    2014-02-01

    Oxidative stress-induced damage, including 8-oxo-guanine and apurinic/apyrimidinic (AP) DNA lesions, were detected in dormant and outgrowing Bacillus subtilis spores lacking the AP endonucleases Nfo and ExoA. Spores of the Δnfo exoA strain exhibited slightly slowed germination and greatly slowed outgrowth that drastically slowed the spores' return to vegetative growth. A null mutation in the disA gene, encoding a DNA integrity scanning protein (DisA), suppressed this phenotype, as spores lacking Nfo, ExoA, and DisA exhibited germination and outgrowth kinetics very similar to those of wild-type spores. Overexpression of DisA also restored the slow germination and outgrowth phenotype to nfo exoA disA spores. A disA-lacZ fusion was expressed during sporulation but not in the forespore compartment. However, disA-lacZ was expressed during spore germination/outgrowth, as was a DisA-green fluorescent protein (GFP) fusion protein. Fluorescence microscopy revealed that, as previously shown in sporulating cells, DisA-GFP formed discrete globular foci that colocalized with the nucleoid of germinating and outgrowing spores and remained located primarily in a single cell during early vegetative growth. Finally, the slow-outgrowth phenotype of nfo exoA spores was accompanied by a delay in DNA synthesis to repair AP and 8-oxo-guanine lesions, and these effects were suppressed following disA disruption. We postulate that a DisA-dependent checkpoint arrests DNA replication during B. subtilis spore outgrowth until the germinating spore's genome is free of damage.

  15. Restoration of ultraviolet-induced unscheduled DNA synthesis of xeroderma pigmentosum cells by the concomitant treatment with bacteriophage T4 endonuclease V and HVJ (Sendai virus).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanaka, K; Sekiguchi, M; Okada, Y

    1975-01-01

    Ultraviolet (UV)-induced unscheduled DNA synthesis of xeroderma pigmentosum cells, belonging to complementation groups A, B, C, D, and E, was restored to the normal level by concomitant treatment of the cells with T4 endonuclease V and UV-inactivated HVJ (Sendai virus). The present results suggest that (1) T4 endonuclease molecules were inserted effectively into the cells by the interaction of HVJ with the cell membranes, (2) the enzyme was functional on human chromosomal DNA which had been damaged by UV irradiation in the viable cells, (3) all the studied groups of xeroderma pigmentosum ("variant" was not tested) were defective in the first step (incision) of excision repair. Images PMID:172893

  16. Encoder: a connectionist model of how learning to visually encode fixated text images improves reading fluency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, Gale L

    2004-07-01

    This article proposes that visual encoding learning improves reading fluency by widening the span over which letters are recognized from a fixated text image so that fewer fixations are needed to cover a text line. Encoder is a connectionist model that learns to convert images like the fixated text images human readers encode into the corresponding letter sequences. The computational theory of classification learning predicts that fixated text-image size makes this learning difficult but that reducing image variability and biasing learning should help. Encoder confirms these predictions. It fails to learn as image size increases but achieves humanlike visual encoding accuracy when image variability is reduced by regularities in fixation positions and letter sequences and when learning is biased to discover mapping functions based on the sequential, componential structure of text. After training, Encoder exhibits many humanlike text familiarity effects. ((c) 2004 APA, all rights reserved)

  17. Saturated free fatty acids and apoptosis in microvascular mesangial cells: palmitate activates pro-apoptotic signaling involving caspase 9 and mitochondrial release of endonuclease G

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Simonson Michael S

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In type 2 diabetes, free fatty acids (FFA accumulate in microvascular cells, but the phenotypic consequences of FFA accumulation in the microvasculature are incompletely understood. Here we investigated whether saturated FFA induce apoptosis in human microvascular mesangial cells and analyzed the signaling pathways involved. Methods Saturated and unsaturated FFA-albumin complexes were added to cultured human mesangial cells, after which the number of apoptotic cells were quantified and the signal transduction pathways involved were delineated. Results The saturated FFA palmitate and stearate were apoptotic unlike equivalent concentrations of the unsaturated FFA oleate and linoleate. Palmitate-induced apoptosis was potentiated by etomoxir, an inhibitor of mitochondrial β-oxidation, but was prevented by an activator of AMP-kinase, which increases fatty acid β-oxidation. Palmitate stimulated an intrinsic pathway of pro-apoptotic signaling as evidenced by increased mitochondrial release of cytochrome-c and activation of caspase 9. A caspase 9-selective inhibitor blocked caspase 3 activation but incompletely blocked apoptosis in response to palmitate, suggesting an additional caspase 9-independent pathway. Palmitate stimulated mitochondrial release of endonuclease G by a caspase 9-independent mechanism, thereby implicating endonuclease G in caspase 9-indpendent regulation of apoptosis by saturated FFA. We also observed that the unsaturated FFA oleate and linoleate prevented palmitate-induced mitochondrial release of both cytochrome-c and endonuclease G, which resulted in complete protection from palmitate-induced apoptosis. Conclusions Taken together, these results demonstrate that palmitate stimulates apoptosis by evoking an intrinsic pathway of proapoptotic signaling and identify mitochondrial release of endonuclease G as a key step in proapoptotic signaling by saturated FFA and in the anti-apoptotic actions of unsaturated FFA.

  18. 17β-Estradiol Increases Expression of the Oxidative Stress Response and DNA Repair Protein Apurinic Endonuclease (Ape1) in the Cerebral Cortex of Female Mice Following Hypoxia

    OpenAIRE

    Alicia K., Dietrich; Gwendolyn I Humphreys; Nardulli, Ann M.

    2013-01-01

    While it is well established that 17β-estradiol (E2) protects the rodent brain from ischemia-induced damage, it has been unclear how this neuroprotective effect is mediated. Interestingly, convincing evidence has also demonstrated that maintaining or increasing the expression of the oxidative stress response and DNA repair protein apurinic endonuclease 1 (Ape1) is instrumental in reducing ischemiainduced damage in the brain. Since E2 increases expression of the oxidative stress response prote...

  19. Deletion of the MAG1 DNA glycosylase gene suppresses alkylation-induced killing and mutagenesis in yeast cells lacking AP endonucleases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiao, W; Chow, B L; Hanna, M; Doetsch, P W

    2001-12-19

    DNA base excision repair (BER) is initiated by DNA glycosylases that recognize and remove damaged bases. The phosphate backbone adjacent to the resulting apurinic/apyrimidinic (AP) site is then cleaved by an AP endonuclease or glycosylase-associated AP lyase to invoke subsequent BER steps. We have used a genetic approach in Saccharomyces cerevisiae to address whether AP sites are blocks to DNA replication and the biological consequences if AP sites persist in the genome. We found that yeast cells deficient in the two AP endonucleases (apn1 apn2 double mutant) are extremely sensitive to killing by methyl methanesulfonate (MMS), a model DNA alkylating agent. Interestingly, this sensitivity can be reduced up to 2500-fold by deleting the MAG1 3-methyladenine DNA glycosylase gene, suggesting that Mag1 not only removes lethal base lesions, but also benign lesions and possibly normal bases, and that the resulting AP sites are highly toxic to the cells. This rescuing effect appears to be specific for DNA alkylation damage, since the mag1 mutation reduces killing effects of two other DNA alkylating agents, but does not alter the sensitivity of apn cells to killing by UV, gamma-ray or H(2)O(2). Our mutagenesis assays indicate that nearly half of spontaneous and almost all MMS-induced mutations in the AP endonuclease-deficient cells are due to Mag1 DNA glycosylase activity. Although the DNA replication apparatus appears to be incapable of replicating past AP sites, Polzeta-mediated translesion synthesis is able to bypass AP sites, and accounts for all spontaneous and MMS-induced mutagenesis in the AP endonuclease-deficient cells. These results allow us to delineate base lesion flow within the BER pathway and link AP sites to other DNA damage repair and tolerance pathways.

  20. Multiple Endonuclease Restriction Real-Time Loop-Mediated Isothermal Amplification: A Novel Analytically Rapid, Sensitive, Multiplex Loop-Mediated Isothermal Amplification Detection Technique.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yi; Wang, Yan; Lan, Ruiting; Xu, Huaqing; Ma, Aijing; Li, Dongxun; Dai, Hang; Yuan, Xuejiao; Xu, Jianguo; Ye, Changyun

    2015-07-01

    Loop-mediated isothermal amplification (LAMP) is restricted to detecting a single target, limiting the usefulness of this method. To achieve multiplex LAMP-based detection, we developed a novel approach we called the multiple endonuclease restriction real-time-LAMP assay. In this system, the LAMP forward or backward inner primers contain 5' end short sequences that are recognized by the restriction endonuclease Nb.BsrDI, and the new forward or backward inner primers were modified at the 5' end with a fluorophore and in the middle with a dark quencher. Nb.BsrDI digests the newly synthesized double-stranded terminal sequences (5' end short sequences and their complementary sequences), which releases the quenching, resulting in a gain of signal. The assay permitted real-time detection of single or multiple target sequences in a single tube, and the positive results can be obtained in as short as 12 minutes. The novel methodology is highly efficient and specific, detecting down to 250 fg of DNA per reaction of Listeria DNA tested, and was successful in evaluating raw meat samples. The multiple endonuclease restriction real-time-LAMP technology, which is an extension of LAMP to accommodate robust, target-specific, and multiplex detection, provides a molecular diagnostic tool with less detection time and high sensitivity and specificity compared with those of LAMP and quantitative real-time PCR. Copyright © 2015 American Society for Investigative Pathology and the Association for Molecular Pathology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. A general fluorescent sensor design strategy for "turn-on" activity detection of exonucleases and restriction endonucleases based on graphene oxide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Qi; Kong, De-Ming

    2013-11-07

    Using graphene oxide (GO) as a nanoquencher, a universal sensor design strategy was developed on the basis of significantly different binding affinities of GO to single-stranded DNAs (ss-DNAs) with different lengths. The proposed sensors could be used for the activity detection of both exonucleases and restriction endonucleases. To achieve this, a single-labeled fluorescent oligonucleotide probe, which had a single-stranded structure or a hairpin structure with a long single-stranded loop, was used. Such a probe could be efficiently absorbed on the surface of GO, resulting in the quenching of the fluorescent signal. Excision of the single-stranded probe by exonucleases or site-specific cleavage at the double-stranded stem of the hairpin probe by restriction endonuclease released fluorophore-labeled nucleotide, which could not be efficiently absorbed by GO, thus leading to increase in fluorescence of the corresponding sensing system. As examples, three sensors, which were used for activity detection of the exonuclease Exo 1 and the restriction endonucleases EcoR I and Hind III, were developed. These three sensors could specifically and sensitively detect the activities of Exo 1, EcoR I and Hind III with detection limits of 0.03 U mL(-1), 0.06 U mL(-1) and 0.04 U mL(-1), respectively. Visual detection was also possible.

  2. Method of implementing frequency-encoded NOT, OR and NOR ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    In this context, polarization encoding technique, intensity-based encoding technique, tristate and quaternary logic operation, multivalued logic operations, symbolic substitution techniques etc. may be mentioned. Very recently, frequency encoding/decoding technique has drawn interest from the scientific community.

  3. The "H" Word: Home Schooling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Butler, Shery

    2000-01-01

    This article discusses home schooling gifted children, including reasons families choose to home school their children, laws regulating home schooling, the educational background of parents who home school, and curriculum options. Advantages and disadvantages of home schooling are explored, along with data indicating the higher achievement of home…

  4. Sex Away from Home

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greenwald, Harold

    1971-01-01

    The reasons why people who are normally truthful to their spouses engage in sex away from home are discussed. These reasons can include loneliness, ego building or the opportunity to have homosexual relations. Sex away from home is likely to increase since the number of people traveling is increasing. (Author/CG)

  5. Home Education in Russia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Staroverova, T. I.

    2011-01-01

    From the eighteenth through the early twentieth centuries, home education (home schooling) by tutors and governesses in Russia was a customary form of schooling for an overwhelming majority of members of the nobility. Social and political transformations of the twentieth century led to substantial changes as the state got actively involved with…

  6. Home Teaching and Herbart.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rust, Val D.; Reed, Frances

    1979-01-01

    Viewing the growing disenchantment with state-controlled schooling, the authors predict that home teaching will become an established educational alternative within a short time, and they reflect on the teachings and writings of Johann Friedrich Herbart, an eighteenth-century advocate of educating children at home. (Editor/SJL)

  7. European Home Energy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tommerup, Henrik M.

    2009-01-01

    An important aim of the european energy performance of buildings directive is to improve the overall energy efficiency of new homes......An important aim of the european energy performance of buildings directive is to improve the overall energy efficiency of new homes...

  8. Ostomy Home Skills Program

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... de Ostomía Ostomy Home Skills Program Adult Ostomy Pediatric Ostomy Programa de Destrezas para manejo Doméstico de Ostomía The Ostomy Home Skills Kit supports patients with educational and simulation materials to learn and ...

  9. Ostomy Home Skills Program

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Stay Up to Date with ACS Association Management Jobs Events Find a Surgeon Patients and Family Contact My Profile Shop ( 0 ) Cart Donate American College of Surgeons Education Patients and Family Skills Programs Ostomy Home Skills Program Ostomy Home Skills ...

  10. Technologies for Home Networking

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    A broad overview of the home networking field, ranging from wireless technologies to practical applications. In the future, it is expected that private networks (e.g. home networks) will become part of the global network ecosystem, participating in sharing their own content, running IP...

  11. Ostomy Home Skills Program

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... de Destrezas para manejo Doméstico de Ostomía Ostomy Home Skills Program Adult Ostomy Pediatric Ostomy Programa de Destrezas para manejo Doméstico de Ostomía The Ostomy Home Skills Kit supports patients with educational and simulation ...

  12. Ostomy Home Skills Program

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Adult Ostomy Pediatric Ostomy Programa de Destrezas para manejo Doméstico de Ostomía Ostomy Home Skills Program Adult Ostomy Pediatric Ostomy Programa de Destrezas para manejo Doméstico de Ostomía The Ostomy Home Skills Kit ...

  13. Ostomy Home Skills Program

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... checklist Evaluation (Complete the Ostomy Patient Survey . We need your opinion!) Program outcomes The ACS Ostomy Home Skills Kit program covers: Adult Ostomy Pediatric Ostomy Ostomía Adulto Order Today Ostomy Home Skills Kit (login or create account ...

  14. Ostomy Home Skills Program

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Ostomy Programa de Destrezas para manejo Doméstico de Ostomía Ostomy Home Skills Program Adult Ostomy Pediatric Ostomy Programa de Destrezas para manejo Doméstico de Ostomía The Ostomy Home Skills Kit supports patients with ...

  15. No Place Like Home.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Austin, Elizabeth

    2000-01-01

    To fight rampant consumerism (Martha Stewart Inc.), reduce the divorce rate, prevent cancer and heart disease, and ensure domestic tranquility, educators should bring back home economics. Workers must put more energy into the home front, and we must begin teaching our children how to live well on less. (MLH)

  16. Asbestos in the Home.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Environmental Protection Agency, Washington, DC.

    The United States Government is concerned about asbestos-containing products in the home because sometimes asbestos fibers can be released from these produces. If asbestos fibers are inhaled, certain types of cancer may later develop. Asbestos in homes poses several problems. Household members have little or no protection from exposure to asbestos…

  17. Health Begins at Home

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    2009-03-30

    Clean and well-maintained homes can prevent many illnesses and injuries. This podcast discusses how good health begins at home.  Created: 3/30/2009 by Coordinating Center for Environmental Health and Injury Prevention (CCEHIP).   Date Released: 3/30/2009.

  18. Classroom at Home.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simmons, Betty Jo

    1994-01-01

    Parents applying for home schooling should be informed about such matters as curriculum options, testing procedures, teaching qualifications, and opportunities for socialization. Home-schooled children should be allowed to participate in as many of the regular school offerings as schools can legitimately accommodate. Provides statistics about home…

  19. Ostomy Home Skills Program

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Destrezas para manejo Doméstico de Ostomía The Ostomy Home Skills Kit supports patients with educational and simulation materials to learn ... skills needed for optimal postoperative recovery. The kit supports the entire surgical ... on the operation, home skills such as emptying and changing a pouch, ...

  20. PAM-Dependent Target DNA Recognition and Cleavage by C2c1 CRISPR-Cas Endonuclease

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yang, Hui; Gao, Pu; Rajashankar, Kanagalaghatta R.; Patel, Dinshaw J. (MSKCC); (Cornell); (Chinese Aca. Sci.)

    2016-12-01

    C2c1 is a newly identified guide RNA-mediated type V-B CRISPR-Cas endonuclease that site-specifically targets and cleaves both strands of target DNA. We have determined crystal structures of Alicyclobacillus acidoterrestris C2c1 (AacC2c1) bound to sgRNA as a binary complex and to target DNAs as ternary complexes, thereby capturing catalytically competent conformations of AacC2c1 with both target and non-target DNA strands independently positioned within a single RuvC catalytic pocket. Moreover, C2c1-mediated cleavage results in a staggered seven-nucleotide break of target DNA. crRNA adopts a pre-ordered five-nucleotide A-form seed sequence in the binary complex, with release of an inserted tryptophan, facilitating zippering up of 20-bp guide RNA:target DNA heteroduplex on ternary complex formation. Notably, the PAM-interacting cleft adopts a “locked” conformation on ternary complex formation. Structural comparison of C2c1 ternary complexes with their Cas9 and Cpf1 counterparts highlights the diverse mechanisms adopted by these distinct CRISPR-Cas systems, thereby broadening and enhancing their applicability as genome editing tools.

  1. Loss of mitochondrial exo/endonuclease EXOG affects mitochondrial respiration and induces ROS-mediated cardiomyocyte hypertrophy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tigchelaar, Wardit; Yu, Hongjuan; de Jong, Anne Margreet; van Gilst, Wiek H; van der Harst, Pim; Westenbrink, B Daan; de Boer, Rudolf A; Silljé, Herman H W

    2015-01-15

    Recently, a locus at the mitochondrial exo/endonuclease EXOG gene, which has been implicated in mitochondrial DNA repair, was associated with cardiac function. The function of EXOG in cardiomyocytes is still elusive. Here we investigated the role of EXOG in mitochondrial function and hypertrophy in cardiomyocytes. Depletion of EXOG in primary neonatal rat ventricular cardiomyocytes (NRVCs) induced a marked increase in cardiomyocyte hypertrophy. Depletion of EXOG, however, did not result in loss of mitochondrial DNA integrity. Although EXOG depletion did not induce fetal gene expression and common hypertrophy pathways were not activated, a clear increase in ribosomal S6 phosphorylation was observed, which readily explains increased protein synthesis. With the use of a Seahorse flux analyzer, it was shown that the mitochondrial oxidative consumption rate (OCR) was increased 2.4-fold in EXOG-depleted NRVCs. Moreover, ATP-linked OCR was 5.2-fold higher. This increase was not explained by mitochondrial biogenesis or alterations in mitochondrial membrane potential. Western blotting confirmed normal levels of the oxidative phosphorylation (OXPHOS) complexes. The increased OCR was accompanied by a 5.4-fold increase in mitochondrial ROS levels. These increased ROS levels could be normalized with specific mitochondrial ROS scavengers (MitoTEMPO, mnSOD). Remarkably, scavenging of excess ROS strongly attenuated the hypertrophic response. In conclusion, loss of EXOG affects normal mitochondrial function resulting in increased mitochondrial respiration, excess ROS production, and cardiomyocyte hypertrophy. Copyright © 2015 the American Physiological Society.

  2. Structure and specificity of the RNA-guided endonuclease Cas9 during DNA interrogation, target binding and cleavage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Josephs, Eric A.; Kocak, D. Dewran; Fitzgibbon, Christopher J.; McMenemy, Joshua; Gersbach, Charles A.; Marszalek, Piotr E.

    2015-01-01

    CRISPR-associated endonuclease Cas9 cuts DNA at variable target sites designated by a Cas9-bound RNA molecule. Cas9's ability to be directed by single ‘guide RNA’ molecules to target nearly any sequence has been recently exploited for a number of emerging biological and medical applications. Therefore, understanding the nature of Cas9's off-target activity is of paramount importance for its practical use. Using atomic force microscopy (AFM), we directly resolve individual Cas9 and nuclease-inactive dCas9 proteins as they bind along engineered DNA substrates. High-resolution imaging allows us to determine their relative propensities to bind with different guide RNA variants to targeted or off-target sequences. Mapping the structural properties of Cas9 and dCas9 to their respective binding sites reveals a progressive conformational transformation at DNA sites with increasing sequence similarity to its target. With kinetic Monte Carlo (KMC) simulations, these results provide evidence of a ‘conformational gating’ mechanism driven by the interactions between the guide RNA and the 14th–17th nucleotide region of the targeted DNA, the stabilities of which we find correlate significantly with reported off-target cleavage rates. KMC simulations also reveal potential methodologies to engineer guide RNA sequences with improved specificity by considering the invasion of guide RNAs into targeted DNA duplex. PMID:26384421

  3. How does Trypanosoma equiperdum fit into the Trypanozoon group? A cluster analysis by RAPD and multiplex-endonuclease genotyping approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Claes, F; Agbo, E C; Radwanska, M; Te Pas, M F W; Baltz, T; De Waal, D T; Goddeeris, B M; Claassen, E; Büscher, P

    2003-05-01

    The pathogenic trypanosomes Trypanosoma equiperdum, T. evansi as well as T. brucei are morphologically identical. In horses, these parasites are considered to cause respectively dourine, surra and nagana. Previous molecular attempts to differentiate these species were not successful for T. evansi and T. equiperdum; only T. b. brucei could be differentiated to a certain extent. In this study we analysed 10 T. equiperdum, 8 T. evansi and 4 T. b. brucei using Random Amplified Polymorphic DNA (RAPD) and multiplex-endonuclease fingerprinting, a modified AFLP technique. The results obtained confirm the homogeneity of the T. evansi group tested. The T. b. brucei clustered out in a heterogenous group. For T. equiperdum the situation is more complex: 8 out of 10 T. equiperdum clustered together with the T. evansi group, while 2 T. equiperdum strains were more related to T. b. brucei. Hence, 2 hypotheses can be formulated: (1) only 2 T. equiperdum strains are genuine T. equiperdum causing dourine; all other T. equiperdum strains actually are T. evansi causing surra or (2) T. equiperdum does not exist at all. In that case, the different clinical outcome of horse infections with T. evansi or T. b. brucei is primarily related to the host immune response.

  4. Endonuclease IV cleaves apurinic/apyrimidinic sites in single-stranded DNA and its application for biosensing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kong, Xiang-Juan; Wu, Shuang; Cen, Yao; Chen, Ting-Ting; Yu, Ru-Qin; Chu, Xia

    2016-07-21

    Endonuclease IV (Endo IV), as a DNA repairing enzyme, plays a crucial role in repairing damaged DNA comprising abasic sites to maintain genomic integrity. The cleaving capability of Endo IV to apurinic/apyrimidinic sites (AP) in single-stranded DNA (ssDNA) was demonstrated. It was found that Endo IV has considerably high cleaving activity to AP sites in ssDNA compared with that in double-stranded DNA (dsDNA). The unique feature of Endo IV in cleaving AP sites in ssDNA was further applied to construct a novel dual signal amplified sensing system for highly sensitive enzyme and protein detection by a combination of exonuclease III (Exo III)-aided cyclic amplification reaction and a rolling circle replication (RCR) technique, which showed a good sensing performance with a detection limit of 0.008 U mL(-1) for Endo IV and 2.5 pM for streptavidin. In addition, the developed method had considerably high specificity for Endo IV and streptavidin over other potential interferences. The developed strategy indeed provides a novel platform for protein and enzyme assays and may find a broad spectrum of applications in bioanalysis, disease diagnosis, and drug development.

  5. Comparison of whole genome sequencing to restriction endonuclease analysis and gel diffusion precipitin-based serotyping of Pasteurella multocida.

    Science.gov (United States)

    LeCount, Karen J; Schlater, Linda K; Stuber, Tod; Robbe Austerman, Suelee; Frana, Timothy S; Griffith, Ronald W; Erdman, Matthew M

    2018-01-01

    The gel diffusion precipitin test (GDPT) and restriction endonuclease analysis (REA) have commonly been used in the serotyping and genotyping of Pasteurella multocida. Whole genome sequencing (WGS) and single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) analysis has become the gold standard for other organisms, offering higher resolution than previously available methods. We compared WGS to REA and GDPT on 163 isolates of P. multocida to determine if WGS produced more precise results. The isolates used represented the 16 reference serovars, isolates with REA profiles matching an attenuated fowl cholera vaccine strain, and isolates from 10 different animal species. Isolates originated from across the United States and from Chile. Identical REA profiles clustered together in the phylogenetic tree. REA profiles that differed by only a few bands had fewer SNP differences than REA profiles with more differences, as expected. The GDPT results were diverse but it was common to see a single serovar show up repeatedly within clusters. Several errors were found when examining the REA profiles. WGS was able to confirm these errors and compensate for the subjectivity in analysis of REA. Also, results of WGS and SNP analysis correlated more closely with the epidemiologic data than GDPT. In silico results were also compared to a lipopolysaccharide rapid multiplex PCR test. From the data produced in our study, WGS and SNP analysis was superior to REA and GDPT and highlighted some of the issues with the older tests.

  6. A molecular switch sensor for detection of PRSS1 genotype based on site-specific DNA cleavage of restriction endonuclease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Qicai; Gao, Feng; Weng, Shaohuang; Peng, Huaping; Lin, Liqing; Zhao, Chengfei; Lin, Xinhua

    2015-01-01

    PRSS1 mutations or polymorphism in the peripheral blood of patients can be used as susceptible molecular markers to pancreatic cancer. A sensor for selective electrochemical detection of PRSS1 genotypes was developed based on site-specific DNA cleavage of restriction endonuclease EcoRI. A mercapto-modified hairpin probe was immobilized on a gold electrode. The probe's neck can be cleaved by EcoRI in the absence of rs10273639 C/C of PRSS1 genotype, but it cannot be cleaved in the presence of T/T. The difference in quantity of electric charge was monitored by biosensors before and after enzymatic cleavage. Electrochemical signals are generated by differential pulse voltammetry interrogation of methylene blue (MB) that quantitatively binds to surface-confined hairpin probe via electrostatic interactions. The results suggested this method had a good specificity in distinguishing PRSS1 genotypes. There was a good linear relationship between the charge and the logarithmic function of PRSS1 rs10273639 T/T type DNA concentration (current=120.6303+8.8512log C, R=0.9942). The detection limit was estimated at 0.5 fM. The molecular switch sensor has several advantages, and it is possible to qualitatively, quantitatively, and noninvasively detect PRSS1 genotypes in the blood of patients with pancreatic cancer. © 2015 by the Association of Clinical Scientists, Inc.

  7. A fluorescence method for detection of DNA and DNA methylation based on graphene oxide and restriction endonuclease HpaII.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Wei; Gao, Chunyan; Xiong, Yanxiang; Zhang, Yuanjian; Liu, Songqin; Pu, Yuepu

    2015-01-01

    DNA methylation plays an important role in many biological events and is associated with various diseases. Most traditional methods for detection of DNA methylation are based on the complex and expensive bisulfite method. In this paper, we report a novel fluorescence method to detect DNA and DNA methylation based on graphene oxide (GO) and restriction endonuclease HpaII. The skillfully designed probe DNA labeled with 5-carboxyfluorescein (FAM) and optimized GO concentration keep the probe/target DNA still adsorbed on the GO. After the cleavage action of HpaII the labeled FAM is released from the GO surface and its fluorescence recovers, which could be used to detect DNA in the linear range of 50 pM-50 nM with a detection limit of 43 pM. DNA methylation induced by transmethylase (Mtase) or other chemical reagents prevents HpaII from recognizing and cleaving the specific site; as a result, fluorescence cannot recover. The fluorescence recovery efficiency is closely related to the DNA methylation level, which can be used to detect DNA methylation by comparing it with the fluorescence in the presence of intact target DNA. The method for detection of DNA and DNA methylation is simple, reliable and accurate. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. Phosphate steering by Flap Endonuclease 1 promotes 5′-flap specificity and incision to prevent genome instability

    KAUST Repository

    Tsutakawa, Susan E.

    2017-06-27

    DNA replication and repair enzyme Flap Endonuclease 1 (FEN1) is vital for genome integrity, and FEN1 mutations arise in multiple cancers. FEN1 precisely cleaves single-stranded (ss) 5\\'-flaps one nucleotide into duplex (ds) DNA. Yet, how FEN1 selects for but does not incise the ss 5\\'-flap was enigmatic. Here we combine crystallographic, biochemical and genetic analyses to show that two dsDNA binding sites set the 5\\'polarity and to reveal unexpected control of the DNA phosphodiester backbone by electrostatic interactions. Via phosphate steering\\', basic residues energetically steer an inverted ss 5\\'-flap through a gateway over FEN1\\'s active site and shift dsDNA for catalysis. Mutations of these residues cause an 18,000-fold reduction in catalytic rate in vitro and large-scale trinucleotide (GAA) repeat expansions in vivo, implying failed phosphate-steering promotes an unanticipated lagging-strand template-switch mechanism during replication. Thus, phosphate steering is an unappreciated FEN1 function that enforces 5\\'-flap specificity and catalysis, preventing genomic instability.

  9. Double-stranded endonuclease activity in Bacillus halodurans clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats (CRISPR)-associated Cas2 protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nam, Ki Hyun; Ding, Fran; Haitjema, Charles; Huang, Qingqiu; DeLisa, Matthew P; Ke, Ailong

    2012-10-19

    The CRISPR (clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats) system is a prokaryotic RNA-based adaptive immune system against extrachromosomal genetic elements. Cas2 is a universally conserved core CRISPR-associated protein required for the acquisition of new spacers for CRISPR adaptation. It was previously characterized as an endoribonuclease with preference for single-stranded (ss)RNA. Here, we show using crystallography, mutagenesis, and isothermal titration calorimetry that the Bacillus halodurans Cas2 (Bha_Cas2) from the subtype I-C/Dvulg CRISPR instead possesses metal-dependent endonuclease activity against double-stranded (ds)DNA. This activity is consistent with its putative function in producing new spacers for insertion into the 5'-end of the CRISPR locus. Mutagenesis and isothermal titration calorimetry studies revealed that a single divalent metal ion (Mg(2+) or Mn(2+)), coordinated by a symmetric Asp pair in the Bha_Cas2 dimer, is involved in the catalysis. We envision that a pH-dependent conformational change switches Cas2 into a metal-binding competent conformation for catalysis. We further propose that the distinct substrate preferences among Cas2 proteins may be determined by the sequence and structure in the β1-α1 loop.

  10. Structure-specific DNA endonuclease Mus81/Eme1 generates DNA damage caused by Chk1 inactivation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Josep V Forment

    Full Text Available The DNA-damage checkpoint kinase Chk1 is essential in higher eukaryotes due to its role in maintaining genome stability in proliferating cells. CHK1 gene deletion is embryonically lethal, and Chk1 inhibition in replicating cells causes cell-cycle defects that eventually lead to perturbed replication and replication-fork collapse, thus generating endogenous DNA damage. What is the cause of replication-fork collapse when Chk1 is inactivated, however, remains poorly understood. Here, we show that generation of DNA double-strand breaks at replication forks when Chk1 activity is compromised relies on the DNA endonuclease complex Mus81/Eme1. Importantly, we show that Mus81/Eme1-dependent DNA damage--rather than a global increase in replication-fork stalling--is the cause of incomplete replication in Chk1-deficient cells. Consequently, Mus81/Eme1 depletion alleviates the S-phase progression defects associated with Chk1 deficiency, thereby increasing cell survival. Chk1-mediated protection of replication forks from Mus81/Eme1 even under otherwise unchallenged conditions is therefore vital to prevent uncontrolled fork collapse and ensure proper S-phase progression in human cells.

  11. The major role of human AP-endonuclease homolog Apn2 in repair of abasic sites in Schizosaccharomyces pombe.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ribar, Balazs; Izumi, Tadahide; Mitra, Sankar

    2004-01-01

    The abasic (AP) sites, the major mutagenic and cytotoxic genomic lesions, induced directly by oxidative stress and indirectly after excision of damaged bases by DNA glycosylases, are repaired by AP-endonucleases (APEs). Among two APEs in Saccharomyces cerevisiae, Apn1 provides the major APE activity, and Apn2, the ortholog of the mammalian APE, provides back-up activity. We have cloned apn1 and apn2 genes of Schizosaccharomyces pombe, and have shown that inactivation of Apn2 and not Apn1 sensitizes this fission yeast to alkylation and oxidative damage-inducing agents, which is further enhanced by Apn1 inactivation. We also show that Uve1, present in S.pombe but not in S.cerevisiae, provides the back-up APE activity together with Apn1. We confirmed the presence of APE activity in recombinant Apn2 and in crude cell extracts. Thus S.pombe is distinct from S.cerevisiae, and is similar to mammalian cells in having Apn2 as the major APE.

  12. Biometrics for home networks security

    KAUST Repository

    Ansari, Imran Shafique

    2009-01-01

    Hacking crimes committed to the home networks are increasing. Advanced network protection is not always possible for the home networks. In this paper we will study the ability of using biometric systems for authentication in home networks. ©2009 IEEE.

  13. An information theoretic characterisation of auditory encoding.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tobias Overath

    2007-10-01

    Full Text Available The entropy metric derived from information theory provides a means to quantify the amount of information transmitted in acoustic streams like speech or music. By systematically varying the entropy of pitch sequences, we sought brain areas where neural activity and energetic demands increase as a function of entropy. Such a relationship is predicted to occur in an efficient encoding mechanism that uses less computational resource when less information is present in the signal: we specifically tested the hypothesis that such a relationship is present in the planum temporale (PT. In two convergent functional MRI studies, we demonstrated this relationship in PT for encoding, while furthermore showing that a distributed fronto-parietal network for retrieval of acoustic information is independent of entropy. The results establish PT as an efficient neural engine that demands less computational resource to encode redundant signals than those with high information content.

  14. Encoding Microreactors with Droplet Chains in Microfluidics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Wenya; Lin, Gungun; Ge, Jin; Fassbender, Jürgen; Makarov, Denys

    2017-12-13

    Droplet-based high throughput biomolecular screening and combinatorial synthesis entail a viable indexing strategy to be developed for the identification of each microreactor. Here, we propose a novel indexing scheme based on the generation of droplet sequences on demand to form unique encoding droplet chains in fluidic networks. These codes are represented by multiunit and multilevel droplets packages, with each code unit possessing several distinct signal levels, potentially allowing large encoding capacity. For proof of concept, we use magnetic nanoparticles as the encoding material and a giant magnetoresistance (GMR) sensor-based active sorting system supplemented with an optical detector to generate and decode the sequence of one exemplar sample droplet reactor and a 4-unit quaternary magnetic code. The indexing capacity offered by 4-unit multilevel codes with this indexing strategy is estimated to exceed 104, which holds great promise for large-scale droplet-based screening and synthesis.

  15. Condensation in insulated homes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wiley, R A

    1978-05-28

    A research proposal on condensation in insulated homes is presented. Information is provided on: justification for condensation control; previous work and present outlook (good vapor barrier, condensation and retrofit insulation, vapor barrier decreases condensation, brick-veneer walls, condensation in stress-skin panels, air-conditioned buildings, retrofitting for conservation, study on mobile homes, high indoor relative humidity, report on various homes); and procedure (after funding has been secured). Measures are briefly described on opening walls, testing measures, and retrofitting procedures. An extensive bibliography and additional informative citations are included. (MCW)

  16. Encoding and Decoding Procedures for Arrangements

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexander A. Babaev

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available This article discusses an algorithm based on the encoding procedure for representing a set of arrangement elements as a single number. Also the author provides the procedure for the inverse transformation of the code into arrangement elements. In addition the Article includes recommendations on the use of the above procedures in combinatorial algorithms of optimization.

  17. Encoders for block-circulant LDPC codes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Divsalar, Dariush (Inventor); Abbasfar, Aliazam (Inventor); Jones, Christopher R. (Inventor); Dolinar, Samuel J. (Inventor); Thorpe, Jeremy C. (Inventor); Andrews, Kenneth S. (Inventor); Yao, Kung (Inventor)

    2009-01-01

    Methods and apparatus to encode message input symbols in accordance with an accumulate-repeat-accumulate code with repetition three or four are disclosed. Block circulant matrices are used. A first method and apparatus make use of the block-circulant structure of the parity check matrix. A second method and apparatus use block-circulant generator matrices.

  18. Optimal Achievable Encoding for Brain Machine Interface

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-12-22

    Brain - Machine Interface Eduardo Chichilnisky Leland Stanford Junior...Oct 2016 – 30 Sep 2017 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER Optimal Achievable Encoding for Brain - Machine Interface 5b...Stanford Artificial Retina 15. SUBJECT TERMS Artificial retina, Retinal prosthesis, Brain - machine interface , Brain -computer interface ,

  19. Evaluative and Taxonomic Encoding in Children's Memory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kail, Robert V., Jr.; Schroll, John T.

    Two experiments were conducted to investigate the development of evaluative and taxonomic encoding in children's memory. The task used was a modification of the Wickens short-term memory task in which subjects' recall of words is tested following a distraction task. The first experiment found that 11-year-old children, but not 8-year-old children,…

  20. Visual Memory : The Price of Encoding Details

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nieuwenstein, Mark; Kromm, Maria

    2017-01-01

    Studies on visual long-term memory have shown that we have a tremendous capacity for remembering pictures of objects, even at a highly detailed level. What remains unclear, however, is whether encoding objects at such a detailed level comes at any cost. In the current study, we examined how the

  1. Letter-Position Encoding and Dyslexia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whitney, Carol; Cornelissen, Piers

    2005-01-01

    This article focuses on applying the SERIOL model of orthographic processing to dyslexia. The model is extended to include a phonological route and reading acquisition. We propose that the temporal alignment of serial orthographic and phonological representations is a key aspect of learning to read, driving the formation of a phonemic encoding.…

  2. Phenotypic and Molecular Characterization of Plasmid- Encoded ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Purpose: To investigate the distribution of plasmid-encoded extended spectrum beta-lacatamases (ESBLs) in Lahore, Pakistan using different phenotypic and molecular methods. Methods: Escherichia coli and Klebsiella spp were obtained over a period of nineteen months (June 2007 to December 2008). Both were tested ...

  3. Ostomy Home Skills Program

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    Full Text Available ... entire surgical team with quality, comprehensive education. The standardized interactive program has been developed by the American ... Ostomy Home Skills Hospital Quality Improvement Package The standardized interactive program has been developed by the American ...

  4. Ostomy Home Skills Program

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    Full Text Available ... Complete the Ostomy Patient Survey . We need your opinion!) Program outcomes The ACS Ostomy Home Skills Kit ... ACS Links About ACS ACS Foundation Have a Question? Press Releases Shop My Profile American College of ...

  5. Home Health PPS

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — Under prospective payment, Medicare pays home health agencies (HHAs) a predetermined base payment. The payment is adjusted for the health condition and care needs of...

  6. Home Health Compare Data

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — These are the official datasets used on the Medicare.gov Home Health Compare Website provided by the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services. These data allow you...

  7. Nursing Home Data Compendium

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — The compendium contains figures and tables presenting data on all Medicare- and Medicaid-certified nursing homes in the United States as well as the residents in...

  8. Nursing Home Compare Data

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — These are the official datasets used on the Medicare.gov Nursing Home Compare Website provided by the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services. These data allow...

  9. Home Improvements Prevent Falls

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Adults / How Can Older Adults Prevent Falls? / Home Improvements Prevent Falls Winter 2014 Issue: Volume 8 Number 4 Page 16-17 MedlinePlus | Subscribe | Magazine Information | Contact Us | Viewers & Players Friends of the National Library of Medicine (FNLM)

  10. Genetics Home Reference: aceruloplasminemia

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... an inherited neurodegenerative disease with impairment of iron homeostasis. Ann N Y Acad Sci. 2004 Mar;1012:299-305. Review. Citation on PubMed More from Genetics Home Reference Bulletins Crick, Watson, and Wilkins Awarded ...

  11. Managing migraines at home

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/patientinstructions/000420.htm Managing migraines at home To use the sharing features ... you drink every day. Learn and practice stress management . Some people find relaxation exercises and meditation helpful. ...

  12. Ostomy Home Skills Program

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    Full Text Available ... Program Commission on Cancer National Accreditation Program for Breast Centers National Cancer Database National Accreditation Program for Rectal Cancer Oncology Medical Home Accreditation Program Stereotactic Breast Biopsy Accreditation Program Cancer Programs Staff Information Children's ...

  13. Staying safe at home

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... both smoke and CO. Make sure that your home heating system and all your appliances are all working correctly. DO NOT leave a ... Never reach into water to get a fallen appliance unless it is unplugged.

  14. Genetics Home Reference: hemophilia

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Share: Email Facebook Twitter Home Health Conditions Hemophilia Hemophilia Printable PDF Open All Close All Enable Javascript to view the expand/collapse boxes. Description Hemophilia is a bleeding disorder that slows the blood ...

  15. Heart failure - home monitoring

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/patientinstructions/000113.htm Heart failure - home monitoring To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. Heart failure is a condition in which the heart is ...

  16. Ostomy Home Skills Program

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    Full Text Available ... Trauma and EMS Cancer and Research Health Information Technology Scope of Practice Pediatric Issues Other Federal Legislative ... The Ostomy Home Skills Kit supports patients with educational and simulation materials to learn and practice the ...

  17. Genetics Home Reference: desmosterolosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Neurological Disorders KidsHealth from Nemours: Cholesterol and Your Child KidsHealth from Nemours: Delayed Speech or Language Development MalaCards: desmosterolosis Merck Manual Home Edition for Patients ...

  18. Genetics Home Reference: sialidosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Share: Email Facebook Twitter Home Health Conditions Sialidosis Sialidosis Printable PDF Open All Close All Enable Javascript to view the expand/collapse boxes. Description Sialidosis is a severe inherited disorder that affects many ...

  19. Genetics Home Reference: osteoarthritis

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Share: Email Facebook Twitter Home Health Conditions Osteoarthritis Osteoarthritis Printable PDF Open All Close All Enable Javascript to view the expand/collapse boxes. Description Osteoarthritis is a common disease of the joints that ...

  20. Genetics Home Reference: schizophrenia

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Share: Email Facebook Twitter Home Health Conditions Schizophrenia Schizophrenia Printable PDF Open All Close All Enable Javascript to view the expand/collapse boxes. Description Schizophrenia is a brain disorder classified as a psychosis, ...

  1. Ostomy Home Skills Program

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    Full Text Available ... System (PQRS) Value-Based Payment Modifier Accountable Care Organizations Regulatory Burden Reduction Stark Law and Anti-Kickback ... Order Today Ostomy Home Skills Kit (login or create account first) Skills Kits Broadcast Rights for Hospitals ...

  2. Home Oxygen Therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... dewar ) that acts like a large thermos. When released, the liquid oxygen immediately converts to a gas ... must be periodically refilled by the home care company but not as frequently as with the older ...

  3. Genetics Home Reference: aniridia

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Share: Email Facebook Twitter Home Health Conditions aniridia aniridia Printable PDF Open All Close All Enable Javascript to view the expand/collapse boxes. Description Aniridia is an eye disorder characterized by a complete ...

  4. Home Health PPS - Reports

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — Abt Associates July 21, 2010 Analysis of 2000-2008 Home Health Case-mix Change Report estimates the extent to which the observed increases in average case-mix were...

  5. Nursing Home Compare

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — The data that is used by the Nursing Home Compare tool can be downloaded for public use. This functionality is primarily used by health policy researchers and the...

  6. Genetics Home Reference: vitiligo

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Share: Email Facebook Twitter Home Health Conditions Vitiligo Vitiligo Printable PDF Open All Close All Enable Javascript to view the expand/collapse boxes. Description Vitiligo is a condition that causes patchy loss of ...

  7. Ostomy Home Skills Program

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Kits Broadcast Rights for Hospitals Ostomy Home Skills Hospital Quality Improvement Package The standardized interactive program has been developed by the ... and Associates Medical Students International Surgeons ...

  8. Ostomy Home Skills Program

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    Full Text Available ... login or create account first) Skills Kits Broadcast Rights for Hospitals Ostomy Home Skills Hospital Quality Improvement ... American College of Surgeons, Chicago, IL 60611-3211 | Privacy Policy | Terms of Use

  9. Genetics Home Reference: porphyria

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Share: Email Facebook Twitter Home Health Conditions Porphyria Porphyria Printable PDF Open All Close All Enable Javascript to view the expand/collapse boxes. Description Porphyria is a group of disorders caused by abnormalities ...

  10. Ostomy Home Skills Program

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    Full Text Available ... at ACS Careers at ACS About ACS Career Types Working at ACS ... Family Contact My Profile Shop ( 0 ) Cart Donate American College of Surgeons Education Patients and Family Skills Programs Ostomy Home Skills ...

  11. Ostomy Home Skills Program

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    Full Text Available ... Subscribe ACS Case Reviews Login CME Test Login Author Instructions Sample Article Chapter Competition Contact Resources in ... login or create account first) Skills Kits Broadcast Rights for Hospitals Ostomy Home Skills Hospital Quality Improvement ...

  12. Ostomy Home Skills Program

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    Full Text Available ... and changing a pouch, problem solving, and home management. A DVD with demonstration of each skill Stoma Practice Model Stoma supplies (measurement guide, marking pen, scissors, sample ...

  13. Ostomy Home Skills Program

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    Full Text Available ... Medical Student Core Curriculum ACS/ASE Medical Student Simulation-Based Surgical Skills Curriculum Cancer Education Cancer Education ... Home Skills Kit supports patients with educational and simulation materials to learn and practice the skills needed ...

  14. Genetics Home Reference: achondroplasia

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Share: Email Facebook Twitter Home Health Conditions Achondroplasia Achondroplasia Printable PDF Open All Close All Enable Javascript to view the expand/collapse boxes. Description Achondroplasia is a form of short-limbed dwarfism. The ...

  15. Home Health Quality Initiative

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — The instrument-data collection tool used to collect and report performance data by home health agencies is called the Outcome and Assessment Information Set (OASIS)....

  16. Home Health Care Agencies

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — A list of all Home Health Agencies that have been registered with Medicare. The list includes addresses, phone numbers, and quality measure ratings for each agency.

  17. Genetics Home Reference: preeclampsia

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Share: Email Facebook Twitter Home Health Conditions Preeclampsia Preeclampsia Printable PDF Open All Close All Enable Javascript to view the expand/collapse boxes. Description Preeclampsia is a complication of pregnancy in which affected ...

  18. Pervasive Home Environments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bull, P.; Limb, R.; Payne, R.

    An increasing number of computers and other equipment, such as games consoles and multimedia appliances for the home, have networking capability. The rapid growth of broadband in the home is also fuelling the demand for people to network their homes. In the near future we will see a number of market sectors trying to 'own' the home by providing gateways either from the traditional ISP or from games and other service providers. The consumer is bombarded with attractive advertising to acquire the latest technological advances, but is left with a plethora of different appliances, which have a bewildering range of requirements and features in terms of networking, user interface, and higher-level communications protocols. In many cases, these are proprietary, preventing interworking. Such technical and usability anarchy confuses the consumer and could ultimately suppress market adoption.

  19. HOME Income Limits

    Data.gov (United States)

    Department of Housing and Urban Development — HOME Income Limits are calculated using the same methodology that HUD uses for calculating the income limits for the Section 8 program. These limits are based on HUD...

  20. Ostomy Home Skills Program

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    Full Text Available ... Specific Registry Surgeon Specific Registry News and Updates Account Setup Resources and FAQs Features of the SSR ... Today Ostomy Home Skills Kit (login or create account first) Skills Kits Broadcast Rights for Hospitals Ostomy ...

  1. Ostomy Home Skills Program

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    Full Text Available ... Trauma and EMS Cancer and Research Health Information Technology Scope of Practice Pediatric Issues Other Federal Legislative ... create account first) Skills Kits Broadcast Rights for Hospitals Ostomy Home Skills Hospital Quality Improvement Package The ...

  2. How Attention Modulates Encoding of Dynamic Stimuli

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Noga Oren

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available When encoding a real-life, continuous stimulus, the same neural circuits support processing and integration of prior as well as new incoming information. This ongoing interplay is modulated by attention, which is evident in the prefrontal cortex sections of the task positive network (TPN, and in the posterior cingulate cortex (PCC, a hub of the default mode network (DMN. Yet the exact nature of such modulation is still unclear. To investigate this issue, we utilized an fMRI task that employed movies as the encoded stimuli and manipulated attentional load via an easy or hard secondary task that was performed simultaneously with encoding. Results showed increased intersubject correlation (inter-SC levels when encoding movies in a condition of high, as compared to low attentional load. This was evident in bilateral ventrolateral and dorsomedial prefrontal cortices and the dorsal PCC (dPCC. These regions became more attuned to the combination of the movie and the secondary task as the attentional demand of the task increased. Activation analyses revealed that at higher load the frontal TPN regions were more activated, whereas the dPCC was more deactivated. Attentional load also influenced connectivity within and between the networks. At high load the dPCC was anti-correlated to the frontal regions, which were more functionally coherent amongst themselves. Finally and critically, greater inter-SC in the dPCC at high load during encoding predicted lower memory strength when that information was retrieved. This association between inter-SC levels and memory strength suggest that as attentional demands increased, the dPCC was more attuned to the secondary task at the expense of the encoded stimulus, thus weakening memory for the encoded stimulus. Together, our findings show that attentional load modulated the function of core TPN and DMN regions. Furthermore, the observed correlation between memory strength and the modulation of the dPCC points to this

  3. Home management of haemophilia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teitel, J M; Barnard, D; Israels, S; Lillicrap, D; Poon, M-C; Sek, J

    2004-03-01

    The demonstrated benefits of home care for haemophilia include improved quality of life, less pain and disability, fewer hospitalizations, and less time lost from work or school. Although reduced mortality has not been demonstrated, the substantial increase in longevity since the early 1980s correlates with the introduction of home treatment and prophylaxis programmes. These programmes must be designed and monitored by haemophilia treatment centres (HTC), which are staffed with professionals with broad and complementary expertise in the disease and its complications. In return, patients and their families must be willing to accept the reciprocal responsibilities that come from administering blood products or their recombinant equivalents at home. Patients with inhibitors to factors VIII or IX pose special challenges, but these complications do not obviate participation in home care programmes. Home care was an essential prerequisite to the introduction of effective prophylactic factor replacement therapy. Prophylaxis offers significant improvements in quality of life, but requires a substantial commitment. The use of implantable venous access devices can eliminate some of the difficulty and discomfort of peripheral venous access in small children, but brings additional risks. The future holds the promise of factor concentrates for home use that have longer half-lives, or can be administered by alternate routes. Knowledge of patient genotypes may allow treatments tailored to avoid complications such as inhibitor development. Gene therapy trials, which are currently ongoing, will ultimately lead to gene-based treatments as a complement to traditional protein-based therapy.

  4. Ambiguities: residents' experience of 'nursing home as my home'.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakrem, Sigrid; Vinsnes, Anne G; Harkless, Gene E; Paulsen, Bård; Seim, Arnfinn

    2013-09-01

    Residential care in nursing homes continues to be necessary for those individuals who are no longer able to live at home. Uncovering what nursing home residents' view as quality of care in nursing homes will help further understanding of how best to provide high quality, person-centred care. To describe residents' experiences of living in a nursing home related to quality of care. The study utilises a descriptive exploratory design. In-depth interviews were undertaken with 15 residents who were not cognitively impaired, aged 65 and over and living in one of four nursing homes. The interviews were transcribed verbatim and analysed by categorising of meaning. Residents perceived the nursing home as their home, but at the same time not 'a home'. This essential ambiguity created the tension from which the categories of perceptions of quality emerged. Four main categories of quality of care experience were identified: 'Being at home in a nursing home', 'Paying the price for 24-hour care', 'Personal habits and institutional routines', and 'Meaningful activities for a meaningful day'. Ambiguities concerning the nursing home as a home and place to live, a social environment in which the residents experience most of their social life and the institution where professional health service is provided were uncovered. High-quality care was when ambiguities were managed well and a home could be created within the institution. Implication for practice. Achieving quality care in nursing homes requires reconciling the ambiguities of the nursing home as a home. This implies helping residents to create a private home distinct from the professional home, allowing residents' personal habits to guide institutional routines and supporting meaningful activities. Using these resident developed quality indicators is an important step in improving nursing home services. © 2012 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  5. Crystallographic and bioinformatic studies on restriction endonucleases: inference of evolutionary relationships in the "midnight zone" of homology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bujnicki, Janusz M

    2003-10-01

    Type II restriction endonucleases (ENases) cleave DNA with remarkable sequence specificity. Their discovery in 1970 and studies on molecular genetics and biochemistry carried out over the past four decades laid foundations for recombinant DNA techniques. Today, restriction enzymes are indispensable tools in molecular biology and molecular medicine and a paradigm for proteins that specifically interact with DNA as well as a challenging target for protein engineering. The sequence-structure-function relationships for these proteins are therefore of central interest in biotechnology. However, among numerous ENase sequences, only a few exhibit statistically significant similarity in pairwise comparisons, which was initially interpreted as evidence for the lack of common origin. Nevertheless, X-ray crystallographic studies of seemingly dissimilar type II ENases demonstrated that they share a common structural core and metal-binding/catalytic site, arguing for extreme divergence rather than independent evolution. A similar nuclease domain has been also identified in various enzymes implicated in DNA repair and recombination. Ironically, following the series of crystallographic studies suggesting homology of all type II ENases, bioinformatic studies provided evidence that some restriction enzymes are in fact diverged members of unrelated nuclease superfamilies: Nuc, HNH and GIY-YIG. Hence, the restriction enzymes as a whole, represent a group of functionally similar proteins, which evolved on multiple occasions and subsequently diverged into the "midnight zone" of homology, where common origins within particular groups can be inferred only from structure-guided comparisons. The structure-guided approaches used for this purpose include: identification of functionally important residues using superposition of atomic coordinates, alignment of sequence profiles enhanced by secondary structures, fold recognition, and homology modeling. This review covers recent results of

  6. A newly discovered Bordetella species carries a transcriptionally active CRISPR-Cas with a small Cas9 endonuclease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ivanov, Yury V; Shariat, Nikki; Register, Karen B; Linz, Bodo; Rivera, Israel; Hu, Kai; Dudley, Edward G; Harvill, Eric T

    2015-10-26

    Clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats (CRISPR) and CRISPR-associated genes (cas) are widely distributed among bacteria. These systems provide adaptive immunity against mobile genetic elements specified by the spacer sequences stored within the CRISPR. The CRISPR-Cas system has been identified using Basic Local Alignment Search Tool (BLAST) against other sequenced and annotated genomes and confirmed via CRISPRfinder program. Using Polymerase Chain Reactions (PCR) and Sanger DNA sequencing, we discovered CRISPRs in additional bacterial isolates of the same species of Bordetella. Transcriptional activity and processing of the CRISPR have been assessed via RT-PCR. Here we describe a novel Type II-C CRISPR and its associated genes-cas1, cas2, and cas9-in several isolates of a newly discovered Bordetella species. The CRISPR-cas locus, which is absent in all other Bordetella species, has a significantly lower GC-content than the genome-wide average, suggesting acquisition of this locus via horizontal gene transfer from a currently unknown source. The CRISPR array is transcribed and processed into mature CRISPR RNAs (crRNA), some of which have homology to prophages found in closely related species B. hinzii. Expression of the CRISPR-Cas system and processing of crRNAs with perfect homology to prophages present in closely related species, but absent in that containing this CRISPR-Cas system, suggest it provides protection against phage predation. The 3,117-bp cas9 endonuclease gene from this novel CRISPR-Cas system is 990 bp smaller than that of Streptococcus pyogenes, the 4,017-bp allele currently used for genome editing, and which may make it a useful tool in various CRISPR-Cas technologies.

  7. Differential interaction kinetics of a bipolar structure-specific endonuclease with DNA flaps revealed by single-molecule imaging.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rachid Rezgui

    Full Text Available As DNA repair enzymes are essential for preserving genome integrity, understanding their substrate interaction dynamics and the regulation of their catalytic mechanisms is crucial. Using single-molecule imaging, we investigated the association and dissociation kinetics of the bipolar endonuclease NucS from Pyrococcus abyssi (Pab on 5' and 3'-flap structures under various experimental conditions. We show that association of the PabNucS with ssDNA flaps is largely controlled by diffusion in the NucS-DNA energy landscape and does not require a free 5' or 3' extremity. On the other hand, NucS dissociation is independent of the flap length and thus independent of sliding on the single-stranded portion of the flapped DNA substrates. Our kinetic measurements have revealed previously unnoticed asymmetry in dissociation kinetics from these substrates that is markedly modulated by the replication clamp PCNA. We propose that the replication clamp PCNA enhances the cleavage specificity of NucS proteins by accelerating NucS loading at the ssDNA/dsDNA junctions and by minimizing the nuclease interaction time with its DNA substrate. Our data are also consistent with marked reorganization of ssDNA and nuclease domains occurring during NucS catalysis, and indicate that NucS binds its substrate directly at the ssDNA-dsDNA junction and then threads the ssDNA extremity into the catalytic site. The powerful techniques used here for probing the dynamics of DNA-enzyme binding at the single-molecule have provided new insight regarding substrate specificity of NucS nucleases.

  8. Nuclear depletion of apurinic/apyrimidinic endonuclease 1 (Ape1/Ref-1) is an indicator of energy disruption in neurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Shilpee; Englander, Ella W

    2012-11-01

    Apurinic/apyrimidinic endonuclease 1 (Ape1/Ref-1) is a multifunctional protein critical for cellular survival. Its involvement in adaptive survival responses includes key roles in redox sensing, transcriptional regulation, and repair of DNA damage via the base excision repair (BER) pathway. Ape1 is abundant in most cell types and central in integrating the first BER step catalyzed by different DNA glycosylases. BER is the main process for removal of oxidative DNA lesions in postmitotic brain cells, and after ischemic brain injury preservation of Ape1 coincides with neuronal survival, while its loss has been associated with neuronal death. Here, we report that in cultured primary neurons, diminution of cellular ATP by either oligomycin or H(2)O(2) is accompanied by depletion of nuclear Ape1, while other BER proteins are unaffected and retain their nuclear localization under these conditions. Importantly, while H(2)O(2) induces γH2AX phosphorylation, indicative of chromatin rearrangements in response to DNA damage, oligomycin does not. Furthermore, despite comparable diminution of ATP content, H(2)O(2) and oligomycin differentially affect critical parameters of mitochondrial respiration that ultimately determine cellular ATP content. Taken together, our findings demonstrate that in neurons, nuclear compartmentalization of Ape1 depends on ATP and loss of nuclear Ape1 reflects disruption of neuronal energy homeostasis. Energy crisis is a hallmark of stroke and other ischemic/hypoxic brain injuries. In vivo studies have shown that Ape1 deficit precedes neuronal loss in injured brain regions. Thus, our findings bring to light the possibility that energy failure-induced Ape1 depletion triggers neuronal death in ischemic brain injuries. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. CHIP has a protective role against oxidative stress-induced cell death through specific regulation of Endonuclease G

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, J S; Seo, T W; Yi, J H; Shin, K S; Yoo, S J

    2013-01-01

    Oxidative stress is implicated in carcinogenesis, aging, and neurodegenerative diseases. The E3 ligase C terminus of Hsc-70 interacting protein (CHIP) has a protective role against various stresses by targeting damaged proteins for proteasomal degradation, and thus maintains protein quality control. However, the detailed mechanism by which CHIP protects cells from oxidative stress has not been demonstrated. Here, we show that depletion of CHIP led to elevated Endonuclease G (EndoG) levels and enhanced cell death upon oxidative stress. In contrast, CHIP overexpression reduced EndoG levels, and resulted in reduced or no oxidative stress-induced cell death in cancer cells and primary rat cortical neurons. Under normal conditions Hsp70 mediated the interaction between EndoG and CHIP, downregulating EndoG levels in a Hsp70/proteasome-dependent manner. However, under oxidative stress Hsp70 no longer interacted with EndoG, and the stabilized EndoG translocated to the nucleus and degraded chromosomal DNA. Our data suggest that regulation of the level of EndoG by CHIP in normal conditions may determine the sensitivity to cell death upon oxidative stress. Indeed, injection of H2O2 into the rat brain markedly increased cell death in aged mice compared with young mice, which correlated with elevated levels of EndoG and concurrent downregulation of CHIP in aged mice. Taken together, our findings demonstrate a novel protective mechanism of CHIP against oxidative stress through regulation of EndoG, and provide an opportunity to modulate oxidative stress-induced cell death in cancer and aging. PMID:23764847

  10. Natural C-independent expression of restriction endonuclease in a C protein-associated restriction-modification system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rezulak, Monika; Borsuk, Izabela; Mruk, Iwona

    2016-04-07

    Restriction-modification (R-M) systems are highly prevalent among bacteria and archaea, and appear to play crucial roles in modulating horizontal gene transfer and protection against phage. There is much to learn about these diverse enzymes systems, especially their regulation. Type II R-M systems specify two independent enzymes: a restriction endonuclease (REase) and protective DNA methyltransferase (MTase). Their activities need to be finely balanced in vivo Some R-M systems rely on specialized transcription factors called C (controller) proteins. These proteins play a vital role in the temporal regulation of R-M gene expression, and function to indirectly modulate the horizontal transfer of their genes across the species. We report novel regulation of a C-responsive R-M system that involves a C protein of a poorly-studied structural class - C.Csp231I. Here, the C and REase genes share a bicistronic transcript, and some of the transcriptional auto-control features seen in other C-regulated R-M systems are conserved. However, separate tandem promoters drive most transcription of the REase gene, a distinctive property not seen in other tested C-linked R-M systems. Further, C protein only partially controls REase expression, yet plays a role in system stability and propagation. Consequently, high REase activity was observed after deletion of the entire C gene, and cells bearing the ΔC R-M system were outcompeted in mixed culture assays by those with the WT R-M system. Overall, our data reveal unexpected regulatory variation among R-M systems. © The Author(s) 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Nucleic Acids Research.

  11. Engineered selective plant male sterility through pollen-specific expression of the EcoRI restriction endonuclease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Millwood, Reginald J; Moon, Hong S; Poovaiah, Charleson R; Muthukumar, Balasubramaniam; Rice, John Hollis; Abercrombie, Jason M; Abercrombie, Laura L; Green, William Derek; Stewart, Charles Neal

    2016-05-01

    Unintended gene flow from transgenic plants via pollen, seed and vegetative propagation is a regulatory concern because of potential admixture in food and crop systems, as well as hybridization and introgression to wild and weedy relatives. Bioconfinement of transgenic pollen would help address some of these concerns and enable transgenic plant production for several crops where gene flow is an issue. Here, we demonstrate the expression of the restriction endonuclease EcoRI under the control of the tomato pollen-specific LAT52 promoter is an effective method for generating selective male sterility in Nicotiana tabacum (tobacco). Of nine transgenic events recovered, four events had very high bioconfinement with tightly controlled EcoRI expression in pollen and negligible-to-no expression other plant tissues. Transgenic plants had normal morphology wherein vegetative growth and reproductivity were similar to nontransgenic controls. In glasshouse experiments, transgenic lines were hand-crossed to both male-sterile and emasculated nontransgenic tobacco varieties. Progeny analysis of 16 000-40 000 seeds per transgenic line demonstrated five lines approached (>99.7%) or attained 100% bioconfinement for one or more generations. Bioconfinement was again demonstrated at or near 100% under field conditions where four transgenic lines were grown in close proximity to male-sterile tobacco, and 900-2100 seeds per male-sterile line were analysed for transgenes. Based upon these results, we conclude EcoRI-driven selective male sterility holds practical potential as a safe and reliable transgene bioconfinement strategy. Given the mechanism of male sterility, this method could be applicable to any plant species. © 2015 Society for Experimental Biology, Association of Applied Biologists and John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  12. Evidence of Nosocomial Infection in Japan Caused by High-Level Gentamicin-Resistant Enterococcus faecalis and Identification of the Pheromone-Responsive Conjugative Plasmid Encoding Gentamicin Resistance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Xinghua; Kudo, Michiaki; Takahashi, Ayako; Tanimoto, Koichi; Ike, Yasuyoshi

    1998-01-01

    A total of 1,799 Enterococcus faecalis isolates were isolated from inpatients of Gunma University Hospital, Gunma, Japan, between 1992 and 1996. Four hundred thirty-two (22.3%) of the 1,799 isolates had high-level gentamicin resistance. Eighty-one of the 432 isolates were classified and were placed into four groups (group A through group D) with respect to the EcoRI restriction endonuclease profiles of the plasmid DNAs isolated from these strains. The 81 isolates were isolated from 36 patients. For 35 of the 36 patients, the same gentamicin-resistant isolates were isolated from the same or different specimens isolated from the same patient at different times during the hospitalization. For one other patient, two different groups of the isolates were isolated from the same specimen. Groups A, B, C, and D were isolated from 5, 14, 12, and 6 patients, respectively. The strains had multiple-drug resistance. The restriction endonuclease digestion patterns of the E. faecalis chromosomal DNAs isolated from isolates in the same group were also identical. The patients who had been infected with the gentamicin-resistant isolates from each group were geographically clustered on a ward(s). These results suggest that the isolates in each group were derived from a common source and had spread in the ward. The gentamicin-resistant isolates exhibited a clumping response upon exposure to pheromone (E. faecalis FA2-2 culture filtrate). The gentamicin resistance transferred at a high frequency to the recipient E. faecalis isolates by broth mating, and the pheromone-responsive plasmids encoding the gentamicin resistance were identified in these isolates. PMID:9705374

  13. Apoptotic DNA Degradation into Oligonucleosomal Fragments, but Not Apoptotic Nuclear Morphology, Relies on a Cytosolic Pool of DFF40/CAD Endonuclease*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iglesias-Guimarais, Victoria; Gil-Guiñon, Estel; Gabernet, Gisela; García-Belinchón, Mercè; Sánchez-Osuna, María; Casanelles, Elisenda; Comella, Joan X.; Yuste, Victor J.

    2012-01-01

    Apoptotic cell death is characterized by nuclear fragmentation and oligonucleosomal DNA degradation, mediated by the caspase-dependent specific activation of DFF40/CAD endonuclease. Here, we describe how, upon apoptotic stimuli, SK-N-AS human neuroblastoma-derived cells show apoptotic nuclear morphology without displaying concomitant internucleosomal DNA fragmentation. Cytotoxicity afforded after staurosporine treatment is comparable with that obtained in SH-SY5Y cells, which exhibit a complete apoptotic phenotype. SK-N-AS cell death is a caspase-dependent process that can be impaired by the pan-caspase inhibitor q-VD-OPh. The endogenous inhibitor of DFF40/CAD, ICAD, is correctly processed, and dff40/cad cDNA sequence does not reveal mutations altering its amino acid composition. Biochemical approaches show that both SH-SY5Y and SK-N-AS resting cells express comparable levels of DFF40/CAD. However, the endonuclease is poorly expressed in the cytosolic fraction of healthy SK-N-AS cells. Despite this differential subcellular distribution of DFF40/CAD, we find no differences in the subcellular localization of both pro-caspase-3 and ICAD between the analyzed cell lines. After staurosporine treatment, the preferential processing of ICAD in the cytosolic fraction allows the translocation of DFF40/CAD from this fraction to a chromatin-enriched one. Therefore, the low levels of cytosolic DFF40/CAD detected in SK-N-AS cells determine the absence of DNA laddering after staurosporine treatment. In these cells DFF40/CAD cytosolic levels can be restored by the overexpression of their own endonuclease, which is sufficient to make them proficient at degrading their chromatin into oligonucleosome-size fragments after staurosporine treatment. Altogether, the cytosolic levels of DFF40/CAD are determinants in achieving a complete apoptotic phenotype, including oligonucleosomal DNA degradation. PMID:22253444

  14. Structural analysis of specific metal chelating inhibitor binding to the endonuclease domain of influenza pH1N1 (2009 polymerase.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eva Kowalinski

    Full Text Available It is generally recognised that novel antiviral drugs, less prone to resistance, would be a desirable alternative to current drug options in order to be able to treat potentially serious influenza infections. The viral polymerase, which performs transcription and replication of the RNA genome, is an attractive target for antiviral drugs since potent polymerase inhibitors could directly stop viral replication at an early stage. Recent structural studies on functional domains of the heterotrimeric polymerase, which comprises subunits PA, PB1 and PB2, open the way to a structure based approach to optimise inhibitors of viral replication. In particular, the unique cap-snatching mechanism of viral transcription can be inhibited by targeting either the PB2 cap-binding or PA endonuclease domains. Here we describe high resolution X-ray co-crystal structures of the 2009 pandemic H1N1 (pH1N1 PA endonuclease domain with a series of specific inhibitors, including four diketo compounds and a green tea catechin, all of which chelate the two critical manganese ions in the active site of the enzyme. Comparison of the binding mode of the different compounds and that of a mononucleotide phosphate highlights, firstly, how different substituent groups on the basic metal binding scaffold can be orientated to bind in distinct sub-pockets within the active site cavity, and secondly, the plasticity of certain structural elements of the active site cavity, which result in induced fit binding. These results will be important in optimising the design of more potent inhibitors targeting the cap-snatching endonuclease activity of influenza virus polymerase.

  15. DOE Zero Energy Ready Home Case Study: Palo Duro Homes — Palo Duro Homes, Albuquerque, NM

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    none,

    2014-09-01

    This builder was honored for Most DOE Zero Energy Ready Homes Built in the 2014 Housing Innovation Awards. By July 2014, Palo Duro had completed 152 homes since the program began in 2013 (under the original program title DOE Challenge Home), all of them certified to the stringent efficiency requirements of DOE’s Zero Energy Ready Home program.

  16. DNA-Encoded Dynamic Combinatorial Chemical Libraries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reddavide, Francesco V; Lin, Weilin; Lehnert, Sarah; Zhang, Yixin

    2015-06-26

    Dynamic combinatorial chemistry (DCC) explores the thermodynamic equilibrium of reversible reactions. Its application in the discovery of protein binders is largely limited by difficulties in the analysis of complex reaction mixtures. DNA-encoded chemical library (DECL) technology allows the selection of binders from a mixture of up to billions of different compounds; however, experimental results often show low a signal-to-noise ratio and poor correlation between enrichment factor and binding affinity. Herein we describe the design and application of DNA-encoded dynamic combinatorial chemical libraries (EDCCLs). Our experiments have shown that the EDCCL approach can be used not only to convert monovalent binders into high-affinity bivalent binders, but also to cause remarkably enhanced enrichment of potent bivalent binders by driving their in situ synthesis. We also demonstrate the application of EDCCLs in DNA-templated chemical reactions. © 2015 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  17. Nucleic acid compositions and the encoding proteins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Preston, III, James F.; Chow, Virginia; Nong, Guang; Rice, John D.; St. John, Franz J.

    2014-09-02

    The subject invention provides at least one nucleic acid sequence encoding an aldouronate-utilization regulon isolated from Paenibacillus sp. strain JDR-2, a bacterium which efficiently utilizes xylan and metabolizes aldouronates (methylglucuronoxylosaccharides). The subject invention also provides a means for providing a coordinately regulated process in which xylan depolymerization and product assimilation are coupled in Paenibacillus sp. strain JDR-2 to provide a favorable system for the conversion of lignocellulosic biomass to biobased products. Additionally, the nucleic acid sequences encoding the aldouronate-utilization regulon can be used to transform other bacteria to form organisms capable of producing a desired product (e.g., ethanol, 1-butanol, acetoin, 2,3-butanediol, 1,3-propanediol, succinate, lactate, acetate, malate or alanine) from lignocellulosic biomass.

  18. Parameter Estimation of Turbo Code Encoder

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mehdi Teimouri

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The problem of reconstruction of a channel code consists of finding out its design parameters solely based on its output. This paper investigates the problem of reconstruction of parallel turbo codes. Reconstruction of a turbo code has been addressed in the literature assuming that some of the parameters of the turbo encoder, such as the number of input and output bits of the constituent encoders and puncturing pattern, are known. However in practical noncooperative situations, these parameters are unknown and should be estimated before applying reconstruction process. Considering such practical situations, this paper proposes a novel method to estimate the above-mentioned code parameters. The proposed algorithm increases the efficiency of the reconstruction process significantly by judiciously reducing the size of search space based on an analysis of the observed channel code output. Moreover, simulation results show that the proposed algorithm is highly robust against channel errors when it is fed with noisy observations.

  19. An Encoding of XQuery in Prolog

    Science.gov (United States)

    Almendros-Jiménez, Jesús M.

    In this paper we describe the implementation of (a subset of) the XQuery language using logic programming (in particular, by means of Prolog). Such implementation has been developed using the Prolog interpreter SWI-Prolog. XML files are handled by means of the XML Library of SWI-Prolog. XPath/XQuery are encoded by means of Prolog rules. Such Prolog rules are executed in order to obtain the answer of the query.

  20. Toward Chemical Implementation of Encoded Combinatorial Libraries

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, John; Janda, Kim D.

    1994-01-01

    The recent application of "combinatorial libraries" to supplement existing drug screening processes might simplify and accelerate the search for new lead compounds or drugs. Recently, a scheme for encoded combinatorial chemistry was put forward to surmount a number of the limitations possessed...... by existing methodologies. Here we detail the synthesis of several matrices and the necessary chemistry to implement the conceptual scheme. In addition, we disclose how this novel technology permits a controlled ′dendritic" display of the chemical libraries....

  1. Synergistic Antiviral Activity of S-033188/S-033447, a Novel Inhibitor of Influenza Virus Cap-Dependent Endonuclease, in Combination with Neuraminidase Inhibitors In Vitro

    OpenAIRE

    Kitano, Mitsutaka; Yamamoto, Atsuko; Noshi, Takeshi; Kawai, Makoto; Yoshida, Ryu; Sato, Akihiko; Shishido, Takao; Naito, Akira

    2017-01-01

    Abstract Background S-033447, an active form of orally available prodrug S-033188, is a novel small molecule inhibitor of cap-dependent endonuclease that is essential for influenza virus transcription and replication. In this study, we evaluated the inhibitory effect of S-033188 in combination with neuraminidase inhibitors on the replication of influenza A/H1N1 virus in cultured cells. Methods The inhibitory effects of S-033447 in combination with NA inhibitors on the cytopathic effect of A/P...

  2. Plasmid profiles of Acinetobacter and Enterobacter species of hospital origin: restriction endonuclease analysis of plasmid DNA and transformation of Escherichia coli by R plasmids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spiliopoulou, I; Droukopoulou, A; Athanassiadou, A; Dimitracopoulos, G

    1992-04-01

    A total of 37 multi-resistant strains (20 Acinetobacter calcoaceticus and 17 Enterobacter cloacae) were isolated from patients of the Intensive Care Units. All the isolates were examined for resistance to a battery of antimicrobial agents by the disk diffusion method. Plasmid profiles and restriction endonuclease analysis of plasmid DNA by EcoR1 revealed the spread of one A. calcoaceticus and two E. cloacae endemic strains. Transformation experiments on Escherichia coli competent cells by three plasmids established the presence of R plasmids in the multi-resistant isolates.

  3. Genetic discrimination for three gynogenetic clones of silver carp Hypophthalmichthys molitrix, based on restriction endonuclease analysis of Nd5-Nd6 region of mitochondrial DNA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Jianfeng; Ye, Yuzhen; Wu, Qingjiang

    2005-03-01

    Three artificial gynogenetic clones of silver carp were produced for the analysis of restriction enzyme digestion patterns of ND5-ND6 region from mtDNA of the clones. It is revealed that all intraclonal individuals shared completely the same digestion patterns but among interclonal individuals did not. The three clones were mixed and cultured in a pond together for two years, and restriction endonuclease digestion patterns of ND5 ND6 were used as genetic markers to assess the growth performance of each clone.

  4. An Intensional Concurrent Faithful Encoding of Turing Machines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thomas Given-Wilson

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available The benchmark for computation is typically given as Turing computability; the ability for a computation to be performed by a Turing Machine. Many languages exploit (indirect encodings of Turing Machines to demonstrate their ability to support arbitrary computation. However, these encodings are usually by simulating the entire Turing Machine within the language, or by encoding a language that does an encoding or simulation itself. This second category is typical for process calculi that show an encoding of lambda-calculus (often with restrictions that in turn simulates a Turing Machine. Such approaches lead to indirect encodings of Turing Machines that are complex, unclear, and only weakly equivalent after computation. This paper presents an approach to encoding Turing Machines into intensional process calculi that is faithful, reduction preserving, and structurally equivalent. The encoding is demonstrated in a simple asymmetric concurrent pattern calculus before generalised to simplify infinite terms, and to show encodings into Concurrent Pattern Calculus and Psi Calculi.

  5. Encoded libraries of chemically modified peptides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heinis, Christian; Winter, Greg

    2015-06-01

    The use of powerful technologies for generating and screening DNA-encoded protein libraries has helped drive the development of proteins as pharmaceutical ligands. However the development of peptides as pharmaceutical ligands has been more limited. Although encoded peptide libraries are typically several orders of magnitude larger than classical chemical libraries, can be more readily screened, and can give rise to higher affinity ligands, their use as pharmaceutical ligands is limited by their intrinsic properties. Two of the intrinsic limitations include the rotational flexibility of the peptide backbone and the limited number (20) of natural amino acids. However these limitations can be overcome by use of chemical modification. For example, the libraries can be modified to introduce topological constraints such as cyclization linkers, or to introduce new chemical entities such as small molecule ligands, fluorophores and photo-switchable compounds. This article reviews the chemistry involved, the properties of the peptide ligands, and the new opportunities offered by chemical modification of DNA-encoded peptide libraries. Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  6. Blind Identification of Convolutional Encoder Parameters

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shaojing Su

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper gives a solution to the blind parameter identification of a convolutional encoder. The problem can be addressed in the context of the noncooperative communications or adaptive coding and modulations (ACM for cognitive radio networks. We consider an intelligent communication receiver which can blindly recognize the coding parameters of the received data stream. The only knowledge is that the stream is encoded using binary convolutional codes, while the coding parameters are unknown. Some previous literatures have significant contributions for the recognition of convolutional encoder parameters in hard-decision situations. However, soft-decision systems are applied more and more as the improvement of signal processing techniques. In this paper we propose a method to utilize the soft information to improve the recognition performances in soft-decision communication systems. Besides, we propose a new recognition method based on correlation attack to meet low signal-to-noise ratio situations. Finally we give the simulation results to show the efficiency of the proposed methods.

  7. Shift-encoded optically multiplexed imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shah, Vinay; Rachlin, Yaron; Shepard, R. Hamilton; Shih, Tina

    2017-04-01

    In a multiplexed image, multiple fields-of-view (FoVs) are superimposed onto a common focal plane. The attendant gain in sensor FoV provides a new degree of freedom in the design of an imaging system, allowing for performance tradeoffs not available in traditional optical designs. We explore design choices relating to a shift-encoded optically multiplexed imaging system and discuss their performance implications. Unlike in a traditional imaging system, a single multiplexed image has a fundamental ambiguity regarding the location of objects in the image. We present a system that can shift each FoV independently to break this ambiguity and compare it to other potential disambiguation techniques. We then discuss the optical, mechanical, and encoding design choices of a shift-encoding midwave infrared imaging system that multiplexes six 15×15 deg FoVs onto a single one megapixel focal plane. Using this sensor, we demonstrate a computationally demultiplexed wide FoV video.

  8. At Home with Students

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lyngsø, Anita

    2015-01-01

    on “NETeducation,” a full-scale development project in nursing education (Lyngsø, 2014). With a focus on online professional education as the starting point, the process of research will follow the shifting learning process, through phases in the virtual classroom and in the students’ own homes. Research in online......This article reflects the methodological challenges presented in the research process, where the principle of 'following the field’ means that the researcher must also follow students engaged in online activities in their own homes. The ethnographic studies are a part of a PhD project...

  9. HomePort

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Le Guilly, Thibaut; Olsen, Petur; Ravn, Anders Peter

    2013-01-01

    Ambient Intelligence systems use many sensors and actuators, with a diversity of networks, protocols and technologies which makes it impossible to access the devices in a common manner. This paper presents the HomePort software, which provides an open source RESTful interface to heterogeneous...... sensor networks, allowing a simple unified access to virtually any kind of protocol using well known standards. HomePort includes means to provide event notification, as well as a tracing mechanism. The software is implemented and we report on initial experiments and provide an evaluation that shows...

  10. [Assessment of our home care and home palliative care].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Midorikawa, Yasuhiko; Suzushino, Seiko; Tamotsu, Kiyokazu

    2014-12-01

    We conducted home care and home palliative care from the department of home care. We provided home care services to 190 patients(105 men, 85 women)in October 2013. Their average age was 78.7(range: 32-102)years old, and home care had been underway from 1 day to 8 years, 10 months. Among all participants, 168(88.4%)suffered from malignant diseases, 168 patients had died, and over half of deceased patients(88 out of 168)had died at home. We used opioids for control of cancer pain, carried out home parenteral nutrition(HPN), home enteral nutrition(HEN), percutaneous endoscopic gastrostomy( PEG), and removed pleural effusion and ascites during home care. In order to facilitate the practice of palliative care by the palliative care team, which consists of various medical staff in the hospital, we are giving high priority to education and enlightenment in the hospital. To provide enlightenment, education, and cooperation between regional home care and home palliative care, we are also conducting educational lectures in the regional party of the Iwaki city medical associate, and providing combined educational-medical training for home care and home palliative care by various medical staff.

  11. Windows Home Server users guide

    CERN Document Server

    Edney, Andrew

    2008-01-01

    Windows Home Server brings the idea of centralized storage, backup and computer management out of the enterprise and into the home. Windows Home Server is built for people with multiple computers at home and helps to synchronize them, keep them updated, stream media between them, and back them up centrally. Built on a similar foundation as the Microsoft server operating products, it's essentially Small Business Server for the home.This book details how to install, configure, and use Windows Home Server and explains how to connect to and manage different clients such as Windows XP, Windows Vist

  12. Bacterial CRISPR/Cas DNA endonucleases: A revolutionary technology that could dramatically impact viral research and treatment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kennedy, Edward M.; Cullen, Bryan R., E-mail: bryan.cullen@duke.edu

    2015-05-15

    CRISPR/Cas systems mediate bacterial adaptive immune responses that evolved to protect bacteria from bacteriophage and other horizontally transmitted genetic elements. Several CRISPR/Cas systems exist but the simplest variant, referred to as Type II, has a single effector DNA endonuclease, called Cas9, which is guided to its viral DNA target by two small RNAs, the crRNA and the tracrRNA. Initial efforts to adapt the CRISPR/Cas system for DNA editing in mammalian cells, which focused on the Cas9 protein from Streptococcus pyogenes (Spy), demonstrated that Spy Cas9 can be directed to DNA targets in mammalian cells by tracrRNA:crRNA fusion transcripts called single guide RNAs (sgRNA). Upon binding, Cas9 induces DNA cleavage leading to mutagenesis as a result of error prone non-homologous end joining (NHEJ). Recently, the Spy Cas9 system has been adapted for high throughput screening of genes in human cells for their relevance to a particular phenotype and, more generally, for the targeted inactivation of specific genes, in cell lines and in vivo in a number of model organisms. The latter aim seems likely to be greatly enhanced by the recent development of Cas9 proteins from bacterial species such as Neisseria meningitidis and Staphyloccus aureus that are small enough to be expressed using adeno-associated (AAV)-based vectors that can be readily prepared at very high titers. The evolving Cas9-based DNA editing systems therefore appear likely to not only impact virology by allowing researchers to screen for human genes that affect the replication of pathogenic human viruses of all types but also to derive clonal human cell lines that lack individual gene products that either facilitate or restrict viral replication. Moreover, high titer AAV-based vectors offer the possibility of directly targeting DNA viruses that infect discrete sites in the human body, such as herpes simplex virus and hepatitis B virus, with the hope that the entire population of viral DNA genomes

  13. Home Health Compare: Find a Home Health Agency

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... page could not be loaded. The Medicare.gov Home page currently does not fully support browsers with " ... widget - Select to show Back to top Footer Home A federal government website managed and paid for ...

  14. School Music Goes Home

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kenney, Susan Hobson

    2012-01-01

    This article explores ways for music teachers to influence music making in the home. Often preschool music programs include parents in the music education process, but when children enter school, the parent connection is not usually continued with the same intensity. This article will serve as a catalyst for further conversations on ways to…

  15. Home Network Security

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Scholten, Johan; van Dijk, H.W.

    2008-01-01

    Service discovery and secure and safe service usage are essential elements in the deployment of home and personal networks. Because no system administrator is present, setup and daily operation of such a network has to be automated as much as possible with a high degree of user friendliness. To

  16. Composting Begins at Home.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dreckman, George P.

    1994-01-01

    Reports the results of a year-long home composting pilot program run by the city of Madison, Wisconsin. The study was designed to gather data on the amount and type of materials composted by 300 volunteer households and to determine the feasibility of a full-scale program. (LZ)

  17. FDA Kids' Home Page

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... and Drug Administration A to Z Index Follow FDA En Español Search FDA Submit search Popular Content Home Food Drugs Medical ... 日本語 | فارسی | English FDA Accessibility Careers FDA Basics FOIA No FEAR Act ...

  18. Home health care

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Board Certified in Internal Medicine and Hospice and Palliative Medicine, Atlanta, GA. Also reviewed by David Zieve, MD, MHA, Isla Ogilvie, PhD, and the A.D.A.M. Editorial team. Related MedlinePlus Health Topics Home Care Services Browse the Encyclopedia A.D.A.M., ...

  19. Ostomy Home Skills Program

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... with educational and simulation materials to learn and practice the skills needed for optimal postoperative recovery. The kit supports ... home management. A DVD with demonstration of each skill Stoma Practice Model Stoma supplies (measurement guide, marking pen, scissors, ...

  20. Depression in nursing homes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Snowdon, John

    2010-11-01

    Although studies have shown the prevalence of depression in nursing homes to be high, under-recognition of depression in these facilities is widespread. Use of screening tests to enhance detection of depressive symptoms has been recommended. This paper aims to provoke discussion about optimal management of depression in nursing homes. The utility of the Cornell Scale for Depression in Dementia (CSDD) is considered. CSDD data relating to residents assessed in 2008-2009 were collected from three Sydney nursing homes. CSDD scores were available from 162 residents, though raters stated they were unable to score participants on at least one item in 47 cases. Scores of 13 or more were recorded for 23% of residents in these facilities, but in most of these cases little was documented in case files to show that the results had been discussed by staff, or that they led to interventions, or that follow-up testing was arranged. Results of CSDD testing should prompt care staff (including doctors) to consider causation of depression in cases where residents are identified as possibly depressed. In particular, there needs to be discussion of how to help residents to cope with disability, losses, and feelings of powerlessness. Research is needed, examining factors that might predict response to antidepressants, and what else helps. Accreditation of nursing homes could be made to depend partly on evidence that staff regularly search for, and (if found) ensure appropriate responses to, depression.