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Sample records for home patients study

  1. HOME CARE NURSES’ ROLES IN ENHANCING QUALITY OF NURSING CARE FOR PATIENTS AT HOME: A PHENOMENOLOGICAL STUDY

    OpenAIRE

    Titan Ligita

    2017-01-01

    Background: Provision of health care service at home is one of the advanced forms of care for patients being discharged from hospitalization. Little is known about the experience of nurses providing home care services through a nursing home-care model especially in Indonesian context. Objective: This study aims to explore the experience in order to increase understanding on the form of home care provision, and consequently the nurses may understand the form of home care globally. Metho...

  2. The first multicenter, randomized, controlled trial of home telemonitoring for Japanese patients with heart failure: home telemonitoring study for patients with heart failure (HOMES-HF).

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    Kotooka, Norihiko; Kitakaze, Masafumi; Nagashima, Kengo; Asaka, Machiko; Kinugasa, Yoshiharu; Nochioka, Kotaro; Mizuno, Atsushi; Nagatomo, Daisuke; Mine, Daigo; Yamada, Yoko; Kuratomi, Akiko; Okada, Norihiro; Fujimatsu, Daisuke; Kuwahata, So; Toyoda, Shigeru; Hirotani, Shin-Ichi; Komori, Takahiro; Eguchi, Kazuo; Kario, Kazuomi; Inomata, Takayuki; Sugi, Kaoru; Yamamoto, Kazuhiro; Tsutsui, Hiroyuki; Masuyama, Tohru; Shimokawa, Hiroaki; Momomura, Shin-Ichi; Seino, Yoshihiko; Sato, Yasunori; Inoue, Teruo; Node, Koichi

    2018-02-15

    Home telemonitoring is becoming more important to home medical care for patients with heart failure. Since there are no data on home telemonitoring for Japanese patients with heart failure, we investigated its effect on cardiovascular outcomes. The HOMES-HF study was the first multicenter, open-label, randomized, controlled trial (RCT) to elucidate the effectiveness of home telemonitoring of physiological data, such as body weight, blood pressure, and pulse rate, for Japanese patients with heart failure (UMIN Clinical Trials Registry 000006839). The primary end-point was a composite of all-cause death or rehospitalization due to worsening heart failure. We analyzed 181 recently hospitalized patients with heart failure who were randomly assigned to a telemonitoring group (n = 90) or a usual care group (n = 91). The mean follow-up period was 15 (range 0-31) months. There was no statistically significant difference in the primary end-point between groups [hazard ratio (HR), 0.95; 95% confidence interval (CI), 0.548-1.648; p = 0.572]. Home telemonitoring for Japanese patients with heart failure was feasible; however, beneficial effects in addition to those of usual care were not demonstrated. Further investigation of more patients with severe heart failure, participation of home medical care providers, and use of a more integrated home telemonitoring system emphasizing communication as well as monitoring of symptoms and physiological data are required.

  3. A Study of the Association Between Multidisciplinary Home Care and Home Death Among Thai Palliative Care Patients.

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    Nagaviroj, Kittiphon; Anothaisintawee, Thunyarat

    2017-06-01

    Many terminally ill patients would prefer to stay and die in their own homes, but unfortunately, some may not be able to do so. Although there are many factors associated with successful home deaths, receiving palliative home visits from the multidisciplinary care teams is one of the key factors that enable patients to die at home. Our study was aimed to find whether there was any association between our palliative home care program and home death. A retrospective study was conducted in the Department of Family Medicine at Ramathibodi Hospital between January 2012 and May 2014. All of the patients who were referred to multidisciplinary palliative care teams were included. The data set comprised of patient's profile, disease status, functional status, patient's symptoms, preferred place of death, frequency of home visits, types of team interventions, and patient's actual place of death. Multiple logistic regression was applied in order to determine the association between the variables and the probability of dying at home. A total of 142 patients were included into the study. At the end of the study, 50 (35.2%) patients died at home and 92 (64.8%) patients died in the hospital. The multivariate logistic regression analysis demonstrated a strong association between multidisciplinary home care and home death (odds ratio 6.57, 95% confidence interval [CI] 2.48-17.38). Palliative home care was a significant factor enabling patients who want to die at home. We encourage health policy makers to promote the development of community-based palliative care programs in Thailand.

  4. Patients' experiences with home parenteral nutrition: A grounded theory study.

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    Wong, Christina; Lucas, Beverley; Wood, Diana

    2018-04-01

    Parenteral nutrition (PN) provides nourishment and hydration as an intravenous infusion to patients with intestinal failure (IF). The aim of the study is to generate theory that explains the experiences of adult patients living with home parenteral nutrition (HPN) and complex medication regimens. A grounded theory methodology was used to explore the experiences of twelve patients receiving HPN. A semi-structured interview was conducted and recorded in each participant's home setting. Each interview was transcribed verbatim. The simultaneous process of data collection and analysis was followed reflecting the principles of the constant comparative approach. A total of 15 patients gave written consent, with 12 of them agreeing to be interviewed. All the participants had previously undergone surgery as a result of chronic ill health or sudden illness. Analysis revealed two core categories: stoma and HPN, and these were supported by the subcategories: maintaining stoma output, access to toilets, managing dietary changes, maintaining the HPN infusion routine, access to technical help to set up an HPN infusion, mobility with HPN equipment and general health changes. The strategy of living with loss was demonstrated by all the participants, and this was supported by the action strategies of maintaining daily activities and social interactions. This study generates new understanding and insight into the views and experiences of patients receiving HPN in the UK. The findings from these participants have been shown to resonate with the Kubler-Ross Model [1] of the five stages of grief. The theory of living with loss was generated by the use of a grounded theory methodology. This small scale exploratory study reveals opportunities for improvements in practice to be considered by the nutrition support team (NST) and other healthcare professionals involved in the patient's hospital stay prior to discharge on HPN. Copyright © 2018 European Society for Clinical Nutrition and

  5. HOME CARE NURSES’ ROLES IN ENHANCING QUALITY OF NURSING CARE FOR PATIENTS AT HOME: A PHENOMENOLOGICAL STUDY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Titan Ligita

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Background: Provision of health care service at home is one of the advanced forms of care for patients being discharged from hospitalization. Little is known about the experience of nurses providing home care services through a nursing home-care model especially in Indonesian context. Objective: This study aims to explore the experience in order to increase understanding on the form of home care provision, and consequently the nurses may understand the form of home care globally. Methods: This study employed a phenomenological design and performed interview in the process of data collection. Data were analysed by using content analysis. Results: The main contexts of home care nurse experiences were generated. There were definition and role of home care nurses, the involvement of family members in the provision of care, the facilitating and hindering factors contributed to home care provision as well as manual on providing home care nursing. Conclusion: The implication from this study is that nursing care should be given to the patients continuously and consequently the need for family involvement is important. Additionally, in providing the home care, a proper manual is needed by home care nurses as the guidance to give best quality of care to patients.

  6. Home and Office Blood Pressure Control among Treated Hypertensive Patients in Japan: Findings from the Japan Home versus Office Blood Pressure Measurement Evaluation (J-HOME Study

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    Nariyasu Mano

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available Appropriate control of blood pressure (BP is essential for prevention of future cardiovascular events. However, BP control among treated hypertensive patients has been insufficient. Recently, the usefulness of self-measured BP at home (home BP measurement for the management of hypertension has been reported in many studies. We evaluated BP control both at home and in the office among treated hypertensive patients in primary care settings in Japan (the J-HOME study. We found poor control of home and office BPs and clarified some factors affecting control. We also examined factors associated with the magnitude of the white-coat effect, the morning–evening BP difference, and home heart rate in this J-HOME study.

  7. The beliefs and expectations of patients and caregivers about home haemodialysis: an interview study

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    Tong, Allison; Palmer, Suetonia; Manns, Braden; Craig, Jonathan C; Ruospo, Marinella; Gargano, Letizia; Johnson, David W; Hegbrant, Jörgen; Olsson, Måns; Fishbane, Steven; Strippoli, Giovanni F M

    2013-01-01

    Objectives To explore the beliefs and expectations of patients and their caregivers about home haemodialysis in Italy where the prevalence of home haemodialysis is low. Design Semistructured, qualitative interview study with purposive sampling and thematic analysis. Setting Four dialysis centres in Italy without home haemodialysis services (Bari, Marsala, Nissoria and Taranto). Participants 22 patients receiving in-centre haemodialysis and 20 of their identified caregivers. Results We identified seven major themes that were central to patient and caregiver perceptions of home haemodialysis in regions without established services. Three positive themes were: flexibility and freedom (increased autonomy, minimised wasted time, liberation from strict dialysis schedules and gaining self-worth); comfort in familiar surroundings (family presence and support, avoiding the need for dialysis in hospital) and altruistic motivation to do home haemodialysis as an exemplar for other patients and families. Four negative themes were: disrupting sense of normality; family burden (an onerous responsibility, caregiver uncertainty and panic and visually confronting); housing constraints; healthcare by ‘professionals’ not ‘amateurs’ (relinquishing security and satisfaction with in-centre services) and isolation from peer support. Conclusions Patients without direct experience or previous education about home haemodialysis and their caregivers recognise the autonomy of home haemodialysis but are very concerned about the potential burden and personal sacrifice home haemodialysis will impose on caregivers and feel apprehensive about accepting the medical responsibilities of dialysis. To promote acceptance and uptake of home haemodialysis among patients and caregivers who have no experience of home dialysis, effective strategies are needed that provide information about home haemodialysis to patients and their caregivers, assure access to caregiver respite, provide continuous

  8. Prevalence and risk indicators of depression in elderly nursing home patients : the AGED study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jongenelis, K; Eisses, AMH; Beekman, ATF; Kluiter, H; Ribbe, MW

    2004-01-01

    Background: Depression is a common and disabling psychiatric disorder in later life. Particular frail nursing home patients seem to be at increased risk. Nursing home-based studies on risk indicators of depression are scarce. Methods: Prevalence and risk indicators of depression were assessed in 333

  9. Telemonitoring and home hospitalization in patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease: study TELEPOC.

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    Mirón Rubio, Manuel; Ceballos Fernández, Rocío; Parras Pastor, Inmaculada; Palomo Iloro, Amaya; Fernández Félix, Borja Manuel; Medina Miralles, Jenifer; Zamudio López, Esther; González Pastor, Javier; Amador Lorente, Caridad; Mena Hortelano, Nazaret; Domínguez Sánchez, Alejandro; Alonso-Viteri, Soledad

    2018-04-01

    Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) is a major consumer of healthcare resources, with most costs related to disease exacerbations. Telemonitoring of patients with COPD may help to reduce the number of exacerbations and/or the related costs. On the other hand, home hospitalization is a cost-saving alternative to inpatient hospitalization associated with increased comfort for patients. The results are reported regarding using telemonitoring and home hospitalization for the management of patients with COPD. Twenty-eight patients monitored their health parameters at home for six months. A nurse remotely revised the collected parameters and followed the patients as programmed. A home care unit was dispatched to the patients' home if an alarm signal was detected. The outcomes were compared to historical data from the same patients. The number of COPD exacerbations during the study period did not reduce but the number of hospital admissions decreased by 60% and the number of emergency room visits by 38%. On average, costs related to utilization of healthcare resources were reduced by €1,860.80 per patient per year. Telemonitoring of patients with COPD combined with home hospitalization may allow for a reduction in healthcare costs, although its usefulness in preventing exacerbations is still unclear.

  10. Home sleep study for patients with myasthenia gravis.

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    Yeh, J-H; Lin, C-M; Chiu, H-C; Bai, C-H

    2015-09-01

    The objective of the study was to examine predictors for sleep-disordered breathing (SDB) in patients with myasthenia gravis (MG) using Watch-PAT. We prospectively studied 58 consecutive patients with MG without respiratory symptoms for a full-night Watch-PAT with concomitant recording of the MG score and acetylcholine receptor antibody concentration and analyzed potential risk factors of SDB. Twenty-four patients (41%) had definitive SDB, which was mild in 12 patients, moderate in six, and severe in six. Assessing risk factors with multivariate models, we found four significant predictors (BMI, age, male gender, and use of azathioprine); BMI was the most powerful predictor. The severity and prevalence of sleep-disordered breathing had no significant association with MG score, myasthenia stage, or seropositivity of acetylcholine receptor antibody. The prevalence of SDB in myasthenic patients with mild and moderate weakness was high when using the Watch-PAT. Both myasthenia-specific factors (use of azathioprine) and general predictors in terms of BMI, age, and male gender predisposed the development of SDB in patients with myasthenia gravis. Careful screening of patients with myasthenia gravis at risk of SDB using Watch-PAT might improve the quality of sleep and cardiovascular health through proper treatment of underlying SDB. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  11. Episodic medical home interventions in severe bedridden chronic respiratory failure patients: a 4 year retrospective study.

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    Barbano, L; Bertella, E; Vitacca, M

    2009-09-01

    Home care for respiratory patients includes a complex array of services delivered in an uncontrolled setting. The role of a respiratory specialist inside the home healthcare team has been scarcely studied up to now. Our aims were to analyse the number and quality of episodic home visits performed by respiratory physicians to severe bedridden Chronic Respiratory Failure (CRF) patients, and also to evaluate the safety of tracheotomy tube substitutions at home. 231 home interventions (59.8/year) in 123 CRF patients (59 males; age 63 +/- 17 y, 24 on oxygen therapy, 35 under non invasive mechanical ventilation, 46 under invasive ventilation, 74 with tracheostomy) located 35 +/- 16 km far from referred hospital, were revised in a period of 4 years (2005-2008). Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease (COPD) (31%) and amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) (28%) were the more frequent diagnoses. Interventions were: tracheotomy tube substitution (64%) presenting 22% of minor adverse events and 1.4% of major adverse events; change or new oxygen prescription (37%); nocturnal pulsed saturimetric trend prescription (24%); change in mechanical ventilation (MV) setting (4%); new MV adaptation (7%). After medical intervention, new home medical equipment devices (oxygen and MV) were prescribed in 36% of the cases while rehabilitative hospital admission and home respiratory physiotherapy prescription was proposed in 9% and 6% of the cases respectively. Patient/caregiver's satisfaction was reported on average 8.48 +/- 0.79 (1 = the worst; 10 = the higher). The local health care system (HCS) reimbursed 70 euros for each home intervention. Families saved 42 +/- 20 euros per visit for ambulance transportation. Home visits performed by a respiratory physician to bedridden patients with chronic respiratory failure: 1. include predominantly patients affected by COPD and ALS; 2. determine a very good satisfaction to patients/caregivers; 3. allow money saving to caregivers; 4. are predominantly

  12. An evaluation of venous thromboembolic risk in acutely ill medical patients immobilized at home: the AT-HOME Study.

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    Haas, Sylvia K; Hach-Wunderle, Viola; Mader, Frank H; Ruster, Katherine; Paar, Wilhelm D

    2007-01-01

    Many risk factors for venous thromboembolism (VTE) in hospitalized medical patients are also present in medical outpatients. VTE prevention represents an important challenge for physicians treating patients at home. The AT-HOME study was a prospective cross-sectional observational study designed to assess awareness of the risk of VTE in immobilized acutely ill medical outpatients among German physicians, many of whom were participating in a national Continuing Medical Education (CME) program designed to raise awareness of VTE. The study involved 1210 medical patients who were acutely confined to bed at home. Physicians performed a subjective assessment of VTE risk, which was rated on a 10-point scale (1 = very low risk; 10 = very high risk). The risk of VTE was also assessed retrospectively by using a scorecard developed for use in hospitalized medical patients. Of the 1210 patients, 198 (16%) had risk scores of 0-4, 319 (26%) had scores of 5 or 6, and 693 (57%) had scores > or =7. Overall, 966 patients (80%) received thromboprophylaxis. The proportion of patients receiving thromboprophylaxis was 0% to 47% in risk score groups 0-4, 76% to 85% in groups 5 and 6, and 90% to 100% in risk score groups 7-10. In the retrospective assessment of VTE risk, 74% of patients were at high risk, 15% were at intermediate risk, and 11% were at low risk. The proportions of patients receiving thromboprophylaxis in these groups were 87%, 61%, and 55%, respectively. The involvement of physicians in educational activities focusing on VTE awareness appeared to create awareness of the risks of VTE in acutely ill medical outpatients.

  13. Palliative sedation for cancer patients included in a home care program: a retrospective study.

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    Calvo-Espinos, Claudio; Ruiz de Gaona, Estefania; Gonzalez, Cristina; Ruiz de Galarreta, Lucia; Lopez, Cristina

    2015-06-01

    Palliative sedation is a common treatment in palliative care. The home is a difficult environment for research, and there are few studies about sedation at home. Our aim was to analyze this practice in a home setting. We conducted a retrospective cross-sectional descriptive study in a home cohort during 2011. The inclusion criteria were as follows: 18 years or older and enrolled in the Palliative Home Care Program (PHCP) with advanced cancer. The variables employed were: sex, age, primary tumor location, and place of death. We also registered indication, type, drug and dose, awareness of diagnosis and prognosis, consent, survival, presence or absence of rales, painful mouth, and ulcers in patients sedated at home. We also collected the opinions of family members and professionals about the suffering of sedated patients. A total of 446 patients (56% at home) of the 617 admitted to the PHCP between January and December of 2011 passed away. The typical patient in our population was a 70-year-old man with a lung tumor. Some 35 (14%) home patients required sedation, compared to 93 (49%) at the hospital. The most frequent indication was delirium (70%), with midazolam the most common drug (mean dose, 40 mg). Survival was around three days. Rales were frequent (57%) as well as awareness of diagnosis and prognosis (77 and 71%, respectively). Perception of suffering after sedation was rare among relatives (17%) and professionals (8%). In most cases, the decision was made jointly by professionals and family members. Our study confirmed the role of palliative sedation as an appropriate therapeutic tool in the home environment.

  14. Prevention of NSAID gastropathy in elderly patients. An observational study in general practice and nursing homes.

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    van Leen, M W F; van der Eijk, I; Schols, J M G A

    2007-07-01

    The objectives of this study were to (i) survey the risk factors for NSAID gastropathy in outpatients (elderly patients in the community), compared to those living in old people's homes or nursing homes, (ii) study the prescription of medication prophylaxis during use of NSAIDs conform the current national guidelines and (iii) survey the influence on gastrointestinal symptoms and safety of pantoprazole 20 mg as prophylaxis for NSAID gastropathy. Patients over 65 years of age, using an NSAID without prophylaxis or newly starting NSAID treatment were included in the study. Pantoprazole 20 mg was prescribed as prophylaxis. Patients using an NSAID with prophylaxis being a proton pump inhibitor at the first visit were registered for epidemiological reasons. Demographic data, risk factors, gastrointestinal complaints, and adverse events were collected at t = 0, t = 2 weeks, t = 3 months and t = 6 months. Differences between groups were analysed with Chi-square tests and Mann-Whitney U tests; changes in time in GI symptoms were tested using Wilcoxon signed ranks tests and McNemar tests. One hundred eighty one general practitioners (treating outpatients and patients in old people's homes)and five nursing home physicians participated in the study and a total of 615 patients were included (522 patients treated by general practitioners (GP) and 93 patients in nursing homes). Four hundred thirty two patients were using NSAIDs without prophylaxis or started using an NSAID at the first visit; 269 (62.1%) and 163 (37.9%) patients respectively. 65.3% of the outpatients (224 out of 343) did not receive indicated prophylaxis, versus 76.2% (16 out of 21) in old people's homes and 42.6% in nursing homes (29 out of 69) (P NSAID prior to the study complained of gastrointestinal symptoms compared to new users (P NSAIDs caused these symptoms. After 2 weeks of treatment with pantoprazole, there was no statistical difference between the two groups. Moreover, both groups showed improvement

  15. "Hospital at home" for neuromuscular disease patients with respiratory tract infection: a pilot study.

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    Vianello, Andrea; Savoia, Francesca; Pipitone, Emanuela; Nordio, Beatrice; Gallina, Giulia; Paladini, Luciana; Concas, Alessandra; Arcaro, Giovanna; Gallan, Federico; Pegoraro, Elena

    2013-12-01

    The "hospital-at-home" model may provide adequate care without an adverse effect on clinical outcome, and is generally well received by users. Our objective was to compare hospital-at-home and in-patient hospital care for neuromuscular disease (NMD) patients with respiratory tract infections. We conducted a prospective randomized controlled trial in a university teaching hospital offering secondary care service to a population of approximately 500,000. We recruited selected NMD patients with respiratory tract infection for whom hospital admission had been recommended after medical assessment. Hospital-at-home was provided as an alternative to in-patient admission. The main outcome measures were need for hospitalization, treatment failure, time to recovery, death during the first 3 months following exacerbation, and cost of patient care. Among 59 consecutive NMD patients eligible for the study, 53 met the criteria for hospital-at-home. Twenty-six subjects were randomized to home care and 27 to hospital care. No significant differences were found in treatment failure (8/26 vs 13/27, P = .19), time to recovery (8.9 ± 4.6 vs 9 ± 8.9 d, P = .21), or mortality at 3 months (3/26 vs 4/27 deaths, P = .42) between the groups. Hospital-at-home failure was independently correlated with type of NMD (P = .004) with an odds ratio of failure of 17.3 (95% CI 2.1 to infinity) for subjects with amyotrophic lateral sclerosis. The total and daily direct cost of patient healthcare was significantly lower for the subjects who were successfully treated at home, compared to the hospitalized individuals. Hospital-at-home is an effective alternative to hospital admission for selected NMD patients with respiratory tract infections.

  16. Tampering by office-based methadone maintenance patients with methadone take home privileges: a pilot study

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    Frank Nathan

    2007-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Methadone Maintenance Treatment (MMT is among the most widely studied treatments for opiate dependence with proven benefits for patients and society. When misused, however, methadone can also be lethal. The issue of methadone diversion is a major concern for all MMT programs. A potential source for such diversion is from those MMT patients who receive daily take home methadone doses. Using a reverse phase high performance liquid chromatography method, seven of the nine patients who were randomly selected to have all of their remaining methadone take home doses (within a 24 hour period analyzed, returned lower than expected quantities of methadone. This finding suggests the possibility that such patients may have tampered with their daily take home doses. Larger prospective observational studies are clearly needed to test the supposition of this pilot study.

  17. Barriers to patient portal access among veterans receiving home-based primary care: a qualitative study.

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    Mishuris, Rebecca G; Stewart, Max; Fix, Gemmae M; Marcello, Thomas; McInnes, D Keith; Hogan, Timothy P; Boardman, Judith B; Simon, Steven R

    2015-12-01

    Electronic, or web-based, patient portals can improve patient satisfaction, engagement and health outcomes and are becoming more prevalent with the advent of meaningful use incentives. However, adoption rates are low, particularly among vulnerable patient populations, such as those patients who are home-bound with multiple comorbidities. Little is known about how these patients view patient portals or their barriers to using them. To identify barriers to and facilitators of using My HealtheVet (MHV), the United States Department of Veterans Affairs (VA) patient portal, among Veterans using home-based primary care services. Qualitative study using in-depth semi-structured interviews. We conducted a content analysis informed by grounded theory. Fourteen Veterans receiving home-based primary care, surrogates of two of these Veterans, and three home-based primary care (HBPC) staff members. We identified five themes related to the use of MHV: limited knowledge; satisfaction with current HBPC care; limited computer and Internet access; desire to learn more about MHV and its potential use; and value of surrogates acting as intermediaries between Veterans and MHV. Despite their limited knowledge of MHV and computer access, home-bound Veterans are interested in accessing MHV and using it as an additional point of care. Surrogates are also potential users of MHV on behalf of these Veterans and may have different barriers to and benefits from use. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  18. Dealing with chemotherapy-related symptoms at home: a qualitative study in adult patients with cancer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Coolbrandt, A.; Dierckx de Casterle, B.; Wildiers, H.; Aertgeerts, B.; Elst, E. Van der; Achterberg, T. van; Milisen, K.

    2016-01-01

    Given that chemotherapy treatments are done mostly in an outpatient setting, patients with cancer must deal with treatment-related symptoms mainly at home. Evidence suggests that they often feel left alone or unprepared to do so. This qualitative study explores how patients deal with

  19. Quality of Life and Nutrition Condition of Patients Improve Under Home Parenteral Nutrition: An Exploratory Study.

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    Girke, Jutta; Seipt, Claudia; Markowski, Andrea; Luettig, Birgit; Schettler, Anika; Momma, Michael; Schneider, Andrea S

    2016-10-01

    Patients with end-stage cancer and advanced chronic bowel disease are often malnourished, which has a negative effect on patients' outcome, well-being, and activity. It is inconclusive whether these patients benefit from home parenteral nutrition. This prospective exploratory study investigates its influence on nutrition state, muscle strength, mobility, and quality of life. Patients ≥18 years old with an indication for home parenteral nutrition were included and followed for 2-24 months. Nutrition parameters, activity, and quality of life were assessed. Forty-eight patients participated (mean age 11.5 years), and 85% were severely malnourished (subjective global assessment score, class C). Four weeks after parenteral nutrition, patients with tumors demonstrated a deterioration in phase angle (from 3.9 to 3.4) and extracellular mass:body cell mass ratio (from 1.6 to 2.1), while patients with bowel disease improved (from 3.4 to 4.0 and 2.1 to 1.6, respectively); grip strength remained constant in both groups (difference: 1.11 and -2.11, respectively). Activity improved in patients with bowel disease but stayed the same in the tumor group (P = .02 and P = .33, respectively). When the groups were pooled, emotional and social functioning domain scores (P parenteral nutrition. Both groups seem to benefit from home parenteral nutrition without harmful side effects. If the indication is determined early, the patients' disease course could perhaps be improved. © 2016 American Society for Parenteral and Enteral Nutrition.

  20. Safety of Intravenous Immunoglobulin (Tegeline®, Administered at Home in Patients with Autoimmune Disease: Results of a French Study

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    Eric Hachulla

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available The efficacy of intravenous immunoglobulins (IVIg in patients with autoimmune diseases (AID has been known for several decades. Majority of these patients received IVIg in hospital. A retrospective study was conducted in 22 centers in France to evaluate the feasibility of the administration of Tegeline, an IVIg from LFB Biomedicaments, and assess its safety at home, compared to in hospital, in patients with AID. The included patients were at least 18 years old, suffering from AID, and treated with at least 1 cycle of Tegeline at home after receiving 3 consecutive cycles of hospital-based treatment with Tegeline at a dose between 1 and 2 g/kg/cycle. Forty-six patients with AID, in most cases immune-mediated neuropathies, received a total of 138 cycles of Tegeline in hospital and then 323 at home. Forty-five drug-related adverse events occurred in 17 patients who received their cycles at home compared to 24 adverse events in hospital in 15 patients. Serious adverse events occurred in 3 patients during home treatment, but they were not life-threatening and did not lead to discontinuation of Tegeline. Forty-five patients continued their treatment with Tegeline at home or in hospital; 39 (84.8% were still receiving home treatment at the end of the study. In conclusion, the study demonstrates the good safety profile of Tegeline administered at home at high doses in patients with AID who are eligible for home administration of Tegeline.

  1. What does built-in software of home ventilators tell us? An observational study of 150 patients on home ventilation.

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    Pasquina, Patrick; Adler, Dan; Farr, Pamela; Bourqui, Pascale; Bridevaux, Pierre Olivier; Janssens, Jean-Paul

    2012-01-01

    Recent home ventilators are equipped with built-in software which provides data such as compliance, estimations of leaks, tidal volume, minute ventilation, respiratory rate, apnea and apnea-hypopnea indexes, and percentage of inspirations triggered by the patient (or ventilator). However, for many of these variables, there is neither consensus nor documentation as to what is to be expected in a population of stable patients under noninvasive ventilation (NIV). To document the values and distribution of specific items downloaded from ventilator monitoring software, by diagnostic category. Analysis of data downloaded from home ventilators in clinically stable patients under long-term NIV, during elective home visits by specialized nurses. Data were collected from home ventilators of 150 patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (n = 32), overlap syndrome (n = 29), obesity-hypoventilation (n = 38), neuromuscular disorders (n = 19), restrictive disorders (n = 21), and central sleep apnea syndrome (n = 11). On average, leaks were low, being lowest in patients with facial masks (vs. nasal masks), and increased with older age. Compliance was excellent in all groups. Patients with neuromuscular diseases triggered their ventilators less and tended to be 'captured', while other groups triggered at least half of inspiratory cycles. Most patients had a respiratory rate just slightly above the back-up rate. Residual apneas and hypopneas were highest in patients with central apneas. Built-in software of home ventilators provides the clinician with new parameters, some of which are a useful adjunct to recommended tools for monitoring NIV and may contribute to a better understanding of residual hypoventilation and/or desaturations. However, an independent validation of the accuracy of this information is mandatory. Copyright © 2011 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  2. Patient-Centered Medical Home Undergraduate Internship, Benefits to a Practice Manager: Case Study.

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    Sasnett, Bonita; Harris, Susie T; White, Shelly

    Health services management interns become practice facilitators for primary care clinics interested in pursuing patient-centered recognition for their practice. This experience establishes a collaborative relationship between the university and clinic practices where students apply their academic training to a system of documentation to improve the quality of patient care delivery. The case study presents the process undertaken, benefits, challenges, lessons learned, and recommendations for intern, practice mangers, and educators. The practice manager benefits as interns become Patient-Centered Medical Home facilitators and assist practice managers in the recognition process.

  3. Clinical characteristics of pneumonia in bedridden patients receiving home care: a 3-year prospective observational study.

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    Ishida, Tadashi; Tachibana, Hiromasa; Ito, Akihiro; Ikeda, Satoshi; Furuta, Kenjiro; Nishiyama, Akihiro; Noyama, Maki; Tokioka, Fumiaki; Yoshioka, Hiroshige; Arita, Machiko

    2015-08-01

    The aim of the study was to describe the epidemiology, clinical features, antimicrobial treatment, and outcomes of bedridden pneumonia patients receiving home healthcare. A 3-year prospective observational study of poor performance status (PS) 3-4 patients receiving long-term home healthcare and hospitalized at a single center with pneumonia between October 2010 and September 2013 was conducted, and their clinical characteristics were compared with non-bedridden community-acquired pneumonia (CAP) patients. A total of 131 CAP patients with PS 3-4, and 400 CAP patients with PS 0-2 were evaluated. The PS 3-4 patients were older, and exhibited a higher frequency of underlying diseases. Aspiration was thought to be associated with pneumonia in 77.1% of the PS 3-4 patients. Streptococcus pneumoniae was the leading pathogen in both groups, whereas the frequency of streptococci and polymicrobial infections was higher in the PS 3-4 group. The incidence of multidrug-resistant pathogens such as methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) or Pseudomonas aeruginosa was lower than in previous healthcare-associated pneumonia reports. The in-hospital mortality and recurrence rates were significantly higher in the PS 3-4 group than in the good PS group (17.6% vs. 6.0%, p < 0.001 and 15.3% vs. 7.5%, p = 0.008, respectively). The clinical characteristics of pneumonia in poor PS patients were similar to healthcare-associated pneumonia (HCAP), except for the frequency of drug-resistant pathogens. Hence, it might be beneficial to categorize pneumonia in home residents with poor PS separately from pneumonia in CAP patients who were previously healthy or experienced mild comorbidities. Copyright © 2015 Japanese Society of Chemotherapy and The Japanese Association for Infectious Diseases. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Exercise rehabilitation on home-dwelling patients with Alzheimer's disease - a randomized, controlled trial. Study protocol

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tilvis Reijo S

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Besides cognitive decline, Alzheimer's disease (AD leads to physical disability, need for help and permanent institutional care. The trials investigating effects of exercise rehabilitation on physical functioning of home-dwelling older dementia patients are still scarce. The aim of this study is to investigate the effectiveness of intensive exercise rehabilitation lasting for one year on mobility and physical functioning of home-dwelling patients with AD. Methods During years 2008-2010, patients with AD (n = 210 living with their spousal caregiver in community are recruited using central AD registers in Finland, and they are offered exercise rehabilitation lasting for one year. The patients are randomized into three arms: 1 tailored home-based exercise twice weekly 2 group-based exercise twice weekly in rehabilitation center 3 control group with usual care and information of exercise and nutrition. Main outcome measures will be Guralnik's mobility and balance tests and FIM-test to assess physical functioning. Secondary measures will be cognition, neuropsychiatric symptoms according to the Neuropsychiatric Inventory, caregivers' burden, depression and health-related quality of life (RAND-36. Data concerning admissions to institutional care and the use and costs of health and social services will be collected during a two year follow-up. Discussion To our knowledge this is the first large scale trial exploring whether home-dwelling patients with AD will benefit from intense and long-lasting exercise rehabilitation in respect to their mobility and physical functioning. It will also provide data on cost-effectiveness of the intervention. Trial registration ACTRN12608000037303

  5. Performance of mechanical ventilators at the patient's home: a multicentre quality control study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farré, R; Navajas, D; Prats, E; Marti, S; Guell, R; Montserrat, J M; Tebe, C; Escarrabill, J

    2006-05-01

    Quality control procedures vary considerably among the providers of equipment for home mechanical ventilation (HMV). A multicentre quality control survey of HMV was performed at the home of 300 patients included in the HMV programmes of four hospitals in Barcelona. It consisted of three steps: (1) the prescribed ventilation settings, the actual settings in the ventilator control panel, and the actual performance of the ventilator measured at home were compared; (2) the different ventilator alarms were tested; and (3) the effect of differences between the prescribed settings and the actual performance of the ventilator on non-programmed readmissions of the patient was determined. Considerable differences were found between actual, set, and prescribed values of ventilator variables; these differences were similar in volume and pressure preset ventilators. The percentage of patients with a discrepancy between the prescribed and actual measured main ventilator variable (minute ventilation or inspiratory pressure) of more than 20% and 30% was 13% and 4%, respectively. The number of ventilators with built in alarms for power off, disconnection, or obstruction was 225, 280 and 157, respectively. These alarms did not work in two (0.9%), 52 (18.6%) and eight (5.1%) ventilators, respectively. The number of non-programmed hospital readmissions in the year before the study did not correlate with the index of ventilator error. This study illustrates the current limitations of the quality control of HMV and suggests that improvements should be made to ensure adequate ventilator settings and correct ventilator performance and ventilator alarm operation.

  6. A cloud-based home health care information sharing system to connect patients with home healthcare staff -A case report of a study in a mountainous region.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nomoto, Shinichi; Utsumi, Momoe; Sasayama, Satoshi; Dekigai, Hiroshi

    2017-01-01

    We have developed a cloud system, the e-Renraku Notebook (e-RN) for sharing of home care information based on the concept of "patient-centricity". In order to assess the likelihood that our system will enhance the communication and sharing of information between home healthcare staff members and home-care patients, we selected patients who were residing in mountainous regions for inclusion in our study. We herein report the findings.Eighteen staff members from 7 medical facilities and 9 patients participated in the present study.The e-RN was developed for two reasons: to allow patients to independently report their health status and to have staff members view and respond to the information received. The patients and staff members were given iPads with the pre-installed applications and the information being exchanged was reviewed over a 54-day period.Information was mainly input by the patients (61.6%), followed by the nurses who performed home visits (19.9%). The amount of information input by patients requiring high-level nursing care and their corresponding staff member was significantly greater than that input by patients who required low-level of nursing care.This patient-centric system in which patients can independently report and share information with a member of the healthcare staff provides a sense of security. It also allows staff members to understand the patient's health status before making a home visit, thereby giving them a sense of security and confidence. It was also noteworthy that elderly patients requiring high-level nursing care and their staff counterpart input information in the system significantly more frequently than patients who required low-level care.

  7. Pediatric Patients Receiving Specialized Palliative Home Care According to German Law: A Prospective Multicenter Cohort Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Silke Nolte-Buchholtz

    2018-05-01

    Full Text Available In Germany, every child with a life-limiting condition suffering from symptoms that cannot sufficiently be controlled is eligible by law for specialized pediatric palliative home care (SPPHC. It is the aim of this study to describe the demographic and clinical characteristics of children referred to SPPHC and to compare patients with cancer and non-cancer conditions. The prospective multicenter study includes data on 75 children (median age 7.7 years, 50.7% male. The majority had non-cancer conditions (72%. The most common symptoms were cognitive impairment, somatic pain, impairment in communication or swallowing difficulties. Swallowing difficulties, seizures, and spasticity occurred significantly more often in non-cancer patients (p < 0.01. Cancer patients received antiemetics significantly more often (permanent and on demand than non-cancer patients (p < 0.01. Significantly more non-cancer patients had some type of feeding tube (57.3% or received oxygen (33.3% (p < 0.01. Central venous catheters had been fitted in 20% of the patients, mostly in cancer patients (p < 0.001. Tracheostomy tubes (9.3% or ventilation (14.7% were only used in non-cancer patients. In conclusion, patients referred to SPPHC are a diverse cohort with complex conditions including a large range of neurologically originating symptoms. The care of pediatric palliative care patients with cancer is different to the care of non-cancer patients.

  8. [A study of home care needs of patients at discharge and effects of home care--centered on patients discharged from a rural general hospital].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Y S; Kim, D H; Storey, M; Kim, C J; Kang, K S

    1992-01-01

    The study was carried out at W. hospital, an affiliated hospital of Y university, involved a total of 163 patients who were discharged from the hospital between May 1990 and March 1991. Data collection was twice, just prior to discharge and a minimum of three months post discharge. Thirty patients who lived within a hour travel time of the hospital received home care during the three months post discharge. Nursing diagnoses and nursing interventions for these patients were analyzed in this study. The results of the study are summarized as follows: 1. Discharge needs for the subjects of the study were analyzed using Gordon's eleven functional categories and it was found that 48.3% of the total sample had identified nursing needs. Of these, the needs most frequently identified were in the categories of sexuality, 79.3%, health perception, 68.2% self concept, 62.5%, and sleep and rest 62.5%. Looking at the nursing diagnosis that were made for the 30 patients receiving home care, the following diagnoses were the most frequently given; alteration in sexual pattern 79.3%, alterations in health maintenance, 72.6%, alteration in comfort, 68.0%, depression, 64.0%, noncompliance with diet therapy, 63.7%, alteration in self concept, 55.6%, and alteration in sleep pattern, 53%. 2. In looking at the effects of home nursing care as demonstrated by changes in the functional categories over the three month period, it was found that of the 11 functional categories, the need level for health perception, nutrition, activity and self concept decreased slightly over the three month period. On the average sleep patterns improved, but restfulness was slightly less and bowel elimination patterns improved but satisfaction with urinary elimination was slightly less. On the other hand, role enactment, sexuality, stress management and spirituality decreased slightly. The only results that were statistically significant at the 0.05 level were improvement in digestion and decrease in pain. No

  9. Dealing with chemotherapy-related symptoms at home: a qualitative study in adult patients with cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coolbrandt, A; Dierckx de Casterlé, B; Wildiers, H; Aertgeerts, B; Van der Elst, E; van Achterberg, T; Milisen, K

    2016-01-01

    Given that chemotherapy treatments are done mostly in an outpatient setting, patients with cancer must deal with treatment-related symptoms mainly at home. Evidence suggests that they often feel left alone or unprepared to do so. This qualitative study explores how patients deal with chemotherapy-related symptoms in their home, which factors and ideas influence their self-management and what role professional caregivers play. One-off, semi-structured interviews were held with 28 adult patients with cancer being treated with chemotherapy. Using a Grounded Theory approach, we cyclically collected and analysed data to come to a thorough understanding of the major conceptual themes and their interconnections. Dealing with chemotherapy-related symptoms involves a process of experiencing and learning how side effects unfold over time and how to deal with them. Patients express very personal symptom experiences and symptom-management styles, which are shaped by personal factors (e.g. coping with cancer and cancer treatment, perceived level of control) and environmental factors (e.g. professionals' attitude, information resources). Improving symptom self-management support requires active exploration of the personal symptom experience and symptom-management style. Professional care should be tailored to the patient's perspective and should address personal and environmental determinants of their behaviour. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  10. Remote Patient Management for Home Dialysis Patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eric L. Wallace

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Remote patient management (RPM offers renal health care providers and patients with end-stage kidney disease opportunities to embrace home dialysis therapies with greater confidence and the potential to obtain better clinical outcomes. Barriers and evidence required to increase adoption of RPM by the nephrology community need to be clearly defined. Ten health care providers from specialties including nephrology, cardiology, pediatrics, epidemiology, nursing, and health informatics with experience in home dialysis and the use of RPM systems gathered in Vienna, Austria to discuss opportunities for, barriers to, and system requirements of RPM as it applies to the home dialysis patient. Although improved outcomes and cost-effectiveness of RPM have been demonstrated in patients with diabetes mellitus and heart disease, only observational data on RPM have been gathered in patients on dialysis. The current review focused on RPM systems currently in use, on how RPM should be integrated into future care, and on the evidence needed for optimized implementation to improve clinical and economic outcomes. Randomized controlled trials and/or large observational studies could inform the most effective and economical use of RPM in home dialysis. These studies are needed to establish the value of existing and/or future RPM models among patients, policy makers, and health care providers.

  11. [Maintaining patients' autonomy at home].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niang, Bénédicte; Coudre, Jean Pierre

    2015-01-01

    To maintain the flow of hospital discharges, the patient's return home with support from a home nursing service is important. If any difficulties are identified, there are various programmes or good practices which can be put into place. The future law on adapting society to ageing also comprises a scheme combining home assistance and nursing care.

  12. A study investigating patients' experience of hospital and home iontophoresis for hyperhidrosis.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    McAleer, Maeve Aine

    2014-08-01

    Iontophoresis is an effective and safe treatment for hyperhidrosis. We investigated patients\\' experiences with the Idrostar® home iontophoresis unit (STD Pharmaceuticals, Hereford, UK) considering compliance and efficacy.

  13. Home based telemedicine intervention for patients with uncontrolled hypertension: - a real life - non-randomized study

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-01-01

    Background Control of blood pressure is frequently inadequate in spite of availability of several classes of well tolerated and effective antihypertensive drugs. Several factors, including the use of suboptimal doses of drugs, inadequate or ineffective treatments and poor drug compliance may be the reason for this phenomenon. The aim of the current non- randomized study was to evaluate the effectiveness of a Home-Based Telemedicine service in patients with uncontrolled hypertension. Methods 74 patients were enrolled in a Home Based Telemedicine group and 94 patients in the Usual Care group. At baseline and at the end of the study, patients in both groups were seen in a cardiology office. Patients in Home Based Telemedicine group additionally were followed by a physician-nurse, through scheduled and unscheduled telephone appointments. These patients also received a blood pressure measuring device that could transmit the readings to a central data monitor via secure data connection. Results During the study period (80 ± 25 days), a total of 17401 blood pressure measurements were taken in the Home Based Telemedicine group corresponding to 236 ± 136 readings per patient and a mean daily measurement of 3 ± 1.7. The scheduled telephone contacts (initiated by the nurse) equaled to 5.2 ± 4.3/patient (370 in total) and the unscheduled telephone contacts (initiated by the patients) were 0.4 ± 0.9/patient (30 in total). The mean systolic blood pressure values decreased from 153 ± 19 mmHg to 130 ± 15 mmHg (p < 0.0001) at the end of the study and diastolic blood pressure values decreased from 89 ± 10 mmHg to 76 ± 11 mmHg (p < 0.0001). In the Usual Care group, the mean systolic blood pressure values decreased from 156 ± 16 mmHg to 149 ± 17 mmHg (p < 0.05) at the end of the study and diastolic blood pressure values decreased from 90 ± 8 mmHg to 86 ± 9 mmHg (p < 0.05). The changes in drug

  14. Do patients in Dutch nursing homes have more pressure ulcers than patients in German nursing homes? A prospective multicenter cohort study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meesterberends, Esther; Halfens, Ruud J G; Spreeuwenberg, Marieke D; Ambergen, Ton A W; Lohrmann, Christa; Neyens, Jacques C L; Schols, Jos M G A

    2013-08-01

    To investigate whether the incidence of pressure ulcers in nursing homes in the Netherlands and Germany differs and, if so, to identify resident-related risk factors, nursing-related interventions, and structural factors associated with pressure ulcer development in nursing home residents. A prospective multicenter cohort study. Ten nursing homes in the Netherlands and 11 nursing homes in Germany (around Berlin and Brandenburg). A total of 547 newly admitted nursing home residents, of which 240 were Dutch and 307 were German. Residents had an expected length of stay of 12 weeks or longer. Data were collected for each resident over a 12-week period and included resident characteristics (eg, demographics, medical history, Braden scale scores, nutritional factors), pressure ulcer prevention and treatment characteristics, staffing ratios and other structural nursing home characteristics, and outcome (pressure ulcer development during the study). Data were obtained by trained research assistants. A significantly higher pressure ulcer incidence rate was found for the Dutch nursing homes (33.3%) compared with the German nursing homes (14.3%). Six factors that explain the difference in pressure ulcer incidence rates were identified: dementia, analgesics use, the use of transfer aids, repositioning the residents, the availability of a tissue viability nurse on the ward, and regular internal quality controls in the nursing home. The pressure ulcer incidence was significantly higher in Dutch nursing homes than in German nursing homes. Factors related to residents, nursing care and structure explain this difference in incidence rates. Continuous attention to pressure ulcer care is important for all health care settings and countries, but Dutch nursing homes especially should pay more attention to repositioning residents, the necessity and correct use of transfer aids, the necessity of analgesics use, the tasks of the tissue viability nurse, and the performance of regular

  15. Euthanasia in patients dying at home in Belgium: interview study on adherence to legal safeguards

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smets, Tinne; Bilsen, Johan; Van den Block, Lieve; Cohen, Joachim; Van Casteren, Viviane; Deliens, Luc

    2010-01-01

    Background Euthanasia became legal in Belgium in 2002. Physicians must adhere to legal due care requirements when performing euthanasia; for example, consulting a second physician and reporting each euthanasia case to the Federal Review Committee. Aim To study the adherence and non-adherence of GPs to legal due care requirements for euthanasia among patients dying at home in Belgium and to explore possible reasons for non-adherence. Design of study Large scale, retrospective study. Setting General practice in Belgium. Method A retrospective mortality study was performed in 2005–2006 using the nationwide Belgian Sentinel Network of General Practitioners. Each week GPs reported medical end-of-life decisions taken in all non-sudden deaths of patients in their practice. GP interviews were conducted for each euthanasia case occurring at home. Results Interviews were conducted for nine of the 11 identified euthanasia cases. Requirements concerning the patient's medical condition were met in all cases. Procedural requirements such as consultation of a second physician were sometimes ignored. Euthanasia cases were least often reported (n = 4) when the physician did not regard the decision as euthanasia, when only opioids were used to perform euthanasia, or when no second physician was consulted. Factors that may contribute to explaining non-adherence to the euthanasia law included: being unaware of which practices are considered to be euthanasia; insufficient knowledge of the euthanasia law; and the fact that certain procedures are deemed burdensome. Conclusion Substantive legal due care requirements for euthanasia concerning the patient's request for euthanasia and medical situation were almost always met by GPs in euthanasia cases. Procedural consultation and reporting requirements were not always met. PMID:20353662

  16. Resourse Use and Disease Couse in dementia - Nursing Home (REDIC-NH), a longitudinal cohort study; design and patient characteristics at admission to Norwegian nursing homes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Røen, Irene; Selbæk, Geir; Kirkevold, Øyvind; Engedal, Knut; Testad, Ingelin; Bergh, Sverre

    2017-05-22

    Earlier studies of nursing home patients show a high prevalence of dementia, neuropsychiatric symptoms (NPS), pain, and dependency in activities of daily living. The REDIC-NH cohort was set up to study the disease course and the resources used in patients with dementia in Norway. The aim of this paper was to describe the methods and the data collection, and to present selected data about patients at admission to a nursing home. We included 696 patients at admission to a nursing home and followed them with biannual assessments until death. Baseline data were collected between March 2012 and November 2014. In October 2016, patients had either completed an 18-month follow-up (n = 349), passed 18 months without assessments (n = 22), or left the study (n = 324). Data on demographics, cognition, NPS, activities of daily living (ADL) functioning, physical health, medication, Quality of Life (QoL), resource use, and caregiver burden, in addition to DNA samples were collected. Mean age of the participants at inclusion was 84.5 years (SD 7.5, range 50 - 105), 63.9% were women. According to data collected in the study, 83.8% had dementia, but only 55.9% of them had a diagnosis of dementia registered in their records. The most frequent dementia diagnosis was Alzheimer's disease, which was present in 71% of those with dementia. Patients with dementia more often experienced delusions, hallucinations, agitation, anxiety, disinhibition, irritability, and aberrant motor behaviour compared to patients without dementia. Depression and anxiety were the most common NPS symptoms. Dementia and NPS were highly prevalent among persons admitted to nursing homes. Only 55.9% of the patients with dementia had a diagnosis of dementia registered in their records.

  17. Breakdown in informational continuity of care during hospitalization of older home-living patients: A case study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rose Mari Olsen

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: The successful transfer of an older patient between health care organizations requires open communication between them that details relevant and necessary information about the patient's health status and individual needs. The objective of this study was to identify and describe the process and content of the patient information exchange between nurses in home care and hospital during hospitalization of older home-living patients.Methods: A multiple case study design was used. Using observations, qualitative interviews and document reviews, the total patient information exchange during each patient's episode of hospitalization (n = 9, from day of admission to return home, was captured.Results: Information exchange mainly occurred at discharge, including a discharge note sent from hospital to home care, and telephone reports from hospital nurse to home care nurse, and meetings between hospital nurse and patient coordinator from the municipal purchaser unit. No information was provided from the home care nurses to the hospital nurses at admission. Incompleteness in the content of both written and verbal information was found. Information regarding physical care was more frequently reported than other caring dimensions. Descriptions of the patients’ subjective experiences were almost absent and occurred only in the verbal communication.Conclusions: The gap in the information flow, as well as incompleteness in the content of written and verbal information exchanged, constitutes a challenge to the continuity of care for hospitalized home-living patients. In order to ensure appropriate nursing follow-up care, we emphasize the need for nurses to improve the information flow, as well as to use a more comprehensive approach to older patients, and that this must be reflected in the verbal and written information exchange.

  18. Home health nurse decision-making regarding visit intensity planning for newly admitted patients: a qualitative descriptive study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Irani, Elliane; Hirschman, Karen B; Cacchione, Pamela Z; Bowles, Kathryn H

    2018-04-13

    Despite patients referred to home health having diverse and complex needs, it is unknown how nurses develop personalized visit plans. In this qualitative descriptive study, we interviewed 26 nurses from three agencies about their decision-making process to determine visit intensity and analyzed data using directed content analysis. Following a multifactorial assessment of the patient, nurses relied on their experience and their agency's protocols to develop the personalized visit plan. They revised the plan based on changes in the patient's clinical condition, engagement, and caregiver availability. Findings suggest strategies to improve visit planning and positively influence outcomes of home health patients.

  19. Polypharmacy and Renal Failure in Nursing Home Residents: Results of the Inappropriate Medication in Patients with Renal Insufficiency in Nursing Homes (IMREN) Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dörks, Michael; Herget-Rosenthal, Stefan; Schmiemann, Guido; Hoffmann, Falk

    2016-01-01

    Polypharmacy has become an emerging public health issue in recent years, since use of multiple medications or polypharmacy is beneficial for many conditions, but may also have negative effects like adverse drug reactions. The risk further increases in patients with chronic renal failure, a comorbidity very frequent in nursing home residents. Since more than 50% of all drugs were renally excreted, dose adjustments in patients with renal failure are required. To assess polypharmacy in German nursing homes, in particular in residents with renal failure. Multi-center cross-sectional study in 21 nursing homes in Bremen and Lower Saxony/Germany. Baseline data were analysed using descriptive statistics. Multivariable logistic regression model and 95% confidence intervals were used to study the association of renal failure and polypharmacy. Of all 852 residents, the analysis comprised those 685 with at least one serum creatinine value so that the estimated creatinine clearance could be calculated. Of those, 436 (63.6%) had a severe or moderate renal failure, defined as estimated creatinine clearance renal failure (estimated creatinine clearance renal failure are common in German nursing home residents and an association of both could be found. Further studies are needed to assess the appropriateness of polypharmacy in these patients.

  20. Communication of the death of a patient in hospices and nursing homes: a qualitative study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rivolta, Maria Marcella; Rivolta, Licia; Garrino, Lorenza; Di Giulio, Paola

    2014-02-01

    Announcing the death of a patient to another in hospices and nursing homes (NH) requires special skills, especially when the recipient is another resident. The aim of this study is to describe how hospice and NH staff deal with the communication regarding a patient's death, if this communication is perceived as a problem, and strategies implemented. The 55 health care workers (HCWs, 26 nurses and 29 auxiliary nurses) of two NHs and two hospices in Turin (Italy) were interviewed with a semi-structured interview exploring the residents' perception of need to receiving information on another patient's death, the experiences of having given this information in the last 6 months, and the strategies implemented. The interviews were analyzed using Colaizzi's method and researchers looked for the main themes and related subthemes. Six themes were identified and grouped into 2 main themes: a. the choice to tell the truth or not, which may be influenced by: the patients' request for confirmation of the fate of the other resident, by patients' fear of death ("I will be next"), the relationships among the guests, and personal and group experiences; b. the need to share own feelings and the burden of deciding whether or not to inform the other residents and how to go about this. If a structured discussion of experiences and reflection on cases is not implemented, HCWs may limit communication to bare information, lies, and adopt behaviors of avoidance and concealment. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Facilitating primary care provider use in a patient-centered medical home intervention study for chronic hemodialysis patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chukwudozie, Ifeanyi Beverly; Fitzgibbon, Marian L; Schiffer, Linda; Berbaum, Michael; Gilmartin, Cheryl; David, Pyone; Ekpo, Eson; Fischer, Michael J; Porter, Anna C; Aziz-Bradley, Alana; Hynes, Denise M

    2018-05-23

    Patients with chronic kidney disease have a high disease burand may benefit from primary care services and care coord A medical home model with direct access to primary care services is one approach that may address this need, yet has not been examined. As a substudy of the Patient-Centered Outcomes Research Institute (PCORI) patient-centered medical home for kidney disease (PCMH-KD) health system intervention study, we examined the uptake of free primary care physician (PCP) services. The PCORI PCMH-KD study was an initial step toward integrating PCPs, a nurse coordinator, a pharmacist, and community health workers (CHWs) within the health care delivery team. Adult chronic hemodialysis (CHD) at two urban dialysis centers were enrolled in the intervention. We examined trends and factors associated with the use of the PCMH-KD PCP among two groups of patients based on their report of having a regular physician for at least six months (established-PCP) or not (no-PCP). Of the 173 enrolled patients, 91 (53%) patients had at least one visit with the PCMH-KD PCP. The rate of visits was higher in those in the no-PCP group compared with those in the established-PCP group (62% vs. 41%, respectively). Having more visits with the CHW was positively associated with having a visit with the PCMH-KD PCPs for both groups. Embedded CHWs within the care team played a role in facilithe uptake of PCMH-KD PCP. Lessons from this health system intervention can inform future approaches on the integration of PCPs and care coordination for CHD patients.

  2. Functioning and health in patients with cancer on home-parenteral nutrition: a qualitative study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mueller, Martin; Lohmann, Stefanie; Thul, Paul; Weimann, Arved; Grill, Eva

    2010-04-16

    Malnutrition is a common problem in patients with cancer. One possible strategy to prevent malnutrition and further deterioration is to administer home-parenteral nutrition (HPN). While the effect on survival is still not clear, HPN presumably improves functioning and quality of life. Thus, patients' experiences concerning functioning and quality of life need to be considered when deciding on the provision of HPN. Currently used quality of life measures hardly reflect patients' perspectives and experiences. The objective of our study was to investigate the perspectives of patients with cancer on their experience of functioning and health in relation to HPN in order to get an item pool to develop a comprehensive measure to assess the impact of HPN in this population. We conducted a series of qualitative semi-structured interviews. The interviews were analysed to identify categories of the International Classification of Functioning, Disability and Health (ICF) addressed by patients' statements. Patients were consecutively included in the study until an additional patient did not yield any new information. We extracted 94 different ICF-categories from 16 interviews representing patient-relevant aspects of functioning and health (32 categories from the ICF component 'Body Functions', 10 from 'Body Structures', 32 from 'Activities & Participation', 18 from 'Environmental Factors'). About 8% of the concepts derived from the interviews could not be linked to specific ICF categories because they were either too general, disease-specific or pertained to 'Personal Factors'. Patients referred to 22 different aspects of functioning improving due to HPN; mainly activities of daily living, mobility, sleep and emotional functions. The ICF proved to be a satisfactory framework to standardize the response of patients with cancer on HPN. For most aspects reported by the patients, a matching concept and ICF category could be found. The development of categories of the component

  3. Functioning and health in patients with cancer on home-parenteral nutrition: a qualitative study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lohmann Stefanie

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Malnutrition is a common problem in patients with cancer. One possible strategy to prevent malnutrition and further deterioration is to administer home-parenteral nutrition (HPN. While the effect on survival is still not clear, HPN presumably improves functioning and quality of life. Thus, patients' experiences concerning functioning and quality of life need to be considered when deciding on the provision of HPN. Currently used quality of life measures hardly reflect patients' perspectives and experiences. The objective of our study was to investigate the perspectives of patients with cancer on their experience of functioning and health in relation to HPN in order to get an item pool to develop a comprehensive measure to assess the impact of HPN in this population. Methods We conducted a series of qualitative semi-structured interviews. The interviews were analysed to identify categories of the International Classification of Functioning, Disability and Health (ICF addressed by patients' statements. Patients were consecutively included in the study until an additional patient did not yield any new information. Results We extracted 94 different ICF-categories from 16 interviews representing patient-relevant aspects of functioning and health (32 categories from the ICF component 'Body Functions', 10 from 'Body Structures', 32 from 'Activities & Participation', 18 from 'Environmental Factors'. About 8% of the concepts derived from the interviews could not be linked to specific ICF categories because they were either too general, disease-specific or pertained to 'Personal Factors'. Patients referred to 22 different aspects of functioning improving due to HPN; mainly activities of daily living, mobility, sleep and emotional functions. Conclusions The ICF proved to be a satisfactory framework to standardize the response of patients with cancer on HPN. For most aspects reported by the patients, a matching concept and ICF category

  4. Age, gender, will, and use of home-visit nursing care are critical factors in home care for malignant diseases; a retrospective study involving 346 patients in Japan

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-01

    Background We aimed to clarify the factors affecting outcomes of home care for patients with malignant diseases. Methods Of 607 patients who were treated in 10 clinics specialized in home care between January and December 2007 at Chiba, Fukuoka, Iwate, Kagoshima, Tochigi and Tokyo prefectures across Japan, 346 (57%; 145 men and 201 women) had malignant diseases. We collected information on medical and social backgrounds, details of home care, and its outcomes based on their medical records. Results Median age of the patients was 77 years (range, 11-102), and 335 patients were economically self-sufficient. Their general condition was poor; advanced cancer (n = 308), performance status of 3-4 (n = 261), and dementia (n = 121). At the beginning of home care, 143 patients and 174 family members expressed their wish to die at home. All the patients received supportive treatments including fluid replacement and oxygenation. Median duration of home care was 47 days (range, 0-2,712). 224 patients died at home. For the remaining 122, home care was terminated due to complications (n = 109), change of attending physicians (n = 8), and others (n = 5). The factors which inhibited the continuity of home care were the non-use of home-visit nursing care (hazard ratio [HR] = 1.78, 95% confidence interval [CI]: 1.05-3.00, p = 0.03), the fact that the patients themselves do not wish to die at home (HR = 1.83, CI: 1.09-3.07, p = 0.02), women (HR = 1.81, CI: 1.11-2.94, p = 0.02), and age (HR = 0.98, CI: 0.97-1.00, p = 0.02). Conclusions Continuation of home care is influenced by patients' age, gender, will, and use of home-visit nursing. PMID:22044683

  5. Impact on Seniors of the Patient-Centered Medical Home: Evidence from a Pilot Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fishman, Paul A.; Johnson, Eric A.; Coleman, Kathryn; Larson, Eric B.; Hsu, Clarissa; Ross, Tyler R.; Liss, David; Tufano, James; Reid, Robert J.

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: To assess the impact on health care cost and quality among seniors of a patient-centered medical home (PCMH) pilot at Group Health Cooperative, an integrated health care system in Washington State. Design and Methods: A prospective before-and-after evaluation of the experience of seniors receiving primary care services at 1 pilot clinic…

  6. Large-Scale Wearable Sensor Deployment in Parkinson's Patients: The Parkinson@Home Study Protocol

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Silva de Lima, A.L.; Hahn, T.; Vries, N.M. de; Cohen, E.; Bataille, L.; Little, M.A.; Baldus, H.; Bloem, B.R.; Faber, M.J.

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Long-term management of Parkinson's disease does not reach its full potential because we lack knowledge about individual variations in clinical presentation and disease progression. Continuous and longitudinal assessments in real-life (ie, within the patients' own home environment) might

  7. [Challenges for home care services in the pain management of cancer patients : A qualitative study].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gnass, I; Krutter, S; Nestler, N

    2018-03-21

    People with cancer are increasingly supported by home care services. Pain is a relevant symptom of these diseases and nurses of home care services are involved in the treatment. The German National Expert Standard "Pain management in nursing" includes evidence-based recommendations for the implementation of adequate pain management. Considering the given structural conditions of home care services, nurses describe both barriers and challenges with the implementation. By means of five guideline-based discussion groups, nurses of 14 home care services were questioned about the challenges they had experienced in pain management. The questioning focuses on the level of implementation of the recommendation for each aspect: pain assessment, pharmacological pain therapy, non-pharmacological pain therapy, pain-related side effects, information, training, and counseling in the care of people with cancer. A qualitative content analysis was conducted. On the one hand, the results illustrate a need for further knowledge and possibilities, e.g., for the assessment of pain as a multidimensional phenomenon and, on the other hand, that the conditions for continuous pain monitoring of cancer patients in home care services are limited. The need for short-term reconciliation with the treatment team and the practitioners proved to be more difficult than the cooperation with the palliative care network. Involvement of family members is important to ensure uninterrupted treatment. Beside knowledge and competencies regarding nursing care, structures and processes for interprofessional pain management need further development and research.

  8. Effects of Pharmacist-Led Patient Education on Diabetes-Related Knowledge and Medication Adherence: A Home-Based Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chow, Ee Pin; Hassali, Mohamed Azmi; Saleem, Fahad; Aljadhey, Hisham

    2016-01-01

    Objective: Patient education is key to the management of acute and chronic conditions. However, the majority of such educational interventions have been reported from health-care settings. In contrast, this study aims to evaluate whether a home-based intervention can result in better understanding about type 2 diabetes mellitus and can increase…

  9. Patient safety culture in Norwegian nursing homes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bondevik, Gunnar Tschudi; Hofoss, Dag; Husebø, Bettina Sandgathe; Deilkås, Ellen Catharina Tveter

    2017-06-20

    Patient safety culture concerns leader and staff interaction, attitudes, routines, awareness and practices that impinge on the risk of patient-adverse events. Due to their complex multiple diseases, nursing home patients are at particularly high risk of adverse events. Studies have found an association between patient safety culture and the risk of adverse events. This study aimed to investigate safety attitudes among healthcare providers in Norwegian nursing homes, using the Safety Attitudes Questionnaire - Ambulatory Version (SAQ-AV). We studied whether variations in safety attitudes were related to professional background, age, work experience and mother tongue. In February 2016, 463 healthcare providers working in five nursing homes in Tønsberg, Norway, were invited to answer the SAQ-AV, translated and adapted to the Norwegian nursing home setting. Previous validation of the Norwegian SAQ-AV for nursing homes identified five patient safety factors: teamwork climate, safety climate, job satisfaction, working conditions and stress recognition. SPSS v.22 was used for statistical analysis, which included estimations of mean values, standard deviations and multiple linear regressions. P-values safety factors teamwork climate, safety climate, job satisfaction and working conditions. Not being a Norwegian native speaker was associated with a significantly higher mean score for job satisfaction and a significantly lower mean score for stress recognition. Neither professional background nor work experience were significantly associated with mean scores for any patient safety factor. Patient safety factor scores in nursing homes were poorer than previously found in Norwegian general practices, but similar to findings in out-of-hours primary care clinics. Patient safety culture assessment may help nursing home leaders to initiate targeted quality improvement interventions. Further research should investigate associations between patient safety culture and the occurrence

  10. An In-home Advanced Robotic System to Manage Elderly Home-care Patients' Medications: A Pilot Safety and Usability Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rantanen, Pekka; Parkkari, Timo; Leikola, Saija; Airaksinen, Marja; Lyles, Alan

    2017-05-01

    We examined the safety profile and usability of an integrated advanced robotic device and telecare system to promote medication adherence for elderly home-care patients. There were two phases. Phase I aimed to verify under controlled conditions in a single nursing home (n = 17 patients) that no robotic malfunctions would hinder the device's safe use. Phase II involved home-care patients from 3 sites (n = 27) who were on long-term medication. On-time dispensing and missed doses were recorded by the robotic system. Patients' and nurses' experiences were assessed with structured interviews. The 17 nursing home patients had 457 total days using the device (Phase I; mean, 26.9 per patient). On-time sachet retrieval occurred with 97.7% of the alerts, and no medication doses were missed. At baseline, Phase II home-dwelling patients reported difficulty remembering to take their medicines (23%), and 18% missed at least 2 doses per week. Most Phase II patients (78%) lived alone. The device delivered and patients retrieved medicine sachets for 99% of the alerts. All patients and 96% of nurses reported the device was easy to use. This trial demonstrated the safety profile and usability of an in-home advanced robotic device and telecare system and its acceptability to patients and nurses. It supports individualized patient dosing schedules, patient-provider communications, and on-time, in-home medication delivery to promote adherence. Real time dose-by-dose monitoring and communication with providers if a dose is missed provide oversight generally not seen in home care. Copyright © 2017 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Overcoming challenges to teamwork in patient-centered medical homes: a qualitative study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Malley, Ann S; Gourevitch, Rebecca; Draper, Kevin; Bond, Amelia; Tirodkar, Manasi A

    2015-02-01

    There is emerging consensus that enhanced inter-professional teamwork is necessary for the effective and efficient delivery of primary care, but there is less practical information specific to primary care available to guide practices on how to better work as teams. The purpose of this study was to describe how primary care practices have overcome challenges to providing team-based primary care and the implications for care delivery and policy. Practices for this qualitative study were selected from those recognized as patient-centered medical homes (PCMHs) via the most recent National Committee for Quality Assurance PCMH tool, which included a domain on practice teamwork. Sixty-three respondents, ranging from physicians to front-desk staff, were interviewed from May through December of 2013. Practice respondents came from 27 primary care practices ranging in size, type, geography, and population served. Practices emphasizing teamwork overcame common challenges through the incremental delegation of non-clinical tasks away from physicians. The roles of medical assistants and nurses are expanding to include template-guided information collection from patients prior to the physician office visit as well as many other tasks. The inclusion of staff input in care workflow redesign and the use of data to demonstrate how team care process changes improved patient care were helpful in gaining staff buy-in. Team "huddles" guided by pre-visit planning were reported to assist in role delegation, consistency of information collected from patients, and structured communication among team members. Nurse care managers were found to be important team members in working with patients and their physicians on care plan design and execution. Most practices had not participated in formal teamwork training, but respondents expressed a desire for training for key team members, particularly if they could access it on-site (e.g., via practice coaches or the Internet). Participants who

  12. Internet-enabled pulmonary rehabilitation and diabetes education in group settings at home: a preliminary study of patient acceptability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burkow, Tatjana M; Vognild, Lars K; Østengen, Geir; Johnsen, Elin; Risberg, Marijke Jongsma; Bratvold, Astrid; Hagen, Tord; Brattvoll, Morten; Krogstad, Trine; Hjalmarsen, Audhild

    2013-03-05

    The prevalence of major chronic illnesses, such as chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) and diabetes, is increasing. Pulmonary rehabilitation and diabetes self-management education are important in the management of COPD and diabetes respectively. However, not everyone can participate in the programmes offered at a hospital or other central locations, for reasons such as travel and transport. Internet-enabled home-based programmes have the potential to overcome these barriers.This study aims to assess patient acceptability of the delivery form and components of Internet-enabled programmes based on home groups for comprehensive pulmonary rehabilitation and for diabetes self-management education. We have developed Internet-enabled home programmes for comprehensive pulmonary rehabilitation and for diabetes self-management education that include group education, group exercising (COPD only), individual consultations, educational videos and a digital health diary. Our prototype technology platform makes use of each user's own TV at home, connected to a computer, and a remote control. We conducted a six-week home trial with 10 participants: one group with COPD and one with diabetes. The participants were interviewed using semi-structured interviews. Both home-based programmes were well accepted by the participants. The group setting at home made it possible to share experiences and to learn from questions raised by others, as in conventional group education. In the sessions, interaction and discussion worked well, despite the structure needed for turn taking. The thematic educational videos were well accepted although they were up to 40 minutes long and their quality was below TV broadcasting standards. Taking part in group exercising at home under the guidance of a physiotherapist was also well accepted by the participants. Participants in the COPD group appreciated the social aspect of group education sessions and of exercising together, each in their own home

  13. The prognosis of incurable cachectic cancer patients on home parenteral nutrition: a multi-centre observational study with prospective follow-up of 414 patients

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bozzetti, F.; Santarpia, L.; Pironi, L.; Thul, P.; Klek, S.; Gavazzi, C.; Tinivella, M.; Joly, F.; Jonkers, C.; Baxter, J.; Gramlich, L.; Chicharro, L.; Staun, M.; van Gossum, A.; Lo Vullo, S.; Mariani, L.

    2014-01-01

    The role of home parenteral nutrition (HPN) in incurable cachectic cancer patients unable to eat is extremely controversial. The aim of this study is to analyse which factors can influence the outcome. We studied prospectively 414 incurable cachectic (sub)obstructed cancer patients receiving HPN and

  14. [Incidence of broken homes in schizophrenic patients. A study of 239 patients treated at a social psychiatric department].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gmür, M; Tschopp, A

    1987-01-01

    259 schizophrenics, 102 women and 157 men, of whom 80 were enlisted from a night clinic, 46 from the Psychiatric University Hospital and 113 from an out-patient clinic, were examined with regard to the frequency of broken home situations during their childhood. 20% had, before they were 18 yrs. old, lost a parent by death and 20% by a traumatic separation. 58% had, before they were 18 yrs. old, lost a parent or had lived together with a parent who was seriously ill or badly disturbed. No relation between the age of first illness and a broken home could, according to these research results, be established. The hypothesis that there is a higher rate of broken home situations by schizophrenics with an early outbreak of the illness, could therefore not be confirmed. Neither could a difference in the occurrence of broken home situations between males and females be observed, with the exception of the frequency of loss of parents by death, which was higher by females. The frequency of the factor 'broken home' in our examines is quite similar to the values round by Bleulers' research, 1940-1945 on male schizophrenics.

  15. No effect on survival of home psychosocial intervention in a randomized study of Danish colorectal cancer patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ross, Lone; Frederiksen, Kirsten; Boesen, Sidsel H

    2009-01-01

    social class and marital status. Likewise, no significant interactions were found between group and these covariates (all p>/=0.08). In the substudy of the possible effect of the intervention on immune parameters, there were no differences between the two groups with respect to lymphocyte proliferation...... or an intervention group. The intervention group received 10 home visits from a project nurse or a medical doctor during the first 2 years after discharge. The home visits aimed at providing emotional support and information. A subgroup of 55 patients provided blood samples 3, 12 and 24 months after discharge...... (all p>/=0.078) or natural killer cell activity (all p>/=0.33) and no consistent effect on the number of specific subsets of cells (phenotypes) during follow-up.Conclusion: The study failed to provide evidence that the psychosocial intervention provided as home visits significantly affected...

  16. Home-based hand rehabilitation with a robotic glove in hemiplegic patients after stroke: a pilot feasibility study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bernocchi, Palmira; Mulè, Chiara; Vanoglio, Fabio; Taveggia, Giovanni; Luisa, Alberto; Scalvini, Simonetta

    2018-03-01

    To evaluate the feasibility and safety of home rehabilitation of the hand using a robotic glove, and, in addition, its effectiveness, in hemiplegic patients after stroke. In this non-randomized pilot study, 21 hemiplegic stroke patients (Ashworth spasticity index ≤ 3) were prescribed, after in-hospital rehabilitation, a 2-month home-program of intensive hand training using the Gloreha Lite glove that provides computer-controlled passive mobilization of the fingers. Feasibility was measured by: number of patients who completed the home-program, minutes of exercise and number of sessions/patient performed. Safety was assessed by: hand pain with a visual analog scale (VAS), Ashworth spasticity index for finger flexors, opponents of the thumb and wrist flexors, and hand edema (circumference of forearm, wrist and fingers), measured at start (T0) and end (T1) of rehabilitation. Hand motor function (Motricity Index, MI), fine manual dexterity (Nine Hole Peg Test, NHPT) and strength (Grip test) were also measured at T0 and T1. Patients performed, over a mean period 56 (49-63) days, a total of 1699 (1353-2045) min/patient of exercise with Gloreha Lite, 5.1 (4.3-5.8) days/week. Seventeen patients (81%) completed the full program. The mean VAS score of hand pain, Ashworth spasticity index and hand edema did not change significantly at T1 compared to T0. The MI, NHPT and Grip test improved significantly (p = 0.0020, 0.0156 and 0.0024, respectively) compared to baseline. Gloreha Lite is feasible and safe for use in home rehabilitation. The efficacy data show a therapeutic effect which need to be confirmed by a randomized controlled study.

  17. Symptoms, unbearability and the nature of suffering in terminal cancer patients dying at home: a prospective primary care study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ruijs, C.D.M.; Kerkhof, A.J.F.M.; van der Wal, G.; Onwuteaka-Philipsen, B.D.

    2013-01-01

    Background: Primary care physicians provide palliative home care. In cancer patients dying at home in the Netherlands (45% of all cancer patients) euthanasia in about one out of every seven patients indicates unbearable suffering. Symptom prevalence, relationship between intensity of symptoms and

  18. Threshold value of home pulse pressure predicting arterial stiffness in patients with type 2 diabetes: KAMOGAWA-HBP study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kitagawa, Noriyuki; Ushigome, Emi; Matsumoto, Shinobu; Oyabu, Chikako; Ushigome, Hidetaka; Yokota, Isao; Asano, Mai; Tanaka, Muhei; Yamazaki, Masahiro; Fukui, Michiaki

    2018-03-01

    This cross-sectional multicenter study was designed to evaluate the threshold value of home pulse pressure (PP) and home systolic blood pressure (SBP) predicting the arterial stiffness in 876 patients with type 2 diabetes. We measured the area under the receiver-operating characteristic curve (AUC) and estimated the ability of home PP to identify arterial stiffness using Youden-Index defined cut-off point. The arterial stiffness was measured using the brachial-ankle pulse wave velocity (baPWV). AUC for arterial stiffness in morning PP was significantly greater than that in morning SBP (P AUC for arterial stiffness in evening PP was also significantly greater than that in evening SBP (P < .001). The optimal cut-off points for morning PP and evening PP, which predicted arterial stiffness, were 54.6 and 56.9 mm Hg, respectively. Our findings indicate that we should pay more attention to increased home PP in patients with type 2 diabetes. ©2018 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  19. Effectiveness of palliative home-care services in reducing hospital admissions and determinants of hospitalization for terminally ill patients followed up by a palliative home-care team: a retrospective cohort study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riolfi, Mirko; Buja, Alessandra; Zanardo, Chiara; Marangon, Chiara Francesca; Manno, Pietro; Baldo, Vincenzo

    2014-05-01

    It has been demonstrated that most patients in the terminal stages of cancer would benefit from palliative home-care services. The aim of this study was to assess the effectiveness of appropriate palliative home-care services in reducing hospital admissions, and to identify factors predicting the likelihood of patients treated at home being hospitalized. Retrospective cohort study. We enrolled all 402 patients listed by the Local Health Authority No. 5, Veneto Region (North-East Italy), as dying of cancer in 2011. Of the cohort considered, 39.9% patients had been taken into care by a palliative home-care team. Irrespective of age, gender, and type of tumor, patients taken into care by the palliative home-care team were more likely to die at home, less likely to be hospitalized, and spent fewer days in hospital in the last 2 months of their life. Among the patients taken into care by the palliative home-care team, those with hematological cancers and hepatocellular carcinoma were more likely to be hospitalized, and certain symptoms (such as dyspnea and delirium) were predictive of hospitalization. Our study confirms the effectiveness of palliative home care in enabling patients to spend the final period of their lives at home. The services of a palliative home-care team reduced the consumption of hospital resources. This study also provided evidence of some types of cancer (e.g. hematological cancers and hepatocellular carcinoma) being more likely to require hospitalization, suggesting the need to reconsider the pathways of care for these diseases.

  20. Development of a Clinical Tool to Predict Home Death of a Discharged Cancer Patient in Japan: a Case-Control Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fukui, Sakiko; Morita, Tatsuya; Yoshiuchi, Kazuhiro

    2017-08-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the predictive value of a clinical tool to predict whether discharged cancer patients die at home, comparing groups of case who died at home and control who died in hospitals or other facilities. We conducted a nationwide case-control study to identify the determinants of home death for a discharged cancer patient. We randomly selected nurses in charge of 2000 home-visit nursing agencies from all 5813 agencies in Japan by referring to the nationwide databases in January 2013. The nurses were asked to report variables of their patients' place of death, patients' and caregivers' clinical statuses, and their preferences for home death. We used logistic regression analysis and developed a clinical tool to accurately predict it and investigated their predictive values. We identified 466 case and 478 control patients. Five predictive variables of home death were obtained: patients' and caregivers' preferences for home death [OR (95% CI) 2.66 (1.99-3.55)], availability of visiting physicians [2.13 (1.67-2.70)], 24-h contact between physicians and nurses [1.68 (1.30-2.18)], caregivers' experiences of deathwatch at home [1.41 (1.13-1.75)], and patients' insights as to their own prognosis [1.23 (1.02-1.50)]. We calculated the scores predicting home death for each variable (range 6-28). When using a cutoff point of 16, home death was predicted with a sensitivity of 0.72 and a specificity of 0.81 with the Harrell's c-statistic of 0.84. This simple clinical tool for healthcare professionals can help predict whether a discharged patient is likely to die at home.

  1. Home parenteral nutrition improves quality of life and nutritional status in patients with cancer: a French observational multicentre study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Culine, S; Chambrier, C; Tadmouri, A; Senesse, P; Seys, P; Radji, A; Rotarski, M; Balian, A; Dufour, P

    2014-07-01

    Malnutrition is a predictor of poor outcomes in patients with cancer. Little is known about the benefit of nutritional support in these patients. The purpose of this study was to assess the impact of home parenteral nutrition (HPN) on quality of life (Qol) in cancer patients. We performed an observational prospective study to determine the impact of HPN on Qol in a population of patients with heterogeneous cancer. Physicians, patients and family members had to complete a questionnaire before HPN administration and 28 days after the course of HPN. Qol was evaluated using the self-administered questionnaire FACT-G. We included 767 patients with cancer of whom 437 ended the study. Mean patient age was 63±11.4 years and 60.5% were men. Primary gastrointestinal cancer was reported in 50% of patients and 65.3% were presenting metastases. Malnutrition was reported in 98.3%. After 28 days of HPN intake, significant improvement was observed in the Qol (49.95±5.82 vs. 48.35±5.01 at baseline, pnutrition risk index had also improved significantly. Most patients (78%) had perceived a positive impact of the HPN. A significant improvement in patient's well-being was perceived also by family members and physicians. Our data suggest that preventing and correcting malnutrition using HPN in patients with cancer might have a significant benefit on their well-being. Randomized controlled studies are required to confirm this finding.

  2. The Natural History of Nursing Home Patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lewis, Mary Ann; And Others

    1985-01-01

    Former nursing home residents (N=197) were followed for 2 years after discharge. Four subgroups of patients were identified on the basis of different patterns of survival and use of health care resources: those who returned home, died in nursing homes, transferred to hospitals, or transferred to other nursing homes. (NRB)

  3. Effectiveness of Home-Based Exercises Without Supervision by Physical Therapists for Patients With Early-Stage Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis: A Pilot Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kitano, Kosuke; Asakawa, Takashi; Kamide, Naoto; Yorimoto, Keisuke; Yoneda, Masaki; Kikuchi, Yutaka; Sawada, Makoto; Komori, Tetsuo

    2018-03-31

    To verify the effects of structured home-based exercises without supervision by a physical therapist in patients with early-stage amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS). A historical controlled study that is part of a multicenter collaborative study. Rehabilitation departments at general hospitals and outpatient clinics with a neurology department. Patients (N=21) with ALS were enrolled and designated as the home-based exercise (Home-EX) group, and they performed unsupervised home-based exercises. As a control group, 84 patients with ALS who underwent supervised exercise with a physical therapist for 6 months were extracted from a database of patients with ALS and matched with the Home-EX group in terms of their basic attributes and clinical features. The Home-EX group was instructed to perform structured home-based exercises without supervision by a physical therapist that consisted of muscle stretching, muscle training, and functional training for 6 months. The primary outcome was the score on the ALS Functional Rating Scale-Revised (ALSFRS-R), which is composed of 3 domains: bulbar function, limb function, and respiratory function. The score ranges from 0 to 48 points, with a higher score indicating better function. In the Home-EX group, 15 patients completed the home-based exercises for 6 months, and 6 patients dropped out because of medical reasons or disease progression. No adverse events were reported. The Home-EX group was found to have a significantly higher respiratory function subscore and total score on the ALSFRS-R than the control group at follow-up (P<.001 and P<.05, respectively). Structured home-based exercises without supervision by a physical therapist could be used to alleviate functional deterioration in patients with early-stage ALS. Copyright © 2018 American Congress of Rehabilitation Medicine. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Preliminary Study of the Effect of Low-Intensity Home-Based Physical Therapy in Chronic Stroke Patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jau-Hong Lin

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available This study was a preliminary examination of the effect of low-intensity home-based physical therapy on the performance of activities of daily living (ADL and motor function in patients more than 1 year after stroke. Twenty patients were recruited from a community stroke register in Nan-Tou County, Taiwan, to a randomized, crossover trial comparing intervention by a physical therapist immediately after entry into the trial (Group I or after a delay of 10 weeks (Group II. The intervention consisted of home-based physical therapy once a week for 10 weeks. The Barthel Index (BI and Stroke Rehabilitation Assessment of Movement (STREAM were used as standard measures for ADL and motor function. At the first follow-up assessment at 11 weeks, Group I showed greater improvement in lower limb motor function than Group II. At the second follow-up assessment at 22 weeks, Group II showed improvement while Group I had declined. At 22 weeks, the motor function of upper limbs, mobility, and ADL performance in Group II had improved slightly more than in Group I, but the between-group differences were not significant. It appears that low-intensity home-based physical therapy can improve lower limb motor function in chronic stroke survivors. Further studies will be needed to confirm these findings.

  5. A prospective observational study assessing home parenteral nutrition in patients with gastrointestinal cancer: benefits for quality of life.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Senesse, Pierre; Tadmouri, Abir; Culine, Stéphane; Dufour, Patrick R; Seys, Patrick; Radji, Abderraouf; Rotarski, Maciej; Balian, Axel; Chambrier, Cecile

    2015-02-01

    Patients with gastrointestinal cancer are at high risk for deterioration of nutrition. Home parenteral nutrition (HPN) could improve nutritional status and quality of life (QoL). The purpose of this study was 1) to evaluate the impact of HPN on QoL, 2) to assess changes in nutritional status, and 3) to assess proxy perception of patient well-being. We conducted a prospective, observational, and a multicenter study. Inclusion criteria were adult patients with gastrointestinal cancer, for whom HPN was indicated and prescribed for at least 14 days. The physician, the patient, and a family member completed questionnaires at inclusion and 28 days later. The QoL was assessed by the patients using the Functional Assessment of Cancer Therapy-General questionnaire, at inclusion and 28 days later. The study included 370 patients with gastrointestinal cancer. The HPN was indicated for cancer-related undernutrition in 89% of the patients and was used as a complement to oral intake in 84%. After 28 days of parenteral intake, global QoL was significantly increased (48.9 at inclusion vs. 50.3, P=0.007). The patients' weight improved significantly by 2.7% (Pnutrition risk screening also decreased significantly (3.2±1.1 vs. 2.8±1.3, P=0.003). HPN could provide benefit for malnourished patients with gastrointestinal cancer. However, randomized controlled studies are required to confirm this benefit and the safety profile. Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  6. Multiple sclerosis patients' experiences in relation to the impact of the kinect virtual home-exercise programme: a qualitative study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palacios-Ceña, Domingo; Ortiz-Gutierrez, Rosa M; Buesa-Estellez, Almudena; Galán-Del-Río, Fernando; Cachon Perez, José M; Martínez-Piedrola, Rosa; Velarde-Garcia, Juan F; Cano-DE-LA-Cuerda, Roberto

    2016-06-01

    Neurorehabilitation programs are among the most popular therapies aimed at reducing the disabilities that result from multiple sclerosis. Video games have recently gained importance in the rehabilitation of patients with motor neurological dysfunctions. Currently, the studies describing the perspective of patients with multiple sclerosis who have participated in rehabilitation programmes via home-based video games are almost inexistent. The aim of this paper was to explore the experiences of multiple sclerosis patients who performed a virtual home-exercise programme using Kinect. A qualitative research enquiry was conducted as part of a study that examined postural control and balance after a 10-week Kinect home-exercise programme in adults with multiple sclerosis. Patients were recruited from a Neurology Unit of a University Hospital. The inclusion criteria were: subjects aged between 20 and 60 years, diagnosed with multiple sclerosis for over 2 years based on the McDonald Criteria; with an EDSS score ranging from 3 to 5. Purposeful sampling method was implemented. The data collection consisted of unstructured interviews, using open questions, and thematic analysis was conducted. Guidelines for conducting qualitative studies established by the Consolidated Criteria for Reporting Qualitative Research were followed. Twenty-four patients with a mean age of 36.69 were included. Four main themes emerged from the data: 1) regaining previous capacity and abilities. The patients described how, after the treatment with Kinect they felt more independent; 2) sharing the disease. The patients sharing the experience of living with MS with their family, thanks to the use of Kinect; 3) adapting to the new treatment. This refers to how the use of the videogame console incorporated novelties to their rehabilitation programme; and 4) comparing oneself. This refers to the appearance of factors that motivate the patient during KVHEP. The patients' experiences gathered in this study

  7. Patient Satisfaction With Maternity Waiting Homes in Liberia: A Case Study During the Ebola Outbreak.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lori, Jody R; Munro-Kramer, Michelle L; Shifman, Jordan; Amarah, Patricia N M; Williams, Garfee

    2017-03-01

    Liberia in West Africa has one of the highest maternal mortality ratios in the world (990/100,000 live births). Many women in Liberia live in rural, remote villages with little access to safe maternity services. The World Health Organization has identified maternity waiting homes (MWHs) as one strategy to minimize the barrier of distance in accessing a skilled birth attendant. However, limited data exist on satisfaction with MWHs or maternal health care in Liberia. This mixed-methods case study examines women's satisfaction with their stay at a MWH and compares utilization rates before and during the Ebola outbreak. From 2012 to 2014, 650 women who stayed at one of 6 MWHs in rural Liberia during the perinatal or postnatal period were surveyed. Additionally, 60 semi-structured interviews were conducted with traditional providers, skilled birth attendants, and women utilizing the MWHs. Quantitative analyses assessed satisfaction rates before and during the Ebola outbreak. Content analysis of semi-structured interviews supplemented the quantitative data and provided a lens into the elements of satisfaction with the MWHs. The majority of women who utilized the MWHs stated they would suggest the MWH to a friend or relative who was pregnant (99.5%), and nearly all would utilize the home again (98.8%). Although satisfaction with the MWHs significantly decreased during the Ebola outbreak (P Liberia are generally satisfied with their experience and plan to use an MWH again during future pregnancies to access a skilled birth attendant for birth. Women are also willing to encourage family and friends to use MWHs. © 2017 by the American College of Nurse-Midwives.

  8. A new multidisciplinary home care telemedicine system to monitor stable chronic human immunodeficiency virus-infected patients: a randomized study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    León, Agathe; Cáceres, César; Fernández, Emma; Chausa, Paloma; Martin, Maite; Codina, Carles; Rousaud, Araceli; Blanch, Jordi; Mallolas, Josep; Martinez, Esteban; Blanco, Jose L; Laguno, Montserrat; Larrousse, Maria; Milinkovic, Ana; Zamora, Laura; Canal, Neus; Miró, Josep M; Gatell, Josep M; Gómez, Enrique J; García, Felipe

    2011-01-21

    Antiretroviral therapy has changed the natural history of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection in developed countries, where it has become a chronic disease. This clinical scenario requires a new approach to simplify follow-up appointments and facilitate access to healthcare professionals. We developed a new internet-based home care model covering the entire management of chronic HIV-infected patients. This was called Virtual Hospital. We report the results of a prospective randomised study performed over two years, comparing standard care received by HIV-infected patients with Virtual Hospital care. HIV-infected patients with access to a computer and broadband were randomised to be monitored either through Virtual Hospital (Arm I) or through standard care at the day hospital (Arm II). After one year of follow up, patients switched their care to the other arm. Virtual Hospital offered four main services: Virtual Consultations, Telepharmacy, Virtual Library and Virtual Community. A technical and clinical evaluation of Virtual Hospital was carried out. Of the 83 randomised patients, 42 were monitored during the first year through Virtual Hospital (Arm I) and 41 through standard care (Arm II). Baseline characteristics of patients were similar in the two arms. The level of technical satisfaction with the virtual system was high: 85% of patients considered that Virtual Hospital improved their access to clinical data and they felt comfortable with the videoconference system. Neither clinical parameters [level of CD4+ T lymphocytes, proportion of patients with an undetectable level of viral load (p = 0.21) and compliance levels >90% (p = 0.58)] nor the evaluation of quality of life or psychological questionnaires changed significantly between the two types of care. Virtual Hospital is a feasible and safe tool for the multidisciplinary home care of chronic HIV patients. Telemedicine should be considered as an appropriate support service for the management of

  9. Nursing perception of patient transitions from hospitals to home with home health.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Shannon Bright; Alexander, Judith W

    2012-01-01

    The study's purpose was to determine nurses' opinions of sending patients from the hospital to home with home health services. The study occurred in the Charleston, South Carolina, Tricounty area (Berkeley, Charleston, and Dorchester counties). Home health agencies and hospitals were invited to participate. The study used a survey design to gather information on nursing perceptions of current practices and needed changes to improve transition of patients. The population was nurses (licensed practical nurses (LPNs) and registered nurses (RNs)) employed at inpatient hospitals or home health agencies in the area. Thirty-four RNs responded with no LPNs respondents. Agency administrators/chief nursing officers agreed for their agencies to participate and distributed the survey using a Research Electronic Data Capture (REDCap) Internet-based survey tool. Using the survey results and information from a literature review, the study developed a list of propositions, which participating administrators reviewed, for improving transitions to home. Both home health and hospital nurses reported a need to improve the process of sending patients from hospital to home with home health services. This study provides hospitals and home health agencies with propositions to facilitate the establishment of a process to communicate effectively patients care needs and streamline the discharging patients from the hospital to home health care; thus, improving patient transition. Case managers and discharge planners will need interagency collaboration along with evidence-based interventions to transition patients from the hospital to home with home health services with various populations. Direct patient care nurses in both hospital and home health settings should share the same accountability as case managers to ensure successful transitions.

  10. Factors associated with emergency services use in Taiwanese advanced cancer patients receiving palliative home care services during out-of-hours periods: a retrospective medical record study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kao, Yee-Hsin; Liu, Yao-Ting; Koo, Malcolm; Chiang, Jui-Kun

    2018-03-12

    For patients receiving palliative home care, the need to visit the emergency department is considered to be an indicator of poor quality care. The situation can be particularly distressing when it occurs outside of normal hours of palliative home care service. The aim of this study was to investigate the factors for emergency department use during out-of-hours periods of palliative home care service among advanced cancer patients in Taiwan. This case-control study was based on a retrospective medical chart review (January 2010 to December 2012) of advanced cancer patients who were receiving palliative home care in a community hospital in south Taiwan. The use of emergency medical services by these patients was dichotomized into either normal hours (8 a.m. to midnight, Monday to Friday, excluding public holidays) of palliative home care or outside normal hours. Logistic regression analyses were performed to evaluate factors associated with emergency services use during out-of-hours period of palliative home care. Of the 94 patients receiving palliative home care, 65 had used emergency services at least once during the 3-year study period. Of these 65 patients, 40% used emergency services during out-of-hours of palliative home care. Patients with distressing conditions (defined as the occurrence of any two conditions of dyspnea, change of consciousness, or gastrointestinal bleeding) were significantly more likely to use emergency services during out-of-hours of palliative home care. Patients at risk of developing dyspnea, change of consciousness, or gastrointestinal bleeding should be provided with relevant information regarding these symptoms and signs.

  11. Advance Care Planning in Nursing Home Patients With Dementia: A Qualitative Interview Study Among Family and Professional Caregivers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Soest-Poortvliet, Mirjam C; van der Steen, Jenny T; Gutschow, Giselka; Deliens, Luc; Onwuteaka-Philipsen, Bregje D; de Vet, Henrica C W; Hertogh, Cees M P M

    2015-11-01

    The aim of this study was to describe the process of advance care planning (ACP) and to explore factors related to the timing and content of ACP in nursing home patients with dementia, as perceived by family, physicians, and nurses. A qualitative descriptive study. A total of 65 in-depth qualitative interviews were held with families, on-staff elderly care physicians, and nurses of 26 patients with dementia who died in the Dutch End Of Life in Dementia (DEOLD) study. Interviews were coded and analyzed to find themes. Family, nurses, and physicians of all patients indicated they had multiple contact moments during nursing home stay in which care goals and treatment decisions were discussed. Nearly all interviewees indicated that physicians took the initiative for these ACP discussions. Care goals discussed and established during nursing home stay and the terminology to describe care goals varied between facilities. Regardless of care goals and other factors, cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) and hospitalization were always discussed in advance with family and commonly resulted in a do-not-resuscitate (DNR) and a do-not-hospitalize (DNH) order. The timing of care planning discussions about other specific treatments or conditions and the content of treatment decisions varied. The factors that emerged from the interviews as related to ACP were general strategies that guided physicians in initiating ACP discussions, patient's condition, wishes expressed by patient or family, family's willingness, family involvement, continuity of communication, consensus with or within family, and general nursing home policy. Two influential underlying strategies guided physicians in initiating ACP discussions: (1) wait for a reason to initiate discussions, such as a change in health condition and (2) take initiative to discuss possible treatments (actively, including describing scenarios). ACP is a multifactorial process, which may lean on professional caregivers' guidance. The most

  12. PROPER I: frequency and appropriateness of psychotropic drugs use in nursing home patients and its associations: a study protocol

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Spek, K.; Gerritsen, D.L.; Smalbrugge, M.; Nelissen-Vrancken, M.H.; Wetzels, R.B.; Smeets, C.H.; Zuidema, S.U.; Koopmans, R.T.

    2013-01-01

    Background: Nursing home patients with dementia use psychotropic drugs longer and more frequently than recommended by guidelines implying psychotropic drugs are not always prescribed appropriately. These drugs can have many side effects and effectiveness is limited. Psychotropic drug use between

  13. PROPER I : Frequency and appropriateness of psychotropic drugs use in nursing home patients and its associations: a study protocol

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Spek, Klaas; Gerritsen, Debby L.; Smalbrugge, Martin; Nelissen-Vrancken, Marjorie H. J. M. G.; Wetzels, Roland B.; Smeets, Claudia H. W.; Zuidema, Sytse U.; Koopmans, Raymond T. C. M.

    2013-01-01

    Background: Nursing home patients with dementia use psychotropic drugs longer and more frequently than recommended by guidelines implying psychotropic drugs are not always prescribed appropriately. These drugs can have many side effects and effectiveness is limited. Psychotropic drug use between

  14. Home administration of maintenance pemetrexed for patients with advanced non-squamous non-small cell lung cancer: rationale, practicalities and phase II feasibility study design.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lal, Rohit; Bourayou, Nawel; Hillerdal, Gunnar; Nicolson, Marianne; Vikstrom, Anders; Lorenzo, Maria; D'yachkova, Yulia; Barriga, Susana; Visseren-Grul, Carla

    2013-10-03

    Home-based care in oncology is mainly reserved for patients at the end of life. Regulations regarding home delivery of cytotoxics differ across Europe, with a notable lack of practice guidelines in most countries. This has led to a lack of data addressing the feasibility of home-based administration of cytotoxic chemotherapy. In advanced non-squamous non-small cell lung cancer, pemetrexed is approved as maintenance therapy after first-line chemotherapy. In this setting, patients have the potential to be treated long-term with maintenance therapy, which, in the absence of unacceptable toxicity, is continued until disease progression. The favourable safety profile of pemetrexed and the ease of its administration by 10-minute intravenous infusion every 3 weeks make this drug a suitable candidate for administration in a home setting. Literature and regulations relevant to the home-based delivery of cytotoxic therapy were reviewed, and a phase II feasibility study of home administration of pemetrexed maintenance therapy was designed. At least 50 patients with advanced non-squamous non-small cell lung cancer, Eastern Cooperative Oncology Group performance status 0-1 and no progressive disease after four cycles of platinum-based first-line therapy are required to allow investigation of the feasibility of home-based administration of pemetrexed maintenance therapy (500 mg/m(2) every 3 weeks until progressive disease or unacceptable toxicity). Feasibility is being assessed as adherence to the home-based administration process (primary endpoint), patient safety, impact on patients' quality of life, patient and physician satisfaction with home care, and healthcare resource use and costs. Enrolment of patients from the UK and Sweden, where home-based care is relatively well developed, commenced in December 2011. This feasibility study addresses an important aspect of maintenance therapy, that is, patient comfort during protracted home-based chemotherapy. The study design

  15. Involvement in decisions about intravenous treatment for nursing home patients: nursing homes versus hospital wards.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klomstad, Kristin; Pedersen, Reidar; Førde, Reidun; Romøren, Maria

    2018-05-08

    Many of the elderly in nursing homes are very ill and have a reduced quality of life. Life expectancy is often hard to predict. Decisions about life-prolonging treatment should be based on a professional assessment of the patient's best interest, assessment of capacity to consent, and on the patient's own wishes. The purpose of this study was to investigate and compare how these types of decisions were made in nursing homes and in hospital wards. Using a questionnaire, we studied the decision-making process for 299 nursing home patients who were treated for dehydration using intravenous fluids, or for bacterial infections using intravenous antibiotics. We compared the 215 (72%) patients treated in nursing homes to the 84 (28%) nursing home patients treated in the hospital. The patients' capacity to consent was considered prior to treatment in 197 (92%) of the patients treated in nursing homes and 56 (67%) of the patients treated in hospitals (p nursing homes than in hospital (90% vs. 52%). Next of kin and other health personnel were also more rarely involved when the nursing home patient was treated in hospital. Whether advance care planning had been carried out, was more often unknown in the hospital (69% vs. 17% in nursing homes). Hospital doctors expressed more doubt about the decision to admit the patient to the hospital than about the treatment itself. This study indicates a potential for improvement in decision-making processes in general, and in particular when nursing home patients are treated in a hospital ward. The findings corroborate that nursing home patients should be treated locally if adequate health care and treatment is available. The communication between the different levels of health care when hospitalization is necessary, must be better. ClinicalTrials.gov NCT01023763 (12/1/09) [The registration was delayed one month after study onset due to practical reasons].

  16. Children of home dialysis patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsaltas, M O

    1976-12-13

    Fifteen children of six families in which one parent was undergoing home dialysis were examined by the Minnesota Multiphasic Personality Inventory, human figure drawings, and family interviews. All the children were found to be clinically depressed, and two thirds had a history of being referred by teachers to school counselors and psychiatrists for behavioral problems in school. Of these referred children, all showed disorders of psychomotor activity and reduced academic achievement. There was no clear-cut evidence that these children were depressed because of exposure to home dialysis per se. The most disturbed children seemed to be responding to depressed parents or to partial object loss. A controlled, prospective study is planned to clarify this question.

  17. Analysis of home-based rehabilitation in patients with motor impairment in primary care: a prospective observational study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vega-Ramírez, Francisco Antonio; López-Liria, Remedios; Granados-Gámez, Genoveva; Aguilar-Parra, Jose Manuel; Padilla-Góngora, David

    2017-07-14

    The purpose of health and social policies is to encourage older people more longevity, remain free of disability and experience quality of life while living in their homes. The aim of this study was to describe the characteristics of 473 patients diagnosed with motor impairment in primary care, the objectives of home-based rehabilitation and its functional impact. This prospective observational study was conducted in the Almería Health District. The analysed variables included age, gender, secondary diagnosis, Barthel Index (BI), physiotherapeutic objectives and techniques, and number of sessions. The sample had a mean age of 83 years, and 59% were women. The assessed conditions with a high prevalence included osteoarticular pathology (55%), Alzheimer's disease (15.1%), cardiovascular disease (13.7%) and stroke (6.5%). The techniques applied mainly consisted of functional exercises (57.1%), caregiver education (13.8%), and technical assistance (5.7%). There were statistically significant differences (t = -15.79; p physiotherapy. Lower patient age was correlated with higher initial and final functional capacities in primary care. This study aimed to present a useful starting point for decision making among management and health administration regarding this population group by approaching the process from the reality of practice and in relation to the rehabilitation provided. ClinicalTrials.gov identifier: NCT02715245 ; Date of registration: 18 January 2016.

  18. An evaluation of patient self-testing competency of prothrombin time for managing anticoagulation: pre-randomization results of VA Cooperative Study #481--The Home INR Study (THINRS).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dolor, Rowena J; Ruybalid, R Lynne; Uyeda, Lauren; Edson, Robert G; Phibbs, Ciaran; Vertrees, Julia E; Shih, Mei-Chiung; Jacobson, Alan K; Matchar, David B

    2010-10-01

    Prior studies suggest patient self-testing (PST) of prothrombin time (PT) can improve the quality of anticoagulation (AC) and reduce complications (e.g., bleeding and thromboembolic events). "The Home INR Study" (THINRS) compared AC management with frequent PST using a home monitoring device to high-quality AC management (HQACM) with clinic-based monitoring on major health outcomes. A key clinical and policy question is whether and which patients can successfully use such devices. We report the results of Part 1 of THINRS in which patients and caregivers were evaluated for their ability to perform PST. Study-eligible patients (n = 3643) were trained to use the home monitoring device and evaluated after 2-4 weeks for PST competency. Information about demographics, medical history, warfarin use, medications, plus measures of numeracy, literacy, cognition, dexterity, and satisfaction with AC were collected. Approximately 80% (2931 of 3643) of patients trained on PST demonstrated competency; of these, 8% (238) required caregiver assistance. Testers who were not competent to perform PST had higher numbers of practice attempts, higher cuvette wastage, and were less able to perform a fingerstick or obtain blood for the cuvette in a timely fashion. Factors associated with failure to pass PST training included increased age, previous stroke history, poor cognition, and poor manual dexterity. A majority of patients were able to perform PST. Successful home monitoring of PT with a PST device required adequate levels of cognition and manual dexterity. Training a caregiver modestly increased the proportion of patients who can perform PST.

  19. Increased Risk of Vascular Events in Emergency Room Patients Discharged Home with Diagnosis of Dizziness or Vertigo: A 3-Year Follow-Up Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Ching-Chih; Ho, Hsu-Chueh; Su, Yu-Chieh; Chiu, Brian C-H; Su, Yung-Cheng; Lee, Yi-Da; Chou, Pesus

    2012-01-01

    Background Dizziness and vertigo symptoms are commonly seen in emergency room (ER). However, these patients are often discharged without a definite diagnosis. Conflicting data regarding the vascular event risk among the dizziness or vertigo patients have been reported. This study aims to determine the risk of developing stroke or cardiovascular events in ER patients discharged home with a diagnosis of dizziness or vertigo. Methodology A total of 25,757 subjects with at least one ER visit in 2004 were identified. Of those, 1,118 patients were discharged home with a diagnosis of vertigo or dizziness. A Cox proportional hazard model was performed to compare the three-year vascular event-free survival rates between the dizziness/vertigo patients and those without dizziness/vertigo after adjusting for confounding and risk factors. Results We identified 52 (4.7%) vascular events in patients with dizziness/vertigo and 454 (1.8%) vascular events in patients without dizziness/vertigo. ER patients discharged home with a diagnosis of vertigo or dizziness had 2-fold (95% confidence interval [CI], 1.35–2.96; pvertigo during the first year. Conclusions ER patients discharged home with a diagnosis of dizziness or vertigo were at a increased risk of developing subsequent vascular events than those without dizziness/vertigo after the onset of dizziness or vertigo. Further studies are warranted for developing better diagnostic and follow-up strategies in increased risk patients. PMID:22558272

  20. Predictors of home death of home palliative cancer care patients: a cross-sectional nationwide survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fukui, Sakiko; Fujita, Junko; Tsujimura, Mayuko; Sumikawa, Yuka; Hayashi, Yayoi

    2011-11-01

    To identify factors influencing the place of death among home palliative cancer care patients, focusing on the role of nurses in terms of pre- and post-discharge from hospital to home care settings. A cross-sectional nationwide questionnaire survey was conducted at 1000 randomly selected homecare agencies in Japan. The questionnaires were completed by primary community nurses of home palliative patients just after their discharge. A total of 568 responses were analyzed (effective response rate, 69%). Multivariate logistic regression analysis revealed the following independent factors of place of death among those patients: desire for home death at referral by both patient and family caregiver; caregiver relationship to patient as daughter or daughter-in-law; totally bedridden functional status of patient; patient not suffering from depression and/or anxiety at referral; patients and caregivers duly informed about the dying process/death in detail, as well as instructed by community nurses about pain management and how to treat/prevent bedsores in home care settings. This study demonstrated the importance of both the hospital and community nurses' role in increasing the patients' chance of dying at home. Hospital nurses should support early transfer to home palliative care according to their assessment of the desire of patient/family caregiver for home death, the patients' clinical status, and caregivers' ability to provide patient care at home. Community nurses should inform patients/family caregiver in detail about the dying process/death just after discharge, relieve patient pain, treat/prevent bedsores, and instruct family caregivers on their symptom control. Crown Copyright © 2011. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Terminal patients in Belgian nursing homes: a cost analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simoens, Steven; Kutten, Betty; Keirse, Emmanuel; Vanden Berghe, Paul; Beguin, Claire; Desmedt, Marianne; Deveugele, Myriam; Léonard, Christian; Paulus, Dominique; Menten, Johan

    2013-06-01

    Policy makers and health care payers are concerned about the costs of treating terminal patients. This study was done to measure the costs of treating terminal patients during the final month of life in a sample of Belgian nursing homes from the health care payer perspective. Also, this study compares the costs of palliative care with those of usual care. This multicenter, retrospective cohort study enrolled terminal patients from a representative sample of nursing homes. Health care costs included fixed nursing home costs, medical fees, pharmacy charges, other charges, and eventual hospitalization costs. Data sources consisted of accountancy and invoice data. The analysis calculated costs per patient during the final month of life at 2007/2008 prices. Nineteen nursing homes participated in the study, generating a total of 181 patients. Total mean nursing home costs amounted to 3,243 € per patient during the final month of life. Total mean nursing home costs per patient of 3,822 € for patients receiving usual care were higher than costs of 2,456 € for patients receiving palliative care (p = 0.068). Higher costs of usual care were driven by higher hospitalization costs (p < 0.001). This study suggests that palliative care models in nursing homes need to be supported because such care models appear to be less expensive than usual care and because such care models are likely to better reflect the needs of terminal patients.

  2. A feasibility study of UMTS mobile phones for supporting nurses doing home visits to patients with diabetic foot ulcers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Simon Bo; Clemensen, Jane; Ejskjær, Niels

    2006-01-01

    We tested the feasibility of Universal Mobile Telephone System (UMTS) mobile phones for video consultations in the home. Five patients with diabetic foot ulcers were included in the study. Each of them was offered three video consultations instead of visits to the hospital outpatient clinic....... The consultations took from 5 to 18 min. In all 15 consultations, the hospital experts were able to assess the ulcer in cooperation with the visiting nurse and to decide on the treatment. However, technical problems sometimes made it difficult for them. Connectivity problems occurred in seven of the 15...... consultations. Also, the audio signal was rather unstable at times. In all situations except one, however, the clinicians were able to reach a decision that the expert felt confident about, and after all consultations the atmosphere and participants' attitudes were very positive....

  3. Outcomes, infectiousness, and transmission dynamics of patients with extensively drug-resistant tuberculosis and home-discharged patients with programmatically incurable tuberculosis: a prospective cohort study

    KAUST Repository

    Dheda, Keertan; Limberis, Jason D; Pietersen, Elize; Phelan, Jody; Esmail, Aliasgar; Lesosky, Maia; Fennelly, Kevin P; te Riele, Julian; Mastrapa, Barbara; Streicher, Elizabeth M; Dolby, Tania; Abdallah, Abdallah; Ben Rached, Fathia; Simpson, John; Smith, Liezel; Gumbo, Tawanda; van Helden, Paul; Sirgel, Frederick A; McNerney, Ruth; Theron, Grant; Pain, Arnab; Clark, Taane G; Warren, Robin M

    2017-01-01

    Background: The emergence of programmatically incurable tuberculosis threatens to destabilise control efforts. The aim of this study was to collect prospective patient-level data to inform treatment and containment strategies. Methods: In a prospective cohort study, 273 South African patients with extensively drug-resistant tuberculosis, or resistance beyond extensively drug-resistant tuberculosis, were followed up over a period of 6 years. Transmission dynamics, infectiousness, and drug susceptibility were analysed in a subset of patients from the Western Cape using whole-genome sequencing (WGS; n=149), a cough aerosol sampling system (CASS; n=26), and phenotypic testing for 18 drugs (n=179). Findings: Between Oct 1, 2008, and Oct 31, 2012, we enrolled and followed up 273 patients for a median of 20·3 months (IQR 9·6-27·8). 203 (74%) had programmatically incurable tuberculosis and unfavourable outcomes (treatment failure, relapse, default, or death despite treatment with a regimen based on capreomycin, aminosalicylic acid, or both). 172 (63%) patients were discharged home, of whom 104 (60%) had an unfavourable outcome. 54 (31%) home-discharged patients had failed treatment, with a median time to death after discharge of 9·9 months (IQR 4·2-17·4). 35 (20%) home-discharged cases were smear-positive at discharge. Using CASS, six (23%) of 26 home-discharged cases with data available expectorated infectious culture-positive cough aerosols in the respirable range (<5 μm), and most reported inter-person contact with suboptimal protective mask usage. WGS identified 17 (19%) of the 90 patients (with available sequence data) that were discharged home before the diagnosis of 20 downstream cases of extensively drug-resistant tuberculosis with almost identical sequencing profiles suggestive of community-based transmission (five or fewer single nucleotide polymorphisms different and with identical resistance-encoding mutations for 14 drugs). 11 (55%) of these downstream

  4. Outcomes, infectiousness, and transmission dynamics of patients with extensively drug-resistant tuberculosis and home-discharged patients with programmatically incurable tuberculosis: a prospective cohort study

    KAUST Repository

    Dheda, Keertan

    2017-01-19

    Background: The emergence of programmatically incurable tuberculosis threatens to destabilise control efforts. The aim of this study was to collect prospective patient-level data to inform treatment and containment strategies. Methods: In a prospective cohort study, 273 South African patients with extensively drug-resistant tuberculosis, or resistance beyond extensively drug-resistant tuberculosis, were followed up over a period of 6 years. Transmission dynamics, infectiousness, and drug susceptibility were analysed in a subset of patients from the Western Cape using whole-genome sequencing (WGS; n=149), a cough aerosol sampling system (CASS; n=26), and phenotypic testing for 18 drugs (n=179). Findings: Between Oct 1, 2008, and Oct 31, 2012, we enrolled and followed up 273 patients for a median of 20·3 months (IQR 9·6-27·8). 203 (74%) had programmatically incurable tuberculosis and unfavourable outcomes (treatment failure, relapse, default, or death despite treatment with a regimen based on capreomycin, aminosalicylic acid, or both). 172 (63%) patients were discharged home, of whom 104 (60%) had an unfavourable outcome. 54 (31%) home-discharged patients had failed treatment, with a median time to death after discharge of 9·9 months (IQR 4·2-17·4). 35 (20%) home-discharged cases were smear-positive at discharge. Using CASS, six (23%) of 26 home-discharged cases with data available expectorated infectious culture-positive cough aerosols in the respirable range (<5 μm), and most reported inter-person contact with suboptimal protective mask usage. WGS identified 17 (19%) of the 90 patients (with available sequence data) that were discharged home before the diagnosis of 20 downstream cases of extensively drug-resistant tuberculosis with almost identical sequencing profiles suggestive of community-based transmission (five or fewer single nucleotide polymorphisms different and with identical resistance-encoding mutations for 14 drugs). 11 (55%) of these downstream

  5. What is a 'secure base' when death is approaching? A study applying attachment theory to adult patients' and family members' experiences of palliative home care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Milberg, A; Wåhlberg, R; Jakobsson, M; Olsson, E-C; Olsson, M; Friedrichsen, M

    2012-08-01

    Attachment theory has received much interest lately in relation to how adults cope with stress and severe illness. The aim of this study was using the experiences of patients and family members to explore palliative home care as a 'secure base' (a central concept within the theory). Twelve patients and 14 family members were interviewed during ongoing palliative home care. The interviews were analysed with deductive qualitative content analysis. Informants expressed the relevance of sensing security during palliative home care because death and dying were threats that contributed to vulnerability. Palliative home care could foster a feeling of security and provide a secure base. This was facilitated when informants had trust in staff (e.g. due to availability and competence in providing symptom relief), felt recognised as individuals and welcomed to contact the team in times of needs. Being comfortable, informed and having an everyday life also contributed to a perception of palliative home care as a secure base. Family members stressed the importance of being relieved from responsibilities that were too heavy. The underlying meanings of experiencing palliative home care as a secure base involved gaining a sense of control and of inner peace, perceiving that despite a demanding and changed life situation, one could continue partially being oneself and having something to hope for, even if this no longer concerned cure for the ill person. Important aspects of palliative home care as providing a secure base were identified and these have implications for clinical practice. Copyright © 2011 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  6. Long-term weight loss after bariatric surgery in patients visited at home outside the study environment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mathus-Vliegen, Elisabeth M H

    2006-11-01

    Bariatric surgery results in sustained weight loss in the majority of patients. The controlled setting of a trial, however, does not necessarily reflect the everyday routine practice. Therefore, to investigate the results of bariatric surgery in a more natural setting, patients were visited at home, outside a study and hospital environment. Patients who underwent a vertical banded gastroplasty or a gastric bypass between 1980 and 1997 were eligible. Body weight and height were measured. Patients filled out general and health status questionnaires (Nottingham Health Profile (NHP)). Responses were obtained from 236/313 subjects (75%) with a mean +/- SD age of 42.9 +/- 10.2 years and a mean current body weight of 100.3 +/- 20.7 kg. A maximum weight loss of 48.2 +/- 18.4 kg or 70.8 +/- 22.4% excess weight loss was obtained after 17 +/- 15 months, of which 32.1 +/- 22.6 kg or 45.2 +/- 29.3%, respectively, was maintained at 8.2 +/- 4.5 years after the intervention. Males and females did not differ in weight loss. The type of operation had no influence. Age >50 years and a BMI >50 kg/m(2) were not related to a poor outcome, but a time lapse of >5 years since the operation resulted in a less well sustained weight loss. The subjective health status improved considerably, but less so with a smaller weight loss and longer lapse of time since the operation. Especially in females, the NHP still deviated substantially from Dutch norm values. Surgically obtained weight loss is satisfactory in patients outside a strictly controlled study setting. Health benefits are substantial, but are adversely affected by weight gain and time elapsed since the operation.

  7. Predictors of Home Care Expenditures and Death at Home for Cancer Patients in an Integrated Comprehensive Palliative Home Care Pilot Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Howell, Doris M.; Abernathy, Tom; Cockerill, Rhonda; Brazil, Kevin; Wagner, Frank; Librach, Larry

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: Empirical understanding of predictors for home care service use and death at home is important for healthcare planning. Few studies have examined these predictors in the context of the publicly funded Canadian home care system. This study examined predictors for home care use and home death in the context of a “gold standard” comprehensive palliative home care program pilot in Ontario where patients had equal access to home care services. Methods: Secondary clinical and administrative data sources were linked using a unique identifier to examine multivariate factors (predisposing, enabling, need) on total home care expenditures and home death for a cohort of cancer patients enrolled in the HPCNet pilot. Results: Subjects with gastrointestinal symptoms (OR: 1.64; p=0.03) and those with higher income had increased odds of dying at home (OR: 1.14; phome care expenditures. Conclusions: Predictors of home death found in earlier studies appeared less important in this comprehensive palliative home care pilot. An income effect for home death observed in this study requires examination in future controlled studies. Relevance: Access to palliative home care that is adequately resourced and organized to address the multiple domains of issues that patients/families experience at the end of life has the potential to enable home death and shift care appropriately from limited acute care resources. PMID:22294993

  8. Cost-effectiveness of home telemonitoring in chronic kidney disease patients at different stages by a pragmatic randomized controlled trial (eNephro): rationale and study design.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thilly, Nathalie; Chanliau, Jacques; Frimat, Luc; Combe, Christian; Merville, Pierre; Chauveau, Philippe; Bataille, Pierre; Azar, Raymond; Laplaud, David; Noël, Christian; Kessler, Michèle

    2017-04-05

    Home telemonitoring has developed considerably over recent years in chronic diseases in order to improve communication between healthcare professionals and patients and to promote early detection of deteriorating health status. In the nephrology setting, home telemonitoring has been evaluated in home dialysis patients but data are scarce concerning chronic kidney disease (CKD) patients before and after renal replacement therapy. The eNephro study is designed to assess the cost effectiveness, clinical/biological impact, and patient perception of a home telemonitoring for CKD patients. Our purpose is to present the rationale, design and organisational aspects of this study. eNephro is a pragmatic randomised controlled trial, comparing home telemonitoring versus usual care in three populations of CKD patients: stage 3B/4 (n = 320); stage 5D CKD on dialysis (n = 260); stage 5 T CKD treated with transplantation (n= 260). Five hospitals and three not-for-profit providers managing self-care dialysis situated in three administrative regions in France are participating. The trial began in December 2015, with a scheduled 12-month inclusion period and 12 months follow-up. Outcomes include clinical and biological data (e.g. blood pressure, haemoglobin) collected from patient records, perceived health status (e.g. health related quality of life) collected from self-administered questionnaires, and health expenditure data retrieved from the French health insurance database (SNIIRAM) using a probabilistic matching procedure. The hypothesis is that home telemonitoring enables better control of clinical and biological parameters as well as improved perceived health status. This better control should limit emergency consultations and hospitalisations leading to decreased healthcare expenditure, compensating for the financial investment due to the telemedicine system. This study has been registered at ClinicalTrials.gov under NCT02082093 (date of registration: February 14

  9. Patient-centeredness to anticipate and organize an end-of-life project for patients receiving at-home palliative care: a phenomenological study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oude Engberink, Agnès; Badin, Mélanie; Serayet, Philippe; Pavageau, Sylvain; Lucas, François; Bourrel, Gérard; Norton, Joanna; Ninot, Grégory; Senesse, Pierre

    2017-02-23

    The development of end-of-life primary care is a socio-medical and ethical challenge. However, general practitioners (GPs) face many difficulties when initiating appropriate discussion on proactive shared palliative care. Anticipating palliative care is increasingly important given the ageing population and is an aim shared by many countries. We aimed to examine how French GPs approached and provided at-home palliative care. We inquired about their strategy for delivering care, and the skills and resources they used to devise new care strategies. Twenty-one GPs from the South of France recruited by phone according to their various experiences of palliative care agreed to participate. Semi-structured interview transcripts were examined using a phenomenological approach inspired by Grounded theory, and further studied with semiopragmatic analysis. Offering palliative care was perceived by GPs as a moral obligation. They felt vindicated in a process rooted in the paradigm values of their profession. This study results in two key findings: firstly, their patient-centred approach facilitated the anticipatory discussions of any potential event or intervention, which the GPs openly discussed with patients and their relatives; secondly, this approach contributed to build an "end-of-life project" meeting patients' wishes and needs. The GPs all shared the idea that the end-of-life process required human presence and recommended that at-home care be coordinated and shared by multi-professional referring teams. The main tenets of palliative care as provided by GPs are a patient-centred approach in the anticipatory discussion of potential events, personalized follow-up with referring multi-professional teams, and the collaborative design of an end-of-life project meeting the aspirations of the patient and his or her family. Consequently, coordination strategies involving specialized teams, GPs and families should be modelled according to the specificities of each care system.

  10. Crisis homes for adult psychiatric patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Aagaard, Jørgen; Freiesleben, Michael; Foldager, Leslie

    2008-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: Inspired by the Crisis Home programme in Madison, we have adapted and evaluated the programme at the Community Mental Health (CMH) Centre in Tønder, Denmark. MATERIAL AND METHODS: Procedures and schedules from the Crisis Home programme were applied in this open trial. Questionnaire...... data concerning satisfaction with the stay and registration data concerning the admissions and bed days two years before and two years after the first stay were obtained. RESULTS: During four years, 52 different patients had a total of 187 stays in a crisis home. Twenty (38.5%) of the patients were...... attached to the ACT team. The average duration of the stays was 4.0 days. The number of readmissions and bed days after the first stay showed a significant downward tendency for the subgroup of patients with a more severe mental disorder, but not for the whole group. The patients, the crisis homes families...

  11. Safety and feasibility audit of a home-based drug-transitioning approach for patients with pulmonary arterial hypertension: an observational study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dawson, A; Reddecliffe, S; Coghlan, C; Schreiber, B E; Coghlan, J G

    2018-04-01

    Newer endothelin receptor antagonists (ERAs) used to treat patients with pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH) are associated with fewer drug-drug interactions than bosentan and require less monitoring. This, combined with a pharmacokinetic basis for improved efficacy, means there may be a clinical rationale for changing therapies. However, this can be challenging and few data on its safety in patients with PAH are available. At the Royal Free Hospital in London, UK, home-based medication transitioning has been standard practice since 2009 to avoid unnecessary hospital visits for patients, unless there is a clinical imperative. In this audit of standard practice we evaluated the consequences of adopting such a strategy when transitioning PAH patients between ERA therapies. Using a Clinical Nurse Specialist-led, home-based transitioning strategy, 92 patients with PAH were transitioned from bosentan to macitentan or ambrisentan. Observational data were analysed retrospectively. The majority of patients were female with PAH associated with connective tissue disease and their ERA was changed in the hope of improving efficacy. The process was well tolerated with no adverse events associated with the process. Seventeen patients died during the study (macitentan, n = 5; ambrisentan, n = 12). None of the deaths was considered related to ERA treatment. The majority of patients remained clinically stable, based on WHO functional class and exercise capacity. An established home-based transitioning strategy can be adopted safely for patients with PAH changing ERA therapies. Most patients remained stable and the therapy change was well tolerated.

  12. Nurse mentor perceptions in the delivery of a home-based cardiac rehabilitation program to support patients living in rural areas: An interpretive study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frohmader, Terence J; Lin, Frances; Chaboyer, Wendy P

    2017-05-01

    Home-based cardiac rehabilitation (CR) programs improve health outcomes for people diagnosed with heart disease. Mentoring of patients by nurses trained in CR has been proposed as an innovative model of cardiac care. Little is known however, about the experience of mentors facilitating such programs and adapting to this new role. The aim of this qualitative study was to explore nurse mentor perceptions of their role in the delivery of a home-based CR program for rural patients unable to attend a hospital or outpatient CR program. Seven nurses mentored patients by telephone providing patients with education, psychosocial support and lifestyle advice during their recovery. An open-ended survey was administered to mentors by email and findings revealed mentors perceived their role to be integral to the success of the program. Nurses were satisfied with the development of their new role as patient mentors. They believed their collaborative skills, knowledge and experience in coronary care, timely support and guidance of patients during their recovery and use of innovative audiovisual resources improved the health outcomes of patients not able to attend traditional programs. Cardiac nurses in this study perceived that they were able to successfully transition from their normal work practices in hospital to mentoring patients in their homes. Crown Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Stress Coping Mechanisms in Elderly Adults: An Initial Study of Recreational and Other Coping Behaviors in Nursing Home Patients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hunter, I. Roy; Gillen, Mark C.

    2009-01-01

    Residents (N = 32) of 3 skilled nursing homes participated in a study designed to document the nature of the stressors they experienced and the coping mechanisms they used. Medical issues were the most common stressors. The most common coping responses were prayer, reading, watching television, listening to music, and talking to friends and…

  14. Enabling ICU patients to die at home.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Battle, Emma; Bates, Lucy; Liderth, Emma; Jones, Samantha; Sheen, Sheryl; Ginty, Andrew; Northmore, Melanie

    2014-10-07

    There is often an overlap between intensive care medicine and palliative medicine. When all curative treatment options have been explored, keeping the patient comfortable and free from pain is the main concern for healthcare practitioners. Patient autonomy in end of life decisions has not been encouraged in the intensive care unit (ICU), until now, because of its specialised and technical nature. Staff at the Royal Bolton Hospital have broken down the barriers to enabling ICU patients to die in their own homes, and have developed a system of collaborative working that can help to fulfil a patient's final wish to go home. This article describes how ICU staff developed a process that enabled two ventilated patients to be transferred home for end of life care.

  15. Burden and outcomes of pressure ulcers in cancer patients receiving the Kerala model of home based palliative care in India: Results from a prospective observational study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Biji M Sankaran

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Aim: To report the prevalence and outcomes of pressure ulcers (PU seen in a cohort of cancer patients requiring home-based palliative care. Materials and Methods: All patients referred for home care were eligible for this prospective observational study, provided they were living within a distance of 35 km from the institute and gave informed consent. During each visit, caregivers were trained and educated for providing nursing care for the patient. Dressing material for PU care was provided to all patients free of cost and care methods were demonstrated. Factors influencing the occurrence and healing of PUs were analyzed using logistic regression. Duration for healing of PU was calculated using the Kaplan Meier method. P < 0.05 are taken as significant. Results: Twenty-one of 108 (19.4% enrolled patients had PU at the start of homecare services. None of the patients developed new PU during the course of home care. Complete healing of PU was seen in 9 (42.9% patients. The median duration for healing of PU was found to be 56 days. Median expenditure incurred in patients with PU was Rs. 2323.40 with a median daily expenditure of Rs. 77.56. Conclusions: The present model of homecare service delivery was found to be effective in the prevention and management of PUs. The high prevalence of PU in this cohort indicates a need for greater awareness for this complication. Clinical Trial Registry Number: CTRI/2014/03/004477

  16. Disease trajectories in nursing home patients.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Husebo, B.S.; Hylen Randhoff, A.; Sandvik, R.; Omland, G.; Gysels, M.; Francke, A.; Hertogh, C.; Ribbe, M.; Deliens, L.

    2011-01-01

    Research aims: About 17 500 patients die in Norwegian nursing homes (NH) every year, 14-27% of these patients have diagnoses of cancer, 75% heart failure, and 80% dementia. Little is known about their last months and days regarding medical treatment, needs for multi-professional care, advance

  17. Nurses' experiences of using a smart mobile device application to assist home care for patients with chronic disease: a qualitative study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chiang, Kuei-Feng; Wang, Hsiu-Hung

    2016-07-01

    To examine nurses' experiences regarding the benefits and obstacles of using a smart mobile device application in home care. The popularity of mobile phones and Internet technology has established an opportunity for interaction between patients and health care professionals. Line is an application allowing instant communication that is available for free globally. However, the literature relating to use of Line in this area is limited. A qualitative study involving individual in-depth interviews. Participants included community nurses (N = 17) from six home care facilities in southern Taiwan who had used Line for home care of chronically ill patients for at least six months. The study was conducted using semi-structured in-depth interviews, which were recorded and converted into transcripts for content analysis. Seven themes emerged from data analysis: reduction in medical care consumption and costs, reduction in workload and stress, facilitating improvement in the quality of care, promotion of the nurse-patient relationship, perceived risk, lack of organisational incentives and operating procedures and disturbance to personal life. Nurses considered Line valuable for use in home care. While this application has diverse functions, its video transfer function could in particular help nursing staff make prompt decisions about patients' problems and promote nurse-patient relationships. However, there might be hidden risks including legal consequences, safety risks to patients, possible violations of professionalism and increased risk of nurse burnout. Increasing nursing staff awareness of using mobile messaging software applications is necessary. This study provides relevant information about the benefits, disadvantages, risks and limitations of nurses' use of Line. The study also provides suggestions for software programmers and future organisational strategy and development. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  18. A cross-sectional study of sputum handling by and supervision of patients with pulmonary tuberculosis treated at home in China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mei, L; Tobe, R G; Geng, H; Ma, Y B; Li, R Y; Wang, W B; Selotlegeng, L; Wang, X Z; Xu, L Z

    2012-12-01

    Disposal of sputum from patients with pulmonary tuberculosis (TB) who are treated at home is an important aspect of preventing the spread of TB. However, few studies have examined disposal of sputum by patients with TB who are treated at home. Patients with pulmonary TB who are treated at home were surveyed regarding sputum handling and supervision. A cross-sectional survey of a representative sample of patients with pulmonary TB who are treated at home was conducted in Shandong Province. Participants were individuals with TB who had been registered with a local agency responsible for TB control. Participants completed a questionnaire with both qualitative and quantitative questions. How sputum was handled was determined and factors associated with sputum disposal were analyzed using a non-parametric test, logistic regression, and content analysis. Responses were received from 720 participants. Patients expectorated sputum 4.56 ± 10.367 times a day, and 68.6% of patients responded that they correctly disposed of their sputum. Supervision as part of TB control focused on the efforts of health agencies and paid little attention to waste management by patients. A non-parametric test showed that sputum disposal was significantly associated with gender, age, education, sputum smear results, attitudes toward waste management, and attitudes toward supervision (all p definition, details, and methods of supervision of waste management by patients with TB to give them relevant health education and enhance their willingness to be supervised. A financial incentive should be provided to health workers supervising management of TB-related waste.

  19. Identifying early dehydration risk with home-based sensors during radiation treatment: a feasibility study on patients with head and neck cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peterson, Susan K; Shinn, Eileen H; Basen-Engquist, Karen; Demark-Wahnefried, Wendy; Prokhorov, Alexander V; Baru, Chaitanya; Krueger, Ingolf H; Farcas, Emilia; Rios, Philip; Garden, Adam S; Beadle, Beth M; Lin, Kai; Yan, Yan; Martch, Stephanie L; Patrick, Kevin

    2013-12-01

    Systems that enable remote monitoring of patients' symptoms and other health-related outcomes may optimize cancer care outside of the clinic setting. CYCORE (CYberinfrastructure for COmparative effectiveness REsearch) is a software-based prototype for a user-friendly cyberinfrastructure supporting the comprehensive collection and analyses of data from multiple domains using a suite of home-based and mobile sensors. This study evaluated the feasibility of using CYCORE to address early at-home identification of dehydration risk in head and neck cancer patients undergoing radiation therapy. Head and neck cancer patients used home-based sensors to capture weight, blood pressure, pulse, and patient-reported outcomes for two 5-day periods during radiation therapy. Data were sent to the radiation oncologist of each head and neck cancer patient, who viewed them online via a Web-based interface. Feasibility outcomes included study completion rate, acceptability and perceived usefulness of the intervention, and adherence to the monitoring protocol. We also evaluated whether sensor data could identify dehydration-related events. Fifty patients consented to participate, and 48 (96%) completed the study. More than 90% of patients rated their ease, self-efficacy, and satisfaction regarding use of the sensor suite as extremely favorable, with minimal concerns expressed regarding data privacy issues. Patients highly valued the ability to have immediate access to objective, self-monitoring data related to personal risk for dehydration. Clinician assessments indicated a high degree of satisfaction with the ease of using the CYCORE system and the resulting ability to monitor their patients remotely. Implementing CYCORE in a clinical oncology care setting is feasible and highly acceptable to both patients and providers.

  20. Edison Home Community Study Unit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee County School District, Ft. Myers, FL. Dept. of Environmental Education and Instructional Development Services.

    History is not merely events that occurred in the past. The past has influenced the present, as the present will influence the future. The purpose of this community study unit is to provide fourth grade students with an opportunity to investigate some of the history of Lee County, Florida. The unit's focus is on Thomas Edison, who built a home in…

  1. The utilization of formal and informal home care by older patients with cancer: a Belgian cohort study with two control groups.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baitar, Abdelbari; Buntinx, Frank; De Burghgraeve, Tine; Deckx, Laura; Bulens, Paul; Wildiers, Hans; van den Akker, Marjan

    2017-09-12

    The purpose of this paper is to analyse the utilization of formal and informal home care among older patients with cancer (OCP) and to compare this with middle-aged patients with cancer (MCP) and older patients without cancer (ONC). Additionally, we examined predictors of transitions towards formal care one year after a cancer diagnosis. OCP and MCP had to be recruited within three months after a cancer diagnosis and have an estimated life expectancy over six months. ONC consisted of patients without known cancer, seen by the general practitioner. Formal and informal care were compared between the patient groups at baseline, i.e. shortly after a cancer diagnosis and changes in care were studied after one year. A total of 844 patients were evaluable for formal care at baseline and 469 patients (56%) at follow-up. At baseline, about half of older adults and 18% of MCP used formal care, while about 85% of cancer patients and 57% ONC used informal care. Formal care increased for all groups after one year though not significantly in OCP. The amount of informal care only changed in MCP which decreased after one year. Cancer-related factors and changes in need factors predict a transition towards formal care after a cancer diagnosis. A cancer diagnosis has a different impact on the use of formal and informal care than ageing as such. The first year after a cancer diagnosis is an important time to follow-up on the patients' needs for home care.

  2. Factors associated with polypharmacy in elderly home-care patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Komiya, Hitoshi; Umegaki, Hiroyuki; Asai, Atsushi; Kanda, Shigeru; Maeda, Keiko; Shimojima, Takuya; Nomura, Hideki; Kuzuya, Masafumi

    2018-01-01

    Polypharmacy, which is often observed in elderly patients, has been associated with several unfavorable outcomes, including an increased risk of potentially inappropriate medications, medication non-adherence, drug duplication, drug-drug interactions, higher healthcare costs and adverse drug reactions. A significant association between polypharmacy and adverse outcomes among older people living in the community has also been confirmed. A reduction in the number of medications should thus be pursued for many older individuals. Nevertheless, the factors associated with polypharmacy in elderly home-care patients have not been reported. Here, we investigated those factors in elderly home-care patients in Japan. We used the data of the participants in the Observational Study of Nagoya Elderly with Home Medical investigation. Polypharmacy was defined as the current use of six or more different medications. We carried out univariate and multivariate logistic regression analyses to assess the associations between polypharmacy and each of several factors. A total of 153 home-care patients were registered. The mean number of medications used per patient was 5.9, and 51.5% of the patients belonged to the polypharmacy group. The multivariate model showed that the patients' scores on the Charlson Comorbidity Index and the Mini-Nutrition Assessment Short Form were inversely associated with polypharmacy, and potentially inappropriate medication was most strongly associated with polypharmacy (odds ratio 4.992). The present findings showed that polypharmacy was quite common among the elderly home-care patients, and they suggest that home-care physicians should prescribe fewer medications in accord with the deterioration of home-care patients' general condition. Geriatr Gerontol Int 2018; 18: 33-41. © 2017 Japan Geriatrics Society.

  3. Improving communication with palliative care cancer patients at home - A pilot study of SAGE & THYME communication skills model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Griffiths, Jane; Wilson, Charlotte; Ewing, Gail; Connolly, Michael; Grande, Gunn

    2015-10-01

    To pilot an evidence-based communication skills model (SAGE & THYME) with UK District Nurses (DNs) who visit patients with advanced cancer early in the dying trajectory. Evidence suggests that DNs lack confidence in communication skills and in assessing cancer patients' psycho-social needs; also that they lack time. SAGE & THYME is a highly structured model for teaching patient centred interactions. It addresses concerns about confidence and time. Mixed methods. 33 DNs were trained in SAGE & THYME in a three hour workshop and interviewed in focus groups on three occasions: pre-training, immediately post-training and two months post-training. Questionnaires measuring perceived outcomes of communication, confidence in communication and motivation to use SAGE & THYME were administered at the focus groups. SAGE & THYME provided a structure for conversations and facilitated opening and closing of interactions. The main principle of patient centeredness was reportedly used by all. Knowledge about communication behaviours helpful to patients improved and was sustained two months after training. Increased confidence in communication skills was also sustained. Motivation to use SAGE & THYME was high and remained so at two months, and some said the model saved them time. Challenges with using the model included controlling the home environment and a change in style of communication which was so marked some DNs preferred to use it with new patients. Training DNs in SAGE & THYME in a three hour workshop appears to be a promising model for improving communication skills when working with cancer patients. Crown Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Early Home Supported Discharge of Stroke Patients:

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Torben; Olsen, T. Skyhøj; Sørensen, Jan

    2006-01-01

    : A systematic literature search for randomized trials (RCTs) on "early supported discharge" was closed in April 2005. RCTs on EHSD without information on (i) death or institution at follow-up, (ii) change in Barthél Index, (iii) length of hospital stay, (iv) intensity of home rehabilitation, or (v) baseline...... data are excluded. Seven RCTs on EHSD with 1,108 patients followed 3-12 months after discharge are selected for statistical meta-analysis of outcomes. The costs are calculated as a function of the average number of home training sessions. Economic evaluation is organized as a test of dominance (both...... of death is not significant. Length of stay is significantly reduced by 10 days (CI, 2.6-18 days). All outcomes have a nonsignificant positive covariance. The median number of home sessions is eleven, and the average cost per EHSD is 1,340 USD. The "action mechanism" and financial barriers to EHSD...

  5. Stroke patients' utilisation of extrinsic feedback from computer-based technology in the home: a multiple case study realistic evaluation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parker, Jack; Mawson, Susan; Mountain, Gail; Nasr, Nasrin; Zheng, Huiru

    2014-06-05

    Evidence indicates that post-stroke rehabilitation improves function, independence and quality of life. A key aspect of rehabilitation is the provision of appropriate information and feedback to the learner.Advances in information and communications technology (ICT) have allowed for the development of various systems to complement stroke rehabilitation that could be used in the home setting. These systems may increase the provision of rehabilitation a stroke survivor receives and carries out, as well as providing a learning platform that facilitates long-term self-managed rehabilitation and behaviour change. This paper describes the application of an innovative evaluative methodology to explore the utilisation of feedback for post-stroke upper-limb rehabilitation in the home. Using the principles of realistic evaluation, this study aimed to test and refine intervention theories by exploring the complex interactions of contexts, mechanisms and outcomes that arise from technology deployment in the home. Methods included focus groups followed by multi-method case studies (n = 5) before, during and after the use of computer-based equipment. Data were analysed in relation to the context-mechanism-outcome hypotheses case by case. This was followed by a synthesis of the findings to answer the question, 'what works for whom and in what circumstances and respects?' Data analysis reveals that to achieve desired outcomes through the use of ICT, key elements of computer feedback, such as accuracy, measurability, rewarding feedback, adaptability, and knowledge of results feedback, are required to trigger the theory-driven mechanisms underpinning the intervention. In addition, the pre-existing context and the personal and environmental contexts, such as previous experience of service delivery, personal goals, trust in the technology, and social circumstances may also enable or constrain the underpinning theory-driven mechanisms. Findings suggest that the theory-driven mechanisms

  6. Attachment figures when death is approaching: a study applying attachment theory to adult patients' and family members' experiences during palliative home care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Milberg, Anna; Friedrichsen, Maria

    2017-07-01

    Attachment theory is currently receiving much attention in relation to how adults cope with severe illness. The study aims were using the experiences of patients and family members to explore attachment figures (a central concept within the theory) during palliative home care. Twelve patients and 14 family members were interviewed during ongoing palliative home care. The interviews were analysed using qualitative content analysis. Four types of attachment figures were identified: (i) family and friends, (ii) health care practitioners, (iii) pets and (iv) God. Both non-physical and physical contact with the attachment figures facilitated a sense of security. In addition, the patient/family members and their attachment figures were described by some as a "we", and when one part of the "we" felt insecure, this made the other also feel insecure. The patients' unstable and progressing illnesses constituted a threat to the patients' and family members' sense of security. The availability of the attachment figures made them feel secure, and they could then divert their attention from the patients' illnesses to other things in everyday life, e.g. socialising with family and friends. Some family members also had to cope with the loss of their own attachment figure, when the patient, who had previously been a source of security for them, was no longer able to offer protection and comfort due to the progression of the illness. Important aspects of attachment figures in the end-of-life context were identified, and their clinical implications will be discussed.

  7. Twenty years of home-based palliative care in Malappuram, Kerala, India: a descriptive study of patients and their care-givers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Philip, Rekha Rachel; Philip, Sairu; Tripathy, Jaya Prasad; Manima, Abdulla; Venables, Emilie

    2018-02-14

    The well lauded community-based palliative care programme of Kerala, India provides medical and social support, through home-based care, for patients with terminal illness and diseases requiring long-term support. There is, however, limited information on patient characteristics, caregivers and programme performance. This study was carried out to describe: i) the patients enrolled in the programme from 1996 to 2016 and their diagnosis, and ii) the care-giver characteristics and palliative care support from nurses and doctors in a cohort of patients registered during 2013-2015. A descriptive study was conducted in the oldest community-based palliative clinic in Kerala. Data were collected from annual patient registers from 1996 to 2016 and patient case records during the period 2013-2015. While 91% of the patients registered in the clinic in 1996 had cancer, its relative proportion came down to 32% in 2016 with the inclusion of dementia-related illness (19%) cardiovascular accidents (17%) and severe mental illness (5%).Among patients registered during 2013-15, the median number of home visits from nurses and doctors in 12 months were five and one respectively. In the same cohort, twelve months' post-enrolment, 56% of patients died, 30% were in continuing in active care and 7% opted out. Those who opted out of care were likely to be aged care-giver at home, 85% of these care-givers being female. The changing dynamics over a 20-year period of this palliative care programme in Kerala, India, highlights the need for similar programmes to remain flexible and adapt their services in response to a growing global burden of Non Communicable Diseases. While a high death rate is expected in this population, the high proportion of patients choosing to stay in the programme suggests that home-based care is valued within this particular group. A diverse range of clinical and psycho-social support skills are required to assist families and their caregivers when caring for a

  8. Long-term independent brain-computer interface home use improves quality of life of a patient in the locked-in state: a case study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holz, Elisa Mira; Botrel, Loic; Kaufmann, Tobias; Kübler, Andrea

    2015-03-01

    Despite intense brain-computer interface (BCI) research for >2 decades, BCIs have hardly been established at patients' homes. The current study aimed at demonstrating expert independent BCI home use by a patient in the locked-in state and the effect it has on quality of life. In this case study, the P300 BCI-controlled application Brain Painting was facilitated and installed at the patient's home. Family and caregivers were trained in setting up the BCI system. After every BCI session, the end user indicated subjective level of control, loss of control, level of exhaustion, satisfaction, frustration, and enjoyment. To monitor BCI home use, evaluation data of every session were automatically sent and stored on a remote server. Satisfaction with the BCI as an assistive device and subjective workload was indicated by the patient. In accordance with the user-centered design, usability of the BCI was evaluated in terms of its effectiveness, efficiency, and satisfaction. The influence of the BCI on quality of life of the end user was assessed. At the patient's home. A 73-year-old patient with amyotrophic lateral sclerosis in the locked-in state. Not applicable. The BCI has been used by the patient independent of experts for >14 months. The patient painted in about 200 BCI sessions (1-3 times per week) with a mean painting duration of 81.86 minutes (SD=52.15, maximum: 230.41). BCI improved quality of life of the patient. In most of the BCI sessions the end user's satisfaction was high (mean=7.4, SD=3.24; range, 0-10). Dissatisfaction occurred mostly because of technical problems at the beginning of the study or varying BCI control. The subjective workload was moderate (mean=40.61; range, 0-100). The end user was highy satisfied with all components of the BCI (mean 4.42-5.0; range, 1-5). A perfect match between the user and the BCI technology was achieved (mean: 4.8; range, 1-5). Brain Painting had a positive impact on the patient's life on all three dimensions: competence

  9. Use of nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs and renal failure in nursing home residents-results of the study "Inappropriate Medication in Patients with Renal Insufficiency in Nursing Homes".

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dörks, Michael; Herget-Rosenthal, Stefan; Schmiemann, Guido; Hoffmann, Falk

    2016-04-01

    Use of potentially inappropriate medications may result in increased morbidity, mortality and resource utilisation. Due to polypharmacy and age-related decline in renal function the elderly population is at particular risk. Therefore, the Beers Criteria include use of nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs in chronic renal failure stage 4 and 5 as these drugs may worsen renal function. According to the summary of product characteristics, the nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs ibuprofen and diclofenac are contraindicated in these patients. Objective was to assess the extent of nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug use in nursing homes with a focus on residents with severe renal failure. Multi-centre cross-sectional study in 21 German nursing homes. The study population comprised residents for whom at least one serum creatinine value and information about sex were available, so that creatinine clearance rate could be estimated. In all, 685 of 852 residents were included as they fulfilled the abovementioned criteria. Renal failure was severe (estimated creatinine clearance rate renal failure (20.8 %). With one exception, all residents prescribed nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs with severe renal failure were treated with at least one nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug that was contraindicated due to the underlying renal function. Notwithstanding their classification as potentially inappropriate medications and underlying contraindications, use of nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs is common among nursing home residents with severe renal failure.

  10. Is Home-Based, High-Intensity Interval Training Cycling Feasible and Safe for Patients With Knee Osteoarthritis?: Study Protocol for a Randomized Pilot Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keogh, Justin W L; Grigg, Josephine; Vertullo, Christopher J

    2017-03-01

    and McMaster Universities Osteoarthritis Index scale[WOMAC] and the Lequesne Index) as well as the timed up and go, sit to stand, preferred gait speed, and body composition. This pilot study appears to be the first study assessing the feasibility and safety of a home-based HIIT training program for middle-aged and older adults with knee OA. As HIIT has been demonstrated to be more effective than MICT for improving aspects of health status, body composition, and/or muscular function in other chronic disease groups, the current study has the potential to improve patient outcomes and inform the design of future randomized controlled trials.

  11. Protocol for a randomised crossover trial to evaluate patient and nurse satisfaction with electronic and elastomeric portable infusion pumps for the continuous administration of antibiotic therapy in the home: the Comparing Home Infusion Devices (CHID) study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hobbs, Jodie G; Ryan, Melissa K; Ritchie, Brett; Sluggett, Janet K; Sluggett, Andrew J; Ralton, Lucy; Reynolds, Karen J

    2017-07-31

    Previous studies comparing satisfaction with electronic and elastomeric infusion pumps are limited, and improvements in size and usability of electronic pumps have since occurred. The Comparing Home Infusion Devices (CHID) study plans to assess patient and nurse satisfaction with an elastomeric and electronic pump for delivering intravenous antibiotic treatment in the home. Secondary objectives are to determine pump-related complications and actual antibiotic dose administered, evaluate temperature variation and compare pump operating costs. The CHID study will be a randomised, crossover trial. A trained research nurse will recruit patients with infectious disease aged ≥18 years and prescribed ≥8 days of continuous intravenous antibiotic therapy from the Royal Adelaide Hospital (RAH) (Adelaide, Australia). Patients will be randomised to receive treatment at home via an elastomeric (Baxter Infusor) or an electronic (ambIT Continuous) infusion pump for 4-7 days, followed by the other for a further 4-7 days. Patient satisfaction will be assessed by a 10-item survey to be completed at the end of each arm. Nurse satisfaction will be assessed by a single 24-item survey. Patient logbooks and case notes from clinic visits will be screened to identify complications. Pumps/infusion bags will be weighed to estimate the volume of solution delivered. Temperature sensors will record skin and ambient temperatures during storage and use of the pumps throughout the infusion period. Costs relating to pumps, consumables, antibiotics and servicing will be determined. Descriptive statistics will summarise study data. This study has been approved by the RAH Human Research Ethics Committee (HREC/16/RAH/133 R20160420, version 6.0, 5 September 2016). Study results will be disseminated through peer-reviewed publications and conference presentations. The CHID study will provide key insights into patient and provider satisfaction with elastomeric and electronic infusion pumps and inform

  12. How do nursing home doctors involve patients and next of kin in end-of-life decisions? A qualitative study from Norway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Romøren, Maria; Pedersen, Reidar; Førde, Reidun

    2016-01-14

    Ethically challenging critical events and decisions are common in nursing homes. This paper presents nursing home doctors' descriptions of how they include the patient and next of kin in end-of-life decisions. We performed ten focus groups with 30 nursing home doctors. Advance care planning; aspects of decisions on life-prolonging treatment, and conflict with next of kin were subject to in-depth analysis and condensation. The doctors described large variations in attitudes and practices in all aspects of end-of-life decisions. In conflict situations, many doctors were more concerned about the opinion of next of kin than ensuring the patient's best interest. Many end-of-life decisions appear arbitrary or influenced by factors independent of the individual patient's values and interests and are not based on systematic ethical reflections. To protect patient autonomy in nursing homes, stronger emphasis on legal and ethical knowledge among nursing home doctors is needed.

  13. Enhancing mHealth Technology in the Patient-Centered Medical Home Environment to Activate Patients With Type 2 Diabetes: A Multisite Feasibility Study Protocol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gimbel, Ronald; Shi, Lu; Williams, Joel E; Dye, Cheryl J; Chen, Liwei; Crawford, Paul; Shry, Eric A; Griffin, Sarah F; Jones, Karyn O; Sherrill, Windsor W; Truong, Khoa; Little, Jeanette R; Edwards, Karen W; Hing, Marie; Moss, Jennie B

    2017-03-06

    The potential of mHealth technologies in the care of patients with diabetes and other chronic conditions has captured the attention of clinicians and researchers. Efforts to date have incorporated a variety of tools and techniques, including Web-based portals, short message service (SMS) text messaging, remote collection of biometric data, electronic coaching, electronic-based health education, secure email communication between visits, and electronic collection of lifestyle and quality-of-life surveys. Each of these tools, used alone or in combination, have demonstrated varying degrees of effectiveness. Some of the more promising results have been demonstrated using regular collection of biometric devices, SMS text messaging, secure email communication with clinical teams, and regular reporting of quality-of-life variables. In this study, we seek to incorporate several of the most promising mHealth capabilities in a patient-centered medical home (PCMH) workflow. We aim to address underlying technology needs and gaps related to the use of mHealth technology and the activation of patients living with type 2 diabetes. Stated differently, we enable supporting technologies while seeking to influence patient activation and self-care activities. This is a multisite phased study, conducted within the US Military Health System, that includes a user-centered design phase and a PCMH-based feasibility trial. In phase 1, we will assess both patient and provider preferences regarding the enhancement of the enabling technology capabilities for type 2 diabetes chronic care management. Phase 2 research will be a single-blinded 12-month feasibility study that incorporates randomization principles. Phase 2 research will seek to improve patient activation and self-care activities through the use of the Mobile Health Care Environment with tailored behavioral messaging. The primary outcome measure is the Patient Activation Measure scores. Secondary outcome measures are Summary of

  14. Patient-centered medical homes for patients with disabilities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hernandez, Brigida; Damiani, Marco; Wang, T Arthur; Driscoll, Carolyn; Dellabella, Peter; LePera, Nicole; Mentari, Michael

    2015-01-01

    The patient-centered medical home is an innovative approach to improve health care outcomes. To address the unique needs of patients with intellectual and developmental disabilities (IDDs), a large health care provider reevaluated the National Committee for Quality Assurance's 6 medical home standards: (a) enhance access and continuity, (b) identify and manage patient populations, (c) plan and manage care, (d) provide self-care and community support, (e) track and coordinate care, and (f) measure and improve performance. This article describes issues to consider when serving patients with IDDs.

  15. Community acquired infections in older patients admitted to hospital from care homes versus the community: cohort study of microbiology and outcomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marwick, Charis; Santiago, Virginia Hernandez; McCowan, Colin; Broomhall, Janice; Davey, Peter

    2013-02-06

    Residents of care homes are at risk of colonisation and infection with antibiotic resistant bacteria, but there is little evidence that antibiotic resistance among such patients is associated with worse outcomes than among older people living in their own homes. Our aim was to compare the prevalence of antibiotic resistant bacteria and clinical outcomes in older patients admitted to hospital with acute infections from care homes versus their own homes. We enrolled patients admitted to Ninewells Hospital in 2005 who were older than 64 years with onset of acute community acquired respiratory tract, urinary tract or skin and soft tissue infections, and with at least one sample sent for culture. The primary outcome was 30 day mortality, adjusted for age, sex, Charlson Index of co-morbidity, sepsis severity, presence of resistant isolates and resistance to initial therapy. 161 patients were identified, 60 from care homes and 101 from the community. Care home patients were older, had more co-morbidities, and higher rates of resistant bacteria, including MRSA and Gram negative organisms resistant to co-amoxiclav, cefuroxime and/or ciprofloxacin, overall (70% versus 36%, p = 0.026). 30 day mortality was high in both groups (30% in care home patients and 24% in comparators). In multivariate logistic regression we found that place of residence did not predict 30 day mortality (adjusted odds ratio (OR) for own home versus care home 1.01, 95% CI 0.40-2.52, p = 0.984). Only having severe sepsis predicted 30 day mortality (OR 10.09, 95% CI 3.37-30.19, p care homes were more likely to have resistant organisms but high levels of antimicrobial resistance were found in both groups. Thus, we recommend that antibiotic therapies active against resistant organisms, guided by local resistance patterns, should be considered for all older patients admitted with severe sepsis regardless of their place of residence.

  16. Taurolidine in Pediatric Home Parenteral Nutrition Patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hulshof, Emma Claire; Hanff, Lidwien Marieke; Olieman, Joanne; de Vette, Susanna; Driessen, Gert-Jan; Meeussen, Conny; Escher, Johanna Caroline

    2017-02-01

    To reduce the incidence of catheter-related bloodstream infections in home parenteral nutrition patients, the use of taurolidine was introduced in the Sophia Children's Hospital in 2011. This introduction led to a reduction in catheter-related bloodstream infections: 12.7/1000 catheter days before the use of taurolidine, compared with 4.3/1000 catheter days afterwards (n = 7) [relative risk = 0.36, 95% confidence interval: 0.20-0.65 (P = 0.018)].

  17. Hospice assist at home : does the integration of hospice care in primary healthcare support patients to die in their preferred location - A retrospective cross-sectional evaluation study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Graaf, Everlien; Zweers, Daniëlle; Valkenburg, Anna Ch; Uyttewaal, Allegonda; Teunissen, Saskia Ccm

    BACKGROUND: A majority of patients prefer to die at home. Specialist palliative care aims to improve quality of life. Hospice assist at home is a Dutch model of general/specialised palliative care within primary care, collaboratively built by general practitioners and a hospice. AIM: The aims of

  18. Maximizing post-stroke upper limb rehabilitation using a novel telerehabilitation interactive virtual reality system in the patient's home: study protocol of a randomized clinical trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kairy, Dahlia; Veras, Mirella; Archambault, Philippe; Hernandez, Alejandro; Higgins, Johanne; Levin, Mindy F; Poissant, Lise; Raz, Amir; Kaizer, Franceen

    2016-03-01

    Telerehabilitation (TR), or the provision of rehabilitation services from a distance using telecommunication tools such as the Internet, can contribute to ensure that patients receive the best care at the right time. This study aims to assess the effect of an interactive virtual reality (VR) system that allows ongoing rehabilitation of the upper extremity (UE) following a stroke, while the person is in their own home, with offline monitoring and feedback from a therapist at a distance. A single-blind (evaluator is blind to group assignment) two-arm randomized controlled trial is proposed, with participants who have had a stroke and are no longer receiving rehabilitation services randomly allocated to: (1) 4-week written home exercise program, i.e. usual care discharge home program or (2) a 4-week home-based TR exercise program using VR in addition to usual care i.e. treatment group. Motor recovery of the UE will be assessed using the Fugl-Meyer Assessment-UE and the Box and Block tests. To determine the efficacy of the system in terms of functional recovery, the Motor Activity Log, a self-reported measure of UE use will be used. Impact on quality of life will be determined using the Stroke Impact Scale-16. Lastly, a preliminary cost-effectiveness analysis will be conducted using costs and outcomes for all groups. Findings will contribute to evidence regarding the use of TR and VR to provide stroke rehabilitation services from a distance. This approach can enhance continuity of care once patients are discharged from rehabilitation, in order to maximize their recovery beyond the current available services. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Pain and psychological well-being of older persons living in nursing homes: an exploratory study in planning patient-centred intervention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tse, Mimi; Leung, Rincy; Ho, Suki

    2012-02-01

    This article is a report on a study to examine the pain situation, the use of oral analgesics and non-pharmacological strategies and the psychological well-being of older patients living in nursing homes; the relationships between pain and psychological well-being were also explored. Pain is common among older adults world-wide, and tends to be under-treated. Indeed, the high prevalence of pain may further hinder the fulfilment of psychological needs in a Maslow hierarchy of needs model. It was a quantitative cross-sectional study; older adults from six nursing homes were invited to join the study in 2007-2009, with a response rate of 100%. Pain was measured using the Geriatric Pain Assessment, happiness using the Subjective Happiness Scale, life satisfaction using the Life Satisfaction Index - A Form, loneliness using the Revised UCLA Loneliness Scale and depression was measured using the Geriatric Depression Scale. A convenience sample of 302 older patients (213 females and 89 males aged from 60 to 101, mean age of 84·99) joined the study. The majority of them had experienced pain in the previous 3 months, with a pain intensity of 4·51 on a 10-point scale. Pain sites were mainly the knee, back, shoulder and musculoskeletal areas. Only 50% of them took oral analgesics, and 70% used non-pharmacological measures for pain relief. The pain group reported significantly more loneliness and depression when compared with their no-pain counterparts. As the number of older patients increases, so does the need for alternative accommodation; thus, pain management education is urgently needed for staff and nursing home residents. © 2011 The Authors. Journal of Advanced Nursing © 2011 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  20. Palliative Sedation in Terminal Cancer Patients Admitted to Hospice or Home Care Programs: Does the Setting Matter? Results From a National Multicenter Observational Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caraceni, Augusto; Speranza, Raffaella; Spoldi, Elio; Ambroset, Cristina Sonia; Canestrari, Stefano; Marinari, Mauro; Marzi, Anna Maria; Orsi, Luciano; Piva, Laura; Rocchi, Mirta; Valenti, Danila; Zeppetella, Gianluigi; Zucco, Furio; Raimondi, Alessandra; Matos, Leonor Vasconcelos; Brunelli, Cinzia

    2018-03-13

    Few studies regarding palliative sedation (PS) have been carried out in home care (HC) setting. A comparison of PS rate and practices between hospice (HS) and HC is also lacking. Comparing HC and HS settings for PS rate, patient clinical characteristics before and during PS, decision-making process, and clinical aspects of PS. About 38 HC/HS services in Italy participated in a multicenter observational longitudinal study. Consecutive adult cancer patients followed till death during a four-month period and undergoing PS were eligible. Symptom control and level of consciousness were registered every eight hours to death. About 4276 patients were screened, 2894 followed till death, and 531 (18%) underwent PS. PS rate was 15% in HC and 21% in HS (P Palliative Medicine. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Home Parenteral Nutrition in Adult Patients With Chronic Intestinal Failure

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brandt, Christopher Filtenborg; Tribler, Siri; Hvistendahl, Mark

    2018-01-01

    BACKGROUND/AIMS: Catheter-related complications (CRCs) cause mortality and morbidity in patients dependent on parenteral support at home (HPN) due to intestinal failure (IF). This study describes the incidences of CRCs in an adult IF cohort over 40 years. It illustrates the evolution and conseque...

  2. Home monitoring of blood pressure: patients' perception and role of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Purpose: To explore the use of the blood pressure monitors by hypertensive patients in Jordanian homes and investigate their effect on emotional status and disease management, and the role of the pharmacist in this regard. Methods: This cross-sectional study was conducted over two months in 2012, in Amman, Jordan.

  3. Balance of power shifts when providing care in patients' homes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sander, Ruth

    2011-06-01

    Nursing practice at home involves entering a place where the patient's and family's values and habits predominate. In hospital, nurses work in safe territory with the aid of conferred authority but this manner might not be suitable in a patient's own home. When people need nursing care, the meaning of home is at risk of changing.

  4. A dual-task home-based rehabilitation programme for improving balance control in patients with acquired brain injury: a single-blind, randomized controlled pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peirone, Eliana; Goria, Paolo Filiberto; Anselmino, Arianna

    2014-04-01

    To evaluate the safety, feasibility and effectiveness of a dual-task home-based rehabilitation programme on balance impairments among adult patients with acquired brain injury. Single-blind, randomized controlled pilot study. Single rehabilitation centre. Sixteen participants between 12 and 18 months post-acquired brain injury with balance impairments and a score task home-based programme six days a week for seven weeks. The primary outcome measure was the Balance Evaluation System Test; secondary measures were the Activities-specific Balance Confidence Scale and Goal Attainment Scaling. At the end of the pilot study, the intervention group showed significantly greater improvement in Balance Evaluation System Test scores (17.87, SD 6.05) vs. the control group (5.5, SD 3.53; P = 0.008, r = 0.63). There was no significant difference in improvement in Activities-specific Balance Confidence Scale scores between the intervention group (25.25, SD 25.51) and the control group (7.00, SD 14.73; P = 0.11, r = 0.63). There was no significant improvement in Goal Attainment Scaling scores in the intervention (19.37, SD 9.03) vs. the control group (16.28, SD 6.58; P = 0.093, r = 0.63). This pilot study shows the safety, feasibility and short-term benefit of a dual-task home-based rehabilitation programme to improve balance control in patients with acquired brain injury. A sample size of 26 participants is required for a definitive study.

  5. [Palliative home care in Westfalia-Lippe--baseline study 12 and 36 months after coming into effect of the "agreement to the implementation of ambulant home palliative careforterminally ill patients"].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lux, E A; Althaus, A; Classen, B; Hilscher, H; Hofmeister, U; Holtappels, P; Mansfeld-Nies, R; Weller, H U

    2013-07-25

    On 2009-04-01 the Association of Statutory Health Insurance Physicians Westfalia-Lippe and health insurance organizations made an agreement to implement palliative home care for terminally ill patients. Based on this agreement, family doctors and palliativecardoctorscooperate,supported by coordinators. 12 and 36 months after coming into effect of the agreement a questionnaire was sent to the regional palliative care networks to collect data about supply structure, number of patients and their place of death. In the year 2011 85,410 people died in Westfalia-Lippe, 9.0% of them were included in palliative care structures. 69.5% of the included patients died at home, 9.9% in hospital (in 2010: 68.7% at home, 14.7% in hospital). A correlation between the population density or the number of included patients per palliative networkcould not be detected. Low-threshold access to palliative care networks(bothfamilydoctorand patientcancontact the palliative care team at any time) improves ambulant palliative care. Non-bureaucratic change from general home palliative care (German abbreviation: AAPV) to specialized home palliative care (SAPV) has proven successful in Westfalia-Lippe. Well-trained and experienced coordinators guarantee multidisciplinary and multiprofessional working of palliative care teams. In order to enhance palliative care in Westfalia-Lippe, data for quality assurance should be defined, periodically collected and evaluated in the future.

  6. Burden of Clostridium difficile-associated disease among patients residing in nursing homes: a population-based cohort study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Holly; Baser, Onur; Wang, Li

    2016-11-25

    Clostridium difficile (C. difficile) infection (CDI) is the leading cause of nosocomial diarrhea in the United States. This study aimed to examine the incidence of CDI and evaluate mortality and economic burden of CDI in an elderly population who reside in nursing homes (NHs). This was a population-based retrospective cohort study focusing on US NHs by linking Medicare 5% sample, Medicaid, Minimum Data Set (MDS) (2008-10). NH residents aged ≥65 years with continuous enrollment in Medicare and/or Medicaid Fee-for-Service plan for ≥12 months and ≥2 quarterly MDS assessments were eligible for the study. The incidence rate was calculated as the number of CDI episodes by 100,000 person-years. A 1:4 propensity score matched sample of cohorts with and without CDI was generated to assess mortality and health care costs following the first CDI. Among 32,807 NH residents, 941 residents had ≥1 episode of CDI in 2009, with an incidence of 3359.9 per 100,000 person-years. About 30% CDI episodes occurred in the hospital setting. NH residents with CDI (vs without CDI) were more likely to have congestive heart failure, renal disease, cerebrovascular disease, hospitalizations, and outpatient antibiotic use. During the follow-up period, the 30-day (14.7% vs 4.3%, P CDI residents vs non-CDI residents. Total health care costs within 2 months following the first CDI episode were also significantly higher for CDI residents ($28,621 vs $13,644, P CDI presents a serious public health issue in NHs. Mortality, health care utilization, and associated costs were significant following incident CDI episodes.

  7. Home-based Neurologic Music Therapy for Upper Limb Rehabilitation with Stroke Patients at Community Rehabilitation Stage - a Feasibility Study Protocol.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alex J Street

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Background: Impairment of upper limb function following stroke is more common than lower limb impairment and is also more resistant to treatment. Several lab-based studies with stroke patients have produced statistically significant gains in upper limb function when using musical instrument playing and techniques where rhythm acts as an external time-keeper for the priming and timing of upper limb movements. Methods: For this feasibility study a small sample size of 14 participants (3 – 60 months post stroke has been determined through clinical discussion between the researcher and study host in order to test for management, feasibility and effects, before planning a larger trial determined through power analysis. A cross-over design with five repeated measures will be used, whereby participants will be randomized into either a treatment (n=7 or wait list control (n=7 group. Intervention will take place twice weekly over 6 weeks. The ARAT and 9HPT will be used to measure for quantitative gains in arm function and finger dexterity, pre/post treatment interviews will serve to investigate treatment compliance and tolerance. A lab based EEG case comparison study will be undertaken to explore audio-motor coupling, brain connectivity and neural reorganization with this intervention, as evidenced in similar studies. Discussion: Before evaluating the effectiveness of a home-based intervention in a larger scale study, it is important to assess whether implementation of the trial methodology is feasible. This study investigates the feasibility, efficacy and patient experience of a music therapy treatment protocol comprising a chart of 12 different instrumental exercises and variations, which aims at promoting measurable changes in upper limb function in hemiparetic stroke patients. The study proposes to examine several new aspects including home-based treatment and dosage, and will provide data on recruitment, adherence and variability of outcomes.

  8. Home-based neurologic music therapy for upper limb rehabilitation with stroke patients at community rehabilitation stage-a feasibility study protocol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Street, Alexander J; Magee, Wendy L; Odell-Miller, Helen; Bateman, Andrew; Fachner, Jorg C

    2015-01-01

    Impairment of upper limb function following stroke is more common than lower limb impairment and is also more resistant to treatment. Several lab-based studies with stroke patients have produced statistically significant gains in upper limb function when using musical instrument playing and techniques where rhythm acts as an external time-keeper for the priming and timing of upper limb movements. For this feasibility study a small sample size of 14 participants (3-60 months post stroke) has been determined through clinical discussion between the researcher and study host in order to test for management, feasibility and effects, before planning a larger trial determined through power analysis. A cross-over design with five repeated measures will be used, whereby participants will be randomized into either a treatment (n = 7) or wait list control (n = 7) group. Intervention will take place twice weekly over 6 weeks. The ARAT and 9HPT will be used to measure for quantitative gains in arm function and finger dexterity, pre/post treatment interviews will serve to investigate treatment compliance and tolerance. A lab based EEG case comparison study will be undertaken to explore audio-motor coupling, brain connectivity and neural reorganization with this intervention, as evidenced in similar studies. Before evaluating the effectiveness of a home-based intervention in a larger scale study, it is important to assess whether implementation of the trial methodology is feasible. This study investigates the feasibility, efficacy and patient experience of a music therapy treatment protocol comprising a chart of 12 different instrumental exercises and variations, which aims at promoting measurable changes in upper limb function in hemiparetic stroke patients. The study proposes to examine several new aspects including home-based treatment and dosage, and will provide data on recruitment, adherence and variability of outcomes.

  9. A home-based comprehensive care model in patients with Multiple Sclerosis: A study pre-protocol [version 1; referees: 2 approved

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lufei Young

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Background Disability is prevalent in individuals with multiple sclerosis (MS, leading to difficulty in care access, significant caregiver burden, immense challenges in self-care and great societal burden.  Without highly coordinated, competent and accessible care, individuals living with progressive MS experience psychological distress, poor quality of life, suffer from life-threatening complications, and have frequent but avoidable healthcare utilizations. Unfortunately, current healthcare delivery models present severe limitations in providing easily accessible, patient-centered, coordinated comprehensive care to those with progressive MS. We propose a home-based comprehensive care model (MAHA to address the unmet needs, challenges, and avoidable complications in individuals with progressive MS with disabling disease. Objective The article aims to describe the study design and methods used to implement and evaluate the proposed intervention.   Method The study will use a randomized controlled design to evaluate the feasibility of providing a 24-month, home-based, patient-centered comprehensive care program to improve quality of life, reduce complications and healthcare utilizations overtime (quarterly for 24 months. A transdisciplinary team led by a MS-Comprehensivist will carry out this project. Fifty MS patients will be randomly assigned to the intervention and usual care program using block randomization procedures. We hypothesize that patients in the intervention group will have fewer complications, higher quality of life, greater satisfaction with care, and reduced healthcare utilization. The proposed project is also expected to be financially sustainable in fee-for-service models but best suited for and gain financial success in valued-based care systems.   Discussion This is the first study to examine the feasibility and effectiveness of a home-based comprehensive care management program in MS patients living with progressive

  10. Evaluation of patients with stroke monitored by home care programs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana Railka de Souza Oliveira

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study was to evaluate the patient with a stroke in home treatment, investigating physical capacity, mental status and anthropometric analysis. This was a cross-sectional study conducted in Fortaleza/CE, from January to April of 2010. Sixty-one individuals monitored by a home care program of three tertiary hospitals were investigated, through interviews and the application of scales. The majority of individuals encountered were female (59%, elderly, bedridden, with a low educational level, a history of other stroke, a high degree of dependence for basic (73.8% and instrumental (80.3 % activities of daily living, and a low cognitive level (95.1%. Individuals also presented with tracheostomy, gastric feeding and urinary catheter, difficulty hearing, speaking, chewing, swallowing, and those making daily use of various medications. It was concluded that home care by nurses is an alternative for care of those individuals with a stroke.

  11. Evaluation of patients with stroke monitored by home care programs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana Railka de Souza Oliveira

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study was to evaluate the patient with a stroke in home treatment, investigating physical capacity, mental status and anthropometric analysis. This was a cross-sectional study conducted in Fortaleza/CE, from January to April of 2010. Sixty-one individuals monitored by a home care program of three tertiary hospitals were investigated, through interviews and the application of scales. The majority of individuals encountered were female (59%, elderly, bedridden, with a low educational level, a history of other stroke, a high degree of dependence for basic (73.8% and instrumental (80.3 % activities of daily living, and a low cognitive level (95.1%. Individuals also presented with tracheostomy, gastric feeding and urinary catheter, difficulty hearing, speaking, chewing, swallowing, and those making daily use of various medications. It was concluded that home care by nurses is an alternative for care of those individuals with a stroke.

  12. Prospective study of catheter-related central vein thrombosis in home parenteral nutrition patients with benign disease using serial venous Doppler ultrasound.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cuerda, Cristina; Joly, Francisca; Corcos, Olivier; Concejo, Javier; Puiggrós, Carolina; Gil, Carmen; Pironi, Loris

    2016-02-01

    Catheter-related central vein thrombosis (CRVT) is a severe complication of home parenteral nutrition (HPN) that may be clinically manifest or subclinical. The aims of the study were to prospectively investigate the incidence of CRVT in patients on HPN with benign disease and determine the influence of different variables on this complication. A prospective, multicentre, observational study in the Home Artificial Nutrition-Chronic Intestinal Failure ESPEN group was performed. Patients with benign disease starting HPN or already on HPN after the insertion of a new catheter, were recruited and followed up with Color Doppler Duplex Sonography (CDDS) evaluations at baseline, 1 week, 3, 6 and 12 months after catheter insertion. Fisher's exact test was used to calculate the association of different variables (related to the patient, type of catheter, vascular access, insertion method, catheter care and anticoagulant treatment) with CRVT events. Sixty-two patients (31 males, 31 females) aged 50 ± 19 (19-83) years were included and followed for a median 363 days, with an Inter Quartile Range of 180-365 days, and a total of 16,186 catheter-days. Six patients had previous CRVT and 16 had history of thromboembolic disease (pulmonary and mesenteric). Forty one patients were receiving anticoagulant treatment. Fifty two patients had tunneled catheters and 10 implanted ports. Two patients had symptomatic thrombosis at 3 and 12 months of follow-up (2 and 3 weeks after normal routine CDDS evaluation). The incidence of CRVT was 0.045/catheter/year. CRVT was not significantly associated with any of the variables analyzed. The incidence of CRVT in patients on HPN for benign disease followed by CDDS is low in the first year of catheterization. We did not observe any case of asymptomatic CRVT. Based on our data, CDDS seems to have low effectiveness as a screening tool for CRVT in asymptomatic patients on HPN with benign disease. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd and European Society for

  13. Burden of Clostridium difficile-associated disease among patients residing in nursing homes: a population-based cohort study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Holly Yu

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Clostridium difficile (C. difficile infection (CDI is the leading cause of nosocomial diarrhea in the United States. This study aimed to examine the incidence of CDI and evaluate mortality and economic burden of CDI in an elderly population who reside in nursing homes (NHs. Methods This was a population-based retrospective cohort study focusing on US NHs by linking Medicare 5% sample, Medicaid, Minimum Data Set (MDS (2008–10. NH residents aged ≥65 years with continuous enrollment in Medicare and/or Medicaid Fee-for-Service plan for ≥12 months and ≥2 quarterly MDS assessments were eligible for the study. The incidence rate was calculated as the number of CDI episodes by 100,000 person-years. A 1:4 propensity score matched sample of cohorts with and without CDI was generated to assess mortality and health care costs following the first CDI. Results Among 32,807 NH residents, 941 residents had ≥1 episode of CDI in 2009, with an incidence of 3359.9 per 100,000 person-years. About 30% CDI episodes occurred in the hospital setting. NH residents with CDI (vs without CDI were more likely to have congestive heart failure, renal disease, cerebrovascular disease, hospitalizations, and outpatient antibiotic use. During the follow-up period, the 30-day (14.7% vs 4.3%, P < 0.001, 60-day (22.7% vs 7.5%, P < 0.001, 6-month (36.3% vs 18.3%, P < 0.001, and 1-year mortality rates (48.2% vs 31.1%, P < 0.001 were significantly higher among the CDI residents vs non-CDI residents. Total health care costs within 2 months following the first CDI episode were also significantly higher for CDI residents ($28,621 vs $13,644, P < 0.001. Conclusions CDI presents a serious public health issue in NHs. Mortality, health care utilization, and associated costs were significant following incident CDI episodes.

  14. Caring for patients on home enteral nutrition: Reported complications by home carers and perspectives of community nurses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lim, Mei Ling; Yong, Bei Yi Paulynn; Mar, Mei Qi Maggie; Ang, Shin Yuh; Chan, Mei Mei; Lam, Madeleine; Chong, Ngian Choo Janet; Lopez, Violeta

    2018-07-01

    To explore the experiences of community nurses and home carers, in caring for patients on home enteral nutrition. The number of patients on home enteral nutrition is on the increase due to advancement in technology and shift in focus of providing care from acute to community care settings. A mixed-method approach was adopted. (i) A face-to-face survey design was used to elicit experience of carers of patients on home enteral nutrition. (ii) Focus group interviews were conducted with community nurses. Ninety-nine carers (n = 99) were recruited. Patient's mean age that they cared for was aged 77.7 years (SD = 11.2), and they had been on enteral feeding for a mean of 29 months (SD = 23.0). Most were bed-bound (90%) and required full assistance with their feeding (99%). Most were not on follow-up with dietitians (91%) and dentists (96%). The three most common reported gastrointestinal complications were constipation (31%), abdominal distension (28%) and vomiting (22%). Twenty community nurses (n = 20) were recruited for the focus group interviews. Four main themes emerged from the analysis: (i) challenge of accessing allied health services in the community; (ii) shorter length of stay in the acute care setting led to challenges in carers' learning and adaptation; (iii) transition gaps between hospital and home care services; and (iv) managing expectations of family. To facilitate a better transition of care for patients, adequate training for carers, standardising clinical practice in managing patients with home enteral nutrition and improving communication between home care services and the acute care hospitals are needed. This study highlighted the challenges faced by community home care nurses and carers. Results of this study would help to inform future policies and practice changes that would improve the quality of care received by patients on home enteral nutrition. © 2018 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  15. Home Parenteral Nutrition in Adult Patients with Chronic Intestinal Failure

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brandt, Christopher Filtenborg; Hvistendahl, Mark; Naimi, Rahim M.

    2017-01-01

    in treating IF with home parenteral nutrition (HPN), this study documents the HPN evolution and describes the demographics and outcome in one of the world's largest single-center cohorts. Methods: We included patients with IF discharged with HPN from 1970-2010. Data were extracted according to European...... Society for Clinical Nutrition and Metabolism classifications from the Copenhagen IF database. Results: Over the decades, we observed an exponential increase in the number of HPN patients. The 508 patients with IF collectively received HPN for 1751 years. While receiving HPN, 211 patients with IF (42...

  16. Complications and co-morbidities in radiographs of patients in traditional bone setters’ homes in Ogwa, Edo State, Nigeria: a community-based study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eze, Kenneth C.

    2012-01-01

    Background: Musculoskeletal injuries are common in developing countries, but access to high quality orthopedic care is not. Traditional bone setters (TBS) serve to fill the gap, but the nature and quality of their treatment are largely understudied. Traditional bone setting in Idunmunkpaghan clan of Ogwa community, Edo State, Nigeria, was founded by Odion Ekhimere between about 1680 and 1705. The TBS practice in this community is studied to find out the complications and co-morbidities associated with it. Methods: A prospective community-based study of the patients admitted in the traditional bone setters’ homes was done at Ogwa over a -2-year period by studying the admission and discharge radiographs of patients treated in the community and by interviewing the TBS and patients. Result: Ninety patients with radiographs of the lesion sites were followed up from admission to discharge at the TBS homes, comprising 53 males (53.89%) and 37 females (41.11%) with a male to female ratio of 1.4:1. Sixty five patients (72.2%) had fracture or dislocation. Forty four of the 65 patients (67.7%) with fracture/dislocation had complications including mal-union 31(70.4%), secondary osteoarthritis 8 (18.2%), non-reduction of dislocation 7 (11.9%), non-union 8 (18.2%), and others 12 (27.2%). Co-morbidities were identified in 15 patients (16.7%) and included severe osteoarthritis 7 (46.7%), diabetic foot ulcer 4 (26.7%), severe hypertension with cardiomegaly 4 (26.7%), metastatic carcinoma of the prostate 3 (20.0%), septic arthritis 2 (13.3%), pulmonary tuberculosis 1 (6.7%) and others 3 (20.0%). Conclusion: The practice of traditional bone setting is well established in Idunmunkpaghan clan in Ukpogo quarter of Ogwa. Education and training of the TBS is the key to reduction of complications and co-morbidities seen in their practices as they have high patronage and the patients have high regards for them and will continue to patronize them

  17. Complications and co-morbidities in radiographs of patients in traditional bone setters’ homes in Ogwa, Edo State, Nigeria: a community-based study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Eze, Kenneth C., E-mail: ezechallenge@yahoo.co.uk [Department of Radiology, Faculty of Medicine, College of Health Sciences, Nnamdi Azikiwe University, Nnewi Campus, Anambra State (Nigeria)

    2012-09-15

    Background: Musculoskeletal injuries are common in developing countries, but access to high quality orthopedic care is not. Traditional bone setters (TBS) serve to fill the gap, but the nature and quality of their treatment are largely understudied. Traditional bone setting in Idunmunkpaghan clan of Ogwa community, Edo State, Nigeria, was founded by Odion Ekhimere between about 1680 and 1705. The TBS practice in this community is studied to find out the complications and co-morbidities associated with it. Methods: A prospective community-based study of the patients admitted in the traditional bone setters’ homes was done at Ogwa over a -2-year period by studying the admission and discharge radiographs of patients treated in the community and by interviewing the TBS and patients. Result: Ninety patients with radiographs of the lesion sites were followed up from admission to discharge at the TBS homes, comprising 53 males (53.89%) and 37 females (41.11%) with a male to female ratio of 1.4:1. Sixty five patients (72.2%) had fracture or dislocation. Forty four of the 65 patients (67.7%) with fracture/dislocation had complications including mal-union 31(70.4%), secondary osteoarthritis 8 (18.2%), non-reduction of dislocation 7 (11.9%), non-union 8 (18.2%), and others 12 (27.2%). Co-morbidities were identified in 15 patients (16.7%) and included severe osteoarthritis 7 (46.7%), diabetic foot ulcer 4 (26.7%), severe hypertension with cardiomegaly 4 (26.7%), metastatic carcinoma of the prostate 3 (20.0%), septic arthritis 2 (13.3%), pulmonary tuberculosis 1 (6.7%) and others 3 (20.0%). Conclusion: The practice of traditional bone setting is well established in Idunmunkpaghan clan in Ukpogo quarter of Ogwa. Education and training of the TBS is the key to reduction of complications and co-morbidities seen in their practices as they have high patronage and the patients have high regards for them and will continue to patronize them.

  18. Home care by general practitioners for cancer patients in the last 3 months of life: An epidemiological study of quality and associated factors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pivodic, Lara; Harding, Richard; Calanzani, Natalia; McCrone, Paul; Hall, Sue; Deliens, Luc; Higginson, Irene J; Gomes, Barbara

    2016-01-01

    Background: Stronger generalist end-of-life care at home for people with cancer is called for but the quality of end-of-life care delivered by general practitioners has been questioned. Aim: To determine the degree of and factors associated with bereaved relatives’ satisfaction with home end-of-life care delivered by general practitioners to cancer patients. Design: Population-based mortality followback survey. Setting/participants: Bereaved relatives of people who died of cancer in London, United Kingdom (identified from death registrations in 2009–2010), were invited to complete a postal questionnaire surveying the deceased’s final 3 months of life. Results: Questionnaires were completed for 596 decedents of whom 548 spent at least 1 day at home in the last 3 months of life. Of the respondents, 55% (95% confidence interval: 51%–59%) reported excellent/very good home care by general practitioners, compared with 78% (95% confidence interval: 74%–82%) for specialist palliative care providers and 68% (95% confidence interval: 64%–73%) for district/community/private nurses. The odds of high satisfaction (excellent/very good) with end-of-life care by general practitioners doubled if general practitioners made three or more compared with one or no home visits in the patient’s last 3 months of life (adjusted odds ratio: 2.54 (95% confidence interval: 1.52–4.24)) and halved if the patient died at hospital rather than at home (adjusted odds ratio: 0.55 (95% confidence interval: 0.31–0.998)). Conclusion: There is considerable room for improvement in the satisfaction with home care provided by general practitioners to terminally ill cancer patients. Ensuring an adequate offer of home visits by general practitioners may help to achieve this goal. PMID:26036688

  19. Patient autonomy in home care: Nurses' relational practices of responsibility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacobs, Gaby

    2018-01-01

    Over the last decade, new healthcare policies are transforming healthcare practices towards independent living and self-care of older people and people with a chronic disease or disability within the community. For professional caregivers in home care, such as nurses, this requires a shift from a caring attitude towards the promotion of patient autonomy. To explore how nurses in home care deal with the transformation towards fostering patient autonomy and self-care. Research design and context: A case study was conducted in a professional development course ('learning circle') for home care nurses, including participant observations and focus groups. The theoretical notion of 'relational agency' and the moral concept of 'practices of responsibility' were used to conduct a narrative analysis on the nurses' stories about autonomy. Eight nurses, two coaches and two university lecturers who participated in the learning circle. Ethical considerations: Informed consent was sought at the start of the course and again, at specific moments during the course of the learning circle. Three main themes were found that expressed the moral demands experienced and negotiated by the nurses: adapting to the person, activating patients' strengths and collaboration with patients and informal caregivers. On a policy and organisational level, the moral discourse on patient autonomy gets intertwined with the instrumental discourse on healthcare budget savings. This is manifested in the ambiguities the nurses face in fostering patient autonomy in their daily home care practice. To support nurses, critical thinking, moral sensitivity and trans-professional working should be part of their professional development. The turn towards autonomy in healthcare raises moral questions about responsibilities for care. Promoting patient autonomy should be a collaborative endeavour and deliberation of patients, professional and informal caregivers together.

  20. Antidepressant Medication Management among Older Patients Receiving Home Health Care

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bao, Yuhua; Shao, Huibo; Bruce, Martha L.; Press, Matthew J.

    2014-01-01

    Objective Antidepressant management for older patients receiving home health care (HHC) may occur through two pathways: nurse-physician collaboration (without patient visits to the physician) and physician management through office visits. This study examines the relative contribution of the two pathways and how they interplay. Methods Retrospective analysis was conducted using Medicare claims of 7,389 depressed patients 65 or older who received HHC in 2006–7 and who possessed antidepressants at the start of HHC. A change in antidepressant therapy (vs. discontinuation or refill) was the main study outcome and could take the form of a change in dose, switch to a different antidepressant, or augmentation (addition of a new antidepressant). Logistic regressions were estimated to examine how use of home health nursing care, patient visits to physicians, and their interactions predict a change in antidepressant therapy. Results About 30% of patients experienced a change in antidepressants versus 51% who refilled and 18% who discontinued. Receipt of mental health specialty care was associated with a statistically significant, 10–20 percentage-point increase in the probability of antidepressant change; receipt of primary care was associated with a small and statistically significant increase in the probability of antidepressant change among patients with no mental health specialty care and above-average utilization of nursing care. Increased home health nursing care in absence of physician visits was not associated with increased antidepressant change. Conclusions Active antidepressant management resulting in a change in medication occurred on a limited scale among older patients receiving HHC. Addressing knowledge and practice gaps in antidepressant management by primary care providers and home health nurses and improving nurse-physician collaboration will be promising areas for future interventions. PMID:25158915

  1. Blood Pressure Home Monitoring in Hypertensive Patients Attending ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Blood Pressure Home Monitoring in Hypertensive Patients Attending a Tertiary ... Sixty percent of the patients were aged 50 - 69 years. ... Patients with high BP readings reported that they exercise more and reduced their daily salt intake.

  2. Patterns of dignity-related distress at the end of life: a cross-sectional study of patients with advanced cancer and care home residents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hall, Sue; Davies, Joanna M; Gao, Wei; Higginson, Irene J

    2014-10-01

    To provide effective palliative care in different settings, it is important to understand and identify the sources of dignity-related distress experienced by people nearing the end of life. To describe and compare the sources of dignity-related distress reported by cancer patients and care home residents. Secondary analysis of merged data. Participants completed the Patient Dignity Inventory (assessing 25 sources of dignity-related distress) and measures of quality of life and depression. A total of 45 adult patients with advanced cancer referred to hospital-based palliative care teams in London, United Kingdom, and 60 residents living in one of 15 care homes in London. Care home residents were older and had poorer functioning. Both groups reported a wide range of dignity-related problems. Although the number or problems reported on the Patient Dignity Inventory was similar for the two groups (mean (standard deviation): 5.9 (5.5) for cancer patients and 4.1 (4.3) for care home residents, p = 0.07), there was a tendency for more cancer patients to report some existential problems. Experiencing physically distressing symptoms and functional limitations were prevalent problems for both groups. Patient Dignity Inventory problems were associated with poorer performance status and functioning for residents, with age and cognitive impairment for cancer patients and with poorer quality of life and depression for both groups. Although characteristics of the samples differed, similarities in the dignity-related problems reported by cancer patients and care home residents support research suggesting a common pathway towards death for malignant and non-malignant disease. A wider understanding of the sources of dignity-related distress would help clinicians provide more effective end-of-life care. © The Author(s) 2014.

  3. Home versus in-patient treatment for deep vein thrombosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Othieno, Richard; Okpo, Emmanuel; Forster, Rachel

    2018-01-09

    Deep vein thrombosis (DVT) occurs when a blood clot blocks blood flow through a vein, which can occur after surgery, after trauma, or when a person has been immobile for a long time. Clots can dislodge and block blood flow to the lungs (pulmonary embolism (PE)), causing death. DVT and PE are known by the term venous thromboembolism (VTE). Heparin (in the form of unfractionated heparin (UFH)) is a blood-thinning drug used during the first three to five days of DVT treatment. Low molecular weight heparins (LMWHs) allow people with DVT to receive their initial treatment at home instead of in hospital. This is an update of a review first published in 2001 and updated in 2007. To compare the incidence and complications of venous thromboembolism (VTE) in patients treated at home versus patients treated with standard in-patient hospital regimens. Secondary objectives included assessment of patient satisfaction and cost-effectiveness of treatment. For this update, the Cochrane Vascular Information Specialist searched the Cochrane Vascular Specialised Register (last searched 16 March 2017), the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL; 2017, Issue 2), and trials registries. We also checked the reference lists of relevant publications. Randomised controlled trials (RCTs) examining home versus hospital treatment for DVT, in which DVT was clinically confirmed and was treated with LMWHs or UFH. One review author selected material for inclusion, and another reviewed the selection of trials. Two review authors independently extracted data and assessed included studies for risk of bias. Primary outcomes included combined VTE events (PE and recurrent DVT), gangrene, heparin complications, and death. Secondary outcomes were patient satisfaction and cost implications. We performed meta-analysis using fixed-effect models with risk ratios (RRs) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs) for dichotomous data. We included in this review seven RCTs involving 1839 randomised

  4. Management and outcomes of ST-elevation myocardial infarction in nursing home versus community-dwelling older patients: a propensity matched study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khera, Sahil; Kolte, Dhaval; Gupta, Tanush; Mujib, Marjan; Aronow, Wilbert S; Agarwal, Pallak; Palaniswamy, Chandrasekar; Jain, Diwakar; Ahmed, Ali; Fonarow, Gregg C; Frishman, William H; Panza, Julio A

    2014-08-01

    The influence of admission source (nursing home [NH] versus community-dwelling) on treatment strategies and outcomes among elderly patients with ST-elevation myocardial infarction (STEMI) has not been investigated. Nationwide Inpatient Sample databases from 2003 to 2010 were used to identify 270,117 community-dwelling and 4082 NH patients 75 years of age or older with STEMI. Retrospective observational study. Propensity scores for admission source were used to assemble a matched cohort of 3081 community-dwelling and 3132 NH patients, who were balanced on baseline demographic and clinical characteristics. Bivariate logistic regression models were then used to determine the associations of NH with in-hospital outcomes among matched patients. In-hospital mortality was significantly higher in patients with STEMI presenting from a NH as compared with community-dwelling patients (30.5% versus 27.6%; odds ratio [OR] 1.15, 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.03-1.29; P = .012). Overall, NH patients were less likely to receive reperfusion (thrombolysis, percutaneous coronary intervention, or coronary artery bypass grafting) (11.5% versus 13.4%; OR 0.84, 95% CI 0.72-0.98; P = .022). However, rates of percutaneous coronary intervention alone were similar in both groups (9.9% in NH versus 9.1% in community-dwelling; OR 1.10, 95% CI 0.93-1.30; P = .276). Mean length of stay was also similar in both groups (5.68 ± 5.40 days in NH versus 5.69 ± 4.98 days in community-dwelling, P = .974). Compared with their community-dwelling counterparts, older NH patients are less likely to receive reperfusion therapy for STEMI and have higher in-hospital mortality. Copyright © 2014 AMDA – The Society for Post-Acute and Long-Term Care Medicine. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Maximum home blood pressure is a useful indicator of diabetic nephropathy in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus: KAMOGAWA-HBP study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oyabu, Chikako; Ushigome, Emi; Matsumoto, Shinobu; Tanaka, Toru; Hasegawa, Goji; Nakamura, Naoto; Ohnishi, Masayoshi; Tsunoda, Sei; Ushigome, Hidetaka; Yokota, Isao; Tanaka, Muhei; Asano, Mai; Yamazaki, Masahiro; Fukui, Michiaki

    2017-11-01

    Maximum home systolic blood pressure has been shown to predict target organ damage. We aimed to clarify the association between maximum home systolic blood pressure and urine albumin to creatinine ratio, an indicator of early-phase diabetic nephropathy in patients with type 2 diabetes. In 1040 patients, we assessed the relationship of mean or maximum home systolic blood pressure and urine albumin to creatinine ratio, and compared the area under the receiver operating characteristic curve of mean or maximum home systolic blood pressure for diabetic nephropathy (urine albumin to creatinine ratio ⩾30 mg/g Cr). Multivariate linear regression analyses indicated that mean morning systolic blood pressure ( β = 0.010, p blood pressure ( β = 0.008, p blood pressure was 0.667 (0.634-0.700; p blood pressure, as well as mean home systolic blood pressure, was significantly associated with diabetic nephropathy in patients with type 2 diabetes.

  6. Effects of leisure activities at home on perceived care burden and the endocrine system of caregivers of dementia patients: a randomized controlled study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hirano, Akemi; Umegaki, Hiroyuki; Suzuki, Yusuke; Hayashi, Toshio; Kuzuya, Masafumi

    2016-02-01

    Psychological stress associated with caregiving is thought to underlie the high incidence of hypertension, ischemic heart disease, and mortality, as well as reduced immune function, among caregivers of dementia patients. Here, we examined the effects of periodic leisure activities performed by caregivers of dementia patients with care recipients at home on perceived care burden and levels of stress hormones. Participants were 42 caregivers aged ≥ 65 years of patients diagnosed with Alzheimer's dementia. They were randomly assigned to intervention and non-intervention groups. The intervention group underwent a leisure activity program (30 min/3 times/week for 24 weeks) with the care recipient, and the control group underwent normal care activities. The Zarit Burden Interview (ZBI) score, a subjective indicator of care burden, significantly decreased after intervention in the intervention group (p leisure activity on the neuroendocrine system. Our findings suggest that periodic leisure activities can reduce perceived care burden among caregivers of dementia patients. However, in order to evaluate accurately the effects of leisure activities of the present study, long-term follow-up of both caregivers and care recipients is necessary. The Nagoya University Department of Medicine Ethics Committee Clinical Trials Registry Number is 1290.

  7. Variations in levels of care between nursing home patients in a public health care system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Døhl, Øystein; Garåsen, Helge; Kalseth, Jorid; Magnussen, Jon

    2014-03-05

    Within the setting of a public health service we analyse the distribution of resources between individuals in nursing homes funded by global budgets. Three questions are pursued. Firstly, whether there are systematic variations between nursing homes in the level of care given to patients. Secondly, whether such variations can be explained by nursing home characteristics. And thirdly, how individual need-related variables are associated with differences in the level of care given. The study included 1204 residents in 35 nursing homes and extra care sheltered housing facilities. Direct time spent with patients was recorded. In average each patient received 14.8 hours direct care each week. Multilevel regression analysis is used to analyse the relationship between individual characteristics, nursing home characteristics and time spent with patients in nursing homes. The study setting is the city of Trondheim, with a population of approximately 180 000. There are large variations between nursing homes in the total amount of individual care given to patients. As much as 24 percent of the variation of individual care between patients could be explained by variation between nursing homes. Adjusting for structural nursing home characteristics did not substantially reduce the variation between nursing homes. As expected a negative association was found between individual care and case-mix, implying that at nursing home level a more resource demanding case-mix is compensated by lowering the average amount of care. At individual level ADL-disability is the strongest predictor for use of resources in nursing homes. For the average user one point increase in ADL-disability increases the use of resources with 27 percent. In a financial reimbursement model for nursing homes with no adjustment for case-mix, the amount of care patients receive does not solely depend on the patients' own needs, but also on the needs of all the other residents.

  8. [Patient safety in home care - A review of international recommendations].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Czakert, Judith; Lehmann, Yvonne; Ewers, Michael

    2018-06-08

    In recent years there has been a growing trend towards nursing care at home in general as well as towards intensive home care being provided by specialized home care services in Germany. However, resulting challenges for patient safety have rarely been considered. Against this background we aimed to explore whether international recommendations for patient safety in home care in general and in intensive home care in particular already exist and how they can stimulate further practice development in Germany. A review of online English documents containing recommendations for patient safety in intensive home care was conducted. Available documents were analyzed and compared in terms of their form and content. Overall, a small number of relevant documents could be identified. None of these documents exclusively refer to the intensive home care sector. Despite their differences, however, the analysis of four selected documents showed similarities, e. g., regarding specific topics of patient safety (communication, involvement of patients and their relatives, risk assessment, medication management, qualification). Furthermore, strengths and weaknesses of the documents became apparent: e. g., an explicit understanding of patient safety, a literature-based introduction to safety topics or an adaptation of the recommendations to the specific features of home care were occasionally lacking. This document analysis provides interesting input to the formal and content-related development of specific recommendations and to practice development in Germany to improve patient safety in home care. Copyright © 2018. Published by Elsevier GmbH.

  9. Pervasive healthcare in the home Supporting patient motivation and engagement

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2010-01-01

    Currently, care and rehabilitation practices move, to a greater extent, out of hospitals and into private homes. This accelerating trend challenges healthcare systems and their patients. Heterogeneous settings such as private homes together with the diverse nature of the inhabitants and their con......Currently, care and rehabilitation practices move, to a greater extent, out of hospitals and into private homes. This accelerating trend challenges healthcare systems and their patients. Heterogeneous settings such as private homes together with the diverse nature of the inhabitants...... and their conditions create both technical and usability constraints and possibilities that can inform development of home-based care and rehabilitation applications. This workshop likes to investigate and discuss challenges, requirements and possibilities related to home-based healthcare applications, seen from...... environments such as private homes? Or, how can User Driven Innovation (UDI) and Participatory Design (PD) be used to create systems that are aesthetically and functionally accepted by persons subject to homebased healthcare and rehabilitation?...

  10. Understanding Pain and Pain Management in Elderly Nursing Home Patients Applying an Interprofessional Learning Activity in Health Care Students: A Norwegian Pilot Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Damsgård, Elin; Solgård, Hege; Johannessen, Karin; Wennevold, Katrine; Kvarstein, Gunnvald; Pettersen, Gunn; Garcia, Beate

    2018-05-17

    Pain is common among elderly patients in nursing homes. However, pain assessment and treatment are inadequate. Interprofessional treatment is recommended, and consequently interprofessional education in pain management is necessary. This pilot project aimed to describe how two interprofessional groups of students approached pain management in two nursing home patients. We formed two teams comprising one student from the nursing, physical therapy, pharmacy, and medical educations. Each team spent one day examining a patient with chronic pain at a nursing home and they developed pain management plans. We collected data through video recordings during teamwork before and after examining the patients and field notes during the patient examination. We analysed the video-recordings applying the seven-step model including 1) viewing the video data, 2) describing the video data, 3) identifying critical events, 4) transcribing, 5) coding, 6) constructing storyline and 7) composing a narrative. Field notes supplied the transcripts. Both teams succeeded in making a pain management plan for their patient. The common examination of the patient was crucial for the students' approaches to pain management and changed their pre-assumptions about the patients' pain. By sharing knowledge and reflecting together, the students reached a common consensus on suggestions for management of the patients' problems. Interprofessional collaboration fostered enthusiasm and a more holistic pain management approach. However,students' lack of knowledge limited their understanding of pain. Knowledge of pain management in nursing home patients and the practice of interprofessional cooperation should be included in pain curricula for health care professionals. Copyright © 2018 American Society for Pain Management Nursing. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Caring for Depression in Older Home Health Patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bruce, Martha L

    2015-11-01

    Depression is common in older home health patients and increases their risk of adverse outcomes. Depression screening is required by Medicare's Outcome and Assessment Information Set. The Depression Care for Patients at Home (CAREPATH) was developed as a feasible strategy for home health nurses to manage depression in their patients. The protocol builds on nurses' existing clinical skills and is designed to fit within routine home visits. Major components include ongoing clinical assessment, care coordination, medication management, education, and goal setting. In a randomized trial, Depression CAREPATH patients had greater improvement in depressive symptoms compared to usual care. The difference between groups was significant at 3 months, growing larger and more clinically meaningful over 1 year. The intervention had no impact on patient length of stay, number of home visits, or duration of visits. Thus, nurses can play a pivotal role in the long-term course and outcomes of patients with depression. Copyright 2015, SLACK Incorporated.

  12. Quantitative Ultrasound for Staging of Hepatic Steatosis in Patients on Home Parenteral Nutrition Validated with Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy: A Feasibility Study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Weijers, G.; Wanten, G.J.A.; Thijssen, J.M.; Graaf, M. van der; Korte, C.L. de

    2016-01-01

    Patients on home parenteral nutrition are at risk for developing liver dysfunction, which is due partly to the accumulation of lipids in the liver (steatosis) and may progress to end-stage liver disease with overt liver failure. Therefore, a timely diagnosis with easy access to repeated assessment

  13. The Use of Home Spirometry in Pediatric Cystic Fibrosis Patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aarti Shakkottai MD

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Medication adherence is poor among pediatric cystic fibrosis (CF patients, with adolescents having one of the lowest adherence rates. We wanted to identify an adherence intervention that would be acceptable to CF adolescents and assess its feasibility. We surveyed 40 adolescents with CF and asked about barriers to and motivators for their own adherence and to generate ideas for potential adherence interventions. Since most of the respondents chose frequent spirometry at home and medication reminders for interventions, we selected 5 subjects, 10 to 14 years of age, with CF to test the feasibility of home spirometry and medication reminders in pediatric CF patients. This article summarizes the results of both the survey and the feasibility pilot study.

  14. Patient Health Goals Elicited During Home Care Admission: A Categorization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sockolow, Paulina; Radhakrishnan, Kavita; Chou, Edgar Y; Wojciechowicz, Christine

    2017-11-01

    Home care agencies are initiating "patient health goal elicitation" activities as part of home care admission planning. We categorized elicited goals and identified "clinically informative" goals at a home care agency. We examined patient goals that admitting clinicians documented in the point-of-care electronic health record; conducted content analysis on patient goal data to develop a coding scheme; grouped goal themes into codes; assigned codes to each goal; and identified goals that were in the patient voice. Of the 1,763 patient records, 16% lacked a goal; only 15 goals were in a patient's voice. Nurse and physician experts identified 12 of the 20 codes as clinically important accounting for 82% of goal occurrences. The most frequent goal documented was safety/falls (23%). Training and consistent communication of the intent and operationalization of patient goal elicitation may address the absence of patient voice and the less than universal recording of home care patients' goals.

  15. Long-term weight loss after bariatric surgery in patients visited at home outside the study environment

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mathus-Vliegen, Elisabeth M. H.

    2006-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Bariatric surgery results in sustained weight loss in the majority of patients. The controlled setting of a trial, however, does not necessarily reflect the everyday routine practice. Therefore, to investigate the results of bariatric surgery in a more natural setting, patients were

  16. Characteristics and health conditions of a group of nursing home patients with mental-physical multimorbidity - the MAPPING study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van den Brink, Anne M. A.; Gerritsen, Debby L.; de Valk, Miranda M. H.; Oude Voshaar, Richard C.; Koopmans, Raymond T. C. M.

    Background: Long-term care facilities have partly taken over the traditional asylum function of psychiatric hospitals and house an increasing group of patients with mental-physical multimorbidity (MPM). Little is known about the characteristics, behavior, and care dependency of these patients. This

  17. Healthcare costs of burn patients from homes without fire sprinklers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Banfield, Joanne; Rehou, Sarah; Gomez, Manuel; Redelmeier, Donald A; Jeschke, Marc G

    2015-01-01

    The treatment of burn injuries requires high-cost services for healthcare and society. Automatic fire sprinklers are a preventive measure that can decrease fire injuries, deaths, property damage, and environmental toxins. This study's aim was to conduct a cost analysis of patients with burn or inhalation injuries caused by residential fires and to compare this with the cost of implementing residential automatic fire sprinklers. We conducted a cohort analysis of adult burn patients admitted to our provincial burn center (1995-2012). Patient demographics and injury characteristics were collected from medical records and clinical and coroner databases. Resource costs included average cost per day at our intensive care and rehabilitation program, transportation, and property loss. During the study period, there were 1557 residential fire-related deaths province-wide and 1139 patients were admitted to our provincial burn center as a result of a flame injury occurring at home. At our burn center, the average cost was CAN$84,678 per patient with a total cost of CAN$96,448,194. All resources totaled CAN$3,605,775,200. This study shows the considerable healthcare costs of burn patients from homes without fire sprinklers.

  18. Clinical and Socio-Demographic Predictors of Home Hospice Patients Dying at Home: A Retrospective Analysis of Hospice Care Association's Database in Singapore.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Yee Song; Akhileswaran, Ramaswamy; Ong, Eng Hock Marcus; Wah, Win; Hui, David; Ng, Sheryl Hui-Xian; Koh, Gerald

    2017-06-01

    Hospice care can be delivered in different settings, but many patients choose to receive it at home because of familiar surroundings. Despite their preferences, not every home hospice patient manages to die at home. To examine the independent factors associated with home hospice patient dying at home. Retrospective analysis of Hospice Care Association's database. Hospice Care Association is the largest home hospice provider in Singapore. The study included all patients who were admitted into home hospice service from January 1, 2004 to December 31, 2013. Cox proportional hazards modeling with time as constant was used to study the relationship between independent variables and home death. A total of 19,721 patients were included in the study. Females (adjusted risk ratio [ARR] 1.09, 95% CI 1.04-1.15), older patients (ARR 1.01, 95% CI 1.00-1.01), shorter duration of home hospice stay (ARR 0.88, 95% CI 0.82-0.94), fewer episodes of hospitalization (ARR 0.81, 95% CI 0.75-0.86), living with caregivers (ARR 1.54, 95% CI 1.05-2.26), doctor (ARR 1.05, 95% CI 1.01-1.08) and nurse (ARR 1.06, 95% CI 1.04-1.08) visits were positive predictors of dying-at-home. Diagnosis of cancer (ARR 0.93, 95% CI 0.86-1.00) was a negative predictor of dying-at-home. Female, older age, living with a caregiver, non-cancer diagnosis, more doctor and nurse visits, shorter duration of home hospice stays, and fewer episodes of acute hospitalizations are predictive of dying-at-home for home hospice patients. Copyright © 2017 American Academy of Hospice and Palliative Medicine. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Customization of home closed-loop insulin delivery in adult patients with type 1 diabetes, assisted with structured remote monitoring: the pilot WP7 Diabeloop study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benhamou, Pierre Yves; Huneker, Erik; Franc, Sylvia; Doron, Maeva; Charpentier, Guillaume

    2018-06-01

    Improvement in closed-loop insulin delivery systems could result from customization of settings to individual needs and remote monitoring. This pilot home study evaluated the efficacy and relevance of this approach. A bicentric clinical trial was conducted for 3 weeks, using an MPC-based algorithm (Diabeloop Artificial Pancreas system) featuring five settings designed to modulate the reactivity of regulation. Remote monitoring was ensured by expert nurses with a web platform generating automatic Secured Information Messages (SIMs) and with a structured procedure. Endpoints were glucose metrics and description of impact of monitoring on regulation parameters. Eight patients with type 1 diabetes (six men, age 41.8 ± 11.4 years, HbA1c 7.7 ± 1.0%) were included. Time spent in the 70-180 mg/dl range was 70.2% [67.5; 76.9]. Time in hypoglycemia < 70 mg/dl was 2.9% [2.1; 3.4]. Eleven SIMs led to phone intervention. Original default settings were modified in all patients by the intervention of the nurses. This pilot trial suggests that the Diabeloop closed-loop system could be efficient regarding metabolic outcomes, whereas its telemedical monitoring feature could contribute to enhanced efficacy and safety. This study is registered at ClinicalTrials.gov with trial registration number NCT02987556.

  20. Study Of Lampungnese Traditional Home Garden Design

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pratiwi, R. A.; Gunawan

    2017-10-01

    Lampung is one area in Indonesia which has a traditional culture that comes from two groups of descents, they are ulun Lampung Pepadun and ulun Lampung Saibatin. Lampungnese traditional culture has been well-known by Indonesian people for its traditional dances, traditional clothing, or traditional home architecture. However, Lampungnese traditional home garden recently may not yet been described. Information related to Lampungnese traditional home garden is still very limited and it does not yet represented the culture based design concept. This research was directed to identify the elements of the home garden and map it into design concept of the Lampungnese traditional home garden based on information of Lampungnese traditional culture. The study was conducted by using descriptive approach through literature review, interviews and cultural exploration, as well as field observation. The study was able to identify the elements forming the Lampungnese traditional home garden, namely gakhang hadap, walai, outdoor kitchenette, firewood place, outdoor kitchen, livestock barns, as well as plants. Space layout of the home garden comprises front yard (tengahbah/terambah/beruan), side yard (kebik/kakebik), and backyard (kudan/juyu/kebon). Each element of the garden is located in the right place of the space layout.

  1. Renal telemedicine through video-as-a-service delivered to patients on home dialysis: A qualitative study on the renal care team members' experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ditchburn, Jae-Llane; Marshall, Alison

    2017-09-01

    The Lancashire Teaching Hospitals NHS Trust in the UK has been providing renal care through video-as-a-service (VAAS) to patients since 2013, with support from the North West NHS Shared Infrastructure Service, a collaborative team that supports information and communication technology use in the UK National Health Service. Renal telemedicine offered remotely to patients on home dialysis supports renal care through the provision of a live high-quality video link directly to unsupported patients undergoing haemodialysis at home. Home haemodialysis is known to provide benefits to patients, particularly in making them more independent. The use of a telemedicine video-link in Lancashire and South Cumbria, UK, further reduces patient dependence on the professional team. The purpose of this paper is to present the perspectives of the renal care team members using the renal telemedicine service to understand the perceived benefits and issues with the service. Ten semi-structured interviews with members of the renal care team (two renal specialists, one matron, two renal nurses, one business manager, one renal technical services manager, two IT technicians and one hardware maintenance technician) were conducted. Thematic analysis was undertaken to analyse the qualitative data. A range of incremental benefits to the renal team members were reported, including more efficient use of staff time, reduced travel, peace of mind and a strong sense of job satisfaction. Healthcare staff believed that remote renal care through video was useful, encouraged concordance and could nurture confidence in patients. Key technological issues and adjustments which would improve the renal telemedicine service were also identified. The impact of renal telemedicine was positive on the renal team members. The use of telemedicine has been demonstrated to make home dialysis delivery more efficient and safe. The learning from staff feedback could inform development of services elsewhere. © 2017

  2. Coping with COPD in patients home

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Helle Marie

    Background: Exacerbation of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) is the second leading cause of emergency admission to medical departments. According to former studies, patients with COPD often awaits and do not react in time to signs of disease worsening, which may result in delay...... of treatment and inappropriate hospital admissions. Aim/objectives: Contributes to increase patients' quality of life and prognosis through an intensified proactive effort and development of competence of patients with COPD, relatives and healthcare professionals involved across sector boundaries, focusing...... on earlier identification and better treatment of exacerbation of COPD. Method: A development study. Through literature and medical journal audit, a tool was developed to identify patients with COPD at special risk for readmission to hospital. Through one year 98 patients were identified and offered two...

  3. Practical guide on home health in heart failure patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jaarsma, T.; Larsen, Torben; Stromberg, A.

    2013-01-01

    in this population and specialised heart failure care can save costs and improve the quality of care. However, only a few European countries have implemented specialised home care and offered this to a larger number of patients with heart failure. Method: We developed a guide on Home Health in Heart Failure patients...... from a literature review, a survey of heart failure management programs, the opinion of researchers and practitioners, data from clinical trials and a reflection of an international expert meeting. Results: In integrated home care for heart failure patients, it is advised to consider the following...... components: integrated multidisciplinary care, patient and partner participation, care plans with clear goals of care, patient education, self-care management, appropriate access to care and optimised treatment. Discussion: We summarised the state of the art of home-based care for heart failure patients...

  4. The effect of nurse-patient interaction on anxiety and depression in cognitively intact nursing home patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haugan, Gørill; Innstrand, Siw T; Moksnes, Unni K

    2013-08-01

    To test the effects of nurse-patient interaction on anxiety and depression among cognitively intact nursing home patients. Depression is considered the most frequent mental disorder among the older population. Specifically, the depression rate among nursing home patients is three to four times higher than among community-dwelling older people, and a large overlap of anxiety is found. Therefore, identifying nursing strategies to prevent and decrease anxiety and depression is of great importance for nursing home patients' well-being. Nurse-patient interaction is described as a fundamental resource for meaning in life, dignity and thriving among nursing home patients. The study employed a cross-sectional design. The data were collected in 2008 and 2009 in 44 different nursing homes from 250 nursing home patients who met the inclusion criteria. A sample of 202 cognitively intact nursing home patients responded to the Nurse-Patient Interaction Scale and the Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale. A structural equation model of the hypothesised relationships was tested by means of Lisrel 8.8 (Scientific Software International Inc., Lincolnwood, IL, USA). The SEM model tested demonstrated significant direct relationships and total effects of nurse-patient interaction on depression and a mediated influence on anxiety. Nurse-patient interaction influences depression, as well as anxiety, mediated by depression. Hence, nurse-patient interaction might be an important resource in relation to patients' mental health. Nurse-patient interaction is an essential factor of quality of care, perceived by long-term nursing home patients. Facilitating nurses' communicating and interactive skills and competence might prevent and decrease depression and anxiety among cognitively intact nursing home patients. © 2013 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  5. Home care patients in four Nordic capitals – predictors of nursing home admission during one-year followup

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liv W Sørbye

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Liv W Sørbye1, Torunn Hamran2, Nils Henriksen2, Astrid Norberg2,31Diakonhjemmet University College, Oslo, Norway; 2Department of Health and Care Sciences, Faculty of Health Sciences, University of Tromsø, Norway; 3Umeå University, Umeå, Ersta Sköndal University College, Stockholm, SwedenAbstract: The aim was to predict nursing home admission (NHA for home care patients after a 12-month follow-up study. This Nordic study is derived from the aged in home care (AdHOC project conducted in 2001–2003 with patients at 11 sites in Europe. The participants in the cohort study were randomly selected individuals, aged 65 years or older, receiving homecare in Oslo, Stockholm, Copenhagen, and Reykjavik. The Resident Assessment Instrument for Home Care (version 2.0 was used. Epidemiological and medical characteristics of patients and service utilization were recorded for 1508 home care patients (participation rate 74%. In this sample 75% were female. The mean age was 82.1 (6.9 years for men and 84.0 (6.6 for women. The most consistent predictor of NHA was receiving skilled nursing procedures at baseline (help with medication and injections, administration or help with oxygen, intravenous, catheter and stoma care, wounds and skin care (adjusted odds ratio = 3.7, 95% confidence interval: 1.7–7.8; P < 0.001. In this Nordic material, stronger emphasizing on higher qualified nurses in a home care setting could prevent or delay NHA.Keywords: aged, home care, cross-sectional study, self-rated health, level of care, care burden, comprehensive assessment, RAI, Nordic

  6. Compliance and safety of a novel home exercise program for patients with high-grade brain tumors, a prospective observational study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baima, Jennifer; Omer, Zehra B; Varlotto, John; Yunus, Shakeeb

    2017-09-01

    The purpose of this study is to evaluate compliance with and safety of a novel independent home exercise program for patients with high-grade brain tumors. We designed this program around the preferences and individual capabilities of this population as well as the potential barriers to exercise in cancer patients. Demographics were collected to better understand those that persisted with exercise. Subjects with high-grade brain tumor received one-time training that included watching an exercise video and live demonstration of resistance band exercises, a balance exercise, and recommendations for walking. Subjects were instructed to do the exercises every day for 1 month. Main outcome measures were percentage of subjects who exercised throughout the month, frequency of exercising, demographic factors, quality of life scores (assessed by FACT-BR), and self report of adverse events. Fourteen of the 15 (93%) subjects started the exercises during the course of the month. Nine of the fifteen (60%) continued the exercises throughout the month. Three additional subjects would have continued to exercise if formal or supervised rehabilitation had been offered. Among the subjects who continued the exercises regularly, higher frequency of exercising was significantly associated with living as married (p = 0.033), annual income >$50,000 (p = 0.047), scores of physical well-being (p = 0.047), and brain cancer specific well-being (p = 0.054) subscales. Among those who exercised frequently, there was also a trend towards increase in total FACT-BR scores (p = 0.059). The subjects who scored higher on the social well-being subscale of the FACT-BR at baseline self-reported a higher likelihood to continue the exercises after 1 month of participation in the study (p = 0.018). No adverse events were reported. Our small group of subjects with high-grade brain tumors demonstrated compliance with and safety of a novel independent strength and balance exercise program in the

  7. DOE Challenge Home Case Study: e2 Homes – Winter Park, Florida

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    none,

    2013-01-01

    This Challenge Home case study describes the first certified DOE Challenge Home as constructed by e2 Homes. Completed in May 2012, the “Wilson Residence” in Winter Park, Florida, is a 4,305-ft2 custom home that scores a HERS 57 without solar and a better than zero net-energy HERS -7 with solar.

  8. Organizational home care models across Europe: A cross sectional study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Eenoo, Liza; van der Roest, Henriëtte; Onder, Graziano; Finne-Soveri, Harriet; Garms-Homolova, Vjenka; Jonsson, Palmi V; Draisma, Stasja; van Hout, Hein; Declercq, Anja

    2018-01-01

    Decision makers are searching for models to redesign home care and to organize health care in a more sustainable way. The aim of this study is to identify and characterize home care models within and across European countries by means of structural characteristics and care processes at the policy and the organization level. At the policy level, variables that reflected variation in health care policy were included based on a literature review on the home care policy for older persons in six European countries: Belgium, Finland, Germany, Iceland, Italy, and the Netherlands. At the organizational level, data on the structural characteristics and the care processes were collected from 36 home care organizations by means of a survey. Data were collected between 2013 and 2015 during the IBenC project. An observational, cross sectional, quantitative design was used. The analyses consisted of a principal component analysis followed by a hierarchical cluster analysis. Fifteen variables at the organizational level, spread across three components, explained 75.4% of the total variance. The three components made it possible to distribute home care organizations into six care models that differ on the level of patient-centered care delivery, the availability of specialized care professionals, and the level of monitoring care performance. Policy level variables did not contribute to distinguishing between home care models. Six home care models were identified and characterized. These models can be used to describe best practices. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Home care nursing observational study on nursing intervention and diagnosis : Analysis of bed-ridden level among elderly patients

    OpenAIRE

    別所, 遊子; 吉田, 幸代; 長谷川, 智子; 竹田, 千佐子; 田邊, 美智子; 松木, 光子

    2000-01-01

    The targets and categories of the home health care for bed-ridden elderly were analyzed in this study. The Questionnaire were sent to 759 home care agencies and 525 data were returned. Among 408 clients analysed, 45% had the history of CVD. Severeness of dementia increased with bed-ridden level of the clients. Amount of care time by nurses was longer at night and holidays when the level went higher. Targets of care differed depending on the bed-ridden level. In Rank A (semi bed-ridden), frequ...

  10. Home-based nerve stimulation to enhance effects of motor training in patients in the chronic phase after stroke: a proof-of-principle study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dos Santos-Fontes, Renata Laurenti; Ferreiro de Andrade, Karina Nocelo; Sterr, Annette; Conforto, Adriana Bastos

    2013-01-01

    Somatosensory stimulation in the form of repetitive peripheral nerve stimulation (RPSS) is a promising strategy to improve motor function of the upper limb in chronic stroke. Home-based RPSS may be an alternative to hospital-based RPSS. To investigate the feasibility and safety of an innovative program of home-based RPSS combined with motor training and to collect preliminary data on the efficacy of this program to enhance hand motor function in patients in the chronic phase after stroke. Twenty patients were randomized to either active or sham RPSS associated with daily motor training performed at home over 4 consecutive weeks. All the patients were able to perform tasks of the Jebsen-Taylor Test (JTT). The primary outcome measures were feasibility, evaluated by self-reported compliance with the intervention, and safety (adverse events). Secondary outcomes comprised improvements in hand function in the JTT after end of treatment and after a 4-month follow-up period. There were no relevant adverse events. Compliance with RPSS and motor training was significantly greater in the active group than in the sham group. Upper extremity performance improved significantly more in the active group compared with the sham group at the end of treatment. This difference remained significant 4 months later, even when differences in compliance with motor training were considered. Home-based active RPSS associated with motor training was feasible, was safe, and led to long-lasting enhancement of paretic arm performance in the chronic phase after stroke for those who can perform the JTT. These results point to the need for an efficacy trial.

  11. Prevalence of Different Combinations of Antiepileptic Drugs and CNS Drugs in Elderly Home Care Service and Nursing Home Patients in Norway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Halvorsen, Kjell H; Johannessen Landmark, Cecilie; Granas, Anne Gerd

    2016-01-01

    Introduction. Antiepileptic drugs (AEDs) are used to treat different conditions in elderly patients and are among the drug classes most susceptible to be involved in drug-drug interactions (DDI). The aim of the study was to describe and compare use of AEDs between home care service and nursing home patients, as these patients are not included in nationwide databases of drug utilization. In the combined population, we investigate DDI of AEDs with other central nervous system- (CNS-) active drugs and DDIs involving AEDs in general. Materials and Methods. Point-prevalence study of Norwegian patients in home care services and nursing homes in 2009. At the patient level, we screened for different DDIs involving AEDs. Results. In total, 882 patients (7.8%) of 11,254 patients used AEDs and number of users did not differ between home care services and nursing homes (8.2% versus 7.7%). In the combined population, we identified 436 potential DDIs in 45% of the patients. Conclusions. In a large population of elderly, home care service and nursing home patients do not differ with respect to exposure of AEDs but use more AEDs as compared to the general population of similar age. The risk of DDIs with AEDs and other CNS-active drugs should be taken into consideration and individual clinical evaluations are assessed in this population.

  12. Early Home Supported Discharge of Stroke Patients:

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Torben; Olsen, T. Skyhøj; Sørensen, Jan

    2006-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: A comprehensive and systematic assessment (HTA) of early home-supported discharge by a multidisciplinary team that plans, coordinates, and delivers care at home (EHSD) was undertaken and the results were compared with that of conventional rehabilitation at stroke units. METHODS......: A systematic literature search for randomized trials (RCTs) on "early supported discharge" was closed in April 2005. RCTs on EHSD without information on (i) death or institution at follow-up, (ii) change in Barthél Index, (iii) length of hospital stay, (iv) intensity of home rehabilitation, or (v) baseline...... are discussed. CONCLUSIONS: EHSD is evidenced as a dominant health intervention. However, financial barriers between municipalities and health authorities have to be overcome. For qualitative reasons, a learning path of implementation is recommended where one stroke unit in a region initiates EHSD...

  13. Home-based nursing interventions improve knowledge of disease and management in patients with heart failure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karina de Oliveira Azzolin

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: to assess patient knowledge of heart failure by home-based measurement of two NOC Nursing Outcomes over a six-month period and correlate mean outcome indicator scores with mean scores of a heart failure Knowledge Questionnaire.METHODS: in this before-and-after study, patients with heart failure received four home visits over a six-month period after hospital discharge. At each home visit, nursing interventions were implemented, NOC outcomes were assessed, and the Knowledge Questionnaire was administered.RESULTS: overall, 23 patients received home visits. Mean indicator scores for the outcome Knowledge: Medication were 2.27±0.14 at home visit 1 and 3.55±0.16 at home visit 4 (P<0.001; and, for the outcome Knowledge: Treatment Regimen, 2.33±0.13 at home visit 1 and 3.59±0.14 at home visit 4 (P<0.001. The correlation between the Knowledge Questionnaire and the Nursing Outcomes Classification scores was strong at home visit 1 (r=0.7, P<0.01, but weak and non significant at visit 4.CONCLUSION: the results show improved patient knowledge of heart failure and a strong correlation between Nursing Outcomes Classification indicator scores and Knowledge Questionnaire scores. The NOC Nursing Outcomes proved effective as knowledge assessment measures when compared with the validated instrument.

  14. Rehabilitation services after the implementation of the nursing home prospective payment system: differences related to patient and nursing home characteristics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murray, Patrick K; Love, Thomas E; Dawson, Neal V; Thomas, Charles L; Cebul, Randall D

    2005-11-01

    The prospective payment system (PPS) for nursing homes was designed to curtail the rapid expansion of Medicare costs for skilled nursing care. This study examines the changes that occurred in nursing home patients and rehabilitation services following the PPS. Free-standing Medicare and/or Medicaid certified nursing homes in Ohio. The percent of new admissions receiving therapy and the amount of rehabilitation therapy provided. A total of 7006 first admissions in 1994-6 (pre-PPS) and 61,569 first admissions in 2000-1 (post-PPS). A logistic model predicting likelihood of rehabilitation was developed and validated in pre-PPS admissions and applied to the post-PPS patients. Rehabilitation services were compared in the pre-PPS and post-PPS cohorts overall, stratified by quintile of predicted score, diagnosis group, and by nursing home profit status. Post-PPS patients had less cognitive impairment, more depression, and more family support. The amount of rehabilitation services declined the most in the higher quintiles of predicted likelihood of rehabilitation and among patients with stroke. The percent of patients receiving rehabilitation services increased the most in the lowest quintile and among patients with medical conditions. These changes were greater in for-profit nursing homes. The implementation of the PPS in nursing homes has been associated with a decrease in the amount of rehabilitation services, targeted at those predicted to receive higher amounts and an increased frequency of providing services targeted at those predicted to be less likely to receive them. The outcomes of the changes deserve further study.

  15. [Home parenteral nutrition for terminal stage of cancer patient].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takamura, S; Sakuyama, T; Nakamura, Y; Takahashi, N; Hattori, M

    1997-12-01

    In the last 6 years, we have experienced 20 cancer patients who received home parenteral nutrition for terminal stage. The patients had 13 gastric cancers, 3 esophageal cancers and 5 others. The prognosis of upper G-I cancer is known to be poorer than that of colon cancer. The home care of our cases, the gastric cancer lasted 25 days on average, which was shorter than others. So the home care for patients in the terminal stage of gastric cancer is very short. Therefore we decide the home care for the terminal stage of gastric cancer as soon as possible. We conducted a questionnaire survey of our cases and family. We finally found that the most important thing is the safety of patient for the maintenance of home care. Our home care system is made up of a 3-way relationship among the patient, support system and doctor. The doctor is on call for the problems of the patient for 24 hours. Therefore, we believe that this system is comfortable for both the patient and family.

  16. Home noninvasive ventilatory support for patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease : patient selection and perspectives

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Storre, Jan Hendrik; Callegari, Jens; Magnet, Friederike Sophie; Schwarz, Sarah Bettina; Duiverman, Marieke Leontine; Wijkstra, Peter Jan; Windisch, Wolfram

    2018-01-01

    Long-term or home mechanical noninvasive ventilation (Home-NIV) has become a well-established form of therapy over the last few decades for chronic hypercapnic COPD patients in European countries. However, meta-analyses and clinical guidelines do not recommend Home-NIV for COPD patients on a routine

  17. Perceptions on use of home telemonitoring in patients with long term conditions - concordance with the Health Information Technology Acceptance Model: a qualitative collective case study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Middlemass, Jo B; Vos, Jolien; Siriwardena, A Niroshan

    2017-06-26

    Health information technology (HIT) may be used to improve care for increasing numbers of older people with long term conditions (LTCs) who make high demands on health and social care services. Despite its potential benefits for reducing disease exacerbations and hospitalisations, HIT home monitoring is not always accepted by patients. Using the Health Information Technology Acceptance Model (HITAM) this qualitative study examined the usefulness of the model for understanding acceptance of HIT in older people (≥60 years) participating in a RCT for older people with Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease (COPD) and associated heart diseases (CHROMED). An instrumental, collective case study design was used with qualitative interviews of patients in the intervention arm of CHROMED. These were conducted at two time points, one shortly after installation of equipment and again at the end of (or withdrawal from) the study. We used Framework Analysis to examine how well the HITAM accounted for the data. Participants included 21 patients aged between 60-99 years and their partners or relatives where applicable. Additional concepts for the HITAM for older people included: concerns regarding health professional access and attachment; heightened illness anxiety and desire to avoid continuation of the 'sick-role'. In the technology zone, HIT self-efficacy was associated with good organisational processes and informal support; while ease of use was connected to equipment design being suitable for older people. HIT perceived usefulness was related to establishing trends in health status, detecting early signs of infection and potential to self-manage. Due to limited feedback to users opportunities to self-manage were reduced. HITAM helped understand the likelihood that older people with LTCs would use HIT, but did not explain how this might result in improved self-management. In order to increase HIT acceptance among older people, equipment design and organisational factors

  18. Self-transcendence and nurse-patient interaction in cognitively intact nursing home patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haugan, Gørill; Rannestad, Toril; Hanssen, Brith; Espnes, Geir A

    2012-12-01

    The aim of this study was to test whether nurse-patient interaction affects cognitively intact nursing home patients' interpersonal and intrapersonal self-transcendence, as well as testing the psychometric properties of the Nurse-Patient Interaction Scale (NPIS). Self-transcendence is considered a spiritual developmental process of maturity in adulthood, and a vital resource of well-being at the end of life. The concept of self-transcendence has previously been explored in various populations, yet the nurse-patient interactions' potential influence on self-transcendence in nursing home patients has not been published previously. A cross-sectional design employing the Self-Transcendence Scale and the NPIS was adopted. A sample of 202 cognitively well-functioning nursing home patients in Norway was selected. The statistical analyses were carried out using lisrel 8.8 and structural equation modelling. Structural equation modelling-analysis indicates statistical significant effect of nurse-patient interaction on the patients' self-transcendence. Direct influence on the intrapersonal and indirect influence on the interpersonal self-transcendence aspects was disclosed. Nurse-patient interaction significantly affected both interpersonal and intrapersonal self-transcendence among cognitively intact nursing home patients. Hence, facilitating caring interventions can be significantly beneficial to older patients' self-transcendence and thereby well-being, both emotional and physical. Caring behaviour signifies the vital and ultimate qualitative nursing behaviour, which promotes self-transcendence and thereby well-being. These findings are important for clinical nursing that intends to increase patients' well-being. © 2012 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  19. Safe medication management in specialized home healthcare - an observational study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lindblad, Marléne; Flink, Maria; Ekstedt, Mirjam

    2017-08-24

    Medication management is a complex, error-prone process. The aim of this study was to explore what constitutes the complexity of the medication management process (MMP) in specialized home healthcare and how healthcare professionals handle this complexity. The study is theoretically based in resilience engineering. Data were collected during the MMP at three specialized home healthcare units in Sweden using two strategies: observation of workplaces and shadowing RNs in everyday work, including interviews. Transcribed material was analysed using grounded theory. The MMP in home healthcare was dynamic and complex with unclear boundaries of responsibilities, inadequate information systems and fluctuating work conditions. Healthcare professionals adapted their everyday clinical work by sharing responsibility and simultaneously being authoritative and preserving patients' active participation, autonomy and integrity. To promote a safe MMP, healthcare professionals constantly re-prioritized goals, handled gaps in communication and information transmission at a distance by creating new bridging solutions. Trade-offs and workarounds were necessary elements, but also posed a threat to patient safety, as these interim solutions were not systematically evaluated or devised learning strategies. To manage a safe medication process in home healthcare, healthcare professionals need to adapt to fluctuating conditions and create bridging strategies through multiple parallel activities distributed over time, space and actors. The healthcare professionals' strategies could be integrated in continuous learning, while preserving boundaries of safety, instead of being more or less interim solutions. Patients' and family caregivers' as active partners in the MMP may be an underestimated resource for a resilient home healthcare.

  20. Patient Reported Outcomes in a New Home-Based Rehabilitation Programme for Prostate Cancer Patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Villumsen, Brigitta R; Jørgensen, Martin Grønbech; Frystyk, Jan

    2015-01-01

    The most optimal exercise plan for men with prostate cancer (PC) receiving androgen deprivation therapy needs to be identified. We plan to investigate a 12-week home-based health programme (exergaming) on physical function, fatigue and metabolic parameters in this group. In addition, our study...... will explore the satisfaction and experience with the health game programme. To the best of our knowledge this is the first RCT study to investigate the effect of a home based health game programme on PC patients. No statistical analysis have been made thus far because inclusion is ongoing, however baseline...

  1. Barriers and facilitators to providing primary care-based weight management services in a patient centered medical home for Veterans: a qualitative study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jay, Melanie; Chintapalli, Sumana; Squires, Allison; Mateo, Katrina F; Sherman, Scott E; Kalet, Adina L

    2015-11-14

    Obesity is highly prevalent among Veterans. In the United States, the Veterans Health Administration (VHA) offers a comprehensive weight management program called MOVE!. Yet, fewer than 10 % of eligible patients ever attend one MOVE! visit. The VHA has a patient-centered medical home (PCMH) model of primary care (PC) called Patient-Aligned Care Teams (PACT) at all Veterans Affairs (VA) Medical Centers. PACT teamlets conduct obesity screening, weight management counseling, and refer to MOVE!. As part of a needs assessment to improve delivery of weight management services, the purpose of this study was to assess PACT teamlet and MOVE! staff: 1) current attitudes and perceptions regarding obesity care; 2) obesity-related counseling practices 3) experiences with the MOVE! program; and 4) targets for interventions to improve implementation of obesity care in the PC setting. We recruited 25 PACT teamlet members from a single VA study site-11 PC physicians, 5 registered nurses, 5 licensed practical nurses, 1 clerical assistant, and 3 MOVE! staff (2 dietitians, 1 psychologist)-for individual interviews using a combination of convenience and snowball sampling. Audio recorded interviews were professionally transcribed and iteratively coded by two independent reviewers. The analytic process was guided by discourse analysis in order to discover how the participants perceived and provided weight management care and what specific attitudes affected their practices, all as bounded within the organization. Emerging themes included: 1) role perceptions, 2) anticipated outcomes of weight management counseling and programs, and 3) communication and information dissemination. Perceived role among PCPs was influenced by training, whereas personal experience with their own weight management impacted role perception among LPNs/RNs. Attitudes about whether or not they could impact patients' weight outcomes via counseling or referral to MOVE! varied. System-level communication about VHA

  2. Home hemodialysis: a comprehensive review of patient-centered and economic considerations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Walker RC

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Rachael C Walker,1,2 Kirsten Howard,1 Rachael L Morton3 1School of Public Health, Sydney Medical School, University of Sydney, Sydney, Australia; 2Hawke’s Bay District Health Board, Hastings, New Zealand; 3NHMRC Clinical Trials Centre, Sydney Medical School, University of Sydney, Sydney, Australia Abstract: Internationally, the number of patients requiring treatment for end-stage kidney disease (ESKD continues to increase, placing substantial burden on health systems and patients. Home hemodialysis (HD has fluctuated in its popularity, and the rates of home HD vary considerably between and within countries although there is evidence suggesting a number of clinical, survival, economic, and quality of life (QoL advantages associated with this treatment. International guidelines encourage shared decision making between patients and clinicians for the type of dialysis, with an emphasis on a treatment that aligned to the patients’ lifestyle. This is a comprehensive literature review of patient-centered and economic impacts of home HD with the studies published between January 2000 and July 2016. Data from the primary studies representing both efficiency and equity of home HD were presented as a narrative synthesis under the following topics: advantages to patients, barriers to patients, economic factors influencing patients, cost-effectiveness of home HD, and inequities in home HD delivery. There were a number of advantages for patients on home HD including improved survival and QoL and flexibility and potential for employment, compared to hospital HD. Similarly, there were several barriers to patients preferring or maintaining home HD, and the strategies to overcome these barriers were frequently reported. Good evidence reported that indigenous, low-income, and other socially disadvantaged individuals had reduced access to home HD compared to other forms of dialysis and that this situation compounds already-poor health outcomes on renal

  3. Nursing Home Cost Studies and Reimbursement Issues

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bishop, Christine E.

    1980-01-01

    This review of nursing home cost function research shows that certain provider and service characteristics are systematically associated with differences in the average cost of care. This information can be used to group providers for reasonable cost related rate-setting or to adjust their rates or rate ceilings. However, relationships between average cost and such service characteristics as patient mix, service intensity, and quality of care have not been fully delineated. Therefore, econometric cost functions cannot yet provide rate-setters with predictions about the cost of the efficient provision of nursing home care appropriate to patient needs. In any case, the design of reimbursement systems must be founded not only on technical information but also on public policy goals for long-term care. PMID:10309223

  4. Nursing home cost studies and reimbursement issues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bishop, C E

    1980-01-01

    This review of nursing home cost function research shows that certain provider and service characteristics are systematically associated with differences in the average cost of care. This information can be used to group providers for reasonable cost related rate-setting or to adjust their rates or rate ceilings. However, relationships between average cost and such service characteristics as patient mix, service intensity, and quality of care have not been fully delineated. Therefore, econometric cost functions cannot yet provide rate-setters with predictions about the cost of the efficient provision of nursing home care appropriate to patient needs. In any case, the design of reimbursement systems must be founded not only on technical information but also on public policy goals for long-term care.

  5. Home sleep studies in the assessment of sleep apnea/hypopnea syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Golpe, Rafael; Jiménez, Antonio; Carpizo, Rosario

    2002-10-01

    To determine the clinical utility of a limited sleep-recording device used unsupervised in the patient's home, compared with in-laboratory, fully supervised polysomnography for the diagnosis of sleep apnea/hypopnea syndrome (SAHS), and to assess its impact on costs. Prospective case study. The sleep-disorders unit of a tertiary referral university hospital. Fifty-five patients suspected of having SAHS and living within 30 km of our laboratory. Patients were studied first in their homes with the limited sleep-recording device. Polysomnography was performed within 30 days of the first study. Both studies were read by independent investigators blinded to the results of the other study. Diagnoses and therapeutic decisions regarding the use of continuous positive airway pressure obtained from the home and laboratory studies were compared. Agreement between the home and laboratory study recordings was also assessed using receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curves and Bland-Altman analysis. One half of the home studies were randomly assigned to be performed with a sleep technician's set up of the equipment in the patient's home (group 1), and the other half with the patient's own setup of the sleep-recording device (group 2), after an instruction period in the hospital. An economic analysis was performed, considering the cost of repeating studies in cases with faulty or inconclusive home studies (these patients should undergo polysomnography as a second step). Seven percent of the home studies in group 1, and 33% in group 2 produced no interpretable data because of artifacts (p home study findings were inconclusive. The diagnosis obtained from the limited sleep-recording device and polysomnography agreed in 75% of the interpretable home studies (89%, if inconclusive home studies were excluded). The area under the ROC curve for the home study-derived parameters was between 0.84 and 0.89, compared with polysomnography. There was no bias between home and polysomnography

  6. Creation of complexity assessment tool for patients receiving home care

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Leopoldina de Castro Villas Bôas

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract OBJECTIVE To create and validate a complexity assessment tool for patients receiving home care from a public health service. METHOD A diagnostic accuracy study, with estimates for the tool's validity and reliability. Measurements of sensitivity and specificity were considered when producing validity estimates. The resulting tool was used for testing. Assessment by a specialized team of home care professionals was used as the gold standard. In the tool's reliability study, the authors used the Kappa statistic. The tool's sensitivity and specificity were analyzed using various cut-off points. RESULTS On the best cut-off point-21-with the gold standard, a sensitivity of 75.5% was obtained, with the limits of confidence interval (95% at 68.3% and 82.8% and specificity of 53.2%, with the limits of confidence interval (95% at 43.8% and 62.7%. CONCLUSION The tool presented evidence of validity and reliability, possibly helping in service organization at patient admission, care type change, or support during the creation of care plans.

  7. Legionnaires' Disease acquired within the homes of two patients: link to the home water supply

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stout, J.E.; Yu, V.L.; Muraca, P.

    1987-01-01

    Two patients with sporadic community-acquired legionnaires' disease are described. Legionella pneumophila was isolated from sputum specimens, and seroconversion of antibody titers was demonstrated for both patients. Legionella pneumophila was also recovered from the residential water supply of both patients. In each case, the serogroup of the environmental organism matched that of the infecting organism. In one patient, serogroup 3 was isolated - a rare cause of legionnaires' disease, and in the second case, monoclonal antibody testing confirmed that the serogroup 1 organisms isolated from sputum and residential water supply samples were identical. The incubation period of legionnaires' disease is presumed to be up to two weeks. Because of medical problems, both patients had been confined to their homes for the entire two weeks before the onset of symptoms. This is the first report that links acquisition of community-acquired legionnaires' disease to contaminated water supplies within the homes of susceptible patients

  8. Cost-effectiveness of the Australian Medical Sheepskin for the prevention of pressure ulcers in somatic nursing home patients: study protocol for a prospective multi-centre randomised controlled trial (ISRCTN17553857

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Montgomery Ken

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Pressure ulcers are a major problem, especially in nursing home patients, although they are regarded as preventable and there are many pressure relieving methods and materials. One such pressure relieving material is the recently developed Australian Medical Sheepskin, which has been shown in two randomized controlled trials 12 to be an effective intervention in the prevention of sacral pressure ulcers in hospital patients. However, the use of sheepskins has been debated and in general discouraged by most pressure ulcer working groups and pressure ulcer guidelines, but these debates were based on old forms of sheepskins. Furthermore, nothing is yet known about the (cost-effectiveness of the Australian Medical sheepskin in nursing home patients. The objective of this study is to assess the effects and costs of the use of the Australian Medical Sheepskin combined with usual care with regard to the prevention of sacral pressure ulcers in somatic nursing home patients, versus usual care only. Methods/Design In a multi-centre randomised controlled trial 750 patients admitted for a primarily somatic reason to one of the five participating nursing homes, and not having pressure ulcers on the sacrum at admission, will be randomized to either usual care only or usual care plus the use of the Australian Medical Sheepskin as an overlay on the mattress. Outcome measures are: incidence of sacral pressure ulcers in the first month after admission; sacrum pressure ulcer free days; costs; patient comfort; and ease of use. The skin of all the patients will be observed once a day from admission on for 30 days. Patient characteristics and pressure risk scores are assessed at admission and at day 30 after it. Additional to the empirical phase, systematic reviews will be performed in order to obtain data for economic weighting and modelling. The protocol is registered in the Controlled Trial Register as ISRCTN17553857.

  9. Cost-effectiveness of the Australian Medical Sheepskin for the prevention of pressure ulcers in somatic nursing home patients: study protocol for a prospective multi-centre randomised controlled trial (ISRCTN17553857).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mistiaen, Patriek; Achterberg, Wilco; Ament, Andre; Halfens, Ruud; Huizinga, Janneke; Montgomery, Ken; Post, Henri; Francke, Anneke L

    2008-01-07

    Pressure ulcers are a major problem, especially in nursing home patients, although they are regarded as preventable and there are many pressure relieving methods and materials. One such pressure relieving material is the recently developed Australian Medical Sheepskin, which has been shown in two randomized controlled trials 12 to be an effective intervention in the prevention of sacral pressure ulcers in hospital patients. However, the use of sheepskins has been debated and in general discouraged by most pressure ulcer working groups and pressure ulcer guidelines, but these debates were based on old forms of sheepskins. Furthermore, nothing is yet known about the (cost-)effectiveness of the Australian Medical sheepskin in nursing home patients. The objective of this study is to assess the effects and costs of the use of the Australian Medical Sheepskin combined with usual care with regard to the prevention of sacral pressure ulcers in somatic nursing home patients, versus usual care only. In a multi-centre randomised controlled trial 750 patients admitted for a primarily somatic reason to one of the five participating nursing homes, and not having pressure ulcers on the sacrum at admission, will be randomized to either usual care only or usual care plus the use of the Australian Medical Sheepskin as an overlay on the mattress. Outcome measures are: incidence of sacral pressure ulcers in the first month after admission; sacrum pressure ulcer free days; costs; patient comfort; and ease of use. The skin of all the patients will be observed once a day from admission on for 30 days. Patient characteristics and pressure risk scores are assessed at admission and at day 30 after it. Additional to the empirical phase, systematic reviews will be performed in order to obtain data for economic weighting and modelling. The protocol is registered in the Controlled Trial Register as ISRCTN17553857.

  10. Which cancer patients are referred to hospital at home for palliative care?

    OpenAIRE

    Grande, G. E.; McKerral, A.; Todd, C. J.

    2002-01-01

    Previous research has shown that palliative home care use is influenced by variables such as age, socioeconomic status, presence of an informal carer, diagnosis, and care dependency. However, there is little information on its association with other health service use. This study compared 121 cancer patients referred to Hospital at Home (HAH) for palliative care with a sample of 206 cancer patients not referred who died within the same period. Electronic record linkage of NHS databases enable...

  11. Agency ownership, patient payment source, and length of service in home care, 1992 2000.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Beth; McAuley, William J; Remsburg, Robin E

    2007-08-01

    Little is known about whether an association exists between agency ownership and length of service among home care patients with different payment sources. This study investigated how for-profit and not-for-profit agencies responded to policy changes in the 1990s with respect to length of service. We examined length of service among 37,364 home care patients using the 1992, 1994, 1996, 1998, and 2000 National Home and Hospice Care Surveys. We used Kaplan-Meier methods and Cox regression models. After we adjusted for patient and agency characteristics, our results revealed that agency ownership was not associated with length of service for patients with private insurance, Medicare, Medicaid, Medicare plus Medicaid, or Medicare plus private insurance. This finding was consistent from 1992 through 2000. Length of service among patients with Medicare decreased significantly from 1998 through 2000, but length of service among patients with Medicaid did not change significantly from 1992 through 2000. Agency ownership is not associated with patient length of service in home care. Regardless of the policy changes in the home care arena in the 1990s, for-profit and not-for-profit home health agencies behaved similarly with regard to length of service among patients within differently structured payment systems.

  12. A comparative study of a new wireless continuous cardiorespiratory monitor for the diagnosis and management of patients with congestive heart failure at home.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andrews, D; Gouda, M S; Higgins, S; Johnson, P; Williams, A; Vandenburg, M

    2002-01-01

    Congestive heart failure (CHF) is a major and increasing chronic disease in Western society, with a high mortality, morbidity and cost for unplanned hospital admissions. Continuous cardiorespiratory monitoring is required to detect Cheyne-Stokes respiration (CSR). We have tested a new wireless monitoring system and compared it with polysomnography (PSG) and respiratory inductance plethysmography (RIP) in six CHF patients with CSR in a sleep laboratory. The wireless system compared well with RIP for the detection of CSR but less well with PSG, which had unexpected but significant respiratory sensing errors that led to misclassification of the respiratory disorder present. The wireless system could be used to select CHF patients for better-customized treatment at home as part of a specialist-supported community telemedicine programme.

  13. Home delivery of medication - the role of a patient information leaflet on maximising service uptake.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watson, L; Ahmed, N; Mccall, H; Minton, J; Benn, P; Edwards, S; Waters, L

    2014-12-01

    There are currently over 30,000 HIV-positive individuals in London and over 25,000 on anti-retroviral therapy. In 2009/2010, this equated to £170m spent by London's NHS on anti-retroviral drugs. Ways employed to reduce this cost include standardising the drugs patients are on and delivering medication to patients at home. Home delivery (HD) medication is exempt from value-added tax. The savings made from 10 patients using the home delivery service would free up resources to provide anti-retroviral therapy to one further patient. Studies have shown that concerns surrounding potential breaches of confidentiality are a potential barrier to some people using the home delivery service. In order to challenge these concerns, a leaflet was devised highlighting the major benefits to both the patient and the NHS of home delivery and addressing concerns over confidentiality. The leaflet was handed out to patients at the Mortimer Market Centre who were currently on anti-retroviral medication but not on home delivery. They were asked to complete a survey on their views of the service before and after reading the leaflet, whether they had been previously aware of the service and whether their concerns had been addressed. Some 79% felt that the patient information leaflet addressed all of their concerns, and it helped 11% decide whether to consider using home delivery. However, as more patients were opposed to the service after reading the patient information leaflet than those considering it, more work needs to be done to explore patients' concerns and other factors influencing home delivery service uptake. © The Author(s) 2014 Reprints and permissions: sagepub.co.uk/journalsPermissions.nav.

  14. Evaluating sociodemographic and medical conditions of patients under home care service

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tolga Önder

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Objective: In our study, we aimed to reveal medical conditions and the sociodemographic conditions of patients under home care service. Methods: Our study is planned on 52 patients who are under home care service at Sarıkamış State Hospital between June 2013 and May 2014. Patients' sex, education, social security status, comorbid diseases and general health status were recorded. Results: Fifty-two patients enrolled. 21 of them (40.4% were men, 31 of them (59.6 % were women. It is revealed that In 36 patients (69.2% did not receive formal education throughout their lives, while16 (30.8% of them had only primary education. All female patients were housewives. The most frequent diseases in home care patients were cerebrovascular disease in 18 (34.6% subjects, Alzheimer's disease in 9 (17.3%, and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease in 4 (7.7% d. 38 patients (73.1% needed routine follow-up. Most of the patients (61.5% had green card health insurance. Only 6 patients (11.5% were in need of narcotic analgesics. Thirteen patients had pressure ulcers due to immobilization. Evaluating the exercise capacity of the patients; 43 (82.7% could not dressed themselves, 38 (73.1% could not use phone. Thirty-two patients had urinary incontinence and 31 had fecal incontinence. Conclusion: Today, population of patients who need home care service is increasing due to ease access to home care service and increase in survival. For a better care of patients, home care providers should be well educated and differences on features of patients and medical conditions it should be taken into consideration.

  15. A System for Monitoring Stroke Patients in a Home Environment

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Klaassen, Bart; van Beijnum, Bernhard J.F.; Weusthof, Marcel H.H.; Hofs, D.H.W.; van Meulen, Fokke; Luinge, Hendrik J.; Lorussi, Frederico; Hermens, Hermanus J.; Veltink, Petrus H.

    2014-01-01

    Currently, the changes of functional capacity and performance of stroke patients after returning home from a rehabilitation hospital is unknown for a physician, having no objective information about the intensity and quality of a patient's daily-life activities. Therefore, there is a need to develop

  16. Care relationships at stake? Home healthcare professionals’ experiences with digital medicine dispensers – a qualitative study

    OpenAIRE

    Nakrem, Sigrid; Solbjør, Marit; Pettersen, Ida Nilstad; Kleiven, Hanne Hestvik

    2018-01-01

    Background Although digital technologies can mitigate the burdens of home healthcare services caused by an ageing population that lives at home longer with complex health problems, research on the impacts and consequences of digitalised remote communication between patients and caregivers is lacking. The present study explores how home healthcare professionals had experienced the introduction of digital medicine dispensers and their influence on patient-caregiver relationships. Methods...

  17. [Clinical evaluation of bedridden patients with pneumonia receiving home health care].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fukuyama, Hajime; Ishida, Tadashi; Tachibana, Hiromasa; Iga, Chiya; Nakagawa, Hiroaki; Ito, Akihiro; Ubukata, Satoshi; Yoshioka, Hiroshige; Arita, Machiko; Hashimoto, Toru

    2010-12-01

    Pneumonia which develops in patients while living in their own home is categorized as community-acquired pneumonia (CAP), even if these patients are bedridden and receiving home health care. However, because of the differences in patient backgrounds, we speculated that the clinical outcomes and pathogens of bedridden patients with pneumonia who are receiving home health care would be different from those of CAP. We conducted a prospective study of patients with CAP who were hospitalized at our hospital from April 2007 through September 2009. We compared home health care bedridden pneumonia (performance status 4, PS4-CAP) with non-PS4-CAP in a total of 505 enrolled patients in this study. Among these, 66 had PS4-CAP, mostly associated with aspiration. Severity scores, mortality rate, recurrence rate and length of hospital stay of those with PS4-CAP were significantly higher than those with non-PS4-CAP. Drug resistant pathogens were more frequently isolated from patients with PS4-CAP than from those of non-PS4-CAP. The results of patients with PS4-CAP were in agreement with those of previous health care-associated pneumonia (HCAP) reports. The present study suggested home health care bedridden pneumonia should be categorized as HCAP, not CAP.

  18. Massage therapy for home care patients using the health insurance system in Japan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kondo, H; Ogawa, S; Nishimura, H; Ono, A

    2018-02-01

    To clarify the status of home care massage services provided to patients. This will help in understanding how many patients utilize this service and the circumstances under which treatment is provided. A retrospective study. Fifty-four acupuncture, moxibustion, and massage clinics. Participants were patients who had received home care massage for six months or more. We collected a total of 1587 responses from these 54 massage clinics; of these, 1415 responses (mean age = 79.1 ± 11.5 years) were valid (valid response rate 89.2%). Actual patients and actual care services. The most common disorder observed among patients who utilized home care massage services was cerebrovascular disease (at approximately 36%), while the second most common were arthropathy-related disorders (16.3%). Although most patients received massage, approximately 30% received manual therapy (e.g. manual correction) and hot fomentation as part of thermotherapy. Notably, only around 10% of patients received massage alone; the majority received treatment in combination with range of motion and muscle-strengthening exercises. This study helped to clarify the actual state of patients receiving home care massage and the details of the massage services provided. This study clearly showed the treatment effectiveness of massage, which can be used by home medical care stakeholders to develop more effective interventions. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Home Enteral Nutrition therapy: Difficulties, satisfactions and support needs of caregivers assisting older patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jukic P, Nikolina; Gagliardi, Cristina; Fagnani, Donata; Venturini, Claudia; Orlandoni, Paolo

    2017-08-01

    The purpose of this study was to comprehend and describe the views, experiences and adaptations of caregivers who assist older patients treated with Home Enteral Nutrition. The objective was to gather empirical evidence to improve the delivery of Home Enteral Nutrition for old patients taking into account the caregivers' support needs. A qualitative methodology with focus groups as data collection method was used to collect the testimonies of 30 informal and formal caregivers of older patients treated with Home Enteral Nutrition by the Clinical Nutrition Service of INRCA (Ancona) during 2014. Quantitative methodology was used to collect socio-demographic data. Partially modified Silver's "Home Enteral Nutrition Caregiver Task Checklist" was used to identify training needs. The constant comparison method was used to code and categorize data and to develop themes of focus groups. Simple descriptive statistics were used to summarize questionnaires. Five main themes were identified from focus groups: acceptance of the therapy, skill acquisition process, need for psychological and practical support at home from healthcare professionals, lifestyle adaptation, affirmation of life and family. All caregivers testified the initial fear and refusal to manage the nutrition pump and the therapy. They expressed the need to be trained gradually, starting during a patient's hospitalization, and continuing in the community. With reference to their overall QoL, it emerged that informal caregivers suffered mostly from the reduction of their free time while formal caregivers suffered social isolation and psychological burden. For both groups the monthly home visit was the most important element of the HEN service. Informal caregivers highlighted the importance of having their loved ones at home. Unsatisfied training needs were identified by the modified Silver's "Home Enteral Nutrition Caregiver Task Checklist". This qualitative study underlined the challenges and adaptations of

  20. Medical home characteristics and the pediatric patient experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burnet, Deborah; Gunter, Kathryn E; Nocon, Robert S; Gao, Yue; Jin, Janel; Fairchild, Paige; Chin, Marshall H

    2014-11-01

    The patient-centered medical home (PCMH) has roots in pediatrics, yet we know little about the experience of pediatric patients in PCMH settings. To examine the association between clinic PCMH characteristics and pediatric patient experience as reported by parents. We assessed the cross-sectional correlation between clinic PCMH characteristics and pediatric patient experience in 24 clinics randomly selected from the Safety Net Medical Home Initiative, a 5-state PCMH demonstration project. PCMH characteristics were measured with surveys of randomly selected providers and staff; surveys generated 0 (worst) to 100 (best) scores for 5 subscales, and a total score. Patient experience was measured through surveying parents of pediatric patients. Questions from the Consumer Assessment of Healthcare Providers and Systems-Clinician and Group instrument produced 4 patient experience measures: timeliness, physician communication, staff helpfulness, and overall rating. To investigate the relationship between PCMH characteristics and patient experience, we used generalized estimating equations with an exchangeable correlation structure. We included 440 parents and 214 providers and staff in the analysis. Total PCMH score was not associated with parents' assessment of patient experience; however, PCMH subscales were associated with patient experience in different directions. In particular, quality improvement activities undertaken by clinics were strongly associated with positive ratings of patient experience, whereas patient care management activities were associated with more negative reports of patient experience. Future work should bolster features of the PCMH that work well for patients while investigating which PCMH features negatively impact patient experience, to yield a better patient experience overall.

  1. Effect of Nursing Home Staff Training on Quality of Patient Survival.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Linn, Margaret W.; And Others

    1989-01-01

    Assessed effects of nursing home staff training in care for the dying on quality of life of 306 terminally ill patients in 5 pairs of matched nursing homes assigned randomly to trained and not trained staff groups. Patients in trained homes had less depression and greater satisfaction with care than patients in control homes at 1 and 3 months.…

  2. Home care utilization and outcomes among Asian and other Canadian patients with heart failure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    King Kathryn M

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Heart failure (HF is a major cause of hospitalization and death in the aging population around the world. Home care utilization is associated with improved survival for the patients with HF, and varies by ethno-culture. The purpose of this study was to investigate the difference in hospital readmission rate and mortality between Asian and other Canadian HF patients. Methods HF patients were identified using hospital discharge abstracts from March 31, 2000 to April 1, 2006 in Calgary Health Region. Readmission and one-year mortality for HF were determined by linking hospital discharge and vital statistics data. Stratified by home care services use, readmission and mortality rates were compared between the Asians and other Canadians while controlling for age, sex, comorbidities, and household income. Results Of 26,171 HF patients discharged from hospital, 56.6% of Asians and 58.0% of other Canadians used home care services [adjusted odds ratio (OR for Asian: 0.84, 95% confidence interval (CI: 0.74-0.89]. The hospital readmission rate was similar between Asians and other Canadians regardless of home care services use. Mortality was similar between those who used home care services (adjusted OR for Asian: 0.96, 95% CI: 0.81-1.13. For patients who did not use home care services, Asians had significantly lower mortality than other Canadians (adjusted OR for Asian: 0.76, 95% CI: 0.60-0.86. Conclusion Mortality was similar between Asian and other Canadian patients when home care services were utilized. However, among those without home care, Asian patients had a significantly lower mortality than other Canadian patients.

  3. 'I try to make a net around each patient': home care nursing as relational practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bjornsdottir, Kristin

    2018-03-01

    As a result of restructuring, home care is increasingly defined in a narrow, task-based way, undermining the holistic nature of practice. Recent practice theories can aid us in articulating the nature of this important, yet often invisible practice. My aim in this article was to enhance our knowledge and understanding of the nature of home care nursing practice. The approach was ethnographic, involving extensive fieldwork and formal interviews with members of five home care nursing teams and 15 older persons receiving care at home in a metropolitan area of Iceland. The study was approved by the National Bioethics Committee. As a net of services, home care was enacted through relational, but often invisible care practices, relating different actors - patient, family and health-care and social-care workers - in doing the work needed for the older persons to live comfortably at home. The work was collective in that it was shared by different actors and motivated by a common understanding that had developed and was preserved in conversations in the teams. Although the findings are limited in that they only reflect home care as practiced in one neighbourhood, they can be seen as providing important insights into what is needed for home care services to work. Home care practice can be understood as relational, aimed at creating a net of needed assistance. This work is a collective accomplishment of the teams and shaped by ideals and values shared among team members. © 2017 Nordic College of Caring Science.

  4. [Indoor air studies of mould fungus contamination of homes of selected patients with bronchial asthma (with special regard to evaluation problems)].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Senkpiel, K; Kurowski, V; Ohgke, H

    1996-02-01

    Investigations of indoor air of the homes of seven patients with asthma bronchiale who showed up with positive reactions following intracutaneous application of fungal allergens revealed that their places of residence were contaminated by fungal and bacterial spores. The number of colony forming units of mesophilic fungal spores of the indoor air ranged from 100 to 1000 CFU/m3 and this was much higher than the mould flora of the outdoor air determined simultaneously. The major fungi species found by the indoor investigation were: Penicillium sp. > Aspergillus sp. > Cladosporium sp., Mucor sp., Chrysonilia sp., Verticillium sp. > Geotrichum sp., Trichoderma sp. In two cases Thermoactinomyces species could be detected in the indoor air. The main cause of fungal contamination were moist building materials on room walls, insufficient air ventilation, bad maintenance of the circulating air-machines and insufficient room hygiene (e.g. biological garbage in the kitchen).

  5. Home-based specialized palliative care in patients with advanced cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nordly, Mie; Vadstrup, Eva Soelberg; Sjøgren, Per

    2016-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: Due to an urgent need for specialized palliative care (SPC) for patients with advanced cancer, an overview of available information on organization and outcomes of home-based SPC would be valuable. Our systematic review aims to give an overview of available information...... on the organization and outcomes of home-based SPC for patients with advanced cancer. Outcomes related to place of death, survival time, quality of life, performance status, and symptom management are included. METHOD: A PICO process search strategy consisting of terms related to cancer, palliation, and home care...... for patients with advanced cancer, resulting in poor information and a lack of evidence. Generally, home-based SPC seems to have some positive effect on pain and dyspnea, but more high-quality studies are required....

  6. Implementing the patient-centered medical home in residency education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doolittle, Benjamin R; Tobin, Daniel; Genao, Inginia; Ellman, Matthew; Ruser, Christopher; Brienza, Rebecca

    2015-01-01

    In recent years, physician groups, government agencies and third party payers in the United States of America have promoted a Patient-centered Medical Home (PCMH) model that fosters a team-based approach to primary care. Advocates highlight the model's collaborative approach where physicians, mid-level providers, nurses and other health care personnel coordinate their efforts with an aim for high-quality, efficient care. Early studies show improvement in quality measures, reduction in emergency room visits and cost savings. However, implementing the PCMH presents particular challenges to physician training programs, including institutional commitment, infrastructure expenditures and faculty training. Teaching programs must consider how the objectives of the PCMH model align with recent innovations in resident evaluation now required by the Accreditation Council of Graduate Medical Education (ACGME) in the US. This article addresses these challenges, assesses the preliminary success of a pilot project, and proposes a viable, realistic model for implementation at other institutions.

  7. Home healthcare services in Taiwan: a nationwide study among the older population

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lai Hsiu-Yun

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Home healthcare services are important in aging societies worldwide. The present nationwide study of health insurance data examined the utilization and delivery patterns, including diagnostic indications, for home healthcare services used by seniors in Taiwan. Methods Patients ≥65 years of age who received home healthcare services during 2004 under the Taiwanese National Health Insurance Program were identified and reimbursement claims were analyzed. Age, gender, disease diagnoses, distribution of facilities providing home healthcare services, and patterns of professional visits, including physician and skilled nursing visits, were also explored. Results Among 2,104,978 beneficiaries ≥65 years of age, 19,483 (0.9% patients received 127,753 home healthcare visits during 2004 with a mean number of 6.0 ± 4.8 visits per person. The highest prevalence of home healthcare services was in the 75-84 year age group in both sexes. Females received more home healthcare services than males in all age groups. Cerebrovascular disease was the most frequent diagnosis in these patients (50.7%. More than half of home healthcare visits and around half of the professional home visits were provided by community home nursing care institutions. The majority of the home skilled nursing services were tube replacements, including nasogastric tubes, Foley catheter, tracheostomy, nephrostomy or cystostomy tubes (95%. Conclusions Nine out of 1,000 older patients in Taiwan received home healthcare services during 2004, which was much lower than the rate of disabled older people in Taiwan. Females used home healthcare services more frequently than males and the majority of skilled nursing services were tube replacements. The rate of tube replacement of home healthcare patients in Taiwan deserves to be paid more attention.

  8. Social participation in home-living patients with mild Alzheimer's disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, Lisbeth Villemoes; Waldorff, Frans Boch; Waldemar, Gunhild

    2007-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate social participation in home-living patients with mild Alzheimer's disease (AD) and to identify predictors for low social participation. The study was based on baseline data from 330 home-living patients with mild AD who participated in The Danish...... Alzheimer Intervention Study (DAISY). Proxy-obtained information from primary caregiver assessed patients' social participation. The result showed that low social participation was present in mild AD. Significant independent predictors of low social participation were impairment in activities of daily...

  9. Qualitative analysis and conceptual mapping of patient experiences in home health care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lines, Lisa M; Anderson, Wayne L; Blackmon, Brian D; Pronier, Cristalle R; Allen, Rachael W; Kenyon, Anne E

    2018-01-01

    This study explored patient experiences in home health care through a literature review, focus groups, and interviews. Our goal was to develop a conceptual map of home health care patient experience domains. The conceptual map identifies technical and personal spheres of care, relating prior studies to new focus group and interview findings and identifying the most important domains of care. Study participants (n = 35) most frequently reported the most important domain as staff who are caring, supportive, patient, empathetic, respectful, and considerate (endorsed by 29% of participants). The conceptual map includes 114 discrete domains.

  10. The prognosis of incurable cachectic cancer patients on home parenteral nutrition

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bozzetti, F; Santarpia, L; Pironi, L

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The role of home parenteral nutrition (HPN) in incurable cachectic cancer patients unable to eat is extremely controversial. The aim of this study is to analyse which factors can influence the outcome. PATIENTS AND METHODS: We studied prospectively 414 incurable cachectic (sub)obstruc...

  11. Administration of care to older patients in transition from hospital to home care services: home nursing leaders' experiences

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dale B

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Bjørg Dale,1 Sigrun Hvalvik21Centre for Caring Research – Southern Norway, Faculty of Health and Sport Sciences, University of Agder, Grimstad, 2Centre for Caring Research – Southern Norway, Faculty of Health and Social Studies, Telemark University College, Porsgrunn, NorwayBackground: Older persons in transition between hospital and home care services are in a particularly vulnerable situation and risk unfortunate consequences caused by organizational inefficiency. The purpose of the study reported here was to elucidate how home nursing leaders experience the administration of care to older people in transition from hospital to their own homes.Methods: A qualitative study design was used. Ten home nursing leaders in two municipalities in southern Norway participated in individual interviews. The interview texts were audio taped, transcribed verbatim and analyzed by use of a phenomenological-hermeneutic approach.Results: Three main themes and seven subthemes were deduced from the data. The first main theme was that the home nursing leaders felt challenged by the organization of home care services. Two subthemes were identified related to this. The first was that the leaders lacked involvement in the transitional process, and the second was that they were challenged by administration of care being decided at another level in the municipality. The second main theme found was that the leaders felt that they were acting in a shifting and unsettled context. Related to this, they had to adjust internal resources to external demands and expectations, and experienced lack of communication with significant others. The third main theme identified was that the leaders endeavored to deliver care in accordance with professional values. The two related subthemes were, first, that they provided for appropriate internal systems and routines, and, second, that they prioritized available professional competence, and made an effort to promote a professional

  12. Using Sensors to Study Home Activities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jie Jiang

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Understanding home activities is important in social research to study aspects of home life, e.g., energy-related practices and assisted living arrangements. Common approaches to identifying which activities are being carried out in the home rely on self-reporting, either retrospectively (e.g., interviews, questionnaires, and surveys or at the time of the activity (e.g., time use diaries. The use of digital sensors may provide an alternative means of observing activities in the home. For example, temperature, humidity and light sensors can report on the physical environment where activities occur, while energy monitors can report information on the electrical devices that are used to assist the activities. One may then be able to infer from the sensor data which activities are taking place. However, it is first necessary to calibrate the sensor data by matching it to activities identified from self-reports. The calibration involves identifying the features in the sensor data that correlate best with the self-reported activities. This in turn requires a good measure of the agreement between the activities detected from sensor-generated data and those recorded in self-reported data. To illustrate how this can be done, we conducted a trial in three single-occupancy households from which we collected data from a suite of sensors and from time use diaries completed by the occupants. For sensor-based activity recognition, we demonstrate the application of Hidden Markov Models with features extracted from mean-shift clustering and change points analysis. A correlation-based feature selection is also applied to reduce the computational cost. A method based on Levenshtein distance for measuring the agreement between the activities detected in the sensor data and that reported by the participants is demonstrated. We then discuss how the features derived from sensor data can be used in activity recognition and how they relate to activities recorded in time

  13. Telemonitoring of home exercise cycle training in patients with COPD

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Franke KJ

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Karl-Josef Franke,1,2 Ulrike Domanski,1 Maik Schroeder,1 Volker Jansen,3 Frank Artmann,4 Uwe Weber,5 Rainer Ettler,6 Georg Nilius1,2 1Department of Pneumology and Critical Care Medicine, Helios Klinik Ambrock, Hagen, 2Witten/Herdecke University, Witten, 3Lung Practice Jansen, Menden, 4Aeroprax Wuppertal, Wuppertal, 5Lung Practice Witten, Witten, 6Lung Practice Ettler, Hagen, Germany Background: Regular physical activity is associated with reduced mortality in patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD. Interventions to reduce time spent in sedentary behavior could improve outcomes. The primary purpose was to investigate the impact of telemonitoring with supportive phone calls on daily exercise times with newly established home exercise bicycle training. The secondary aim was to examine the potential improvement in health-related quality of life and physical activity compared to baseline. Methods: This prospective crossover-randomized study was performed over 6 months in stable COPD patients. The intervention phase (domiciliary training with supporting telephone calls and the control phase (training without phone calls were randomly assigned to the first or the last 3 months. In the intervention phase, patients were called once a week if they did not achieve a real-time monitored daily cycle time of 20 minutes. Secondary aims were evaluated at baseline and after 3 and 6 months. Health-related quality of life was measured by the COPD Assessment Test (CAT, physical activity by the Godin Leisure Time Exercise Questionnaire (GLTEQ. Results: Of the 53 included patients, 44 patients completed the study (forced expiratory volume in 1 second 47.5%±15.8% predicted. In the intervention phase, daily exercise time was significantly higher compared to the control phase (24.2±9.4 versus 19.6±10.3 minutes. Compared to baseline (17.6±6.1, the CAT-score improved in the intervention phase to 15.3±7.6 and in the control phase to 15.7±7.3

  14. Comorbidity of depression and anxiety in nursing home patients

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Smalbrugge, M.; Jongenelis, L.; Pot, A.M.; Beekman, A.T.F.; Eefsting, J.A.

    2005-01-01

    Objectives: To assess the occurrence and risk indicators of depression, anxiety, and comorbid anxiety and depression among nursing home patients and to determine whether depression and anxiety are best described in a dimensional or in a categorical classification system. Methods: DSM and

  15. Home

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    Military Commission Seal VWAP Login Home Go ABOUT US Organization Overview Organizational Chart Families VWAP Login CCTV Sites Travel Media MC News CCTV Sites Travel Today at OMC Home Today at OMC Daily

  16. Wound healing and all-cause mortality in 958 wound patients treated in home care

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zarchi, Kian; Martinussen, Torben; Jemec, Gregor B. E.

    2015-01-01

    to investigate wound healing and all-cause mortality associated with different types of skin wounds. Consecutive skin wound patients who received wound care by home-care nurses from January 2010 to December 2011 in a district in Eastern Denmark were included in this study. Patients were followed until wound...... healing, death, or the end of follow-up on December 2012. In total, 958 consecutive patients received wound care by home-care nurses, corresponding to a 1-year prevalence of 1.2% of the total population in the district. During the study, wound healing was achieved in 511 (53.3%), whereas 90 (9.4%) died...

  17. Welcoming Home the Patient with a New Ostomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walker, Cynthia A; Rau, Lou Ann; Green, Mary Phyllis

    2015-01-01

    The 5-day average inpatient hospital length-of-stay postostomy limits opportunities for patients and family members to master self-care of the new ostomy prior to discharge. The literature suggests premature discharge, poor care coordination, lack of symptom reporting and follow-up as the primary factors supporting causes of readmissions. Home care nurses are faced with failed handoffs, limited resources, poor care coordination, payor restrictions, and knowledge and skill deficits that negatively impact safe and effective discharge practices of patients with a new ostomy. This article describes an evolving community standard related to nursing care of the patient with a new ostomy as identified by the Baltimore Wound, Ostomy, Continence (WOC) Nursing Affiliate. Case managers, discharge planners, intake team members, and home care nurses benefit from ongoing education from WOC nurse experts to master the skills needed to care for patients with ostomies.

  18. Opportunities for social workers in the patient centered medical home.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hawk, Mary; Ricci, Edmund; Huber, George; Myers, Marcella

    2015-01-01

    The Patient Centered Medical Home (PCMH) has been hailed as one method of improving chronic care outcomes in the United States. A number of studies have underscored the importance of the social work role within the PCMH, yet little existing research explores the social worker as a driver of improved patient care. The Pennsylvania Chronic Care Initiative was created with a primary goal of increasing the number of practices that were recognized as PCMH by the National Committee for Quality Assurance. This article describes findings from in-depth qualitative interviews with representatives from seven primary care practices, in which the authors examined barriers and facilitators to implementation of the initiative. Barriers to implementation included small practice size, payer-driven care, not having a strong physician champion, variability within patient populations, and high implementation costs. Facilitators included having a social worker coordinate behavioral health services, clinical nurse case managers, preexisting models of outcomes-driven care, and being part of an integrated health delivery and financing system. Recommendations strengthening the role of medical social workers in primary care practices are discussed.

  19. Hurricane Elena and Pinellas County, Florida: Some Lessons Learned from the Largest Evacuation of Nursing Home Patients in History.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mangum, Wiley P.; And Others

    1989-01-01

    Studied prior planning for and problems associated with evacuation of 1,860 nursing home patients in Pinellas County, Florida, due to Hurricane Elena in 1985 through questionnaires administered to nursing home administrators and public documents. Found most serious problems to be transporting patients to shelters in timely fashion, delayed passage…

  20. Diagnostic accuracy of the original 30-item and shortened versions of the Geriatric Depression Scale in nursing home patients

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jongenelis, K; Eisses, AMH; Gerritsen, DL; Beekman, ATF; Kluiter, H; Ribbe, MW

    Objective To determine the diagnostic accuracy of the 30-item and shortened versions of the Geriatric Depression Scale (GDS) in diagnosing depression in older nursing home patients. Method Three hundred and thirty-three older nursing home patients participated in a prospective cross-sectional study

  1. Diagnostic accuracy of the original 30-item and shortened versions of the Geriatric Depression Scale in nursing home patients

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jongenelis, K; Eisses, AMH; Gerritsen, DL; Beekman, ATF; Kluiter, H; Ribbe, MW

    2005-01-01

    Objective To determine the diagnostic accuracy of the 30-item and shortened versions of the Geriatric Depression Scale (GDS) in diagnosing depression in older nursing home patients. Method Three hundred and thirty-three older nursing home patients participated in a prospective cross-sectional study

  2. A Virtual Ward for Home Hemodialysis Patients – A Pilot Trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael J. Raphael

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Background: Patients with end-stage renal disease (ESRD have a high rate of hospitalization and are prone to care gaps that may occur during the transition from hospital to home. The virtual ward (VW is an innovative model that provides short-term transitional care to patients upon hospital discharge. The VW may be an effective intervention to address care gaps. Objectives: The primary objective of the pilot study was to assess the feasibility and practicality of implementing the Home Dialysis VW (HDVW on a broader scale. Design: The HDVW Pilot Study enrolled home hemodialysis patients following one of four inclusion criteria: 1. Discharge from hospital, 2. Completion of an in-hospital medical procedure, 3. Prescription of an antibiotic, 4. Completion of home hemodialysis training. Patients were followed in the HDVW for 14 days and during this time were assessed serially with a clinician-led telephone interview for one of three transitional care gaps: 1. Requirement for change in hemodialysis prescription, 2. Requirement for coordination of follow-up care, 3. Requirement for medication change. Setting: The study was conducted in Toronto, Ontario, Canada at a quaternary care academic teaching hospital from 2012–2013. Patients: This study included 52 HDVW admissions among 35 patients selected from the existing home hemodialysis program. Measurements: The primary outcome was the identification of the number of care gaps at each HDVW admission. Secondary outcomes included the identification of potential predictors of care gaps and description of clinical adverse events following HDVW admission (readmissions, emergency department visits, unplanned visits to the home hemodialysis in-center. Results: The implementation and execution of the HDVW Pilot Study proved to be technically feasible and practical. A care gap was identified in 35 (67 % of the HDVW admissions. In total, the cohort experienced 85 care gaps. There were no baseline demographic

  3. Association of comorbidities with home care service utilization of patients with heart failure while receiving telehealth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Radhakrishnan, Kavita; Jacelon, Cynthia S; Bigelow, Carol; Roche, Joan P; Marquard, Jenna L; Bowles, Kathryn H

    2013-01-01

    Comorbidities adversely impact heart failure (HF) outcomes. Telehealth can assist healthcare providers, especially nurses, in guiding their patients to follow the HF regimen. However, factors, including comorbidity patterns, that act in combination with telehealth to reduce home care nursing utilization are still unclear. The purpose of this article was to examine the association of the comorbidity characteristics of HF patients with nursing utilization along with withdrawal from telehealth service during an episode of tele-home care. A descriptive, correlational study design using retrospective chart review was used. The sample comprised Medicare patients admitted to a New England home care agency who had HF as a diagnosis and had used telehealth from 2008 to 2010. The electronic documentation at the home care agency served as the data source, which included Outcome and Assessment Information Set data of patients with HF. Logistic and multiple regression analyses were used to analyze data. The sample consisted of 403 participants, of whom 70% were older than 75 years, 55% were female, and 94% were white. Comorbidities averaged 5.19 (SD, 1.92), ranging from 1 to 11, and nearly 40% of the participants had 5 or more comorbidities. The mean (SD) nursing contacts in the sample was 9.9 (4.7), ranging from 1 to 26, and 52 (12.7%) patients withdrew from telehealth service. For patients with HF on telehealth, comorbidity characteristics of anemia, anxiety, musculoskeletal, and depression were significantly associated with nursing utilization patterns, and renal failure, cancer, and depression comorbidities were significantly associated with withdrawal from telehealth service. Knowledge of the association of comorbidity characteristics with the home care service utilization patterns of patients with HF on telehealth can assist the home health nurse to develop a tailored care plan that attains optimal patient outcomes. Knowledge of such associations would also focus home

  4. Constipation prophylaxis reduces length of stay in elderly hospitalized heart failure patients with home laxative use.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Staller, Kyle; Khalili, Hamed; Kuo, Braden

    2015-11-01

    Elderly, hospitalized patients suffer disproportionately from constipation; however, little data suggest that constipation prophylaxis reduces length of stay (LOS). We performed a retrospective analysis of elderly patients admitted to our hospital with congestive heart failure (CHF) to determine the effects of constipation prophylaxis on LOS. Patients ≥ 65 years old admitted with the diagnosis of CHF in 2012 were evaluated for home and hospital laxative use on admission. Our primary outcome was LOS. We used linear regression modeling to independently evaluate the impact of constipation prophylaxis on LOS. Among 618 patients who were eligible for our study, 201 (32.5%) were using laxatives at home, whereas 254 (41.1%) were started on a prophylactic laxative on admission. There was no significant difference in LOS between patients receiving prophylaxis versus those who did not (P = 0.32). Patients with home laxative use had a 1 day longer LOS compared to those without laxative use (6 vs 5, P = 0.03). Among patients with home laxative use, there were 2 days longer LOS in those who were not given constipation prophylaxis on admission (8 vs 6, P = 0.002). After multivariate adjustment, failure to use constipation prophylaxis in patients with home laxative use was the only independent predictor of increased LOS (P = 0.03). Among elderly patients admitted for CHF exacerbations, failure to use constipation prophylaxis in patients with home laxative use is associated with a significantly longer LOS. Our data suggest that routine use of bowel prophylaxis for elderly CHF patients with preexisting constipation may reduce LOS. © 2015 Journal of Gastroenterology and Hepatology Foundation and Wiley Publishing Asia Pty Ltd.

  5. Home intravenous antibiotic treatment for acute pulmonary exacerbations in cystic fibrosis - Is it good for the patient?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sequeiros Iara

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available There is a worldwide drive for the home management of chronic respiratory diseases. With the widespread use of home intravenous (IV treatment for cystic fibrosis (CF pulmonary exacerbations (PExs, evidence pointing to an inferior outcome of care for home-treated patients in comparison to hospital-treated patients is a cause of concern. Currently, patients who self-administer IV antibiotics at home are provided with equipment and instructions on the use of antibiotics. Policies vary; but in most UK centers, these patients are then followed up by the multidisciplinary team only on days 1, 7 and 14 of the treatment course. We aimed to review the current published literature in search for evidence for the value and the shortfalls of self-administered IV treatment at home for acute PExs in CF patients in comparison to conventional hospital treatment. We searched the electronic database system Medline for published papers regarding studies comparing home- and hospital-based IV antibiotic treatment for both adult and pediatric CF patients. Sixteen studies were identified and grouped into those that showed a similar outcome between home and hospital treatment and those that showed an inferior outcome for home management. Most studies were retrospective or inadequately powered to provide clear answers. Ideally, outcome of care for home treatment should be at least equal to outcome for hospital treatment. Extensive efforts should be made to standardize therapies preserving the advantages of home management and addressing the perceived reasons for an inferior outcome. Until further studies provide definitive answers, treatment at home should be reserved for adequately selected patients and individualized depending on the unique settings of each CF center and specific patients′ requirements. There is great need for a prospective randomized controlled trial comparing home and hospital treatments in order to clarify this matter.

  6. First-time urea breath tests performed at home by 36,629 patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dahlerup, Søren; Andersen, Rikke Charlotte; Nielsen, Birgitte Sperling Wilms

    2011-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The aim of the current study was (1) to describe the use of a (13) C-urea breath test (UBT) that was performed by patients at their homes as a part of a test-and-treat strategy in primary care and (2) to investigate the prevalence of Helicobacter pylori in patients taking a first...

  7. Predictors of change and continuity in home care for dementia patients

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vernooy-Dassen, M.J.F.J.; Felling, A.J.A.; Persoon, J.M.G.

    1997-01-01

    Objective. To investigate predictors of change in the sense of competence of primary caregivers and continuity in home care for dementia patients. Design. A prospective longitudinal study with a follow-up period of 10 months. Setting. Dementia patients living in the community selected by Dutch

  8. Prevalence and correlates of psychotropic drug use in Dutch nursing-home patients with dementia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nijk, Renate M; Zuidema, Sytse U; Koopmans, Raymond T C M

    BACKGROUND: Neuropsychiatric symptoms in dementia patients are common and are often treated with psychotropic drugs. The aim of this study was to determine the prevalence and correlates of psychotropic drug use in Dutch nursing home patients with dementia. METHODS: Psychotropic drug use of 1322

  9. The use of the waiting list in a fair selection of patients for nursing home care

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Meiland, F. J.; Danse, J. A.; Hoos, A. M.; Wendte, J. F.; Gunning-Schepers, L. J.

    1996-01-01

    When health care resources are scarce, waiting lists may be used as a distribution measure in order to enhance the fair allocation of resources through selection of patients. In this study, the structure and use of a waiting list for a fair selection of patients for nursing home admission was

  10. The effect of organizational climate on patient-centered medical home implementation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reddy, Ashok; Shea, Judy A; Canamucio, Anne; Werner, Rachel M

    2015-01-01

    Organizational climate is a key determinant of successful adoption of innovations; however, its relation to medical home implementation is unknown. This study examined the association between primary care providers' (PCPs') perception of organization climate and medical home implementation in the Veterans Health Administration. Multivariate regression was used to test the hypothesis that organizational climate predicts medical home implementation. This analysis of 191 PCPs found that higher scores in 2 domains of organizational climate (communication and cooperation, and orientation to quality improvement) were associated with a statistically significantly higher percentage (from 7 to 10 percentage points) of PCPs implementing structural changes to support the medical home model. In addition, some aspects of a better organizational climate were associated with improved organizational processes of care, including a higher percentage of patients contacted within 2 days of hospital discharge (by 2 to 3 percentage points) and appointments made within 3 days of a patient request (by 2 percentage points). © The Author(s) 2014.

  11. The effectiveness of the use of a digital activity coaching system in addition to a two-week home-based exercise program in patients after total knee arthroplasty: study protocol for a randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harmelink, Karen E M; Zeegers, A V C M; Tönis, Thijs M; Hullegie, Wim; Nijhuis-van der Sanden, Maria W G; Staal, J Bart

    2017-07-05

    There is consistent evidence that supervised programs are not superior to home-based programs after total knee arthroplasty (TKA), especially in patients without complications. Home-based exercise programs are effective, but we hypothesize that their effectiveness can be improved by increasing the adherence to physical therapy advice to reach an adequate exercise level during the program and thereafter. Our hypothesis is that an activity coaching system (accelerometer-based activity sensor), alongside a home-based exercise program, will increase adherence to exercises and the activity level, thereby improving physical functioning and recovery. The objective of this study is to determine the effectiveness of an activity coaching system in addition to a home-based exercise program after a TKA compared to only the home-based exercise program with physical functioning as outcome. This study is a single-blind randomized controlled trial. Both the intervention (n = 55) and the control group (n = 55) receive a two-week home-based exercise program, and the intervention group receives an additional activity coaching system. This is a hand-held electronic device together with an app on a smartphone providing information and advice on exercise behavior during the day. The primary outcome is physical functioning, measured with the Timed Up and Go test (TUG) after two weeks, six weeks and three months. Secondary outcomes are 1) adherence to the activity level (activity diary); 2) physical functioning, measured with the 2-Minute Walk Test (2MWT) and the Knee Osteoarthritis Outcome Score; 3) quality of life (SF-36); 4) healthcare use up to one year postoperatively and 5) cost-effectiveness. Data are collected preoperatively, three days, two and six weeks, three months and one year postoperatively. The strengths of the study are the use of both performance-based tests and self-reported questionnaires and the personalized tailored program after TKA given by specialized physical

  12. Does an 8-week home-based exercise program affect physical capacity, quality of life, sick leave, and use of psychotropic drugs in patients with pulmonary embolism? Study protocol for a multicenter randomized clinical trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rolving, Nanna; Brocki, Barbara C; Mikkelsen, Hanne R; Ravn, Pernille; Bloch-Nielsen, Jannie Rhod; Frost, Lars

    2017-05-30

    The existing evidence base in pulmonary embolism (PE) is primarily focused on diagnostic methods, medical treatment, and prognosis. Only a few studies have investigated how everyday life is affected by PE, although many patients are negatively affected both physically and emotionally after hospital discharge. Currently, no documented rehabilitation options are available for these patients. We aim to examine whether an 8-week home-based exercise intervention can influence physical capacity, quality of life, sick leave, and use of psychotropic drugs in patients medically treated for PE. One hundred forty patients with incident first-time PE will be recruited in five hospitals. After inclusion, patients will be randomly allocated to either the control group, receiving usual care, or the intervention group, who will be exposed to an 8-week home-based exercise program in addition to usual care. The intervention includes an initial individual exercise planning session with a physiotherapist, leading to a recommended exercise program of a minimum of three weekly training sessions of 30-60 minutes' duration. The patients have regular telephone contact with the physiotherapist during the 8-week program. At the time of inclusion, after 2 months, and after 6 months, the patients' physical capacity is measured using the Incremental Shuttle Walk test. Furthermore the patients' quality of life, sick leave, and use of psychotropic drugs is measured using self-reported questionnaires. In both randomization arms, all follow-up measurements and visits will take place at the hospital from which the patient was discharged. Levels of eligibility, consent, adherence, and retention will be used as indicators of study feasibility. We expect that the home-based exercise program will improve the physical capacity and quality of life for the patients in the intervention group. The study will furthermore contribute significantly to the limited knowledge about the optimal rehabilitation of

  13. A Home Integral Telecare System for HIV/AIDS Patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caceres, Cesar; Gomez, Enrique J; Garcia, Felipe; Chausa, Paloma; Guzman, Jorge; Del Pozo, Francisco; Gatell, Jose Maria

    2005-01-01

    VIHrtual Hospital is a telemedicine web system for improving home integral care of chronic HIV patients through the Internet. Using the videoconference, chat or messaging tools included in the system, patients can visit their healthcare providers (physician, psychologist, nurse, psychiatrist, pharmacist, and social worker), having these access to the Electronic Patient Record. The system also provides a telepharmacy service that controls treatment adherence and side effects, sending the medication to the patient's home by courier. A virtual community has been created, facilitating communication between patients and improving the collaboration between professionals, creating a care plan for each patient. As a complement, there is a virtual library where users can find validated HIV/AIDS information helping to enhance prevention. This system has been developed using low cost technologies in order to extend the number of patients involved in its trial. Thus, VIHrtual Hospital is now on trial in the Hospital Clinic (Barcelona, Spain) involving a hundred patients and twenty healthcare professionals during two years.Although we are still waiting for the final results of the trial, we can already say that the use of telemedicine systems developed ad hoc for a chronic disease, like HIV/AIDS, improve the quality of care of the patients and their care team. The system described is a good example of the possibilities that technologies are offering to create new chronic patient care models based on telemedicine.

  14. An analytics approach to designing patient centered medical homes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ajorlou, Saeede; Shams, Issac; Yang, Kai

    2015-03-01

    Recently the patient centered medical home (PCMH) model has become a popular team based approach focused on delivering more streamlined care to patients. In current practices of medical homes, a clinical based prediction frame is recommended because it can help match the portfolio capacity of PCMH teams with the actual load generated by a set of patients. Without such balances in clinical supply and demand, issues such as excessive under and over utilization of physicians, long waiting time for receiving the appropriate treatment, and non-continuity of care will eliminate many advantages of the medical home strategy. In this paper, by using the hierarchical generalized linear model with multivariate responses, we develop a clinical workload prediction model for care portfolio demands in a Bayesian framework. The model allows for heterogeneous variances and unstructured covariance matrices for nested random effects that arise through complex hierarchical care systems. We show that using a multivariate approach substantially enhances the precision of workload predictions at both primary and non primary care levels. We also demonstrate that care demands depend not only on patient demographics but also on other utilization factors, such as length of stay. Our analyses of a recent data from Veteran Health Administration further indicate that risk adjustment for patient health conditions can considerably improve the prediction power of the model.

  15. The effect of self-transcendence on depression in cognitively intact nursing home patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haugan, Gørill; Innstrand, Siw Tone

    2012-01-01

    Aims. This study's aim was to test the effects of self-transcendence on depression among cognitively intact nursing home patients. Background. Depression is considered the most frequent mental disorder among the elderly population. Specifically, the depression rate among nursing home patients is three to four times higher than that among community-dwelling elderly. Therefore, finding new and alternative ways to prevent and decrease depression is of great importance for nursing home patients' well-being. Self-transcendence is related to spiritual as well as nonspiritual factors, and it is described as a correlate and resource for well-being among vulnerable populations and at the end of life. Methods. A two-factor construct of the self-transcendence scale (interpersonal and intrapersonal) and the hospital anxiety and depression scale (HADS) was applied. A sample of 202 cognitively intact nursing home patients in central Norway was selected to respond to the questionnaires in 2008/2009. Results. A hypothesized SEM model demonstrated significant direct relationships and total effects of self-transcendence on depression. Conclusion and Implication for Practice. Facilitating patients' self-transcendence, both interpersonally and intrapersonally, might decrease depression among cognitively intact nursing home patients.

  16. End-of-life expectations and experiences among nursing home patients and their relatives

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fosse, Anette; Schaufel, Margrethe Aase; Ruths, Sabine

    2014-01-01

    . CONCLUSION: Nursing home patients and their relatives wanted doctors more involved in end-of-life care. They expected doctors to acknowledge their preferences and provide guidance and symptom relief. PRACTICE IMPLICATIONS: High-quality end-of-life care in nursing homes relies on organization, funding......OBJECTIVE: Synthesize research about patients' and relatives' expectations and experiences on how doctors can improve end-of-life care in nursing homes. METHODS: We systematically searched qualitative studies in English in seven databases (Medline, Embase, PsycINFO, CINAHL, Ageline, Cochrane...... decision-makers reported uncertainty and distress when guidance from health personnel was lacking. They worried about staff shortage and emphasized doctor availability. Relatives and health personnel seldom recognized patients' ability to consent, and patients' preferences were not always recognized...

  17. Characteristics and trends in required home care by GPs in Austria: diseases and functional status of patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pichler Ingrid

    2006-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Almost all societies carry responsibility towards patients who require continuous medical care at home. In many health systems the general practitioner cooperates with community based services of home care and coordinates all medical and non medical activities. In Austria the general practitioner together and in cooperation with relatives of the patient and professional organisations usually takes on this task by visiting his patients. This study was carried out to identify diseases that need home care and to describe the functional profile of home care patients in eastern Austria. Methods Cross sectional observational study with 17 GP practices participating during 2 study periods in 1997 and in 2004 in eastern Austria. Each GP identified patients requiring home care and assessed their underlying diseases and functional status by filling in a questionnaire personally after an encounter. Patients in nursing homes were excluded. Statistical tests used were t-tests, contingency tables, nonparametric Wilcoxon signed rank sum test and Fisher-combination test. Results Patients with degenerative diseases of the central nervous system (65% caused by Alzheimer's disease and cerebrovascular occlusive disease and patients with degenerative diseases of the skeletal system (53% were the largest groups among the 198 (1997 and 261 (2004 home care cases of the 11 (1997 and 13 (2004 practices. Malignant diseases in a terminal state constituted only 5% of the cases. More than two thirds of all cases were female with an average age of 80 years. Slightly more than 70% of the patients were at least partially mobile. Conclusion Home care and home visits for patients with degenerative diseases of the central nervous and skeletal system are important elements of GP's work. Further research should therefore focus on effective methods of training and rehabilitation to better the mental and physical status of patients living in their private homes.

  18. The course of apraxia and ADL functioning in left hemisphere stroke patients treated in rehabilitation centres and nursing homes.

    OpenAIRE

    Donkervoort, M.; Dekker, J.; Deelman, B.

    2006-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To study the course of apraxia and daily life functioning (ADL) in left hemisphere stroke patients with apraxia. DESIGN: Prospective cohort study. SETTING: Rehabilitation centres and nursing homes. SUBJECTS: One hundred and eight left hemisphere stroke patients with apraxia, hospitalized in rehabilitation centres and nursing homes. MEASURES: ADL-observations, Barthel ADL Index, Apraxia Test, Motricity Index. RESULTS: During the study period of 20 weeks, patients showed small improv...

  19. The linkage between employee and patient satisfaction in home healthcare.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosati, Robert J; Marren, Joan M; Davin, Denise M; Morgan, Cynthia J

    2009-01-01

    Greater accountability for patient outcomes, reduced reimbursement, and a protracted nursing shortage have made employee and patient satisfaction results central performance metrics and strategic imperatives in healthcare. Key questions are whether the two interact and if so, how can that relationship be leveraged to obtain maximum gains in both employee and patient satisfaction. This article examines the experience of a large, nonprofit home care agency in exploring these issues. The agency found that organizational commitment to patient care and customer service are fundamental to patient satisfaction. The more employees perceived that the organization is focused on quality and customers, the more patient satisfaction increased. Among nurses, work-life balance, fair compensation, and regard for employees all influenced patient satisfaction.

  20. Environmental impacts of informal settlements with second homes (vacation homes. A case study: Apuseni Nature Park.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    OANA ALEXANDRA CIUPE

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available The past decades has seen the rapid development of second homes in many country of the world. Therefore, secondary dwellings used for tourism-related purposes (vacation homes or second homes are a reality that becomes more pronounced and visible at both nationally and internationally level. However, the rapidity and the novelty of the phenomenon creates difficulties in terms of efficient management and suitable integration in spatial planning and urbanism plans, favoring - in a negative way - expanding of build-up areas (with second homes in a chaotic way. Since there has been no detailed investigation of second homes tourism from the perspective of informal settlements, this article follows a case-study design, with in-depth analysis of informal settlements with vacation homes found in Apuseni Nature Park. Based on long-term field research, will be exemplified 4 types of informal settlements with second homes (vacation homes identified in the case study. The aim of this paper is to critically analyse the effects of informal settlements with vacation homes on the natural environment.

  1. Justifying continuous sedation until death: a focus group study in nursing homes in Flanders, Belgium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rys, Sam; Deschepper, Reginald; Deliens, Luc; Mortier, Freddy; Bilsen, Johan

    2013-01-01

    Continuous Sedation until Death (CSD), the act of reducing or removing the consciousness of an incurably ill patient until death, has become a common practice in nursing homes in Flanders (Belgium). Quantitative research has suggested that CSD is not always properly applied. This qualitative study aims to explore and describe the circumstances under which nursing home clinicians consider CSD to be justified. Six focus groups were conducted including 10 physicians, 24 nurses, and 14 care assistants working in either Catholic or non-Catholic nursing homes of varying size. Refractory suffering, limited life expectancy and respecting patient autonomy are considered essential elements in deciding for CSD. However, multiple factors complicate the care of nursing home residents at the end of life, and often hinder clinicians from putting these elements into practice. Nursing home clinicians may benefit from more information and instruction about managing CSD in the complex care situations which typically occur in nursing homes. Copyright © 2013 Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. [Chronic home-care patients and their primary health care environment].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bilbao Curiel, I; Gastaminza Santacoloma, A M; García García, J A; Quindimil Vázquez, J A; López Rivas, J L; Huidobro Fernández, L

    1994-03-15

    Describing the primary level of attention to chronic home patients (CHP), their quality or life and the one of their home carers. Descriptive transverse study. Teaching Unit of Family of Sestao (Vizcaya) urban environment. 197 CHP patients with subacute, chronic illnesses or in terminal stages or handicapped, that is to say, people who cannot attend the Medical Centre and needing constant home care (longer than 4 weeks) although they do not need to be in hospital at the moment. A questionnaire made up by the researching group. April-June 1992. The clinical histories and home interviews. Mean age (78 +/- 23) years old; 70% were women; average of health problems of patients (4.2 +/- 4); average of drug consumption by patients (3.6 +/- 4); average of one visit to each patient per two months; 75% did not need derivation. The average age of people looking after them was (58 +/- 28) years old and 77.3% of them were women. Their average QL index was (9 +/- 2.4) out of 10, 9.2% had a QL index between 4 and 7 although there was nobody under 3. We have found an old population, mostly women with an average of health problems of (4.24 +/- 4) and who are polymedicated. 9.4 of them are not looked after by anybody. Generally their homes are habitable enough. In 77.3% of the cases the carers are women and 65.6% do not receive any domiciliary help.

  3. HomeNL: Homecare Assistance in Natural Language. An Intelligent Conversational Agent for Hypertensive Patients Management.

    OpenAIRE

    Rojas Barahona , Lina Maria; Quaglini , Silvana; Stefanelli , Mario

    2009-01-01

    International audience; The prospective home-care management will probably of- fer intelligent conversational assistants for supporting patients at home through natural language interfaces. Homecare assistance in natural lan- guage, HomeNL, is a proof-of-concept dialogue system for the manage- ment of patients with hypertension. It follows up a conversation with a patient in which the patient is able to take the initiative. HomeNL pro- cesses natural language, makes an internal representation...

  4. Effect of home care service on the quality of life in patients with gynecological cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aktas, Demet; Terzioglu, Fusun

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of the research was to determine the effect of home care service on the quality of life in patients with gynecological cancer. This randomized case control study was carried out in a womans hospital between September 2011 and February 2012. Women undergoing gynecological cancer treatment were separated into intervention and control groups, of 35 patients each. The intervention group was provided with nursing care service through hospital and home visits (1st, 12th weeks) within the framework of a specifically developed nursing care plan. The control group was monitored without any intervention through the hospital routine protocols (1st, 12th weeks). Data were collected using An Interview Form, Home Visit Monitoring Form and Quality of Life Scale/Cancer Survivors. Effects of home care service on the quality of life in gynecological cancer patients were investigated using chi-square tests, McNemar's test, independent t-test and ANOVA. This study found that the intervention group receiving home care service had a moderately high quality of life (average mean: 6.01±0.64), while the control group had comparatively lower quality (average mean: 4.35±0.79) within the 12 week post- discharge period (phome care services to be efficient in improving the quality of life in patients with gynecological cancer.

  5. Outcomes in nursing home patients with traumatic brain injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lueckel, Stephanie N; Kosar, Cyrus M; Teno, Joan M; Monaghan, Sean F; Heffernan, Daithi S; Cioffi, William G; Thomas, Kali S

    2018-05-09

    Traumatic brain injury is a leading cause of death and disability in the United States. In survivors, traumatic brain injury remains a leading contributor to long-term disability and results in many patients being admitted to skilled nursing facilities for postacute care. Despite this very large population of traumatic brain injury patients, very little is known about the long-term outcomes of traumatic brain injury survivors, including rates of discharge to home or risk of death in long-term nursing facilities. We hypothesized that patient demographics and functional status influence outcomes of patients with traumatic brain injury admitted to skilled nursing facilities. We conducted a retrospective cohort study of Medicare fee-for-service beneficiaries aged 65 and older discharged alive and directly from hospital to a skilled nursing facility between 2011 and 2014 using the prospectively maintained Federal Minimum Data Set combined with Medicare claims data and the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services Vital Status files. Records were reviewed for demographic and clinical characteristics at admission to the skilled nursing facility, including age, sex, cognitive function, ability to communicate, and motor function. Activities of daily living were reassessed at discharge to calculate functional improvement. We used robust Poisson regression with skilled nursing facility fixed effects to calculate relative risks and 99% confidence intervals for mortality and functional improvement associated with the demographic and clinical characteristics present at admission. Linear regression was used to calculate adjusted mean duration of stay. Overall, 87,292 Medicare fee-for-service beneficiaries with traumatic brain injury were admitted to skilled nursing facilities. The mean age was 84 years, with 74% of patients older than age 80. Generally, older age, male sex, and poor cognitive or functional status at admission to a skilled nursing facility were associated with

  6. Hospital-at-Home Programs for Patients With Acute Exacerbations of Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease (COPD)

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCurdy, BR

    2012-01-01

    hospital care of acute exacerbations of COPD? Research Methods Literature Search Search Strategy A literature search was performed on August 5, 2010, using OVID MEDLINE, OVID MEDLINE In-Process and Other Non-Indexed Citations, OVID EMBASE, EBSCO Cumulative Index to Nursing & Allied Health Literature (CINAHL), the Wiley Cochrane Library, and the Centre for Reviews and Dissemination database for studies published from January 1, 1990, to August 5, 2010. Abstracts were reviewed by a single reviewer and, for those studies meeting the eligibility criteria, full-text articles were obtained. Reference lists and health technology assessment websites were also examined for any additional relevant studies not identified through the systematic search. Inclusion Criteria English language full-text reports; health technology assessments, systematic reviews, meta-analyses, and randomized controlled trials (RCTs); studies performed exclusively in patients with a diagnosis of COPD or studies including patients with COPD as well as patients with other conditions, if results are reported for COPD patients separately; studies performed in patients with acute exacerbations of COPD who present to the ED; studies published between January 1, 1990, and August 5, 2010; studies comparing hospital-at-home and inpatient hospital care for patients with acute exacerbations of COPD; studies that include at least 1 of the outcomes of interest (listed below). Cochrane Collaboration reviews have defined hospital-at-home programs as those that provide patients with active treatment for their acute exacerbation in their home by medical professionals for a limited period of time (in this case, until the resolution of the exacerbation). If a hospital-at-home program had not been available, these patients would have been admitted to hospital for their treatment. Exclusion Criteria home ED visits transfer to long-term care days to readmission eligibility for hospital-at-home Statistical Methods When possible

  7. Examining the Role of Primary Care Physicians and Challenges Faced When Their Patients Transition to Home Hospice Care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shalev, Ariel; Phongtankuel, Veerawat; Lampa, Katherine; Reid, M C; Eiss, Brian M; Bhatia, Sonica; Adelman, Ronald D

    2018-04-01

    The transition into home hospice care is often a critical time in a patient's medical care. Studies have shown patients and caregivers desire continuity with their physicians at the end of life (EoL). However, it is unclear what roles primary care physicians (PCPs) play and what challenges they face caring for patients transitioning into home hospice care. To understand PCPs' experiences, challenges, and preferences when their patients transition to home hospice care. Nineteen semi-structured phone interviews with PCPs were conducted. Study data were analyzed using standard qualitative methods. Participants included PCPs from 3 academic group practices in New York City. Measured: Physician recordings were transcribed and analyzed using content analysis. Most PCPs noted that there was a discrepancy between their actual role and ideal role when their patients transitioned to home hospice care. Primary care physicians expressed a desire to maintain continuity, provide psychosocial support, and collaborate actively with the hospice team. Better establishment of roles, more frequent communication with the hospice team, and use of technology to communicate with patients were mentioned as possible ways to help PCPs achieve their ideal role caring for their patients receiving home hospice care. Primary care physicians expressed varying degrees of involvement during a patient's transition to home hospice care, but many desired to be more involved in their patient's care. As with patients, physicians desire to maintain continuity with their patients at the EoL and solutions to improve communication between PCPs, hospice providers, and patients need to be explored.

  8. Patient Safety Culture and the Association with Safe Resident Care in Nursing Homes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas, Kali S.; Hyer, Kathryn; Castle, Nicholas G.; Branch, Laurence G.; Andel, Ross; Weech-Maldonado, Robert

    2012-01-01

    Purpose of the study: Studies have shown that patient safety culture (PSC) is poorly developed in nursing homes (NHs), and, therefore, residents of NHs may be at risk of harm. Using Donabedian's Structure-Process-Outcome (SPO) model, we examined the relationships among top management's ratings of NH PSC, a process of care, and safety outcomes.…

  9. DOE Zero Energy Ready Home Case Study: Cobblestone Homes — 2014 Model Home, Midland, MI

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    none,

    2014-09-01

    This builder's first DOE Zero Energy Ready Home won a Custom Builder award in the 2014 Housing Innovation Awards, scored HERS 49 without PV or HERS 44 with 1.4 kW of PV, and served as a prototype and energy efficiency demonstration model while performance testing was conducted.

  10. Can the care transitions measure predict rehospitalization risk or home health nursing use of home healthcare patients?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ryvicker, Miriam; McDonald, Margaret V; Trachtenberg, Melissa; Peng, Timothy R; Sridharan, Sridevi; Feldman, Penny H

    2013-01-01

    The Care Transitions Measure (CTM) was designed to assess the quality of patient transitions from the hospital. Many hospitals are using the measure to inform their efforts to improve transitional care. We sought to determine if the measure would have utility for home healthcare providers by predicting newly admitted patients at heightened risk for emergency department use, rehospitalization, or increased home health nursing visits. The CTM was administered to 495 home healthcare patients shortly after hospital discharge and home healthcare admission. Follow-up interviews were completed 30 and 60 days post hospital discharge. Interview data were supplemented with agency assessment and service use data. We did not find evidence that the CTM could predict home healthcare patients having an elevated risk for emergent care, rehospitalization, or higher home health nursing use. Because Medicare/Medicaid-certified home healthcare providers already use a comprehensive, mandated start of care assessment, the CTM may not provide them additional crucial information. Process and outcome measurement is increasingly becoming part of usual care. Selection of measures appropriate for each service setting requires thorough site-specific evaluation. In light of our findings, we cannot recommend the CTM as an additional measure in the home healthcare setting. © 2013 National Association for Healthcare Quality.

  11. Randomized trial of the ForeseeHome monitoring device for early detection of neovascular age-related macular degeneration. The HOme Monitoring of the Eye (HOME) study design - HOME Study report number 1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chew, Emily Y; Clemons, Traci E; Bressler, Susan B; Elman, Michael J; Danis, Ronald P; Domalpally, Amitha; Heier, Jeffrey S; Kim, Judy E; Garfinkel, Richard A

    2014-03-01

    To evaluate the effects of a home-monitoring device with tele-monitoring compared with standard care in detection of progression to choroidal neovascularization (CNV) associated with age-related macular degeneration (AMD), the leading cause of blindness in the US. Participants, aged 55 to 90 years, at high risk of developing CNV associated with AMD were recruited to the HOme Monitoring of Eye (HOME) Study, an unmasked, multi-center, randomized trial of the ForeseeHome (FH) device plus standard care vs. standard care alone. The FH device utilizes preferential hyperacuity perimetry and tele-monitoring to detect changes in vision function associated with development of CNV, potentially prior to symptom and visual acuity loss. After establishing baseline measurements, subsequent changes on follow-up are detected by the device, causing the monitoring center to alert the clinical center to recall participants for an exam. Standard care consists of instructions for self-monitoring visual changes with subsequent self-report to the clinical center. The primary objective of this study is to determine whether home monitoring plus standard care in comparison with standard care alone, results in earlier detection of incident CNV with better present visual acuity. The primary outcome is the decline in visual acuity at CNV diagnosis from baseline. Detection of CNV prior to substantial vision loss is critical as vision outcome following anti-angiogenic therapy is dependent on the visual acuity at initiation of treatment. HOME Study is the first large scale study to test the use of home tele-monitoring system in the management of AMD patients. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  12. Unmet home healthcare needs and quality of life in cancer patients: a hospital-based Turkish sample.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ataman, Gülsen; Erbaydar, Tugrul

    2017-07-01

    Home healthcare services in Turkey are provided primarily to patients that are bedridden or seriously disabled. There are no such services integrated with hospital services that are specifically designed for cancer patients. The present study aimed to explore the home healthcare needs of cancer patients and their experiences related to unmet home healthcare needs. The study included 394 adult cancer patients who were followed up at the surgical oncology department of a university hospital. A 37-item, study-specific questionnaire and the European Organisation for Research and Treatment of Cancer Quality of Life Questionnaire for cancer patients (EORTC-QLQ-C30) were administered, and patient clinical records were evaluated. Home healthcare was provided primarily by the patients' immediate family members; the professional home healthcare usage rate was only 2.8%. Patient quality of life (QoL) was negatively affected by cancer, especially those with stage three and four disease. The frequency of the need for home healthcare services due to disease-related health problems during the 30 days prior to administration of the questionnaires was as follows: pain (62.9%), surgical wound care (44.9%), injection of therapeutics (52.3%), gastrointestinal complaints (51.8%), anxiety (87.1%), psychosocial assistance (77.2%) and information about cancer (94.4%). In the absence of home healthcare services, the patients primarily used institutional healthcare services to meet their needs; otherwise, their needs were not met. The physical and psychosocial problems that cancer patients experience could be solved in most cases by professional home healthcare services. Hospital-integrated home healthcare services might not only improve cancer patient QoL but might also increase the effectiveness of hospital-based healthcare services. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  13. An Exploration of Intent to Use Telehealth at Home for Patients with Chronic Diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shu-Lin Uei

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Telecare is defined as care practiced at a distance. It is an effective strategy for improving the self-health care management of home-patients with chronic diseases. The purpose of this study was to explore the intent to use of telehealth patients. The correlation between the self-care behaviors, the intent to use of telehealth, and the effects on physiological indicators of patients with chronic disease at home were studied. A cross-sectional study design employing purposive sampling was selected. The structured questionnaire ‘Telecare Usage Intention Scale and Self-Care Behavior Scale’ were used, ‘HbA1c, glucose levels and monthly blood pressure measurements’ were analyzed in this thirteen month study. The self-care behaviors of the participants were positively correlated with their intent to use telehealth (p < 0.01. The results also indicated that HbA1c, glucose levels and frequency BP measurement of the participants improved significantly after using telecare (p < 0.005. The results indicated a strong intent to use telehealth and positive perception of telecare services by in-home patients with a chronic disease. Telehealth improves the self-care behavior of in-home chronic disease patients and enhances medical professionals’ ability to deliver quality and effective healthcare.

  14. Home-based nursing interventions improve knowledge of disease and management in patients with heart failure 1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Azzolin, Karina de Oliveira; Lemos, Dayanna Machado; Lucena, Amália de Fátima; Rabelo-Silva, Eneida Rejane

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: to assess patient knowledge of heart failure by home-based measurement of two NOC Nursing Outcomes over a six-month period and correlate mean outcome indicator scores with mean scores of a heart failure Knowledge Questionnaire. METHODS: in this before-and-after study, patients with heart failure received four home visits over a six-month period after hospital discharge. At each home visit, nursing interventions were implemented, NOC outcomes were assessed, and the Knowledge Questionnaire was administered. RESULTS: overall, 23 patients received home visits. Mean indicator scores for the outcome Knowledge: Medication were 2.27±0.14 at home visit 1 and 3.55±0.16 at home visit 4 (P<0.001); and, for the outcome Knowledge: Treatment Regimen, 2.33±0.13 at home visit 1 and 3.59±0.14 at home visit 4 (P<0.001). The correlation between the Knowledge Questionnaire and the Nursing Outcomes Classification scores was strong at home visit 1 (r=0.7, P<0.01), but weak and non significant at visit 4. CONCLUSION: the results show improved patient knowledge of heart failure and a strong correlation between Nursing Outcomes Classification indicator scores and Knowledge Questionnaire scores. The NOC Nursing Outcomes proved effective as knowledge assessment measures when compared with the validated instrument. PMID:25806630

  15. Effects of Patient-centered Medical Home Transformation on Child Patient Experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harder, Valerie S; Krulewitz, Julianne; Jones, Craig; Wasserman, Richard C; Shaw, Judith S

    2016-01-01

    Patient experience, 1 of 3 aims for improving health care, is rarely included in studies of patient-centered medical home (PCMH) transformation. This study examines the association between patient experience and National Committee on Quality Assurance (NCQA) PCMH transformation. This was a cross-sectional study of parent-reported child patient experience from PCMH and non-PCMH practices. It used randomly sampled experience surveys completed by 2599 patients at 29 pediatric and family medicine PCMH (n = 21) and non-PCMH (n = 8) practices in Vermont from 2011 to 2013. Patient experiences related to child development and prevention were assessed using the Consumer Assessment of Health care Providers and Systems (CAHPS). A 10-point increase in NCQA score at PCMH practices is associated with a 3.1% higher CAHPS child prevention score (P = .004). Among pediatric practices, PCMH recognition is associated with 7.7% (P child development and prevention composite scores, respectively. Among family medicine practices, PCMH recognition is associated with 7.4% (P = .001) and 11.0% (P child development and prevention composite scores, respectively. Our results suggest that PCMH recognition may improve child patient experience at pediatric practices and worsen experience at family medicine practices. These findings warrant further investigation into the differential influence of NCQA PCMH transformation on family medicine and pediatric practices. © Copyright 2016 by the American Board of Family Medicine.

  16. A Comparison of Clinical Parameters and Outcomes over 1 Year in Home Hemodialysis Patients Using 2008K@home or NxStage System One.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brunelli, Steven M; Wilson, Steven M; Ficociello, Linda H; Mullon, Claudy; Diaz-Buxo, Jose A

    2016-01-01

    The prevalence of home hemodialysis (HHD) in the United States is growing, driven in part by improvements in dialysis machines for home use. We assessed clinical parameters and outcomes in HHD patients using either Fresenius 2008K@home or NxStage System One over 1 year. Patients were 18 years or older and received HHD for ≥30 days between January 1, 2009, and June 30, 2010. A propensity score match was used to control for differences in baseline characteristics, and 2008K@home patients were stratified by frequency of use. Data for outcome measures were analyzed using generalized linear mixed models. Treatment frequency was lower for 2008K@home groups than System One. Mean standardized Kt/V (stdKt/V) was 2.75 for 2008K@home ≥3.5x/week users and 1.99 for System One users (p < 0.001). Erythropoiesis-stimulating agent use tended to be lower for patients using System One. There were no statistically significant differences across groups in serum albumin, calcium, phosphorus, hemoglobin, or parathyroid hormone levels, normalized protein catabolic rate, body mass index, number of hospitalizations, or hospitalized days. Clinical parameters and outcomes for HHD patients using 2008K@home and System One were largely equivalent, although 2008K@home use was associated with higher stdKt/V. Further studies will be required to establish whether these differences in stdKt/V relate to differences in technology, treatment schedule, or a combination thereof.

  17. Self-transcendence in cognitively intact nursing-home patients: a resource for well-being.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haugan, Gørill; Rannestad, Toril; Hammervold, Randi; Garåsen, Helge; Espnes, Geir Arild

    2013-05-01

    This article reports an empirical study of self-transcendence in cognitively intact nursing-home patients. The aim was to investigate the interrelationships between self-transcendence and nursing-home patients' physical, social, emotional and functional well-being. Finding new and alternative approaches to increase well-being among nursing-home patients is highly warranted. Self-transcendence is considered a developmental process of maturity in adulthood and a vital resource for well-being at the end of life, thus self-transcendence could be a useful approach. Cross-sectional The self-transcendence scale and the Functional Assessment of Cancer Therapy General (FACT-G) Quality of Life questionnaire were used. A sample of 202 cognitively intact nursing-home patients in Mid-Norway was selected to respond to the instruments in 2008 and 2009. Analysis was applied by means of LISREL 8·8 Structural Equation Modelling. A two-factor construct of self-transcendence showed that intrapersonal self-transcendence directly affected functional well-being and indirectly influenced physical, emotional and functional well-being. Interpersonal self-transcendence directly affected social and emotional well-being. Additionally important influences were disclosed from functional to emotional and from emotional to physical well-being. Finding nursing interventions to enhance both intrapersonal and interpersonal self-transcendence might benefit nursing-home patients' overall well-being. In a holistic perspective of body-mind-spirit, this research generates new-research questions about the pathways between the different dimensions of well-being in nursing-home patients, which is important to holistic nursing practice. © 2012 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  18. Home-based humidification for mucositis in patients undergoing radical radiotherapy: preliminary report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morton, Randall P; Thomson, Vicki C; Macann, Andrew; Gerard, Catherine M; Izzard, Mark; Hay, K David

    2008-04-01

    Oropharyngeal mucositis is a frequent, severe complication of local irradiation for tumours in the head and neck. We postulated that heated humidification of inspired air via a nasal interface may palliate symptoms of mucositis by reducing the discomfort associated with dry, sticky secretions. We sought to review the effect of home-based humidification on hospital admissions and the patient reported experience of that humidification. This study was a retrospective review. A historical (control) group of patients did not receive home humidification at any stage (n = 55) and a study group (n = 53) received home humidification at or after the onset of grade 3 mucositis. A questionnaire was sent to study group patients to obtain information about their experience of using the humidifier at home. There were no demographic differences between the study and control groups, but the study group had significantly more advanced cancer (stage IV; p = .0307) and significantly higher total fractions and days treated (p humidification were admitted after starting that use (p humidification was of benefit, and 81% stated that it relieved mouth or throat pain. Humidification of inspired gas offers a simple, drug-free option for managing a number of the adverse mucosal effects of radiation and chemoradiation in head and neck cancer patients.

  19. Promoting cancer screening within the patient centered medical home.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarfaty, Mona; Wender, Richard; Smith, Robert

    2011-01-01

    While consensus has grown that primary care is the essential access point in a high-performing health care system, the current model of primary care underperforms in both chronic disease management and prevention. The Patient Centered Medical Home model (PCMH) is at the center of efforts to reinvent primary care practice, and is regarded as the most promising approach to addressing the burden of chronic disease, improving health outcomes, and reducing health spending. However, the potential for the medical home to improve the delivery of cancer screening (and preventive services in general) has received limited attention in both conceptualization and practice. Medical home demonstrations to date have included few evidence-based preventive services in their outcome measures, and few have evaluated the effect of different payment models. Decreasing use of hospitals and emergency rooms and an emphasis on improving chronic care represent improvements in effective delivery of healthcare, but leave opportunities for reducing the burden of cancer untouched. Data confirm that what does or does not happen in the primary care setting has a substantial impact on cancer outcomes. Insofar as cancer is the leading cause of death before age 80, the PCMH model must prioritize adherence to cancer screening according to recommended guidelines, and systems, financial incentives, and reimbursements must be aligned to achieve that goal. This article explores capacities that are needed in the medical home model to facilitate the integration of cancer screening and other preventive services. These capacities include improved patient access and communication, health risk assessments, periodic preventive health exams, use of registries that store cancer risk information and screening history, ability to track and follow up on tests and referrals, feedback on performance, and payment models that reward cancer screening. Copyright © 2011 American Cancer Society, Inc.

  20. Teleconsultation for integrated palliative care at home: A qualitative study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Gurp, J.; van Selm, M.; van Leeuwen, E.; Vissers, K.; Hasselaar, J.

    2016-01-01

    Background: Interprofessional consultation contributes to symptom control for home-based palliative care patients and improves advance care planning. Distance and travel time, however, complicate the integration of primary care and specialist palliative care. Expert online audiovisual

  1. Changes in symptoms and pain intensity of cancer patients after enrollment in palliative care at home

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dumitrescu, Luminita; van den Heuvel-Olaroiu, Marinela; van den Heuvel, Wim J. A.

    2007-01-01

    This study describes the activities and interventions carried out by an at-home palliative care team treating cancer patients who died within two years of being enrolled in a palliative care program. It analyzes which changes in symptoms and pain occurred and which sociodemographic and medical

  2. Agency Ownership, Patient Payment Source, and Length of Service in Home Care, 1992-2000

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Beth; McAuley, William J.; Remsburg, Robin E.

    2007-01-01

    Purpose: Little is known about whether an association exists between agency ownership and length of service among home care patients with different payment sources. This study investigated how for-profit and not-for-profit agencies responded to policy changes in the 1990s with respect to length of service. Design and Methods: We examined length of…

  3. Patient-Centered Medical Home in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ortiz G

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Gabriel Ortiz1, Len Fromer21Pediatric Pulmonary Services, El Paso, TX; 2Department of Family Medicine, David Geffen School of Medicine, UCLA, Los Angeles, CA, USAAbstract: Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD is a progressive and debilitating but preventable and treatable disease characterized by cough, phlegm, dyspnea, and fixed or incompletely reversible airway obstruction. Most patients with COPD rely on primary care practices for COPD management. Unfortunately, only about 55% of US outpatients with COPD receive all guideline-recommended care. Proactive and consistent primary care for COPD, as for many other chronic diseases, can reduce hospitalizations. Optimal chronic disease management requires focusing on maintenance rather than merely acute rescue. The Patient-Centered Medical Home (PCMH, which implements the chronic care model, is a promising framework for primary care transformation. This review presents core PCMH concepts and proposes multidisciplinary team-based PCMH care strategies for COPD.Keywords: Patient-Centered Medical Home, chronic care model, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, patient education, physician assistants, nurse practitioners

  4. Determinants of the Morning-Evening Home Blood Pressure Difference in Treated Hypertensives: The HIBA-Home Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lucas S. Aparicio

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. The morning home blood pressure (BP rise is a significant asymptomatic target organ damage predictor in hypertensives. Our aim was to evaluate determinants of home-based morning-evening difference (MEdiff in Argentine patients. Methods. Treated hypertensive patients aged ≥18 years participated in a cross-sectional study, after performing home morning and evening BP measurement. MEdiff was morning minus evening home average results. Variables identified as relevant predictors were entered into a multivariable linear regression analysis model. Results. Three hundred sixty-seven medicated hypertensives were included. Mean age was 66.2 (14.5, BMI 28.1 (4.5, total cholesterol 4.89 (1.0 mmol/L, 65.9% women, 11.7% smokers, and 10.6% diabetics. Mean MEdiff was 1.1 (12.5 mmHg systolic and 2.3 (6.1 mmHg diastolic, respectively. Mean self-recorded BP was 131.5 (14.1 mmHg systolic and 73.8 (7.6 mmHg diastolic, respectively. Mean morning and evening home BPs were 133.1 (16.5 versus 132 (15.7 systolic and 75.8 (8.4 versus 73.5 (8.2 diastolic, respectively. Significant beta-coefficient values were found in systolic MEdiff for age and smoking and in diastolic MEdiff for age, smoking, total cholesterol, and calcium-channel blockers. Conclusions. In a cohort of Argentine medicated patients, older age, smoking, total cholesterol, and use of calcium channel blockers were independent determinants of home-based MEdiff.

  5. [How can psychological help be provided for the patient/caregiver tandem home?].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boucharlat, M; Montani, C; Myslinski, M; Franco, A

    2006-01-01

    Elderly people and their family helpers are often isolated at home and do not have access to the professional psychological help that they require. For an elderly population, the trips to consulting rooms are difficult, tedious and expensive. Besides, maintaining a patient at home is heavy to manage for close relatives because of the organization, financial issues and above all the risk of psychological burnout. The literature shows us that psychological assistance is more common at distance from home, in hospitals, in special institutions or specific organizations. However, there is a clear need of help at home. We propose to develop psychological assistance at home for the patient/helper tandem in cases of dementia. This prospective study reports three different cases. This study is a qualitative pilot study. Participants characteristics: patients were diagnosed with severe dementia, assistance showed deep fatigue of the helper, both members of the tandem lived at home, age above 69 years, the eed for nursing care at home. THERAPEUTIC ASSESSMENT: The psychological clinician acts after proposing his helpand not on a clear request from the patient. He will meet his patient 7 times during 4 months. The meetings always take place in the same place and last 45 minutes. Confidentiality during the meeting is explained and guaranteed so the patient can speak openly. An independent psychologist assessed the monitoring in the hospital. Our methodology included two assessments: the first, assessing the task of the helper before the evaluation and the second taking into account a new measurent of the task and the opinions of the participants following a semi-directed interview. The evaluation of the task was performed using Zarit's scale. The evaluation was also based on the clinical observation of the psychologist. Organization of the monitoring: one meeting per week was sufficient for all participants with a minimal duration of 45 minutes. The fact that the meetingsrook

  6. Learning to care for older patients: hospitals and nursing homes as learning environments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huls, Marije; de Rooij, Sophia E; Diepstraten, Annemie; Koopmans, Raymond; Helmich, Esther

    2015-03-01

    A significant challenge facing health care is the ageing of the population, which calls for a major response in medical education. Most clinical learning takes place within hospitals, but nursing homes may also represent suitable learning environments in which students can gain competencies in geriatric medicine. This study explores what students perceive as the main learning outcomes of a geriatric medicine clerkship in a hospital or a nursing home, and explicitly addresses factors that may stimulate or hamper the learning process. This qualitative study falls within a constructivist paradigm: it draws on socio-cultural learning theory and is guided by the principles of constructivist grounded theory. There were two phases of data collection. Firstly, a maximum variation sample of 68 students completed a worksheet, giving brief written answers on questions regarding their geriatric medicine clerkships. Secondly, focus group discussions were conducted with 19 purposively sampled students. We used template analysis, iteratively cycling between data collection and analysis, using a constant comparative process. Students described a broad range of learning outcomes and formative experiences that were largely distinct from their learning in previous clerkships with regard to specific geriatric knowledge, deliberate decision making, end-of-life care, interprofessional collaboration and communication. According to students, the nursing home differed from the hospital in three aspects: interprofessional collaboration was more prominent; the lower resources available in nursing homes stimulated students to be creative, and students reported having greater autonomy in nursing homes compared with the more extensive educational guidance provided in hospitals. In both hospitals and nursing homes, students not only learn to care for older patients, but also describe various broader learning outcomes necessary to become good doctors. The results of our study, in particular the

  7. [Descriptive Analysis of Health Economics of Intensive Home Care of Ventilated Patients].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lehmann, Yvonne; Ostermann, Julia; Reinhold, Thomas; Ewers, Michael

    2018-05-14

    Long-term ventilated patients in Germany receive intensive care mainly in the patients' home or in assisted-living facilities. There is a lack of knowledge about the nature and extent of resource use and costs associated with care of this small, heterogeneous but overall growing patient group. A sub-study in the context of a research project SHAPE analyzed costs of 29 patients descriptively from a social perspective. Direct and indirect costs of intensive home care over a period of three months were recorded and analyzed retrospectively. Standardized recorded written self-reports from patients and relatives as well as information from the interviewing of nursing staff and from nursing documentation were the basis for this analysis. There was an average total cost of intensive home care for three months per patient of 61194 € (95% CI 53 884-68 504) including hospital stays. The main costs were directly linked to outpatient medical and nursing care provided according to the Code of Social Law V and XI. Services provided by nursing home care service according to § 37(2) Code of Social Law V (65%) were the largest cost item. Approximately 13% of the total costs were attributable to indirect costs. Intensive home care for ventilated patients is resource-intensive and cost-intensive and has received little attention also from a health economics perspective. Valid information and transparency about the cost structures are required for an effective and economic design and management of the long-term care of this patient group. © Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  8. Impact of Home Health Care on Health Care Resource Utilization Following Hospital Discharge: A Cohort Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiao, Roy; Miller, Jacob A; Zafirau, William J; Gorodeski, Eiran Z; Young, James B

    2018-04-01

    As healthcare costs rise, home health care represents an opportunity to reduce preventable adverse events and costs following hospital discharge. No studies have investigated the utility of home health care within the context of a large and diverse patient population. A retrospective cohort study was conducted between 1/1/2013 and 6/30/2015 at a single tertiary care institution to assess healthcare utilization after discharge with home health care. Control patients discharged with "self-care" were matched by propensity score to home health care patients. The primary outcome was total healthcare costs in the 365-day post-discharge period. Secondary outcomes included follow-up readmission and death. Multivariable linear and Cox proportional hazards regression were used to adjust for covariates. Among 64,541 total patients, 11,266 controls were matched to 6,363 home health care patients across 11 disease-based Institutes. During the 365-day post-discharge period, home health care was associated with a mean unadjusted savings of $15,233 per patient, or $6,433 after adjusting for covariates (p Home health care independently decreased the hazard of follow-up readmission (HR 0.82, p home health care most benefited patients discharged from the Digestive Disease (death HR 0.72, p home health care was associated with significant reduction in healthcare utilization and decreased hazard of readmission and death. These data inform development of value-based care plans. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Assessment of status of patients receiving palliative home care and services provided in a rural area-Kerala, India

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jayakrishnan Thayyil

    2012-01-01

    Conclusions: The service could address most of the medical, psychosocial, and supportive needs of the patients and reduce their pain and symptoms. The interface between institutional-based care and home care needs more exploration and prospective studies.

  10. A nationwide survey of patient centered medical home demonstration projects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bitton, Asaf; Martin, Carina; Landon, Bruce E

    2010-06-01

    The patient centered medical home has received considerable attention as a potential way to improve primary care quality and limit cost growth. Little information exists that systematically compares PCMH pilot projects across the country. Cross-sectional key-informant interviews. Leaders from existing PCMH demonstration projects with external payment reform. We used a semi-structured interview tool with the following domains: project history, organization and participants, practice requirements and selection process, medical home recognition, payment structure, practice transformation, and evaluation design. A total of 26 demonstrations in 18 states were interviewed. Current demonstrations include over 14,000 physicians caring for nearly 5 million patients. A majority of demonstrations are single payer, and most utilize a three component payment model (traditional fee for service, per person per month fixed payments, and bonus performance payments). The median incremental revenue per physician per year was $22,834 (range $720 to $91,146). Two major practice transformation models were identified--consultative and implementation of the chronic care model. A majority of demonstrations did not have well-developed evaluation plans. Current PCMH demonstration projects with external payment reform include large numbers of patients and physicians as well as a wide spectrum of implementation models. Key questions exist around the adequacy of current payment mechanisms and evaluation plans as public and policy interest in the PCMH model grows.

  11. Attractiveness of working in home care: An online focus group study among nurses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Groot, Kim; Maurits, Erica E M; Francke, Anneke L

    2018-01-01

    Many western countries are experiencing a substantial shortage of home-care nurses due to the increasing numbers of care-dependent people living at home. In-depth knowledge is needed about what home-care nurses find attractive about their work in order to make recommendations for the recruitment and retention of home-care nursing staff. The aims of this explorative, qualitative study were to gain in-depth knowledge about which aspects home-care nurses find attractive about their work and to explore whether these aspects vary for home-care nurses with different levels of education. Discussions were conducted with six online focus groups in 2016 with a total of 38 Dutch home-care nurses. The transcripts were analysed using the principles of thematic analysis. The findings showed that home-care nurses find it attractive that they are a "linchpin", in the sense of being the leading professional and with the patient as the centre of care. Home-care nurses also find having autonomy attractive: autonomy over decision-making about care, freedom in work scheduling and working in a self-directed team. Variety in patient situations and activities also makes their work attractive. Home-care nurses with a bachelor's degree did not differ much in what they found attractive aspects from those with an associate degree (a nursing qualification after completing senior secondary vocational education). It is concluded that autonomy, variety and being a "linchpin" are the attractive aspects of working in home care. To help recruit and retain home-care nursing staff, these attractive aspects should be emphasised in nursing education and practice, in recruitment programmes and in publicity material. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  12. What impact do anxiety, depression, perceived control and technology capability have on whether patients with chronic heart failure take-up or continue to use home tele-monitoring services? Study design of ADaPT-HF.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crundall-Goode, Amanda; Goode, Kevin M; Clark, Andrew L

    2017-04-01

    Home tele-monitoring (HTM) is used to monitor the clinical signs and symptoms of patients with chronic heart failure (CHF) in order to reduce unplanned hospital admissions. However, not all patients who are referred will agree to use HTM, and some patients choose to withdraw early from its use. ADaPT-HF will investigate whether depression, anxiety, low perceived control, reduced technology capability, level of education, age or the severity or complexity of a patient's illness can predict refusal of, or early withdrawal from, HTM in patients with CHF. The study will recruit 288 patients who have been recently admitted to hospital with heart failure who have been referred for HTM. At the time of referral, patients will complete depression (nine-item Patient Health Questionnaire), anxiety (seven-item Generalised Anxiety Disorder questionnaire), perceived control (eight-item revised Controlled Attitudes Scale) and technology capability (ten-item Technology Readiness Index 2.0) screening questionnaires. In addition, data on demographics, diagnosis, clinical examination, socio-economic status, history of comorbidities, medication, biochemistry and haematology will be recorded. The primary outcome will be a composite of refusal of or early withdrawal from HTM. The principle analysis will be made using logistic regression. By establishing which factors influence a patient's decision to refuse or withdraw early from HTM, it may be possible to redesign HTM referral processes. It may be that patients with CHF who also have depression, anxiety, low control and poor technology skills should not be referred until they receive appropriate support or that they should be managed differently when they do receive HTM. The results of ADAPT-HF may provide a way of making more efficient and cost-effective use of HTM services.

  13. Saving our backs: safe patient handling and mobility for home care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beauvais, Audrey; Frost, Lenore

    2014-01-01

    Predicted work-related injuries for nurses and home healthcare workers are on the rise given the many risk factors in the home environment and the escalating demands for home healthcare workers in the United States. Fortunately, safe patient handling and mobility programs can dramatically decrease injuries. Despite strides being made to promote safe patient handling and mobility programs in acute care, more can be done to establish such initiatives in the home care setting.

  14. Medication errors in home care: a qualitative focus group study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berland, Astrid; Bentsen, Signe Berit

    2017-11-01

    To explore registered nurses' experiences of medication errors and patient safety in home care. The focus of care for older patients has shifted from institutional care towards a model of home care. Medication errors are common in this situation and can result in patient morbidity and mortality. An exploratory qualitative design with focus group interviews was used. Four focus group interviews were conducted with 20 registered nurses in home care. The data were analysed using content analysis. Five categories were identified as follows: lack of information, lack of competence, reporting medication errors, trade name products vs. generic name products, and improving routines. Medication errors occur frequently in home care and can threaten the safety of patients. Insufficient exchange of information and poor communication between the specialist and home-care health services, and between general practitioners and healthcare workers can lead to medication errors. A lack of competence in healthcare workers can also lead to medication errors. To prevent these, it is important that there should be up-to-date information and communication between healthcare workers during the transfer of patients from specialist to home care. Ensuring competence among healthcare workers with regard to medication is also important. In addition, there should be openness and accurate reporting of medication errors, as well as in setting routines for the preparation, alteration and administration of medicines. To prevent medication errors in home care, up-to-date information and communication between healthcare workers is important when patients are transferred from specialist to home care. It is also important to ensure adequate competence with regard to medication, and that there should be openness when medication errors occur, as well as in setting routines for the preparation, alteration and administration of medications. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  15. [Clinical utility of home blood pressure monitoring in patients under treatment].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bauk, L; Costa, H A; Caligiuri, S I

    2015-01-01

    A low number of patients who are treated with antihypertensive drugs achieve therapeutic goals. Home blood pressure monitoring is an excellent tool for studying this population. To determine the prevalence of patients with controlled and uncontrolled hypertension, as well as white-coat-effect and masked hypertension, and to evaluate the relationship with target organ damage in different groups. Blood pressure readings were performed simultaneously in the clinic and in the home using the same validated oscillometric equipment on 83 hypertensive patients on treatment with 2 or more antihypertensive drugs. They were then classified into 4 groups according to the cut-off values of the clinic and home blood pressure measurements. Left ventricular mass index, carotid intima media thickness, and microalbuminuria as markers of target organ damage, were also evaluated. Controlled blood pressure was present in 32.5%, 30.2% had sustained hypertension. The white coat effect was seen in 26.5%, while 10.8% were masked uncontrolled hypertension. Left ventricular mass index was higher in patients with no ambulatory control compared to controlled patients, and carotid IMT was also higher too in uncontrolled and white coat effect groups than controlled patients. More than one third of our patients who were treated with 2 or more drugs were not properly controlled, and they had significantly greater target organ damage than controlled patients. Copyright © 2014 SEHLELHA. Published by Elsevier Espana. All rights reserved.

  16. Predictors for living at home after geriatric inpatient rehabilitation: A prospective cohort study.

    OpenAIRE

    Kool, Jan; Oesch, Peter; Bachmann, Stefan

    2017-01-01

    OBJECTIVE To evaluate patient characteristics predicting living at home after geriatric rehabilitation. DESIGN Prospective cohort study. PATIENTS A total of 210 patients aged 65 years or older receiving inpatient rehabilitation. METHODS Candidate predictors evaluated during rehabilitation were: age, vulnerability (Vulnerable Elders Survey), multimorbidity (Cumulative Illness Rating Scale), cognition (Mini-Mental State Examination), depression (Hospital Anxiety and ...

  17. Patient satisfaction with home-birth care in The Netherlands.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kerssens, J.J.

    1994-01-01

    One of the necessary elements in an obstetric system of home confinements is well-organized postnatal home care. In The Netherlands home care assistants assist midwives during home delivery, they care for the new mother as well as the newborn baby, instruct the family on infant health care and carry

  18. Predictors of Discharge to Home after Thrombolytic Treatment in Right Hemisphere Infarct Patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E-I. Ruuskanen

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Background The aim of the study was to assess the association between thrombolysis and length of hospital stay after right hemisphere (RH infarct, and to identify which cognitive functions were predictive of discharge. Methods The study group consisted of 75 acute RH patients. Thirty-three patients had thrombolysis. Neuropsychologicalexaminations were performed within 11 days of stroke onset. The cognitive predictors were visual neglect, visual memory, visual search and reasoning and visuoconstructive abilities. The outcome variable was time from stroke to discharge to home. Results Thrombolysis emerged as a statistically significant predictor of discharge time in patients with moderate/severe stroke (NIHSS ≥5. In the total series of patients and in patients with mild stroke (NIHSS <5, thrombolysiswas not significantly associated with discharge time. Milder visuoconstructive defects shortened the hospital stay of the whole patient group and of patients with moderate/severe stroke. In all patient groups, independence in activitiesof daily living (ADL was a significant single predictor of a shorter hospital stay. The best combination of predictors for discharge was independence in ADL in the total series of patients and in patients with mild stroke, and thrombolysis and independence in ADL in patients with moderate/severe stroke. Conclusions Thrombolytic treatment was a significant predictor of earlier discharge to home in patients with moderate/severe RH infarct, while cognitive functions had less predictive power.

  19. Study of information needs of juveniles in Asero remand home ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The study examines the information needs of juveniles in Asero remand home, Abeokuta, Ogun State, Nigeria. A structured questionnaire was used to obtain data for the study. Interviews were also conducted with the staff of the home to supplement the data. Of the respondents 100% revealed that their major information ...

  20. Quality of life of patients with schizophrenia treated in foster home care and in outpatient treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mihanović M

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Mate Mihanović,1,2 Branka Restek-Petrović,1,2 Anamarija Bogović,1 Ena Ivezić,1 Davor Bodor,1 Ivan Požgain3 1Psychiatric Hospital “Sveti Ivan”, Zagreb, 2Faculty of Medicine Osijek, Josip Juraj Strossmayer University of Osijek, 3Department of Psychiatry, University Hospital Center Osijek, Osijek, Croatia Background: The Sveti Ivan Psychiatric Hospital in Zagreb, Croatia, offers foster home care treatment that includes pharmacotherapy, group psychodynamic psychotherapy, family therapy, and work and occupational therapy. The aim of this study is to compare the health-related quality of life of patients with schizophrenia treated in foster home care with that of patients in standard outpatient treatment. Methods: The sample consisted of 44 patients with schizophrenia who, upon discharge from the hospital, were included in foster home care treatment and a comparative group of 50 patients who returned to their families and continued receiving outpatient treatment. All patients completed the Short Form 36 Health Survey Questionnaire on the day they completed hospital treatment, 6 months later, and 1 year after they participated in the study. The research also included data on the number of hospitalizations for both groups of patients. Results: Though directly upon discharge from the hospital, patients who entered foster home care treatment assessed their health-related quality of life as poorer than patients who returned to their families, their assessments significantly improved over time. After 6 months of treatment, these patients even achieved better results in several dimensions than did patients in the outpatient program, and they also had fewer hospitalizations. These effects remained the same at the follow-up 1 year after the inclusion in the study. Conclusion: Notwithstanding the limitations of this study, it can be concluded that treatment in foster home care is associated with an improvement in the quality of life of patients

  1. Comparative economic evaluation of home-based and hospital-based palliative care for terminal cancer patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kato, Koki; Fukuda, Haruhisa

    2017-11-01

    To quantify the difference between adjusted costs for home-based palliative care and hospital-based palliative care in terminally ill cancer patients. We carried out a case-control study of home-care patients (cases) who had died at home between January 2009 and December 2013, and hospital-care patients (controls) who had died at a hospital between April 2008 and December 2013. Data on patient characteristics were obtained from insurance claims data and medical records. We identified the determinants of home care using a multivariate logistic regression analysis. Cox proportional hazards analysis was used to examine treatment duration in both types of care, and a generalized linear model was used to estimate the reduction in treatment costs associated with home care. The case and control groups comprised 48 and 99 patients, respectively. Home care was associated with one or more person(s) living with the patient (adjusted OR 6.54, 95% CI 1.18-36.05), required assistance for activities of daily living (adjusted OR 3.61, 95% CI 1.12-10.51), non-use of oxygen inhalation therapy (adjusted OR 12.75, 95% CI 3.53-46.02), oral or suppository opioid use (adjusted OR 5.74, 95% CI 1.11-29.54) and transdermal patch opioid use (adjusted OR 8.30, 95% CI 1.97-34.93). The adjusted hazard ratio of home care for treatment duration was not significant (adjusted OR 0.95, 95% CI 0.59-1.53). However, home care was significantly associated with a reduction of $7523 (95% CI $7093-7991, P = 0.015) in treatment costs. Despite similar treatment durations between the groups, treatment costs were substantially lower in the home-care group. These findings might inform the policymaking process for improving the home-care support system. Geriatr Gerontol Int 2017; 17: 2247-2254. © 2017 Japan Geriatrics Society.

  2. Home

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    AF Branding & Trademark Licensing Join the Air Force Home About Us The Air Force Symbol Display Resources Document Library TM Connect Search AF Branding and Trademark Licensing Program: important links Legal Documents 10 U.S.C. § 2260 15 U.S.C. § 167;167; 1114-1125 DODI 5535.12, DoD Branding and

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    intersect as Attack Wing leaders change roles The 112th COS postured as cyber shield for Pa. infrastructure 111th Attack Wing 111th Attack Wing 21st Century Guard Airmen Home News Photos Art Video Resources - The Balance Search 111th Attack Wing: COMMUNITY/ENVIRO May 16, 2018; Pa. Department of Health update

  4. [Perspective of informal caregivers on home care. Qualitative study with a computer program].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prieto Rodríguez, M Angeles; Gil García, Eugenia; Heierle Valero, Cristina; Frías Osuna, Antonio

    2002-01-01

    A hot debate exists in our country as to the models of home care which must be developed. This study is aimed at ascertaining how the family caregivers of terminal cancer patients, of the elderly suffering from dementia and of individuals having undergone major operations in outpatient surgery programs rate the quality of the home care provided. A phenomenological type qualitative study based on discussion groups (9), triangular groups (5) and in-depth interviews (22). This study was conducted in Andalusia throughout the 1999-2000 period. The subjects of the study were the main caregivers of patients provided with home care through the healthcare centers. The information must be analyzed by means of a Nudist-4 software-aided content analysis. The analysis variables were those of the Servqual model. For the caregivers of cancer patients, the most important aspects of the quality of the home care provided were the Response Capacity and Accessibility. This analysis revealed that the patients suffered pain but the pain was not controlled. Negative aspects hindering accessibility were the lack of home care coverage outside of regular working hours, the difficulty of getting in touch by phone, the length of time it takes for someone to come and the visits solely on request. The caregivers of patients having undergone major outpatient surgery want Security and Reliability. They complain of the short length of time within which the patients are released from the hospital and of the home care provided by the health care center. The caregivers of the elderly with dementia place top priority on being provided with the materials they need to take care of these patients. Caregivers' and patients' expectations differ, depending on health problems, therefore, the type of home care provided should vary, according to the health problems involved. It is necessary to develop a flexible model, capable of adapting to different patient needs and the diverse circumstances that affect

  5. How Accurate Are Home Blood Pressure Devices in Use? A Cross-Sectional Study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcel Ruzicka

    Full Text Available Out of office blood pressure measurements, using either home monitors or 24 hour ambulatory monitoring, is widely recommended for management of hypertension. Though validation protocols, meant to be used by manufacturers, exist for blood pressure monitors, there is scant data in the literature about the accuracy of home blood pressure monitors in actual clinical practice. We performed a chart review in the blood pressure assessment clinic at a tertiary care centre.We assessed the accuracy of home blood pressure monitors used by patients seen in the nephrology clinic in Ottawa between the years 2011 to 2014. We recorded patient demographics and clinical data, including the blood pressure measurements, arm circumference and the manufacturer of the home blood pressure monitor. The average of BP measurements performed with the home blood pressure monitor, were compared to those with the mercury sphygmomanometer. We defined accuracy based on a difference of 5 mm Hg in the blood pressure values between the home monitor and mercury sphygmomanometer readings. The two methods were compared using a Bland-Altman plot and a student's t-test.The study included 210 patients. The mean age of the study population was 67 years and 61% was men. The average mid-arm circumference was 32.2 cms. 30% and 32% of the home BP monitors reported a mean systolic and diastolic BP values, respectively, different from the mercury measurements by 5 mm Hg or more. There was no significant difference between the monitors that were accurate versus those that were not when grouped according to the patient characteristics, cuff size or the brand of the home monitor.An important proportion of home blood pressure monitors used by patients seen in our nephrology clinic were inaccurate. A re-validation of the accuracy and safety of the devices already in use is prudent before relying on these measurements for clinical decisions.

  6. Coordinated hospital-home care for kidney patients on hemodialysis from the perspective of nursing personnel

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luz María Tejada-Tayabas

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: To examine, from the nursing perspective, the needs and challenges of coordinated hospital-home care for renal patients on hemodialysis. METHODS: A qualitative analysis was conducted with an ethnographic approach in a hemodialysis unit in San Luis Potosi, Mexico. Semistructured interviews were conducted with nine nurses, selected by purposeful sampling. Structured content analysis was used. RESULTS: Nurses recounted the needs and challenges involved in caring for renal patients. They also identified barriers that limit coordinated patient care in the hospital and the home, mainly the work overload at the hemodialysis unit and the lack of a systematic strategy for education and lifelong guidance to patients, their families and caregivers. CONCLUSIONS: This study shows the importance and necessity of establishing a strategy that goes beyond conventional guidance provided to caregivers of renal patients, integrating them into the multidisciplinary group of health professionals that provide care for these patients in the hospital to establish coordinated hospital-home care that increases therapeutic adherence, treatment substitution effectiveness and patient quality of life.

  7. Smart homes, private homes? An empirical study of technology researchers? perceptions of ethical issues in developing smart-home health technologies

    OpenAIRE

    Birchley, Giles; Huxtable, Richard; Murtagh, Madeleine; ter Meulen, Ruud; Flach, Peter; Gooberman-Hill, Rachael

    2017-01-01

    Background Smart-home technologies, comprising environmental sensors, wearables and video are attracting interest in home healthcare delivery. Development of such technology is usually justified on the basis of the technology?s potential to increase the autonomy of people living with long-term conditions. Studies of the ethics of smart-homes raise concerns about privacy, consent, social isolation and equity of access. Few studies have investigated the ethical perspectives of smart-home engine...

  8. Comparative Study of the Influence of the Home Background on ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The purpose of this study was finding out how the various home environments in which students live affect the development of their ability to continue with school academic success. It sought to establish if there was any relationship between the home front and the students' academic achievement. Within these ...

  9. Nurse-patient interaction is a resource for hope, meaning in life and self-transcendence in nursing home patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haugan, Gørill

    2014-03-01

    Spiritual dimensions such as hope, meaning in life and self-transcendence have been found to be predictors of successful ageing, life satisfaction and well-being in older individuals. Connectedness and communicating with others have been seen to facilitate hope, meaning in life and self-transcendence among nursing home patients. This study aimed to investigate the associations between hope, meaning in life, self-transcendence and nurse-patient interaction in a nursing home population. A cross-sectional design was employed, collecting data in 44 different Norwegian nursing homes (NHs) from 250 patients who met the inclusion criteria. Approval by all regulatory institutions dealing with research issues in Norway and the Management Unit at the 44 NHs was obtained. A sample of 202 cognitively intact nursing home patients responded to the Herth Hope Index, the Purpose in Life test, the Self-Transcendence Scale and the Nurse-Patient Interaction Scale. A structural equation model (SEM) of the hypothesized relationships between the constructs was tested. The SEM model fit well with the present data. Significant direct relationships of nurse-patient interaction on hope, meaning in life and self-transcendence were displayed. Meaning and the interconnectedness dimension of hope appeared to be particularly dynamic resources, revealing significant influences on all the constructs in the SEM model tested. Nurse-patient interaction influences hope, meaning in life and self-transcendence in cognitively intact nursing home patients and might be an important resource in relation to patients' health and global well-being. Thus, care providers are above all fundamental for nursing home patients. Advancing caregivers' interacting and communicating skills might facilitate patients' health and global well-being and inspire professional caregivers as they perform their daily care practices. More research of the effectiveness of such strategies is greatly needed. The SEM model tested

  10. Rationale and design for the Asia BP@Home study on home blood pressure control status in 12 Asian countries and regions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kario, Kazuomi; Tomitani, Naoko; Buranakitjaroen, Peera; Chen, Chen-Huan; Chia, Yook-Chin; Divinagracia, Romeo; Park, Sungha; Shin, Jinho; Siddique, Saulat; Sison, Jorge; Soenarta, Arieska Ann; Sogunuru, Guru Prasad; Tay, Jam Chin; Turana, Yuda; Wang, Ji-Guang; Wong, Lawrence; Zhang, Yuqing; Wanthong, Sirisawat; Hoshide, Satoshi; Kanegae, Hiroshi

    2018-01-01

    Home blood pressure (BP) monitoring is endorsed in multiple guidelines as a valuable adjunct to office BP measurements for the diagnosis and management of hypertension. In many countries throughout Asia, physicians are yet to appreciate the significant contribution of BP variability to cardiovascular events. Furthermore, data from Japanese cohort studies have shown that there is a strong association between morning BP surge and cardiovascular events, suggesting that Asians in general may benefit from more effective control of morning BP. We designed the Asia BP@Home study to investigate the distribution of hypertension subtypes, including white-coat hypertension, masked morning hypertension, and well-controlled and uncontrolled hypertension. The study will also investigate the determinants of home BP control status evaluated by the same validated home BP monitoring device and the same standardized method of home BP measurement among 1600 or more medicated patients with hypertension from 12 countries/regions across Asia. ©2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  11. Development of eHOME, a Mobile Instrument for Reporting, Monitoring, and Consulting Drug-Related Problems in Home Care: Human-Centered Design Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dijkstra, Nienke Elske; Sino, Carolina Geertruida Maria; Heerdink, Eibert Rob; Schuurmans, Marieke Joanna

    2018-03-07

    Home care patients often use many medications and are prone to drug-related problems (DRPs). For the management of problems related to drug use, home care could add to the multidisciplinary expertise of general practitioners (GPs) and pharmacists. The home care observation of medication-related problems by home care employees (HOME)-instrument is paper-based and assists home care workers in reporting potential DRPs. To facilitate the multiprofessional consultation, a digital report of DRPs from the HOME-instrument and digital monitoring and consulting of DRPs between home care and general practices and pharmacies is desired. The objective of this study was to develop an electronic HOME system (eHOME), a mobile version of the HOME-instrument that includes a monitoring and a consulting system for primary care. The development phase of the Medical Research Council (MRC) framework was followed in which an iterative human-centered design (HCD) approach was applied. The approach involved a Delphi round for the context of use and user requirements analysis of the digital HOME-instrument and the monitoring and consulting system followed by 2 series of pilots for testing the usability and redesign. By using an iterative design approach and by involving home care workers, GPs, and pharmacists throughout the process as informants, design partners, and testers, important aspects that were crucial for system realization and user acceptance were revealed. Through the report webpage interface, which includes the adjusted content of the HOME-instrument and added home care practice-based problems, home care workers can digitally report observed DRPs. Furthermore, it was found that the monitoring and consulting webpage interfaces enable digital consultation between home care and general practices and pharmacies. The webpages were considered convenient, clear, easy, and usable. By employing an HCD approach, the eHOME-instrument was found to be an easy-to-use system. The systematic

  12. Prevalence and predictors of potentially inappropriate medications among home care elderly patients in Qatar.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alhmoud, Eman; Khalifa, Sabah; Bahi, Asma Abdulaziz

    2015-10-01

    Older patients receiving home health care are particularly at risk of receiving potentially inappropriate medications compared to community-dwelling population. Data on appropriateness of prescribing in these patients is limited. To investigate the prevalence, patterns and determinants of potentially inappropriate medications among elderly patients receiving Home Health Care Services in Qatar. Home Health Care Services department in Hamad Medical Corporation-Qatar. A cross-sectional study, conducted over a 3 months period. Patients 65 years and older, taking at least one medication and receiving home care services were included. Potentially inappropriate medications were identified and classified in accordance with the American Geriatrics Society 2012 Beers Criteria. Prevalence of potentially inappropriate medications using updated Beers criteria. A total of 191 patients (38.2%) had at least one potentially inappropriate medication. As per Beers criteria, 35% of medications were classified as medications to be avoided in older adults regardless of conditions and 9% as potentially inappropriate medications when used with certain diseases or syndromes. The majority of potentially inappropriate medications (56%) were classified as medications to be used with caution. The two leading classes of potentially inappropriate medications were antipsychotics (27.4%) and selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (16%). Significant predictors of inappropriate prescribing were hypertension [adjusted OR 1.7; 95% CI (1.0, 2.8)], dementia [adjusted OR 2.0; 95% CI (1.2, 3.1)], depression [adjusted OR 21.6; 95% CI (2.8, 168.4)], and taking more than ten prescribed medications [adjusted OR 1.9; 95% CI (1.3, 2.8)]. Prescribing potentially inappropriate medications is common among older adults receiving home health care services in Qatar, a finding that warrants further attention. Polypharmacy, hypertension, depression and dementia were significantly associated with potentially

  13. Nutritional intake of gut failure patients on home parenteral nutrition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    DiCecco, S.; Nelson, J.; Burnes, J.; Fleming, C.R.

    1987-01-01

    Nutrient intake patterns were analyzed in 23 patients with gut failure who were receiving home parenteral nutrition (HPN). All patients had stable weights without changes in intravenous calories or protein for 3 consecutive months. Our objectives were to assess oral intake of calories, carbohydrates, fat, and protein, to examine relationships between oral nutrient intakes and disease categories, and to compare oral and intravenous intakes to calculated resting energy expenditure (REE). Two patterns of oral nutrient intake were identified among the patients. Patients with short bowel syndrome, regardless of the underlying disease, consumed calories by mouth that clearly exceeded calculated resting energy expenditure (short bowel, non-Crohn's, 170% of REE; short bowel, Crohn's, 200 of REE); however, calories approximating the REE had to be given via HPN, suggesting that efficiency of absorption was at a very low level. Patients with diffuse gut diseases (radiation enteritis or pseudo-obstruction syndromes) had very low intakes of oral nutrients. The distribution of oral calories among carbohydrate, protein, and fat did not differ among the disease categories

  14. Results of home parenteral nutrition in patients with severe inflammatory bowel disease - an alternative for surgery of malnourished patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turkot, Maryla; Sobocki, Jacek

    2017-10-31

    In the world, the inflammatory bowel disease affects an increasing number of younger and younger patients, and in some of them parenteral nutrition is an alternative to high-risk surgical intervention due to advancement of the disease and malnutrition. The aim of the study was to assess the results of home parenteral nutrition in patients with severe bowel inflammatory disease, in whom surgical treatment is associated with high risk of complications. A retrospective analysis was conducted on 46 patients, who received home parenteral nutrition instead of another surgical intervention. The inclusion criteria included home parenteral nutrition and diagnosis of Crohn's disease or ulcerative colitis. Mean number of complications requiring hospital admission per patient was 1.76, the BMI increased by 4.3 on average [kg/m2]. During parenteral nutrition, the percentage of patients, in whom anti-inflammatory or immunosuppressant drugs were completely discontinued, was 17.4%. In the whole group, at least one immunosuppressive drug was discontinued in onefifth of patients. Mean albumin level increased by 2.4 g/L, lymphocyte count dropped by 474 lymphocytes/mm3, and leukocyte count increased by 747.6/mm3. The patients described their condition as good in 87%, and 7.4% of patients were able to work. Home parenteral nutrition positively affects patient's general condition by increasing BMI and normalizing biochemical test results. The results indicate the need to consider this method as an alternative to surgical intervention in severe bowel inflammatory disease with high perioperative risk, which could reduce the complication rate.

  15. An configuration method of patient service cloud for the home patient with multi sensor network

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Noji, Tamotsu; Arino, Masashi; Saito, Mayuko; Horii, Minoru; Ogino, Tadashi; Suto, Yasuzo; Sasaki, Hitoshi; Mansei, Kouiti

    2010-01-01

    We are advancing the research of patient service cloud in the global medical collaboration network system based on 3D electronic referral letters. In this paper it proposes one configuration method of private cloud that aims at the home care patient's health care and independence support based on voice navigation system (VONAVS). We evaluate 3D image compression rate, try image compositing Cloud's configuration by the multi sensor network, and search for the configuration method of the remote image diagnosis. The proposed configuration method expands the possibility to the global medical collaboration network system for new large areas such as a telemedicine, an emergency care, and home medical care. (author)

  16. A Nationwide Survey of Patient Centered Medical Home Demonstration Projects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bitton, Asaf; Martin, Carina

    2010-01-01

    Background The patient centered medical home has received considerable attention as a potential way to improve primary care quality and limit cost growth. Little information exists that systematically compares PCMH pilot projects across the country. Design Cross-sectional key-informant interviews. Participants Leaders from existing PCMH demonstration projects with external payment reform. Measurements We used a semi-structured interview tool with the following domains: project history, organization and participants, practice requirements and selection process, medical home recognition, payment structure, practice transformation, and evaluation design. Results A total of 26 demonstrations in 18 states were interviewed. Current demonstrations include over 14,000 physicians caring for nearly 5 million patients. A majority of demonstrations are single payer, and most utilize a three component payment model (traditional fee for service, per person per month fixed payments, and bonus performance payments). The median incremental revenue per physician per year was $22,834 (range $720 to $91,146). Two major practice transformation models were identified—consultative and implementation of the chronic care model. A majority of demonstrations did not have well-developed evaluation plans. Conclusion Current PCMH demonstration projects with external payment reform include large numbers of patients and physicians as well as a wide spectrum of implementation models. Key questions exist around the adequacy of current payment mechanisms and evaluation plans as public and policy interest in the PCMH model grows. Electronic supplementary material The online version of this article (doi:10.1007/s11606-010-1262-8) contains supplementary material, which is available to authorized users. PMID:20467907

  17. Staff attitude and experience in dealing with rational nursing home patients who refuse to eat and drink.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mattiasson, A C; Andersson, L

    1994-11-01

    This paper describes the personal attitudes of nursing home staff and their experience of coping with rational nursing home patients who refused to eat and drink. Professional caregivers in 13 nursing homes and nursing home units in the county of Stockholm, Sweden, were asked to judge an ethical conflict involving a situation in which a patient of sound mind refused to eat and drink. Two questions were raised: (a) What would your unit's decision be in this case? (b) What is your personal opinion in this case? Answers to question (a) showed that 20% believed that the patient's autonomy would be respected, i.e. the patient would be allowed to die without medical intervention. Concerning question (b), the results showed that approximately 50% believed that the patient's wishes regarding food refusal must be respected. Furthermore, the results suggested that both professional category and number of years' service made a difference to the staff views on patient autonomy. Finally, the findings indicated that the nursing homes included in the study did not show any distinct policy with regard to the autonomy of elderly nursing home patients in refusing to eat and drink.

  18. Acute impact of home parenteral nutrition in patients with late-stage cancer on family caregivers: preliminary data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santarpia, Lidia; Bozzetti, Federico

    2018-02-01

    Since there is no information regarding quality of life of caregivers assisting patients with advanced malignancy on home parenteral nutrition, herewith we report a preliminary series of 19 patients who received total parenteral nutrition at home under the strict supervision of their relatives. The relatives of 19 incurable patients with cancer-related cachexia, discharged from the hospital with a home parenteral nutrition program, were prospectively studied. They filled out a validated questionnaire, the Family Strain Questionnaire Short Form, prior to patient discharge and after 2 weeks of home care. The questionnaire included 30 items, which explored different domains regarding the superimposed burden on caregivers in relation to the assistance given to their relatives. Our findings show that the basal level of strain was relatively high (about three quarters of positive answers) but did not increase after 2 weeks of home care. Similarly, there was no difference in the nutritional status and quality of life of the patients. Eight patients and their relatives could be also analyzed after 2 months and the results maintained unchanged. This preliminary investigation shows that home parenteral nutrition does not exacerbate the level of strain on caregivers involved in surveillance of such a supportive intervention. It is possible that the perception of an active contribution to the benefit of patients, who maintained unchanged their nutritional status and quality of life, could gratify caregivers despite the objective burden in the constant supervision of administering Parenteral Nutrition.

  19. Using Technology, Clinical Workflow Redesign, and Team Solutions to Achieve the Patient Centered Medical Home

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-01

    Redesign, and Team Solutions to Achieve the Patient Centered Medical Home LTC Nicole Kerkenbush, MHA, MN Army Medical Department, Office of the...TITLE AND SUBTITLE Using Technology, Clinical Workflow Redesign, and Team Solutions to Achieve the Patient Centered Medical Home 5a. CONTRACT...Describe how these tools are being used to implement the Patient Centered Medical Home care model 2 2011 MHS Conference MEDCOM AHLTA Provider Satisfaction

  20. The Patient-Centered Medical Home Neighbor: A Critical Concept for a Redesigned Healthcare Delivery System

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-25

    Sharing Knowledge: Achieving Breakthrough Performance 2010 Military Health System Conference The Patient -Centered Medical Home Neighbor: A Critical...DATE 25 JAN 2011 2. REPORT TYPE 3. DATES COVERED 00-00-2011 to 00-00-2011 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE The Patient -Centered Medical Home Neighbor: A...Conference What is the Patient -Centered Medical Home?  …a vision of health care as it should be  …a framework for organizing systems of care at both the

  1. HIA 2016 DOE Zero Energy Ready Home Case Study: Mandalay Homes, Cathedral Point at The Dells, Prescott, AZ

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pacific Northwest National Laboratory

    2016-09-01

    Case study of a DOE 2016 Housing Innovation Award winning production home in the mixed-dry climate that met the DOE Zero Energy Ready Home criteria and achieved a HERS 47 without PV or HERS -2 with PV.

  2. Shortening a Patient Experiences Survey for Medical Homes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Judy H. Ng

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available The Consumer Assessment of Healthcare Providers and Systems—Patient-Centered Medical Home (CAHPS PCMH Survey assesses patient experiences reflecting domains of care related to general patient experience (access to care, communication with providers, office staff interaction, provider rating and PCMH-specific aspects of patient care (comprehensiveness of care, self-management support, shared decision making. The current work compares psychometric properties of the current survey and a proposed shortened version of the survey (from 52 to 26 adult survey items, from 66 to 31 child survey items. The revisions were based on initial psychometric analysis and stakeholder input regarding survey length concerns. A total of 268 practices voluntarily submitted adult surveys and 58 submitted child survey data to the National Committee for Quality Assurance in 2013. Mean unadjusted scores, practice-level item and composite reliability, and item-to-scale correlations were calculated. Results show that the shorter adult survey has lower reliability, but still it still meets general definitions of a sound survey for the adult version, and resulted in few changes to mean scores. The impact was more problematic for the pediatric version. Further testing is needed to investigate approaches to improving survey response and the relevance of survey items in informing quality improvement.

  3. 78 FR 53506 - Proposed Information Collection (Care Coordination Home Telehealth (CCHT) Patient Satisfaction...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-08-29

    ... Coordination Home Telehealth (CCHT) Patient Satisfaction Survey, VA Form 10-0481); Activity: Comment Request... required to obtain patient perspective on satisfaction with the CCHT program and messaging devices. DATES.... Titles: Care Coordination Home Telehealth (CCHT) Patient Satisfaction Survey, VA Form 10-0481. OMB...

  4. 78 FR 76193 - Agency Information Collection (Care Coordination Home Telehealth (CCHT) Patient Satisfaction...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-12-16

    ... Coordination Home Telehealth (CCHT) Patient Satisfaction Survey) Activities Under OMB Review AGENCY: Veterans... patient perspective on satisfaction with the CCHT program and messaging devices. DATES: Comments must be...: Care Coordination Home Telehealth (CCHT) Patient Satisfaction Survey, VA Form 10-0481. Type of Review...

  5. Cost-effectiveness of the Australian Medical Sheepskin for the prevention of pressure ulcers in somatic nursing home patients: study protocol for a prospective multi-centre randomised controlled trial (ISRCTN17553857).

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mistiaen, P.; Achterberg, W.P.; Ament, A.; Halfen, R.; Huizinga, J.; Montgomery, K.; Post, H.; Francke, A.

    2008-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Pressure ulcers are a major problem, especially in nursing home patients, although they are regarded as preventable and there are many pressure relieving methods and materials. One such pressure relieving material is the recently developed Australian Medical Sheepskin, which has been

  6. The Healthy Home Offerings via the Mealtime Environment (HOME) Plus study: Design and methods1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fulkerson, Jayne A.; Neumark-Sztainer, Dianne; Story, Mary; Gurvich, Olga; Kubik, Martha Y.; Garwick, Ann; Dudovitz, Bonnie

    2014-01-01

    Background Informed and engaged parents and healthful home environments are essential for the health of youth. Although research has shown health benefits associated with family meals, to date, no randomized controlled trial (RCT) has been developed to examine the impact of a family meals intervention on behavioral and health outcomes. Methods/Design The Healthy Home Offerings via the Mealtime Environment (HOME) Plus study is a two-arm (intervention versus attention-only control) RCT being conducted in Minneapolis/St. Paul. Built on previous pilot research, HOME Plus aims to increase the frequency and healthfulness of family meals and snacks and reduce children’s sedentary behavior, particularly screen time, to promote healthier eating and activity behaviors and prevent obesity. HOME Plus is delivered to families in community settings. The program includes 10 monthly sessions focused on nutrition and activity education, meal planning and preparation skill development. In addition, five motivational goal-setting phone calls are conducted with parents. The primary outcome measure is age- and gender-adjusted child BMI-z score at post-intervention by treatment group. Secondary household-level outcomes include family meal frequency, home availability of healthful foods (fruits/vegetables) and unhealthful foods (high-fat/sugary snacks) and beverages (sugar-sweetened beverages), and the quality of foods served at meals and snacks. Secondary child outcomes include dietary intake of corresponding foods and beverages and screen time. Conclusions The HOME Plus RCT actively engages whole families of 8–12 year old children to promote healthier eating and activity behaviors and prevent obesity through promotion of family meals and snacks and limited media use. PMID:24480729

  7. The Healthy Home Offerings via the Mealtime Environment (HOME) Plus study: design and methods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fulkerson, Jayne A; Neumark-Sztainer, Dianne; Story, Mary; Gurvich, Olga; Kubik, Martha Y; Garwick, Ann; Dudovitz, Bonnie

    2014-05-01

    Informed and engaged parents and healthful home environments are essential for the health of youth. Although research has shown health benefits associated with family meals, to date, no randomized controlled trial (RCT) has been developed to examine the impact of a family meals intervention on behavioral and health outcomes. The Healthy Home Offerings via the Mealtime Environment (HOME) Plus study is a two-arm (intervention versus attention-only control) RCT being conducted in Minneapolis/St. Paul. Built on previous pilot research, HOME Plus aims to increase the frequency and healthfulness of family meals and snacks and reduce children's sedentary behavior, particularly screen time, to promote healthier eating and activity behaviors and prevent obesity. HOME Plus is delivered to families in community settings. The program includes 10 monthly sessions focused on nutrition and activity education, meal planning and preparation skill development. In addition, five motivational goal-setting phone calls are conducted with parents. The primary outcome measure is age- and gender-adjusted child BMI-z score at post-intervention by treatment group. Secondary household-level outcomes include family meal frequency, home availability of healthful foods (fruits/vegetables) and unhealthful foods (high-fat/sugary snacks) and beverages (sugar-sweetened beverages), and the quality of foods served at meals and snacks. Secondary child outcomes include dietary intake of corresponding foods and beverages and screen time. The HOME Plus RCT actively engages whole families of 8-12 year old children to promote healthier eating and activity behaviors and prevent obesity through promotion of family meals and snacks and limited media use. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Study protocol: home-based telehealth stroke care: a randomized trial for veterans

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    McGee-Hernandez Nancy

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Stroke is one of the most disabling and costly impairments of adulthood in the United States. Stroke patients clearly benefit from intensive inpatient care, but due to the high cost, there is considerable interest in implementing interventions to reduce hospital lengths of stay. Early discharge rehabilitation programs require coordinated, well-organized home-based rehabilitation, yet lack of sufficient information about the home setting impedes successful rehabilitation. This trial examines a multifaceted telerehabilitation (TR intervention that uses telehealth technology to simultaneously evaluate the home environment, assess the patient's mobility skills, initiate rehabilitative treatment, prescribe exercises tailored for stroke patients and provide periodic goal oriented reassessment, feedback and encouragement. Methods We describe an ongoing Phase II, 2-arm, 3-site randomized controlled trial (RCT that determines primarily the effect of TR on physical function and secondarily the effect on disability, falls-related self-efficacy, and patient satisfaction. Fifty participants with a diagnosis of ischemic or hemorrhagic stroke will be randomly assigned to one of two groups: (a TR; or (b Usual Care. The TR intervention uses a combination of three videotaped visits and five telephone calls, an in-home messaging device, and additional telephonic contact as needed over a 3-month study period, to provide a progressive rehabilitative intervention with a treatment goal of safe functional mobility of the individual within an accessible home environment. Dependent variables will be measured at baseline, 3-, and 6-months and analyzed with a linear mixed-effects model across all time points. Discussion For patients recovering from stroke, the use of TR to provide home assessments and follow-up training in prescribed equipment has the potential to effectively supplement existing home health services, assist transition to home and

  9. Privacy, boundaries and smart homes for health: An ethnographic study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burrows, Alison; Coyle, David; Gooberman-Hill, Rachael

    2018-03-01

    This article explores how people negotiate borders and boundaries within the home, in the context of health and the introduction of new technologies. We draw on an ethnographic study involving a socially diverse group of people, which included people with experience of telecare or smart home energy systems. Participants engaged in various strategies to regulate the borders of their home, even though new technologies have begun to change the nature of these borders. Participants managed health conditions but also their use of technology through boundary work that permitted devices to be more or less visible and integrated within the home. Findings highlight that if smart healthcare technologies are to be accepted in the home then there is a need for mechanisms that allow people to control the interpretation of data and flow of information generated about them and their households. Copyright © 2018 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  10. Accuracy of the Distress Thermometer for home care patients with palliative care needs in Germany.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wüller, Johannes; Küttner, Stefanie; Foldenauer, Ann Christina; Rolke, Roman; Pastrana, Tania

    2017-06-01

    Our aim was to examine the accuracy of the German version of the Distress Thermometer (DT) compared with the Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale (HADS) in patients with palliative care needs living at home. Ours was a 15-month cross-sectional study beginning in September of 2013 in Germany with consecutive patients cared for by a palliative home care service. The survey was implemented during the initial visit by a home care team. Patients were excluded if they were under 18 years of age, mentally or physically unable to complete the assessment questionnaires as judged by their healthcare worker, or unable to understand the German language. During the first encounter, the DT and HADS were applied, and sociodemographic and medical data were collected. A total of 89 persons completed both the HADS and DT questionnaires (response rate = 59.7%; mean age = 67 years; female = 55.1%; married = 65.2%; living home with relatives = 73.0%; oncological condition = 92.1%; Karnofsky Performance Scale [KPS] score: 0-40 = 30.3%, 50-70 = 57.3%, >80 = 6.7%). The mean DT score was 6.3 (±2.3), with 84.3% of participants scoring above the DT cutoff (≥4). The mean HADStotal score was 17.9 (±7.8), where 64% of participants had a total HADS score (HADStotal) ≥15, 51.7% reported anxiety (HADSanxiety ≥ 8), and 73% reported depression (HADSdepression ≥ 8). Using the HADS as a gold standard, a DT cutoff score ≥5 was optimal for identifying severe distress in patients with palliative care needs, with a sensitivity of 93.0%, a specificity of 34.4%, a positive predictive value (PPV) of 73.3%, and likelihood ratios LR+ = 1.42 (home with palliative care needs in order to offer adequate support.

  11. A randomized, controlled comparison of home versus institutional rehabilitation of patients with hip fracture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuisma, Raija

    2002-08-01

    To compare ambulation outcomes between home and institutional rehabilitation of patients with hip fracture. Randomized controlled clinical equivalence trial. The Queen Elizabeth Hospital in Hong Kong. Eighty-one patients with hip fracture. Study group patients (40) were discharged directly home from the acute hospital and visited by a physiotherapist an average of 4.6 times. The control group subjects (41) were discharged to a rehabilitation centre for further treatment lasting on average 36.2 days (SD 14.6) and they received physiotherapy daily. Ambulation ability measured on a categorical scale. The mean age of the subjects was 75 years (SD 8.3 years). Females comprised 60% of all the subjects and majority were retired or home makers. Both groups of patients improved in their ambulation ability during their rehabilitation period but neither group achieved their pre-ambulatory status by the time of completion of the study. The study group achieved significantly higher ambulation scores (p institution-based rehabilitation.

  12. [Oral and dental health and oral and dental support of home patients--role of dental hygienist in the home service nursing station].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hayashi, T; Kimura, M; Tamura, N; Hirata, S; Yabunaka, T; Kamimura, Y

    1999-12-01

    Home patients have few chances for going out, so communication with their family means a lot. Talking and eating are particular pleasures. Therefore, oral and dental health and oral and dental support are very important for home patients. A dental hygienist from our clinic visits and offers oral and dental health (oral care) and oral and dental support (oral rehabilitation) to home patients as part of a care plan with home care nurses. Moreover, as general conditions are closely related with oral function, maintaining oral and dental health and regular oral and dental support are very important in order to improve the quality of life (QOL) of home patients.

  13. Home Away from Home?: A Case Study of Student Transitions to an International Branch Campus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cicchetti, Kaitlin Oyler

    2017-01-01

    This study explored the transition experience of home-campus students attending an international branch campus. The studied was informed by a diverse range of literature, including the internationalization of higher education and student affairs, development of international branch campuses, students in transition, the development of student…

  14. Decisions to withhold diagnostic investigations in nursing home patients with a clinical suspicion of venous thromboembolism.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Henrike J Schouten

    Full Text Available This study aimed to gather insights in physicians' considerations for decisions to either refer for- or to withhold additional diagnostic investigations in nursing home patients with a suspicion of venous thromboembolism.Our study was nested in an observational study on diagnostic strategies for suspected venous thromboembolism in nursing home patients. Patient characteristics, bleeding-complications and mortality were related to the decision to withhold investigations. For a better understanding of the physicians' decisions, 21 individual face-to-face in-depth interviews were performed and analysed using the grounded theory approach.Referal for additional diagnostic investigations was forgone in 126/322 (39.1% patients with an indication for diagnostic work-up. 'Blind' anticoagulant treatment was initiated in 95 (75.4% of these patients. The 3 month mortality rates were higher for patients in whom investigations were withheld than in the referred patients, irrespective of anticoagulant treatment (odds ratio 2.45; 95% confidence interval 1.40 to 4.29 but when adjusted for the probability of being referred (i.e. the propensity score, there was no relation of non-diagnosis decisions to mortality (odds ratio 1.75; 0.98 to 3.11. In their decisions to forgo diagnostic investigations, physicians incorporated the estimated relative impact of the potential disease; the potential net-benefits of diagnostic investigations and whether performing investigations agreed with established management goals in advance care planning.Referral for additional diagnostic investigations is withheld in almost 40% of Dutch nursing home patients with suspected venous thromboembolism and an indication for diagnostic work-up. We propose that, given the complexity of these decisions and the uncertainty regarding their indirect effects on patient outcome, more attention should be focused on the decision to either use or withhold additional diagnostic tests.

  15. DOE Zero Energy Ready Home Case Study: Sterling Brook Custom Homes — Village Park Eco Home, Double Park, TX

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    none,

    2014-09-01

    This builder won a Custom Builder honor in the 2014 Housing Innovation Awards for this showcase home that serves as an energy-efficient model home for the custom home builder: 1,300 visitors toured the home, thousands more learned about the home’s advanced construction via the webpage, YouTube, Twitter, Facebook, Instagram, and Pinterest.

  16. Integration of pharmacists into a patient-centered medical home.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scott, Mollie Ashe; Hitch, Bill; Ray, Lisa; Colvin, Gaye

    2011-01-01

    To define the joint principles of the patient-centered medical home (PCMH) and describe the integration of pharmacists into a PCMH. Family medicine residency training program in North Carolina from 2001 to 2011. Mountain Area Health Education Family Health Center is a family medicine residency training program that is part of the North Carolina Area Health Education Center system. The goal of the organization is to train and retain health care students and residents. The practice is recognized as a level III PCMH by the National Committee for Quality Assurance (NCQA) and seeks to provide quality, safe, patient-centered care according to the joint principles of PCMH. Pharmacists, nurses, nutritionists, care managers, Spanish translators, and behavioral medicine specialists work collaboratively with physicians to provide seamless, comprehensive care. The Department of Pharmacotherapy is embedded in the family medicine clinic. Three pharmacists and two pharmacy residents are involved in providing direct patient care services, ensuring access to community resources, assisting patients with transitions of care, providing interprofessional education, and participating in continuous quality improvement initiatives. The pharmacists serve as clinical pharmacist practitioners and provide medication therapy management services in a pharmacotherapy clinic, anticoagulation clinics, and an osteoporosis clinic and via an inpatient family medicine service. Multiple learners such as student pharmacists, pharmacy residents, and family medicine residents rotate through the various pharmacy clinics to learn about pharmacotherapeutic principles and the role of the pharmacist in PCMH. PCMH is a comprehensive, patient-centered, team-based approach to population management in the primary care setting. Pharmacists play a vital role in PCMH and make fundamental contributions to patient care across health care settings. Such innovations in the ambulatory care setting create a unique niche

  17. Reasons for psychiatric consultation referrals in Dutch nursing home patients with dementia: a comparison with normative data on prevalence of neuropsychiatric symptoms.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kat, M.G.; Zuidema, S.U.; Ploeg, T. van der; Kalisvaart, K.J.; Gool, W.A. van; Eikelenboom, P.; Jonghe, J.F. de

    2008-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To study psychiatric consultation referrals of nursing home patients with dementia and to compare referral reasons with normative data on prevalence of neuropsychiatric symptoms. METHODS: This is part of a cross-sectional study of 787 patients residing in 14 nursing homes in the

  18. Reasons for psychiatric consultation referrals in Dutch nursing home patients with dementia: a comparison with normative data on prevalence of neuropsychiatric symptoms

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kat, Martin G.; Zuidema, Sytse U.; van der Ploeg, Tjeerd; Kalisvaart, Kees J.; van Gool, Willem A.; Eikelenboom, Piet; de Jonghe, Jos F. M.

    2008-01-01

    Objective To study psychiatric consultation referrals of nursing home patients with dementia and to compare referral reasons with normative data on prevalence of neuropsychiatric symptoms. Methods This is part of a cross-sectional study of 787 patients residing in 14 nursing homes in the

  19. Reasons for psychiatric consultation referrals in Dutch nursing home patients with dementia: a comparison with normative data on prevalence of neuropsychiatric symptoms

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kat, M.G.; Zuidema, S.U.; van der Ploeg, T.; Kalisvaart, K.J.; van Gool, W.A.; Eikelenboom, P.; de Jonghe, J.F.M.

    2008-01-01

    Objective: To study psychiatric consultation referrals of nursing home patients with dementia and to compare referral reasons with normative data on prevalence of neuropsychiatric symptoms. Methods: This is part of a cross-sectional study of 787 patients residing in 14 nursing homes in the

  20. Home palliative care works: but how? A meta-ethnography of the experiences of patients and family caregivers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarmento, Vera P; Gysels, Marjolein; Higginson, Irene J; Gomes, Barbara

    2017-12-01

    To understand patients and family caregivers' experiences with home palliative care services, in order to identify, explore and integrate the key components of care that shape the experiences of service users. We performed a meta-ethnography of qualitative evidence following PRISMA recommendations for reporting systematic reviews. The studies were retrieved in 5 electronic databases (MEDLINE, EMBASE, PsycInfo, BNI, CINAHL) using 3 terms and its equivalents ('Palliative', 'Home care', 'Qualitative research') combined with 'AND', complemented with other search strategies. We included original qualitative studies exploring experiences of adult patients and/or their family caregivers (≥18 years) facing life-limiting diseases with palliative care needs, being cared for at home by specialist or intermediate home palliative care services. 28 papers reporting 19 studies were included, with 814 participants. Of these, 765 were family caregivers and 90% were affected by advanced cancer. According to participants' accounts, there are 2 overarching components of home palliative care: presence (24/7 availability and home visits) and competence (effective symptom control and skilful communication), contributing to meet the core need for security. Feeling secure is central to the benefits experienced with each component, allowing patients and family caregivers to focus on the dual process of living life and preparing death at home. Home palliative care teams improve patients and caregivers experience of security when facing life-limiting illnesses at home, by providing competent care and being present. These teams should therefore be widely available and empowered with the resources to be present and provide competent care. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://www.bmj.com/company/products-services/rights-and-licensing/.

  1. Business Solutions Case Study: Marketing Zero Energy Homes: LifeStyle Homes, Melbourne, Florida

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    2015-06-01

    Building America research has shown that high-performance homes can potentially give builders an edge in the marketplace and can boost sales. But it doesn't happen automatically. It requires a tailored, easy to understand marketing campaign and sometimes a little flair. This case study highlights LifeStyle Homes’ successful marketing approach for their SunSmart home package, which has helped to boost sales for the company. SunSmart marketing includes a modified logo, weekly blog, social media, traditional advertising, website, and sales staff training. Marketing focuses on quality, durability, healthy indoor air, and energy efficiency with an emphasis on the surety of third-party verification and the scientific approach to developing the SunSmart package. With the introduction of SunSmart, LifeStyle began an early recovery, nearly doubling sales in 2010; SunSmart sales now exceed 300 homes, including more than 20 zero energy homes. Completed homes in 2014 far outpaced the national (19%) and southern census region (27%) recovery rates for the same period. As technology improves and evolves, this builder will continue to collaborate with Building America.

  2. Associations between pain and depression in nursing home patients at different stages of dementia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erdal, Ane; Flo, Elisabeth; Selbaek, Geir; Aarsland, Dag; Bergh, Sverre; Slettebo, Dagrun D; Husebo, Bettina S

    2017-08-15

    Pain is associated with depression in nursing home patients with dementia. It is, however, unclear whether pain increases depression. Therefore we evaluated the prospective associations between pain and depressive symptoms in nursing home patients at different stages of cognitive impairment. Two longitudinal studies were combined, including 931 patients (≥65 years) from 65 nursing homes. One study assessed patients at admission, with 6-month follow-up (2012-2014). The other study assessed residents with varying lengths of stay, with 4-month follow-up (2014-2015). Patients were assessed with the Mini-Mental State Examination, the Mobilisation-Observation-Behaviour-Intensity-Dementia-2 Pain Scale, and the Cornell Scale for Depression in Dementia. At baseline, 343 patients (40% of 858 assessed) had moderate to severe pain, and 347 (38% of 924) had depression. Pain increased the risk of depression (OR 2.35, 95% CI 1.76-3.12). Using mixed model analyses, we found that a 1-point increase in pain was associated with a .48 increase in depression (pdepressive symptoms decreased over time, and having less pain at follow-up was associated with a decrease in depressive symptoms (within-subject effect; p=.042). The two cohorts had different inclusion criteria, which may reduce generalisability. The study design does not allow conclusions on causality. Pain and depressive symptoms are associated in patients with dementia. Because reduced pain is associated with less depressive symptoms, these patients should be assessed regularly for untreated pain. The benefit of analgesic treatment should be weighed carefully against the potential for adverse effects. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  3. A Customized Online Nutrition Guidance System Is Effective for Treating Patients with Nonalcoholic Fatty Liver Disease by Supporting Continuity of Diet Therapy at Home: A Pilot Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aoyama, Tomonori; Takada, Hidekatsu; Uchiyama, Akira; Kon, Kazuyoshi; Yamashina, Shunhei; Ikejima, Kenichi; Ban, Hideyuki; Watanabe, Sumio

    2017-01-01

    Continuity is required for diet therapy, but it depends on patients. We examined the utility of a new tool, the customized online nutrition guidance system, in patients with nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD). Seven patients plotted their body weight (BW) and marked a customized task card on completion for 90 days on a website. The instructors encouraged them by e-mail. BW, serum transaminase levels, and system usage were evaluated. The results showed that BW and serum alanine aminotransferase levels were significantly lower than at baseline. BW and task visualization as well as encouragement by e-mails were effective in ensuring continuity. Thus, this system is effective in keeping NAFLD patients motivated to continue their diet therapy. PMID:28674352

  4. Dietary intakes differ between renal transplant recipients living in patient hotels versus home.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kahra, Terhi; Jenssen, Trond; Løvik, Astrid

    2004-04-01

    To compare dietary intake and health-related quality of life approximately 6 to 10 weeks after renal transplantation in patients living at home and at a patient hotel, and how the patients were following a heart-healthy diet according to the current American Heart Association guidelines. Cross-sectional observational study. Outpatient clinic at Rikshospitalet University Hospital, Norway. Forty renal transplant patients, 20 patients (14 men and 6 women) in both groups. There were 4 diabetic patients in each group. Dietary intake was assessed by 4-day dietary records. Health-related quality of life was investigated by the SF-36 questionnaire. The main outcome variables were daily energy intake and intakes of protein, total fat, saturated fat, cholesterol, fiber, and fruit and vegetables. The variables were tested by 2-sample t-tests, and significance was set at.05. There was no statistically significant difference in daily energy intake between the groups (P =.08), but there were significantly higher daily intakes of protein (P =.003), total fat (P =.03), monounsaturated fat (P =.02), cholesterol (P =.04), fiber (P =.02), calcium (P =.03), and fruit and vegetables (P =.03) in the group living at the patient hotel. The mean intake of saturated fat was 14.5% of total energy in the group living at home and 14.6% in the group living at the patient hotel. There were no significant differences in health-related quality of life between the groups. The results suggest that there are differences in dietary intake in renal transplant patients living at home compared with those at a patient hotel. It seems that neither of the groups follows current guidelines for reducing the risk of cardiovascular disease.

  5. The course of apraxia and ADL functioning in left hemisphere stroke patients treated in rehabilitation centres and nursing homes.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Donkervoort, M.; Dekker, J.; Deelman, B.

    2006-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To study the course of apraxia and daily life functioning (ADL) in left hemisphere stroke patients with apraxia. DESIGN: Prospective cohort study. SETTING: Rehabilitation centres and nursing homes. SUBJECTS: One hundred and eight left hemisphere stroke patients with apraxia, hospitalized

  6. Giving rheumatology patients online home access to their electronic medical record (EMR): advantages, drawbacks and preconditions according to care providers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Vaart, R.; Drossaert, Constance H.C.; Taal, Erik; van de Laar, Mart A F J

    2013-01-01

    Technology enables patients home access to their electronic medical record (EMR), via a patient portal. This study aims to analyse (dis)advantages, preconditions and suitable content for this service, according to rheumatology health professionals. A two-phase policy Delphi study was conducted.

  7. Business Solutions Case Study: Marketing Zero Energy Homes: Tommy Williams Homes, Gainesville, Florida

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    2015-06-01

    Building America research has shown that high-performance homes can potentially give builders an edge in the marketplace and can boost sales, but it doesn't happen automatically. It requires a tailored, easy-to-understand marketing campaign, and sometimes a little flair. This case study highlights the successful marketing approach of Tommy Williams Homes, which devotes resources to advertising, targeted social media outlets and blogs, realtor education seminars, and groundbreaking and open house celebrations. As a result, in one community, 2013 property sales records show that TWH outsells the only other builder in the development at a higher price, with fewer days on the market.

  8. A pilot study of the nocturnal respiration rates in COPD patients in the home environment using a non-contact biomotion sensor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ballal, Tarig; Zaffaroni, Alberto; Heneghan, Conor; Shouldice, Redmond; Boyle, Patricia; McNicholas, Walter T; De Chazal, Philip; Donnelly, Seamas C

    2014-01-01

    Nocturnal respiration rate parameters were collected from 20 COPD subjects over an 8 week period, to determine if changes in respiration rate were associated with exacerbations of COPD. These subjects were primarily GOLD Class 2 to 4, and had been recently discharged from hospital following a recent exacerbation. The respiration rates were collected using a non-contact radio-frequency biomotion sensor which senses respiratory effort and body movement using a short-range radio-frequency sensor. An adaptive notch filter was applied to the measured signal to determine respiratory rate over rolling 15 s segments. The accuracy of the algorithm was initially verified using ten manually-scored 15 min segments of respiration extracted from overnight polysomnograms. The calculated respiration rates were within 1 breath min −1 for >98% of the estimates. For the 20 subjects monitored, 11 experienced one or more subsequent exacerbation of COPD (ECOPD) events during the 8 week monitoring period (19 events total). Analysis of the data revealed a significant increase in nocturnal respiration rate (e.g. >2 breath min −1 ) prior to many ECOPD events. Using a simple classifier of a change of 1 breath min −1 in the mode of the nocturnal respiration rate, a predictive rule showed a sensitivity of 63% and specificity of 85% for predicting an exacerbation within a 5 d window. We conclude that it is possible to collect respiration rates reliably in the home environment, and that the respiration rate may be a potential indicator of change in clinical status. (paper)

  9. Advantages and Disadvantages of the Patient-Centered Medical Home: A Critical Analysis and Lessons Learned.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Budgen, Jacqueline; Cantiello, John

    This article provides a detailed examination of the pros and cons associated with patient-centered medical homes (PCMHs). Opinions and findings from those who have studied PCMHs and those who have been directly involved with this type of health care model are outlined. Key lessons from providers are detailed, and critical success factors are highlighted. This synthesized analysis serves to lend evidence to health care managers and providers who are considering implementation of the PCMH model.

  10. Patients with Korsakoff syndrome in nursing homes: characteristics, comorbidity, and use of psychotropic drugs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gerridzen, Ineke J; Goossensen, M Anne

    2014-01-01

    Very limited literature exists on the care and course of patients with Korsakoff syndrome (KS) living in long-term care facilities (LTCFs). Even less literature can be found on the pharmacological treatment of behavioral symptoms of KS. The purpose of the present study was to describe baseline characteristics, comorbidity, and the use of psychotropic drugs in institutionalized patients with KS. In this cross-sectional descriptive study, 556 patients were included living in ten specialized care units in Dutch nursing homes. Data were collected by means of a retrospective chart review. The majority of patients were men (75%) and single (78%) with a mean age on admission of 56.7 years (SD 8.9, range 29.8-85.3). Mean length of stay was 6.0 years (SD 5.4, range 0.2-33.3). Sixty-eight percent of patients suffered from at least one somatic disease and 66% from at least one extra psychiatric disorder. One or more psychotropic drugs were prescribed to 71% of patients with a great variation in prescription patterns between the different nursing homes. Patients with KS depending on long-term care usually have comorbidity in more than one domain (somatic and psychiatric). The indications for prescribing psychotropic drugs are in many cases unclear and it seems probable that they are often given to manage challenging behavior. Longitudinal studies on the evidence for this prescription behavior and possible alternatives are recommended.

  11. Patients' experiences of care and support at home after a family member's participation in an intervention during palliative care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Norinder, Maria; Goliath, Ida; Alvariza, Anette

    2017-06-01

    Patients who receive palliative home care are in need of support from family members, who take on great responsibility related to caregiving but who often feel unprepared for this task. Increasing numbers of interventions aimed at supporting family members in palliative care have been described and evaluated. It is not known whether and how these interventions actually affect the care or support provided to a patient, even though it has been suggested that family members would be likely to provide better care and support and thus allow for positive experiences for patients. However, this has not been studied from the perspective of the patients themselves. The objective of our study was to explore patients' experiences of care and support at home after family members' participation in a psychoeducational intervention during palliative care. Our study took a qualitative approach, and interviews were conducted with 11 patients whose family members had participated in a psychoeducational intervention during palliative home care. The interviews were analyzed employing interpretive description. Patients' experiences were represented by three themes: "safe at home," "facilitated and more honest communication," and "feeling like a unit of care." Patients felt that their needs were better met and that family members became more confident at home without risking their own health. Patients felt relieved when family members were given the opportunity to talk and reflect with others and hoped that the intervention would contribute to more honest communications between themselves and their family members. Further, it was of great importance to patients that family members receive attention from and be confirmed and supported by healthcare professionals. Our findings show how an intervention targeted at family members during palliative home care also benefits the patients.

  12. Prevalence, incidence and associated factors of pressure ulcers in home palliative care patients: A retrospective chart review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Artico, Marco; Dante, Angelo; D'Angelo, Daniela; Lamarca, Luciano; Mastroianni, Chiara; Petitti, Tommasangelo; Piredda, Michela; De Marinis, Maria Grazia

    2018-01-01

    Terminally ill patients are at high risk of pressure ulcers, which have a negative impact on quality of life. Data about pressure ulcers' prevalence, incidence and associated factors are largely insufficient. To document the point prevalence at admission and the cumulative incidence of pressure ulcers in terminally ill patients admitted to an Italian home palliative care unit, and to analyse the patients' and caregivers' characteristics associated with their occurrence. Retrospective chart review. Patients ( n = 574) with a life expectancy ⩽6 months admitted to a palliative home care service were included in this study. The prevalence and incidence rates were 13.1% and 13.0%, respectively. The logistic regression models showed body mass index ( p 70 and >1 caregiver at home as the dichotomous variables predictors of presenting with a pressure ulcer at time of admission and during home palliative care. The notable pressure ulcers' incidence and prevalence rates suggest the need to include this issue among the main outcomes to pursue during home palliative care. The accuracy of body mass index, Braden Scale and Karnofsky Performance Scale in predicting the pressure ulcers risk is confirmed. Therefore, they appear as essential tools, in combination with nurses' clinical judgment, for a structured approach to pressure ulcers prevention. Further research is needed to explore the home caregivers' characteristics and attitudes associated with the occurrence of pressure ulcers and the relations between their strategies for pressure ulcer prevention and gender-related patient's needs.

  13. Perceived barriers to communication between hospital and nursing home at time of patient transfer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shah, Faraaz; Burack, Orah; Boockvar, Kenneth S

    2010-05-01

    To identify perceived barriers to communication between hospital and nursing home at the time of patient transfer and examine associations between perceived barriers and hospital and nursing home characteristics. Mailed survey. Medicare- or Medicaid-certified nursing homes in New York State. Nursing home administrators, with input from other nursing home staff. Respondents rated the importance as a barrier to hospital-nursing home communication of (1) hospital providers' attitude, time, effort, training, payment, and familiarity with nursing home patients; (2) unplanned and off-hours transfers; (3) HIPAA privacy regulations; and (4) lost or failed information transmission. Associations were determined between barriers and the following organizational characteristics: (1) hospital-nursing home affiliations, pharmacy or laboratory agreements, cross-site staff visits, and cross-site physician care; (2) hospital size, teaching status, and frequency of geriatrics specialty care; (3) nursing home size, location, type, staffing, and Medicare quality indicators; and (4) hospital-to-nursing home communication, consistency of hospital care with health care goals, and communication quality improvement efforts. Of 647 questionnaires sent, 229 were returned (35.4%). The most frequently reported perceived barriers to communication were sudden or unplanned transfers (44.4%), transfers that occur at night or on the weekend (41.4%), and hospital providers' lack of effort (51.0%), lack of familiarity with patients (45.0%), and lack of time (43.5%). Increased hospital size, teaching hospitals, and urban nursing home location were associated with greater perceived importance of these barriers, and cross-site staff visits and hospital provision of laboratory and pharmacy services to the nursing home were associated with lower perceived importance of these barriers. Hospital and nursing home characteristics and interorganizational relationships were associated with nursing home

  14. [Development and validation of the Korean patient safety culture scale for nursing homes].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoon, Sook Hee; Kim, Byungsoo; Kim, Se Young

    2013-06-01

    The purpose of this study was to develop a tool to evaluate patient safety culture in nursing homes and to test its validity and reliability. A preliminary tool was developed through interviews with focus group, content validity tests, and a pilot study. A nationwide survey was conducted from February to April, 2011, using self-report questionnaires. Participants were 982 employees in nursing homes. Data were analyzed using Cronbach's alpha, item analysis, factor analysis, and multitrait/multi-Item analysis. From the results of the analysis, 27 final items were selected from 49 items on the preliminary tool. Items with low correlation with total scale were excluded. The 4 factors sorted by factor analysis contributed 63.4% of the variance in the total scale. The factors were labeled as leadership, organizational system, working attitude, management practice. Cronbach's alpha for internal consistency was .95 and the range for the 4 factors was from .86 to .93. The results of this study indicate that the Korean Patient Safety Culture Scale has reliability and validity and is suitable for evaluation of patient safety culture in Korean nursing homes.

  15. A New Baroreceptor Sensitivity-Restoring Ca-Channel Blocker Diminishes Age-Related Morning Blood Pressure Increase in Hypertensive Patients: Open-Label Monitoring of Azelnidipine Treatment for Hypertension in the Early Morning (At-HOME Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mitsunori Sugiyama

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Morning blood pressure (BP surge, which exhibits an age-related increase, is a risk factor for stroke in elderly hypertensive patients, independently of the 24-h BP level. We studied the effect of the new baroreceptor sensitivity (BRS-restoring Ca-channel blocker (CCB azelnidipine (AZ on this age-related morning BP increase. Methods: We conducted a 16-week prospective study to clarify the effect of morning dosing of AZ on home BPs measured in the morning and in the evening in 2,546 hypertensive patients (mean age, 65.1 years; female, 53.6%. Results: At baseline, ME-Dif (morning systolic BP [SBP]–evening SBP increased with age, independently of ME-Ave (average of the morning and evening SBPs. This age-related increase of ME-Dif was exaggerated by regular alcohol drinking and beta-blocker use. After AZ treatment (14.3 ± 3.6 mg/day, ME-AV and ME-Dif were significantly reduced independently of each other, with reductions of –18.1 ± 15.6 and –2.5 ± 13.2 mmHg, respectively (both p < 0.001. AZ treatment decreased age-related increase in ME-Dif particularly in patients who were regular consumers of alcohol and in beta-blocker users. Conclusions: The new BRS-restoring CCB AZ significantly reduced age-related increase in morning BP and had some potential benefit on cardiovascular protection in hypertension, particularly in elderly patients and/or consumers of alcohol.

  16. Drug treatment at the end of life: an epidemiologic study in nursing homes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jansen, Kristian; Schaufel, Margrethe Aase; Ruths, Sabine

    2014-12-01

    To examine drug treatment in nursing home patients at the end of life, and identify predictors of palliative drug therapy. A historical cohort study. Three urban nursing homes in Norway. All patients admitted from January 2008 and deceased before February 2013. Drug prescriptions, diagnoses, and demographic data were collected from electronic patient records. Palliative end-of-life drug treatment was defined on the basis of indication, drug, and formulation. 524 patients were included, median (range) age at death 86 (19-104) years, 59% women. On the day of death, 99.4% of the study population had active prescriptions; 74.2% had palliative drugs either alone (26.9%) or concomitantly with curative/preventive drugs (47.3%). Palliative drugs were associated with nursing home, length of stay > 16 months (AOR 2.10, 95% CI 1.12-3.94), age (1.03, 1.005-1.05), and a diagnosis of cancer (2.12, 1.19-3.76). Most initiations of palliative drugs and withdrawals of curative/preventive drugs took place on the day of death. Palliative drug therapy and drug therapy changes are common for nursing home patients on the last day of life. Improvements in end-of-life care in nursing homes imply addressing prognostication and earlier response to palliative needs.

  17. Patient-centered medical home cyberinfrastructure current and future landscape.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Finkelstein, Joseph; Barr, Michael S; Kothari, Pranav P; Nace, David K; Quinn, Matthew

    2011-05-01

    The patient-centered medical home (PCMH) is an approach that evolved from the understanding that a well-organized, proactive clinical team working in a tandem with well-informed patients is better able to address the preventive and disease management needs in a guideline-concordant manner. This approach represents a fundamental shift from episodic acute care models and has become an integral part of health reform supported on a federal level. The major aspects of PCMH, especially pertinent to its information infrastructure, have been discussed by an expert panel organized by the Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality at the Informatics for Consumer Health Summit. The goal of this article is to summarize the panel discussions along the four major domains presented at the summit: (1) PCMH as an Evolving Model of Healthcare Delivery; (2) Health Information Technology (HIT) Applications to Support the PCMH; (3) Current HIT Landscape of PCMH: Challenges and Opportunities; and (4) Future HIT Landscape of PCMH: Federal Initiatives on Health Informatics, Legislation, and Standardization. Copyright © 2011 American Journal of Preventive Medicine. All rights reserved.

  18. Lessons Learned from Implementing the Patient-Centered Medical Home

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ellen P. Green

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The Patient-Centered Medical Home (PCMH is a primary care model that provides coordinated and comprehensive care to patients to improve health outcomes. This paper addresses practical issues that arise when transitioning a traditional primary care practice into a PCMH recognized by the National Committee for Quality Assurance (NCQA. Individual organizations' experiences with this transition were gathered at a PCMH workshop in Alexandria, Virginia in June 2010. An analysis of their experiences has been used along with a literature review to reveal common challenges that must be addressed in ways that are responsive to the practice and patients’ needs. These are: NCQA guidance, promoting provider buy-in, leveraging electronic medical records, changing office culture, and realigning workspace in the practice to accommodate services needed to carry out the intent of PCMH. The NCQA provides a set of standards for implementing the PCMH model, but these standards lack many specifics that will be relied on in location situations. While many researchers and providers have made critiques, we see this vagueness as allowing for greater flexibility in how a practice implements PCMH.

  19. Exploring the Barriers of Home Care Services in Iran: A Qualitative Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Heshmatolah Heydari

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available With increasing chronic diseases, the use of home care is rising in the world. Home care in Iran has many challenges and to improve that, we should identify the challenges and barriers of home care. The aim of this study was to identify and explore the barriers of home care in Iran. This is a qualitative study with content analysis approach that was conducted in Iran in 2015. Fourteen key informants comprising health policymakers, faculty members, nurses, and physicians as well as patients and families engaged in home care purposefully participated in this study. Data was obtained using face-to-face semistructured interviews. A focus group discussion was also used to complete the findings. Graneheim and Lundman’s approach was used for analysis of data and Lincoln and Guba’s criteria were used to confirm the trustworthiness of study’s findings. The data were divided into three main categories and eight subcategories. Main categories included treatment-based approach in the healthcare system, cultural dimensions, and the lack of adequate infrastructure. A position for home care in the healthcare system, considering cultural dimensions in Iranian society and providing an appropriate infrastructure, can be beneficial to improve the situation of home care services in Iran.

  20. Patient safety culture in care homes for older people: a scoping review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emily Gartshore

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In recent years, there has been an increasing focus on the role of safety culture in preventing incidents such as medication errors and falls. However, research and developments in safety culture has predominantly taken place in hospital settings, with relatively less attention given to establishing a safety culture in care homes. Despite safety culture being accepted as an important quality indicator across all health and social care settings, the understanding of culture within social care settings remains far less developed than within hospitals. It is therefore important that the existing evidence base is gathered and reviewed in order to understand safety culture in care homes. Methods A scoping review was undertaken to describe the availability of evidence related to care homes’ patient safety culture, what these studies focused on, and identify any knowledge gaps within the existing literature. Included papers were each reviewed by two authors for eligibility and to draw out information relevant to the scoping review. Results Twenty-four empirical papers and one literature review were included within the scoping review. The collective evidence demonstrated that safety culture research is largely based in the USA, within Nursing Homes rather than Residential Home settings. Moreover, the scoping review revealed that empirical evidence has predominantly used quantitative measures, and therefore the deeper levels of culture have not been captured in the evidence base. Conclusions Safety culture in care homes is a topic that has not been extensively researched. The review highlights a number of key gaps in the evidence base, which future research into safety culture in care home should attempt to address.

  1. Medical rehabilitation of leprosy patients discharged home in abia and ebonyi States of Nigeria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Enwereji, Ezinne Ezinna; Ahuizi, Eke Reginald; Iheanocho, Okereke Chukwunenye; Enwereji, Kelechi Okechukwu

    2011-11-01

    To examine the extent to which medical coverage is available to discharged leprosy patients in communities. Evidence has shown that after care services, follow-up visits and national disease prevention programs are important components of medical rehabilitation to leprosy patients discharged home after treatment. Denying them accessibility to these services could expose them to multiple disabilities as well as several disease conditions including HIV/AIDS. These adverse health conditions could be averted if health workers extend healthcare services to discharged leprosy patients. This study was conducted to examine the extent to which discharged leprosy patients have access to healthcare services in the communities. All 33 leprosy patients who were fully treated with multi-drug therapy (MDT) and discharged home in the two leprosy settlements in Abia and Ebonyi States of Nigeria were included in this study. The list of discharged leprosy patients studied and their addresses were provided by the leprosy settlements where they were treated. Also, snowball-sampling method was used to identify some of the leprosy patients whose addresses were difficult to locate in the communities. Instruments for data collection were questionnaire, interview guide and checklist. These were administered because respondents were essentially those with no formal education. Analysis of data was done quantitatively and qualitatively. Findings showed that 20 (60.6%) of discharged patients did not receive health programs like HIV/AIDS prevention or family planning. Also, follow-up visits and after-care services were poor. About 14 (42.4%) of the patients live in dirty and overcrowded houses. On the whole, discharged patients were poorly medically rehabilitated (mean score: 4.7±1.1 out of total score of 7). Denying discharged leprosy patients opportunity of accessing health care services could increase prevalence of infectious diseases including HIV/AIDS among them. There is need to extend

  2. Patient Hand Hygiene at Home Predicts Their Hand Hygiene Practices in the Hospital

    OpenAIRE

    Barker, Anna; Sethi, Ajay; Shulkin, Emily; Caniza, Rachell; Zerbel, Sara; Safdar, Nasia

    2014-01-01

    We examine factors associated with hand hygiene practices of hospital patients. Hygiene decreased compared to at home, and home practices were strongly associated with hospital practices. Understanding and leveraging the intrinsic value some patients associate with hand hygiene may be important for improving overall hospital hygiene and decreasing healthcare-associated infections.

  3. Prevalence and Predictors of Use of Home Sphygmomanometers Among Hypertensive Patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zahid, Hira; Amin, Aisha; Amin, Emaan; Waheed, Summaiya; Asad, Ameema; Faheem, Ariba; Jawaid, Samreen; Afzal, Adila; Misbah, Sarah; Majid, Kanza

    2017-04-11

    Few studies have looked at the predictors of use of home sphygmomanometers among hypertensive patients in low-income countries such as Pakistan. Considering the importance of home blood pressure monitoring (HBPM), cross-sectional study was conducted to evaluate the prevalence and predictors of the usage of all kinds of HBPM devices. This study was conducted in Karachi during the time period of January-February 2017. Adult patients previously diagnosed with hypertension visiting tertiary care hospitals were selected for the study. Interviews from the individuals were conducted after verbal consent using a pre-coded questionnaire. The data was analyzed using Statistical Package for the Social Sciences v. 23.0 (SPSS, IBM Corporation, NY, USA). Chi-squared test was applied as the primary statistical test. More than half of the participants used a home sphygmomanometer (n=250, 61.7%). The age, level of education, family history of hypertension, compliance to drugs and blood pressure (BP) monitoring, few times a month at clinics were significant determinants of HBPM (P values manual type (n=122, 48.8%). Moreover, avoiding BP measurement in a noisy environment was the most common precaution taken (n=117, 46.8%). The study showed that around 40% of the hypertensive individuals did not own a sphygmomanometer and less than 25% performed HBPM regularly. General awareness by healthcare professionals can be a possible factor which can increase HBPM.

  4. Home-based zoledronic acid infusion therapy in patients with solid tumours: compliance and patient-nurse satisfaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lebret, Thierry; Mouysset, Jean-Loup; Lortholary, Alain; El Kouri, Claude; Bastit, Laurent; Ktiouet, Meryem; Slimane, Khemaies; Murraciole, Xavier; Guérif, Stéphane

    2013-06-01

    This study aimed to explore patient and nurse satisfaction, compliance with best practice, technical feasibility and safety of home infusion of the bisphosphonate zoledronic acid (ZOL). This was a prospective 1-year survey of home ZOL therapy (4 mg Zometa, 15-min i.v., every 3-4 weeks) in patients with bone metastases secondary to a solid malignancy. A physician questionnaire, nurse satisfaction/feasibility questionnaire and patient satisfaction questionnaire were administered at several time-points. Physician participation rate was 56.5% (87/154). Physicians enrolled 818 patients visited by 381 predominantly community nurses. Of the 788 case report forms received, 763 met inclusion criteria. Patient characteristics were as follows: median age, 68 years (30-95); M/F, 40/60; ECOG-PS 0 or 1, 78.6%; and primary tumour site, breast (55.2%), prostate (28.4%), lung (7.2%) or other (9.4%). Nurse satisfaction rates were high: organisation of home ZOL therapy, 90.9%; ease of infusion, 96.7%; patient-nurse relationship, 97.5%; and relationship with hospital staff, 73%. Patient satisfaction was also very high (95.3%). The main reasons were quality of the nurse-patient relationship (57.6%), less travel/waiting (68.8%), home environment (52.9%) and less disruption to daily routine (36.6%). ZOL therapy was well tolerated, the discontinuation rate due to adverse events (including deaths whether related to diseases progression or not) was 33.6%. The incidence of osteonecrosis of the jaw was 0.6% and of fractures, 0.2%. Practitioner compliance with best practice was 76.7-83.7% for recommended and/or tolerated dosage, 73% for dental hygiene checks at inclusion and 48-56% thereafter, 66% for pre-infusion hydration, and often undocumented for calcium/vitamin D supplementation. Home ZOL therapy was well tolerated. Both patient and nurse satisfaction were very high. However, better compliance with best practice should be encouraged.

  5. Everything safe? – Risk situations in advanced home care from the point of view of ventilated patients and their relatives

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ewers, Michael; Schaepe, Christiane; Lehmann, Yvonne

    2017-01-01

    Background: The number of home mechanically ventilated (HMV) patients has been growing for years. However, little is known about requirements, processes and effects of advanced home care, provided in distance from clinics and doctors. To date, safety related aspects of the above mentioned issues have scarcely been examined. Aim: Users of advanced home care were asked about their experiences and about situations in which they felt safe or unsafe. The aim was to gain insights into the daily care provision, explore safety risks from the users’ point of view, and to develop new approaches to enhance patient safety in home care for the severely ill. Method: A qualitative explorative study has been carried out, based on semi-structured interviews (ventilated patients N = 21; relatives N = 15). Sampling, data collecting and data analysis were guided by principles of Grounded Theory. Results: Risk situations occur when (non-)verbal communication offers of HMV patients are overseen or misunderstood, patient- or technology related monitoring tasks are neglected, if coordination and collaboration requirements are undervalued and if negotiation processes as well as education and supervision needs are disregarded. Furthermore, nurses’ lack of competence, self-confidence and professionalism may produce risk situations. Conclusion: Listen carefully to patients and relatives can help to identify quality shortcomings in advanced home care, to prevent risk situations and to develop patient-centered safety concepts for this particular setting.

  6. Long-term evaluation of home-based pulmonary rehabilitation in patients with COPD

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Grosbois JM

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Jean Marie Grosbois,1,2 Alice Gicquello,3 Carole Langlois,4 Olivier Le Rouzic,3 Frédéric Bart,2 Benoit Wallaert,2,3 Cécile Chenivesse5 1FormAction Santé, rue Pietralunga, Pérenchies, 2Service de Pneumologie, CH Béthune, 3Service de Pneumologie et Immunoallergologie, Centre des Compétences des Maladies Pulmonaires Rares, Hôpital Calmette, CHRU Lille, 4Unité de Biostatistiques, CHRU Lille, 5AP-HP, Groupe Hospitalier Pitié-Salpêtrière Charles Foix, Service de Pneumologie et Réanimation Médicale, Boulevard de l’Hôpital, Paris, France Introduction: Personalized, global pulmonary rehabilitation (PR management of patients with COPD is effective, regardless of the place in which this rehabilitation is provided. The objective of this retrospective observational study was to study the long-term outcome of exercise capacity and quality of life during management of patients with COPD treated by home-based PR.Methods: Home-based PR was administered to 211 patients with COPD (mean age, 62.3±11.1 years; mean forced expiratory volume in 1 second, 41.5%±17.7%. Home-based PR was chosen because of the distance of the patient’s home from the PR center and the patient’s preference. Each patient was individually managed by a team member once a week for 8 weeks with unsupervised continuation of physical exercises on the other days of the week according to an individual action plan. Exercise conditioning, therapeutic patient education, and self-management were included in the PR program. The home assessment comprised evaluation of the patient’s exercise capacity by a 6-minute stepper test, Timed Up and Go test, ten times sit-to-stand test, Hospital Anxiety and Depression score, and quality of life (Visual Simplified Respiratory Questionnaire, VQ11, Maugeri Respiratory Failure 28.Results: No incidents or accidents were observed during the course of home-based PR. The 6-minute stepper test was significantly improved after completion of the

  7. Maximum home systolic blood pressure is a useful indicator of arterial stiffness in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus: post hoc analysis of a cross-sectional multicenter study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ushigome, Emi; Fukui, Michiaki; Hamaguchi, Masahide; Tanaka, Toru; Atsuta, Haruhiko; Mogami, Shin-ichi; Tsunoda, Sei; Yamazaki, Masahiro; Hasegawa, Goji; Nakamura, Naoto

    2014-09-01

    Maximum (max) home systolic blood pressure (HSBP) as well as mean HSBP or HSBP variability was reported to increase the predictive value of target organ damage. Yet, the association between max HSBP and target organ damage in patients with type 2 diabetes has never been reported. The aim of this study was to investigate the association between max HSBP and pulse wave velocity (PWV), a marker of arterial stiffness which in turn is a marker of target organ damage, in patients with type 2 diabetes. We assessed the relationship of mean HSBP or max HSBP to PWV, and compared area under the receiver-operating characteristic curve (AUC) of mean HSBP or max HSBP for arterial stiffness in 758 patients with type 2 diabetes. In the univariate analyses, age, duration of diabetes mellitus, body mass index, mean clinic systolic blood pressure (SBP), mean HSBP and max HSBP were associated with PWV. Multivariate linear regression analyses indicated that mean morning SBP (β=0.156, P=0.001) or max morning SBP (β=0.146, P=0.001) were significantly associated with PWV. AUC (95% CI) for arterial stiffness, defined as PWV equal to or more than 1800 cm per second, in mean morning SBP and max morning SBP were 0.622 (0.582-0.662; P<0.001) and 0.631 (0.591-0.670; P<0.001), respectively. Our findings implicate that max HSBP as well as mean HSBP was significantly associated with arterial stiffness in patients with type 2 diabetes. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Propensity for paying home visits among general practitioners and the associations with cancer patients' place of care and death

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Winthereik, Anna K; Hjertholm, Peter; Neergaard, Mette Asbjoern

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Previous studies of associations between home visits by general practitioners and end-of-life care for cancer patients have been subject to confounding. AIM: To analyse associations between general practitioners' propensity to pay home visits and the likelihood of hospitalisation...... and dying out of hospital among their cancer patients. DESIGN: A national register cohort study with an ecological exposure. Standardised incidence rates of general practitioner home visits were calculated as a measure for propensity. Practices were grouped into propensity quartiles. Associations between...... propensity groups and end-of-life outcomes for cancer patients aged 40 or above were calculated. SETTING/PARTICIPANTS: Danish general practitioners and citizens aged 40 or above were included from 2003 to 2012. RESULTS: We included 2670 practices with 2,518,091 listed patients (18,364,679 person...

  9. Perspectives on the delegation of hygienic care in the context of home nursing: a qualitative study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dumitrescu, Irina; Vliegher, Kristel De; Cordyn, Sam; Maigre, Audrey; Peters, Edgard; Putzeys, Dominique

    2018-05-02

    In light of current trends and healthcare evolutions, delegation of patient care from home nurses to health care assistants (HCAs) is increasingly important. Hygienic care is an essential component of nursing education and practice, yet it has rarely been the subject of scientific literature. To understand the opinions and experiences of home nurses and policy makers with regard to the meaning of hygienic care and the delegation of these acts in the context of home nursing. A descriptive qualitative study (six focus groups with home nurses and two with policy makers from the Belgian home nursing sector). Content analysis of the data and the use of NVivo 11.0 software. Hygienic care is a cyclical care process of continuously investing in a trusting relationship with a patient, assessing their care needs and ability for self-care and taking action and evaluating care as situations change. All of this must be mutally agreed with the patient and should consider their environment and lifestyle. The decision to delegate hygienic care is based on patient assessments and the patient's specific care needs using nursing diagnoses and indicators. Finally, barriers and facilitating factors for both delegating and providing hygienic care were addressed. Hygienic care is a crucial component of nursing care, that can be delegated to HCAs with the necessary supervision.

  10. When a patient goes home: Meaningful lessons in designing for the patient experience of Cervical Radiculopathy and Stroke paralysis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Lasse Nørgaard; Poulsen, Sven Døfler; Coxon, Ian Robert

    2013-01-01

    Presented in this paper are remarkably powerful learning experiences from two researchers in two separate studies. One dealing with the lived experience of patients suffering paralysis from stroke or brain haemorrhage and the other studying patients with Cervical Radiculopathy. Both cases originate......) of home rehabilitation for people with these conditions. In this paper we not only share our practical experiences and lessons learned in pushing the boundaries of researching human experience but also how it deeply affected us as researchers in achieving the illusive, 'experience of understanding' - what...

  11. Behavioral Health and Health Care Reform Models: Patient-Centered Medical Home, Health Home, and Accountable Care Organization

    OpenAIRE

    Bao, Yuhua; Casalino, Lawrence P.; Pincus, Harold Alan

    2013-01-01

    Discussions of health care delivery and payment reforms have largely been silent about how behavioral health could be incorporated into reform initiatives. This paper draws attention to four patient populations defined by the severity of their behavioral health conditions and insurance status. It discusses the potentials and limitations of three prominent models promoted by the Affordable Care Act to serve populations with behavioral health conditions: the Patient Centered Medical Home, the H...

  12. A home monitoring program including real-time wireless home spirometry in idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis: a pilot study on experiences and barriers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moor, C C; Wapenaar, M; Miedema, J R; Geelhoed, J J M; Chandoesing, P P; Wijsenbeek, M S

    2018-05-29

    In idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis (IPF), home monitoring experiences are limited, not yet real-time available nor implemented in daily care. We evaluated feasibility and potential barriers of a new home monitoring program with real-time wireless home spirometry in IPF. Ten patients with IPF were asked to test this home monitoring program, including daily home spirometry, for four weeks. Measurements of home and hospital spirometry showed good agreement. All patients considered real-time wireless spirometry useful and highly feasible. Both patients and researchers suggested relatively easy solutions for the identified potential barriers regarding real-time home monitoring in IPF.

  13. Sociocultural determinants of home delivery in Ethiopia: a qualitative study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kaba M

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Mirgissa Kaba,1 Tesfaye Bulto,2 Zergu Tafesse,2 Wassie Lingerh,2 Ismael Ali2 1Department of Preventive Medicine, School of Public Health, Addis Ababa University, 2Integrated Family Health Program, John Snow, Inc., Addis Ababa, Ethiopia Background: Maternal health remains a major public health problem in Ethiopia. Despite the government’s measures to ensure institutional delivery assisted by skilled attendants, home delivery remains high, estimated at over 80% of all pregnant women.Objective: The study aims to identify determinants that sustain home delivery in Ethiopia.Methods: A total of 48 women who delivered their most recent child at home, 56 women who delivered their most recent child in a health facility, 55 husbands of women who delivered within 1 year preceding the study, and 23 opinion leaders in selected districts of Amhara, Oromia, Southern Nations, Nationalities, and Peoples’ Region, and Tigray regions were involved in the study. Key informant interview, in-depth interviews, and focus group discussions were conducted to collect data using checklists developed for this purpose. Data reduction and analysis were facilitated by Maxqda qualitative data analysis software version 11.Results: Findings show that pregnancy and delivery is a normal and natural life event. Research participants unanimously argue that such a life event should not be linked with health problems. Home is considered a natural space for delivery and most women aspire to deliver at home where rituals during labor and after delivery are considered enjoyable. Even those who delivered in health facilities appreciate events in connection to home delivery. Efforts are underway to create home-like environments in health facilities, but health facilities are not yet recognized as a natural place of delivery. The positive tendency to deliver at home is further facilitated by poor service delivery at the facility level. Perceived poor competence of providers and limited

  14. Sociocultural determinants of home delivery in Ethiopia: a qualitative study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaba, Mirgissa; Bulto, Tesfaye; Tafesse, Zergu; Lingerh, Wassie; Ali, Ismael

    2016-01-01

    Maternal health remains a major public health problem in Ethiopia. Despite the government's measures to ensure institutional delivery assisted by skilled attendants, home delivery remains high, estimated at over 80% of all pregnant women. The study aims to identify determinants that sustain home delivery in Ethiopia. A total of 48 women who delivered their most recent child at home, 56 women who delivered their most recent child in a health facility, 55 husbands of women who delivered within 1 year preceding the study, and 23 opinion leaders in selected districts of Amhara, Oromia, Southern Nations, Nationalities, and Peoples' Region, and Tigray regions were involved in the study. Key informant interview, in-depth interviews, and focus group discussions were conducted to collect data using checklists developed for this purpose. Data reduction and analysis were facilitated by Maxqda qualitative data analysis software version 11. Findings show that pregnancy and delivery is a normal and natural life event. Research participants unanimously argue that such a life event should not be linked with health problems. Home is considered a natural space for delivery and most women aspire to deliver at home where rituals during labor and after delivery are considered enjoyable. Even those who delivered in health facilities appreciate events in connection to home delivery. Efforts are underway to create home-like environments in health facilities, but health facilities are not yet recognized as a natural place of delivery. The positive tendency to deliver at home is further facilitated by poor service delivery at the facility level. Perceived poor competence of providers and limited availability of supplies and equipment were found to maintain the preference to deliver at home. The government's endeavor to improve maternal health has generated positive results with more women now attending antenatal care. Yet over 80% of women deliver at home and this was found to be the

  15. Beta-blocker withdrawal among patients presenting for surgery from home

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schonberger, Robert B.; Lukens, Carrie L.; Turkoglu, O. Dicle; Feinleib, Jessica L.; Haspel, Kenneth L.; Burg, Matthew M.

    2012-01-01

    Structured Abstract Objective This study sought to measure the incidence of perioperative beta-blocker non-compliance by patients who were prescribed chronic beta blocker therapy and presented for surgery from home. The effect of patient non-compliance on day of surgery presenting heart rate was also examined. Design Prospective observational study with outcome data obtained from review of the medical record. Setting The preoperative clinic and operating rooms of a Veterans Administration hospital. Participants Patients on chronic beta blocker therapy who presented from home for surgery. Interventions None. Measurements and Main Results Demographic and comorbidity data as well as data on self-reported compliance to beta-blocker therapy, initial day of surgery vital signs, and recent ambulatory vital signs were collected. Ten out of fifty subjects (20%; 95% CI = 9-31%) reported not taking their day of surgery beta-blocker. These self-reported non-adherers demonstrated a higher presenting heart rate on the day of surgery vs. adherent subjects (median of 78 beats per minute vs. 65 beats per minute, p=0.02 by Wilcoxon Rank-Sum Test). The difference-in-difference between baseline primary care and day of surgery heart rate was also statistically significant between compliant and non-compliant subjects (-7 beats per minute vs. +12.5 beats per minute, p<0.00001). Conclusions Patient self-report and physiologic data documented failure to take beta-blockers and possible beta-blocker withdrawal in 20% of patients who presented for surgery from home. If these findings are confirmed in larger studies, improved patient understanding of and compliance with medication instructions during preoperative visits should be a focus of future quality improvement initiatives. PMID:22418043

  16. Proportion and characteristics of patients who measure their blood pressure at home: Nationwide survey in Slovenia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Petek-Šter Marija

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Home blood pressure monitoring has several advantages over blood pressure monitoring at a physician's office, and has become a useful instrument in the management of hypertension. Objective. To explore the rate and characteristics of patients who measure their blood pressure at home. Methods. A sample of 2,752 patients with diagnosis of essential arterial hypertension was selected from 12596 consecutive office visitors. Data of 2,639 patients was appropriate for analysis. The data concerning home blood pressure measurement and patients' characteristics were obtained from the patients' case histories. Results 1,835 (69.5% out of 2,639 patients measured their blood pressure at home. 1,284 (70.0% of home blood pressure patients had their own blood pressure measurement device. There were some important differences between these two groups: home blood pressure patients were more frequently male, of younger age, better educated, from urban area, mostly non-smokers, more likely to have diabetes mellitus and ischemic heart disease and had higher number of co-morbidities and were on other drugs beside antihypertensive medication. Using the logistic regression analysis we found that the most powerful predictors of home blood pressure monitoring had higher education level than primary school OR=1.80 (95% CI 1.37-2.37, non-smoking OR=2.16 (95% CI 1.40-3.33 and having a physician in urban area OR=1.32 (95% CI 1.02-1.71. Conclusion. Home blood pressure monitoring is popular in Slovenia. Patients who measured blood pressure at home were different from patients who did not. Younger age, higher education, non-smoking, having a physician in urban area and longer duration of hypertension were predictors of home blood pressure monitoring.

  17. Supplementary home biofeedback improves quality of life in younger patients with fecal incontinence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bartlett, Lynne; Sloots, Kathryn; Nowak, Madeleine; Ho, Yik-Hong

    2015-01-01

    Biofeedback is a scarce, resource-intensive clinical therapy. It is used to treat patients with bowel problems, including fecal incontinence (FI), who fail to respond to simple dietary advice, medication, or pelvic floor exercises. Populations are aging and younger cohorts use technology in managing their health, affording FI self-management opportunities. Does supplementary home-based biofeedback improve FI and quality of life (QOL)? Seventy-five incontinent participants (12 male), mean age 61.1 years, consented to participate. Thirty-nine patients (5 male) were randomized to the standard biofeedback protocol plus daily home use of a Peritron perineometer (intervention) and 36 patients (7 male) to the standard biofeedback protocol (control). On completion of the study each perineometer exercise session was rated for technique by 2 raters, blinded to the patient and order of sessions. With the exception of Fecal Incontinence Quality of Life Scale lifestyle improvement (intervention--9.1% vs. controls--0.3%, P=0.026) and embarrassment improvement (intervention--50.0% vs. controls--18.3%, P=0.026), supplementary home biofeedback did not result in greater clinical improvement for the intervention group as a whole. However, on stratification around the mean age, continence and QOL of younger people in the intervention group were significantly better than those of their control counterparts. Graphed perineometer sessions demonstrated high compliance and improvement in exercise technique. Perineometers provided reassurance, motivation, and an exercise reminder ensuring that confidence was achieved quickly. Home biofeedback was acceptable and well tolerated by all users. Younger participants significantly benefited from using this technology.

  18. DOE Zero Energy Ready Home Case Study: One Sky Homes — Cottle Zero Net Energy Home, San Jose, CA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    none,

    2014-09-01

    This builder took home the Grand Winner prize in the Custom Builder category in the 2014 Housing Innovation Awards for its high performance building science approach. The builder used insulated concrete form blocks to create the insulated crawlspace foundation for its first DOE Zero Energy Ready Home, the first net zero energy new home certified in the state of California.

  19. Prospective study on cost-effectiveness of home-based motor assessment in Parkinson's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cubo, E; Mariscal, N; Solano, B; Becerra, V; Armesto, D; Calvo, S; Arribas, J; Seco, J; Martinez, A; Zorrilla, L; Heldman, D

    2017-02-01

    Introduction Treatment adjustments in Parkinson's disease (PD) are in part dependent on motor assessments. The aim of this study was to evaluate the cost-effectiveness of home-based motor monitoring plus standard in-office visits versus in-office visits alone in patients with advanced PD. Methods The procedures consisted of a prospective, one-year follow-up, randomized, case-control study. A total of 40 patients with advanced PD were randomized into two groups: 20 patients underwent home-based motor monitoring by using wireless motion sensor technology, while the other 20 patients had in-office visits. Motor and non-motor symptom severities, quality of life, neuropsychiatric symptoms, and comorbidities were assessed every four months. Direct costs were assessed using a standardized questionnaire. Cost-effectiveness was assessed using the incremental cost-effectiveness ratio (ICER). Results Both groups of PD patients were largely comparable in their clinical and demographic variables at baseline; however, there were more participants using levodopa-carbidopa intestinal gel in the home-based motor monitoring group. There was a trend for lower Unified Parkinson's Disease Rating Scale functional status (UPDRS II) scores in the patients monitored at home compared to the standard clinical follow-up ( p = 0.06). However, UPDRS parts I, III, IV and quality-adjusted life-years scores were similar between both groups. Home-based motor monitoring was cost-effective in terms of improvement of functional status, motor severity, and motor complications (UPDRS II, III; IV subscales), with an ICER/UPDRS ranging from €126.72 to €701.31, respectively. Discussion Home-based motor monitoring is a tool which collects cost-effective clinical information and helps augment health care for patients with advanced PD.

  20. The association between home care visits and same-day emergency department use: a case-crossover study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Aaron; Schumacher, Connie; Bronskill, Susan E; Campitelli, Michael A; Poss, Jeffrey W; Seow, Hsien; Costa, Andrew P

    2018-04-30

    The extent to which home care visits contribute to the delay or avoidance of emergency department use is poorly characterized. We examined the association between home care visits and same-day emergency department use among patients receiving publicly funded home care. We conducted a population-based case-crossover study among patients receiving publicly funded home care in the Hamilton-Niagara-Haldimand-Brant region of Ontario between January and December 2015. Within individuals, all days with emergency department visits after 5 pm were selected as cases and matched with control days from the previous week. The cohort was stratified according to whether patients had ongoing home care needs ("long stay") or short-term home care needs ("short stay"). We used conditional logistical regression to estimate the association between receiving a home care visit during the day and visiting the emergency department after 5 pm on the same day. A total of 4429 long-stay patients contributed 5893 emergency department visits, and 2836 short-stay patients contributed 3476 visits. Receiving a home care nursing visit was associated with an increased likelihood of visiting the emergency department after 5 pm on the same day in both long-stay (odds ratio [OR] 1.32, 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.17-1.48) and short-stay patients (OR 1.22, 95% CI 1.07-1.39). Stronger associations were observed for less acute visits to the emergency department. No associations were observed for other types of home care visits. Patients receiving home care were more likely to visit the emergency department during the evening on days they received a nursing visit. The mechanism of the association between home care visits and same-day emergency department use and the extent to which same-day emergency department visits could be prevented or diverted require additional investigation. © 2018 Joule Inc. or its licensors.

  1. Hospital at Home care for older patients with cognitive impairment: a protocol for a randomised controlled feasibility trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pouw, Maaike A; Calf, Agneta H; van Munster, Barbara C; Ter Maaten, Jan C; Smidt, Nynke; de Rooij, Sophia E

    2018-03-27

    An acute hospital admission is a stressful life event for older people, particularly for those with cognitive impairment. The hospitalisation is often complicated by hospital-associated geriatric syndromes, including delirium and functional loss, leading to functional decline and nursing home admission. Hospital at Home care aims to avoid hospitalisation-associated adverse outcomes in older patients with cognitive impairment by providing hospital care in the patient's own environment. This randomised, non-blinded feasibility trial aims to assess the feasibility of conducting a randomised controlled trial in terms of the recruitment, use and acceptability of Hospital at Home care for older patients with cognitive impairment. The quality of care will be evaluated and the advantages and disadvantages of the Hospital at Home care programme compared with usual hospital care. Eligible patients will be randomised either to Hospital at Home care in their own environment or usual hospital care. The intervention consists of hospital level care provided at patients' homes, including visits from healthcare professionals, diagnostics (laboratory tests, blood cultures) and treatment. The control group will receive usual hospital care. Measurements will be conducted at baseline, during admission, at discharge and at 3 and 6 months after the baseline assessment. Institutional ethics approval has been granted. The findings will be disseminated through public lectures, professional and scientific conferences, as well as peer-reviewed journal articles. The study findings will contribute to knowledge on the implementation of Hospital at Home care for older patients with cognitive disorders. The results will be used to inform and support strategies to deliver eligible care to older patients with cognitive impairment. e020313; Pre-results. © Article author(s) (or their employer(s) unless otherwise stated in the text of the article) 2018. All rights reserved. No commercial use is

  2. Impact of specialist home-based palliative care services in a tertiary oncology set up: a prospective non-randomized observational study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dhiliwal, Sunil R; Muckaden, Maryann

    2015-01-01

    Home-based specialist palliative care services are developed to meet the needs of the patients in advanced stage of cancer at home with physical symptoms and distress. Specialist home care services are intended to improve symptom control and quality of life, enable patients to stay at home, and avoid unnecessary hospital admission. Total 690 new cases registered under home-based palliative care service in the year 2012 were prospectively studied to assess the impact of specialist home-based services using Edmonton symptom assessment scale (ESAS) and other parameters. Out of the 690 registered cases, 506 patients received home-based palliative care. 50.98% patients were cared for at home, 28.85% patients needed hospice referral and 20.15% patients needed brief period of hospitalization. All patients receiving specialist home care had good relief of physical symptoms (P care (OOH) through liaising with local general practitioners; 42.68% received home based bereavement care and 91.66% had good bereavement outcomes. Specialist home-based palliative care improved symptom control, health-related communication and psychosocial support. It promoted increased number of home-based death, appropriate and early hospice referral, and averted needless hospitalization. It improved bereavement outcomes, and caregiver satisfaction.

  3. Measuring the Cost of the Patient-Centered Medical Home: A Cost-Accounting Approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lieberthal, Robert D; Payton, Colleen; Sarfaty, Mona; Valko, George

    To explore the cost for individual practices to become more patient-centered, we inventoried and calculated the cost of costly activities involved in implementing the Patient-Centered Medical Home (PCMH) as defined by the National Committee for Quality Assurance. There were 3 key findings. The cost of each PCMH-related clinical activity can be classified in 1 of 3 major categories. Cost offsets can be used to defray part of the cost recognition. The cost of PCMH transformation varied by practice with no clear level or pattern of costs. Our study suggests that small- and medium-sized practices may experience difficulty with the financial burden of PCMH recognition.

  4. Safety in home care: A research protocol for studying medication management

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Easty Anthony

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Patient safety is an ongoing global priority, with medication safety considered a prevalent, high-risk area of concern. Yet, we have little understanding of the supports and barriers to safe medication management in the Canadian home care environment. There is a clear need to engage the providers and recipients of care in studying and improving medication safety with collaborative approaches to exploring the nature and safety of medication management in home care. Methods A socio-ecological perspective on health and health systems drives our iterative qualitative study on medication safety with elderly home care clients, family members and other informal caregivers, and home care providers. As we purposively sample across four Canadian provinces: Alberta (AB, Ontario (ON, Quebec (QC and Nova Scotia (NS, we will collect textual and visual data through home-based interviews, participant-led photo walkabouts of the home, and photo elicitation sessions at clients' kitchen tables. Using successive rounds of interpretive description and human factors engineering analyses, we will generate robust descriptions of managing medication at home within each provincial sample and across the four-province group. We will validate our initial interpretations through photo elicitation focus groups with home care providers in each province to develop a refined description of the phenomenon that can inform future decision-making, quality improvement efforts, and research. Discussion The application of interpretive and human factors lenses to the visual and textual data is expected to yield findings that advance our understanding of the issues, challenges, and risk-mitigating strategies related to medication safety in home care. The images are powerful knowledge translation tools for sharing what we learn with participants, decision makers, other healthcare audiences, and the public. In addition, participants engage in knowledge exchange

  5. Autonomous rehabilitation at stroke patients home for balance and gait: safety, usability and compliance of a virtual reality system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Held, Jeremia P; Ferrer, Begoña; Mainetti, Renato; Steblin, Alexander; Hertler, Benjamin; Moreno-Conde, Alberto; Dueñas, Alvaro; Pajaro, Marta; L-Parra-Calderón, Carlos; Vargiu, Eloisa; Zarco, Maria J; Barrera, Maria; Echevarria, Carmen; Jódar-Sánchez, Francisco; Luft, Andreas R; Borghese, Nunzio A

    2017-09-25

    New technologies, such as telerehabilitation and gaming devices offer the possibility for patients to train at home. This opens the challenge of safety for the patient as he is called to exercise neither with a therapist on the patients' side nor with a therapist linked remotely to supervise the sessions. To study the safety, usability and patient acceptance of an autonomous telerehabilitation system for balance and gait (the REWIRE platform) in the patients home. Cohort study. Community, in the stroke patients' home. 15 participants with first-ever stroke, with a mild to moderate residual deficit of the lower extremities. Autonomous rehabilitation based on virtual rehabilitation was provided at the participants' home for twelve weeks. The primary outcome was compliance (the ratio between days of actual and scheduled training), analysed with the two-tailed Wilcoxon Mann- Whitney test. Furthermore safety is defined by adverse events. The secondary endpoint was the acceptance of the system measured with the Technology Acceptance Model. Additionally, the cumulative duration of weekly training was analysed. During the study there were no adverse events related to the therapy. Patients performed on average 71% (range 39 to 92%) of the scheduled sessions. The Technology Acceptance Model Questionnaire showed excellent values for stroke patients after the training. The average training duration per week was 99 ±53min. Autonomous telerehabilitation for balance and gait training with the REWIRE-system is safe, feasible and can help to intensive rehabilitative therapy at home. Telerehabilitation enables safe training in home environment and supports of the standard rehabilitation therapy.

  6. Critical decisions for older people with advanced dementia: a prospective study in long-term institutions and district home care

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Toscani, F.; Steen, J.T. van der; Finetti, S.; Giunco, F.; Pettenati, F.; Villani, D.; Monti, M.; Gentile, S.; Charrier, L.; Giulio, P. Di

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To describe and compare the decisions critical for survival or quality of life [critical decisions (CDs)] made for patients with advanced dementia in nursing homes (NHs) and home care (HC) services. DESIGN: Prospective cohort study with a follow-up of 6 months. SETTING: Lombardy Region

  7. A comparison of center-based vs. home-based daily hemodialysis for patients with end-stage renal disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kraus, Michael; Burkart, John; Hegeman, Rebecca; Solomon, Richard; Coplon, Norman; Moran, John

    2007-10-01

    Home hemodialysis has been a therapeutic option for almost 4 decades. The complexity of dialysis equipment has been a factor-limiting adoption of this modality. We performed a feasibility study to demonstrate the safety of center-based vs. home-based daily hemodialysis with the NxStage System One portable hemodialysis device. We also performed a retrospective analysis to determine if clinical effects previously associated with short-daily dialysis were also seen using this novel device. We conducted a prospective, 2-treatment, 2-period, open-label, crossover study of in-center hemodialysis vs. home hemodialysis in 32 patients treated at 6 U.S. centers. The 8-week In-Center Phase (6 days/week) was followed by a 2-week transition period and then followed by the 8-week Home Phase (6 days/week). We retrospectively collected data on hemodialysis treatment parameters immediately preceding the study in a subset of patients. Twenty-six out of 32 patients (81%) successfully completed the study. Successful delivery of at least 90% of prescribed fluid volume (primary endpoint) was achieved in 98.5% of treatments in-center and 97.3% at home. Total effluent volume as a percentage of prescribed volume was between 94% and 100% for all study weeks. The composite rate of intradialytic and interdialytic adverse events per 100 treatments was significantly higher for the In-Center Phase (5.30) compared with the Home Phase (2.10; p=0.007). Compared with the period immediately preceding the study, there were reductions in blood pressure, antihypertensive medications, and interdialytic weight gain. Daily home hemodialysis with a small, easy-to-use hemodialysis device is a viable dialysis option for end-stage renal disease patients capable of self/partner-administered dialysis.

  8. Behavioral health and health care reform models: patient-centered medical home, health home, and accountable care organization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bao, Yuhua; Casalino, Lawrence P; Pincus, Harold Alan

    2013-01-01

    Discussions of health care delivery and payment reforms have largely been silent about how behavioral health could be incorporated into reform initiatives. This paper draws attention to four patient populations defined by the severity of their behavioral health conditions and insurance status. It discusses the potentials and limitations of three prominent models promoted by the Affordable Care Act to serve populations with behavioral health conditions: the Patient-Centered Medical Home, the Health Home initiative within Medicaid, and the Accountable Care Organization. To incorporate behavioral health into health reform, policymakers and practitioners may consider embedding in the reform efforts explicit tools-accountability measures and payment designs-to improve access to and quality of care for patients with behavioral health needs.

  9. Hospital-admitted COPD patients treated at home using telemedicine technology in The Virtual Hospital Trial

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jacobsen, Anna Svarre; Laursen, Lars C; Østergaard, Birte

    2013-01-01

    Recent reviews suggest that telemedicine solutions for patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) may prevent hospital readmissions and emergency room visits and improve health-related quality of life. However, the studies are few and only involve COPD patients who are in a stable...... phase or in-patients who are ready for discharge. COPD patients hospitalized with an acute exacerbation may also benefit from telemedicine solutions. The overall aim is to investigate a telemedicine-based treatment solution for patients with acute exacerbation of COPD at home as compared to conventional...... hospital treatment measured according to first treatment failure, which is defined as readmission due to COPD within 30 days after discharge....

  10. Dehydration of Older Patients in Institutional Care and the Home Environment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lešnik, Amadeus; Piko, Nejc; Železnik, Danica; Bevc, Sebastjan

    2017-11-01

    Dehydration in older adults is an important clinical problem associated with more comorbidities, longer hospital stays, and higher mortality rates. However, in daily clinical practice, no single gold standard marker of hydration status in older adults is available. The aim of the current study was to define the fluid balance status in older adults residing in institutional care or the home. Four hundred ten patients (192 from institutional care and 218 from home care) 65 and older from the region of lower Styria (Slovenia) were included in the study. Serum osmolality, electrolytes, and blood urea nitrogen to creatinine (BUN:Cr) ratio were used to identify dehydration. Statistically significant differences were found between groups in serum osmolality and BUN:Cr ratio. Moreover, dehydration (defined as increased serum osmolality) was significantly more common in patients in institutional care than home care (51% versus 41.3%, respectively). The results confirm that dehydration is a common clinical problem in older adults, especially in those from institutional care. Although many methods of determining hydration status in older adults have been proposed, no gold standard exists, making hydration evaluation difficult in this population. [Res Gerontol Nurs. 2017; 10(6):260-266.]. Copyright 2017, SLACK Incorporated.

  11. A conceptual framework for interprofessional shared decision making in home care: Protocol for a feasibility study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Murray Mary-Anne

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Shared decision making (SDM is fundamental to informed consent and client-centered care. So far, SDM frameworks have been limited to the client-physician dyad, even though care is increasingly delivered by interprofessional (IP teams. IP collaboration is especially essential in home care, one of health care's most rapidly growing areas. This study will assess whether it is possible to practice SDM in IP home care. Methods/Design We will use a qualitative case study and a quantitative survey to capture the macro, meso and micro levels of stakeholders in home care. The case study will follow the knowledge-to-action process framework to evaluate the work of an IP home care team at a Quebec City health center. Sources of data will include one-on-one interviews with patients, family caregivers or surrogates and significant others, and administrators; a focus group of home care health professionals; organizational documents; and government policies and standards. The interview guide for the interviews and the focus group will explore current practices and clinical problems addressed in home care; factors that could influence the implementation of the proposed IP approach to SDM; the face and content validity of the approach; and interventions to facilitate the implementation and evaluation of the approach. The survey will ask 300 health professionals working in home care at the health center to complete a questionnaire based on the Theory of Planned Behaviour that measures their intentions to engage in an IP approach to SDM. We will use our analysis of the individual interviews, the focus group and the survey to elaborate a toolkit for implementing an IP approach to SDM in home care. Finally, we will conduct a pilot study in Alberta to assess the transferability of our findings. Discussion We believe that developing tools to implement IP SDM in home care is essential to strengthening Canada's healthcare system and furthering

  12. Home tracheotomy mechanical ventilation in patients with amyotrophic lateral sclerosis: causes, complications and 1-year survival.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sancho, Jesús; Servera, Emilio; Díaz, José Luis; Bañuls, Pilar; Marín, Julio

    2011-11-01

    Home tracheotomy mechanical ventilation (HTMV) can prolong survival in patients with amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) when non-invasive ventilation (NIV) fails, but knowledge about HTMV is scarce. The aim of this study was to determine the causes of tracheotomy and the main issues of 1-year HTMV in a cohort of patients with ALS. A prospective study of all patients needing HTMV was performed in a referral respiratory care unit (RCU) from April 2001 to January 2010. Patients' informed decisions about HTMV were fully respected. Caregivers were trained and could telephone the RCU. Hospital staff made home visits. All patients (n=116) agreed to participate and a tracheotomy was needed for 76, mainly due to bulbar dysfunction. Of the 38 who had a tracheotomy, in 21 it was performed in an acute setting and in 17 as a non-emergency procedure. In 19 patients the tracheotomy was related to the inadequacy of mechanically assisted coughing (MAC) to maintain normal oxygen saturation. During HTMV, 19 patients required hospitalisation, 12 with respiratory problems. The 1-year survival rate was 78.9%, with a mean survival of 10.39 months (95% CI 9.36 to 11.43). Sudden death was the main cause of death (n=9) and only one patient died from respiratory causes. No predictive factors for survival were found. Besides NIV inadequacy, the ineffectiveness of mechanically assisted coughing appears to be a relevant cause of tracheotomy for patients with ALS with severe bulbar dysfunction. Patients choosing HTMV provided by a referral RCU could have a good 1-year survival rate, respiratory problems being the main cause of hospitalisation but not of death.

  13. Actual versus recommended storage temperatures of oral anticancer medicines at patients' homes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vlieland, N D; van den Bemt, Bjf; van Riet-Nales, D A; Bouvy, M L; Egberts, Acg; Gardarsdottir, H

    2017-01-01

    Background Substantial quantities of unused medicines are returned by patients to the pharmacy each year. Redispensing these medicines would reduce medicinal waste and health care costs. However, it is not known if medicines are stored by patients as recommended in the product label. Inadequate storage may negatively affect the medicine and reduce clinical efficacy whilst increasing the risk for side effects. Objective To investigate the proportion of patients storing oral anticancer medicines according to the temperature instructions in the product label. Methods Consenting adult patients from six Dutch outpatient hospital pharmacies were included in this study if they used an oral anticancer medicine during February 2014 - January 2015. Home storage temperatures were assessed by inclusion of a temperature logger in the original cancer medicines packaging. The primary outcome was the proportion of patients storing oral anticancer medicines as specified in the Summary of Product Characteristics, either by recalculating the observed temperature fluctuations to a single mean kinetic temperature or by following the temperature instructions taking into account a consecutive 24-h tolerance period. Results Ninety (81.1%) of the 111 included patients (47.8% female, mean age 65.2 (SD: 11.1)) returned their temperature loggers to the pharmacy. None of the patients stored oral anticancer medicines at a mean kinetic temperature above 25℃, one patient stored a medicine requiring storage below 25℃ longer than 24 h above 25℃. None of the patients using medicines requiring storage below 30℃ kept their medicine above 30℃ for a consecutive period of 24 h or longer. Conclusion The majority of patients using oral anticancer medicines store their medicines according to the temperature requirements on the product label claim. Based on our results, most oral anticancer medicines will not be negatively affected by temperature conditions at patients' homes for a maximum of

  14. DOE ZERH Case Study: Evolutionary Home Builders, The Adaptation Home, Geneva, IL

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    none,

    2015-09-01

    Case study of a DOE 2015 Housing Innovation Award winning custom home in the cold climate that got a HERS 30 without PV, with 2x8 24” on center walls with blown fiberglass and 4” polysio rigid foam; basement with 2” XPS interior, 4” under slab, 4” exterior of foundation wall; vented attic with R-100 blown cellulose; wo air-to-air heat pumps SEER 14.1; HSPF 9.6; heat pump water heater.

  15. Being a nurse in nursing home for patients on the edge of life.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hov, Reidun; Athlin, Elsy; Hedelin, Birgitta

    2009-12-01

    Nurses in nursing homes care for patients with complex health problems that need to be followed up by medical treatment. Most patients benefit from the treatment, but for some the treatment seems only to lengthen their death process. Sometimes questions are raised as to whether life-sustaining treatment should be withheld/withdrawn. Decisions related to such questions are difficult to make as some patients are 'on the edge of life', which is understood as a transition between living and dying with an unpredictable outcome, whether the illness will lead to recovery or dying. The aim of this study was to acquire a deeper understanding of what it is to be a nurse in a nursing home for patients on the edge of life. The research design was qualitative, based on hermeneutic phenomenology. Fourteen nurses at two nursing homes were interviewed twice. The result shows that when facing a patient on the edge of life, the nurses were challenged as professionals and as human beings. Two main themes were identified, which included two sub-themes each. The first main theme: 'striving to do right and good for everyone' included the sub-themes 'feeling certain, but accompanied by uncertainty' and 'being caught between too much responsibility and too little formal power'. The second main theme: 'being a vulnerable helper--the prize and the price', contained the sub-themes 'needing emotional protection in professional commitment' and 'feeling undervalued in spite of professional pride'. The essence was: 'being a lonely and enduring struggler between opposite poles'. The findings revealed paradoxes in nurses' work which might threaten nurses' professional identity and put heavy demands on their professional performance. There is a need for formal involvement in end-of-life decisions from nurses, further education and support to nurses related to patients on the edge of life.

  16. What do patients value about spinal manipulation and home exercise for back-related leg pain? A qualitative study within a controlled clinical trial

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Maiers, M.; Hondras, M. A.; Salsbury, S. A.

    2016-01-01

    contributors to both their satisfaction and the worthwhile nature of treatment. HEA was liked for its convenience and ability to foster an exercise habit. SMT was liked for specific aspects of the modality (e.g. manipulation, stretching) and provider competency. Most participants reported no dislikes for SMT...... exercise with advice (HEA). Design Qualitative study in a controlled clinical trial. Method Semi-structured interviews conducted after 12 weeks of treatment asked participants about satisfaction with care and whether treatment was worthwhile. An interdisciplinary research team conducted content analysis...

  17. Team functioning as a predictor of patient outcomes in early medical home implementation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Frances M; Rubenstein, Lisa V; Yoon, Jean

    2018-03-12

    New models of patient-centered primary care such as the patient-centered medical home (PCMH) depend on high levels of interdisciplinary primary care team functioning to achieve improved outcomes. A few studies have qualitatively assessed barriers and facilitators to optimal team functioning; however, we know of no prior study that assesses PCMH team functioning in relationship to patient health outcomes. The aim of the study was to assess the relationships between primary care team functioning, patients' use of acute care, and mortality. Retrospective longitudinal cohort analysis of patient outcomes measured at two time points (2012 and 2013) after PCMH implementation began in Veterans Health Administration practices. Multilevel models examined practice-level measures of team functioning in relationship to patient outcomes (all-cause and ambulatory care-sensitive condition-related hospitalizations, emergency department visits, and mortality). We controlled for practice-level factors likely to affect team functioning, including leadership support, provider and staff burnout, and staffing sufficiency, as well as for individual patient characteristics. We also tested the model among a subgroup of vulnerable patients (homeless, mentally ill, or with dementia). In adjusted analyses, higher team functioning was associated with lower mortality (OR = 0.92, p = .04) among all patients and with fewer all-cause admissions (incidence rate ratio [IRR] = 0.90, p team functioning within PCMH models for achieving improved patient outcomes. A focus on team functioning is important especially in the early implementation of team-based primary care models.

  18. [Pilot-experience in home care: bedridden aged patients of a basic health unit, Porto Alegre, Brazil].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marques, Giselda Quintana; Freitas, Ivani Bueno de Almeida

    2009-12-01

    The objectives of this study were to describe the development of a pilot-project in home care to bedridden aged patients at a Basic Health Unit, and identify demographic, social and health aspects of these patients, as well as relevant aspects reported by the health team that implemented the home care. The study had descriptive and evaluative characteristics. The patients' enrollment forms and health records and the project's records were analyzed. The pilot-experience permitted to develop the team's skills, in addition to being enriching and of great responsibility for the professionals and caregivers involved. The results indicated the need for continuous home care and adjustments in its organization with the purpose of increasing the areas for health care and improving the population's quality of life.

  19. Importance of patient education on home medical care waste disposal in Japan

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ikeda, Yukihiro, E-mail: yuyu@med.kindai.ac.jp

    2014-07-15

    Highlights: • Attached office nurses more recovered medical waste from patients’ homes. • Most nurses educated their patients on how to store home medical care waste in their homes and on how to separate them. • Around half of nurses educated their patients on where to dispose of their home medical care waste. - Abstract: To determine current practices in the disposal and handling of home medical care (HMC) waste, a questionnaire was mailed to 1965 offices nationwide. Of the office that responded, 1283 offices were analyzed. Offices were classified by management configuration: those attached to hospitals were classified as ”attached offices” and others as “independent offices”. More nurses from attached offices recovered medical waste from patients’ homes than those from independent offices. Most nurses educated their patients on how to store HMC waste in their homes (79.3% of total) and on how to separate HMC waste (76.5% of total). On the other hand, only around half of nurses (47.3% from attached offices and 53.2% from independent offices) educated their patients on where to dispose of their HMC waste. 66.0% of offices replied that patients had separated their waste appropriately. The need for patient education has emerged in recent years, with education for nurses under the diverse conditions of HMC being a key factor in patient education.

  20. Importance of patient education on home medical care waste disposal in Japan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ikeda, Yukihiro

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • Attached office nurses more recovered medical waste from patients’ homes. • Most nurses educated their patients on how to store home medical care waste in their homes and on how to separate them. • Around half of nurses educated their patients on where to dispose of their home medical care waste. - Abstract: To determine current practices in the disposal and handling of home medical care (HMC) waste, a questionnaire was mailed to 1965 offices nationwide. Of the office that responded, 1283 offices were analyzed. Offices were classified by management configuration: those attached to hospitals were classified as ”attached offices” and others as “independent offices”. More nurses from attached offices recovered medical waste from patients’ homes than those from independent offices. Most nurses educated their patients on how to store HMC waste in their homes (79.3% of total) and on how to separate HMC waste (76.5% of total). On the other hand, only around half of nurses (47.3% from attached offices and 53.2% from independent offices) educated their patients on where to dispose of their HMC waste. 66.0% of offices replied that patients had separated their waste appropriately. The need for patient education has emerged in recent years, with education for nurses under the diverse conditions of HMC being a key factor in patient education

  1. R-2000 home health study : Homeowner health in R-2000 and new conventional homes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Parekh, A.

    2002-01-01

    A field study was conducted by Health Canada and Natural Resources Canada (NRCan) to evaluate self-reported health symptoms by residents of R-2000 and conventional homes in Nova Scotia and New Brunswick. It involved 52 energy efficient R-2000 and 50 conventionally built houses. Health Canada collected and analyzed data concerning changes in occupant health after moving into R-2000 houses and similar conventional houses. Definite trends in improvements of respiratory symptoms of occupants in R-2000 houses were revealed, compared to the results obtained for occupants of conventional houses. New occupants of R-2000 houses reported significant improvement in indoor air quality in 94 per cent of cases, while only 77 per cent of conventional homeowners reported similar results. Fifty six per cent of the occupants of R-2000 homes reported a general improvement in their health, compared to 32 per cent in conventional houses. The testing of houses in other regions is being planned by Health Canada. tabs

  2. Feeding tube-related complications and problems in patients receiving long-term home enteral nutrition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vasileios Alivizatos

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Aim: The aim of this study was to evaluate the long-term complications and problems related to gastrostomy and jejunostomy feeding tubes used for home enteral nutrition support and the effect these have on health care use. Materials and Methods: The medical records of 31 patients having gastrostomy (27 patients and jejunostomy (4 feeding tubes inserted in our Department were retrospectively studied. All were discharged on long-term (>3 months enteral nutrition and followed up at regular intervals by a dedicated nurse. Any problem or complication associated with tube feeding as well as the intervention, if any, that occurred, was recorded. Data were collected and analyzed. Results: All the patients were followed up for a mean of 17.5 months (4-78. The most frequent tube-related complications included inadvertent removal of the tube (broken tube, plugged tube; 45.1%, tube leakage (6.4%, dermatitis of the stoma (6.4%, and diarrhea (6.4%. There were 92 unscheduled health care contacts, with an average rate of such 2.9 contacts over the mean follow-up time of 17.5 months. Conclusion: In patients receiving long-term home enteral nutrition, feeding tube-related complications and problems are frequent and result in significant health care use. Further studies are needed to address their optimal prevention modalities and management.

  3. Actual and preferred place of death of home-dwelling patients in four European countries: making sense of quality indicators.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maaike L De Roo

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Dying at home and dying at the preferred place of death are advocated to be desirable outcomes of palliative care. More insight is needed in their usefulness as quality indicators. Our objective is to describe whether "the percentage of patients dying at home" and "the percentage of patients who died in their place of preference" are feasible and informative quality indicators. METHODS AND FINDINGS: A mortality follow-back study was conducted, based on data recorded by representative GP networks regarding home-dwelling patients who died non-suddenly in Belgium (n = 1036, The Netherlands (n = 512, Italy (n = 1639 or Spain (n = 565. "The percentage of patients dying at home" ranged between 35.3% (Belgium and 50.6% (The Netherlands in the four countries, while "the percentage of patients dying at their preferred place of death" ranged between 67.8% (Italy and 86.0% (Spain. Both indicators were strongly associated with palliative care provision by the GP (odds ratios of 1.55-13.23 and 2.30-6.63, respectively. The quality indicator concerning the preferred place of death offers a broader view than the indicator concerning home deaths, as it takes into account all preferences met in all locations. However, GPs did not know the preferences for place of death in 39.6% (The Netherlands to 70.3% (Italy, whereas the actual place of death was known in almost all cases. CONCLUSION: GPs know their patients' actual place of death, making the percentage of home deaths a feasible indicator for collection by GPs. However, patients' preferred place of death was often unknown to the GP. We therefore recommend using information from relatives as long as information from GPs on the preferred place of death is lacking. Timely communication about the place where patients want to be cared for at the end of life remains a challenge for GPs.

  4. Doctors' learning experiences in end-of-life care - a focus group study from nursing homes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fosse, Anette; Ruths, Sabine; Malterud, Kirsti; Schaufel, Margrethe Aase

    2017-01-31

    Doctors often find dialogues about death difficult. In Norway, 45% of deaths take place in nursing homes. Newly qualified medical doctors serve as house officers in nursing homes during internship. Little is known about how nursing homes can become useful sites for learning about end-of-life care. The aim of this study was to explore newly qualified doctors' learning experiences with end-of-life care in nursing homes, especially focusing on dialogues about death. House officers in nursing homes (n = 16) participated in three focus group interviews. Interviews were audiotaped and transcribed verbatim. Data were analysed with systematic text condensation. Lave & Wenger's theory about situated learning was used to support interpretations, focusing on how the newly qualified doctors gained knowledge of end-of-life care through participation in the nursing home's community of practice. Newly qualified doctors explained how nursing home staff's attitudes taught them how calmness and acceptance could be more appropriate than heroic action when death was imminent. Shifting focus from disease treatment to symptom relief was demanding, yet participants comprehended situations where death could even be welcomed. Through challenging dialogues dealing with family members' hope and trust, they learnt how to adjust words and decisions according to family and patient's life story. Interdisciplinary role models helped them balance uncertainty and competence in the intermediate position of being in charge while also needing surveillance. There is a considerable potential for training doctors in EOL care in nursing homes, which can be developed and integrated in medical education. This practice based learning arena offers newly qualified doctors close interaction with patients, relatives and nurses, teaching them to perform difficult dialogues, individualize medical decisions and balance their professional role in an interdisciplinary setting.

  5. Prevalence of apraxia among patients with a first left hemisphere stroke in rehabilitation centres and nursing homes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Donkervoort, M; Dekker, J; van den Ende, E; Stehmann-Saris, J C; Deelman, B G

    2000-04-01

    To investigate the prevalence of apraxia in patients with a first left hemisphere stroke. Left hemisphere stroke patients staying at an inpatient care unit of a rehabilitation centre or nursing home and receiving occupational therapy (n = 600). A short questionnaire on general patient characteristics and stroke-related aspects was completed by occupational therapists for every left hemisphere stroke patient they treated. A diagnosis of apraxia or nonapraxia was made in every patient, on the basis of a set of clinical criteria. The prevalence of apraxia among 492 first left hemisphere stroke patients in rehabilitation centres was 28% (96/338) and in nursing homes 37% (57/154). No relationship was found between the prevalence of apraxia and age, gender or type of stroke (haemorrhage or infarct). This study shows that approximately one-third of left hemisphere stroke patients has apraxia.

  6. Impact of home carpets on childhood lead intervention study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yiin, L.-M.; Lioy, P.J.; Rhoads, G.G.

    2003-01-01

    Blood lead data for a childhood lead exposure study have been reanalyzed to examine the impact of carpets on the effectiveness of a cleaning intervention in 39 New Jersey urban houses. All eligible houses in the study were classified as carpeted and uncarpeted depending on the number of rooms that were carpeted. The cleaning protocol was associated with a significant reduction in the blood lead concentrations for the uncarpeted homes (P=0.004), whereas no significant change was found for the carpeted homes (P=0.566). We also completed correlation analyses between the number of cleaning visits and the percentage reduction in blood lead for the carpeted/uncarpeted houses. There was a significant correlation (r=0.67) between the number of cleanings and blood lead reduction for the uncarpeted homes, but no correlation (r=0.04) for the carpeted homes. In a multiple regression model that took confounding variables into account, the carpet status (carpeted or uncarpeted) remained a factor of the effect of cleaning on blood lead (P=0.05). We conclude that the presence of contaminated carpets inhibits the effectiveness of home cleaning despite a high-efficiency particulate air filtered vacuum protocol that removes a substantial amount of lead dust

  7. Patient-pharmacist communication during a post-discharge pharmacist home visit.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ensing, H.T.; Vervloet, M.; Dooren, A.A. van; Bouvy, M.L.; Koster, E.S.

    2018-01-01

    Background With the shifting role of community pharmacists towards patient education and counselling, they are wellpositioned to conduct a post-discharge home visit which could prevent or solve drug-related problems. Gaining insight into the communication during these home visits could be valuable

  8. 75 FR 62635 - Proposed Information Collection (Patient Satisfaction Survey Michael E. DeBakey Home Care Program...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-12

    ... Collection (Patient Satisfaction Survey Michael E. DeBakey Home Care Program) Activity: Comment Request... determine patients' satisfaction with services provided by or through the Michael E. DeBakey Home Care...: Patient Satisfaction Survey Michael E. DeBakey Home Care Program, VA Form 10-0476. OMB Control Number...

  9. Justifying continuous sedation until death: A focus group study in nursing homes in Flanders, Belgium

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rys, S.; Deschepper, R.; Deliens, L.; Mortier, F.; Bilsen, J.

    2013-01-01

    Continuous Sedation until Death (CSD), the act of reducing or removing the consciousness of an incurably ill patient until death, has become a common practice in nursing homes in Flanders (Belgium). Quantitative research has suggested that CSD is not always properly applied. This qualitative study

  10. Treatment of acute relapses in multiple sclerosis at home with oral dexamethasone : a pilot study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    De Keyser, J; Zwanikken, C; Zorgdrager, A; Oenema, D

    The objective of this study was to investigate the feasibility of treating relapses of multiple sclerosis (MS) at home with oral dexamethasone. Twenty-five out of 28 consecutive patients with MS who presented with a relapse of less than 2 weeks' duration were treated on an open basis with oral

  11. Quality improvement in healthcare delivery utilizing the patient-centered medical home model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akinci, Fevzi; Patel, Poonam M

    2014-01-01

    Despite the fact that the United States dedicates so much of its resources to healthcare, the current healthcare delivery system still faces significant quality challenges. The lack of effective communication and coordination of care services across the continuum of care poses disadvantages for those requiring long-term management of their chronic conditions. This is why the new transformation in healthcare known as the patient-centered medical home (PCMH) can help restore confidence in our population that the healthcare services they receive is of the utmost quality and will effectively enhance their quality of life. Healthcare using the PCMH model is delivered with the patient at the center of the transformation and by reinvigorating primary care. The PCMH model strives to deliver effective quality care while attempting to reduce costs. In order to relieve some of our healthcare system distresses, organizations can modify their delivery of care to be patient centered. Enhanced coordination of services, better provider access, self-management, and a team-based approach to care represent some of the key principles of the PCMH model. Patients that can most benefit are those that require long-term management of their conditions such as chronic disease and behavioral health patient populations. The PCMH is a feasible option for delivery reform as pilot studies have documented successful outcomes. Controversy about the lack of a medical neighborhood has created concern about the overall sustainability of the medical home. The medical home can stand independently and continuously provide enhanced care services as a movement toward higher quality care while organizations and government policy assess what types of incentives to put into place for the full collaboration and coordination of care in the healthcare system.

  12. An ethical analysis of a home visit case study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pibernat, Artur Dalfó; Vidal, Jessica Rosell; Pibernat, Enric Dalfó; Rodríguez, Francisco Javier Pelegrina; Colomer, Gerard; Cid, Maria Feijoo

    2017-12-01

    This article will explore a clinical case study of a home visit carried out by the case manager nurse. In this case, we will discuss the dilemma of finding the balance between autonomy and beneficence from the perspective of principlist ethics, virtue ethics and the 'ethics of care'. The main conflict in this case study deals with all proposals are unsuitable and it is not necessary for a nurse to pay him a home visit, whereas for the healthcare system it is considered necessary. We could conclude that, during the home visit, the case manager aspires to achieve excellence, and throughout his clinical relationship with Francesc, searches for a series of virtues, respecting certain fundamental principles. In this way, the case managers ensure that Jaume's care is more humanised. The case has been anonymised and confidentiality maintained.

  13. Living with and Caring for Patients with Alzheimer’s Disease in Nursing Homes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shahrzad Yektatalab

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Many of the patients with Alzheimer disease are taken care of in nursing homes. However the literature on the experiences of Iranian formal caregivers of older adults with Alzheimer disease is scarce. This qualitative study explored the caring experiences of formal caregivers in nursing homes that can improve the quality of care and patient’s quality of life. Methods: This qualitative study used the principles of descriptive content analysis to analyze these data. Our participants included 11 female and 3 male caregivers aged 25 to 38 years who were selected for interviewing based on a purposive sampling method. The data were analyzed with a content analysis method. Results: Nearly 900 initial codes were extracted and categorized into 6 main themes including "managing difficult behaviors", "dependence on familial care", "continuum of different feelings", "care for a child", "living with the patients" and "not understanding the patients", which was further analyzed in the two subcategories "caring without enough information" and " a dead man moving". Conclusion: The care provided by our informants was mainly influenced by attitudes, culture and religious beliefs of caregivers about family attachment and ample driven reward of helping and caring frail or old people in Islam. These cultural and religious beliefs could facilitate provision of care and confrontation with patients’ child-like behaviors. It is suggested that employment of trained staff and plans for their continued education can improve the quality of care and the quality of the patient's life.

  14. Factors associated with nursing home placement of all patients admitted for inpatient rehabilitation in Singapore community hospitals from 1996 to 2005: a disease stratified analysis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cynthia Chen

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVES: To (1 identify social and rehabilitation predictors of nursing home placement, (2 investigate the association between effectiveness and efficiency in rehabilitation and nursing home placement of patients admitted for inpatient rehabilitation from 1996 to 2005 by disease in Singapore. DESIGN: National data were retrospectively extracted from medical records of community hospital. DATA SOURCES: There were 12,506 first admissions for rehabilitation in four community hospitals. Of which, 8,594 (90.3% patients were discharged home and 924 (9.7% patients were discharged to a nursing home. Other discharge destinations such as sheltered home (n = 37, other community hospital (n = 31, death in community hospital (n = 12, acute hospital (n = 1,182 and discharge against doctor's advice (n = 24 were excluded. OUTCOME MEASURE: Nursing home placement. RESULTS: Those who were discharged to nursing home had 33% lower median rehabilitation effectiveness and 29% lower median rehabilitation efficiency compared to those who were discharged to nursing homes. Patients discharged to nursing homes were significantly older (mean age: 77 vs. 73 years, had lower mean Bathel Index scores (40 vs. 48, a longer median length of stay (40 vs. 33 days and a longer time to rehabilitation (19 vs. 15 days, had a higher proportion without a caregiver (28 vs. 7%, being single (21 vs. 7% and had dementia (23 vs. 10%. Patients admitted for lower limb amputation or falls had an increased odds of being discharged to a nursing home by 175% (p<0.001 and 65% (p = 0.043 respectively compared to stroke patients. CONCLUSIONS: In our study, the odds of nursing home placement was found to be increased in Chinese, males, single or widowed or separated/divorced, patients in high subsidy wards for hospital care, patients with dementia, without caregivers, lower functional scores at admission, lower rehabilitation effectiveness or efficiency at discharge and primary diagnosis groups such

  15. DOE Zero Energy Ready Home Case Study: Thrive Home Builders, Lowry Plan

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pacific Northwest National Laboratory

    2017-09-01

    Thrive Home Builders built this 4,119-ft2 home at the Lowry development in Denver, Colorado, to the high-performance criteria of the U.S. Department of Energy’s Zero Energy Ready Home Program. Despite the dense positioning of the homes, mono-plane roof designs afforded plenty of space for the 8.68 kW of photovoltaic panels. With the PV, the home achieves a Home Energy Rating System (HERS) score of 4 and the home owners should enjoy energy bills of about $-11 a year. Without the PV, the home would score a HERS 38 (far lower than the HERS 80 to 100 of typical new homes).

  16. The influence of ergonomic devices on mechanical load during patient handling activities in nursing homes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koppelaar, Elin; Knibbe, Hanneke J J; Miedema, Harald S; Burdorf, Alex

    2012-07-01

    Mechanical load during patient handling activities is an important risk factor for low back pain among nursing personnel. The aims of this study were to describe required and actual use of ergonomic devices during patient handling activities and to assess the influence of these ergonomic devices on mechanical load during patient handling activities. For each patient, based on national guidelines, it was recorded which specific ergonomic devices were required during distinct patient handling activities, defined by transferring a patient, providing personal care, repositioning patients in the bed, and putting on and taking off anti-embolism stockings. During real-time observations over ~60 h among 186 nurses on 735 separate patient handling activities in 17 nursing homes, it was established whether ergonomic devices were actually used. Mechanical load was assessed through observations of frequency and duration of a flexed or rotated trunk >30° and frequency of pushing, pulling, lifting or carrying requiring forces 230 N from start to end of each separate patient handling activity. The number of patients and nurses per ward and the ratio of nurses per patient were used as ward characteristics with potential influence on mechanical load. A mixed-effect model for repeated measurements was used to determine the influence of ergonomic devices and ward characteristics on mechanical load. Use of ergonomic devices was required according to national guidelines in 520 of 735 (71%) separate patient handling activities, and actual use was observed in 357 of 520 (69%) patient handling activities. A favourable ratio of nurses per patient was associated with a decreased duration of time spent in awkward back postures during handling anti-embolism stocking (43%), patient transfers (33%), and personal care of patients (24%) and also frequency of manually lifting patients (33%). Use of lifting devices was associated with a lower frequency of forces exerted (64%), adjustable bed and

  17. Why Hospitals and Payers are Recommending Home Care Upon Discharge Instead of SNF or Traditional Home Health Services--Alternative Payment Model Hospital Incentives Aligning with Patient Choice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luke, Josh

    2016-01-01

    Seniors and other hospital patients in the United States have traditionally had the option of being discharged to a skilled nursing facility (convalescent home) for post-acute services, or home with nursing and therapy services provided in the home setting. Traditionally, these home based services have been referred to as "home health." As more Americans have retired, home health services have expanded and are readily accessible. This growth put tremendous stress on the Medicare fund which pays for senior care services. However, "Home Care," which traditionally has been viewed as non-medical home based services, has also become a booming industry for the cost conscious in recent years as more Americans reach retirement age. With the passing of the Affordable Care Act in 2010, providers and payers are now finding themselves responsible for post-acute care and continuous patient health, so cost efficient solutions for post-acute care are thriving. For the first time in history, American hospitals and Insurers are recognizing Home Care as an effective model that achieves the Triple Aim of Health Care reform. Home Care, which is no longer completely non-medical services, has proven to be an integral part of the care continuum for seniors in recent years and is now becoming a viable solution for keeping patients well, while still honoring their desire to age and heal at home. This paper analyzes the benefits and risks of home care and provides a clear understanding as to why American hospitals are emphasizing SNF Avoidance and skipping home health, opting instead to refer patients directly to home care as the preferred discharge solution in a value based model.

  18. Home telemonitoring of severe chronic respiratory insufficient and asthmatic patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manuela Zamith

    2009-05-01

    Full Text Available For 9 months we evaluated a portable device to transfer patient-clinician data by Internet: oximetry, ECG, clinical questionnaires and messages from the doctor. Fifty-one patients with severe chronic respiratory insufficiency (CRI were followed at the hospital Pulido Valente and Espirito Santo and 21 asthmatics (A were followed at the latter hospital. The use and acceptance of this device was evaluated through questionnaires soliciting patients’ and health professionals’ opinions. Patients with CRI followed in Lisbon were also asked about hospital admissions and quality of life compared with a nine month period before the monitoring programme.CRI patients found learning to use the system more difficult; the majority (80% reported problems with the equipment, qualified as rare/occasional in 62% of the cases. For 31 CRI patients followed in Lisbon, the use of the system was classified as correct in 12 patients, incorrect in 7 and reasonable in 12 patients. The first group had a reducded number and duration of hospital admissions and also improved quality of life. With this remote monitoring system 80% of CRI patients reported they were more/much more supported and 33 patients (75% would use this system in the future. 81% of asthmatic patients would also like to maintain this type of monitoring. The service was considered useful by the researchers. We concluded that home telemonitoring was a positive contribution to the management of chronic patients and raised awareness of it should be considered in the future. Resumo: Durante nove meses avaliámos umdispositivo portátil para transferência de dados pelaInternet entre doentes e profissionais de saúde: oximetria,ECG, respostas a questionários e mensagens. Foramincluídos 51 insuficientes respiratórioscrónicos (IRC graves acompanhados no Hospital de PulidoValente (Lisboa e no Hospital do Espírito Santo(Évora e 21 asmáticos deste último hospital. Autiliza

  19. Challenges for Infants’ Home Care: a Qualitative Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zeinab Hemati

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Background Home care is an acceptable strategy for the relationship between family and healthcare team and implementation of healthcare interventions, and infants’ nurses could play an important role in enhancing the capability of families and promoting child health in this area. This study examined challenges facing infants’ home care from nurses’ viewpoints in Iranian culture.Materials and MethodsA qualitative design was used to explain challenges facing infants’ home care from nurses’ viewpoints. Participants included 20 nurses’ working in the neonatal units of University hospitals in Isfahan, Iran in 2015. Data collection was done by interviewing nurses working in neonatal units of Shahid Beheshti and Alzahra hospitals. All the data were analyzed by qualitative content analysis.ResultsFour main categories of “The need to warn the community ", “culture",” need for security " and ” legal support" were extracted from the participants' explanations, indicating the dimensions of Challenges for Infants’ Home Care.Conclusion Nursing policy makers and managers are able to help to facilitate home care and improve the infants’ health through correcting the infrastructure and eliminating current obstacles.

  20. The relationships between self-transcendence and spiritual well-being in cognitively intact nursing home patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haugan, Gørill; Rannestad, Toril; Hammervold, Randi; Garåsen, Helge; Espnes, Geir A

    2014-03-01

    Self-transcendence is considered a developmental process of personal maturity and a vital resource of well-being in later adulthood. Measurement of the associations between self-transcendence and spiritual well-being in cognitively intact nursing home patients has not been previously published. The aim of this study was to identify the relationships between self-transcendence and spiritual well-being in cognitively intact nursing home patients. A cross-sectional design using the self-transcendence scale and the FACIT-Sp spiritual well-being questionnaire was adopted. A sample of 202 cognitively intact nursing home patients in mid-Norway was selected to respond to the questionnaires in 2008 and 2009. Statistical analyses were conducted using lisrel 8.8 (Scientific Software International, Chicago, IL, USA) and structural equation modelling. A hypothesised structural equation model comprising a two-factor construct of self-transcendence and a three-factor construct of spiritual well-being demonstrated significant direct relationships between self-transcendence and spiritual well-being and total effects of self-transcendence on spiritual well-being. Facilitating patients' self-transcendence, both interpersonally and intrapersonally, might increase spiritual well-being among cognitively intact nursing home patients, which is seen to be of great importance to nursing home patients' overall satisfaction and satisfaction with staff. The two-factor construct of self-transcendence and the three-factor construct of FACIT-Sp allow a more complex examination of the associations between the constructs and prove more specific guidelines for nursing interventions promoting well-being in nursing home patients. © 2013 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  1. Organizational Processes and Patient Experiences in the Patient-centered Medical Home.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aysola, Jaya; Schapira, Marilyn M; Huo, Hairong; Werner, Rachel M

    2018-06-01

    There is increasing emphasis on the use of patient-reported experience data to assess practice performance, particularly in the setting of patient-centered medical homes. Yet we lack understanding of what organizational processes relate to patient experiences. Examine associations between organizational processes practices adopt to become PCMH and patient experiences with care. We analyzed visit data from patients (n=8356) at adult primary care practices (n=22) in a large health system. We evaluated the associations between practice organizational processes and patient experience using generalized estimating equations (GEE) with an exchangeable correlation structure to account for patient clustering by practice in multivariate models, adjusting for several practice-level and patient-level characteristics. We evaluated if these associations varied by race/ethnicity, insurance type, and the degree of patient comorbidity MEASURES:: Predictors include overall PCMH adoption and adoption of six organizational processes: access and communications, patient tracking and registry, care management, test referral tracking, quality improvement and external coordination. Primary outcome was overall patient experience. In our full sample, overall PCMH adoption score was not significantly associated with patient experience outcomes. However, among subpopulations with higher comorbidities, the overall PCMH adoption score was positively associated with overall patient experience measures [0.2 (0.06, 0.4); P=0.006]. Differences by race/ethnicity and insurance type in associations between specific organizational processes and patient experience were noted. Although some organizational processes relate to patients' experiences with care irrespective of the background of the patient, further efforts are needed to align practice efforts with patient experience.

  2. Health Economic Evaluation of Home and Hospital-Based Care in T2D Patients on Insulin Therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Janati, Ali; Sarabchian, Mohamad Ali; Mohaghegh, Bahram; Aghmohamadzadeh, Naser; Seyedin, Hesam; Gholizadeh, Masumeh; Hasanpoor, Edris

    2017-11-01

    Type 2 Diabetes is a main concern of public health in contemporary world with remarkable mortality, delayed complications and health costs. Governments are obliged to improve the quality of health care and consider appropriate strategies to reduce the costs. An alternative strategy for hospital services is care at home. Therefore, this study was aimed to evaluate the cost-effectiveness of home-based and hospital-based diabetes care. A quasi-experimental, pre-test and post-test design was conducted in Northwest Iran. Sixty subjects who were eligible insulin-treatment type 2 diabetes mellitus were randomly assigned into two equal groups to receive home-based or conventional hospital-based care. Data on glycosylated hemoglobin (HbA1c), hypoglycemia episodes, time needed to achieve glycemic control level, diabetes treatment satisfaction, diabetes knowledge and costs during three months were collected. The cost of home-based care in insulin therapy diabetes was 61% less compared with the hospital-based methods. The former strategy was cost-effective in terms of reduction in HbA1C and the time needed to achieve glycemic control. The patients in home care group were more satisfied and knowledgeable. The care at home approach for type 2 diabetic patients can be introduced and supported as a cost-effective care method in the country.

  3. Smart Health Caring Home: A Systematic Review of Smart Home Care for Elders and Chronic Disease Patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moraitou, Marina; Pateli, Adamantia; Fotiou, Sotiris

    2017-01-01

    As access to health care is important to people's health especially for vulnerable groups that need nursing for a long period of time, new studies in the human sciences argue that the health of the population depend less on the quality of the health care, or on the amount of spending that goes into health care, and more heavily on the quality of everyday life. Smart home applications are designed to "sense" and monitor the health conditions of its residents through the use of a wide range of technological components (motion sensors, video cameras, wearable devices etc.), and web-based services that support their wish to stay at home. In this work, we provide a review of the main technological, psychosocial/ethical and economic challenges that the implementation of a Smart Health Caring Home raises.

  4. At-home palliative sedation for end-of-life cancer patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alonso-Babarro, Alberto; Varela-Cerdeira, Maria; Torres-Vigil, Isabel; Rodríguez-Barrientos, Ricardo; Bruera, Eduardo

    2010-07-01

    Using a decision-making and treatment checklist developed to facilitate the at-home palliative sedation process, we assessed the incidence and efficacy of palliative sedation for end-of-life cancer patients with intractable symptoms who died at home. We retrospectively reviewed the medical records of 370 patients who were followed by a palliative home care team. Twenty-nine of 245 patients (12%) who died at home had received palliative sedation. The mean age of the patients who received palliative sedation was 58 +/- 17 years, and the mean age of the patients who did not receive palliative sedation was 69 +/- 15 years (p = 0.002). No other differences were detected between patients who did or did not receive palliative sedation. The most common indications for palliative sedation were delirium (62%) and dyspnea (14%). Twenty-seven patients (93%) received midazolam for palliative sedation (final mean dose of 74 mg), and two (7%) received levomepromazine (final mean dose of 125 mg). The mean time between palliative sedation initiation and time of death was 2.6 days. In 13 of the cases (45%), the palliative sedation decision was made with the patient and his or her family members, and in another 13 patients (45%), the palliative sedation decision was made only with the patient's family members. We concluded that palliative sedation may be used safely and efficaciously to treat dying cancer patients with refractory symptoms at home.

  5. Implementation of Patient-Centered Medical Homes in Adult Primary Care Practices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alexander, Jeffrey A; Markovitz, Amanda R; Paustian, Michael L; Wise, Christopher G; El Reda, Darline K; Green, Lee A; Fetters, Michael D

    2015-08-01

    There has been relatively little empirical evidence about the effects of patient-centered medical home (PCMH) implementation on patient-related outcomes and costs. Using a longitudinal design and a large study group of 2,218 Michigan adult primary care practices, our study examined the following research questions: Is the level of, and change in, implementation of PCMH associated with medical surgical cost, preventive services utilization, and quality of care in the following year? Results indicated that both level and amount of change in practice implementation of PCMH are independently and positively associated with measures of quality of care and use of preventive services, after controlling for a variety of practice, patient cohort, and practice environmental characteristics. Results also indicate that lower overall medical and surgical costs are associated with higher levels of PCMH implementation, although change in PCMH implementation did not achieve statistical significance. © The Author(s) 2015.

  6. Attitudes and views of physicians and nurses towards cancer patients dying at home.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Porta, M; Busquet, X; Jariod, M

    1997-03-01

    The objective was to study attitudes and views of primary care professionals towards terminally ill cancer patients who die at home, using a cross-sectional study based in the health district of Manresa (province of Barcelona, Catalonia, Spain) of the Catalan Health Service, involving 151 primary health care professionals (87 physicians and 64 nurses). By using a self-responded anonymous questionnaire (response rate 89%) it was found that despite excellent motivation, primary care professionals reported widespread frustration and a poor opinion of the quality of care provided to terminally ill cancer patients. Attitudes and views clearly differ by age, sex and geographic setting. In the study area, most professional are reluctant to disclose the diagnosis of cancer, and this attitude is associated with a more favourable assessment of the support provided to the family. The idea that the most appropriate place of death is at home is strongly linked to the belief that patients ought to be informed of their illness, to feelings of frustration and to youth. These findings further substantiate the need and the potential for ample changes in terminal cancer care in Spain.

  7. Integrating Depression Care Management into Medicare Home Health Reduces Risk of 30- and 60-Day Hospitalization: The Depression Care for Patients at Home Cluster-Randomized Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bruce, Martha L; Lohman, Matthew C; Greenberg, Rebecca L; Bao, Yuhua; Raue, Patrick J

    2016-11-01

    To determine whether a depression care management intervention in Medicare home health recipients decreases risk of hospitalization. Cluster-randomized trial. Nurse teams were randomized to intervention (12 teams) or enhanced usual care (EUC; 9 teams). Six home health agencies from distinct geographic regions. Home health recipients were interviewed at home and over the telephone. Individuals aged 65 and older who screened positive for depression on nurse assessments (N = 755) and a subset who consented to interviews (n = 306). The Depression CARE for PATients at Home (CAREPATH) guides nurses in managing depression during routine home visits. Clinical functions include weekly symptom assessment, medication management, care coordination, patient education, and goal setting. Researchers conducted telephone conferences with team supervisors every 2 weeks. Hospitalization while receiving home health services was assessed using data from the home health record. Hospitalization within 30 days of starting home health, regardless of how long recipients received home health services, was assessed using data from the home care record and research assessments. The relative hazard of being admitted to the hospital directly from home health was 35% lower within 30 days of starting home health care (hazard ratio (HR) = 0.65, P = .01) and 28% lower within 60 days (HR = 0.72, P = .03) for CAREPATH participants than for participants receiving EUC. In participants referred to home health directly from the hospital, the relative hazard of being rehospitalized was approximately 55% lower (HR = 0.45, P = .001) for CAREPATH participants. Integrating CAREPATH depression care management into routine nursing practice reduces hospitalization and rehospitalization risk in older adults receiving Medicare home health nursing services. © 2016, Copyright the Authors Journal compilation © 2016, The American Geriatrics Society.

  8. Gerontechnology for demented patients: smart homes for smart aging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frisardi, Vincenza; Imbimbo, Bruno P

    2011-01-01

    In an aging world, maintaining good health and independence for as long as possible is essential. Instead of hospitalization or institutionalization, the elderly with chronic conditions, especially those with cognitive impairment, can be assisted in their own environment with numerous 'smart' devices that support them in their activity of daily living. A "smart home" is a residence equipped with technology that facilitates monitoring of residents to improve quality of life and promote physical independence, as well as to reduce caregiver burden. Several projects worldwide have been conducted, but some ethical and legal issues are still unresolved and, at present, there is no evidence of the effects of smart homes on health outcomes. Randomized controlled trials are needed to understand the plus and minuses of these projects, but this will only be possible with a widespread proliferation and penetration of smart homes in the social network.

  9. Newborn well-child visits in the home setting: a pilot study in a family medicine residency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lakin, Ashley; Sutter, Mary Beth; Magee, Susanna

    2015-03-01

    The purpose of our study was to pilot a home visit program targeting neonates conducted by family medicine residents. While the literature shows that home visit programs are successful at preventing adverse outcomes for young children, such as improving parenting practices and promoting breastfeeding, no data exist about newborn home visits conducted by resident physicians. Residents conducted newborn home visits precepted by a family medicine faculty member from June 2012--May 2013. Subjects were recruited from the residency continuity practice and randomized to receive two home visits (which replaced two office visits) or routine office-based newborn care. All participants were surveyed using the validated WHOQOL-BREF quality of life scale and a patient satisfaction instrument. Metrics were also obtained from the electronic medical record. Mothers and resident physicians completed an open-ended questionnaire about their experience. All patients, whether receiving office-based or home-based care, rated their care highly. Significant differences were seen in usage of acute care in the first 6 months of life, and mothers in the home visit group trended toward initiating breastfeeding at a higher rate. The home visit group ranked their quality of life higher across all domains when compared to the control group, approaching statistical significance in two domains. Residents providing home visits reported increased connectedness to patients and improved confidence in anticipatory guidance delivery. Home visits are valuable for families with newborns, in terms of minimizing acute care service usage, breastfeeding promotion, and perhaps increasing maternal perceptions of well-being. A home visit program has the potential to enhance resident education and the doctor-patient relationship.

  10. BTS Case Study: The Galloway Family Home

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brandegee Group

    1999-01-01

    Case study of an energy-efficient Habitat for Humanity house that uses 30% less energy than conventional residential construction. The project was part of the Jimmy Carter Work Project in rural Appalachia in 1997

  11. Dyadic psychological intervention for patients with cancer and caregivers in home-based, specialized palliative care

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    von Heymann-Horan, Annika Berglind; Puggaard, Louise Berg; Nissen, Kathrine Grovn

    2017-01-01

    Patients with incurable cancer and their informal caregivers have numerous psychological and psychosocial needs. Many of these patients wish to receive their care and die at home. Few home-based specialized palliative care (SPC) interventions systematically integrate psychological support. We...... present a psychological intervention for patient–caregiver dyads developed for an ongoing randomized controlled trial (RCT) of home-based SPC, known as Domus, as well as the results of an assessment of its acceptability and feasibility. The Domus model of SPC for patients with incurable cancer...... and their caregivers offered systematic psychological assessment and dyadic intervention as part of interdisciplinary care. Through accelerated transition to SPC, the aim of the model was to enhance patients' chances of receiving care and dying at home. Integration of psychological support sought to facilitate...

  12. Operation of Wastewater Treatment Plants: A Home Study Training Program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    California State Univ., Sacramento. Dept. of Civil Engineering.

    This manual was prepared by experienced wastewater treatment plant operators to provide a home study course to develop new qualified workers and expand the abilities of existing workers. The objective of this manual is to provide the knowledge and skills necessary for certification. Participants learn the basic operational aspects of treatment…

  13. Home based rehabilitation for patients with COPD : an attractive alternative

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wijkstra, Peter

    2007-01-01

    Pulmonary rehabilitation programs are well established to provide a multidisciplinary approach to control and alleviate symptoms and to optimise functional capacity in patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). In the last decade a large number of studies have investigated the

  14. Blood Pressure Home Monitoring in Hypertensive Patients Attending ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Results: Two hundred and five hypertensive patients who practice HMBP were recruited into this study. Sixty percent of ... communicating BP readings to their physicians is needed. ... (DOAJ), African Journal Online, Bioline International, Open-J-Gate and Pharmacy Abstracts .... to analyze relationships between continuous.

  15. Embedding care management in the medical home: a case study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daaleman, Timothy P; Hay, Sherry; Prentice, Amy; Gwynne, Mark D

    2014-04-01

    Care managers are playing increasingly significant roles in the redesign of primary care and in the evolution of patient-centered medical homes (PCMHs), yet their adoption within day-to-day practice remains uneven and approaches for implementation have been minimally reported. We introduce a strategy for incorporating care management into the operations of a PCMH and assess the preliminary effectiveness of this approach. A case study of the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill Family Medicine Center used an organizational model of innovation implementation to guide the parameters of implementation and evaluation. Two sources were used to determine the effectiveness of the implementation strategy: data elements from the care management informatics system in the health record and electronic survey data from the Family Medicine Center providers and care staff. A majority of physicians (75%) and support staff (82%) reported interactions with the care manager, primarily via face-to-face, telephone, or electronic means, primarily for facilitating referrals for behavioral health services and assistance with financial and social and community-based resources. Trend line suggests an absolute decrease of 8 emergency department visits per month for recipients of care management services and an absolute decrease of 7.5 inpatient admissions per month during the initial 2-year implementation period. An organizational model of innovation implementation is a potentially effective approach to guide the process of incorporating care management services into the structure and workflows of PCMHs.

  16. ESPEN Guidelines on Parenteral Nutrition: home parenteral nutrition (HPN) in adult patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Staun, M.; Pironi, L.; Bozzetti, F.

    2009-01-01

    Home parenteral nutrition (HPN) was introduced as a treatment modality in the early 1970s primarily for the treatment of chronic intestinal failure in patients with benign disease. The relatively low morbidity and mortality associated with HPN has encouraged its widespread use in western countries....... Thus there is huge clinical experience, but there are still few controlled clinical studies of treatment effects and management of complications. The purpose of these guidelines is to highlight areas of good practice and promote the use of standardized treatment protocols between centers...

  17. DOE Zero Energy Ready Home Case Study: Garbett Homes, Herriman, Utah

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    none,

    2013-09-01

    As the first net zero-energy production home certified in Utah, this house incorporates two 94% efficient tankless water heaters and two roof-mounted solar panels that preheat the home's water supply. This home won a 2013 Housing Innovation Award in the production builder category.

  18. DOE Zero Energy Ready Home Case Study: Amaris Homes, Afton Model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pacific Northwest National Laboratory

    2017-09-01

    Amaris Homes built this 3,734-ft2 home in Afton, Minnesota, to the performance criteria of the DOE Zero Energy Ready Home (ZERH) program. A high-efficiency gas boiler provides hot water for the zoned radiant floor system as well as for faucets and showers. A high-efficiency heat pump provides zoned cooling.

  19. DOE Zero Energy Ready Home Case Study: Mandalay Homes — Pronghorn Ranch, Prescott Valley, AZ

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    none,

    2014-09-01

    The builder has certified 20 homes to DOE Zero Energy Ready Home program and plans are underway for 50 more. Winner of a Production Builder prize in the 2014 Housing Innovation Awards, the homes achieved a HERS score of 48 without photovoltaics (PV) or HERS 25 with 3.5 kW PV included.

  20. Human-centered design and smart homes : How to study and design for the home experience?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Eggen, J.H.; van den Hoven, E.A.W.H; Terken, J.M.B.; van Hoof, J.; Demiris, G.; Wouters, E.J.M.

    2016-01-01

    The focus of this chapter is on designing for smart homes. The perspective will be user-driven design research. The chapter starts with a context analysis of the home environment. This analysis shows that, from a user perspective, home is about emotions and not about the physical house with all its

  1. Genetic Mediation of the Home Environment during Infancy: A Sibling Adoption Study of the HOME.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Braungart, Julia M.; And Others

    1992-01-01

    The home environment of nonadoptive and adoptive sibling pairs was assessed using the Home Observation for Measurement of the Environment when each sibling was one and two years of age. Correlations between home environment scores for nonadoptive siblings were greater than those for adoptive siblings. (BC)

  2. Whole-Home Dehumidifiers: Field-Monitoring Study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Burke, Tom; Willem, Henry; Ni, Chun Chun; Stratton, Hannah; Whitehead, Camilla Dunham; Johnson, Russell

    2014-09-23

    Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL) initiated a WHD field-metering study to expand current knowledge of and obtain data on WHD operation and energy consumption in real-world applications. The field study collected real-time data on WHD energy consumption, along with information regarding housing characteristics, consumer behavior, and various outdoor conditions expected to affect WHD performance and efficiency. Although the metering study collected similar data regarding air conditioner operation, this report discusses only WHDs. The primary objectives of the LBNL field-metering study are to (1) expand knowledge of the configurations, energy consumption profiles, consumer patterns of use (e.g., relative humidity [RH] settings), and environmental parameters of whole-home dehumidification systems; and (2) develop distributions of hours of dehumidifier operation in four operating modes: off, standby, fan-only, and compressor (also called dehumidification mode). Profiling energy consumption entails documenting the power consumption, duration of power consumption in different modes, condensate generation, and properties of output air of an installed system under field conditions of varying inlet air temperature and RH, as well as system configuration. This profiling provides a more detailed and deeper understanding of WHD operation and its complexities. This report describes LBNL’s whole-home dehumidification field-metering study conducted at four homes in Wisconsin and Florida. The initial phase of the WHD field-metering study was conducted on one home in Madison, Wisconsin, from June to December of 2013. During a second phase, three Florida homes were metered from June to October of 2014. This report presents and examines data from the Wisconsin site and from the three Florida sites.

  3. Implementation of Activity Sensor Equipment in the Homes of Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease Patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tillis, William; Bond, William F; Svendsen, Jessica; Guither, Sheila

    2017-11-01

    Telemedicine care models for managing advanced chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) may benefit from the addition of motion sensing, spirometry, and tablet-based symptom diary tracking. We conducted a feasibility study of telemedicine in the home setting using multiple activity sensor monitoring equipment. Deployment and monitoring were supported by home health nurses with technical advice from the equipment makers as needed. Data analytics for motion sensing was provided by the research sponsor, but was not used for care decisions. On study intake, a health risk assessment, Quality of Life (SF-36) survey, and the St. George Respiratory Questionnaire were administered to assess patients' self-perception of quality of life, activities of daily life function, and difficulty living with COPD. Twenty-eight patients were enrolled and data were gathered for a minimum of 6 months and maximum of 9 months. The researchers demonstrated that augmentation of traditional telemedicine methods with motion sensing, spirometry, and symptom diaries appears feasible. The technical, process, logistics barriers, and solutions required for system deployment are described. The researchers demonstrated that augmentation of traditional telemedicine methods with motion sensing, spirometry, and symptom diaries appears feasible. Further exploration will be needed to determine the value of this information in preventing outcomes relevant to patients.

  4. Family's difficulty scale in end-of-life home care: a new measure of the family's difficulties in caring for patients with cancer at the end of life at home from bereaved family's perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ishii, Yoko; Miyashita, Mitsunori; Sato, Kazuki; Ozawa, Taketoshi

    2012-02-01

    The aim of this study was to develop a tool to measure the family's difficulties in caring for cancer patients at the end of life at home: Family's Difficulty Scale in end-of-life home care (FDS). The draft of the FDS was derived from a pilot interview survey and literature reviews. The questionnaires were sent to 395 bereaved family caregivers whose family members were patients with terminal cancer receiving home service. We obtained 306 responses (response rate, 81%). Factor analysis resulted in 29 items and 8 factors: Burden of Care, Concerns about Home Care Doctor, Balance of Work and Care, Patient's Pain and Condition, Concerns about Visiting Nurse, Concerns about Home Care Service, Relationship between Family Caregivers and their Families, and Funeral Preparations. The cumulative rate of contribution was 71.8%. Cronbach coefficient α for the FDS was 0.73-0.75; the intraclass correlation coefficient in the test-retest examination was 0.75-0.85. Evidence for construct validity was confirmed by convergent and divergent validity. Concurrent validity was confirmed by significant correlations between identified factors and concurrent measures. The validity and reliability of this new instrument were confirmed. This scale should help home care providers to assess and focus on family difficulties and provide individualized care for the family who cares for a patient with terminal cancer at home.

  5. The concept of restraints in nursing home practice: a mixed method study in nursing homes for people with dementia.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zwijsen, S.A.; Depla, M.F.I.A.; Niemeijer, A.R.; Francke, A.L.; Hertogh, C.M.P.M.

    2011-01-01

    Introduction: Although in most developed countries the use of restraints is regulated and restricted by law, the concept of restraint in nursing home care remains ambiguous. This study aims to explore how care professionals and family members of nursing home residents with dementia in the

  6. Home enteral nutrition recipients: patient perspectives on training, complications and satisfaction

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Boland, Karen

    2016-10-01

    The equitable provision of home enteral nutrition (HEN) in the community can have a transformative effect on patient experience and family life for adults and children alike. While optimising quality of life in HEN patients can be challenging, the initiation of HEN positively impacts this measure of healthcare provision.1 Quality of life scores have been shown to improve in the weeks after hospital discharge, and HEN is physically well tolerated. However, it may be associated with psychological distress, and sometimes reluctance among HEN patients to leave their homes.2 Globally, HEN can attenuate cumulative projected patient care costs through a reduction in hospital admission and complications including hospital acquired infections.3 In an era where the cost of disease related malnutrition and associated prolonged hospital stay is being tackled in our healthcare systems, the role of HEN is set to expand. This is a treatment which has clear clinical and social benefits, and may restore some independence to patients and their families. Rather than the indications for HEN being focused on specific diagnoses, the provision of months of quality life at home for patients is adequate justification for its prescription.4 Previously, a review of HEN service provision in 39 cases demonstrated that patients want structured follow-up after hospital discharge, and in particular, would like one point of contact for HEN education and discharge.5 Management structures, funding challenges and the need for further education, particularly within the primary care setting may limit optimal use of HEN. The Irish Society for Clinical Nutrition and Metabolism (IrSPEN) aims to develop a national guideline document, drawing on international best practice, forming a template and standards for local policy development in the area of HEN service provision, training and follow-up. The first step in guideline development was to investigate patient experience for adults and children alike. Care

  7. [The planned home care transfer by a local medical support hospital and the introduction to home intravenous hyper alimentation--the making of a home care patient's instruction plan document].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shinobu, Akiko; Ohtsu, Yoko

    2004-12-01

    It is important to offer continuous medical service without interrupting everyone's various job functions at the Tama Numbu-Chiiki Hospitals in order to secure the quality and safety of home medical care to patients and their families. From 1998 up to the present, home intravenous hyper alimentation (home IVH) has been introduced by individually exchanging information that was based on items such as clinical case, doctor and caregiver in charge of the day, and introductory information. Five years have passed since we started an introduction of home IVH, and it appears that the medical cooperation of home IVH between the Minami-tama medical region and its neighboring area has been established. Then, we arranged an examination of the past 2 years based on the 57 patients who elected to choose home IVH instruction. Consequently, we created "home IVH introduction plan document" in standardizing a flow from home IVH introduction to post-hospital intervention. Since November of 2003, the plan document has been utilized and carried out to 5 patients by the end of February in 2004. This home IVH introduction plan document was able to clarify the role of medical person in connection with the patient. Therefore, we could not only share the information, but also could transfer medical care smoothly from the hospital to the patient's home.

  8. When Patients Customize Nursing Home Ratings, Choices And Rankings Differ From The Government's Version.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mukamel, Dana B; Amin, Alpesh; Weimer, David L; Sharit, Joseph; Ladd, Heather; Sorkin, Dara H

    2016-04-01

    Report cards currently published by the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services (CMS) offer composite (summary) quality measures based on a five-star ratings system, such as the one featured on the Nursing Home Compare website. These ratings are "one size fits all patients" measures. Nursing Home Compare Plus is an alternative that allows patients and their families to create their own composite scores based on their own preferences and medical needs. We present data from 146 patients who were discharged from the hospital to nursing homes who used Nursing Home Compare Plus. We found that the individual patient-constructed composites differed from CMS's five-star ratings composite. Patients differed from each other and from CMS in the number of performance measures they chose to include in their composite and in their weighting of each performance measure. When comparing Nursing Home Compare Plus to Medicare's five-star ratings, we found only minimal agreement on ranking of nursing homes. We conclude that patients might benefit if current report cards are modified to include an option for personalized ranking. Project HOPE—The People-to-People Health Foundation, Inc.

  9. The effect of somatic symptom attribution on the prevalence rate of depression and anxiety among nursing home patients

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Smalbrugge, M.; Pot, A.M.; Jongenelis, L.; Beekman, A.T.F.; Eefsting, J.A.

    2005-01-01

    The validity of diagnostic psychiatric instruments for depression and anxiety disorders may be compromised among patients with complex physical illness and disability. The objective of this study was to determine the effect on the prevalence rate of depression and anxiety in a nursing home

  10. Taurolidine-citrate-heparin lock reduces catheter-related bloodstream infections in intestinal failure patients dependent on home parenteral support

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tribler, Siri; Brandt, Christopher F.; Petersen, Anne H.

    2017-01-01

    Background: In patients with intestinal failure who are receiving home parenteral support (HPS), catheter-related bloodstream infections (CRBSIs) inflict health impairment and high costs.Objective: This study investigates the efficacy and safety of the antimicrobial catheter lock solution, taurol...

  11. Antipsychotic drug prescription rates among Dutch nursing homes : the influence of patient characteristics and the dementia special care unit

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Putten, M. J. G.; Wetzels, R. B.; Bor, H.; Zuidema, S. U.; Koopmans, R. T. C. M.

    2014-01-01

    Objectives: To assess the differences in antipsychotic drug prescription rates in residents with dementia in dementia special care units (SCUs) of Dutch nursing homes, considering the differences in patient characteristics. Method: As part of the Waalbed-II study, the data on antipsychotic drug use

  12. Home parenteral nutrition (HPN) in patients with post-bariatric surgery complications

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Van Gossum, A; Pironi, L; Chambrier, C

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND & AIMS: Obesity is a worldwide health problem. Bariatric surgery (BS) is becoming one of the most commonly used methods for fighting obesity and its associated comorbidities. However, current BS techniques can be associated with early or late complications that may require nutritional...... support. The aim of this retrospective observational study was to determine the indications and outcomes for patients on Home parenteral nutrition (HPN) due to post-bariatric surgery complications. METHODS: A specific questionnaire was designed by the ESPEN HAN/CIF working group and submitted to HPN...... centers. This questionnaire included: patient demographics, type of surgery, BMI before surgery and at start of HPN, indications for HPN including technical and nutritional complications (early within 2 months after surgery or late), outcome, PN regimen, and HPN complications. Patients were...

  13. Gatekeepers as Care Providers: The Care Work of Patient-centered Medical Home Clerical Staff.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Solimeo, Samantha L; Ono, Sarah S; Stewart, Kenda R; Lampman, Michelle A; Rosenthal, Gary E; Stewart, Greg L

    2017-03-01

    International implementation of the patient-centered medical home (PCMH) model for delivering primary care has dramatically increased in the last decade. A majority of research on PCMH's impact has emphasized the care provided by clinically trained staff. In this article, we report our ethnographic analysis of data collected from Department of Veterans Affairs staff implementing PACT, the VA version of PCMH. Teams were trained to use within-team delegation, largely accomplished through attention to clinical licensure, to differentiate staff in providing efficient, patient-centered care. In doing so, PACT may reinforce a clinically defined culture of care that countermands PCMH ideals. Such competing rubrics for care are brought into relief through a focus on the care work performed by clerks. Ethnographic analysis identifies clerks' care as a kind of emotional dirty work, signaling important areas for future anthropological study of the relationships among patient-centered care, stigma, and clinical authority. © 2016 by the American Anthropological Association.

  14. Resource utilization in home health care: results of a prospective study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trisolini, M G; Thomas, C P; Cashman, S B; Payne, S M

    1994-01-01

    Resource utilization in home health care has become an issue of concern due to rising costs and recent initiatives to develop prospective payment systems for home health care. A number of issues remain unresolved for the development of prospective reimbursement in this sector, including the types of variables to be included as payment variables and appropriate measures of resource use. This study supplements previous work on home health case-mix by analyzing the factors affecting one aspect of resource use for skilled nursing visits--visit length--and explores the usefulness of several specially collected variables which are not routinely available in administrative records. A data collection instrument was developed with a focus group of skilled nurses, identifying a range of variables hypothesized to affect visit length. Five categories of variables were studied using multiple regression analysis: provider-related; patient's socio-economic status; patient's clinical status; patient's support services; and visit-specific. The final regression model identifies 9 variables which significantly affect visit time. Five of the 9 are visit-specific variables, a significant finding since these are not routinely collected. Case-mix systems which include visit time as a measure of resource use will need to investigate visit-specific variables, as this study indicates they could have the largest influence on visit time. Two other types of resources used in home health care, supplies and security drivers, were also investigated in less detail.

  15. In-home Telerehabilitation for Older Persons with Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease: A Pilot Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michel Tousignant

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this pilot study was to investigate the efficacy of in-home telerehabilitation for people with Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease (COPD. Three community-living elders with COPD were recruited in a rehabilitation outpatient group and by direct referrals from pneumologists with outpatients who have COPD. A pre/post-test design without a control group was used for this pilot study. Telerehabilitation sessions (15 sessions were conducted by two trained physio­therapists from a service center to the patient’s home. Locomotor function (walking performance and quality of life were measured in person prior to and at the end of the treatment by an independent assessor. Clinical outcomes improved for all subjects except for locomotor function in the first participant. In-home telerehabilitation for people with COPD is a realistic alternative to dispense rehabilitation services for patients requiring physical therapy follow-up. 

  16. Frequent use of opioids in patients with dementia and nursing home residents

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen-Dahm, Christina; Gasse, Christiane; Astrup, Aske

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Pain is believed to be undertreated in patients with dementia; however, no larger studies have been conducted. The aim was to investigate prevalent use of opioids in elderly with and without dementia in the entire elderly population of Denmark. METHOD: A register-based cross-sectional......BACKGROUND: Pain is believed to be undertreated in patients with dementia; however, no larger studies have been conducted. The aim was to investigate prevalent use of opioids in elderly with and without dementia in the entire elderly population of Denmark. METHOD: A register-based cross......-sectional study in the entire elderly (≥65 years) population in 2010 was conducted. Opioid use among elderly with dementia (N = 35,455) was compared with elderly without (N = 870,645), taking age, sex, comorbidity, and living status into account. RESULTS: Nursing home residents (NHRs) used opioids most frequently...

  17. Self-transcendence, nurse-patient interaction and the outcome of multidimensional well-being in cognitively intact nursing home patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haugan, Gørill; Hanssen, Brith; Moksnes, Unni K

    2013-12-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the associations between age, gender, self-transcendence, nurse-patient interaction and multidimensional well-being as the outcome among cognitively intact nursing home patients. Self-transcendence is considered to be a vital resource of well-being in vulnerable populations and at the end of life. Moreover, the quality of care and the nurse-patient interaction is found to influence self-transcendence and well-being in nursing home patients. A cross-sectional design employing the Self-Transcendence Scale, the Nurse-Patient Interaction Scale, the FACT-G Quality of Life and the FACIT-Sp Spiritual Well-Being questionnaires was adopted. A sample of 202 cognitively intact nursing home patients from 44 nursing homes in central Norway was selected. A previous documented two-factor construct of self-transcendence was applied. The statistical analyses were carried out by means of independent sample t-test, correlation and regression analyses. Multiple linear regression analyses revealed significant relationships between interpersonal self-transcendence and social, functional and spiritual well-being, whereas intrapersonal self-transcendence significantly related to emotional, social, functional and spiritual well-being. Nurse-patient interaction related to physical, emotional and functional well-being. Age and gender were not significant predictors for well-being, except for functional and spiritual well-being where women scored higher than men. Nurse-patient interaction and self-transcendence are vital resources for promoting well-being physically, emotionally, functionally, socially and spiritually among cognitively intact nursing home patients. Nurse-patient interaction signifies vital and ultimate nursing qualities promoting self-transcendence and multidimensional well-being. These findings are important for clinical nursing intending to increase patients' well-being. © 2012 The Authors Scandinavian Journal of Caring Sciences

  18. 77 FR 69550 - Proposed Information Collection (Patient Satisfaction Survey Michael E. DeBakey Home Care Program...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-11-19

    ... (Patient Satisfaction Survey Michael E. DeBakey Home Care Program) Activity: Comment Request AGENCY.... DeBakey Home Care Program. DATES: Written comments and recommendations on the proposed collection of...: Patient Satisfaction Survey Michael E. DeBakey Home Care Program, VA Form 10-0476. OMB Control Number...

  19. 76 FR 624 - Proposed Information Collection (Patient Satisfaction Survey Michael E. DeBakey Home Care Program...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-05

    ... Collection (Patient Satisfaction Survey Michael E. DeBakey Home Care Program) Activity: Comment Request... satisfaction with the quality of services/care provided by home care program staff. An agency may not conduct... Form 10-0476).'' SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: Title: Patient Satisfaction Survey Michael E. DeBakey Home...

  20. DOE Zero Energy Ready Home Case Study, Weiss Building & Development, LLC., System Home, River Forest, Illinois

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    none,

    2013-09-01

    The Passive House Challenge Home located in River Forest, Illinois, is a 5-bedroom, 4.5-bath, 3,600 ft2 two-story home (plus basement) that costs about $237 less per month to operate than a similar sized home built to the 2009 IECC. For a home with no solar photovoltaic panels installed, it scored an amazingly low 27 on the Home Energy Rating System (HERS) score.An ENERGY STAR-rated dishwasher, clothes washer, and refrigerator; an induction cooktop, condensing clothes dryer, and LED lighting are among the energy-saving devices inside the home. All plumbing fixtures comply with EPA WaterSense criteria. The home was awarded a 2013 Housing Innovation Award in the "systems builder" category.