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Sample records for home prothrombin time

  1. Prothrombin time (PT)

    Science.gov (United States)

    PT; Pro-time; Anticoagulant-prothrombin time; Clotting time: protime; INR; International normalized ratio ... PT is measured in seconds. Most of the time, results are given as what is called INR ( ...

  2. An evaluation of patient self-testing competency of prothrombin time for managing anticoagulation: pre-randomization results of VA Cooperative Study #481--The Home INR Study (THINRS).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dolor, Rowena J; Ruybalid, R Lynne; Uyeda, Lauren; Edson, Robert G; Phibbs, Ciaran; Vertrees, Julia E; Shih, Mei-Chiung; Jacobson, Alan K; Matchar, David B

    2010-10-01

    Prior studies suggest patient self-testing (PST) of prothrombin time (PT) can improve the quality of anticoagulation (AC) and reduce complications (e.g., bleeding and thromboembolic events). "The Home INR Study" (THINRS) compared AC management with frequent PST using a home monitoring device to high-quality AC management (HQACM) with clinic-based monitoring on major health outcomes. A key clinical and policy question is whether and which patients can successfully use such devices. We report the results of Part 1 of THINRS in which patients and caregivers were evaluated for their ability to perform PST. Study-eligible patients (n = 3643) were trained to use the home monitoring device and evaluated after 2-4 weeks for PST competency. Information about demographics, medical history, warfarin use, medications, plus measures of numeracy, literacy, cognition, dexterity, and satisfaction with AC were collected. Approximately 80% (2931 of 3643) of patients trained on PST demonstrated competency; of these, 8% (238) required caregiver assistance. Testers who were not competent to perform PST had higher numbers of practice attempts, higher cuvette wastage, and were less able to perform a fingerstick or obtain blood for the cuvette in a timely fashion. Factors associated with failure to pass PST training included increased age, previous stroke history, poor cognition, and poor manual dexterity. A majority of patients were able to perform PST. Successful home monitoring of PT with a PST device required adequate levels of cognition and manual dexterity. Training a caregiver modestly increased the proportion of patients who can perform PST.

  3. Oral contraceptives and the prothrombin time.

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    Pangrazzi, J; Roncaglioni, M C; Donati, M B

    1980-02-02

    Dr. De Teresa and others reported that mean prothrombin time ratio of 12 patients on long-term anticoagulation with warfarin was significantly higher when they were also taking oral contraceptives (OCs). A study of prothrombin complex activity was recently conducted in female rats treated with an estrogen-progestogen combination (lynestrenol 5 mg; mestranol 0.3 mg/kg body weight) which resulted in a 100% infertility in this species. After 1 treatment for only 1 estral cycle, OC-treated rats had a significantly longer Normotest clotting time (37.7+ or-0.5 sec) than control rats (31.0+or-0.4); the difference was even more notable after 10 cycles. Although this finding has not been reported in women on OCs, it may be that the estrogen-induced "lability" of the prothrombin complex occurs in humans only in special conditions, such as anticoagulation. Alternatively, liver dysfunction occurring among women on OCs may be responsible for reduced metabolism of warfarin, contributing to the effectiveness of the anticoagulation. Further pharmacology studies should be done to clarify the interaction between OCs and oral anticoagulants.

  4. 21 CFR 864.7750 - Prothrombin time test.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Prothrombin time test. 864.7750 Section 864.7750 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES HEMATOLOGY AND PATHOLOGY DEVICES Hematology Kits and Packages § 864.7750 Prothrombin time...

  5. Evaluation of Prothrombin Time and Activated Partial ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    and activated partial thromboplastin time (APTT) were investigated in treated and untreated diabetics as well as ... decrease the availability of these proteins which affect the clotting ... calcum rabbit brain thromboplastin reagent placed in.

  6. Prothrombin time is predictive of low plasma prothrombin concentration and clinical outcome in patients with trauma hemorrhage: analyses of prospective observational cohort studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balendran, Clare A; Lövgren, Ann; Hansson, Kenny M; Nelander, Karin; Olsson, Marita; Johansson, Karin J; Brohi, Karim; Fries, Dietmar; Berggren, Anders

    2017-03-14

    Fibrinogen and prothrombin have been suggested to become rate limiting in trauma associated coagulopathy. Administration of fibrinogen is now recommended, however, the importance of prothrombin to patient outcome is unknown. We have utilized two trauma patient databases (database 1 n = 358 and database 2 n = 331) to investigate the relationship of plasma prothrombin concentration on clinical outcome and coagulation status. Database 1 has been used to assess the relationship of plasma prothrombin to administered packed red blood cells (PRBC), clinical outcome and coagulation biomarkers (Prothrombin Time (PT), ROTEM EXTEM Coagulation Time (CT) and Maximum Clot Firmness (MCF)). ROC analyses have been performed to investigate the ability of admission coagulation biomarkers to predict low prothrombin concentration (database 1), massive transfusion and 24 h mortality (database 1 and 2). The importance of prothrombin was further investigated in vitro by PT and ROTEM assays in the presence of a prothrombin neutralizing monoclonal antibody and following step-wise dilution. Patients who survived the first 24 h had higher admission prothrombin levels compared to those who died (94 vs.67 IU/dL). Patients with lower transfusion requirements within the first 24 h (≤10 units of PRBCs) also had higher admission prothrombin levels compared to patients with massive transfusion demands (>10 units of PRBCs) (95 vs.62 IU/dL). Admission PT, in comparison to admission ROTEM EXTEM CT and MCF, was found to be a better predictor of prothrombin concentration <60 IU/dL (AUC 0.94 in database 1), of massive transfusion (AUC 0.92 and 0.81 in database 1 and 2 respectively) and 24 h mortality (AUC 0.90 and 0.78 in database 1 and 2, respectively). In vitro experiments supported a critical role for prothrombin in coagulation and demonstrated that PT and ROTEM EXTEM CT are sensitive methods to measure low prothrombin concentration. Our analyses suggest that prothrombin concentration

  7. The effects of Aloe vera [gel] on clotting time, prothrombin time and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Published reports on the effects of Aloe vera gel on blood coagulation in experimental animals are relatively scanty. Aim: To determine the effect of Aloe vera gel on clotting time, prothrombin time and plasma fibrinogen concentration in albino Wistar rats. Methods: A total of 28 adult albino Wistar rats divided ...

  8. The influence of N-acetylcysteine on the measurement of prothrombin time and activated partial thromboplastin time in healthy subjects

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jepsen, S; Hansen, A B

    1994-01-01

    mg kg-1 h-1 for 32 h in six male subjects. The intrinsic, extrinsic and common pathway of coagulation were monitored with activated partial thromboplastin time (APTT), and prothrombin time, respectively. In addition, the extrinsic coagulation pathway was monitored with the clotting activity of single...... factors II, VII, and X. No effect on the intrinsic coagulation pathway was observed. There was a significant and rapid decrease in prothrombin time. Coagulation factors II, VII and X, the three components of prothrombin time, decreased significantly to different degrees. We conclude that infusion of N...

  9. Hubungan Hiperglikemia dengan Prothrombin Time pada Mencit (Mus musculus yang Diinduksi Aloksan

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    Muhammad Ibnu Malik

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available AbstrakDiabetes mellitus mempunyai dua macam komplikasi yaitu komplikasi akut dan kronik. Komplikasi kronik DM (mikroangiopati dan makroangiopati terjadi akibat disfungsi endotel yang disebabkan oleh berbagai proses pathogenesis yaitu hiperglikemia, stres oksidatif, peningkatan jumlah asam lemak bebas, Protein Kinase C β dan defek sekresi insulin. Kerusakan pembuluh darah (disfungsi endotel tersebut dapat dideteksi melalui pemeriksaan activated partial prothrombin time (APTT dan prothrombin time (PT yang berperan dalam mekanisme homeostasis padatubuh.Tujuan penelitian ini adalah untuk melihat hubungan hiperglikemia dengan prothrombin time pada mencit putih (Musmusculus yang diinduksi aloksan. Desain penelitian ini adalah post test only control group design yang dilaksanakan dari Oktober 2013 hingga Februari 2014 di Laboratorium Sentral RS. Dr. M. Djamil Padang. Subjek penelitian adalah mencit putih (Musmusculus yang telah memenuhi criteria inklusi dan eksklusi, kemudian dibagi menjadi kelompok hiperglikemia (diinjeksikan aloksan dan kelompok kontrol. Setelah adaptasi selama tujuh hari, dilakukan injeksi aloksan serta pemeriksaan glukosa darah dan berat badan tiap empat hari sekali. Pada hari ke 30 dilakukan terminasi untuk mengukur PT mencit. Hasil menunjukkan terdapat pemendekan PT pada kedua kelompok penelitian dengan rerata PT kelompok control adalah 7,96 detik dan kelompok hiperglikemia adalah 8,12 detik. Hasil pengukuran tersebut menunjukkan tidak terdapat hubungan antara hiperglikemia dan prothrombin time (p > 0,05.Kata kunci: hiperglikemia, diabetes mellitus, prothrombin time, aloksan.AbstractDiabetes mellitus have two complication, they are acute and chronic complication. Chronic complication of DM (microangiopathy and macroangiopathy accured because endotel dysfunction which caused by various pathogenesis, such as hyperglycemia, oxydative stress, upregulation of free fatty acid, Protein Kinase C β and insulin secretion defect

  10. Clinical factors influencing normalization of prothrombin time after stopping warfarin: a retrospective cohort study

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    Zondag Michelle

    2008-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Anticoagulation with warfarin should be stopped 4–6 days before invasive procedures to avoid bleeding complications. Despite this routine, some patients still have high International Normalized Ratio (INR values on the day of surgery and the procedure may be cancelled. We sought to identify easily available clinical characteristics that may influence the rate of normalization of prothrombin time when warfarin is stopped before surgery or invasive procedures. Methods Clinical data were collected retrospectively from consecutive cases from two cohorts, who stopped warfarin 6 days before surgery. An INR value of 1.6 or higher on the day of surgery or requirement for reversal with vitamin K the day before surgery were criteria for slow return (S to normal INR. Results Of 202 patients, 14 (7% were classified as S. Eight of the S-patients required reversal with vitamin K one day before surgery and in another case surgery was cancelled due to high INR. Baseline INR was the only variable significantly associated with classification as S in stepwise logistic regression analysis (p = 0.003. The odds ratio for being in the normal group was 0.27 (95% confidence interval 0.12–0.62 for each unit baseline INR increased. The positive predictive value of baseline INR with a cut off at > 3.0 was only 15% and for INR > 3.5 it was 33%. Conclusion Baseline INR, but not the size of the maintenance dose, is associated with the rate of normalization of prothrombin time after stopping warfarin, but it has limited utility as predictor in clinical practice. Whenever normal hemostasis is considered crucial for the safety, the INR should be checked again before the invasive procedure.

  11. Four-factor prothrombin complex concentrate improves thrombin generation and prothrombin time in patients with bleeding complications related to rivaroxaban: a single-center pilot trial.

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    Schenk, Bettina; Goerke, Stephanie; Beer, Ronny; Helbok, Raimund; Fries, Dietmar; Bachler, Mirjam

    2018-01-01

    Direct oral anticoagulants (DOACs) pose a great challenge for physicians in life-threatening bleeding events. The aim of this study was to test the efficacy of reversing the DOAC rivaroxaban using four-factor PCC (prothrombin complex concentrate), a non-specific reversing agent. Patients with life-threatening bleeding events during rivaroxaban treatment were included and administered 25 U kg -1 of PCC. Blood samples were collected immediately prior to as well as after PCC treatment at predefined time intervals. The primary endpoint was defined as the difference in thrombin generation (TG) parameters ETP (endogenous thrombin potential) and C max (peak thrombin generation) prior to and ten minutes subsequent to PCC treatment. Thirteen patients, of whom the majority suffered from intra-cranial haemorrhage (ICH) or subdural haemorrhage (SDH), were included and administered PCC. The results show that the ETP (TG) significantly ( p  = 0.001) improved by 68% and C max (TG) by 54% (p = 0.001) during PCC treatment. In addition, the Quick value (prothrombin time: Quick PT ) significantly improved by 28% and the activated partial thromboplastin time (aPTT) was decreased by 7% ten minutes after PCC administration. C max was reduced at baseline, but not ETP, aPTT or Quick PT . Lag time until initiation (TG, t lag ), thromboelastometry clotting time (CT EXTEM ) and time to peak (TG, t max ) correlated best with measured rivaroxaban levels and were out of normal ranges at baseline, but did not improve after PCC administration. In 77% of the patients bleeding (ICH/SDH-progression) ceased following PCC administration. During the study three participants passed away due to other complications not related to PCC treatment. The possibility of thrombosis formation was also evaluated seven days after administering PCC and no thromboses were found. This study shows that use of PCC improved ETP, C max, Quick PT and aPTT. However, of these parameters, only C max was reduced at the

  12. Prothrombin Time, Activated Partial Thromboplastin Time, Fibrinogen, dan D-dimer Sebagai Prediktor Decompensated Disseminated Intravascular Coagulation Sisseminated pada Sepsis

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    Fenny

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Sepsis is a systemic response to infection especially in pneumonia case. Sepsis can cause complications such as disseminated intravascular coagulation (DIC which can be divided into compensated and decompensated DIC. The purpose of this study was to assess whether the value of prothrombin time (PT, activated partial thromboplastin time (aPTT, fibrinogen, and D-dimer levels can be used as predictors of decompensated DIC in sepsis patients. This study was conducted at the Laboratory of Clinical Pathology Rumah Sakit Hasan Sadikin Bandung since September 2008 to June 2010. Subjects were patients with sepsis caused by pneumonia. PT and aPTT values, fibrinogen, and D-dimer levels was recorded from all sepsis patients then patients were observed until diagnosed decompensated or non-decompensated DIC, then the value of PT, aPTT, fibrinogen and D-dimer levels in the group of decompensated DIC and non-decompensated DIC were analysed. This study used cohort design. Subjects were 39 sepsis patients (58% with outcome decompensated DIC and 28 sepsis patients (42% with outcome non-decompensated DIC. From the hemostasis parameter test out, it was found that PT, aPTT, and fibrinogen were the predictor of decompensated DIC in patients with sepsis with relative risk 240.500, 7.157, and 6.421; respectively. Conclusions, prothrombin time, aPTT, fibrinogen are the test to know coagulation activation. Hemostasis parameter to predict decompensated DIC in sepsis patients are the shorten PT, aPTT, and the increased fibrinogen

  13. In vivo bleeding time and in vitro thrombelastography measurements are better indicators of dilutional hypothermic coagulopathy than prothrombin time.

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    Kheirabadi, Bijan S; Crissey, Jacqueline M; Deguzman, Rodolfo; Holcomb, John B

    2007-06-01

    The coagulopathy of trauma is generally confirmed by prothrombin time (PT) > or =16 seconds or an international normalized ratio > or =1.5. However, the utility of these values as a screening test is unknown. We examined different coagulation tests to determine the best predictor of coagulopathic bleeding and mortality in a small animal hemorrhage model. Coagulopathy was induced in male New Zealand White rabbits by warfarin (W; 2 mg/kg for 2 days; n = 7), or hemodilution and hypothermia (HH; 50% blood exchange with Hextend, 34.5 +/- 0.3 degrees C; n = 7). Normal (N) rabbits without pretreatment served as the control (n = 7). Blood samples collected after coagulopathy induction and analyzed by prothrombin time (PT), activated partial thromboplastin time (aPTT), and thromboelastography (TEG) tests. Liver bleeding time (BT) was also measured before injury. An uncontrolled hemorrhage was created by a longitudinal splenic incision and the abdomen was closed. Rabbits were resuscitated with Hextend solution (25 mL/kg) to return blood pressure to baseline and monitored for 2 hours or until death at which time blood loss was measured. Warfarin-induced coagulopathy increased BT, PT, and aPTT. TEG showed increased reaction (R) and clot formation (K) times and marked decrease in clotting rate (alpha angle and Vmax). Hemodilution hypothermia coagulopathy increased only BT and aPTT, and decreased the clotting rate (alpha angle and Vmax) and strength of the clot. After injury, blood losses were higher in coagulopathic rabbits (W = 54.6 +/- 4.2 and HH = 51.1 +/- 8.9 mL/kg) than in normal rabbits (30.6 +/- 12.4 mL/kg) and resulted in 86%, 100%, and 0% death, respectively. BT and Vmax consistently predicted coagulopathic bleeding and death in all animals. Although satisfactory in warfarin-induced coagulopathy, PT was not a valid screening test for dilutional and hypothermic coagulopathy. BT and TEG measurements of blood clotting rate are better indicators of coagulopathic bleeding

  14. EFFECT OF METHANOLIC SEED EXTRACT OF PERSEA AMERICANA(AVOCADO PEAR ON PROTHROMBIN TIME AND ACTIVATED PARTIAL THROMBOPLASTIN TIME IN MICE

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    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Twenty (20 adult albino mice were used in the study to determine the effect of methanolic seed extract of Persea Americana on prothrombin time (PT and activated partial thromboplastin time (APTT test. The mice were obtained and kept for 2 weeks to acclimatize. They were weighed and divided into 5 groups. Group A served as control without the extract. Groups B to E were orally administered with graded doses of 200mg, 400 mg, 800 mg and 1600mg/kg body weight per mice daily for 28 days. Blood samples were collected through the median canthus into ti-sodium citrate anticoagulant containers for the analysis of PT and APTT, using standard operative procedure. The analysis was carried out at the Haematology Laboratory of University of Nigeria Teaching Hospital (UNTH Enugu. The results showed a prolonged APTT time at all the doses of the extract when compared with the control (P and lt;0.05. The prothrombin time at the dosage of 200mg/kg did not differ when compared with the control (P and gt;0.05. The increase in PT and APTT was dose dependent. This result pattern suggests that the extract causes prolonged prothrombin time and APTT at various concentrations possibly due to its high potassium content. The extract can be recommended in anticoagulant therapy since it prolongs PT and APTT.

  15. Characteristics of scrub typhus, murine typhus, and Q fever among elderly patients: Prolonged prothrombin time as a predictor for severity.

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    Chang, Ko; Lee, Nan-Yao; Ko, Wen-Chien; Lin, Wei-Ru; Chen, Yen-Hsu; Tsai, Jih-Jin; Chen, Tun-Chieh; Lin, Chun-Yu; Chang, Ya-Ting; Lu, Po-Liang

    2017-06-22

    The clinical manifestations of scrub typhus, murine typhus and acute Q fever in the elderly are not clear. We conducted a retrospective study to identify the characteristics of the elderly aged ≥65 years with a comparison group aged 18-64 years among patients with scrub typhus, murine typhus, or acute Q fever who were serologically confirmed at three hospitals in Taiwan during 2002-2011. Among 441 cases, including 187 cases of scrub typhus, 166 acute Q fever, and 88 murine typhus, 68 (15.4%) cases were elderly patients. The elderly had a higher severe complication rate (10.3% vs. 3.5%, p = 0.022), but did not have a significantly higher mortality rate (1.47% vs. 0.54%, p = 0.396). Compared with those without severe complications, we found the elderly (p = 0.022), dyspnea (p = 0.006), less relative bradycardia (p = 0.004), less febrile illness (p = 0.004), prolonged prothrombin time (PT) (p = 0.002), higher levels of initial C-reactive protein (p = 0.039), blood leukocyte counts (p = 0.01), and lower platelet counts (p = 0.012) are significantly associated with severe complications. Only prolonged prothrombin time was associated with severe complications in multivariate analysis (p = 0.018, CI 95% 0.01-0.66). Among clinical symptoms and laboratory data, multivariate analysis revealed chills was less frequently occurred in the elderly (p = 0.012, 95% confidence interval [CI]: 1.33-9.99). The elderly cases with scrub typhus, murine typhus, or acute Q fever would be more likely to have severe complications, for which prothrombin time prolongation is an important predictor for severe complications. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  16. A novel prothrombin time method to measure all non-vitamin K-dependent oral anticoagulants (NOACs)

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    Lindahl, Tomas L.; Arbring, Kerstin; Wallstedt, Maria; Rånby, Mats

    2017-01-01

    Background There is a clinical need for point-of-care (POC) methods for non-vitamin K-dependent oral anticoagulants (NOACs). We modified a routine POC procedure: Zafena’s Simple Simon™ PT-INR, a room-temperature, wet-chemistry prothrombin time method of the Owren-type. Methods To either increase or decrease NOAC interference, two assay variants were devised by replacing the standard 10 µL end-to-end capillary used to add the citrated plasma sample to 200 µL of prothrombin time (PT) reagent by either a 20 µL or a 5 µL capillary. All assay variants were calibrated to show correct PT results in plasma samples from healthy and warfarin-treated persons. Results For plasmas spiked with dabigatran, apixaban, or rivaroxaban, the 20 µL variant showed markedly higher PT results than the 5 µL. The effects were even more pronounced at room temperature than at +37 °C. In plasmas from patients treated with NOACs (n = 30 for each) there was a strong correlation between the PT results and the concentration of NOACs as determined by the central hospital laboratory. For the 20 µL variant the PT response of linear correlation coefficient averaged 0.90. The PT range was INR 1.1–2.1 for dabigatran and apixaban, and INR 1.1–5.0 for rivaroxaban. Using an INR ratio between the 20 µL and 5 µL variants (PTr20/5) made the NOAC assay more robust and independent of the patient sample INR value in the absence of NOAC. Detection limits were 80 µg/L for apixaban, 60 µg/L for dabigatran, and 20 µg/L for rivaroxaban. Conclusions A wet-chemistry POC PT procedure was modified to measure the concentrations of three NOACs using a single reagent. PMID:28891412

  17. Plasma lipids and prothrombin time in rats fed palm oil and other commonly used fats in Egypt

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hussein, Mona M.

    1993-02-01

    Full Text Available Sprague-Dawley rats were fed for a total period of 8 weeks on six diets that were different in the source of their fat content. The fat content was provided either, palm oil or palm olein or corn oil or hydrogenated fat, or frying palm oil and mixture of corn oil + hydrogenated fat in the ratio (1:1. The latter was given to the control group. Animals fed these various experimental diets showed statistically significant differences in serum cholesterol and serum triglycerides content among all group. Increased HDL-cholesterol content was evident in animals fed on palm-olein and palm oil. The frying oil fed group showed lowest HDL-cholesterol content. In these experiments palm olein fed animals showed highest ratio of HDL-cholesterol to total cholesterol while the lowest ratio was shown in rats fed on frying oil. Prothrombin (PT and activated partial thromboplastin time (PTT showed higher values In palm oil, palm olein and corn oil diets as compared to all groups with each other.

    Ratas Sprague-Dawley fueron alimentadas durante un periodo total de 8 semanas con seis dietas diferentes en su contenido graso. El contenido graso fue proporcionado por aceite de palma u oleína de palma o aceite de maíz o grasa hidrogenada o aceite de palma de fritura y mezcla de aceite de maíz + grasa hidrogenada en la relación (1:1. El último fue dado al grupo de control. Los animales alimentados con las diferentes dietas experimentales mostraron diferencias significativas estadísticamente en el contenido en colesterol y triglicéridos en suero entre todos los grupos. El aumento en contenido HDL-colesterol fue evidente en animales alimentados con oleína de palma y aceite de palma. El grupo alimentado con aceite de fritura mostró el más bajo contenido en HDL-colesterol. En estos experimentos, los animales alimentados con oleína de palma mostraron la mayor relación de HDL-colesterol a colesterol total, mientras que la relación más baja fue mostrada

  18. INR calibration of Owren-type prothrombin time based on the relationship between PT% and INR utilizing normal plasma samples.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lindahl, Tomas L; Egberg, Nils; Hillarp, Andreas; Ødegaard, Ole R; Edlund, Bror; Svensson, Jan; Sandset, Per M; Rånby, Mats

    2004-06-01

    Prothrombin time (PT) is clinically important and is used to monitor oral anticoagulant therapy. To obtain PT results in international normalized ratio (INR), the current standardization procedure is complex and involves reference reagents. The PT of diluted plasma samples can be determined with a combined thromboplastin (the Owren-type procedure), but not necessarily with a plain thromboplastin (the Quick-type procedure). Owren-type PT procedures can therefore, as an alternative to the INR calibration, be calibrated with diluted normal plasma to give PT results in percent of normal PT activity (PT%). The present study explored if a plasma-based calibration of an Owren-type PT procedure can be used to obtain results in INR. The approach was to establish a relationship between PT% and INR by multi-center analysis of 365 samples from healthy individuals and patients on warfarin treatment. INR values were obtained by manual Quick-type reference procedure and PT% values by various automated Owren-type procedures. A relationship INR = (1/PT% + 0.018)/0.028 was found. A calibration procedure, based on the relationship, was investigated. Calibrators were the median PT of 21 normal plasma at dilutions representing 100%, 50%, 25%, 12.5% and 6.25% of normal PT activity. These were assigned INR values of 1.00, 1.36, 2.07, 3.05 and 6.36. Calibration of various Owren-type assays was repeatedly performed by 5 expert laboratories during 3 consecutive years. The INR values of certain lyophilised or frozen control plasmas were determined. The frozen control plasmas had externally assigned INR values according to WHO guide-lines. Within the laboratory, CV was typically below 3%. No appreciable difference among the results of the different laboratories or the three assay occasions was found. Externally assigned and INR values were essentially identical to those found. These and other results indicated that the calibration procedure was reproducible, precise and accurate. Thus, an

  19. Genetics Home Reference: prothrombin thrombophilia

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... complications may include pregnancy-induced high blood pressure ( preeclampsia ), slow fetal growth, and early separation of the ... from the 2005 William Beaumont Hospital Symposium on Molecular Pathology. J Mol Diagn. 2006 Sep;8(4): ...

  20. The prothrombin time/international normalised ratio (PT/INR) line: derivation of local INR with commercial thromboplastins and coagulometers – two independent studies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Poller, Leon; Ibrahim, S.; Keown, M.

    2011-01-01

    reagents, and from 7.0% to 2.6% with rabbit reagents. In the second study, deviation was reduced from 11.2% to 0.4% with human reagents by both local ISI calibration and the PT/INR Line. With rabbit reagents, 10.4% deviation was reduced to 1.1% with both procedures; 4.9% deviation was reduced to 0.5......Background: The WHO scheme for prothrombin time (PT) standardization has been limited in application, because of its difficulties in implementation, particularly the need for mandatory manual PT testing and for local provision of thromboplastin international reference preparations (IRP). Methods...... thromboplastins and coagulometers. INRs were compared with manual certified values with thromboplastin IRP from expert centres and in the second study also with INRs from local ISI calibrations. Results: In the first study with the PT/INR Line, 8.7% deviation from certified INRs was reduced to 1.1% with human...

  1. Recombinant snake venom prothrombin activators

    OpenAIRE

    L?vgren, Ann

    2012-01-01

    Three prothrombin activators; ecarin, which was originally isolated from the venom of the saw-scaled viper Echis carinatus, trocarin from the rough-scaled snake Tropidechis carinatus, and oscutarin from the Taipan snake Oxyuranus scutellatus, were expressed in mammalian cells with the purpose to obtain recombinant prothrombin activators that could be used to convert prothrombin to thrombin. We have previously reported that recombinant ecarin can efficiently generate thrombin without the need ...

  2. Elevated prothrombin time on routine preoperative laboratory results in a healthy infant undergoing craniosynostosis repair: Diagnosis and perioperative management of congenital factor VII deficiency.

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    Jones, Kareen L; Greenberg, Robert S; Ahn, Edward S; Kudchadkar, Sapna R

    2016-01-01

    Congenital factor VII deficiency is a rare bleeding disorder with high phenotypic variability. It is critical that children with congenital Factor VII deficiency be identified early when high-risk surgery is planned. Cranial vault surgery is common for children with craniosynostosis, and these surgeries are associated with significant morbidity mostly secondary to the risk of massive blood loss. A two-month old infant who presented for elective craniosynostosis repair was noted to have an elevated prothrombin time (PT) with a normal activated partial thromboplastin time (aPTT) on preoperative labs. The infant had no clinical history or reported family history of bleeding disorders, therefore a multidisciplinary decision was made to repeat the labs under general anesthesia and await the results prior to incision. The results confirmed the abnormal PT and the case was canceled. Hematologic workup during admission revealed factor VII deficiency. The patient underwent an uneventful endoscopic strip craniectomy with perioperative administration of recombinant Factor VIIa. Important considerations for perioperative laboratory evaluation and management in children with factor VII deficiency are discussed. Anesthetic and surgical management of the child with factor VII deficiency necessitates meticulous planning to prevent life threatening bleeding during the perioperative period. A thorough history and physical examination with a high clinical suspicion are vital in preventing hemorrhage during surgeries in children with coagulopathies. Abnormal preoperative lab values should always be confirmed and addressed before proceeding with high-risk surgery. A multidisciplinary discussion is essential to optimize the risk-benefit ratio during the perioperative period. Copyright © 2016 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  3. Effect of N-acetylcysteine on the accuracy of the prothrombin time assay of plasma coagulation factor II+VII+X activity in subjects infused with the drug. Influence of time and temperature

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thorsen, Sixtus; Teisner, Ane; Jensen, Søren Astrup

    2009-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: The prothrombin time (PT) assay of factor II+VII+X activity is an important predictor of liver damage in paracetamol poisoned patients. It complicates interpretation of results that the antidote, acetylcysteine (NAC) depresses this activity. The aim was to investigate if NAC influences...... to plasma in vitro decreased factor II+VII+X activity at 37 degrees C in a time-dependent manner. This effect was quenched at temperatures ... to a significant additional depression of factor II+VII+X activity in plasma from subjects infused with NAC during the first 3h of infusion indicating that it contained reactive NAC. The risk that this NAC interfered with the accuracy of the PT assay was considered minimal with samples stored below 24 degrees C...

  4. Effect of N-acetylcysteine on the accuracy of the prothrombin time assay of plasma coagulation factor II plus VII plus X activity in subjects infused with the drug. Influence of time and temperature

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thorsen, S.; Teisner, A.; Jensen, S.A.

    2009-01-01

    Objectives: The prothrombin time (PT) assay of factor II+VII+X activity is an important predictor of liver damage in paracetamol poisoned patients. It complicates interpretation of results that the antidote, acetylcysteine (NAC) depresses this activity. The aim was to investigate if NAC influences...... added to plasma in vitro decreased factor II+VII+X activity at 37 degrees C in a time-dependent manner. This effect was quenched at temperatures 24 degrees C. Activity lost at 37 degrees C could partly be recovered by subsequent incubation at 5 or 20 degrees C. Incubation at 37 degrees C prior to assay...... led to a significant additional depression of factor II+VII+X activity in plasma from subjects infused with NAC during the first 3h of infusion indicating that it contained reactive NAC. The risk that this NAC interfered with the accuracy of the PT assay was considered minimal with samples stored...

  5. Correlation between HBsAg, prothrombin time activity, and indocyanine green retention rate at 15 minutes in patients with HBeAg-positive chronic HBV infection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    FAN Wenhai

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available ObjectiveTo investigate the correlation between HBsAg, prothrombin time activity (PTA, and indocyanine green retention rate at 15 minutes (ICG R15 in patients with HBeAg-positive chronic HBV infection. MethodsA total of 92 patients with HBeAg-positive chronic HBV infection who were admitted to The First Hospital of Lanzhou University from December 2015 to April 2016 were enrolled and divided into chronic hepatitis B (CHB group (24 patients, compensated liver cirrhosis group (38 patients, and decompensated liver cirrhosis group (30 patients. Serum HBsAg quantitation, PTA test, and liver reserve function test (ICG R15 were performed for all patients. The chi-square test was used for comparison of categorical data between groups, an analysis of variance was used for comparison of continuous data between multiple groups, and a Pearson correlation analysis was also performed. ResultsThere were significant differences between the three groups in serum HBsAg quantitation (3.82±0.43 log10IU/ml vs 2.88±0.36 log10IU/ml vs 2.60±0.27 log10IU/ml, F=25.19, P<0.001, ICG R15 (7.51%±3.10% vs 9.57%±8.18% vs 24.13%±14.28%, F=24.00, P=0.001, and PTA (8100%±1762% vs 83.08%±9.64% vs 62.32%±16.90%, F=13.42, P=0.009. The correlation analysis showed that PTA was negatively correlated with ICG R15 in all three groups (r=-0.948, -0.602, and -0.735, all P<0.01. In the compensated liver cirrhosis group and decompensated liver cirrhosis group, HBsAg was positively correlated with PTA (r=0.410 and 0.473, both P<0.05 and negatively correlated with ICG R15 (r=-0.427 and -0.768, P<0.01. ConclusionIn HBeAg positive patients, there are certain correlations between HBsAg, PTA, and ICG R15, which, to a certain degree, reflects the liver reserve function in patients with chronic HBV infection.

  6. Alternative Strategies for Pricing Home Work Time.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zick, Cathleen D.; Bryant, W. Keith

    1983-01-01

    Discusses techniques for measuring the value of home work time. Estimates obtained using the reservation wage technique are contrasted with market alternative estimates derived with the same data set. Findings suggest that the market alternative cost method understates the true value of a woman's home time to the household. (JOW)

  7. Effect of acetylcysteine on prothrombin index in paracetamol poisoning without hepatocellular injury

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schmidt, Lars E; Knudsen, Tore Tveit; Dalhoff, Kim

    2002-01-01

    Acetylcysteine treatment reduces liver damage after paracetamol overdose, but can affect the prothrombin index, which is used to assess the progress of overdose patients. We aimed to assess retrospectively the effect of intravenous acetylcysteine on the prothrombin index in patients with paraceta......Acetylcysteine treatment reduces liver damage after paracetamol overdose, but can affect the prothrombin index, which is used to assess the progress of overdose patients. We aimed to assess retrospectively the effect of intravenous acetylcysteine on the prothrombin index in patients...... with paracetamol poisoning without signs of hepatocellular injury. Prothrombin index had been recorded before, and serially during, acetylcysteine treatment in 87 patients. After initiation of treatment, prothrombin index decreased (mean 0.33, 95% CI 0.29-0.38) in all patients, and was strongly associated...... with the start of acetylcysteine infusion. In patients with uncomplicated paracetamol poisoning, a fall in this index might be misinterpreted as a sign of liver failure, leading to prolonged treatment time....

  8. Is it acceptable to use coagulation plasma samples stored at room temperature and 4°C for 24 hours for additional prothrombin time, activated partial thromboplastin time, fibrinogen, antithrombin, and D-dimer testing?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rimac, V; Coen Herak, D

    2017-10-01

    Coagulation laboratories are faced on daily basis with requests for additional testing in already analyzed fresh plasma samples. This prompted us to examine whether plasma samples stored at room temperature (RT), and 4°C for 24 hours can be accepted for additional prothrombin time (PT), activated partial thromboplastin time (aPTT), fibrinogen (Fbg), antithrombin (AT), and D-dimer testing. We measured PT, aPTT, Fbg in 50 and AT in 30 plasma samples with normal and pathological values, within 4 hours of blood collection (baseline results) and after 24-hours storage at RT (primary tubes), and 4°C (aliquots). D-dimer stability was investigated in 20 samples stored in primary tubes at 4°C. No statistically significant difference between baseline results and results in samples stored at RT and 4°C was observed for PT (P=.938), aPTT (P=.186), Fbg (P=.962), AT (P=.713), and D-dimers (P=.169). The highest median percentage changes were found for aPTT, being more pronounced for samples stored at 4°C (13.0%) than at RT (8.7%). Plasma samples stored both at RT and 4°C for 24 hours are acceptable for additional PT, Fbg, and AT testing. Plasma samples stored 24 hours in primary tubes at 4°C are suitable for D-dimer testing. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  9. Effect of N-acetylcysteine on the accuracy of the prothrombin time assay of plasma coagulation factor II+VII+X activity in subjects infused with the drug. Influence of time and temperature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thorsen, Sixtus; Teisner, Ane; Jensen, Søren Astrup; Philips, Malou; Dalhoff, Kim; Bendtsen, Flemming

    2009-01-01

    The prothrombin time (PT) assay of factor II+VII+X activity is an important predictor of liver damage in paracetamol poisoned patients. It complicates interpretation of results that the antidote, acetylcysteine (NAC) depresses this activity. The aim was to investigate if NAC influences the accuracy of the plasma PT assay. The accuracy of Nycotest PT was studied using plasma added NAC in vitro and plasma from subjects infused with NAC. The latter results were compared with those obtained by analysis of PT by CoaguChek S. Therapeutic NAC concentrations added to plasma in vitro decreased factor II+VII+X activity at 37 degrees C in a time-dependent manner. This effect was quenched at temperatures depression of factor II+VII+X activity in plasma from subjects infused with NAC during the first 3h of infusion indicating that it contained reactive NAC. The risk that this NAC interfered with the accuracy of the PT assay was considered minimal with samples stored below 24 degrees C. This was supported by similarity of results obtained by analysis of appropriately stored plasma and simultaneously drawn blood by CoaguChek S. Residual reactive NAC does not interfere with the accuracy of the PT assay of plasma stored below 24 degrees C, but NAC-induced loss in activity at 37 degrees C may be partly recovered during subsequent storage below 24 degrees C.

  10. Tempo de protrombina e de tromboplastina parcial ativada em caprinos criados extensivamente no Estado do Rio Grande do Norte Prothrombin time and activated partial thromboplastin time in goats raised extensively at Rio Grande do Norte State, Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Benito Soto-Blanco

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available Neste trabalho objetivou-se estabelecer os padrões de normalidade para tempo de protrombina (TP e tempo de tromboplastina parcial ativada (TTPA em caprinos criados extensivamente no estado do Rio Grande do Norte. Foram utilizados 40 caprinos SRD, 13 machos e 27 fêmeas, adultos, com idades entre 1 e 6 anos, todos clinicamente sadios. As amostras sanguíneas foram coletadas por venopunção jugular em tubos contendo citrato de sódio a 3,8%. O plasma foi imediatamente separado por centrifugação e refrigerado a ± 4ºC e, posteriormente, submetido às determinações de TP e TTPA por meio de métodos manuais utilizando kits comerciais. Os valores obtidos para caprinos da região, de 25,4 ± 0,90 e 39,5 ± 1,41 segundos para TP e TTPA, respectivamente, estavam dentro da normalidade.This study aimed to establish normal pattern for the prothrombin time (PT and activated partial thromboplastin time (APTT in goats extensively raised at Rio Grande do Norte state, Brazil. A total of 40 clinically healthy adult goats (13 males and 27 females aged 1 to 6 years-old was used. Blood samples were collected from jugular vein in tubes containing 3.8% of sodium citrate. The plasma was immediately separated by centrifugation and refrigerated at ± 4ºC and after submitted to PT e APTT determinations through manual methods using commercial kits. The results for goats in the region of 25.4 ± 0.90 and 39.5 ± 1.41 seconds, respectively, for PT and APTT were in an adequate range.

  11. Pneumatic tube system transport does not alter platelet function in optical and whole blood aggregometry, prothrombin time, activated partial thromboplastin time, platelet count and fibrinogen in patients on anti-platelet drug therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Enko, Dietmar; Mangge, Harald; Münch, Andreas; Niedrist, Tobias; Mahla, Elisabeth; Metzler, Helfried; Prüller, Florian

    2017-01-01

    Introduction The aim of this study was to assess pneumatic tube system (PTS) alteration on platelet function by the light transmission aggregometry (LTA) and whole blood aggregometry (WBA) method, and on the results of platelet count, prothrombin time (PT), activated partial thromboplastin time (APTT), and fibrinogen. Materials and methods Venous blood was collected into six 4.5 mL VACUETTE® 9NC coagulation sodium citrate 3.8% tubes (Greiner Bio-One International GmbH, Kremsmünster, Austria) from 49 intensive care unit (ICU) patients on dual anti-platelet therapy and immediately hand carried to the central laboratory. Blood samples were divided into 2 Groups: Group 1 samples (N = 49) underwent PTS (4 m/s) transport from the central laboratory to the distant laboratory and back to the central laboratory, whereas Group 2 samples (N = 49) were excluded from PTS forces. In both groups, LTA and WBA stimulated with collagen, adenosine-5’-diphosphate (ADP), arachidonic acid (AA) and thrombin-receptor-activated-peptide 6 (TRAP-6) as well as platelet count, PT, APTT, and fibrinogen were performed. Results No statistically significant differences were observed between blood samples with (Group 1) and without (Group 2) PTS transport (P values from 0.064 – 0.968). The AA-induced LTA (bias: 68.57%) exceeded the bias acceptance limit of ≤ 25%. Conclusions Blood sample transportation with computer controlled PTS in our hospital had no statistically significant effects on platelet aggregation determined in patients with anti-platelet therapy. Although AA induced LTA showed a significant bias, the diagnostic accuracy was not influenced. PMID:28392742

  12. The reliability of point-of-care prothrombin time testing. A comparison of CoaguChek S and XS INR measurements with hospital laboratory monitoring.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Ryan, F

    2010-02-01

    The development of point-of-care (POC) testing devices enables patients to test their own international normalized ratio (INR) at home. However, previous studies have shown that when compared with clinical laboratory values, statistically significant differences may occur between the two methods of INR measurement. The aim of this study was to evaluate the accuracy of the CoaguChek S and XS POC meters relative to clinical laboratory measurements. As part of a randomized, crossover patient self-testing (PST) study at Cork University Hospital, patients were randomized to 6 months PST or 6 months routine care by the anticoagulation management service. During the PST arm of the study, patients measured their INR at home using the CoaguChek S or XS POC meter. External quality control was performed at enrollment, 2 months and 4 months by comparing the POC measured INR with the laboratory determined value. One hundred and fifty-one patients provided 673 paired samples. Good correlation was shown between the two methods of determination (r = 0.91), however, statistically significant differences did occur. A Bland-Altman plot illustrated good agreement of INR values between 2.0 and 3.5 INR units but there was increasing disagreement as the INR rose above 3.5. Eighty-seven per cent of all dual measurements were within the recommended 0.5 INR units of each other. This study adds to the growing evidence that POC testing is a reliable and safe alternative to hospital laboratory monitoring but highlights the importance of external quality control when these devices are used for monitoring oral anticoagulation.

  13. Valores de referência do tempo de protrombina (TP e tempo de tromboplastina parcial ativada (TTPa em cães Reference ranges of prothrombin time (PT and activated partial thromboplastin time (aPTT in dogs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sonia Terezinha dos Anjos Lopes

    2005-04-01

    Full Text Available Os fatores de coagulação são parte integrante da hemostasia normal, e tanto as coagulopatias hereditárias como adquiridas que envolvem este sistema são de grande importância veterinária, geralmente evidenciadas por manifestações clínicas, tais como, petéquias, equimoses, hematomas e sangramentos tardios. O presente trabalho teve por objetivo a determinação dos valores de referência do tempo de protrombina (TP e tempo de tromboplastina parcial ativada (TTPa, por métodos manuais. Para tanto, utilizou-se "kits" para dosagens humanas, devido à inexistência de produtos similares de uso específico veterinário. Foram utilizados 40 cães clinicamente sadios, sem raça definida, machos ou fêmeas, de diferentes idades. As amostras sanguíneas foram de 2,5ml cada, colhidas por venopunção cefálica e acondicionadas em tubos de centrífuga contendo 0,25ml de citrato de sódio a 3,8%. O plasma foi imediatamente separado por centrifugação e as determinações de TP e TTPa foram realizadas utilizando-se "kits" comerciais "HemoStat Thromboplastin-SIª" e "HemoStat aPTT-El b", respectivamente. Os resultados obtidos foram de 6,87 ± 1,4 segundos para o TP com valores mínimo e máximo de 4,07 e 9,67, respectivamente, e de 15,10 ± 1,6 segundos para TTPa com valores mínimo e máximo de 11,9 e 18,3, respectivamente. Conclui-se, que os valores obtidos neste trabalho podem ser utilizados como referência. Os reagentes utilizados para plasma humano podem ser empregados para o plasma de cães.The coagulation factors are part of normal hemostasis, and both hereditary and acquired coagulopathies that involve this system have an important role in veterinary medicine, generally evidenced by clinical signs such as: petechias, ecchymosis, hematomas and late hemorrhagies. The objective of this experiment was to determine reference range values of prothrombin time (PT and activated partial thromboplastin time (aPTT, for manual methods. Human commercial

  14. Assessing Clinical Laboratory Quality: A College of American Pathologists Q-Probes Study of Prothrombin Time INR Structures, Processes, and Outcomes in 98 Laboratories.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Howanitz, Peter J; Darcy, Theresa P; Meier, Frederick A; Bashleben, Christine P

    2015-09-01

    The anticoagulant warfarin has been identified as the second most frequent drug responsible for serious, disabling, and fatal adverse drug events in the United States, and its effect on blood coagulation is monitored by the laboratory test called international normalized ratio (INR). To determine the presence of INR policies and procedures, INR practices, and completeness and timeliness of reporting critical INR results in participants' clinical laboratories. Participants reviewed their INR policies and procedure requirements, identified their practices by using a questionnaire, and studied completeness of documentation and timeliness of reporting critical value INR results for outpatients and emergency department patients. In 98 participating institutions, the 5 required policies and procedures were in place in 93% to 99% of clinical laboratories. Fifteen options for the allowable variations among duplicate results from different analyzers, 12 different timeliness goals for reporting critical values, and 18 unique critical value limits were used by participants. All required documentation elements were present in 94.8% of 192 reviewed INR validation reports. Critical value INR results were reported within the time frame established by the laboratory for 93.4% of 2604 results, but 1.0% of results were not reported. Although the median laboratories successfully communicated all critical results within their established time frames and had all the required validation elements based in their 2 most recent INR calculations, those participants at the lowest 10th percentile were successful in 80.0% and 85.7% of these requirements, respectively. Significant opportunities exist for adherence to INR procedural requirements and for practice patterns and timeliness goals for INR critical results' reporting.

  15. Elevated prothrombin time/international normalized ratio associated with concurrent administration of regorafenib and warfarin in a patient with advanced colorectal cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kitade, Hironori; Hiromasa-Yamasaki, Azusa; Hokkoku, Kengo; Mori, Mitsue; Watanabe, Michio; Nakai, Masuo; Yano, Seiji

    2016-01-01

    Regorafenib and its metabolites may inhibit the activities of several CYP or UDP-glucuronosyltransferase isoforms, including that of CYP2C9. Therefore, pharmacological agents that are CYP2C9 substrates may show elevated circulating levels and enhanced drug efficacy when concurrently used with regorafenib. Previous studies showed that the area under the plasma concentration-time curve of warfarin, which is the substrate for CYP2C9, increased upon co-administration of regorafenib. However, there are no reports indicating that the anticoagulant effects of warfarin increased upon co-administration of regorafenib. We report a case of a 76-year-old man with liver metastasis of colon cancer. He was treated with regorafenib at a dosage of 120 mg daily on days 1 to 21 every 4 weeks as a third-line therapy. He had a history of acute myocardial infarction and had taken 2 mg warfarin daily. Three weeks after the treatment began, PT/INR values markedly increased, although there was no hemorrhage. Administration of regorafenib and warfarin was discontinued, and then PT/INR rapidly decreased. Warfarin administration was restarted (0.5 mg daily) and the dose was increased up to 1.5 mg daily. The patient's PT/INR values exhibited a tendency to increase when concurrently used with regorafenib, the dose of which was reduced to 80 mg daily on days 1 to 14 every 3 weeks at a physician's discretion. The clinical course of this patient suggested that PT/INR might increase during concurrent use of warfarin and regorafenib. Therefore, PT/INR should be periodically monitored during the concurrent use of warfarin and regorafenib.

  16. Explaining Home Bias in Trade: The Role of Time Costs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Inkoo Lee

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available We study how time costs, combined with elasticity of substitution across home and foreign goods, can explain the home bias puzzle in a framework of flexible prices. Using a simple two-country model, we show that introducing time costs to an otherwise standard competitive model improves its ability to rationalize home bias in trade. Our analysis suggests that home bias and corresponding incomplete risk-sharing naturally arise in the presence of time costs, even under the assumption of complete financial markets and low elasticity of substitution between home and foreign goods.

  17. Time Students Spend Working at Home for School

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wagner, Petra; Schober, Barbara; Spiel, Christiane

    2008-01-01

    The paper presents three studies which deal with the time students spend working at home for school. In addition, the paper focuses on the distribution of time investment over the course of a week and on the relationship between academic achievement and time spent working at home for school. In sum, 824 students with an average age of 15 years…

  18. Home teleworkers need more time to recover after work

    OpenAIRE

    Smulders, P.G.W.; Houtman, I.L.D.

    2007-01-01

    In the Netherlands, on average 4.6% of employees perform normal working hours at home. However, large differences emerge between occupational groups and in the relation between job demands and hours worked at home. Although working at home is perceived as improving work–life balance, in fact it is associated with needing more time for recovery after work. This may partly be caused by high job demands.

  19. Time Investment and Time Management: An Analysis of Time Students Spend Working at Home for School

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wagner, Petra; Schober, Barbara; Spiel, Christiane

    2008-01-01

    This paper deals with the time students spend working at home for school. In Study 1, we investigated amount and regulation of time. Study 2 serves to validate the results of Study 1 and, in addition, investigates the duration of the time units students used and their relation to scholastic success. In Study 1, the participants were 332 students…

  20. Prothrombin complex concentrate in the reduction of blood loss during orthotopic liver transplantation: PROTON-trial

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    F. Arshad (Freeha); B. Ickx (Brigitte); R.T. van Beem (Rachel); W.G. Polak (Wojciech); F. Grüne (Frank); F. Nevens (Frederik); M. Ilmakunnas (Minna); A.M. Koivusalo (Anna-Maria); H. Isoniemi (Helena); P.F.W. Strengers; H.J.M. Groen (Henk); H.G.D. Hendriks (Herman); T. Lisman (Ton); J. Pirenne (Jacques); R.J. Porte (Robert)

    2013-01-01

    textabstractBackground: In patients with cirrhosis, the synthesis of coagulation factors can fall short, reflected by a prolonged prothrombin time. Although anticoagulants factors are decreased as well, blood loss during orthotopic liver transplantation can still be excessive. Blood loss during

  1. Prothrombin complex concentrate in the reduction of blood loss during orthotopic liver transplantation : PROTON-trial

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Arshad, Freeha; Ickx, Brigitte; van Beem, Rachel T.; Polak, Wojciech; Grune, Frank; Nevens, Frederik; Ilmakunnas, Minna; Koivusalo, Anna-Maria; Isoniemi, Helena; Strengers, Paul F. W.; Groen, Henk; Hendriks, Herman G. D.; Lisman, Ton; Pirenne, Jacques; Porte, Robert J.

    2013-01-01

    Background: In patients with cirrhosis, the synthesis of coagulation factors can fall short, reflected by a prolonged prothrombin time. Although anticoagulants factors are decreased as well, blood loss during orthotopic liver transplantation can still be excessive. Blood loss during orthotopic liver

  2. 21 CFR 864.7720 - Prothrombin consumption test.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Prothrombin consumption test. 864.7720 Section 864.7720 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES HEMATOLOGY AND PATHOLOGY DEVICES Hematology Kits and Packages § 864.7720 Prothrombin...

  3. Cost analysis of nursing home registered nurse staffing times.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dorr, David A; Horn, Susan D; Smout, Randall J

    2005-05-01

    To examine potential cost savings from decreased adverse resident outcomes versus additional wages of nurses when nursing homes have adequate staffing. A retrospective cost study using differences in adverse outcome rates of pressure ulcers (PUs), urinary tract infections (UTIs), and hospitalizations per resident per day from low staffing and adequate staffing nursing homes. Cost savings from reductions in these events are calculated in dollars and compared with costs of increasing nurse staffing. Eighty-two nursing homes throughout the United States. One thousand three hundred seventy-six frail elderly long-term care residents at risk of PU development. Event rates are from the National Pressure Ulcer Long-Term Care Study. Hospital costs are estimated from Medicare statistics and from charges in the Healthcare Cost and Utilization Project. UTI costs and PU costs are from cost-identification studies. Time horizon is 1 year; perspectives are societal and institutional. Analyses showed an annual net societal benefit of 3,191 dollars per resident per year in a high-risk, long-stay nursing home unit that employs sufficient nurses to achieve 30 to 40 minutes of registered nurse direct care time per resident per day versus nursing homes that have nursing time of less than 10 minutes. Sensitivity analyses revealed a robust set of estimates, with no single or paired elements reaching the cost/benefit equality threshold. Increasing nurse staffing in nursing homes may create significant societal cost savings from reduction in adverse outcomes. Challenges in increasing nurse staffing are discussed.

  4. Real-time embedded face recognition for smart home

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zuo, F.; With, de P.H.N.

    2005-01-01

    We propose a near real-time face recognition system for embedding in consumer applications. The system is embedded in a networked home environment and enables personalized services by automatic identification of users. The aim of our research is to design and build a face recognition system that is

  5. Impact of infusion speed on the safety and effectiveness of prothrombin complex concentrate

    OpenAIRE

    Pabinger , Ingrid; Tiede , Andreas; Kalina , Uwe; Knaub , Sigurd; Germann , Reinhard; Ostermann , Helmut

    2009-01-01

    Abstract Prothrombin complex concentrate (PCC) infusion is preferred for emergency reversal of coumarin therapy. Rapid infusion can potentially save crucial time; however, the possible impact of high infusion speed on PCC safety and effectiveness has not been delineated. In a prospective multinational clinical trial with 43 patients receiving PCC (Beriplex? P/N) for emergency reversal of coumarin therapy, infusion speeds were selected by the investigators. In a two-phase statistica...

  6. Plasma fibrin clot properties in the G20210A prothrombin mutation carriers following venous thromboembolism: the effect of rivaroxaban.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Janion-Sadowska, Agnieszka; Natorska, Joanna; Siudut, Jakub; Ząbczyk, Michal; Stanisz, Andrzej; Undas, Anetta

    2017-08-30

    We sought to investigate whether the G20210A prothrombin mutation modifies plasma fibrin clot properties in patients after venous thromboembolism (VTE) and how rivaroxaban treatment affects these alterations. We studied 34 prothrombin mutation heterozygous carriers and sex- and age-matched 34 non-carriers, all at least three months since the first VTE episode, before and during treatment with rivaroxaban. Clot permeability (K s ) and clot lysis time (CLT) with or without elimination of thrombin activatable fibrinolysis inhibitor (TAFI) were assessed at baseline, 2-6 hours (h) after and 20-25 h after intake of rivaroxaban (20 mg/day). At baseline, the prothrombin mutation group formed denser clots (K s -12 %, p=0.0006) and had impaired fibrinolysis (CLT +14 %, p=0.004, and CLT-TAFI +13 %, p=0.03) compared with the no mutation group and were similar to those observed in 15 healthy unrelated prothrombin mutation carriers. The G20210A prothrombin mutation was the independent predictor for K s and CLT before rivaroxaban intake. At 2-6 h after rivaroxaban intake, clot properties improved in both G20210A carriers and non-carriers (K s +38 %, and +37 %, CLT -25 % and -25 %, CLT-TAFI -20 % and -24 %, respectively, all pCLT +17 %, CLT-TAFI +13 %, all p<0.001). Rivaroxaban concentration correlated with fibrin clot properties. After 20-25 h since rivaroxaban intake most clot properties returned to baseline. Rivaroxaban-related differences in clot structure were confirmed by scanning electron microscopy images. In conclusion, rivaroxaban treatment, though improves fibrin clot properties, cannot abolish more prothrombotic fibrin clot phenotype observed in prothrombin mutation carriers following VTE.

  7. Short-time home coming project in evacuation zone

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tatsuzaki, Hideo

    2011-01-01

    Accident at Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Plants (NPPs) forced neighboring residents to evacuate, and evacuation zone (20 km radius from NPPs) was defined as highly contaminated and designated as no-entry zones. Residents had been obliged to live a refugee life for a longer period than expected. Short-time home coming project was initiated according to their requests. They came to the meeting place called transfer place (20 - 30 km radius from NPPs), wore protective clothing and personal dosimeter with having drinking water and came home in evacuation zone with staffs by bus. Their healthcare management professionals were fully prepared for emergency. After collecting necessary articles at home within two hours, they returned to the meeting place by bus for screening and dressing, and went back to refuge house. If screening data were greater than 13 kcpm using GM counters, partial body decontamination had been conducted by wiping and if greater than 100 kcpm, whole body decontamination was requested but not conducted. Dose rate of residents and staffs was controlled less than 1 mSv, which was alarm level of personal dosimeter. Stable iodine was prepared but actually not used. (T. Tanaka)

  8. Efeito de alguns curares naturais e da d-Tubocurarina retardando o tempo de coagulação e o tempo de protombina do sangue humano Natural curares and d-Tubocuratine effects on human blood clothing time and prothrombine time

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    João Canali

    1967-01-01

    Full Text Available In this paper the author points out to a old question of about 200 years ago in wich two kinds of opinions were discussed. BANCROFT and FONTANA in one hand atributes for the Indian arrow poison (curare the propriety of uncoagulate the blood, and C. BEBNAHDJ, B. RODRIGUES and others made an contradictory opinion upon this subject. In our experiments, we utilized 4 curares samples from indians who lives near the Brazilian border at Colombia, the famous Ticunas poison, and the alkaloid d-Tubocurarine. These poisons were added in form of emulsion in saline to the blood and blood plasma in order to perform two kinds of experiments. In one serie of experiments we observed the effect of curare on human blood coagulation time according to LEE-WHITE technic puting 0.5 ml of the various poisons emulsions previously into the tube. By this method, we have found that the emulsion containing 0.1 g of the poison in 10 ml saline was the most effective (Table II, therefore we used this curare emulsion concentration in the other serie of experiments, in which we tested the action of these venoms on the human blood plasma prothrombins time, (Quick Technic adding 0.1 ml of the saline poison emulsion to each 0.1 ml of human blood plasma. Results from these experiments can be seen on Table II. These experiments we have tried on one sample of human blood plasma plus the differents curares samples; and in another opportunity four samples of human blood plasma were tried with the curare from Ticunas indians (the most effective in this respect. Results from these experiments may be seen on Table III. All the poison tried in our experiments was previously tested on toads legs (B. crucifer to verify his curares action. All times obtained with the experiments above, show highly significant results (P<001 when compared with the blood and blood plasma mixed with in the same volume of saline. Our results, point out that BANCROFT and FONTANA views upon the effect of curare on

  9. The Story of Serum Prothrombin Conversion Accelerator, Proconvertin, Stable Factor, Cothromboplastin, Prothrombin Accelerator or Autoprothrombin I, and Their Subsequent Merging into Factor VII.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Girolami, Antonio; Cosi, Elisabetta; Santarossa, Claudia; Ferrari, Silvia; Luigia Randi, Maria

    2015-06-01

    Factor VII (FVII) deficiency is one of the two congenital coagulation disorders that was not discovered by the description of a new bleeding patient whose clotting pattern did not fit the blood coagulation knowledge of the time (the other is factor XIII deficiency). The existence of an additional factor capable of accelerating the conversion of prothrombin into thrombin was suspected before 1951, the year in which the first family with FVII deficiency was discovered. As several investigators were involved in the discovery of FVII deficiency from both sides of the Atlantic, several different names were tentatively suggested to define this entity, namely stable factor (in contrast with labile factor or FV), cothromboplastin, proconvertin, serum prothrombin conversion accelerator, prothrombin acceleration, and autoprothrombin I. The last term was proposed by those who denied the existence of this new entity, which was instead considered to be a derivate of prothrombin activation, namely autoprothrombin. The description of several families, from all over the world, of the same defect, however clearly demonstrated the singularity of the condition. Factor VII was then proposed to define this protein. In subsequent years, several variants were described with peculiar reactivity toward tissue thromboplastins of different origin. Molecular biology techniques demonstrated several gene mutations, usually missense mutations, often involving exon 8 of the FVII gene. Later studies dealt with the relation of FVII with tissue factor and activated FVII (FVIIa). The evaluation of circulating FVIIa was made possible by the use of a truncated form of tissue factor, which is only sensitive to FVIIa present in the circulation. The development of FVII concentrates, both plasma derived and recombinant, has facilitated therapeutic management of FVII-deficient patients. The use of FVIIa concentrates was noted to be associated with the occasional occurrence of thrombotic events, mainly

  10. Home teleworkers need more time to recover after work

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Smulders, P.G.W.; Houtman, I.L.D.

    2007-01-01

    In the Netherlands, on average 4.6% of employees perform normal working hours at home. However, large differences emerge between occupational groups and in the relation between job demands and hours worked at home. Although working at home is perceived as improving work–life balance, in fact it is

  11. Home

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    Military Commission Seal VWAP Login Home Go ABOUT US Organization Overview Organizational Chart Families VWAP Login CCTV Sites Travel Media MC News CCTV Sites Travel Today at OMC Home Today at OMC Daily

  12. A home monitoring program including real-time wireless home spirometry in idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis: a pilot study on experiences and barriers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moor, C C; Wapenaar, M; Miedema, J R; Geelhoed, J J M; Chandoesing, P P; Wijsenbeek, M S

    2018-05-29

    In idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis (IPF), home monitoring experiences are limited, not yet real-time available nor implemented in daily care. We evaluated feasibility and potential barriers of a new home monitoring program with real-time wireless home spirometry in IPF. Ten patients with IPF were asked to test this home monitoring program, including daily home spirometry, for four weeks. Measurements of home and hospital spirometry showed good agreement. All patients considered real-time wireless spirometry useful and highly feasible. Both patients and researchers suggested relatively easy solutions for the identified potential barriers regarding real-time home monitoring in IPF.

  13. Time Spent in Home Production Activities by Married Couples and Single Adults with Children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Douthitt, Robin A.

    1988-01-01

    A study found that, over time, married women employed full time have not decreased the time spent working in the home. Married men with young children have increased the time spent on home work. Single parents' time most closely resembled that of married women. (JOW)

  14. Perceived barriers to communication between hospital and nursing home at time of patient transfer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shah, Faraaz; Burack, Orah; Boockvar, Kenneth S

    2010-05-01

    To identify perceived barriers to communication between hospital and nursing home at the time of patient transfer and examine associations between perceived barriers and hospital and nursing home characteristics. Mailed survey. Medicare- or Medicaid-certified nursing homes in New York State. Nursing home administrators, with input from other nursing home staff. Respondents rated the importance as a barrier to hospital-nursing home communication of (1) hospital providers' attitude, time, effort, training, payment, and familiarity with nursing home patients; (2) unplanned and off-hours transfers; (3) HIPAA privacy regulations; and (4) lost or failed information transmission. Associations were determined between barriers and the following organizational characteristics: (1) hospital-nursing home affiliations, pharmacy or laboratory agreements, cross-site staff visits, and cross-site physician care; (2) hospital size, teaching status, and frequency of geriatrics specialty care; (3) nursing home size, location, type, staffing, and Medicare quality indicators; and (4) hospital-to-nursing home communication, consistency of hospital care with health care goals, and communication quality improvement efforts. Of 647 questionnaires sent, 229 were returned (35.4%). The most frequently reported perceived barriers to communication were sudden or unplanned transfers (44.4%), transfers that occur at night or on the weekend (41.4%), and hospital providers' lack of effort (51.0%), lack of familiarity with patients (45.0%), and lack of time (43.5%). Increased hospital size, teaching hospitals, and urban nursing home location were associated with greater perceived importance of these barriers, and cross-site staff visits and hospital provision of laboratory and pharmacy services to the nursing home were associated with lower perceived importance of these barriers. Hospital and nursing home characteristics and interorganizational relationships were associated with nursing home

  15. Time to and predictors of dual incontinence in older nursing home admissions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bliss, Donna Z; Gurvich, Olga V; Eberly, Lynn E; Harms, Susan

    2018-01-01

    There are few studies of nursing home residents that have investigated the development of dual incontinence, perhaps the most severe type of incontinence as both urinary and fecal incontinence occur. To determine the time to and predictors of dual incontinence in older nursing home residents. Using a cohort design, records of older nursing home admissions who were continent or had only urinary or only fecal incontinence (n = 39,181) were followed forward for report of dual incontinence. Four national US datasets containing potential predictors at multiple levels describing characteristics of nursing home residents, nursing homes (n = 445), and socioeconomic and sociodemographic status of the community surrounding nursing homes were analyzed. A Cox proportional hazard regression with nursing home-specific random effect was used. At 6 months after admission, 28% of nursing home residents developed dual incontinence, at 1 year 42% did so, and at 2 years, 61% had dual incontinence. Significant predictors for time to developing dual incontinence were having urinary incontinence, greater functional or cognitive deficits, more comorbidities, older age, and lesser quality of nursing home care. The development of dual incontinence is a major problem among nursing home residents. Predictors in this study offer guidance in developing interventions to prevent and reduce the time to developing this problem which may improve the quality of life of nursing residents. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  16. Home Economics Curricula in Pakistan: Time for Reform?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saeed, Fouzia; McClelland, Jerry

    1991-01-01

    Most home economics in Pakistan focuses on women's homemaking skills (food preparation, clothing, interior design), not career orientation; it caters to upper/middle class needs and traditional roles. Rural/lower class women's needs (agricultural production, nutrition, hygiene, family planning) are not generally served. (SK)

  17. Early discharge and home care after unplanned cesarean birth: nursing care time.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brooten, D; Knapp, H; Borucki, L; Jacobsen, B; Finkler, S; Arnold, L; Mennuti, M

    1996-09-01

    This study examined the mean nursing time spent providing discharge planning and home care to women who delivered by unplanned cesarean birth and examined differences in nursing time required by women with and without morbidity. A secondary analysis of nursing time from a randomized trial of transitional care (discharge planning and home follow-up) provided to women after cesarean delivery. An urban tertiary-care hospital. The sample (N = 61) of black and white women who had unplanned cesarean births and their full-term newborn was selected randomly. Forty-four percent of the women had experienced pregnancy complications. Advanced practice nurses provided discharge planning and 8-week home follow-up consisting of home visits, telephone outreach, and daily telephone availability. Nursing time required was dictated by patient need and provider judgment rather than by reimbursement plan. More than half of the women required more than two home visits; mean home visit time was 1 hour. For women who experienced morbidity mean discharge planning time was 20 minutes more and mean home visit time 40 minutes more. Current health care services that provide one or two 1-hour home visits to childbearing women at high risk may not be meeting the education and resource needs of this group.

  18. Home

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    AF Branding & Trademark Licensing Join the Air Force Home About Us The Air Force Symbol Display Resources Document Library TM Connect Search AF Branding and Trademark Licensing Program: important links Legal Documents 10 U.S.C. § 2260 15 U.S.C. § 167;167; 1114-1125 DODI 5535.12, DoD Branding and

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    intersect as Attack Wing leaders change roles The 112th COS postured as cyber shield for Pa. infrastructure 111th Attack Wing 111th Attack Wing 21st Century Guard Airmen Home News Photos Art Video Resources - The Balance Search 111th Attack Wing: COMMUNITY/ENVIRO May 16, 2018; Pa. Department of Health update

  20. Report: Review of Hotline Complaint on Employee Granted Full-Time Work-at-Home Privilege

    Science.gov (United States)

    Report #10-P-0002, October 7, 2009. We found an unauthorized, full-time work-at-home arrangement that has existed for 9 years and allows a NETI employee to work from home in Ohio instead of an office in Washington, DC.

  1. General practice cooperatives: long waiting times for home visits due to long distances?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giesen, Paul; van Lin, Nieke; Mokkink, Henk; van den Bosch, Wil; Grol, Richard

    2007-02-12

    The introduction of large-scale out-of-hours GP cooperatives has led to questions about increased distances between the GP cooperatives and the homes of patients and the increasing waiting times for home visits in urgent cases. We studied the relationship between the patient's waiting time for a home visit and the distance to the GP cooperative. Further, we investigated if other factors (traffic intensity, home visit intensity, time of day, and degree of urgency) influenced waiting times. Cross-sectional study at four GP cooperatives. We used variance analysis to calculate waiting times for various categories of traffic intensity, home visit intensity, time of day, and degree of urgency. We used multiple logistic regression analysis to calculate to what degree these factors affected the ability to meet targets in urgent cases. The average waiting time for 5827 consultations was 30.5 min. Traffic intensity, home visit intensity, time of day and urgency of the complaint all seemed to affect waiting times significantly. A total of 88.7% of all patients were seen within 1 hour. In the case of life-threatening complaints (U1), 68.8% of the patients were seen within 15 min, and 95.6% of those with acute complaints (U2) were seen within 1 hour. For patients with life-threatening complaints (U1) the percentage of visits that met the time target of 15 minutes decreased from 86.5% (less than 2.5 km) to 16.7% (equals or more than 20 km). Although home visits waiting times increase with increasing distance from the GP cooperative, it appears that traffic intensity, home visit intensity, and urgency also influence waiting times. For patients with life-threatening complaints waiting times increase sharply with the distance.

  2. Time providing care outside visits in a home-based primary care program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pedowitz, Elizabeth J; Ornstein, Katherine A; Farber, Jeffrey; DeCherrie, Linda V

    2014-06-01

    To assess how much time physicians in a large home-based primary care (HBPC) program spend providing care outside of home visits. Unreimbursed time and patient and provider-related factors that may contribute to that time were considered. Mount Sinai Visiting Doctors (MSVD) providers filled out research forms for every interaction involving care provision outside of home visits. Data collected included length of interaction, mode, nature, and with whom the interaction was for 3 weeks. MSVD, an academic home-visit program in Manhattan, New York. All primary care physicians (PCPs) in MSVD (n = 14) agreed to participate. Time data were analyzed using a comprehensive estimate and conservative estimates to quantify unbillable time. Data on 1,151 interactions for 537 patients were collected. An average 8.2 h/wk was spent providing nonhome visit care for a full-time provider. Using the most conservative estimates, 3.6 h/wk was estimated to be unreimbursed per full-time provider. No significant differences in interaction times were found between patients with and without dementia, new and established patients, and primary-panel and covered patients. Home-based primary care providers spend substantial time providing care outside home visits, much of which goes unrecognized in the current reimbursement system. These findings may help guide practice development and creation of new payment systems for HBPC and similar models of care. © 2014, Copyright the Authors Journal compilation © 2014, The American Geriatrics Society.

  3. Adolescent physical activity and screen time: associations with the physical home environment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Farbakhsh Kian

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Previous research on the environment and physical activity has mostly focused on macro-scale environments, such as the neighborhood environment. There has been a paucity of research on the role of micro-scale and proximal environments, such as that of the home which may be particularly relevant for younger adolescents who have more limited independence and mobility. The purpose of this study was to describe associations between the home environment and adolescent physical activity, sedentary time, and screen time. Methods A total of 613 parent-adolescent dyads were included in these analyses from two ongoing cohort studies. Parents completed a Physical Activity and Media Inventory (PAMI of their home environment. Adolescent participants (49% male, 14.5 ± 1.8 years self-reported their participation in screen time behaviors and wore an ActiGraph accelerometer for one week to assess active and sedentary time. Results After adjusting for possible confounders, physical activity equipment density in the home was positively associated with accelerometer-measured physical activity (p Conclusions The home environment was associated with physical activity and screen time behavior in adolescents and differential environmental effects for males and females were observed. Additional research is warranted to more comprehensively assess the home environment and to identify obesogenic typologies of families so that early identification of at-risk families can lead to more informed, targeted intervention efforts.

  4. An In-Home Digital Network Architecture for Real-Time and Non-Real-Time Communication

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Scholten, Johan; Jansen, P.G.; Hanssen, F.T.Y.; Hattink, Tjalling

    2002-01-01

    This paper describes an in-home digital network architecture that supports both real-time and non-real-time communication. The architecture deploys a distributed token mechanism to schedule communication streams and to offer guaranteed quality-ofservice. Essentially, the token mechanism prevents

  5. Real-Time Communication in Wireless Home Networks

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Scholten, Johan; Jansen, P.G.

    This paper describes a medium access protocol for real-time communication in wireless networks. Medium access is controlled by a scheduler, which utilizes a pre-emptive earliest deadline first (PEDF) scheduling algorithm. The scheduler prevents collisions in the network, where normally only

  6. Home environment relationships with children’s physical activity, sedentary time, and screen time by socioeconomic status

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tandon Pooja S

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Children in households of lower socioeconomic status (SES are more likely to be overweight/obese. We aimed to determine if home physical activity (PA environments differed by SES and to explore home environment mediators of the relation of family SES to children’s PA and sedentary behavior. Methods Participants were 715 children aged 6 to 11 from the Neighborhood Impact on Kids (NIK Study. Household SES was examined using highest educational attainment and income. Home environment was measured by parent report on a survey. Outcomes were child’s accelerometer-measured PA and parent-reported screen time. Mediation analyses were conducted for home environment factors that varied by SES. Results Children from lower income households had greater media access in their bedrooms (TV 52% vs. 14%, DVD player 39% vs. 14%, video games 21% vs. 9% but lower access to portable play equipment (bikes 85% vs. 98%, jump ropes 69% vs. 83% compared to higher income children. Lower SES families had more restrictive rules about PA (2.5 vs. 2.0. Across SES, children watched TV/DVDs with parents/siblings more often than they engaged in PA with them. Parents of lower SES watched TV/DVDs with their children more often (3.1 vs. 2.5 days/week. Neither total daily and home-based MVPA nor sedentary time differed by SES. Children’s daily screen time varied from 1.7 hours/day in high SES to 2.4 in low SES families. Media in the bedroom was related to screen time, and screen time with parents was a mediator of the SES--screen time relationship. Conclusions Lower SES home environments provided more opportunities for sedentary behavior and fewer for PA. Removing electronic media from children’s bedrooms has the potential to reduce disparities in chronic disease risk.

  7. A descriptive retrospective study of time consumption in home care services: how do employees use their working time?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holm, Solrun G; Angelsen, Ragnhild O

    2014-09-26

    Home care services in Norway are provided for free, and municipalities are responsible for their provision to all those in need of them, in accordance with the Act on Municipal Health and Care Services. The costs of home care services are increasing. Many municipalities are now working to find the best cost-effective solutions to ensure that home care services are of sufficient quality but still affordable. This paper describes how nurses and health workers spend their working time, with a hypothesis that driving time and time required to document details of the care given are underestimated in weekly planning schedules. This article sets out a descriptive retrospective study of day-schedules and driving routes for staff working in home care services. Data were analyzed using GIS. The driving time was between 18% and 26% of working time in municipality A, and between 21% and 23% in municipality B. Visiting time varied between 44% and 62% in municipality A, and 40% and 56% in municipality B. Other tasks, including the legally-required documentation of the care given, varied between 19% and 32% in municipality A and 21% and 38% in municipality B. Overall, 22% of the driving routes in municipality A, and 14% in municipality B, took more time than expected. In municipality A, 22% of the day-schedules underestimated overtime; this figure was 14% in municipality B. In home care services, time taken for driving and to write statutory documentation seems to have been underestimated. Better planning and organization of driving routes would reduce driving time and allow more time for other necessary work.

  8. Anti-prothrombin antibodies are associated with adverse pregnancy outcome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marozio, Luca; Curti, Antonella; Botta, Giovanni; Canuto, Emilie M; Salton, Loredana; Tavella, Anna Maria; Benedetto, Chiara

    2011-11-01

    Women with antiphospholipid antibodies (aPL) such as lupus anticoagulant, anticardiolipin antibodies, and anti-β(2) glycoprotein-1 antibodies are at high risk of late pregnancy complications, such as severe pre-eclampsia, placental insufficiency, and fetal loss. It has been observed that aPL consists of a heterogeneous group of antibodies targeting several phospholipid-binding plasma proteins, including also anti-prothrombin (anti-PT), anti-protein S (anti-PS), and anti-protein C (anti-PC) antibodies. Their potential role in late pregnancy complications is not known. The aim of this work was to investigate the association between those autoantibodies and histories for adverse pregnancy outcome. Anti-PT, anti-PS, and anti-PC antibodies were evaluated in 163 patients with previous severe pre-eclampsia, fetal death, and/or placental abruption and in as many women with previous uneventful pregnancies, negative for aPL. The prevalence of anti-PT antibodies was higher in cases than in controls (OR, 95% CI: 10.92, 4.52-26.38). The highest prevalence was observed in subjects with fetal death. Anti-PT antibodies appear to be associated with adverse pregnancy outcome, irrespectively of aPL. © 2011 John Wiley & Sons A/S.

  9. Does Home Visiting Benefit Only First-Time Mothers?: Evidence from Healthy Families Virginia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huntington, Lee; Galano, Joseph

    2013-01-01

    It is a common assumption that mothers who have had previous births would participate less fully and have poorer outcomes from early home visitation programs than would first-time mothers. The authors conducted a qualitative and quantitative study to test that assumption by measuring three aspects of participation: time in the program, the number…

  10. Decreased prothrombin conversion and reduced thrombin inactivation explain rebalanced thrombin generation in liver cirrhosis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Romy M W Kremers

    Full Text Available Impaired coagulation factor synthesis in cirrhosis causes a reduction of most pro- and anticoagulant factors. Cirrhosis patients show no clear bleeding or thrombotic phenotype, although they are at risk for both types of hemostatic event. Thrombin generation (TG is a global coagulation test and its outcome depends on underlying pro- and anticoagulant processes (prothrombin conversion and thrombin inactivation. We quantified the prothrombin conversion and thrombin inactivation during TG in 30 healthy subjects and 52 Child-Pugh (CP- A, 15 CP-B and 6 CP-C cirrhosis patients to test the hypothesis that coagulation is rebalanced in liver cirrhosis patients. Both prothrombin conversion and thrombin inactivation are reduced in cirrhosis patients. The effect on pro- and anticoagulant processes partially cancel each other out and as a result TG is comparable at 5 pM tissue factor between healthy subjects and patients. This supports the hypothesis of rebalanced hemostasis, as TG in cirrhosis patients remains within the normal range, despite large changes in prothrombin conversion and thrombin inactivation. Nevertheless, in silico analysis shows that normalization of either prothrombin conversion or thrombin inactivation to physiological levels, by for example the administration of prothrombin complex concentrates would cause an elevation of TG, whereas the normalization of both simultaneously maintains a balanced TG. Therefore, cirrhosis patients might require adapted hemostatic treatment.

  11. More efficient reversal of dabigatran inhibition of coagulation by activated prothrombin complex concentrate or recombinant factor VIIa than by four-factor prothrombin complex concentrate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lindahl, Tomas L; Wallstedt, Maria; Gustafsson, Kerstin M; Persson, Egon; Hillarp, Andreas

    2015-03-01

    The number of patients on antithrombotic treatment due to atrial fibrillation and venous thromboembolism is increasing fast due to an aging population. A growing proportion will be treated with novel oral anticoagulants, the first in clinical use was the direct oral thrombin inhibitor dabigatran (Pradaxa®). A small percentage of the patients on dabigatran will experience serious bleeding or be in need of urgent surgery. The aim of this study was to test the effects of different hemostatic agents in potentially reversing the anticoagulant effects in vitro in blood or platelet-rich plasma (PRP) spiked with dabigatran. Whole blood or PRP was spiked with the active substance dabigatran, 200 μg/L. We measured clotting time being induced by 1.4 pmol/L tissue factor using the instrument ReoRox2™ and initial clot growth velocity from a tissue factor covered surface using the instrument Thrombodynamics Analyzer T-2™. Dabigatran prolonged clotting time 5-fold but reduced clot growth velocity only slightly. The reversing effects of prothrombin complex concentrates (PCC), activated PCC (APCC) and recombinant activated factor VII (rFVIIa) were then tested. APCC (1.8 U/mL) reduced the prolonged clotting time by 1/3, rFVIIa (2 μg/L) only slightly (n = 10-20). The reduction was not significant using Mann-Whitney test but significant using t-test with Bonferronis' correction for multiple comparisons, whereas PCC (0.56 U/mL) had no effect on clotting time. APCC doubled initial clot growth velocity, although even more in the absence of dabigatran. In conclusion, APCC and rFVIIa, but not PCC, seem to reverse, at least partially, some effects of dabigatran on coagulation parameters. Systematic evaluation of case reports, registries and, ultimately, randomized clinical trials are needed to elucidate potential benefit for patients. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. How nursing staff spend their time on activities in a nursing home: an observational study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Munyisia, Esther Naliaka; Yu, Ping; Hailey, David

    2011-09-01

    This article is a report of a study to examine how nursing staff spend their time on activities in a nursing home. Few studies have investigated how nursing staff spend their time on activities in a nursing home. Such information is important for nurse managers in deciding on staff deployment, and for evaluating the effects of changes in nursing practice. A work sampling study with an observational component was undertaken in 2009 with nursing staff at a nursing home. A total of 430 activities were recorded for Registered Nurses, 331 for Endorsed Enrolled Nurses, 5276 for Personal Carers, and 501 for Recreational Activity Officers. Registered Nurses spent 48·4% of their time on communication and 18·1% on medication management. Endorsed Enrolled Nurses spent 37·7% on communication and 29·0% on documentation tasks. Communication was the most time-consuming activity for Recreational Activity Officers and Personal Carers, except that Personal Carers in a high care house spent more time on direct care duties. Hygiene duties and resident interaction were more frequently multitasked by the nursing staff in high care than in low care house. Nursing staff value their face-to-face interaction for successful care delivery. There is need, however, to investigate the effects of this form of communication on quality of care given to residents. Differences in multi-tasked activities between high care and low care houses should be considered when deploying staff in a nursing home. © 2011 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  13. Television Viewing at Home: Age Trends in Visual Attention and Time with TV.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, Daniel R.; And Others

    1986-01-01

    Decribes age trends in television viewing time and visual attention of children and adults videotaped in their homes for 10-day periods. Shows that the increase in visual attention to television during the preschool years is consistent with the theory that television program comprehensibility is a major determinant of attention in young children.…

  14. Parental Experiences of the "Time Together" Home Visiting Intervention: An Attachment Theory Perspective

    Science.gov (United States)

    Butcher, Rebecca L.; Gersch, Irvine S.

    2014-01-01

    This paper reports the results of research into parental experiences of the Somerset (UK) "Time Together" home visiting intervention, with regards to its impact on the parent-child relationship. The research was carried out using an Attachment Theory lens in order to understand the qualitative experiences of seven parents of children in…

  15. Safe current in home and spare time. Sicherer Strom in Heim und Freizeit. Vortraege

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1982-01-01

    The papers read at the meeting of the Association of Electrical Engineers (VDE) in May 1982 are intended on the one hand to create awareness of sources of danger and, on the other hand, to demonstrate and discuss how safety can be further enhanced by consistent use of standardization and enlightenment. They are titled as follows: Power accidents in home and spare time; Physiological aspects of accidents; Tasks of the state in consumer protection; Consumer protection through laws and standards; Test institutions and test-marks; Installation technology at home and abroad; Protective measures; Teaching and learning safety; Training for electricians and continuation training.

  16. Does home equipment contribute to socioeconomic gradients in Australian children’s physical activity, sedentary time and screen time?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dot Dumuid

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Activity behaviours (physical activity, sedentary time and screen time have been linked to health outcomes in childhood. Furthermore, socioeconomic disparities have been observed in both children’s activity behaviours and health outcomes. Children’s physical home environments may play a role in these relationships. This study aimed to examine the associations and interactions between children’s physical home environment, socioeconomic status and moderate-to-vigorous physical activity, sedentary time and screen time. Methods Australian children (n = 528 aged 9–11 years from randomly selected schools participated in the cross-sectional International Study of Childhood Obesity, Lifestyle and the Environment. Children’s physical home environment (access to equipment, socioeconomic status (household income and parental education and demographic variables (gender and family structure were determined by parental questionnaire. Moderate-to-vigorous physical activity and sedentary time were measured objectively by 7-day 24-h accelerometry. Screen time was obtained from child survey. The associations between the physical home environment, socioeconomic status and moderate-to-vigorous physical activity, sedentary time and screen time were examined for 427 children, using analysis of covariance, and linear and logistic regression, with adjustment for gender and family structure. Results The presence of TVs (p < 0.01 and video game consoles (p < 0.01 in children’s bedrooms, and child possession of handheld video games (p = 0.04, cell phones (p < 0.01 and music devices (p = 0.04 was significantly and positively associated with screen time. Ownership of these devices (with the exception of music devices was inversely related to socioeconomic status (parental education. Children’s moderate-to-vigorous intensity physical activity (p = 0.04 and possession of active play equipment (p = 0.04 were

  17. Does home equipment contribute to socioeconomic gradients in Australian children's physical activity, sedentary time and screen time?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dumuid, Dot; Olds, Timothy S; Lewis, Lucy K; Maher, Carol

    2016-08-05

    Activity behaviours (physical activity, sedentary time and screen time) have been linked to health outcomes in childhood. Furthermore, socioeconomic disparities have been observed in both children's activity behaviours and health outcomes. Children's physical home environments may play a role in these relationships. This study aimed to examine the associations and interactions between children's physical home environment, socioeconomic status and moderate-to-vigorous physical activity, sedentary time and screen time. Australian children (n = 528) aged 9-11 years from randomly selected schools participated in the cross-sectional International Study of Childhood Obesity, Lifestyle and the Environment. Children's physical home environment (access to equipment), socioeconomic status (household income and parental education) and demographic variables (gender and family structure) were determined by parental questionnaire. Moderate-to-vigorous physical activity and sedentary time were measured objectively by 7-day 24-h accelerometry. Screen time was obtained from child survey. The associations between the physical home environment, socioeconomic status and moderate-to-vigorous physical activity, sedentary time and screen time were examined for 427 children, using analysis of covariance, and linear and logistic regression, with adjustment for gender and family structure. The presence of TVs (p music devices (p = 0.04) was significantly and positively associated with screen time. Ownership of these devices (with the exception of music devices) was inversely related to socioeconomic status (parental education). Children's moderate-to-vigorous intensity physical activity (p = 0.04) and possession of active play equipment (p = 0.04) were both positively associated with socioeconomic status (household income), but were not related to each other (with the exception of bicycle ownership). Children with less electronic devices, particularly in their bedrooms

  18. The TIME Questionnaire: A tool for eliciting personhood and enhancing dignity in nursing homes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pan, Jingyan Linda; Chochinov, Harvey; Thompson, Genevieve; McClement, Susan

    2016-01-01

    This study aimed at evaluating the effectiveness of the TIME (This Is ME) Questionnaire in eliciting personhood and enhancing dignity; specifically investigating the residents' and health care providers' perspectives in the nursing home setting. Residents (n = 41) from six nursing homes in a Canadian urban center completed both the TIME Questionnaire and a feedback response questionnaire; health care providers (n = 22) offered feedback both through a questionnaire or participation in a focus group. 100% of the residents indicated the summary was accurate. 94% stated that they wanted to receive a copy of the summary, 92% indicated they would recommend the questionnaire to others, 72% wanted a copy of the summary to be placed into their medical chart. Overall HCPs' agreed that they have learned something new from TIME, and that TIME influenced their attitude, care, respect, empathy/compassion, sense of connectedness, as well as personal satisfaction in providing care. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. ICT and Substitution between Out-of-home and At-home Work; the Importance of Timing

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Graaff, de Thomas; Rietveld, Piet

    2003-01-01

    This paper investigates the determinants of at home and out-of-home labor supply in the Netherlands in the 199s, focusing on the presence of ICT technologies in households -in particular modempossession.To investigate these determinants, a sequential hurdle model is estimated where people first

  20. Socio-demographic, psychosocial and home-environmental attributes associated with adults' domestic screen time

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Owen Neville

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Sedentary behaviors (involving prolonged sitting time are associated with deleterious health consequences, independent of (lack of physical activity. To inform interventions, correlates of prevalent sedentary behaviors need to be identified. We examined associations of socio-demographic, home-environmental and psychosocial factors with adults' TV viewing time and leisure-time Internet use; and whether psychosocial and environmental correlates differed according to gender, age and educational attainment. Methods This cross-sectional study was conducted in Ghent, Belgium, between March and May 2010. Respondents to a mail-out survey (n = 419; 20-65 years; mean age 48.5 [12.1] years; 47.3% men completed a questionnaire on sedentary behaviors and their potential socio-demographic, psychosocial and home environmental correlates. Statistical analyses were performed using multiple linear regression models. Results The independent variables explained 31% of the variance in TV viewing time and 38% of the variance in leisure-time Internet use. Higher education, greater perceived pros of and confidence about reducing TV time were negatively associated with TV viewing time; older age, higher body mass index, larger TV set size and greater perceived cons of reducing TV time showed positive associations. Perceived pros of and confidence about reducing Internet use were negatively associated with leisure-time Internet use; higher education, number of computers in the home, positive family social norms about Internet use and perceived cons of reducing Internet use showed positive associations. None of the socio-demographic factors moderated these associations. Conclusions Educational level, age, self-efficacy and pros/cons were the most important correlates identified in this study. If further cross-sectional and longitudinal research can confirm these findings, tailored interventions focusing on both psychosocial and environmental factors in

  1. Load Balancing Integrated Least Slack Time-Based Appliance Scheduling for Smart Home Energy Management

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silva, Bhagya Nathali; Khan, Murad; Han, Kijun

    2018-01-01

    The emergence of smart devices and smart appliances has highly favored the realization of the smart home concept. Modern smart home systems handle a wide range of user requirements. Energy management and energy conservation are in the spotlight when deploying sophisticated smart homes. However, the performance of energy management systems is highly influenced by user behaviors and adopted energy management approaches. Appliance scheduling is widely accepted as an effective mechanism to manage domestic energy consumption. Hence, we propose a smart home energy management system that reduces unnecessary energy consumption by integrating an automated switching off system with load balancing and appliance scheduling algorithm. The load balancing scheme acts according to defined constraints such that the cumulative energy consumption of the household is managed below the defined maximum threshold. The scheduling of appliances adheres to the least slack time (LST) algorithm while considering user comfort during scheduling. The performance of the proposed scheme has been evaluated against an existing energy management scheme through computer simulation. The simulation results have revealed a significant improvement gained through the proposed LST-based energy management scheme in terms of cost of energy, along with reduced domestic energy consumption facilitated by an automated switching off mechanism. PMID:29495346

  2. Load Balancing Integrated Least Slack Time-Based Appliance Scheduling for Smart Home Energy Management

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bhagya Nathali Silva

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available The emergence of smart devices and smart appliances has highly favored the realization of the smart home concept. Modern smart home systems handle a wide range of user requirements. Energy management and energy conservation are in the spotlight when deploying sophisticated smart homes. However, the performance of energy management systems is highly influenced by user behaviors and adopted energy management approaches. Appliance scheduling is widely accepted as an effective mechanism to manage domestic energy consumption. Hence, we propose a smart home energy management system that reduces unnecessary energy consumption by integrating an automated switching off system with load balancing and appliance scheduling algorithm. The load balancing scheme acts according to defined constraints such that the cumulative energy consumption of the household is managed below the defined maximum threshold. The scheduling of appliances adheres to the least slack time (LST algorithm while considering user comfort during scheduling. The performance of the proposed scheme has been evaluated against an existing energy management scheme through computer simulation. The simulation results have revealed a significant improvement gained through the proposed LST-based energy management scheme in terms of cost of energy, along with reduced domestic energy consumption facilitated by an automated switching off mechanism.

  3. Load Balancing Integrated Least Slack Time-Based Appliance Scheduling for Smart Home Energy Management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silva, Bhagya Nathali; Khan, Murad; Han, Kijun

    2018-02-25

    The emergence of smart devices and smart appliances has highly favored the realization of the smart home concept. Modern smart home systems handle a wide range of user requirements. Energy management and energy conservation are in the spotlight when deploying sophisticated smart homes. However, the performance of energy management systems is highly influenced by user behaviors and adopted energy management approaches. Appliance scheduling is widely accepted as an effective mechanism to manage domestic energy consumption. Hence, we propose a smart home energy management system that reduces unnecessary energy consumption by integrating an automated switching off system with load balancing and appliance scheduling algorithm. The load balancing scheme acts according to defined constraints such that the cumulative energy consumption of the household is managed below the defined maximum threshold. The scheduling of appliances adheres to the least slack time (LST) algorithm while considering user comfort during scheduling. The performance of the proposed scheme has been evaluated against an existing energy management scheme through computer simulation. The simulation results have revealed a significant improvement gained through the proposed LST-based energy management scheme in terms of cost of energy, along with reduced domestic energy consumption facilitated by an automated switching off mechanism.

  4. Cooperation versus Coordination: Using Real-time Telemedicine for Treatment at Home of Diabetic Footulcers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Clemensen, Jane; Larsen, Simon Bo

    2007-01-01

    In conventional treatment the patient with a diabetic foot ulcer travels to hospital for consultations with the experts. We conducted an organizational analysis of the cooperation taking place when telemedicine was used for treatment at home instead. In a pilot study, five patients were offered t...... the barriers to real-time communication, but at the same time provide mechanisms for asynchronous communication in situations where synchronous communication is not possible. Udgivelsesdato: December 2007......In conventional treatment the patient with a diabetic foot ulcer travels to hospital for consultations with the experts. We conducted an organizational analysis of the cooperation taking place when telemedicine was used for treatment at home instead. In a pilot study, five patients were offered...

  5. Time Out-of-Home and Cognitive, Physical, and Emotional Wellbeing of Older Adults: A Longitudinal Mixed Effects Model.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Johanna Petersen

    Full Text Available Time out-of-home has been linked with numerous health outcomes, including cognitive decline, poor physical ability and low emotional state. Comprehensive characterization of this important health metric would potentially enable objective monitoring of key health outcomes. The objective of this study is to determine the relationship between time out-of-home and cognitive status, physical ability and emotional state.Participants included 85 independent older adults, age 65-96 years (M = 86.36; SD = 6.79 who lived alone, from the Intelligent Systems for Assessing Aging Changes (ISAAC and the ORCATECH Life Laboratory cohorts. Factors hypothesized to affect time out-of-home were assessed on three different temporal levels: yearly (cognitive status, loneliness, clinical walking speed, weekly (pain and mood or daily (time out-of-home, in-home walking speed, weather, and season. Subject characteristics including age, race, and gender were assessed at baseline. Total daily time out-of-home in hours was assessed objectively and unobtrusively for up to one year using an in-home activity sensor platform. A longitudinal tobit mixed effects regression model was used to relate daily time out-of-home to cognitive status, physical ability and emotional state. More hours spend outside the home was associated with better cognitive function as assessed using the Clinical Dementia Rating (CDR Scale, where higher scores indicate lower cognitive function (βCDR = -1.69, p<0.001. More hours outside the home was also associated with superior physical ability (βPain = -0.123, p<0.001 and improved emotional state (βLonely = -0.046, p<0.001; βLow mood = -0.520, p<0.001. Weather, season, and weekday also affected the daily time out-of-home.These results suggest that objective longitudinal monitoring of time out-of-home may enable unobtrusive assessment of cognitive, physical and emotional state. In addition, these results indicate that the factors affecting out-of-home

  6. Time spent on home food preparation and indicators of healthy eating.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monsivais, Pablo; Aggarwal, Anju; Drewnowski, Adam

    2014-12-01

    The amount of time spent on food preparation and cooking may have implications for diet quality and health. However, little is known about how food-related time use relates to food consumption and spending, either at restaurants or for food consumed at home. To quantitatively assess the associations among the amount of time habitually spent on food preparation and patterns of self-reported food consumption, food spending, and frequency of restaurant use. This was a cross-sectional study of 1,319 adults in a population-based survey conducted in 2008-2009. The sample was stratified into those who spent 2 hours/day on food preparation and cleanup. Descriptive statistics and multivariable regression models examined differences between time-use groups. Analyses were conducted in 2011-2013. Individuals who spent the least amount of time on food preparation tended to be working adults who placed a high priority on convenience. Greater amount of time spent on home food preparation was associated with indicators of higher diet quality, including significantly more frequent intake of vegetables, salads, fruits, and fruit juices. Spending food preparation was associated with significantly more money spent on food away from home and more frequent use of fast food restaurants compared to those who spent more time on food preparation. The findings indicate that time might be an essential ingredient in the production of healthier eating habits among adults. Further research should investigate the determinants of spending time on food preparation. Copyright © 2014 American Journal of Preventive Medicine. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Anti-prothrombin (aPT) and anti-phosphatidylserine/prothrombin (aPS/PT) antibodies and the risk of thrombosis in the antiphospholipid syndrome. A systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sciascia, Savino; Sanna, Giovanni; Murru, Veronica; Roccatello, Dario; Khamashta, Munther A; Bertolaccini, Maria Laura

    2014-02-01

    Antibodies to prothrombin are detected by directly coating prothrombin on irradiated ELISA plates (aPT) or by using the phosphatidylserine/prothrombin complex as antigen (aPS/PT). Although these antibodies have both been associated with antiphospholipid syndrome (APS) and a correlation between the two assays have been reported, it seems that aPT and aPS/PT belong to different populations of autoantibodies. It was our objective to systematically review the available evidence on aPT and aPS/PT antibodies and the risk of thrombosis in APS. Medline-reports published between 1988 and 2013 investigating aPT and aPS/PT as a risk factor for thrombosis were included. Whenever possible, antibody isotype(s) and site of thrombosis were analysed. This systematic review is based on available data from more than 7,000 patients and controls from 38 studies analysing aPT and 10 aPS/PT. Antibodies to prothrombin (both aPT and aPS/PT) increased the risk of thrombosis (odds ratio [OR] 2.3; 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.72-3.5). aPS/PT seemed to represent a stronger risk factor for thrombosis, both arterial and/or venous than aPT (OR 5.11; 95%CI 4.2-6.3 and OR 1.82; 95%CI 1.44-2.75, respectively). In conclusion, routine measurement of aPS/PT (but not aPT) might be useful in establishing the thrombotic risk of patients with previous thrombosis and/or systemic lupus erythematosus. Their inclusion as laboratory criteria for the APS should be indisputably further explored.

  8. The association between leisure time sedentary behaviour among adults and objective neighbourhood characteristics nearby home

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Storgaard, Rikke Lynge; Hansen, Henning Sten

    2017-01-01

    is to examine the association between neighbourhood walkability and availability of sports and recreational facilities within 400 and 800 m from home and leisure time sedentary time. METHODS: The study was based on a cross sectional health survey of 49,806 adults aged 16+, conducted in 2010. Self......-reported information on leisure time sedentary time was combined with GIS based measures of neighbourhood physical environment and individual characteristics taken from registers. A multilevel regression analysis was performed. RESULTS: Good availability of recreational and sports facilities in the neighbourhood...... sedentary time and the walkability index was less clear and overall insignificant. CONCLUSION: Neighbourhoods with good availability of sports facilities, parks and recreational areas support less leisure time sedentary time. Intervention efforts may benefit from emphasizing the importance of having...

  9. Disruption Management for the Real-Time Home Caregiver Scheduling and Routing Problem

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Biao Yuan

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available The aggravating trend of the aging population, the miniaturization of the family structure, and the increase of families with empty nesters greatly affect the sustainable development of the national economy and social old-age security system of China. The emergence of home health care or home care (HHC/HC service mode provides an alternative for elderly care. How to develop and apply this new mobile service mode is crucial for the government. Therefore, the pertinent optimization problems regarding HHC/HC have constantly attracted the attention of researchers. Unexpected events, such as new requests of customers, cancellations of customers’ services, and changes of customers’ time windows, may occur during the process of executing an a priori visiting plan. These events may sometimes make the original plan non-optimal or even infeasible. To cope with this situation, we introduce disruption management to the real-time home caregiver scheduling and routing problem. The deviation measurements on customers, caregivers, and companies are first defined. A mathematical model that minimizes the weighted sum of deviation measurements is then constructed. Next, a tabu search (TS heuristic is developed to efficiently solve the problem, and a cost recorded mechanism is used to strengthen the performance. Finally, by performing computational experiments on three real-life instances, the effectiveness of the TS heuristic is tested, and the advantages of disruption management are analyzed.

  10. Making time for family meals: Parental influences, home eating environments, barriers and protective factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Blake L

    2018-04-06

    Frequent family mealtimes have been associated with numerous positive dietary, health, and behavioral outcomes for children and families. This review article summarizes some of the beneficial outcomes associated with having frequent family dinners. Current trends in family dinner frequency are discussed in the context of barriers that influence how often families eat dinner together, including time issues, work issues, and distractions in the home environment. Next, several parental influences and home environment factors that promote healthy and consistent family dinners are outlined. Finally, limitations are discussed and a few practical suggestions are mentioned to help encourage families, employers, and policy-makers to make family mealtimes a regular practice for as many families as possible. Copyright © 2018. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  11. Signs of Change? At-Home and Breadwinner Parents’ Housework and Child-Care Time

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chesley, Noelle; Flood, Sarah

    2016-01-01

    We analyze American Time Use Survey (ATUS) data to examine patterns in domestic work among at-home and breadwinner parents to further gauge how time availability, relative earnings, and gender shape time use in couples with extreme differences in earnings and work hours. We find that involvement in female-typed housework is an important driver of overall housework time. It is counter-normative housework behavior by at-home fathers that shapes conclusions about how time availability, relative resources, and gender influence parents’ housework. While time availability appears to shape child care in comparable ways across parents, mothers are more engaged in child care than similarly-situated fathers. Overall, our comparisons point to the importance of distinguishing among gender-normative housework tasks and accounting for differences in engagement on work and non-work days. Our results also provide a basis for assessing the social significance of growing numbers of parents in work-family roles that are not gender-normative. PMID:28596619

  12. Signs of Change? At-Home and Breadwinner Parents' Housework and Child-Care Time.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chesley, Noelle; Flood, Sarah

    2017-04-01

    We analyze American Time Use Survey (ATUS) data to examine patterns in domestic work among at-home and breadwinner parents to further gauge how time availability, relative earnings, and gender shape time use in couples with extreme differences in earnings and work hours. We find that involvement in female-typed housework is an important driver of overall housework time. It is counter-normative housework behavior by at-home fathers that shapes conclusions about how time availability, relative resources, and gender influence parents' housework. While time availability appears to shape child care in comparable ways across parents, mothers are more engaged in child care than similarly-situated fathers. Overall, our comparisons point to the importance of distinguishing among gender-normative housework tasks and accounting for differences in engagement on work and non-work days. Our results also provide a basis for assessing the social significance of growing numbers of parents in work-family roles that are not gender-normative.

  13. 21 CFR 864.7735 - Prothrombin-proconvertin test and thrombotest.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Prothrombin-proconvertin test and thrombotest. 864.7735 Section 864.7735 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES HEMATOLOGY AND PATHOLOGY DEVICES Hematology Kits and Packages § 864...

  14. Screen-Time Weight-loss Intervention Targeting Children at Home (SWITCH): a randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maddison, Ralph; Marsh, Samantha; Foley, Louise; Epstein, Leonard H; Olds, Timothy; Dewes, Ofa; Heke, Ihirangi; Carter, Karen; Jiang, Yannan; Mhurchu, Cliona Ni

    2014-09-10

    Screen-based activities, such as watching television (TV), playing video games, and using computers, are common sedentary behaviors among young people and have been linked with increased energy intake and overweight. Previous home-based sedentary behaviour interventions have been limited by focusing primarily on the child, small sample sizes, and short follow-up periods. The SWITCH (Screen-Time Weight-loss Intervention Targeting Children at Home) study aimed to determine the effect of a home-based, family-delivered intervention to reduce screen-based sedentary behaviour on body composition, sedentary behaviour, physical activity, and diet over 24 weeks in overweight and obese children. A two-arm, parallel, randomized controlled trial was conducted. Children and their primary caregiver living in Auckland, New Zealand were recruited via schools, community centres, and word of mouth. The intervention, delivered over 20 weeks, consisted of a face-to-face meeting with the parent/caregiver and the child to deliver intervention content, which focused on training and educating them to use a wide range of strategies designed to reduce their child's screen time. Families were given Time Machine TV monitoring devices to assist with allocating screen time, activity packages to promote alternative activities, online support via a website, and monthly newsletters. Control participants were given the intervention material on completion of follow-up. The primary outcome was change in children's BMI z-score from baseline to 24 weeks. Children (n = 251) aged 9-12 years and their primary caregiver were randomized to receive the SWITCH intervention (n = 127) or no intervention (controls; n = 124). There was no significant difference in change of zBMI between the intervention and control groups, although a favorable trend was observed (-0.016; 95% CI: -0.084, 0.051; p = 0.64). There were also no significant differences on secondary outcomes, except for a trend towards

  15. A time series based sequence prediction algorithm to detect activities of daily living in smart home.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marufuzzaman, M; Reaz, M B I; Ali, M A M; Rahman, L F

    2015-01-01

    The goal of smart homes is to create an intelligent environment adapting the inhabitants need and assisting the person who needs special care and safety in their daily life. This can be reached by collecting the ADL (activities of daily living) data and further analysis within existing computing elements. In this research, a very recent algorithm named sequence prediction via enhanced episode discovery (SPEED) is modified and in order to improve accuracy time component is included. The modified SPEED or M-SPEED is a sequence prediction algorithm, which modified the previous SPEED algorithm by using time duration of appliance's ON-OFF states to decide the next state. M-SPEED discovered periodic episodes of inhabitant behavior, trained it with learned episodes, and made decisions based on the obtained knowledge. The results showed that M-SPEED achieves 96.8% prediction accuracy, which is better than other time prediction algorithms like PUBS, ALZ with temporal rules and the previous SPEED. Since human behavior shows natural temporal patterns, duration times can be used to predict future events more accurately. This inhabitant activity prediction system will certainly improve the smart homes by ensuring safety and better care for elderly and handicapped people.

  16. Is There Time Enough? Temporal Resources and Service Performance in the Danish Home Care Sector

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pernille Tufte

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Reflecting on the temporal conditions of home care work, care workers are fairly critical, stressing that time frames are inflexible and time is limited and occasionally insufficient, altogether constituting a time pressure in work performance. Besides from the immediate consequences of time scarcity in the daily work performance, care workers relate the issue of time to a more fundamental discussion of what the performance of care does and should entail. The purpose of the article is to examine care workers’ perceptions of the temporal conditions of care work, investigating how time pressure constitutes a challenge to care workers’ own sense and valuation of their work. The article is informed by two theoretical perspectives: standardization of care services and performance of care work in private homes. Empirically, the article examines how care workers perceive the relations between the temporal framing and the possibilities to perform care work. Methodologically, the article is based on qualitative data, collected through focus group interviews and participant observation, and analyzed within the perspective of reflexive interpretation, using grounded theory method and hermeneutic approaches of analysis. A central focus of analysis is the concept of “additional care services.” The use of the concept reflects different understandings of care. Relying on the logic of standardization, managers articulate additional services as definite items, which could (and should be left out of the performance of care work. Care workers do, however, not accept this notion. Relying on their experience of work, they perceive additional services as an ambiguous concept, which recognizes the multiple character of care work. Conclusions are that time scarcity constitutes a pressure on work performance as a whole, reducing care workers’ flexibility, challenging their authority, but still keeping them in a position of responsibility. Ultimately, the

  17. Associations between home environment and after-school physical activity and sedentary time among 6th grade children

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lau, Erica Y; Barr-Anderson, Daheia J; Dowda, Marsha; Forthofer, Melinda; Saunders, Ruth P; Pate, Russell R

    2015-01-01

    This study examined associations of various elements of the home environment with after-school physical activity and sedentary time in 671 sixth-grade children (Mage = 11.49 ± 0.5 years). Children’s after-school total physical activity (TPA), moderate-to-vigorous physical activity (MVPA) and sedentary time were measured by accelerometry. Parents completed surveys assessing elements of the home social and physical environment. Mixed-model regression analyses were used to examine the associations between each element of the home environment and children’s after-school physical activity and sedentary time. Availability of home physical activity resources was associated positively with after-school TPA and negatively with after-school sedentary time in boys. Parental support was associated positively with after-school TPA and MVPA and negatively with after-school sedentary time in girls. The home physical environment was associated with boys’ after-school physical activity and sedentary time, whereas the home social environment was associated with girls’ after-school physical activity and sedentary time. PMID:25386734

  18. Explaining Direct Care Resource Use of Nursing Home Residents: Findings from Time Studies in Four States

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arling, Greg; Kane, Robert L; Mueller, Christine; Lewis, Teresa

    2007-01-01

    Objective To explain variation in direct care resource use (RU) of nursing home residents based on the Resource Utilization Groups III (RUG-III) classification system and other resident- and unit-level explanatory variables. Data Sources/Study Setting Primary data were collected on 5,314 nursing home residents in 156 nursing units in 105 facilities from four states (CO, IN, MN, MS) from 1998 to 2004. Study Design Nurses and other direct care staff recorded resident-specific and other time caring for all residents on sampled nursing units. Care time was linked to resident data from the Minimum Data Set assessment instrument. Major variables were: RUG-III group (34-group), other health and functional conditions, licensed and other professional minutes per day, unlicensed minutes per day, and direct care RU (wage-weighted minutes). Resident- and unit-level relationships were examined through hierarchical linear modeling. Data Collection/Extraction Methods Time study data were recorded with hand-held computers, verified for accuracy by project staff at the data collection sites and then merged into resident and unit-level data sets. Principal Findings Resident care time and RU varied between and within nursing units. RUG-III group was related to RU; variables such as length of stay and unit percentage of high acuity residents also were significantly related. Case-mix indices (CMIs) constructed from study data displayed much less variation across RUG-III groups than CMIs from earlier time studies. Conclusions Results from earlier time studies may not be representative of care patterns of Medicaid and private pay residents. New RUG-III CMIs should be developed to better reflect the relative costs of caring for these residents. PMID:17362220

  19. Prevalence of antibodies to prothrombin in solid phase (aPT) and to phosphatidylserine-prothrombin complex (aPS/PT) in patients with and without lupus anticoagulant.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bertolaccini, Maria Laura; Sciascia, Savino; Murru, Veronica; Garcia-Fernandez, Cesar; Sanna, Giovanni; Khamashta, Munther A

    2013-02-01

    Antibodies to prothrombin in solid phase (aPT) and those to phosphatidiyserine-prothrombin complex (aPS/PT) have been suggested to strongly correlate with the presence of lupus anticoagulant (LA). As their clinical diagnostic value and true relationship with the LA remains elusive, we designed this study to evaluate the prevalence and significance of aPT and aPS/PT in a large cohort of patients with and without LA. Samples from 257 patients were included. aPT and aPS/PT were tested by ELISA. LA was tested as per the current criteria from the ISTH Subcommittee on LA-Phospholipid-dependent antibodies. aPS/PT and aPT were found in 51% and 32% of LA-positive (LA+ve) patients and in 22% and 28% of LA-negative (LA-ve) patients, respectively. Thrombosis, particularly venous thrombosis was associated with IgG aPT in the LA+ve group (p=0.0006) and in the LA-ve group (p=0.017). Antibodies to phosphatidylserine-prothrombin, either IgG and IgM were associated with thrombosis in general (p=0.0003) in particularly with venous thrombosis in the LA+ve group (paPS/PT were independent risk factors for thrombosis and pregnancy loss. In conclusion, aPS/PT, but not aPT, are more frequently found in patients with LA. Their association with thrombosis seems to be independent of the presence of LA.

  20. Parent and child screen-viewing time and home media environment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jago, Russell; Stamatakis, Emmanuel; Gama, Augusta; Carvalhal, Isabel Mourão; Nogueira, Helena; Rosado, Vítor; Padez, Cristina

    2012-08-01

    Screen-viewing time has been associated with adverse health outcomes. Data on the predictors of youth screen-viewing time is predominately from older children in North America. Parental and home media environment factors that are associated with screen-viewing time could be targeted in interventions. Examine if parental screen-viewing time and electronic media (access to game equipment, TVs, PCs, and laptops) environment factors were associated with Portuguese children's screen-viewing time and if associations differed by child age (families with children aged 3-10 years. Data were collected in 2009-2010 and analyzed in 2011. Outcomes were child spending ≥2 hours watching TV and ≥1 hour per day playing with combined other media. Exposures were mothers and fathers watching ≥2 hours of TV and electronic media variables. Parental TV-viewing time was strongly associated with child weekday and weekend TV-viewing time across all four gender and age subgroups. Maternal TV-viewing time was a stronger predictor of child TV-viewing time than paternal TV-viewing time. There was very limited evidence that parental TV-viewing time was associated with combined other media time among boys or girls. Access to electronic game equipment increased the likelihood that children spent >1 hour using combined other media on weekdays and weekend days. Parental TV-viewing time was associated with Portuguese children's TV-viewing time. The numbers of TVs in the household and electronic games equipment access were also associated with TV- and combined other media-viewing/usage time. Copyright © 2012 American Journal of Preventive Medicine. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Taste, choice and timing: Investigating resident and carer preferences for meals in aged care homes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Milte, Rachel; Ratcliffe, Julie; Chen, Gang; Miller, Michelle; Crotty, Maria

    2018-03-01

    There has been little empirical investigation of the preferences of people living in aged care homes for food services. The aim of the present study was to elicit consumer preferences and their willingness to pay for food service in aged care homes. Current residents or their family members were invited to take part in the discrete choice experiment questionnaire administered via interview. Of the 109 eligible residents and 175 eligible family members approached for consent 121 (43%) participated, including 43 residents. Participant preferences were influenced by food taste, choice in relation to serving size, timing of meal selection, visual appeal, and additional cost. Participants indicated they would be willing to pay an additional $24 (US$18.42) per week for food which tasted excellent and $8 (US$6.14) per week to have choice in serving sizes. The study found that respondents were willing to pay a premium to receive food that met their expectations of taste, and for a high level of control over serving sizes, which has implications for the funding and provision of food and dining in long-term care in the future. © 2018 The Authors Nursing & Health Sciences Published by John Wiley & Sons Australia, Ltd.

  2. Family involvement in timely detection of changes in health of nursing homes residents: A qualitative exploratory study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Powell, Catherine; Blighe, Alan; Froggatt, Katherine; McCormack, Brendan; Woodward-Carlton, Barbara; Young, John; Robinson, Louise; Downs, Murna

    2018-01-01

    To explore family perspectives on their involvement in the timely detection of changes in their relatives' health in UK nursing homes. Increasingly, policy attention is being paid to the need to reduce hospitalisations for conditions that, if detected and treated in time, could be managed in the community. We know that family continue to be involved in the care of their family members once they have moved into a nursing home. Little is known, however, about family involvement in the timely detection of changes in health in nursing home residents. Qualitative exploratory study with thematic analysis. A purposive sampling strategy was applied. Fourteen semi-structured one-to-one interviews with family members of people living in 13 different UK nursing homes. Data were collected from November 2015-March 2016. Families were involved in the timely detection of changes in health in three key ways: noticing signs of changes in health, informing care staff about what they noticed and educating care staff about their family members' changes in health. Families suggested they could be supported to detect timely changes in health by developing effective working practices with care staff. Families can provide a special contribution to the process of timely detection in nursing homes. Their involvement needs to be negotiated, better supported, as well as given more legitimacy and structure within the nursing home. Families could provide much needed support to nursing home nurses, care assistants and managers in timely detection of changes in health. This may be achieved through communication about their preferred involvement on a case-by-case basis as well as providing appropriate support or services. © 2017 The Authors. Journal of Clinical Nursing Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  3. Antibodies to phosphatidylserine/prothrombin complex as an additional diagnostic marker of APS?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Žigon, P; Čučnik, S; Ambrožič, A; Sodin Šemrl, S; Kveder, T; Božič, B

    2012-06-01

    Antiprothrombin antibodies can be measured by ELISA using either a prothrombin/phosphatidylserine complex (aPS/PT) or prothrombin alone (aPT) as antigen. We aimed to compare the clinical features of autoimmune patients with avidity of aPS/PT and determine the diagnostic efficiency of aPS/PT and aPT for assessing antiphospholipid syndrome (APS). aPS/PT were of low (n = 9), heterogeneous (n = 31) and high (n = 8) avidity out of 48 cases. None of the samples with low avidity were positive in aPT ELISA. Among patients with heterogeneous or high avidity aPS/PT, there was a significantly greater number of patients with APS as compared to patients with low avidity (38/39 vs. 7/9; p < 0.05). No SLE patients had high avidity antiprothrombin antibodies.

  4. Toward real time detection of the basic living activity in home using a wearable sensor and smart home sensors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bang, Sunlee; Kim, Minho; Song, Sa-Kwang; Park, Soo-Jun

    2008-01-01

    As the elderly people living alone are enormously increasing recently, we need the system inferring activities of daily living (ADL) for maintaining healthy life and recognizing emergency. The system should be constructed with sensors, which are used to associate with people's living while remaining as non intrusive views as possible. To do this, the proposed system use a triaxial accelerometer sensor and environment sensors indicating contact with subject in home. Particularly, in order to robustly infer ADLs, we present component ADL, which is decided with conjunction of human motion together, not just only contacted object identification. It is an important component in inferring ADL. In special, component ADL decision firstly refines misclassified initial activities, which improves the accuracy of recognizing ADL. Preliminary experiments results for proposed system provides overall recognition rate of over 97% over 8 component ADLs, which can be effectively applicable to recognize the final ADLs.

  5. Prothrombin Complex Concentrate for Intracerebral Hemorrhage Secondary to Vitamin K Deficiency Bleeding in a 6-Week-Old Child.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rech, Megan A; Wittekindt, Lindsay; Friedman, Samantha D; Kling, Kendall; Ubogy, David

    2015-12-01

    Four-factor prothrombin complex concentrate is approved for use of life-threatening bleeding secondary to vitamin K antagonism in adults. We describe the use of four-factor prothrombin complex concentrate for hemostasis in a 6-week-old child with life-threatening vitamin K dependent-bleeding who never received vitamin K prophylaxis at birth. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Prothrombin fragment 1+2 in urine as a marker on coagulation activity in patients with suspected pulmonary embolism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wexels, Fredrik; Dahl, Ola E; Pripp, Are H; Seljeflot, Ingebjørg; Borris, Lars C; Haslund, Anniken; Gudmundsen, Tor E; Lauritzen, Trine; Lassen, Michael R

    2014-07-01

    We have recently reported that increased levels of urine prothrombin fragment 1+2 reflected radiologically verified deep vein thrombosis. In this study we evaluated whether urine prothrombin fragment 1+2 was associated with pulmonary embolism in non-selected patients. Patients with clinical suspected pulmonary embolism were interviewed on comorbidities and medications. Urine was collected from each patient before radiological examination and snap frozen until analysed on urine prothrombin fragment 1+2 with an ELISA kit. Imaging of the pulmonary arteries were conducted with contrast enhanced computer tomography. Pulmonary embolism was diagnosed in 44/197 patients. Non-significantly higher urine prothrombin fragment 1+2 levels were found in non-selected patients with pulmonary embolism vs. those without (p=0.324). Significantly higher urine prothrombin fragment 1+2 levels were found in the pulmonary embolism positive patients without comorbidities (n=13) compared to the control group (n=28) (p=0.009). The calculated sensitivity, specificity and negative predictive value using the lowest detectable urine prothrombin fragment 1+2 level was 82%, 34% and 87%, respectively. There was no significant urine prothrombin fragment 1+2 level difference in patients with and without pulmonary embolism. In non-comorbide pulmonary embolism positive patients the urine prothrombin fragment 1+2 levels were significantly higher compared to the control group. The negative predictive value found in this study indicates that uF1+2 has the potential to identify patients with a low risk of PE. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Measuring patient-centered medical home access and continuity in clinics with part-time clinicians.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosland, Ann-Marie; Krein, Sarah L; Kim, Hyunglin Myra; Greenstone, Clinton L; Tremblay, Adam; Ratz, David; Saffar, Darcy; Kerr, Eve A

    2015-05-01

    Common patient-centered medical home (PCMH) performance measures value access to a single primary care provider (PCP), which may have unintended consequences for clinics that rely on part-time PCPs and team-based care. Retrospective analysis of 110,454 primary care visits from 2 Veterans Health Administration clinics from 2010 to 2012. Multi-level models examined associations between PCP availability in clinic, and performance on access and continuity measures. Patient experiences with access and continuity were compared using 2012 patient survey data (N = 2881). Patients of PCPs with fewer half-day clinic sessions per week were significantly less likely to get a requested same-day appointment with their usual PCP (predicted probability 17% for PCPs with 2 sessions/week, 20% for 5 sessions/week, and 26% for 10 sessions/week). Among requests that did not result in a same-day appointment with the usual PCP, there were no significant differences in same-day access to a different PCP, or access within 2 to 7 days with patients' usual PCP. Overall, patients had >92% continuity with their usual PCP at the hospital-based site regardless of PCP sessions/week. Patients of full-time PCPs reported timely appointments for urgent needs more often than patients of part-time PCPs (82% vs 71%; P Part-time PCP performance appeared worse when using measures focused on same-day access to patients' usual PCP. However, clinic-level same-day access, same-week access to the usual PCP, and overall continuity were similar for patients of part-time and full-time PCPs. Measures of in-person access to a usual PCP do not capture alternate access approaches encouraged by PCMH, and often used by part-time providers, such as team-based or non-face-to-face care.

  8. Association Between Symptom Burden and Time to Hospitalization, Nursing Home Placement, and Death Among the Chronically Ill Urban Homebound.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Nancy; Ornstein, Katherine A; Reckrey, Jennifer M

    2016-07-01

    Homebound adults experience significant symptom burden. To examine demographic and clinical characteristics associated with high symptom burden in the homebound, and to examine associations between symptom burden and time to hospitalization, nursing home placement, and death. Three hundred eighteen patients newly enrolled in the Mount Sinai Visiting Doctors Program, an urban home-based primary care program, were studied. Patient sociodemographic characteristics, symptom burden (measured via the Edmonton Symptom Assessment Scale), and incidents of hospitalization, nursing home placement, and death were collected via medical chart review. Multivariate Cox proportional hazards models were used to analyze the effect of high symptom burden on time to first hospitalization, nursing home placement, and death. Of the study sample, 45% had severe symptom burden (i.e., Edmonton Symptom Assessment Scale score >6 on at least one symptom). Patients with severe symptom burden were younger (82.0 vs. 85.5 years, P nursing home placement or death. The homebound with severe symptom burden represents a unique cohort of patients who are at increased risk of hospitalization. Tailored symptom management via home-based primary and palliative care programs may prevent unnecessary health care utilization in this population. Copyright © 2016 American Academy of Hospice and Palliative Medicine. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Evaluation of Factor V Leiden, Prothrombin G20210A, MTHFR C677T and MTHFR A1298C gene polymorphisms in retinopathy of prematurity in a Turkish cohort.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aydin, Hatip; Gunay, Murat; Celik, Gokhan; Gunay, Betul Onal; Aydin, Umeyye Taka; Karaman, Ali

    2016-12-01

    To assess Factor V Leiden (FVL) (rs6025), Prothrombin G20210A (rs1799963), MTHFR C677T (rs1801133), and MTHFR A1298C (rs1801131) gene mutations as risk factors in the development of retinopathy of prematurity (ROP). A total of 105 children were included in this cross-sectional study. Patients were divided into two groups. The study group consisted of 55 infants with a history of ROP and the control group comprised 50 healthy infants with term birth. All subjects were screened for the presence of certain mutations (FVL, Prothrombin G20210A, MTHFR C677T and MTHFR A1298C) by Real-Time PCR at 1 year of age. The mean gestational age (GA) and birth weight (BW) of the study group were, 28.65 ± 2.85 weeks and 1171 ± 385.74 g, respectively. There were no significant differences of genotype and allele frequency of Prothrombin G20210A, MTHFR A1298C and MTHFR C677T between the study and control groups (p > 0.05). Eight children (14.5 %) had heterozygous and one child (1.8%) had homozygous FVL mutation in the study group. One child (2%) in the control group had heterozygous FVL mutation. There was statistically significant differences of FVL allele and genotype frequencies between the groups (p < 0.05). The prevalence of FVL polymorphism (16.3 %) was higher in ROP patients than control subjects in this Turkish cohort. We suggest a possible association of FVL mutation with ROP at the end of the study.

  10. Perinatal outcomes and travel time from home to hospital: Welsh data from 1995 to 2009.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paranjothy, Shantini; Watkins, W John; Rolfe, Kim; Adappa, Roshan; Gong, Yi; Dunstan, Frank; Kotecha, Sailesh

    2014-12-01

    To study the association between travel time from home to hospital and birth outcomes. For all registrable births to women resident in Wales (1995-2009), we calculated the travel time between the mother's residence and the postcode-based location for both the birth hospital and all hospitals with maternity services that were open. Using logistic regression, we obtained odds ratios for the association between travel time and each birth outcome, adjusted for confounders. In our analysis of 412 827 singleton births, for every 15-min increase in travel time to the birth hospital, there was an increased risk of early (n = 609; OR: 1.13; 95%CI: 1.07, 1.20) and late neonatal death (n = 251; OR: 1.15; 95%CI: 1.05, 1.26). Results for intrapartum stillbirth were inconclusive (n = 135; OR: 1.13; 95%CI: 0.98, 1.30). For the above-combined (n = 995) results, we get OR: 1.15, 95%CI: 1.09, 1.20. No association was found with travel time to the nearest hospital (OR: 1.01; 95%CI: 0.90, 1.13 per 15-min increase in travel time) for the composite outcome of intrapartum stillbirth and neonatal deaths. Longer travel time to the birth hospital was associated with increased risk of neonatal deaths, but there was no strong evidence of association with the geographical location of maternity services. ©2014 Foundation Acta Paediatrica. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  11. Load Balancing Integrated Least Slack Time-Based Appliance Scheduling for Smart Home Energy Management

    OpenAIRE

    Bhagya Nathali Silva; Murad Khan; Kijun Han

    2018-01-01

    The emergence of smart devices and smart appliances has highly favored the realization of the smart home concept. Modern smart home systems handle a wide range of user requirements. Energy management and energy conservation are in the spotlight when deploying sophisticated smart homes. However, the performance of energy management systems is highly influenced by user behaviors and adopted energy management approaches. Appliance scheduling is widely accepted as an effective mechanism to manage...

  12. Daily time spent indoors in German homes--baseline data for the assessment of indoor exposure of German occupants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brasche, Sabine; Bischof, Wolfgang

    2005-01-01

    Comprehensive time-activity studies, for use as a basis for estimates of personal exposure, are not readily available in Germany. This analysis of time spent indoors at home is based on data from "Dampness and mould in homes" (2000/ 2001)--a study of about 12,000 persons living in 5530 randomly selected apartments and houses in Germany. The results show the mean times per day people in Germany spend in their homes, classified by gender, age group, building location, city size, region, building type, owner-occupier status, number of people at home, smoking and ventilation habits, moisture emission and ill health factors such as asthma, allergy and number of acute respiratory infections per year. The overall mean time spent at home, 15.7 h per, is in accordance with results from US-American (15.6 h/day) and Canadian (15.8 h/day) human activity surveys carried out in the nineties, as well as being consistent with the German Environmental Survey (1990/92) and a small German study in 1987.

  13. Real Time Information Based Energy Management Using Customer Preferences and Dynamic Pricing in Smart Homes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Muhammad Babar Rasheed

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents real time information based energy management algorithms to reduce electricity cost and peak to average ratio (PAR while preserving user comfort in a smart home. We categorize household appliances into thermostatically controlled (tc, user aware (ua, elastic (el, inelastic (iel and regular (r appliances/loads. An optimization problem is formulated to reduce electricity cost by determining the optimal use of household appliances. The operational schedules of these appliances are optimized in response to the electricity price signals and customer preferences to maximize electricity cost saving and user comfort while minimizing curtailed energy. Mathematical optimization models of tc appliances, i.e., air-conditioner and refrigerator, are proposed which are solved by using intelligent programmable communication thermostat ( iPCT. We add extra intelligence to conventional programmable communication thermostat (CPCT by using genetic algorithm (GA to control tc appliances under comfort constraints. The optimization models for ua, el, and iel appliances are solved subject to electricity cost minimization and PAR reduction. Considering user comfort, el appliances are considered where users can adjust appliance waiting time to increase or decrease their comfort level. Furthermore, energy demand of r appliances is fulfilled via local supply where the major objective is to reduce the fuel cost of various generators by proper scheduling. Simulation results show that the proposed algorithms efficiently schedule the energy demand of all types of appliances by considering identified constraints (i.e., PAR, variable prices, temperature, capacity limit and waiting time.

  14. Real-time attended home-polysomnography with telematic data transmission.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bruyneel, Marie; Van den Broecke, Sandra; Libert, Walter; Ninane, Vincent

    2013-08-01

    Home-polysomnography (HPSG) has been proposed as a cost-effective alternative for obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) diagnosis. We assessed, in a feasibility study, whether telematic transmission using the Dream® and Sleepbox® technologies was associated with low HPSG failure rate. Patients referred by chest physicians for clinical suspicion of OSA underwent one HPSG, using Dream® and Sleepbox® (Medatec, Belgium), which is a wireless system able to communicate with Dream®, and with Internet through a wi-fi/3G interface. It is equipped with a digital infrared camera, and with a speaker/microphone system for bidirectional audio/video communication via Skype®. The Sleep Lab nurse performed a remote discontinuous monitoring of the PSG. In case of sensor loss, she called the patient who had been previously educated to replace the sensors. Twenty-one patients have been studied. 90% of the recordings were of excellent quality. We observed a 10% PSG failure rate: one failure of the Dream®, and one recording of poor quality. There were 2 successful Skype® interventions resulting in readjustment of the defective probes (nasal cannula and EEG). PSG signal visualization was possible in 90% of cases but Skype® connection was problematic in 19% of cases. However, patients could be reached by phone to solve the problem. Real-time attended HPSG through telematic data transmission is feasible and could be an interesting perspective to decrease the failure rate of home sleep studies, even if some technical aspects need to be improved. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Has Work Replaced Home as a Haven? Re-examining Arlie Hochschild's Time Bind Proposition with Objective Stress Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Damaske, Sarah; Smyth, Joshua M.; Zawadzki, Matthew J.

    2014-01-01

    Using innovative data with objective and subjective measures of stress collected from 122 employed men and women, this paper tests the thesis of the Time Bind by asking whether people report lower stress levels at work than at home. The study finds consistent support for the Time Bind hypothesis when examining objective stress data: when participants were at work they had lower values of the stress hormone cortisol than when they were at home. Two variables moderated this association – income and children at home – such that the work as haven effect was stronger for those with lower incomes and no children living at home. Participants also, however, consistently reported higher subjective stress levels on work days than on non-work days, which is in direct contrast to the Time Bind hypothesis. Although our overall findings support Hochschild's hypothesis that stress levels are lower at work, it appears that combining work and home increases people's subjective experience of daily stress. PMID:24869785

  16. Has work replaced home as a haven? Re-examining Arlie Hochschild's Time Bind proposition with objective stress data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Damaske, Sarah; Smyth, Joshua M; Zawadzki, Matthew J

    2014-08-01

    Using innovative data with objective and subjective measures of stress collected from 122 employed men and women, this paper tests the thesis of the Time Bind by asking whether people report lower stress levels at work than at home. The study finds consistent support for the Time Bind hypothesis when examining objective stress data: when participants were at work they had lower values of the stress hormone cortisol than when they were at home. Two variables moderated this association - income and children at home - such that the work as haven effect was stronger for those with lower incomes and no children living at home. Participants also, however, consistently reported higher subjective stress levels on work days than on non-work days, which is in direct contrast to the Time Bind hypothesis. Although our overall findings support Hochschild's hypothesis that stress levels are lower at work, it appears that combining work and home increases people's subjective experience of daily stress. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Marginal Groups in Marginal Times: Gypsy and Traveller Parents and Home Education in England, UK

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhopal, Kalwant; Myers, Martin

    2016-01-01

    This article examines the experiences of home education for Gypsy and Traveller groups in England, UK. We argue that home education is perceived in a particular historical "moment" characterised in the media and more generally throughout society by "risk". Against this backdrop this article considers Gypsy and Traveller…

  18. Organizational and Individual Conditions Associated with Depressive Symptoms among Nursing Home Residents over Time

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cassie, Kimberly M.; Cassie, William E.

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: To examine the effect of organizational culture and climate on depressive symptoms among nursing home residents. Design and Methods: Using a pooled cross-sectional design, this study examines a sample of 23 nursing homes, 1,114 employees, and 5,497 residents. Depressive symptoms were measured using the Minimum Data Set, Depression Rating…

  19. How registered nurses, licensed practical nurses and resident aides spend time in nursing homes: An observational study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCloskey, Rose; Donovan, Cindy; Stewart, Connie; Donovan, Alicia

    2015-09-01

    Calls for improved conditions in nursing homes have pointed to the importance of optimizing the levels and skills of care providers. Understanding the work of care providers will help to determine if staff are being used to their full potential and if opportunities exist for improved efficiencies. To explore the activities of care providers in different nursing homes and to identify if variations exist within and across homes and shifts. A multi-centre cross-sectional observational work flow study was conducted in seven different nursing homes sites in one Canadian province. Data were collected by a research assistant who conducted 368 h of observation. The research assistant collected data by following an identical route in each site and recording observations on staff activities. Findings indicate staff activities vary across roles, sites and shifts. Licensed practical nurses (nursing assistants) have the greatest variation in their role while registered nurses have the least amount of variability. In some sites both registered nurses and licensed practical nurses perform activities that may be safely delegated to others. Care providers spend as much as 53.7% of their time engaged in non-value added activities. There may be opportunities for registered nurses and licensed practical nurses to delegate some of their activities to non-regulated workers. The time care providers spend in non-value activities suggest there may be opportunities to improve efficiencies within the nursing home setting. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Prothrombin G20210A gene mutation in pregnant females with thrombotic obstetric complications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alam, M.A.; Ali, N.; Ayyub, M.

    2018-01-01

    To determine the frequency of prothrombin G20210A gene mutation in pregnant females with adverse thrombotic obstetric complication and to compare it with prothrombin G20210A gene's frequency in control population. Study Design: Case control study. Place and Duration of Study: Department of Haematology, Army Medical College Rawalpindi and Military Hospital Rawalpindi, from Nov 2013 to Oct 2014. Material and Methods: Sixty pregnant females were included in the study; 30 were cases with adverse thrombotic obstetric complication, while 30 were controls. Detailed history was obtained and 3 ml blood in EDTA tube was collected. DNA was extracted from whole blood and through RT-PCR, presence of prothrombin G20210A gene mutation was looked for in patients and controls. Data was analyzed using SPSS 21. Results: A total of 60 women-30 cases with thrombotic obstetric complications as 'cases' and 30 as 'controls'- were included in the study. Mean age of 'cases' was 28.70 +- 4.23 years while that of 'controls' was 27.33 +- 4.49 years. There was no statistically significant difference among the two groups (p=0.54). In case group only one of 30 (3.3%) patients had heterozygous F2 G20210A mutation while 29 (96.7%) patients had wild type allele. In control group, all the 30 (100%) subjects had wild type allele. The odds of finding the mutation in cases was 1:29 i.e. 0.03 as compared to zero in the control group. The difference was statistically insignificant (p=0.5). Conclusion: Our study shows that the frequency of F2 G20210A gene mutation in pregnant females having adverse thrombotic obstetric complications was not significantly different from its frequency in control population. (author)

  1. Travel time from home to hospital and adverse perinatal outcomes in women at term in the Netherlands

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ravelli, A. C. J.; Jager, K. J.; de Groot, M. H.; Erwich, J. J. H. M.; Rijninks-van Driel, G. C.; Tromp, M.; Eskes, M.; Abu-Hanna, A.; Mol, B. W. J.

    Objective To study the effect of travel time, at the start or during labour, from home to hospital on mortality and adverse outcomes in pregnant women at term in primary and secondary care. Design Population-based cohort study from 2000 up to and including 2006. Setting The Netherlands Perinatal

  2. Money Allocation to Out-of-Home Leisure Activities and the Organization of These Activities in Time and Space

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dane, Gamze; Arentze, Theo A.; Timmermans, Harry J P; Ettema, Dick

    2015-01-01

    Monetary budgets influence activity participation and related travel as they demarcate limits on how people organize their activities in time and space. In this paper, we are interested in money allocation to out-of-home leisure activities and how this is affected by duration, sociodemographics, and

  3. Dabigatran and its reversal with recombinant factor VIIa and prothrombin complex concentrate

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sølbeck, Sacha; Nilsson, Caroline U; Engström, Martin

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: Dabigatran is a new oral direct thrombin inhibitor. No specific antidote exists in the event of hemorrhage, but prothrombin complex concentrate (PCC) and recombinant activated factor VII (rFVIIa) are suggested therapies. Sonoclot is a bedside viscoelastic instrument for monitoring...... different Sonoclot cuvettes: Glassbead, kaolin and tissue factor (diluted) activated. RESULTS: The Sonoclot detected in vitro-induced anticoagulation due to dabigatran with the glassbead- and kaolin-activated cuvettes. There was no reversing effect of PCC, probably due to the presence of heparin in the PCC...

  4. Microangiopathic antiphospholipid antibody syndrome due to anti-phosphatidylserine/prothrombin complex IgM antibody.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Senda, Yumi; Ohta, Kazuhide; Yokoyama, Tadafumi; Shimizu, Masaki; Furuichi, Kengo; Wada, Takashi; Yachie, Akihiro

    2017-03-01

    Herein we describe a case of microangiopathic antiphospholipid syndrome (MAPS) due to anti-phosphatidylserine/prothrombin complex (aPS/PT) IgM antibody successfully treated with rituximab. A significant correlation was observed between the clinical course and the aPS/PT IgM antibody titer, which can rise earlier before the appearance of clinical symptoms. Rituximab can be safely and effectively used for MAPS. Although detection of only aPS/PT IgM antibody is rare, aPS/PT IgM antibody might be associated with the pathogenesis of MAPS and might be a useful marker of disease activity. © 2017 Japan Pediatric Society.

  5. Health care and social service professionals' perceptions of a home-visit program for young, first-time mothers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, S A; Jack, S M; Gonzalez, A; Duku, E; MacMillan, H L

    2015-01-01

    Little is known about health care and social service professionals' perspective on the acceptability of long-term home-visit programs serving low-income, first-time mothers. This study describes the experiences and perspectives of these community care providers involved with program referrals or service delivery to mothers who participated in the Nurse-Family Partnership (NFP), a targeted nurse home-visit program. The study included two phases. Phase I was a secondary qualitative data analysis used to analyze a purposeful sample of 24 individual interviews of community care providers. This was part of a larger case study examining adaptations required to increase acceptability of the NFP in Hamilton, Ontario, Canada. In Phase II (n = 4), themes identified from Phase I were further explored through individual, semi-structured interviews with community health care and social service providers, giving qualitative description. Overall, the NFP was viewed as addressing an important service gap for first-time mothers. Providers suggested that frequent communication between the NFP and community agencies serving these mothers could help improve the referral process, avoid service duplication, and streamline the flow of service access. The findings can help determine key components required to enhance the success of integrating a home-visit program into an existing network of community services. The function of home-visit programs should not be viewed in isolation. Rather, their potential can be maximized when they collaborate and share information with other agencies to provide better services for first-time mothers.

  6. The novice birthing: theorising first-time mothers' experiences of birth at home and in hospital in Australia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dahlen, Hannah G; Barclay, Lesley M; Homer, Caroline S E

    2010-02-01

    to explore first-time mothers' experiences of birth at home and in hospital in Australia. a grounded theory methodology was used. Data were generated from in-depth interviews with women in their own homes. Sydney, Australia. 19 women were interviewed. Seven women who gave in a public hospital and seven women who gave birth for the first time at home were interviewed and their experiences were contrasted with two mothers who gave birth for the first time in a birth centre, one mother who gave birth for the first time in a private hospital and two women who had given birth more than once. three categories emerged from the analysis: preparing for birth, the novice birthing and processing the birth. These women shared a common core experience of seeing that they gave birth as 'novices'. The basic social process running through their experience of birth, regardless of birth setting, was that, as novices, they were all 'reacting to the unknown'. The mediating factors that influenced the birth experiences of these first-time mothers were preparation, choice and control, information and communication, and support. The quality of midwifery care both facilitated and hindered these needs, contributing to the women's perceptions of being 'honoured'. The women who gave birth at home seemed to have more positive birth experiences. identifying the novice status of first-time mothers and understanding the way in which they experience birth better explains previous research that reports unrealistic expectations and fear that may be associated with first-time birthing. It demonstrates how midwives can contribute to positive birth experiences by being aware that first-time mothers, irrespective of birth setting, are essentially reacting to the unknown as they negotiate the experience of birth. Copyright 2008 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Screen-time Weight-loss Intervention Targeting Children at Home (SWITCH): A randomized controlled trial study protocol

    OpenAIRE

    Tsai Midi; Jiang Yannan; Epstein Leonard; Foley Louise; Mhurchu Cliona; Maddison Ralph; Dewes Ofa; Heke Ihirangi

    2011-01-01

    Abstract Background Approximately one third of New Zealand children and young people are overweight or obese. A similar proportion (33%) do not meet recommendations for physical activity, and 70% do not meet recommendations for screen time. Increased time being sedentary is positively associated with being overweight. There are few family-based interventions aimed at reducing sedentary behavior in children. The aim of this trial is to determine the effects of a 24 week home-based, family orie...

  8. Antiphosphatidylserine/prothrombin antibodies (aPS/PT) as potential markers of antiphospholipid syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vlagea, Alexandru; Gil, Antonio; Cuesta, Maria V; Arribas, Florencia; Diez, Jesús; Lavilla, Paz; Pascual-Salcedo, Dora

    2013-06-01

    The antiphospholipid antibodies present in antiphospholipid syndrome (APS) are directed at a number of phospholipid-binding proteins: β2 glycoprotein I (β2GPI), prothrombin, and so on. Antibodies directed at β2GPI are accepted as a classification criterion for APS, while the presence of antiprothrombin antibodies is not. In the present article, we investigated the possible role of antiphosphatidylserine/prothrombin antibodies (aPS/PT) as marker of APS on a cohort of 295 individuals with APS (95 primary APS and 45 secondary APS) and APS-related diseases. We found aPS/PT to be highly associated with venous thrombosis (immunoglobulin G [IgG] aPS/PT odds ratio [OR], 7.44; 95% confidence interval [CI], 3.97-13.92 and IgM aPS/PT OR, 2.54; 95% CI, 1.35-4.77) and obstetric abnormalities (IgG aPS/PT OR, 2.37; 95% CI, 1.04-5.43), but not with arterial thrombosis. A very high degree of concordance between the concentration of aPS/PT and lupus anticoagulant activity was demonstrated. Therefore, we support the inclusion of aPS/PT determination as second-level assay to confirm APS classification.

  9. New tests to detect antiphospholipid antibodies: antiprothrombin (aPT) and anti-phosphatidylserine/prothrombin (aPS/PT) antibodies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sciascia, Savino; Khamashta, Munther A; Bertolaccini, Maria Laura

    2014-05-01

    Antiprothrombin antibodies have been proposed as potential new biomarkers for thrombosis and/or pregnancy morbidity in the setting of the antiphospholipid syndrome (APS). Antiprothrombin antibodies are commonly detected by ELISA, using prothrombin coated onto irradiated plates (aPT), or prothrombin in complex with phosphatidylserine (aPS/PT), as antigen. Although these antibodies can co-exist in the same patient, aPT and aPS/PT seem to belong to different populations of autoantibodies. Early research explored the role of antibodies to prothrombin as potential antigenic targets for the lupus anticoagulant (LA). To date their clinical significance is being investigated and their potential role in identifying patients at higher risk of developing thrombotic events or pregnancy morbidity is being probed.

  10. TED-Time and life saving External Defibrillator for home-use.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weiss, Teddy A; Rosenheck, Shimon; Gorni, Shraga; Katz, Ioni; Mendelbaum, Mendel; Gilon, Dan

    2014-06-01

    Sudden Cardiac Death--SCD --is a major unmet health problem that needs urgent and prompt solution. AICDs are very expensive, risky and indicated for a small group of patients, at the highest risk. AEDs--Automatic External Defibrillators--are designed for public places and although safe, cannot enter the home-market due to their cost and need for constant, high-cost maintenance. We developed TED, a low-cost AED that derives its energy off the mains, designed for home-use, to save SCD victims' lives. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Type of oral solid medication packaging and medication preparation time in nursing homes: A direct observation study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cready, C M; Hudson, C; Dreyer, K

    2017-12-01

    Medication administration is a substantial portion of the workday in nursing homes, with the medication preparation step being the most time-consuming. However, little is known about how medication preparation time is affected by the type of packaging used for oral solid medications (ie, tablets/capsules). We examined the effects of two types of packaging. As fewer steps are associated with strip packaging compared to bingo card packaging, we hypothesized that the increase in medication preparation seconds per resident with each additional oral solid medication would be smaller when strip packaging was used. A total of 430 medication preparations conducted by eight nurses during the regularly scheduled morning medication administration period in two nursing homes-using strip packaging and bingo card packaging, respectively-were observed. Each medication preparation observation was matched to its corresponding medication administration record and observations averaged across resident. Using the resident sample (N=149), we estimated three regression models (adjusting the standard errors for the clustering of resident by nurse). The first model regressed medication preparation seconds on the number of oral solid medications. The second model added the type of packaging used and the control variables (type of unit [long-term care, post-acute care], the number of one-half pills and the dosage form diversity in the preparation). To test our hypothesis, the third model added an interaction term between the number of oral solid medications and the type of packaging used. As hypothesized, all else equal, the number of oral solid medications tended to increase medication preparation time per resident in both nursing homes, but the increase was smaller in the strip packaging nursing home (Ppackaging nursing home increased medication preparation by an average of 13 seconds (b=13.077), whereas each oral solid medication administered in the strip packaging nursing home

  12. Associations of American Indian children's screen-time behavior with parental television behavior, parental perceptions of children's screen time, and media-related resources in the home.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barr-Anderson, Daheia J; Fulkerson, Jayne A; Smyth, Mary; Himes, John H; Hannan, Peter J; Holy Rock, Bonnie; Story, Mary

    2011-09-01

    American Indian children have high rates of overweight and obesity, which may be partially attributable to screen-time behavior. Young children's screen-time behavior is strongly influenced by their environment and their parents' behavior. We explored whether parental television watching time, parental perceptions of children's screen time, and media-related resources in the home are related to screen time (ie, television, DVD/video, video game, and computer use) among Oglala Lakota youth residing on or near the Pine Ridge Reservation in South Dakota. We collected baseline data from 431 child and parent/caregiver pairs who participated in Bright Start, a group-randomized, controlled, school-based obesity prevention trial to reduce excess weight gain. Controlling for demographic characteristics, we used linear regression analysis to assess associations between children's screen time and parental television watching time, parental perceptions of children's screen time, and availability of media-related household resources. The most parsimonious model for explaining child screen time included the children's sex, parental body mass index, parental television watching time, how often the child watched television after school or in the evening, parental perception that the child spent too much time playing video games, how often the parent limited the child's television time, and the presence of a VCR/DVD player or video game player in the home (F(7,367) = 14.67; P strategy for reducing overweight and obesity in American Indian children.

  13. 20 CFR 404.1008 - Agent-driver or commission-driver, full-time life insurance salesman, home worker, or traveling...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... commission-driver, full-time life insurance salesman, home worker, or traveling or city salesman. (a) General... 20 Employees' Benefits 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Agent-driver or commission-driver, full-time life insurance salesman, home worker, or traveling or city salesman. 404.1008 Section 404.1008...

  14. First-time urea breath tests performed at home by 36,629 patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dahlerup, Søren; Andersen, Rikke Charlotte; Nielsen, Birgitte Sperling Wilms

    2011-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The aim of the current study was (1) to describe the use of a (13) C-urea breath test (UBT) that was performed by patients at their homes as a part of a test-and-treat strategy in primary care and (2) to investigate the prevalence of Helicobacter pylori in patients taking a first...

  15. Is There Time Enough? Temporal Resources and Service Performance in the Danish Home Care Sector

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tufte, Pernille

    2013-01-01

    constitutes a challenge to care workers’ own sense and valuation of their work. The article is informed by two theoretical perspectives: standardization of care services and performance of care work in private homes. Empirically, the article examines how care workers perceive the relations between...

  16. The work pattern of personal care workers in two Australian nursing homes: a time-motion study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qian Si-Yu

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The aim of the study is to describe the work pattern of personal care workers (PCWs in nursing homes. This knowledge is important for staff performance appraisal, task allocation and scheduling. It will also support funding allocation based on activities. Methods A time-motion study was conducted in 2010 at two Australian nursing homes. The observation at Site 1 was between the hours of 7:00 and 14:00 or 15:00 for 14 days. One PCW was observed on each day. The observation at Site 2 was from 10:00 to 17:00 for 16 days. One PCW working on a morning shift and another one working on an afternoon shift were observed on each day. Fifty-eight work activities done by PCWs were grouped into eight categories. Activity time, frequency, duration and the switch between two consecutive activities were used as measurements to describe the work pattern. Results Personal care workers spent about 70.0% of their time on four types of activities consistently at both sites: direct care (30.7%, indirect care (17.6%, infection control (6.4% and staff break (15.2%. Oral communication was the most frequently observed activity. It could occur independently or concurrently with other activities. At Site 2, PCWs spent significantly more time than their counterparts at Site 1 on oral communication (Site 1: 47.3% vs. Site 2: 63.5%, P = 0.003, transit (Site 1: 3.4% vs. Site 2: 5.5%, P  Conclusions At both nursing homes, direct care, indirect care, infection control and staff break occupied the major part of a PCW’s work, however oral communication was the most time consuming activity. Personal care workers frequently switched between activities, suggesting that looking after the elderly in nursing homes is a busy and demanding job.

  17. One-Class Classification-Based Real-Time Activity Error Detection in Smart Homes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Das, Barnan; Cook, Diane J; Krishnan, Narayanan C; Schmitter-Edgecombe, Maureen

    2016-08-01

    Caring for individuals with dementia is frequently associated with extreme physical and emotional stress, which often leads to depression. Smart home technology and advances in machine learning techniques can provide innovative solutions to reduce caregiver burden. One key service that caregivers provide is prompting individuals with memory limitations to initiate and complete daily activities. We hypothesize that sensor technologies combined with machine learning techniques can automate the process of providing reminder-based interventions. The first step towards automated interventions is to detect when an individual faces difficulty with activities. We propose machine learning approaches based on one-class classification that learn normal activity patterns. When we apply these classifiers to activity patterns that were not seen before, the classifiers are able to detect activity errors, which represent potential prompt situations. We validate our approaches on smart home sensor data obtained from older adult participants, some of whom faced difficulties performing routine activities and thus committed errors.

  18. A home for science: The life and times of Tropical and Polar field stations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geissler, P Wenzel; Kelly, Ann H

    2016-12-01

    A 'halfway house' between the generic, purified space of the laboratory and the varied and particular spaces of the field, the field station is a controlled yet uncontained setting from which nature can be accessed and anchored. As living quarters for visiting scientists, field stations are also enmeshed in the routine and rhythms of everyday domestic life, and in longer cycles of habitation, wear, and repair. This introduction considers the empirical and conceptual significance of Polar and Tropical field stations as homes for scientific work and scientific lives. The field station's extra-territorial yet intimate character affects the credibility and circulation of knowledge along science's frontiers. The challenge of making a home in the (non-temperate) field and the mundane experiences of expatriation and appropriation establish particular political dynamics of knowledge-making in these locations. They bring into focus the imaginaries of nature and science that drive transnational research and put into relief the aesthetic and affective dimensions of work and life in these distant homes for science. All these themes are pursued and amplified in a different medium by the artists who contributed to our research and are also featured in this special issue.

  19. Cerebral Venous Thrombosis and Pulmonary Embolism with Prothrombin G20210A Gene Mutation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dagli, Canan Eren; Koksal, Nurhan; Guler, Selma; Gelen, Mehmet Emin; Atilla, Nurhan; Tuncel, Deniz

    2010-04-01

    A 25-year-old man presented with symptoms of syncope, cough, headache and hemoptysis. Cranial MR and venography showed thrombus formation in the right transverse sinus and superior sagittal sinus. Computed tomographic pulmonary angiography (CTPA) showed an embolic thrombus in the right pulmonary truncus and lung abscess. The patient was young, and there were no signs of lower extremity deep venous thrombosis or other major risk factors for pulmonary embolism (PE) including cardiac anomaly. The only risk factor we were able to identify was the presence of the prothrombin G20210A gene mutation. Anticoagulant treatment with oral warfarin (10 mg daily) and imipenem (4X500 mg) was started. The patient was hospitalized for antibiotic and anticoagulation therapies for three weeks and was discharged on lifelong treatment with warfarin (5 mg daily).

  20. Magnetic resonance imaging of myocardial infarction during prothrombin complex concentrate therapy of hemophilia A

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gruen, D.R.; Winchester, P.H.; Brill, P.W.; Ramirez, E.

    1997-01-01

    In patients with hemophilia, prothrombin complex concentrates (PCCs) have been successfully used to bypass inhibitors to fctor VIII during bleeding episodes. The use of PCCS, including FEIBA (factor eight inhibitor bypassing activity), has been associated with thromboembolic complications. Myocardial infarction (MI) is a rare but serious complication, reported in 13 previous cases, six in the pediatric age group. In all four patients who died during the acute MI, autopsy revealed extensive myocardial hemorrhage. The hearts of three other patients examined at least 5 months after the acute MI showed no evidence of prior hemorrhage. Magnetic resonance (MR) imaging has been shown to be able to evaluate the sequelae of myocardial infarction in adults with coronary artery disease and in children with Kawasaki syndrome. We report the first case of the used of MR imaging in the evaluation of myocardial damage during the acute stage of a FEIBA-associated MI in a 10-year-old boy. (orig.)

  1. Antiphosphatidylserine/prothrombin antibodies as biomarkers to identify severe primary antiphospholipid syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoxha, Ariela; Mattia, Elena; Tonello, Marta; Grava, Chiara; Pengo, Vittorio; Ruffatti, Amelia

    2017-05-01

    Anti-phosphatidylserine/prothrombin (aPS/PT) antibodies have begun to be considered potentional biomarkers for antiphospholipid syndrome (APS). This cohort study investigate the role of aPS/PT antibodies as a risk factor for severe APS by evaluating the association between those antibodies and clinical/laboratory profiles of APS. Plasma/serum samples from 197 APS patients, 100 healthy subjects and 106 patients with autoimmune diseases were collected. IgG/IgM aPS/PT antibodies were assayed using commercial ELISA kit. Prevalences of IgG and IgM aPS/PT (pantiphospholipid antibody patients than in double and single positivity ones (p<0.0001 for all). APS/PT antibodies were associated to severe thrombosis, severe pregnancy complications inducing prematurity, and vascular microangiopathy, all generally associated to high risk APS forms requiring strong therapy.

  2. Magnetic resonance imaging of myocardial infarction during prothrombin complex concentrate therapy of hemophilia A

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gruen, D.R. [Dept. of Radiology, The New York Hospital-Cornell Medical Center, New York, NY (United States); Winchester, P.H. [Dept. of Radiology, The New York Hospital-Cornell Medical Center, New York, NY (United States); Brill, P.W. [Dept. of Radiology, The New York Hospital-Cornell Medical Center, New York, NY (United States); Ramirez, E. [Dept. of Radiology, The New York Hospital-Cornell Medical Center, New York, NY (United States)

    1997-03-01

    In patients with hemophilia, prothrombin complex concentrates (PCCs) have been successfully used to bypass inhibitors to fctor VIII during bleeding episodes. The use of PCCS, including FEIBA (factor eight inhibitor bypassing activity), has been associated with thromboembolic complications. Myocardial infarction (MI) is a rare but serious complication, reported in 13 previous cases, six in the pediatric age group. In all four patients who died during the acute MI, autopsy revealed extensive myocardial hemorrhage. The hearts of three other patients examined at least 5 months after the acute MI showed no evidence of prior hemorrhage. Magnetic resonance (MR) imaging has been shown to be able to evaluate the sequelae of myocardial infarction in adults with coronary artery disease and in children with Kawasaki syndrome. We report the first case of the used of MR imaging in the evaluation of myocardial damage during the acute stage of a FEIBA-associated MI in a 10-year-old boy. (orig.)

  3. Des-γ-Carboxy Prothrombin (DCP as a Potential Autologous Growth Factor for the Development of Hepatocellular Carcinoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yu-Sheng Zhang

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Des-γ-carboxy prothrombin (DCP is a prothrombin precursor produced in hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC. Because of deficiency of vitamin K or γ-glutamyl carboxylase in HCC cells, the 10 glutamic acid (Glu residues in prothrombin precursor did not completely carboxylate to γ-carboxylated glutamic acid (Gla residues, leaving some Glu residues remained in N-terminal domain. These prothrombin precursors with Glu residues are called DCPs. DCP displays insufficient coagulation activity. Since Liebman reported an elevated plasma DCP in patients with HCC, DCP has been used in the diagnosis of HCC. Recently, its biological malignant potential has been specified to describe DCP as an autologous growth factor to stimulate HCC growth and a paracrine factor to integrate HCC with vascular endothelial cells. DCP was found to stimulate HCC growth through activation of the DCP-Met-JAK1-STAT3 signaling pathway. DCP might increase HCC invasion and metastasis through activation of matrix metalloproteinase (MMPs and the ERK1/2 MAPK signaling pathway. DCP has also been found to play a crucial role in the formation of angiogenesis. DCP could increase the angiogenic factors released from HCC and vascular endothelial cells. These effects of DCP in angiogenesis might be related to activation of the DCP-KDR-PLC-γ-MAPK signaling pathway. In this article, we summarized recent studies on DCP in biological roles related to cancer progression and angiogenesis in HCC.

  4. Use of Prothrombin Complex Concentrate in Patients during Heart Transplantation after Implantation of a Left Ventricular Mechanical Support System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. V. Lomivorotov

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Heart transplantation in patients after implantation of mechanical cardiac support devices entails an extremely high risk for perioperative bleeding. Recombinant activated coagulation factor VII is presently used to reduce the volume of bleeding in this patient group. There are parallel data on its administration-induced thromboembolic events in the literature. This paper describes a case of using a prothrombin complex concentrate in a patient during explantation of a left ventricular bypass system and subsequent orthotopic heart transplantation in the presence of significant hypocoagulation. At the end of a surgery, 1200 IU of the agent was used at a remaining bleeding rate of more than 1000 ml/hour. Within the first 24 hours after surgery, the rate of discharge drainage was less than 100 ml/hour. A control plain chest X-ray study revealed massive left-sided hydrothorax on day 2 postsurgery. The left pleural cavity was revised under thoracoscopic guidance and 1000 ml of blood clots were evacuated. Although the administration of prothrombin complex concentrate did not guard against re-intervention, its use seems a promising strategy in life-threatening bleedings in patients after explantation of mechanical cardiac support devices. Further multicenter investigations are required to determine the efficacy and safety of prothrom-bin complex concentration in cardiac surgery. Key words: Recombinant activated coagulation factor VII, prothrombin complex concentration, mechanical cardiac support device, orthotopic heart transplantation.

  5. Risk of venous thromboembolism and myocardial infarction associated with factor V Leiden and prothrombin mutations and blood type

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sode, Birgitte F; Allin, Kristine H; Dahl, Morten

    2013-01-01

    ABO blood type locus has been reported to be an important genetic determinant of venous and arterial thrombosis in genome-wide association studies. We tested the hypothesis that ABO blood type alone and in combination with mutations in factor V Leiden R506Q and prothrombin G20210A is associated...

  6. Prothrombin fragment 1+2 in urine as an indicator of sustained coagulation activation after total hip arthroplasty

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Borris, L.C.; Breindahl, M.; Ryge, C.

    2007-01-01

    Purpose: Prothrombin fragment 1 + 2 measured in spot urine (uF1 + 2) is an indicator of thrombin generation. We examined whether measured levels of uF1 + 2 can be used to differentiate between patients who do and do not acquire sustained coagulation activation after total hip arthroplasty (THA...

  7. Fixed Versus Variable Dosing of Prothrombin Complex Concentrate in Vitamin K Antagonist-Related Intracranial Hemorrhage : A Retrospective Analysis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Abdoellakhan, Rahat Amadkhan; Miah, Ishita Parveen; Khorsand, Nakisa; Meijer, Karina; Jellema, Korne

    Millions of patients receive vitamin K antagonist (VKA) therapy worldwide. Annually 0.2-1 % of all VKA users develops an intracranial hemorrhage (ICH). Prothrombin complex concentrate (PCC) is administered to restore the INR In a before and after design, we compared successful achievement of an INR

  8. Prothrombin G20210A mutation, hypogonadotropic hypogonadism, and generalized vitiligo-related ischemic stroke in a young adult.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Varoglu, Asuman Orhan; Kocatürk, Idris; Tatar, Abdulgani

    2010-06-01

    Cerebral infarction is a rare neurological situation in young adults, usually caused by genetic factors. We report here a case of multiple cerebral infarctions with prothrombin G20210A mutation, hypogonadotropic hypogonadism, and generalized vitiligo as a first case report. A 17-year-old female adolescent was admitted to our clinic due to a change in mental status. The patient's neurological examination revealed loss of consciousness and the presence of tetraparesia. Generalized vitiligo was also detected. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and diffusion-weighted investigations (DWIs) showed acute ischemic stroke in the bilateral cerebellum, pons and left occipital regions. Heterozygote prothrombin G20210A mutation was found upon genetic examination. She had never had a menstrual cycle. Laboratory data revealed that the level of luteinizing hormone (LH) was 0.5 mIU/mL (1.1-11.6) and follicle-stimulating hormone (FSH) was 1.7 mIU/mL (2.8-11.3). Therefore, she was diagnosed with hypogonadotropic hypogonadism. The causes of ischemic stroke are heterozygote prothrombin G20210A mutation, generalized vitiligo, and hypogonadotropic hypogonadism. After treatment, the patient's neurological deficit partially improved and she was discharged. In order to identify the etiology of ischemic stroke, we suggest physicians take into account heterozygote prothrombin G20210A mutation and endocrine abnormalities, especially hypogonadotropic hypogonadism and generalized vitiligo.

  9. Day Ahead Real Time Pricing and Critical Peak Pricing Based Power Scheduling for Smart Homes with Different Duty Cycles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nadeem Javaid

    2018-06-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, we propose a demand side management (DSM scheme in the residential area for electricity cost and peak to average ratio (PAR alleviation with maximum users’ satisfaction. For this purpose, we implement state-of-the-art algorithms: enhanced differential evolution (EDE and teacher learning-based optimization (TLBO. Furthermore, we propose a hybrid technique (HT having the best features of both aforementioned algorithms. We consider a system model for single smart home as well as for a community (multiple homes and each home consists of multiple appliances with different priorities. The priority is assigned (to each appliance by electricity consumers and then the proposed scheme finds an optimal solution according to the assigned priorities. Day-ahead real time pricing (DA-RTP and critical peak pricing (CPP are used for electricity cost calculation. To validate our proposed scheme, simulations are carried out and results show that our proposed scheme efficiently achieves the aforementioned objectives. However, when we perform a comparison with existing schemes, HT outperforms other state-of-the-art schemes (TLBO and EDE in terms of electricity cost and PAR reduction while minimizing the average waiting time.

  10. Length of home hospice care, family-perceived timing of referrals, perceived quality of care, and quality of death and dying in terminally ill cancer patients who died at home.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamagishi, Akemi; Morita, Tatsuya; Kawagoe, Shohei; Shimizu, Megumi; Ozawa, Taketoshi; An, Emi; Kobayakawa, Makoto; Tsuneto, Satoru; Shima, Yasuo; Miyashita, Mitsunori

    2015-02-01

    This study aims to clarify the length of home hospice care, family-perceived timing of referrals, and their effects on the family-perceived quality of care and quality of death and dying of terminally ill cancer patients who died at home and identify the determinants of perceived late referrals. A multicenter questionnaire survey was conducted involving 1,052 family members of cancer patients who died at home supported by 15 home-based hospice services throughout Japan. A total of 693 responses were analyzed (effective response rate, 66 %). Patients received home-based hospice care for a median of 35.0 days, and 8.0 % received home hospice care for less than 1 week. While 1.5 % of the families reported the timing of referrals as early, 42 % reported the timing as late or too late. The families of patients with a length of care of less than 4 weeks were more likely to regard the timing of referrals as late or too late. The patients of family members who regarded the timing of referrals as late or too late had a significantly lower perceived quality of care (effect size, 0.18; P = 0.039) and lower quality of death and dying (effect size, 0.15, P = 0.063). Independent determinants of higher likelihoods of perceived late referrals included: frequent visits to emergency departments, patient being unprepared for worsening condition, and patient having concerns about relationship with new doctor. Discharge nurse availability was independently associated with lower likelihoods of perceived late referrals. A significant number of bereaved families regarded the timing of referrals to home hospices as late, and the perceived timing was associated with the family-perceived quality of care and quality of death and dying. Systematic strategies to overcome the barriers related to perceived late referrals are necessary.

  11. Have Nursing Home Compare quality measure scores changed over time in response to competition?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castle, Nicholas G; Engberg, John; Liu, Darren

    2007-06-01

    Currently, the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services report on 15 Quality Measures (QMs) on the Nursing Home Compare (NHC) website. It is assumed that nursing homes are able to make improvements on these QMs, and in doing so they will attract more residents. In this investigation, we examine changes in QM scores, and whether competition and/or excess demand have influenced these change scores over a period of 1 year. Data come from NHC and the On-line Survey Certification And Recording (OSCAR) system. QM change scores are calculated using values from January 2003 to January 2004. A series of regression analyses are used to examine the association of competition and excess demand on QM scores. Eight QMs show an average decrease in scores (ie, better quality) and six QMs show an average increase in scores (ie, worse quality). However, for 13 of the 14 QMs these average changes averaged less than 1%. The regression analyses show an association between higher competition and improving QM scores and an association between lower occupancy and improving QM scores. As would be predicted based on the market-driven mechanism underlying quality improvements using report cards, we show that it is in the most competitive markets and those with the lowest average occupancy rates that improvements in the QM scores are more likely.

  12. Long-term safety and efficacy of a pasteurized nanofiltrated prothrombin complex concentrate (Beriplex P/N): a pharmacovigilance study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hanke, A A; Joch, C; Görlinger, K

    2013-05-01

    The rapid reversal of the effects of vitamin K antagonists is often required in cases of emergency surgery and life-threatening bleeding, or during bleeding associated with high morbidity and mortality such as intracranial haemorrhage. Increasingly, four-factor prothrombin complex concentrates (PCCs) containing high and well-balanced concentrations of vitamin K-dependent coagulation factors are recommended for emergency oral anticoagulation reversal. Both the safety and efficacy of such products are currently in focus, and their administration is now expanding into the critical care setting for the treatment of life-threatening bleeding and coagulopathy resulting either perioperatively or in cases of acute trauma. After 15 yr of clinical use, findings of a pharmacovigilance report (February 1996-March 2012) relating to the four-factor PCC Beriplex P/N (CSL Behring, Marburg, Germany) were analysed and are presented here. Furthermore, a review of the literature with regard to the efficacy and safety of four-factor PCCs was performed. Since receiving marketing authorization (February 21, 1996), ~647 250 standard applications of Beriplex P/N have taken place. During this time, 21 thromboembolic events judged to be possibly related to Beriplex P/N administration have been reported, while no incidences of viral transmission or heparin-induced thrombocytopenia were documented. The low risk of thromboembolic events reported during the observation period (one in ~31 000) is in line with the incidence observed with other four-factor PCCs. In general, four-factor PCCs have proven to be well tolerated and highly effective in the rapid reversal of vitamin K antagonists.

  13. Effect of electronic time monitors on children's television watching: pilot trial of a home-based intervention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ni Mhurchu, Cliona; Roberts, Vaughan; Maddison, Ralph; Dorey, Enid; Jiang, Yannan; Jull, Andrew; Tin Tin, Sandar

    2009-11-01

    This pilot study evaluated the feasibility (recruitment, retention, and acceptability) and preliminary efficacy of a six-week home-based electronic time monitor intervention on New Zealand children's television watching in 2008. Twenty-nine children aged 9 to 12 years who watched more than 20 h of television per week (62% male, mean age 10.4 years) were randomised to either the intervention or the control group. The intervention group received an electronic TV time monitor for 6 weeks and advice to restrict TV watching to 1 h per day or less. The control group was given verbal advice to restrict TV watching. Participant retention at 6 weeks was 93%. Semi-structured interviews with intervention families confirmed moderate acceptability of TV time monitors and several perceived benefits including better awareness of household TV viewing and improved time planning. Drawbacks reported included disruption to parents' TV watching and increased sibling conflict. Time spent watching television decreased by 4.2 h (mean change [SD]: -254 [536] min) per week in the intervention group compared with no change in the control group (-3 [241] min), but the difference between groups was not statistically significant, p=0.77. Both groups reported decreases in energy intake from snacks and total screen time and increases in physical activity measured by pedometer and between-group differences were not statistically significant. Electronic TV time monitors are feasible to use for home-based TV watching interventions although acceptability varies between families. Preliminary findings from this pilot suggest that such devices have potential to decrease children's TV watching but a larger trial is needed to confirm effectiveness. Future research should be family-orientated; take account of other screen time activities; and employ TV time monitors as just one of a range of strategies to decrease sedentary behaviour.

  14. Time-dependent, low-dose reporting limit for dosimeters that are taken home at the end of the workday

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sonder, E.

    1994-01-01

    In routine personnel dosimetry, it is usual to report doses only where th occupational dose (measured dose with background subtracted) is greater than previously determined reporting limit. The reporting limit, although se administratively, should be justified by an assessment of the errors inherent in th personnel and background dose measurements, and estimates of the probability that a zero exposure will yield a dosimeter response equal to the reporting limit. For background subtraction and reporting limits, it was realized that the source of low-dose uncertainty is very much dependent on whether dosimeters are held in racks at the work site or remain with the employee. The External dosimetry Program for the DOE facilities at Oak Ridge, Tennessee, is operated such that dosimeters are taken home by the employee at the end of each workday. This report is a summary measurements of background radiation in a variety of home locations, and calculations of the effect of the variation of this background on the uncertainty low-level occupational dose and on the reporting level. When dosimeters are stored at a given location (e.g., the facility gate), it theoretically possible to determine the background there to any desired accuracy; the errors in occupational dose are then those due to measurement noise and dosimeter calibration. However, when different dosimeters are stored in different homes, th difference in background between a particular location and the average for a locations appears as an added uncertainty in the occupational dose. Since this difference is not random, but fixed for a given location, the error due to this difference increases linearly with assignment time. From the background measurements, time-dependent values of the standard deviation of occupational do and critical levels are derived and used to define an expression for the reporting limit

  15. Ontogenetic view on PIVKA-II in the development of prothrombin synthesis in infants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    O. G. Ivanko

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the research was to study the content of PIVKA-II in the blood serum as an integrative measure of latent vitamin K deficiency in breastfed infants aged from the birth to 6 months of life. Materials and methods. 178 children aged from the birth to 6 months of life who were born without birth injuries in the term of 38–41 of weeks gestation with a weight 2800–4200 g were examined. The immunoenzyme assay for PIVKA-II study was performed with ANTIBODY RESEARCH kit PIVKA-II ELISA Kit (USA Results. Children who had not received postnatal prophylactic injection of vitamin K1 in dose of 1 mg intramuscularly in their majority (62 % had abnormally elevated serum PIVKA-II (>40 Au/ml at the first week of life. In 92 % of children who had received a prophylactic dose of vitamin K1 immediately after birth, PIVKA-II was in a normal limit. The normal concentrations of PIVKA-II were observed in children aged 2–6 months regardless of vitamin K prophylactics. The situation worsened dramatically in children who were treated with antibiotics because more than 50 % of these children have experienced high PIVKA-II values. Conclusions. Almost all the children in their first week of life whom for any reasons vitamin K1 was not prescribed have exhibited an elevation of PIVKA-II in blood serum. This indicates an inborn deficiency of vitamin K experienced by fetuses and newborns. Prophylactic injection of vitamin K1 to newborns normalizes the processes of prothrombin carboxylation and PIVKA-II concentrations are getting normal. Children, who did not receive vitamin K1 after the birth, during the first month of life spontaneously normalize the PIVKA-II concentrations. The improvement of prothrombin carboxylation is obviously connected with the colon microbiota development which can provide children with well absorbed vitamin K2 (menaquinone. In 55.5 % of breastfed children aged up to 6 months who had received antibiotics the PIVKA-II appeared elevated again

  16. Millbury Nursing Home, Common's Road, Navan, Meath.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Ryan, F

    2009-08-01

    Increased frequency of prothrombin time testing, facilitated by patient self-testing (PST) of the International Normalized Ratio (INR) can improve the clinical outcomes of oral anticoagulation therapy (OAT). However, oversight of this type of management is often difficult and time-consuming for healthcare professionals. This study reports the first randomized controlled trial of an automated direct-to-patient expert system, enabling remote and effective management of patients on OAT.

  17. [Recurrent vascular access trombosis associated with the prothrombin mutation G20210A in a adult patient in haemodialysis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quintana, L F; Coll, E; Monteagudo, I; Collado, S; López-Pedret, J; Cases, A

    2005-01-01

    Vascular access-related complications are a frequent cause of morbidity in haemodialysis patients and generate high costs. We present the case of an adult patient with end-stage renal disease and recurrent vascular access thrombosis associated with the prothrombin mutation G20210A and renal graft intolerance. The clinical expression of this heterozygous gene mutation may have been favoured by inflammatory state, frequent in dialysis patients. In this patient, the inflammatory response associated with the renal graft intolerance would have favored the development of recurrent vascular access thrombosis in a adult heterozygous for prothrombin mutation G20210A. In the case of early dysfunction of haemodialysis vascular access and after ruling out technical problems, it is convenient to carry out a screening for thrombophilia.

  18. [False positive serum des-gamma-carboxy prothrombin after resection of hepatocellular carcinoma].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hiramatsu, Kumiko; Tanaka, Yasuhito; Takagi, Kazumi; Iida, Takayasu; Takasaka, Yoshimitsu; Mizokami, Masashi

    2007-04-01

    Measurements of serum concentrations of des-gamma-carboxy-prothrombin (PIVKA-II) are widely used for diagnosing hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). Recently, when we evaluated the correlation of PIVKA-II between two commercially available PIVKA-II immunoassay kits (Lumipulse f vs. Picolumi) to introduce it in our hospital, false high values of PIVKA-II were observed in Lumipulse assay. Four(4%) of 100 serum samples showed false high values, and all of them were obtained from patients less than 2 month after curative resection of HCC. Examining additional 7 patients with HCC resection, serum samples from the 5 patients had the same trend. To elucidate the non-specific reaction by Lumipulse assay which utilized alkaline phosphatase (ALP) enzymatic reaction, inhibition assays by various absorbents such as inactive ALP and IgM antibodies were performed. Excess of inactive ALP reduced the high values of PIVKA-II. Note that anti-bleeding sheets (fibrinogen combined drug), which included bovine thrombin, were directly attached on liver of all patients with HCC resection in this study. As the sheets also contaminate ALP and probably produce IgM antibodies to ALP, the IgM may cross-react with anti-PIVKA-II antibodies directly. Taken together, it was suggested that produced antibodies against ALP derived from anti-bleeding sheets led false high values of PIVKA-II in the patients with HCC resection.

  19. Antibodies to Phosphatidylserine/Prothrombin Complex in Antiphospholipid Syndrome: Analytical and Clinical Perspectives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peterson, Lisa K; Willis, Rohan; Harris, E Nigel; Branch, Ware D; Tebo, Anne E

    2016-01-01

    Antiphospholipid syndrome (APS) is an autoimmune disorder characterized by thrombosis and/or pregnancy-related morbidity accompanied by persistently positive antiphospholipid antibodies (aPL). Current laboratory criteria for APS classification recommend testing for lupus anticoagulant as well as IgG and IgM anticardiolipin, and beta-2 glycoprotein I (anti-β2GPI) antibodies. However, there appears to be a subset of patients with classical APS manifestations who test negative for the recommended criteria aPL tests. While acknowledging that such patients may have clinical features that are not of an autoimmune etiology, experts also speculate that these "seronegative" patients may test negative for relevant autoantibodies as a result of a lack of harmonization and/or standardization. Alternatively, they may have aPL that target other antigens involved in the pathogenesis of APS. In the latter, autoantibodies that recognize a phosphatidylserine/prothrombin (PS/PT) complex have been reported to be associated with APS and may have diagnostic relevance. This review highlights analytical and clinical attributes associated with PS/PT antibodies, taking into consideration the performance characteristics of criteria aPL tests in APS with specific recommendations for harmonization and standardization efforts. © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. History of Maltreatment in Childhood and Subsequent Parenting Stress in At-Risk, First-Time Mothers: Identifying Points of Intervention During Home Visiting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shenk, Chad E; Ammerman, Robert T; Teeters, Angelique R; Bensman, Heather E; Allen, Elizabeth K; Putnam, Frank W; Van Ginkel, Judith B

    2017-04-01

    Home visiting is an effective preventive intervention that can improve parenting outcomes for at-risk, new mothers, thereby optimizing subsequent child development. A history of maltreatment in childhood is common in mothers participating in home visiting, yet the extent to which such a history is related to parenting outcomes during home visiting is unknown. The current study evaluated whether mothers with a history of maltreatment in childhood respond less favorably to home visiting by examining the direct and indirect pathways to subsequent parenting stress, a key parenting outcome affecting child development. First-time mothers (N = 220; age range = 16-42) participating in one of two home visiting programs, Healthy Families America or Nurse Family Partnership, were evaluated at enrollment and again at 9-and 18-month post-enrollment assessments. Researchers administered measures of maternal history of maltreatment in childhood, depressive symptoms, social support, and parenting stress. Maternal history of maltreatment in childhood predicted worsening parenting stress at the 18-month assessment. Mediation modeling identified two indirect pathways, one involving social support at enrollment and one involving persistent depressive symptoms during home visiting, that explained the relation between a history of maltreatment in childhood and parenting stress at the 18-month assessment. Ways to improve the preventive effects of home visiting for mothers with a history of maltreatment in childhood through the identification of relevant intervention targets and their ideal time of administration are discussed.

  1. Effect of Automobile Travel Time Between Patients' Homes and Ophthalmologists' Offices on Screening for Diabetic Retinopathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Macon, Céline; Carrier, Hélène; Janczewski, Aurélie; Verger, Pierre; Casanova, Ludovic

    2018-01-01

    The accessibility of ophthalmologists appears to influence the quality of screening for diabetic retinopathy (DR). The principal objective of this study was to analyze the effect of automobile travel time to the closest ophthalmologist on the time to DR screening. This historical cohort study used reimbursement databases from the principal national health insurance fund. Patients were included if they had been reimbursed at least thrice for oral antidiabetic medications in the 12 months before the study start date. Patients were followed up from January 1, 2008, for 4 years. The expected event was a DR screening by an ocular fundus examination. The automobile travel time to the nearest ophthalmologist was calculated by the distance between communes, estimated by appropriate software. A Kaplan-Meier curve and a multivariate Cox model were used to model the effect of travel time on the time until DR screening. A sensitivity analysis of travel time described the results of the Cox model. At the start of 2008, 6,573 patients living in 328 different municipalities were included. The multivariate model found that patients living 60 min or more away from an ophthalmologist had a lower instantaneous probability of DR screening than those living travel time. Increased automobile travel time for patients with diabetes to the nearest ophthalmologist was associated with a longer time to DR screening.

  2. Structure–activity relationships of the human prothrombin kringle-2 peptide derivative NSA9: anti-proliferative activity and cellular internalization

    OpenAIRE

    Hwang, Hyun Sook; Kim, Dong Won; Kim, Soung Soo

    2006-01-01

    The human prothrombin kringle-2 protein inhibits angiogenesis and LLC (Lewis lung carcinoma) growth and metastasis in mice. Additionally, the NSA9 peptide (NSAVQLVEN) derived from human prothrombin kringle-2 has been reported to inhibit the proliferation of BCE (bovine capillary endothelial) cells and CAM (chorioallantoic membrane) angiogenesis. In the present study, we examined the structure–activity relationships of the NSA9 peptide in inhibiting the proliferation of endothelial cells lines...

  3. Trends in US home food preparation and consumption: analysis of national nutrition surveys and time use studies from 1965-1966 to 2007-2008.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Lindsey P; Ng, Shu Wen; Popkin, Barry M

    2013-04-11

    It has been well-documented that Americans have shifted towards eating out more and cooking at home less. However, little is known about whether these trends have continued into the 21st century, and whether these trends are consistent amongst low-income individuals, who are increasingly the target of public health programs that promote home cooking. The objective of this study is to examine how patterns of home cooking and home food consumption have changed from 1965 to 2008 by socio-demographic groups. This is a cross-sectional analysis of data from 6 nationally representative US dietary surveys and 6 US time-use studies conducted between 1965 and 2008. Subjects are adults aged 19 to 60 years (n= 38,565 for dietary surveys and n=55,424 for time-use surveys). Weighted means of daily energy intake by food source, proportion who cooked, and time spent cooking were analyzed for trends from 1965-1966 to 2007-2008 by gender and income. T-tests were conducted to determine statistical differences over time. The percentage of daily energy consumed from home food sources and time spent in food preparation decreased significantly for all socioeconomic groups between 1965-1966 and 2007-2008 (p ≤ 0.001), with the largest declines occurring between 1965 and 1992. In 2007-2008, foods from the home supply accounted for 65 to 72% of total daily energy, with 54 to 57% reporting cooking activities. The low income group showed the greatest decline in the proportion cooking, but consumed more daily energy from home sources and spent more time cooking than high income individuals in 2007-2008 (p ≤ 0.001). US adults have decreased consumption of foods from the home supply and reduced time spent cooking since 1965, but this trend appears to have leveled off, with no substantial decrease occurring after the mid-1990's. Across socioeconomic groups, people consume the majority of daily energy from the home food supply, yet only slightly more than half spend any time cooking on a given

  4. Trends in US home food preparation and consumption: analysis of national nutrition surveys and time use studies from 1965–1966 to 2007–2008

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-01

    Background It has been well-documented that Americans have shifted towards eating out more and cooking at home less. However, little is known about whether these trends have continued into the 21st century, and whether these trends are consistent amongst low-income individuals, who are increasingly the target of public health programs that promote home cooking. The objective of this study is to examine how patterns of home cooking and home food consumption have changed from 1965 to 2008 by socio-demographic groups. Methods This is a cross-sectional analysis of data from 6 nationally representative US dietary surveys and 6 US time-use studies conducted between 1965 and 2008. Subjects are adults aged 19 to 60 years (n= 38,565 for dietary surveys and n=55,424 for time-use surveys). Weighted means of daily energy intake by food source, proportion who cooked, and time spent cooking were analyzed for trends from 1965–1966 to 2007–2008 by gender and income. T-tests were conducted to determine statistical differences over time. Results The percentage of daily energy consumed from home food sources and time spent in food preparation decreased significantly for all socioeconomic groups between 1965–1966 and 2007–2008 (p ≤ 0.001), with the largest declines occurring between 1965 and 1992. In 2007–2008, foods from the home supply accounted for 65 to 72% of total daily energy, with 54 to 57% reporting cooking activities. The low income group showed the greatest decline in the proportion cooking, but consumed more daily energy from home sources and spent more time cooking than high income individuals in 2007–2008 (p ≤ 0.001). Conclusions US adults have decreased consumption of foods from the home supply and reduced time spent cooking since 1965, but this trend appears to have leveled off, with no substantial decrease occurring after the mid-1990’s. Across socioeconomic groups, people consume the majority of daily energy from the home food supply, yet only

  5. Time-limited home-care reablement services for maintaining and improving the functional independence of older adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cochrane, Andy; Furlong, Mairead; McGilloway, Sinead; Molloy, David W; Stevenson, Michael; Donnelly, Michael

    2016-10-11

    Reablement, also known as restorative care, is one possible approach to home-care services for older adults at risk of functional decline. Unlike traditional home-care services, reablement is frequently time-limited (usually six to 12 weeks) and aims to maximise independence by offering an intensive multidisciplinary, person-centred and goal-directed intervention. To assess the effects of time-limited home-care reablement services (up to 12 weeks) for maintaining and improving the functional independence of older adults (aged 65 years or more) when compared to usual home-care or wait-list control group. We searched the following databases with no language restrictions during April to June 2015: the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL); MEDLINE (OvidSP); Embase (OvidSP); PsycINFO (OvidSP); ERIC; Sociological Abstracts; ProQuest Dissertations and Theses; CINAHL (EBSCOhost); SIGLE (OpenGrey); AgeLine and Social Care Online. We also searched the reference lists of relevant studies and reviews as well as contacting authors in the field. We included randomised controlled trials (RCTs), cluster randomised or quasi-randomised trials of time-limited reablement services for older adults (aged 65 years or more) delivered in their home; and incorporated a usual home-care or wait-list control group. Two authors independently assessed studies for inclusion, extracted data, assessed the risk of bias of individual studies and considered quality of the evidence using GRADE. We contacted study authors for additional information where needed. Two studies, comparing reablement with usual home-care services with 811 participants, met our eligibility criteria for inclusion; we also identified three potentially eligible studies, but findings were not yet available. One included study was conducted in Western Australia with 750 participants (mean age 82.29 years). The second study was conducted in Norway (61 participants; mean age 79 years).We are very uncertain as to

  6. Parenting style, the home environment, and screen time of 5-year-old children; the 'be active, eat right' study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lydian Veldhuis

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION: The global increase in childhood overweight and obesity has been ascribed partly to increases in children's screen time. Parents have a large influence on their children's screen time. Studies investigating parenting and early childhood screen time are limited. In this study, we investigated associations of parenting style and the social and physical home environment on watching TV and using computers or game consoles among 5-year-old children. METHODS: This study uses baseline data concerning 5-year-old children (n = 3067 collected for the 'Be active, eat right' study. RESULTS: Children of parents with a higher score on the parenting style dimension involvement, were more likely to spend >30 min/day on computers or game consoles. Overall, families with an authoritative or authoritarian parenting style had lower percentages of children's screen time compared to families with an indulgent or neglectful style, but no significant difference in OR was found. In families with rules about screen time, children were less likely to watch TV>2 hrs/day and more likely to spend >30 min/day on computers or game consoles. The number of TVs and computers or game consoles in the household was positively associated with screen time, and children with a TV or computer or game console in their bedroom were more likely to watch TV>2 hrs/day or spend >30 min/day on computers or game consoles. CONCLUSION: The magnitude of the association between parenting style and screen time of 5-year-olds was found to be relatively modest. The associations found between the social and physical environment and children's screen time are independent of parenting style. Interventions to reduce children's screen time might be most effective when they support parents specifically with introducing family rules related to screen time and prevent the presence of a TV or computer or game console in the child's room.

  7. Parenting style, the home environment, and screen time of 5-year-old children; the 'be active, eat right' study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Veldhuis, Lydian; van Grieken, Amy; Renders, Carry M; Hirasing, Remy A; Raat, Hein

    2014-01-01

    The global increase in childhood overweight and obesity has been ascribed partly to increases in children's screen time. Parents have a large influence on their children's screen time. Studies investigating parenting and early childhood screen time are limited. In this study, we investigated associations of parenting style and the social and physical home environment on watching TV and using computers or game consoles among 5-year-old children. This study uses baseline data concerning 5-year-old children (n = 3067) collected for the 'Be active, eat right' study. Children of parents with a higher score on the parenting style dimension involvement, were more likely to spend >30 min/day on computers or game consoles. Overall, families with an authoritative or authoritarian parenting style had lower percentages of children's screen time compared to families with an indulgent or neglectful style, but no significant difference in OR was found. In families with rules about screen time, children were less likely to watch TV>2 hrs/day and more likely to spend >30 min/day on computers or game consoles. The number of TVs and computers or game consoles in the household was positively associated with screen time, and children with a TV or computer or game console in their bedroom were more likely to watch TV>2 hrs/day or spend >30 min/day on computers or game consoles. The magnitude of the association between parenting style and screen time of 5-year-olds was found to be relatively modest. The associations found between the social and physical environment and children's screen time are independent of parenting style. Interventions to reduce children's screen time might be most effective when they support parents specifically with introducing family rules related to screen time and prevent the presence of a TV or computer or game console in the child's room.

  8. Evaluation of AHRQ's on-time pressure ulcer prevention program: a facilitator-assisted clinical decision support intervention for nursing homes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olsho, Lauren E W; Spector, William D; Williams, Christianna S; Rhodes, William; Fink, Rebecca V; Limcangco, Rhona; Hurd, Donna

    2014-03-01

    Pressure ulcers present serious health and economic consequences for nursing home residents. The Agency for Healthcare Research & Quality, in partnership with the New York State Department of Health, implemented the pressure ulcer module of On-Time Quality Improvement for Long Term Care (On-Time), a clinical decision support intervention to reduce pressure ulcer incidence rates. To evaluate the effectiveness of the On-Time program in reducing the rate of in-house-acquired pressure ulcers among nursing home residents. We employed an interrupted time-series design to identify impacts of 4 core On-Time program components on resident pressure ulcer incidence in 12 New York State nursing homes implementing the intervention (n=3463 residents). The sample was purposively selected to include nursing homes with high baseline prevalence and incidence of pressure ulcers and high motivation to reduce pressure ulcers. Differential timing and sequencing of 4 core On-Time components across intervention nursing homes and units enabled estimation of separate impacts for each component. Inclusion of a nonequivalent comparison group of 13 nursing homes not implementing On-Time (n=2698 residents) accounts for potential mean-reversion bias. Impacts were estimated via a random-effects Poisson model including resident-level and facility-level covariates. We find a large and statistically significant reduction in pressure ulcer incidence associated with the joint implementation of 4 core On-Time components (incidence rate ratio=0.409; P=0.035). Impacts vary with implementation of specific component combinations. On-Time implementation is associated with sizable reductions in pressure ulcer incidence.

  9. Three- versus four-factor prothrombin complex concentrate for the reversal of warfarin-induced bleeding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holt, Tara; Taylor, Scott; Abraham, Prasad; Mcmillian, Wesley; Harris, Serena; Curtis, James; Elder, Tai

    2018-01-01

    Objective: The objective of this study was to evaluate the effectiveness of 3-factor prothrombin complex concentrate (3F-PCC) compared to 4-factor PCC (4F-PCC) in warfarin-associated bleeding. Methods: This multicenter, retrospective, cohort study analyzed data from patients admitted between May 2011 and October 2014 who received PCC for warfarin-associated bleeding. The primary outcome was the rate of international normalized ratio (INR) normalization, defined as an INR ≤1.3, after administration of 3F-PCC compared to 4F-PCC. Other variables of interest included the incidence of additional reversal agents, new thromboembolic events, and mortality. Results: A total of 134 patients were included in the analysis. The average dose of PCC administered was 24.6 ± 9.3 units/kg versus 36.3 ± 12.8 units/kg in the 3F-PCC and 4F-PCC groups, respectively, P < 0.001. Baseline INR in the 3F-PCC and 4F-PCC groups was 3.61 ± 2.3 and 6.87 ± 2.3, respectively P < 0.001. 4F-PCC had a higher rate of INR normalization at first INR check post-PCC administration compared to 3F-PCC (84.2% vs. 51.9%, P = 0.0001). Thromboembolic events, intensive care unit and hospital length of stay, and mortality were similar among both groups. Conclusion: The use of 4F-PCC leads to a more significant reduction in INR compared to 3F-PCC though no difference in mortality or length of stay was observed. Thromboembolism rates were similar among both groups. PMID:29619338

  10. Anti-phosphatidylserine/prothrombin antibodies: an additional diagnostic marker for APS?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pregnolato, Francesca; Chighizola, Cecilia B; Encabo, Susan; Shums, Zakera; Norman, Gary L; Tripodi, Armando; Chantarangkul, Veena; Bertero, Tiziana; De Micheli, Valeria; Borghi, Maria Orietta; Meroni, Pier Luigi

    2013-07-01

    Among the diagnostic assays for anti-phospholipid syndrome (APS), lupus anticoagulant (LA) is the strongest predictor of thrombosis; however, it presents several limitations as interference with anticoagulant therapy and poor inter-laboratory agreement. Two-thirds of LA activity is apparently due to antibodies against prothrombin (PT), usually detectable by ELISA. Binding of PT to phosphatidylserine (PS) has been shown to enhance solid-phase anti-PT assay sensitivity. To determine the prevalence of antibodies against PS/PT (aPS/PT) in APS, we tested the semiquantitative QUANTA Lite(®) aPS/PT ELISA in a cohort of 80 APS patients. The prevalence of aPS/PT was 81.3%, rising to 87.6% when considering LA-positive subjects only. We observed a strong correlation between aPS/PT and LA (p = 0.006). To note, APS patients with thrombotic manifestations displayed significantly higher IgG aPS/PT titers compared to 20 aPL asymptomatic carriers (p = 0.012). To rule out a possible cross-reactivity of anti-β2 glycoprotein I antibodies (aβ2GPI) with PS/PT complex, we tested two monoclonal aβ2GPI antibodies and an affinity-purified (AP) polyclonal aβ2GPI IgG obtained from the serum of a patient reacting against both β2GPI and PS/PT. The two monoclonal antibodies did not show any reactivity against PS/PT complex, similarly the AP IgGs did not react toward PS/PT antigen while preserved their aβ2GPI activity. Our findings suggest that aPS/PT are a definite antibody population in APS. Moreover, the good correlation between aPS/PT ELISA and LA may support its use as a surrogate test for LA, particularly useful to overcome the technical limitations of the functional assay.

  11. Home blood sugar testing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diabetes - home glucose testing; Diabetes - home blood sugar testing ... Usual times to test your blood sugar are before meals and at bedtime. Your provider may ask you to check your blood sugar 2 hours after a meal or ...

  12. Home safe home: Evaluation of a childhood home safety program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stewart, Tanya Charyk; Clark, Andrew; Gilliland, Jason; Miller, Michael R; Edwards, Jane; Haidar, Tania; Batey, Brandon; Vogt, Kelly N; Parry, Neil G; Fraser, Douglas D; Merritt, Neil

    2016-09-01

    The London Health Sciences Centre Home Safety Program (HSP) provides safety devices, education, a safety video, and home safety checklist to all first-time parents for the reduction of childhood home injuries. The objective of this study was to evaluate the HSP for the prevention of home injuries in children up to 2 years of age. A program evaluation was performed with follow-up survey, along with an interrupted time series analysis of emergency department (ED) visits for home injuries 5 years before (2007-2013) and 2 years after (2013-2015) implementation. Spatial analysis of ED visits was undertaken to assess differences in home injury rates by dissemination areas controlling differences in socioeconomic status (i.e., income, education, and lone-parent status) at the neighborhood level. A total of 3,458 first-time parents participated in the HSP (a 74% compliance rate). Of these, 20% (n = 696) of parents responded to our questionnaire, with 94% reporting the program to be useful (median, 6; interquartile range, 2 on a 7-point Likert scale) and 81% learning new strategies for preventing home injuries. The median age of the respondent's babies were 12 months (interquartile range, 1). The home safety check list was used by 87% of respondents to identify hazards in their home, with 95% taking action to minimize the risk. The time series analysis demonstrated a significant decline in ED visits for home injuries in toddlers younger than2 years of age after HSP implementation. The declines in ED visits for home injuries remained significant over and above each socioeconomic status covariate. Removing hazards, supervision, and installing safety devices are key facilitators in the reduction of home injuries. Parents found the HSP useful to identify hazards, learn new strategies, build confidence, and provide safety products. Initial finding suggests that the program is effective in reducing home injuries in children up to 2 years of age. Therapeutic/care management study

  13. Home Automation

    OpenAIRE

    Ahmed, Zeeshan

    2010-01-01

    In this paper I briefly discuss the importance of home automation system. Going in to the details I briefly present a real time designed and implemented software and hardware oriented house automation research project, capable of automating house's electricity and providing a security system to detect the presence of unexpected behavior.

  14. Screen-time Weight-loss Intervention Targeting Children at Home (SWITCH: A randomized controlled trial study protocol

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tsai Midi

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Approximately one third of New Zealand children and young people are overweight or obese. A similar proportion (33% do not meet recommendations for physical activity, and 70% do not meet recommendations for screen time. Increased time being sedentary is positively associated with being overweight. There are few family-based interventions aimed at reducing sedentary behavior in children. The aim of this trial is to determine the effects of a 24 week home-based, family oriented intervention to reduce sedentary screen time on children's body composition, sedentary behavior, physical activity, and diet. Methods/Design The study design is a pragmatic two-arm parallel randomized controlled trial. Two hundred and seventy overweight children aged 9-12 years and primary caregivers are being recruited. Participants are randomized to intervention (family-based screen time intervention or control (no change. At the end of the study, the control group is offered the intervention content. Data collection is undertaken at baseline and 24 weeks. The primary trial outcome is child body mass index (BMI and standardized body mass index (zBMI. Secondary outcomes are change from baseline to 24 weeks in child percentage body fat; waist circumference; self-reported average daily time spent in physical and sedentary activities; dietary intake; and enjoyment of physical activity and sedentary behavior. Secondary outcomes for the primary caregiver include change in BMI and self-reported physical activity. Discussion This study provides an excellent example of a theory-based, pragmatic, community-based trial targeting sedentary behavior in overweight children. The study has been specifically designed to allow for estimation of the consistency of effects on body composition for Māori (indigenous, Pacific and non-Māori/non-Pacific ethnic groups. If effective, this intervention is imminently scalable and could be integrated within existing weight

  15. Real-Time Location Systems for Asset Management in Nursing Homes: An Explorative Study of Ethical Aspects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. van Hoof

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available Real-time location systems (RTLS can be implemented in aged care for monitoring persons with wandering behaviour and asset management. RTLS can help retrieve personal items and assistive technologies that when lost or misplaced may have serious financial, economic and practical implications. Various ethical questions arise during the design and implementation phases of RTLS. This study investigates the perspectives of various stakeholders on ethical questions regarding the use of RTLS for asset management in nursing homes. Three focus group sessions were conducted concerning the needs and wishes of (1 care professionals; (2 residents and their relatives; and (3 researchers and representatives of small and medium-sized enterprises (SMEs. The sessions were transcribed and analysed through a process of open, axial and selective coding. Ethical perspectives concerned the design of the system, the possibilities and functionalities of tracking, monitoring in general and the user-friendliness of the system. In addition, ethical concerns were expressed about security and responsibilities. The ethical perspectives differed per focus group. Aspects of privacy, the benefit of reduced search times, trust, responsibility, security and well-being were raised. The main focus of the carers and residents was on a reduced burden and privacy, whereas the SMEs stressed the potential for improving products and services.

  16. Comparison of 3-Factor Prothrombin Complex Concentrate and Low-Dose Recombinant Factor VIIa for Warfarin Reversal

    OpenAIRE

    Chapman, Scott A; Irwin, Eric D; Abou-Karam, Nada M; Rupnow, Nichole M; Hutson, Katherine E; Vespa, Jeffrey; Roach, Robert M

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Prothrombin complex concentrate (PCC) and recombinant Factor VIIa (rFVIIa) have been used for emergent reversal of warfarin anticoagulation. Few clinical studies have compared these agents in warfarin reversal. We compared warfarin reversal in patients who received either 3 factor PCC (PCC3) or low-dose rFVIIa (LDrFVIIa) for reversal of warfarin anticoagulation. Methods Data were collected from medical charts of patients who received at least one dose of PCC3 (20 units/kg) or LDr...

  17. Prothrombin and risk of venous thromboembolism, ischemic heart disease and ischemic cerebrovascular disease in the general population

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Weischer, Maren; Juul, Klaus; Zacho, Jeppe

    2010-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: We tested the hypotheses that Prothrombin G20210A heterozygosity associate with increased risk of venous thromboembolism (VTE), ischemic heart disease (IHD), and ischemic cerebrovascular disease (ICVD) in the general population and re-tested risk of IHD and ICVD in two case......-control studies. METHODS: 9231 individuals from the Danish general population were followed for VTE (VTE=DVT+PE), deep venous thrombosis (DVT), pulmonary embolism (PE), IHD, myocardial infarction (MI), ICVD, and ischemic stroke (IS) for a median of 24 years. Case-control studies included 2461 IHD cases and 867...

  18. The mediating role of the home environment in relation to parental educational level and preschool children's screen time: a cross-sectional study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Määttä, Suvi; Kaukonen, Riikka; Vepsäläinen, Henna; Lehto, Elviira; Ylönen, Anna; Ray, Carola; Erkkola, Maijaliisa; Roos, Eva

    2017-09-02

    Previous studies suggest that preschoolers from low socioeconomic backgrounds engage in more screen time. Still, the factors in the social and physical home environment driving these differences in preschool children's screen time are poorly understood. This study examines potential home environment mediators in the associations between parental educational level and preschoolers' screen time. A total of 864 children aged 3-6 years and their parents participated in a cross-sectional DAGIS study in 2015-2016. Parents recorded their children's screen time in a diary (N = 823). For the analyses, the daily average screen time at home was calculated. Parental questionnaires (N = 808) assessed educational level and eight social and physical environment factors in the home (i.e., descriptive norm for children's screen time, parental screen use in front of children, parental importance for limiting children's screen time, parental attitude toward societal pressures for children's screen time, access to screens at home, parental self-efficacy for limiting children's screen time, satisfaction of children's screen time, and rules for limiting children's screen time). Parental education was grouped into low, middle, and high education. The associations were tested by conducting mediation analyses adjusted by season and children's sex and age. The significant mediators in the single-mediator models were included in the final multiple-mediator models. Of the potential eight mediators, the following four had a significant indirect association: descriptive norm for children's screen time, parental screen use in front of children, parental importance for limiting children's screen time, and parental attitude toward societal pressures for children's screen time. Parents with high education had lower descriptive norm and used fewer screens in front of children compared to parents with middle or low education, and in turn, these factors were associated with less screen time among

  19. The mediating role of the home environment in relation to parental educational level and preschool children’s screen time: a cross-sectional study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Suvi Määttä

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Previous studies suggest that preschoolers from low socioeconomic backgrounds engage in more screen time. Still, the factors in the social and physical home environment driving these differences in preschool children’s screen time are poorly understood. This study examines potential home environment mediators in the associations between parental educational level and preschoolers’ screen time. Methods A total of 864 children aged 3–6 years and their parents participated in a cross-sectional DAGIS study in 2015–2016. Parents recorded their children’s screen time in a diary (N = 823. For the analyses, the daily average screen time at home was calculated. Parental questionnaires (N = 808 assessed educational level and eight social and physical environment factors in the home (i.e., descriptive norm for children’s screen time, parental screen use in front of children, parental importance for limiting children’s screen time, parental attitude toward societal pressures for children’s screen time, access to screens at home, parental self-efficacy for limiting children’s screen time, satisfaction of children’s screen time, and rules for limiting children’s screen time. Parental education was grouped into low, middle, and high education. The associations were tested by conducting mediation analyses adjusted by season and children’s sex and age. The significant mediators in the single-mediator models were included in the final multiple-mediator models. Results Of the potential eight mediators, the following four had a significant indirect association: descriptive norm for children’s screen time, parental screen use in front of children, parental importance for limiting children’s screen time, and parental attitude toward societal pressures for children’s screen time. Parents with high education had lower descriptive norm and used fewer screens in front of children compared to parents with middle or

  20. Diagnostic accuracy of des-gamma-carboxy prothrombin for hepatocellular carcinoma in a French cohort using the Lumipulse® G600 analyzer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sultanik, P; Ginguay, A; Vandame, J; Popovici, T; Meritet, J-F; Cynober, L; Pol, S; Bories, P-N

    2017-01-01

    The increasing incidence of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) in Western countries requests reliable tumour markers for preclinical diagnosis. We evaluated the diagnostic accuracy of des-gamma-carboxy prothrombin (DCP), in comparison with alpha-fetoprotein (AFP) in a French cohort using a new analyser. One hundred and sixty-two patients with virus-related cirrhosis (46 HCC patients and 116 controls) were recruited in this retrospective proof-of-concept study. DCP was measured on new Lumipulse ® G600 analyzer and AFP on usual Cobas e602 analyzer in serum samples that were collected at the time of HCC diagnosis for HCC patients or during follow-up for controls. DCP and AFP levels were higher in HCC patients. The area under receiver operating characteristic curve was larger for DCP than for AFP (0.89 vs 0.77, P=.03). At the cut-off value of 128 mAU/mL, sensitivity and specificity for DCP were 74% and 92%. At the cut-off value of 20 μg/L, sensitivity and specificity for AFP were 63% and 82%. NRI >0 for the association of "AFP+DCP" were 101%, P<.0001, and 23%, P=.03, compared to "AFP" or "DCP" alone, respectively. We conclude that DCP outperformed AFP for the detection of HCC. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  1. Embracing Complexity: Using Technology to Develop a Life-Long Learning Model for Non-Working Time in the Interdependent Homes for Adults with Autism Spectrum Disorders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chiang, I-Tsun; Chen, Mei-Li

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to employ complexity theory as a theoretical framework and technology to facilitate the development of a life-long learning model for non-working time in the interdependent homes for adults with Autism Spectrum Disorders (ASD). A "Shining Star Sustainable Action Project" of the ROC Foundation for Autistic…

  2. Variations over time in the effects of age and sex on hospitalization rates before and after admission to a nursing home: A German cohort study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoffmann, Falk; Allers, Katharina

    2017-08-01

    We examined hospitalization rates for nursing home residents before and after their entry to the home, stratified by sex and age. A cohort study was conducted using data from a large health insurance fund on 127,227 residents aged 65 years and over newly admitted to a nursing home between January 1, 2010, and December 31, 2014. We assessed hospitalization rates and proportions being hospitalized in 6-month intervals one year before nursing home placement and up to 5 years thereafter. Multiple Poisson regression models were fitted to calculate relative risks (RR). Mean age was 84.0 years and 74.6% of the cohort were females. Hospitalization rates were 194.4 per 100 person-years (PY) in the 12 months before entry to the nursing home and 120.0 per 100 PY thereafter. Rates were highest immediately before entry in both sexes. The influence of age was most pronounced in the 12-7 months before entry (RR: 2.37 for 65-74 vs. 95+ years) and declined thereafter (1.29-1.38 up to month 24 after entry). In contrast, the influence of sex was greater after entry (RR: 1.13 for males vs. females in the 12-7 months before and 1.23-1.31 up to month 24 after entry). Hospitalization rates of nursing home residents are much higher in Germany than in other Western countries. We have provided some insight into the influence of age and sex on hospitalization rates, which varied over the period (time before and after entry to the nursing home) analyzed. We urgently recommend that future studies on the hospitalization of residents stratify their analyses by sex, age and period. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. Effectiveness of a multidimensional home nurse led heart failure disease management program--a French nationwide time-series comparison.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agrinier, Nelly; Altieri, Christelle; Alla, François; Jay, Nicolas; Dobre, Daniela; Thilly, Nathalie; Zannad, Faiez

    2013-10-09

    The purpose of this study was to assess the effectiveness of a disease management program (DMP) in heart failure (HF) on the incidence of HF hospitalizations and related costs in a real-world population-based setting. Insuffisance CArdiaque en LORraine (ICALOR), a DMP for HF was established in 2006 in the French region of Lorraine. Patients were enrolled after an index HF hospitalization. They received educational and home-visit monitoring programs by HF-trained nurses. General physicians received automatic alerts about patients' significant clinical or biological changes. We used the ICALOR and the national diagnostic related group databases to conduct a comparison of time-series trends in HF hospitalizations in France. The economic impact was obtained using the national scale of costs in France. The median age of the 1222 patients recruited before 2010 was 76 years, and 65% were male. Upon enrollment, patients essentially presented with NYHA class II (n=537, 48%) or class III (n=359, 32%) symptoms. One-year mortality rate was 20.3%. The implementation of the ICALOR program was associated with a reduction in HF hospitalizations in Lorraine estimated by an absolute difference between the number of hospitalizations observed in the Lorraine region and that expected had it been similar to that observed in the whole country of -7.19% in 2010. The estimated annual hospital cost saved by ICALOR was €1,927,648 in 2010. Coordinated DMP of HF might improve outcome cost-effectively when implemented in a real-world population setting, and was associated in Lorraine with a substantial modification of the trend of HF hospitalizations. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Leaving home in Denmark

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Rikke Skovgaard

    2015-01-01

    The paper focuses on ethnic differences in the timing and patterns of leaving the parental home. Leaving home is a key transition in the life course of the individual, and extensive research has been conducted on the timing and patterns of leaving it. However, ethnic differences in these patterns...... of leaving home. Results showed that while some differences disappeared when controlling for covariates, others persisted, thus indicating ethnic differences in home-leaving patterns. A strong link between leaving home and marriage was substantiated for Turks, but not for Somalis. The home-leaving patterns...... of Somalis were much more similar to those of Danes. Overall, Turkish descendants were similar to Turkish immigrants but with some differentiation. The analyses identified the existence of ethnic differences in home-leaving patterns but also found evidence of a shift towards less traditional patterns, i...

  5. Understanding significant processes during work environment interventions to alleviate time pressure and associated sick leave of home care workers--a case study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andersen, Gunn Robstad; Westgaard, Rolf H

    2013-11-15

    Ergonomic and work stress interventions rarely show long-term positive effect. The municipality participating in this study received orders from the Norwegian Labour Inspectorate due to an identified unhealthy level of time pressure, and responded by effectuating several work environment interventions. The study aim is to identify critical factors in the interaction between work environment interventions and independent rationalization measures in order to understand a potential negative interfering effect from concurrent rationalizations on a comprehensive work environment intervention. The study, using a historic prospective mixed-method design, comprised 6 home care units in a municipality in Norway (138 respondents, response rate 76.2%; 17 informants). The study included quantitative estimations, register data of sick leave, a time line of significant events and changes, and qualitative descriptions of employee appraisals of their work situation gathered through semi-structured interviews and open survey responses. The work environment interventions were in general regarded as positive by the home care workers. However, all units were simultaneously subjected to substantial contextual instability, involving new work programs, new technology, restructurings, unit mergers, and management replacements, perceived by the home care workers to be major sources of stress. Findings suggest that concurrent changes induced through rationalization resulted in negative exposure effects that negated positive work environment intervention effects, causing an overall deteriorated work situation for the home care workers. Establishment and active utilization of communication channels from workers to managers are recommended in order to increase awareness of putative harmful and interruptive effects of rationalization measures.

  6. Nursing Homes

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Home › Aging & Health A to Z › Nursing Homes Font size A A A Print Share Glossary Basic ... Reason For Living in A Nursing Home Some type of disability with activities of daily living (ADLs) ...

  7. Home Care

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... are part of home healthcare agencies. You may benefit from home care if you are dealing with ... it will trigger an emergency response or checkup phone call. Newer technologies ... or mobile testing technology (home diagnostics), including x-rays and ...

  8. Promoting smoke-free homes: a novel behavioral intervention using real-time audio-visual feedback on airborne particle levels.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Neil E Klepeis

    Full Text Available Interventions are needed to protect the health of children who live with smokers. We pilot-tested a real-time intervention for promoting behavior change in homes that reduces second hand tobacco smoke (SHS levels. The intervention uses a monitor and feedback system to provide immediate auditory and visual signals triggered at defined thresholds of fine particle concentration. Dynamic graphs of real-time particle levels are also shown on a computer screen. We experimentally evaluated the system, field-tested it in homes with smokers, and conducted focus groups to obtain general opinions. Laboratory tests of the monitor demonstrated SHS sensitivity, stability, precision equivalent to at least 1 µg/m(3, and low noise. A linear relationship (R(2 = 0.98 was observed between the monitor and average SHS mass concentrations up to 150 µg/m(3. Focus groups and interviews with intervention participants showed in-home use to be acceptable and feasible. The intervention was evaluated in 3 homes with combined baseline and intervention periods lasting 9 to 15 full days. Two families modified their behavior by opening windows or doors, smoking outdoors, or smoking less. We observed evidence of lower SHS levels in these homes. The remaining household voiced reluctance to changing their smoking activity and did not exhibit lower SHS levels in main smoking areas or clear behavior change; however, family members expressed receptivity to smoking outdoors. This study established the feasibility of the real-time intervention, laying the groundwork for controlled trials with larger sample sizes. Visual and auditory cues may prompt family members to take immediate action to reduce SHS levels. Dynamic graphs of SHS levels may help families make decisions about specific mitigation approaches.

  9. Analysing home-ownership of couples: the effect of selecting couples at the time of the survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mulder, C H

    1996-09-01

    "The analysis of events encountered by couple and family households may suffer from sample selection bias when data are restricted to couples existing at the moment of interview. The paper discusses the effect of sample selection bias on event history analyses of buying a home [in the Netherlands] by comparing analyses performed on a sample of existing couples with analyses of a more complete sample including past as well as current partner relationships. The results show that, although home-buying in relationships that have ended differs clearly from behaviour in existing relationships, sample selection bias is not alarmingly large." (SUMMARY IN FRE) excerpt

  10. Hard Times: The Effects of Financial Strain on Home Care Services Use and Participant Outcomes in Michigan

    Science.gov (United States)

    D'Souza, Jennifer C.; James, Mary L.; Szafara, Kristina L.; Fries, Brant E.

    2009-01-01

    Purpose: When government funding for long-term care is reduced, participant outcomes may be adversely affected. We investigated the effect of program resources on individuals enrolled in the Michigan Home- and Community-Based Services (HCBS) waiver program for elderly and disabled adults. Design and Methods: Using dates of major policy and budget…

  11. Prothrombin complex concentrate for reversal of vitamin K antagonist treatment in bleeding and non-bleeding patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Johansen, Mathias; Wikkelsø, Anne; Lunde, Jens

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Treatment with vitamin K antagonists is associated with increased morbidity and mortality. Reversal therapy with prothrombin complex concentrate (PCC) is used increasingly and is recommended in the treatment of patients with bleeding complications undertaking surgical interventions......, as well as patients at high risk of bleeding. Evidence is lacking regarding indication, dosing, efficacy and safety. OBJECTIVES: We assessed the benefits and harms of PCC compared with fresh frozen plasma in the acute medical and surgical setting involving vitamin K antagonist-treated bleeding and non...... finding a beneficial effect of PCC in reducing the volume of fresh frozen plasma (FFP) transfused to reverse the effect of vitamin K antagonist treatment. The number of new occurrences of transfusion of red blood cells (RBCs) did not seem to be associated with the use of PCC (RR 1.08, 95% CI 0.82 to 1...

  12. Improvement in Obstructive Sleep Apnea Diagnosis and Management Wait Times: A Retrospective Analysis of a Home Management Pathway for Obstructive Sleep Apnea

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Samuel Alan Stewart

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Obstructive sleep apnea is a common condition within the Canadian population. The current gold standard for diagnosis and management of patients is in-laboratory (in-lab polysomnography; however, the limited availability of testing options for patients has led to long wait times and increased disease burden within the population. The Sleep Research Laboratory in Saskatoon (Saskatchewan implemented a home management program to run in parallel with the in-lab system several years ago in an effort to increase their capacity and reduce wait times. The present study was a retrospective analysis of all patients referred to the program between 2009 and 2012. The home management system has improved wait times by diagnosing and managing up to one-half of the referred patient population, reducing the wait for in-lab treatment from a median of 152 days in 2009 to 92 days in 2012 (P<0.0001. Moving forward, home management can provide a viable alternative to in-lab testing for patients who meet strict entry criteria, reducing the in-lab workload and, ultimately, reducing wait times.

  13. D-Dimer and prothrombin fragment 1 + 2 in urine and plasma in patients with clinically suspected venous thromboembolism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wexels, Fredrik; Seljeflot, Ingebjørg; Pripp, Are H; Dahl, Ola E

    2016-06-01

    Increased levels of urine prothrombin fragment 1 + 2 was recently reported to be associated with imaging-verified venous thromboembolism. In this study we evaluated the relationship between plasma D-dimer and plasma and urine prothrombin fragment 1 + 2 in patients with suspected venous thromboembolism. Urine and blood samples were collected from patients with suspected pulmonary embolism or deep vein thrombosis. The samples were analysed with commercially available ELISA kits. The diagnosis of venous thromboembolism was verified with contrast-enhanced computer tomography of the pulmonary arteries or lower extremity deep vein compression ultrasound and venography as appropriate. Venous thromboembolism was diagnosed in 150 of 720 patients. Significantly higher levels of plasma D-dimer and prothrombin fragment 1 + 2 in plasma and urine were found in those with imaging-confirmed venous thromboembolism versus those without (P fragment 1 + 2 in plasma. Further development of ELISA analyses for urine testing of prothrombin fragment 1 + 2 may improve its diagnostic accuracy.

  14. Comparison of three-factor and four-factor prothrombin complex concentrates regarding reversal of the anticoagulant effects of rivaroxaban in healthy volunteers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Levi, M. [=Marcel M.; Moore, K. T.; Castillejos, C. F.; Kubitza, D.; Berkowitz, S. D.; Goldhaber, S. Z.; Raghoebar, M.; Patel, M. R.; Weitz, J. I.; Levy, J. H.

    2014-01-01

    Four-factor prothrombin complex concentrates (PCCs), which contain factor II, FVII, FIX, and FX, have shown the potential to reverse the anticoagulant effect of rivaroxaban in healthy volunteers. The purpose of this study was to determine whether a three-factor PCC, which contains little FVII, has a

  15. Prothrombin 20210 G: a mutation and Factor V Leiden mutation in women with a history of severe preeclampsia and (H)ELLP syndrome

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Pampus, M. G.; Wolf, H.; Koopman, M. M.; van den Ende, A.; Buller, H. R.; Reitsma, P. H.

    2001-01-01

    The 20210 G-A prothrombin gene variant and the Factor V Leiden mutation are mutations associated with venous thrombotic risk. The aim of our study was to assess the prevalence of these specific mutations in women with a history of preeclampsia or hemolysis elevated liver enzymes, and low platelet

  16. Phenotypic presentation of thrombophilia in double heterozygote for factor v leiden and prothrombin 20210 G>A mutations: Case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nagorni-Obradović Ljudmila

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Physicians usually do not suspect pulmonary thromboembolism in younger patients except in those who have thrombophilia. In those latter patients some special conditions such as trauma or surgery may provoke the disease. In some adult persons, thrombophilia may still remain unrecognized, until appearance of additional conditions influence development of thrombosis. A 55-year-old Caucasian female, non-smoker, experienced sudden chest pain and hemoptysis without chest trauma. History taking revealed type 2 diabetes mellitus and hypothyroidism. She was overweight with body mass index 29.0. The review of the family history revealed that her father and mother died of brain infarction, while her 22-year-old son and 24-year-old daughter were healthy. Due to suspicion for thrombosis, multi-slice computerized tomography thorax scan was done and pulmonary embolism was diagnosed. Although without clear risk factor for thrombosis in our patient, we performed laboratory investigation for congenital thrombophilia. Genetic analysis showed double heterozygous for factor V Leiden and prothrombin 20210 G>A mutations. Congenital thrombophilia was risk factor for thrombosis in our patient but haemostatic imbalance was not previously clinically recognized. She had two pregnancies without complications. Appearance of other associative factors such as endocrine disorders - hypothyroidism and metabolic syndrome with diabetes type 2, and overweigh were additional potential triggers for clinical manifestation of pulmonary thromboembolism in her adult age. Her children underwent genetic analysis, too. The son was also double heterozygous for factor V Leiden and prothrombin 20210 G>A mutations, while daughter was heterozygous for factor V Leiden, and none had clinical signs of thrombosis. [Projekat Ministarstva nauke Republike Srbije, br. ON175081 i br. ON 175091

  17. Homing oneself

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Winther, Ida Wentzel

    2009-01-01

    What is home? A building, a physical and mental phenomenon, or a concept?  There are many homes and ways `to home oneself´. Many of us quite often dwell in other places than at home (as professional commuters between two places, as travellers staying in hotels, as children of divorced parents...

  18. Associations between factors within the home setting and screen time among children aged 0–5 years: a cross-sectional study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carson Valerie

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Excessive engagement in screen time has several immediate and long-term health implications among pre-school children. However, little is known about the factors that influence screen time in this age group. Therefore, the purpose of this study was to use the Ecologic Model of Sedentary Behavior as a guide to examine associations between intrapersonal, interpersonal, and physical environment factors within the home setting and screen time among pre-school children. Methods Participants were 746 pre-school children (≤ 5 years old from the Kingston, Ontario, Canada area. From May to September, 2011, parents completed a questionnaire regarding several intrapersonal (child demographics, interpersonal (family demographics, parental cognitions, parental behavior, and physical environment (television, computer, or video games in the bedroom factors within the home setting. Parents also reported the average amount of time per day their child spent watching television and playing video/computer games. Associations were examined using linear and logistic regression models. Results Most participants (93.7% watched television and 37.9% played video/computer games. Several intrapersonal, interpersonal, and physical environment factors within the home setting were associated with screen time. More specifically, age, parental attitudes, parental barriers, parental descriptive norms, parental screen time, and having a television in the bedroom were positive predictors of screen time; whereas, parental education, parental income, and parental self-efficacy were negative predictors of screen time in the linear regression analysis. Collectively these variables explained 64.2% of the variance in screen time. Parental cognitive factors (self-efficacy, attitudes, barriers, descriptive norms at the interpersonal level explained a large portion (37.9% of this variance. Conclusions A large proportion of screen time in pre-school children was

  19. Just-in-Time Evidence-Based E-mail “Reminders” in Home Health Care: Impact on Nurse Practices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murtaugh, Christopher M; Pezzin, Liliana E; McDonald, Margaret V; Feldman, Penny H; Peng, Timothy R

    2005-01-01

    Objective To test the effectiveness of two interventions designed to improve the adoption of evidence-based practices by home health nurses caring for heart failure (HF) patients. Data Sources/Study Setting Information on nurse practices was abstracted from the clinical records of patients admitted between June 2000 and November 2001 to the care of 354 study nurses at a large, urban, nonprofit home care agency. Study Design The study employed a randomized design with nurses assigned to usual care or one of two intervention groups upon identification of an eligible patient. The basic intervention was a one-time e-mail reminder highlighting six HF-specific clinical recommendations. The augmented intervention consisted of the initial e-mail reminder supplemented by provider prompts, patient education material, and clinical nurse specialist outreach. Data Collection At each home health visit provided by a study nurse to an eligible HF patient during the 45-day follow-up period, a structured chart abstraction tool was used to collect information on whether the nurse provided the care practices highlighted in the e-mail reminder. Principal Findings Both the basic and the augmented interventions greatly increased the practice of evidence-based care, according to patient records, in the areas of patient assessment and instructions about HF disease management. While not all results were statistically significant at conventional levels, intervention effects were positive in virtually all cases and effect magnitudes frequently were large. Conclusions The results of this randomized trial strongly support the efficacy of just-in-time evidence-based reminders as a means of changing clinical practice among home health nurses who are geographically dispersed and spend much of their time in the field. PMID:15960694

  20. Home, Smart Home

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Ellen Kathrine; Olesen, Gitte Gylling Hammershøj; Mullins, Michael

    2013-01-01

    The article places focus on how smart technologies integrated in a one family- home and particular the window offer unique challenges and opportunities for designing buildings with the best possible environments for people and nature. Toward an interdisciplinary approach, we address the interaction...... between daylight defined in technical terms and daylight defined in aesthetic, architectural terms. Through field-tests of a Danish carbon-neutral home and an analysis of five key design parameters, we explore the contradictions and potentials in smart buildings, using the smart window as example of how...... to the energy design is central. The study illuminates an approach of the design of smart houses as living organisms by connecting technology with the needs of the occupants with the power and beauty of daylight....

  1. [Analysis of a Family-centred Care Programme with Follow-up Home-visits in Neonatology - In Times of the Directive from G-BA].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hüning, B M; Reimann, M; Sahlmen, S; Leibold, S; Nabring, J C; Felderhoff-Müser, U

    2016-07-01

    Marked progress in neonatology changed care of very preterm infants (VLBW) over the last decades - but also the attitude towards family-centred care (FCC). With the directive of the German Federal Joined Committee (G-BA), politicians recognize the necessity of neonatal FCC. To evaluate time and personnel costs necessary at a centre of established FCC. Elternberatung "Frühstart" is a FCC programme for VLBW and seriously ill neonates from preganancy at risk to follow-up home-visits delivered by one interdisciplinary team. Analysis (2011-2014): 1.) Number of cases /participation in programme, 2.) resources of time, 3) and personnel, 4.) funding, 5) economic impact. 1.1.2011-31.12.2014: 441 cases (total cases: 2 212) participated in the programme. Participation of VLBW: mean 92% (86.4-97,2%). Costs of time are highest in neonates with congenital malformations: median 13.8 h, VLBW: median 11,2 h. Transition to home is most time intensive: median 7,3 (0-42.5) h. In average of 3.1 full-time nurses (part-time workers) are able to counsel 48 families/quarter. In severe cases funding is partly provided by health care insurances for social medical aftercare: positive applications: mean 92.7% (79.6-97.7%). Participation in the FCC programme in neonatology is high and costs of time are manageable. © Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  2. Home visits by neighborhood Mentor Mothers provide timely recovery from childhood malnutrition in South Africa: results from a randomized controlled trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mbewu Nokwanele

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Child and infant malnourishment is a significant and growing problem in the developing world. Malnourished children are at high risk for negative health outcomes over their lifespans. Philani, a paraprofessional home visiting program, was developed to improve childhood nourishment. The objective of this study is to evaluate whether the Philani program can rehabilitate malnourished children in a timely manner. Methods Mentor Mothers were trained to conduct home visits. Mentor Mothers went from house to house in assigned neighborhoods, weighed children age 5 and younger, and recruited mother-child dyads where there was an underweight child. Participating dyads were assigned in a 2:1 random sequence to the Philani intervention condition (n = 536 or a control condition (n = 252. Mentor Mothers visited dyads in the intervention condition for one year, supporting mothers' problem-solving around nutrition. All children were weighed by Mentor Mothers at baseline and three, six, nine and twelve month follow-ups. Results By three months, children in the intervention condition were five times more likely to rehabilitate (reach a healthy weight for their ages than children in the control condition. Throughout the course of the study, 43% (n = 233 of 536 of children in the intervention condition were rehabilitated while 31% (n = 78 of 252 of children in the control condition were rehabilitated. Conclusions Paraprofessional Mentor Mothers are an effective strategy for delivering home visiting programs by providing the knowledge and support necessary to change the behavior of families at risk.

  3. [Secondhand smoke exposure at home and leisure time according to the day of the week (working and non-working day) in Barcelona].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martínez-Sánchez, José M; Fu, Marcela; Schiaffino, Anna; Sureda, Xisca; Saltó, Esteve; Moncada, Albert; Ariza, Carles; Nebot, Manel; Pascual, José A; Fernández, Esteve

    2012-01-01

    The objective of this study is to describe the differences in the exposure to secondhand smoke (SHS) at home and at leisure time according to the day of the week (working and non-working day) which exposure occurs in Barcelona. We carried out a cross-sectional study of a representative sample of adult (>16 years) non-smokers in Barcelona before the Spanish smoking law came into effect (years 2004-2005). We studied the prevalence of exposure to SHS at home and leisure time by means of a questionnaire and a biomarker (salivary cotinine). The questionnaire included questions on exposure to SHS on working days and nonworking days. The prevalence of exposure to SHS at home was 27.4% (6.8% exposed only on working days, 5.7% exposed only on non-working days, and 14.9% exposed on both working and non-working days). The prevalence of exposure to SHS at leisure time was 61.3% (10.7% exposed only on working days, 13.6% exposed only on non-working days, and 37.0% exposed on both working and non-working days). The exposure to SHS only on non-working days at leisure time decreases with age (χ(2) of trend = 183.7; phome on working and non-working days showed higher levels of salivary cotinine concentration, regardless of sex, age group, and educational level. In conclusion, the exposure to SHS occurs mainly during leisure time. Questions on SHS exposure according to working and non-working days allow to characterizing the exposure to SHS, especially when the exposure occurs at leisure time.

  4. Prothrombin Time Prolongation was the Most Important Indicator of Severe Bleeding in Children with Severe Dengue Viral Infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laoprasopwattana, Kamolwish; Binsaai, Jehrabeeyah; Pruekprasert, Pornpimol; Geater, Alan

    2017-08-01

    To determine the indicators of severe bleeding in children with severe dengue viral infection (DVI), the medical records of patients aged <15 years admitted to Songklanagarind Hospital in southern Thailand during 1989-2011 were reviewed. Severe-bleeding DVI was defined as needing blood products transfusion owing to DVI-caused bleeding. Of the 238 children with severe DVI according to the World Health Organization 2009 criteria, 44 (18.5%) had severe bleeding, of whom 28 (63.6%) died. The international normalized ratio (INR) had high correlations with both transaminase enzymes (Spearman correlation, rs = 0.67-0.69, p <0.01). Multivariate analysis found that patients who had dengue haemorrhagic fever (DHF) grade IV, platelets <20 000/mm3 and INR ≥ 1.5 had increased risk of severe bleeding with odds ratios (95% confidence intervals) of 3.4 (1.4, 8.6), 2.6 (1.1, 6.2) and 10.6 (4.0, 28.4), respectively. Blood products should be at hand in severe DHF children with high risk of severe bleeding. © The Author [2017]. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  5. Plasma lipids and prothrombin time in rats fed palm oil and other commonly used fats in Egypt

    OpenAIRE

    Hussein, Mona M.; Salama, Fawzy M.; Ebada, Karina M.

    1993-01-01

    Sprague-Dawley rats were fed for a total period of 8 weeks on six diets that were different in the source of their fat content. The fat content was provided either, palm oil or palm olein or corn oil or hydrogenated fat, or frying palm oil and mixture of corn oil + hydrogenated fat in the ratio (1:1). The latter was given to the control group. Animals fed these various experimental diets showed statistically significant differences in serum cholesterol and serum triglycerides content amo...

  6. Two-year evaluation of Intermittent Preventive Treatment for Children (IPTc combined with timely home treatment for malaria control in Ghana

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Seake-Kwawu Atsu

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Intermittent preventive treatment (IPT has recently been accepted as an important component of the malaria control strategy. Intermittent preventive treatment for children (IPTc combined with timely treatment of malaria related febrile illness at home to reduce parasite prevalence and malaria morbidity in children aged between six and 60 months in a coastal community in Ghana. This paper reports persistence of reduced parasitaemia two years into the intervention. The baseline and year-one-evaluation findings were published earlier. Objective The main objective in the second year was to demonstrate whether the two interventions would further reduce parasite prevalence and malaria-related febrile illness in the study population. Methods This was an intervention study designed to compare baseline and evaluation findings without a control group. The study combined home-based delivery of intermittent preventive treatment for children (IPTc aged 6 - 60 months and home treatment of suspected febrile malaria-related illness within 24 hours. All children aged 6 - 60 months received home-based delivery of intermittent preventive treatment using amodiaquine + artesunate, delivered at home by community assistants every four months (6 times in 24 months. Malaria parasite prevalence surveys were conducted before the first and after the third and sixth IPTc to the children. The evaluation surveys were done four months after the third and sixth IPTc was given. Results Parasite prevalence which reduced from 25% to 3.0% at year-one evaluation had reduced further from 3% to 1% at year-two-evaluation. At baseline, 13.8% of the children were febrile (axilary temperature of ≥37.5°C compared to 2.2% at year-one-evaluation while 2.1% were febrile at year-two-evaluation. Conclusion The year-two-evaluation result indicates that IPTc given three times in a year (every four months combined with timely treatment of febrile malaria illness, is

  7. Two-year evaluation of Intermittent Preventive Treatment for Children (IPTc) combined with timely home treatment for malaria control in Ghana.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahorlu, Collins K; Koram, Kwadwo A; Seake-Kwawu, Atsu; Weiss, Mitchell G

    2011-05-15

    Intermittent preventive treatment (IPT) has recently been accepted as an important component of the malaria control strategy. Intermittent preventive treatment for children (IPTc) combined with timely treatment of malaria related febrile illness at home to reduce parasite prevalence and malaria morbidity in children aged between six and 60 months in a coastal community in Ghana. This paper reports persistence of reduced parasitaemia two years into the intervention. The baseline and year-one-evaluation findings were published earlier. The main objective in the second year was to demonstrate whether the two interventions would further reduce parasite prevalence and malaria-related febrile illness in the study population. This was an intervention study designed to compare baseline and evaluation findings without a control group. The study combined home-based delivery of intermittent preventive treatment for children (IPTc) aged 6 - 60 months and home treatment of suspected febrile malaria-related illness within 24 hours. All children aged 6-60 months received home-based delivery of intermittent preventive treatment using amodiaquine + artesunate, delivered at home by community assistants every four months (6 times in 24 months). Malaria parasite prevalence surveys were conducted before the first and after the third and sixth IPTc to the children. The evaluation surveys were done four months after the third and sixth IPTc was given. Parasite prevalence which reduced from 25% to 3.0% at year-one evaluation had reduced further from 3% to 1% at year-two-evaluation. At baseline, 13.8% of the children were febrile (axilary temperature of ≥ 37.5 °C) compared to 2.2% at year-one-evaluation while 2.1% were febrile at year-two-evaluation. The year-two-evaluation result indicates that IPTc given three times in a year (every four months) combined with timely treatment of febrile malaria illness, is effective to reduce malaria parasite prevalence in children aged 6 to 60 months

  8. Measured winter and spring-time indoor temperatures in UK homes over the period 1969–2010: A review and synthesis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vadodaria, K.; Loveday, D.L.; Haines, V.

    2014-01-01

    This paper presents a review and synthesis of average winter and spring-time indoor temperatures in UK homes measured over the period 1969–2010. Analysis of measured temperatures in a sample of solid wall dwellings in the UK, conducted as part of the CALEBRE research project, is included. The review suggests that, for periods when occupation was likely, there has been little or no increase in winter and spring-time average living room temperatures over the last 40 years, with average recorded living room temperatures having been historically lower than the WHO-recommended value of 21 °C. Correspondingly, for periods of likely occupation, average bedroom temperatures appear to have increased. Compared with non-domestic buildings, there have been fewer investigations of domestic thermal comfort, either in the UK or elsewhere, and hence the paper also calls for further detailed investigations of domestic indoor temperatures during occupied hours together with thermal comfort evaluations in order to better understand domestic thermal environments. Based on suggestions from the limited range of studies available to date, living room temperatures may need to be maintained within the range 20–22 °C for thermal satisfaction, though this requires confirmation through further research. The study also emphasises that improving the energy efficiency of homes should be the primary means to effect any increases in indoor temperatures that are deemed essential. Considerations for future policy are discussed. - Highlights: • We review indoor temperatures measured in UK homes during 1960-2010. • We present analysis of temperature recorded by our study in 20 UK homes. • Little or no increase observed in living room temperatures for the last 40 years. • Occupied bedroom temperatures appear to have increased. • Living room temperatures have been historically lower than the WHO guidelines

  9. Effect of a 2-year home-based endurance training intervention on physiological function and PSA doubling time in prostate cancer patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hvid, Thine; Lindegaard, Birgitte; Winding, Kamilla

    2016-01-01

    AIM: Physical activity after prostate cancer diagnosis has been shown to reduce the risk of disease progression. Here, we aimed to evaluate the effect of a 2-year home-based endurance training intervention on body composition, biomarkers levels, and prostate-specific antigen (PSA) doubling time...... composition, insulin sensitivity, and biomarkers were measured at 0, 6, and 24 months of intervention. PSA doubling time (PSADT) was calculated based on monthly PSA measurements. RESULTS: Twenty-five patients were enrolled, and 19 patients completed the study. PSADT increased in the training group from 28...

  10. Investigation of time-resolved atmospheric conditions and indoor/outdoor particulate matter concentrations in homes with gas and biomass cook stoves in Nogales, Sonora, Mexico.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holmes, Heather A; Pardyjak, Eric R

    2014-07-01

    ambient air measurements. However, a large fraction of time is typically spent indoors where a variety of activities including cooking, heating, tobacco smoking, and cleaning can lead to elevated PM concentrations. This study investigates the influence of meteorology, outdoor PM, and indoor activities on indoor air pollution (IAP) levels in the United States-Mexico border region. Results indicate that cooking fuel type and meteorology greatly influence the IAP in homes, with biomass fuel use causing the largest increase in PM concentration.

  11. Home range and travels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stickel, L.F.; King, John A.

    1968-01-01

    . Peromyscus generally used and maintained several or many different home sites and refuges in various parts of their home ranges, and frequently shifted about so that their principal activities centered on different sets of holes at different times. Once established, many Peromyscus remained in the same general area for a long time, perhaps for the duration of their lives. Extent of their travels in different directions and intensity of use of different portions of their home ranges varied within a general area in response to habitat changes, loss of neighbors, or other factors. Various authors have obtained both direct and indirect evidence of territoriality, in some degree, among certain species of Peromyscus. Young mice dispersed from their birth sites to establish home ranges of their own. Adults also sometimes left their home areas; some re-established elsewhere; others returned after exploratory travels. Most populations contained a certain proportion of transients; these may have been wanderers or individuals exploring out from established home ranges or seeking new ones. When areas were depopulated by removal trapping, other Peromyscus invaded. Invasion rates generally followed seasonal trends of reproduction and population density. Peromyscus removed from their home areas and released elsewhere returned home from various distances, but fewer returned from greater distances than from nearby; speed of return increased with successive trials. The consensus from present evidence is that ho-ming is made possible by a combination of random wandering and familiarity with a larger area than the day-to-day range. Records of juvenile wanderings during the dispersal phase and of adult explorations very nearly encompassed the distances over which any substantial amount of successful homing occurred. Methods of measuring sizes of home ranges and the limitations of these measurements were discussed in brief synopsis. It was co

  12. High risk of cerebral-vein thrombosis in carriers of a prothrombin-gene mutation and in users of oral contraceptives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martinelli, I; Sacchi, E; Landi, G; Taioli, E; Duca, F; Mannucci, P M

    1998-06-18

    Idiopathic cerebral-vein thrombosis can cause serious neurologic disability. We evaluated risk factors for this disorder, including genetic risk factors (mutations in the genes encoding factor V and prothrombin) and nongenetic risk factors (such as the use of oral contraceptive agents). We compared the prevalence of these risk factors in 40 patients with cerebral-vein thrombosis, 80 patients with deep-vein thrombosis of the lower extremities, and 120 healthy controls. The G1691A mutation in the factor V gene and the G20210A prothrombin-gene mutation, which are established genetic risk factors for venous thrombosis, were studied. We also assessed the use of oral contraceptives and other risk factors for thrombosis. The prevalence of the prothrombin-gene mutation was higher in patients with cerebral-vein thrombosis (20 percent) than in healthy controls (3 percent; odds ratio, 10.2; 95 percent confidence interval, 2.3 to 31.0) and was similar to that in patients with deep-vein thrombosis (18 percent). Similar results were obtained for the mutation in the factor V gene. The use of oral contraceptives was more frequent among women with cerebral-vein thrombosis (96 percent) than among controls (32 percent; odds ratio, 22.1; 95 percent confidence interval, 5.9 to 84.2) and among those with deep-vein thrombosis (61 percent; odds ratio, 4.4; 95 percent confidence interval, 1.1 to 17.8). For women who were taking oral contraceptives and who also had the prothrombin-gene mutation (seven patients with cerebral-vein thrombosis but only one control), the odds ratio for cerebral-vein thrombosis rose to 149.3 (95 percent confidence interval, 31.0 to 711.0). Mutations in the prothrombin gene and the factor V gene are associated with cerebral-vein thrombosis. The use of oral contraceptives is also strongly and independently associated with the disorder. The presence of both the prothrombin-gene mutation and oral-contraceptive use raises the risk of cerebral-vein thrombosis further.

  13. Home Teaching and Herbart.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rust, Val D.; Reed, Frances

    1979-01-01

    Viewing the growing disenchantment with state-controlled schooling, the authors predict that home teaching will become an established educational alternative within a short time, and they reflect on the teachings and writings of Johann Friedrich Herbart, an eighteenth-century advocate of educating children at home. (Editor/SJL)

  14. Home hemodialysis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Agar, John W; Perkins, Anthony; Heaf, James G

    2015-01-01

    We describe the infrastructure that is necessary for hemodialysis in the home focusing on physical requirements, the organization of plumbing and water, and the key features that should guide the selection of machines that are suitable for home use.......We describe the infrastructure that is necessary for hemodialysis in the home focusing on physical requirements, the organization of plumbing and water, and the key features that should guide the selection of machines that are suitable for home use....

  15. Fixed Versus Variable Dosing of 4-factor Prothrombin Complex Concentrate for Emergent Warfarin Reversal

    Science.gov (United States)

    2018-04-06

    Acute Bleeding on Long-Term Anticoagulation Therapy; Hemorrhage; Significant Bleeding in Patients With a Coagulopathy (Prolonged Thrombin Time); Urgent Reversal of Vitamin K Antagonist (VKA) Anticoagulation

  16. Outcomes Following Three-Factor Inactive Prothrombin Complex Concentrate Versus Recombinant Activated Factor VII Administration During Cardiac Surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harper, Patrick C; Smith, Mark M; Brinkman, Nathan J; Passe, Melissa A; Schroeder, Darrell R; Said, Sameh M; Nuttall, Gregory A; Oliver, William C; Barbara, David W

    2018-02-01

    To compare outcomes following inactive prothrombin complex concentrate (PCC) or recombinant activated factor VII (rFVIIa) administration during cardiac surgery. Retrospective propensity-matched analysis. Academic tertiary-care center. Patients undergoing cardiac surgery requiring cardiopulmonary bypass who received either rFVIIa or the inactive 3-factor PCC. Outcomes following intraoperative administration of rFVIIa (263) or factor IX complex (72) as rescue therapy to treat bleeding. In the 24 hours after surgery, propensity-matched patients receiving PCC versus rFVIIa had significantly less chest tube outputs (median difference -464 mL, 95% confidence interval [CI] -819 mL to -110 mL), fresh frozen plasma transfusion rates (17% v 38%, p = 0.028), and platelet transfusion rates (26% v 49%, p = 0.027). There were no significant differences between propensity-matched groups in postoperative stroke, deep venous thrombosis, pulmonary embolism, myocardial infarction, or intracardiac thrombus. Postoperative dialysis was significantly less likely in patients administered PCC versus rFVIIa following propensity matching (odds ratio = 0.3, 95% CI 0.1-0.7). No significant difference in 30-day mortality in patients receiving PCC versus rFVIIa was present following propensity matching. Use of rFVIIa versus inactive PCCs was significantly associated with renal failure requiring dialysis and increased postoperative bleeding and transfusions. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Resistant to the Recession: Low-Income Adults’ Maintenance of Cooking and Away-From-Home Eating Behaviors During Times of Economic Turbulence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Lindsey P.; Ng, Shu Wen

    2014-01-01

    Objectives. We examined the effects of state-level unemployment rates during the recession of 2008 on patterns of home food preparation and away-from-home (AFH) eating among low-income and minority populations. Methods. We analyzed pooled cross-sectional data on 118 635 adults aged 18 years or older who took part in the American Time Use Study. Multinomial logistic regression models stratified by gender were used to evaluate the associations between state-level unemployment, poverty, race/ethnicity, and time spent cooking, and log binomial regression was used to assess respondents’ AFH consumption patterns. Results. High state-level unemployment was associated with only trivial increases in respondents’ cooking patterns and virtually no change in their AFH eating patterns. Low-income and racial/ethnic minority groups were not disproportionately affected by the recession. Conclusions. Even during a major economic downturn, US adults are resistant to food-related behavior change. More work is needed to understand whether this reluctance to change is attributable to time limits, lack of knowledge or skill related to food preparation, or lack of access to fresh produce and raw ingredients. PMID:24625145

  18. Resistant to the recession: low-income adults' maintenance of cooking and away-from-home eating behaviors during times of economic turbulence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Lindsey P; Ng, Shu Wen; Popkin, Barry M

    2014-05-01

    We examined the effects of state-level unemployment rates during the recession of 2008 on patterns of home food preparation and away-from-home (AFH) eating among low-income and minority populations. We analyzed pooled cross-sectional data on 118 635 adults aged 18 years or older who took part in the American Time Use Study. Multinomial logistic regression models stratified by gender were used to evaluate the associations between state-level unemployment, poverty, race/ethnicity, and time spent cooking, and log binomial regression was used to assess respondents' AFH consumption patterns. High state-level unemployment was associated with only trivial increases in respondents' cooking patterns and virtually no change in their AFH eating patterns. Low-income and racial/ethnic minority groups were not disproportionately affected by the recession. Even during a major economic downturn, US adults are resistant to food-related behavior change. More work is needed to understand whether this reluctance to change is attributable to time limits, lack of knowledge or skill related to food preparation, or lack of access to fresh produce and raw ingredients.

  19. Elevated levels of antibodies against phosphatidylserine/prothrombin complex and/or cardiolipin associated with infection and recurrent purpura in a child: a forme fruste of antiphospholipid syndrome?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kinoshita, Yuri; Mayumi, Nobuko; Inaba, Motoyuki; Igarashi, Touru; Katagiri, Ichigen; Kawana, Seiji

    2015-07-15

    Antiphospholipid syndrome is an autoimmune disorder characterized by the occurrence of venous and arterial thrombosis, as well as morbidity in pregnancy, in the presence of anti-phospholipid antibodies. The diagnosis of antiphospholipid syndrome is usually established based on clinical and laboratory findings by strictly following the 2006 Sapporo classification. However, the diagnosis remains challenging owing to the ongoing debates on the serological criteria. We report a case we describe as forme fruste antiphospholipid syndrome in which these criteria were not fulfilled. Purpura appeared repeatedly in a female infant starting from the age of 6 months and following episodes of upper respiratory infections and vaccinations. The levels of anti-cardiolipin IgG antibodies and anti-phosphatidylserine/prothrombin complex antibodies were elevated in accordance with these events. Histopathological evaluation revealed multiple small vessel thrombi in the dermis and adipose tissue. After 2 weeks of treatment with aspirin and heparin, the cutaneous symptoms subsided. Infection has long been associated with antiphospholipid syndrome, and anti-phosphatidylserine/prothrombin antibodies are considered a new marker for the diagnosis of antiphospholipid syndrome. Forme fruste antiphospholipid syndrome should be considered even if the antiphospholipid syndrome diagnostic criteria are not completely fulfilled, especially in the presence of elevated levels of anti-phosphatidylserine/prothrombin antibodies and known preceding infections.

  20. Concomitant homozygosity for the prothrombin gene variant with mild deficiency of antithrombin III in a patient with multiple hepatic infarctions: a case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Macheta M

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Introduction Hereditary causes of visceral thrombosis or thrombosis should be sought among young patients. We present a case of a young man presenting with multiple hepatic infarctions resulting in portal hypertension due to homozygosity of the prothrombin gene mutation not previously described in literature. Case presentation A 42-year-old Caucasian man with a previous history of idiopathic deep vein thrombosis 11 years earlier presented with vague abdominal pains and mildly abnormal liver function tests. An ultrasound and computed tomography scan showed evidence of hepatic infarction and portal hypertension (splenic varices. A thrombophilia screen confirmed a homozygous mutation for the prothrombin gene mutation, with mildly reduced levels of anti-thrombin III (AT III. Subsequent testing of his father and brother revealed heterozygosity for the same gene mutation. Conclusion Hepatic infarction is unusual due to the rich dual arterial and venous blood supply to the liver. In the absence of an arterial or haemodynamic insult causing hepatic infarction, a thrombophilia should be considered. To our knowledge, this is the first reported case of a hepatic infarction due to homozygosity of the prothrombin gene mutation. It is unclear whether homozygotes have a higher risk of thrombosis than heterozygotes. In someone presenting with a first thrombosis with this mutation, the case for life-long anticoagulation is unclear, but it may be necessary to prevent a second and more severe second thrombotic event, as occurred in this case.

  1. Research on the model of home networking

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yun, Xiang; Feng, Xiancheng

    2007-11-01

    It is the research hotspot of current broadband network to combine voice service, data service and broadband audio-video service by IP protocol to transport various real time and mutual services to terminal users (home). Home Networking is a new kind of network and application technology which can provide various services. Home networking is called as Digital Home Network. It means that PC, home entertainment equipment, home appliances, Home wirings, security, illumination system were communicated with each other by some composing network technology, constitute a networking internal home, and connect with WAN by home gateway. It is a new network technology and application technology, and can provide many kinds of services inside home or between homes. Currently, home networking can be divided into three kinds: Information equipment, Home appliances, Communication equipment. Equipment inside home networking can exchange information with outer networking by home gateway, this information communication is bidirectional, user can get information and service which provided by public networking by using home networking internal equipment through home gateway connecting public network, meantime, also can get information and resource to control the internal equipment which provided by home networking internal equipment. Based on the general network model of home networking, there are four functional entities inside home networking: HA, HB, HC, and HD. (1) HA (Home Access) - home networking connects function entity; (2) HB (Home Bridge) Home networking bridge connects function entity; (3) HC (Home Client) - Home networking client function entity; (4) HD (Home Device) - decoder function entity. There are many physical ways to implement four function entities. Based on theses four functional entities, there are reference model of physical layer, reference model of link layer, reference model of IP layer and application reference model of high layer. In the future home network

  2. Parenting style, the home environment, and screen time of 5-year-old children; the 'be active, eat right' study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    L. Veldhuis (Lydian); A. van Grieken (Amy); C.M. Renders (Carry); R.A. Hirasing (Remy); H. Raat (Hein)

    2014-01-01

    textabstractIntroduction: The global increase in childhood overweight and obesity has been ascribed partly to increases in children's screen time. Parents have a large influence on their children's screen time. Studies investigating parenting and early childhood screen time are limited. In this

  3. Parenting Style, the Home Environment, and Screen Time of 5-Year-Old Children; The 'Be Active, Eat Right' Study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Veldhuis, L.; van Grieken, A.; Renders, C.M.; Hira Sing, R.A.; Raat, H.

    2014-01-01

    Introduction: The global increase in childhood overweight and obesity has been ascribed partly to increases in children's screen time. Parents have a large influence on their children's screen time. Studies investigating parenting and early childhood screen time are limited. In this study, we

  4. Home Automation and Security System

    OpenAIRE

    Surinder Kaur,; Rashmi Singh; Neha Khairwal; Pratyk Jain

    2016-01-01

    Easy Home or Home automation plays a very important role in modern era because of its flexibility in using it at different places with high precision which will save money and time by decreasing human hard work. Prime focus of this technology is to control the household equipment’s like light, fan, door, AC etc. automatically. This research paper has detailed information on Home Automation and Security System using Arduino, GSM and how we can control home appliances using Android application....

  5. Association of prothrombin complex concentrate administration and hematoma enlargement in non-vitamin K antagonist oral anticoagulant-related intracerebral hemorrhage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gerner, Stefan T; Kuramatsu, Joji B; Sembill, Jochen A; Sprügel, Maximilian I; Endres, Matthias; Haeusler, Karl Georg; Vajkoczy, Peter; Ringleb, Peter A; Purrucker, Jan; Rizos, Timolaos; Erbguth, Frank; Schellinger, Peter D; Fink, Gereon R; Stetefeld, Henning; Schneider, Hauke; Neugebauer, Hermann; Röther, Joachim; Claßen, Joseph; Michalski, Dominik; Dörfler, Arnd; Schwab, Stefan; Huttner, Hagen B

    2018-01-01

    To investigate parameters associated with hematoma enlargement in non-vitamin K antagonist oral anticoagulant (NOAC)-related intracerebral hemorrhage (ICH). This retrospective cohort study includes individual patient data for 190 patients with NOAC-associated ICH over a 5-year period (2011-2015) at 19 departments of neurology across Germany. Primary outcome was the association of prothrombin complex concentrate (PCC) administration with hematoma enlargement. Subanalyses were calculated for blood pressure management and its association with the primary outcome. Secondary outcomes include associations with in-hospital mortality and functional outcome at 3 months assessed using the modified Rankin Scale. The study population for analysis of primary and secondary outcomes consisted of 146 NOAC-ICH patients with available follow-up imaging. Hematoma enlargement occurred in 49/146 (33.6%) patients with NOAC-related ICH. Parameters associated with hematoma enlargement were blood pressure ≥ 160mmHg within 4 hours and-in the case of factor Xa inhibitor ICH-anti-Xa levels on admission. PCC administration prior to follow-up imaging was not significantly associated with a reduced rate of hematoma enlargement either in overall NOAC-related ICH or in patients with factor Xa inhibitor intake (NOAC: risk ratio [RR] = 1.150, 95% confidence interval [CI] = 0.632-2.090; factor Xa inhibitor: RR = 1.057, 95% CI = 0.565-1.977), regardless of PCC dosage given or time interval until imaging or treatment. Systolic blood pressure levels < 160mmHg within 4 hours after admission were significantly associated with a reduction in the proportion of patients with hematoma enlargement (RR = 0.598, 95% CI = 0.365-0.978). PCC administration had no effect on mortality and functional outcome either at discharge or at 3 months. In contrast to blood pressure control, PCC administration was not associated with a reduced rate of hematoma enlargement in NOAC-related ICH

  6. Unimaginable homes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Møller, Kristian; Klausen, Maja

    2018-01-01

    The chapter draw from critical mediatization theory, critical intimacy theory, and cultural gerontology and asks: How do elderly people practice their mediatized homes? Which roles do media play in constituting and disturbing the flows of bodies into the home? Moreover: how do dominant...... in the making of the mediatized home space. We conclude by returning to the research questions and making explicit how researching flows of bodies that in many ways inhabit homes of the in-between contributes to both gerontological and geomediatization research agendas....

  7. Thrombotic safety of prothrombin complex concentrate (Beriplex P/N) for dabigatran reversal in a rabbit model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herzog, Eva; Kaspereit, Franz J; Krege, Wilfried; Doerr, Baerbel; van Ryn, Joanne; Dickneite, Gerhard; Pragst, Ingo

    2014-09-01

    In vivo animal data have shown prothrombin complex concentrate (PCC) to be effective in preventing bleeding induced by excessive plasma levels of the direct thrombin inhibitor dabigatran. This animal model study was designed to determine the risk of thrombosis associated with administration of a PCC (Beriplex P/N) to reverse dabigatran-induced bleeding. Anesthetized rabbits were treated with initial 0, 75, 200 or 450 μg kg(-1) dabigatran boluses followed by continuous infusions to maintain elevated plasma dabigatran levels. At 15 min after the start of dabigatran administration, PCC doses of 0, 50 or 300 IU kg(-1) were administered. Thereafter, coagulation in an arteriovenous (AV) shunt was evaluated and histopathologic examination for thrombotic changes performed. Venous thrombosis was also assessed in a modified Wessler model. At the suprapharmacologic dose of 300 IU kg(-1), PCC increased thrombus weight during AV shunting, but this effect could be prevented by dabigatran at all tested doses. AV shunt occlusion after PCC administration was delayed by 75 μg kg(-1) dabigatran and abolished by progressively higher dabigatran doses. High-dose treatment with 300 IU kg(-1) PCC resulted in histologically evident low-grade pulmonary thrombi; however, that effect could be blocked by dabigatran in a dose-dependent manner (p=0.034). In rabbits treated with high-dose PCC, dabigatran inhibited thrombus formation during venous stasis. PCC effectively reversed dabigatran-induced bleeding. In this animal study, thrombosis after PCC administration could be prevented in the presence of dabigatran. PCC reversed dabigatran-induced excessive bleeding while retaining protective anticoagulatory activity of dabigatran. Copyright © 2014. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  8. Plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 4G/5G polymorphism, factor V Leiden, prothrombin mutations and the risk of VTE recurrence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sundquist, Kristina; Wang, Xiao; Svensson, Peter J; Sundquist, Jan; Hedelius, Anna; Larsson Lönn, Sara; Zöller, Bengt; Memon, Ashfaque A

    2015-11-25

    Plasminogen-activator inhibitor (PAI)-1 is an important inhibitor of the plasminogen/plasmin system. PAI-1 levels are influenced by the 4G/5G polymorphism in the PAI-1 promoter. We investigated the relationship between the PAI-1 polymorphism and VTE recurrence, and its possible modification by factor V Leiden (FVL) and prothrombin (PTM) mutations. Patients (n=1,069) from the Malmö Thrombophilia Study were followed from discontinuation of anticoagulant treatment until diagnosis of VTE recurrence or the end of the study (maximum follow-up 9.8 years). One hundred twenty-seven patients (11.9 %) had VTE recurrence. PAI-1 was genotyped by TaqMan PCR. Cox regression analysis adjusted for age, sex and acquired risk factors of VTE showed no evidence of an association between PAI-1 genotype and risk of VTE recurrence in the study population as a whole. However, by including an interaction term in the analysis we showed that FVL but not PTM modified the effect of PAI-1 genotype: patients with the 4G allele plus FVL had a higher risk of VTE recurrence [hazard ratio (HR) =2.3, 95 % confidence interval (CI) =1.5-3.3] compared to patients with the 4G allele but no FVL (reference group) or FVL irrespective of PAI-1 genotype (HR=1.8, 95 % CI=1.3-2.5). Compared to reference group, 5G allele irrespective of FVL was associated with lower risk of VTE recurrence only when compared with 4G allele together with FVL. In conclusion, FVL has a modifying effect on PAI-1 polymorphism in relation to risk of VTE recurrence. The role of PAI-1 polymorphism as a risk factor of recurrent VTE may be FVL dependent.

  9. Excessive sitting at work and at home: Correlates of occupational sitting and TV viewing time in working adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hadgraft, Nyssa T; Lynch, Brigid M; Clark, Bronwyn K; Healy, Genevieve N; Owen, Neville; Dunstan, David W

    2015-09-15

    Recent evidence links sedentary behaviour (or too much sitting) with poorer health outcomes; many adults accumulate the majority of their daily sitting time through occupational sitting and TV viewing. To further the development and targeting of evidence-based strategies there is a need for identification of the factors associated with higher levels of these behaviours. This study examined socio-demographic and health-related correlates of occupational sitting and of combined high levels of occupational sitting/TV viewing time amongst working adults. Participants were attendees of the third wave (2011/12) of the Australian Diabetes, Obesity and Lifestyle (AusDiab) study who worked full-time (≥35 h/week; n = 1,235; 38 % women; mean ± SD age 53 ± 7 years). Logistic and multinomial logistic regression analyses were conducted (separately for women and men) to assess cross-sectional associations of self-reported occupational sitting time (categorised as high/low based on the median) and also the combination of occupational sitting time/TV viewing time (high/low for each outcome), with a number of potential socio-demographic and health-related correlates. Higher levels of occupational sitting (>6 h/day) were associated with higher household income for both genders. Lower levels of occupational sitting were associated with being older (women only); and, for men only, having a blue collar occupation, having a technical/vocational educational attainment, and undertaking more leisure-time physical activity (LTPA). Attributes associated with high levels of both occupational sitting and TV viewing time included white collar occupation (men only), lower levels of LTPA (both genders), higher BMI (men), and higher energy consumption (women). Higher household income (both genders) and professional/managerial occupations (men only) were correlates of high occupational sitting time, relative to low occupational sitting time, while health-related factors (lower LTPA, higher BMI

  10. Telemedicine in Neonatal Home Care

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Holm, Kristina Garne; Brødsgaard, Anne; Zachariassen, Gitte

    2016-01-01

    participatory design and qualitative methods. Data were collected from observational studies, individual interviews, and focus group interviews. Two neonatal units participated. One unit was experienced in providing neonatal home care with home visits, and the other planned to offer neonatal home care......BACKGROUND: For the majority of preterm infants, the last weeks of hospital admission mainly concerns tube feeding and establishment of breastfeeding. Neonatal home care (NH) was developed to allow infants to remain at home for tube feeding and establishment of breastfeeding with regular home...... visits from neonatal nurses. For hospitals covering large regions, home visits may be challenging, time consuming, and expensive and alternative approaches must be explored. OBJECTIVE: To identify parental needs when wanting to provide neonatal home care supported by telemedicine. METHODS: The study used...

  11. Parenting Style, the Home Environment, and Screen Time of 5-Year-Old Children; The ‘Be Active, Eat Right’ Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Veldhuis, Lydian; van Grieken, Amy; Renders, Carry M.; HiraSing, Remy A.; Raat, Hein

    2014-01-01

    Introduction The global increase in childhood overweight and obesity has been ascribed partly to increases in children's screen time. Parents have a large influence on their children's screen time. Studies investigating parenting and early childhood screen time are limited. In this study, we investigated associations of parenting style and the social and physical home environment on watching TV and using computers or game consoles among 5-year-old children. Methods This study uses baseline data concerning 5-year-old children (n = 3067) collected for the ‘Be active, eat right’ study. Results Children of parents with a higher score on the parenting style dimension involvement, were more likely to spend >30 min/day on computers or game consoles. Overall, families with an authoritative or authoritarian parenting style had lower percentages of children's screen time compared to families with an indulgent or neglectful style, but no significant difference in OR was found. In families with rules about screen time, children were less likely to watch TV>2 hrs/day and more likely to spend >30 min/day on computers or game consoles. The number of TVs and computers or game consoles in the household was positively associated with screen time, and children with a TV or computer or game console in their bedroom were more likely to watch TV>2 hrs/day or spend >30 min/day on computers or game consoles. Conclusion The magnitude of the association between parenting style and screen time of 5-year-olds was found to be relatively modest. The associations found between the social and physical environment and children's screen time are independent of parenting style. Interventions to reduce children's screen time might be most effective when they support parents specifically with introducing family rules related to screen time and prevent the presence of a TV or computer or game console in the child's room. PMID:24533092

  12. Orchestrating utility supply and demand in real-time via the Internet, home networks, and smart appliances

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cruickshank, R.F. III [Power Networks, Big Indian, NY (United States)

    2008-07-01

    This paper presented a model to illustrate the efficient coordination between the supply-side and demand-side of household electricity use and the magnitude of demand that can be managed using real-time pricing. In real-time supply and demand side management, a variable price for service is sent via Internet from the supply-side to the demand-side. The 3 benefits to this type of demand-side management are that traditional fossil-fuelled electrical capacity can operate less of the time and more efficiently; renewable electrical capacity such as wind and solar power can be put to use more efficiently when it becomes available; and additional means are available to protect the transmission and distribution infrastructure of the utility. A critical requirement is that pricing should change frequently throughout the day so that budget conscious consumers do not have to wait too long for favourable pricing to use their appliances. 12 refs., 9 figs.

  13. Effect of preceding home-visit nursing on time to discharge in hospitalization for the treatment of behavioural and psychological symptoms of dementia among patients with limited familial care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kitamura, Tatsuru; Shiota, Shigehito; Jinkawa, Shigetoshi; Kitamura, Maki; Hino, Shoryoku

    2018-01-01

    During hospitalization for behavioural and psychological symptoms of dementia (BPSD), it is imperative to build a support system for each patient in the community for after they obtain symptom remission. To this end, patients lacking adequate family support are less likely to be discharged to their own homes and need stronger support systems to be established. This study therefore investigated the effects of home-visit nursing before admission on time to home discharge among patients with limited familial care who were hospitalized for treatment of BPSD. A single-centre chart review study was conducted on consecutive patients admitted from home between April 2013 and September 2015 for treatment of BPSD and who had lived alone or with a working family member. Time to home discharge was compared between patients who had home-visit nursing before their admission and those who did not. In total, 58 patients were enrolled in the study, of whom 12 had preceding home-visit nursing (PHN group) and 46 did not (non-PHN group). Patients in the PHN group were younger (77.7 ± 4.9 vs. 84.1 ± 6.1 years, P = 0.0011) and had higher Mini-Mental State Examination scores (16.8 ± 7.2 vs 11.8 ± 7.3, P = 0.0287). A multivariate Cox proportional hazard regression analysis adjusted for age and Mini-Mental State Examination scores showed a higher likelihood of discharge to home in the PHN group (hazard ratio: 3.85; 95% confidence interval: 1.27-11.6;, P = 0.017) than in the non-PHN group. Home-visit nursing before admission of BPSD patients for treatment could improve the rate of discharge to home among patients with limited familial care after subsequent hospitalization. Home-visit nursing could also enhance collaborative relationships between social and hospital-based care systems, and early implementation could improve the likelihood of vulnerable patient types remaining in their own homes for as long as possible. © 2018 Japanese Psychogeriatric

  14. The Effect of the Transition to Home Monitoring for the Diagnosis of OSAS on Test Availability, Waiting Time, Patients’ Satisfaction, and Outcome in a Large Health Provider System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ahmad Safadi

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available During 2009, the Haifa district of Clalit Health Services (CHS has switched from in-lab polysomnography (PSG to home studies for the diagnosis of obstructive sleep apnea (OSA. We assessed the effects of this change on accessibility, waiting time, satisfaction, costs, and CPAP purchase by the patients. Data regarding sleep studies, CPAP purchase, and waiting times were collected retrospectively from the computerized database of CHS. Patients’ satisfaction was assessed utilizing a telephone questionnaire introduced to a randomized small sample of 70 patients. Comparisons were made between 2007 and 2008 (in-lab PSGs and 2010 and 2011 (when most studies were ambulatory. Of about 650000 insured individuals in the Haifa district of CHS, 1471 sleep studies were performed during 2007-2008 compared to 2794 tests during 2010-2011. The average waiting time was 9.9 weeks in 2007-2008 compared to 1.1 weeks in 2010-2011 (P<0.05. 597 CPAPs were purchased in 2007-2008 compared to 831 in 2010-2011. The overall patients’ satisfaction was similar, but discomfort tended to be higher in the in-laboratory group (4.1 vs 2.7 in a scale of 0–10; P=0.11. Switching to ambulatory diagnosis improved the test accessibility and reduced the waiting times. Patients’ satisfaction remained similarly high. The total direct cost of OSA management was reduced.

  15. Early Full-Time Day Care, Mother-Child Attachment, and Quality of the Home Environment in Chile: Preliminary Findings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cárcamo, Rodrigo A.; Vermeer, Harriet J.; van der Veer, René; van IJzendoorn, Marinus H.

    2016-01-01

    Research Findings: Two longitudinal studies are reported examining the effects of full-time day care in Mapuche and non-Mapuche families in Chile. First, the Magellan-Leiden Childcare Study (MLCS) used a sample of 95 mothers with children younger than 1 year old (n = 36 in day care). Second, we partially cross-validated our results in a large and…

  16. Prothrombin G20210A mutation is associated with young-onset stroke: the genetics of early-onset stroke study and meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Baijia; Ryan, Kathleen A; Hamedani, Ali; Cheng, Yuching; Sparks, Mary J; Koontz, Deborah; Bean, Christopher J; Gallagher, Margaret; Hooper, W Craig; McArdle, Patrick F; O'Connell, Jeffrey R; Stine, O Colin; Wozniak, Marcella A; Stern, Barney J; Mitchell, Braxton D; Kittner, Steven J; Cole, John W

    2014-04-01

    Although the prothrombin G20210A mutation has been implicated as a risk factor for venous thrombosis, its role in arterial ischemic stroke is unclear, particularly among young adults. To address this issue, we examined the association between prothrombin G20210A and ischemic stroke in a white case-control population and additionally performed a meta-analysis. From the population-based Genetics of Early Onset Stroke (GEOS) study, we identified 397 individuals of European ancestry aged 15 to 49 years with first-ever ischemic stroke and 426 matched controls. Logistic regression was used to calculate odds ratios (ORs) in the entire population and for subgroups stratified by sex, age, oral contraceptive use, migraine, and smoking status. A meta-analysis of 17 case-control studies (n=2305 cases ischemic stroke did not achieve statistical significance (OR=2.5; 95% confidence interval [CI]=0.9-6.5; P=0.07). However, among adults aged 15 to 42 years (younger than median age), cases were significantly more likely than controls to have the mutation (OR=5.9; 95% CI=1.2-28.1; P=0.03), whereas adults aged 42 to 49 years were not (OR=1.4; 95% CI=0.4-5.1; P=0.94). In our meta-analysis, the mutation was associated with significantly increased stroke risk in adults ≤55 years (OR=1.4; 95% CI=1.1-1.9; P=0.02), with significance increasing with addition of the GEOS results (OR=1.5; 95% CI=1.1-2.0; P=0.005). The prothrombin G20210A mutation is associated with ischemic stroke in young adults and may have an even stronger association among those with earlier onset strokes. Our finding of a stronger association in the younger young adult population requires replication.

  17. Relationship between Travel Time from Home to a Regional Sleep Apnea Clinic in British Columbia, Canada, and the Severity of Obstructive Sleep.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allen, A J M Hirsch; Amram, Ofer; Tavakoli, Hamid; Almeida, Fernanda R; Hamoda, Mona; Ayas, Najib T

    2016-05-01

    In the majority of people with obstructive sleep apnea, the disorder remains undiagnosed. This may be partly a result of inadequate access to diagnostic sleep services. We thus hypothesized that even modest travel times to a sleep clinic may delay diagnosis and reduce detection of milder disease. We sought to determine whether travel time between an individual's home and a sleep clinic is associated with sleep apnea severity at presentation. We recruited patients referred for suspected sleep apnea to the University of British Columbia Hospital Sleep Clinic between May 2003 and July 2011. The patient's place of residence was geocoded at the postal code level. Travel times between the population-weighted dissemination areas for each patient and the sleep clinic were calculated using ArcGIS (ESRI, Redlands, CA) network analyst and the Origin-Destination matrix function. All patients underwent full polysomnography. There were 1,275 patients; 69% were male, the mean age was 58 years. (SD = 11.9), and the mean apnea-hypopnea index was 22 per hour (SD = 21.6). In the univariate model, travel time was a significant predictor of obstructive sleep apnea severity (P = 0.02). After controlling for confounders including sex, age, obesity, and education, travel time remained a significant predictor of sleep apnea severity (P travel time was associated with an increase in the apnea-hypopnea index of 1.4 events per hour. For reasons that remain to be determined, travel times are associated with the severity of obstructive sleep apnea at presentation to a sleep clinic. If the results can be verified at other centers, this may help guide the geographic distribution of sleep centers within a health care system.

  18. The Frequency of Factor V Leiden, Prothrombin G20210A and Methylenetetrahydrofolate Reductase C677T Mutations in Migraine Patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ruhsen Öcal

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: Migraine is an independent risk factor for ischemic stroke, but its pathophysiology is still unclear. Genetic factors that predispose patients to thrombosis have been studied in patients with migraine to highlight the pathogenesis, but the results remain controversial. In this study, the frequencies of factor V Leiden (FVL, prothrombin (Pt G20210A and methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase (MTHFR C677T mutations were investigated. METHODS: One hundred and sixty patients aged of 15 to 55 years with no history of systemic disease and who had been diagnosed as migraine according to the International Headache Society (IHS diagnostic criteria at Baskent University Hospital Neurology Outpatient Clinics were investigated for FVL, Pt G20210A and MTHFR C677T mutations from their genomic DNA, and the results were compared with those of healthy controls. RESULTS: One hundred and fifty five (96.9% of 160 migraine patients were homozygote normal, 5 (3.1% were heterozygote and none of them were homozygote mutant for FVL. The control group had 9.8% heterozygote individuals but the difference between the percentages was not statistically significant (p> 0.05. There were no homozygote mutant individuals in the Turkish population study in normal subjects like our study. Thirty nine (24.4% of 160 migraine patients were heterozygote and 8 (5% were homozygote mutant for MTHFR C677T. The control group had 37 (34.9% heterozygote and 6 (5.6% homozygote mutant individuals. The difference between the percentages was not statistically significant (p= 0.15. Three (1.9% of 160 migraine patients were heterozygote and 5 (2.9% of the control group were heterozygote mutant for Pt G20210A mutation. The control group had 37 (34.9% heterozygote and 6 (5.6% homozygote mutant individuals. The difference between the percentages was not statistically significant (p= 0.420. CONCLUSION: Our study indicates that FVL, Pt G20210A and MTHFR C677T gene mutations, which are considered

  19. The Frequency of Factor V Leiden, Prothrombin G20210A and Methylenetetrahydrofolate Reductase C677T Mutations in Migraine Patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ruhsen Öcal

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: Migraine is an independent risk factor for ischemic stroke, but its pathophysiology is still unclear. Genetic factors that predispose patients to thrombosis have been studied in patients with migraine to highlight the pathogenesis, but the results remain controversial. In this study, the frequencies of factor V Leiden (FVL, prothrombin (Pt G20210A and methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase (MTHFR C677T mutations were investigated. METHODS: One hundred and sixty patients aged of 15 to 55 years with no history of systemic disease and who had been diagnosed as migraine according to the International Headache Society (IHS diagnostic criteria at Baskent University Hospital Neurology Outpatient Clinics were investigated for FVL, Pt G20210A and MTHFR C677T mutations from their genomic DNA, and the results were compared with those of healthy controls. RESULTS: One hundred and fifty five (96.9% of 160 migraine patients were homozygote normal, 5 (3.1% were heterozygote and none of them were homozygote mutant for FVL. The control group had 9.8% heterozygote individuals but the difference between the percentages was not statistically significant (p> 0.05. There were no homozygote mutant individuals in the Turkish population study in normal subjects like our study. Thirty nine (24.4% of 160 migraine patients were heterozygote and 8 (5% were homozygote mutant for MTHFR C677T. The control group had 37 (34.9% heterozygote and 6 (5.6% homozygote mutant individuals. The difference between the percentages was not statistically significant (p= 0.15. Three (1.9% of 160 migraine patients were heterozygote and 5 (2.9% of the control group were heterozygote mutant for Pt G20210A mutation. The control group had 37 (34.9% heterozygote and 6 (5.6% homozygote mutant individuals. The difference between the percentages was not statistically significant (p= 0.420. CONCLUSION: Our study indicates that FVL, Pt G20210A and MTHFR C677T gene mutations, which are considered

  20. Antiphosphatidylserine/prothrombin (aPS/PT) antibodies are associated with Raynaud phenomenon and migraine in primary thrombotic antiphospholipid syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kopytek, M; Natorska, J; Undas, A

    2018-04-01

    Objectives Antibodies to phosphatidylserine/prothrombin complex (aPS/PT) detectable in sera of some patients with antiphospholipid syndrome (APS) have been shown to correlate with thrombosis. However, associations of aPS/PT antibodies with APS related disorders remain unclear. Aim To evaluate whether there are any associations between aPS/PT antibodies and Raynaud phenomenon, migraine and/or valvular lesions in primary thrombotic APS (PAPS). Methods We enrolled 67 consecutive patients (56 women) with thrombotic PAPS (VTE in 80.6%), aged 46.2 ± 13.5 years. The exclusion criteria were: acute coronary syndromes or stroke within preceding 6 months, cancer, severe comorbidities and pregnancy. The IgG and IgM aPS/PT antibodies were determined by ELISA with the cut-off of 30 units. We recorded Raynaud phenomenon, migraine and valvular lesions. Results Positive IgM or/and IgG aPS/PT antibodies were observed in 29 patients (43.3%), with a higher prevalence of IgM antibodies ( n = 27, 40.3%) compared with IgG isotype ( n = 12, 17.9%, p = 0.014). aPS/PT antibodies were observed most commonly in patients with triple aPL ( n = 12, 85.7%) compared with those with double ( n = 5, 35.7%) or single aPL antibodies (n = 12, 30.8%, p = 0.03), with no association with demographics, the ANA titre, the type of thrombotic events or medications. Raynaud phenomenon, migraine and valvular lesions were observed in 15% ( n = 10), 30% ( n = 20) and 18% ( n = 12) of the patients, respectively. Raynaud phenomenon and migraine, but not valvular lesions, were markedly more frequent in PAPS patients presenting with positive aPS/PT antibodies ( n = 10, 34.5% vs. n = 0, 0%; p = 0.0001). Conclusions In PAPS patients aPS/PT antibodies are related to the occurrence of both Raynaud phenomenon and migraine.

  1. Antibodies to phosphatidylserine/prothrombin (aPS/PT) enhanced the diagnostic performance in Chinese patients with antiphospholipid syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Shulan; Wu, Ziyan; Zhang, Wen; Zhao, Jiuliang; Norman, Gary L; Zeng, Xiaofeng; Zhang, Fengchun; Li, Yongzhe

    2018-03-21

    Increasing evidence has highlighted the role of non-criteria antiphospholipid antibodies (aPLs) as important supplements to the current criteria aPLs for the diagnosis of antiphospholipid syndrome (APS). In this retrospective study, we evaluated the clinical relevance of antibodies to phosphatidylserine/prothrombin (aPS/PT) in Chinese patients with APS. A total of 441 subjects were tested, including 101 patients with primary APS (PAPS), 140 patients with secondary APS (SAPS), 161 disease controls (DCs) and 39 healthy controls (HCs). Serum IgG/IgM aPS/PT was determined by ELISA. The levels of IgG/IgM aPS/PT were significantly increased in patients with APS compared with DCs and HCs. IgG and IgM aPS/PT were present in 29.7% and 54.5% of PAPS, and 42.1% and 53.6% of SAPS, respectively. For diagnosis of APS, IgG aCL exhibited the highest positive likelihood ratio (LR+) of 21.60, followed by LA (13.84), IgG aβ2GP1 (9.19) and IgG aPS/PT (8.49). aPS/PT was detected in 13.3% of seronegative PAPS patients and 31.3% of seronegative SAPS patients. LA exhibited the highest OR of 3.64 in identifying patients with thrombosis, followed by IgG aCL (OR, 2.63), IgG aPS/PT (OR, 2.55) and IgG aβ2GP1 (OR, 2.33). LA and IgG aCL were correlated with both arterial and venous thrombosis, whereas IgG aPS/PT and IgG aβ2GP1 correlated with venous or arterial thrombosis, respectively. Our findings suggest that the inclusion of IgG/IgM aPS/PT may enhance the diagnostic performance for APS, especially in those in whom APS is highly suspected, but conventional aPLs are repeatedly negative. In addition, IgG aPS/PT may contribute to identify patients at risk of thrombosis.

  2. Emergency management of major bleeding in a case of maxillofacial trauma and anticoagulation: utility of prothrombin complex concentrates in the shock room

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alessandro Morotti

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Life-threatening bleeding in anticoagulation with Warfarin is an emergency challenging issue. Several approaches are available to treat bleeding in either over-anticoagulation or propeanticoagulation, including vitamin K, fresh frozen plasma and prothrombin complex concentrates (PCC administration. In coexisting trauma-induced bleeding and anticoagulation, reversal of anticoagulation must be a rapid and highly effective procedure. Furthermore the appropriate treatment must be directly available in each shock rooms to guarantee the rapid management of the emergency. PCC require a simple storage, rapid accessibility, fast administration procedures and high effectiveness. Here we report the utility of PCC in management of a craniofacial trauma in proper-anticoagulation.

  3. A review of the clinical utility of INR to monitor and guide administration of prothrombin complex concentrate to orally anticoagulated patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sølbeck, Sacha; Ostrowski, Sisse R; Johansson, Pär I

    2012-01-01

    the initiation steps of the haemostatic process. The objective of the present review was to reassess the evidence for using INR as a tool to guide administration of prothrombin complex concentrates (PCC) to OAC patients. A Medline and Cochrane database search was conducted using the following keywords...... value to aim for when reversing OAC was found. In three of the studies it was reported that patients reaching their target INR continued to bleed, whereas three studies reviewed reported good haemostatic response also in patients that did not reach their target INR. The present review found limited...

  4. Longitudinal associations of away-from-home eating, snacking, screen time, and physical activity behaviors with cardiometabolic risk factors among Chinese children and their parents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dong, Fei; Howard, Annie Green; Herring, Amy H; Thompson, Amanda L; Adair, Linda S; Popkin, Barry M; Aiello, Allison E; Zhang, Bing; Gordon-Larsen, Penny

    2017-07-01

    Background: Little is known about intergenerational differences in associations of urbanization-related lifestyle behaviors with cardiometabolic risk factors in children and their parents in rapidly urbanizing China. Objective: We tested the intergenerational differences in longitudinal associations of away-from-home eating, snacking, screen time, and leisure-time sports with high waist-to-height ratio (WHtR), elevated blood pressure (BP), elevated glycated hemoglobin (HbA1c), and elevated C-reactive protein (CRP) among Chinese children and their parents. Design: We studied children enrolled in the longitudinal China Health and Nutrition Survey (1991-2009, 7 surveys) aged 7-17 y in ≥2 surveys (average follow-up: 2.3 surveys out of a possible 4 surveys with the age restriction; n = 3875, including 1175 siblings) and their parents (2947 mothers, 2632 fathers) living in the same household. We used 3 consecutive interviewer-administered 24-h dietary recalls to derive a 3-d average for away-from-home eating (nonconsumer, >0 and 1 and ≤2, or >2 h/d) and leisure-time sports (any or none). Random-effects logistic regression was used to examine the associations of lagged (average: 3 y) behaviors with cardiometabolic risk factors (WHtR, BP, HbA1c, and CRP). Results: We detected intergenerational differences in associations between lagged behaviors and risk factors ( P- interaction parents' high WHtR (OR: 0.68; 95% CI: 0.53, 0.88) but positively associated with children's high WHtR (OR: 1.46; 95% CI: 1.01, 2.12). Lagged fruit and vegetable snack consumption was negatively related to parents' (OR: 0.76; 95% CI: 0.59, 0.97) and children's (OR: 0.58; 95% CI: 0.33, 1.00) high WHtR. Lagged screen time (>2 compared with ≤1 h/d) was positively associated with parents' (OR: 2.58; 95% CI: 1.56, 4.28) and children's high WHtR (OR: 2.26; 95% CI: 1.06, 4.83). Conclusion: Parent-offspring differences in associations between lifestyle behaviors and cardiometabolic risk factors

  5. Second-home electricity consumption

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Andersen, Frits M.; Morthorst, Poul Erik [Risoe, Systems Analysis Department, Technical University of Denmark, P.O. Box 49, DK-4000 Roskilde (Denmark); Christensen, Morten S.; Kofoed, Niels-Ulrik [Esbensen Consulting Engineers, Carl Jacobsens Vej 25D, DK-2500 Valby (Denmark); Jensen, Ole Michael [Danish Building Research Institute, Department of Energy and Environment, University of Aalborg, P.O. Box 119, DK-2970 Horsholm (Denmark)

    2008-01-15

    In Denmark, electricity consumption in first and second homes has developed quite differently. Since 1990, electricity consumption in ordinary residences has grown moderately, while consumption in weekend and second homes has increased considerably. In turn, this development has been blamed on a growing number of luxury cottages, new legislation permitting senior citizens to have their permanent address in their second home and a growing number of electric appliances. In order to examine the growing electricity consumption in second homes and to estimate future demand, a multidisciplinary study combining top-down and bottom-up analyses was conducted, i.e., combining models using aggregated economic parameters and feasibility studies using technical parameters, respectively. The top-down estimation showed that changes in electricity consumption in second homes correlate to changes in income. The bottom-up estimation showed that consumption was mainly affected by the frequency with which second homes were used in the winter time. This indicates that additional second homes, increased full-time use and intensified use of electric appliances are the main reasons for the observed increases in electricity consumption. Luxury tourism use and senior citizens' that use a few per cent of the second homes as their home contribute to a minor degree to the overall increase of electricity consumption. Scenarios show that this development may accelerate with increased leisure time, increased use and more permanent settlement in second homes. (author)

  6. Second-home electricity consumption

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Andersen, Frits M.; Christensen, Morten S.; Jensen, Ole Michael; Kofoed, Niels-Ulrik; Morthorst, Poul Erik

    2008-01-01

    In Denmark, electricity consumption in first and second homes has developed quite differently. Since 1990, electricity consumption in ordinary residences has grown moderately, while consumption in weekend and second homes has increased considerably. In turn, this development has been blamed on a growing number of luxury cottages, new legislation permitting senior citizens to have their permanent address in their second home and a growing number of electric appliances. In order to examine the growing electricity consumption in second homes and to estimate future demand, a multidisciplinary study combining top-down and bottom-up analyses was conducted, i.e., combining models using aggregated economic parameters and feasibility studies using technical parameters, respectively. The top-down estimation showed that changes in electricity consumption in second homes correlate to changes in income. The bottom-up estimation showed that consumption was mainly affected by the frequency with which second homes were used in the winter time. This indicates that additional second homes, increased full-time use and intensified use of electric appliances are the main reasons for the observed increases in electricity consumption. Luxury tourism use and senior citizens' that use a few per cent of the second homes as their home contribute to a minor degree to the overall increase of electricity consumption. Scenarios show that this development may accelerate with increased leisure time, increased use and more permanent settlement in second homes

  7. Real-Time Analysis of a Sensor's Data for Automated Decision Making in an IoT-Based Smart Home.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khan, Nida Saddaf; Ghani, Sayeed; Haider, Sajjad

    2018-05-25

    IoT devices frequently generate large volumes of streaming data and in order to take advantage of this data, their temporal patterns must be learned and identified. Streaming data analysis has become popular after being successfully used in many applications including forecasting electricity load, stock market prices, weather conditions, etc. Artificial Neural Networks (ANNs) have been successfully utilized in understanding the embedded interesting patterns/behaviors in the data and forecasting the future values based on it. One such pattern is modelled and learned in the present study to identify the occurrence of a specific pattern in a Water Management System (WMS). This prediction aids in making an automatic decision support system, to switch OFF a hydraulic suction pump at the appropriate time. Three types of ANN, namely Multi-Input Multi-Output (MIMO), Multi-Input Single-Output (MISO), and Recurrent Neural Network (RNN) have been compared, for multi-step-ahead forecasting, on a sensor's streaming data. Experiments have shown that RNN has the best performance among three models and based on its prediction, a system can be implemented to make the best decision with 86% accuracy.

  8. Real-Time Transmission and Storage of Video, Audio, and Health Data in Emergency and Home Care Situations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Riccardo Stagnaro

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available The increase in the availability of bandwidth for wireless links, network integration, and the computational power on fixed and mobile platforms at affordable costs allows nowadays for the handling of audio and video data, their quality making them suitable for medical application. These information streams can support both continuous monitoring and emergency situations. According to this scenario, the authors have developed and implemented the mobile communication system which is described in this paper. The system is based on ITU-T H.323 multimedia terminal recommendation, suitable for real-time data/video/audio and telemedical applications. The audio and video codecs, respectively, H.264 and G723.1, were implemented and optimized in order to obtain high performance on the system target processors. Offline media streaming storage and retrieval functionalities were supported by integrating a relational database in the hospital central system. The system is based on low-cost consumer technologies such as general packet radio service (GPRS and wireless local area network (WLAN or WiFi for lowband data/video transmission. Implementation and testing were carried out for medical emergency and telemedicine application. In this paper, the emergency case study is described.

  9. Weekly working hours for Norwegian hospital doctors since 1994 with special attention to postgraduate training, work–home balance and the European Working Time Directive: a panel study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosta, Judith; Aasland, Olaf G

    2014-01-01

    Objectives To examine the weekly working hours of Norwegian hospital doctors from 1994 to 2012 with special emphasis on the quality of postgraduate training and work–home balance, and in relation to the requirements of the European Working Time Directive (EWTD). Design Panel study based on postal questionnaires. Setting Norway. Participants Unbalanced cohort of 1300–1600 doctors in 1994, 1995, 1996, 1997, 2000, 2002, 2004, 2006, 2008, 2010 and 2012. Outcome measures Self-reported total weekly working hours and whether 45 weekly working hours are too short, sufficient, or too long to meet the quality requirements of obligatory postgraduate training for junior doctors. Results From 1994 to 2012, the number of weekly working hours was stable for senior (46–47 h) and junior (45–46 h) hospital doctors. In 2012, significantly more senior (27–35%) than junior (11–20%) doctors reported suboptimal work–home balance, defined as working more than 48 h a week. The majority perceived the present situation with an average of 45 h per week for juniors as sufficient for obligatory postgraduate specialist training, but doctors of higher age (OR 1.04, 95% CI 1.01 to 1.08), senior doctors (1.07, 1.04 to 1.11) and doctors working in surgical specialties (OR 1 vs laboratory medicine 0.03, 0.01 to 0.25, internal medicine 0.31, 0.17 to 0.58, psychiatry 0.12, 0.04 to 0.36, paediatrics 0.36, 0.12 to 1.07, anaesthesiology 0.08, 0.02 to 0.39, gynaecology 0.07, 0.01 to 0.56 and others 0.39, 0.04 to 3.56) were more likely to want the work-week to be longer. Conclusions The weekly working hours of Norwegian hospital doctors were always below the EWTD requirements. A significant growth of hospital doctor density over the past two decades, national regulations and cultural values might be important factors. Specialty differences in perception of sufficient training time may call for more flexibility in working time regulations. PMID:25311038

  10. Weekly working hours for Norwegian hospital doctors since 1994 with special attention to postgraduate training, work-home balance and the European working time directive: a panel study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosta, Judith; Aasland, Olaf G

    2014-10-13

    To examine the weekly working hours of Norwegian hospital doctors from 1994 to 2012 with special emphasis on the quality of postgraduate training and work-home balance, and in relation to the requirements of the European Working Time Directive (EWTD). Panel study based on postal questionnaires. Norway. Unbalanced cohort of 1300-1600 doctors in 1994, 1995, 1996, 1997, 2000, 2002, 2004, 2006, 2008, 2010 and 2012. Self-reported total weekly working hours and whether 45 weekly working hours are too short, sufficient, or too long to meet the quality requirements of obligatory postgraduate training for junior doctors. From 1994 to 2012, the number of weekly working hours was stable for senior (46-47 h) and junior (45-46 h) hospital doctors. In 2012, significantly more senior (27-35%) than junior (11-20%) doctors reported suboptimal work-home balance, defined as working more than 48 h a week. The majority perceived the present situation with an average of 45 h per week for juniors as sufficient for obligatory postgraduate specialist training, but doctors of higher age (OR 1.04, 95% CI 1.01 to 1.08), senior doctors (1.07, 1.04 to 1.11) and doctors working in surgical specialties (OR 1 vs laboratory medicine 0.03, 0.01 to 0.25, internal medicine 0.31, 0.17 to 0.58, psychiatry 0.12, 0.04 to 0.36, paediatrics 0.36, 0.12 to 1.07, anaesthesiology 0.08, 0.02 to 0.39, gynaecology 0.07, 0.01 to 0.56 and others 0.39, 0.04 to 3.56) were more likely to want the work-week to be longer. The weekly working hours of Norwegian hospital doctors were always below the EWTD requirements. A significant growth of hospital doctor density over the past two decades, national regulations and cultural values might be important factors. Specialty differences in perception of sufficient training time may call for more flexibility in working time regulations. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://group.bmj.com/group/rights-licensing/permissions.

  11. [Home births].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Welffens, K; Kirkpatrick, C; Daelemans, C; Derisbourg, S

    In Belgium, very few women give birth outside the delivery room. In the United Kingdom and in the Netherlands, they are more numerous. Several studies evaluated obstetric and neonatal outcomes of home births compared with hospital births. We selected seven recent and large studies (with cohorts of more than 5.000 women) using PubMed, Science Direct and Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews. Several questions were examined. Is there any difference in maternal and neonatal outcomes depending on the intended place of birth? Does parity affect outcomes ? What are the characteristics of women who choose to deliver at home ? We conclude that giving birth at home improves obstetric outcomes but is riskier for the baby, especially for the first one. The women delivering at home are mainly white Europeans, between 25 and 35 years old, in a relationship, multiparous and wealthier. In order to avoid this increased risk for the baby while preserving the obstetric advantages, alongside birth centers offer an intermediate solution. They combine the reassuring home-like atmosphere with the safety of the hospital. In Belgium, the first alongside birth center " Le Cocon " (a low technicity unit distinct from the delivery room) offers now this type of alternative place of birth for women in Hôpital Erasme in Brussels.

  12. Returning home

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Agergaard, Jytte; Brøgger, Ditte

    2016-01-01

    flows. By focusing on these educational migrants, this paper explores how they connect to their rural homes. Guided by a critical reading of the migration-development scholarship, the paper examines how migrants and their relatives make sense of educational migrants’ remitting and returning practices......, and by comparing three groups of educational migrants, the migrants’ reasons for staying connected and sending remittances are scrutinized. The paper finds that although educational migrants do not generate extensive economic remittances for local development in Nepal, they stay connected to their rural homes...

  13. The "Nursing Home Compare" measure of urinary/fecal incontinence: cross-sectional variation, stability over time, and the impact of case mix.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yue; Schnelle, John; Spector, William D; Glance, Laurent G; Mukamel, Dana B

    2010-02-01

    To assess the impact of facility case mix on cross-sectional variations and short-term stability of the "Nursing Home Compare" incontinence quality measure (QM) and to determine whether multivariate risk adjustment can minimize such impacts. Retrospective analyses of the 2005 national minimum data set (MDS) that included approximately 600,000 long-term care residents in over 10,000 facilities in each quarterly sample. Mixed logistic regression was used to construct the risk-adjusted QM (nonshrinkage estimator). Facility-level ordinary least-squares models and adjusted R(2) were used to estimate the impact of case mix on cross-sectional and short-term longitudinal variations of currently published and risk-adjusted QMs. At least 50 percent of the cross-sectional variation and 25 percent of the short-term longitudinal variation of the published QM are explained by facility case mix. In contrast, the cross-sectional and short-term longitudinal variations of the risk-adjusted QM are much less susceptible to case-mix variations (adjusted R(2)case-mix variations across facilities and over time, and therefore it may be biased. This issue can be largely addressed by multivariate risk adjustment using risk factors available in the MDS.

  14. Randomized Video-Feedback Intervention in Home-Based Childcare: Improvement of Children's Wellbeing Dependent on Time Spent with Trusted Caregiver.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Groeneveld, Marleen G; Vermeer, Harriet J; van IJzendoorn, Marinus H; Linting, Mariëlle

    The childcare environment offers a wide array of developmental opportunities for children. Providing children with a feeling of security to explore this environment is one of the most fundamental goals of childcare. In the current study the effectiveness of Video-feedback Intervention to promote Positive Parenting-Child Care (VIPP-CC) was tested on children's wellbeing in home-based childcare in a randomized controlled trial. Forty-seven children and their caregivers were randomly assigned to the intervention group or control group. Children's wellbeing, caregiver sensitivity, and global childcare quality were observed during a pretest and a posttest. We did not find an overall intervention effect on child wellbeing, but a significant interaction effect with months spent with a trusted caregiver was present. Children who were less familiar with the caregiver showed an increase in wellbeing scores in both the intervention and control group, but for the group of children who were more familiar with the caregiver, wellbeing increased only in the intervention group. Although there was no overall effect of the VIPP-CC on children's wellbeing, the VIPP-CC seems effective in children who have been cared for by the same trusted caregiver for a longer period of time.

  15. ?I Was a Full Time Proper Smoker?: A Qualitative Exploration of Smoking in the Home after Childbirth among Women Who Relapse Postpartum

    OpenAIRE

    Orton, Sophie; Coleman, Tim; Lewis, Sarah; Cooper, Sue; Jones, Laura L.

    2016-01-01

    Background: \\ud Many women stop smoking during pregnancy but relapse shortly afterwards, potentially putting their infants at risk of secondhand smoke (SHS) exposure. Women who were able to stop during pregnancy may be a motivated group, receptive to making behaviour changes postpartum to protect their infant from SHS exposure. Understanding more about their experiences of relapse, and if this influences home smoking behaviours and children’s exposure to SHS in the home may help to inform int...

  16. Fermilab | Home

    Science.gov (United States)

    Industry Students and teachers Media ... Five (more) fascinating facts about DUNE Engineering the Mathematics in Music June 2 10 a.m. Get to Know the Lederman Science Center June 3 1 p.m. Ask a Scientist Security, Privacy, Legal Use of Cookies Quick Links Home Contact Phone Book Fermilab at Work For Industry

  17. Volume of Home and Community Based Services and...

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — Volume of Home- and Community-Based Services and Time to Nursing-Home Placement The purpose of this study was to determine whether the volume of Home and Community...

  18. Home Education: The Social Motivation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beck, Christian W.

    2010-01-01

    Data from a Norwegian survey show correlation between a student's socially related problems at school and the parent's social motivation for home education. I argue that more time spent at school by a student could result in more socially related problems at school, which can explain an increase in social motivation for home education.

  19. Second-home electricity consumption

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Møller Andersen, Frits; Christensen, M.S.; Jensen, O.M.

    2008-01-01

    in electricity consumption. Luxury tourism use and senior citizens' that use a few per cent of the second homes as their home contribute to a minor degree to the overall increase of electricity consumption. Scenarios show that this development may accelerate with increased leisure time, increased use and more...

  20. Solar Electricity for Homes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roman, Harry T.

    2012-01-01

    Every day, the sun showers the Earth with millions of times more energy than its people use. The only problem is that energy is spread out over the entire Earth's surface and must be harvested. Engineers are learning to capture and use some of this energy to make electricity for homes. Solar panels make up the heart of a solar system. They can be…

  1. Mining the Home Environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cook, Diane J.; Krishnan, Narayanan

    2014-01-01

    Individuals spend a majority of their time in their home or workplace and for many, these places are our sanctuaries. As society and technology advance there is a growing interest in improving the intelligence of the environments in which we live and work. By filling home environments with sensors and collecting data during daily routines, researchers can gain insights on human daily behavior and the impact of behavior on the residents and their environments. In this article we provide an overview of the data mining opportunities and challenges that smart environments provide for researchers and offer some suggestions for future work in this area. PMID:25506128

  2. Mining the Home Environment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cook, Diane J; Krishnan, Narayanan

    2014-12-01

    Individuals spend a majority of their time in their home or workplace and for many, these places are our sanctuaries. As society and technology advance there is a growing interest in improving the intelligence of the environments in which we live and work. By filling home environments with sensors and collecting data during daily routines, researchers can gain insights on human daily behavior and the impact of behavior on the residents and their environments. In this article we provide an overview of the data mining opportunities and challenges that smart environments provide for researchers and offer some suggestions for future work in this area.

  3. Urinary Prothrombin Fragment 1+2 in relation to Development of Non-Symptomatic and Symptomatic Venous Thromboembolic Events following Total Knee Replacement

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Borris, Lars Carl; Breindahl, Morten; Rud-Lassen, Michael

    2011-01-01

    Prothrombin fragment 1+2 is excreted in urine (uF1+2) as a result of in vivo thrombin generation and can be a marker of coagulation status after an operative procedure. This study compared uF1+2 levels in patients with symptomatic and non-symptomatic venous thromboembolism (VTE) after total knee...... replacement (TKR) and in event-free sex- and age-matched controls. Significantly higher median uF1+2 levels were seen in the VTE patients on days 1, 3, and the day of venography (mostly day 7) after TKR compared with controls. The uF1+2 levels tended to be high in some patients with symptomatic VTE; however...

  4. Factor V Leiden mutation, prothrombin gene mutation, and deficiencies in coagulation inhibitors associated with Budd-Chiari syndrome and portal vein thrombosis: results of a case-control study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Janssen, H. L.; Meinardi, J. R.; Vleggaar, F. P.; van Uum, S. H.; Haagsma, E. B.; van der Meer, F. J.; van Hattum, J.; Chamuleau, R. A.; Adang, R. P.; Vandenbroucke, J. P.; van Hoek, B.; Rosendaal, F. R.

    2000-01-01

    In a collaborative multicenter case-control study, we investigated the effect of factor V Leiden mutation, prothrombin gene mutation, and inherited deficiencies of protein C, protein S, and antithrombin on the risk of Budd-Chiari syndrome (BCS) and portal vein thrombosis (PVT). We compared 43 BCS

  5. Factor V Leiden mutation, prothrombin gene mutation, and deficiencies in coagulation inhibitors associated with Budd-Chiari syndrome and portal vein thrombosis : results of a case-control study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Janssen, HLA; Meinardi, [No Value; Vleggaar, FP; van Uum, SHM; Haagsma, EB; van der Meer, FJM; van Hattum, J; Chamuleau, RAFM; Adang, RP; Vandenbroucke, JP; van Hoek, B; Rosendaal, FR

    2000-01-01

    In a collaborative multicenter case-control study, we investigated the effect of factor V Leiden mutation, prothrombin gene mutation, and inherited deficiencies of protein C, protein S, and antithrombin on the risk of Budd-Chiari syndrome (BCS) and portal vein thrombosis (PVT), We compared 43 BCS

  6. Change in Work-Time Control and Work-Home Interference Among Swedish Working Men and Women: Findings from the SLOSH Cohort Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leineweber, Constanze; Kecklund, Göran; Lindfors, Petra; Magnusson Hanson, Linda L

    2016-12-01

    The aim is to study the influence of change in work-time control (WTC) on work-home interference (WHI) while adjusting for other work-related factors, demographics, changes at work and WHI at baseline among women and men. An additional aim was to explore sex differences in the relation between change in WTC and WHI. The study included working participants of the Swedish Longitudinal Occupational Survey of Health (SLOSH) study of the third (2010) and fourth (2012) waves (n = 5440). Based on a seven-item index, four groups of WTC were formed: stable high (40 %), stable low (42 %), increasing (9 %), or decreasing (9 %) WTC over the 2 years. WHI was measured by four items and individuals were categorised in whether suffering or not suffering of WHI. Sex-stratified logistic regression analyses with 95 % confidence intervals (CI) were used to estimate the odds of experiencing WHI by change in WTC. Controlling for demographics and work-related factors, women with stable low (OR = 1.46; 95 % CI 1.14-1.88) and women and men with decreasing WTC (women OR = 1.99; 95 % CI 1.38-2.85; men OR = 1.80; 95 % CI 1.18-2.73) had higher odds of WHI than those with a stable high WTC. Additionally, adjusting for changes at work and WHI at baseline did not alter the results substantially. Interaction analysis did not reveal any significant sex difference in the relation between WTC and WHI. For both women and men decreased and for women only, low control over working hours resulted in WHI also after adjusting for work-related factors and demographics.

  7. Bringing Your Baby Home

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... for Educators Search English Español Bringing Your Baby Home KidsHealth / For Parents / Bringing Your Baby Home What's ... recall your baby's seemingly endless crying episodes. The Home Front Introducing your baby to others at home ...

  8. The Medical Home

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Videos for Educators Search English Español The Medical Home KidsHealth / For Parents / The Medical Home What's in ... for your child. What Does the Term "Medical Home" Mean? A medical home isn't a place ...

  9. The nonenzymatic subunit of pseutarin C, a prothrombin activator from eastern brown snake (Pseudonaja textilis) venom, shows structural similarity to mammalian coagulation factor V.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rao, Veena S; Swarup, Sanjay; Kini, R Manjunatha

    2003-08-15

    Pseutarin C is a group C prothrombin activator from the venom of the eastern brown snake Pseudonaja textilis. It is a multi-subunit protein complex consisting of catalytic and nonenzymatic subunits similar to coagulation factor Xa and factor Va, respectively. Here we describe the complete sequence of the nonenzymatic subunit. Based on the partial amino acid sequence of the nonenzymatic subunit, degenerate primers were designed. Using a "walking" strategy based on sequentially designed primers, we determined the complete cDNA sequence of the nonenzymatic subunit. The cDNA encodes a protein of 1461 amino acid residues, which includes a 30-residue signal peptide, a mature protein of 1430 amino acid residues, and a stop codon. cDNA blot analysis showed a single transcript of approximately 4.6 kb. The deduced amino acid sequence shows approximately 50% identity to mammalian factor V and by homology has a similar domain structure consisting of domains A1-A2-B-A3-C1-C2. Interestingly, the B domain of pseutarin C is shorter than that of mammalian factor V (FV). Although most of the proteolytic activation sites are conserved, 2 of 3 proteolytic sites cleaved by activated protein C are mutated, and thus activated protein C is not able to inactivate this procoagulant toxin. The predicted posttranslational modifications, including disulfide bonds, N-glycosylation, phosphorylation, and sulfation, in pseutarin C are significantly different compared with bovine factor V. Thus, our data demonstrate that the nonenzymatic subunit of group C prothrombin activators is structurally similar to mammalian FV.

  10. The Prothrombin G20210A Mutation is Associated with Young-Onset Stroke: The Genetics of Early Onset Stroke Study and Meta-Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Baijia; Ryan, Kathleen A.; Hamedani, Ali; Cheng, Yuching; Sparks, Mary J.; Koontz, Deborah; Bean, Christopher J.; Gallagher, Margaret; Hooper, W. Craig; McArdle, Patrick F.; O'Connell, Jeffrey R.; Stine, O. Colin; Wozniak, Marcella A.; Stern, Barney J.; Mitchell, Braxton D.; Kittner, Steven J.; Cole, John W.

    2014-01-01

    Background and Purpose Although the prothrombin G20210A mutation has been implicated as a risk factor for venous thrombosis, its role in arterial ischemic stroke is unclear, particularly among young-adults. To address this issue, we examined the association between prothrombin G20210A and ischemic stroke in a Caucasian case-control population and additionally performed a meta-analysis Methods From the population-based Genetics of Early Onset Stroke (GEOS) study we identified 397 individuals of European ancestry aged 15-49 years with first-ever ischemic stroke and 426 matched-controls. Logistic regression was used to calculate odds ratios in the entire population and for subgroups stratified by gender, age, oral contraceptive use, migraine and smoking status. A meta-analysis of 17 case-control studies (n=2305 cases ischemic stroke did not achieve statistical significance (OR=2.5,95%CI=0.9-6.5,p=0.07). However, among adults aged 15-42 (younger than median age), cases were significantly more likely than controls to have the mutation (OR=5.9,95%CI=1.2-28.1,p=0.03), whereas adults ages 42-49 were not (OR=1.4,95%CI=0.4-5.1,p=0.94). In our meta-analysis, the mutation was associated with significantly increased stroke risk in adults ischemic stroke in young-adults and may have an even stronger association among those with earlier onset strokes. Our finding of a stronger association in the younger-young adult population requires replication. PMID:24619398

  11. The Science of Home Automation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas, Brian Louis

    Smart home technologies and the concept of home automation have become more popular in recent years. This popularity has been accompanied by social acceptance of passive sensors installed throughout the home. The subsequent increase in smart homes facilitates the creation of home automation strategies. We believe that home automation strategies can be generated intelligently by utilizing smart home sensors and activity learning. In this dissertation, we hypothesize that home automation can benefit from activity awareness. To test this, we develop our activity-aware smart automation system, CARL (CASAS Activity-aware Resource Learning). CARL learns the associations between activities and device usage from historical data and utilizes the activity-aware capabilities to control the devices. To help validate CARL we deploy and test three different versions of the automation system in a real-world smart environment. To provide a foundation of activity learning, we integrate existing activity recognition and activity forecasting into CARL home automation. We also explore two alternatives to using human-labeled data to train the activity learning models. The first unsupervised method is Activity Detection, and the second is a modified DBSCAN algorithm that utilizes Dynamic Time Warping (DTW) as a distance metric. We compare the performance of activity learning with human-defined labels and with automatically-discovered activity categories. To provide evidence in support of our hypothesis, we evaluate CARL automation in a smart home testbed. Our results indicate that home automation can be boosted through activity awareness. We also find that the resulting automation has a high degree of usability and comfort for the smart home resident.

  12. A Home Away from Home

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    McIlvenny, Paul

    2008-01-01

    The House of Tiny Tearaways (HTT) first appeared on British television in May 2005. Over a six-day period, three families are invited to reside in a specially designed house together with a resident clinical psychologist. The house is to be “a home away from home” for the resident families...... in order to analyze excerpts from the program and to explore how the affordances and constraints of the specially designed house—its architecture and spatial configuration, as well as the surveillance technology embedded within its walls—are assembled within particular familial activities, and how...... the relationships between family members are reshaped as a result. The analysis focuses on several key phenomena: 1) practices of video observation in relation to the domestic sphere; 2) use of inscription devices, such as video displays, to capture and visualize behavior and action in the “home;” 3) practicing...

  13. eTEST: Developing a Smart Home HIV Testing Kit that Enables Active, Real-Time Follow-Up and Referral After Testing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wray, Tyler; Chan, Philip A; Simpanen, Erik; Operario, Don

    2017-05-08

    Men who have sex with men (MSM) are the group at highest risk for contracting human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) in the United States, but many do not test as frequently as recommended. Home-based self-testing (HBST) for HIV holds promise for promoting regular testing among these individuals, but currently available HBSTs have limited follow-up options, providing only a 1-800 number that participants can call. Failure to actively conduct follow-up counseling and referrals after HBST use could result in delays in seeking confirmatory testing and care among users receiving reactive (preliminary positive) test results. HBST also fails to connect users who test negative with other prevention services that can reduce their future risk for HIV. The aim of our study was to use qualitative research methods with high-risk MSM to inform development of a "smart" HBST kit. The kit utilizes existing Internet-of-Things (IoT) technologies to monitor HBST use in real-time and enable delivery of timely, active follow-up counseling and referrals over the phone. In phase 1, individual interviews (n=10) explored how participants might use HBST and their views and preferences for conducting counseling and referral after HBST. Based on these perspectives, we developed a smartphone app (iOS, Android) that uses data from light sensors on Bluetooth low energy (BLE) beacons to monitor when HBST kits are opened, facilitating timely follow-up phone contact with users. In phase 2, a usability study conducted among high-risk MSM (n=10) examined the acceptability and feasibility of this system and provided user perspectives after using the system along with HBST. Phase 1 themes suggested that MSM preferred HBST, that most thought active follow-up after HBST would be valuable, and that doing so over the phone within 24 h after testing was preferable. Phase 2 results showed that the eTEST system successfully detected HBST use in nearly all cases. Participant perspectives also suggested that the

  14. Home care, hospitalizations and doctor visits

    OpenAIRE

    Gonçalves Judite; Weaver France

    2014-01-01

    This study estimates the effects of formal home care on hospitalizations and doctor visits. We compare the effects of medically- and non-medically-related home care and investigate heterogeneous effects by age group and informal care availability. Two-part models are estimated, using data from Switzerland. In this federal country, home care policy is decentralized into cantons (i.e. states). The endogeneity of home care is addressed by using instrumental variables, canton and time fixed effec...

  15. The SMILE Program: Does Timing and Dosing of Nurse Home Visits Matter in Reducing Adverse Birth Outcomes for African American Women

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-03-13

    aspiration, prenatal drug exposure, anemia , sickle cell trait, or identification of any other adverse health condition to include premature birth...p=.840), preeclampsia (LBW: χ 2 = .034, df= 1, p=.967; Premature: χ 2 =.087, df= 1, p=.920), placenta previa (LBW: χ 2 = .173, df= 1, p=.845...interdisciplinary approaches to research and practice (1st ed.). San Francisco, CA: Jossey-Bass. HOME VISITATION & BIRTH OUTCOMES 29 Fry-Johnson, Y . W

  16. The Home of Man

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hauberg, Jørgen; Bjerrum, Peter

    2018-01-01

    Abstract: Accordingly, Le Corbusier in “Towards a New Architecture”, 1922, the question was: “Architecture or revolution” – also stated in “The Home of Man”, 1942: “… people live in poor conditions, this is the real, the most profound reason for the battles and upheavals of our time.” The ninetee......Abstract: Accordingly, Le Corbusier in “Towards a New Architecture”, 1922, the question was: “Architecture or revolution” – also stated in “The Home of Man”, 1942: “… people live in poor conditions, this is the real, the most profound reason for the battles and upheavals of our time...

  17. "I Was a Full Time Proper Smoker": A Qualitative Exploration of Smoking in the Home after Childbirth among Women Who Relapse Postpartum.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sophie Orton

    Full Text Available Many women stop smoking during pregnancy but relapse shortly afterwards, potentially putting their infants at risk of secondhand smoke (SHS exposure. Women who were able to stop during pregnancy may be a motivated group, receptive to making behaviour changes postpartum to protect their infant from SHS exposure. Understanding more about their experiences of relapse, and if this influences home smoking behaviours and children's exposure to SHS in the home may help to inform intervention development to prevent infant SHS exposure.Guided by interpretative phenomenological methodology we conducted and analysed nine semi-structured interviews with women who quit smoking during pregnancy, but relapsed ≤3 months postpartum.Central to mothers' accounts of their smoking behaviours during pregnancy and postpartum was their desire to be a 'responsible mother'. Mothers described using strategies to protect their infant from SHS exposure, and held strong negative attitudes towards other smoking parents. After relapsing, mothers appeared to reposition themselves as 'social' or 'occasional' smokers rather than 'regular' smokers.Findings suggest that interventions to prevent/reduce infants' home SHS exposure should build on mothers' intentions to be responsible parents. As mothers who relapse principally view themselves as 'social' or 'occasional' smokers, interventions that are highlighted as relevant for women with these types of smoking patterns may be more likely to be responded to, and, ultimately, be effective.

  18. “I Was a Full Time Proper Smoker”: A Qualitative Exploration of Smoking in the Home after Childbirth among Women Who Relapse Postpartum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coleman, Tim; Lewis, Sarah; Cooper, Sue

    2016-01-01

    Background Many women stop smoking during pregnancy but relapse shortly afterwards, potentially putting their infants at risk of secondhand smoke (SHS) exposure. Women who were able to stop during pregnancy may be a motivated group, receptive to making behaviour changes postpartum to protect their infant from SHS exposure. Understanding more about their experiences of relapse, and if this influences home smoking behaviours and children’s exposure to SHS in the home may help to inform intervention development to prevent infant SHS exposure. Methods Guided by interpretative phenomenological methodology we conducted and analysed nine semi-structured interviews with women who quit smoking during pregnancy, but relapsed ≤3 months postpartum. Findings Central to mothers’ accounts of their smoking behaviours during pregnancy and postpartum was their desire to be a ‘responsible mother’. Mothers described using strategies to protect their infant from SHS exposure, and held strong negative attitudes towards other smoking parents. After relapsing, mothers appeared to reposition themselves as ‘social’ or ‘occasional’ smokers rather than ‘regular’ smokers. Conclusions Findings suggest that interventions to prevent/reduce infants' home SHS exposure should build on mothers' intentions to be responsible parents. As mothers who relapse principally view themselves as ‘social’ or ‘occasional’ smokers, interventions that are highlighted as relevant for women with these types of smoking patterns may be more likely to be responded to, and, ultimately, be effective. PMID:27308829

  19. "I Was a Full Time Proper Smoker": A Qualitative Exploration of Smoking in the Home after Childbirth among Women Who Relapse Postpartum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orton, Sophie; Coleman, Tim; Lewis, Sarah; Cooper, Sue; Jones, Laura L

    2016-01-01

    Many women stop smoking during pregnancy but relapse shortly afterwards, potentially putting their infants at risk of secondhand smoke (SHS) exposure. Women who were able to stop during pregnancy may be a motivated group, receptive to making behaviour changes postpartum to protect their infant from SHS exposure. Understanding more about their experiences of relapse, and if this influences home smoking behaviours and children's exposure to SHS in the home may help to inform intervention development to prevent infant SHS exposure. Guided by interpretative phenomenological methodology we conducted and analysed nine semi-structured interviews with women who quit smoking during pregnancy, but relapsed ≤3 months postpartum. Central to mothers' accounts of their smoking behaviours during pregnancy and postpartum was their desire to be a 'responsible mother'. Mothers described using strategies to protect their infant from SHS exposure, and held strong negative attitudes towards other smoking parents. After relapsing, mothers appeared to reposition themselves as 'social' or 'occasional' smokers rather than 'regular' smokers. Findings suggest that interventions to prevent/reduce infants' home SHS exposure should build on mothers' intentions to be responsible parents. As mothers who relapse principally view themselves as 'social' or 'occasional' smokers, interventions that are highlighted as relevant for women with these types of smoking patterns may be more likely to be responded to, and, ultimately, be effective.

  20. Exercise at Home

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Home Health Insights Exercise & Weight Exercise at Home Exercise at Home Make an Appointment Ask a Question ... with the movement and contact your provider. Posture Exercises Better posture means better breathing and movement. Axial ...

  1. Respiratory Home Health Care

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Us Home > Healthy Living > Living With Lung Disease > Respiratory Home Health Care Font: Aerosol Delivery Oxygen Resources ... Teenagers Living With Lung Disease Articles written by Respiratory Experts Respiratory Home Health Care Respiratory care at ...

  2. Asthma Home Environment Checklist

    Science.gov (United States)

    This checklist guides home care visitors in identifying environmental asthma triggers most commonly found in homes. It includes sections on the building, home interior and room interior and provides low-cost action steps for remediation.

  3. Home Care Services

    Science.gov (United States)

    Home care is care that allows a person with special needs stay in their home. It might be for people who are getting ... are chronically ill, recovering from surgery, or disabled. Home care services include Personal care, such as help ...

  4. HOME Grantee Areas

    Data.gov (United States)

    Department of Housing and Urban Development — The HOME Investment Partnership Program (HOME) is authorized under Title II of the Cranston-Gonzalez National Affordable Housing Act. HOME provides formula grants to...

  5. Home recording for musicians for dummies

    CERN Document Server

    Strong, Jeff

    2008-01-01

    Invaluable advice that will be music to your ears! Are you thinking of getting started in home recording? Do you want to know the latest home recording technologies? Home Recording For Musicians For Dummies will get you recording music at home in no time. It shows you how to set up a home studio, record and edit your music, master it, and even distribute your songs. With this guide, you?ll learn how to compare studio-in-a-box, computer-based, and stand-alone recording systems and choose what you need. You?ll gain the skills to manage your sound, take full advantage of MIDI, m

  6. Eldercare at Home: Choosing a Nursing Home

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... required, these services can be provided by a separate home health agency as directed by a doctor or ... complaints made by or on behalf of nursing home residents and work to resolve the problems. If they are unable ...

  7. The association of factor V G1961A (factor V Leiden), prothrombin G20210A, MTHFR C677T and PAI-1 4G/5G polymorphisms with recurrent pregnancy loss in Bosnian women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jusić, Amela; Balić, Devleta; Avdić, Aldijana; Pođanin, Maja; Balić, Adem

    2018-08-01

    Aim To investigate association of factor V Leiden, prothrombin G20210A, MTHFR C677T and PAI-1 4G/5G polymorphisms with recurrent pregnancy loss in Bosnian women. Methods A total of 60 women with two or more consecutive miscarriages before 20 weeks of gestation with the same partners and without history of known causes or recurrent pregnancy loss were included. A control group included 80 healthy women who had one or more successful pregnancies without history of any complication which could be associated with miscarriages. Genotyping of factor V Leiden, prothrombin G20210A, MTHFR C677T and PAI-1 4G/5G polymorphisms were performed by polymerase chain reaction/restriction fragments length polymorphism method (PCR/RFLP). Results Both factor V Leiden and MTHFR C677T polymorphisms were significantly associated with recurrent pregnancy loss (RPL) in Bosnian women while prothrombin G20210A and PAI-1 4G/5G polymorphisms did not show strongly significant association. Conclusion The presence of thrombophilic polymorphisms may predispose women to recurrent pregnancy loss. Future investigation should be addressed in order to find when carriers of those mutations, polymorphisms should be treated with anticoagulant therapy. Copyright© by the Medical Assotiation of Zenica-Doboj Canton.

  8. Elevated prothrombin time on routine preoperative laboratory results in a healthy infant undergoing craniosynostosis repair: Diagnosis and perioperative management of congenital factor VII deficiency

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kareen L. Jones

    2016-01-01

    Conclusion: A thorough history and physical examination with a high clinical suspicion are vital in preventing hemorrhage during surgeries in children with coagulopathies. Abnormal preoperative lab values should always be confirmed and addressed before proceeding with high-risk surgery. A multidisciplinary discussion is essential to optimize the risk-benefit ratio during the perioperative period.

  9. Home economics in past and present

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Benn, Jette

    2012-01-01

    . Through the 100 years period thee roles and valuations of the teachers have changed. Why and how the subject has changed is essential to analyse in order to understand the present situation and to give proposals for the future. Teachers within home economics have been and are still mainly female. This can......, essential and important aspects of home economics, take these aspects up to present time and make perspectives for the future. As a start I will state some postulates to show some of the dilemmas and dialectics, which are at the agenda. • Home economics is a subject in a conflict between science (theory......) and everyday life experiences (practice) • Home economics is gendered • Home economics is culturally dependant, society determined, individually featured • Home economics holds potentials, possibilities, and difficulties These postulates are essential to bring to an open discussion for developing home...

  10. Advances in Home Photo Printing

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Qian Lin; Brian Atkins; Huitao Luo

    2004-01-01

    With digital camera adoptions going main stream, consumers capture a record number of photos.Currently, the majority of the digital photos are printed at home. One of the key enablers of this transformation is the advancement of home photo printing technologies. In the past few years, inkjet printing technologies have continued to deliver smaller drop size, larger number of inks, and longer-lasting prints. In the mean time, advanced image processing automatically enhances captured digital photos while being printed. The combination of the above two forces has closed the gap between the home photo prints and AgX prints. It will give an overview of the home photo printing market and technology trends, and discuss major advancements in automatic image processing.

  11. Frequency of In-Home Internet Use Among Prekidney and Postkidney Transplant Patients-Facilitators and Barriers to Use and Trends Over Time.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lockwood, Mark B; Dunn-Lopez, Karen; Burke, Larisa; Becker, Yolanda T; Saunders, Milda

    2017-11-01

    As health-related communications become digitized, strategies to increase adoption of these Web-based platforms are needed. The purpose of this study was to assess facilitators and barriers to in-home Internet use among prekidney and postkidney transplant patients. A single center, cross-sectional survey of 240 consecutive patients of all levels of technological proficiency who presented to an urban transplant center in the United States. The Patient Information and Technology Assessment consists of 6 demographic questions, 3 disease-related questions, and 8 technology-related questions. Much of the sample was African American, male with a mean age of 51 years, and median income of $53 800/year. Logistic regression analysis was undertaken, and after adjusting for covariates, we found Smartphone ownership (odds ratio [OR], 4.94; 95% confidence interval [CI], 2.32-10.52), a higher number of Internet users in the home (OR, 2.00; 95% CI, 1.11-3.62), and having college education and beyond (OR, 4.88; 95% CI, 2.03-11.74) increased the likelihood of being a frequent Internet user. African American or Hispanic/Latino patients were less likely to be frequent Internet users compared with white patients (OR, 0.26 and 0.24, respectively, compared with whites, all P increased, frequent Internet use decreased (OR, 0.52; 95% CI, 0.29-0.92). As age increased, reports of frequent Internet use decreased. Lower rates of Internet use among African Americans and Hispanic/Latinos in urban areas in the United States remains a problem despite a significant increase in access to the Internet and Smartphone ownership. The finding that Internet use increases as the number of Internet users in the household increases indicates that leveraging the patient's social support network and/or the development of patient information champion programs may aid with patient's adoption of health technology and patient engagement in self-care.

  12. Routing in Wireless Multimedia Home Networks

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Scholten, Johan; Jansen, P.G.; Hop, Laurens

    This paper describes an adapted version of the destination sequenced distance vector routing protocol (DSDV) which is suitable to calculate routes in a wireless real-time home network. The home network is based on a IEEE 802.11b ad hoc network and uses a scheduled token to enforce real-time

  13. Routing in Wireless Multimedia Home Networks

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Scholten, Johan; Jansen, P.G.; Hop, Laurens

    This paper describes an adapted version of the destination sequenced distance vector routing protocol (DSDV) which is suitable to calculate routes in a wireless ¿real-time¿ home network. The home network is based on a IEEE 802.11b ad hoc network and uses a scheduled token to enforce real-time

  14. Home Automation and Security System Using Android ADK

    OpenAIRE

    Deepali Javale; Mohd. Mohsin; Shreerang Nandanwar; Mayur Shingate

    2013-01-01

    Today we are living in 21st century where automation is playing important role in human life. Home automation allows us to control household appliances like light, door, fan, AC etc. It also provides home security and emergency system to be activated. Home automation not only refers to reduce human efforts but also energy efficiency and time saving. The main objective of home automation and security is to help handicapped and old aged people which will enable them to control home appliances a...

  15. Substitution between Working at Home and Out-of-Home: The Role of ICT and Commuting Costs

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Graaff, T.; Rietveld, P.

    2007-01-01

    This paper analyzes the trade-off between working at home and out-of-home, ICT and commuting time. To this end, we develop a microeconomic demand system, which explicitly incorporates both time and income constraints. Commuting time is considered as the price to be paid for working out-of-home and a

  16. Night-time activity forecast by season and weather in a longitudinal design - natural light effects on three years' rest-activity cycles in nursing home residents with dementia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wahnschaffe, Amely; Nowozin, Claudia; Rath, Andreas; Floessner, Theresa; Appelhoff, Stefan; Münch, Mirjam; Kunz, Dieter

    2017-12-01

    Backround: Night-time agitation is a frequent symptom of dementia. It often causes nursing home admission and has been linked to circadian rhythm disturbances. A positive influence of light interventions on night-time agitation was shown in several studies. The aim of our study was to investigate whether there is a long-term association between regional weather data (as indicator for daylight availability) and 24-hour variations of motor activity. Motor activity of 20 elderly nursing home residents living with dementia was analyzed using recordings of continuously worn wrist activity monitors over a three-year period. The average recording duration was 479 ± 206 days per participant (mean ± SD). Regional cloud amount and day length data from the local weather station (latitude: 52°56'N) were included in the analysis to investigate their effects on several activity variables. Nocturnal rest, here defined as the five consecutive hours with the least motor activity during 24 hours (L5), was the most predictable activity variable per participant. There was a significant interaction of night-time activity with day length and cloud amount (F 1,1174 = 4.39; p = 0.036). Night-time activity was higher on cloudy short days than on clear short days (p = 0.007), and it was also higher on cloudy short days than on cloudy long days (p = 0.032). The need for sufficient zeitgeber (time cue) strength during winter time, especially when days are short and skies are cloudy, is crucial for elderly people living with dementia. Activity forecast by season and weather might be a valuable approach to anticipate adequately complementary use of electrical light and thereby foster lower night-time activity.

  17. Smart Home Hacking

    OpenAIRE

    Kodra, Suela

    2016-01-01

    Smart Home is an intelligent home equipped with devices and communications systems that enables the residents to connect and control their home appliances and systems. This technology has changed the way a consumer interacts with his home, enabling more control and convenience. Another advantage of this technology is the positive impact it has on savings on energy and other resources. However, despite the consumer's excitement about smart home, security and privacy have shown to be the strong...

  18. Clinical performance of antibodies to prothrombin and thrombin in Chinese patients with antiphospholipid syndrome: potential interest in discriminating patients with thrombotic events and non-thrombotic events.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Shulan; Wu, Ziyan; Li, Jing; Li, Ping; Chen, Si; Wen, Xiaoting; Li, Liubing; Zhang, Wen; Zhao, Jiuliang; Zhang, Fengchun; Li, Yongzhe

    2017-04-01

    A hallmark feature of antiphospholipid syndrome (APS) is the presence of a wide spectrum of antiphospholipid antibodies. In this study, we evaluated the clinical relevance of antibodies to prothrombin (PT) (aPT) and thrombin (aThr) in Chinese patients with APS. A total of 229 subjects were tested, including 86 patients with APS [35 patients with primary APS (PAPS), 51 patients with APS associated with other diseases (APSAOD)], 104 patients with non-APS diseases (disease controls), and 39 healthy controls. Serum IgG/IgM/IgA aPT and aThr were determined by ELISA. The levels of both IgG/IgM/IgA aPT and IgG/IgM/IgA aThr were significantly increased in patients with PAPS and APSAOD compared with patients with non-APS thrombosis and non-APS PRM, and HC. Both IgG aPT and IgG aThr exhibited promising diagnostic potentials for APS with sensitivities and specificities of 16.3 and 95.8% (IgG aPT), and 19.8 and 99.3% (IgG aThr), respectively. Importantly, both IgG aPT (OR 4.06; 95% CI 1.49-11.05) and IgG aThr (OR 4.49; 95% CI 1.62-12.45) were significantly correlated with arterial, but not venous, thrombotic events. Our findings highlighted that IgG aPT and IgG aThr could serve as promising biomarkers to identify patients at risk of arterial thrombosis in China.

  19. A Retrospective Propensity Score-Matched Early Thromboembolic Event Analysis of Prothrombin Complex Concentrate vs Fresh Frozen Plasma for Warfarin Reversal Prior to Emergency Neurosurgical Procedures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agarwal, Prateek; Abdullah, Kalil G; Ramayya, Ashwin G; Nayak, Nikhil R; Lucas, Timothy H

    2017-06-29

    Reversal of therapeutic anticoagulation prior to emergency neurosurgical procedures is required in the setting of intracranial hemorrhage. Multifactor prothrombin complex concentrate (PCC) promises rapid efficacy but may increase the probability of thrombotic complications compared to fresh frozen plasma (FFP). To compare the rate of thrombotic complications in patients treated with PCC or FFP to reverse therapeutic anticoagulation prior to emergency neurosurgical procedures in the setting of intracranial hemorrhage at a level I trauma center. Sixty-three consecutive patients on warfarin therapy presenting with intracranial hemorrhage who received anticoagulation reversal prior to emergency neurosurgical procedures were retrospectively identified between 2007 and 2016. They were divided into 2 cohorts based on reversal agent, either PCC (n = 28) or FFP (n = 35). The thrombotic complications rates within 72 h of reversal were compared using the χ 2 test. A multivariate propensity score matching analysis was used to limit the threat to interval validity from selection bias arising from differences in demographics, laboratory values, history, and clinical status. Thrombotic complications were uncommon in this neurosurgical population, occurring in 1.59% (1/63) of treated patients. There was no significant difference in the thrombotic complication rate between groups, 3.57% (1/28; PCC group) vs 0% (0/35; FFP group). Propensity score matching analysis validated this finding after controlling for any selection bias. In this limited sample, thrombotic complication rates were similar between use of PCC and FFP for anticoagulation reversal in the management of intracranial hemorrhage prior to emergency neurosurgical procedures. Copyright © 2017 by the Congress of Neurological Surgeons

  20. Poor anticoagulation control in patients taking warfarin at a tertiary and districtlevel prothrombin clinic in Cape Town South Africa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I Ebrahim

    2018-05-01

    Full Text Available Background. Warfarin is the most commonly used anticoagulant for both primary and secondary prevention of thromboembolism. For anticoagulation efficacy, the international normalised ratio (INR needs to be within the therapeutic range for at least 65% of time on warfarin.Objectives. To describe INR control in patients on long-term warfarin and identified predictors of good INR control at two dedicated warfarin follow-up clinics in Cape Town, South Africa (SA.Methods. We reviewed clinical records of patients in care at the INR clinics at Mitchell’s Plain Community Health Centre and Groote Schuur Hospital. We included patients who had been on warfarin therapy for at least 27 months and excluded patients with <6 months of INR monitoring data or a >70-day gap between INR tests in the calculation period, and if >25% of follow-up time was at an alternative site. The time in therapeutic range (TTR over 180 days using the Rosendaal method was calculated, and we categorised INR control as good if the TTR was ≥65%. We constructed a multivariate logistic regression model to identify associations with good INR control.Results. We included 363 patients, with a median age of 55 years (interquartile range (IQR 44 - 64, of whom 65.6% were women. The most common indications for warfarin were valvular heart disease (45.7% and atrial fibrillation (25.1%. The mean TTR was 47%, with only 91/363 patients having good INR control. In a multivariate model adjusted for age, sex, clinic and target INR, patients aged ≥55 years were more likely to have good INR control than younger patients (adjusted odds ratio 1.69, 95% confidence interval 1.03 - 2.79. Poorly controlled patients had more frequent INR monitoring than those with good INR control, with a median of 8 INRs (IQR 6 - 10 v. 6 INRs (IQR 5 - 8 in the 180-day period (p<0.0001.Conclusions. Only 25.1% of patients in our study achieved good INR control, despite regular INR monitoring. There is an

  1. Brain Computer Interface on Track to Home

    OpenAIRE

    Miralles, Felip; Vargiu, Eloisa; Dauwalder, Stefan; Solà, Marc; Müller-Putz, Gernot; Wriessnegger, Selina C.; Pinegger, Andreas; Kübler, Andrea; Halder, Sebastian; Käthner, Ivo; Martin, Suzanne; Daly, Jean; Armstrong, Elaine; Guger, Christoph; Hintermüller, Christoph

    2015-01-01

    The novel BackHome system offers individuals with disabilities a range of useful services available via brain-computer interfaces (BCIs), to help restore their independence. This is the time such technology is ready to be deployed in the real world, that is, at the target end users' home. This has been achieved by the development of practical electrodes, easy to use software, and delivering telemonitoring and home support capabilities which have been conceived, implemented, and tested within ...

  2. The Change of the Family Life Affected by the Shorter Working Time : From the Point of View of the Home Management

    OpenAIRE

    平田, 道憲

    1994-01-01

    In Japan, the working time has been decreasing. However, Japanese working people spend more hours per year to work than those in Western countries. The policy of the shorter working time is conducted by the Japanese Government in order that the working people get more free time. This paper examines whether the shorter working time of working members in the family enrich the time use of the other members of the family. Especially, the effect of the shorter working time of husbands to wives...

  3. Home Visits

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    cophuser

    was conducted from the beginning of November 2008 and ended in March 2009. ... Program's Recipe for CSB porridge and modified for consistency and taste [11]. The ... The community health workers questioned the mothers in Pular or French .... fuel to prepare the PSB compared with the CSB since the cooking time is ...

  4. 'Stay home for as long as possible': midwives' priorities and strategies in communicating with first-time mothers in early labour.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eri, Tine S; Blystad, Astrid; Gjengedal, Eva; Blaaka, Gunnhild

    2011-12-01

    To explore the priorities and strategies midwives in a labour ward use in their communication with primiparous women who seek contact in the early phase of labour. A qualitative study using focus groups. Norway. 18 Midwives. Five themes that seemed to constitute the key elements in the communication were identified. The themes were designated 'Getting the picture', 'Normalising the situation', 'Giving concrete advice', 'Letting the woman make the decision', and 'Staying at home for as long as possible'. The findings of this study indicate that the midwives' overall strategy was to encourage women to remain out of hospital for as long as possible 'for their own good'. This strategy seems to rely on knowledge derived from non-contextual science within the dominant medical childbirth paradigm, and might not meet women's needs in early labour. When women are admitted in early labour, midwives should be able to 'protect' these women from unnecessary interventions and do so in partnership with the women themselves rather than accepting that women's mere presence in the labour ward yields complications and increases the likelihood of caesarean section. From the findings of this study, it is reasonable to ask whether an obstacle to this course might be the midwives' subordination to the medical paradigm. This causes midwives to function as 'gatekeepers' to the medical system instead of working in accordance with the philosophy of midwifery: 'for women's own good'. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Meals in nursing homes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kofod, Jens Erik; Birkemose, A.

    2004-01-01

    Undernutrition is present among 33% of nursing home residents in Denmark. Hence, it is relevant to examine the meal situation at nursing homes to single out factors that may increase or reduce the residents' food intake. in the ongoing Danish nursing home debate it is claimed that a new type...... of nursing home improves the residents' meal situation with a positive effect on nutrition. The aim of this work is to test the general hypothesis that (i) residents appreciate the meal situation in these nursing homes and (ii) nutritional status of the residents is improved in this type of nursing home....... This study was carried out in four Danish nursing homes at various locations in Denmark. The methods used are qualitative interviews and observations at four nursing homes in combination with measurement of body mass index (BMI) at two of the four nursing homes. Undernutrition is defined as a BMI below 20...

  6. Brain Computer Interface on Track to Home.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miralles, Felip; Vargiu, Eloisa; Dauwalder, Stefan; Solà, Marc; Müller-Putz, Gernot; Wriessnegger, Selina C; Pinegger, Andreas; Kübler, Andrea; Halder, Sebastian; Käthner, Ivo; Martin, Suzanne; Daly, Jean; Armstrong, Elaine; Guger, Christoph; Hintermüller, Christoph; Lowish, Hannah

    2015-01-01

    The novel BackHome system offers individuals with disabilities a range of useful services available via brain-computer interfaces (BCIs), to help restore their independence. This is the time such technology is ready to be deployed in the real world, that is, at the target end users' home. This has been achieved by the development of practical electrodes, easy to use software, and delivering telemonitoring and home support capabilities which have been conceived, implemented, and tested within a user-centred design approach. The final BackHome system is the result of a 3-year long process involving extensive user engagement to maximize effectiveness, reliability, robustness, and ease of use of a home based BCI system. The system is comprised of ergonomic and hassle-free BCI equipment; one-click software services for Smart Home control, cognitive stimulation, and web browsing; and remote telemonitoring and home support tools to enable independent home use for nonexpert caregivers and users. BackHome aims to successfully bring BCIs to the home of people with limited mobility to restore their independence and ultimately improve their quality of life.

  7. Brain Computer Interface on Track to Home

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Felip Miralles

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The novel BackHome system offers individuals with disabilities a range of useful services available via brain-computer interfaces (BCIs, to help restore their independence. This is the time such technology is ready to be deployed in the real world, that is, at the target end users’ home. This has been achieved by the development of practical electrodes, easy to use software, and delivering telemonitoring and home support capabilities which have been conceived, implemented, and tested within a user-centred design approach. The final BackHome system is the result of a 3-year long process involving extensive user engagement to maximize effectiveness, reliability, robustness, and ease of use of a home based BCI system. The system is comprised of ergonomic and hassle-free BCI equipment; one-click software services for Smart Home control, cognitive stimulation, and web browsing; and remote telemonitoring and home support tools to enable independent home use for nonexpert caregivers and users. BackHome aims to successfully bring BCIs to the home of people with limited mobility to restore their independence and ultimately improve their quality of life.

  8. PROSPECTS OF THE CONTRIBUTION OF HOME GARDENS TO ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Admin

    Department of Forest Production and Products, University of Agriculture ... food in home gardens, stability of food supply over time, and ecological role of home ... RESEARCH IN FORESTRY, WILDLIFE AND ENVIRONMENTAL VOLUME 5, No.

  9. Long-term home care scheduling

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gamst, Mette; Jensen, Thomas Sejr

    In several countries, home care is provided for certain citizens living at home. The long-term home care scheduling problem is to generate work plans spanning several days such that a high quality of service is maintained and the overall cost is kept as low as possible. A solution to the problem...... provides detailed information on visits and visit times for each employee on each of the covered days. We propose a branch-and-price algorithm for the long-term home care scheduling problem. The pricing problem generates one-day plans for an employee, and the master problem merges the plans with respect...

  10. Where do ethno-linguistic groups meet? How copresence during free-time is related to copresence at home and at work

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Toomet, O.; Silm, S.; Saluveer, E.; Ahas, R.; Tammaru, T.

    2015-01-01

    This paper analyzes ethnic segregation across the whole activity space—at place of residence, place of work, and during free-time. We focus on interethnic meeting potential during free-time, measured as copresence, and its relationship to copresence at place of residence and work. The study is based

  11. TRAVEL AND HOME LEAVE

    CERN Multimedia

    Human Resources Division

    2002-01-01

    Administrative procedures for : Travel to the home station and home leave (hl) Additional travel to the home station (at) Travel to the home station and home leave for family reasons (hlf) As part of the process of simplifying administrative procedures, HR and AS Divisions have devised a new, virtually automatic procedure for payment of travel expenses to the home station. The changes are aimed at rationalising administrative procedures and not at reducing benefits. The conditions of eligibility are unchanged. The new procedure, which will be operational with effect from 1st June 2002, will greatly simplify the administrative processing of claims for travel expenses and the recording of home leaves. Currently, requests for payment are introduced manually into the Advances and Claims system (AVCL) by divisional secretariats. All travel to the home station starting prior to 1st June 2002 will be processed according to the existing system whereas that starting on 1st June and after will be processed accordi...

  12. Nursing Home Quality Initiative

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — This Nursing Home Quality Initiative (NHQI) website provides consumer and provider information regarding the quality of care in nursing homes. NHQI discusses quality...

  13. Ostomy Home Skills Program

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Overview The skills kit contains: A booklet with information on the operation, home skills such as emptying and changing a pouch, problem solving, and home management. A DVD with demonstration of each skill Stoma ...

  14. Ostomy Home Skills Program

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... JACS Jobs Events Find a Surgeon Patients and Family Contact My Profile Shop ( 0 ) Cart Donate American College of Surgeons Education Patients and Family Skills Programs Ostomy Home Skills Program Ostomy Home ...

  15. Ostomy Home Skills Program

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... kit contains: A booklet with information on the operation, home skills such as emptying and changing a pouch, problem solving, and home management. A DVD with demonstration of each skill Stoma ...

  16. Home Health Compare

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — Home Health Compare has information about the quality of care provided by Medicare-certified home health agencies throughout the nation. Medicare-certified means the...

  17. Using oxygen at home

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... at Home Tell your local fire department, electric company, and telephone company that you use oxygen in your home. They ... M. is also a founding member of Hi-Ethics and subscribes to the principles of the Health ...

  18. Ostomy Home Skills Program

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Careers at ACS Careers at ACS About ACS Career Types Working at ACS ... American College of Surgeons Education Patients and Family Skills Programs Ostomy Home Skills Program Ostomy Home Skills ...

  19. HOME Rent Limits

    Data.gov (United States)

    Department of Housing and Urban Development — In accordance with 24 CFR Part 92.252, HUD provides maximum HOME rent limits. The maximum HOME rents are the lesser of: The fair market rent for existing housing for...

  20. Ostomy Home Skills Program

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... ACS Careers at ACS About ACS Career Types Working at ACS ... Education Patients and Family Skills Programs Ostomy Home Skills Program Ostomy Home Skills Program Adult Ostomy ...

  1. Community Nursing Home (CNH)

    Data.gov (United States)

    Department of Veterans Affairs — The Community Nursing Home (CNH) database contains a list of all Community Nursing Home facilities under local contract to Veterans Health Administration (VHA). CNH...

  2. Home Improvements Prevent Falls

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... turn JavaScript on. Feature: Falls and Older Adults Home Improvements Prevent Falls Past Issues / Winter 2014 Table ... and ensure your safety. "Safe-ty-fy" Your Home Some Questions for Your Provider Will my medicines ...

  3. Home Canning and Botulism

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... this? Submit What's this? Submit Button Past Emails Home Canning and Botulism Language: English (US) Español (Spanish) ... myself and others safe when it comes to home-canned foods? Many cases of foodborne botulism have ...

  4. The impact of family policy and career interruptions on women's perceptions of negative occupational consequences of full-time home care

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ejrnæs, Anders

    2011-01-01

    for their careers. On the one hand, our findings confirm the hypothesis that long-term absence from the labour market due to full-time care has negative consequences for women's occupational careers. On the other hand, our findings show that countries with well paid leave schemes combined with access to high...... quality childcare reduce the perceived negative occupational consequences of the time spent on full-time care. This is the case independently of the duration of the career interruption due to care-giving....

  5. Antiphosphatidylserine/prothrombin antibodies (aPS/PT) as potential diagnostic markers and risk predictors of venous thrombosis and obstetric complications in antiphospholipid syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Hui; Zheng, Hui; Yin, Yu-Feng; Hu, Qiong-Yi; Teng, Jia-Lin; Sun, Yue; Liu, Hong-Lei; Cheng, Xiao-Bing; Ye, Jun-Na; Su, Yu-Tong; Wu, Xin-Yao; Zhou, Jin-Feng; Norman, Gary L; Gong, Hui-Yun; Shi, Xin-Ming; Peng, Yi-Bing; Wang, Xue-Feng; Yang, Cheng-De

    2018-03-28

    The aim of the study was to determine the prevalence and clinical associations of antiphosphatidylserine/prothrombin antibodies (aPS/PT) with thrombosis and pregnancy loss in Chinese patients with antiphospholipid syndrome (APS) and seronegative APS (SNAPS). One hundred and eighty six Chinese patients with APS (67 primary, 119 secondary), 48 with SNAPS, 176 disease controls (79 systemic lupus erythematosus [SLE], 29 Sjogren's syndrome [SS], 30 ankylosing spondylitis [AS], 38 rheumatoid arthritis [RA]) and 90 healthy donors were examined. IgG and IgM aPS/PT, IgG/IgM/IgA anticardiolipin (aCL) and IgG/IgM/IgA anti-β2-glycoprotein I (anti-β2GPI) antibodies were tested by ELISA. One hundred and sixty (86.0%) of APS patients were positive for at least one aPS/PT isotype. One hundred and thirty five (72.6%) were positive for IgG aPS/PT, 124/186 (66.7%) positive for IgM aPS/PT and 99 (53.2%) positive for both. Approximately half of the SNAPS patients were positive for IgG and/or IgM aPS/PT. Highly significant associations between IgG aPS/PT and venous thrombotic events (odds ratio [OR]=6.72) and IgG/IgM aPS/PT and pregnancy loss (OR=9.44) were found. Levels of IgM aPS/PT were significantly different in APS patients with thrombotic manifestations and those with fetal loss (p=0.014). The association between IgG/IgM aPS/PT and lupus anticoagulant (LAC) was highly significant (pAPS was 101.6. Notably, 91.95% (80/87) of LAC-positive specimens were positive for IgG and/or IgM aPS/PT, suggesting aPS/PT is an effective option when LAC testing is not available. Anti-PS/PT antibody assays demonstrated high diagnostic performance for Chinese patients with APS, detected some APS patients negative for criteria markers and may serve as potential risk predictors for venous thrombosis and obstetric complications.

  6. 6. Home deliveries

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Sitwala

    determine factors associated with home deliveries. Main outcome ... deliver at home than a health facility compared to those who .... regression analysis, women who had four years of schooling or .... by report bias, the burden of home deliveries is a real challenge .... Journal of Econometrics 1987; 36: 185-204. 14. Michelo ...

  7. Ostomy Home Skills Program

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Ostomy Home Skills Program Ostomy Home Skills Program Adult Ostomy Pediatric Ostomy Programa de Destrezas para manejo Doméstico de Ostomía Ostomy Home Skills Program Adult Ostomy Pediatric Ostomy Programa de Destrezas para manejo ...

  8. Home area networks

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Koonen, A.M.J.

    2013-01-01

    This article consists of a collection of slides from the author's conference presentation. Some of the specific areas/topics discussed include: Convergence in home networks, home service scenarios; Home wired network architectures, CapEx and OpEx; Residential Gateway; Optical fiber types;

  9. Home in the Making

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kreuzer, Maria; von Wallpach, Sylvia; Muehlbacher, Hans

    2016-01-01

    In a context of unprecedented migration home reaches high relevance. This study aims at understanding the (re-)construction of home by first generation consumer migrants. The findings provide insights into consumers’ (re-)construction of various dimensions of home and identify “inner home” as a n...

  10. Home Energy Saver

    Science.gov (United States)

    release announcing Home Energy Saver and a Q-and-A. The "About" page should tell you everything you need to know about using Home Energy Saver. If you have any questions, please email the project leader, Dr. Evan Mills. News Releases Microsoft Licenses Berkeley Lab's Home Energy Saver Code for Its

  11. Social disparities in parental smoking and young children's exposure to secondhand smoke at home: a time-trend analysis of repeated cross-sectional data from the German KiGGS study between 2003-2006 and 2009-2012.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuntz, Benjamin; Lampert, Thomas

    2016-06-08

    Children who are exposed to secondhand smoke (SHS) have an increased risk of a wide range of health problems and illnesses. Smoke-free legislation aims to improve indoor air quality and in this way protect the health of people who do not smoke. This paper examines trends in SHS exposure at home among children in Germany since the introduction of smoking bans in public places. Special focus is placed on the importance of the family of origin's socioeconomic status (SES) and on parental smoking behaviour. The analyses are based on two waves of the "German Health Interview and Examination Survey for Children and Adolescents" (KiGGS)-one of which was conducted immediately before the introduction of central smoke-free legislation in the 2003-2006 period, the other approximately 6 years later from 2009 to 2012. A comparison is made between the answers given by the parents of children aged between 0 to 6 (KiGGS baseline study, n = 6680; KiGGS Wave 1, n = 4455). Domestic SHS exposure is covered in the parent interviews by asking whether anyone is allowed to smoke at home in the presence of their child. Parental smoking behaviour is determined separately for mothers and fathers. SES is determined on the basis of the parents' education, occupational status and income. The percentage of 0- to 6-year-old children exposed to SHS in the parental home fell from 23.9 to 6.6 % in the period from 2003-2006 to 2009-2012. At the same time, the percentage of children with at least one parent who smokes decreased from 49.8 to 41.8 %. While relative social inequalities in parental smoking behaviour have tended to increase over time, inequalities in domestic SHS exposure have persisted. Children whose parents smoke and children from low-SES families are still most likely to be exposed to tobacco smoke. In both study periods and after statistical adjustment for parental smoking behaviour, children with a low SES had a 6.6-fold higher risk for SHS exposure in the parental home

  12. The home electronic media environment and parental safety concerns: relationships with outdoor time after school and over the weekend among 9-11 year old children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilkie, Hannah J; Standage, Martyn; Gillison, Fiona B; Cumming, Sean P; Katzmarzyk, Peter T

    2018-04-05

    Time spent outdoors is associated with higher physical activity levels among children, yet it may be threatened by parental safety concerns and the attraction of indoor sedentary pursuits. The purpose of this study was to explore the relationships between these factors and outdoor time during children's discretionary periods (i.e., after school and over the weekend). Data from 462 children aged 9-11 years old were analysed using generalised linear mixed models. The odds of spending > 1 h outdoors after school, and > 2 h outdoors on a weekend were computed, according to demographic variables, screen-based behaviours, media access, and parental safety concerns. Interactions with sex and socioeconomic status (SES) were explored. Boys, low SES participants, and children who played on their computer for  1 h outside after school than girls, high SES children and those playing on a computer for ≥2 h, respectively. Counterintuitive results were found for access to media devices and crime-related safety concerns as both of these were positively associated with time spent outdoors after school. A significant interaction for traffic-related concerns*sex was found; higher road safety concerns were associated with lower odds of outdoor time after school in boys only. Age was associated with weekend outdoor time, which interacted with sex and SES; older children were more likely to spend > 2 h outside on weekends but this was only significant among girls and high SES participants. Our results suggest that specific groups of children are less likely to spend their free time outside, and it would seem that only prolonged recreational computer use has a negative association with children's outdoor time after school. Further research is needed to explore potential underlying mechanisms, and parental safety concerns in more detail.

  13. Where Do Ethno-Linguistic Groups Meet? How Copresence during Free-Time Is Related to Copresence at Home and at Work.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ott Toomet

    Full Text Available This paper analyzes ethnic segregation across the whole activity space-at place of residence, place of work, and during free-time. We focus on interethnic meeting potential during free-time, measured as copresence, and its relationship to copresence at place of residence and work. The study is based on cellphone data for a medium-sized linguistically divided European city (Tallinn, Estonia, where the Estonian majority and mainly Russian-speaking minority populations are of roughly equal size. The results show that both places of residence and work are segregated, while other activities occur in a far more integrated environment. Copresence during free-time is positively associated with copresence at place of residence and work, however, the relationship is very weak.

  14. Strategy Guideline: Demonstration Home

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Savage, C.; Hunt, A.

    2012-12-01

    This guideline will provide a general overview of the different kinds of demonstration home projects, a basic understanding of the different roles and responsibilities involved in the successful completion of a demonstration home, and an introduction into some of the lessons learned from actual demonstration home projects. Also, this guideline will specifically look at the communication methods employed during demonstration home projects. And lastly, we will focus on how to best create a communication plan for including an energy efficient message in a demonstration home project and carry that message to successful completion.

  15. Strategy Guideline. Demonstration Home

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hunt, A.; Savage, C.

    2012-12-01

    This guideline will provide a general overview of the different kinds of demonstration home projects, a basic understanding of the different roles and responsibilities involved in the successful completion of a demonstration home, and an introduction into some of the lessons learned from actual demonstration home projects. Also, this guideline will specifically look at the communication methods employed during demonstration home projects. And lastly, we will focus on how to best create a communication plan for including an energy efficient message in a demonstration home project and carry that message to successful completion.

  16. Digital Living at Home

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Pernille Viktoria Kathja; Christiansen, Ellen Tove

    2013-01-01

    of these user voices has directed us towards a ‘home-keeping’ design discourse, which opens new horizons for design of digital home control systems by allowing users to perform as self-determined controllers and groomers of their habitat. The paper concludes by outlining the implications of a ‘home......Does living with digital technology inevitably lead to digital living? Users talking about a digital home control system, they have had in their homes for eight years, indicate that there is more to living with digital technology than a functional-operational grip on regulation. Our analysis......-keeping’ design discourse....

  17. Modular Zero Energy. BrightBuilt Home

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aldrich, Robb [Consortium for Advanced Residential Buildings (CARB), Norwalk, CT (United States). Steven Winters Associates, Inc.; Butterfield, Karla [Consortium for Advanced Residential Buildings (CARB), Norwalk, CT (United States). Steven Winters Associates, Inc.

    2016-03-01

    Kaplan Thompson Architects (KTA) has specialized in sustainable, energy-efficient buildings, and they have designed several custom, zero-energy homes in New England. These zero-energy projects have generally been high-end, custom homes with budgets that could accommodate advanced energy systems. In an attempt to make zero energy homes more affordable and accessible to a larger demographic, KTA explored modular construction as way to provide high-quality homes at lower costs. In the mid-2013, KTA formalized this concept when they launched BrightBuilt Home (BBH). The BBH mission is to offer a line of architect-designed, high-performance homes that are priced to offer substantial savings off the lifetime cost of a typical home and can be delivered in less time. For the past two years, CARB has worked with BBH and Keiser Homes (the primary modular manufacturer for BBH) to discuss challenges related to wall systems, HVAC, and quality control. In Spring of 2014, CARB and BBH began looking in detail on a home to be built in Lincolnville, ME by Black Bros. Builders. This report details the solution package specified for this modular plan and the challenges that arose during the project.

  18. LHC@home gets new home

    CERN Multimedia

    Oates, John

    2007-01-01

    "The distributed computing project LHC@home is moving to London from Cern in Switzerland. Researchers at Qeen Mary University have been trialling the system since June, but are now ready for the offical launch" (1 page)

  19. Efficient Power Scheduling in Smart Homes Using Hybrid Grey Wolf Differential Evolution Optimization Technique with Real Time and Critical Peak Pricing Schemes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Muqaddas Naz

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available With the emergence of automated environments, energy demand by consumers is increasing rapidly. More than 80% of total electricity is being consumed in the residential sector. This brings a challenging task of maintaining the balance between demand and generation of electric power. In order to meet such challenges, a traditional grid is renovated by integrating two-way communication between the consumer and generation unit. To reduce electricity cost and peak load demand, demand side management (DSM is modeled as an optimization problem, and the solution is obtained by applying meta-heuristic techniques with different pricing schemes. In this paper, an optimization technique, the hybrid gray wolf differential evolution (HGWDE, is proposed by merging enhanced differential evolution (EDE and gray wolf optimization (GWO scheme using real-time pricing (RTP and critical peak pricing (CPP. Load shifting is performed from on-peak hours to off-peak hours depending on the electricity cost defined by the utility. However, there is a trade-off between user comfort and cost. To validate the performance of the proposed algorithm, simulations have been carried out in MATLAB. Results illustrate that using RTP, the peak to average ratio (PAR is reduced to 53.02%, 29.02% and 26.55%, while the electricity bill is reduced to 12.81%, 12.012% and 12.95%, respectively, for the 15-, 30- and 60-min operational time interval (OTI. On the other hand, the PAR and electricity bill are reduced to 47.27%, 22.91%, 22% and 13.04%, 12%, 11.11% using the CPP tariff.

  20. Real-Time Analysis of a Sensor’s Data for Automated Decision Making in an IoT-Based Smart Home

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nida Saddaf Khan

    2018-05-01

    Full Text Available IoT devices frequently generate large volumes of streaming data and in order to take advantage of this data, their temporal patterns must be learned and identified. Streaming data analysis has become popular after being successfully used in many applications including forecasting electricity load, stock market prices, weather conditions, etc. Artificial Neural Networks (ANNs have been successfully utilized in understanding the embedded interesting patterns/behaviors in the data and forecasting the future values based on it. One such pattern is modelled and learned in the present study to identify the occurrence of a specific pattern in a Water Management System (WMS. This prediction aids in making an automatic decision support system, to switch OFF a hydraulic suction pump at the appropriate time. Three types of ANN, namely Multi-Input Multi-Output (MIMO, Multi-Input Single-Output (MISO, and Recurrent Neural Network (RNN have been compared, for multi-step-ahead forecasting, on a sensor’s streaming data. Experiments have shown that RNN has the best performance among three models and based on its prediction, a system can be implemented to make the best decision with 86% accuracy.

  1. HomePort

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Madsen, Per Printz

    2009-01-01

    In the last couple of year's computer based home control systems are getting more and more common in modern homes. For instance these systems take care of light control, heat control and security systems.  The latest trend is to use wireless communication like Z-Wave and ZigBee to interconnect...... different components in these systems. One of the characteristics is that each system, like for instance heat and light, has their own specific way of using the communication system.   This paper describes a way to connect different home control systems through an intelligent gateway, called a Home......Port. The HomePort consists of a number of Subsystem communication drivers, a virtual communication layer, an interpreter and a PC- based compiler for a high level control language, called GIL (Gateway intelligence language). The focus in this paper will be on the upper two layers in the Home...

  2. Facilitating home birth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Finigan, Valerie; Chadderton, Diane

    2015-06-01

    The birth of a baby is a family experience. However, in the United Kingdom birth often occurs outside the family environment, in hospital. Both home and hospital births have risks and benefits, but research shows that, for most women, it is as safe to give birth at home as it is in hospital. Women report home-birth to be satisfying with lowered risks of intervention and less likelihood of being separated from their family. It is also more cost effective for the National Health Service. Yet, whilst midwives are working hard to promote home birth as an option, it remains controversial. The aim of this paper is to raise awareness of the safety of home birth and the needs of women and midwives when a home birth is chosen. It provides an overview of care required and the role of the midwife in the ensuring care is woman-centred and personalised.

  3. Measuring care of the elderly: psychometric testing and modification of the Time in Care instrument for measurement of care needs in nursing homes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nyberg Per

    2008-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Aging entails not only a decrease in the ability to be active, but also a trend toward increased dependence to sustain basic life functions. An important aspect for appropriately elucidating the individual's care needs is the ability to measure them both simply and reliably. Since 2006 a new version of the Time in Care needs (TIC-n instrument (19-item version has been explored and used in one additional municipality with the same structure as the one described in an earlier study. Methods The TIC-n assessment was conducted on a total of 1282 care recipients. Factor analysis (principal component was applied to explore the construct validity of the TIC-n. Cronbach's alpha was calculated to test reliability and for each of the items remaining in the instrument after factor analysis, an inter-rater comparison was carried out on all recipients in both municipalities. Independently of each other, a weighted Kappa (Kw was calculated. Results. The mean of each weighted Kappa (Kw for the dimensions in the two municipalities was 0.75 and 0.76, respectively. Factor analysis showed that all 19 items had a factor loading of ≥ 0.40. Three factors (General Care, Medical Care and Cognitive Care were created. Conclusion The TIC-n instrument has now been tested for validity and reliability in two municipalities with satisfactory results. However, TIC-n can not yet be used as a golden standard, but it can be recommended for use of measurement of individual care needs in municipal elderly care.

  4. Ostomy Home Skills Program

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Advocate at Home Program State Legislative Action Center Leadership & Advocacy Summit Webinars Practice Management Practice Management Practice Management CPT Coding Bulletin Articles ...

  5. Comparison of home and away-from-home physical activity using accelerometers and cellular network-based tracking devices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramulu, Pradeep Y; Chan, Emilie S; Loyd, Tara L; Ferrucci, Luigi; Friedman, David S

    2012-08-01

    Measuring physical at home and away from home is essential for assessing health and well-being, and could help design interventions to increase physical activity. Here, we describe how physical activity at home and away from home can be quantified by combining information from cellular network-based tracking devices and accelerometers. Thirty-five working adults wore a cellular network-based tracking device and an accelerometer for 6 consecutive days and logged their travel away from home. Performance of the tracking device was determined using the travel log for reference. Tracking device and accelerometer data were merged to compare physical activity at home and away from home. The tracking device detected 98.6% of all away-from-home excursions, accurately measured time away from home and demonstrated few prolonged signal drop-out periods. Most physical activity took place away from home on weekdays, but not on weekends. Subjects were more physically active per unit of time while away from home, particularly on weekends. Cellular network-based tracking devices represent an alternative to global positioning systems for tracking location, and provide information easily integrated with accelerometers to determine where physical activity takes place. Promoting greater time spent away from home may increase physical activity.

  6. Comparing Sleep Quality and General Health Among the Elderly Living at Home and at Nursing Home

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mansour Beyrami

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: Survey about the issues and problems related to elderly in order to improve their quality of life of this increasing population has become a universal concern.This study was performed by the purpose of comparing the sleep quality and general health among the Elderly Residing at Home and Old People's Homes. Methods & Materials: This study is descriptive-analytic type. Population of this investigation consisted of elderly men and women (upper than 60 years old living at personal home and at nursing home in Tabriz. Sample group composed of 100 elderly (50 men and 50 women 50 living at home and 50 living at nursing home who were selected through available sampling method. For collecting data, Goldberg General Health Questionnaire and Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index were used. Data were analyzed by Multivariate analysis of variance (MANOVA. Results: Findings showed that In terms of general health and its components (Physical symptoms, anxiety, social dysfunction and depression and Sleep quality and its components (Subjective quality of sleep, time for sleep, total sleep time, sleep efficiency, routine, sleep disorders, sleep medications and daily dysfunction there were significant differences between nursing home residents and elderly residents in nursing homes (P=0.001. Conclusion: Findings indicated that elderly residents in nursing home are experiencing more symptoms of anxiety, depression, physical symptoms and social dysfunction Compared with the elderly whom resident at home. Also the results showed that the elderly residents of nursing homes have poor sleep quality than ones whom residents at home. On the other hand Future development of elderly care institution is inevitable. Therefore, more attention to the living conditions of elderly residents of institutions seems necessary.

  7. Sex Away from Home

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greenwald, Harold

    1971-01-01

    The reasons why people who are normally truthful to their spouses engage in sex away from home are discussed. These reasons can include loneliness, ego building or the opportunity to have homosexual relations. Sex away from home is likely to increase since the number of people traveling is increasing. (Author/CG)

  8. SETI@home

    Science.gov (United States)

    Project Help Donate Porting Graphics Add-ons Science About SETI@home About Astropulse Science Community Message boards Questions and Answers Teams Profiles User search Web sites Pictures and music User University of California SETI@home and Astropulse are funded by grants from the National Science Foundation

  9. Home | SREL Herpetology Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Savannah River Ecology Laboratory Herpetology Program Herp Home Research Publications Herps of SC /GA P.A.R.C. Outreach SREL Home powered by Google Search Herpetology at SREL The University of SREL herpetology research programs have always included faculty of the University of Georgia, post

  10. Creating a new home

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gram-Hanssen, Kirsten; Bech-Danielsen, Claus

    2012-01-01

    Housing research is increasingly focusing on how different groups of residents use their dwelling and transform it into a home. In this article, we look at the homes of immigrants in Danish social housing. The article is based on qualitative interviews with Somali, Iraqi and Turkish immigrants, a...

  11. European Home Energy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tommerup, Henrik M.

    2009-01-01

    An important aim of the european energy performance of buildings directive is to improve the overall energy efficiency of new homes......An important aim of the european energy performance of buildings directive is to improve the overall energy efficiency of new homes...

  12. Health Begins at Home

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    2009-03-30

    Clean and well-maintained homes can prevent many illnesses and injuries. This podcast discusses how good health begins at home.  Created: 3/30/2009 by Coordinating Center for Environmental Health and Injury Prevention (CCEHIP).   Date Released: 3/30/2009.

  13. Ostomy Home Skills Program

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... de Destrezas para manejo Doméstico de Ostomía Ostomy Home Skills Program Adult Ostomy Pediatric Ostomy Programa de Destrezas para manejo Doméstico de Ostomía The Ostomy Home Skills Kit supports patients with educational and simulation ...

  14. Technologies for Home Networking

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    A broad overview of the home networking field, ranging from wireless technologies to practical applications. In the future, it is expected that private networks (e.g. home networks) will become part of the global network ecosystem, participating in sharing their own content, running IP...

  15. Genetics Home Reference

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Page Search Home Health Conditions Genes Chromosomes & mtDNA Resources Help Me Understand Genetics Share: Email Facebook Twitter Genetics Home Reference provides consumer-friendly information about the effects of genetic variation on human health. Health Conditions More than 1,200 health ...

  16. Asteroids@Home

    Science.gov (United States)

    Durech, Josef; Hanus, J.; Vanco, R.

    2012-10-01

    We present a new project called Asteroids@home (http://asteroidsathome.net/boinc). It is a volunteer-computing project that uses an open-source BOINC (Berkeley Open Infrastructure for Network Computing) software to distribute tasks to volunteers, who provide their computing resources. The project was created at the Astronomical Institute, Charles University in Prague, in cooperation with the Czech National Team. The scientific aim of the project is to solve a time-consuming inverse problem of shape reconstruction of asteroids from sparse-in-time photometry. The time-demanding nature of the problem comes from the fact that with sparse-in-time photometry the rotation period of an asteroid is not apriori known and a huge parameter space must be densely scanned for the best solution. The nature of the problem makes it an ideal task to be solved by distributed computing - the period parameter space can be divided into small bins that can be scanned separately and then joined together to give the globally best solution. In the framework of the the project, we process asteroid photometric data from surveys together with asteroid lightcurves and we derive asteroid shapes and spin states. The algorithm is based on the lightcurve inversion method developed by Kaasalainen et al. (Icarus 153, 37, 2001). The enormous potential of distributed computing will enable us to effectively process also the data from future surveys (Large Synoptic Survey Telescope, Gaia mission, etc.). We also plan to process data of a synthetic asteroid population to reveal biases of the method. In our presentation, we will describe the project, show the first results (new models of asteroids), and discuss the possibilities of its further development. This work has been supported by the grant GACR P209/10/0537 of the Czech Science Foundation and by the Research Program MSM0021620860 of the Ministry of Education of the Czech Republic.

  17. Biometrics for home networks security

    KAUST Repository

    Ansari, Imran Shafique

    2009-01-01

    Hacking crimes committed to the home networks are increasing. Advanced network protection is not always possible for the home networks. In this paper we will study the ability of using biometric systems for authentication in home networks. ©2009 IEEE.

  18. Biometrics for home networks security

    KAUST Repository

    Ansari, Imran Shafique; Ahmad, Qutbuddin S.

    2009-01-01

    Hacking crimes committed to the home networks are increasing. Advanced network protection is not always possible for the home networks. In this paper we will study the ability of using biometric systems for authentication in home networks. ©2009

  19. Evolution of Home Automation Technology

    OpenAIRE

    Mohd. Rihan; M. Salim Beg

    2009-01-01

    In modern society home and office automation has becomeincreasingly important, providing ways to interconnectvarious home appliances. This interconnection results infaster transfer of information within home/offices leading tobetter home management and improved user experience.Home Automation, in essence, is a technology thatintegrates various electrical systems of a home to provideenhanced comfort and security. Users are grantedconvenient and complete control over all the electrical homeappl...

  20. Thrombophilic Genetic Factors PAI-1, MTHFRC677T, V Leiden 506Q, and Prothrombin 20210A in Noncirrhotic Portal Vein Thrombosis and Budd-Chiari Syndrome in a Caucasian Population

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mario D’Amico

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Thrombophilic genetic factors PAI-1, MTHFRC677T, V Leiden 506Q, and Prothrombin 20210A were studied as risk factors in 235 Caucasian subjects: 85 patients with abdominal thrombosis (54 with portal vein thrombosis (PVT and 31 with Budd-Chiari syndrome (BCS without liver cirrhosis or hepatocellular carcinoma and 150 blood bank donors. Seventy-five patients with PVT/BCS showed associated disease or particular clinical status (46 PVT/29 BCS: 37 myeloproliferative neoplasm (20 PVT/17 BCS, 12 abdominal surgery (10 PVT/2 BCS, 10 contraception or pregnancy (6 PVT/4 BCS, 7 abdominal acute disease (6 PVT/1 BCS, and 9 chronic disease (4 PVT/5 BCS; ten patients did not present any association (8 PVT/2 BCS. PAI-14G-4G, MTHFR677TT, and V Leiden 506Q were significantly frequent (OR 95% CI and χ2 test with P value in abdominal thrombosis; in these patients PAI-14G-4G and MTHFR677TT distributions deviated from that expected from a population in the Hardy-Weinberg equilibrium (PAI-1: χ2=13.8, P<0.001; MTHFR677: χ2=7.1, P<0.01, whereas the equilibrium was respected in healthy controls. V Leiden Q506 and Prothrombin 20210A were in the Hardy-Weinberg equilibrium both in patients with abdominal thrombosis and healthy controls. Our study shows an important role of PAI-14G-4G and MTHFR677TT in abdominal thrombosis without liver cirrhosis or hepatocellular carcinoma.

  1. Green House Adoption and Nursing Home Quality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Afendulis, Christopher C; Caudry, Daryl J; O'Malley, A James; Kemper, Peter; Grabowski, David C

    2016-02-01

    To evaluate the impact of the Green House (GH) model on nursing home resident-level quality of care measures. Resident-level minimum data set (MDS) assessments merged with Medicare inpatient claims for the period 2005 through 2010. Using a difference-in-differences framework, we compared changes in care quality and outcomes in 15 nursing homes that adopted the GH model relative to changes over the same time period in 223 matched nursing homes that had not adopted the GH model. For individuals residing in GH homes, adoption of the model lowered readmissions and several MDS measures of poor quality, including bedfast residents, catheter use, and pressure ulcers, but these results were not present across the entire GH organization, suggesting possible offsetting effects for residents of non-GH "legacy" units within the GH organization. GH adoption led to improvement in rehospitalizations and certain nursing home quality measures for individuals residing in a GH home. The absence of evidence of a decline in other clinical quality measures in GH nursing homes should reassure anyone concerned that GH might have sacrificed clinical quality for improved quality of life. © Health Research and Educational Trust.

  2. Home Within Me

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kreuzer, Maria; Mühlbacher, Hans; von Wallpach, Sylvia

    2017-01-01

    In an increasingly globalized, digitalized and perceived unmanageable world, consumers strive for belongingness, identification and security and re-discover the importance of home. Home is central to peoples’ individual as well as collective identities and their self-development (McCracken, 1989...... in Austria and the sample consisted of 15 locals (study 1) and 17 first generation immigrants (study 2) to identify possible commonalities and differences. This research adds to existing literature by 1) empirically confirming the existence of dimensions of home (e.g., physical, social, temporary...

  3. Preventive home visits to older home-dwelling people in Denmark: are invitational procedures of importance?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ekmann, A; Vass, M; Avlund, K

    2010-01-01

    Since 1998 all municipalities in Denmark have been required by law to offer two annual preventive home visits to all home-dwelling citizens aged 75 or over. The influence of invitational procedures on acceptance rates has not been investigated. The aim of this study was to describe and investigate...... whether different invitational procedures were associated with first preventive home visit acceptance rates. The study was based on secondary analyses of data from the Danish Intervention Study on Preventive Home Visits. Data were collected from 1998 to 2002. Of the 4060 participants in the main study......, 3245 reported receiving an offer for an identifiable preventive home visit, of whom 2399 (73.9%) provided complete data for the main analyses in the present study. Invitational procedures were categorised as: (1) a letter with a proposed date and time for the visit, (2) a visitor telephone call, and (3...

  4. Ostomy Home Skills Program

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Medical Student Core Curriculum ACS/ASE Medical Student Simulation-Based Surgical Skills Curriculum Cancer Education Cancer Education ... Home Skills Kit supports patients with educational and simulation materials to learn and practice the skills needed ...

  5. Ostomy Home Skills Program

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... of Surgeons Professional Association Advocate at Home Program State Legislative Action Center Leadership & Advocacy Summit Webinars Practice Management Practice Management Practice Management CPT Coding Bulletin Articles ...

  6. Nursing Home Data Compendium

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — The compendium contains figures and tables presenting data on all Medicare- and Medicaid-certified nursing homes in the United States as well as the residents in...

  7. HOME Income Limits

    Data.gov (United States)

    Department of Housing and Urban Development — HOME Income Limits are calculated using the same methodology that HUD uses for calculating the income limits for the Section 8 program. These limits are based on HUD...

  8. Pervasive Home Environments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bull, P.; Limb, R.; Payne, R.

    An increasing number of computers and other equipment, such as games consoles and multimedia appliances for the home, have networking capability. The rapid growth of broadband in the home is also fuelling the demand for people to network their homes. In the near future we will see a number of market sectors trying to 'own' the home by providing gateways either from the traditional ISP or from games and other service providers. The consumer is bombarded with attractive advertising to acquire the latest technological advances, but is left with a plethora of different appliances, which have a bewildering range of requirements and features in terms of networking, user interface, and higher-level communications protocols. In many cases, these are proprietary, preventing interworking. Such technical and usability anarchy confuses the consumer and could ultimately suppress market adoption.

  9. Ostomy Home Skills Program

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... for Hospitals Ostomy Home Skills Hospital Quality Improvement Package The standardized interactive program has been developed by the American College of Surgeons ... and Associates Medical Students International Surgeons ...

  10. Ostomy Home Skills Program

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... login or create account first) Skills Kits Broadcast Rights for Hospitals Ostomy Home Skills Hospital Quality Improvement Package The standardized interactive program has been developed by the ...

  11. Ostomy Home Skills Program

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... at ACS ACS and Veterans Diversity at ACS Benefits ... Profile Shop ( 0 ) Cart Donate American College of Surgeons Education Patients and Family Skills Programs Ostomy Home Skills ...

  12. Genetics Home Reference: achondroplasia

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Share: Email Facebook Twitter Home Health Conditions Achondroplasia Achondroplasia Printable PDF Open All Close All Enable Javascript to view the expand/collapse boxes. Description Achondroplasia is a form of short-limbed dwarfism. The ...

  13. Home Health Quality Initiative

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — The instrument-data collection tool used to collect and report performance data by home health agencies is called the Outcome and Assessment Information Set (OASIS)....

  14. Genetics Home Reference: phenylketonuria

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Share: Email Facebook Twitter Home Health Conditions Phenylketonuria Phenylketonuria Printable PDF Open All Close All Enable Javascript to view the expand/collapse boxes. Description Phenylketonuria (commonly known as PKU) is an inherited disorder ...

  15. Home Health Care Agencies

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — A list of all Home Health Agencies that have been registered with Medicare. The list includes addresses, phone numbers, and quality measure ratings for each agency.

  16. Genetics Home Reference: schizophrenia

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Share: Email Facebook Twitter Home Health Conditions Schizophrenia Schizophrenia Printable PDF Open All Close All Enable Javascript to view the expand/collapse boxes. Description Schizophrenia is a brain disorder classified as a psychosis, ...

  17. Nursing Home Compare Data

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — These are the official datasets used on the Medicare.gov Nursing Home Compare Website provided by the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services. These data allow...

  18. Building Homes, Building Careers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cohn, Meredith

    1987-01-01

    The Construction Trades Foundation, a nonprofit corporation of business, industry, and school leaders, provides high school students in Montgomery County, Maryland, with unique hands-on experiences in construction, home design, marketing, public relations, and other fields. (SK)

  19. Home Electrical Safety Checklist

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Interrupter Protection for Pools, Spas and Hot Tubs Metal Ladders and Electricity Don’t Mix Electrocution Hazard with Do-It-Yourself Repairs of Microwave Ovens Preventing Home Fires: Arc Fault Circuit Interrupters (AFCIs) Power up with ...

  20. Genetics Home Reference: depression

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Share: Email Facebook Twitter Home Health Conditions Depression Depression Printable PDF Open All Close All Enable Javascript to view the expand/collapse boxes. Description Depression (also known as major depression or major depressive ...

  1. Genetics Home Reference: alkaptonuria

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Share: Email Facebook Twitter Home Health Conditions Alkaptonuria Alkaptonuria Printable PDF Open All Close All Enable Javascript to view the expand/collapse boxes. Description Alkaptonuria is an inherited condition that causes urine to ...

  2. Home Health PPS - Reports

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — Abt Associates July 21, 2010 Analysis of 2000-2008 Home Health Case-mix Change Report estimates the extent to which the observed increases in average case-mix were...

  3. Ostomy Home Skills Program

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Resources Educational Resources E-Learning Entering Resident Readiness Assessment Evidence-Based Decisions in Surgery Medical Student Resources ... checklist Evaluation (Complete the Ostomy Patient Survey . We need your opinion!) Program outcomes The ACS Ostomy Home ...

  4. Genetics Home Reference: preeclampsia

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Share: Email Facebook Twitter Home Health Conditions Preeclampsia Preeclampsia Printable PDF Open All Close All Enable Javascript to view the expand/collapse boxes. Description Preeclampsia is a complication of pregnancy in which affected ...

  5. Ostomy Home Skills Program

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Stay Up to Date with ACS Association Management Jobs Events Find a Surgeon Patients and Family Contact My Profile Shop ( 0 ) Cart Donate American College of Surgeons Education Patients and Family Skills Programs Ostomy Home Skills ...

  6. Home Health Compare Data

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — These are the official datasets used on the Medicare.gov Home Health Compare Website provided by the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services. These data allow you...

  7. Ostomy Home Skills Program

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Centers National Cancer Database National Accreditation Program for Rectal Cancer Oncology Medical Home Accreditation Program Stereotactic Breast ... collaboration with the American Society of Colon and Rectal Surgeons (ASCRS), American Urological Association (AUA), Certified Enterostomal ...

  8. Nursing Home Compare

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — The data that is used by the Nursing Home Compare tool can be downloaded for public use. This functionality is primarily used by health policy researchers and the...

  9. Ostomy Home Skills Program

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Trauma and EMS Cancer and Research Health Information Technology Scope of Practice Pediatric Issues Other Federal Legislative ... The Ostomy Home Skills Kit supports patients with educational and simulation materials to learn and practice the ...

  10. Heart failure - home monitoring

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/patientinstructions/000113.htm Heart failure - home monitoring To use the sharing features on ... your high blood pressure Fast food tips Heart failure - discharge Heart failure - fluids and diuretics Heart failure - what to ...

  11. Home garden plums

    Science.gov (United States)

    The paper is to provide extension information on plums for home owners in Georgia and other Southeastern states. It includes seven sections: introduction, varieties, planting, pruning, fertilization, pests/diseases, and long term care....

  12. Home Health PPS

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — Under prospective payment, Medicare pays home health agencies (HHAs) a predetermined base payment. The payment is adjusted for the health condition and care needs of...

  13. Ostomy Home Skills Program

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Specific Registry Surgeon Specific Registry News and Updates Account Setup Resources and FAQs Features of the SSR ... Today Ostomy Home Skills Kit (login or create account first) Skills Kits Broadcast Rights for Hospitals Ostomy ...

  14. Ostomy Home Skills Program

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Up to Date with ACS Association Management JACS Jobs Events Find a Surgeon Patients and Family Contact My Profile Shop ( 0 ) Cart Donate American College of Surgeons Education Patients and Family Skills Programs Ostomy Home Skills ...

  15. Eye Injuries at Home

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... by the Numbers — Infographic Five Steps to Safer Champagne Celebrations Eye Injuries at Home Leer en Español: ... that can splatter hot grease or oil. Opening champagne bottles during a celebration. Drilling or hammering screws ...

  16. Ostomy Home Skills Program

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... ACS ACS and Veterans Diversity at ACS Benefits ... Profile Shop ( 0 ) Cart Donate American College of Surgeons Education Patients and Family Skills Programs Ostomy Home Skills ...

  17. Ostomy Home Skills Program

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... skills such as emptying and changing a pouch, problem solving, and home management. A DVD with demonstration of each skill Stoma Practice Model Stoma supplies (measurement guide, marking ...

  18. Private Investment Purchase and Nursing Home Financial Health

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cadigan, Rebecca Orfaly; Stevenson, David G; Caudry, Daryl J; Grabowski, David C

    2015-01-01

    Objective To explore the impact of nursing home acquisition by private investment firms on nursing home costs, revenue, and overall financial health. Data Sources Merged data from the Medicare Cost Reports and the Online Survey, Certification, and Reporting system for the period 1998–2010. Study Design Regression specification incorporating facility and time fixed effects. Principal Findings We found little impact on the financial health of nursing homes following purchase by private investment companies. However, our findings did suggest that private investment firms acquired nursing home chains in good financial health, possibly to derive profit from the company’s real estate holdings. Conclusions Private investment acquired facilities are an important feature of today’s nursing home sector. Although we did not observe a negative impact on the financial health of nursing homes, this development raises important issues about ownership oversight and transparency for the entire nursing home sector. PMID:25104476

  19. Private investment purchase and nursing home financial health.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orfaly Cadigan, Rebecca; Stevenson, David G; Caudry, Daryl J; Grabowski, David C

    2015-02-01

    To explore the impact of nursing home acquisition by private investment firms on nursing home costs, revenue, and overall financial health. Merged data from the Medicare Cost Reports and the Online Survey, Certification, and Reporting system for the period 1998-2010. Regression specification incorporating facility and time fixed effects. We found little impact on the financial health of nursing homes following purchase by private investment companies. However, our findings did suggest that private investment firms acquired nursing home chains in good financial health, possibly to derive profit from the company's real estate holdings. Private investment acquired facilities are an important feature of today's nursing home sector. Although we did not observe a negative impact on the financial health of nursing homes, this development raises important issues about ownership oversight and transparency for the entire nursing home sector. © Health Research and Educational Trust.

  20. Modelling home equity conversion loans with life insurance models

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Baškot Bojan

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Home equity represents a reserve that can be used for providing additional money for its owners during their retirement. Life insurance models can be successfully applied to model home equity conversion loans. The home equity conversion loan is a financial product that provides a certain flexibility by using home equity as a resource for a quality life during retirement. Home equity conversion loans do not have a predetermined maturity date, as do conventional loans. But, like every loan, it must be repaid. One potential advantage of using a home equity conversion loan during tough financial times instead of some types of need-based assistance is that eligibility is straightforward. Home equity conversion loans can be useful tools in the process of pension system reform.

  1. Home Area Networks and the Smart Grid

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Clements, Samuel L.; Carroll, Thomas E.; Hadley, Mark D.

    2011-04-01

    With the wide array of home area network (HAN) options being presented as solutions to smart grid challenges for the home, it is time to compare and contrast their strengths and weaknesses. This white paper examines leading and emerging HAN technologies. The emergence of the smart grid is bringing more networking players into the field. The need for low consistent bandwidth usage differs enough from the traditional information technology world to open the door to new technologies. The predominant players currently consist of a blend of the old and new. Within the wired world Ethernet and HomePlug Green PHY are leading the way with an advantage to HomePlug because it doesn't require installing new wires. In the wireless the realm there are many more competitors but WiFi and ZigBee seem to have the most momentum.

  2. High performance homes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Beim, Anne; Vibæk, Kasper Sánchez

    2014-01-01

    Can prefabrication contribute to the development of high performance homes? To answer this question, this chapter defines high performance in more broadly inclusive terms, acknowledging the technical, architectural, social and economic conditions under which energy consumption and production occur....... Consideration of all these factors is a precondition for a truly integrated practice and as this chapter demonstrates, innovative project delivery methods founded on the manufacturing of prefabricated buildings contribute to the production of high performance homes that are cost effective to construct, energy...

  3. Australia's Bond Home Bias

    OpenAIRE

    Anil V. Mishra; Umaru B. Conteh

    2014-01-01

    This paper constructs the float adjusted measure of home bias and explores the determinants of bond home bias by employing the International Monetary Fund's high quality dataset (2001 to 2009) on cross-border bond investment. The paper finds that Australian investors' prefer investing in countries with higher economic development and more developed bond markets. Exchange rate volatility appears to be an impediment for cross-border bond investment. Investors prefer investing in countries with ...

  4. Sms-Based Home Management System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paing Soe Oo

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Mobile phones are widely used nowadays for different application such as wireless control and monitoring due to its availability and ease of use. The implemented system is based on global system mobile GSM network by using short message service SMS. The design mainly contains a GSM modem and Arduino Uno. In this work the system will be described how to manage and control home appliances using mobile phone people can use this system to do things in their home from a far place before they reach home. For instance user may controlmanage hisher home lighting door or water pump which needed in daily life in different area House Office or factory etc. when they are away from home. The user can check the condition in the home that light is on or off door is locked or unlocked water pump is on or off and so on. If the time taken for this appliances to perform a task is known that can also be set so that if the time elapsed the appliance will automatically switch off itself. The control is done by sending a specific SMS messages from smart phone to a SIM900 and Arduino Uno which is connected to the appliance once the message is received the SIM 900 will send the command to a microcontroller in Arduino for controlling the appliance appropriately. Also feedback status of three devices can be requested in designed system.

  5. More Than Four Walls: The Meaning of Home in Home Birth Experiences

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emily Burns

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available The “home versus hospital” as places of birth debate has had a long and at times vicious history. From academic literature to media coverage, the two have often been pitted against each other not only as opposing physical spaces, but also as opposing ideologies of birth. The hospital has been heavily critiqued as a site of childbirth since the 1960s, with particular focus on childbirth and medicalisation. The focus of much of the hospital and home birthing research exists on a continuum of medicalisation, safety, risk, agency, and maternal and neonatal health and wellbeing. While the hospital birthing space has been interrogated, a critique of home birthing space has remained largely absent from the social sciences. The research presented in this article unpacks the complex relationship between home birthing women and the spaces in which they birth. Using qualitative data collected with 59 home birthing women in Australia in 2010, between childbearing and the home should not be considered as merely an alternative to hospital births, but rather as an experience that completely renegotiates the home space. Home, for the participants in this study, is a dynamic, changing, and even spiritual element in the childbirth experience, and not simply the building in which it occurs.

  6. Smartphone home monitoring of ECG

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szu, Harold; Hsu, Charles; Moon, Gyu; Landa, Joseph; Nakajima, Hiroshi; Hata, Yutaka

    2012-06-01

    A system of ambulatory, halter, electrocardiography (ECG) monitoring system has already been commercially available for recording and transmitting heartbeats data by the Internet. However, it enjoys the confidence with a reservation and thus a limited market penetration, our system was targeting at aging global villagers having an increasingly biomedical wellness (BMW) homecare needs, not hospital related BMI (biomedical illness). It was designed within SWaP-C (Size, Weight, and Power, Cost) using 3 innovative modules: (i) Smart Electrode (lowpower mixed signal embedded with modern compressive sensing and nanotechnology to improve the electrodes' contact impedance); (ii) Learnable Database (in terms of adaptive wavelets transform QRST feature extraction, Sequential Query Relational database allowing home care monitoring retrievable Aided Target Recognition); (iii) Smartphone (touch screen interface, powerful computation capability, caretaker reporting with GPI, ID, and patient panic button for programmable emergence procedure). It can provide a supplementary home screening system for the post or the pre-diagnosis care at home with a build-in database searchable with the time, the place, and the degree of urgency happened, using in-situ screening.

  7. Administrative circular n°3 (Rev. 2) – Home leave, travel to home station and assimilated leave and travel

    CERN Multimedia

    2013-01-01

    Administrative Circular No. 3 (Rev. 2) entitled “Home leave, travel to the home station and assimilated leave and travel”, approved by the Director-General following discussion at the Standing Concertation Committee meeting of 11 October 2012 and entering into force on 1 January 2013, is available on the intranet site of the Human Resources Department.   This circular is applicable to employed members of the personnel. It cancels and replaces Administrative Circular No. 3 (Rev. 1) entitled “Travel to the home station and home leave” of June 2002. The circular was revised in order to take into account the new status of Associate Member State and the fact that henceforth, home stations may be situated on territory outside of Europe. It is proposed to introduce a new system of determination of the benefits (Travel expenses, travel time and distance indemnity) granted in the context of home leave and supplementary journeys to the home station.  For t...

  8. Smart assistants for smart homes

    OpenAIRE

    Rasch, Katharina

    2013-01-01

    The smarter homes of tomorrow promise to increase comfort, aid elderly and disabled people, and help inhabitants save energy. Unfortunately, smart homes today are far from this vision – people who already live in such a home struggle with complicated user interfaces, inflexible home configurations, and difficult installation procedures. Under these circumstances, smart homes are not ready for mass adoption. This dissertation addresses these issues by proposing two smart assistants for smart h...

  9. Progranulin inhibits platelet aggregation and prolongs bleeding time in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Yahya, A M; Al-Masri, A A; El Eter, E A; Hersi, A; Lateef, R; Mawlana, O

    2018-05-01

    Several adipokines secreted by adipose tissue have an anti-thrombotic and anti-atherosclerotic function. Recently identified adipokine progranulin was found to play a protective role in atherosclerosis. Bearing in mind the central role of platelets in inflammation and atherosclerosis, we aimed, in this study, to examine the effect of progranulin on platelet function and coagulation profile in rats. Healthy male albino Wistar rats weighing (250-300 g) were divided into 4 groups. Three groups were given increasing doses of progranulin (0.001 µg, 0.01 µg, and 0.1 µg) intraperitoneally, while the control group received phosphate-buffered saline (PBS). Bleeding time, prothrombin time, activated partial thromboplastin time and platelet aggregation responses to adenosine diphosphate and arachidonic acid were assessed. Administration of progranulin resulted in a significant inhibition of platelet aggregation in response to both adenosine diphosphate, and arachidonic acid. Bleeding time, prothrombin time and activated partial thromboplastin time were significantly prolonged in all groups that received progranulin, in particular, the 0.1 µg dose, in comparison to the control group. This preliminary data is first suggesting that the antiplatelet and anticoagulant action of progranulin could have a physiological protective function against thrombotic disorders associated with obesity and atherosclerosis. However, these results merit further exploration.

  10. Smart homes with smartphones : Creating a Smart home application for smartphones

    OpenAIRE

    Lärka, Martin

    2015-01-01

    The goal of this master thesis was to evaluate the field of Smart home applications run on mobile platforms such as smart phones. This was at the time a relatively new field that has attracted the attention of Smart phone giants like Apple and Google. This raised the question whether or not the users willingness to embrace the technology. To evaluate the field, a literature study was conducted covering the Smart home technology, and Apple’s and Google’s Smart home solutions. The rendered in a...

  11. Coming Home at Paranal

    Science.gov (United States)

    2002-02-01

    Unique "Residencia" Opens at the VLT Observatory Summary The Paranal Residencia at the ESO VLT Observatory is now ready and the staff and visitors have moved into their new home. This major architectural project has the form of a unique subterranean construction with a facade opening towards the Pacific Ocean , far below at a distance of about 12 km. Natural daylight is brought into the building through a 35-m wide glass-covered dome, a rectangular courtyard roof and various skylight hatches. Located in the middle of the Atacama Desert, one of the driest areas on Earth, the Residencia incorporates a small garden and a swimming pool, allowing the inhabitants to retreat from time to time from the harsh outside environment. Returning from long shifts at the VLT and other installations on the mountain, here they can breathe moist air and receive invigorating sensory impressions. With great originality of the design, it has been possible to create an interior with a feeling of open space - this is a true "home in the desert" . Moreover, with strict ecological power, air and water management , the Paranal Residencia has already become a symbol of innovative architecture in its own right. Constructed with robust, but inexpensive materials, it is an impressively elegant and utilitarian counterpart to the VLT high-tech facilities poised some two hundred meters above, on the top of the mountain. PR Photo 05a/02 : Aerial view of the Paranal Observatory area. PR Photo 05b/02 : Aerial view of the Paranal Residencia . PR Photo 05c/02 : Outside view of the Paranal Residencia . PR Photo 05d/02 : The Entry Hall (fisheye view). PR Photo 05e/02 : The Entry Hall with garden and pool. PR Photo 05f/02 : The Reception Area . PR Photo 05g/02 : The Reception Area - decoration. PR Photo 05h/02 : The Reception Area - decoration. PR Photo 05i/02 : The Reception Area - decoration. PR Photo 05j/02 : View towards the Cantine . PR Photo 05k/02 : View towards the Kitchen . PR Photo 05l/02 : View

  12. ATLAS@Home looks for CERN volunteers

    CERN Multimedia

    Rosaria Marraffino

    2014-01-01

    ATLAS@Home is a CERN volunteer computing project that runs simulated ATLAS events. As the project ramps up, the project team is looking for CERN volunteers to test the system before planning a bigger promotion for the public.   The ATLAS@home outreach website. ATLAS@Home is a large-scale research project that runs ATLAS experiment simulation software inside virtual machines hosted by volunteer computers. “People from all over the world offer up their computers’ idle time to run simulation programmes to help physicists extract information from the large amount of data collected by the detector,” explains Claire Adam Bourdarios of the ATLAS@Home project. “The ATLAS@Home project aims to extrapolate the Standard Model at a higher energy and explore what new physics may look like. Everything we’re currently running is preparation for next year's run.” ATLAS@Home became an official BOINC (Berkeley Open Infrastructure for Network ...

  13. Medicine management in municipal home care : delegating, administrating and receiving

    OpenAIRE

    Gransjön Craftman, Åsa

    2015-01-01

    The general aim of this thesis was to investigate how delegation of medication is handled in municipal home care. Specific aims were to 1) explore the prevalence of medication use in older adults over time; 2) describe district nurses’ experiences of the delegation of medication management to municipal home care personnel; 3) explore and describe how home care assistants experience receiving the actual delegation of the responsibility of medication administration; and 4) to describe how older...

  14. Do parents and best friends influence the normative increase in adolescents' alcohol use at home and outside the home?

    Science.gov (United States)

    van der Vorst, Haske; Engels, Rutger C M E; Burk, William J

    2010-01-01

    The present study explored the possible impact of parental supervision of adolescents' alcohol use and drinking with parents on concurrent and prospective associations between adolescents' drinking at home and drinking outside the home. The impact of drinking with their best friend, parental drinking behaviors, and sibling influence on adolescent alcohol use were also examined, as well as whether drinking at home and outside the home predicted problem drinking. We used three waves of longitudinal full-family data (fathers, mothers, and two adolescent siblings; N = 428). Bi-directional effects between drinking at home and drinking outside the home were found for both adolescents, with drinking in one setting predicting drinking in another setting over time. Both drinking at home and drinking outside the home predicted subsequent problem drinking. These associations did not differ as a function of adolescents drinking with parents or their best friend or of parental supervision of adolescents' alcohol use. Only adolescents' gender seemed to moderate these effects but solely in midadolescence. For 15-year-old boys (but not for girls), at-home drinking predicted outside-the-home drinking 1 year later. Taken together, adolescents' alcohol use increases over time, regardless of setting or with whom they drink. According to these results, prevention workers should focus on making parents more aware of their role in delaying the age at drinking onset.

  15. Reflections: Volunteering at Home.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Amanda

    2016-08-01

    Many young people look forward to volunteering abroad and overlook the ample volunteer opportunities at home. There are several advantages to volunteering at home: you help people in your own community; you can make a long-term commitment; and you have continuity of care for your patients. There are >1200 free clinics in the United States whose main goal is to provide care to the indigent population. These free clinics are always looking for volunteers with specialized medical training. This article reviews the medically related and unrelated volunteer opportunities available in the United States. Volunteering at home is a worthwhile experience, and I encourage the otolaryngology community to explore these opportunities. © American Academy of Otolaryngology—Head and Neck Surgery Foundation 2016.

  16. HomePort

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Le Guilly, Thibaut; Olsen, Petur; Ravn, Anders Peter

    2013-01-01

    Ambient Intelligence systems use many sensors and actuators, with a diversity of networks, protocols and technologies which makes it impossible to access the devices in a common manner. This paper presents the HomePort software, which provides an open source RESTful interface to heterogeneous...... sensor networks, allowing a simple unified access to virtually any kind of protocol using well known standards. HomePort includes means to provide event notification, as well as a tracing mechanism. The software is implemented and we report on initial experiments and provide an evaluation that shows...

  17. Association Between the 20210G>A Prothrombin Gene Polymorphism and Arterial Ischemic Stroke in Children and Young Adults-Two Meta-analyses of 3586 Cases and 6440 Control Subjects in Total.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarecka-Hujar, Beata; Kopyta, Ilona; Skrzypek, Michal; Sordyl, Joanna

    2017-04-01

    Previous data have shown that the 20210G>A polymorphism of the Factor II gene is related to an increased prothrombin level, which may in turn lead to a procoagulant state. The heterogeneous and multifactorial character of arterial ischemic stroke often results in contradictory reports describing the association between the 20210G>A polymorphism and arterial ischemic stroke in different populations. We performed a meta-analysis of available data addressing the relation between the FII 20210G>A polymorphism and arterial ischemic stroke, both in young adults and children. We searched PubMed using appropriate keywords. The inclusion criteria for the study were as follows: case-control study, study population consisting of children, study population consisting of young adults, arterial ischemic stroke confirmed by magnetic resonance imaging or computed tomography, and English language. The exclusion criteria included lack of genotype or allele frequencies, study design other than a case-control study, outcome definition other than arterial ischemic stroke, and previously overlapped patient groups. Finally, 30 case-control studies (14 in children and 16 in young adults) were included. Statistical analyses were conducted using R software. Heterogeneity between the studies was evaluated using the Dersimonian and Laird's Q test. In the case of significant between-studies heterogeneity, the pooled odds ratio was estimated with a random-effects model, otherwise a fixed-effects model was used. The pooled analysis showed that carriers of 20210A allele (GA+AA genotypes) of the prothrombin gene are more common in arterial ischemic stroke patients, both in children and young adults, than in control subjects (P = 0.006; odds ratio, 1.83; 95% confidence interval, 1.19 to 2.80 and P = 0.001; odds ratio, 1.69; 95% confidence interval, 1.25 to 2.28, respectively). The results of the present meta-analysis have proven that the FII 20210G>A polymorphism is associated with arterial

  18. Losing Items in the Psychogeriatric Nursing Home

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. van Hoof PhD

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Losing items is a time-consuming occurrence in nursing homes that is ill described. An explorative study was conducted to investigate which items got lost by nursing home residents, and how this affects the residents and family caregivers. Method: Semi-structured interviews and card sorting tasks were conducted with 12 residents with early-stage dementia and 12 family caregivers. Thematic analysis was applied to the outcomes of the sessions. Results: The participants stated that numerous personal items and assistive devices get lost in the nursing home environment, which had various emotional, practical, and financial implications. Significant amounts of time are spent on trying to find items, varying from 1 hr up to a couple of weeks. Numerous potential solutions were identified by the interviewees. Discussion: Losing items often goes together with limitations to the participation of residents. Many family caregivers are reluctant to replace lost items, as these items may get lost again.

  19. Monitoring Quality Across Home Visiting Models: A Field Test of Michigan's Home Visiting Quality Assurance System.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heany, Julia; Torres, Jennifer; Zagar, Cynthia; Kostelec, Tiffany

    2018-06-05

    Introduction In order to achieve the positive outcomes with parents and children demonstrated by many home visiting models, home visiting services must be well implemented. The Michigan Home Visiting Initiative developed a tool and procedure for monitoring implementation quality across models referred to as Michigan's Home Visiting Quality Assurance System (MHVQAS). This study field tested the MHVQAS. This article focuses on one of the study's evaluation questions: Can the MHVQAS be applied across models? Methods Eight local implementing agencies (LIAs) from four home visiting models (Healthy Families America, Early Head Start-Home Based, Parents as Teachers, Maternal Infant Health Program) and five reviewers participated in the study by completing site visits, tracking their time and costs, and completing surveys about the process. LIAs also submitted their most recent review by their model developer. The researchers conducted participant observation of the review process. Results Ratings on the MHVQAS were not significantly different between models. There were some differences in interrater reliability and perceived reliability between models. There were no significant differences between models in perceived validity, satisfaction with the review process, or cost to participate. Observational data suggested that cross-model applicability could be improved by assisting sites in relating the requirements of the tool to the specifics of their model. Discussion The MHVQAS shows promise as a tool and process to monitor implementation quality of home visiting services across models. The results of the study will be used to make improvements before the MHVQAS is used in practice.

  20. Windows Home Server users guide

    CERN Document Server

    Edney, Andrew

    2008-01-01

    Windows Home Server brings the idea of centralized storage, backup and computer management out of the enterprise and into the home. Windows Home Server is built for people with multiple computers at home and helps to synchronize them, keep them updated, stream media between them, and back them up centrally. Built on a similar foundation as the Microsoft server operating products, it's essentially Small Business Server for the home.This book details how to install, configure, and use Windows Home Server and explains how to connect to and manage different clients such as Windows XP, Windows Vist

  1. Home advantage in the Winter Paralympic Games 1976-2014.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, Darryl; Ramchandani, Girish

    2017-01-01

    There is a limited amount of home advantage research concerned with winter sports. There is also a distinct lack of studies that investigate home advantage in the context of para sport events. This paper addresses this gap in the knowledge by examining home advantage in the Winter Paralympic Games. Using a standardised measure of success, we compared the performances of host nations at home with their own performances away from home between 1976 and 2014. Both country level and individual sport level analysis is conducted for this time period. Comparisons are also drawn with the Winter Olympic Games since 1992, the point from which both the Winter Olympic Games and the Winter Paralympic Games have been hosted by the same nations and in the same years. Clear evidence of a home advantage effect in the Winter Paralympic Games was found at country level. When examining individual sports, only alpine skiing and cross country skiing returned a significant home advantage effect. When comparing home advantage in the Winter Paralympic Games with the Winter Olympic Games for the last seven host nations (1992-2014), we found that home advantage was generally more pronounced (although not a statistically significant difference) in the case of the former. The causes of home advantage in the Winter Paralympic Games are unclear and should be investigated further.

  2. Smart Home System Based on GSM Network

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bakhtiar Ali Karim

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available Due to increasing robbery and intrusion, establishing home-security system has become a correlated part of the modern houses, buildings, and offices. As the family members are not at home all the time, the traditional home security system, which makes alarm sound only, may not be efficient enough. Alternatively, Global System for Mobile communications (GSM based security system can provide higher level of security and convenience compared to the traditionally used systems. The main objective of the current paper is to design and implement cost-efficient and reliable security, safety and home automation system for protection and occupants’ convenience. If any undesired events, such as intrusion, gas leakage and fire occurs in the house, our system warns the homeowner in real-time using Short Message Service (SMS. With the proposed system home appliances can also be controlled in three ways, namely sending SMS from the authorized numbers to the system through GSM network, smartphone app using Bluetooth module and infrared (IR control using IR module

  3. Home Health Compare: Find a Home Health Agency

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... page could not be loaded. The Medicare.gov Home page currently does not fully support browsers with " ... widget - Select to show Back to top Footer Home A federal government website managed and paid for ...

  4. AP@home: The Artificial Pancreas Is Now at Home.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heinemann, Lutz; Benesch, Carsten; DeVries, J Hans

    2016-07-01

    In the past years the development of an artificial pancreas (AP) has made great progress and many activities are ongoing in this area of research. The major step forward made in the last years was moving the evaluation of AP systems from highly controlled experimental conditions to daily life conditions at the home of patients with diabetes; this was also the aim of the European Union-funded AP@home project. Over a time period of 5 years a series of clinical studies were performed that culminated in 2 "final studies" during which an AP system was used by patients in their home environment for 2 or 3 months without supervision by a physician, living their normal lives. Two different versions of the AP system developed within this project were evaluated. A significant improvement in glycated hemoglobin was observed during closed-loop conditions despite the fact that during the control period the patients used the best currently available therapeutic option. In addition, a "single-port AP system" was developed within the project that combines continuous glucose monitoring and insulin infusion at a single tissue site. By using such a combined device the patients not only have to carry one less device around, the number of access points through the skin is also reduced from 2 to 1. In summary, close cooperation of 12 European partners, both academic centers and industry, enabled the development and evaluation of AP systems under daily life conditions. The next step is to develop these into products in cooperation with commercial partners. © 2016 Diabetes Technology Society.

  5. Home readings of blood pressure in assessment of hypertensive subjects

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, P.E.; Myschetzky, P; Andersen, A R

    1986-01-01

    Out-patient clinic blood pressure (OPC-BP) was compared to home blood pressure (Home-BP) measured three times daily during a two week period in 122 consecutively referred hypertensive subjects. A semi-automatic device (TM-101) including a microphone for detection of Korotkoff-sounds, self......-deflation of cuff pressure and digital display of blood pressure was used. Mean difference between OPC-BP and Home-BP was systolic +13 mm Hg (range -21 - +100 mg Hg) and diastolic +5 mm Hg (range -27 - +36 mm Hg). Although a significant correlation could be demonstrated between Home-BP and OPC-BP, the inter...

  6. ThinkHome Energy Efficiency in Future Smart Homes

    OpenAIRE

    Christian Reinisch; Mario J. Kofler; Félix Iglesias; Wolfgang Kastner

    2011-01-01

    Abstract Smart homes have been viewed with increasing interest by both home owners and the research community in the past few years. One reason for this development is that the use of modern automation technology in the home or building promises considerable savings of energy, therefore, simultaneously reducing the operational costs of the building over its whole lifecycle. However, the full potential of smart homes still lies fallow, due to the complexity and diversity of the systems, badly ...

  7. Home Automation : Smart home technology and template house design

    OpenAIRE

    Zheng, Zeya

    2013-01-01

    In this thesis, home automation’s general knowledge, technology information and each component will be introduced to the reader in the first half of the whole thesis. In the second half, thesis includes the Home Automation template design and market competitiveness analysis. The author assumes that the reader is going to spend lots of money to have a smart home. In this situation, the author introduces the home automation to the reader at each component. So the reader in this thesis actu...

  8. Ostomy Home Skills Program

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Workforce Trauma and EMS Cancer and Research Health Information Technology Scope of Practice Pediatric Issues Other Federal Legislative ... Overview The skills kit contains: A booklet with information on the ... and home management. A DVD with demonstration of each skill Stoma ...

  9. Future Home Network Requirements

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Charbonnier, Benoit; Wessing, Henrik; Lannoo, Bart

    This paper presents the requirements for future Home Area Networks (HAN). Firstly, we discuss the applications and services as well as their requirements. Then, usage scenarios are devised to establish a first specification for the HAN. The main requirements are an increased bandwidth (towards 1...

  10. Home Ventilator Guide

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... lower cost, and compensation for leaks from masks. Disadvantages include lack of internal batteries, no or few ... www.gerespiratorycarecentral.com/home_care.php Löwenstein Medical Technology GmbH + Co. KG (Weinmann.de) https://loewensteinmedical.de/ ...

  11. Kinunigmi (At Home).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pulu, Tupou L.; And Others

    This first level social studies text, designed for children in bilingual Inupiat-English programs in the Alaskan villages of Ambler, Kobuk, Kiana, Noorvik, Selawik, and Shungnak, is a story about a little girl's activities in her home. Each page of text is illustrated with a black-and-white drawing. (CFM)

  12. Home, Hearth and Computing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seelig, Anita

    1982-01-01

    Advantages of having children use microcomputers at school and home include learning about sophisticated concepts early in life without a great deal of prodding, playing games that expand knowledge, and becoming literate in computer knowledge needed later in life. Includes comments from parents on their experiences with microcomputers and…

  13. Ostomy Home Skills Program

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Workforce Trauma and EMS Cancer and Research Health Information Technology Scope of Practice Pediatric Issues Other Federal Legislative ... supports the entire surgical team with quality, comprehensive education. The ... A booklet with information on the operation, home skills such as emptying ...

  14. Home vision tests

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... missing areas. If any lines appear distorted or broken, note their location on the grid using a pen or pencil. DISTANCE VISION This is the standard eye chart doctors use, which has been adapted for home use. The chart is attached to a wall ...

  15. Ostomy Home Skills Program

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... emptying and changing a pouch, problem solving, and home management. A DVD with demonstration of each skill Stoma Practice Model Stoma supplies (measurement guide, marking pen, scissors, sample pouch) Ostomy self-care checklist Evaluation (Complete the Ostomy Patient Survey . We ...

  16. At Home with Students

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lyngsø, Anita

    2015-01-01

    This article reflects the methodological challenges presented in the research process, where the principle of 'following the field’ means that the researcher must also follow students engaged in online activities in their own homes. The ethnographic studies are a part of a PhD project...

  17. Depression in nursing homes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Snowdon, John

    2010-11-01

    Although studies have shown the prevalence of depression in nursing homes to be high, under-recognition of depression in these facilities is widespread. Use of screening tests to enhance detection of depressive symptoms has been recommended. This paper aims to provoke discussion about optimal management of depression in nursing homes. The utility of the Cornell Scale for Depression in Dementia (CSDD) is considered. CSDD data relating to residents assessed in 2008-2009 were collected from three Sydney nursing homes. CSDD scores were available from 162 residents, though raters stated they were unable to score participants on at least one item in 47 cases. Scores of 13 or more were recorded for 23% of residents in these facilities, but in most of these cases little was documented in case files to show that the results had been discussed by staff, or that they led to interventions, or that follow-up testing was arranged. Results of CSDD testing should prompt care staff (including doctors) to consider causation of depression in cases where residents are identified as possibly depressed. In particular, there needs to be discussion of how to help residents to cope with disability, losses, and feelings of powerlessness. Research is needed, examining factors that might predict response to antidepressants, and what else helps. Accreditation of nursing homes could be made to depend partly on evidence that staff regularly search for, and (if found) ensure appropriate responses to, depression.

  18. Home Network Security

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Scholten, Hans; van Dijk, Hylke

    2008-01-01

    Service discovery and secure and safe service usage are essential elements in the deployment of home and personal networks. Because no system administrator is present, setup and daily operation of such a network has to be automated as much as possible with a high degree of user friendliness. To

  19. Personalized Home-Networks

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Soler, José; Gandy, Michael

    2007-01-01

    The paper provides details of a home-networking architecture based on an enhanced residential gateway. Initially the need for mechanisms allowing user-dependent network behavior is described and afterwards details of an initial implementation are provided in terms of architectural description...

  20. Home-based care

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Mrs. Patience Edoho Samson-Akpan

    study was to ascertain the relationship between home-based care and quality of life of PLWHA in support groups in. Calabar South Local Government Area. A correlational design was utilized and a purposive sample of 74 PLWHA participated in the study. A self developed and well validated questionnaire was used for data ...

  1. Doing Home Works

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nelund, Sidsel

    2013-01-01

    of aesthetic analysis of artworks and ethnographic fieldwork (Georgina Born); and 3) the use of generative ethnographic stories as a writing tool (Helen Verran). The latter two, especially, are then employed in analysing the Beirut-based extended exhibition, ‘Home Works: A Forum on Cultural Practices...

  2. Protokoller til Home Automation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kjær, Kristian Ellebæk

    2008-01-01

    computer, der kan skifte mellem foruddefinerede indstillinger. Nogle gange kan computeren fjernstyres over internettet, så man kan se hjemmets status fra en computer eller måske endda fra en mobiltelefon. Mens nævnte anvendelser er klassiske indenfor home automation, er yderligere funktionalitet dukket op...

  3. Ostomy Home Skills Program

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... The Ostomy Home Skills Kit supports patients with educational and simulation materials to learn and practice the skills needed for optimal postoperative recovery. The kit supports the entire surgical team with quality, comprehensive education. The standardized interactive program has been ...

  4. Ostomy Home Skills Program

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Contact My Profile Shop ( 0 ) Cart Donate American College of Surgeons Education Patients and Family Skills Programs Ostomy Home Skills ... facs.org Copyright © 1996-2018 by the American College of Surgeons, Chicago, IL 60611-3295 | Privacy Policy | Terms of Use

  5. Composting Begins at Home.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dreckman, George P.

    1994-01-01

    Reports the results of a year-long home composting pilot program run by the city of Madison, Wisconsin. The study was designed to gather data on the amount and type of materials composted by 300 volunteer households and to determine the feasibility of a full-scale program. (LZ)

  6. Ostomy Home Skills Program

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Use Patient Opioid Use Position Statements and Task Force Patient Education Initiatives Advocacy and Health Policy Updates Selected Research ... at ACS ACS and Veterans Diversity at ACS Benefits ... Profile Shop ( 0 ) Cart Donate American College of Surgeons Education Patients and Family Skills Programs Ostomy Home Skills ...

  7. High performance homes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Beim, Anne; Vibæk, Kasper Sánchez

    2014-01-01

    . Consideration of all these factors is a precondition for a truly integrated practice and as this chapter demonstrates, innovative project delivery methods founded on the manufacturing of prefabricated buildings contribute to the production of high performance homes that are cost effective to construct, energy...

  8. Feasibility of BCI Control in a Realistic Smart Home Environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kosmyna, Nataliya; Tarpin-Bernard, Franck; Bonnefond, Nicolas; Rivet, Bertrand

    2016-01-01

    Smart homes have been an active area of research, however despite considerable investment, they are not yet a reality for end-users. Moreover, there are still accessibility challenges for the elderly or the disabled, two of the main potential targets for home automation. In this exploratory study we design a control mechanism for smart homes based on Brain Computer Interfaces (BCI) and apply it in the “Domus”1 smart home platform in order to evaluate the potential interest of users about BCIs at home. We enable users to control lighting, a TV set, a coffee machine and the shutters of the smart home. We evaluate the performance (accuracy, interaction time), usability and feasibility (USE questionnaire) on 12 healthy subjects and 2 disabled subjects. We find that healthy subjects achieve 77% task accuracy. However, disabled subjects achieved a better accuracy (81% compared to 77%). PMID:27616986

  9. Feasibility of BCI Control in a Realistic Smart Home Environment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nataliya Kosmyna

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Smart homes have been an active area of research, however despite considerable investment, they are not yet a reality for end-users. Moreover, there are still accessibility challenges for the elderly or the disabled, two of the main potential targets for home automation. In this exploratory study we design a control mechanism for smart homes based on Brain Computer Interfaces (BCI and apply it in the Domus smart home platform in order to evaluate the potential interest of users about BCIs at home. We enable users to control lighting, a TV set, a coffee machine and the shutters of the smart home. We evaluate the performance (accuracy, interaction time, usability and feasibility (USE questionnaire on 12 healthy subjects and 2 disabled subjects. We find that healthy subjects achieve 77% task accuracy. However, disabled subjects achieved a better accuracy (81% compared to 77%.

  10. Feasibility of BCI Control in a Realistic Smart Home Environment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kosmyna, Nataliya; Tarpin-Bernard, Franck; Bonnefond, Nicolas; Rivet, Bertrand

    2016-01-01

    Smart homes have been an active area of research, however despite considerable investment, they are not yet a reality for end-users. Moreover, there are still accessibility challenges for the elderly or the disabled, two of the main potential targets for home automation. In this exploratory study we design a control mechanism for smart homes based on Brain Computer Interfaces (BCI) and apply it in the "Domus" smart home platform in order to evaluate the potential interest of users about BCIs at home. We enable users to control lighting, a TV set, a coffee machine and the shutters of the smart home. We evaluate the performance (accuracy, interaction time), usability and feasibility (USE questionnaire) on 12 healthy subjects and 2 disabled subjects. We find that healthy subjects achieve 77% task accuracy. However, disabled subjects achieved a better accuracy (81% compared to 77%).

  11. Home telecare for older persons: experiences and perceived effects.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Peeters, J.; Francke, A.

    2010-01-01

    Introduction: Western countries have to face a strongly increasing health care demand, related to ageing of population and an increasing number of chronically ill. At the same time, a growing nursing shortage exists. Home telecare provides opportunities in this regard. Up till now, home telecare in

  12. Persona-based Adaptation in a Smart Green Home

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Havinga, P. (Paul); Leeuwen, van H. (Henk); Salomons, E. (Etto); Teeuw, W. (Wouter)

    2012-01-01

    In this paper Etto Salomons presents his vision of the GoGreen project on a smart home that is capable of decreasing energy consumption while at the same time increasing user comfort. To identify the main challenges he introduces a general model for intelligent homes that describes the current

  13. Home births in the United States, 1990-2009.

    Science.gov (United States)

    MacDorman, Marian F; Mathews, T J; Declercq, Eugene

    2012-01-01

    After 14 years of decline, the percentage of home births rose by 29% from 2004 to 2009, to the point where it is at the highest level since data on this item began to be collected in 1989. The overall increase in home births was driven mostly by a 36% increase for non-Hispanic white women. About 1 out of every 90 births to non-Hispanic white women are now home births. The percentage of home births for non-Hispanic white women was three to five times higher than for any other racial or ethnic group. Home births have a lower risk profile than hospital births, with fewer births to teenagers or unmarried women, and with fewer preterm, low birthweight, and multiple births. The lower risk profile of home compared with hospital births suggests that home birth attendants are selecting low-risk women as candidates for home birth. The increase in the percentage of home births from 2004 to 2009 was widespread and involved selected states from every region of the country. The large variations in the percentage of home births by state may be influenced by differences among states in laws pertaining to births are more prevalent among non-Hispanic white women (7). midwifery practice or out-of-hospital birth (8,9), as well as by differences in the racial and ethnic composition of state populations, as home Studies have suggested that most home births are intentional or planned home births, whereas others are unintentional or unplanned, because of an emergency situation (i.e., precipitous labor, labor complications, or unable to get to the hospital in time) (3,6). Although not representative of all U.S. births (see "Data source and methods"), 87% of home births in a 26-state reporting area (comprising 50% of U.S. births) were planned in 2009. For non-Hispanic white women, 93% of home births were planned (10). Women may prefer a home birth over a hospital birth for a variety of reasons, including a desire for a low-intervention birth in a familiar environment surrounded by family

  14. WSN- and IOT-Based Smart Homes and Their Extension to Smart Buildings

    OpenAIRE

    Ghayvat, Hemant; Mukhopadhyay, Subhas; Gui, Xiang; Suryadevara, Nagender

    2015-01-01

    Our research approach is to design and develop reliable, efficient, flexible, economical, real-time and realistic wellness sensor networks for smart home systems. The heterogeneous sensor and actuator nodes based on wireless networking technologies are deployed into the home environment. These nodes generate real-time data related to the object usage and movement inside the home, to forecast the wellness of an individual. Here, wellness stands for how efficiently someone stays fit in the home...

  15. Home Appliances as Home Controllers: Concepts and Set-Top Box Implementation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Z. Jovanovic

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available In this paper we present a novel softwarebased home control platform suitable as an extension to digital home appliances that are equipped with a CPU (settop boxes, home theatre systems, TV sets, gaming consoles, etc. By using an appliance they are already accustomed to, users become able to control lights, appliances and media playback in their homes. Intelligence and awareness are achieved with a support for execution of recipes – preprepared scripts that define timely actions and respond to triggers obtained from sensors. Software abstraction layer facilitates integration of any desired communication protocol. In our prototype, we supported Zigbee and DMX for light control, X10 for light/appliances control over power line, as well as Ethernet-based optical cameras as motion/presence sensors and UPnP/DLNA based equipment for distributed media playback.

  16. Eldercare at Home: Mobility Problems

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Community Home › Resources › Eldercare at Home: Mobility Problems Font size A A A Print Share Glossary previous ... doctor or physical therapist to find out what type of cane or walker the older person needs. ...

  17. Blood pressure monitors for home

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/007482.htm Blood pressure monitors for home To use the sharing features ... may ask you to keep track of your blood pressure at home. To do this, you will need ...

  18. Dental plaque identification at home

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/003426.htm Dental plaque identification at home To use the sharing ... a sticky substance that collects around and between teeth. The home dental plaque identification test shows where ...

  19. Home-Use Tests - Cholesterol

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Medical Procedures In Vitro Diagnostics Home Use Tests Cholesterol Share Tweet Linkedin Pin it More sharing options ... a home-use test kit to measure total cholesterol. What cholesterol is: Cholesterol is a fat (lipid) ...

  20. Genetics Home Reference: PURA syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... TJ, Vreeburg M, Rouhl RPW, Stevens SJC, Stegmann APA, Schieving J, Pfundt R, van Dijk K, Smeets ... article on PubMed Central More from Genetics Home Reference Bulletins Genetics Home Reference Celebrates Its 15th Anniversary ...

  1. Home apnea monitor use - infants

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/patientinstructions/000755.htm Home apnea monitor use - infants To use the sharing ... portable. Why is an Apnea Monitor Used at Home? A monitor may be needed when: Your baby ...

  2. Newly Homeless Youth Typically Return Home

    OpenAIRE

    Milburn, Norweeta G.; Rosenthal, Doreen; Rotheram-Borus, Mary Jane; Mallett, Shelley; Batterham, Philip; Rice, Eric; Solorio, Rosa

    2007-01-01

    165 newly homeless adolescents from Melbourne, Australia and 261 from Los Angeles, United States were surveyed and followed for two years. Most newly homeless adolescents returned home (70% U.S., 47% Australia) for significant amounts of time (39% U.S., 17% Australia more than 12 months) within two years of becoming homeless.

  3. Spanning the Home/Work Creative Space

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Davis, Lee N.; Davis, Jerome; Hoisl, Karin

    the employee brings to work. Based on Woodman et al.’s (1993) “interactionist perspective” on organizational creativity, supplemented by literature on search and knowledge re/combination, we explore whether and how leisure time activities can span the creative space between the employee’s home and workplace...

  4. Home Food Preservation Training for Extension Educators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goard, Linnette Mizer; Hill, Melinda; Shumaker, Katharine; Warrix, Marisa

    2013-01-01

    During times of economic downturn, there has been an increased interest in home food preservation. As the primary resource for current research-based recommendations, a team of Extension Family and Consumer Sciences educators with specialization in food safety and food preservation responded to this demand by developing a standardized food…

  5. The Home Care Crew Scheduling Problem:

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, Matias Sevel; Justesen, Tor; Dohn, Anders

    In the Home Care Crew Scheduling Problem a staff of caretakers has to be assigned a number of visits to patients' homes, such that the overall service level is maximised. The problem is a generalisation of the vehicle routing problem with time windows. Required travel time between visits and time...... preference constraints. The algorithm is tested both on real-life problem instances and on generated test instances inspired by realistic settings. The use of the specialised branching scheme on real-life problems is novel. The visit clustering decreases run times significantly, and only gives a loss...... windows of the visits must be respected. The challenge when assigning visits to caretakers lies in the existence of soft preference constraints and in temporal dependencies between the start times of visits. We model the problem as a set partitioning problem with side constraints and develop an exact...

  6. 38 CFR 59.40 - Maximum number of nursing home care and domiciliary care beds for veterans by State.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... home care and domiciliary care beds for veterans by State. 59.40 Section 59.40 Pensions, Bonuses, and... ACQUISITION OF STATE HOMES § 59.40 Maximum number of nursing home care and domiciliary care beds for veterans... projection of demand for nursing home and domiciliary care by veterans who at such time are 65 years of age...

  7. Simplification of Home Cooking and Its Periphery

    OpenAIRE

    小住, フミ子; 北崎, 康子; Fumiko, OZUMI; Yasuko, KITAZAKI

    1997-01-01

    Sence of home cooking has been changing with the times. Various topics, which make us conscious of health and dietary habits, such as delicatessen, half-ready-made foods, eating out, and utilization of home delivery service and food imports are involved in those of simplification of cooking. We requested 64 students to fill in a questionnaire in three parts. The recovery was 96.4%. The results are as follows : The main reason for purchasing delicatessen or half-ready-made foods was that "they...

  8. Smart homes design, implementation and issues

    CERN Document Server

    Suryadevara, Nagender Kumar

    2015-01-01

    The book addresses issues towards the design and development of Wireless Sensor Network based Smart Home and fusion of Real-Time Data for Wellness Determination of an elderly person living alone in a Smart Home. The fundamentals of selection of sensor, fusion of sensor data, system design, modelling, characterizations, experimental investigations and analyses have been covered. This book will be extremely useful for the engineers and researchers especially higher undergraduate, postgraduate students as well as practitioners working on the development of Wireless Sensor Networks, Internet of Things and Data Mining.

  9. Mechanism of hematopoietic stem cell homing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jiang Fuquan

    2000-01-01

    The clinical transplantation of hematopoietic stem cell (HSC) originating from many sources such as bone marrow, peripheral blood and cord blood has been widely applied in recent years. At the same time, the development of the study on the mechanism of HSC homing which involves multi-procedures has been achieved. And a lot of molecular and cytokines on the surface or in the microenvironment of HSC are functioning in homing. The purpose of is to review those molecular and cytokines on which more studies have been focused in the past

  10. [Maintaining patients' autonomy at home].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niang, Bénédicte; Coudre, Jean Pierre

    2015-01-01

    To maintain the flow of hospital discharges, the patient's return home with support from a home nursing service is important. If any difficulties are identified, there are various programmes or good practices which can be put into place. The future law on adapting society to ageing also comprises a scheme combining home assistance and nursing care.

  11. Ensuring Quality Nursing Home Care

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... cases, you can also call the Department of Health. Nursing homes are required to post information on how you ... nursing homes in your area, go to Medicare’s Nursing Home Compare website at ... information is not intended to diagnose health problems or to take the place of medical ...

  12. Home advantage in professional tennis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Koning, Ruud H.

    2011-01-01

    Home advantage is a pervasive phenomenon in sport. It has been established in team sports such as basketball, baseball, American football, and European soccer. Attention to home advantage in individual sports has so far been limited. The aim of this study was to examine home advantage in

  13. Solo Living - the meaning of home for persons living alone

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Toke Haunstrup

    observed. Firstly, solo livers emphasize independence from others as important. Several of the informants have had negative experiences with living together with a partner, and they like the feeling of being independent. At the same time, most informants also keep a door open for the possibility of moving...... together with "the right one", which indicates that ambiguity is related to the situation of solo living. Secondly, some of the solo livers spend more time outside home (occupied by leisure activities or together with friends) compared to people living in family households in general, which suggests...... a different balance between time at home and outside home for some solo livers....

  14. OpenSHS: Open Smart Home Simulator

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nasser Alshammari

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available This paper develops a new hybrid, open-source, cross-platform 3D smart home simulator, OpenSHS, for dataset generation. OpenSHS offers an opportunity for researchers in the field of the Internet of Things (IoT and machine learning to test and evaluate their models. Following a hybrid approach, OpenSHS combines advantages from both interactive and model-based approaches. This approach reduces the time and efforts required to generate simulated smart home datasets. We have designed a replication algorithm for extending and expanding a dataset. A small sample dataset produced, by OpenSHS, can be extended without affecting the logical order of the events. The replication provides a solution for generating large representative smart home datasets. We have built an extensible library of smart devices that facilitates the simulation of current and future smart home environments. Our tool divides the dataset generation process into three distinct phases: first design: the researcher designs the initial virtual environment by building the home, importing smart devices and creating contexts; second, simulation: the participant simulates his/her context-specific events; and third, aggregation: the researcher applies the replication algorithm to generate the final dataset. We conducted a study to assess the ease of use of our tool on the System Usability Scale (SUS.

  15. OpenSHS: Open Smart Home Simulator.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alshammari, Nasser; Alshammari, Talal; Sedky, Mohamed; Champion, Justin; Bauer, Carolin

    2017-05-02

    This paper develops a new hybrid, open-source, cross-platform 3D smart home simulator, OpenSHS, for dataset generation. OpenSHS offers an opportunity for researchers in the field of the Internet of Things (IoT) and machine learning to test and evaluate their models. Following a hybrid approach, OpenSHS combines advantages from both interactive and model-based approaches. This approach reduces the time and efforts required to generate simulated smart home datasets. We have designed a replication algorithm for extending and expanding a dataset. A small sample dataset produced, by OpenSHS, can be extended without affecting the logical order of the events. The replication provides a solution for generating large representative smart home datasets. We have built an extensible library of smart devices that facilitates the simulation of current and future smart home environments. Our tool divides the dataset generation process into three distinct phases: first design: the researcher designs the initial virtual environment by building the home, importing smart devices and creating contexts; second, simulation: the participant simulates his/her context-specific events; and third, aggregation: the researcher applies the replication algorithm to generate the final dataset. We conducted a study to assess the ease of use of our tool on the System Usability Scale (SUS).

  16. The moral geography of home care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liaschenko, J

    1994-12-01

    One result of the historical division of labor between nurses and physicians is that nurses became the eyes and ears of the physician, extending their perceptual capabilities across space and time. This "gaze of medicine" has evolved with the rise of technology, hospitals, and the medical profession to a sort of scientific totalitarianism. Protecting and enhancing patient agency, which is part of the moral work of nursing practice, can be difficult under such circumstances. Yet the geography of sickness is changing as patients move from the hospital back to the home. Because home is thought of as private, as the patient's domain, nurses may think that supporting patient agency will be easier with this transformation of health care. But that assumption may not be warranted since the gaze of medicine will follow patients and change the landscape of the home. The challenge for nursing will be to sharpen the "gaze of nursing," which is an antidote to the strictly biomedical understanding of disease.

  17. Simulation of Smart Home Activity Datasets

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jonathan Synnott

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available A globally ageing population is resulting in an increased prevalence of chronic conditions which affect older adults. Such conditions require long-term care and management to maximize quality of life, placing an increasing strain on healthcare resources. Intelligent environments such as smart homes facilitate long-term monitoring of activities in the home through the use of sensor technology. Access to sensor datasets is necessary for the development of novel activity monitoring and recognition approaches. Access to such datasets is limited due to issues such as sensor cost, availability and deployment time. The use of simulated environments and sensors may address these issues and facilitate the generation of comprehensive datasets. This paper provides a review of existing approaches for the generation of simulated smart home activity datasets, including model-based approaches and interactive approaches which implement virtual sensors, environments and avatars. The paper also provides recommendation for future work in intelligent environment simulation.

  18. Simulation of Smart Home Activity Datasets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Synnott, Jonathan; Nugent, Chris; Jeffers, Paul

    2015-06-16

    A globally ageing population is resulting in an increased prevalence of chronic conditions which affect older adults. Such conditions require long-term care and management to maximize quality of life, placing an increasing strain on healthcare resources. Intelligent environments such as smart homes facilitate long-term monitoring of activities in the home through the use of sensor technology. Access to sensor datasets is necessary for the development of novel activity monitoring and recognition approaches. Access to such datasets is limited due to issues such as sensor cost, availability and deployment time. The use of simulated environments and sensors may address these issues and facilitate the generation of comprehensive datasets. This paper provides a review of existing approaches for the generation of simulated smart home activity datasets, including model-based approaches and interactive approaches which implement virtual sensors, environments and avatars. The paper also provides recommendation for future work in intelligent environment simulation.

  19. Identification of inactivity behavior in smart home.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poujaud, J; Noury, N; Lundy, J-E

    2008-01-01

    To help elderly people live independently at home, the TIMC-IMAG laboratory developed Health Smart Homes called 'HIS'. These smart Homes are composed of several sensors to monitor the activities of daily living of the patients. Volunteers have accepted to be monitored during 2 years in their own flats. During one year, we carried out our survey on one elderly patient. Thanks to this experimentation, we will access to relevant information like physiological, environmental and activity. This paper focuses on daily living activity. We will introduce an original data splitting method based on the relationship between the frame of time and the location in the flat. Moreover we will present two different methods to determine a threshold of critical inactivity and eventually we will discuss their possible utilities.

  20. Home seismometer for earthquake early warning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horiuchi, Shigeki; Horiuchi, Yuko; Yamamoto, Shunroku; Nakamura, Hiromitsu; Wu, Changjiang; Rydelek, Paul A.; Kachi, Masaaki

    2009-02-01

    The Japan Meteorological Agency (JMA) has started the practical service of Earthquake Early Warning (EEW) and a very dense deployment of receiving units is expected in the near future. The receiving/alarm unit of an EEW system is equipped with a CPU and memory and is on-line via the internet. By adding an inexpensive seismometer and A/D converter, this unit is transformed into a real-time seismic observatory, which we are calling a home seismometer. If the home seismometer is incorporated in the standard receiving unit of EEW, then the number of seismic observatories will be drastically increased. Since the background noise inside a house caused by human activity may be very large, we have developed specialized software for on-site warning using the home seismometer. We tested our software and found that our algorithm can correctly distinguish between noise and earthquakes for nearly all the events.

  1. When Globalization Hits Home

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Borrás, Susana; Haakonsson, Stine Jessen

    Lead firms are increasingly reorganizing their innovation activities into global innovation networks. Such reorganization has potentially major impact on their existing home-based innovation networks. Based on 31 interviews in four case studies of lead firms in the Danish food industry, the paper...... analyzes the dynamics of five key features of home-based innovation networks: 1) size of the national networks, 2) type of organization, 3) content of collaboration within the network, 4) concurrent globalization of organizations in the network, and 5) degree of formalization of network interactions....... The dynamics are generally differentiated according to the type of lead firm strategy, i.e. knowledge augmenting or knowledge exploiting. The qualitative and exploratory findings point towards some effects on national innovation networks. Hence, the paper concludes by hypothesizing that the globalization...

  2. The @Home project

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Coxon, Ian Robert

    2014-01-01

    of being overshadowed by what is increasingly seen as new (and substantial) pharmacological and health equipment business market opportunities in what is now viewed as a health 'industry'. The Centre for Innovation at Mayo Clinic (CFI) in Rochester USA, has conducted many projects which border on and have...... investigated various aspects of care provision and patient experience within a patient's home environment. Considerable work by other researchers inside and outside the health field has also contributed insights and platforms for moving healthcare in this direction. In most areas of the western world......, the healthcare sector is struggling to cope with the scale of strain that shifting demographics, rising costs and increasing chronic/complex care is placing on the health system. The shift towards home based care and personal health self-management is seen as offering some possibilities to alleviate...

  3. Energy comes home

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aune, Margrethe

    2007-01-01

    The growth in private energy consumption is an increasing problem in western countries. From an environmental point of view, this consumption has to be reduced. On the basis of two Norwegian case studies, this article discusses private energy consumption and possibilities for reduction, with a special focus on the home. It argues against a rational economic view of the consumer and emphasizes the significance of a more subtle understanding of private energy use. The article approaches the challenges of reducing private energy consumption by analysing the domestication of the home and discusses everyday life activities as well as the phenomenon of rebuilding and redecorating. By using the concept of domestication, the article challenges the linear understanding of technological as well as behavioural change. Private energy consumption is part of a complex network and it is necessary to understand this network in order to achieve a more permanent reduction

  4. Palliative Sedation at Home

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barathi, B

    2012-01-01

    Patients with advanced cancer often suffer from multiple intractable physical symptoms. Though majority of the symptoms can be controlled, in some of the patients these symptoms remain refractory and uncontrolled till the end. Palliative sedation (PS) is one of the ways to relieve intractable suffering of the dying cancer patients. The main concern while using PS is its life-shortening effect. This case report describes the feasibility of administering PS in Indian home settings. PMID:22837615

  5. Palliative sedation at home

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B Barathi

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Patients with advanced cancer often suffer from multiple intractable physical symptoms. Though majority of the symptoms can be controlled, in some of the patients these symptoms remain refractory and uncontrolled till the end. Palliative sedation (PS is one of the ways to relieve intractable suffering of the dying cancer patients. The main concern while using PS is its life-shortening effect. This case report describes the feasibility of administering PS in Indian home settings.

  6. [Aromatherapy in nursing homes].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barré, Lucile

    2015-01-01

    Pierre Delaroche de Clisson hospital uses essential oils as part of its daily organisation for the treatment of pain and the development of palliative care. The setting up of this project, in nursing homes and long-term care units, is the fruit of a complex mission carried out by a multidisciplinary team, which had to take into account the risks involved and overcome a certain amount of reluctance. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  7. Ostomy Home Skills Program

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Workforce Trauma and EMS Cancer and Research Health Information Technology Scope of Practice Pediatric Issues Other Federal Legislative Issues Regulatory Issues Regulatory Issues Regulatory Issues Stop Overregulating My OR ... Rectal Surgeons (ASCRS), American Urological Association (AUA), Certified Enterostomal Therapy Nurses (CETN), and the United Ostomy Associations of America (UOAA). The skills kit contains: A booklet with information on the operation, home skills such as emptying ...

  8. Ostomy Home Skills Program

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Workforce Trauma and EMS Cancer and Research Health Information Technology Scope of Practice Pediatric Issues Other Federal Legislative Issues Regulatory Issues Regulatory Issues Regulatory Issues Stop Overregulating My OR ... American Urological Association (AUA), Certified Enterostomal Therapy Nurses (CETN), and the United Ostomy Associations of America (UOAA). Program Overview The skills kit contains: A booklet with information on the operation, home skills such as emptying ...

  9. Home advantage in the Winter Olympics (1908-1998).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balmer, N J; Nevill, A M; Williams, A M

    2001-02-01

    We obtained indices of home advantage, based on the medals won by competing nations, for each event held at the Winter Olympics from 1908 to 1998. These indices were designed to assess home advantage while controlling for nation strength, changes in the number of medals on offer and the performance of 'non-hosting' nations. Some evidence of home advantage was found in figure skating, freestyle skiing, ski jumping, alpine skiing and short track speed skating. In contrast, little or no home advantage was observed in ice hockey, Nordic combined, Nordic skiing, bobsled, luge, biathlon or speed skating. When all events were combined, a significant home advantage was observed (P = 0.029), although no significant differences in the extent of home advantage were found between events (P > 0.05). When events were grouped according to whether they were subjectively assessed by judges, significantly greater home advantage was observed in the subjectively assessed events (P = 0.037). This was a reflection of better home performances, suggesting that judges were scoring home competitors disproportionately higher than away competitors. Familiarity with local conditions was shown to have some effect, particularly in alpine skiing, although the bobsled and luge showed little or no advantage over other events. Regression analysis showed that the number of time zones and direction of travel produced no discernible trends or differences in performance.

  10. Development and validation of a remote home safety protocol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Romero, Sergio; Lee, Mi Jung; Simic, Ivana; Levy, Charles; Sanford, Jon

    2018-02-01

    Environmental assessments and subsequent modifications conducted by healthcare professionals can enhance home safety and promote independent living. However, travel time, expense and the availability of qualified professionals can limit the broad application of this intervention. Remote technology has the potential to increase access to home safety evaluations. This study describes the development and validation of a remote home safety protocol that can be used by a caregiver of an elderly person to video-record their home environment for later viewing and evaluation by a trained professional. The protocol was developed based on literature reviews and evaluations from clinical and content experts. Cognitive interviews were conducted with a group of six caregivers to validate the protocol. The final protocol included step-by-step directions to record indoor and outdoor areas of the home. The validation process resulted in modifications related to safety, clarity of the protocol, readability, visual appearance, technical descriptions and usability. Our final protocol includes detailed instructions that a caregiver should be able to follow to record a home environment for subsequent evaluation by a home safety professional. Implications for Rehabilitation The results of this study have several implications for rehabilitation practice The remote home safety evaluation protocol can potentially improve access to rehabilitation services for clients in remote areas and prevent unnecessary delays for needed care. Using our protocol, a patient's caregiver can partner with therapists to quickly and efficiently evaluate a patient's home before they are released from the hospital. Caregiver narration, which reflects a caregiver's own perspective, is critical to evaluating home safety. In-home safety evaluations, currently not available to all who need them due to access barriers, can enhance a patient's independence and provide a safer home environment.

  11. PLANNED HOME BIRTH: A REVIEW

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tamara Serdinšek

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Background: Home birth is as old as humanity, but still most middle- and high-income countries consider hospitals as the safest birth settings, as complications regarding birth are highly unpredictable. Despite this there are a few countries in which home birth in integrated into official healthcare system (the Netherlands, United Kingdom, Canada etc.. Home births can be divided into unplanned and planned, and the latter can be further categorized by the presence of the birth attendants. This review focuses on planned home births, which are differently represented throughout the world. In the United States 0.6-1.0% of all children are born at home, in the United Kingdom 2-3%, in Canada 1.6% and in the Netherlands 20-30%. For Slovenia, the number of planned home births is unknown; however, in 2010 0.1% of children were born outside medical facilities.Conclusions: The safety of home birth in still under the debate. While research confirms smaller number of obstetric interventions and some complications in mothers who give birth at home, the data regarding the neonatal and perinatal mortality and morbidity is still conflicting. This confirms the need for large multicentric trials in this field. Current home birth guidelines emphasize that women should be well informed regarding the possible advantages and disadvantages of home births. In addition, the emphasis is on definition of selection criteria for home birth, indications for intrapartal transfer to the hospital and appropriate education of birth attendants. 

  12. Remixing Memory through Home Movies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shaun Wilson

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available

    Times New Roman;">Abstract: The moving image has traditionally provided a catalyst for screen-based culture to develop a language that evokes a means and experience of storytelling positioned in-between the image and the viewer.  However, this article will frame such a relationship by distancing the moving image from a cinematic or industrial context to instead look to the amateur cohort of private films commonly referred to as ‘home movies’, In doing so, I will consider what Bachelard refers to as a returning to childhood in search of memory, to form a reasoned understanding of the ways in which memory itself can be grafted in-between film and experience. This article will focus on celluloid film which I will define as vintage home movies, namely Standard 8mm and Super 8mm film contributed from domestic-orientated archives. The discussion will examine two main video installations evidencing selected work in the wider series.Filmic Memorials (2002-06 comprised of a substantial body of work established from my family collection of 8mm home movies.

    Times New Roman;">Résumé: Dans notre culture de l'écran, l 'image mobile a souvent servi de catalyseur à l

  13. Tactics for homing in mobile life

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Petersen, Marianne Graves; Lynggard, Aviaja Borup; Krogh, Peter Gall

    2010-01-01

    For many people home making is an activity, which extends beyond a single house. We introduce the terminology of Homing as the act of home making, when in a primary home, secondary home or more temporary spaces. By point of departure in existing literature on home making and through ethnographic...

  14. Business Metrics for High-Performance Homes: A Colorado Springs Case Study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Beach, R. [IBACOS, Inc, Pittsburgh, PA (United States); Jones, A. [IBACOS, Inc, Pittsburgh, PA (United States)

    2016-04-26

    This report explores the correlation between energy efficiency and the business success of home builders by examining a data set of builders and homes in the Colorado Springs, Colorado, market between 2006 and 2014. During this time, the Great Recession of 2007 to 2009 occurred, and new-home sales plummeted both nationally and in Colorado Springs. What is evident from an analysis of builders and homes in Colorado Springs is that builders who had Home Energy Rating System (HERS) ratings performed on some or all of their homes during the Recession remained in business during this challenging economic period. Many builders who did not have HERS ratings performed on their homes at that time went out of business or left the area. From the analysis presented in this report, it is evident that a correlation exists between energy efficiency and the business success of home builders, although the reasons for this correlation remain largely anecdotal and not yet clearly understood.

  15. Exploring the linkage between the home domain and absence from work: Health, motivation, or both?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    ten Brummelhuis, L.L.; ter Hoeven, C.L.; de Jong, M.D.T.; Peper, B.

    2013-01-01

    The aim of this study was twofold. First, we examined depleting and enriching effects of employees' home domain (home demands and quality time spent at home) on unscheduled absence from work. Second, we tested the assumption of the medical and withdrawal models that absence duration and frequency

  16. Design of smart home gateway based on Wi-Fi and ZigBee

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yang

    2018-04-01

    With the increasing demand for home lifestyle, the traditional smart home products have been unable to meet the needs of users. Aim at the complex wiring, high cost and difficult operation problems of traditional smart home system, this paper designs a home gateway for smart home system based on Wi-Fi and ZigBee. This paper first gives a smart home system architecture base on cloud server, Wi-Fi and ZigBee. This architecture enables users to access the smart home system remotely from Internet through the cloud server or through Wi-Fi at home. It also offers the flexibility and low cost of ZigBee wireless networking for home equipment. This paper analyzes the functional requirements of the home gateway, and designs a modular hardware architecture based on the RT5350 wireless gateway module and the CC2530 ZigBee coordinator module. Also designs the software of the home gateway, including the gateway master program and the ZigBee coordinator program. Finally, the smart home system and home gateway are tested in two kinds of network environments, internal network and external network. The test results show that the designed home gateway can meet the requirements, support remote and local access, support multi-user, support information security technology, and can timely report equipment status information.

  17. Fall Down Detection Under Smart Home System.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Juang, Li-Hong; Wu, Ming-Ni

    2015-10-01

    Medical technology makes an inevitable trend for the elderly population, therefore the intelligent home care is an important direction for science and technology development, in particular, elderly in-home safety management issues become more and more important. In this research, a low of operation algorithm and using the triangular pattern rule are proposed, then can quickly detect fall-down movements of humanoid by the installation of a robot with camera vision at home that will be able to judge the fall-down movements of in-home elderly people in real time. In this paper, it will present a preliminary design and experimental results of fall-down movements from body posture that utilizes image pre-processing and three triangular-mass-central points to extract the characteristics. The result shows that the proposed method would adopt some characteristic value and the accuracy can reach up to 90 % for a single character posture. Furthermore the accuracy can be up to 100 % when a continuous-time sampling criterion and support vector machine (SVM) classifier are used.

  18. New Whole-House Solutions Case Study: Quadrant Homes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    none,

    2013-02-01

    Quadrant moved ducts and high efficiency furnace inside conditioned space on nearly all 300 customizable house plans. The builder uses dry, true factory-assembled walls, extensive air sealing, and just in time delivery for pre-sold homes.

  19. Development of home power management system | Apeh | Nigerian ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Development of home power management system. ... The unit also exhibited good implementation of the timing algorithm for all programmed outputs. It switched "ON" ... This flexibility in an automation system is one strong point of this device.

  20. Teleconsultation for integrated palliative care at home: A qualitative study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Gurp, J.; van Selm, M.; van Leeuwen, E.; Vissers, K.; Hasselaar, J.

    2016-01-01

    Background: Interprofessional consultation contributes to symptom control for home-based palliative care patients and improves advance care planning. Distance and travel time, however, complicate the integration of primary care and specialist palliative care. Expert online audiovisual